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Full text of "Journal of proceedings of the M. W. Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons, of the State of New Hampshire"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/journalofproceedOOfree 



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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01817 0503 




JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



M. W. GRAND LODGE 



Free and /Accepted Masons 



OF THE 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 



Semiannual Pommunicatton, Dec'r 29, y^ J^. 5868; and at the 
^nnual Pommunication, jIune 9 and to, 



frb 




5 86 9 



ALEXANDER M. WINN, M. D., Manchester, . . . M. W. Grand Master. 
Hon. HORACE CHASE, Hopkinton. R. W. Grand Secretary. 



i 



MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
PRINTED BY CHARLES F. LIVINGSTON. 

1869. 



'<2§l^ 



-e^£ 



■ ■■ ■■ ■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■ 



dK» 



JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



M. W. GRAND LODGE 



OF THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE FRATERNITY OF 



j^ree and Accepted M.asons 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

AT THE 

jsemi-^nnual pommunication held pec'r 29,^:. j^. 5868, and at 
the ^Annual. Pommunication, jJune 9 and io, 



n- 




5869, 



ALEXANDER M. WINN, M. D., Manchester, . . . M. W. Grand Master. 
Hon. HORACE CHASE, HopkintoD, R. W. Grand Secretary. 



MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
PRINTED BY CHARLES F. LIVINGSTON. 

1869. 



JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS, 



DECEMBER, A. L. 5868. 



The semi-annual communication of the M. TV. Grand 
Lodge of the ancient and honorable fraternity of Free 
and Accepted Masons of the State of New Hampshire, 
was held at Manchester, on Tuesday, the 29th day ot 
December, A. D. 1868, A. L. 5868. 

GRAND OFFICERS PRESENT. 

Alexander M. Winn, 3f. W. Grand Master. 

John K. Holbrook, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. 

N. W. Cumner, R. W. Sen. Grand Warden. 

William Barrett, R. W. Jan. Grand Warden. 

Daniel R. Marshall, R. W. Grand Treasurer yro tern. 

Horace Chase, R. W. Grand Secretary. 

Jeremiah D. Parker, 

Clinton W. Stanley, 

Nathan Hutchinson, 

George P. Cleaves, J> R. W. Dis. JDep. Grand Masters. 

J. W. Dearborn, 

Jesseniah Kittredge, 

Mark S. Aiken, 

(485 ) 



S- Grand Chaplains. 

S- W. Grand Deacons. 



486 

Albert S. Waite, } 

A. M. Brackett, >B. W. Grand Lecturers. 

Chas. M. Robinson, ) 

George S. Hill, 

John D. Patterson 

Edward Gustine, 

Andrew Bunton, pro tern 

Joseph W. Robinson 

Tobias D. Foss, 

John Clement, \ W. Grand Stewards. 

E. Ayers, 

Jacob D. March, 

John J. Bell, W. Grand Marshal pro tern. 

Ltjther W. Nichols, W. Grand Sword Bearer. 

Oliver A. Medbury, W. Grand Pursuivant. 

George L. Reed, W. Grand Tyler. 



PAST GRAND OFFICERS. 

John H. Rowell, M. W. Past Grand Master. 

John S. Kidder, R. W. Past Deputy Grand Master. 

J. M. Hayes, 

Edward Gustine, 

Ezra Huntington, ] B. W. P. Dis. Dep. Grand Masters. 

Eli Dodge, 

Rufus L. Bartlett, 



There being a constitutional number of Grand Officers 
and representatives of subordinate lodges present, the M. 
W. Grand Lodge was opened in ample form, W.'. and 
Kev. Bro. Geo. S. Hills, officiating as Grand Chaplain. 

On motion, Voted, That all Master Masons in the city in 
regular standing, be admitted to seats in the Grand Lodge 
during its present session. 

The committee on credentials consisting of Brothers 
Edward Parker and A. S. Ball ant yne, reported the 



487 

following officers and representatives of subordinate 
lodges and visiting brethren present, and entitled to seats 
In the Grand Lodge. 



REPRESENTATIVES OF SUBORDINATE LODGES 

St. John's Lodge, JSTo. 1. 
Samuel S. Fletcher, W. Master: 

Benevolent Lodge, JVo. 7. 
William Lane, Representative. 

Hiram Lodge, JVo. 9. 
B. F. Whitcomb, Senior Warden, 

Mount Cube Lodge, JSTo. 10. 

S. C. Demick, proxy for Senior Warden. 
Harvey Stetson, Junior Warden. 

King Soloman's Lodge, JSTo. 14, 

Edwin A. Jones, W. Master. 

Sumner E. Philbrick, Senior Warden, 

Richard O. Messer, Representative, 

Mount Vernon Lodge, JSTo. 15. 

Albert S. Waite, W. Master. 
Hiram Sargent, Representative. 

Olive Branch Lodge, JSTo. 16. 
Hiram Clark, Senior Warden, 



488 



Sullivan Lodge, No. 19. 

John L. Shackford, W. Master. 
Henry F. Hopkins, Senior Warden. 
Gilman B. Johnson, Junior Warden. 
George E, Laavrence, Representative. 



Humane Lodge, No. 21. 
Tobias D. Foss, Representative, 

Mount Moriah, No. 22. 
Stephen Fellows, Representative. 

Cheshire Lodge, No, 23, 

Albion P. Wood, W. Master. 
Mervin G. Day, Senior Warden, 

Bethel Lodge, No. 24, 
Warren Pratt, Representative, 

Altemont Lodge, No. 26, 

Isaac F. Preston, W. Master. 
Nathan U. Forbusii, Senior Warden. 
James Templeton, proxy for Junior Warden, 

St. Peter's Lodge, No. 31. 

"Benjamin T. Putney, W. Master. 

Robert Lea^iston, proxy for Senior Warden, 

John E, French, Representative, 



489 

Mount Lebanon Lodge, No. 32. 

George B. Lane, 'proxy for W. Master, 
George E. Chase, Senior Warden. 
Eazen Copp, Representative. 

Harmony Lodge, No. 38. 

John F. Chase, W. Master. 
John Goodale, Senior Warden, 

Rising Sun Lodge, No. 39. 

Edward Parker, W. Master. 
Henry M, Davis, Senior Warden. 
Frank A. McKean, Junior Warden, 
Nathan H. Foster, Representative, 

Lafayette Lodge, No, 41, 

C. F. Warren, W. Master. 
Wm. B. Lane, Senior Warden, 

D. O. Furnald, Junior Warden. 
Jacob B. Hartwell, Representative, 

Social Friend's Lodge, No. 42, 

• 
Charles S. Coburn, W. Master, 
Elisha Ayre, Senior Warden. 
Leonard J. Ttjttle, Junior Warden, 

Aurora Lodge, No. 43, 

George L. Kimball, W. Master, 
Daniel Johnson, Senior Warden, 
Gilman George, Junior Warden. 
John F. Jones, Representative, 



490 

St. Mark's Lodge, No. 44. 

William H. Brickett, W. Master. 
George W. Barker, Senior Warden. 
Lewis S. Morris, Junior Warden. 

Pacific Lodge, No. 45. 
Augustus H. Bixby, W. Master. 

Libanus Lodge, No. 49. 
Stephen S. Chick, Representative. 

St. Andrews Lodge, No. 56. 

James W. Lord, W. Master. 
Henry C. Walker, Senior Warden. 
Joseph Cheever, Junior Warden. 
Joseph B. Adams, Representative. 

Charter Oak Lodge, No. 58. 
Josephus L. Drake, Representative. 

Star in tfye Last Lodge, No. 59. 

Charles G. Conner, W. Master. 

John J. Bell, proxy for Senior Warden , 

Joseph S, Parsons, Junior Warden, 

Meridian Lodge, No. 60, 

Edwin C. Stone, Senior Warden. 
Frank H. Daniell, Junior Warden, 
John C. Neal, Representative. 



491 

Washington Lodge, No. 61. 

Isaac W. Smith, W. Master. 
Joseph Kidder, Senior Warden. 
Andrew Bunton, Junior Warden. « 

James M. Vakntjm, Representative. 

Unity Lodge, JSTo. 62. 

Asa M. Bkackett, W. Master. 

Herbert F. Stevens, 'proxy for Senior Warden. 

George E. Cotton, proxy for Junior Warden. 



Burns' Lodge, JSTo. 66. 

Chauncy H.' Greene, W. Master. 

James J. Barrett, proxy for Senior Warden. 



Mount Prospect Lodge, JSTo. 69.. 
Joseph S. Morrison, W. Master. 

Horace Chase Lodge, JSfo. 72. 
Gieman H. Dimond, Junior Warden. 

Ossipee Valley Lodge, JSTo. 74. 
John C. Bickeord, W. Master. 



Rockingham Lodge, JSfo, 76. 

A. Frank Patten, proxy for W. Master 
Rueus E. Patten, Senior Warden. 
James T. Dudley, Junior Warden. 
John H. Nutting, Representative, 



492 

Golden Rule Lodge, JVo. 77. 

Edward Bishop, Senior Warden. 
John H. Hillman, Representative. 

Doric Lodge, JVo. 78. 
Adam S. Ballantyne, W. Master. 

Union Lodge, JVo. 79. 
Moses H. Meeeow, W. Master. 

Monadnock Lodge, JVo. 80. 

John Clement, W. Master. 
Reuben Pbatt, Junior Warden. 

Kearsarge Lodge, JVo. 81. 

Chablton W. Woodbuby, W. Master. 
Geobge F. Sleepeb, proxy for Senior Warden. 
Joseph Bakee, proxy for Junior Warden. 
Geobge Sleepeb, Representative . 

Corinthian Lodge, JVo. 82. 

Joseph P. Roby, W. Master. 
Sylvanus Smith, Representative. 

Gideon Lodge, JVo. 84. 

Samuel E. Woodman, proxy for W. Master. 
Joseph B. Cubeiee, Senior Warden. 

SpicJcet Lodge, JVo. 85. 

Geobge H. Whitney, W. Master. 
James A. Teoy, Senior Warden. 
Geobge C. Goedon, Junior Warden. 
■I \ m is Ayee, Representative, 



493 

The M. W. Grand Master appointed Brothers I. W. 
Smith and Samuel S. Fletcher, to fill vacancies in the 
committee on lodges. 

A petition for the removal of Sullivan Lodge, No. 19, 
from Lee to Epping was presented, and referred to the 
committee on lodges. 

R.-. W.-. Bro. Jesseniah Kittredge offered the fol- 
lowing resolution, which was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the Grand Secretary be requested to 
procure a Steel Plate engraving of his Photograph at the 
expense of this Grand Lodge, obtain printed impressions 
from said Plate, and cause to be bound as a frontispiece 
one copy in each number of the second volume of the 
reprinted proceedings now in course of publication, and 
that he be authorized to draw upon the Grand Treasurer 
for a sum sufficient to cover the expense. 

The Grand Secretary presented the bill of Bro. C. F. 
Livingston, for printing the proceedings of the Grand 
Lodge for 1868, amounting to $592.01. Bros. J. D. 
Parker and O. C. Fisher, were appointed substitutes for 
absent members of the finance committee. 

The Grand Secretary presented a communication from 
several brethren in Maryland, cautioning the Lodges in 
this jurisdiction against imposition of one John Buxton 
a resident of Chester, whom they represent as an unwor- 
thy character. 

The Grand Secretary then proposed to present sundry 
other communications relating to suspensions, expulsions, 
amendment of bylaws and other matters, which on 
motion were postponed till the annual communication in 
June next. 

Called from labor to refreshment until two o'clock p. m, 



494 



AFTERNOON. 

At two o'clock p. M. the Grand Lodge reassembled and 
resumed labor. 

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge were suspended for 
the purpose of exemplifying the work on the Entered 
Apprentice Degree, when Bro. Wm. Barrett, R. W. 
Junior Warden was called to the East, who proceeded to 
open a Lodge of E. A. in behalf of Washington Lodge, 
No. 61, — the following brethren officiating as officers of 
the Lodge. Bros. N. W. Cumner, as /Senior Warden'; 
A. M. Winn, 'as Junior Warden; D. R. Marshall, as 
Treasurer; C. F. Livingston, as Secretary; Charles 
M. Robinson, as Senior Deacon; Andrew Bunton, as 
Junior Deacon. 

The Lodge being opened, Mr. Henry J. Young, a 
candidate furnished by Washington Lodge, was admitted 
and made a Mason in due and ancient form. 

While the candidate was being prepared, Bros. A. S. 
Waite and A. M. Brackett rehearsed a part of the 
lecture in the first degree of Masonry. 

The Lodge was then closed and the Grand Lodge 
resumed labor. 

The committee on credentials in addition to the fore- 
going Grand Officers, Past Grand Officers and Represen- 
tatives of lodges, made the following report of visiting 
brethren in attendance, and entitled to seats in the Grand 
Lodge, which was accepted. 

Edward Aiken, Benevolent, No. 7 ; A. J. Hall, Olive 
Branch, No. 16; Cornelius Cooledge, Harmony, No. 38; 
N. M. Ames, Rising Sun, No. 39 ; George Abbott, Robert 
G. Annan, Henky A. Bailey, Charles Si Baker, Nathaniel 



4&5 



Baker, Daniel Balch, A. A. Balch, Rueus L. BartleTT-5 
Otis Barton, Stephen J. Batchelder, Joseph E. Bennett, 
Nathan B. Bickford, Edward S. Blanchard, Benjamin P. 
Brooks, J. Frank Brown, John N. Bruce, Lewis E. Bryant, 
David T. Burleigh, Henry A. Campbell, William N. 
Chamberlin, Albert B. Chase, Joseph B. Cilley, Harry M. 
Clark, Jesse M. Coburn, William W. Colburn, George 
Colby, Henry Colby, J. Langdon Cox, Woodbridge Cressey, 
David Cross, Harvey L. Currier, Emil Custer, George W. 
Dodge, Beuben Dodge, Israel Dow, Thomas Dunlap, 
Joseph T. Durgin, Clarence M. Edgerly, Joseph G. 
Edgerly, William G. Everett, John U. Farnham, Gideon 
Flanders, Matthew Forsaith, Samuel C. Forsaith, Joseph 
Freschl, James D. Gage, William G. Garmon, Matthew 
Gault, Alpheus Gay, Horace M. Gillis, John Gillis, 
Charles M. Gordon, Sylvester C. Gould, James Harvell, 
William E. Hazen, Robert Heath, Isaac L. Heath, William 
J. Hickok, Freeman Higgins, Bushrod W. Hill, Edwin H. 
Hobbs, John Hosley, Ezra Huntington, John Irwin, Lemuel 
H. James, Benjamin C. Kendall, W t illiam E. Killey, George 
C. Kimball, John'W. Lane, Thomas W. Lane, Thomas A. 
Lane, A. Judson Lane, Henry Lewis, George F. Lord, 
Samuel C. Lowell, John C. Lyeord, Reuben S. Marshall, 
Daniel H. Maxeield, Ira J. McAlister, Charles F. McCoy, 
John K. McQuestion, David A. Messer, James Mitchell, Jr., 
Robert F. Moore, George F. Moore, Thomas S. Montgomery, 
George Morgan, Bartlett A. Morse, David Moulton, 
Emerson Moulton, Henry T. Mowatt, George Murdough, 
Samuel F. Murry, John P. Newell, George W. Nichols, 
Thomas R. Northrup, Isaac C. Noyes, Charles Osgood, 
Charles Osbrey, Charles W. Paige, William S. Palmer, 
William B. Patten, William R. Patten, John D. Patterson, 
John Pattee, Moses O. Pearson, William G. Perry, Thomas 
Pillsbury, Charles P. Porter, William A. Potter, John B. 
Prescott, James W. Preston, John D. Powell, George W. 
Quinby, Isaac Quint, John H. Rand, Frank H. Redeield, 
Edwin P. Richardson, Frank T. E. Richardson, George W. 
Riddle, William P. Riddle, Oilman E. Riddle, Benjamin 
W. Robinson, George P. Rockwell, Henry W. Rowe, Edson 
W. Sanborn, Henry H. Scribner, William Shepherd, 



496 

William Short, Gilmam Stearns, Henry F. Straw, Joel 
Taylor, Andrew J. Tebbetts, M. G. J. Tewksbury, George 
W. Thayer, Moses Wadleigh, George W. Weeks, John K. 
Wilson, Thomas Wilson, George W. Witham, Peter O. 
Woodman, Lafayette, No. 41 ; Alden S. Wood, Horace B. 
Johnson, Dayid S. Clark, John Campbell, St. Maries, No. 
44 ; E. W. Colburn, B. F. Woodbury, Pacific, No. 45 ; 
Nath'l Faxon, Carroll, No. 57 ; R. M. Davis, George D. 
Stackpole, Meridian, No. 60 ; Fred'k B. Balch, Fred'k W. 
Batchelder, Samuel N. Bell, Chas. G. Blake, Alpheus 

BODWELL, LORING B. BoDWELL, ThOS. P. BADGER, LUTHER H. 

Brown, Chas. Bunton, Geo. B. Chandler, John M. Chand- 
ler, Bradbury P. Cilley, Nath'l W. Cumner, B. Frank Cur- 
rier, Joseph S. Doolittle, Fred. C. Dow, Oscar G. Farmer, 
Joseph W. Fellows, Ebenezer Ferren, John W. Forbes, 
Hiram Forsaith, Hazen K. Fuller, J. Frank Gordon, Joseph 
A. Haines, E. W. Harrington, Natt Head, Albe C. Heath, 
Frank D. Heath, Edwin L. Hill, William H. Hill, James 
Holmes, Benjamin K. Hoyt, Horace Hubbard, Nathan P. 
Hunt, Wilberforce Ireland, Albert Jackson, Stevens 
James, Samuel W. Jones, John S. Kidder, 'Samuel B. Kidder, 
Ezra Kimball, J. W. D. Knowlton, Daniel W. Lane, 
Charles F. Livingston, Frederick S. Manning, Granville 
P. Mason, John Mooar, Thomas Morgan, John T. Nesmith, 
A. P. Olzendam, Samuel A. Ordway, John Patterson, Wil- 
liam H. Plumer, J. Q. A. Sargent, Charles H. Scott, 
Frederick Smith, John T. Spofford, John V. Sullivan, 
Clinton W. Stanley, Daniel F. Straw, Benjamin M. 
Tillotson, George H. True, S. G. Walker, F. H. Webster, 
A. H. Weston?Jas. A. Weston, Wm. White, J. W. Wilkins, 
D. H. Lang, James R. Batchelder, Washington, No. 61; I. S. 
Young, A. P. Gilman, S. Poor, A. W. Brown, Rockingham, 
No. 76; William Dyer, A. P. Shattuck, Robert Ford, E. 
S. Dickenson, J. H. Emmons, Union No. .79; O. P. Patten, 
Gideon, No. 84; Chas. C. Talbot, D. N. Ross, Levi Clough, 
Spiclcet, No. 85; Henry Seaman, Waterloo, No. 105, Iowa; 
John G. Lane, Peoria, No. 15, Illinois; J. H. Thureee, 
Montgomery Lodge, Milford, Mass. ; N. B. Houghton, Grecian 
Lodge, and F. E. Wheeler, Tuscan Lodge, Lawrence, 3Iass. ; 
Alden S. Wood. 



49? 

The committee on lodges then made the following 
report which was accepted, and a resolution presented by 
said committee was adopted. 

REPORT. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the State of New 
Hampshire : 

The undersigned, committee upon lodges, to whom was referred 
the petition of Sullivan Lodge, No. 19, of Lee, for removal to 
Epping, having attended to the duty assigned them, respectfully 
present the following report : 

Your committee met the officers and several of the members of 
Sullivan Lodge, also several of the members of Star in the East 
Lodge of Exeter. 

It appeared to your committee that the petition is signed by 
nineteen of the twenty-six members of Sullivan Lodge; that a 
special communication of said lodge was holden on the 26th of 
November last, of which every member was duly notified, and at 
which it was unanimously voted to petition this M. W. Grand 
Lodge for leave to remove said Lodge from Lee to Epping; that 
the consent of Rising Star Lodge, No. 47, of New Market, was 
granted March 27, 1868, and of Strafford Lodge, No. 29, of 
Dover, October 29th, 1868, they being the two nearest lodges, as 
required by article 5, section 3 of the constitution of this Most 
Worshipful Grand Lodge, and that the distance to which it is 
proposed to remove the lodge is three and one half miles. The 
petioners assign as reasons for the removal — 

1st. That there is no suitable place in Lee that can be pro- 
cured for a lodge, the meetings of said lodge being held in the 
front chamber of a farm house. 

2d. That but few of the members reside in Lee, and of those 
who do reside in Lee all but two are too old and infirm to attend 
the meetings of the Lodge. 

3d. That most of the members, and nearly all of the working 
members reside in Epping, and in the immediate vicinity of the 
place where it is proposed to locate the lodge, if removed. 

Your committee find all these allegations proved. 

The lodge room at Lee is 15 by 16 feet in size, and is in the 
second story of a dwelling house. If removed to Epping the 



498 

lodge would be accommodated in a hall 20 by 24 feet which can 
be enlarged to 20 by 30 feet with suitable ante-rooms, in a good 
and retired location. 

At the last annual communication of this M. W. Grand Lodge 
in June last, the following vote was passed. 

Whereas, Sullivan Lodge, No. 19, for the year last past has 
neglected to meet for work and the election of officers, or to make 
returns to this Grand Lodge, therefore 

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge declare the charter of Sullivan 
Lodge, No. 19, forfeited, and that said Lodge be stricken from the 
roll of subordinate lodges. 

Some three months since the charter of said lodge was revived 
by the M. W. Grand Master, since which time this lodge has made 
some ten or twelve Masons. 

There was no opposition before your committee from any one 
to the removal asked for. Some of the members of Star in the 
East Lodge expressed a fear that there might not be suitable 
persons in Epping and vicinity of which to make a nourishing 
lodge, and for the lack of such, improper persons might possibly 
in time be received to the detriment of the craft. 

Your committee however find that if removed it would embrace 
within its jurisdiction the towns of Epping, Lee, Nottingham, 
Fremont, and parts of Raymond, Northwood and Brentwood, and 
from representations made to your committee they entertain no 
doubt that the lodge if removed to Epping would be a nourishing 
lodge, and an ornament to the frateruity of lodges. 

This is an ancient lodge, having been chartered in 1807, and 
has done much valuable service to the craft. The time for. its 
usefulness in Lee, however, seems to have culminated with the 
death and removal of many of its former members. The question 
of its continuance seems to have been put at rest by the act of 
reviving its charter, and your committee are of the opinion that 
the usefulness of the lodge and of the craft generally, will be pro- 
moted by granting the prayer of the petition; ani they would 
therefore recommend the passage of the accompanying resolution. 

Isaac W. Smith, } Committee 

John C. Neal, > on 

Samuel S. Fletcher, ) Lodges. 
Manchester, Dec. 29, 1868. 



499 

Resolved, That the prayer of the petition of members of Sulli- 
van Lodge, No. 19, for removal from Lee to Epping, be granted. 

The business of the Grand Lodge was suspended and a 
Lodge of Fellow Crafts opened. 

R.-. W.*. N. W. Cumner was called to the East, who 
opened a Lodge of Fellow Crafts in due form, assisted by 
the M. W. Grand Master acting as Senior Warden, R.\ 
W.*. Wm. Barrett, Junior Warden, Bros. I. W. Smith 
and Andrew Bunton, Deacons. 

Brother Frank Newton, a candidate furnished by 
Washington Lodge, was passed to the degree of Fellow 
Craft, in due and ancient form. 

The Lodge of Fellow Crafts was then closed in due 
form. 

The Grand Lodge was then called from labor to refresh- 
ment until seven o'clock in the evening. 



EVENING. 

At seven o'clock the Grand Lodge reassembled and 
suspended business, and a Lodge of Master Masons was 
opened in due form by R.-. W.-. John R. Holbrook, 
acting as W. Master, assisted by Bros. N. W. Cumner 
in the West, Wm. Barrett in the South, Brothers E. 
Gustine and A. Bunton acting as Deacons. 

Bro. George C. Kimball, a candidate furnished by 
Lafayette Lodge, No. 41, was introduced and raised to 
the sublime degree of Master Mason in due and ancient 
form. 

2 



500 

The Grand Officers repaired to their respective stations 
and the Grand Lodge resumed business. 

Bro. J. W. Dearborn presented the following resolu- 
tion which was adopted. 

Resolved, That the chairman of the committee on 
clothing and furniture, be authorized to draw an order on 
the Grand Treasurer for the amount of expenses incurred 
by them, by order of the Grand Lodge at the June 
session. 

The Committee on Finance reported in tavor of allowing 
the bill of Bro. C. F. Livingston of $592.01, which was 
accepted and the same ordered to be paid. 

K.-. W.-. Rufus L. Bartlett submitted the following 
question for the consideration of the Grand Lodge. 

Is it in accordance with Masonic law to confer the 
degree of E. A., F. C. or M. M. upon more than five 
candidates at one and the same communication ? Which 
was referred to the committee on jurisprudence. 

The M. W. Grand Master decided that, in the mean 
time, no more than five candidates shall be admitted at 
the same meeting in any degree. 

Bro. Wm. Barrett raised the question whether a can- 
didate for the honors of Masonry could be permitted to 
withdraw his application after the same had been received 
and placed on file in the Lodge, when the M. W. Master 
also decided that no gentleman could withdraw his appli- 
cation, but that all applications for the honors of Masonry, 
after being received and filed, must come to a ballot; and 
the Grand Secretary was instructed to examine carefully 



501 

the records to see if the Grand Lodge had taken action 
upon this matter. 

There being no further business before the Grand 
Lodge, the Throne of Grace was addressed by the Grand 
Chaplain, and the Grand Lodge was closed in ample form. 

A true record. Attest : 

Grand Secretary. 




JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



M. W. GRAND LODGE 



OF THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE FRATERNITY OF 



Free and A 



ree and Accepted /Vlasons 



JYL 



OF THE 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



AT THE 



j&NNUAL pOMMUNICATION, jJUNE 9 AND i O, 



Af 




5869, 



ALEXANDER M. WINN, M. D., Manchester, . . . M. W. Grand Master. 
Hon. HORACE CHASE, Hopkinton, R. W. Grand Secretary. 



MANCHESTER, N. H. : 
PRINTED BY CHARLES F. LIVINGSTON. 

1869. 



JOURNAL OF PROCEEDINGS 



JUNE, A. L. 5869. 



The annual communication of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honorable Fraternity of 
Free and Accepted Masons, was held at Masonic Temple 
in Concord, on Wednesday and Thursday, the 10th and 
11th days of June, A. D. 1869, A. L. 5869. 

GRAND OFFICERS PRESENT. 



Alexander M. Winn, M. W. Grand Master. 
John R. Holbrook, R. W. Deputy Grand Master. 
N. W. Cumner, R. W. Sen. Grand Warden. 
Wm. Barrett, R. W. Jun. Grand Warden. 
John Knowlton, R. W. Grand Treasurer. 
Horace Chase, R. W. Grand Secretary. 

R t W. District Deputy Grand Masters, 
Jeremiah D. Parker, District No. 1. 



Clinton W. Stanley, 


a 


" 2. 


"Matttatc Hutchinson 


a 


" 4. 


J. W. Dearborn, 


a 


" 6. 




a 


" 7. 


Mark S. Aiken, 


a 


" 9. 



( 505 ) 



506 

H. W. Grand Lecturers. 

John A. Harris, District No. 5. 

A. M. Brackett, <• " 6. 

Leland J. Graves, " " 7. 

Albert S. Waite, " " 8. 

Hiram Clark, '•' " 9. 

Albert Barker, " " 10. 

W. Edward Gustine, Sen. Grand Deacon. 

" Daniel W. Edgerly, 

" Joseph W. Robinson, 

" J. D. March, Grand Stewards. 

" T. D. Foss, 

" Daniel R. Marshall, 

" Edmund P. Hutchinson, Grand Marshal. 

" Luther W. Nichols, Grand Sword Bearer 

" Oliver A. Woodbury, Grand Pursuivant. 
Bro. George L. Reed, Grand Tyler. 



PAST GRAND OFFICERS. 

Israel Hunt, ~\ 

Horace Chase, > M. W. Past Grand Masters. 

John H. Rowell, ) 

Josiah Morse, P. Grand Senior Warden. 

Lewis Woodman, 

Charles Lane, 

David Murray, 

John M. Hunt, 

Abel Hutchins, 

C. K. Drake, 

John Wilder, ) E. W. Past D. D. Grand Master, 

Henry O. Kent, 

Eli Dodge, 

Hazen Bedel, 

J. B. Edgerly, 

Chas. H. Burns, 

Thos. J. Smith, 



507 

OFFICERS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF SUBORDINATE LODGES. 

St. John's Lodge, JSTo. 1. 

Chas. G. Pickering, proxy for W. Master. 
John H. Cheeyer, Senior Warden. 
Edwin D. Coffin, Junior Warden. 
A. J. Hill, Bepresentative. 

Franklin Lodge, JSTo. 6. 

Adoniram Smalley, proxy for W. Master. 
George F. Bean, Junior Warden. 
A. W. Baker, Bepresentative. 



Benevolent Lodge, No. 7. 
J. L. Spring, proxy for W. Master. 

North Star Lodge, No. 8. 

Edward Sayage, W. Master. 

Chas. L. Plaisted, proxy for Senior Warden. 

W. Cobleigh, Junior Warden. 

L. H. Legro, Bepresentative. 

Hiram Lodge, No. 9. 

Francis Whitcomb, W. Master. 
Geo. O. Woodcock, Senior Warden. 
John W. Collins, 'proxy for Junior Warden. 
C. H. Long, Bepresentative. 

Blazing Star Lodge, No. 11. 

John A. Harris, W. Master. 
Samuel F. Morrill, Senior Warden. 
Horace A. Brown, Junior Warden. 
Jona. F. Cotton, Bepresentative. 



508 
Faithful Lodge, No. 12. 

George S. Bond, W. Master. 

Edwin P. Ge-roult), proxy for Junior Warden. 

Loeen H. Royce, Representative. 

King Solomon's Lodge, JVo. 14. 

Edwin A. Jones, W. Master. 

S. E. Philbeick, Senior Warden. 

M. L. Walkee, Representative. 

Mount Vernon Lodge, JVo, 15. 

Josiah Tuenee, Senior Warden. 
Aethue H. Ingeam, Junior Warden. 
Daniel A. Geoege, Representative. 

Olive Branch Lodge, JVo. 16. 
Hieam Claek, W. Master. 

Morning Star Lodge, JVo. 17. 

John W. Aveey, proxy for Junior Warden. 
John H. Rust, Representative. 

Charity Lodge, No. 18. 
Feedeeick W. Bailey, Representative. 

Sidlivan Lodge, JVo. 19. 

H. F. Hopkins, W. Master. 

Gilman B. Johnson, Senior Warden. 

James M. Godfeey, proxy for Junior Warden. 

John L. Shackford, Representative. 



509 
Humane Lodge, JSTo. 21. 

Noah Tebbetts, proxy for W. Master. 
T. D. Foss, proxy for Senior Warden. 
E. P. Hodgdon, proxy for Junior Warden. 
Silas Hussey, Representative. 



Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 22. 

Stephen Fellows, W. Master. 
Byron Fellows, Representative. 



Cheshire Lodge, No. 23. 

A. P. Wood, W. Master. 

Geo. E. Hilliakd, Junior Warden. 



Bethel Lodge, No. 24. 

N. Y. Oliver, W. Master. 
James O. Reed, Representative. 



Altemont Lodge, No. 26. 
Augustus Fuller, 'proxy for W. Master. 

Strafford Lodge, JSTo. 29. 

Geo. W. Tash, W. Master. 
Wm. R. Tapley, Senior Warden. 
Chas. H. Sawyer, Junior Warden. 
Samuel M. Wheeler, Representative. 

St. Peter's Lodge, JSTo. 31. 
JamUs M. Sawyer, Representative. 



r 
510 

Mount Lebanon Lodge, JVo. 32. 

A. Dolloff, W. Master. 
J. C. Blake, Senior Warden. 
R. R. Somes, Junior Warden. 
E. E. Webster, Representative. 

Evening Star Lodge, JVo. 37. 

Hazen Bedel, W. Master. 
Wm. S. Rolfe, Representative. 

Harmony Lodge, No. 38. 
Abel Farley, Representative. 

Rising Sun Lodge, JVo. 39. 

Henry M. Dayis, W. Master. 
Jacob Libbey, proxy for Senior Warden. 
O. A. Woodbury, Junior Warden. 
John A. Spaulding, Representative. 

Philesian Lodge, No. 40. 

Edward Alexander, proxy for Senior Warden. 
Ellery Albee, proxy for Junior Warden. 
E. M. Forbes, Representative. 

Lafayette Lodge, No. 41. 

Wm. B. Lane, W. Master. 
C. F. Warren, Representative. 

Social Friends Lodge, JVo. 42. 

Charles S. Coburn, W. Master. 
Elisha Ayer, Senior Warden. 
Leonard J. Tuttle, Junior Warden. 
Solon A. Carter, Representative. 



511 
Aurora Lodge, JSTo. 43. 

Albert B. Johnson, Junior Warden. 
Daniel Johnson, Representative. 

St. Mark's Lodge, JSTo. 44. 

John D. Ordway, Senior Warden. 
Greenleap C. Bartlett, Junior Warden. 

Pacific Lodge, No* 45. 

A. H. Bixby, W. Master. 

S. D. Downes, proxy for Senior Warden. 

T. W. Ordway, Junior Warden. 

Grafton Lodge, No. 46. 
George F. Putnam, Representative. 

Rising Star Lodge, JSlo. 47. 

Benj. F. Watson, prbxy for W. Master. 

Thomas Tuttle, Senior Warden. 

C. H. Trickey, proxy for Junior Warden. 

Libanus Lodge, JVb. 49. 

James G. Young, Senior Warden. 
Stephen S. Chick, Representative. 

Social Lodge, JVb. 50. 

O. T. Cummings, Senior Warden. 

Converse G. Morgan, proxy for Junior Warden. 

N. S. Wheeler, Representative. 



512 

Clinton Lodge, No. 52. 

George S. Neville, W. Master. 
Daniel Cragin, proxy for Senior Warden. 
D. W. Russell, Junior Warden. 
A. E. Jaques, Representative. 

Columbian Lodge , No. 53. 

George Rust, proxy for W. Master. 
George B. Holland, Representative. 

St. Andrews Lodge , No. 56. 

James W. Lord, W. Master. 
J. B. Adams, Representative. 

Charter Oak Lodge, No. 58. 
Aldo M. Rumney, Representative. 

Star in the Last Lodge, No. 59. 

Charles G. Conner, W. Master. 
Charles C. Hunkins, proxy for Senior Warden. 
Eben. Folsom, proxy for Junior Warden. 
John J. Bell, Representative. 

Meridian Lodge, No. 60. 

Frank H. Daniell, Senior Warden. 
John C. Neal, Representative. 

Washington Lodge, No. 61. 

JosErn Kidder, W. Master. 
Andrew Bunton, Senior Warden. 
George B. Chandler, Junior Warden. 
Isaac W. Smith, Representative. 



513 

Unity Lodge, No. 62. 

A. M. Brackett, W. Master. 
Charles Jones, Representative. 

Moosehillock Lodge, No. 63. 

L. W. Currier, W. Master. 
Mark L. Aiken, Representative. 

Kane Lodge, No. 64. 
Hiram Noyes, Representative. 

Granite Lodge, No. 65. 
James Hamilton, Representative. 

Burns Lodge, No. 66. 

C. H. Greene, W. Master. 

S. B. Page, proxy for Senior Warden. 

Frank Paddleeord, proxy for Junior Warden. 

C. C. Smith, Representative. 

Souhegan Lodge, No. 67. 
W. M. Sanderson, Representative. 

Bed Mountain Lodge, No. 68. 
E. Q. Fellows, Representative. 

Mount Prospect Lodge, No. 69. 
T. P. Cheney, Representative. 



514 
Eureka Lodge, No. 70. 

F. D. Woodbury, W. Master. 
William P. Hoit, Senior Warden. 
James F. Gordon, Junior Warden. 

Fraternal Lodge, No. 71. 

Luther Hayes, proxy for W. Master. 
D. W. Edgerly, Senior Warden. 
C. W. Tapley, Junior Warden. 
Charles H. Boodey, Representative. 

Horace Chase Lodge, No. 72. 

Geo. N. Herbert, W. Master. 
Levi N. Barnes, Senior Warden. 
John T. Nelson, Junior Warden. 
R. D. Scales, Representative. 

Gorliam Lodge, No. 73. 
Addison Dalley, Representative. 

Ossipee Valley Lodge, No. 74. 

J. C. Bickford, W. Master. 
Frank R. Hobbs, Senior Warden. 
Frank H. Lord, Representative. 

Winnipissiogee Lodge, No. 75. 
George Montgomery, Representative. 

Rockingham Lodge, No. 76. 

Rufus E. Patten, W. Master. 
James Adams, Representative. 



515 

• Golden Bule Lodge, Mb; 77. 

H. F. Horton, proxy for W. Master. 

A. A. Thayer, Representative. 

Doric Lodge, No. 78. 

George W. Morrison, proxy for W. Master. 
J. M. Taylor, Senior Warden. 

B. F. Brown, Junior Warden. 

A. S. Ballantyne, Representative. 

Union Lodge, No. 79. 

Ira S. Chase, proxy for W. Master. 
M. H. Merrow, Representative. 

Monadnock Lodge, No. 80. 

John Clement, W. Master. 
Wm. Butler, Junior Warden. 
A. J. Blake, Representative. 

Kearsarge Lodge, No. 81. 

C. W. Woodbury, W. Master. 
John B. Wadleigh, Senior Warden. 
Joseph Baker, Junior Warden. 

J. D. Philbrick, Representative. 

Corinthian Lodge, No. 82. 
Sylvanus Smith, Representative. 

Chocorua Lodge, No. 83. 

H. P. Smith, proxy for W. Master. 
W. H. H. Fernald, Senior Warden. 
T. C. Gordon, Representative. 



516 

Gideon Lodge, No. 84. • 

C. H. Smith, 'proxy for W. Master. 
J. D. Curbieb, Senior Warden. 
A. Dunn, Junior Warden. 
J. W. Dudley, Representative. 

Sipickett Lodge > No. 85. 

G. K. Whitney, W. Master. 
Geo. C. Gordon, Junior Warden. 
James Ayeb, Representative. 



Visiting Brethren. 

Brothers N. H. Randlett, No. 6; Thomas Rust, No. 17 
H. B. Stickney, No. 23; J. H. Steele, Jonas Livingston, No 
26; Jos. W. Welch, Chas. A. Tufts, Oliver Wyatt, No. 29 
Mason W. Tappan, No. 31; H. Copp, G. P. Smith, No. 32 
Charles Osbrey, No. 41 ; A. S. Carpenter, Thos. E. Hatch 
D. H. Ward, Horatio Colony, J. S. Taft, E. E. Lyman, No 
42; Allen Pride, Benj. F. Haley, No. 47; Jeremiah Cross 
John P. Jewell, Ephraim G. Wallace, Frank S. Dodge 
George E. Fellows, No. 60; John M. Forbes, C. F. Living 
ston, J. W. Fellows, No. 61; John W. F. Locke, No. 71 
Robert Ford, J. N. Dickerson, Stillman Clark, O. F. 
Morse, No. 79; John M. Shirley, C. G. Peirce, Nathan 
Woodbury, Wm. H. Huntoon, H. A. Weymouth, John P. 
Carr, D. C. Gookin, No. 81; S. N. Lougee, No. 82; Nath'l 
Faxon, T. B. Newby, W. C. Eastman* 



The M. W. Grand Lodge was opened in ample form 
with prayer by W. and Eev. James Adams, acting as 
Grand Chaplain. 

*Rrothers Faxon, Nkwby and Eastman were reported by the committee as officers of Mt. 
Washington Lodge, U. D. As such they have no vote in Grand Lodge and are recorded only as 
visiting brothers, not knowing of what Lodge they are members. 



517 

The M. W. Grand Master appointed the following 
standing committees : 

Committee on Credentials. — Bros. Edward Parker, 
Geo. W. Tash, Josiah B. Edgerly. 

Committee on Unfinished Business. — Bros. J. W. 
Dearborn, Hazen Bedel, Solon A. Carter. 

Committee on Lodges. — Bros. Chas. H. Burns, Wm. 
B. Lane, John A. Harris. 

Committee on Finance. — Bros. Chas. G. Pickering, 
John A. Spaulding, Andrew Bunton. 

Committee on Jurisprudence. — Bros. Clinton W. 
Stanley, George N. Eastman, Henry O. Kent. 

Committee on Returns. — Bros. Cyrus K. Drake, Noah 
Tebbetts, Henry M. Davis. 

Committee on Doings of Grand Officers. — Bros. Thos. 
E. Hatch, Joseph W. Fellows, John M. Shirley. 

On motion of R.*. W.*. Henry O. Kent, 

Voted, That the reading of the proceedings of the last 
annual and semi-annual communications be dispensed with, 
and that the record of the same as published be approved. 

R. W. Bro. Gustine offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted : 

Resolved, That all Master Masons in the city in regu- 
lar standing, be admitted to seats in the Grand Lodge 
during its present session. 

Bro. Thos. E. Hatch presented a petition for a new 
Lodge at Keene, which was referred to the committee on 
Lodges. 



518 

A petition for the removal of Ossipee Valley Lodge, 
and accompanying papers, were presented and referred to 
the committee on Lodges. 

Resolutions and papers of Social Friends Lodge, No. 
42, remonstrating against the creation of a new Lodge at 
Keene, were presented and referred to the committee on 
Lodges. 

The Grand Secretary presented the bill of Morrill 
& Silsby, for stationery, &c, which was referred to the 
committee on finance. 

On motion of Bro. Barrett, the account of Morrill 
& Silsby for printing return tickets was referred to the 
committee on finance. 

The Grand Secretary presented a statement of reprint- 
ing, binding &c, of the second volume of proceedings, 
with the account of Bro. Charles F. Livingston, and 
his own account of money received, money paid out by 
him, and for his services, which were referred to the com- 
mittee on finance. 

Bro. Tebbetts offered the following resolutions which, 
with amendments suggested and accepted by him, were 
adopted in the following form : 

Resolved, That one copy of the second volume of 
reprinted proceedings of this Grand Lodge be presented 
to each Grand Lodge in correspondence with this Grand 
Lodge, one copy to each subordinate Lodge under this 
jurisdiction, one copy to each Grand Officer of this Grand 
Lodge, and one copy to each elective Past Grand Officer 
of this Grand Lodge, free of charge, and that the same 
be sold to such other brethren as may Avish to purchase 
the same at two dollars per copy. 



519 

Resolved, That all subordinate Lodges under this juris- 
diction that have not received the first volume of reprinted 
proceedings, shall be furnished with one copy each with- 
out charge. 

On motion of M. W. Bro. Israel Hunt, 

Voted, That two o'clock this afternoon be assigned as 
the hour to go into the election of Grand Officers. 

The M. W. Grand Master then read his annual address, 
as follows : 



ADDKESS. 

To tlie Most Worshipful Grand .Lodge : 

Bremen: — Precept, enforced by example, is the most 
powerful instructor of mankind, and is at the same time 
the most efficient rebuke to offenders against the laws of 
God and man. If the precepts of our institution teach 
those principles which constitute the sum total of sound 
morality, then how important is it that our example 
should shine forth a brilliant light to illumine, to guide 
and to instruct. When the Fathers of our order chose 
their associates, they selected only those whose example 
afforded abundant evidence of their being fitted for the 
noble calling and the elevating duties of the race before 
them. Let us imitate their example, otherwise we shall 
increase our numbers without increase of character, use- 
fulness or influence. Positive virtues, and not the mere 
absence of vice, should characterize the example of all 
our associates. 

The closing Masonic year brings us together to take 
counsel for the future and to review the past. In this 



520 

review I could wish that a better talent and more time 
might have been brought to the discharge of the duties of 
the office of Grand Master. I however feel assured that 
in the exercise of that Masonic charity which characterizes 
this jurisdiction, you will pass lightly over the deficiencies, 
omissions and errors of action exhibited, and remember 
only the very little good I may have done. 

Of the three Lodges chartered at our last annual com- 
munication, I was present at the institution of Pacific 
Lodge at Francestown, and installed their officers. By my 
request, R. W. Bro. Stanley instituted Spickett Lodge 
at Salem, and installed their officers. I also requested W. 
Bro. E. C. Knight to institute White Mountain Lodge, at 
Whitefield, and install their officers. I, on the 19th of 
July, restored the charter of Sullivan Lodge at Lee. 

By my request, M. W. Bro. C. H. Bell laid the corner 
stone of at Exeter, on the 4th of July.- On 

the same day I dedicated the hall of Libanus Lodge, at 
Somersworth, and publicly installed their officers. 

On December 10th, I dedicated the hall of Social 
Friends Lodge, at Keene. 

By my request, R. W. Bro. Stanley dedicated the 
hall of Pacific Lodge, at Francestown, and M. W. Bro. 
Rowell the hall of Chocorua Lodge, at Meredith. 

I have granted dispensations to brethren of North Con- 
way for a new Lodge, to be called Mount Washington 
Lodge, and to brethren of Keene for a new Lodge, to be 
called The Lodge of the Temple, both of which expire 
and will be returned at this time. 

I have installed the officers of quite a number of our 
Lodges, and visited many of them ; in all of which I 
have been received with a kindness, courtesy and hospi- 
tality long to be remembered. 

By consulting our constitution, general regulations, and 
proceedings, I have been enabled to decide all questions 
presented during the past year, and I believe satisfactorily 



521 

to the brethren, with 'one exception. In this instance, 
brethren whose opinion I value, dissenting. I have 
referred the question to your committee on jurisprudence, 
from whom I expect a report at this communication. 

Complaint against but one, Lodge has been brought to 
the notice of the Grand Lodge during the past year. In 
company with our K. W. Deputy Grand Master I visited 
the Lodge, when we examined the cause of complaint, 
heard the parties, and adopted such measures and made 
such suggestions as we at the time thought would promote 
the best interests of our order. 

To my associate officers of the Grand Lodge I offer my 
earnest thanks, for their very efficient assistance in the 
discharge of the duties of this office, and to the brethren 
of the jurisdiction my grateful acknowledgement of their 
uniform kindness and courtesy, whenever and wherever 
we met. 

Grateful for honors so often by your partiality be- 
stowed, I now as cheerfully return the Grand Master's 
Gavel as I accepted it one year since. 

With ^humble acknowledgement to the Supreme Grand 
Master for past blessings and enjoyments, and devout 
aspirations for their continuance, let us approach the 
business before us. 



Which, on motion, was referred, with the following 
reports of District Deputy Grand Masters, to the com- 
mittee on doings of Grand Officers. 



522 



REPORTS OF DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 



DISTRICT NUMBER TWO. 



To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, having been honored by the appointment of 
D. D. G. Master over Lodges Nos. 21, 29, 49, 65, 71, and 75, 
begs leave to submit the following report. 

January 9th, 1869, I visited Humane Lodge, No. 21, at 
Rochester. I found a large number of brethren present, and had 
an opportunity of witnessing the work in the three degrees, which 
was well done in due and ancient form. I examined their records, 
which are well and correctly kept. I am pleased to report this 
Lodge in a prosperous condition, and they are now fitting and 
preparing a commodious and beautiful, hall which will be ready 
for dedication in a few months. 

January 25th, 1869, I visited Fraternal Lodge, No. 71, at 
Farmington ; found a goodly number of brethren present, and had 
an opportunity of seeing them work in the third degree, which 
was well done. I examined their records ; found them well and 
correctly kept. 

January 28th, 1869, I visited Libanus Lodge, No. 49, at 
Somersworth. I found an unusually large number of brethren 
present; had an opportunity of seeing them work in the third 
degree, which was well done in due and ancient form. I examined 
their records, found them neatly and correctly kept. The high 
Masonic and personal character of their present W. Master, is a 
guarantee that during his administration nothing will be left 
undone which would be for the good and welfare of the Lodge. 



523 

• April 22, 1869, I visited Winnipissiogee Lodge, No. 75, at 
Alton. Here I found a goodly number of brethren present; wit- 
nessed the work in the third degree, which was well done. I 
examined their records ; found them well and correctly kept. 

April 27th, I visited Granite Lodge, No. 65, at Rollinsford. 
This being their annual meeting for choice of officers they did 
no work. I examined their records, which I found very neatly 
and correctly kept. May 11th, I again visited Granite Lodge, 
when I had an opportunity of seeing their newly-elected officers 
work the E. A. degree, which was done in due and ancient form, 
and in a manner highly commendable and praiseworthy. 

Strafford Lodge, No. 29, at Dover. I am a member of this 
Lodge and have attended most of the communications during the 
past year. Their work is well done, their records are neatly and 
correctly kept. I have granted four dispensations during the past 
year to advance candidates faster than our regulations allow, good 
and sufficient reasons having been shown me therefor. 

In closing my official communiaction with the several Lodges 
placed under my care, I beg leave to tender to them for their 
kindness, attention and hospitality, their uniform courtesy and 
affability, my lasting gratitude. 

In conclusion, allow me to say, so far as I have been able to 
learn, the true Masonic spirit prevails throughout this district, 
and the outer courts of our sanctuary have been well guarded 
during the past year. 

All of which is respectfully and fraternally submitted, 

JOSEPH HARTFORD, D. D. G. M. 



524 

DISTRICT NUMBER THREE. 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, having been appointed District Deputy over 
Lodges Nos. 39, 41, 44, 45, 61, 76 and 85, herewith most respect- 
fully submits his annual report of his doings. 

September 3, 1868, I visited, and by order of the M. W. Grand 
Master, and with his assistance, consecrated, constituted and 
installed the officers of Spickett Lodge, No. 85, at Salem. Since 
then I have be£n unable to visit them, but J learn from the W. 
Master that they have made but two Masons ; that they have all 
indebtedness paid, and have about forty dollars in the treasury. 
The high character of the W. Master and other officers of this 
Lodge is a sure guaranty that the wo,rk will be well done, and that 
the ancient usages and landmarks of the craft will be rigidly 
adhered to, and that none but good men and true will ever be 
admitted within their Lodge room. 

December 3, I visited St. Mark's Lodge, No. 44, at Derry, 
and witnessed the work on the third degree, which in the main 
was well and correctly done. There was a goodly number of the 
brethren present, and all manifested an earnest desire to promote 
the harmony and prosperity of the institution. This Lodge has a 
comfortable lodge room, suitably furnished, but its members are 
scattered over a large territory, and its meetings are not so large as 
they would be were it not for this disadvantage. 

They have made, during the past year, ten Masons. Their 
records are very well kept. They have in the treasury, $175.00, 
which is well invested, and all their bills are paid. They have 
fifty-five members. 

March 1, 1869, I visited Pacific Lodge, No. 45, at Frances- 
town, and by order of the M. W. Grand Master dedicated their 
new lodge rooms. The weather was very severe and the travel- 
ing bad, and there were consequently but a few of the brethren 
present. This Lodge appears to be in a flourishing condition, and 
from my acquaintance with the officers and brethren, I may safely 
say that the institution will suffer no detriment at their hands. 
They have recently erected a fine hall, sufficiently large and com- 
modious for their wants, and have furnished it with great neatness 



525 

and good taste. They have made twenty Masons since their last 
annual communication. They have thirty members. They are owing 
about seven hundred and fifty dollars, which is held among the 
members of the Lodge. This debt has been created in conse- 
quence of building their hall and furnishing it. I desire to tender 
my grateful acknowledgments to R. W. Bro. Wi. Bahkett, and 
the brethren who accompanied him from Nashua, for their valu- 
able assistance on the occasion of the dedication of the new hall 
of that Lodge. 

March 30, I visited and witnessed the work on the first degree 
in Rockingham . Lodge, No. 76, at Candia. This Lodge con- 
tinues to prosper under the superintendence of W. Bro. James 
Adams. I was much pleased with the strict conformity of their 
work on this degree with that of the Grand Lodge. 

May 11th, I again visited this Lodge and witnessed the work 
on the third degree, and I am pleased to say that on the first section 
of this degree the work was in accordance with the requirements 
of the Grand Lodge, but as to the remaining work on this degree I 
cannot bestow the same commendation. It was in some particu- 
lars entirely different from anything I had ever seen. Upon my 
first visit, the night was very stormy and the traveling bad, but 
there was, notwithstanding this, a good attendance. On my second 
visit the hall was well filled and the brethren, by their presence, 
their attention to the work, and the order maintained, plainly 
showed that they were imbued with the spirit of Freemasonry. 
Their records are very well and correctly kept. They are in debt 
about three hundred and fifty dollars, which is held by one of the 
brethren. Their bills are all paid, and they have a lodge room 
and furniture which would be a credit to any Lodge. Their debt 
was created in fixing up their hall and providing the furniture. 
They have made twenty-two Masons the past year. 

May 5, I visited Rising Sun Lodge, No. 39, at Nashua, and 
witnessed the work on the third degree, which was very well done. 
This Lodge is in a very flourishing condition. They have made 
twelve Masons during the past year. They have on hand a fund 
of nearly twenty-five hundred dollars, which is well invested. The 
records are very well kept. 

I have frequently visited Lafayette Lodge, No. 41, and 
Washington Lodge, No. 61, of which latter I am a member. 



526 

It gives me much pleasure to say that there is no abatement in 
the zeal and fidelity of the officers and members of these Lodges. 
They were never in a more prosperous condition than at this time. 
The records of both Lodges are neatly and accurately kept, and 
all the officers have striven to maintain the high reputation and 
to deserve the high encomiums bestowed upon them in previous 
years. There have been made in Lafayette Lodge, twenty-one, 
and in Washington, twenty-five Masons, during the past year. 
The treasurer's account shows that Lafayette Lodge has on hand 
about two thousand dollars, which is deposited in savings banks. 
The treasurer's account shows that Washington Lodge has on 
hand about seven hundred dollars, while during the past year 
new collars, after the style of those of the Grand Lodge, have been 
purchased at an expense of about one hundred and seventy-five 
dollars, and all bills paid. 

In conclusion, I would say that harmony and prosperity prevail 
throughout the various Lodges in my jurisdiction. All the 
brethren seem inbued with the true spirit of the order, and strive 
to maintain and preserve the ancient usages and landmarks of the 
fraternity, believing that by so doing they are but carrying out the 
precepts of the order, and that in so doing they will become 
better men, better citizens, and truer and more zealous Christians. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CLINTON W. STANLEY, D. D. G. M. 
May 15, 1869. 



527 

DISTRICT NUMBER FOUR. 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

Having been appointed District Deputy Grand Master for the 
fourth Masonic District, embracing Lodges Nos. 7, 24, 26, 52 
and 67, I beg leave to report as follows. 

On January 21st, in company with several of my Masonic friends, 
I visited Altemont Lodge, No. 26, at Peterborough. I found 
a good number of brethren present ; witnessed the work on the 
third degree, which was well done. After which I installed the 
officers. The financal condition of this Lodge is sound and the 
records well kept. I can truly say of this Lodge, that they are 
in a very nourishing condition. 

Clinton Lodge, No. 52, Wilton. I visited this Lodge on 
February 4th, installed the officers, and witnessed the work on E. 
A. degree. This Lodge has made more improvement within the 
last year than any other Lodge in this District. I am happy to 
say that the officers of Clinton Lodge are young men of high 
moral character, and are full of Masonic zeal; their records are 
neatly kept. 

Sotjhegan Lodge, No. 67, I visited at a special communica- 
tion in March last, and installed the officers, but have had no 
opportunity of witnessing their work. I found the records neatly 
and correctly kept, and the finances carefully attended to. 

On the same evening I visited Bethel Lodge, No. 24, and 
witnessed the work on the third degree. This Lodge, though 
among the oldest in the State, is at present laboring under many 
disadvantages. Its membership is small and scattered over con- 
siderable territory. Its proximity to Souhegan Lodge is detri- 
mental to its increase, as the latter is more easy of access. Its 
hall and furniture are in bad repair, and with so many depressing 
circumstances it was not to be expected that the work would be 
done with that enthusiasm and zeal which should characterize 
Masonic work in order to make a proper impression upon the 
candidate. > 

Benevolent Lodge, No. 7, of which I am a member and a 
constant attendant at all communications, I take pleasure in 
reporting as being in a very healthy condition, and the best 



528 

working Lodge in the district, and I think it will compare 
favorably with any in the State. February last, I attended a 
meeting of this Lodge, composed of its members, their ladies and 
invited guests, and publicly installed the officers. After the 
installation, a beautiful gold ring was presented to W.\ M.\ 
Hinds (in behalf of the Lodge), for the valuable services he had 
rendered the Lodge during the past two years. After which the 
company partook of refreshments. The evening was spent in a 
very pleasant and agreeable manner. The specie basis of this 
Lodge is sound, and the records neatly and properly kept. 

I have granted but few dispensations during the past year, and 
then only (for what seemed to me) to be good and sufficient 
reasons. 

In closing, allow me to say that the true spirit of Masonry 
reigns throughout our borders, and my earnest prayer is, that 
it may so continue until time shall be no more. 
Fraternally yours, 

N. HUTCHINSON, D. D. G. M. 



DISTRICT NUMBER FIVE. 

To the M. W. Or and Master of the State of New Hampshire: 

When you honored me by appointing me District Deputy Grand 
Master, it was my intention to attend to the duties of the office 
with fidelity, and to visit every Lodge within my jurisdiction; but 
sickness and absence from home, have prevented my attending to 
the* duties of the office as I should otherwise have done. I have 
only been able to visit the Lodges in my own city, but from fre- 
quent inquiry of the officers and members of oth^ Lodges in the 
jurisdiction, I am satisfied that they are in a prosperous condition. 
I have granted but three dispensations and those only by and with 
your consent and advice. I am pleased to say that the Lodges 



529 

are more careful and strict in the examination of candidates, 
which will result in a great benefit to the craft. As I shall 
probably net be in the jurisdiction the coming year, I respectfully 
request you to appoint some more worthy brother in my place. 

Regretting my inability to fulfill the duties of the important 
office to which you was pleased to appoint me, 

I am very truly and fraternally yours, 

GEORGE P. CLEAVES, D. D. G. M. 
Boston, June 7, 1869. 



DISTRICT NUMBER SIX. 



To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, appointed District Deputy Grand Master over 
Lodges Nos. 17, 57, 58, 62, 68 and 74, submits the following 
report. 

Have visited all the Lodges above named. Was present at the 
regular communication of Morning Star Lodge, No. 17, at 
Wolfeborough, in February, and witnessed the work in the third 
degree, which was performed in a dignified manner, and in accord- 
ance with that of this Grand Lodge. This is really one of our 
best working Lodges ; spirit of harmony prevails ; lodge meet- 
ings well attended; good degree of interest manifested; records 
very neatly and properly kept by our faithful and venerable Bro. 
Rust, who has long had charge thereof, and the Lodge seems to 
be in a very flourishing condition, doing a fair amount of work 
upon well-selected material. Finances well cared for. 

Carroll Lodge, No. 57, Freedom. Was present as its com- 
munication in August, witnessed work in first and second degrees, 
quite well performed. The finances are in good condition; 
records well made. Was present, and publicly installed its officers 
on the afternoon of May 27, assisted by Past Grand Master 



530 



Rowell, whom I unexpectedly met at that place, and Brothers 
Emerson and Drake, of Charter Oak. I am sorry to report a 
spirit of discord in this Lodge ; should it long continue the Lodge 
will not only suffer, but Masonry be brought into disrepute. 

Charter Oak Lodge, No. 58, Effingham. Am a member of 
this Lodge, and have attended all its communications for the past 
year. There has been but a small amount of work performed, 
but the meetings have been well attended and harmony has pre- 
vailed. Records well kept by their faithful Secretary, Bro. Moore, 
whose efficiency was acknowledged at our last annual communica- 
tion by his eighth re-election. It is and has ever been the object 
of the officers of this Lodge to conform strictly to the phraseology 
of the Grand Lodge ritual, and we think their work will bear a 
favorable comparison with that of any Lodge in this district. 
The N. E. M. C. Institute at this place merits the patronage of 
the craft. It is under the care of excellent teachers, and its 
advantages are equal to those offered by any of our seminaries. 
Charter Oak Lodge has paid from its charity -fund the tuition 
of all orphan children of Master Masons, who have availed them- 
selves of the privileges conferred by the Institute. 

Unity Lodge, No. 62, Wakefield. Visited at its regular com- 
munication in January, and witnessed work in the third degree. 
M. W. Grand Master Winn was present, and a large delegation 
of visiting brethren from sister Lodges. This Lodge has an effi- 
cient board of officers ; works well ; records and finances in good 
condition; harmony prevailing; attendance fair; doing a good 
amount of work ; very cautious in its selection of material, and 
we entertain no fears of its prosperity. 

Visited Red Mountain Lodge, No. 68, Sandwich, at its regu- 
lar communication in May. Installed its officers and witnessed 
work in second and third degrees. This Lodge, although not 
doing a large amount of work, is yet very careful in regard to 
quality of material selected. Few Lodges in this particular can 
produce so fair a record. The meetings are not very fully attended 
as its members are mostly business men and scattered over con- 
siderable territory, yet there is a unity of effort. Its finances 
are properly cared for and its records a model. I have the vanity 
to believe that for chirography and terseness, no Lodge in the 
State can furnish superior. They are, and have ever been, in the 






531 

handwriting and under the supervision of Bro. C. C. Fellows, 
Past D. D. Grand Master. This Lodge can but succeed. 

Ossipee Valley Lodge, No. 74, Ossipee. Visited it at its 
regular communication in October, also in December and again in 
February, when I inspected its work, records, &c. This Lodge 
has been doing a fair amount of work, yet that noble contention 
or rather emulation of who best can work and best agree, does 
not exist to a very great extent. A necessity is felt by the active 
members of infusing its disordered system with new life and vigor, 
and in accordance with this view, the necessary vote has been 
passed and consent of the two nearest Lodges obtained, to remove 
it to another portion of the town about six miles distant. This 
subject will come before the Grand Lodge at this session for its 
consideration. As matters now stand, not only the Lodge but 
the institution suffers. 

By request of M. W. Grand Master Winn, I visited Mt. 
Washington Lodge, U. D., at North Conway, on the 3d 
instant, accompanied by Bro. J. L. Drake, of Charter Oak. 
As the Master was unavoidably absent, we did not see a specimen 
of their work, but had the pleasure of meeting with quite a 
number of the officers and members of the Lodge, viewing their 
records, &c. They have done a good amount of work; officers 
and members energetic, yet cautious ; anxious to know the right 
way and walk therein ; records systematically arranged, and very 
neatly and properly kept. 

We believe that the interests of Masonry have for some time 
past demanded a Lodge at this place. The territory is quite large 
and material good. They will ask for a charter at this communi- 
cation of the Grand Lodge. 

We believe most of the Lodges in this district are at fault in 
regard to the examination of candidates for advancement, being 
too superficial or altogether omitting the duty. 

I hereby return my sincere thanks to the brethren of the several 
Lodges in this district, who have received and treated me so 
courteously. 

Respectfully and fraternally, 

J. W. DEARBORN, D. D. G. M. 



532 
DISTRICT NUMBER SEVEN. 

To the M. W, Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, District Deputy Grand Master of District 
No. 7, comprising Lodges Nos. 12, 18, 30, 40, 42, 53, 77 and 
80, respectfully submits the following report. 

Charity Lodge, No. 18, Jaffrey, I visited December 23d, 1868. 
The weather was cold and unpleasant, the attendance was conse- 
quently small. I witnessed the work on the M. M. degree, which 
I am sorry to say was not very well done, and which the W. 
Master informed me he did not expect would be, for the reason 
they had not conferred the degree for some time ; his S. W. had 
recently died, and his S. D. was absent. He felt as though they 
had been left out in the cold, not having been visited for three 
years. Their records are well kept and their finances in good con- 
dition, having a fund of about three hundred dollars. They have 
a very comfortable lodge room, and I see no reason why they may 
not do good work if they could devote a little more time to it. 

Monadnock Lodge, No. 80, at Troy, I visited January 21st, 
1869. I witnessed the work on the F. C. and M. M. degrees, 
which was correctly and elaborately done. Bro. Clement is now 
serving his third term, and is one of the most correct working 
Masters in this district. This is a new and one of the youngest 
Lodges in the State, and was obliged to contract quite a large 
debt to commence with, but should they be favored as they have 
been, they will in a few years relieve themselves entirely. They 
have a very pretty lodge room, which they fitted up at their own 
expense, and have a lease of it for ten years, free of rent. Their 
records are well kept, and they have one of the most perfect set 
of books I have seen. 

Faithful Lodge, No. 12, at Charlestown, I visited January 
25th. This Lodge has an old charter, revived for the third time 
some eight years since. Their first Master was instructed in a 
foreign jurisdiction, and brought with him work differing from 
that adopted by the Grand Lodge of this State ; some of the 
instruction given by him still shows itself in their work. The 
officers of the Lodge are anxious to make their work conform to 
the regulations of the Grand Lodge. I think they have improved 



533 

within the last two years, and have no doubt they will in due time 
eradicate what is foreign. Their records are well kept and their 
finances in good condition, having paid all their liabilities and 
have a small amount in the treasury. 

St. Paul's Lodge, No. 30, Alstead, I visited February 4th. 
The day was stormy and few were present. I witnessed the work 
on the M. M. degree; the work was indifferently done, not as well 
as usual, they informed me, for the reason the Lodge had not been 
in a condition to work for a long time. In September they had the 
misfortune to lose their lodge room, furniture, jewels, charter and 
in fact everything save the records for the past few years, which 
happened to be in the hands of the Secretary. Their loss is 
irreparable, their records being complete for nearly fifty years, 
not having lost a communication during that time. About three 
years since they built a new and commodious hall, which involved 
them in a large debt, which they had reduced somewhat, the 
insurance on the building hardly paying the balance, so that upon 
the strictest search they found themselves entirely destitute, and 
but for the very generous present of a set of jewels by Social 
Friends Lodge, No. 42 they would have found it difficult to 
proceed. It is hoped in due time they will be able to procure a 
new hall and go on with their work. 

Philesian Lodge, No. 40, at Winchester, I visited February 
23d. I witnessed the work on all the degrees ; it was passably 
done, but not quite as well as I should like to see it. This Lodge 
owns the hall in which they meet, and have a small amount in the 
treasury; their records are well kept. 

Columbian Lodge, No. 53, at Walpole, I visited February 
24th. This Lodge (of which I am a member) at the time of my 
visit had not done any work ; at that time I witnessed the work 
on the E. A. degree, which was tolerably done, considering it was 
the first attempt of the present Master. The charter of this Lodge 
was revived about seven years since, and in starting it was obliged 
to contract quite a large debt, which I am happy to say is now 
removed. The records of the Lodge are well kept. 

Golden Rule Lodge, No. 77, Hinsdale, I visited March 11th. 
I witnessed the work on the M. M. degree. This is a young and 
active Lodge, but for some reason the work has got strangely 
mixed up with that of other jurisdictions. It is situated in the 



534 



corner of the State, near Massachusetts and Vermont, which is 
probably the reason. The W. Master was not aware of the fact, 
not having a ritual of the work in this State, and not having been 
visited, as he informed me, for two years. I have no doubt he 
will correct his work immediately. 

This Lodge has a very pretty hall and own the entire building 
in which it is situated, part of which they rent for more than 
enough to pay the interest on their debt. Their records are well 
kept. 

Social Friends Lodge, No. 42, at Keene, I visited March 
30th. This is by far the largest Lodge in this district and doing 
the most work. Having resided in this town the past year, I 
have attended nearly all of their communications and have had an 
opportunity to see their work; I think I can see a decided im- 
provement since I came here, and should they remain united I see 
nothing why they may not compare favorably with any Lodge in 
the State. Within the past year they have removed from their old 
hall, which was rather small, to a new and spacious one in the 
same building where there is ample room ; they procured new and 
beautiful jewels and entirely new furnished the hall; in so doing 
they have expended the funds they had on hand and find them- 
selves with a small debt, which need not give them any trouble, 
should they have their usual amount of work. 

I have visited all the Lodges in this district, officially, once, 
and some of them in a social way more than once, and it gives 
me pleasure to say that I have been received with all the respect 
due to the representatives of the Grand Lodge. I have endeav- 
ored to correct such irregularities as I have seen, and given such 
information as was wanted, whenever called on. 

