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Full text of "May Meeting. Painters and Engravers of New England; Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland; Yeas and Nays on General Conway's Motion"

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196 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 



MAY MEETING. 

The Society held its stated monthly meeting this day, 
Thursday, May 10th, at eleven o'clock, a.m. ; Colonel 
AspiNWALL, one of the Vice-Presidents (the President 
being absent), in the chair. 

The Librarian announced donations from the State of 
Ohio ; the State of Khode Island ; the New-Jersey His- 
torical Society; the New-England Loyal Publication So- 
ciety ; the Society for the Encouragement of Domestic 
Industry; the State Historical Society of Iowa; the Pro- 
prietors of the "Heraldic Journal"; the Proprietors of 
the " Savannah Republican " ; John Appleton, M.D. ; 
Surgeon-General Joseph K. Barnes ; J. M. Clark, Esq. ; 
Mr. A. Cushing ; Mr. E. H. Goss ; B. A. Gould, Esq. ; 
George Punchard, Esq. ; Hon. A. H. Rice ; Dr. J. M. 
Toner ; Daniel Treadwell, Esq. ; W. A. Whitehead, 
Esq. ; Hon. Henry Wilson ; Mrs. J. E. Worcester ; Pro- 
fessor S. J. Young ; and from Messrs. Amory, Deane, 
Green, Lawrence, Webb, and Winthrop, of the Society. 

Dr. RoBBiNS, the Corresponding Secretary, reported a 
letter of acceptance from James Parton, Esq., of New 
York, who had been elected a Corresponding Member 
at the last meeting. 

Mr. Deane communicated a letter from Mr. Ticknor, 
relating to a few letters found among the papers left by 
the late Miss Belknap. They were intended for the 
Society, if Mr. Deane should decide that they were 
worthy of preservation. Mr. Deane stated that the pack- 
age received contained letters of the elder Buckminster, 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGEATEES OP NEW ENGLAND. 197 

John Eliot, Governor Gore, and others ; and, on his 
motion, the thanks of the Society were presented to Mr. 
Ticknor for this acceptable gift.* 

Mr. Deane read a letter from Mr. Whitmore, regret- 
ting his inability to be present at the meeting, as he had 
contemplated reading a paper on the " Early Engravers 
of NeAv England." At Mr. Whitmore's request, Mr. 
Deane communicated this paper to the meeting ; and, 
on his motion, it was referred to the Committee on the 
Publication of the Proceedings. 

THE EARLY PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW 
ENGLAND. 

BY MK. WILLIAM H. WHITMOEE. 

It has been commonly supposed, that the earliest portraits 
painted in New England, except possibly a few executed by 
amateurs, were those by Smibert. We propose to show that 
there was at least one eariier resident painter, and to call 
attention to his proficiency in the kindred art of engraving. 

It is probably safe to assume, that, prior to 1723, no en- 
graver capable of executing a portrait on copper or steel had 
visited New England. In that year appeared a " Life of the 
Rev. Increase Mather," by his son. Cotton Mather, which, 
though printed by B. Green for R. Belknap in Boston, has 
prefixed a very poor portrait, the work of John Sturt, an 
English engraver, who died in London in 1730. 

Nothing but the lack of a competent artist here could have 
caused the publisher to send abroad for this portrait. 

PETEE PELHAM. 
Soon after this date, however, an educated artist of very 

* Many of these letters are worthy of publication, but are reserved for a future 
volume of Collections from the " Belknap Papers." — Eds. 



198 MASSACHUSETTS mSTOBICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

considerable ability did take up his residence here. This 
was Peter Pelham, of whom we know only that he had been 
resident in London, and there, by his wife Martha, had chil- 
dren, baptized at St. Paul's, Covent Garden : viz., Peter, 17th 
December, 1721 ; and Charles, 9th December, 1722. 

Two letters from his sister, Helen Pelham, fortunately pre- 
served, show that their father was living in 1748, but was 
dead in 1763, and that he lived to be over eighty years of 
age ; and it would seem probable, that he was Peter Pelham, 
an English engraver, born about 1684. Of him Dr. Spooner 
(" Biographical History of the Pine Arts ") writes that he 
engraved a number of portraits, and had a son, J. C. Pelham, 
born in 1721, who painted historical pieces and portraits, but 
achieved no reputation. This connection is, however, purely 
conjectural. 

The earliest work we have yet traced to Pelham is his en- 
graved portrait of the Rev. Cotton Mather, dated 1727. It 
is inscribed, "P. Pelham ad vivum pinxit, ab origine fecit et 
excud." This is a distinct claim to his execution of a painted 
portrait ; and in the Library of the American Antiquarian 
Society at Worcester, Mass., among the other family portraits 
of the Mathers, is an oil painting which corresponds with the 
engraving. Not only are the accessories the same, but the 
portrait is reversed in the engraving, as if the artist copied 
it upon the copper as it stood before him. We may surely 
accept this as Pelham's original, as there is no other claimant. 
The picture has been repaired and rebacked within a few 
years, thus preventing any chance of finding an inscription 
thereon.* 



* By the kindnesa of Mr. Deane, my attention has been called to the following 
receipt among the Belknap Papers: — 

JSozton March the Wth 1727-8. 

B«ceived of the Revd Mr. Benjn Coleman the Sum of 3 shillings hemg the first Payment of the 
Subscription for a Print in Metzoo : of the late Rev. Dr. Cotton iJSatijIt, by which the Bearer is 
Entitled to the said Print Paying 2 shillings at the DeUyery of the same, By me Peter Pelham. 

The Italics are in writing. 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 199 

In 1731, Pelham published a portrait inscribed, " Rev. John 
Moorhead, Minister of a Church of Presbyterian Strangers at 
Boston in New-England. Transit hora sine mora : sic transit 
Gloria Mundi. Prjeter Deum Optabile nihil est. P. Pelham 
pinxit et fecit." The same inscription, " pinxit et fecit," is 
on an undated portrait of Mather Byles. With these confir- 
mations of the Mather portrait, we may be sure that Pelham 
was a painter. 

Yet he did not engrave his own pictures solely : two 
other painters, we know, were associated with him. In or 
about 1734, he engraved Smibert's portrait of the Rev. Ben- 
jamin Colman, of which the Rev. E. Turell (" Life of Colman," 
Boston, 1747, p. 231) writes : — 

"His picture drawn in the year 1734 by the greatest Master our 
Country has seen, Mr. John Smibert, shows both his Face and Air 
to Perfection : And a very considerable Resemblance is given us in 
the Metsotinto done from it by Mr. P. Pelham, which is in many of 
our Houses." 

Most critics to-day would be apt to consider Pelham's 
engravings as superior to Smibert's paintings. 

In 1743 the portrait of the Rev. William Cooper, and 
probably soon after, that of the Rev. Joseph Sewall, both 
painted by Smibert, were engraved by Pelham. 

In 1750, a portrait of the Rev. Thomas Prince was en- 
graved by Pelham, from a painting by Greenwood. 

We have thus the names of Smibert and Greenwood as 
resident artists. Of these, John Smibert, a Scotchman, born 
at Edinburgh in 1684, had studied in Italy before 1728, 
when he was induced by Bishop Berkeley to share his for- 
tunes in America. With the failure of Berkeley's scheme 
we have nothing to do at present ; but it was the means of 
bringing Smibert to Boston, where he married and had chil- 
dren. 

Greenwood was undoubtedly a citizen of Boston, and of 



200 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

both these artists we shall have more to say after completing 
our notice of the Pelhams. 

To revert to Peter Pelham. We are obliged to glean 
from the journals of the day the few items which help us to 
gain a few details of his life. We have already shown that 
he came here probably between 1724-26 ; that in 1727 he 
engraved Cotton Mather's portrait, and in 1731 John Moor- 
head's, as well as that of Benjamin Colman in 1733-34. 

In 1734, we find that he had already commenced a school, 
in which, by later advertisements, we find he taught not only 
writing and reading, but dancing, painting, and needlework. 
The department of needlework may have been confided to his 
wife. 

The advertisement in the " Boston Gazette " for April 5th, 
1734, reads, — 

" At Mr Pelham's House near the Town Dock is to be sold sundry 
sorts of Household Goods (for Cash) very Cheap, he having Intention 
to break up House-keeping. 

" N. B. Attendance will be given from Eight till Twelve o'clock 
every morning, but not after that Hour on account of his preparing 
for his School in the Afternoon, which he continues to keep as hereto- 
fore." 

The next announcement, from the " Boston Gazette " for 
Feb. 6th, 1738, reads thus : — 

"Mr Peter Pelham gives notice to all Gentlemen and Ladies in 
Town and Country, That at the House of Philip Dumerisque Esq, 
in Summer street (next his own Dwelling house) Young Gentlemen 
and Ladies may be Taught Dancing, Writing, Eeading, painting upon 
Glass, and all sorts of needle work." 

In 1743 Pelham issued an engraving of the portrait of the 
Rev. William Cooper, inscribed " J. Smibert pinxit, P. Pelham 
fecit 1748. Printed for and Sold by Stephen Whitney at 
y° Rose and Crown in Union Street, Boston." 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 201 

The next item, also in reference to an engraving, is from 
the " Boston Evening Post" for July 27th, 1747:— 

"A curious Print of His Excellency, William Shirley, Esq, done 
in mezzotinto, by Mr Peter Pelharn, to be sold by him at his school, in 
Queen Street — at Mr Stephen Whitney's, at the Hose & Crown, 
in Union street, — and at Mr. James Buck's near the Brazen Head, in 
CornhiU." 

