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Full text of "Journal history of the Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteers, 1861-1865 : its victories and its reverses, and the campaigns and battles of Winchester, Port Republic, Cedar Mountain, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain, Atlanta, The March to the Sea and the campaign of the Carolinas in which it bore an honorable part"

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-KWIS P. UfCKI.F.V, I.ATK COLON I 1. 2Q1H < ). V. V. I. 



JOURNAL HISTORY 



OF THE 



TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, 

1861-1865, 
ITS VICTORIES AND ITS REVERSES. 



And the campaigns and battles of Winchester, Port Re 
public, Cedar Mountain, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, 
Lookout Mountain, Atlanta, The March to the 
Sea, and the campaign of the Carolinas, in 
which it bore an honorable part. 



BY 



j. HAMP SECHEVERELL, 
J I- . 

(LATE COMPANY B,) , 



CLEVELAND f 
1883. 



aq 



COMRADES AND FRIENDS: 

On the twentieth anniversary of the organization of 
the Twenty-ninth regiment Ohio Veteran volunteer in 
fantry, Comrade J. H. SeCheverell was instructed to pre 
pare a history of the same, and the undersigned were 
appointed a committee to supervise its publication. 
Comrade SeCheverell, after months of perplexing labor, 
completed the manuscript which was examined by us in 
Cleveland, July 19, 1882. It was then decided to issue 
fifty proof copies of the work to be put into the hands 
of members of the regiment for such additions or correc 
tions as should be found necessary. This was done, and 
after the return of the proofs and the incorporation of 
whatever corrections they contained, Comrade SeChev 
erell visited Akron, and spent several days with Colonel 
Schoonover, to whom was intrusted the corrections 
for that vicinity, and it is with no small degree of satis 
faction that we now present the work to the comrades 
and friends of the regiment with our hearty endorse 
ment, believing it as complete and perfect as it is possible 
to make it. 

DAVID W. THOMAS, 

THOMAS W. NASH, 



THADDEUS E. HOYT, 
ERWIN F. MASON, 
CHAUNCEY H. COON, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO, February i, 1883. 



M134604 



> Committee. 



AUTHOR S PREFACE. 

In the following pages no attempt at literary gush is 
made, the design being simply to preserve from oblivion 
the record of the valiant deeds of this, the bravest of the 
brave regiments from the Buckeye State, that in the dim, 
distant future, when each comrade shall have answered 
to his last earthly roll-call and gone to the " grand 
review " with the many whose bones now repose in that 
far away country of the orange and the magnolia, those 
left behind may not forget the sacrifices made, and the 
untold dangers endured for that flag, the beautiful, starry 
emblem of a now united people, whose supremacy pre 
served for them the blessings of this great country, the 
best beneath the ethereal vault of heaven. 

The data from which the journal portion of the volume 
is composed was obtained from members of the regi 
ment, who certify to its correctness. Colonel Jonas 
Schoonover furnished, from Atlanta to Washington. 

The reader will mark the entire absence of personal 
laudation so common in works of this class, and the 
crowding of a few favored ones to the front to the exclu 
sion of the hundreds of equally brave and meritorious 
men in perhaps lowly positions. That the fortunes of 



10 PREFACE. 

war brought many forward with flattering prominence is 
most true, and that thousands who wore the simple 
blouse of blue and carried the musket were possessed of 
merit as great is also true. To have been a member of 
the Twenty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteers is 
glory enough for a lifetime. If you did your duty, it is 
well ; if you failed, printers ink will not make a hero of 
you. Then let each be content with the happy assur 
ance that he did what he could for the flag. 

The writer would acknowledge in an especial manner 
his obligations to L. D. Drum, adjutant-general of the 
United States army, for the very complete casualty list at 
the close of the volume ; also, to Samuel B. Smith, adju 
tant-general of Ohio, Hon. E. B. Taylor, Colonel 
Edward Hayes, Jonas Schoonover, Captain R. H. Bald 
win, George W. Holloway ; the members of the very 
efficient revisory committee, Captains D. W. Thomas, T. 
W. Nash, Lieutenant T. E. Hoyt, Sergeant E. F. Mason, 
and C. H. Coon ; the Ashtabula Sentinel, Jefferson 
Gazette, and the Akron Daily News, for numerous 
courtesies extended to him, during the preparation of 
this work; and to each comrade and friend who has aided 
him in his labors, to name all of whom would require 
many pages. He has conscientiously endeavored to 
make the volume free from errors. If he has succeeded 
it will be the first of its kind. However, such as it is, it 
is presented to the regiment and its friends with the 
belief that it contains much of value. 

JEFFERSON, OHIO, February i, 1883. 



INTRODUCTION. 

The author of this volume has honored me with an 
invitation to write an "Introduction." A book without 
a preface would be an anomaly: in other words, out of 
harmony with established usage; not strictly important, 
but answering much the same purpose as the "whereas 3 
preceding the resolutions of the convention. 

I have not been permitted to read the author s manu 
script, yet I do not hesitate to assure the reader that as 
he peruses the pages of the book he will find much to 
entertain and profit. To the veteran who enlisted and 
fought in the historic "Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran 
volunteer infantry" it will be read with especial interest. 
The eye will moisten, and the heart swell with mingled 
emotions as he is reminded again of the varying scenes 
of the camp, the march, and the battle. Others, too 
young to remember anything of the war, but who have 
heard the stories of the conflict from their fathers, will 
read this historic sketch of the old regiment with the 
greatest avidity. 

We well remember the author as "Hamp," the drum 
mer boy of Company B, his boyish look, with his neatly- 
fitting suit of blue, and the tenor drum suspended from 
his neck, while with nimble fingers he plied the ebony 
sticks in beating the tattoo, reveille, or the "long roll." 

He has done a real and invaluable service to his com 
rades in gathering up and condensing in neat and durable 



12 INTRODUCTION. 

form so many interesting facts relating to the work of a 
noble regiment. So much, at least, is saved from 
oblivion. 

In writing the history of any war only a mere outline 
can be thought of. Anything like a full and detailed 
account of what happened is out of the question. 
Neither time nor space would permit. 

The multiplied thousands who carried their muskets 
and knapsacks on foot all over " Dixie," and who really 
did the hard work of the conflict, must be massed in 
history even as in war they were massed against the foe. 
Their individual deeds of daring and suffering were not 
a whit behind those of the great Wellingtons, Washing- 
tons, and Grants. The latter were in positions to glide 
easily into history, and have their heroic deeds emblaz 
oned and read in the books of every nation. The 
former may have loved their country as well and fought 
as bravely for her honor, and yet die in obscurity, "to 
fortune and to fame unknown." 

Dr. SeCheverell has doubtless done his best under the 
circumstances to do justice to the name of every member 
of the old Twenty-ninth. It was known as the Giddings 
regiment, in honor of the Hon. Joshua R. Giddings, for 
twenty consecutive years a member oi the lower house 
of Congress. 

Perhaps no man during his time did more than Mr. 
Giddings to create public opinion in favor of the freedom 
of the slave. The regiment was raised almost entirely 
within^the bounds of his old district, and it was fitting 
that it should bear his name. But I remember that 
when recruiting it a frequent objection to enlistment was 
that should any member of the regiment be so unfortu 
nate as to be taken prisoner by the " Rebs," he would 
be forthwith shot, hung, or burnt at the stake, particu- 



INTRODUCTION. 13 

larly on Giddings account, and that the name would be 
so odious in the South, and would so advertise the regi 
ment that every member would be especially hunted 
down and exterminated. 

I think "Hamp" has failed utterly to ascertain that 
any prisoner from the Twenty-ninth was thus punished, 
although many of the boys were often in rebel hands. 

I have ever considered myself fortunate and honored 
in having been associated with such a regiment. 

I was duly appointed and commissioned as the first 
chaplain, holding the position one year, resigning at the 
expiration of that time, and receiving an honorable dis 
charge from the service. 

Of the officers of the regiment much might be said. 
Nobody who ever knew Colonel Buckley will ever forget 
him. A brave man, a great admirer of order and dis 
cipline, faultlessly neat and tidy, a confirmed dyspeptic ; 
yet the most ticklish and fun provoking humor often 
cropped out in his conversation and intercourse with 
men. One morning, away down between Bull Run and 
Fredericksburg, when the tired and jaded men were in 
line for the day s march, the Colonel was in his saddle 
with his toes daintily touching the stirrups, his pale, clean 
shaven face shaded by the visor of his blue cap, from 
beneath which his practiced eye swept the whole regi 
ment at a glance, while his well-polished sword, firmly 
gripped, stood perpendicular, resting against the shoul 
der ; with a stentorian voice he published the following 
order : u Men of the Twenty-ninth, let there be no 
straggling on the march to-day. But if any of you do 
straggle take Twenty-ninth off from your caps and put 
on One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania." 

The joke on the One Hundred and Tenth Pennsyl 
vania was fully appreciated and immensely enjoyed (a 



14 INTRODUCTION. 

regiment noted for straggling). With roars of laughter 
the boys shouldered their muskets and knapsacks for 
another hard day s march through the pine barrens. 

Lieutenant-colonel Clark is remembered as a staunch 
advocate of temperance, whose interests were ever for 
the men. 

Major Clemmer, as a genial, bluff soldier, whose songs 
often enlivened the dreariness of the camp or bivouac; 
and Quartermaster Gibbs, as a man of prompt execution, 
who expected equal promptness from others. Many 
anecdotes and incidents of them could be narrated 
by the page, but I remember that the introduction 
to the volume is not the place for sketches of this kind; 
and I fear that I have already introduced much that does 
not strictly belong to this part of the book. I beg par 
don for any seeming trespass in this direction. 

This introduction, written in the midst of other press 
ing duties, with frequent interruptions, now most affec 
tionately inscribes this volume to every member of the 
Twenty-ninth regiment of Ohio Veteran volunteer in 
fantry; to their wives and their children. 

I am happy to enjoy this privilege of saying a few 
words in Dr. SeCheverelPs book to my old comrades. 
My prayer is that God will bless every surviving member 
of the regiment, with their families, also the widows and 
orphans of deceased members, and that when the battle 
of life is over, we may wear the victor s crown in heaven. 

R. H. HURLBURT, M.D., D.D., 
Late Chaplain Twenty-ninth regiment, O. V. V. I. 

MARION, IOWA, July 18, 1882. 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

The South Preparing for War The Fall of Sumter The Grand 
Rally to the Support of the Flag Formation of the Regiment 17 

CHAPTER II. 

The Departure from Camp Giddings At the Front Death of 
Lander Advance up the Valley Winchester . . -34 

CHAPTER III. 

The Battle of Winchester " btonewall" Jackson Whipped Con 
gratulatory Orders and Dispatches . . . -39 

CHAPTER IV. 

Pursuit of Jackson The "Long " March Fredericksburg to Front 
Royal March to Waynesboro . . . . .42 

CHAPTER V. 
Battle of Port Republic The Twenty-ninth nearly Annihilated 46 

CHAPTER VI. 

Cedar Mountain Battle at that Point Severe Loss of Life For 
ward to Alexandria . . . . . 51 

CHAPTER VII. 

Return to the Front Monocacy Bridge Frederick City Recruits 
Dumfries . . . . . . 58 

CHAPTER VIII. 

Battle of Chancellorsville March to Leesburg Littletown and 
Gettysburg . . . . . . .64 

CHAPTER IX. 
Battle of Gettysburg Official Report of General Meade . 69 

CHAPTER X. 

Move to Washington Embark for New York Return Trans-, 
ferred to the Western Army . . . . -75 



1 6 CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XL 

Spring Campaign of 1864 Murfreesboro Corporal" Greene 
The "Mule Brigade" Congratulatory . . .80 

CHAPTER XII. 

Lookout Mountain The Fight Complimentary Reports Re-en 
listment . . . . . . . .84 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Shelmound Wauhatchie Valley Ringgold Battle of Dug Gap- 
On the Move . . . . . . .89 

CHAPTER XIV. 
Battle of Resaca In pursuit of the Fleeing "Chivalry "(?) . 94 

CHAPTER XV. 
Pumpkin Vine Creek Slight Unpleasantness Personal . . 98 

CHAPTER XVI. 
Advance to Pine Knob The Fight A Forward Movement . 104 

CHAPTER XVII. 

Battle of Gulp s Farm or Kennesaw mountain The Glorious 
Fourth Advance to the Chattachoochie . . .109 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Battle of Peach Tree Creek Some of the Boys " visit Ander- 
sonville . . . . . . .116 

CHAPTER XIX. 
Siege of Atlanta The Capitulation .... 120 

CHAPTER XX. 
With Sherman to the Sea Colonel Schoonover s Journal . 127 

CHAPTER XXL 

The Campaign of the Carolinas Washington Grand Review 
Northward, "Good Bye" and "Home Again|" . . 142 



General Review ... .... 155 



Official Roster ....... 159 



Casualties . . . . . . . . 234 



TWENTY-NINTH O. V. V. I. 



CHAPTER I. 

The South Preparing for War The Fall of Sumter The Grand 
Rally to the Support of the Flag Formation of the Regiment. 

President Lincoln, in his inaugural address of March 
4, 1 86 1, said: "1 have no purpose, directly or indirectly, 
to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States 
where it exists. I believe that I have no lawful right, 
and I have no inclination to do so." The South had 
apparently decided otherwise, and continued the prep 
arations for secession, begun under the administration 
of, and so ably seconded by that old imbecile, James Bu 
chanan. 

The outlook became so fraught with danger to the 
Union, that on April yth a naval expedition sailed from 
New York to the relief of Fort Sumter. Its arrival off 
Charleston harbor was followed by a furious bombard 
ment of the fort by the rebel batteries of General Beau- 
regard. The capitulation on April i3th, of the little 
handful of gallant men who so bravely defended their 
country s flag, was followed by an outburst of patriotic 
indignation perhaps never before witnessed in the his 
tory of the world. In an incredibly short space of 
time the President s call for seventy-five thousand men 

17 



: i8: 



-NINTH OHIO 



was filled by citizens eagerly marching to the defense 
of the National capital. 

The rebels meanwhile were busily engaged in appro 
priating or destroying the available arms and munitions 
of war belonging to the Government. At Bull Run, a 
few miles from Washington, General Beauregard massed 
his rebel horde, and here, on July 2ist, General McDow 
ell gratified the insane "On to Richmond" cry, by giving 
them battle. The result was the complete overthrow of 
the Union army, which retreated in the wildest disorder 
to Washington. This event cast a deep gloom over 
the entire North (barring the copperhead element). 
More than twice the time allowed by the knowing(?) 
ones to crush the Rebellion (sixty days) had elapsed, 
and yet it was growing stronger every day. The North 
was not yet awake to the magnitude or" the work it had 
undertaken. The first patriotic outburst was on the 
wane; the sympathy of England and the encouragement 
given to the rebels by the "copperheads" in the North, 
gave a prestige to the Southern cause which, to many, 
bespoke the final success of treason. In this dark hour 
of our country s peril, that brave old hero, Joshua R. 
Giddings, with B. F. Wade, E. B. Woodbury, and other 
well known associates, feeling that they had been disap 
pointed in the acts of another regiment, made up in 
part of soldiers recruited in this district, obtained per 
mission to organize regiment number Twenty-nine, which 
should be made up as far as possible, of those in polit 
ical sympathy with the projectors. The report of the 
soldiers already returned from the three months service, 
and who were generally ready to go again, seemed to in 
dicate who they wished for commanders. Major Lewis 
P. Buckley, of Akron, educated at West Point, was gen 
erally desired as colonel, and Thomas Clark, of Cleve- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 19 

land, formerly a cadet at Norwich university, Vermont, 
was for the same reason selected to commence the work. 
He was accordingly appointed major, on the i3th of 
August. Two days later he was mustered into service, 
and ordered to report at once to Jefferson, select a suit 
able location, and organize a camp. On the iyth he 
arrived at Jefferson, and a couple of days were spent in 
examining fields offered; at last the grounds of the 
County Agricultural Society were selected. A part of 
company A reported on the i9th, and company B in the 
afternoon of the same day. The camp equipage arrived 
on the 20th. On the 2yth company C reported, and on 
September zoth, company D, and with this company 
came Colonel Buckley, who had just completed his ser 
vice in the Nineteenth regiment. 

Following are the companies, in the order they en 
tered the service, with the commanders and the localities 
from which they were recruited: Company A, Captain 
William F. Fitch, was recruited in Jefferson and vicinity, 
and Hartsgrove. Company B, Captain Wilbur F. Ste 
vens, was recruited in Pierpont and vicinity, and Har- 
persfield. Company C, Captain Edward Hayes, was 
recruited in Andover and vicinity, Gustavus, Ohio, and 
Espyville, Pennsylvania. Company D, Captain Pulaski 
C. Hard, was recruited in Akron, Summit county. Com 
pany E, Captain Horatio Luce, was recruited in Conne- 
aut and surrounding townships. Company F, Captain 
John F. Morse, was recruited in Painesville and Mentor, 
Lake county, and Montville, Geauga county. Company 
G, Captain John S. Clemmer, was recruited in Akron 
and vicinity. (Second Lieutenant W. P. Williamson, of 
this company, who was shot dead at the battle of Win 
chester, Virginia, March 23, 1862, was the first man in 
the regiment to die by rebel hands.) Company H, Cap- 



20 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

tain Jonas Schoonover, was recruited in Akron and vi 
cinity. Company I, Captain Russell B. Smith, was 
recruited in Medina county, and by transfers; and com 
pany K, Captain Alden P. Steele, was recruited from 
the various townships in Ashtabula county. 

The adverse causes before referred to, materially re 
tarded the enlistment of the regiment, and it was not 
until about December ist that the different company 
organizations were completed and the following staff 
officers elected : 

Colonel Lewis P. Buckley, Akron, Summit county. 

Lieutenant-colonel Thomas Clark, Cleveland, Cuya- 
hoga county. 

Major John S. Clemmer, Mogadore, Summit county. 

Adjutant C. T. Chaffee, Jefferson, Ashtabula county. 

Quartermaster O. F. Gibbs, Harpersfield, Ashtabula 
county. 

Chaplain R. H. Hurlburt, Hartsgrove, Ashtabula 
county. 

Surgeon A. K. Fifield, M. D., Conneaut, Ashtabula 
county. 

Assistant Surgeon S. S. Burrows, M. D., Geneva, 
Ashtabula county. 

Commissary Henry Wright, Trumbull, Ashtabula 
county. 

Sergeant-major W. P. Williamson, Akron, Summit 
county. 

Quartermaster-sergeant M. D. Norris, Mesopotamia, 
Trumbull county. 

Hospital Steward E. P. Haynes, Atwater, Portage 
county. 

Fife -major Richard Noonan, Hudson, Summit 
county. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 21 

Drum-major Gurley G. Crane, Cuyahoga Falls, Sum 
mit county. 

Leader regimental band Chauncey Brainard, Gustavus, 
Trumbull county. 

During the interim carne the easy days of soldier life. 
Ah ! those happy, golden days of camp life, when, with 
guard mount, battalion drill, and dress parade, the time 
passed swiftly away, and each heart beat high with patri 
otic desire for early marching orders; days looked back 
to from the dreary bivouac in the snow, tentless, and 
with clothing in tatters, scarce covering the form from 
the bitter, cutting winds of winter, or in the drizzling 
rain on the lonely outpost when sharp-eyed rebels only 
waited for the opportunity to send the leaden messenger 
of death whizzing in your direction. Sometimes the 
" boys " thought the rations were not sufficiently " gilt- 
edged," quite too plain in fact, for the savers of the 
country s honor, yet how often, while trying, almost in 
vain, with the half-pint of raw meal to keep the soul and 
the poor emaciated body together in those hell devised 
starvation traps Libby, Belle Isle, Andersonville, and 
Salisbury did the brave fellows turn with longing hearts 
to the bounteous commissary at old Camp Giddingb. 
Fears were oft expressed lest the war would close before 
the Twenty-ninth should be permitted to add its mite to 
the support of the flag. How needless they were the 
rolls show; more than one-third (five hundred and forty) 
of the one thousand five hundred and thirty-two mem 
bers of the regiment, were either killed, wounded, or 
missing in action, and one hundred and fifty-seven died 
of disease. The colors, too, which waved so grandly in 
the sharp winter air, that long agone Christmas morning 
in 1 86 1, are now in shreds, rent and torn by the leaden 



22 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

hail through which they were carried to glorious vic 
tories. 

This beautiful stand of colors was presented to the 
regiment on Wednesday, November 2yth, by Hon. J. R. 
Giddings, on behalf of the donors, the ladies of Ashta- 
bula and Summit counties. Mr. Giddings spoke as fol 
lows : "Gentlemen, officers and soldiers. Before en 
tering upon the particular duty assigned me on the pres 
ent occasion, I may be permitted to congratulate you 
and the country, upon the completion of your regi 
mental organization and the perfection of your prepara 
tion for the field. I desire you at all times to bear in 
mind the causes which led to its formation. The pres 
ent rebellion has its origin far back in history. Its first 
overt acts were put forth in Congress by subjecting the 
people of the free States to gag rules, by striking down 
the right of petition, by arraigning and publicly censur 
ing Representatives for the faithful discharge of duty, by 
annexing, unconstitutionally, slave territory, and extend 
ing and strengthening the encroachments of slavery. To 
these violent encroachments upon the constitutional 
rights of the free States, this Western Reserve has from 
the first, presented a very general resistance 

" The ladies have prepared a splendid National and 
regimental stand of colors, and have imposed on me the 
pleasing duty of presenting them to the regiment. In 
all past ages civilized nations have gone forth to war 
under their own banner, on which was inscribed some 
device, figure, or emblem, peculiar to such nation. 
Thus each tribe among the Israelites had its particular 
banner. The early Christians fought under the cross, 
the Romans under the golden eagle, the Mohammedans 
under the crescent. The founders of our government 
selected for their colors a groundwork of blue, repre- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 23 

senting immutable justice and unlimited power, on which 
the stars, representing light, are twinkling in the vaulted 
heavens, while in mid ether the bird of Jove is floating, 
a fitting representation of the ease and power with which 
liberty and civilization are gliding over the earth ; while 
the stars and stripes of red and white represent the vital 
principles and purity of our institutions. 

[Addressing Colonel Buckley]: "To you, sir, as 
commander, I present these beautiful standards, for the 
use and benefit of the regiment. On behalf of the fair 
donors I confide these National and regimental stand 
ards to the care of yourself, your gallant officers and 
men. Wherever you go let them be borne aloft and re 
spected as the emblem of universal freedom to all who 
seek your protection. Preserve them unstained, except 
by the blood of your enemies. Bear in mind that you 
go forth to fight the battles of the human race for all 
coming time ; and should the roar of cannon, the rat 
tling of muskets, the clashing of sabres, the din and 
smoke of battle surround you, remember the cause in 
which you are engaged, and be assured that if you fall, 
we who are left will care for your widows and children. 
Your own heroic deeds shall be enshrined in our mem 
ories, recorded in our history, admired by coming gener 
ations, and approved by a holy and just God." 

Colonel Buckley replied : " Respected Sir I re 
ceive this stand of colors in behalf of the Twenty-ninth 
regiment. I return through you to the noble and 
patriotic ladies of Ashtabula and Summit counties their 
grateful thanks ; and whenever and wherever it is un 
furled to the breeze, and we look upon its stars and 
stripes, may we then remember the generous donors and 
the vow we this day make. This flag, the flag of our 
country, which has been our pride and our boast, and 



24 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

which is respected by all civilized nations ; this flag, 
thank God, shall yet wave triumphantly wherever it has 
been struck down by the ruthless arm of the traitors ; 
and, companions, whenever we look upon this beautiful 
flag may it inspire us to redouble our energies to do our 
duty to our beloved country, and if God in his provi 
dence permits us to return to home and kindred, may 
this flag come back with us to bear witness that the 
Twenty-ninth regiment Ohio volunteers was in the 
thickest of the fight. 

" Sir, you have spoken in high commendation of my 
command. I can assure you I feel myself honored in 
having command of such a regiment, It will be my 
pride and ambition, with my fellow-officers to make it in 
all things pertaining to a well drilled and well disciplined 
regiment, one of the best in Ohio. And now, fellow- 
soldiers, in the presence of this assembly, and before 
high heaven, we swear upon the altar of our country to 
defend this flag so long as there shall be one true heart 
and strong arm to hold it to the breeze." 

At last the " boys " impatience to go anywhere but 
here, was gratified by an order to move to Camp Chase, 
near Columbus, Ohio, the date December 25th ; and 
right here it may not be amiss to give an extract from 
an editorial in the Ashtabula Sentinel, as showing what 
the people of Jefferson thought of the regiment : 

" They leave Jefferson with the respect and esteem of 
our citizens as an orderly and well behaved body of men. 
They have been over three months within our quiet vil 
lage, during which time no disturbance has occurred and 
no depredations have been committed. They have 
proved themselves honorable men, the best evidence that 
they will be brave soldiers. When they are heard from 
in the fight we have no fears of a bad account." 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 25 

ORIGINAL REGIMENTAL ROSTER. 

Following is the roster of the regiment as given in the 
issue of the Ashtabula Sentinel, dated December 25, 
1 86 1, inserted by request of the committee on revision : 

FIELD OFFICERS. 

Colonel Lewis P. Buckley, Akron. 
Lieutenant-colonel Thomas Clark, Cleveland. 
Major J. S. Clemmer, Mogadore. 
Adjutant C. T. Chaffee, Jefferson. 
Sergeant-major W. P. Williamson, Akron. 
Quartermaster O. F. Gibbs, Harpersfield. 
Quartermaster-sergeant M. D. Norris, Mesopotamia. 
Commissary H. Wright, Trumbull. 
Chaplain R. H. Hurlburt, Hartsgrove. 
Surgeon A. K. Fifield, Conneaut. 
Assistant Surgeon S. S. Burrows, Geneva. 
Hospital Steward E. P. Haynes, Atwater. 
Fife-major Richard Noonan, Hudson. 
Drum-major G. G. Crane, Chagrin Falls. 

REGIMENTAL BAND. 

Leader Chauncy Brainard. 

Fifers Moses C. Rist, George B. Mason, Henry Beach, Henry H. 
Ray, Rufus Daniels, Walter St. John, Edward B. Fitts, Charles N. 
Bancroft, E. P. Hall, William R. Meeker. 

Drummers Albert E. Brainard, Erastus Brainard, John Price, Calvin 
Crane, Albert Walker, William H. Rawdon, Lucius K. Woodbury, 
Corwin Spencer, Johnson W. Matterson, Luthur Canfield, Silas H. 
Kent; Louis Price, bass; Edward B. Woodbury, bass. 

Cymbal Buel W. Brainard. 

Bugler Edwin N. Devan. 

COMPANY A. 
Captain William T. Fitch. 
First Lieutenant L. Grover. 
Second Lieutenant W. S. Crowell. 
First Sergeant E. J. Hurlburt. 
Third Sergeant C. H. Coon. 
Fourth Sergeant W. H. Grant. 
Fifth Sergeant S. G. Elliott. 
First Corporal N. B. Adams. 
Second Corporal A. L. Rickard. 
Third Corporal R. M. Gates. 



26 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Fourth Corporal T. E. Hoyt. 
Fifth Corporal M. F. Roberts. 
Sixth Corporal J. B. Dalrymple. 
Seventh Corporal H. C. Rood. 
Eighth Corporal J. M. Loomis. 
Drummer R. Lewis. 
Wagoner William Daniels. 

PRIVATES. 

J. M. Bronson, M. A. Brown. P. B. Broughton, H. G. Clafflin, 
Charles Covert, M. M. Canfield, F. M. Canfield, L. M. Coon, E. G. 
Clark, Julius Coleburn, Henry Decker, P. A. Decker, A. L. Dalrym 
ple, G. W. Dudley, Henry Turner, D. Thatcher, H. E. Woodin, W. 
B. Shearer, Abram Exceen, J. A. Exceen, John Ellis, A. A. Fenton, J. 
M. Sober, W. A. Thompson, E. P. Young, C. H. Broughton, George 
Birch, E. O. Brown, W. A. Frisbie, Leonard Grover, R. W. Graham, 
J. W. Henry, S. Hyde, Cyrus Hendrick, E. W. Herrick, W. B. Hoyt, 
E. M. Holcomb, John Hague, A. Harley, W. C. Ives, E. C. Joles, G. 
W. Jones, L. M. Johnson, A. M. Knowlton, W. R. Williams, Elizer 
Wilder, W. L. Wood, M. St. John, R. E. Woodbury, A. Thompson, 
J. W. Bartlett, S. C. Buck, A. B. Benjamin, C. C. Bugbee, E. J. 
Maltby, A. H. Frayer, O. B. Laskey, S. O. Latimer, J. E. March, A. 
W. McNaughton, G. B. Mowry, F. B. Mowry, F. Potter, E. Richer- 
son, C. Roath, B. L. Roberts, N. W. Simmons, T. W. Simmons, 
John Sylvester, Wilber Sloat, Theodore Smith, John Shears, Alonzo 
D. Squires, Pickering Smith, S. R. Thompson, V. Wilson, S. N. 
Hubbard, A. B. Durfee, N. Wilder. 

COMPANY B. 

Captain W. F. Stevens. 
First Lieutenant A. Bishop. 
Second Lieutenant A. Wilson. 
First Sergeant B. N. Smith. 
Second Sergeant J. E. Tanner. 
Third Sergeant F. M. Hewitt. 
Fourth Sergeant P. O. Warren. 
Fifth Sergeant A. B. Isham. 
First Corporal A. J. Langworthy. 
Second Corporal O. Fairbrother. 
Third Corporal R. Griswold. 
Fourth Corporal L. K. Bean. 
Fifth Corporal D. B. Peck. 
Sixth Corporal F. A. Chapman. 
Seventh Corporal E. Potter. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 27 

Eighth Corporal A. Bishop. 
FiferG. Miles. 
Drummer J. H. SeCheverell. 
Wagoner E. P. McArthur. 

PRIVATES. 

E. T. Allen, L. P. Allen, S. Atkin, F. R. Ackley, S. S. Andrews, D. 
Ames, H. Beckwith, T. Beckwith, H. Brainard, C. Brainard. J. Bra- 
zee, I. Brainard, O. J. Burbank, D. Brown, D. J. Baur, C. F. Baur, J. 
W. Baur, M. Burgett, A. H. Benham, W. R. Carr, F. Case, H. Clark, 
S. Chapman, }. Doe, H. Durfee, B. T. Durfee, M. DeWolf, J. C. 
DeWolf, E. Furman, J. H. Fails, N. A. German, N. Hicks, H. 
Hicks, N. Hendricks, M. B. Hoskins, F. Hallett, H. O. Holmes, E. 
C. Holmes, R. Hartwell, B. L. Haskin, C. Hall, W. P. Johnson, V. 
Jordan, A. A. Kumig, N. Knapp, D. Knapp, J. Kohlar, F. Leonard, 
J. Mervin, R. McKee, B. A. McArthur, C. W. Matthews, R. McFall, 
L. Montgomery, R. Wilson, S. B. Wilder, G. McNutt, D. Newcomb,. 
J. Newman, D. Potter, W. Potter, J. Phinney, S. C. Pierce, M. 
Rowe, G. Rowe, G. Wright, J. Rounds, A. Rogers, J. Rockwell, E. 
Phillips, R. Sills, H. Smith, S. Stanley, R. Stewart, W. H. Vanscoik,. 
L. Wright. 

COMPANY C. 

Captain Edward Hayes. 
First Lieutenant B. F. Perry. 
Second Lieutenant F. T. Stewart. 
First Sergeant C. W. Kellogg. 
Second Sergeant R. L. Jones. 
Third Sergeant D. W. Rolph. 
Fourth Sergeant G. W. Beckwith. 
Fifth Sergeant G. W. Britton. 
Second Corporal C. J. Galpin. 
Third Corporal H. M. Ryder. 
Fourth Corporal N. H. Bailey. 
Fifth Corporal W. A. Baker. 
Sixth Corporal G. R. Leonard. 
Seventh Corporal C. C. Fitts. 
Eighth Corporal W. A. Burwell. 
Drummer B. Phelps. 
Wagoner T. Kellogg. 

PRIVATES. 

W. Alger, L. B. Brainard, S. W. Bronson, G. D. Brockett, T. R.. 
Brown, E. Britton, A. H. Beardslee, R. W. Cross, D. V. Chaffee, W. 
J. Chambers, O. P. Crosby, S. O. Crosby, H. C. Carey, J. Chapelt 
R. A. Cunningham, R. Churchill, L. Clark, C. W. DeWitt, W. P.. 



28 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Dady. C. E. Dudley, G. Eastlick, G. Enos, }. Williams, A. W. Mann, 
J. Noble, M. E. Forbes, J. A. Frazier, J. Fleming, J. Grey, E. Gibbs, 
W. G. Gillett, J. Hall, D. S. Halstead, A. Kingsley, H. Laughlin, 
F. D. Lane, J. W. Lee, H. Lyons, H. C. Lord, L. O. Lindsley, 
L. W. Leavit, D. C. Lindsley, J. Leslie, E. F. Mason, M. Maloney, J. 
W. Matteson, A. L. Monty, J. Winby, A. Mason. W. Yokes. J. 
Yokes, S. Warren, J. Warren, J. Wenham, D. Thomas, }. Thomas, 
W. H. Shores, J. C. Shaw, S. G. Strickland, B. F. Sperry, W. 
Sisley, J. F. Rowley, H. C. Rice, N. J. Merrells, T. J. Merrells, B. 
Miller, E. O. Miller, D. B. Parker, O. K. Phelps, W. Palmer, J. D. 
Rea, D. Ryckman, W. H. Runyon. 

COMPANY D. 

Captain Pulaski C. Hard. 
First Lieutenant M. T. Wright. 
Second Lieutenant J. H. Grinnell. 
First Sergeant G. W. Dice. 
Second Sergeant J. H. Knox. 
Third Sergeant W. E. Dockrey. 
Fourth Sergeant J. C. Ewart. 
Fifth Sergeant L. A. McAdams. 
First Corporal J. Hile. 
Second Corporal L. Robinson. 
Third Corporal S. Woolridge. 
Fourth Corporal P. Nicholas. 
Fifth Corporal G. Welch. 
Sixth Corporal L. B. Starks. 
Seventh Corporal W. H. Hart. 
Eighth Corporal F. C. Remley. 
Fifer B. H. Wads worth. 
Drummer W. B. Crane. 
Wagoner A. Hunsicker. 

PRIVATES. 

W. H. Alexander, M. M. Hutchinson, R. Partridge, ]. S. Alexan 
der, W. H. Bloomfield, O. Brewster, C. Beck, J. W. Chalfant, N. 
Cochran, R. T. Chapman, C. Dudley, G. Ellis, N. C. Finney, G. 
Foust, L. E. Gaylord, A. W. Golden, }. Gardner, J. C. Glass, M. 
Houghland, W. D. Haynes, E. Hastings, H. H. Heath, H. Haring, 
J. Hugh, C. G. Tolcott, V. V. Viers, H. F. Waters, E. Hamilton, J. 
H. Hill, D. Hartigan, S. J. lies, W. H. Jones, P. B. Jones, J. A. 
{ones, S. Kissinger, J. Lamberson, N. Leohner, L. Lindsay, W. 
Medesker, G. Montenyohle, W. Mendleson, H. W. Morill, L. Meriam, 
H. Niman, A. W. Niman, I. Powlis, S. Parks, J. Parks, A. A. Wol- 
cott, J. Winters, G. J. Young, B. Pontius, H. Ream, A. J. Ream, A. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 29 

Replogle, E. Randall, J. Rodenbaugh, L. C. Richardson, W. C. 
Stoughton, W. Shanfelt, N. Smith, P. W. Smith, J. G. Stinehour, J. 
H. Snyder, C. Sherbonder, D. Schaaf, S. Strecker, L. Squires, E. E. 
Skinner, J. Steese, L. Standish, H. A. Thompson,]. B. Yohey, J. G. 
Wait. 

COMPANY E. 

Captain H. Lirce. 

First Lieutenant T. S. Winship. 

Second Lieutenant E. Howard. 

First Sergeant L. G. Bevins. 

Second Sergeant T. L. Gould. 

Third Sergeant G. Hayward. 

Fourth Seigeant H. Andrews. 

Fifth Sergeant W. G. Buds. 

First Corporal A. Durkee. 

Second Corporal N. L. Parmeter. 

Third Corporal H. Dewey. 

Fourth Corporal C. P. Rhoades. 

Fifth Corporal S. J. Rockwell. 

Sixth Corporal D. Platt. 

Seventh Corporal C. Howard. 

Eighth Corporal L. Dean. 

Fifer C. Luce. 

Drummer J. S. Bellows. 

Wagoner H. J. Reaves. 

PRIVATES. 

J. P. Bagley, A. Bardsley, D. Baringer, A. Blanchard, F. Brown, E. 
J. Brewer, O. Brewer, H. Bronson, B. Brick, W. L. Carey, C. W. 
Carey, W. L. Coulburn, I. Conklin, A. Crouch, E. Curtis, L. Culver, 
F. Culver, W. H. Crawford, I. M. Dalrymple, H. Dalrymple, E. 
Davis, R. Dewey, P. Vanskoik, H. Warren, W. Ellsworth, N. Gil- 
lett, D. Goodwell, J. C. Greenlee, O. Gunn, L. Harper, J. S. Had 
dock, D. W. Hall, E. Hopkins, H. Hill, W. Holden, W. N. Hill, L. 
Hill, W. Johnson, O. Jones, J. Jones, G. A. Lilley, F. Lovejoy, T. 
Marsh, M. Mayhew, D. M. Morley, T. S. McCartney, L. Weber, W. 
Woodward, I. N. Meeker, D. Platt, Jr., J. O. Phillips, C. Pier, G. J. 
Putney, P. Proctor, J. Pike, H. Rhodes, G. Ryon, E. Ryon, W. 
Roberts, I. Roberts, W. A. Robinson, J. Sammon, H. Sly, W. Ster 
ling, A. H. Stirrett, J. A. Sinclair, A. E. Tracy, H. Thornton, S. 
Tuttle, R. Vanskoik, L. J. Woodard, E. Wilson, Thomas Shultz. 



COMPANY F. 



Captain John F. Morse. 
First Lieutenant H. Gregory. 



30 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Second Lieutenant E. Burridge. 
First Sergeant L. H. Martindale. 
Second Sergeant J. Jerome. 
Third Sergeant R. H. Baldwin. 
Fourth Sergeant S. Hall. 
Fifth Sergeant M. E. Gregory. 
First Corporal C. Woodford. 
Second Corporal G. Gray. 
Third Corporal N. B. Noyes. 
Fourth Corporal C. Van Valkenburg. 
Fifth Corporal B. Pickett. 
Sixth Corporal H. Macumber. 
Seventh Corporal N. Harvey. 
Eighth Corporal C. N. Hayes. 
Fifer O. F. Stickney, 
Drummer J. Schofield. 
Wagoner J. H. Whitney. 

PRIVATES. 

D. Auringer, A. Austin, J. Briggs, H. E. Balch, S. E. Balch, J. J. 
Belknap, J. Broughton, C. Broughton, H. C. Canfield, J. Carson, W. 
Call, R. Cannon, P. H. Chapin, C. V. Clark, A. Cole, C. Cain, A. 
Case, F. Dimock, N. P. Durkee, M. Dowling, P. Dowiing, T. Dovvl- 
ing, J. Dustin, J. Dodge, E. Ewer, M. Flinn, J. Flood, F. Flood, 
I. Foss, E. L. Gray, Y. E. Gregory, I. J. Houghkirk, D. D. Hill, A. 
D. Harroun, A. }. Harroun, F. R. Johnson, J. D. Johnson, P. Joyce, 
J. King, W. Lindley, M. Malone, J. C. McLean, S. McLean, J. Man 
ly, A. Neil, E. S. Ontis, A. B. Paine, J. B. Pickett, T. Ryne, L. Ryne. 
J. Shelby, P. Shelby, S. M. Smith, C. Smith, Pomeroy Smith, S. B. 
Smith, O. F. Stetson, A. E. Sanford, A. Sperry, E. Williams. G. Wil 
liams, C F. Waldron, L. Walker, G. T. Wicks. 

COMPANY G. 

Captain John S. Clemmer. 

Since the above was in type Captain Clemmer has been elected 
major. Vacancy not filled. 
First Lieutenant James Treen. 
Second Lieutenant J. J. Wright. 
First Sergeant C H. Russell. 
Second Sergeant W. Chamberlain, 
Third Sergeant George Treen. 
Fourth Sergeant Adam Hart. 
Fifth Sergeant E. F. Smith. 
First Corporal William WirL 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 31 

Second Corporal Franklin Mest. 

Third Corporal M. M. Martin. 

Fourth Corporal E. B. Hubbard. 

Fifth Corporal A. C. French. 

Sixth Corporal T. Caldwell. 

Seventh Corporal G. F. Hewett. 

Eighth Corporal John W. Wise. 

PRIVATES. 

Oscar C Andrews, Edward Alley, C. H. Anderson, A, P. Atchison, 
Augustus Belden, G. F. Brayington, Lester P. Burke, John Burns, L. 
D. Clements, William Cline, David Y. Cook, T. Cummins, John Ce- 
phus, John Campbell, C. A. Downey, George W. Deam.Noah Downey, 
Henry H. Ewell, John W. Ewell, William A. Faze, Jacob D. Foster, H. 
W. Geer, Thomas E. Green, M. Greenwall, John Gross, Albert W. Hall, 
Robert W. Hall, Eli Harrington, Hiram Hill, Roswell Hoffman, John 
Huggett, N. P. Humiston, Jehiel Lane, Jehiel Lane, Jr., William C. 
Lantz, Joseph Limerick, Joseph F. Loomis, John H. Lower, Oliver 
Lee, T. E. McCain, G. J. McCormick, J. M. McCormick, J. H. Mc 
Donald, Isaac Madlem, B. F. Manderbach, C. W. Martin, F, Meztler, 
AVilliam Harrington, William H. Moore, John B. Nowling, C. F. 
Remley, Uriah Reifsnyder, C. L. Robinson, Jacob Rosenbaum, John 
Rowland, James W. Smith, E. S. Smith, G. Sherbondy, George 
Strohl, Ferris Townsend, James B. Treen, John D. Treen, Charles 
Upham, John Watson, John F. Weidle, S. C. Winkleman, Daniel 
Wise, Carroll W. Wright, Charles Young, Conrod Zilite, David Mc- 
Intyre, John Kummer, Mortimer Vanhining. 

COMPANY H. 
Captain J. Schoonover. 
First Lieutenant A. J. Fulkerson. 
Second Lieutenant H. Mack. 
First Sergeant T. W. Nash. 
Second Sergeant O. H. Remington. 
Third Sergeant J. B. Storer. 
Fourth Sergeant J. L. Ferguson. 
Fifth Sergeant H. L. Curtis. 
First Corporal L. Wagoner. 
Second Corporal W. H. Connell. 
Third Corporal D. W. Thomas. 
Fourth Corporal T. Davis. 
Fifth Corporal C. H. Edgerly. 
Sixth Corporal William Leggett. 
Seventh Corporal G. B. Myres. 
Eighth Corporal M. Humphrey. 



32 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Fifer J. Hart. 
Drummer M. Smith. 
Wagoner J. Miller. 

PRIVATES. 

J. Ardis, T- Baird, J. Buck, T. G. Boak, F. H. Boyer, L. Bruno, J. 
Best, John Davis, W. Davis, W. Dennison, W. Demings, ]!.. Em- 
spranger, J. Fritz, T. Folger, O. C. Field, R. Farnham, C. Fairchild, 
D. Harbaugh, J. Heffelfinger, L. Harris, J. Harris, J. D. Hall, H. 
Hazzen, S. W. Hart, A. Hazzen, P. Jones, G. C. Kellogg, C. H. 
King, A. A. Kellogg, D. Kittmger, F. Morris, G. Nichols, E. Ober- 
holtz, C. H. Paine, L. L. Porter, S. Paine, J. Pierson, A. A. Palmer, 
W. Peet, C. Rottert, H. Ridder, L. Rodgers, G. Youells, A. Robin 
son, E. Randerbush, H. Root, W. Robinson, J. Snowbarger, G. 
Slusser, J. Smith, F. Smith, N. Salsberry, H. H. Scott, }. C. Stall, W. 
Spears, C. C. Tooker, W. H. Tooker, E. Turner, J. Wilson, H. Wolf, 
O. O. Wright, R. M. Wilkins, A. Wallace, J. Wells. 

COMPANY I. 

[Not fullv organized.] 
Captain R. B. Smith. 
First Lieutenant A. A. Philbrick. 
Second Lieutenant William J. Hall. 
First Sergeant C. C. Lord. 
Drummer William Elliott. 
Wagoner B. Alderman. 

PRIVATES. 

N. B. Adams, W. H. Abbott, A. Archer, A. Alderman, J. J. Bair, 

C. Beach, U. Cook, J. C. Cally, W. H. Cooper, J. Craig, W. Dick 
inson, J. Everhard, Martin Eliiott, W. Eldred, Z. Farnsworth, C. F. 
Gove, W. Gilbert, J. Grine, T. N. Harrington, A. Holden, P. Hawk, 

D. N. Hubbard, W. Wildy, C. H. Kinsdig, R. S. Krahl, J. Miller, 
N. Miller, J. G. Marsh, M. H. Murdock, M. L. Maley, M. McNerny, 
T. J. Nicholls, H. Newcomb, M. G. Owen, J. R. Policy, J. Perkins, 
L. Pegg, T. R. Phinney, ]. Rupp, H. Rex, G. W. Reed, G. Rorke, 

E. Rushon, Jackson Roe, Joseph Roe, S. F. Sawyer, A. Squires, J. 
Sage, J. Sowers, E. M. Suplee, D. C. Stevens, S. Sturdevant, J. H. 
Freman, A. Thompson, J. A. Walsh, }. Winters, C. L. Welton, E. C. 
Whitaker, O. O. Wakeman, W. Waterman, S. E. Wilson, A. A. 
Woodruff, W. N. DeWitt. T. F. Henderson, M. Hendnck, R. Hill. 

COMPANY K. 

Captain Alden P. Steele. 

First Lieutenant D. E. Hurlburt. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 33 

Second Lieutenant William Neil. 
First Sergeant C. C. Johnson. 
Second Sergeant A. O. Benjamin. 
Third Sergeant G. C. Judd. 
Fourth Sergeant H. H. Fenton. 
Fifth Sergeant]. B. Partch. 
First Corporal D. Phillips. 
Second Corporal E. W. Gray. 
Third Corporal G. M. Cowgill. 
Fourth Corporal A. D. Eddy. 
Fifth Corporal Luther Kinney. 
Sixth Corporal Joel Ritter. 
Seventh Corporal J. Alexander. 
Eighth Corporal Lewis Wrisley. 
Drummer H. Wilder. 
Wagoner Cooley Griffin. 

PRIVATES. 