This is a large district, the extreme Lodges being nearly fifty 
miles apart and some of them inconvenient of access. I have 
found that quite a number of the Lodges in this district have 
their charters handsomely framed and suspended in the Lodge 
room ; Is it safe and proper to do so ? Two Lodges in this vicinity 
have lost theirs by fire by so doing. 

I visited the Lodge of the Temple, a Lodge under dispen- 
sation from the M. W. Grand Master, located in this town, May 
11th. I granted a dispensation to confer the E. A. degree, for the 
purpose of improving the officers in the work and lectures. I 



535 

witnessed the work, but having no instructions from the Grand 
Master, I considered my visit merely a social one. 

May 18th, I visited Social Friends Lodge, No. 42, at a 
special communication, and installed its officers publicly. 

May 19th, I attended the annual meeting of Columbian 
Lodge, No. 53, and installed its officers. 

May 20th, I visited Monadnock, No. 80, and installed its 
officers publicly. 

JESSENIAH kittredge, d. d. g. m. 

Keene, May 28th, 1869. 



DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT. 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire: 

The undersigned, Deputy of District No. 8, respectfully reports 
that in attending to the duties of his appointment, he has visited 
the various Lodges in his district, most of them at special com- 
munications; has seen work performed or exemplified in them all, 
with a single exception, and is of the opinion that Masonry in his 
district is in a prosperous condition, that the Lodges are endeav- 
oring to work the Grand Lodge work, and are accomplishing a 
steady and healthy growth, and would especially remark with 
pleasure, that there seems to be generally a growing disposition to 
scrutinize carefully the character of such as make application for 
membership, and to refuse admission to unsuitable persons. The 
strength and benefit of the institution depends vastly more on the 
character than the numbers of its membership. The utmost 
order and harmony prevail in the various lodge rooms, and the 
closest attention was paid to the work while it was going on. The 
direction of the Grand Lodge in relation to examination of candi- 
dates for advancement, has been generally complied with. 
<I have been everywhere received with the greatest courtesy, and 



536 

both officers and brethren have rendered me every assistance in 
their power, in my examination. 

In regard to individual Lodges. I visited Mount Vernon- 
Lodge, No. 15, at Newport, at their regular communication, 
Monday, April 26th. There was a full attendance and much interest 
manifested; saw the third degree conferred. Bro. Waite, Grand 
Lecturer for this district, is W. Master of this Lodge, and as was 
to be expected, the work was done with great accuracy; the 
records are well kept, and the financial condition of the Lodge is 
excellent, but they much need a better and more commodious hall 
for meeting. 

Monday, May 3d, visited Cheshire Lodge, No. 23, at Cornish. 
Found it in good working order; saw the third degree conferred, 
agreeably to the New Hampshire ritual ; made examination of the 
records and general condition of the Lodge, and am able to make 
a favorable report of the same. 

Tuesday, May 4th, visited Franklin Lodge, No. 6, at Lebanon. 
The officers of this Lodge are now upon their third year of service 
in their present positions, are wide-awake active men, who love 
the institution for its own sake, and make it a rule to do well 
whatever they do. They have an excellent hall, fitted up in fine 
style, and do their work with great promptness and accuracy. 
This Lodge is every way in a very prosperous condition, and 
their records are the best kept of any in the district. 

Wednesday, May 5th, I visited Social Lodge, No. 50, at 
Enfield. The attendance at this Lodge is not large, but they are 
maintaining themselves in a good and healthy condition, and are 
endeavoring to do their work according to the directions of the 
Grand Lodge. Their records are well and tastefully kept. 

Thursday, May 6th, visited in the afternoon Mount Moriah 
Lodge, No. 22, at Grafton. The members of this Lodge are so 
widely scattered that but few of them assembled and but little 
was done. There is not here a sufficient attention to the letter of 
the law and the Masonic ritual. I trust that the next year may 
witness an improvement in those respects. 

On same day, in evening, visited Kearsarge Lodge, No. 81, 
at Andover, and found them in excellent working order, doing 
their work exactly according to the directions of the Grand 
Lodge, The establishment of their Lodge is of recent date, and 



537 

they have fitted up their hall in fine style, making it a very attract- 
ive place for meeting. There is in this Lodge every indication 
of prosperity. 

Friday, May 7th, visited King Solomon's Lodge, No. 14, at 
Wilmot, and found them under the efficient direction of Bro. E. 
A. Jones, their W. Master, doing an excellent work and making 
every effort for improvement in Masonic knowledge. Saw the 
second degree conferred ; the work was well done, and in accord- 
ance with the directions of the Grand Lodge. 

Hiram Lodge, No. 9, at Claremont, I have not formally 
visited as I am a member thereof. This is an old Lodge, and has a 
large number of members, but the attendance is not so large as is 
desirable. This Lodge labors under a rather unusual inconven- 
ience, that of having too large a hall. It has done considerable 
work during the past year, and I think has endeavored to comply 
with the requirements of the Grand Lodge. 
Respectfully submitted, 

IRA COLBY, Jr., D. D. G. M. 



DISTRICT NUMBER NINE. 



To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, having been appointed District Deputy Grand 
Master for the Ninth Masonic District, respectfully submits the 
following report. 

I have visited all the Lodges in this District except Chocortja 
Lodge, at Meredith, which was visited by P.*. G.\ M.\ Rowell, 
who dedicated their hall. From him I learn that this Lodge is in 
a flourishing condition, that they are doing a fair amount of work, 
and are anxious to excel. 

Mount Prospect Lodge, No. 69, at Holderness. This Lodge I 
visited at their regular communication in January, accompanied by 



538 

R.\ W.\ Hiram Clark, Grand Lecturer. We found the officers 
prompt at their several stations, and a goodly number of brethren 
present; all seemed to meet upon the level. I witnessed their 
work on the second degree, which was correctly done. After con- 
ferring this degree, Bro. Clark lectured with them, and I was 
pleased to find them so well posted in the lectures. Their records 
are well kept, and their finances in a prosperous condition. This 
Lodge has done but little work during the past Masonic year, 
believing that a slow and healthy growth is better than a too rapid 
one. 

Olive Branch Lodge, No. 16, Plymouth, I visited January 
26th. I did not have the pleasure of seeing this Lodge work. 
They have done but little the past year, thinking it better to 
guard well the outer door, than to find in their building unsuitable 
material. I found their records well kept, and their lodge room 
neat and commodious. 

Mount Cube Lodge, No. 10, at Orford. This Lodge I visited 
at their stated communication in September, and also at a special 
meeting, February 2d, afternoon and evening. Here I found a 
young Lodge working under an old charter, and anxious to do 
their work in accordance with the Grand Lodge work. I had the 
pleasure of seeing them work on the three degrees, and was 
pleased with the manner in which they did it, each officer at his 
station, the brethren attentive, and the lectures given with the 
degrees in an impressive manner. This Lodge has done a large 
amount of work, which is not to be regretted if they have used 
the right material; they seem to guard well the outer door, and 
mean to admit none but the worthy. Their records are well kept 
and their prospects good for the future. 

• Grafton Lodge, No. 46, Haverhill, I visited at their regular 
meeting in February, but did not have the pleasure of meeting with 
them in open Lodge, owing to their meeting in the afternoon, and 
I did not arrive until the Lodge had closed ; but from conversation 
with the Master and Wardens, I can report them as doing well, 
adding to their numbers good and worthy men. 

Kane Lodge, No. 64, at Lisbon. This Lodge I visited at 
their regular communication in March. I witnessed their work in 
the second degree. I was sorry that I could not see them work 
in the three degrees, for I had so often heard of their good work 



539 

that I was anxious to witness it. I found their records well kept. 
This is a large Lodge, having over two hundred members, and 
has the largest fund on hand of any Lodge in this district. 

Burns Lodge, No. 66, Littleton, I visited at their regular 
meeting in March, and found every officer at his station, with a 
large attendance of the brethren. I do not wonder at the easy 
and masterly manner in which the work was done here, for when 
officers and brethren take hold with the. zeal they did, it is easy 
and pleasant for the Master to work. I had the pleasure of 
witnessing their work on the second and third degrees, which was 
done in accordance with the Grand Lodge work, and I was 
pleased W see the promptness with which each one did his part. 
This Lodge is in a pleasant and growing village, and is constantly 
adding to its numbers, being careful to admit none but the worthy. 
They have a large and splendid hall, neatly and tastefully fur- 
nished. I found the records in good hands, and finances sound. 

Moosehillock Lodge, No. 63, of which I am a member, I 
have attended regularly, unless absent from town. I visited it 
officially at their annual meeting, and installed their officers, who, 
I am satisfied, will see to it that this Lodge maintains its former 
reputation for accuracy in work and zeal for the order. The 
records remain in the hands of Bro. S. G. Currier, who has for 
many years faithfully and correctly recorded the doings of the 
Lodge, and the finances are in a prosperous condition. 

The Lodges in this district I find, are generally anxious to 
perfect themselves in the Grand Lodge work and lectures. I have 
endeavored to impress upon each Lodge the necessity of a uni- 
formity of work, and also the importance of the Grand Lodge 
resolution requiring candidates for advancement to be examined in 
open Lodge. I find a diversity of practice in these examinations, 
some Lodges requiring a greater proficiency than others, but with 
one exception — the exception being a Lodge which had not heard 
of this resolution — the examination is made, and some degree of 
proficiency required. I find the custom of giving the candidate 
the degrees, and promising him the lectures at some future meet- 
ing, somewhat prevalent in this district, which I think is to be 
regretted, and I hope to see some action taken in this Grand 
Lodge thereon. There seems to me to be but one time when these 
lectures can make the right impression. 



540 



All the Lodges in this district are, I think, doing well. Perhaps 
they are not adding to their numbers as fast as in some former 
years, but they are manifesting a strong desire to participate in 
the higher principles of the order ; harmony prevails, and may we 
all bear in remembrance and practice those truly Masonic virtues, 
temperance, fortitude, prudence and justice, ever remembering 
that we, are " traveling upon the level of time to that undiscov- 
ered country, from whose bourn no traveler returns." 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARK L. AIKEN, D. D. G. M. 



DISTRICT NUMBER TEN. 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, having been appointed District Deputy Grand 
Master for the 10th Masonic district, over Lodges Nos. 8, 37, 73 
and 86, respectfully submits the following report. 

North Star Lodge, No. 8, at Lancaster. This is one of the 
oldest Lodges in the State, and has done an average amount 
of work during the past year. Notwithstanding the new Lodge 
formed at Whitefield, has taken quite a number of members from 
this Lodge, it still has a large membership, and as I learn from 
W.\ M.\ Savage, a state of general good feeling and harmony 
prevails. I did not arrive in season to witness their work, but 
from their past record it is not behind many of the Lodges in this 
respect. I examined their records, which are well and neatly 
kept. Its finances, although small, are well invested. 

Evening Star Lodge, No. 37, at Colebrook. Owing to 
unavoidable circumstances I have not had the pleasure of visiting 
this Lodge the past year. W.\ M.\ Rolee informs me that 



541 

the Lodge was never in better condition than at the present time. 
They have done a larger amount of work the past year than ever 
before. The material worked has been of the first quality. 
Their motto is "slow and sure," and as long as they stand by that 
they are safe. Not having the pleasure of witnessing their work, 
I cannot speak of the present, but judging from the past Lhave 
no hesitation in saying it is well and correctly done. Bro. Rolee 
informs me that their records are well kept, and their finances are 
in good condition, that union and harmony prevail among their 
members. 

Goeham Lodge, No. 73, at Gorham. Of this Lodge I am a 
member, and endeavor to attend its meetings when possible for 
me to do so. This Lodge has done a large amount of work the 
past year, which has been well done, and of the best material; its 
records are well kept, and its finances in a good condition, they 
being well and securely invested. A general good feeling prevails 
among its members aud peace along its borders. 

White Mountain Lodge, No. 86, Whitefield. I visited this 
Lodge, May 26; called a special communication for that purpose. 
It being a new Lodge I felt anxious to witness its work. I 
granted them a dispensation to confer the third degree upon Bro. 
Libby, who had taken the first and second degrees at regular 
meetings previously. I was very much pleased to find its mem- 
bers anxious to be sure they were right and then proceed; that is 
a good motto. Their *vork was very well and correctly done, 
records neatly and correctly kept, and their financial condition 
very good. The Lodge is a little in debt, it being chartered last 
year. They have a very convenient and secure hall, although not yet 
wholly furnished. They have an excellent set of jewels, books, 
&c, and bid fair to be one of the best Lodges in the State. 

In conclusion, I will say, that I believe that never in this juris- 

• diction has Masonry been more prosperous than in the past year, 

and I am happy to say that, so far as I am aware, not only 

prosperity, but harmony and good feeling exist among the Lodges, 

and among the members of the several Lodges in this district. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

U. SHOREY, D. D. G. M. 

Gorham, May 31st, 1869. 



542 

The committee on credentials made a report embracing 
the foregoing list of Grand Officers, Past Grand Officers, 
officers and representatives of subordinate Lodges, and 
visiting brethren in attendance, which report was ac- 
cepted. 

The Grand Lodge was then called off for refreshment 
until two o'clock in the afternoon. 



AFTERNOON . 

At two o'clock the Grand Lodge re-assembled and was 
called to labor. Present as in the morning. 

The hour assigned for the election of Grand Officers 
having arrived, Bros. John A. Harris and Thomas E. 
Hatch were appointed a committee to collect, count, and 
declare the state of the votes, and the Grand Lodge pro- 
ceeded to ballot for Grand Officers, when the following 
brethren were severally declared duly elected. 

ALEXANDER M. WINN, Farmington, M. W. Grand Master. 
JOHN R. HOLBROOK, Portsmouth, 2^ W. D. Grand Master. 
N. W. CUMNER, Manchester, R. W. Sen. Grand Warden. 
WILLIAM BARRETT, Nashua, R. W. Jun. Grand Warden. 
JOHN KNOWLTON, Portsmouth, R. W. Grand Treasurer. 
HORACE CHASE, Hopkinton, R. W. Grand Secretary. 

W. B. Reynolds, formerly a member of Unity Lodge, 
No. 62, and expelled therefrom, presented his petition, 
and the petition of members of said Unity Lodge and 
other Lodges, praying the M. W. Grand Lodge to restore 
him to his former rights and privileges in Masonry, which 
petitions were referred to a select committee, consisting of 
Bros. Hazen Bedel, George Montgomery and Stephen 
Chick. 



543 



Petitions for new Lodges at North Conway and North 
Strafford were presented, which, with accompanying 
papers, were referred to the committee on Lodges. 

The M. W. Grand Master announced the following 
appointments of Grand Officers : 



District Deputy Grand Masters. 

District No. 1, R. W. John J. Bell, Exeter, over Lodges Nos. 
1, 19, 47, 56, 59. 

2, " " E. C. Kinnear, Farmington, over Lodges 
Nos. 21, 29, 49, 65, 71, 75. 

3, " " Edwaed Parker, Nashua, over Lodges 
Nos. 39, 41, 44, 45, 61, 76, 85. 

4, " " Charles H. Burns, Wilton, over Lodges 
Nos. 7, 24, 26, 52, 67. 

5, " " A. S. Ballantyne, Sanbornton, over 
Lodges Nos. 11, 31, 32, 38, 43, 60, 
70, 72, 78, 79. 

6, " "J. W. Dearborn, Effingham, over Lodges 
Nos. 17, 57, 58, 62, 68, 74, 87. 

7, " " Royal H. Porter, Keene, over Lodges 
Nos. 12, 18, 30, 40, 42, 53, 77, 88. 

8, " " Albert S. Waite, Newport, over Lodges 
Nos. 6, 9, 14, 15, 22, 23, 50, 81. 

9, " " Henry L. George, Plymouth, over 
Lodges Nos. 16, 46, 63, 64, 66, 69. 

10, " " Henry O. Kent, Lancaster, over Lodges 
Nos. 8, 37, 73, 86. 



Grand Lecturers. 

District No. 1, R.\ W.\ Oliver G. Fernald, Portsmouth. 

" " 2, " Charles A. Tuns, Dover. 

" " 3, " Charles M. Robinson, Nashua. 

" " 4, " Mortimer H. Morrison, Peterboro'. 

" " 5, " John A. Harris, Concord. 



544 



District No. 6, R.\ W.\ Henry R. Parker, Wolfeborough. 
" " 7, " Henry Abbott, Winchester. 

" " 8, " Leland J. Graves, Claremont. 

" " 9, " Henry W. Smith, Littleton. 

" " 10, " Albert Barker, Colebrook. 



Grand Chaplains. 
R. W. and Rev. James Adams, Candia. 



<c a 



Thomas B. Newby, Conway. 
Orin J. Waite, Franklin. 



Grand Deacons. 

W.\ Edward Gustine, Keene. 
" Clinton W. Stanley, Manchester. 

Grand Stewards. 

W.\ Daniel W. Edgerly, Farmington. 
" Daniel R. Marshall, Nashua. 
" Tobias D. Foss, Strafford. 
" Jacob D. March, Nashua. 
" Joseph W. Robinson, Concord. 
" Charles S. Coburn, Keene. 

W.\ A. H. Bixby, Francestown, Grand Marshal. 
" Luther W. Nichols, Concord, Grand Sword Bearer. 
" Oliver A. Woodbury, Nashua, Grand Pursuivant. 
" George L. Reed, Concord, Grand Tyler. 



REPORT ON FINANCE. 

The committee on finance to whom was referred the account 
of Horace Chase, Grand Secretary of this Grand Lodge, respect- 
fully report, that they find upon examination, that the Grand 



545 

Secretary, has paid out for the year commencing June 16th, 1868, 
the sum of $616.35, and that during the same period he has 
received the sum of $544.00, leaving a balance due him of 
$72.35. 

We also recommend that the sum of $150.00 be paid the 
Grand Secretary for his services in arranging and compiling the 
second volume of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge, from 
1842 to 1856. 

The committee have examined the account of Bro. J. J. Bell, 
for services as chairman of committee on foreign correspondence, 
amounting to $50.00, and recommend that the same be paid. 

They have also examined the account of the R. W. Grand 
Treasurer, and find him charged as follows : 

1868, June, balance of cash in his hands, $2,048 29 

1869, June, to cash for $1000.00 bond sold, 1,067 50 

To cash for $500.00 bond sold, 535 00 
To cash received of Grand Sec'y, 822 50 

$4,473 29 

Ck. 

1868, By Paid C. F. Livingston, $300 00 

" John J. Bell, 50 00 

" Wm. Bakkett, 415 37 

" C.F.Livingston, 250 00 

" Grand Secretary Chase, 100 00 

" C.F.Livingston, 592 01 

" Grand Secretary Chase, 375 00 

Dec. " Bent & Bush, 647 40 

1869, " Commission, 44 00 

June, " Geo. L. Reed, 15 00 

" J. W. Deakbokn, 28 00 

" M.L.Aiken, 18 00 

" Guild & Delano, 839 50 

$3,674 28 



$799 01 



From which deduct the following bills which the committee 
recommend to be paid : 



546 

MoRRILL & SlLSBY, $14 55 

John J. Bell, 50 00 

N.Hutchinson, 18 50 

Joseph Hartford, 15 00 

John J. Bell, 5 00 

C. W. Stanley, 18 00 

Jesseniah Kittredge, 20 00 

Daniel R,. Marshall, 3 00 

Ira CoLBY,Jr 14 20 

A.M.Winn, 20 00 

Balance due the Grand Sec'y, 72 35 

C. F. Livingston, 377 25 

Amount allowed Grand Secretary for 
compiling second volume proceed- 
ings Grand Lodge, 150 00 

$777 85 

The amount of cash on hand, $21 16 

To which add one $1000.00 5-20 bond with one year or more 
interest balance in the hands of the Treasurer as above. 

Charles G. Pickering, for the Committee on Finance. 



Which report was accepted and concurred in. 

Called from labor to refreshment until seven o'clock 
this evening. 



EVENING SESSION. 

At seven o'clock the Grand Lodge re-assembled and was 
called to labor. 

The special committee appointed on the petition of 
Wm. B. Reynolds, made the following report, which was 
accepted and concurred in. 

The committee to whom was referred the petition of Wm. B. Rey- 
nolds, to be restored to the rights and privileges of Masonry, 
from which he has been expelled by Unity Lodge, No. 62, report 



547 

that they have considered said petition and a recommendation 
accompanying the same, of the W. Master, Wardens and Secre- 
tary, and many members of said Lodge and other Master Masons, 
and are unanimous in recommending that the Grand Lodge restore 
said Wm. B. Reynolds to all the rights and privileges of Masonry 
that he enjoyed previous to his expulsion, and that he be notified 
of the same in due form. 

Which is respectfully submitted, 

Hazen Bedell, J 

Geokge Montgomery, > Committee. 

Stephen Chick, 3 



REPORT ON LODGE RETURNS. 

The Committee on Returns of Lodges, having carefully ex- 
amined the returns made to the Grand Secretary at this commu- 
nication, submit the following as the result of their examination : 

St. John's, No. 1, Benevolent, No. 7, Blazing Star, No. 11, 
Faithful, No. 12, King Solomon's, No. 14, Olive Branch, No. 16, 
Morning Star, No.. 17, Charity, No. 18, Sullivan, No. 19, Humane, 
No. 21, Mount Moriah, No. 22, Cheshire, No. 23, Bethel, No. 24, 
Strafford, No. 29, St. Peter's, No. 31, Mount Lebanon, No. 32, 
Evening Star, No. 37, Rising Sun, No. 39, Philesian, No. 40, 
Lafayette, No. 41, Social Friends, No. 42, Aurora, No. 43, St. 
Mark's, No. 44, Pacific, No. 45, Grafton, No. 46, Rising Star, 
No. 47, Libanus, No. 49, Social, No. 50, Clinton, No. 52, Colum- 
bian, No. 53, St. Andrews, No. 56, Charter Oak, No. 58, Star in 
the East, No. 59, Meridian, No. 60, Washington, No. 61, Kane, 
No. 64, Burns, No. 66, Souhegan, No.. 67, Mount Prospect, No. 
69, Eureka, No. 70, Fraternal, No. 71, Horace Chase, No. 72, 
Gorham, No. 73, Ossipee Valley, No. 74, Winnipissiogee, No. 
75, Rockingham, No. 76, Golden Rule, No. 77, Doric, No. 78, 
Union, No. 79, Monadnock, No. 80, Kearsarge, No. 81, Corin- 
thian, No. 82, Chocorua, No. 83, Gideon, No. 84, Spicket, No. 
85, White Mountain, No. 86, Lodge of the Temple, U. D., all 
correct. Franklin, No. 6, not footed correctly; North Star, No.. 
8, no return; Hiram, No. 9, fees to Grand Lodge omitted, mem- 

5 



548 

bers not alphabetically arranged; Mount Cube, No. 10, names of 
members not returned ; Mount Vernon, No. 1 5, number of mem- 
bers not returned; Altemont, No. 26, officers names included with 
members ; St. Paul, No. 30, no return ; Harmony, No. 38, num- 
ber of members wrong ; Carroll, No. 57, no return ; Unity, No. 
62, no return; Moosehillock, No. 63, no return; Granite, No. 
65, dues not footed ; Red Mountain, No. 68, number of members 
wrong, time of communication not given. 

All which is respectfully submitted, 

C. K. Drake, "\ 

Noah Tebbetts, > Committee. 

Henry M. Datis, ) 



Which report was accepted. 

On motion of M.*. W.*. Israel Hunt, Voted, That the 
Grand Secretary be instructed to collect the dues of delin- 
quent Lodges, and also to give to the Lodges which have 
made incorrect returns the opportunity to correct them. 

The committee on foreign correspondence offered 
their report, and on motion of Bro. Wm. Barrett, it was 
voted that the reading of the report be dispensed with, 
and that it be published with the printed proceedings. 

The M. W. Grand Master appointed Bros. John J. 
Bell, Albert R. Hatch and Charles H. Burns, com- 
mittee on foreign correspondence. 

The special committee, appointed at the last annual 
communication, on the petition of P. C. Cambridge, asked 
for further time to make report, which was granted, and 
his petition continued by vote of the Grand Lodge. 



549 
REPORT ON DOINGS OF GRAND OFFICERS. 

To the M. W. Grand Lodge of the State of New Hampshire : • 

Your committee to whom was referred the doings of Grand 
Officers have attended to the duties assigned them, and report that 
they have received and examined the reports of the District 
Deputy Grand Masters for all the districts. 

In all except number five, those officers appear to have attended 
to their duties faithfully, and to have made particular exertion to 
visit all the respective jurisdictions, and to scrutinize particularly 
the condition and transactions of each. 

The District Deputy Grand Master in district number five, 
reports that by reason of sickness and unavoidable absence from 
the State, he has been prevented from a more particular discharge 
of his duties, but the general condition of the several Lodges in 
his jurisdiction is commendable. 

From these reports the several Lodges appear to be approach- 
ing more nearly to a uniformity in work than ever before. In a 
few localities there has been an unwarrantable deviation from the 
standard work ; the eause does not appear. 

Financially, the Lodges seem to be in a more prosperous con- 
dition than in previous years, and in some instances there is quite 
a large amount of funds carefully invested. 

In several cases new halls have been erected and beautifully 
furnished, which your committee deem very commendable when- 
ever the condition of the Lodge is such as to warrant it. 

Generally, a spirit of harmony prevails, promising the highest 
degree of prosperity within this jurisdiction, but we are sorry to 
report that, in a few Lodges, a spirit of discord has been 
fomented wholly unworthy of men, and more particularly of 
brother Masons. Such conduct brings reproach and dishonor 
upon our institution, and we hope it may never again intrude it- 
self within the order. 

We commend the manner in which the several District 
Deputy Grand Masters have attended to their duty, particularly 
in those instances where a detailed statement of the financial con- 
dition of Lodges in their districts have been made, and attention 
has been given to the manner and amount of work done. 



550 

The eloquent and appropriate address of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Master deserves especial commendation, as setting forth in 
plain and expressive style the condition of such matters as has 
been his official duty to consider. 

Thomas E. Hatch, ) 

Joseph W. Fellows, > Committee. 

John M. Shikley, j 



REPORT ON LODGES. 

The committee to whom have been referred the several matters 
relating to Lodges, submit the following as their report : 

They recommend that a charter be granted for a new Lodge at 
North Conway, lately working under a dispensation, to be called 
Mount Washington Lodge, and numbered 87, and that the same 
be assigned to District No. 6. 

In the matter of the petition of John C. Bickford and twenty- 
seven others, praying for permission to remove Ossipee Valley 
Lodge, No. 74, from Centre Ossipee to West Ossipee, the parties 
having complied in all respects with the requirements of the 
Grand Constitution, and it appearing for the benefit of the Lodge 
to make the change, the committee recommend that the Lodge 
have leave to make the desired removal. 

The committee recommend that the petition of Charles P. 
Shoff and nineteen others, asking for a new Lodge at North 
Strafford, be dismissed, they not deeming it expedient to grant a 
charter. 

They recommend that the by-laws which have been submitted 
to them be referred to the several District Deputy Grand Masters. 

The committee have fully heard the parties in the matter of the 
petition of A. S. Carpenter and others, asking for a charter for 
a new Lodge at Keene, lately working under dispensation, and 
although they find some informality in the proceedings, the com- 
mittee are of the opinion that it will be for the best interest of 
the order to establish a new Lodge at that place. 

They therefore recommend that a charter be granted for a new 



551 



Lodge at said Keene, to be called "The Lodge of the Temple," 
to be numbered 88, and assigned to District No. 7. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles H. Burns, ) 

John A. Harris, > Committee. 

Wm. B. Lane, ) 



On motion, said report was accepted and the recom- 
mendations of the committee for granting a charter for a 
new Lodge at North Conway, for the removal of Ossipee 
Valley Lodge, from Centre Ossipee to West Ossipee, and 
for dismissing the petition for a new Lodge at North 
Strafford, were concurred in. 

Brother Thos. E. Hatch moved that that part of the 
report recommending the formation of a new Lodge at 
Keene be concurred in, and a charter for the same issue 
accordingly, which motion, after a long and animated dis« 
cussion in favor and against, was put and decided in the 
affirmative. 

Bro. Wm. Barrett, offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted : . 

Resolved, That the custodian of the Grand Lodge library 
be instructed to complete files of proceedings of sister 
Grand Lodges in correspondence with this Grand Lodge, 
so far as practicable, and cause the same to be bound, and 
that he be further instructed to procure suitable book- 
cases for the same ; and that the M. W. Grand Master be 
authorized to draw his order on the Grand Treasurer for a 
sum sufficient to pay the expense, when the bill shall be 
approved by the custodian, Bro. John A. Harris. 

On motion, Resolved, that the dispensations of those 
Lodges whose charters are granted at this session, be 



552 

extended until charters are furnished and the Lodges 
duly constituted. 

The Grand Lodge was then closed until nine o'clock 
to-morrow morning. 



THURSDAY, June 11th, 1869. 

At nine o'clock in the morning the M. W. Grand Master 
opened the Grand Lodge in due form. 

The R. W. Grand Secretary gave the following notices : 
of the expulsion of John F. Mouse, by Grafton Lodge, 
No. 46, January 2d, 1868 ; of the expulsion of A. Tyler 
Palmer, by Charity Lodge, No. 23, E. I., June 25th, 
1868 ; of the expulsion of Nathan J. Crandall, by 
Warwick Lodge, , September 7th, 1868 ; of the sus- 
pension of Lockhart Davenport, by Golden Rule 
Lodge, No. 77, October 29th, 1868 ; of an amendment of 
the by-laws of Cheshire Lodge, No. 23, changing the 
time of stated communication. 

Bro. N. W. Cumner offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted : 

'Resolved, That a page in the proceedings of the Grand 
Lodge be inscribed to the memory of our deceased Bro. 
W.*. Asahel Adams Balch, and that the Grand Secretary 
be instructed to forward a copy of the same to the widow 
of the deceased. 

On motion of Grand Secretary, 

Voted, That all the Grand Officers of this Grand Lodge 
for the past year be presented with a copy of the second 
volume of reprinted proceedings. 

The revised Grand Constitution, presented at the last 
annual communication, the consideration of which was 



553 

postponed to the second day of this communication, at ten 
o'clock A.M., and the day and hour having arrived, was 
taken up, read article by article and section by section, 
debated, amended and adopted. [See Appendix.] 

The Grand Lodge was then called from labor until 
two o'clock in the afternoon. 



AFTERNOON. 

The Grand Lodge re-assembled at two o'clock P. M., 
and was called from refreshment to labor. 

Bro. William Barrett, offered the following resolu- 
tions which were read and adopted : 

Resolved, That Bro. John J. Bell be directed to pro- 
cure the printing of one thousand (1000) copies of the 
new Grand Constitution, as soon as may be, after this 
session of the Grand Lodge, and to forward the same to 
the Grand Secretary, who shall immediately send four (4) 
copies to each Lodge, and one copy to each officer of the 
Grand Lodge. 

Resolved, That Bro. Bell be authorized and directed 
to prepare such forms as may be necessary under the new 
Grand Constitution, and cause the same to be printed and 
bound with the constitution. 

Bro. Horace Chase proposed in writing to amend the 
Grand Constitution of this Grand Lodge by striking out 
section 117., article XIV., which reads as follows : 

" There shall be but one ballot for all the degrees. If 
objections are made to a candidate after initiation, charges 
shall be filed and a trial had, as provided in article 
XVII." ; and inserting the following instead thereof; 

"No candidate for the honors of Masonry shall be ini- 



554 

tiated or advanced to any higher degree, but upon a clear 
and unanimous ballot upon each degree." 

Which proposed amendment was ordered to be filed 
with the Grand Secretary, and lay over for consideration 
till the next annual communication of the Grand Lodge. 

Bro. Hazen Bedell offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted : 

Resolved, That all candidates for the honors of 
Masonry, whose applications shall have been received and 
filed prior to the adoption of the revised Grand Constitu- 
tion, if admitted, shall receive the degrees for the fees 
required under the old constitution. 

On motion of Bro. John J. Bell, 

Voted, That the Grand Treasurer be instructed to effect 
an insurance on the jewels and clothing of the Grand 
Lodge. 

E. W. Bro. Barrett offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted : 

Resolved, That E. W. Bro. Horace Chase be presented 
with twenty copies of the second volume of the reprinted 
proceedings of the Grand Lodge. 

There being no further business before the Grand 
Lodge, it was closed by the M. W. Grand Master in ample 
form, with prayer by E. W. and Eev. Thomas B. Newby, 
Grand Chaplain. 

A true record. Attest : 

Grand Secretary. 



Address of Grand Master : 

ALEXANDER M. WINN, M. D. 

Manchester. N. H. 



Address of Grand Secretary : 

Hon. HORACE CHASE, 

IlopJcinton, iV". H. 



( 555 ) 




IN MEMORY OF 



ASAHEL A. BALOH, 

P. High Priest of Mt. Horeb Chapter, 

AND W. GRAND STEWARD 
OP THE M. W. GRAND LODGE. 



Born, June 1, 1826 ; Died, January 16, 1869. 



( 557 ) 



LIST OF PAST GRAND OFFICERS, 

WHO, BY THE CONSTITUTION, ARE MEMBERS OP AND ENTITLED TO A VOTE IN 
THE GRAND LODGE, AS CORRECTED JUNE, A. L. 5869. 



PAST GRAND MASTERS. 



Israel Hunt, 
John Christie, 
Horace Chase, 
Daniel Balch, 
Ichabod G. Jordan, 
Alfred Greeley, 
George H. Hubbard, 
Charles H. Bell, 
Jona. Everett Sargent, 
John H. Rowell, 



Rising Sun, No. 39, 
St. Andrew's, No. 56, 
Aurora, No. 43, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
Lib anus, No. 49, 
Rising Sun, No. 39, 
St. Peter's, No. 31, 
Star in the East, No. 59, 
Moosehillock, No. 63, 
Meridian, No. 60, 



LOCATION. 

Nashua. 

Portsmouth. 

Henniker. 

Manchester. 

Somersworth. 

Nashua. 

Bradford. 

Exeter. 

Wentworth. 

Franklin. 



PAST DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 

Jacob C. Hanson, Libanus, No. 49, Somersworth. 

Richard N. Ross, Strafford, No. 29, Dover. 

John S. Kidder, Washington, No. 61, Manchester. 

PAST GRAND WARDENS. 



John H. White, 
Joshua Edwards, 
John Knowlton, 
Josiah Morse, 
Christopher Whitney, 
George W. Balloch, 
John B. Fish, 



Strafford, No. 29, 
Libanus, No. 49, 
St. John's, No. 1, 
Aurora, No. 43, 
Bethel, No. 24, 
Libanus, No. 49, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
( 559 ) 



Dover. 

Somersworth. 

Portsmouth. 

Henniker. 

New Ipswich. 

Somersworth. 

Manchester. 



560 



PAST DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 



Thomas Clapman, 
Charles Lane, 
Elijah Bingham, 
Francis Russell, 
David Murray, 
Titus V. Wadsworth, 
Eliphalet Lyman, 
John M. Hunt, 
Harrison G. Harris, 
William P. Riddle, 
John Bennett, 
Jacob 0. Smith, 
William D. McPherson, 
Theodore T. Abbot, 
Jonas Parker, 
Josiah G. Hadley, 
Silas Dinsmore, 
Robert Dunlap, 
John J. Prentiss, 
Josiah B. Edgerly, 
Albert R. Hatch, 
Hosea Fessenden, 
Samuel Dunster, 
John F. Duncklee, 
Ira Rust, 
Cyrus K. Drake, 
Abel Hutchins, 
Lewis Woodman, 
Edward H. Rollins, 
Edward W. Harrington, 
James H. Edgerly, 
Jared I. Williams, 
Thomas Snow, 
Samuel M. Wilcox, 
Elisha E. Dodge, 
Philip H. Paddleford, 
Isaac H. Marshall, 
Charles G. Conner, 
William W. Bailey, 
Barrett Ripley, 
Thomas Spurlin, 



St. John's, No. 1, 
Mt. Lebanon, No. 32, 
St. Paul's, No. 30, 
Mt. Lebanon, No. 32, 
Rising Star, No. 47, 
Meridian, No. 60, 
North Star, No. 8, 
Rising Sun, No. 39, 
St. Peter's, No. 31, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
St. John's, No. 1, 
Rising Sun, No. 39, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
Mount Vernon, No. 15, 
St. John's, No. 1, 
Harmony, No. 38, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
Hiram, No. 9, 
Humane, No. 21, 
St. John's, No. 1, 
Blazing Star, No. 11, 
Strafford, No. 29, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
St. Paul's, No. 30, 
Charter Oak, No. 58, 
Blazing Star, No. 11, 
Hiram, No. 9, 
Blazing Star, No. 11, 
Washington, No. 61, 
Humane, No. 21, 
North Star, No. 8, 
Libanus, No. 49, 
Star in the East, No. 59, 
Granite, No. 65, 
Burns, No. 66, 
Rising Sun, No. 39, 
Star in the East, No. 59, 
Rising Sun, No. 39, 
Social Friends, No. 42, 
Strafford, No. 29, 



Portsmouth. 

Gilford. 

Alstead. 

Gilford. 

Newmarket. 

Franklin. 

Lancaster. 

Nashua. 

Bradford. 

Manchester. 

Portsmouth. 

Nashua. 

Manchester. 

Manchester. 

Newport. 

Portsmouth. 

Hillsborough. 

Manchester. 

Claremont. 

Rochester. 

Portsmouth. 

Concord. 

Dover. 

Manchester. 

Alstead. 

Effingham. 

Concord. 

Claremont, 

Concord. 

Manchester. 

Rochester. 

Lancaster. 

Somersworth. 

Exeter. 

Rollinsford. 

Littleton. 

Nashua. 

Exeter. 

Nashua. 

Keene. 

Dover. 



561 



John Wilder, 
C. C. Fellows, 
Ezra C. Knight, 
Urban Shorey, 
William P. Walker, 
Rufus L. Bartlett, 
W. B. Clement, 
Edward Gustine, 
John Young, Jr., 
Henry 0. Kent, 
John Dame, 
Franklin McDufpee, 
Ezra Huntington, 
Charles H. Burns, 
Eli Dodge, 
John Blackmer, 
Don H. Woodward, 
A. M. Gove, 
Thomas J. Smith, 
Hazen Bedell, 
Jeremiah D. Parker, 
Joseph Hartford, 
Clinton W. Stanley, 
Nathan Hutchinson, 
Jesseniah Kittredge, 
Ira Colby, Jr., 
Mark S. Aiken, 



Altemont, No. 66, 

Red Mountain, No. 68, 

Kane, No. 64, 

Gorham, No. 73, 

St. Andrews, No. 56, 

Lafayette, No. 41, 

Meridian, No. 60, 
Social Friends, No. 42, 
Mount Vernon, No. 15, 
North Star, No. 8, 
St. John's, No. 1, 

Humane, No. 21, 
Lafayette, No. 41, 
Clinton, No. 52, 
St. Peter's, No. 31, 
Red Mountain, No. 68, 
Social Friends, No. 42, 
Franklin, No. 6, 
Moosehillock, No. 63, 
Evening Star, No. 37, 
Star in the East, No. 59, 
Strafford, No. 29, 
Washington, No. 61, 
Benevolent, No. 7, 
Columbian, No. 53, 
Hiram, No. 9, 
Moosehillock, No. 63, 



Peterborough. 

Sandwich. 

Lisbon. 

Gorham. 

Portsmouth. 

Manchester. 

Franklin. 

Keene. 

Newport. 

Lancaster. 

Portsmouth. 
Rochester. 

Manchester. 

Wilton. 

Bradford. 

Sandwich. 

Keene. 

Lebanon. 

Went worth. 

Colebrook. 

Exeter. 

Dover. 

Manchester. 

Milford. 

Walpole. 

Claremont. 

Wentworth. 



Note.— All Past Grand Masters, Past Deputy Grand Masters, Past Grand War- 
dens, and Past District Deputy Grand Masters, are members of this Grand Lodge 
while they remain members of some subordinate Lodge under its jurisdiction. 



N. B.— The Secretaries of subordinate Lodges are respectfully requested to give 
information of any errors they may find in the foregoing list of Past Grand Officers, 
or any changes that may occur, that they may be noted and hereafter corrected. 



562 



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APPENDIX 



REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 



REPORT. 



In Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, 
Concord, June 10, A. L. 5869. 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence submit the follow- 
ing report : 

We have examined the proceedings of thirty-nine domestic, and 
four foreign Grand Bodies, which have been submitted to us, viz : 

Alabama, Dec. 7, 5868; Arkansas, Nov. 16, 5868; California, 
Oct. 13, 5868; Canada, July 8, 5868; District of Columbia for 
5868; Connecticut, May 13,5868; Delaware, June 27,5868; 
Florida, January 13, 5868; Georgia, Oct. 27, 5868; Idaho, Dec. 
16, 5867, June 22, 5868; Illinois, Oct. 6, 5868; Indiana, May 
26,5868; Iowa, June 2,5868; Kansas, Oct. 20,5868; Ken- 
tucky, Oct. 19, 5868; Louisiana, Feb. 16, 5868 ; Maine, May, 
5868; Maryland, Nov. 16, 5868; Massachusetts for 5868 ; Michi- 
gan, Jan. 13, 5868; Mississippi, Jan. 20, 5868 ; Missouri, Oct. 12, 
5868; Nebraska, June 24, 5868; Nevada, Sept. 17, 5868; New 
Brunswick, Sept. 23, 5868; New Jersey, Jan. 22, 5868; New 
York, June 2, 5868; North Carolina, Dec. 7, 5868; Nova Scotia, 
June 24, 5868; Ohio, Oct. 20, 5868; Oregon, June 22, 5868; 
Pennsylvania for 5868; Rhode Island, May 18,5868; South 
Carolina, Nov, 17, 5868; Tennessee, Oct. 5, 5868; Texas, June 
8,5868; Vermont, June 10, 5868; Virginia, Dec. 14, 5868; 
Washington, Sept. 17, 5868; West Virginia, Nov. 10, 5868; 
Wisconsin, June 9, 5868 ; Bulletin du Grand Orient de France for 
5868. 

(3) 



ALABAMA. 

This Grand Lodge commenced its forty-eighth annual communi- 
cation at Montgomery, December 7th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
One hundred and ninety-nine Lodges were represented. 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ George D. Norbis, presented an 
eloquent address. Of our order he says: 

" Loaded with the charms of antiquity, interesting by a thousand associations of 
history, heroism, and romance, the order yet possesses all the health and life of 
novelty, all the liberality and benevolence of reform. It exists in the body and 
bosom of the people ; it catches their sentiments, is modified by their thoughts, and 
changes with their manners. It partakes of their improvement, and adapts itself to 
all the various changes of man. Within its shadow the rich aud the poor meet on 
terms of equality ; the one forgets his wealth and his pride, and the other forgets 
his poverty and his sorrow. Their sympathies, ever otherwise asunder, are here 
mingled together, and they go forth into the world again, conscious that opposition 
in rank cannot with them create hostility of feeling. They lose the artificial dis- 
tinctions of society, and assume the pure, original and kindly intercourse of fellow- 
men. The great man finds familiar friendship in walks of society where his name 
would otherwise never have been uttered, but with awe ; and the obscure poor man 
finds himself exciting interest and acquiring importance among those whose looks 
hitherto have been bent upon him with coldness and condescension." 

He thus disposes of that fruitful source of discussion, uniformity 
of work: 

" The ritual is useful and necessary, but much cumbered with many words ; 
but it is by no means Masonry ; the elucidation of our symbols in the search of 
Truth, and the practice of its deductions thereby learned, I consider to be in deed 
and in truth, Masonry in its highest sense. As to uniformity, except in the 
essentials, viz. : the G. W. andS., together with the traditions — it is a myth, and 
can never be accomplished." 

He had decided among other things, that any member may veto 
the advancement of the candidate before the O. B., and that he 
need not give his reasons; that a member who cannot be present, 
may make his objection to the affiliation of a brother known to 
the Master, who should withhold the ballot ; that a Mason may 
take the benefit of the bankrupt act; that the minutes must always 
be read before closing, for correction and approval, and read at 
the next stated communication for reference only; that maims 
cannot be initiated or advanced ; to all which we say, amen. But 
he also decided that a Past Master who has never received the 
P.\M.\ degree may install, which, with our understanding that 
that degree is an essential part of the ceremony of installation, 
seems erroneous. 



He reported having granted nine dispensations for new Lodges. 
This Grand Lodge has a historian, Bro. Samuel H. Dixon, who 
thus states what he hopes to accomplish : 

" When I entered upon my duties as Historian of Masonry in Alabama, I deter- 
mined to compile a full and complete history of every Lodge in the State (defunct 
or living), and the history of the Grand Lodge, with an abstract of its most import- 
ant proceedings. This I find to be a Herculean task ; but by diligence and perse- 
verance I hope to accomplish the desired object." 

Would it not be well for our Grand Lodge to attempt some- 
thing of the sort. 

Eight charters were granted for new Lodges, and two were con- 
tinued under dispensation. The committee on jurisprudence re- 
ported, that the right of objecting to the admission of a visitor is 
in the Lodge, and not in any individual brother, and should not be 
exercised but for good reasons. The first part of this decision may 
be doubted. They also decided that the Senior Warden succeeds 
to the Master, the Junior Warden succeeds in the absence of both 
his superiors ; therefore, a vacancy in the office of Master cannot 
be filled if there be a Warden, but that the Junior Warden does 
not succeed the Senior, either temporarily or permanently, and 
therefore a dispensation may be granted to elect a Senior Warden 
when the office is vacant; they also decided that a Mason cannot 
renounce Masonry ; he may dimit, he may refuse to participate in 
the active work of the craft, or to fulfill his obligations, but he 
remains a Mason, unless for some Masonic crime he be expelled ; 
they also say a dimit should be refused where the object is to 
renounce Masonry. We rather prefer to regard his membership as 
voluntary; if he desires a dimit, and is clear of all charges, we 
would not hold him to unwilling membership. A Mason he is and 
must remain, but Lodge membership is another thing. A special 
committee reported against the Grand Lodge committing itself to 
Masonic Cooperative Life Insurance Companies, — whatever these 
last be, — with which the Grand Lodge wisely concurred. 

The report on foreign correspondence, from the pen of M.\ 
W.\ W. C. Penick, reviews the proceedings of forty- two Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. He quotes from the Arkan- 
sas report the position that negro equality in Masonry would 
make the institution impracticable, if not contemptible, and says : 



" And what is this all for? To extend the institution to a class of profanes, of 
whom, to say the least of it, it is hut an experiment upon a servile race, not free 
born in the sense of Masonry? And it is a question to-day, whether he is not a 
worse slave than before. Now, if the opinion of Brother Peck, that the negro is 
capable of the highest order of intellectual and social improvement, is right, time 
will prove it ; but if on the contrary, he is mistaken, woe to Masonry. Now, why 
not wait until a generation of free-born negroes, with culture and education, can 
perhaps be safely trusted, and when prejudices and doubts will have passed away or 
have become solved in the clear light of experience." 

The experiment suggested has been tried already, under perhaps 
not the most favorable circumstances, and though as a race, they 
are still far from highly advanced standing, individuals can be 
found, who by their talents and their virtues," seem to render the 
opinion of G.\ M.\ Peck, to say the least of it, probable. He 
approves the view, now becoming general, that fees upon affilia- 
tion should be abolished. Of the Mormon question, our brother 
thus delivers himself: 

" Well, we fear that the Grand Master of Colorado may lend himself to the Mor- 
mon interest and be instrumental in permitting the Mormons — those adulterous biga- 
mites, to get into and finally possession of the Lodge at Salt Lake City. We un- 
hesitatingly sustain the action taken by the Grand Master of Nevada on the Mormon 
question— not because of their religion, but because of their adulterous proclivities 
and practices." 

Our brother is a good deal troubled about the " everlasting 
nigger," which, if his view of such of them as he sees is correct, 
is not to be wondered at. He says of them : 

" We have lately turned loose on us a race of men naturally indolent, lazy, and 
depraved in morals, who will not work and must eat, who lie up and sleep by day to 
prowl about and steal by night. And it requires as much time, trouble and expense 
to guard and save what we make from them, as it does to make it. Many of our 
members and best citizens have left and are leaving the country, and thousands 
more would, if they could raise enough of means to go with." 

If he could only see that the question of the negro in Masonry 
is just now merely speculative, and will remain so, if intemperate 
brothers do not get themselves warm about it ; that there is no 
likelihood that negroes will be made Masons, unless he and such 
as he stir up the fanatics he so much dreads, — it would be much 
better for the craft. He hauls us over the coals for our lenient 
treatment of certain brothers at Great Falls, but as he is not 
alone in this, we prefer to answer all at once, which we shall do 
farther on. We had marked other passages for quotation, but 
want of space forbids. 



ARKANSAS. 

The thirtieth annual communication of this Grand Lodge com- 
menced at Little Rock, November 16th, A. L. 5868, A. D, 1868. 
Ninety-eight Lodges were represented. 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ E. .H English reports having 
granted seventeen dispensations for new Lodges. He thus 
reports the action of one of the particular Lodges : 

" The Worshipful Master of Shady Grove Lodge, No. 108, writes : ' At the last 
session of the Grand Lodge there was an edict passed, compelling all Lodges to 
provide themselves with a Lodge seal — their returns to be made out under seal of 
the Lodge ; all failing to do so not to be received (p. 37-8). We fully acknowledge 
the right of the Grand Lodge to do this, but believe it to be an abuse of power to 
inflict burthens that would be grievous to bear. We, therefore, as per resolution, 
unanimously surrender up our charter,' etc. 

" Seals are of great antiquity ; they are perhaps older than the art of writing, and 
certainly preceded, for many ages, the invention of printing. Tubal-Cain, the son 
of Zillah, and, in his line, the eighth man from Adam, was the first artificer in brass 
and iron, and doubtless fashioned seals for the ante-deluvian patriarchs. Solomon 
had a seal of mystic form and devices, and the Arabians, to this day, attribute a tal- 
ismanic influence to the seal of our ancient Grand Master. The seal has been used 
in all ages as a symbol of nationality and sovereignty, and is the most solemn evi- 
dence of the authenticity of legal, as well as Masonic transactions. No Lodge or 
intelligent Mason, anywhere on the globe, would recognize a charter, diploma, or 
dimit, without the impression of the seal of the Grand or subordinate Lodge from 
which it purports to emanate. In requiring her subordinates, which were delinquent 
in that respect, to procure and use seals, this Grand Lodge but enjoined the observ- 
ance of an ancient Masonic usage. But the Grand Lodge did not indicate whether 
the seals were to be fashioned from metal, stone, or wood. This was left to the taste 
and means of the Lodges. If Shady Grove Lodge had not the means to appro- 
priate twelve or fifteen dollars to pay for a seal manufactured in the ordinary style, 
some ingenious brother might have carved one on the end of a hard stick, to be used 
by the Lodge until its finances were in an improved condition. The surrender of 
the charter was a desperate remedy for the burthen complained of." 

He reports St. John's College to be doing well, and bespeaks its 
favorable consideration at the hands of the Grand Lodge, and 
recommends that action be taken to preserve the Masonic history 
of the State. 

Sixteen Lodges were chartered, seven dispensations continued, 
and two ordered to issue. As usual, the surplus funds were 
given to St. John's College. The use of Masonic emblems upon 
public signs or other advertisements, as a means of inducing cus- 
tom or patronage to men in business enterprise, was unanimously 
condemned. It was ordered that no fee should be charged for 
affiliation, if application was made within six months of coming 



8 

into the jurisdiction of the Lodge, but if not made within that 
time, " he shall then pay an initiation fee of the usual amount." 
The last provision we should deem unwise. 

The report on foreign correspondence was submitted by Bro. 
C. B. Moore, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-five Grand 
Bodies, including ours. We have the Great Falls books again. 
Our brother heartily disapproves of Masonic jewelry, and as 
heartily approves of brethren living together in unity, and reads 
Bros. Guilbert of Iowa, and Barry, of Georgia, a lesson for 
the hard names they called each other; though, not unnaturally, 
he thinks Bro. Barry has some little palliation, which he cannot 
see in the case of Bro. Guilbert, while to us, the provocation 
seems about equally insufficient. 



CALIFORNIA. 

The nineteenth annual communication of this Grand Lodge 
commenced at San Francisco, October 13th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 
1868. One hundred and forty-nine Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ William A. Davis, G.\ M.\, in his address, 
reports having granted six dispensations for new Lodges ; that he 
upheld the law against the admission of maims, but permitted 
their advancement ; that some system of annual inspection of the 
Lodges was necessary ; (our California brethren have not hereto- 
fore seen any use for District Deputy Grand Masters) ; he recom- 
mends action in relation to San Francisco Board of Relief. 

This Grand Lodge has a valuable Masonic library, and the 
Grand Secretary reports an addition of thirty-five volumes during 
the year, on reading the titles of some of which we were almost 
tempted to disobey the command, " Thou shalt not covet," and 
sincerely wished that such a library was within our reach. We 
wish to call the attention of the craft in this State to the conclud- 
ing paragraph of the Grand Secretary's report; the italics are 
ours. 



"The only arrears for dues at the date of closing the financial portion of this 
report were $3.75, being slight errors of two Lodges, which will be corrected when 
the accounts of the current year are made up ; and it is pleasant to add, as usual, 
that the returns of every Lodge in the jurisdiction, for the current year, have been 
received." 



9 

The Masonic Board of Relief, of San Francisco, reports an 
expenditure for charity of $7,461.03, of which twenty dollars 
was for a brother hailing from New Hampshire. 

" Of the foregoing sura of $7,461.03, disbursed for the relief of the sick and 
needy, there was expended, — 

For Masons of California, $1,714 10 

* f Masons of other jurisdictions, 2,866 40 

■" widows and orphans of Masons of California, 658 00 

" widows and orphans of Masons of other jurisdictions, . . 2,222 53 

Being a total of $7,461 03 

No portion of the foregoing sum has been expended for any member of any of the 
Lodges comprising this Board, or for his wife, widow, or orphans, each Lodge in 
the city caring for its own sick, needy, or destitute." 

The committee on address of the Grand Master reiterate his 
demand for an efficient system of inspection of the Lodges. We 
believe they will find none better than ours, of District Deputy 
Grand Masters, each having charge of a number he can fairly 
attend to. Six charters were granted to Lodges under dispensa- 
tion, and one dispensation ordered to issue. Caucusing and 
electioneering for Masonic office was emphatically disapproved. 
The following shows the harsh and unjust manner in which our 
California brethren strain their laws to meet abuses which doubt- 
less press hard upon them. But, as in the case of suspension of 
unaffiliated brothers, no fair construction of the language of the law 
would make it read as they do ; and if it were ever so plain, nothing 
could justify the outrageous injustice of condemning a brother 
unheard, and without even a pretence of an inquiry into his 
guilt. No body of men, much less of Masons, can do that 
rightfully . 

" The provisions of that section are, that any member refusing or neglecting to 
pay his dues shall be notified by the Secretary, that, 'unless at the next stated meet- 
ing, either his dues be paid, or sickness or inability to pay be shown as the cause of 
such refusal or neglect, he will be suspended from all the rights and privileges of 
Masonry.' And further, that ' if neither of these things be done, he shall be so sus- 
pended, unless for special reasons shown, the Lodge may otherwise determine.' 
This seems to be as plain as words could make it. ' He shall be so suspended,' 
unless the Lodge otherwise determine for good reasons shown. The only discretion 
the Lodge can exercise is to remit the dues or extend the time for payment. If 
neither of these be done, he is suspended by operation of the law, and the Lodge 
has no occasion to take any action in the matter." 

A brother pays his dues, but by some error, the Secretary 
neglects to credit him ; such things have happened with the most 



10 

careful and honest of men ; he is notified by the Secretary 
of neglect in paying his dues ; he is prepared to show the error, 
but no, he must pay his dues again, or be suspended without 
trial. Such, the Grand Lodge of California declares to be their 
law ! ! Somebody wanted to bury suicides with Masonic honors, 
but the Grand Lodge, upon recommendation of a committee, 

" Resolved, That no Lodge in this jurisdiction shall bury with Masonic honors, 
any Mason who has committed suicide." 

The report on correspondence was prepared by Bro. William. 
H. Hill, and ably reviews the proceedings of forty-two Grand 
Bodies, including ours. He reports the formation of a Provincial 
Grand Lodge for British Columbia, under the Grand Lodge of 
Scotland. He disapproves the decision of the Grand Master of 
Connecticut, that an officer reelected need not be again installed ; 
in a sense, he need not, as he holds the office till his successor is 
elected and installed, whether he or some one else be that suc- 
cessor ; but he should be installed, and is guilty of an irregularity 
if he is not, and such refusal or neglect may very properly be 
regarded as a refusal to accept the office, and justify a new elec- 
tion. Bro. Hill doubts about suspension being a proper remedy 
for non-payment of dues. We think we should, if such a law as 
that of California were offered us. He doubts if it is so serious 
a crime as some regard it. That depends much upon the circum- 
stances and the animus ; it may be a serious Masonic crime, and 
it may be a very venial one ; the error is in fixing an invariable 
penalty like the law of Draco, and worse than that, making 
accusation, conviction. He discourses on P.\ G.\ M.\ Guilbeet, 
of Iowa, after the following: manner ; 



" When we first opened this well printed pamphlet, we missed, as the features of 
an old friend, that well-known and extensively commented upon ' spread eagle ' style 
of Past Grand Master Guilbert. ' Alas ! : said we, ' shall we never gaze upon his like 
again ? nor be again carried several miles beyond the top of Olympus, and all those 
Mounts of old?' But we were mistaken. Our well-meaning but exceedingly ec- 
centric brother has laid down the Grand Master's pen, but only to spread himself 
over additional acres (more or less), as the chairman of the committee on foreign 
correspondence. His report is in the appendix, and only covers one hundred and 
sixty-six pages ! And such a report, we venture to say, was never before written 
by mortal man, be he Mason or otherwise— no Grand Lodge proceedings ever before 
provoked more wholesale laughter than this— for he who reads must have the double- 
di&tilled blues, if he can resist a prolonged cachinnation ! We would like to quote 
a few pages, just to enliven this very dull and prosy essay of our own, but must be 



11 

content with a few gems only. We hope our Iowa brethren have stereotyped this 
wonderful report, that generations yet unborn may see and read the sayings of Bro. 
Guilbert in the year of Light 5867." 

He approves the action of our Grand Lodge in the Great Falls 
matter, and on the subject of army Lodges, but does not think so 
well of District Deputy Grand Masters. If he were here, he 
would be as well satisfied of their utility as we are. 

We fully endorse the following, from his review of New Jersey : 

" The mission of Masonry is rather with the present than with the hereafter ; 
rather with things temporal than with things eternal. Its labors and influences are 
directed to ameliorate the conditions of human life. It seeks to open the fountains 
of benevolence, to make the selfish man less selfish, the avaricious man less avari- 
cious, to soften the hard heart, and to bring the erring back into the path of duty. 
It stretches out its hands to succor the needy and the orphan, to dry the widow's 
tear, to cause the sun to shine where shadow had rested, to make life a joy and not 
a burden, and to smooth the pillow of suffering and death. It concedes to the 
Church the more honored, influential, and sacred position, but strives, in its own 
peculiar way, and by its own peculiar influences, as a handmaid of the Church, to 
assist her in every good and perfect work." 

Of the Grand Lodge of Nevada, and the Mormons, he says : 

" Our Oregon brother is of the opinion that the Grand Master of Nevada was a 
little too severe in his animadversions upon Mormons and Mormonism, and the un- 
suitableness of both for Masonic fellowship. In this we differ from our worthy 
brother, and are of the opinion that if he were as near this foul national ulcer as is 
our Nevada brother, he would think and speak about as plainly and pointedly of 
its undesirableness." 



CANADA. 

The thirteenth annual communication of this Grand Lodge was 
held at London, in the Province of Ontario, July 8th, A. L. 5868, 
A. D. 1868. One hundred and sixty chartered Lodges and ten 
under dispensation were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ W. M. Wilson, G.-. M.-., suitably notices the 
death of distinguished brethren of that jurisdiction; alludes to 
the murder of Thomas D'Arcy McGee, and the attempted 
assassination of the Duke of Edinburgh, in terms, that if the 
Fenians only had a Grand Lodge and committee of correspond- 
ence like some we wot of, would have brought a storm on his 
head for mixing politics with his Masonry ; mentions the forma- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick, and recommends its 
recognition ; speaks of a General Grand Lodge for the Dominion, 



12 

in terms that indicate little hope of its establishment. He thus 
speaks of the selection of Masters, words of troth and soberness, 
which all Lodges should heed, here as well as there : 

" In connection with these matters, there is one evil existing to which I trace 
many of the difficulties which are now of so frequent occurrence ; I allude to the 
want of a proper care, and to the neglect of Masonic law and principle, too often 
evinced by the members of the craft in the selection of those who are to govern our 
subordinate Lodges. Brethren are too often selected as rulers, merely because 
their social qualities may be of a high order, and often, also, from their general 
popularity, without duly considering their ability to work the Lodge, their adminis- 
trative capacity to govern it, or their possession of those still higher qualities which 
are so essential to the successful carrying on of the great work of Masonry. In 
selecting your Masters, let me entreat you, my brethren, always first to consider 
your duty to Masonry and to your Lodge. This important duty can never properly 
be performed, if you place in the chair one who has to rely upon others fordoing 
that which he is incapable of performing himself." 

He reports having granted twelve dispensations for new Lodges. 
Twelve warrants were ordered to issue to the Lodges working 
under dispensation. The constitution was so amended as to 
require the board of general purposes, a sort of committee, who 
do all the work here assigned to the several standing committees 
and some more, to meet two days before the meeting of the 
Grand Lodge, and to pay them per diem and mileage. On the 
recommendation of the board of general purposes, the Grand 
Lodge of New Brunswick was recognized and welcomed as the 
only Masonic authority in New Brunswick, Of the General 
Grand Lodge, the board of general purposes say : 

" The question of establishing a General Grand Lodge being one surrounded with 
issues that require the nicest discrimination, it is a source of much gratification to 
your board to know that the matter has been treated with so much judicious caution 
by our M. W. Grand Master, who truly remarks that any precipitate haste on the 
part of indiscreet friends would assuredly retard the successful consummation of so 
desirable an end." 

The time when such a body coujd be established has probably 
passed, and, with the experience of such bodies this side the 
border, happily passed. 

The report on foreign correspondence was submitted by Bro. 
Thomas White, Jr., and reviews the proceedings of thirty-six 
Grand Lodges, one of which was ours. The Grand Lodge of 
Connecticut having refused to recognize that of Nova Scotia, on 
the ground that it was the offspring of " secession and revolu- 
tion," the Canada committee say : 



13 

" The Committee, and the Grand Lodge in accepting their report, appear to have 
overlooked the fact that Nova Scotia has for years been occupied by three distinct 
governing authorities, and was, in fact, in the strict Masonic sense of the term, ' un- 
occupied territory ' until the local Grand Lodge was established." 

Of maims, and the opinions of authorities on the question of 
their admission, our brother says : 

" It is a curious fact that the authorities on this question are very nearly divided. 
We are inclined to think that but for the peculiar circumstances of the country, 
there would be no such division, and that the heart, rather than the head, prompts 
to laxity in this respect. That men who, in the nation's hour of great trial, went to 
the front and bore the brunt of battle, and who have come back bearing with them 
the evidences of the terrible struggle they have gone through, should have to pay a 
further penalty for their patriotism by being debarred from the right to enter our 
sacred portals, seems hard. The rule, however, is a clear one, and can only be re- 
laxed by a violation of an ancient landmark." 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

We have received the proceedings of this Grand Lodge, for the 
year of Light, 5868, A. D. 1868. Several special communica- 
tions were held to lay corner stones and perform similar ceremo- 
nies. On the 5th of May, the Grand Lodge met in semi-annual 
communication, all the Lodges in the jurisdiction, sixteen in 
number, being represented. The business was wholly of local 
interest, and shows a state of great prosperity among the Lodges. 

The annual communication was held November 3d, at which all 
the Lodges were again represented. The Grand Visitor and 
Lecturer, R.\ W.\ D. B. Searle, thus touches upon an evil 
which is everywhere severely felt : 

" I have been for a long time deeply impressed with a general want of desire 
among the body of Masons to obtain that true knowledge of Masonry that extends 
beyond the ritual, and reaches the spirit and object of our order. I regret that so 
many seem to be contented with merely receiving the degrees, or satisfied with per- 
mission to sit in the Lodge and admire its workings, yet do not have any desire to 
search for its hidden and beautiful mysteries that lay buried in darkness and are un- 
known to those who do not seek to obtain them. Masons should remember that by 
merely taking the ' degrees ' they have but reached the threshold of Masonry, and 
further, that all the beauties of Masonry are afterwards to be discovered only by 
those who will apply themselves in studying that which will disclose and bring to 
light the hidden treasures. Those who have no desire to obtain this knowledge, I 
believe are useless material to the craft. By such I mean the admission of members 
who have no desire to become active and bright workmen." 



14 



An installation communication was held December 28th, at 
which fifteen Lodges were represented. M.\ W.\ Benjamin B. 
French, Grand Master, reports having granted dispensations, in 
two instances, to Lodges to hold stated communications at different 
times from those provided in the by-laws. We cannot understand 
how this can be. He had also granted a dispensation to reconsider an 
unfavorable ballot. As we had learned the laws of our institution, 
this could not be done, and we should fear it would be productive 
of great injury to the craft. There is too much tendency now to 
inquire into and question the propriety of the use of the black 
ball ; and let it be understood that there is a loop-hole to try it 
again, and such disposition will be strongly increased. The 
Grand Master also reports two dispensations for new Lodges. 
He also recommends another stated meeting of the Grand Lodge, 
in the month of January. 

Charters were granted to the two Lodges under dispensation ; 
the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick was recognized ; on recom- 
mendation of the committee on finance, the following were 
adopted : 

" Resolved, That hereafter no gloves or aprons shall be furnished to any member 
of the Masonic fraternity (except its Grand Officers) by this Grand Lodge. 

" Resolved, That no member shall appear in any Masonic procession without 
conforming to the rules in relation thereto, that is to say : he shall wear black coat 
and pants, black hat, white gloves, and a white lamb-skin apron. 

" Resolved, That this Grand Lodge recommend to each and every brother to 
purchase, without delay, a lamb-skin apron and white gloves, to be worn by them 
on all public Masonic processions." 

The report on foreign correspondence was submitted by Bro. 
M. C. Baxter, and acknowledges the receipt of the proceedings 
of thirty-six Grand Lodges, including ours ; but he only briefly 
notices those of thirteen, among which ours is not. 



CONNECTICUT. 

This Grand Lodge held its eightieth annual communication at 
Hartford, May 13th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Eighty-six war- 
ranted Lodges and two under dispensation were represented. 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ Wm. Storer, commences his 
address with a beautiful tribute to Masonry, from which we quote : 



15 

" Freemasonry is something more than a mere system of forms and ceremonies. 
It is a living reality, — a tangible good ; and while it does not claim to be religion, or 
even a substitute for religion, it has, nevertheless, a direct tendency to make all men 
better who will practice its teachings. It inculcates every virtue, and discounte- 
nances every vice. It teaches its votaries to be temperate in all things ; to be fear- 
less, though not reckless, in maintaining the right ; to be cautious and prudent in 
the indulgence of thought, word and action ; to practice the strictest and most in- 
flexible integrity in all their dealings. It is a noble science, and opens to the searcher 
for truth an unfathomable depth of knowledge. He who most diligently pursues 
the profound study of Masonry, is most thoroughly aware that there is much more 
yet to be learned." 

He reports having granted two dispensations for new Lodges.' 
Also, in two instances, dispensations to reconsider an unfavorable 
ballot. Where did he get his authority to do it, we wonder ? 
He also, against his own first and better opinion, granted a dis- 
pensation to elect a new Master. He decided : 

" Although a charter may be voted to any proper number of petitioners by the 
Grand Lodge, no Lodge is in existence under that charter, until the instrument 
itself has been delivered and the Lodge duly constituted." 

Three charters were granted for new Lodges, one of them not 
having worked under dispensation. It was then — 

" Resolved, That the representatives present from the several Lodges, to which 
charters have been voted at the present Grand Communication, be admitted as 
members of this Grand Lodge." 