On the 22nd of May, 1748, Pelham was married at Trinity 
Church to Mrs. Mary Singleton, widow of Richard Copley, of 
Boston, and of course received into his family her son John 
Singleton Copley, afterwards so distinguished as an artist. 
To this period belong the two following advertisements. The 
first from the " Boston News Letter " for July 11, 1748 : — 

" Mrs Mary Pelham, (formerly the widow Copley on Long Wharf, 
tobacconist) is removed to Lindel's Row, against the Quaker Meeting 
House, near the upper end of King Street, Boston, where she con- 
tinues to sell the best Virginia Tobacco, Cut, Pigtail, and Spun, of all 
sorts, by Wholesale and Retail, at the cheapest rates." 

The second is from the " Boston Gazette " for Septem- 
ber 20th, 1748 : — 

"Mr. Pelham's Writing and Arithmetick School near the Town 
House, (during the Winter) will be open from Candle Light till nine 
in the Evening, as usual, for the benefit of those employed in Business 
all the Day — ; and at his Dwelling House near the Quaker's meeting 
in Lindall's Row, all persons may be supply'd with the best Virginia 
Tobacco, cut, spun into very best Pigtail and all other sorts ; also SnufF 
at the cheapest Rates." 

A sprightly antiquary of this city, some two years ago, 
founded quite a lively article upon the Copleys, on a mistaken 
view of these advertisements. It seems perfectly clear, that 
Mrs. Mary Pelham, finding her husband's means not abundant, 
preferred to add her contribution to the common fund by 
keeping up her tobacco-shop. It seems as clear that her 
husband pursued his path of engraving and teaching: w© 

26 



202 MASSACHUSETTS HISTOBICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

shall presently show to which pursuit the step-sou, Copley, 
was directed. 

During the ensuing three years, Pelham seems to have 
been most fully employed as an artist; and here we may 
properly insert, in its chronological order, the following let- 
ter written by his sister in England : — 

Oct. 3. 1748 
My dear Brother, — I begin writing to you without knowing 
whether it will ever come to your hands or not, but I am determined 
to write, and hope you will get some of my letters if not all. This is 
the third time I have wrote since February ; in my last I told you 
that my father was very well, and so he is now, thank God Almighty 
for it. I am in the country, but hear frequently from my dear 
father. We have been out of town ever since the second of May. I 
long to have a letter from you to know how you and all your family 
does. In your last you were so good as to tell my father how your 
sons was disposed of. I hope Peter is happily married. As Charles 
is brought up a merchant I flatter myself that some time or an other 
he will come to England. O my dear soul how glad I shall be to see 
him ; if please God I should be alive then. I shall here send you a 
direction how to write to me, which I did in my two last letters, 
but till I hear from you I am not sure you got them. I hope you will 
never fail to write when any ships come to London, for it is the great-' 
est pleasure in the world to my dear father and me to hear of your 
welfare. I am sure my letters must be very stupid to my dear brother, 
as I have nothing entertaining to tell you, for as you know none of my 
acquaintance, nor I any of yours, must make my letters very stupid ; 
for after I have inquired how you, your wife, and the dear children are, 
and tell you my father and self are well, I have nothing more to say. 
As for news I can never write of that you have in a better manner 
than what I can express it. So will conclude with my best wishes and 
love to your self and to your wife, and to all your family and hope 
you will believe me to be. 

Your ever loving sister Helek Pelham 

I send this to town to ray 

father & get him to send it 

to the New England Coffee house. 

Direct for me at the Hon"* Mrs. Conways 

in Green St, near Grosvenor Square 

To Mr Peter Pelham, S'. 

at Boston in New England. 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 203 

We again quote from the " Boston News Letter " for June 
7th, 1750: — 

" To be sold by James Buck at the Spectacles in Queen St. An 
accurate Print in Metzotinto of the Rev Thomas Prince, A. M. Like- 
wise all Sorts of Maps & Prints, among which is a Set of Prints com- 
pletely coloured, proper for viewing in Camera Obscurse." 

To this period of his life we may assign the portrait of 
the Rev. Joseph Sewall, " J Smibert pinxit, P. Pelham fecit," 
and possibly that of Mather Byles already noticed. There is 
also a portrait of the " Rev. Edward Holyoke Fxads. Harvard 
1749," which is in Pelham's style, though not signed by him. 

The last item we have found is in the " Boston News 
Letter" for September 17th, 1751, and reads as follows: — 

" To be sold by P. Pelham, at his house near the Quakers Meeting- 
House, a print in Metzotintu of Thomas Hollis, late of London, 
merchant, a most generous Benefactor to Harvard College in New- 
England, having founded two Professorships and ten Scholarships in 
said College, given a fine Apparatus to Experimental Philosophy, 
and increased the Library with a large Number of valuable books 
&c. &c. done from a curious whole length Picture by Joseph High- 
more in London, and placed in the College Hall in Cambridge. Also 
sundry other Prints at said Pelham's." 

The records of Trinity Church in Boston, where Pelham 
had long worshipped, show that he was buried December 
14th, 1751. We have searched in vain for any obituary 
notice of him from any of the clergymen whose appearance 
he has preserved for posterity. Brief as this sketch is, we 
now know more of him, perhaps, than of most of his con- 
temporaries ; and, if we can restore him to his rank as the 
founder of the arts of painting and engraving in New Eng- 
land, our time has been well employed. 

It is probable that Pelham left very little property, since 
no inventory was returned by his widow. The year following 
she published this notice in the " Boston Gazette " for Aug. 
18th, 1752: — 



204 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [Mat, 

"All persons indebted to the estate of Mr Peter Pelham, late 
of Boston, deceased, are hereby requested to pay the same to Mary 
Pelham, widow, Administratrix to said estate ; and those to whom the 
Estate is indebted are desired to apply to the said Administratrix in 
order for a settlement." 

For nearly forty years Mrs. Pelham continued to reside in 
Boston, and without doubt her declining years were cheered 
by the success of her son, Copley, whose talent as a painter 
had brought him fame and competence. 

Her son by Pelham, viz., Henry Pelham, born 14th Febru- 
ary, 1748-9, was also an artist, like his half-brother. He 
certainly painted and engraved a picture on " The Finding of 
Moses," and, by a brief account of him in the London " Notes 
and Queries," First Series, vol. iv. p. 306, it seems he pub- 
lished other engravings. He was a good civil engineer, and 
was agent in Ireland for the Marquis of Lansdowne. He was 
accidentally drowned in the river Kenmare, 1806. His face, 
however, has been preserved in the famous picture of the 
" Boy and Squirrel," which was Copley's first great success. 
As is well known, this noted picture, since the death of Lord 
Lyndhurst, has been reclaimed, and added to the art-treasures 
of our city. 

The death of Mrs. Pelham, widow of our artist, called 
forth the following notice in the " Boston Gazette " for May 
4th, 1789: — 

" Died, on Wednesday last, Mrs Mary Pelham, widow of Mr Peter 
Pelham, late of this town, and mother of Mr. Copley. Her funeral 
will be attended this afternoon, at four o'clock, from her dwelling 
house, at New Boston, when and where, her, Mr Copley's and the 
family's friends and acquaintances are requested to grace the proces- 
sion." 

Her will makes her "good friend, Charles Pelham of New- 
ton," her executor; and to him and to his daughter (her 
god-daughter), Harriet Pelham, various bequests are made. 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 205 

JOHN SINGLETON COPLEY. 

The last and most famous member of Pelham's family 
was his step-son, John Singleton Copley, born in 1738, the 
son of Richard Copley, who died in 1748. 

It is not our province here to examine the life or recount 
the triumphs of Copley as a painter. It is enough for us to 
claim him as an engraver on the evidence of an engraved 
portrait of the " Eev. William Welsteed of Boston in New- 
England, M. 58, 1753, J. S. Copley pinxit et fecit. Printed 
for and sold by Stephen Whiting at y" Rose and Crown in 
Union St." 

This first step in his artistic life bears so plainly the 
mark of Pelham's style, that we may be sure it was to his 
step-father that Copley owed much valuable rudimentary in- 
struction. It is true he afterwards deplored his lack of 
proper teaching; but this may well refer to that higher train- 
ing which he sought and obtained abroad. Only four years 
afterwards, in 1757, he painted those grand portraits of the 
Tracys of Newburyport, which in his old age he regarded 
as nearly his best productions in that style. So far as his 
initiation in the art, and very possibly the awakening of his 
taste, is concerned, we may surely claim Pelham as Copley's 
master. 

We will close this account of the Pelhams, by relating a 
few particulars in reference to the descendants of Peter Pel- 
ham and his first wife. 

His son, Peter, jun., had married here in 1746; but, in or 
about 1749, he removed to Virginia, where his family increased 
to thirteen children. We have seen quite an extended pedi- 
gree, tracing many branches now scattered through the South 
and the West. One descendant was William, Surveyor-gen 
eral of Arkansas, and probably another was the artillery 
ofiicer who has gained some notoriety among the Rebels, in 
Virginia. 



206 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

William Pelham, the youngest son, was born in Boston, 
and undoubtedly was buried from Trinity Church, 28th Janu- 
ary, 1760-61. 

Charles Pelham, the other son by the first wife, was 
educated as a merchant ; but the following advertisement in 
the "Boston News Letter" of April 23d, 1762, probably re- 
fers to some period when he had been unsuccessful : — . 