R. W. Alderman, J. Blodgett, H. Davenport, D. W. Fisher, A. N. 
Alderman, Orlando Clark, G. W. Dean, William Fisher, C. A. Baker, 
T. Cook, E. E. Durfee, T. J. Fails, F. Burt, F. N. Cutler, F. W. 
Eggleston, L. Fowler, George Bullis, C. Conrad, William Fletcher, 
W. Fitzgerald, P. M. Griggs, Hiram Griggs, J. Goldsmith, H. Ham 
mond, J. Hammond, W. S. Hoxter, H. Holcomb, F. Hilliard, Judson 
Hunt, }. L. Hayward, C. O. Hinkle, F. Johnson, E. A.Johnson, John 
Jinks, William Knox, F. Love, George Light, William Law (trans 
ferred to company G, December 14, 1861), D. Marsh, J. McCloud, J. 
Mathews, A. F. Mills, O. O. Oliver, S. Pierce, G. Perry, William 
Pond, G. A. Patchen, M. Ramsey, F. Rounds, William Reed, E. 
Reed, J. Randell, Solon Squires, J. Spain, J. Swinton, J. St. Clair, J. 
Sanfield, George Strong, D. Turner, J. Taylor, Jr., James Williams, 
C. W. Wilson, O. E. Wilson, A. J. Wightman. 

3 



34 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER II. 

The Departure from Camp Giddings At the Front Death of Lander 
Advance up the Valley Winchester. 

Christmas morning, 1861, dawned clear, with the 
earth bountifully covered with snow, and soon the busy 
preparations for this the first march were apparent every 
where. Knapsacks were packed, tents were struck, and 
the camp equipage snugly put into shape for transporta 
tion to Ashtabula, and at 10 o clock the drums beat off- 
Then the regiment filed out of the enclosure, bidding a 
fond good-bye, many for the last time, to the old camp, 
up through the town, where everybody was waiting to 
wish the "boys" Godspeed. "Head of column left," 
and the Twenty-ninth regiment was en-route for Ashta 
bula and the front, followed by the prayers of fathers, 
mothers, brothers, sisters, and sweethearts, that its every 
effort might be crowned with success, and that, if heaven 
so willed, all might return safely to the arms of loved 
ones, "when the cruel war was over." How beautiful 
they looked in their new uniform, and how gaily the 
bayonets glistened in the bright sunlight as each man 
kept step to the music. 

Arriving at Ashtabula, the regiment took cars, and 
was soon whirling rapidly towards Columbus, where i 1 
arrived the following day. 

On disembarking from the cars, a march of four miles 
on the National pike to the west brought the regiment to 
Camp Chase, where it was assigned to barracks, and the 
sweets (?) of soldier life began to be more perceptible. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 35 

While lying here, the regiment attended the inauguration 
of David Tod as Governor of Ohio, and perfected itself 
in the school of the soldier. On the 26th day of Jan 
uary, 1862, the long roll again sounded; the Twenty- 
ninth regiment fell in, and marched to the depot, a dis 
tance of four miles. It took cars, and steamed away for 
Dixie, passing through Newark and Zanesville, and 
across the Ohio river at Bellair, thence via the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad through the mountains of West Virginia 
to a point some six miles below Cumberland, Maryland, 
where it made its first camp in Dixie. There it was as 
signed to the left flank of the Third brigade (the Seventh 
Ohio volunteer infantry occupying the right), Colonel E. 
B. Tyler commanding, and here it may be well to state 
that from this time until the Seventh regiment was dis 
charged the service (July 8, 1864,) the two regiments 
occupied the same position, engaged in the same battles, 
and endured an equal amount of the hard service inci 
dent to the several campaigns. The Twenty-ninth re 
mained in active service for nearly a year after the 
discharge of its well-bred friends of the Seventh and 
until the collapse of the Rebellion. This for the benefit 
of those who imagine that only one regiment was re 
cruited in Northern Ohio. 

On February 5, 1862, a general movement was ordered 
to entrap the forces of Stonewall Jackson, then occupy 
ing Romney. The Twenty-ninth and its brigade took 
cars to French s store, and marched some twenty miles 
to a point between Romney and Winchester to intercept 
the retreat of the rebels. The attempt was futile, how 
ever, as those whom the federals sought had flown ere 
the designated point was reached. This march was a 
terrible one, and told heavily on the men, many of whom 
succumbed to disease incident to exposure to the intense 



36 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

cold, the fording of streams whose icy waters were often 
waist deep, and the general hardships, were sent to hos 
pital at Cumberland, and never returned to duty. Re 
turning the following day, the regiment bivouacked at a 
point some eight miles from the Baltimore & Ohio rail 
road, known as Pine Levels or the Heights of Hamp 
shire. Here it remained some ten days exposed to the 
intense cold, without tents, few blankets, on short rations, 
and no cooking utensils. Rude brush enclosures were 
constructed, which served the same purpose as Artemus 
Ward s window sash, sort of "tangle the cold " or "keep 
out the coarsest." It was by the greatest effort that the 
men were kept from freezing. This sort of thing seemed 
a pretty tough introduction to the "Sunny South," but 
hardships of this kind became the normal experience of 
the Twenty-ninth regiment, and the sunny spots which 
occasionally intervened were duly appreciated. 

The next move was to the eastward to Paw Paw sta 
tion on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, near which the 
Twenty-ninth and its brigade went into camp. Febru 
ary 22d, Washington s birthday, was duly observed. A 
general review was indulged in. The streets were pret 
tily trimmed with evergreens; and arches, and other 
pretty devices were numerous. The Twenty-ninth were 
domiciled in small and nearly worn out wall tents. 

On Saturday, March ist, as the shades of evening 
were falling, the Twenty-ninth and its command marched 
with two days rations, in the direction of Winchester, 
Virginia, the object being the capture of that important 
point. After an all night s march the command halted, 
and, in a blinding snow storm, waited for further orders. 
At 5 o clock P. M. a counter-march was ordered, and at 
about midnight the old camp at Paw Paw was reached. 
The object of this move was to attend the remains of 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 37 

brave General Lander to the cars, which was accom 
plished on the following day. All the troops in the vicin 
ity were present. At 9 o clock on the morning of Sat 
urday, March 8th, the command struck tents and 
marched to the railroad ; at night took cars and moved 
in the direction of Martinsburg, en route for Winches 
ter. Some two or three days were occupied in reaching 
the former place, as extreme caution was necessary. A 
burned bridge at Back creek stopped further steam loco 
motion, and on the nth the command moved forward 
through Martinsburg, encamping some two miles out on 
the Winchester road. Here General James Shields, of 
some celebrity in the Mexican war, assumed command 
of the division, and the One Hundred and Tenth Penn 
sylvania infantry volunteers was added to the brigade. 
The following morning the column continued the for 
ward movement, under orders to join General Banks, in 
his attack on Winchester. The rebels retreated, and 
Shields division went into camp to the north of Win 
chester, some four miles out on the Martinsburg pike. 

When the rebels first occupied Virginia General Johns 
ton (commanding the extreme left of Beauregard s army) 
took possession of Winchester. Troops from here de 
stroyed the Baltimore & Ohio railroad and constantly 
harrassed our forces in the direction of Harper s Ferry 
and Cumberland. It was of great importance that the 
Union arms gain and hold possession of this point, 
hence the concentration of Federal troops in this 
vicinity. 

Skirmishing with the enemy was a daily occurrence, 
and, on the morning of March 2oth, a reconnoissance in 
force was made up the valley to Strasburg. General 
Shields, with the Twenty-ninth and its brigade, number 
ing some six thousand men, moved direct to that point, 



38 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

while Colonel Mason s brigade advanced on the Front 
Royal road. At Cedar creek a lively artillery duel 
transpired, during which the rebels succeeded in burning 
the bridge. The following morning the entire command 
fell back to its camp below Winchester. This was a march 
which tested the men s power of endurance to its ut 
most. The rain fell lightly but continuously during the 
day. For rations the men had barely one cracker each, 
and yet they made the entire distance twenty-two 
miles in seven hours, halting only a few minutes about 
noon. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 39 



CHAPTER III. 

The Battle of Winchester or Kernstown Stonewall Jackson Whipped. 

At Kernstown, some four miles south of Winchester, 
Jackson s command, numbering fully fifteen thousand 
men, was massed, and on March 22d attacked the Union 
outposts. The citizens of Winchester, who, by the way, 
were about as thoroughly imbued with treason as at any 
point within the writer s knowledge in the whole of the 
chivalrous (?) South, were in high glee at the prospect of 
being rid of those odious Lincoln hirelings, and some 
were so sanguine of success to the Southern arms that 
they prepared elegant repasts for the victors. However 
that may be, the rebel horde did not enter Winchester 
at this time, except, perhaps, a few dead ones carried 
there for burial. 

Soon after the firing began the First and Second 
brigades of General Shields division were moved to the 
front, and a lively skirmish ensued resulting in the re 
pulse of the enemy. General Shields was wounded 
quite severely during this brief engagement, and at night, 
when active hostilities ceased, he retired to Winchester. 
The dawn of Sunday, March 23d, was heralded by the 
rapid boom of artillery and the lively rattle of musketry, 
as the advance of the two armies resumed the skirmish 
ing of the previous afternoon. This was continued dur 
ing nearly the entire forenoon. About noon the long 
roll beat throughout our camp ; quickly the men fell into 
line, and in columns of fours, under command of brave 
Colonel Buckley, marched rapidly, a portion of the dis- 



40 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

tance at a double quick, toward the point of attack. 
On reaching Winchester the regiment halted, came to a 
front, loaded their pieces, and remained until the artillery 
and trains had passed. We then moved on the road 
leading to Kernstown, some two or three miles, and 
again halted. After some vexatious delay the regiment 
again resumed the march and soon reached the scene of 
the action, which was about seven miles from Winches 
ter. The enemy were under General Thomas J. Jack 
son (Stonewall). His right extending across the Pike lead 
ing to Strasburg, and his forces on his left masked behind 
a stone fence, while at the rear for a considerable distance 
the ground was a gradual ascent covered with stumps 
and wood which were well used as cover. The Twenty- 
ninth regiment and its brigade was moved to the ex 
treme right of the line, and, formed in close column, by 
division, moved forward through the timber to the at 
tack. At close range the rebels opened a heavy fire, but 
we continued to advance, halting at a small ravine where 
we deployed in line of battle, and in this position a sharp 
and determined engagement ensued. The distance 
between the opposing forces did not exceed sixteen 
rods. Late in the afternoon an order was given the 
Third brigade to charge the rebel line. Quick as thought 
the whole line sprang forward, and with cheers sounding 
above the roar of the conflict, in the teeth of a murder 
ous fire, swept down over the stone wall and at the bay 
onet s point drove the enemy from their chosen position. 
To the rear they fled until reaching their artillery, where 
another stand was made and a rally attempted. The 
Union lead poured into their ranks with such deadly ef 
fect that they soon became panic-stricken, and in the 
greatest disorder retreated in whatever direction best 
offered an avenue of escape, and Stonewall Jackson, the 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 41 

pride of the South and by many considered the bravest 
general in the rebel army, was whipped, and that, too, by 
a force much inferior in numbers, many of whom had 
never faced death before. 

To make the victory still more sure our forces followed 
the disordered mass of fleeing rebels and captured many 
prisoners, until darkness closed over all, when our brave 
boys returned to rest upon their laurels upon the bloody 
field of carnage, bury the dead and care for the wound 
ed. The result of this battle was a loss to the rebels of 
the Shenandoah valley, at that time of great importance 
to them, with casualties amounting to some five hundred 
men killed, wounded, and left on the field, and three 
hundred prisoners. The loss of the Twenty-ninth regi 
ment in this action was : Five killed, seven wounded, 
two missing; aggregate fourteen. See casualties at the 
close of the volume for names. 



42 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER IV. 

Pursuit of Jackson The "Long" March Fredericksburg to Front. 
Royal March to Waynesboro. 

At early dawn on the morning of March 24th the 
Union army pushed forward in pursuit of the retreating 
rebels. The Twenty-ninth deployed as skirmishes in, 
the advance. Many wounded Confederates were found 
in private houses along the line of march. About noon 
the dashing rebel cavalry officer Ashby came from cover 
and suddenly swooped down upon the regiment with 
aheavy cavalry force. Rallying by companies and 
forming squares, a well directed volley soon sent 
the rebels in haste to the rear. The pursuit of 
the fleeing rebels was continued until nightfall, when 
the regiment went into bivouac near Cedar creek. The 
next morning (25th) our columns again pushed forward 
until reaching a point a little in advance of Strasburg, 
where a halt was ordered and a camp (Kimball,) estab 
lished. Here we remained for some time, making fre 
quent raids into the surrounding country and skirmish 
ing almost daily with the enemy. 

April ist the regiment again moved after the retreat 
ing army, and about daylight on the following morning 
indulged in some artillery firing with the rebel rear 
guards. During the month of April the regiment 
marched up the valley as far as Newmarket, passing the 
towns of Woodstock and Mount Jackson. At the latter 
place a hospital was established, and companies G and 
E were detailed for provost, and other duties, in and 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 43. 

around Mount Jackson, while the remainder of the regi 
ment moved up the valley to Camp Thurburn and con 
tinued the usual picket, camp, and guard duties. 

May 3d left camp and marched up the valley in the 
direction of Harrisburg; halted about three miles from 
town and camped for the night. May 5th, returned 
from near the town of Harrisburg and went into camp 
four miles above Newmarket, where the regiment re 
mained until the i2th day of May, when it left the 
Shenandoah valley at Newmarket on the long march to 
Fredericksburg, marched to Luray, and encamped for 
the night (marched eighteen miles). Thirteenth, moved 
at 7 A. M. The Twenty-ninth, was detailed as rear guard- 
Fourteenth, marched at 6, reached Front Royal at 3:30 
p. M. and camped for the night. Fifteenth, marched at 9 A. 
M., traveled thirteen miles, and went into camp. Six 
teenth, marched at 6:30 A. M., reached Gains Cross 
Road, and camped for the night, (marched ten miles). 
May 1 7th, marched at 6 A. M., and reached Warrenton 
(distance of eighteen miles), and went into camp for the 
night. Sunday, May i8th, remained in camp. Mon 
day, i Qth, marched at 5 o clock A. M., and at 3 P. M.. 
reached the Orange & Alexandria railroad at Catlet s 
Station, and went into camp. Remained until May 2ist, 
when the regiment again marched at 6 A. M., halting at 
10:30 p. M. for the night. Twenty-second, marched at 
7 A. M., reached Falmouth in the evening, and went into 
camp. Friday, May 23d, the army under Major-general 
McDowell was reviewed by Abraham Lincoln, the Presi 
dent of the United States, with satisfactory results. 
Sunday, 25th, marched at 6 A. M., and at 4:30 went 
into camp. Twenty-sixth, marched at 5 A. M., and 
camped for the night at Catlet s Station. Twenty- 
seventh, marched some four miles on the Manassas Gap, 



44 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

railroad, and went into camp. Twenty-eighth, marched 
at 5 A. M. past White Plains: after tramping fifteen miles 
went into camp. Twenty-ninth, marched at 7 o clock 
A. M. in the direction of Front Royal, reached Rector- 
town at 4 o clock p. M., and two hours later fell in, in 
light marching order, and moved forward, leaving the 
baggage until May 3ist, when at 4 o clock A. M. it 
moved forward towards Front Royal, reaching Pied 
mont at 9 A. M., and Markham at 4 p. M.; moved to 
within six miles of Front Royal, and camped for the 
night. June ist, marched to Front Royal, and at 4 P. 
M. moved forward some three miles on the Luray road, 
and went into camp. June 2d, marched at 6 A. M., 
marched thirteen miles, and went into camp. Third, 
marched at 7 A. M., reached Luray at 12 M., passed 
through the town on the Newmarket road, some two 
miles and camped. Fourth, remained in camp all day. 
Fifth, marched at 5 A. M., marched four miles, halted, 
put up our tents, and prepared to be comfortable, when 
at 3 o clock P. M. we were ordered to move. This was 
occasioned by the close proximity of the rebel batteries 
on the opposite side of the river. The regiment marched 
about one mile and again halted for the night. Sixth, 
ordered to march at 4 A. M., fell into line at 5, moved 
two miles, halted, stacked arms, soon fell in and 
marched about two miles farther, pitched our tents, and 
at 6 P. M. fell in and marched back to the place the regi 
ment left in the morning, where we arrived at 12 at 
night, and went into camp. Saturday, 7th, the regiment 
was up at 4 A. M. and marched at 9 A. M. (the baggage 
was ordered to Luray and Front Royal; Sergeant C. H. 
Edgerly and Private Willard Denison, of Company H, 
were furloughed home for thirty days), marched up the 
cast bank of the Shenandoah river, a distance of four- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 45: 

teen miles, halted at 6 P. M., and went into camp. 
Eighth, marched at 4 A. M., halted at 6:30 for breakfast, 
and at 8:15 again moved forward; soon heard the artillery 
firing at Cross Keys on the west side of the Shenandoah 
river and mountain. The regiment moved on up the 
river and about 5 o clock p. M. were in sight of the 
rebels, whose ambulances and train were moving rapidly 
in retreat in the direction of Port Republic from the 
battle of Cross Keys. The Union forces were under 
the command of Major-general John C. Fremont, and 
the Confederate army commanded by Major-general 
Thomas J. Jackson. The Union army took shelter in a 
strip of woods at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountain, 
near Port Republic, Virginia, and bivouacked for the 
night. 



46 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER V. 

Battle of Port Republic The Twenty-ninth Suffer Great Loss. 

On June gth, in the dim light of early morning the 
-enemy began to move, and soon our artillery opened a 
brisk fire on them. The Twenty-ninth regiment, under 
command of Colonel Buckley, was ordered to fall in, 
.and at 6:45 o clock marched out of the timber into the 
open field, and moved forward a short distance, when 
the men unslung knapsacks and other equipage and, 
reduced to light marching order, advanced by the right 
flank, and when near the rebel position came into line 
on the double quick. While doing so we were obliged 
to pass a board fence ; and at this critical time the rebels 
opened a heavy fire of musketry, but the regiment 
moved steadily forward and took position in the open 
field. The rebels in front of our right wing were behind 
a strong post and rail fence. 

From the base of the mountain to the Shenandoah 
river was about one-half mile. The extreme left of our 
line extended into the timber and near the base of the 
mountain with the right flank extending to the river. 
The Fifth, Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio regiments were 
on our left, and the Seventh Virginia, Seventh, Thirteenth 
and Fourteenth Indiana on our right. The Twenty- 
ninth being about the right center regiment during the 
battle, and at this time in support of Huntington s bat 
tery, which was belching forth its shot and shell, doing 
deadly execution in the ranks of the advancing rebels. 
When in close range the rebels charged. Reserving our 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 47 

fire until they were almost upon us, the order was given, 
and with a yell the entire line poured its leaden hail 
into the gray clad columns of the chivalry, producing 
fearful slaughter, and following with a charge so impetu 
ous that they were forced to retire from their secure posi 
tion behind the fence, and here, for more than three 
hours and a half, our brave fellows, though outnumbered 
ten to one by the enemy and fighting against fate, kept 
them at bay and held the position. During this charge 
it is said that Allen Mason, of company C, Twenty- 
ninth regiment, captured the colors of the Seventh 
Louisiana Tigers, and Lieutenant Gregory and a part of 
company F made prisoners of twenty-five of the same 
regiment. At last the little handfull, who had so gal 
lantly contended against such fearful odds, were forced 
to retire. The Twenty-ninth regiment moved to the rear, 
perhaps an eighth of a mile, and came to a halt, holding 
the rebel forces in check until the entire Union forces 
had passed to the rear. In the meantime the rebels had 
opened fire upon us with a battery at close range, which 
did fearful execution in our rapidly decimating ranks. 
When all our troops had passed, our regiment faced to 
the right and moved obliquely into the timber; the rebels 
in the meantime passed down the road and we were 
nearly surrounded, and now, for a distance of nearly 
two miles occurred a desperate struggle for freedom, 
The men fought with the desperation born of despair. 
Brave old Colonel Buckley (who before beginning the 
day s business addressed the regiment, saying : " Aim 
low, men, and at every shot let a traitor fall !") on 
foot, his own and one other horse having been disabled 
by a shot, rallied the men, and with sword in hand with 
them succeeded in cutting their way through the cordon 
of gray devils almost surrounding them, and escaped to 



48 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

the mountains near, where some one hundred men of the 
different regiments of the Third brigade, with Colonel 
Buckley at their head, bivouacked for the night. The 
small remainder of the regiment, except those killed,, 
wounded or captured, succeeded in reaching the main 
army. Captain Baldwin says that those who reached the 
main army of the Twenty-ninth regiment numbered only 
thirteen officers and men. 

The night succeeding this eventful day of blood and 
carnage was spent amid the gloom and darkness of the 
forest. The men gathered about their brave commander 
as if to shield him from the damps of night, their . 
thoughts turning meanwhile to the absent comrades, 
many of whom, how many they knew not, were lying, 
still and ghastly, upon the bloody field, a sacrifice to the 
incompetency of the general commanding. The day 
following, the little band began its weary march to the 
rear, seeking shelter at night in some unused furnace 
buildings. The next day they came in sight of the rear 
guard of the retreating army, where they found the small 
remnant of the Twenty-ninth, who had escaped death or 
capture, and who, when they saw their beloved colonel 
alive and well, fairly rent the very heavens above with 
their glad shouts of welcome. 

The number of the Union army engaged in this battle 
was some twenty-five hundred, and could form but one 
line of battle, while Stonewall Jackson s official report 
shows his army to have numbered some thirty-four thous 
and. The Twenty-ninth regiment lost heavily in this 
battle. The aggregate was : Killed, 12 ; wounded, 33 ; 
captured, 105 ; total, 150, 

After the battle the Twenty-ninth regiment moved 
down the valley to Luray, where the command encamped 
for a few days rest, then forward to Front Royal, and on 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 49 

to Alexandria, reaching that point on June 27th, en 
camping on a rise of ground immediately adjacent to 
the line of fortifications. The Third brigade was now 
composed of the Seventh, Fifth, Sixty-sixth, and Twenty- 
ninth Ohio regiments, in the order named. General 
Shields having resigned by reason of McDowell s mis 
representations in relation to the ill-advised battle of 
Port Republic, General Sturgis, who has recently re 
ceived so much adverse criticism through the press of 
the country, for his brutal and inhuman treatment of his 
men, was placed temporarily in command. After lying 
at this point for nearly one month orders were received 
to move to the aid of General McClellan on the Penin 
sula, and we embarked on transports, but the order 
was countermanded and the Third brigade marched 
back to its old camp. 

July 25th we were ordered to join the force of General 
Pope, then marching via Warrenton to the Rapidan 
river. Proceeding by rail to the former point the bri 
gade was reorganized and attached to Banks Second 
corps, afterwards changed to the Twelfth army corps, as 
the First brigade of General Augur s Second division. 
After a few days of " masterly inactivity " we marched 
in the direction of Luray. Debouching to the left on 
the road leading southward toward the Rapidan, we soon 
reached Little Washington and went into camp. While 
here the troops were reviewed by Generals Pope and 
Banks, who complimented our brigade very highly upon 
its perfection in drill and discipline. General Tyler was 
here ordered to Washington, and Brigadier-general John 
W. Geary, late colonel of the Twenty-eighth Pennsyl 
vania infantry volunteers, was placed in command of our 
brigade. His regiment and Knapp s battery were also 

4 



50 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

assigned to the brigade. A forward movement in the 
direction of Culpeper Court House, Virginia (on the 
Rapidan), was begun on August 8th. Here the Con 
federates were preparing defences, and at Cedar Moun 
tain, some seven miles to the southwest of our position, 
they were strongly fortified. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 51 



CHAPTER VI. 

1862. 

Cedar Mountain Battle- Severe Loss of Life Forward to Alexandria. 
August 8th, the regiment moved at 2 o clock, advanced 
to Culpeper Court House, and went into camp ; and 
at 10:40, on the morning of August Qth, moved forward 
in the direction of Cedar mountain. Halted a short 
time, and the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiment was 
sent to the right on an eminence as signal guard. The 
remainder of the brigade soon advanced, halting at 
intervals, as the day was insufferably hot (several men 
died this day of sunstroke). At last, passing through a 
piece of timber, we approached the open field with a 
rolling country in our front, and at 1:30, while making 
preparations for dinner (near a fine spring of water), 
skirmishing and artillery firing was heard on our right, 
which continued at intervals until 3:45, when the rebels 
appeared in heavy force, ready for battle, and the Union 
lines were formed without delay. The Twenty-ninth 
regiment (commanded by Captain W. F. Stevens, of 
Company B,) was ordered to advance and take position 
in rear of a battery which had been placed on a ridge. 
Here the regiment took position, the right resting on 
the road, and the left extending into the field, covered 
from the enemy by the hill on which the battery 
was placed. The Twenty-ninth, with other regiments of 
the brigade, was about on the right of the left wing of 
the line in open field, while the right wing extended 
across the road, and into the timber. The regiment 



52 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

remained in this position, supporting the battery, and 
receiving a heavy fire from the rebel artillery in our front. 
Here several men were wounded. 

At 5 o clock P. M., we moved over the crest of the 
hill, to a cornfield some distance in advance of our pre 
vious position. During the advance to this new position 
a terrific cannonade opened on us, dealing great destruc 
tion to our ranks. Apparently every cannon of the 
enemy was let loose against us, but J we never faltered in 
this march of death, despite the terrible missiles that 
were tearing through our bleeding ranks. Comrades 
were falling, and brothers dying. The mangled and 
bleeding victims of the fury and violence of war were left 
thick around us, making the ground sacred on which 
they fell; but we wavered not. Reaching a low piece 
of ground, we halted, and were ordered to lie down 
and continue firing. We remained for one hour in the 
open field, exposed to this furious storm of grape and 
canister, shot and shell. Comrades gave up their lives 
so gently that it was scarce possible to tell the living 
from the dead. The fatal missile struck the victim, 
leaving the lifeless clay in the same attitude which the 
living body occupied. During the fatal period death 
assumed a real character while life seemed but a dream. 
The engagement had now become general. The brigade 
of General Prince came up, and formed on the left of 
our regiment. The Sixty-sixth, Fifth, and Seventh Ohio 
regiments were formed on our right, in the order named. 
(The Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiment was not with 
us in this engagement.) 

At a given signal the brigade arose and, with defiant 
yells, rushed forward to the charge, Prince s brigade on 
the left moved forward with us. A sheet of flame and 
smoke burst forth from rebel batteries, musketry replied 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 53 

to musketry, bayonet clashed with bayonet, and cheers 
rang out against cheers, as one side or the other gained 
the advantage in this deadly conflict. Daring warmed 
into rashness, and bravery into recklessness. Hurrah ! 
we force them back, their line is broken, a battery is 
almost within our grasp; when in this moment of seem 
ing certain victory, fresh columns of rebel infantry rush 
upon us on the double-quick, masked batteries open on 
us at the same moment a most furious enfilading fire, 
causing our brave boys to reel and stagger. An . 
order comes for us to retire, when three-fourths of our 
regiment have been placed out of the fight dead or 
wounded. Slowly and sadly the remaining few obey the 
order, keeping our faces to the foe until fresh troops 
arrive to take our places, when we resume our position 
in the reserve near Telegraph hill. Each regiment of 
the brigade had done nobly, but all alike had suffered 
a loss so great that the four regiments together could 
not show a respectable facing front for one regiment. 
As night settled over the field of carnage and of death 
our entire army corps withdrew to the position it held 
early in the day, but our artillery kept up a desultory 
firing, with but short intervals during the night. 

The casualties of this battle were: Killed, n; 
wounded, 26; missing, 12. Total, 49. 

Private George Williams, company F, came off the 
field with his third gun two having been shot from his 
hands. 

During August loth and nth skirmishing continued. 
In the afternoon of the last-named day the 2Qth regi 
ment was inspected. Adjutant Storer reported eighty- 
three men only present for duty. 

The Union army remained on the field three days, 
retiring, on August i2th, to Culpeper Court House, 



54 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

where it encamped. Our pickets, going over the battle 
field on the i3th, reported that dead horses were piled 
in promiscuous positions; dismounted cannons, wrecked 
caissons, and broken fire-arms were everywhere, while 
the graves of the fallen, singly and in trenches, were 
scattered over the entire field, only the freshly heaped 
up earth marking the spots. In one spot were the 
unburied bodies of a boy in blue and one in gray, their 
arms interlocked as their brave souls went out to the 
God who gave them, the one for the right, the other, it 
is hoped, forgiven for his misguided championship of 
the wrong. 

Twelfth, marched to Culpeper Court House, and went 
into camp. i3th, put up tents and prepared to live. 
i4th, and all is quiet. i5th, another inspection and re 
view. There is one consolation if we do have inspec 
tion- every other day, there are so few men left that but 
little time is consumed in doing so. i6th, iyth, and 
1 8th, still in camp; was inspected again, and at 6 o clock 
on the evening of the latter day, struck tents under 
orders to march; slept on our arms that night. iQth, 
marched at 10 A. M., north to the Rappahannock, a dis 
tance of eleven miles, and went into camp. Had only 
a small quantity of green corn to eat. 2oth, all quiet in 
camp. 2ist, at 6 A. M. firing began, and was kept up 
along the line all day; at 7 in the evening the regiment, 
under command of Captain Schoonover, marched two 
miles and halted; company H was sent forward to the 
picket line, and the regiment moved at 6:30 A. M. along 
the Rappahannock; halted at 9:30; after a brief rest the 
regiment again fell in, and marched till 12 at noon with 
out breakfast ; sharp firing along the line; halted until 
6* o clock P. M.; moved up the Rappahannock river 
two miles, halted, stacked arms, and remained up nearly 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 55 

all night ; (rainy) no tents or blankets, made our bed 
of rails. Saturday, August 23d, at 6 o clock A. M. the 
artillery opened fire, and continued until 1 1 o clock p, 
M. ; remained on our arms all day; at 10 o clock p. M. 
moved a short distance up the river, and the Twenty- 
ninth went on picket. 24th, and all is quiet; at 9:30 
A. M. the artillery commenced firing, which was kept up 
continually during the day. 25th, artillery and musketry 
firing all along the line; at 8 o clock p. M. the Twenty- 
ninth with its brigade moved up the river four miles and 
camped for the night. 26th, no rations for breakfast, 
but after a short time some green corn was procured, 
which filled the bill. At 8 A. M. the artillery dueling again 
commenced and was kept up the remainder of the day. 
The Twenty-ninth regiment moved one-half mile for 
shelter, remained here until 9 p. M., when it marched 
forward until 3 o clock A. M., of the 2yth; halted, moved 
forward a distance of three miles, and again halted. At 
i o clock P. M., moved in the direction of Warrenton 
Junction, and camped for the night (no rations for sup 
per or breakfast). On the morning of the 28th day of 
August, the regiment moved at 5 A. M., marched three 
miles and halted, drew rations and moved on in the 
direction of Bristow station, and camped tor the night. 
Heavy firing in our advance all day. 29th, remained in 
camp, about two miles above Bristow station. 3oth, 
marched at 6 o clock A. M. and halted at Bristow station, 
and remained till 5 o clock p. M., when the enemy was 
reported in our rear. The sick and disabled were moved 
to Alexandria and other points. August 3ist, teams and 
trains containing camp and garrison equipage and other 
army supplies, were moved in the direction of Fairfax 
Court House. 

During the campaign under Major-general Pope from 



56 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

August 20th until the regiment reached Alexandria on 
the 2d day of September, 1862, it was one continuous 
march and counter-march, by day and night, moving up 
the Rappahannock as far as White Sulphur Springs. On 
the 29th and 3oth of August near the Bull Run battle 
ground. A very hard battle was fought, in which the 
Nationals were forced from the field, and again late in 
the afternoon on the ist day of September at Chantilly, 
a short distance from Fairfax Court House, a sanguinary 
battle was fought, which continued late in the evening. 
In this last engagement the Nationals held the field at 
night, and on the 2d the Union army fell back within 
the fortifications around Washington city. During the 
last two or three days of the above campaign the Twen 
ty-ninth regiment was completely cut off from the main 
army, as it had been ordered to guard the quartermaster 
stores with other government property on the railroad 
at and near Bristow station, and when ordered to join its 
brigade it found the enemy in the rear, so that it was 
only by a circuitous route in the direction of Brintsville, 
and a forced march that it reached the Chantilly bat 
tlefield during the engagement, on September ist. 
Here it bivouacked for the night, and on the following 
day marched to Arlington heights, via Alexandria, where 
it went into camp: 

During the last twelve days of the campaign the 
Twenty-ninth suffered severely for rations and rest, it 
being on the march, under fire, and on the skirmish line 
the entire time. When we reached Fairfax station, on 
the platform of the depot we found an immense table 
upon which our wounded boys were being subjected to 
the ofttimes bungling butchery of ignorant alleged 
surgeons, a number of whom were busily engaged in 
depriving the poor fellows under their charge of wounded 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 57 

legs and arms, and in many cases hastening their death 
thereby. This worse than murder by men, the majority 
of whom, when at home, had never even witnessed a 
capita] operation, cannot be too highly condemned. 
{The writer is personally acquainted with professional 
men of this sort, who came out of the service first-class 
carvers, but the number of brave fellows sacrificed to 
bring about this state of proficiency is unknown.) It 
was now ascertained that the Confederate army of 
General Lee was making rapid marches towards Mary 
land. To checkmate this movement our columns were 
at once ordered on a retrograde movement in the direc 
tion of Washington. Reaching Alexandria, we passed 
up the Potomac, crossing at the long bridge, and mov 
ing forward to Georgetown where a halt of one day was 
made, the command departing the following morning 
for Frederick City, Maryland, which was said to be occu 
pied by the rebels. A day s march brought us beyond 
Rockville, Maryland, where we encamped for the night. 
At 2 o clock, on the afternoon of September 5th, the 
regiment marched to Monocacy Junction, where the 
rebels had a short time previous destroyed the railroad 
bridge. 



58 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER VII. 

Frederick City Recruits Dumfries. 

The regiment remained at Monocacy junction, guard 
ing the immense supply trains which had accumulated 
here by reason of the burned bridge. Sergeant Bald 
win relates that a lot of rebel prisoners passed Mono 
cacy bridge, one of whom claimed to have fired seven 
shots at Colonel Buckley at the battle of Port Republic, 
but without effect. About September i3th, the bridge 
having beeo replaced, we moved on to Frederick city, 
Maryland. Here we engaged in camp, picket, and pro 
vost duty, and a large number of the men were detailed 
to care for the wounded from the battlefields of South 
Mountain and Antietam, September i4th and lyth. 

In the meantime we were joined by a large number of 
recruits, amongst which was a brigade cornet band, com 
posed of the following members : George Shaw, leader; 
Everett Shaw, assistant leader ; J. G. Caskey, Jacob 
Koplin, Sylvanus Hile, Columbus Ferguson, N. G. 
Hartman, Christian Hardag, William Kurtz, George 
Metcalf, James Lyon, " Bige " Nickerson, Benjamin 
Snyder, George Turney, Micajah Rice, Bennett Wads- 
worth, Edward White, Frank Waltz, Eli Waltz; Gurley 
G. Crane, drum major. 

November 25th, Colonel Clark says : " Patiently 
waiting in camp. Dress parade to-day, the first many 
of us have seen since May last. Only about two hun 
dred men in line. Remembering how far our line 
reached at Camp Giddings, our force looks small in 
deed." 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 5^ 

November 2yth. "Cold and raw. A fierce gale 
makes our canvas houses rock like cradles. We are 
now having an easy time; that is all but the men and the 
mules. Our men go on duty every other day. As to 
rations, don t think any of us will get the gout." 

November 27th. "Thanksgiving. Distance lends 
enchantment, etc., to turkeys, chickens, pies, and fix- 
in s that make good cheer at home. Well, some of us 
are thankful that we are here instead of being locked 
up in those dirty rebel prisons. Nine of our officers and 
a large number of our men have just been released. 
This inactivity is irksome to the voluntee r who has 
business at home needing his attention. We hardly 
think Burnside will reach Richmond via Fredericksburg 
unless he goes as some of us did as prisoners." 

On the loth day of December, 1862, the regiment 
struck tents at Frederick City, Maryland, and moved by 
cars in the direction of Harper s Ferry. At Sandy 
Hook a halt was made for the night; slept in freight 
cars; suffered severely from cold. The following day 
marched at 6 A. M. About noon crossed the Potomac 
and Shenandoah rivers into Virginia ; marched about nine 
miles and camped for the night. Twelfth, marched at 3, 
p. M. some nine miles and went into camp. Thirteenth, 
moved at 6 A. M., marched twelve miles, halted for din 
ner, passed through Leesburg, and camped for the night. 
Fourteenth, marched at sunrise, passed through Fairfax 
Court House to the station, where we encamped. 
Fifteenth, marched till about 4 P. M., crossed Broad run 
and encamped for the night. Sixteenth, marched four 
miles in rain, snow, and mud; at 12 M. halted for din 
ner; had a fight with a Pennsylvania regiment over some 
rails that had been collected from the fence. These we 
used for wood occasionally in preparing our meals. I 



60 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

is perhaps unnecessary to mention that the Twenty- 
ninth boys enjoyed good fires to-day. In the afternoon 
the Twenty-ninth went on picket one mile to the rear. 
Seventeenth, brigade counter-marched to Fairfax station, 
where it remained until the ipth, when it moved south 
east about one and one-half miles to an orchard, where 
it encamped, and where it remained until the 27th, 
when it marched at 9 A. M; reached Broad run 
late in the evening. On the hill on the south side of 
the creek was a fort occupied by rebels; the Twenty- 
ninth crossed the creek, halted, loaded their guns, and 
advanced, and a red-hot little skirmish ensued at the 
close of which the rebels fell back. We went into the 
fort, sending two companies out in the road leading 
towards Dumfries as skirmishers. The regiment re 
mained on arms all night; cold and frosty. Guns are 
not very warm bed-fellows. Twenty-eighth, marched at 
7:30 A. M., Twenty-ninth in advance of division. About 
10 o clock met some rebel cavalry; the Twenty-ninth 
regiment deployed into line of battle, a few shots were 
fired, and the rebels fell back. One man wounded in 
company A. While in this position Generals Slocum, 
Geary, and Green came up; a battery was soon in posi 
tion which sent a few shots after the retreating rebel 
cavalry. In the afternoon marched through the woods 
on right of road, in line of battle, while the division 
moved in the road ; skirmishing the balance of the day. 
At dark we halted three miles from Dumfries and 
camped for the night. Twenty-ninth, reached Dumfries 
about 10 o clock A. M., and went into camp on the side 
hill in the woods north of town. 

January i, 1863, the regiment and its brigade re 
mained at Dumfries, doing camp arid picket duty, until 
January i6th, when it was ordered to march on two 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. , 6 1 

hours notice, did not march. On the iyth and i8th 
nothing transpired worthy of note. On the ipth the 
regiment passed in grand review by Colonel Charles 
Canby, of the Sixty-sixth Ohio infantry. January 27th, 
General Geary visited the regiment while on parade, and 
complimented us on our discipline, neat appearance, and 
soldierly deportment. February 2nd, Colonel L. P. 
Buckley, Adjutant T. S. Winship, Captain E. Burridge 
and Lieutenant Gregory, of company F, resigned and 
went home. Lieutenant J. B. Storer was made adju 
tant, and Sergeant H. R. Baldwin, of company F, pro 
moted to captain. February 3d, Companies D and I 
were detached at Dumfries landing, on the Potomac, 
about four miles from camp, doing guard duty, unload- 
ng army supplies from boats, and loading the Second 
Division trains. 

On the i4th some musketry firing was heard in the 
direction of Brentsville. 

March gth, Eli Waltz, of Company D, and a member 
of the brigade band, died. 

April 1 6th, Companies D and I moved from the land 
ing, and joined the regiment. 

From the 2Qth day of December, 1862, the time when 
the Twenty-ninth regiment entered Dumfries, its duties 
were severe ; the line of pickets was over three miles 
long, and over one mile from camp; and as the rebel 
cavalry were hovering around, the main roads entering 
Dumfries, were patroled at night. Our men suffered 
severely from cold and the protracted storms. In the 
meantime five companies were added to the brigade. 
The Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania originally had fifteen 
companies; five companies were added to the new re 
cruits, and designated the One Hundred and Forty- 
seventh Pennsylvania, with Ario Pardee as colonel. Our 



62 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

first brigade now consists of the Twenty-ninth, Seventh, 
Fifth, and Sixty-sixth Ohio regiments, and Twenty-eighth 
and One Hundred and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania. 

The suffering our men endured during our stay at 
Dumfries from inclemency of the weather, the arduous 
service, and the scarcity of almost every necessity, 
cannot be easily over-estimated, and it might with pro 
priety go into history as a counterpart of that much 
written about, and extensively illustrated affair " Wash 
ington at Valley Forge." 

About the 2oth day of April, 1863, with Colonel 
Clark in command, the Twenty-ninth regiment, with its 
brigade, left Dumfries, Virginia, and marched to Aqua 
creek, which place it reached two days later, and en 
camped about one mile from the Potomac river. Aqua 
creek is sixty miles below Washington on the river ; it 
was used as a base for supplies, and a field hospital was 
soon established. The regiment with its brigade re 
mained at this place performing the usual camp and gar 
rison duty, building forts and, at the same time, doing its 
full share of picket duty. We are encamped on the hill 
overlooking the Potomac. To the north and west is a 
fine rolling country partly covered with pine timber and 
tangled undergrowth. All was quiet until orders were 
received to march ; then what a bustle ; haversacks were 
filled, each soldier furnished with sixty rounds of ammu 
nition, and preparations made for " business." At 7 
o clock A. M., on the 2yth day of April, the regiment fell 
into line and moved forward on the road leading to 
Kelleys ford via Stafford Court House and Hartwood 
church, reaching the Rappahannock river at Kelley s 
ford late in the afternoon. The enemy was found in 
small force on the south bank of the river. Late in the 
evening the Sixty-sixth Ohio regiment crossed the river 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 63 

in a small boat capable of carrying but one company at 
a time. The regiment deployed as skirmishers, holding 
the enemy back until the division had all crossed when 
we bivouacked for the night. The next morning we 
marched at 5:30 A. M., the Twenty-ninth regiment in 
advance ; passed through a low, level country, with 
heavy timber; halted at 12 M. for dinner at a fine resi 
dence on a large plantation j fell in at 1:30 p. M. and 
moved in an easterly direction, reaching the Rapidan 
river late in the afternoon. The bridge had been de 
stroyed, so that a crossing was not effected until in the 
evening, after which the Twenty-ninth camped for the 
night. 29th instant, marched at 7:30 A. M. on the 
direct road to Chancellorsville. About 10 o clock A. M. 
General Slocum came up and orders were received for 
the Twenty-ninth regiment to send out a line of skir 
mishers on the right of the road, which was done, the 
regiment passing through an open field and entering 
the timber, forcing the enemy back ; marched on the 
flank through the woods and thick undergrowth for 
several miles, were then ordered to join the brigade. 
We reached Chancellorsville late in the afternoon of 
April 3oth, where we found a small force of Confed 
erate soldiers who were engaged in throwing up earth 
works near the Chancellor house, at a point where the 
roads crossed, one leading to the United States ford, 
and the other to Fredericksburg. The Twenty-ninth 
regiment, with its brigade and division, were the first 
Union soldiers to enter the place. A number of prison 
ers were taken, and late in the evening the Twenty-ninth 
moved a short distance southwest from the main road 
and the Chancellor house into a piece of timber and 
bivouacked for the night. 



64 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER VIII. 
1862. 

Battle of Chancellorsville March to Leesburg, Littletown, and 
Gettysburg. 

The morning of May ist dawned upon a scene of bustle 
and active preparation for the bloody work which was 
to follow. Troops had been arriving during the entire 
night from the direction of the United States ford, and 
the light of early morning revealed an almost solid mass 
of blue-coated soldiers filling the open fields and woods 
in the vicinity of the Chancellor house. They were 
mainly from the Fifth, Eleventh, and Twelfth corps. At 
about 8 o clock A. M. the Twenty-ninth, with its brigade 
and division, made a reconnoissance in force, and after 
marching about one-half mile the division formed in 
line of battle, and in this position was moved about the 
field until afternoon, when the lines were generally 
moved to the east through the timber, the right resting 
on the road. Moving perhaps half a mile we found 
the enemy in strong force, his artillery masked in 
the road. During this time some skirmishing and 
artillery firing was indulged in, and several of the 
Twenty-ninth were wounded. Late in the afternoon we 
moved to the rear under a heavy fire from the rebel 
artillery. Reaching the place we had left in the morn 
ing we set to work throwing up breastworks. The rebels 
advanced and our skirmishers kept up a rattling fire 
all night, while the regiment worked like beavers pre 
paring the works for the coming conflict. The Second 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 65 

division, commanded by John W. Geary, occupied about 
the left center in the order of battle. 

During the evening of May ist the Confederate army 
were charging the right of our lines, and for four hours 
the artillery firing on both sides was terrific. It con 
tinued at intervals the entire night. The air was ablaze 
and full of deadly missiles dealing destruction all around 
us; the earth trembled under our feet; the rattle and 
roar of artillery was like continued bursts of thunder. 
The heavens seemed on fire, revealing the deadly strife 
of two grand armies locked in close embrace, fighting 
with desperate valor. The dense smoke was lightened 
by rapid flashes of artillery, the bursting of shell, and the 
unceasing discharges of musketry, making a scene grand 
and terrible in the extreme. At midnight this deadly 
combat ceased, the death-like stillness which succeeded 
being broken only by the cries of the wounded and the 
dying comrades so recently beside us in deadly combat. 
About i o clock at night pickets were posted forty yards 
from the main line. We were so near the rebel pickets 
we could hear every movement. Here we lay flat on 
the ground watching for demonstrations of the enemy 
until the dawning of another day of blood and death. 
In the first flush of early morning the rebels advanced 
with columns en masse and at once opened fire on us. 
This we returned and then quickly retired under a storm 
of leaden hail. Leaping over the rifle-pits we soon 
rejoined the command. 

The Twenty-ninth regiment now moved in a south 
westerly direction along the line of works a short distance 
in support of a New York regiment. While supporting 
this regiment the Twenty-ninth was under artillery fire 
from the right flank. Colonel Clark was struck by a 
shell, and rendered unconscious nearly two hours. The 

5 



66 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

regiment again moved into its old position on the road 
south of the Chancellorsville house, where it remained 
under heavy fire of artillery and musketry, and in the 
afternoon our right flank was turned, and the Union 
army was soon forced back in the direction of the river, 
at Bank s ford. When the Twenty-ninth fell back the 
rebels were in possession of the Chancellor house, and 
there were not one hundred Union soldiers in sight. 
The army fell back about one mile and a half, filling the 
woods and the road leading to Banks ford. Here it 
took a strong position and threw up a line of works and 
remained until May 6th, when, after being on arms all 
night, it marched at 6 A. M., crossed the river at Banks* 
ford, and camped for the night. 

During the three days fight the Twenty-ninth regi 
ment lost quite heavily; the killed were four, wounded 
forty-two, and prisoners twenty-five. 

In this action the rebel loss was officially reported in 
killed, wounded, and missing, as upward of 10,000 men, 
while the Union loss was about the same. The rebel 
loss in killed and wounded was greater than ours, in 
addition to which they lost one of their ablest generals. 

May yth, marched at 6:30 A. M. It rained hard all 
day. We passed Hartwood church, Staffordshire, and 
went into camp near Aqua creek, and here it remained 
until June 3d, when the regiment moved to the south 
about one mile, and engaged in the construction of two 
small forts. 

Early on the morning of June J3th, we received orders 
to march. Tents were struck, but it was not until late 
in the afternoon that we moved, and then marched dur 
ing the whole night, reaching Dumfries after daylight on 
the morning of the i4th. 