Compare this with the undoubtedly correct decision of the 
Grand Master, just quoted. The impropriety and folly of such 
action is seen in the subsequent action by whicji the vote granting 
a charter to one of the Lodges was reconsidered and recommitted 
to the committee, who made no other report, and no further action 
taken ; yet this embryo Lodge, still-born as it turns out, is ad- 
mitted to rule the craft. It was ordered that copies should be 
kept of all charters, and that the Lodges return to the Grand 
Secretary copies of their charters, which is an excellent idea we 
might copy to advantage. The following may produce good 
results, and furnish a remedy for a very common complaint : 

" Resolved, That whenever it shall come to the knowledge of a subordinate 
Lodge in this State, that any person shall have obtained the degrees of Masonry 
during a temporary absence therefrom, and in violation of the regulations of this 
Grand Lodge, it shall be the duty of the Lodge in whose jurisdiction said person 
shall reside, without delay, to present charges against him, and proceed with hia 
trial in due form." 
7 



16 

The report on correspondence, prepared by the Grand Secretary, 
Bro. Jos. K. Wheeler, reviews the proceedings of thirty-eight 
Grand Lodges, including New Hampshire. He thus quotes one 
resolution passed by the Grand Lodge of Florida, and comments 
upon it : 

"Resolved, That this Grand Lodge does not recognize negro equaity with the 
whites. 
" We would ask here, what has this to do with Masonry ?" 

He understands G.\ M.\ Peck, of Iowa, to propose separate 
Lodges for negroes, and thus comments : 

" We are of the opinion that the subject should be disposed of in the same manner 
as the German question. ' Would not the tendency be to separate ' the negroes from 
the whites, ' whereas Masonry ought to unite them/ If the negroes are worthy to 
gain admission, why not receive them into our own Lodges, and would they not be 
more benefited by the association than if set apart by themselves. We are opposed 
to any caste in Masonry, and if they cannot be received into our own Lodges, we 
deem it unwise to establish negro Lodges for that purpose, in opposition to the feel- 
ings of a large part of the present members of the institution. It is no reason to 
urge that because Lodges are in some jurisdictions making Masons of Indians, 
the negro should be entitled to the same privilege, for Lodges in some, if not all 
jurisdictions, are making Masons of material that should be rejected." 

He emphatically disapproves of dispensations for degrees ; 
thinks those made out of the proper jurisdiction are not clandes- 
tine, but should be refused recognition at home. Kentucky 
returns the number of ministers belonging to the fraternity in 
that State, and our Connecticut brother asks them, next time, to 
let us know the number of blacksmiths in their jurisdiction. In 
his notice of the address of the Grand Master of Louisiana, he 



" He says there seems to be a pressure from several sources for some modification 
or evasion, (by special dispensation), of that clause in the constitution, which posi- 
tively forbids the reconsideration of an unfavorable ballot, and being well convinced 
that it would be unsafe to deviate in the least from this regulation, has refused to 
dispense with the requirement. We would copy his views on the subject, had we 
not already alluded to the sacredness of the ballot in some other place. We how- 
ever agree with him fully in regard to the subject." 

Of non-affiliation, he thus writes, apropos to Minnesota ; 

" The Grand Master recommends that the subject be referred to a special commit- 
tee, to take into consideration whether they should not pay dues to the Lodge in 
whose jurisdiction they reside, or affiliate within a specified time or be suspended. 



17 

We fail to see how' either of tie recommendations can do much good, for the ma- 
jority of non-affiliated Masons become so in consequence of the non-payment of 
dues, and to undertake to enforce dues upon them, would simply be ridiculous ; to 
suspend them lor non-affiliation would be unjust, and to compel them to affiliate, 
might be impossible, for they must depend solely on the suffrages of their brethren 
for this privilege. It is indeed a vexed question, and we trust ere long, some satis- 
factory solution will be arrived at." 



DELAWARE. 

The sixty-second annual communication of this Grand Lodge 
was held at Wilmington, June 27th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
Seventeen Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Daniel McClintock, Grand Master, reports 
that, although requested, he has granted no dispensations to con- 
fer degrees, and he strongly reprehends such dispensations. He 
decided that when an applicant had been previously rejected in 
another jurisdiction, he could not be received without the consent 
of the Lodge which rejected him — of the correctness of which, 
there can be no doubt ; but when two members of the committee 
of investigation signed the report in blank, supposing it was to be 
favorable, but the chairman filled it up unfavorable, the Secretary, 
by mistake read it favorable, the objecting brother being absent, 
the ballot was passed and the candidate elected, he decided : 

" The candidate is duly and regularly elected. When a ballot is held for a candi- 
date, all members present taking part therein, the ballot fair, the candidate declared 
by the W. M., duly elected, it can only be reconsidered at the same meeting, when 
all the members who participated in the first ballot must be present. The law in 
this instance I refer to, so far as the ballot, would be the same whether the commit- 
tee's report is favorable or otherwise. 

" Should a committee report unfavorably, and none of them be present when the 
report was acted upon, and by any means the candidate elected, they would have the 
right, as any member or visiting brother would, to object to the conferring of the 
degrees, but the W. M. would be the judge as to whether they were valid or not, and 
would be presumed to take such action as would promote unity and harmony." 

We should doubt whether such proceedings could be considered 
regular in any view, but if they were/ we deem the better view to 
be, that any member possesses the right at any time, without 
giving any reason, to stop the candidate until he is made a Mason, 
by informing the Master of his objection, whose duty it then is, 
to state that the candidate is rejected, objection having been made 
to him, and the name of the brother making the objection is one 



18 

of the secrets of the chair which he has no right to reveal. No 
one, however worthy, should be forced into the companionship of 
a brother, against his will, and the craft is in much more danger 
from the introduction than the rejection of candidates. He thinks 
a suicide, if the act was done in a state of insanity, may be 
buried with Masonic honors, but if sane, he could not. » 

One warrant was granted for a new Lodge, and the proceedings 
show a new life and spirit, and an obvious determination to cor- 
rect all irregularities, which induces us to hope that the action 
which we condemned so heartily last year may be corrected ere 
long. 

The report on correspondence, from the pen of the very able 
Grand Secretary, R.\ W.\ J. P. Allmond, reviews the proceed- 
ings of thirty-five Grand Lodges, including ours. He thus 
criticises a practice which, however circumstances in sparsely 
settled communities may seem to recommend it, will generally be 
found to work evil : 

" It would appear from the following resolution that Maryland is in the habit of 
chartering traveling Lodges, or Squatters : 

" ' Resolved, That the resolution passed at the last communication, granting 
permission to Mount Ararat Lodge, No. 44, to hold meetings at Havre-de-Grace, 
Aberdeen and Perrymansville, be repealed,' which resolution was lost. Would it 
not be well for Maryland to establish ' Bush Meeting ' Lodges ? " 

Our brother calls attention to the fact that we called their 
annual communication for 1866 the sixteenth, instead of the 
sixtieth, as it should be. That must have been the fault of the 
types, for we could not have knowingly committed such an error. 



FLORIDA. 

This Grand Lodge convened in annual communication at Talla- 
hasse, January 13, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Thirty-eight Lodges 
were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Henry J. Stewart, Grand Master, reports having 
granted four dispensations for new Lodges, and that two Lodges 
have surrendered their charters. He announces the decease of 
M.\ W.\ P.*. G.\ M.\ Thomas Brown, whose reports on foreign 
correspondence, of which committee he was for seven years 
chairman, have made him generally known to the fraternity. . 



19 

Our brethren at the South seem to have their attention es- 
pecially directed to Masonic institutions of learning; and no 
amount of failure seems to convince them that Masonic bodies 
are not well adapted to conduct such enterprises. Two different 
projects were presented to the Grand Lodge, and each finally 
received some measure of countenance. Five charters were 
granted to new Lodges, three of which, however, seem to have 
been to take the place of others, which the devastations of war 
had laid waste and destroyed. The other proceedings were of 
merely local interest. There was no report on correspondence, 
but a new constitution was proposed, read, and printed for the 
Lodges, and ordered to be considered at the next annual commu- 
nication. 



GEORGI A. 

The annual communication of this Grand Lodge convened at 
Macon, October 27th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Two hundred 
and thirteen chartered Lodges and three under dispensation were 
represented. 

The M.\ W.\ John Harris, Grand Master, states in his ad- 
dress, that some want of harmony prevails in that jurisdiction 
from animosities growing out of political excitement, and that 
" bitter and vindictive feelings" from that cause have led " many 
brethren to forget their obligations to one another, and even that 
they were Masons," but he hopes the good example and wise 
counsel of the more prudent brethren, added to the soothing 
effects of time and reflection, will finally control and remove feel- 
ings so much to be regretted. He reports having granted one 
dispensation for a Lodge, to take the place of one whose charter 
had been revoked, and that he had not distributed the five thou- 
sand dollars his Grand Lodge had ordered to be distributed to the 
poor and needy, because accompanied and hampered by conditions 
and restrictions, which would render its distribution according to 
the strict letter of the vote, difficult and unsatisfactory, and so the 
hungry went unfed and the naked unclothed, for all the Grand 
Lodge did for them. 

The Deputy Grand Master of the first district, R.\ W.\ Davis 
N. Austin, decided, " that a candidate possessing mental and, 



20 

physical abilities sufficient to enable him to discharge with 
promptness and fidelity all the duties imposed by Masonic obliga- 
tions, is not ineligible on account of dotage." He also had 
decided that a Mason might be tried for offenses committed before 
he was a Mason, if they were such great moral delinquences as 
to render his connection with the Lodges injurious to the charac- 
ter and public reputation of the craft, and also in case of felonies. 
We are not quite sure if the last be correct ; we are inclined to* 
the view that the Mason may and should be tried for offences- 
before he was a Mason, unless they were such as were known to- 
the Lodge at the time of making, or would have been known, had 
ordinary inquiry been made ; our idea being, that our institution 
should be one of good men only, and all others should be excluded 
as soon as known, for the common good as well as common pro- 
tection, our punishments not being intended to reform the 
offender, but to protect the craft. If this be so, the injury to the 
craft is the same, and the need of protection to the body of the 
craft, both from the contamination of association with the impure^ 
and the loss of reputation from being in bad company, is just as 
great whether the offense was committed before or after any given 
date. If, however, the facts were known to the Lodge, it has 
already, in the most solemn manner, passed upon them, and should 
not go back on its own acts. 

The R.\ W.\ G. W. Adams, Deputy Grand Master of the 
fourth district, reports having granted two dispensations for new 
Lodges ; that power being given to the four Deputy Grand Mas- 
ters which this Grand Lodge finds it convenient to have. 

A considerable portion of the time of the communication was 
taken up with discussions upon educational matters, the Grand 
Lodge running one college, and being called upon to take charge, in 
whole or in part, of one or two more. The Grand Lodge refused 
to take charge of any more bantlings of the kind, and rather 
turned the cold shoulder upon the Southern Masonic College, 
which, however, seemed to have made something of a struggle 
the previous year, and was reported to be working successfully. 
We know of no instance, however, where such institutions have 
not proved to be uncommonly large and voracious elephants to the 
Lodges having them in charge. Four charters were granted for 
new Lodges. Tfrree colored persons, acting as a committee of 



21 

Eureka Lodge, No. 11, working under a charter from "Prince 
Hall Grand Lodge, of the State of Massachusetts," presented a 
communication, as the Georgia committee understand it, seeking 
to learn the feelings of the Grand Lodge toward the colored 
Lodge, and advice about forming a colored Grand Lodge ; and, for 
a wonder, our brethren kept their temper, did not seem to im- 
agine that any wrong was intended by any legitimate Masons 
toward them, and the committee reported that they did not know 
any such body as Prince Hall Grand Lodge, and that they felt 
sure the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts would not invade their 
jurisdiction, and that no body but the Grand Lodge of Georgia 
could establish Lodges in that State ; therefore they could not 
acknowledge them as Masons : which was precisely what they 
should do ; if all our southern brethren were as wise, we should 
soon cease to hear the subject of colored Masonry talked of. 
The committee on jurisprudence reported, " that it is not in the 
power of a Grand Lodge to set aside the result of a ballot once 
declared." The correct rule ; but, in one or two cases, we notice 
Grand Masters have assumed the pOwer to do it. Such a power 
we deem too dangerous to be entrusted anywhere. The committee 
on the address of the Grand Master "admire" the prudence of 
the Grand Master in not attempting to dispense the charity the 
Grand Lodge had directed him to distribute, holding : 

" It is on the subordinate Lodges rests the duty of dispensing charity — and this from 
their own funds. Certainly the funds of the Grand Lodge should not be touched for 
thiu purpose, except perhaps under extraordinary circumstances, which circumstan- 
ces do not at this time exist. To indiscriminately scatter the hard-earned means 
and resources of the fraternity in the keeping of their trustees, the Grand Lodge, 
with no chance of adequate benefits to any, your committee deem unwise, unmason- 
ic, and tending to the ultimate poverty of the order." 

Well, the dispensing of charity is their own business, and no 
one else should interfere. Steps were taken looking to the erec- 
tion of a Grand Lodge hall in Macon. 

The report on correspondence was from the practised pen of 
M.\ W.\ Samuel Lawrence, and is admirable, both in tone and 
matter, reviewing the proceedings of thirty- four Grand Lodges, 
among which we regret to find ours was not one. He heartily 
approves the ruling of G.\ M.\ Preble, of Maine, some years 
since, that any member of a Lodge might inform the Master that, 
if present, he should vote against a candidate, and in that case, 



22 

it is the duty of the Master to have the candidate entered on the 
minutes as rejected : 

" And would regard it an outrage upon the fraternity and the entire spirit of its 
landmarks and laws, should such protest of a member in good standing, unable to 
attend the particular meeting when a ballot is to be had, be disregarded." 

He thus wisely, as we think, touches the negro question : 

" Brother Gouley thinks ' the time has come when every Grand Lodge has got to 
define itself on the subject of so-called negro Masons.' Our Grand Lodge has long 
since defined itself on this question, and others have done the same. But we really 
do not partake of the fears some seem to have on this subject. Except for the 
guidance of ' young and inexperienced Masons ' it hardly needs that statutes should 
be passed to protect the craft against them. Save in some rare cases, where politi- 
cal bias may temporarily warp the feelings and better judgment of brethren, 
negroes will hardly be recognized among Masons for some time in this country— and 
then under a different status than that they now occupy to the fraternity. Social 
taste alone will be barrier enough for us for long time to come— and ' sufficient unto 
the day is the evil thereof.' Armed with the ballot and the law prohibitiug the in- 
troduction of a visitor obnoxious to any member of the Lodge, we are sufficiently 
protected, and will be always, if the landmarks are not innovated on." 

We had marked several other passages for quotation, but we 
have no room. 



IDAHO. 

We have the proceedings of the convention to organize this 
Grand Lodge, at Idaho City, December 16, A. L. 5867, and of 
the first annual communication at the same place, on June 22d, 
A. L. 5868, at both which all the Lodges in the jurisdiction, five 
in number, were represented. In the convention, Owyhee 
Lodge, under dispensation from the Grand Master of Oregon, was 
admitted with one vote. We cannot but regard this as irregular, 
but as all the proceedings seem to have been unanimous, no harm 
arises but the bad precedent, which induces us to mention it, in 
hope to prevent its being followed hereafter. The constitution 
of the Grand Lodge of Oregon, with the necessary changes, was 
adopted, the officers elected and regularly installed. A charter 
was granted to Owyhee Lodge. It was ordered that the charters 
and records of all the Lodges should be annually sent up to the 
Grand Lodge for its inspection ; what was proposed to be gained 



23 

by this very onerous requirement, we do not perceive. They are 
after non-affiliated Masons with a sharp stick : 

" Resolved, That any non-affiliated Mason living within the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge, who shall fail or neglect to contribute a sum equal to his monthly 
dues for a loDger period than six months, when able to do so, shall not be entitled to 
any of the rights and privileges of Lodges." 

At the annual communication, the following was adopted : 

" Resolved, That the Most Worshipful Grand Masters of this body be required to 
have a life-sized photograph taken of themselves, as soon as practicable after their 
installation, for this Grand Lodge ; and the Grand Treasurer is authorized to pay 
for the same upon the presentation of an order by the Grand Secretary, who is 
hereby authorized to draw the same." 

At this rate they will soon be far ahead of us. A charter was 
granted for a new Lodge at Silver City, the location of Owyhee 
Lodge. We know towns grow fast in that country, but two 
Lodges chartered in the same town in less than a year, looks as 
though something more than legitimate growth was at the bottom. 
There was no report on correspondence because of the short time 
since the organization. 



ILLINOIS. 

The twenty-eighth annual communication of this Grand Lodge 
convened at Springfield, October 6th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
Four hundred and thirty Lodges were represented. 

The M.*. W.\ Jerome R. Gorin, Grand Master, reports 
having granted thirty-six dispensations for new Lodges ; that the 
plan of District Deputy Grand Masters worked well; urges the 
matter of a Grand Lodge hall ; commends Bro. Reynolds, for 
many years Grand Secretary, who had determined to retire from 
that post. 

Thirty-six charters were ordered to issue, nine dispensations 
were continued, and one new dispensation granted, showing that 
the number of Lodges in Illinois is probably not decreasing. 
The recommendation of a committee to tax the Lodges for a new 
Grand Lodge hall was rejected, and the subject laid over one 
year. The committee on the Grand Master's address suggest cau- 
tion in the, too great multiplication of Lodges, as weakening the 



24 



old Lodges, and leaving insufficient support for the new. The 
system of District Deputy Grand Masters, a new experiment in 
this jurisdiction, had worked so well the past year that their 
number was increased to twenty-four, and measures were taken to 
make the office a constitutional one. The large size of the Grand 
Lodge, and the great difficulty, if not impossibility, of transact- 
ing the business, should all the Lodges be fully represented, begins 
to attract the attention of this Grand Lodge, and an inquiry was 
ordered as to what should be done. Probably, in several of the 
largest jurisdictions, Provincial Grand Lodges, like those of Eng- 
land, may soon be found imperatively necessary. This Grand 
Lodge, with a few others, has a Grand Orator, who must, of 
course, open his mouth and deliver an oration ; but our brethren 
seem to have had difficulty in finding time for him, and once con- 
cluded to print his oration without hearing it, but finally, they 
found time to listen to it. We should think, where the time 
for business is so short in proportion to the work to be done, the 
talk, however fine, had better be dispensed with. However, 
tastes differ. 

The report on correspondence is from the pen of Bro. Rey- 
nolds, the Grand Secretary, now Grand Master, whom but to 
name is to praise, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-nine 
American and six European Grand Lodges. On the negro ques- 
tion, he thus replies to Bro. Penick, of Alabama, who was much 
horrified at the proposition of M.\ W.\ Bro. Peck, of Iowa : 

" In the review of Iowa, M. W. Bro. Peck catches it. Bro. Peck made a labored 
argument in favor pf recognizing negro Masons. His remarks were explicit, candid 
and respectful. What was the result ? The Grand Lodge dissented from the views 
of the Grand Master by such a majority as to settle the whole question. Here is a 
difference of opinion; the question is fairly presented and settled. Why is Brother 
Penick so sensitive? Is he disposed to agitate, and agitate, for the purpose of 
keeping alive the flame of resentment in the South and agitation in the North ? It 
seems to us like an utter absence of either wisdom, alas ! or discretion." 

Our brother is 'considerably stirred up by Bro. Gouley, of Mis- 
souri, who was severe on the practice of granting dispensations for 
degrees, and perhaps in citing the State of Illinois as an example, 
said more than was necessary ; and Bro. Reynolds hits him 
back as hard as he gives. " Let us have yeace." He doubts 
whether the Wardens ought not to have the Past Master degree. 
We see in other proceedings allusions to such a degree, and talk 



25 

about virtual P.\ M.\, actual P.*. M.\, and Chapter P.\ M.\, and 
P.\ M.\ not made in the Chapter. We should like to know what 
a Lodge or a Grand Lodge of Master Masons knows, or wants to 
know about any other degrees or pretended degrees in Masonry 
than the three only (we say only advisedly) genuine Masonic 
degrees of E.\ A.'., F.\ C.\ and M.\ M.\ If there be any such 
other degrees, they are none of our business as Blue Lodge 
Masons, and if we attempt to legislate about them, we shall in- 
evitably blunder before we get through. If there be a degree 
called P.*. M.\, and the writer hereof thinks there is, as he has 
received it virtually and actually, in the Chapter and out of it, 
those who have it are probably capable of taking care of it, with- 
out our assistance as Grand Lodges of symbolic Masonry. Bro. 
Reynolds does the writer of our report for 1867 too much honor : 
he calls us P.*. G.\ M.\ Our brothers have never conferred that 
distinguished honor upon that brother. Bro. Reynolds was 
probably misled by mistaking him for M.\ W.\ Chaeles H. 
Bell, who, some years since, was Grand Master. Our brother 
thinks we were wrong in our views of the controversy between 
Lafayette Lodge, of the District of Columbia, and Resurgam 
Lodge, of Iowa. Our view was and is, that the candidate residing 
in Indiana should not be made elsewhere, without the consent of 
:the particular Lodge in whose jurisdiction he resided, and of the 
(Grand Master of Indiana, neither of which was formally obtained. 
But no objection being made from Indiana, Lafayette Lodge may 
be excused for regarding the letter of the Master of the Indiana 
Lodge as giving the needed consent, and if so having commenced 
the work, were then entitled to finish it as against every one else, 
and if they yielded it, yielded it on such terms as they thought 
right. We understand Bro. Reynolds to hold that the candidate, 
having received one degree in one State and then removing to 
another, that the Lodge in the latter State, in whose general juris- 
diction he resides, gains a right to confer the remaining degrees 
upon him, while we hold to the old charge, that no Master shall 
supplant another in his work, &c. Upon further reflection, we 
think, Bro. J£eynolps must see that we are right. 



26 

INDIANA. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in annual communication at Indi- 
anapolis, May 26th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One hundred and 
sixty-three chartered Lodges and twenty-three under dispensation 
were represented. 

The M.*. W.\ Harvey G. Hazeleigg, Grand Master, replaces 
his usual review of the proceedings of other Grand Lodges, by a 
supercilious and sneering notice of a few of the questions mooted 
in the Masonic world, and an equally offensive reply to the sug- 
gestions which had been made, that Indiana should recede from 
her peculiar laws and customs, which are rapidly separating the 
institution in that State from the rest of the community of Grand 
Lodges on this continent. Grant all that Indiana claims, that in 
the particulars to which her attention has been called, she has in 
nothing exceeded the authority she has — it well deserves consid- 
eration, if it is wise that she should isolate herself from the 
rest of the fraternity. As was well said by Bro. Caeson of Ohio, 
uniformity of law and usage is even more desirable than uniformity 
of work, as it is really more vital to the nature of our institution. 
Bro. Hazeleigg seems to us to claim the right to deny and disre- 
gard all landmarks except those which he has himself set up, but 
he might have done even this in a more courteous and fraternal 
manner. He acknowledges the receipt of the proceedings of 
thirty-eight Grand Lodges. The following extracts will show 
something of his manner : 

" It would be tedious and become uninteresting should we give the congratula- 
tions of each Grand Master to the body over which he presided, the number of dis- 
pensations granted and the applications refused— the number of visits and the cordi- 
ality of his reception at every place visited. These are all appropriate enough in 
the jurisdiction where they occur, but nowhere else. Nor is it necessary that we 
should say how kind and lovingly the committees on foreign correspondence admire 
and tickle each other when agreeing, and how, unnecessarily snappish they become 
when they think they have been slighted or their track crossed, or something said 
that falls short of or over-tops their standard, while each doubtless, like ourselves, 
feel persuaded that their own course, if not the best, is at least as good as others. 
Our laws and practice is the result of no little reflection, experience, and observa- 
tion ; we never find fault with what others do or say, unless we are satisfied that 
some fundamental principle is involved, being content that others should govern 
their internal police matters as to them shall seem best." 

" On the right of appeal from a decision of the Master of a subordinate Lodge, 
there is some room for doubt. I believe most all writers on Masonic jurisprudence 
hold that there is no appeal from his decision to the Lodge ; but as these writers 



27 

mutually distrust and differ from each other on important points, thereby evidencing 
that all are not right, I feel inclined to doubt the correctness of so sweeping a dec- 
laration, as that there is no case in which an appeal to the Lodge from|the decision 
of the Master would be allowable. During the ceremonial work of the Lodge, there 
are many and satisfactory reasons why an appeal should not be entertained ; but 
there are many and important matters coming before a Lodge for its action that 
don't come under tha^Blass called the « work ' of the Lodge, and on such subjects, 
if there is not, there ought to be a right to appeal, and Fdoubtjnot there is such B a 
right." 

" In view of the many differences of opinion about ancient laws, charges and regu- 
lations, it is but the part of common honesty to say that they never were immu- 
table ; that the changed condition of everything pertaining to the affairs of the hu- 
man family, and the progress of enlightened civilization has necessitated a change 
in these laws, while pure and unadulterated Freemasonry and the ancient landmarks 
ever have and ever will remain the same. The change in its laws and police regula- 
tions have no more effect upon its stability and unchangeable^hieroglyphics than has 
the change of language upon the verity of eternal truth. They both are and ever 
will remain the same." 

He reports having granted twenty-two dispensations for new 
Lodges and arrested the charter of a Lodge for making a Mason 
of a man with one leg, and recommends its revocation; the Grand 
Lodge however, restored it. He then puffs a Masonic history, of 
which we know nothing but his account of it : 

" If all the Masonic books ever published were placed in one pile, and Brother 
Mitchell's in another, and I were compelled to choose, I would take Bro. Mitch- 
ell's. I do wish it could be in the hands of every Mason. It is what we Avant to 
show what is ancient Masonry, and what modern manufactory. The editor of The 
Masonic Trowel justly says : ' Brother Mitchell is the only author who has pre- 
pared a complete history of the order. The author assumes that Masonry was in- 
stituted by King Solomon, and proves his assertion true, or that'our traditions are 
false and Masonry a cheat. The Doctor is the first author who has taken the Bible 
as his stand -point, and attempted to prove therefrom that Masonry was instituted 
by Divine command for the overthrow of the heathen mythology, and to bring back 
the worshippers of idols to the knowledge of the true God.' Strong as this lan- 
guage is, I can now, from having examined the work, endorse every word of it as 
true. Brother Mitchell is not only the first, but the only author who has placed 
Freemasonry upon its ancient rituals and traditions— established their truth by the 
language and teachings of the Bible, and then built thereon." 

Eighteen charters were granted to new Lodges, five dispensa- 
tions continued and five new dispensations ordered to issue ; pro- 
vision was made to have some of the more important and labori- 
ous committees meet before the Grand Lodge, and get their work 
done before the meeting — following in that the example of Illinois. 
It may well deserve consideration whether we might not advanta- 
geously do the same. 



28 



IOWA, 

This Grand Lodge assembled in annual convocation at Des 
Moines, June 2d, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One hundred and 
thirty-one Lodges were represented. 

M.-.W.*. Reuben Mickel, Grand Mas&», reports having 
granted twenty-one dispensations for new Lodges, the members of 
most of which he found to have recently come from other jurisdic- 
tions, from which he concludes that the new Lodges were not 
built up by dividing the old Lodges, and were therefore indicative 
of healthy growth. He had decided that a Mason suspended in 
another State, whose Lodge had become extinct, and he himself a 
reputable citizen of Iowa, could only be relieved of his suspension 
by the Grand Lodge of his former residence ; and that desertion 
from military service was no Masonic crime. 

Measures were taken looking to a permanent location of the 
Grand Lodge and building a Masonic temple, which it was pro- 
posed to effect by putting the location up at auction to the highest 
bidder — a method which does not commend itself to our judgment 
as suited either to the dignity or harmony of the Grand Lodge. 
Nineteen charters were granted to new Lodges, eight dispensa- 
tions continued and one ordered to issue. It was decided that a 
Lodge in another jurisdiction had no right to try and discipline a 
member of a Lodge in Iowa, which seems to us too broad ; if the 
brother is a resident within the jurisdiction of a different Lodge 
from that in which he is a member, the Lodge in whose jurisdic- 
tion he is, may, it seems to us, proceed to try him or complain to 
the Lodge of his membership. The Masonic temple coming up 
again, was laid over to the next annual communication for the 
action of the Lodges. Bro. Guilbert is said to have read some 
part of his report on correspondence, but it does not appear in 
the proceedings. 



KANSAS. 

The thirteenth annual communication of this Grand Lodge was 
held at Lawrence, October 20th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Forty- 
eight Lodges were represented. 

The M.\\V.\ M. S. Adams, Grand Master, reports having 



29 

issued ten dispensations for new Lodges, one of which was for 
Mt. Moriah Lodge, at Great Salt Lake City, Utah. This Lodge 
had formerly worked under a dispensation from the Grand Master 
of Nevada, but it will be remembered that M. W. Bro. DeBell 
forbade their receiving either candidates or visitors who were Mor- 
mons, which ruling was approved by the Grand Lodge of Nevada. 
Their dispensation was continued one year, when on returning it, 
asking for a charter, the petitioners said if they could not have a 
charter without the prohibition relating to Mormons they did not 
wish it. The Grand Lodge, thinking this savored of dictation, 
promptly refused to give them a charter; they then applied, stating 
the fact, to the Grand Lodge of Montana, which refused to grant a 
charter, but referred them to the Grand Lodge of Nevada ; they 
then applied to the Grand Lodge of Colorado, which also refused 
to interfere; they then asked the Grand Master of Kansas for a 
dispensation, as it would appear, without saying anything of their 
past history and obtained it. We cannot avoid quoting the fol- 
lowing from the Grand Master's address : 

" Masonry supposes the candidates for its honors in some degree intelligent, and 
requires them, if meaning to be true men, to extend that intelligence steadily while 
within an earthly Lodge. In other words, Masonry is knowledge, not merely of 
rituals, but of science, physical, political and moral ; and demands a fair share of 
every brother's time for its mastery. Without such attainment, no man can expect 
to fulfill his duties to his fellow-men, to his family, or his Maker. Let the young 
brother mark this, and each day set apart a portion of time for that thorough self- 
culture everywhere inculcated in our instructions, and so vital to the perfection ex- 
pected of him who has thoughtfully entered upon a Masonic life. He will find, let me 
assure him, work enough for his earlier years, enough for his mature manhood— yes 
work enough till the last sand be down." 

The following decision of Grand Master Adams, states the law 
as we understand it : 

"The penal jurisdiction of a Lodge extends to all Masons residing within its geo* 
graphical jurisdiction, whether affiliated or not ; yet courtesy would require that in 
case of affiliated Masons, the charges should be sent to the Lodge of which the ac* 
cused is a member ; then, if they neglect or refuse to take cognizance of the case, 
the Lodge within whose jurisdiction the brother resides may proceed to try the 
case. When two or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction, each Lodge will take 
exclusive jurisdiction of its own members," 

The B-.\ W.'.D.-.G.-. M.\, Edward A. Smith, reports having 
granted one dispensation for a new Lodge. Six charters were 
granted and one dispensation continued. Among the charters 



30 

granted was one to Mt. Moriah Lodge. While there is no Masonic 
law which prohibits this course, courtesy to the Grand Lodge of 
Nevada would seem to have required the action of the Grand , 
Lodges of Montana and Colorado ; our brethren in Kansas, one 
would suppose, could hardly have expected that brethren who 
would be insubordinate and disrespectful to their former superior, 
would be altogether free from such conduct toward their present 
superior when any occasion should arise. 

The report on foreign correspondence, from the hand of R.\ W.\ 
E. T. Cake, the Grand Secretary, notices the proceedings of 
thirty-five Grand Bodies, including ours. On the Iowa decision, 
upon which we have commented, he says : 

" Upon this subject, we hold that every Mason is amenable to the laws and regu- 
lations of the Grand Lodge jurisdiction in which he may reside, and a brother vio- 
lating these regulations may be tried and disciplined by the Lodge in whose jurisdic- 
tion the offense was committed. We believe we have members of Iowa Lodges 
permanently residing within this jurisdiction, and we hold them amenable to our 
laws, but through courtesy we might proceed as they prescribe." 

He quotes largely from G.\M.\ Hazelrigg, of Indiana, in re- 
lation to the powers of Masters and Grand Masters, and making 
Masons at sight, but without expressing any opinion. He notices 
that Nevada, Montana and Colorado had refused a charter to Mt. 
Moriah Lodge, at Salt Lake City, but of course makes no 
comment. 



KENTUCKY. 

This Grand Lodge held its annual communication at Louisville, 
October 19th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Three hundred and one 
chartered Lodges and fifteen under dispensation were represented. 

The M.\W.\ Elisha S. Fitch, Grand Master, reports having 
granted fourteen dispensations for new Lodges, one of which he 
afterward revoked. He also reports that " several" dormant 
Lodges had resumed work, and two had surrendered their charters. 
He seems to regard the Grand Master as merely the presiding 
officer in the Grand Lodge, a sort of speaker, and is especially 
hard on the assumed power of making Masons at sight. It would 
be easy to show how the power originated and that it does 
exist beyond the power of Grand Lodges, or anything but the as- 



31 

sembly of all the craft to the youngest Entered Apprentice, to take 
it away, but it is a power which has no place in Masonry in this 
country and should never be exercised; therefore, we do not deem 
a discussion upon it useful. Certain brethren composing the 
Lodge at Lexington, proposed holding a convention of the Lodges 
in that part of the State, to consider the propriety of a division of 
the Grand Lodge. This coming to the ears of the Grand Master he 
at once issued an edict forbidding the meeting of the convention, 
and admonishing all concerned that such action would subject 
them and their Lodges to exemplary discipline, which seems to 
have had the desired effect. 

The Grand Treasurer reported the resources of the Grand 
Lodge to be $78,006.92. The following order was also adopted: 

" Resolved, That previous to the next annual communication, the Grand Steward 
and Tyler place numbers on the seats in this Grand Lodge, according to seniority, in 
order that Representatives may have desirable seats in preference to visiting 
brethren ; and that in arranging the hall, the Grand Master's seat be moved to the 
center of the east side of the hall." 

Where was the Grand Master's seat before, we wonder ? 

Fourteen charters were granted, five dispensations continued, 
and six ordered to issue. A committee could see no reason why 
Lodges might not be incorporated, but the Grand Lodge recom- 
mended its subordinates not to obtain civil charters, and appointed 
a committee to see if the act of incorporation of the Grand 
Lodge could not be made to cover all that is desired in that 
respect. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by the Grand Sec- 
retary, Bro. J. M. S. McCokkle, and reviews the proceedings of 
twenty-eight American and three European Grand Bodies. Mas- 
sachusetts had provided that the acceptance of a civil charter 
should "operate as a surrender and revocation of its Masonic 
charter or warrant from this Grand Lodge." Bro. McCokkle 
protests against this, if it is thereby intended that the charter 
shall be arrested without trial, and correctly, for nothing can be 
more unjust than to condemn a Lodge or individual unheard ; but 
we see no reason why the Grand Lodge may not declare any act it 
deems improper shall amount to a surrender of the lodge warrant. 
If the Lodge afterward does the act, knowing the law, they cannot 
complain, and the only question to be tried is, whether the for- 
bidden act has been committed. 



32 

LOUISIANA. 

The fifty-sixth annual communication of this Grand Lodge was 
held at Louisville, February 10th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Eighty 
chartered Lodges and four under dispensation were represented. 

The Grand Master seems, from his address, to have turned over 
most of the duties of the office to his Deputy, whose residence in 
New Orleans rendered him more accessible to the craft. The D.\ 
D.\G.\M.\,R.\ W.\ Henry R. Swasey, reports having granted 
three dispensations for new Lodges, as well as performed a great 
number of other official acts. 

Four charters were ordered to issue to Lodges under dispensa- 
tion. Three thousand dollars was voted to Louisiana Relief 
Lodge, to aid in building a tomb on the new lots the Grand Lodge 
had donated in the Masonic cemetery. Bro. H. Hamburger 
presented the report of the Relief Lodge, by which it appears that 
83398. had been expended for the relief of stranger brethren 
during the preceding year. The Grand Lodge, the year before, 
had ordered the sale of the Grand Lodge hall and the purchase of 
a lot on which to erect a Masonic temple; the sale was not made 
but the purchase was, and the Grand Lodge was divided on the 
expediency of proceeding with the new building, and after two 
reports from committees, one either way, the subject w r as con- 
tinued a year. A mania seems to exist just now for the erection 
of magnificent edifices for Masonic halls, which, with the ordinary 
magniloquence, are denominated Temples. They are apt to cause 
great embarrassment by the taxation which they almost inevitably 
cause, and in some instances great dissatisfaction, almost insub- 
ordination, is caused by remote Lodges feeling that they are 
taxed, and more heavily in proportion to their means, to erect 
palaces for others to enjoy. Still it seems probable that most of 
our great cities are to have such buildings erected by the craft. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by R. W. Bro. 
James B. Scot, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-six Grand 
Lodges, not including New Hampshire. He is strenuous against 
the advancement of maims ; he considers the resolution about 
negroes, passed in so many southern Grand Lodges, works of 
supererogation, which, so far as the admission of colored men to 
the Lodges is considered, is no doubt true, but they are mis- 
chievous in that they deny the fundamental, basis of the fraternity, 



33 . 

which is that of a society designed to unite men of every nation, 
sect, and opinion, its real basis being the universal brotherhood of 
man. True, Masonry seeks none but good men, but the internal 
qualifications existing, the external accidents form no legal ground 
of objection, and when Grand Lodges and respectable brethren 
attempt to undermine and overthrow the entire fabric of our insti- 
tution, on account of some fancied fear that they may be required 
to associate with persons disagreeable to them, when to every dis- 
passionate observer it is obvious that no chance of such a thing 
exists, it is then the duty of every true Mason to rebuke the false 
sentiment. It is said negroes are not free born; where true, it is 
a valid objection, which very few, if any, would disregard. It is 
said they are degraded and brutal, unfit for association with 
Masons. If any man is so, he ought not to be made a Mason, 
whether white or colored. Some have even gone so far as to say 
that the negro never can be educated to be fit to be made a 
Mason. If unfit, he should not be made ; why not then rest sat- 
isfied with what are undoubted and unquestioned objections ? Why 
abandon all these and attempt to stand on the entirely indefensible 
ground, that the man is not white f Suppose a man to be every- 
thing that is desirable, but the one thing, that is, color, is not like 
the majority of Masons ; born free, as his ancestors for generations 
were before him, educated, talented, adorned with all Christian 
virtues, a refined gentleman, but black. Can it be pretended that 
in such case he is ineligible for the mysteries of Masonry ? If it 
be said there are none such, there can be none such, then place 
your objection on the safe ground of valid and well known objec- 
tions : he is not free born, ignorant, brutal, bad, or no gentleman, 
— not urge the mere accident of color. Bro. Scot rebukes the in- 
temperance of Bro. Barry, of Georgia, extracts from whose 
report we gave in a former report of our own. In truth, the sen- 
timent of almost all our southern brethren is opposed to Bro. 
Barry's report, as that of all the northern brethren is to the 
somewhat similar intemperance of Bro. Guilbert, the almost uni- 
versal feeling being one of brotherhood, full of that charity which 
neglects to see the inevitable foibles of human nature. So may it 
ever be among the craft. Bro. Scot defends the committees on 
foreign correspondence against Bro. Hazelrigg, of Indiana, but 
it is hardly necessary — tlMr utility is too generally acknowledged. 
He quotes the same history of the clandestine negro Lodges which 



"34 

we quoted in a former report, which is erroneous in some particu- 
lars. The charter of African Lodge, No. 459, was not in usual 
form, although after reading the published copy of it, we fail to 
see that it grants the powers which have been assumed under it. 
It was not granted in violation of the rights of the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts, for the two Provincial Grand Lodges had each 
become defunct, or at least dormant, and the present Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts had not been constituted. When the Grand 
Lodge of Massachusetts was formed, no notice was taken of this 
Lodge, holding a charter from the same source that many of the 
other Lodges did, and this might raise the question as to the 
status of a legal Lodge existing in a territory before the formation 
of a Grand Lodge, but which the other Lodges refuse to receive 
into the Grand Lodge upon its formation. This charter was never 
returned, but is still held in Boston by the so-called negro Grand 
Lodge. Its being dropped from the register of the Grand Lodge 
of England took place upon the union of the "ancients" and 
"moderns." We think also, that it is claimed that some Lodge 
chartered by some Masonic power, true or false, in Hayti, joined 
African Lodge in the formation of the first negro Grand Lodge. 
These do not, of course, show that these Lodges as now existing, 
are legal, or anything other than clandestine, but having given the 
report, truth requires that we should correct such errors as we 
find. On work he says : 

" Proficiency in the work is greatly to be desired, for, in the present rush of ap- 
plicants for admission, the degrees are too frequently conferred in a hurried and im- 
perfect manner. But even when properly conferred, the degrees are not complete 
without the lectures, or at least so much of them as will impress the newly made 
brother with the import and solemnity of our ceremonies. As to the lecture, we 
have never admired the catechetical form, except so far as it is useful to post up the 
candidate ; but no degree should be conferred without the lecture being given either 
in that mode or in the form of a narrative. As to obtaining complete uniformity in 
the verbiage of the lectures, we consider the idea wholly chimerical. No arbitrary 
system can long be preserved without resort to modes which are unlawful — for the 
most retentive memory will sometimes be at fault. One man is gifted with a fluency 
of language, while another expresses himself in a terse and concise style, hence no 
two persons employ the same words to convey the same idea. Thus, while there 
are differences in the verbiage of the different systems, the great essentials are pre- 
served in all. We have never been able to appreciate the benefits which the frater- 
nity have derived from the wranglings and bickerings of the advocates of the differ- 
ent systems, and consider the rule of our Grand Lodge, requiring uniformity in the 
ties which bind us together and the modes of recognition, as the only one which can 
satisfactorily settle the much-vexed question of ^>rk and lectures. It gives an intel- 
ligent Master full scope to explain and illustrate the symbolism of the degrees, and 



35 

thus incite the initiate to explore the esoteric meaning of our ceremonies and sym- 
bols, which, even with the fullest explanation of their lawfully accepted teachings 
that can be given in the Lodge, are still the veils which conceal the hidden glories of 
Freemasonry from those who consider that a mere proficiency in the work makes 
them ' bright ' Masons." 

We had marked several passages of this very able report for 
quotation or comment, but the growing length of our report calls 
upon us to stay our hand. 



MAINE. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in annual communication at Port- 
land, May 5th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One hundred and twenty- 
nine Lodges were represented. 

The M.-.W.-. Timothy J. Murray, Grand Master, reports 
jhaving granted three dispensations for new Lodges. He decided 
that an officer reelected should be reinstalled; as if not, as no 
officer can act until installed, he would continue to act under his 
former election or appointment, and not under the latter. On the 
^subject of threatened attack upon our institution, he says : 

" This condition of affairs, however, places upon us a responsibility ; and the 
proper manner in which to meet this issue is of much importance. We should all 
bear in mind that ours is not a controversial or belligerent institution ; that its 
spirit, as well as teachings, forbid us to wrangle or dispute about it ; and that the 
best answer we can make to ' railing accusations ' is to point to the lives and con- 
versation of those whom we delight to honor. While no inducement ought to lead 
us into argument with those who may ridicule and falsify the character of our insti- 
tution, there is a work for every Mason to do, that may redound to its lasting good 
and honor." 

Five charters were granted and three dispensations ordered to 
issue to new Lodges. Lodges were prohibited from obtaining acts 
of incorporation, and Bro. Josiah H. Drummond was appointed 
a committee to prepare a plan for the incorporation of trustees to 
hold the property and secure the supposed advantages of acts of 
incorporation. 

The report on foreign correspondence was prepared by Bro. J. 
H. Drummond, and reviews the proceedings of forty-four Grand 
.Bodies, including all the Grand Lodges of the United States but 
three. Bro. Drummond thus argues the question of the pro- 
priety of the surrender of charters upon the formation of a new 
Grand Lodge, and sas it seems to us, conclusively. The surrender 



36 

of the charters in such cases, is quite a modern idea and, though 
doubtless well meant, is a mistaken one. 

" This action is founded upon the idea, that when a new Grand Lodge is formed, 
its constituents must surrender their old charters and take new ones. This is not 
according to the ancient practice, and is erroneous in principle. The proper course 
is to have the charters endorsed by the new Grand Lodge. The Lodges should con- 
tinue their existence. If they surrender their charters they at once cease to exist. 
They cannot have two charters at the same time ; and it inevitably follows that if 
they surrender their charters, they put an end to their existence as Lodges, and the 
new charters are for new Lodges. When the Grand Lodge of Maine was formed, 
the subordinates retained their charters, and are still working under them. 

"It is not necessary, in order for a Grand Lodge to govern a subordinate that it 
should also give the subordinate existence. When Lodges are chartered, they are 
created for an indefinite time. Lodges thus created may transfer their allegiance, in 
case of the formation of a Grand Lodge in their territory, and become a constituent 
of a new Grand Lodge. A Grand Lodge cannot be created without subordinate 
constituents. And it is a curious idea, and quite absurd , that after it has been 
created, its constituents must immediately die and receive new life from it ! When 
they die, does it net die also ? The true idea is, that the constituents from their lo- 
cation have the right to form a new Grand Lodge for their own government. 

" The regularity of a Grand Lodge may be questioned. If not formed by at least 
three regular Lodges, it is irregular. The Lodges forming it should retain their old 
charters, in order to have the proper evidence of their regularity, and the conse- 
quent regularity of the Grand Lodge. If their charters, for other causes, are ever 
surrendered, the new Grand Lodge should retain them for the same reason.' 7 

" The endorsement of the charter is well enough, but not necessarij. The Grand 
Lodge takes jurisdiction of all Lodges in the State, whether they will or not ; and 
no act of that kind is necessary to show that any particular Lodge is under its 
authority. When the Grand Lodge of Maine was formed, all the Lodges had Massa- 
chusetts charters; and they have them yet, without endorsement or alteration. 
This whole matter was then examined by Simon Greenleaf and his associates, and 
the course indicated above adopted. We must say that it seems to us the only 
course consonant with reason and common sense." 

Of the Past Master's degree he says : 

" The installation of a Master is conclusive evidence to a Master's Lodge, that he- 
has received all the necessary instructions and qualifications. We believe, therefore , 
either that the installing officer should be authorized to give him all these instruc- 
tions, or if more Past Masters are required to give him any, the same number should 
be required to install. But as our laws authorize and require a Master to install his 
successor, he is thereby invested with full power to do so in every respect. 

"If the installation does not include the conferring of the P. M. degree, there 
should be a record of it. Accordingly, we have seen a few instances in which there 
appears upon the records of a Lodge a certified copy of the proceedings of a Lodge 
of Past Masters, certified by order of the installing officer. But these instances are 
rare and of recent date. The record, therefore, of an installation must have inclu- 
ded in ancient times, by force of the term, the conferring on the Master of the P. M. 
degree. And we believe that the old practice was for the installing officer alone (if 
necessary) to confer this degree ; that such should be the practice now ; and that 



37 

the practice of requiring a convocation of three Past Masters to confer this 
degree— [the decision in Minnesota (1865) which Bro. Paul was criticising]— is 
modern, and was borrowed from another organization." 

Of making Masons at sight : 

" We hold that this prerogative of the Grand Master cannot be taken from him by 
a regulation ; but we hope that the universal sentiment of the fraternity against its 
exercise will be sufficient to prevent its frequent use.'-" 

Bro. Deummond reviews the whole question relative to West 
Virginia, and holds that Grand Lodge regular, answering each ob- 
jection that has been made to it, in all which we fully agree with 
him. Of negro Lodges and negro Masons he says: 

" This settles the status of all these bodies and their members ; they can receive 
' no countenance ' whatever, not because of their race or color, but because they are, 
at best, but clandestine Masons. 

" Another question, however, has been agitated. Will regular Lodges receive 
negroes ? And if so, must other Lodges recognize them? 

"Let us go back to the landmarks again. A candidate must he free born, and 
elected by the unanimous vote of the Lodge ; and no visitor can be admitted to a 
Lodge against the objection of a single one of its members ; and no new Lodge can 
be formed without permission of the Grand Lodge. 

" These would seem to be all that is required for this generation, at any rate ; the 
law is simple, But comprehensive." 

"Whoever sits in the Grand Orient of France must ordinarily sit with a negro 
brother ; and it is useless to undertake to say, that the law of Masonry excludes a 
man, physically, mentally, and morally qualified, because of his race, or color. 
Lodges may not choose to receive a man of another race ; that is their prerogative ; 
but to allow political questions to cause innovations in Masonry will quickly destroy 
it. And we frankly but fraternally suggest to our Southern brethren, that their 
course in endeavoring to change the old rule opens the door to changes in the other 
direction. Let us, therefore, adhere to the landmarks, and sail our good old ship 
with even keel, avoiding Scylla on the one hand, and Charybdis on the other," 



MARYLAND. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in annual communication, in Bal- 
timore, November 16th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Fifty-eight 
Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ "YW. John Coates, Grand Master, reports having 
granted four dispensations for new Lodges ; also a bequest of 
nearly twenty-five thousand dollars, by the will of Bro. Samuel 
Pickering, formerly a member of Baltimore City Lodge. 

The income of the grand charity fund for the last six months 



38 

was $1870. ; but the widows and orphans and the decayed brethren 
get none of it, the Grand Lodge itself seeming to be in the great- 
est need, and investing the whole income in Masonic temple 
stock. Five charters were granted to Lodges working under dis- 
pensation. The charter of one Lodge was declared forfeited. 

The report on correspondence was again from the pen of Bro.- 
William J. Wroth, and reviews the proceedings of forty-one 
Grand Lodges, including ours. He suggests whether, as the ballot 
for initiation is on the admission of the candidate to the fraternity, 
any Master Mason present ought not to vote. The reasons for 
such view appear strong to us, and at one time it seemed not un- 
likely that such might become the law ; but the final agreement 
of authority confined the right to members of the Lodge, and 
when anything is settled, we say let it stay settled. Like the 
Louisiana committee, Bro. Wkoth regards a dimit as necessary 
to affiliation, but we fail to be convinced. It is the duty of the 
Lodge to make certain that the brother who proposes to affiliate 
with them is what he professes, and is free from prior duties to 
any other Lodge ; of this the dimit forms the best and most con- 
venient evidence, but failing that, we see no reason why all the 
facts should not be substantiated in some other way,' and if the 
applicant is a Master Mason and free from all duties and obliga- 
tions to any other Lodge, the whole object of requiring the dimity 
except "red tape," has been attained. He inquires if it would 
not be better to deprive all who remain unaffiliated for a year, of 
all the rights and privileges of Masons ? Now, in this case, a 
brother removes from one town to another ; desirous of doing his 
duty to the craft, he dimits from the Lodge he left, and from 
jealousy or spite, he is rejected on his application for membership 
in the place of his new residence. Shall he be punished because: 
the Lodge won't let him affiliate ? He asks the question, " Has a 
Lodge under dispensation the right to affiliate members ?" As 
we understand it, Lodges under dispensation have very different 
powers in different jurisdictions ; we suppose it to be competent 
for Grand Lodges to grant such powers to these Lodges as they 
may deem best, so that what a Lodge under dispensation rnay or 
may not do, can only be learned by reference to the laws of the 
jurisdiction where the Lodge is. We, in New Hampshire, give 
no such power to these Lodges. 



39 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

From this Grand Lodge, we have an abstract of proceedings in 
the year 1868. At the quarterly communication, March 11th, 
eighty-eight Lodges were represented. F.our charters were granted 
to Lodges under dispensation. One of the Lodges having com- 
plained that certain individuals living in their jurisdiction, had ob- 
tained the degrees in another jurisdiction, our venerable mother, 
thus unpleasantly made aware that there is something not right in 
Massachusetts, opened one eye partially, and directed: 

" That whereas such a course is subversive of all good discipline, and dangerous to 
the safety and best interests of Freemasonry, we do hereby recommend that the M. 
W.- Grand Master be requested to communicate with the Grand Masters of other 
Grand Lodges, and request them to unite with the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts in 
adopting such measures as shall hereafter prevent such irregularity, and thereby en- 
hance the safety of our beloved order." 

At the quarterly communication, June 10th, seventy-five Lodges, 
were represented. It was ordered that, Roxbury and Boston be- 
ing united by the civil power, the jurisdiction of the Lodges 
became concurrent over the whole united city. The power of the 
civil government to affect Masonic jurisdiction, has, in some other 
quarters, been disputed. 

At the quarterly communication, September 9th, forty-six 
Lodges were represented. Three charters were granted to Lodges 
under dispensation. 

At the annual communication, December 9th, one hundred and 
thirty-four Lodges were represented. At each of the other com- 
munications, the committee on the Grand Master's address had 
further time given to make a report, and now, a new address be- 
ing delivered, the committee and their report appear to be for- 
gotten. The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ Chahles C. Dame, reports 
having granted four dispensations for new Lodges. Of the Grand 
Lodges of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, he says : 

" I am not aware that these brethren have yet succeeded in accomplishing their 
wishes in their respective Provinces, and I would caution this Grand Longe to con- 
sider well the rights of all parties, as well as the great principles of our order, before 
making themselves a party to the questions in issue between these brethren and their 
parent Grand Lodges. Sundry documents received by me, relating to this matter, 
accompany this address." 

A considerable part of the address is taken with the great debt 



40 

caused by building the Masonic Temple, and the difficulties 
caused by the extra taxation required to provide for it. 
In the proceedings, we note the following : 

" A petition signed bj 7 Lewis Hayden and several others, claiming to be Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, and asking to be recognized as such, was received, 
read, and, on motion of R. W. Bro. John T. Heard, was referred to R. W. Brothers 
John T. Heard, George W. Warren, Bradford L. Wales, Isaac Hull Wright, 
Charles Levi Woodbury, Tracy P. Cueever, and Charles W. Moore." 

This is the negro Grand Lodge, and we shall look for the report 
of the committee with interest. 

At the stated communication, December 29th, it does not ap- 
pear that any one was present but the Grand Officers, permanent 
members, and the Grand Master of Rhode Island. The officers 
elected at the annual communication were installed, and the new 
Grand Master, M.\ W.\ William Sewall Gardner, delivered 
his inaugural. It is largely occupied with endeavoring to remove 
the ill feeling caused by the increased taxation. 

If the Grand Lodge would follow the example of the other 
Grand Lodges, and let the brethren know, not only the few 
extracts from its records which it now publishes, but the whole of 
its proceedings, and something, through a committee on foreign 
correspondence, of what was doing outside of Massachusetts, it 
would render their task much lighter, and would, no doubt, be of 
use to the craft elsewhere. As it is, the brethren in Massachu- 
setts, knowing nothing of the Grand Lodge except from the im- 
perfect recollection of those representatives who may be present, 
naturally feel that it is something of which they are no part, and 
merely telling them that they, by their representatives, are part of 
it, will not relieve the feeling that it is a Boston notion, and that, 
after fitting up their own halls, at their own expense, they arc 
heavily taxed to fit a magnificent edifice for the Boston Lodges. 
Enlighten them, as the experience of other Grand Lodges has led 
them to do to their subordinates, and a large part of the present 
unwillingness to be taxed would be likely to disappear. 

MICHIGAN: 

The annual communication of this Grand Lodge was held at 
Detroit, January 13th, A. L. 5869, A. D. 1869. Two hundyed, 
and twenty Lodges were represented. 



41 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ S. C. Coffinbttr Y, reports having 
granted twelve dispensations for new Lodges ; that a "brother in 
one of the Lodges desired to withdraw from the crafty saying that 
"it is not possible for me to endorse the institution, or to feel 
bound by its obligations ;" that he would pledge his honor never 
to claim anything of the craft. The Lodge referred the question 
to the Grand Master. He decided that the Lodge could 1 /iot 
accept such withdrawal ; that the mutual rights and duties of th Q 
fraternity and the individual brother could only be dissolved by 
the expulsion of the brother for Masonic crime ; but that a 
brother who declared that he could not endorse the institution, 
nor be bound by its obligation, might and should be expelled 
from the craft. All of which seems to us right. Bro. Coffin- 
bue,y presents to his Grand 'Lodge a magnificent scheme to erect 
a Masonic temple, to cost $600,000, including land; to be paid for 
by tax on the members and by the rents, which he concludes 
could be done in twelve years. It would then yield an income of 
thirty thousand dollars, which he then proposes to apply in a 
munificent manner. (" Green suits my complexion best, green it 
shall be.") He also argues in favor of some system of so-called 
Masonic life insurance, which we fear uppdd not be likely to work 
well. T 

Bro. Blanchakd, the Grand Visitor and Lecturer for twelve 
years, reports : 

" Go into the two hundred and forty-four Lodges reported within this jurisdiction 
at the last communication, and those working since under dispensations— question 
the Masters, the Wardens, and the brethren from the borders of our lower lakes, all 
over this Peninsular, and onward to the rugged shores of Lake Superior, where the 
Lodges are springing up amid their picturesque scenery, under the supervision of 
our worthy Brother Planner, E. W. District Deputy Grand Master for the Upper 
Peninsular, and everywhere you will find order and uniformity in the lectures, work, 
and minor details of the Lodges, as far as human imperfection will permit." 

If true, this is really a wonderful result of the energy and devo- 
tion of Bro. Blanchakd, but we fear our venerable brother has 
allowed the wish to be father to the belief. 

The committee on the new temple made a report recommending 
action of a much more moderate character than the scheme of the 
Grand Master, but it was laid on the table till the next annual 
communication. 

Bro. Clemmeb offered the following, which was adopted : 



42 

" Wliertas, Many subordinate Lodges in this Grand Jurisdiction, either from 
want of a proper knowledge of the work and several lectures adopted by this Grand 
Lodge, or in willful neglect of the same do not comply with resolution, No. 20,"— 

Followed by a resolution for the appointment of assistant Lec- 
turers, which confirms our doubt of the accuracy of Bro. Blan- 
chard's faith in uniformity of work. 

Fourteen charters were granted, and two dispensations con- 
tinued. 

The report on correspondence, prepared by R. W. Bro. 
Fenton, the Grand Secretary, reviews the proceedings of thirty- 
seven Grand Bodies, including New Hampshire, but is chiefly a 
compilation of matters of interest in that jurisdiction. 



MINNESOTA. 

The sixteenth annual convocation of this Grand Lodge was held 
at St. Paul, January 12th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Sixty-one 
Lodges were represented. 

The first business seifcs to have been to dedicate the new 
Masonic hall, which had been fitted up to replace one destroyed 
by fire. At this time, an address was delivered by W. Bro. S.. 
Y. McMasters, D. D. LL. D., Grand Chaplain. 

The M.\ W.\ C. W. Nash, Grand Master, reports having 
granted seven dispensations for new Lodges, and renewed three 
others. In accordance with the vote of his Grand Lodge, he had 
appointed five District Deputy Grand Masters, who are also Grand 
Lecturers, for terms of from one to five years ; had called them 
together, made strict search for the true light and the ancient 
work ; the result of which is thus announced : 

" The Deputies will present a report to this Grand Body, of their action in pro- 
curing the ' ancient work,' and they are prepared to exemplify the same at such 
time as the Grand Lodge may designate. 

" I have made it a study, to examine and closely investigate this work, and as far 
as in my power, to obtain its history, origin and authenticity ; and from all the light 
and information that I can obtain from experienced and eminent Masons, I am fully 
satisfied, that it is the genuine ancient work. 

" My conclusions are as follows : That this work is that which Bro. Wilson re- 
ceived from Bro. Barney in 1817— Barney from Webb in 1815— Webb from Preston 
about 1795— Preston from his predecessors about 1775." 



43 

"This result is wonderful, in view of the fact that Preston's 
work was almost wholly new, and his own, in all but the essential 
landmarks ; that Webb adapted his work from Preston with 
changes greater than are found in the most diverse work used in 
this country, leaving out Pennsylvania, in which the Preston- 
Webb work was never adopted ; that Webb himself continually 
changed his work, as did his successors, Gleason, Cross, Bar- 
ney, Wilson, and numerous others. The truth is, this search 
for an ancient work in which the exact language to be used shall 
be discovered, is wholly illusory. There is no such work. Penn- 
sylvania has deviated less from the work of a century ago and 
above, than any of the rest of us, and the result is, the great 
difficulty which exists, in a Mason made elsewhere and with only 
ordinary instruction, working into Pennsylvania Lodges, and of 
Pennsylvania Masons working into Lodges in other States. The 
Hemming work of the United Grand Lodge of England is still 
more different, yet no one doubts the right of that Grand Lodge 
to teach it. The mode of work derives its sole authority from the 
edict of the Grand Lodge, and not from antiquity, real or only 
supposed, and no Grand Lodge ever attempted to establish uni- 
formity, that was not always, openly or tacitly, tinkering it. 
Whatever work any Grand Lodge sees fit to require (preserving 
the landmarks) is, within that jurisdiction, the only correct work, 
to which every Mason is bound to adhere. The work which the 
Grand Master thus lauds, is the Rob. Morris, Conservator, work, 
of which the claims to veneration for antiquity were so success- 
fully dissipated, in the report of the committee of our Grand 
Lodge, some years since. 

A committee make a long report on unaffiliated Masons, con- 
cluding with the following resolution, which was adopted : 

" Resolved, That all non-affiliated Masons who are permanent residents within 
this jurisdiction, be notified by the oldest Lodge within whose jurisdiction they 
reside, to apply for membership in some Lodge within one month after such notice 
shall be given, and any non-affiliated Mason who does not make such application 
after such notice, shall be deemed guilty of unmasonic conduct, and shall be liable 
to suspension ; and it is hereby made the duty of the oldest Lodge having jurisdic- 
tion where such non-affiliated Mason resides, to prefer charges against such Mason, 
and try him for such unmasonic conduct ; and that the W. M. of the Lodge having 
jurisdiction be required to enforce this resolution." 

The writer of this report has satisfied himself that these 
attempts to change the voluntary character of the fraternity are 



44 

ill-advised, and will be finally productive of evil. If a brother, 
for any reason, ceases to desire to maintain his relationship with 
us, no good will arise from attempting to force him to do so, and 
no advantage to the craft from the instant infliction of severe 
penalties. 

The committee on ancient landmarks reported against a uniform 
code of by-laws, enacted by the Grand Lodge, and, as we think, 
wisely ; the Grand Lodge should make such general regulations 
as are deemed necessary, and then leave each Lodge to make such 
local regulations as it needs. The difficulty is, that too many 
brethren, when preparing Lodge by-laws, deem it necessary to 
legislate upon all subjects, without reference to what the Grand 
Lodge has done. Let, however, the Grand Lodge strike out of 
such codes, when presented for approval, everything for which 
provision is made in the Grand Constitution and General Regula- 
tions, and this evil will soon disappear. 

Ten charters were granted to the Lodges under dispensation. 
"Upon recommendation of a committee, it was resolved, " That 
the granting of a charter to open a new Lodge, does not dimit 
the members thereof from the Lodge to which they formerly 
belonged." Which is contrary to the usually received doctrine. 
It was also resolved that a candidate rejected in one Lodge of 
concurrent jurisdiction, might apply to the other. We had sup- 
posed that the old law, -that no Master should supplant another in 
his work, was not yet obsolete. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by M.\ W.\ A. T. 
C. Pierson, and ably reviews the proceedings of thirty-six Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. G.\ M.\ English, of Arkan- 
sas, having wondered what Methuselah did in the long winter 
nights of his almost-a-thousand years, Bro. Piekson thus assists 
him : 

" Tradition says that Adam wrote books, that Seth made quite a number— that 
Noah preserved them in the Ark. Where did Moses get the data for his history but 
from the books that had come down to him— the first chapter of Genesis is evidenl ly 
copied. 

" Col made man perfect and ' in His own image made He him.' If he was perfect 
he had all the knowledge which the finite mind was capable of receiving ; as he lost 
his original state of perfection, it was natural that he should place on record the 
history of his time for the information of his successors. But perhaps Methuselah 
was not a reading man.'' 



45 

We never heard of the traditions referred to, but suppose it is 
all right. Apropos to the approval of a case . of discipline for 
slander, he thus criticizes the zeal of his Grand Master for the 
ancient work : 

"The conclusions of the committee were based upon the rules of old fashioned 
Masonry ; they, with Grand Master English, of Arkansas, who says, 'that it is un- 
masonic for one brother to speak ill of another, though in so doing he may speak 
the truth,' will be classed as old fogies— behind the age — outlived their time, &c. 
The doctrine is too practical to suit Young America, and consequently in the new, 
ancient, genuine, printed work that requires a perfect uniformity in letters, all that 
about ' speaking ill ' of a brother, or ' sustaining his good name,' &c, is omitted in the 
0. B. In these latter days, you will hear the instruction— and particular stress laid 
thereon — ' you must say at Jerusalem,' not of or in but at j it is very important that 
you remember this exact language ; but where or how often is the instruction given, 
or if given, is it heeded : ' If a brother has faults, let the world know them by some 
other tongue than yours.' " 

One of the greatest mischiefs our Lodges have to encounter, 
is the disposition of indiscreet brethren to grumble at, or even 
endeavor to penetrate the mystery of the black ball ; to all such 
brethren we recommend the following, told by Bro. Pierson, on 
the authority of P.*. G.\ M.\ Tucker, of Vermont: 

" An application had been made by a well-known and very popular young man. 
On the evening that the petition was to be acted upon, there was an unusually large 
attendance. The ballots were spread, and to the surprise of all his friends a negative 
appeared; a second ballot was had, with a like result, but before the W. M. could, 
declare it, several of the brethren had simultaneously risen, each declaring that 
there was either a mistake, or personal pique had operated, and demanded another 
ballot ; the W. M. weakly alloAved the remarks, and ordered a third ballot ; at the 
word* dark in the south,' brethren sprung to their feet declaring that it must be a 
personal pique ; that the young man was well-known, and his character above 
reproach; so brother after brother was allowed to make remarks, until the circle 
from which the negative must have come, was narrowed to but three or four ; 
another ballot was demanded and conceded by the W. M. ; the ballot was had, each 
of the friends of the applicant watching closely those who had not spoken ; as the 
word dark was again pronounced, a scene of confusion ensued very seldom wit- 
nessed in a Masonic Lodge. Reasons were demanded, and even the W. M., giving 
way to the storm, requested of the brother who had been signaled as casting the 
negative, to give his reasons for so doing. The storm was hushed as an old brother, 
a physician, arose, and protesting against such a violation of the rights of a Mason, 
avowed that he did it; he had hoped and desired to exercise his rights unknown and 
unquestioned. As he resumed his seat, other than complimentary remarks were in- 
dulged in by brethren. Finally the W. M. interposed, requesting of the brother, 
for the satisfaction of the Lodge, to assign his reasons. Amidst profound silence the 
old brother again arose, and after rebuking the brethren for their unmasonic course, 
said : ' I had hoped to keep my reasons a perpetual secret, but you, brethren, and 
you W. M., will ever remember that you have, as it were, forced me to speak. I 
know this young man to be a libertine. I know that he has seduced the daughter; 
of a member of this Lodge ; the father does not know it—he is your W. M !" 



46 

Bro. Pierson, evidently, is not pleased at G.\ M.\ Nash's 
attempt to produce uniformity of work, and flings at it in several 
places. As we have already said, while we do not believe in the 
necessity or utility of such attempts to produce uniformity, we 
hold every Mason should bow to the decree of his Grand Lodge 
on that subject. Of non-affiliation, he says : 

" Grand Lodges are very much exercised about the question of non-affiliation, and 
what to do to compel affiliation. We have known high-toned gentlemen, and even 
ministers, not that they are always better than other men, to be refused affiliation. 
Masons, who before and after their rejection never failed liberally to contribute when 
called upon, and yet they could not join the nearest Lodge ! Must they be kept out 
in the cold? We say no; apply where you please. In the present age, if it ever 
was, rejection is no evidence of unfitness, in either candidates or for membership." 