" Charles Pelham hereby informs all the Gentlemen and Ladies in 
Town and Country that he proposes again to open a Dancing School 
on Monday the third day of May next, at Concert Hall, where he will 
give constant Attendance as usual, every Monday, Thursday and Sat- 
urday in the Afternoon, provided he may meet with suitable encour- 
agement. He therefore begs leave to desire that those who intend 
to favour him therein, would be so good as to apply to him (at Mrs 
Pelham's, next door to Thomas Lechmere Esq, at New Boston) any 
Time before the said Third of May." 

To this period belongs the following letter addressed to 
him by his aunt: — 

Chiohesteb Feby 15* 1762. 

Mt dear Nephew, — The third of this month brought me the 
comfort & pleasure of a letter from you dated Nov. 2. 1761. Indeed 
I was rejoiced to see one, for I have been vastly uneasy as I have 
never heard from you since Oct. 27, 1759 & I have written you three 
letters since that. My dear I have never heard from you since that 
dreadful fire happened at Boston, therefore judge of my uneasiness. 
But, thank God, I have now heard that you are well, as for your 
brother Peter, I have not heard from him this age — poor William 
you mentioned him to me & said he was but of a poor constitu- 
tion, and till then I did not know that there was any children of 
your mother's, but Peter & you ; or if I did I had forgot it. So your 
brother has five children, poor man I pity him. You have never seen 
Capt Parker I suppose since you told me of him, I know him perfectly 
well 

Now Charles as to my picture, how can you think I would sit for it. 
Your grandfather sat for his at 80, 'tis true, but there never was so 
handsome, so charming a man at that age as he was — it was with 
much ado that I got him to have it done. I told him I would not be 
without it for any thing in the world, nor indeed no more I would, and 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGEAVEES OP NEW ENGLAND. 207 

as there was a tolerable good painter upon the place, I insisted on it — 
but as to miniature there is not one nearer than London, & it would 
cost above half a year's income to have it done, were I even there, 
and most likely I shall never go there again, for tho' my dear father 
was older than I, yet in constitution I was always older than him. So 
desire never to hear any more on that subject, for I shall never come 
into it. 

I am much obliged to Mr Parsons who sent me your letter directly, 
and I send this to him and beg the favour of him to send it. I desire 
you will send yours to him when you write, which I hope will not be 
long before I shall be made so happy. Now I must tell the dates 
of my letters which I wrote — Tours of Oct 27, 1 reed Jany 2. 60 — 
& I answered that Apr 18 — I wrote again Aug 15, & in Mch 13 
61 — so you see how often I have wrote to you — 3 letters for one. I 
hope this will come safe, for indeed my dear, writing is not the agreea- 
blest thing in the world, unless I could write as well as you do — but 
my writing and spelling is so bad that I can take no pleasure in it — 
but it is the only way that any one can have the pleasure of conversing 
with their friends & I hope so near & dear as you are to me that you 
will be good enough to make allowances for an old woman. 

I saw in the papers you had a fine burial at Boston — poor General 
Whitmore, some of his troops are here. I think it was a sad accident 
he met with My dear child I cannot possibly make my letter agreea- 
ble to you by telling you all the chit-chat, as you know not a soul 
here, so will conclude with assuring you how much I am 
Your affectionate aunt & humble servant 

Helen Pelham. 

P. S. — My dear nephew. I do not remember any thing about 
your ever having the small pox, but think it most likely you never had 
it, by your brother having so lately got it — ' so hope you will always 
avoid it, as you say you have done. I cannot tell what to say in 
regard to your coming to England, as it is not in my power to give 
you the assistance I could wish, therefore must say you are right in 
staying in a place where you are known & settled — & dont doubt 
but God will give a blessing to your honest endeavours, & shall think 
myself happy in hearing from you & of your welfare, — which I hope 
you will be so good as to gratify me in as often as you can. 

He soon retrieved his position, if indeed, in the opinion 
of the time, he had ever lost it ; and, removing to Medford, 



208 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

where he was schoolmaster, married there 6th December, 
1766, Mary, daughter of Andrew Tyler by his wife Miriam, 
a sister of the famous Sir William Pepperell. He is named in 
1779, by Colonel Eoyal, in a letter from England, as " Charles 
Pelham, Esq., who used to do business for me." 

Prior to his marriage, he had bought, in April, 1765, the 
homestead of the Rev. John Cotton, in Newton, with one hun- 
dred and three acres of land, for £735. Jackson says of him, 
" He was represented by his neighbours to have been a very 
polite and intelligent man. Opened an academy at his own 
house, and fitted scholars for College." — "He was a staunch 
friend of the Colony, as will appear by the resolutions he 
prepared for the Town." 

His daughter, Helen, married Thomas Curtis, and was 
the mother of our late distinguished citizen, Charles Pelham 
Curtis. We may add, that the portrait of Charles Pelham, 
painted by Copley, is still preserved. 

JOHN SMIBERT. 

Of John Smibert, whom we have mentioned as an early 
artist, we will present two facts which are probably not 
extant in print. First, he married Mary Williams, at Bos- 
ton, 30th July, 1730, and had children, — Alison, b. 14th May, 
1731 ; William, 29th January, 1732 ; John, 24th November, 
1733; Nathaniel, 20th January, 1734. Secondly, the inven- 
tory of his estate which contains some interesting items. It 
reads as follows : — 

Inventory of the Estate of Mr. John Smibeft, late of Boston, Painter, taken by us the 
subscribers, in February, 1762. 

The easterly half of the House & land in Queen St. 

Fourteen acres of land in Boxbury 

A House lott of Land in the Westerly part of Boston 

Plate, 109 oz & 15 p<. 

Silver watch & seal & 2 rings 

Wearing apparel 12 . 12, Library 11 >. 18 .. 5 

Fire arms & silver hilted sword 



^466. 


.13. 


.4 


186. 


. 13. 


.4 


10 






36. 


. 6. 


.4 


8. 


. 2. 


.8 


24. 


.10. 


.5 


3. 


.17. 


.4 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OF NEW ENGLAND. 209 

Colours & oyls 307 .. 16 .. 5, 35 portraits 60 .. 5 .. 4 368 .. 1 .. 9 

41 History pieces & pictures in that taste 16 .. .0 

13 Landskips 2 .. 18 2 Conversation Pictures 23 .. 6 .. 8 25 .. 19 .. 8 

Bustoes & figures in Paris plaister & models 4 .. 5 .. 8 

Prints & books of prints 11 .. 12 .. 8 Drawings 4 . 16] 16.. 8 .. 8 

Pillows, prospect glass & magnifying glass, foyles & flutes 1 .. 11 . 4 

An eight day clock 9 .. 6 .. 8 Desk & book case 8 17 .. 6 .. g 

Escrutore 2. Table Linnen 9 .. 18 .. 8 Sheeting do 16 .. 9 .. 11 28 .. 8 .. 7 

two pieces of brown linnen 6 .. 15 .. 8 

4 feather beds Bolsters & pillows Bedsteads & Curtains 21 .. 6 .. 8 

3 do do do 8.0.0 

12 pr of blankets & 3 rugs 3 .. 12 . 

two silk quilts & a coverlid 4 . 18 .. 4 five looking glasses 6 .. 17 11 .. 10 . 8 

China & Earthen ware 3 .. 17 .. 4 
three chests of drawers & 1 table 5 .. 13 4 Easy chairs & couch 1 .. 17 .. 4 7 .. 10 .. 8 

three dozen & 10 chairs 12 .. 3 .. 4 Ten tables 4 .. 6. 5 carpets 2 .. 4 18 .. 13 .. 4 

Pewter 8. .9. .2 Iron & tin ware 11 .. 2 .. 11 19 .. 12 .. 1 

Brass & copper ware 13 .. 19 .. 2 

Bell metal skillits 49| 2» 2 .. 12 .. 9 

Gross of glass bottles 1 .. 12 Lumber in the garrett 2.1.4 3 .. 13 .. 4 

Negro girl Phillis 26 .. 13 .. 4 Horse chaise & runners 24 .. 5 ,. 4 60 .. 18 .. 8 

Cloaths press, chest, boxes, brushes, baskets, bellows &o 1 .. 16 .. 8 

£. 1387 ..4.9 
David Cutter 
Joseph Gale 
John Greenwood. 

Maey Smibekt ) , „ 
I adm" 
John Moffatt ) 

22 Sept. 1762. [Suflf. Wills, vol. 46, p. 277.] 

"We have not space to attempt an enumeration of his pic- 
tures, nor can we easily account for his undue popularity. 
Perhaps the association with Berkeley aided him socially, or 
he may have owed something to his marriage. At all events, 
though but an inferior painter, his tastes must have led him 
to a close acquaintance with his fellow-artist, Pelham. Some 
indication of this may be found in the tradition, that John 
Singleton Copley, Pelham's step-son, was a student with 
Smibert. To be sure, Copley was only thirteen when his 
presumed instructor died ; but it is very probable that he 
was the recipient of some attention, if not information. 
Smibert seems to have been highly estimated by the public 
of his day, and numerous portraits remain bearing the stamp 
of his painstaking, but utterly commonplace, brush. 

27 



210 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

His son, Nathaniel Smibert, is said to have shown much 
promise as an artist, but he died at the age of twenty-one. 



JOHN GEEENWOOD. 