1 5th, march at 4 A. M. Halted on the north bank of 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 67 

the Occoquan creek for dinner. Resuming the march 
in the afternoon we passed Fairfax station and Court 
House on the road leading to Leesburg (marched 
twenty-five miles). This was a march of much suffering 
to the men, several of whom died during the day from 
sunstrokes. 

1 6th. Remained in camp all day. 

1 7th. March in the direction of Leesburg. Halted 
at 12 M., and camped for the night. 

June 1 8th, Marched to near Leesburg and went into 
camp. Oh ! How it rains I 

i9th. Remained in camp cleaning up guns and equi 
page, and all is quiet. In the afternoon the Twelfth 
army corps were ordered out to witness the shooting 
of three deserters from. the First division of the Twelfth 
army corps. Following are the names : William Mc- 
Kee, company A, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania ; Christopher 
Krumbart, company A, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania; and 
William Grover, company B, Thirteenth New Jersey. 
Lieutenant-colonel Clark left us here badly broken 
down in health. 

Sunday, June 20th. In camp cleaning up for inspec 
tion. 2ist and 22d in camp. 230, 24th and 25th, 
Captain Schoonover, in charge of one hundred and 
twenty men from the brigade, felling timber, uncovering 
Ball s Bluff in front of Fort Beauregard. 

26th. The regiment left Leesburg, crossing the Poto 
mac at Edward s Ferry, passed Poolsville, and encamped 
for the night at Monocacy aqueduct. 

27th. Moved at 4:30 A. M. by way of Point of Rocks, 
Petersville and Parkersburg, and camped for the night 
five miles from Harper s Ferry. 

28th. Moved in the forenoon, passing through Har 
per s Ferry, then up the tow path of the Baltimore & 



68 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Ohio canal to Clear Springs, where the Twenty-ninth 
passed under the canal through a culvert, and moving in 
the direction of Frederick City, Maryland, went into 
camp. 

29th. Moved through Frederick City in the direc 
tion of Pennsylvania, and went into camp. General 
Hooker was relieved from command of the Army of the 
Potomac, and General George G. Mead placed in com 
mand. 

3oth. Moved north into Pennsylvania, and late in 
the afternoon reached Littlestown, where we had a skir 
mish with the advance guard of the rebel Lee, which 
falling back toward Gettysburg, we moved north of 
town ; mustered for pay and went into camp for the 
night. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 69 



CHAPTER IX. 

Gettysburg. 
1863. 

July i, 1863, the Twenty-ninth regiment, under com 
mand of Captain Edward Hayes, marched at 6:30 A. M., 
passed through Littletown and on towards Gettysburg. 
After moving some five miles, we halted, and while 
preparing for dinner, first heard the distant artillery fir 
ing which seemed to be many miles away. 

While resting, troops were passing to the front. 
Meanwhile some of Company H had advanced to an 
eminence, from which they soon returned, reporting that 
the cannonading was not far off, as they could plainly 
see the shells as they burst above the timber. We were 
soon on the march, halting occasionally to breathe, as it 
was excessively hot and dusty. When about two miles 
from Gettysburg, we met ambulances returning with the 
wounded of the First and Eleventh corps, which had 
been engaged. Advancing a short - distance, we found 
still further evidence of the fight in the bodies of those 
who had been killed in battle, and left beside the road. 
Late in the afternoon the Twenty-ninth reached the 
Union lines near Seminary Hill, and here batteries were 
in position. The troops were moving, and the rapid 
forming of lines gave evidence that a battle was nigh. 

The Twenty-ninth regiment filed to the left of the pike, 
and advancing about forty rods, took a position in a 
wheat field, in line of battle, and here remained on arms 
during the night. 



70 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

During the day (July ist) the First corps, commanded 
by General J. F. Reynolds, had a sharp fight, in which 
Reynolds was killed. The Eleventh corps (Howard s) 
was also engaged. Late in the afternoon the Nationals 
were pressed back, and took a strong position a short 
distance from Gettysburg, on Seminary Ridge, which 
ended the battle for that day. 

During the night we could hear the moving of confed 
erate troops and artillery in our front, while at the 
same time the Nationals were coming onto the field, so 
that in the morning of July 2d, the open field and 
woods presented a solid mass of troops, artillery and 
supply trains. 

About 8 o clock A. M., July 2d, the Twenty-ninth 
regiment moved back to the pike, and moved with the 
division to a position in the timber on a hill, near the 
right of the line. Here breastworks were thrown up, and 
skirmishing was almost continuous along the line during 
the forenoon, and until about 3 o clock p. M., when the 
struggle was renewed on the left, and gradually extended 
to the center. About 6 o clock p. M., there was a lull on 
the left, and the fight raged with renewed vigor on the 
extreme, right and center, with Howard s Eleventh and 
Slocum s Twelfth -corps. Late in the evening the 
Twenty-ninth, with the brigade, withdrew from the works, 
and moved back about three-fourths of a mile, where it 
remained during the forepart of the night, moving back 
and forth, and constantly skirmishing. The entire army 
appeared to be in motion the greater part of the night. 

July 3, 1863, at the dawn of day, the Twenty-ninth, 
with the brigade, moved back to, and took position in 
the works left the night before, and about 4 o clock A. M. 
the conflict was renewed. 

The rebels who had possession of our works were 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 71 

quickly driven back, and, fifteen minutes after the first 
gun was fired, the engagement become general along the 
entire line, and for six hours the musketry was one con 
tinued roll, interspersed at^intervals by the crash of the 
artillery. The Twenty-ninth remained in the works ex 
cept when allowed to retire to secure ammunition, clean 
pieces, etc. While thus securing ammunition the rebels 
charged the line on our right, gained possession of the 
works, and were advancing in force, when that gallant 
officer, Colonel Hayes, ordered the Twenty-ninth to fall 
in, fix bayonets, and advance to the charge of the rebels 
in the rifle pits and advancing on our right. The regi 
ment made a half wheel to the right and advanced 
double-quick, when the rebels gave way. An eastern 
shore regiment took position next on our right, holding 
the rebels in check. A battery was immediately placed in 
position, a few rounds from which sent the Confederates 
to the rear, leaving their dead and wounded thick about 
our line of works. 

The Confederates in our front were EwelPs corps, in 
cluding our old acquaintance, Stonewall Jackson s brig 
ade, which fought with desperation. The rattle of the 
musketry, which extended from the extreme right to the 
left center of our line, had now become continuous, and 
about i o clock p. M. General Lee opened a furious fire 
upon our lines from over one hundred and fifty pieces 
of artillery, to which more than one hundred National 
guns quickly responded; some sixty thousand small arms 
were heard amidst the roar of artillery. This unearthly 
din continued until late in the afternoon, when the firing 
ceased except at intervals, and this continued during 
the entire night. 

Brevet Captain George Hayward, of company E, pro 
moted for gallant conduct at Chancellorsville, was killed 



72 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

in this fight. He was daring almost to rashness, always 
at the front, unmindful of danger, while his tender 
solicitude for his men endeared him to all who knew 
him, and his death was sincerely regretted. The rebel 
who killed him was concealed in the crevice of the rock 
not more than twenty paces from our line. Upon again 
exposing his person not less than one hundred rifles were 
discharged at him ; he sprang backward, a shrill cry 
rang out upon the air, and brave Hayward s death was 
avenged. 

A little further down the hill lay the dead body of 
Major Light, assistant adjutant-general on Ewell s staff, 
who had perished in the morning assault. 

Early on the morning of July 4th the Twenty-ninth 
regiment advanced in reconnoissance over the battlefield, 
and for the first time gained a full knowledge of the 
fearful loss of life the rebels had sustained, full five 
thousand of whom had answered to their last roll-call. 
Still the mystery exists how any rebels escaped, as each 
soldier of the Union army had, in the seven hours fight, 
fired tw*o hundred and fifty rounds of ammunition, suf 
ficient to have annihilated the entire Southern army. 

We moved forward to the base of Gulp s hill, and 
thence left, to the creek near Cemetery hill, on the op 
posite bank of which were posted the gray-coated pick 
ets of the enemy. Rebel troops were moving -through 
the town, while a force was fortified on Seminary ridge. 
Pickets were thrown out to observe their movements and 
we retired to the main line. 

During the day nearly five thousand stand of rebel 
arms were collected from the field, in front of Geary s 
division alone. Our fallen comrades were tenderly, 
though rudely, transferred to the kindly embrace of 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 73 

mother earth, while the wounded were collected at con 
venient points to receive the necessary treatment. 

Whoever has followed the phases of the battle of 
Gettysburg must have been expressed with the stubborn 
valor displayed on both sides by the common soldiers. 
The dauntless resolution exhibited in the attacks made 
it a terribly bloody and destructive conflict, and the 
unyielding and resolute front of the defence brought 
victory. But there was no possibility of achieving on 
either side such sweeping and complete triumphs as are 
recorded of wars in other countries and in other days, in 
a contest between two armies where the common soldiers 
were of such a temper and in such earnest as were these. 
It is a sad spectacle to see the manhood of two claiming 
to be Christian peoples thus march out to a field, like 
trained pugilists, and beat, and gouge, and pummel each 
other until one or the other from exhaustion must yield. 
It is revolting and sickening, and it is hoped that the 
day will come when disputes arising among nations may 
be settled by compromise, as two reasonable and upright 
men would decide a difference, governed by the golden 
rule, instead of resorting to blows where right and jus 
tice must be subordinate to brute force. But in a great 
battle like that which we have been considering it is not 
the soldiers themselves who are responsible, but the 
parties who make the quarrel. Hence, while the mind 
revolts at the scenes of destruction which the field dis 
closes, the immediate actors are not to be held account 
able. They go in obedience to the dictates of duty and 
of patriotism, and while they may indulge no personal 
hatred toward those who for the time they call enemies, 
they must in battle inflict the greatest possible injury 
upon them. In all ages the highest honors have been 
reserved for those who have fought the battles of their 



74 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

country and this is right. For if there is any deed in 
the power of a mortal which can sway the feelings or 
soften the heart it is that of one man laying down his 
life for another. The breast heaves and the eye is suf 
fused with tears at the spectacle of Pythias putting his 
life in jeopardy only for his friend. There is a halo of 
glory hovering about the profession of arms. It has its 
seat in the sacrifice of self, which is its ruling spirit. 

The man who stands upon the field of battle and faces 
the storm of death that sweeps along, whether he merely 
puts his life thus in jeopardy or is actually carried down 
in death, torn and mangled in the dread fight, is worthy 
of endless honors, and though we class the deed with 
the lowest of human acts, prompted by a hardihood 
which we share with the brutes, and in which the most 
ignorant and besotted may compete with the loftiest, yet 
it is an act before which humanity will ever bow and 
uncover. Who that walked that field of carnage and 
beheld the maimed and mangled, and him cold in death, 
could withhold the tribute of honor and respect ? For, 
could he make that dying soldier s lot his own, or that of 
his nearest and dearest friend, he would only then justly 
realize the sacrifice. Our casualties in the fight were : 
Killed, nine ; wounded, thirty-five ; missing, one. Total, 
forty-five. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 75 



CHAPTER X. 

Return to Washington Embark for New York Return Transferred 
to the Western Army. 

The pursuit of the retreating enemy was commenced 
by the Twelfth army corps at i o clock p. M., on July 5th. 
At night we encamped at Littletown, Pennsylvania, and 
on the following morning moved by the way of Frederick 
to Antietam creek. On the 7th instant we marched 
through Frederick, filed to the right, and passed by a 
rebel spy that was hanging to a limb of a tree. We 
moved a short distance, and halted, where we remained 
all night. On the 8th we marched over the mountains 
in the direction of Sharpsburg. On the pth we passed 
over the battlefield, and camped near Fairplay, Mary 
land. On the loth we moved through the town, and 
camped for the night near Falling waters. On the fol 
lowing day we advanced to Fairplay, a small town to the 
south of St. James college, and the Twenty-ninth regi 
ment, with its customary good (t) fortune, was thrown out 
as skirmishers, and during the day exchanged frequent 
shots with the enemy s cavalry, and at night resting in 
position on the extreme front. 

During the night rebel cavalry approached very near 
our line, but our orders were positive not to fire unless 
attacked. On the following morning we were relieved 
and retired to the main line, where we assumed position 
as support to Knapp s battery, which was hotly engaged 
at intervals during the day. 

On the morning of the i$th instant we rejoined our 



76 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

brigade, anticipating an attack. Riflepits were thrown up 
and due preparation made. The enemy are Strongly 
fortified between St. James college and Williamsport, 
some two miles distant, and on the 1 4th he was reported 
as falling back across the Potomac. Heavy cannonading 
is heard towards the river, and the First division of 
General Williams advances in reconnoissance, the Second 
acting as support. A dispatch states that Lee s army, in 
full retreat, began crossing the river yesterday, continued 
through the night and to-day. Our troops are hotly en 
gaged with his rear guard, and we remain in position 
until the morning of the i8th, when we move briskly for- 
ward in pursuit of the fleeing chivalry, who were now 
across the Potomac in Virginia. We marched via 
Sharpsburg and Antietam. 

While passing through the woods three men were shot 
by Mosby s cavalry. A march of sixteen miles and we 
halt within three miles of Harper s Ferry. At Sandy 
Hook we remain until the morning of the igth instant, 
when we move forward via Harper s Ferry, to Hillsboro, 
Virginia. 

On the following morning we are early on the move, 
advancing as far as Snickers ville, near the gap of that 
name, where pickets are thrown out and we bivouac for 
the night. We remain here for two days, during which 
time we muster and pass in review. Colonel W. T. 
Fitch recently promoted, and who has been absent on 
leave since March 28th, joined us here, and assumed 
command. 

On the morning of the 23d we again moved forward, 
passing through Upperville and on to Ashby s gap, 
where, at a late hour, we go into camp. Having marched 
thirty miles since morning sleep was sweet that night, 
with mother earth for a bed, and only heaven s blue 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 77 

canopy for a cover. At 3 o clock on the morning of the 
24th we march rapidly forward through the villages of 
Markham and Linden, halting for dinner at Manassas 
gap, then forward, changing direction by column to the 
south-southeast, in the direction of White Plains. 
Marching sixteen miles we halted for the night. 

The next day we marched to White Plains, and the 
next by the way of Thoroughfare gap, Haymarket, and 
Greenwich, the latter a pretty little village, settled by 
English people, for whose protection guards were sta 
tioned, as they were in fact in many instances for the 
protection of rebel property. After a brief halt we 
marched forward via Catlett s station and Warrenton, 
where we joined the First and Eleventh corps of our 
army and encamped for the night, then forward again to 
Kelley s Ford, on the Rappahannock, when, after a short 
visit, the brigade took cars for Alexandria, Virginia, 
under orders for New York city, to quell the memorable 
draft riots induced by the Southern sympathizers and 
copperheads. 

On August 23d we embarked on the steamer Baltic 
and moved down the Potomac. When near its outlet 
we went fast aground. This action occurred about noon 
on the 24th, and three days elapsed before we were 
again on the move. On the 28th, at 9:45 A. M., we 
round Cape Henry and strike the swells of the Atlantic. 
A rough sea soon sends many of the command to the 
rail to well, if the reader was ever seasick he will ap 
preciate the situation. It is not pleasant to linger long 
upon this scene ; the recollection of it, even now, almost 
destroys one s interest in sublunary affairs. 

On the 29th we pass the narrows and enter New York 
harbor, coming to anchor near Governor s Island at 12 
o clock M. 



78 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

From our anchorage the view was grandly beautiful 
with the immense shipping, Brooklyn on the right, New 
York to the front, and Jersey City on the left. On the 
left of Governor s Island Castle William (now used as a 
magazine) stands out in bold relief. To its right is the 
fort which protects the harbor. On September ist we 
disembarked and went into camp on the island. The 
men are in fine spirits and delighted with the change. 

The troubles in the city having subsided we re-em 
barked aboard the Baltic, which, on the 8th day of Sep 
tember, heads towards the sea. When passing the nar 
rows the guns of the fort thunder a salute; soon Sandy 
Hook is passed and we are again in the open sea, all 
happy at the prospect of going to the front, the inactivity 
of camp life with nothing to do having become tiresome 
in the extreme. 

On September loth we came to anchor in Chesapeake 
Bay, where we remained one day, then passed on again 
to Alexandria, disembarked, and went into camp to the 
south of the town. Two days later and we again move 
forward to Elk creek, where we encamp for the night. 

September i6th, marched at 6 A. M., reached the Rap- 
pahannock at noon, and here rejoined our old brigade, 
moved forward to Raccoon ford on the north side of the 
Rapidan. General Lee s forces are massed on the op 
posite shore of the river, and as we came up our ears 
were greeted with the pleasing sound of rapid musketry 
firing proceeding from the pickets of the two armies. 
During the afternoon we witnessed the execution of two 
deserters from the Seventy-eighth New York. 

During the last of September we learned of the defeat 
of the Western army at Chickamauga, and the Twelfth 
corps was at once transferred to the Department of the 
West, and without delay proceeded by rail to Washing- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 79 

ton, and thence via Wheeling, Columbus, Indianapolis, 
Nashville, to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where we arrived 
October 5th. 

After a few days rest the regiment again resume the 
march, passing Duck river, Bell Buckle, and Wartrace, 
when the Seventh Ohio halted, while the Twenty-ninth 
moved on to Normandy, on the Nashville & Chattanooga 
railroad. Here it remained in camp, with the usual 
routine of camp and picket duty until late in October, 
when the regiment and brigade broke camp, took the 
cars for Bridgeport, Alabama, where it arrived on the 
^yth, disembarked, and camped for the night. On the 
morning of October 28th the Twenty-ninth regiment 
crossed the Tennessee river with the wagon train. Halt 
ing at Shellmound for dinner, marched until late in the 
evening, and halted near White Sides, where all camped 
for the night. About 1 1 o clock p. M. artillery firing, 
with heavy volleys of musketry, was heard in the direc 
tion of Chattanooga, continuing two or three hours. 



8o TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XL 

Murfreesboro General Greene The Mule Brigade Congratulatory. 

While at Murfreesboro scouts reported that Wheeler s 
cavalry was in the vicinity, and the Second division 
(Geary s) was pushed forward to meet it, the First divis 
ion remaining to guard the post and railway communica 
tion. Geary moved forward in the direction of Bridge 
port, encountering Wheeler s force near the line of the 
railway. A brief but sharp skirmish ensued, which re 
sulted in the repulse and hasty retreat of the rebels. We 
then advanced without delay to Bridgeport. October 
2yth the Second division, Geary commanding, with 
Creighton and Greene in command of the First and 
Second brigades, crossed the Tennessee, the object to 
open communication on the south side of the river by 
way of Wauhatchie valley and Lookout mountain for the 
relief of General Thomas at Chattanooga. 

Brigadier-general Greene, with three regiments of 
infantry and four pieces of Knapp s battery, numbering 
about fifteen hundred men, with a wagon train of provis 
ions) was sent to the relief of the famishing army at 
Chattanooga, the balance of our command following as 
fast as practicable with the immense supply train in 
charge. After we had encamped for the night the signal 
corps of General Greene informed us that his command 
had encamped at Wauhatchie, within six miles of Chat 
tanooga. The knoll occupied by them derived its name 
from an Indian battle fought there years before. It is 
situated in the valley not far from the base of Lookout 
mountain. Knapp s guns were placed in position facing 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 8 1 

Lookout, and pickets stationed perhaps fifty yards to the 
front. 

About midnight General Hood s division came down 
from the heights of Lookout and quietly surrounded 
General Greene s small force, and at once commenced 
an attack. Greene s men, aroused from their slumber, 
hastily formed line under a most deadly fire from all 
sides, and one of the most desperate struggles on record 
ensued. We were awakened by the sound of the distant 
combat, and forming into line hastily advanced to their 
rescue. When we arrived Hood s rebels had been 
routed and were flying in all directions, intent only on 
reaching their mountain stronghold. There was a regu 
lar stampede of the mules, which had broken loose and 
were braying furiously. This, with loud shouts from our 
men, must have induced a belief in the valorous rebel 
horde that a large force of cavalry was charging down 
upon them, and their fears and flight was indeed a grand 
burlesque finale to a terrible tragedy. 

General Greene had lost one-third of his force, killed 
and wounded, his ammunition was exhausted, and order 
ing the mules cut loose, he made a desperate bayonet 
charge to cut his way to freedom. The mules providen 
tially moved in the same direction, mingling the thunder 
of their tread and their awful voices with the shouts of 
Greene s men, and our own, to let them know that assist 
ance was coming. The effect was to throw Hood s rebel 
army into a wild panic and put them to rout. Three 
hundred prisoners and about one thonsand stand of 
arms were captured. Every man of Knapp s battery, 
save one only, was either killed or wounded. Among 
the former was Lieutenant Geary, son of General John 
W. Geary. The ground was covered with the dead and 
injured of both the blue and the gray. 

6 



82 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

While assisting the wounded and burying the dead, 
Generals Grant, Hooker, and Thomas, with their re 
spective staffs, arrived from Chattanooga. The former 
coolly remarked as he surveyed the bloody scene : 
"Well, boys, you must have had a hot time of it, judg 
ing from appearances." There was silence among the 
men, who knew that an army was cosily reposing but 
four miles away, which could easily have averted the 
terrible bloodshed, but were so completely disheartened 
by the defeat at Chickamauga that they dare not venture 
from their stronghold to the relief of gallant "Corporal" 
Greene, who happily turned defeat into a heroic victory. * 

The following lines, composed by one of our com 
mand, fully relates the grand finale and 

CHARGE OF THE MULE BRIGADE. 
Half a mile, half a mile, 
Half a mile onward, 
Right towards the Georgia troops 

Broke the two hundred. 
"Forward the Mule Brigade, 

Charge for the rebs ! " they neighed; 
Straight for the Georgia troops 
Broke the two hundred. 

"Forward the Mule Brigade!" 
Was there a mule dismayed? 
Not when the long ears felt 

All their ropes sundered. 
Theirs not to make reply; 
Theirs not to reason why; 
Theirs but to make them fly; 
On to the Georgia troops 

Broke the two hundred. 

Mules to the right of them, 
Mules to the left of them, 
Mules behind them 

Pawed, neighed, and thundered. 
Breaking their own confines, 
Breaking through Longstreet s lines, 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 83 

Into the Georgia troops 

Stormed the two hundred. 
Wild all their eyes did glare, 
Whisked all their tails in air, 
Scatt ring the chivalry there, 

While all the world wondered. 
Not a mule s back bestraddled, 
Yet how they all skedaddled; 
Fled every Georgian 
Unsabred, unsaddled, 
Scattered and sundered. 
How they were routed there 

By the two hundred. 
Mules to the right of them, 
Mules to the left of them. 
Mules behind them 

Pawed, neighed, and thundered; 
Followed by hoof and head 
Full many a hero fled, 
Fain in the last ditch dead; 
Back from an "ass s jaw," 
All that was left of them 

Left by the two hundred. 
When can their glory fade? 
Oh! the wild charge they made! 

All the world wondered. 
Honor the charge they made, 
Honor the Mule Brigade 

Long-eared two hundred. 

Major-general George H. Thomas issued an order 
complimenting the column under Major-general Hooker, 
which took possession of the line from Bridgeport to the 
foot of Lookout Mountain, for their brilliant success in 
driving the enemy from every position which they at 
tacked. The repulse by General Geary s command of 
the greatly superior numbers who attempted to surprise 
him, will rank among the most distinguished feats of 
arms of the war. 

We moved forward the next evening, and threw up a 
line of works on the site of this night attack. 



84 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XII. 

Lookout Mountain The Battle The Regiment Re-enlist. 

The line of General Geary s division now extends 
along the foot of Lookout mountain, parallel with the 
rebel line, and only separated from it by the creek along 
its base. For nearly ten days the commissary stores in 
tended for us have been largely forwarded to Chat-* 
tanooga, leaving us with scarcely anything to eat. When 
on the skirmish line we often sent our reserves around 
to the right of the mountain to secure corn from a field 
in that location, held by the rebels, and quite lively little 
fights would result. Our boys always returned with 
corn, however, which we parched to allay in part the 
bitter pangs of hunger. As with everything earthly our 
long fast ended, rations came, and life began to seem 
almost worth living, exchanges of coffee and tobacco 
were almost hourly made between the Union and rebel 
soldiers, each forgetting for the time the hate engendered 
over the fight for corn. Our main line was being strongly 
fortified, the rebels meanwhile keeping up an almost 
continuous bombardmennt of our line from their bat 
teries on the heights of Lookout. Strong details were 
employed in cutting away the forest on our front to en 
able our artillery to cover an hourly expected attack. 
The situation remained the same until November 23d, 
when, toward night, the beat of the "long roll" called 
Geary s division to arms. It at once moved promptly 
forward, formed line of battle, facing Lookout heights, 
and advanced to its base along the creek. Osterhaus 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 85 

division of the Fifteenth corps, and Whittaker s brigade, 
of the Fourth corps, now advanced to the left of Geary s 
division. The rebels soon discovered this movement 
and promptly moved a strong force down the mountain 
side within easy musket range, where they strongly 
fortified during the night. 

The morning of November 24th opened out a simul 
taneous discharge of our entire artillery, which was 
parked along the mountain s point, the infantry on our 
left advancing to the base of the mountain. The First 
brigade, led by Colonel Creighton, and followed by the 
Second and Third brigades, moved rapidly up the creek 
to the right under cover of the woods, then debouching 
to the left. The First brigade took the advance and be 
gan the ascent of Lookout heights, being favored by a 
friendly ravine extending toward the crest of the moun 
tain. The brigade had advanced perhaps two-thirds of 
the distance before the enemy discovered its movements, 
and now the men renew their efforts, driving the enemy 
before them despite the terrible fire poured into our ad 
vance, and after a desperate struggle reach the rocky 
crest and disappear in a thick mist (referred to by most 
writers, we believe, as clouds, and which gave this en 
gagement the title of the "battle above the clouds"). 
The line of the whole division is extended, and in a 
moment sweeps down in an impetuous charge on both 
the rebel flank and rear. Their batteries are reached, 
the cannoniers beaten back, and the guns captured. On 
ward, upward, with loud cheers our columns rush to vic 
tory, carrying everything before them. A whole brigade 
is captured, and Lookout mountain, since famous in 
song and story, is ours. This victory was won by 
Geary s men, assisted only by Whittaker s brigade acting 
as support. The troops below now came gallantly(P) up 



86 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

the mountain to claim, as usual, the honors won, as the 
voluminous reports subsequently written by their gener 
als amply attest. Geary and his brigade commanders 
had no reports to make save that their division stormed" 
the heights and carried them, capturing the enemy s 
artillery and the entire rebel force occupying the main 
defenses of the mountain. Some time after the capture 
the standard of the "white star" division was planted on 
the crest and the stars and stripes was soon waving be 
side it. No danger was incurred by this, as hone of the 
enemy remained except the prisoners, yet it has been 
written and rewritten as if it were an event of some im 
portance. 

"The morning of November 25th revealed the white 
star standard of Geary and the glorious old stars and 
stripes to the army below, floating triumphantly side by 
side on Lookout s rocky crest. Prolonged huzzas 
greeted the victors from below, and to confirm that to 
the victors belong the spoils, a detachment from two 
regiments of Geary s command take charge of the pris 
oners, seven stand of colors, and a great number of can 
non captured." 

The rebels had burned the bridge across Lookout 
creek, which delayed our further advance a short time. 
A bridge was soon improvised, however, and a crossing 
was effected. The command moved on to Rossville, 
where it engaged Braggs left, while General Thomas, ad 
vancing from Chattanooga valley, moved up Missionary 
ridge, striking Bragg a crushing blow in the center, and 
Pap Sherman was making it warm for his right flank. 
About 2 o clock P. M. the firing became general along the 
entire line, which continued until late in the afternoon, 
when the rebels were driven from the field with great 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 87 

loss. The Union army advanced a short distance and 
bivouacked for the night. 

November 26, we moved on after the retreating army, 
and at a small creek near Greysville, Georgia, had a 
skirmish, driving the enemy as far as Ringgold and Tay 
lor s ridge, where they were in position behind breastwork 
in the narrow pass extending through the ridge in the 
direction of Dalton. 

27th. . Geary s division made a gallant charge upon the 
rebel works. The First brigade, commanded by Colonel 
William R. Creighton, made a direct assault on Taylor s 
ridge, while the Second and Third brigades engaged the 
rebels in the narrow defile. After a terrible struggle the 
Nationals were forced back a short distance. A battery 
was moved forward and placed in position, which opened 
with double shotted guns upon the enemy, soon driving 
them precipitately to the rear, leaving the Nationals in 
possession of the field. In this engagement the Union 
loss was quite heavy. 

On the 28th ihe army moved back, Geary s division 
reaching Wauhatchie valley on the 29th. Resting a few 
days, when the Twenty-ninth Ohio regiment broke camp 
and on December 3d moved across Lookout creek, 
marched about two miles west of Summerville, on Look 
out mountain, where it camped for the night. Returned 
to its old camp at Wauhatchie, Tennessee, on the 
5th day of December, and the campaign of 1863 ended. 

At Wauhatchie, on the zoth day of December, 1863, 
the Twenty-ninth Ohio, though now reduced to less 
than three hundred effective men for duty, almost to a 
man re-enlisted for three years more, should the war so 
long continue, and were given a thirty-days furlough 
home for the purpose of recruiting. The headquarters 
of the regiment was established at Cleveland, Ohio. 



88 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

It remained here some two months. At last the deci 
mated ranks were filled and, on the morning of February 
8, 1864, the regiment bade a second good bye to friends, 
and amidst their prayers for success and a safe return 
departed for the front, determined to die for the flag if 
necessary, and, after a tedious ride of many weary miles 
arrived at Bridgeport, Alabama, via Louisville, Nashville, 
and Murfreesboro, where it went into winter quarters and 
remained until the opening of the spring campaign of 
1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 89 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Shelmound Wauhatchie Valley Ringgold Battle of Dug or Mill 
Creek Gap or Buzzard s Roost On the Move. 

On the morning of May 3, 1864, at 10 o clock, we 
broke camp, crossed the Tennessee river, and moved 
eastward along its south bank to Shelmound, where we 
encamped for the night. On the following day the march 
was resumed, the column halting for dinner in Wauhat 
chie valley. Crossing Lookout Creek and mountain, 
we encamped for the night on its east side and two miles 
distant from Chattanooga. The column resumed its 
line of march at 7 A. M., on the 5th. Moving cautiously 
during the day, in the advance, it halted for the night a 
short distance west of Ringgold, Georgia. At daybreak 
on the following morning we moved forward, and about 
9. o clock formed line of battle, remaining here during 
the day and subsequent night. The beat of the u long 
roll" on the following morning called us to arms, and we 
immediately advanced in line of battle. When near 
Gordon s Springs General Kilpatrick passed to our right 
with his command. Our column came to a halt for the 
night near Tunnel hill. 

At about ii A. M., on May 8th, we pushed forward in 
order of columns right in front, and at 3 o clock arrived 
in front of John s Mountain at Rocky Face Ridge, on 
the summit of which the enemy were entrenched in force. 
The Twenty-ninth Ohio regiment and Twenty-eighth 
Pennsylvania of the First brigade, Colonel Candy com 
manding/with three regiments of Buschbeck s Second 
brigade, formed in line, the latter on the right, and in this 



90 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

order at once moved forward to storm the ridge. The- 
position of the Twenty-ninth regiment in the assaulting 
column was on the extreme left, the Twenty-eighth 
Pennsylvania next on its right, connecting with the 
Second brigade. Our instructions were to make a strong 
demonstration, and to carry, if possible, the rebel posi 
tion. While advancing to the assault, the brass bands in 
cur rear indiscreetly commenced playing National airs, 
which attracted the attention of the rebel commander,, 
who rapidly concentrated reinforcements in our front. 
The advance up the declivity was nearly as difficult as 
Lookout Mountain, and more completely fortified. Its* 
summit was steep, precipitous, and covered with scraggy 
rocks and immense boulders. From our position we 
commanded a fine view of Dug Gap, a narrow, artificial 
cut through the rocky summit, connecting with a road 
extending almost parallel with the ridge to the gap 
beyond, and by a zigzag course reaching the mountain s 
base. The rebels had so completely fortified themselves 
that it was next to impossible for our assaulting force t& 
get nearer than their base. As we approached the rebel 
line, a regiment was moved by left flank across our front. 
At this moment the rebel line opened a fire so deadly in 
effect that the regiment in our front became disordered 
and broke through our ranks to the rear, causing a mo 
mentary confusion in the ranks of the Twenty-ninth regi 
ment. At this moment the order was given to advance, 
which was executed with a rush despite the deadly volleys 
that were cutting through our ranks. Up ! up ! we go 
to death or victory ! and commenced to scale the obstruc 
tions close to their works; and now a storm of deadly 
missiles are hurled against us. Rocks, boulders, and 
even cart-wheels come crashing down upon us. Yet we 
moved steadily in the deadly advance until ordered back 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 9 1 

by our officers, when we retired a few paces to reform 
our line, the fallen trees only separating us from the 
enemy. 

Here we made a determined and bloody fight, but 
having no support to cover our flank we were subjected 
to a deadly cross-fire from the left, yet the regiment stub 
bornly stood its ground, returning shot for shot until its 
ammunition was exhausted. More was secured from the 
cartridge-boxes of the dead and wounded, and with this 
we fought on, determined to hold the position until rein 
forcements should reach us. Just before dusk an order 
came from the commanding general for the Twenty- 
ninth regiment to retire, all the other regiments having 
done so some time previous. To cover our retreat a 
line of skirmishers was thrown out, composed of men 
from each company who volunteered for this dangerous 
duty, and right nobly did they perform this work, firing 
with deadly precision as they retired from the field into 
the valley below, where the Twenty-ninth were already in 
bivouac, and comrades cheered lustily as the skirmishers 
came in, happy to know they had not met the fate of 
others. 

John Davis, of company B, a Scotchman by birth and 
one of the best shots in the regiment, fired the last shot 
in this day s action, and was the last to leave the field. 

The Twenty-ninth regiment in this fight distinguished 
itself by brave conduct, though at last compelled to 
retire from lack of support. Our losses in killed and 
wounded was more than double that of any other regi 
ment engaged : Killed, 26; wounded, 67; captured i; 
total 94. 

General Geary highly complimented the regiment for 
its gallantry, remarking that he never saw men advance 
under such murderous fire, especially when unsupported 



92 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

and where the chances of success were so desperate. 
The Twenty-ninth regiment lost nearly one-third its 
numbers during this three hours engagement, and many 
were the individual acts of heroism displayed, which it 
would give the writer pleasure to record. As but few 
are now remembered, the remainder would suffer an in 
justice were these given. It is, however, but simple jus 
tice to state that the regiment fully sustained its previous 
reputation as a fighting organization, each individual 
doing his full share in the terrible work. Subsequent 
events proved that this assault was made to draw the 
enemy to this point, thus giving McPherson s corps and* 
Kilpatrick s cavalry an opportunity to possess Snake 
Creek Gap, a desirable situation several miles in our 
right rear, opening a flank movement directly on the ene 
my s rear. 

On May gih we encamp at Mill Creek, near Johns 
Mountain, where we remain until 12 o clock, midnight. 
We then move to the right and throw up earthworks. 
May zoth we are still at work. We receive the news of 
General Grant s victory over General Lee at the Wilder 
ness, near Chancellorsville, Virginia, where our regiment 
received such a baptism of blood a little more than a 
year since. Alas ! how many of our brave boys have 
gone down to death since then. 

May nth. Still in the same position, hourly expect 
ing orders to move; quartermasters remove all extra bag 
gage to the rear; all men unable for active service sent to 
hospital, and everything possible put into perfect fighting 
order, and by the way it s ever so much nicer penning 
these lines here in our cosy room in the far away Western 
Reserve of the Buckeye State than was the actual ex 
perience in Secessia during those early May days of 
1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 93 

On the 1 2th instant we moved forward to Snake 
Creek Gap, forming a junction with the Fifteenth and 
Sixteenth corps (McPherson s), where we remained dur 
ing the night. At 2 o clock P. M. on the following day 
we advanced toward Resaca, fully occupying Snake 
Creek Gap. Our cavalry are sharply engaged with the 
enemy. Here brave General Kilpatrick is wounded. At 
4 o clock P. M. the battle is still raging fiercely, and the 
enemy are being slowly driven back. At last a hill is 
captured which covers the entire rebel line. Here we 
fortify and rest for the night. 

May i4th a severe engagement opens near Resaca; 
we advance by a circuitous route to the left; the Four 
teenth corps is engaged; during the afternoon we 
joined our Twentieth corps and moving rapidly to the 
left; succeeded in rescuing a portion of the Fourth corps 
from disaster and defeat, and one of its batteries from 
certain capture, the infantry support having been driven 
back, leaving the battery at the mercy of the rebels. 
Robinson s brigade, of Williams division, Twentieth 
corps, who were in the advance, fortunately reached the 
scene of action in time to prevent the capture of an 
other battery by making a counter-charge on the advanc 
ing rebel legions. We came up soon after this support, 
which soon ended in the complete repulse of the rebels, 
driving them beyond their fortifications. The Twentieth 
army corps received the compliments of the command 
ing general, Hooker, for their gallant work, which re 
sulted in a loss to the enemy of some four hundred men 
killed and wounded. 



94 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Battle of Resaca, Georgia In Pursuit of the Fleeing Chivalry (?) 

At an early hour on the morning of May i5th sharp 
skirmishing opened along our entire front. General 
Geary s Second division moved a short distance to the 
left and halted for orders. About 1 1 o clock Generals 
Sherman, Hooker, and Thomas, with their respective 
staffs, reached the battlefield and immediately held a 
council of war. General Hooker is requested to assume 
command of selected troops to take the offensive, and 
is asked how large a force he required to capture a cer 
tain fort directly in our front, known to be the enemy s 
stronghold and the key to his position. Hooker aston 
ished his superiors by replying : " Geary s division can, 
I think, carry that position if it can be done by anyone." 
As this conversation was heard by our men we were pre 
pared for what was to follow. 

As soon as General Geary had received his instruc 
tions, the Second division moved to the attack in the 
following orders : Second and Third brigades in the 
advance, with the First brigade closely massed in their 
rear, the latter advancing closely in support of the attack 
ing column. Our advance was met with obstinate resist 
ance, yet we steadily pushed forward, driving the enemy 
back and gaining possession of three lines of hills in 
rapid succession, the last of which was in close proximity 
to the rebel fort, only a narrow ravine intervening. The 
enemy are strongly entrenched in earthworks extending 
in the rear of the fort. The First brigade commenced 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. . 95 

a rapid firing at short range to cover the sortie being 
made by regiments of the Second and Third brigades. 
These regiments rush gallantly forward to the assault. 
They are repulsed but quickly reform, and, with other 
regiments sent to their support, they again pass forward. 
The fort was captured and lost three times in succession, 
but at last the rebels are forced to flee before our furious 
charge. Leaving the guns they join the main line. 

The Union forces prevented the rebels from again 
-occupying the fort until dark, when detachments from 
the Twenty-ninth and other Ohio regiments of the First 
brigade were sent to open a trench through the earth 
works of the fort through which to move the guns into 
the ravine below. The rebels discovering this charged 
down upon us to recapture the guns. Expecting such 
an attack the First brigade had moved forward into the 
ravine, and now waited the coming of the rebels. When 
close upon them a signal was given, which was followed 
by a sheet of flame along our whole line, dealing terri 
ble destruction into the rebel ranks, immediately fol 
lowed by a determined bayonet charge, which threw their 
lines into disorder and they fled panic-stricken over 
their fortifications, closely pursued by our command, 
whose loud huzzas sent Johnston s army in rapid retreat, 
abandoned all its cannon, hospital, and commissary 
stores, and with their usual savagery leaving their own 
dead and wounded upon the field. We also captured 
many prisoners. 

This success was a grand victory for the "white star" 
division of the Twentieth corps, yet not unattended with 
losses, which were, however, light in comparison with 
those of the enemy. In fact, in the night attack we 
had so thoroughly surprised the enemy that but feeble 
resistance was made. 



g6 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

At an early hour on the morning of May i6th we 
pushed rapidly forward in pursuit of the retreating rebels. 
At 9 o clock A. M. we came into line on the bank of the 
Coosa river, near the railroad bridge, which our cavalry 
had prevented the rebels from burning, though they had 
made repeated efforts to do so. The enemy s flight was 
so rapid that he had not even time to seriously impair 
the railroad track. Our locomotives, with trains of sur- 
plies, soon came in sight. We now advanced across the 
river and encamped for the night. 

At 12 M. on May lyth, the general forward move 
ment of our army was resumed. The Twenty-nintn* 
regiment was the advance guard of its division, and 
assisted in driving the rebels from the little village of 
Calhoun, where we halt for the night. At 5 o clock on 
the following morning we again moved forward in the 
direction of Rome, Georgia. At Rome cross-roads the 
rebels were met and promptly engaged by the Fourth 
corps; a lively fight ensued, resulting in slight losses on 
both sides. The enemy retreated, and we continued the 
pursuit until 9 o clock p. M., when we encamped for the 
night. 

On the next morning at early dawn we pushed for 
ward, continuing until 3 o clock p. M., when we halt and 
form line near Kingston, Georgia. The whole force of 
the enemy are immediately on our front, and the Fourth 
corps promptly open fire upon them, which resulted in a 
further movement of the chivalry to the rear. 

We remain here until the morning of May 23d when 
we move about daylight via Cassville and Cass station to 
the Etowah river, which is crossed on pontoons, and a 
halt for the night made on its opposite bank. The next 
morning we resume the weary march, coming into 
line of battle at about 9 A. M. We advanced in this 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 97 

order up the Raccoon hills, or Alatoona range, until 
night, when we encamp at Burnt Hickory. The First 
brigade, as advance guard, moved ahead at daybreak, 
via the Burnt Hickory road. 



TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XV. 

Pumpkin Vine Creek Dallas, or New Hope Church Slight Unpleas 
antness Personal. 

At Pumpkin Vine creek we discover the enemy and 
drive back his skirmishers, who are stationed on its op 
posite bank, recovering the bridge, which we cross and 
throw out skirmishers on the opposite side. While this 
was being accomplished, General Hooker and Staff, with* 
a small body guard, pushed ahead to reconnoiter. He 
had not advanced far, however, when he was attacked by 
a force of rebel sharp shooters. He now came tearing 
back into our lines shouting to General Geary to move 
his First brigade into position to hold the enemy in 
check nntil the Second and Third brigades should come 
up, they being some four miles in our rear. We quickly 
formed line by columns to the right and left, the Twen 
ty-ninth Ohio occupying position on the extreme left, 
Knapp s battery taking position immediately in our rear, 
to cover the bridge in case we were forced to retire be 
fore reinforcements should reach us. As the left com 
pany of the Twenty-ninth were completing the battle- 
line a rebel column was found marching in close 
proximity to our flank. 

Ten paces to the front the skirmishers were hotly en 
gaged, but our flank was uncovered. We immediately 
face to the left and prepare to fire, but are prevented by 
instructions not to draw on a general engagement but to 
hold the position at all hazards. The rebel column on 
our flank, however, slowly retired without firing a gun, 
.and forming on their main line, which was massed in the 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 99 

woods a short distance to our front. During this time 
we hastily changed front in form of a semi-circle to pro 
tect us from flank attack. This movement was executed 
none too soon, as the enemy came immediately to the 
attack, and a sharp engagement opened all along the 
line, which was a hot one, yet it gallantly held its own 
until the balance of its division came up. Forming in 
bolumn with us, we advance on the rebel line and drive 
them slowly back. 

The battle now became fierce and our assaults were 
heroically met. Generals Hooker and Geary were present 
and ordered the attack, the plan of which was to advance 
lines and fire, to be followed by bayonet charges, by 
which the enemy was steadily driven back. Our front 
line was frequently relieved by columns from the rear, 
thus keeping fresh men at the front. Geary s division 
alone had driven Hood s rebel corps back to the forks of 
the road at New Hope church, when Butterfield s Third 
division arrived and took position on our left. Soon 
after, Williams came up with the First division and 
passed to the front, which allowed the Second division 
to drop in the reserve long enough to clean our firearms 
and replenish cartridge-boxes, when we again advance in 
support of the First and Third divisions. 

Just as the sun disappeared in the western horizon, 
General Geary ordered the First brigade to charge the 
enemy. This movement was executed on the double- 
quick, and as our columns passed in perfect alignment 
to the front, Butterfield s and \Villiams commands 
greeted us with hearty cheers of genuine admiration. 
Onward the column rushes, and closing with the enemy 
delivers a terrible volley. The charge is continued, the 
air resounding with defiant cheers as the enemy is driven 
from the field and down a hill at a brisk run. It was 



100 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

now beginning to grow dark, and the impetuous rush of 
the men soon brought them within a short distance of a 
line of brush-covered work which concealed the enemy s 
batteries, who at once opened a terrific and deadly fire of 
grape and canister into our ranks. Instantly falling on 
the ground, we deliver so destructive a fire on their 
cannoniers that their guns are soon silenced. Our left 
being without support, an attempt to carry their works 
was extremely hazardous. The regiment on our right 
had already retired some distance to our right rear, mak 
ing the situation of the Twenty-ninth regiment one of 
great danger, but owing to the darkness we knew nothing, 
of it until an officer of Geary s staff came forward with 
an order to fall back, when we retired to a position some 
forty paces from the rebel line. 

The enemy had now ceased firing, and perfect silence 
reigned, only broken by the groans of the wounded and 
dying. The Twenty-ninth regiment had suffered severe 
loss, and only the favorable depression in its front saved 
it from annihilation. W. F. Stevens, captain of com 
pany B, was wounded in this action. 

The Fifth Ohio, on our right on higher ground, suffered 
fearfully from the masked batteries, one company being 
almost entirely decimated. This caused the regiment to 
retire to the knoll. Colonel Patrick, a most gallant 
officer of the Fifth, was killed, also seventy-five of his 
men killed and wounded. The loss of the Twenty-ninth 
Ohio in this charge was forty killed and wounded, shot 
down in almost the short space of time required to 
record it. 

It was not long before we heard tremendous cheering 
in the distance on our right front, which was caused by 
Sherman moving a force in that direction, turning the 
rebel flank, which was soon in full retreat. Immediately 



VETERAN VOhUNTEElls. 



after, sounds were heard in the supposed deserted rebel 
works, which we believed were our own men who had 
recently occupied them, and by reason of this supposed 
safety our whole command was soon in slumber deep 
and heavy from exhaustion of the day s labor. 

At early dawn on May 26th the enemy discovered our 
close proximity, and at once opened upon us with artil 
lery, and at about the same time advanced its infantry 
to attack us in our rear. This movement was dis 
covered, however, in time to prevent its further progress. 
After a hot fight the enemy retired to his fortifications. 
During the day several attempts were made in the same 
direction, but without effect. Near the close of the day 
we were temporarily relieved and retired to a ravine a 
few yards in our rear, where we received rations, the first 
"square meal" in two days. 

At an early hour the following morning (May 2yth) 
our artillery took position at the breastworks and opened 
a furious cannonading, which is replied to with spirit by 
the rebel batteries. During the afternoon the enemy 
made a sortie on our line, a general engagement ensued, 
and the rebels were beaten back. The Twenty-ninth 
regiment loss was slight, we being well protected by rifle 
pits. The rebel loss in this attack was severe, their dead 
and wounded being thickly strewn in front of our works. 
During this attack General Sherman and staff took posi 
tion in our rear. General Hooker is generally where the 
bullets fly thickest, and his utter disregard of danger has 
won the love of the " boys," who call him " Uncle Joe," 
and who are all, at any time, ready to go through fire if 
he so desires, knowing he will not ask them to go where 
he fears to lead. 