" In Nevada, affiliation may be a question of dollars and cents, but we venture the 
assertion that it would make no difference in Minnesota. All that is said and written 
upon the subject of non-affiliation is predicated upon the presumption that every 
Mason can become a member of a Lodge, which we all know is not a fact. We know 
Masons of unimpeachable moral character, of high social standing, who are non- 
affiliates by compulsion— have applied and been rejected. Is it fair to deny many 
such Masons ' all Masonic privileges, rites and charities V " 

In our report, last year, we doubted the propriety of the dis- 
pensation for Northern Light Lodge, at Fort Garry, in British 
America, as we had previously done of a Lodge chartered by the 
Grand Lodge of Washington Territory, in British Columbia, and 
upon the ground that the British Possessions were properly 
within the province of the British Grand Lodges, as the Terri- 
tories of the United States were of American Grand Lodges. 
And as we then supposed no American Grand Lodge would concede 
to foreign Grand Lodges the privilege of erecting Lodges in our 
Territories, so we thought we should respect the rights of the 
British Grand Lodges in the dependencies of the British Crown. 
To this view, Bro. Pierson replies : 

"The American dogma of the exclusive jurisdiction of a Grand Lodge within 
certain territory, we recognize and approve. But none of the Grand Lodges 
in the old world recognize the doctrine. We also claim that our Grand Lodge has 
concurrent jurisdiction in territory anywhere where there is no Grand Lodge. We 
never heard that the world had been divided up into Masonic districts, and parceled 
out among Grand Lodges. We do not believe that the usefulness of a Masonic Lodge 
depends upon the political government of the country from whence its authority 
emanates. 

"We do not believe that Northern Light Lodge would have made any better 
Masons for having gone to England— some 5000 miles— for a charter, than they now 
do, having received a charter from a Grand Lodge some 300 miles distant, and with 
the members of which they are in constant communication." 



47 

Bro. Piekson thinks a candidate may be received on affirma- 
tion, agreeing with Maine. Most of the other Grand Lodges 
think differently, and we suppose we must assent to the general 
opinion, though we confess not to be entirely convinced. He 
approves the decision of G.\ M.\ Furnas, of Nebraska, that 
notice to the W. Master, by a member, that he objects to the 
candidate and, if present, would black-ball him, is a rejection. 

We had marked other passages for quotation, but we have 
already given Minnesota a large share of notice, and want of 
space forbids. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in its fiftieth annual communica- 
tion at. Natchez, January 20th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One 
hundred and forty-nine Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ John T. Lamkin, Grand Master, alludes to the 
completion of the half century of his Grand Lodge ; deplores the 
destitute condition of the people of that State, at that time, and 
calls for a full manifestation of "that brightest ornament of our 
profession — charity." He had decided that when a Lodge had 
elected an ineligible brother, as Master, and the election had been 
returned to the Grand Lodge, but he had not been installed, that 
a dispensation should not issue for a new election, but the Lodge 
remain for the year subject to the Senior Warden. Why, we do 
see. 

The Grand Secretary reports having issued one dispensation for 
a new Lodge, by direction of the Grand Lodge, and ten more by 
direction of the Grand Master. One Lodge reported that they 
had borrowed money at three and one-half per cent, a month, 
which was eating them up (and no wonder), and asking for as- 
sistance. The committee on jurisprudence reported, that in the 
vacation they had decided that a dimit was not essential to 
gaining membership, but that the facts usually substantiated by 
it, might be established in other ways. The practice of having 
this committee answering questions, during recess, to whomsoever 
may ask, which seems to obtain favor in Mississippi, does not 
strike us as a good one. Nine charters were granted to new 
Lodges, one dispensation was continued, and one new one ordered 
to issue. There was no report on correspondence, 



48 

MISSOURI. 

The forty-eighth annual communication of this Grand Lodge 
was held at St. Louis, October 12th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
One-hundred and forty-six Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ William E. Ditnscomb, Grand Master, reports 
having granted forty-two dispensations for new Lodges. He had 
made the following decisions, among others : 

" Any member of a Lodge has the right to object to a degree being conferred upon 
an elected candidate at any time previous to his introduction into the Lodge, and the 
Master is bound to respect his objection ; nor can the degree be conferred until said 
objection be withdrawn." 

" A Lodge has the right to discipline a member for an unmasonic offense commit- 
ted previous to his initiation. When he petitioned the Lodge for initiation, if he had 
been guilty of a crime which the investigating committee failed to ascertain, he prac- 
ticed a fraud upon the fraternity in presuming to make his application for the 
degrees, and for this fraud, as well as for the offense itself, he is certainly amenable 
to his Lodge. I am aware that a different ruling prevails in some other jurisdictions, 
but my decision seems to be in full accordance with the spirit and object of our in- 
stitution." 

"A member suspended for a definite time for non-payment of dues is not dis- 
charged therefrom upon its expiration, but is liable to be suspended again for the 
same amount for which he was originally suspended if he fail to liquidate it." 

The two latter are not uniformly decided in different jurisdic- 
tions, and the law can hardly be regarded as settled. The Grand 
Secretary reports having issued fifty-four dispensations for new 
Lodges, fourteen by order of the Grand Lodge, and forty by 
order of the Grand Master. 

This Grand Lodge once owned an elephant in the shape of a 
Masonic College, but traded it off to the State, which assumed its 
obligation to maintain a first-class school, which it had not done. 
(The buildings were at Lexington, where a portion of the late un- 
pleasantness culminated, and little but the walls were left.) 
Measures were taken to stir up the State to do its duty to that in- 
stitution. The following resolution was adopted, the reason for 
which we cannot understand : 

"Resolved, That during the sitting of this Grand Lodge no subordinate Lodge 
under this jurisdiction can be legally opened, or any business transacted therein, 
without special permission of this Grand Lodge, except to perform funeral services, 
as provided by sec. 19, art. XVI, by-laws of Grand Lodge." 



49 

Fifty charters were granted to new Lodges ; five dispensations 
were continued, and five more ordered to issue. 

The report on correspondence is from the pen of the Grand Sec- 
retary, Bro. Geo. Frank Gotjley, and reviews the proceedings 
of thirty-seven Grand Bodies, not including #Jew Hampshire. 
He believes in standard by-laws, and complains of the reports of 
committees on that subject, because they, although intelligible to 
those interested, are not so to him. We suppose a man bound 
hand and foot, and chained to the wall, would not travel far out 
of the way, but would that be better than to be at liberty, even if 
he did sometimes get out of the path? Our brother seems to have 
an especial spite at the 'Ancient and Accepted Scotch rite, and 
whenever he sees anything which looks to him like that rite, it 
has an effect similar to that which scarlet has upon some animals, 
and he immediately dashes at it. It is said it was not always so. 
Now, however, he is offended that Grand Lodges should recognize 
Supreme Councils and Grand Orients of that rite, even when 
there is no other Masonic organization. He would permit for- 
eign Grand Lodges to establish Lodges in our Territories, in 
which, we cannot but think, he stands in a small minority. 



NEBRASKA. 

This Grand Lodge held its eleventh annual communication at 
Bellevue, June 24th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Fourteen Lodges 
were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ 0. H. Irish, Grand Master, reported having 
granted six dispensations for new Lodges ; had refused to grant 
any for conferring degrees ; and highly commends the orphans' 
school fund. 

The Grand Secretary had commenced a grand library, and was 
much encouraged by the success of his efforts. Six charters were 
granted to new Lodges, whose representatives were admitted to 
seats but not to votes. Subsequently, however, a motion was 
made and entertained to amend the constitution so as to make the 
Masters and Wardens elect of Lodges to whom charters may be 
granted, members of the Grand Lodge. A step in the wrong 
direction, it seems to us. The committee on jurisprudence re- 
ported : 



50 

" The right of a brother Master Mason to object to the admission of an applicant 
for membership, or for the several degrees conferred in a Master Mason's Lodge, can- 
not be denied ; and that where objection is made to the Worshipful Master, it is his 
doty to declare the brother or candidate rejected -without a ballot, Hnless the objec- 
tion be withdrawn, eren if the objecting brother be absent from the Lodge at the 
time of making the obPction, or when the balloting is ordered." 

The report on correspondence, prepared by the Grand Secretary, 
Bro. J. N. Wise, reviews the proceedings of thirty-six Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. Of Masonic life insurance 
projects, he says : 

" Now, we would not raise our voice against so laudable a proceeding as life insur- 
ance ; it is a good and wise provision on the part of all who take out policies , and 
your committee are all policy holders in various good companies, but we look upon 
this system in Masonry as totally foreign to its work. As well might we endeavor 
to introduce other mercantile and financial pursuits within the sacred walls of the 
Lodge for the purpose of pecuniary benefit. To us it seems that if a Mason is 
anxious to insure his life for the benefit of his wife or children, he can do so very easily 
in any of the old solid insurance companies, where, we have no doubt, he can find a 
brother who will act squarely with him. The work before the fraternity to-day is of 
that character which should purge, purify and guard the order, and nothing should 
be introduced which might ever savor of discord. Popularizing Freemasonry is like 
spanning a chasm— the material may not sustain its own weight, unless the work- 
men follow the designs on the trestle-board. We are opposed to all innovations. 
Our work has withstood all the convulsions incident to the past, as it is, and as it is, 
it will endure through the future." 

He thus discourses of Lodges under dispensation : 

" The only remedy for the evils resulting from Lodges under dispensation is, in our 
opinion, a cessation of such work. It has always appeared, at least, very singular, 
to draw it mildly, that so much empressement should suddenly develop itself in por- 
tions of the fraternity, that no patience could be exercised, no waiting for the next 
grand communication, nothing short of dispensation, in every case, answering the 
Masonic zeal (?) of the eager petitioners for a new Lodge. On the heels of the ap- 
plication, and ofttimes before, the applicants and most of the Masons in the neighbor- 
hood of the new Lodge ask for dimits from the regular Lodge to which they belong, 
and thus too often a wide swath of unaffiliated Masons is very injudiciously made by 
the ill-directed feelings of generosity on the part of regular Lodges. This whole 
matter merits the earnest attention of the fraternity, and we sincerely hope some 
decisive action may be had to check a growing evil." 

These views will hardly find general acceptance. 

Bro. Wise, too, don't like thirty-second and thirty-third degrees. 
He holds, that in the absence of the Master and both Wardens, 
no Past Master or private member can open the Lodge. Which 
is correct doctrine. 



51 

NEVADA. 

The fourth annual communication of this Grand Lodge con- 
vened at Virginia City, September 15th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 

Ten chartered Lodges, and two under dispensation were repre- 
sented. 

The M.\ W.'.John C. Currier, Grand Master, reported 
having granted two dispensations for new Lodges. He thinks the 
abolition of fees, on affiliation, and the life-membership plan, are 
both working well. He disapproves of testimonials to eminent (?) 
Masons, and calls upon those who really deserve them to refuse 
to receive them, that the fashion thus set may prevent their being 
given to unsuitable persons. He probably will not succeed in 
this. 

The committee on jurisprudence decided that speaking disre- 
spectfully of the Holy Bible is a Masonic offence. Two charters 
were granted to the Lodges under dispensation. 

The report on correspondence, prepared by Bro. Robert H. 
Taylor, reviews the proceedings of thirty-two Grand Lodges, in- 
cluding New Hampshire. He thinks that in the formation of a 
new Grand Lodge, a majority of the particular Lodges in the 
territory should unite, although he can find nothing in the old 
constitutions and regulations about it. We agree with him, and 
should not expect those old constitutions to provide for a state of 
things which scarcely arose before the present century. Like 
numerous other western brethren, our brother is dissatisfied with the 
ancient regulation, that no Master shall supplant another in the 
work, and is unwilling to lose the chance of making a man a 
Mason, because at some former time, in another jurisdiction, he 
has been rejected. He thinks that only members present should 
have the right to object to the reception of a candidate, but a 
majority of Grand Lodges hold to the safer and more conserva- 
tive rule, that a brother may object, though absent. He thinks 
affirmation won't do. 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The first annual communication of this Grand Lodge was held 
at St. John, September 23d, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Twenty- 
three Lodges were represented. 



52 ' 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ B. Lester Peters, congratulates 
his Grand Lodge that but two Lodges in the jurisdiction, both 
Scotch, have failed to unite with the new Grand Lodge. He 
reports the action of the board of general purposes, relative to a 
Masonic temple, and commends that enterprise. 

The Grand Lodge fixed the first day of January, 1869, as the 
time within which all Lodges in the Province should unite with 
the Grand Lodge, or be proceeded against for contumacy. The 
remaining proceedings were local in their character and interest. 
There was no report on correspondence. 

NEW JERSEY. 

A special communication of this Grand Lodge was held at 
Trenton, July 31st, A. L. 5867, A. D. 1867, for the purpose of 
making financial arrangements consequent upon the defalcation of 
the Grand Treasurer. 

At the annual communication, also at Trenton, January 22d, A. 
L. 5868, A. D. 1868, seventy-six, out of the eighty Lodges in the 
jurisdiction were represented. 

The Grand Master, M.\ W.\ William Silas Whitehead, 
reports that he had granted five dispensations for new Lodges. 
He had decided : 

" No dimit can be granted without the affirmative vote of the Lodge. A majority 
has therefore the power to deny a dimit. Having the power, the question of right is 
for the consciences of the members." 

We think all membership should be voluntary, and a brother 
has the right to withdraw his membership from his Lodge, pro- 
vided he is in good standing, and clear on the books. He thus 
discourses of the nature of our institution : 

" In the first place, that the Masonic Lodge is not the church, nor a substitute for 
it. 

" Secondly. It is not the sole, primary, and fundamental object of the Masonic in- 
a titution to enforce personal morality. 

" Thirdly. The Masonic fraternity is not, primarily, a charitable society. 

" What, then, is the true, fundamental, and essential idea of our institution? 

" I hold that the central idea of Masonry, the foundation stone upon -which the 
superstructure rests, is the recognition and practical application of the great prin- 
ciple of the universal brotherhood of man. Whether he drew his first breath amid 
polar snows or under the burning sun of the tropics ; whether he owe political alle- 



53 

giance to an empire, a kingdom or a republic ; whether he be clad in the purple of 
Dives or the rags of Lazarus ; whether his skin be bleached with the hue of the Cau- 
casian or be clouded with the ' shadow'd livery of the burnish'd sun ; ' whether he 
worship his God in a Methodist meeting-house, an Episcopal church, a Catholic 
cathedral, a Jewish synagogue, or a Mohammedan mosque ; the great lesson which 
Masonry teaches to its votaries is, that ' a man's a man for a' that.' Creeds and 
forms of faith are good things in their place's. I have but little faith in the professor 
of religion without a creed. Love of country is a glorious and beautiful thing in its 
place, and one of the noblest passions that can animate the human breast. ' If I 
forget thee, oh Jerusalem ! let my right hand forget her cunning. If I do not re- 
member thee in the time of my trouble, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my 
mouth.' Political preferences and affiliations are good things in their places. He is 
unworthy of his birthright as a citizen of this republic, who has not fixed views upon 
the great questions of public policy, which agitate the state and country. But the 
great heart of humanity, weary of the unceasing and harassing strife of this busy 
and selfish world, where 

1 The natural bond 
Of brotherhood is severed as the flax 
That falls asunder at the touch of fire,' 

longs for some common platform, where rumors of contentions on these and 
kindred subjects can never reach it more. And this eager longing of the human 
heart, the Masonic institution alone can satisfy. Here, we are all citizens of one 
country, which is the great globe itself: members of one family, which is the entire 
human race ; children of one Father, which is God. And this, as I conceive, is the 
true idea of the institution of Masonry." 

" And now, my brethren, I glean for every one of you, from these remarks, a 
lesson for the year. Deal gently with thy brother. If temptation overcome him, 
deal gently with thy brother. If the frailty of human nature cause him to deviate 
from the path of rectitude, deal gently with thy brother. If, amid the busy scenes 
of the outer world, the excitement and turmoil of life's battle, or under the burden 
of pressing cares, or in the relaxation of social intercourse, he shall, for the moment, 
forget his obligations and duties to the craft, deal gently with thy brother. There is 
much that is good in the world. Be generous in your judgment of all ; be hopeful 
in your hopes of all." 

A candidate was proposed, it being known that objection existed, 
and that he would be black-balled ; the petition was put over 
from time to time ; finally, the Lodge voted that he might have 
leave to withdraw his petition, with leave to apply to either of 
two other Lodges, and the objecting brethren left the Lodge ; 
which then rescinded the leave to withdraw, balloted for and 
elected the candidate, and gave him the first degree ; the Grand 
Master decided the election was irregular, but the committee on 
jurisprudence reported : 

" Your committee are of opinion that the irregularity in the proceedings of the 
Lodge was in permitting the withdrawal of the petition of the candidate in the way 
it was done, and that action was therefore void ; this proceeding being irregular. 



54 



did not affect the standing of the candidate, and his election was valid, and he is en- 
titled to advancement in the usual order, although the sharp practice of the Lodge 
toward those who objected to his admission, is open to censure." 

This, the Grand Lodge would not agree to, but do not appear 
to have done anything more about it. The cnarter should have 
been taken from the offending Lodge, and the Master expelled. 
Eleven charters were granted to new Lodges. The total loss from 
the dishonesty of the Grand Treasurer was $5,146.37. The 
report on correspondence was from the pen of Bro. Joseph H. 
Hough, the Grand Secretary, and reviews the proceedings of 
thirty-seven Grand Lodges, including New Hampshire. Of the 
Grand Lodge of West Virginia, he says : 

" The subject of Grand Lodge jurisdiction is here involved to a very great extent, 
and we cannot see but that they [the Grand Lodge of Virginia] still have the exclu- 
sive control of their original territory, as always heretofore acknowledged, and we 
believe that they have done nothing to forfeit that right. The fact of the federal 
government having seen fit to divide the territory into two States, does not change 
the matter at all." 

If this be so, there is no legal Grand Lodge in the United 
States. The Grand Lodges of England stood relative to this 
country just as Virginia does to West Virginia, but the political 
power having maintained a separation, it was held, and rightfully, 
that independent Grand Lodges might and should be formed, and 
since, no doubt has been entertained in this country, that upon the 
separation of the political government a new Grand Lodge was a 
necessity. In the case of Maine, that course was pursued, and 
no one seems to have thought of the need of the consent of 
Massachusetts, or of surrendering charters; their dues they did 
pay, and so should the West Virginia Lodges. Bro. Guilbert 
has touched our New Jersey brethren, too ; he spoke of the 
" Commonwealth of Camden and Amboy," and called them "Blue 
Hen's Chickens," which they say belongs to Delaware. Now, 
Bro. Guilbert "ortn't orter" said so, but we suspect if he had 
not flown his spread eagle quite so high in other places, Bro. 
Hough would have overlooked this. 



55 

NEW YORK. 

The annual communication of this Grand Lodge was held in 
New York, June 2d, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Four hundred and 
ninety-one Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Stephen H. Johnson, Grand Master, reports to 
the Grand L6*dge the death of those eminent Masons, James 
Herring, Reuben Hyde Walworth, and Finlay M. King. 
Of the complaints of the violation of jurisdiction by New York 
Lodges, he says : 

" Difficulties of this character too frequently occur, much to the annoyance and 
disquiet of all the parties concerned ; and yet we know that in most, if not in all 
cases, they arise from inadvertence, and not from any disposition to commit an in- 
tentional wrong. 

" Our laws on the subject are sufficiently stringent, and if duly observed cannot 
fail to put an end to their recurrence in the future." 

The Grand Lodge of New York and its officers have uniformly 
agreed to the right rule on this subject, but the violations of juris- 
diction still continue. We fear the truth is, the Grand Lodge 
has no actual authority (which it dare exercise) over its subordi- 
nates in the city of New York, where these violations of known 
duty occur. If she has such authority, let her arrest the charter 
of the next Lodge that offends, and the whole difficulty is gone ; 
we shall hear no more complaints. As it now is, her subordinates 
care nothing for her discipline, more than they do for the well-un- 
derstood Masonic law, which they have so long violated with 
impunity. 

The Grand Secretary reports having issued twenty-eight dispen- 
sations for the formation of new Lodges. The trustees report the 
hall and asylum fund as amounting to $284,167.87. Nothing 
was done further about a Masonic temple. P.*. G.\ M.\ Lewis 
proposed a plan for six District Grand Lodges similar to the Pro- 
vincial Grand Lodges of the British system ; but this and other 
projects to relieve the Grand Lodge were all postponed. The 
large business of this Grand Lodge will soon render some scheme 
like that of Bro. Lewis's necessary. The New York City Board 
of Relief report having expended in charity, the past year, 
$5,969.11, distributed among applicants from eight foreign 
countries, and twenty-six States and Territories of this Union. 
The negotiation with the People's College, at Havana, still drags 



56 

on, but legal difficulties prevent its final consummation. Twenty- 
seven charters were granted to new Lodges, and one dispensation 
continued. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by M.\ W.\ John 
L. Lewis, and fully reviews the proceedings of thirty-six domestic 
and seventeen foreign Grand Lodges, including New Hampshire. 
Of the address of G.\ M.\ English, of Arkansas, he says : 

"He notes, as most other Grand Masters have done, that there is not an over- 
whelming degree of knowledge on the subject of Masonic law prevalent among 
Masters of Lodges, — not enough, in fact, to produce fatal consequences if it should 
strike in." 

Of the resignation or dimission of Masters or Wardens during 
their term, he says : 

" In this latitude it is understood that no one is obliged to be elected to office, but 
that having accepted an election, he also accepts the responsibilities attached there- 
to ; one of which is a solemn promise to faithfully discharge his official duties during 
the official term. He cannot apply for a dimit during his term without violating his 
official pledge ; and although instances might arise in which the officer might over- 
look this fact, the Grand Lodge does not propose to give him the opportunity, and 
therefore wisely provides that he cannot resign. As a general thing, there are more 
aspirants for office than there are brethren qualified to discharge the duties thereof, 
and it cannot be wise to increase the opportunity of unqualified brethren by facilita- 
ting their rotation into and out of office." 

Of Lodges under dispensation, and the views of G.\ M.\ Spar- 
row, of Ohio, who derived them from the power of the Grand 
Master to make Masons at sight, he says : 

" On this point we venture to differ from our distinguished friend and brother, and 
to submit that the power of Grand Masters as now exercised, to grant dispensations 
to open and hold Lodges, does not rest on any prerogative whatever, but on the will 
and pleasure of the Grand Lodge, expressed in its constitution and regulations, of 
which the Grand Master is the executive agent. 

"It is an undoubted prerogative of the Grand Master, derived from immemorial 
usage, to summon seven brethren, congregate them into a Lodge, and there make 
Masons at sight, as it is termed ; although this prerogative is now limited to making 
at sight in the body of a Lodge already regularly constituted, which is, in fact, 
nothing more than granting a dispensation to shorten the time, or, as it is phrased, 
to confer the degrees in cases of emergency ; but the occasional or emergent Lodges 
contemplated in the exercise of this prerogative, never had and never were intended 
to have a continuous existence. Their object being accomplished by the making, 
the act of closing dissolved the temporary organization into its original elements. 
Such Lodges were formed previous to the revival in 1717 by the sheriff's warrant, 
and after that time by the authority of the Grand Master. Lodges under dispensa- 
tion are an entirely different affair. They are created for the purpose of continued 



57 

existence, and with the expectation that after they have exhibited their skill by 
labor under dispensation they will receive an unlimited lease of life by a warrant of 
constitution. In erecting such Lodges the Grand Master acts as the agent of the 
Grand Lodge, and by its delegated authority ; his discretion being called into action 
only to decide whether in allowing such Lodge to be organized he will be promoting 
the interests of his principal, the Grand Lodge. These be plain words, but a brief 
examination of and reflection upon the facts involved will show that they are true, 
and then it will also be seen that the powers of subordinate Lodges under dispensa- 
tion are just those allowed to them by regulation of the Grand Lodge, and that they 
neither partake of nor depend upon any prerogative of the Grand Master." 

Of the rights of a brother under charges, he says : 

" He .decided, and seems to regard the decision as indisputable, that a brother 
under charges is not entitled to any privileges whatever, except that of an impartial 
trial. 

" We are aware that this opinion was in former years quite extensively, if not uni- 
versally, held, but we had indulged the hope that discussion had thoroughly exploded 
it. We grieve to see it again announced, regarding it as we do in opposition to 
every idea of justice and fair play. To prefer charges against a brother is one 
thing, to prove them, very often, quite another. Suppose that under this ruling a 
brother should be deprived of all his privileges, and at his trial it should be proven 
that the charges had no foundation in fact, who is to compensate the brother for the 
flagrant wrong done him? Punishment should follow, not precede trial, and no 
Mason should be punished until, after an impartial trial, he has been proved guilty. 
As a sequence to this ruling, Bro. Anderson decides that a brother under charges 
having cast a black-ball, the election of the candidate is not thereby invalidated, 
and he may be initiated. From our point of view, the proposition and its sequence 
are too outrageous for serious consideration." 

Bro. Lewis thus notices our report for 1867 : 

" In his notice of New York he speaks of our review of European Grand Lodges 
as containing but little to interest his constituents. And he further remarks, that 
but few, if any, of these bodies would escape a rough overhauling from committees 
on foreign correspondence, were they American bodies and acting as they do. Our 
distinguished brother knows his own people better than we do ; but his estimate of 
what is interesting to them does not limit the area of what they ought to be inter- 
ested in. We are all of us too much given to the idea that Masonry, as we see it 
in our immediate neighborhood, or as we know it to be practiced in our own juris- 
diction, is as near perfection as can reasonably be expected ; and yet no reflecting 
man can deny that perfection is not given to man, and there is always something for 
the wisest to learn. There are, too, many brethren in all jurisdictions who think 
that Masonry is the same in France or Germany as in New Jersey, bating the differ- 
ence of language ; and that in those countries Grand Lodges are occupied as in this, 
in deciding questions of Lodge jurisprudence. It ought to be a matter of interest to 
these brethren, wherever they may be, to rise to a higher knowledge of the institu- 
tion, and not only to discover the differences that do exist, but the reasons why, the 
spirit being the same, the forms should so widely differ. It seems to us that the an- 
nual review given in connection with this report is a means of education that should 
not be neglected, and that the brethren would find their profit in giving it attentive 
perusal and consideration." 



58 

As we, last year, came to much the same conclusion, we again 
give our brethren the benefit of the New York committee's labors 
on the European proceedings, and bespeak the careful reading of 
it. We have omitted so much as relates to the internal affairs of 
the late Grand Lodge of Hanover : 

EUROPEAN GRAND LODGES. 

FRANCE. 

The annual communication of this Grand Orient was held in the city of Paris on 
the 10th day of June last, 2S2 subordinate bodies, of various grades, being repre- 
sented by 269 brethren. 

Grand Master Mellinet presided and opened the session by a brief address, in 
which he congratulated the brethren upon the continued prosperity attending their 
labors. 

The finances are declared to be in a most satisfactory condition. 

Speaking of the debates on the regulations about to be adopted, he reminds the 
Grand Orient that sound reasons are to be offered rather than fine speeches. 

He refers to the disposition made manifest by some Lodges to admit atheists to 
initiation, and invites such a formal declaration on the subject as shall forever set 
the question at rest and maintain the true character of the institution. 

At a subsequent period the Grand Orient, by an overwhelming majority, gave the 
required vote. 

The session was taken up with the discussion and amendment of the regulations 
(three hundred and thirty-three articles) auxiliary to and explanatory of the consti- 
tution, and the discussion and adoption of the financial budget. 

On the 15th, the legislative assembly having been closed, the international ban- 
quet was held, at which there were present the representatives of thirty-two foreign 
Grand Lodges and Grand Orients, besides many visiting brethren having no official 
character. 

After the customary honors had been rendered these brethren, and acknowledged 
in their behalf by one of their number, Bro. Battaille, from the Committee on 
" Recompenses," made a report worthy in every sense of its distinguished author. 
After a glowing and brilliant tribute to the labors of Masonry in general, and a state- 
ment of its undying principles, he proceeded to name the several recipients of the 
medal of honor awarded by the Grand Orient to those who had deserved well of 
Masonry. Each award was accompanied by a statement of the act or acts which 
had led to its presentation. We have not space for the details, but we gladly repro- 
duce the names, as follows : 

1. Reunion Lodge at Toulon, for devoted and courageous service during the visita- 
tion of cholera in 1865. 

2. Bro. Morvan, for devotion to those stricken with cholera, at Lorient, in the 
same year. 

3. Capt. Mitciiel, an English brother, for saving the lives of twenty French sea- 
men, in Mexico, in 1862. 

4. Bro. Montdesik, for eminent services during the earthquake at Point a Pitre, in 
1843. 

5. Bros. Kebmovan, Canonville, and Icery, for eminent services to Masonry in 
Mauritius. 



59 



6. Bra. Fremier, for having saved the Lodge archives from fire at Valparaiso, in 
1862, at the risk of his own life. 

7. Bro. Cohen, of Constantine, for long- continued services to humanity against 
fire, flood, and epidemic. 

8. Bro. Auguste Lafage, of Rochelle, for saving a man from drowning, in the 
night, at the imminent risk of his own life. 

9. Bro. Vuitton, founder of a Lodge, and for seventeen consecutive years its 
Master, and during all that time a firm and consistent champion of Masonry. 

10. Bro. Bremond, for defending at his own risk, a Lodge mistakenly accused by 
t he civil authorities. 

11. Bro. Labbe, for courageous defense of the liberty of conscience. 

We may remark that these awards are made periodically —once in ten years, we 
believe— and are held up by the Grand Orient as an inducement to all its disciples to 
illustrate by practice the teachings of our Craft. 

We know of no reason why a similar institution might not furnish incentives to 
our brethren to merit its awards, and leave to their generations the medal of honor 
as a precious inheritance. 

Then followed the banquet, at which about one thousand brethren sat down, but 
which, beyond the fact of so many nations being represented, presented nothing of 
note. 

Among the memorials referred to the Grand Council for future action were two, 
praying the Grand Orient to use its influence to cause a change in the laws of foreign 
Grand Orients where the initiation of persons of Israelitish faith is forbidden. 

During the year several distinguished members of this Grand Orient have been 
called to the silent land. Among them we note Bro. Heuillant, a Past Deputy 
.Grand Master, and Bro. Lengle, Deputy Grand Master, charged with the foreign 
correspondence of the Grand Orient. 

To those unacquainted with the social condition of France, a correct estimate of 
the difficulties under which the Masonic Institution labors could hardly be arrived at. 
Opposed, harassed, and misrepresented at every turn by the representatives of a 
religious body drawing apart, at least, of its support from the State, and thus from 
the toil of Masons themselves, the infirmities of human nature may plead for them 
if occasionally they forget Masonic inspirations, and turn upon those who seek to 
rend them. Generally throughout France the religious institution alluded to refuses 
the rite of sepulture to Masons except upon condition of ante-mortem renunciation, 
and it forbids its temples to the brethren who would fain pay the last tribute of 
respect to the fraternal dead. In other cases, and when this obstacle is not inter- 
posed, they are obliged to obtain a permit from the civil authorities to surround the 
grave of a brother and bid adieu to his remains with the accustomed formalities of 
the Craft. The lack of educational facilities among the people, and the inviting 
field thus left to superstition and prejudice, add to the difficulties in the way of the 
Craft, and make the devotion of the brethren an act of true heroism. It is always 
easier to criticise the faults and shortcomings of others than it is to resist temptation 
when we ourselves are exposed to it ; and we, secure in the popular esteem, enjoying 
our portion of popular freedom of thought and speech and action, and safe in this 
strong defense against the futile envy of fanaticism, may well find a large share of 
allowance for those who seek to maintain our cause and uphold its banners in a 
land where men have conscience-keepers, fed by the State to torture and misrepre • 
sent the acts and designs of their fellows. Our brethren in France, fortunately for 
themselves and for the institution in their charge, perceive that the strong point of 
their enemies is in the want of education among the masses, and they wisely seek to 
counteract it, not by a weak resort to vituperation and abuse, but by disseminating 
intelligence among the people, and thus preparing them to resist error and become 



60 

disciples of the truth. la due time they will succeed, and then Masonry will flour- 
ish, as it always flourishes where mind is untrammeled by superstition. 

It is worthy of note that the Grand Orient publishes each year a full report of the 
debates at its annual assemblies ; many of the speeches giving evidence of superior 
cultivation and profound appreciation of the essential doctrines of the Craft. 



GRAND LODGE OF SAXONY. 

This Grand Lodge transmits to us, with accustomed regularity, its Protocols Nos. 
77, 78, 79, 80 and 81, respectively dated April 27, August 17, September 15, Novem- 
ber 9, 1867, and February 15, 1868. 

The enlightened and true Masonic spirit displayed by our sister of Saxony is in 
glaring contrast with the narrow-minded sectarian ideas pursued by some of her im- 
mediate neighbors. It is fully and truly illustrated in an occurrence which took 
place on the 17th of February, 1868, in the Lodge Zu den drei Schwertern und As- 
tr&a zur grunenden Raute, at Dresden. On that day a Mohammedan, by the name 
of Gatha Sadik, a merchant of Dresden, was made a Mason. True to the faith of 
his fathers, the candidate appeared in his national dress, and after answering the 
three questions usually propounded in a satisfactory manner, in the Arabic language , 
he was initiated. 

We rejoice that our brethren of Saxony are so fully in accord with ourselves. 
For one of our own daughter Lodges has a similar instance on record. It seems that 
a Mohammedan, by the name of Mahmoun Jdmah, First Lieutenant of a frigate of 
the Imaum of Muscat, lying at anchor in the harbor of New York, petitioned St. 
John's Lodge, No. 1, of New York, to be made a Mason. He was initiated on the 
11th of June, 1839. It was impossible to procure a Koran for the occasion. The* 
candidate, on being informed of this, inquired whether the book used by the Lodge 
contained the doctrine of a belief in a Supreme Being. Assured of this, he ex- 
pressed himself satisfied, remarking that that was a good enough Koran for him. 

The Supreme Conseil of Louisiana, at New Orleans, by letter of May 2d, ex- 
pressed a desire to form closer relations with the Grand Lodge. It was, however, 
concluded to await further information before appointing a representative. 

The manifest of the Verein deutscher Freimaurer was read and referred to a com 
mittee for investigation. 

We are under renewed obligations to our representative near the Grand Lodge, 
R. W. Bro. Von Mensch, who presented an excellent and elaborate abstract from our 
transactions for 1866 and 1867. 

The annual meeting of the Grand Lodge took place September 15, 1867. Four- 
teen Lodges were represented by their Masters. M. W. Bro. Warnatz addressed 
the Grand Lodge as follows : 

" Worshipful and Beloved Brethren .-—Saluting you in the name of the Grand 
Lodge, and extending to you the right hand of fellowship, we welcome you in the 
hall which has been placed at our disposal by the Lodges Zu den drei Schwertern 
and Zum goldnen Apfel for a great number of years. From our circle we miss 
many dear brethren, who have departed for the eternal East. Let us arise, as a 
tribute of respect to their honored memory. With much pleasure we salute the 
brethren, who have never before attended a Grand Lodge communication ; and we 
rejoice to see in our midst to-day the Deputy Grand Master, as well as the W. Rep- 
resentatives of foreign Grand Lodges who are in friendly relations with us. 

"The Lodges have resolved that an annual communication of the Grand Lodge 
shall take place in future. May this result beneficially for us and Masonry generally ; 
may it strengthen the confidence of the Lodges in their representatives and in the 



61 

officers of the Grand Lodge ; and, above all, may it lead to the recognition of the 
principal aim of Masonry, to the cementation of brotherly love on the principle of 
humanity in the warm ways of a united family circle, where every one is willing to 
lend a portion of his strength for a great purpose, in which we all have the glorious 
aim of being recognized as true priests in the service of Wisdom and Love. 

" It is known, my brethren, that new regulations are not always easily put in op- 
eration. They require practice, and must be adjusted as necessity demands. It 
would be no easy task to select subjects for discussion ; and experience will have to 
teach whether an annual communication would be preferable to one to be held bien- 
nially or triennially. 

" The Lodges represented here will have to decide what subjects shall be brought 
up for discussion. All propositions will have to be seconded, and if not sufficiently 
seconded, the regular order of business will be taken up. A motion in order to be 
brought up for discussion will have to be seconded by five Lodges. According to the 
statutes, the vote is taken by Lodges, and from this no deviation can be made to- 
day. The votes will be cast, where Lodges are represented, by their Masters ; and 
if those are not present, by the next officer in succession ; and when no deputies 
are present, by proxy. For a final disposition of all matters discussed, it will be 
ascertained by vote whether the subject is to be laid before the Lodges for considera- 
tion, and eventually for adoption in the Grand Lodge. 

" But, my brethren, all subjects and all business would not make this a day, as it 
should be to us, of joy for brother Masons, if we have not brought with us the spirit 
of brotherly love and Masonic intelligence. 

" Beloved brethren, we have' for a long time past, after the sifting of some very 
questionable propositions, amended, in part, our Constitution, for which we may 
congratulate ourselves. Old and tested forms have been preserved to us, the great 
liberties of the Lodges have not been circumscribed by our Union ; the tried form of 
the Grand Lodge, which only executes in a brotherly way the wishes of the Lodges, 
has been sustained. Let us preserve this happy moderation in future whenever 
necessary. It has contributed to our cementation, and heightened and secured for 
us the respect of the Masonic world and of foreign Grand Lodges even across the 
ocean. Let us, to-day, also show an unbroken chain, united by a common enthusi- 
asm for Masonry, the glory of which will reflect upon the Lodges of our Union. 
Let us enthusiastically and cordialy represent the Masonic family of our immediate 
fatherland. Keeping steadily in view our Masonic duties, let us approach the ques- 
tions to be brought before us to-day. It is not a labor which will improve and in- 
struct us in the ritual ; it is, like all Grand Lodge labors, of a purely business nature. 
But it must be permeated by the spirit of Masonry, as it is the labor of Master 
Masons, whose Masonic intelligence shall illumine Lodge life, which sometimes is not, 
very recreative. It is an assembly of brethren who are the light of Lodges. There- 
fore, let us courageously begin our labors! " 

A proposition to abolish the right of jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge was unani- 
mously voted down. 

The Grand Orient of Italy at Florence, Grand Master Frapoli, has expressed the 
desire, in a letter of August 21, 1867, to enter into closer relations with the Grand 
Lodge of Saxony. The Grand Master remarked that it was to be feared that, with 
the present political and church movements in Italy, there might be danger that the 
Italians would not be able to steer clear of entanglements. A fundamental principle 
of Masonry would be violated thereby. It was also desirable that further information 
should be obtained as to the relations which the two Grand Lodges of Italy bore to 
each other. He also remarked that Grand Master Frapoli had replied to the ques» 
tions in the second number of the Grand Lodge Bulletin, as follows : 

" In regard to the questions which you propound, we will answer frankly. 



62 

1. " That the Lodges affiliated with the Grand Orient of Freemasons in Italy are 
strictly forbidden to occupy themselves with political debates ; but that in our 
writings, we accord the same liberty of the press that is conceded to our citizens by 
the laws of the State. 

2. " That inasmuch as we have not succeeded, after weeding out the irregular ele- 
ments of Milan and Palermo, in forming one National Grand Lodge, with the desir- 
able part thereof, we have to acknowledge the necessity of keeping our Lodges from 
contact with irregular brothers ; the more so, as those few Lodges were riot suffi- 
ciently careful in the selection of their material. 

" The so-called Masonic Lodges, formed by speculators or impostors at Naples, we 
need not mention here. 

" We shall be very happy to enter into a closer alliance with your brethren, as it 
seems to us to be the principal aim of Freemasonry to bring together all nations in 
brotherly relationship." 

The Grand Lodge resolved to ask the Lodges for instructions in the matter. Pro- 
tocol No. 81, however, informs us that the Constitution of the Grand Orient of Italy, 
at Florence, had been received, and the principles therein laid down being deemed 
satisfactory, the Grand Lodge entered into closer relationship with the Grand Orient 
of Italy by mutual representation. 

Peace and harmony prevail with our sister of Saxony, and her daughter Lodges 
appear to be in a prosperoas condition. 

GRAND LODGE ZUR SONNE, AT BAYREUTH. 

This Grand Lodge met May 28, 1867. The Lodge Zum Morgenstem offered a 
resolution, " that the Grand Lodge should use its influence to induce the three Grand 
Lodges at Berlin, and also the Grand Lodges at Hanover and Darmstadt, to declare 
themselves in favor of the initiation of non-Christians." The presiding officer re- 
marked, that however well intentioned this proposition might be, and however much 
in consonance with that of the Grand Lodge as well as his own, yet from existing 
circumstances the effort would prove futile. The Grand Lodge of Hamburg had 
formerly made numerous efforts in that direction, and lately the occasion of the in- 
troduction of a representative of the Grand Lodge Zu den drei Welt-Kugeln, in the 
Grand Lodge of New York, had called out a similar motion in the latter body. So 
far, the efforts made had only resulted in the admission of non-Christian brethren as 
visitors to the labors of the Prussian Lodges. He doubted, however, whether the 
unanimously adopted motion of this Grand Lodge would meet with any better 
success, and thought that it would be preferable to modify the motion, so as to 
recommend it warmly to the consideration of the sister Grand Lodges of Berlin. 

The indefatigable Dr. Leutbecher, of the clandestine Lodge Licht, Liebe,Leben, 
is continually vibrating between the Grand Lodges Zur Sonne and Zur Eintracht, 
for recognition. No sooner does he receive his quietus in one, than he turns up in 
the other. In a letter of March 3, 18G7, he again repeats the question, whether and 
under what conditions the Grand Lodge would be inclined to grant to his irregular 
association a charter as a regular Lodge. The matter was laid before all daughter 
Lodges, which declared that they were opposed to recognizing him and his associ- 
ates as a lawful Lodge, inasmuch as the three principal officers of that clandestine 
body, who had been dishonorably discharged from a Lodge years ago, could have no 
authority to form a Lodge ; that they were not under the tongue of good report, and 
their association did not rest upon the indispensably necessary moral foundation. 
The request was refused. 

There remains, therefore, but one way open to the persevering applicant. Let 
him apply to the Grand Master of Hamburg. 



63 

A resolution was adopted by the Grand Lodge, that " every brother who has been 
initiated in a Lodge of Baden, must, if he change his residence to a place where 
another Lodge of that jurisdiction is located, affiliate with and pay his dues to that 
Lodge." 

GRAND LODGE ZUR EINTRACHT. 

We are not in possession of the protocols of this Grand Lodge. The only subject 
of interest that reaches us from other sources is in reference to an agreement which 
this Grand Lodge endeavored to enter into with the Grand Orient of France. 

It seems that the Grand Lodge last year adopted a resolution expressing its desire 
to enter into an arrangement with the Grand Orient of France relative to the initia- 
tion of strangers in French Lodges. M. W. Bro. Leykam: reported that he had ad- 
dressed a letter to M. W. Bro. Mellinet, the Grand Master of France, on the 25th of 
May, 1867, at the same time transmitting to him a draft for the agreement. On the 
20th of June he received an answer, in which Bro. Mellinet states that he was 
fully aware of the evils resulting from the initiation of strangers in various French 
Lodges, and that his views on the subject fully coincided with those of Bro. Leykam ; 
but that to his regret the proposition could not be carried into effect in France, as 
he had no power to prohibit the initiation in French Lodges of persons from the 
Duchy of Hesse, or the city of Frankfort, without previous inquiry into their char- 
acter at their place of residence. The French Lodges would consider such a prohi- 
bition an attack on their liberties, but that he would not fail to enjoin officially upon 
the Lodges the necessity of an inquiry, and he had no doubt a satisfactory result 
would be arrived at. 

The Lodge Ludwig zu den drei Sternen, at Friedberg, has petitioned the Grand 
Lodge that she, like the newly instituted Lodges at Bingen, may be permitted to 
suspend Section 116 of the Constitution, which interdicts the initiation of non-Chris- 
tians, and at the same time make a corresponding change in her Ritual. The Lodge 
places herself on the platform of the Ancient Regulations, and deems the abolition 
of the so-called Christian principle the more necessary, as the civil government has 
long ago recognized as equal people of all religious confessions. 



MOTHER GRAND LODGE OF THE ECLECTIC UNION, FRANKFORT- 
ON-THE-MAIN. 

This Grand Body was in session December 8,1865, January 12, February 23, March 
11, May 25, August 31, December 7, 1866, and February 22, March IS, May 31, 1867. 

Bro. Danker was re-elected Grand Master for 1866 and 1867. At the session of 
May 31st, Grand Master Bro. Danker made the following remarks in regard to the 
publication of the proceedings of the Grand Lodge in Masonic journals. 

" Of late the transactions of the Grand Lodge have found publicity through the 
Masonic press. However well-intentioned this may be, and although the Grand 
Lodge does not feel called upon to explain and correct officially publications of the 
kind, in order to remove erroneous impressions of existing relations and facts, she 
cannot omit declaring : 

1. That the Constitution of an Eclectic Lodge in the Orient of Berlin, has nowise 
been the subject of discussion in this Grand Lodge. 

2. That up to the present time no movement has been deemed necessary on the 
part of the Eclectic Union to secure its continued existence, as it has not been en- 
dangered, or in any way questioned. 

3. That the private and confidential correspondence, which the then presiding 

10 



64 

officeijof the Grand Lodge of Hanover had requested, would not lead to an endanger- 
ing of the eclectic principle, or to an eventual discontinuance of her activity ; and 
that the publication of an isolated sentence leads to altogether erroneous conclusions." 
For the revision of the Constitution, which is to take place in 1870, the Grand 
Lodge has taken the necessary steps, and the daughter Lodges are invited to forward 
any propositions for amendments they may desire. These are to be systematized 
and revised by a committee appointed for the purpose. The result of its labors is 
then to be laid before the Grand Lodge for consideration. 



GRAND NATIONAL MOTHER LODGE ZU DEN DREI WELTKUGELN (THREE 
GLOBES), AT BERLIN. 

The protocols of this Grand Lodge in our possession are dated March 22, May 2, 
June 24, September 5, November 2, 7 and 22, and December 5, 1867. 

The meeting of March 22d was for the purpose of celebrating the birthday of the 
King of Prussia, the protector of the Order in his States. The regular quarterly 
assembly of May 2d was opened by the Grand Master, Bro. Messerschmidt, who 
expressed his gratification at meeting in Grand Lodge the Masters of Lodges located 
outside of Berlin. The Grand Lodge, on the 7th of March, had expressed the desire 
that the legal representatives of her daughter Lodges (Masters or Deputy Masters) 
when they had received the Fourth Degree, should be present at the session of the 
Grand Lodge in May of every year, in order to take part in the discussion and vote 
upon any proposed changes of the general laws. He remarked, that past experience 
taught them that correspondence with the Lodges and explanations were of little 
use, and that the representatives of the Lodges, chosen from the members of the 
Grand Lodge, were rarely in possession of sufficient information to speak under- 
standing^ of the affairs of the Lodges they represent. The Grand Lodge, therefore, 
had appointed a special Committee to draw up fresh instructions for the last men- 
tioned representatives, and had caused them to be printed for the use of the mem- 
bers of the present session, as the instructions of February 9, 1801, were no longer 
applicable to present circumstances. It could not be doubted that these steps are 
properly appreciated by all daughter Lodges, and would be beneficial to the future 
prosperity of the Institution. The Grand Lodge, therefore, was rejoiced that in 
consequence of this invitation, several Masters and Deputy Masters of Lodges had 
taken their seats as representatives." 

For the clearer understanding of the present mode of representation of the Lodges 
in the Grand Lodge, we will state that the latter is composed of the members of the 
four daughter Lodges at Berlin, who have attained a higher degree than that of 
Master Mason, and if elected as representatives by daughter Lodges outside of Berlin 
are obliged to accept the same. Any Lodge affiliating with the National Mother 
Lodge Zu den drei Weltkugeln must choose a representative from the members of 
the four Berlin daughter Lodges, proposed by the Grand Lodge. The Lodge, in all 
probability, has never seen its representative, and is unacquainted with his views. 
Nor is he acquainted with the affairs of the Lodge he represents, except by corres- 
pondence. To effect a change in this defective system of Lodge representation, the 
following proposition was offered at the session of the Grand Lodge, December 6, 
1866: 

" To enable every daughter Lodge outside of Berlin to participate in the delibera- 
tions of proposed laws in Grand Lodge through their Master or Deputy Masters, it 
is recommended that all discussions and action upon amendments of the Constitu- 
tion and Statutes are to be had at a session appointed for that purpose by the Grand 
Lodge. The last quarterly session of the Grand Lodge in the month of May would 



65 

be the most desirable for that purpose, as that season of the year would offer the 
least obstacle to the travel of brethren residing outside of Berlin. The May session 
of the Grand Lodge, when the election of Grand Officers takes place, would thereby 
acquire the desirable character of a principal annual session, and it might be at- 
tended by the Masters or Deputy Masters of the Lodges as their representatives, not 
only to consult on Masonic legislation and the election of officers, but also to discuss 
particular occurrences, make known the views of the Lodges, prepare questions of 
reform, create more intimate relations between the National Mother Lodge and her 
daughters, and also to lessen the correspondence between the Directory and the 
Lodges." 

Nineteen Masters and Deputy Masters of Lodges attended the session of May 2d, 
and seventeen forwarded excuses for non-attendance. The revision of the law in 
regard to instruction for the representatives of Lodges, as reported by the committee 
was adopted ; the report, however, does not state what the amended law now is. 
The communication of June 24th was devoted to the celebration of St. John's 
Day. 

The Grand Lodge has 60 active, and 659 honorary members. 104 active Lodges, 
with a membership of 11,800, are affiliated with her. The condition of the Lodges 
seems to be satisfactory to the Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Lodge, from its various charity funds, dispensed to the poor 4,186 
thalers during 1866. 

The Supreme Conseil of Louisiana, at New Orleans, communicated to the Grand 
Lodge, by letter dated May 2, 1867, that it had resolved to admit negroes, who had 
been initiated in lawful Lodges, as visitors to their labors, and that it was its desire 
to open more intimate relations with the Grand Lodge by the appointment of mutual 
representatives. The Grand Lodge approved the proposition. 

Two of the daughter Lodges of the former Grand Lodge of Hanover have applied 
for affiliation with the Grand Lodge, and were accepted. 

The Lodge Ernst zum Compass, at Gotha, has forwarded a number of propositions 
to amend the Constitution of the Grand Lodge, one of them as follows : 

" The Lodge Ernst zum Compass is convinced that the requirement of a confes- 
sion of faith is not in accordance with the spirit or history of Freemasonry. She 
desires that all daughter Lodges may take this question into serious consideration, 
and moves that the question may be brought up for discussion in the Grand Lodge." 
The Lodge " Georg," etc., at Arolsen, made similar propositions. 

On the 22d of November the Grand Lodge celebrated its Seventieth Anniversary. 
M. W. Bro. Von Messerschmidt delivered an address, giving a condensed history of 
the Grand Lodge ; but as we propose to give a full abstract from the history pub- 
lished by the Grand Lodge, of which a copy has been kindly transmitted to us, we 
will merely cite a few points from the address. He says : " At the beginning of the 
nineteenth century there were affiliated with the Grand Lodge 34 daughter Lodges, 
numbering 1,780 members, which now have increased to 105 active Lodges with a 
membership ot 11,844. The present Grand Master has wielded the gavel since 1848 
without intermission." 

The address is accompanied by the reports of the different Grand Officers. The 
Grand Stewards' Lodge has charge of the economical department of the Grand 
Lodge. It is divided into four departments, which have charge of the following 
branches : 

1. The care of the table and its utensils. 

2. Supervision over the furniture. 

3. Providing and distributing the dresses of the Order and of wine. 

4. Providing light and playing-cards. 



66 

To meet expenses, the Treasurer of the Stewards' Lodge draws upon the funds of - 
the Grand Lodge. But as the duties of the Stewards' Lodge became more and more 
extended, several of its duties, such as the charge of the Grand Lodge library, etc., 
were transferred to separate commissions. In 1807 its expenditures amounted to 
828 thalers ; in 1810, to 1,612 thalers ; whilst the present estimate, made triennially, 
is 14,850 thalers. 

A Grand Censorship is also one of the features of the Grand Lodge. This office 
formerly devolved upon the Grand Stewards' Lodge, but was separated from it in 
1803. 

Its duties are to settle disputes between brethren. An insult to the Grand Censors 
is deemed equivalent to one offered to the Grand Lodge itself. In 18G5 their duties 
were still further defined, and they now are : 

1. To see that the laws of the Grand Lodge are supported. 

2. To keep watch over the moral conduct of the brethren. 

3. To try Masonic offenders and pronounce judgment. 

One of the Grand Censors is in duty bound to be present at the meetings of the 
Lodges. The Grand Censorship, however, has charge of the four Berlin Lodges 
only. 

The report of the Grand Librarian is very interesting. The plan for establishing 
a library originated in 1773 by twenty-four Masons. In 1776 the Grand Lodge issued 
the first catalogue. The number of volumes then on the shelves was 75G. In 1834 
the library contained 4213 ; in 1855, 6,047 ; and at present, 7,266 volumes. The last 
acquisition is that of a part of the collection made by F. Nicolai, comprising 1,640 
works, in 1,150 volumes and 95 manuscripts, treating on Masonry, including Knights 
Templar, Rose Croix, Illuminates, Cabala, etc. 

The Grand Almoner reports on the charities dispensed by the Grand Lodge. At 
present he disburses 2,000 thalers annually. Up to 1866, 155,953 thalers were dis- 
tributed in charities. 

Orphans are under the charge of another department. The aim is to give to 
orphans of deceased brethren a proper education. It was at first intended to es- 
tablish an Orphan Asylum; but it was finally resolved to leave the children, who 
have lost their father, with the mother, and grant necessary assistance ; or where 
both parents are dead to place them in some respectable private family. 

From January 1857, to July 1, 1867, thirty-seven children were supported, during 
which time 9,034 thalers were expended. On the 1st July, 1867, the funds on hand 
of that department amounted to 6,996 thalers. At present there are twenty children 
of deceased brothers remaining with their mothers, and for their support 500 thalers 
are set aside. It is stated that this has proved to be the most efficient way of 
granting support. 

There is also a Pension Fund, to aid students, from which 16,687 thalers were ex- 
pended from 1814 to* 1867. This branch of the fund is supported by collections in 
the four Berlin Lodges. Besides this, there are funds created by donations, etc., 
which have the same aim. During the seventy years of existence of the Grand 
Lodge, 32,000 thalers have been disbursed in that direction. 

The total of the Grand Lodge funds amounts now to 270,707 thalers. 

The Grand Lodge entered into a mutual representation with the Grand Lodge, 
Dos Benedictinos, at Rio Janeiro, the Grand Orient of Italy, at Florence, and the 
Grand Lodge of Denmark. 

The manifest issued by the Verein deutsclier Freimaurer of June 9, 1867, was 
received and placed on file. 

With its protocols the Grand Lodge transmits to us a handsomely printed octavo 
volume of 364 pages, containing a complete and valuable history of that body from 



67 

its origin to the close of the year 1866. The first portion of this history was written 
by Bro. O'Etzel, a former Grand Master, and printed in 1840, to commemorate the 
centenary existence of the Grand Lodge. In issuing the second edition,, the Directory 
of the Grand Lodge revised the original of Bro. O'Etzel, and brought the history 
down to the close of the year 1866. The history contains the origin of the " Three 
Globes of Berlin," and possesses some very interesting information on this point. 
We deem this a sufficient excuse for the extensive abstract we make therefrom. 

The volume opens with the information that Frederic the Great, then heir 
apparent to the throne of Prussia, formed a Masonic Lodge in his palace at Rheins- 
berg, over which Bro. Von Oberg, Master of a Lodge at Hamburg, presided. On 
the return of Bro. Von Oberg to Hamburg in November, 1739, the Crown Prince 
assumed the government of the Lodge, and after ascending the throne removed it to 
his palace at Charlottenburg. This Lodge was without name, but is subsequently 
alluded to as Loge Premiere, also as Loge au Roi noire Grand Maitre. 

In 1740 a small number of Masons applied to the King for permission to form a 
Lodge. They received a charter November 9th, of that year, by the name of Aux 
trois Globes, and adopted a Constitution modeled after that of the Grand Lodge of 
England. The latter acknowledged the Lodge at once, under the plea that the 
King, being naturally Grand Master in his own dominions, was fully authorized to 
constitute Lodges therein. The Lodge soon gained in extent by affiliation of the Loge 
Premiere, which ceased to exist in December, 1740, and also by initiations, so that 
in 1741 it already numbered ninety-six members. In 1744 the Lodge, by consent of 
the King, assumed the title of Grand Royal Mother Lodge, Zu den drei Waltkugeln 
(Three Globes) , yet its presiding officer continued to be designated as Master only. 
Up to 1747 the Lodge, with the consent of the King, had granted charters to six 
daughter Lodges. To that period, and for some time thereafter, these charters 
were generally granted to a well-informed brother, who, after receiving it, pro- 
ceeded to form a Lodge. It was but of rare occurrence that a number of brethren 
united in forming a Lodge, and to apply for a charter. The mother Lodge exercised 
an indifferent supervision over her daughters, and, in fact, she had little or no 
authority over them. The Ritual and Instruction, which are now written or printed 
for the use of the Lodges, were at that time communicated orally, and underwent 
many changes, particularly as they were translated from one language into another. 
With this they also received the imprint of the prevailing customs of the different 
nationalities through which they were transmitted. At first the mother Lodge 
essentially practiced the old English work. Up to 1747 the King seems to have 
been considered Grand Master, although he had ceased to take any interest in the 
Lodge. With pecuniary embarrassments dissensions arose, and in order to produce 
greater harmony it was decided to elect a Deputy Grand Master, which was done in 
that year. The Lodge, however, still continued to elect a Master annually. With 
better regulations, peace and prosperity returned and Lodges increased in numbers. 
Up to 1754 the membership of the mother Lodge was limited to forty-five, but in 
that year it was determined that all who were initiated therein should be entitled to 
membership without further ballot. A new Lodge, by the name of La petite 
Concorde, was formed in Berlin during that year, and received a charter from the 
mother Lodge, with the following peculiar restrictions : Its membership was con- 
fined to twelve ; no visitor was to be admitted in it unless previously introduced in 
the mother Lodge ; the Lodge was not permitted to initiate, pass, or raise any one, 
the mother Lodge reserving that privilege to herself; the new Lodge also agreed 
never to celebrate St. John's Day by herself. In 1755 dissensions arose in the new 
Lodge, which led to its withdrawal from the mother Lodge. At the request of the 
latter the civil authorities interdicted the meeting of the Lodge Concorde, but Field 



68 

Marshal Lord Keith, Governor of Berlin at that time, and Deputy Grand Master of 
the North German Lodges under the Grand Lodge of England, permitted the re. 
sumption of her labors, and promised to procure for her a charter from the Grand 
Lodge of England. 

The ancient law that a candidate for initiation "must be * * * hale and 
sound, not deformed or dismembered at the time of making, but no woman, no 
eunuch," was singularly interpreted by the mother Lodge. We are informed that, 
in December, 1755, Liuni, a singer, was proposed in the mother Lodge. Doubts 
arose in the minds of the brethren as to the propriety of initiating him, he being a 
eunuch. By some it was considered a violation of the Ancient Constitution, which 
prohibited the initiation of a mainedman. The mother Lodge, therefore, resolved 
to ask the advice of the Lodge Absalom at Hamburg. The latter replied, " that 
eunuchs might be initiated without hesitation, if otherwise possessing the essential 
qualifications for making a good and upright Mason, and if free from vices." Liuni 
was accepted. 

The origin of the Grand Lodge Royal York of Prussia dates from the year 1760. 
During that year the mother Lodge granted a charter to the Lodge Aux trois 
Colombes (The Three Doves) , from which subsequently sprang the before-named 
Grand Lodge. In 1761 this Lodge changed her name to De VAmitie aux troix 
Colombes. In 1761 the Lodge Concorde, which had been chartered by the mother 
Lodge in 1747, granted a charter for the formation of a new Lodge against the 
earnest remonstrance of the mother Lodge. Unfriendly feelings resulted therefrom. 
A reconciliation, however, took place between the three Berlin Lodges during the 
same year. The Lodge Concorde agreed to return to the mother Lodge, and abstain 
in future from granting charters to new Lodges. The year 1761 also witnessed for 
the first time the election of a Grand Master in the mother Lodge. 

In 1762 the higher degrees of the Clermont System were introduced in the mother 
Lodge and in two of her daughter Lodges. This was soon followed by the intro- 
duction of other high degrees. Dissensions resulted therefrom, and for the first time 
the term "System" was used to designate the various rites which had sprung into 
existence. The Lodge V Union, chartered by the mother Lodge, worked according 
to the Scottish Rite. Hund, with his System of Strict Observance, became promi- 
nent in 1765, and the mother Lodge gave her adhesion to it through the influence 
of Bro. Zinnendorf, who had been elected Master. He, however, could not agree 
with Hund as to the position he should occupy in the Order in Germany, and there- 
fore sent a brother to Stockholm, in order to obtain the Ritual of the Swedish 
System. Retiring from the chair the year following his election, and claiming to be 
vested with power to charter Lodges, he instituted several and furnished them the 
new Masonic Ritual imported by him from Sweden, and on St. John's Day, 1770, 
instituted a new Lodge, which he called the Grand Lodge of Germany. The Grand 
Lodge of England recognized the latter in 1773. 

The Lodge De PAmitie separated from the mother Lodge in 1765, initiated the 
Duke of York, the oldest brother of King George I. of England, and through his 
influence obtained a charter from the Grand Lodge of England, on the 24th day of 
June, 1767, under the name of La Royal Yoi^k de VAmitie, No. 330, adopted the 
English Ritual, but also worked the higher degrees according to the French Rite. 
Almost simultaneously with this a Bro. Koppen severed his connection with the 
mother Grand Lodge and instituted the Order of the African Builders. He found a 
number of adherents, but finally disappeared from view, after a precarious existence 
of twenty years. 

Dissensions naturally followed the introduction of these various Rites. Brethren 
of one system were interdicted fi'om holding communication with those of other 
systems. Particular signs were introduced in the Lodges, and these clashings were 



69 

only harmonized when Bro. Wallnee was installed Grand Master of the united 
Lodges, practicing the Scottish Rite. Kind feelings took the place of old animosi- 
ties, and when Prince Frederic August of Brunswick was installed National Grand 
Master of the Prussian States, the mother Lodge assumed the title of Grand National 
Mother Lodge of the Prussian States. Amicable relations were also restored with 
the Lodge Royal York. 

In 1783 the National Mother Lodge cut herself loose from the Rite of Strict Observ* 
ance, declared herself independent, and in 1797 established a Directory for the 
conduct of her business and that of her daughter Lodges. The government also 
bestowed upon her the powers and privileges of a corporation. 

New difficulties, however, loomed up, by the withdrawal from Berlin of the Na- 
tional Grand Master Duke Frederic Augustus, and the change in the Masonic views 
of Bro. Wallner in 1797. A conference was called of the four daughter Lodges 
at Berlin, and it was concluded to reinstitute a Directory which should govern in 
the name of the mother Lodge. The same Directory also constituted the Orient, 
whose duty it also is to keep the system free from all foreign admixtures. All 
resolutions adopted by the mother Lodge as well as the election of Masters by the 
daughter Lodges, had to be approved by this Directory. Both the Grand Master 
and his Deputy were shorn of all their power. The Directory acts in the name and 
place of the mother Lodge, but has to receive the assent of the mother Lodge to 
anything for which the latter may become liable. On the other hand, the Directory 
became responsible to the State for all resolutions adopted by the National Mother 
Lodge, and it was therefore necessary that all regulations of the National Mother 
Lodge should receive the approval of the Directory. 

The Lodge Royal York divided herself into four Lodges, in 1798, and with other 
daughter Lodges which she had previously chartered, formed a Grand Lodge under 
the name of Grand Lodge of Freemasons Royal York zur Freundschaft. The 
National Grand Lodge of Germany, at Berlin (Swedish system), violently opposed 
the new Grand Lodge, but without success. On the 20th October, 1798, the King 
issued an edict forbidding all secret societies, exempting therefrom, however, the 
then existing three Grand Lodges of Berlin, viz., the National Mother Grand Lodge 
Zu den drei Weltkugeln, the Grand Lodge of Germany, and that of Royal York, 
with their daughter Lodges. Other Lodges were prohibited by this edict. 

In 1799 the Grand Master and Deputy of the Three Globes resigned their offices, 
and the mother Lodge concluded not to elect a Grand Master for the present. The 
Master of the mother Lodge for the time being was recognized as temporary Grand 
Master. 

In 1807, a convention was agreed upon between the three Berlin Grand Lodges, 
according to which a monthly conference, composed of four members from each 
Grand Lodge, was held, whose duty it was to consult on subjects of common inter- 
est to German Freemasonry. This, however, was abolished in 1823, in consequence 
of dissensions between the Grand Lodge of the Swedish System and Royal York. 
In 1839, a Grand Masters' Union, which still exists, was established, having for its 
object a consultation on common Masonic subjects, and the cementing of friendly 
relations between the Lodges of the " Fatherland." 

In 1833, changes in the Ritual were proposed, when it was laid down as a leading 
principle that everything that rested upon an historical foundation, or had become 
sacred by time and dear to the brethren by usage, should be preserved ; changes 
only should be made which the spiritual necessities of an advanced age seemed to 
require. 

In 1840, the present King, then Crown Prince of Prussia, was initiated into Ma- 
sonry, in the presence of the three Grand Lodges of Berlin, according to the 
Swedish System, and immediately assumed the Protectorate over all the Lodges in 



70 

Prussia. When he ascended the throne, the Protectorate devolved upon his son, 
the Crown Prince, who was initiated in 1853. Nothing of general interest seems to 
have transpired to 1866, with which year the history closes. 

In the course of this history a subject is discussed on which, inasmuch as it was 
at one time the cause of a remonstrance on the part of our Grand Lodge with those 
of Berlin, we cannot forbear to make a few remarks, particularly as a principle of 
vital importance to the institution is involved therein. In 1844 the three Grand 
Lodges of Berlin made the following declaration : 

" The three Grand Lodges have the same aim as regards the Order ; they labor for 
the ennobling of their members and the happiness of mankind, according to the 
principles of Christianity, but without any tendency to politics or sectional con- 
fession," etc. 

The Grand Lodge of the Three Globes states that her Statutes of 1790 are based 
upon the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of England, of 1723, and, in consequence, 
has engrafted the following among her laws : 

" Chap. IV., Sec. 1 — A Freemason must be an upright and candid professor of 
the Christian religion." 

An appendix to the Statutes adopted in 1808 further prescribes : 

" Sec. 20. — A Jew can not be initiated, affiliated, or be admitted a visitor." 

In 1841, however, this section was stricken out, in consequence of a remonstrance 
by a Lodge under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Holland, one of whose 
members, being an Israelite, was refused admission as visitor to a Berlin Lodge. 

But Section 166 of the same Revised Statutes, adopted during that year, contains 
the following : 

" Sec. 166. — Those persons only can be proposed for initiation in Freemasonry 
who 

" 1. Profess Christianity, without regard to particular creed," etc. 

" Sec. 201 Every brother who desires to be affiliated with any Lodge under our 

jurisdiction must be a professor of Christianity." 

A commission for the revision of the Statutes of the Three Globes declared, in 
1840, "that the initiation in and affiliation with the daughter Lodges of the National 
Mother Lodge of non-Christians was an impossibility." This declaration was unani- 
mously adopted by the mother Lodge. The Commission, however, declared " that 
all brethren who prove themselves members of regularly constituted Masonic 
Lodges, recognized by the Berlin Grand Lodges, can be admitted as visitors, as it 
seems a contradiction to recognize a Lodge, and yet refuse its members admission." 

To justify its requirements, a profession of Christianity in a candidate, or for 
affiliation, the Grand Lodge cites the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of England, 
of the year 1723, as follows: 

Section 1 of that instrument says: "But though in ancient times Masons were 
charged in every country to be of the religion of that country or nation, whatever 
it was, yet it is now thought more expedient only to obligata them to that religion 
in which all men agree, leaving their particular opinions to themselves— that is, to 
be good men and true * * * by whatever denominations or persuasions they 
may be distinguished," etc. 

Which the mother Grand Lodge explains : " By ' religion in which all men agree ' 
is to be understood the Christian religion solely." 

To support its views, the Grand Lodge refers to VI., 3 (should be 2), of the An- 
cient Charges, where it speaks of the " behavior" of the brethren after the Lodge 
in the following language : " Therefore no private piques or quarrels must be 
brought within the door of the Lodge, far less any quarrels about religion, or na- 
tions, or State policy, we being only, as Masons, of the Catholic religion above 



71 

mentioned ; we are also of all nations, tongues, kindreds, and languages, a nd are 
resolved against all politics as what never yet conduced to the welfare of the Lodge , 
nor never will. This charge has been always strictly enjoined and observed ; but 
especially ever since the Reformation in Britain, or the dissent and secession of these 
nations from the communion of Rome." 