Of the other associate of Pelham, John Greenwood, we 
know much less. I am indebted to Isaac J. Greenwood, of 
New York, for the information that he was probably the son 
of Samuel Greenwood, of Boston, ship-builder and merchant, 
by his second wife, Mary Charnock, and was baptized at the 
Old South Church, 10th December, 1727. If this be the per- 
son, he married, 17th December, 1769, Frances Stevens; left 
this country before the Revolution, went probably to India, 
but eventually settled in London as an auctioneer, and died 
at Margate in 1792. 

In confirmation of this theory, it will be noticed that John 
Greenwood was one of tlie appraisers on the estate of 
John Smibert, and is the only one whom we can suppose 
to have been competent to value the paintings composing a 
part of it. 

The fourth name to be placed on the list of painters here, 
is that of Richard Jennys, jun., whose portrait, in metzotint, 
of the Rev. Jonathan Mayhew, of Boston, is inscribed " pinxit 
et fecit." It was published by Nath. Hurd, and, though un- 
dated, must have been issued before 1768. 

Lastly, we have to place on our list the name of Black- 
burn, of whom at present no particulars can be given, so 
completely has his memory been forgotten, although as an 
artist he was second only to Copley. 

GOLDSMITHS AND ENGRAVERS. 

We have now to consider a class, more properly denom- 
inated artisans, than artists, — men who were rarely employed 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 211 

on copper or steel plate, but who wrought at goldsmith's 
work, or engraved cards and similar small pieces. 

First among these we place Nathaniel Hurd, born at Bos- 
ton, 13th of February, 1730. He was the son of Jacob Hurd» 
goldsmith, and Elizabeth Mason, his wife. The pedigree is 
traced through Jacob, a joiner of Charlestown, to Jacob of 
Boston, a son of John, who was a settler here in 1639. 

As Nathaniel Hurd was, perhaps, the most accomplished 
engraver from 1750 to 1777, the following particulars may be 
interesting. 

In a memoir of him, published in the " New-England Maga- 
zine" (Boston, 1832), Mr. Buckingham writes : — 

"In seal-cutting and die-engraving, Mr. Hurd was considered supe- 
rior to any in the colonies. Coats-of-arms, pictures, and carvings were 
not much valued and sought after, a century ago, in New England. 
They approximated too near to graven images, in the view of our 
puritanical forefathers, to meet with much encouragement. Portrait- 
painting, however, met with considerable countenance. They deemed 
it a mark of family affection, and individual respect and esteem ; so 
that, from the time of Mr. Smybert, who came over to this country 
with Dean Berkeley, down to the period when Copley flourished as our 
first portrait painter, there were very few families, in easy circum- 
stances, who had not a picture by the hand of that very eminent 
American painter ; but, as to engravings on copper-plate by an Ameri- 
can, there was hardly such a thing to be seen in New England." 

Of Hurd he adds, — 

" He was probably the first person who undertook to engrave on 
copper in the United States. We have seen a miniature likeness of 
the Rev. Dr. Sewall, minister of the Old South Church in Boston, en- 
graved by Hurd, in the linear style, in 1764. In this art he was his 
own instructor." 

We have seen that this writer was mistaken about Hurd's 
position as the earliest engraver, as this honor belongs to 
Pelham. We think it very probable that he was a pupil 
of Pelham's, since there was an acquaintance between the 



212 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

families, evidenced by the portrait of Hurd, painted by 
Copley. 

In truth, we doubt if Hurd ever made any other portrait 
than that mentioned. His skill lay chiefly in executing small 
plates, of which many specimens remain. The taste of the 
day for coats-of-arms led many people into the fashion of 
having book-plates made. Those which we have seen are 
very neatly designed and well executed, the details of the 
ornamentation being very delicate. Another example re- 
mains in a plate for invitation cards of Thomas Bernard 
and Edward Oxnard, for the Commencement at Harvard, in 
1767. The demand for such articles as cards and bill-heads 
probably sufficed to keep one artist well occupied ; but, as an 
additional employment, he used to engrave or chase silver- 
plate.* The growing wealth of New England found expres- 
sion then in the use of massive plate; and one of the most 
common advertisements in the journals of the day was of sil- 
ver lost or stolen. Often it is described as stamped " Hurd." 
The father and brother of the engraver were goldsmiths 
here. A salver yet owned by E. C, Moseley, Esq., has the 
stamp "Hurd," and on the face is engraved a fine represen- 
tation of the Oliver arms. 

We have Mr. Buckingham for our authority in saying that 
Hurd also published one or more caricatures, as that of the 
pillorying of a certain Dr. Seth Hudson, who, in 1762, was 
convicted of counterfeiting the Province notes. 

Hurd probably never married. His brother, Benjamin 
Hurd, was a goldsmith, as was also his brother-in-law, Daniel 
Henchman, a son of the Rev. Nathaniel Henchman. 



* We insert the following advertisement from the " Boston Gazette," 28th April, 
1760:— 

" Nathaniel Hurd Informs his Customers he has remov'd his Shop from Maccarty's Corner 
on the Exchange, to the hack Part of the opposite Brick Building, where Mr Ezekiel Price kept 
his Office, where lie conUnues to do all Sorte of Goldsmith's Work ; likewise engraves in Gold, 
BilTer, Copper, Brass, and Steel, in the neatest Manner and at a reasonable Kate." 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OF NEW ENGLAND. 213 

In his will Nathaniel Hurd mentions his sister Sarah, who 
married Thomas Walley, and was the ancestress of Wendell 
Phillips, Esq., and of the Hon. Samuel H. Walley, of Boston. 
He also mentions his sister Anne, the wife of John Furnass ; 
and to her son, John Mason Furnass, he bequeathed his tools, 
owing to the genius which Furnass discovered for the profes- 
sion of engraving. 

THOMAS JOHNSON AND ROBERT TURNER. 

Out of courtesy to the sex, we will next insert from the 
"Boston Gazette" for May, 1748, the advertisement which 
follows : — 

" Drawing, Japanning and Fainting on Glass taught by 
Mrs Sarah Morehead at the Head of the Rope Walks, near 
Fort Hill." And proceed to two other engravers, whose 
works mainly contributed to arouse the devotion of our an- 
cestors. These were Thomas Johnson and Robert Turner, 
both of whom furnished plates of music to accompany the 
Versions of the Psalms in use a century ago. 

When the first plates appeared is, perhaps, now forgotten ; 
but the following title shows something of the matter : — 

" An Introduction to the Singing of Psalm-Tunes. In a plain and 
easy Method with a collection of Tunes in three Parts. By the 
Reverend Mr Tufts. The Eleventh Edition. Printed from Copper- 
Plates, Neatly Engraven. Boston, N.E. Printed for Samuel Ger- 
rish, 1744." 

In this there are ten pages of music ; but, instead of notes, 
the letters F, S, L, M, are used. 

Eight years after this, however, we find the following vol- 
ume issued : — 

" A New Version of the Psalms of David ; Fitted to the Tunes 
used in the Churches : with several Hymns out of the Old and New 
Testament. By John Barnard, Pastor of a Church in Marblehead. 



214 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETT. [Mat, 

Boston: N.E. Printed by J. Draper for T. Leverett in Cornhill 
1752." 

At the end are sixteen pages of music, the notes being 
angular or diamond-shaped instead of round. "Engraved, 
Printed & Sold by James Turner near the Town House, Bos- 
ton, 1752." 

That Turner sometimes practised other parts of his pro- 
fession, is witnessed by two examples. In the first place, we 
have a copy of the book-plate of John Franklin, brother of 
Benjamin, which is quite neatly designed. For a photograph 
of this, I am indebted to William Duane, Esq., of Philadel- 
phia, and it has been published in the "Heraldic Journal" 
(vol. ii. p. 97). 

Secondly, there is among the Curwin papers, at Salem, a 
bill dated Marblehead, Sept. 2, 1752, and rendered to the 
executors of William Lynde, containing these items : — 

To 8 escutcheons for y" Funeral of y° Dec^ at 8| ap" 
„ an Inscription on y" Breastplate of the Coffin 
„ 9 enamell rings for do w' 13 dwt. 23 gr. ~ 
„ fashioning ditto at 9|4 ap' 

„ adding a Crescent for difference to each of the Escutch- 
eons at 2| ap' 



■} 



£6 







..8 


4 


.. 4 




11 



£11 ..16 

Here ends our present knowledge of this Essex worthy, 
though we have searched the files for some notice of his 
death. 

Of our townsman, Thomas Johnson, we know a little more. 
He was born here in 1708, and died 8 May, 1767, aged 59, as 
his tombstone in the King's-Chapel yard shows. 

In 1760 there appeared — probably a companion to Bar- 
nard's version and Turner's notes, and adapted to conserva- 
tive minds — the following volvime : — 

"A New Version of the Psalms of David: Fitted to the Tunes 
used in the Churches. By N. Brady, D.D. Chaplain in Ordinary, 



1866.] PAINTERS AND ENGRAVERS OP NEW ENGLAND. 215 

and N. Tate, Esq ; Poet-Laureat to His Majesty. Boston ; New- 
England : Re-printed by D. and J. Kneeland, in Queen-street, for T. 
Leverett, in Cornhill. 1760." 

Annexed are 16 pages of music, "Engraved, Printed & 
sold by Thomas Johnston, Brattle Street, Boston, 1755." 

It may be added, that these sets of notes were detached 
from the text, and could be sold and used with any version, 
or separately. 

In 1760 we also find the following announcement in the 
" Boston Gazette," under date of April 28, 1760 : — 

" An exact Chart of Canada River (from the Island of Anticosta, 
as far up as Quebec) the Islands, Rocks, Shoals and Soundings, as 
they appear at Low Water (taken from the French), to be Sold by 
the Printers hereof, and by Thomas Johnston in Brattle Street." 