The battle continues throughout the following day, 
with brisk infantry firing and heavy cannonading almost 



102 TWENT\ -NINTH OHIO 

incessantly. As night again shrouds the bloody field the 
Twenty-ninth regiment, with the exception of company 
B, which was on the skirmish line, relieved the Seventh 
Ohio, One Hundred and Ninth, and One Hundred and 
Forty-seventh Pennsylvania. The rebels were unusually 
quiet during the night. Company B remained on the 
skirmish nearly all of the following day and was kept 
hotly engaged. The company s position was not more 
.than eight rods from the rebel outposts, who made it ex 
tremely hot for us as we went back and forth to the relief 
of our comrades, and sometimes unsoldierly attitudes 
were assumed to evade their deadly aim. Late in the 
day company B was relieved. Henry Brainard, Spencer 
Atkin, and Henry Clark volunteered to go out and bring 
in the bodies of Albert Atkin, C. A. Davis, and Jerome 
Phinney, which they did, the enemy opening fire upon 
them with musketry and artillery, the deadly missiles fly 
ing thick and fast about them. Such was the treatment 
of the " chivalry " to men bravely exposing themselves 
to give Christian interment to the gallant men who had 
fought their last battle. However, none were injured. 
While pertorming the last sad rites of burial, the rebels 
came out in a sortie and made furious assaults along our 
entire line. Our men reserved their fire until the enemy 
were close upon them, when, at a given signal, some 
twenty cannon, double shotted with grape, opened fire, 
which made the earth tremble with their awful thunder, 
while the infantry sent deadly volleys into their ranks. 
The result of this fire was most terrible slaughter to the 
enemy, who broke and ran anywhere to cover, leaving 
several hundred dead and dying behind, the ground 
between the two lines being literally covered with the 
rebel dead. During the 3oth there were several sharp 
fights, our regiment having several men wounded. May 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 103 

3ist the regiment was under fire, as usual, the greater 
part of the day, and at night was engaged in the con 
struction of an advanced line of works, under a heavy 
fire from the entire rebel line. Before they were fully 
completed the rebels commenced an attack and we fell 
back on the main line. General Geary being present, 
exclaimed, "Get back to your command in readiness for 
an engagement." One ensued, which resulted in driv 
ing the enemy back with severe loss to them. We now 
resumed work and finally succeeded in completing the 
line, though continually annoyed by the enemy s firing. 
On the morning of June ist the regiment resumed its 
place on the front line and was soon furiously engaged, 
which continued during the fore part of the day. At 
noon the Twentieth corps was relieved by Logan s Fif 
teenth corps and moved to the left as support to the 
Fourth corps (General Howard). The following morn 
ing we moved towards the left and at 1 1 o clock A. M. 
formed line and pushed forward in concert with Scho- 
field s Twenty-third corps. We capture two lines of 
rebel works, the enemy falling back. That night we 
slept on our arms. At dawn on the 3d we advanced 
and were soon engaged with the enemy, the skirmishing 
along our whole line being very strong. During the day 
Sherman succeeded in turning the rebel right, causing 
him to retire with severe loss. Twenty-ninth loss : 
Killed, six; -wounded, twenty-four; captured, one; total 
thirty-one. This is the tenth day we have been under 
fire. 4th. Firing during all of last night. All quiet 
to-day. 



104 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Advance to Pine Knob Battle at that Place A Forward Movement. 

At 5 o clock on the morning of June 6th, the army 
pushed forward after the retreating enemy. When about 
two miles from Ackworth Station he makes a stand, and 
we wheel into line, the Twenty-ninth acting as skirmish- 
ers while the other troops were engaged in preparing 
rifle-pits. The Fourteenth corps now came up, forming 
on our left, and General Howard s Fourth corps on our 
right. The position remained the same until June loth, 
when the Twenty-ninth Ohio is sent forward on a recon- 
noissance. A large force of rebels are found to be 
strongly entrenched on Pine mountain. At dark the 
regiment returned to the main line, where the situation 
remains unchanged until June i4th, when our entire 
force move forward. The Twentieth, with the Fourth 
corps on its left, take position immediately in front of 
the rebel army, on Pine mountain. At evening the 
Twenty-ninth was again advanced to the skirmish line, 
and was engaged, as was our artillery, throughout the 
greater part of the night. On the following day, June 
i5th, occurs the battle of Pine Knob, Georgia. 

At early dawn our regiment pushed forward as the 
advance of a general flank movement on Pine mountain, 
which resulted in its capture without severe fighting. 
The Twentieth corps was changed from the front to the 
right. Moving rapidly in that direction it soon reached 
another strongly entrenched position of the enemy, 
when the column made a left half wheel, which brought 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 105 

the first brigade of Geary s division directly in front of 
Pine Knob. 

This position of the enemy was found to be strongly 
fortified. Twenty embrazures, from which as many can 
non bristled, covered all the approaches to it. General 
Hooker ordered General Geary to send two regiments in 
a sortie against the rebel position, and the Twenty-ninth 
Ohio and Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiments, the 
latter on our left, were at once forwarded to the assault. 
General Hooker, mounted on his famous gray charger, 
advanced with us, immediately in rear of our line. The 
general s presence greatly encouraged the men in this 
desperate undertaking. 

On the hill were the twenty cannon, which we knew 
would soon belch forth destruction to our ranks. The 
two regiments silently but rapidly cross a ravine where 
they encounter two rebel regiments. These proved to 
be the First and Twenty-ninth Georgia. We opened 
fire briskly and charging upon them soon drove them in 
disorder to the rear. 

We pursued them so hotly that our standard-bearer 
was at one time within a few paces of the rebel Twenty- 
ninth Georgia colors, which we were making desperate 
efforts to capture. The rebel color-bearer was shot, 
but their flag was grasped again by another rebel who 
escaped with it into their fortification. But the regiment 
to which he belonged was nearly annihilated before it 
succeeded in regaining its main line. Our regiment had 
rushed upon them forcing them back step by step until 
they were under cover, and we had succeeded in killing, 
wounding, and taking prisoners all except the little hand 
ful who escaped with the flag. At the moment of their 
escape we made a dash to carry their fortifications, but 
were checked by abattis and a deep trench hidden by 



IO6 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

brush. At this point their artillery opened with mur 
derous discharges of grape and canister, which produced 
terrible destruction in our ranks. Still the line stands 
firm. Another instant and our men are laying flat upon 
the ground and the deadly missies go hissing harmlessly 
through the air over our heads. We now open a fire 
upon their cannoniers, so deadly in its character that the 
guns are soon silenced. 

Night was fast coming on when our line was ordered 
to fall back to a more secure position. The men now 
engage in the erection of earthworks within a few rods o/ 
the rebel fort on -the knob, which placed the Twenty- 
ninth Ohio in the extreme front, our flanking regiments 
assuming a circular position on our right and left rear. 
We were under fire all night, the rebel infantry and artil 
lery keeping up an almost continuous rattle in their 
endeavors to drive our men from their labors on the for 
tifications. Despite this, however, we held our position, 
though suffering a constant loss in our ranks. 

Just at daybreak on the i6th instant the Sixty-sixth 
Ohio, of our brigade from the reserve, relieved us ; we, 
however, left them well protected by the strong earth 
works constructed during the night. 

The Twenty-ninth Ohio regiment went into this 
action with two hundred members, of whom thirty-nine 
were killed and wounded. Among the killed was First 
Sergeant Joel E. Tanner, one of our bravest men. Soon 
after his death his commission reached us promoting 
him to a captaincy for bravery in action. God help that 
little wife of his in her far away northern home to bear 
his death bravely as the wife of a soldier should, even 
though all her hopes and bright anticipations seem shat 
tered by the blow. Generals Joe Hooker and Geary 
announced in warm terms their admiration of the " gal- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 07 

lant manner in which the Twenty-ninth Ohio and Twenty- 
eighth Pennsylvania regiments conducted themselves in 
the assault on Pine Knob." The former remarked that 
taking into consideration the deadly fire we were exposed 
to, we had accomplished that which he never saw so 
small a force attempt before. As he was present in the 
assault his opinion is of value. 

Sharp skirmishing and artillery firing continued along 
the line during the day. At night the Twenty-ninth 
regiment moved to the front, relieving the Sixty-sixth 
Ohio regiment. It was nearly morning when we dis 
covered that the enemy were withdrawing their artillery. 
We at once advanced and possessed the rebel fortifica 
tions on the hill with little trouble, as the artillery had 
already withdrawn and the infantry were rapidly follow 
ing. After daylight we pushed forward, only to find the 
enemy in another strong position, which we at once at 
tacked. A rambling fire was kept up during the entire 
day. 

During the following day (June i8th) the same state 
of affairs continued, the firing extending along our entire 
front. At an early hour next morning the enemy re 
treated, and we moved in pursuit, the Twenty-ninth 
Ohio regiment, as usual, in the advance as skirmishers. 
Why, I believe the "boys" would have rebelled had they 
not been put on the skirmish line whenever there was a 
prospect of somebody being killed on our side. Rapidly 
we gained possession of two lines of hills, and soon 
found the enemy upon a third ridge, strongly fortified. 
A skirmish of two hours duration ensues, and we are 
ordered to fall back to the main line, as support to 
Bundy s Thirteenth New York battery. 

June 2oth the Twenty-ninth regiment and its brigade 
are in line three miles southwest of Marietta, Georgia, 



I08 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

and skirmished all day with the enemy. As night came 
on our division moved to the right, forming on the right 
of Butterfield s Third division. Our regiment was again 
on the skirmish line, and in active engagement during 
the greater part of the night. The next morning we 
formed line of battle near Gulp s farm and to the right 
of Little Kenesaw mountain. At about 1 1 A. M. our 
regiment was withdrawn from the skirmish line, and at 
once began throwing up rifle-pits parallel with works of 
Williams First division on our right and Butterfield s on 
our left. The Third brigade of the Second division naw 
advanced and engaged the enemy, our single line afford 
ing feeble protection in the event of an attack on our 
position. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 09 



CHAPTER XVII. 

Battle of Gulp s Farm or Kenesaw Mountain The Glorious Fourth 
Advance to the Chattahoochie. 

June 22d we move to the front, and occupy a ridge on 
Gulp s farm, which covers the level on our front. We 
had been but a short time in this position when the 
rebel General Hood s corps was moved directly on our 
front, and immediately advanced in furious attack upon 
the divisions of Generals Geary and Williams. Our 
artillery was at once turned upon the advancing rebel 
columns, which, with the terrific volleys our infantry 
poured into their ranks, produced a sudden check to their 
further advance, and in less than one hour these two 
divisions succeeded in beating back and putting to total 
rout Hood s entire command, which suffered great loss, 
while ours was but slight. The enemy left on the field 
2,100 killed, wounded, and prisoners, besides many 
wounded, removed from the field. The estimated rebel 
loss was 3,000 men. Eight hundred of the rebel dead 
were buried on the field. 

At the close of this action a body of our skirmishers 
were deployed over the field, finding the enemy s dead 
and wounded scattered thickly about. In places they 
lay stretched across each other, literally heaped up, 
bloody, terrible dead. Our skirmishers advanced rap 
idly, and were soon engaged with the enemy s rear, but 
this soon ceased, and we established a picket line for the 
night. We remained on the field until noon of the 23d, 
when we were retired and rejoined the main line. 

At about 4 o clock p. M., one hundred guns opened a 



110 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

simultaneous fire on Little Kenesaw mountain. Directly 
in front of our regiment and across the creek, which flows 
along the base of the mountain, is level ground. At 
this point is situated a block-house and rifle-pits, the 
latter between the house and mountain, and both now 
held by rebel sharpshooters, who were continually pick 
ing off our cannoniers. General Geary, evidently con 
templating an advance of his line, called for twenty 
volunteers from the Twenty-ninth regiment to dislodge 
these troublesome occupants of the block-house and 
rifle-pits. In response to this call two men from each 
company came quickly forward, and at once advanced 
across the creek and ravine. The rebels soon discovered 
the detachment; and opened fire upon it. Sergeant 
Griswold, of Company B, in command, rapidly advanced 
his men up the rise of open ground lying between him 
and the enemy, and with a rush amidst a perfect storm 
of bullets, closed on the rifle-pits, capturing all who 
remained in them. 

We now approach the rear of the block-house and 
demand its surrender. The rebel lieutenant in com 
mand exclaimed from the window of the house: "You 
d d yanks, take us if you can ! " and immediately 
opened fire. The door of the house is soon battered 
down, and the rebels attempt to cut their way out. 
Finding themselves covered by nearly a score of rifles, 
aimed by determined men, all, with the exception of the 
rebel lieutenant and one other, threw down their arms 
and surrendered. The rebel officer fired on the captors 
and lost his life by his rashness. We had now a total of 
twenty-one prisoners. Several others were killed or 
badly wounded. The former were sent at once to the 
rear, and the little force deployed along the road to hold 
the position until reinforcements should arrive. How- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. Ill 

ever, they were not furnished, and after holding the po 
sition some two hours a heavy body of rebels came 
upon us, stealing along under cover of the bushes on 
the opposite side of the road, suddenly arose and fired 
a volley at us. The speed we made across the level 
field with the rebels in hot pursuit, their bullets whistling 
past our ears in the most energetic manner, would have 
dismayed a professional pedestrian. 

June 24th, skirmishing during the day. As night 
came on a detachment of the Twenty-ninth regiment 
was sent out on picket. Nothing occurred during the 
night, and at dawn we returned to our brigade, where 
orders were received to hold ourselves in readiness to 
move on notice, cannonading and skirmish fighting being 
kept up along the line. 

The situation remained unchanged until June 27th. 
At an early hour this morning two men from each com 
pany of our regiment volunteered to advance to the re 
lief of the Pennsylvania regiment on the outposts, and 
about 9 o clock A. M. we moved forward. We were also 
to dislodge the rebel sharpshooters, who had been allowed 
to again possess the block-house and rifle-pits. Crossing 
the creek and ravine we made a quick dash toward the 
locality mentioned, amid a hot cross-fire from rebels 
along the fence before referred to. But as we close the 
rebels abandon the block-house and rifle-pits, yet dispute 
with the energy of desperation, every inch of our ad 
vance as they retire. We, however, gained possession 
of the road beyond the house, an important position 
covering the rebel left on Little Kenesaw. 

They now opened fire on us from the mountain on 
our left and front. Making a flank movement to the 
left we came up in rear of some rebel rifle-pits, captur 
ing eleven prisoners and holding the position until the 



112 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Fifth Ohio regiment came to our support. That regi 
ment at once began to fortify, while we remained on the 
skirmish line under constant fire. The enemy discov 
ered the work of the Fifth and trained their batteries 
from different directions on our position, and also ad 
vanced infantry, who made repeated attempts to dis 
lodge us. Solid shot and shell came crashing through 
the block-house, the shells bursting amongst us in quick 
succession. Nor were their musketry behind in sending 
their death-dealing missiles upon us. 

Knapp s battery soon came up the hill, and swinging 
into position, unlimbered and opened a rapid cross-fife 
on Little Kenesaw mountain. About this time the 
Fourteenth, with a portion of the Fourth corps, made a 
desperate assault on the mountain a short distance to our 
left. The engagement now became serious, one shell 
killing twelve and another six of our men. To hold the 
position we had captured was an arduous undertaking, 
and so severe was the fighting that those of us who had 
advanced early in the morning had fired nearly two hun 
dred rounds. At dusk the fighting ceased, and we are 
recalled to our command. 

June 28th. This morning at sunrise we advance 
obliquely to the right, and, reaching an advanced position, 
throw up fortifications; rebel batteries open fire on us 
meanwhile. Our lookout, as he sees smoke issue from 
the rebel guns, calls out: " Lay down," "lay low," or 
"look out, she s coming," etc. Many laughable and other 
incidents occurred during this bombardment, such as at 
tempts to dodge shells, etc. Charles Upton, of Company 
G, while carrying a rail, had it cut in two by a shell ; he, 
however, escaped unhurt. 

June 2Qth. To-day the Fourteenth corps obtained a 
temporary truce under flag, during which they interred 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 113 

their dead. An assault is made on this corps during the 
early part of the night, but is repulsed, and we were not 
again disturbed. 

June 3oth. During this afternoon the Twenty-ninth 
regiment received orders to move. About 10 o clock at 
night our corps (the Twentieth) was relieved by the 
Fourteenth. We at once marched several miles to the 
right in relief of the Twenty-third cerps. 

On July ist our regiment was again engaged. The 
fighting ceased only with daylight. Sharp skirmishing 
and severe cannonading continued during the entire day 
of the 2d, and at night the Twenty-ninth regiment occu 
pied its customary position on the skirmish line. This 
time, however, it was accompanied by the Twenty-eighth 
Pennsylvania. Just before daylight on the morning of 
July 3d, the enemy were found to be retreating, and we 
at once moved forward to find the works deserted, the 
troops having evacuated. The position, as supposed, 
was almost impregnable to direct assault, being con 
structed to enfilade an attack of infantry. 

The army now push forward in pursuit of the retreat 
ing rebels, the Twenty-ninth Ohio and Twenty-eighth 
Pennsylvania taking the advance in the order of heavy 
skirmishers. We soon came upon Wheeler s rebel 
cavalry, and engaged his dismounted men so promptly 
that they fell precipitately back to where their horses 
were picketed. The Twenty-ninth succeeded in captur 
ing nearly one hundred of them in their hurried efforts 
to remount. The Second division during the pursuit 
captured nearly nine hundred prisoners. The rebels were 
steadily falling back on the Chattahoochie river. It was 
late when we halted for the night. How sweet the woo 
ing of the drowsy god after such long continued fatigue, 
only those who have been there can imagine, the soft sid*e 

8 



114 TWENTV-NINTH OHIO 

of a rail on such occasions being more luxurious than 
any patent spring contrivance of to-day. 

July 4th. On this day, made glorious to all this good 
ly land by the forefathers of both the blue and gray, was 
celebrated by the issue of full rations of hard-tack, 
s , bacon, and coffee, and wonderful feats of gor 
mandizing ensued. To make the day something of a 
reminder of the Northern anniversary, with its tearing 
headache of the 5th, General "Joe" ordered an issue 
of liquor to the men, the first of the campaign. About 
4 o clock p. M. we broke camp and marched towards the 
left, but soon came to a halt for the night. 

At dawn on the following day we pushed forward and 
took possession of a line of works the rebels had only 
evacuated on our approach. They are now crossing 
Chattahoochie river. The advance is continued until 
within about one and one-half miles of the river, where 
we encounter a second line of rebel works, occupied by 
the enemy to cover the retreat across the river. 

July 6th we occupy the position of yesterday. Dur 
ing the forenoon our regiment was support of Bundy s 
New York battery, engaged in shelling the rebels from a 
fort. About 2 P. M. we returned with the battery to the 
main line, and one hour later moved with our division to 
the left and formed line of battle, in which position we 
passed the night. On the day following we marched to 
the left and assumed position in line between the Four 
teenth and Fifteenth corps. Sharp skirmishing was kept 
up nearly all night. This position is maintained by our 
regiment, with daily skirmishing, until the early dawn of 
July loth, when the Twenty-ninth Ohio is pushed for 
ward on a reconnoissance. We discover that the enemy 
have retreated across the Chattahoochie. On reaching 
the river we deploy as skirmishers along the north bank, 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 115 

the enemy being posted along the opposite side. At 
lanta lies only nine miles to the south of us. The rebel 
army of General Joe E. Johnston is said to be strongly 
intrenched some four miles south of our position. A 
small number only of rebels remain on the opposite bank 
of the Chattahoochie. The Union and rebel pickets 
are on good terms, often meeting in the middle of the 
river, where they exchange coffee for tobacco, which, by 
the way, was a very scarce article with us. The Twenty- 
ninth Ohio regiment now musters only one hundred and 
fifty men for duty. The mustering officer tells us that 
we have lost more men killed and wounded in propor 
tion to the number present at the beginning of this cam 
paign than any regiment in the Western army. 

July 6, we were in support of a battery during the 
forenoon. During the afternoon we moved to the left, 
camping in a beautiful grove of pines. 

7th. Moved forward some three miles, to a ridge 
commanding a fine view of the country. 

nth. The rebels have crossed Chattahoochie river. 
Our pickets are posted on its north bank. 

i yth. Moved forward to the left, crossed the Chatta 
hoochie river at Peace ferry about 9 o clock p. M. 

i8th. Moved forward some two miles, skirmishing 
much of the distance. 

1 9th. Advanced to Peach Tree creek, which we 
crossed, encountering the enemy and taking some 
prisoners. 



Il6 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

Battle of Peach Tree Creek Some of the "boys" go to Anderson- 

ville. 

On the morning of July 2oth, just as old Sol was tint 
ing the east with his rosy hue, our army began a general 
forward movement, the Twentieth corps in this advance 
being on the right centre, the Fourth corps left, resting 
on our right, and Newton s division (Fourth corps) con 
necting with our left. Slight skirmishing ensued early 
in the morning, but towards noon the enemy retired. 
The unbroken stillness which followed caused us to ad 
vance cautiously lest the rebels draw us into an ambush. 
On reaching Peach Tree creek, a narrow, sluggish stream, 
whose abrupt banks, covered with briars and a dense, 
almost impassable undergrowth, would be a fatal barrier 
to a routed army, especially as the stream was without 
bridges, the entire command came to a halt until cross 
ings could be constructed. Previous to the crossing of 
the main line General Geary ordered forward a force in 
reconnoissance, consisting of the Twenty-ninth Ohio, 
Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania, a detachment of the 
Thirty-third New Jersey, and four pieces of Bundy s 
New York battery, Geary himself following and direct 
ing the movement. When once across we advanced 
over several rough sparsely wooded ravines until reach 
ing an eminence overlooking a narrow, open valley 
on our front and left. Immediately on our right 
front was a piece of heavy timber, extending also on 
our rear. The ridge directly in our front was covered 
with a thick undergrowth, affording a fine position for an 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 17 

ambuscade. Our force was now brought to a half 
Bundy s battery was hastily put into position on the ridge 
to cover the valley. The Twenty-ninth Ohio assumed 
position on the right, and the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvanfa 
on the left of the battery. D. E. Hurlburt, captain of 
company K, had charge of a detail from the Twenty- 
ninth and Sixty-sixth Ohio regiments in the skirmish of 
the timber, so he states. 

The detachment of the Thirty-third New Jersey 
deployed as skirmishers across the valley in our front, 
General Geary and staff following closely in its rear. 
While they were advancing, we hastily constructed a 
light barricade of fence rails, and Bundy prepared his 
battery for business. We anxiously watched General 
Geary and the skirmishers as they cautiously moved up 
the ridge. 

When within a few yards of the underbrush a large 
force of rebels "came from cover, and with wild yells 
rushed forward. Captain Bundy at once opened fire 
upon them, which threw them into disorder, but did not 
check their advance. As Geary and staff passed over our 
line his chief, Captain Elliott, fell from his horse, shot 
dead. Geary shouted to us, "A general engagement ! a 
general engagement ! My brave men hold to your po 
sition. I will send support to you." He was answered 
with rousing cheers. When the little remnant of the 
skirmishing force had come in we commenced a rapid 
fire in connection with Captain Bundy s double-shotted 
guns, which speedily thinned the advancing columns of 
rebels, but without avail, as the breaks were at once filled 
with fresh troops. As the rebels attempted to close with 
us our men seemed to be endowed with the valor born 
of desperation, and clubbed them back. Forward they 
came, a dense mass of living fire, and bravely we sus- 



Il8 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

tained the shock of twenty times our number. The 
sharp rattle of musketry, the loud roar of Bundy s guns, 
and the defiant shouts of the combatants, in close hand 
to hand conflict, can never be erased from the tablets of 
memory while life shall last. It was grandly, awfully 
terrible. 

A dense smoke settled around the battery and enclos 
ing the extreme left of the regiment, hid the position of 
our right. Suddenly firing begins on us from our rear. 
The cannoniers are disabled and the infantry are called 
upon to work the guns, which were instantly turned to 
the rear upon heavy masses of rebels advancing from 
the woods on our flank. The greater part of our regi 
ment had discovered this movement in time to change 
front to rear, but were instantly forced back by the over 
whelming numbers of the rebels, and those in charge of 
the battery were instantly surrounded by a powerful mob 
of yelling fiends. Still the double-shotted guns continue 
to belch forth fire and death, cutting great gaps in the 
ranks of the enemy at each discharge. 

At the guns front, with muskets clubbed, a hand to 
hand conflict was had, to allow the reloading of the guns. 
The situation was now most desperate. A cordon of 
the enemy hemmed in the brave band, now reduced to 
but seventy men, whose ammunition was exhausted, and 
at last they were forced to surrender the battery. Henry 
Rood, of company A, and Henry E. Clark, company B, 
are the only names the writer has been able to secure of 
those captured at this time. 

General Geary came up soon after, charged the enemy 
and recovered the battery, which was instantly turned 
upon the rebels, causing great destruction. The prison 
ers were, however, too far in the rear for recapture, and 
they were conveyed to that loathsome earthly hell, Ander- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 19 

sonville. What they endured, the cruelties of the studied 
starvation by express order of chivalric Jeff Davis, and 
the horrible atrocities accorded to defenseless prisoners 
by the Southern opponents in this unholy, ungodly con 
flict, the writer will not attempt to describe ; language 
fails in the recital. Loss : Killed, two; wounded, seven; 
captured, five; total fourteen. 



120 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XIX. 

Siege of Atlanta The Capitulation General Sherman s Report. 

July 2ist, heavy skirmishing on our right. 220!, we 
moved forward in pursuit of the retreating rebels. 23d, 
we are now strongly intrenched, within two miles of 
Atlanta, Georgia ; lively skirmishing much of the time. 
24th, shelling and picket firing to-day ; rebels charged! 
our line but were repulsed. 25th, brisk firing all day. 
26th, advanced our line forty rods. 27th, quiet along 
the lines. 28th, heavy firing on our right; the rebels 
are repulsed. 29th and 3oth, fighting continues. 

August 2st to 3d, hot firing all the time. 4th, Na 
tional Thanksgiving Day; fighting on our right ; rebels 
driven back; skirmishing every day all the time; getting 
monotonous. 25th, left our works and fell back to the 
Chattahoochie river, near Vining station ; marched all 
night. 27th, Major-general W. H. Slocum assumed 
command of the Twentieth army corps. 

September 4th, moved forward to Atlanta, which we 
reached about 2 o clock p. M.; marched through the 
city and went into camp about one and one-half miles 
west of the city. 6th, received an order from General 
Sherman that the campaign was ended, and that the 
troops are to have a full month s rest; that our task was 
not only done, but well done. i2th, the citizens of At 
lanta were moved south to-day; from this date we lay 
in camp with little to mar our happiness till November 
ist, when we received orders to send all our baggage to 
the rear and put ourselves in light marching order. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 121 

November 5th, orders having been received for the 
troops to move, the Twenty-ninth struck tents and 
marched from Atlanta at 3:30 P. M. in the direction of 
Stone Mountain, some three miles, and camped for the 
night. At i o clock p. M. on the following day, the reg 
iment marched back to Atlanta, and again occupied its 
old camp. 

During the afternoon of the ist of September spe 
cific orders for the withdrawal of Stewart s rebel corps de 
armee and the militia were issued, and about sunset the 
latter were withdrawn from the trenches. When they 
were fairly on the road Stewart s corps followed, all being 
en route by midnight, except the cavalry, a brigade or 
two of infantry, and the pickets. These latter remained 
until the advance of the Twentieth corps neared the city 
on the morning of the 2d. The explosion of ammuni 
tion was of course heard at the position of the Twentieth 
corps, and though General Slocum (who it appears was 
in command of the Twentieth corps at the time) had re 
ceived no intelligence of Sherman s great success at 
Jonesboro, he was not unprepared to find Hood gone 
any morning, and the explosions convinced him that the 
withdrawal was taking place. He instantly issued orders 
to his division commanders, Generals Ward, Williams, 
and Geary, to send out each a heavy reconnoissance at 
daybreak on the morning of the 2d. 

About 1,000 men were detailed from each division, 
and at 5 A. M. pushed forward on neighboring roads into 
Atlanta on the north and northwest, encountering no op 
position. They pushed rapidly forward, and at 8 o clock 
came in sight of the rebel intrenchments, so lately occu 
pied with enemies but now silent and deserted. 

Advancing rapidly, Colonel Coburn, commanding 
General Ward s reconnoissance, entered the enemy s 



122 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

works, encountering in the suburbs Mayor Calhoun, of 
Atlanta, and a deputation of the city council. The for 
mer nervously presented a paper surrendering the city 
and asking protection. Colonel Coburn refused to re 
ceive the paper for informality, and directed that another 
should be drawn up. Mayor Calhoun invited several of 
General Ward s staff to accompany him to the court 
house, where the documents should be made en regie, 
promising at the same time to expel the drunken rebel 
stragglers, who were lingering in the streets and were dis 
posed to skirmish with our advance. He immediately 
took measures to effect the last, and accompanied by the 
officers whose names are offered in attest, he returned to 
the court-house, and the following document was drawn 
up: 

" ATLANTA, GEORGIA, ) 
September 2, 1864. J 

"Brigadier-general Ward, Commanding Third Division 
Twentieth Corps. 

"SiR : The fortunes of war have placed the city of 
Atlanta in your hands, and as mayor of the city I ask 
protection to non-combatants and private property. 

" JAMES M. CALHOUN, 

Mayor of Atlanta. " 

The preliminary formalities thus disposed of, our 
troops entered the city with music and flags, marching 
promptly and erect. A fine flag-staff was found on the 
Franklin printing house, where the Memphis Appeal had 
been printed. The stars and stripes were soon flung to 
the calm, sunny air amid the cheers of the brave men 
who had fought for so many weary, consuming days to 
place it there. 

General Henry W. Slocum established his headquar 
ters at the Trout house, the leading hotel of the city, 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 

overlooking the public square. In the forts around At 
lanta eleven heavy guns, mainly sixty-four pounders, were 
left by the enemy; also about three thousand muskets, in 
good order, stored in various parts of the city, were 
found ; also three locomotives in running order, and 
large quantities of manufactured tobacco were discov 
ered. Between one and two hundred stragglers, the 
majority of them very drunk, were fished from their hid 
ing places and placed under guard at the court-house. 

GENERAL THOMAS CONGRATULATORY ORDER. 

ARMY HEADQUARTERS, July 26, 1864. 
"The major-general commanding the army congratu 
lates the troops upon the brilliant success attending the 
Union arms in the late battles. In the battle of the 
2oth instant, in which the Twentieth corps, one division 
of the Fourth corps, and part of the Fourteenth corps 
were engaged, the total union loss in killed, wounded, 
and missing was 1,733. I n front of the Twentieth corps 
there were put out of the fight 6,000 rebels; 563 of the 
enemy were buried by our own troops, and the rebels 
were permitted to bury 250. The Second division of 
the Fourth corps repulsed seven different assaults of the 
enemy with light loss to themselves, and which must 
have swelled the number of dead buried by the rebels to 
beyond 300. We also captured seven stands of colors. 
No official report has been received of the part taken in 
the battle by the Fourteenth corps. In the battle of the 
22d instant, the total Union loss in killed, wounded, and 
missing was 3^500, and also 10 pieces of artillery. The 
rebel loss in prisoners captured was 3,200. The known 
dead of the enemy in front of the Fifteenth and Six 
teenth corps and one division of the Seventeenth corps 
was 2,142. The other divisions of the Seventeenth 



124 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

corps repulsed six assaults of the enemy before they fell 
back, and which will swell the rebel loss in killed to at 
least 3,000. The latest reports state that we buried over 
3,200 rebels killed in this fight. There were captured 
from the enemy in this battle 18 stands of colors and 
5,000 stands of arms. 

"By command of 

MAJOR-GENERAL GEORGE H THOMAS. 

"W. D. WHIPPLE, 

Assistant Adjutant-general." 

GENERAL SHERMAN S SPECIAL FIELD ORDER NO. 68. , 

"HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION, OF THE \ 
MISSISSIPPI IN THE FIELD, 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, SEPT. 8, 1864. j 

"The officers and soldiers of the armies of the Cum 
berland, Ohio, and Tennessee have already received the 
thanks of the Nation through its President and com 
mander in chief, and it remains now only for him who 
has been with you from the beginning, and who intends 
to stay all the time, to thank the officers and men for 
their intelligence, fidelity, and courage displayed in the 
campain of Atlanta. On the ist day of May our armies 
were lying in garrison, seemingly quiet, from Knoxville 
to Huntsville, and our enemy lay behind his rocky-faced 
barrier at Dalton, proud, defiant, and exultant. He 
had time since Christmas to recover from his discom 
fiture on the Mission Ridge, with his ranks filled, and a 
new commander in chief, second to none of the Con 
federacy in reputation for skill, sagacity, and extreme 
popularity. All at once our armies assumed life and 
action and appeared before Dalton. Threatening Rocky 
Face, we threw ourselves upon Resaca, and the rebel 
army only escaped by the rapidity of its retreat, aided 
by w the numerous roads with which he was familiar, and 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 125 

which were strange to us. Again he took post, at Alla- 
toona, but we gave him no rest, and by a circuit toward 
Dallas and a subsequent movement to Ackworth, we 
gained the Allatoona pass. Then followed the eventful 
battles about Kenesaw and the escape of the enemy 
across the Chattahoochie river. The crossing of the 
Chattahoochie and breaking of the Augusta road was 
most handsomely executed by us, and will be studied as 
an example in the art of war. At this stage of our game 
our enemies became dissatisfied with their old and skil 
ful commander and selected one more bold and rash. 
New tactics were adopted. Hood first boldly and 
rapidly on the 2oth of July fell on our right at Peach 
Tree creek, and lost again. On the 22d he struck our 
extreme left and was severely punished; and finally again 
on the 28th he repeated the attempt on our right, and 
that time must have been satisfied, for since that date he 
has remained on the defensive. We slowly and gradu 
ally drew our lines about Atlanta, feeling for the railroads 
which supplied the rebel army and made Atlanta a place 
of importance. We must concede to our enemy that 
he met these efforts patiently and skilfully, but at last he 
made the mistake we had waited for so long and sent 
his cavalry to our rear, far beyond the reach of recall. 
Instantly our cavalry was on his only remaining road, 
and we followed quickly with our principal army, and 
Atlanta fell into our possession as the fruit of well-con 
certed measures, backed by a brave and competent army. 
This completed the grand task which had been assigned 
us by our Government, and your general again repeats 
his personal and official thanks to all the officers and 
men composing this army for the indomitable courage 
and perseverance which alone could give success. We 
have beaten our enemy on every ground he has chosen, 



126 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

and have wrested from him his own Gate city, where 
were located his foundries, arsenals, and workshops, 
deemed secure on account of their distance from our 
base and the seeming impregnable obstacles intervening. 
Nothing is impossible to an army like this, determined 
to vindicate a government wherever our flag has once 
floated, and resolved to maintain them at any and all 
cost. 

"In our campaign many, yea very many of our noble 
and gallant comrades have preceded us to our common 
destination, the grave; but they have left the memory 
of deeds on which a Nation can build a proud histor^. 
McPherson, Harker, McCook, and others dear to us all, 
are now the binding links in our minds that should at 
tach more closely together the living, who have to com 
plete the task which still lies before us in the dim 
future. 

"I ask all to continue as they have so well begun, the 
cultivation of the soldierly virtues that have ennobled 
our own and other countries, courage, patience, obedi 
ence to the laws and constituted authorities of our 
Government, fidelity to our trusts, and good feeling 
among each other; each trying to excel the other in the 
practice of those high qualities, and it will then require 
no prophet to foretell that our country will, in time, 
emerge from this war purified by the fires of war and 
worthy its great founder, Washington. 

"W. T. SHERMAN, 
Major-general commanding." 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 127 



CHAPTER XX. 

With Sherman to the Sea Colonel Schoonover s Journal Siege of 
Savannah. 

Tuesday, the 8th instant, the Twenty-ninth was very 
busy holding election. Detachments from other organ 
izations were permitted to vote at the Twenty-ninth head 
quarters. The Twenty-ninth regiment cast three hun 
dred and eighty-four votes. Of these Lincoln received 
three hundred and fifty and McClellan thirty-four. 
During the day the regiment was wide awake and 
enthusiastic, and gave every soldier a chance to vote. 
At 6:30 A. M. on the following day, while the regiment 
was in tents eating breakfast, the rebels opened a lively 
fire with artillery, at short range. The enemy approached 
our picket, which was posted west of camp, covering the 
Sandtown road, who were surprised and fell back without 
firing a shot; hence the first intimation that we had that 
the enemy was near was the report of their artillery and 
the bursting of shells in our midst. The Twenty-ninth 
fell in and took position behind the fortification which 
the regiment had constructed. In the meantime a line 
of skirmishers was sent out and soon the enemy were 
driven back. A portion of the brigade was sent out on 
the Sandtown road, marched a few miles, but the Con 
federates had flown, and late in the afternoon the scout 
ing party returned to camp. 

November roth. Remained in camp occupied in the 
usual camp and picket duties, and the inspection of 
amunition, arms, and accoutrements, and all was quiet, 



128 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

and at 8 o clock in the evening the city of Atlanta took 
fire and was nearly annihilated. Saturday, the i2th, in 
camp, and all is quiet. Sunday, November 13th, the 
Twenty-ninth was detailed to tear up and destroy the 
railroad, and 7:30 marched out on the railroad leading 
to Chattanooga, and was engaged until 10 at night in 
burning the ties and bending the rails. At night the 
regiment returned to its old camp at Atlanta. i4th in 
stant, in camp; all quiet. A man in company I was 
injured by falling from a building. i5th instant, 
marched at 6:30 A. M. on the road leading to Stone 
mountain in a southeast direction from Atlanta, and 
at 6 P. M. halted and went into camp (marched fifteen 
miles). 1 6th instant, marched at 7:30 A. M., and at 
5:15 P. M. halted and camped for the night (marched 
twelve miles). i7th instant, marched at 5 o clock A. 
M., and after marching twelve miles halted for dinner, 
and at 2 p. M. fell in and marched until 5 P. M., when 
the regiment halted and went into camp. i8th instant, 
moved at 4:30 A. M.; marched ten miles, and at 12 M. 
halted for dinner; fell in at i o clock and at 6 P. M. 
halted and camped for the night (marched twenty miles 
during the day), ipth instant, marched at 6:30 A. M. 
Twentieth instant, moved fourteen miles and camped 
for the night near Edenton. 2ist, marched through 
Edenton in the direction of Milledgeville, a distance of 
sixteen miles, and went into camp. 22d, marched at 
5:30 A. M., halted at 12 M. one hour for dinner, and at 
1:15 P. M. fell in and marched until 8 o clock P. M., 
passed through Milledgeville and crossed the Oconee 
river and camped for the night. 23d, Twenty-ninth reg 
iment detailed for picket ; fell in and moved east about 
three-fourths of a mile, passing through the woods and 
advancing into an open country ; during its stay on 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 129 

picket duty some of the boys went out on a foraging ex 
pedition, and it is not necessary to state that they were 
successful, and that honey, sweet potatoes, and some 
fine chickens (which the quartermaster had left), made a 
very pleasant repast. 24th, received orders to join the 
brigade; marched at 7 o clock A. M., and halted at 1:30 
for dinner; fell in at 2:15 p. M., halted at 7:30, camped 
for the night; marched fifteen miles. 25th, moved at 7 
A. M., passing through a low country covered with heavy 
timber and thick undergrowth ; the Twenty-ninth was 
train guard; halted at 12 M., at Buffalo creek, for dinner; 
found the bridge destroyed; parked the train, and late in 
the afternoon the bridge was repaired and the regiment 
with the train crossed, passed through Buffalo swamp 
and camped for the night; marched twelve miles. 26th, 
the regiment was ordered up at 3:30 A. M., remained on 
arms until 7:30, when it marched with the brigade; halted 
at 1:30 P. M. at Sandersville for dinner, and in the after 
noon marched to the Georgia Central] railroad, tore up 
about two miles of track, and at 8:30 went into camp; 
drew rations of honey for supper. 27th, marched at 5 
A. M., reached the railroad at 8:50, tore up the track, 
and at 2:30 p. M. marched to Davisboro, which it 
reached at 9 o clock, and camped here ; marched nine 
miles. 28th, in the forenoon marched back to the rail 
road, and tore up track until 5 o clock p. M., then 
marched back to Davisboro, and camped for the night ; 
nothing special transpired during the night except the 
burning of a house, which accidentally (?) took fire ; 
search was made in the regiments of the brigade by the 
staff officers to find out if possible the cause of the fire, 
but "not guilty" was the response. 29th, marched at 
6:30 A. M., halted at 11:30, at Bartlows station, for din 
ner, and in the afternoon marched through Bostwick and 



130 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

went into camp; marched 14 miles. 3oth, marched at 6 
A. M., halted at Daniel Blake s plantation for dinner, and 
in the afternoon marched four miles and camped for the 
night. 

December i, 1864, marched at 7:30 A. M., the Second 
division in the advance, passed through a low, wet coun 
try, almost impassable to the ordnance train ; halted at 
8:15 and camped for the night; marched fifteen miles. 
2d, marched at 6 A. M., First brigade in advance; moved 
about ten miles; halted at 12 M. for dinner, at a creek 
where the rebels had destroyed the bridge, and while 
preparing dinner, the Twenty-ninth regiment was ordered 
to fall in, which it did without delay, and marched to 
the creek; the enemy was found on its opposite bank in 
considerable force ; the regiment was ordered to drive 
the enemy out of the timber,, force them back and hold 
them while the bridge was being rebuilt; we loaded our 
guns, and crossing the -bank four companies under Cap 
tain Schoonover advanced to the right up the road, 
through the timber (which was a thick undergrowth) 
driving the enemy out of the woods and into an open 
field about one mile from the bridge; barricaded the 
road with rails, and the other six companies under Major 
Wright, advanced direct to the point through the woods 
about one mile, the enemy falling back ; the regiment 
held its position until the bridge was rebuilt, and a 
crossing effected, and late in the P. M. the brigade 
moved through the swamp and camped for the night. 
3d, remained in camp until after dinner, then moved 
forward the remainder of the day and all night; had no 
supper; halted at 7 A. M. for breakfast, near Millen ; the 
old stockade was empty, the prisoners having been re 
moved the day before; after breakfast on the 4th, we 
moved forward, marched all day, and at 8 p. M. halted 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 131 

and camped for the night. 5th, marched at 7 A. M., 
halted at 2:30 P. M. for dinner; moved three miles in the 
afternoon, and at 6 went into camp for the night. 6th, 
marched ten miles and camped for the night, 7th, 
marched at 7 A. M., halted at 12:30 for dinner; rained 
all the forenoon, had no dinner; marched in the after 
noon, halted at 7 P. M. and camped for the night, near 
Springfield ; marched twelve miles. 8th, marched at 
6:30 A. M. and camped at 4:30 p. M. near Eden. 

pth instant at 9 A. M., moved six miles and halted 
thirty minutes for dinner at Wallhower Swamp, where 
the Confederates were found in force. The fallen tim 
ber which obstructed the road was soon removed by the 
Pioneer corps, and in the meantime with the Third 
brigade, of Geary s division in the advance, had a sharp 
skirmish with the rebels. While the road was being 
cleared the Second division were resting on their arms, 
except the Third brigade, which had advanced nearly 
through the swamp. While engaged with the enemy 
the train was ordered forward, and the Twenty-ninth 
regiment advanced on double-quick in support of the 
brigade thus engaged. Passing the train it reached the 
Third brigade, which had advanced about one mile and 
a half. The Twenty-ninth immediately formed line on 
the left of the road in rear of the Third brigade, and 
skirmished until dark, when the firing ceased. During 
the night the rebels fell back, roth instant, moved at 
7 A. M. and marched through the swamp where we 
found small earth works and two small field pieces 
masked to cover the road through the swamp, but when 
the boys in blue were discovered the rebels moved to 
the rear. The regiment marched thirteen miles with 
some skirmishing and artillery firing during the day and 
night. 



132 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

When about four miles from the city of Savannah, 
Georgia, rebel artillery was found to be in the road be 
hind earthworks to impede our progress. The Twenty- 
ninth regiment, with the brigade, filed to the left of the 
road and took position in the timber, where it bivouacked 
for the night. After leaving Atlanta, Georgia, on the 
1 5th day of November, 1864, the army was designated 
as the Army of Georgia, the Twelfth and Fourteenth 
corps, known as the left wing, commanded by Major- 
general H. W. Slocum, and the Fifteenth and Seven 
teenth corps, known as the right wing, commanded by 
Major-general O. O. Howard, Major-general William T. 
Sherman in command of the Army of Georgia. 

On this march the army cut loose from the base of 
supplies at Atlanta, and lived mostly from forage on the 
country. On reaching the enemy within four miles of 
Savannah, on the loth day or December, the division 
had accumulated several hundred head of cattle. Sun 
day, December nth, moved in the morning about one 
mile, and took a position near the rebel lines, the 
Twenty-ninth regiment, on the extreme left of the line, 
with its left reaching the Savannah river. While in this 
position the rebels opened fire with artillery from a fort 
immediately in our front, and the infantry from their 
strong line of works, kept up a continual fire. The 
brigade remained in line until late in the afternoon, sus 
taining slight loss, when it fell back through the open 
field into the woods and laid on arms all night. On the 
1 2th inst., at 2:30 A. M., fell in and advanced to the 
front about one-half mile to the old levee, and thence 
filed to the left. Marched about three-fourths of a mile, 
halted, and prepared to charge the rebels. To do so 
the right had to pass a dike or canal with four or five 
feet of water, and assault the fort and breastworks in 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 133 

open field. The charge was abandoned, and at 4:30 A. 
M. the regiment returned to camp, where we remained 
skirmishing and artillery firing during the day. On the 
1 3th inst. the Twenty-ninth was on skirmish line all day. 
During the night we advanced our line through a woods, 
which was heavy pine, mixed with live oak, within two 
hundred yards of the rebel line, where they were strongly 
intrenched. Between the contending armies was no 
timber except scattering undergrowth, and a canal near 
the rebel line of works. In this advanced position the 
regiment dug rifle-pits, which were strongly barricaded 
with timber. 