" This," the Grand Lodge continues, "alludes directly to the religion mentioned 
(Section 1) in the Ancieat Charges, where it is designated as 'Catholic," and points 
to the Church entanglements during the English Reformation. This, therefore 
teaches us that the term of 'Catholic religion' does not mean the Roman Catholic 
Church, but those doctrines only which all professors of Christianity possess in 
common. * * * It can not be at all doubted that these laws were made for Chris- 
tians only, as they were drawn up by Bro. Anderson, a clergyman of the Church of 
England, and approved by Bro. Desagulier, a clergyman of the Reformed Church, 
and Deputy Grand Master," etc. * * * " For these reasons," the mother Grand 
Lodge continues, "it is to be assumed that the initiation in Freemasonry was con- 
ditioned upon a profession of Christianity, according to the Constitution of 1723. 
The Masonic Institution, according to the Constitution, is to be made a society for the 
whole human family, resting upon a Christian basis — the supporter and transplanter 
of original Christianity, free from all priestcraft. On the 15th November, 1723, 
the following important resolution was adopted (General Regulation XXXIX.) : 
' Every annual Grand Lodge has an inherent power and authority to make new 
regulations, or alter these, for the real benefit of this ancient Fraternity, provided 
always, that the old landmarks be carefully preserved,' etc. This power was ex- 
ercised by the Grand Lodge of England, in 1738, when the Constitution was amended . 
The section on religion, as amended, read as follows : ' A Mason is obliged, by his 
tenure, to obey the moral law ; and if he rightly understands the art, he will never 
be a stupid atheist nor irreligious libertine. He, of all men, should best understand 
that God seeth not as man seeth ; for man looketh at the outward appearance, 
but God looketh to the heart. A Mason is, therefore, particularly bound never to 
act against the dictates of his conscience. Let a man's religion or mode of worship 
be what it may, he is not excluded from the order provided he believe in the glorious 
Architect of heaven and earth, and practice the sacred duties of morality. Masons 
unite with the virtuous of every persuasion in the firm and pleasing bond of fraternal 
love ; they are taught to view the errors of mankind with compassion, and to strive, 
by the purity of their own conduct, to demonstrate the superior excellence of the 
faith they may possess. Thus Masonry is the centre of union between good men 
and true, and the happy means of conciliating friendship among those who must 
otherwise have remained at a perpetual distance.' " 

The constitution of 1738 was revised by its author, Anderson. This section, 
however, remained intact in the constitution of the Grand Lodge of England in its 
several editions of 1815, 1827, 1841 and 1855. 

The Grand Lodges of Prussia themselves seem to be fully aware that this forced 
construction placed by them upon that part of the Ancient Charges is with the 
intent of making them conform to the principles they have adopted. The address 
delivered by the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge Royal York, at Berlin, on St. 
John's Day, ISCu, which lies before us, expresses it very clearly. He says therein : 
" Suffice it to state that the Grand Lodge has labored faithfully and effectively ac- 
cording to the doctrines transmitted to her by her English mother. If, in some 
respects, she has traveled paths diverging from her— if, for instance, she has planted 
herself upon a Christian platform — it is not the result of accident or arbitrariness, 
but it is just as indigenous to our country as the enlarged tendencies in England 
are to that country. In our fatherland the religious differences have never terra- 



72 



inated in bloody persecutions or in splits of sectarianism," etc. The last sentence 
certainly shows a strange oversight on the part of the M. W. brother. Has he for- 
gotten that it took thirty long bloody years before the Catholic Church was forced 
to tolerate the Protestant Church ? It was not by their free will that religious 
liberty was allowed. The whole continent was strewn with slain ; and they only 
yielded the point when they could fight no longer. Their hate still remained ; the 
sword was only sheathed for the time, to be drawn again when opportunity offered. 

But the Grand Lodge of the Three Globes also asserts that the principle of 
Christian faith has been sanctioned, in its original form, by nearly all Grand Lodges 
of Europe and North America. 

We fail to discover that the principle of Christianity is at all alluded to in the last 
cited section, and furthermore assert that it is entirely ignored by a very over- 
whelming majority of the Grand Lodges of the world. In Germany, the constitu- 
tions of the Grand Lodges of Saxony, Zur Sonne, at Baireuth, the Eclectic Union of 
Frankfort-on-the-Main and Hamburg, have for their foundation the constitution of 
the Grand Lodge of England of 1723. In direct contradiction with it are the con- 
stitutions of the three Grand Lodges of Prussia at Berlin, (Royal York, Three 
Globes, and the Grand Lodge of Germany). The Grand Lodge Zur Eintrackt, at 
Darmstadt, presents a divided house, four of her daughter Lodges adhering strictly 
to the constitution of '1723, whilst the laws of the other four do not rest upon that 
basis. These, with the Grand Lodges of Sweden and Denmark, have engrafted 
upon it the principle of a profession of Christianity. The Grand Lodges of the rest 
of the world adhere strictly to the ancient law, and rest upon the principle of 
universality. 

In the constitution of 1723 the principle of universality of the institution was laid 
down as the foundation stone. It was adopted by the Grand Lodge of Ireland in 
1730, by that of Scotland in 1761, by Holland in 1761, by France in 1771, by Ham- 
burg in 1801. Even the more modern Grand Lodges of Italy and South America, 
sprung from France, are based upon the principle of freedom in religious belief, as 
laid down in the ancient charges. It is engrafted on the constitutions of all the 
Grand Lodges of the world, and only Sweden and Denmark and a part of Germany 
adopt the exclusive principles. Of the seventy-five Grand Lodges of the world, six 
only recognize the so-called Christian principle. The great majority of the eight 
thousand Lodges of the world countenance the initiation of non-christians, whilst 
on the other hand, the puny minority of only two hundred and twenty-three 
Lodges cultivate the so-called Christian principle. Again and again war has 
been made upon it, and it has been discussed in all its bearings. Theoretically, it 
has been overpowered. long since; In practice it has been retained, however, with 
a zeal worthy of a better cause. The day is not far distant, when this unmasonic 
and illiberal idea will be dispelled by the sun of enlightenment. The boundaries 
of exclusiveness are becoming more circumscribed day by day. The question has 
been already virtually decided by an immense majority vote. 

The Grand Lodge to the Three Globes explains that the term " Catholic Religion " 
means not the Church of Rome, but Christianity generally. All Lodges of the 
world originally sprung from those of England, Ireland, and Scotland ; they agree 
in their fundamental principles, in the peculiarities and essentials of Masonry, in 
the principle of universality, and interpret the word catholic, what it was intended 
to convey, "universality, general.'''' If the Masonic institution is founded for the 
purposes of Christianity, then its necessity is more than problematical. It would 
be altogether unnecessary and superfluous. 

Originally, there was no Masonry in Germany but what was transplanted by the 
Grand Lodge of England. When Masonry in Germany began to worship strange 
gods, the Lodges ignored and abandoned the ancient landmarks and usages. 



73 

Many of them have returned to the ancient faith. But the three Prussian Grand 
Lodges and those of Sweden and Denmark still worship around the strange altar. 
These bodies, in reality, exclude themselves from the rest of the Masonic family, 
although they have much in common with them in regard to principles, symbols, 
forms, and constitution ; but in this one essential they certainly differ from the rest. 
The Masonic institution, in ideal elevation, stands far above all contingencies of 
human life, far above all severing barriers, far above all other societies. The Prus- 
sian, Swedish, and Danish Lodges lack these essentials. They are a union of pro- 
fessing Christians, a community professing a certain faith. Masonry esteems man 
according to his moral worth ; they take in consideration accidental, external cir- 
cumstances. Masonry selects the pure man, as he came from the hands of his 
Creator ; the Prussian Lodges, as accident of birth or society has formed him, the 
Christian. The structure of true Freemasonry is perfect and consistent in itself , 
that of Prussian Masonry is contradictory and imperfect. In Prussian Lodges the 
character of candidates of the Jewish faith is investigated, their names are placed 
on the lists of candidates, and occasionally they are very warmly recommended 
for initiation to Lodges outside of Prussia, whilst they themselves refuse to bring 
them to Masonic light. They admit them as visitors, yet make a distinction between 
those whom they treat as brethren, and those whom they recognize as such in name 
only. They do not concede to them the right of initiation and affiliation in their 
Lodges, and refuse to be just and practice tolerance. 

Bat ancient prejudices must give way before education and the enlightenment 
of the age. The Prussian Government now admits its Jewish subjects to seats in 
its Parliament and in liberality and enlightenment, in freedom from prejudices, 
Masons should lead and not follow. They should not be Sons of Light in name 
merely. We look, at no distant day, for a change in the views of our sister Grand 
Lodges of Prussia. Already the signs prognosticating this change appear here and 
there on the horizon. We will only refer to the circular letter issued on St. John's 
Day, 1867, by the Lodge Ernst Zum Compass, at Gotha, a daughter Lodge of the 
Three Globes. Gladly would we transfer the whole of it to our pages, but our 
limits forbid. Let the following points, offered as amendments to the constitution, 
therefore suffice to show the sentiments of that enlightened Prussian Lodge. 

1. The right of an unrestricted vote by the Lodge in the Grand Lodge is asked 
for. 

3. The requirement of a confession of faith as a condition for the reception of a 
candidate is not in accordance with the principles of Masonry, does not rest upon 
an historical foundation, and should therefore be abolished. 

We do not at all doubt that the propositions of this Lodge will be looked up n by 
many, and perhaps by a majority, of the Prussian Lodges as having a de-christian- 
izing tendency, whilst those of liberal and cosmopolitan views will regard them as 
a sign of the revival of pure Masonry, as transmitted to us all by our common 
mother, the Grand Lodge of England. The propositions of the Lodge at Gotha 
are unquestionably of vital importance to Masonry in Prussia. A profession of 
religion ; the excessive control of the Prussian Grand Lodges over their daughter 
Lodges, extending itself heretofore even to the approval of the officers elected by 
the Lodges ; no voice or vote in legislation or the election of Grand Lodge officers 
except through representatives appointed from the Berlin Lodges by the Grand 
Master ; in fact, a complete control in every respect, falls with strange effect upon 
the ears of an American Mason. The sun of enlightenment is already piercing the 
clouds that overhung the sky of Prussian Masonry. The indications are encouraging. 
We have it, although not from official sources, that the Grand Lodge has it under 
serious contemplation to repeal that part of its constitution which requires a pro- 
fession of Christianity of the candidate. Let them remember the memorable words 



74 

on religious belief of their King, Frederic the Great, whose memory is deeply 
venerated by every Prussian, and who is the father of Masonry in that country.: 
" Let every one be happy after his own fashion.'' In the spirit of Masonic kindness, 
we can only wish our Prussian brethren, God-speed. 

GRAND LODGE OP PRUSSIA, ROYAL YORK ZUR FREUNDSCHAFT, 

BERLIN. 

This Grand Lodge held its quarterly meetings January 21 and March 4, September 
2 and December 2, 1867. 

In regard to the recognition of the Grand Orient of Belgium, the Grand Lodge 
declared itself in accord with the other two Grand Lodges of Berlin, to the effect 
that "if the Grand Orient would see fit to readopt the clause in her laws prohibit- 
ing the discussion of religious and political questions in the Lodges, the Grand 
Lodge would be willing to resume brotherly intercourse with it, and admit the 
members of that Orient as visitors to her daughter Lodges." 

The " Manifest to the Grand Lodges of the world " issued by the Verein deutscher 
Freimaurer, and the fundamental laws adopted by it, were placed on file. 

The exchange of representatives asked for by the Supreme Conseil of Louisiana, 
at New Orleans, was disposed of by a motion to ascertain from the Grand Lodge of 
Louisiana, with which a mutual representation already exists, what relations the 
Supreme Conseil occupies to the latter. 

GRAND LODGE OF HANOVER. 

After an active existence of forty years the Grand Lodge of Hanover had ceased 
to exist. It held its last session on the 28th of March, 1868. 

The war of 1866 between Austria and Prussia resulted in the annexation of the 
kingdom of Hanover to Prussia, and in its train followed the question of the future 
existence of the Grand Lodge. According to an edict issued by a former King of 
Prussia, October 20, 1798, three Grand Lodges only are permitted to exist in his 
dominions. It was supposed by many, however, that, inasmuch as Hanover pos- 
sessed an independent Grand Lodge before its annexation to Prussia, its quiet con- 
tinuance would be permitted, particularly as the edict before alluded to seemed to 
have been modified in 1848, by the enactment of a law permitting Prussian subjects 
to assemble without arms in closed rooms and form societies not prohibited by law. 
This anticipation was not realized. The Grand Lodge of Hanover was swept away 
by a cabinet order of February 17, 1867, whether justly or otherwise, or how much 
the dissensions which sprung up in the Grand Lodge itself contributed to this deplor- 
able result, we will not undertake to discuss. 

GRAND LODGE OF HAMBURG. 

At the session of May 4, 1867, the annual meeting of the Grand Lodge, only six 
daughter Lodges outside of Hamburg were represented by their Masters. The 
resolution adopted August 5, 1865 (see Transactions, New York, 1866, p. 186) was 
repealed, against which, Franklin Lodge, No. 2, of New York, entered a protest. 
The following amendment to Section 130 of the constitution was adopted by a vote 
of seventy to nine : 

" The meeting in May is the annual communication of the Grand Lodge, to which 
time, all important discussions and the enactment of laws affecting the general in- 
terest of Masonry or of the Grand Lodge Union, are to be deferred, if otherwise not 



75 

incompatible with the interest of Masonry. This meeting is to be attended, as far 
as possible, by all daughter Lodges through their Masters, Deputy Masters, one of 
the Wardens, or by one or more Master Masons, not exceeding three, who are mem- 
bers of the Lodge and appointed for that purpose. Daughter Lodges, which, by too 
great a distance, or for other reasons, are prevented from participating in the annual 
meeting by direct deputies, may forward their votes in writing, on subjects sub- 
mitted to them, at least four weeks previous to it, or they m ay be represented y 
their (local) representatives, or by any brother Master Mason. The latter two, 
however, in order to participate in the deliberations, must be furnished with written 
instructions, or be authorized for the occasion by a written proxy." 

At the quarterly communication, August 17, 1867, a letter dated May 2, 1867, 
addressed to the Grand Lodge by the Supreme Conseil of Louisiana, at New Orleans, 
was laid before the Grand Lodge, asking for recognition and mutual representation. 
The letter, similar to the one addressed to the Grand Lodge of Saxony, stated that 
the Supreme Conseil had adopted a resolution to admit as visitors to her daughter 
Lodges brethren of lawful Lodges, without reference to race and color. A declara- 
tion was inclosed, dated May 1, 1867, in which a Bro. Dunn, Grand Master, and 
Bank, Deputy Grand Master, of the (colored) Grand Lodge of Louisiana, and twenty- 
six other (colored) brethren of various Lodges, certify that they were invited by 
Bro. Chassaignac, Grand Master of the Supreme Conseil, and Master of the Lodge 
La Liberie, No. 19, to visit that Lodge, and that they had been received in a most 
brotherly manner. Dr. Buek remarked that this was very gratifying, inasmuch as 
it was the first instance of a recognition of colored Lodges and brethren by a 
Masonic authority in North America. It therefore should incline them favorably 
toward that Grand Body. Nevertheless, he felt some hesitation in recommending a 
closer alliance. The proposition did not come from the Grand Lodge of Louisiana, 
which is recognized by all American Grand Lodges, but from a body of which we 
have no knowledge ; that they were not informed whether it and its daughter Lodges 
are universally acknowledged, particularly as there existed in North America 
several Supreme Conseils, which did not consider each other legitimate. ' Our Grand 
Lodge had reason to be cautious in her conduct toward American Lodges. He 
therefore recommends that the Grand Lodge should express its regret at being 
compelled to decline the alliance, which was assented to. 

Heretofore the conduct of the Grand Master of Hamburg has not been remarkable 
for caution, if he thought his ambitious schemes could be advanced thereby. The 
colonization of his two clandestine Lodges in New York is evidence thereof. With 
age, perhaps, his bump of caution may become more fully developed. We can wish 
him no greater enjoyment than to meet his twenty-eight above-mentioned " colored 
brethren " in a close room, during the summer solstice in New Orleans. The worthy 
Doctor of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg declines for the present to enter into any 
relationship with the Supreme Conseil of Louisiana, for fear that that body may not 
be universally recognized by the North American Grand Lodges. He, however, has 
not the least compunction in associating with the clandestine negro Lodges of North 
America, not one of which was ever recognized by any regular Lodge of white 
Masons in these United States. " Consistency, thou art a jewel," but thy name is 
not Buek. We have always insisted, and it now becomes more apparent day by day, 
that it was neither philanthropy nor principle that induced him to take the clandes- 
tine negro Masons under his protecting wing. There are other reasons for the course 
pursued by him. If we had recognized the two clandestine bodies he has planted 
in our midst, if we were to throw open the territory we Masonically occupy as a 
Grand Lodge to his machinations and colonization schemes, the benign smile of 
the M. W. Doctor would never have gladdened the heart of the clandestine negro 
Mason. 



76 

la Protocol No. 118, of May 3, 1867, of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, we find the 
following report. 

Doctor Barthelmess, of Brooklyn, who attended that Grand Lodge session, made 
the following remarks : 

" Two reasons impelled him to speak : 

"1. He desired to express his sincere thanks to the members of the Grand Lodge, 
who had shown him attentions beyond his expectations. 

" 2. To meet the prejudices which had occasionally manifested themselves in the 
Masonic press, as well as in private, in regard to the position of Pythagoras Lodge, 
No. 1, and Franklin Lodge, No. 2, in America, and also in Europe. Especially was 
he informed by Bro. Rose, Past Master of Pythagoras Lodge, that he had found 
very erroneous impressions prevailing, particularly in Dresden. It had been re- 
ported there that it was merely stubbornness on the part of Pythagoras Lodge, that 
she had not reaffiliated with the Grand Lodge of New York. The idea also pre- 
vailed in some places that the position of Pythagoras Lodge was very disagreeable, 
onerous, and l-etarding her prosperity. He, however, could give the assurance 
that the Lodge was perfectly happy and contented with the position she occupied, 
and for that reason had no desire to take the step indicated. The enmity which had 
manifested itself against her was based only upon the opinion of a portion of the 
Masonic press hardly to be noticed, or upon the attacks of a few members of the 
Masonic Fraternity in America. The majority of the brethren, as well as a portion 
of the officers of the Grand Lodge there, were, although not strictly Masonically, yet 
in personal friendly accord with the members of Pythagoras Lodge. As far as it 
was possible for him to predict the future, Pythagoras Lodge would never return to 
the Grand Lodge of New York ; that was a matter of conviction with her members, 
of which they were now even more firmly convinced than they were sixteen years 
ago. It can no longer be deemed stubbornness on the part of the Grand Master, or 
a blind persistency in the course taken. If a change should ever be deemed neces- 
sary, that change will be made in another direction than by an affiliation with the 
Grand Lodge of New York. 

"The presiding officer returned his thanks to Bro. Barthelmess for the joyful 
communication, which only confirmed the favorable view which he had for a long 
time entertained of the relations in New York. He could assure the beloved Lodges, 
Pythagoras, No. 1, and Franklin, No. 2, that the Grand Lodge of Hamburg would 
never abandon her two beloved daughters in New York, provided they themselves 
did not desire to withdraw from her. He begged Bro. Barthelmess, on his return, 
to make this assurance of the Hamburg Grand Lodge known to the beloved brethren 
in Brooklyn and New York." 

We owe it to the indefatigable exertions of our faithful and esteemed representa- 
tive of Dresden, R. W. Bro. Von Mensch, that the machinations of the Hamburg 
Grand Master and his consort on this side of the ocean are so well understood by 
the Grand Lodges of Germany ; and we again express to him our grateful acknowl- 
edgements for his labors. 

The addresses were gotton up, as Dr. Barthelmess himself states, for the purpose 
of changing the settled opinions of all Grand Lodges in the United States, and of an 
overwhelming majority of those of Europe. The Masonically demagogic tendencies 
and efforts of the supervisor of the New York daughters of the Grand Lodge of 
Hamburg, and of the presiding officer of the latter body, are too well understood on 
both sides of the Atlantic, and it will take something more than the uttering of the 
word " presto" by Dr. Barthelmess to produce a change. His assurances will be 
taken for what they worth, and that is little indeed. 

The rabid reformers and uprooters of established and universally acknowledged 
laws will, however, unhesitatingly approve them. Dr. Barthelmess' remarks may 



77 

leave the impression that the Grand Lodge of New York had extended an invitation 
to him and his Lodges to return to the fold of the Grand Lodge of New York, which 
certainly is not a fact. He expresses himself perfectly satisfied with the position 
they occupy, and the Grand Lodge of New York has no reason to be less contented 
with her own. Dr. Barthelmess' assurance that the course pursued by the Grand 
Master of Hamburg was only condemned by a very small portion of American Ma- 
sons is singularly void of truth ; Hamburg Masons are not recognized by any of the 
legal Grand Lodges in this country. He also seems to lay great stress upon the 
fact, that in common life Hamburg Masons hold friendly intercourse with American 
Masons. It would be strange were it otherwise. Masonically, Hamburg Masons 
are dead to us ; outside of Masonry our laws permit an interchange of courtesies 
and civilities. Dr. Barthelmess also asserts that, as far as his power of prophecy 
enables him to look into the future, in case of a separation from Hamburg by her 
two New York Lodges, they will not rejoin the Grand Lodge of New York. The 
meaning of that assurance has since become more apparent. For a resolution has 
been adopted by the so-called Ve.re.in deutsch-amerikanischer Freimaurer (Society 
of German-American Freemasons) , which has its seat in New York, to the follow- 
ing effect : " The officers of the society are directed to prepare a manifest inviting 
all German Lodges and all German brethren to attend a Masonic Congress by 
deputies, for the purpose of consulting on the formation of an independent Lodge 
Union for the United States," which, if successful, will be guided and governed by 
Dr. Barthelmess. It remains to be seen whether the German Masons of America 
are willing to assume an isolated position in this country. We have too much faith 
in the good sound sense of the great majority of our German brethren, to believe 
that they are willing to do the bidding of the rabid reformers, or that they can be 
cajoled to forward the designs of a few ambitious leaders. 

In the Protocol No. 122, of November 16, 1867, Dr. Buek acknowledges the 
receipt of the Transactions of the Grand Lodge of Texas with the remark, " that 
this brotherly advance made by that Grand Lodge deserves to be the more gratefully 
acknowledged by the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, as it was unexpected on the part 
of a Grand Lodge in the United States." He was satisfied that the Grand Lodge 
would consent, in acknowledgment of this act of friendship, to forward, with its 
thanks, to the beloved sister at Houston, the list of the Grand Lodge. 

We are satisfied that the Grand Lodge of Texas will, sooner or later, discover the 
iron hand, at present so carefully concealed in a velvet glove. 

In the same Protocol Dr. Buek also acknowledges the receipt, through Dr. 
Barthelmess, of several numbers of the "Reform "organ of the Verein deulsch' 
amerikanischer Freimaurer, from which he is rejoiced to learn that among the 
seven newly joined members some belonged to the Grand Lodge of New York, and 
also a Bro. Ray, the Master of a colored Lodge at Brooklyn. We are only sur- 
prised that the Triangle, heretofore the organ of Dr. Buek, has been so very 
unceremoniously discarded. 

The same Protocol also acknowledges the receipt of a letter from Pythagoras 
Lodge, No. 1, Brooklyn, in which it is stated that she has unanimously approved 
the fundamental laws adopted by the Verein deutscher Freimaurer, at Worms, 
June 8 and 9, 1867, and that the Lodge would be guided by them in its future 
actions. They therefore propose that the Grand Lodge of Hamburg should also 
express herself in favor of the same fundamental laws. 

It is certain, however, that both the happy New York daughters of the Grand 
Lodge of Hamburg do not look upon these fundamental laws of the Worms' con* 
vention through the same spectacles, as appears from the following abstract, which 
we do not find mentioned in the Hamburg protocol. 



78 



Franklin Lodge, No -2, of New York, adopted the following resolutions at her 
meeting of October 21, 1867 : 

" In consideration of the fundamental Masonic law projected at the Masonic con- 
gress of June 8 and 9, 1867, at Worms, and the manifest addressed to all Grand 
Lodges of the world, which accompanied it : 

" In consideration that we also are called upon to indorse the said manifestation ; 

" In consideration that the present prevailing rhetorical-declamatory tendency 
of the Masonic institution is one of the chief causes of its decay, and of its limited 
influence on the practical life of the present time ; 

"In just surprise that the Verein deutscher Maurer, in contradiction to its 
antecedents and its heretofore pursued course, in order to carry out its intended 
reforms, has addressed itself to Masonic institutions, the absolute abolition of which 
must be the first effective and real problem of honest reform efforts ; 

" With regret that by means of that manifest the Masonic world of Germany is to 
be made tributary to the prevailing deceptive syllogism, to effect a unity at the 
expense of liberty, by a centralization alike objectionable in principle and in expe- 
rience ; 

"In view of the frequently, clearly, and definitely expressed opinions of our 
Lodge in regard to necessary and indispensable reforms in Masonry ; 

" With particular reference to Sections 4, 5, 10, 15 and 16 of the mentioned plan, 
which are diametrically opposed to the fundamental idea of liberty and sovereignty 
of Lodges ; 

" With the conviction that the course taken by the Verein deutscher Maurer, at 
Worms, will not lead to agreeable, practical reform results; 

" The Lodge Franklin, No. 2, resumes the order of business." 

There certainly exists, to say the least, a great inconsistency between the pro- 
fession and practice of Franklin Lodge. Considering as she does the rhetorical- 
declamatory tendency of Masonry one of the chief causes of its decay, and its 
limited influence on practical life, it would be difficult to produce a set of resolu- 
tions of a higher bombastic order than those above quoted. Considering as she 
does, the abolition of Grand Lodges the first and greatest aim of the reformers, she 
adheres with peculiar tenacity to her connection with the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, 
disregarding even the gentle hints so frequently thrown out of late by Dr. Bdek 
that his daughters of New York might depai't in peace as soon as they pleased. 

The protocol of Hamburg contains the letter of Pythagoras Lodge approving the 
fundamental laws and manifest of the Verein deutscher Maurer. Why does it omit 
this " hifalutin " production of Franklin Lodge, disapproving the same? Perhaps 
the diversity of views in the happy New York family of the M. W. Doctor of Ham- 
burg is the cause of his wish for a quiet and peaceable separation. 

We must confess that we have just the slighest curiosity to learn how the Grand 
Master of Hamburg will relish being " abolished " by his daughter Lodge. 

The Grand Lodge has appointed a representative near the Grand Orient of Italy, 
at Florence. 

VEREIN DEUTSCHER FREIMAURER (Society' op German Freemasons) OF 

GERMANY. 

We have received the report of the Verein for the year 1867. The political 
occurrences in Germany prevented the meeting of the Society in 1866. On the 8th 
and 9th of June, 1867, it held a session at Worms, adopted what they call fundamen- 
tal laws, and at the close of the session issued the following : 



79 

"Manifest to all the Geand Lodges of the World. 

" Most Worshipful and Beloved Brethren : — If Freemasonry, to -which we are all 
attached with enthusiasm and love , has not to its full extent succeeded in fulfilling 
its exalted mission to ennoble and conciliate mankind, and to make it happier, and 
crown with success all that is good, it is mainly to be attributed to its imperfect 
organization. 

" Freemasonry is universal, and all Lodges, wheresoever dispersed around the 
globe, constitute but one Lodge. This clearly and distinctly expresses the exalted 
idea that our Union is a unit, which as yet awaits realization. 

" However great and manifold may be the merits due to the first Grand Lodge- 
that of England— for her Masonic labors, and however much entitled to our grati- 
tude, still it can not be denied that she has not sufficiently guarded the general 
unity of the institution. It therefore could not fail that the institution, in the course 
of its expansion and development in various countries, would to some extent assume, 
not only other forms and laws, but also different characteristics, according to the 
spirit of nationality and the peculiar necessities and tendencies of the age. 

" In the course of the last century a centrifugal movement took place, which more 
or less led to a formation of the Grand Lodges, according to geographical and politi- 
cal boundaries. In its train followed divisions and isolations ; the various Grand 
Lodges adopted different constitutions, doctrines, usages, and systems ; and are not 
at all, or at best but loosely, united to each other. 

" Freemasonry must be a unit, a confederation of and for humanity. This, how- 
ever, is not yet the case, in the full sense of the word ; neither will it be, so long as 
its unity, as heretofore, is only an ideal, produced by the ties of a spirit of brother- 
hood and the form of its rites ; nor until it has received externally a corresponding 
expression by a formal representation through universal laws and regulations. 

" The Verein deutscher Freimaurer, animated by a desire to reunite the Order in 
freedom and love, according to the organic nature of the institution and the pro- 
gressive idea and tendencies of the times, has industriously occupied itself for years 
with a draft of universal laws for the institution, and after conscientious delibera- 
tion, has adopted the same at the annual meeting held at Worms, on the 8th and 9th 
of June, in the form accompanying this. The undersigned officers have received 
the honorable commission to lay before you, honored and beloved brethren, these 
fundamental laws for examination and adoption. It cannot escape your attention 
that a unity in essentials only is aimed at, uniting with what already exists, and 
aiming at that which is attainable. In other respects, it absolutely adheres to the 
Masonic principles of freedom, equality and brotherly love, self-administration, and 
universal priesthood ; and this every Grand Lodge may adopt. 

" It would be unnecessary for us to point out in particular how desirable and 
beneficial in its consequences for the institution and the human race the result would 
be, if all Grand Lodges would unite in a call for an International Masonic Congress, 
and the formation of an administrative committee for the whole union (Universal 
Grand Lodge). Bold as this idea may appear, its realization is no longer chimeri- 
cal, since communication has become so extended everywhere, since nations have 
drawn closer to each other by international industrial exhibitions— it already is a 
reality. And what has been possible for material interests, can and must also be 
attainable for the spiritual and moral interests of the human race ! It is only neces- 
sary that every individual and every corporation should manifest the good-will 
so proper in view of so great and good a cause : to go to work courageously and 
free from prejudice, and to sacrifice willingly personal inclinations and opinions. 

" If, therefore, the influence of the Lodges has been generally beneficial ; and if, 
wherever they have labored in the true spirit, they have promoted and extended 
11 



80 

morality, brotherly love, and the welfare of the human race, how much more will 
this be the case if the single links of the union are drawn closer to each other ; if 
they shall improve their internal arrangements, breathe new life into the Masonic 
body, keep step with the progressive tendencies of the times, and labor everywhere 
according to one plan and in the same spirit. 

" Under the full expectation that you, honored and beloved brethren, will willingly 
unite with us to produce, as far as possible, an internal and external unity, and an 
organic bond of the union, and thereby call into existence the golden age of Mason- 
ry, we confidently ask you to accept and favor the following, in the spirit of and 
resting upon the fundamental laws of the Ancient Charges of 1723, which would 
serve to produce an internal bond between all Lodges and Masons of the world. 

" In this hope we salute you with respect and brotherly love. 

" By order of the Verein deutscher Maurer, 

(The officers). 

" Worms, June, 1867." 

To give the laws adopted by the society, and alluded to in the foregoing manifest 
in extensio, would require too much of our space ; we will, therefore, merely give 
what appears to us to be their principal points. 

"Every association adopting these fundamental laws for its guidance, becomes 
a recognized part of the Masonic Union, that is to say, a just and perfect Lodge, 
as soon as the officers of a confederation of Lodges (Grand Lodges), or three recog- 
nized Lodges, have examined their laws and regulations, and certified to their 
Masonic correctness. 

" Isolated Lodges should not exist. Lodges and Grand Lodges should be organ- 
ized into National Grand Lodges, and assemble periodically. These should be com- 
posed of representatives of all the Lodges, and elect their own officers. Wherever 
this can not be carried out, all Grand Lodges, who have adopted the same funda- 
mental laws, should assemble in one body. In the latter case, every individual 
Lodge of the nation must belong to one of these Grand Lodges. 

" By means of this national confederation, all Lodges become a part of the Uni- 
versal Grand Lodge, which receives its vitality in the Universal (international) 
Masonic Congress, and the Supreme College of officers to be elected therein. 

" Even where National Grand Lodges exist, Confederations of Lodges, as above 
described, may exist, if they adopt the laws of the National Grand Lodge. In the 
same manner the National, as well as every other Grand Lodge, is subject to the 
laws of the Universal Grand Lodge : and every individual Lodge to those of the 
Lodge Confederation to which it belongs. 

"Special laws are enacted in individual Lodges by its members, in the Lodge 
Confederations by the assembled deputies of the Lodges composing the same. 

"Every five or seven years the National Masonic Congress, or the Grand Lodge 
occupying that position, elect deputies to the International Masonic Congress. The 
latter has the sole right to change any laws which may have been adopted, by a 
two-thirds vote. 

" The International Masonic Congress, under direction of its elected officers, 
whose powers it prescribes, enacts special laws, etc. It is the Supreme Court, en- 
forces the general laws, and has power to punish violations of the same, by censure 
or by withdrawal of Masonic recognition. This Congress is also the Supreme Court 
of Appeals in case of differences between the subordinate parts of the Confedera- 
tion. 

"Every part of the Union is subject to the laws of the Confederation, and to those 
of the State Government in which it is located.' 4 



81 

This, then, is the result of the labors of the Verein, or rather of its recognized 
leaders. The first meeting of the Verein was held in May, 1861, and others were 
held annually thereafter, excepting in 1866. This self-constituted body proclaimed 
at its birth that it aimed at the abolition of Grand Lodges, and at a change of all 
ritualistic forms, which latter would necessarily result in a change of the spirit of 
the Masonic Institution. Having placed itself at first upon a level with Lodges and 
Grand Lodges, it now even takes a step in advance of that position, issues a manifest 
to all Grand Lodges of the world, and calls upon them to adopt its proposed funda- 
mental laws. 

A self-constituted Masonic Lodge has ever been deemed clandestine, and commu - 
nication with it interdicted. Single members or a congregation of them cannot act 
independently ; they must have the approval of constituted authority, and every 
effort that does not rest upon a legal foundation must be held to be uncalled for and 
unlawful. The position of this body claiming to be Masonic is, to say the least, 
anomalous. The annual assemblies of Masons of former times was superseded by 
formation of the Grand Lodge of England, the peculiar features of which are 
generally engrafted in some form upon almost all the Grand Lodges of the world. 

Whilst, however, the Grand Lodges of the United States are composed of the 
representatives (Master and Wardens) of the daughter Lodges, who annually elect 
the officers of the Grand Lodge from among their own number, this is not the case 
in all the Grand Lodges of Europe. In some of the Grand Lodges of Germany, for 
instance, Lodges are denied the privilege of direct representation from among their 
own members. They are compelled to nominate their representatives from the mem- 
bers of a Lodge located at the seat of the Grand Lodge. The defects of that system 
it is unnecessary for us to point out. If the reformers had confined their efforts to 
bring about a change in that system by lawful means, they would have had a plausi- 
ble pretext for their movement. But having, like all reformers, aimed at the up- 
rooting of all that has been heretofore held sacred and inviolable, a total failure of 
their plan3 could have been foreseen. Discovering that the great body of the Fra- 
ternity in Germany remained aloof, they have changed base. Their former watch- 
word " Abolition of Grand Lodges " is changed to " Confederacy of Lodges, Grand 
Lodges, National Grand Lodges, and Universal Grand Lodges." Instead of depriv- 
ing Grand Lodges of all power, they propose to create a Universal Grand Lodge, 
with power of making laws to govern and control the Masonic Fraternity of the 
world. To speculate upon the result which the realization of this chimerical and 
impracticable idea would produce, we consider a waste of time. And if the plan 
could be carried into effect, what position would this Universal Grand Lodge occupy 
in regard to the three Prussian Grand Lodges and their King Protector ? Would or 
could he or they submit to an " authority " over them ? And how would an edict of 
this "Supreme Grand Lodge" be respected in France, in case of disagreements 
among the brethren in that country, such as have occurred within the last decade, 
when Napoleon the Third forced upon them as Grand Master a man who was not 
then even a Mason? And as to the adoption of the plan in this country, we can 
only predict its utter failure. The formation of a General Grand Lodge of the 
United States has been as often defeated as it was attempted. Neither the Grand 
Lodges of this country nor those of Europe are ready or willing to renounce their 
independence and subject themselves to a superior authority. 

Reforms to be successful should originate in legal Lodges or Grand Lodges. The 
members of these bodies are the most competent judges of necessary changes. 
Whensver attempts for that purpose were made outside of this, they have invaria- 
bly resulted in failure. We need only point to the efforts for Masonic reform in 
Germany itself, during the latter part of the last century. Not only did these 
attempts not lead to a closer union of the Fraternity, but rather to the estrangement 
of its several parts. 



82 

However well-meaning the propositions of these " Reformers " may be, their final 
effect upon our institution should be well considered. A change of our vital prin- 
ciples cannot be made, unless the whole Fraternity consents thereto. No portion of 
the great family has the right to lay them aside in part or whole. Such a step 
can only lead to the downfall of the institution. New principles may be adopted, 
new forms set up, new tendencies followed, but whenever that takes place, it will 
cease to be Masonry. Let us hold firmly to that which has been handed down to 
us, disturb not that which has heretofore been and is now considered sacred. If 
changes of a local nature are necessary to our brethren of Germany, let them effect 
them in a legitimate way, but let them beware how they remove the ancient land- 
marks. 

That there is danger threatening Masonry here and everywhere from the facility 
with which the profane gain admission, cannot be denied. Wholesale initiations 
and the too rapid increase of Lodges are not conducive to the health and prosperity 
of the institution. Our numbers should not be recruited from those who are led 
within our circle by motives of selfish ambition, social enjoyment, or curiosity. 
With the gratification of their object, their interest vanishes. The higher spirit of 
Masonry has never unfolded itself to them, because they never sought it. Self-im- 
provement, a self-sacrificing love for the brotherhood, reflection on the life hereafter, 
and an elevation of soul, was not their aim. They merely sought for material ad- 
vantages. Hence the material that offers itself for the building of our temple 
should be closely scrutinized, and the standard of acceptance raised. But the 
greatest danger lies hidden in a change of the principles that underlie our institu - 
tion. 

If reforms are necessary, let them be directed to a change of obsolete usages, to 
the pruning of abuses, to a careful scanning of the candidates' moral and mental 
qualifications. An entire change is neither called for nor necessary. It is not a 
principle of Masonry to force its spread. Let it be permitted to expand itself 
naturally. Let us preserve the liberty of religious faith. Let us foster a spirit of 
brotherly love among its members, a duty of self-knowledge, a spirit of humility, 
the practice of virtue, and imprint upon the minds of its votaries the necessity of 
laboring for the welfare of all. If Masonry cannot effect this, it has outlived its 
object and utility. 

The Vercin now has about three hundred members, comparatively a small number 
when we consider that it has existed seven years, and that Germany has twenty- 
five thousand Masons. It had selected Elberfield (Prussia) as the place for its meet- 
ing this year. This, however, we are now informed, has been vetoed by the Grand 
Lodges of Prussia. 

ITALY. 

Masonry in Italy seems still to be in a somewhat unsettled condition. There exist 
in that country four Grand Lodges, viz., at Turin, Milan, Palermo, and Florence. 
The Grand Lodge at Florence, the largest of the four, has one hundred and thirty- 
nine Lodges under her jurisdiction, which includes those located in Turkey, etc. ; 
that at Palermo thirty-nine Ledges, and the other two a small number only. A de- 
sire for a union of some of the Italian Grand Lodges had manifested itself, to which 
we alluded in our report of 186G, which, however, seems to have been frustrated. 
Dissensions sprung up, and publicity was given to these animosities in the papers of 
the day, which furnished rich materials to the enemies of Masonry. Not a voiee 
seems to have been raised to correct the wrongful impressions created thereby. 

The Bolletino del Grande Oi^iente della Massoneria in Italy contains a circular 
letter of the first Deputy Grand Master, Bro. Frapoli, of the Grand Orient of Italy, 
in which, among other things, he says that the aim of Masonry is threefold : 1. The 



83 

study of nature, and the peaceable promotion of universal progress. 2. The brother- 
hood and solidarity of the people. 3. The instruction and welfare of all members 
of the national family. 

The Grand Orient has entered into closer relations with foreign Grand Lodges by 
the appointment of mutual representatives. In a letter addressed to the Grand 
Lodge of Hamburg, Bro. Frapoli says: "In answer to the questions which you 
propound, I will freely state : 1. That the Lodges affiliated with the Grand Orient of 
Italy are strictly prohibited to discuss political questions ; but in writing, we permit 
the same freedom that is conceded to every citizen by the State. 2. That after the 
late failure to form a united National Grand Lodge by excluding the irregular ele- 
ments of Milan and Naples, we are of necessity obliged to guard our Lodges from 
contact with irregular brethren, the more so as these Lodges, although not numerous , 
are too indifferent in regard to the reception of material that offers itself. The 
Lodges formed by speculators or impostors at Naples and elsewhere we need not 
mention here." 

The following, in regard to the Grand Orient at Florence, is from the procotols of 
the Grand Lodge of Hamburg : 

The Grand Orient of Italy, at Florence, called together by Garibaldi and De- 
Lucca, met in convention of all Italian Lodges, on the 24th June, at Naples. 

Several important resolutions were adopted, among which are the following : A 
reduction of the members of the Grand Lodge from forty to twenty-four ; the elec- 
tion of a Grand Master for five years ; a reformation in the Ritual ; prohibition to all 
daughter Lodges to discuss politics and church affairs ; and an interdict to print 
Masonic articles without the sanction of the Grand Orient. 

Bro. Garibaldi was elected Honorary Grand Master for life, and De Lucca for 
the year 1867. Bro. Th. Cordova was elected Grand Master, and Bro. Ludovico 
Frapoli First Deputy Grand Master. 

The Bolletino Officiate del Gran Consiglio, at Milan, contains the edicts and also 
a report of the annual communication of the Grand Orient at Naples. At the an- 
nual communication of July 15 and 16, 1867, at Milan, eight Lodges were rep- 
resented. The proposition for a union of all Italian Grand Lodges into one body 
was discussed, but a union with the Grand Orient at Florence and the Scottish 
Rite was declined. Bro. Ansonio Franchi was made honorary presiding officer 
for life. Bros. Reineri and Aglebert second and third honorary presiding officers. 
Bro. Guiliano Guastalla was elected presiding officer of the Grand Council. 
Bros. Cremona and Luzzati, Deputies, and Samuel Segre, Grand Secretary. 

A Lodge has sprung into existence whose members belong to different Italian 
Lodges. They propose to remain independent from all Grand Lodges. Their aim 
s expressed in the name they have selected for themselves, " Propogandists of 
Masonic Unity." Their head is Bro. D. Sampieri, 33d.\ 

GRAND LODGE OF THE NETHERLANDS. 

The annual assembly of that Grand Body took place on the 25th of November, 1866. 
The fiftieth Masonic anniversary of the Grand Master, Prince Frederic, of the 
Netherlands, was celebrated by the Grand Lodge with great splendor on that day. 
Deputations from forty-two Lodges participated therein. To commemorate the 
event, the Grand Master presented to the Grand Lodge his rich collection of Ma- 
sonic works, manuscripts, etc., formerly the property of Bro. Kloss, deceased. 

A provincial Grand Lodge of South Africa was instituted at Cape Town. Four 
new Lodges were chartered in South Africa. 

From the report of the Grand Lodge of June 16, 1867, it appears that the Grand 



84 

Master has appointed Bro. Van Lennep as Deputy Grand Master, in place of Bro. 
Van Rappard, deceased. 

The Grand Lodge has affiliated with her fifty active and sixteen dormant Lodges, 
and eighteen of which no information has been received for some time past. 

From the decennial report of Bro. Willekes Macdonald, it appears that during 
that time the membership in the Netherlands has increased by 400. In the Nether- 
lands, excepting therefrom, however, the colonies, there were on the 31st March, 

1866, 1,862 Masons ; and according to the latest information, they had increased to 
1,907. 

According to a report from Alexandria, a Lodge has been instsituted in the valley 
of the Nile by the name of "Abraham Lincoln," working under a charter of the 
Grand Orient of Italy. 

The Grand Lodge exchanged representatives with the Grand Lodge of Lusitania 
(Portugal). 

The Buitenland'sche Cwrespondentie discusses the allocution of the Pope very 
thoroughly, and winds up the article as follows " If the question is asked how the 
allocution was received in different countries, the answer may be given as follows : 
In Italy with derision, in France with an apology, in England with contempt, in 
Germany with grief." 

GREECE. 

Whilst we deeply regret the discontinuance of the Grand Lodge of Hanover, we 
rejoice over the formation of a Grand Lodge in ancient Greece. Athens was here- 
tofore the seat of a Directory under the Grand Orient of Italy, with the following 
eight Lodges under its jurisdiction : 1. Panhellenium, at Athens; 2. Possidonia, in 
Pereo ; 3. Scufas, at Calcio ; 4. Corcyros, at Corfu ; 5. Archimedes, at Patrasso ; 
6. Figli di Leonida, at Syra ; 7. Rhigas de Pherreen, at Lamia ; 8. Progresso, at 
Argos. 

The Directory and Lodges petitioned the Grand Orient of Italy to assent to a 
severance of the connection, to which the latter gave its consent on the 7th April, 

1867, at the same time granting permission to form a Grand Lodge. 

A constituting assembly of the Greek Freemasons accordingly met on the 18th 
day of May, and continued in session until the 2d of June. A constitution was 
formed, which is soon to be published. Bro. Nicholas Damashino was elected and 
installed Deputy Grand Master, to conduct the affairs of the Grand Lodge until a 
Grand Master is elected. An exchange of representatives was effected with the 
Grand Orient of Italy. 

The pleasure with which we greet this news is marred by occurrences which have 
since taken place in that country. A letter dated June 17, 1867, at Patras, brings 
the sorrowful news that on the 16th of June, after the close of divine service, incen- 
diary placards against Freemasonry, invoking God's wrath against them, were dis- 
tributed among the people. At twelve o'clock M. a rabble, numbering two or three 
hundred, attacked the house of a quiet, peaceable man, a photographic artist by oc- 
cupation, because he was supposed to be the head of Freemasons. Windows, furni- 
ture, etc., were smashed, and his house, with one adjoining, burned to the ground. 
By the greatest exertions only, and with the aid of faithful friends, the photogra- 
pher sueceeded in making his escape from the daggers of his persecutors. He was 
hunted for in every direction, and would have undoubtedly fallen a victim to the 
wrath of the mob had he not succeeded in reaching a foreign steamer lying at 
anchor in the port. Half an hour after the occurrence, the police and armed men 
made their appearance on the scene of the riot, whereupon the mob dispersed. It 
was the intention of the rabble to fire the dwelling of every Freemason in the place. 



85 

On the day following a demonstration was made to raze the house of another Free- 
mason, which, however, were frustrated by the timely arrival of the police. A 
young man was most brutally beaten in his own house, and another escaped a simi- 
lar fate by presenting a pistol and threatening to shoot down the first man who at- 
tempted to lay hands upon him. Since then the foreigners have called upon their 
consuls for protection for themselves and their property. The police also took pre- 
cautionary measures, and peace has not since been disturbed. The chief mover in 
this persecution of Freemasons is said to be the son of a Greek ex-Minister of State, 
because he was rejected by a newly constituted Lodge on account of his notoriously 
bad and immoral character. It is also stated that incendiary articles published in a 
public journal in Athens, and the fanaticism of a physician and a lawyer, contribu- 
ted to incite the populace. They insist that the Freemasons were in league with the 
devil, that they were conspiring to overthrow the orthodox church, etc. The authori- 
ties are said to have taken the matter very coolly, and it is reported that an officer 
of high position has expressed himself " that he greatly regretted that one house 
only was burned to the ground." 

If scenes like these had occurred when Greece was under the heel of the Turk, it 
might have been attributed to the barbarism of the people. But what palliation is 
there for regenerated Greece ? They are a disgrace to the nation. Even the authori- 
ties looked on apparently with complacency, and mob-law was rampant and su- 
preme. The laws of the land and of society are violated with impunity, and the 
rabble stride through the streets with murder and arson inscribed upon their 
banner. 

But if it is claimed that the rioters were the dregs of the town, what explanation 
can be made of the following article which appeared in a public journal of the day, 
and which reads as follows : 

" I assume that the people of Patras have burned the Lodge and killed all the 
Masons. Where is the law that condemns him who has killed the wolf? Has not 
Christ himself said of those who give offense to - their brethren, ' that it would be 
good for them if a mill-stone was tied around their neck, and they were drowned in 
the depths of the sea.' Would they not have benefited humanity and performed a 
work of love, if they had done what Christ has taught ? Such a work, according to 
Christ's teachings, would have been wholesome for the Masons themselves, because 
it stops their bad acts, that are a vexation to the souls of the brethren, and which 
will be the more punishable in the judgment to come." 

Can it be believed that the above is written in the present age of civilization ? 
The auto da fes, the rack of the Inquisition, never proclaimed murder and rapine 
with more boldness. But where such doctrines are openly and boldly proclaimed 
and taught, where the mob is permitted to walk about unpunished and unmolested, 
and where it is unblushingly asserted that such acts are not crimes, but God-pleas- 
ing deeds, and that it is a religious duty to burn down the dwellings of their 
neighbors who differ with them in opinion, where it is proclaimed that murder 
resounds to the glory of God and truth, can it be said that justice exists? Deep 
must be the social degradation of a people that upholds such a government and 
such doctrines. Its moral sense is at a low ebb. 

BRAZIL. 

The Grand Lodges Dos Benedictinos and Do Lavradio, at Rio be Janeiro, are still 
occupying their former antagonistic position. The Grand Lodge Dos Benedictinos 
has published a report, in which she states that she is now recognized by the Grand 
Orient of France, the Grand Lodge of Lusitania and Hanover, and the Supreme 



86 

Councils of New York and Cuba. She has thirty-five daughter Lodges under her 
jurisdiction, of which seventeen are at Rio and eighteen in the provinces. 

Bro. Joaquim Saldenha Morinho is Grand Master ; Bro. Joaquim Joze Ignacio , 
Deputy Grand Master ; and Bro. Joao Soverino da Silva, Grand Secretary. At a 
festival Lodge, held by the Grand Lodge on the 16th of May, 1865, the Grand Master 
addressed the brethren. In the address he alluded to the aims which the Grand 
Lodge had set before itself, among which is the abolition of slavery in Brazil , and 
the education of the masses. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

In closing our report upon European Grand Lodges, we desire to mention a part 
of the Masonic family with which heretofore our acquaintance has been very 
slight. In Wallachia and Roumania, the country which lately chose a new 
ruler in Prince Charles, of the House of Hohenzollern, we are informed, consider- 
able agitation is perceptible among the members of Lodges now working under the 
Grand Orient of France. The brethren of the Lodges Les Disciples de Pythagore, 
at Galatz, and Le Phare Hospitalier, at Braila, are agitating the question of severing 
their connection with the Grand Orient of France, and forming a Grand Lodge of 
their own, under the name of Ghrand Orient de Roumaine, with its seat at Bucharest, 
now the capital of the country. The German brethren at Galatz, said to number 
about forty, have it under consideration to apply for a charter to the Grand Lodge 
of Hamburg. It is, however, stated that the German element is at present too 
weak to promise success. 

Upon the whole, the tidings that come to us from that region are not very en- 
couraging. The brethren, as a body, residing there, lack the zeal necessary to pro- 
mote the interest of the institution. The attendance of the Lodge meetings are 
reported to be very slim and the diversity of opinions prevailing among the brethren 
seems to be retarding the development of sociality and the progress of Masonry. 

Some of the government officers, particularly in the telegraph offices, who were 
Masons, have been dismissed. It is, however, reported that this is done without 
the knowledge and against the wishes of Prince Charles. Let us hope that 
Masonry will also there find a genial soil. 

From Egypt the news comes to us that the Lodge Luce d' Orient, at Cairo, has 
called a convention of Lodges. The following responded to the call : Les Pyra- 
mides, Regeneration de la Grece, Cajo Graces, Ecossais, and St. John's, of Alexan- 
dria, Bulwer, Sphynx, Grecia and Luce d'Oriente, of Cairo, and Mont Sinai, of 
Suez. 

The object of the convention was to effect a closer alliance among the Lodges of 
that country, and to advance the interest of Masonry. 

A number of resolutions were adopted, some of which, according to our ideas, 
are foreign to the spirit of Masonry. 

Whilst Masonry in Europe, during the past year, has been generally prosperous , 
it has not escaped vituperations and persecutions. Ancient Rome, the metropolis 
of a priestly hierachy, sounds the key-note as usual. Untiring in its efforts to 
bring to servitude the free spirit of God-worship, it encompasses the world with its 
emissaries, for the purpose of retarding the efforts made for the education and en- 
lightenment of the people. But its days are numbered ; it must crumble to ruins. 
Not the Rome with its palaces and art treasures ; but Rome the seat of an hierarchy, 
whose success lies in the ignorance of the masses. Papal bulls and anathemas have 
lost their terror. No longer do they shake thrones, no longer do they draw pilgrim 
penitent potentates in ashes and sackcloth to the feet of the Pope, and no longer 



87 

does he dispense crowns, no longer make and unmake emperors and kings. The 
spell is broken and dispelled. 

In Italy, where Masonry, but a few years ago, was prohibited under the severest 
penalties, and where our rites were practiced in secret, it has found a permanent 
abiding place, and the Masonic gavel resounds even within hearing of the Vatican. 

Portugal and Greece now have their Grand Lodges. The annexation of Hesse to 
Prussia has opened that country also to our Royal Art. Austria, where from 1780 
to 1790 Masonry enjoyed great prosperity, but where in 1795 the Lodges were closed 
by the Imperial Government, is now compelled to make concessions to its people. 
It has already enacted laws regulating the rights of associations and the assembling 
of societies, and the day is not remote when that country will again see prosperous 
Lodges within its boundaries. Already the organ of the Archbishop of Vienna ex- 
presses the fear that the radicals of that city are determined to establish Masonic 
Lodges. 

Russia and Spain cannot much longer remain so far in the rear of progressing en- 
lightenment. And although the Belgian Senator Baron Della Failla, the presid- 
ing officer of a Catholic Congress that met at Mechlen, proclaims in his harangue to 
that body, " that they are the sons of the crusaders, they also must undertake a 
crusade against the damned unbelievers," comparing the Freemasons to the Moham- 
medans and Masonry to the Islam, thereby showing that the old hatred is still rank- 
ling in the bosom of some, who should rise above it by means of their education ; it 
is, on the other hand, not without interest to know that, under the Prussian Govern- 
ment, slanders against Freemasonry will no longer go unpunished. For we are in- 
formed that the rector of a Catholic Church at Cologne was condemned, by the Cor- 
rectional Court, to pay a fine of 25 thalers and to imprisonment for ten days, for an 
article insulting to Masonic Lodges, which he published in his paper, and for spread- 
ing falsehoods that would expose them to the hatred and contempt ©f the public. 

The prophet says : "Watchman, what of the night? " The Watchman replies : 
"It is still night, but the morning is dawning." And the morning is dawning for 
Masonry in those countries. 

IN CONCLUSION 

W-5 have but a word to add, and that is to say, that we have endeavored with an 
impartial hand and in the spirit of fraternal love to give such a sketch of the trans- 
actions of our great Brotherhood as may fairly represent its status at the time of re- 
view. While it is impossible, within any reasonable limit, to reproduce all the good 
things that have passed under our notice in the thousands of pages before us, it has 
been a matter of no small difficulty to keep our report within its present bounds, and 
yet do moderate jnstice to our cotemporaries. That the brethren of our jurisdiction 
will read it, we have a right in their interest to ask. That the same prosperity which 
has thus far attended the doings of the Craft may be continued, and that it may be 
given to us all, humbly acknowledging the Source of the many blessings vouchsafed 
us, wisely to profit by our opportunities, we earnestly pray. 



JOHN L. LEWIS, 
JOHN W. SIMONS, ] 
M. PINNER. 



'} 



88 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

This Grand Lodge commenced its eighty-second annual commu- 
nication, at Raleigh, December 7th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
One hundred and seventy-one Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ R. W. Best, Grand Master, has no mercy for 
the drones and parasites, which he says got into the Lodges 
during the war. He says, " We repeat, cut them off, for they are 
as much out of place in a Masonic Lodge, as a viper in a nursery." 
He was much exercised about the work, fearing that Bro. Stev- 
enson, the Grand Lecturer, had lost the true, simon-pure " Stev- 
enson work " of the Grand Lodge. So he called a convention, 
convinced the aged brother of his errors, and established what 
some brother called the " best work," and was at rest. He had 
decided that a candidate could be stopped till the degree was con- 
ferred, and that the objecting brother need not give his reasons. 
He recommended omitting printing the names of all the brethren 
with the proceedings, but the Grand Lodge thought differently, 
so we have one hundred and forty-eight pages of them. He 
reports having granted sixteen dispensations for new Lodges. He 
also recommends a Masonic Congress of all Grand Lodges in 
America, to settle the work, which he thinks needs settling as 
much now as it did in 1843. Does our brother suppose, we 
wonder, that all other Grand Lodges, like North Carolina, believe 
in the Baltimore work ? 

On the recommendation of a committee who had applied to all 
the Grand Lodges for copies of any written work which might be 
permitted in their respective jurisdictions, but had been able to 
hear of none but a proposal to have one in Rhode Island, appar- 
ently not yet carried out, the following was adopted : 

" Resolved, That the making or using of any letter or cypher to the true Masonic 
work and mysteries, is not authorized by the ancient customs of the order, is con- 
trary to its principles and teachings and cannot, therefore, be sanctioned by this 
Grand Lodge. 

Resolved, That the true Masonic mysteries should be taught and handed down by 
oral teaching alone, as has been done from remote ages, and that any departure 
from this principle is fraught with danger to the institution." 

The experience of the committee in search of such light to the 
contrary notwithstanding, we believe no Grand Lodge exists, 
which works any modification of the Preston-Webb or the 



89 

Hemming work and lectures, in which some such work, in writing 
or print, cannot be found, and is not relied upon; the truth 
being, no human memory can be relied upon to retain and per- 
petuate so much of verbal accuracy as either of these systems 
demands. Twelve charters were granted, and three Lodges con- 
tinued under dispensation. The committee to whom was referred 
the Grand Master's proposal for a National Congress on the work, 
reported in favor, but the Grand Lodge determined that it was 
inexpedient. 

The report on correspondence was from the pen of Bro. Robert 
B. Vance, and reviews the proceedings of forty-three domestic 
and three foreign Grand Bodies. G.\ M.\ Williams, of Ala- 
bama, had decided that when the W. Master prefers charges, he 
should not preside at the trial, and that the Senior Warden should 
preside although the W. Master be present. Bro. Vance does 
not concur, holding, as we think correctly, that in the presence 
of the W. Master, no one can take the East from* him but the 
Grand Master or his Deputy. He also holds that the W. Master, 
in the case supposed, may preside, which we doubt. The W. 
Master should not prefer charges, for it places him in inconsistent 
positions. If he feels compelled to do so, the Grand Master 
should be requested to preside himself or by Deputy. Bro. 
Vance is one of the last who alludes to the political situation in 
the late war, and not without some bitterness, which, however we 
might have looked for it a few years ago, is now inexcusable. He 
seems quite pleased with the report of Bro. Barry, of Georgia, 
from which we quoted in a former report. In two instances, our 
North Carolina brethren have gone off at half-cock : in charging 
the Grand Lodge of New York with instituting negro Lodges, 
and in charging the Grand Lodge of England with the improper 
conduct of two Lodges at Halifax, then working under Scotch 
charters. We should have been glad if, when they had learned 
their error, they had more frankly admitted it. In the first 
instance, without any apology for the wrong done New York — a 
wrong which very slight knowledge of current Masonic intelli- 
gence should have prevented — they shift their complaint to the 
charge, that New York should have told them of the existence of 
the clandestine negro Lodges ; the puerility of which is apparent. 
The Grand Lodge of England, having courteously examined 
into the complaint made to it, and shown that in this matter, at 



90 

least, it had done no wrong, our North Carolina brethren, instead 
of making an apology for the charge, complain of the Colonial 
Board of England, because it takes the occasion to reiterate the 
views of that Grand Lodge on the subject of jurisdiction — views 
universally condemned on this continent, but generally acted upon 
in Europe. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

From this Grand Lodge we have proceedings of several quar- 
terly communications, and the annual communication, at Halifax, 
June 24th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 

At the quarterly communication, September 13th, A. L. 5867, 
eight Lodges were represented. The only matter of interest was 
the passage of a resolution that a Fellow Craft, who by sickness 
had been deprived of the full use of his limbs, might be raised to 
the third degree . 

At the quarterly communication, December 13th, A. L. 5867, 
eleven Lodges were represented. At this communication, G.\ 
M.*. Davis recommended that the Grand Lodge should fix a time, 
within which all Lodges in the Province should unite with it or be 
declared clandestine. The committee on the Grand Master's 
address, while concurring generally in his views, recommended 
that action be deferred until the next communication. A charter 
was granted to Scotia Lodge, before on the registry of Scotland. 
The Grand Master, from impaired health, was compelled to leave 
the Province, whereupon an address and a piece of plate were 
presented, in token of the appreciation of the brethren of his 
labors in behalf of the Grand Lodge, to which he made a suitable 
reply. 

At the quarterly communication, March 15th, A. L. 5868, 
eleven Lodges were represented. The Deputy Grand Master, 
R.\ W.\ S. R. Sircom, reported that he had granted three dis- 
pensations for Lodges, one of which was to a Lodge formerly 
under Scottish jurisdiction; to all of which charters were granted. 

An emergent communication was held May 15th, A. L. 5868, 
at which nine Lodges were represented. The Deputy Grand 
Master stated the object to be, to appoint a committee to confer 
with one appointed by the District Grand Lodge under English 
authority ; which committee was appointed. 



91 

At the quarterly communication, June 12th, A. L. 5868, twelve 
Lodges were represented. The Deputy Grand Master reported 
having issued a dispensation for Acacia Lodge, formerly under the 
Grand Lodge of England. The committee appointed to confer 
with District Grand Lodge reported that the English Lodges pro- 
posed the following : 

" The committee from the District Grand Lodge propose to the committee from 
the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, that a convention of all the Masonic bodies as 
Lodges in the Province, be called at some convenient place for the purpose of form- 
ing a United Grand Lodge, under one head, to be called the United Grand Lodge of 
Nova Scotia. That at said convention all superiority be left aside, and that the 
parties there present, form themselves into a Grand Lodge, and there make choice 
of Grand Lodge officers, issue warrants, &c." 

To which they made the following counter proposition : 

" In order to a thorough consolidation of the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, the 
Grand Lodge are desirous to accomplish the same, and the committee of the said 
Grand Lodge propose that the Lodges under the Grand Lodge of England be wel- 
comed into the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia, should an application be made, either 
through the Secretary of the District Grand Lodge, or directly by the Lodges to the 
Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia. That then the Grand Lodge of Nova Scotia issue 
such authority to said Lodges as will entitle them to all their Lodge rights, such as 
their funds, the position of their Past Masters, and other matters, and full repre- 
sentation in Grand Lodge under the constitution. 

That charters be granted to said Lodges at or after the quarterly meeting in Sep- 
tember, and at such meeting the roll of said Grand Lodge be revised, and the 
Lodges shall be numbered and placed on the roll according to the seniority of such 
Lodges, by satisfactory proof of the date of the original organization of the several 
Lodges on the list at such period." 

The following resolution was adopted : 

" That should an application be received from any Lodge under English jurisdic- 
tion for a warrant, during recess of Grand Lodge, the Deputy Grand Master be em- 
powered to grant a working warrant upon receipt of the application, and that the 
confirmation of the same be made the first business of the annual communication, 
and that said Lodge be entitled, at said communication, to a full representation." 

A charter was granted to Acacia Lodge. 

At the annual communication, thirteen Lodges were represented. 
The Deputy Grand Master reported having granted a dispensa- 
tion for a Lodge at Barrington ; that he had attempted a corres- 
pondence with the Grand Master of Scotland, but no action YiM 
been taken by that Grand Lodge because of the absence of the 
Grand Master, who, through indisposition, had been compelled to 
retire to the south of France. He refers to the report of the 



92 



committee of conference, for the progress of matters in the 
Province. 

The Grand Secretary reports a long circular which he had sent 
to all Lodges in the Province, giving the circumstances attending 
the formation of the Grand Lodge, and the negotiations with the 
English District Grand Lodge, with their failure, and urging all 
the Lodges not already affiliated with the Grand Lodge, to do so. 
Notice was given by a brother that, at the next communication, 
he should move that all Lodges in the Province not uniting with 
the Grand Lodge should be declared clandestine. The new Grand 
Officers were installed by M.\ W.\ Hiram Chase, Past Grand 
Master, of Maine. The difficulties under which this Grand Lodge 
has labored, prove the necessity of the law, which should be ad- 
hered to, that all the Lodges within the political division in which 
it is proposed to establish a new Grand Lodge, should be invited, 
and that at least a majority of them, not less than three, should 
unite in its formation. We deem it probable the Grand Lodge 
will be able to sustain itself, and finally obtain exclusive jurisdic- 
tion in the Province, but if they had acted with the discretion and 
good judgment of their neighbors in New Brunswick, the craft 
would have been spared a too scandalous struggle for authority, 
the influence of which can hardly be other than injurious to the 
institution. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by Bro. William 
Taylor, and notices the proceedings of twenty-eight Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. He commences by saying: 

" We deem this department highly requisite. This is about the only way that our 
Lodges can obtain a general idea of what takes place in the Masonic world, and 
how very many important points that we are in doubt and uncertainty about, are 
disposed of in older and more experienced jurisdictions. Your committee have 
carefully kept this object in view in their extracts. We have refrained from any 
criticisms of our own, wishing rather to learn well and truly the workings of our 
venerable institution themselves, and having our brethren of the jurisdiction en- 
lightened by the opinions and decisions of those who have labored long to good 
effect in placing the order in so efficient and honorable position as it now occupies." 

What the committee propose to themselves, they appear to 
trave done well, but we deem something more than this the duty 
of committees of correspondence. 



93 

OHIO. 

This Grand Lodge held its fifty- ninth annual communication at 
Dayton, October 20th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Two hundred 
and sixty-five Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Howard Mathews, Grand Master, reports 
having granted twenty dispensations for new Lodges. He seems 
to doubt the necessity of so many new Lodges, but considered 
himself bound to grant the dispensation if the necessary forms 
had been gone through, and the proper papers presented. This, 
if the correct view of his power and duty under the laws of his 
Grand Lodge, shows a most unsound condition of things. The 
Grand Lodge should at once place a share of the responsibility 
upon the Grand Master by placing the final granting of dispensa- 
tions at his discretion. He reports that in one Lodge, a brother 
having presented a written protest against the advancement of 
two Entered Apprentices, the Lodge ordered it to be laid " under 
the table," which coming to his ears, he had arrested the charter 
of the Lodge, and he recommended it should be declared 
forfeited. He refers to a growing disposition to cultivate 
androgynous degrees, notwithstanding an edict of the Grand 
Lodge prohibiting side degrees. He recommends that Lodges 
be allowed to create emeritus members of those who, by 
age or infirmity are no longer able to participate in all the active 
work of the Lodge ; honorary membership to be conferred on 
those who have rendered valuable service to the craft ; not active 
members of the Lodge conferring it. 

The proposal to amend the constitution, by confining the repre- 
sentation of the Lodges to the W. Masters, having failed to 
obtain the necessary majority of the Lodges, was ordered to be 
again submitted. Twenty-six charters were ordered to issue to 
new Lodges, and two dispensations were granted. A proposition 
was made, from a committee appointed the year before, to provide 
a mode of commutation of dues, which was referred to the com- 
mittee on by-laws, to report next year. Adoptive side degrees 
were expressly forbidden, and Lodges forbidden to allow their 
halls to be used to confer them. The arrest of the charter of the 
Lodge that threw a brother's protest under the table, was ap- 
proved, and the Grand Master authorized in his discretion to 
restore it. • 



94 

The report on correspondence, from the pen of Bro. Wm. M. 
Cunningham, reviews the proceedings of thirty-two Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. He has something to say 
about the Great Falls' books. 