Johnston had also practised as a herald painter; for we 
have seen a tricking of the Lynde arms, dated in 1740, and 
signed by him, which shows that he was quite proficient in 
water-color painting. 

In his inventory, wherein he is termed a " japanner," we 
find the following items : — 

"10 small pictures 30s; glass arms, 4s; 2 pictures 62s; Dr. May- 
hew and Mr Gee's picture 36s; 6 pictures 9s; large piece of painting 
24s ; 4 pictures 2s ; Book of Heraldry 48s ; sundry pictures £2 .. 16 .. 4 ; 
3 paint stones and brushes, 15 copper plates, 40s; easel, burnishers, &c 
— one organ unfinished &c." 

By his nuncupative will, he left to his wife, Bathsheba, 
" all my psalm-tune plates, together with the press." 

It seems highly probable that he also engraved a little por- 
trait of Increase Mather, of which a copy is in the library of 
the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

On the whole, with his known engravings and his easel left 
behind him, Johnston may claim to be admitted td the frater- 
nity of the early New-England artists. 

Lastly among our Colonial or Provincial engravers we may 
name Paul Eevere. He was born, says Buckingham, in Bos- 



216 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [May, 

ton, in December, 1734, his father being a goldsmith here, 
and his grandfather, being a refugee from France, living in 
Guernsey. 

Eevere first practised his art as an engraver of silver 
plate ; but afterwards he tried his hand on copper-plate.* 
Buckingham records a portrait of the Rev. Dr. Mayhew as 
one of his earliest efforts. A warm patriot, he devoted much 
time to political caricatures and engravings connected with 
our early struggles with the Crown. 

"In 1775, he engraved the plates, made the press, and printed the 
bills of the paper money, ordered by the Provincial Congress of Mas- 
sachusetts, then in session at Watertown." 

Of the events of his public and private life we need make 
no farther mention, as they are sufficiently well known. 

We may conclude our account with Buckingham's citation 
from the manuscripts of Samuel Davis of Plymouth, in regard 
to the succeeding engravers. He names " Vent, Brigdon, 
"Webb, Edwards, Pierpont, Burt, Bowyer, Parker, Belknap, 
Emery, Holmes, Tyler, Woodward, Prothingham, and Codner.'? 
We may add Callender, who acquired and destroyed Pelham's 
plates, as we were assured by the late Rev. William Jenks, of 
Boston. 

A circular letter from William A. Whitehead, Cor- 
responding Secretary of the New-Jersey Historical So- 
ciety, was read, inviting this Society to send delegates 
to the New-Jersey Society's meeting, on Thursday, the 



* Curionsly enough, Revere also tried his hand at ft set of notes for the Psalms, as 
appears by the following in the "Boston Gazette," 4 Feb. 1765: — 

" Just Published and to be Sold by Josiali Flagg and Paul Eevere in Fish Street at the North 
End of Boston — A Collection of the best Psalm-Tunes in two, three and four Parts, from the 
most celebrated Authors ; fitted to all Measures and approved of by the best Masters in Boston, 
New-Kngland. To which are added. Some Hymns and Anthems ; the greater Part of them never 
before Printed in America. 

Set in score by Josiah Flagg. 

Engraved by Paul Kevere." 



1866.] "CEOMWELLIAN SETTLEMENT OF IRELAND." 217 

17th of May, at which it is intended to celebrate the 
two-hundredth anniversary of the settlement of Newark, 

This communication was referred to the Standing 
Committee, to ascertain if it would be agreeable to any 
of the members to be present on the occasion referred 
to. 

Dr. Ellis spoke of the volume of Proceedings which 
the Society had directed to be prepared from its early 
records. As one of the Committee, he had examined 
these records ; and though he believed our predeces- 
sors were, in their labors, equally faithful with the 
present "members, yet • he found that the records were 
exceedingly meagre ; and it would be necessary, in 
order to properly illustrate the early history of the 
Society, to seek for information from other sources. 
Many memoirs of deceased members w^ere yet to be 
written. It remained a question with him whether he 
should prepare memoirs of these members from such 
sources as were open to him, to be included in the 
volume, or adopt some other method. Information or 
assistance from any member who could offer it, was 
desired. 

On an inquiry from Mr. Sibley, whether one volume 
would embrace all the Proceedings of the Society, from 
its commencement to the time at which the first printed 
volume of Proceedings begins. Dr. Ellis stated, that it 
would depend upon the amount of material that could 
be collected beyond the Records, whether one volume 
or more would be requisite. 

Professor Torrey referred to a paper printed in the 
second volume of the fourth series of our Collections, 

28 



218 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [Mat, 

being a "letter from certain ministers and others of 
New England to Cromwell, upon his application to per- 
sons here [in New England] to settle in Ireland ; " and 
he read from Pendergast's " Cromwellian Settlement of 
Ireland " a passage (founded on unpublished manu- 
scripts), from which it appears that a few persons did 
emigrate from New England, and were admitted as ten- 
ants of a portion of the confiscated Irish lands. Sev- 
eral families went over in 1656, and were settled near 
Garristown, about fifteen miles north of Dublin. In 
1655, two islands near Sligo had been set apart for 
the use of expected immigrants from New England ; 
but whether they were ever settled in this way, does 
not appear. 

The Corresponding Secretary called attention to a 
printed broadside, which he had noticed in his Cabinet, 
containing the yeas and nays on General Conway's 
motion in the House of Commons, 27th February, 1782, 
in favor of terminating the war with the American 
Colonies. The sheet was sent to the Society by the 
Hon. Thomas Beekman, of Peterboro', Madison Coun- 
ty, N.y., formerly a member of Congress from that 
State, through the Hon. Edward Everett, whose letter, 
dated 23d March, 1834, accompanied the document. 
The following is a copy : — 

In the House of Commons on Wednesday 27th Fehriiary, 1782, 
The Eight Honourable General Conway moved a Resolution, on 
which an Address to His Majesty was presented on Friday 1st of 
March, purporting, 

" That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, most hum- 
bly to represent to His Majesty, that the further Prosecution of offen- 
sive War on the Continent of North America, for the Purpose of 



1866.] TEAS AND NATS ON GENERAL CONWAT'S MOTION. 



219 



reducing the revolted Colonies to Obedience by Force, will be the Means 
of weakening the Efforts of this Country against the European Enemies, 
tends, under the present Circumstances, dangerously to increase the mutual 
Enmity so fatal to the Interests both of Great-Britain and America, and, 
by preventing an happy Reconciliation with that Country, to frustrate the 
earnest Desire graciously expressed- by His Majesty to restore the Bless- 
ings of Public Tranquillity." 

On which, after a long Debate, the House divided, 



FOR PEACK WITH AMERICA. 



Bedfyrckhire. 
Earl of Upper Ossory County 

Hon. St. And. St. John Ditto 
Sir Wm. Wake Bedford 



Berks. 



W. H. Hartley 

John Elwes 
Francis Annesley 
R. A. Neville 
John Aubrey 
Chaloner Arcedeckne 
Hon. J. Montagu 

Backs. 
Earl Vemey 
Hon. Thomas Grenville 
James Grenville 
Hon. Wm. Grenville 
Viscount Mahon 
Gen. Smith 
J. M. Smith 
Wm. Drake 
W. Drake, jun. 



County 

Ditto 

Reading 

Ditto 

Wallingford , 

Ditto 

Windsor 



County 

Ditto 

Buckingham 

Ditto 

Chipping Wycomb 

Wendover 

Ditto 

Amersham 

Ditto 



Cambridgeshire. 
Hon. P. Yorke County 

Hon John Townshend University 
Benjamin Keene Cambridge 

J. W. Adeane Ditto 



Cheshire. 



S. R. Cotton 
J. Crewe 
R. W. Bootle 



County 

Ditto 

Chester 



CormeaU. 



Sir Wm. Lemon, Bart 

Ed. Eliot 

Samuel Salt 

Hon. W. Tollemache 

George Hunt 

Sir John Kamsden, Bart. 

Thomas Lucas 

Edward J. Eliot 

Dudley Long 



County 

Ditto 

Leskeard 

Ditto 

Bodmyn 

Grampound 

Ditto 

St. Germain's 

Ditto 



Cumberland. 


Henry Fletcher 


County 
Carlisle 


Earl of Surrey 


William Lowther 


Ditto 


John Lowther 


Cockermouth 


J. B. Garforth 


Ditto 


Derbi/shire. 


Rt.Hon.Ld.Geo. Cavendish County 


Edward Coke 


Derby 


Devonshire. 


John Parker 


County 


John RoUe 


Ditto 


Viscount Howe 


Dartmouth 


A. Holdsworth 


Ditto 


Hump. Minchin 


Okehampton 


R. Palk 


Ashburton 


Sir George Yonge, Bart. 


Honiton 


J. Wilkinson 


Ditto 


Hon. Richard Fitzpatrick 


Tavistock 


Sir Fred. Rogers 


Plymouth 


J. Baring 


Exeter 



Dorsetshire. 

Hump. Sturt County 

Thomas Scott Bridport 

Richard Beckford Ditto 

Henrv Bankes Corfe Castle 

H. W. Mortimer Shaftesbury 

W. Morton Pitt Poole 



Durham. 



John Tempest 
General Lambton 



Durham C. 
Ditto 



Essex. 

John Luther County 

Sir Robert Smith, Bart. Colchester 

Ch. Potter Ditto. 