In the Ikies of rifle-pits our pickets were stationed and 
performed the duty of skirmishers, being relieved 
every twenty-four hours, which was done under cover of 
night. In the meantime the regiment fell back about 
one-fourth of a mile, and constructed works of heavy 
timber, in the rear of which the men put up their shelter 
tents. Here they could partake of the scanty rations (but 
dare not sleep), as the artillery firing and skirmishing 
was kept up continually day and night on the i4th, i5th, 
1 6th and iyth; and Sunday, the i8th, skirmishing and 
artillery duelling all along the line. On the iQth skirmish 
ing all day. In the evening a detail was made from our 
brigade under the command of Major Myron T. Wright, 
to construct new lines of works. While engaged in the 
work at 7 o clock p. M., he received a severe wound in the 
left foot (at which time Captain Jonas Schoonover took 
command), the ball entering the foot a little below the 
instep, and lodged into the center of the heel about one 
inch from the bottom of the foot. On the 2oth, firing 
all along the line. This ceased at n o clock p. M. The 
Twenty-ninth regiment, with its brigade and division, 
has been in position on the left of the road leading 



134 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

f rom Springfield to the city of Savannah, with its main 
line in the timber, its right resting on the river. During 
the ten days the command remained in front of Savan 
nah it took charge of large rice mills on the river, and 
supplied the men with rice. The quartermaster used 
large quantities for the train teams. At one time rice 
sold for fifty cents per quart (before the capture of Fort 
McAllister, on December i3th, 1864). The rebels in 
our front were behind a heavy line of works, which was 
surmounted with large timber called head logs, with port 
holes in their front. At their rear was a large body of 
timber, their right rested on the river, where they had 
constructed two forts, one near the river, and the other 
a short distance west along their line, where they had a 
strong position behind sand bags. But our lines were 
advancing nearer every day, and during the night of 
December 20th they evacuated their works, and fell back 
to Savannah, crossing the river into South Carolina. 
At 4 A. M., on the 2ist day of December, the Twenty- 
ninth fell in, and moved in the advance of the brigade 
to the front. Passing the rifle-pits, it filed to the left, 
across the canal near the rebel fort, finding their works 
and entire line evacuated. We moved on in the direc 
tion of Savannah. On reaching the city, the Twenty- 
ninth Ohio and Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania regiments 
moved down the river to Fort Jackson, which had been 
evacuated and set on fire. The regiments reached the 
fort at 9 A. M., and at 12 o clock at night the rebels blew 
up their gunboat Beauregard. We remained at the fort 
until December 24th, with the usual routine of camp and 
garrison duty. In the meantime the Twenty-ninth took 
an inventory of the ordnance and ordnance stores cap 
tured by the Twenty-ninth regiment and the Twenty- 
eighth Pennsylvania in Fort Jackson and other forts 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 135 

along the Savannah river. On the 24th instant the regi 
ment was ordered to move at 9 A. M. The Twenty- 
ninth, in rear of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania volun 
teers, marched to the city of Savannah, passing through 
it, and encamping on the west side. 

On the 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th and 29th, fixing com 
pany quarters, and attending to the usual routine 
of camp and guard duty. Friday, the 3oth, the 
army reviewed. The Twenty-ninth regiment moved 
from camp at 8:30 A. M., and marched to Liberty street 
in the city of Savannah, where it joined the brigade 
formed on the left, in prolongation with the Sixty-sixth 
regiment of Ohio volunteers. After review it returned 
to its old camp at 2 o clock p. M. Saturday, the 3ist, 
inspection and muster for pay at 10 A. M. 

January i, 1865, monthly inspection at 2 o clock p. 
M. 2d, ^d, 4th and 5th, nothing occurred except the 
usual camp duty. 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, in camp, and 
up to the 1 8th the Twenty-ninth was doing camp duty, 
arid on the i8th received news of the fall of Fort Fisher. 
From the i9th to the 25th engaged in camp duty and 
regimental drill. 



CAPTAIN SCHOONOVER S REPORT. 

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-NINTH OHIO ) 
VETERAN VOLUNTEER INFANTRY. 

SAVANNAH, Georgia, Dec. 28,^1864. ) 
A. H. W. Creigh, first lieutenant, and acting assistant 
adjutant-general First brigade, Second division, Twen 
tieth corps : 

" LIEUTENANT : In compliance with circular from 
headquarters First brigade, Second division, Twentieth 
corps, dated Savannah, Georgia, December 23, 1864,"! 



136 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

have the honor most respectfully to make the following 
report : 

" I took command of the regiment in front cf Savan 
nah, Georgia, on December 20, 1864. Nothing worthy 
of note transpired during the day. At 4 o clock A. M. 
of the 2ist instant the Twenty-ninth in advance of the 
First brigade, took up a line of march to the city of 
Savannah, and from there to Fort Jackson, when I 
reported to Colonel Flinn, Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania 
volunteers, for duty, and performed garrison duty until 
December 24th, when the regiment was ordered to 
march at 9:30 A. M. The Twenty-ninth in rear or" 
Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, marched to the 
city, and through it to the west side, where we are now 
encamped. 

" I am very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JONAS SCHOONOVER, 

Captain commanding Twenty-ninth Ohio Veter an Volun 
teer Infantry. 

" HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, J 

SECOND DIVISION, TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS. > 

SAVANNAH, Georgia, December 25, 1864. j 

" Captain W. T. Forbes, assistant adjutant general : 

" In compliance with circular order No. 144, I have 
the honor to submit the following report of the opera 
tions of this brigade, from the capture of Atlanta, Sep 
tember 2, 1864, to the occupation of Savannah, Georgia, 

December 21, 1864, etc., etc 

December 2d, the. march was resumed at daybreak and 
was uninterrupted until Buckhead creek was reached 
The bridge over this place was partially destroyed, and a 
few of the enemy s cavalry were on the opposite side of 
the swamp. Major Wright, commanding the Twenty- 
ninth Ohio volunteers, was ordered to cross the creek 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 137 

with his regiment and drive and keep away this force, 
which was accomplished without loss. The command 
camped for the night near Buckhead church. 
December i2th to December 2oth inclusive, a substan 
tial line of works was thrown up for the protection of 
the command from the artillery of the enemy, and in 
addition to this two forts, with thirteen embrasures in 
the aggregate, were constructed by the command. The 
working parties on Fort No. 2 were under the command 
of Captain Kreicler, One Hundred and Forty-seventh 
Pennsylvania volunteers, and those on Fort No. 3 under 
command of Captain E. B. Woodbury, Twenty-ninth 
Ohio volunteers. Both these officers and the men under 
their command are deserving of praise for the energy 
and perseverance manifested in the prosecution of the 
duty assigned them. 

"December 2ist, the enemy having evacuated their 
position the night previous, their works were occupied at 
an early hour by the skirmishers of the division, and by 
sunrise the city of Savannah was entered and occupied, 
this brigade being in line in the advance into the city. 
Soon after reaching the city, the Twenty-eighth Penn 
sylvania and Twenty-ninth Ohio volunteers, under com 
mand of Colonel John Flynn, were, by order of the 
commanding-general of division, through Captain Veale, 
aide-de-camp, dispatched to occupy Fort Jackson and the 
smaller forts and batteries near it. The possession of 
the forts and other works was gained with but slight re 
sistance. 

"Inventory of ordnance and ordnance stores captured 
by the Twenty-ninth Ohio volunteers and the Twenty- 
eighth Pennsylvania in Fort Jackson and other forts on 
the Savannah river: Forty-four thirty-two-pounders, two 
ten-inch Columbiads, twenty eight-inch Columbiads, two 



138 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

rifled thirty-two-pounders, twelve twenty-four-pounder 
howitzers, one eight-inch mortar, three three-inch rifled 
field-pieces, etc., etc. Of the ninety-one guns captured, 
fourteen only were found to have been spiked and shot 
ted. The gun-carriages were broken and temporarily 
disabled, and all the implements were broken and 
destroyed. 

"To the regimental commanders I tender my thanks 
for the strict obedience to orders, and the enforcement 
of the regulation prescribed in regard to the conduct of 
the march, and especially are they due to Major M. T % 
Wright, Twenty-ninth Ohio volunteers, who was seriously 
wounded while supervising the working parties on the 
forts, for the promptitude exhibited by him in the execu 
tion of all orders, and his strict attention to the duties 
incumbent on him throughout the entire campaign. 
"Respectfully submitted, 

"ARID PARDEE, 
Commanding Brigade." 



EXTRACT OFFICIAL REPORT OF GENERAL GEARY. 

" December 29th, a conference of the division and 
brigade commanders with the general commanding the 
corps, was held at 10 A. M. to-day, with the view to the 
adoption of a plan for storming the enemy s works, as 
soon as the heavy guns should be in readiness to open 
fire. Fort No. i was finished this evening. The details 
from the First and Third brigades continued work on 
the other forts during the night, under a heavy artillery 
fire from the enemy. Several casualties occurred, among 
them Major Wright, a most valuable officer, commanding 
the Twenty-ninth Ohio volunteers, who was severely 
wounded by a shell. Sloan s battery of three-inch rifled 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 139 

guns had already taken position in a work thrown up to 
the right of Fort 3, and in the open field. 

"December 2oth. The usual artillery firing and sharp 
shooting to-day. By this evening we had constructed 
and in readiness for use in the contemplated assault, 
two hundred large straw fascines, to fill up ditches in 
front of the enemy s works; also a large number of fas 
cines made of bamboo-cane. The latter were to be 
used for bridging the canal by laying them across baulks, 
which were furnished from the pontoon train for that 
purpose. The work on Forts 2 and 3 was well advanced 
to-day, and would probably be completed to-night. 
Three siege-guns (thirty-pounder Parrotts) were brought 
down this evening and mounted in Fort No. 2. I as 
certained this morning that the enemy had completed a 
pontoon bridge from Savannah across to the South Caro 
lina shore, and notified .the general commanding corps 
of the discovery. This bridge was about two and a half 
miles from my left. The usual artillery firing was kept 
up by the enemy during the day and night. During the 
night I heard the movement of troops and wagons across 
the poontoon bridge before mentioned, and sent a report 
of the fact to the general commanding corps. Leaving 
one of my staff to watch the sounds in that direction, I 
notified my officer of the day and brigade commanders 
to keep a vigilant watch upon the enemy, as they were 
probably evacuating. The details on Forts 2 and 3 con 
tinued working through the night, the enemy shelling 
them heavily. 

" December 2 ist. After 3 o clock this morning the 
firing ceased, and my pickets advancing to the enemy s 
line, found them hastily retreating. Having possession 
of their line of works with all their cannon in front of 
my own and the other division of the corps, I immedi- 



140 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

ately sent a staff officer to notify the general command 
ing, and at the same time pushed forward rapidly in the 
direction of Savannah, hoping to overtake and capture a 
part of the enemy s force. My skirmishers deployed 
and swept over all the ground between the evacuated 
works and the Ogeechee canal, from the river to the 
Augusta road, while my main body of troops marched 
rapidly by the flank through McAlpin s plantation to the 
Augusta road, and on into the city. Just outside of the 
city limits near the junction of the Louisville and Augus 
ta roads, I met the mayor of Savannah and a delegation 
from the board of alderman, bearing a flag of truce. 
From them I received in the name of my commanding 
general the surrender of the city. This was at 4:30 A. 
M., and I sent immediately another staff officer to an 
nounce the surrender to the general commanding the 
corps. He had considerable difficulty in passing the 
line of another division of this corps on the Augusta 
road, but finally convinced them that he belonged to the 
Twentieth corps and not to the enemy. In the mean 
time my entire division entered the city of Savannah at 
early dawn, and before the sun first gilded the morning 
clouds, our National colors, side by side with those of 
my own division, were unfurled from the dome of the 
exchange, and over the United States custom house. 
The brigade which led on entering the city, was at once 
ordered to patrol it, reduce it to order and quiet, and 
prevent any pillaging or lawlessness on the part either of 
soldiers or citizens. My orders on the subject were very 
strict, and within a few hours this city, in which I had 
found a lawless mob of low whites and negroes pillaging 
and setting fire to property, was reduced to order. Many 
millions of dollars worth of cotton, ordnance and com 
missary stores, etc., which would have been otherwise 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 141 

destroyed, were saved to the United States Government, 
and the citizens once more enjoyed security under the 
protection of that flag which again waved over them, ex 
actly four years since the passage by the State of South 
Carolina of the Secession Act. 

" Two regiments from Pardee s brigade, the Twenty- 
eighth Pennsylvania and Twenty-ninth Ohio veteran 
volunteers, were sent down to Fort Jackson, and early 
in the morning had possession of it and all the inter 
mediate and surrounding works. The iron-plated ram, 
Savannah, which lay in the river below the city, threw 
shells at these two regiments as they flung the stars and 
stripes to the breeze from the walls of Fort Jackson. 
All the other gun-boats of the enemy had been fired by 
them and burned to the water s edge. 

" On the arrival of the major-general commanding the 
left wing, I was, by his order, placed in command of the 
city. Until nearly 10 A. M. continued firing was heard 
in the direction of Beaulieu, and supposing that a por 
tion of the enemy might still be south of us, I kept one 
brigade under arms during the forenoon. Three rebel 
flags were captured by my command, which will be duly 
forwarded. 

" I am, Colonel, very-respectfully 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN W. GEARY, 

Brigadier-general commanding Second division Twen 
tieth corps." 



142 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CHAPTER XXL 

The Carolina Campaign Washington Grand Review The New 
Flag Westward, and Home again. 

On the 27th day of January, after the order to march 
was issued, the Twenty-ninth broke camp and marched 
at 8 A. M., in rear of the Sixty-sixth Ohio regiment ; 
halted at 2 p. M. and encamped for the night (marched 
twelve miles). 28th instant, marched at 7 A. M. in rear 
of the Sixty-sixth Ohio regiment and brigade train ; at 
7 P. M. camped for the night (marched ten miles). 29th 
instant, marched at 6:30 A. M., Twenty-ninth in rear of 
Sixty-sixth Ohio, and passed through Springfield ; halted 
at 2 P. M. and camped for the night. 3oth instant, in 
camp ; three companies of the Twenty-ninth regiment 
went on picket. 3ist instant, in camp. 

February ist. The Twenty-ninth regiment inspected 
by General Ario Pardee at 9 A. M. 2d instant, the 
ordinary camp and picket duty was the order of the day. 
The 3d instant, ordered to march at 6 p. M. ; the order 
was countermanded, and we went into camp for the 
night. 4th, marched at 6 A. M., the Twenty-ninth in 
advance of the brigade ; crossed the Savannah river at 
Sisters Ferry at 10 A. M., marched five miles and camped 
for the night ; Twenty- ninth detailed for picket. 5th, 
relieved at 2 p. M., marched in rear of brigade, and at 
9:30 P. M., went into camp for the night (marched six 
miles). 6th, marched at 7 A. M., halted at 11:30 for din 
ner, fell in at 12 M., halted at 5 P. M. and camped for 
the night (marched fifteen miles). 7th, marched at 7 A. 
M. ; at 6:30 P. M. went into camp for the night. 8th 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 143 

instant, marched at 6 A. M., halted at 1 1 130 for dinner ; in 
seven minutes fell in and marched five miles, halted at 
3:15 and camped for the night near Buford Bridge, 9th, 
marched at 6 A. M., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade 
and with ordnance train ; marched eighteen miles, and 
at 5 P. M. camped for the night near Blackville, South 
Carolina. loth, marched at 7 A. M., halted near Black 
ville, and at 2 p. M. crossed the Edisto river, and at 10 
p. M. camped for the night (marched eight miles), nth 
instant in camp. i2th marched at 6 A. M., arrived at 
the North Edisto river this afternoon (a distance of ten 
miles), engaged in a skirmish in which the Fifth Ohio 
had one man killed and three wounded. Company G 
of the Twenty-ninth had one man killed, Jack Rape. 
Went into camp for the night. i3th, marched at 6 A. 
M., crossed the North Edisto and skirmished with the 
enemy. Halted and remained until 9 p. M., when the 
regiment fell in, marched four and one-half miles and 
halted for the night. The Twenty-ninth went on picket. 
Tuesday, i4th, marched at 8 A. M. some six miles and 
halted. Our regiment went on picket as usual. i5th 
instant, marched at 7 A. M. in rear of brigade, skirmish 
ing ; marched ten miles ; went into camp at Lexing 
ton at 3 P. M. ; at 5 o clock moved to the left of the 
Sixty-sixth Ohio. Thursday, i6th, marched at 8 A. M. 
one mile to the rear and went on picket ; at 6:30 fell 
in and marched six miles as rear guard to the Twentieth 
army corps ; halted and went into camp at 4 P. M. 
1 7th, marched at 9 A. M. i8th, marched at 6:30 A. M., 
crossed the Seluda river at 1:30 p. M., halted for dinner ; 
at 2:15 fell in and marched four miles ; halted at 5 p. M. 
and camped for the night.. Sunday in camp until 3:30 
p. M. when " fall in " was sounded by the bugler. The 
Twenty-ninth fell in and took the advance of brigade, 



144 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

marched four miles, and at 11:30 p. M. halted for the 
night near Bush river. The Twenty-ninth was again 
fortunate and went on picket. 2oth, marched at i P. M. 
in rear of brigade and at 7 P. M. went into camp for the 
night (marched six miles, crossing Broad river near 
Frost s Mill). 2ist instant, marched at 6 A. M. and 
entered Winsboro at 11:30 A. M. Five companies of the 
Twenty-ninth detailed for picket. The other companies 
camped for the night. 22d, Left Winnsboro at 3:45 p. 
M., marched six miles and camped for the night. 23d, 
marched at 6:30 A. M., six miles, halted at 10:20 A. M. an 
hour for dinner; at 11:30 fell in and marched forward, 
crossed the Catawba river and went into camp at mid 
night. Friday, 24, marched at 9:30 (we were the divis 
ion train guard), halted at i P. M. for dinner ; at 2 p. 
M. fell in and marched five miles ; at 4:30 halted and 
camped for the night ; rainy. Saturday, 25th, rainy ; 
remained in camp. Sunday, 26th, marched at 7 A. M., 
with Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance of brigade ; halted 
at 3 P. M. and camped for the night (marched ten miles). 
27th, marched one and one-half miles, crossed Hanging 
Rock creek and went into camp. 28th, marched at 6:30 
A. M., Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade (marched eight 
miles), and went into camp at i P. M. Mustered for pay 
for January and February. 

Wednesday, March ist, marched at i P. M., and at 
9 P. M. halted and went into camp for the night near Big 
Clinch creek (marched twelve miles). 2d, marched 
at 8 A. M.; at 12 M. halting for dinner. In the afternoon 
moved one-eighth of a mile and camped for the night. 
3d, marched at 6:30 A. M.; moved with wagon train; 
reached Chesterfield at 11:30 p. M. and went into camp 
for the night (marched thirteen miles), March 4th, 
moved at 7 A. M., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade; 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 145 

halted at 4 P. M. and camped for the night (marched 
nine miles). 5th, remain in camp all day; detailed 
Charles Galpin, company C, and J. Bennett Powers, 
company E, as escort at Twentieth corps headquarters. 
6th, marched at 8:30 A. M; Twenty-ninth in rear of 
brigade; reached Cheraw at 1:15 P. M.; halted for dinner, 
and at 4 fell in and crossed the river, marched four miles 
and camped for the night (marched sixteen miles), yth, 
marched at 7 A. M.; halted at 2:30 p. M. ; went into camp 
for the night; marched on the Fayetteville road (fourteen 
miles). 8th, marched at 11:30 A. M.; halted at 1:30 
for dinner; at 4:30 fell in, and at 10:15 p. M. halted and 
camped for the night (marched eight miles). Qth, 
marched at 6:30 A. M., and at 2 P. M, halted for dinner; 
at 3 fell in, and at 6 halted and went into camp 
for the night (marched thirteen miles). loth, 
marched at 3:30 P. M.; Twenty-ninth in advance of 
brigade; marched four miles and camped for the night, 
nth, marched at 6:30 A. M.; Twenty-ninth in rear of 
brigade; halted at 7:30 p. M. for supper, and at 10:30 
fell in and marched until 2:20 A. M.; went into camp for 
the night (marched thirteen miles). i2th, marched at 
8 A. M.; reached Fayetteville at 4 P. M., and camped for 
the night (marched thirteen miles). i3th, marched at 
2:30 P. M.; passed through Fayetteville and camped for 
the night. i4th, marched at 4:30 A. M.; crossed Cape 
Fear river; marched two miles; halted for breakfast, and 
remained in camp for the day. i5th, marched at 12 
M., eight miles, and at j i P. M. camped for the night. 
1 6th, marched at 9 A. M., Twenty-ninth in advance of 
brigade, and at 7 p. M. halted; Twenty-ninth were for 
tunate enough to remain a detail for picket (marched 
seven miles). i7th, on picket. i8th, marched at 7 A. M., 
Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade; halted at 7 P. M., and 



146 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

ITl 

went into camp for the night (marched eight miles), 
ipth, marched at n A. M., with division train (marched 
eleven miles); halted at 6:30, and camped at 9:30 p. M.; 
packed up and marched with train on Goldsboro road; 
joined First and Third divisions of the Twentieth army 
corps; marched all night, and in the morning arrived at 
the battlefield of Bentonville. 20th, in camp all day 
with constant artillery firing during the day. 2ist, in 
camp and the artillery is steadily firing. 22d, marched 
at 8 A. M., Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance of brigade; 
halted at 12 M. for dinner; at i p. M. fell in and marched 
on the Goldsboro road; halted at 12 M. at night, an$ 
went into camp (marched fifteen miles). 23d, marched 
at 6 A. M., Twenty-ninth Ohio in rear of division train; 
halted at 11:30 for dinner; at 12:30 p. M. fell in, crossed 
the Neuse river (marched twelve miles), and went into 
camp for the night. Corporal Exceen, company A, was 
wounded by a rebel while on picket. 24th, marched 
at 7 A. M. and entered Goldsboro, North Carolina, at 12 
M.; passed through town and went into camp; at 4:30 
p. M. orders were received detailing the Twenty-ninth 
Ohio to guard a wagon train for the Second division; 
reached the point of destination at 7 P. M., near the 
Wilmington railroad, and camped for the night (marched 
eight miles). 25th, marched at 8 A. M., and arrived at 
Goldsboro at 12 M. (noon); passed through town about 
two miles and went into camp. 

From March 25th to April 9th we were doing the 
usual duty in and around camp and on picket. On the 
loth inst. marched at 6 A. M., moved up the river and 
went in camp for the night atn o clock, nth, marched 
at 6 A. M., reached Smithfield at 3 P. M., camped for the 
night. 1 2th, received the news of the surrender of Gen 
eral R. E. Lee and his army at 8 A. M. and marched at 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 147 

<9 A. M.; halted at 6:30 P. M. and camped for the nigh t 
(marched seventeen miles). i3th, marched at 5:30 A t 
M., Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance; passed through 
Raleigh, North Carolina, and at 2:30 p. M. halted and 
went into camp (marched fifteen miles). Remained in 
camp until the 25th. On the 2oth reviewed by General 
John W. Geary, and on the 22d the Twentieth army 
corps was reviewed by General W. T. Sherman. Sun 
day, 23d. inspection. 25th, arched at 9 A. M., 
Twenty-ninth Ohio in rear of brigade; halted for dinner, 
and at 3 P. M. fell in and marched fifteen miles; halted 
at 8 P. M. and camped for the night. 26th and 27th, 
in camp. 28th, returned to our old camp near 
Raleigh, North Carolina. 29th, in camp. 3oth, 
marched at 7 A. M.; passed through Raleigh, and at 6 
p. M. halted and camped for the night (marched fifteen 
miles). 

May ist, marched at 5 A. M.; at 12 M. halted for 
dinner; at i p. M. fell in, crossed Tar river, and at 6 p. 
M. camped for the night (marched twenty-three miles). 
2d, marched at 5 A. M. ; halted at 11:45 f r dinner; at 
i P. M. fell in, marched twenty miles, and at 5 P. M. 
camped for the night (Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance of 
brigade). 3d, marched at 4:30 A. M.; marched to the 
State line of Virginia, a distance of eleven miles, and 
camped for the night. 4th, marched at 6 A. M.; crossed 
the Roanoke river; at 2 p. M. halted for dinner; at 5 fell 
in and moved forward; halted at 6:30, and camped for 
the night (marched twenty miles). 5th, marched at 
5:30 A. M.f at 2:15 p. M. halted for dinner; marched at 
4; halted at 6:30 and camped for the night (marched 
twenty miles). 6th, marched at 5 A. M.; halted at 
10:45 * or dinner; fell in at i P. M.; passed Black and 
White station on the south side railroad, and at 6:30 p. 



148 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

M. camped for the night (marched eleven miles), yth, 
marched at 6 A. M.; at 11:45 halted for dinner; fell in 
at 1:30 P. M., and crossed the Appomatox river; at 6:15 
camped for the night, Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance of 
brigade (marched twenty miles). 8th, marched at 6 
A. M.; passed Clover Hill coal mines; halted at 12 M. 
for dinner; at i p. M. fell in and marched to Falling 
creek, and at 7 P. M. camped for the night, .Twenty- 
ninth Ohio in rear of brigade (marched twenty miles). 
9th, moved our camp two miles. loth, in camp all 
day. nth, marched at 10 A. M.; passed through 
Manchester and Richmond in the afternoon, and at 5:30 
camped near Brook s creek for the night (marched twelve 
miles). 1 2th, marched, at 6 A. M., on Brooks pike; 
halted at 10 A. M. for dinner; at 12 M. fell in and 
marched to Ashland, and at 6:30 camped for the night 
(marched 12 miles). J3th, marched at 5:30 A. M.; 
crossed the South Anna; halted at 11:30 for dinner; at 
i P. M. fell in, crossed the Little river, and at 3:30 went 
into camp (marched sixteen miles). Sunday, i4th, 
marched at 5 A. M., Twenty-ninth Ohio in advance of 
brigade; crossed the North Anna river, and at 12 M. 
halted for dinner; fell in at 2 p. M.; marched on the 
Spottsylvania Court House road; halted at 5:30 and 
camped (marched eighteen miles). i5th, marched at 
5 A. M., T.wenty-ninth Ohio in rear of brigade and divis 
ion train; halted at 11:45 f r dinner; fell in; passed 
through Chancellorsville, crossed the Rappahannock and 
at 10 P. M. camped for the night (marched twenty miles). 
1 6th, marched at 4:30 A. M.; halted at 12 M. for din 
ner; at 1:30 p. M. fell in and marched on the road that 
leads to Warrenton junction via Hartwood church, and 
camped for the night (marched, eighteen miles). lyth, 
marched at 5 A. M., reached Brentsville at 2 p. M., a dis- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 149 

tance of twelve miles, and camped for the night. i8th, 
marched at 6 A. M.; halted at 12 M. for dinner; fell in 
at 2:30 P. M, marched until 9 P. M., and camped for the 
night; William Lutz, company H, injured by the falling 
of a tree (marched fifteen miles). i9th, marched at 
6 A. M.; halted at 12 M. for dinner; at 1:30 fell in, moved 
forward; at 6:30 p. M. reached Clouds Mills, Twenty- 
Ninth Ohio in advance of brigade (marched fifteen 
miles). 2oth, 2ist, 22d, 23d, and 24th, in camp. 

25th, moved forward to Washington, District of Co 
lumbia, where it attended the grand review, the grand 
est spectacle the world has ever seen, and thence to 
Bladensburg, where it received the new colors, which 
the following matter, furnished by comrade G. W. Hollo- 
way, will sufficiently explain. 

The new flag for the Twenty-ninth regiment, contrib 
uted by the citizens of Summit and Ashtabula counties, 
was accompanied by the following letter from Colonels 
Buckley and Fitch. The receipt of the new flag is 
gracefully acknowledged by the letter of Mr. G. W. Hol- 
loway, appended thereto, which letter was accompanied 
by the old flag, which had been borne by this gallant reg 
iment in so many bloody battles. 

AKRON, May, 1865. 

COL. JONAS SCHOONOVER. DEAR SIR : We have the 
honor and pleasure of forwarding to the gallant old 
Twenty-ninth another national flag, the gift of its old 
friends in Ashtabula and Summit counties. This is the 
third national flag given the regiment from the same 
source. It is certainly a strong proof that its friends 
still believe it to be one of the bravest of the brave of 
the many noble regiments Ohio has given to fight this 
great battle. If the regiment had no other proof than 

s old and tattered flags, that alone would show that it 



150 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

had been in the thickest of the fight, ever ready to 
breast the fury of the battle storm; but its history tells 
us that it has borne an honorable part in nearly a score 
of the hardest fought battles of the war. Citizen sol 
diers, take this flag and bear it aloft wherever duty calls, 
and your friends will take your past record as a guaran 
tee that it will never be dishonored by the Twenty-ninth 
Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. Colonel, please re 
member us to the dear old Twenty-ninth, and accept for 
yourself our best wishes. 

LEWIS P. BUCKLEY, , 

WILLIAM T. FITCH, 
Old Cols, of the Twenty-ninth Ohio. 

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-NINTH OHIO, 
BLADENSBURG, MARYLAND, Junes, 1865. 
Colonels Buckley and Fitch, and S. A. Lane, Esq.: 

GENTLEMEN: In the name of the officers and men 
of the Twenty-ninth Ohio veteran volunteer infantry, I 
herewith acknowledge the receipt of the beautiful flag 
presented the regiment, and in return I present to you 
the old one, which it has been our proud honor to carry 
victoriously over many hard-fought battle-fields. That 
dear "old flag" which has been our companion through 
years of fearful war and carnage, and which symbolizes 
our glorious nationality, tells its own story. We return 
it to you, but not so beautiful in form and color as when 
presented to us eighteen months ago. But whilst its 
external beauty has been defaced, yet the great life- 
giving principles of which it is the exponent, are all the 
more deeply enshrined in the hearts of its defenders, and 
Liberty receives through this standard another bright and 
shining star to her beautiful constellation. Take it, then, 
and place it among the archives of the nation, that it 
may be preserved as a sacred memorial, and handed 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 151 

down to latest posterity as a glorious legacy and standard 
that was borne, as by angel hands, in opposition to op 
pression and rebellion. Be assured that it is with a 
renewed national pride that we look upon this beautiful 
flag presented to the Twenty-ninth Ohio, by the patriotic 
and loyal citizens of Summit and Ashtabula counties. 
The past history of almost four years in war, speaks for 
our conduct as soldiers and patriots for the future. We 
promise never to desert this flag, nor will we permit 
traitors or rebels to wrest it from our hands. We will 
always be willing and ready to unfurl it in defense of the 
principles of our glorious, free Republic. Truly our 
country s faith has learned a new interpretation of her 
standard. The white typifies the purity of purpose which 
belongs to her true ruler; the red points to the crimson 
tide in which life flows forth a willing offering; the blue 
reminds her of herjhome in heaven, to which all the good 
are gathered; the stars in her banner tell of light in 
darkness, and she shall learn to range them in a new and 
beautiful order, as the constellation of the cross. It is 
that flag which has solved most conclusively the long 
disputed problem of a free republican form of govern 
ment. It was that flag which was so bravely and triumph 
antly carried through the ordeal of war by our Revolu 
tionary sires, and encircled them with a halo of glory 
that shall be handed down untarnished to millions of 
unborn freemen. It was that flag which, under God, en 
abled our forefathers to gain our glorious independence, 
and here, in this beautiful land of lakes and rivers, rear 
a temple of liberty which stands first among the nations 
of the earth, the envy and admiration of all. It is the 
flag which we have learned to love and to defend, and 
which we cherish in our hearts as the guardian angel of 
our country. 



152 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

May that same God who has given so many brave 
hearts to defend it, continue to preserve it, and may it 
give light and liberty to millions who are yet groaning 
under tyranny and oppression. But we would not pass 
by unnoticed the many noble brave men who offered 
themselves a willing sacrifice upon our country s altar 
in defense of that national banner. The voices of our 
fallen comrades are borne to us in solemn silence by 
every breeze that fans our brow. The South is billowed 
with the graves where sleep the patriot martyrs of con 
stitutional liberty, until the resurrection morn. We hold 
them dear to our hearts, for may it never be forgotten 
that their deeds of valor facilitated the consummation of 
the glorious results which have just been achieved. 
Though they be dead, they yet speak, and will continue 
to speak to the end of all time, and dear to each patriot 
heart will ever be the memory of those who died in 
defense of the Union. 

There are many 

Patriots have toiled in their country s cause, 
Bled nobly, and their deeds, as they deserve, 
Receive proud recompense. We give in charge 
Their names to the sweet lyre. The historic muse 
Proud of her charge, marches with it down 
To latest time : and sculpture, in her turn, 
Gives bond, in stone and ever-during brass, 
To guard and immortalize her trust." 

At Bladensburg we went into camp, and remained 
until June 10. Marched to Washington at 8 p. M., and 
embarked on the cars of the Baltimore & Ohio rail 
road and steamed away homeward, bound to Parkers- 
burg by way of Grafton, West Virginia, thence by boat 
to Louisville, Kentucky; moved five miles into the 
country, where we remained until the i3th day of July, 
when we were mustered out. Repairing to Camp 
Taylor, near Cleveland, Ohio, we were paid off and 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 153 

formally discharged from the service on the 226. and 
23d days of July, 1865. 

We have now followed the regiment through nearly 
four years of the most arduous service which ever fell to 
the lot of any organization of this character, marching 
and fighting through most of the States in rebellion, its 
pathway marked by the graves of our comrades who fell. 
In the interim, hundreds of the brave 1540 who were 
upon its rolls, pass under the charge of the worse than 
fiends of hell, who presided at Libby, Belle Isle, Ander- 
sonville, and other courts of death, by courtesy called 
rebel prisons, where, after being robbed of all they pos 
sessed, and even stripped of necessary clothing, they 
were subjected to a systematic course of starvation (and 
that, too, under the immediate supervision of that foul 
blot upon humanity, Jeff Davis) until their brave spirits 
went out to the God who gave them. In the army of 
the East, with the army of the. West, with Sherman in 
the glorious march to the sea, and the brilliant campaign 
of the Carolinas where there was danger and death 
shone the " white star " of the Twenty-ninth. The 
skirmish line and the advance became so nearly the 
normal condition of the regiment that assignment to 
positions less dangerous elicited exclamations of surprise 
from the "boys." 

At length the last ditch, so frequently referred to by 
the braggart rebels, was reached chivalrous Jeff Davis 
in hoc and crinoline begged that mercy be shown to 
"woman and children." The bubble secessia burst, and 
the command, now reduced to a mere handful, turn sadly 
northward, its columns " gaping from the havoc of shot 
and shell, and the disease of the camp, and prison pen, 
its colors ragged and torn, but proud and defiant as ever 
one grand ovation to the living, a sad wailing requiem 



154 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

for the dead," and "good byes" are said in the beautiful 
Forest city, as each departed for their homes to assume 
the peaceful avocations of four years before. 

Gradually they have drifted away some to a quiet 
nook in the country church yard, and others to the east, 
west, and south, until now they may be found in nearly 
every State and Territory in this vast Union. Annually 
they come together in re-union at some convenient point 
in Puritan Western Reserve, and 

" Fight their battles o er again." 

Each year a committee is appointed whose duty it i 
to draft resolutions of condolence to the memory of the 
comrades whose "final statements" have been called for 
since the last meeting, and this committee always have 
something to do. Each yearly roll call is shorter than 
its predecessor, and it does not require a long look into 
the future to find only the roll no one to call it, and 
none to answer to their names if called. 

Absent " comrades, gone before us 
In the great review to pass 
Never more to earthly chieftain 
Dipping colors as ye pass 
Heaven accord ye gentle judgment 
As before the throne ye pass." 

While almost within gun shot of the site of the can 
vass covered field of 1861, busily engaged in well nigh 
vain endeavors to retain his grip upon the "ragged edge" 
of a somewhat precarious existence, and but a few laps 
in advance of the grim gentleman with the hour glass 
and scythe, abides 

THE DRUMMER BOY(?) OF COMPANY B. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 155 



GENERAL REVIEW. 

The following review of the battles, sieges, marches, 
and campaigns in which the Twenty-ninth regiment was 
engaged, is from the pen of Colonel Jonas Schoonover. 
It gives in brief the important work of the regiment 
during its nearly four years service, and should the 
"gentle reader" find the descriptive portion of the his 
tory too voluminous, she has but to turn to this review 
to find consolation. 

Beginning with the service in the winter of 1861-2, 
along the waters of the Potomac and its tributaries, and 
in the mountain regions of Hampshire county, the 
Romney expedition in West Virginia, the advance to 
Winchester via Little mountain and Martinsburg, thence 
into the Shenandoah valley. The Strasburg march, 
which ended in the battle of Winchester, where the 
Federal army, under General Shields, and the rebels, 
commanded by General T. J. Jackson, at Kernstown, 
engaged in a sanguinary battle on March 23d, 1862, in 
which the Union army gained a victory. The Twenty- 
ninth Ohio done its full share, suffering slight loss in 
killed and wounded. The march up the valley to Mad- 
isonburg; the long march to Fredericksburg, leaving the 
Shenandoah valley at New Market on the i2th day of 
May, 1862, and reaching Fredericsburg May 22, 1862, 
a day or two later returning to Luray via Warrenton and 
Front Royal, up the Luray valley to Port Republic, 
where, on the gth day of June, it engaged in battle with 
heavy loss in killed and wounded. One hundred and 
ten were made prisoners. The Twenty-ninth was en 
gaged at short range in the open field against three times 



156 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

its number over four hours. During the time the 
struggle was desperate on both sides. The battle of 
Cedar mountain, seven miles from Culpepper Court 
house, on August Qth, the Union army under Banks, the 
rebels under Longstreet, the Twenty-ninth was engaged 
in the open field without cover, and sustained consider 
able loss. Then followed the retrograde move to Cul 
pepper; the campaign of General Pope, including the 
second battle of Bull Run; and the march to Frederick 
City; the winter and spring campaign of 1862 and 1863, 
under Major-general Joseph Hooker, at Dumfries, was 
memorable for its intense suffering; then came the march 
to Chancellorsville, and the battle there, which began 
May ist, and ended on the 3d, in which the Twenty- 
ninth suffered heavy loss and was the last to leave the 
field. May 5th we crossed the Rappahannock on our 
way to Gettysburg via Aqua creek, Dumfries, Fairfax 
Court House, Leesburg, Edward s Ferry, Harper s Ferry, 
Frederick, and Littletown, where we fought one of the 
most determined battles of the war, commencing on the 
ist and ending on the 4th day of July, 1863. 

We returned to Virginia; moved to New York to quell 
riots ; returned again ; advanced to the Rapidan; reported 
to the Department of the Cumberland, via the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad, crossing the Ohio river at Bellaire. 
On September 3oth, we passed through Columbus, 
Ohio; Indianapolis, Indiana, and Louisville, Ken 
tucky, and halted at Murfreesboro. Tennessee. In Octo 
ber we passed down to Stevenson and Bridgeport, Ala 
bama, and up the Tennessee river to Wauhatchie valley. 

On November 24th and 25th, we were engaged in the 
battle of Lookout mountain; Missionary Ridge on 
November 24th and 25th, and Taylor s Ridge and Ring- 
gold, Georgia, on November 26th and 27th, 1863. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 157 

In December of the same year we re-enlisted, and 
during the winter we prepared for a vigorous and active 
campaign in the early spring of 1864. On May 3d, we 
left Bridgeport, Alabama, on the Georgia campaign, 
passing around Lookout Mountain, Rossville, and Craw 
fish springs. On May 8th, the Twenty-ninth regiment 
took an active part in the battle of Dug Gap, Geor 
gia, where it distinguished itself for bravery unparal 
leled in modern history ; every fourth man was killed 
or wounded. We moved on to Resaca, and in the 
fight of the 1 4th our loss was light. We moved 
on to Calhoun, Adairsville, Kingston, and Cassville on 
May 2 1 st. In the battle of Pumpkin Vine Creek (or 
Dallas) from May 25th to the 28th, we met with some 
loss. In the battle of Pine Knob on June i5th, the 
Twenty-ninth suffered severe loss. Many of its brave 
heroes, whose valor will ever be held in memory by every 
survivor of the Twenty-ninth regiment, were killed. 
The battles of Lost and Kenesaw Mountain were on 
June 2oth and 27th, and we advanced to the Chattahoo- 
chie river, via Marietta, Georgia, and then to the battle 
of Peach Tree Creek. 

The Georgia campaign, from May 8th until the evacua 
tion of Atlanta on September 2, 1864, a period of four 
months, was one continuous battle. The marching 
through Georgia was a glorious achievement, and will 
ever be recorded as one of the most brilliant feats in this 
or any other war. In Sherman s grand march to the 
sea and the siege and capture of Savannah, Georgia, the 
Twenty-ninth did its full share. It was) engaged 
from December loth to the 2ist, when it entered the 
city of Savannah. On January 27, 1865, we moved on 
the campaign through the Carolinas, and were engaged 
in the following battles, and skirmishes of this campaign; 



158 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Averysboro, North Carolina, on March i6th;Bentonville, 
North Carolina, on March 19, 1865, and marching to 
Goldsboro on March 24th. After Johnston s army at 
Raleigh, North Carolina, and the final march through 
Virginia to Washington in May, 1865, we took part in 
the grand review, thence to Louisville, Kentucky, on to 
Camp Taylor at Cleveland, Ohio, and home. The regi 
ment was in the service nearly four years, and it is but 
justice to state that during its entire term it was never 
driven from its position by direct assault. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 159 



OFFICIAL ROSTER. 



The writer of the volume visited the office of the 
adjutant-general at Columbus, Ohio, and prepared a 
verbatim copy of the rolls of the Twenty-ninth regiment 
as transcribed in that office, which was published and 
issued with the proof copies. The following roster is 
largely from the pen of Colonel Jonas Schoonover, who 
is responsible for its correctness. 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Colonel Lewis P. Buckley, mustered into service De 
cember 28, 1861; honorably discharged, for disability, 
January 26, 1863. 

Colonel William T. Fitch, mustered into service July 
17, 1863; promoted to major January 28, 1864; wound 
ed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864; discharged for 
wounds received in action, October 13, 1864. 

Colonel Jonas Schoonover, mustered out with regi 
ment; entered service as captain October 15, 1861; pro 
moted to major January 18, 1865; to lieutenant-colonel 
April i, 1865; to colonel July 12, 1865; the only officer 
of the regiment commissioned before leaving the State, 
who served through the war; commanded company H 
from November i, 1864, to January 31, 1865. 

Lieutenant-colonel Thomas Clark, mustered into ser 
vice as major August 15, 1861; promoted to lieutenant- 
colonel November 28, 1861; honorably discharged, for 
disability, June 19, 1863. 



l6o TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Lieutenant-colonel Edward Hayes, discharged, for 
disability, November 17, 1864; entered the service as 
captain August 26, 1861; promoted to major August 16, 
1863; to lieutenant-colonel October 17, 1863; wounded 
at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Major John S. Clemmer, mustered into service De 
cember 25, 1861; honorably discharged, for wounds 
received at Port Republic, Virginia, December 12, 1862. 

Major Myron T. Wright, died January 7, 1865, from 
wounds received in action at Savannah, Georgia, De 
cember 19, 1864; wounded at Peach Tree creek, Geor 
gia, July 20, 1864; entered service as first lieutenant; 
promoted to captain March 13, 1862; to major October 
29, 1864; to lieutenant-colonel January 18, 1865. 

Major Everson J. Hurlburt, mustered out with regi 
ment; entered the veteran service as captain; promoted 
to major April 24, 1865; lieutenant-colonel July 12, 
1865; mustered out with regiment ; wounded in battles 
of Port Republic, Virginia, Cedar Mountain, Virginia, 
and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 

Surgeon Amos K. Fifield, mustered into service Au 
gust 23, 1861; discharged, for disability, August 12, 
1864. 

Surgeon Ellwood P. Haines, resigned June 26, 1865; 
promoted assistant surgeon March 31, 1863; promoted 
to surgeon August 29, 1864. 

Surgeon Thomas B. Miser, mustered out with regi 
ment; entered service as assistant surgeon August 24, 
1864; promoted to surgeon June 26, 1865. 

Assistant Surgeon Sylvester S. Burrows, mustered in 
to service September 10, 1861; honorably discharged 
January 26, 1863. 

Assistant Surgeon Cyrus Hosack, mustered into ser- 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. l6l 

vice August 22, 1862; discharged, for disability, August 
7, 1863. 

Adjutant Comfort T. Chaffee, mustered into service 
August 27, 1861; honorably discharged, no reason as 
signed, April 13, 1862. 

Adjutant Theron S. Winship, mustered into service Sep 
tember 1 6, 1861; honorably discharged, for disability, 
January 26, 1863. 

Adjutant James B. Storer, discharged by reason of 
wounds received in action, November 30, 1864; entered 
the service as sergeant; promoted to sergeant-major 
March 14, 1862; to adjutant January 20, 1863; wounded 
at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Adjutant Thomas Folger, mustered out with regiment 
July 13, 1865; transferred to field and staff as adjutant 
April 6, 1865; promoted captain July 12, 1865. 

Regimental-quartermaster Oscar F. Gibbs, promoted 
to captain May 25, 1864; honorably discharged for dis 
ability April 3, 1865; mustered into service October 2i ? 
1861. 

Chaplain Russell H. Hurlburt, mustered into service 
December 10, 1861; honorably discharged, for disability, 
August 4, 1862. 

Chaplain Lyman D. Ames, mustered into service 
February 19, 1863; resigned June 26, 1865. 

TRANSFERRED. 

Sergeant-major Palmer Williamson, mustered into ser 
vice August 25, 1861; transferred to company G; pro 
moted to second lieutenant December 21, 1861. 

Sergeant-major James B. Storer, mustered into service 
October 17, 1 86 1; transferred to company F; promoted 
to second lieutenant April 13, 1862. 

Sergeant-major Benjamin W. Smith, mustered into 
service August 19, 1861; transferred to company K; pro- 



1 62 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

moted to second lieutenant August 9, 1862; see com 
pany K. 

Sergeant-major Gary H. Russell, mustered into ser 
vice September 30, 1861; transferred to company G; 
promoted to second lieutenant March i, 1862; see com 
pany G. 

Sergeant-major Charles W. Kellogg, mustered into 
service August 26, 1861; transferred to company C; pro 
moted to second lieutenant December i, 1863; see com 
pany C. 

Sergeant-major Henry M. Ryder, mustered into ser 
vice August 26, 1861; transferred to company C; pro 
moted to second lieutenant January 26, 1863; see com 
pany C. 

Sergeant-major Jacob Buck, mustered out with regi 
ment; re-enlisted as sergeant December 21, 1863; pro 
moted sergeant-major June 19, 1865; first lieutenant 
July 12, 1865. 

Quartermaster-sergeant Martin D. Norris, mustered 
into service August 14, 1861; transferred to company A; 
promoted to second lieutenant April 13, 1862; see com 
pany A. 

Quartermaster-sergeant Caius C. Lord, mustered out 
with regiment; promoted to quartermaster-sergeant June 
17, 1865. 

Hospital Steward Ell wood P. Haines, mustered into 
service September 16, 1861 ; transferred to field and staff; 
promoted to assistant surgeon March 31, 1863. 

Hospital Steward John Heffelfinger, mustered out 
with regiment. 

Commissary-sergeant Nathan L. Parmeter, mustered 
out with regiment; promoted to commissary-sergeant 
June 16, 1865. 

Principal Musician Gurley G. Crane, mustered into 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 163 

service September 10, 1861; transferred to company F; 
promoted to second lieutenant March 13, 1863; see 
company F. 

Principal Musician Richard Noonan, mustered into 
service September 10, 1861; transferred to veteran 
reserve corps; date unknown. 

Principal Musician Andrew J. Ream, absent since 
July 9, 1865. 

Principal Musician Richard Lewis, no discharge fur 
nished on muster-out roll. 

DISCHARGED. 

Quartermaster-sergeant George W. Beckwith, dis 
charged August 8, 1864. 

Sergeant-major Lyman H. McAdams, discharged to 
accept promotion as first lieutenant in company D (see 
company D) December 18, 1864. 

Sergeant-major David W. Thomas, promoted to ser 
geant-major December 18, 1864; discharged to accept 
promotion as first lieutenant in company H January 21, 
1865 (see company H). 