OREGON. 

This Grand Lodge held its eighteenth annual communication at 
Portland, June 22d, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Twenty-six Lodges 
were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Avery A. Smith, Grand Master, thus admon- 
ishes his brethren : 

"I would, however, admonish my brethren that we as Masons have other and 
higher duties to perform than the transaction of the simple business of the Lodge 
and learning scanty portions of our ritual ; that we are not Masons simply because 
we have been regularly initiated, passed and raised in a just and legally constituted 
Lodge of such. We can only become such by learning to subdue our passions, act- 
ing upon the square, keeping a tongue of good report, practicing charity and con- 
forming to all the excellent rules and requirements Masonry inculcates." 

He reports having granted four dispensations for new Lodges. 
He had decided : 

" A brother must have sat in open Lodge with another within one year, before he 
can properly vouch for him ; otherwise he should be examined." 

We can see no reason for the limit, and the committee on juris- 
prudence, to whom it was referred, say they " know of no 
Masonic law to sustain it, although" they "consider it a safe 
rule." He had also decided that an unfavorable report did not 
reject a candidate, but a ballot must be had. The committee on 
jurisprudence, on the authority of Mackey, reported against this, 
and the Grand Lodge ordered it stricken out. The general con- 
sent of Grand Lodges had settled this question against Bro. 
Mackey, very illogically, as it seems to us, but when anything is 
settled, we prefer to have it stay settled. 

Four charters were granted to new Lodges, and a charter re- 
stored which had been surrendered, as the committee say, to : 

" Establish the precedent that the Grand Lodge is but the custodian of the char- 
ter of a subordinate Lodge, and the same can be returned at any time when the 
disability under which it was surrendered no longer exists, subject at all times to 
the decision of the Grand Lodge." m 



95 

The report on correspondence was prepared by Bro. S. F. 
Chadwick, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-eight Grand 
Lodges, including New Hampshire. He takes exception to our 
regulation requiring a rejected applicant for membership to wait 
a year before making a new application. We understand him to 
admit the rule to be proper as to petitions for initiation, but 
thinks the Master Mason should be at liberty to apply as often as 
he pleases. We admit that the Master Mason has rights far 
superior to the profane, but not that one of those rights is that of 
membership in any particular Lodge, until he shall have been 
received by the members thereof, while we think, — and upon that 
our regulation is based, — that the harmony of the Lodge is best 
promoted by requiring him, in case of rejection, to wait till the 
feelings which are apt on such occasions to arise, have had time 
to fade away ; and also because when the application is immedi- 
ately renewed it is apt to give rise to canvassing, on the part of 
friends, to secure his election, which almost necessarily leads to 
trouble. Our law does not proceed, as Bro. Chadwick seems to 
suppose, upon any idea that the brother is unworthy, but upon 
the entirely different one of preserving the harmony of the 
Lodge, nor do we conceive that any wrong is done the brother, 
who, we are confident, is more frequently the one chiefly benefited 
by the regulation. Much of the brother's reasoning seems to us 
based on the new-fangled California notion, that non- affiliates, 
although their position as such is against their will, are, without 
trial and without guilt, to be indefinitely suspended. As the 
Grand Lodge of New Hampshire has not yet adopted this new 
notion, and probably never will, the wrong our brother anticipates 
in that way is not likely to occur. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

From this Grand Lodge, we have an abstract of proceedings 
for the year 5868. 

A quarterly communication was held at Philadelphia, December 
2d, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868, at which one hundred and thirty 
Lodges were represented. 

The committee of finance reported the Grand Lodge charity 
fund to amount to 855,322.39, and the Girard trust to $52,035.64. 
12 



96 

They also report the whole amount expended on the new temple 
to be $209,344.77. 

The annual communication was held at Philadelphia, December 
28th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. The "abstract" does not show 
that any Lodges were represented. We formerly saw remarks 
upon the unnecessary number of Grand Chaplains our Grand 
Masters had appointed, but G.\ M.\ Vatjx has gone farther in 
that direction than ever was done here ; he appointed and in- 
stalled no less than fifteen. 

The R.\ W.\ Richard Vatjx, Grand Master, in his address, 
congratulates his brethren that they are so well contented with 
their isolation in the matter of work, that used in that State being 
different from that in use in any other part of the world. He 



" The attachment to Pennsylvania work has been revived ; its simple but impres- 
sive ceremonies are viewed and understood as the true symbolization of those great 
truths and eternal principles of Freemasonry which exist in their grandeur and 
beauty when freed from all extrinsic and mere ostentatious clothing, intended too 
often as attractive for those who are never Masons, though members of the craft. 
The esoteric mysteries which Freemasonry holds enfolded within its sealed and se- 
cured enclosures, can only be comprehended by their own light. Their perpetuity 
in their original character can only be maintained by the most unyielding opposi- 
tion to every innovation. If the mind and heart of a brother need modern novelties 
to clothe these mysteries with that which is an innovation, to be more comprehensi- 
ble or commanding, he has mistaken an ignis fatuus for Masonic light, and great 
will become his blindness." 

He repeats his request of last year, that Pennsylvania brethren 
be not too strictly examined ; but if our brethren there insist upon 
having a work different from everybody else, we can see no in- 
justice in requiring them to learn at least so much of what all 
other Masons deem desirable, if not essential, as shall enable 
them to prove themselves to us. He truly says, the danger 
to Masonry now is from within, not from without. He reports 
having constituted thirty-one new Lodges the past year. He 
argues that committees of investigation should report unani- 
mously ; such is not our practice, nor do we see any good reason 
for it. A large part of the pamphlet is taken up with the cere- 
monies and address at the laying of the corner-stone of the new 
temple, June 24th. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by Bro. J. R. 
Fisher, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-five domestic and 



97 

four foreign Grand Bodies. The committee and the Grand Master 
make great point of what they call the Pennsylvania doctrine, 
that each Grand Lodge is absolutely supreme in its own jurisdic- 
tion. Hence, the committee decline to criticise the action of 
their neighbors, which seems to us a perfect non sequitur; for, 
admitting the supremacy and independence of each Grand Lodge, 
friendly and kindly criticism is in no way inconsistent therewith, 
and furnishes the most ready, if not the only, method of securing 
that degree of uniformity which is essential, if we would have our 
institution the same in substance in each jurisdiction, — differ- 
ences in details there will always be. They do, however, give us 
the benefit of their disapproval of our action in the Great Falls' 
matter. Of Nova Scotia and West Virginia, the committee say : 



" The rule adopted with such general approval of its Masonic justice, and indeed 
as Masonic law in regard to the Grand Lodge of Canada, must govern in both these 
cases. That rule strictly stated is this : A Grand Lodge, to be so considered, must 
be the only supreme, sovereign Masonic authority within its boundaries. In both 
Nova Scotia and West Virginia, there is a conflict of Masonic authority as to this 
very question." 



That is, there was no Grand Lodge (legal one, we suppose is 
meant) in England from 1735 to 1813 ; in Massachusetts, till the 
union in 1792; there is now none in Prussia, Italy, Brazil, and, 
we believe, some other countries where two Grand Lodges ami- 
cably divide the jurisdiction. And how about Pennsylvania her- 
self? There are, as it is reported, two other Grand Lodges 
claiming to be Masonic, in that State. Would the legitimate 
Grand Lodge there be entirely satisfied if her sister Grand Lodges 
should refuse her recognition, because of these spurious and clan- 
destine bodies. Until recently, both Virginia and West Virginia 
claimed that the jurisdiction there belonged to themselves, each 
to the exclusion of the other ; and because of the dispute, Penn- 
sylvania would not decide. Would she like her own doctrine 
applied to herself? The committee disapprove of the incorpora- 
tion of Lodges. They hold the correct doctrine on the subject of 
maims. They approve the system of Grand Lodge representa- 
tives, the utility of which has not been apparent to us, it seeming 
to be chiefly a way of multiplying high-sounding titles to some of 
our brethren who have a taste that way. 



98 

The almoners of the Grand Lodge charity report having dis- 
tributed $2,675 to one hundred and fifty-three applicants, from 
ten States and one foreign country; and the stewards of the 
Girard trust, that they had distributed $2,784.50 to one hundred 
and six brethren from fifteen States and nine foreign countries. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

We have the proceedings of this Grand Lodge for the year 
ending May 18th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 

At the semi-annual communication held at Providence, Novem- 
ber 13th, sixteen chartered Lodges and two under dispensation 
were represented. The proceedings were entirely local. 

At the annual communication, held at Providence, May 18th, 
twenty Lodges were represented, with two under dispensation. 

A committee, appointed to investigate the case of Bro. Over- 
ton G. Langley, who, it was alleged, was improperly made a 
Mason in a Lodge in the District of Columbia, while a resident of 
Newport, R. I., reported, that at the time Bro. Langley was an 
actual resident of Washington and not of Newport, and : 

" That Centennial Lodge has acted in the case in all particulars in accordance 
with Masonic usage. 

The M.\ W.\ Thomas A. Doyle, Grand Master, reports having 
granted two dispensations for two new Lodges, and one permit- 
ting Pawcatuck Lodge, No. 90, on the registry of Connecticut, 
to hold its meetings in the village of Westerly, but without juris- 
diction in Rhode Island ; Pawcatuck, Connecticut, and Westerly, 
Rhode Island being in truth one village, and the hall jointly fitted 
up by Pawcatuck Lodge, Connecticut, and Franklin Lodge, Rhode 
Island, on the Connecticut side of the river, and which was to 
have been occupied by the two Lodges, by consent of the two 
Grand Lodges concerned, having been burned. The Grand 
Master also reports that he had, upon complaint in due form, and 
after trial by a committee, deposed and suspended the Master of 
one of the Lodges, which action was confirmed at nie semi-annual 
communication. Charters were granted to the two Lodges work- 
ing under dispensation. 

There was no report on correspondence. 



t 
99 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

The annual communication of this Grand Lodge was held at 
Charleston, November 17, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One hundred 
and six Lodges were represented. 

In the absence of the Grand Master, we learn that the Grand 
Lodge was opened in ample (?) form by the Deputy Grand Master. 
How is that Bro. Bhuns ? 

The committee on grievances reported, that the accuser should 
have no right of appeal, which was sustained by 4 the Grand Lodge. 
This ruling was supported by reference to the civil law, which fails 
to satisfy us; the object of Masonic trial is to elicit the truth, and 
if it is hidden by any mistake or false action of the particular 
Lodge, it should be corrected, no matter by whom it is brought to 
the notice of the Grand Lodge. We cannot see but that Lodges 
are as likely to err in acquitting as in convicting the accused. 
The civil law is based upon other considerations, which have no 
weight in a Masonic Lodge. The Grand Lodge, on report of a 
committee appointed the year before, declared lotteries a violation 
of the great principles of the order. Twelve charters were 
ordered to issue to new Lodges. The Grand Lodge also adopted 
a report in favor of "Masonic Mutual Life Insurance Companies, 
whose object is to insure the lives of Master Masons of good 
standing in their respective Lodges, without respect to age, &c." 
We fear evil from the introduction of this project, which seems to 
have become general in the southern states. 

The report on correspondence was prepared by the Grand Sec- 
retary, Bro. R. S. Bkuns, and reviews the proceedings of twenty- 
three Grand Lodges, including ours. Bro. Beuns stands almost 
if not quite alone in his approval of the temper of some parts of 
the report on foreign correspondence of Bro. Barky, of Georgia, 
from which we quoted in a former report; probably even he will 
soon be ashamed of it. Apropos to the celebration of St. John's 
day, Bro. Brtjns says : 

" The Grand Master suggests that this festival be abandoned altogether, and I ap- 
prove of the suggestion. In fact, the time is not far off when Masonry will need to 
abandon St. John himself altogether ; for what is the necessary connection between 
himself and Masonry ? It is not easy to discover. Masonry may, indeed, recognize 
great and good men, patriots, patriarchs and prophets, as excellent models for 
study, but to adopt the representatives of any religion, specially in their religious or 



100 

sectarian character, is clearly in conflict with one of the most essential and abso . 
lutely saving landmarks of the fraternity from the beginning." 

This is not a singular attempt to reduce Masonry to a mere 
Deism ; as such attempts have failed in the past, so probably will 
they in the future. Masonry never was and is not now a system 
of religion, but everywhere it recognizes the religion of the 
country where it is established, provided it be based upon the 
worship of one God, but it is not Deism, the difference between 
which and Atheism is but a vanishing point. Of the rights of a 
brother under changes he says : 

" As a general rule it must be remembered that neither God, nor society, nor 
social institutions of any kind ever confer rights, except upon conditions. The 
conditions involve the moral law in the case. If the conditions are not 
complied with, the individual forfeits his rights, has no rights, and until his own 
case is decided, is in a state of abeyance, as a criminal himself, and cannot become 
an accuser, still less one to sit in judgment upon any other accused." 

Bro. Bruns is a great stickler for the rights of parent Grand 
Lodges, and would refuse recognition to both Nova Scotia and 
West Virginia, because of the want of assent of the parent Grand 
Lodge. Will he be kind enough to inform us when and in what 
manner that consent was given to the formation of his own Grand 
Lodge. He thinks we need greater uniformity of laws and decis- 
ions, and suggests a work on Masonic jurisprudence; such a work 
would at present, and probably always, be more or less local, and 
would not acquire any universal authority : indeed, just now the 
tendency is to have such a work in each jurisdiction, and of course 
to perpetuate local views and usages. 

TENNESSEE. 

The fifty-fifth annual communication of this Grand Lodge was 
held at Nashville, October oth, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Two 
hundred and thirty-four chartered Lodges and twenty-four under 
dispensation were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Joseph M. Anderson, Grand Master, reports 
having granted twelve dispensations for new Lodges, and that he 
had suspended a Master of a Lodge for drunkenness. 

Twenty-six charters were ordered to issue for Lodges under dis- 
pensation, and one new dispensation was ordered to issue, although 
the committee say of them : 



101 

" The committee farther recommends that charters be issued to the other Lodges 
before named, rather because they have been correctly and earnestly working under 
dispensations granted by the Grand Lodge at its last annual communication and by 
the Grand Master in the interim, than that the good of Masonry in this jurisdiction 
required their organization." 

This want of reason ought never to be urged as cause for 
granting a charter, and the action of Tennessee requires the pro- 
test of all true Masons against such evident abuse of power. 

The question was submitted to the committee on jurisprudence : 

" Has a member of a subordinate Lodge a right to vote in the Lodge while he is 
under charges for unmasonic conduct?" 

The majority of the committee say no, but the minority : 

" He has. He is entitled to the presumption of innocence until proven guilty." 

Which last was adopted by the Grand Lodge. 

This Grand Lodge has a fashion of holding what it calls a Lodge 
of Sorrow ; we wish somebody would tell us what they are ? and 
what they have to do with Masonry ? and what authority a Grand 
Lodge of Blue Masons has to institute them ? They seem to us 
an attempt to borrow something from the quasi deistic neologisms 
which hang upon the skirts of the Grand Orient of France. 

The report on foreign correspondence was from the pen of Bro. 
George S. Blackie, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-six 
Grand Lodges, including ours. Of the prevalent desire to compel 
affiliation he says : 

" We wish we could establish some such plan, and that the unaffiliated would agree 
to it. But it is useless to talk of such matters as long as trivial or party prejudices 
lead brethren to reject any candidates for affiliation in any Lodge. We have heard 
that such is the case in our jurisdiction, and we warn those guilty of such practices, 
that however "bright" they may be, they are not true Masons — they hit the 
power of the craft a cowardly blow in the dark, and should themselves be tried for 
anti-masonic conduct. The liberty of the ballot is not questioned, but such views 
are no matters to affect it. The very fact of a brother desiring affiliation is in his 
favor, and should be so regarded. Such a compulsion, however, as is recommended, 
would be an infringement on the rights of Lodges and the constitution." 

Bro. Blackie thinks we ought to discipline deserters from the 
army, because, as he says, they forfeit their honor, and break their 
oath. We think he is wrong, and such has been the almost uni- 
versal decision. He unhesitatingly answers no, to the making by 
affirmation. 



102 

TEXAS. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in its thirty-second annual com- 
munication at Houston, June 8th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One 
hundred and fifty-two Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ John R. Fretwell, Grand Master, reports that 
he had not issued a single dispensation for a new Lodge for the 
year, although quite a number of petitions had been presented to 
him. The Deputy Grand Master, however, reports that he had 
granted three and extended one. 

Eleven charters were ordered to issue to Lodges under dispen- 
sation, two dispensations continued, and three new dispensations 
granted ; so we think the Craft there are not likely to suffer from 
the refusal of the Grand Master. The committee on jurisprudence 
thus reported on unaffiliates : 

" Your committee on Masonic jurisprudence ask leave to report that we have ex- 
amined the inquiries referred to us as to what the rights of a dimitted Mason are ; 
and, in reply, say that a dimitted Mason has no rights. He is not entitled to charity 
or any of the rights and privileges of a contributing member. His position is fully 
and clearly defined by our constitution, article V., chapter 5, sections 1, 20, 21. In 
answer to the question, " Should not all unaffiliated Masons be required to pay, at 
least, the sum of one dollar annually to the Grand Lodge fund ?" we say this Grand 
Lodge has not the power to levy such a tax, even if disposed so to do." 

But no action was taken upon it by the Grand Lodge. 

The report on correspondence was presented by Bro. W. B. 
Botts, and reviews the proceedings of thirty-four Grand Lodges, 
including New Hampshire. California had decided, as we think 
correctly, that a Master cannot refuse admission to a member of 
his Lodge ; the Texas committee seem to doubt it : 

" From some of the results of this decision, we beg leave to differ with the com- 
mittee. It is the duty of the Master to govern his Lodge with regularity, and 
preserve its harmony. For this he alone is responsible, and it is reiterated at every 
meeting that peace and harmony must prevail. The Master being thus responsible 
for the preservation of harmony in his Lodge, we think it not only his right, but his 
duly, to prevent anything calculated to interrupt this. For this purpose, we believe 
that he has the right to deny admission to any brother, if he has good reason to 
believe that such brother will interrupt the harmony, or be the means of destroying 
the good feeling so necessary in all well-governed Lodges." 

They think the West Virginia Lodges should have paid up their 
dues before forming a new Grand Lodge. We do not see that it 
was essential for them to do it before taking that action. 



103 

The Grand Lodge of Hamburg had claimed a correspondence 
with that of Texas ; the committee say : 

" We hold no correspondence with the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, and desire to 
hold none. Neither will we recognize any of her subjects until she has properly 
recognized the rights of our sister Grand Lodge of New York. If one of our 
reports, or circulars, found their way through the mail to the Grand Lodge of Ham- 
burg, it was the result of accident and not design. We take our stand in this matter 
with the other Grand Lodges of the United States." 



VERMONT. 

The annual communication of this Grand Lodge was held at St. 
Johnsbury, June 10th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Seventy-four 
chartered Lodges and seven under dispensation were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Levekett B. Englesby, Grand Master, reports 
having granted eleven dispensations for new Lodges ; that in one 
or two instances he had allowed a reconsideration of the ballot, 
which he admits to be wrong, and promises if entrusted with the 
power, he never would do it again. We do not believe that any 
earthly power can entrust him with that authority. 

A resolution was adopted providing for schools of instruction in 
each district, to be called by the District Deputy Grand Master. 

Eleven charters were ordered to issue to Lodges under dispensa- 
tion and two new dispensations granted. Our brethren across the 
river are troubled about the work, largely arising from their old 
boast that they had the original simon-pure Jacobs ; and a long 
protest from the former Grand Lecturer Samuel Wilson, is ap- 
pended to the proceedings. Bro. Wilson ought to know that 
there is no authority for any lectures but the order of the Grand 
Lodge, which has the authority to change them even to the extent 
the Grand Lodge of England did, in adopting the Hemming work 
and lectures. 

The report on correspondence is from the able pen of the Grand 
Secretary Bro. Henry Clark, and reviews the proceedings of six 
Grand Lodges, one of them New Hampshire. We fully assent to 
the following : 

" ' That no profane person has any rights in Masonry. The election of an appli- 
cant merely invests him with the privilege of being admitted into the fraternity — 
which privilege, for good cause, can be withheld.' 

The above is the right view of the case, and the fraternity would be far better off 



104 

should Masters follow it strictly, for oftentimes they initiate applicants because the 
Lodges have so voted, when from their own knowledge it will be detrimental to the 
interests of Masonry, and their own Lodge in particular." 

And the following : 

" We commend, as eminently correct, and should be a universal regulation among 
Masonic Lodges, the decision of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, that is quoted by our 
Wisconsin brethren, that: 

' A person who is engaged in any business or occupation which is forbidden, and 
against the exercise of which penalties are denounced by any law of this State, or 
of the United States, cannot be made a Mason.' 

We would go further and require that charges be preferred against a brother who 
is already a Mason, and enters into any traffic forbidden by the laws of the State or 
United States." 

We wish Bro. Clark would give us the statistics of his Lodges ; 
it would greatly assist in preparing our table. 



VIRGINIA. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in annual communication at Rich- 
mond, December 14th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One hundred 
and two Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ William Terry, Grand Master, reports having 
granted fourteen dispensations for new Lodges. He thus dis- 
courses on the qualifications of candidates : 

" It is not enough that you do not know anything against the candidate, but you 
must know enough of him to satisfy you that he is every way qualified and worthy 
of the honor you propose to confer. It is easy to prevent the admission of an un- 
worthy candidate, but once admitted, a great deal of trouble may be given and much 
injury done. The admission of the unworthy is to us 
' The direful spring 
Of woes unnumbered.' 

And what are the qualifications of candidates ? 

1st. Their circumstances : 

According to the ancient charges, the candidate must be " of limbs whole, as a 
man ought to be." In the language of our own Grand Lodge, not " so maimed that 
they cannot conform to the ritual," and capable of " pursuing their worldly avoca- 
tions" if " necessitated so to do ;" thus clearly contemplating a conformity to "law 
and usage," and guarding against the admission of persons, who, in all reasonable 
probability, would become a burden to the fraternity. Masons should be charitable, 
but their obligations neither require them to assume the peculiar and responsible 
relation of Masons to these charitable objects, nor indeed, are they permitted. 

2d. Their connections : 

According to the ancient charges, the candidate must be " no bastard "—he must 
be " free-born, of good kindred, true and no bondsman ;" and agreeably to the regu- 
lations of the general assembly of 1663, the candidate must be " of able body, honest 



105 

parentage, good reputation and an observer of the laws of the land.'' It thus ap- 
pears that it is not alone sufficient that the candidate should be personally unexcep- 
tionable ; his connections must be such as will not bring reproach upon the fraternity. 
When we admit a person into our order, we assume certain relations, not only to the 
initiate, but to certain of his kindred, and it is evidently not only proper, but even 
required that this kindred should be such as we are willing to assume these responsi- 
ble relations to, but feel justified in imposing them upon others. 

3d. Moral qualifications : 

While I urge the brethren to give strict attention to the moral qualifications of 
candidates, yet I will not, in this paper, undertake to discuss this branch of the 
subject, as it opens too wide a field for the limits I have prescribed to myself. 

4th. The intellectual endowments : 

A candidate must not only possess the requisites of " circumstances," " connec- 
tions," and " moral qualifications," but he must be possessed of sufficient mental 
capacity to enable him clearly to understand and discharge the " functions and 
duties " devolving upon him in this relation ; he must have such mental culture 
that he "be capable of reading, that he may enrich his mind ; of writing, that he 
may communicate his thoughts to others," and for a more comprehensive view of 
these matters, I would call the attention of brethren to pages 84 and 232 of our 
Text Book, edition 1866. A proper observance of these requirements and discharge 
of our duty in the premises would preserve for honor and usefulness our ancient and 
honorable order ; but a neglect of them brings its fruits in the shameful conduct of 
many who have gained admittance among us." 

Thirteen charters were ordered to issue to Lodges under dispen- 
sation and two dispensations continued. 

The most important business of the communication, was the 
amicable adjustment of all difficulties with the Grand Lodge of 
West Virginia, by the adoption of the following : 

" The committee appointed to confer with the commissioners from the Grand 
Lodge of West Virginia to this Grand Lodge, in reference to the differences existing 
between these Grand Bodies, beg leave to report that they have had a full and 
free conference with said commissioners, and take great pleasure in stating that the 
spirit manifested by the Grand Lodge of West Virginia toward this Grand Lodge 
is fully appreciated by your committee ; and while it is a source of deep regret, 
that circumstances have occurred which, in the opinion of our brethren of West 
Virginia, justified them in forming a Grand Lodge, yet, in the spirit of fraternal 
feeling, and with an ardent desire to cultivate peace and harmony with all Grand 
Bodies, we are willing to recognize the Grand Lodge of West Virginia as a legally 
constituted body upon their complying with the conditions heretofore prescribed 
by this Grand Lodge ; and the said commissioners being present and having satis- 
fied this Grand Lodge that the Grand Lodge of West Virginia has fully complied 
with the conditions aforesaid, or is now ready and willing to comply with the same; 
be it therefore 

1st. Resolved, That this Grand Lodge hereby recognizes the said Grand Lodge 
of West Virginia, and extends to her our fraternal and Masonic recognition, and 
cordially recommend her to all other Grand Masonic Bodies in correspondence with 
this Grand Lodge. 

2d. Resolved, That the political boundaries of a State being definitely given and 
decided upon, fixes the Masonic jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of that State, 
except in so far as rights may have vested under charters theretofore lawfully issued. 



106 

3d. Resolved, That the political status of the counties of Jefferson and Berkeley, 
being at this time undetermined, the Grand Lodge of Virginia will for the present 
retain her jurisdiction over such Lodges in said counties as desire to report to this 
Grand Lodge ; but will authorize the opening of no new Lodge in either of said 
counties until their status is definitely settled, it being understood that the Grand 
Lodge of West Virginia shall on their part be subject to the like restrictions. 

Ith. That inasmuch as the original charters which emanated from this Grand 
Lodge to the subordinate Lodges in West Virginia, have been formally surrendered 
to this Grand Lodge, but the said subordinate Lodges having earnestly asked that 
they may be returned to them to be laid up in their archives as mementos of the 
past ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the said subordinate Lodges be permitted to retain the said old 
charters. 

5th. Resolved, That this Grand Lodge recommend to all of its subordinate 
Lodges in the territorial limits of West Virginia, to surrender their present charters 
to, and ask new charters from, the Grand Lodge of West Virginia." 

We congratulate our brethren of both jurisdictions upon the 
happy settlement of this affair, and in doing so desire to bear wit- 
ness especially to the uniform good temper and true Masonic spirit 
manifested on both sides, in a matter so likely to have engendered 
heated discussion. Our brethren of both jurisdictions have done 
honor to the craft as well as to themselves by their conduct of 
this delicate matter. 

There was no report on correspondence, but the Grand Secre- 
tary acknowledges the receipt of the proceedings of forty-three 
Grand Bodies, including New Hampshire. 

We wish Bro. Dove would fix up his statistics for the informa- 
tion of his brethren. 



WASHINGTON. 

The eleventh annual communication of this Grand Lodge was 
held at Olympia, September 17, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. Ten 
chartered Lodges, and one under dispensation, were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ James Biles, Grand Master, reported having 
granted two dispensations for new Lodges, one of them for Alaska 
Lodge, at Sitka, Alaska Territory. 

A charter was granted to Blue Mountain Lodge, and the dispen- 
sation of Alaska Lodge continued. 

A report on correspondence was submitted and read, and the 
Grand Secretary authorized to print such part as he might deem 
advisable. Upon which he says : 



107 

" The Grand Secretary (being the chairman of the committee on foreign corres- 
pondence) " deems it advisable," in view of the " situation," not to " push things " 
at the present, gladly awaiting a more favorable exhibit of the credit side of our 
balance sheet before incurring the heavy expense of printing a long report, much of 
which doubtless would be " dead weight" and of doubtful expediency or value to 
the Grand Lodge." 

He acknowledges the receipt of proceedings from thirty-four 
Grand Lodges, including ours, and recommends that the Grand 
Lodges of Idaho and New Brunswick, and the Provincial Grand 
Lodge of British Columbia on the Scottish Register be recognized. 
This last Grand Lodge was organized December 24th, 5867, at 
Victoria. R.\ W.\ J. W. Powell, M. D., Victoria, Provincial 
Grand Master. 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

The fourth annual communication of this Grand Lodge assem- 
bled at "Wheeling, November 10th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. 
Twenty-four Lodges were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ William J. Bates, Grand Master, reports 
having granted six dispensations for new Lodges. He also calls 
attention to the relations with Virginia which a few weeks later 
were so harmoniously arranged. 

The following report was received and adopted : 

" The grand committee, to which was referred the proposed amendment to the 
general regulations, providing for the appointment of a committee to examine into 
and report upon the character of candidates, would respectfully report, that in their 
judgment, it is not expedient to make such amendment. 

Under the existing regulations, it is the duty of every brother to inquire for him- 
self, in regard to the character of those seeking admission to our institution ; and 
no regulation should be adopted which would seem to teach that this duty and re- 
sponsibility may be transferred from the individual Mason to a committee." 

Four charters were granted to Lodges under dispensation, and 
commissioners appointed to visit the Grand Lodge of Virginia to 
arrange all matters in controversy. 

The report on correspondence presented by Bro. T. H. Logan, 
reviews the proceedings of thirty-four domestic and four foreign 
Grand Bodies. Of the inclination to pry into the secret ballot he 
says : 

" It happens, too frequently, that we are more jealous of what we call the rights 
of a profane friend, than we are of the rights of the brethren. We should be careful 



108 

not to incur obligations to a friend not a Mason, which would embarrass us in our 
relations with those who are more than friends. Don't ask your friend to "join the 
Masons." Don't tell him that he " ought to be a Mason." If he moves in that 
directon let him be able to say, truthfully, that it is of his own free will and accord. 
Above all, do not. by any act or word of yours, convey to him the impression that 
you are to act as his champion, and that possibly he has enemies in the Lodge. 
There is a wonderful amount of unmasonic opinion and feeling prevalent among 
Masons upon these subjects. We think that about the most important lesson to be 
taught the young Mason, in these days, is that he is not to regard himself as a 
Masonic missionary ; that he is not to go out into the lanes and streets and bring in 
the " lame and the halt and the blind," thinking that because they are his friends, 
the door of the Lodge must open to them as it did to him." 

We also quote the following with approbation : 

" The remarks of Bro. Sanders in regard to politics in Montana gives us the 
opportunity to make a statement which will, we trust, correct impressions 
which seem to exist in certain quarters, in regard to our own Grand Lodge. Its 
organization has been regarded by a few as a political movement. There is no 
foundation for such an opinion, outside of the act of congress constituting the State 
of West Virginia. We can say (and our opportunities for knowing the facts have 
been ample), that political questions and prejudices have never presented themselves 
in our Grand Lodge. In the first board of Grand Officers, elected in 1865, both 
sections in political opinion and sympathy of our then distracted country were rep- 
resented. Since then, as in Montana, both armies have been represented, not only 
in the membership, but in the Grand Lodge, and in the board of Grand Officers. 
Nor was this state of facts the result of special arrangement or deliberation in any 
case. Masonic considerations, swayed only by fraternal good will and affection, 
have ever been paramount. As a result, although representing outside of the 
Lodge all shades of political opinion,— inside, as brethren, we " dwell together in 
unity." 

Our proceedings do not seem to have reached the committee. 



WISCONSIN. 

This Grand Lodge assembled in its twenty-fifth annual commu* 
nication at Milwaukee, June 9th, A. L. 5868, A. D. 1868. One 
hundred and thirty-eight chartered Lodges and three under dis- 
pensation were represented. 

The M.\ W.\ Hablow Pease, Grand Master, reports having 
granted three dispensations for new Lodges. He also calls atten- 
tion to the continued annual deficit in the finances, and recom- 
mends retrenchment in the cost of Grand Lecturers and in print- 
ing; if they would omit the worse than needless printing the 
names of all the members, they would help the matter a great 
deal. 



109 

Four charters were ordered to issue to Lodges under dispensa- 
tion. The report on correspondence was from the pen of Bro. 
Gabe Botjck, and acknowledges the receipt of proceedings of 
forty Grand Lodges, including New Hampshire, but does not re- 
view, but in thirteen pages he attempts to give the substance of 
what he regards as interesting. He spends three of his pages on 
the question of the advancement of maims, and comes to the con- 
clusion that they should be advanced. A resolution submitted by 
the committee to that effect was sent to the committee on juris- 
prudence, to report next year. He thinks we are growing too 
fast ; he says : 

"And we are fearful that if our brethren in that, and some other jurisdictions, 
continue for a few years longer to increase so rapidly, they will find themselves in 
that lamentable position so forcibly expressed by the two following simple words, 
viz: 'Powerful weak.' 

"We are of opinion that the present form of petition is inadequate ; it might 
embrace much information which the applicant should be compelled to disclose in 
his petition, and which would form a groundwork upon which the committee could 
make a more thorough investigation. If the petition should give the place of 
residence, or residences, of the applicant for some years previous to the application ; 
his occupation, or occupations, during that time, it would be the means of affording 
valuable assistance to the committee in their investigation. A history of the appli- 
cant's life, both as to residence and occupation for some years, would, upon its face, 
afford some light as to his character — whether he was a man fixed and stable in his 
purposes, or fickle and uncertain. One of the great difficulties that a committee 
now encounter is to find any substantial information upon which to make any report, 
and are compelled, when interrogated, to admit that they could find nothing par- 
ticularly in favor of or against the petition." 

Of the trial of Masters and the Indiana new lights : 

" We do not propose to discuss the question as to the right of a Grand Lodge to 
change this ancient law ; but in a fraternal spirit, and with candor, we would 
suggest to our generous brethren of the jurisdiction of Indiana, whether it is proper 
or in good taste, for a Grand Lodge to change a long-established law, without the 
approval of, or consulting with any other of the Grand Lodges. 

And we would respectfully suggest, if it would not be the better rule, if any 
Grand Lodge is of the opinion that any rule or law (not a landmark), which has 
been long in force among the craft, should be amended or changed, not to take 
the responsibility upon itself to repeal or change the same, but to call the matter 
to the attention of the several Grand Lodges, get a general expression of opinion 
from all, and if such repeal or change is pretty generally recommended, then go 
on and do it, but if the opinion is generally unfavorable, then abandon it ; sacrifice 
your own opinion and judgment to that of the general wishes of the craft." 



110 

CONCLUSION. 

Several Grand Lodges, through their committees of correspond- 
ence, have criticised the action of our Grand Lodge on the subject 
of the Great Falls printed books. It is of course too late for us 
now to change the action which has been taken, yet we may well 
consider whether we have proceeded correctly, that in future we 
may avoid the errors of the past ; not that we are likely to have 
the same case again, but the general question of discipline seems 
to be included. One Grand Lodge approves our course, while 
eight condemn, generally in pretty pointed language. That the 
offence was one which would have justified the Grand Lodge in 
revoking the charter of Libanus Lodge and expelling those 
brethren immediately concerned, is, no doubt true, but the view 
of the committee who had that subject in charge, and no doubt of 
the Grand Lodge, was, that the only true ends of Masonic punish- 
ments are : to reform the offender, and to protect the craft from 
the then offender, or others in like case. It is true every Mason 
must know that such books are a direct violation of Masonic obli- 
gations ; but no more so than written ones, which have been used, 
at least, ever since the Prestonian lectures were invented (about a 
century), and probably before, as we learn that when Anderson 
first published his Constitutions, many brethren committed manu- 
scripts to the flames in their zeal against so much printing of the 
nature and character of the fraternity. Let that be as it may, in 
this country the Preston-Webb lectures have always been commu- 
nicated and preserved in written books. Rob Morris printed a 
compilation of such, the celebrated Mnemonics of the Conserva- 
tors, which is now used, printed books and all, by several Grand 
Lodges. We did not, therefore, deem the plea of ignorance to be 
entirely objectionable, nor the guilt of the brothers so entirely 
without extenuation, as some committees on foreign correspondence 
would seem to regard it. We were also satisfied that the brothers 
chiefly concerned were convinced of their error, and would not be 
liable to be caught committing the like offense again. In the 
same manner, we were satisfied that the course recommended and 
adopted would preserve the craft as effectually as any that could be 
taken, both from the injury already effected and from any future 
attempt of like character. We therefore deemed that all legiti-. 
mate ends of punishment were attained. We believe that those 



Ill 

books, some copies of which the Grand Lodge did not get hold of, 
are effectually suppressed, and we are in no danger from that 
source, or from any liability to further injury from the same direc- 
tion. The writer of this report, who was also on the committee 
who examined the Great Falls matter, thinks the Grand Lodge 
should have gone farther in one direction and included written 
books with the printed ones. This, however, the Grand Lodge 
refused to do, and is supported therein by the actual practice of 
the craft everywhere, probably from the earliest times. Upon re- 
flection, therefore, we fail to see any legitimate object which is not 
attained by the course pursued. 

Among the subjects mooted in the craft, the negro question 
seems to have met with a lull, but indications exist that it is to be 
revived with more intensity than ever. We regard it ag indis- 
putable that it is an utter overthrow of the foundation on which 
Masonry is built, to deny to the colored man admission to the 
craft by any general law on account of his race or color only, he 
being otherwise liable to no objection. Tf any individual brother 
chooses to exercise his veto at the ballot box, his motives are be- 
tween him and his God alone. It is clear also, that no Lodge is 
bound to receive any visitor whose sitting in the Lodge would 
bring discord into the Lodge. So much for the question as it re- 
lates to the negro in regular and legitimate Lodges. 

There is, as is well known, an extensive organization, perhaps 
more than one, of colored men claiming to be Masons, which has 
always been declared clandestine by all legitimate Grand Lodges on 
this continent. The members of these Lodges we have refused to 
recognize, not because of their color but on account of their clan- 
destine making. Facts are coming to light which tend to show 
that the true history of these Lodges has not been told. They 
are said to derive their authority from the charter of the Grand 
Lodge of England to African Lodge ; it has been said that this 
was in violation of the jurisdictional rights of the Grand Lodge of 
Massachusetts. The American doctrine of Grand Lodge jurisdic- 
tion has grown up since then, and is not elsewhere fully received 
even now ; besides, there was then no Grand Lodge of Massachu- 
setts, or in that State, whose rights could be interfered with ; for 
notwithstanding the claim to antiquity of that Grand Lodge, it 
was not formed till 1792, and the two Provincial Grand Lodges 



112 

before existing in that colony both expired in 1775, by the death 
of their Provincial Grand Masters. The Massachusetts Grand 
Lodge did not pretend to meet after the death of Warren, and 
although St. John's Grand Lodge did have some sort of meetings, 
probably no law that has ever existed in Masonry anywhere would 
hold such meetings regular. It has been also said that the original 
warrant of African Lodge was returned to England and the Lodge 
revived with a copy of it ; this has been shown to be an error, the 
warrant never was returned, and is now in possession of the so- 
called negro Masons. Other questions relating to these Lodges 
are mooted, but as we are likely soon to have many more facts 
from the investigations of committees in Georgia and Massachu- 
setts, we are inclined to reserve any farther views we may have 
until next year. In the meanwhile, we have seen nothing yet to 
cast any doubt over the correctness of the decision that these or- 
ganizations are spurious and clandestine. 

The Grand Lodge of Louisiana seems to be threatened with 
trouble from the actions of a body claiming to be a Supreme 
Council of the A.*, and A.*. Scotch rite. Of its regularity, as 
such, of course we can know nothing. It has been declared spuri- 
ous by a Balustre of the Sovereign Commanders of the Supreme 
Councils, at Charleston and Boston, but we know (as Master 
Masons) as little whether these latter bodies are genuine, nor 
need we care so long as they do not interfere in symbolic Masonry. 
This Council at New Orleans has attempted to create Lodges of 
the first three degrees in Louisiana ; now we do know that no 
Council or other body or individual of that rite under any circum- 
stances whatever, has the right in the United States, or anywhere 
else where a Grand Lodge exists, to create any such Lodges ; and 
should any Supreme Council attempt to do anything of the kind, 
every Mason who adheres to such Council should be expelled from 
Masonry at once, without any parley ; and if there be any legiti- 
mate Masons in Louisiana who adhere to this Council, the Grand 
Lodge of Louisiana owe it as a duty to the craft, to see that they 
are cut off at once and without mercy. This body has also been 
attempting some kind of fraternization with the spurious negro 
Grand Lodge in Louisiana, and has in some way engaged the 
Grand Orient of France to give it some recognition. We trust 
the Grand Orient will retract any such unadvised and illegal 



113 

action, so far as it relates to symbolic Masonry. As to what it 
may do with the so-called High Grades part of it, we are not in- 
terested. All the Grand Lodges have common interest with that 
of Louisiana, in both the establishment of Lodges by this Council, 
and the recognition of spurious and clandestine Masons.. 

The subject of advancement of maims, and what shall be done 
with unaffiliated Masons, are still discussed, but seem to come no 
nearer a conclusion. 

Peace and prosperity seem to be the lot of the craft everywhere. 
In fact, the multiplication of Lodges and the increase of Masons 
is almost too great for belief; yet it is believed that greater and 
more careful scrutiny is given to candidates than ever before ; still 
in the great crowd who now approach the portals of our Lodges, 
many unworthy must probably be received. It therefore behooves 
us to redouble our diligence to stop as many unworthy as- 
possible. 

JOHN J. BELL, for the Committee. 



114 



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CONSTITUTION 



AND 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



OF THE 



tmh A®bp 



OF 



THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE FRATERNITY 



OF 



Free and Accepted Masons 



OF 



THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Adopted June 10th, A. L. 




MANCHESTER, N.H. : 
PRINTED BY C. F. LIVINGSTON 
1869. 



INTRODUCTION 



At. the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge in June, A. L. 5867, numerous 
amendments to the Constitution having been proposed, which seemed to iudicate a 
desire and necessity for a thorough revision of that instrument, the following reso- 
lution was moved by the then Deputy Grand Master, M. W*. Alexander M. Winn, 
and was adopted : 

" Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to revise the Grand Constitu- 
tion and General Regulations of tbis_Grand Lodge, and report at the next Semi- An- 
nual Communication ; and that all amendments now pending, or that may be 
proposed at this Communication, be referred to said Committee." 

Bros. John J. Bell, John A. Harris and William Barrett were appointed the 
Committee for that purpose. 

No report was made at the Semi- Annual Communication, but at the Annual Com- 
munication in June, A. L. 5868, the Committee submitted their report in print, 
which was read and copies thereof distributed to the members present. The con- 
sideration of the proposed new Consthution was postponed to the Annual Commu- 
nication, A. L. 5869, and made the special order for 10 o'clock a. m., of the second 
day of the session, at which time it was taken up and carefully considered, such 
amendments made thereto as seemed to be required, and finally adopted. 

By a subsequent resolution, the undersigned was appointed a Committee to 
procure the printing and distribution to the Lodges of a sufficient number of copies 
of the Constitution, and was also requested to prepare forms and directions for the 
use of the Lodges under the new Constitution, to be printed as an appendix to the 
Constitution. 

I have endeavored, in pursuance of that request, to prepare such forms and direc- 
tions as are necessary to the proper discharge of the duties required by the Consti- 
tution. 

An index has also been prepared, which, it is hoped, will render all parts of the 
Constitution readily accessible to all. 

JOHN J. BELL, Committee. 



[3 ] 



CONSTITUTION 



PART I. 



OF THE GRAND LODGE. 

Article I. Style and Title. 

II. Officers and Members, their style and title. 

III. Communications. 

IV. Powers of the Grand Lodge. 

V. Qualification, Election and Installation of Officers. 

VI. Powers and Djities of Grand Officers. 

VII. Stations, Jewels and Clothing. 



ARTICLE I. 

STYLE AND TITLE. 

Section 1. The style and title of the Grand Lodge is : " The 
Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and 
Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of 
the State of New Hampshire." 

ARTICLE II. 
OFFICEKS AND MEMBERS, THEIR STYLE AND TITLE. 



Section— 

2. Grand Lodge, how constituted. 

3. Officers, their style and title. 

4. Appointment of Proxies. 



Section— 

5. Qualification of Members. 

6. Master or Warden not to be Rep- 

resentative. 



Section 2. The Grand Lodge consists of its Officers, and the 
Worshipful Masters and Wardens, for the time being, of the 
several subordinate Lodges under its jurisdiction, or their legally 

[5 ] 



appointed Proxies, and one Representative of each Lodge, to be 
elected by its members ; together with all Past Grand Masters, 
Past Deputy Grand Masters, Past Grand Wardens and Past 
District Deputy Grand Masters, while they retain their allegiance 
to this Grand Lodge. 

Section 3. The Officers of the Grand Lodge are, in addition 
to the Grand Master, whose style is Most Worshipful : 

a Deputy Grand Master, 

a Senior Grand Warden, 

a Junior Grand Warden, 

a District Deputy Grand Master in each District, 

a Grand Treasurer, 

a Grand Secretary, 

a Grand Lecturer in each District, 

two Grand Chaplains, whose style is Right Worshipful : 

a Senior Grand Deacon, 

a Junior Grand Deacon, 

a Grand Marshal, 

four Grand Stewards, 

a Grand Sword Bearer, 

two Grand Pursuivants, whose style is Worshipful ; 

a Grand Tyler, who is not entitled to any vote in the Grand 
Lodge. 

Section 4. The appointment of the Proxy of the Master or 
Warden of a particular Lodge to represent him in Grand Lodge 
shall be in writing, signed by the Principal, and shall designate at 
what Communication of the Grand Lodge the Proxy shall act, and 
shall be for one Communication only, and shall be void if the 
Principal appear in person. 

Section 5. All Officers and members of the Grand Lodge 
must be Master Masons, holding allegiance to this Grand Lodge. 
Representatives of particular Lodges must be members of the 
Lodges they respectively represent. 

Section 6. No Master or Warden of a particular Lodge can 
be cliosen the Representative of said Lodge in the Grand Lodge. 



ARTICLE III. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Section— 

7. Annual. 

8. Semi-Annual. 

9. No Business at Semi-Annual. 



Section — 

10. If St. John Evangelist fall on Sat- 

urday, Sunday*or Monday. 

11. Special. 



Section 7. The Annual Communications of the Grand Lodge 
shall be holden in Concord on the third Wednesday of May, at 

11 o'clock A. M. 

Section 8. The Semi -Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge shall be holden on the Festival of St. John the Evangelist, 
at such place as the Grand Lodge shall at the Annual Communi- 
cation direct. If the Grand Lodge shall give no direction, the 
Semi -Annual Communication shall be holden at Manchester, at 
11 o'clock A. M. 

Section 9. At the Semi -Annual Communication no business 
shall be ^ transacted but the Exemplification of the Work and 
Lectures. 

Section 10. If the Festival of St. John the Evangelist shall 
fall upon Saturday, Sunday or Monday, the Semi- Annual Commu- 
nication shall be held on the Tuesday following. 

Section 11. Special Communications may be called as the 
Grand Lodge or Grand Master may direct. 

ARTICLE IV. 

POWERS OF THE GRAND LODGE. 



Section 12. The Grand Lodge, by the ancient Constitutions 
and usages of the Fraternity, is invested with certain original and 
essential powers and privileges belonging to the ancient Craft, and 
shall have power especially — 

First. — To enact and enforce all Laws and Regulations for the 
government of the Fraternity, and to alter, amend and repeal the 
same at pleasure. 

Second. — To constitute new Lodges, by granting Dispensations 
and Warrants under seal ; and for good cause, to suspend, revoke 
or annul the same at pleasure. 



Third. — To establish and preserve a uniform mode of Work- 
ing and Lectures, under the sanction of the ancient landmarks 
and customs of Masonry. 

Fourth. — To assess and collect from the several Lodges under 
its jurisdiction, such sums of money as may be deemed necessary 
for the benefit of the Craft. * 

Fifth. — To hear and determine all questions of dispute between 
two or more Lodges. 

Sixth. — To hear and decide all cases of appeal from the 
decision of particular Lodges. 

Seventh. — To demand and receive such fees and charges for 
granting Dispensations, Warrants, Certificates and Diplomas, as 
may be reasonable. 

Eighth. — To hear and decide all charges and complaints against 
any Officer of the Grand Lodge, and to inflict such punishment 
on the delinquent and guilty as may appear just and proper. 

Ninth. — To exercise all such powers, and perform all such acts, 
as by custom are exercised and performed by Grand Lodges. But 
in no case to alter, deface or remove the ancient established land- 
marks of Masonry. 

ARTICLE V. 

QUALIFICATION, ELECTION AND INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS. 



Section— 

13. Eligibility to certain offices. 

14. Election and appointment of 

Officers. 

15. Installation, when, by whom. 

16. If Grand Master absent. 



Section— 

17. Installation of other Officers. 

18. Obligation. 

19. Proclamation. 

20. No Officer to act until installed. 



Section 13. No Brother shall be eligible to the office of 
Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand Warden, or District 
Deputy Grand Master, unless he shall have been regularly elected 
and duly installed Master of a duly constituted Lodge, and faith- 
fully discharged his duties in such office for the term for which he 
was elected. And no one of the Officers above named, during 
his continuance in office, shall be Master or Warden of a par- 
ticular Lodge. Nor shall the Master of any particular Lodge be 
eligible to either of the above-named offices in the Grand Lodge, 
during his continuance in office as Master. 



9 



Section 14. The Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, Grand 
Wardens, Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary shall be chosen 
by ballot. The other Officers shall be appointed by the Grand 
Master. In all cases of ballot, a majority shall be necessary to 
make a choice. 

. Section 15. The Officers of the Grand Lodge, elected and 
appointed, shall be installed at the Annual Communication of the 
Grand Lodge, as soon after their election and appointment as may 
be. The Grand Master shall be installed by his immediate 
predecessor ; or, in his absence, by the senior Past Grand Master 
present, and in the absence of such Past Grand Master, by the 
senior Past Master present ; preference, however, being given to 
Past Grand Officers, according to their rank. 

Section 16. In case the Grand Master elect be absent at the 
time of installation, he may be installed at such time and place, 
and by such person, as the Grand Lodge may specially authorize 
and appoint, unless he declines to accept said office. 

Section 17. All elected or appointed Grand Officers, if 
present, shall be installed in open Grand Lodge. If any elected 
or appointed Grand Officer be absent at such time of installation, 
he may be installed by some person specially authorized, in manner 
provided for the installation of the Grand Master, as set forth in 
the preceding section. No Officer required by the Constitution to 
take an obligation prior to his installation, can be installed by 
proxy. 

Section 18. The several Grand Officers, previous to their 
installation, shall make the following declaration : 

"I, A. B., do solemnly promise, on the honor of a Mason, that 

I will perform the duties ' of the office of , to the best of 

my abilities, agreeably to the Constitution of this Grand Lodge, 
and the ancient usages and landmarks of Masonry." 

Section 19. All Grand Officers, elected or appointed, when 
installed, shall be proclaimed by the Grand Marshal, and shall 
hold their respective offices until their successors are duly elected 
and installed. 

Section 20. No elected Officer of the Grand Lodge, or of 
any particular Lodge, can act as such until he is duly installed. 



10 
ARTICLE VI. 

POWER AND DUTY OF GRAND OFFICERS. 



Section — 

37. Compensation of Grand Treas- 

urer. 

38. Duties of Grand Secretary. 

39. Grand Secretary to notify chair- 

men of Committees. 

Grand Secretary to forward edicts 
and list of Officers. 

Grand Secretary to print and dis- 
tribute proceedings. 

Grand Sec'y to distribute blanks. 

43. Grand Secretary to collect fees 
and dues and give bond. 

44. Grand Secretary to make report 
and statement of accounts. 

45. D. D. G. Masters to visit and in- 
spect Lodges. 

46. D. D. G. Masters to communicate 
edicts &c, and report to the 
Grand Master before Mayl, 
and be paid their expenses. 

47. D. D. G. Masters to keep records. 

48. Visitation of Lodges. 

49. Duties of Grand Lecturers 
compensation. 

50. Duty of Grand Chaplains. 

51. Duties of Grand Deacons. 



40. 



41. 



i'J. 



and 



Section— 

21. Grand Master shall preside. 
•22. Grand Master may grant Dispen- 
sations, arrest Warrant, sus- 
pend Brother or Lodge, and 
convene the Grand Lodge. 

23. Grand Master may convene any 

Lodge. 

24. Grand Master shall visit Lodges. 

25. Grand Master to divide the State 

into Districts and assign limits. 

26. Grand Master may appoint spe- 

cial Deputies. 

27. Grand Master shall appoint all 

Committees and give the cast- 
ing vote. 

28. Grand Master may grant Dispen- 

sations for processions, con- 
ferring degrees, and all other 
acts belonging to his office. 

29. Grand Master to cause Exemplifi- 

cation of work at Semi- An- 
nual Communication. 

30. Deputy Grand Master to assist 

Grand Master and preside in 
his absence. 

31. Deputy Grand Master to succeed 

Grand Master, when. 

32. Duties of Grand Wardens. 

33. Succession of Grand Wardens. 

34. Grand Treasurer to have charge 

of funds and give bonds. 

35. Grand Treasurer to exhibit state- 

ment of accounts. 

36. Grand Treasurer to receive all 

money from Grand Secretary, 
keep all property deposited, 
exhibit accounts, have charge 
of jewels and take receipts 
for' those delivered. 



Section 21. The Grand Master shall preside over and govern 
the Grand Lodge at all its Communications. 

Section 22. The Grand Master has power and authority, 
during the recess of the Grand Lodge, to grant Dispensations to 
new Lodges, to continue in force until the next Annual Communi- 
cation of the Grand Lodge; to arrest the Dispensation or Warrant 
of any Lodge, for good cause, until the next Communication of 
the Grand Lodge ; and for dereliction of duty, or other unmasonic 
conduct, he may suspend a Brother or Lodge until the next 
Communication of the Grand Lodge, when he shall present the 
reason for such arrest or suspension, in writing. He may convene 
the Grand Lodge at pleasure, giving reasonable notice thereof to 



Duty of Grand Marshal. 
Duty of Grand Stewards. 
Duty of Grand Sword Bearer. 
Duties of Grand Pursuivant. 
Duty of Grand Tyler. 



11 

the Lodges and members, of the time and place intended for the 
meeting, and stating therein the object of it. 

Section 23. The Grand Master may convene any Lodge 
within his jurisdiction, preside therein (with his Officers or other- 
wise), inspect their proceedings, and require their conformity to 
the regulations and edicts of the Grand Lodge. 

Section 24. The Grand Master shall, at least once in a year, 
by himself, his Deputy or District Deputy, visit all the Lodges 
under this jurisdiction, examine into their conduct, their records 
and proceedings ; correct irregularities and prevent innovations ; 
and make a report of his doings to the Grand Lodge at its Annual 
Communication. 

Section 25. The Grand Master has authority from time to 
time, as he may think for the good of Masonry, to divide the 
State into Districts, and assign their Kmits. Every newly- consti- 
tuted Lodge shall be assigned by him to some District, and notice 
given to the District Deputy Grand Master of the same. 

Section 26. The Grand Master may appoint a special Deputy 
or Deputies, to constitute a new Lodge or Lodges, or for any 
other purpose to be specified in such appointment. 

Section 27. The Grand Master shall appoint ail Committees 
of the Grand Lodge, when presiding therein, unless otherwise 
ordered, and shall give the casting vote whenever, in any question 
before the Grand Lodge, there shall be an equal number of votes. 

Section 28. The Grand Master may grant Dispensations for 
processions and for conferring Degrees, and do all other acts and 
deeds that are warranted and required of him by the regulations 
and ancient customs of the Fraternity. 

Section 29. It shall be the duty of the Grand Master, or 
presiding Officer, at the Semi -Annual Communications of the 
Grand Lodge, to give, or cause to be given, Exemplification of 
the Work and Lectures in each Degree. 

Section 30. It shall be the duty of the Deputy Grand Master 
to attend all the Communications of the Grand Lodge, and to 
render to the Grand Master such assistance as may be required of 
him ; and in the absence of the Grand Master he shall preside in 
Grand Lodge, and perform such duties and possess such authority, 
while presiding, as appertain to the Grand Master. 



12 



Section 31. In case of the death, or removal from the State, 
of the Grand Master, the Deputy Grand Master shall, ex officio, 
exercise all the powers and perform all the duties of the Grand 
Master, as herein provided, until the next Annual Communication 
of the Grand Lodge ; and during the temporary absence of the 
Grand Master, he shall exercise and perform like powers and 
duties. 

Section 32. It shall be the duty of the Grand Wardens to 
assist the Grand Master in the Grand Lodge; and, when required, 
they are to attend in the examination of any particular Lodge, and 
act as his Wardens. 

Section 33. In the absence of the Grand Master and the 
Deputy Grand Master, the Senior Grand Warden shall preside 
over the Grand Lodge ; and in his absence, the Junior Grand 
Warden ; and in the absence of all these, then the Past Grand 
Masters, Past Deputy Grand Masters, and Past Grand Wardens, 
according to seniority ; and if no Officer of either grade be 
present, the senior Past Master is to preside, unless he waive his 
right to another Brother who is Past Master. In either of these 
cases the presiding Officer, unless he be Past Grand Master,, shall 
wear the jewel of the Deputy Grand Master. 

Section 34. The Grand Treasurer shall have the custody and 
charge of the Funds of the Grand Lodge ; and shall, before he 
enters upon the duties of his office, give bond with surety or 
sureties, to " the satisfaction of the Grand Master and Grand 
Wardens, conditioned for the faithful discharge of his trust ; and 
shall, from time to time, invest all unappropriated Funds in his 
hands, in such manner as the Grand Lodge or Grand Master may 
direct. 

Section 35. He shall lay before the Grand Lodge, on the 
first day of the Annual Communication thereof, a statement of 
his accounts, exhibiting the amount received and paid o,ut, and on 
what account, with the respective dates of receipts and disburse- 
ments. 

Section 36. He shall receive all moneys from the Grand 
Secretary, as well as all other moneys paid to the Grand Lodge; 
shall pay all bills passed by the Committee of Finance, shall have 
in his careall Warrants, Records, Seals, and Clothing returned to 



13 

the Grand Lodge, shall annually render to the Grand Lodge a 
statement of his accounts, together with the vouchers, wi,th 
schedule of the funds of the Grand Lodge; and shall deliver 
to his successor in office the funds and other property of the 
Grand Lodge, taking duplicate receipts therefor, one of which 
he shall deposit with the Grand Secretary. He shall also take 
charge of the Jewels, Furniture, and Clothing of the Grand 
Lodge, and keep a record of the Officers to whom any of the 
Jewels, Clothing, &c, shall be delivered, and shall take a receipt 
therefor in such form as the Grand Lodge or Grand Master may 
direct. 

Section 37. The Grand Treasurer shall receive annually, as a 
full compensation for his services, one per cent, upon all moneys 
in the Treasury. 

Section 38. The Grand Secretary shall attend upon the 
Communications of the Grand Lodge, observe and record the 
proceedings thereof, and preserve the same in suitable books kept 
for that purpose. He shall summon the members to attend 
all meetings of the Grand Lodge, in such manner as the Grand 
Lodge or Grand Master may direct. He shall receive all peti- 
tions, applications, and appeals, and lay them before the Grand 
Master. He shall have the custody of the Seal of the Grand 
Lodge. He shall engross, attest, and affix the Seal to all War- 
rants, Commissions, Diplomas, and Certificates, when ordered by 
the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge. He shall keep a list of 
all the Lodges under this jurisdiction, according to seniority. 

Section 39. The Grand Secretary shall furnish the Chairman 
of every Committee with a copy of the vote of his appointment, 
and attend all Committees with the records and papers of his 
office, when required ; and shall record all reports of Committees 
which may be accepted by the Grand Lodge. 

Section 40. The Grand Secretary shall, as soon as may be, 
after its several Communications, forward to each member of the 
Grand Lodge, such number of copies of the Edicts and Regu- 
lations of the Grand Lodge, including a list of the Grand 
Officers for the time being, as shall be directed by the Grand 
Master; and all such other transactions of the Grand Lodge as 
may be necessary for the information and regulation of the 
particular Lodges. 



14 



Section 41. The Grand Secretary, when required, shall cause 
a transcript of the Journal of the Proceedings of the Grand 
Lodge to be printed, as soon after the Annual Communication as 
the same can be done, and shall forward a copy thereof to each 
of the Grand Lodges of the United States, and also to the Grand 
Lodges of such foreign States as may be in communication with 
this Grand Lodge, and one copy to each member of this Grand 
Lodge, and one copy also to each particular Lodge. 

Section 42. The Grand Secretary shall transmit to the 
Secretaries of the particular Lodges all the necessary blanks and 
instructions for their use; and, during the intervals of the Commu- 
nications of the Grand Lodge, under the direction of the Grand 
Master, answer all communications addressed on the subject of 
Masonry. 

Section 43. The Grand Secretary shall collect and receive all 
fees and sums of money which shall become due to the Grand 
Lodge and pay the same over to the Grand Treasurer ; shall open 
and keep an account with each particular Lodge, and report a 
statement thereof at each annual communication of the Grand 
Lodge; and, before entering upon the duties of his office, shall 
give bond, with sufficient surety or sureties to the satisfaction of 
the Grand. Master and Grand Wardens, conditioned for the 
faithful discharge of his trust. 

Section 44. The Grand Secretary shall, at the Annual Com- 
munication, make a report of his doings in his office to the Grand 
Lodge, with a statement of his accounts. 

Section 45. The District Deputy Grand Masters shall visit 
the several Lodges in their respective Districts once, at least, in 
every year ; preside in the same, when present ; and shall inspect 
their by-laws, the state and condition of their finances, records 
and mode of working; but if unable to visit any Lodge, they 
may appoint some suitable Brother to perform that duty. 

Section 46. The District Deputy Grand Masters shall com- 
municate to the Lodges all such Edicts and Regulations of the 
Grand Lodge as may be received by them from the Grand Secre- 
tary ; shall, on or before the first day of May in each year, make 
a detailed report of their doings to the Grand Master; and 
they shall attend annually in the Grand Lodge. They shall be 



15 



reimbursed their expenses in visiting Lodges, their accounts 
being first examined and passed by the Committee of Finance. 

Section 47. Each District Deputy Grand Master shall keep a 
book of records in which he shall record every official act per- 
formed by him with the date thereof. 

Section 48. It shall be incumbent on the Grand Master, 
Deputy Grand Master, Grand Wardens, District Deputy Grand 
Master and Grand Lecturers, severally to improve and perfect 
themselves in the Sublime Arts and Work appertaining to the 
several Degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master 
Mason; and to make themselves masters of the several Masonic 
Lectures and ancient Charges belonging to those Degrees; to 
consult with each other and with Masters of particular Lodges for 
the purpose of adopting measures suitable and proper for diffusing 
a knowledge of said Lectures and Charges, and a uniform mode 
of Working in the several Lodges throughout this jurisdiction; 
and the better to effect this laudable purpose, the Deputy Grand 
Master and Grand Wardens are severally hereby authorized and 
empowered to visit and preside in every and any Lodge in this 
State; and the District Deputy Grand Masters are hereby 
severally required to visit, as often as practicable, the several 
Lodges within their respective Districts, and are hereby author- 
ized and empowered to preside in the same ; all the above-named 
Officers are authorized to examine the doings of the several 
Lodges, correct irregularities, and give such directions and 
instructions as the good of the Fraternity may require; always 
adhering to the ancient landmarks of the Order and the require- 
ments of this Constitution. 

Section 49. The Grand Lecturers are to instruct the several 
Lodges within their respective Districts in the Work and 
Lectures of the several Degrees ; and shall once in each year visit 
the same for that purpose, and the Grand Lodge shall pay the 
expenses the Grand Lecturer may necessarily incur in visiting and 
instructing the Lodges. 

Section 50. The Grand Chaplains shall attend the Commu- 
nications of the Grand Lodge, and perform such clerical duties as 
may be suitable to the occasion, and as are established by 
Masonic usage. 



16 



Section 51. The Grand Deacons shall assist within the Grand 
Lodge in such duties as appertain to their office, and attend the 
Grand Master in processions. 

Section 52. The Grand Marshal shall direct the organization 
of the Grand Lodge before it is opened; collect from the members 
and petitioners in the Grand Lodge all communications, and place 
them before the Grand Master; shall introduce visitors; shall 
direct the formation of processions ; regulate all festivals and 
refreshments, and shall communicate or execute all commands of 
the Grand Master not otherwise provided for. 

Section 53. The Grand Stewards shall properly distribute 
the Jewels and Clothing, and collect the same at the closing of the 
Grand Lodge, and place them in charge of the Grand. Treasurer ; 
and shall, under the direction of the Grand Marshal, provide 
suitably for the Grand Lodge at every Communication. 

Section 54. The Grand Sword Bearer is to attend the Grand 
Master, and assist the Grand Marshal in the discharge of his 
duties. 

Section 55. The Grand Pursuivants are to attend to the 
Officers, members and visitors ; to see that they appear in Grand 
Lodge suitably clothed, and under the direction of the Grand 
Marshal, that they take their proper stations. In all public 
processions of the Grand Lodge, they shall precede and assist the 
Grand Marshal. 

Section 56. The Grand Tyler shall guard the outer door. 

ARTICLE VII. 
STATIONS, JEWELS, AXD CLOTHING. 

Section— j Section— 

57. Stations. 59. Clothing. 

f 58. Jewels. 

Section 57. The stations of the Officers in Grand Lodge are 

as follows: 

The M.\ W.\ Grand Master, 

In the East, at the head of the Grand Lodge. 

The R.\ W.\ Deputy Grand Master, 
In the East, next to and left of the Mr. W.\ Grand Master. 



17 

The R.\ W.\ Senior Grand Warden, 

In the West. 

The R.\ W.\ Junior Grand Warden, 
In the South. 

The M.\ W.*. Past Grand Masters, 

In the East, at the right of the Mr. W.\ Grand Master, and the 
Junior Past Grand M aster next to the Grand Master. 

The R.\ W.\ Past Deputy Grand Masters, 

In the East, at the right of the Past Grand Masters. 

The R.\ W.\ Past Grand Wardens, 

In the East, at the right of the Past Deputy Grand Masters, 

The R.\ W.\ District Deputy Grand Masters, 
In the East, on the left of the Deputy Grand Master, 

The R.\ W.\ Past District Deputy Grand Masters, 
In the East, on the left of the District Deputy Grand Masters* 

The R.\ W.\ Grand Treasurer, 
On the right, in front of the Grand Master. 

The R.\ W.\ Grand Secretary, 
On the left, in front of the Grand Master. 

The R.\ W.\ Grand Lecturers. 
In the East, in front of the District Deputy Grand Masters* 



1 



The R.\ W.\ and Rev. Grand Chaplains, 

In the East, the Senior in front upon the right of the Grand 

Master, and between him and the Past Junior Grand Master; 

and the Junior in front upon the left of the Grand 

Master, and between him and the Dr. G.\ Master. 

The W.\ Grand Marshal, 

Upon the left of the Grand Master, in front of the Grand 

Secretary. 

The W.\ Senior Grand Deacon, 

Upon the right of the Grand Master, in front of the Grand 

Treasurer . 



The W.*. Junior Grand Deacon, 
In the West, on the right of the Senior Grand Warden. 

The W.\ Grand Stewards, 

In the South, two upon the right, and two upon the left of the 
Junior Grand Warden, one Steward in front of the other. 

The W.\ Grand Sword Bearer, 
At the left of the Grand Marshal. 

The W.\ Grand Pursuivants. 
Near the doors of entrance to the Grand Lodge. 

Section 58. The Jewels of the Grand Officers are: 
The Grand Master : The Compass extended upon the sex- 
tant of a circle, to the angle of 45°, with the Square within the 
Compass, and above the Square an Eye irradiated, within a Tri- 
angle, also irradiated, upon an Oval within the Compass. 

Past Grand Blasters: The same as the Grand Master, except 
the Square. 



19 

Deputy Grand Master : The Compass opened to the angle of 
45° athwart the Square ; within the Compass a Pentalpha. 

Senior Grand Warden : The Level. 

Junior Grand Warden: The Plumb. 

District Deputy Grand Masters : The Compass opened to the 
angle of 45° athwart the Square ; within the Compass, a Sun 
irradiated. 

Grand Treasurer: Cross Keys. 

Grand Secretary : Cross Pens. 

Grand Lecturers: The 47th proposition of Euclid in silver 
upon a Triangle in gold ; within the Square a letter G. 

Grand Chaplains: The open Bible upon a Triangle irradiated. 

Grand Deacons: The Dove and Olive Branch. 

Grand Marshal : Cross Batons. 

Grand Stewards: The Cornucopia athwart the Compass, open 
to the angle of 45°. 

Grand Sword Bearer : Cross Swords. 

Grand Pursuivants : Sword and Baton crossed. 

Grand Tyler: A Sword pendent. 

All the Jewels, except those of the Grand Master, Past Grand 
Masters, Deputy Grand Master, and District Deputy Grand 
Masters, to be placed within a Circle. 

Section 59. The Officers of the Grand Lodge shall wear 
their appropriate Jewel appended to a purple velvet collar, and a 
white apron trimmed with purple. The Masters and Wardens of 
particular Lodges shall wear their appropriate Jewels appended to 
a blue velvet collar and a plain white apron. Representatives of 
Lodges shall wear a white apron, which may be trimmed with 
purple. And no member of the Grand Lodge shall be allowed to 
speak or vote in Grand Lodge unless he be properly clothed. 



PART II 



OF PARTICULAR LODGES. 

Article VIII. Dispensations and Warrants for new Lodges. 

IX. Of Removal of Lodges. 

X. Surrender, Forfeiture and Revocation of Warrants. 

XL Renewal of Warrants. 

XII. Powers and Duties. 

XIII. Officers. 



ARTICLE VIII. 



DISPENSATIONS AND WARRANTS FOR NEW LODGES. 



Section- 



60. Dispensations, by whom issued. 

61. Dispensations, requisites for. 

62. Dispensations, Grand Lecturer's 

certificate. 

63. Dispensations, Sanction of Master 

and Wardens. 

64. Dispensations and Warrants, fees 

for. 



Section — 

65. Dispensation, Petition for. 

66. Dimits to be received before con- 

stitution. 

67. Lodges, by whom constituted. 

68. Lodges must be constituted. 



Section 60. Dispensations for holding new Lodges may be 
issued by the Grand Master, or the Grand Lodge, on the petition 
of not less than seven Master Masons of known skill and good 
standing. 

Section 61. Every petition for a Dispensation or Warrant to 
form a new Lodge, shall be accompanied by the approbation and 
recommendation of the two Lodges, subordinate to this Grand 
Lodge, nearest the place where the new Lodge is to be held, by 
vote of said Lodges at stated Communications, notice having been 
given at previous stated Communications, and of the District 
Deputy Grand Master of the District, vouching for the moral and 
Masonic ability of the petitioners, and recommending the Grand 
Lodge to grant them a Dispensation or Warrant. 

Section 62. Every petition for a new Lodge shall also be 
accompanied by the Certificate of the Grand Lecturer of the 
District, that he has examined the Master and Wardens nomin- 
ated in the petition, and found them well skilled in the entire 
Work and Lectures of Ancient Craft Masonry. 

[ 20 ] 



21 

Section 63. If a majority of the petitioners are members of 
a regularly constituted Lodge, under the jurisdiction of this 
Grand Lodge, they shall also obtain a Certificate from the Master 
and Wardens of the Lodge of which they are members, sanction- 
ing the separation and their erection into a new Lodge. 

Section 64. The fee for such Dispensation shall be twenty- 
five dollars, to be paid to the Grand Secretary, and every 
Dispensation shall be returned to the Grand Lodge at the next 
Annual Communication, together with an attested transcript of all 
the proceedings, and the By-Laws of the Lodge working under 
the same. If these be approved by the Grand Lodge, a Warrant 
of Constitution may be issued to the petitioners, bearing even 
date with the Dispensation, for which they shall pay to the Grand 
Secretary the further sum of fifty dollars, seven of which shall be 
for the Grand Secretary. ; . 

Section 65. The form of a Petition for Dispensation shall be 
in substance as follows : 

" To the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient, Free and 
Accepted Masons in New Hampshire. 

"We, the undersigned, being Master Masons of good standing, 
and having the prosperity of the Craft at heart, are anxious to 
exert our best endeavors to promote and diffuse the genuine 
principles of Freemasonry; and for the convenience of our 
respective dwellings, and other good reasons, we are desirous of 
forming a new Lodge, to be named Lodge. We, there- 
fore, with the approbation of the District Deputy Grand Master, 
and the two Lodges nearest the place where the new Lodge is to 
be held, respectfully pray for a Dispensation empowering us to 

meet as a regular Lodge at , and there discharge the duties 

of Ancient Craft Masonry, in a constitutional manner, according 
to the forms of the Order, and the laws of the Grand Lodge. 

And we have nominated and do recommend Brother A 

B- to be the first Master; Brother C D to be 

the first Senior Warden, and Brother E F to be the 

first Junior Warden of said Lodge. The prayer of this petition 
being granted, we promise strict obedience to the commands of 
the Grand Master, and the laws and regulations of the Grand 
Lodge." 



22 



Section 66. Before a new Lodge shall be constituted, the 
Grand Master, or his Deputy, who shall be appointed to constitute 
such Lodge, shall receive the dimits or recommendations of all 
Brothers who shall become members of such new Lodge. 

Section 67. Every new Ledge shall be solemnly constituted, 
dedicated, and consecrated, by the Grand Master and his Officers, 
or by some competent Brother especially appointed by him for the 
purpose. 

Section 68. No new Lodge is recognized, or its Officers 
entitled to vote in this Grand Lodge, unless it be regularly 
constituted, solemnly dedicated, and consecrated, and no Officer of 
a Lodge working under Dispensation is entitled to a seat as 
Representative in the Grand Lodge. 

ARTICLE IX. 

OF REMOVAL OF LODGES. 



Section— 

69. Lodge to be summoned. 

70. Vote of Lodge and Certificate of 

nearest Lodges. 



Section— 

71. Consent of Grand Lodge. 



Section 69. Whenever the members of a Lodge wish to 
remove it from one town to another, or more than two miles from 
where the meetings have usually been held, the Master shall 
summon every member of the Lodge to attend a stated communi- 
cation, notice having been given at a previous stated communica- 
tion, for the express purpose of taking the ^subject of removal 
into consideration. 

Section 70. If the Lodge shall deem such removal expedient, 
they shall present a petition for that purpose to the Grand Lodge, 
which petition shall be signed by not less than three-fourths of 
the members of the Lodge desiring a removal, and shall be 
accompanied with certificates from the two nearest Lodges, 
testifying their approbation of the proposed measure. 

Section 71. If the Grand Lodge, on such petition, shall 
deem it proper to grant the prayer of the petition, the Warrant 
of the Lodge to be removed shall be presented to, the Grand Secre- 



23 



tary, who shall indorse on it the vote of the Grand Lodge 
removing the particular Lodge, which vote shall be signed by the 
Grand Master and countersigned by the Grand Secretary, and for 
which the Lodge to be removed shall pay to the Grand Secretary 
the sum of ten dollars. 

ARTICLE X. 

SURRENDER, FORFEITURE, AND REVOCATION OF WARRANTS. 



Section — 

72. On surrender of Warrant all 

property to be given up to 
Grand Lodge. 

73. Funds to belong to Grand Lodge. 

74. Lodges neglecting to Work or 

make Returns, their Warrants 
forfeited. 

75. Upon revocation or forfeiture, 

books, papers and property to 
be given up to Grand Lodge. 



Section— 

76. Warrants restored, how. 

77. Members implicated, disqualified. 
• 78. Mason assisting in Work of sus- 
pended or cancelled Lodge to 
be expelled. 

79. Warrant not surrendered if seven 

adhere to it. 

80. Master and Wardens refusing to 

obey summons, punishment. 



Section 72. If any particular Lodge shall see fit to surrender 
its Warrant, whether or not with the intention of resuming it at a 
future period, it shall be the duty of the last Master, Treasurer, 
and Secretary of such Lodge, to deliver to the Grand Treasurer, 
with the Warrant, the by-laws, records, seal, clothing, funds, 
and other property of the Lodge of every description; and all 
the property of a Lodge surrendering its Warrant, with the 
intention of resuming it, shall be held by the Grand Lodge in 
trust until such time as the Warrant shall be restored, or the 
intention of reclaiming it abandoned. 

Section 73. The interest of all funds and property of a 
Lodge whose Warrant is surrendered with the intention of 
resuming it, and all funds or property of a Lodge whose Warrant 
is surrendered absolutely, belong to the Grand Lodge, for such 
uses as it may direct. 

Section 74. Every Lodge that shall neglect or refuse to pay 
its dues to the Grand Lodge, or to make regular returns, or to be 
represented in the Grand Lodge for two years, or shall neglect to 
assemble for Work for the space of one year, shall be stricken 
from the Grand Lodge books, be deprived of the benefits of 
Masonry, and its Warrant forfeited. 



24 



SECTION 75. Upon the revocation or forfeiture of the 
Warrant of any Lodg3, it shall be the duty of the last Master, 
Treasurer, and Secretary thereof, to surrender to the Grand 
Treasurer the Warrant, books, papers, jewels, and furniture of 
said Lodge, within six months from the time of such revocation or 
forfeiture; and all members of a Lodge who shall refuse to make 
such surrender, or who shall vote to divide the funds among 
themselves, or to appropriate them in any other way than is here 
designated, shall be deemed guilty of a violation of the rules and 
regulations of Masonry. 

Section 76. No Warrant which has been surrendered, 
(whether with the intention of resuming it or not,) forfeited, or 
revoked, shall be restored, unless upon the petition of seven 
Master Masons, of whom four at least of the petitioners for its 
restoration were members of the Lodge at the time of its 
surrender. And "it shall be the duty, of the petitioners to notify 
the District Deputy Grand Master of the District, and the two 
Lodges nearest their residence, of their intention to petition for 
the restoration. 

Section 77. If at any time it shall be found necessary to 
suspend or cancel the Warrant of any Lodge for irregular or 
unmasonic conduct, the members of said Lodge who were impli- 
cated in such irregular or unmasonic conduct at the time of its 
having incurred such penalty, shall be disqualified to join or visit 
any other Lodge, without special permission from the Grand 
Lodge, obtained on memorial. 

Section 78. Any Mason assisting at the work of a Lodge, 
knowing its Warrant to have been suspended or cancelled, shall 
be liable to expulsion from the rights of Masonry. 

Section 79. Every Warranted Lodge is a constituent part of 
the Grand Lodge, in which body all the power of the Fraternity 
resides; and no authority, except that possessed by the Grand 
Lodge, can annul, abrogate, or destroy the power of a Warrant. 
If, therefore, the majority of a Lodge should determine to leave 
the institution, or that Lodge, the Constitution, or power of assem- 
bling, remains with the rest of the members who adhere to their 
allegiance. If the number, however, be reduced to less than 
seven, the Warrant shall be returned, agreeably to the regulation 
in such cases provided. ' 



25 



Section 80. If the Master and Wardens of any Lodge be 
summoned to attend, or to produce the Warrant, books, papers, or 
accounts of their Lodge to the Grand Master, or the District 
Deputy Grand Master within whose jurisdiction it is located, or 
to any Committee authorized by the Grand Lodge, and shall refuse 
to comply, or give satisfactory reasons for non-compliance, they 
may be suspended, and the proceedings shall be notified to the 
Grand Lodge, when, in case of contumacy, expulsion, suspension, 
or revocation of Warrant shall be the penalty. 

ARTICLE XI. 

RENEWAL OF WARRANTS. 

Section 81. If the Warrant of any Lodge shall accidentally 
be destroyed by fire, or otherwise, the Grand Secretary shall, by 
authority of the Grand Master, on application of said Lodge, 
furnish a new Warrant, or a certified copy of the original; said 
Lodge paying the necessary expense for preparing the same. 

ARTICLE XII. 

POWERS AND DUTIES. 



Section— 

82. General Powers. 

83. Master to convene Lodge to 

receive D.*. D.\ G.\ M.\ * 

84. Dues to Grand Lodge. 

85. Returns. 



86. 



87. 



Must have Warrant from this 

Grand Lodge. 
Fees. 

Degrees, how conferred. 
Fuuds for Masonic purposes only. 
Business in Master's Lodge. 



Section— 

91. Unauthorized Lectures forbidden. 

92. Discussions not Masonic forbid- 

den. 

93. No public procession without 

Grand Master's permission. 

94. Funerals. 

95. By-Laws to be approved by the 

Grand Lodge. 
9G. By-Laws, how amended. 
97. Blank Returns and Diplomas. 



Section 82. All Lodges under this jurisdiction have a right 
to convene as Free and Accepted Masons, to receive and enter 
Apprentices, pass Fellow Crafts, and raise Master Masons, and 
establish fees therefor ; to choose Officers annually, establish funds 
for charitable purposes, and transact all matters appertaining to 
Masonry, agreeably to their Warrants, the laws of the Grand 
Lodge, and the ancient usages of the Craft. 



26 



Section 83. It shall be the duty of every Master or presiding 
Officer of a Lodge, when notified of the intended official visit of 
the District Deputy Grand Master, to convene his Lodge, receive 
him as the Representative of the Grand Lodge, resign to him the 
Chair while making his official communication, and submit to his 
inspection the By-Laws, Records, and mode of Working. 

Section 84. Every Lodge under the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge shall pay for the support thereof, into the Grand Treasury, 
the sum of two dollars for each and every candidate initiated in 
such Lodge. 

Section "85. Every Lodge shall annually make a return of 
its Officers and members, the names of those who have been 
made Masons, passed to the degree of Fellow Craft, and raised to 
the sublime degree of Master Mason in such Lodge, during the 
year ending April fifteenth next preceding, with the date thereof; 
and of such other matters as may be required byathe Grand 
Secretary ; which shall be returned to the Grand Secretary, with 
the dues to the Grand Lodge, on or before the first day of May. 

Section 86. No Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons can legally assemble in this State under a Warrant 
granted by any foreign Masonic power. 

Section 87. The fee demanded by a Lodge for conferring the 
degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason, 
shall not be less than twenty-five dollars, including the fee to the 
Grand Lodge; and no Lodge under this jurisdiction shall take 
notes of hand for fees, or grant any time of credit therefor. 

Section 88. No Lodge shall confer either of the degrees of 
Ancient Craft Masonry upon more than one candidate at the same 
time and by the same ceremony, or more than five degrees at the 
same Communication, or on the same day. 

Section 89. No Lodge shall appropriate or use its funds, or 
any part thereof, for any other object than charitable or other 
Masonic purposes. 

Section 90. No business shall be transacted in a Lodge of 
Entered Apprentices or of Fellow Crafts, except that pertaining to 
the W T ork and Lectures of those degrees. All general business, 
such as the election and installation of Officers, the discussion of 
questions relating to the general interests of the Fraternity, and 



the local affairs of\the Lodge, shall be transacted in a Master's 
Lodge. 

Section 91. No Lodge shall encourage, promote, or permit 
the delivery of any Masonic Lectures which have not been 
sanctioned and authorized by the Grand Lodge. Nor shall any 
Mason be permitted to deliver such Lectures under this jurisdic- 
tion. 

Section 92. The discussion of any subject not of a strictly 
Masonic character is prohibited in every Lodge under this 
juridiction. 

Section 93. No Lodge shall form a public procession, 
funeral processidhs excepted, without permission from the M.\ 
W.\ Grand Master. 

Section 94. No one beneath the degree of Master Mason, 
shall be buried with Masonic honors and the formalities of the 
Order. It is the duty of a Lodge of which a Brother is a 
member, or ; the nearest Lodge, to attend and perform the usual 
Masonic burial service over deceased Master Masons, when 
requested so to do by the deceased, or his nearest relatives. 

Section 95. Every Lodge shall transmit to the Grand 
Secretary, immediately after their adoption, a copy of its By- 
Laws, for the examination of the Grand Lodge; and whenever 
the By-Laws of any Lodge shall be altered or amended, a copy of 
the same thus altered or amended shall be transmitted as above 
directed. In the recess of the Grand Lodge, the By-Laws of any 
Lodge, or any amendment or alteration of them, may be submitted 
to the Grand Master, and if approved by him, shall be in force 
until the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge. 

Section 96. No Lodge shall have power to suspend tempora- 
rily anv of the provisions of its By-Laws, nor alter or amend the 
same, unless such suspension, alteration or amendment shall have 
been proposed and entered on the records of the Lodge at a 
previous regular Communication; and in no case shall any such 
proposed suspension, alteration, or amendment be acted upon 
except at a stated Communication. 

Section 97. Every Lodge shall be furnished by the Grand 
Lodge with necessary blank Returns, on making due application 
therefor to the Grand Secretaiy. Blank Diplomas shall also be* 



28 



furnished to the particular Lodges by the Grand Secretary, as the 
Lodges may severally require, they paying the Grand Lodge for 
each Diploma, the sum of one dollar, or the cost thereof. The 
Grand Secretary shall receive from the hands of the Grand Lodge 
the sum of fifty cents for each Diploma furnished a particular 
Lodge, as his fee for sealing and certifying the same. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

OFFICERS. 



Section- 
OS. Must be members. 
99. Master must have been Warden. 

100. Master, how installed. 

101. Wardens cannot Work unless 

Past Master present. 

102. Special Communication, how 

called. 



Section— 

103. Master responsible for Warrant, 

and to have it present at 
opening. 

104. Constitution and By-Laws to be 

read before election. 



Section 98. No Brother can be elected or appointed an 
Officer of a Lodge, unless he be a member of such Lodge, 
except the Tyler, who shall, however, be a member of some 
Lodge. 

Section 99. No Brother is eligible to the office of Master of 
a Lodge who has not served acceptably as a Warden in some 
regularly constituted Lodge under the jurisdiction of this or some 
other Grand Lodge, at least six months; except where a new 
Lodge is to be formed, or where no such Warden can be found. 

Section 100. The Master of every Lodge under this juris- 
diction shall be installed by some Officer of the Grand Lodge, 
who is authorized by this Constitution to preside in a particular 
Lodge, or by some regular Past Master. 

Section 101. No Lodge, in the absence of the Master, shall 
Initiate, Craft, or Raise, unless a Past Master is present. 

Section 102. No special Communication of a Lodge shall bo 
called without the order of the Master; in his absence, that of 
the Senior Warden ; in the absence of both, that of the Junior 
Warden ; or in the absence of these three Officers, that of the 
three oldest Master Masons, members of the Lodge. 

Section 103. The Master of a Lodge has the special charge of 



29 

its Warrant, and it is his duty to see that it is carefully preserved. 
It must be present when the Lodge is opened. 

Section 104. The Constitution of this Grand Lodge, and the 
By-Laws of each particular Lodge, so far as they relate to the 
election and qualification of Officers of particular Lodges, shall 
be read at every Annual Communication of each Lodge prior to 
the choice of its Officers. 



PART III 



OF INDIVIDUALS 



Article XIV. Of Candidates and Balloting. 

XV. Of Advancement and Dispensations. 
XVI. Of Members. 



ARTICLE XIV. 



OF CANDIDATES AND BALLOTING. 



Section — 

105. Physical qualifications. 

106. Petition, requisites of. 

107. Petitions and ballots to be at 

stated Communications, to lay 
over four weeks, and inquiry 
made. 

108. Fees to be paid before applica- 

tion. 

109. Candidates must apply to near- 

est Lodge. 

110. Candidates must have been in 

jurisdiction twelve months. 



Section— 

111. Candidate from jurisdiction of 

another Lodge in this State. 

112. Candidates from out the State. 
113.. Petitions not to be withdrawn. 



114. 



116. 
117. 
118. 



Rejected candidate must wait 

twelve months. 
Rejected candidate not to apply 

to any other Lodge without 

consent. 
Ballot unanimous. 
One ballot for the degrees. 
Declaration of candidates. 



Section 105. By the ancient regulations, the physical 
deformity of an individual operates as a bar to his admission into 
the Fraternity. But as this regulation was adopted for the 
government of the Craft, at a period when they united the 
character of operative with that of speculative Masons, this Grand 
Lodge authorizes such a construction of the regulation as that, 
when the deformity of the candidate is not such as to prevent him 
from being instructed in the arts and mysteries of Freemasonry, 
and does not amount to an inability honestly to acquire the means 
of subsistence, the admission will not be an infringement upon 
the ancient landmarks, but will be consistent with the spirit of 
our Institution. 

Section 106. The petition of every candidate for initiation 
in any Lodge, must be printed or in writing, signed by the appli- 

[ 30 ] 



31 

cant, stating his age, residence, occupation, and whether he has 
ever made application to, and been rejected by, any other Lodge; 
and be accompanied by the recommendation of not less than 
two members of the Lodge. 

Section 107. No candidate for initiation shall be proposed 
or balloted for at a special Communication, nor be balloted for, 
until his application has laid over for the consideration of the 
members at least four weeks, without first obtaining a Dispensa- 
tion therefor; nor shall a candidate in any event be balloted for, 
into whose moral character a strict inquiry has not been made. 

Section 108. No Lodge under this jurisdiction shall receive 
the application of any one to be made a Mason, or to be Passed, 
or Raised, unless the prescribed fee for said degree has been 
previously deposited in the hands of the Secretary. If the candi- 
date for the degrees when balloted for, be rejected, the sum so 
deposited shall be returned to him. 

Section 109. Every candidate must apply to the Lodge 
nearest his residence, by the nearest traveled way. 

Section 110. No application of any person for the degrees 
shall be entertained by any Lodge, unless he shall have resided 
within the jurisdiction of the Lodge to which application is made 
at least twelve months next preceding said application, except 
as provided in the two following sections. 

Section 111. If any person wishes for initiation in any 
Lodge, who resides without the jurisdiction of such Lodge, but 
in this State, he shall first obtain the unanimous consent of the 
Lodge within whose jurisdiction he resides, by vote of the Lodge, 
at a stated Communication, notice thereof having been given 
at a previous stated Communication, which consent, under seal of 
the Lodge, shall be annexed to his application. 

Section 112. If any person wishes for initiation in any 
Lodge, who resides without the State, he shall first obtain the 
consent of the Lodge within whose jurisdiction he resides, by 
unanimous vote, at a stated Communication, and the permission in 
writing of the Grand Master within whose jurisdiction he resides, 
which consent and permission shall be annexed to his application. 

Section 113. No petition for initiation, or application for 
membership, shall be withdrawn. 



32 



Section 114. A rejected applicant for the degrees cannot 
again present his petition to any Lodge within twelve months of 
his rejection. 

Section 115. No candidate whose application may be rejected 
by a Lodge, shall be initiated in any Lodge other than the one 
which rejected him, unless the Lodge recommend him to another 
Lodge by a unanimous vote — the vote to be taken by the secret 
ballot, at a stated Communication, notice thereof having been 
given at a previous stated Communication. And the Master and 
Wardens shall cause all rejections to be communicated to the 
Grand Secretary, who shall immediately communicate the same 
to all the Lodges under this jurisdiction. And if any Mason 
knowingly assist, or recommend for initiation, to any Lodge 
whatever, any candidate, rejected as aforesaid, except as above 
provided, such Mason shall be expelled from the Institution. 

Section 116. The general rule which governs the Order in 
the admission of members and candidates, is, that such admission 
is to be sanctioned by entire unanimity ; and so sacred and 
fundamental does the Grand Lodge conceive this rule to be, that 
no candidate shall be initiated in any Lodge without a clear and 
unanimous ballot in his favor. Every member present shall 
ballot on the application, unless excused by the Lodge. 

Section 117. There shall be but one ballot for all the 
degrees. If objections are made to a candidate after initiation, 
charges shall be filed and a trial had, as provided in Article XVII. 

Section 118. Every candidate for Masonry shall, before 
initiation, give an unqualified affirmative answer to the following 
questions : 

" Do you sincerely declare upon your honor, before these 
witnesses, that, unbiased by friends, and uninfluenced by 
mercenary motives, you freely and voluntarily offer yourself a 
candidate for the mysteries of Masonry ? 

"Do you sincerely declare, upon your honor, before these 
witnesses, that you are prompted to solicit the privileges of 
Masonry by a favorable opinion conceived of the institution, a 
desire of knowledge, and a sincere wish of being serviceable to 
your fellow creatures ? 

"Do you sincerely declare, upon your honor, before these 



witnesses, that you will, cheerfully conform to all the ancient 
established usages and customs of the Fraternity ?" 



ARTICLE XV. 



OF ADVANCEMENT AND DISPENSATIONS. 



Section— 

119. Candidate to be examined as to 

proficiency. 

120. Time of Work before advance- 

ment. 



Section— 

121. Advancement in another Lodge. 

122. Fees for Dispensation. 



Section 119. No Brother shall be advanced to a higher 
Degree in Masonry, without having been first examined by the 
Master in open Lodge as to his proficiency in the preceding 
Degree. 

Section 120. No candidate can be admitted to more than 
one degree at the same time, except by Dispensation. All 
Entered Apprentices must work one month as such before they 
can be passed to the degree of Fellow Craft. All Fellow Crafts 
must work in a Lodge of Crafts one month before they can be 
raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason. 

Section 121. When application for the degree of Fellow 
Craft or Master Mason is made to any Lodge, other than that in 
which the applicant was initiated or passed, it shall be accom- 
panied by the consent of the Lodge in which he was initiated 
or passed, by unanimous vote, at a stated Communication, which 
consent shall be under seal of the Lodge, and shall be annexed 
to the application. 

Section 122. Whenever a Dispensation is granted for 
conferring degrees, it shall be the duty of the Officer granting the 
same, to require and receive of the Lodge to whom the same may 
be granted, the sum of five dollars for the Dispensation, which 
shall be paid to the Grand Secretary for the use of the Grand 
Lodge ; and the Lodge shall require of the candidate ten dollars 
in addition to their usual fee. 

3 



34 



ARTICLE XVI. 



OF MEMBERS. 



Section— 

123. Admission of members. 

124. In one Lodge only. 

125. Of changing membership from 

one Lodge to another. 
12G. Removal alone does not justify 
striking name from roll. 



Section— 

127. Discharged not to be members of 

another Lodge. 

128. Visitor may call for Warrant, 



Section 123. No Brother shall be admitted a member of any 
particular Lodge, until he has been raised to the sublime degree 
of Master Mason. Every Master Mason raised in any Lodge, may 
become a member thereof by signing the By-Laws. Every candi- 
date for membership not raised in the Lodge, or raised more than 
six months before, must be proposed at a stated Communication, 
and be balloted for at a subsequent stated Communication of 
the Lodge, and accepted by unanimous ballot. 

Section 124. No Brother shall be a member of more than 
one Lodge, nor shall he hold more than one office in the same 
Lodge, at the same time. 

Section 125. Any Brother desiring to change his member- 
ship from one particular Lodge to another, shall apply to the 
Lodge for a recommendation to such other Lodge, which if no 
sufficient objection appears shall be granted, and shall be in 
writing under seal of the Lodge, and shall be presented with his 
application for membership to such other Lodge, when, if elected 
to membership in the new Lodge, his membership in his old 
Lodge shall cease from that time ; if not elected, his membership 
in the old Lodge shall remain unaffected. 

Section 126. The removal of a Brother into another juris - 
diction, does not, of itself, authorize his name to be stricken from 
the roll of the Lodge of which he is a member. 

Section 127. Any Brother who has been discharged from 
membership for the non-payment of dues, shall not be admitted to 
membership in any other Lodge, until the same are paid or 
remitted. 

Section 128. A visiting Brother has a right to call for the 
Warrant of the Lodge he desires to visit. 



PART IV. 

TRIALS AND PENALTIES 

Article XVII. Trials and Penalties. 



ARTICLE XVII. 



TRIALS AND PENALTIES. 



Section— 

129. Rules for trials. 

130. Form of voting. 

131. Punishments. 

132. Restoration, how. 

133. Application for restoration. 

134. Lodges to watch the conduct of 

their members. 

135. Sojourners. 

136. If no penalty affixed, what pun- 

ishment. 



Section— 

137. Trial of Master. 

138. Effect of suspension or expulsion 

by R. A. Chapter or Com- 
mandery. 

139. Non-pnyment of dues. 

140. Effect of reversal of sentence by 

Grand Lodge. 

141. Trials in Grand Lodge. 

142. Publication of expulsions. 



Section 129. Whenever a member of a Lodge, or a Brother, 
shall be accused of any offence, which, if proved, would subject 
him to suspension or expulsion, he shall have a fair and impartial 
trial, and the proceedings shall be conducted substantially as 
follows : 

Rule 1. The accusation shall be made in writing, under the 
signature of a Master Mason, and given in charge to the Secretary 
of a Lodge, who, under the direction of the Master, shall serve, 
or cause the accused to be served with an attested copy of the 
charges, and shall give him seasonable notice of the time and 
place of hearing, if his residence be known. 

Rule 2. The examination of the charges shall be had in a 
Lodge specially notified and convened for the purpose, at which 
none but members of the Lodge, or of the Grand Lodge, shall be 
admitted, except as counsel or witnesses. 

[35] 



36 

Rule 3. The accused may select any Brother for his counsel, 
and the witnesses shall testify on their honor, and if Masons, 
on their honor as such. Hearsay evidence shall be excluded. 

Rule 4. If the witnesses can not or will not attend the Lodge, 
their depositions may be taken and read as evidence. Reasonable 
notice of the time and place of taking each deposition shall be 
given in writing to the opposite party, by the person appointed to 
take the same; the deponent shall give his testimony on his 
honor; both parties may be present with their counsel, and put 
such questions to the deponent as they please and are relevant. 
The deposition, having been reduced to writing, shall be read to, 
and then signed by, the deponent, and sealed up in his presence, 
and returned unopened to the Lodge. 

Rule 5. The question, " 7s the accused guilty or not guilty?" 
shall be distinctly put to each member of the Lodge, by name, 
commencing with the youngest. The Secretary shall record the 
answer as given. 

Rule 6. If the accused shall be found guilty, the question 
shall then be taken on the grade of punishment in the following 
order : 

1st. "Shall the accused be expelled?" If two-thirds of those 
voting do not vote for expulsion — 

2d. "Shall the accused be suspended?" If two-thirds of those 
voting do not vote for suspension, the punishment of reprimand 
by the Master shall be imposed as of course without further vote 
of the Lodge, and the Master shall proceed at once to administer 
the reprimand in open Lodge. 

Rule 7. If the verdict be suspension or expulsion, an attested 
copy of the proceedings shall be sent to the Grand Lodge at the 
next ensuing meeting thereof for examination and final action. 

Rule 8. A sentence of suspension or expulsion shall not take 
full effect until confirmed by this Grand Lodge ; but shall operate 
as suspension of the delinquent in the mean time. 

Rule 9. The Lodge shall appoint some Brother to take 
minutes of the evidence, which shall be preserved on the files of 
the Lodge, but not entered upon the records. 

Rule 10. The Secretary shall keep a full record of all pro- 
ceedings, and shall transmit within thirty days, and before the 
meeting of the Grand Lodge, to the Grand Master, a full copy of 



37 

all the evidence, charges, specifications, notices, services of same, 
and of all things in any way pertaining to the trial, which copy 
shall be signed by the Master and attested by the Secretary, under 
seal. 

Rule 11. Either party may appeal from the decision of the 
Lodge or rulings of the Master, which appeal must be in writing, 
signed, by the appellant and filed with the Secretary of the Lodge 
within one month of the decision, and must set forth the reason 
why he makes the appeal. The appellant shall give at least ten 
days' notice in writing to the other party of such appeal, prior to 
the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge. 

Section 133. In taking the vote upon the questions, "Is the 
accused guilty or not guilty?" "Shall the accused be expelled?" 
" Shall the accused be suspended?" every Brother present must 
vote unless excused by unanimous vote of the Lodge. 

Section 131. Masonic punishments are expulsion, suspension, 
which must be indefinite, and reprimand, which shall be admin- 
istered by the Master in open Lodge. 

Section 132. No Mason, whose suspension or expulsion has 
been confirmed by this Grand Lodge, shall be restored to the 
privileges of Masonry, except by a unanimous vote of the 
members present when such restoration may be acted on, of the 
Lodge by which he was so expelled or suspended, and with the 
consent and approbation of the Grand Lodge. 

Section 133. The application for restoration shall be in 
writing, signed by the applicant, presented to the Lodge at a 
stated Communication, when a time shall be appointed by the 
Lodge for its consideration at some stated Communication. 

Section 134. Every Lodge is required to keep a careful 
watch over the conduct of its members ; and should any member 
of a Lodge be addicted to profanity, intemperance, lewdness or 
gambling, or be charged with any other violation of his Masonic 
duties and obligations, it shall be the duty of such Lodge imme- 
diately to institute an inquiry into the facts of the case, and if 
the Brother charged with offending be found guilty, the Lodge is 
required, as justice shall demand, to reprimand the offender, 
suspend or expel him from all the rights and privileges of 
Masonry, until a thorough reformation takes place. 



38 

Section 135. Particular Lodges have power, and may take 
cognizance of any immoral or unmasonic conduct of a sojourning 
Brother ; that is, in cases where the offender is a member of any 
Lodge within the United States, the Lodge in whose precinct he 
may be accused of immoral or unmasonic conduct, may inquire 
into and report the same to the Lodge whereof he is a member, 
that he may be there tried ; and in cases where the accusecLis not 
a member of any such Lodge, the Lodge within whose jurisdic- 
tion the offence shall have been committed, may proceed as 
against a member thereof, and censure, suspend, or expel the 
offender, as the nature of the offence may require. 

Section 130. A Lodge or Brother offending against any law 
or regulation of the Craft, or of the Grand Lodge, to the breach 
of which no penalty is attached, shall, at the discretion of the 
Grand Lodge, or particular Lodge having jurisdiction of the case, 
be subject to admonition, suspension or expulsion. 

Section 137. It shall not be competent for a Lodge to try its 
Master. Any five members of the Lodge, or the District Deputy 
Grand Master, may impeach him before the Grand Master, who 
shall order an investigation of the charges ; and if in his opinion 
they are well founded, and of a character to justify the proceeding, 
he may suspend the delinquent, and summon him to appear at the 
next Communication of the Grand Lodge, to show cause why he 
should not be dealt with according to the regulations and usages 
in such cases established. 

Section 138. An expulsion or suspension of a Brother from 
a Royal Arch Chapter, or a Commandery of Knights Templar, 
shall not operate as an expulsion or suspension from the Lodge of 
which he is a member. 

Section 139. No Lodge shall suspend or expel a member 
from the rights of Masonry for non-payment of dues. The 
penalty of such delinquency shall be forfeiture or suspension of 
membership; and that only after due trial, as in other Masonic 
misdemeanors. 

Section 140. Whenever the Grand Lodge shall reverse or 
abrogate the decision of a particular Lodge, suspending or 
expelling a Brother, and shall restore him to the benefits and 
privileges of Masonry, he shall not thereby be restored to 



39 

membership within the body from which he was suspended or 
expelled, without its unanimous consent.. 

Section 141. The Grand Lodge has power to try and punish 
its own members for any offence. In case of complaint against 
any member of the Grand Lodge, Master of any particular Lodge, 
or any Lodge, the Grand Master may refer the same to a 
Committee of five Past Masters, by a commission under his 
hand and seal, who shall notify the parties and proceed with 
the hearing agreeably to the rules for the regulation of particular 
Lodges, so far as the same may be applicable, and shall forth- 
with return to the Grand Master, with the commission, attested 
copies of all their proceedings, together with their findings in both 
matters of law and fact, with any recommendation they deem 
proper. Upon such return the Grand Master may restore the 
accused or suspend him till the pleasure of the Grand Lodge be 
known, and shall submit all the papers to the Grand Lodge at the 
next Annual Communication, for their action. 

Section 142. No Lodge, or any member thereof, shall, with- 
out permission of the Grand Lodge, publish, or in any way make 
known the expulsion of a Brother, except to the Fraternity, or 
within the Lodge, farther than to state verbally the fact, whenever 
the honor, interests or reputation of Masonry may seem to 
demand it. 



P A RT V 



MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS. 



Article XVIII. Of Committees, «!x. 

XIX. Rules for government of the Grand Lodge. 
XX. Amendments. 



ARTICLE XVIII. 

OF COMMITTEES, ETC. 

Section — Section — 

143. Committee of Charity. 148. Chairmen and reports. 

144. No certificate to be granted to 149. Expenses how paid. 

solicit charity. 150. Reconsideration. 

145. Standing Committees. 151. Members to have only one vote. 

146. G.\ M *. may refer any question 152. Records to be read. 

in recess to Committee on 153. No funds of Grand Lodge to be 

Jurisprudence. used except for Masonic pur- 

147. None but members on Commit- poses. 

tees. 

Section 143. The Grand Master and Grand Wardens, for the 
time being, shall constitute a Committee of Charity. 

Section 144. No Lodge, or Officer, or member of a Lodge, 
shall, undsr any circumstances, give a certificate or recommen- 
dation to enable a Mason to go from Lodge to Lodge as a pauper, 
or in an itinerant manner to apply to Lodges for relief. 

Section 145. The Grand Master, or presiding Officer, shall, 
at each Annual Communication, nominate the following Commit- 
tees, to consist of three each, to be confirmed by the Grand Lodge, 
and continue in office until the next Annual Communication, 
namely : 

A Committee on Credentials; 
on Finance ; 

on Foreign Correspondence ; 
on Unfinished Business ; 
on Lodges ; 
on Returns ; 

on Doings of the Grand Officers ; 
on Trials and Appeals, 
on Jurisprudence. 
I 10 ] 



41 



Section 146. The Grand Master may refer any question of 
law or usage arising in the recess of the Grand Lodge, to the 
Committee on Jurisprudence, who may report to the Grand Master, 
or to the Grand Lodge at its next Annual Communication. 

Section 147. No Brother, not a member of the Grand Lodge, 
shall be appointed on any Committee therein. This, however, is 
not intended to militate against the right of the Grand Master to 
commission any Brother in writing, for a specific purpose. 

Section 148. All Committees, chosen or appointed, shall 
report their proceedings in writing, at the same Communication 
with their appointment, unless otherwise directed by the Grand 
Lodg3. The first Brother chosen or appointed, shall be chairman, 
and shall duly notify each of the Committee of the time and 
place of meeting. 

Section 149. The expenses of all Committees shall be paid 
by the Grand Lodge. 

Section 150. No vote passed in the Grand Lodge, or in a 
particular Lodge, can be reconsidered by a less number than were 
present when the vote was passed. 

Section 151. No Officer or member of this Grand Lodge 
shall be entitled to more than one vote, either in his own right or 
as proxy. 

Section 152. At every Communication of the Grand Lodge, 
the records of the preceding Communication shall be read by the 
Grand Secretary before the Lodge proceeds to business, unless 
otherwise ordered by vote of the Grand Lodge. 

Section 153. No portion of the funds of this Grand Lodge 
shall be appropriated or used for any purpose, except for defray- 
ing the necessary expenses of the Grand Lodge, the promotion of 
the interests of the Institution, and the relief of distressed worthy 
Brethren, their widows and orphans. 

ARTICLE XIX. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF GRAND LODGE. 

Section 154. Rule 1. None but members of the Grand 
Lodge, Past Officers of other Grand Lodges excepted, shall be 



42 



present at the opening of the same, nor shall any visitor be 
admitted during the session except by permission of the Grand 
Master, and by vote of the Grand Lodge. 

Rule 2. Members and visitors shall keep the seats assigned 
them, except the Grand Marshal, and Officers whose duties may 
call them about the Lodge. 

Rule 3. All resolutions shall be submitted in writing, before 
there shall be any debate upon them ; as shall all motions, if the 
presiding Officer, or any Brother, desire it. 

Rule 4. In all elections, and upon every question which may 
come before the Grand Lodge for decision, each member present 
shall be entitled to one vote only, except upon a call of any five 
members, in which case the vote shall be taken by Lodges, and 
each Lodge represented shall then be entitled to four votes, all of 
which shall be on the same side ; and the representatives of each 
Lodge respectively may decide on which side of the question the 
votes of their Lodge shall be cast. The other members of the 
Grand Lodge shall be entitled to one vote each. A member 
cannot delegate his right of voting to another. 

Rule 5. Each member shall vote on all questions, unless 
excused by the Grand Lodge. 

Rule 6. Every member who speaks shall rise, and remain 
standing, addressing himself to the Grand Presiding Officer ; nor 
shall he be interrupted unless by a call to order from the presid- 
ing Officer, or from some member of the Grand Lodge. 

Rule 7. When a question is under debate, no motion shall be 
received, except to lay on the table, to commit, to amend, or to 
postpone, which motions shall take precedence in the order above 
named. 

Rule 8. A motion to amend, until decided, shall preclude all 
other amendments of the main question. 

Rule 9. Any member may call for a division of the question, 
where the same will admit of it. 

Rule 10. No new motion, which totally changes the subject 
matter on which the original motion was intended to operate, 
shall be admitted, under color of amendment, as a substitute for 
the motion under debate. 

Rule 11. No member, except one of the majority which 



43 

decided the question, shall be allowed to move for a reconsidera- 
tion. 

Rule 12. After a motion is stated by the Grand Presiding 
Officer, it shall be deemed to be in the posession of the Grand 
Lodge, but may be withdrawn by the mover at any time before 
decision or amendment. 

Rule 13. There shall be no debate upon any question after it 
has been put by the Grand Presiding Officer. 

Rule 14. All motions and reports may be committed at the 
pleasure of the Grand Lodge. 

Rule 15. While the Grand Presiding Officer is addressing the 
Grand Lodge, or putting a question, or a Brother is speaking, no 
member shall entertain any private discourse, or pass between the 
speaker and the chair. 

Rule 16. No Brother shall leave the Grand Lodge during the 
session, without permission of the Grand Master. 

Rule 17. No Brother shall speak more than twice upon the 
same question, unless to explain, without permission from the 
Grand Lodge. 

ARTICLE XX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Section 15.5. The Grand Lodge shall have full power and 
authority to make such amendments, alterations and additions to 
this Constitution, at any regular Communication, as they shall 
think proper and expedient for the benefit of the Craft ; provided 
such amendment, alteration or addition, be preposed in writing, at 
an Annual Communication of this Grand Lodge, be filed with the 
Grand Secretary, and lay over for consideration till the next 
Annual Communication; and such proposed amendment, altera- 
tion, or addition, when acted upon, may be amended as the Grand 
Lodge shall deem proper; provided, also, that the ancient land- 
marks of Masonry be carefully preserved. 



APPENDIX, 



FOBMS AND INSTRUCTIONS 

Prepared by order of the Grand Lodge, and directed to be 
printed with the Constitution. 



[i] 

FORM OF APPOINTMENT OF PROXY, IN GRAND LODGE, OF MASTER 
OR WARDEN OF A PARTICULAR LODGE. 

( Section 4. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Hon- 
or able Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State 
of New Hampshire : 

I hereby appoint Brother my proxy, to represent me, 

as of Lodge, No. , at the (semi-) Annual Com- 

munication of the Grand Lodge, to be holden at , on 

the day of , 18 

Witness my hand and seal at , this day of , 

A.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

[l. s.] A. B., of Lodge, No. . 



[2] 

FORM OF DEPUTATION BY THE GRAND MA.STER. 

( Section 26. ) 

To all the Fraternity to whom these Presents shall come : 

Know ye. That I, , Most Worshipful Grand 

Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in New Hampshire, 
reposing full trust and confidence in the care, skill and good con- 

(l) 



duct of our (B.\ W.\) Brother , do hereby appoint and 

depute the said (R.\ W.\) Brother , in my name and 

place, to fully constitute, solemnly consecrate, and dedicate 
Lodge, No. , to whom a Warrant of Constitution has been issued 
by the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge, and to install its Officers in 
(due) form, according to the ancient usages and customs of the 
Craft ; at such time within days hereof, as the said 

shall appoint, and for so doing this shall be his sufficient warrant. 
Given under my hand and seal, at , this day 

of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. D. 18 . 

[e. s. ] A. B., Grand Master. 

In place of the clause in italics, clauses may be inserted : To dedicate a Hall, 
lay a Corner Stone, or perform any other act, which it may be the desire of the 
Grand Master to have done. 



[3] 

FORM OF GRAND TREASURER'S BOND. 
( Section 34. ) 

Know all Men by these Presents : 

That we, of , in the County of , and State of 

New Hampshire, as Principal ; and , and , 

of , as Sureties, are holden and stand firmly bound 

unto , Grand Master of Masons in New Hampshire, in 

trust for the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and 
Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State 
of New Hampshire, in the sum of dollars, to the pay- 

ment whereof, we hereby jointly and severally bind ourselves and 
our heirs respectively, firmly by these Presents, sealed with our 
seals, and dated this day of , A. D. 18 

The condition of this obligation is such, That if the said , 

who has been elected Grand Treasurer of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Lodge aforesaid, shall well and truly discharge and per- 
form all the duties of Grand Treasurer of said Grand Lodge, for 
the term of one year, and for such farther term or terms as he 
may be re-elected, according to the Constitution and General 
Regulations of said Grand Lodge, and especially shall safely keep 
all funds and other property of said Grand Lodge, or which may 
be deposited with said Grand Lodge, shall keep true and just 
accounts of the same, pay such orders as may be drawn upon him 
agreeably to said Constitution and Geneial Regulations, or the 
vote of said Grand Lodge, and annually, and at such other times 
as may be required by the Grand Lodge, or the Grand Master, lay 
before said Grand Lodge or Grand Master, a particular statement 
of his accounts, and of the funds and property in his hands, and 



at the close of his term, shall pay over and deliver to his successor 
in said office of Grand Treasurer, all books, papers, funds, or 
property of any kind in his possession as Grand Treasurer, then 
this obligation to be void. 



A. B. 


'•L. S. 


CD. 


^L. S. 


E. F. 


*L. S. 



[4] 

FORM OF GRAND SECRETARY'S BOND. 
( Section 43. ) 

Know all Men by these Presents : 

That we, , of , in the County of , 

and State of New Hampshire, as Principal, and , and , 

of , ,as Sureties, are holden and stand firmly bound 

unto , Grand Master of Masons in New Hampshire, in 

trust for the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and 
Honorable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State 
of New Hampshire, in the sum of dollars, to the payment 

whereof, we hereby jointly and severally bind ourselves and our 
heirs respectively, firmly by these Presents, sealed with our seals, 
and dated this day of , a. d. 18 . 

The condition of this obligation is such, That if the said , 

who has been elected Grand Secretary of the Most Worshipful 
Grand Lodge aforesaid, shall well and truly discharge and perform 
all the duties of Grand Secretary of said Grand Lodge, for the 
term of one year, and for such farther term or terms as he may be 
re-elected, according to the Constitution and General Regulations 
of said Grand Lodge, and especially shall receive all moneys that 
may be paid to him as Grand Secretary, and pay the same over to 
the Grand Treasurer, keep accurate accounts between said Grand 
Lodge and the Particular Lodges, and annually, and at such other 
times as may be required by the Grand Lodge, or Grand Master, 
lay before said Grand Lodge, or Grand Master, a statement of his 
accounts, and of the accounts between said Grand Lodge and the 
particular Lodges, and at the close of his term, deliver to his suc- 
cessor in said office of Grand Secretary s all books, papers, funds 
or property of any kind in his possession as Grand Secretary, then 
this obligation to be void. 

A. B. [l.s.] 
CD. [l.s.] 
E. F. [l.s.] 



The Constitution requires certain steps to be taken before a Dispensation shall be 
granted for a new Lodge. It is believed that the Forms following contain nothing 
but what is essential should appear before the Dispensation be granted. 

The Brethren desirous of forming a new Lodge, first prepare and sign a petition 
therefor, in the form prescribed in Sec. 65 of the Constitution; this petition is then 
submitted to the two nearest Lodges subordinate to the Grand Lodge, for their 
approbation and recommendation, at stated communications of such Lodges, notice 
thereof having been given at previous stated communications. 



[5] 

FORM OF APPROBATION AND RECOMMENDATION BY NEAREST 

PARTICULAR LODGE. 

( Section 61. ) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , holden 

at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 : 

The petition of several Brethren, praying for a Dispensation to 
open a new Lodge at , in the County of , was 

duly laid before the Lodge, pursuant to notice given at a stated 
Communication on the day of , a.'. l.\ 58 , A. D. 18 , 

when it was 

Resolved, That this Lodge, being fully satisfied that the peti- 
tioners are Master Masons in good standing, and being prepared 
to vouch for their moral character and Masonic abilities, does 
approve the formation of such new Lodge, and recommend that 
the Dispensation prayed for be granted them. 
A true copy of the record. 

[ L. s. ] A. B., Secretary, 

Lodge, No. 

Having obtained such approbation and recommendation from the two nearest 
Lodges, the petition and recommendations should be submitted to theD.\D.\ 
G.\M.\ of the District, for his approval and recommendation. 

[6] 

FORM OF APPROVAL AND RECOMMENDATION BY D.'.D.'.&.'.M.'. 

( Section 61. ) 

The petition of several Brethren, praying for a Dispensation to 
open a new Lodge at , in the County of , with 

the approbation and recommendation of Lodge, No. , 

holden at , miles from the proposed location of said 

new Lodge, and of Lodge, No. , holden at , miles 

from said proposed location, has been laid before me ; and being 



fully satisfied that the petitioners are Master Masons, and being 
prepared to vouch for their moral character and Masonic abilities, 
and believing such new Lodge will be for the good of the Craft, I 
approve the formation of such new Lodge, and recommend that 
the Dispensation prayed for be granted to them. 

Dated this day of , a.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ —th Masonic Dist. 



If a majority of the petitioners are members of a regular Lodge under the juris- 
diction of the Grand Lodge, they must also have the certificate of the Master and 
Wardens sanctioning the separation. 

m 

FORM OF SANCTION OF MASTER AND WARDENS. » 

( Section 63. ) 

The petition of several Brethren, a majority of whom are 
members of Lodge, No. , praying for a Dispensation to 

open a new Lodge at , in the County of , has 

been laid before us, and having considered the same, we hereby 
sanction and approve the separotion of said Brethren from 
Lodge, No. , and the formation of such new Lodge. 

Given under our hands at , this day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , 
a. D. 18 . 

A. B., W.\ Master, \ 

C. D., Senior Warden, > Lodge, No. 

E. F., Junior Warden, ) 



The Master and Wardens named in the Dispensation, then go before the Grand 
Lecturer of the District, and are by him examined as to their skill in the Work and 
Lectures, which should be entire familiarity with all the Work and Lectures in the 
three degrees. 

[8] 

FORM OF GRAND LECTURER'S CERTIFICATE. 

( Section 62. ) 

In accordance with the provisions of Sec. 62 of the Constitution 
of the Grand Lodge, 1 have carefully and fully examined , 

recommended to be -Worshipful Master, and , and , 

recommended to be Senior and Junior Wardens, of a new Lodge, 
to be opened at , in the County of , and find 

them well skilled in the entire Work and Lectures of Ancient 
Craft Masonry. 



6 



Given under my hand at , this day of , a.-. l.\ 58 
a. D. 18 . 

A. B., Grand Lecturer, — th Masonic Dist. 



These several papers having been procured, should be forwarded, with the re- 
ceipt of the Grand Secretary for the Dispensation fee, to the Grand Master, who will 
consider the same, and if he deem it best for the interests of the whole Craft, he will 
issue his Dispensation, which may be in the following form : 



[9] 

FORM OF DISPENSATION. 
\ ( Sections 22 & 60. ) 

To all whom it may concern : 

Know ye, That I, , Most Worshipful Grand Master ot 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in New Hampshire, having 
received a petition from a constitutional number of Brethren, who 
have been properly vouched for as Master Masons in good standing, 
setting forth, that having the honor and prosperity of the Craft at 
heart, they are desirous of establishing a new Lodge at , and 

requesting a Dispensation for the same ; which petition is accom- 
panied by the approbation and recommendation of the two Lodges 
subordinate to this Grand Lodge nearest the place where the new 
Lodge is to be held, and of the District Deputy Grand Master of 
that District, and the certificate of the Grand Lecturer, that he 
has examined the Master and Wardens nominated in the petition, 
and found them well skilled in the entire Work and Lectures of 
Ancient Craft Masonry, and the sanctum, of the Master and 
Wardens of Lodge, No. , of which a majority of the peti- 

tioners are members : and good and sufficient cause appearing to 
me for granting the prayer of said petition : I do, by virtue of 
the power in me vested by the Constitution of the Grand Lodge 
of New Hampshire, and the ancient usages of the Craft, grant 
this my Dispensation, empowering Brothers , , , 

to meet as a regular Lodge at , by the name of 

Lodge ; and I do hereby appoint Brother , to act as 

Worshipful Master, Brother , to act as Senior Warden, 

and Brother , to act as Junior Warden of the said Lodge : 

and I do further authorize the said Brethren to enter Apprentices, 
pass Fellow Crafts, and raise Master Masons, according to the 
ancient usages and landmarks of the Craft, and the Constitution 
and Regulations of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of New 
Hampshire, and not otherwise. 



And this my Dispensation shall continue in force until the next 
Annual Communication of the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of 
New Hampshire, at which time I require and enjoin the said 
Brethren to return this Dispensation to the Grand Lodge aforesaid, 
together with an attested transcript of all their proceedings under 
the same, and their By-Laws, that the said Grand Lodge may 
advise thereon. 

Given under my hand, and the seal of the Grand Lodge, 
at , this day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

[l. s. ] A. B., Grand Master. 

C. D., Grand Secretary. 



At the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, the new Lodge returns 
to the Grand Lodge the Dispensation, with an attested transcript of their pro- 
ceedings under it, and the By - Laws they have adopted. It is not absolutely re* 
quired that they should present a petition for a Warrant, yet that course would seem 
advisable, and such petition may be in the following form : 



[10] 

FORM OF PETITION FOR WARRANT OF CONSTITUTION. 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Hon~ 
orable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of 
New Hampshire : 

The undersigned respectfully represent, that they have, for some 
time past, met as a regular Lodge at , under the name 

of Lodge, by virtue of a Dispensation from Most 

Worshipful , Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted 

Masons in New Hampshire, which Dispensation with an attested 
transcript of our proceedings, and our By - Laws, is herewith 
returned. 

We would therefore pray, that a Warrant of Constitution be 
granted us for the said Lodge, which prayer being granted, we 
promise strict obedience to the Constitution and Regulations of 
the Grand Lodge, and regular attendance on its Communications. 

Dated the day of a.-. l.\ 53 , a. d. 18 . 



If a Lodge vote to remove, in accordance with Sections G9 and 70 of the Con- 
stitution, the following forms may be used. 

[ii] 

FORM OF PETITION FOR REMOVAL OF A LODGE. 

( Section 70. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of 
New Hampshire: 

The undersigned respectfully represent, that Lodge, 

No. , has heretofore met at , in the County of , 

that we are desirous to remove said Lodge to ; that at a 

stated Communication of said Lodge, held on the day of , 

a.*. l.\ 58 , notice of our desire to remove was openly given in 
said Lodge ; that every member of said Lodge was specially 
summoned to attend a stated Communication of said Lodge, held 
on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , for the express purpose of 

taking the subject of removal into consideration, at which last 
Communication the Lodge deemed such removal expedient ; that 
there are members of said Lodge : wherefore, we pray for 

permission to remove said Lodge to 

Dated the day of a. 4 . l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 



This petition should be accompanied by a copy of the proceedings of the Lodge 
in the matter, attested by the Secretary, and the certificate of the Master and 
Secretary of the number of members. It must also be accompanied by the appro- 
bation of the two nearest Lodges. 



[12] 

FORM OF APPROBATION FOR REMOVAL OF LODGE BY THE 

NEAREST PARTICULAR LODGES. 

( Section 70. ) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , holden 

at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

The vote of Lodge, No. , heretofore meeting at , 

in the County of , deeming its removal to expedient, 

was duly laid before the Lodge ; when it was 

Resolved, That this Lodge approve the removal of 
Lodge, No. , from , to 

A true copy of the records. 
[ l. s. ] A. B., Secretary. 



If it is desired to revive a dormant Lodge in accordance with the. provisions of 
Sec. 76 of the Constitution, the following forms may be used. 

[13] . 

FORM OF PETITION FOE RESTORATION OF WARRANT WHICH 

HAS BEEN SURRENDERED WITH THE INTENTION OF 

RESUMING IT. 

( Section 76.) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons in New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, Master Masons, respectfully represent, that on 
the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , Lodge, No. , holding 

a Warrant of Constitution from the Most Worshipful Grand 
Lodge of New Hampshire, for certain reasons surrendered their 
Warrant to the said Grand Lodge, with the intention, expressed 
in said surrender, of resuming the same at some future and more 
auspicious period; that we are now desirous of resuming the 
said Warrant, and of working under the same ; wherefore we (the 
first having been members of said Lodge at the time of such 

surrender), pray that the said Warrant, together with the By- 
Laws, records, seal, clothing, funds and other property of said 
Lodge, may be restored to us, and we be authorized to meet and 
work as a regular Lodge, agreeably to the Constitution and 
General Regulations of the Grand Lodge, and the ancient land- 
marks of the Craft. 

Dated at , this day of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

To be signed by at least seven Master Masons, at least four of whom were 
members of the Lodge at the time of its surrender of the Warrant. 

[14] 

FORM OF PETITION FOR RESTORATION OF WARRANT WHICH 

HAS BEEN SURRENDERED ABSOLUTELY, FORFEITED, 

OR REVOKED. 

( Section 76. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the 
State of New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, Master Masons, respectfully represent, that 
on the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , the Warrant of Constitution 
of Lodge, No. , was {surrendered to said Grand 

Lodge), {declared to he forfeited by said Grand Lodge), {revoked 



10 



by said Grand Lodge). That we are desirous of reviving the 
said Lodge: Wherefore we (the first having been members 

of said Lodge at the time of such [surrender ], [forfeiture, and not 
having been implicated in any improper or unmasonic conduct^, 
[revocation, and not having been implicated in any improper or un- 
masonic conauct~\), pray that the said Warrant may be restored to 
us, and we be authorized to meet and work as a regular Lodge, 
agreeably to the Constitution and General Regulations of the 
Grand Lodge, and the ancient landmarks of the Craft. 

Dated at , this day of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , 



To be signed by at least seven Master Masons, at least four of whom were 
members of the Lodge at the time of the surrender, forfeiture, or revocation of its 
Warrant. 

Under the new Constitution, it is believed this can only be done by the Grand 
Lodge, and not by the Grand Master, 

Accompanying either of the above petitions, should be the approval of the two 
nearest Lodges in this State, and of the D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ 



[15] 



FORM OF APPROBATION FOR RESTORATION OF WARRANT BY 
NEAREST PARTICULAR LODGES. 
, ( Section 76. ) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , holden 

at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 

The petition of several Brethren, at least four of whom were 
members of Lodge, No. , whose Warrant has been 

[surrendered), {forfeited), {revoked), praying for the restoration 
of such Warrant, was duly laid before the Lodge, when it was 

Resolved, That this Lodge approve the restoration of the 
Warrant of Lodge, No. , to the petitioners therefor. 

A true copy of the records. 
[ l. s. ] A. B., Secretary. 



[16] 



FORM OF APPROVAL BY D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ OF RESTORATION OF 



WARRANT. 

( Section 76. ) 



The petition of several Brethren, at least four of whom were 
members of Lodge, No. , whose Warrant has been 

[surrendered), {forfeited), {revoked), praying for the restoration 



11 

of such Warrant, with the approbation of Lodge, No. , 

holden at , miles from said Lodge, and 

Lodge, No. , holden at , miles from said 

Lodge, No. , has been laid before me, and being satisfied that 
the petitioners are Master Masons, of whom the first were 

members of said Lodge, No. , and believing such res- 

toration will be for the good of the Craft, I approve the restoration 
of said Warrant. 

Dated this day of- , a.\ l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 

A. B., Dr. Dr. Gr.Mr. —th Masonic Dist. 



The form of return is to be prescribed by the Grand Secretary from time to time, 
and as the necessary blanks are furnished the Lodges, it is deemed unnecessary to 
give any form here. The return should give the* exact date of every degree con- 
ferred in the Lodge for the year, in the order in which the degrees were conferred, 
and this, although the candidate was returned the previous year, as having received 
a lower degree. It should contain the full name of each Officer and member, and 
the names of the Officers should not be repeated among the members. It should be 
made out and sent, with the dues, to the Grand Secretary immediately after the 15th 
of April, and in no event should it be retained till the meeting of the Grand Lodge. 



[17] 

FORM OF PETITION TO BE MADE A MASON. 
( Section 106. ) 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens, and Brethren of 

Lodge, No. , of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons : 

The petition of the subscriber, respectfully represents, that 
having long entertained a favorable opinion of your ancient Insti- 
tution, he is desirous, if found worthy, of being admitted a 
member thereof. 

His age is years, his place of residence , his occu- 

pation . He has never before made application as a 

candidate to any Lodge. 

( Signed). A. B. 



If he has before been a candidate, in place of the last clause should be the 
following : 

He has on the day of , made application to Lodge, 

No. , and been ( accepted or rejected as the case may be ). 



12 

[18] 

FORM OF RECOMMENDATION OF CANDIDATE. 

( Section 106. ) 

We are personally acquainted with the above applicant, and 
from a confidence in his integrity, and the uprightness of his in- 
tention, recommend and propose him as a proper candidate for the 
mysteries of Masonry. 

A. B. 

C. D. 



It will be found convenient to have printed with the petition, a receipt for the 
Initiation fee, certificate of reference to Committee, and their report, which will 
then present the whole transaction in one document. 



[19j 

FORM OF CONSENT BY A LODGE, THAT A CANDIDATE WITHIN 
THEIR JURISDICTION MAY APPLY TO ANOTHER LODGE. 

( Sections 111 and 112. ) 

At a stated communication of Lodge No. , {on the registry 

of the Mr. Wr. Grand Lodge of ,) holden at , on 

the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

The application of (lately) resident of , within the 

jurisdiction of this Lodge, for the consent of this Lodge, that he 
may apply for and receive the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry 
in Lodge No. , holden at , was duly laid before the 

Lodge, when it was unanimously 

Resolved, That this Lodge consent, that may apply for and 

receive the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry in Lodge, No. 

, holden at , they making due inquiry into his character. 

A true copy of the records. 

[ l. s.] A. B., Secretary. 



The words in the first parenthesis to be inserted when the Lodge is not subordi- 
nate to the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, otherwise omitted. 

The word " lately " in the second parenthesis, to be inserted when the candidate 
has not resided in the jurisdiction of the Lodge twelve months. 

This consent should be inexorably refused when any doubt exists of the worthi- 
ness of the candidate, and if the least doubt occurs, the Worshipful Master should 
order the secret ballot thereon, 



13 

■ [20] 

FORM OF . PERMISSION, BY THE GRAND MASTER OE ANOTHER 
■ STATE, EOR THE APPLICATION EOR THE DEGREES IN 
ANY LODGE IN THIS STATE. 

( Section 112. ) 

To all to whom these Presents shall come : 

Whereas, application has been made to me, by , 

(lately) a resident of , within the jurisdiction of Lodge, 

No. , on the Registry of the M.\ W.\ Grand Lodge of , 

for permission to apply for and receive the degrees of Ancient 
Craft Masonry in Lodge, No. , on the Registry of the 

Grand Lodge of New Hampshire, which application is accom- 
panied by the consent of said Lodge, No. , granted at a 
stated Communication, which consent under the seal of the Lodge 
is hereto annexed. 

Therefore, Know ye, that I, , Most Worshipful 

Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in , 

hereby grant this, my permission, that the said , may 

apply for and receive the degrees of Ancient Craft Masonry in 
said Lodge, No. 

In witness whereof I have hereto set my hand and private seal, 
this day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 

[l'. s. ] A. B., Grand Master. 



[21] 

FORM OF CONSENT THAT A REJECTED CANDIDATE MAY APPLY 

TO ANOTHER LODGE. 

(Section 115.) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , holden 

at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

The application of , who was rejected in this Lodge 

on the day of , a. l. 58 , a. d. 18 , on his 

application to be made a Mason, for the recommendation of this 
Lodge to Lodge No. , was duly laid before the Lodge, 

pursuant to notice given at a stated Communication on the 
day of , a.', l.". 58 , a. d. 18 , when the secret ballot hav- 
ing been passed, he was thereby unanimously recommended to 
said Lodge No. 

A true copy of the records. 
[ I" s. ] A. B., Secretary, 



11. 

[22] . • 

FORM OF CONSENT THAT E.\ A.*. OR F.\ C.V MAY APPLY 

FOR AND RECEIVE THE REMAINING DEGREES IN 

ANOTHER LODGE. 

(Section 121.) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge No. •, holden 

at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

The application of , who was initiated as an E.\ A.*. 

on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , and passed to 

the degree of F.\ G.'. on the day of a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 

18 , in this Lodge, for the consent of this Lodge, that he may 
apply for and receive the remaining degrees in Lodge, 

No. , was duly laid before the Lodge, when it was 

Resolved, That this Lodge consent that , an E.\ A.*. 

(or a F.\ C.\), may apply for and receive the remaining degrees 
in Lodge, No. , they making due inquiry into his 

character. 

A true copy of the records, 
[ l. s. ] . A. B., Secretary. 



[23] 

FORM OF RECOMMENDATION TO JOIN ANOTHER LODGE. 
(Section 125.) 

To all whom it may concern : 

This is to certify that Brother is, at the date of 

these presents, a Master Mason in good and regular standing, and 
a member of Lodge, No. , and having paid all dues, 

and being free from all charges, he is, at his own request, by vote 
of said Lodge, recommended to Lodge, No. , for 

membership therein ; if elected and received in said Lodge, 

No. , then his membership in this Lodge shall cease from the 

date of such reception ; if not received by said Lodge, then 

his membership in this Lodge remain unaffected hereby. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Lodge, at , 

this day of , A.-. L.\ 58 , A. d. 18 . 

[ l. s. ] A. B., Secretary, 

Lodge, No. 



The above should be used whenever it is desired to change the membership from 
one Lodge to another. If it is desired to retire from the Lodge membership alto- 
gether, the following may be used. 



1.5 

[24] 

FORM OF DIMIT. 

To whom it may concern: 

This is to certify that Brother is, at the date of these 

presents, a Master Mason in good and regular standing, and 
having paid all dues, and being free from all charges, he is, at his 
own request, by vote of the Lodge, dimitted from membership 
in Lodge, No. , under the jurisdiction of the Grand 

Lodge of New Hampshire. 

Given under my hand and the seal of the Lodge, at , 

this day of , A.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

[l. s.] A. B., Secretary, 

Lodge, No. 



In thepreparation of the Forms and Instructions under Art. XVII., I am greatly 
indebted to R.\W.\ Brother William Barrett, who prepared complete Forms and 
Instructions for-trials by Commissioners, under the New York practice, which the 
Committee on the Constitution were not inclined to recommend. But Bro. Bar- 
rett kindly placed his manuscript in my hands for use in preparing the following, 



FORMS OF TRIALS AND APPEALS. 

(Section 129. ) 

The first step toward a Masonic Trial is to prefer charges, or make a complaint. 
Tbe requisites of a complaint are, that it be brief, and yet definite ; clearly pointing 
out the nature of the offense charged, with an accurate specification of the time, 
place and circumstances of its commission. This may be preferred by any Brother, 
but more appropriately, by the Junior Warden, under whose charge the Brethren 
are when at refreshment. 

[25] 

FORM OF COMPLAINT. 
(Rule 1.) 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens, and Brethren of Lodge, 

No. . 

Brother is hereby charged with immoral and unma- 

sonic conduct in the matters following : 

First specification, That the said , on the day 

of , a.*. l.\ 58 , in a public street at , was in a state 

of intoxication from the use of strong and spirituous liquors, in 
violation of his duty as a Mason, and to the scandal and disgrace 
of the Craft. 



16 

Second specification, That the said on the day 

of , a.\ l.\ 58 , at said , and at divers other times 

and places between that time and the date of these charges, was 
intoxicated by strong and spirituous liquors, although admonished 
therefor by the Master and Wardens of this Lodge, in violation of 
his duty as a Mason, and to the scandal and disgrace of the Graft. 

It is therefore demanded, that the said be tried for 

the said offenses according to Masonic law and usage. 

Dated the day of , a.*.l.\ 58 , A. D. 18 

A. B., Junior Warden. 

A new specification should be added for each separate state of facts constituting 
a Masonic offense. The specification should be stated as it is expected to be proved , 
with reasonable certainty as to time, place and circumstances, shortly, but distiuctly 
A few forms are given, but it is obviously impossible to prepare a form for each case 
that may occur ; it is hoped, as no technicality is required, the forms given may 
suggest the form in other cases. 

[26] 

FOR SLANDER. 

That the said did, on the day of , a.*. l.\ 

58 , at , in the presence and hearing of and 

others, use the following slanderous words of and concerning 
(here insert the name of person or Lodge slandered), (then set out 
the words used as near as possible). 

[27] 

FOR CHEATING. 

That the said , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 

58 , at , did wrong, cheat and defraud (here insert the 

name of the person or Lodge defrauded), by (here insert a descrip- . 
tion of the method of cheating used). 

[28] 

FOR THREATENING TO INJURE THE LODGE BY BLACKBALLING 
CANDIDATES. 

That the said , on the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , 

at , did threaten to impede the work of the Lodge, by an 

improper use of the blackball, in the following language (here 
insert the language used as perfectly as possible). 



17 

The charge should be given to the Secretary ; the Master then directs a special 
Communication of the Lodge to be called to act upon the subject, and also directs 
the Secretary to notify the accused, by serving him with an attested copy of the 
charges and specifications, and a summons for his appearance before the Lodge. 

g [29] 

FORM OF NOTICE TO THE ACCUSED. 
( Rule 1. ) 
To Brother , 

Take notice, that the within (or foregoing) is a copy of the 
complaint and specifications preferred against you in 
Lodge, No. ; and that the Worshipful Master has called a special 
Communication of said Lodge, to be held on the day of , 

a.\l.\ 58 ; a. d. 18 , at o'clock, p.m., to consider said 
charges, and you are summoned and required to be present at the 
Lodge-room of said Lodge at that time, to make answer to said 
complaint and specifications, and receive the award of the Lodge 
thereon. 

Dated the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., Secretary, 
Lodge, No. 

The Constitution requires the notice to be a seasonable one, — that is, such notice 
as will give the accused time to obtain counsel, if he desires, to answer the charges, 
and to procure his evidence ; no absolute rule as to time can be given, as what would 
be seasonable would vary with the nature of the charge, and the distance of the 
accused and witnesses from the Lodge. It should always be such that the same 
may be fairly heard. 

The Secretary should keep a duplicate copy of the notice to the accused, which 
should be attached to the original complaint and specifications, and upon which he 
should make a return of the time and manner of service. 

[30] 

FORM OF 



RETURN OF 


SERVICE OF NOTICE TO THE ACCUSED. 




(RtLK 1.) 


that on the 


day of , A.\ l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , 



(I gave the within-named , in hand), a notice, of 

which the above is a true copy, together with a true and attested 
copy of the charges and specifications hereto attached. 
Dated the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., Secretary 

Lodge, No. . 



18 

In place of the clause in parenthesis may be either of the following, as the truth 
may be : 

[31] 

(I left at the abode of the within-named , enclosed in 

an envelope, securely sealed and directed to him). 

[32] 

(I deposited in the post-office at , enclosed in an 

envelope, securely sealed, and directed as follows (give the direc- 
tion on the letter exactly as sent), " If not called for within ten 
days return to , , N. H.," and paid the postage 

thereon, which letter has [not] been returned to me). 

The Secretary should also notify the Complainant. 

[33] 

FOKM OF NOTICE TO COMPLAINANT. 

To Brother , 

Take notice, that the Worshipful Master has called a special 
Communication of Lodge, No. , at the Lodge-room of 

said Lodge, on , the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , 

a. D. 18 , at o'clock, p. m., to consider the charges and 

specifications made by you against Brother , and 

Brother has been duly notified to be present. 

Dated the day of , a/.l.\ 58 , a. r>. 18 . 

A, B., Secretary, 

Lodye s No. . 

To this a return should be made in the same manner as of the notice to the 
accused, the form of which may be altered for the purpose. 

The accused should, at the day of hearing, make answer to the charges. It is 
not essential that this should be in writing, but that ihe record may be fully made 
up, the following form is recommended : 

[34] 

FORM OF ANSWER BY ACCUSED. 

A. B., in answer to the charges and specifications against him, 
says, that he is not guilty of either of them as set forth by the 
accuser. 

Dated the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B. 



19 

The answer may vary according to the facts in each case. The specifications may 
be admitted in part, and denied in part, or admitted and other matters pleaded in 
extenuation or mitigation. But as any advantage of that kind can as well be had at 
the trial on a general denial of the whole charge, it will usually be found that the 
form given will be most convenient. 

To procure the attendance of witnesses on either side, if they are Masons, the 
Master will issue a summons to compel their attendance, which they are bound to 
obey, and should they refuse, without sufficient excuse, they may be punished 
therefor, as guilty of unmasonic conduct. They may attend voluntarily, when of 
course no summons is necessary. If they are not Masons, their attendance is of 
course wholly voluntary. 



[35] • 

FORM OF SUMMONS TO MASON AS WITNESS. 

To Brother 

. You are hereby summoned and required to attend a special 
Communication qf Lodge, No. , to be held at their 

Lodge-room, on the day of a.'.l.*. 58 , a. d. 18 , 

at o'clock, p. m., and there testify what you know relative to a 
complaint made by Brother against Brother 

Dated the day of , a.'.l.*. 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., Master, 

Lodge, No. . 

The person serving the summons should make upon a copy of it a return of the 
tine and mode of service. 



[36] 

FORM OF RETURN OF SERVICE OF SUMMONS OF WITNESS. 

I certify that on the day of , a.*, l *. 58 , a. d. 18 , 

I gave to the within^named , in hand, a summons, 

of which the above is a true copy. 

A. B> 



If the service Was made in any other mode, as by leaving it at his house, &c, the 
return should state the exact mode of service. 

Should occasion arise foi* taking the deposition of a witness, the Master should 
issue a commission to some suitable person, if possible a Master Mason, to take such 
deposition. 



20 

[37] 

FORM OF COMMISSION TO TAKE DEPOSITION. 
( Rule 4. ) 

To 

You are hereby authorized to take the deposition in writing 
of , of what he knows relating to a complaint and 

specifications made to Lodge, No. , by Brother 

against Brother 

You will give reasonable notice, in writing, to both parties, of 
the time and place appointed by you for taking such deposition ; 
the deponent will testify upon his honor ; both parties may be 
present with their counsel, and put such questions as they may 
please and are relevant. If any question be proposed to the pro- 
priety or relevancy of which objection is made, you will write the 
question at length as asked; you will then write the objection, 
after which you will propose the question to the deponent, and 
write his answer, in the exact words used by him as near as possi- 
ble. The deposition being completed, you will read the same to 
the deponent, and after he has signed it, you will securely seal the 
same, together with this commission and your return of your 
doings thereon, in an envelope in his presence, and return the 
same to Lodge, No. 

Dated the day of , a.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 

A. B., Master 

Lodge, No. . 

[38] 

NOTICE TO PARTIES OF TAKING DEPOSITION. 
( Rule 4. ) 
To Brother , and Brother 

Take notice, That on the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , 

a. D. 18 , at , in , at o'clock in the noon, 

by virtue of a commission sent to me from Worshipful Brother 
, Master of Lodge, No. , I shall take the 

deposition of , of what he knows relating to a com- 

plaint and specifications made to Lodge, No. , by 

Brother against Brother 

Dated the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 

A. B., appointed to take 

such deposition. 



A return of the service should be made as in other cases. 



21 



No particular form is necessary in the deposition, the only object being to give, so 
far as practicable, the language and manner of the witness. If either party desires 
it, the questions and answers may both be written. If objection is made to any 
question as leading or irrelevant, or for any other cause, the question, the objection, 
and the answer should each be written, that the Lodge may judge of the propriety of 
the question and answer. If any objection is made to the person appointed to take 
the deposition, or to any other part of the proceedings, it should be made and noted 
in the return to the commission. The commencement of the deposition may be aa 
follows : 



[39] 

POEM OP COMMENCEMENT OE DEPOSITION. 
(Rule 4.) 

I, , of , on my honor (as a Mason), 

depose and say, &c. &c. 

[40] 

FORM OF RETURN ON COMMISSION TO TAKE A DEPOSITION. 
(Rule 4.) 

Pursuant to the annexed commission, on the day of , 

a.-. l.\ 58 , a. D. 18 ,1 notified both the parties in writing, 
that on the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , at , 

in , at o'clock, in the noon, I should take the 

deposition of the said , and at said time and place 

the appended deposition was given, the parties being present and 
putting such questions as they pleased. After such deposition 
had been reduced to writing, it was by me read to said deponent, 
who afterward signed the same. 

(The accused objected to the person appointed to take the deposi- 
tion, because he was not a Mason). 

(The complainant objected to the caption, because the notice given 
him was too short to enable him to get his counsel present). 

Dated the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., appointed to take 

such deposition. 



If either party was hot present, the return should show who was present and who 
absent. 

If any other objection is made to the deposition, or any part of it, the person 
appointed to take it will not attempt to judge of the validity of the objection, but 
will return it, with such facts as may be necessary to the proper understanding of it, 
to the Lodge for their judgment. He should place the commission, copy of notice 

ft 



22 

to the parties, return of service thereon, and the deposition, in an envelope, securely 
seal the same, and direct it as follows : 



[41] 

FORM OF DIRECTION ON SEALED ENVELOPE CONTAINING 
DEPOSITION AND OTHER PAPERS. 

To Lodge, No. , of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons : 

Enclosed is the deposition and accompanying papers of , 

taken to be used in the matter of the complaint of Brother 
against Brother , now pending in said Lodge. Taken and 

sealed up by me, in the presence of the deponent, this day of 

, A.*. l.\ 58 , A. d. 18 . 

A. B., appointed to take 

such deposition. 

If any papers are produced, they should be marked with letters or numbers, and 
referred to thereby in the deposition, and then attached to it. 

On the day appointed, the W.\ Master opens a special Communication of the 
Lodge on the third degree, when the complaint, specifications, notices to the 
accused and to the complainant, and the answer of the accused, are read. If any 
objection exists to the regularity of any of the proceedings, it should then be made, 
when the Lodge will proceed to determine it. There being none, or having been 
Overruled, the evidence is then presented. If any objection is made to any part of 
the evidence, the Lodge will by vote determine upon it. The evidence having all 
been presented, the counsel or the parties will be permitted to make such remarks, 
pertinent to the case, as they may wish, when the parties with their counsel will 
retire, and the Lodge will then proceed to determine the question of guilt and the 
nature of the punishment. 



[42] 

FORM OF RECORD OF SPECIAL COMMUNICATION FOR THE 

PURPOSE OF MASONIC TRIAL. 

(Rule 10.) 

A special Communication of Lodge, No. , of 

A. F. and A. M., was held at , on , the 

day of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , at o'clock, p. m. 

Present : W.\ A. B., Master, &c. 

[The full Christian and surname, with the initials at least of all 
middle names, of all Officers and members should appear. If 
there are visitors, as none can be admitted but members of the Grand 
Lodge, the record should show their rank, and their right as mem' 
bers of the Grand Lodge). 



23 

The Lodge was opened in due form on the third degree in 
Masonry. 

This Communication was called for the special purpose of con- 
sidering the complaint and specifications made by Brother 
against Brother 

The complaint, specifications, notices, returns, and answer of the 
accused, having been read, 

Brother was appointed to take minutes of 

the evidence, &c, to be preserved on the files of the Lodge. 

The evidence, as well on the part of the accused as on that of 
the complainant, was then presented and heard by the Lodge. 

The parties with their counsel then retired. 

The question, " Is the accused guilty or not guilty ? " was then 
distinctly put to each member of the Lodge present, by name, 
commencing with the youngest, when the following Brethren said 
he was guilty : {Here give the names of all those who voted guilty). 

And the following Brethren said he was not guilty : {Here 
give the names of all those who voted not guilty). 

A majority of the members present find the accused to be 
guilty. 

The question, " Shall the accused be expelled?" was then put 
in the same manner, when the following Brethren voted yes : 
[Here give the names of those in the affirmative). 

And the following Brethren voted no : {Here give the names of 
those in the negative). 

Two thirds not having voted in favor of expulsion, the question, 
" Shall the accused be suspended ? " was then put in the same 
manner, when the following Brethren voted yes : {Here give the 
names of those in the affirmative). 

And the following Brethren voted no : {Here give the names of 
those in the negative). 

Two thirds not having voted in favor of suspension, the Master 
then ordered that the accused be reprimanded. 

Brother was then introduced, when the Master 

proceeded to administer the reprimand in open Lodge. 

There being no farther business, the Lodge was closed in due 
form and in harmony, until the next stated Communication. 

Attest: A. B., Secretary. 



If two thirds vote for either expulsion or suspension* of course the Lodge proceeds 
no farther with the question of the grade of punishment 

The Constitution requires that some Brother be appointed to take minutes of the 
evidence, &c. The record of the evidence should also show all objections to the 
regularity of the proceedings, or to the admission of evidence. 



24 

[43] 

FORM OF RECORD OF EVIDENCE, ETC., ON THE TRIAL. 
( Rule 9. ) 

At a special Communication of Lodge, No. , held 

at , on the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , 

for the purpose of considering the complaint and specifications 
made by Brother against Brother , 

the following complaint and specifications were read : 

{Here copy the complaint and specifications). 

The notices to the accused and the complainant, with the returns 
to the same, were then read, as follows : 

(Here copy the notices and returns). 

Brother , being then asked what answer he had to 

make to the said complaint and specifications, submitted the 
following answer : 

(Here copy the answer). 

Brother requested that , not 

a Mason, might be admitted to assist him as his counsel, which 
was refused by the Lodge, it being contrary to Masonic usage 
to admit as counsel any person not a Mason. 

Brother then requested Brother 

to assist him as his counsel, who consented to do so. 

Brother then objected to the second specification 

as not being sufficiently definite and certain, which was overruled 
by the Lodge. 

Brother was then called as a witness by the 

complainant, in support of said charges, and testified as a Master 
Mason as follows : I reside in , am a member 

of Lodge, No. , in good and regular standing. I am 
acquainted with Brother ; I saw him on Main 

street in , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 

I was on the opposite side of the street ; he appeared to be much 
intoxicated, 

Objection was made to witness testifying as to the appearance 
of the accused, saying that he should state what the accused did, 
and how he acted ; stating his appearance being but stating his 
conclusion from what he saw ; but the objection was overruled. 

I saw him five or ten minutes; he reeled as he walked, &c, 
(as the facts may be). 

On cross-examination he further testified : I knew that Brother 
had been sick for several days. Am a physician ; 
do not think Brother 's reeling and staggering while 

walking, was the result of weakness caused by his sickness. Can 
conceive of a man's being so weak from sickness long continued, 
as to reel like a man intoxicated. Am certain this could not have 
been the case with Brother . Have none but the 



25 

kindest feelings towards Brother . May have said 

he was drinking too much of late, &c. 

The Lodge having been properly cautioned, Mr. 
was then called as a witness by the complainant, and testified on 
his honor, as follows : {Here give the testimony as in the case of 
the first witness). 

On cross-examination Mr. further testified, &c. 

(Here give the cross-examination). 

The complainant then offered the deposition of Brother 

Objection was made to this deposition, because the person ap- 
pointed to take it was not a Mason, which was overruled by the 
Lodge. 

Objection was further made because the notice given the accused 
was too short to enable him to get his counsel present, which 
appearing to be the fact, the deposition was rejected. 

(Or) it appearing that the counsel relied on was not a Mason, 
and could not have appeared, and that the accused was present 
and asked such questions as he saw fit, the objection was over- 
ruled, and the deposition was read and is hereto annexed, 
marked (A). 

The evidence on the part of the complainant here closed. 

Brother , in behalf of Brother , 

then offered the affidavit of Mr. , to which the 

complainant objected, on the ground that Mr. 
should be produced for cross-examination, and the affidavit was 
rejected by the Lodge. 

The Lodge having been properly cautioned, Mr. 
was then called as a witness, and the complainant then consented 
that the affidavit might be read, which was read accordingly, and 
is hereto annexed, marked (B). 

On cross-examination Mr. further testified, &c. 

The evidence was then closed. 

Attest : A. B., appointed to take 

minutes of the evidence. 

These minutes are thus given in a somewhat extended form, because they present 
a convenient way of calling attention to certain facts and proceedings in the coarse 
of a trial. Thus, the statement of objections by either party, and the grounds of 
them, and the decision of the Lodge thereon, both of which should always be 
stated ; that a person not a Mason was not permitted to act as counsel, but that the 
accused had or had not counsel ; that the first witness testified in his character as a 
Master Mason ; that the Lodge was properly cautioned before the admission of the 
second witness, who was not a Mason, and made his statement on his honor ; that 
the testimony is taken down as near as practicable in the words of the witness, &c; 
that an affidavit taken without the knowledge of the other party was not admitted, 
&c, &c. 

In case the accused is suspended or expelled, it may be desirable that he should 
be officially informed of it. 



26 

[44] 

FORM OF NOTICE OF CONVICTION. 

To 

Take notice, that at a special Communication of Lodge, 

No. , held at , on the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , 

A. d. 18 , upon consideration of the complaint and specifications 
made by Brother against you, it was adjudged 

and determined by the Lodge that you are guilty of the offence 
charged in said complaint and specifications, and that you be 
expelled (or suspended) from all the rights and privileges of 
Masonry. 

Attest: A. B., Secretary 

Lodge, No. 

It is the duty of the Secretary, within thirty days, and before the meeting of the 
Grand Lodge, to transmit full copies of everything relating to the trial to the Grand 
Master. This is required to enable the Grand Master to examine them, and if any 
informality exists, send them back to the Lodge for correction. If the Secretary 
omits therefore to put in everything, he will be called upon to furnish the whole 
series anew, and corrected. 



[45] 

FORM OF REPORT TO GRAND MASTER. 
( Rule 10. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and 
A ncepted Masons in New Hampshire : 

The following are true copies of all the papers and proceedings, 
in and by Lodge, No. , in the matter of the complaint 

made by Brother against Brother 

(Here copy everything). 

% [>. s.] A. B., Master 

Attest : Lodge, No. . 

C. D., Secretary . Lodge, No. . 

If the Grand Master discovers no informality, or after such errors as are pointed 
out by him have been corrected, a copy of all the proceedings are sent to the Grand 
Lodge, at the next Annual Communication, 



27 

[46] 

FORM OF RETURN TO GRAND LODGE. 

( BULE 9. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honora- 
ble Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of 
New Hampshire : 

The following are true copies of all the papers and proceedings 
in and by Lodge, No. , in the matter of the complaint 

made by Brother against Brother 

(Here copy everything as before). 

[l. s. ] A. B., Master 

Attest : Lodge, No. . 

C. D., Secretary Lodge, No. 

If no appeal has been taken by either party, the Committee on Trials and Appeals, 
to whom the papers will be referred, will not ordinarily hear anything from any one, 
but will examine the papers to see that everything has been done in a formally cor- 
rect manner, and that the conclusion is justified by the evidence, and if so they will 
recommend its confirmation, otherwise they will send the matter back to the Lodge 
for correction. 

If either party desires to be heard by the Grand Lodge, he should appeal from the 
decision or ruling which he deems wrong. 



[47] 

FORM OF APPEAL. 
( Rule 11. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Lodge of the Ancient and Honora- 
ble Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of 
New Hampshire : 

The undersigned appeals to you, from the decision of 
Lodge, No. , made on the day of , a.\ l.\ 58 , 

a. d. 18 , in passing sentence of suspension upon him, and 
specifies the following as the grounds of his appeal : 

1st. Because the Lodge erred in not permitting Mr. 
to appear and assist him as his counsel. 

2d. Because the second specification of the charge is not suffi- 
ciently definite and certain. 

3d. Because the Lodge erred in receiving testimony as to 
appearances of intoxication. 

4th, Because the Lodge erred in admitting the deposition 



28 



of , which was taken before a person not a Mason. 

5th. Because the Lodge erred in admitting the same deposition, 
although no seasonable notice was given the accused of the taking 
thereof. 

6th. Because the Lodge erred in rejecting the affidavit of 
Mr. 

7th. Because the evidence was not sufficient to warrant the 
verdict of the Lodge. 

8th. Because the Lodge erred in fixing the penalty of suspen- 
sion by a mere majority vote. 

All of which appears by the papers, proceedings and evidence 
in the case. 

Dated the day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B. 

This appeal must be filed with the Secretary, within one month of the decision, 
and is returned by him to the Grand Lodge, with the other papers and proceedings 
in the case. 

It may be desirable for the appellant to retain a copy and have it at the Grand 
Lodge. 

[48] 

NOTICE OF APPEAL. 
(Rule 11.) 

To 

Take notice, that I have taken an appeal from the decision 
of Lodge, No. , in the matter of the complaint and 

specifications made by you against me, and that I shall prosecute 
the same at the Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, on 
the day of , a.\ l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B. 

This notice should be served as other notices, and a return made, which the appel- 
lant should have with him at the Grand Lodge. 

The appeal by the complainant, and notice, should be like the above, with the 
necessary alterations, which can easily be made. 



[49] 

FORM OF PETITION FOR RESTORATION. 
( Section 133. ) 
To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of 
Lodge, No. 

Respectfully represents , that on the day 



29 

of , a.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , he was' expelled (or sus- 

pended) from all the rights and privileges of Masonry, by said 
Lodge, No. , and he now prays, that with the consent and 
approbation of the Grand Lodge, he may be restored to his rights 
and privileges as a Master Mason. 

Dated the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d, 18 . 

A. B. 



Should the ballot be favorable, a copy of the petition and action of the Lodge 
thereon, should be communicated to the Grand Lodge, at its next Annual Coramu* 
nication. 



[50] 

EORM OF RECOMMENDATION TO THE GEAND LODGE OE THE 

EESTOEATION OE AN EXPELLED OR SUSPENDED MASON. 

( Sections 132 and 133. ) 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , held 

at , on the day of , A.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , 

the following petition was presented : (Here copy the petition for 
restoration). Which was received, and the stated Communication 
on the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , was appointed 

for its consideration, and it was referred to a Committee consisting 
of Brothers , , and 

Attest : A. B., Secretary 

Lodge, No. 

At a stated Communication of Lodge, No. , held 

at , on the day of , A.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

The Committee, to whom had been referred the petition of 
, for restoration to the rights and privileges of 
Masonry, made their report as follows: (Sere copy their report). 
Whereupon, the ballot being passed, the Lodge voted unanimously 
in favor of such restoration, and it was : 

Voted, That it be recommended to the Grand Lodge to consent 
to and approve the restoration of to the rights and 

privileges of Masonry. 

A. B., Secretary 

Lodge, No. 



30 

[51] 

FORM OF IMPEACHMENT OF MASTER OF A LODGE. 

( Section 137. ) 

To the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons in New Hampshire : 

The undersigned, , , , 

, ,five members in good and regular 

standing of Lodge, No. , (or District Deputy Grand 

Master of the th Masonic District), hereby impeach W.\ Bro. 
, Master of (said) Lod^e, No. , of 

unmasonic conduct in the matters following : (Here insert specifi- 
cations of the conduct complained of). 

Dated the day of , a.'. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

(To be signed by the Impeachers.) 



The complaint against any member of the Grand Lodge, by an individual Brother 
against a Lodge, or by one Lodge against another, may be in similar form to the 
complaint in a particular Lodge (Form 25), except the address, which should be, 
" To the Most Worshipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
in New Hampshire." Upon receiving the impeachment of a Master, or the com- 
plaint against a member of the Grand Lodge, or a particular Lodge, the Grand 
Master issues a commission for trial. 



[52] 

FORM OF COMMISSION FOR TRIAL IN GRAND LODGE. 

( Section 141. ) 

To B. W. Brothers , , , 

Know ye, That I, , Most Worshipful Grand 

Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in New Hampshire, 
by virtue of the provisions of the Constitution of the Grand 
Lodge, and ancient Masonic usage, hereby appoint and commis- 
sion you to examine and try the matters named in the annexed 
impeachment (or complaint and specifications). In performing 
this duty, you will cause the accused to be served with an attested 
copy of the complaint and specifications, and notify both parties 
of the time appointed by you for hearing the matter, a reasonable 
time before such hearing. You will proceed with the trial, 
according to Masonic law and usage, agreeably to the rules for the 
regulation of trials in particular Lodges, so far as the same may 
be applicable, and return to me, with this commission, attested 



31 

copies of all your proceedings, together with your findings in both 
matters of law and fact, with any recommendations you may think 
proper. 

Witness my hand and private seal, this day of , 

A.*. &.'. 58 , a. D. 18 . 

A. B., Grand Master, 

[53] 

FORM OF NOTICE TO THE ACCUSED. 

To (insert proper name and title of the accused). 

Take notice, that the annexed is a true copy of the complaint 
and specifications preferred against you to the Most Worshipful 
, Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons in New Hampshire, on the day of , a.*. l.\ 

58 , a. d. 18 , and that we have been appointed by him a 
Committee to hear and try the same, and that we will meet for 
that purpose at , on , the day of , 

A.'. e.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , at o'clock in the noon, at which 

time you are hereby summoned and required to appear, and then 
and there make answer to said complaint, and be heard thereon. 

Dated the day of , a.-. l.\ 58, a. d. 18 . 

(To be signed by the Committee.) 



[54] 

FORM OF NOTICE TO THE COMPLAINANT. 

To 

Take notice, that we have been appointed by the Most Wor- 
shipful Grand Master of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in 
New Hampshire, a Committee to hear and try the complaint and 
specifications preferred by you against , on the 

day of , a.-. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , and that we will meet 

for that purpose at , on , the day of , 

a.*. e.\ 58 , a. d. 18 , at o'clock in the noon, and 

the accused has been notified to be present. 

Dated the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

(Signed by the Committee.) 



The names of all may be signed by the Chairman, he adding, " By 
Chairman." 

Returns should be made of the service of these notices, as in Form 30, 



32 

The accused having received notice of the complaint, &c, and of the appointment 
of the Committee, if he has any objection to either of the Committee, should make 
his challenge, that the Grand Master, if satisfied there is ground for it, may supply 
the vacancy. If there be probable ground of objection, the Brother challenged 
should remove all question by resignation. 

The answer of the accused may be as in Form 34, or may be more particular. 
Se^ the directions following Form 30. 

The summons of witnesses, and depositions, may be similar to the forms in par- 
ticular Lodges, and be issued by the Chairman of the Committee. 

At the time appointed, the Committee meet and appoint one of their number to 
act as Clerk. The Constitution provides that the first named shall be Chairman . 
The trial will then proceed as in a particular Lodge. 



[55] 

FORM OF RETURN TO COMMISSION. 

To the Most Worshipful , Grand Master of 

Ancient Free and Accepted Masons in New Hampshire : 

The Committee appointed by the annexed commission, having 
caused the accused to be served with an attested copy of the com- 
plaint and specifications, and notified both parties of the time and 
place appointed by them to hear and try the cause, as will appear 
by the notices and returns hereto annexed, marked "A" and "B", 
met at , on , the day of , a.\l.\ 58 , 

A. d. 18 , at o'clock in the 

Present — 

B,.-. W.\ Bro. 



noon. 



Brother was appointed to act as Clerk of the 

Committee. 

The complaint and specifications annexed to the commission 
were then read. 

The notices to the accused and to the complainant, with the 
returns to the same, hereto annexed and marked "A" and "B," 
were then read. 

The accused, being then asked what answer he had to make to 
the said complaint and specifications, submitted the answer, 
hereto annexed, marked " C." 

(The record of the trial is then given as in Form 43). 

The evidence being closed, after hearing both parties, we have 
found and determined (here insert the findings both of law and 
fact). 



» 



33 

We therefore recommend (here insertf such recommendations of 
punishment, as to the Committee seem just). 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Dated the day of , a.*, l.'. 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B.,> 
C. D.,| 

E. F.,\ Committee. 

G.H. 

J. L.„ 

Should the Committee fail to finish the hearing at one sitting, the return should 
show at what hour, and to what time and place, the hearing was adjourned, and at 
the commencement of the next sitting, the hour and place, when and where, it was 
recommenced, and who were present. 



[56] 

FORM OF ADJOURNMENT, ETC., OF HEARING. 

The Committee then at o'clock, m., adjourned till 
at o'clock, m., at the same place. 

On , the day of , a.m.". 58 , a. d. 18 , 

at o'clock in the noon, the Committee met pursuant to 

adjournment. 

Present — 

R.\ W.\ Bro. , &c 

If the Committee recommend the suspension or revocation of the Warrant of a 
Lodge, they will also return the names of those members whom they find were con- 
cerned in the irregular or unmasonic conduct. See Section 77. 



[57] 

FORM OF NOTICE BY GRAND MASTER OF SUSPENSION, AND 

SUMMONS TO ATTEND THE NEXT GRAND LODGE. 

( To Individual. ) 

To Brother , 

Take notice that the Committee appointed to hear and try the 
complaint made against you on the day of , a.-. l.\ 

58 , a. d. 18 , by , having fully heard the 

matter, have found and determined (here insert so much of the find- 
ings as is necessary), and recommend (here insert the recommend- 
ation). 

You are therefore suspended from all the rights and privileges 
of Freemasonry, till the pleasure of the Grand Lodge be known, 



D 



I 



and are summoned and required to attend the Annual Communi 
cation of the Grand Lodge, on the day of May next. 
Dated the day of , a.\ l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 



A. B., Grand Master. 



[58] 

FORM OF NOTICE BY GRAND MASTER OF SUSPENSION, AND 

SUMMONS TO ATTEND THE NEXT GRAND LODGE. 

( To a Lodge. ) 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of 
Lodge, No . 

Take notice (as in Form 57 to the close of the recommendation). 

The Warrant of your Lodge is therefore suspended, till the 
pleasure of the Grand Lodge be known, and you are summoned 
and required to attend the Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge on the day of May next, and to bring with you 

the Warrant and records of your Lodge, with all books and papers 
in any wise relating to the said complaint, or referred to in the 
hearing before the said Committee. 

Dated the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., Grand Master. 



[59] 

FORM OF SUMMONS TO MEMBERS IMPLICATED. 
( Section 77. ) 

To Brothers (here insert all the names returned by the Committee). 

Take notice, that by the return of the Committee, duly commis- 
sioned to hear and try the complaint made by 

against Lodge, No. , it appears that you and each of 

you were implicated in the irregular and unmasonic conduct com- 
plained of. You are therefore summoned and required to attend 
the next Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge, on the 
day of May next, at which time the Grand Lodge will act on such 
return. 

Dated the day of , a.*. l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B., Grand Master. 

A return of the service of each of the last three notices should be made to 
the Grand Master, to be by him returned to the GraDd Lodge with the other papers. 



35 

At the Grand Lodge, the Committee on Trials and Appeals, to whorh the papers 
will be referred, will not ordinarily hear any further testimony than appears in the 
return to the Commission, unless notice has been given that such evidence will be 
offered, but will determine the matter upon the evidence already taken. 



[60] 

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO OFFEK NEW TESTIMONY. 

To 

Take notice, that upon the hearing of the complaint, and return 
of the commission issued thereon, by against 

, the undersigned will offer evidence to prove 
(here state what it is intended to prove). 

Dated the dav of , a.\l.\ 58 , a. d. 18 . 

A. B. 

If new evidence is offered, of course rebutting evidence will be received without 
notice. 



Although not coming strictly within the scope of my appointment, the following 
form of records has been prepared, at the suggestion of many Brethren, who have 
had occasion to observe the loose way in which the records of some Lodges are 
kept. No obligation exists upon any Lodge to observe this form ; and perhaps 
other forms may be in use equally, and perhaps more, distinct. Nor is it supposed 
that all the business here given could ever occur at any one Lodge meeting. It is 
hoped that it will furnish to Secretaries a model, which may assist many of them in 
what is to them an unaccustomed duty. One or two general suggestious may be 
pardoned. It is to be presumed that all Lodge meetings are regular, although some 
of them are statedly held in pursuance of the By-Laws, and others specially called 
by the Master. To distinguish a meeting therefore, as "regular," means nothing. 
The full Christian and surnames, with initials of all other names, of every Brother 
present, should appear. If there be two of the same name, the whole of the middle 
name should be given, or the individuals otherwise distinguished. The capacity in 
which Brothers appear, as Officers, members or visitors, should also be designated. 
If a Brother is temporarily acting in an office, it is neater and better to place " as," 
or *' acting as," before the name of the office, than 2?. t., or pro tern., after it. The 
record should show all money received at that Communication, which includes all 
received by the Secretary since the last Communication. 



[61] 

FORM OF LODGE KEOOltD. 

A stated Communication of Strict Observance Lodge, No. 100 } 
Of A. F. and A. M., was held at Freemasons' Hall, in Kilkenny 5 
On Thursday, the twenty-fourth day of June, A.\ L.\ 5869, A. £. 
1869, at 7 J o'clock V. x. 



36 



PRESENT. 



Officers. 



W.\ Benjamin F. Preston, M. 
Bro. Joseph W. Webb, S. W. 

" James Anderson as J. W. 

11 John Knovvlton, Treas.'. 

" Horace Chase, Sec.*. 

" John Dean Oliver, S. D. 

" Anthony Sayre, J.\ D.\ 

" Emanuel Rebold, Chap.-. 

" Christopher Wren, Mar. 

" Charles E. Starr, S. Stew. 

M Amos Dermott, J. Stew. 

" John Doe, Tyler. 

W.\ George Payne, P.\ M.\ 
" Stephen Morin, P.-. M.\ 



Members. 

Bro.*. William Morgan. 
" John Davis Oliver. 
" J. T. Desaguliers. 
" Frederic Dalcho. 
" Moses M. Hayes. 
" Isaac DaCosta. 

Visitors. 

M.\ W.\ A. M. Winn, G.-.M.- 

Fraternal Lodge, No. 71, 

Farmington. 
R.\ W.\ Henry O.Kent, 

D.-.D.-.G.-.M.-. 10th Dist. 

North Star Lodge, No. 8, 

Lancaster. 
Bro. Jeremy Cross, Solar Lodge, 

No. 14, Bath, Me. 



The Lodge was opened in due form on the third degree in 
Masonry. 

The records of the stated Communication, May 27th, and of 
the special Communications, June 10th and 19th, were read and 
approved. 

The petition of Mr. Andrew Jackson to be made a Mason, 
recommended by Brothers Anthony Sayre and Emanuel Rebold, 
and accompanied by the deposit, was received and referred to a 
Committee consisting of Brothers Horace Chase, Frederic Dalcho 
and William Morgan. 

The petition of Mr. Abraham Lincoln to be made a Mason, 
recommended by Brothers John Knowlton and James Anderson, 
accompanied by the consent of Rising Virtue Lodge, No. 10, Ban- 
gor, Maine, and the permission of M.\ W.\ John H. Lynde, 
Grand Master ot Masons in Maine, and by the deposit, was 
received, and referred to a Committee, consisting of Brothers John 
Dean Oliver, John Davis Oliver, and Lawrence Dermott. 

The petition of Brother Joseph Balsamo, an Entered Appren j 
tice, for advancement, recommended by Brothers Charles E. Starr 
and Horace Chase, accompanied by the consent of St. John's 
Lodge, No. 1, in which he was initiated, and the deposit, was 
received, and referred to a Committee consisting of Brothers 
Joseph W. Webb, Stephen Morin and Christopher Wren. 

The Committee on the petition of Mr. Albert Pike to be made 
a Mason, reported unfavorably, whereupon he Was balloted for and 
rejected; and the W.\ Master directed his deposit to be returned. 



3? 

The Committee on the petition of John Q. A. Fellows reported 
favorably, whereupon he was balloted for and elected. 

The Committee on the petition of Brother Henry Fowle, to be 
admitted a member of this Lodge, reported favorably, whereupon 
he was balloted for and duly elected. 

A communication from the R.\ W.\ Grand Secretary, giving 
notice of rejections, was read and ordered to be placed on file, 
and the names entered on the black book. 

A communication from Rising Sun Lodge, No. 39, at Nashua, 
asking information about one James Buchanan, was read and 
referred to a Committee consisting of Brothers George Payne, 
Emanuel Rebold and John Knowlton. 

A communication from Mrs. Martha Jones, the widow of our 
late Brother John Jones, was read. 

Voted, That the W.\ Master draw his order on the Treasurer 
for the sum of twenty-five dollars, and pay the same to Mrs. 
Martha Jones. 

A communication from Pythagoras Lodge, No. 1, at New York, 
on the register of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg, was read and 
ordered to be placed on file. 

The Committee appointed at the special Communication, June 
19th, to prepare resolutions expressive of the feelings of this 
Lodge, on the death of our late Brother, John Jones, submitted 
the following : (here insert the resolutions), which were adopted. 

The Committee appointed at the last stated Communication, to 
agree with the owner for the use of Freemason's Hall, reported : 
That they had taken a lease of the Hall for five years, at the rate 
of fifty dollars a year, — which report was accepted and the lease 
ratified. 

The bill of Wood & Hall, for sundry articles furnished the 
Lodge, amounting to $23.65, was presented, when it was — 

Ordered, That the bill of Wood & Hall be paid. 

The bill of Kilkenney Cornet Band, for services June 19th, was 
presented, and referred to a Committee consisting of the Master 
and Wardens. 

The bill of the Tyler, for washing aprons, amounting to $1.87, 
was presented, when it was — 

Ordered, That the bill of John Doe be paid. 

The Lodge of Master Masons was then closed, and a Lodge of 
Entered Apprentices opened in its stead. 

Mr. John Q. A. Fellows, a candidate for initiation, being In 
waiting, was duly prepared, brought forward, and initiated as an 
Entered Apprentice, in due and ancient form. 

Brother Arthur Craig, an Entered Apprentice, was then exam- 
ined as to his proficiency in the first degree, which being satis- 
factory : 

The Lodge of Entered Apprentices was closed, aao! a Lodge of 
Fellow Crafts opened in its stead. 



88 

Brother Arthur Craig, an Entered Apprentice, being in wait- 
ing, was duly prepared, brought forward, and passed to the degree 
of Fellow Craft, in due and ancient form. 

Brother William Martin, a Fellow Craft, was then examined as 
to his proficiency in the second degree, which being satisfactory : 

The Lodge of Fellow Crafts was closed, and a Lodge of Master 
Masons opened in its stead. 

Brother William Martin, a Fellow Craft, being in waiting, was 
duly prepared, brought forward, and raised to the sublime degree 
of Master Mason, in due and ancient form. 

The application of Brother John Q. A. Fellows, an Entered 
Apprentice, for advancement, accompanied by the fee, was received 
and placed on file. 

The application of Brother Arthur Craig, a Fellow Craft, for 
advancement, accompanied by the usual fee, was received and 
placed on file. 

Brother William Martin signed the By-Laws, and became a 
member of this Lodge. 

The records of the evening were then read for correction, and 
approved. 

There being no further business, the Lodge was closed in due 
form, and in harmony, till the next stated Communication. 

Receipts : 

Mr. Andrew Jackson, deposit, $10.00 

" Abraham Lincoln, " 10.00 

Bro.\ Joseph Balsamo, " 5.00 

John Q. A. Fellows, " 5.00 

" Arthur Craig, " 10.00 

" Isaac Da Costa, dues, 1.00 

Frederic Dalcho, " 1.00 



A true record. Attest : 



$42.00 
Horace Chase, Secretary, 



INDEX. 



SEC. PAGE* 

Accusation i.**n...i>. Rule 1, 129 35 

Accused to be notified and have copy of charges Rule 1, 129 35 

to have counsel Rale 3, 129 36 

Advancement in another Lodge : ; . . . » . . 121 33 

objection to i 117 32 

only after examination : 119 33 

time of waiting for 120 33 

Amendment, only one at a time Rule 8, 154 42 

changing subject matter s Rule 10, 154 42 

of Constitution 155 43 

Annual Communications of Grand Lodge 7 7 

" of particular Lodges, Constitution and 

By-Laws to be read 104 29 

Appeal, how taken Rule 11, 129 37 

Appeals, &c, to be received by Grand Secretary, &c, 38 13 

Ballot, members must vote on 11*5 32 

must be at stated Communication 107 31 

must be unanimous 116 32 

single for all the degrees. . 117 32 

Blanks, &c, furnished by Grand Secretary 42 14 

Bond of Grand Secretary 43 14 

of Grand Treasurer 34 12 

Brothers must all vote in trials 130 37 

Business to be done in Master's Lodge 90 26 

not at Semi- Annual 9 7 

By-Laws, amendments, how made — 96 27 

cannot be suspended 96 27 

may be temporarily authorized by G.\ M/ 95 27 

to be approved by Grand Lodge 95 27 

&c, to be read before election 104 29 

to be returned with Dispensation 64 21 

Candidate advanced in another Lodge, when 121 33- 

from out the State 112 31 

must apply to nearest Lodge 109 3^. 

( m 



• 40 



SEC. 

Candidate must have resided in jurisdiction 12 months 110 

must be proposed four weeks 107 

must be proposed at stated Communication 107 

not to be balloted for till strict enquiry 107 

only one at a time 88 

only one degree at a time 120 

out of the jurisdiction but in the State Ill 

requisites of petition of 106 

to assent to questions 118 

Casting vote of Grand Master, when. . . 27 

Certificate to seek relief forbidden 144 

&c, Grand Secretary to engross &c, 38 

Chairman of Committees 148 

Chapter or Commandery, expulsion or suspension in 138 

Charge Rule 1, 129 

Charity, Committee on 143 

Clothing in Grand Lodge 59 

Commandery or Chapter, expulsion or suspension in 138 

Commissions, &c, Grand Secretary to engross, &c, 38 

Committees, expenses of 149 

Chairman 148 

on Charity! 143 

must be members 147 

on Jurisprudence 146 

Standing 145 

to be appointed by the Grand Master 27 

when to report 148 

Communication Annual, of particular Lodges — Constitution and 

By-Laws to be read 104 

of Particular Lodge, how called 102 

Communications of Grand Lodge 7-11 

Compensation of Grand Treasurer 37 

Complaint Rule 1, 129 

Consent for advancement in another Lodge 121 

of Lodge that another Lodge may do Work 111-112 

that rejected applicant may apply elsewhere — how given . . 115 

Constitution, &c, to be read before election 104 

Counsel of accused Rale 3, 129 

Copy of proceedings in expulsion or suspension to be sent to Grand 

Lodge Rule 7, 129 

Copies, in trials, to be sent Grand Master Rule 10, 129 

Credit for fees forbidden S7 

Degrees, fees for 87 

limit of, on the same day 88 

only one at a time 120 

Depositions in trials Rule 4, 129 

Deputy Grand Master cannot be Master or Warden 13 

Grand Master, duties of 30-31 

Grand Master, eligibility for 13 

Grand Master, if G.\ M.\ dead, &c, to act 31 

.Grand Master to act during temporary absence of G.\ M.\. . 31 



PAGE. 

31 
31 
31 
31 
26 
33 
31 
30 
32 
11 
40 
13 
41 
38 
35 
40 
19 
- 38 
13 
41 
41 
40 
41 
41 
40 
11 
41 

29 

28 

7 

13 
35 
33 
31 
32 
29 
36 

36 
36 
26 

26 
26 
33 
36 

8 
11-12 

8 
12 
12 



41 



SEC. PAGE. 

Deputy Grand Master to assist Grand Master 30 11 

Grand Master to preside in absence of Grand Master 30 11 

Grand Master to visit Lodges 48 15 

Destruction of Warrant 81 25 

Dimits of petitioners for new Lodge 66 22 

Diplomas, blank, to be furnished 97 27 

Grand Secretary's fee for 97 28 

a &c, Grand Secretary to engross, &c.,. . . ... 38 13 

Discussions prohibited 92 27 

D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ cannot be Master or Warden 13 8 

duties of 45-48 14-15 

eligibility for 13 8 

Lodge to be convened to receive 83 26 

may appoint special Deputy when 45 14 

reimbursed their expenses 46 14 

to communicate Edicts, &c, 46 14 

to keep records *. 47 15 

to report before May 1st to G.\ M.* 46 14 

to visit Lodges, &c, 45 14 

Dispensation, fee for, for degrees 122 33 

for processions and degrees to be granted by the Grand 

Master 28 11 

fee for, for new Lodge 64 21 

for new Lodge, accompanied by recommendation of 

two nearest Lodges, &c, 61 20 

for new Lodge, by whom issued 60 20 

for new Lodge, requisites for 60-65 20-21 

Grand Master may arrest 22 10 

granted by Grand Master to new Lodges 22 10 

petition for 65 21 

sanction of Master and Wardens for 63 21 

to be returned to Grand Lodge, &c 64 21 

Disqualification of members implicated on revocation of warrant. . 77 24 

Districts assigned by Grand Master 25 11 

Division of question Rule 9, 154 42 

Dues, member discharged for non-payment of, not admitted to 

any other Lodge 127 34 

to Grand Lodge 84 26 

Duty of Grand Chaplains 50 15 

of Deputy Grand Master 30-31 11-12 

of Grand Deacons 51 16 

of D.\D.\ G/.M.- 45-48 14-15 

of Grand Lecturers 49 15 

of Grand Marshal 52 16 

of Grand Master ,,.. , 21-29 10-11 

of Grand Pursuivants 55 16 

of Grand Secretary , 38-44 13-14 

of Grand Stewards 53 16 

of Grand Sword Bearer , , 54 16 

of Grand Treasurer , 34-37 12-13 

of Grand Tyler , 56 16 

of Grand Wardens. .,.,,..,...,,/,,..,,,, , 32-33, \% 



42 



Elicts, &c. to be sent to members by Grand Secretary 

Election of Officers in Grand Lodge— majority elects 

Constitution and By-Laws to be read before 

Eligibility to be Master of Lodge 

to office in Grand Lodge 

Examination for advancement 

of charges Rule 2, 

Exemplification of Work at Semi- Annual 

Expenses D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ to be reimbursed 

of Committees 

Expulsion or suspension, copy of proceedings to be sent to Grand 

Lodge, Rule 7, 

Expulsion or suspension, to be confirmed by Grand Lodge. .Rule 8, 

or suspension, effect gf before confirmation Rule 8, 

not to Joe published 

Fee must be paid before application received 

Fees for degrees. 

Forfeiture of Warrant 

of Warrant, members implicated, disqualified 

of Warrant, property, &c, surrendered to Grand Lodge, 
of Warrant, refusal to surrender property, or vote to 

divide, penalty 

Funds, by whom invested 

for charitable purposes only 

for what purposes used 

Funerals 

Grand Chaplains, duty of 

Deacons, duty of 

Lodge , dues to 

Lodge, how constituted 

Lodge, Officers of 

Lodge, Officers and members of, must be Master Masons, 

holding allegiance to Grand Lodge 

Lodge, powers of 

Lodge, style and title of 

Lodge, trials in 

Lodge to try its own members, &c 

Lecturers, their duties 

Lecturers to visit Lodges 

Marshal, duty of 

Marshal to proclaim Officers installed 

Master, by whom installed 

Master cannot be Master or Warden 

Master, duties of 

Master, eligibility for 

Master, if absent, how installed 

Master, in recess of Grand Lodge may approve By-Laws 

Master may appoint special Deputies 

Master may convene particular Lodge, <Vc 

Master mav convene the Grand Lodge, how , , . 



SEC. 


PAGE. 


40 


13 


14 


9 


104 


29 


99 


28 


13 


8 


119 


33 


129 


35 


9 


7 


46 


14 


149 


41 


129 


36 


129 


30 


129 


30 


142 


39 


108 


31i 


87 


26- 


74 


2$ 


77 


24 


75 


24 


75 


24 


34 


12 


89 


20 


153 


41 


94 


27 


50 


15 


51 


10 


84 


20 


2 


5 


3 





5 





12 


7 


1 


5 


141 


39 


141 


39 


49 


15 


48-49 


15 


52 


It 


19* 


9, 


W 


9. 


13- 


8: 


21-29. 


10-11; 


13 


8; 


10 


9. 


95 


27 


20 


11 


23 


11 


22 


10, 



43 



SIC. PAGE 

Grand Master may grant Dispensations for processions and for 

conferring Degrees 28 11 

Master may refer to Committee on Jurisprudence 146 41 

Master may suspend a Brother or Lodge 22 10 

Master to appoint all Committees 27 11 

Master to arrest Dispensation or Warrant 22 10 

Master to assign Districts 25 11 

Master, to assign every new Lodge to some District 25 11 

Master to exemplify Work and Lectures at Semi-Annual 

Communications 29 11 

Master to grant Dispensations to new Lodges 22 10 

Master to give casting vote, when 27 11 

Master to give reason for suspensian 22 10 

Master to preside in Grand Lodge 21 10 

Master to visit, &c, Lodges each year 24 11 

Officers, Jewels of 58 18 

Officers, stations of 57 16 

Officers to hold until their successors are appointed and 

installed 19 9 

Pursuivants, duty of 55 16 

Secretary, bond of 43 14 

Secretary, duties of 38-44 13-14 

Secretary to answer communications 42 14 

Secretary to attend Committees with records, &c 39 13 

Secretary to collect money and pay to Grand Treasurer 43 14 

Secretary to engross, &c, all Warrants, &c 38 13 

Secretary to furnish Chairmen of Committees with copy of 

vote of appointment 39 13 

Secretary to furnish necessary blanks, &c 42 14 

Secretary to have custody of the Seal 38 13 

Secretary to keep account with particular Lodges . . 43 14 

Secretary to keep list of Lodges 38 13 

Secretary to make report 44 14 

Secretary to observe and record proceedings 38 13 

Secretary to print and distribute proceedings 41 14 

Secretary to receive all petitions, &c 38 13 

Secretary to record reports of Committees 39 13 

Secretary to send Edicts and Regulations and list of Officers 

to each member 40 13 

Secretary to summon meetings of Grand Lodge 38 13 

Stewards, duty of 53 16 

Sword Bearer, duty of 54 16 

Treasurer, compensation of 37 13 

Treasurer, duties of 34-37 12-13 

Treasurer to deliver property to successor and take receipts 36 13 

Treasurer to have charge of funds 34 12 

Treasurer to have charge of Jewels, &c, of Grand Lodge. . . 36 13 

Treasurer to give bond 34 12 

Treasurer to invest funds 34 12 

Treasurer to receive money and pay bills 36 12 

Treasurer to report his accounts . , . . . 35-36 12-13 

Treasurer to take care of all Warrants, records, &c. ,. ,,,,... 36 12 



44 



Grand Treasurer to take receipt for Jewels, &c, delivered 

Tyler, duty of 

Tyler has no vote in Grand Lodge 

Wardens cannot be Master or Warden 

Wardens, duties of 32-33 

Warden, eligibility for 

Wardens to assist Grand Master 

Wardens to succeed, when 

Wardens to visit Lodges 

Hearsay evidence excluded Rule 3, 129 36 



Initiation, objection after 

&c, none, unless Past Master present. 

questions to candidate 

Installation of Grand Master — by whom 

of Grand Master, if absent, how 

of Master of Lodge 

no Officer to act till installed 

not to be by proxy 

obligation 

of Grand Lodge, when 



Jewels of Grand Officers 

&c, of Grand Lodge to be in charge of Grand Treasurer. 

&c, Grand Treasurer to take receipt for 

Jurisdiction of Lodge — Candidates 

Jurisprudence, Committee on 



8KC. 


PAGE. 


36 


13 


56 


16 


3 


6 


13 


8 


1-33 


12 


13 


8 


32 


12 


33 


12 


48 


15 



Lectures and Work, Grand Master to exemplify at Semi-Annual 

Communications 

none not authorized by Grand Lodge 

Limitation of conferring degrees 

List of Lodges to be kept by the Grand Secretary 

of Officers to be sent to members by Grand Secretary 

Lodge cannot suspend or expel for non-payment of dues 

cannot try its Master 

Communication — how called 

forfeiture of warrant 

neglecting or refusing to pay dues or make returns, &c, 
two years 

neglecting work for year 

new — see new Lodge 

not to assemble under foreign Warrant 

not to receive application till fee paid 

not to use funds but for Masonic purposes 

not to work unless Past Master present 

of Masters alone can transact business 

powers of 

removal of 69-71 

returns of 

revival of , . , . , 



117 


32 


101 


28 


118 


32 


15 


9 


16 


9 


100 


28 


20 


9 


17 


9 


18 


9 


15 


9 


58 


18 


36 


13 


36 


13 


109 


31 


146 


41 


29 


11 


91 


27 


88 


26 


38 


13 


40 


13 


139 


38 


137 


38 


102 


28 


74 


23 


74 


23 


74 


23 


86 


26 


108 


31 


89 


26 


101 


28 


90 


26 


82 


25 


i-71 


22-23 


85 


26 


76 


24 



45 



SEC. 

Lodge, surrender of Warrant of. 72-73 

suspended, &c, penalty for Work 78 

suspension or amendment <jf By-Laws 96 

to be convened to receive D.\ D.\ G.\ M.* 83 

to pi-eserve discipline 134 

to transmit Bj r -Laws for approval 95 

blank returns to be furnished 97 

Officers of, must be members 98 

Maims 105 

Master, by whom installed 100 

cannot be Grand Master, &c, 13 

eligibility for 99 

how tried 137 

Lodge cannot try 137 

not Representative 6 

or Wardens refusing to obey summons, &c, 80 

proxy of, for one Communication only 4 

proxy of, to be in writing 4 

proxy void if principal appear 4 

to convene Lodge to receive D.\ D.\ G.\ M.* 83 

to have charge of Warrant, &c 103 

Masters only to be buried with Masonic honors 94 

Member discharged for non-payment of dues not admitted to any 

other Lodge 127 

Members must vote on ballot for initiation 116 

must vote on trials 130 

of Grand Lodge can have but one vote 151 

of Grand Lodge, Master Masons holding allegiance to 

Grand Lodge 5 

of Lodge or Grand Lodge only present at trials Rule 2, 129 

and visitors to keep their seats Rule 2, 154 

Membership can be in one Lodge only 124 

how obtained 123 

mode of changing 125 

not lost by removal 126 

of Officers of Lodges 98 

Minutes of trial to be kept Rule 9, 129 

Motions, precedence of Rule 7, 154 

to be in writing Rule 3, 154 

Name of Grand Lodge 1 

New Lodge, dimits of petitioners for 66 

dispensations for, by whom granted 60 

Grand Lecturers' certificate for 62 

petition for 65 

not represented till constituted 68 

not recognized till constituted 68 

recommendations for 61 

requisites for dispensation for 60-68 

sanction of Master and Wardens for 63 

to be assigned to some district , 25 



23 
24 
27 
26 
37 
27 
27 
28 

30 

28 

8 

28 

38 

38 

6 

25 

6 

6 

6 

26 

28 

27 

34 
32 
37 
41 

6 
35 
42 
34 
34 
34 
34 
28 
36 
42 
42 



22 
20 
20 
21 
22 
22 
20 
20-21 
21 
11 



46 



New Lodge to be constituted and by whom 

Non-payment of dues, member discharged for, not admitted to any 

other Lodge 

of dues, penalty for 

Notice to accused, &c, Rule 1, 

of appeal Rule 11, 

Obligation on installation in Grand Lodge 

Office, no Brother can hold more than one 

Officers in Grand Lodge, how elected or appointed 

in Grand Lodge, when installed 

in Grand Lodge, when and how installed 

of Grand Lodge, Master Masons holding allegiance to 
Grand Lodge 

must be members of their Lodges 

not to act until installed 

of the Grand Lodge 

of Grand Lodge proclaimed 

Opening of Grand Lodge, none but members present Rule 1, 

Particular Lodge may be convened, &c, by Grand Master 

Past Master must be present for Work 

Permission of Grand Master to confer degrees 

Penalty for assisting in Work of forfeited Lodge 

for recommending, &c, rejected applicant 

if Master or Wardens refuse to obey summons 

Petition for new Lodge accompanied by certificate of Grand 

Lecturer 

for removal of Lodge 

for restoration of Warrant 

must be received at stated Communication 

not received before fee is paid 

not to be withdrawn 

of candidates, requisites of 

&c, to be received by Grand Secretary, &c, 

Physical disqualification of candidates 

Powers of Grand Lodge 

of Lodges 

Processions prohibited without dispensation 

Proceedings, Grand Secretary to print and distribute 

how distributed 

Proxy of Master or Warden •. ... 

of Master or Warden for one Communication only 

of Master or Warden to be in writing 

of Master or Warden void if principal appear 

of Officer to be installed forbidden 

Publication of expulsions 

Punishment, how determined Rule 6, 

Punishments 131 



67 



Qualifications, physical, of candidates. 
Question, division of 



Rule 0, 



127 


34 


139 


38 


129 


35 


129 


37 


18 


9 


124 


34 


1-4 


9 


15 


9 


17 


9 


5 


6 


98 


28 


20 


9 


3 


6 


19 


9 


154 


41 


23 


11 


101 


28 


112 


31 


78 


24 


115 


32 


80 


25 


62 


20 


70 


22 


76 


24 


107 


31 


10S 


31 


113 


31 


106 


30 


38 


13 


105 


30 


12 


7 


82 


25 


93 


27 


11 


14 


41 


14 


2 


5 


4 


6 


4 


6 


4 


6 


17 


9 


142 


39 


129 


36 


-136 


37-3S 


105 


30 


154 


42 



47 



SEC. PAGE. 

Question, in trials, mode of taking. , Rule 5, 129 36 

on punishment, how taken Rule 6, 129 36 

put to candidate - 118 32 

Recommendation for new Lodge, requisites of. 61 20 

for relief forbidden 144 40 

for removal of Lodge. 70 22 

to change membership 125 34 

Reconsideration of vote 150 41 

who may move Rule 11, 154 42 

Records, D.\ D.\ G.\ M.- 47 15 

to be read 152 41 

Receipt for Jewels, &c, to be taken by Grand Treasurer 36 13 

Refusal of Master and Wardens to obey summons 80 25 

to surrender property on surrender or forfeiture of warrant 75 24 

Regulations to be sent to members by Grand Secretary 40 13 

Rejected applicant can only apply to same Lodge 115 32 

applicant, consent to apply elsewhere — how given 115 32 

applicant must wait twelve months 114 32 

Removal does not forfeit membership 126 34 

of Lodge 69-71 22-23 

of Lodge — consent of nearest Lodges 70 22 

of Lodge — every member to be summoned 69 22 

of Lodge, fee for 71 23 

of Lodge must be by vote of Grand Lodge 71 22 

of Lodge, petition for 70 22 

of Lodge to be acted on at stated Communications, after 

notice 69 22 

of Lodge to be endorsed on Charter 71 22 

Reports of Committees 148 41 

of D.\ D.\ G.\ M/ 46 14 

of Committees to be recorded 39 13 

of Grand Secretary 44 14 

of Grand Treasurer 35-36 12-13 

of trial, Secretary to send Grand Master Rule 10, 129 36 

Representatives members of Lodge they represent 5 6 

not Master or Warden 6 6 

Residence of candidate out cf jurisdiction . .111-112 31 

of twelve months required 110 31 

Resolutions and motions to be in writing . Rule 3, 154 42 

Restoration 132-133 37 

of Warrant 76 24 

Returns, blanks to be furnished 97 27 

of Lodges 85 26 

and dues not paid for two years 74 23 

Reversal of decision does not restore to membership 140 38 

Revival of Lodge 76 24 

Revocation — see forfeiture 74 23 

Rules of order . 154 41 

Sanction of Master and Wardens for new Lodge 63 21 

Seal of Grand Lodge in custody of Grand Secretary 38 13 



48 



SEC. PAGE. 

Secretary to notify accused, &c, Rule 1, 129 35 

to transmit report of trial to Grand Master Rule 10, 129 36 

Semi- Annual exemplification of Work . 9 7 

Communication, no business at 9 7 

Communication, time of 8 7 

Sojourners, trial of 135 38 

Speaker to rise and remain standing .Rule 6, 154 42 

Special Communications 11 7 

Communications of Grand Lodge to be called by Grand 

Master — when and how . . . ._ 22 10 

Communications of particular Lodge — how called 102 28 

Deputies, Grand Master may appoint 26 11 

Standing Committees 145 40 

Stations of Grand Officers 57 16 

Style and title of Grand Lodge 1 5 

and title of Officers of the Grand Lodge 3 6 

Succession in office 33 12 

Surrender, not while seven adhere 79 24 

of Warrant 72-73 23 

of Warrant — Grand Lodge entitled to property, &c. . . 73 23 
of Warrant — Master and Secretary to deliver up 

property, &c, 72 23 

of Warrant — refusal to surrender property or vote to 

divide 75 24 

of Warrant to be resumed 72 23 

Suspension by Grand Master 22 10 

or expulsion — copy of proceedings to be sent to Grand 

Lodge Rule 7, 129 36 

or expulsion — effect of before confirmation Rule 8, 129 36 

or expulsion to be confirmed by the Grand Lodge. .Rule 8, 129 36 

Time of Annual Communication 7 7 

of Semi-Annual Communication 8 7 

Transcript of proceedings to be returned with dispensation 64 21 

Trials, rules for 129 35 

every brother must vote 130 37 

of sojourners 135 38 

in Grand Lodge 141 39 

Tyler, membership of 98 28 

Visitation of D.\ D.\ G.\ M/ 45-48 14-15 

of Lodges 48 15 

Visiting brother may call for Warrant 128 34 

Visitors — when admitted in Grand Lodge Rule 1, 154 41 

Vote, every member must Rule 5 , 154 42 

how taken in Grand Lodge Rule 4, 154 42 

to divide funds on surrender or forfeiture of Warrant 75 24 

Warden not representative 6 6 

proxy of, for one Communication only 4 6 

proxy of, to be in writing 4 6 

proxy void if principal appear 4 6 



49 



SEC. JPAGE. 

Warrant, fee for i 64 21 

Grand Master may arrest 22 10 

&c, Grand Secretary to engross, &c 38 13 

in charge of Master 103 28 

lost or destroyed 81 25 

must be present at opening 103 28 

not lost while seven adhere 79 24 

not from any foreign power. . . 86 26 

records, &c, Grand Treasurer to take care of 36 12 

restoration of 76 24 

surrender of — see surrender 72-73 23 

visiting brother may call for 128 34 

when granted , 64 21 

Witnesses Rule 3, 129 36 

may give deposition, when Rale 4, 129 36 

Withdrawal of petition forbidden 113 31 

Work and Lectures, GrandMaster to exemplify, at Semi- Annual 

Communications 29 11 

neglected for one year 74 *23 

of forfeited Lodge, penalty for assisting in 78 24 



INDEX TO FORMS. 



fcAGE. 

Accused, answer by. ... . ; ; 18 

notice to ; 17-31 

Adjournment of hearing in trial before commission from Grand Lodge 33 

Answer by accused ; . lg 

Appeal 27 

notice of . . , ; 8 . . 28 

Appointment of proxy ; . i 

Approbation of D.\ D.\ G.'. M»\ for new Lodge 4 

of D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ for restoration of Warrant io 

of nearest Lodge for new Lodge , , 4 

of nearest Lodge to removal of Lodge 8 

of nearest Lodge for restoration of Warrant. 10 

Bond of Grand Secretary 3 

of Grand Treasurer 2 



■50 



PAEG. 

Caption of deposition 21 

Candidate, consent that be may apply to another Lodge 12 

permission of Grand Master to receive degrees in this State. ... 13' 

petition to be made a Mason 11 

recommendation of 12 

rejected, consent to apply to another Lodge 13 

Charges 15 

Commencement of deposition 21 

Commission by Grand Master 1 

for trial in Grand Lodge 3d 

for trial in Grand Lodge, adjournment of hearing 33 

for trial in Grand Lodge, return to 32 

of proxy 1 

to take deposition 20 

Complaint and specifications 15 

in Grand Lodge 30 

Complainant, notice to. i 18-31 

Consent that candidate may apply to another Lodge 12 

that E.\ A/, or F.\ C.\ may apply to another Lodge for 

advancement 14 

that rejected candidate may apply to another Lodge 13 

Conviction, notice of 26 

Deposition, commencement of 2l 

commission to take 20 

direction on back of envelope containing 22 

notice of, taking to parties 20 

return on commission to take 21 

Deputation by Grand Master 1 

Dimit. ; 15 

Direction on back of envelope containing deposition .;...;.. 22 

Dispensation for new Lodge 

D.*. D.\ G.\ M.\, approval and recommendation of, for new Lodge 4 

approval of restoration of Warrant 10 

Entered Apprentice, consent that he may apply to another Ledge for 

advancement 14 

Evidence* &Ci, record of, on trial 24 

Fellow Craft, consent that he may apply to another Lodge for advancement, 14 

Grand Lecturer's certificate of qualification of Master and Wardens of 

new Lodge 5 

Lodge, commission for trial in 30 

Lodge, return to commission for trial in 32 

Master, notice of suspension by, and summons to attend Grand 

Lodge, to individual 33 

Master, notice of suspension by, and summons to attend Grand 

Lodge, to Lodge 34 

Secretary's bond 3 

Treasurer's bond 2 



51 



Inipeachment of Master of a Lodge . 



Lecturer', Grand, certificate of qualification of Master and Wardens of new 

Lodge 5 

Lodge, approval of D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ for restoration of Warrant of 10 

approval of nearest Lodge for removal of. . .' 8 

approbation of nearest Lodge for restoration of Warrant of 10 

consent that candidate may apply to another Lodge 12 

consent that E.\ A.\ or F.\ C.\ may apply to another Lodge for 

advancement 14 

consent that rejected candidate may apply to another Lodge 13 

petition for removal of 8 

petition for restoration of Warrant surrendered with intention of 

resuming it 

petition for restoration of Warrant surrendered absolutely, forfeited 

or revoked 9 

recommendation to join another Lodge 14 

record 35 



Master of a Lodge, impeachment of 30 

Members implicated in unmasonic conduct, summons to 34 

Membership, recommendation to change 14 

New Lodge, approbation and recommendation of nearest Lodge 4 

Lodge, approval and recommendation of D.\ D.\ G.*. M.\ for 4 

Lodge, dispensation for 6 

Lodge, Grand Lecturer's certificate of qualification of Master and 

Wardens 5 

Lodge; petition for Warrant for 7 

Lodge, sanction of Master and Wardens for 5 

New testimony, notice of intention to offer ; 35 

Notice to accused : . ■ • 17-31 

of appeal 28 

by Grand Master of suspension, &c, to individual 33 

to complainant 18-31 

of conviction > 26 

by Grand Master of suspension, &c, to Lodge 34 

of intention to offer new testimony 35 

to parties of taking deposition 20 

Permission by Grand Master that candidate may receive degrees in this 

State 13 

Petition to be made a Mason 11 

for removal of Lodge 8 

for restoration 28 

for restoration of Warrant surrendered with intention to resume it, 9 
for restoration of Warrant surrendered absolutely, forfeited, or 

revoked 9 

for Warrant for new Lodge 7 

Proxy, appointment of 1 



52 



PACK. 

Recommendation of candidate : .. i 12 

of D.\ D.\ G.\ M.\ for new Lodge 4 

to join another Lodge 14 

of nearest Lodge for new Lodge 4 

for restoration, to Grand Lodge 29 

Record of Lodge 35 

of special Communication for trial 22 

of evidence, &c, on trial 24 

Rejected candidate, consent to apply to another Lodge 13 

Removal of Lodge, approbation of nearest Lodges 8 

of Lodge, petition for 8 

Report to Grand Master, of trial 26 

Restoration, petition for 28 

recommendation to Grand Lodge for 29 

of Warrant, approval of D.\ D.\ G.\ M/ 10 

of Warrant, approbation of nearest Lodge 10 

of Warrant, petition for when surrendered with intention to 

resume 9 

of Warrant, petitition for when surrendered absolutely, for- 
feited or revoked 9 

Return of service of notice to accused, personal 17 

of service of notice to accused, by leaving at abode 18 

of service of notice to accused, by mail 18 

of service of summons of witness 19 

on commission to take deposition 21 

to commission for trial in Grand Lodge . . 4 32 

to Grand Lodge, of trial, &c 27 

Sanction of Master and Wardens to formation of new Lodge 5 

Specifications of complaint or charges. . > ; 15-16 

Summons to Mason as witness 19 

&c, by Grand Master, to attend Grand Lodge, to Lodge 34 

&c, by Grand Master, to attend Grand Lodge, to individual 33 

to members implicated in uhmasonic conduct 34 

Trials 15 

Trial in Grand Lodge, commission for 30 

Warrant for new Lodge, petition for ... 7 

Witness, summons for, if Mason , 19 



The HF Group 

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8/22/2006