Gloticestershire. 
Sir Wm. Guise, Bart. County 

Sir Wm. Codrington, Bart. Tewkesbuiy 
James Martin Ditto 

Charles Barrow Gloucester 

John Webb Ditt» 



220 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



[May, 



Herefordshire. 
Sir George Comewall, Bt. County 
John Scudamore Hereford 

R. P. Knight Leominster 



William Plomer 
Baron Dimsdale 
William Baker 
John Radcliffe 
Wm. 0. Sloper 



Hertfordshire. 



Earl of Ludlow 

' Kent 
Hon. Charles Masham 
Filmer Honywood 
Robert Gregory 
Sir Horace Mann 
Clement Taylor 
Charles Robinson 
George Gipps 

Lancashire. 

Thomas Stanley County 

Wilson Braddyll Lancaster 

General Burgoyne Preston 

Hon. H. Walpole Wigan 

Thomas Lister Clithero 

John Parker Ditto 



County 

Hertford 

Ditto 

St. Alban'a 

Ditto 



County 



County 

Ditto 

Rochester 

Maidstone 

Ditto 

Canterbury 

Ditto 



Leicestershire. 



William Pochin 
Hon. Booth Grev 



County 
Leicester 



Lincolnshire. 
Charles And. Pelham County 

Sir John Thorold, Bart. Ditto 
George Sutton Grantham 

John Harrison Grimsby 

Sir Thomas Clarges, Bart. Lincoln 



Middlesex. 



John Wilkes 

Hon. Charles J. Fox 

Fred. Bull 

John Sawbridge 

Nath. Newnham 

Sir Watkin Lewes, Knt. 



County 

Westminster 

London 

Ditto 

Ditto 

Ditto 



Monmouthshire. 



John Hanbury 
John Morgan 



County 
Ditto 



Norfolk. 

Sir Edward AsUey, Bart. County 

T. W. Coke Ditto 

Sir Harbord Harbord Norwich 

Hon. R. Walpole Yarmouth 

Richard Hopkins Thetford 

C. Molyneux Lynn 

Northamptonshire. 
Thomas Powys County 

Lucy KnightJey Ditto 



Richard Benyon 
James Phipps 
Viscount Althorpe 
Frederic Montague 



Peterborough 
Ditto 

Northampton 
Higham Ferrers 



Northumberland. 
Sir Wm. Middleton, Bart. County 
Sur M. W. Ridley, Bart. Newcastle 

Nottinghamshire. 
Charles Meadows County 

Robert Smith Nottingham 

Rt. Hon. Lord G. Sutton Newark 

Oxon. 
Rt. Hon. Ld. Robert Spencer Oxford C. 
Hon. P. Bertie Ditto 

Salop. 
Noel Hill County 

Richard Hill Ditto 

Sir Charleton Leighton, Bt. Shrewsbury 
Thomas Whitmore Bridgenorth 

Admiral Pigot Ditto 



Somersetshire. 



Sir J. Trevelyan 
Hon. J. J. Pratt 
Clement Tudway 
Robert Child 
R. Pennington 
F. F. Luttrel 



County 

Bath 

Wells 

Ditto 

Milborne Port 

Minehead 



Hants. 



Jer. C. Jervoise County 

Robert Thistlethwayte Ditto 

J. Fuller Southampton 

Edward Morant Yarmouth 

Sir J. G. Gritfin Andover 

B. Lethulier Ditto 

Viscount Middleton Whitchurch 
Right Hon. T. Townshend Ditto 



Staffordshire. 



Sir J. Wrottesley 
Hon. E. Monckton 
R. B. Sheridan 
George Anson 
T. Gilbert 



County 

Stafford 

Ditto 

Litchfield 

Ditto 



Suffolk. 
Sir Charles Bunbury, Bart. County 
Sir John Rous, Bart. Ditto 

Thomas Staunton Ipswich 

SirGerrardVanNeck.Bart. Dunwich 
Sir Charles Davers, Bart. Bury St. Edmunds 
Rt. Hon. General Conway Ditto 



Surry. 




Sir Joseph Mawbey, Bart. 


County 


Hon. A. Keppel 


Ditto 


Edward Norton 


Haslemere 


W. S. Stanhope 


Ditto 


Sir Robert Clayton, Bart. 


Blechingley 


Rt.Hon.Sir Fletcher Norton Guildford 


Sir Richard Hotham 


Southwark 


N. PolhiU 


Ditto 



1866.] TEAS AND NATS ON GENERAL CONWAT'S MOTION. 221 



Sussex. 
Et.Hon.Ld.George Lennox County 
Hon. T. Pelhara Ditto 

Hon. Major Stanhope Bramber 

Sir H. Gough Bart. Ditto 

Sir Th. G. Skipwith, Bart. Steyning 
J. Peachey Shoreliam 

Thomas Kemp Lewes 

Thomas Steele Chichester 

P. W. Balier Arundel 

Warmckshire, 
Sir Geo. Shuckburgh, Bt. County 
Sir Robert Lawley, Bart. Ditto 
Sir Robert Ladbroke Warwick 

Westmoreland, 
James Lowther County 

General Honeywood Appleby 

Hon. Wm. Pitt Ditto 



Wilts. 




Ch. Penruddock 


County 


William Hussey 


Salisbury 


Hon. "Wm. Bouverie 


Ditto 


Henry Uawkins 


Chippenham 


John Dunning 


Calne 


Rt. Hon. Isaac Barre 


Ditto 


Thomas Pitt 


Old Sarum 


W. A. Court 


Heytesbury 


Samuel Estwick 


Westbury 


J. W. Gardiner 


Ditto 


Rt. Hon. Lord Herbert 


Wilton 


Worcestershire. 


Hon. Edward Foley 


County 


Wm. Lygon 


Ditto 


Sir John Rushout 


Evesham 


C. W. B. Rous 


Ditto 


Hon. Andrew Foley 


Droitwich 


Edward Winnington 


Ditto 


T. Bates Rous 


Worcester 



YorJcshire. 
Henry Duncombe County 

Sir Geo. Savile, Bart. Ditto 

Sir James Pennyman, Bt. Beverley 



Evelyn Anderson 
Viscount Duncannou 
James Hare 
William Weddell 
Edmund Burke 
Henry Pierse 
William Nedham 
Hon. George Fitzwilliam 
Marquis of Graham 
William Lawrence 
Earl Tyrconnel 
Sir Thomas Gascoigne, Bt 
Beilby Thompson 
Lord John Cavendish 
Charles Turner 
William Wilberforce 



Ditto 

Kniiresborough 

Ditto 

Malton 

Ditto 

Northallerton 

Pontefract 

Richmond 

Ditto 

Rippon 

Scarborough 

Thirske 

Ditto 

York 

Ditto 

Hull 



Cinque Ports. 



John Trevannion 
J. Nesbit 



Dover 
Winchelsea 



Wales. 



Viscount Bulkeley 

Sir George Warren 

Ch. Morgan 

J. Vaughan 

J. Parry 

Sir W. W. Wynne, Bart. 

Richard Middleton 

Sir R. Mostvn 

Watkin Williams 

W. Mostyn Owen 

Ch. Edwin 

E. L. Vaughan 



Anglesea 

Beaumaris 

Breconshire 

Carmarthenshire 

Carnarvonshire 

Denbighshire 

Denbigh 

Flintshire 

Flint 

Montgomeryshire 

Glamorganshire 

Merionethshire 



Scotland. 



Sir T. Dundass 
J. H. Blair 
Sir Gilb. Eliot 
J. S. Stuart 
Earl of Fife 



Edinburghshire 

Edinburgh 

Roxburghshire 

Renfrewshire 

Bamfshire 



George Byng 
Vise. Maitland 



Ayes , 

Tellers . . . . , 

Total Majority , 



234 

2 

236 



FOE THE MINISTET. 



S. Whitbread 


BedfordsMre. 

Bedford 




Berks. 


John Mayor 
P. P. Powney 


Abingdon 
Windsor 




Bucks. 


Ant. Bacon 

Thomas Ord 
Robert Waller 


Aylesbury — Con- 
tractor 
Ditto 
Wycomb 



Cambridgeshire. 
James Mansfield University 

Cheshire. 
Tho. Grosvenor Chester 

Cornwall. 
Hon. George Percival Launceston 

Thomas Bowlby Ditto 

Vise. Maiden Lestwithiel 

H. Rosewame Truro 

Wm. Masterman Bodmyn 



222 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTOEICAL SOCIETY. 



pklAT, 



Et. Hon. Ch. Jenkinson 
Sir Grey Cooper 
John BuUer 
William Graves 
Sir Fr. Basset 



Saltash 

Ditto 

Eastloo 

Ditto 

Penryn — Made a 



Baronet the other day, on account of his 
tin and copper, which he supplies Govern- 
ment with, by contract, 
J. Rogers Ditto 

J. Macphersoa Camelford 

J. Pardee Ditto 

William Praed St. Ives 

Abel Smith Ditto 

Lord Shuldham Fowey 

P. Eashleigh Ditto 

Lord Hyde Helston 

Francis Hale Saint Michael's — 

Nephew to the Pay-Master General. 
John Morshead Callington 

George Stratton Ditto 

Sir Wm. James Westloo 

John BuUer Ditto 

John Stephenson Tregony 

John Dawes Ditto 

Derbyshire, 
Hon. Nat. Curzon County — Son of 

Lord Scarsdale, chairman of "committees 
in the H. of Lords. 

Demnshire. 