Sergeant-major George McNutt, promoted to sergeant- 
major March i, 1865; discharged to accept promotion 
as first lieutenant in company H (see company H) June 
19, 1865. 

Quartermaster-sergeant Giles R. Leonard, promoted 
quartermaster-sergeant August 8, 1864; discharged to ac 
cept promotion as first lieutenant in company C (see* 
company C) June 18, 1865. 

Commissary-sergeant Marcus F. Roberts, promoted 
commissary-sergeant April i, 1865; discharged to accept 
promotion as first lieutenant in company K (see company 
K) June 16, 1865. 

Commissary-sergeant William H. Wright, discharged 



164 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

to accept promotion as captain in company H (see com 
pany H) April 9, 1865. 

REGIMENTAL BAND. 

Mustered out and discharged by General Order July 
2, 1862. 

Leader Chauncy Brainard, mustered into service Au 
gust 26, 1861. 

Albert E. Brainard, mustered into service August 26, 
1861. 

George B. Mason, mustered into service September 
TO, 1861, 

William Meeker, mustered into service September 10, 
1861. 

Albert Walker, mustered into service September 10, 
1861. 

Calvin Crane, mustered into service September 10, 
1861. 

Erastus Brainard, mustered into service September 
10, 1861. 

Walter St. John, mustered into service August 14, 
1861. 

John Price, mustered into service August 19, 1861. 

William H. Rawdon, mustered into service September 
16, 1861. 

Lucius K. Woddbury, mustered into service Septem 
ber 10, 1 86 1. 

Buel W. Brainard, mustered into service August 26, 
1861. 

Henry Beach, mustered into service September 10, 
i86z. 

Moses C. Rist, mustered into service September 10, 
1861. 

Corwin Spencer, mustered into service September 10, 
1861. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 165 

Lewis Price, mustered into service August 19, 1861. 

Johnson W. Mattison, mustered into service August 
26, 1861. 

Luther H. Canfield, mustered into service August 14, 
1861. 

Henry H. Ray, mustered into service October 15, 
1861. 

The following names appear upon the original roster 
but do not again occur : Rufus Daniels, Edward B. 
Fitts, Charles N. Bancroft, E. P. Hall, S. H. Kent, and 
E. B. Woodbury. 



COMPANY A. 

Mustered into service September 7, 1861. Mustered 
out by reason of expiration of term of service. 

Captain William T. Fitch, promoted colonel July 17, 
1864. 

Captain Everson J. Hurlburt, promoted second lieu 
tenant February 28, 1862; first lieutenant May i, 1862; 
captain June 28, 1863; major April 10, 1865; lieutenant- 
colonel July 12, 1865. 

Captain David W. Thomas, promoted first lieutenant 
company H January 6, 1864 (see company H); captain 
company A April 19, 1865. 

First Lieutenant Leverett Grover, resigned January 28, 
1862. 

First Lieutenant William S. Crowell, resigned April 13, 
1862. 

First Lieutenant Winthrop H. Grant, promoted second 
lieutenant May 15, 1863; to first lieutenant July 18, 
1863; killed in battle at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 



1 66 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

First Lieutenant Silas G. Elliott, promoted second 
lieutenant June 18, 1863; first lieutenant May 25, 1864; 
captain company E January 6, 1865 (see company E). 

First Lieutenant Thaddeus E. Hoyt, promoted first 
sergeant June 12, 1864; first lieutenant January 21, 
1865. 

Second Lieutenant Martin D. Norris, resigned October 
28, 1862. 

NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 

Sergeant Everson J. Hurlburt, promoted. 

Sergeant Chauncy H. Coon, promoted first sergeant 
February 28, 1862; discharged September 30, 1864. 

Sergeant Winthrop H. Grant, promoted to first lieu 
tenant July 18, 1863; killed at Dug Gap, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Silas G. Elliott, promoted. 

Sergeant Wallace B. Hoyt, died in Andersonville 
prison October 20, 1864. 

Corporal Newton B. Adams, transferred to company 
I December 17, 1861. 

Corporal Andrew L. Rickard, killed in battle, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Corporal Roderick M. Gates, died at Alexandria, Vir 
ginia, August 27, 1863. 

Corporal Thaddeus E. Hoyt, promoted. 

Corporal Marcus F. Robert, promoted. 

Corporal Joseph B. Dalrymple, mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal James M. Loomis, discharged April 17, 
1863. 

Corporal Henry C. Rood, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Drummer Richard Lewsi, transferred to non-commis 
sioned staff November i, 1863. 

Wagoner William Daniels, discharged June 28, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 167 

PRIVATES. 

James M. Bronson, mustered out with company. 

Marshall A. Brown, died at Winchester, Virginia, 
March 10, 1862. 

Pulaski B. Broughton, mustered out by reason of ex 
piration of term of service September 9, 1864. 

Henry E. Clafflin, mustered out with company. 

Francis M. Canfield, discharged July 23, 1862. 

Charles Covert, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
August 14, 1863. 

Mortimer M. Canfield, transferred to Veteran Reserve 
corps September i, 1863. 

Loren M. Coon, promoted to corporal January i, 
1864. 

Emory G. Clark, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
February 15, 1864. 

Julius Coleburn, discharged April 3, 1862. 

Henry Decker, discharged July 30, 1862. 

Perry A. Decker, discharged October 4, 1862. 

Alma L. Dalrymple, died at Winchester, Virginia, May 
2, 1862. 

George H. Dudley, discharged January 30, 1863. 

Henry Turner, discharged October 18, 1864. 

Daniel Thatcher, mustered out with company. 

Horace E. Woodin, mustered out with company. 

W. B. Shearer, discharged June 20, 1865. 

Abram Exceen, discharged October 9, 1862. 

John A. Exceen, promoted to corporal January i, 
1864. 

John Ellis, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
March 30, 1865. 

Alpheus A. Fenton, transferred to Veteran Reserve 
corps August i, 1863. 

Joseph M. Sober, discharged February 6, 1863. 



1 68 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

William A. Thompson, discharged October 9, 1862. 

Eli P. Young, discharged April 5, 1863. 

Charles H. Broughton, discharged June 28, 1862. 

George Birch, discharged June 28, 1862. 

Edwin O. Brown, died from wounds received at Gettys 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 20, 1863. 

William A. Frisbie, discharged November 8, 1864. 

Leonard Grover, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Rosalva W. Graham, discharged November i, 1862. 

John W. Henry, discharged July 10, 1862. 

Sylvester Hyde, discharged July 20, 1862. 

Cyrus Hendrick, discharged for wounds received at 
Gettysburg July 3, 1863, October 17, 1863. 

Edwin W. Hernck, mustered out with company. 

Eli M. Holcomb, discharged November 22, 1862. 

John Hague, promoted to first sergeant. 

Addison Harley, discharged July 25, 1862. 

William C. Ives, died at Cumberland, Maryland, 
March 5, 1862. 

Eli C. Joles, discharged July 2, 1862. 

George W. Jones, mustered out with company. 

Lafayette M. Johnson, promoted to first sergeant 
March i, 1865. 

Adrian M. Knowlton, killed in battle at Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Henry Bolster, discharged November 30, 1862. 

Almond O. Hungerford, discharged November i, 
1861. 

Wallace R. Williams, discharged June 13, 1865. 

Elizer Wilder, discharged July 22, 1862. 

William L. Wood, promoted to corporal January i, 
1864. 

Montezuma St. John, discharged August 5, 1862. 

Robert E. Woodbury, discharged June 25, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 169 

Augustus Thompson, discharged July 20, 1862. 

John W. Bartlett, discharged July 28, 1862. 

Sylvester C. Buck, discharged June 13, 1862. 

Ammi B. Benjamin, promoted to corporal June i, 
1865. 

Christopher C. Bugbee, discharged June 28, 1862. 

Emory J. Maltby, promoted to first sergeant June 15, 
1864. 

Albert H. Frayer, promoted to corporal June i, 1865. 

Orlin B. Laskey, discharged September 9, 1864. 

Starr O. Latimer, discharged March 14, 1863. 

James E. March, discharged February 4, 1863. 

Abram W. McNaughton, died at Cumberland, Mary 
land, January 28, 1862. 

Gillispie B. Mowry, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Franklin B. Mowry, mustered out with company. 

Franklin Potter, killed in battle of Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Emerson Richerson, died at Cumberland, Maryland, 
March 10, 1862. 

Cyrus Roath, killed in battle at Pine Knob, Georgia, 
June 15, 1864. 

Burdette L. Roberts, discharged August 4, 1862. 

Nelson W. Simmons, discharged July 17, 1862. 

John Sylvester, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Wilber Sloat, mustered out with company. 

Theodore Smith, died at Bridgewater, Alabama, March 
25, 1864. 

John Shears, discharged September 12, 1862. 

Alonzo Squires, discharged May 18, 1862. 

Pickering P. Smith, promoted to sergeant. 

Silas R. Thompson, discharged April 5, 1863. 

Corporal Seth N. Hubbard, died at Martinsburg, Vir 
ginia, April 12, 1862. 



I7O TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Volney Wilson, mustered out with company. 

Thaddeus W. Simmons, discharged June 20, 1862. 

Abram B. Durfee, mustered out with company. 

Nathaniel Wilder, mustered out with company. 

George De Wolf, discharged October 9, 1861. 

David Fox, discharged November i, 1861. 

Ferdinand Burt, transferred to company K November, 
i, 1861. 

Washington I. Butcher, transferred to Veteran Re 
serve corps, September i, 1863. 

Almoner. Woodruff, transferred to company I, Decem^ 
ber 17, 1861. 

Almond O. Hun gerford, discharged November i, 
1861. 

RECRUITS OF 1862. 

George Root, died at Dumfries, Virginia, March 16, 
1863. 

William Monger, absent without leave. 
Robert Monger, absent without leave. 
Stephen H. Crane, discharged January n, 1863. 
Diodate Ensign, discharged February 15, 1863. 
Reuben Smith, discharged August 3, 1863. 
Gaius St. John, discharged February 15, 1863. 
Charles Babb, discharged June 5, 1865. 
L. H. Dalrymple, discharged June 5, 1865. 
James O. Latimer, discharged March 30, 1863. 
Isaac Monger, discharged June 5, 1865. 
Oscar Parkill, discharged April 10, 1865. 
Samuel Ray, discharged June i, 1865. 

RECRUITS OF 1864. 

Daniel B. Alderman, mustered out with company. 
Isaac E. Haggett, wounded near Marietta, Georgia, 
July i, 1864; mustered out, with company. 
Alonzo LeBlanc, mustered out with company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 17 I 

Francis Wilbur, mustered out with company. 

Thomas Bonner, substitute, captured March n, 
1865. 

Isaac Brian, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Daniel Brook, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Jacob Critten, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Peter B. Covert, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John Carey, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Jesse Freel, drafted, discharged July 7, 1865. 

Jacob Kramp, drafted, discharged July 12, 1865. 

James Mitchell, drafted, mustered out with company. 

George McKammin, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Charles Blake, substitute, died at Savannah, Georgia, 
December 31, 1864. 

Robert McKee, drafted, died in North Carolina, April 
6, 1865. 

Henry Miller, drafted, died at Savannah, Georgia, 
March 31, 1865. 

Jacob Ballenbach, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Jacob Cunningham, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Gottleib Fell, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Franklin Hawkins, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Jacob Kanauf, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Ferdinand Kable, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry Oswald, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

James O. Parker, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Isaac Samms, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Smalley, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 



172 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Joseph Sockwell, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Walter St. John, transferred to regimental band Sep 
tember 20, 1861. 

Seth E. Wilson, transferred to company I, December 
17, 1861. 



COMPANY B. 

Mustered into service September 7, 1861. 

Captain Wilbur F. Stevens, discharged at expiratiori 
of term of service, September 9, 1864. 

Captain Thomas W. Nash, promoted second lieuten 
ant October 30, 1862; first lieutenant June 29, 1864; 
captain October 12, 1864; mustered out with company. 

Captain Andrew Wilson, promoted first lieutenant 
November 26, 1862; promoted captain May 25, 1864, 
discharged by expiration of term of service October 31; 
1864. 

First Lieutenant Alfred Bishop, resigned February 13, 
1863. 

Second Lieutenant John J. Hoyt, joined for service in 
1862; resigned November i, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant Edward T. Curtis, joined com 
pany as second lieutenant October i, 1862; detached in 
Veteran Reserve corps March 20, 1864; promoted first 
lieutenant May 25, 1864; mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Benjamin N. Smith, transferred to non-com 
missioned staff May i, 1862. 

Sergeant Joel E. Tanner, promoted second lieutenant 
June 25, 1864; killed at Pine Knob, Georgia, June 15, 
1864. 

Sergeant Francis M. Hewitt, discharged June 19, 
1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 173 

Sergeant Perry O. Warren, discharged September 24, 
1862. 

Sergeant Byron A. Isham, discharge not furnished. 

Sergeant Nathan A. Germond, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Lewis Montgomery, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant A. J. Langworthy, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Henry F. Brainard, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Henry E. Clark, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Rush Griswold, promoted first lieutenant 
company F, May 26, 1865. 

Sergeant George McNutt, transferred to non-commis 
sioned staff, April 6, 1865. 

Corporal Orville Fairbrothers, died May 27, 1862. 

Corporal Levi K. Bean, died of wounds April 2, 1862. 

Corporal Darius B. Peck, discharged August 5, 1862. 

Corporal Frank A. Chapman, discharged January 3, 
1863. 

Corporal Elbridge Potter, discharged for wounds, 
November 27, 1864. 

Corporal Albert Bishop, transferred to company I, De 
cember 30, 1861. 

Corporal Edwin Furman, discharged June i, 1862. 

Corporal Spencer Atkin, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Albert H. Benham, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal John Davis, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Vanness Jordan, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Henry Hicks, mustered out with company. 

Musician George W. Miles, died June 20, 1862. 

Musician Hamilton SeCheverell, captured at Winches- 



174 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

ter, May 14, 1862; discharged July 3, 1862, by reason 
of General Order No. 65, A. G. O. 

Musician John Price, transferred to regimental band, 
September 10, 1861. 

Musician Lewis Price, transferred to regimental band, 
September 10, 1861. 

Musician Henry Cedar, captured; discharged June 15, 
1865. 

Isaiah Bramard, discharged September 9, 1864. 

Newell Hicks, discharged September 9, 1864. 

Milton B. Hoskins, discharged September 9, 1864. 

Manley A. Rowe, discharge not furnished. 

Robert Stewart, discharge not furnished. 

Harvey Beckwith, killed at Winchester, Virginia, 
March 23, 1862. 

Alvinson A. Kinney, killed at Cedar Mountain, Au 
gust 9, 1862. 

John Baur, captured June 9, 1862, died in rebel 
prison. 

Conant Brainard, died April 30, 1862. 

Charles F. Baur, died April 19, 1862. 

Andrew Bright, recruit of 1862, died June 2, 1864. 

George Gale, recruit of 1862, died April 14, 1863. 

Herman O. Holmes, died April 6, 1862. 

Clark Hull, died July 14, 1862. 

Jacob Kohler, died May 4, 1862. 

Newcomb Knapp, died April 23, 1862. 

John Marvin, died February 7, 1862. 

Robert McFall, died June 27, 1862. 

Jonas Newman, died April 5, 1862. 

Dyer Newcomb, died January 29, 1863. 

William Potter, died of wounds, July 8, 1864. 

Albert Rogers, died January 7, 1862. 

Jesse Rockwell, died February 25, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 175 

Robert Sills, died in Libby Prison, no date. 

William H. Vanscoit, died April 5, 1862. 

Rufus Wilson, died June i, 1862. 

Cassius Giddings, claimed as minor September 9, 
1861. 

Jerome Doe, absent without leave. 

Benson L. Raskins, absent without leave. 

Frank Leonard, absent without leave. 

Walter Nelson, recruit of 1862, discharged November 
n, 1862. 

Gilbert Rowe, absent without leave. 

Hannibal Smith, absent without leave. 

Darius Ames, discharged September 25, 1863. 

Elmer T. Allen, discharged June 2, 1862. 

Samuel S. Andrews, discharged June 18, 1862. 

Leslie P. Allen, discharged May 30, 1862. 

Franklin B. Ackley, discharged June 12, 1862. 

Monroe Burgett, discharged September 14, 1862. 

Lewis Baur (1862), discharged November 5, 1862. 

Oscar J. Burbank, discharged February 15, 1863. 

Thomas Beckwith, discharged June 26, 1862. 

William R. Carr, discharged August 6, 1862. 

Sterling Chapman, discharged January 30, 1862. 

Andrew J. Curtiss (1862), discharged December 20, 
1863. 

Frederick Case, discharged February 13, 1863. 

Benjamin H. Durfee, discharged October 25, 1862. 

Holce Durfee, discharged March 3, 1863. 

Joseph C. DeWolf, discharged February 13, 1863. 

Mortimer DeWolf, discharged December 31, 1862. 

John W. Ingersoll, discharged October 16, 1862. 

Joseph H. Failer, discharged October 12, 1862. 

Edwin C. Holmes discharged June 18, 1862. 

Ralph Hartwell, (1862), discharged October 29, 1862. 



I 76 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Nelson Hendrick, discharged December 15, 1862. 

Frank Hartwell (1862), discharged December 10, 
1862. 

David Knapp (1862), discharged November i, 1863. 

Alfred Lewis (1862), discharged March 5, 1863. 

Earl P. McArthur, discharged April 12, 1862. 

Charles W. Matthews, discharged September 15, 
1862. 

Robert -McKee, discharged February 13, 1862. 

Daniel Potter, discharged October 25, 1862. 

Seth C. Pierce, discharged October 20, 1862. , 

Reuben Pitney (1862), discharged November i, 
1862. 

Edward Phillips, discharged April 5, 1863. 

Stephen A. Stanley, discharged February 13, 1863. 

Lamson Wright, discharged February 13, 1863. 

Sidney B. Wilder, discharged February 13, 1863. 

Samuel R. Emmes (1862), transferred to Invalid 
corps February 16, 1864. 

Albert Grate, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
June 15, 1864. 

Finley Hollett, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
March 20, 1864. 

Byron A. McArthur, transferred to company I, De 
cember 30, 1861. 

Stephen Sturdevant, transferred to company I, De 
cember 15, 1861. 

George W. Atkin, mustered out with company. 

Job Brazee, mustered out with company. 

Daniel J. Baur, mustered out with company. 

Dudly Brown, mustered out with company. 

William P. Johnson, mustered out with compauy. 

James Rounds, mustered out with company. 

George Wright, mustered out with company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 177 

Peter Dennis, mustered out with company. 

John Edwards (1863), wounded at Mill Creek, Geor 
gia, mustered out with company. 

Jeremiah Hennesy (1863), mustered out with com 
pany. 

James Ryan (1863), discharged July 10, 1865. 

Daniel A. Smith, no record of discharged. 

George Barne, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Michael R. Godfrey, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

John Mason, substitute, musteaed out with company. 

Samuel S. McDonald, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

Joseph Pearce, drafted, sick in hospital. 

Martin V. Rudolph, drafted, discharged July 5, 1865. 

Adam Rymond, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John A. Trackler, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Robert Stewart, substitute, sick in hospital. 

John Tester, substitute, sick in hospital. 

Albert W. Atkins, killed at Dallas, Georgia, May 29, 
1864. 

Jerome Phinney, killed at Dallas, Georgia, May 29, 
1864. 

Cornelius A. Davis, killed at Dallas, Georgia, May 29, 
1864. 

Melancthon Poe, substitute, died at Savannah, Geor 
gia, February 15, 1865. 

Jacob Scott, drafted, died at Savannah, Georgia, De 
cember 22, 1864. 

George W. Warden, 1863, died at Marietta, Georgia, 
October 29, 1864. 



178 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

George W. Wright, died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
May 31, 1864. 

Samuel S. Andrews, discharged June 5, 1865. 

John Burns, discharged November 17, 1864. 

Peter Dancoe, 1863, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Thomas B. Dustin, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Andrew J. Folk, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Cyrus Grubb, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry H. Harder, 1862, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Andrew Hogan, 1863, discharged May 6, 1865. 

Leonard Hammond, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Daniel Heck, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Harrison Hay, substitute, discharged May 26, 1865. 

William Julien, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Joseph S. Lewis, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Byron Moffett, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Samuel Myres, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Ely Oaks, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

George W. Stocking, 1862, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William H. Stration, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Rees Hickey, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Leroy Sill, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

John C. Shaw, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Avery Turner, 1862, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Thornton, drafted, discharged June 17, 1865. 

Charles Wilson, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Jacob W. Yohe, drafted, discharged June 12, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 79 



COMPANY C. 

Mustered into service September 7, 1861. 

Captain Edward Hayes, promoted to 
signed to staff July 17, 1863. 

Captain Rollin L. Jones, promoted from first ser 
geant to captain January 6, 1865 ; captured at Port Re 
public June 9, 1862 j wounded at Pine Knob, Georgia, 
June 9, 1864; mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Benjamin F. Perry, resigned, by rea 
son of disability, June 20, 1862. 

First Lieutenant Frank T. Stewart, promoted and as 
signed to duty at Alexandria, Virginia, April 3, 1863. 

First Lieutenant Almor B. Paine, promoted from pri 
vate to first lieutenant January 6, 1865; captain January 
29, 1865, and assigned to company F (see company F). . 

Second Lieutenant Henry M. Ryder, promoted from 
sergeant-major April 10, 1863; died at Georgetown, Dis 
trict of Columbia, September 25, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant Charles W. Kellogg, promoted to 
second lieutenant June 20, 1862; first lieutenant April 
3, 1863; to captain October 12, 1864; transferred to 
company F.(see company F). 

Second Lieutenant Giles R. Leonard, transferred to 
non-commissioned staff as quartermaster-sergeant Au 
gust 8, 1864; promoted first lieutenant May 31, 1865; 
mustered out with company. 

Sergeant George W. Britton, killed at Port Republic, 
Virginia, June 9, 1862. 

Sergeant Daniel W. Rolph, discharged, date unknown. 
Sergeant George W. Beckwith, transferred to non 
commissioned staff, May ist, 1862. 



l8o TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Sergeant Nelson H. Bailey, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Warren A. Baker, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Charles C. Fitts, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Obed. K. Phelps, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Eli Britton, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Charles W. Kellogg, promoted June 20. 1862. 

Sergeant Rollin L. Jones, promqted January 6, 1865. 

Corporal William A. Burwell, killed at Port Republic?, 
June 9, 1862. 

Corporal Henry M. Ryder, promoted to sergean 
major, and transferred to non-commissioned staff. 

Corporal John Chapell, discharged November n, 
1862. 

Corporal Algernon Kingsley, discharged November u, 
1862. 

Corporal Hiram Laughlin, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Joel W. Lee, mustered out with company. 

Corporal William N. Runyon, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal John Warren, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Henry C. Lord, mustered out with company 

Corporal James Wenham, mustered out with company- 
Corporal Michael Maloney, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Charles J. Galpin, mustered out with com. 
pany. 

Corporal Joseph Winby, mustered out with company. 

Henry C. Carey, served three years; discharged. 

Edgar O. Miller served three years; discharged. 

Beneville Miller served three years; discharged. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. l8l 

John Gray, killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Julius Lavelle, killed at Chancellorsville, Virginia, 
May 3, 1863. 

Allen L. Monty, killed at Port Republic, Virginia, 
June 9, 1862. 

John Williams, killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
July 3, 1863. 

John Yokes, killed at Cedar Mountain, Virginia, 
August 9, 1862. 

Willis Sisley, killed at Port Republic, Virginia, June 9, 
1862. 

Albert H. Beardsley, died at Cumberland, Maryland, 
February 17, 1862. 

Oliver P. Crosby, died at Edinburg, Virginia, April 23, 
1862. 

Romeo Churchill, died at Harper s Ferry, Virginia, 
January 13, 1863. 

Charles E. Dudley, died at Cumberland, Maryland, 
February 4, 1862. 

Wellington G. Gillett, died at Mount Jackson, Vir 
ginia, May 20, 1862. 

David B. Parker, died from wounds received, August 
12, 1862. 

James Thomas, died at Cumberland, Maryland, March 
9, 1862. 

Aaron Warner (1862), died at Bridgeport, Alabama, 
June 3, 1864. 

William P. Dady, absent without leave. 

Asa J. Dibble (1862), absent without leave. 

James C. Griffin (1862), absent without leave. 

Floyd D. Lane, mustered out with company. 

John Leslie, absent without leave. 

William H. Shires, absent without leave. 
Stephen Warren, discharged April 21, 1863. 



182 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Loren B. Brainard, discharged August 5, 1862. 

Sherman W. Bronson, discharged July 15, 1863. 

Thaddeus R. Brown, discharged November 26, 1862. 

Daniel V. Chaffee, discharged, date unknown. 

Luther Clark, discharged April 15, 1862. 

Robert A. Cunningham, discharged February 18, 
1863. 

James Clark (1862), discharged May 14, 1863. 

Charles W. DeWitt, discharged, date unknown. 

Edwin M. Devan, discharged November 13, 1863. 

George Eastlick, discharged for wounds, June 9, 1862,, 

George Enos, discharged August 5, 1862. 

Marvin E. Forbes, discharged October 29, 1862. 

John A. Frazier, discharged June 27, 1864. 

Edwin Gibbs, discharged April 3, 1863. 

Joseph Hall, discharged for wounds November 6, 
1862. 

Daniel S. Halstead, discharged July 21, 1862. 

Hiram Lyons, discharged August 15, 1862. 

Lester W. Leavitt (1862), ditcharged October 29, 
1862. 

Lucius O. Linsley, discharged October 30, 1862. 

Norman Morrill, discharged, date unknown. 

Erwin F. Mason, discharged for wounds received at 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1863. 

Byron Philps (drummer), discharged April 3, 1863. 

Wellington Palmer, discharged, date unknown. 

John D. Rea, discharged July 8, 1862. 

David Ryckman, discharged October 30, 1862. 

James F. Rowley, discharged July 8, 1862. 

William Yokes, discharged for wounds received Sep 
tember i, 1864. 

Chauncy Brainard (musician), transferred to regimen 
tal band September 10, 1861. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 183 

Sylvester Strickland, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Buel W. Brainard (musician), transferred to regimen 
tal band September 10, 1861. 

Albert E. Brainard (musician), transferred to regimen 
tal band September 10, 1861. 

Russell W. Cross, transferred to Invalid corps August 
i, 1863. 

William J. Chambers, transferred to Invalid corps 
August i, 1863. 

William Eldred, transferred to company I December 
13, 1861. 

James Fleming, transferred to company F, November 
i, 1861. 

Thomas F. Henderson, transferred to company I De 
cember 13, 1861. 

Ransom S. Krahl, transferred to company I December 
13, 1861. 

Johnson W. Mattison, transferred to regimentrl band 
September 10, 1861. 

Thomas J. Merrill, transferred to Invalid corps, De 
cember i, 1863. 

Martin Owen, transferred to company I December 13, 
1861. 

John R. Policy, transferred to company I December 
15, 1861. 

Euclid M. Supplee, transferred to company I Decem 
ber 15. 1861. 

John Sage, transferred to company I December 15, 
1861. 

John Scofield, transferred to company F November i, 
1861. 

Henry Strale (1862), transferred to invalid corps. 

Orlando Wakeman, transferred to company I Decem 
ber 15. 1861. 



184 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Truman A. Kellogg (wagoner), mustered out with 
company. 

Warren Algers, mustered out with company. 

George D. Brockett, wounded May 8, 1864, dis 
charged July 22, 1865. 

Johnson Noble, captured, mustered out with company. 

Charles E. Parkill, wounded, mustered out with com- 
pany. 

Henry C. Price, captured, mustered out with company. 

Benjamin F. Sperry, captured, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John C. Shaw, missing in action at Peach Tree Creek, 
Georgia July 20, 1864. 

James Turton, captured, mustered out with company. 

David Thomas, wounded, mustered out with company. 

David Clark (1862), discharged July 12, 1865. 

Obed Knapp (1862), mustered out with company. 

Christe Arnold, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Frederick Blench, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Aus. Bowman, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Charles Clause, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Andrew Goff, drafted, mustered out with company. 

John Humbell, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Albert Kunerd, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Eibs Lemmers, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Lorenz Paul, drafted, mustered out with company. 

John Ritter, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Andrew Reser, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Abraham Schivenforth, drafted, mustered out with 
company. 

Frank Slomp, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Henry Lunnemen, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 185 

Frank S. Faller, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John Kepler, joined the company at Camp Chase, 
Ohio, January, 1862; killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 
8, 1864. 

Jacob Dunkell, drafted, died April 17, 1865. 

Allen Mason, died from wounds May 29, 1864. 

Charles F. W. Marshall, substitute, absent without 
leave. 

John Aid, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Israel Bech (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

William H. Clark, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Sidney O. Crosby (1861), discharged June 9, 1865. 

Fred Deffinger, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Aaron Everly (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

Samuel E. Fay (1862), discharged May 26, 1865. 

Michael Fisher, drafted, June 5, 1865. 

William Hawk (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Hettishimer, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

William Helmholz, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Hollis, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

John E. Kelk, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Christian Kah, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Dryden Lindsley (1861), wounded May 8, 1864; leg 
amputated; discharged January 9, 1865. 

John L: Myer, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Hiram O. Morgan (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

Jacob Buck, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

George Roesch, substitute, discharged June 7, 1865. 

Daniel Schaunn, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

James Fleming, wounded at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 
8, 1864; transferred to Veteran Reserve corps. 



1 86 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Martin Winkel, drafted, discharged June 10, 1865. 
Andrew Main, transferred to naval service, no date. 
Micajah J. Rice, transferred to company D July 31, 
1865. 



COMPANY D. 

Mustered into service September 27, 1861. 

Captain Pulaski C. Hard, resigned March 13, 1862. 

Captain Myron T. Wright, promoted to captain Nov 
ember 26, 1862; promoted to major January 5, 1864. % 

Captain Lyman H. McAdams, promoted to first lieu 
tenant November 12, 1864; promoted to captain January 
6, 1865; mustered out with company. 

Captain George W. Dice, promoted to first lieutenant 
April 13, 1862; promoted to captain May 25, 1864; 
killed in action at Pine Knob, Georgia, June 17, 1864. 

First Lieutenant Joshua Hile, promoted to first lieu- 
teant January 6, 1865; mustered out with company. 

Second Lieutenant James H. Grinnell, honorably dis 
charged April 10, 1864. 

Sergeant George W. Dice, promoted. 

Sergeant John H. Knox, died at Strasburg, Virginia, 
May 22, 1862. 

Sergeant William E. Dockery, transferred to company 
I, December 23, 1861. 

Sergeant Joseph C. Ewart, discharged April 20, 1862. 

Sergeant Lyman H. McAdams, promoted -and trans 
ferred to non-commissioned staff, May 18, 1863. 

Sergeant Charles G. Talcott, veteran, mustered out 
with company. 

Sergeant Joseph Parks, veteran, sick in hospital. 

Sergeant Jacob Rodenbaugh, veteran, mustered out 
with company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 187 

Sergeant Jacob Replogle, veteran, mustered out with 
company. 

Sergeant John G. Wait, veteran, mustered out with 
company. 

Sergeant Samuel Wooldridge, veteran, killed at Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal Lewis B. Starks (1861), served three years. 

Corporal George Welsh (1861), served three years. 

Corporal Frederick C. Remley, killed at Port Republic, 
Virginia, June 9, 1862. 

Corporal Laben Robinson, discharged April 4, 1863. 

Corporal William A. Hart, discharged December 22, 
1862. 

Corporal James S. Alexander, discharged September 
27, 1864. 

Corporal Leonard E. Gaylord, mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal Jacob C. Glass, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Norman Cochran, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Edy Randall, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Walter Randall (1863), mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal George Faust, killed at Dug Gag, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Corporal George J. Young, died frcm wounds, July i, 
1865. 

Corporal Charles Steese (1862), discharged, G. O. 
No. 77, June 5, 1865. 

Corporal Norman J. Smith, transferred to Veteran 
Reserve corps, March 8, 1865. 

Hiram Harring (1861), served three years. 

George Montenyohl (1861), served three years. 

Washington Shanfelt (1862), served three years. 



1 88 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Henry A. Thompson (1861), served three years. 

John B. Yohey (1861), served three years. 

William H. Alexander (1861), no record. 

Eber Bennett (1862), killed at Pine Knob, Georgia, 
June 1 6. 1864. 

Thomas J. Bare (1862), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Benjamin F. Pontious killed at Gettysburg, Penn 
sylvania, July 3, 1863. 

Samuel Shanafelt (1862), killed at Chancellorsville, 
Virginia, May 3, 1863. 

Charles A. Clapp, died at Jefferson, Ohio, December 
5, 1861. 

Elisha Hamilton, died at Luray, Virginia, June 24, 
1862. 

William H. Jones, died at Lynchburg, Virginia, July 

21, 1862. 

. Leonard Squires, died from wounds at Alexander, Vir 
ginia, September 4, 1862. . 

Andrew Wolcott, died at Alexandria, Virginia, Sep 
tember 4, 1862. 

Elias Walters (1862), died at Dumfrees, Virginia, 
April 10, 1863. 

Evan H. Wright (1862), died at Frederick, Maryland, 
December 7, 1862. 

Alvin W. Niman, died at Cumberland, Maryland, 
March 14, 1862. 

George W. McCormick, absent without leave. 

Warren B. Crane, musician, discharged October 22, 
1862. 

Bennett H. Wadsworth, musician, discharged Septem 
ber 26, 1863. 

Andrew Hunsicker, wagoner, discharged November 9, 
1863. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 189 

William H. Bloomfield, discharged August 22, 1862. 
Lewis Ball (1862), discharged July 17, 1863. 
John G. Caskey (1862), discharged July 17, 1864. 
Rufus T. Chapman, discharged September 27, 1864. 
William C. Finney, discharged June 8, 1863. 
Marshal Hoagland, discharged September 27, 1864. 
Enoch Hastings, discharged August 2, 1862. 
John H. Hue, discharged June 4, 1863. 
William Hile (1862), discharged December 3, 1862. 
Phineas B. Jones, discharged August 22, 1862. 
John A. Jones, discharged July 25, 1862. 
John Lamberson, discharged June 15, 1863. 
Noah Leohrer, discharged February 18, 1863. 
Lauren Merrian, discharged July 22, 1862. 
William Midisker, discharged January 19, 1863. 
William Mendleson, discharged December 20, 1862. 
Henry W. Morrill, discharged December 20, 1862. 
Almon Nimon, discharged August 17, 1862. 
Richard Partridge, discharged November 4, 1862. 
Isaac Powlus, discharged October 23, 1862. 
Hiram Ream, discharged February 18, 1863. 
Lewis Richardson, discharged December 10, 1862. 
William C. Stoughton, discharged August 3, 1862. 
John G. Stinhour, discharged August 17, 1862. 
Solomon Streeker, discharged June 5, 1862. 
Edwin E. Skinner, discharged August 17, 1862. 
Lansing D. Standish, discharged January 18, 1863. 
John H. Steese, discharged November 16, 1862. 
Merwin Shaw (1862), discharged November 14, 1862. 
John H. Snyder, discharged April 7, 1865. 
Presley Thomas (1862), discharged October 3, 1863. 
George Fordt (1862), discharged May 20, 1863. 
Valentine Viers, discharged April 4, 1863. 
Henry F. Waters, discharged August 15, 1862. 



IQO TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Gurley G. Crane, musician, promoted. 

Charles Dudley, transferred to company I December 
23, 1861. 

Horace H. Heath, transferred to company I Decem 
ber 22. 1861. 

Stephen Kissinger, transferred to company I Decem 
ber 27, 1861. 

Richard Noonan, musician, transferred to veteran 
reserve corps. 

Andrew J. Ream, musician, transferred to company I 
December 30, 1861. 

Micajah J. Rice (1862), transferred to veteran reserve 
corps. 

William P. Williamson, promoted. 

William H. Wright, promoted to commissary sergeant 
Septemper 15, 1861. 

Oscar Brewster, transferred to company F, Seventh 
Ohio regiment; volunteer by re-enlisting December 22, 
1863. 

Joseph Chalfant, discharged June 14, 1865. 

George Ellis, mustered out with company. 

Aaron W. Golden, mustered out with company. 

William D. Haynes, prisoner of war. 

Martin M. Hutchinson, mustered out with company. 

David Hartigan, sick in hospital. 

Luther Lindsley, mustered out with company. 

Samuel W. Parks, transferred to naval service. 

Charles Sherboney, sick in hospital. 

Daniel Schaaf, mustered out with company. 

Jacob Winters, mustered out with company. 

Ezra Spidle (1862), prisoner of war. 

Everett T. Shaw, mustered out with company. 

Montgomery Alexander (1864), mustered out with 
company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. igi 

John H. Becktold (1864), mustered out with com 
pany. 

John A. Burkert (1864), mustered out with company. 

David M. Brown (1864), sick in hospital. 

William E. Dales (1863), mustered out with company. 

Noah W. Taylor (1863), mustered out with company 

John H. Hue (1863), mustered out with company. 

John C. Hawley (1864), mnstered out with company. 

Nicholas Long (1864), sick in hospital. 

Robert Lutz (1863), musteied out with company. 

Isaac Medisker (1863), mustered out with company. 

David W. Powell (1863), sick in hospital. 

James W. H. Snyder (1864), no record of discharge. 

Lorenzo McVallen (1863), mustered out with com 
pany. 

John J. White (1863), mustered out with company. 

Patrick Cox, substitute, mustered out with company. 

James Daily, substitute, mustered out with company. 

William Monroe, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Robert Maryhagh, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John McArty, substitute, no record of discharge. 

Samuel McCarren, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

William D. Bogan, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Alfred Hilbert, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Martin Lowrey, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Henry Reck, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Jacob Snyder, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Benjamin Switzer, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 



192 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Simon Shenk, substitute, mustered out with company. 

Holmes J. White, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Henry A. Hane (1864), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

William Hastings (1864), killed at Dallas, Georgia, 
May 25, 1864. 

John W. Stuer (1864), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Charles A. Downey (1861), wounded at Dug Gap, and 
died at Ringgold, Georgia, May 15, 1864. 

Jacob Gardner (1861), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Christopher Beck (1861), died of wounds September 
16, 1864. 

Stephen J. lies (r86i), died March 8, 1864. 

Theron W. Smith, died July 8, 1864. 

Levi Baughman, died September 2, 1864. 

John H. Montgomery, died June 2, 1864. 

Simon J. Peters, died June 27, 1864. 

John Demland, substitute, died December 8, 1864. 

Charles Mullett, died July i, 1865. 

Levi Rank, drafted, died June 7, 1865. 

Henry E. Bryan, discharged, no date. 

Archey C. Ferguson (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

Francis Huffman (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

George W. Holloway (1862) discharged June 5, 1865. 

Sylvanus Hile, mustered out with company. 

Jacob Koplin, mustered out with company. 

Benjamin Snyder, mustered out with company. 

Edward Spicer, mustered out with company. 

George Shaw, mustered out with company. 

David C. Winkler, 1862, discharged, G. O. No. 77, 
June 5, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 193 

Franklin J. Waltz, mustered out with company. 

Thomas Duny, discharged March 27, 1865. 

Elias Shatt, discharged May 26, 1865. 

Seth M. Thomas, discharged May 28, 1865. 

James Bowles, discharged, G. O. No. 77, June 5, 
1865. 

Daniel D. Luke, discharged June 24, 1865. 

Duncan McKenzie, mustered out with company. 

Peter C. McEvery, mustered out with company. 

Barney Gockey, mustered out with company. 

James H. Scott, mustered out with company. 

Thomas Sanders, mustered out with company. 

Benjamin Showles, discharged, G. O. No. 77, June 5, 
1865. 

William G. Buss, mustered out with company. 



COMPANY E. 

Mustered into service September 27, 1861. 

Captain Horacio Luce, killed in battle of Port Repub 
lic, Virginia, June 8, 1862. 

Captain Ebenezer B. Howard, 1862, promoted from 
second to first lieutenant April 13, 1862; captain June 
9, 1862; resigned March 6, 1863. 

Captain Silas G. Elliott, promoted first sergeant De 
cember 12, 1863; first lieutenant June 12, 1864; cap 
tain, January 21, 1865; transferred from A to E ; 
mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Theron S. Winship, transferred to reg 
imental staff as adjutant, April 13, 1862. 

First Lieutenant Addison J. Andrews, promoted first 
sergeant December. 22, 1863; fi rst lieutenant, January 
21, 1865 ; mustered out with company. 

13 



194 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

First Lieutenant William Neil, 1862, promoted to first 
lieutenant April 13, 1862; resigned January 30, 1863. 

First Lieutenant Thomas W. Nash, promoted to cap 
tain, and transferred to company B January i, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant Albert Durkee, 1862, promoted 
from corporal to second lieutenant April 13, 1862; 
resigned July 9, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant William B. Quirk, joined for duty 
September 19, 1862; resigned October 17, 1862. 

Second Lieutenant Theodore L. Gould, 1862, promoted 
from first sergeant October 27, 1862; discharged for dis- 
ability at Georgetown, District of Columbia, no date. 

Second Lieutenant George Hayward, killed at Gettys 
burg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1863. 

First Sergeant Nathan L. Parmeter, promoted to com 
missary sergeant, transferred to non-commissioned staff, 
June 16, 1865. 

First Sergeant Charles Howard, mustered out with 
company. 

Sergeant Addison E. Tracy, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant William Sterling, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Framcis Culver, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Alonzo H. Sterrett, transferred to United 
States infantry November 22, 1864. 

Sergeant William Colburn, promoted to sergeant June 
16, 1865; mustered out with company. 

Corporal Hiram Dalrymple, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Hiram Thornton, paroled prisoner of war. 

Corporal Lewis Harper, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Charles W. Gary, mustered out with com 
pany. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 1 95 

Corporal Heman Dewey, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Lucius Deane, discharged February 16,1863. 

Corporal Rufus H. Hulburt, 1862, paroled prisoner of 
war. 

Corporal Jacob V. D. Clark (1862), mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal Isaac Dalrymple, killed at Port Republic, 
Virginia, June 9, 1862. 

Corporal George A. Sinclair, discharged July 24, 1862. 

Corporal Daniel Platt, Sr., discharged July 22, 1862. 

Corporal Albert Doty (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

Musician Charles Luce, mustered out with company. 

Musician John S. Bellows, discharged April 3, 1863. 

Wagoner William H. Holden, mustered out with com 
pany. 

PRIVATES. 

Albert Blanchard, served three years. 

John C. Greenlee, served three years. 

George J. Putney, served three years. 

Daniel W. Platt, Jr., served three years. 

Edward Byron, served three years. 

James B. Bagley, killed in battle at Cedar Mountain, 
Virginia, August 9, 1862. 

Orrin Brewer, died at Strasburg, Virginia, May 14, 
1862. 

Andrew Beardsley, died at Alexandria, Virginia, July 
29, 1862. 

G. W. Batchelor, died at Dumfries, Virginia, March 8, 
1863. 

Ethan Davis, died at Cumberland, Maryland, March 
8,^1862. 

Nelson Gillett, died at Pierpont, Ohio, July 15, 1864. 

William Johnson, died at Cumberland, Maryland, April 
10, 1862. 



196 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

James S. Pike, died at Jefferson, Ohio, January 14,. 
1862. 

Harvey A. Reaves, died at Winchester, Virginia, June 
26, 1862. 

Hiram Sly, died in rebel prison in June, 1862. 

Thomas Schultz, died of wounds at Stafford Court 
House, Virginia, May 12, 1863. 

Truman H. Williams, died at Bridgeport, Alabama, 
February 29, 1864. 

Daniel Berringer, absent without leave. 

Washington Ellsworth, absent without leave. 

John S. Haddock, absent without leave. 

Orenus Jones, absent without leave. 

West Roberts, absent without leave. 

Isaac Roberts, absent without leave. 

John Sammon, absent without leave. 

Walter Woodward, absent without leave. 

Herman Benson, discharged July 25, 1862. 

Edward J. Brewer, discharged October 25, 1862. 

Charles Blake, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Wilder H. Crawford, discharged June 26, 1862. 

Albert Crouch, discharged June 6, 1862. 

Elijah Curtis, discharged for wounds July 12, 1862. 

Loren Culver, discharged July 3, 1862. 

Isaac Conklin, discharged August 29, 1862. 

John A. Ford, discharged February 18, 1863. 

David B. Franklin, discharged September 5, 1863. 

David Goodwill, discharged August 3, 1862. 

Wallace W. Hill, discharged August 30, 1862. 

Steven B. Hopkins, discharged March 10, 1863. 

Emery Hopkins, discharged April 3, 1863. 

Charles H. Hawkins, discharged November 27, 1863. 

George A. Lillie, discharged July 24, 1863. 

Marshal Morse, discharged November 24, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 197 

Isaac A. Meeker, discharged July 26, 1862. 

Daniel M. Morley, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Calvin Pier, discharged August 14, 1862. 

James O. Phillips, discharged July 29, 1862. 

Peter Proctor, discharged December 2, 1862. 

Henry Rhoades, discharged July 24, 1862. 

George Ryan, discharged October 25, 1862. 

Stedman J. Rockwell, discharged November 20, 1862. 

William Robinson, discharged November 3, 1862. 

Peter Vanskoik, discharged August 19, 1862. 

Lewis Webber, discharged for wounds September 9, 
1862. 

L. J. Woodward, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Ancil O. Benjamin, transferred to company K Decem 
ber 13, 1861. 

Frederick Brown, transferred to Sixth United States 
cavalry October 31, 1862. 

LeGrand Bivius, transferred to Invalid corps, Septem 
ber 17, 1863. 

George M. Cowgill, transferred to company K, De 
cember 13, 1 86 1. 

Elias H. Durfee, transferred to company K December 
13, 1861. 

Luther Fowler, transferred to company K December 
13, 1861. 

Hiram Griggs, transferred to company K December 
13, 1861. 

Charles P. Rhoades, transferred to Invalid corps Sep 
tember i, 1863. 

Cornelius Hinkle, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 13, 1861. 

Joseph Hammond, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 13, 1861. 



198 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Elwood P. Raines, transferred to non-commissioned 
staff hospital steward, September 16, 1861. 

Levant Hill, transferred to Sixth United States cav 
alry, October 31, 1863. 

Franklin Lovejoy, transferred to Sixth United States 
cavalry, October 31, 1863. 

Thaddeus Marsh, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 29, 1861. 

Lorenzo B. Norton (1862), transferred to invalid corps 
January 12, 1864. 

William Pond, transferred to company K, December 
13, 1861. 

Lewis Shores (1862), transferred to invalid corps, Sep 
tember i, 1863. 

William L. Gary, mustered out with company, 

Roby Dewey, mustered out with company. 

Orlando Gunn, mustered out with company. 

David W. Hall, paroled prisoner. 

Hamilton Hill, on detached service. 

James Jones, mustered out with company. 

Robert Vanskoyt, mustered out with company. 

Henry Warren, mustered out with company. 

Calvin Wilson, mustered out with company. 

Alvah B. Cole (1862), in hospital. 

Thomas G. Franklin (1862), in hospital. 

Joseph R. Lynn (1862), on detached duty. 

Chauncey Mason (1862), in hospital. 

RECRUITS OF 1864. 

Carlisle W. Kinnear, mustered out with company. 
James B. Powers, mustered out with company. 
John P, Benjamin, drafted in hospital. 
James E. Browning, drafted, in hospital. 
William C. Chatman, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 199 

John Cooper, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Isaac N. Elsea, substitnte, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Erastus F. Francis, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Ezra Isham, substitute, in hospital, 

John A. Loach, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Jesse Lake, drafted, in hospital. 

William C. Ramsey, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

William Stiner, substitute, in hospital. 

Riley Toland, drafted in hospital. 

Joseph White, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Albert N. Atwater, died at Monroe, Ohio, July 4, 
1864. 

William F. Boal, drafted, died at New York City, 
April 5, 1865. 

Barney Brick, veteran, died at Atlanta, Georgia, Sep 
tember 8, 1864. 

Thomas S. McCartney, veteran, died of wounds, Chat 
tanooga, Tennessee, July 16, 1864. 

Samuel Perry, substitute, died at New York City April 
8, 1865. 

Adison E. Way, drafted, died at New York City 
April 19, 1865. 

James Braiden, substitute, absent without leave, 

Cyrus B. Boal, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Richard Cash, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

John Cowen, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865, 

Morton M. Cook, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Charles Hermandaffer, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Lewis Jacobs, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 



200 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO. 

Benjamin Holton (1862), discharged December 9, 
1864. 

Peter Jacobs, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry Johnson, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

John W. Kinner (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

John Kuner, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Michael Mayhew, veteran, discharged May 26, 1865. 

Ephraim Oman, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Simon Riley, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Joseph Sucre, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Sherman Tuttle, veteran, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Charles Beckvvorth, transferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corps April 21, 1865. 



COMPANY F. 

Mustered into service September, October, November, 
and December, 1861. 

Captain John T. Morse, resigned April 15, 1862. 

Captain Eleazer Burridge, promoted first lieutenant 
April 13, 1862; captain May i, 1862; discharged Febru 
ary 3, 1863, for wounds received in battle of Port Re 
public June 9, 1862. 

Captain Roland H. Baldwin, promoted first sergeant 
September 16, 1862; promoted to captain February 3, 
1863; resigned November i, 1864. 

Captain Aimer B. Paine, promoted from private to 
sergeant July i, 1862; first sergeant March i, 1863; first 
lieutenant January 6, 1865; captain June 28, 1865; 
mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Hamblin Gregory, resigned January 
26, 1863, disability. 

First Lieutenant Rush Griswold, promoted to corporal 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 2OI 

January i, 1862; sergeant May i, 1862; first sergeant 
June 16, 1864; first lieutenant January 6, 1865; mus 
tered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Charles W. Kellogg, promoted to 
second lieutenant June 20, 1862; first lieutenant January 
26, 1863; captain company K April 24, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant James B. Storer, promoted second 
lieutenant April 13, 1862; first lieutenant and adjutant 
January 26, 1863; to captain October 12, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant Gurley G. Crane, promoted second 
lieutenant March i, 1863; first lieutenant May 25, 1864; 
discharged July 10, 1864. 

Sergeant Harrison L. Martindale, discharged for dis 
ability May 10, 1862. 

Sergeant Joseph Jerome, discharged for wounds Sep 
tember 16, 1862. 

Sergeant Marcus E. Gregory, discharged Aug. i, 1862. 

Sergeant George Gray, discharged February 18, 1863. 

Sergeant Solon Hall, discharged November 10, 1862. 

Sergeant Edwin Williams, died May 23, 1862. 

Sergeant Charles F. Waldron, transferred to Invalid 
corps March 27, 1863. 

Sergeant Aimer B. Paine, promoted. 

Sergeant Absalom Case, promoted to first sergeant; 
mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Cornelius Woodford, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Isaac J. Houghkirk, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Orlando Wilson, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Charles M. Dustin, mustered out with com 
pany. 



202 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO. 

Sergeant R. H. Baldwin, promoted February 3, 
1863. 

Corporal Simpson McLean, mustered out November 
2, 1864. 

Corporal Nathan Harvey, discharged December 13, 
1862. 

Corporal Hugh Macumber, discharged October 8, 
1862. 

Corporal Naaman B. Noyes, discharged November 25, 
1862. 

Corporal Cyrenus Van Volkenburg, discharged No- 
vember 8, 1862. 

Corporal Burton Pickett, died from wounds August 
14, 1862. 

Corporal William Lindsley, transferred to Invalid 
corps March 22, 1864. 

Corporal Spencer E. Balch, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Cornelius V. Clark (1864), mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal Iremus M. Foot (1862), discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Corporal C. N. Hayes, discharged April 18, 1863. 

Charles Cain, served three years; discharged October 
18, 1864. 

Jason Manley, served three years; discharged October 
1 8, 1864. 

Jesse B. Pickett, served three years; discharged Oc 
tober 1 8, 1864. 

Oscar F. Stetson, served three years; discharged Octo 
ber 1 8, 1864. 

John Schofield (musician), discharged February 18, 
1863. 

Daniel Ansinger, discharged February 18, 1863. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 203 

Corwin Broughton, discharged May 10, 1862. 
Job Broughton, discharged June 23, 1862. 
Jason Brigg, discharged October 9, 1862. 
John W. Buele (1862), discharged December n, 1862. 
Caleb S. Buele (1862), discharged March 4, 1863. 
Miles Chadwick, claimed as minor, no date. 
Cornelius V. Clark, discharged November 12, 1862. 
William L. Crosby (1862), discharged March 6, 1863. 
Robert Cannon, discharged October 20, 1862. 
Martin P. Durkee, discharged August 28, 1863. 
Elmer Ewer, discharged November i, 1862. 
James Flood, discharged April 25, 1863. 
Youngs E. Gregory, discharged February 24, 1863. 
Andrew Harroun, discharged June 10, 1862. 
Alexander D. Harroun, discharged February 18, 1863. 
Luther C. Hawley (1862), discharged November 22, 
1862. 

Daniel D. Hill, discharged April i, 1863. 
Parish Joice, discharged May 10, 1862. 
John C. McLean, discharged November 14, 1862. 
Melvin Malone, discharged November 12, 1862. 
Jehiel Maltby (1862), discharged April 10, 1863. 
Frederick Meno, discharged August 12, 1862. 
Eliphalet S. Outis, discharged November 12, 1862. 
George A. Patcher, discharged December 12, 1862. 
Louis Rynd, discharged June 30, 1863. 
Thomas Ryne, discharged April 14, 1863. 
Chester Smith, discharged November 16, 1862. 
Ambrose Sperry, discharged February 8, 1863. 
Peter Shelby, discharged February 8, 1863. 
Pomeroy Smith, discharged April 4, 1863. 
James Thorp, discharged August 12, 1862. 
Ellsworth W. Taylor, discharged October i, 1862. 
George Wick, discharged April 3, 1863. 



204 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Frederick R. Johnson, killed at Port Republic, Vir 
ginia, June 9, 1862. 

Josiah D. Johnson, killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
Julys, 1863. 

Sidney M. Smith, killed at Port Republic, June 9, 
1862. 

Oscar Stickney (musician), died April 28, 1863. 

John A. Austin, died April 2, 1862. 

Hiram E. Balch, died "February 18, 1862. 

John J. Belnap, wounded, died June 17, 1864. 

Franklin Dimock, died February 18, 1862. 

Michael Bowling, died May 18, 1862. 

Alexander Neal, died from wounds March 29, 1862. 

George Meno, died from wounds August 12, 1862. 

Ellison Reed, Jr., died November i, 1862. 

James H. Whitney, died in Libby prison June 3, 
1862. 

Perry H. Chapin, absent without leave. 

John Dodge, absent without leave. 

Robert Davidson, absent without leave. 

Russell Goodrich, absent without leave. 

James Shelby, captured at Fredericksburg May 24, 
1862. 

Peter Smith, absent without leave. 

Henry M. Babcock, held by Sixth Ohio cavalry in 
previous enlistment. 

John Blodgett, transferred to company K, December 
n, 1861. 

John Carson, transferred to invalid corps, August i, 
1863. 

Michael Flinn, transferred to invalid corps December 
9, 1863. 

James Fleming, transferred to company C November 
2, 1861. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 205 

Loren Frisby (1862) transferred to invalid corps Jan 
uary 22, 1864. 

Ellery W. Gray, transferred to company K December 
14, 1861. 

William Knox, transferred to company K December 
14, 1861. 

James King, transferred to Invalid corps August i, 
1863. 

John Sarsfield, transferred to company K December 
14, 1861. 

Jonathan Taylor, transferred to company K Decem 
ber 14, 1861. 

Alonzo Cole, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Call, mustered out with company. 

James Foss, mustered out with company. 

Ellery L. Gray, mustered out with company. 

Asa E. Sanford, honorably discharged, no date. 

Luther Walker, mustered out with company. 

Albert Parker, musician (1864), mustered out with 
company. 

Richard Adams, substitute, sick in hospital. 

Horace Bradley, substitute, discharged May 25, 1865. 

Howard Bell, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Trenton R. Capus, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

John H. Castello, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Andrew P. Debs, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

William Freeman, substitute, discharged July 6, 1865. 

Miron S. Giles, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Augustus Howell, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 



206 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

David Nichols, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Columbus Shoemaker, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

William P. Vins, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Joseph Weaver, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Jabin S. Dustin, killed at Pine Knob, Georgia, June 
15, 1865. 

John L. Best, substitute, died December 5, 1864. 

Richard Conn, drafted, died December 8, 1864. 

Thomas Clifford, drafted, died March 2, 1865. 

Joseph Datson, substitute, died March 2, 1865. 

George Hautworth, drafted, died May 26, 1865. 

Lysander T. King (1864), died May 6, 1865. 

Ephraim Odell, substitute, died February i, 1865. 

Elmore Stevens (1864), died July 10, 1864. 

George Williams (1864), died of wounds June 27, 
1864. . 

Franklin A. Helwig (1864), discharged May 27, 1865. 

William Batchelder (1864), discharged June 17, 1864. 

William F. Babcock, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

George W. Brenfield, substitute, discharged May 27, 
1865. 

Henry C. Canfield, veteran, discharged August 10, 
1864. 

Jacob Cramer, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Thomas Dowling, veteran, discharged May 15, 1865. 

Matthew Dickey, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Joseph Dixon, substitute, discharged May 27, 1865. 

Franklin Flood, veteran, discharged March 8, 1865. 

Samuel Ferguson, substitute, discharged May 27, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 207 

Martin Freshcorn, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Jacob Histend, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Decatur Humphrey (1862), discharged May 22, 1862. 

Alpheus W. Hardy (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

Cassius N. Rixford, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Charles Riley, drafted, discharged June 15, 1865. 

Samuel J. Rodman, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry Stero (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Sober (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 

George S. Scott, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Sheridan B. Smith, discharged January 18, 1865. 

Syrenus VanVolkenburg (1864), discharged May 26, 
1865. 

Peter Bowling, veteran, transferred to First United 
States Pioneer brigade, Army of Cumberland, August 24, 
1864. 



COMPANY G. 

Mustered into service September 30, 1861. 

Captain John S. Clemmer, commissioned captain Sep 
tember 30, 1861; promoted December 21, 1861. 

Captain Josiah J. Wright, commissioned first lieutenant 
September 30, 1861; promoted captain December 21 1 
1861; resigned October i, 1862. 

Captain James Treen, commissioned second lieuten 
ant September 30, 1861; promoted to Captain October 
21, 1862; resigned May 25, 1863. 

Captain Wilbur F. Chamberlain, promoted first ser 
geant December 22, 1863; first lieutenant May 25, 1864; 
captain October 12, 1864; mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Benjamin F. Manderbach, promoted 
corporal December 22, 1863; sergeant May 9, 1864; 



208 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

first sergeant July i, 1864; first lieutenant January 6, 
1865; mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Gary H. Russell (1863), served three 
years; promoted captain October 12, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant W. P. Williamson, Winchester, 
Virginia, March 23, 1862, the first in the regiment to die 
by rebel bullets. 

Sergeant George Strohl, captured June 9, 1862; mus 
tered out October 1 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Albert W. Hall, discharged December 22, 
1864. 

Sergeant Alexander C. French, killed at Cedar Moun 
tain, Virginia, August 9, 1862. 

Sergeant Edward F. Smith, killed at Chancellorsville, 
Virginia, May 3, 1863. 

Sergeant George Sherbondy, died at Aqua Creek, 
Virginia, April 25, 1863. 

Sergeant George Treen, discharged June 20, 1862. 

Sergeant Adam Hart, transferred to Veteran Reserve 
corps, August 8, 1863. 

Sergeant David Y. Cook, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Charles W. Martin, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Isaac Madlem, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Roswell B. Hoffman, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant George Hammontree (1863), mustered out 
with company. 

Sergeant Ellis T. Green, killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Christian F. Remley, killed at Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Lewis Crocker (1862), discharged June 5, 
1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 2Og 

Sergeant Stephen W. Griffith (1862), discharged June 
5, 1865. 

Sergeant C. N. Russell, promoted. 

Sergeant W. F. Chamberlain, promoted. 

Sergeant B. F. Manderbach, promoted. 

Corporal John D. Treen, mustered out December 22, 
1864. 

Corporal Augustus Belden, killed by guerrillas, May 
30, 1862. 

Corporal Charles Robinson, killed at Port Republic, 
Virginia, June 9, 1862. 

Corporal John W. Ewell, died at Cumberland, Mary 
land, March 6, 1862. 

Corporal Alfred P. Atchinson, discharged July 10, 
1862. 

Corporal Conrad Zittle, transferred to Veteran Reserve 
corps, September 30, 1863. 

Corporal George C. Guest (1862), mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal Gustavus A. Monroe, mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal Thomas White. (1862), discharged May i, 
1865. 

Corporal Hammond W. Geer (veteran), discharged 
May 23, 1865. 

Corporal Andrew Thompson, drafted, discharged May 
i, 1865. 

Corporal William Wirt, died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
June 30, 1864. 

Corporal Franklin Wirt, no record. 

Corporal Martin M. Mills, absent without leave. 

Corporal E. B. Hubbard, absent without leave. 

Corporal A. C. French, promoted to sergeant. 

Corporal T. Caldwell, absent without leave. 

14 



210 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Corporal G. F. Hewett (veteran), mustered out with 
company. 

PRIVATES. 

William Fisher, served three years. 

John Gross, served three years. 

Eli Harrington, served three years. 

Frank Metzler, served three years. 

James M. McCormick, served three years. 

John W. Wise, served three years. 

John A. Kummer (1861) in hospital. 

Hiram C. Hill, killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
Julys, 1863. 

William F. Harrington, killed at Peach Tree creek, 
Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

John Rowland, killed byguerrillas, May 3, 1862. 

Jacob Rosenbaum, killed at Port Republic, Virginia, 
June 9, 1862. 

George F. Brayenton, died of wounds May 17, 1864. 

Lewis D. Clemmens, died at Providence, Rhode 
Island, September 7, 1862. 

Robert W. Hall, died at Frederick, Maryland, Jan 
uary 15, 1863. 

Charles D. Hine (1862), died at Middlebury, Ohio, 
March 31, 1863. 

William H. Hartley (1862), died of wounds July 15, 
1864. 

Newton P. Humison, died in rebel prison July 28, 
1862. 

Joseph Loomis, died at Cumberland, Maryland, Feb 
ruary 26, 1862. 

Tallio E. McCain, died of wounds, August 8, 1863. 
James L. Smith (1862), died at Dumfries, Virginia, 
March 3, 1863. 
Urias Reifschneider, absent without leave. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 211 

Inman Lewis (1862), absent without leave. 
Daniel Wise, absent without leave. 
Oscar C. Andrews, claimed as a minor. 
Lester P. Burke, discharged July 16, 1862. 
Albert Bentley, claimed as a minor. 
John Cephus, discharged October 9, 1862. 
Noah Downey discharged June 29, 1864. 
Henry Edson (1862), discharged September 12, 1864. 
Henry H. Ewell, discharged July 21, 1864. 
William A. Haze, discharged June 7, 1862. 
Dudley W. Fisher, discharged June 17, 1862. 
Jacob Gates (1862), discharged November 3, 1862. 
John Huggett, discharged February i, 1863. 
Joseph Limerick, discharged July 16, 1862. 
Jehiel Lane, Jr., discharged October n, 1862. 
John A. Lower, discharged July 16, 1862. 
Oliver Lee, discharged November i, 1861. 
William H. Moore, discharged August 15, 1862. 
James H. McDonald, discharged August 10, 1862. 
George F. West, discharged July 19, 1862. 
John B. Nowling, discharged November 20, 1862. 
Richard D. Riley (1862), discharged April 25, 1863. 
ErnestS. Smith, discharged November 3, 1862. 
James W. Smith, discharged June 12, 1863. 
Ferris Townsend, discharged November 15, 1862. 
Mortimer Vanhyning, discharged October 22, 1861. 
Carroll W. Wright, discharged July 30, 1862. 
Franklin Winkleman, discharged December 22, 1861. 
John Watson, discharged December 19, 1862. 
Charles Young, discharged October n, 1862. 
John Barnes (1862), transferred to Veteran Reserve 
corps September 30, 1863. 

Edward Curtiss (1862), promoted. 
Jehiel Lane, discharged October 24, 1862. 



212 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Christian Conrad, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 14, 1861. 

George W. Deane, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 14, 1861. 

Charles Downey, transferred to company D, Decem 
ber 18, 1863. 

Michael Greenwall, transferred to company I, Decem 
ber 13, 1861. 

William L. Low, transferred to company K, Decem 
ber 14, 1861. 

William Luce (1862), transferred to company K, Jan 
uary 15, 1862. 

David Mclntyre, transferred to company K, January 
i, 1862. 

Louis Pegg, transferred to company I, December 14, 
1861. 

John Randall, transferred to company K, December 
14, 1861. 

De Witt C. Stevens, transferred to company I, Decem 
ber 14, 1861. 

William F. Waterman, transferred to company I, De 
cember 14, 1 86 1. 

Edward Alley (veteran), mustered out with company. 

William Cline (veteran), mustered out with company. 

Thomas Cummins (veteran) mustered out with com 
pany. 

James B. Treen (veteran), prisoner of war. 

Charles Upham (veteran), prisoner of war. 

Samuel Winkleman (veteran), mustered out with com 
pany. 

James Gaule (1862), missing in action May 8, 1864. 

Charles E. Griffin (1862), mustered out with com 
pany. 

Justice Townsley (1862), in hospital May 25, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 213 

Andrew B. Holman (1862), in hospital March i, 
1865. 

Erick Osborn (1862), mustered out with company. 

Frank O. Weary (musician), mustered out with com 
pany. 

George W. Gibson (1864), in hospital July 24, 1864. 

Francis D. Leeds (1864), substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

Norman Bateman (1864), substitute, mustered out 
with company. 

Absalom Brooks (1864), in hospital January 25, 1865. 

Calvin G. Brown (1864), in hospital April 28, 1865. 

William Davis (1864), substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

Patrick Dignen (1864), drafted, mustered out with 
company. 

David Foley (1864), substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

James McPeck (1864), substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

Anderson Montague (1864), drafted, in hospital April 
28, 1865. 

James Suies (1864), substitute, in hospital December 

21, 1864. 

John L. Shipman (1864), substitute, in hospital April 
25, 1865. 

Francis Tucker (1864), absent without leave July 51 
1865. 

John C. Kendrick, mustered out company. 

William C. Lantz (veteran), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

John S. Rape (1864), killed at North Edisto River, 
South Carolina, February 12, 1865. 

Jacob D. Foster (veteran), died March 29, 1864. 



214 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Mitchell Bubbington (1864), substitute, died December 
n, 1864. 

Adam Hulbert (1864), substitute, died March 25, 
1865. 

Morgan Johnson (1864), died February 26, 1864. 

James A. Lane (1864), drafted, died November 25, 
1864. 

George Murray (1863), died of wounds, May 9, 1864. 

John A. Stewart (1864), substitute, died November 29, 
1864. 

John Woodard(i864), died of wounds, May n, 1864. < 

Martin Yingling (1864), absent without leave. 

Ransom J. Fisher (1864), substitute, discharged 
January i, 1865. 

Joseph B. Arbach (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Vincent C. Brown (1864), drafted, discharged June i> 
1865. 

Simon P. Eversole (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Christopher C. Garrison (1864), drafted, discharged 
June 5, 1865. 

John Campbell (1862), discharged May 25, 1865. 

Daniel S. Hardman (1864), drafted, discharged June 
5, 1865. 

Cornelius Horrigan (1864), drafted, discharged June 
5, 1865. 

Byron Law (1864), discharged May 4, 1865. 

George J. McCormick (veteran), discharged June i, 
1865. 

William Rush (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

William H. Stillwell (1864), drafted, discharged June 
5, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 215 

John F. Weidle (veteran), discharged September 29, 
1864. 

William Woodard (1864), discharged September 12, 
1864. 

Thomas Bolton (1864), discharged May 4, 1865. 



COMPANY H. 

Mustered into service in October and November, 
1861. 

Captain William H. Wright, promoted captain April 
9, 1865; mustered out with company. 

Captain Jonas Schoonover, discharged to accept pro 
motion, April i, 1865. 

Captain Andrew J. Fulkerson, promoted to captain 
May 25, 1864; mustered out August 15, 1864. 

First Lieutenant George McNutt, promoted to ser 
geant December 22, 1863 ; sergeant-major March i, 
1865 ; first lieutenant June 19, 1865; mustered out with 
company. 

First Lieutenant David W. Thomas, discharged to 
accept promotion, April i, 1865. 

Second Lieutenant Henry Mack, resigned May 2, 
1862. 

Second Lieutenant Thomas W. Nash, discharged to 
accept promotion June 28, 1864. 

Sergeant Thomas W. Nash, promoted. 

Sergeant O. H. Remington, discharged September 26, 
1863. 

Sergeant James B. Storer, promoted to non-commis 
sioned staff February 15, 1862. 

Sergeant James L. Ferguson, discharged June 18, 
1862. 



2l6 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Sergeant Henry L. Curtiss, discharged October 10, 
1862. 

Sergeant Charles Fairchilds, died at Alexandria, Vir 
ginia, September n, 1862. 

Sergeant Alphonzo Hazzen, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant Reuben Farnam, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Sergeant John Davis, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Floyd Morris, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Thomas Davis, killed at Pine Knob, Geergia^ 
June 15, 1864. 

Sergeant Thomas Folger, promoted. 

Sergeant Jacob Buck, transferred to non-commissioned 
staff. 

Sergeant D. W. Thomas, promoted. 

Corporal Lewis Wagoner, discharged September 24, 
1862. 

Corporal Warren H. Connell, killed at Dug Gap. 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal C. H. Edgerly, discharged 1862. 

Corporal William Liggett, died at Middletown, Vir 
ginia, May 26, 1862. 

Corporal George B. Myers, discharged May 26, 1862^ 

Corporal Marcus Humphrey, discharged November 3, 
1864. 

Corporal Charles H. King, discharged July 17, 1865. 

Corporal Lewis Rogers, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Lester Bruno, mustered out with company. 

Corporal George Nichols, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal George Manning (1862), mustered out with 
company. 

Henry Murgan (musician), discharged July 19, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 2 17 

Corporal John Bissell (1862), mustered out with com 
pany. 

John C. Hart (musician), discharged 1863. 

John Ardis, absent without leave. January n, 1862. 

John D. Hall, absent without leave, December 22, 
1861. 

Reuben Wagoner, absent without leave November 30, 
1861. 

Isaac Wells, absent without leave May 21, 1862. 

Merick Q. Smith, absent without leave. 

John Wilson, absent without leave June 22, 1862. 

Eli Raudebush, discharged March 7, 1862. 

Jacob Baird, discharged April 3, 1862. 

G. T. Boak, mustered out with company. 

Frank H. Boyer, served three years, discharged No 
vember 3, 1864. 

John Best, discharged January 28, 1862. 

William Dennings, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
December 16, 1863. 

Willard Dennison, discharged October 10, 1862. 

Joseph Ernsparger, discharged November 3, 1864. 

Jacob Fritz, discharged November 3, 1864. 

O. C. Field, mustered out with company. 

David Harbaugh, discharged November 3, 1864. 

John Heffelfinger, transferred to non-commissioned 
staff March 3, 1863. 

Lewis Harris, killed in action at Winchester, Virginia, 
March 23, 1862. 

John Harris, discharged September 26, 1862. 

Henry Hazzen, discharged July 15, 1862. 

Samuel W. Hart, discharged July 10. 1865. 

O. W. Hale, discharged by special order number , 
1861. 

George C. Kellogg, discharged May 29, 1862. 



2l8 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Theodore Jones, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
April 1 6, 1864. 

A. A. Kellogg, musician, mustered out with company. 

David Kittinger, served three years, discharged No 
vember 3, 1864. 

Eli Oberholtz, discharged. 

C. H. Paine, discharged, served three years, Novem 
ber 3, 1864. 

Lauren L. Porter, discharged, no date. 

Silas Payne, discharged, July 12, 1862. 

Joseph Pierson, died at Mt. Jackson, Virginia, May 3, 
1862. 

Alfred A. Palmer, mustered out with company. 

William Peet, discharged July 21, 1862. 

Charles Rotart, served three years, discharged Novem 
ber 3, 1864. 

Herman Ridder, discharged July 25, 1862. 

George Youells, served three years, discharged No 
vember 3, 1864. 

Andrew Robinson, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
May 7, 1864. 

Hiram Root, discharged August 4, 1862. 

William Robinson, discharged, July 22, 1862. 

Jacob Snowberger, mustered out with company. 

George Slusser, served three years, discharged Novem 
ber 3, 1864. 

John Smith, died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, May 25, 
1864, of wounds received in action at Dug Gap, Georgia r 
May 8, 1864. 

Frank J. Smith, transferred to naval service May 18, 
1864. 

Norman Saulsbury, died at Frederick, Maryland, April 
3, 1862. 

Henry H. Scott, discharged December 3, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 2 19 

Jesse C. Stall (1862), mustered out with company. 

William Spear, discharged, by reason of wounds, May 
3, 1865. 

C. C. Tooker, discharged December 9, 1862. 

Evander Turner, discharged to accept promotion, 
April 13, 1865. 

Henry Wolf, discharged, by reason of wounds no 
date. 

Oliver O. Wright, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
December, 1863. 

William H. Tooker, mustered out with company. 

Robert M. Wilkins, killed at Cedar Mountain, August 
9, 1862. 

Alexander Wallace, discharged December 4, 1862. 

William Davis, discharged December 18, 1862. 

Isaac Miller (wagoner), discharged February 18, 1863. 

Joseph Roe, transferred to company I December, 1861. 

Jackson Roe, transferred to company I December, 
1861. 

James Sowers, transferred to company I December, 
1861. 

John R. Benton (1862), died at Cleveland, Ohio, 
August, 1863. 

Jeremiah Congdon (1862), sick in hospital. 

Edward W. Farr (1862), discharged June 29, 1865. 

James C. Hammond (1862), died at Dumfries, Vir 
ginia, March 14, 1863. 

Eli C. Joles (1862), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 

Henry J. Knapp (1862), discharged May 18, 1865. 

William Lutz (1862), discharged June 29, 1865. 

Hartwell A. Parker (1862), discharged January io> 
1863. 

Elisha H. Pursell(i862), died in 1865. 



22O TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

John H. Wright (1862), discharged September 21, 
1864. 

Hiram Boyd, substitute, discharged with company. 

John Buck, (1864), mustered out with company. 

Allen Brown (1864), mustered out with company. 

Newton Barkhammer (1864), mustered out with com 
pany. 

John V. Cummings (1864), substitute, mustered out 
with company. 

John Cowan ( 1 864),\irafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

William Durant (1864), died at Resaca, Georgia, dis 
charged May 25, 1864. 

Anton Ehrlar, substitute, discharged June 23, 1865. 

John Funk (1864), mustered out with company. 

William Ford (1864), drafted, sick in hospital. 

Samuel Flesher (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

James Heathman (1864), mustered out with company. 

Henry N. Hullinger (1864), substitute, mustered out 
with company. 

Henrick Hoyer (1864), substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Selburn H. Hall (1864), substitute, discharged June 
5, 1865. 

John J. Jones (1864), substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Daniel Kilso (1864), discharged June i, 1865. 

John Kreps (1864), drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Emanuel Kaley (1864), died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
March 25, 1864. 

Benjamin Lee (1864), killed at Peach Tree Creek, 
Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

George B. Myers (1864), mustered out with company. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 221 

William Shameon (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Peter Leuzler (1864), mustered out with company. 

William McVay (1864), drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Stephen Nettle (1864), mustered out with company. 

Ira S. Nash (1864), mustered out company. 

James R. Purine (1864), discharged April, 1865. 

Charles Osburn (1864), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Augustus Richards (1864), mustered out with com 
pany. 

Martin Smith (1864), killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Salathiel Shurtzer (1864), substitute, mustered out 
with company. 

Harvey J. Smith (1864), mustered out with company. 

David Smith (1864), mustered out with company. 

Phillip Stadler(i864), mustered out with company. 

Mortimer Van Hyning (1864), discharged May 27, 
1865. 

James Wild (1864), discharged June 23, 1865. 

Edman Wiswell (1864), substitute, discharged July 18, 
1865. 



COMPANY I. 

Mustered into service September, October and Novem 
ber, and December, 1861. 

Captain Russell B. Smith, resigned June 12, 1863. 

Captain Edwin B. Woobury, promoted second lieuten 
ant March 13, 1862; first lieutenant, April 14, 1863; cap 
tain, June 29, 1864; major, July 12, 1865; mustered out 
with company. 



222 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

First Lieutenant Augustus Philbrick, resigned March 
3, 1862. 

First Lieutenant Seth E. Wilson, resigned May 10, 
1862. 

First Lientenant Stephen Kissinger, promoted from 
first sergeant to first lieutenant January 21, 1865; mus 
tered out with company. 

Second Lieutenant William J. Hall, resigned January 
25, 1862. 

First Sergeant John G. March (brevet first lieutenant 
not commissioned), killed at Gettysburg, Pennsysvaniaj 
July 3, 1863. 

Sergeant Ransom D. Billings, killed at Atlanta, 
Georgia, July 28, 1864. 

Sergeant Zaccheus Farnsworth, died May 5, 1862. 

Sergeant George Rorke, died May 14, 1862. 

Sergeant Martin G. Owen, discharged September n, 
1862. 

Sergeant Clark Beach, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Henry Rex, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant James Hawk, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Almon Woodruff, mustered cut with com 
pany. 

Sergeant John Rupp, mustered out with company. 

Sergeant Thomas Henderson, died September 10, 
1864. 

Sergeant Cassius C. Lord, transferred to non-commis 
sioned staff. 

Sergeant Norton B. Adams, transferred to Veteran 
Reserve corps January 23, 1865. 

Corporal Warren F. Wilbur, died May 16, 1863. 

Corporal John Sage, absent without leave. 

Corporal Joel J. Bair, discharged November 18, 1862. 

Corporal Horace H. Heath, discharged June 12, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 223 

Corporal J. R. Policy, discharged June i, 1862. 

Corporal Charles F. Gove, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal William Abbott, mustered out with company. 

Corporal James Walsh, mustered out with company. 

Corporal James Sowers, mustered out with company. 

Corporal DeWitt C. Stevens, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Corporal Eli Rushon, mustered out with company. 

Albert Bishop, killed at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, 
July 2, 1864. 

Joseph Baker, killed at Atlanta, Georgia, July 18, 
1864. 

Jonathan Everhard, killed at Pine Knob, Georgia, 
June 16, 1864. 

James Grine, killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 
3, 1863. 

Cass M. Nims, killed at Cedar Mountain, Virginia, 
August 9, 1862. 

Tobias Phinney, killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 

Henry Rupp, killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

John Craig, died April 15, 1862. 

George M. Craighl, died October 7, 1862. 

William Dickinson, died of wounds, June 13, 1863. 

David N. Hubbard, died March 25, 1862. 

William Wildy, died December 15, 1861. 
i O. O. Wakeman, died April 29, 1862. 

William Campbell, substitute, died February 18, 
1865. 

Harrison Gordon, drafted, died December n, 1864. 

Alvah Holden (1861), died at Savannah, Georgia, 
March 27, 1865. 

Charles Link, drafted, died December 3, 1864. 



224 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Hiram Newcomb (1861), died at Ringold, Georgia, of 
wounds received at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 15, 1864. 

Andrew Ream (musician), transferred to non-commis 
sioned staff, September i, 1863. 

Spencer Atkins, transferred to company B, January 5 , 
1863. 

H. W. Horton, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
July i, 1863. 

Lewis Pegg, transferred to company F, Seventh Ohio 
veteran volunteer infantry, December 24, 1863. 

John Patchen, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
March 5, 1864. 

Roswell Krahl, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
February 15, 1864. 

A. W. Holdredge, transferred to Veteran Reserve corps 
April i, 1865. 

Charles Hawkins, absent without leave. 

Charles Dudley, absent without leave. 

William N. Dewitt, absent without leave. 

Robert Hill, absent without leave. 

Edwin Holcomb, absent without leave. 

Roswell Trail, absent without leave. 

William Trail, absent without leave. 

Charles Welton, absent without leave. 

George Jarvis, absent without leave. 

Alderman Bidwell, teamster June 10, 1862. 

William Babcock, discharged April 27, 1863. 

William H. Cooper, discharged May 15, 1862. 

John C. Cauley, discharged October 29, 1862. 

William Dewitt, discharged November i, 1862. 

Martin Elliott, discharged July 14, 1862. 

Michael Greenwall, discharged December 5, 1862. 

Theodore N. Harrington, discharged May 20, 1862. 

Sidney Kennedy, discharged April 4, 1863. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 225 

Henry Kennedy, discharged April 4, 1863. 
Nathan Miller, discharged July 2, 1862. 
Mandleburt Manley, discharged September n, 1862. 
Milton H. Murdock, discharged February 23, 1863. 
Bryon McArthur, discharged December 4, 1862. 
Thomas J. Nichols, discharged April 27, 1863. 
William Pond, discharged November 5, 1862. 
Jackson Roe, discharged August 9, 1862. 
Joseph Roe, discharged August 9, 1862. 
Orville O. Rockwell, discharged April 12, 1863. 
Euclid Suplee, discharged June 16, 1862. 
Ira Scott, discharged November i, 1862. 
Thomas Sharkey, discharged August 29, 1863. 
Stephen Sturdephant, discharged April 3, 1864. 
Alpha Thompson, discharged August 12, 1862. 
E. C. Whitticher, discharged July 28, 1863. 
Albert Alderman mustered out with company. 
Uriah Cook, mustered out with company. 
William E. Dickey, mustered out with company. 
William Eldred, mustered out with company. 
William Gilbert, mustered out with company. 
Philip Hawk, mustered out with company. 
Cosom M. Kindig, mustered out with company. 
James Miller, mustered out with company. 
Michael McNerny, mustered out with company. 
Albert Squires, mustered out with company. 
George W. Reed, mustered out with company. 
Sereno F. Sawyer, mustered out with company. 
William Waterman, mustered out with company. 
Ferdinand Cutler, mustered out with company. 
Willard Trail, mustered out with company. 

RECRUITS. 

Joel J. Bair (1861), mustered out with company. 
Gordon Case, mustered out with company. 

15 



226 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Henry H. Hibbard, mustered out with company. 

William Kelley mustered out with company. 

Francis Kelley, mustered out with company. 

Edwin Mabry, mustered out with company. 

William Mabry, mustered out with company. 

Hudson Merritt, mustered out with company. 

Frederick Newmyer, mustered out with company. 

William P. Rushon, mustered out with company. 

William Stille, in hospital. 

Milo Sharp, mustered out July 3, 1865. 

Owen Woohes, mustered out with company. 

William Akres, substitute, mustered out with com* 
pany. 

Percival Bever, drafted, mustered out July 10, 1865. 

Joseph Deal, drafted, mustered out with company. 

George W. Mead, drafted, in hospital. 

McClane J. Marfier, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Isaac Welch (February, 1865), mustered out July 3, 
1865. 

Abel Archer, veteran, discharged June 6, 1865. 

Robert A. Bloomer, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

James Ensler, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Christian Fetterhoff, drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

John Ford, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Theodore Hawk, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Thomas Hill, substitute, discharged June 2, 1865. 

Christopher Letherer, drafted, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

Dennis McGunnigal, substitute, discharged June 5, 
1865. 

David Miller, substitute, discharged June 5, 1865. 

Henry May, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 227 

John Nesbit, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 
James Perkins, veteran, discharged June 22, 1865. 
James Reed (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 
Elisha Robinson, drafted, discharged May 27, 1865. 
John Shannon (1862), discharged May 4, 1865. 
Henry H. Turner, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 
Daniel Truman, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 
Reuben Wilson (1862), discharged June 5, 1865. 
James Winters, veteran, discharged September, 1864. 
Richard Adams, substitute, discharged July 3, 1865. 
Horace Stevens, drafted, discharged June 5, 1865. 
James H. Freeman, killed at Port Republic, Virginia, 
June 9, 1862. 

COMPANY K. 

Mustered into service September, October, November 
and December, 1861. 

Captain Alden P. Steele, resigned April 13, 1862. 

Captain Charles W. Kellogg, promoted second lieu 
tenant June 20, 1862; first lieutenant January 26, 1863; 
captain April i, 1865; mustered out with company. 

Captain David E. Hurlburt, promoted to captain 
April 13, 1863; discharged August 29, 1864. 

Lieutenant William Neil, transferred to company E 
Januay 5, 1863. 

First Lieutenant Marcus F. Roberts, sergeant of com 
pany A, promoted to first lieutenant of company K May 
31, 1865; mustered out with company. 

First Lieutenant Wilbur A. Chamberlain, promoted to 
captain of company E, October 12, 1864. 

Second Lieutenant Benjamin N. Smith, promoted 
May i, 1862; discharged March 16, 1864. 

Sergeant William E. Gray, shot at Frederick, Mary 
land, December 10, 1862. 



228 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Sergeant Christopher C. Johnson, discharged April 3, 
1863. 

Sergeant Ansel O. Benjamin, discharged March 13, 
1863. 

Sergeant George C. Judd, discharged March 2, 1863. 

Sergeant Lewis Wrisley, discharged August 12, 1863. 

Sergeant Luther L. Kinney, discharged. 

Sergeant Joseph C. Hammond, mustered out with 
company. 

Sergeant Cornelius O. Hinkle, mustered out with 
company. 

Sergeant Michael F. Haldman, drafted, mustered out 
with company. 

Sergeant Ulysses S. Hoxter, promoted. 

Sergeant Charles Potter, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Sergeant Harlow H. Fenton, discharged June 7, 1865. 

Corporal Fayette N. Johnson, discharged December 
27, 1864. 

Corporal Thaddeus Marsh, died at Cumberland, 
Maryland, March 3, 1862. 

Corporal Joel Ritter, absent without leave. 

Corporal Alfred D. Eddy, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Daniel Turner, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Frederick A. Rounds, mustered out with 
company. 

Corporal James Spain, mustered out with company. 

Corporal Esick Blanchard (1862), discharged June 19, 
1865. 

Corporal James C. McCleary, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

Alber M. Alderman, discharged September 28, 1864. 

David Mclntyre, served three years; discharged Octo 
ber 20, 1864. 

William Law, discharged, no date. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 229 

Hezekiah Davenport, served three years; discharged 
December 6, 1864. 

Joseph M. Marsh (1862), killed at Dallas, Georgia, 
May 28, 1864. 

Mathias Soden (1862), killed at Gettysburg, Pennsyl 
vania, July 3, 1863. 

Byron Bulfinch (1862), died at Frederick, Maryland, 
October 28, 1862. 

Orlando Clark, died at Strasburg, Virginia, May 13, 
1862. 

Philander M. Griggs, died at Alexandria, Virginia, 
October 3, 1862. 

John L. Haywood, died at Back Creek, Virginia, 
March 13, 1862. 

Oney McLee, died at Camp Wade, Virginia, July 17, 
1862. 

Sylvester Pierce, died at Frederick, Maryland, Octo 
ber 20, 1862. 

Martin Banney, died at Alexandria, Virginia, July u, 
1862. 

Daniel Phillips, missing in action at Cedar Mountain, 
Virginia, August 9, 1862. 

George P. Strong, missing in action at Cedar Mountain, 
Virginia, August 9, 1862. 

William Fitzgerald, missing in action at Cedar Moun 
tain, Virginia, August 9, 1862. 

Osmond O. Oliver, missing in action at Chancellors- 
ville, Virginia, May 3, 1863. 

George Bullis, absent without leave. 

John Blodgett, absent without leave. 

Elias H. Durfee, absent without leave. 

Reuben Alderman, discharged April 4, 1863. 

James Alexander, discharged June 19, 1863. 

Lewis Brown (minor), discharged December 15, 1861 



230 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Charles W. Bancroft, discharged May i, 1862. 

Aaron C. Baker, discharged July 10, 1862. 

Wellington Burns (1862), discharged April 4, 1863. 

Thomas Cook (minor), discharged December 23, 1861. 

William Chalmers (1862), discharged February 6, 
1863. 

Francis M. Cutler, discharged July 9, 1862. 

Rufus N. Daniels (1862), discharged December 2 y 
1862. 

Almond T. Mills, deserted August 18, 1862. 

Foster W. Eggleston, discharged January 3, 1863. * 

Luther Fowler, discharged May i, 1862. 

William Fletcher, discharged September 29, 1862. 

James Goldsmith, discharged July 9, 1862. 

Hiram Griggs, discharged May 31, 1862. 

Renslo C. Griffin, discharged October 3, 1862. 

Alonzo Hurlburt, claimed by Sixth Ohio volunteer 
cavalry, December 10, 1861. 

William Houston, left at Camp Giddings December, 
1861. 

Judson Hunt, discharged June 10, 1862. 

Horace Holcomb, discharged May 31, 1862. 

Martin H. Hammond, discharged December 2, 1862. 

Edwin A. Johnson, discharged June 13, 1862. 

John Jenks, discharged February 17, 1862. 

William Knox, discharged August i, 1862. 

Franklin Love, discharged July 28, 1862. 

William Luce (1862), discharged October i, 1862. 

Delos Marsh, discharged June 9, 1862. 

John McLoud, discharged June 7, 1862. 

Joseph Matthews, discharged July 31, 1862. 

Joseph B. Partch, discharged June 30, 1862. 

George Perry, discharged April 4, 1863. 

John Randall, discharged August 27, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 231 

Solon Squires, discharged July 14, 1862. 

John St. Clair, discharged, date unknown. 

John Swinton, discharged November 3, 1862. 

Albert J. Wightman, discharged June 9, 1862. 

Harmon Wilder, discharged October 2, 1862. 

George W. Weeks (1862), discharged November 3, 
1862. 

Charles W. Wilson, discharged October 10, 1862. 

George W. Gargle, transferred to company I, Decem 
ber 27, 1861. 

Thomas Shultz, transferred to company E, December 
18, 1861. 

James Williams, transferred to invalid corps, Decem 
ber i, 1863. 

William J. Pond, transferred to company I, December 
29, 1861. 

Christian Conrad, discharged July 22, 1865. 

George W. Deem, mustered out with company. 

Francis J. Hibbard, mustered out with company. 

George W. Light, mustered out with company. 

John Sarsfield, mustered out with company. 

Jonathan Tyler, mustered out with company. 

William H. Stratton, mustered out with company. 

Clinton B. White, mustered out with company. 

Sylvester W. Collins, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Levi H. Greene, drafted, left in hospital. 

Henry Garden, drafted, mustered out with company. 

James B. Haskins, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Jacob Lenox, substitute, mustered out with company. 

John Loudon, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Antoine Miller, substitute, mustered out with com 
pany. 



232 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

James Ritchendoller, substitute, mustered out with 
company. 

George H. Wilson, drafted, mustered out with com 
pany. 

Joseph White, drafted, mustered out with company. 

Thomas J. Failes, veteran, killed at Pine Knob, Geor 
gia, June 15, 1864. 

Amos Long, killed at Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 

Joseph Herman, drafted, died at Savannah, Georgia, 
February 13, 1865. 

Morris Madison, drafted, died at Jeffersonville, In 
diana, November 29, 1864. 

William Reed, veteran, died at Atlanta, Georgia, Sep 
tember 29, 1864. 

Henry Swarts, drafted, died at Savannah, Georgia, 
June 9, 1865. 

Daniel W. Abbott, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

James Amsdill, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Ferdinand Burt, veteran, discharged February 6, 
1866. 

Daniel Barber, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Michael Bulyer, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Harmon Baker, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Theodore M. Cochran, substitute, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

Charles Eberle, substitute, discharged June 19, 1865. 

William Finiarty, substitute, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

John H. Finneman, drafted, discharged June 18, 
1865. 

Henry C. Farnsworth, drafted, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

John Grun, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 233 

John W. Hutchinson, drafted, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

Henry C. Hardnock, drafted, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

Andrew Horn, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Edson G. Holcomb (1862), discharged June 19, 1865. 

John W. Joslin (1862), discharged June 19, 1865. 

Daniel V. Lowary, substitute, discharged June 19, 
1865. 

William Norris (1862), discharged June 19, 1865. 

William H. Parker (1862), discharged April i, 1865. 

Alonzo S. Pelton, drafted, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Gabriel Quesino, drafted, discharged June 17, 1865. 

Samuel Ripple, substitute, discharged June 19, 1865. 

Frederick Schrapel, drafted, discharged July 19, 1865. 

Samuel B. Emmons (1864), discharged July 18, 1865. 

Asa A. Sanford, discharged July 28, 1865. 



234 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



CASUALTIES. 



The following list of casualties is prepared from the 
records in the War Department, and contains the name 
of every member of the regiment, whose disability was 
reported to the department. It is believed to be per- 
feet. 

RECORD OF DEATHS IN TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT OHIO 
VOLUNTEERS, EXCEPT KILLED IN ACTION. 

1861. 

Private Charles A. Clap, company D, December 8, 
1861. 

1862. 

Private John A. Austin, company F, April 2, 1862. 

Corporal Augustus Belden, company G, May i, 1862. 

Private Albert H. Beardsley, company C, February 17, 
1862. 

Private Hiram E. Balch, company F, February i8 t 
1862. 

Private Marshal A. Brown, company A, March io> 
1862. 

Private Conant Brunian, company B, April 30, 1862. 

Private Oren Brewer, company E, May 23, 1862. 

Private Charles F. Bauer, company B, April 19, 1862. 

Private Andrew Beardsley, company E, July 29, 1862. 

Private Byron Bulnnch, company K, October 28, 
1862. 

Private John Craig, company I, April 15, 1862. 

Private Oliver P. Crosby, company C, April 23, 1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 235 

Private Orlando Clarke, company K, May 15, 1862. 

Private Lewis D. Clements, company G, September 7, 
1862. 

Private George M. Cargill, company I, October 7, 
1862. 

Private Charles E. Dudley, company C, February 17, 
1862. 

Private Franklin Dimock, company F, February 28, 
1862. 

Private Ethan Davis, company E, March 6, 1862. 

Private Alma Dalrymple, company A, May 2, 1862. 

Private Michael Dowling, company F, May 18, 1862. 

Private William Dickinson, company I, June 13, 1862. 

Corporal John W. Ewell, company G, March 6, 1862. 

Sergeant Zaccheus Farnsworth, company I, May 3, 
1862. 

Private Orvid Fairbrothers, company B, May 27, 1862. 

First Sergeant Charles Fairchild, company H, Septem 
ber ii, 1862. 

Sergeant William E. Grey, company H, December 19, 
1862. 