Charles Boone Ashburton 

Adm. Darbj' Ditto 

Viscount Fielding Beeralston — Son 

of Ld. Denbigh, Master of the King's 
Hounds, Lord of the BedchaiSiber, and 
just made Major of Dragoons. ,' 

Lawrence' Cox Ditto ' 

Sir R. Payne Plympton 

Hon. J. Stuart Ditto — Son of the 

E. of Bute. 

L. Browne Totness — Son of 

his Majesty's Gardener. 

J. Cleveland Barnstable 

Fr. Basset Ditto 

Right Hon. Richard Rigby Tavistock 



Dorsetshire. 



William Ewer 
Hon. Henrv Fane 
D. R. Mitciiell 
Rt. Hon. Welbore Ellis 
Gab. Stewart 



Dorchester 

Lime 

Ditto 

Weymouth 

Ditto — Disposes 



of places in this borough to himself and 
friends, thro' the interest of his father 
Tucker, worth manv thousands a year, 
Wm. R. Rumbold " Ditto 

John Boyd Wareham 

Joseph Gulston Poole 

John Bond Corse Castle 

Sir Francis Sykes Shaftesbury 

Durham, 
Sir Thomas Clavering County 

£ssex. 
T. B. Bramston County 

Hon. G. A. North Harwich 



Gloucestershire. 

Samuel Blackwell Cirencester 1 bkhism 

James Whitshead Ditto j i«»j 

Lord Bathurst, President of the Council. 

Hants. 

Hen. Penton Winchester 

Lovel Stanhope Ditto 

Sir Wm. Gordon Portsmouth 

Hon. J. St. John Newport, 

Sir Richard W'orsley Ditto 

Sir Thomas Rumbold Yarmouth 

E. M. Worsley Newton 

Wm. Jolliffe Petersfield 

T. S. Jolliffe Ditto 

Hans Sloane Southampton 

Ed. Gibbon Lymington 

Hon. John Luttrell Stockbridge 

Serefordshire. 

Rt. Hon. T. Harley County— Contrac- 

torum Generalissimo. 

Sir Richard Symons Hereford 

Vise. Bateman Leominster 

St. Leger Douglas Weobly 



Vise. Hinchinbroke 
Sir Hugh Palliser 
Lord Mulgrave 

Kent. 
Sir C. Frederick 
Sir Walter Rawlinson 
Geo. Finch Hatton 



County 

Huntingdon 

Ditto 



Queensborough 

Ditto 

Rochester 



Lancashire. 
Sir Tho. E^erton County — Col. of 

a Regiment worth lOOOl. a year, which 
his Manchester constituents raised for 
him, and bribed him with, to vote against 
the Liberties and Welfare of his Country. 
He is also a great catch-singer, and friend 
of the immaculate Karl of Sandwich. 
Sir H. Houghton Preston — Favours 

from the Blue Ribbon. Dr. Finch, a Pre- 
bendary of VVestm. 
Ab. Rawlinson Lancaster 

B. Gascoyne, jun. Liverpool 

Hen. Rawlinson Ditto 

T. Davenport Newton 



Leicestershire. 



J. P. Hungerford 
J. Darker 



County 
Leicester 



Lincolnshire. 

Robert Vyner Lincoln — Said he 

would not cry out against paying towards 
the support of the American war, till 
land was taxed 14s. in the pound; and 
yet was the very first complainant of his 
sufferings occasioned by that verj' war, 
viz. in the article of wool. His nephew 
just made Preb. of Canterb. 

Sir Geo. Howard Stamford 

Hen. CecU Ditto 



1866.] TEAS AND NATS ON 6ENEEAL CONWAT'S MOTION. 



223 



H. Sibthorpe 
Francis Eyre 



Boston 
Grimsby 



Monmouthshire. 
Sir John Stepney Monmoutli 

JYifrfolk. 
Kt. Hon. Ch. Townshend Yarmoutli 
J. C. Talbot Castle Rising 

Eob. Mackretb Ditto 

N&rihampfomhire* 
Geo. Rodney Northampton 

J. W. Egerton Brackley 

T. CasweU Ditto 

Northumberland* 
Anth. Storer Morpeth 

Peter Delme Ditto 

Hon. John Vaughan Berwick 

Sir J. H. Delaval Ditto 

Nottinghamshire. 
D. P. Coke Nottingham 

Wharton Amcots Retford 

Oxfordshire. 
Rt. Hon. Lord. Ch. Spencer County 
Vise. Parker Woodstock 

Rt. Hon. Lord North Banbury — The 

Noble Lord in the Blue Ribbon himself, 
who assures the House daily, "he has 
gained nothing by his Place." 

Is being Chancellor of the Exchequer and 
First Lord of the Treasxuy, nothing ? 
Are the Cinque Ports, nothing ? Are 
great Appointments for his Father, Wife, 
Brother, Sons, Brother-in-law, and Cous- 
ins to the third and fourth Generation, 
nothing ? Besides Dependents of all 
kinds, from Sir Grey Cooper to Mr. Bate. 

Are not the Noble Lord's Emoluments, be- 
sides his patronage, 50,0001. a year at 
least? 

Is not the Earl of Guilford Treasurer of the 
Queen's Houshold? 

Is not Lady North Ranger of Bushy Park ? 

Is not Brother Brownlow, Prelate of the 
Garter and Winchester? 

Is not Son Geo. Sec. and Compt. of the Q 
Houshold, Sec. of the Exchequer, and 
has he not a Regiment of Government 
Volunteers? 

Is not Son Fred. Chamberlain of the Tally 
Court? 

Is not Brother Willoughby in the King's 
Bedchamber ? 

Have not Cousin Bagots two Peerages in 
one year, a Bishoprick, Deanery, Collec- 
torship of Middlesex, of itself 40001. a 
year? &c. &c &c. 

Has not Cousin Dartmouth the Privy Seal? 

Cousin Harleys, the Bedchamber, Deanery 
of Windsor, and THE LOANS ? 

Legge's, Digby's, Burgoyne's innumerable 
Appointments of high Rank and Profit, 



down to Whitshead Keene, and little 
Scarsdale, Chairman of Committees ? 
After all, " Is not the Noble Lord commend- 
able instead of culpable, for providing for 
his relations ? " Beit so! Let him not 
however insult the Distresses of his 
Country by pretending, " that a large 
"Stock has not been fattened on the Public 
"Pasture."'^ 

Sir William Dolben University 

Francis Page Ditto 



Rutlandshire. 



G. B. Brudenell 



County 



Shropshire. 
William Pulteney Shrewsbury 

Rt. Hon. Lord Clive Ludlow 

Fred. Cornwall Ditto 

Wm. Clive Bishops Castle 

Hen. Strachey Ditto 

Somersetshire. 

John Townson Milbom Port — 

Salt-petre itself. For this business the 
Directors of the E. India Company meet 
on Friday, to pass judgment on his con- 
duct. 

Hon. A. Poulett Bridgewater 

Mat. Brickdale Bristol 

Geo. Daubeny Ditto 

S. Smith Ditto 

A. Moysey Bath 

Staffordshire. 
Viscount Lewisham County — Son of 

Ld. Dartmouth, Privy Seal, and Coz. to 

the Premier. 
Arch. Macdonald Newcastle 

John Courtney Tamworth 

John Calvert Ditto 



Barne Bame 
Sir James Marriot 
Viscount Beauchamp 
Hon. Rob. Conway 
P. C. Crespigny 
General Phillipson 
A. J. Skelton 



Dunwich 

Sudbury 

Orford 

Ditto 

Aldborough 

Eye 

Ditto 



" Surrey, 
George Onslow Guildford 

Rt. Hon. Lord Newhaven Gatton 
Robert Mayne Ditto 

John Kenrick Blechingley 

Sussex. 

Thomas Fitzherbert Arundel 

Sir Cecil Bisshopp Shoreham 

Sir Sampson Gideon Ditto 

Henry Drummond Midhurst — Con- 

tractor, and one of the Quadruple in the 
Loan 

Sir J. Irwin East-Grinstead 

Herbert Ditto 

J. Wallace Horsham 

Sir George Oabome Ditto 



224 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTOEICAL SOCIETT. 



[Mat, 



Warwickshire. 
Hon. Ch. Greville Warwick 

Lord Sheffield Coventry — Be- 

sides tlie title, has the rank of Lieut. Col. 
Commandant, with a Reg. of Dragoons, 
worth 12001. a year, which his subaltern 
Officers, whose Heads he was put over, it 
is said paid for raising. 
Edward Roe Yeo Ditto 



Wilts. 



Sir J. T. Long 
Hen. Jones 
Lord Courtown 
F. Burton 
Viscount Fairford 



Devizes 

Ditto 

Marlborough 

Heytesbury 

Malmsbury — Son 



of the Earl of Hillsborough, Secretary of 
State, is said to give it as his opinion, that 
next to his Father, he looks upon Bamber 
Gascoigne to be the greatest politician in 
Europe. 



J. Calvert 
K. W. Wraxall 
Hon. Gen. St. John 
William Strahan 
George Selwyn 
Robert Shaftoe 
Hon. H. S. Conway 



Ditto 
Hindon 
Wotton-Basset 
Ditto 

Luggershall 
Down ton 
Ditto 



Worcestershire. 
Rt. Hon. Lord Westcote Bewdley 



Hon. W. Ward 



Worcester 



Yorlcshire. 



Ch. Mellish 
William Chaytor 
Edwin Lascelles 
Ch. Atkinson 

celebrated Cornfactor. 
Hon. J. Phipps 
Hon. Fred. Robinson 



Wales. 



Sir Ch. Gould 
Earl of Lisbume 
John Campbell 

Glynn Wynn 
Lord Kensington 
Whitshed Keene 



Aldborough 
Under Heydon 
Northallerton 
Heydon The 

Scarborough 
Rippon 

Brecon 

Cardiganshire 

Cardigan 

Caernarvon 

Haverfordwest 

Montgomery 



Hugh Owen 
Thomas Johnes 
E. Lewis 

Cityue 
Sir Ch. Famaby 
Viscount Palmerston 
John Ord 
Philip Stephens 
Sir Richard Sutton 
Sir Edward Deering 
Richard Jackson 
William Dickenson 
Hon. Thomas Onslow 
John Durand 
Sir J. Henniker 



Pembroke 
Radnorshire 
New Radnor 

Ports. 

Hythe 

Hastings 

Ditto 

Sandwich 

Ditto 

New Romney 

Ditto 

Rye 

Ditto 

Seaford 

Dover 



Scotland. 
Adam Drummond 
Sir Adam Fergusson 
Sir. J. Anstruther 
Lord Fred. Campbell 
J. Campbell 
Sir Robert Laurie 
Sir Robert Herries 
Rt. Hon. Henry Dundas 
Rt. Hon. Lord W. Gordon 
Robert Skene 
Sir Arch Edmonston 
Rt. Hon. Lord A. Gordon 
George Graham 
States L. Morris 

Johnston 

J. Henderson 

Andrew Stuart 

Francis Charteris 

Sir VV. Aug. Cunningham 

A. Murray 

John Fringle 

Sir James Cockbum 

William Adam 

Hon. Keith Stewart 

Charles Ross 

Hon. J. Wemyss 



Aberdeen, &c. 

Airshire 

AnstrutherWeston 

Argyleshire 

Culross 

Dumfriesshire 

Dumfries, &c. 

Edinburghshire 

Elginshire 

Fifeshire 

Irvine, &c. 

Kincardineshire 

Kinrossshire 

Kintore 

Kircudbright 

Kirkaldy 

Lanerkshire 

Lauder, &c. 

Linlithgowshire 

Peebleshire 

Selkirkshire 

Selkirk, &c. 

Wigton, &c. 

Wigtonshire 

Wick, &c. 

Sutherlandshire 



John Robinson 
Mr. Adam 



Ministry 
Tellers .... 
Total Minority 



215 

2 

217 



ABSENTEES. 



(f) Ackland John 

Ambler Ch. 

Bacon Ed. 

Barwell Rich. 

(/) Bamfylde Sir Ch. 

(f) Barrington John 

Baynton And. 

Benfield Paul 

(/) Bentinck Lord Ed. 



Bridgewater 

Boroughbridge 

Norwich 

Helston 

Exeter 

Newton 

Weobly 

Cricklade 



Nottinghamshire (/) Bullock John 



Bertie Lord Robert 
Boscawen Hugh 
(/) Blake Sir P. 
(/) Bowes A. R. 
(/) Bridgman Sir H. 
(/) Bridgman H. S. 
Burrell Sir Merrick 
Burrard H. 



Boston 

St. Maw's 

Sudbury 

Newcastle 

Wenlock 

Wigan 

Bedwin 

Lymington 

Steyniug 



1866.] YEAS AND NATS ON GENERAL CONWAT'S MOTION. 



225 



(/) Cavendish Lord G. H. 

Coghill Sir John 

Clayton VVm. 

(f) Clerke Sir P. J. 

Clinton Sir Henry 

Coxe Sir Ch. 

(f) Coxe R. H. 

Crawford J. 

Cust F. C. 

Cust P. 

Damer Hon. Geo. 

(/) Dempster George 

Duntze Sir J. 

(f) Dundas Charles 

(f) Button James 

U'Oyley Chr. 

Dalrymple H. 

Eden Sir John 

Eden Kt. Hon. William. 

Elphinston Hon. G. K. 

Evelyn W. 

Eyre Ant. 

(/) FarrerT. 

(f) Fleming Sir Michael 

(f) Forrester George 

(/) Fludyer Sir Sam. 

i'onnereau M. 

Frederic John 

Gascoigne Bamber 

Garden Alex. 

{f) Gal way Viscount 

if) Goddard Ambrose 

Halliday John 

Hamilton Rt. Hon. W. G. 

(/) Halsey T. 

Hervey Eliab 

Hanger Hon. Wm. 

Harris Sir James 

Hudson Giles 

Johnston George 

(/) Keppel Hon. William 



Derby 

Newport 

Marlow 

Totness 

Newark 

Byegate 

Somersetshire 

Dumbarton 

Grantham 

llchester 

Dorchester 

Cuper 

Tiverton 

Orkney 

Gloucestershire 

Seafbrd 

Haddingtonshire 

Durham 

Woodstock 

Dumbartonshire 

Hythe 

Boroughbridge 

Wareham 

Westmoreland 

Wenlock 

Aldborough 

Aldbo rough 

Christ Church 

Truro 

Aberdeenshire 

Pomfret 

Wilts 

Taunton 

Wilton 

Herts 

Maiden 

Christ Church 

Chippenham 

St. Michaels 

Lestwithel 

Chichester 



Leigh T. P. 

Lincoln Earl of 

(f) Lowther Sir James 

Luttrell Hon. H. L. 

Luttrell H. F. 

Luttrell Hon. James 

Mackworth Sir Herbert 

(f) Manners Ld. Robert 

Manners Ld. Robert 

Macleod Lord 

Melburn Lord 

(/) MethuenP. 

Monro Sir Hector 

Moncktoii Hon. Gen. 

Murray Hon. J. 

( f) Noel Thomas 

i^ugent Earl 

Owen Hugh 

(/) Pelham Hon. Hen. 

Percy Lord Alg. 

Pitt Hon. George 

Phillips George 

Purling John 

Roberts John 

Rodney Sir George Biydges 

(f) Ross Gen. 

■Scott H. 

Sinclair J. 

Strutt John 

(/) Scudamore Ch. Fitzroy 

Stuart Hon. Charles 

Trentham Vise. 

Vernon Richard 

Warren Sir J. 

(/) Walpole Hon. Thomas 

'/) Wenman Viscount 

(/) Wilkinson P. 

Wilmot John E. 

Wollaston William 

VVoodley Wm. 

Yorke Hon. J. 



Newton 

Retford 

Cumberland 

Bossiney 

Minehead 

Stockbridge 

Cardiff 

Cambridgshire 

Hull 

Rossshire 

Luggershall 

Bedwin 

Inverness, &c. 

Portsmouth 

Perthshire 

Rutlandshire 

St. Michael's 

Pembrokeshire 

Lewes 

Northumberland 

Dorsetshire 

Caermarthen 

Weymouth 

Taunton 

Westminster 

Cromartyshire 

Berwickshire 

Caithnessshire 

Maiden 

Thetford 

Bossiney 

Newcastle 

Okehampton 

Marlow 

Lynn 

Oxfordshire 

Old Sarum 

Tiverton 

Ipswich 

Marlborough 

Ryegate 



JPrieJKiS to their Country, and y<w Peace with America marked (y") — Absent .... 34 

Total Majority 286 

270 
Besides several independent and very respectable Members who voted in the Minority on 
this occasion — such as Mr. Parker Coke, Mr. Rawlinson, Mr. Rashley, Mr. Whitbread, 
Mr. Darker, &c. &c. 

Ayes 236 

Noes 217 

Absentees 101 

Vacant Seats 3 

Speaker 1 

Total Number of the whole House 658 



N. B. The absent Gentlemen marked {f), with many others less 
known to the Publisher, are distinguished Friends of their Country; and if 
they had been present, it is supposed would have voted with the Majority 

29 



226 MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. [Jubte, 

on this Question, making in all upwards of Two Hundred and Seventy 
Members, in Opposition to, and against the utmost Efforts of the Min- 
ister; who, besides Mr. Secretary Robinson's endearing Lures, cer- 
tainly exerted all his Abilities, Zeal, and Assurances on this Occasion. 
" How are the Mighty fallen ! " — It is worth observing also, there 
were, with the Minister, only Eleven against Sixty-Four County Mem- 
bers in England and Wales who voted for this Question. For the 

Addenda of Places, Pensions, Contracts, &c. see a small Pamphlet 
just published by J. Stockdale, entitled, " Substance of the Charges 
" of Mismanagement on the Naval Enquiry, &c." 

Attendance is only wanting, to complete the Downfal of an Admin- 
istration which every Day brings some fresh Calamity home to the 
Breast of every Man among us. — The single Question now is, Whe- 
ther the Premier and his Dependents shall retain their Places, to the 
final Ruin of the Empire ; or by a Change of Men and Measures, we 
shall regain the Confidence of America, and retain our Properties and 
Importance. 

Printed for J. STOCKDALE, opposite BuKLiifOTON-HocsE, PICOADILLT. (Price Two-pence, 
or Twelve Shillings a Hundred.] 

William V. Wells, Esq., of San Francisco, was elected 
a Corresponding Member. 



JUNE MEETING. 

A stated monthly meeting of the Society was held 
this day, Thursday, June 14, at eleven o'clock, a.m. ; 
the President, the Hon. Robert C. Winthrop, in the 
chair. 

The President announced to the Society, that the 
Recording Secretary, Charles Deane, Esq., sailed for 
Europe on the 6th instant, to be absent for several