Private Wellington G. Gillett, company C, May 21, 
1862. 

Private Philander M. Griggs, company K, October 
3, 1862. 

Corporal Seth N. Hubbard, company A, April 12, 
1862. 

Private John L. Hay ward, company K, March 13, 
1862. 

Private David N. Hubbard, company I, March 20, 
1862. 

Private Elisha Hamilton, company D, June 9, 1862. 

Private Herman O. Holmes, company B, April 6, 
1862. 



236 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Clark Hall, company B, July 14, 1862. 

Private Newton P. Humiston, company G, July 28, 
1862. 

Private William C. Ives, company A, March 5, 1862. 

Private William Johnson, company E, April 6, 1862. 

Private William H. Jones, company D, July 21, 1862. 

Sergeant John H. Knox, company D, May 22, 1862. 

Private Joseph Loomis, company G, February 21, 
1862. 

Corporal William Liggitt, company H, May 25, 1862. 

Musician Thaddeus Marsh, company D, March 5, 
1862. 

Private George W. Miles, company B, June 20, 1862. 

Private Robert McFall, company B, June 27, 1862. 

Private Oney McGee, company K, July 14, 1862. 

Private Alvin W. Newman, company D, February 13, 
1862. 

Private Peter Nicholas, company D, April 19, 1862. 

Private James Pike, company E, January 14, 1862. 

Private Joseph Pierson, company H, May 3, 1862. 

Private Sylvester Pierce, company K, October 20, 
1862. 

Sergeant George Rorke, company I, May 14, 1862. 

Private Emerson Richerson, company A, March 10, 
1862. 

Private John Rowland, company G, May i, 1862. 

Private Harvey A. Reaves, company E, May 28, 1862. 

Private Martin Ranney, company K, July n, 1862. 

Private Ellson Reed, Jr., company F, November i, 
1862. 

Private Norman Salisbury, company H, April 3, 1862. 

Private Hiram Sly, company E, July 6, 1862. 

Private Leonard Squires, company D, September 4, 
1862. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, 237 

Private James Thomas, company C, March 9, 1862. 

Private William H. Vanscoit, company B, April 5, 
1862. 

Sergeant Edwin Williams, company F, May 23, 1862. 

Private O. O. Wakeman, company I, April 29, 1862. 

Private Andrew A. Wolcott, company D, May n, 
1862. 

Private James H. Whitney, company F, June 3, 1862. 

Private Rufus Wilson, company B, June 21, 1862. 

Private Eben H. Wright, company D, December 7, 
1862. 

1863. 

Private John W. Baur, company B, captured at Port 
Republic, Virginia, June 9, 1862, supposed to be dead. 

Private George W. Batchelor, company E, March 8, 
1863. 

Private John R. Benton, company H, June 28, 1863. 

Private Edward I. Brown, company A, July 20, 1863. 

Private Romeo Churchill, company C, January 13, 
1863. 

Corporal Roderick M. Gates, company A, August 27, 
1863. 

Private George Gale, company B, April 14, 1863. 

Private Robert W. Hall, company G, January 15, 
1863. 

Private James C. Hammond, company H, March 14, 
1863. 

Private Charles D. Hine, company G, March 23, 
1863. 

First Sergeant John H. Knox, company D, May 22, 
1863. 

Private Julius Lavelee, company C, May 7, 1863. 

Private Abram W. McNaughten, company A, Jan 
uary 28, 1863. 



238 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Tallis E. McCain, company G, August 12, 
1863. 

Private Dyer Newcomb, company B, January 29, 
1863. 

Private Moses Pennington, company E, May 15, 1863 

Private George A. Root, company A, March 19, 1863 

Private C. Robinson, company E, June 21, 1863. 

Private H. M. Ryder, company C, September 25, 
1863. 

Sergeant George Shabondy, company G, April 24, 
1863. 

Private James L. Smith, company G, March 4, 1863. 

Musician Oscar F. Stickney, company F, April 28, 
1863. 

Private Thomas Shultz, company E, May 12, 1863. 

Private Robert Sills, company B, supposed to be dead. 

Corporal Warren Wilbur, company I, May 10, 1863. 

Private Elias Waltz, company D, April 10, 1863. 
1864. 

Private Albert W. Atwater, company E, July 4, 1864 

Private George F. Braginton, company G, May 16, 
1864. 

Private Andrew J. Breght, company B, June 2, 1864. 

Private John J. Belnap, company F, June 18, 1864. 

Private Levi Baughman, company D, September 2, 
1864. 

Private Barney Brick, company E, September 8, 1864. 

Private Christopher Beck, company D, September 17, 
1864. 

Private Charles S. Blake, company A, November 14, 
1864. 

Private Mitchell Babbington, company G, December 
u, 1864. 

Private Richard Conn, company F, December 8, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 239 

Private John T. Best, company F, December 25, 
1864. 

First Lieutenant George W. Dice, company D, June 
17, 1864. 

Private Charles A. Downey, company D, May 14, 
1864. 

Private Charles Demlin, company D, December 8, 
1864. 

Private William Durant, company H, May 25, 1864. 

Private John Denneland, company D, December 8, 
1864. 

Private Thomas Dowling, company F, 1864. 

Private Charles Ellis, company B, July 16, 1864. 

Private Thomas J. Fales, company K, June 17, 1864. 

Private Jacob Gardner, company D, May 24, 1864. 

Private James Gaule, company G, supposed to be 
dead. 

Private Nelson Gillett, company E, July 15, 1864. 

Private Harrison Gordon, company I, December 17, 
1864. 

Private William H. Hartley, company G, July 15, 
1864. 

Sergeant Thomas F. Henderson, company I, Septem 
ber 10, 1864. 

Private Henry A. Hane, company D, May 26, 1864. 

Private W. B. Hoyt, company A, October 20, 1864. 

Private Morgan Johnson, company G, February 29, 
1864. 

Private Emanuel Kaley, company H, March 28, 
1864. 

Private James H. Lane, company G, November 25, 
1864. 

Private Charles Link, company I, December 3, 1864. 

Corporal Allen Mason, company C, May 29, 1864. 



240 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private John H. Montgomery, company D, June 2, 
1864 (June 8, 1864). 

Private George Murray, company G, May 9, 1864. 

Private Thomas S. McCartney, company E, July 16, 
1864. 

Private Morris Madison, company K, November 29, 
1864. 

Private Hiram Newcomb, company I, May 31, 1864. 

Private William Potter, company B, July 6, 1864. 

Private Simeon J. Peters, company D, July 2, 1864. 

Private William Reed, company K, September 2, 
1864. 

Private Levi Yanke, company D, December 17, 1864. 

Corporal Theodore Smith, company A, March 24, 
1864. 

Private John Smith, company H, May 25, 1864. 

Private Elmore Stevens, company F, July 10, 1864. 

Private John A. Stewart, company G, November 19, 
1864. 

Private Jacob Scott, company E, December 24, 1864. 

Sergeant Samuel Woodbridge, company D, May 8, 
1864. 

Private Truman Williams, company E, February 29, 
1864. 

Private John Woodard, company G, May n, 1864. 

Private George W. Write, company B, May 31, 1864. 

Private Aaron Warner, company C, June 3, 1864. 

Private George Williams, company F, June 2, 1864. 

Private William Wirt, company G, June 20, 1864. 

Private George W. Warden, company B, October 29, 
1864. 

1865. 

Private William F. Boal, company E, April 2, 1865. 
Private Thomas Clifford, company F, March 2, 1865. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 24! 

Private William Campbell, company I, February 18, 
1865. 

Private Joseph Datson, company F, March 2, 1865. 

Private Jacob Dunkal, company C, April 17, 1865. 

Private Jacob D. Foster, company G, March 29, 1865. 

Private Levi H. Green, company A, March 7, 1865. 

Private Alvah Holden, company I, January 25, 1865. 

Private Joseph Herman, company K, February 13, 
1865. 

Private Adam Hulbert, company G, March 26, 1865. 

Private George Huntwork, company F, May 26, 1865. 

Private Lysander T. King, company T, May 6, 1865. 

Private Henry Miller, company A, February 4, 1865. 

Private Robert McKee, company A, April 6, i&6s. 

Private Charles Mullett, company D, June 22, 1865. 

Private Ephraim Odell, company F, February i, 1865. 

Private Melancthon Poe, company B, February 13, 
1865. 

Private Samuel Perry, company E, April 8, 1865. 

Private Henry Swartz, company K, January 9, 1865. 

Private James Simms, company A, March 4, 1865. 

Major M. Wright, January 7, 1865. 

Private Addison A. Way, company E, April 19, 1865. 

Corporal George J. Young, company D, June 14, 
1865. 

16 



242 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



RECORD OF KILLED, WOUNDED AND CAPTURED IN THE 
TWENTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS DURING THE YEAR 
1862. 

COMPANY A. 

First Lieutenant Everson J. Hulbert, wounded, June 
9, 1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Second Lieutenant Martin D. Norris, wounded, June 
9, 1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal Joseph B. Dalrymple, wounded, June 9, 
1862, *Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Franklin B. Mowry, wounded, June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Henry P. Turner, wounded, June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private James E. March, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Theodore Smith, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Montezuma St. John, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Nelson W. Simmons, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Perry A. Decker, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Eli P. Young, wounded June 8, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

First Lieutenant Everson J. Hulbert, wounded August 
9, 1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

First Sergeant Winthrop H. Grant, wounded August 
9, 1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 243 

Sergeant Silas G. Elliott, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal James M. Loomis, woifnded August 9, 
1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private S. M. Coon, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Mortimer Canfield, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Daniel Thatcher, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Rosalva W. Graham, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Nathaniel Wilder, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private S. E. Colburn,* captured March 23, 1862, 
Winchester, Virginia. 

Sergeant T. E. Hoyt,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private H. P. Turner,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private P. A. Decker,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private E. J. Maltby,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private A. L. Rickard,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private J. A. Exceen,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private John Ellis,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Albert Frazier,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

.Private F. B. Mowrey,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 



244 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private J. E. March,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal W. B. Hoyt,* captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private C. Covert,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private C. Roth,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private John Sylvester,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private J. B. Broughton,* captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Eli P. Young,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Leonard Grover,* captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

COMPANY B. 

Private Harvey Beckwith, killed March 20, 1862, Win 
chester, Virginia. 

Corporal Levi K. Bean, killed March 23, 1862, Win 
chester, Virginia. 

Private Monroe Burgett, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private George McNutt, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private N. A. Germond, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Alvinson Kinney, killed Angust 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant Rush Griswold, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal Elbridge Potter, wounded August 9, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 245 

Corporal Frank Chapman, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private George Wright, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Henry Hicks, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Henry Brainard, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Oscar Burbanks, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Lewis Montgomery, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private D. Newcomb, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Robert Sills,* captured May 25, 1862, Stras- 
burg, Virginia. 

Private J. C. DeWolf,* captured May 25, 1862, Stras- 
burg, Virginia. 

Musician J. H. SeCheverell, captured May 14, 1862, 
Winchester, Virginia. 

Lieutenant Andy Wilson," 55 captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Sergeant J. E. Tanner,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal A. J. Longworthy,* captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Spencer Atkins,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Albert H. Benham,* captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private John W. Baur,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia; died in prison. 

Private Job Brazee,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 



246 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private William D. Potter,* captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private L. J. Phinney,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private S. A. Stanley,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private S. B. Wilder.* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private G. W. Atkins,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

COMPANY C. 

Second Lieutenant Frank F. Stewart, wounded August 
9, 1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant George W. Britton, killed June 9, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Sergeant Henry W. Ryder, wounded June 9, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal William A. Burwell, killed June 9. Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal John Chapell, wounded August 9, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal Algernon Kingsley, wounded August 9, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal Allen Mason, wounded March 23, Winches 
ter, Virginia. 

Private George Eastlick, wounded June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Joseph Hall, wounded August 9th, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Beneville Miller, wounded March 23d, Win 
chester, Virginia. 

Private David B. Parker, mortally wounded August 
9th, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 247 

Private William H. Runyan, wounded June 9th, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Allen A. Monty, killed June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Willis Sisley, killed June 9th, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private Thomas Davis, wounded June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Joseph Wimby, wounded June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private John Williams, wounded August 9th, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private John Yokes, killed August 9th, Cedar Moun 
tain, Virginia. 

Private H. M. Rice,* captured May 25th, Strasburg, 
Virginia. 

Private George D. Brockett,* captured May 25th, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

Sergeant R. L. Jones,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Captain Edward Hayes,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal H. C. Lord,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public Virginia. 

Private Johnson Noble,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Benjamin F. Sperry,* captured June 9th, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private James Turton,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private N. H. Bailey,* captured June gth, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private S. O. Crosby,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 



248 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private D. L. Lindley,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private R. W. Cross,* captured June Qth, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private J. Fleming,* captured June 9th, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private M. Maloney,* captured June 9th, Port Repub 
lic, Virginia. 

Private John A. Frazier,* captured June 9th, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

COMPANY D. 

Captain Myron T. Wright, wounded March 23, 
1862, Winchester, Virginia. 

Private Valentine Viers, wounded March 23, 1862, 
Winchester, Virginia. 

Private John Snyder*, wounded March 23, 1862, 
Winchester, Virginia. 

Lieutenant James H. Grinnell, wounded June 9, 
1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal Frederick C. Remley, killed June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal William A. Hart, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private William Mendleson, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private* F. R. Johnson, killed June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Henry W. Morrel, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Theron W. Smith, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Lieutenant George W. Dice, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 249 

Sergeant Lewis B. Stark, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal George Foust, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal James S. Alexander, wounded August 9, 
1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Leonard E. Squares, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private William C. Finney, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private William D. Haynes, wounded August 9, 
1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private John G. Stemhour, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Henry A. Thompson, wounded August 9, 
1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Jacob Gardner, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Norman Cochran, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Marshall Hoagland, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Leonard Gaylord*, captured August 9, 1862, 

Sergeant S. Woodbridge*, captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private O. Brewster*, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private W. H. Jones*, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private J. Waite*, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private E. Randall*, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 



250 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private J. Replogle*, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private John Hughes*, captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

COMPANY E. 

Private Peter Vanskoik, wounded March 23, Win 
chester, Virginia. 

Captain Horatio Luce, killed June 9, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Corporal Isaac Dalrymple, killed June 9, Port Repub-* 
lie, Virginia. 

Private Frederick Brown, wounded June 9, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Lewis Weber, wounded June 9, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private William Robinson, wounded June 9, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private James P. Bagley, killed August 9, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Thomas McCarty, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal Charles Howard, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal N. L. Parmeter, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private S. J. Rockwell, captured March 23, 1862, 
Winchester, Virginia. 

Lieutenant William Neil, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private L. Hill, captured June 9, 1862, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private James C. Jones, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 251 

Private Elijah Curtiss, wounded accidentally. 

Private M. Mayhew, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Nelson Gillett, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Musician John S. Bellows, captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

Private Frances Colver, captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

Private Herman Sly, captured May 25, 1862, Stras 
burg, Virginia. 

Private David W. Hall, captured May 25, 1862, Stras 
burg, Virginia. 

COMPANY F. 

Private Alexander Neil, killed March 23, 1862, Win 
chester, Virginia. 

Private A. Case, wounded March 23, 1862, Winches 
ter, Virginia. 

Private Sidney M. Smith, killed June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Frederick R. Johnson, killed June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Captain Eleazer Burridge, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

First Lieutenant Hamblin Gregory, wounded June 9, 
1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Sergeant Roland H. Baldwin, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Asa E. Sanford, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

First Sergeant Joseph Jerome, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Aimer B. Paine, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 



252 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Sheridan B. Smith, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal Burton Pickett, killed August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private George N. Meno, killed August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant Aimer B. Paine, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Spencer E. Balch, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Thomas Dowling, wounded August 9, 1862,* 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Peter Dowling, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Simpson McLeon, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private George A. Patchen, wounded August 9, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Jabin S. Duston, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Charles F. Waldron, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal George Gray, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private John C. McLeon, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private L. Walker*, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Pomeroy Smith*, captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Ellison Reed, Jr., killed June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Lieutenant H. Gregory*, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 253 

Sergeant Solon Hall,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal George Woodford, captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal N. B. Noyes,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private J. J. Belknap,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private C. VanValkenburg,* captured August 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private C. V. Clark,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Charles Cain,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private William Call,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Peter Bowling,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private Martin P. Durkee, captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Jason Manley,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private M. Malcom,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Eliphalet S. Ontis,* captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Peter Smith,* captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Edson Reed,* captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Ferris Townsend,* captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

Private Newton Hummiston,* captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 



254 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private George F. Hewitt,* captured May 25, 1862, 
Strasburg, Virginia. 

Private James Whitney,* captured May 25, 1862, Stras 
burg, Virginia. 

COMPANY G. 

Second Lieutenant W. P. Williamson, killed March 
23d, Winchester, Virginia. 

Corporal Charles Robinson, killed June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private Jacob Rosenbaum, killed June 9th, Port Re-* 
public, Virginia. 

Captain J. J. Wright, wounded August 9th, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant Alexander C. French, killed August gth, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private James W. Smith, wounded June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private M. Grenewald, wounded August 9th, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Lieutenant Gary H. Russell,* captured June 9th, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Sergeant W. F. Chamberlain/ captured June 9th, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Sergeant C. W. Martin,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Sergeant George Strohl/* captured June 9th, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private C. F. Remley,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private William Fisher,* captured June gth, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal C. Zeittle,* captured June 9th, Port Repub 
lic, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 255 

Corporal John Kummer,* captured June gth, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal E. T. Green,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private C. Bragington,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private C. Lantz,* captured June 9th, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private T. McCain,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private J. Burns,* captured June 9th, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private J. Campbell,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private H. Geer,* captured June 9th, Port Republic, 
Virginia. 

Private William Wirt,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private J. Gross,* captured June 9th, Port Republi^ 
Virginia. 

Private William Gorrington,* captured June 9th, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private D. Stevens,* captured June 9th, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private John Worth,* captured May 9th, near Eden- 
burg, Virginia. 

COMPANY H. 

Private Lewis Harris, mortally wounded March 23, 
1862, Winchester, Virginia, died April 7, 1862. 

Private Robert M. Wilkins, killed August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Reuben Farnam, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 



256 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Hiram Root, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Samuel W. Hart, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Captain Jonas Schoonover, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Alfred Hazzen, wounded August 9, 1862, Ce 
dar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private L. Rodgers, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Lieutenant Thomas W. Nash, captured June 9, 1862^ 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal E. Oberholtz, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private John Heffiefinger, captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private S. W. Hart, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private J. C. Stall, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private W. H. Connell, captured May, 1862, near Ed- 
enburg, Virginia. 

COMPANY I. 

Corporal Alfred Bishop, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private James H. Freman, killed June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private John Everhard, killed June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Sergeant Ransom D. Billings, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private William H. Abbott, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 257 

Private Albert Alderman, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private William Dickison, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private William Pond, wounded August 9, 1862, Ce 
dar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Ransom Craigl, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private Michael Greenwalsh, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private W. J. Waterman, killed June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Lieutenant B. N. Smith, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant John G. Marsh, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private R. S. Krahl, killed August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private B. McArthur, wounded August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private James Winters, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Lieutenant R. B. Smith, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Lieutenant E. B. Woodbury, captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private William Gilbert, captured May 25, 1862, Stras- 
burg, Virginia. 

Private M. McNerny, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private J. Roup, captured June 9, 1862, Port Repub 
lic, Virginia. 

Private W. J. Eldred, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

17 



258 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private W. Waterman, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private A. A. Woodruff, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private C. C. Lord, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private James M. Perkins, captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Private James Sowers, captured May, 1862, near Ed- 
inburg, Virginia. 

Sergeant G. Cowgill, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re-* 
public, Virginia. 

Sergeant J. Walsh, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Corporal C. Gove, .captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia.. 

Corporal C. Beech, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal A. Woodruff, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

COMPANY K, 
AND FIELD AND STAFF. 

First Sergeant Christopher C. Johnson, wounded June 
9, 1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Color Sergeant Ulysses S. Hoxter, wounded June 9, 
1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Frederick A. Rounds, wounded June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Private Ferdinand Burt, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

First Sergeant Christopher C. Johnson, wounded Au 
gust 9, 1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 259 

Sergeant William E. Gray, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal Cornelius O. Hinkle, wounded August 9, 
1862, Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Corporal Jonathan Taylor, wounded August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 

Sergeant V. S. Horter, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Frank Hibbard, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private David Mclntyre, killed June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private Ph. M. Griggs, wounded August 9, 1862, Ce 
dar Mountain, Virginia. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Clark, wounded and cap 
tured June 9, 1862, Port Republic, Virginia. 

Major John S. Clemmer, wounded June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Captain David E. Hurlburt, captured June 9, 1862, 
Port Republic, Virginia. 

Lieutenant William Neil, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Sergeant G. C. Judd, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private F. Rounds, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private F. J. Hibbard, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private G. W. Dean, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private D. Phillips, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private William Fitzgerald, captured August 9, 1862, 
Cedar Mountain, Virginia. 



260 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private G. P. Strong, captured August 9, 1862, Cedar 
Mountain, Virginia. 

Private H. H. Fenton, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private J. Williams, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private John Sarsfield, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. . 

Sergeant A. D. Benjamin, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal W. S. Hoxter, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Corporal Luther Kinney, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private F. Johnson, captured June 9, 1862, Port Re 
public, Virginia. 

Private D. Mclntyre, captured June 9, 1862, Port 
Republic, Virginia. 

Private J. Jenks, captured June 9, 1862, Port Repub 
lic, Virginia. 



RECORD OF KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING OF THE 
TWENTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS AT THE BATTLE OF 
CHANCELLORSVILLE, VIRGINIA, ON THE 1ST, 2D AND 
3D OF MAY, 1863. 

Private F. B. Mowrey, company A, wounded. 
Private R. E. Woodbury, company A, wounded. 
Private M. M. Canfield, company A, wounded. 
Private Isaac Monger, company A, wounded. 
Private D. Thatcher, company A, wounded. 
Private L. M. Johnson, company A, missing. 
Corporal Daniel J- Baur, company B, wounded. 
Corporal Nathan G. Germond, company B, wounded. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 261 

Sergeant Rush Griswold, company B, missing. 

Private Vaness Jordan, company B, missing. 

Second Lieutenant Henry M. Ryder, company C, 
wounded and died. 

Sergeant Charles C. Fitts, company C, wounded. 

Private Julius Lavelle, company C, wounded. 

Private Andrew W. Mann, company C, wounded. 

Private M. Maloney, company C, wounded. 

Private George D. Brockett, company C, missing. 

Private Samuel E. Fay, company C, missing. 

Private Henry C. Lord, company C, missing. 

Private William Yokes, company C, missing. 

Private John Warren, company C, missing. 

Private Samuel Shanefelt, company D, killed. 

Private Norman Cochran, company D, wounded. 

Private Andrew Hunsicker, company D, wounded. 

Private Edward Spicer, company D, wounded. 

Private Henry Thompson, company D, wounded. 

Private George J. Young, company D, wounded. 

Private John H. Hill, company D, killed. 

Private Thomas Shultz, company E, wounded and 
died. 

Private Lorenzo Norton, company E, wounded. 

Private Rufus Hurlburt, company E, wounded. 

Private Sherman Tuttle, company E, wounded. 

Private D. B. Franklin, company E, missing. 

Private Roby Dewey, company E, missing. 

Private Daniel Platt, company E, missing. 

Corporal Alonzo Cole, company F, wounded. 

Private Orlando Wilson, company F, wounded. 

Private Jehial Johnson, company F, wounded. 

Private Charles Canfield, company F, wounded. 

Sergeant Charles T. Waldron, company F, missing. 

Corporal Isaac J. Houghkirk, company F, missing. 



262 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Peter Bowling, company F, missing. 

Private William Sober, company F, missing. 

Sergeant Edward F. Smith, company G, killed. 

Private William Wirt, company G, wounded. 

Private Thomas White, company G, wounded. 

Private Justus Townsley, company G, wounded. 

Private Julius McCain, company G, wounded. 

Private Andrew Halman, company G, wounded. 

Private Henry Ewell, company G, wounded. 

Private John F. Weidle, company G, wounded. 

Private George Guest, company G, wounded. 

First Sergeant Wilbur F. Chamberlain, company G, 
missing. 

Private Albert Hall, company G, missing. 

Private William H. Hartley, company G, missing. 

Private Eli Overholtz, company H, wounded. 

Private Andrew Robinson, company H, wounded. 

First Lieutenant Andrew J. Fulkerson, company H, 
missing. 

Private Henry Wolf, company H, missing. 

Private William Lutz, company H, missing. 

Corporal Warren Wilbur, company I, wounded. 

Private Thomas Sharkey, company I, wounded. 

Private Ferdinand Cutler, company I, wounded. 

Sergeant Newton B. Adams, company I, missing. 

Corporal Almon Woodruff, company I, missing. 

Private Joseph Baker, company I, missing. 

Captain David E. Hurlburt, company K, wounded. 

Private James Williams, company K, wounded. 

Private Ferdinand Burt, company K, wounded. 

Private Joseph Marsh, company K, wounded. 

Private David Turner, company K, wounded. 

Private Osmond O. Oliver, company K, missing, never 
heard from. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 263 

Private Edson G. Holcomb, company K, missing. 
Private Fred Rounds, company E, wounded. 
Lieutenant E. J. Hurlburt, company A, wounded. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Commissioned officers Killed o. Wounded, 3. Missing, i 

Non-commissioned officers and 
privates Killed 2. Wounded, 42. Missing, 26 

Total Killed 2. Wounded, 45. Missing, 27 

Casualties . . 7 2 



RECORD OF KILLED AND WOUNDED OF THE TWENTY- 
NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYS 
BURG, PENNSYLVANIA, JULY 2D AND 30, 1863. 

First Lieutenant J. G. Marsh, company D, killed. 
First Sergeant George Hayward, company E. killed. 
Private Benjamin F. Pontius, company D, killed. 
Private J. Johnson, company F, killed. 
Private John Williams, company C, killed. 
Private Mathias Soden, company K, killed. 
Private Jacob Gardner, company D, wounded. 
First Sergeant J. Kessinger, company I, wounded. 
Corporal J. Reed, company I, wounded. 
Private Sidney A. Kennedy, company I, wounded. 
Corporal Eli Rushon, company I, wounded. 
Corporal George Putney, company E, wounded. 
Private James Rounds, company B, wounded. 
Private M. A. Rowe, company B, wounded. 
Private William Jennings, company H, wounded. 
Private Hiram C. Hill, company G, killed. 
Private M. B. Raskins, company B, wounded. 
Private Ed. Farr, company H, wounded. 
Private O. O. Wright, company H, wounded. 
Sergeant C. Woodford, company F, wounded. 



264 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Corporal G. McLain, company F, wounded. 
Private Thomas Bowling, company F, wounded. 
Corporal Loren Frisby, company F, wounded. 
Private E. L. Gray,* company F, wounded. 
Private Alpheus Hardy,* company F, wounded. 
Private A. W. Hardy, company F, wounded. 
Private E. F. Mason, company C, wounded. 
Private B. Miller, company C, wounded. 
Private E. O. Miller, company C, wounded. 
Private T. J. Merrell, company C, wounded. 
Private W. H. Runyon, company C, wounded. 
Private Obed Knapp, company C, wounded. 
Private Esick Blanchard, company K, wounded. 
Sergeant John A. Kummer, company G, wounded. 
Private Tallis E. McKain, company G, wounded. 
Private Harry Gould, company G, wounded. 
Private Isaac Munger, company A, wounded. 
Private F. B. Mowery, company A. wounded. 
Private Ed. J. Brown, company A, wounded. 
Private C. Hedrick, company A, wounded. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed 7 

Wounded 33 

Total... 40 



RECORD OF CASUALTIES OF THE TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT 
OHIO VOLUNTEERS, FROM MAY 3, 1864, TO JANUARY 27, 
1865. 

First Lieutenant Winthrop C. Grant, company A, 
killed, Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Adrian M. Knowlton, company A, killed, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 265 

Private Franklin Potter, company A, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Keppler, company C, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Gray, company C, killed, Dug Gap, Geor 
gia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Samuel Wooldridge, company D, killed, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal George Foust, company D, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Thomas J. Bare, company D, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John W. Steese, company D, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Ellis T. Treen, company G, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Christian F Remley, company G, killed, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Curtis M. Lanty, company G, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private W. H. Connell, company H, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Eli C. Joles, company H, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Charles Osborne, company H, killed, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Martin Smith, company H, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Tobias R. Phinney, company I, killed, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Henry Rapp, company I, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Cass M. Nimms, company I, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



266 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Amos Long, company K, killed, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Cyrus Roath, company A, killed, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Eber F. Bennet, company D, killed, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Sergeant Andrew L. Rickard, company A, killed, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

First Sergeant Joel E. Tanner, company B, killed, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Jabin S. Dusten, company F, killed, Pin$ 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Lewis J. Phinney, company B, killed, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 29, 1864. 

Private A. W. Atkins, company B, killed, Dallas, Geor 
gia, May 29, 1864. 

Private C. A. Davis, company B, killed, Dallas, Geor 
gia, May 29, 1864. 

Private W. Hasting, company D, killed, Dallas, Geor 
gia, May 26, 1864. 

Sergeant J. H. Marsh, company K, killed, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private James Baker, company I, killed, near Kenesaw, 
Georgia, July 2, 1864. 

Sergeant Thomas Davis, company H, killed, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Corporal James Gunn, company I, killed, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private W. F. Harrington, company G, killed, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private Benjamin R. Lee, company H, killed, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Sergeant D. Ransom (James ?) Billings, company I, 
killed, near Atlanta, Georgia, July 28, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 267 

Private C. W. Kellogg, company C, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

COMMISSIONED OFFICERS WOUNDED. 

Colonel William T. Fitch, Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 

Lieutenant-colonel Edward Hayes, Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

Adjutant James B. Storer, Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 
1864. 

First Lieutenant George W. Dice, Dug Gap, Georgia, 
May 8, 1864. 

First Lieutenant W. F. Chamberlain, Dug Gap, Geor 
gia. 

First Lieutenant George W. Dice, Pine Knob, June 
1 6, 1864, since died. 

Captain W. F. Stevens, Dallas, Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Captain Myron T. Wright, Peach Tree Creek, Geor 
gia, July 20, 1864. 

Major Myron T. Wright, December 19, 1864; died at 
Savannah, Georgia, January 7, 1865. 

Sergeant Thaddeus E. Hoyt, company A, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant A. L. Rickard, company A, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Ellis, company A, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864, 

Private N. A. Germond, company B, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private George Wright, company B, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Potter, company B, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Edwards, company B, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



268 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Andrew Bright, company B, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal Allen Mason, company C, died of wounds, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private D. C. Lindsley, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private George D. Brackett, company C, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Yokes, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Samuel E. Fany, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Wenham, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Henry C. Lord, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Obed Knapp, company C, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal M. Hougland, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Rufus T. Chapman, company D, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Jabin S. Duston, company F, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private John Montgomery, company D, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Jacob Gardner, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Charles A. Downey, company D, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Henry Hane, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John H. Hughes, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 269 

Private Levi Baughman, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Charles Steese, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Burkert, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private D. C. Stevens,* company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Seth M. Thomas, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Theron W. Smith, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private David M. Brown, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Thomas White, company G, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 27, 1864. 

Private Isaac Medsker, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John J. White, company D, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

First Sergeant A. J. Andrews, company E, wounded 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal Hiram Thornton, company E, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal Hiram Dalrymple, company E, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Barney Buck, company E, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private J. Bennet Powers, company E, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Thomas Franklin, company E, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Franklin Flood, company F, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



270 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Alonzo Cole, company F, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Color Corporal Hammond W. Geer, company G, 
wounded, Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private George F. Braggington, company G, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864 (died). 

Private George I. McCormick, company G, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Woodard, company G, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Woodard, company G, wounded, Daf- 
las, Georgia, May 27, 1864. 

Private George Murray, company G, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Corporal Floyd Morris, company H, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Henry J. Knapp, company H, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Perrine, company H, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Smith, company H, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John H. Wright, company H, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Wild, company G, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant Newton B. Adams, company I, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Gilbert, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Abel Archer, company I, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private A. W. Woldridge, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 271 

Private Theodore Hawk, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Alvah Holden, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private C. H. Kindig, company I, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Hiram Newcomb, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Perkins, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Shannon, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Stetle, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Reed, company I, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

William Roshon, company I, wounded, Dug Gap, 
Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Winters, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Waterman, company I, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

First Sergeant N. S. Hoxter, company K, wounded, 
Dug Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private David Hartigan, company D, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 15, 1864. 

Sergeant L. L. Kinney, company K, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Sergeant J. C. Hammond, company K, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private F. A. Rounds, company K, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private W. H. Stratton, company K, wounded, Dug 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



272 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Corporal G. B. Mowrey, company A, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private J. O. Latimer, company A, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Sergeant George McNutt, company B, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Dudley Brown, company B, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private John Davis, company B, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 27, 1864. 

Private John Davis, company B, wounded, Pins 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private G. W. Stocking, company B, wounded, Dal 
las, Georgia, May 27, 1864. 

Private George W. Stocking, company B, wounded, 
Pine Knob, June 15, 1864. 

First Sergeant R. L. Jones, company C, wounded Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private David Clark, company C, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private James Fleming, company C, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Corporal George J. Young, company D, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private D. W. Powell, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Daniel Schaaf, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private John Snyder, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private H. A. Thompson, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private J. B. Yohey, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 273 

Sergeant C. Howard, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Corporal R. H. Hurlburt, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private D. W. Hall, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private M. Mahan, company E, wounded, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private T. S. McCartney, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private J. W. Kinnear, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

First Sergeant, A. B. Paine, company F, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Corporal J. J. Houghkirk, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Corporal J. W. Foot, company F, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 31, 1864. 

Private J. B. Belknap, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Charles Cook, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private J. Johnson, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private George Williams, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private H. Edson, company G, wounded, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private W. Hartley, company G, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private George Guest, company G, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Evander Turner, company H, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 



274 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Henry Wolf, company H, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private William Sperr, company H, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

First Sergeant S. Kissinger, company I, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private William Trail, company I, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private E. Newberry, company I, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private T. J. Fales, company K, wounded, Pine Knobj 
Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Daniel I. Turner, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private Jeremiah Congdon, company H, wounded, 
near Kennesaw, Georgia, June 24, 1864. 

Private Robert D. Lutz, company D, wounded near 
Atlanta, Georgia, July 28, 1864. 

Private Charles H. Beckwith, company E, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 25, 1864. 

Private I. E. Haggett, company A, wounded near 
Marietta, Georgia, July i, 1864. 

Sergeant N. H. Bailey, company C, wounded near 
Marietta, Georgia, July i, 1864. 

Private Louis Crocker, company G, wounded near 
Marietta, Georgia, July i, 1864. 

Private Tobias Nettles, company H, wounded 
near Marietta, Georgia, July i, 1864. 

Private H. Farnsworth, company K, wounded near 
Marietta, Georgia, July i, 1864. 

Private H. C. Rood, company A, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private E. W. Henick, company A, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 275 

Private O. J. Parkill, company A, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private John Burns, company B, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private Charles E. Parkill, company C, wounded, Dal 
las, Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private Israel Beck, company C, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Sergeant J. T. Parks, company D, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private B. Holton, company D, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private J. C. Greenlee, company E, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Sergeant George McNutt, company B, wounded, Dal 
las, Georgia, May 28, 1864. 

Corporal S. E. Balch, company F, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private John Goss, company G, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private J. Townsley, company G, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private William Demmings, company H, wounded, 
Dallas, Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private William Lutz, company H, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private A. Richards, company H, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Corporal C. F. Gove, company I, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private James Hawks, company I, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private James Walsh, company I, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 



276 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private G. W. Deem, company K, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private T. J. Failes, company K, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Corporal N. J. Smith, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 18, 1864; Kenesaw Mountain, 
Georgia, June 22, 1864. 

Private Elias Shutt, company D, wounded, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Georgia, June 22, 1864. 

Private Stephen Griffith, company G, wounded, Kene 
saw Mountain, Georgia, June 22, 1864. % 

Private W. Harrington, company G, wounded, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Georgia, June 22, 1864. 

Sergeant C. Woodford, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 18, 1864. 

Corporal S. McLain, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 18, 1864. 

Private O. E. Wilson, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 18, 1864. 

Private George Williams, company F, killed, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Georgia, June 23, 1864. 

Sergeant C. F. Sawyer, company I, wounded, Kene 
saw Mountain, Georgia, June 20, 1864. 

Private N. Wilder, company A, wounded, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private John Hague, company A, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private L. M. Coon, company A, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 1 6, 1864. 

Sergeant B. A. Isham, company B, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private S. S. Andrews, company B, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 277 

Private F. A. Rounds, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Ezra Spidel, company D, wounded, Pine Knob, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Jacob Winters, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private G. W. Holloway, company D, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private C. Vanvalkenburg, company F, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private P. E. Wilson, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private S. McLean, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private William Cline, company G, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private William Harrington, company G, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Sergeant Alphonzo Hazzen, company H, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Lester Bruno, company H, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Samuel Heathman, company H, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private George Manning, company H, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private John Sarsfield, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private F. N. Johnson, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private C. O. Hinkle, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private George G. Guest, company I, wounded, 
Resaca, Georgia, May 15, 1864. 



278 TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private Daniel Kelsea, company A, wounded, Resaca, 
Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private W. A. Frisbie, company A, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, June 28, 1864. 

Private John N. Wise, company G, wounded, Kene- 
saw Mountain, Georgia, June 28, 1864. 

Private A. B. Durfee, company A, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private B. F. Holten, company E, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 26, 1864. 

Private George W. Reed, company I, wounded, Dal 
las, Georgia, May 30, 1864. 

Private Frank Culver, company E, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private Thomas Dowling, company F, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 16, 1864. 

Private W. F. Harrington, company G, wounded, Dal 
las, Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Color Bearer M. McNerney, company I, wounded, 
Dallas, Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private W. H. Stratton, company K, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private A. B Durfee, company A, wounded, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private B. F. Holton, company E, wounded, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private Frank Culver, company E, wounded, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private Thomas Dowling, company F, wounded, 
Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864 (died). 

Color-bearer M. McNerney, company I, wounded, 
Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private W. H. Stratton, company K, wounded, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 279 

Private Christopher Beck, company D, wounded, 
near Atlanta, Georgia, August i, 1864. 

Private Robert Williams, company A, wounded, near 
Marietta, Georgia, June 27, 1864. 

Private Peter Dennis, company B, wounded, near 
Marietta, Georgia, June 27, 1864. 

Sergeant B. F. Manderbach, company G, wounded, 
near Marietta, Georgia, June 28, 1864. 

Private R. E. Woodbury, company A, wounded, near 
Marietta, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private John H. White, company B, wounded, Mill 
Creek Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private William Porter, company D, wounded, Mill 
Creek Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private Dennis Stevens, company I, wounded, Mill 
Creek Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private J. S. Deshore, company F, wounded, Resaca, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Corporal G. B. Mowry, company A, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, May 15, 1864. 

Corporal A. J. Langworthy, company B, wounded, 
Pine Knob, Georgia, May 15, 1864. 

Corporal H. Harlow Fenton, company K, wounded, 
no record. 

Private Levi Baughman, company D, wounded, Mill 
Creek, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private George Bason, company B, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25th to June 4, 1864. 

Private James Brands, company D, wounded, Kene- 
saw Mountain, Georgia, June 26 and 27, 1864. 

Private G. W. Drew, company K, wounded, Dallas, 
Georgia, May 25, 1864. 

Private Ferdinand Burt, company K, wounded, Mill 
Creek, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 



2 So TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 

Private G. W. Heern, company K, wounded, Pine 
Knob, Georgia, June 15, 1864. 

Private George Hammerstein, company G, wounded, 
Atlanta, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private James Nardham, company C, wounded, Mill 
Creek, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private John Cooper, company E, wounded December 
n, 1864. 

Private James Rounds, company B, wounded June 16, 
1864. 

Private Jacob Foster, company G, wounded May 25, 
1864. 

Private Charles Cain, company F, missing, Mill Creek 
Gap, Georgia, May 8, 1864. 

Private James Gaule, company G, missing, Peach Tree 
Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Corporal H. C. Rood, company A, missing, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

First Sergeant Rush Griswold, company B, missing, 
Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Corporal H. E. Clark, company B, missing, Peach 
Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20,- 1864. 

Private J. C. Shaw, company C, missing, Peach Tree 
Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private Alonzo Cole, company F, missing, Peach Pree 
Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Private H. Merrill, company I, missing, Peach Tree 
Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. 

Corporal Hiram Thornton, company E, missing Nov 
ember 20, 1864. 

Private M. Babington, company G, missing November 
20, 1864. 

Those killed near Dallas were buried on a ridge just 
to the right of the Burnt Hickory and Dallas road, i 



VETERAN VOLUNTEERS. 281 

rear of our works. Those killed June i5th and i6th, 
were buried on a ridge near Kenesaw Mountain, 100 
yards in rear of the front line of our works; the graves all 
marked and easily distinguished. 

GEORGE W. HOLLOWAY, 
Late Co. D, 29th Regiment. 



REPORT OF CASUALTIES IN THE TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 
VOLUNTEER VETERAN INFANTRY, FROM JANUARY 27 TO 
MARCH 26, 1865. 

Private John Rape, company G, killed February 12, 
1865. 

Private James Bailer, company D, wounded February 
12, 1865. 

Private James Miller, company I, wounded February 
12, 1865. 

Sergeant Charles Potter, company K, wounded Feb 
ruary 12, 1865. 

Private William H. Abbott, company I, wounded Feb 
ruary 12, 1865. 

First Sergeant Ulysses S. Hoxter, company K, missing 
March n, 1865. 

Private David W. Hall, company E, missing March 
15, 1865. 

Corporal Rufus Hulbert, company E, missing March 
15, 1865. 

Private Charles Upham, company G, missing March 
14, 1865. 

Private Milo Sharp, company I, missing March 19, 
1865. 

Corporal John A. Exceen, company A, wounded March 
24, 1865. 



282 



TWENTY-NINTH OHIO 



Private Adam Hulbert, company G, wounded March 
24, 1865. 

Private Thomas Bonner, company A, missing March 
n, 1865. 



AGGREGATE LOSSES OF KILLED, WOUNDED, AND MISSING 
OF THE TWENTY-NINTH REGIMENT OHIO VETERAN 
VOLUNTEER INFANTRY IN EACH BATTLE, FROM THE OR 
GANIZATION OF THE REGIMENT, SEPTEMBER, 1 86 1, TO 
JUNE I, 1865. 



Names of Battle. 


Place. 


Date. 


C: 

I 


Wounded . 




. 

3 

op 


[Aggregate. 


"Winchester 


Virginia 
Virginia 


1862. 
March 23. . . 
June 9 . 


- 

12 
II 

4 
9 

26 

"e 

9 
i 

i 

i 

8r 


7 

33 

20 

42 

35 
67 

24 

30 

5 

7 


2 
105 
12 

2^ 

I 
I 
I 

2 
- 


14 
150 
49 
7 1 

45 
94 

2 

3 1 
39 

12 

14 


Port Republic 


Cedar Mountain 
Chancellorsville 

Gettysburg 


Virginia 
Virginia 

Pennsylvania .... 

Georgia 
3-eorgia 
Georgia 
Georgia 
Georgia 
Georgia 
Georgia 
Georgia 

South Carolina . . 
North Carolina . . 


August 9 
May i, 2, 3.. 
1863 

J ul y 3- 

1864 
May 8 


Mill Creek Gap 
Resaca 
New Hope Church 
Pine Knob 
Kenesaw Mouutain 
Peach Tree Creek 
Atlanta 
Savannah 

North Edisto River 
Goldsboro . 


May 15 
May 25 
!une 15 
une 26 
uly 20 
September 2. 
December 21 
1865 
February 12. 
March 23. . . 


28(y 


9 

163 


4 
4 

12 

541 


Grand Total 



N. B. A remarkable fact, the Twenty-ninth fought its first battle on 
the 23d of March, and its last on the same date. 



ERRATA. 



Page 192 eighth line, "Steur " should be "Steen." 
Page 193 Captain Luce was killed June 9, 1862. 
Page 194 ninth line, for "October 17" read "October 27,"; twen 
ty-fourth line, for "Francis" read Frances." 

Page 196 twelfth line, "Haddock " should be "Hadlock." 
Page 197 seventeenth line, "Bivius" should be "Bivins." 
Page 198 twenty-first line, "Vanskoyt" should be "Vanskoik." 
Page 203 fourth and fifth lines, instead ot " Buele " read "Beede"; 
eleventh line from bottom, "Outis" should be "Ontis." 

Page 204 tenth line, John J. Belknap was wounded June 15, 1864. 
Page 206 fifth line, "Vins" should be "Viers"; nineteenth line, 
George Williams was killed at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia; twenty- 
second line, the last date should be June 17, 1865. 

Page 207 third line, last date should read May 22, 1865; twelfth 
line from bottom, insert the word "major" between the word "promo 
ted" and date. 

Page 209 fourth line from bottom, instead of " Martin M. Mills" 
read "Mill? M. Martin." 

Page 210 fourth line, William Fisher was captured June 9, 1862; 
fourth line from bottom "Tallio" should be "Tallis." 

Page 213 twelfth line from bottom, "Suies" should be "Sines." 
Page 214 first line, for " Bubbington" read "Babbington." 
Page 216 last line, for "Murgan" read "Morgan." 
Page 220 third line, for "discharged" read "mustered out"; elev 
enth and twelfth lines, take out word discharged. " 

Page 221 fourth line from bottom, for "Woobury " read "Wood- 
bury. " 

Page 222 sixth line from bottom, for "Norton" read "Newton." 
Page 223 tenth line, Albert Bishop was a corporal; twenty-fourth 
line, for " M " read " W." 

Page 224 ninth line from bottom, after "teamster" insert "dis 
charged. " 

Page 225 twenty-first line, for "with company" read "in hospi- 



284 ERRATA. 

tal"; ditto with fifth line from bottom; twenty-third line, for "with 
company " read "July 5, 1865." 

Page 226 eighth line from bottom, "June 5" should read "June 2." 

Page 227 twelfth line from bottom, for " 1863" read " 1862"; sixth 
line from bottom, for "A" read "F"; next line, for "E" read "G." 

Page 229 eleventh line, Philander M. Griggs was wounded at Ce 
dar Mountain, August 9, 1862. 

Page 231 ninth line, "Cargle" should be "Craighl." 

Page 232 last line, for "Grun" read "Green." 

Page 234 first name, for "Clap" reaa "Clapp"; same line, for "De 
cember 8 " read "5"; ninth line from bottom, for "Brunian" read 
" Brainard "; sixth line from bottom, take "e " out of "Bauer." 

Page 235 third line from bottom, for ."June 9" read "June 24." 

Page 236 sixteenth line, for "Newman" read "Niman"; sixth line 
from bottom, for "Ellson" read "Ellison." 

Page 237 sixth line, for "May n" read "September 4." 

Page 238 tenth line, for "Shabondy" read "Sherbondy"; twenty-* 
first line, for "Braginton" read "Braggington"; twenty-third line, for 
"Breght" read "Bright"; twenty-fourth line, for "Belnap" read 
Belknap. " 



To 



USE 



642-3405 






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htb 2 

H 

UNIV. OF CALIF., Bl 



.Gene 



U.C.BERKELEY LIBRARIES 




THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY