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Full text of "Keith's magazine on home building"

tfft Oft 9. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

ON HOME BUILDING 



WITH WHICH IS CONSO 

The Journal of Modern 

MAX L. KEITH, Publish^ 

225 Lumber Exchange - Minnea 



Contents for January 



HOSE FARM, SUMMER HOME OF MR. E. J. LONGYEAR AT LAKE MINNETONKA 

THE ARTIFICIAL LILY POND - - , Vr-*' 

TYPICAL AMERICAN HOMES - 

COMBINATION ARCHITECTURE 

CONCRETE BRICK 

HOW TO PROTECT STRUCTURAL METALS 

PROBLEMS IN CONCRETE 

A SPOKANE HOME 

DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION - 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS ... 

TABLE CHAT 

CEMENT ...... 

PAINTING AND FINISHING 

QUESTIONS ANSWERED ON CONSTRUCTION 

HEATING AND PLUMBING - - - ... 

SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS - 

BOOK NOTICES - ' '\ 




46 
52 
56 
60 
64 
68 
72 
74 
78 
80 



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PUBLISHER'S STATEMENT 

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ing materials of any sort, has any connection, either editorially or proprietary with this publication. 
For sale by all News Dealers in the United States and Canada - Trade supplied by American News Co. and Branches 



Entered Jan. 1 , 1899, at the 'Postoffice in Minneapolis, Minn. , for transmission through the mails as second- class mallet 

COPYRIGHTED lylO 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Vol. XXIII 



JANUARY, 19/0 



No. 



ROSE FARM 



The Summer Home of Mr. E. J. Longyear at Lake Minnetonka 




CARRIAGE ENTRANCE AND POSTERN DOOR 



Courtesy of The Keith Co. 



Lake Minnetonka is justly famed for 
the beauty of the summer homes lining 
its picturesque shores, and Mr. Long- 
year's country place easily takes first rank 
among them. Rose Farm takes its 
name from the truly wonderful rose gar- 
den which forms part of the grounds 
wherein flourish twenty or more varie- 
ties of roses, giving a constant succession 
of bloom not only through the summer 
but yielding royal roses in late October. 

The place is a happy compromise be- 
tween the opposing claims of the idealist 



and the realist. Between the purely ar- 
tistic and the practical, there is supposed 
to be more or less antagonism; the eth- 
ical side the side of pure beauty, is 
often imcompatible with practical needs, 
and we are liable to pay dearly in in- 
creased cost and decreased comfort and 
convenience, for too much subordination 
of the practical to the romantic or ideal- 
istic side. 

It is not, however, impossible to recog- 
nize both of these claims and to intro- 
duce into constructive and practical art 



8 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




that indefinable and inexpressible qual- 
ity which we call the ideal. In truth, 
constructive skill and knowledge is one 
part of the making of an artist, and the 
true architect is both artist and an adept 
in constructive art. This subtle and in- 
definable quality in the architect is what 
gives an architecture of individuality and 
picturesqueness, a dwelling suited to the 
aspects of the nature where it is placed, 
instead of the tiresome "brick boxes with 
slate lids" that so often confront us. 

A lavish nature supplied abundant 
stimulus to the imagination, and fur- 
nished a romantic environment for the 
architecture of Rose Farm. 

The one hundred acres of rolling wood- 
land furnish grounds of great breadth 
and expanse, while giving a delightful 
seclusion to the place which is part of 
its charm. 

The house itself is approached by a 



broad and beautiful drive of perhaps half 
a mile in extent, beneath grand maples 
and elms of "the forest primeval" the 
drive terminating in a broad gravelled 
space before the carriage entrance. Not 
until the house is fairly reached, does one 
realize the extent of the dwelling, which 
from one point of view modestly retires 
behind a slight rise of ground. As a 
matter of fact, the house contains four- 
teen sleeping rooms, two having been 
recently added, with several attached 
bath rooms in addition to the great liv- 
ing rooms, halls and corridors whose ar- 
rangement is seen by reference to the 
floor plans herewith shown. 

In designing the house some of the 
individual conditions for the architect to 
meet included the needs and require- 
ments of a large family, plus the profuse 
hospitality of the owners. 

Mingled with these requirements were 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



haunting memories of the old English 
farmhouses, seen in foreign travel. 
Both the practical needs and the artistic 
feeling were met in the low, rambling 
English farmhouse type of design select- 
ed for the dwelling which fits in so ad- 
mirably with the environment of which 
the surrounding woodland is an essen- 
tial feature. 

The house itself is of shingle construc- 
tion, brown-stained, with relief of cream 
white trim, above rugged and pictur- 
esque cobble-stone 'work in foundation 
and portico piers; the cobblestones being 



neys and cobblestone walls, its many and 
quaintly grouped windows; while the 
"Posterne doore," with its alluring sug- 
gestion of some old English Manor house 
in feudal times, brings to mind Lowell's 
felicitous lines 

"I love to enter pleasure by a postern, 
Not the broad popular gate that gulps 

the crowd." 

Another illustration gives part of the 
water front of the house, which is placed 
perhaps three hundred feet back from 
the lake. A magnificent porch stretches 
across this front and around one end of 




CHIMNEY BREAST OF LAKE BOULDERS IN LIVING HALL 



used for the chimney construction also. 
The soft browns and greys blend with 
the browns and greens of the woodland 
as though they had grown up together, 
furnishing the old-time atmosphere 
which artists strive for. 
"Some people love four careful walls 
And some love out-of-doors." 

It may be readily determined which 
class the owners of Rose Farm belong 
to, as the low, rambling structure of the 
house itself comes into view on the car- 
riage side, with its delightful irregu- 
larity of roof and gable, its rugged chim- 



the house, from where are beautiful wa- 
ter views and from the balcony and cir- 
cular sleeping porch above. From this 
front an ample lawn sweeps down to the 
water, charmingly broken by groups of 
nature trees, their branches throwing 
long, slanting shadows across the bright- 
ness of the lawn. The ground has been 
left in just its natural contour, to sweep 
happily down from the house, without 
the usual attempt to reduce all hum- 
mocks and hollows to an artificial level. 
This fidelity to nature, indeed, and care- 
ful eschewing of "improvements" that 



10 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




FLOOR PLANS OF 
ROSE[.FARM 



5EC=TIP FL?*P PLAM 



would give an artificial air to the place, 
is its most penetrating charm. 

Much money and skill have gone to the 
beautifying of the grounds; but while 
their beauty has not just "happened," 
but is the result of intelligent study of 
each feature and of the place as a whole, 
there is no formal scheme, or artificial 
restraint. In almost every site nature 
herself offers some suggestions or hints 
to the true artist as a basis from which 
to work. Rose Farm, proffered a wealth 
of natural beauty and resource, which 
has been carefully and cleverly incor- 
porated in the general plan. The native 
shrubs of the woods have been utilized 
for decorative purposes. The scarlet 
clusters of the highbush cranberry flash 
fitfully along the drive; brilliant su- 



machs flame in clumps, the delicate pink 
of the bush honeysuckle, the fragrance 
of the wild grape, the graceful bitter- 
sweet vines, tall brakes and ferns all 
have been woven into this fascinating 
scheme of rural decoration which offers 
so many delightful and unconventional 
possibilities. We enter the great living 
hall, 28x30, with its broad staircase at 
one side and massive chimney breast of 
the lake boulders reaching up to the ceil- 
ing at the other, its heavily beamed ceil- 
ing and oak furnishings relieved by 
palms and ferns and pass through onto 
the immense loggia or screened veranda 
of the lake front a place to linger long 
and be loth to leave. The whole loggia 
is tasteful and luxuriously fitted up with 
easy chairs, couches and swinging seats 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



11 



in green wicker with crex porch rugs in 
bright colors. Here and in the balcony 
above the family life is largely lived 
outdoor life being still further provided 
for by the circular dining porch which 
opens from the formal dining room in- 
side. The balcony above the veranda is 
a sleeping porch occupied by the four 
boys of the family. 

Perhaps one of the most attractive of 
the interior features is the long upper 
corridor, with the large window opening 
on the landing. This corridor has the 
walls done in a reproduction of a colo- 
nial landscape paper in blocks, all in 
soft greys, giving a very light and cheer- 
ful aspect. Greys and browns, in fact, 
may be said to form the color scheme of 
the interior, the soft grey of the plaster 
framed in by the brown woodwork and 
relieved by the green and grace of ferns 
and brilliant bloom. 

The sleeping rooms are treated in light 
and delicate tones, the two on the first 
floor being devoted to the mother and 
small daughter. One of the guest cham- 
bers on the second floor called the rose 



room is hung with a cretonne paper in 
a rose design with hangings and bed 
furnishings to match, white furniture 
with rose panels, and white woodwork. 
Another is carried out similarly in the 
nasturtium motif. 

While this delightful home is chiefly 
used in summer, it is kept open the year 
round, for an hour's auto ride brings 
them easily out from the city for the 
beauty of the October days when the 
maples and sumachs flame and all lesser 
garden glories pale before them. Then 
house parties and "week-ends" tax even 
this generous roof-tree, while winter 
snows bring the still greater pleasures 
of ice-boating without and blazing log 
fires within. The view of the house in 
winter was taken on one of these merry 
occasions, and gives a better idea of its 
extent, by reason of the absence of the 
dense summer foliage. 

Summer or winter, Rose Farm is per- 
ennial in its charm. 

"A house of dreams untold 
It looks out over the whispering treetops 
And faces the setting sun." 




LAKE FRONT OF ROSE FARM IN WINTER 



13 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



The Artificial Lily Pond 

By Ida D. Bennett 





Courtesy John S. Bradstreet & Co. 
FOUNTAIN OF LILY POND 

S THE greatest charm of the 
quiet landscape lies in its still 
bodies of water reflecting the 
sky and waving trees, or in its 
rippling brooks or gently flowing river, 
so the garden which adds to its wealth 
a pool of clear and dimpling water, star- 
red over with fragrant lilies, white and 
crimson and rose, casting their shadows, 
with that of the leaves and stems, in the 
depth below, has a charm unknown to 
the garden which lacks this attraction. 
And this appeals, not alone to one's 
aesthetic sense but to the practical in- 
stincts as well for the water lily garden, 
once established, needs little further care ; 
it requires neither to be watered, culti- 
vated or weeded and is, for this reason, 



the garden par excellence for the busy 
man or woman or the invalid whose prin- 
cipal part in the garden is to enjoy. 

No matter how well cared for the re- 
mainder of the garden may be, it is rare 
to enter its precincts without seeing 
something to be done a straggling or 
fallen plant to tie up, a too luxuriant vine 
to prune back, a bed which needs the soil 
loosened or weeds removed and ever, al- 
ways, the need of water. With the lily 
pond no such need exists, or at least it 
is not perpetual and persistent as in the 
earth garden ; once established and start- 
ed in the spring there will be little need 
of further attention ; of course, there must 
be a certain amount of water added from 
time to time to supply the amount lost 
by evaporation and taken up by the 
plants the latter being considerable, but 
the amount lost by evaporation is much 
less than would be supposed, even un- 
der the hottest sun, as the pads of the 
lilies cover the water quite closely and 
prevent evaporation in any considerable 
degree ; and where there is a water sys- 
tem on the place the supplying of water 
is settled permanently as far as the labor 
is concerned as it is only necessary to 
turn on the water and let it flow into the 
pool or to throw it in a fine spray over 
the lilies, cleansing and brightening them 
at the same time that the pool is being 
filled and overflowed. 

Occasionally it will be necessary to re- 
move faded leaves, or even to thin out a 
too luxuriant a growth and that is all, 
except to enjoy and enjoy again this most 
charming of gardens. 

There is a general impression abroad 
that the construction of a lily pond is 
attended with much trouble and expense 
and it certainly is something of a trouble 
in a community where this form of gar- 
dening is unknown, but the trouble is 
largely imaginary, as any mason who is 
capable of constructing a good, water- 
tight cistern can construct a successful 
lily garden and there are many men who 
are not masons who are doubtless quite 
competent to undertake a work of this 
kind, given the necessary detail, and it is 
for the benefit of those who wish prac- 



KEITH S MAGAZINE 



13 




Courtesy John S. Bradstreet & Co. 
A LILY POND IN MINNEAPOLIS 



tical information that will enable them 
to undertake the construction that this 
article is written. 

There are several materials suitable 
for the construction of an artificial pond, 
any one of which may be used, the con- 
venience with which they may be ac- 
quired being the principal element to be 
considered. Stone, brick and concrete all 
being satisfactory if well laid, but it will 
probably be found more economical, 
throughout the greater part of the coun- 
try, to use concrete or cement blocks as 
this may be laid so solid as to insure per- 
fect tightness, which is the first essential 
of success. If cement blocks are used 
they will have to be made for the purpose 
from a special mould, as the pond will 
probably be round and so square blocks 
will not be available. The round pond 
is more practical as it does away with 
corners, which are likely to cause trouble 
and should be avoided. Moreover the 
round pond is far more attractive. 

In constructing the pond the earth 
should be removed to the depth of two 
and a half feet and the diameter of the 
excavation must allow for the thickness 
of the walls eight inches being thick 
enough for brick or concrete walls. In 
laying concrete it will be necessary to 
use a form for the inside of the circle, 
the earth, if hard and smoothly excavat- 
ed, doing for the outer form of the circle. 
A very good concrete may be made by 



mixing dry one part of Portland cement 
and two and one-half parts of clean, 
coarse sand until the mixture shows a 
uniform color and then adding five parts 
of clean broken stone or coarse gravel 
and spraying on sufficient water to bring 
the mass to the proper working condition. 
The broken stone or gravel should be 
thoroughly wetted before adding. Con- 
crete should be used within one hour aft- 
er making and for that reason should 
only be made in such quantities as are 
required for immediate use. The con- 
crete after being placed in position 
should be lightly rammed or tamped until 
the moisture comes to the surface. It 
will be well in laying the sides of the 
pond to extend the concrete over a few 
inches onto the pond bottom and in lay- 
ing the floor of the pond to lap onto this 
as the joint sometimes gives trouble by 
the walls settling more than the floor. 
The floor of the pond is laid last and is 
constructed the same as a cellar bottom 
or sidewalk, using the concrete about six 
inches thick and finishing off floor and 
side walls with a cement of one part ce- 
ment to two parts sand thoroughly mixed 
before water is added and the whole may 
be washed over with a coat of clear ce- 
ment if desired. The walls of the pond 
should extend above the level of the 
ground about four inchs and be neatly 
finished off. There should be an over- 
flow provided for at one side by cutting 



14 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



down the curb into a shallow hollow and 
constructing a drain from this point into 
the adjoining garden or elsewhere. Wat- 
er-loving plants may be placed at the foot 
of this drain and so be supplied with 
abundance of water if the pool is flushed 
daily. It will be necessary to furnish a 
drain to empty the pool in the fall and 
this may be cheaply and easily provided 
by sinking a four-inch tile, or two, if 
necessary, down into the underlying 
gravel, its mouth level with the floor of 
the pool. If, however, there should be 
no gravel beneath the pool a large hole 
three foot or more in depth should be 
dug and filled with gravel into which the 
tile may be sunk. The juncture of the 
tile and floor must be perfect else there 
will be a leak of water. The mouth of 
the tile may be closed with a large wood- 
en plug which has had a small hole, not 
more than three-quarters of an inch, 
bored in it and a round rod, long enough 
to reach above the earth thrust into this 
completes the closing. The wood of the 
plug and rod swelling makes a watertight 
joint and in the fall the withdrawal of 
the rod allows the water to escape. This 
is a very primitive plug but is far more 
effectual than a plumber's trap and has 
the advantage of resisting the curiosity 
of the casual small boy. 

Over this outlet, before placing the 
earth in the pond, a twelve-inch tile 
which has been reduced in length to about 
fifteen or eighteen inches, should be 
placed. This is to prevent the earth set- 
tling about the plug and working into 
the drain when the plug is withdrawn. It 
also is convenient place for letting in the 
water as it will not disturb the soil and 



foul the water as would be the case were 
the stream turned directly upon it. 

The cement must be kept wet until set 
and the sooner the earth and water can 1 
be gotten into the pool after the mason 
work is completed the better. 

The best earth for the growing of wat- 
er lilies is marsh earth or muck mixed 
with well decayed cow manure. This 
should be filled in to the depth of one 
foot and leveled off smooth. Over this 
about an inch of clear white sand lake 
sand is best should be spread as evenly 
as possible. This may be done after the 
lilies are planted and so the surface left 
white and free from anything which, 
would foul the water. The lilies should 
be planted so that their crowns are just 
above the level of the soil. In planting 
the lilies in the bed it will be necessary to 
place broad boards to stand on as the 
soil in the beds is much too soft. Not 
more than Half a dozen plants should be 
placed in a pool twelve feet wide, as they 
spread rapidly and the large floating 
leaves require an abundance of room. By 
the second or third year it will be neces- 
sary to remove a part of these, probably. 

Where there is a water supply the mat- 
ter of conveying water to the pool is sim- 
ple, as it may be either piped there, the 
entrance of the pipe being through the 
masonry and into the tile over the drain- 
age hole or a surface pipe may be con- 
nected by hose with the pool or a stand 
pipe in the center may be furnished with 
a fountain spray and greatly add to the 
attractiveness of the pool, but in this case 
great pains must be taken to make all 
secure about the plumbing or leakage- 
will result. 




Courtesy John S.Bradstreei~&.Co. 
ANOTHER VIEW OF LILY POND 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



15 



Typical American Homes 



By H. Edward Walker 




A COMBINATION OF WHITE CEMENT AND RED BRICK 



OHREE types of American homes 
are shown, in which cement is 
^___ used as an exterior finish, in 
whole or in part. As builders 
become more familiar with the artistic 
possibilities of this material and its prop- 
er application a marked improvement is 
noted. At the beginning of the cement 
era, as it may be termed, workmen were 
timid about producing exterior surface 
effects. Men who had been considered 
finished workmen as plasterers, found 
they had no knowledge of the proper 
method of producing certain kinds of ex- 
terior work. If a dashed surface was re- 
quired, the very^ knack of throwing it on 
evenly was hard to acquire. Only a few 



had the necessary knowledge and dexter- 
ity and these kept it to themselves as 
long as possible. Early contracts taken 
locally were finished entirely by the em- 
ployers, their employes carried the work 
to a certain point and were allowed to 
go no further. But man is imitative. A 
case comes to mind of a close figure giv- 
en by a general contractor on a suburban 
building. The principal cement finishing 
firms wanted a price which, as the con- 
tract was let, meant a loss to the con- 
tractor. A progressive workman was 
found, in the employ of another firm, 
who spent his spare time dashing cement 
upon the foundation of his house, for 
practice. He soon became expert at the 



16 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



work and his firm was able to make a 
price which brought the work through 
without loss. Although no profit was 
made the job was the "open sesame" to 
more important work. 

The work is no longer a secret in the 
larger communities and prices have ad- 
justed themselves somewhat. Competi- 
tion as yet, has had no disastrous results, 
for more of the better class of dwellings 
are being cement coated every day. With 
the early attempts came the demand for 
color in cement. This gave and, in some 
instances, is still giving a great amount 
of trouble. Various methods are now in 
vogue which are fairly successful and 
many pleasing effects have been ob- 
tained. The first illustration shows a 
cement surface of a very plain character, 
used as a body covering with trimmings 
of brick at angles and about the win- 
dows. This arrangement of mate- 
rials of different texture and color is 
almost always pleasing if the de- 
sign is in capable hands. This house has 



a splendid location overlooking the city 
and this probably accounts for the round 
tower effect which mars its whole ap- 
pearance. A covered outlook obtained 
in almost any other way is preferable to 
a tower, except upon buildings of the 
castle type. With this corrected, the de- 
sign would be quiet and dignified; as it 
is the tower of metal looks cheap and 
out of harmony. The second house is 
altogether satisfying. It is in the half- 
timber style, one sees it at a glance, there 
is nothing about it which suggests any 
other style, it is simply but logically car- 
ried out. The use of red brick or pavers 
in wide recessed white mortar joints 
about the porch and lower story, give a 
texture to the wall and a suggestion of 
age, all the more appropriate because of 
the style employed. 

The front gable has a peculiar charm, 
somewhat elusive for exact definition, 
but it seems to be in the treatment of 
the casement window, with its square 
panes and strong muntins. The corbel- 




A SATISFACTORY HALF TIMBER HOUSE 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



17 




AN ALL CEMENT EXTERIOR 



FREMONT D. ORFF, Architect 
H. EDW. WALKER, Associate 



ing below, supporting the beam on which 
the- timbers rest, is very effective. It 
creates a letter A outline of the gable, 
giving expression. A childhood thought 
of houses like faces, possessing expres- 
sion, comes back and seems as real now 
.as then. 

The cement is rough cast which goes 
well with the general tone of the whole 
composition. The shingles of the main 
roof are of stained red cedar but on the 
flat low pitched roof of the porch asbes- 
tos shingles are used, it being a more 
difficult situation, and will last a lifetime. 
A good material once in place is often 
the cheapest thing in the years to follow. 
The plain little gable over the porch en- 
trance is unobtrusive but the wide open- 
ing gives promise of hospitality. The 
remaining house is of interest chiefly be- 
cause it is simple in outline. The shad- 
ows are well cast, a thought which should 
not be lost sight of in design. Although 
not a stable quantity, a proper projection 
gives a shadow, which in its ever vary- 



ing outlines should make a design in- 
teresting. 

The entrance hood is pleasing with its 
gable roof supported on heavy wooden 
brackets on either side. The grouping 
of the front windows in triplicate is a 
good feature and does not cut up the 
wall surface into so many small areas, a 
fault of individual windows. Quaint 
window effects are obtained by the use 
of small rectangular glass panes. 

The buttresses of the front steps with 
their smooth cement caps give a sense of 
permanence and strength to the entrance. 
The cement coat is rougher than is usual 
but not extremely so. On the right is 
seen a house which has a very rough 
surface in harmony with its own archi- 
tecture but which would be out of place 
for the house under consideration. It 
will be seen that care should be taken 
in the selection of cement as an exterior 
coating, not only as a coating, but in the 
more artistic sense of varied methods of 
application, this also in its proper rela- 
tion to the style of architecture of the 
structure. 



18 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A VIEW OF THE COURT 



Combination Architecture 



By Mrs. Kate Randall 

Photographs by F. W. Martin 




E ARE indebted to the Japanese 
for much that is charming in all 
lines of art, and not the least of 
our borrowings is the grace of 
their architecture. When cleverly mod- 
ified to suit our needs, and particularly 
when combined with the Spanish mis- 
sion style, the results are most suc- 
cessful. The broad eaves and sweep- 
ing curves of the long room are 
well adapted to a sunny climate and one- 
story buildings. The best examples are 
either built of solid concrete or have a 
timbered frame entirely covered with the 
plaster, though some very effective 
houses are seen, where the frames are 
partly exposed, merely plastered between 
the joists. Many architects still cling to 
the old terra cotta tiles for the roof, but 
as these have been found almost too 
porous, a metal tile has been successfully 
substituted, but the latest fancy seems to 
be the use of Malthoid as a roof covering. 
This is a very heavy building paper, 
which comes in large sheets and is nailed 



to the roof boards lapping well over the 
edges of the wide eaves. It is said to be 
very durable when kept well painted, and 
is certainly very effective, having the ap- 
pearance of a heavy lead sheathing. The 
Japanese mission ' combination is well 
brought out in the house illustrated. The 
heavy beams and projecting timbers, the 
hanging balconies and pagoda-like roof, 
are entirely Japanese, while the plastered 
walls and central court suggest their 
Spanish origin. 

It has but one story, with the excep- 
tion of two pagoda-like towers, which are 
raised somewhat above the general level 
of the roof. The tower in the center, di- 
rectly back of the courts is a part of the 
den or smoking room, a few steps lead- 
ing off to this very charming roof parlor. 
The other tower, at the southeast corner 
of the house, is used as a sleeping porch 
and is easily accessible from the sleep- 
ing rooms below. From the center of the 
court, one enters a square hall the main 
entrance of the house. Opposite this 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



19 




THE ENTRANCE 



entrance is the den or smoking room, at 
the right the dining room and on the left 
the very large living room. The windows 
of this beautiful room command a view 
that is rarely surpassed and the archi- 
tests are to be congratulated on their suc- 
cessful arrangement of windows and big 
stone fireplace. 

The exquisite finish of beamed ceilings 
and woodwork is a feature of the whole 
house and particularly of this room. 

Projecting wings form the sides of the 
court, and from the living room, a long 
hall runs the length of the south wing, 
with many casement windows opening 
into the court. Bed rooms, dressing rooms 
and bath rooms are well arranged, leading 
from this hall, which ends in a large room, 
the southeast corner of the house. Adjoin- 
ing it is a most complete nursery with its 
own bath and diet kitchen, and above 
these, the sleeping porch mentioned be- 
fore. Leading directly from the corner 
bed room and convenient to the nursery, 
there is a large porch on the south, quite 
away from the main entrance and chance 
callers. It forms a delightful out-of-door 
living room. The north wing is entirely 
devoted to butler's pantry, kitchen and 
servants' rooms. They have their own 
entrance, away from the court, into the 
kitchen garden on the north. 

The timbers of the roof and all ex- 



posed beams are treated with some prep- 
aration which produces the effect of age. 
The silvery tone of old sandal wood the 
beautiful volcanic wood of Japan all 
other exterior woodwork, frames of doors 
and windows, etc., has a slight trace of 
green in the natural oil finish so slight, 
however, that one barely recognizes it as 
a tint. 

This harmonizes well with the green 
tint of the plastered walls and the artistic 
door of the main entrance carfies out 
the same scheme of green in its opales- 
cent glass, set in heavy brass mouldings. 

The court is paved with large red tiles. 
There is a beautiful central pool and 
fountain, surrounded by palms and feath- 
ery bamboos. Low, comfortable seats 
fill the spaces beneath the windows, but 
the most attractive feature of all is the 
sense of dignity and repose which per- 
vades the whole a feature unfortunately 
lacking in many of our modern homes. 

However perfect a house may be archi- 
tecturally, its success, as a whole, is made 
or marred by its setting, and how often 
one must wait many years for this per- 
fect setting to mature. In this case the 
owners were fortunate enough to possess 
a fine old orange grove with a back- 
ground of towering eucaliptus trees, need- 
ing but the touch of an artist's hand to 
combine the old and the new into a most 
beautiful home. 



20 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Concrete Brick 

A Building Material of the First Class 
By Warfield Webb 




TWO PLEASING DESIGNS 




MONO the materials that are 
finding favor with builders of 
modern structures, concrete 
brick claims its share of just rec- 
ognition. The fact that this form of 
building material has thus far been 
adopted by a proportionately small num- 
ber of constructors, is due more to their 
ignorance of the real merits of a prop- 
erly made concrete brick than to any 
fault that might be possessed by the 
material itself. This is made plain when 
it is understood that there are many ad- 
mirable features in .connection with a 
well made concrete brick, that are not 
possessed by many forms of structural 
material on the market today. 



Like other commodities that are not 
understood, or that have been presented 
to the people in the wrong light, con- 
crete brick have been held in abeyance 
by many w,ho were skeptical, simply be- 
cause they did not know the real value 
of this material for structural purposes. 
It is often said that there is no merit in 
a concrete brick, but the author of the 
statement is nearly always one who has 
no real knowledge of what is meant by 
a concrete brick, made on a machine that 
has merit to perfect an article that will 
equal the best clay brick made. 

This sounds like a very elaborate and 
a very unsound statement, but the facts 
are borne out by practical demorstra- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



21 



lions, and the greater adoption of con- 
crete brick is certain to be the outcome. 
It is not the object here to decry clay 
brick, but to prove that the concrete 
brick, if it has been made with care, is 
equal to and nearly always superior to 
other building materials. How to obtain 
this result is the secret that must be 
gained with pains and sound judgment. 
It is a fact, and the same results that 
are being outlined today by a limited 
number of operators, can be accom- 
plished by others who are willing to 
learn. 

Primarily, the first essential to the per- 
fect concrete brick is the best materials 
obtainable. These can be had, but care 
must be exercised in their selection. 
Portland cement that is of the best qual- 
ity; clean, sharp sand, and either gravel 
or crushed stone, or many other aggre- 
gates, for that matter, may be used and 
the desired results obtained. With the 




ORDINARY CONCRETE BRICK 

materials should be united a modern 
plant. By this is meant a plant equipped 
with the best concrete brick machines, a 
steam tunnel, and first class mixer. This 
does not necessitate a great outlay of 
capital, and the plant can be operated 
upon an economical plan that will keep 
the expenses reasonably low. 

For backing brick a mixture of three 
to five can be used and the result will 
be ample for the purpose. There is not 
much care needed in the manufacture of 
these brick, and they can be used in 
ordinary work, giving the same results 





ATTRACTIVE FACES OF CONCRETE BRICK 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



as ordinary clay brick, save that they 
are harder and more durable. For fac- 
ing brick, however, which will combine 
many styles, there is more care to be 
taken, and a mixture of not less than one 
to five should be used. One man can 
turn out from three to five thousand face 
brick per day, or even more, if he is an 
expert, and as many as twenty thousand 
backing brick can be manufactured by 
five men in a day of ten hours. The lat- 
ter brick are made on power machines, 
which are operated automatically and 
are naturally time savers. However, the 
chief use for concrete brick now is for 
face brick, because the possibilities of 
manufacturing them in a variety of faces 
and colors is so great that there is a 
wider field for the activities of the oper- 
ator. 

One of the prime objects in favor of 
the concrete brick is the comparative 
cost of these and clay brick. It is safe 
to assert that the concrete brick can be 
manufactured cheaper than clay brick, 
for ordinary brick, and far less in pro- 
portion to the more attractive styles of 
clay face brick. There is, however, an 
item that must be considered carefully in 
the manufacture of concrete brick and 
that applies to the operation of the ma- 
chine itself. In manufacturing concrete 
brick, particularly face brick, the ma- 
chine should be operated with the face 
upward so that the varying styles can 
be perfected in this way. Where the 
face of the brick is down, one has no 
opportunity of manufacturing brick that 
will be noted for their attractive faces, 
and also there will be no possibility of 
making the face altogether waterproof, 
this being done by trowelling or floating 
the brick, an operation of the machine 
itself. This is only possible on an up- 
face machine. 

When the brick are taken from the ma- 



chine they should be loaded on tram 
cars and placed in the steam tunnel, 
which should not vary in temperature 
more than 100 degrees or less than 75, 
the moisture and heat simply being suf- 
ficient to gradually cure the brick with- 
out causing them to dry out before crys- 
tallization has taken place. The ordinary 
way heretofore used of curing the con- 
crete brick was by moistening them at 
repeated intervals, which is very uncer- 
tain, unless done by an experienced man, 
and then not nearly as satisfactory as 
when done in the steam chamber. On 
the other hand it will require longer time 
to cure the brick by wetting them in this 
way than by steam curing them, the lat- 
ter operation requiring only from twelve 
to twenty-four hours to complete the 
work. 

Note the tensile strength of clay and 
concrete brick. Tests have been made to 
prove that concrete brick can withstand 
considerably more pressure than clay 
brick. The granite test is three thou- 
sand pounds and concrete brick have ex- 
ceeded this by over two thousand pounds 
per square inch. Their ability to with- 
stand fire, moisture and frost has been 
made so plain that no one who has seen 
the tests can longer doubt or dispute the 
fact that there is real merit in a concrete 
brick that has been made with care by 
the operator. 

While there might be a possible danger 
in concrete work as applied to mono- 
lithic, reinforced or block, the likelihood 
of danger in using a well made concrete 
brick is placed at the lowest minimum. 
The small unit is an item in favor of 
this and this is only obtainable in the 
brick form. Concrete brick will come, 
but education must make this possible, 
and a first class article will add to the 
earlier advent of this "most modern form 
of structural material. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



23 



How to Protect Structural Metals 

Courtesy of O. C. Harn 

( Continued Series as formerly run in the Journal of Modern Construction.) 



Article III 

What Red Lead Is and How It Is 
Made. 

Red lead is an oxide of lead and if of 
theoretical purity, contains 90.65 per 
cent, of lead. Its formula is PbsO* and 
apparently it is plumbate of lead, formed 
by the combination of peroxide of lead 
(PbO*) and litharge (PbO). It is a red 
powder varying in color from a light or- 
ange to a dark red. 

Metallic lead is melted and, in the 
molten condition, is slowly oxidized to 
litharge. This litharge is a more or less 
yellow substance and, for the purpose of 
making red lead, should be as free from 
crystals as possible. The litharge*is fine- 
ly ground and then placed in a rever- 
beratory furnace and subjected to a low 
red heat. At this temperature it slowly 
absorbs oxygen and is converted into red 
lead according to the following equation : 
3PbO+O= Pb.O. 

The oxidation of litharge to red lead 
is never complete; that is to say, it is al- 
most impossible, in the present state of 
the art, to oxidize all of the litharge to 
red lead. 

There is one form of red lead, using 
the term in its generic sense, which is 
made by the oxidation of white lead. 
This is known as orange mineral, and, 
on account of its original fineness and 
its amorphous condition, is more readily 
oxidized and, consequently, usually con- 
tains a lower percentage of litharge than 
'red lead made from metallic lead. 

The temperature at which litharge is 
manufactured is ordinarily above 1,600 
F. The temperature at which litharge is 
converted into red lead is between 900 
and 1000 F. If the temperature is ma- 



terially below 900, little or no oxidation 
takes place. If it is materially above 
1000, the red lead gives up oxygen and 
is converted back into litharge. 

Red Lead Should Be Fine and Highly 
Oxidized. 

For painting purposes, red lead should 
be as fine as possible. If it is not suffi- 
ciently fine, it will tend to run when 
mixed with linseed oil and it will have 
an inferior covering power. Red lead 
should be oxidized as highly as is rea- 
sonably possible; that is, it would appear 
that a red lead which contains over 90 
per cent, red lead and under 10 per cent, 
litharge makes the best combination for 
painting purposes, and the standard of 
quality should be placed at this figure. 

The color of red lead depends to some 
extent upon the purity of the pig lead or 
other materials from which it has been 
made. If made from a reasonably pure 
pig lead it will have a bright, clean color. 
The difference in depth of color depends 
largely upon its fineness. The finer the 
red lead, generally speaking, the more 
inclined it is to an oragne color. The 
coarser the red lead, generally speaking, 
the deeper will be the red color. Red 
lead, if finely ground and made from un- 
vitrified stock, should to the naked eye 
show only occasional glistening particles. 

No Mill Necessary In Mixing. 
In the preparation of paint by mixing 
red lead with linseed oil the use of a mill 
is unnecessary. The red lead mixes read- 
ily and can be stirred into the oil so as 
to obtain a suitable paint with littl dif- 
ficulty. It has some tendency to settle 
out of the oil, so that the paint should 
be occasionally stirred during its use. 



24 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



If the red lead contains a high per- 
centage of litharge, this litharge is apt 
to act on the oil, forming a lead soap 
and, when allowed to stand for any 
length of time, occasions hardening in 
the bottom of the keg or barrel in which 
it has been mixed. If, however, the red 
lead is finely ground and contains less 
than 10 per cent, of litharge, the ten- 
dency to harden is not great; so that the 
paint mixture containing such a red lead 
can be allowed to stand several days 
without becoming hard enough to pre- 
vent its being readily blended with the 
oil again. 

In the preparation of red-lead paint, 
raw linseed oil can be used, or a mixture 
of raw linseed oil and boiled oil in the 
proportion of two of raw to one of boiled 
oil. It is preferable not to use any liquid 
drier, as that contains a volatile thin- 
ner, such as turpentine, which tends to 
impair the working qualities of the paint. 
Generally speaking, the amount of red 
lead to be used in the preparation of red- 
lead paint should be as large in propor- 
tion as possible in order to obtain the 
best results. Thirty-three pounds red 
lead to one gallon of oil is recommended 
as a general proportion, although' twenty- 
eight pounds to the gallon of oil may be 
found more practical under some condi- 
tions. A reduction in the amount of 
pigment should be made only when the 
circumstances of the case particularly 
demand it. 

Red Lead's Relation to Linseed Oil. 

The nature of the relation between red 
lead and linseed oil in paint is a matter 
of some dispute. It is believed by some 
that red lead forms a cement by combin- 
ing with the linseed oil. It would seem, 
on the other hand, that this combina- 
tion only takes place in proportion to the 
free litharge present and not between the 
red lead and the linseed oil. 

It appears also that much of the char- 
acter, of red-lead paint is given to it by 
the effect the red lead has upon the dry- 
ing of the oil, the lead and the oil dry- 
ing all the way through, while a manga- 
nese drier dries on the surface. It has 



been suggested that the boiled oil used 
with red lead should contain no manga- 
nese. This may be a good practice. It 
seems more likely, however, that the 
amount of lead present is sufficient to- 
overcome any tendency towards surface 
drying given to the boiled oil when man- 
ganese is present in it. 

The Uses of Red Lead. 
One might cover the uses of red lead 
as a protective paint for metals in the 
words : "Wherever metal is used." It 
may be profitable, however, to enume- 
rate some of the more important fields- 
in which a protective paint is required 1 
and call attention to some of the consid- 
erations peculiar to each. 

Structural Iron and Steel. 

The architect and engineer are proba- 
bly more vitally interested in the proper 
paint for metal work than any other class 
of paint users, for more serious conse- 
quences, follow a mistake upon their part- 
Not only may vast sums of mone)'- be lost 
through the imperfect protection of the 
iron and steel skeletons of their struc- 
tures, but human life itself hangs upon 
the proper preservation of those great: 
steel frames.' 

An architect or an engineer may cor- 
rectly figure the stress and strain, and 
the manufacturer may conscientiously 
turn out steel of the finest strength and 
quality, but unless rust is kept from the 
columns, beams and girders, the strong, 
safe skyscraper of today may become a 
death-trap a few years hence. 

An excuse which might pass muster if 
only ordinary business risks were in- 
volved is utterly inadequate to defend 
the use of a substitute for red lead. 

Thus one sometimes hears an excuse 
like this : "Yes, I know red lead is the 
best paint for metals, but what I use is 
more convenient and I guess it does pret- 
ty well." 

In the face of what is at stake, it is 
scarcely conceivable that any responsible 
man could make two such admissions in 
the same breath, namely, that "red lead 
is the best," but "I am using something; 
else." 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



25 



Probl 



ems in 



Concrete 



By H. Edward Walker 

(Continued Series as formerly run in the Journal of Modern Construction.) 




Article XIII 

AVING taken up the subject 
of foundation walls and their 
construction in concrete it is 
fitting that walls above grade 
be next considered. 

A few of the different methods are here 
presented and to the practical mind, 
variations of their construction will be 
suggested to meet special requirements. 

The walls shown are suitable for 
dwellings in thickness and for larger 
buildings where piers are placed at 
proper intervals. The construction 
would be of service in most any case 
by varying the thickness of the walls. 
No attempt is made to illustrate special 
construction, only typical wall sections 
being shown. Illustration A is of a 
monolithic concrete wall in the center 
of which a two-inch terra cotta tile has 
been placed to form an air space. 

This idea was carried out in three 
houses, one of which appeared in Article 
XII. The houses were built on grounds 
the whole length of a city block and are 
now about five years old. The entire 
wall was poured between two fourteen- 
inch planks and the tile was inserted 
by hand, as each batch was poured. The 
tile was placed with the interspaces run- 
ning lengthwise of the wall. There 
would seem to be some advantage in 
placing the tile end for end, forming a 
vertical air space from bottom to top. 
Good ventilation of the entire wall would 
thus be obtained and it is not likely that 
the strength of a properly built wall 
would be sufficiently impaired to make it 
unsafe for dwelling houses. This would 
be an item for consideration in larger 
structures if this method was adopted. 



As it is the wall has been dry, no com- 
plaints having been heard in the five 
years of its history. The internal and ex- 
ternal faces are shown in plaster and 
cement finish. 

Illustration B is a similar method, in 
which the tile is placed upon the inner 
surface of the wall. This would be an 
advantage in removing the inner form, 
the planking being unable to stick to the 
tile. In this case the tile would not be 
considered as a factor in the strength of 
the wall and should be placed with the 
interspaces in the upright position, to 
provide ventilation where desirable. The 
union between the tile and the concrete 
will be of such a character that the posi- 
tion of the tile is not important. There 
is no special reason for using terra cotta 
tile, rather than cement tile, if the lat- 
ter can be obtained as readily in a given 
locality. This method is used in an ar- 
tistic house built at South Orange, N. J. 

Illustration C shows concrete tile as 
a building material. It comes in a vari- 
ety of sizes and can be given an external 
surfacing, after the wall is built, or not, 
as may be thought desirable. Internally, 
the usual coat of plaster is applied di- 
rectly to the tile. The blocks may be 
laid up in ashlar effects either regular, 
facer and binding courses or random, by 
using tile of different sizes. Four and 
eight inch are sizes commonly used to 
produce these effects. Many very de- 
sirable houses have been built of this 
material and the exterior walls were 
made eight inches in thickness. All the 
interior partitions were made of tile four 
inches thick and twelve by twelve 
square. This material may be properly 
classed as concrete because the aggre- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



gate is of concrete, mixed to suit the 
conditions necessary to produce a hol- 
low thin walled block. 

The fire resisting qualities of this 
system are of the best and in like 
manner its resistance to cold. 

Illustration D shows a concrete brick 
facing, backed up with a six or eight inch 
cement tile wall with plaster directly 
upon the inner surface. 

Concrete brick has not been very at- 
tractive in appearance until lately, al- 
though its strength and durability have 
long been recognized. Experiments 
along the line of artistic surfacing, col- 
oring, and a judicious use of aggregates 
have made it possible to produce some 
surprising results, the beauty and artistic 
worth of- some of the better specimens 
being beyond question. A wall of this 
kind allows the use of all the pattern ef- 
fects obtainable, by the use of clay 
bricks, but also requires the service of a 
skilled bricklayer. 

The brick is bound to the tile backing 
with metal wall ties, at intervals, in ad- 
dition to the mortar and may be erected 
simultaneously, or independent of it if the 
ties arc inserted in the material first 
erected. 

Illustration F shows the ordinary 
monolithic concrete wall as ordinarily 
poured in forms, with an outer finished 
surfacing of cement of a character, as 
may be desired. At the time of pouring 
wires were placed between the boards 
at intervals that they might become se- 
curely imbedded in the concrete, leav- 
ing a free end upon the interior surface 
of the wall. In this way expanded metal 
lath, having a high rib at regular dis- 
tances on centers, can be attached, on 
which to plaster. The presence of the 
high rib keeps the plastering away from 
the concrete wall, forming an air space 
which prevents frost from penetrating 
to the finished wall surface of the room. 
This method of solving this problem is 



a good one and might even be applied 
to a wall already built. It would be 
necessary to plug the wall in order to 
attach the wires for the lath, unless they 
had already been provided. 

Illustration F is a section through a 
wall composed of cement blocks. No 
attempt has been made to show any par- 
ticular system of block construction. 
The underlying principle is the same, 
that of a central air space surrounded 
by inner and . outer walls of the block. 
The better designed systems aim to have 
no block extend entirely through the 
wall, that frost may not be conveyed to 
the inner surface. This has been over- 
come in a great many ways, one system, 
comes to mind, which has a continuous 
block, but it contains a double air space. 
In adopting any concrete block system, 
this point should be looked into with 
great care. If after a thorough explana- 
tion it cannot be demonstrated that frost 
will not penetrate, that system, if used, 
must be backed with a plastered wall 
as in illustration E, to insure a dry wall. 
It is not necessary to use metal lath 
for this purpose, as furring strips and 
wood lath will answer, but of course 
are not fireproof. A metal lath is better 
galvanized, if there is considerable damp- 
ness coming through the wall. 

Architects have held aloof from the 
cement block for a long time, because 
the early blocks, in most cases, possessed 
neither artistic beauty or stability. Like 
a great many new" things, misleading 
statements were made, which caused a 
great amount of comment. Men who 
had never used a bag of cement in their 
lives looked into the matter and con- 
ceived the idea that there was a fortune 
within reach by mixing almost anything 
with cement, in the form of blocks. 

As a result block appeared on the mar- 
ket of a color resembling mud com- 
monly seen in the street and of a facing 
utterly impossible for anything but the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



27 



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28 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



most ordinary structures. In many 
cases, if the block did not actually 
crumble, it soaked water at each storm 
to such an extent, that the wall was wet 
for days after. Manufacturers of block 
machines added their quota to the trouble 
by making facings which were not log- 
ical or artistic. Often a rock face was 
produced which in itself was good, but 
when each and every block was identical 
the wall lacked the variety seen in a 
real stone wall. Utterly absurd was the 
casting of several brick together in one 
block. No possible amount of pointing 
up could make it look like a real brick 
wall because the joint between the 
blocks were always apparent, cutting en- 
tirely across the bricks that should have 
been continuous. This was even car- 
ried out in cobble stone effects, which 
are seldom well done even with the real 
article. These things kept the cement 
block from getting a foothold as a build- 
ing material and many honest-minded 
people couldn't see why, because the dif- 



ficulties required special training to ob- 
viate. Architects came in for a great 
deal of unmerited criticism, but this did 1 
not make the blocks more attractive or 
influence artistic judgment. .There is- 
just enough of the impracticable about 
the first class architect to make him place 
his profession and the artistic execution, 
of his work before his own personal in- 
terests. For these reasons it was difficult 
for the cement block to get the right 
start. Progressive men took hold of the- 
matter with a view of finding out, if the 
trouble existed, what it was. Soon the 
requirements of the architects were con- 
sidered and today the cement block,, 
properly made, is a thing of beauty and' 
may be used to advantage in important 
work. 

At the cement show at Chicago next 
month every conceivable variety of block 
will be seen, showing what a great ad- 
vance has been made from those early 
mixtures of mud and inexperience. 
(To be continued.) 



A Spokane Home 

By Courtesy of Keith & White house, Architects 




POKANE, a city of 125,000 peo- 
ple, lying in a great fruit coun- 
try, is surrounded with suburban 
acre tracts. These tracts con- 
tain the homes of many who are lovers 
of the country life and freedom, yet 
whose business is in the city which is 
easily reached by the suburban electric 
lines. 

The illustrations shown are of such a 
home built at Glenrose, six miles from 
the center of Spokane. The house faces 
east on Cherry Lane. This lane derives 
its name from the fact that each side is 



bordered with cherry trees which give 
forth their beauty of bloom in the spring 
and shade and abundance of fruit in the 
summer. 

The house nestles close to the western 
side of a bluff sixty to seventy feet high, 
and commands a beautiful view across a 
small valley dotted with suburban homes 
and orchards, through which runs the 
electric railway only a quarter of a mile 
distant from the house, then beyond the 
valley is a rising eastern slope and high 
beautifully timbered hills. 

Here one may live, 'mid fresh air and 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A NORTHWEST BUNGALOW 



flowers, sunshine, gardens and fruit, free 
from the city's smoke, noise and bustle, 
free from the heavy burdens of city tax- 
ation and mistaken social obligations, 
yet so close, only twenty-five minutes' 
ride to the center of the city, that none 
of the city's pleasures and conveniences 
need be foregone. 

This six-room home is modest yet com- 
plete in all its appointments. 

The rustic stone of the piers of the 
porch and walls and chimney base was 
picked up with moss clinging to it from 
the nearby bluff. The stone is laid up 
in black mortar with recessed joints, 
leaving the stone work with an extreme- 
ly rough face. 

The facing of the chimney is of clinker 
or cull brick. These bricks are twisted 
and many are melted together, giving 
off pleasing bright colors from their sur- 
faces, where the intense heat of burning 
has caused a glazed surface. 

The outside main walls are of narrow 
siding, painted a light gray, the trim is 



painted ivory white. The gable panels 
are finished with a fine screened gravel. 

All porch floors are of cement, as are 
also the entrance and carriage steps. The 
porch balustrate is of rough plank, sawed 
in a pattern and stained a soft green. 

The roof shingles are stained a soft 
green. 

The front bedrooms open onto a 
screened sleeping balcony. 

All windows of the second story and 
attic are casements, hinged to open. 

The main rooms are finished in curly 
fir, stained and waxed. 

The living room has a wood cornice, 
chair rail and corner panel piece. The 
south wall is taken up with a built-in 
brick fireplace at one side of which is a 
built-in book case and on the other a 
writing desk. Above the book case and 
writing desk are leaded casement win- 
dows. 

The north end of the living room is 
given up to the entrance vestibule and 
stairway. These are separated from the 



30 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




VESTIBULE AND STAJ&WAY FROM LIVING ROOM 



main room by a double column opening. 

All the "finish is plain with scarcely 
any moulded work. 

The dining room is shut off by sliding 
doors. The rear wall is taken up by a 



simple sideboard and built-in seats on 
either side. 

The second floor gives three good 
sized rooms and bath. There is ample 
room in the attic for one additional room. 




THE LIVING ROOM FIREPLACE 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



31 




THE DINING ROOM SIDEBOARD 



The main floors are maple; others are 
of fir. 

The basement floor is cemented and 
ceiling is plastered. 

The basement contains a hot air heat- 
ing and ventilating furnace, vegetable 
room and fuel room. 

In the kitchen is a dumb waiter, run- 
ning to the vegetable room. Built-in 



cases in the kitchen give ample storage 
for all dishes. Provision is also made 
for flour and meal bins, utensil cupboards 
and drawers. 

The owner has a fine water supply by 
a windmill and cement tank back on the 
bluff at the rear of the house. 

The sewerage is drained to a cesspool. 

The cost of the house as described was 
about $4,500.00. 




32 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




FUMED WOODWORK, WITH DULL YELLOWS, GREENS AND BLUES IN DECORATION. 




WITH SIMPLICITY AS A KEYNOTE. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



33 



Designs for the Home -Builder 




ITH so many beautiful and suit- 
able designs, available from 
many sources, it is a matter of 
regret that so many people make 
a poor selection. Almost any publica- 
tion, of popular interest, contains de- 
signs of up-to-date pleasing dwellings. 
Architects have made great strides in 
recent years, in the conception of home 
ideas. A client is no longer advised to 
build a house in a certain style because 
it happens to be the fad. 

After the requirements of a family have 
been considered, as to the number of 
rooms necessary, some thought should 
be given to the best style of house to 
build on the lot which is to contain it. 
A level lot with few trees or none at 
all may have a house on symmetrical 
lines in a distinctive style, suitable to 
formal effects. Where trees abound and 
the land slopes to different levels, a 
rambling picturesque habitation is best. 
A careful study of all the conditions is 
necessary. Often important items are 
not considered at all. A certain style is 
decided upon and as long as its arrange- 
ment meets the requirements, no further 
thought is given. It may be entirely out 
of place in the setting it receives, how- 
ever appropriate in other situations. In 
selecting a design try to know all the re- 
quirements. 

Design "BIOS." 

The outside walls of this house, in- 
cluding porch walls, are of monolithic 
concrete, 12 in. thick and provide for 
a 2-in. air cell, formed by the insertion of 
2-in. planks laid horizontally in the form 
and drawn as the walls are constructed. 

The basement walls are solid mono- 
lithic concrete, and all floors and roof 
reinforced concrete. Gutters and eaves 



will be of reinforced concrete. Beam 
work over veranda and loggia will be of 
concrete, a %-in. iron rod being im- 
bedded in each beam for reinforcement. 

All outside walls and ceilings are plas- 
tered directly on the concrete. Interior 
partitions consist of metal studs and wire 
lath. 

The roof is covered with Mission dull 
glazed tiles. 

The window and doer frames are of 
wood. 

The interior trim is of clear, plain 
white oak in the first floor, except serv- 
ice portions and kitchen, which will be 
of yellow pine. The second floor is 
trimmed in birch. All finished floors 
throughout the building are of clear red 
oak, except attic, kitchen, and service 
portions, which are of yellow pine and 
maple. First floor woodwork is stained 
and filled and given a coat of shellac and 
a coat of flat varnish. 

All other woodwork is either enam- 
eled, or given three coats of good inter- 
ior varnish. Plaster is sand finish and 
stained with pure pigments and glue, 
the whiting, as in kalsomining, being 
omitted. 

The exterior exposed walls of the 
building are of an ivory tint, produced by 
introducing the color into the concrete in 
liquid state. Trimmings outside to be 
cream color. 

The veranda, vestibule and loggia 
floors are of concrete marked to repre- 
sent tile, coloring being introduced with 
the concrete in liquid state. The design- 
er estimates the cost at about $8,000. 
Design "B106." 

This unique house is built at Berkley, 
a suburb of San Francisco. The outside 
walls and roof are of cedar shingles. The 



34 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



trimmings are of redwood treated with 
several coats of outside varnish. 

Clinker brick is used for the external 
portions of the chimney laid in very un- 
even courses. 

The cantilever effect of the porch is a 
prominent feature of the design. The 
balconies at the third story are used for 
flower boxes. The interior finish is of 
slash grain pine throughout, designed 
with as few mouldings as possible. The 
floors of the principal room are of oak. 
The corner windows, rough sand stone 
mantel and the book cases, take up the 
entire space of the front wall. Over 
the book cases are small windows filled 
with a Japanese fibre design of birds, be- 
tween two pieces of glass. A new idea 
successfully carried out. 

Of the four chambers, two have stained 
woodwork and two ivory enameled. The 
bath room and pass closet have tiled 
walls. The architect places the complete 
cost at $6,500. 

Design "B107." 

A dark brown stiff mud brick forms 
the base of this house up to the sill 
course of the windows. Above this com- 
mon brick is used and is given a stucco 
finish. The exterior woodwork was used 
direct from the saw and was stained a 
dark brown. 

The interior finish is of stained Texas 
pine and vertical grain Texas pine floors. 
The walls are tinted. There is no fur- 
nace. The architect states that it cost 
$2,000, and it certainly is a very pleasing 
little home. 

Design "BIOS." 

Artistic is the term to apply to this 
charming home. Its details are classic" in 
outline and have been very carefully 
worked out, which gives the house style 
like a well tailored garment. The com- 
bination of materials adds much to the 
success of the design. Shingles or sid- 
ing used about the porch and walls to the 



level of the second story windows, is 
joined to a cement finish above. 

The entrance porch is unique in its 
treatment but very pleasing with its 
composition and ornamentation. 

The house contains reception room, 
hall, sitting room, dining room, pantry 
and kitchen on the first floor. 

There are four good chambers, a dress- 
ing room and a bath room on the second 
floor. 

The finish of main rooms of first story 
is white oak or birch with pine painted 
for the balance. A hot air furnace is in- 

4. . 

eluded in the estimate. The cost, as 
above described, would be about $3,800.. 

Design "B109." 

A house suitable for a narrow lot, is 
often hard to find with rooms of good 
size, but in this case the problem has 
been very nicely worked out. The house 
is cement coated and has a moderate 
amount of half-timbering. The design 
is simple and the solid effect of the porch 
piers give it an air of strength. The 
first floor contains vestibule, hall, living 
room, dining room, kitchen, pantry and 
entry. 

There are four good chambers with 
bath room, linen closet and stairs to at- 
tic on the second floor. The interior fin- 
ish is of birch. 

The cost, $3,800, is the architect's esti- 
mate, complete with hot water heat. 

Design "B110." 

This is a cozy little home of six rooms 
and bath, all on one floor. The rooms 
are good sized and well lighted. 

The entrance is made directly into the 
living room. At one end is the fireplace, 
on either side of w;hich is a cozy seat, 
with casement windows above. 

At the other end of the living room 
or the opening into the dining room is 
a beamed ceiling effect under which are 
built-in bookcases, opening into the liv- 
ing room. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



35 



The dining room is fitted with a built- 
in sideboard which has ample space for 
china above, enclosed with leaded glass 
doors, and drawers and cupboards below 
for linen, silver, etc. At the end of the 
dining room is an oriel bay with four 
casement windows, an ideal place for 
potted plants. 

The kitchen has a built-in buffet and 
dish closet with ample space for cooking 
utensils of all kinds. The back door 
opens to an enclosed porch which is ar- 
ranged to house a refrigerator. 

The den makes a cozy sanctum with a 
wide, generous window seat. 

The bedrooms are of good size and 
have spacious closets. 

The bath is fitted with porcelain en- 
ameled fixtures and is close to the bed- 
rooms. 

Off the hall is a linen closet with 
shelves and drawers'. 

The attic is a storage space. 
The basement can be either full or half 
height. 

Hot water heat is installed. 
As shown by the cut the house is fin- 
ished, on the exterior, with shingles to 
the window sills and from this point up 
the walls are plaster stucco on metal 
lath. A panel timber effect is worked 
in on the front gable. 

$3,500 is stated by the architects to 
have been the cost in Spokane. 

Design "Bill." 

This pleasing little design is of interest 
because it is out of the ordinary. The 
exterior walls are of brick dashed over 
with cement and the roof is of shingles 
stained red, forming a pleasing contrast. 
The quaint windows and picturesque 
flower boxes give an old world flavor 
which is very charming. The plan is ex- 
cellent and the interior is finished in 
Georgia pine. 

With furnace heat and modern plumb- 
ing the architects estimate the cost at 
$2,500. 



Design "B112." 

A square brick house on simple lines 
possesses a quiet dignity of its own. This 
house is of that order. The approach and 
entrance is quite imposing, one-third of 
the width of the house being devoted to 
the steps, up from the lawn level. The 
front door opens to an ample vestibule 
and through this the hall is reached with 
its beamed ceiling, stairway and open- 
ings to reception room, living and dining 
rooms. These rooms are of generous size 
and each contains a fireplace so situated 
that it forms part of a vista, from one 
room to another. There is also a large 
kitchen, pantry, back stair and toilet 
room on this floor. The reception room 
and bath room are in white enamel, the 
kitchen and pantry in natural chestnut 
and the rest in quarter sawed oak. There 
are four chambers on the second floor 
those in front being in. stained birch and 
the two at the rear in white enamel. 
There are two bathrooms on this floor 
with numerous closets. The attic stair 
is located over the back stair, opening 
into the rear hall. 
The cost is estimated at $12,000. 

Design "B113" 

This beautiful house has been admired 
by a great many people. Its quiet dignity 
wins it a place in the memory, as one of 
the best designs of recent years. It has 
all the old time simplicity and beautiful 
detail of the genuine Colonial. It would 
be difficult to overestimate it, considered 
in its proper use and environment. 

It is not a large house, but it requires a 
wide lot for a proper setting. Its entrance 
is the central feature and it dominates the 
whole elevation by reason of its pure classic 
detail. The porches at either side give 
breadth and character, while the generous 
width of low hung cornice casts a pleasing 
shadow on cool, gray cement walls. The 
clinging vine finds a ready foothold on its- 
rough surface, giving the house a dignified 

(Design descriptions continued on page 39) 



86 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Thornton A. Herr, Designer 

By Courtesy of Universal Portland Cewent Co. 



DESIGN "B 105" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



37 




u u LI u u a 




SKETCH OF A LIVING ROOM WITH RECESSED SEAT. 



38 



KEITH S MAGAZINE 




DESIGN "B 106" 



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KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



39 




DESIGN "B 107 " 



A. E. Sanders, Architect 



air of age. The hall and living room are 
finished in a flat surfaced white, with 
mouldings of the best Colonial period. A 
concession is made to the prevailing cus- 
tom, in making the woodwork of the din- 
ing room of dark English oak. 

The fireplace of the living room and the 
sideboard of the dining room are placed 



in juxtaposition as regards the whole 
scheme of arrangement, that a vista may 
be obtained in either direction. The kitch- 
en and pantry are conveniently arranged 
with reference to the dining room and 
contain a model modern equipment. 

There are front and back stairs, the 

( Design descriptions continued on page 40.) 




40 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




The Keith Co., Architects 



DESIGN "B 108' 



latter entirely separate from the main por- 
tion of the house, on both floors. 

There are four chambers and bath room 
on the second floor with balconies over 
the porches. 

The rooms are well supplied with clos- 
ets and the whole arrangement is compact 
with no space wasted. 

The large chamber, bath and hall are fin- 



ished in white and the other rooms in 
natural birch. All floors are of hardwood 
except the tile floors of vestibule and bath 
room. A hot-water plant is included with 
radiation concealed as far as possible. 

The house proper has a frontage of 40 
feet .and a varying width from 19 feet to 
32 feet. It is estimated that the house 
could be built locally for about $6,000. 



KITCHEN \/ PANTRV 

10 . DINING- ROOM 




SECOND FIDO? PLAN* 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



41 





Arthur C. Clausen, Architect 



DESIGN "B 109 " 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




DESIGN "B 110 



Keith & Whitehouse, Architects 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



43 




DESIGN "B 111 



Edwins & Eichenfeld, Architects 





44 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE HOME OF G. A. HERMANN, ROSEBERG PLAN, BELLEVUE; 



DESIGN "B 112" 





KEITH S MAGAZINE 



45 




Exterior by Wood, Donn & Denning, Architects 



DESIGN "B 113 " 





46 



KEITH'S M AGAZI N E 




Conducted by Eleanor Allison Cummins, Decorator Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Other Phases of the City Apartment. 

AST month we had something to 
say about the decoration of the 
square type of apartment, with 
special reference to an apartment 
with a northern exposure, suggesting a 
liberal use of the warmer tones of tan, 
yellow and terracotta. In this issue we 
will consider the same type of apartment, 
but with sunny rooms. 

The Value of Gray. 

Gray has two qualities : It reflects and 
it recedes. Both recommend it for small 
rooms, where both light and space are 
limited. It is a mistake to think of gray 
as always a cold color. Some grays are 
cold, the purple grays and the blue grays, 
and the pure grays formed by the mixture 
of white and black. A purple gray is 
frankly out of the question for any dec- 
orative purpose, cheerless by day, ugly 
by artificial light. Pure grays are good 
backgrounds for pink and red tones, best 
of all for the charming combination of 
pink roses and blue ribbons. The blue 
grays are in a class by themselves, valu- 
able as a setting for certain sorts of pic- 
tures and china, not to be mixed up with 
other colors by any means. In fact it is one 
of the things decorators have learned of 
late years that cold colors have a beauty 
of their own, that effects other than those 
of warmth and cosiness are to be sought 
for. 

Warm Grays. 

But there are several tones of gray 
which are to be classed as warm. Gen- 
erally the warm tones are made by the 
admixture of a certain amount of yellow. 
Add a little green and you get sage. Or 
a very little red gives a pinkish gray, 
which is a pleasing background. Still, 



at its warmest, gray is hardly the tone 
for a north room, unless it is to be used 
for a studio or some similar purpose 
which subordinates all merely esthetic 
considerations. An exception might also 
be made for merely summer rooms, or 
those in warm climates in which even 
the northern light is more or less suf- 
fused with sunshine. Then too there is 
the room which is a background and 
nothing more. I recall a northern room 
with white woodwork and cold gray 
walls, chosen specially for the setting out 
of some very beautiful old red curtains 
of damask and of many warm toned 
pictures. The gray wall merely accen- 
tuated the warm tones. 

Three Rooms in a Line. 

As in the case of the apartment con- 
sidered last month, we will take for 
granted dining room, parlor and bed- 
room, all in a line and opening into one 
another. Instead of having the coloring 
of each room tone into the others, they 
shall be alike only in one point, that of 
the wall for which we will choose a warm 
gray cartridge paper of the tone best de- 
scribed as putty color. 

This sort of a gray goes well with 
either fumed oak or mahogany wood 
work, and is an admirable background 
for bright colors. An illustration of this 
is the frenuent use of it as a ground fo 
fine French brocades and tapestries, and 
for the effective printed linens made in 
England. With this gray wall the ceiling 
should be gray, a tone just off white, 
warmed with the merest suspicion of yel- 
low. In the dining room, it should be 
carried down on the side wall to meet a 
plate rail, or at least a heavy moulding. 
The pictures in a dining room should 
never be numerous and the dropped ceil- 
ing furnishes the walls, even if a plate 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



47 







Houses of Concrete 

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repairs, are cool in summer, warm in 
winter, and combine the qualities of 
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'Concrete Country Residences' ' (out of print) 2.00 

'Concrete Cottages' ' sent free 

'Concrete Construction about the Home and 

on the Farm" sent free 

'Reinforced Concrete in Factory Construction" delivery. .10c 

'Concrete in Railroad Construction' ' $1.00 

'Concrete in Highway Construction" l.OC 

'Concrete Garages' ' sent free 

I! your dealer cannot supply you with ATLAS, write to 

THE ATLAS PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

Dept. L. 30 Broad St. New York 



Illl 

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Samples of any special line mailed upon request 

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FAB-RIK-O-NA Wall Coverings are recommended 
and sold by all first-class decorators. 




In This Charming House 

All the windows are CASEMENTS 
twinging out, convenient, practical 
and a joy and comfort to the owner. 
With one hand he can unlock, swing 
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and he does NOT have to open the 
screens. 

Our beautiful FREE Booklet tells why 

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Record-Herald Building CHICAGO 



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48 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



rail is not used. The writer's personal 
feeling- is that a plate rail is advisable 
only in a room with very much broken 
walls or in one which is specially built 
and furnished for a collection of china. 
The succession of small plates, often of 
inconspicuous design, at a considerable 
height above the eye line is neither inter- 
esting nor harmonious. Better have a 
group of really good specimens on some 
section of the wall, where they can be 
examined with ease. 

Arabian Net Curtains. 
With grav walls, use curtains of Ara- 
bian net, next the pane, finishing them 
with a two-inch hem at sides and bottom, 
providing them with simple cord and tas- 
sels, so they can be looped back at will. 
Nothing is so undesirable in an apart- 
ment as elaborate arrangements of cur- 
tains. One must be screened from in- 
trusive neighbors, but let the screening 
be as simple as possible. If another set 
of curtains is desired let them be long 
ones of some thick material, hanging 
straight from a pole to the floor and push- 
ed far back at either side of the window. 
In our gray dining room we might use for 
the purpose Old-Style moreen, which 
comes in the soft gray of old damask, and 
has the merit of being very reasonable 
in price, seventy-five cents a yard, double 
width. As it is rather stiff, the lower 
hem should be weighted. 

The Floor. 

As we have said before, the ideal treat- 
ment for the floor of a small dining room 
is to leave it bare, giving the stained 
floor as high a polish as possible ; H you 
must have any covering at all, lay down 
two or three small Oriental rugs. In 
choosing them avoid those of strong 
tones of color. They seldom fade har- 
moniously and the trail of aniline dye- 
stuff is over the modern Oriental rug. 
The Furnishings. 

The choice of furniture should be gov- 
erned by the woodwork. If the finish is 
golden oak, mahogany is out of the ques- 
tion. Moreover, most mahogany furni- 
ture is too large for apartment rooms. 
Of the various woods on the market, 
fumed oak is probably the most a satis- 
factory. For the very tiny dining room, 
one can get a circular table with three or 



four chairs so shaped that they can be 
slipped under the table, projecting only 
the width of the thickness of their backs. 
And for a small dining room, a large buf- 
fet is preferable to a sideboard. 

Whether the furniture be oak or ma- 
hogany, covers for the sideboard, or serv- 
ing table, and a centrepiece for the dining 
table when not in use effectively made of 
heavy gray crash or homespun linen, 
more or less elaborately embroidered in 
heavy silk or mercerized cotton. If the 
furniture is mahogany, this embroidery 
is effective in orange browns with a touch 
here and there of gray blue. With oak, 
gray green is the better choice. Covers 
of this sort seem better adapted to a room 
constantly on view than starched white 
linen, besides keeping clean much longer. 
Complete the room with two or three 
brown toned photographs, one or two 
bits of copper to catch the light, and for 
the rest depend on your china. 

The Combination of Green and Gray. 

The decorator has always admitted to 
being a heretic on the subject of green 
as a general decorative panacea, never- 
theless in the parlor, keeping to the gray 
walls, she would lay a plain rug of low 
toned green, a grayish olive if possible. 
From choice, she would have Louis 
Seize furniture with grayish white paint- 
ed frames and cane backs, the seats cover- 
ed with a green and white striped frabric, 
what the French call toile. 

Failing this she would acquire an old 
parlor suit of French design, the sort of 
thing which, in black haircloth, was com- 
mon enough twenty-five years ago, have 
it enameled and upholstered with the 
same striped fabric. One large armchair 
she would have, overstuffed and covered 
with silvery green linen velour, or cotton 
velvet. A tabouret and a couple of small 
tables should also be enameled, and for 
the tables and as a scarf for the mantel 
she would use soft green brocaded silk, 
edged with a narrow fringe. One of the 
tables she would devote to bits of silver, 
the tabouret should hold a fern in a green 
jar, and the mantel should boast a pair 
of silver or plated candlesticks and a 
porcelain clock. On the walls she would 
hang at least one mirror in a white frame, 
delicate engravings or etchings in the 
simplest of narrow black frames, and 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



49 




OLONIAL houses 
demand simple 
treatment in 
hardware orna- 
mentation. A 
design in French 
Renaissance or 
L'Art Nouveau would be 
incongruous. For homes 
of Colonial Architecture, 
Sargent & Company 
provide a wide range 
of choice in hardware 
trimmings. 



Sargent's 



__ 
Hardware 



adds not only to the artistic beauty of any home, but increases its selling 
value as well. The vast superiority in appearance and the wearing quali- 
ties of Sargent's Hardware more than offset any slight increase in cost 
over inferior goods. Even if the most expensive goods are selected, 
the cost of the hardware is but a small proportion of the total cost of 
building. 

Sargent's Book of Designs Sent FREE 

illustrates a number of hardware patterns especially for homes of Colonial 
Design. But among the seventy and more styles pictured can be found 
designs appropriate for any style, period or architectural motif. In addition 
to the Book of Designs we will send free to anyone requesting it our 
COLONIAL BOOK showing Cut Glass Knobs, Knockers, etc. Address 

SARGENT & CO., 151 Leonard St., New York 



SPECIAL OFFERS 

To the Subscriber for 1910 

\V7E are desirous of seeing every purchaser of our books also a subscriber to Keith's Magazine 
and therefore make the following very attractive combination offers. If you have already 
ordered a book and wish to come in under one of these offers, send the difference. 

KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Subscription for one year 

With 100 designs Bungalows and Cottages - $1.50 

With 100 designs Medium priced houses, costing $2,000 to $4,000 2.00 

With 100 designs Concrete Houses, English Half Timber. 2.00 

With 100 designs- Attractive Homes costing $4,000 to $10,000 2.00 

With 74 designs Typical American Homes, costing $3.000 to $5.000 2.00 

With 72 designs Typical American Homes, costing $5.000 and up . 2.00 

With 40 designs Duplex and Double Houses, (Flats ..-.. 1-50 

With Practical House Decoration (162 pages) illustrated .'.... - 2.00 

With 182 Beautiful Interior Views .".'.: :.:......,. 1-75 

With any (2) dollar books I publish - 2.75 

With any (2) books I publish (including 100 designs, Bungalows and Cottages 3.00 

These offers have a greater value than ever on account of the enlargement of the magazine, 
increased to 80 pages for January 1910 number. 

MAX L. KEITH, Publisher 

399 Lumber Exchange Minneapolis, Minnesota 



60 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



little groups of powdered ladies in oval 
silvered frames. 

Nosegay Borders. 

Since the dining room is soberly dig- 
nified, the parlor dainty, the third room 
shall be gay, and we will begin by choos- 
ing a flowered paper border, something 
quaint and old-timey. As borders are 
made now, we shall be likely to find what 
we want as the stripe of paper by the roll. 
The ceiling shall drop only a little, say 
nine inches, to the gray side wall, and we 
will carry the border around the door 
frames, the window frames and just 
above the surbase. This is a revival of 
an old fashion. 

For the furniture we will choose rat- 
tan or wicker, painting it gray, a trifle 
darker than the wall. Or if the wood- 
work is dark, use the gray brown of 
fumed oak. Then make everything 
bright with a linen taffeta or a printed 
linen, choosing one with a grayish ground 
and a pattern of brightly colored flowers. 
Use this for straight curtains hanging 
from a pleated valance, for loose cush- 
ions, for a table cover and to cover a 
high four-fold screen. If the room must 
be used as a sleeping room, a folding 
iron cot, one of the sort which doubles 



up in the centre, can hide decorously be- 
hind the screen. If it is only an addi- 
tional sitting room the screen is a charm- 
ing bit of furniture, standing across a 
corner as a background for a big fern, or 
a tea table. But remember that to con- 
ceal anything effectually a screen must 
be four-fold. The three-fold screen may 
protect from a draught or temper the 
light but it does not conceal. 

The floor may have a square of gray 
terry, securely fastened down with rug 
pins, or it may be partially covered by a 
white or gray goatskin rug. Unless one 
is unhappy without pictures the walls 
had best be left bare, except for a mirror 
or two. 

Making the Furniture Help. 

A good deal can be done by a discreet 
disposition of the furniture. Do not let 
a large piece of furniture, such as a couch 
or a piano, follow the , long lines of the 
room. Stand the couch at an angle to the 
fireplace, with a screen behind it. Let the 
upright piano turn its back to the company 
across a corner. As far as possible, make 
two centers of interest in the room. 

Another help is to use two medium sized 
rugs, rather than one large one, neither 
large enough to conceal the floor, but leav- 
ing a generous margin of polished boards. 




AN ANTIQUE BUFFET. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



51 



WOULD YOU LIKE 

Home 



A Bright, 

Original, 

Attractive 



With Your Own Individual Ideas as the Key 
Note of the Design 




OUR $5.00 SKETCH OFFER 

On teceipt of $5.00 and a rough diagram or des- 
cription of your own ideas we will make a special 
study of your requirements and prepare the first 
and second floor plans accurately laid out to a scale 
with a picture of the exterior of the house as it 
would appear when completed, advising you of the 
additional charge for Complete Working Drawings, 
Specifications, E f .c. . which will be as low as is 
consistent with the labor involved. This offer 
applies to residences only costing not over $5,000 
and is made simply to demonstrate to you the value 
of competent services in interpreting and rendering 
practical your original ideas so that the home 
will be a complete success in every detail. 

' ' There is no art to find the mind's construc- 
tion in the face.'" Macbeth. 

-BUT- 

' ' The dwelling a man builds, reveals his per- 
sonality, and through its halls and porticos 
runs the story of his life." 

Now if the problem be given proper consider- 
ation, it means time and time is money. We 
would be speedily overwhelmed with requests if this 
were a free offer, consequently it is not free. No 
signed contract is asked for. We propose to make 
our work so pleasing and satisfactory as to demon- 
strate beyond a question that the best is certainly 
the cheapest for you. The fact that houses built 
from our designs sell advantageously when built 
proves they are practical and desirable. This is 
an important matter should you wish to dispose 
of your property. 

Our latest books of plans with costs, sizes, etc. , are : 

100 Small Cottages and Bungalows... .$ .50 

98 Estimated Cost to Build $ 800 to $1200 50 

136 $1200 to $1600 1.00 

186 $1600 to $2000 1.00 

226 $2000 to $2500 1.00 

191 $2500 to $3000 .1.00 

207 $3000 to $4000 1.00 

154 $4000 and upward 1.00 

THE KEITH CO., Architects 

1721 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, Minn. 




COLONIAL 
MANTELS 



MadeofOrna- 
mental Brick 



<fc 1 
^ 



and 
UP 



fll Last longest look best are not too costly. 
^-|| There's no other kind so good so pleasing. 

|| Our Sketch Book tells all about them. 

|| Write for it before you build or remodel. 

PHILADELPHIA & BOSTON FACE BRICK CO, 

P. O. Box 8518, BOSTON, MASS. 



MAILED 
FREE 

Book 107 IN 
56 pages of 



STAIRWORK, 
ETC. 

EVERYONE 
INTERESTED 
IN BUILDING 
SHOULD 
HAVE IT 

WRITE TO-DAY 

We Sell to Dealers 
Only 




52 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of 
Keith's Magazine. Inquiries pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the 
attention of an expert in that line. 

Letters intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing De- 
partment, and be accompanied by a diagram of floor plan. 

Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general interest 
will be published in these columns. 



"H. C. Please advise me about paper- 
ing and painting our house. It is a two- 
story frame house, 29x31 feet, on the 
'square' order, with many pretty win- 
dows. The first story has wide siding, 
the second story narrow, a hip-roof with 
dormer windows on sides and front open- 
ing into the attic. A wide porch in front, 
enclosed with the narrow siding, from 
ground to two feet above the floor. Faces 
south with no trees in the yard. Tell me 
how to have it painted? I have an idea 
it would be pretty with one story paint- 
ed dark green and the other white, with 
white trimmings around the windows of 
the dark part. Another member thinks 
it should be brown below and white 
above. If painted in two colors would 
it look better to have the dark color be- 
low or above, or would you advise us to 
have it all one color, white for instance? 

"Reception hall is on the southwest 
corner and is about 11x11 feet; living 
room is on the southeast and is 13^x16 
1-6 feet. There is a beam and pillars be- 
tween this room and the hall. Back of 
the living room is the dining room, with 
double sliding doors between. It is 12x 
14)4 feet and has windows on the east 
and north sides. The rooms are nine feet 
high, the floors and woodwork oak, all 
well lighted; even the hall contains sev- 
eral windows. Please tell me how to 
have them papered." 

Ans. H. C. It is advised to use one 
color for the entire body of house. A 
deep ivory is suggested with trim the 
same, green roof and green window 
shades. 

The rooms being small and all connect- 
ed, it is advised to use green tones in 
the living room, a mixed pepper contain- 
ing green, soft reds and light browns in 
the hall and golden browns and creams 
in the dining room. 



A. H. L. My dining room furniture 
is toona mahogany and I want a color 
scheme to harmonize with it. Rugs and 
standing wood can be anything you say. 
Living room in close connection by large 
opening. 

The rooms are well lighted, though 
facing north and of course the living 
room must tone in well with the dining 
room. 

Ans. A. H. L. As to the information 
desired by you, would say that toona 
mahogany in the natural finish is a dif- 
ficult proposition, as nowadays furniture, 
wall coverings, etc., are made to harmon- 
ize with the stained wood. In your case, 
you are prevented from giving the furni- 
ture a setting of blue or green, which 
make good contrasting treatments for it, 
by the northeast facing, as the effect 
would be too cold. Accordant tones 
must be used in these rooms and this 
treatment, if properly carried out, would 
give a very artistic result. 

Cherry woodwork finished natural, 
would be most in harmony for the stand- 
ing wood, with birch floors. There are a 
few things in rugs and wall paper that 
would carry out .these rooms in accord- 
ant tones admirably. There is a paper 
in the softest of creamy terra cotta 
tones, with a fine design in the darker 
tone on the lighter ground, at 75 cents a 
roll for the living room and there is a 
Wilton rug matching this paper perfectlv 
in a 9x12 size for ^$40.00. The dining 
room wall for 6 feet up could be tinted 
plain, to match the living room paper, 
with a deep, pinkish cream above the 
plate rail and a frieze decoration of fall 
leaves in reddish browns, light greens 
and soft dull reds, a-t the top. The rug 
here could be either the same as living 
room or a mixture of soft dull greens and 
terra cottas. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



53 



ttll 

pleasures 
and 

palaces 




like 



It is the 

interior furnishing 
and finishing that makes 
a house a house that makes 
a home the most delightful place in 
the world. Even more important than the furnishing is 
the finishing of the woodwork. 

The finest oak or the costliest mahogany, unless properly 
finished with the right materials, will prove a poor invest- 
ment. On the other hand, ordinary pine, where properly 
finished, is both beautiful and attractive. 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

will develop the natural beauty of any woood costly mahogany, finest 
oak, or ordinary pine. They emphasize Nature's artistic markings of 
the grain, and never raise, obscure or cloud them. 

Men who know wood finishing architects, builders, furniture, piano 
and car manufacturers, etc., use Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes in 
preference to all others. They give a smooth, tough, elastic finish 
that will stand the test of time without signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

"MODERN WOOD FINISHING" Write for it. 

This book was prepared by our corps of expert wood finishers. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with plates of finished 
wood in natural colors. Every builder should have a copy of this book. 

Simply write the request on a post card and 
we will send you the book by return mail. 



The BRIDGEPORT WodD FINISHING c 

S.|uNE^VMlLFORD.CONN 

CHICAGO BOSTON 






54 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to Questions Continued 



"]. W. S. I am building a new home 
in Muskogee, Okla., and I want to ask 
about wall paper and draperies. The. 
house fronts west and has a large west 
porch; rooms rather small and the ceil- 
ings are 10-foot ones. The entire lower 
floor has hardwood floors, and the wood- 
work is weathered oak. The front hall 
is 13x16 feet and will be used as a living 
room. It has glass doors in west end, 
and two large south windows, one of 
them on the stair landing. Mission fire- 
place and the furniture is Craftsman. The 
rugs are orientals, two shades of tan, soft 
green and some red. What shall I use for 
curtains and what for wall decorations? 
Opening out from hall on north through 
a columned opening is a music room fur- 
nished in mahogany. It has large west 
and north windows oriental rug in 
shades of tan with some yellow in it. 
Opening from this room is the library. It 
has oriental rug, prevailing shade old 
rose. Only one window, a large north 
one, in this room. Furniture, Craftsman, 
with two pieces of green wicker. Will 
you suggest curtains for these two rooms 
and colors for wall paper? Also por- 
tieres, which I wish to be heavy enough 
to insure privacy when drawn. Opening 
out from the hall at east end is the dining 
room. It is furnished in early English, 
very massive and handsome. Has large 
east window and twin windows on south 
forming an alcove. I have a heavy velvet 
brussels rug, light tan background with 
small floral design in red, green and 
brown in subdued colors. Would you 
wainscot the walls and use plate rail? 
I have a large china case and many beau- 
tiful plates and steins. What would you 
suggest for walls, and for window cur- 
tains? Should I use portieres at folding 
doors between dining room and hall? 
Dining room, music hall, library and hall 
are to be heated by grates. What would 
you advise using for buffet cover and din- 
ing table when latter is not in use? Do 
you like stenciled decorations?" 

Ans., J. W. S. Taking up the lower 
floor first in general, it is advised to car- 
ry a rather uniform treatment of wall 
tones through the entire floor both on ac- 
count of their being thrown together by 
the wide openings and because of the 
woodwork. The only difficulty is with 



the mahogany furniture of the music 
room, which should have had a happier 
setting than weathered oak. The room 
can be given a most pleasing wall treat- 
ment in sympathy with its character and 
the furniture. The tones of the rug will 
help, unless the yellow mentioned is 
prominent; we will hope it is the yellow- 
ish cream of the orientals. The wall pa- 
per suggested for this room is the softest 
of pale ecru backgrounds quite well cov- 
ered with a design soft of garlands, en- 
closing a small lute, all in oyster white. 
There is no color. It is proposed to use an 
oyster white ceiling tint and draperies and 
furniture coverings of soft, rose and 
ivory. This paper is just being used upon 
a music room here in the city with charm- 
ing effect. It does not clash with the 
wood finish ; it tones in with the rug and 
is a lovely setting for the mahogany. But 
the accessories must be carefully chosen. 
A plain Eltonbury paper in the library, 
back in a putty color, will be a good back- 
ground for pictures and books, also for 
the warm rose shades of the rug carried 
into the other furnishings. Velour por- 
tieres in the deep, plain rose will har- 
monize with both rooms and hang heav- 
ily. 

There is a fine paper in deep putty 
grey having a rough textile surface and 
carrying a conventional design in a dark- 
er tone which would be admirable in the 
hall with the oriental rugs and weathered 
oak. A dining room paper has been de- 
scribed before in these columns, showing 
a frieze decoration in dull blues and 
greens on a tan ground which meets per- 
pendicular vine on each edge of the pa- 
per and there is also a low dado 16 inches 
high above the baseboard of the same 
foliage with soft old red poppies inter- 
mingled. With your ten-foot ceilings this 
could be used to advantage. Or, you 
could have a dull green lower hall and 
a plate rail about 6 feet from floor, above 
it^ a plain soft ecru wall with foliage 
frieze of green, brown, etc., leaves. The 
plain space above the plate rail would 
be a fine background for your china. 

In regard to curtains, etc., they are 
difficult to suggest without samples. 

In regard to stencil decorations, it is 
seldom they are well enough done to be 
artistic. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



55 




THE MAN WHO DID NOT BUILD A HOUSE FOR 
HIS WIFE 





No need to shake, shove hard and get all out 
of patience trying to open that sliding door. Un- 
necessary to have it stick, bind and get off the 
track. Specify or order immediately 

THE ALLITH RELIABLE ROUND TRACK 
PARLOR DOOR HANGERS 

You'll surely come to it later. 

The Allith alone gives you absolute freedom 
from all sliding door annoyances. They are a step 
in advance of all others. No other parlor door 
hanger runs so smoothly and so noiselessly. The 
wheel is brass bushed and steel cased with hard 
fibre tread. The bearing is anti-friction. The 
hanger and plate for attaching to the door are sup- 
plied in either malleable iron or wrought steel. 
The adjusting screw has an extra long bearing in 
f/ame of hanger which makes a ve*y strong and 
positive adjustment. The adjusting screw can- 
not work loose and is easily regulated without 
removing door casing. 

The round steel track with tightly fitting inside 
supports is of the best possible construction. The 
sagging or warping of walls, floors, or doors does 
not in any way affect the perfect working of this 
hanger. 

When building or remodeling your home don't 
fail to have your sliding doors equipped with these 
hangers. They mean a permanent end to all your 
former sliding door troubles. 

Insist that your architect specify Allith Reliable 
Parlor Door Hangers. 

Local Dealers sell them. If yours should not 
happen to, write us for particulars also kindly give 
name of your architect. Please let us hear from you. 



ALLITH MFG, CO, 



4321 West Taylor St, 
CHICAGO 



56 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 







OT HOUSEHOI/D ECONOMICS HI 



JSL 




The Art of Resting. 

ATIGUE is incidental to all 
healthy exertion. It is nature's 
danger signal, advising that the 
point of pernicious activity has 
been reached. In fact, the absence of 
physical fatigue is sometimes a dangerous 
symptom, an indication that the individu- 
al is living on his nerves. People of 
acutely nervous temperament sometimes 
get to a point where they seem to be 
wound up, to be able to go on indefinite- 
ly without muscular weariness, a con- 
venient condition in times of stress, but 
hardly desirable as a permanent state. 

But fatigue implies the necessity of 
rest and very few people understand the 
art of resting. Babies and cats do and 
they are a convenient object lesson. Lift 
the paw of a sleeping cat and note the 
absolute relaxation of the muscles, the 
entire absence of tension. Just in pro- 
portion as the adult can acquire the 
faculty of physical relaxation is he able 
to, rest effectively. The maintenance of 
tension is fatal to rest. 

Mental and Physical Tension. 

Tension to most women suggests the 
sewing machine, the too tightly drawn 
upper thread snapping with the motion 
of the needle bar. But muscles and nerves 
do not snap, they only stretch pain- 
fully. The weary muscle responds to 
the insistent will, the exhausted brain cell 
does its share of the work, but sooner or 
later the retribution comes, a calamity 
by no means to be remedied by the turn 
of a screw. 

This condition of tension is one of the 
incidents of the stress of our modern life, 
the life in which for many of us, the de- 
mands are so much more than we can 
meet. To change the condition is be- 



yond the power of any one person. The 
only thing to do is to cultivate the habit 
of moving along the line of least resis- 
tance and when motion ceases, to rest, 
thoroughly and completely. 

Rest is the cessation of work, it is also 
the cessation of thought about work. You 
do not rest effectually when your muscles 
are quiet and your brain cells in a state 
of agitation. Only as all activity ceases 
are you in the condition to let the neces- 
sary work of repair go on. Every 
thought, every restless motion is so 
much hindrance to the beneficent work. 
Only as you hold both in check do you 
attain perfect relaxation. And this hold- 
ing in check is not an action but a state, 
the dismission of all disturbing thoughts, 
the emptying of one's mind, so to speak. 
Entire cessation of thought is a matter 
of training but one can let one's^ mind 
wander at will, following out a chance 
suggestion, so long as it has nothing to 
do with one's ordinary affairs. Ten, 
twenty minutes of such pleasant wander- 
ing, and one goes back to the regular 
work of the hour refreshed. 

The conditions of physical rest are 
much the same. The tension muscles 
must be relaxed as far as possible, and 
perfect quiet be maintained. It is a good 
thing to cultivate the habit of dropping 
down in absolute idleness for ten min- 
utes, when a longer rest is not possible,, 
repeating the process often. A couch 
in the dining room is a great help. If 
one must go up stairs for a rest one keeps 
on. Next best is a steamer chair in the 
kitchen. 

A third point is to cultivate restful 
ways of working. Do the disagreeable, 
drudging things in the morning, when 
you feel fresh. Do not have long 
stretches of monotonous taskwork 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




E C A US E so many people 
have demonstrated that the 
UNDERFEED Syste md o e s 
reduce the cost of heating from 
50% to 66 2 /i%, the words DULL, TIMES and IDLE MOMENTS have 
been blue pencilled from UNDERFEED records. The so-called panic year 
proved an Underfeed record breaker. This season we have put up a still higher 
figure. The reason? A child can understand. The 

PeckWilliamson Underfeed 

HEATING SVSTEMS 
> "C* ! 

w R R M Furnaces - gseuwss Boilers 

Save Va to a /a of Coal Bills 

You can easily figure it out. CHEAPEST slack, the sort which would smother an ordinary furnace or boiler 
fire, yields in the UNDERFEED as much clean, even heat as the HIGHEST priced coal. The difference in cost is 
YOURS. This saving alone is great enough to soon pay for the UNDERFEED. This isn't all. Coal is fed from 
below and with all fire on top, smoke and gases wasted in other furnaces and boilers, 

must pass thru the flames and are consumed. This 

is an aid to better health and means additional 

heat. Ashes are few and are removed by shaking 

the grate bar as in ordinary heaters and boilers. 

George B. Catlin, of the Detroit Evening News, has 
had an Underfeed over four years. He's enthusiastic 

about it. He tells how much money he saves 

each winter, and writes: 

" A very ordinary mathematician can fig- 
ure the difference between 15 tons of slack 
at 82 per ton put in and 22 tons of coal at 
prices ranging from 87.25 to 87. 5O put In. 
The difference in a single year more than 
compensated for the higher cost of the fur- 
nace and we have heat to let out of the 
windows." 

We've hundreds of letters just like this. 
Let us send you FREE many fac-simile 
testimonials with our Underfeed Booklet 
of Furnaces or Special Catalog 1 of Steam 
and Hot Water Boilers. Heating 1 plans 
and services of our Engineering 1 Corps 
FREE. Write today, giving name of local 
dealer with whom you'd prefer to deal. 

THE PECK-WILLIAMSON COMPANY 

385 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati, O. 

Furnace Dealers, Hardware Men and Plumbers are invited to write Today for 
Profitable Agency Proposition. 




Illustration shores furnace 
without casing, cut away to 
show how coa I is forced up 
under fire, which burns on top. 




58 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Household Economics Continued 



Work at one thing for an hour and then 
change off. Use all the physical aids you 
can, labor saving machines, chemicals 
and the like. Try, even though it goes 
against the grain, to sit down at many of 
your tasks, ironing, preparing vegetables, 
some parts of cooking. And, harder still, 
learn to slight some things. Discrim- 
inate between essentials and non-essen- 
tials, between the dirt which is perni- 
cious and that which is merely unsightly. 
And, above all, do not feel that you must 
do everything in the way your mother 
did it before you. Work out a process 
for yourself and simplify, simplify, sim- 
plify. 

The Habit of Grumbling. 

People, who have had an experience 
with convents, know that it is the rule to 
maintain absolute silence during a good 
part of the day. This rule applies to all 
the working hours, and whoever first 
framed it was certainly wise. For it ren- 
ders the practice of grumbling almost 
impossible. If a grievance arising at ten 
o'clock in the morning must be saved up 
for comment at two o'clock recreation, 
the chances are it has been forgotten by 
that time and never sees the light, which 
is so much clear gain. 

Now if those ofus wHo live in families 
could only practice this sort of restraint, 
what a gain in comfort and harmony. For 
time cures all ills, even the little discom- 
forts of life. "Don't mention it" is such 
a good rule for the minor worries of life. 
And the things that must be mentioned, 
for correction, why not leave them till 
the time when the same circumstances re- 
cur? We do not nearly realize the mis- 
ery caused in families, particularly to 
sensitive children, by the habit of endless 



complaint. It lies at the root of fully 
half the unhappiness of domestic life. 
Very often the matter of complaint might 
be remedied by some trifling readjust- 
ment, some little change immaterial to 
everyone, but it is so much easier to find 
refuge in censure. 

But if the fault finding habit is dis- 
tressing to others, it reacts fatally upon 
one's self. A fault finder is never popular 
even in the heyday of youth, and is sure- 
ly treading the downward path to a 
querulous old age. It takes other people 
to realize our defects, we all idealize our- 
selves. It is very wholesome sort of dis- 
cipline once in a while to take a candid 
survey of our actions and their tenden- 
cies. 

Rissoles from Cold Meat. 

When you make pastry, in cold 
weather, set aside a lump of dough and 
keep it in the refrigerator until you have 
some cold roast beef or lamb, or better 
still poultry. It will keep perfectly for 
several days. 

Chop the cold meat fine, season it high- 
ly and moisten it with gravy. If you 
have no gravy, improvise some with a 
couple of bouillon capsules and a little 
kitchen bouquet. Roll the pastry out very 
thin and cut it into squares. On each 
square lav a tablespoonful of the chopped 
meat folding the pastry over like a turn- 
over. Make a kettle of deep fat very hot, 
put the rissoles in a frying basket and 
drop it into the fat. Fry until the rissoles 
are brown and remove them to a hot 
platter. If deep fat is not attainable, you 
may bake them in a hot oven till they are 
nicely browned. They are more appe- 
tizing than hash, more substantial than 
croquettes. 



THE ART, SCIENCE AND SENTIMENT OF 
HOME BUILDING 



A COMPLETE AUTHORITY 
FOR HOME BUILDERS 



COMPLETE TABLE OF CON- 
TENTS SENT UPON REQUEST 




A POPULAR COTTAGE 

DESIGN No. 300 



A beautiful nd practical book containing two hundred illustrations 
and forty-six chapters on the planning and designing of all parts of 
every kind of a home. It contains detailed description, plans and 
illustrations of fifty homes varying in cost from $1,000 to $20,000, Also 
many illustrated chapters on the planning of 

BUNGALOWS 

cottages, country homes, farm homes, city homes, duplex houses, frame 
houses, brick and cement houses, etc., and profusely illustrated articles 
on entrances, windows, fireplaces, stairways, kitchen and pantry ar- 
rangements, articles on letting contracts, the practical side of home 
buildimg, etc, Every left-hand page is a full page of illustrations. The 
book is seven inches by ten inches, printed on heavy enameled paper, 
cover stamped in gold, "Worth many times its price, " writes one. 
"The handsomest thing in its line that we have ever seen," writes an- 
other. ALL. books sent on approval with privilege of return and 
money back. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, S1.0O 

ARTHUR C. CLAUSEN, Architect fc E 

405-7-9 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn. eight different floor plans 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



59 





PROSLATE ROOFING and SIDING 



For residences of all kinds you will not find a more attractive, 

more economical, more serviceable roofing and siding than PROSLATE. 

DURABILITY: 

PflOSLATE is not an uncertainty its base is our regular 
PAROID ROOFING which has stood the test of time in every 
climate it wears as well as the best shingles. 

ECONOMY: 

PROSLATE costs less than good shingles and clapboards and 
the cost of laying is much less. Anyone can lay PROSLATE. 

ATTRACTIVENESS: 

PROSLATE is a rich, reddish brown in color. We can furnish 
PROSLATE with either straight or ornamental edges. The 
latter gives the effect of a slate or shingle roof. 
Your buildings will be the most attractive in your neighbor- 
hood if covered with PROSLATE and you will save money. 
SEND FOR SAMPLE AND ATTRACTIVE BOOKLET 

F.W. BIRD & SON, Makers 

ESTABLISHED 1817 

EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 



THE MAN WHO DID BUILD A HOUSE FOR 
HIS WIFE 




Round Hot 
Water Heater. 

Sectional 
St eam and 
Water Heaters. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

HART & GROUSE CO., 

Utica, N. Y. 

80 Lake St.. Chicago. 

SOLD BY 

SAXTON HEATING CO., 
Minneapolis. 



60 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SO* e HA MEAT THAT CANNA eAT~ANt>5OM e WOULD CAT TMAT WANT IT 
BUT W MA M6AT AND W CAN CAT 
5A LET TM e LORD B 6 THANKIT 





TABL 




ABLE Cloths for Ceremonious 
Occasions. 

The newest table cloths for 
festival occasions have some sort 
of decoration in the centre, which dis- 
penses with the use of an embroidered 
centerpiece. 

Some of these table cloths are of the 
heaviest quality of double damask, cir- 
cular, two yards or two-and-a-half in di- 
ameter, and edged with Cluny lace, about 
three inches wide, put on without full- 
ness. Then a medallion of the lace, per- 
haps eighteen inches across, is inserted 
in the centre, the damask cut away be- 
neath it. Midway between the medal- 
lion and the edge of the table, at the place 
occupied by the hostess, her monogram 
or initials are worked with more or less 
elaboration. 

Sometimes instead of a medallion of 
the lace, a square or circle is outlined 
with wide insertion, edged on either side 
with lines of large dots heavily padded 
and embroidered in satin stitch, a similar 
line heading the lace edge. When a 
square is formed, the strips of insertion 
outlinine it may cross and extend to the 
edges of the cloth. 

Less expensive, but quite as elegant, 
is a cloth with a scalloped edge, headed 
by an elaborate pattern in eyelet em- 
broidery, the same pattern outlining the 
central circle. The work is simple, but 
very effective, and exceedingly durable. 
The edge of the cloth beyond the scallops 
should be turned down on the wrong 
side in a narrow hem. Scallops so treat- 
ed will never frav. 



The very newest thing, fresh ,from 
Paris, is a tablecloth at whose centre 
four nine-inch squares are marked off. 
Two of these are filled with white env 
broidery, in an intricate conventional de- 
sign. The alternating squares are cut 
out and the space filled in with hand 
made filet lace, or some one of the many 
braid laces. 

The same idea is carried out in cut 
work. A square design is stamped in the 
centre of the plain damask cloth, the 
edges buttonholed, the brides worked 
and the background of the design cut 
out. It goes without saying that the 
lines inclosing the design should be 
straight. The edge of the cloth may be 
finished with a cut work border, or sim- 
ply scalloped. 

Italian Hand Made Linens. 

Beautiful tablecloths and napkins can 
be fashioned from the hand woven Italian 
linens, which are now imported in con- 
siderable variety. The fabric is so ex- 
quisite that ornament, other than hem- 
stitching seems almost superfluous. The 
most appropriate decoration is the com- 
bination of open squares or circles and 
buttonholed bars known as reticella 
work. The Decorative Art societies sup- 
ply patterns for this work, which is more' 
a matter of the right sort of thread and 
abundant patience than of special skill, 
the stitches being of the simplest. 

Whether it really pays to embroider 
table linen is a matter of individual judg- 
ment. Elaborately embroidered and lace- 
trimmed linen is only appropriate when 
the other table appointments are in keep- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



61 



FANEUIL 

PATTERN 



Durability and Beauty 

have made this ware famous for many years. 
It affords the longest service 
and satisfaction 



The heaviest triple plate is guaranteed by 
the trade mark 

1847 ROGERS BROS.TP?T 



'Silver Plate that 
Wears" 



Sold by leading dealers. Send for catalogue " N-35 " showing designs! 
MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., Meriden, Conn. 

(International Silver Co., Successor) 



New York 

Chicago 

San Francisco 




$25.85 

For this elegant, 
massive selected 
oak or birch, ma- 
hogany finished 
mantel 
"FROM FACTORY 

TO YOU" 

Price includes our 
"Queen" Coal 
Grate with best 
quality enameled 
tile for facing and 
hearth. Gas Grate 
$2. 50 extra. Man- 
tel is 82 inches 
high, 5 feet wide. 
Furnished with round or square columns, 
full length or double as shown in cut. 
Dealers' price not less than $40. 

CENTRAL MANTELS 

are distinctive in workmanship, style and 
finish and are made in all styles Colonial to 
Mission. CATALOGUE FREE Will send 
our new 112 page catalogue free, to carpen- 
ters, builders, and those building a home. 

Central Mantel Company 



"REPUTATION AND 
QUALITY COUNT" 



1227 Olive Street 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 




ROLL'S PATENT 
Lock -Joint Columns 

Suitable for Pergolas, Porches or 
Interior use are made exclusively by 

HARTMANN-SANDERS CO. 

Elston and Webster Avon., Chicago. 111. 

Eastern Office. 1 123 Broadway, N. Y. City 

A new and very complete catalogue of columns will be 

sent on request. AskforG-40." 




That Bungalow 

which you intend to build this Spring 
will need the soft, artistic tones of 

Cabot's Shingle Stains 

to make it harmonize with its surroundings. 
They are for shingles and all other exterior wood 
work, and preserve the wood thoroughly from de- 
cay and insects. 50% cheaper than paint, 100% 
handsomer , and any intelligent boy can apply them . 

Send for samples of Stained Wood and Circulars. Fret 



Samuel Cabot, Inc., 

Agents at all central points. 



Woodruff Leeming, Architect, New York 



62 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Table Chat Continued 



ing. For most of us a modest line of hem- 
stichting is as much as our belongings can 
live up to. But other things being equal, 
there is an element of permanence about 
such work which should commend it to 
anyone who really cares for needle craft. 
One would rather work on an heirloom 
than put endless stitches into a sofa 
cushion which will be hopelessly shabby 
in a year's time. 

Brass Tea Services. 

Brass tea equipages are gaining in 
favor. They are finished with lacquer so 
that they will not tarnish, and are most 
graceful in shape. The set, sold for about 
$15.00, sometimes less, consists of a 
tray, a teapot, a tea caddy, sugar 
bowl and cream pitcher. The brass is 
most effective with bright colored china 
and is proof against the accidents which 
befall china. 

Then there are copper tea services, con-- 
sisting of pot, bowl, pitcher and tray, of 
a curious conical shape, with ebony 
handles and a repoussee decoration. The 
set costs $12.00, and bears the stamp of 
the craftsman shops. 

To accompany it, or to be used with 
an entire porcelain service, is a copper 
tea kettle and stand, of the same design. 
The lamp is of generous size, the kettle 
lined with tin and provided with a wicker 
handle. 

Separate copper trays, twelve inches by 
sixteen-, either oval or square, cost $4.00. 
At about the same price are mahogany 
trays, while cheaper ones are of green 
oak, with wicker handles, the bottom of 
the tray being of glass laid over cretonne 
of an effective design of red tulips and 
green leaves. 

Wedgewood Basket Ware. 

This ware is a reproduction of one of 
the specialties of the Wedgewood fac- 
tories in the Golden Age of English pot- 
tery. The ware is glazed and cream- 
colored, and made in a variety of pieces, 
plates, ice cream dishes, candlesticks, 
fruit dishes, ferneries and bon bon dishes. 
The two latter are commended to people 
in search of individual favors for din- 
ners. Tiny bon bon baskets are only 
twenty cents, small ferneries thirty five. 
A fair sized fruit dish costs a dollar.. 
Plates of various sizes have plain centers 
and an edge of basket work. 



Breakfast Sets. 

The leading shops now make a spe- 
cialty of breakfast sets. A breakfast set 
usually contains fifty-five pieces, and 
most of them are in some of the various 
sorts of blue and white ware, blue wil- 
low, Copenhagen, Delft, or Spode Tower. 
The last named is specially pretty and a 
set costs $10.80. By selecting the pieces 
required from open stock a smaller serv- 
ice, better adapted to the needs of the 
average family, can be made up, at less 
cost. 

A Use for Cheese Shells. 

After all the contents have been scoop- 
ed from an Edam or pineapple cheese, 
save the shell and use it for serving 
creamed celery, macaroni with tomato, 
or cheese and tomato. The effect is very 
pretty and the shell will add a little 
flavor to the contents. 

A Hubbard squash is prettily served 
in the shell. Bake the squash in the 
usual manner, cutting it in half laterally. 
When it is tender, scoop it out, butter and 
season the pulp and pack it in half of the 
shell. It will probably be necessary to 
cut off the point at the end of the squash 
to make it stand evenly. Set it on a plat- 
ter with a folded napkin wrapped around 
it. If squash is merely salted and but- 
tered, not peppered, any which remains 
after a meal can be utilized for a pie or 
a squash custard. 

China Coffee Services. 

While the fancy is for metal tea serv- 
ices, there is a fad for coffee services in 
china. This is a German fashion, and 
most of the sets to be had are in one or 
other of the German wares. Sets always 
include a large porcelain tray. It must 
be remembered that a china coffee pot 
is only adapted to the percolating proc- 
ess and should not be set upon the fire. 
These porcelain coffee services range in 
price from $4.50 to $16.00. A service 
can often be made up at a smaller price 
from some of the numerous open stock 
patterns. A service of this sort is ef- 
fective on a side table in the dining room. 
Preserving Lemon Rinds. 

After squeezing lemons do not throw 
away the peels. Cut them into small 
pieces, after removing the seeds and cook 
them into a preserve with their weight of 
sugar and a little water. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



63 




An Edwards 
Metal 
Spanish 
Tile 
Roof 

Costs No More Than a Good Tin Roof 

Architectural and ornamental in appearance and the most "Beautiful Roof in the World." 
Its extreme lightness (about one-eighth that of slate), durability and the fact that it is fire- 
proof, rain-proof and storm-proof, commend it to those desiring something out of the ordinary 
in roofing. 

Snd us the dimensions of your building and let us name you prices. 

DESCRIPTIVE BOOKLET SENT FREE ON REQUEST RESPONSIBLE REPRESENTATIVES WANTED 

THE EDWARDS MANUFACTURING eO. 

"THE SHEET METAL FOLKS" 

52O-S4O Culvert St. CIINCIINNATTI, OHIO 

Largest Manufacturers of Iron and Steel Roofing In the World 




MALLORY'S 

Standard 
Shutter Worker 

The only practical device to 
open and close the Shutters 
without raising windows or 
disturbing screens. 
Can be applied to old or new houses, whether brick, stone 
or frame, and will hold the blind firm in any position. 
Perfectly burglar proof. 

Send for Illustrated Circular if your hardware dealer 
does not keep them, to 

MALLORY MANUFACTURING CO. 



251 Main Street 



Flemington, New Jersey, U. S A. 



IXL ROCK 
MAPLE AND 
BIRCH 
FLOORING 




Selected Red Birch 
Bird's-eye Maple and 
Cherry Flooring 



One important feature 
is the wedge shaped 
tongue and groove 
which enters easily, drives 
up snug and insures a per- 
fect face at all times without 
after smoothing, an advan- 
tage that is not obtained by 
any other manufacture. 

Our method of auvseasoning 
and kiln drying has stood 
the test for twenty years. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET 



Wisconsin Land & Lumber Co, 

HERMANSVILLE, MICHIGAN 



ATTENTION TO DETAILS 

Will 

Insure Comfort 

IN YOUR HOME 
See that Your Doors are hung with 

STANLEY'S 

Ball -Bearing Hinges 

No creaking of doors 
No need of oiling 
No sagging 

ARTISTIC BOOKLET FREE 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

Dept. T, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



64 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



^pm- -^ .. p 1 P^^^^->^'-.^^'^^^ 

:OX-.- . ; fc v.V.V-7 5-ii'?.; ."'...4-.'. ';>.'.,.-i -V- ^12^^11 '-' - '^' -' : '.--:'- -Er./.. r - '.* -. -? i' .-.'fc. .. .-iii ,-,,, rfcr ..' jn ..^ '* ;.f ill:-'. ^ 





Ancient Cement Construction. 

NE of the most important dis- 
coveries which has been made 
in many years is the recent un- 
earthing by Prof. Ramon Mena, 
of the ancient city of Otumba, about five 
miles from the present city of Otumba, 
Mexico. 

Two houses were unearthed, the first 
of which is stone, with the stone walls, 
or what is left of them, about six feet 
in height. The other house, probably 
the residence of some priest of very high 
rank, is of cement; floors of cement and 
walls of cement, the latter being fres- 
coed in red and blue the whole being 
in a perfect state of preservation. This 
house contains three rooms and cellar. 
The cellar has several rooms, all with 
cement floors. 

Near this house was discovered a "teo- 
cali," or temple, with the platform and 
walls still preserved. One wall was 
something over two meters thick, which 
denotes the strength with which the Tex- 
cocans and Aztecs of a civilization which 
antedates any other in America by sev- 
eral generations used to build their pub- 
lic edifices. The bases, upon which evi- 
dently reposed four columns, were also 
discovered in a good state of preserva- 
tion on the teocali. 

Concrete Jacketed Timber Piles. 

During the past eight or ten years 
a good many examples of concrete- 
sheathed timber pile construction have 
been built by the State Harbor Commis- 
sioners of San Francisco, the object be- 
ing to obviate the rapid destruction of 
unprotected timber by the teredo, which 
is very active in the Bay of San Fran- 
cisco. Ordinary wooden piles, driven to 
secure the requisite bearing, were pro- 
vided with an outer casing of concrete 
formed in cylindrical moulds placed over 
the piles after driving. From a recent 



article by Mr. John G. Little, in the "En- 
gineering News," it appears that the 
present condition of piers built on this 
type of substructure is far from satis- 
factory, and that in consequence rein- 
forced concrete cylinder piers are being 
adopted in the important scheme of har- 
bor improvements now in progress. 

Record Breaking Concrete Construction. 

Within just 49 days from the time of 
commencing work on the concreting of 
the full nine floors of the St. Anthony 
Hotel Annex, at San Antonio, Texas, 
the work was completed by the Rein- 
forced Concrete Construction Co. Over 
5,000 yards of concrete work was done. 
H. A. Banks, superintendent of the con- 
struction company, says : "I am con- 
fident we have broken all records for 
the South. We started work on the first 
floor August 25. The roof was finished 
October 13. By the system used, neither 
shovel nor wheel-barrow have been 
touched to the concrete until it was prac- 
tically in place. It was "slipped" from 
the mixer into a bucket and hoisted 30 
feet above the floor on which work was 
in progress and then sent down a chute 
and distributed by the force of gravity. 
The system is a new one, but I believe 
is the future concrete way. We used 
from 800 to 815 sacks of cement every 
eight hours." Concrete Age. 

A Mining Village of Concrete. 

The industrial village of Mineville, 
N. Y., near Port Henry, is gradually be- 
ing transformed from a collection of 
wooden shacks to one of imposing build- 
ings of concrete. The village is near 
some rather extensive mines and is in 
; the heart of what was once a great 
forest, but wood is now being supplanted 
for all other purposes. 

It should be stated that one of the 
factors that led to this extensive use of 
concrete was the possession by the com- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



65 



Asbestos "Century" Shingles 

"The Roof that Outlives the Building" 

The house owner has to depend 
on your knowledge in choosing his 
roofing and he is especially open to sugges- 
tions that affect his pocketbook. 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles protect the house 
absolutely are impervious to weather, proof against 
fire, free from accidental breakage. They are the 
most attractive roofing made. They cost no more 
to lay than any other roofing regarded as first-class, 
and nothing afterward for painting or repairs. 

Can there be any doubt as to what roofing you shall recom- 
mend? 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles are dense and elastic shingle-like sheets 
of asbestos fibre-cement. Made in three colors Newport Gray (silver gray). 
Slate (blue Black), and Indian Red, in numerous shapes and several sizes. 
Ask your Roofer for new quotations. Write for Booklet "Reinforced 1910." 

The Keasbey & Mattison Company, Factors, 
Ambler, Pennsylvania 



WHY NOT 

Use the Best Roofings the ones that 
Bear the "Diamond Mack" Label? 



Sign 




of 

It is by all means the surest way of knowing that 

you are getting full value for your Roofing Money, when 

you see that they bear the "DIAMOND MACK" trade mark. 

UNDERFELT BURLAP INSERTED GRANITE SURFACED 

Roofing is Guaranteed by the manufacturer to be HAIL- FIRE- and STORM-PROOF 
and gives the Best of Service for years. 

The same High Grade Quality is found in our COMPO, Rubber and Sand- 
Surfaced Roofings in all Ply. 

Don't forget, we carry complete lines of Building Paper. 



McCLELLAN PAPER COMPANY 



FARGO . 
SIOUX FALLS 



"The Home of Quality' 
MINNEAPOLIS 



DULUTH 

LA CROSSE 



66 



KEllH'S MAGAZINE 



Cement Continued 



pany of a very superior aggregate in the 
shape of the "tailings" or residue left 
after the separation of the ore. An im- 
mense heap of these tailings gives a 
seemingly inexhaustible supply of aggre- 
gate, and tests have proved that cement 
mixed with the run of tailings in the 
proportion of 1 to 5 produces a very su- 
perior concrete block without the addi- 
tion of sand or gravel. 

The buildings of concrete comprise a 
power station with a chimney, which is 
also of concrete, an office building which 
is approached by a series of concrete 
steps, a school house, fifty small houses 
for workmen, several four-family tene- 
ment houses for foreign labor, and a 
number of more imposing houses for 
heads of departments, a lock-up and a 
pay-master's office. In fact at the present 
time there are but a few structures in the 
town which are built of anything but 
concrete. Concrete Age. 

A Strong Endorsement of Concrete 
Buildings. 

The great Bush Terminal factories 
stand as notable examples of modern con- 
crete construction, this being the con- 
census of opinion of eminent engineers 
as well as leading manufacturers. After 
having had practical experience with con- 
crete as the leading structural material, 
the company makes the following an- 
nouncement: 

"Over half a million dollars will be ex- 
pended in the near future by the Bush 
Terminal Company in the erection of two 
more of its model loft buildings, three 
of which are now standing at Thirty- 
fifth, Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh 
Streets, respectively, between Second 
and Third Avenues, South Brooklyn. 
Plans for the new structures have just 
been completed by Architect William 
Higginson and are now on file in the 
Building Department. The new factories 
will stand north of Thirty-ninth Street 



and, like their predecessors, will be six 
stories high, 600 feet by 75 feet, and each 
containing about 300,000 square feet of 
floor space. The cost is figured at ap- 
proximately $300,000 each, and if pres- 
ent plans are carried out there will ulti- 
mately be twenty of these buildings par- 
allel with the great South Brooklyn wa- 
terfront and calculated to contribute a 
generous share to the difficult task of 
solving the freight problem of the port 
of New York. The buildings are to be 
o-f reinforced concrete and rank in insur- 
ance tables as absolutely fireproof and 
among the least expensive risks issued. 
The particular function for which these 
loft buildings are designed is to enable 
wholesalers and manufacturers to follow 
the modern commercial policy of having 
plants located along the tide-water line. 
They represent the materialization of the 
new idea that the wareroom or factory 
must be brought to the railroad car in 
order to serve its purpose rightly, and 
the fact that yards of the ten freight- 
carrying roads reaching New York City, 
as well as the landing places of 17 steam- 
ship lines are located in this section of 
South Brooklyn, has converted it into 
an industrial community, the growth of 
which will depend only upon the num- 
ber of loft buildings which the Bush 
Terminal Company will construct." 

A Dark Gray Cement Walk. 

A Bloomington, Illinois, citizen has 
built a cement sidewalk which is said 
to be a great improvement over the or- 
dinary white cement walk. He uses 
enough lamp black mixed with the ce- 
ment to make it a dark color and holds 
that such walks are much easier .on the 
eyes of people using them than the white 
cement walks, as well as being very 
handsome. The dark gray walk is much 
admired in Bloomington and doubtless 
on a sunny day will be grateful to weak 
eyes. 




S E DGWICKS 

Better Homes Cost Less you find, when you examine Sedgwick plans. 

The years you are to spend in your home, the enjoyment you are 
to get out of it, the money you put into it, all make it plain that you 
should make yourself as expert as possible choosing your home. 

"BEST HOUSE PLANS" is my book of 200 modern homes full of ideas, 
showing new architectural work. Designs which are unique for 
homes costing $500 to $6,000. Send NOW for this eautiful book, 
Price $1. OO. New, large and improved 8th edition just off the 
press. To those interested, a New Book of Churches FREE. 
CHAS. S. SEDGWICK, 1028 K, Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



67 



The Big Trio 

KEITH'S MAGAZINE 
NATIONAL BUILDER 



AND 



CON CRETE 



OFFERED under special clubbing arrange- 
ments, one year's subscription to the 
three leading building monthlies for 

I $2.50 

This is an entirely new and wonderful 
value offer as the subscription price singly 
for Keith's is $1.50, National Builder $2.00, 
and Concrete $1.00, a total of 

$4.50 for '$2.50 



CARPENTERS 
CONTRACTORS 

will be attracted to this offer because these 
three monthly magazines completely cover 
the building field. 

Each magazine is strong in its special- 
ty. Keith's for the design and artistic treat- 
ment of Home Building, National Builder 
for its practical articles and drawings and 
more technical trade topics. Concrete as the 
leading trade paper in the interest of cement 
construction. 

We do not know how 
long this offer will be 
published and suggest that 
you order NOW. 

Make remittance to 

KEITH'S 

MAGAZINE 



KEITH'S 
MAGAZINE 




THE NAT I 




BUILDER 



362 DEARBORN STREET 

CHICAGO 

Offers this 
Great Building Opportunity: 



complete plans with 
estimate of material 
and price . . . For 



H. 



00 



The plans are medium priced, up-to-date 
homes. The front, side and rear elevations 
with floor plans and details drawn to quar- 
ter-inch scale, are on a 

LARGE SUPPLEMENT 

36 x 24 inches 

Plans Drawn to Scale the Same as 

a Regular Blue Print and You 

Get One Every Month 

A complete bill of materials with an accurate 
estimate of cost accompanies each plan. 







THIS IS ONE OF THE HOUSES 

It was planned by Chicago Architects, 
who rank high as designers 

It is of moderate cost and the outside is of 
Plaster Work, now so popular. 
Besides this, each number has other houses 
of low cost, including a Beautiful Bungalow 
with plans. 

The writers, selected by Architect Fred T. 
Hodgson, Editor, cover the entire building 
field. 

Send in the coupon and you may find some- 
thing new and good for the new home you 
are planning. 



$2.00 per year 20 cents per copy 

NATIONAL BUILDER, 

362 Dearborn St., Chicago: 

Put ME down for one year's subscription, for which 
I enclose $1.00 in money or stamps and THIS COUPON 
which is good for $1.00 credit on the order. 



Name_ 



City- 



Street No._ 



Keith's, Jan. '10. 



68 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



FINISH NG 




Proper Treatment of Floors. 

The proper treatment of floors, says 
Building Management, is today a much 
debated question, and the dissatisfaction 
so often expressed on this subject is due 
to the lack of proper information. When 
finish counts for so much on a floor, it 
is strange, indeed, that so little thought 
is given to the material and methods 
to be employed. 

Generally, when a new floor is to be 
put _ down, great care is taken in the se- 
lection of the wood and in laying it; but 
when the question of finishing arises, the 
qualifications of the mechanic, and the 
material to be used, are given but little 
attention. The result often is disappoint- 
ment and greatly increased cost, for ere 
long the old finish must be removed and 
replaced. 

On the other hand, the proper method, 
if followed from the first, would pro- 
duce not only a beautiful finish, but one 
that would be a pleasure for years to 
come. These remarks are applicable to 
the refinishing of old floors also, and in 
view _ of the importance of the subject, 
building managers should acquaint 
themselves thoroughly with the various 
methods of finishing floors and the re- 
sults obtained by the use of the various 
floor finishes. 

Too much care cannot be given to the 
preparation of a hardwood floor, as it 
has been proven bevond question that 
ninety-nine of every hundred complaints 
arise from carelessness in this most im- 
portant particular. 

In a new building the floor, of course, 
is the very last thing to be finished, and 
that, which should have the greatest 
care and ample time for completion, is 
hurried most of all. 

What is the result? No attention hav- 
ing been given to the directions of the 
manufacturer, to the state of the atmos- 
phere when the finish was applied, or, in 
fact, to any of the several conditions at- 



tending a proper execution of the work, 
the tenant moves in and in a few weeks 
discovers signs of failure in the finish 
of his beautiful floors. The blame for 
this condition is at once laid upon the 
material used, and the manufacturer is 
called on to state why he sold such in- 
ferior goods. 

Some of the blunders often made in 
cleaning new or unfinished floors may 
be avoided if the following directions are 
followed : 

Wash as little as possible; use sand- 
paper, where it will answer. When the 
floor has been well protected by cover- 
ing, it will usually be found that nothing 
is necessary, except a good sweeping, 
before applying the first coat; but in case 
the floor is soiled, and it is necessary to 
wash it, use clear water if it will remove 
the dirt; but if obliged to use something 
to soften the dirt, put in about a gill of 
household ammonia to the pail of water 
and, after washing wipe the floor dry 
and wash again with clear water, in or- 
der to free the wood of all ammonia that 
may remain. Use as little ammonia as 
possible to obtain the desired end, as an 
excessive amount darkens the wood. A 
better wash is made with a pint of alco- 
hol to a pail of water, and it is not detri- 
mental to the varnish. 

Washing the floor with turpentine 
will also give good and safe results. 
Sandpaper will remove many spots that 
may seem to need washing. When a 
stain comes from paint, sandpaper and 
turpentine will generally remove it. Use 
alcohol to remove grease spots. 
Cracking of Painted Glass. 

Will a sign painted across a glass win- 
dow cause the glass to break? The ques- 
tion is often asked and is variously an- 
swered. Opinions appear to differ. 

Some sign painters declare that it nev- 
er happens at least that it never has 
with their work. Others believe it may 
happen, although they have not seen in- 




Look for This LI at Painting Time 



Spring painting time will soon be here and thousands of dwelling houses, 
churches, factories and other buildings will need one or more coats of our pure white 
lead and linseed oil, for livening them up or to save them from decay. 

We have a special word for those who have used our white lead before and 
could not be induced to use anything else in their painting. 

It is about our new steel keg. This is a new package this year and takes the 
place of the long familiar oak keg. The white lead is the important thing, but know- 
ing the package insures your getting the genuine material. Please look at the 
illustrations above the new kegs are of steel, gun metal finish, and come in two 
shapes as pictured. The one hundred pound size has straight sides; the smaller 
sizes taper towards the bottom. 

Steel is the ideal material for packing white-lead-in-oil for paint purposes because, 
not being porous it does not absorb the oil, and the lead always stays moist. Look 
for the new steel keg, either at the store or on your premises when the painter starts 
to work, and, very important, see that the Dutch Boy Painter trade mark is on the 
side. That is your guaranty that you are getting pure white lead of our manufacture. 

Your paint dealer has it. 

Color Schemes and Suggestions 

For those contemplating painting, we have a package of helps, including a book 
of color schemes, giving artistic ideas for carrying out color harmony, both for interior 
and exterior painting. Free. Ask for House-owners' Painting Outfit K. E. 

National Lead Company 



New York Boston Buffalo Chicago 

Cincinnati Cleveland St. Louis 

{ John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Philadelphia ) 
( National Lead & Oil Co., Pittsburgh ) 





70 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Painting and Finishing Continued 



stances. Still others refer to cases, well 
authenticated, where cracking has closely 
followed painting. 

The conflict of opinion must be due 
to the difference of experience, and partly 
to doubt as to whether a break was 
caused by the painting or by something 
else. 

Breaking seems to happen most fre- 
quently where the window has a south- 
ern exposure, and where the background 
of the paint is black. It is well known 
that black paint so used will absorb 
more heat than the clear glass, and that 
the difference in temperature may easily 
be sufficient to crack the glass. 

It is fair to conclude that sometimes 
the glass will crack when it is painted, 
other times it will not depending chiefly 
on exposure, color of background and 
the quality of the glass itself. A safe 
rule for the painter is to give his patron 
warning that there is great danger and 
let the proprietor assume responsibility 
for all accidents. Dutch Boy Painter. 
Wall Paper Hints. 

Owners of new homes, says Beauti- 
ful Homes, make many mistakes in the 
selection of wall paper, and while it is 
largely a matter of personal opinion, 
there are certain rules which must not 
be overlooked. Especially is this so of 
the new home where bare walls must 
be covered with their first coat of paper. 
A wall paper expert gives the following 
valuable hints: 

Never use large figured papers on low- 
ceilinged rooms. 

Plain color and self-toned stripes in- 
crease the apparent height of a room. 

Do not use red or dark green paper 
in a dark room. These colors are in- 
clined to absorb the light. Yellow, 
white or creamy tints are much more 
cheerful. 

Light blue and pink paper look well 
in rooms that are flooded with sunlight. 
but they soon fade. This makes paper- 
ing very expensive if we would have 
our walls look fresh at all times. When 
the paper 'cannot be renewed often, use 
more substantial colors in sunny rooms. 

Where pictures are to be hung, select 
a plain background and never put a gar- 
ish paper in a room that must be oc- 
cupied by an invalid. 

Many home-makers fall into the error 



of purchasing expensive styles of paper 
far beyond their means. Fine grades of 
delicately tinted papers will keep one 
poor, because they must be renewed at 
regular intervals. One can often save 
money on wall paper by purchasing rolls 
of year-old patterns at a great reduction. 
If these are of conventional designs they 
always look well. Wall paper patterns 
change every year, and it frequently hap- 
pens that old patterns are brought back 
into favor after the lapse of a season or 
two. 

Deep borders and ornate friezes 
should be avoided in small rooms. The 
average home does not offer conditions 
which will do them justice. A common 
error is to purchase wall paper of a 
gaudy and novel type which will often 
spoil the appearance of the furniture. 

There is a tendency at the present 
time in the finest homes to paper an en- 
tire floor in one color, and this, in some- 
respects, is a good plan. It conveys an 
air of harmony and restfulness and that 
should be the sole idea in papering. 

A great many people do not pay 
enough attention to the selection of walF 
paper. Time should be taken to select 
the best of six patterns sifted down from 
the contractor's possible twenty. The 
papering of the new home is a very im- 
portant matter and should be given care- 
ful attention on the part of the whole 
family, 

Cleaning Varnished Surfaces. 

There has been considerable discussion- 
on the subject of cleaning varnished 
surfaces and several ways more or less- 
elaborate have been suggested and tried 
out; but from my experience and inquiry 
I have found that the simplest and best 
method is to use Ivory Soap and warm 
water, wipe perfectly dry and polish with 
chamois skin. 

What Can be Done with Old Gold* 
Frames. 

Gold frames may be renewed and 
cleaned with a mixture of onion juice 
thinned with water. Take one onion, 
and cut in half; squeeze with a lemon 
squeezer and thin with water. Three 
ounces of water to a medium onion. 
Be careful not to use it too strong, for 
it ^ may take off the gold. Rinse well' 
with clean water and leave dry; them 
dry polish with a soft cloth. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



71 




OUR GREAT NEW YEAR DIAMOND SPECIALS 




No 8r8-#ZO. No. 87-#85. No. 8685-#85. No. 8688-*5O. No. 866-#?5. 

These RinKB were among our greatest sellers during the Holidays. Thousands upon thousands were s old over the counter in our three 

IOF" \S 

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DDnC A. nn Dppt. A-SS. 92 to 98 State Street Chicago. III. 

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eraphic liluntratlons of Diamonds, flne Watches and 
artistic Jewelry. Mailed FREE. W rite today. Don't de'ay. 




"DIRECT FROM FACTORY" 

fan approval} 
PRICE ON THIS 

Piano-Finish, Selected Figure, 
Quarter-Sawed Oak Mantel is 

$29.4O 

Dealers' price $40 to $50. 

It is 82 in. hiifh, 60 in. wide. 36x18 French 
Bevel Mirror, four elaborate capitals. 

Includes Tile Facing. 60x18 Hearth, Plat- 
ed Frame and Club House Grate. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
AND PARQUETRY 

will last as long- as the house. Any car- 
penter can lay it easier than ordinary floor- 
ing. Get our prices. 

TILE AND MOSAICS 

for everywhere, WALI-S, FLOORS, ETC. 

Write for catalog of Mantels, Grates, Tiles for floors and baths. Slate 
Laundry Tubs, Grilles, etc. It is free. Or send 10 cents to pay postage on 
"our Art Mantel Catalog. Mantel Outfits from $12 to $200. Made to order 
Fly Screens for doors and windows. 

W. J. OSTENDORF, 2923 N. Broad st. Philadelphia, Pa, 




FURNACE 




We will deliver a complete heating 
equipment at your station at factory 
prices and wait for our pay while you 
test it during 60 days of winter weather. 

The entire outfit must satisfy you or 
you pay nothing. Isn't this worth looking 
Into? Could we offer such liberal terms 
If we didn't know that the Hess Furnace 
excels In service, simplicity, efficiency, 
economy t 

We are makers not dealers and will 
save you all middlemen^' profits. No room 
for more details here. Write today for free 
48-page booklet which tells all about it. 

Your name and address on a post card 
is sufficient. } 

HESS, 717 Tacoma Bldg , Chicago 



INTERIORS BEAUTIFUL 

A Very Choice Collection of 182 Interesting Rooms 




'"THERE is a fascination in seeing the inside of other people's houses, particularly where taste and the artistic atmosphere 
* prevail. We have examined hundreds of interior views and selected from them 182 of the best, each one of which has. 
some special feature of interest and merit. A group of modern Halls, Stairways, Living Rooms, Dens, Fireplaces, Dining: 
Rooms, Bed Rooms. Be sure to order this book and add to your ideas for interior treatment, style of fireplaces, cozy seats 
wall decorations, price $1.00. THIS BOOK WITH KEITH'S FOR ONE YEAR. $1. 75 

M. L. KEITH, Lumber Exchange Bldg., Minneapolis. 



72 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Make Near-Marble. 

Jas. B. C. Gentlemen : I am curious 
to know something of the imitation mar- 
ble which is being made in the lobby of 
the Rogers Hotel. It seems to be some 
kind of a composition but horsehair 
seems a strange thing to use in connec- 
tion with such work. The marble is of 
a green color. 

Ans. Jas. B. C. Investigating the 
''marble," we find that Tulio Davia of 
Venice and Frank Karl of Chicago are 
employed in its making. The "marble" is 
to form the outer covering of the huge 
concrete pillars supporting the lobby 
ceiling. 

The preparation is called scagiola, ac- 
cording to Signer Davia and is in imita- 
tion of "vert antique." One pillar has al- 
ready been finished and bears all the 
veins and rough tracery of the true "vert 
antique." 

The veins are made by dipping a net- 
work of horse hairs in a preparation and 
laying it on a sheet of linoleum. After 
the preparation has dried it is tinted at 
irregular intervals and the entire linoleum 
is wrapped about the concrete pillars. 
Concrete Block Facing. 

J. H. Gentlemen : I wish to produce 
some cement blocks with a pure white 
face, and as I have only made the ordi- 
nary block until now, I am writing you 
for information. Kindly let me know 
what materials are used and in what pro- 
portions. This matter is important as 
it will enable me to compete for some 
very good work if I can make this class 
of blocks. 

Ans. J. H. 

Blocks may be faced with one-quarter 
or one-half inch surface, either pure white 
in color or any light effect desired, by the 
use of one part of good white Portland 
Cement, two or three or even four parts 
crushed white marble screenings, white 



sand or other light aggregates, all pass- 
ing an one-eighth inch mesh, graded in 
size to particles which will be retained 
on a No. 50 screen. 

Mix thoroughly with water, plaster in- 
side the forms and immediately fill in 
with good quality of Portland Ce- 
ment in proportions as used in the manu- 
facture of concrete blocks. After taking 
down the moulds, the surface should be 
kept wet for two or three days or several 
weeks if economy will permit. After the 
first week a very beautiful effect will be 
produced by washing off the surface with 
dilute muriatic acid, one part sulphuric 
acid, three parts water. Apply three 
coats with a brush one coat right after 
the other, wash off with clear water 
played on by a hose. A texture, sparkle 
and life is produced which rivals the nat- 
ural stone. 

Painting Cornice. 

G. G. B. There are nearly 200 feet of 
cornice on my house. The cornice is 
ceiled with pitchy hard pine ceiling. 
What will be the proper treatment of this 
lumber to insure the adherence of paint? 
Would it 'be a good plan to give this 
lumber a coat of shellac? I have used 
shingle stain for gables and roof and 
will use a pretty grey paint for the first 
story. What will be the proper treat- 
ment of the ceiling of the porch? 

Ans. G. G. B. Answering your re- 
quest for treatment for the pitchy cornice 
of your house, would advise the use of a 
thin coat of grain alcohol shellac on the 
pitchy hard pine boards of the cornice. 
After this is dry, put on linseed oil paint. 
You want the very best material for this 
particular job that you can get or you are 
going to have constant trouble with it. 
For the porch ceiling, think that a light 
blue would look well, or you might var- 
nish for a natural finish. Either way 
would be acceptable. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



73 



Answers to Questions on Construction Continued 



Cisterns. 

B. R. H. Would like advice regard- 
ing best way to build a cistern in the 
cellar. Is there danger of dampness? If 
so, would a well fitting wooden lined 
lid help it? Would you consider six by 
six, five feet high about right size for 
ordinary sized family? 

Ans. B. R. H. As a subscriber, we 
are pleased to answer your inquiry. Or- 
dinarily there is no danger of dampness. 
It would be preferable, however, to use 
a cast iron cover similar to one found on 
the ordinary business street sidewalk 
covering a coal manhole. 6x6x5 feet 
should be ample for a medium sized fam- 
ily. 
To Preserve Brick from Smoke Stains. 

P. T. B. Gentlemen : The building 
adjoining my store recently burned out 
and portions of my brickwork were badly 
smoked up. The face of the brick does 
not seem to be damaged other than this. 
I wish to put my building in first class 
shape and would like to know if there 
is any acid or preparation which can be 



used for the purpose. The brick is a 
good red pressed quality and I would 
not like to paint it unless it is absolutely 
necessary. 

Ans. P. T. B. 

A new compound for cleaning smoke 
stains from brick fronts has recently 
made its appearance on the market. 
After a fire in a building the brick work 
is often badly discolored about the doors 
and windows with smoke and gases, and 
the removal of this during the work of 
reconstruction has always been a labor- 
ious task, usually accomplished by the 
use of sand and water and a wire brush. 
The new compound is composed of one 
gallon of soft soap, to which is added two 
pounds of powdered pumice, double oo or 
F, and one pint of liquid ammonia. First 
remove as much of the soot as possible 
with the stiff broom or fibre brush. Then 
apply the soap and ammonia mixture 
with an ordinary fibre brush, or common 
whitewash brush, and let it remain on 
for about 20 or 30 minutes, and the dis- 
coloration will disappear. 



w .-' 




This Mid-Winter Weather 

IS THE TIME WHEN A 

Perfect System of Warm Air Circu- 
lation means Comfort in 
That New Home 




A JONES SYSTEM 
Heats this Cottage Home 
at the Least Possible Cost 



THE JONES REGISTERS 

have been placed in over 350,000 of the best homes since 1 902. 
We are leaders in the register business in the United States. 
With our registers but one-half the basement pipes are necessary. 

T. H. Kehoe of New Britian, Conn., writes: 

"Having faith in the principle upon which the Jones register was constructed and beleiv- 
ing that with it a smaller furnace would do the work, I put in a 22-inch furnace and have had 
no trouble in heating my house in the coldest and windiest weather we have had, while I know 
of others, having just as good a furnace as mine and a much larger one, who complained they 
could not heat their houses upon windy days. That I have been able to heat my house so well 
is due to the ventilating feature of the Jones register, as it takes out the cold air and givei the 
hot air a chance to get in. This and many other features of the register recommend it. " 



Drop us a postal today for Free Booklet. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



The United States Register Co., Battle creek, Mich. 

BRANCHES Minneapolis, Kansas City, Mo., DesMoines, la., Toronto, Ont. 



74 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



:A1 (NG 



PLVMBING 





F one expects to get the best possi- 
ble results even from a good fur- 
nace, he should co-operate with 
it. One important method of co- 
operating is by providing the air of the 
rooms that are to be heated with mois- 
ture. As it is humidity in summer that 
often causes us to swelter, so in winter 
it is often the arid condition of the room 
atmosphere that is responsible for our 
shivering, even when we are "sitting 
over the register." If air is allowed to 
become dry, it develops a tendency to 
cool. The hot air that a furnace pours 
into a room will make that room com- 
fortable much more quickly if the air 
in the room is moist than it will if the 
air is dry. It follows, therefore, that 
to keep the air moist is to reduce the 
coal bill or to increase the heating possi- 
bilities of a given amount of coal. It is 
perfectly safe to assert that too much 
moisture cannot be provided. And it 
must be artificially provided, because the 
air in the winter ordinarily is very dry. 
As a rule, the colder the day, the more 
arid the air. When the people in the 
house are most likely to be suffering 
from cold, the air is most likely to be 
suffering from lack of moisture. This 
condition can be remedied. 

Modern furnaces are provided with 
evaporators. There is a mistaken idea 
prevalent in many quarters that the 
evaporator is intended to contain water 
which will prevent the furnace "from 
burning out." The furnace, if it is a 
good one, requires no such preventive 
agent. The sole purpose of the evap- 
orator is to humidify the atmosphere of 
the rooms that are to be heated. The 
water in the container evaporates rap- 
idly when the furnace is heated, and the 
moisture is absorbed by the thirsty warm 
air. It is important that the evaporator 
should be large enough to contain con- 
siderable water and that it should be 
located so high on the furnace that it 



will not remain cold. It seems logical 
that it should be as near the top as pos- 
sible, because the first air that is heated 
in the hot air chamber has a tendency 
to rise and it is not benefited greatly 
by an evaporator that is fixed near the 
bottom of the furnace. But the most 
important thing to be remembered is that 
the evaporator, wherever it is located on 
the furnace, is put there for use and not 
for ornamental purposes. It should be 
"watered" regularly. To fill it daily is 
almost as important as to put coal on the 
fire. Beautiful Homes. 

Material for Service Pipes. 

The quality of the work done by the 
plumber will depend very greatly upon 
the quality of the pipes which he uses. 
All service pipes should be of the best 
quality, or the work will be a failure from 
the beginning. Various kinds of mate- 
rial are used for service pipes in different 
localities, and they are usually chosen in 
accordance with the adaptability of the 
water to the material of which the pipe 
is composed. 

Plain iron pipe is non-poisonous, 
cheap, and easily jointed, but it soon 
gathers rust, which fills the bore of the 
pipe and eats it away, necessitating the 
replacement by new pipe. Galvanized 
iron, or zinc coated iron, will retain its 
coating on the inside a little longer than 
plain iron, but when this coating begins 
to scale, as it will eventually, the water 
may become dangerous to health, as the 
salts of zinc are poisonous with some 
waters, if taken in sufficient quantity. 
Tar-coated iron is used extensively on 
account of its cheapness, but its inner 
surface of tar will be removed by friction 
in less than a year. Its advantage lies 
in the fact that outside contact with all 
kinds of soil will not affect it as rapidly 
as it will plain iron. Plain iron is af- 
fected by both outside and inside cor- 
rosion, so that its decay is hastened. 

Pure tin pipe is perfectly safe and non- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



75 



THE CELEBRATED FURMAN BOILERS 




| Valuable Catalogue on Modern Steam and Hot Water Heat- 
ing, mailed free. Address 

The Herendeen Manufacturing Company 



5 NORTH ST. 



GENEVA, NEW YORK 



As an Investment, Furman Boiler 
in Improved Health, Increased C< 




No. 296 PEARL ST. 



NEW YORK CITY 




New Idea Hinges 

"THE BEST BY EVERY TEST" 

Doors Mounted on these hinges 

Cannot sag and are always kept to true alignment. 
New Idea Hinges are now giving satisfaction on many 
residence, church, school, hotel, apartment, 

office buildings and factories 
Send today for our new hinge catalogue 

Stover Mfg, Co,, 704 Hance Aye,, Freeport, 111, 




Gain Comfort, Secure Health and 
Economize Heating Expense 

by warming your home with our 
open grate fire that does More than 
look bright and warms More than 



one room. 



The Jackson 
Ventilating Grate 



does all these things, and 
Mora. It draws in fresh air 
from outside, warms it by cir- 
culating it around the fire in a 
warming chamber and then 
pours it out into the room thru 
the register over the arch, just nactly as a furnace 
Alts. It warms several connecting rooms, or 
other rooms upstairs, furnishing four times the 
heat from tne same fuel. The best heating in- 
vestment for a cheer-loving home. Any mason 
can set it up from our complete plant furnished 
Free. Heats the house in Fall or Spring as well 
as a furnace with about half the fuel. 

Sent lor Free Catalog of ventilating grates, 
mantels, andirons, and all kinds of fireplace 
fixtures, with explanations, illustrations, full 
information and prices ; also reference to users 
in your region. 






Many styles of grate and 
Mantels to choose from. 



Study this diagram 
and you will see at 
once the heating 
and ventilating 
principle which makes this grate 
superior to all others. 
EDWIN A. JACKSON & BRO. 

MANUFACTURERS 

K Bcekman St. New York 



Perfect Light for the Country Home 

^ Combination 
Gas Machine 



Hera l lighting system that not 
only means good profits for you but 
it will give the most satisfactory 
service to your customers. 
The best light for residences, 
schools, churches, factories, etc., 
especially where city gas or electricity 
are not available. 

This system of lighting is cheaper 
than any other form of light and gives 
perfect results. A gas plant complete 
in itself right in the house. Perfectly 
safe. Examined and tested by the 
Underwriters' Laboratories and listed 
' by the Consulting Engineers of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
The gas is in all respects equal to city 
coal gas, and is ready for use at any 
time without generating, for illu- 
minating or cooking purposes. The 
standard for over 40 years. Over 
15,000 in successful operation. 

The days of kerosene lamps are 
over. Why not sell this light in your 
community? Write for informatio , 
prices and 72-page book, "Lighting 
for Evening Hours." 

DETROIT 
Heating & Lighting Co. 

362 Wight St. DETROIT, MICH. 



76 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Heating and Plumbing Continued 



corrosive, but is difficult to work, as a 
special solder, called "bismuth solder," 
is necessary to joint it properly. It is 
very liable to crack at the edge of the 
joint, and leaks are difficult to repair. 

Brass pipe is very durable if properly 
annealed, is light, strong, and -easily 
jointed. It is said to be poisonous, how- 
ever, when used to conduct water for 
drinking purposes. Copper pipes are not 
used as a cold water supply, but are fre- 
quently used on hot water connections 
between the range and the boiler. Shop- 
pell's. 

Soil Pipes. 

One of the most important require- 
ments of soil pipes, of course, is that 
they shall be self-draining. If the pipe 
is very large it does not require as great 
a fall as does a small pipe. No house 
owner should accept and pay for plumb- 
ing work until after it has been thor- 
oughly tested. The best system for test- 
ing is to plug up the pipes at their lowest 
outlet and fill them with water clear to 
the roof level. This will develop weak- 
nesses or leaks. The inside soil pipes 
should be of iron and should extend at 
least five feet through the outside house 
wall. From this point, for the sake of 
economy, salt glazed vitrified clay pipe 
may be used. This pipe will not be af- 
fected by the action of steam, gases or 
acids and the glazing will not scale. 
Beautiful Homes. 

Electric Heating on a Large Scale. 

That electric heating is to become a 
prominent feature in the homes of the 
future seems to be an undoubted fact. 
A new twelve-story apartment house is 
just being completed on the Morning- 
side Heights section of Riverside Drive, 
New York City, almost opposite Grant's 
Tomb. It will have a roof garden, on 
which will be a children's playground 
and a tennis court. Both of these will 
be inclosed in a grill. Two towers, with 
a pergola between them, will afford a 
delightful lounging place in warm weath- 
er, with attractive river views for the 
loungers. 

The apartments will range in size from 
six rooms and two baths to large duplex 
suites, containing fourteen rooms and 



five baths. Each apartment will contain 
a stationary vacuum cleaning plant. The 
heating of the apartments will be by 
electricity, and the structure will be the 
first example of electric heating on a 
large scale. Architecturally, the build- 
ing will be imposing enough to meet the 
demands of the striking topography of 
this section of the metropolis. The gran- 
ite and white-glazed brick finish, relieved 
by window and balcony lines, will make 
a very striking effect. Shoppell's. 

Distinctive Colors for Piping in Power 
Plants. 

A plan is on foot, which it is to be 
hoped will be standardized throughout 
the country, to adopt distinctive colors 
for painting piping in power plants to 
identify the various lines of pipe and 
thus eliminate confusion from this source 
among workmen and others. 

Apropos of the above we publish the 
following : 

The householder smothered his wrath 
and descended to the basement. "Are 
you the plumber?" he asked of the 
grimy-looking individual who was tink- 
ering with the pipes in the cellar. 

"Yes, guv'nor," answered the man. 

"Been long in the trade?" 

"'Bout a year, guv'nor. 

"Ever make mistakes?" 

"Bless yer, no, guv'nor." 

"Oh, then, I suppose it's all right. I 
imagined you had connected up the 
wrong pipes, for the chandelier in the 
drawing-room is spraying like a foun- 
tain, and the bathroom tap's on fire !" 



Plumbing 
Supplies 

-AT 

Wholesale 
Prices 



Everything in the 
Plumbing Line 




I guarantee to save you 20% to 40% on high class goods. 
No seconds, only first quality. Write and let me prove to 
you the money I can save you. Illustrated catalogue free. 

B. K. KAROL, 768 to 772 West Harrison Street, Chicago, III. 






KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



77 




PHENIX 

HANGERS and 

FASTENERS 

Solve (he problem HOW TO 
BANG and FASTEN Storm Win. 
dows and Window Screens 

It's the "Housewife's Joy" for 
Clean Windows, Ideal Ventila- 
tion, no Flies and Solid Comfort 
RETAIL PRICE, 10, 18. 20 AND 300 

PER SET, WITH SCREW* 

Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers or direct 

For descriptive catalog, address 

PHENIX MFG. CO. 

048 Center St.. Milwaukee, Wit. 



HESSiiiaOCKER 



HPHE only modern Sanitary Steel 

1 Medicine Cabinet Oi Locker. 

Handsome beveled mirror door. Snow 

w bite, everlasting enamel, inside and out. 



FOR YOUR BATHROOM 




Costs less than wood and is better. Should be 
in every bathroom. Is dust, germ and vermin 
proof and easily cleaned with warm water. 

Made in four styles and three sizes. Price 
$7.00 and up. 

Send for illustrated circular. 
HESS, 717 L Tacoma Bid., Chicago 

Makers of the Hess Steel Furnace. 
Sold on Approval. Free Booklet. 



BOUND EDITION OF KEITH'S MAGAZINE YEAR I 

Just a Few Copies Left 

The twelve numbers of 1908 containing a wealth of instructive 
material, designs and beautiful views of the American Home both 
exterior and interior, is handsomely bound in dark green cloth 
and lettered in gold. Shipped by prepaid Express for $2.25. 
This edition with current subscription $3.25 

Send order to M. L. KEITH, Publisher, MINNEAPOLIS 



PRACTICAL HOUSE DECORATION 



The book for all who intend to decorate either a new 
or old home. Written by experienced decorators. 
162 pages, profusely illustrated. Contains many dec- 
orative schemes for a moderate cost house, giving 
treatment for each room. A gold mine of artistic 
suggestions. Size 7 x 9M inches, printed on fine 
enameled paper, limp covers. Price $1.00. 



THIS BOOK WITH KE TH'S MAGAZINE 



for one year, both for $2.00 including three extra 
recent numbers of the Magazine offered with all new 




subscriptions. Order your copy today. 

M. L. KEITH, Publisher, Minneapolis 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 



More Appreciation for the Landscape 
Architect. 

Samuel Parsons, Jr., is authority for 
the statement that the younger genera- 
tion of architects are giving more atten- 
tion to landscape architecture and rec- 
ognize it as a special and separate branch 
of the profession ; that they are more apt 
to call the landscape architect into con- 
sultation before the building is located 
on its site and co-operate with him to- 
ward a successful solution of the prob- 
lem involved than the older practitioners. 
According to Mr. Parsons, there is a 
noticeable improvement in the taste of 
the general public and while amateur 
gardeners or florists continue to attempt 
the practice of landscape architecture, it 
is rapidly being recognized as a profes- 
sion composed of educated and enlight- 
ened individuals who are something more 
than horticulturists and truck gardeners. 

Tremendous Building Activity. 
During the first nine months of the 
past year, builders in the metropolitan 
district of New York City have expended 
about $250,000,000 in the erection of new 
structures, and their total outlay for the 
year 1909 promises to reach nearly $350,- 
000,000. Suburban builders of homes are 
passing all previous records. Some 250,- 
000 people will be added to the popula- 
tion of the suburbs as a result of the full 
year's work. The total outlay in Manhat- 
tan has reached $108,000,000 for new 
buildings, and $10,000,000 for alterations, 
making the expenditures in this borough 
alone, $118,000,000 in all. For the corre- 
sponding period last year it was only 
$68,000,000, so that building operations 
have almost doubled since then. 

Brooklyn's building record for the nine 
months is about $45,000,000 for new 
structures, and $3,650,000 for alterations 
or $48,650,000 in all. By far the largest 
part of this amount has been invested in 
homes, either flathouses or small private 
dwellings. The total outlay for the cor- 
responding period last year was not ex- 
ceeding $30,000,000. 

Builders in the Bronx Borough have 



spent more than $30,000,000 on new 
structures during the first nine months 
of the year, which compares with a little 
more than $12,000,000 for the same period 
in 1908. The Borough of Queens is 
maintaining its highest records in build- 
ing operations. The great mass of its 
construction is devoted to small dwell- 
ings. The borough's outlay for new 
buildings during the nine months reached 
$12,800,000, and the alterations bring this 
amount up to $13,400,000. Queens has 
built more than 3,500 new structures dur- 
ing the year. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad is planning 
to open its tunnels to Long Island in 
February, at the latest, and this gigantic 
rapid transit improvement will be of in- 
estimable value to the suburban develop- 
ment of Long Island. Electrification of 
connecting roads will give direct rapid 
transit from outlying home centers to the 
Pennsylvania terminal in Manhattan. 
The new system will save forty minutes 
over the old-time schedules. Exchange. 

Minneapolis Building Record. 
Totals for building operations in 1909 
show that all previous records have been 
broken. 

The record for the first eleven months 
now obtainable gives a total of 5,823 per- 
mits representing $12,237,240. For the 
same period in 1908, the permits were 
.5,394, amounting to $9,370,745. 

In November, 1909, 425 permits were 
issued, costing $1,056,385. 

For November, 1908, 388 permits were 
issued, costing $922,995. 

It is confidently expected that a total 
of $13,000,000 will be reached when all 
figures are compiled for 1909. It is 
known that many large buildings are in 
prospect for the spring and this year 
will no doubt show a substantial increase 
over 1909. 

When water splashes at the faucets 
and there is hammering in the pipes, it 
may usually be taken for granted that 
the water pressure is high. The remedy 
for these troubles is to install a valve 
that will reduce the water pressure. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



79 



A STARTLING! EXPOSURE 
THE MENACE OF 1HC POLICE 



THREE MILLION DOLLARS A 
DAY FOR CRIME 




BY 

HUGH C WEIR 




THE police are the public officials closest in touch 
with our every-day life. They are supposed to 
protect us from criminals, arrest and punish law- 
breakers, and in general see that the law is enforced. 
Are they really doing this ? Mr. Hugh C. Weir, a writer 
and investigator of unusual ability, who has been work- 
ing for months on the subject, will furnish a group of 
articles for THE WORLD TO-DAY- showing that they 
do not. He will not deal in generalities, but will give facts, naming persons and places. He has 
collected material which promises to make one of the biggest of magazine sensations. These 
articles will be : 

I. Three Million Dollars a Day for Crime 

THAT IS WHAT CRIME COSTS THE UNITED STATES. 

II. The Bully in the Blue Uniform 

WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THE "THIRD DEGREE" PROCEDURE OF THE POLICE. 

III. The Plunder of the Police 

SOME ACCOUNT OF THE GRAFT IN OUR POLICE FORCE. 

IV. Substituting Brains for Clubs 

HOW THE POLICE SYSTEM IS BEING TENTATIVELY REFORMED. 

The first article will appear in the January number. Besides giving an account of the cost 
of crime, it will tell in detail how undesirable men are appointed to the police force. 
How common laborers, and even criminals, are made into " protectors " of the public, and 
how, within the police force of many cities, there exist organizations which make discipline 
all but impossible. Every citizen who is interested in the great question of public safety 
should read this series. 

OTHER BIG FEATURES OF THE JANUARY ISSUE 
The Governors' Messages to the People 

The January number of THE WORLD TO-DAY will contain statements from a number of the Gov- 
ernors of the Middle West showing what, in their opinions, are the most pressing problems of their 
respective States. This collection of brief statements from men who really voice the sentiment of the 
dominant party of each State will be a revelation to the Nation. The Middle West is rapidlv becom- 
ing the debating ground of politics. This symposium might almost be called a program for the 
Nation's to-morrow. 

Roosevelt in Africa 

Mr. E. M. Newman, the noted lecturer, will tell in the January issue of his meeting 
Ex. Pres. Roosevelt and his caravan in the heart of Africa and his own impressions 
of the big game country. New photographs of great interest. 



The Old West in the New East 

January issue will also contain the first article of our TRAVEL series. 
China and Japan are the countries visited, and Prof. E. D. Burton will tell why 
the Chinaman as well as the Jap must be reckoned with in the future. These 
are but a few of the many articles that will make the January number 
one of exceptional interest and the best issue of THE WORLD 
TO-DAY ever published. If you miss it, you will miss a treat. 
At all dealers for 15 cents, or send $1.50 for an entire year. 

THE WORLD TO-DAY, CHICAGO 




\*> 



80 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



GLIMPSES OF BOOKS 




Concrete Pottery and Garden Furniture. 

By Ralph C. Davison. 
OR the adornment of home 
grounds, much of interest will be 
found in this book. Garden fur- 
niture of every description is discussed, 
from the simple vase to the most elabor- 
ate modelings in concrete. 

The book not only treats of the proper 
designs and objects for the purpose, but 
goes into the method of producing them. 
The handy man will find much that can 
be made at a small expense, at odd mo- 
ments and for the manufacturer of ce- 
ment products, exact instructions are 
given as to the production of the most 
elaborate work. 

This book should be of general inter- 
est. It contains thirteen chapters in 196 
pages, with 140 illustrations. 



Building Construction 

The following is a list of Particular Sub- 
jects treated in former numbers of the 
Journal of M o d e r n Construction. 



ALL FULLY ILLUSTRATED. 



SUBJECTS 

Interior Details of Sideboards, etc. - 
Dormer Designs and Details - - - 
Seven Garages with Material Required 
Concrete, Its uses and Abuses - - - 
Homes of Concrete ------- 

Modern Illumination ...... 

Strength of Foundations .... 

About Tile Floors ....... 

Oriel Windows ........ 

High Art on Concrete Stone ... 
Plaster on Cement Block Veneer - - 
Modern Ideas of Design - - - - - 

Article on Porches ....... 

Article on Elsctric Lighting ... 
Built-in Sideboards ...... 

Moderate Priced Fire-Proof Houses - 
Problems in Concrete (Continued) - 
Plaster Casts in Interior Decoration - 
An Economical and Picturesque 

Concrete House ...... 

Problems in Concrete (Continued) - 
Problems in Concrete (Continued) - 
Uncommon Uses of Cement - - - 
Problems in Concrete (Continued) - 



Month Published 

Sept. 1907 
Sept. 1907 

Oct. 1907 

Oct. 1907 

Nov. 1907 

Nov. 1907 

Nov. 1807 

Dec. 1907 

Dec. 1907 

Dec. 1907 

Dec. 1987 

Jan. 1908 

Feb. 1908 

Mar. 1908 

Mar. 1908 

April 1908 

Mar. 1909 

Mar. 1909 




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ANY 3 NUMBERS and KEITH'S 6 MONTHS $1.0O. 



M. L. KEITH, 525 Lumber Ex. 
MINNEAPOLIS. 



The chapter on color effects in con- 
crete tile, etc., is specially instructive 
and interesting. 

Munn & Co., New York Publishers. 
Price $1.50. 



Ann Veronica. 

By H. G. Wells. 

Readers of the earlier work of this au- 
thor, will miss the pseudo-scientific 
method in the present volume. The book 
is of special interest because it deals with 
up-to-the-minute problems which we as 
Americans are just beginning to get a 
glimpse of. The suffragette movement 
in England will have its American out- 
break without doubt. Dealing with a 
young girl of more than average mental- 
ity the book shows her resentment of 
parental restrictions, her rebellion and 
flight. Her experiences are the history 
of centuries in the relation of man to 
woman, yet new to her. She takes an 
active part with the suffragettes, listens 
to arguments new, old and threadbare. 
From the militant suffragette, with little 
need or respect for man in the abstract, 
she becomes under the spell of love, one 
who finds her greatest aim in life, to be 
an existence merged with that of the 
man she loves. Her trust under the most 
adverse conditions is rewarded by a 
happy fruition. This book should be 
widely read that light may be received 
on the coming battle of the sexes. Har- 
per and Brothers, N. Y., Publishers. 
Price, $1.50. 



Around the World in a Berry Wagon, 

Is the title of a picture book, illustrated 
in color by W. W. Denslow. Each coun- 
try is visited and the principal historic 
events are stated in an entertaining way 
making it of interest to all. A child 
could not fail to be interested in it. 
Berry Brothers, Limited, Detroit, Mich. 
Price lOc. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ON HOME BUILDING 



WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED 



THE JOURNAL OF MODERN CONSTRUCTION 

M. L. KEITH, Publisher 

525 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minnesota 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 851 Marquette Bldg. NEW YORK OFFICE: No. 1 Madison Avenue 



CONTENTS FOR FEBRUARY, 1911 

Page 

EDITORIAL 74 

THE DINING ROOM AS IT SHOULD BE 77 

A CHILDREN'S PLAY ROOM 83 

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS OF THE HOME 87 

WALL DECORATIONS 90 

A MODIFIED CHALET 94 

DESIGNS FOR THE HOME BUILDER 96 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING 108 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION 114 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 118 

TABLE CHAT 122 

CEMENT 126 

PAINTING AND FINISHING 1 32 

HEATING AND PLUMBING '.. 136 

SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 1 40 

GLIMPSES OF BOOKS ... . . 144 



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For sale by all News Dealers in the U. S. and Canada. ' Trade supplied by American News Co. and Branches 



Entered January 1 , 1899. at the Post Office in Minneapolis, Minn., for transmission through the mails at second-class matter. 

COPYRIGHTED 1910. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



VOL. XXV 



FEBRUARY, 191 



No. 2 




A DINING ROOM WAINSCOTED TO THE CEILING 



The Dining Room as It Should Be 



By MARY H. NORTHEND 

(Photographs by the Author) 




HE dining-room more than any 
other room in the house demands 
careful consideration in the mat- 
ter of planning and equipment. 
Its purpose limits its treament, and af- 
fords but narrow scope for individuality 
which is the most potent factor of in- 
terior decoration. Thus the most must 
be made of limited opportunities. 

The vital point is location. In the 
planning of a new home this matter is 



readily solved, if a little thought is be- 
stowed upon it, and even in a dining- 
room already built, the results of faulty 
arrangement can be materially lessened 
at slight expense. 

No better location could be found than 
one that opens directly upon a veranda, 
to which the table can be removed, dur- 
ing the summer months. Of course in 
this case the porch must be screened, 
and long French windows must be pro- 



78 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



vided to connect the room and the ve- 
randa. 

Another excellent location is that 
where windows upon opposite sides of 
the room, as east and west walls, give 
opportunity for cross currents of air dur- 
ing the heated term. No other position 
can give the same effect of coolness, but 
it presupposes an arrangement of rooms 
by which large doors can connect the 
dining-room with other apartments 
across the hall, or else a very unusual 
narrowness of the house plan at that par- 
ticular point, so that its total width is 
but the length of one room. 

However placed, the dining-room must 
inevitably connect with the kitchen, or 
with the pantry which serves as an in- 
termediary between the two. In many 
city houses, this fact unfortunately is apt 
to determine the position of the dining- 
room, without regard to more esthetic 
considerations. 

It frequently happens that the most 
glaring fault of the dining-room is poor 
lighting. Cheerfulness should be the 
predominant characteristic of this apart- 
ment, and unless ample provision is made 
for the entrance of sunshine, the room 
loses the chief asset to its success. It is 
often possible in a gloomy room to add 
a bay window at the end or at the side 
of the room, thus affording additional 
light, as well as a wider view and an in- 
crease of floor space. 

The position of the fireplace in the 
dining-room deserves , consideration. 
This feature, while no longer absolutely 
necessary for warmth, is always as pleas- 
ing as it is decorative. Its best location 
is in the end wall, rather than at the side. 
If the space in the centre of the end wall 
is needed for the buffet, the fireplace may 
well be put into one corner. This loca- 
tion aids symmetry, if balanced by a 
built-in china closet across the other cor- 
ner, with the buffet between them. 
These built-in cabinets are worthy of 



thought. Not only do they decorate a 
plain interior and afford the best pos- 
sible repositories for china ware, but they 
frequently successfully tone down an 
ugly bit of construction. Then, too, in 
a small room, where economy of floor 
space is necessary, they do away with 
the need of buffet or side-table. 

After location and architectural fea- 
tures, the main consideration is that of 
finish. Oak is undoubtedly the standard 
wood for the dining-room finish. Golden 
oak and antique oak are favorable to 
color combinations, since they harmonize 
with almost everything, and form a per- 
fect background. Chestnut makes 
beautiful paneling, but on the whole 
nothing exceeds dull finished oak. 

For a small room, very flat paneling 
is best, as the flatter the panels, the 
larger the effect of the room. A room 
paneled from floor to ceiling is unde- 
niably charming, but the cost is a con- 
siderable item. Only the very best ma- 
terial and the best workmanship are 
worthy to be used in such details. Any 
attempt to substitute the cheaper grades 
of either would probably result in warp- 
ing and disfigurement which is difficult 
to repair. 

If a part of the wall is to be plaster, 
the top of the wainscoting should be 
guarded. If a high wainscot is desired, 
let it stop at the same distance from the 
ceiling as the tops of the windows and 
doors. If the wainscot is to be low, it 
should reach above the floor only as far 
as the window-sills, for it will be found 
that a restful effect can be obtained only 
by lines that are continuous. If the room 
is low-studded, never break the side wall 
into halves by the wainscoting; use 
thirds instead. Divisions of a side wall 
into halves, either vertically or horizon- 
tally, are to be deprecated. 

No other treatment conveys quite the 
same sense of exquisite neatness and 
perfect cleanliness which we receive 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



79 




WHITE FINISH AND QUAINT COLONIAL FURNITURE IN MAHOGANY 




A MODERN DINING ROOM WITH CRAFTSMAN MOTIVES 



80 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



from that introduced by Robert Adam 
and his brother, and continued in the 
Georgian and Colonial periods. This 
gives us clean-looking wall-surfaces, 
paneled in woodwork for some consider- 
able distance, and finished in plaster 
above the woodwork. All the wood- 
finish is hard white enamel, very easily 
cleansed. A good treatment of the plas- 
ter wall above, is to panel that also, in 
white, light grey, or light green. White 
paneled walls are always pleasing for a 
town dining-room, and furnish a becom- 
ing background for pictures or for furni- 
ture. 

If the Adam line of treatment is to be 
followed, the ceiling and chimney-piece 
should be decorated in low relief with 
some one of the designs made by this 
great English master of decoration. It 
would be well to have a fine Adam side- 
board, with separate pedestals surmount- 
ed by the old urns or knife boxes. Either 
Sheraton or Chippendale furniture would 
be effective. 

The Colonial treatment requires less 
elaborate decoration than that which has 
just been mentioned. It is neat, fresh, 
and dignified. Its white enameled wall 
surface may be extended only as far as 
the wainscot extends, for a plastered wall 
with a plain Colonial wall paper is in 
perfect harmony. The white enamel con- 
trasts finely with highly polished silver 
and old mahogany furniture in Chippen- 
dale or Sheraton styles. 

Quaint touches may be given to a 
Colonial dining-room, by introducing the 
plain prim fireplace of our great-grand- 
mother's day, with and-irons, fender, 
tongs, bellows, and even warming-pan. 
A grandfather's clock can well be placed 
in such a room, if we have a corner 
where it will balance well with fireplace 
or built-in buffet. The old Windsor 
chairs may be used, and the rug may be 
woven to order in imitation of the old- 
fashioned rag-carpet. 



These individual touches have en- 
deared to us the Colonial dining-room, so 
that more of them are in use among us 
today than of any other type. Right 
here is where we must use firm restraint, 
however, lest we indulge our love of 
curios at the expense of good taste. We 
need to apply Sheraton's rule for dining- 
room furnishing, and limit our individual 
efforts to "substantial and useful things, 
avoiding trifling ornaments and unneces- 
sary decorations." 

As for the furniture, the material may 
be mahogany, Flemish oak, golden oak, 
antique oak, or any of the cheaper and 
lighter woods, stained to imitate one of 
these standard sorts. Mahogany is al- 
ways the queen of woods, but the gen- 
uine is expensive. Flemish oak is more 
reasonable in price, and is exceedingly 
handsome. Either of these woods, or 
their imitations, are beautifully harmon- 
ious in a Colonial room with white finish. 
A fine effect is "obtained by staining the 
furniture to match the woodwork, but 
this makes it necessary to buy the req- 
uisite pieces in unfinished wood. 

The number of articles to be used is 
rigidly limited by Sheraton's rule, al- 
ready mentioned. These include the din- 
ing-table and chairs, the sideboard, the 
serving-table and the china cabinet. These 
are indispensable, and any one of them 
can be omitted only when we find a per- 
fect substitute to fill its place. 

To this number may be added at will 
a tea-table; a glass closet; a leather- 
covered davenport, to match the chairs, 
in case that they have leather seats ; a 
tall clock, if the style of the room is 
Colonial; a tabouret for a large fern or 
artistic bit of pottery in the bay window ; 
and a screen in front of the door through 
which the food is to be brought. In a 
very large room, all of these features 
could be introduced ; but far more usually 
the rooms are small for their intended 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



81 




POORLY SELECTED FURNITURE IN A ROOM OF ARTISTIC FINISH 



purpose, and every effort must be used 
to avoid overcrowding. 

The dining-table is of course the lead- 
ing feature. It is the central thought of 
the whole room, and as such it should be 
treated. Only by keeping this idea con- 
stantly in mind can we secure for it the 
harmonious setting which it should have. 
Ordinarily speaking, round or elliptical 
tables belong to round or elliptical 
rooms, and square or oblong tables be- 
long to rooms that are rectangular in 
shape. Of course the round table can be 
used in a rectangular room, if the sharp 
outlines of the corners are eliminated. 
Suppose at one end of the room there 
is a bay window of the curved type. Into 
the corners of the main wall at each side 
of this window china closets, in delightful 
imitation of the old-time corner cup- 



board, can be arranged at slight expense. 
Then the corners at the other end of the 
room can be neatly done away with by 
using a tall clock in the one and a screen 
of good height in the other, where the 
service door leads to the kitchen. In 
such a transformed room the round table 
can be placed with perfect harmony. 

But whatever the shape of the cable, 
its proper place is invariably in the exact 
center of the room. Its size depends en- 
tirely upon the number of persons for 
whom provision is to be made. Its top 
should be sufficiently ornamental to be 
left bare. In the centre, a doily, of drawn 
work, embroidery, or Irish crochet, may 
be placed, with some simple decoration 
like a vase of roses, or a brass bowl filled 
with nasturtiums. 

The chairs should be carefully chosen 



82 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



as to height, with high, flat backs, and 
seats that are deep and easy. Their style 
should correspond with that of the finish 
and the furniture. Comfort will be in- 
creased by using the regulation carver's 
and tea-pourer's chairs at each end of the 
table, as their seats are slightly more ele- 
vated than those of the ordinary pattern, 
with the addition of arms and of higher 
backs. 

The sideboard or buffet performs much 
the same office as the serving-table. The 
former is more suitable for large rooms, 
and the latter for small ones. By the 
use of built-in closets, we may dispense 
with the buffet, in the case of small and 
informal dining-rooms of a modified 
Colonial type. We may even omit both 
details, if we provide a ledge of reason- 
able width above the lower division of 
the closet. As this arrangement, if ex- 
tended, will also do away with the need 
of a movable china cabinet, it is easy to 
see that much floor space is saved, and 
that for small dining-rooms the sugges- 
tion has much value. 

The floor itself should be left uncarpet- 
ed. A Persian rug is generally the most 
desirable floor covering, unless a plain 
ground is desired, in which case, a fine 



Wilton pile may be chosen. It will be 
found, however, that a closely-set pattern 
of harmonious coloring is more service- 
able in the dining-room than one of plain 
color and no pronounced design. This is 
because it keeps in better condition with- 
out showing wear and tear, and also be- 
cause it gives the room more character. 

The ample windows, with which the 
dining-room should always be provided, 
should be simply draped with light-col- 
ored blinds, and shades to be drawn at 
night and in the heated period. Silk is 
much used for this purpose, as are many 
materials that have a silken finish. 

Besides the natural lighting, the artifi- 
cial light has to be considered. No room 
with shadowy corners is attractive, and 
provision should be made for lighting 
these dark spaces. The fixtures should be 
chosen with a view to harmony, and 
those simple and durable should be given 
the preference. The time has happily 
passed when the central light is consid- 
ered sufficient illumination, and, in con- 
sequence, the dining-room of the present 
is a pleasant, cheerful apartment, devoid 
of dim nooks, filled with depressing 
shadows. 







A DECORATIVE FRIEZE IN COLORS 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



83 



A Children's Play Room 

The Necessity and Advisability of Pleasing Surroundings 



By ARTHUR E. GLEED 

(Drawings by the Author) 




A BRIGHT AND CHEERFUL PLAY ROOM 




N THE cultivation of good taste 
in the home, to begin with the 
children is a stronghold for the 
future, and the provision of an 
artistic and pleasant playroom for their 
special use will do much for the awaken- 
ing of their sense of the appreciation of 
the beautiful. The idea that a room 
which cannot be used for anything else 
will "do for the children," is an absurd 
mistake, and the practice of getting rid 



of old furniture and faded draperies by 
furnishing the children's room with them 
is really to distort the growing artistic 
taste in the coming generation, and to 
show at the same time that we ourselves 
have no true conception of the word ar- 
tistic. 

The children's room should be a place 
of happiness. Its coloring should be 
bright and cheerful, suggesting the out- 
door world, and its furnishing should be 



84 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE STENCILLED FRIEZE OF CHILDISH FIGURES 



simple and plain, relieved by design of 
an almost primitive nature, that the 
whole may be easily understood by the 
occupants. The hygienic details must be 
studied, and the choice of a sunny situa- 
tion is essential, for the room will be 
used more in winter than in summer. 
Spacious windows should be provided to 
admit abundant air and light, and the 
heating should be sufficiently adequate 
. to admit of the windows being open in 
winter, that the pure air may be enjoyed 
whilst the children indulge in active 
games and dances. 

In the play-room illustrated we have a 
good example of a cheerful environment 
for children, and at the same time the 
appointments are inexpensive, easily 
cleaned, and sufficiently durable to stand 
the hard wear they are likely to receive. 
The walls, at the lower part where most 
of the wear takes place, are lined with 
a wooden wainscot. Above that they are 
painted with oil color as far as the frieze, 



and the latter, together with the ceiling, 
have a kalsomine finish. The color 
scheme is a happy combination of blue 
and green, used as a background for the 
warmer and brighter tints of the deco- 
rative patterns. 

The stencilled frieze is two feet deep, 
and has the effect of lowering the wall 
spaces to suit the height of the children. 
The ceiling and background of the frieze 
as far as the skyline are tinted a pale 
blue, and the remainder of the frieze 
background, forming the distant trees, is 
tinted a light sunny green. The large 
trees are put in with a dull blue-green 
for the foliage and olive green for the 
trunks. The groups of children are in 
dainty shades of pink, mauve and yellow, 
with a dull flesh pink for the faces, hands 
and feet. The rabbits in the foreground 
are creamy white, and touches of bright 
color are added by the powdering of blos- 
soms between them. The design of the 
frieze is so arranged that it does not 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



85 




form a regular repeating pattern, but can 
be varied and arranged to suit each wall 
space. A pleasing group of trees and 
figures can be placed over each window 
and door, and then the remaining space 
on either side filled in to form a proces- 
sion of children between trees. After the 
main figures are spaced out, the rabbits 
and small flowers can be added to the 
foreground where space suggests them, 
and the whole lined up with a wooden 
picture molding stained deep green. The 
finished frieze will have the appearance 
of a quaint procession of child figures 
and rabbits, which will form a series of 
pictures that will be a delight to chil- 
dren. 

The wall space below the frieze is oil 
painted a light sunny green as far as 
the wainscot, and the latter is stained 
deep green and oil finished to bring out 
the grain of the wood. 

One end of the room is fitted with a 
three-sided settle and a table as shown 



in the illustration. This end of the room 
would be used for all kinds of table 
games, reading, lessons, and also as a 
dining place. To complete the dining 
place idea, a small dresser-sideboard 
stands behind the projecting side of the 
settle, and holds all the china, etc., neces- 
sary for meals. Children delight in all 
kinds of housekeeping games, and it 
should be an entertaining task for them 
to lay the table for their own meals, and 
by the stimulus of reality, they will learn 
the value of much that is usually done 
for them by adults. Their work would 
consist only of laying the table ready for 
meals and clearing it afterwards, for of 
course all cooking would be done else- 
where. But even this small service, 
when well done, would be excellent train- 
ing for the children, and the entertain- 
ing of little visitors under such circum- 
stances would have an added pleasure. 

The settle could be constructed open 
underneath as in the illustration or it 



86 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



could be built in box form and thus pro- 
vide a handy place for storing books, 
papers, etc. The seat should be fitted 
with mattress shaped cushions covered 
in some dark green material such as 
serge or denim. 

Except where the settle and sideboard 
stand, the wainscot is capped by a broad 
shelf, supported at intervals by brackets. 
This shelf is specially used for toys, for 
these have considerable decorative value, 
and are well displayed against the plain 
green wall. Immediately below the shelf 
are placed some substantial hooks for 
rackets, etc., and one particular wall- 
space could be set apart for wraps. 

Growing plants are an important item 
in a children's room, for apart from their 
beauty, they are a great educational fac- 
tor if the child is taught the requirements 
of plant life. A plant stand such as il- 
lustrated would not be a very costly af- 
fair, and it would be a veritable indoor 
garden when filled with blossoming 
plants. It should be substantially built 
of wood an inch thick, with legs two 
inches square that it may stand firmly 
and bear the weight of a number of pots. 
The box should be fitted with a shallow 
zinc tray to take any overflow of water. 
The roof with its upright supports can 
be more lightly built, and a pretty effect 
would be got by making the roof of sil- 
ver birch bark and training ivy up the 
posts and over the roof. There are many 
hardy flowers that will blossom well at 
a sunny window, and it would not be diffi- 
cult to keep up a show of color, especial- 
ly as the pots can easily be removed and 
replaced by others from the outdoor gar- 
den, according to season. 

The main part of the room is left clear 
of furniture, to allow for games and 
romping. One or two chairs can be in- 
troduced, but the settle will supply al- 
most all the seats wanted, and the clear 
space will be appreciated by the children. 
If they possess many books, a set of 



bookshelves standing on the floor im- 
mediately below the toy shelf would be 
an incentive to tidiness. One large rug 
to cover the center of the floor need be 
the only floor covering, and beyond that 
the boards can either be stained and 
waxed, or painted a dull green. 

The curtains at the windows are of un- 
bleached linen, decorated with a broad 
border at the bottom edge, executed 
either by stencilling or appliqued linen. 
A bold design of apple branches would 
be a suitable subject as the natural tints 
of dull green and red-brown would har- 
monize well with the buff color of the 
unbleached linen. 

Expensive wood should not be used 
for the fittings and furniture of the room, 
for children like to be free and active in 
their own domain. White pine can be 
made up inexpensively, and when stained 
a warm green and given a dull polish, it 
will give an excellent effect. Pictures for 
the walls, framed in green frames to ac- 
cord with the woodwork, should be 
chosen with simple subject and rendered 
without detail, that they may be easily 
and definitely understood. Excellent 
nursery pictures can be obtained printed 
in bright yet artistic colors, with subjects 
such as birds, ships, and landscapes treat- 
ed in a quaint manner, which appeal im- 
mediately to the eye and mind of a child. 

Such a room would be well worth 
spending time and money over, for the 
environment of children needs the ut- 
most study, as they, even more than 
adults are influenced by their surround- 
ings. If they mix constantly with their 
elders, and are always forced to adapt 
themselves to the grown-up world, they 
miss the natural free growth of child- 
hood. But allowed a living-room of their 
own, where things are in proportion to 
their size, and the surroundings are sim- 
plified to suit their minds, they will learn 
more soundly all that is really useful and 
beautiful. 



KFITH'S MAGAZINE 



87 



Construction Details of the Home 

The Frame Its Construction, Erection 
and Enclosure 

By H. EDWARD WALKER 

(Continued from January Issue) 




I OO/ <t-TC.lC-VlfW StrCTion[ J 



THE BALOON FRAME 




pies 



HAT is known as the balloon 
frame is generally employed in 
the construction of the wood 
house. The fundamental princi- 
of the construction are still pre- 



served, yet the methods as to detail have 
undergone radical changes. In the early 
days intricate framing and numberless 
difficult joints were considered absolutely 
necessary, but simplicity is now the key- 
note of the construction. In the methods 
illustrated the work is shown, not as it 
might be under the very best practice, 
but as the modern workman would put 



it together if left to his own devices and 
as would be acceptable in most localities. 
The previous article treating of the 
basement showed the posts, girders and 
joists erected upon the foundation and 
the lining floor in place ready for the 
frame. The next step is to spike a 2x4 
in place about the outer walls directly 
upon the lining floor, as indicated on the 
accompanying section. The partitions of 
the various rooms are then outlined upon 
the lining floor in 2x4s. In each case 
where a partition has the same direction 
as the joists they should be doubled be- 



88 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



neath it, or otherwise arranged as shown 
in figure 8 of the previous article. The 
studs are now erected, spaced 16 inches 
on centers and doubled at corners. No 
notice is ordinarily taken of the position 
of openings at this time either in the ex- 
terior or interior walls. There would 
seem to be some advantage in marking 
the position of doors and windows upon 
the 2x4 shoe before the studs are placed, 
but it is seldom done. The studs of the 
outside wall are shown 18 feet long, this 
being the length commonly used where 
level ceilings are to obtain in the second 
story. This gives 9 feet for the first story 
and 8 feet 5 inches for the second story, 
both measured in the clear, without cut- 
ting the stud to waste. The second floor 
joists rest upon a ribbon, as it is called, 
1 inch by 4 inches, notched into these 
studs to keep the wall flush on the inside 
after plastering. See section. The 
joists may also be notched to receive the 
ribbon but it is seldom considered neces- 
sary, the joist being carefully spiked to 
the stud. 

The interior studs are cut in story 
lengths only, with provision for a plate 
spiked across their upright ends, consist- 
ing of two 2x4s, upon which rest the 
inner ends of the second floor joists. The 
interior studs of the second story rest 
upon this plate and continue up to a 
similar plate that supports the attic 
joists. See isometric view. 

The rafters and attic joists are framed 
to a double 2x4 plate spiked to the upper 
ends of the outside studs, the rafters 
being notched to secure a better bed and 
the corner of the joists are beveled off in 
line with the rafter as shown on the iso- 
metric view. The upper ends of the 
rafter are spiked to a ridge board one 
inch in thickness and in depth as required 
by the pitch of the rafters. Where rafters 
coming from different directions inter- 
sect a hip or valley is formed and a hip 
or valley rafter is necessary to carry the 



load coming from both directions. This 
requires a strong timber deeper than the 
joist framed against it, to include the 
whole depth of their cut ends. The ele- 
vation shows a portion of the exterior 
with the framing all in place. The studs 
are shown doubled at the corners, spaced 
16 inches on centers, starting at the bot- 
tom from a 2x4 shoe and ending in a 
double plate of 2x4 at the top, on which 
rest the attic joists and roof rafters. The 
second floor joists are shown resting 
upon the ribbon and the flooring in place. 

Short pieces of 2x4 should be cut be- 
tween the studs of all walls, as indicated, 
for bridging. As soon as the floor joists 
are in place they should be bridged with 
1 inch by 2 inch cross bridging as shown 
in figure. One line of bridging in a span 
of 14 feet or less is sufficient. Greater 
spans should have two lines of bridging. 

Window openings are shown with 2x4 
doubled about them showing method of 
construction and support. These open- 
ings are cut in after the frame is up and 
should be carefully framed for strength 
and accuracy. The studs at either side 
of the window frame should be set to 
allow a weight pocket from 2^4 to 2^ 
inches wide. The blind stop, which is that 
portion of the window next to and under- 
neath the outside casing, should always 
be wide enough to nail to the studding at 
the sides, holding the frame securely in 
place. 

Two other methods of placing the 
rafters and attic joists are shown and a 
larger drawing of the first method de- 
scribed. Fig. 1 shows the attic joists sup- 
ported upon a ribbon like that at the 
second floor level, with the rafter resting 
upon the plate at the top of the studding. 
This allows more headroom in the attic 
at the outer walls, but if the first and 
second stories are of the usual heights, 
requires extra long studs at a greater ex- 
pense. It does give a greater height to 
the cornice and more space above the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



89 




IxaT 

CROSS DP. 



FRAMING OF RAFTERS, JOISTS AND PLATES 



second story windows, a feature to be de- 
sired. Fig. 2 shows the attic joists rest- 
ing upon a single plate with an additional 
plate spiked to them above on which the 
rafters rest. This requires no more ma- 
terial than figure 3 shown with a double 
plate, requires a little less framing in its 
erection, and gives a little more height 
to the building. The outside boarding 
or sheathing should be put on diagonally 
and should be dressed and matched, af- 
fording strength to the whole frame and 
keeping out cold. It will be found that 
loose knots and knot holes are in evi- 



dence after the walls are sheathed, un- 
less a very superior grade of lumber is 
used and all such places should be cov- 
ered with waste pieces of shingle, care- 
fully nailed in place with short nails, 
from the inside. Care should be taken 
that all portions of the frame are level 
and plumb, thus avoiding trouble when 
the more important finishing materials 
are placed in position. 

All portions should be carefully nailed 
not only to insure safety but to avoid 
settlement and displacement so often in- 
dicated by cracked plastering. 



(To be continued.) 



90 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Wall Decorations 

Suggestions as to Materials and Treatment 
By MARGARET ANN LAWRENCE 

(Designs by the Author) 




U I ' 



y/i'rUfl* i/ai : 

'! ? , ^^Er^ 

' 

' / *'A-^ . 






AN OVER-MANTEL DECORATION IN TAPESTRY EFFECT 




HERE has probably never been a 
time when the subject of house- 
hold decoration has received 
quite the interest which is ac- 
corded it at present. The subject is one 
which is of as great vital importance to 
the home builder, as is the question of ar- 
chitecture and what might be called the 
more practical side of house furnishing. 
For many years the house painter or 
decorator used stiff, unattractive stencils 
on walls and ceilings. Motifs that had 
no relation either in color or design to 
anything else in the room but today it 
is quite changed. The earnest, intelli- 
gent attention given to wall decoration 
in the modern house is one of the strong- 
est points of difference between the old 
order and the new, the whole idea being 



to make these prominent spaces serve as 
a natural background for the furnishings. 

Women today demand harmony and 
individuality in their houses. As a result 
many interesting and artistic decorations 
are seen done by amateurs as well as 
professionals. 

The hanging of a wall with fabric re- 
quires no professional hand. Stretch 
your strips of cloth, tacking them lightly 
in place at first as they may require more 
stretching later. There are many coarse- 
ly woven coverings now on the market, 
all suitable for this purpose. In cover- 
ing the entire wall, the material may be 
tacked or pasted to the wall ; edges just 
meeting under strips of lathing or nar- 
row moulding stained to match the wood- 
work. Finish at the top with picture 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



91 



moulding, also a narrow strip above the 
baseboard. 

This treatment gives the effect of Jap- 
anese paneling and is delightful in ap- 
pearance. 

The next step is in selecting the sten- 
cils and the colorings to be used. There 
is today a wholesome reaction from the 
elaborate frescoing of garlands, bow- 
knots and scrolls of twenty years ago. 
Between this and the severely plain there 
is a happy medium, where decoration of 
thoughtful design shall be sparingly 
used, and will add a touch of individu- 
ality to even the simplest house. 

If one is afraid to design and cut a 
stencil most excellent ones can be pur- 
chased at the art stores ; or they will have 
individual motifs cut if so ordered. 

It is well to practice- a little before 
attempting the wall, to get the desired 
colorings and spacings. Dilute oil paints 
with turpentine and then wipe the brush 
nearly dry. Put on the color in vertical 
dabs, rubbing in lightly. The stencil 
should be well fastened to prevent slip- 
ping and also at the edges to prevent the 
color running, leaving a ragged edge. 
Decide as to spacings. Measure care- 
fully and keep them on a straight line. 
Charcoal dots and large pins will help 
mark where the repeats are to come. 

We get a feeling of unity in the deco- 
ration of a room by taking one motif and 
repeating it in the stencil on the wall, 
the embroidery of covers and the com- 
bination of both stencil and needle-work 
on hangings. 

The general use of the softly tinted 
alabastined walls in new houses makes 
very charming results and lighter color- 
ings are possible. 

Take a side wall color of a dull soft 
medium shade of green, the shade so 
restful to weary eyes and tired over- 
strained nerves. Carry it up to the ceil- 
ing, tinted in a pearl white. Now stencil 
a bold conventional motif at regular and 



evenly separated distances in a faint 
salmon pink, with a fine black outline on 
either side. It should drop about twenty- 
four inches from the plate rail. Use the 
color just as it has been prepared for 
the wall surface, only have it somewhat 
thicker and stronger in tone. Apply with 
short even strokes of the brush, taking 
care not to use too much paint, or it will 
run under the stencil. Fill every aper- 
ture of the pattern before removing the 
stencil, and have as many brushes as 
there are colors used. 

Now carry the stencil in small size 
varied a trifle to fit different spaces, to 
your curtains, couch cover and pillow or 
two, and you will have a room which 
repays in full for all the thought and 
labor expended, and which has no trace 
of the commercial ready-made effects se- 
cured by wall paper. 

Once started in wall decoration, you 
will be looking for more worlds to con- 
quer; or rather, more walls to cover. 
There will be a space back of a couch or 
corner seat, or the wall over a mantel 
piece. Whatever you do, avoid over dec- 
oration. 

Relying upon the fact that your wall is 
some solid color, choose the material to 
harmonize. Burlap, denim, Japanese 
grass cloth and matting all take color 
nicely. 

In working on these large surfaces it 
will be found very much easier to merely 
trace the design of the pattern on the 
material from the stencil and apply the 
color with a large brush. The color to 
be used is the same as for stenciling on 
fabrics tube paint thinned with turpen- 
tine or dyes. The applying of these free 
hand will be found very simple and it is 
much easier to shade the design a trifle 
if not bothered with keeping the stencil 
in place. 

A dado of Japanese matting stenciled 
to correspond with the hangings makes 
an interesting room. Measure the length 



92 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A DADO OF BURLAP STENCILLED IN ROSES 



of each wall, avoiding seams when pos- 
sible. Tack it in place with ordinary 
tacks. A chair rail corresponding to the 
woodwork in the room gives the neces- 
sary finish at the top. Matting, while very 
artistic in effect, is not suitable for all 
rooms. In a study, den or the living 
room of a cottage it is very pleasing. 
The color may be applied before the mat- 
ting is in place or afterwards. A deli- 
cate tracing of plum blossoms on bare 
branches suggestion of Japanese art 
stenciled along the side which goes to the 
top, using dull red, gray green and 
brown for the stems makes an attractive 
design. 

The design of roses shown was used as 
a frieze in a room where screen, couch 
cover and hangings were decorated with 
the same motif. The material is tan bur- 
lap ; the colors dull red, leaves green and 
stems brown. A narrow moulding holds 
it at both upper and lower edge. In a 
dining room a plate rail could be used 
instead of lower moulding. The dragon 
design is suitable for den or study. The 
material is Japanese grass cloth. It can 
be purchased of any large department 



store and comes in a variety of good 
tones, but as a rule cream color is best 
to use. The dragons were worked out 
in yellow and black on a soft maroon 
background, or touches of gold with the 
black would also be effective. For the 
woman who desires the effect of a tapes- 
try, the over-mantel decoration shown 
can be easily duplicated. A soft green 
cotton rep material was used for the 
background this to be the length and 
width of the space to be filled. White 
china silk was used for the two larger 
panels, which were outlined with a small 
green cord, while natural colored linen 
was applied and outlined with the silk 
cord, making panels for the lettering. 
This was done with brown oil paints, 
each letter being outlined in black. The 
foreground is tinted a soft gray green 
with darker green shadows around the 
tree trunks; for the sky, faint clouds of 
blue are shown, and delicate masses of 
pink nearer the horizon line represent the 
azalia trees. The tree trunks are of linen 
tinted with oils in green and brown and 
give a rounded effect. Silk takes color 
so beautifully, any background can be 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



93 



easily obtained, and dyes will be found 
best for using on this material. The finer 
details are unfortunately lost in the 
photograph. 

Most important of the charming rooms 
which go to make the twentieth century 
home complete is the nursery, where the 
little ones spend the larger portion of 
their time. First among the many things 
which go to make the nursery light and 
pleasing is the wall decoration, and the 
importance of this cannot be over-esti- 
mated. The many varieties of paper 
shown fully illustrate this fact, and there 
is really great difficulty in selecting suit- 
able ones. One thing not to be consid- 
ered in a nursery is large figured decora- 
tion which when the evening shadows 
light upon the wall will to the childish 
imagination assume goblin shapes, terri- 
fying to the extreme. Then, too, bright 
colors are decidedly unfit for this room. 
The eyes of the little ones must rest upon 
the wall tints throughout the day and 
brilliant colors are injurious. In choos- 
ing the color it will have to depend on 
the size and location of the room. If 
large and sunny the general scheme 
should be cool and subdued, using only 
occasional bright touches of color. On 
the other hand if one is unfortunate 
enough to have a dark room or one on 



the north side of the house, it should 
have plenty of soft dull reds and yellows 
in the decoration. 

If possible have tinted walls as they 
are much more sanitary. If this is not 
possible, choose smooth finish paper in 
a soft gray green tone. Stencil a frieze 
with children's figures or the quaint 
square animals so pleasing to childish 
minds. These can be applied directly 
to the paper, or can be stenciled on linen 
or common brown crash. These wash- 
able wall coverings are especially good 
for nurseries and the rooms of all grow- 
ing young people. Some of the coloring 
in wall papers is poisonous and makes 
the air unwholesome. Tapestry dyes or 
oil paints, diluted with turpentine and 
applied thinly, then pressed with a warm 
iron will make these colorings washable. 
The little Kate Greenaway figures 
marked out in pinks, green and blues are 
very attractive ; the animals in greens 
or delft blue on the cream crash look 
well. If one wishes to economize, 
mouldings may be done away with and 
to cover seams and outline panels strips 
of mounting board may be substituted. 
This comes in good colors and an inch 
wide strip fastened with a double row of 
brass headed tacks makes a good finish, 
or inch wide linen tape could be used. 




A DRAGON DESIGN FOR DEN OR STUDY 



94 



A Modified Chalet 

By UNA NIXON HOPKINS 




THE COMBINATION OF COBBLE-STONE, CONCRETE WALL AND BROWN STAINED WOOD 

IS VERY PLEASING 




BUNGALOW with the charac- 
teristics of a Swiss chalet is the 
pleasing result of an attempt to 
vary the lines ordinarily used in 
small houses which are more prescribed 
than those of larger ones. 

The foundation of brick extends up- 
ward as high as the belt course and is 
roughly plastered above the ground. 
A plastered brick wall continues at the 
same height, enclosing the porch and 
terrace, being re-inforced at the corners 
by cobblestone, and broken by the en- 
trance steps on the front and sides. The 
light color of the masonry relieves the 
dark brown of the shakes covering the 
exterior. 

A balcony across the front gives the 
needed horizontal line to the house. 



It is constructed of perpendicular, 
rough boards each scalloped along the 
edges, in the center and beveled at the 
lower ends, with a flat board finish at 
the top. 

A well proportioned living room has 
casements along the front, and glass 
doors onto the terrace flanked by double 
casements and a large pressed brick fire- 
place between the outside door and the 
door into the dining room. 

The end of the latter room is given up 
to a buffet with a window in the center 
over the shelf. 

There are two bedrooms, and a bath, 
on the first floor, besides two above and 
a lavoratory. Very little space has been 
taken up by the stairs. In fact the plan, 
as a whole, is most compact. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



95 





vppf.e-fi.ooe- 



THE LIVING ROOM AND DINING ROOM OF BEAUTIFUL PROPORTIONS AND THE CHAMBERS'ARE 

MANY AND OF GOOD SIZE 




A MODERN LIVING ROOM FINISHED IN CURLY FUR WITH AN OAK STAIN 



96 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Designs for the Home-Builder 




HE selection of a design is a 
perplexing matter, so many dif- 
ferent propositions of home life 
depend upon it, that it is hard to 
find something that exactly meets the 
requirements. With this in view it is 
aimed to make the design section special- 
ly helpful. 

The reader is advised to go over each 
design carefully noting the relation of 
plan to exterior and the general arrange- 
ment. Try to build a house of character, 
that will have something of yourself in it, 
reflecting lines of thought and study. 
Simple effects are best both in composi- 
tion and in the use of materials. 

Environment has a great influence up- 
on the nature of the materials best to use 
and in what combination. A lot covered 
with trees of natural growth should have 
a house o^ different appearance than 
would be best for bare prairie land where 
trees must be set out. A hillside over- 
looking a beautiful valley would indi- 
cate the picturesque. There is harmony 
possible in all situations. 

The designs selected cover the require- 
ments of various sites and the business 
side, as it appears to the individual, has 
been considered as well as the purely 
artistic. 

No design is admitted to these pages 
that does not appear to have characteris- 
tics which will be of value to our read- 
ers. Some must build with the utmost 
care to get dollar for dollar in return 
and to such, a design on ordinary lines 
will often be best. Simplicity and artis- 
tic merit go hand in hand and the quality 
of the work required often means a good 
price. Preparation for an early staf t will 
save money for the homebuilder. 



Design B 214 

A cozy little home is here provided, 
giving a very pretty interior arrange- 
ment. The den located at the back of sit- 
ting room will be found a most desirable 
feature. 

Four good rooms are arranged on the 
second floor. The finish of the main 
rooms would be in birch and hardwood 
floors. 

The basement contains a laundry and 
hot air heater. 

Width, 26 feet; depth, 34 feet; height 
of basement, 7 feet ; first story, 9 feet 
5 inches ; second story, 8 feet 3 inches ; 
second story rooms full height. Esti- 
mated cost, $2,500. 

Design B 215 

This home is unique and pleasing with 
its twin gables and cement exterior. So 
many now consider the porch a place 
where the family and friends may have 
privacy and the front entrance a thing 
apart. This idea is admirably worked 
out in the plan. 

The entrance vestibule serves its pur- 
pose and the porch is reached from the 
side entrance or from the large living 
room. 

This room with the dining room have 
been treated much in common with only 
a ceiling beam dividing them. The fire- 
place with seats, book cases and flower 
ledges make pleasant features of both 
rooms. 

The stair up and down in relation to 
the kitchen, etc., is especially well 
planned. On the second floor are three 
good chambers, linen closet, bathroom 
and balcony. The finish of first is birch 
in a rich brown stain with birch 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A Pleasing Spacious Home 

DESIGN B 214 




98 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER-Conlinued 



floors. The chambers are in white 
enamel with birch floors. The con- 
struction is frame, and the basement con- 
tains laundry and hot water plant. Size, 
exclusive of porch, 24 feet by 28 feet. 
Estimated cost, $4,000. Less expensive 
finish and materials of ordinary quality 
would effect quite a saving. 
Design B 216 

A home built in the Northwest. Cob- 
ble stone, clinker brick, siding, shingles 
and gravel dashed stucco enter into the 
exterior of this house. The entrance and 
carriage steps and porch floors are of ce- 
ment. The main rooms are finished in 
curly fir, stained and waxed. In the 
living room is a wooden cornice, chair 
rail, columned openings and brick fire- 
place with writing desk on one side and 
book case on the other. 

There are sliding doors to the dining 
room and it contains a simple sideboard 
and built-in seats. The kitchen has 
built-in cupboards and a dumb waiter to 
the vegetable room. The main floors 
are of maple, others of fir. The second 
floor contains three good chambers, a 
screened balcony and a bathroom. There 
is good attic space and stair. The floor 
of basement is cement, the ceiling is 
plastered and it contains a hot air fur- 
nace. Size, 28 feet by 30 feet, exclusive 
of porch. This is a very complete house 
and costs about $4,500. 

Design B 217 

This attractive little bungalow has a 
sided exterior and the porch piers are of 
brick with a vine lattice supported on 
rafters above. It contains living, dining 
room and kitchen with two. chambers 
and a bath. A foundation of stone sup- 
ports the structure, and no basement is 
contemplated, or heating plant. Provi- 
sion is made for a fireplace and the kitch- 
en range, however. The finish is of Geor- 
gia pine throughout, including floors. 



The story is 9 feet in height. A family 
of three would be accommodated very 
nicely in this bungalow, the living room 
being of good size and with other ap- 
pointments in keeping, it would make a 
very pleasing home. Few designs are 
as quaint in appearance and as compact 
in plan as this. The size is 38 feet wide 
by 27 feet deep and the estimated cost 
is $2,750. 

Design B 218 

This is a type of the old colonial farm 
house, modernized with a broad paved 
terrace in front and a trellis beamed hood 
over the entrance. The walls are a 
cream white color with sash and trim 
painted a pure white. The roof is stained 
moss green and the blinds a dark bottle 
green. The plan is the usual colonial 
type with a center hall and living room 
on one side and dining room on the oth- 
er. Kitchen and pantry appointments 
are very good with convenient stairway 
arrangements. There are four chambers 
and bath on the second floor. Finish, 
except kitchen part, is in white enamel. 
The floors are of birch. The laundry and 
hot water heating plant are located in 
the basement. Because of a beautiful 
view and garden the porch is located at 
the rear. Size of house is 30 feet by 32 
feet. Cost with economy of construc- 
tion and materials, $3,700. 

Design B219. 

This house is of frame construction 
with stucco exterior finish, on very plain 
lines. The arrangement of living-room, 
dining-room and drawing-room is very 
impressive with the stair, fireplace and 
columned opening, all in birch finish. On 
the second floor are four chambers and a 
bath-room finished in white enamel. 
Birch floors throughout. Contains a fair 
attic space. Hot water plant and laundry 
in basement. Size without projections, 30 
feet by 28 feet. Estimated cost $4,500. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



99 




A. R. Van Dyck, Architect 



Unique Cement Cottage Design 

DESIGN B 215 




100 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER Continued 



Design B 220 

A lake home is a desirable possession 
and this one is especially so because it 
has all the advantages of a permanent 
residence. The porch is a delightful fea- 
ture and could be entirely screened. The 
arrangement of rooms is admirable and 
the chambers in number and size to ac- 
commodate visiting friends. An ample 
fireplace affords warmth and cheer for 
chilly evenings. The finish and floors are 
in Georgia pine. The roof is stained green, 
the shingled walls brown and all the 
trim is painted cream white. For sum- 
mer use, no heating plant is contemplat- 
ed. Size, without porch, 30 feet by 45 
feet. Estimated cost, $2,800. 



Design B 221 

This is a very compact little house oc- 
cupying, exclusive of projections, only 
27 feet 6 inches by 24 feet. On the first 
floor in addition to the usual living room, 
dining room and kitchen, is a library 
which may be used as a chamber as it 
contains a good closet. On the second 
floor are three chambers well supplied 
with closets and a good bathroom. The 
finish is of birch with birch floors. In 
the basement are laundry and hot water 
heating plant. The roof shingles are 
stained green and those on dormer sid- 
ed and gable ends are a darker green. 
The body color on the siding is colonial 
yellow and the trimmings are white. The 
cose estimate is $2.750. 




A DINING ROOM WITH ATTRACTIVE LIGHTING FEATURES AND FIREPLACE 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



101 




Keith & Whitehouse. Architects 



A Picturesque North- Western Home 

DESIGN B 216 




102 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A Bungalow Carefully Planned 



DESIGN B 217 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



103 




John Henry Newson, Architect 



An Old Colonial Design 



DESIGN B 218 





104 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




F. E. Colby, Architect 



A Stucco House of Frame Construction 

DESIGN B 219 





f"IR5T T^LODR 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



105 




Arthur C. Clausen, Architect 



A Lakeside Home 

DESIGN B 220 




I. 




C_ f-T,v<~^I^> C^ff. 



^ *--.: 4 



106 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A. M. Worthington, Architect 



Gambrel Roof and Dormer Treatment 

DESIGN B 221 





KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



107 




Designed by the Owner 



A Bungalow with a Court 



DESIGN B 222 




108 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Conducted by ELEANOR ALLISON CUMMINS, Decorator, Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Why Blue Schemes are so Seldom 
Pleasing. 

O color is really so popular as 
blue, no other is so often hope- 
lessly ugly when applied to dec- 
oration. If you have half a doz- 
en tables at a fair, each decorated and 
furnished in one color, you may be fairly 
certain that the blue one will be the un- 
successful one. Part of this is due to the 
fact that many blues change their tone 
in artificial light, but making due al- 
lowance for this still the results are often 
very disappointing. 

Blue China. 

One might assume that blue china 
would fit into a blue scheme, but it takes 
the hand of an artist to compose such 
a scheme. Put your blue china in a green 
room; relieve it against a clear pale yel- 
low; best of all make it the strong color 
note of a composition in low toned gold- 
en browns, but do not mix it up with a 
lot of other blues. 

Blue Blues and Green Blues. 

We seldom realize how seldom blue 
materials, whether papers or textiles, are 
free from a tinge of green. This is not 
objectionable, a turquoise blue being one 
of the most beautiful colors imaginable. 
But you do not want a room done up in 
many shades of turquoise blue. Put it 
with grayish green or with greenish yel- 
low and it is enchanting, but by itself it 
is overwhelming. The blue for a whole 
color scheme must be pure tone, modi- 
fied if needs be only by white or black. 
You find the sort of blue in Delft china, 
and in Nankin porcelain, and rightly 
managed it affords a color scheme of 
great beauty and refinement. But it is 
coloring which admits no rivals and you 



cannot introduce any other positive 
color. 

Sectional Furniture. 

One of the developments of the mor- 
tise and tenon construction so extensive- 
ly used in the making of Mission furni- 
ture, is the shipping of furniture to the 
consumer from the factory in sections, 
requiring for their putting together a 
very small amount of mechanical skill. 
Naturally this sort of furniture is limit- 
ed in its scope, as it cannot have perma- 
nent upholstery, but within well defined 
limits there is a very considerable 
choice. Furniture of this sort is made 
from selected oak of the quality used for 
the better grades of furniture, and can 
be had already stained and polished, 
stained to order, or sent out in the nat- 
ural wood, for the purchaser to finish 
himself. As compared with the prices 
charged by dealers, the cost of the sec- 
tional furniture is about half the retail 
price for furniture of the same quality. 
For instance, a library table of very sim- 
ple construction, with a circular top, for- 
ty inches in diameter, cross braced legs 
and a circular under shelf is sold for 
$9.25, while its price in a retail shop 
would be from eighteen to twenty dol- 
lars. Moreover it can be had in unusual 
finishes like Early English, Nut Brown, 
Weathered Green and English Oak, 
which are seldom found in ordinary 
stocks. 

The Occasional Bed. 

So few city houses have a permanent 
guest chamber that it becomes neces- 
sary to have an extra bed in one of the 
living rooms. Enlightened taste frowns 
upon the once popular folding bed and 
its place is taken by some sort of a 
couch, either a box couch or a wire cot 
with a mattress. The latter is by far 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



109 



Kraft 




Novel texture, durable, sun-proof this newest 
Wiggin Creation is distinctive for unique, effective 
wall decoration. Kraft Ko-Na is of the famous 




FAB-RIK-O-NA 

line of highest grade woven wall coverings, which 
include Art Ko-Na, Kord Ko-Na, etc., and the finest 
quality Fast Color Burlaps. Send for booklet of samples 
mentioning goods desired. 

H B. WIGGIN'S SONS CO.. 214 ARCH ST.. BLOOMFIELD. N. J. 
This Trnde Mark on back of every yard. Patent applied for. 



Perfect Liht for the Country Home 

]f Combination 
Gas Machine 



as W 



Here is a lighting system 

that not only means good profits 

for you but it will give the most 
satisfactory service to your cus- 
tomers. 

The best light for residences, 
schools, churches, factories, etc., 
especially where city gas or elec- 
tricity are not available. 

This system of lighting is 
cheaper than any other form of 
light and gives perfect results. 
A gas plant complete in itself 
right in the house. Perfectly 
, safe. Examined and tested by 
the Underwriters' Laboratories 
and listed by the Consulting En- 
gineers of the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters. The gas is in 
all respects equal to city coal 
gas, and is ready for use at any 
time without generating, for il- 
luminating and cooking purposes. 
The standard for over 40 years. 
Over 15,000 in successful opera- 
tion. 

The days of kerosene lamps are 
over. Why not sell this light in 
your community? Write for in- 
formation, prices and 72-page 
book, "Light for Evening Hours." 

DETROIT 
HEATING & LIGHTING CO. 

362 Wight St., Detroit, Mich. 






IXL ROCK 
MAPLE AND 
BIRCH 
FLOORING 




Selected Red Birch 
Bird's-eye Maple and 
Cherry Flooring 



One important feature 
is the wedge shaped 
tongue and groove 

which enters easily, drives 
up snug and insures a per- 
fect face at all times without 
after smoothing, an advan- 
tage that is not obtained by 
any other manufacture. 

Our method of air-seasoning 
and kiln drying: has stood 
the test for twenty years. 



ASK FOR IXL 



Wisconsin Land & Lumber Co, 

HERMANSVILLE, MICHIGAN 




The ONLY WAY is the 

PHENIX WAY. 

Screens and Storm Sash 
are as easily hung or re- 
moved from inside as 
you would hang a picture 
Hangers only, retail at lOc 
Hangers and Fasteners re- 
tail at 15c and 25c 
Our Specialties: Rust Proof 
Fly Screens for Good 
Buildings. 
For Descriptive Catalogue address 

PHENIX MFG. CO. 

048 Center Si. Milwaukee. Wife 




The Owner of this Attractive 
House Enjoys His Windows 

They're ALL casements hinged to swing OUT tight in 
winter and catching ALL the breezes in summer. 

They're equipped with our famous Holdfast Adjusters to 
operate and lock easily with one hand without disturbing 
screens, storm sash, curtains or Venetian blinds. 

Our free hand-book tells you all about up-to-date case- 
ments and our remarkable casement devices. 

Write TO-DAY to the 

CASEMENT HARDWARE COMPANY 



156 Washington Street 



CHICAGO 



110 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



DECORATION AND FURNISHING-Continued 



the most comfortable, as the bed can be 
made up and the whole concealed by a 
drapery. It is almost impossible to 
make up a bed upon a box couch as 
there is no way of tucking in the clothes. 
Some box couches are made with a de- 
tachable mattress. They cost more but 
are worth the difference if it can be af- 
forded. A box with a hinged lid, six 
feet long, a foot high and two feet six 
inches wide, well castered, can be made 
at small expense and plainly covered 
with cretonne or tapestry. The hair or 
cotton mattress should be covered with 
the same material, with welted edges, 
and carefully tufted. The whole thing 
will cost less than the ready made ar- 
ticle and be far more satisfactory, as the 
box .couch is usually upholstered with 
sweepings, or shoddy, or something 
equally unsanitary. When not in use 
the bedding can be tucked away inside 
the couch. 

Space Saving. 

In limited quarters one needs to ap- 
ply the principle of the sky scraper. We 
may very profitably build cupboards 
high up on our walls, in which things 
not in immediate use can be stored 
away. The writer recalls a clergyman's 
study, in a parish house building, in 
which the fireplace occupied an alcove, 
with bookshelves built in at either end. 
The ceiling of this ingle nook was three 
feet lower than that of the body of the 
room, and the space was closed in with 
an arrangement of sliding panels. To 



^BUILDING? 

Then let us send you copy of our new booklet KE-2 
which tells all about the proper method of finishing 
floors and interior 



Johnson's Wood Dye 



makes inexpensive soft woods just as 
artistic and beautiful as hard woods. 
Tell us the kind of woods you will 
use and we will mail you panels 
of those moods artistically finished 

together with our 25c booklet 

all free and postpaid. 

S. C. Johnson & Son, Racine, Wis 

The Wood Finishing Authorities 




be sure this closet was only to be 
reached with the assistance ' of a step 
ladder, but it held an endless variety 
of things not often wanted. 

Hanging bookcases and cabinets are 
less common than they were a few years 
ago, which is a pity, for, aside from their 
convenience they were good for break- 
ing up a long wall space. The smaller 
bamboo book cases can be hung with 
excellent effect if the legs are cut off 
and their places supplied by small 
turned knobs. Their proportions are 
seldom very goofd, and they are im- 
proved by cutting off one shelf. 

Another saver of space at a lower 
level is a plate rack. In fact, most small 
dining rooms, such as one finds in city 
apartments and the average small sub- 
urban house, would be much improved 
if the sideboard were dispensed with al- 
together and its place supplied by a 
good sized serving table, with a long 
plate rack above it. A plate rack is par- 
ticularly effective where all the china 
is in one color, and jugs as well as cups 
hang from its hooks, and it is quite per- 
missible to have a number at different 
places on the walls. There is a sort 
which is more elaborate than those 
usually seen, which has, beside the 
places for plates and cups, a section in- 
closed with glass doors, and is really a 
hanging closet. 

The Old Fashioned China Closet. 

In old houses one sometimes finds a 
closet between the parlor and the din- 
ing-room. It is reminiscent of the days 
when women took great pride in their 
housekeeping, and were glad to have 
their china displayed to the best advan- 
tage for the benefit of their guests. It 
is a fashion worth copying in the mod- 
ern house. Such a room, with a win- 
dow in it, lined from floor to ceiling 
with cupboards with leaded panes, with 
commodious presses for linen, has a dig- 
nity never attained by the butler's pan- 
try. 

The Dining-Room as a Living-Room. 

In reading English books on house 
furnishing one notes the fact that in the 
average family the dining-room is used 
for many other purposes besides eating. 
There the preference seems to be for a 
few really spacious rooms on the ground 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



11 



SARGENT 




lardwaisi 



E/very person building a new 
louse or remodeling an old 
one should pay particular 
attention to the selection 
of the hardware no 
detail is of more im- 
portance 



Building 
hardware and 
locks bearing the 

are the result of years 

of persistent endeavor towards ultimate per- 
fe<ftion. They represent all that is best in quality of 
materials, skilled workmanship, durability and SAFETY, 
while the patterns are of the highest type of artistic design, 
lany of the most important buildings in the United States are 
. .lipped with lt=ciaMai Locks and Hardware for instance, the 
;w City Hall in Chicago, the Custom House in New York, the 
Congressional Office Building in Washington and many other notable 
public buildings as well as thousands of the finest private residences. 
|i=fartcMai| Locks and Hardware not only add to the beauty of any 
house, but increase its selling value as well. The line is all-inclusive 
there is nothing in building hardware needs that we do not supply. 



LOCKS Famous for 
their security. For dwellings, hotels, 
office buildings, etc. The Easy Spring 
Principle makes them smooth-working, 
yet long-wearing and SAFE. 



HARD WA RE Quality 
hardware in every respect. Numerous de- 
signs for every style of house, for every 
period of architecture, and every pattern 
true 1o the schoodtom which it is derived 



The 



Book of Designs Free 



portrays faithfully a large number of the most artistic patterns and gives information 
that everyone who contemplates building should have. Write for a complimentary 
copy to-day. If interested in the Colonial, mention the fact, and we will include 
our Colonial Book. 

SARGENT & COMPANY, 151 Leonard Street, New York 



112 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



DECORATION AND FURNISHING-Continued 



floor, rather than for a number of con- 
tracted ones, each devoted to a special 
use, and doubtless there is much to be 
said for their point of view. The aver- 
age American house is huddled, and a 
huddled house is never dignified. 

But there are manifest disadvantages 
in using the same table for writing and 
for dining, and books and china are in- 
compatible in the same cupboard. 
Therefore the English architect arrives 
at a compromise and builds his large 
living room with an annex, a sort of al- 
cove, in which he places the dining- 
room furniture, perhaps separating it 
only by curtains, possibly with sliding 
doors, from the rest of the room. This 
arrangement is sometimes used here in 
bungalows and other summer houses, 
but it would seem also to have its merits 
in a house built for permanent occupa- 
tion. Of course the alcove would have 
to be so placed as to have a door into 
the kitchen. An alcove of this sort 
might well differ in color- arid furnish- 
ing from the larger space adjoining it. 

Walls Without Pictures. 

English designers of wall papers draw 
a distinction between the wall which is 
to serve as a background for pictures 
and that which is a decoration in itself. 
For a room to be hung with pictures 
they design a paper which is practically 
a monotone. It may have an elaborate 
pattern, but that pattern is so well bal- 
anced and printed in such slightly vary- 
ing tones of the same color, that it dif- 
fers from a plain surface only in hav- 
ing a suggestion of irregular elevation, 
or of texture. But for the wainscoted 
room so common over there, with its 
very limited area above the paneling or 
for the room with many large pieces of 
furniture, cabinets and the like, stand- 
ing against the walls, requiring the re- 
lief of strong color and bold design, they 



make a wall paper which is a picture in 
itself. Such were the papers designed 
by William Morris, and Voysey and Hey- 
wood Sumner have followed in his foot- 
steps. As to the use of these decorative 
papers, which are imported and can be 
had in the large Eastern cities, and 
probably elsewhere as well, the hall of 
a good sized house, or possibly the li- 
brary with very many books, seems to 
be about the only room in the American 
house in which their use is possible. The 
many papers copying brocades occupy 
a position between the two, but they are 
only suitable for a drawing-room or re- 
ception-room. If one can acclimatize 
one of these decorative wall papers, the 
beauty of its design and the exquisite 
balance of its coloring will prove a very 
real satisfaction. 

Hanging Miniatures. 

Miniatures lose much of their distinc- 
tive charm by being hung with other 
pictures/ A group of miniatures of dif- 
ferent periods and styles of painting is 
far more interesting than any number 
of isolated examples. A narrow space 
on the wall, between two windows or 
doors, or at one side of a high cabinet, 
may be utilized for a group of minia- 
tures. They need a special background. 
Miniatures in strong colors, or those of 
men, look best against a red background. 
Those in more delicate colors, like the 
average of eighteenth century portraits, 
are admirably relieved against a ground 
of grayish green, or of old gold. For a 
few miniatures of varied styles, a dark 
old rose is as good a background as can 
be had, and in all cases the ground 
should be velvet or some other piled 
fabric. Attach the strip of velvet, 
hemmed at sides and end to the wall 
just below the picture moulding, stand- 
ing some article of furniture so that its 
lower edge is hidden. 




SEDGWICKS 

"BEST HOUSE PLANS," a beautiful book of 200 modern homes cost- 
ing $500. to $6000. I have had many years experience in planning houses, 
cottages and buildings, well arranged, well constructed and economi- 
cal to build. If you want the BEST RESULTS, consult a man of ex- 
perience and reputation for GOOD WORK. This book gives plans, ex- 
teriors and descriptions. Price $1.00. "BUNGALOWS and COT- 



TAGES," a new book showing 50 up-to-date designs, all built from my ff*L 



, 

plans, pretty one-story bungalows and cottages. If you want a sirall 
ECONOMICAL HOME, don't fail to send for one of these books. Price 
50c. For $1.25 I will send you BOTH BOOKS. To prospective church 
builders I send my portfolio of churches FREE. 
CHAS. S. SEDGWICK. 1028 K, Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis 




KEITH'S- MAGAZINE 



113 




Beauty Economy Durability 

The Three Vital Qualities of 

Oak Flooring 

q The beauty of OAK FLOORING 
is constantly becoming more appre- 
ciated. There is no question of the 
superior advantages of OAK FLOOR- 
ING over any other Hardwood Floor- 
ing. 

q OAK FLOORING is cheaper than carpets. 
It beautifies any home and exhibits more taste 
and a greater degree of harmony with its 
other surroundings than any carpet ever made. 
A parlor, hall, or dining room is half fur- 
nished when laid with handsome OAK 
FLOORING. 



J Specify and use OAK FLOORING. Its 
great wearing qualities insures against repair 
bills. Any good architect will tell you that 
OAK FLOORING is an investment, as it is a 
prime factor in determining values. 



Write us for further information. 

The Oak Flooring Bureau 

420 Hammond Bldg. , Detroit, Mich. 




protected 
-y Body 



Roof Mots Green 



When 

You Insure 
Your House 



against fire you seek the company that 
is highest in reputation and integrity 
not lowest in price. So when you paint, 
which is weather and decay insurance, 
you should seek the brand that wears 
best and longest gives best results 





Experienced users who insist on quality will 
tell you that "High Standard" has reduced 
their paint bills. Its lower ultimate cost is due 
to greater spreading and hiding power, longer 
wear and the smooth condition in which it leaves 
a surface when properly applied, as proved by 
practical competitive tests. 



flat finish for walls and plaster, 
offers quality, economy, wear-resistance and the 
sanitary advantage of being washable. Costs 
less than the kind of wall paper you would 
want; wears longer; is fadeless. 

JLinaliro on the woodwork is the ideal 
enamel for beauty and durability. 

Portfolio of "Good Homes" showing interiors 
decorated with Mellotone and other Little Blue 
Flag products; also exteriors finished with 
' ' High Standard" sent for 25c. less than actual 
cost. "Common Sense about Interiors" and 
"Fashions in Color," free. 



MAKERS OF 

Paint, Varnish. Stains. Enamels all of " High Standard " Quality 
450-456 Third St., Dayton, Ohio 



Boston 



New York Chicago Kansas City 



14 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note. The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of Keith s Magazine. Inquiries 
pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the attention of an expert. _ 

Letters intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing Department, and be accom- 
panied by a diagram of floor plan. Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general in- 
terest will be published in these columns. 



H. R. K. I desire to ask some advice 
regarding the inside finishing of a sim- 
ple country home, facing west, rough 
sketch of which I enclose herewith. I 
desire color scheme for paper, painting, 
unholstery and rugs suitable for each 
floor. I wish something durable and as 
inexpensive as possible, yet at the same 
time desire it artistic and in good taste. 
Would paint or linoleum be better for 
kitchen floor, and what for dining-room. 

The kitchen is to be painted, the par- 
lor and living-room plastered, the re- 
mainder of the rooms ceiled and papered. 
The rooms are small, about 16x18, and it 
is desired to make them look as large as 
possible, as well as the halls. I had 
thought of a light brown oak finish for 
the woodwork, thinking the light would 
be 'better than a dark color to make the 
rooms look larger, but have decided on 
nothing. Tell me how the floors should 
be finished around the edges of the rugs, 
also give complete information regarding 
the finishing of the open fire places, 
which are in each room, and which are 
made of plain red brick. We have no 
expert workmen near, so will ask that all 
terms be as plain as possible, in order 
that they may be thoroughly understood 
and carried out. 

I enclose some samples of paper for 
help as relates to color only, and if you 
can find in them something suitable, it 
would aid materially in getting the paints 
and colors. We had thought of having 
the plastered walls painted, but the halls, 
dining and bedrooms will be papered, and 
it seems that only solid colors in paper 
would be suitable and harmonize. Would 
not solid colors tend to make the rooms 
look larger? The writer is partial to 
solid colors always, but it is hard to ob- 
tain the same here, and if you can do so, 
would like you to give me the name of a 
house from which I might obtain same. 



We had thought of a straw color for 
walls and cream for ceiling of parlor, but 
as this is a south room, fear the color 
would be too warm, 'but it might be used 
in a north room, if harmonious with the 
scheme you suggest, so leave that to you. 
Please mention the length that the drop 
ceiling should extend down the walls. 
The rooms are only moderately high. 

H. R. K. Ans. I have made selections 
from the paper samples sent and attached 
them to your plan sketch. Plain walls 
are good, but I should certainly use a 
figured paper in the hall. One of the 
new landscape papers in all gray tones, 
would be exceedingly pretty in a south- 
ern hall with ivory woodwork. The 
woodwork in parlor should be ivory, like 
ceiling and the two chambers should 
have white woodwork. The light brown 
paint would give a dingy characterless 
interior. Do the living and dining-room 
woodwork with stain of the manufactur- 
er whose name I enclose, thinning it and 
putting it on light. It will be a hundred 
times prettier even on pine than brown 
paint. Your rooms are not small, and 
the brown stain will not make them look 
smaller. The floors should be stained oak 
all over, shellaced and waxed. 

Your fireplaces should have simple 
wood mantels to match the finish of the 
woodwork in each room. Do not drop 
the ceilings at all, unless the walls are 
more than 9'6". Linoleum is the best 
choice for the kitchen floor. 

H. P. T. Enclosed please find a sketch 
of the^ first floor of my new home. Will 
you kindly help me in deciding the col- 
ors for the walls which are to be tinted. 
The woodwork and furniture are golden 
oak and the floors hardwood. The house 
is on a corner lot facing north. 

H. P. T. Ans. With golden oak wood- 
work it is advised to tint the hall a golden 
brown with cream ceiling: the living- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



115 



your 

eariis 




/ ~|~ V HE interior wood finishing of your home is the 
-* last touch of refinement or abuse-. Nothing so 

beautifies a home as properly finished woodwork whether it be of ordinary 
pine, finest oak or costly mahogany. 

On the other hand, nothing so mars a home as improperly finished wood- 
work. But it is easy to have beautiful woodwork. Simply irisist on the use of 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes develop the natural beauty of the wood 
and never cloud or obscure it. They emphasize Nature' s artistic markings 
of the grain and never raise it. 

And Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes give a smooth elastic finish 
that will stand trie test of time and changes in temperature, without 
signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

Write for "Modern Wood Finishing" 
Our corps of experts have prepared an excellent book on 
Wood Finishing. Every home builder should have it. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with 
plates of finished wood in natural colors. 

Simply write the request on a post 
card, and we will send you the book 
by return mail. 




PV* 

13 



NEW MILFORD, CONN. 



116 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS-Continued 



room a soft ecru, with ceiling very light 
shade of same; and the dining-room 
walls old blue, with paler shade for ceil- 
ing. This will suit the southwest expo- 
sure of dining-room, while the ecru and 
brown tones are best for the north light. 

Mrs. W. B. H. I wish to have my cot- 
tage redecorated this fall and will ap- 
preciate suggestions from you in regard 
to wall papers, woodwork, hangings and 
floor coverings. The woodwork in all 
the house is the natural pine just hard 
oiled, but it doesn't harmonize with each 
room. I would like to have your ideas 
on the subject. Nearly all my furniture 
is quarter sawed oak. Can you suggest 
finishes for walls and woodwork to har- 
monize with furniture. If I stick too 
closely to buffs, creams and browns won't 
the effect be very dull and lifeless? 

The house faces east which is very de- 
sirable in this climate. 

Mrs. W. B. H. Ans. Replying to 
your recent letter asking for suggestions 
on interior decoration would say that if 
it is desired to retain the oiled pine finish 
in living and dining-room, you cannot do 
better than keep these rooms in browns 
and creams, especially as they are on the 
north side of the house: They need not, 
however, be dull and lifeless. The rugs 
can introduce rich notes of color if orna- 
mental, though rugs in brown shades 
with touches of yellow and cream would 
be better. The dining room could have 
a frieze of trees against a sunset sky or 
a frieze of autumn leaves. There are 
lovely curtains of ecru scrim with scat- 
tered figures in light green and gold. In 
the living-room, a closer harmony in 
browns would be very attractive. We 
should advise, however, painting the 
woodwork of parlor and bedrooms, ivory 
white and using on the wall of the east 
parlor a light gray paper in self-toned 
all-over design. Have your furniture up- 
holstered an artistic cretonne, the ground 
well covered with a tapestry design 
wherein dull reds, yellows and deep blues 
are blended. In one bedroom the walls 
could have a light blue chambray paper 
and the curtains, chair covers, bedspreads 
and bureau covers of flowered chintz 
showing much old rose on a mode ground. 
With such a treatment even oak furniture 



could be used with the white woodwork. 
The thing is to get the right cretonne. 

Mrs. J. E. M. - I want to get some in- 
formation in regard to the wood finish 
and color scheme in my new house. The 
house is a story and a half bungalow 
type, faces east, with an east and south 
gallery. The living-room and dining- 
room are on the front, facing east. The 
dining-room has panel wainscoting up to 
plate rail, and I want to know what color 
to stain the wainscoting and what color 
paper to use above. I have Mission fur- 
niture, Early English, also a green art 
square with little shades of tan and black 
that I wish to use in this dining-room. 
The living-room opens into dining-room 
with plain square opening, with sliding 
doors or portieres ; has fireplace, three 
windows in east or front and two in 
south. I want to use weathered oak Mis- 
sion furniture in living-room, so please 
suggest color for paper, wood finish and 
color of brick for open fireplace. I pre- 
fer solid color, ingrain papers. There is 
a bedroom back of the living-room, with 
fireplace and two windows in south. 
This room opens into back hall, also onto 
gallery on the side. Please suggest color 
scheme throughout ; the furniture for this 
room is in quarter sawed oak. 

Mrs. J. E. M. Ans. In reply to your 
inquiry, desire to say that inasmuch as 
the furniture of all the rooms mentioned 
is oak in some of the brown tones, the 
stain used for the woodwork had best be 
of uniform stain throughout of the kind 
stated in our letter. This will be in har- 
mony with the different finishes of the 
furniture and have a more restful effect 
than if you tried to match each room ex- 
actly to the furniture. 

Since the dining-room rug is green with 
tan, the wall above the wainscot could be 
a soft tan with ceiling a lighter shade. As 
this is an east room, curtains of yellow 
silk would give warmth of color. 

The living-room wall could be a dull 
grey-green with fireplace facings of dark, 
rough surfaced brick of a greenish hue 
with undertones of dull red. The oak 
furniture of the south bedroom will be 
well relieved against a wall of soft old 
blue, with chintz curtains and bedspread 
in soft dull old rose and blue. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



17 




Clean Running Water 
in this Country Home 

No Bucket- Carry ing No Freezing 

You can have running water with ample pressure clean, 
pure, and palatable in every part of your home, no matter where 
you live, and avoid the annoyance and danger of gravity tanks forever, 
when you own a 






No air pressure system of water 
supply is a genuine complete 



without the^trade mark 
on the plant. This trade mark 
stands for everything that is mod- 
ern and satisfying in a pneumatic 
water system and is for your 
protection. Make sure it is there. 



Compressed air that powerful and dependable force, 
purifies the water from your well, cistern, lake or spring and 
forces it with a steady, never-failing flow to kitchen, bathroom, 
laundry, lavatory, barn or dairy water that's cool in summer, 
never-freezing in winter avoiding the possible bursting of 
water tanks and the dangers of stagnant water. Both hard 
and soft running water, hot or cold, always at your command. 

No matter what size your home or what your requirements, 
a complete Jkattei Jjs&te*. $y4t&m^ o f j us t the proper size (using 
any style of power you desire) can be installed in your basement 
or at any other convenient place. 



Make the Water System you install a permanent invest- 
ment. Own the plant that furnishes you dependable fire 
protection and that will be a source of satisfaction for a 
lifetime. This the &ad*K is doing for fourteen thousand 
others it will do the same for you. 

Ask for the book, itf the Question of Water,'''' on coupon herewith, 
and talk it over with your architect and your plumber. 

Leader Iron Works 

Decatur III. and Owego, N. Y. ' 
New York City Office, 15 William St. Chicago Office, Monadnock Block- 



Cut out and mall this coupon 



Leader Iron Works, 

1708 Jasper St., Decatur, HI. 

Without cost or obligation, mail me your 
book" The Question of Water," with full 
particulars about Leader Water Systems. 



Name. 



R.F. D. or Box 



State . 

* 



118 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




HOUSEHOI/D ECONOMICS iH 




A Recent Controversy. 

N animated discussion has been 
going on in one of the New York 
dailies as to the respective de- 
mands upon the mind of an edu- 
cated woman of professional and domes- 
tic life. A great wail has gone up as 
to the cruelty of expecting women who 
have received a liberal education to bring 
their minds down to trivialities like but- 
tons and porridge, important as these 
may be to the welfare of a family. It 
was assumed of course that all educated 
women are engaged in highly intellectual 
pursuits and the emancipated are having 
it all their own way, when "A College 
Bred Insurgent," came forward with the 
assertion that, having married after a 
number of years of more or less success- 
ful professional life, she has found that 
the successful conduct of a household of 
husband and children makes greater de- 
mands upon a trained intelligence than 
most of the work done by women in 
other spheres of activity. She points out 
the fact that very much of so-called pro- 
fessional work is monotonous in the ex- 
treme, an unending round of trivial repe- 
tition, giving as examples teaching, the 
bulk of the work done by women in 
publishing houses and as editorial assist- 
ants, and the occupations described by 
that very ugly word, secretarial. She 
declares that her present state has a 
varied charm in its constant opportuni- 
ties for the exercise of every sort of nat- 
ural or acquired ability, which was ut- 
terly lacking in her admittedly success- 
ful professional career. 

Following suit, various other ladies of 
similar experience have hastened to cor- 
roborate her statements, until the pro- 



fessional woman, so far from being en- 
viable is made to appear the victim of 
circumstances, professional only because 
she has had no chance to be anything 
else. 

Of course there are exceptions. There 
are women naturally destitute of the all- 
around ability which the housekeeper 
needs, who yet specialize admirably. The 
routine character of most of the profes- 
sional work open to women is not ob- 
jectionable to them, may even be help- 
ful to their partcular type of mind. But 
most women are different. They are im- 
pulsive and spontaneous, geting at things 
intuitively rather than reasonably, and 
these are the qualities which go to make 
the successful head of a household and, 
in the last analysis, these are the traits 
which make a woman lovable and good 
to live with, and not to be compensated 
for by any merely intellectual qualities. 
The value of mental training for the 
average woman is not to fit her for the 
doing of distinctly intellectual work, but 
to enable her to use her native abilities 
to the best advantage. College ought 
not to make a woman superior to ordi- 
nary work, but fit her to do it better, by 
giving her a better standard of values 
and by teaching her to adapt means to 
ends with absolute accuracy. Moreover, 
even a smattering of science, and most 
colleges give much more than a smatter- 
ing, is of the greatest value in a calling 
so largely concerned with nutritive 
values and the chemistry of food as that 
of the modern housekeeper. 

When all is said and done, the whole 
contention harks back to this ; that what- 
ever is set before a woman to do is her 
profession, not less the ordering of a 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



19 



Jack's House No. 2. 




This is an exact reproduction of the lath 
which Jack used on the exterior of his house, 
which he covered with Portland Cement Stucco. 



It is KNO-BURN expanded metal Lath. 
Jack found full information in booklet "O" 
which is sent out to anyone interested if they 
write to 



[See Jack's House"] 
Next Month 



930-950 Old Colony Building 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Fresh Air and Protection 

against intrusion can be had with the 
IVES WINDOW VENTILATING LOCK 



AS 
APPLIED 

TO 
WINDOW 




ASK 

YOUR 
HARDWARE 

DEALER 
FOR THEM 



The H. B. IVES CO., Sole Manufacturers 
NEW HAVEN. CONN. 

88-Page Catalog Builders' Hardware Specialties Free. 



The MAJESTIC 

Foundation Fuel Chute 

PROTECTS THE BUILDING 




MALLORY'S 

Standard 
Shutter Worker 

The only practical device to 
open and close the Shutters 
without raising windows or 
disturbing screens. 
Can be applied to old or new houses, whether brick, stone 
or frame, and will hold the blind firm in any position. 
Perfectly burglar proof. 

Send for Illustrated Circular if your hardware dealer 
does not keep them, to 

MALLORY MANUFACTURING CO. 

251 Main Street Flemington, New Jersey. U. S A. 




No Battered 
Siding, Broken 

Glass or 
Soiled Lawn 

When a 

Majestic Chute 

Is Used. 



Burglar Proof. 

Made in three sizes and when light is de- 
sired can be furnished with a Rubber- 
Glass Window. 
Write for Address of Nearest Dealer. 

Majestic Furnace Co. 

HUNTINGTON, INDIANA. 



120 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS-Continued 



house and the rearing of children than 
medicine, or law, or pedagogy, or any 
other of the avenues of activity which 
the development of the forces of modern 
life has opened to her. 

The Household Refuse. 

What to do with the rubbish of the 
house, garbage, sweepings, papers, all the 
thousand and one things which accumu- 
late so rapidly, is a puzzle in places 
where there is not a regular system for 
the removal of all this debris. The in- 
telligent housekeeper will try to find 
some means of its disposition, other than 
that of absolute destruction, but always 
of a sort which will not be a nuisance to 
other people. 

Figs seem to have been created for the 
purpose of acting as scavengers, but it 
is seldom practicable to keep a pig, and 
the one decent and sanitary thing to do 
with garbage is to burn it. Many people 
have an unreasoning prejudice against 
this, being certain that it must smell. So 
it will, if a damp mass is laid upon a 
slowly burning fire, but if it is put on 
by degrees, when the fire is glowing, 
the chimney draft opened and all the 
others closed, there is no odor at all. 
Large things, like watermelon or squash 
rinds can be dried out before being 
burned by being laid over the oven, un- 
der the back lids of the range. It may 
be half a day before they can be poked 
over onto the coals, but ultimately they 
will reach the disintegrating point. 

Sweepings can usually be burned, also 
scrubbing cloths and the like, which can 



HESSMiaOCKER 



'"FHE only modern Sanitary Steel 

1 Medicine Cabinet ox Locker. 

Handsome beveled mirror door. Snow 

white, everlasting enamel, inside andout. 



FOR YOUR BATHROOM 



Costs less than wood and is better. Should be 
in every bathroom. Is dust, germ and vermin 
proof and easily cleaned with warm water. 

Made in four styles and three sii.es. Price 
$7.00 and up. 

Send for illustrated circuit r. 

HESS, 717 L Tacoma Bid,, Chicago 

Makers of the Hess Steel furnace. 

Said on Approval. Free Booklet. 




be helped to extinction by having a little 
kerosene dripped over them,- putting a 
layer of paper on top so that the match 
will not come in direct contact with the 
oil. Garbage, sweepings, old cloths, all 
these are unwholesome refuse for which 
nothing but destruction will answer. 
Letters and waste paper should share the 
same fate. But let the stamps be saved 
as there are many charitable institutions 
which collect them. 

The Worth of the Cancelled Stamp. 

This, by the way, has long been a 
puzzle. Vague legends as to the value 
of a million stamps have floated about 
for many years, but the facts are well 
known. Cancelled stamps are used in 
large quantities for the manufacture of 
papier mache, being forwarded to Swit- 
zerland through an agent in New York, 
a barrel at a time. 

The Useful Newspaper. 

The discarded newspaper has many 
uses which should save it from destruc- 
tion. The kitchen should always have 
a pile somewhere within easy reach. Lay 
down papers on the table when you are 
making cake ; spread them under the 
ironing board and use one to wipe the 
iron on ; spread a thick layer under the 
ironing sheet and blanket to protect the 
table; have two or three, thickly folded, 
upon which to set dripping pans and 
saucepans when they are taken from the 
range ; have a pad of them in front of 
the sink and at the side of the table 
where one stands to cook, where they 
are a fair substitute for a rubber mat. 

Many other uses will suggest them- 
selves, and the surplus can always be 
sent to a paper mill. In some places 
considerable sums have been realized for 
charities by the systematic collection of 
newspapers, for which a good price is 
paid by the ton. 

Do you ever think when you are pack- 
ing a missionary box to fill in the cor- 
ners with pieces of brown wrapping pa- 
per and rolls of tissue paper? These 
things, the commonplace of towns, are 
treasures in remote places, and the same 
thing is true of string. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



121 



Home Refrigeration 

It tells you how to select the Home Refrigerator how to know the good from 
the poor how to keep a Refrigerator sweet and sanitary how your food can be 
properly protected and preserved how to keep down ice bills lots of things you 
should know before selecting any Refrigerator. , 

Don't be deceived by claims being made for other so-called 
"porcelain" refrigerators. The "Monroe" has the only real por- 
celain food compartments made in a pottery and in one piece of 
solid, unbreakable White Porcelain Ware over an inch thick, 
with every corner rounded, no cracks or crevices anywhere 



GKMonroe" 



A Lifetime Refrigerator 



is the only refrigera- 
tor that can be made 
"hospital-clean" in a 
jiffy by simply wip- 
ing out with a hot 
cloth There are no 




Always told DIRECT 

and at Factory Price*. 

Cash or Monthly Payment* 



hiding places for germs no odors, no dampness. The leading 

hospitals use the "Monroe" exclusively and it is found today 

in a large majority of the very best homes. It is built to last 

a lifetime and will save you its cost many times over in ice bills, 

food waste and repair bills. Other refrigerators must be made 

with sections to come apart bolts, screws, braces and strips to work loose and with cracks, crevices and 

corners in which food collects and decays germs breed and odors arise to taint the food placed therein. 

The "Monroe" is never sold in stores, but direct from the factory to you, freight prepaid to your railroad 

station, under our liberal trial offer and an ironclad guarantee of "full satisfaction or money refunded." 

Fav Pavmpntc We depart this year from our rule of all cash with order and will send the "Monroe" 

***][ * ayniClH.5 freight prepaid on our liberal credit terms to all desiring to buy that way 

Just say. "Send Monroe Book." on a postal card and it will go to you by next mall. (8) 

MONROE REFRIGERATOR COMPANY. Station 6, Lockland, Ohio 

NO DELAY TO GET THE CLOTHES DRY ON WASH-DAY 

When using the "CHICAGO-FRANCIS" Combined Clothes Dryer and Laundry Stove. 

Clothes are dried without extra expense as the waste heat 
from laundry stove dries the clothes. Can furnish stove 
suitable for burning wood, coal or gas. Dries the clothes as 
perfectly as sunshine. Especially adapted for use in Resi- 
dences, Apartment Buildings and Institutions. All Dryers 
are built to order in various sizes and can be made to fit 
almost any laundry room. Write today for descriptive cir- 
cular and our handsomely illustrated No. K 12 catalog. 
Address nearest office. 




A Modern Residence Laundry Room showing installa- 
tion of "CHICAGO-FRANCIS-' Dryer and Laundry Stove 



CHICAGO DRYER CO. 

DEPT. K 
386 Wabash Ave., Chicago, III. 



OR 



DRYER MFG. CO. 

DEFT. K 
204 E. 26th St., New York City 



-THE CELEBRATED FURMAN BOILERS 




Valuable Catalogue on Modern Steam and Hot Water Heat- 
ing, mailed free. Address 
The Herendeen Manufacturing Company 



As an Investment, Furman Boilers return Large Divide 
in Improved Health, Increased Comfort and Fuel Saved. 



B NORTH ST. 



GENEVA, NEW YORK 



No. 286 PEARL ST. 



NEW YORK CITY 



rt 



122 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 








SO* e MA MEAT THAT CANNA CAT- AND 5OM 6 WOULD CAT TMAT WANT IT 
BUT W 6 MA M6AT AND W 6 CAN CAT 



5A LGT TM e LORD B TMANKIT 





TABLE: OMAT 




Mid-Winter Table Decorations. 

HE flower par excellence for 
February is the hot-house tulip, 
with its delicious shading from 
pink to deep cream. It is the 
least bit stiff, but when a mass is spread 
out in a low glass bowl, the straightness 
of the stems is not specially noticeable, 
so satisfying is the color. Or, for a long 
table they may be used in three glass 
vases, a taller one in the middle, a 
smaller one at each side of it, the tulips 
arranged with asparagus fern. Such 
flower holders can be had in sets of three 
or five, connected by chains, but the 
effect is rather set. They look better 
when isolated. Now that epergnes have 
come back, one may construct a pyramid 
of fruit in the centre of the table, with 
flowers at the corners in rather low vases. 

Fern dishes are deservedly popular, 
but are very hard to keep in good con- 
dition in highly heated houses. It is 
almost necessary to remove them to a 
cool place between meals, unless one is 
willing to renew them every few weeks. 
And, apropos of ferns, beautiful fern 
dishes have been made from old-fash- 
ioned silver plated casters, not the re- 
volving sort. 

A permanent table decoration which is 
pretty and unusual is a dwarf tree. The 
fashion is a Japanese one, but the tiny 
tree can be had from city florists. It 
may be planted in some sort of a flower 
pot, or rise from a mound of moss ar- 
ranged on a tray. 



Faience Receptacles. 

Coburg faience is ivory white, and it 
comes in curious forms, suggesting the 
balustraded parterres of a formal French 
garden. There is usually an inner and 
outer receptacle and the flowers and 
foliage are arranged in the space between 
the two. Of course only very small 
flowers can be used and the effect is for- 
mal in the extreme. Candle sticks can 
be had to match. Some of the faience is 
plain, other gilded. 

Far more beautiful, if less novel, are 
the small oblong flower boxes in ivory 
Italian terra cotta, with decorations in re- 
lief, generally classic ones of figures and 
animals. The smaller sizes are good for 
small flowers like violets, with a glass or 
metal receptacle inside, or they will hold 
three or four small ferns. The beautiful 
tones of the faience contrast delightfully 
with the colors of the flowers or foliage. 

Using French Chestnuts. 

Most of us are very conservative 
about trying new articles of food. We 
stick to our old friends and are blind to 
the merits of any others. But in cities 
where there is a considerable foreign 
population new articles of food are often 
brought to one's attention, some of them 
with substantial advantages over those 
to which we are accustomed. The French 
or Italian chestnut, for instance, is better 
and cheaper than our own nut, and has 
the advantage of always being in season. 
For those who are unfamiliar with it, it 
may be said that it is nearly as large as 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



123 



There's a Reason Why 

Architects, Contractors, Builders and 
Owners are Specifying, Recommend- 



ing and Using 

READY-TO-LAY 



^^ KEAUY -TO-LAY * _ 

Buemite 

FLEXIBLE-CEMENT- lMATi7PIAI 
BURLAP-INSERTED 1V1A. 1 Hi IX 1 A. JL 

FOR ROOFING and SIDING 




Summer Homes, Bungalows, Garages, 

Barns, Residence, Business and Factory Buildings 
It Is Because BUtrttite Has Been Found 

THE BEST BY TEST 

Artistic and Attractive in appearance, Durable 
and Economical with Superior Fire-Retardative 
and Weather-Resisting Qualities to meet Extreme 
Weather Conditions. Sparks, Hail, Sleet, Slid- 
ing Ice, Rain, Snow, or the extremes of Cold and 
Heat do not affect its superior Upper Coating, 
which is made with two separate and distinct 
surfaces, i. e., BIRD SAND and "TWOLAYR" 
SLATE CHIPS. (Patent Pending.) 

For the "TWOLAYR" Slate Surfaced Material. Nat- 
ural Colored Slate of Unfading Quality is used, the fine 
slab-shaped Slate Chips being embedded into the Pure 
Asphalt Composition so thoroughly and put there to 
stay that a smooth, even i.pper mineral surface (there 
being two layers of the slate chips) is the result, thus se- 
curing the well-known IMPERVIOUSNESS and 
WEATHER-RESISTING QUALITIES OF SLATE. AT 
ONE-FOURTH THE COST. 

2 Permanent ) SLATE- RED I 
Natural - and "Stoddard" 

Slate Colors ) SLATE-GREEN I 



UNIFORM SOLID SLATE 
Surface. Requires no Painting. 
Kept Clean & Bright by the Rain. 



The First Cost The Only Expense 

Architects, Contractors, Builders, Roofing Experts, 
Owners and Occupants will find our Samples and Booklet, 

"BURMITE QUALITY COUNTS" 

Illustrated with buildings, beautifully printed in colors, 
showing effect of BURMITE MATERIAL, applied as a 
Roofing and Siding, both interesting and instructive. 
Mailed free of all charges and obligation. WRITE TODAY. 

Bermingham & Seaman Co. 

ROOFING MANUFACTURERS 

GENERAL OFFICES, 1208-1226 Tribune Bldg. 
PLANT, 56th, Armitage and Grand Aves. 





in silverware are always to be 
had in the famous 187 ROGERS 
BROS, silver plate, a (act that is 
well worth remembering when 
newly furnishing or replenish- 
ing the home. 

1847 

ROGERS BRQS.T& 

silverware is fully guaranteed 
by the largest silver manufac- 
turers in the world. It is 
"Stiver Plate that 
Wears." 



A new pattern the 
"Sharon, is illus- 
trated here. It has 
all the richness and 
charm of solid silver. 

Sold by all leading 
dealers. Send for 
illustrated catalogue 

"B-35:' 



MERIDEN BRITANNIA COMPANY 

(International Silver Co., Successor) 

Meriden, Conn. 
Now York Chicago San Francisco Hamilton, Canada 



SHARON 



124 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



TABLE CHAT- Continued 



a horse chestnut and neither as sweet or 
as mealy as our own. 

Italians use chestnuts not as a dainty 
but as a staple article of food. They 
cook them whole or make a puree of 
them. They are also served as a salad 
and used for various sauces and entrees. 
Perhaps their commonest use is as a 
stuffing for poultry, for which they are 
boiled and mashed fine, a cup of chest- 
nuts added to each cup of plain bread 
and butter stuffing, with a little cream, 
a dash of cayenne and a very little hot 
water. The stuffing should be tender but 
not moist enough to be soggy. The 
chestnuts are of course cooked in salted 
water, an end of the shell being cut off 
before they are put in. An old fowl can 
be stuffed with this mixture and braised, 
after the fashion of a pot roast, and is 
extremely good. 

A puree is merely the boiled and 
mashed chestnuts put through a sieve, 
seasoned exactly like mashed potato. It 
may be thinned out with a little stock and 
served as a border to chops, in a ring 
of jellied chicken, or with fillets of fried 
fish. 

Again the chestnuts are boiled in 
stock, mixed with a cream sauce and 
served as an entree in a hollowed out loaf 
of bread browned in butter. Or small 
rolls can be used instead of the loaf. 

For a salad, have the chestnuts boiled, 
peeled and chilled, mix them with a few 
chopped green peppers and capers and 
lay them on heart leaves of lettuce, cov- 
ering with a mayonnaise made of lemon 
juice instead of vinegar. Chestnut soup 
is merely cream of chicken seasoned with 
salt and paprika, to which a suitable 
quantity of mashed chestnuts is added, 
the whole cooked slowly fifteen minutes 
and strained. Serve it in bouillon cups 
for a first course at a company luncheon. 

A chestnut sauce for puddings or ice 
cream is made by simmering boiled 
chestnuts in sugar syrup, with a little 
sherry and grated orange peel, covering 
the saucepan tightly so that the wine 
will not lose its strength. That very 
expensive foreign sweetmeat, marrons 
glaces is neither more nor less than large 



chestnuts cooked till tender, shelled and 
skinned, dried in a cloth, and simmered 
in thick syrup. 

A Use for Princess Lamps. 

Or is their vogue so long passed that 
even the name is forgotten? They were 
small lamps with a standard and circular 
oil tank, the whole of porcelain, very 
popular with china painters some fifteen 
years ago, and many of them must sur- 
vive. Fitted with some sort of a fluffy 
shade, they are extremely pretty for op- 
posite corners of a supper table, taking 
up less room than candelabra and giving 
more light. The writer is under the im- 
pression, possibly erroneous, that she has 
seen them in the popular colonial glass. 
Lamps have one substantial advantage 
over candles that they are very much 
safer. With the flame protected by a 
chimney the most nervous hostess may 
be at ease. 

New Paper Napkins. 

Extremely dainty paper napkins for 
supper parties are of white crepe paper 
with pinked edges and inch wade borders, 
either pink or green, with three or four 
gilt lines inside the color. They cost 

o 

twenty-five cents a hundred. 

Colors for February Festivities. 

Loncoln's birthday seems hardly accli- 
matized as yet, but the national red, 
white and blue is certainly the most ap- 
propriate coloring for the great patriot. 
Scarlet is sacred to St. Valentine, as 
being the color of hearts, but blue rib- 
bons and pink roses have equally senti- 
mental associations, while the Continent- 
al uniform colors of blue and buff are as 
suitable for Washington's Birthday and 
a much more effective decorative scheme 
than the stars and stripes. 

Duck and Oranges. 

Thick slices of acid oranges as a garnish 
for roast duck are common enough, but 
try the combination of dice of cold duck 
with double the quantity of sliced 
oranges, dressed with salt, oil and pap- 
rika, with a garnish of olives, and served 
on lettuce leaves for a Sunday night 
supper. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



125 




VOU can get as much heat 

, with one Aldine Fireplace and save 
60 per cent of your fuel bill as from 
four common grates. 

This is because it is really 
a return draft stove in fire- 
place form. 85 per cent of 
the heat is thrown out into 
the room instead of 85 per 
cent being wasted as in 
common grates. 

It can be set in any 
chimney opening at half the 

cost of a common grate, no 

special chimney construction is 

necessary, no pipe to connect, 

extra large fire pot; made in 

seven patterns, at prices no 

higher than any good common 

grate. 

Send for our free booklet and see how 

an Aldine is suited to your needs. 

50,000 now in use. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 

back. 

Rathbone Fireplace Mfg. Co. 

5602 Clyde Park Avenue, - Grand Rapids, Michigan 

Makers of all kinds of Fireplaces. 



Stencil No. 106 




California 
Red wo o d 

Best Porch Wood known 

REDWOOD withstands the 
weather better than any 
other wood suitable for porch 
work. Does not crack, con- 
tains no pitch, is free from 
knots and does not rust or rot. 
If you do not know what a 
wonderful material Redwood 
is for porch work ask us to 
tell you more about it. 

The illustration shows our 
special "Eureka" porch col- 
umn worked from If in. staves. 
It is guaranteed not to "open" 
up, crack or warp. Will re- 
tail $1,00 per post over any 
other wood, and net you a greater profit. 

Talk Redwood it means more money for you and 
greater satisfaction to your customers. 

Write for our special folder on Redwood porch 
work. 




GREATEST SASH r DOOR HOUSE. 



I II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




Wouldn't you like to know in 
advance what colors would 
look best on the outside of 
your house? 

We have a Portfolio of color schemes 
for house-painting which we send 
free on request. This shows colors 
in artistic combinations on actual 
houses. There are fifteen of these 
plates, each showing a different style 

o f architecture 
and each s u g- 
gesting a differ- 
ent color scheme 
with complete 
specifications for 
obtaining it. 






. 

Our book No. 108-J shows our latest designs in 
Wood Carpet, Parquetry Flooring, Grilles and Man- 
tels. Ask for it if you haven't a copy. 



^ ^ - Another Portfolio 

\^-" This one on interior decoration 

This Portfolio shows an attractive cottage bunga- 
low, decorated and furnished throughout. Each 
room, as well as three exteriors, and a veranda, are 
shown in their actual colors, and accompanying each 
plate are carefully worked out specifications. Even 
the curtains, rugs, draperies and furniture are sug- 
gested. Vou can adapt any or all of these color com- 
binations in the Portfolio, or our Decorative Depart- 
ment will prepare without cost special suggestion to 
be used, upon request. 

Write today for these two helpful Portfolios. 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINTS&VARNISHES 

Sold by merchants everywhere. Ask your local dealer for 
color cards and full information. For the Special Home 
Decoration Service write to the Sherwin-Williams Co., Decor- 
ative Dept., 629 Canal Road, N. W., Cleveland, O. 



a a a a a a 
a si a a a a a a a"" 

Stencil No. 35 



126 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 





The Past Year in the Portland Cement 
Industry. 

HE Geological Survey figures for 
the year 1909, showing a produc- 
tion of nearly 63,000,000 barrels 
of Portland cement, was quite a 
surprise to those interested in the in- 
dustry. The remarkable upward growth 
of the curve of Portland cement produc- 
tion is one of the greatest features of 
American industry, marking as it does a 
gain of nearly 60,000,000 barrels in out- 
put within the last decade. The develop- 
ment in 'the year 1909 was, to a very 
great degree, outside of the well known 
Lehigh district, which, in 1899, produced 
nearly 73 per cent of all the Portland 
cement manufactured in the United 
States, while in 1909 it produced about 
36 per cent. 

The growth of the industry has been 
generally distributed over the country, 
and it is becoming more and more recog- 
nized that the fundamental principle that 
the price of Portland cement is the mill 
price, plus the freight and plus the 
handling or, in other words, the cost to 
the consumer. 

From figures so far gathered and made 
public, the indications are that the year's 
output for 1910 will run between 70 and 
75 millions of barrels, the percentage of 
growth being possibly less than the aver- 
age percentage in previous years. But, 
in considering this fact, it must be re- 
membered that the sum total of produc- 
tion has grown so rapidly that a growth 
of 20 per cent upon the figures of the 
present periods would aggregate more 
than 12,000,000 barrels, whereas the 20 
per cent average growth in previous 
years rarely exceeded from 6 to 8 million 
I barrels per annum. In figuring this large 
^increased output for 1910 much consid- 
eration must be given to the wide pub- 



licity that the Portland cement industry 
has had. 

Impervious Concrete. 

By Albert Moyer, Assoc. Am. Soc. C. E. 
In the minds of the laymen, particu- 
larly a man or woman about to build 
a residence, the principal prejudice 
against concrete is dampness. This uni- 
versal building material has been found 
so prominently successful for a variety 
of purposes, that nearly all prejudices 
have been removed. This one, however, 
seems to remain among those uninformed 
and unskilled in engineering. 

Concrete properly proportioned and 
properly placed is probably as dense as 
any building material known, therefore, 
as impervious to water. Aggregates such 
as sand, gravel or crushed stone can be 
proportioned practically and economical- 
ly so that impervious concrete results. 

It is unnecessary to use patented or 
other waterproofing compounds with 
well proportioned concrete, natural meth- 
ods are far more permanent than artifi- 
cial. The following description of the 
concrete water tower which has just re- 
cently been erected at Westerly, R. L, 
should dispose of this subject once and 
for all. 

The tower was erected by the Aber- 
thaw Construction Co., of Boston, Mass. 
It is composed of concrete made of an 
average mixture of one yard of stone, 
one yard of sand, 2 5-11 barrels of Port- 
land cement to one yard of concrete, and 
about 5 per cent of hydrated lime. The 
tower holds 650,000 gallons carrying a 
total height of 70 feet of water; inside 
diameter is 40 feet; the walls are 14 
inches thick, reinforced with steel rods. 

As the tower was made water tight 
by the density of the concrete great care 
was exercised in the choice of the aggre- 
gates and the cement ; in mixing, the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Asbestos "Century" Shingle Roof Residence of Dr. J. B. Porteous, Atlantic City, N. J. ; 
H. A. Stout, Atlantic City. Architect ; Atlantic City Cornice Works, Atlantic City, Roofers 

Asbestos 'Century' Shingles 

"The Roof that Outlives the Building" 

\Y7HEN the roofing contractor brings you an estimate for the 
roof just ask him how much repairs and painting are 
going to add to the first cost. 

Asbestos " Century" Shingles make an absolutely permanent 
roof^no repairs, no painting and their first cost is no higher 
than you expect to pay for a first class roof. 

They are the first practical lightweight roofing of reinforced con- 
crete and are the only indestructible roofing known to the build- 
ing trade. 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles literally outlive the building. They improve 
with age and exposure. Cannot rot, rust, crack, split or blister. They are 
weatherproof fireproof -timeproof. 

All over America and Europe you will find proof of the durability of these 
shingles on all types of buildings. The illustration shows the residence of Dr. 
J. B. Porteous, Atlantic City, N. J., one of the thousands of buildings in this 
country roofed with Asbestos "Century" Shingles. 

You can get Asbestos "Century" Shingles in three colors Newport Gray 
(silver gray), Slate (blue black), and Indian Red in numerous shapes and 
sizes. Ask your responsible Roofer about Asbestos "Century" Shingles. 
Write for our illustrated Booklet "Reinforced 191 1" full of valuable informa- 
tion for the man with a building to be roofed. 

The Keasbey & Mattison Company 

Factors 
AMBLER, PENNSYLVANIA 



128 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



CEMENT-Continued 



following excellent method was em- 
ployed ; as a little water was put into the 
mixer, it was followed by about half the 
required amount of stone; this was 
turned for a few minutes until the blades 
were well cleaned; the cement and sand 
were next added and finally the balance 
of the stone for the batch. The concrete 
was mixed sloppy and very carefully 
placed as there is no final finish on the 
outside surface. No water or even damp- 
ness has shown on the surface. 

Earthquake-Proof Construction. 

We all remember the Messina earth- 
quake, which spread ruin and death 
throughout that district of Italy. Short- 
ly after the earthquake, a royal commis- 
sion was appointed to investigate the 
most suitable building materials and 
regulation for earthquake countries. 

That reinforced concrete has demon- 
strated its efficiency for this use is shown 
by the following paragraph from the re- 
port of the commission : 

"After an examination of the various 
systems of construction admissible, the 
members of the committee are firmly of 
the opinion that structures whose walls 
and floors are of reinforced concrete, 
with certain special modifications and 
subject' to the adoption of other special 
materials for certain parts of the build- 
ing, are best adapted to resist the various 
disturbances arising out of seismic move- 
ments., and, therefore, those most highly 
suited to combat the effects of earth- 
quakes." Exchange. 



Penetration of Concrete by Frost. 

We want to build a concrete protec- 
tion to prevent a supply pipe from freez- 
ing. The pipe is 4 inches in diameter 
and 30 feet long. My idea was that if 
a boxing of concrete, two feet square, 
was made around the pipe it should keep 
out the frost. 

It is generally felt that properly cured 
concrete is absolutely immune to frost. 
We should scarcely advise you to make 
a box of concrete, two feet on the side, 
around a four-inch pipe. In our judg- 
ment, six inches would be ample. The 
essential thing is to have an insulating 
air-space. 

Granulated Slag in Concrete Block. 

Is granulated slag ever used in the 
manufacture of concrete block? We have 
some that is sharp, but rather porous. 
Sand has to be shipped here and costs 
rather high. We can get slag cheaper. 

If slag is entirely free from particles 
of unburned coal, and if it has weathered 
for a sufficient time to free it from sul- 
phur and other impurities, it is used in 
concrete, but not where any great weight 
is to be carried. Well graded slag finds 
its place in curtain walls, partitions and 
similar construction. Slag concrete 
naturally possesses high fireproof quali- 
ties. 

Cement Blocks With Wet Mixture. 

In the following is described a success- 
ful process to manufacture concrete 
building blocks with a wet mixture. 

The molds are filled with a rather stiff 
wet mixture of concrete. The facing for 




The Heart of a Room 



"\ Y/HETHER in living Room, Hall, Den, or Bedroom the fireplace with 

YM its cheery blaze is the center of attraction. Be sure this chief 

decorative feature is the best obtainable, both artistically and 

practically. No other form of fireplace equals the brick mantel; and the 

best brick mantel made is the P. & B. BRICK MANTEL 




lenor decoration, several sizes to nt any room, or any corner ot tne room. 
Composed entirely of brick no danger from the hottest fire. Shipped care- 
fully packed in barrels. Any mason can connect -with chimney. Complete 
working plans accompany each mantel. Whether you are building, thinking 
of building, or simply remodeling an interior, send for our sketch book, to be 
had for the asking. 



PHILADELPHIA & BOSTON FACF RRirk 

IILAM^LLriMAA D\A3I\ST1 I /\V,L DKKJV 



P. O. BOX 861 8, BOSTON, MASS. 

New York Sales Offices, 11 2 W. 42d St. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



129 



If You Have A Fire 
place 




You can secure four times the usual amount 
of heat by using a 

Jackson Ventilating Grate 

These grates each heat two or more rooms 
on one or different floors in severest weather, 
and they will heat an entire residence with 
two-thirds the fuel of a furnace. 

IF You HAVE No FIREPLACE you can se- 
cure the effect of an ordinary open grate by the 
use of a MAYFLOWER OPEN FRANKLIN. Many 
people use them in preference to the ordinary 
open fireplace.. 

CATALOG "K" shows the Ventilating 
Grate. Send for this, and also for catalogues 
of Mantels, Franklins, Andirons, or anything 
else you wish in the fireplace line. 

Edwin A. Jackson & Bro. 

25 Beckman St., N. Y. 



ATTENTION TO DETAILS 

wai 

Insure Comfort 

IN YOUR HOME 
See that Your Doors are hung with 

STANLEY'S 

Ball -Bearing Hinges 

No creaking of doors 
No need of oiling 
No sagging 

ARTISTIC BOOKLET FREE 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

Dept.T, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 







With the help of this free book "Concrete Con- 
struction About the Home and on the Farm" you 

can make your home more livable. Send for it 
today. 

A T"I AC? PORTLAND 

ATLAS CEMENT 

is pure and absolutely uniform. It is made from 
the finest raw materials. We also make stainless 
ATLAS White Portland Cement for decorative 
purposes. 

Other books in the ATLAS Cement Library : 



Concrete Houses and Cottages 

Vol. I Large Houses 

Vol. II Small Houses .... 

Concrete in Highway Construction . 
Reinforced Concrete in Factory Construction 

(delivery charge) 

Concrete in Railroad Construction 

Concrete Cottages 

Concrete Garages 



$1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



.10 
1.00 
. Free 
Free 

If your dealer cannot supply you with ATLAS, 
write to 

THE ATLAS PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 
DEPT. L, 3O BROAD ST., NEW YORK 

Largest productive capacity of any cement company in the 
world. Over 50,000 barrels per day. 



130 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



CEMENT-Continued 



the block should be one part cement; 
and one and one-half parts coarse sand, 
which should also be a rather stiff, wet 
mixture. The facing is placed on the block 
in a ridge through the center the full 
length of the block. A piece of moistened 
cheese cloth that is wider and longer 
than the mold is then spread over the 
mold, and the face plate, which is per- 
forated, is pressed on the cloth, the im- 
pression made, the face plate is removed 
and the cloth is stripped from the block. 

A simple way of testing the method is 
to cover a little facing material with 
cheese cloth, and make an impression 
with a piece of carved molding. 

The cost of 24-inch blocks based on 
labor at $2.00 per day, cement at $1.40 
per barrel, and sand at $1.00 per yard, 
the body of the block being a four to 
one mixture, is as follows : Smooth face 
piece, five cents; hammered face piece 
six cents; and the rock face piece, eight 
cents. The full block (two pieces) 
smooth block, ten cents; hammered face, 
eleven cents, and the rock face, thirteen 
cents. 

More defective walls are built by the 
use of too much lime in the mortar than 
any other cause. Mortar for wet-mix 
blocks requires but little lime, as the 
blocks are practically waterproof. 

In all the walls made with one two- 



piece blocks the vertical joints are at 
the center of the open spaces in the walls, 
which is an advantage, as all vertical 
joints should be pointed or plastered 
over the side of the wall to insure a tight 
joint. 

The molds are sanded before they are 
filled with concrete. The sides are 
higher than the ends in order that the 
face plate may be held in position when 
the impression is made. Wet blocks can 
be made faster and with less hard work 
than dry blocks, as there is no tamping 
and they do not require sprinkling and 
care after they are made. 

Information Wanted Concerning Treat- 
ment of Concrete Surfaces. 

A report has recently been issued by 
the committee on exterior treatment of 
concrete surfaces of the National Asso- 
ciation of Cement Users, of which Mr. 
Leonard C. Wason, of the Aberthaw 
Construction Co., is chairman. It is the 
wish of the committee to obtain addition- 
al information from manufacturers, engi- 
neers and users of appliances and ma- 
terials for coating concrete surfaces. Any 
information in regard to the above would 
be much appreciated. Correspondence in 
regard to same should be addressed to 
Leonard C. Wason, president, of the 
Aberthaw Construction Co., 8 Beacon 
street, Boston, Mass. 



Of Greatest Importance in a Roofing is its Ability to withstand all 
Weather Conditions, Fire, Etc. 

Get VULCANITE SILEX ROOFING 



and it will fill every requirement, besides giving a handsome appearance, 
a Silvery Gray Color and Marble coated on both sides. 



Is of 



Comes in One, Two and Three Ply Extra Heavy and Burlap Extra Heavy. 
We'll be glad to have you test our samples. 



McClellan Paper Company 



FARGO 



'The Home of Quality 
MINNEAPOLIS 



DULUTH 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



131 



You Should Use 

SACKETT PLASTER BOARD 

INSTEAD OF LATH 

in that new building of yours because SACKETT insures greater comfort, 
better walls and -will save you future repair bills. 

ij SACKETT is the ideal lathing material. Has superior advantages which you 
cannot afford to overlook. SACKETT is fireproofing, soundproofing, heatproof- 
ing, coldproofing and lathing in one simple operation. SACKETT comes in 
stiff, true, firm sheets, 32" x 36", about the thickness of lath and is nailed direct 
to the studding or joists and plastered over. 

J SACKETT Plaster Board and U. S. G. Hard Wall Plaster bond together perfectly and make 
solid, durable and sanitary walls of unequaled quality the kind of walls that will make your 
building worth more. 

J Only the conspicuous merits of SACKETT can be presented in any single advertisement. Our 
booklet K covers the subject thoroughly and contains information of vital interest to YOU. Send 
for it, and we will also mail you a sample of SACKETT Plaster Board showing its use in connec- 
tion with U. S. G. Hard Wall Plaster. 

UNITED STATES GYPSUM CO. 



New York 



Cleveland 



Chicago 



Minneapolis 



Kansas City 



San Francisco 




All cement, brick and stucco 
exteriors need 

PETRIFAX Cement Coating 

Without it rain and dampness are sure to penetrate, causing 
damage and unsanitary conditions. 

Petrifax waterproofs the exterior. It consists of a mineral 
base, which is carried into thepores of the cement by a volatile 
liquid, which evaporates quickly, leaving a hard yet elastic 
surface that will not crack, chip nor peal, even under climatic 
changes. To cement and stucco it gives a uniform and pleas- 
ing color that these materials themselves never have, and 
without destroying their texture. Let us tell you more about 

this successful waterproof coating. We are always glad 
^ to answer questions. Ask for Booklet. 

ItavfAr Rraflmve f A 119 B road St., Boston, Mass. 
IFr.Uri Dl UtllttliS Vll.ll33Broadway,NewYork,N.Y. 
Makers of Dexter Brothers' English Shingle Stains. 
AGENTS H. M Hooker Co., Chicago; John D. S. Potts, 
218 Kace St., Phila. ; Carolina Portland Cement Co., Bir. 
minpham and Montgomery,Ala., Jacksonville, Fla., Charles- 
ton, S.C.. New Orleans, La., and Atlanta. Ga. ; C. M. Brocket 
Cement Co., Kansas City, Mo. ; Sherman Kimball, San Francisc 
Calif. ; F. 8. Combs, Halifax. N.S. ; AND DEALERS. 



Be sure 

the word 

PETRIFAX 

and our 

name 

are on 

every 

barrel, 

keg and 

can. 





FURNACE 



We will deliver a complete heating 
equipment at your station at factory 
prices and wait for our pay while you 
test it during 60 days of winter weather. 

The entire outfit must satisfy you or 
you pay nothing. Isn't this worth looking 
Into? Could we offer such liberal terms 
If we didn't know that the Hess Furnace 
excels In service, simplicity, efficiency, 
economy 1 

We are makers not dealers and will 
save you all mlddlemens' profits. No room 
for more details here. Write today for free 
48-page booklet which tells all about It. 

your name and address on a fast card 
is sufficient. 



1 HESS, 717 Tacoma BldB-, Chicago 





"DIRECT FROM FACTORY" 

[on approval] 
PRICE ON THIS 

Piano-Finish, Selected Figurt, 
Quarter-Sawed Oak Mantel is 



Dealers' price $40 to $50. 

It is 82 in. high, 60 in. wide. 36x18 French 
Bevel Mirror, four elaborate capitals. 

Includes Tile Facing-, 60x18 Hearth. Plat- 
ed Frame and Club House Grate. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
AND PARQUETRY 

will last as long as the house. Any car- 
penter can lay it easier than ordinary floor- 
ing. Get our prices. 

TILE AND MOSAICS 

tor everywhere. WALLS. FLOORS, ETC. 

Write for catalosr of Mantels, Grates, Tiles for floors and baths. Slat* 
Laundry Tubs, Grilles, etc. It is free. Or send 10 cents to pay postage on 
our Art Mantel Catalog. Mantel Outfits from $12 to $200. Made to ordet 
Fly Screens for doors and windows. 

W. J, OSTENDORF, 2923 n. BU a. Philadelphia, Pa. 



132 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



FINISHING 





Painting and Varnishing When Frosty. 

HE nights are frosty in most parts 
of the country now, and it is well 
to remember this when having 
exterior varnishing or painting 
to do. Varnishing should be done as 
early in the morning as possible, so that 
it can set before night. Paint will not 
be seriously affected unless a severe frost 
comes, in which case the paint had bet- 
ter be at least partly dry before the end 
of the day, otherwise it may be caught 
by the hard frost and ruined. Light 
frosts do not affect paint very much, if 
at all, but the hard, freezing frosts will 
damage paint if in a fresh condition. 
Also, the painting on the north and 
northeast sides are most likely to be hurt, 
while that done where the wind of a 
frosty night does not hit will escape. 

Too Much Paint Being Used? 

There is no question about the value of 
thin coats well rubbed in and out, as the 
painters say. A heavy coat of paint is 
always a bad thing. Better four thin 
coats than two or three coats containing 
as much paint as the four thin coats. It 
is not so much a question of how much 
lead or how much oil to use, but how 
much to rub it out on the work. Make 
the paint rather stiff, but rub it out well. 

What Gold Size Is. 

Gold size may be either a varnish, or 
a more elaborate and indefinite com- 
pound. In either case it should be a 
quick drier and have a tough substance. 
The former class is preferable, as being 
definite. In appearance it will answer 
as a hard to medium dark varnish. An 
inferior gold size sometimes met with is 
made up of half-and-half boiled oil and 
benzine rosin varnish, with perhaps a 
trace of better material to fit a certain 
price. The smell is frequently disguised, 



but a gluey appearance is against it with 
the careful buyer. The home-made ar- 
ticle, used by some, is simply fat oil, 
produced in several ways, the most fa- 
miliar being the adding of raw oil to dry 
red lead and allowing it to stand in a 
warm place for some weeks, the oil com- 
ing to the top and being then in a thick- 
ened condition. 

Cleaning Paint Pots and Cups. 

A very good plan for cleaning paint 
,pots and cans, particularly small articles, 
is to have a pot of oil on the stove, and 
let it become quite hot, though not boil- 
ing, then place the vessels that are to 
be cleaned in the oil, which in a little 
time will soften up the old paint, and 
then it may be scraped off, the paint be- 
ing added to the oil for straining and 
using for paint. 

How to Use Paint and Varnish Remover. 

It is rather costly, and one may easily 
waste it in not knowing how to save. 
First, coat the surface all over, not a little 
patch, but the entire surface. Let it re- 
main on for some time, then try it; if 
the stuff is well loosened up, scrape it off. 
If not, do not scrape, but give it another 
coat. In this way you will finally have 
the entire coating of old stuff loose, when 
it may easily be removed entire. By 
doing little patches and not letting the 
remover have time to get at the bottom 
of things, you simply waste the material. 
Keep the can containing the remover 
well closed, for it is very volatile, es- 
caping readily. These removers act slow- 
ly, and cannot eat at once through sev- 
eral old coats of paint or varnish ; if the 
latter were of recent formation it would 
at once curl up, and then be easily 
scraped or even wiped off. Use a wire 
brush where you cannot readily use a 
scraper, after applying the remover. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



133 




A House White-Leaded Is a House 
Well Painted 

It is very important that you give much thought to the painting of that house 
you are planning. 

Paint is the protection you can give your house against the wear of time and 
weather. It is the only insurance you can get against these two promoters of decay 
and deterioration. 

It depends upon the paint you use on your house as to just how much protec- 
tion you are going to give that house. Poor paint gives poor protection and, in- 
versely, good paint gives good protection. 

There is one way that you can be absolutely sure of obtaining paint that will 
produce perfect protection for your property real protection that will stand the 
assaults of time and weather and add years to the life of your house and that is to 
have your painter use pure white lead and pure linseed oil paint. 

See that the white lead is Dutch Boy Painter white lead then you will be sure 
the white lead is absolutely pure. 

Any tint, any shade, any finish. 

For exterior and interior use. 

Look for the Dutch Boy Painter on the keg. 



New York 



National Lead Company 



Cincinnati 



Boston 



Cleveland 



Buffalo 



St. Louis 



Chicago 



(John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Philadelphia) 
(National Lead & Oil Co., Pittsburgh) 



134 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



New 
Roofing Discovery 

Works Wonders in Beautifying Home! 




For Simplest and Grandest Homes 



CHARMING Moorish beauty and dig- 
nity of appearance of Metal Spanish 
Tile gives an air of distinction to the 
home graced by this wonderful new and 
practically indestructible roofing. 

It has taken home builders of America by 
storm, for it is the modernization of the 
wonderfully beautiful roofs of historic Span- 
ish edifices. 

The art of making this roofing, left behind 
by fleeing Moors driven out of Spain cen- 
turies ago, until 1910 could not be made 
practical for the modern home, despite its 
alluring beauties. 

After years of experiment, we have hit 
the solution That is why today we are able 
to offer American homes the amazing at- 
tractiveness of 

Metal Spanish Tile Roofing 

Its scores of vital, practical advantages cost no 
more than common roofing, yet mean tremendous 
economy it needs no repairs and outlasts several 
ordinary roofs because of its practically indestruct- 
ible metal construction. 

It is absolutely wind, weather, storm, fire and 
lightning proof. 

Easy to apply. No soldering, no special tools 
any ordinary mechanic can apply it. Interlocking 
system by which tiles dovetail into each other makes 
the roof absolutely water tight and provides for ex- 
pansion and contraction perfectly summer and 
winter. It is guaranteed non-breakable. 

HOMEBUlLDERS-Simply send us today the dimensions 
of your building and we will tell you by return mail exact 
cost of all material. Our new 1910 book on beautifying 
the modern American home by use of Metal Spanish Tile 
is yours for the asking. A postal will bring it. Address 

The Edwards Manufacturing Co. 

The Largest Makers of Steel Roofing 
and Metal Shingles in the World 

520-540 Culvert St. Cincinnati!, Ohio 



PAINTING AND FINlSHING-Continued 

Make a forward and backward movement 
with the brush. After the remover clean 
up with benzine and a rag; but as this 
cuts rather poorly, better add a little 
benzol to the benzine, which will cause 
the fluid to cut better; or use wood al- 
cohol. When removing old stuff from 
hardwood work do not get down into 
the filler; and to avoid this, as soon as 
the surface coats are softened scrape 
them away and wipe up with a rag wet 
with alcohol. If the remover gets at the 
filler it will remain there and injure the 
subsequent finish. If it gets into the 
filler apply more and get out the old filler 
and fill anew. 

Raising a Ladder. 

When you raise a ladder, do not raise 
it with one leg alone resting on the 
ground, but see that both legs are rest- 
ing there. This will prevent strain on 
the ladder, which in turn causes the 
rounds to become loose. Also, in taking 
the ladder down, be careful and do not 
take it down on a strain, remembering 
that there is a right and a wrong way 
for doing even so simple a thing as this. 

Coloring Paint in the Pot. 

When you want to color or tint a pot 
of paint do not add the color direct from 
the can, but first thin it up a little with 
turpentine, or benzine, which is just as 
good for the purpose and much cheaper. 
It is also a clever idea to thin up some 
color and place it in a bottle or other 
suitable vessel, and have it on the job, 
ready to add to paint if needed. Another 
way to add color to paint, when mixing 
a batch, is to add the color to the stiff 
lead, direct from the color can, then work 
this up into the paste. A good way also 
for adding driers. 

Free-Hand Relief Material. 

Free-hand relief stuff may be made 
from one pound of plaster of Paris, four 
ounces of dry white lead and two tea- 
spoonfuls of baking soda. Mix to a paste 
with cold water and fill at once into the 
bulb. The bicarbonate of soda prevents 
the mixture from settling too soon. If 
it is desired to have it colored, then add 
some dry color to the dry plaster, and 
if bronze is wanted then dust some on 
while the stuff is still wet. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



135 



WOULD YOU LIKE 

Home 



A Bright, 

Original, 

Attractive 



With Your Own Individual Ideas as the Key 
Note of the Design 




OUR $5.00 SKETCH OFFER 

On receipt of $5.00 and a rough diagram or des- 
cription of your own ideas we will make a special 
study of your requirements and prepare the first 
and second floor plans accurately laid out to a scale 
with a picture of the exterior of the house as it 
would appear when completed, advising you of the 
additional charge for Complete Working Drawings, 
Specifications, Etc., which will be as low as is 
consistent with the labor involved. This offer 
applies to residences only costing not over $5.000 
and is made simply to demonstrate to you the value 
of competent services in interpreting and rendering 
practical your original ideas so that the home 
will be a complete success in every detail. 

' ' There is no art to find the mind's construc- 
tion in the face." Macbeth. 

-BUT- 

' ' The dwelling a man builds, reveals his per- 
sonality, and through its halls and porticos 
runs the story of his life." 

Now if the problem be given proper consider- 
ation, it means time and time is money. We 
would be speedily overwhelmed with requests if this 
were a free offer, consequently it is not free. No 
signed contract is asked for. We propose to make 
our work so pleasing and satisfactory as to demon- 
strate beyond a question that the best is certainly 
the cheapest for you. The fact that houses built 
from our designs sell advantageously when built 
proves they are practical and desirable. This is 
an important matter should you wish to dispose 
of your property. 

REMEMBER: It is not what you pay for 
plans that is the real consideration, but it is 
what you yet. Why? Because upon your plans 
and especially the details of construction de- 
pends utterly the proper or improper expend- 
iture of all^your building funds. Quite im- 
portant, is it not? 

THE KEITH CO., Architects 

1721 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, Minn. 



See that this trade-mark is 
on every can of varnish used 
in finishing your new home. 

You can get other varnishes 
that cost less but you will regret 
it if you use them. 

For all floors and other wood- 
work insist upon 




Any dealer or painter can furnish them. 
BERRY BROTHERS, Ltd. 

Established 1858 
Largest Varnish Makers in the World 

Address all Correspondence to DETROIT 

Factories : 

Detroit, Michigan 

Walkerville, Ontario 

Branches : 

New York, Boston 
Philadelphia, Baltimore 



Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis 
San Francisco 




136 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



^..-^-.^ 

AND PLVMBING 





Directions for Operating Round or 
Square Steam Boilers. 

EFORE STARTING a fire in the 
boiler see that the gauge glass is 
half full of water or up to the 
water line, also open the lower 
try cock and see that it contains water. 
The gauge glass should always be about 
half full of water when the apparatus is 
in operation, and should the water by 
any means get below the gauge glass the 
fire should be drawn and the apparatus 
allowed to cool down before the water is 
turned on. If the water is attended to at 
the same time as the fire all trouble will 
be obviated. 

To start the fire, first close the check 
damper in smokebox, then see that the 
direct damper in the smoke pipe is open. 

Open the draft door in ashpit suffi- 
ciently to get a good draft. Fill the fire- 
pot full of dry kindling wood and when 
burning well, put on sufficient coal to 
cover the wood. As the wood continues 
to burn and the coal is fully ignited, fill 
the firepot with coal. The damper reg- 
ulator should then be adjusted so that 
the draft door in the ashpit and the check 
clamper in the smoke box are closed, the 
damper regulator lever level with no 
slack in either chain. The operation of 
the boiler can then be controlled by the 
weight on the lever. 

Open the feed door slide to supply air 
for perfect combustion. The feed door 
should not be opened to regulate the tem- 
perature: this can be better accomplished 
by the use of the dampers, with more 
satisfactory results and greater economy 
of fuel. To "keep" fire, the draft damp- 
ers must be regulated to suit the draft 
of Chimney; no rule can be laid down in 
this matter, as no two chimneys draw 
alike; consequently each apparatus must 
be regulated as experience teaches and 
the requirements call for. 



When it is desirable to check the fire 
and prevent the generating of steam, the 
chain can be unhooked from the damper 
in ashpit door, or the weights removed 
from the damper regulator. 

With the water base square sectional 
boiler only, a direct draft damper is pro- 
vided ; it should be opened when first 
starting the fire or when the fire is low 
and is required to be raised quickly, at 
all other times it should be kept closed 
to prevent wasting" fuel. 

The fire should have attention during 
extremely cold weather at least three 
times a day. In moderate weather twice 
a day will be sufficient. This should be 
done early in the morning and late at 
night. To obtain good results the fire 
should be kept clean and perfectly free 
from ashes and clinkers. Keep the fire- 
pot full of coal and the grate clear of 
ashes. In the morning after the fire has 
been cleaned, put on only enough coal to 
cover the fire. When this is burning 
freely, put on sufficient coal to fill the 
firepot. Remove the ashes daily from the 
ashpit to avoid burning out the grates. 

The clean-out doors on the front of the 
boiler above the feed door should be 
opened as often as necessary, to clean off 
any_ deposit which might form on the 
sections. A cleaning brush is furnished 
with the boiler and the surfaces should 
be cleaned off at least once a week when 
the boiler is in use, or oftener, depending 
upon the quality of the fuel used. At all 
other times the clean-out doors should be 
kept closed. 

Occasionally lift the safety valve to 
see that it opens easily. 

Should all the water get out of the 
boiler, first dump the fire, open the fire 
door and let the boiler cool off, before 
refilling. If the apparatus is to be left 
without fire in cold weather, draw all the 
water off, to avoid freezing. 



137 



A Little Boiler 
That Does the Work of a Big One 



Because of its perfect construction and 
improved design, the "RICHMOND" Round 
Sectional Boiler for heating homes either by 
steam or hot water saves fuel and saves feed- 
ing lessens not only the expense but the 
labor of heating the home. 

With this heating system you get all the 
advantages in. the way of greatest fuel econ- 
omy and the constant, every-day efficiency 
of steam or hot water heating at no greater 
cost than is required to install a hot air heat- 
ing plant with its attendant big fuel con- 
sumption and uneven, hard-to-control heat- 
giving power. 

This small boiler, by reason of its econ- 
omy, places steam or hot water heat within 
the easy reach of any home owner, whether 
the house be new or old. 

RICHMOND* 



Boilers 



Radiators 



Write for this Book 



If you are interested in heating and build- 
ing large or small, write us. Ask for catalog 
325 Learn for yourself about this perfect 
system which is so economical of fuel that it 
saves its own cost and pays its own mainten- 
ance 

Address in the West 

fameron jSchroth (ameron 



Western Distributors for 
1CHMOND- Boilers and Radiators 



323 Michigan Street 
Chicago 




* In this boiler the sections run CROSSWISE instead 
of up and down. 

The hottom section, which lorms the ash-pit, is of 
special heavy construction made in one piece with 
every provision for expansion, and no possibility of 
breaking. 

Corrugated Fire-Pot 

The second section Is the firepot, which has an 
ingeniously corrugated inner edge giving additional 
heating service and preventing the deadening of the 
coal at the edge of the fire. 

The top sections, in which the water is heated, are 
a triumph in boiler construction. 

The gases are carried up from the firepot In com- 
bustion through a series of round openings and over- 
hanging arms in these top sections. They are carried 
upward until they reach a deflecting section which 
sends the flames down and back again to do more 
work. 

All the Heat Utilized 

When the burning gases finally reach the smoke 
box they find a new kind of check damper, which 
automatically prevents the escape of the heated gases 
into the smoke box until they have done their full 
work 

By actual test one small size boiler with this check- 
draft attachment will do as much work more econom- 
ically than a larger size would without It. 

The grate bars are of a superior triangleconstruction 
so arranged that part or all of the grate can be shaken 
as desired. 

The firepot has the clinker door at the grate line so 
that clinkers may be readily reached with the slicing 
bar. 

Self-Cleaning Surface 

The firepot and a large proportion of the boiler 
above it is self-cleaning, while ample provision is 
made for cleaning other parts of the boiler by large 
clean-out doors without lowering the fire and interfer- 
ing with the heating of the building. 



"RICHMOND" Bath Tubs Lavatories Sinks 

If you are about to build, investigate, too. bath tubs, which bears the name "RICHMOND" 



the "RICHMOND" line of enameled ware. Every- 
thing in enameled ware, from kitchen sinks to 



is the best that can be made, less expensive 
in the beginning and in the end. 



THE M^CRUM-HOWELL Co. 103 



New York 



Two factories at Uniontown. Pa. One at Norwich, Conn. One at Racine. Wi 



138 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



HEATING AND PLUMBING- Continued 



The water need not be drawn off from 
the apparatus during the summer 
months, and it is not necessary to renew 
the water in an apparatus oftener than 
once a year; the water should be drawn 
off and the apparatus refilled with fresh 
water just before starting the fire in the 
fall. 

See that the boiler has a separate flue 
and a good draft and at the beginning of 



Q5BUYSTHIS COMPLETE 

-BATHROON OUTFIT 




MODERN 



FOR EVERY 
HONE 



THE LUXURIES OF MODERN PLUMBING AT 
HALF THE ORDINARY COST. 

This outfit is complete ready for installation. Our standard 
thread connection enables you to put it in yourself without any 
knowledge of plumbing. Complete instructions with every outfit. 
We have put this outfit into 1900 homes. 
COMPLETE PNEUMATIC WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS 

FROM $42.00 UPWARDS. 
Save $100.00 to $250.00 on your 
steam or hot water heating plants 

Send in sketch of building, and we will 
quote you j>rice on complete system that 
you can install yourself by following 
specia? plans and instructions with each 



system. 

Write for our 100-page Catalog FREE 

Learn how you can eliminate exorbitant 

Cr'ces by buying direct from one of the 
irgest concerns in the business estab- 
lished over thirty-four years. 

ThiS catalog shows everything in plumb- 
ing and gas fitting that you could pos- 
sioly use, and quotes you prices that you can not approach else- 
where. Wash stands, closets, bathtubs, pipe, fittings, steam and 
hot water heating plants, acetylene lighting plants, gas and elec- 
tric fixtures, tools of all kinds. 

> jl postal will bring the Catalog Write today to Dept. C. 




M.J. GIBBONS 



Sewage Disposal 

Without Sewers 
For Country Homes 

is best secured by the Ashley 
Patented System. Don't allow disease 

germs to breed in open drains 
or in cesspools at your country place. Write 
for Free Illustrated Booklet. Address 

ASHLEY HOUSE SEWAGE DISPOSAL CO. 

108 Armida Ave., Morgan Park, III. 




each season have the smoke pipe cleaned 
and put in good order. 

Use coal of good quality. As a rule 
stove size coal will give better results 
than any other. 

Have both supply and return valves 
on the radiators either wide open or 
tightly closed. If partially open the ra- 
diators will draw the water from the 
heater. If compression air valves are 
used open them when the radiators are 
filling with steam, to expel the air, and 
close them when the air is liberated. 

To obtain best results, use good au- 
tomatic air valves. 

A little time devoted to understanding 
the working of this apparatus will amply 
repay for the trouble, and when once un- 
derstood can be run with little trouble 
or attention. 

Practical Points for Plumbing Systems. 

I come now to some more specific ad- 
vice, contained in the following maxims : 

Each building should have a separate 
connection with the street sewer. Large 
buildings may require several connec- 
tions, and these are better than one pipe 
of a very large size. 

All the drain, soil, waste, and vent 
pipes within the building, and up to a 
point five feet outside, should be of heavy 
cast-iron pipe, with lead-caulked joints, 
or of galvanized screw jointed pipe with 
recessed drainage fittings. No earthen- 
ware or tile drains should be allowed 
within the building. 

All pipe conduits for sewage should 
be constructed air and water tight, to 
prevent leakage of sewage and of sewer 
air. 

All the horizontal and vertical pipes 
should be carried as straight as possible. 
Offsets on vertical vent-lines should be 
made under 45 degrees. 

On horizontal lines use Y branches, 
not tees, for junctions or connections. 

All the pipe conduits, traps, cleanouts, 
as well as the fixtures, should be kept 
exposed and easily accessible for inspec- 
tion or repairs. 

All soil and vent pipes should be ex- 
tended the full size to the roof, or even 
enlarged at the roof, to prevent closing 
of the pipes by hoar frost in cold cli- 
mates. No pipe above the roof should be 
less than 4 inches. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



139 




DO 
YOU 

WANT 

THE 
BEST? 

Round Hot 
Water Heater. 

Sectional 

Steam an d 
Water Heaters. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Hart & Grouse Co, 

Utica, N. Y. 
80 LAKE ST., CHICAGO 



Our Beautiful Booklet, "Pergolas" 

Illustrated with views of some of the most attractive new 
homes and grounds showing exceedingly artistic results 
in pergola treatment. This booklet is right off the press, 
and is yours for the asking. Ask for Booklet G-27. 

Proportions in columns make or mar the success and ar- 
tistic effect of the pergola. That is why a pergola built with 

KOLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

made in classic proportions, will insure your getting a 
charming and beautiful pergola. They are equally suitable 
for porches or interior work and are made exclusively by 

HARTMANN-SANDERS COMPANY 

Elston and Webster Aves., Chicago, 111. 
Eastern Office: - - 1 1 23 Broadway. N. Y. City 



THE NAT1 




BUILDER 




362 DEARBORN STREET 

CHICAGO 
Offers this 

Qreat Building Opportunity: 



complete plans witn 
estimate of material 
and price . . . For 



00 



The plans are medium priced, up-to-date 
homes. The front, side and rear elevations 
with floor plans and details drawn to quar- 
ter-inch scale, are on a 

LARGE SUPPLEMENT 

36 TO. 24 inches 

Plans Drawn to Scale the Same as 
a Regular Blue Print and You 

Get One Every Month 
A complete bill of materials with an accurate 
estimate of cost accompanies each plan. 




THIS IS ONE OF THE HOUSES 

It was planned by Chicago Architects, 
who rank high as designers 

It is of moderate cost and the outside is of 
Plaster Work, now so popular. 
Besides this, each number has other houses 
of low cost, including a Beautiful Bungalow 
with plans. 

The writers, selected by Architect Fred T. 
Hodgson, Editor, cover the entire building 
field. 

Send in the coupon and you may find some- 
thing new and good for the new home you 
are planning. 



$2.00 per year 20 cento per copy 

NATIONAL BUILDER, 

362 Dearborn St., Chicago: 

Put ME down for one year's subscription, for which 
I enclose $1.00 in money or stamps and THIS COUPON 
which is good for $1.00 credit on the order. 



Name_ 



City- 



Street No._ 



Keith's, Feb., '11. 



140 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 



TRADE CONDITIONS. 



1911 will be a generally prosperous 
year for all lines. 

Minneapolis Electric Motor Co. We 
have every expectation that this year's 
business will compare favorably with all 
previous years as our place is crowded 
at all times. 



National Manufacturing and Supply 
Co., Minneapolis. Business with us this 
year has been highly satisfactory from 
every point of view, collections were 
never better, and we have finished strong- 
ly with substantial shipments, made this 

month We anticipate an increased vol- p rice List of Building Material. 

ume of business in 1911 and have already c , 

booked a great many orders for future bt " Petersburg, Ma. 

delivery. A number of residence and Rough framing up to and including 

apartment houses are in process of con- 2x 8 to 20 feet in length ,. .$16.00 

struction here. Rough framing 2x10 to 20 feet in 

Reid Supply Co., Minneapolis. We are _ len & th / ............ 18.00 

just closing one of the biggest month's Rough framing 2x12 to 20 feet in 

business in our history and while we ex- length 20.00 

pect the usual lull in the country terri- a for dressing framing per 

tory, prospects in the city indicate that thousand 2.00 

building operations will continue through Extra for a11 lengths over 20 feet to 

the winter on a larger scale than usual. ^4 * eet 2.00 

Our reports coming in from the sur- 'loormg, ceiling and siding B. & B. ^ 

rounding territory show us many towns grade 26.00 

which heretofore have used no modern Flooring, ceiling and siding, No. 1 

sanitary plumbing, are now installing Common or mill run 20.00 

water and sewerage systems and the Sized sheeting 17.00 

people are anxiously awaiting the time Specified lengths of flooring, ceiling 

when they can equip their homes in a ar >d siding extra per thousand.. 4.00 

modern sanitary manner. People are fast Outside finish lumber 25.00 

coming to realize the great importance Inside finish lumber ..* 30.00 

of sanitation and especially in its connec- Mouldings 1 inch or under per 100 

tion with plumbing and what it means L ft (stock moulding) 60 

towards the prevention of sickness and Mouldings each y? inch additional 

disease. or fraction (stock moulding) ... .20 

American Ornamental Iron & Bronze Shingles No. 1 cypress 5.00 

Co., Minneapolis. Some time ago, our Shingles No. 2 cypress. .;.-....... 4.00 

contracts having grown to such a degree Lath 4.00 

that we were no longer able to execute Brick 12.00 

them in our old quarters, we were forced Columns 4x4 up to 8 feet in height 1.00 

to seek larger quarters. We have never Columns 5x5 up to 8 feet in height 1.25 

had a better year, and expect that 1911 Columns 6x6 up to 8 feet in height 1.50 

will be even a greater year with us. Columns 8x8 up to 8 feet in height 

Power Equipment Co., Minneapolis. colonial 2.00 

During the holiday season interest in en- Columns 9x9 up to 8 feet in height 

gines, boilers, dynamos, motors, and colonial 2.50 

pumps usually gives way to other mat- Columns 10x10 up to 8 feet in 

ters, even in the wholesale world. How- height colonial 3.00 

ever, we have fortunately not felt the Extra for each 1 foot or fraction 

general quietude. Our business is run- thereof in length 25 

ning at practically the same gait at Extra for boring . ' [59 

which it has traveled all summer and Door frames ^ casing plain mould- 
fall. We should like to prophesy that ed head 1.25 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



141 




A. G. C. Fletcher, Architect, New York 



\ Artistic, Economical and Reliable 



If you have had bad results with the kerosene- 
oil shingle-stains, don't condemn all stains. 

Cabot's Shingle Stains 

have stood the test for over twenty-five years in all 
parts of the world. Thousands of people have used 
them, and hundreds of unsolicited testimonials have 
been received, showing that they look better, wear 
better and preserve the wood better than any other 
exterior colorings. 

Samples of colors on wood with catalogue sent free 

SAMUEL CABOT, Inc., Sole Manufacturer. 

141 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

Agents at all Central Points. 




$25.85 

For this elegant, 
massive selected 
oak or birch, ma- 
hogany finished 
mantel 
"FROM FACTORY 

TO YOU" 

Price includes our 
"Queen" Coal 
Grate with best 
quality enameled 
tile for facing and 
hearth. Gas Grate 
$2. 50 extra. Man- 
tel is 82 inches 
high, 5 feet wide. 
Furnished with round or square columns, 
full length or double as shown in cut. 
Dealers' price not less than $40. 

CENTRAL MANTELS 

are distinctive in workmanship, style and 
finish and are made in all styles Colonial to 
Mission. CATALOGUE FREE Will send 
our new 112 page catalogue free, to carpen- 
ters, builders, and those building a home. 

Central Mantel Company 

1227 Olive Street ST. LOUIS, MO. 



-REPUTATION AND 
QUALITY COUNT" 




LIKE THIS 



for your Dining Room or Library is only one 
of the many attractive designs we have to offer. 

We have appropriate Ceilings and Walls for 
every room in your house from Parlor to Cellar, 
and for all classes of buildings. 

We make a specialty of Church work. 

If about to build, remodel or decorate, you will find 
the No-Co-Do Steel Ceilings and Walls the most decorative, 
durable and economical of anything you can use. Can be 
put over old plaster by any mechanic. 

Dust, Vermin and Fireproof. 
WIN not crack or fall. 

A Dainty Bathroom 

Tile your Bath Room, Laundry, 
Pantry and Kitchen Wall? with the No- 
Co-Do Steel Tiling, better and cheaper 
than the Porcelair, lasts a life-time. 

Separate Catalogues for Ceilings 
and Tiline will be furnished either 
direct or through your dealer. State 
which you want. 

We want a dealer in every town. 

RORTHROP, CO BURN 4 DODGE CO., 33C1imy SL, New Tort 






PERFECT satisfaction and a large saving from 
the "JONES" System of Heating, one principle 
of which is the heating of one room on two 
floors from the same basement pipe. 

Our improved "JONES" Side Wall Registers have 
been installed in over 350,000 of the most comfort- 
ably heated homes of the United States and Canada 
and insure perfectly working warm air heating plants. 

Send for Booklet, "HOME, SWEET HOME." 

U. S. REGISTER CO., Battle Creek, Mich. 




142 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS-Continued 



Window frames % casing plain 
head 1.40 

Door frames y$ casing plain mould- 
ed with sill and transom 1.35 

Door frames \ l /% casing extra 10 

Frames do not include inside trim. 
Carpenters receive from $2.50 to $3 

for 8y 2 to 9 hours. 

Aid. 

Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
February 8-9, 1911. 

The United States Civil Service Com- 
mission announces an examination on 
February 8-9, 1911, to secure eligibles 
from which to make certification to fill 
about eleven vacancies in the position of 
deck officer and two vacancies in the po- 
sition of aid. 

Applicants should at once apply either 
to the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission, Washington, D. C., or to the sec- 
retary of the board of examiners at any 
place mentioned in the list printed here- 
on, for Form 1312. 



Topographic Draftsman. 
Copyist Topographic Draftsman. 

February 8-9, 1911. 

The United States Civil Service Com- 
mission announces an examination on 
February 8-9, 1911, to secure eligibles 
from which to make certification to fill a 
vacancy in the position of topographic 
draftsman (male), Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Washington, D. C., $900 per an- 
num, and vacancies requiring similar 
qualifications as they may occur in any 
branch of the service. 

The salary of the position of topo- 
graphic draftsman ranges usually from 
$1,000 to $1,500 per annum, and for copy- 
ist topographic draftsman from $900 to 
$1,500 per annum. 

Both men and women will be admitted 
to this examination. 

Applicants should at once apply 
to the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission, Washington, D. C., for applica- 
tion Form 1312. 



To avoid the annoyance and expense 
of broken sash cords, insist on 

SILVER LAKE A 

(Since 1869 the Standard) 

The name is stamped on every 

foot of the genuine. Write for our 

guarantee. 

SILVER LAKE CO. 

98 Chauncy St. - - Boston, Mass. 




Plumbing 
Supplies 

AT 

Wholesale 
Prices 

Everything in the 
Plumbing Line 



I guarantee to save you 20% to 40% on high class goods. 
No seconds, only first quality. Write and let me prove to 
you the money I can save you. Illustrated catalog free. 

B. K. KAROL 768 to 772 West Harrhon Street, Chicago; III. 



Mr'51.00^ On Approval .Freight Paid 

' msjfa 





SBCTIONA,!, BOOKCASE 

Endorsed "The Best" by Over Fifty Thousand Users 

The Lundstrom cases are made under our own patents, in our own fac- 
tory, and the entire production is sold direct to the home and office. That 
is the reason we can offer them at such reasonable prices. In purchasing 
a Lundstrom Sectional Bookcase, you are not helping to test a doubtful 
experiment, but are getting an article which time and experience have 
proven a wonderful success. Our Sectional Bookcases are the product of 
years of undivided attention to this one line of manufacture. 

Book sections have non-binding, disappearing glass doors, and are high- 
ly finished in Solid Golden Oak. Other styles and finishes at correspond- 
ingly low prices. Write for new catalogue No. 9. 

THE C. J. LUNDSTROM MFG. CO.. LITTLE FALLS. N. Y. 

Manufacturers of Sectional Bookcases and Filing Cabinets 
New York Office : 372 Broadway 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



143 



ACME 

WOVEN WOOD LATH 



For Interior and Exterior Use 
When applied and plastered, or con- 
creted in accordance with our specifica 
tions is guaranteed to make a perfect wall 
Free from lath cracks and lath buckles. 
Booklet free on request. 

ACME WOVEN WOOD LATH CO. 



Suite 1015 New National Bank of Commerce Bldg. 

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 

U. S. A. 





THE COMFORT OF THE 



FIREPLACE 



adds much to the value of the house, especially when framed 
in an appropriate 

WOOD MANTEL 

Write for our illustrated booklet full of helpful suggestions. 
It's free. 

WOOD MANTEL MFC'S ASS'N, H. T. BENNETT, Sec'y. 
Room 1231 State Life Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 




Dr. P. B. Laskey't Bungalow, Marblehead, Mass. 
Covered With Nefionset Prostate. 

Going to build a Bungalow ? 

You will find NEPDNSET PROSLATE 
ROOFING AND SIDING less expensive 
but a more permanent and better protection 
against the heat and cold than shingles or clap- 
boards. 

There are different NEPUNSET 
ROOFINGS for different types 
of buildings, all with at least ten 
years of service. 

Write for booklet. 

F. W. BIRD & SON 

Established 1795 

Ea.t Walpole, Ma... 




144 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



GLIMPSES OF BOOKS 




First Love. 

By Marie Van Vorst. 
HIS is avstory of a man's life be- 
ginning in his boyhood days 
just after the death of his bril- 
liant but improvident father. 
The personal property is being sold at 
auction and among other things is his 
father's gun. The boy's eyes are long- 
ingly fixed upon it and a beautiful young 
matron seeing his desire purchases it and 
gives it to him. He remembers her al- 
ways and his boyish imagination pictures 




Do You Want a Fireplace in 

"V/YI11* "Urimo? Do you want the cheer, the comfort 

x uui nuiucr ,1^, on i y an open fi re can give? 

Haven't you at least one room in your house which can be absolute- 
ly transformed by the addition of a fireplace? Or, if you are 
thinking ot building, don't you owe it to yourself to find out all you 
can about fireplaces before deciding? 

Our Beautiful Free Book "Home and The Fireplace" 
is a regular mine of information about fireplaces. It tells all about 
Colonial Fireplaces, the only kind in the world sold under a pos- 
itive guarantee. It tells all about the Colonial Plan that makes 
buying a fireplace as simple as ordering a picture. Besides, it con- 
tains a number of beautiful illustrations of the splendid Colonial 
Designs just a few representative selections from the complete 
Colonial line with descriptions and prices. If you have any idea of 
building, or if you would like to know how and where you can add 
a fireplace to your present home, you need this book. 
WRITE TODAY Just send your name and address, but we would 
suggest that you write at once. Just drop us a line right now. 

COLONIAL FIREPLACE CO., 
Department 2372. 12th SI. and 46th Ave.. CHICAGO. lift. 



IWonf *li/ Man wn o knows good architecture to send 
YY am IDC man for my new ^ok, "Homes of Character," 

which contains over 40 choice designs 
of houses, cottages and bungalows. 
All new, practical plans, with con- 
cise descriptions and accurate cost 
estimates. Compiled by an architect 
of ability and 20 years experience 
in building homes. $1. prepaid. Sam- 
ple pages, 2 cents. 

JOHN HENRY NEWSON, Architect, 1243 Williamson Bldg., Cleveland, 0. 




her as a divinity. His father's friend, an 
old physician, sends the boy to school 
and college. He again meets the wom- 
an and his boyhood love returns. He 
is hurt and she nurses him through a 
long illness. Her husband is a brute 
and nothing could prevent a separation 
if she asked it. A beautiful girl is in love 
with the man but nothing came of it. 
The woman is not many years his sen- 
ior and she finds herself very much in 
sympathy with him. Yet she sacrifices 
her own feelings for what she considers 
his best interests and sends him from 
her. He finally marries a girl of his boy- 
hood days who was his first love. It is 
a beautiful story of human life as it ex- 
ists, not perhaps altogether as the world 
demands it, but as it often is. Price 
$1.50. The Bobbs-Merrill Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Mary Ware in Texas. 

By Annie Fellows Johnston. 

A story of a young girl and her devo- 
tion to her family. 

Her brother, a mining engineer, is in- 
jured and will never walk again. The 
family income is cut off with the excep- 
tion of what an artist sister can send 
from New York. Each member of the 
family strives for the benefit of the oth- 
er and the beauty of the home life makes 
a very pretty and helpful story. The 
scene is laid in a small town near San 
Antonio and Mary undertakes the care 
of two very troublesome children in an 
effort to do her share. There are some 
very lovable people in the book and the 
reader cannot help but feel their in- 
fluence. The brother is finally restored 
to health by an operation and the family 
fortune improves. It is not a love story 
yet the future promises well. The book 
is one of the "Little Colonel Series" and 
one might expect more of Mary's life in 
a future volume. It is a book that an 
adult can read with pleasure as well as 
those in their teens. Price $1.50. L. C. 
Page & Company, Boston. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

ON HOME BUILDING 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED 

The Journal of Modern Construction 

MAX L. KEITH, Publisher, 

225 Lumber Exchange - Minneapolis, Minn. 



Contents for March 



PERGOLA ADORNMENT OF HOME GROUNDS 

A COLONIAL SURVIVAL 

BAMBOO AS A BUILDING MATERIAL - 

PROBLEMS IN CONCRETE - - ' 

A HOME-MADE LAWN ROLLER - 

NOTES ON GARDENING 

HOW TO PROTECT STRUCTURAL METALS 

DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION 

HOUSEHOLD ^CONOMICS 

TABLE CHAT 

CEMENT - "'.- 

PAINTING AND FINISHING 

QUESTIONS ANSWERED ON CONSTRUCTION 
HEATING AND PLUMBING - - - - 
SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS ; ... 
GLIMPSES OF BOOKS 



PAGE 

- 165 
173 

- 176 

178 

- 182 
184 

- 186 
188 



202 
208 
214 
218 
222 
226 
230 
234 
238 
240 



CAUTION 



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Entered Jan. I, 1899, at the 'Posloffice in Minneapolis, Minn. , for transmission through the mails as second-class matter 

COPYRIGHTED 1910 




8 

PH 

s 
8 

4 

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KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Vol. XXIII 



MARCH, 1910 



No. 3 



Pergola Adornment of Home Grounds 



By Phidias Pecksniff, Architect 




A PERGOLA, HOUSE AND GARDENS. 




S it that he is too busy, too com- 
mercial, or lacking in artistic 
perception, that the American 
does so little for his home 
grounds? To many, a well kept lawn is 
considered sufficient and no attempt is 
made to produce anything more. A 
house must be beautiful indeed, that is 
sufficient unto itself, without flowers or 
shrubbery. 

There is always a harsh line at the 
base, the house rises too abruptly from 
the lawn, the lines are too straight, clear 
cut and well defined, to be artistic. 

The softening influence of plants and 
blossoms is needed, with harsh corners 
rounded in the planting to give the house 
a proper setting. When this is attempted 



it is often poorly done, with an utter 
lack of judgment as to first principles. 
Too often if shrubs are planted, the ar- 
rangement seems to provide for the har- 
vesting of some crop. To plant shrub- 
bery on the lines of an apple orchard is, 
of course, a mistake of the worst kind. 
Good judgment demands that such things 
be planted in mass effects, as back 
grounds for other and smaller plants, or 
as a screen. In this latter position the 
pergola may be considered the frame or 
support, the shrubbery and vines, the 
decorations and festoons covering it. 

The uses of the pergola are not gen- 
erally and properly understood. It may 
consist of a few columns with overhead 
beams attached to the house, arranged 



166 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



to provide a leafy screen on the sunny 
side of some room, or as is often the 
case, it is set apart from the house as a 
small shady nook for quiet afternoon 
seclusion. Where the grounds are ample 
the pergola may be used with good ef- 
fect as a covered way over the path lead- 
ing up from the side gate to the house. 
Assuming that such an arrangement pre- 
sented a broadside view from the prin- 
cipal approach, this would be a very ef- 
fective addition to the appearance as a 
whole. A pergola often forms a connec- 
ting link between buildings. 

Three detached houses were built with 
grounds occupying the whole length of 
a city block. The families were related 
and connecting pergolas were built to 
give privacy to the walks between the 
houses. The effect of the gleaming white 
columns and clinging vines and greenery, 
was especially fine from the road. It 
sometimes happens that the surroundings 
are very objectionable in appearance, at 
least in one direction. Under these con- 
ditions a carefully located pergola with 
the addition of trees and shrubbery, will 
do much to screen, and hide from view. 

A large pergola fits properly into the 
scheme of a beautiful formal garden. 
From the house terrace, steps may lead 
down to a slightly sunken garden, geo- 
metrically arranged with winding walks 
and classic garden furniture. A lily pond, 
placed to reflect the blue sky, and white 
columned pergola, becomes a gem in the 
picture. In an open space before the per- 
gola, a sun dial may be erected like an 
altar, giving a sense of classic purity and 
cultured restfulness. 

The materials employed in the con- 
struction of the pergola are largely dic- 
tated by the requirements and environ- 
ment. A house of classic design should 
have its pergola in keeping. Even 
though it has no direct connection with 
the house, the details of both should be 
in harmony. To produce a really fine ef- 



fect the grounds, garden furniture and all 
structures erected should be carefully 
studied in their mutual relation, that no 
inharmonious note be introduced. It is a 
matter of regret that an estate possessing 
some very good marble seats, in the an- 
cient style, should harbor wooden seats 
built of slats around the trees. Yet this 
condition exists in several places locally. 

When classic columns are used in the 
pergola, the Doric order seems to be 
given the preference, no doubt because 
of the simplicity and beauty of its lines. 
The more ornate orders may be used for 
the more important portions of the house, 
allowing the pergola to be of simple de- 
sign. A wooden house should have its 
pergola also of wood, but the foundations 
for the columns should be of stone or 
concrete and extend below frost. It is 
possible that on well drained soil, free 
from clay, no difficulty would arise if the 
footing stone was simply laid in position 
on the earth as leveled off. 

Columns not properly set may be 
forced out of line by the action of the 
frost, distorting the whole pergola. 

White pine, white cedar, cypress, red 
cedar, yellow poplar and fir. are the most 
satisfactory woods for pergola construc- 
tion. A great many columns are turned 
from the solid log, and a hole three inches 
in diameter bored through its entire 
length to prevent checking and splitting, 
but this method is not always success- 
ful. The presence of sap in the round 
log from which the column is turned is 
a factor that hastens decay. For better 
construction, the modern column is built 
up of staves, the joints of which are of 
interlocking design, making it impossible 
for them to come apart. The stock used 
should be not less that two inches thick, 
and can be readily inspected in all its 
parts before putting together, affording 
every opportunity for good results, in the 
finished product. 

A Doric column of white cedar, 10 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



167 




A RUSTIC EFFECT OF POSTS AND POLES. 




OF CLASSIC BEAUTY. 



168 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Court. 8 j oj Hartmann-Sanders Co. 



A PERGOLA ON LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 



inches in diameter and 7 feet 6 inches in 
length will cost about $6.25 each, or if 
fluted, 20 per cent additional. This is 
but little in excess of what the cost would 
be for similar columns, made from the 
solid log. Lintels of 2 by 8 stuff, rafters 
of 2 by 6, three feet on centers and lat- 
tice of 1 by 2 will cost from $2.50 to 
$2.75 per running foot. 

The end columns should be anchored 
by a rod passing through each column 
from the lintel and firmly bedded in the 
concrete foundation. These rods in 9 
foot lengths cost 75 cents to one dollar 
each. 

Concrete foundation piers, 16 inches 
square and carried 3 feet into the ground 
cost about $2.50 each. 

The cost of erection of a pergola, upon 
the piers can be obtained locally. 

A cheaper method of securing a foun- 
dation is to use short posts of either lo- 
cust, cedar, or chestnut, set three feet 
into the ground and projecting eighteen 



inches above. The tops are dressed to 
allow the columns to slip over after which 
they are secured by nailing. 

The rustic pergola is very picturesque, 
but is used with a house of architectural 
style in keeping. Shingle and cobble- 
stone exteriors allow a free treatment of 
materials for the pergola. 

Rough sawn timber or logs and cut 
poles may be employed with good effects. 

Unless the wood possesses a strong 
tenacious bark, it had better be removed 
when the pergola is built. Bark that is 
continually sloughing off, is a source of 
annoyance and requires continual atten- 
tion to keep the immediate vicinity clean 
and neat. Sawn timbers may have ends 
cut in grotesque outlines, to suit the 
general character of the surroundings. 

Much less liberty should be taken with 
a rafter end over a classic column, only 
outlines being used that are in accord 
with the order of architecture employed. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



169 




A PERGOLA BARE AND BLEAK WITHOUT COVERING. 



Where posts and poles are used they may 
be arranged in constructive design more 
varied than with classic columns and lintel 
and the rafter effects may be made ram- 
bling, by the use of crooked poles. 

Cement exteriors used for modern 
houses make it a logical material in the 
construction of the pergola. The column 
may be either solid, or of expanded met- 
al stretched on a wood frame and ce- 
mented over. 

Architects often omit the finer mould- 
ings from cement columns used for this 



purpose and increase the diameter, pro- 
ducing a very substantial appearance, 
which is hardly justified by what is to be 
carried. 

The diameters of strictly classic columns 
bear a certain fixed relation to their 
height for each order of architecture, and 
it is well to maintain these proportions, 
even though the structure does not carry 
the weight intended for the complete 
order. 

Rough masonary piers of stone laid 
with wide white joints are sometimes very 




Courtesy of Hartmann-Sanders Co. 
AN EFFECTIVE DESIGN. 



170 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Courtesy oj Hartmann-Sanders Co. 
A SIMPLE EFFECT IN CITY ENVIRONMENT. 



effectively used instead of columns and 
cost for a pier 18 inches square and 8 feet 
high is about $10.00. A brick pier 12 in- 
ches square of equal hight will cost 
$9.00, and if 16 inches square $11.00. A 
brick pier 20 inches square costs $13.00. 
The stone or concrete foundation is in- 
cluded in each case. 

These prices might be reduced some- 
what in rural communities. 

If the nature of the materials used for 
the piers or columns does not afford a 
natural foothold for vines, wires should 
be arranged to support them, until they 
have grown sufficiently to gain the 
rafters. 

The question of planting about a per- 
gola is of first importance. It is not 
enough that the pergola be on good lines 
and of proper architectural detail, it must 
be covered to fulfil its mission. The 
planting about it should be intelligently 
done, by someone who knows just what 
to use, to produce the best results. Not 
only should the vines used be attractive 
and of great covering capacity but they 
should be selected with a view to climatic 
conditions. No matter how luxuriantly 
a plant grows, during the warm months 
of summer, it is of no service if it will not 
live through the winter. 

Another thing to consider is the ex- 
posure, for even a pergola standing in 
the open, may be so situated that the sun 
cannot reach plants equally well on all 
sides of it. Plants for shady places must 



be selected with great care, to avoid hav- 
ing naked columns and unhealthy unde- 
veloped vines. Some vines, by reason of 
the color of their bark, or the tenacity 
with which the berries cling, are desirable 
because of the effect they produce in win- 
ter. Residents of the northern states 
have to consider the plant for the whole 
year, to get even a little brightness in 
the winter. 

The relation of the annuals to the 
perennials must be considered in the 
planting about the pergola. 

Some annuals are best displayed 
against certain kinds of vines, so it is im- 
portant that they be well chosen. As 
the hardy vines and hardy perennial 
flowers are so much more satisfactory, 
especially so with the beginner, more at- 
tention is given to them at this time. 

A few of the best hardy vines to use 
for pergolas are the following-: Ampelop- 
sis, Quinquirolia, which requires training 
up, but is very hardy. Ampelopsis Engel- 
manni, the best for concrete pergolas, as 
it clings to stone or concrete and requires 
no tying up. Celastrus Scandens, a twin- 
ing vine, having yellow flowers, followed 
by clusters of orange berries, which hang 
on all winter, and add to the winter scen- 
ery. The clusters of berries make pleas- 
ing decorations for the interior of one's 
home in winter. 

Aristolochia Sipo, a very good climber, 
producing light green foliage; 10 to 12 
inches m diameter, and curious pipe 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



171 




Courtesy of B. Terrell Hoyt Landscape Architect 
A PERGOLA AND SUNDIAL. 




THE END OF AN EXPOSITION BUILDING. 



172 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



shaped flowers. The scarlet Trumpet 
Vine, also a very good climber, producing 
reddish trumpet like flowers nearly all 
summer and these are followed by beau- 
tiful berries which make them very af- 
fective. 

There are a number of other vines 
sometimes used, including the family of 
Clematis, most of which need very favor- 
able sunny locations, however, and the 
proper covering in winter, although the 
Clematis Virginia is very hardy and a 
quite rapid grower and does not need as 
much care. Thos who wish to try some of 
the other Clematis, such as the Paniculata, 
may probably have success, but the Jack- 
manni and Henrii and other large flow- 
ering varieties, should be used carefully 
to start with until one sees how they 
winter. The Matrimony Vine is used 
quite extensively. The wild grape vine 
and also the tame grape, and still another, 
or a cross between the wild and tame, 
called the Beta Grape, the fruit of which 
is fine for jelly. 

A few of the hardy perennial flowers 
that are used in planting about pergolas 
with the view of giving a succession of 
the bloom are as follows : Achillea, the 
Pearl, small white double flowers ; Hardy 
Aster; Bleeding Heart, an old favorite; 
Campanula Coreopsis, yellow flowers; 
Shasta Daisy, white petals; Delphinium, 
all shades of bue ; Dianthus or hardy pink ; 
Gypsophila or Baby's Breath, fine deli- 
cate white flower; Hemerocallis Lily; 



Lily of the Valley; Platycodon; Sedum ; 
Dianthus; Peonies in color; Hardy 
Phlox, any color; Iris German, Siberian, 
Oriental and Japanese, in many beautiful 
colors and combinations. Out of the 
above selection one can pick the varieties 
producing the desired colors of flowers 
and by getting them properly arranged 
in regard to hight and general appea"r- 
ance the effect should be very pleasing. 

It is evident that the proper design, 
placing and planting of a pergola is an 
important matter involving the services 
of a competent architectural designer, 
proper construction of the component 
parts and a landscape architect to adorn 
it upon completion. 

The illustrations are selected with a 
view of showing pergolas of various 
types on large and small estates. The 
frontis shows a beautiful composition in 
a magnificent setting of large trees, 
spacious lawn and winding roadway. The 
vines have not yet reached their fullest 
growth, which gives the white pergola 
somewhat more prominence than is de- 
sirable. 

From other views a good idea may be 
obtained of the general appearance of the 
classic wooden columns. These were 
made with the interlocking joints de- 
scribed that are so necessary in good con- 
struction. The rustic pergola which may 
be built with materials afforded by the 
forest, is also shown as constructed by 
the owner. 



The author is indebted to B. Terrell Hoyt, Landscape Architect, for suggestions as to planting. 




Courtesy of Hartmann-Sanders Co. 
SIMPLE BUT OF GOOD CONSTRUCTION. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



173 



A Colonial Survival 




By[jE. A. Cummins 

E ARE all of us familiar with the 
main outlines of our colonial his- 
tory, with the great tides of im- 
migration, flowing in from various 



European centers, England, Sweden, Hol- 
land, so familiar that we take small account 
of the lesser streams of people that here 
and there found an entrance, beginning life 
in the new country and carrying it on 
somewhat withdrawn from the crowd. 

One of these side issues was the settle- 
ment at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, by the 
Moravians, in 1741. They were one of the 
many small sects which sprang up in Ger- 
many in the eighteenth century, protest- 
ing, by their attempt to return to the con- 
ditions of the primitive Church, against 
the materialism of the eighteenth century. 
Theirs was the first attempt at the com- 
munistic life in the New World and, unlike 
most of its successors, the community, di- 
minished, indeed, and impoverished, has 
survived the changes of modern times. The 
town with its great church and its commun- 
ity houses is still a place of pilgrimage for 
lovers of the quaint and picturesque. The 
old arts are practised, the old customs ob- 




FIREPLACE FACING : 



BIRDS OF TINTERN AND LITTLE BRICKS. 



served, the services and hymns of Count 
Zinzendof and his band of followers still 
in use. 

The Moravians came from the land of 
earthernware stoves, and brought with 
them the art of making tiles, and of the 
manufacture of various glazes. These 
processes have been handed down from one 
workman to another, until they have come 
into the hands of practical potters who, 
while retaining the old methods, have en- 
larged their scope, and have ransacked the 
whole field of ceramic art for artistic de- 
signs. 

Beautiful as the Moravian tiles are, to 
the eye of an artist, in color, in surface, 
and in design, let no one think of them as 
the fine flower of the potter's art. They 
have not the mechanical perfection of the 
ordinary glazed tile of commerce, smooth 
to the touch and absolutely regular in out- 
line. Nor is the design reproduced with 
painstaking accuracy, so that, in a hundred 
tiles, not one will vary a hair's breadth 
from its fellow. You will find that sort of 
thing in, the Dutch tiles, just beginning to 
come into our market in available shape, 
tiles which have many 
admirable qualities, 
and which are quite 
unexcelled for very 
many uses. 

But the Moravian 
tiles carry upon their 
face the sign manual 
of the craftsman. If 
you value the touch 
of individuality, the 
distinction of the 
hand with the brain 
behind it, the Mora- 
vian tiles will appeal 
to you. 

The surface of 
these tiles is some- 



74 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 






what rough, not unpleasantly so, but just English abbeys. Half a dozen titles picked 



rough enough to be characteristic, like the 
lines in a man's face, or the touch of silver 
in his hair. Some are wholly glazed, some 
unglazed ; others have a glazed design 
against a rough ground; still others have 
the design cut in, intaglio fashion, either 
glazed or unglazed; still another sort has 
the pattern incised, its lines traced out in 
a color contrasting with the ground. 

The colors are usually low-toned, but low 
tones of positive color. The color schemes 
are never washy. Often the coloring of 
the tile is modified by the use of a glaze 
which has a flush of red, giving a warm 
tone, unusual and charming. While the 
tiles are oftenest made in strong reds, yel- 
lows, blues and greens, 
they can be had in lighter 
colors, lemon yellow, cream 
white, buff, while almost 
any design can be had in 
unglazed white against a 
ground of light color, buff, 
green, blue, or lilac. 

The most interesting 
thing about these tiles is 
the wide range of design. 
The sources of ornament 
vary from the primitive 
patterns brought over by 
the Moravians to copies of 
the intricate traceries of 
the Moorish potters. Some 
claim a Persian or Byzan- 
tine origin, others have 
been copied from the 
mosaics at Ravenna, or FIREPLACE : 
from the tiled floors of 



out at random give an idea of the range of 
choice: "The Birds of Tintern Abbey," 
"The Falconer of Gloucester," "The Star 
of Granada," "A Delia Robbia Cherub 
Border," "Spanish Cross, from Toledo," 
"Terra, from a German Stove Tile." 

The authorities of the pottery advise the 
use of these decorated tiles in connec- 
tion with plain-surfaced tiles, red or buff, 
the plain surface acting as a foil to the 
elaborate design. This method materially 
reduces the cost of a tiled facing or floor- 
ing. Some of the tiles are of large size, as 
for instance the arrangement from S. 
Apolinaris, at Ravenna, measuring 11x14 
inches. Two of these used in connection 







ARRANGEMENT OF TILES IN TULIP PATTERN, 
WITH MOTTO "POST TENEBRAS LUX." 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



175 







with plain tiles are ample for a fireplace, 
and the same is true of many other of the 
larger tiles. Some of them are sufficiently 
interesting and beautiful to be used as 
pictures, framed in a band of dark wood. 

The special significance of this form of 
ceramic art, for our readers, is owing to 
the fact of its harmony with and adjust- 
ment of concrete building. Wall mosaics 
are made as well as tiles, and these are 
imbedded in a flat surface of wall, or fill 
in the triangular spaces between arches, 
with admirable effect. In a clubhouse in 
Philadelphia heavy, square concrete sup- 
ports have been enriched by tiles of strong 
color applied so as to form a capital, a band 
of tiles being inserted in a groove lower 
down. In another instance the concrete pil- 
lar was given a Byzantine form, the capital 
being faced with tiles, glazed and unglazed, 
flat and in relief. With this use of the tiles, 
the concrete is left in exactly the state in 



which it is when the forms are removed, 
as being the most effective setting for the 
tiles. 

Like some other things very beautiful 
and artistic, these tiles are not to be used 
unadvisedly. They need an environment 
of their own, oak rather than mahogany, 
the Craftsman style rather than the Colon- 
ial, clear outlines and strong colors. With 
these limitations, they are altogether de- 
sirable, a great acquisition to the ranks of 
things beautiful and sincere, whose number 
increases with every year. 

LIST OF CUTS OF MORAVIAN TILES. 

1. A Spanish Border. 

2. The Knight of Nuremberg. 

3. The Birds of Bedwyn Magna. 

4. Flower Pot and Tulip. 

5. The Birds of Tintern Abbey. 

6. The Swastika of Persepolis. 

7. The Wheel of Castle Acre. 

8. The Lions of Bedwyn Magna. 




A PLATE-RAIL AND CONTENTS. 



176 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




FILIPINO HOUSE OF NIPA LEAVES AND BAMBOO, PUT TOGETHER WITH RATTAN STRINGS 

AND WOODEN SPIKES. 

Bamboo as a Building Material 

By Monroe Woolley 




HAT a Filipino, or a Jap for that 
matter, cannot do with bamboo in 
construction is not worth record- 
ing. When a Filipino wishes to 
build anything from a pig-pen to a house 
or bridge he simply straps on his bolo, 
takes to the woods, and brings back a lot 
of bamboo poles. Herein is about all the 
material he requires. The bolo is also the 
only tool he needs. It is a long, heavy 
knife ; a half-breed butcher knife and axe. 
For supports, joists, and rafters he uses 
the round, straight poles as they are taken 
from the thicket. For boards he splits the 
poles open and flattens them out. For nails 
he uses small wooden pins made from 
pieces of bamboo, or tough rattan strings 
secured by stripping the bark off the pole. 
For a floor he cuts strips of bamboo, usual- 
ly an eighth of an inch thick and one inch 
wide, from the poles. These he weaves 
with rattan strings to the floor timbers, 
making a strong but somewhat springy 
floor. Bamboo floors are the cleanest 
floors in the world but owing to their per- 
forated surface are hardly adaptable to 



cold climates. The surface, having a glossy, 
enameled, natural finish, will not cause dirt 
to adhere and the cracks permit all dust 
and dirt to drop through to the ground be- 
low. In photograph number one is shown 
the frame work of a roof, made by lacing 
bamboo poles together, being raised pre- 
paratory .to placing supports under it. This 
is thatched over with dry nipa leaves which 
make a good substitute for shingles. Steps 
to enter the house, which generally sits 
from four to six feet off the ground to 
avoid dampness, are made in the form of a 
bamboo ladder. 

Streams are frequently bridged with 
nothing but bamboo, not a nail, aside from 
wooden pins, being used. The supports, 
railings, spans, etc., are made of the solid 
poles ; the floor is made of bamboo lath in- 
terlaced so strongly that it will bear any 
number of pedestrians, and, sometimes, a 
team of mules and an army wagon. While 
the bridge shown in the picture is scarcely 
thirty feet in length, the writer has seen 
bridges of this material from fifty to one 
hundred feet long. The poorer class of 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



177 




NATIVES RAISING THE FRAME ROOF OF A BAMBOO HOUSE. 



Filipinos make their furniture of bamboo 
and rattan, their cooking utensils of baked 
clay, and as they eat from banana leaves 
used as dishes, *and get their food from the 



streams and forests, their wants are easily 
supplied. Poor Richard's claim that na- 
ture's wants are few fits the islanders re- 
markably well. 



KSEfes^.. 



^^ \ ^xc *-**?< >3D^ 

.m^^^l 




A BAMBOO BRIDGE SPANNING A PHILIPPINE CREEK. 



178 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Problems in Concrete 

By H. Edward Walker 
(Continued from the February Number) 




A CLUBHOUSE OF CEMENT. 




ARTICLE XV. 

HE uses to which concrete can 
be put seem numberless. It is 
so ready to the hand in large 
or small quantities and requires 
so little labor to work it, that for or- 
dinary purposes it seems to fill almost 
any situation. Among its uses, that re- 
quire considerable skill, is as a new fin- 
ish for old structures. 

How often a rambling old house is 
seen, that was quite a pretentious dwell- 
ing in its day, but is now -sadly out of 
date. A great .many times the main lines 



are excellent, but there is an over- 
abundance of "ginger bread." Perhaps 
the house is very old and the siding has 
been painted so many times that it is 
impossible to ever get a good finished 
job again. 

It may be that an addition is con- 
templated which must be built of more 
substantial materials. A case in point 
is that of a room used as a library. 
The house was of wood but the new 
room was to be fireproof, to protect a 
valuable collection of books and art 
curios. It was deemed inexpedient to 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



179 



construct the walls of fireproof material 
and cover them externally with siding 
to correspond with the house. An archi- 
tect was consulted and he began by tak- 
ing careful measurements of the entire 
exterior of the house, from which to re- 
produce the elevations. 

The house was in a semi-classic style, 
somewhat Italian in its outlines, with a 
large amount of jig-saw detail, so pop- 
ular fifty years ago. 

The elevations having been repro- 
duced, the designer began to study them 
with a view to giving the house a ce- 
ment finish and at the same time mak- 
ing the design more in harmony with 
modern ideas. This did not mean such 
radical changes that the house would 
be entirely different, for if the lines were 
originally founded on good principles, 
the lapse of time could not affect them. 
But the overabundance of heavy fan- 
tastic detail is a thing which can always 
be remedied with a good saw and an 
ax, and it is often surprising how a de- 
sign gets constantly better, as the work- 
man proceeds with the removal of this 
unnecessary junk. 

Some very clumsy brackets at the 
corners of this house, under the cornice, 
were discarded and some flat sawn out 
work was covered up by the cement 
coat. 

There were two balconies, including 
some balusters of good design. These 
were retained and the wood work 
scraped and repaired. Before applying 
the furring strips, on which to nail the 
expanded metal lath, all projections, such 
as the mouldings of string courses, were 
removed to allow the lath to pass over, 
keeping the same vertical plane. This 
was necessary except in such instances 
where it was desirable to have the course 
reproduced in cement. All windows and 
doors were given caps and sills of ce- 
ment in keeping with the style. This 
was not difficult as the cement was ap- 
plied a little thicker upon the lath and 
given a different surface from the gen- 
eral surface of the wall. 

At the ground line was laid a block 
of cast cement all around the house, 
and the furring was carried over the old 
stone foundation wall to this block, that 
the cement coating might be continuous. 
The result of the completed work was 



surprising. From being an old-time 
mansion, overloaded with ugly detail, it 
became a handsome cement structure, 
thoroughly up to date in appearance. 

A good architect can do almost any- 
thing with one of these old houses, if 
not too much hampered by the ideas of 
the client. If good results are to be ob- 
tained the owner must realize this. It 
requires more skill to give a good ap- 
pearance to an old structure than to ob- 
tain the same result when building new. 
For this reason the competent designer 
should have every chance given him to 
obtain a good result. 

The illustration will give a good idea 
of how the cement is applied. At the 
bottom of the page is a horizontal sec- 
tion through the window box and house 
wall, cutting across the studding. The 
old siding is shown and the casing about 
the windows. The furring strips are 
usually s/4 inch by 1^4 inches and are 
spaced 8 inches on centers. The wood 
casing projects beyond the siding and 
the furring strip upon it must be thinner 
to keep the same even face of the lath 
without springing it out of line with the 
other furring strips. 

A removable strip is secured to the 
casing, projecting equal to the thickness 
of the finished wall. This serves as a 
limiting strip, against which the cement 
is finished about openings. 

The lath is secured to the furring strips 
and is stretched only enough to line 
it up properly. There should be no spe- 
cial amount of tension upon the expand- 
ed metal, when the plaster is in place. 

Galvanized lath is best but in any case 
it should be thoroughly imbedded in the 
cement. Where it is necessary to make 
a projecting course, it may be necessary 
to put in special furring strips and cut 
the lath to fit over it. The window 
cap shown must be done in this way, 
unless the moulding over the old wood 
cap is removed. 

The cement sill in this case is made 
by making an outline frame limiting the 
outlines of the sill and the center is then 
plastered full up to the face of the frame 
and finished as desired. When the lim- 
iting frame is removed it leaves a clear cu t 
edge all around the sill, just as it would 
be in stone. It is well to provide for an 
undercut at the lower edge to form a 



180 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



^v. _. 

CEMENT COATINQ 







H 






KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



181 



drip. The upper edge should be care- 
fully worked up under the projection of 
the old wood sill, to make a durable and 
even upper line. 

If it is possible to obtain a proper union 
between the masonry of the old founda- 
tion and the new concrete, it will be best 
to treat it in that way. If not, a cast ce- 
ment course shall be carefully set at 
grade, as shown, to form a base above 
the snow line. The remainder of the 
old exposed wall can then be furred out, 
lathed and cemented over. 

In no case should a new cement ex- 
terior appear above an old masonry 
wall. It does not appear homogeneous. 

An ordinary box cornice is shown with 
the built-in gutter. The soffit or under- 
side has been furred and lathed directly 
upon the finishing lumber without re- 
moving the mouldings. The finishing 
coat of cement upon this should be 
smoother than the body of the house in 
most cases. It should be a carpet float 
finish rather than a dashed coat. 

A wooden moulding placed in the 
angle between the side wall and the sof- 
fit should be sanded and painted in har- 
mony with the cement. 

A section through the wall is shown 
and elevations of the sided wall and 
after its treatment with cement. The 
matter of finishing coats is largely one 
of preference, but it is well to give a 
roughness to the general body of the 
wall and have caps, sills and courses of 
smoother finish. A contrast obtained in 
this way will give the house tone and 
finish it would lack if kept all in one 
surface. 

Porches and steps should receive spe- 
cial attention in remodeling an old house, 
that they appear in harmony with the 
new work. Many old houses suit their 
occupants admirably as to internal ar- 
rangement and there would be no ques- 
tion of anything different if it were not 
for the exterior. It is here that cement 
stucco comes to the aid of the family 
that has no wish to leave the old home, 
but would like it to make a better ap- 
pearance. 

It is well to keep in mind that the 
original style of the house is best re- 
tained, if possible. 



Changes should be made carefully with 
a view of improving the existing outlines, 
rather than to make something entirely 
different. It will cost less to improve 
the old house on its own lines than to 
work it over in another style. However, 
if something very different is wanted, a 
good designer will be able to advise as 
to what can be done and the probable 
cost. If an old nondescript design can 
be changed without too much trouble to 
a fine appearing mission type, for exam- 
ple, it would be well to do it. 

A feature which enters largely into the 
proposition is that of warmth. The old 
house may be very cold, with cracks in 
the plaster and openings due to the 
shrinking of its timbers. The foundation 
walls may be crumbling, letting in a lot 
of outside air which makes cold floors 
and feet seem the natural condition in 
winter. Examination of old back-plas- 
tering has shown that in many cases it 
was poorly done, full of cracks and often 
fallen from the lath entirely. 

Overcoating the old house with ce- 
ment will stop up all these cracks, keep 
out the wind and make it once more a 
comfortable habitation. 

Properly cemented over the house 
should need no further attention. 

The cement should be evenly applied 
that the finished work may have the 
right appearance. 

Often, if done by unskilled mechanics, 
it is apparent where one day's work 
ended and the next began, but in com- 
petent hands the whole surface will be 
of one even tone and texture. As a 
foothold for vines nothing could be bet- 
ter, and a picturesque effect can be ob- 
tained greater than is possible on a sided 
wood house. Time would mellow such 
a building, making it more beautiful each 
year. 

No paint is necessary, an item to be 
considered in favor of cement. 

Suppose a house is fifty years old and 
has been painted twenty times at $40 
each time. That is equal to $800 and 
this amount could have been saved if 
the cement had been applied in the first 
place. An overcoating of cement ap- 
plied to the old home by one who knows 
how will produce a new effect at a trif- 
ling expense. 

(To be continued) 



182 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



A Home-Made Lawn Roller 




LAWN roller is a very useful 
implement about the home 
grounds. So many of our read- 
ers are completing new homes 
and will be confronted by an accumula- 
tion of brick-bats, lath, shingles, cuttings, 
etc., on which to grow grass, that a de- 
scription of a lawn roller, made by the 
author, is deemed timely. 

Among the things left by the mechan- 
ics was an odd length of 12-inch galvan- 
ized furnace pipe and some pieces of gas 
pipe. The furnace pipe was cut off even- 
ly about two feet long. A circle was 
marked upon a board of the same diam- 
eter as the pipe and nails driven, just 
outside its circumference, slanting out- 
ward. In the center of the circle a hole 
one-half inch deep was bored, of the same 
diameter as the gas pipe. This prepared 
board formed the base upon which the 
furnace pipe rested, while it was being 
filled with concrete. A board exactly 
similar was prepared to fit over the top, 
all as shown in figure 1. The gas pipe 
was cut, with a hack saw, one inch longer 
than the furnace pipe. The concrete was 
then mixed, one part of Portland cement 
to two parts of clean sharp sand. The 
furnace pipe was placed on the board 
within the circle of nails, which pre- 
vented it from getting out of shape and 
fitted it perfectly. The gas pipe was in- 
serted into the hole in the center of the 
board, thus coming up within the fur- 
nace pipe and projecting one-half inch 
above it. Enough concrete was now 
poured in to hold the gas pipe upright, 
then the upper board was placed in po- 
sition, the gas pipe fitting into it, thus 
locating the gas pipe in the exact center 
of the furnace pipe. Removing the up- 
per board, concrete was poured in and 
neatly troweled over at the top. Quan- 
tities of burned nails, pieces of tin, iron 
and stone were introduced into the con- 
crete to give it weight and strength. 

Any tendency of the gas pipe to get 
out of center was overcome by frequent 



tests with the upper board, which readily 
relocated it in the soft concrete. Finally 
the upper board was placed in position 
and left until the concrete was thorough- 
ly hardened. In this manner, a cylin- 
drical mass of concrete was formed, en- 
cased in galvanized iron, with a gas pipe 
through the center projecting one-half 
inch at each end. The handle was made 
of round iron of a diameter suitable to 
be contained within the gas pipe. It was 
bent in the furnace and its shape gives 
it sufficient spring to. hold it in position. 
A blacksmith would have charged about 
$1.50 for it. The length is the same as 
the handle of the lawn mower. The 
diameter of the roller may be larger, but 
the relative size of the gas pipe and 
handle must be such that there is little 
friction or "play." A little grease should 
be used occasionally. If the galvanized 
pipe is made at a tin shop and the gas 
pipe is cut by a plumber, the only tools 
required to make the roller would be a 
hammer, bit and brace, to make the board 
forms, a trowel to smooth the concrete 
and a shovel to mix it. A blacksmith 
will make a more satisfactory handle 
than a novice, but an old lawn mower 
handle may be available that can be at- 
tached by a little ingenuity. 

In time the galvanized iron will lose 
its coating and rust, coming away from 
the concrete. If the concrete was well 
tamped it will be found smooth and in 
every way as serviceable as the iron cov- 
ering. A roller constructed in this man- 
ner is quite good enough for the ordinary 
requirements of the householder and is 
produced at a price which is insignificant 
compared with that of the more elaborate 
ones offered for sale. This is a very 
good time to prepare for the coming sum- 
mer when the lawn will need attention, 
walks repaired and holes in the tennis 
court filled and flattened out. A little 
work for a short time in the basement 
will produce a roller which will be a 
great aid in getting an early start for 
new grass about your new home. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



183 




HOAt-AADH- 
LAW/1-ROLLtR: 




184 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Notes on Gardening 




JAPANESE HAREBELL. 



SWEET PEAS. 




Plant As Soon As Frost Is Gone. 

ROUND for sweet peas should 
be prepared by digging trenches 
about a foot deep. Place some 
fine, old manure or fertilizer 
and stamp it down. 

Put in the soil that was removed from 
the trench, working it thoroughly 'till it 
is finely pulverized. 

The trenches in which the seeds are 
actually planted are now made in this 
prepared ground, about six inches deep. 
The seeds should be thickly sown and 
covered with about two inches of soil 
at the bottom of the six-inch trench. 
Press the soil down firmly over the seed 
with the foot. Seeds do best well packed 
in fine soil. When the seeds come up, 
thin them out to about seven or eight 
inches apart and build up the soil grad- 
ually about them .till a ridge is formed 
about an inch above the level of the bed. 
Have wire netting or other trellis ready 



as soon as the vines begin to climb. It 
is said that the hot wire in summer time 
is not good for the climbing vine, but 
such good results are often obtained, in 
spite of the wire, that failure may be 
laid to some other cause. Twine may 
be substituted if desired and requires but 
little labor to place in position, after a 
frame is erected. Cultivate carefully 
about the plants as soon as they begin 
to climb. Lawn clippings or leaves laid 
about them will help to keep the ground 
moist. Sweet peas should be watered 
often, but the water should go on the 
ground, not on the vines. Plant early, 
as there is more danger of being too 
late than too early. Just as soon as the 
frost is out of the ground is the time and 
there will be no danger, or need to 
worry. 

Indoor Planting. 

The amateur gardener makes his worst 
mistakes in spring. The seed coming 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



185 



from a reliable seed house may be all 
that it should be, but if not properly han- 
dled bare spots will occur in the garden, 
where beautiful blossoms were expected. 

Young plants are often killed by the 
hot sun or choked by heavy or dry soil. 

To get results like the professional 
florist the amateur should begin now by 
sowing seed of various showy and de- 
sirable annuals, in boxes and pots to be 
kept indoors till ready to set out. 

Holes should be provided in the bot- 
tom of the boxes for drainage, but not 
too many. If too much drainage is pro- 
vided the soil dries too rapidly and the 
plant suffers. 

The ordinary garden soil should be 
placed at the bottom of the box and a 
lighter soil well mixed placed on top. 

Seeds germinate better in light soil but 
need the better soil later to sustain the 
plant. Sow the small seed on the surface 
and spread fine soil over them, then press 
it down but not hard enough to cause 
the soil to bake. 

The coarse seed can be planted in lit- 
tle drills or planted individually and cov- 
ered over with a thin layer of earth. 
After planting sprinkle gently until the 
ground has all it can absorb, but not 
enough to make it soggy. From now 
on water the box, whenever the soil is 
dry a little below the surface. It will 
be an aid in the care of the soil to plant 
in rows, as any tendency to bake can be 
broken up, without disturbing the grow- 
ing plant. Give the box plenty of light 
but shield it from hot sunlight. When 
the plants have grown to a reasonable 
size, it should be warm enough to set 
them in the garden. Care should be 
taken to disturb the roots as little as 
possible, or not at all to avoid retarding 
the growth. Some plants cannot be 
moved at all if there is any shock at- 
tendant to the operation. 

Planting and Care of Tomatoes. 

Tomatoes should be started in the 
house and be well advanced when it is 
warm enough to set outside. Tin cans 
are best to contain them and should be 
prepared by carefully cutting out the 
top and bottom. Heat will no longer re- 
move these portions, as the method of 
construction is different from the old- 
fashioned cans. Place the cans in a 
shallow wooden box, properly drained 
and fill with earth. Plant the seed and 



water the plants frequently but not 
enough to keep the soil soggy. 

While the plant is growing is a good 
time to prepare the frame for it to grow 
upon. It will be too late to begin this 
work when the plant is set out, because 
the whole garden will require attention 
and some parts must suffer if time is 
wasted now. 

A simple support is made by driving 
four stakes at the corners of a square 
about one foot in area, and nailing slats 
from one stake to the other. The tomato 
is trained over these, but is not forced 
to spread out as much as it should, al- 
lowing the fruit to be separated from 
the foliage. 

If space will permit make a frame 
about two feet square with about six 
slats nailed across. 

Drive four stakes, to project six inches 
above the ground and upon these lay the 
frame. The plant will spread out through 
and upon this frame and the fruit, when 
it appears, will be supported. There will 
be no danger of it falling off and every 
portion can be reached by the sun to 
ripen evenly. 

Often with improper frames the fruit 
is removed and ^placed with the unripe 
portion to the sun, a method not always 
satisfactory. 

The frames having been made and the 
plants ready to transplant, the boxes 
containing the cans may be taken out to 
the garden. Scoop out enough dirt to 
allow the tin cans to set in, with a pro- 
jection above ground of two inches. Do 
not remove the can. It is an excellent 
protection against cut worms and will 
not interfere, in the least, with the 
growth of the plant. The plants may be 
grown in paper boxes if preferred, in 
which case cut the sides when trans- 
planting and leave to rot away. The bot- 
tom must always be removed. 

The Lawn in the Making. 

Much depends upon the character of 
the soil in producing and maintaining 
a lawn. A good dressing on sand often 
supports a good lawn, but it requires 
constant attention. With a good .depth 
of soil a lawn should be brought to per- 
fection in such a manner that frequent 
watering is unnecessary, except in the 
hottest weather. The lot should be care- 
fully graded with a view to shedding 



186 



the water most advantageously. This 
should be carefully studied, by the own- 
er, with relation to the adjoining prop- 
erty. The whole surface should be care- 
fully raked till it is relatively level, the 
soil fine and all foreign substances re- 
moved. The amateur will do well to 
roll the whole surface before seeding. 
This will cause slight depressions to 
become apparent. Having corrected 
these the seed may be considered. Grass 
seed should do well upon the prepara- 
tion above, but if there is much clay, 
clover will do better. The clay may be 
treated with ashes to break up the cohe- 
sion of its parts. 

After seeding, the ground should be 
rolled and watered regularly. It should 
be thoroughly soaked, but with a fine 
spray, to avoid washing the surface. 

Continue the rolling every few days 
after the grass is well started. Keep the 
lawn mowed regularly, never allowing it 
to get beyond control of the mower. 

New grass should be cut as long as 
possible, by setting the machine up. 
When the lawn is well started water it 
thoroughly and allow it to go without 
for a while. Beginning with short in- 
tervals and increasing the time will force 
the root system to go deeper and thus 
be better prepared to sustain the grass. 
This is true of certain trees. Frequent 



watering of shade trees produces a super- 
ficial root system which should be deep- 
er to reach the water stored in the 
ground by nature. 

Fertilizer of some kind should be ap- 
plied each year or at least each alternate 
season. 

When an immediate effect must be 
produced, sodding with turf from other 
places is resorted to. 

It is absolutely necessary on terraces, 
where the soil may wash down before 
the turf is formed. 

The sod should be free from weeds 
or other plants and cut with sharp clean 
borders. 

The ground should be carefully leveled 
and well soaked just before the sod is 
laid. Cut the sod in convenient sizes 
and about l l / 2 inches thick. Just before 
laying turn the sod face downward and 
soak it thoroughly. All pieces should 
be thoroughly bedded and carefully fitted 
one to the other. If this is not done 
the roots get no foothold upon the soil 
and the piece dies. 

It is better to sow seed in the north- 
ern states, in the early spring as soon 
as the weather will allow. If the seed is 
sown in the early autumn, thin portions 
can be reseeded in the following spring. 
The rake should be used carefully in the 
early growth of the grass or better not 
at all till it is firmly grounded. 



How to Protect Structural Metals 

Courtesy of O. C. Harn 
(Continued from the February Number) 




THE PROPER CARE OF METAL BEFORE AND 
AFTER PAINTING. 

HE application of the right paint 
is the most vital step in the pre- 
vention of corrosion, but every 
other possible precaution should 
be taken. The following points should 
be carefully observed. 

It is exceedingly important to clean 
off rust before painting. Rust is an ac- 
celerator of rusting. It is also apt to 
cause the peeling of the paint. 

Have the surface to be painted as 
smooth as possible. It has been ob- 



served that brightly polished steel plates 
which have been scratched, corrode slow- 
ly except at the scratches, where they 
rust rapidly. Structural steel makers 
may ^some day realize the importance 
of this phenomenon and provide struc- 
tural steel with much smoother surface 
than now. At present, structural steel 
is a rough piece of manufacture. Care 
should be exercised at the mill, however, 
to produce as smooth and clean a prod- 
uct as possible. Then the responsibility 
is upon the contractor to keep it so. 
The practice of throwing iron and steel 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



187 



members on the ground and allowing 
them to be covered with dirt and refuse 
cannot be commended. They should be 
handled with care and placed on proper 
sunports. As far as possible they should 
be kept under cover, unless they are to 
be used within a comparatively short 
time. 

For years the practice of giving struc- 
tural steel one coat of protective paint 
before it left the shop held universal 
sway. Of late, however, the custom has 
been questioned and many architects and 
engineers are having the steel delivered 
unpainted. The new idea has much to 
recommend it two considerations es- 
pecially. The first is, that a certain 
amount of weathering is desirable to rid 
the iron of mill scale. The other is, that 
shop coats are generally poorly done by 
cheap labor and really do more harm 
than good, because they cover up the evi- 
dence of poor work in the matter of 
cleaning the metal. In case there is no 
shop coat, the first painting should be 
done just before assembling begins. 

Scale and all other foreign material 
must be removed before painting. The 
relative value of the sand-blast, wire- 
brush and pickling, as methods for clean- 
ing, are discussed elsewhere in this book- 
let. 

Little can be done on a structure toward 
securing equality of surface condi- 
tions that is, the same composition of 
metal but what can be done should be 
done, and where palpably different con- 
ditions exist, such as where wrought 
iron rivets and bolts are used on Bessemer 
steel members, extra precaution should 
be taken with the painting at such points. 
No paint is absolutely impermeable to 
water or to gases. It is therefore worth 
while to keep the moisture contents of 
the air as low as possible. This has 
particular reference to subways, cel- 
lars, etc. In exposed structural work, all 
gutters or pockets in which the rain- 
water might otherwise collect should be 
made to drain as nearly dry as possible. 
In subways and viaducts carbonic and 
other acids are apt to collect. This 
should be prevented ar far as practicable 
by mechanical or chemical means. 

PREPARING FOR PAINTING. 

Just before assembling begins all parts 
of the metal which are not to be exposed 
that is, those parts which cannot be 



cleaned and painted after erection 
should be thoroughly cleaned with wire 
brushes and scrapers and at least two 
coats of red lead should be applied to 
these surfaces. 

While the use of the sand-blast is the- 
oretically a desirable thing, so few con- 
tractors are equipped or are willing to 
use it that the utmost that can be done 
at present is to insist upon thorough 
cleaning with wire brushes and scrapers, 
with the assistance perhaps of the ham- 
mer and cold chisel. This cleaning should 
be done under the proper supervision of 
a competent inspector. Painting should 
immediately follow cleaning. 

The selection of proper men to do the 
cleaning is a matter of no small impor- 
tance. These men should be impressed 
with the importance of their work, which 
should be specialized as far as practic- 
able. The habit of contracting for clean- 
ing and painting work together and plac- 
ing the whole in the hands of the em- 
ployers of unskilled labor is a cause of 
much bad work. As far as practicable 
the cleaning should be done separately 
by men whose direct interest is that of 
the owner. 

For the cleaning of small articles, pick- 
ling in sulphuric acid is an excellent 
method, care to be taken afterwards to 
wash the sulphuric acid all off the iron 
and then to cover the articles with caus- 
tic lime until ready to paint. The fol- 
lowing method of treatment should give 
satisfactory results: Dip the articles 
if at all greasy, in a hot ten-per-cent, 
caustic soda solution; then in hot wat- 
er; then for, say ten minutes in hot 
ten-per-cent sulphuric acid; then in hot 
water; then in hot ten-per-cent carbon- 
ate of soda (soda ash) solution ; 
rinse well in hot water, and pack in 
slacked lime until time for painting has 
come. Remove from the lime; wash 
well with water; brush clean, and dry 
rapidly. 

AS TO QUALITY IN RED LEAD. 

Red lead is not all alike. Some manu- 
facturers, relying upon the excellence of 
oxide of lead in a general way, do not 
pay much attention to making their red 
lead uniform in composition, texture, 
color, etc. This fact has led many large 
users of red lead to adopt certain speci- 
fications on these points to which they 
require the material to measure up. 



188 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Designs for the Home -Builder 



D 



HIS is a season when designs are 
in great demand. With the re- 
turn of spring, building enthusi- 
asm is at a white heat and things 
must move, to satisfy the demands of the 
building public. To the man who has 
looked forward to a home of his own and 
whose efforts have at last brought him 
to within striking distance of the reality, 
his house is the most important project 
of the year. 

If he has almost, but not quite, decided 
upon his design, he is anxious to do so at 
once and welcomes every one published, 
as a possible solution of the few remain- 
ing points. Nine designs appear in this 
number and will be found sufficiently varied 
as to style and price, to suit the require- 
ments of many. 

A pleasiijg concrete house is submit- 
ted with a good floor plan. The gambrel 
roof is in evidence, as is also the simple 
but artistic cottage. A unique design 
of stone or concrete is offered and de- 
signs in cemented expanded metal. Of 
interest will be a duplex house in cement, 
a form of dwelling much in favor where 
a home and an investment is desired at 
one and the same time. 

Design "B 122." 

This design provides for enclosing 
walls to be 12-inch solid concrete, water- 
proofed on inside with waterproof paint. 
Exterior of walls except neat and cast 
work treated chemically to produce rough 
effect. All foundations and footings 
solid concrete. Contrasts are obtained 
only by smooth effect of all neat work 
which includes cast work, sill course, 
water table, coping and sills as shown 
all gutters to be concrete. 

Roof. To be concrete continuous slabs 
3 inches thick, reinforced. 

Floors. To be reinforced slabs 5 l / 2 
inches thick, finished and polished, using 
marble dust. Mantel seat and beams of 
living room to be concrete as shown. 

Partitions. All partitions to be solid 



3-inch plaster partitions. Wainscot of 
kitchen, bath and toilet to be ruled ce- 
ment 5 feet high. 

Stairs. To be reinforced and built 
without strings; rails to same to be 6- 
inch solid rails with molded cap. 

Plastering. To be patent mortar sand 
finish, includes all rooms, except base- 
ment and attic. 

Carpentry. All frames of windows 
and doors to be pine. All finish to be 
either of plain flat sawed red oak, as 
shown on plans, or short leaf yellow 
pine; all oak doors veneered, balance of 
doors solid. 

Painting. All exterior window frames 
and sash to be painted three coats of lead 
and oil color white, inside of sash ex- 
posed in rooms stained. All trim and 
doors stained one coat and waxed. 

Plumbing, Gas and Sewerage. All 
work to be installed according to city 
ordinances. All fixtures to be plain, 
serviceable fixtures. 

Heating. To be hot water, boiler to 
be cast iron sectional boiler, cast iron 
radiation. 

Electrical. Work to be installed ac- 
cording to rules and regulations of com- 
pany furnishing current, complete with 
bells, switches, etc. 

The designer has carefully estimated 
the cost at $8,000. 

Design "B 123." 

Believers in the simple life will be at- 
tracted to this plain little cottage. The 
designer has kept in mind the essentials 
and kept away from the superfluities. 
The exterior is cemented over and it is 
covered by a simple hipped roof of 
shingles. 

The homelike little entrance with its 
seat promises well for the man with a 
pipe after dinner. The large living room 
contains a fireplace in a nook as illus- 
trated. 

In front on either side of the entrance 
is a shallow alcove containing a "bunk." 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



189 



Cottage Designs for the Home-Builder Continued 



This supplements the sleeping accom- 
modations wonderfully. Sufficient pri- 
vacy is provided by curtains from the 
beam overhead. There is a well ap- 
pointed kitchen and entry with refriger- 
ator space. 

The chamber opens upon a bathroom 
of good size and a large closet. 

The interior finish is in the mission 
style with rough plaster. 

The ceiling is 9 feet 6 inches in height. 

The cost to build this cottage in Col- 
orado is stated at $1,500 without heat. 
Design "B 124." 

The gambrel roof has been employed 
in this Colorado home with sided gable 
ends. 

The basement walls are of stone and 
range work above grade is white sand 
stone. The first story is built of very 
light grey brick; the remainder of the 
house is frame. The porch is constructed 
with clustered columns and is approached 
by a wide flight of steps with buttresses 
on either side. 

The plan is arranged for a central hall 
with parlor and living room at either 
side. 

There is a dining room with an en- 
trance porch, a pantry, kitchen and 
screened porch. 

The stairs arise, with a combination 
flight for kitchen use, to the second floor. 

There are five chambers, those in front 
having a dressing room each adjacent. 

The bathroom is large and has floor 
and walls to the height of four feet of 
tile. 

There are many closets, including linen 
closet and store room. 

The walls are of sand finish and tinted. 

The interior finish is of hard pine 
stained and finished without glass. The 
floors of principal rooms and hall are of 
oak. Everything about this house is of 
the best and its cost was $7,000. It 
should be built in some localities for less 
money. 

Design "B 125." 

In the exterior and floor plan illus- 
trated herewith is shown a five-room 
shingled bungalow. 

The one-story bungalows have many 
advantages. They are picturesque, and 
the ease of housework is a strong factor 
in their favor. 



This little cottage is finished in fir in 
the main three front rooms. The ar- 
rangement of rooms, bath and closets 
is very convenient. 

There is a good sized cellar under the 
kitchen and dining room. 

Built-in cupboard for dishes in the 
kitchen and built-in sideboard in the din- 
ing room. 

All the floors are of fir stained. 

The porches are of good size. 

All hardware is of brass with the ex- 
ception of the bath, which is nickled. 

The outside of the house is shingled 
(all double courses) and stained a warm 
brown with trimmings of ivory white. 
The roof shingles are stained moss green. 

It has a good sized attic for storage 
space. 

The foundation is of split granite 
boulders. 

Casement windows throughout the 
house with the exception of kitchen win- 
dows which are double hung. 

The cost complete including plumbing 
was $1,700. 

Design "B 126." 

This cement and stone house is on very 
simple square lines and simple details. 
It should be situated on a wide lot to 
get the best effect. Its porches are items 
of interest in the design and protect two 
sides of the house. 

The living room is of splendid propor- 
tions and has a pleasing view of the 
hall and stairway. The dining room is 
well located and of good size. There is 
a butler's pantry, kitchen and kitchen 
pantry. 

The appointments of the service por- 
tion of the house are unusually complete 
and convenient. On the second floor are 
three bed rooms, a sitting room, a sewing 
room and a bathroom. The sitting room 
can be used as a chamber at any time. 
The lower story is finished in oak for 
the principal rooms with oak floors. This 
finish is continuous to the hall of the sec- 
ond story. The chambers, however, are 
of white enamel with birch doors in ma- 
hogany finish. There is a hot-water heat- 
ing plant and a good quality of plumb- 
ing fixtures. The architect estimates the 
cost at $5,000 or $6,000 according to fin- 
ish and equipment. 

(Continued on page 191) 



190 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




C. WHITNEY STEVENS, Designer 



Courtesy Universal Portland Cement Co. 



An Artistic Cement House 



DESIGN "B 122 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



191 




Cottage Designs for the Horn e -Builder Continued 



Design "B 127." 

A most compact and economical house 
to build. The good sized sitting room 
has a fireplace with bevel plate mirror 
above mantel shelf and bookcases at 
either side, having leaded glass doors. 
.Combination stair, large pantry, hard- 
wood floor in hall, dining room, kitchen, 
second story hall and bath. White oak 
finish on first floor except kitchen part. 
There is space in the attic for a room if 
desired. 

Full basement, cement floor, ash pit, 
fuel bin, laundry and outside cellar en- 
trance. Hot air furnace. Finish of 
kitchen and second story, pine, poplar 
or cypress, painted. House is well built, 
the estimate including back plaster, 
matched sheathing, double floors, and 
building paper on all double floors, walls 
and roof. 

Cost, $3,528. Width, 33 feet. Depth, 
29 feet. Height of basement, 7 feet 6 
inches. First story, 9 feet 5 inches. Sec- 
ond story, 8 feet 3 inches. 

Design "B 128." 

This house of masonry construction 
is admirably adapted to a large lot, or a 
country estate. It is on very graceful 



lines yet very symmetrical and com- 
mands a view in every direction, from 
its many windows. The terrace and 
porches on three sides, make it possible 
to move about freely, even in inclement 
weather. 

There is a large reception hall and 
ingle nook, with wide openings to living 
room and dining room. The kitchen, 
pantry, stairway and entry are all con- 
venient and well located. 

The main stair has a few steps up from 
the rear entry, to act as stair from 
kitchen, etc., without passing through the 
front hall. A feature that will be appre- 
ciated by the older members of the fam- 
ily is a bed room on the first floor, with 
bath room adjacent. There are four good 
chambers on the second floor. The first 
story is 9 feet and the second story is 8 
feet 6 inches high. The finish is golden 
oak and birch on first and second stories 
respectively. 

The architects estimate the cost, ex- 
clusive of heating or plumbing, at $4,500 
to $5,000. 

Design "B 129." 

This duplex house, except that it has 
two front entrances, might easily be tak- 
(Continued on page 139) 



192 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Ora W. Alford, Designer 



A Simple Cottage Home 



DESIGN "B123" 




KEITH'S M AGAZI NE 



193 



Cottage Designs for the Home=Builder Continued 



en for a private residence. It is ce- 
ment coated on wire lath with a medium 
degree of roughness. The wood details 
are somewhat colonial, and are painted 
white. On the first floor the vestibule 
opens into a reception room from which 
one may pass to t'.,< A living room or be- 
neath the stair to the chamber. There 
is a spacious dining room, a pantry, a 
kitchen, a bath room, rear chamber, and 
a large linen closet. The second floor 
has an alcove with a closet in place of 
the reception room. The finish is stock 
yellow pine and fir floors. The hot wa- 
ter plants are separate and are not in- 
cluded in the estimate. There are addi- 
tional rooms in the attic and a laundry 
in the basement with storage rooms. 
The cost is estimated at about $4,550. 
The height of basement is 7 feet 6 inches, 
the first story 9 feet 6 inches, and the up- 
per story 9 feet. 

Design "B 130." 

Bungalows are not hard to find nowa- 
- v days, but a bungalow made of cement 



blocks is not so common. This design 
has a cement block exterior, built up of 
8x24 inch blocks with cement window 
sills and lintels. The plan is made to 
accommodate a family of two, there be- 
ing a parlor, dining room, chamber, bath 
and kitchen with small attic space on the 
second floor, but no basement. 

It is one of those houses which mark 
the opening of a new era in building con- 
struction. Ten years ago a house built of 
concrete blocks could not be found. This 
house is, therefore, up-to-date in every 
respect. Concrete houses call for simple 
exteriors, houses with regular propor- 
tions and symmetrical, well balanced ele- 
vations. Designs of this character are 
not only desirable but necessary for the 
construction of concrete block houses, 
having the distance so spaced between 
the windows that full length blocks can 
be used without cutting. All these things 
have been carefully provided for in the 
plans for our model concrete bungalow. 
Estimated cost, $1,665. 




THE FIREPLACE AND NOOK. 



194 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A. E. Saunders, Architect 



A Gambrel Roof with Twin Gables 

DESIGN "B 124" 



Livinfi Room . . 

,3-6.20-0 Hal1 

9-0 wlie. 




ARTHUR E. SAUNDEPJ 1 

ARCHITBOT 




FIRST FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



195 




Keith & Whitehouse, Architects 



A Shingled Bungalow f 



DESIGN "B 125" 



|0'0 



T 



r- 

ux 
t 







R'B 



\ 



196 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Arthur C. Clausen, Architect 



Design of Cobblestones and Cement 



DESIGN "B 126" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



197 




The Keith Co., Architects 



An Attractive Wooden House 



DESIGN "B 127" 




^SECOND FLOOR 



198 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



&, m^-^seZWtfsFFm les 

0.'- ^SS^^'4M;,3^ 



** - ;-"! 

^^&Cil 
^ 




Edwins & Eichenfeld, Architects 



Attractive in Cement or Stone 



DESIGN "B 128" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



199 




From "Duplex Houses and Flats." 



A Duplex of Cement 



DESIGN "B 129" 



CHAR PORCH 



KlTC 
9-6'xio' 



DATH- 






^rj ALCOVE 'i*xi* 



SAL CO/IT- 



REAR PORCH 

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ROOAV- 

. 



PORCH 



J 



200 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Journal of Modern Construction Series 



A Cement Block Cottage 



DESIGN "B 103 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



201 



- 












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Leader Iron Works 

1705 Jasper Street Decatur, Illinois 

Room 517, 15 William Street, New York City 



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202 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




W 



Conducted by Eleanor Allison Cummins. Decorator Brooklyn. N. Y. 




As to Curtains. 

EADERS of these pages know 
that the writer holds no brief 
for curtains. She is of the opin- 
ion that they are of doubtful 
utility and of more than doubtful beauty. 
That is to say, in most cases. The aver- 
age Irish point or Nottingham lace cur- 
tain is an abomination. It has no in- 
trinsic beauty, it is so much trouble to 
wash it that it is seldom clean, and it 
adds greatly to the cost of house fur- 
nishing. 

But in the narrow streets of a city, 
we must attain a measure of privacy and 
in many cases we can only do it by the 
use of some sort of a transparent cur 
tain. The thinner this is and the more 
closely it clings to the pane the better. 
The vogue of the sash curtain, covering 
the lower half of the window is over, 
but it had distinguished merits. The 
principal objection to it is that it looks 
very awkward when the shade is raised 
above the centre of the window. If this 
necessity does not exist, the sash cur- 
tain can be made a distinctly beautiful 
addition to the room, as its small size ad- 
mits of the use of more expensive mate- 
rial and decoration than would perhaps 
be afforded for a full sized curtain. In- 
sets of Renaissance lace, bands of 
Madeira work, insertions and edgings of 
Cluny lace and filet, or reticella squares 
may all be applied to sash curtains, with 
the certainty that none of their beauty 
will be lost, the light shining through 
them enhancing their beauty of outline 
and delicacy of texture. 

Worth an Effort. 

What is really worth while in the way 
of curtains is the long curtain of heavy 
texture, hanging straight to the floor, 
from a pole, well pushed back, so that 



it does not obscure the light, or else 
hung from a small rod, under some sort 
of valance, and reaching only to the sill. 
Which of the two arrangements is 
chosen is a matter which depends upon 
the shape and size of the window, and 
upon the proportions of the room. But 
whichever is used, these heavy curtains 
are a very distinct addition to the fur 
nishing of a room, and worth some sac- 
rifice. 

Curtains for Different Windows. 

The French window, reaching to the 
floor, and the deeply embrasured win- 
dow, alike, demand floor length curtains,, 
hanging from a. bracketed pole. The ex- 
ception to this is when the recess of the 
deeply embrasured window is filled in 
with a seat, in which case the curtains- 
should stop at the sash. 

On the other hand, windows flush 
with the wall, and at any considerable 
distance above the floor, should have sill 
length curtains. And most curtains of 
this sort are improved by a pleated val- 
ance, reaching at least nine inches below 
the window frame. This way of hanging- 
curtains is specially adapted to low win- 
dows and to windows in groups. 

The Relation of the Curtains to the Rest 
of the Room. 

In general, heavy curtains should be 
darker than the walls of the room, and 
the same rule applies to portieres. If the 
wall is figured, the curtain should be 
plain, and vice versa. The very ugliest 
of ^modern decorative fashions is that 
which hangs cretonne curtains exactly 
matching the wall paper at windows and 
doors. Aside from the fact that paper 
and cretonne differ just enough to make 
the variation perceptible, the effect of 
a room thus treated is exactly as if one 
should cover a box inside and out with 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



203 





B New Effects iRVfoveixVs&ll Fabrics 




Will not fade. Can be cleaned 
with damp sponge or cloth. 

"Art Ko-Na" cloth newest of Wiggin's famous "Fab-Rik-O-Na" 
creations affords unlimited possibilities for exquisite wall effects. 
Delicate colors and tones in splendid variety, novel texture and 
remarkable durability make this covering the finest ever created for 
artistic wall treatment. Send for "Art Ko-Na" booklef of samples. 



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(Trade Mark registered in United States and Great Britain) 



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COVERINGS 



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Since 1895 H. B. Wiggin's Sons Co. have been the acknowledged leaders in manufacturing 
woven wall fabrics. The trade mark "Fab-Rik-O-Na" expresses originality, quality and beauty. 

FAB-RIK-O-NA Wall Samples of any of these perfect coverings will be sent upon request. 

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first-class decorators. H , B- WIGGIN'S SONS CO., 21 4 Arch Street, Bloomfield, N. J. 




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Manufacturers of All Kinds of Fireplaces and Trimmings 



204 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



the same flowered paper. The proper 
use of cretonne matching the wall paper 
is for loose cushions for wicker furniture. 
for bed and bureau covers, for pillows, 
in short, for any purpose where the two 
materials are separated from each other, 
ever so slightly. Their happiest associa- 
tion is in a room with a high panelled 
wainscot, the cretonne furniture cover- 
ings repeating the color and design of 
the papering of the upper wall. 

Flowered Taffeta for Curtains. 
An effective, and not expensive ma- 
terial for curtains is linen taffeta, either 
the imported double width variety, or the 
domestic goods in single width. To find 
satisfactory designs in the latter requires 
search, but they can be had, and the neu- 
tral tone of the ground of both sorts 
adapts them for uses for which the or- 
dinary cretonnes would be out of place. 
These taffetas and the printed linens are 
-quite suitable for use as curtains in sim- 
ply furnished libraries and living rooms. 
The curtain should be treated as the 
high light in the room, any other posi- 
tive color harmonizing with it. 

Charming flat gimps come specially 
for bordering such curtains, being a com- 
promise between a braid and a fringe. 
The hang of the curtains is much im- 
proved by inserting weights in the low- 
er hem. 

Cotton Rep. 

Another cheap material, this in plain 
color, is cotton rep. It is most pleasing 
in browns and greens, hangs well and 
needs no lining, unless strong sunlight 
shines through it. Its price varies from 
thirty-nine to fifty cents, double width. 
In making it up, a silk cord overhanded 
to its edges gives it the appearance of 
something very much finer than it is. 
Indeed in using almost any cheap ma- 
terial, the finish tells greatly. 

Prima Vera. 

A new wood for furniture, as yet seen 
only in bedroom furniture, is prima vera. 
In color and texture it is not unlike 
white mahogany, although with less 
grain. It is made up in severely simple 
shapes, as what is known as cottage fur- 
niture, and costs about the same as nat- 
ural birch. It would seem to be a desir- 
able addition to the list of inexpensive 



woods, and the range of. pieces in which 
it is made will doubtless be extended, as 
soon as its market is assured. 

Elizabethan and Jacobean Furniture. 

In more expensive furniture, there is 
a revival of the style of furniture in 
vogue in the reigns of Elizabeth and 
James the First. So far the output 
seems to be confined to bedroom and 
dining room furniture, with some set- 
tles, tables and chairs which might be 
used for a library. The pieces are of 
large size, many of them severely plain 
in outline, others with twisted legs and 
more or less rather flat carving. The 
Elizabethan chairs and stools have rush 
seats, the Jacobean seats and backs of 
finely wrought cane. A noticeable fea- 
ture are the hanging knobs, for doors and 
drawers, in dull brass. 

The wood is oak, the finish dull, the 
color warmer than fumed oak, but about 
the same depth of tone. A fair average 
price for a set of dining room furniture 
in this style is two hundred and seventy- 
five dollars, while a bed room set of 
many pieces, with twin beds, elaborate- 
ly carved, costs in the neighborhood of 
nine hundred dollars. The size of this 
furniture adapts it only to rooms of 
large size, and one would say that to be 
seen at its best it would require specially 
constructed rooms with beamed ceilings 
and panelled walls. It would seem also 
to demand much strong color to give it 
a semblance of cheerfulness. If these 
limitations are borne in mind, it would 
be an excellent purchase, from the point 
of view of durability and of real artistic 
quality. But it certainly makes no ap- 
peal to those who care first of all for 
cheerfulness. Though when one sees 
the popularity of Mission furniture, one 
wonders if they are so many, after all. 

Adam Furniture. 

Still another revival is seen in the 
copies of the delicate and beautiful work 
of the Brothers Adam. Their chairs, 
settles and tables, of white enamelled 
wood, delicately painted in pale colored 
medallions, are copied with great ac- 
curacy for use in formal drawing rooms, 
in combination with French tapestries 
and brocades in light colors, flowered or 
striped. They too require a setting of 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 205 

OUR BEAUTIFUL BOOKLET 

PERGOLAS 

Illustrated with views of some of the most attractive new homes and grounds 

showing exceedingly artistic results in pergola treatment. This 

booklet is right off the press, and is yours on request. 

Call for Booklet G-27. 



We are in position to advise you intelligently on correct construction 
of a Pergola. We solicit your inquiries. 



THE 
PERGOLA 

f HARTMANM-5ANDERS COMPANY 
) - -^nfsS 1 - 

Send for Catalogue G-27. We also have Catalogue 29, which is yours for the asking. 




Proportions in the Columns make or mar the Success and Artistic Effect 
of the Pergola. That is why a Pergola built with 

KOLL'S PATENT 
LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

made in Classic Proportions, will insure your getting a Charming and 

Beautiful Pergola. They are Equally Suitable for Porches 

or Interior Work and are made Exclusively by 

Hartmann- Sanders Company 

Elston and Webster Aves., Chicago, 111. 
Eastern Office: - - - 1123 Broadway. N. Y. City 



206 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



their own, a lofty room with panelled 
walls and much plaster decoration in re- 
lief. This furniture is very beautiful in 
its way, but not for everyday use. 

Silver Deposit on Porcelain. 

The silver deposit, which has been so 
popular as a /decoration for glass, is now 
applied to porcelain. Exquisite tea and 
coffee services are of pale tinted porce- 
lain, yellow or apricot, the silver applied 
in delicate traceries. TThe sets, pot, sugar 
bowl and cream pitcher, include a tray. 
They are commended to the seeker for 
wedding gifts. 

Lighting the Dinner Table. 

Most people will agree that the ordin- 
ary over head lighting with gas or elec- 
tricity is not specially happy. The light 
which should descend is distributed over 
the ceiling. An overhead light is singu- 
larly unbecoming and, on festal oc- 
casions at least, women like to look their 
best at dinner. Of course candles are 
the ideal thing, but it must be confessed 
they are exceedingly troublesome, while 



the shades have a perverse fashion of 
getting on fire. 

It is not many years since that ban- 
quet lamps were in fashion. They were 
high enough to keep the heat of the lamp 
from the food, and the shade threw a 
soft radiance over the table. Like many 
other things they went out with the in- 
creased use of electricity. One often 
finds them in second hand stores, for a 
mere song. Possibly the burner may be 
out of order but that is easily remedied. 
The shade must be supplied, as the old 
ones are always hooeless, and the best 
sort is nearly, if not quite, opaque. Given 
the -proper sort of frame, which can be 
had at any department store, and a hand- 
some shade can be contrived from cre- 
tonne, figured silk, or grass cloth. Or 
one may choose a pale colored geisha 
shade, in accordance with the general 
tone of the room. Another point in favor 
of a lamp of this sort is that it is a very 
dignified centre piece in the absence of 
flowers. When flowers are attainable 
the lamp may rise with excellent effect, 
from a mass of blossoms about its base. 




Two Helpful Books for Every Home 

Either book -is worth having. Both are worth asking for. 

One the new 9U>l>IV&rnick Bookcase catalogue suggests library furnish- 
ings and arrangement. The other contains lists of the "Worlds' 
Best Books" for children and adults. Both sent upon request. 

Elastic Bookcases 



are sold at uniform prices, freight prepaid everywhere. 

We not only furnish the most economical and practical bookcases for the 
home but we now assist you in a substantial way by furnishing plans of 
artistic library interiors, and by giving you authoritative lists of the best books 
ublished. Catalog and Book Lists mailed Free. Simply address Dept.Z 



tn>eSlot>e?V&rt)ict<e 60, Cincinnati, U. S. A 




THE CELEBRATED FURMAN BOILERS 




Valuable Catalogue on Modern Steam and Hot Water Heat- I As an Investment, Furman Boilers return Large Dividends 

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, The Herendeen Manufacturing Company 



5 NORTH ST. 



GENEVA, NEW YORK 



No. 296 PEARL ST. 



NEW YORK CITY 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



207 



THE ART, SCIENCE AND SENTIMENT 

OF HOME- 
B U I LDING 




An Appreciation 

"About the only thing wronj* with this book 
is iftt tie. It Should have been named "The 
Practical Side of Homebuildine," because there 
is nothing; more practical than making the home 
artistic, than buildicg it on scientific lines, to in- 
sure sanitary conditions and warmth, or than 
making it to su it t he sentimentj desire fora home 
i.i kerjjinir with one's aste and st 'ion. However 
practicili'y, although omitted from the title, is not 
omitted from the book The author aims to give 
the inttndviy homebu Ider pnctical advice c 
Such subjects M bjymg the lot, letting the con- 
tract, choosing materials, etc. Problems about 
front doors, windows, stairways, fireplaces, porch- 
es, exteriors, fin shinx*. etc., are taken up in de- 
tail jnd treated with sound common sense. Near- 
ly all questions that can be anticipated are answer- 
ed, and the book should prove a great help for 
thobe wkoaie {.'laming homes. ' ' -Ouiuth Hcrokl. 




(New Enlarged Third Edition) 

A Complete Authority for the Man 
Who is Going to Build a Home 

It contains over forty chapters and over three hun- 
dred illustrations, divided among 100 designs, 100 
floor plans and over 100 views and drawings, illus- 
trating the interior and exterior planning and design- 
ing of homes. It includes the planning of large and 
small City and Suburban homes. Bungalows and Du- 
plex Houses. It is not a mere catalogue. I have no 
stock plans for sale. I do not confiscate what my pre- 
vious clients own and have paid for. There is too 
much quality about my drawings to put them on a 
'emnant bargain counter. And the book proves it. 
It fully describes sanitary bomebuilding. the choosing 
of materials, the cheapest way to build a home right, 
etc. It is verily "The Book of a Thousand Facts on 
Homebuilding." Index sent on request. 
Price Postpaid, $1.00 

A monthly supplement, "Practical Homebuild- 
ing, ' ' sent free for one year follow ing sale of book 

Arthur C. Clausen, 

Architect, 

405-7-9 Lumber Exchange, 
MINNEAPOLIS, - MINN. 




A Few of the Many 

"A beautiful, practical book containing com- 
plete information on the planning and designing 
Of every kind of home. ' ' Kansas C ity Post. 

" Arthur C.Clausen. the architect, has published 
an original work on architecture entitled "The 
Art, Scienc- and Sentiment of Homebuildine" in 
which the veil of mystery is lifted from the trials o f 
building homes properly The book is printed 
on heavy enameled paper and profusely illus- 
ttated with halftones, line drawings and dia- 
grams. ' ' T) e Brooks Press. 

"It is certainly a most complete compendium 
of facts. Has many illustrations and drawings and 
covers a wide range of subjects, including the 
planningof every kind of home, Thebooktruly 
gives the impression that the author's heart was 
inhij work and that he hada vast treasury of in- 
formation to draw upon. The WOKLD recom- 
mends his book to readers." Vancouver World. 




ATTENTION TO DETAILS 

wai 

Insure Comfort 

IN YOUR HOME 
See that Your Doors are hung with 



Ball - Bearing Hinges 

No creaking of doors 
No need of oiling 
No sagging 

ARTISTIC BOOKLET FREE 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

Dept. T, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



WE SAVE YOU 




THE DEALER'S PROFIT 



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you that it is the best furnace you ever used. 

Write for catalog today and learn all the 
facts about this unique furnace proposition. 

The Jahant Heating Company 

202 Howard, St. Akron, Ohio 



208 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of 
Keith's Magazine. Inquiries pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the 
attention of an expert in that line. 

Letters intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing De- 
partment, and be accompanied by a diagram of floor plan. 

Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general Interest 
will be published in these columns. 



E. R. S. I herewith send you ground 
plans of our house fronting north, ceil- 
ing nine feet, .all finished in quarter- 
sawed oak, I want color scheme for all 
the walls and ceiling. Also please give 
me kind, color and dimensions of rugs 
for this house. 

Second floor to be finished in birch, 
two north bedrooms to be white, with 
mahogany doors;- undecided about the 
two south bedrooms ; bathroom wain- 
scoting and floor 'white tile. Dimensions 
of bedrooms N. W. 10x15, N. E. 13x15, 
S. E. 10x15, and S. W. 12x12. 

Ans. E. R. S. In reply to your recent 
letter asking for some suggestions, 
would say an ideal treatment for this 
attractive house would be fumed oak 
with a reddish cast toning in with the 
reddish mottled fireplace brick. On the 
living room wall a putty grey Guildhall 
tapestry paper with the design brought 
out in a darker tone of the grey. Ceil- 
ing a light tone of the grey. Rug, drap- 
eries and upholstering carried out in rich, 
deep blues. The lower $y 2 feet of din- 
ing room wall covered with fabricona 
in rich, metallic blue, the wall above a 
grey crepe paper with frescoed decora- 
tion of bluish grapes and foliage in rich 
greens. Ceiling, same grey tint as liv- 
ing room. Rug of mixed blues and 
greens in a Wilton 9x12, cost $40.00. 
Living room rug, if one large rug must 
be made special, and a 10x16 Saxony 
rug would cost about $80.00. 

There is but little wall space in hall 
and one of the Japanese metalized ef- 
fects would be handsome there with ori- 
ental rug in blues and dull reds, same 
carried out in the stair carpet in Wilton. 
If preferred, green could be substituted 
in living and dining rooms for the blue. 

For one of the north bedrooms, use a 
light grey and white striped paper with 
cut out frieze of wild roses, the wild 



roses carried out in over draperies at 
windows and in chair covers, etc. In 
the other, a nasturtium design on a white 
ground for 7 feet up to molding, then 
ivory white wall and ceiling. One of 
the south bedroms would be pretty done 
in a light greyish tan chambray, pan- 
eled top and bottom and in corners with 
a pink rose banding, with rug having 
greyish tan center and rose border. 

S. E. K. I want to ask your help 
in decorating a $2,500 bungalow of five 
rooms. 

In my room I want Circassian wal- 
nut and as I have a dresser and wash- 
stand of golden quarter-sawed oak, I 
would like to use it in guest room. 

As I cannot get cobblestones for my 
fireplace and chimney, please suggest 
something that will take their place and 
be as pretty. Somewhere on my fire- 
place or mantle I want the motto, "I 
cannot warm you if your heart be cold." 
How~could this be used? 

Ans. S. E. K. It is suggested to stain 
or paint the woodwork in living and din- 
ing room a soft olive green ; to use a 
paper imitating rough plaster in a warm 
putty grey on living room walls, ceiling- 
a lighter grey, with green rug and green 
wicker furniture. To have a plate rail 
in dining room with a thirty-inch frieze 
of oranges and deep green foliage on a 
deep cream ground above it, with cream 
ceilmg. Below plate rail either burlap 
or a fabric paper in a rich green, with 
furniture of ash-stained green. 

In regard to the fireplace, rough clink- 
er brick, bedded in mortar, would give 
the bungalow effect. The motto could 
be lettered upon a plain plaster panel, 
let in to the brick of the over-mantel or 
there could be a very thick shelf of wood 
or cement and the motto lettered upon 
the wide, outer edge of the shelf. 

Casement windows would be practical 



pleasures 
and 

palaces 

w 




eres 
icplace 

like 
Home 



It is the 

interior furnishing 
and finishing that makes 
a house a house that makes 
a home the mo.st delightful place in 
the world. Even more important than the furnishing is 
the finishing of the woodwork. 

The finest oak or the costliest mahogany, unless properly 
finished with the right materials, will prove a poor invest- 
ment. On the other hand, ordinary pine, where properly 
finished, is both beautiful and attractive. 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

will develop the natural beauty of any woood costly -mahogany, finest 
oak, or ordinary pine. They emphasize Nature's artistic markings of 
the grain, and never raise, obscure or cloud them. 

Men who know wood finishing architects, builders, furniture, piano 
and car manufacturers, etc., use Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes in 
preference to all others. They give a smooth, tough, elastic finish 
that will stand the test of time without signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

"MODERN WOOD FINISHING" Write for it. 

This book was prepared by our corps of expert wood finishers. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with plates of finished 
wood in natural colors. Every builder should have a copy of this book. 

Simply write the request on a post card and 
we will send you the book by return mail. 



RIDGEPORT W06D FINIS 



NEW MILFORD. CONN. 

CHICAGO 



BOSTON 



210 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to Questions Continued 



in your climate, or you could have an 
effect of casements in a group of win- 
dows, where all were fixed, except one 
made to open. Screens are placed on the 
outside and the casement swings in. 

It is not customary to place any fur- 
niture on a sleeping porch, other than 
the cot bed and possibly a chair or two. 

Soft old blue would be pleasing with 
the Circassian walnut. A guest room 
with golden oak furniture is hard to 
make dainty. Pretty chintz hangings 
with a light grey basket pattern wall 
would be about the best choice for a 
north room. 

Our house is a cottage facing west. 
The rooms are small, and I fear that the 
rooms will look crowded by the time the 
necessary furniture is placed in them. 

The woodwork except in the kitchen 
has been painted white. Would not ivory 
be better? 

The floors are unpainted boards. What 
shall we do with them, as we wish to use 
rugs. 

First, there is the tiny vestibule, three 
feet by four feet. What color wall paper 
would you suggest for it? 

Then the little parlor, eleven feet by 
nine; has two windows, one on the west, 
the other on the south. 

The height of the ceilings in all the 
rooms is nine feet. 

The furniture will be fiber rush, stained 
green and upholstered in a white and 
green cretonne pattern. The rugs are 
Persian with light brown the predominat- 
ing color. 

The living room opens from the parlor 
with doorway five feet wide. The room 
measures ten feet bv nine. The furniture 
will be the same in this room, with green 
oak library table. There is but one win- 
dow, on the south. What color rug, cur- 
tains and paper would be best here? 

Ans. The first advice offered by the 
decorator, is to take out the partition 
between parlor and living room and make 
one good room. It will relieve the 
cramped effect of the whole house to 
have one large living room. The other 
rooms don't matter. This does away 
with any portierres between, which 
would cost as much as taking out the 
partition, and your mahogany and green 
reed furniture, with its cretonne cover- 



ings, will fraternize together admirably. 
Yes, the woodwork here would be better 
in ivory, but the white will answer. Get 
.some dainty, fine white scrim curtains' 
for the windows, either by the yard, with 
a little edge, or by the pair, with deep 
hems and insertions, $4.50 a pair. Put 
an apple green, silk finished Eltonberry 
paper on the wall, 90 cents a roll and 
white ceiling. Get a plain green rug for 
the center of your long room perhaps 
a 6x9 with one of the Persian rugs each 
side of it. You will have a dainty, charm- 
ing room, but not too fine to use. The 
cracks in floor must be well filled, paint- 
ed a dark water green and waxed. Stain 
the other floors dark brown, shellac and 
wax. 

Paint the woodwork in dining room a 
cigar brown and use a soft old blue wall 
paper; curtains of cream figured net or 
cross bar scrim. I should paint kitchen 
. woodwork a light brown, walls cream 
color, with brown and cream linoleum on 
floor. 

The birdseye maple will look well 
against soft old blue walls, or rose. A 
tapestry bedroom rug in a 4x7 size would 
cost but little and come in lovely colors 
and designs. 

F. A. W. Please send me a color 
scheme for paper, interior painting and 
carpets or ruges and upholstery. I en- 
close the house plan from which our plan 
is taken. We have arranged the living 
room fireplace on the west wall and have 
put the reception room all in the hall 
making an open stairway. 

The house faces the south. I have a 
red rug that I must use and thought it 
would do in the dining room. The hall 
and bed rooms will be finished in white, 
woodwork dull finish. 

The living room in mission and the 
dining room in oak to match the furni- 
ture. The reception room or hall will 
have mahogany furniture which must be 
re-upholstered. The living room will 
eventually be finished with mission furni- 
ture, but at present we have some oak 
for the room along with the new mission 
pieces. One bed room has mahogany 
with brass bed. The second has white 
beds with white furniture. 

Ans. F. A. W. In answer to your 
recent letter, this is a small, compactly 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 211 

ON SMALL MWiipMMWi 
MOMIW ^ 

'0.33 MB 

* li 



BRASS BED 



12; 



Massive ALL-BRASS BED, 
large 2-Inch posts, any 
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You send a very small sum with order, we ship goods at once an< 
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every purchase. We charge absolutely nothing for this credi 1 
service no interestno extras of any kind. No security required. 
Absolute satisfaction or money back. Everything confidential 

CATALOG N- 29 FREE 

Write for our Bio; New Catalog. It's an immense volume, beauti- 
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lamps, silverware, go-carts, refrigerat9rs, stoves, ranges, etc., 
etc. Write at once for this great Bargain Catalog write today! 

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Largest, oldest and best known homefurnishing concern in Amer- 
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COLONIAL 
MANTELS 



Made of Orna- 
mental Brick 



1 



and 



f|| Last longest look best are not too costly. 
^11 There's no other kind so good so pleasing. 

II Our Sketch Book tells all about them. 

'|| Write for it before you build or remodel. 

PHILADELPHIA & BOSTON FACE BRICK CO, 

P. O. Box 8518, BOSTON, MASS. 





Q Wan for HOME 

DECORATION 
FREE 

Before you do over any room in your house write 
for this portfolio which suggests many attrac- 
tive color schemes for each room in the house. 

These suggestions are practical. The exact 
treatment for walls, ceilings, floors, woodwork, 
as well as definite suggestions for draperies, 
hangings, rugs and furniture, are described and 
specified and are accompanied by decorator's 
suggestions giving you the exact color scheme 
and are also accompanied by reproductions in 
color of rooms thus treated showing you just 
how they will look. 

Nothing so complete and practical has ever been 
offered. This service is entirely free and is offered in 
the interest of more attractive interiors, secured by use 
of Sherwin-Williams' Paints and Varnishes. You are not 
compelled to use the Sherwin-Williams" products to get 
the benefit of our decorative suggestions, but do not for- 
get that as good results as are shown in this portfolio can- 
not be obtained unless the Sherwin-Williams' products 
are used. 

Stenciling offers an attractive border and frieze 
treatment for both walls and draperies. It is very easy 
to do. Many of our designs call for stenciling. Our 
stencil book is sent free, and a complete small stencil- 
ing outfit which you can use yourself will be sent to 
any address on receipt of one dollar. 




SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 

PAINTS 6- VARNISHES 

Address all inquiries to Decorative Department 
629 Canal Road, N. W., Cleveland, Ohio 




212 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to Questions Continued 

arranged house and the contrast between 
the white woodwork of the reception hall 
and dark, mission oak of the living room 
opening from it will be rather violent. It 
is advised to overcome this as far as 
possible, by a strong, rich red on the 
walls of reception hall, using the red rug 
there. If too large, possibly it can be cut 
into two small ones to fit the floor space. 
If this is not possible and the red rug 
must be used in the dining room, then 
tint the ceiling between beams a light, 
vivid red, and make the lower side walls 
a dull, grey-green with decoration of 
autumn leaves in greens and reds above. 
Do the living room walls in a soft ^in- 
conspicuous grayish green, with ceiling 
several shades lighter but carrying the 
same tone of color. Have the rug and 
furnishings in deeper, richer greens. 
With this scheme, use a tapestry paper 
in the hall, showing dull blues, greens 
and terra cottas on a greyish ground, and 
two small oriental rugs. 




Quilt 



A "Comforter" that Will Keep the 
Whole Family Warm 

A house lined with Cabot's Sheathing 
Quilt will be wind and frost proof. It will 
be warm in winter and cool in summer. No 
heat can get out nor cold get in, or vice 
versa. It is not a mere paper or felt, but a 
thick matting which retains the warmth as 
a bird's plumage does. "It is cheaper to 
build warm houses than to heat cold ones." 

Sample and catalogue free on request. 

SAMUEL CABOT (Inc.) 

141 Milk Street, Boston. Mass. 

AGENTS AT ALL CENTRAL POINTS. 



<c 

' NO PLACE LIKE 
HOME EVEN IF 
IT BE RENTED 




HOW Ml? AND MRS. RUOD GOT 
THEIR DAUGHTfR INTO 50CIETY 





KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



213 



A Home 

Where a Servant is Not Required 




TLOOPC 



IST FLOOR 



Houses designed to meet individual 

requirements. No stock plans 

ALFRED M. BLINN, Architect 

98 State Street BOSTON. MASS. 




Many styles of jrrate and 
mantels to choose from. 



This Grate Does 
Double Duty 

It Combines Perfect Ven- 
tilation With Economical 
Heating 

and, with the same amount of 
fuel, burning any kind, will 
pay for itself in three years in 
increased heating efficiency. 
Heats house in Fall or Spring 
better than a furnace and 
takes about half the fuel. 

The Jackson Ventilating Grate 

is as beautiful as the most artistic ordinary grate and 
affords the same sense of coziness and cheer; but it 
ventilates, not dangerously, with air drawn across the 
room from door and window cracks, cold, but health- 
fully with air drawn in from outside thru a fresh air 
duct, circulated around the fire and sent into the room 
thru the register over the arch, fresh but Warmed. 
Gain comfort and save money by investigating. Any 
mason can set it up from our Complete flans Fur- 
nished Free. 

Send for Free 
Ca talog of our wood 
mantels, and irons, 
and all kinds of fire- 
place fixtures, a s 
well as ventilating 
grates, with explan- 
ations, illustrations, 



full information and 
prices ; also refer- 
ence to users in 
your region. 




SHUTS OUT COLD AIR CURRENTS 



EDWIN A. JACKSON & BRO., Manufacturers 

25 Beekman Street NEW YORK 




New Roofing Discovery 

Works Wonders in Beautifying Home! 

For Simplest and Grandest Homes 

Charming Moorish beauty and dignity of appear- 
ance of Metal Spanish Tile gives an air of distinction 
to the home graced by this wonderful new and 
practically indestructible roofing. 

It has taken home builders of America by storm, 
fork is the modernization of the wonderfully beauti- 
ful roofs of historic Spanish edifices. 

The art of making this roofing, left behind by 
fleeing Moors driven out of Spain centuries ago, 
until 1910 could not be made practical for the mod- 
ern home, despite its alluring beauties. 

After years of experiment, we have hit the solu- 
tion. That is why today we are able to offer Amer- 
>can homes the amazing attractiveness of 

Metal Spanish Tile Roofing 

Its scores of vital, practical advantages cost no 
more than common roofing, yet mean tremendous 
economy it needs no repairs and outlasts several 
ordinary roofs because of its practically indestruct- 
ible metal construction. 

It is absolutely wind, weather, storm, fire and 
lightning proof. 

Ejfy to apply. No soldering, no special tools 
any ordinary mechanic can apply it. 

Interlocking systwn by which tiles dovetail into 
each other makes the roof absolutely water tight 
and provides for e> pansion and contraction perfect- 
ly summer and winter. 

It is guaranteed non-breakable. 

Homebuilders simply send us today the dimen- 
sions of your building and we will tell you by return 
mall exact cost of all material. 

Our new 1910 book on beautifying the modern 
American home by use of Metal Spanish Tile is 
yours for the asking. A postal will bring it. Address 

The Edwards Manufacturing Co. 

The Largest Makers of Steel Poofing 
and Metal Shingles in the World 



520-540 Culvert St. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



214 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




HOUSEHOI/D ECONOMICS 




The Children's Problem. 

EOPLE who live in small places 
have a class of difficulties, from 
which dwellers in cities are, or 
may be, happily exempt. He 
who lives in a city of any size, if he be- 
longs to the great middle class, as most 
of us do, seldom has a very definite so- 
cial position. He chooses his own friends, 
makes his own, is quite free from the 
social competition which exists in small 
communities. In a lesser degree, per- 
haps, the condition applies to his wife 
and children. 

But in the smaller places, everyone 
knows everyone else, all one's friends 
belong to the same set, do the same 
things, share the same amusements. So 
do the children. If my child does not 
go to your child's party, woe betide us. 
If my child does not return your child's 
party, worse yet. 

Rivalries and jealousies, a commercial 
attitude in social intercourse, are bad 
enough among grown people, infinitely 
worse when they extend to children. 
Your own effort to keep up socially may 
result in nothing worse than nervous 
prostration which however trying is not 
a moral malady, but your child may get 
a spiritual twist which will last him all 
his life. For nothing is more certain 
than that formal social life, as it com- 
monly exists, tends to make the people 
who take part in it exceedingly self- 
centred, jealous of consideration, dis- 
regardful of others, except in the most 
formal way. Traits like these are not 
uncommon developments of human na- 
ture, but are hardly to be desired in a 
child. How to escape his acquiring them 
is one of his mother's problems. 



A Matter of Substitution. 

Some sort of substitution for the un- 
desirable diversion is almost always pos- 
sible. If you do not want your child to 
share in the good time of his playmates, 
give him some other sort of a good time, 
and at the same time. For the average 
child living in a small place, all the joys 
of life are summed up in a day in the 
city. It is doubtful if, in the long run, 
it is more expensive than the party, with 
its necessity for a special dress and ac- 
cessories, and its probable resultant of 
doctor's bills. 

There is another aspect to the matter, 
the benefit to the child's mental develop- 
ment. No amount of study can take the 
place, as a means of culture, of the see- 
ing of pictures, the hearing of good 
music, the familiarity with all sorts of 
beautiful objects, wihch are to be had 
in a city, at slight trouble and expense. 
Take for instance the matter of the study 
of history. Which child has the more 
definite idea of our colonial epoch, the 
one who is letter perfect in the book, or 
the one for whom the written outline is 
filled out by a familiarity with the cos- 
tume, the furniture and the details of 
domestic life generally, such as is ob- 
tained from visits to the museums where 
historical collections are to be seen? Or 
the matter of languages. How real 
French and German become to a child, 
when he sees them on signs, or hears 
them spoken in the foreign quarters of 
our cosmopolitan cities. It is the dif- 
ference between the practical and the 
academic, and it is the fault of too much 
of our education that it is academic. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



215 




The Colonial Entrance 

The correct design, beautiful finish, 
and durable construction of the Morgan 
Colonial Door makes the Colonial entrance 
an artistic and practical success. 




are perfect doors, built of several layers with 
the grain running crosswise, making shrink- 
ing, warping or swelling impossible. Ve- 
neered in all varieties of hard wood birch, 
plain or quarter sawed red or white oak, 
brown ash, mahogany, etc. 

Morgan Doors are light, remarkably 
strong and absolutely perfect in every detail 
of construction. 

Each Morgan Door is stamped "Morgan" 
which guarantees quality, style, durability 
and satisfaction. 

In our new book" The Door Beautiful " 
Morgan Doors are shown in their natural 
color and in all styles of architecture for in- 
terior or exterior use, and it is explained why 
they are the best and cheapest doors for per- 
manent satisfaction In any building. A copy 
will be sent on request. 

Architects: Descriptive details of Morgan Doors 
may be found in Sweet's index, pages 678 and 679. 

Morgan Company, Dept. F , Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Distributed by 

Morgan Sash and Door Company, Chicago, III. 
Morgan Company, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. 
Morgan Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 




your floors 

become the pride 

of your home 





Write far the bank and 
free sample mention 

four dealer* s name. 

Sample "Briifilener"it 
brighten floors alii free. 



The If ax with a Guarantee 

Apply Once a Year BOOKFREE 

On Either Hardwood or Pine Floors 

and preserve its beauty by cleaning with "Brightener." 
"Old English" is more lasting and shows that much de- 
ji sired rich, subdued lustre, because it is made better than ordinary 
wax it contains more of the hard (expensive) Brazilian Wax. 

For Floors, Furniture and all Interior Woodwork 

no other finish is so attractive, economical, easily applied or satis- 
factory as "Old English." Never flakes, nor shows heel marks or 
scratches, nor becomes sticky. Guaranteed to give satisfaction, if 
used as directed, or money refunded. 

Sold by high class dealers in paints. 1 Ib. covers 300 sq. ft., 50c. Ib. 

A. S. BOYLE & CO., 1924 West 8th St., Cincinnati, Ohio 
Maker of " Brishtcner" which cleans and brightens floors. 




"Beautiful Floors 

their Finish andCare ' ' 
New and Old Floori 
Stopping Cracks 
Care Waxed Floors 
Cleanirg & Polishing 
Kitchen & Bathroom 



216 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Household Economics Continued 



Being Indispensable to the Children. 

''Any. real social- betterment- for chil- 
dren must originate with 'the mother. She 
sets the pace" for the children, or may do 
so, if she will. It rests with her to be 

;^he person whose spciety is dearer to 
them than any other pleasure, and to 
make, their home life so happy that the 
whole question of diversion assumes a 
position very much in the background. 

'She may not be able to offer substitutes 
for the pleasures of the other children, 
but she ca'n create such attitude of mind 
that she can say, "Mother doesn't think 
it best," with the certainty of cheerful 
acquiescence. That is the sort of thing 
which is really worth while, whose price 
is greater than that of chiffons, or of an 
artistic- house, oj of social recognition, 
or of any one of a dozen, things for which 
women strive/ It is best achieved by the 
cultivation of simplicity in the best sense 
of the word. The principle of simplifica- 
tion may be applied to almost every 
department of life, mental, .spiritual and 



physical, with great benefit. For sim- 
plicity is another word for leisure, and 
without leisure there can be no real ap- 
preciation of life and its opportunities. , 
Fine Laundering at Home. 

One economy which always pays is to 
do up laces and muslins for one's self. 
Two or three visits to the laundry and a 
lingerie waist or a muslin gown is hope- 
lessly shabby, if not actually tattered. 

White soap, thin starch and sufficient- 
ly small irons are the principal requisites, 
also, in addition to the regular ironing 
board, a sleeve board and a bosom board, 
thickly padded with flannel, under their 
muslin covers. With the proper uten- 
sils the work is pure pleasure. No dry 
cleaning process takes the place of soap 
and water as a freshener of soiled cloth- 
ing. 

Why should not the untrained woman 
take up fine laundry work as a specialty? 
In any well-to-do community she would 
be a formidable rival to the laundries, if 
her prices were at all reasonable. 



THE NAME 



On a Carpet Sweeper 

Insures Easy, Thorough Sweeping 

To use tallow candles for illuminating purposes today would be no 
more absurd than to use a corn broom for sweeping fine carpets or 
rugs. Would you use a harsh whisk broom to brush a delicate fabric 
\>f silk or satin? We are confident you wouldn't. 

Then why use a harsh corn broom for sweeping a fine carpet or rug? A 
corn broom is positively destructive to fine carpets or rugs, to say nothing of 
the fact that it doesn't sweep clean. After you've swept with a broom, the 
BISSELL will follow and gather an immense quantity of fine dust and grit. 
Once you use a BISSELL you will never be without one, and don't forget 
its economy, as it will outlast fifty corn brooms. Sold everywhere 
Prices from $2.75 to $6.50. Send for free booklet. 
Buy a. Bissell "Cyco" BALLBEARING Sweeper now of your dealer, send 
us the purchase slip, within one week from the date of purchase, and 
Ve will send you a neat useful present FREE. 

BISSELL CARPET SWEEPER CO., Dept. 149. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

(Largest and Only Exclusive Carpet Sweeper 
Makers in the World.) 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



217 



Special Subjects in Building 



Following is a List of Particular Subjects and Special Classes of Designs Treated in 
Former Numbers of KEITH'S Magazine ON HOME BUILDING 

ALL FULLY ILLUSTRATED 



Any Four Copies Included with a Year's Subscription, $1.50 

Month Price 
SUBJECT Publiihei Per Copy 

J Concrete Block Construction Oct. 1907 $ .15 
10 Auto Houses, with Full Description of Materials and 

Cost Aug. 1907 .15 

Two and Four-Family Duplex Houses and Flats June 1907 .15 

Good Club Houses Sept. 1907 .15 

Heating and Plumbing Dec. 1907 .15 

Q Types of Colonial Mansions Jan. 1908 .15 

A" " (Concluded) Feb. 1908 .15 

The Out Door Living Room June 1908 .15 

Six Modern Homes Built in Denver July 1908 .15 

Q American Homes of English Design Aug. 1908 .15 

KA Mountain Camp Sept. 1908 .15 

Vines for Porches and Arbors Sept. 1908 .15 

Entrance Gates (English) Oct. 1908 .15 

*+^ Building a Five- Room Bungalow Dec. 1908 .15 

^ American Homes of Swiss Chalet Design Jan. 1909 .15 

gj Colonial Entrances Mar. 1909 .15 

A Bachelor's Home Mar. 1909 .15 

The Use of Cobblestones in Small Houses July 1909 .15 

, Thatched Roofs for Garden Houses Sept. 1909 .15 

^_Q Rustic Buildings Built of Logs Sept. 1909 .15 

Q Interesting Doorways Oct. 1909 .15 

IH American Bungalows and Chalets Dec. 1909 .15 

1( SPECIAL COUNTRY HOUSE NUMBER. , 0) 

Use of Cobblestones in Country Houses ] 

<y Designs for Country Homes (-Apr. 1909 .25 

|H Colonial Country Gardens J 

*^3 Gateways Colonial May 1909 .15 ^ 

The Bungalow Ideal May 1909 .15 

<y Four Good Bungalows June 1909 .15 

^ INSIDE THE HOUSE C3 

* ILLUSTRATED Inside Plastering Oct. 1907 $ .15 

_^ Leaded Glass Work Oct. 1908 .15 ^H 

^ " Rugs and Carpets Nov. 1907 .15 *S 

" Decorative Metal Work Dec. 1907 .15 JT 

" Character In Detail Jan. 1908 .15 W 

" ' Care of House Plants During Winter Feb. 1908 .15 . 

, " Kitchen Ideas for a Cottage June 1908 .15 J? 

^ " Colonial Halls and Stairways Aug. 1908 .15 + 

^ " Putting in a Hot Air Furnace Sept. 1908 .15 O 

QJ " Suggestions on House Painting Sept. 1908 .15 

r* " Concrete Floors Sept. 1908 .15 *qj 

VH " Decoration of Ceiling and Walls Jan. 1909 .15 r/} 

| ** The New Idea in Decorative Art Feb. 1909 .15 

O " Tints and Stencils as Applied to Coun- ^ 

^"fc try Homes Apr. 1909 .25 y^ 

m* "A Paneled and Stenciled Dining Room.. May 1909 .15 

,__ " Artistic Designs in Lighting Fixtures. . .June 1909 .15 CM 

Jj " The Revival of Hand- Woven Rugs July 1909 .15 Q> 

iH " Laying Parquetry Floors Aug. 1909 .15 JjJ 

hM " Color in Decoration Nov. 1909 .15 ^5 

J " How to Build a Coal Bin Door Dec. 1909 .15 W 

Send Orders to 

M. L. KEITH, 225 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn. 



218 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




SOW MA MAT THAT CANNA 6AT-ANI>5OM e WOULD CAT TMAT WANT IT 
BUT W 6 MA M6AT AND W e CAN CAT 





TABLE: OMAT 




Pink Tulips for Decoration. 

ONE of the early Spring flowers 
are quite so lovely as the hot 
house tulips, shading from 
cream to deep pink, their green 
leaves just the right shade to be a foil 
to the pink. Stiff, to be sure, but no 
stiffer than jonquils, or any other of the 
bulbous flowers. 

It is a mistake to put flowers of strong 
color in any receptacle with much color 
of its own. The average vase makes the 
judicious grieve. Put your tulips in a 
holder of pure white glass, or else use a 
silver bowl, or jug. It may be fancy, 
but the writer always thinks that flowers 
lose something by being brought into 
contact with the brilliance of cut glass. 
A clear, plain glass that allows the stems 
to be seen is a better choice. 

Silvered Flower Holders. 

An effective holder for flowers may be 
made from any cheap glass vase of grace- 
ful shape. If the surface is corrugated, 
so much the better. Give it two coats of 
silver powder mixed with banana oil. 
The silvering mixture will adhere per- 
fectly well and can be renewed when 
tarnished. 

The Resources of a Can of Salmon. 

Canned salmon is a friend in need. It 
offers the possibility of any number of 
savory dishes, one as good as the other, 
is cheap and is always attainable. 

For ordinary use the tall cans are 
preferable, as giving twice the quantity 
of fish at the same price as the flat cans. 
The Alaska salmon is perhaps not so 



highly flavored as the Columbia River, 
but it is firmer, of a better color, and 
freer from oil. 

If the salmon is to be served whole, the 
can must be opened just below the upper 
edge, instead of inside it. If this is done, 
it is possible to slip the piece of fish out 
whole. In this shape it can be simply 
laid upon a bed of lettuce leaves, after 
the oil has been drained off and sur- 
rounded with sections of lemon. Or the 
fish may be covered, (masked was the 
word used by old fashioned cooks,) with 
a tartare sauce, which is nothing more 
nor less than a thick and highly seasoned 
mayonnaise with an addition of chopped 
pickles and capers. 

If the can of salmon is to furnish a 
dinner, it may be heated by setting the 
opened can in a saucepan of boiling 
water, covering it and cooking it for 
twenty minutes. Slip the fish carefully 
onto a folded napkin and serve with it 
some one of the regulation sauces. Al- 
low a can of salmon for three persons, 
if served hot. 

Various Entrees. 

For most of these a sauce is neces- 
sary, and it is better to use a drawn but- 
ter than a sauce containing milk or 
cream. Most people like a suspicion of 
acid with fish, either lemon or vinegar, 
neither of which exactly agree with milk. 
An additional quantity of butter makes 
the sauce quite as rich as any cream 
sauce. 

The most obvious entree is made by 
heating the salmon, carefully freed from 
skin and bone and picked up, in the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 
f Siher Plate that Wears" 



219 



CHARTER 
OAK 



Spoons, forks and fancy serving pieces proven 
to give longest service bear the trade mark 



1847 ROGERS BROS 

the stamp that guarantees the heaviest triple plate. 

Send for Catalog " Q-35 " showing designs. 



xs 

TRIPLE 



M-RIDEN BRITANNIA CO. 

(International Silver Co., Successor.) 
MERIDEN, CONN. 



NEW YORK 



FRANCISCO 



Home Ref rigeration 

This book tells how to select the home Refrigerator how to know the poor from the 
good how to keep down ice bills. 1 1 also tells how some Refrigerators harbor germs how 
to keep a Refrigerator sanitary and sweet lots of things you snculd know before buying 
ANY Refrigerator. 

It tells all about the "Monroe, "the refrigerator with 
inner walls made in one piece from undreakable SOLID 
PORCELAIN an inch thick and highly glazed, with 
every corner rounded. No cracks or crevices anywhere. 
The "Monroe" is as easy to keep clean as a china bowl. 



GKMonroe" 




Always sold DIRECT 
and at FACTORY PRICES. 
Cash or Monthly Payments 



Most other refrigerators have cracks and corners which 
cannot be cleaned. Here, particles of food collect and breed 
germs by the million. These germs get into your food and 
make it poison, and the family suffersfrom no traceable cause. 
The "Monroe" can be sterilized and made germlessly 
clean in an instant by simply wiping out with a cloth wrung- 
from hot water. It's like " washing dishes, " for the "Monroe 
is really a thick porcelain dish inside. 

The high death rate among children in the summer 
months could be greatly reduced if the Monroe Refrigerator 
was used in every home. 

The "Monroe" is installed in the best flats and apartments, occupied by 
people who CARE and is found today in a large majority of the VERY 
BEST homes in the United States. The largest and best Hospitals use it 
exclusively. The health of the whole family is safeguarded by the use of a 
Monroe Refrigerator. 

When you have carefully read the book and know all about Home Re- 
frigeration . you will know WHY, and will realize how important it is to 
select carefully. Please write for the book today. 

Monroe Refrigerator Co., Station 6, Cincinnati, Ohio 



NOTE CAREFULLY ^^ ^^ 



Sent 'Anywhere on Trial 

We will send the Monroe to ny responsible person any- 
where to use until convinced. No obligation to keep it 
unless you wish to. The Monroe must sell itself to_ you on 




"DIRECT FROM FACTORY" 

[on approval] 
PRICE ON THIS 

Piano-Finish, Selected Figurt, 
Quarter-Sawed Oak Mantel is 

$29. 4O 

Dealers' price $40 to $50. 

It is 82 in. high, 60 in. wide, 36x18 French 
Bevel Mirror, four elaborate capitals. 

Includes Tile Facing, 60x18 Hearth, Plat- 
ed Frame and Club House Grate. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
AND PARQUETRY 

will last as long as the house. Any car- 
penter can lay it easier than ordinary floof- 
ing. Get our prices. 

TILE AND MOSAICS 

for everywhere, WALLS, FLOORS, ETC. 

Write for catalog of Mantels, Grates, Tiles for floors and baths. Slate 
Laundry Tubs, Grilles, etc. It is free. Or send 10 cents to pay postage on 
our Art Mantel Catalog. Mantel Outfits from $12 to $200. Made to order 
Fly Screens for doors and windows. 

W. J, OSTENDORF, 2923 *. BH a. Philadelphia, Pa. 



HESSjtMLOCKER 



THE only modern Sanitary Steel 
Medicine Cabinet or Locker. 
Handsome beveled mirror door. Snow 
white, everlasting enamel,insideandout. 





FOR YOUR BATHROOM 



Costs less than wood and is better. Should be 
in every bathroom. Is dust, germ and vermin 
proof and easily cleaned with warm water. 

Made in four styles and three sizes. Price 
$7.00 and up. 

Send for Illustrated circular. 

HESS, 717 L Tacoma Bid., Chicago 

Makers of the Hess Steel Furnace, 
Sold on Approval. Free Booklet. 



220 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Table Chat- Continued 



sauce, seasoning it highly and using it 
to fill baking shells of some sort. Cover 
the shells with crumbs and reheat them 
in the oven. 

For jellied salmon, remove skin and 
bone and divide the fish into inch pieces. 
Make a pint of very acid lemon jelly, 
without sugar, using gelatine, grating 
into it a cucumber. The cucumber may 
be run through the chopping machine 
after it is peeled, with less trouble than 
grating. 

Let the jelly get cold, but not set; 
pour it an inch deep into a mould and 
set into a cold place till it is slightly 
stiff. Then put in a layer of salmon, ar- 
ranging the pieces neatly and pressing 
them down into the stiffened jelly. Pour 
in more jelly, let it stiffen and repeat the 
process till the mould is full. When 
the jelly is perfectly firm, turn it out of 
the mould onto lettuce leaves, arranged 
on a platter, garnishing with hard boiled 
eggs. 

Not everyone makes a good Newburg 
sauce, but it is very good for salmon. 
While Newburg preparations are usual- 
ly prepared and served in the chafing 
dish, they are equally suitable for use 
with a casserole and the earthenware 
retains the heat so well that it is almost 
as good as the more expensive chafing 
dish. 

You need a casserole for another prep- 
aration of salmon which calls for one of 
the small cans of tomato paste, sold in 
Italian groceries. For this the fish is 
divided into convenient pieces and ar- 
ranged in the casserole, each layer 
sprinkled with paprika, salt, chopped 
onion and, if available some canned or 
dried mushrooms. Dilute the can of 
tomato sauce to the proper consistency 
with hot water, salting it if necessary, 
and add a piece of butter. Pour the 
sauce over the fish, cover the casserole 
and cook two hours on the side of the 
range, or in a very slow oven. 

For salmon croquettes, add to the fine- 
ly picked fish one half its bulk of cooked 
spaghetti, chopped fine. Proceed as for 
any other sort of croquettes. Salmon 
cutlets only varying from croquettes in 
being pressed out into a flat shape. Ei- 
ther should be served with a sauce of tar- 
tare. 



Some Novelties in Dinner Services. 

In looking over recent importations of 
china, one notes a tendency to more de- 
cided color effects. Even the Limoges 
porcelains have a more positive air. The 
floral decoration is not stronger in color, 
but there is more of it, and the pattern 
is emphasized by much gold in borders 
and handles. To many people this china 
represents the acme of dainty distinction, 
but most of it is too characterless to ap- 
prove itself to an artist. 

The English potteries excel in artistic 
wares at a low price. The blue willow of 
Staffordshire is typical of many of these 
wares. Its covered dishes are specially 
satisfactory and remarkably inexpen- 
sive. Another variety has much the 
same effect, but its design is Indian in- 
stead of Chinese. This is called Indian 
Khyber. Still another variation, in a 
more expensive ware, has the willow pat- 
tern on a white ground worked out in 
scarlet, black and gold and is most ef- 
fective. A color not often found is a rose 
red and this is seen in one of the Ger- 
man wares, a half inch band covered with 
a diapering of gold edging all the pieces. 

For the country house dining room, 
whose scheme of decoration includes 
flowered cretonne hangings, or possibly 
a flowered wall paper, there is an Eng- 
lish porcelain service, at low cost, in the 
immediate neighborhood of $15, whose 
floral pattern in rather bright colors re- 
calls the far more expensive Dresden. 
German and French Stone Ware. 

Much imported stone ware in green 
has been put on the market lately. It is 
a little less suggestive of the kitchen 
than the customary brown shade, while 
costing rather more. Some is a dark 
green and there is a medium olive shade, 
which is very pleasing. There are all 
sorts of casseroles and marmite pots, 
custard cups and ramekins, and a good 
variety, as to size, of chocolate, tea and 
coffee pots. Many of the coffee pots are 
of the French variety, practically tea 
pots fitted with a percolator. They fit 
in capitally with the popular green 
scheme for dining rooms. As coffee 
makers, too much cannot be said in 
praise of them. They have the trans- 
cendent merit, denied to metal, of keep- 
ing the coffee hot. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



221 



ROOFINGS AND BUILDING PAPERS 
The Best on the Market at the Price! 



Sign 



If you are in the Market for a Reliable Roofing or Building Paper, we can supply 

you with the Best that's manufactured at a price that others ask ior Inferior goods. 

Get Samples and test our Che 

Underf elt and Compo Rubber Roofing 

Underf elt Sand Surface 

Underf elt 3 and 5 Ply Granite 

4aaJfiy 

We will also be glad to give you samples of any class of Building Papers that you might desire. 




McCLELLAN PAPER COMPANY 



FARGO 
SIOUX FALLS 



"The Home of Quality" 
MINNEAPOLIS 



DULUTH 
LA CROSSE 




SCDGWICKS 

Better Homes Cost Less you find, when you examine Sedgwick plans. 

The years you are to spend in your home, the enjoyment you are 
to get out of it, the money you put into it, all make it plain that you 
should make yourself as expert as possible choosing your home. 

"BEST HOUSE PIANS" is my book of 200 modern homes-full of ideas, 
showing new architectural work. Designs which are unique for 
homes costing $500 to $6,000. Send NOW for this eautif ul book, 
Price $1. OO. New, large and improved 8th edition just off the 
press. To those interested, a New Book of Churches FREE. 
CHAS.S.SEDGWICK, 1028 K, Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis 




PRACTICAL HOUSE DECORATION 



The book for all who intend to decorate either a new 
or old home. Written by experienced decorators. 
162 pages, profusely illustrated. Contains many dec- 
orative schemes for a moderate cost house, giving 
treatment for each room. A gold mine of artistic 
suggestions. Size 7 x 9% inches, printed on fine 
enameled paper, limp covers. Price $1.00. 



THIS BOOK WITH KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



for one year, both for $2.00 including three extra 
recent numbers of the Magazine offered with all new 
subscriptions. Order your copy today. 



IY1. L KEITH, Publisher, Minneapolis | 




222 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




m 



Third Annual Cement Show. 

HE cement show is now being 
held at the Coliseum in Chicago. 
It began on February 18th and 
will close on the 26th. Particu- 
lars of special railroad rates of a fare and 
one-half for the round trip with a time 
limit March 2nd are announced in an- 
other column of this issue. This is the 
greatest cement show ever given. 

Phenomenal Growth of Cement Industry. 

The growth of the cement industry in 
the United States has been one of phe- 
nomenal rapidity. Ten years ago the 
business of making cement was confined 
to a number of comparatively small mills. 
Today the output and consumption is 
upward of 50,000,000 barrels annually, 
valued at a little over $1.00 a barrel, and 
cement constitutes one of the ten lead- 
ing mineral products of the United 
States. Concrete is coming into general 
use in building of every kind. 

Over 25,000 tests have been made by 
the Technologic branch of the U. S. 
Geological Survey of plain and reinforced 
concrete beams, columns, and blocks, 
under every possible condition, to deter- 
mine their tensile and crushing strength 
and fire-resisting qualities. 



Fox Floor Scrapers 

& Scraper Knives 



This 

is the 

most 

perfect 

machine 

of the kind 

made. Saves 

its cost in 

two days. 

You 

need 

it. 



have a reputation back of 
them and are guaranteed 
to give satisfaction. 
^ Scrapers sent on 
trial. Write for 
Catalogue. 

X MFG. CO. 

Dept. 10 
k Brooklyn, Wis. 



To accomplish these tests a number of 
heavy machines have been used, several 
of 200,000 and 300,000 pounds, and one 
of 600,000 capacity. There is now near- 
ing completion at Pittsburg, the largest 
machine in the world for testing the 
strength of structural materials used in 
great buildings and engineering works. 

Process for Painting Concrete Surface 

with Oil Paint. 

Take one part of commercial sulphuric 
acid to one hundred parts of water and 
with this solution paint the concrete sur- 
face twice. Then rinse thoroughly with 
clean water and after the surface has 
dried apply the oil paint. In this process 
the alkali and lime is transformed into a 
harmless sulphuric combination, this 
process has produced very satisfactory 
results. 

Use of Nails in Concrete Reinforcing. 

M. S. Moissieff, a well-known engineer 
in a paper read by him recently at an en- 
gineering conference at Atlantic City, 
stated that little attention had been paid 
to the methods of reinforcing concrete 
with nails, because on its face it would 
appear to be very uneconomical and 
would not promise to be a commercial 
success. He recounted some interesting 
observations made with reinforcement of 
this character. This occurred through 
the necessity of filling the compartments 
of a large steel casting with a material 
of that character. The casting formed a 
pedestal of an important bridge in New 
York City and it was suggested that con- 
crete reinforced with wire nails, or cut 
wire, be used and tests of the material 
followed. The results of these tests were 
so satisfactory that concrete reinforced 
by wire nails was adopted for the filling 
of the_ casting. A table of results were 
also given. Aside from the practical con- 
siderations of utilization, the tests have 
a theoretical bearing, and illustrated how 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



223 




Have a Water- Works 
System of Your Own 

Put a "Paul" Pump in your cellar 
or your barn pipe it to the nearest 
water supply or to your well or cistern 
connect the motor to the lighting circuit 
and you will always have plenty of 
water under pressure all through your 
house at a cost of less than li cents for 
150 gallons. Can be arranged to pump 
into an open tank to increase pressure of 
city supply or for pneumatic water system. 

Don't confuse the "Paul" Pump with 
other light duty pumps. It is entirely 
different in principle. Size for size, it has 
a greater capacity than any other pump 
on the market. So simple anyone can 
tend it or it can be furnished to work auto- 
matically without any attention if desired. 

No matter how difficult your water 
supply problem seems, write for the ad- 
vice of our expert engineers. They will 
advise you free of charge just what to do. 

Our booklet No. 12,021 will interest 
you. It tells why we claim the "Paul" 
Pump is the best. Send for it today. 

Fort Wayne Engineering & Mfg, Co, 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 




MALLORY'S 

Standard 
Shutter Worker 

The only practical device to 
open and close the Shutters 
without raising windows or 
disturbing screens. 
Can be applied to old or new houses, whether brick, stone 
or frame, and will hold the blind firm in any position. 
Perfectly burglar proof. 

Send for Illustrated Circular if your hardware dealer 
does not keep them, to 

MALLORY MANUFACTURING CO. 

251 Main Street Flemington, New Jersey. U. S A. 




ATLAS 

PORTLAND 

CEMENT 

is pure, uniform and made from the genu- 
ine Cement Rock. It is the brand that 
everyone should bear in mind who is build- 
ing any sort of building for which is wanted 
permanence, sanitary construction, artistic 
design, fireproofing, absence of vibration 
and great strength. 

The books in our Atlas Cement Library 
will help you if you are contemplating 
any kind of building construction. Send 
for any or all of them. 

"Concrete Houses and Cottages" 



Vol 



Rtinfor 



Large Houses, $1.00 Vol. II, Small Houses. $1.00 
Atlas Cement Library Other Books 

Construction about the Home and on the Farm - - Free 
in Highway Construction -.-..-.- $1.00 
ed Concrete in Factory Construction (delivery charge) .10 



in Railroad Construction 
Cottages 



Country Residence! (out of print) 



1.00 
Free 
2.00 



Garages ...-.-..-...... Free 




NONE JUST AS GOOD 

If your dealer cannot supply you, write to 

THE ATLAS PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 
DEPT. L 30 BROAD ST., NEW YORK 

Largest output ef any cement company in the world. 
Over 50,000 barrels per day 




224 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cement Continued 



the compressive strength of a material 
may be increased by reinforcing its 
shearing resistance. The nails reinforce 
the shearing planes in all possible direc- 
tions and thereby develop the high com- 
pressive resistance of the material, thus 
throwing some light on the internal 
stresses of a body in compression. The 
high cost would preclude the use of con- 
crete so reinforced to any considerable 
extent. 

Attractive Surface Finish for Concrete. 

Erect forms of rough boards by the 
usual methods, in courses of 3 ft. or less. 
Plaster inside of forms with wet clay, 
work to a plastic consistency which will 
adhere to the forms. Corners may be 
rounded by this method, and by indenta- 
tions bead work and other designs can 
be accomplished. 

While the clay is wet, apply evenly, 
loose buff, red or other colored sand, 
after which, pour in the concrete by the 
same method as applied to ordinary wet 
concrete construction, remove forms in 
usual time and after clay is dry, wash 
off the clay with water and if necessary 
scrub slightly with a brush. The sand 
will thus adhere to the concrete giving 
a surface of pleasing color and texture. 
Vulcanite Portland Cement Co. 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION. 



Topographic Draftsman. Copyist Topo- 
graphic Draftsman. 



March 9-10, 1910. 

The United States Civil Service Com- 
mission announces an examination on 
March 9-10, 1910, to secure eligibles from 
which to make certification to fill two vacan- 
cies in the position of topographic drafts- 
man (male) in the Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey, one at $1,000 and the other at $900 
per annum, and vacancies requiring sim- 
ilar qualifications as they may occur in any 
branch of the service. 

The salary of the position of topograph- 
ic draftsman ranges usually from $1,000 to 
$1,500 per annum, and for copyist topo- 
graphic draftsman from $900 to $1,500 per 
annum. 

Both men and women will be admitted 
to this examination. 

Applicants should at once apply either to 



the United States Civil Service Commis- 
sion, Washington, D. C., or to the secre- 
tary of the board of examiners at any large 
city, for application Form 1312. No appli- 
cation will be accepted unless properly exe- 
cuted and filed with the Commission at 
Washington. In applying for this exam- 
ination the exact title as given at the head 
of this announcement should be used in 
the application. 



Reduced Rates to Chicago 

On Account of the Third Annual Cement Show 
February 18-26, 1910 

The railroads in the Central Passenger Asso- 
ciation territory, as enumerated hereinafter, will 
make a reduced- rate of a fare and one-half for 
the round trip on the certificate plan where the 
one way rate is $1.00 or more. Going tickets 
may be purchased on any day, February 15-24, 
inclusive. 

The railroads in the Trunk Line Association 
territory will make a rate of a fare and one-half 
for the round trip on the certificate plan. Go- 
ing tickets may be purchased on any day, Feb- 
ruary 15-23, inclusive. 

The railroads in the New England Passenger 
Association, will make a rate of a fare and one- 
half for the round trip on the certificate plan. 
Going tickets may be purchased on any day, Feb- 
ruary 15-24, inclusive. 

On the going trip in all cases full fare must 
be paid and a certificate obtained from the agent,, 
in addition to the usual ticket; if he does not 
offer you a certificate ask him for it, account 
Chicago Cement Show. Present this certificate 
to the Validating Agent at the Coliseum in Chi- 
cago, any day, February 18-25, inclusive, between 
the hours of 9 a. m. and 9 p. m., when the cer- 
tificate will be validated promptly, a fee of 25 
cents being charged by the Validating Agent. 
This certificate will entitle you to purchase at 
the railroad ticket office a return ticket for one- 
half the regular fare, the return limit being 
March 2. 

Frost will damage fresh concrete, but 
after the work has stood for three or 
four days, it is proof against severe cold. 

White concrete can be made by adding 
to a base of one part of white cement 
two parts of fine, white sand. This con- 
crete may be polished so that it will 
closely resemble marble. 



80% PROFIT 

Is the record we submit to manufacturers of cement 

Roofing and Floor Tile 

MADE UPON OUR MACHINE 

No other machine does the same work in the same way. 
Our illustrated pamphlet is yours on request. 

THE G8UMMAN CONCRETE MACHINERY CO., - - - Zaaesville, Ohio 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



225 



Perfect Lisjht for the Country Home 

T Combination 
Gas Machine 



BHLJIU 



Here Is lighting yclem that not 
only means good profits for you but 
it will give the most satisfactory 
service to your customers. 
The best light for residences, 
schools, churches, factories, etc., 
especially where city gas or electricity 
are not available. 

This system of lighting Is cheaper 
than any other form of light and gives 
perfect results. A gas plant complete 
in itself right in the house. Perfectly 
safe. Examined and tested by the 
Underwriters' Laboratories and listed 
1 by the Consulting Engineers of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
The gas is in all respects equal to city 
coal gas, and is ready for use at any 
time without generating, for illu- 
minating or cooking purposes. The 
standard for over 40 years. Over 
15,000 in successful operation. 

The days of kerosene lamps are 
over. Why not sell this light in your 
community? Write for information, 
prices and 72-page book, "Lighting 
for Evening Hours." 

DETROIT 
Heating & Lighting Co. 

362 Wight St. DETROIT, MICH. 






MAILED 
FREE 

Book 107 IN 
56 pages of 



STAITOK, 
ETC. 

EVERYONE 
INTERESTED 
IN BUILDING 
SHOULD 
HAVE IT 

WRITE TO-DAY 

We Sell to Dealers 
Only 




Richfield Springs, Glazed Bevel Plate 



INTERIORS BEAUTIFUL 

A Very Choice Collection of 182 Interesting Rooms 




*FHERE is a fascination in seeing the inside of other people's houses, particularly where taste and the artistic atmosphere 
prevail. We have examined hundreds of interior views and selected from them 182 of the best, each one of which has 
some special feature of interest and merit. A group of modern Halls, Stairways, Living Rooms, Dens, Fireplaces, Dining 
Kooms, Bed Rooms. Be sure toorder this book and add to your ideas for interior treatment, style of fireplaces, cozy seats. 
Vail decorations, price $1.00. THIS BOOK WITH KEITH'S FOR ONE YEAR. $1. 75 

M. L. KEITH, Lumber Exchange Bldg., Minneapolis 



226 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




PAINTING 



FINISHING 




Paint and Varnish Remover. 

HERE it is desired to do a good 
job of refinishing, whether a 
house or a chair, every painter 
knows that it is necessary to re- 
move the old finish clean to the wood. 
Only by so doing can a first-class re- 
finishing job be done. It is, of course, 
sometimes more expensive to do the 
work in this way, as more material and 
labor is required in doing the work, but 
where any really good job is wanted, by 
that large and increasing class of people 
who desire to keep their buildings in the 
best possible condition the extra cost is a 
small matter compared with the satis- 
faction of having the work properly done. 
Of course, where the surface is reason- 
ably smooth, it is possible to clean with 
the burner or scraper, but this is often 
hazardous, and is objectionable and a 
nuisance, especially in dwelling houses 
and office buildings. The burner often 
causes .damage by fire, and the marring 
of the wood by careless workmen is in- 
evitable. 

It is difficult to say what quantity of 
remover is needed for any particular job, 
as much depends upon the age and the 
number of coats to be removed. The 
standard removers now on the market, 
when flowed on the surface with a brush, 
will penetrate quickly the ordinary var- 
nished or painted surface and the old 
finish may be wiped off with cloth or 
waste within three or four minutes after 
application. If there are many old coats, 
it will take longer, and in some cases it is 
best to let the remover remain on the sur- 
face an hour or more. Some painters 
make the mistake of putting on just a 
little of the remover over a few square 
inches of surface to be refinished and 
then wipe up as they go along. This 
method requires much more time and 
more remover than by flowing the re- 
mover on, allowing it to remain the re- 



quired length of time and then cleaning 
off. 

After the remover has been applied to 
a painted or varnished surface, you will 
notice that the remover goes down 
through the finish and the surface be- 
comes alligatored. If, upon trying a 
small place, it appears that the under sur- 
faces have not been affected and sfficiejit 
remover has not been applied to affect 
them, do not remove the first application, 
but add a second application and allow 
the remover to stand twice as long as did 
the first application. If sufficient re- 
mover is applied to the surface, it will go 
through any number of coats in a few 
minutes and can then be wiped or scraped. 

Sometimes it is asked if it is an econo- 
my to use paint and varnish remover on 
the outside of buildings. Sometimes it 
is and sometimes it is not. We find that 
some of the paints used on outside work 
become baked and hard and it is almost 
impossible to remove them with solvents, 
torch or scraper. Whether it is an econo- 
my to use remover on the outside of a 
house can only be determined by trying 
remover on a small part of the building. 
If it is seen that the remover readily 
takes hold of the paint and lifts it, it 
would then undoubtedly be a real econo- 
my to use remover. If the remover does 
not take hold, the painter will probably 
find that it is also difficult, if not almost 
impossible, to scrape the surface. It 
would be well to be careful about taking 
a contract to remove the old finish from 
a house that is in this shape. 

Users of paint and varnish remover 
will find it an economy to apply the re- 
mover freely, as what is wanted is 
prompt and effective action in going 
through the old finishes, and, in order to 
do this effectively, you must apply suf- 
ficient solvent to go through the surfaces 
of the finishes. It is not an economy to 
apply too small a quantity of remover. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



227 



Right Painting 
Preserves Property 





AINT is more than color, and more than 
appearance. Permanency and protection to the 
surface covered are of first importance. The 
variation of color should be taken care of only 
after these are assured* 

C. Pure white lead and linseed oil are the 
recognized basic necessities of paint. Why? 
Because they form a perfect union and, when 
mixed, have the quality of penetrating the sur- 
face covered and becoming a part of it. Such 
paint never cracks or scales. It wears down 
uniformly and the surface is ready for repaint- 
ing without scraping or any preparation other than brushing 
off the dust. 

C. Use National Lead Company's pure white lead ("Dutch 
Boy Painter " trademark), have it mixed with pure linseed oil, 
and your painting must be economical because it will last. It 
will also be beautiful. Ask the painter who takes pride in his 
profession if this is not true. He knows. 

C. National Lead Company's pure white lead is the best known 
and enjoys the largest sale in the world. It is exactly what we 
say it is pure white lead containing no chalk, barytes or any of 
those other subtle adulterants which make painting an expense. 
C. If you paint our way you secure both beauty and durability. 
Write us for our "Dutch Boy Paint Adviser No. K,E, Complete 
color schemes correct methods. Free. 

Our Pure White Lead ("Dutch Boy Painter" trademark) is now packed in steel kegs, dark gun-metal 



Jlniali, instead of in oak kegs as heretofore. 



NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY 



An office In each of the following cities: 
New York Boston Buffalo Cincinnati Chicago Cleveland 

(John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Philadelphia) 
(National Lead and Oil Company, Pittsburgh) 



St. Louis 



228 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Painting and Finishing Continued 

All large consumers use it freely and find 
it an economy to do so. Extracts from 
paper by J. P. Floen. 

Coloring Wood by Inoculation. 

A correspondent of one of our exchanges 
says: "For several years I have been 
working on a process of coloring timber 
by inoculation and have now brought it 
to a state of perfection, whereby I can 
color wood almost any desired shade of 
any size and length of tree when the tree 
is alive and standing ; in fact, I furnish 
the chemicals, and nature does the rest. 
I do not even deaden the tree, nor change 
its outside appearance. The roots are in- 
oculated with chemicals with the desired 
color, the sap passing it along on its way 
to the leaves and colors the most minute 
fibers ; in fact, the color is part of the tree 
itself." The correspondent says, further: 
"I can also deposit any odor in any tree 
and make the wood so strong with cam- 
phor that no moth would enter the chest 
where the wood is impregnated with the 
camphor and again give it the odor of the 
most delicate perfume. Chemicals can 
also be put in the trees in such a way that 
they mix beautiful tints and markings." 
Carriage Monthly. 

Paint's Fourth Function. 

To the preservative, decorative and 
sanitary functions of paint a fourth field 
has been opened, for Paint, the Moral 
Agent, according to a recent story in a 
Paris paper which declares that the latest 
Parisian reformatory methods apply the 
"paint cure" to moral delinquents. This 
will be interesting news on this side, 
where reform efforts have been centered 
upon the point. Here's the story: 

"A husband who had been living in- 
harmoniously with his wife consulted a 
doctor. No cause being found for dis- 
agreements, the doctor visited the pa- 
tient's home and there found red paint on 
the walls. The doctor ordered a change. 

" 'Red paint,' he said, 'excited the tem- 
per, try the blue/ which soothing experi- 
ment was made and the temper of the 
wife became as angelic as ever before. 

"The physician says a blue room will 
tame the most exacting shrew." 




GLORIOUS ! 
MARY PLOVER HEARD! 
WE WERE GOING TO 
BUILD AND INVITfl 
tlEFOHER PARTY 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



229 



THE NAT I 




BUILDER 



362 DEARBORN STREET 

CHICAGO 

Offers this 
Great Building Opportunity: 

complete plans with d? OO 
estimate of material *r I 
and price . . . For *~ 

The plans are medium priced, up-to-date 
homes. The front, side and rear elevations 
with floor plans and details drawn to quar- 
ter-inch scale, are on a 

LARGE SUPPLEMENT 

36 x 24 inches 

Plans Drawn to Scale the Same as 

a Regular Blue Print and You 

Get One Every Month 

A complete bill of materials with an accurate 
estimate of cost accompanies each plan. 




THIS IS ONE OF THE HOUSES 

It was planned by Chicago Architects, 
who rank high as designers 

It is of moderate cost and the outside is of 
Plaster Work, now so popular. 
Besides this, each number has other houses 
of low cost, including a Beautiful Bungalow 
with plans. 

The writers, selected by Architect Fred T. 
Hodgson, Editor, cover the entire building 
field. 

Send in the coupon and you may find some- 
thing new and good for the new home you 
are planning. 



$2.00 per year 20 cent* per copy 

NATIONAL BUILDER, 

362 Dearborn St., Chicago: 

Put ME down for one year's subscription, for which 
I enclose $1.00 in money or stamps and THIS COUPON 
which is good for $1.00 credit on the order. 



Name. 



City, 



Keith's, Mch. '10. 



Street No., 




Colonial 
Designs 



'N the selection 
of hardware 
trimmings for 
a Colonial 
house, harmony 
should prevail be- 
tween hardware 
design and archi- 
tectural style. The 
new- old-fashioned 
knocker and door-latch here 
illustrated are splendid examples of the 
appropriateness and unusual excellence of 

Sargent's 

ARTISTIC 

Hardware 

for homes of the Colonial type. 
The latch and cylinder lock 
also show how modem secur- 
ity and convenience can be 
combined with old-fashioned 
appearance. 

Besides nearly a score of 
Colonial patterns, Sargent's 
Hardware is made in designs 
to harmonize with all periods 
and schools of architecture 
for interior and exterior. 

If you are building, get 

Sargent's Book of Designs 
Sent FREE 

Illustrates and describes nearly 
eighty varieties of hardware. 

The Colonial Book 

also free shows Cut Glass Knobs, 
Door Handles, Door Knockers and other 
fittings adapted for a Colonial house. 
Write for the books to-day, addressing 
SARGENT & COMPANY. 151 Leonard St., N. Y. 





230 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Quality of Sand Lime Bricks. 

H. B. Am about to build a house and 
would like you to advise me about the 
use of sand lime brick. They have been 
recently called to my attention but I 
would like to know if they are equal to 
clay brick. I like the appearance of the 
samples submitted but wish to make no 
mistake. 

H. B., Ans. We have seen a great 
many samples of sand lime brick and 
have also noted it in the wall. A lot of 
comment from different sources has come 
to our notice and from this information 
we are able to reply as follows: 

Clay bricks have long been used for 
structural purposes, and while they have 
given splendid service, they lack some 
of the important advantages possessed 
by some other kind of bricks. 

Among these the sand-lime 'product 
has claim to recognition. Sand-lime 
bricks have long been used in some 
countries, particularly Germany, and it 
appears that when the materials are first- 
class and the manufacture of the brick 
is understood, the result is generally sat- 
isfactory. 

These bricks work well in structures, 
have a considerable carrying capacity, 
and will withstand a great heat. They 
are also water-proof. 

For residence work they seem to have 
no fault except that they are more dif- 
ficult to lay than clay bricks because 
they do not have the same suction. In 
factory buildings they have been a fail- 
ure because the vibration from machin- 
ery and the slamming of heavy doors 
causes the mortar to loosen. Even a rich 
cement mortar does not hold them as 
well as it does other bricks. Sand-lime 
brick is composed of good lime and clean 
sand, or some other aggregate, such as 
ground marble, crushed granite, and 
kindred materials. These are carefully 
mixed and pressed. Perhaps the great- 



est difficulty in the manufacture of the 
brick is in the proper selection of lime. 
The best lime for the purpose is rich in 
magnesia, and it must be fresh. It is 
crushed, the sand is added, and the mix- 
ture is run into the press in uniform 
amounts. Special machinery is employ- 
ed. The bricks pass from the powerful 
press into a form of kiln termed a "hard- 
ening cylinder," where they remain from 
eight to twelve hours, and in which the 
materials are fused. The bricks can be 
used as soon as they are cool. The above 
is a mere outline of the process, there be- 
ing a number of technical details de- 
manding great care. 

When the bricks are made with white 
sand they are often called granite or 
silicate bricks. 

An Inquiry from Japan. 

S. I. Respected Sir. I read in your 
honorable magazine at our government 
school, of the very agreeable woods in 
your large country. It is my intention 
to engage in manufacture and will, in my 
pleasing occupation, require to make 
some very good purchases of these said 
woods. Is the cost value kindly estab- 
lished by the attraction of gravitation, or 
the area of the several dimensions. Too 
much expensive space I wish to elimin- 
ate, but will appreciate news of woods 
both affectionate and cheap. 

S. I., Ans. We are pleased to be of 
service to a reader at so great a distance. 
Most woods in the U. S. are sold by bulk 
or as we term it, cubical contents. The 
quality of the wood determines the price 
per cubic foot or superficial surface. 
While in some instances and under some 
circumstances other methods might be of 
advantage to purchasers, the manufac- 
turer, and the persons owning the tim- 
ber lands, yet it is the established rule 
with us and is not likely to be changed. 

In some countries wood is bought by 
weight, and the buyer comes more nearly 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



231 




Asbestos "Century" Shingle Roof Residence of Rufus Choate Porter, Dallas, Texas: J. E. Flanders, Dallas, 
Architect; Wm. F. Nicholls, Dallas, Superintending Architect; George Doclson, Dallas, Contractor 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles 

"The Roof that Outlives the Building" 

THE ARCHITECT or Builder who has been used to regarding all roofings as a 
choice of evils should learn about Asbestos "Century" Shingles the first roof- 
ing material that grows progressively better under exposure to the elements. 
Asbestos "Century" Shingles are dense and elastic shingle-like sheets, made of 
hydraulic cement reinforced in every direction with interlacing asbestos fibers. 

Dampness rain and snow freezing and thawing hasten the maturing of the 
cement. Make the Shingles tougher and harder. 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles protect the building and need neither painting 
nor repairs. 

They cannot rust like tin or decay like wooden shingles or crack and split 
like slate or hold moisture and rot the roof timbers like tiles. 

Made in three colors, numerous shapes and several sizes. Ask your Roofer for 
new quotations. Write for Booklet, "Reinforced 1910." 

The Keasbey & Mattison Company 

FACTORS 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 



232 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to Questions on Construction Continued 



getting what he bargains for; but even 
then he mav miss it if he receives green 
wood when he wants dry. According to 
timber testing engineers of United States 
Forest Service, wood may lose half or 
more its green weight in seasoning. Ce- 
dar for lead pencils is bought by weight 
in this country. The pieces are so small 
and of such irregular size that they can 
not conveniently be stacked and meas- 
ured as cordwood. 

The bulk of nearly all woods decreases 
as seasoning goes on. A hundred cords 
green will make from 89 to 93 cords 
when dry. This is a factor of no small 
importance to dealers who handle large 
quantities. 

Woodlot owners and farmers who have 
small forest tracts from which they ex- 
pect to sell cordwood, are no less in- 
terested than contractors who buy and 
sell large quantities. It will stand them 
in hand to know how much difference it 
makes whether wood is cut long or short, 
chopped or sawed, whether the sticks are 
round or split, whether large or small, 
and whether the measurements are to be 
made while the wood is green or after it 
is seasoned. 

E. H. B. Kindly tell me the best ma- 
terial to line a house the inside of which is 



B. TERREL. HOYT, 

Landscape Architect and Forester 

Designs or full working plans for the development of 
Home Grounds, Parks and Cemeteries. Surveys made. 

Send for booklet, "Home Beautifying and Landscape Art." 
342 Security Bank Bldg., - - Minneapolis, Minn. 




Cheaper than wood for 

Lawns, Churches, Cem- 
eteries. Public Grounds. Also Wrought Iron Fence. Cataloguo 
free. Write for Special Offer. , 
THE WARD FENCE CO., Box 147 D.catur, Ind. 



PREVENTS DRAFTS, DUST AND WINDOW RATTLING. 

IVES' PATENT 
Window Stop Adjuster. 




PATENTED. 




The only Stop Adjuster made from one piece of metal with solid 
ribs and heavy bed that will not cup, turn or bend in tightening 
the screw. Manufactured only by The H. B. IVES CO., New 
Haven, Conn.,U. S. A. ( Fifty-page Catalogue Mailed Free. ) 



formed of narrow beaded wooden boards. 
I have used cardboard and covered the 
latter with wall paper and with good suc- 
cess, but I would like to know a substitute 
for the cardboard, or the best quality of 
cardboard to use. 

Ans. E. H. B. We think probably the 
best solution of your problem would be the 
use of cheese cloth glued to the cardboard. 
This will give you a base for applying the 
wall paper. 

How to Stick Leather on Metal. 

H. K. I will be obliged if you will 
give me the formula for a good cement 
to attach leather to metal. 

H. K., Ans. 

In order to fix leather to metal, dilute 
one part (weight) coarsely crushed gall 
nuts with eight parts (weight) of dis- 
tilled water about six hours, and filter 
through linen. Then pour one part 
(weight) of cold water over one part 
(weight) glue, let it stand for 24 hours 
and heat the whole, whereby a concen- 
trated glue solution is obtained. Now 
coat the leather with the warm gall nut 
extract, bring the glue solution on the 
roughened and warmed metal, lay the 
leather on it, press it firmly, and allow 
to dry in the air. The leather will ad- 
here so firmly to the metal that it can- 
not be separated without tearing it. 

Cement Uniting Wood or Stone to Glass 
or Metal. 

Z. N. A. Can you give a good for- 
mula for a cement which will unite wood 
or stone to glass or metal. To be of use 
for my purpose it should be tough, 
harden quickly, and not shrink after set- 
ting. 

Z. N. A., Ans. 

"The simplest formula we know of, is 
to mix monoxide of lead, known as 
litharge _ or massicot, preferably the lat- 
ter, which comes in a yellow powder, 
with enough glycerine to make a paste 
of the desired consistency, and use it 
immediately after mixing. This cement 
may be colored by adding dry colors in 
small portions, but these must not be 
more_ than 10% of the quantity of the 
massicot or litharge used or it will pre- 
vent quick setting. Gentle heating will 
make it set in a few minutes, and then 
it will resist both pressure and heat." 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



233 




Studying HOUSE PLANS Origfnality 

This plan for a N. Y. C. client (see 172) is but one of 
hundreds in our books of plans, giving views, sizes, etc. 
226 Costg. $2000 to $2500 $1.00 



100 Small Cot. and Bung. 
98 Costg. $ 800 to $1200 



.60 
.60 



136 
186 



$1200 to $1600 $1.00 
$1600to $2000 $1.00 



191 
207 
172 



$2500 to $3000 1.00 
$3000 to $4000 1.00 
$4000 and up'd 1.00 
1.00 



56 plans of Duplexes, Douple Houses, Flats, etc. 

KEITHS~NC mis xs BUILT vrw 




A modification in brick of one of my Ladies' Home Journal 
designs especially studied for correctness of plan. In books 
226, 191 and 207 scheduled above are many variations of this 
plan in frame and brick construction. 



ONDER HOUSE! 
N* 4 




One of 100 Bungalow designs we have of every variety of 
floor plan arrangement. See Book of ICO Designs. Also for 
larger and better class of Bungalows, our other books contain 
many attractive designs, both one and one-and-a-half story. 




This KEITH Design, against 5 others from leading archi- 
tects, was awarded first prize by unanimous vote of the 
Minneapolis Park Board and over 2500 out of 4000 visitors 
voted for it without knowing the Board's decision. 




^ Shingles below, plaster above. A winner! Compactness of plan and 
simple detail means money saved. Shown in 226 book of plans. 

THE BUILDING flF IT 128 P a?es - Illustrated, a practical guide to 

niu ui I y ou can recognize and remedy tl flf! 

faulty work, thus supervising the construction of your own home. * ' "" 

THF KFITH Pft I 721 HennepiAve. 
111E, IYE/1 1 II i/U., Minneapolis. Minn. 



Ml 




PROSLATE ROOFING and SIDING 



For residences ot all kinds you will not find a mon attractive, 
more economical, more serviceable rooting and siding than PROSLATE. 
DURABILITY: 

PROSLATE is not an uncertainty its base Is our regular 
PAROIO ROOFING which has stood the test of time in every 
climate it wears as well as the best shingles. 

ECONOMY: 

PROSLATE costs less than good shingles and clapboards and 
the cost of laying is much less. Anyone can lay PROSLATE. 

ATTRACTIVENESS: 

PROSLATE is a rich, reddish brown in color. We can furnish 
PROSLATE with either straight or ornamental edges. The 
latter gives the effect of a slate or shingle roof. 
Your buildings will be the most attractive in your neighbor- 
hood if covered with PROSLATE and you will save money. 



F. w 



SON, Makers 



ESTABLISHED 1817 
EAST WALPOLE, MASS. 




$25.85 



For this elegant, 
massive selected 
oak or birch, ma- 
hogany fi n i s h e d 
mantel 
"FROM FACTORY 

TO YOU" 

Price includes our 
"Queen" Coal 
Grate with best 
quality enameled 
tile for facing and 
hearth. Gas Grate 
$2. 50 extra. Man- 
tel is 82 inches 
high, 5 feet wide. 
Furnished with round or square columns, 
full length or double as shown in cut. 
Dealers' price not less than $40. 

CENTRAL MANTELS 

are distinctive in workmanship, style and 
finish and are made in all styles Colonial to 
Mission. CATALOGUE FREE Will send 
our new 112 page catalogue free, to carpen- 
ters, builders, and those building a home. 

Central Mantel Company 



"REPUTATION AND 
QUALITY COUNT" 



1227 Olive Street 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



234 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



MArK/miKI ^ 
AND PLVMBING 





Controlling and Regulating Heat. 

The first thing to be done in our 
homes, to bring about a better condi- 
tion, no matter how they are heated, 
says Building Management, is to stop 
overheating our living rooms and our 
bedrooms. A thermometer is almost as 
essential as the heating apparatus itself. 
With furnace, hot water, or steam heat, 
a thermostat should be used, and under 
ordinary conditions, the temperature in 
the living rooms should never be above 
72 degrees Fahrenheit. If proper pre- 
cautions regarding humidity are taken, a 
temperature from 65 to 68 degrees will 
be found perfectly comfortable, and effect 
a considerable saving in the coal bill. 

The regulation of the humidity is es- 
pecially important. It is humidity and 
not real heat which is responsible for 
so much of the discomfort produced in 
the warm months of the year. A hot 
air furnace should always be equipped 
with an automatic humidifier of the right 
size. If it has this equipment, the proper 
degree of humidity can be assured in the 
home. If no humidifier is applied to the 
furnace, the water pan should be kept 
full of water, and a small can, or bucket 
of water should be hung under each reg- 
ister. If the home is heated by either 
steam or hot water, the indirects should 
be equipped with a perforated pan hu- 
midifier, which is not expensive, and is 
so made that, while it will furnish a large 
volume of moisture in the air, it will not 
interfere with the heat. 

The most important of all the require- 
ments for controlling and regulating the 
heat is the ventilation. All ventilation 
must begin with the removing of foul 
air. Homes with fireplaces have a first- 
class exhaust vent if properly used. If 
the fireplace is built solely for ornament, 
the top of the flue should be capped with 
non-down draft vent head. In homes 
heated by stoves or hot air, a light fire 



of shavings or paper built in the fire- 
place will start the draft upward, and the 
exhaust vent will be completed. Much 
better results can be obtained where the 
fireplace can be used, as a light coal fire, 
or the heat from a gas log creates a 
strong updraft. In homes heated by 
steam or hot water, a positive updraft 
can be maintained in the fireplace by 
running an aspirating pipe up the flue. 
One bedroom, at least, should have an 
exhaust vent for cases of sickness. The 
living room in homes built without vent 
flues and heated by stoves, will have to 
depend upon window ventilation and the 
fireplace for fresh air and ventilation. 
When possible the window vents should 
be placed so as to get cross circulation, 
by putting a small vent in two windows, 
placed opposite each other in each room. 
If this is not possible, there should be 
two vents of a larger size placed in two 
windows as far apart as possible. This 
method of ventilation is more expensive 
in fuel than that by aspirating vent flues, 
but it is worth the price in the health 
and comfort which it provides in the 
long run. 

Regulating Noise from Plumbing. 

A very disagreeable feature of plumb- 
ing work in the home is the noise due to 
the operation of plumbing fixtures. In 
many residences the operation of the 
water closet in the bathroom can be 
heard all over the building. Such noise, 
however, is unnecessary, and can be 
avoided by intelligent design of the sys- 
tem and judicious selection, of fixtures, 
says a writer in a recent issue of Shop- 
pell's. It is well to be acquainted with 
the various closets that are on the mar- 
ket, so that when a noiseless one is 
wanted it can be specified by catalogue 
plate and number. But even when the 
closet is noiseless in operation, noiseless 
plumbing is not assured unless the sup- 
ply and waste pipes are likewise proper- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



235 



A Perfectly Heated Home 

YOU might just as well have that new home 
properly heated and ventilated while you're 
about it and know that your system of heat- 
ing is not costing you unnecessarily large bills for 
fuel. The "Jones" Side Wall Registers insure 
perfectly working warm air heating plants and the 
greatest amount of heat from a given amount of 
fuel, and the "Jones" System of Installation 
insures perfectly ventilated and perfectly heated 

HOM ES 

Our improved "Jones" Registers have been 
installed in more than 350,000 of the most com- 
fortably heated residences in the United States and 
Canada. We have prepared a neat little booklet, 
"Home, Sweet Home," which we will be pleased 
to send to you on request. It treats of the com- 
fort and health to be derived from a perfectly ven- 
tilated and heated home, and incidentally gives a 
number of reasons for ' J ones' ' superiority. 

U. S. REGISTER CO., Battle Creek, Mich. 

BRANCHES: 

Minneapolis. Minn. Des Molnes, la. 

Kansas City. Mo. Toronto. Can. 




HERBERT C. CHIVERS CO., ARCHITECTS 

NEW YORK - ST. LOUIS - SAN FRANCISCO 

Publish ARTISTIC HOMES 

A HOUSE BOOK 

SENT POST-PAID 
Price 50 Cents 



BUNGALOW 



PORTFOLIO OF MODERN DESIGNS SOe. 

Book of Artistic CHtircfeec, 5Oc. 



HERBERT C. CHIVERS CO. ,,JS*:*g.. ST. LOUIS 





PHENIX 

HANGERS and 
FASTENERS 

Solve the problem HOW TO 
HANG and FASTEN Storm Win- 
dows and Window Screens 

It's the "Housewife's Joy" tar 
Clean Windows, Ideal Ventila- 
tion, no flies and Solid Comfort 

RETAIL PRICE. 10. 15. 20No3OO 

Pen SIT. WITH SCREW* 

Sold by all Hardware 

Dealers or direct 

For descriptive catalog, address 

PHENIX MFG. CO. 

048 Center St.. Milwaukee. Wit. 




FURNACE 




We will deliver a complete heating 
equipment at your station at factory 
prices and wait for our pay while you 
test it during 60 days of winter weather. 

The entire outfit must satisfy you or 
yon pay nothing;. Isn't this worth looking 
into? Could we offer such liberal terms 
If we didn't know that the Hess Furnace 
excels In service, simplicity, efficiency, 
economy ? 

We are makers not dealers and will 
save you all mlddlemens* profits. No room 
for more details here. Write today for free 
48-page booklet which tells all about It. 

Your name and address on a post card 
is sufficient. } 

HESS, 71 f Tacoma Bldg.. Chicago 



236 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Heating and Plumbing -Continued 



tioned to their several uses. If the 
supply pipes are too small, there will be 
a disagreeable hissing sound when water 
is being drawn, not only at closet fix- 
tures, but at other points in the building. 
Further, if the pressure is high and 
properly designed faucets or suitable air 
chambers are not provided, there will 
be a pounding noise when a faucet 
is closed, due to water hammer. These 
sources of trouble can be eliminated by 
using slow-closing faucets and large-size 
supply pipes to the various fixtures. 

The noise of water from closet fixtures 
flowing through the soil pipe can be de- 
creased in volume by using three-inch 
soil pipes in the partitions, and the re- 
maining noise can be almost entirely 
done away with by filling the space 
around the pipe and between the laths 
and plaster of the partition with some 
non-sound conducting substance. 

Laundry Fixtures. 

In the moderate-priced homes the laun- 
dry trays are located either in the kitchen 
or in the basement, and much may be 
said in favor of each location. If the 
laundry is located in the cellar it neces- 
sitates an extra stove for boiling the 
clothes and imposes extra work on the 
servant carrying the clothes down to 
wash and up again to hang out, to say 
nothing of the extra steps that must be 
taken answering rings at the door bells. 
Further, it makes inconvenient the serv- 
ant's work, for she cannot well do her 
washing and at the same time tend to 
the meals which are cooking. On the 
other hand, if the laundry is located in 
the cellar and well partitioned off, there 
is less danger of the steam and odor per- 
meating the living-rooms. 

In the larger, more expensive homes a 
separate laundry, located on the ground 
floor, adjoining the kitchen, will be found 
desirable. This will afford light, air and 
easy access to the yard to hang out 
clothes, as well as a direct means of ap- 
proach to the outside doors, and super- 
vision of the kitchen. The completely 
equipped laundry will have three laundry 
trays, a washing machine, either power 
or hand ; centrifugal wringer or separator 
for removing the free water from clothes ; 
a clothes drier and a gas-heated hand 



mangle. Provision should be made in 
the yard for drying clothes in the open 
air during favorable weather, the driers 
being reserved only for stormy days. Of 
course, an iron stove, which can be used 
also for boiling clothes, and the usual 
ironing horses and other portable pieces 
will likewise be required, but the latter 
partake more of the nature of furnish- 
ings than fixtures. 

Pressure System of Hot Water Heating. 

Perry Weber Rathbun, in the "Ameri- 
can Carpenter and Builder," declares that 
the excessive cost of many hot water 
heating systems is due to the large pip- 
ing used, to overcome, as it is claimed, 
friction. He says he has found by prac- 
tical experiments that, with pressure, 
either by the use of regulating valves, or 
mercury appliances, the pipe areas can 
safely be reduced 50 per cent, and the 
radiation 15 per cent, with tappings from 
60 to 80 per cent smaller than are used 
with the old open tank system. The 
water under pressure can be run up as 
high as 240 degrees Fahr. without boil- 
ing, which gives such a system of hot 
water heating the efficiency of steam 
heating, without any o'f its disadvant- 
ages. 

**A pressure system contains from 25 to 
30 per cent less water than the ordinary 
hot water system. This reduction causes 
the plant to be very responsive to firing, 
thus causing a quicker circulation and 
overcoming the slowness to heat which 
is very common with the old-style sys- 
tem. The quickened flow of water over 
the heated plates of the boiler absorbs 
heat more rapidly from the fire and de- 
livers it quickly to the radiators which 
distribute it in the room. 

Artistic Bath Rooms. 

A well-to-do man whose new residence 
was recently completed, hit upon a novel 
plan for decorating the bath rooms. In 
one of them the floors and walls repre- 
sent the bottom of the ocean. Marine 
plants and fishes are painted on a dark 
green background. In the other bath 
room the beach at Atlantic City is repre- 
sented, and among the crowd of bathers 
are the man and his family. The work 
was executed by a well-known artist, 
and the likenesses are good. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



237 




DO 
YOU 

WANT 
THE 

BEST? 

Round Hot 
Water Heater. 

_. .- Sectional 

IvOVcil Steam and 

J Water Heaters. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Hart & Grouse Co. 

Utica, N. Y. 
80 LAKE ST., CHICAGO 



IXL ROCK 
MAPLE AND 
BIRCH 
FLOORING 




Selected Red Birch 
Bird'g-eye Maple and 
Cherry Flooring 



One important feature 
is the wedge shaped 
tongue and groove 

which enters easily, drives 
up snug and insures a per- 
fect face at all times without 
after smoothing, an advan- 
tage that is not obtained by 
any other manufacture. 

Our method of air-seasoning 
and kiln drying has stood 
the test for twenty years. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET 



Wisconsin Land & Lumber Co, 

HERMANSVILLE, MICHIGAN 



Plumbing 
Supplies 

AT 

Wholesale 
Prices 



Everything in the 
Plumbing Line 




I guarantee to save you 20% to 40% on high class goods. 
No seconds, only first quality. Write and let me prove to 
you the money I can save you. Illustrated catalogue free. 

B. K. KAROL, 768 to 772 West Harrison Street, Chicago, III. 




RID YOURSELF OF SLIDING 
DOOR ANNOYANCES 

No need to shake, shove hard and get all out 
of patience trying to open that sliding door. Un- 
necessary to have it stick, bind and get off the 
track. Specify or order immediately 

THE ALLITH RELIABLE ROUND TRACK 
PARLOR DOOR HANGERS 

You'll surely come to it later. 

The Allith alone gives you absolute freedom 
from all sliding door annoyances. They are a step 
in advance of all others. No other parlor door 
hanger runs so smoothly and so noiselessly. The 
wheel is brass bushed and steel cased with hard 
fibre tread. The bearing is anti-friction. The 
hanger and plate for attaching to the door are sup- 
plied in either malleable iron or wrought steel. 
The adjusting screw has an extra long bearing in 
frame of hanger which makes a vey strong and 
positive adjustment. The adjusting screw can- 
not work loose and is easily regulated without 
removing door casing. 

The round steel track with tightly fitting inside 
supports is of the best possible construction. The 
sagging or warping of walls, floors, or doors does 
not in any way affect the perfect working of this 
hanger. 

When building or remodeling your home don't 
fail to have your sliding doors equipped with these 
hangers. They mean a permanent end to all your 
former sliding door troubles. 

Insist that your architect specify Allith Reliable 
Parlor Door Hangers. 

Local Dealers sell them. If yours should not 
happen to, write us for particulars also kindly give 
name of your architect. Please let us hear from you. 

ALLITH MFG. CO, 4321 West Taylor St, 
CHICAGO 



238 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 



Announcement. 

Mr. F. A. Hall, who for the past twelve 
years has been manager of the Chain 
Block & Hoist Dept., of the Yale & 
Towne Mfg. Co., whose general offices 
are at Nos. 9-13 Murray street, New York, 
and whose works are at Stamford, Conn., 
has resigned his position in order to ac- 
cept election as vice-president and treas- 
urer of the Cameron Engineering Co., of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. Hall's successor will be Mr. R. T. 
Hodgkins, who for several years has been 
his chief assistant, and who is thoroughly 
qualified by experience and ability suc- 
cessfully to perform the duties of the po- 
sition. 

In his new connection Mr. Hall ex- 
pects to make a specialty of trolleys and 
appliances for overhead handling of ma- 
terials, and in connection therewith, to 
make use of the Yale & Towne blocks 
and hoists, with the sale of which he has 
so long and prominently been identified. 

A Glass Brick Which Withstands Winter 
Weather. 

The developing of a process by which 
glass brick can be made on a merchant- 
able basis has engaged the attention of 
the inventor, C. B. Lawton, of Connells- 
ville, Pa., for over two years. Last 
September he announced that a process 
had been reached by which glass brick 
could be successfully made in competi- 
tion with enameled brick. The National 
Glass Brick Co., Connellsville, Pa., under 
the management of Mr. Lawton, deter- 
mined at once to demonstrate the be- 
havior of glass brick under extreme at- 
mospheric changes, and last October 
finished a building all of glass brick, both 
inside and out, including partitions, using 
no cornice, lintels, sills, gutters or chim- 
neys, except such as were made of glass 
brick. The winter's experience tends to 
show that glass brick separately filled 
with concrete will stand atmospheric 
changes. Glass brick partitions where 
center-poured with soft concrete will 
stand all the atmospheric changes that 
they will likely encounter in inside work. 



It was also demonstrated that outside 
walls should not be center-poured, as the 
extremes of temperature are liable to 
cause cracks in either the fifth or sixth 
brick of each course because of the inter- 
locking joint formed by the pouring of 
the concrete. As a result of the demon- 
stration the makers have determined to 
ship all glass brick filled before leaving 
the factory except partition brick. 



CATALOGUES. 
Asbestos Building Materials. 
An instructive catalogue, No. 102, of 
the H. W. Johns-Manville Co. is at hand. 
It shows to what a large extent asbestos 
products enter into modern construction. 
Asbestos is illustrated in sheets as a roof- 
ing material, as shingles, as inside finish, 
as wall plaster, as stucco, as theatre cur- 
tains, etc. Of special interest to the 
home builder are the illustrated pages on 
Keystone insulation, insulating blocks 
and cold storage. Moulded closet seats 
and tanks are shown, which exactly rep- 
resent any desired wood finish and are 
all in one piece. Much useful informa- 
tion is contained. Home office, Milwau- 
kee. Wis. 

Colonial Hardware. 

Some beautiful examples of old colo- 
nial designs appear in a booklet of Sar- 
gent & Co., New Haven, Conn. The 
door knobs in brass and cut glass are 
very effective. Used with the proper key 
plates or escutcheons the proper feeling 
would be imparted to a room, which 
otherwise might be rendered ridiculous. 
Colonial architecture is something more 
than classic wood mouldings. Old-time 
front door handles in admirable patterns, 
supplemented with beautiful old knock- 
ers, will meet the requirements of the 
most fastidious. 

For less pretentious positions, door 
latches may be obtained and for drawer 
fronts, drop handles are provided. The 
Sargent easy spring lock is shown and 
its good points enumerated. This book- 
let will help anyone to produce the right 
effect in a colonial house or room. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



239 




HOW TO 

USE 
CONCRETE 

A book of 250 pages of 
authoritative information answering 

1100 QUESTIONS ON CONCRETE 

including articles on 

HOW TO MOLD CONCRETE BENCHES 
HOW TO MAKE CONCRETE FLOWER POTS 
HOW TO MOLD LAUNDRY TUBS OF CONCRETE 
HOW TO MOLD BALUSTRADES 
HOW TO APPLY CONCRETE STUCCO 
HOW TO LAY A CONCRETE SIDEWALK 
HOW TO BUILD A CONCRETE BOAT 
HOW TO MAKE CONCRETE FIREPLACES 
HOW TO BUILD A CONCRETE FURNACE 

This book is written in plain English, the desire of the authors being to present in 
handy form the best recognized methods of handling concrete. The text includes 
a number of articles, with plans drawn to scale, instructing the reader in different 
branches of concrete work, and a large amount of miscellaneous information on 
important points has been collected and thoroughly indexed. 

The book is printed on fine book paper, profusely illustrated, bound in 
Grey cloth. Prospectus for 2c stamp. 

Book sent for $1.00, Express Paid 

CONCRETE PUB. CO., Detroit, Mich. 

The first edition of this book, bound in cloth and boards, 
was sold out eight days after publication. 

M A G A ZINE F REE 

If you will mail the attached coupon with a remit-, 
tance of $1.00, we will send you a free copy of^ 
CONCRETE, a monthly magazine devoted >%/ 
to concrete work. Do this today. Aw *-?*? 

USE THE 
COUPON 



240 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



GLIMPSES OF BOOKS 




FEW carefully selected books will 
be reviewed on this page each 
month. A good book is a power- 
ful influence in the creation of 
the home and we trust that Keith's will 
be an aid to our readers in the selection 
of a library. Editor. 



Miss Selina Lue. 
By Maria Thompson Daviss. 

This is the story of a dear old maid, 
who lost the only man she could ever 
love, by a premature explosion. 

By way of compensation she manages 
to include the whole community in her 
love, and mothers all the babies whose 
real mothers need her help. 

The love story of the beautiful daugh- 
ter of an impoverished first family and 
the artist, son of a rich lumberman, is 
told in a simple, humerous manner, mak- 
ing one forget that there is anyone in ex- 
istence, other than those with good in- 
tentions toward their neighbor. 

The wholehearted goodfellowship of 
the artist makes him a favorite with all 
and nothing could be funnier than the 
inducements offered with a view to his 
permanent residence. 

Think of an offer of sign painting with 
a possible job with an electric power 
company, to a man capable of painting 
a $10,000 picture. 

The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Indian- 
apolis. Price $1.00. 



The Florentine Frame. 

(By Elizabeth Robins.) 
Some books are valued chiefly for what 
they are not. The Florentine Frame, a 
simple little story possessing good literary 
style, is a case in point. 

A young professor of literature, writes 
a successful play and many of its early dif- 
ficulties are overcome by the author's 
friendship with a lady of culture and refine- 
ment who is considered an authority upon 
the subject. She is a widow, wealthy, and 
the mother of a girl of sixteen. The three 



form a very close friendship from which 
others are excluded as much as possible. 

Another play is started, but does not 
make progress, the author finding it diffi- 
cult to concentrate his ideas. 

The friendship between the man and the 
woman seems likely to ripen into love, 
when a married cousin and her young hus- 
band arrive. As the wife of a young man, 
her efforts to keep a youthful appearance 
are ridiculous and in a way she is posed 
as the "horrible example." 

At this time the mother discovers that 
the daughter is in love with the playwright 
and she holds him at arms' length, never 
allowing him to reach a formal proposal. 
Her daughter's happiness is her first con- 
sideration and the marriage takes place. 
Upon their return from abroad a telegram 
arrives announcing the death of the mother. 
The wife realizes that her husband has 
never loved her in the way she expected, 
but after a period they are united in the 
thought of the mutual love of the mother 
and the possibilities of the future. The 
book appeals to the literary sense rather 
than the desire for mere entertainment. 

Moffat, Ward & Company, New York, 
price $1.50. 



A book on construction, Light and 
Heavy Timber Framing Made Easy, is 
at hand and should be of special use to 
the man who was obliged to get an edu- 
cation in the school of experience. To 
the average person who left school early, 
the ramifications of XYZ and PDQ 
are awesome things and conceal more 
than they reveal. 

This book by Fred T. Hodgson aims to 
eliminate all this and explains methods 
of timber framing. The book contains 
395 pages with an index to timber fram- 
ing alphabetically arranged. There are 
over 450 illustrations and diagrams. The 
subjects covered range from joints in 
framing to difficult floor and roof con- 
struction, including trusses, bracing of 
walls, etc. Frederick I. Drake & Co., 
Chicago, Publishers. Cloth, $2.00. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

ON HOME BUILDING 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED 

The Journal of Modern Construction 

MAX L. KEITH, Publisher, 

225 Lumber Exchange - Minneapolis, Minn. 



Contents for April 






SOME PLASTER HOUSES IN THE NORTHWEST 
DECORATIVE MANTELS FOR RADIATORS 
MODERN CONVENIENCES AT "101 RANCH" - 
CULTIVATION. OF SPRING BULBS - - " - 
AN ATTRACTIVE CONCRETE HOUSE - ') - 
ODD FEATURED OF CALIFORNIA ARCHITECTURE 
NOTES ON GARDENING /'..... 
PROBLEMS IN-'CONCRETE - - - - , - 

DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING '"' V - ""-*' 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS - ' 

TABLE CHAT i - 

CEMENT ,- - - ' 1 

PAINTING AND FINISHING 

QUESTIONS ANSWERED ON CONSTRUCTION 

HEATtNG AND PLUMBING' " .* - ' - - - 

SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS - - - 

GLIMPSES OF BOOKS .... ,.,-h .,..; 



PAGE 

- 245 
251 

- 254 
256 

- 260 
263 
266 
270 
274 



292 
298 
302 
306 
310 
316 
322 
324 
330 
336 



J ^ \J *J* J Q 



All remittances, whether through news agent, or by money order, draft, 
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^^ new address to which they wish the magazine sent. 

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^^^^^ his subscription, notice to that effect should be sent. Otherwise 

it is assumed that a continuance is desired. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

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No person, firm or corporation, interested directly or indirectly in the production or sale of build- 
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For gale by all News Dealers in the United States and Canada - Trade supplied by American News Co. and Branches 



Entered Jan. I ', 1899, at the "Postoffice In Minneapolis, Minn., for transmission through the mails as second-class matter 

COPYRIGHTED 1910 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Vol. XXIII 



APRIL, 19/0 



No. 4 



Some Plaster Houses in the Northwest 




TRACEY AND SCRIVER RESIDENCES WITH GARAGE IN BACKGROUND 




HERE are few more beautiful 
drives in America, than Lake of 
the Isles Boulevard as it winds 
around the three miles of irreg- 
ular shore of the lovely sheet of water 
which is one of the gems in the park 
system embellishing Minneapolis, as a 
necklace of emeralds and pearls adorns 
a beautiful woman. 

Fortunate are those who have secured 
building sites overlooking this charming 
drive, since now for this privilege, one 
must pay a great price. 



Mr. Scriver was among the fortunate 
ones, having joint ownership with Mr. 
Tracy in 150 feet of frontage on this 
boulevard. The happy manner in which 
the two owners have joined forces to 
improve their property by one compre- 
hensive and unified scheme, is illustrated 
in the accompanying photographs and 
plan of the houses and grounds. 

The piece of ground with its 150 feet 
of circling frontage, narrowed to about 
75 feet in the rear. Also, the ground 
rose steeply from the boulevard with a 



246 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



grade of twenty feet. The owners de- 
sired the exterior design to embody as 
far as consistent with the northern lati- 
tude, features of Spanish American or 
Mission Architecture which had capti- 
vated their fancy in California travel and 
both houses must have garage accommo- 
dation for automobiles. Each desired 
the maximum amount of "view" and sun- 
light. The architect has solved the prob- 
lem by setting the houses so that- they 
diverge widely at the front and are 
brought together at the rear so that the 
double garage forms the background of 
the court between and closes a charming 
vista of the grounds. The garage is 
made part of the architectural scheme 
and the line of division between the 
houses as shown on the ground plan, di- 
vides the garage into entirely separate 
, and distinct halves, each with its own 
equipment. 

The garage itself, is half concealed 
from view by the landscape treatment of 
tall cannas and spireas in front of it, 
its red tiled roof beyond the green fore- 
ground making a picture upon which the 
eye rests with pleasure. The architect 
has added to the effectiveness of the pic- 
ture by a happy use of red brick for 
the walks which approach the houses 
from each side and outline the court, also 
in the broad copings, steps and trim of 
the concrete retaining wall in front. The 
contrast of the red brick with the green 
grass and the grey plaster, gives life and 
interest to the whole thing. 

Comparing the ground plan with the 
second illustration, a clear idea is ob- 
tained of the retaining wall with pricked 
terrace anJ steps, the separate flights of 
steps connecting with a central brick 
walk which again divides in front of the 
shrubbery and leads to each entrance. 
The ornamental iron screen at the top of 
the retaining wall gives partial seclusion 
from the passers-by on the boulevard be- 
low, while not depriving them of the 



pleasure which every one feels in a 
glimpse of such a home for if "all the 
world loves a lover," it is equally true 
that all the world loves a pretty place. 
There is a sentiment about home build- 
ing as universal and eternal as lovers' 
vows. 

These houses, though only forty feet 
back from the boulevard, are yet given 
an effect of retirement by the height 
above the street and the skilful handling 
of the space, while the omission of divi- 
sion walls gives a feeling of increased 
space to the grounds. The outlook in 
every .direction is natural beauty of the 
most appealing kind, supplemented by 
just enough of artificial aid to make it 
most effective. The treatment of the 
house and grounds has aimed to utilize 
the beautiful setting and be in harmony 
with it. 

The owners' choice of a concrete 
house was therefore favorable to this ob- 
ject, since a concrete house suggests 
strength and restfulness, while the grey 
surface relieved by the white trim and 
Spanish tile roof, affords a satisfying 
unity between the dwelling and the lo- 
cation. The deep cornice of the roofs, 
the, entrance hoods and the exposed tim- 
bers of the Tracy house, offer certain 
lines of projection and relief and the 
softening effect of shadows on the wall 
spaces. 

Part of the problem which confronted 
the architect was to design two houses 
alike, yet different; both suggesting 
Spanish design, yet conforming to Amer- 
ican ideas of comfort and convenience. 
The first part of the problem was solved 
by the nearly identical interior arrange- 
ment developed in the one case by round- 
ing exterior features and in the other by 
square projections. The houses show 
Spanish influence in the rococo curves 
of the gable faces, in the red tile roofs 
and in the minaret chimneys, but the 
type is much modified by American ideas 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



247 




DIAGRAM OF GROUNDS AND FIRST FLOOR PLANS OF RESIDENCES 



248 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE SCRIVER RESIDENCE AND DUAL ENTRANCE TO GROUNDS 



and at died openings are freely mingled 
with square. There are people who ob- 
ject to the Spanish forms as not appropri- 
ate to our northern latitudes. Well, 
why not ? California, to be sure, brought 
over the Spanish type, but northern Spain 
and Italy is as cold in winter as Minne- 
sota nearly. In fact, the climate is very 
similar to ours. A great Spanish artist 
on a recent visit to the United States 
said of us, "Your sky and atmosphere 
are more brilliant even than Spain's." 
Interior views are shown of only one 
of the houses, that of Mr. Scriver's. The 
floor plan is developed in an interesting 
manner. The scale of the house itself is 
of generous description. The rooms are 
of ample size and arranged for conven- 
ience and agreeable effect. The central 
part of the house is given up to the hall 
and stairway, the ceiling heavily beamed. 
The hall opens to a brick paved terrace 
covered with a tiled roof hood. The 
vestibule and hall walls are enriched by 



a decoration in oils in English Renais- 
sance style, showing beautiful colorings 
in shaded bronze tones which harmonize 
with the rich Persian Iran runner on the 
stair. These tones are carried out 
through the adjoining living room and 
on through the upper hall into the up- 
stairs sitting room where they are soft- 
ened and lightened into the restful gray- 
green grasscloth which covers the walls. 
In this room are the bookcases and here 
is the family life. The room is given a 
light, cheerful character by furniture of 
natural wicker upholstered with an Eng- 
lish chintz in bright colorings. Hang- 
ings of the chintz are used at the win- 
dows. 

Returning to the first floor, we pass 
into the living room where the wood- 
work, as in the hall, is dark mahogany. 
Here the walls are hung with a genuine 
antique tapestry, whose soft, dull sheen 
is heightened by the draperies of bronze 
green 'velour bordered with antique gold 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



249 



banding. Through tall glass doors with 
arched tops, one steps out upon delight- 
ful little balconies and these doors have 
French shades of pale ecru Sun-dure. 
The wide chimney breast, with its re- 
cessed nooks on either side, occupies one 
entire end of the room with the broad 
hearth in front raised six inches from 
the floor and forming a sort of dais which 
also carries across the room. This hearth 
and the fireplace facings above it are laid 
with Moravian tile in artistic shadings 
of dull red which blend with the rich 
colors of the immense Turkish rug. 

There is an Elizabethan dining room 
with wall decorations in oil fresco carried 
out in the geometric design belonging to 
the type, put on with many shadings, over- 
lapping and producing a very rich effect. 
The room is really built around the beau- 
tiful Italian carved buffet, a rare and 
much prized possession of the owner, 
and the Elizabethan treatment is its suit- 
able setting. The dining room proper 
opens into a small out-door breakfast 



room with a brick floor; a sleeping porch 
is above. 

But the spot beloved by the household, 
is the sun-room, above the rounding 
front porch, which is fitted up with radi- 
ators and electric lights, making it per- 
fectly comfortable in the coldest winter 
day, even without the sunlight which 
floods the place. 

In truth, a winter's snow storm is al- 
ways a drawing card here. The great, 
white world outside is a most enticing 
contrast to the warmth and coziness 
within, with green things growing in 
wall baskets and jars. The walls of the 
sun-room are of grayish green plaster 
with white woodwork and a water color 
decoration of ivy vines runs along the 
ceiling angle. This ivy vine decoration 
is scarcely distinguishable from the real 
ivy which grows in wall baskets of Shin- 
to brown wicker and is trained across 
the window frames. The windows have 
no other shades or curtains than Vene- 
tian blinds, raised and lowered at will 




THE LIVING ROOM 



250 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



and indifferent to sun or rain. The fur- 
niture is green wicker. "When we sit 
out here at night," says Mr. Scriver, "the 
world seems far away and remote. It 
is so still, only the swift flash of auto 
lights speeding by, or the silent gliding 
of boats over the lake in summer, the 
dark outlines of the trees penciled against 
the sky and the silence." Such is the 
charm of this location, sequestered yet 
in the heart of a great city. 

Although the houses have been built 
but one summer only, the creepers and 
shrubbery plantings at their base already 
lend softness and grace. It is a mistake 
to cover the walls and windows of a 
dwelling too completely and thus hide 
the beauty of its own lines and surface. 
This error has been avoided, though ex- 
tensive plantings will give more luxuri- 
ant growth in the near future. In the 
spring, the central flower bed as well as 
borders along the wall and the walks, 
will be ablaze with the glow of red and 
yellow tulips already planted. 



These houses illustrate forcibly the 
advantage of allowing the functions of 
the architect to extend beyond the mere 
planning of the dwelling itself. ' A house 
planned without reference to its sur- 
roundings lacks a very essential element 
of success. It is with pleasure that we 
note the growing tendency among clients 
to constitute their architect an advisory 
board, not only as regards the grounds 
about the house, but as to its details 
of interior decoration and furnishing. 
Nor should it be forgotten that the cor- 
relative duties of their relation are equal- 
ly important and that if the architect re- 
quest and accept such a trust,, he must 
be. well fitted and equipped tp discharge 
it. It is one thing to advise a client to 
spend money; it is quite another to help 
him to spend it consistentlv and well. 
Such additional responsibilities involve 
study and alertness along many lines 
not always supposed to belong to the 
architect's equipment, as well as . prac- 
tical information and experience. --.y. 




THE ELIZABETHAN DINING ROOM 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



251 



Decorative Mantels for Radiators 



By Arthur E. Gleed 





DESIGN FOR A RADIATOR MANTEL, OF 

WROUGHT IRON LINED WITH BRASS 

WIRE GAUZE 



HE useful and necessary radiator 
is, in most well decorated houses, 
distinctly out of harmony with 
the rest of the . appointments. 
In winter its welcome warmth makes it 
tolerable, but in summer its common- 
placeness increases to absolute ugliness. 
Its mechanical construction practically 
prevents it being specially designed and 
varied to suit the requirements of each 
room, but there is no reason why the 
working parts should not be covered by 
a mantel, which could not only be in 
harmony with the surroundings, but 



could be made an artistic feature of the 
room. 

' In designing a useful necessity the 
main idea to be kept in mind is not to 
interfere with the utility of the object, 
and not even to disguise or hide its exist- 
ence, but rather to make its purpose a 
thing of beauty. In the present case, 
we must bear in mind that a radiator is 
a source of heat, and any cover or mantel 
we make must not in any way prevent -it 
radiating heat. The materials we use 
must be of a kind that will stand heat 
and even to a certain extent suggest it. 
Wood, owing to the ease with which it 
warps, would be out of place, as also 
would all textiles. Metals of all kinds 
are perfectly suited to the purpose, and 
their ideal construction is in the form of 
grilles, open wrought or cast patterns, 
pierced work, and wire gauzes. To these 
may be added, by way of relief and orna- 
ment, earthenware tiles and polished 
stone such as marble. With these mate- 
rials at hand, and if the utility side is 
given due consideration, and the design 
so planned that every opportunity is giv- 
en to allow the heat to radiate, then there 
is endless scope for the craftsman to con- 
struct mantels that will accord with the 
most elaborate scheme of interior dec- 
oration. 

Figure 1 is a suggestion for a mantel 
to be used in an interior of large pro- 
portions, such as an entrance hall of a 
public building or a ball-room. It is de- 
signed to serve as a source of light as 
well as of heat, a combination which is 
to be greatly recommended, as it seems 
entirely natural to find the two together. 



252 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




RADIATOR MANTEL OF CAST IRON WITH 
GLAZED TILE 

Its construction consists of a wrought 
iron framework, lined on the inside with 
brass wire gauze. The main lines of the 
design would need to be heavy to give 
adequate support to the two electric light 
standards, but the floral design and min- 
or parts could be as light in construc- 
tion as was consistent with the design. 
If the radiator was against a wall there 
would be no necessity to have the back 
of the mantel filled in, but otherwise the 
same design as the front would be re- 
peated on the back. A dead black fin- 
ish would be serviceable for the iron 
framework and in conjunction with the 
dull gold color of the brass gauze would 
be very effective. I.f a richer appear- 
ance was wanted, for such a position as 
a ball-room or a theater vestibule, the 
design could be carried out in dull bronze 
for the framework, with the gauze gilt a 
pale shade of gold, and this with amber 
glass shades for the lamps would look 
extremely rich. 

Figure 2 is a mantel of simpler con- 
struction and if made of cast iron its cost 
would be quite moderate. The glazed 
tiles used form part of the complete de- 
sign by being a simple blossom pattern 
to crown the upright leafed stems of the 
grill work. The note of color in the tiles 
could also be turned to advantage by re- 



peating the color scheme of the room, 
At a little more expense a richer effect 
could be got by making the grill work 
of wrought iron with a bright finish and 
lining the mantel with brass wire gauze. 
In this and in the preceding design one 
end of the mantel would open as a door 
to allow the regulator of the radiator to 
be adjusted as desired. 

Figure 3 is a design of much lighter 
construction, which would allo^ of the 
mantel being easily removed for clean- 
ing purposes. It is 'practically a three- 
leaved screen with a hinged top which 
locks it together. The rough iron frame 
is plain and light, and is filled with panels 
of pierced brass and a center panel of 
repousse work. The framework could be 
left a dull gray finish, with the brass 
work lacquered to a soft satin surface. 
The center panel offers a good opportun- 
ity to illustrate some symbol of heat, 
and in the example given the great heat 
giving sun with flame rays is used. 
Equally effective would be a convention- 
al design of flames and smoke, or even 
a campfire scene. Combinations of vari- 
ous metals, with surfaces finished in dif- 
ferent fashions, will produce beautiful 
color effects, and this center panel would 
be very successful if made of polished 
copper, and then heated until it takes on 
those beautiful shades of purple, red, and 
orange peculiar to that metal. 

In this last example of a mantel, a sug- 
gestion is offered for wall treatment by 
which the position of the radiator is em- 
phasized. Supposing the room to be 
panelled, an interesting center could be 
made by filling the panel behind the radi- 
ator with a warm-toned decorative pic- 
ture, and on either side of it arranging 
electric light. Such a combination of 
heat and light, together with the artistic 
effect which could be got with the man- 
tel and decorative panel, would transform 
that part of the room where the ugly 
radiator usually stands into a place of 
beauty. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



253 



ii 

141^1 Mijl: 

J t*\ I UTJ ^ 




RADIATOR MANTEL IN THE FORM OF A LIGHT WROUGHT IRON SCREEN WITH PANELS 

OF PIERCED BRASS AND REPOUSSE WORK 



254 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Modern Conveniences at " 1 1 Ranch 

Home of Miller Brothers, of Wild West Show Fame, 

at Bliss, Oklahoma 




ALL MODERN RESIDENCE AT "101 RANCH" 



HHE owners of 101 Ranch are soon 
to have a* house- warming, ^in. what 
prbbably is the most, .Admirable 

' country residence, not ^nly in Ok- 
lahoma, but in the Southwest, The new 
residence will be occupied in a few days, 
and was built to replace, a frame struc- 
ture destroyed by fire last winter. The 
sum of $25,000 has been expended in the 
bare building, to which will be added 
$10,000 in fixtures and furnishings. 

When the owners of* 101 Ranch con- 

9Btt'^> ' * '< & 
suited an architect they gave orders' .for 

a building so absolutely fireproof that if 
necessary a bonfire could! be set in .any 
room without danger to the b,uilding. 



Steel and concrete were used, and it is 
believed that the only portion that could 
be burned "are the hardwood floors, the 
doors :and the ornamental woodwork; 
otherwise the entire building, from cellar 
-to garret would be intact, even the roof 

, being of asbestos material. 

The residence contains every modern 
convenience and cortifort, private plants 
furnishing electric light, steam heat, hot 
and cold water and hot and cold ventila- 
tion. - For weeks a driller from Pennsyl- 

:, vania -has. be. en boring for gas in the resi- 
dence grounds, bait 1 without success. 
More than $10,000 has been spent in go- 
ing down about 2,600 feet, but drilling 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



255 



will not be abandoned in the search for 
natural gas until the maximum limit of 
3,000 feet has been reached. 

This beautiful residence, with its mas- 
sive porticos on two sides, and its porte 
cochere, resembles an old-fashioned 
Southern home. It commands a fine view 
of the beautiful Salt Fork Valley, and 
from the upper porticos this winding 
stream may be followed eastward to 
where it flows into the Arkansas River, 
among the blue hills of the Osage Coun- 



try. Surrounding the residence are or- 
chards, vineyards, vast fields of alfalfa, 
corn and wheat, and further away the 
thousands of acres of pasture lands, on 
which graze thousands of head of cattle 
and horses. Under the roof, above the 
halls, the reception rooms, living rooms 
and guest rooms, is the billiard parlor, 
Each room is finished in a different 
wood, and its walls and ceiling frescoed 
in individual tints and designs. 




256 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cultivation of Spring Bulbs 



By Althea Harwin 




EXTENSIVE TULIP BEDDING 




HERE is no time of year when 
floral beauty is more grateful to 
the eve than in the early days of 
spring, after the long months of 
wintry gray and gloom. And this patch 
of yivid color should not be for the flor- 
ist's window alone. It belongs to the 
home, as indeed all flowers do. The 
jaded spirit turns with fond response to 
the rose bed that struggles into bloom 
in spite of midsummer's heat and dust; 
but the flowers of April are the ones 
really worth while. Their environment 
is the crisp green of young grass and 
foliage, the delicious pale blue of rain- 
washed sky. Their appeal is to the 
youthful heart, new-born with hope and 
full of appreciation for the glories of na- 
ture. 

How unfortunate, then, that the early 
spring garden is made a feature of only 
the wealthiest homes! The reason for 
this fact is not far to seek. The flowers 
that "make" the spring garden, that 
sometimes even lift their brilliant blos- 
soms through a thin blanket of belated 



snow, are the tulip, the jonquil, the hya- 
cinth and a few others of their immedi- 
ate family, and they present one decided 
disadvantage to the amateur gardener. 
Their life is such a short one that one is 
almost tempted to say they do not pay 
for the space they occupy, when one con- 
siders that that space must either be re- 
planted or remain bare the rest of the 
season. 

This replanting is the bugbear that 
stands in the way of the spring bulb; 
but it is a mountain only to the gardener 
who has not attempted to transcend it. 
Indeed it is not a serious matter at all 
when it is carried on systematically and 
with intelligence. It involves changing 
the contents of the beds twice, and there 
are geraniums, salvia, lantana, pinks and 
a multitude of other plants that may 
be set out after the bulbs have done their 
work and have been put away for the 
summer. Many of these summer bloom- 
ers will be in prime condition for pot- 
ting when the time comes to return the 
bulbs to their places in the beds, and the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



257 



window garden will profit quite as much 
as the spring garden, by the system. 

The preparation of the beds is of vital 
importance, and luckily the soil that has 
been used for growing such plants as 
are likely to be chosen for the summer 
months will be about right for the bulbs 
that are to inhabit it over winter. After 
the plants have been taken up the beds 
should be thoroughly loosened up, and 
enriched with leaf mould or good loam 
Under no circumstances should manure 
be mixed with the soil. When the bed 
is in readiness, the bulbs should be plant- 
ed, from twelve to fifteen inches apart, 
and three inches deep. In the case of 
the Chinese lily the depth should be six 
inches. When the bed is smoothed over, 
give it a primary mulch of stable manure. 
This ought to be repeated just before 
actual winter sets in, as most of the first 
mulch has been carried down into the 
soil by the fall rains and the second coat 
is needed both for warmth and for spring 
fertilization. 

Many an amateur gardener has found 
the early bulbous plant a sore disappoint- 
ment because he has waited until spring 
to set out his bulbs, or has assumed that 
the bulb that has produced bloom all 
winter in the window garden could go 
right on blooming when put out into 
the spring bed. The potted plant usu- 




IRIS IN MASSED EFFECT 

ally requires two years of repose in the 
garden soil to recuperate from the strain 
of winter forcing, and the fresh bulb 
that is planted in the spring has no time 
to prepare roots, and consequently it is 
without vitality. It exhausts its own 
small store of nourishment in producing 
a few sickly flowers, and when its puny 
effort is over there is nothing to dig up 
and put away for next year's garden. 

The bulb that is properly planted in 
October will develop a thick clump of 
roots before the ground becomes suffi- 
ciently chilled to check all growth, an 
abundance of roots to supply all the 
moisture and nourishment the plant re- 
quires when the gorgeous blossoms are 
making their heaviest demands upon it. 
When the period of blooming is past 
there will still be sufficient vitality to 




LAWN DOTTED WITH CROCUS 



258 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



mature new bulbs, and these should not 
be dug up until the leaves have almost 
died down to the ground. This will be 
about the time the summer plants will 
demand the space, and the exchange can 
be made on the same day, early in May 
or early in June according to the local- 
ity. In case the bulbous plants do not 
die down with sufficient promptitude, 
they may be dug up with such earth as 
will cling to the roots and put away in 
the cellar until the earth is dry. It may 
then be shaken off, the bulbs carefully 



fully, either with the watering pot or 
with the smallest stream that the garden 
hose will run, the water applied directly 
to the roots and the surrounding earth. 
It should be kept from the buds as far 
as possible. Some devotees of the spring 
bulb go so far as to have tarpaulin tents 
ready with which to shield their tulips 
and narcissus in case of heavy rain. 

For those who do not relish the labor 
t>f changing the beds, and for those who 
have ample garden space, the bulbous 
plants that remain in the ground from 




CALADIUMS BORDERING SHRUBBERY 



picked out and put away in dry sand, in 
properly labeled boxes and in a place 
that is neither too hot nor too damp. 
That is about all there is to the growing 
of bulbous plants, except that while they 
are blooming they must be watered with 
intelligence and practically nothing 
else ! A heavy rain will sadly mar the 
blossoms, and the garden hose, in the 
hands of the enthusiastic novice, will 
ruin them utterly. In case of a very dry 
spring, the plants may be watered care- 



year to year will be found more satis- 
factory. It is only necessary to arrange 
a suitable environment for them so that 
the bed will not look distressingly bare 
during the long months of summer. 
There are other bulbous plants, such as 
the hardy German iris, Lilium lancifol- 
ium, the old-fashioned tiger and day lilies 
and the hardy gladiolus, around and 
among which the hyacinths, narcissus, 
jonquils and tulips may be planted. At 
first there ought to be generous space in 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



259 



the beds, since the clumps increase in 
size year by year. Montbretia, a most 
generous bloomer during the summer 
and an unusually handsome plant, is one 
that can be used to great advantage in 
such a bed. 

Another satisfactory treatment is 
available, especially on a large lawn, and 
this can be adapted to the diminutive 
garden as well. It is the arrangement of 
spring bulbs as a border to large masses 
of shrubbery. Where space is at a 
premium, let the shrubs occupy the fence 
corners, the angle of the veranda or the 
long and narrow area between the fence 
and the walk. The advantage of using 
bulbs in conjunction with shrubbery is 
apparent. At the time of April bloom- 
ing, there will be a suitable background 
of brown branches and swelling buds for 
the gaily dressed tulips and the dainty 
narcissus, and when the low-growing 
bulbous plants have finished their brief 
course of activity, the shrubs will have 
sent out verdant branches to conceal the 
bare beds from view. 

Even in the rose beds and along the 
walks it is not necessary- to dig up the 
bulbs. The spot where the tulip bulb 
lies Buried may be marked by an incon- 
spicuous stake, so that no harm shall 
come to the semi-dormant root when the 
growing plants are receiving necessary 
cultivation. The bulbs that remain in 
the ground from year to year require 
the annual mulch of stable manure, and 
aside from this they demand no atten- 
tion whatever. 

More charming even than the long 
beds of tulips and the round beds of 
hyacinth, in the early days of spring, is 
the lawn that is all dotted over with 
crocus, squills and snow drops. Almost 
in a night these modest blossoms open 
their blue and white petals, like thick- 
strewn stars in a green firmament, and 
when they pass away they leave the lawn 
as perfect as if they had not been there. 
And they will come and go thus silently 




and unostentatiously year after year if 
they have been properly planted in the 
first place. They should be set out after 
the sod is well established and free from 
weeds and, like the other hardy bulbs, 
they must be planted in the fall. The 
inexperienced gardener will use a sharp- 
ened stake with which to bore a hole in 
the close turf, the result of which is that 
the earth will be packed hard and dis 
couragingly tough for the frail rootlets 
that must penetrate it. The better plan 
is to use an ordinary auger, such as car- 
penters employ in boring holes. Set it 
in the turf and give it two or three turns, 
loosening the earth at the same time that 
a sufficientlv deep hole is made. Intro- 
duce the bulb and cover it over with the 
earth that has been removed. The first 
fall these lawn-planted bulbs should be 
mulched, but after that they may be 
trusted to take care of themselves. 




A BORDER OF TULIPS 



260 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



An Attractive Concrete House 



By Charles Alma Byers 
(Photographs by the Author) 




EXTERIOR VIEW SHOWING GENERAL CHARACTER OF STYLE 



OHE accompanying photographs 
illustrate an attractive little 
concrete house built at a cost of 
$4,200. It contains six rooms 
and bath, all on one floor, and a front 
porch, half pergolaed, and a rear pergola- 
court. It is of simple, pleasing design, 
possessing plain cement walls and a flat 
shingled roof, the eaves of which have a 
universal projection of two feet eight 
inches. Its general appearance suggests 
a blending of the California bungalow 
and the mission style of architecture, 
with neither style strongly in evidence. 
It was designed by its owner, Franz A. 
Bischoff, an artist of Los Angeles, Cal., 
assisted by . Architect Lester Moore of 
the same city. 

- The house has a frontage of forty-sev- 
en feet and a depth of fifty-four feet. It 
contains a living room sixteen by twen- 
ty-eight feet, a dining room fourteen by 



fifteen feet, a kitchen eleven by fourteen 
feet, a bath room eight by thirteen feet, 
and three bed rooms, one twelve by ten 
feet and two twelve by sixteen feet. 
The front porch, including the pergola, 
is eleven by thirty-two feet, while the 
pergola-court in the rear is twenty by 
thirty-two feet. 

The front door opens from the front 
porch directly into the large living room. 
To the left, running parallel with the 
room's greater dimension, are located the 
three bed rooms and the bath room, and 
to the right are the dining room and 
kitchen. In the farther end are three 
large windows which give an excellent 
view of the court, and before which is 
placed a built-in window seat. The room 
contains an immense brick fireplace, 
shown in one of the accompanying photo- 
graphs, and also built-in bookcases. 

The dining room is separated from the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



261 




PERGOLA, COURT AND FLOWERS, IN THE REAR 







262 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



living room only by portieres. This room 
possesses a double window, from which 
a view is had into the front pergola, and 
two windows on the north. An excel- 
lent built-in buffet is located between 
the latter two. 

On the inside the house is finished 
throughout, with the exception of the 
floors, of California red wood, and in 
these two rooms it is left its natural 
color, by being simply waxed. In the 
kitchen, the bath room and the bed 
rooms the woodwork is enameled white. 
The floors are of birch, polished and 
waxed. The gas and electric fixtures are 
brass, of special massive design, har- 
monizing well with the general interior 
effect. 

The pergola-court, in the rear, is one 
of the house's most admirable features. 
It is provided with hammocks and com- 



fortable seats, and is an excellent outdoor 
lounging place. It contains a fountain, 
surrounded by ferns and flowers, and 
from it leads a graveled and flower-bor- 
dered walk to the artist's studio, which 
stands on the rim of the picturesque Ar- 
royo Seco. 

The walls of the house average eight- 
een inches in thickness, giving an appear- 
ance of rnassiveness. They are con- 
structed oi cement, of excellent quality, 
over metal lath a wall that should prove 
satisfactory in almost any locality. 

Although simple in general design, the 
house presents an attractive and pleasing 
appearance from every point of view. It 
has excellent structural lines, and is com- 
pact and durably built. It should be du- 
plicated anywhere at from $4,000 to $4,- 
5CO. 




THE DINING ROOM, SHOWING BUFFET AND GENERAL ARRANGEMENT 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



263 



Odd Features of California Architecture 



By Edith Everett 




HESE five photographs, picked 
at random, from the many de- 
signs shown by Miss Julia Mor- 
gan, and Ira Wilson Hoover 
successful San Francisco architects 
show certain characteristics of California 
architecture, which are particularly west- 
ern, and especially interesting. 

The first picture shows the fence and 
gateway of a beautiful concrete house in 
Oakland, California. The concrete wall 
matches the house, while the tile top 
to the gateway corresponds to the red 
roof of the residence. The low, light col- 
ored wall sets off to good advantage the 
green luxuriance of the well kept lawn, 
and the red tiled gateway on its concrete 
pillars is a delightful finish to a perfect 
picture. From the view given, one gets 
"but a glimpse of the large trees and the 
picturesque beauty of one of Oakland's 
finest homes. 

The next picture shows just the en- 
trance to the Mills College Library a 
building of which Mills College's friends 
are justly proud. It is a plaster struc- 
ture, with red tile roof. But the door- 
way with its flower-filled balcony above 
its palms on either side is the fea- 
ture which is distinctly Californian, and 
to which 'the picture calls attention. The 
large arched windows of the second 
story tell of the Westerner's love of air 
.and light, and are one of the many at- 
tractive features of this California 
library. 

A doorway of markedly different style 
is shown in the third picture. It is the 



entrance to a very artistic shingle house. 
The small brick porch is partly shaded 
by the circular covered top to the door- 
way, ft can hardly be called a porch and 
yet it gives some shelter. But the large 
projecting window above, the broad cov- 
ered doorway, and the brick wall with 
its stone steps on either side make what 
may be called a perfect whole artistic- 
ally. For those who do not desire large 
verandas and many Californians do not 
this litile portico is an idea that at- 
tracts. The effect is much enhanced, 
however, by the projecting window 
above. Among the many shingle houses 
of Berkeley the shingle structure is 




A CONCRETE GATEWAY WITH RED TILE 
ROOF 



264 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




el. The visitor, who stands by the foun- 
tain, within this charming court, can 
imagine himself transported to. the Old 
World, and half expects fair Senoritas 
to appear at the old-fashioned windows 
above. Fairest flowers bloom, the. foun- 
tain- plays, and the long corridors re- 
sound with merry laughter. It is par- 
ticularly the flowers, the corridors, the 
latticed windows which convey the spell 
of a foreign land. 

The courtyard idea is old, to be sure, 
yet there has never been anything found 
more beautiful. One can gather from 
this view just how enchanting the house 
is. Even then the reality is beyond any- 
thing a picture can show. 
,. The last photograph is of the Retiring 



ENTRANCE TO WELLS COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Berkeley's most popular house none 
surpasses this one in fitness and comfort. 

The gateway and two entrances were 
chosen to show little features, which 
help to make up the uniqueness of Cali- 
fornia architecture. That it is the most 
original architecture of the United States, 
needs no proof. To every traveler it is a 
self-evident fact. 

The fourth picture was chosen as an 
illustration of a style peculiarly suited to 
the soft climate of the Golden State. 
Perhaps it could scarcely be copied in a 
cheaper dwelling house and maybe it 
would seem out of place in our bleaker 
northern climate. 

This is the courtyard of a thirty-five 
thousand dollar concrete house of Berke- 
ley. It has the air of the Spanish house 
after which Californians delight to mod- 




A GENEROUS DOORWAY IN SHINGLE SET- 
TING 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



265 



Pavilion at Mountain View Cemetery, 
Oakland. This little rustic pavilion is 
all in keeping with the locality. The 
brown hills back of it, the two towering 
eucalyptus trees in front of it, the well 
kept walks, the fountains and flowers 
set off this odd little structure. It is 
almost all veranda, as can be told from 
the photograph. The flowering plants 
being about the porch the cool shade, 
the playing water, the luxuriant foliage, 
the open room, invite the weary to rest. 
Different as these pictures are, they 
illustrate my point, that there are many 
unique features in the architecture of the 
Far West. As the traveler proceeds 
from the East towards the West he notes 
the change in buildings, and when final- 
ly California is reached, he feels the 
originality, the daring of the western 
architects, who build as they feel, for a 
people who love comfort, as well as 
adornment, and who are tied by no tradi- 
tions a people who live in a land of sun- 
shine and flowers, and gather from Na- 
ture's beauties a certain ability to rear 
dwellings that fit the scene. 




THE COURTYARD ENTRANCE OP A CON- 
CRETE HOUSE 




RETIRING PAVILION, MOUNT VIEW CEMETARY 



266 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Notes on Gardening 




A VASE OF COSMOS 



A Guide for Planting to Get the Best 
Color Effects in the Flower Beds. 



1 



HE gardener should always keep 
in mind the date at which dif- 
ferent flowers bloom and ar- 
range his planting accordingly. 
Each month new flowers should be com- 
ing to perfection to take the place of 
those that have stopped blooming. 

The following are the colors of the 
more common flowers blooming in June 
and July. Speaking generally, the most 
pleasant color schemes are those in which 
strongly contrasting tints are separated 
by whites or pale yellows. Blues and 
reds never lose by being bordered or set 
off against white. Lilacs and purples 
often gain immeasurably by having yel- 
low flowers lead up to them. 



T.he blue flowers are : Forget-me-nots, 
penstemon, Stokes' Aster, love-in a-mist, 
lobelia, ageratum. 

Blue and white are: Campanula, 
delphinium, penstemon; digitalis, Jacob's 
ladder, platycodon and lobelia. 

Red and yellow are: v ' Canna, annual 
gaillardia, calliopsis (redJ>.an4 brown). 

White are : Poppies, valerian, lilum 
candidum, Shasta daisy, yucca, phlox, Ja- 
cob's ladder, cosmos', lobelia, nicotiana 
and sweet alyssum. 

Strong yellows are : Canna, marigold, 
calliopsis, poppy, coreopsis and anfhemis. 

Pink are: Poppies, valerian, campan- 
ula lychnis, geraniums, cosmos and lava- 
tera. 

For strong scarlets, select salvia and 
geranium. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



267 



For rich red effects, use zinnia, canna, 
cosmos, cardinal flower, nicotiana, mon- 
arda, poppies and lychnis viscaria. 

It will be noted that many of the flow- 
ers in this table appear tinder several 
tints. When selecting such plants, be 
sure to order seeds of the color-variety 
you desire. 

For multicolored beds, the following 
flowers come in a large variety of colors 
and can be planted so as to give a great 
mixture of tints a very desirable re- 
sult sometimes when there is a dull spot 
in the corner that needs gay colors. For 
this purpose plant the mixed varieties of 
fox-glove, Sweet William, corn flowers, 
poppies, sweet peas, petunias, snap-drag- 
on, dahlia, stock, zinnia, nasturtium, 
phlox, candy tuft and portulacca. 

Of course this list is offered not as be- 
ing comprehensive, but as being a well 
selected one, suggesting the flowers that 
are easiest for amateurs to raise and that 
will give the most satisfaction to the av- 
erage gardener. 

FLOWERS FOR NEXT SUMMER. 

To get the best results and avoid bare 
spots in the garden it is well to use judg- 
ment in planting the seeds. The germ 
life of most flower seed is lightly pro- 
tected and should not be planted too 
early. Nothing is gained by too much 
haste, as the cold retards germination 
and weakens the plant. 

Seeds are often planted too deep, pre- 
venting the light seed from reaching the 
surface with its shoots before it is stifled. 



Sweet peas are an exception in plant- 
ing and may be placed very early; some 
hardy varieties can be in before the frost 
is all out, without damage. 

A pleasing variety of sweet peas is 
called the Orchid, it having much the ap- 
pearance of that flower. It is longer than 
the ordinary pea blossom and of a rose 
pink color. 

The aster is a beautiful and satisfactory 
flower for the 'garden and may be had in 
numerous colors and kinds. The "Beu- 
lah" is an aster of the giant comet class, 
some specimens measuring nearly six 
inches in diameter. 

The "Cynthia" aster is very handsome, 
with its large showy blossoms of rich 
purplish blue. 

One of the most beautiful is the 
"Mary," snowy white, very large and 
delicately petaled. 

Practically all the annual plants flour- 
ish in the northern states and a great 
many of the perennials also. The peren- 
nials increase their growth and hardiness 
year by year as they become adapted to 
the soil and climate. Of these the peony 
is one of the most popular and will thrive 
in almost any garden soil and is perfectly 
hardy. Phlox is a perennial possessing 
advantages even over the showy peony 
because of its longer blooming period and 
the greater variety of its coloring. It is 
well adapted to the climate of the colder 
portions of the United States and south- 
ern Canada and one is well rewarded for 
the time spent in its cultivation. 



THE VEGETABLE GARDEN 



Quantity of Seeds Required. 
HE amateur is always in doubt 
as to how much seed of a given 
kind to plant in a given space. 
Just how many plants will come 
up is something of a problem and one 
which can only be answered approxi- 
mately. Seedsmen arrive at a very good 



m 



estimate, but some latitude must be al- 
lowed for the many things that tend to 
influence the calculations adversely. The 
following list, will give what is a fair av- 
erage for fresh seed : A pint of dwarf or 
bush beans will plant 100 feet. An ounce 
of beet seed will sow sixty feet. One 
ounce of Brussels sprouts is enough to 



268 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



plant a bed six feet by six feet, which 
space should produce about 2,000 plants. 
An ounce of carrot will sow at least fif- 
teen rows of ten feet each. A pint of 
corn will plant seventy-five hills. One 
ounce of lettuce will plant 125 feet and 
produce at least 1,000 plants, and three 
times that many if they are close headed. 
An ounce of parsley will sow 150 feet. 
One ounce of parsnip will sow between 
200 and 300 feet. A quart of peas will 
sow 100 feet. An ounce of radish will 
sow 100 feet. Spinach and turnip will 
give 150 feet to the ounce. 

It will be plain that for most vege- 
tables you need not buy anywhere near 
an ounce. The seedsmen put up packets 
that contain from one-fourth to one-third 
and one-half an ounce, which are ample. 

Before seeding down the vegetable 
garden, the earth should be made fine 
and thoroughly raked. A new tool, used 
for another purpose, suggests itself as a 
means of removing gravel and other un- 
desirable material from the soil. This is 
what is known as the shovel ash sifter. 
It is an implement not unlike one-half of 
the old-fashioned boat called a scow, 
with a long wooden handle. The bot- 
tom is full of round holes about l /^ inch 
in diameter. In soft earth it could be 
used as a shovel, throwing the larger ma- 
terial aside after shaking the smaller 
through. The next thing is to level off 
the bed, or if the ground is wet it should 
have a little dip in the direction of the 
rows. This may be accomplished by ty- 
ing a rope to each end of a plank and 
dragging it over the soft ground. This 
not only levels off the space but makes 
the ground firm for seeding. 

For rows that are to be two feet apart 
provide a stick of that length as a meas- 
ure. 

Drive little stakes just the length of 
this stick apart along each side of the 
patch all the way down, to serve as a 
guide. 



Get a light board as near the length 
of the rows as possible and lay it on the 
patch so that one edge will lie along what 
is to be a row, as indicated by the little 
stakes. With a sharp stick draw your 
furrow for the seeds, using the edge of 
the board as a ruler. Of course these fur- 
rows must be of different depths, ac- 
cording to the kind of seed that goes into 
them. 

If your soil is not good, it will pay to 
make the furrow (or drill, as gardeners 
call it) deeper than is. needed for the seed 
and scatter in a little chemical fertilizer 
or bone meal. Cover this with earth so 
that it won't touch the seed, and then 
sow. 

After the seeds are in, rake the earth 
very lightly back on them, taking care 
not to disturb them. Then walk along 
the row, treading on it with all your 
weight to press the earth all around the 
seeds and give them a thoroughly firm 
bed. 

You can't pack the earth around those 
babies too tightly. After they have been 
packed, rake loose earth lightly over the 
furrow, to cover it and prevent the soil 
around the seeds from drying out and 
baking. Don't rake much on. 

Having finished the row, label one of 
the stakes by wiring a bit of wood on it. 
Don't trust to a paper label. The first 
rain will ruin it. Don't trust to memory 
about your rows, either. If you don't 
mark them as you go along you will be 
sorry when the weeds begin to come, 
which they often do before the vegetables 
peep out. 

If you can't get a board to serve the 
purpose, get a long stick. It will do as 
well except that you can't use it to kneel 
on, which is a decided convenience. If 
you can't even get a stick, stretch twine 
between the stakes to serve as a guide 
for the rows. 

Don't try to seed down the patch with- 
out such a guide. It will be not only ex- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



269 



tremely troublesome, but it will be im- 
possible to get the rows straight. 

Prepare your board, stakes, wooden la- 
bels, etc., now, and you will be able to 
plant a thirty-foot patch in a few hours, 
whereas without preparation it may take 
a day or more and then be a poor job. 
How to Set Out Growing Plants. 

To set out ordinary shrubs success- 
fully requires only a little common sense 
mixed with the necessary manual labor. 
A responsible dealer will deliver the 
plants with the roots carefully protected. 
If you cannot give them immediate at- 
tention put them all into a hastily dug 
trench, just as they come from the nur- 
seryman. Put the root portions into the 
trench, cover carefully with .earth and 
press the earth down with the feet. With 
a liberal supply of water the plants may 
be left for days before final planting. 
This process is called "heeling in" and 
is a wise thing to do even when the 
plants are to be set out at once, if there 
are many of them. Sun or wind are 
very injurious to exposed roots and 
should be kept from them. 

Make the hole for planting bigger and 
deeper than the plant would seem to re- 
quire. Throw aside the inferior lower 
soil and fill in with fine top soil and some 
manure set deep enough to keep it from 
the roots when the plant is set in the 
hole. Make this bottom filling firm, by 
trampling upon it till a firm foundation 
is obtained. The plant is held upright 
in the hole in the position it is to occu- 
py when planted. If the longest roots 
reach the bottom without cramping the 
depth is properly determined and the 
plant may be allowed to rest till a por- 
tion of the earth is replaced. 

Throw finely pulverized dirt in till the 
roots are all covered. Pack them down 
as hard as possible. The roots are com- 
pressed and twisted now and the plant 
will be much deeper in the pit than it 
should be, but you will achieve the nec- 
essary result of packing the roots thor- 
oughly with soil. 



Now pull the plant up gently, so that 
it stands perfectly perpendicular and as 
high as it should be. You can tell this 
by the appearance of the main stem, 
which will show the earth line. 

Hold it with one hand and with the 
other pack earth down between the roots. 
No matter how tightly it seems to have 
been packed before, you will find that 
you can poke your finger into innumer- 
able cavities. All these must be filled 
up tightly. 

When you cannot possibly force an- 
other bit of earth between or under the 
roots, fill in the hole. Every shovelful 
must be trampled down. When you have 
filled to within an inch of the top, throw 
in manure or other fertilizer, but don't 
let it touch the stem. 

Then turn the water on. Don't stop 
till the ground is so well soaked that 
the water remains standing on top. 
When it has finally drained away, cover 
with leaves or grass or other vegetable 
litter for a mulch, or toss finely raked 
earth over it. 

Soak freely for some days after plant- 
ing. Don't sprinkle, but pour it in from 
hose or bucket. Remember, however, 
that though the plant needs lots of water 
after it is in, you must not plant it in 
wet ground. The soil must be dry while 
you plant. 

Much care should be taken in purchas- 
ing' plants. Try to find out as much 
about the man who sells you the stock 
as possible and the firm he represents. 
If he only fills the order on his own ac- 
count from other dealers it may be very 
difficult to get plants replaced, for those 
that die or are not satisfactory. Go to 
headquarters if possible. It is more sat- 
isfactory usually. There are, however, 
perfectly reliable men who have fur- 
nished their customers with well selected 
stock year after year and may be relied 
upon. The wise purchaser will inquire 
into these matters before placing his or-* 
der. 



270 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Problems in Concrete 

By H. Edward Walker 
(Continued from the March Number) 




A WALL SURFACE IN ROUGH CONCRETE 




ARTICLE XVI. 

Concrete Surfaces. 

HE surface treatment of concrete 
is one of the most important 
considerations in connection with 
its employment as a structural 
material. No matter what qualities of 
stability, constructive advantages in erec- 
tion, etc., a material may possess, if it 
cannot be finished in an attractive man- 
ner its field is limited. Early experiences 
with concrete revealed its weakness in 
this respect. Readily adaptable to any 
form or almost any condition requiring 
strength, its appearance left much to be 
desired. So much so in fact that the de- 
signer, the only person who could really 
make it an artistic success, refused to 
have anything to do with it as an ex- 
posed material. 

The cement block, as it was originally 



presented, was impossible, but has now 
been made acceptable to all but the sever- 
est critics. Block surfaces are either 
modeled in the machine or tool dressed 
_after the concrete has hardened. The 
color is added to the aggregate or is pro- 
duced by the color of the aggregate in 
its natural state. Tones from white to 
dark grey may be influenced by the color 
of the cement itself. 

In considering concrete surfaces, how- 
ever, it is the extended surface rather 
than the unit or individual block, that 
conies within the scope of this article. 

Surfaces are of three kinds, those which 
are produced upon a mass concrete as 
originally poured into the forms, by re- 
moving a portion of it, those applied to 
the surface of the forms just before pour- 
ing and those that are plastered upon the 
surface, commonly called stucco. The 
method of either surfacing is subject to 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



271 



variation, not only in the making but in 
the finished product. 

Considering the monolithic surface 
produced in situ first, it will be seen that 
the face of the wall after the forms are 
removed is most uninteresting, repro- 
ducing as it does all the imperfections 
of the forms. The surface may be fairly 
smooth but in places the aggregate shows 
and there are variations in color. A film 
of mortar is formed against the mould 
and may or may not scale off when the 
form is removed. 

Many designers claim that the proper 
treatment of this surface, that of expos- 
ing the aggregate, is the honest and log- 
ical expression of concrete as an artistic 
building material and that methods 
which stick something on, covering up 
the rough wall, are a sham and the wrong 
principle of design. 

This would seem to be rather an ex- 
treme view without some modification 
or explanation. It is certainly true that 
concrete should stand upon its own mer- 
its and not derive its popularity from its 
ability to imitate something else. For 
this reason any attempt to imitate a unit 
construction upon the surface of a mono- 
lithic construction is false and contrary 
to an independent principle of design. 
But the treatment of large surfaces with 
a coating of aggregates of pleasing di- 
mensions and color evenly applied, pre- 
serves the idea of a monolithic construc- 
tion and as such is no more open to crit- 
icism than the method employed which 
removes a portion of the constructed wall 
to expose the larger materials. 

THE SCRUBBING METHOD. 

This latter method is carried out in this 
manner : 

The forms are removed in twenty- 
four hours after placing the concrete and 
it is then scrubbed with a scrubbing 
brush, or a wire brush if the concrete is 
too hard. A hose is used to spray the 
surface, washing away all the surface 
mortar, leaving the larger pieces of ag- 
gregate exposed. 

If good results are to be obtained prep- 
aration should be made at the time the 
concrete is mixed, the cement should be 
of a shade to harmonize or emphasize the 
aggregates and they in turn should be of 
a size and color to produce the effect de- 
sired. 



Different surfaces and textures may be 
obtained by using aggregate of graded 
sizes and mixing in a certain proportion 
of pebbles, marble screenings, broken 
brick, or burnt clay, giving color and 
brightness to an otherwise dead expanse 
of wall. 

A very successful example, actually 
constructed, is described by Albert Moy- 
er, C. E., as composed of one part Port- 
land cement, three parts limestone and 
white marble screenings about the size of 
sand, five parts ^-inch trap rock and one 
part of 1-inch white marble chips. 

The walls are placed in courses and 
may be handled in such a manner that 
coarse or fine material will find its way 
to the exposed surface. A spade may be 
pushed down next to the form and the 
fresh concrete crowded back, allowing 
the finer particles to find their way to the 
surface as it is removed. On the other 
hand tamping in the center of the wall 
will force the larger particles to the wall 
surfaces, to be exposed when treated with 
the brush. If the walls are stained from 
surplus water of the courses, at the time 
of placing, the stain may be removed by 
washing with commercial muriatic acid 
four to six parts of water. This also re- 
moves cement stain from the stone and 
brightens up the whole external surface. 

There is one serious objection to the 
wall surface finished by scrubbing and 
that is the fact that the forms must be 
removed before the concrete is thorough- 
ly hardened. Walls that have been al- 
lowed to properly set may be treated 
with muriatic acid as above stated, pro- 
ducing much the same result, but should 
be thoroughly washed to remove all 
traces of the acid. 

THE CLAY TREATMENT. 

A pebble dash effect may be artifi- 
cially produced bv what is known as the 
clay treatment. The forms may be erect- 
ed in the usual manner, to a height of 3 
feet or less as desired. The inside of the 
form that is to be the exposed surface 
when finally completed, is next plastered 
with wet clay. Colored pebbles from Y^ 
inch to those that would be retained on a 
54 -inch screen are then pressed by hand 
into the wet clay, which will sustain them 
in the vertical position. As soon as this 
is completed the concrete is poured and 
stands the usual length of time before 



272 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




CONTRASTING SHADES BY USING DIFFERENT COLORED AGGREGATES. 
SURFACE PRODUCED BY BUSH-HAMMERING 



the forms are removed. After the con* 
crete has thoroughly set, wash the clay 
from the wall with a hose and scrub 
lightly with a brush. Certain elements 
in the clay will enter into chemical com- 
bination with the cement, producing 
pleasing color effects with the contrast- 
ing pebbles. Great care must be taken 
to properly arrange the pebbles that no 
joint will be visible between one batch 
and its neighbor. In many instances the 
lower pebbles appear in a straight hor- 
izontal line, clearly showing the different 
levels of the concrete pouring. It would 
seem that this might be overcome by pre- 
paring the inner surface of the form with 
clay and pebbles as described above, and 
then pouring until the concrete came to 
the center of the topmost plank, leaving 
the upper half to be filled when the next 
section of form was erected. This would 
allow the pebbles to assume that irreg- 
ular position which is so desirable in the 
finished surface, giving no suggestion of 
its layer cake method of construction. 



THE TOOLED METHOD. 

A pointed or toothed tool may be used 
upon the surface of the wall. The mor- 
tar which has flushed to the surface is 
cut away, together with particles of the 
mortar between the aggregates. The 
dead grey color of the flat cement wall 
is broken up and light and shadow is 
emphasized by this roughing process. 
The different colors of the stones con- 
tained in gravel add much to the appear- 
ance of a wall so treated, but the dress- 
ing must be carefully done to produce 
the most pleasing results. 

This method is said to be objectionable 
because it destroys the surface mortar, 
which is the most waterproof part of the 
concrete. A wall so treated will absorb 
more moisture after dressing than before, 
if there is any tendency to porosity. A 
properly proportioned and well-handled 
concrete is very dense and waterproof, 
reducing the likelihood of absorbtion to 
the minimum. When the concrete is two 
or three weeks old the picking may be 
done, 40 to 50 feet of surface with a hand 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



273 






tool and 50 to 60 feet with a pneumatic 
tool, being an average day's work. 

BUSH-HAMMERING. 

Hand hammering and the penumatic 
hammer are used to prepare concrete wall 
surfaces. The longer the time that is al- 
lowed to elapse, from three weeks up to 
three months after placing the concrete 
before bush hammering, the more artistic 
will be the result, due to the crystalliza- 
tion of the cement. 

The cement becomes as hard as the 
stone forming the aggregate after a lapse 
of three months and the stone broken by 
the hammer give life to the surface. 
After this time bush hammering becomes 
very difficult and hand hammering nearly 
impossible. Hammers as heavy as nine 
pounds and light as three have been em- 
ployed to advantage, the tendency being 
in favor of the light hammer and few 
points. A popular hammer is one of three 
pounds with four points, pyramidal in 
shape and two-thirds of an inch apart. 
Of the nine-pound hammers one is used 
with thirty-two and twenty-five points 
on the ends and one with twenty-five and 
sixteen points. Three cents per square 
foot is an average cost for this work ex- 
clusive of the cost of scaffolding. 

Compressed air is used for bush ham- 
mering on large structures where it is 
readily available, with good results. 



THE SAND BLAST. 



Sand blast finish is also produced by 
compressed air, sand being impinged 
against the surface of the wall, cutting 
away the outer material, after the man- 
ner of the scrubbing method and is a 
very economical treatment for large sur- 
faces. 

The surfaces described have each a 
beauty of its own depending not wholly 
upon the care in the execution of the 
work upon the exterior. Either of these 
methods might result in failure or be in- 
differently good if the underlying aggre- 
gates to be exposed are not of the proper 
kind and quality. At the expense of repe- 
tition it is urged upon the constructor to 
use special care in introducing materials, 
calculated to produce the best results and 
to see that they are properly incorpo- 
rated with the mass, that they may be 
evenly distributed through the concrete. 
A little ingenuity will produce thorough- 
ly artistic and novel results. 

As an example, a belt course of red 
granite chips might be introduced into 
the form to make a pleasing contrast in 
outline and color with lighter colored ag- 
gregates of the wall proper. Mechanical 
difficulties, tending to produce inartistic 
results, by lack of unity in the surface 
texture, etc., should be studied and over- 
come by the practical, resourceful mind. 



(To be continued.) 




SURFACE PRODUCED BY PEBBLES SET IN CLAY AGAINST THE FORMS 



274 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Designs for the Home -Builder 




ITH a view of making the design 
section especially helpful at a time 
when building operations are 
reaching a very active period, the 
number of designs have been largely in- 
creased. Many of the designs are artis- 
tic and have been selected with the idea 
of showing what is being done by up-to- 
date designers. The talent as exemplified 
by the illustrations is of a high order and 
the section is correspondingly -improved 
by the presence of these designs. 

The popular house is not always the 
most artistic, but if the home builder will 
be guided by a capable designer in the 
production of his plans, keeping his hand 
gently but firmly upon the purse strings, 
the result should be a house that he is 
proud to own and of which the neighbor- 
hood is proud. 

Some people hesitate to go contrary to 
what is commonly constructed in their 
vicinity thinking that such a house can 
be more readily disposed of if necessary. 
This is true only in a very ordinary neigh- 
borhood where even ,a good hou&e would 
not sell readily. The following will show 
that there is a demand for houses built 
on lines radically;. different from -the con- 
ventional. A lady, whb hail .J^eled 
much and had artistic ideas'iuiiran^Eng- 
lish cottage in the half-timber style Upon 
a high priced lot in a very good location. 
It was well planned and had style juSt 
as a well-tailored garment has it, in ev- 
ery line, in every detail. 

She bought shrubbery, erected flower 
boxes and kept them full of beautiful 
flowers, making the place the 'talk of a 
very large city. Many people would have 
thought, at the beginning, that the de- 
signer was exorbitant in his charges but 
how insignificant they seemed compared 



with the price she eventually sold it for, 
because of his artistic taste and her own 
good judgment in presenting the finished 
product. 

Design "B 131" 

Materials. All foundations, walls, 
piers and footings to grade lines, and all 
exterior walls above the grade lines to 
the roof lines, and interior bearing parti- 
tion walls, to be made of plain concrete. 
The facing of all exterior walls, to be of 
finer mixture of concrete, using screened 
crushed stone not exceeding ]/2." in diam- 
eter, torpedo sand and cement, making 
an apparently rough uniform surface. 

The basement walls to be 12" thick, ex- 
terior walls two stories in height, first 
story to be 10", second story 8". All in- 
terior bearing partition walls and one- 
story exterior walls to be 8". Other in- 
terior partitions to be built of 3" con- 
crete blocks. 

All exterior walls to have furring strip 
and metal lath for plaster inside. All in- 
terior walls and ceilings to be plastered 
over the concrete surface. All floors to 
be of reinforced concrete. The living 
._ room to have reinforced concrete beams. 
\.A11 exterior porch columns, outside steps, 
|r%tc,, to be of plain concrete. The brack- 
;'-,. ets under the front entrance porch, the 
pergola beams and rafter parts, to be cast 
in moulds. The stairways to be of rein- 
fgrced concrete. Chimneys to be built of 
c6.ncrete blocks. 

The porch floor to be laid in a soft red 
cement tile, 12" x 12", with y 2 " black ce^ 
ment joints. The hearths of the fire- 
places to be of colored cement tiles. The 
basement floor to be-4" concrete flooring. 
Top floors in kitchen, pantries and rear 
entry to be cement finish. All other 
floors to be oak. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



275 



Cottage DenignM for the 

The roof construction to be structural 
steel covered with shingle tile. 

Interior finish of hall, living room and 
dining room to be in hardwoods. Wood- 
work in all bedrooms to be white wood 
for enamel and paint finish. Woodwork 
in kitchen, pantries, etc., to be white 
wood for paint. Woodwork of servant's 
hall and servant's quarters to be yellow 
pine for stain. 

All plumbing to be first-class, using en- 
ameled iron fixtures. Laundry in base- 
ment. 

Building to be heated by hot water. 

The designer estimates the cost at 
$8,000. 

Design "B 132" 

The cement exterior is very popular 
and in this instance a house suggesting 
English architectural detail is shown in 
which the color scheme is quite a de- 
parture. Half-timbering is usually stained 
a brown or bottle green but in this case 
it is pure white forming a very good con- 
trast with the grey cement. The living 
room is very long and appears narrow on 
the drawing but actually this is not ap- 
parent because of the triple, recessed 
window at the side which adds to its 
width. At the end is a brick fireplace with 
bookcases on either side. 

The dining room contains a built-in 
sideboard and connects with the hall by 
a wide opening. The kitchen contains 
built-in cupboards, a sink, gas stove, etc., 
and the refrigerator is located in the en- 
try under the stair landing. 

There are four chambers on the second 
floor with ample closet space, a bathroom 
and a bedding balcony. 

The attic is large and well lighted and 
contains two bedrooms. In the basement 
is a hot water plant, a laundry and vege- 
table cellar. The first story is finished in 
oak, with oak floor and is 9 feet in height. 
The second story is finished in pine en- 
ameled, with birch floors and is 8 feet 6 



Home-Builder Continued 

inches high. The basement is 7 feet 6 
inches high. The house is 29 feet 6 inches 
wide and 28 feet 6 inches deep and cost 
approximatejy $4,500, including plumb- 
ing, heating, art glass, etc. 

Design "B 133" 

This charming little home is designed 
in the English style, of brick below with 
stucco above and a moderate amount of 
half-timbering in the gables. All its details 
are carefully studied and give it an air 
of refinement. The hooded entrace porch 
is a feature of the style, a family porch 
being provided where there is more priv- 
acy. Note the flower boxes and planting 
of shrubbery obliterating the harsh line 
usually apparent at the base of .a house. 
The hall, living room and dining room are 
combined in a large open effect by the 
use of wide columned openings. The 
ceiling beams of these rooms are solid 
and are not a sham, being the actual sup- 
port of the second floor. The space be- 
tween them is paneled in wood. There 
is a spacious kitchen, a den and enclosed 
porch. 

On the second floor are three cham- 
bers, a bathroom and a sleeping porch. 
The attic is of good size. The first story 
is finished in oak with oak floors. The 
second story is finished in white enamel 
with oak floors. The basement is 7 feet 
6 inches in height, the first story 9 feet 
and the second story 8 feet 6 inches. 
There is a hot water plant, laundry and 
storage room. 

The architect states that the complete 
cost of the house was $7,000. 

Design "B 134" 

This house has caused quite a little 
comment of a favorable nature owing to 
its simplicity of design and the nature of 
the materials. It is built with hollow 
concrete walls except the porch, which is 
of monolithic construction. The wide 
arches and simple coping of the porch 






276 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cottage Designs for the Home-Builder Continued 



add much to the appearance of the house. 
The exterior is of rough cast cement of 
a yellowish clay color. The cornice has 
a projection of four feet and with the 
green Spanish tile of the roof carries out 
the mission idea of design. On the first 
floor are hall, living room with fireplace, 
a dining room and kitchen, finished in 
red oak. On the second floor are three 
good chambers, a dressing room and a 
bathroom finished in hard pine with 
beech floors. 

The house is 26 feet wide and 30 feet 
deep with walls 10 inches thick. The 
cost of the house was remarkably cheap, 
being as stated by the owner only $3,400 
with furnace heat, plumbing and all fix- 
tures in place complete. 

Design "B 135" 

The simple treatment given in this cot- 
tage home is the making of it. The large 
porch columns which support the second 
story give a solid and substantial appear- 
ance. 

Particularly attractive is the little hall 
with its seat and half screened staircase. 
The little bay in the dining room has a 
shelf for flowers and the windows are of 
leaded glass. 

There is a full basement with a hot air 
heating plant provided ; also a laundry. 

The finish of the main rooms of first 
story is in white oak with hardwood 
floors throughout, also in the second 
story hall and bath. Balance in pine. 

Cost, $2,380. Width, 24 ft. ; depth, 32 
ft. ; height of basement, 7 ft. ; first story, 
9 ft. 5 in. ; second story, 8 ft. 7 in. 

Design "B 136" 

This house is of frame with rough cast 
cement as an exterior covering. Its lines 
are very pleasing although simplicity is 
the key-note. 

The front porch is of good size and is 
screened in. There is a central hall with 
openings to a large living room contain- 
ing a fireplace and to a dining room with 
built-in sideboard. The kitchen is nicely 
arranged and has a few steps up opening 
on to main stair, to second floor. The 
entry contains the ice box and stairs to 
basement. The main room of the first 
floor are finished in plain red oak with 



oak floors. The kitchen is pine to paint 
with a pine floor. 

On the second floor are three pleasant 
chambers, a bathroom and a bedding 
balcony. The finish is pine to paint with 
birch floors. 

The house is 28 feet by 22 feet exclu- 
sive of porch and the basement is 7 feet 
6 inches high, the first story 9 feet and 
the second story 8 feet 6 inches. It is 
warmed by a hot water plant and the 
architects state the cost to have been 
$4,200. 

Design "B 137" 

This novel bungalow type of duplex 
was designed to give the occupants of one 
apartment the care of both. To this end 
but one kitchen is provided from which 
both dining rooms can be served. This 
arrangement makes one party carefree as 
to meals and housework and proves a 
paying investment for the other. The 
kitchen as shown is quite large and if 
absolutely separate apartments are de- 
sired, a partition can be built dividing it, 
that each may have half. By this arrange- 
ment each apartment would have a porch, 
living room, dining room, pantry, kitchen, 
three chambers and a bathroom. One 
living room contains a fireplace, book- 
shelves and a nook. There is a plentiful 
supply of closets. Externally the 
home is very attractive. The construc- 
tion is frame, but would appear well if 
cemented over upon expanded metal 
lath. The windows are cut up in diamond 
lights and are for the most part case- 
ment hung. A simple but pleasing dor- 
mer on the roof adds to the available 
space on the second floor. The building 
is 52 ft. long and 42 ft. 6 in. wide. The 
first story is 9 ft. 4 in., the second from 5 
ft. 6 in. to 8 ft. 3 in. high. The owner 
claims to have built it, using birch finish 
and floors, for $4,480, without heat. 
Design "B 138" 

This interesting little cottage has a 
very home-like air with its extensive 
porch and low, sweeping roof. There is 
a full basement of quarried stone, the ex- 
posed portions above ground being of 
ashlar. The first story is built of white 
pressed brick. The first floor contains a 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



277 



Cottage Dealgma for the Home-Bnilder Continued 



living room with a pretty inglenook 
about the fireplace, a dining room with 
china closet, pantry with refrigerator, 
cupboards, etc., and a well appointed 
kitchen with its own screened porch. 
There are two first floor bedrooms and a 
bathroom all upon a private hall. 

The second floor contains three rather 
large bedrooms with extra large closets 
and a sewing room. There is a balcony 
for each of the front and side rooms. The 
interior woodwork is of birch in a dark 
stain. The floors are of hard pine. The 
plastered walls are tinted and the fire- 
place is in grey brick. 

The house is 44 feet 6 inches by 34 
feet, it is heated by a furnace and the 
basement contains laundry, cellar and 
store-room in addition to the furnace 
room with outside cellar entrance. The 
architect states that the complete cost 
was $4,500. 

Design "B 139" 

A very generously proportioned bunga- 
low with accommodations for two cham- 
bers on the second floor if desired. This 
bungalow is built on the style of the Cali- 
fornia homes and has a very large porch 
10 ft. wide across a portion of the front 
and around on one side. Five rooms and 
a bath are secured on the ground floor. 
These rooms, as will be noted by the floor 
plan below, are of very good size, particu- 
larlv the living room and front chamber. 
A slight change is made in the house 
built, as shown by accompanying photo- 
graph, from the plan. This change oc- 
curs on one side where the wall is per- 
fectly straight and the side entrance has 
been omitted. 

Good generous grounds are required 
for the building of. such a home as the 
house measures, including the porch, 47 
ft. wide. The ceiling height is 10 ft. It 
is intended to have a basement under 
only a portion of the house, as it is de- 
signed more for summer use than for cold 
climates. With the use of soft wood fin- 
ish throughout, yellow pine flooring, the 
estimated cost is $2,590. 

Design "B 140" 

In the revival of the "Old Time Col- 
onial" we find much in its quaint beauty 
to admire. The severe plainness is re- 
lieved by the refinement of detail and 
there is much in the early Colonial work 



that is instructive and helpful to us in 
planning our modern homes. In those 
days simplicity and economy were more 
a necessity than at the present time, thus 
the regular rectangular outline of the 
house was seldom deviated from. The 
central hall, with the double parlors on 
one side, the dining room and kitchen on 
the opposite side constituted the plan of 
such a house. 

In our illustration we have attempted 
to give a fair sample of this early Colon- 
ial work, with some modifications of the 
interior arrangement. The recessed en- 
trance with its elliptic arched porch, its 
central door way with side lights and 
old fashioned knocker, from the central 
feature of the front facade which is 34 
feet, the depth of the house being 26 feet 
standing with the broad side of the roof 
to the front and the wide central chim- 
ney at each end and finished in brick or 
cement on the outside of the house. The 
exterior is shingled with the long shaved 
shingles and the windows symmetrical in 
form enclosed with solid shutters as of 
old. At the left of the central hall is a 
large living room with open fireplace and 
a den or library at the rear, separated by 
columned arch. On the right is the din- 
ing room provided with a fireplace and a 
recessed sideboard, and opens through 
the pantry to the rear, connecting with 
the kitchen and the rear hallway. 

On the second floor are three good 
chambers and a central dressing room, 
ample clothes closets and a large bath- 
room. The rear stairs are continued to 
the attic which space may be used for 
storage purposes. The estimated cost of 
this house including heating and plumb- 
ing is $4,500. 

Suggestions for painting are as fol- 
lows : the shingles on the side to be 
stained a light brown, the roof a dark 
Sienna brown, all trimmings, casings, 
cornices, porch, etc., to be painted a light 
cream color. The interior woodwork to 
be finished in white and cream enamel 
paint and the floors throughout to be of 
hardwood stained to suit the taste. 

Design "B 141" 

This is a spacious house of brick con- 
struction, suitable for a suburban home, 
where large lots are available to afford a 
proper setting. The design is in a style 



278 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Courtesy of Universal Portland Cement Co. 



William D. Mann. Designer 



A Simple Country House of Cement 



DESIGN "B131" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



279 




Cottage r>enlKn for the Home-Builder Continued 



calculated to emphasize constructive 
methods peculiar to the material em- 
ployed, showing a variety of different 
"bonds" in a logical and pleasing man- 
ner. The treatment is scholarly and vig- 
orous, producing an ideal home. The 
entrance porch is not the porch proper, 
being intended as a shelter before the en- 
trance rather than a place for the family 
to assemble. Such a porch is arranged 
facing the formal garden and where priv- 
acy is afforded. From the vestibule one 
may pass directly into the living room 
with its beamed ceiling and large fire- 
place or to the reception room with its 
more formal decorations. The stairway 
leads up from the living room and the 
dining room is adjacent, separated by slid- 
ing doors. From the dining room, with 
its sideboard and fireplace one may pass 
to a porch or to the kitchen by way of a 
large pantry. There is a servants' porch, 
basement and back stair and a kitchen 
closet. 

On the second floor are four chambers 
each with its clothes closet and a bath- 
room. Opening from the rear stair is 
also a servants' room with a private bath- 
room. The attic is spacious and might 
be divided into rooms. 



The basement is provided with laun-, 
dry, drying rooms, storage space, vege- 
table cellar, etc., and a hot water plant. 

The principal first story rooms are fin- 
ished in hardwoods with hardwood 
floors. On the second floor the finish is 
white enamel except the hall, the wood- 
work of which is continued from the floor 
below. The house is 28 feet by 60 feet 
and is estimated to cost from $10,000 to 
$12,000, according to finish and appoint- 
ments. 

Design "B 142" 

A spacious roomy house providing a 
very pleasant interior arrangement and 
a neat exterior, the porch treatment and 
dormers on front of house breaking the 
plainness and giving individuality to the 
design. 

The main rooms of the first floor are 
finished in oak or birch and hardwood 
floors throughout the entire first and sec- 
ond stories. Painted woodwork in rear 
of first story and entire second story. 
Basement under entire house, with hot 
water heater and laundry. Two rooms 
finished off in attic. 

Cost, $5,740. Width, 40 ft. ; depth, 38 
ft.; height of basement, 7 ft. 6 in.; first 
story, 10. ft. 5 in. ; second story, 9 ft. 3 in. 



280 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




H. Edward Walker, Formerly Associated 



FREMONT D. ORFF, Architect 



A Square Cement House with White Trim 



DESIGN "B 132 " 





FK-F 




1 1'. Ill 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



281 




CECIL BA YLESS CHAPMAN, Architect 



A Half -Timber Design in English Style 



DESIGN "B 133" 



FT-fiTo L1.*._ L __ L -J L-t.LLL 






f I IU 3 T | |T i 

f L O O H. J 
PLAN 



282 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




HORACE BAR.\ARD, Owner and Designer 



A Cement House of Mission Style 



DESIGN "B 134" 





KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



283 




; KKITH CO., Architects 



A Gambrel Roofed Cottage 



DESIGN "B 135" 





284 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




DOWNS & EADS, Architects 



A Picturesque Cement Cottage 



DESIGN "B 136" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



285 




From "Duplex Houses and Flats." 



An Artistic Duplex Cottage Design 

Suggesting the Private Residence 



DESIGN "B 137" 




286 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




ARTHUR E. SAUNDERS. Architect 



A Picturesque Brick Cottage 



DESIGN "B 138 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



287 









Journal of Modern Construction Series 






- 



A Pleasing Bungalow Type 



DESIGN "B 139" 




288 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




CHAS. S. SEDGWICK, Architect 



The Old Time Colonial 

DESIGN "B 140" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



289 




A SUBURBAN HOME 



DESIGN "B 141 



290 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE KEITH CO., Architects 



A Design of Good Proportions 



DESIGN "B 142" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



291 



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292 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Conducted by Eleanor Allison Cummins, Decorator Brooklyn, N. Y. 



O 



Toning Up. 

HERE is a room which the writ- 
er sees several times a week, an 
exceedingly refined room, with 
many beautiful things in it, with 
a hardwood floor and a number of good 
Oriental rugs. The furniture is old ma- 
hogany, some of it heirlooms, the pic- 
tures are unexceptionable, the walls a 
light terra cotta, very pleasing in the 
northern exposure of this particular 
room. The upholstery is in canvas, of 
a lighter shade of terra cotta, the window 
curtains cream colored with figures of 
dull red and golden brown. Portieres at 
two large doors are of a petit point tap- 
estry with a Renaissance design in dark 
blue, olive and light red. It sounds well 
and yet the room is absolutely uninter- 
esting. What is the matter? Just the 
absence of any positive color. The only 
definite color anywhere is in the por- 
tieres, and there so blended that the re- 
sult is a neutral tint. Nothing in the 
room catches the eye, and this special 
room is typical of ah endless number of 
others. 

The Abuse of Neutral Tints. 

People are horribly afraid of strong 
color. They think that a negative scheme 
of color must be pleasing because it is 
not vulgar. So we have an epidemic of 
golden browns and faded terra cottas 
and tan colors, to say nothing of occa- 
sional excursions into gray and sage 
green. William Morris used to beg his 
pupils in decorative art to note the 
strong, pure colors of nature, and to 
refrain from mud, as he designated most 
of the neutral tints in vogue. Neutral 
tints have their function, invaluable as 
backgrounds, as a foil to positive color, 
but only as such. And, even for that 
purpose, they have their limitations, and 



are more or less of a concession to a de- 
fective color sense. Which is more ef- 
fective, the contrast of a positive and a 
neutral tint, or the harmony of a gamut 
of shades of a positive color? Undoubt- 
edly, the harmony, but it needs an ar- 
tist to achieve it, and most of us are not 
artists. 

Mistakes. 

Let us consider for a minute the mis- 
takes in this neutral tinted room of which 
I have spoken. In the first place the 
rugs have very little character. Their 
patterns are small, and their general tone 
too low for them to look well on a golden 
oak floor. Either they should have been 
in stronger tones, or the floor should 
have been darker, preferably the latter 
alternative, as they harmonize admirably 
with the walls and the furnishings. 

Another mistake was in the upholster- 
ing of the furniture. The terra cotta 
canvas is out of keeping with handsome 
mahogany furniture, despite the fact that 
it was by no means cheap. It has no 
texture and looks very little better than 
a cotton material. Better have used the 
tapestry of the portieres for coverings, 
and something else for hangings. Then 
the different tones of the tapestry, the 
soft olives, dull red and low toned blue 
could have been repeated in silk pillow 
covers, bits of embroidery, book bindings 
and bric-a-brac. As it is now, colored 
objects in the room are absolutely unre- 
lated to anything around them, mere 
casual sploshes. 

For the tapestry hangings others of 
dark terra cotta velour might have been 
substituted, with good effect. The win- 
dow curtains are well enough. The only 
criticism to be made upon them is that 
they shut out a good deal of light from 
a room, dark at the best. The thin- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



293 



Kraft Ko~n.a 

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OHIYIUDL L-HDUI. IIIU, BOSTON, MASS. 

Agents at all Central Points 



George Nichols, Architect 
New York 




294 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



nest of net would be more utilitarian and 
quite as pleasing. 

Of the pictures in the room, only two 
or three water colors are in the right en- 
vironment, and those have not light 
enough to bring out their best points. 
The others, etchings and prints of much 
detail, do not have enough light. Some 
of them have wide white mats which 
contrast too strongly with the walls. 
Brown toned photographs in dark wood- 
en frames would be more effective, pic- 
tures whose beauty is of mass rather 
than line. The same criticism may be 
made upon the bric-a-brac, which is too 
dainty for a room of so dark a color 
scheme. Bronze, plaster casts, green or 
brown pottery would tell far better than 
cloisonne enamel ivory carvings, or Sat- 
suma, the present ornamentation. 

Are these strictures rather drastic? 
Possibly. Still, without shaking the com- 
placency of many possessors of uninter- 
esting rooms, they may point the way 
to reformation to someone who is not 
complacent, only a bit bewildered. 

. Equipment of the Guest Chamber. 

Always supposing the institution to be a 
possible one, as it seldom is in city 
nouses, the guest chamber has this ad- 
vantage : You do not have to live in it 
all the time and it is a good place in 
which to trv experiments. For instance, 
if I were inspired to experiment with 
lavender, confessedly the most difficult 
color to use successfully, I would make 
my first attempt in the spare bedroom. 

Again, the spare room has so little 
hard usage that it is quite possible to in- 
dulge in daintinesses out of the question 
in a room slept in all the time. 

But the esthetic aspect of the room 
should be subordinate to its comfort. 
This would seem to be a truism, but 
haven't we all had some unpleasant ex- 
periences in the way of guest chambers? 
An illuminated invitation to "sleep sweet 
within this quiet room" does not com- 
pensate for the fact that we have spent 
a great deal of waking time in its 
bounds in taking thought for the numer- 
ous articles more frail than beautiful 
which ornament it. So many people de- 
posit all the fancy work given them in 
the guest chamber. A reading lamp, a 
stickable pin cushion and a full ink bot- 



tle are conspicuously absent. Not so the 
hat pin holders and the sachets and the 
blocks of rusty pins and the work basket 
with No. 30 cotton and shoe buttons. 

Most people make a mistake in putting 
their handsomest furniture into the spare 
bedroom. A comfortable bed, a good 
light, reasonable conveniences for dress- 
ing and bathing, these are the things he 
needs, who is here today and gone to- 
morrow. Put the extra money you have 
to spend into a screen, a couch of some 
sort and a really easy chair. Have a 
reading lamp and keep it filled, and 
trimmed, and a desk or writing table 
with clean pens and a full ink bottle. 

The best couch for a bed room is a 
divan with wire mattress, and a cretonne 
cover and pillows. It can be used at need 
for a child's bed. Better still is a box 
couch with a detachable mattress, the 
whole covered with cretonne. A screen 
should be of sufficient height and breadth 
to shut off the corner where the washing 
arrangements are complete. A carpenter 
will make it for you reasonably enough, 
and you can cover it with cretonne at 
slight expense. 

Get one of the cheap Morris chairs, 
or pick one up second hand. Remove all 
the varnish, with one of the preparations 
sold for the purpose, give it two coats of 
white paint, and two thin ones of enamel. 
Make cretonne slip covers for the cush- 
ions and you will have a very personable 
chair, not exactly like your neighbor's. 

If you are moved to have a draped 
toilet table of the same cretonne, have 
a piece of glass (it need not be French 
plate) fitted to its top, laid over the cre- 
tonne and fastened down through holes 
drilled in its corners. It is decidedly 
smart and saves a lot of washing. You 
should also have a special chair. Any 
sort ^of a straight legged chair will do, 
provided its back is the same width at 
top and bottom. Enamel it white and 
cut off the back so it is only about a foot 
high, or even less. Upholster the seat 
and fit a sort of cap, five inches deep, 
finished at the bottom with a narrow cot- 
ton gimp or fringe, to the sawed off top. 
In fitting out the toilet table, do not for- 
get to add candle sticks, with colored 
candles, pale pink or green to harmonize 
with the cretonne. You can get glass 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



295 



Save 60^ 



OF YOUR 




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By Using An 

Aldine Fireplace 

And Get Four Times as Much Heat 
as You Can Get from Any Other Grate. 

The Aldine saves the expense of your 
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Fifty thousand Aldines are now doing this 
in two thousand towns in this country and Can- 
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own town where you 
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Aldine No. 3 Write US now for Aldine No. 4 

Aldine Blue Book telling a plain, clear story which proves the above facts. 

RATHBONE FIREPLACE MFG. CO. 

5616 Clyde Park Ave. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF FIREPLACES AND TRIMMINGS 



296 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



candlesticks very cheaply and they are 
quite good enough, especially if you add 
pretty shades. A little enterprise will 
disinter from some second hand store a 
mirror whose frame can be covered with 
a puff of cretonne, with good results. 

A painted floor, its cracks carefully 
filled, Crex or rag rugs, a pair of single 
beds with cretonne spreads, the divan, 
the dressing table, the Morris chair and 
the screen, two or three good pictures, 
clean linen and plenty of towels, and your 
guest chamber is good enough for any- 
one, even if your cretonne has not cost 
more than a shilling a yard, and your 
curtains are nothing but cheesecloth. 
Some Points on the Piano. 

The upright piano is less of a white 
elephant than the old-fashioned square 
one, but it is very seldom a pleasing part 
of the furnishings. The temptation is 
always to have it stand straight along 
one wall, generally in the longest space, 
and on a line with the fireplace, and in a 
long and narrow parlor it is sure to em- 
phasize the defective proportions of the 
room. 

The best position for an upright piano, 
the cottage piano of English novels, is 
across a corner, with its back to the 
room. Then the player is completely 



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screened from her audience, an advan- 
tage to a nervous person, and one of the 
corners of the room is effectivelv dis- 
posed of. Moreover, the back of the 
piano can be used as a background for 
something. Of course this arrangement 
involves a covering for the back, more or 
less elaborate. For the average room, a 
curtain, shirred on a brass rod, of some 
thin silk is as satisfactory as anything. 
Or the back may be concealed by a high 
four-fold screen. 

The back of the piano may serve as a 
background for a group of some sort, a 
small table of bric-a-brac or books, a 
bench heaped with gay cushions, or a 
large plant, on a pedestal. It is a capital 
place to hang a collection of miniatures, 
or small pictures, or medallions. 

So placed, the piano is a distinct addi- 
tion to the general effect of the room in 
which it stands. Whether that room 
should be the drawing room depends 
upon the habits of the family. In most 
houses it would be a distinct gain if the 
piano could be banished to an upstairs 
sitting room, but that is too much to 
hope for and it will probably continue to 
occupy its place as a parlor ornament. 

So few people understand the care of 
a musical instrument that one caution is 
always in order. Do not set the piano 
against the chimney of the adjoining 
house, or where it will be exposed to 
dampness and draughts from an open 
window. The mechanism is as sensitive 
as if it were human, more so in fact, 
for human beings become acclimated, 
pianos never. 

The Rage for Moire Effects. 

The popularity of moire fabrics for 
clothes has extended to decoration, and 
textiles and wall papers alike are watered 
elaborately. These watered papers have 
much to recommend them, as most self- 
colored papers have, and the various tints 
are very beautiful, but they are quite out 
of place in the average room. One must 
have exceedingly handsome furniture 
and pictures in order to live up to a 
moire wall. If you are going to spend 
so much money, far better lay it out in 
covering your walls with Japanese grass 
cloth, not all of whose colors fade, and 
which is a permanent joy to the artistic 
soul. 






KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



297 



THE ART, SCIENCE AND SENTIMENT 

OF HOME- 
BU I LDING 




(New Enlarged Third Edition) 



An Appreciation 

"About the only thing wrong with this book 
is its title. It should have been named "The 
Practical Side of Homebuilding." because the e 
is nothing more practical "han making the home 
Hiiistic, tluin building it on scientific lines, to in- 
sure sanitary conditions and warmth, or than 
making it to suit the sentimental desire fora home 
i. i keeping with one's taste and station. However, 
practicality, although omitted from the title, is not 
omitted from the book. The author aims to give 
the intending homebuilder practical advice on 
such subjects as buying the lot, letting the con- 
tract, choosing materials, etc. Problems about 
frontdoors, windows, stairways, fireplaces, porch- 
es, exteriors, finishings, etc., are taken up in de- 
tail and treated with sound common sense. Near- 
ly all questions tha' can b- anticipated are answer- 
ed, and the book should prove a great help for 
those who are planning homes. ' ' -Duluth Herold, 




A Complete Authority for the Man 
Who is Going to Build a Home 

Containing 30 chapters and over 300 illustrations 
of designs, plans, interior views and drawings 
illustrating the interior and exterior planning of 
all kinds of homes. It includes the planning of large 
and small, city and suburban homes, bungalows and 
duplex housej. Sanitary homebuilding, the choosing 
of proper materials and the cheapest way to build a 
home right are all described in detail. Read the 
editorial comments to the right and left of this col- 
umn. These are but a small part of the voluntary 
praises of this book by the press throughout the 
country. The book has truthf jlly been called "The 
Book of a Thousand Facts on Homebuilding." 

Printed on heavy enameled paper, seven inches 
bv eleven inches in size, with tue cover stamped in 
gold. Index sent upon request. 

Price Postpaid, $1.00 

A monthly supplement, "Practical Homebuilding," 
sent gratis lur one year following sale of book. 

Arthur C. Clausen, 

Architect, 

405-7-9 Lumber Exchange, 
MINNEAPOLIS, - MINN. 




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R 



298 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of 
Keith's Magazine. Inquiries pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the 
attention of an expert in that line. 

Letters Intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing De- 
partment, and be accompanied by a diagram of floor plan. 

Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general Interest 
will be published in these columns. 



J. T. I enclose floor plans and eleva- 
tion of house I am building. Please ad- 
vise me as to color scheme. Expect to 
finish with birch and stain desired color. 
Would you advise using rug in dining 
room ? What is best way to finish kitch- 
en, paint or varnish? Furniture will be 
all new. Would mahogany be good color 
for den? What we want is a good mod- 
erate priced finish. What size should 
rugs be? 

The plan speaks for itself, so just tell 
us what would be the modern way of fin- 
ishing and furnishing it. 

J. T. Ans. The living room and hall 
being thrown together by so wide an 
opening, should receive the same finish. 
The birch with mahogany stain would 
look handsome here, provided the stain 
is dark and not too red. Ash, oak or fir 
would be more appropriate for the den, 
and for the dining room, either could be 
used. If you like mahogany dining room 
furniture, then finish the room in birch 
stained mahogany. As this is an east 
facing, the room would be very pretty 
with a chair rail Z l / 2 feet from the floor, 
the lengthwise panel thus formed filled 
with leaf green grass cloth, burlaps or 
paper; the plate rail lined up with the 
tops of the openings and the space be- 
tween filled with a brilliant chintz paper, 
birds of paradise, blossoms and green 
leaves on a cream ground, with cream 
ceiling. 

The living room and hall walls in soft 
grey tones; the den done with an ef- 
fective but inexpensive paper in browns 
and reds. Yes, a rug gives a finish to 
the dining room and the noise of chairs 
on the bare floor is unpleasant. Kitchen 
woodwork is easy to take care of if mere- 
ly shellacked and varnished. 

W. E. J. I am planning to build a 
cottage of 7 rooms. First floor has hall 



with stairway, living room, 28x15, dining 
room, kitchen and bedrooms, with three 
bedrooms and bath in attic. Expect to 
use concrete blocks or stone veneer for 
outside walls. Stuccoed cables. I would 
be glad to have your suggestion as to 
color of stained roof or would you prefer 
slate. Also kind of material for inside 
finish and color of same, whether stained 
or natural color. Please state color of 
paper for walls and ceilings. Also de- 
sign of rugs, floral or oriental. Location 
of building site is suburban with east 
front and ground slopes each way from 
building site. Would you advise the kind 
of material I have in mind to use for out- 
side walls? 

W. E. J. Ans. The dimensions of the 
rooms you contemplate means a cottage 
of considerable size. Concrete blocks are 
now made much superior to the first ef- 
forts in that line, and you could use them 
either in part or as a whole for outside 
walls with good effect. If the house is to 
be cottage style, the blocks could be used 
for the first story with plaster in the 
gables as you suggest. The plaster best 
be the grey color of the blocks. A red 
roof would then be oleasing, either of 
shingles stained or tile in Spanish red. 
The outside trim could be a dark olive 
green, with white window sash. 

In regard to your interior, it is diffi- 
cult to advise, knowing nothing of your 
preferences or the degree of cost you con- 
template, whether hard or soft wood. For 
an inexpensive cottage, very nice effects 
can be had in soft wood either stained or 
painted. 

As to rugs, orientals are always the 
best if one can afford them ; thev are es- 
pecially desirable in the hall and living 
room. Floral designs are only admissible 
for chambers, and should be very spar- 
ingly used even there, only as borders 
with plain centers. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



299 



ome 



your 




Heari 



/our 
ome 



'"TpHE interior wood finishing of your home is the 
* last touch of refinement or abuse. Nothing so 

beautifies a home as properly finished woodwork whether it be of ordinary 
pine, finest oak or costly mahogany. 

On the other hand, nothing so mars a home as improperly finished wood- 
work. But it is easy to have beautiful woodwork. Simply insist on the use of 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes develop the natural beauty of the wood 
and never cloud or obscure it. They emphasize Nature's artistic markings 
of the grain and never raise it. 

And Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes give a smooth elastic finish 
that will stand the test of time and changes in temperature, without 
signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

Write for "Modern Wood Finishing'' 
Our corps of experts have prepared an excellent book on 
Wood Finishing. Every home builder should have it. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with 
plates of finished wood in natural colors. 

Simply tear out this ad. and write 
your name and address on the border 
and we will send you 
this book. 



TkBwDGEPORT GDD FINISHING @ 

y&2?Z NEW MILFORD, CONN. **!&$$* 



300 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to Questions Continued 

F. E. J. I herewith enclose part of the 
first floor plan of a home we are building. 
Would like suggestions on interior wood- 
work finishing. 

By glancing at sketch you will notice 
the reception room and parlor face the 
north. The stairway is in the reception 
room, the large opening between this 
room and parlor finished with arch grille. 
My parlor furniture is ma'hogany. Should 
these two rooms be finished alike and 
what are your suggestions for the finish 
of both rooms? 

There is a large opening between the 
parlor and sitting room. I wish to fur- 
nish the sitting room with mission fur- 
niture. How should the wood-work be 
finished? There is to be a large opening 
with columns between the sitting room 
on the west. I wish to furnish it in 
golden oak. Would you finish these two 
rooms alike or if not how should the 
columns be finished? 

F. E. J. Ans. The woodwork of hall 
and parlor better be the same, though it 
is not absolutely essential. The hall 
could have a fumed oak finish if oak fur- 
niture is preferred there, but in that case 
the opening into parlor should not be so 
wide and the grille should be dispensed 
with, while portieres would be a neces- 
sity. If mahogany furniture is used in 
parlor, the woodwork must be either ma- 
hogany stained or white, preferably the 
former with your arrangement of rooms. 
I should advise a birch finish stained dark 
mahogany for hall and parlor with fumed 
brown in living and dining rooms. I 
should transfer the columned opening to 
the hall and use sliding doors between 
living and dining room. It is a great 
mistake not to be able to close off the 
dining room. If preferred, you could 
have glass doors between. Two wide 
openings are quite sufficient and you will 
regret it if you have no means of closing 
off one room. It is also strongly advised 
to omit the grilles which are no longer 
used in up to date houses. 



Make Windows Shine 
a one-half pint bottle put 



Into a one-half pint bottle put two 
tablespoons of whiting and fill the bottle 
with ammonia; shake well. Take a soft 
cloth and rub on windows; let stand five 
minutes, then polish with a flannel cloth 
and the windows will shine. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



301 



MAILED 
FREE 

Book 107 IN 
56 pages of 

DOORS, 
WINDOWS, 
STAIRWORK, 
ETC. 

EVERYONE 
INTERESTED 
IN BUILDING 
SHOULD 
HAVE IT 

WRITE TO-DAY 

We Sell to Dealers 
Only 




Richfield Springs, Glazed Bevel Plate 



Building Construction 

The following is a list of Particular Sub- 
jects treated in former numbers of the 
Journal of Modern Construction. 

ALL FULLY ILLUSTRATED. 



SUBJECTS Monti) Published 

Interior Details of Sideboards, etc. - Sept. 1907 
Dormer Designs and Details ... Sept. 1907 

Seven Garages with Material Required Oct. 1907 

Concrete, Its uses and Abuses - - - Oct. 1907 

Homes of Concrete ------- Nov. 1907 

Modern Illumination ------ Nov. 1907 

Strength of Foundations - ... Nov. 1807 

About Tile Floors ------- Dec. 1907 

Oriel Windows -------- Dec. 1907 

High Art on Concrete Stone - - - Dec. 1907 

Plaster on Cement Block Veneer - - Dec. 1987 

Modern Ideas of Design ----- Jan. 1908 

Article on Porches ------- Feb. 1908 

Article on Elactric Lighting - - - Mar. 1908 

Built-in Sideboards ...... Mar. 1908 

Moderate Priced Fire-Proof Houses - April 1908 

Problems in Concrete (Continued) - Mar. 1909 

Plaster Casts in Interior Decoration - Mar. 1909 
An Economical and Picturesque 

Concrete House ------ May 1909 

Problems in Concrete (Continued) - May 1909 

Problems in Concrete (Continued) - June 1909 

Uncommon Uses of Cement - - - July 1909 

Problems in Concrete (Continued) - July 1909 



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ANY 3 NUMBERS and KEITH'S 6 MONTHS $1.00. 



N. L. KEITH, 525 Lumber Ex. 
MINNEAPOLIS. 




New Roofing Discovery 

Works Wonders in Beautifying Home! 

For Simplest and Grandest Homes 

Charming Moorish beauty and dignity of appear- 
ance of Metal Spanish Tile gives an air of distinction 
to the home graced by this wonderful new and 
practically indestructible roofing. 

It has taken home builders of America by storm, 
for it is the modernization of the wonderfully beauti- 
ful roofs of historic Spanish edifices. 

The art of making this roofing, left behind by 
fleeing Moors driven out of Spain centuries ago, 
until 1910 could not be made practical for the mod- 
ern home, despite its alluring beauties. 

After years of experiment, we have hit the solu- 
tion. That is why today we are able to offer Amer- 
ican homes the amazing attractiveness of 

Metal Spanish Tile Roofing 

Its scores of vital, practical advantages cost no 
more than common roofing, yet mean tremendous 
economy it needs no repairs and outlasts several 
ordinary roofs because of its practically indestruct- 
ible metal construction. 

It is absolutely wind, weather, storm, fire and 
lightning proof. 

E^sy to apply. No soldering, no special tools 
any ordinary mechanio can apply it. 

Interlocking system by which tiles dovetail into 
each other makes the roof absolutely water tight 
and provides for ex pansion and contraction perfect- 
ly summer and winter. 

It is guaranteed non-breakable. 

Homebuilders simply send us today the dimen- 
sions of your building and we will tell you by return 
mail exact cost of all material. 

Our new 1910 book on beautifying the modsrn 
American home by use of Metal Spanish Tile is 
yours for the asking. A postal will bring it. Address 

The Edwards Manufacturing Co. 

The Largest Makers of Steel Roofing 
and Metal Shingles in the World 



520-540 Culvert St. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



02 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




HOUSEHOI/D ECONOMICS fp 




A Neglected Department. 

O part of the household activ- 
ity, duty or pleasure, but has its 
relation to the economic ques- 
tion. But some of these parts 
seem to have, at first blush, a more def- 
inite relation than others. For that rea- 
son, we seldom think of the charities of 
the household in any systematic way. 
With some of us it is a matter of giving, 
in one way or another, as much as we 
can spare, with others the matter re- 
solves itself into the question, "How lit- 
tle can I decently give?" 

Everyone will admit the claims of the 
unfortunate upon those better placed. 
But very few people admit those claims 
in such a way as to reduce their char- 
ities to a system, or to consider the best 
way of administering relief, so as to 
avoid pauperizing the recipient. Organ- 
ized charity has made great strides in 
the last twenty years, but a large part 
of the prosperous still consider it a 
heartless machine. It has, like all other 
good things, its defects, and these very 
much on the surface, but it does efficient- 
ly what is the essence of the best sort of 
charity. It makes connections, exactly 
the thing which the poor cannot do for 
themselves. Somewhere there is just the 
sort of help adapted to every individual 
case of need. Organized charity, sooner 
or later, brings the need and its satisfac- 
tion in touch with each other. 

Why not hand over all our charities 
to the organized charities, putting up a 
sign on the side door, "Applicants for aid 
are referred to the Charity Organization 
Society," giving number and street. It 
is an excellent way for the sort of per- 
son to whom our Elizabethan forefath- 



ers referred as "A valiant beggar." Us- 
ually his valor carries him neither there 
nor back to us. But charity of that sort, 
even if backed up by a heavy subscrip- 
tion seems deficient in the finer elements 
of virtue. It is like a rose without per- 
fume, decorative rather than attractive. 
It lacks the personal touch which blesses 
giver and recipient alike. 

But it is just the personal element 
which leads so many kindly people astray, 
tempting them to the sort of charity 
which hurts rather than helps. You see 
Mary Maloney, poorly clad, evidently 
wretched, and the kindly impulse to re- 
lieve her immediate needs betrays you 
into giving her money which too often 
goes into the liquor saloon or is spent in 
absolutely foolish ways. And with every 
visit to your kitchen, with every dole of 
assistance Mary Maloney becomes less 
inclined to earn an honest living for her- 
self and her family. Nor is there any 
evidence that the condition of the family 
is at all improved by your beneficence. 
The Maloney family approximates more 
and more to a sieve through which your 
goods and money, often representing sac- 
rifices on your part, fall to unknown 
depths. 

Sanctified Common Sense. 

Part of the trouble with charity as or- 
dinarily administered by individuals is 
that they think of it in an abstract fash- 
ion, rather than as business which must 
be learned. No sensible woman would 
treat a flower garden as she treats the 
Maloneys. She would study conditions 
and adapt means to ends. She would 
realize that some plants need stimulation, 
others must be kept back. She would 
see that each plant had just the right al- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



303 




LIQUID GRANITE 

and the Home Beautiful 

Varnish occupies a conspicuous place in the making of modern 
homes, and Liquid Granite is the most desirable, durable and satis- 
factory varnish yet produced for Floor Finishing 
and all other domestic purposes. ^ ^ It is invaluable 
\'m restoring Oilcloth and Linoleum. & <& It is easy 
i'to apply and difficult to deface. J* & Put up in 
.cans of convenient size from ^ pint to 5 gallons. 

Send for samples of Finished Woods and in- 
formation on Wood Finishing and Home 
Varnishing, Free on request. 




New York 
Boston 
Philadelphia 
Baltimore 



DEALERS EVERYWHERE 

BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

Varnish Manufacturers 

Department Z, DETROIT 

Canadian Office and Factory : Walkerville, Ont 



Chicago 
Cincinnati 
St. Louis 
San Francisco 



304 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Household Economics Continued 



lowance of water and sunshine, and she 

would not flood her beds because she had 

a plenty of water and liked to be liberal. 

Beginning with the Breadwinner. 

In all this, I am thinking of each house- 
hold of well-to-do people as having rela- 
tions with at least one poor family, of the 
sort, which more or less regularly, needs 
help of some sort. If every prosperous 
family in the community would assume 
this responsibility, the problem of the 
poor would be largely solved. Incident- 
ally their relation helps to solve some of 
the problems of the prosperous family, as 
well. 

Given the assumption of this relation 
to one poor family, the probabilities are 
that there is a man at the head of it, and 
that its misfortunes are more or less due 
to his misconduct or mismanagement. It 
is just at this point that many of us fail 
in helping the poor efficiently. We re- 
strict ourselves to dealings with the wom- 
en and children of the family, knowing, 
and known to, the man only at second 
hand. There we make a mistake for, in 
most cases, we might have far more in- 
fluence over him than we generally ac- 
quire over his wife. A man of the poorer 
classes is far more likely than a woman 
to meet advances exactly as they are 
meant. Tact and sincere friendliness will 
often accomplish wonders with him. Un- 
less he is hopelessly demoralized, the first 




IXL ROCK 
MAPLE AND 
BIRCH 
FLOORING 




Selected Red Birch 
Bird's-eye Maple and 
Cherry Flooring 



One important feature 
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Our method of air-seasoning 
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Wisconsin Land & Lumber Co, 

HERMANSVILLE, MICHIGAN 



help to the unfortunate family, after its 
crying needs of food and shelter have 
been satisfied, should be directed toward 
him. Decent clothing, warm underwear, 
substantial shoes will raise his self re- 
spect and increase his chances of getting 
employment, if idle, or of retaining it 
under difficult conditions. 

Intelligent help for the poor involves 
another ability, that of seeing things out 
of their eyes. We are too apt to feel 
sympathy with them for ills which do not 
appear to them as such. We lament over 
their lack of the refinements of life, for- 
getting that they have not been trained 
to appreciate them. We pity them for 
being obliged to eat coarse food, for their 
lack of privacy and of sanitary arrange- 
ments which seem to us indispensable. 
The surest proof that we are wrong in 
this is the course of domestic servants, 
who have been used to all these things, 
yet, marrying comfortably, deliberately 
elect the lower standard. 

Poverty is a hard thing, but we have 
made it infinitely worse if, by our insist- 
ence on the adoption of our own stand- 
ard we have added to its sting the subtle 
poison of discontent. 
Taking Advantage of Lowered Prices. 
The hand to mouth system of purchas- 
ing has its merits, especially where serv- 
ants are concerned, and we know it is the 
underlying principle of French house- 
keeping, the most economical in the 
world, but it has its limitations. It is 
well to make exceptions in favor of pur- 
chasing in quantities at times of special 
cheapness. 

In the spring eggs are always cheap. 
Now is the time to make and pack away 
in a tin box, with plentiful wrappings of 
waxed paper a big loaf of pound cake and 
another of lady cake, perhaps also a loaf 
of fruit cake, ready for summer emergen- 
cies. A two quart jar of mayonnaise 
dressing will keep for weeks in a dark 
corner of the refrigerator, indefinitely, if 
it is put up in small bottles and sealed. 
Another advantageous purchase in 
early spring is that of oranges for marma- 
lade. It is an easily made sweet and the 
home made article costs less than half 
the price of the imported. Small econo- 
mies like these involve little trouble but 
make themselves pleasantly perceptible 
in the course of the year. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



305 



Home Refrigeration 

> This book tells how to select the home Refrigerator how to know the poor from the 
good how to keep down ice bills. 1 1 also tells how some Refrigerators harbor germs how 
to keep a Refrigerator sanitary and sweet lots of things you snould know before buying 
ANY Refrigerator. 

It tells all about the "Monroe, "the refrigerator with 
inner walls made in one piece from undreakable SOLID 
PORCELAIN an inch thick and highly glazed, with 
every corner rounded. No cracks or crevices anywhere. 
The "Monroe" is as easy to keep clean as a china bowl. 



GKMonroe" 



Most other refrigerators have cracks and corners which 
cannot be cleaned. Here, particles of food collect and breed 
germs by the million. These germs get into your food and 
make it poison, and the family suffersfrom no traceable cause. 

The "Monroe" can be sterilized and made germlessly 
clean in an instant by simply wiping out with a cloth wrung 
from hot water. It's like ' 'washing dishes, ' ' for the ' 'Monroe" 
is really a thick porcelain dish inside. 




Always sold DIRECT 
and at FACTORY PRICES, 
Cash or Monthly Payments 



NOTE CAREFULLY ^f?^" 1 



Sent Anywhere on Trial 

'here to use until convinced. Xo obligation to keep it 
nless you wi.sh to. The Monroe mut sell itaelf to you on 



The high death rate among children in the summer 
months could be greatly reduced if the Monroe Refrigerator 
was used in every home. 

The "Monroe" is installed in the best flats and apartments, Occupied by 
people who CARE and is found today in a large majority of the VERY 
BEST homes in the United States. The largest and best Hospitals use it 
exclusively. The health of the whole family is safeguarded by the use of a 
Monroe Refrigerator. 

When you have carefully read the book and know all about Home Re- 
frigeration you will know WHY, and will realize how important it ia to 
select carefully. Please write for the book today. 

Monroe Refrigerator Co., Station 6, Cincinnati, Ohio 




DO 
YOU 

WANT 
THE 

BEST? 

Round Hot 
Water Heater. 

._ t Sectional 

IvOVcll St eam and 

* Water Heaters. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Hart & Grouse Co. 

Utica, N. Y. 
80 LAKE ST., CHICAGO 



FINELY PRINTED NEW CUTS 



'M 



1 J"il"l 



t a -Him trz 

' J ! 

. U-* 4 L -U- - 






II you ever 

intend to build, send 

for the above book to-day 

ARTISTIC HOMES 

A 1000-page book of over 1500 plans, hand- 
somely bound, Price $1. 00. Former Price $2. 00. 
Express prepaid for 25c. Purchasers of the $1.00 
new book require no other, as it contains by far the 
largest number of house designs ever published. 

- THE BOOK CONTAINS 
409 one and two-story Cottages of $300 to J1500; 540 Residences 
of 81200 to 51500; 379 Residences of U1500 to S2SOO; 225 Resi- 
dences of 82500 to S9000; 100 California Bungalows. I have de- 
signed churches, schools, libraries, theatres, stores, hotels, banks, 
etc., all over the U. S., and have a special department for the plan- 
ning of residences. Book of 32 Churches. 25c. Bungalow Book. 50c. 

HERBERT C. CHIVERS 

ResideiceDept. 833 CONSTULTINO St. Louis, Mo. 

IARCHITECH 



306 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SOAA e MA MAT THAT CANNA eAT~AN&5OM e WOULD CAT TMAT WANT IT 
BUT W 6 MA MAT AND W CAN CAT 
SA LET TM^LORD B e THANKIT 





TABLE: OMAT 





Fruits and Flowers. 

FTER a good many years of dis- 
use fruit as a table decoration 
has come back. Grapes, white, 
green, purple and pink, are the 
most manageable fruit for the purpose, 
and almost always to be had but apples, 
pears and oranges are not to be despised. 
Fruit and flowers are often combined 
for a centerpiece, and special dishes come 
for the purpose, with receptacles for 
flowers at the edges. These are in Dres- 
den china, with openwork borders. 

Charming color schemes suggest them- 
selves for these combinations. Green and 
purple grapes and violets is one ; another 
is green grapes and daffodils ; still anoth- 
er in bananas, oranges and French mari- 
golds. A flower to be had in early spring 
which is very decorative in conjunction 
with fruit is the acacia. 

Chinese Lilies. 

If one's china is green, or white and 
gold, there is no prettier centerpiece for 
ordinary occasions than a green bowl of 
Chinese lilies. That is to say if one is 
successful in getting them to bloom. Some- 
times the florist will part with a clump of 
blossoming lilies for a small consideration. 
They are equally pretty in a blue bowl. 

Simple Linens for the Bare Table. 

Using a polished table for luncheon is 
such a pretty fashion that it should not 
be rendered troublesome by insisting up- 
on too many doyleys. It is very nice in- 
deed to have a doyley for each place, with 



a matching centre piece, but it is not ab- 
solutely necessary. There are several 
other ways of doing. One is to have a 
set of three pieces, carving cloth, centre 
piece and tray cloth, which need not be 
embroidered, but should match. Heavy 
linen with an edge of lace is admirable 
for these, or they may be of damask, hem- 
stitched, the end pieces oblong, the cen- 
tre square. A touch of individuality is 
given by the initials of the mistress of 
the house, either in white, or in the color 
predominating in the china. 

Another way is to have a strip of linen 
half a yard wide, running from end to 
end of the table, or hanging over a quar- 
ter of a yard, its ends finished with lace, 
or fringed. Matching squares may be 
laid under the plates of those who sit at 
the sides of the table. This arrangement 
is often carried out in heavy crash of 
homespun linen for a Craftsman dining 
room, and is in much better taste than 
fine laces and embroideries. A very lit- 
tle artistic skill will enable one to adapt 
the pattern of the wall paper to the orna- 
mentation of these runners, using heavy 
linen thread or crewel to carry out the 
design. 

For the round table used by four peo- 
ple, or less, a square of linen or damask, 
put on diagonally, its points under the 
plates, answers capitally. Instead of em- 
broidery it may have an inset of wide 
linen insertion, or medallions of Cluny, 
or squares of filet, set in at intervals, the 
dark wood underneath bringing out the 
pattern charmingly. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



307 




6fc 



1847 ROGERS BROS 



The illustration above shows the leading patterns in this famous brand of silver plate. In beauty 
of design, finish and wearing quality they represent the highest grade of silver plate that is made. 
A desirable feature of this well-known ware is that you can buy at any time spoons, forks and 
knives to match the above patterns. Thus at your convenience you can easily get together a 
complete set in "Silver Plate that Wears." For sale by leading dealers everywhere. Let us 
send you our catalogue <; R-35" to aid in selection. 

New York MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., Meriden, Conn. Chicago 

( International Silver Co., Successor.) 
Meriden Silver Polish, the "Silver Polish that Cleans." 




$25.85 

For this elegant, 
massive selected 
oak or birch, ma- 
hogany finished 
mantel 



"REPUTATION AND 
QUALITY COUNT" 



"FROM FACTORY 
TO YOU" 

Price includes our 
"Queen" Coal 
Grate with best 
quality enameled 
tile for facing and 
hearth. Gas Grate 
$2. 50 extra. Man- 
tel is 82 inches 
high, 5 feet wide. 
Furnished with round or square columns, 
full length or double as shown in cut. 
Dealers' price not less than $40. 

CENTRAL MANTELS 

are distinctive in workmanship, style and 
finish and are made in all styles Colonial to 
Mission. CATALOGUE FREE Will send 
our new 112 page catalogue free, to carpen- 
ters, builders, and those building a home. 

Central Mantel Company 



1227 Olive Street 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 




Our Beautiful Booklet, " Pergolas'* 

Illustrated with views of some of the most attractive new 
homes and grounds showing: exceedingly artistic results 
in pergola treatment. This booklet is right off the press, 
and is yours for the asking. Ask for Booklet K-27. 

Proportions in columns make or mar the success and ar- 
tistic effect of the pergola. That is why a pergola bu ilt with 

ROLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

made in classic proportions, will insure your getting a 
charming and beautiful pergola. They are equally suitable 
for porches or interior work and are made exclusively by 

HARTMANN-SANDERS COMPANY 

Elston and Webster Aves.. Chicago. 111. 
Eastern Office: - - 1 123 Broadway. N. Y. City | 



308 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Table Chat Continued 



Outlining Table Damask. 

A mode of decoration at the command 
of anyone who can sew at all is to pick 
out the pattern on a damask tray cloth 
with fine outline stitch, using mercerized 
cotton for the purpose, enriching the de- 
sign with a few French knots. 

When the general effect of the table is 
considered, one gets better results with 
one large piece of handsome linen than 
from a multiplicity of small embroid- 
eries. So many pieces are apt to obscure 
the beauty of the surface of polished 
wood, besides being a great deal of 
trouble. We ought to try to eliminate 
fussiness, in all our household ways, and 
we shall certainly .do so if we substitute 
one handsome, easily laundered piece for 
a dozen. 
Tho Craftsman or Mission Dining Room. 

There is one point in connection with 
the popular Mission furnishing too of- 
ten neglected. L :) eople seem to think 
they can use exactly the same sort oi 
china and table furnishings as they would 
with golden oak or mahogany. Never 
was ._a... greater, .mistake As. ,w,e,ll...c.o.Y.er.... 
the walls with a Louis Seize .paper, all 
ribbons and garlands, as to put the faded 
daintiness of Limoge china and Ken- 
sington embroideries into contrast with 
the bold outlines and rough finish of 
weathered oak. Canton china, some of 
the strongly colored Japanese wares, as 
Kaga, copper, brass, pottery of definite 
color, these are the things for the Mis- 
sion, dining room. If your belongings 
are of a different sort, think twice be- 
fore you ^gi-ve the order for a Mission 
diriing 'room. ,,\ .*:/ -*,$._ 

Saving of Tablecloth. 

The writer has an acquaintance who-;is 
most successful in keeping her tablecloths 
spotless, and some of her ways may be 
suggestive. 

.At her own right hand .stands a tray 
large enough to hold the tea or coffee 
pot and one cup, and whatever bever- 
age is served is poured out upon the 
tray. 

At the other end of the table, the cloth 
is protected by a large carving 'cloth and, 
as men have a way of rumpling up such 
things, it is stiffly starched and ironed 
without folding. 

Any dish whose contents are specially 



liquid is set upon a plate. If it is a open 
oval dish it is set into a platter a little 
larger. In serving the dessert, sherbet 
glasses, set uoon small plates, are used 
for all cold puddings, while for fruit pie 
and solid hot puddings a plate larger than 
the ordinary dessert plate is used. All 
these precautions would be of no ef- 
fect if the maid were not carefully train- 
ed to wipe the bottom of every dish 
which has been in contact with the range. 
Coasters. 

The coasters which are shown in such 
quantities in the house-furnishing shops 
are an assistance in keeping the table- 
cloth clean. The smallest size is useful 
for tumblers, larger sizes for the oil 
cruet, the milk jug, or the carafe. Some 
of them are very expensive, crystal and 
solid silver, or silver deposit, and are 
really works of art, but there is also a 
great variety of inexpensive ones, of 
foreign manufacture. These have por- 
celain bottoms and an openwork edge of 
nickel or silver plate. A set of a tray 
and six coasters can be had as cheaply 
as a dollar and a quarter. Some special- 
ly pretty ones are in blue and white 
china. 

Pumpkin Pudding. 

A dainty which may appeal to people 
who object to' pie is a pumpkin pudding, 
made from the canned pumpkin, or 
squash. It is made like^the mixture for 
pies, but with less pumpkin, an additional 
egg and cream instead of milk. Evapor- 
ated milk diluted to the richness of cream 
will answer very-welK /'Bake the mixture 
in a rather deep .pudding dish, serving it 
very cold. You may, if you choose, use 
the yolks of the eggs only, saving the 
whites for a meringue. 

Serving Small Birds. 

Small birds of any sort, squabs, tiny 
chicke'ns or ducklings may be served 
upon thick slices of fried hominy. The 
hominy should be of the pearl sort, made 
very stiff, cooled in a dish of sufficient 
size to admit of cutting large slices, and 
should be prepared the day before. Fry 
the slices brown in deep fat. Lay the 
birds on the slices of hominy, with a 
border of lettuce, garnishing .the dish 
with thick slices of orange with the peel 
on. Pass French dressing and currant 
jelly. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



309 




Simple Artistic 

This door is adapted for Crafts- 
man interiors, Dens, Libraries, 
Studies, etc., and its beautiful grain 
and finish give a note of distinction 
to any room. 




are perfect doors, light, remarkably strong and 
built of several layers of crossed grained wood, 
pressed together with water-proof glue, making 
shrinking, warping or swelling impossible. 
Veneered in all varieties of hard wood Birch, 
plain or quarter-sawed red or white Oak, brown 
Ash, Mahogany, etc. 

Morgan Doors are the highest standard of door 
quality ; made in one of the largest and most pro- 
gressive factories in the country. 

Each Morgan Door is stamped " MORGAN " 
which guarantees quality, style, durability and 
satisfaction. 

In our new book "The Door Beautiful" Morgan 
Doors are shown in their natural color and in all 
styles of architecture for interior or exterior use, and 
it is explained why they are the best and cheapest 
doors for permanent satisfaction in any building. 
A copy will ft* sent on request. 

Architects. Descriptive details of Morgan Doors 
may be found in Sweet's index, pages 678 and 679. 

Morgan Company, Dept. F., Oshkosh, Wis. 

Distributed by Morgan Sash ana Door Company, Chicago. 
Morgan Millwork Company, Baltimore, Md. 

Handled by Dealers who do not substitute. 




8 E D G WICKS 

Better Homes Cost Less you find, when you examine Sedfwick plans. 

The years you are to spend in your home, the enjoyment you are 
to get out of it, the money you put into it, all make it plain that you 
should make yourself as expert as possible choosing your home. 

"MST HOUSE PUWS" is my book of 200 modern homes full of ideas, 
showing new architectural work. Designs which are unique for 
homes costing $500 to $6,000. Send NOW for this eautif ul book, 
Price $1. OO. New, large and unproved 8th edition just off the 
press. To those interested, a New Book of Churches FREE. 
CHAS. S. SEDG WICK. 1028 K, Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis 




GENERAL FAVORITE! 



Sign 



MACK 



Duality 



The "Diamond Mack'' Brand of 

Roofings and Building Papers 

is the general favorite with users of 

Ready Roofings. Especially is this true of our 

Underfelt, Rubber, Sand, Granite and Burlap Roofings 

and our Faultless Duplex Plaster Board. Test our Samples. 



McCLELLLAN PAPE,R COMPANY 



FARGO 
SIOUX FALLS 



'The Home of Quality' 
MINNEAPOLIS 



DULUTH 
LA CROSSE 



310 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 







\: 

* Ti^y.":?:.!-. 1 . . ii. ;al"BrMJiJt r-^rffe JMfr^'iMtfV'Hf 




The Production of Proper Concrete Ag- 
gregates. 

Their relation to the concrete industry 
constructively and commercially. 

THE giant strides made by concrete 
construction in the past few years 
has led to a demand for an im- 
proved quality of aggregates. 
Many localities have no available depos- 
its suitable for a concrete mixture and 
must rely upon aggregates shipped from 
a distance. Safety demands that nothing 
but the best enter into reinforced con- 
crete. Both owner and contractor are 
vitally concerned in this matter, their in- 
terests being practically identical. No 
one can afford to take chances where hu- 
man life is at stake. 

To supply this demand numerous com- 
panies have come into being and the 
above illustration shows a modern plant 
that supplies Minnesota and the adjacent 
states. 

The plan is built after a plan which is 



the result of the experience of many 
years in the business by similar concerns 
about Chicago, and is therefore today the 
most up-to-date plant of the kind in the 
United States. 

The material to be produced is washed 
and screened crushed rock and gravel, all 
of granite and trap suitable for all forms 
of concrete construction, roofing gravel, 
paving, etc., and also washed sand suit- 
able for concrete, brickwork, plaster, etc. 

There is unlimited material in banks 
adjacent to this plant, which is dug by 
a large steam excavator of standard type, 
loaded into cars and dumped into a hop- 
per from which it is carried by a belt 
conveyor to the top of the structure, 
where a powerful stream of water meets 
it and carries it through a series of 
screens; the boulders; 'and cobble stone 
rejected by the first screen are passed 
through a large gyratory Crusher and this 
crushed material is conveyed to the 
screens and finds its place in the bin 




PLANT OF THE WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL CO., LOCATED ON THE GREAT NORTHERN R. R. 
WEST OF CITY LIMITS, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



311 




For the outside walls of plaster, 
concrete or cement houses 

DEXTER BROTHERS' 
Petrifax Cement Coating 

preserves the texture, prevents any dampness from work- 
ing inside, and produces a uniformity of color. Petrifax 
Coating: is manufactured from a mineral base, ground as 
fine as modern machinery will allow. This base is carried 
into the pores of the concrete, plaster or cement by a 
volatile liquid, which readily evaporates, leaving a hard 
surface which will not crack, chip or peal off. 
Write for catalog and samples. 

DEXTER BROTHERS CO. 

105 Broad Street, Boston 
Branch Office: 542 Fifth Avenue. New York 

AGENTS: 

H. M. HOOKER CO.. 651 Washington Boulevard. Chicago. III. 
J. D. S. POTTS. 218 Race St.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



Artistic Mantels of Wood 

* 

and 
Tile 

Shipped direct from fac- 
tory, wh'.ch means a 
savin? to you. We pay 
the freight and ship sub- 
ject to examination and 
approval. 

Our Economy 
and Perfection 
Grates are fuel 
savers, which 
means that it is 
not a luxury to 
use them; you would obtain full benefit of 
the fuel consumed and at the same time, 
the greatly needed ventilation. Write for 
descriptive catalogue. 

Contracts taken for Tile Floors in any part 
of the U. S. Send diagram of space to be cov- 
ered and designs with price will be submitted. 

Heitland Grate H Mantel Co. 

101 S. Fifth St., Quincy. 111., U. S. A. 






PORTLAND 

CEMENT 

is pure, uniform and made from the genu- 
ine Cement Rock. It is the brand that 
everyone should bear in mind who is build- 
ing any sort of building for which is wanted 
permanence, sanitary construction, artistic 
design, fireproofing, absence of vibration 
and great strength. 

The books in our Atlas Cement Library 
will help you if you are contemplating 
any kind of building construction. Send 
for any or all of them. 

"Concrete Houses and Cottages" 

Vol Large Houses, $1.00 Vol. II, Small Houses, $1.00 
Atlas Cement Library Other Books 

Concrete Construction about the Home and on the Farm - - Free 
Concrete in Highway Construction ----...- $1.00 

Riinforced Concrete in Factory Construction (delivery charge) .10 
Concrete in Railroad Construction -.-...... 1.00 

Concrete Collates .............. Free 

Concrete Country Residencei (out of print) ...... 2.OO 

Concrete Garages Free 




NONE JUST AS GOOD 
If your dealer cannot supply you, wrile to 

THE ATLAS PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 
DEPT. L 30 BROAD ST., NEW YORK 

Largest output ef any cement company in the world. 
Over 50,000 barrels per day 




312 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cement Continued 



suited to the size to which it is screene 1. 
The bins are equipped with chutes from 
which cars will be loaded. The product, 
therefore, is a mixture of crushed rock 
and gravel, all either granite or trap of 
the sizes as follows : 

No. 1. 

Material passing l^-inch round holes. 
Everything under 1^-inch taken out. 

No. 2. 

Material passing l*4-inch round holes. 
Everything under %-inch taken out. 

No. 3 (Roofing Gravel). 
Material passing j^-inch round holes. 
Everything under 5-16-inch taken out. 

No. 4 (Sand). 
Material passing 5-16-inch round holes. 

CONCRETE MIXTURE 

A mixture of any of the above sizes as 
desired. 

All harmful particles, such as loam, 
clay, etc., are removed, and nothing but 
the pure granite and trap of whatever 
size desired is furnished to the customer. 
In addition to the four large bins, which 
are. constructed like wheat elevators, 
with storage capacity of many cars each, 
the Company has a ground storage loca- 
tion adjoining the bins, where an unlim- 
ited amount of graded material can be 
stored and from this storage pile loaded 
on board cars by gravity at a moment's 
notice, ready for shipment. 

Heretofore washed sand or gravel, 
available locally and for the adjacent ter- 
ritory, has been unheard of and it has 
been absolutely impossible to secure 
gravel screened to the proper sizes for 
concrete. 

The material being of granite and trap, 
is offered as the very finest material in 
the world for all reinforced concrete con- 



struction, on account of its enormous 
crushing strength, far greater than that 
of any other material used for the pur- 
pose. 

The tests made recently by the U. S. 
Geological Survey have demonstrated 
that concrete is the greatest fire resist- 
ant and non-conductor of all building ma- 
terial. The San Francisco fire absolute- 
ly proved this, and the new San Fran- 
cisco is almost all concrete. It has been 
shown also that concrete containing 
gravel and no calcarious substances, 
which are liable to disintegrate through 
calcination when subjected to extreme 
heat, is by far the best for all building 
purposes. The idea of cleaning and wash- 
ing gravel has been perfected in this 
country to the highest point in and about 
Chicago, where there are now a score or 
more of gravel washing plants, with ca- 
pacities ranging from 200 to 3,000 cubic 
yards per day. The capacity of this plant 
is SCO cubic yards of sand and granite 
and trap, and gravel per day, superior to 
the Chicago product in quality. 

Spring operations will begin about the 
first of April. The machinery is all new 
and up-to-date and no breakdowns or de- 
lays should occur. 

The establishment of this new plant 
affords another demonstration of the 
splendid progress of the concrete indus- 
try, in this section of the country, and 
shows that the hit or miss methods of 
this construction is a thing of the past. 
Having aggregates of the very best to 
work with, many problems yet unsolved, 
may be undertaken by concrete engineers 
and what is most important, makes it 
possible for contractors to give the best 
service to all employing them. 



OUR PRODUCT 

Consists of washed sand and gra- 
vel, in assorted sizes, free from 
loam, clay, etc. Being free from 
calcarious substances that are lia- 
ble to disintegrate when subjected 
to extreme heat, it is by far the 
best for all building purposes. 




CAPACITY 500 cu. yds. DAILY for Production. 



OUR PROPOSITION 

We are prepared to furnish ag- 
gregates for all kinds of concrete 
work, in any quantity on short 
notice. Our facilities for handling 
orders in our territory are unsur- 
passed, with unlimited resources, 



Are as important to the mixture as cement itself, and impart as much strength. Constructive 
failure means financial failure. You can rely upon concrete containing our washed aggregates. 

Gravel supplied for Roofing. 

THE WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL COMPANY, 

N. W. Phone, Main 882. MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 514 Lumber Exchange. 



KEITH'S NEW BOOKS 

FOR THE HOMEBUILDER 




No. 13,7* -A VERY POPULAR COTTAGE-ON OF THE 100 DESIGNS IN BOOK 1. 



YOU BUILD A HOME BUT ONCE "Do It Right. 

Subscribe to KEITH'S MAGAZINE and get posted. 



1 Book 100 Plans 



Bungalows and Cottages 

To meet the increasing call for this style of 
home, moderate in cost, we have largely in- 
creased the number of designs among our col- 
lections of Bungalows and inexpensive Cot- 
tages combining in a new edition 100 designs. 

42 Bungalows [ 

58 Cottages } 
These 100 designs were selected from over 
one thousand different plans and they repre- 
sent the houses which have proven the most 
popular and for which there has been the 
greatest call. Every house is a prize design 
and everyone thinking of building a modest 
cottage home or bungalow for the lakeside will 
surely find this book to be just what is wanted. 

Practical House Decoration 

Here is a book (162 pages) that all home 
builders and home lovers will find of great 
value and of practical assistance in planning 
new hall decorations and artistic arrangement 
of rooms. It contains over 80 illustrations and 
many artistic decorative schemes. Linen paper 
cover. Price $1. 

Typical American Homes 

74 designs, homes costing to build, $3,000 to 
$5,000, and 72 designs, homes costing to build 
$5,000 and up. 

These plans are picked from some of the 
best residence designs of about twenty leading 
architects of the country and they will give you 
a fine variety of ideas. My special offer on 
either of these volumes is $1 each, or both for 
$1.50. 

10O Designs for Cement Houses 

A book of designs for concrete block, all cem- 



ent exteriors and the attractive English Half 
Timber designs. 

The use of concrete as a material for the 
construction of residences has increased with 
such strides of late that we have found nearly 
every other prospective home-builder inquires 
about designs in concrete. We have been 
working on a superb collection of such designs 
for a good many months, obtaining photo- 
graphs of some of the choicest work to be seen 
and now offer 

"New Ideas in Concrete Designs" 

A book of 144 pages containing- nearly 200 
illustrations of which 100 are designs with 
floor plans. 

100 Designs ot Attractive Homes 
Costing $20OO to $40OO 

A splendid collection of plans, many of which 
are full two-story houses. 

Beautiful Interiors 

A collection consisting of 182 interior views 
from selected photographs of artistic and at- 
tractive living rooms, halls, dining rooms, etc. 

Here is the List 

1. 100 designs Bungalows and Cottages, cost- 

ing $400 to $3,000 $0.50 

2. 100 designs moderate priced homes, costing 

$2,000 to $4,000 1.00 

3. 100 designs concrete, brick and English 

Half Timber houses 1.00 

4. 40 duplexes, flats and double houses 50 

6. 182 Beautiful Interior Views 1.00 

6. 162-page book Practical House Decoration 1.00 

7. 72 designs Typical American Homes, cost- 

ing 5,000 and up (special) 1.00 

8. 74 designs Typical American Homes, cost- 

ing $3,000 to $5,000 (special) 1.00 

Total value $7.00 



Att Eight Books, List Value $7.00, Will Be Sent on One Order, Postpaid for $4.50. 
Keith's Magazine One Year and Any $1 Book in Above List for $2.00. 

M. L. KEITH, Publisher, 524 Lumber Exch., Minneapolis, Minn. 



314 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cement Continued 

The Recent Show at Chicago 

Furthering the interests and great de- 
velopment of the cement industry, there 
has just closed at Chicago, one of the most 
successful and interesting cement shows 
held in this country. This year, not only 
was the show a great success from the 
standpoint of fine exhibits, interest and edu- 
cation to those attending the same, but in 
the more practical direction the actual 
volume of business transacted by the ex- 
hibitors. As a rule, exhibitors at national 
shows of this kind, consider that the gen- 
eral benefit from publicity is sufficient rec- 
ompense for the expense and effort for 
such affairs. This year, however, a num- 
ber of concerns took a great many orders. 

There were many more individual ex- 
hibitors this year than before and the en- 
tire floor space of the large Coliseum in 
Chicago which is a mammoth hall, was oc- 
cupied to advantage. The balcony space 
was crowded as well as the annex. The 
Portland cement manufacturers' exhibits, 
represented some of the finest displays, par- 
ticular among these being the exhibits of 
the Atlas Portland Cement Co., The Uni- 
versal Portland Cement Co., The Chicago 
Portland Cement Co. and the Lawrence 
Portland Cement Co. More . prominent 
this year than ever before, were the ex- 
hibits of the waterproofing compound con- 
cerns. It was noticed that the De Smet ex- 
hibit attracted unusual attention. The 
Sandusky Co. had a most interesting dis- 
play of their Medusa waterproof com- 
pound, as well as Dexter Bros, of Boston; 
the Illinois Damp Proofing Co., and the 
National Waterproofing Co. 

Representative Journals of the building 
industry were on hand and showed unusual 
spirit and energy in getting their publica- 
tions to the notice of every one attending 
the show. The publications devoted prin- 
cipally to the interests of concrete construc- 
tion were always in large demand, though 
many of the more technical and engineer- 
ing papers were represented. Personally, 
we were very much pleased with the cour- 
tesies extended to us as an exhibitor and 
with the business written during the week 
of the show at our booth. 

Everyone seemed greatly pleased; there 
was a splendid spirit of co-operation be- 
tween the management and the exhibitors 
and the results of this show will encourage 
further effort for another year. 




r mctf Free Help in' 

Decoration? 

" ~*" This portfolio contains definite 

Stencil 

^"'^and workable suggestions for 
every room in the house, for the 
treatment of walls, floors, ceilings, 
woodwork, rugs, hangings and fur- 
niture ? giving color schemes .and 
exact specifications for each surface, 
and is a part of the system of help 
in home decoration offered free. 
This portfolio will be sent to anyone 
who desires to decorate or re-deco- 
rate a room or an entire house. 
There is no string tied to it, but 
bear in mind that you cannot get 
the results as shown in this port- 
folio unless you use Sherwin-Wil- 
liams' products. 

Stencil Book Stencilin is an inexpen- 
and simple method of 
decorating flat walls, curtains, draperies and 
hangings. Our stencil book shows hundreds 
of stencil designs like this here, at small cost, 
and tells you how to use them. 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 

PAINTS 8-VARNISHES 

Address att inquiries to Decorative Department 
629 Canal Road, N. W., Cleveland, Ohio 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



315 





Running Water 

Anywhere Any Time Any Quantity 

No matter where you live or how large your 
house or estate whether it's on a hill or in a 
hollow you can enjoy all the advantages of a per- 
fect water works system at a very low cost. A 

"Paul" Pump 

placed in your barn or cellar and connected to the 
nearest water supply will give you an abundance 
of running water at ample pressure in the house, 
barn, anywhere you want it. Think of the con- 
venience of such a system no more tiresome 
carrying of water perfect protection in case of 
fire plenty of water for garden and dairy. 

The "PAUL" Pump can be run by an electric 
motor or by a belt from any other power. So 
simple any one can tend it or it can be furnished 
to operate automatically if desired. Superior 
in every way to any other pump sold for this 
kind of work. 

Tell us what you want to do, write for our book- 
let No. 12,021 telling why "Paul" Pumps are best, and 
we will advise you without charge just which one of 
our water supply systems is best suited to your needs. 

Fort Wayne Engineering 4 Mfg. Co. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 





MALLORY'S 

Standard 
Shutter Worker 

The only practical device to 
open and close the Shutters 
without raising windows or 
disturbing screens. 
Can be applied to old or new houses, whether brick, stone 
or frame, and will hold the blind firm in any position. 
Perfectly burglar proof. 

Send far Illustrated Circular if your hardware dealer 
does not keep them, to 

MALLORY MANUFACTURING CO. 



251 Main Street 



Flemington, New Jersey. U. S A. 



316 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




PAINTING 



FINISHING 




How to Protect Structural Metals. 

Courtesy of O. C. Hamm. 
(Continued from March Number.) 
Mixing and Applying the Paint, 
eneral Cautions. Where parts of 
iron and steel are unusually ex- 
posed to corroding or abrasive 
influences, they should receive 
extra attention in the matter of painting 
and preferably an extra coat should be 
applied to all such places. Thus all bolts, 
rivet-heads, all edges and all corners, 
should have an extra coat of protective 
paint so that at these points the paint 
may be thicker than where the surface is 
simply flat and therefore not subject to 
especially destructive influences. 

All parts in contact should be flushed 
fully with paint as it is at such points 
that corrosion is apt to be especially in- 
sidious. Engineering construction should 
provide for the accessibility of all parts 
for the purpose of painting. 

In all cases the application of the paint 
should be done by competent workmen, 
using round brushes wherever practic- 
able. The round, pound brush is an ex- 
cellent type of brush to use. 

The paint should be of such thickness 
as to require a strong arm and wrist to 
brush' it out. 

Structural Iron Work for Buildings. 
In buildings, structural iron and steel 
are generally encased in brick or con- 
crete. We have already called attention 
to the advisability of painting structural 
iron and steel which is so encased. All 
such structural metal work should re- 
ceive three coats of red lead paint, and 
in addition, such touching up of edges 
and rivet-heads and bolts as may be nec- 
essary to thoroughly protect these espe- 
cially exposed parts. The first coat 
should be of pure red lead and linseed 
oil (Formula No. 1). The second coat 
should be red lead and linseed oil with 
an ounce of lamp black in oil added for 



the purpose of changing the tint (Form- 
ula No. 2). The third or finishing coat 
may be a darker red-lead coat (Formula 
No. 4), a dark olive (Formula No. 6) or 
it may be a black coat of finely ground 
graphite or lamp black (Formula No. 5). 
The addition of a small percentage of 
varnish to this finishing coat will im- 
prove its quality. 

Bridges, Viaducts and Elevated Roads. 
Structural iron and steel exposed as it 
is on bridges, viaducts, elevated roads 
and all similar structures should receive 
the same treatment as described above 
for iron work except that they should 
have four coats instead of three, consist- 
ing of two protective coats of red lead 
and linseed oil (Formulas 1 and 2) and 
two finishing coats. The finishing coats 
may be of any color desired, and material 
should be chosen according to circum- 
stances. (See "Finishing Paints.") 

The first finishing coat should be put 
on somewhat flat or dead, while the final 
coat should have a full gloss. Care 
should be especially observed in the prop- 
er painting of inaccessible parts before 
erection. 

Subways. In the painting of iron and 
steel in subways the same general rule 
should be observed as for bridges and 
viaducts (paragraph preceding), except 
that the bases of all columns and vertical 
supports should have five coats of paint. 
The first two coats should be red lead in 
linseed oil (Formulas 1 and 2). The fin- 
ishing coats may be as described above 
for "Structural Iron Work for Build- 
ings," except where a white finish is de- 
sired. In such cases the third coat 
should be of white lead in linseed oil 
mixed according to Formula No. 9. The 
fourth coat should be white lead in lin- 
seed oil mixed according to Formula No. 
10. 

If an enamel finish is desired on top of 
this fourth coat, finish with Formula No. 
11. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 317 





Plain Words 
From a Painter 
To a House-Owner 



]OU would think that painters averaged better 
than bankers, lawyers or merchants, the way 
people trust them," said an old painter to a 
property-owner who had called him in to tell 
him why his painting had gone wrong. 
4L "Painters will average just as high in skill 
and honesty as any class, perhaps," he con- 
tinued, "but don't think that good painters have no unworthy 
competitors. We have fakirs to contend with in our trade as 
much as you do in yours. And you property-owners make it 
hard for those of us who try to do the right thing. You leave 
everything to the painter. 

C/'But what painter? The one who bids lowest. What do you 
expect the cheapest man in the bunch will do to you when you 
leave it all to him ? Of course you get stung sometimes. 
C. " There is nothing much wrong with this job except that the 
painter used a substitute for pure white lead and did his work too 
hurriedly. I suppose he had to do it in order to make anything 
on what you paid him." 

C.The old painter was right. Specify pure white lead guaranteed 
by the "Dutch Boy Painter" for all your painting and give the good 
painters in your community an even chance. Then allow them 
time to do the work right. It pays in the end. 
C.Take a step toward being, paint- wise (and money-wise) by 
asking us for " Dutch Boy Paint Adviser No. H. . Includes in- 
formation on painting, decoration (in the house and out) flower 
and shrubbery arrangement, etc., a most valuable collection of 
booklets free. 

Our Ture White Lead ("Dutch Boy Painter" trademark) is now packed in steel 
kegs, dark gun-metal finish, instead of in oak kegs as heretofore. Ask your dealer. 

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY 

A n office in each of the following cities : 
New York Boston " Buffalo Cincinnati Chicago . Cleveland St. Louis 

(John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Philadelphia) 
(National Lead and Oil Company, Pittsburgh) 



318 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Painting and Finishing Continued 



The bases of columns and vertical sup- 
ports, for which we have advised a fifth 
coat, should receive three coats of red 
lead in linseed oil, the first and third be- 
ing mixed according to Formula No. 1, 
the second coat according to Formula 
No. 2 and the fourth and fifth coats ac- 
cording to the finish desired. (See "Fin- 
ishing Paints.") 

Decorative Iron Work. Railings, 
grilles, fences, fire-escapes and similar 
metal work should be painted the same 
as bridges, viaducts and elevated roads. 
The finishing paint will depend largely 
on the decorative demands. The first 
finishing coat should be applied some- 
what flat and the final coat with full 
gloss. Black, dark olive and dark brown 
are serviceable for finishing coats. Black 
may be obtained with lamp black, dark 
olive by using Formula No. 6, and dark 
brown by using Formula No. 7. 

Tin Roofs and Tin Side-Sheathing. 
The foundation for a tin roof should be 
very tight, for the rusting of such roofs 
usually begins underneath, not on top. 
It would be good practice to lay tin roof- 
ing on building paper. Every piece of 
tin should have one coat of red lead 
(Formula No. 1) on its under side before 
being laid. 

After thoroughly cleaning to remove 
the rosin and fluxing materials, the com- 
pleted roof should receive two coats of 
protective paint. (Formulas Nos. 1 and 
3.) The finishing coat may be a red lead 
paint with from four to sixteen ounces 
of lamp black to the gallon (see Formu- 
las Nos. 4 and 7), or any good paint 
which will give the tint desired. Form- 
ula No. 7 gives a rich brown and is very 
desirable, but in specifying be careful 
that' an iron-oxide paint is not substi- 
tuted. The latter will imitate the red- 
lead and lamp-black paint very closely in 
appearance but is not so durable. 

Painting Galvanized Iron. Galvan- 
ized iron is sheet iron coated with zinc 
by dipping or by means of galvanic or 
electric action. The process was invent- 
ed and is used in an attempt to protect 
the iron from corrosion. The method 
is unsatisfactory alone, however, and it 
is found necessary to paint galvanized 
iron the same as any other form of the 
metal. 



Its greatest advantage is the fact that 
it can be soldered and can therefore be 
used for cornices. Its great disadvantage 
is that, while it requires painting, it re- 
sists paint. Unless very carefully done 
the best paint will peel from it. 

Where practicable it is a good plan to 
let the galvanized iron weather until it 
has developed a tooth, then clean the 
surface with a wire brush. This is fre- 
quently impracticable, however, and the 
following method of preparing the sur- 
face is recommended by a great many 
excellent painters, although our own ex- 
periments with it have not been so uni- 
formly successful as to justify a sweep- 
ing endorsement: 

In one gallon of soft water dissolve 
two ounces each of copper chloride, cop- 
per nitrate and sal ammoniac, then add 
two ounces of crude hydrochloric acid. 
This must be done in an earthen or glass 
vessel, never in tin or other metal re- 
ceptacle. Apply the solution with a 
wide, flat brush. 

Finishing Paints. 

When iron and steel have had a suffi- 
cient number of coats of good protective 
paint^ the problem is to select suitable 
finishing paints. Generally speaking, any 
good paint can be applied over a suitable 
foundation. By good paints we mean 
paints that, selected as to color for ar- 
tistic reasons, are reasonably imperme- 
able and contain no actually deleterious 
constituents. If the paint is to be ex- 
posed out of doors, more care should be 
exercised in the selection of the paint to 
be used than if the paint is not to be ex- 
postd. 

It can be considered good practice to 
have the finishing coat of a color close 
to that of the original iron: that is, if 
the two or more protective coats start 
as red, one or two finishing coats of black 
paint on top of this would ensure fairly 
complete protection and covering of the 
metal. The black paint could not be ap- 
plied imperfectly without such imperfect 
application becoming immediately no- 
ticed by the showing through of the red 
protective coatings. 

Where the iron and steel are exposed, 
the kind of finishing paint to use de- 
pends upon the color desired. 

For railroad bridges and structures 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



319 



THE NAT I 




BUILDER 



362 DEARBORN STREET 

CHICAGO 

Offers this 
Qreat Building Opportunity: 

00 



complete plans with 
estimate of material 
and price . . . For 



<t | 
*P I 

* 



The plans are medium priced, up-to-date 
homes. The front, side and rear elevations 
with floor plans and details drawn to quar- 
ter-inch scale, are on a 

LARGE SUPPLEMENT 

36 x 24 inches 

Plans Drawn to Scale the Same as 
a Regular Blue Print and You 

Get One Every Month 
A complete bill of materials with an accurate 
estimate of cost accompanies each plan. 




THIS IS ONE OF THE HOUSES 

It was planned by Chicago Architects, 
who rank high as designers 

It is of moderate cost and the outside is of 
Plaster Work, now so popular. 
Besides this, each number has other houses 
of low cost, including a Beautiful Bungalow 
with plans. 

The writers, selected by Architect Fred T. 
Hodgson, Editor, cover the entire building 
field. 

Send in the coupon and you may find some- 
thing new and good for the new home you 
are planning. 



$2.00 per year 20 cents per copy 

NATIONAL BUILDER, 

362 Dearborn St., Chicago: 

Put ME down for one year's subscription, for which 
I enclose $1.00 in money or stamps and THIS COUPON 
which is good for $1.00 credit on the order. 



Name. 



City. 



Street No., 



Keith's, Apr. '10. 




Your House is Worth More 

A Pennsylvania householder painted hi& 
house with one coat of "High Standard" 
Paint. A few weeks later he wrote : 

"Before painting I couldn't get an offer. I 
have now been offered 50 % more than I asked. ' ' 

Good paint adds far more to the value of 
your house than the cost of the paint itself 
and labor of applying. 

It is besides, economy and insurance. Thi& 
economy this insurance, increases with the 
quality of the paint. 

You can readily see then, how 




lipdPaint 

which is the highest possible quality, is really less 
expensive, even at a somewhat higher price per gallon. 

Because of this extra quality, High Standard, 
machine-mixed paint lasts years LONGER than 
other paint, covers MORE square feet per gallon, and 
is always uniform an advantage which rule-o'-thumb 
paints cannot possess. And it leaves the surface in good 
condition for repainting a most important factor in cost. 

The "Little Blue Flag" is your protection on 
" High Standard," and all other Lowe Brothers. 
Quality Products Linduro, a high-grade enamel; 
Vernicol, a wood stain; Mellotone, a dull finish for 
walls, ceilings and woodwork; and Varnishes for 
every purpose. 

Let us send you one or all of the following books, 
telling more about results you can get with ' ' Little Blue 
Flag" products, and why they are most economical: 

"Good Homes by Good Architects," a handsome port- 
folio printed in beautiful colors, showing exteriors, 
interiors, and plans of different houses, every one 
built many times. (Enclose 25c.) 

"Common Sense About Interiors." (Free) 

"Paint and 1'ainting." (Free) 

THE LOWE BROTHERS COMPANY 

0-45 6 Third Street. DAYTON, OHIO ^ 

Boston New York Chicago Kansas City 



320 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Painting and Finishing Continued 



similarly exposed, a black oaint is to be 
preferred. For decorative purposes, it is 
often desirable to use a dark olive. For 
interior work, enamel paints are some- 
times used; in which case, white lead or 
zinc enamels are to be preferred to those 
made from lithopone. 

A small amount of varnish is some- 
times used also in other finishing paints 
besides enamels. There is no objection 
to this, as it adds hardness and imper- 
meability to the coat. When such paints 
begin to decay, however, they are apt to 
decay with great rapidity and conse- 
quently should be watched carefully. 

In certain places, such as train sheds, 
where the color is not important, it has 
been difficult to obtain satisfactory pro- 
tection on account of the sulphur in the 
engine smoke ; and in such cases the best 
protection on record has been obtained 
by applying, over the wet paint, sheets 
of thin paraffin paper, subsequently giv- 
ing this also a coat of paint. 

There are so many conditions which 
determine the kind of paint to be used 
as a finishing paint that we can simply 
conclude this phase of the subject by re- 
peating that, when a good foundation 
paint has been applied to iron and steel, 
any good paint can be used over it as a 
finishing paint. 

Tints for Finishing Coats. 

In cases where decoration is important 
and especially where the painted iron 
work should be brought into harmony 
with the surrounding color scheme, it 
is very often desirable to use white or 
light tints. In all such cases pure white 
lead and linseed oil is the finishing paint 
to use. These materials make the most 
durable finishing paint for average con- 
ditions and by using with them the prop- 
er tinting colors, any desired tint or 
shade can be obtained. 

White lead and linseed oil are espe- 
cially adapted for use over red lead and 
linseed oil, because linseed oil dries much 
the same with these two pigments and 
therefore the two paints make a homo- 
geneous film, as regards the dried-oil 
component. 

A word of caution should be given 
upon the use of red lead and lamp black 
to form a brown. (Formula No. 7.) 



This gives a color which can be very 
easily imitated by the brown oxides of 
iron and care should be exercised that 
the latter is not substituted for the more 
durable red lead. 

(Formulas referred to will be found in 
the May issue.) 

A Quaint Effect in Den Decorating 

In a small, low-ceiled room, used as a 
den, a quaint effect has been obtained, 
says the Painters' Magazine, by the use 
of a dado, about four and a half feet 
high, made from a grotesquely figured 
Japanese matting, turned sideways and 
covered at the bottom by the wainscot 
cap, and at the top by a molding which 
forms the bottom member of the sup- 
porting band for a shelf, about six inches 
broad, that is carried on pairs of brack- 
ets at intervals, runs round the room and 
serves to support a collection of pottery 
and bric-a-brac gathered up in numerous 
trips out of the beaten pathways of travel. 
The upper wall is made of a plastic relief 
compound, a greenish gray tone, put on 
through a wire mesh, to give the effect 
of texture. This background has been 
divided into panels by flat oak moldings 
about two and a half inches wide. Long 
rectangular panels are surmounted by 
smaller square panels, with diagonal 
pieces, the direction reversing in the ad- 
joining panels to give the effect of diag- 
onal bracing. A broad chimney piece, 
built of light red mottled brick, rises to 
the height of the wainscot shelf. The 
casement windows are made up of a 
series of diamond-shaped pane, set in 
wood muntins. The white plastered ceil- 
ing is divided into square panels by sim- 
ilar moldings to those on the upper walls. 
The floor is of oak, stained dark and par- 
tially covered with a fluff rug, woven like 
a rag carpet from pieces of old brussels 
and ingrain carpets. The furniture is 
solid and heavy broad-armed splint 
chairs with loose cushions and a box 
divan heaped with gay sofa pillows and 
a large mission table that serves as a 
writing desk. 



To find the number of square yards 
in a floor or wall, multiply the length 
by the width or height (in feet) and 
divide the product by 9 the result will 
be square yards. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



321 




"The Wax with a Guarantee" 

Makes Floors Beautiful 

IT can be applied with equal success to either hardwood or 
pine floors and (if you use "Brightener" ) once a year is 
generally sufficient. Old English Floor Wax gives a rich, 
subdued lustre, and lasts because it's made better than 
ordinary floor wax has more of the hard (expensive) wax 
in it. Old English doesn't show scratches or heel marks; 
never becomes sticky. It is economical and gives the 
handsomest effect known to all interior woodwork. 
50c. Ib. (1 Ib. covers 300 sq. ft. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction when used as directed, or money refunded. 

Send for Free Sample and Floor Book. 
Also cut out and mail us the list at the right, check- 
ing the subjects which interest you. 

A. S. BOYLE & CO. 

1924 West 8th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Manufacturers of "Brightener" 
which keeps floors clean 
and bright. 



D Finishing New Floors 

D Finishing Old Floois 

D Hardwood Floors 

D Cleaning and Polishing 

D Care Waxed Floors 

D Kitchen, Pantry Floors 

D Bathroom Floors 

D Stopping Clacks 




INTERIORS BEAUTIFUL 

A Very Choice Collection of 182 Interesting Rooms 




Rooms, Bed Rooms. Be sure to order this book and add to your ideas for interior treatment, style of fireplaces, cozy seats, 
vail decorations, price $1.00. THIS BOOK WITH KEITH'S FOR ONE YEAR. $1. 75 

M. L. KEITH, Lumber Exchange Bldg., Minneapolis 



322 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




&/E.STIONS 

HSI 



L 




R. J. In the January number of your 
magazine you tell of a man in Blooming- 
ton, 111., mixing lamp black with cement 
to give it a darker color. Will you please 
give me the proportion of lamp black 
used to get this effect? 

R. J. Ans. In reference to the mixing 
of lamp black with cement to give it a 
darker color, will say that the best way 
to get it the exact shade would be a series 
of experiments on a small scale. You can 
get a small portion of lamp black and tak- 
ing several portions of cement with one 
of lamp black and mixing it dry. This 
will give you an idea of what the color 
will be after it has been wet, has set and 
dried out. 

A little care must be exercised in keep- 
ing track of the proportions used until 
satisfactory results are obtained. The 
quantities may then be mixed with the 
proportion. 

We are not in possession of any data 
of exact measurements or we would for- 
ward them to you. In any case we ex- 
pect you will get better results in obtain- 
ing the right shade than by any formula 
that we might send. It possibly might 
contain more or less of the material than 
you desire. 

Drying New Buildings. 

F. A. T. In correspondence with 
friends in Europe, I have asked concern- 
ing methods of drying new buildings 
abroad, but my people being engaged in 
other occupations cannot give me satis- 
factory information. Can you give me 
the required data as I believe some im- 
provement has been made upon the meth- 
ods employed here and they might be of 
service to me in my business as a build- 
ing contractor. 

F. A. T. Ans. 

^ U. S. Consul Charles N. Daniels, of 
Sheffield, furnishes the following informa- 
tion concerning a demonstration of a 



hygienic system recently given in that 
English city in which builders took con- 
siderable interest : 

Hitherto occupation of newly built 
houses has been delayed in order to al- 
low them to dry, but with the use of this 
new apparatus, freshly plastered rooms 
can be perfectly dried within three days,, 
and the excessive moisture of the walls 
completely extracted. 

The apparatus consists of a stove with 
a fire box, suitable for coke fuel, sur- 
rounded by a number of small-diameter 
tubes, similar to gas pipes. By means- 
of the apparatus, fresh, dry outside air en- 
ters constantly into the air-supply tubes,, 
and is highly heated in the tubes sur- 
rounding the fireplace. It ascends in a 
dry-heated state in the room, passes 
along the ceiling and walls, and absorbs 
the dampness, sinking down after being* 
saturated with the same and re-entering 
the apparatus. It then mixes with the 
coke gases in the outlet tube for the 
smoke, and eventually escapes into the 
chimney. 

This constantly renewed fresh outside 
air furnishes an abundance of carbonic 
acid to the mortar, thus hardening it, and 1 
producing in a short time the same effect 
as if the mortar had dried naturally. It 
is claimed by this system that no moist- 
ure can possibly show later on. 

A striking recommendation for the ap- 
paratus is that the German law prohibit- 
ing the habitation of any house until six 
months after construction is abrogated 
by the authorities where this system is- 
used. 



Silver Plating Without a Battery. 
D. E. P. I am at quite a distance fronu 
anyone in the plating business and have 
a few small pieces of shelf hardware that 
I desire to give a plating of silver. The 
question is perhaps unusual for your 
magazine but I will be obliged if you* 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



323 




PERSONAL attention to the selec- 
tion of hardware trimmings will be 
to your advantage if you are build- 
ing or remodeling a home. Quality 
and durability of the hardware, 
the style of architecture with which 
it is to harmonize, your architect's 
advice and your own taste should all 
be considered in determining the design. 
The result is certain to be entirely satisfac- 
tory if the chosen pattern is selected from 

Sargent's Artistic 
Hardware 



It possesses quality in a high degree, a decora- 
tive value appreciated by those whose object is to 
make a home artistic and complete in all its appoint- 
ments. If the house you are planning is of the 
French order of architecture, Georgian, Colonial or 
other style, 

SARGENT'S Book of Designs Sent FREE 

will enable you to make your selection from a num- 
ber of patterns especially designed for the style of 
architecture you prefer. The seventy and more 
patterns illustrated will offer a wide choice. THE 
COLONIAL BOOK also free shows Door 
Handles, Cut Glass Knobs, Knockers, etc. Addrest 

SARGENT & COMPANY, 151 Leonard St., New York. 




12 



AND 
UP 



Colonial $ 
Mantels 

MADE, OF 

Ornamental Brick 



Last longest look best are not too costly. 
There's no other Rind so good so pleasing. 
Our Sketch Book tells all about them. 
Write for it before you build or remodel. 

PHILA. & BOSTON PACE BRICK CO. 

P. O. Box 8518, Boston, MM*. 



WE SAVE YOU 




..* 



THE DEALER'S PROFIT 



Send for Our New 
Furnace Book 

No matter what you think 
about the furnace question, 
you ought to have a copy of 
our new catalog of Jahant 
Down Draft Furnaces. You 
ought to know how we 
make them and how 
"We Sell Them Direct" 
saving you all of the deal- 
er's profit and giving you a 
built- to-order heating plant 
at a small advance over fac- 
tory cost. The 
Jahant Down Draft Furnace 
is the most efficient furnace 
ever built. Gets more heat 
out of the coal and is easier 
to regulate because it has 
the patented "down draft" 
feature. Burns wood, hard 
or soft coal, and consumes 
every particle, leaving no 
cinders or clinkers. Saves at least 1 A to V* on coal bills. 
We design complete outfit for your house, ship it prepaid 
to your freight station and let you pay for it 

$10 Down and $10 a Month 

With each outfit we supply special plans, full directions 
and all necessary tools (free) so that any man of mod- 
erate intelligence can easily do the installing. Each 
outfit is also accompanied by a 360-Day Guarantee Bond, 
by the terms of which we agree to take the furnace and 
refund your money if a year's trial does not convince 
you that it is the best furnace you ever used. 

Write for catalog today and learn all the 
' facts about this unique furnace proposition. 

The Jahant Heating Company 

t 202 Howard St. Akron, Ohio 



324 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



to Questions on Construction Continued 



can tell me if I can plate these pieces 
without a battery and how to do it. 

D. E. P. Ans. Your question is in- 
deed somewhat outside of our informa- 
tion but we have succeeded in locating 
the information from Electrical Mechan- 
ics as follows : 

Dissolve eight silver quarters (money) 
or silver of equivalent amount in two 
ounces of nitric acid (strong), and to this 
add four ounces of common salt dis- 
solved in as little water as possible. A 
heavy precipitate is silver chloride. De- 
cant the liquid, add more salt solution to 
see if all the silver has been taken out. 
Wash the silver chloride precipitate with 
water and then dissolve it in a solution 
composed of two ounces potassium cya- 
nide and three ounces sodium hyposul- 
phite in 6 ounces of water. Filter the 
solution, if necessary, and make up to 
two quarts with pure rain water. Hang 
the articles to be plated in the solution 
suspended by a strip of lead or immerse 
the articles and boil them for ten to 
twenty minutes, according to the thick- 
ness of the plating desired. The articles 
to be olated must be free from grease, 
fat and dirt. By this method we get a 

LAWN FENCE 

Many Styles. Sold on trial at 
wholesale prices. Save 20 
to 3O per cent. Illustrated 
Catalogue free. Write today. 

KITSELMAN BROS. 

Hoi 330 Muncie. Indiana 




B. TERREL HOYT, 

Landscape Architect and Forester 

Designs or full workingplans for the development of 
Home Grounds, Parks and Cemeteries. Surveys made. 

Send for booklet, "Home Beautifying- and Landscape Art." 
342 Security Bank Bldg,, Minneapolis, Minn. 




PHENIX 

HANGERS and 

FASTENERS 

Solve (he problem HOW TO 
HANG and FASTEN Storm Win. 
dows and Window Screens 

It's the "Housewife's Joy" for 
Clean Windows, Ideal Ventila- 
tion, no Flies and Solid Comfort 

RCTAIL PR ICC. 10, 16, 2OAND3OO 
Pen SIT, WITH ScurwB 

Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers or direct 

For descriptive catalog, addrtu 

PHENIX MFG. CO. 

048 Center St.. Milwaukee. Via. 



durable and handsome silver plating on 
watch chains, rings, medals, watches, 
ornaments and german silver' articles. 

E. H. Last fall we erected a new 
storage building with gable roof along- 
side of a similar one we already had 
built and in joining the two buildings 
we had to make a gutter the whole length 
of the building, which I fear we made a 
fatal mistake as it leaks like a sprinkling 
can. Now the snow is commencing to 
melt. We finished it with felt the same 
as the other roof with a fall of about 
12 inches in 120 feet. I ask you for ad- 
vice regarding this gutter, and what way 
would be the best to fit it right so it 
will not cause us any further trouble. 
I might say we lapped the felt about 6 
inches and stuck it down, also coated 
over it with seam composition two or 
three coats and sanded the last coat, but , 
all to no avail. 

E. H. Ans. In reference to leaking 
roofs between the two buildings you 
have er'ected. It would seem to us that 
there was not sufficient pitch to the 
gutter to carry off the water satisfac- 
torily. Also, that being placed between 
two high pitched roofs, there was every 
chance of water backing up under any 
portion of the roof, where the material 
might have become loose. This being 
caused by loose nailing or lack of adhe- 
sion in the cement, which might occur 
most anywhere. There should have been 
several layers of loofing at this point 
carried up to two or three feet on either 
side. 

We do not think it would be wise to 
attempt to do much with the roof, while 
it is in this shape. 

We are going to advise you of a way, 
which, costing a little more, may solve 
the problem. Build a little piece of roof, 
slanting from the front of the lowest 
point between the two roofs, which will 
make kind of a ridge between them, and 
at the same pitch as the existing roof. 
Then from this ridge line build a long, 
flat section of roof, till it again reaches 
the lowest point between the two roofs. 
This gives -a sharp pitch to the roof be- 
tween the two gables, in front and long 
flat part running between towards the 
rear. Cover this again with roofing, care- 
fully applied, making a long lap to the 
existing roof, 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



325 



Fire Protection 
Added Value 
A Perfect Wall 

Investigate the modern way of constructing walls. 

Climax Wood Mortar 

is one of our quality brands of hard Gypsum Plaster. 
Use Climax Wood Mortar over Sackett Plaster 
Board and you will have a wall of great strength- 
fire retarding, sound deadening, fuel saving and a 
safe surface for decoration. 



TRADE 



It is almost criminal to continue the fire-trap construction 
of lime plaster over wood lath when modern methods offer 
something vastly better at practically the same cost. 

Let Us Tell You More About This 

Our booklet gives clearly and concisely the truth about 
plastering walls, a subject few laymen understand. Your 
name and address brings you a copy free. 

Grand Rapids Plaster Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Makers of 

Climax Wood Mortar Hercules Wall Plaster 

Superior Wood Fibre Plaster Gypsum Wall Plaster 

Sales Agents for Sackett Plaster Board 
For Sale by all dealers In Builder's Supplies 



Plumbing 
Supplies 

-AT- 

Wholesale 
Prices 



Everything in the 
Plumbing Line 




I guarantee to save you 20% to 40% on high class goods. 
No seconds, only first quality. Write and let me prove to 
you the money I can save you. Illustrated catalogue free. 

B. K. KAROL, 768 to 772 West Harrison Street, Chicago, III. 




"DIRECT FROM FACTORY" 

[on approval] 
PRICE ON THIS 

Piano-Finish, Selected Figurt, 
Quarter-Sawed Oak Mantel is 



Dealers' price $40 to $50. 

It is 82 in. high, 60 in. wide, 36x18 French 
Bevel Mirror, four elaborate capitals. 

Includes Tile Facing, 60x18 Hearth, Plat- 
ed Frame and Club House Grate. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
AND PARQUETRY 

will last as long as the house. Any car* 
penter can lay it easier than ordinary floor- 
ing. Get our prices. 

TILE AND MOSAICS 

lor everywhere, WALLS, FLOORS, ETC. 

Write for catalog of Mantels, Grates, Tiles for floors and baths. Slate 
Laundry Tubs, Grilles, etc. It is free. Or send 10 cents to pay postage on 
our Art Mantel Catalog. Mantel Outfits from $12 to $200. Made to order 



st. Philadelphia, Pa. 



The "Jones' System 




These Improved "Jones" Registers are Installed 
in More than 350,000 Homes, Since 1902 

TN-AS-MUCH as the plan of heating one 
room on the first floor and one on the sec- 
ond floor from the same pipe is a departure 
from the OLD way of heating with warm air, 
many people are slow to adopt this system 
for two-floor work; but we only ask a trial, 
as 'seeing is believing. " 

Jones Siclewall Registers insure per- 
fectly working warm air heating plants and 
greatest amount of heat from a given quantity 
of fuel. The many testimonials we are re- 
ceiving is evidence of the favor with which 
these registers are being received. 

The U. S. Register Co., Souris, Manitoba 

GENTLEMEN: Your registers in our opinion are twenty 
years ahead of anything else on the market. 

HAMURIDGE & Co. 

Write for Our Prices and Booklet, "Home, Sweet Home." 

U. S. REGISTER CO., 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

BRANCHES: 

Minneapolis, "Minn. Des Moines. la. 

Kansas City, Mo. Toronto, Can. 



326 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



HEATING^, rK/fOIKI ^ 
AND PLVMBING 




who have to do with plumb- 
ing work have noticed that, under 
certain atmospheric conditions, the cold 
water pipes "sweat," and if provision is 
not made to prevent the sweating, dam- 
age, or at least nuisance, is liable to be 
caused to the walls and ceilings of a 
building. They have noticed that it is 
always the cold water pipes that sweat, 
in striking contrast to the perspiration of 
animals which is induced only when they 
are warm. They observe further that 
that not only cold water pipes, but tanks, 
vats, jugs, and vessels of all kinds, when 
filled with cold water exhibit the same 
characteristic, and the question is often 
asked "what causes the collection of 
moisture on the outside of water pipes 
and tanks that contain cold water, and 
how can it be avoided?" 

The answers to the questions are quite 
simple. Air, at different temperatures, 
has a different capacity for moisture, al- 
though at any temperature, air can be 
made comparatively dry. The compara- 
tive moisture and dryness of air is per- 
ceptible to the senses just before and im- 
mediately after a thunder storm. The 
oppressive feeling and sticky sensation 
experienced before the storm is attribut- 
ed to the humidity or moisture in the air, 
which at that time is saturated or in such 
a condition that an addition of moisture 
or a drop in temperature will cause the 
moisture to be precipitated in the form 
of rain drops. The moisture having been 
precipitated, the air becomes dry to such 
an extent that the humidity is below the 
normal and the air greedily absorbs mois- 
ture from whatever source it can be 
drawn. This absorption of moisture or 
evaporation takes place so fast that it 
lowers the temperature of air and person, 
and produces that delightful feeling of 
freshness so noticeable after a shower. 

Before precipitation of moisture can 
take place, the air must reach the point 



of saturation; but the point of satura- 
tion varies with the temperature. That 
is why there are cold rains in fall and 
winter and warm rains in spring and 
summer. Another example might be 
cited in the case of dew. During the 
daytime when the sun is shining the air 
becomes charged with moisture but not 
to the point of saturation. After sun- 
down the air becomes cooler, its capacity 
to absorb moisture becomes diminished 
and part of the moisture it contains, that 
which is in excess of its capacity at the 
lowered temperature, is precipitated in 
the form of dew. 

The same agencies that operate to 
cause a storm or precipitate dew are 
what cause the sweat on water pipes and 
tanks. Air that is charged with moisture, 
if brought in contact with a surface which 
is much colder than itself, will immedi- 
ately become chilled and have its point 
of saturation lowered. Immediately that 
happens, the moisture it carried becomes 
condensed and adheres to the cold sur- 
face with which it is in contact. It fol- 
lows, from the foregoing statement, that 
the warmer and more humid the weath- 
er, the more a pipe will sweat, and such 
is the case. Under ordinary conditions, 
pipes are never known to sweat in win- 
ter and even in summer during dry 
weather, the pipes remain dry. Circula- 
tion of air has much to do with the 
amount of moisture condensed on a pipe. 
If the room or compartment in which the 
pipe is located be closed, so that only the 
air in the room can come in contact with 
the pipe, only the small quantity of mois- 
ture contained in the air in the room can 
condense on the metal. During warm, 
humid weather, however, when every one 
is gasping for breath, windows and doors 
are thrown open for the circulation of 
air; consequently the amount of mois- 
ture precipitated during humid weather 
is at the maximum. Indeed, by observ- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



327 



WOULD YOU LIKE 

Home 



A Bright, 

Original, 

Attractive 



With Your Own Individual Ideas as the Key 
Note of the Design 




OUR $5.00 SKETCH OFFER 

On receipt of $5.00 and a rough diagram or des- 
cription of your own ideas we will make a special 
study of your requirements and prepare the first 
and second floor plans accurately laid out to a scale 
with a picture of the exterior of the house as it 
would appear when completed, advising you of the 
additional charge for Complete Working Drawings, 
Specifications, E f .c.. which will be as low as is 
consistent with the labor involved. This offer 
applies to residences only costing not over $5,000 
and is made simply to demonstrate to you the value 
of competent services in interpreting and rendering 
practical your original ideas so that the home 
will bt a complete success in every detail. 

' ' There is no art to find the mind 1 s construc- 
tion in the face." Macbeth. 

-BUT- 

1 ' The dwelling a man builds, reveals his per- 
sonality , and through its halls and porticos 
runs the story of his life." 

Now if the problem be given proper consider- 
ation, it means time and time is money. We 
would be speedily overwhelmed with requests if this 
were a free offer, consequently it is not free. No 
signed contract is asked for. We propose to make 
our work so pleasing and satisfactory as to demon- 
strate beyond a question that the best is certainly 
the cheapest for you. The fact that houses built 
from our designs sell advantageously when built 
proves they are practical and desirable. This is 
an important matter should you wish to dispose 
of your property. 

Our latest books of plans with costs, sizes, etc. , are : 

100 Small Cottages and Bungalows $ .50 

98 Estimated Cost to Build $ 800 to $1200 50 

136 $1200 to $1600 1.00 

186 $1600 to $2000 1.00 

226 $2000 to $2500 1.00 

191 $2500 to $3000. 1.00 

207 $3000 to $4000 1.00 

154 $4000 and upward 1.00 

THE KEITH CO., Architects 

1721 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, Minn. 



Neponset Black Waterproof 
Building Paper 




A Building Paper ought to be a protection to a house, 
an insulation against dampness, drafts and 

temperature changes. 
At The End of Ten Years it Should be as Efficient 

as The Day The House W as Sheathed 
)nly WATERPROOF paper can provide permanent 

protection. Compare a sample of 

Neponset Black Waterproof Building Paper 

with any other building paper and you 

will see the difference. 

Before you build send for a sample of NEPONSET 
and our book "Comfortable Homes." 

F. W. BIRD & SON, Maker* 

Established 1817 
East Walpole, - - . Macs. 



Perfect Light for the Country Home 

^ Combination 
Gas Machine 



Here I* lighting system that not 
only means good profits for you but 
it will give the most satisfactory 
service to your customers. 
The best light for residences, 
schools, churches, factories, etc., 
especially where city gas or electricity 
are not available. 

This system of lighting Is cheaper 
than any other form of light and gives 
perfect results. A gas plant complete 
in itself right in the house. Perfectly 
safe. Examined and tested by the 
Underwriters' Laboratories and listed 
1 by the Consulting Engineers of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
The gas is in all respects equal to city 
coal gas, and is ready for use at any 
time without generating, for illu- 
minating or cooking purposes. The 
standard for over 40 years. Over 
15,000 in successful operation. 

The days of kerosene lamps are 
over. Why not sell this light in your 
community? Write for information, 
prices and 72-page book, 
"Light for Evening Hours" 

DETROIT 
Heating & Lighting Co. 

362 Wight St. DETROIT, MICH. 






328 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Heating and Plumbing Continued 



ing the condition of cool basements or 
cellars during humid weather, when all 
the windows and doors leading therein 
are open, it will be found that a miniature 
rain storm is taking place and that not 
pnly the pipes but even the floor and the 
walls have become damp from the con- 
densed moisture of the atmosphere. 

As the sweating of the pipes in summer 
is caused by the contact of air with the 
pipes, obviously the best way to prevent 
sweating is to prevent the air from com- 
ing in contact with the pipes. To do this 
the pipes should be covered with a good 
non-heat conducting substance, such as 
is used to prevent the loss of heat from 
steam pipes. 

A New Departure in Closet Seats and 
Tanks. 

All sorts of schemes have been tried 
by manufacturers of closet seats and 
tanks to make them hold together. The 
sections of some wooden seats have been 
fastened together with bolts ; others have 
been held together by running a hoop 
around the outside, etc. No way has, 
however, been found of treating wood so 
that dampness, moisture and heat would 
not affect it. In spite of anything that 
can be done, it will shrink, swell, warp 
and crack. Then, of course, wood is por- 
ous, which is about as undesirable in 
closet seats, from a sanitary standpoint, 
as cracks and crevices. 

About all of the objectionable features 
of wooden seats and tanks seem to have 
been overcome in such an easy way in 
the line recently placed on the market 
by the H. W. Johns-Manville Co., New 
York, called "Sanitor," that it is strange 
no one has thought of this before. These 
seats and tanks are moulded in one piece 
from indurated fibre. This material is 
familiar to most of us in connection with 
fibre pails, wash tubs, water cooler tanks, 
etc., many of which have given satisfac- 
tory service for 30 years or more. 

This material is non-porous and can- 
not absorb water; therefore no lining is 
required in tanks made of it, which does 
away with the danger of corrosion. 

It is claimed that this material will not 
swell, shrink, warp, crack or sweat. 

By a clever mechanical process, the 
exact grain of mahogany and oak is 
transferred to these seats and tanks. This 
is done so perfectly that few would be 



able to distinguish them from wood. The 
manufacturers are sending a "sample of 
this material and descriptive booklet to 
interested parties. 

Modern Methods of Heating 

With the opening of the fall season 
comes the time for preparation for the 
winter's cold, says Shoppell's Magazine. 
Builders of new homes must see to it that 
adequate heating facilities are included 
in the plans for their dwelling, and the 
owners of homes must examine their 
heating plants and see to it that they are 
in order to do properly the work for 
which they were designed. It is a mis- 
taken idea, too commonly accepted, that 
a heating system, once installed, requires 
no further care or attention, but will con- 
tinue to furnish adequate heat for the 
home at all times. Too many household- 
ers hold this notion and fail to have their 
heating plants inspected before the time 
for their use arrives, with the result that 
their families suffer, during the cold sea- 
son, from a lack of adequate heating 
facilities. 

Now is the time for the inspection of 
furnaces, steam heaters, water heaters, 
hot air heatings, and, in fact, every heat- 
ing establishment. The radiator of the 
steam heating plant has been idle for 
nearly six months, and a hundred defects 
may have arisen in the system, none of 
them, perhaps, really serious, but all of 
them combined capable of reducing the 
power of the plant to do its work prop- 
erly. The radiator should be inspected 
closely, all dirt which may have found 
its way into the pipes removed, and the 
entire system placed in a condition to 
allow it to distribute its heat in the most 
economical and effective manner. If the 
housekeeper takes proper care of the 
radiator during the season that it is not 
used, it is probable that few, if any, 
defects will be found. But the average 
housekeeper does not do this. With the 
taking away of the necessity for turning 
on and off the steam, comes absolute neg- 
ligence of the radiator, and the result is 
that it is very likely to become unfitted 
for its work. Under these circumstances, 
nothing but careful inspection, and the 
remedy of defects discovered, can as- 
sure the home of proper heat during the 
cold season which is approaching. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



329 



llcntlng- and Plumbing Continued 



There are many heating systems used 
in the home of today, leaving out the 
stove, which are primitive in this twen- 
tieth century and only applicable to a 
small class of modern buildings. There 
is the hot-air, or furnace, system ; the 
combination system, hot air combined 
with either steam or hot water radiation; 
steam heating either by direct or in- 
direct radiation ; hot water heating, either 
pressure or exhaust fans used to circu- 
late the heated air; and electrical heat- 
ing; but this last is seldom used on ac- 
count of its great expense. In addition 
to these systems, there are a large num- 
ber of modifications, such as vacuum 
heating, mercury seal, etc. All these 
systems are liable to get out of order 
during the time that they are not in ac- 
tive use, and all should be inspected with 
great care, and defects remedied before 
they are placed in commission again. 
The modern methods of heating are won- 
derful improvements over the old-time 
stove, but to get the best service from 
them, they must be closely watched, and 
not allowed to get our of order. 



The wise householder will not defer 
the inspection until the last moment, 
when the great rush comes on the crafts- 
men who make the repairs or alterations. 
He will attend to this duty at once, and 
have his heating system placed in com- 
plete working order. By doing this now 
he will not only save expense, because 
when the craftsmen are not over-busy 
they work better and more cheaply, but 
he will make certain his supply of heat 
for the winter by acting at a time when 
it is possible to secure the services of 
repairers without trouble or annoyance. 
Look to your heating appliances at once, 
and prepare your home for the winter 
at the most favorable time. 

Closet for Covers and Cutlery. 

A kitchen convenience which must be 
used to be fully appreciated, is a shallow 
closet closed in by sliding doors, with 
two or more narrow grooved shelves for 
pot lids, on the eye line with hooks be- 
low for the kitchen cutlery. It can be 
built in on one side of the kitchen fire- 
place, or occupy any convenient recess. 



Health in a Country Home is 
Imperiled by Lack of Sewage Facilities 

If you have inadequate facilities for the disposal of sewage 
on your place; if you tolerate cesspools or open drains, 
you are giving disease a standing invitation. Don't wait 
for the outbreak of sickness to spur you to measures of 

Safe Sanitation 

Investigate this subject now. Complete literature telling how 
sewage can be disposed of perfectly without sewers, free on 
application. Inadequate or insanitary conveniences promote 
neither health nor self-respect. Booklet free on request. 

ASHLEY HOUSE-SEWAGE DISPOSAL CO. 

6516 Normal Boulevard - - Chicago 



Carry 
Water 





fl | | f^ft I A 4%ff* 

RNACE 

9 \J 9 99 "*%? 



You need never carry another pail of water or even go 
out of the house on stormy days. Put running water in your 
home in the kitchen bathroom toilet and have an 
adequate supply In the barn for watering stock washing 
carriages, harness for the lawn garden or for protection 
against flre besides. A 




We will deliver a complete heating 
equipment at your station at factory 
prices and wait for our pay while you 
test it during 60 days of winter weather. 

The entire outfit must satisfy you or 
you pay nothing. Isn't this worth looking 
Into ? Could we offer such liberal terms 
if we didn't know that the Hess Furnace 
excels In service, simplicity, efficiency, 
economy t 

We are makers not dealers and will 
save you all mlddlemens' profits. No room 
for more details here. Write today for free 
48-page booklet which tells all about it. 

Your name and address on a fast card 
it sufficient. 

HE* S, T17 Tacoma Bldg., Chicago 



makes this possible. It eliminates the unsightly elevated water 
tank that freezes in Winter or dries out in Summer. The com- 
pressed air in a Leader Steel tank does all the work. In your 
cellar or buried in the ground it cannot freeze, and it solves the 
water problem forever. A complete system costs $48.00 upwards 
and you can install it yourself, if you like. 

Booklet and Catalogue Free Sign and mail the coupon 
below, and the booklet <T How I Solved the Water Supply Prob- 
lem" and complete catalogue will be sent you by return mail. 
Leader Iron Works, 1 706 Jasper St., Decatur, III. 
Room 817 15 William t., New York City. 




Leader Iron Works, 1 706 Jasper St., Decator, 111- 
Send me free your book and catalogue 
of Leader Water Systems. 

Name ' 

Address 

Town State 



330 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 




Glass Bricks for Houses 

ERMANY uses glass bricks for 
building purposes with measur- 
ed success. In Berlin is con- 
structed a small villa, the walls 
of which are built of glass bricks, of 
several shades of dark green and blue. 
The glass bricks are especially adapted to 
construction where light, cleanliness and 
neatness are particularly in demand, says 
the Chicago Tribune. In Hamburg they 
are utilized in place of windows. They 
admit light in walls, which police regu- 
lations require to be fireproof and 
windowless. 

In addition to admitting light to dark 
hallways, rooms, etc., they are said to 
possess the same strength as ordinary 
clay bricks. They are also utilized in walls 
and yards and partitions in the interior 
of houses, salesrooms, offices, work- 
shops, etc., as well as for the construc- 
tion of verandas, hothouses, kiosks, bath- 
rooms, hospitals, ice factories, butcher 
shops, railway stations, breweries, 
stables, and in other places where clean- 
liness, light and uniform temperature 
are specially desired. 

The brick are also made with wire 
coating for fireproof walls. In some of 
the recently erected buildings in Milan, 
Italy, bricks made of glass have been 
adopted for ground and upper floors on 
account of the light obtained. They are 
also coming into use for partition work 
in some of the hospitals on account of 
hygienic principles. 

In one of the leading banking institu- 
tions in the city of Turin the lobby office 
floor, which is about 36 by 58 feet, is 
entirely paved with glass bricks laid in 
iron frames for the purpose of admitting 
light into the basement, where are lo- 
cated numerous private boxes or vaults. 
In the Netherlands hollow green trans- 
parent glass bricks are used principally 
for light giving purposes in machine 
shops and conservatories. 



American Exposition, Berlin, 1910 

That America is to have a comprehen- 
sive and representative Exposition in 
Berlin in 1910 is assured. Manufactur- 
ers and business men throughout the 
country are displaying a lively interest 
in the undertaking- and applications for 
space have been received by the Ameri- 
can committee from many states. The 
indications are that every branch of 
American progress will be shown at the 
Exposition. "There will be no customs 
duty and exhibits will be entitled to a 
material ocean freight reduction both 
ways." 

It is but natural that the United States 
should seek to hold an All-American Ex- 
position in Europe ; for our export trade 
in that direction has reached splendid 
proportions and it is constantly increas- 
ing. 

There has just been issued by the 
American Committee, whose office is at 
No. 50 Church street, New York, an at- 
tractively arranged prospectus of the Ex- 
position, which outlines the objects and 
advantages of the enterprise. 

As this will be the first All-American 
Exposition ever held in a foreign coun- 
try, it will be of interest to all Europe 
as well as to America. 

June, July and August, three of the 
best months of the year, have been se- 
lected in which to hold the Exposition. 

Belfast Machine Embroidery 

That the exquisite hand embroidery of 
the Irish peasants can be very closely du- 
plicated by machinery is being demon- 
strated by Belfast manufacturers, Consul 
Samuel S. Knabenshue says: 

Belfast is noted as one of the great 
centers for hand embroidery, especially 
of linen goods. The plan pursued is to 
send the goods, after being stamped with 
the patterns, to small shopkeepers in the 
villages throughout the country, who act 
as agents, placing the work among the 
women of the cottages over the country- 
side. When the embroidery is completed, 
the agent pays the workers and returns 
the goods to the Belfast manufacturer, 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



331 



Splinters and Shavln 

who is obliged to launder them thorough- 
ly to remove the dirt and the smell of 
peat smoke. The great drawback to this 
system has always been that the manu- 
facturer is not able to fill orders prompt- 
ly, as he can never count on prompt work 
by the women and girls. At seasons when 
farm work offers they drop the embroid- 
ery, because they can make more money 
by working in the fields. 

These unsatisfactory conditions are 
now being revolutionized. Existing em- 
broidery machines were at first rebuilt, 
with attachments devised by the improv- 
ers, increasing their adaptability. Later 
the manufacturers began building entire- 
ly new machines. There are now five 
firms in Belfast building embroidery ma- 
chines, each having its own peculiar de- 
vices. 

Several hundred machines of these va- 
rious makes are at work in Belfast estab- 
lishments. They enable embroidered 
goods to be produced much cheaper than 
by hand; the quality of the work is ex- 
cellent; and for the first time in the his- 
tory of the trade the manufacturers of 



Continued 



such goods are able to contract for de- 
livery of finished goods at a given date 
with absolute certainty. The cheapen- 
ing in the cost of production has in turn 
lead to an increase in demand on the part 
of the public. 

The machines are all on the general 
principle of the sewing machine, with 
this addition: The needle bar has not 
only a vertical motion, as in the ordinary 
sewing machine, but also (while the 
needle is above the cloth) a horizontal 
motion, at right angles to the line of 
feed. This second motion is controlled 
by a lever operated by the right knee of 
the person using the machine, who thus 
has both hands left free to guide the 
work, which is stretched on a hoop, as 
in hand embroidery. When the knee 
lever is untouched, the machine makes a 
plain row of stitching, such as that rep- 
resenting a leaf stem, for example; and 
by the degree of movement given the 
knee lever the width of the embroidery is 
regulated up to the full "throw" of the 
machine. The widest "throw" provided 
for so far is three-quarters of an inch, 



THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL 

COMPLIMENTARY PORTFOLIO OF COLOR PLATES 



NOTABLE EXAMPLES OF 



INEXPENSIVE DECORATION AND FURNISHING 



"THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" is an illustrated monthly 
magazine, which gives you the world's best authority 
on every feature of making the home beautiful. 

It is invaluable for either mansion or cottage. It 
shows you wherein taste goes farther than money. Its 
teachings have saved costly furnishings from being 
vulgar; and on the other hand, thousands of inexpen- 
sive houses are exquisite examples of superb taste from 
its advice. It presents its information interestingly and 
in a very plain, practical way. Everything is illustrated. 

"THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" is a magazine which no 
woman interested in the beauty of her home can afford 
to be without. It is full of suggestions for house build- 
ing, house decorating and furnishing, and is equally 
valuable for people of large or small income. 

ELLEN M. HENROTIN, 
Ex. Pres. Nat. Federation of Women's Clubs. 




Its reaJers all say it is a work remarkably worthy, 
thorough and useful. The magazine costs $3.00 a year. 

But to have you test its value for $1.00, we will send you the 
current number and "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" Portfolio gratis, 
on receipt of the Five Months' Trial Subscription coupon. The 
Portfolio is a collection of color plates and others of rooms in 
which good taste rather than lavish outlay has produced charming 
effects. The Portfolio alone is a prize which money cannot ordina- 
rily purchase. Enclose $i .00 with the coupon filled out and send to 

HERBERT s. STONE, Publisher of THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL 



A "House Beautiful" Illustration greatly reduced 



THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL, 261 Michigan Ave., Chicago 

You may send me your Portfolio of Notable Examples of 
Inexpensive Home Decoration and Furnishing, and a copy 
of the current issue of "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL." 
enclose herewith $1.00 for a special rate five-month trial 
subscription to the "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL." 



TOWN OR CITY 



332 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Splinter* and Shavings Continued 



though so great a width is infrequent in 
the patterns now most in favor. The 
prices of the different makes of machines 
range from $68 to $85 per machine. They 
are power driven, and are operated at the 
rate of 1,200 to 1,400 stitches a minute. 
The operators are girls, who easily learn 
the manipulations and become very much 
interested in the work. (A list of manu- 
facturers of these embroidery machines 
is on file in the Bureau of Manufactures, 
and samples of the work, transmitted by 
Consul Knabenshue, will be loaned to 
textile firms upon application to the 
Bureau.) 

Rebuilding the Campanile at Venice 

The construction of the new Campanile 
at Venice is proceeding apace, and 1911 
should see its completion. It has been 
fortunate in being relieved of all pecun- 
iary embarrassments a fate which our 
tottering cathedrals have not avoided 
and the originally estimated $360.000 and 
the later calculation of $400,000 have al- 
ready been supplied, together with a com- 
fortable surplus for emergencies. The 
new Campanile will resemble the old in 
appearance, though iron clamps and gird- 
ers will in reality make it entirely safe. 
The only proposed alteration is the re- 
moval of a pillar which stood in the cen- 
ter of the tower, in favor of a passenger 
lift. For the most part, too, old asso- 
ciations are being preserved, the stone 
being quarried in Istria, the cement com- 
ing from Montferrat, the sand from 
Brenta places all famous in Venetian 
history. Magnificent work is being done, 
an excellent example of reconstructive 
skill being the piecing together of the 
Madonna of Sansovino, which was found 
smashed into nearly two thousand frag- 
ments. So, owing to the generosity of 
the art patrons of Europe in general and 
the Pope in particular, the Campanile 
will soon reassert its domination. 

Niew Mixture for Prevention of Dust 

In England some county authorities 
are trying a new process of preventing 
dust on roads, which, it is claimed, will 
last three years, and the county engineer 
states that he knows of cases nearly of 
that age and still good. There is no tar 
or oil in the composition, and it can be 
laid for four cents per square yard. It can 



be applied in any weather and -never gets 
slippery. It is also claimed that after a 
year's 'time the use of tar injures the 
road and causes the surface to deterior- 
ate. 

We notice from our exchanges that 
new compositions are constantly being 
tried, and up to date not one seems to be 
wholly satisfactory. As in the clipping 
quoted above, tar is complained of as in- 
juring the road. Others, again, contain 
substances that when used, the washing 
of the roads into water courses is very 
injurious to trees and vegetation. And 
it may be said that in all cases it is a 
costly process. However, we may live 
in hopes that sometime we may discover 
a method that will answer the purpose, 
and not bankrupt the neighborhoods 
where used. Very probablv it will come 
by improving our road building. 

French Houses Are Artistic 

The influence of the French on the 
architecture of the present day is ex- 
erted through their school of architec- 
ture, L'Ecole cles Beaux Arts, the lead- 
ing school for architecture in the world. 
Owing to the true artistic democracy 
and liberality of the French, this govern- 
ment school has been open to students 
of all countries, and its influence is 
world-wide. We in America must also 
pav tribute to this great school, as its 
influence was a timely aid to us in shap- 
ing, through the American students, our 
architectural destinv when we were sore- 
ly in need of it, says William Neil Smith 
in the Delineator recently. We owe it 
mostly to the French that we are at the 
present, for the first time, ranking favor- 
ably with, if not surpassing, our older 
mother countries in Europe. 

A house that is typical of the French 
movement is stucco washed a pure 
white. The roof of the tower is covered 
with light green glazed tile. The small 
brackets directly beneath the roof are 
painted a vermilion red. The large 
brackets are painted white, to harmonize 
with the rest of the building. The sash 
of the wndows are painted white, but the 
frames are green. The ornamental bal- 
conies which project from the face of the 
tower and the building proper are con- 
structed of saw balusters and wood 
strips in pattern, and are painted green, 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



333 



Ornamental Cresting 

Cresting Finials, 



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PRACTICAL HOUSE DECORATION 



The book for all who intend to decorate either a new 
or old home. Written by experienced decorators. 
162 pages, profusely illustrated. Contains many dec- 
orative schemes for a moderate cost house, giving 
treatment for each room. A gold mine of artistic 
suggestions. Size 7 x 9/4 inches, printed on fine 
enameled paper, limp covers. Price $1.00. 



THIS BOOK WITH KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



for one year, both for $2.00 including three extra 
recent numbers of the Magazine offered with all new 
subscriptions. Order your copy today. 




M. L KEITH, Publisher, Minneapolis 



334 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Splinters and Shaving* Continued 



the same shade as the roof and the 
frames of the windows. 

The harmonious awnings were evi- 
dently designed, as they should be, by 
the architect, to form an integral part of 
the building; and too much stress cannot 
be laid on the importance of carrying 
out this idea. In this instance they are 
white and green striped, the green ex- 
actly matching the green of the wood- 
work on the rest of the exterior. 

The roof garden and sun parlor form 
a very interesting and practical feature, 
and one which is seldom incorporated in 
a small house in America. It not only 
adds a great deal to the living qualities 
of the house, but, as is shown in the il- 
lustration, has been made an addition 
to the beauty of the building as well. 
The tower forms the sun parlor, inclosed 
in glass for the winter, not in temporary 
sash, but with permanent glass inclos- 
ures, with sash which can be thrown 
open during the summer and which are 
part of the design. 

Cost of Bricklaying by a Municipality 
As a result of the very careful investi- 
gation of the Sewer Department of the 
city of Boston, Metcalf & Eddy, con- 
sulting civil engineers to the Boston Fi- 
nance Commission, present in a recent re- 
port some very interesting facts regard- 
ing the cost of brick laying by munici- 
pal employees. Comparing the smaller 
sewers built by the Massachusetts Met- 
ropolitan commission with those built 
by the day labor force of the city of Bos- 
ton, the engineers find the prices rang- 
ing from $9.04 to $18.34 per thousand 
on the day labor work, whereas on the 
Metropolitan work done by contract the 
highest price was $4.23 and the lowest 
$2.77. 

Based on the number of brick laid, the 
difference between the day labor work of 
the city and the contract work of the 
Metropolitan board is as noticeable as 
is the difference in cost. These items 
are particularly interesting when it is 



noted that upon the city work, taking 
the average for a whole week, the num- 
ber of brick laid per mason per hour 
was as low as 13, and the largest num- 
ber was 242, as against 94 and 570 re- 
spectively upon the Metropolitan work. 
The highest number per hour for the 
average of an entire job done by the 
Sewer Division was 78, whereas the low- 
est average upon Metropolitan work was 
165 and the highest 384. 

The engineers show that to consider- 
able extent the excessive cost under city 
administration was due to the fact that 
sufficient work was not always presented 
to keep the masons busy, but taking ma- 
terial and labor costs into consideration 
it appears that the total cost for brick 
masonry in the sewers was $30.75 per 
thousand brick and $18.45 per cubic yard 
of brick work on the basis of 600 brick 
to the yard. It is shown that fair price 
to pay for Portland cement concrete of 
this class would not be in excess of $8.00 
per cubic yard. The engineers therefore 
recommend the substitution of concrete 
for brick work in sewer construction 
wherever possible. 

Some Wood Statistics in the State of 
Washington 

A 14-room house was recently built at 
Elma, Washington, from the lumber of a 
single yellow fir. There was nearly 38,- 
000 ft. of lumber in the logs of the tree, 
and the stump inside the bark measured 
9 ft. The total height of the tree was 
300 ft., its lumber was worth $1,000, and 
the trunk was straight and without a 
limb for 100 ft. 

Statistics show, says Popular Me- 
chanics, that there is enough timber 
standing in the state of Washington to 
build 5,000,000 six-room houses, sufficient 
to shelter one-third of the population of 
the United States. The timber would 
furnish ties for 1,893,939 miles of rail- 
way track, or suffice to construct a plank 
road 3 in. thick and 500 ft. wide that 
would extend around the world twice. 




ALADDIN HOUSE $ 298 



DWELLING HOUSES, BARNS, SUMMER COTTAGES 

Aladdin Knocked Down Houses are shipped everywhere. Every* 
piece of material comes to you out and fitted and ready to nail in 
place. No skilled labor required. Permanent, attractive, warm 
and lasting. Mot portable. Price includes all lumber cut to fit, 
shingles, doors, windows, glass, patent plaster board, interior trin. 
and finish, paint, nails, locks, hardware and complete instructions. 

Houses from to 12 rooms. Save four profits by buying direct from 

mill. Send stamps for catalog. NORTH AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION CO., BAY CITY, MICH. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



335 




KELSEY HEATED-MT. KISCO, N. Y. 
Delano & Aldrich, Architects 

36,000 Kelsey 
have been sold 

to Home-Owners who investigated 

Let us send you our Booklet, 
"The Triumph of the Kelsey" 
so that you may know why the 

Kelsey gives results which 
causes every user to recommend 



The Kelsey Fresh Air 
System of Heating 

The Quantity of Heat and Quality of Heat 
supplied by the Kelsey is unlimited. 
It gives all the heat you want, all the time you 
want it, and everywhere you want it. 

The Kelsey Warm Air Generator 
does not scorch the air as a furnace does; it warms 
great volumes of fresh air properly and forces into 
every room, and is always preferred by people who 
investigate, to the unhealthful steam or hot-water ra- 
diator systems which warm the same air over and over. 

Don't Make the Mistake 

of believing all heaters are alike. The KELSEY, with 
its great battery of ZIG-ZAG HEAT TUBES, has double 
the weight and heating surfaces of ordinary heaters, 
warms air by the best method ; is most easily man- 
aged and heats small houses, large houses, churches 
and schools with less fuel than any other heater that 
can produce results in any way as satisfactory. 



KELSEY HEATING CO. 



Chicago Office: 
609 W. Lake St. 



MAIN OFFICE: 
102 Fayette St., Syracuse. N. Y. 



New York City Office; 
156 C. Fifth Ave. 



Attractive Home Decoration 

need not cost any more than the most commonplace, but 
it requires unusual taste and expert knowledge of color 
effects. We will furnish you an original color scheme 
which will suit your individual needs, if you will send 
us a pencil sketch of your house plan or describe arrange- 
ment of rooms, giving color of woodwork and purpose 
of each room. Our charge for this service is 

ONE DOLLAR 

On receipt of your remittance, we wilj promptly for- 
ward complete color scheme suitable for tint, oil or paper 
treatment, showing color for each room. Money gladly 
refunded if color scheme is not entirely satisfactory. 

INTERIOR DECORATING CO. 

1219 Corn Exchange Bank Bldg. CHICAGO 



The Fox Hand Scraper 

Size 31-2x3 1-2 inches. 
Cutting Edge 31-4 inches. 

Sent, express charges pre- 
paid on receipt of $1 .25 

We manufacture 
Scraper Knives for 
all make.* of Floor 
Scrapers and guar- 
antee them to be of the exact temper and toughness 
required Write for prices and get our catalogue 
describing the Fox No. 1 FLOOR SCRAPER, the 
most perfect machine of the kind made. 
FOX MFG. CO., Dept. 10, BROOKLYN, WIS. 




trial. 



ATTENTION TO DETAILS 

Will 

Insure Comfort 

IN YOUR HOME 
See that Your Doors are hung with 

STANLEY'S 

Ball - Bearing Hinges 

No creaking of doors 
No need of oiling 
No sagging 

ARTISTIC BOOKLET FREE 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

Dept.T, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



336 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



GLIMPSES OF BOOKS 



FEW carefully selected books will 
be reviewed on this page each 
month. A good book is a power- 
ful influence in the creation of 
the home and we trust that Keith's will 
be an aid to our readers in the selection 
of a library. Editor. 




How to Use Concrete. 

By Walter C. Boynton and R. Marshall. 

This is a book of practical information 
upon the use of concrete and contains 
much that is useful, not heretofore pub- 
lished. Every phase of concrete work is 
fully entered into and described. The 
table of contents will convey a better 
idea of its value to those interested in 
concrete, than an extended notice, and is 
as follows : 

Molding" Monolithic Concrete Balus- 
trades How to Make a Seaworthy Con- 
crete Boat Bridge Work, Balustrades 
and Ornamentation, Plaster Face-Plates 
for Monolithic Walls How to Make a 
Plant Urn Building a Concrete Block 
Furnace Concrete Bath and Laundry 
Tubs Molding Ornamental Flower Pots 
and Vases Reinforced Concrete Benches 
for Greenhouses Laying Wood Floors 
on Concrete Bases Concrete Mantel and 
Fireplace Silos, Stand Pipes and Water 
Towers Concrete Tanks f o r Feed- 
Water Storage Model Concrete Tile 
Plant Cost of Concrete Culvert Con- 
crete Linings for Ditches Cost of Con- 
crete Drain Tile How. to Mold Concrete 
Benches Concrete Arbor Seat of Simple 
Design Making Hexagonal Sidewalk 
Block in Concrete Concrete Pavement 
in Fond clu Lac, Wisconsin Concrete 
Pavements Under Patents Material Re- 
quired for Concrete Sidewalks Cost 
Figures on Concrete Sidewalks Wire 
Conduits Made of Concrete Concrete 
Gutter Covers at Cross Walks Associa- 
tions of Cement Users C o n c r e t e 
Bridges of Simple Design Concrete 
Theatres, Banks and Schools How to 
Make Concrete Monuments Glue and 
Waste Molds for Concrete Work Mold- 



ing Ornamental Concrete Work Con- 
crete Block Cost Data Stucco, What is 
it and How Applied Strength of Con- 
crete Brick Manufacture of Concrete 
Fence Posts N. A. C. U. Sidewalk 
Specifications Miscellaneous Informa- 
tion. 

Concrete Publishing Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Price in cloth, $1.00. 



The Kingdom of Slender Swords. 

By Hallie Erminie Rives. 

Springtime in Japan forms a beautiful 
setting for this charming love story by 
the Author of "Satan Sanderson." Bar- 
bara Fairfax visiting the daughter of the 
American Ambassador at Tokio, is an 
orphan whose parents married in Japan, 
her mother returning after her husband's 
death to the United States where Bar- 
bara was born. Her lover is to meet her 
in Japan expecting to win her consent. 
The secretary of the legation, a younger 
man, who has become famous for his 
achievements is aviation, saves her from 
a vicious dog at the risk of his life. The 
situation develops rapidly and they be- 
come very much in love with each other. 
Apparently he is false to her and she 
becomes engaged to the first man, Austin 
Ware. Philip Ware, his dissipated 
younger brother, in the course of the mis- 
understanding, and his association with 
a goverment expert on explosives, a 
foreigner, threatens the honor of Japan. 
The wonderful display of loyalty and 
self sacrifice upon the part of a young 
Japanese girl to obtain the secret of the 
conspirators for her country is a touch- 
ing and dramatic incident of the book. 
Their plans are frustrated by the aviator 
in the face of a host of difficulties and 
his final vindication in Barbara's eyes 
leads her to accept him. Japan appears 
in a most favorable light, the book is 
very cleverly written and shows careful 
preparation upon the part of the author. 

The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. Price, $1.50. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

ON HOME BUILDING 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED 

The Journal of Modern Construction 

MAX L. KEITH, Publisher, 

525 Lumber Exchange ,'**' Minneapolis, Minn. 
Eastern Office: No. 1 Madison Ave., New York City 

Contents for May 



EDITORIAL - -- - -- 

THE STAIRWAY AND ITS AUXILIARY FEATURES 

LEADED GLASS FOR DOMESTIC USE 

A STATELY SPOKANE HOME 

TWO UNIQUE STRUCTURES 

NOTES ON GARDENING 

CONCRETE TILING 

DESIGNS FOR THE HOME-BUILDER *- 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING - - - - 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION - 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

TABLE CHAT * . . ;- - - 

CEMENT - ... V/*UX -- 

PAINTING AND FINISHING 

HEATING AND PLUMBING 

SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 

BOOK NOTICES - - - - -V~ S 



Page 

338 

341 
346 

351 
356 

358 
261 



376 
380 
384 
388 
392 
396 
400 
404 
408 



CAUTION ^^ remittances, whether through news agent, or by money order, draft, 
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-^ ^ his subscription, notice to that effect shou'd be sent. Otherwise 

it is assumed that a continuance is desired. 



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For sale by all News Dealers in the United States and Canada - Trade supplied by American News Co. and Branches 



Entered Jan, /, 1899, at the ( Postoffice in Minneapolis, Minn. , for transmission through the mails as second-class matter 

COPYRIGHTED 1910 




VARI-COLORED MOONLIGHT ON THE STAIRWAY A STUDY IN SILHOUETTE. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Vol. XXIII 



MAY, 1910 



No. 5 



The Stairway and Its Auxiliary Features 



By Charles Alma Byers 

( Photographs by the Author ) 




STAIRWAY AND RECEPTION HALL, IN FLEMISH OAK, GIVING AN EFFECT OF WARMTH 

AND HARMONY. 




ROBABLY no other single in- 
terior feature of the house of 
two stories, or more, deserves 
greater attention from the archi- 
tect and decorator than does the stair- 
way. Located, as it usually is, where it 
commands the first, or almost the first, 
attention of the visitor crossing the 
threshold, it should be made one of the 



structural masterpieces of the home. 
Whether it lead from the reception hall 
of the mansion or near-mansion, or from 
the living room of less pretentious home, 
it is, in a sense, the hub of that home 
the point from which extend the house's 
various ramifications, or passageways. In 
almost every home its setting, in fact, 
forms the common household center, or 



342 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



meeting place, and because of its conse- 
quent prominence, it, together with the 
setting, demands artistic consideration. 

The well designed stairway makes pos- 
sible the introduction of many pretty 
and comfort-giving features, and the ar- 
rangement of these also should be care- 
fully studied. Cozy corners with built-in 
seats are always a popular auxiliary of 
the stairway, and they invariably lend 
charm to the home. Settings for pedes- 
tals and tabourets, bearing statuary and 
ferns or flowers, are also provided, while 
the stairway wall may be given touches 
of coloring by the display of pictures or 
the introduction of art glass windows. 
There is no better place, in fact, for the 
use of art glass in the home than for the 
stairway windows. 

The first photograph here presented 
gives a very artistic view of a stairway 
lighted by a large art glass window. The 
effect is that of moonlight pouring 
through the window onto the first stair- 
way landing, lighting up a large oil paint- 
ing and throwing a giant fern and the 



railing into silhouette. A Venus de Milo 
stands on a pedestal in a dark recess of 
the stairway arrangement, and is lighted 
by a glare of light from the reception 
hall fireplace. 

The second illustration gives a de- 
tailed view of the same stairway, this 
view showing the reception hall as it 
appears in daylight. The room is shown 
as the visitor sees it when crossing the 
threshold. The stairway is of compara- 
tively simple design, and at the same 
time it helps very materially in giving 
the room a tone of elegance and warmth. 
There are five steps leading to the first 
landing, onto which the art glass window- 
pours its vari-colored light, and then the; 
stairway turns at right angles. The 
room is finished exclusively in dark col- 
ors, the woodwork being of Flemish oak, 
while the walls are covered with paper 
of plain, unusual design, done in dull 
greens and blues. The rugs, as well as 
the stairway carpet, are of Oriental pat- 
tern and coloring. The effect is one of' 
harmony and coziness throughout. 




A WELL DESIGNED STAIRWAY WITH COZY CORNER, BUILT-IN SEATS, ETC. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A STAIRWAY THAT PROVIDES BUILT-IN WINDOW SEATS, FINISHED IN GOLDEN OAK. 




AN ATTRACTIVE STAIRWAY IN AN INEXPENSIVE ::c:/~. 



344 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




A MODERNIZED COLONIAL, STAIRWAY SHOWING ELEVATED ALCOVE WITH GRANDFATHER'S 

CLOCK, ETC. 



The third photograph shows a stair- 
way that affords an excellent cozy cor- 
ner, which occupies the space interven- 
ing between the stairway and the dining 
room and under the upper turn of the 
stairway. The corner is provided with 
a built-in seat, and is made partially se- 
cluded by the use of Oriental drapes. 
The floor of this cozy corner is raised 
one step above the floor reception hall, 
and the entrance to the stairway, formed 
by two pillars, one of which is capped 
with a piece of bronze statuary, leads 
from this elevation. The entrance ar- 
rangement also provides for a second 
built-in seat, which becomes an asset of 
the reception hall proper. The hall, 
from which the stairway leads, connects 
the living. room with the "den," portiers 
forming the only partitions. The wood- 
work of the stairway, the reception hall 
and the rooms is of weathered oak. 

The fourth photograph shows a recep- 



tion hall and stairway finished in golden 
oak, with the plastered portions of the; 
walls tinted buff. The stairway ar- 
rangement is simple but effective. The 
lower and principal flight leads to a land- 
ing which is lighted by three large win- 
dows of leaded art glass, at which point 
the course of the stairway reverses and 
continues to the second floor. The space 
under the landing and the second section 
of the flight is utilized as a cozy corner, 
which is provided with a built-in window 
seat. The corner is lighted by three 
windows similar to the ones which are 
seen at the midway landing of the stair- 
way. 

The fifth illustration shows a plain but 
artistically designed stairway in an in- 
expensive home. The stairway leads 
from the living room, and at an eleva- 
tion of six steps it turns at right angles, 
providing a space beneath that is utilized 
for a closet. The woodwork of the room, 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



345 



as well as the stairway, consists of Cali- 
iornia redwood, imply oiled. 

The sixth illustration shows an im- 
mense reception hall with stairway de- 
signed to represent a modernized colonial 
style of architecture. The stairway ar- 
rangement is particularly interesting, and 
introduces an unusual feature. The first 
six steps lead to a sort of alcove, which 
is provided with chairs and a grandfather 
clock, and is lighted by a large plate 
glass window. The course of the stair- 
way reverses at this point and continues 
to the second floor. The reception hall 
serves as an unpartitioned connection be- 
tween the drawing room, the library and 
the dining room. The woodwork is en- 
ameled white and the plastered portions 
of the walls and ceiling are tinted a deep 
buff. 

The seventh photograph illustrates a 
simple effective stairway arrangement in 
an inexpensive home. The stairway is 



constructed in three sections or flights, 
and at the second landing are four art 
glass windows. A modern grandfather's 
clock is also a feature of this landing. 
The woodwork of the stairway, as well 
as that of the hallway, is of Flemish oak, 
while the rugs and carpets are of Orien- 
tal pattern and coloring. The simplicity 
of the arrangement is responsible for its 
charm. 

Stairway designing, as will be real- 
ized from a careful study of the subject, 
and the accompanying illustrations, is 
very much of an art. The general in- 
terior appearance of a house of two sto- 
ries depends very largely upon the stair- 
way and reception hall arrangement, and 
no home can possess an inviting atmos- 
phere if the arrangement is slighted. The 
stairway and its setting offer many pos- 
sibilities, and the prospective home-build- 
er can well afford to give the subject 
more than passing thought. 




A SIMPLE, EFFECTIVE, STAIRWAY ARRANGED FOR AN INEXPENSIVE HOME. 



346 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Leaded Glass for Domestic Use 

By J. A. Knowles 




FIG. I. 



Courtesy Norman Reed & Co., Eng. 




HEN the momentous questions 
of plan, elevations, and materials 
have all been successively at- 
tacked and settled ; and the 
house is well on the way towards com- 
pletion, the next items which engage the 
attention of the home-builder are the 
decorations, furnishings, and interior fit- 
tings of the future home ; and in no other 



part of the work will more caution be 
necessary, nor careful thought reap a 
richer reward than in avoiding the many 
pitfalls which lie open for the unwary. 

After all it is the inside of the house 
in which we live, it is there the family 
life centers and there the greater part 
of the occupants' time is spent, so no ele- 
gance of exterior architecture can com- 
pensate for an unsatisfactory interior 
plan, nor is this in any way laudable if it 
is attained at the expense of interior har- 
.mohy. 

Having thus demonstrated the law of 
unity, exterior and interior, and taking 
it for granted that we have already at- 
tained the first by placing ourselves in 
the hands of a competent architect, and 
co-operating with him as much as pos- 
sible ; let us not do anything as the work] 
draws near completion to introduce a. 
false note in decorations or furnishings,.; 
which would tend to mar what would, 
otherwise be, in every way, commendable^ 
Under this head of decoration comes the. 
design of various windows and their fit- 1 
ness for the different openings, rooms, - 
lightings, and all other conditions, which 
have to be taken into consideration to- 
produce complete harmony. 

It is, of course, impossible in the scope 
of a short article, such as this, to lay 
down definite rules which could govern 
the design of windows for domestic use 
for all styles of houses and every period 
of architecture. All that is possible is 
to draw the attention of the inquiring 
home-builder to a few general principles 
and leave these to his consideration with 
the recommendation that he take the 
advice and assistance of his architect, as 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



347 



being one best acquainted with the spe- 
cial conditions and requirements of his 
individual case. 

A special point to be considered in 
our scheme of leaded glass windows is 
the varied requirements they 'are to ful- 
fil in the several rooms with regard to 
the different amount of illumination re- 
quired. For instance, suppose we have a 
hall with somewhat limited window 
space, it would be obviously unwise to 
have, say a treatment in dark opal glass, 
which would tend to make the hall, 
which is the first room we see, as we 
enter, and which should give us a sug- 
gestion of the rest of the home, and the 
character of its inmates, dark and 
gloomy. On the other hand in the draw- 
ing room, where we generally concen- 
trate our best efforts in decorations, the 
most handsome furniture and richest 
hangings, a cold icy light pouring in at 
the windows to dazzle and bewilder the 
eyes, would clearly be out of place; 
rather, here should we use our softest 
tones and richest harmonies, bearing al- 
ways in mind the general effect of the 
whole interior; the color of the carpets, 
the tinting of the walls, the character of 
the upholstering even to the binding of 
the books on the bookshelves, and the 
embroidery on the sofa cushions to pro- 
duce complete restfulness and harmony. 

The dining room, too, it seems to me, 
should be treated in a light manner, so 
as to give airiness to the general effect, 
for it is here we eat, sunrise and sunset, 
and oftentimes paterfamilias wishes to 
look up the latest movements of the stock 
market in his morning paper ere depart- 
ing for the serious business of the day, 
without resorting to artificial light. 

Most homes nowadays are not consid- 
ered complete without a den, and if this 
nook for rest has a window, it -would be 
very appropriate to have it made in some 
deep and rich glasses with some quaint 
device, such as for instance, goldfish 




FIG. 2. 



Courtesy Gascoyne & Sow?, Nottingham, Eng- 



swimming in water, or a little landscape 
done in lead and glass alone as in figures 
2 and 3. But these things can best be 
left to the individual taste of each home- 
builder, and if the above general prin- 
ciples be followed, it will not be possible 
for them to go far astray. 

Of course, by far the greatest factor 
that should influence the design of the 
windows is the architecture of the house 
and the individual styles of interior fit- 
tings, when as is often the case, the 
home is not designed in the same style 
throughout the interior, the different 
rooms being treated according to distinct 
styles, as for instance the library in 
Gothic, the drawing room Colonial or 
Louis-Quinze, etc. Yet no matter what 
style has to be followed, it is a great mis- 
take to make a window a special feature, 
as if the whole house had been designed 
and built around it to show it off, there- 
fore making the interior of the room so 
dark that it is impossible to read or move 
about with any degree of comfort. Fail- 
ure in this respect, especially in opal 
windows, often mars what would other- 
wise be a meritorious piece of work. 
After all a window is merely an incident 
in the general scheme, and not the end 
and aim of the whole purpose of the 



348 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



building any more than any other part of 
the work. It is, therefore, the worst of 
bad taste to emphasize it unduly. Let 
simplicity be the keynote throughout, for 
nothing can be worse than over orna- 
mentation, simple lines in the leadwork 
to bring out and emphasize the surround- 
ing millions instead of a mass of mean- 
ingless scrolls, which have no connec- 
tion whatever with the surroundings. 

Such a window, intended for an up- 
right light in a hall is illustrated in Fig. 
No. 1. There is no attempt at forcing the 
effect, the whole being simple and digni- 
fied, depending solely on the spacing and 
disposition of the upright lines. This 
would best be carried out in double 
strength, American (or thin plate glass) 
with perhaps small pieces of antique or 
iridescent to give a touch of color to 
the general scheme. 

This brings us to the question of the 
several kinds of glasses of which a win- 





no. 5. 



Courtesy of The "Diamant" 



FIG. 3. Courtesy Gascoyne & Sons, Nottingham, Eng. 

dew can be made, which are in them- 
selves so many and varied in character 
that it would be possible to write an ar- 
ticle on this alone. It will be, perhaps, 
sufficient for our purpose to describe a 
few that more generally are used in do- 
mestic work. These comprise sheet, 
single and double strength (which is the 
regular window glass), antique, opales- 
cent, muffled, iridescent and cathedral. 
This last, in spite of its high sounding 
name is almost the cheapest kind of col 
ored glass, and as the colors in this are 
of very crude tints, it would be well to 
dismiss it entirely from consideration, 
with the exception, perhaps, of one or 
two of the paler tints, such as ambers 
and olives. 

Antique is a glass made by hand in 
small sheets, full of bubbles, and vary- 
ing in thickness. It is extremely useful 



KEITH'S MAGAZINL 



349 




FIG. 4. 



Courtesy oj The "Diamanf 



350 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




FIG. 6. 



Courtesy of The "Diamant" 



for quarry work, and wherever a quaint 
-and old world feeling is needed. 

Opalescent, as its name implies, is of 
a cloudy or milky appearance similar to 
the precious stone of the same name, and 
is nearly always made of two or more 
colors, which harmonize with one an- 
other, mixed together, so as to produce 
a streaky effect. When used with taste, 
it is extremely useful, but no glass is 
capable of such meritricious effects in 
the hands of an unskilful artist as this. 

Muffled is a transparent glass, made 
in all colors, but with a wavy surface 
similar to ripples in water, and irides- 



cent has on its surface a beautiful blue 
and green shimmer, which only appears 
when the light falls upon the glass, but 
is invisible when the light comes through. 
It is, therefore, mostly used in such 
things as bookcase door lights when the 
light falls .on the window and little or 
none comes tTirough. 

There are many other forms of glass, 
which lend themselves to produce the 
most happy results in the hands of an 
experienced artist, such as roundels, 
which were originally the broken off bot- 
toms of wine glasses, which some genius 
with an eye to their decorative effect ap- 
propriated for use in a window with most 
successful results, and are now made es- 
pecially for the purpose of window mak- 
ing; and mother of pearl, which though 
of course not glass at all, is yet a new 
power of gaining effects by its delicate 
use in small pieces in a manner similar 
to the iridescent. 

Figure No. 4 shows a decorative treat- 
ment of a landscape to be carried out in 
opal glasses to obtain a fairly rich color 
effect, and would be most suitable for a 
staircase window, where it was possible 
to view it at a proper distance such as 
from a hallway or landing above. Fig- 
ures Nos. 5 and 6 show two small lights 
illustrating how leaded work can be 
made beautiful without being necessar- 
ily complicated or expensive. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



351 



A Stately Spokane Home 

Built in the Georgian Colonial Style 



(Photographs by the Architects, Keith & Whitehouse) 




RESIDENCE OF MR. DANIEL MORGAN, SPOKANE, WASH. 




HE growth of our American cit- 
ies is a constant surprise not 
only to foreigners but to our 
own people. Each season sees 
large areas improved by fine homes 
where the cornfield and pasture were 
but yesterday. Our country is so vast 
that it is hard for the resident of one 
section to realize that all the progress is 
not in his immediate vicinity. The West 
has so long been associated in our minds, 



as being a vast territory, crude and yet 
in the swaddling clothes of civilization, 
that it is something of a shock to find 
splendid cities where villages were ex- 
pected and stately colonial residences on 
what may once have been the site of 
miner's cabins. 

The last twenty years has seen vast 
changes over the entire country, and 
few cities have forged ahead as has Spo- 
kane, in material progress. A visible and 



352 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE CARRIAGE ENTRANCE. 

substantial sign of the times is in the 
many homes both large and small, that 
have been built in the very recent years. 
Among them is the beautiful home of 
Daniel Morgan in the Manito Park dis- 
trict. 

Architecturally the house closely fol- 



lows the Georgian Colonial type. On 
the front elevation is a large portico sup- 
ported by four massive Doric columns. 
Across the full length of the front and. 
east elevations, runs a wide porch with 
a balcony supported by small Doric col- 
umns. 

On the west is a carriage entrance pro- 
tected by a portico. The exterior finish 
is of four-inch cedar siding laid 2*4 
inches to the weather. The shingled roof 
stained black, and the two exposed chim- 
neys are of pressed cream colored brick 
laid in red mortar. 

Entrance is made through a vestibule 
with a floor of mosaic tile, at one end of 
which is a built-in seat of mahogany. 

The vestibule opens into a large re- 
ception hall, 28 feet in length. This is- 
finished in Honduras mahogany and has- 
quarter-sawed oak floors. On the right 
a columned opening leads to the library 
and on the left a similar opening con- 
nects with the living room, thus giving- 
the house dignity and spaciousness. 
These columns are fluted mahogany with 
Ionic caps. Against the wall are pilasters 
with composition caps. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



353 



On the right wall of the hall is a large 
cheval glass. At the far end is the stair- 
way, which is divided from the main hall 
by an elliptical arch. Two steps up is 
the first landing of the stairs, and back 
of this is a recess with a seat. Above 
the seat is a wood panel and above this 
is a plaster shell in gold leaf tints. The 
balustrade of the stairs is white enamel 
with mahogany rail. There is a second 
landing in view. 

The living room is finished in mahog- 
any and has a cornice at the ceiling. The 
walls are treated with green silk arm- 
ures, and the ceiling is hand-decorated 
plaster. The floors are quarter-sawed 
white oak. 

A large fireplace and hearth are faced 
with green faience tile. The mantelpiece 
is in heavy effect, the Colonial effect be- 
ing carried out in Ionic columns. On 
each side of the fireplace are large plate 



glass windows, and on the right is a built- 
in seat concealing a wood lift connect- 
ing with the fuel room in the basement. 

Double sliding doors divide the living 
room from the djning room. This room 
has a beamed ceiling and is also finished 
in mahogany. There is a paneled wain- 
scot six feet high, the panels being done 
in blue leather. A plate rail crowns the 
wainscot, above which the wall is 
treated in tapestry. 

At the far end of the room is a built- 
in buffet with a swelled front, leaded 
glass doors and plate glass mirror and 
glass shelves. On the east side of the 
room is a triple window. This room is 
reached from the living room and from 
the main hall. 

The library walls are done in brown 
silk armures and the ceiling is hand deco- 
rated. 

Back of the library is the den, reached 




LOOKING INTO LIVING ROOM FROM RECEPTION HALL. 



354 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



by a side hall off the stairs hall. This 
hall is reached from the outside through 
the carriage entrance. 

Fir is used in the den finish, there be- 
ing a paneled wainscot in brown leather. 
Above the wainscot is a frieze showing a 
forest and setting sun in appropriate 
tints. The fireplace is built of fancy 
pressed brick, the hearth being red pot- 
tery tile. On each side of the fireplace 
are wine cupboards. The room is lighted 
by casement windows. This room was 
designed to receive the Indian curios of 
which the owner has a large collection. 

Between the dining room and kitchen 
is a butler's pantry, finished in white 
enamel and having tile floor and tile 
wainscot. The top of the work table is 
mahogany. 

The kitchen also has a tile floor and 
tile wainscot 5 feet high. It is one of 
the modern kitchens in the city. One en- 
tire wall is taken up with cupboards, 



drawers and shelves. The range is con- 
structed to burn either gas or coal. A 
dumbwaiter connects with the 'storeroom 
in the basement, and the sink fixtures are 
white enamel all built in one piece. There 
is a radiator to be used as a plate warmer. 
The work table is covered with a marble 
slab and underneath it is a concealed fuel 
box. Above the tile wainscot the walls 
are done in "sanitas." The kitchen con- 
nects with a large back porch, which is 
latticed in. There is a back stairway 
from the kitchen to the second floor and 
to the basement. 

The second floor arrangement consists 
of five bed-rooms and bath, all leading 
from one central hall. The entire floor 
is finished in white enamel 8 coat work, 
the last coat being rubbed down to an 
egg shell finish. All bed-room walls are 
papered. The owner's bed-room is treat- 
ed in pale blue and white. 

The facings of fireplace and hearth are 




DEN FURNISHED WITH INDIAN CURIOS. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



355 



of white tile with pale blue border. The 
room has a large closet and a lavatory. 
It connects with a dressing room, which 
opens upon the front balcony through a 
French door. The boudoir also has a 
closet. 

All the other chambers have large clos- 
ets, and there is a large linen closet with 
shelves and drawers at the bathroom en- 
trance. 

The bathroom has a tile floor and tile 
wainscot and hard plaster walls. Every- 
thing in the room is white, including all 
the fixtures. There is a large Roman tub 
and a pedestal basin. 

A shower bath is built in connection 
and enclosed with marble slabs. There 
is a closet and a clothes chute to the 
laundry. 

In the attic is a large cedar closet 
for storage purposes. 

There is a full basement under the 
house with cement floors. The base- 
ment is divided into the laundry, fruit 
cellar, storage room and fuel room and 
toilet. It is equipped with a hot water 
heating plant. All walls of the basement 
are plastered. 

The house has a vacuum cleaning sys- 
tem and also a ventilation system 





MANTEL IN OWNER'S BEDROOM. 

throughout that operates on the gravity 
principle. Another unusual convenience 
is an electrically-operated washing ma- 
chine in the laundry. In addition to the 
hot water system the house is to have 
an instantaneous water heating appara- 
tus connecting with all the water faucets. 




356 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Two Unique Structures 



By Edith Everett 




UNITARIAN CHURCH, BERKLEY, CALIF. 



D 



HE town of Berkeley, California, 
has two structures, which for 
novelty cannot be surpassed, 
even in the Old World. One is 
the Unitarian church, the other is the 
famous Greek theatre. 

The picture gives a fair idea of the 
unique little church. Nothing could be 
more different, from the traditional con- 
ception of what a church should be; yet 
after all it is one of the prettiest, most 
picturesque buildings that can be found 
anywhere. 

It is a low, roomy shingle structure. 
Built low, it is said, because the man who 
lives next door, and who sold the lot, 



specified that his view of the bay should 
not be shut off. Vines and rose bushes 
climb over the church, and it is on one 
side almost concealed by trees. The 
chimney is entirely hidden by thick 
vines. Geraniums border the path, and 
grow close about the church itself. Lo- 
cated at the intersection of two streets, 
it has two entrances. The two low 
porches at each entrance are large and 
exceedingly attractive. The support of 
each porch is a tree trunk standing just 
as cut, the rough bark fitting in admir- 
ably with the dark shingle building and 
huge wooden rafters. The windows are 
covered with awnings, to keep out the 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



357 



bright California sun. Within the church 
is little trace of the conventional. The 
assembly room is modern and conven- 
ient in every respect. Such is the Uni- 
tarian church of Berkeley, without spire 
or bell, unique even among new 
churches. 

At the back of the University of Cali- 
fornia campus, cut into the hillside, is 
located the beautiful Greek theatre. The 
town of Berkeley can boast that through 
the gift of William Hearst it possessed 
the first Greek theater in America. Here 
among the immense pines and giant 
eucalyptus, the student is introduced to 
the old world of the Greek. 

It is a most perfect out-of-door theatre, 
built exactly like the theatre of ancient 
times. One can imagine that he has 
slipped back a few centuries as he enters 



this vast amphitheatre. Thousands of 
people can be seated on these tiers of 
stone seats, and here the university holds 
many exercises, as California weather 
will permit out-of-door gatherings at al- 
most all seasons. 

Here a band sounds better than in a 
close opera house, here a beautiful solo, 
sung while the sighing trees murmur ac- 
companiment, is the most perfect delight. 
This theatre has been much talked of, 
and has been copied by some eastern uni- 
versities, but in no other region can the 
Greek idea be so successfully carried out 
as in the mild climate of California. The 
stately columns of the broad stage, the 
classic entrances, the great tiers of stone 
seats, combine to make a structure of 
which the state university is justly 
proud. 




GREEK THEATRE, BERKLEY, CALIF. 



358 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Notes on Gardening 




AN AMERICAN BEAUTY ROSE BUSH. 




Tea Roses. 

GREAT variety of roses have 
size, brilliant color and are very 
fragrant, yet to many the tea 
rose has a peculiar charm. Its 
simplicity, modest bearing and 
tea odor makes it a favorite 
among roses. Two varieties of special 
interest are pink and white Maman Co- 
chet. The flowers are remarkably beau- 
tiful in form, charming in color and re- 
main perfect long after being cut. 
The white is even more beautiful than 



very 
delicate 



the pink, being tinged with rose color. 
The buds, ' which are unusually well 
shaped, should not be cut until they are 
about three-quarters open, as they are 
then at their best. The plants are vig- 
orous, of their kind, and bear many flow- 
ers. The tea rose is not in itself a hardy 
variety and requires special protection 
in northern latitudes. The earth should 
be hilled up about each plant and a shel- 
ter of boards with a slanting roof to 
shed the water, built about them. Dry 
leaves should be placed about the plant 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



359 



filling the entire shelter. This should be 
done before the first severe frost comes. 
Judgment should be used in removing 
the shelter as it is not well to leave it 
too long or remove it too early. Tender 
plants should be carefully watched in the 
spring till all danger of frost is past. 
Backgrounds and Garden Limits. 

With a recently improved lot there 
should be a good opportunity of starting 
right. It is assumed that all rubbish has 
been carefully removed and that the 
soil if not originally of good quality has 
been supplied. 

Consider the outlines of the lot, its phys- 
ical geography as to grades, the trees 
already upon it and the adjoining prop- 
erty. The points of the compass are im- 
portant because sunlight is more essen- 
tial to some plants than others and 
storms usually come from some direc- 
tion peculiar to the locality. Decide just 
where a barn, garage or other out-build- 
ings will best be located, their relation 
one to another and where the dividing 
line shall be between them and the veg- 
etable and flower garden. If any of the 
buildings are of such a character that 
they are best hidden, a background of 
trees and shrubs may be provided. The 
vegetable garden is often enclosed with 
a fence of wire, upon which vines may 
grow or against which shrubs may be 
planted. Ordinarily the taller plants and 
trees should be planted at the limits of 
the grounds, at the sides and across the 
rear, with as much open space in and 
about the center as possible. Portions 
of this can be used later for flowers, but 
in no case should a lawn be planted all 
over with isolated shrubs or small flow- 
er gardens. Such a scheme is spotty in 
appearance and depends altogether upon 
the individual beauty of the plant or 
flower, with no idea of a well ordered 
plan for the whole lot. A great deal of 
study should be given the general out- 
line before any thought is given to the 



kind of trees or shrubs to be used. Set- 
tle it once and for all, if possible, because 
a year is easily lost in transplanting and 
it is time in a garden that brings per- 
fection. If the lot is of good size, the 
service yard should be entirely separate 
from the grounds proper, where one may 
go for rest and recreation. 

The weekly wash is more a matter of 
sanitation than sightliness and should 
be in a space by itself, screened from 
view. It is better to figure out quite an 
elaborate scheme to start with, adding 
to a well established foundation from 
time to time till it is. complete, than to 
outline something simple that must be 
continually torn up to make way for 
things that were overlooked. If a lily 
pond is ever to be desirable, let there 
be enough open lawn in the proper loca- 
tion, to make its introduction a simple 
matter. It is too bad to move a well 
established tree to accommodate a ten- 
nis court that is an afterthought. 

Before the house is built is an excel- 
lent time to consider these matters, or 
even while the plans are being drawn. 
The architect will, in most cases, have 
some excellent ideas along this line. The 
location of the house upon the lot is 
most important if the appearance of the 
whole place is to be of the best. If the 
lot is small and the house itself is the 
limit of view, the garden plants should 
be massed about it leading up from the 
sides of the lot, thus carrying the eye 
till it reaches the full expanse of the 
completed picture. 

If the house is the background, the 
shrubs need not be of a large growing 
variety. A slender poplar may be plant- 
ed quite close and, if so located that 
it comes between windows, it will in no 
way obstruct the view from the house. 
Vines, hollyhocks, golden glow, with 
smaller plants and flowers at the base 
will give a very satisfactory effect. If 
the garden has to tend away from the 



360 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



house, and there is no pretty fence or 
stone wall to give it a natural boundary, 
plan a heavy, thick, tall background. 
You can set young poplars or catalpas, 
both quick growers and good foliage 
makers. Between them can come for- 
sythias, weigelias and deutzias. 

The forsythia will give a wonderful 
golden bloom early in the spring. The 
weigelias and deutzias will bloom after 
the forsythia has lost its flowers and has 
replaced them with its exquisite green 
foliage. Thus the background will fur- 
nish both flowers and leaves for the 
whole gardening season. 



If you want a background immediate- 
ly, train honeysuckle, morning glory, cu- 
cumber vine or woodbine on stakes. The 
vines will interlace as they grow, and in 
the second year you will have an almost 
impenetrable fence of green. Keep it 
cut to a height of seven or eight feet and 
it will throw all its strength into the bot- 
tom parts. 

Innumerable other backgrounds might 
be made, the above being only sugges- 
tive. The idea in mind is, to put some- 
thing at a distance to look at, with color 
furnished by a judicious selection of flow- 
ers and shrubbery. 



FERTILIZERS FOR GARDENS 



How Much Is Needed in the Average 
Home Plot. 

The three important food requirements 
of plants, whether they be trees, vege- 
tables or flowers, are nitrogen, potash 
and phosphoric acid. Nitrogen is sup- 
plied by nitrate of soda, sulphate of am- 
monia, fish-scrap or slaughter-house ref- 
use. Unleached wood ashes give a fair 
percentage of potash and a large per- 
centage of lime, both most valuable. 
Phosphoric acid is furnished by phos- 
phate rock (prepared chemically) and by 
bone meal, bone black and guano. 

For a plot 100 by 100 feet, 75 pounds 
of chemical fertilizer will be sufficient 
unless the soil is extremely barren, when 
the quantity may have to be increased 
by 50 per cent. The average home gar- 
den needs nothing else so much as abun- 
dant potash. For this reason, wood ashes 
are among the most valuable fertilizers. 

It is difficult, however, to get these in 
any except a wood-burning country, un- 
less you are willing to buy from dealers 
in garden supplies, who will usually sell 
only in full 200-pound barrel lots, charg- 
ing from $2 to $2.25. These, however, 
are the very best ashes, being Canadian 
hardwood. 

Very efficient fertilizer can be made by 
mixing 20 pounds of sulphate of am- 



monia, 30 pounds of bone ash and 25 
pounds of muriate of potash, all of which 
can be bought from wholesale chemists 
at a net cost that will be within $3.50. 
A cheaper but very good mixture can be 
made from 10 pounds of nitrate of soda, 
10 pounds of acid phosphate and 10 
pounds of muriate of potash. This gives 
a highly concentrated fertilizer, the muri- 
ate of potash being equivalent to more 
than 60 pounds of wood ashes. It will 
cost less than $1.50, but it will lack bulk, 
and this makes it a difficult matter to 
so spread it as to give its full benefit to 
all parts of the place. 

Of course, for ordinary purposes, ma- 
nure, especially from cowyards, is fully 
effective; but it is not always as easy to 
get as the chemicals, and it is offensive 
and therefore not desirable in the front 
garden. 

For the vegetable garden, if the soil 
is naturally good, a fair average require- 
ment is one-quarter of a pound of chem- 
ical fertilizer to the square yard. This 
will answer excellently for practically ev- 
ery ordinary vegetable, such as onions, 
spinach, squash, cabbage and lettuce. 
For peas it is well to feed a little extra 
nitrate of soda whenever seed goes in 
for successive plantings. These vege- 
tables devour nitrogen at a great rate, 
and they can't do without it. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



361 



Concrete Tiling 

By Warfield Webb 




TWO DESIGNS OF CONCRETE DECORATIVE TILING. 



OHERE are newer possibilities in 
the development of the concrete 
______ industry ; ideas that embody al- 
together different lines in con- 
struction work, and these should be 
noted very carefully by those who are 
watching the real progress of this indus- 
try. One among these newer triumphs 
that has at least been given a fair amount 
of experiment, is the manufacture and 
development of the concrete decorative 
tile industry. Tiling that is used for bath- 
rooms, fireplaces, lavatories, and in some 
instances, for floors. It is not possible 
to attain perfection in any undertaking 
without careful study, and long experi- 
ments. There are details that will arise 
from time to time to mar the progress 
of the work, and for this reason it de- 
mands the most particular work on the 
part of the operator. This has a spe- 



cial significance in connection with 
above mentioned idea. 

Much of the failure of concrete con- 
struction work in all lines, from the most 
simple to the most costly, has been due 
in a way from an eagerness on the part 
of the concrete operators to overlook 
the details that would make success pos- 
sible. This is the fault, and the remedy 
lies in greater pains, and the most in- 
tricate study. In the manufacture of this 
newer tiling for decorative purposes, 
there is a field that will demand, not 
alone care, but that will open up newer 
possibilities for the greater development 
of the concrete workers' higher art. 
There are several features in connection 
with the manufacture of this tile that 
will make it of far greater value as a 
structural material, and among these is 
the saving in cost, the decorative possi- 



362 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



bilities, and the durability of the tile 
themselves. 

The experiments thus far made prove 
that the cost of the concrete tiling is 
about one-half that of the clay tile, the 
average cost of the latter to the dealers 
being from fifteen cents to sixty and sev- 
enty cents per square foot. 

This is a consideration that must ap- 
peal to every constructor, and added to 
this the fact that there is no limit to the 
decorative features to these tile, is only 
another factor that makes their use a 
greater possibility. As to the number of 
colors there is no limit. They can be 
manufactured with a dark or light back- 
ground, in cameo effect, or in mosaic de- 
signs. This is done simply with the aid 
of chips of marble or granite, and there 
has been work done in this way that 
was a surpirise to the operator himself. 
The colors are very strong, and the sur- 
face can be either made flat or glazed, 
the former now being the more costly 
and largely used in clay tiling. 

When we consider the single fact that 
the perfection attained today in the clay 
tile industry has been due to the labors 
of centuries, there is every reason why 
the concrete tile should become a factor 
with the continued experiments that 
have thus far made possible the results 
already obtained, and that within a few 
months they could compare most favor- 
ably with the time-honored clay product. 
Their durability is assured because it is 
a fact well known that when a good qual- 
ity of concrete has been manufactured 
that it will last for centuries. This is 
a feature that needs no exploitation. 

Another feature in connection with the 
concrete tiling is the fact that they can 
be manufactured in a number of different 
sizes, according to the requirements of 
the individual, and also in the particular 
design that may be wanted by the pur- 
chaser. The average thickness of con- 
crete tile is about one-half inch, the same 
as that of clay tile. The methods in use 
for manufacturing the tile are very sim- 
ple, and unlike the clay tile do not re- 
quire burning. They are less brittle also, 
and in this way are very much less liable 
to break. The illustrations shown here- 



with were made on a concrete brick ma- 
chine that can be utilized for the manu- 
facture of concrete tiling, by simply mak- 
ing the backing of sand, thus permitting 
the concrete to attain only the required 
depth. The face of the tile is manufac- 
tured upward, so that the features of 
colors or other decoration can be worked 
out by the operator to his desired like- 
ness. The tile are only possible on a 
machine having the up-face feature, as 
it will be impossible to perfect the tiling 
in any other way. 

The backing of the tile is a mixture of 
cement and sand, of about one to three, 
while the face of the tile is of neat ce- 
ment, with the addition of such colors or 
other decoration as one desires in order 
to perfect his labors. The finished tile 
are ready for use when the cement has 
been permitted to set, and the flat face 
is at once obtainable. For making the 
face of the tile glazed, the use of an em- 
ery wheel is essential, this giving the pol- 
ish that is found now in the cheaper 
quality of clay tile. 

The work thus far done in this way 
has been approved of by a number of 
people who have noted the possibilities 
in the art, and have predicted that their 
use will simply be a matter of time. The 
real secret in the perfection of this newer 
art in concrete work is that the operator 
himself must be a man who has the 
artistic temperament developed to a cer- 
tain degree. He will find that this is 
important, as it is in other labors that 
require the best that is in a man. It is 
useless to undertake anything that has 
merit in it, unless the operator can pro- 
gress each day. The possibilities of con- 
crete construction do not end with the 
building of a house or other work that 
merely calls for strength anl durability, 
but it has in its makeup some features 
that are to be studied, and to open the 
way for other features that are as yet 
in embryo. This newer feature of con- 
crete decorative tile is one of these, and 
the results of the labors thus far expend- 
ed have proven that there is a future in 
the development of the same that is 
worthy the consideration of thinking 
men. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



363 



Designs for the Home -Builder 




T this season of the year the de- 
sign section is of special inter- 
est to our readers. This is the 
time when business for the year 
is well in hand and the outlook is favor- 
able, giving confidence to prospective 
builders. Even where weather condi- 
tions are such that active construction 
work may be carried on at any time, the 
man who is going to spend his money 
in a home likes to feel that the year is 
well established as a prosperous one be- 
fore beginning work. A great many are 
selecting designs now with a view of get- 
ting started at once, thus having the ad- 
vantage of all the best weather before 
the stifling heat of midsummer takes 
all the life and energy from the work- 
men. Another advantage is the fact that 
an early occupancy of a house built dur- 
ing the summer is desirable, because it 
affords time to get the family properly 
settled before winter sets in. There are 
always a thousand and one things to do 
to a new place after all the items of the 
contract have been fulfilled. The lot is 
full of lath, shingles, brickbats and ev- 
ery conceivable building material ref- 
use, all of which must be disposed of 
before the lot can be put in shape. If 
trees can be set out, shrubbery planted 
and sod placed, the next spring will see 
a degree of progress all out of proportion 
with the age of the place. 

The sooner the plan is decided upon 
and the house started, the sooner will the 
owner be able to move in. He will find 
the time none too long to get the house 
and grounds in shape before the cold 
weather puts a stop to further work. 
The man who is looking for a house of 
good size of concrete construction will 
find two very satisfactory designs. 



The artistic cottage, the bungalow, the 
two-storied house of shingles and cement 
and the square house are all here repre- 
sented by good examples drawn by ca- 
pable designers. 

Design "B 143" 

Walls and chimneys to be of plain or 
bush-hammered concrete blocks, laid up 
in alternating wide and narrow courses. 
Inside of all exterior walls to be covered 
with R. I. W. and plastered. Concrete 
blocks are also to be used for basement 
walls, piers and partitions. Basement 
walls to be waterproofed, partitions to be 
plastered directly on the concrete blocks. 

Footings to be concrete. Basement 
floor and floor in dining room porch to 
be concrete with cement finish. All flues 
to have tile lining except kitchen vent. 
All floors to be reinforced concrete with 
wood floors on top, nailed to sleepers im- 
bedded in the concrete. Building paper 
is to be used between floors. Balcony 
and porch floors to have cement finish 
stained. All sills and steps to be of con- 
crete as well as hoods over entrances. 
Same to be stained little lighter than gen- 
eral tone of the house. All lintels to be 
of concrete block reinforced with iron 
rods in lower chambers of blocks. Roof 
to be of reinforced cinder concrete with 
asbestos shingles nailed directlv to con- 
crete. 

Oak trim in main rooms ; yellow pine 
in remaining rooms. All rooms to have 
continuous head casing with corner cas- 
ings in main rooms. Casement windows 
to be used throughout. Same to swing 
out except in basement, where windows 
are to swing in and up. Cubic contents, 
40,075 cubic feet. 

The itemized estimate of the designer 
placed the cost at $7,967. 



364 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cottage Designs for the 

Design "B 144" 

This reinforced concrete residence as 
illustrated, is constructed on an entirely 
new system, which the contractor claims 
is a very great saving in labor and mate- 
rials. 

This is a location where the land falls 
away from the street some 20 feet and 
as there is a remarkably fine view at the 
rear, the house has been specially de- 
signed for this location, with plenty of 
piazza, and balcony space. 

The house is so designed that the rear 
part of first floor could be used as a sep- 
arate bungalow residence by making the 
lavatory into a kitchen, and using the 
music room for a dining room. On this 
same floor are two good chambers and 
a roomy bathroom in this wing, practi- 
cally making two houses if desired. 

On entering the house from the street, 
one is impressed with the roomy hall and 
wide stairway, the stairs being 4 feet 
wide of reinforced concrete handsomely 
finished in white enamel with mahog- 
any rail. 

The hall is 8-0 wide and is very taste- 
fully finished with a beamed ceiling, and 
the walls are painted and stippled in a 
soft green shade. From the right we 
enter a large, well lighted living room, 
12x26, with a recessed fireplace nook 
40x12, with beamed ceiling, beams being 
four feet apart. Although these beams 
are of reinforced concrete (as is every 
part of the house throughout) they are 
colored to resemble antique brown oak 
with the panels between beams finished 
in a soft, cream tint. The walls are 
painted a soft primrose yellow with ivory 
white trimmings; the sash are all fin- 
ished in ivory white and the doors a rich 
mahogany, rubbed to a smooth, dull fin- 
ish. This makes a beautiful homelike 
room and the cosy recessed wide fire- 
place with seats on either side, and man- 
tle of concrete finished in a brown stone 



Home-Builder Continued 

color, makes a room well adapted for en- 
tertaining a large party as well as for 
solid comfort. 

The dining room has a beamed ceiling 
and also a plate rail 6-0 high with birch 
doors finished a mahogany color, and 
with the pretty casement windows gives 
a very satisfactory room. 

The kitchen walls are of white cement 
tile 5 inches square and 4 feet high, enam- 
eled a cream white, the upper part of the 
walls being painted a pale robin's egg 
blue and stippled and finished 'in a dull 
egg shell gloss. 

The plumbing is finished open with 
pipes of polished brass and the floor is 
tiled a dark shade of red, making a very 
clean and attractive sanitary kitchen. 

Going to the second floor, the stair- 
way leads into an unusually large and 
well lighted hall 8x12, from which there 
are French windows opening out onto a 
balcony 10-0 wide x 22 long and from 
here there is a delightful view of the sur- 
rounding country. 

There are three good sized chambers, 
each having a good roomy closet. There 
is also a large linen closet and a stair- 
way leading to the roof where it is ar- 
ranged for a roof garden with a protect- 
ing balustrade on all four sides. 

The outside walls of the house are fin- 
ished a soft gray color and the roof is 
trimmed with a mission design of red 
tile. 

The whole treatment is artistic and 
very effective, and is something of a new 
design, being what might be termed a 
combination of a Spanish and mission 
style. There is absolutely no waste room 
about the house. It was intended to 
combine the artistic with economy and 
this seems to have been attained as the 
contractors inform us that this house can 
be built complete in every way, including 
hot water heating, at a price which is be- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



365 



Cottage Designs for the 

low the cost of a first-class wooden build- 
ing. 

The contractors are also the owners 
of what they term the Interlocking Stone 
System, which is a reinforced system of 
concrete of which they are the patentees. 
Built in the location illustrated this 
house would cost from $15,000 to $18,- 
000. 

Design "B 145" 

This simple little brick bungalow is 
built in the West and is nicely adapted 
to the needs of a small family. The ex- 
terior walls are dark brown brick laid 
in deep red mortar. The gables, bay 
windows, ceilings of porches, etc., are 
plastered with cement and given a rough 
surface. A dark oak brown paint is used 
on all the exterior woodwork, giving a 
very pleasing effect. 

There is a large vestibule, with a coat 
closet, opening through a columned arch- 
way to the living room. A fireplace at 
the end of this room adds much to its 
appearance and is opposite the two col- 
umned opening that leads to dining room 
and vestibule respectively. The dining 
room opens also upon the central hall 
and to the pantry. The bay window at 
the side adds to its width and gives it 
ample light. 

The pantry is located to the rear of 
the dining room, is well fitted, up, and 
opens into the kitchen. There is an am- 
ple back porch from the kitchen, also a 
door to the basement and another to the 
central hall. There are two bedrooms, 
each with a closet, a linen closet and a 
bathroom. There is a good attic storage 
space above reached by a stair from the 
hall. The interior finish is selected Tex- 
as pine, stained and wax finished. The 
walls are rough sand finish tinted. There 
is a basement under the entire house 
containing laundry, cellar, furnace and 
coal room with cement floors. The con- 
tract price as furnished by the architect, 



Home- Hull dor Continued 

including plumbing and heating, was ap- 
proximately $2,750. 

Design "B 146" 

There is a peculiar charm about this 
house in the English style with its stuc- 
co, shingles and half-timbering. It is 
homelike and restful with an air of re- 
finement and simplicity. The lower 
story is of frame construction, covered 
with expanded metal and cemented over, 
receiving a final dashed coat of uniform 
roughness. The shingles above are laid 
with double courses at regular intervals 
giving extra strength to the shadow ef- 
fect. The trim is in dark brown stain 
except the windows, which are painted 
white, forming a pleasing contrast with 
the shingles and cement. There is a cen- 
tral hall with stairway and the dining 
room, pantry and kitchen are located on 
one side and the long living room and 
its sun porch on the other. A flight of 
rear stairs leads up from the kitchen to 
the main stair landing. On the second 
floor are three large chambers with clos- 
et space, a sewing room, a bathroom and 
a large balcony at the rear. There is a 
large attic that might be divided into 
rooms. 

The basement is divided into laundry, 
fuel, furnace and storage rooms. 

The first story is finished in oak with 
oak floors and the second floor in pine to 
paint with birch floors. The basement is 
7 feet 6 inches high, the first story 9 feet 
and the second story 8 feet 6 inches. 

The architect stated that this house 
was finished complete even to the decora- 
tions and lighting fixtures for $5,200. 
Design "B 147" 

Planned for a lakeside summer cottage 
and a design which should be built on a 
wide lot, for it is planned 41 feet wide. 
What a generous nay, luxurious porch, 
10 feet wide, this gives. Plenty of room 
to swing hammocks at both ends and be 
well clear of the entrance. 



366 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Courtesy Universal Portland Cement Co. 



R. C. OSTERGREN, Designer 



A Cement House on Simple Lines 



DESIGN "B 143" 




PI.AM or FIRST FLOOR. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



367 




Cottage Dealgrn* for the Home-Builder Continued 



Although the photographic view shows 
exterior finished in siding, shingles would 
secure a much more artistic exterior. 
Drop siding could be used with some 
saving in cost and if properly stained, 
a very satisfactory effect could be se- 
cured. 

Special attention is merited to the lay 
out of rooms which has been planned, 
the thought in mind being a house "for 
the good old summer time." Lots of 
company and rooms in the front which 
can be thrown open to make practically 
one great room across the front. If ad- 
ditional sleeping quarters are required, 
the living room can be made into a third 
chamber and those wishing to add an 
open fireplace can build an outside chim- 
ney at the end of dining room. 

Estimated cost in yellow pine finish, 
$2,275. This means ceiled walls. No 
finish on second floor. Size of cottage 
41x27^ feet and height of first story is 
10 feet. 



Design "B 148" 

This design is a model for a brick or 
concrete block cottage home. The at- 
tractive vista opened up across the en- 
tire breadth of the house, the prettily 
arranged combination staircase, the cozy 
study at the end of the living room with 
the fireplace, convenient access from the 
kitchen to the front door without pass- 
ing through any other room, the econom- 
ical hall arrangement on the second floor, 
with provision for bath room, etc., all 
make the interior quite as attractive as 
the outside appearance of this cottage. 

If a larger house were desired it would 
be well to cary up the second story full 
height, and a very attractive design could 
be made of it thus. 

There is a full basement under the 
house with a cemented floor. Hardwood 
floors and finish in all the principal rooms 
of the first floor are included. 

Width, 36 feet 4 inches ; depth, 25 feet 
10 inches ; height of basement, 7 feet 6 



368 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




JOHN J. SMITH, Architect 



A Uuique Concrete House 



DESIGN "B 144" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



369 




Cottage Designs for the Home-Builder Continued 



inches ; first story, 9 feet 5 inches ; second 
story, 8 feet 3 inches ; lowest height in 
second story, 6 feet. Estimated cost, 
$3,995. 

Design "B 149" 

This Italian design makes a beautiful 
home for a wide lot and especially de- 
signed for a rural home, at Lakeside or 
Seashore. Entering through a Portico 
entrance with side lighted doorway into 
the reception hall or alcove off from the 
main living room, the latter extending 
across the left from front to rear of 
house and lighted on both sides is 14 
feet by 27 feet, with a wide fireplace and 
wide French window on each side of the 
fireplace, opening out into a spacious 
screened porch, that is 12 by 27 feet, 
above which is a screened sleeping porch 
and all enclosed under the main roof. 
The roof is low pitched, with widespread 
eaves, projected 4 feet, the rafter timbers 
showing and finished on the underside. 
At the right of the entrance is the din- 
ing room, back of which is the kitchen, 
opening through the pantry. A maid's 



room and porch are at the rear. The 
main staircase is centrally located with a 
section of stairs, leading up from the 
kitchen to the main platform. 

On the second floor there are five 
sleeping rooms, each provided with clos- 
ets and a large bath room. The attic 
story reached from the rear stairs is low 
and lighted with small windows below 
the eaves and has ample space for stor- 
age purposes. There is a good basement 
under the entire house, laundry, etc. The 
finish throughout is in Washington fir, 
with dark flemish stain and the floors of 
birch left in natural color. The casings 
and woodwork are very simple. 

The exterior is cemented to the top 
of the first story and the second story 
is covered with wide rough siding, 
stained brown. The roof shingled and 
stained red and all of the casings, cor- 
nices, etc., painted white. 

The total dimensions are 56 feet front- 
age by 28 feet depth. The estimated 
cost of this house, exclusive of heating 
and plumbing, is $7,000. 



370 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




ARTHUR E. SA UNDERS. Architect 



A Simple Little Brick Bungalow 



DESIGN "B 145" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



371 




CECIL BAYLESS CHAPMAN, Architect 



Restful and Home-LikeEnglish Style 



DESIGN "B 146" 



SECOND FLOOR, r IR3T FLOOR, 




372 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Journal of Modern Construction Series 



A Brown Bungalow with White Trim 



DESIGN "B 147 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



373 




THE KEITH CO., Architects 



A Simple Brick Cottage 



DESIGN "B 148 " 




OELCOHD FLOOR 



374 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




CHAS. S. SEDGWICK, Architect 



A Plain Italian Exterior 



DESIGN "B 149 " 




FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



375 



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376 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




win 



W 



W 



Conducted by Eleanor Allison Cummins, Decorator Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Cretonnes for 1910. 

RETONNES are firmly in- 
trenched. Each season sees a 
greater variety of coloring and 
design than that before it. The 
tendency would seem to be toward more 
positive colors and larger patterns. That 
is in the English and American goods. 
Most of the French ones, with the ex- 
ception of the shadow cretonne, other- 
wise known as toile jaspe, are in small 
patterns, and have white, rather than 
cream colored grounds. The French de- 
signer would seem always to have in 
mind the white wood work of the typical 
French house. 

Hand Printed Cretonnes. 

Practically new this season are the 
French hand printed cretonnes, small 
patterned and dainty, suggestive on a 
small scale of old, eastern chintzes. Each 
part of the design is printed by hand, 
the result a dainty precision of outline 
quite unlike that of machine printing. 
Thirty-one inches wide, these cretonnes 
cost a dollar and fifteen cents a yard. It 
goes without saying that they have all 
the durable qualities of French cottons 
printed with vegetable colors, and may 
be relied upon to fade harmoniously, im- 
proving with years. 

Repped Cretonnes. 

Repped cretonnes at sixty-five cents a 
yard are a desirable purchase for rooms 
which do not get hard usage, as they are 
very decorative. Most of them are open 
to the objection of having large uncov- 
ered ground spaces of light color, which 
show soil easily, but there are a few 
dark colored ones having the effect of 
fruit and flowers worked in cross stitch. 
The same pattern can be duplicated in 
silkoline for curtains. 



Among the lighter colored cretonnes 
of this sort are those whose design is a 
combination of peonies and ribbons. One 
coloring shows the flowers in shades 
from salmon pink to light red, the rib- 
bons blue ; another has an effective com- 
bination of lavender flowers and green 
ribbons. This latter is most effective 
with the soft gray of silver maple fur- 
niture. 

American Taffetas. 

Double width American taffetas cost 
only fifty-five cents a yard, in the quaint 
pattern of tropical birds and flowers 
which suggests the crewel embroidery 
of our ancestors. They are said to wash, 
but^ the writer distrusts the statement, 
having had experiences with their sort. 
On the other hand, their brown linen 
colored ground keeps clean a long time, 
and they look like something better than 
they are. They are too stiff to hang well 
and not available for curtains, but just 
the thing for a big easy chair or for a 
slip cover for a long sofa. 

Printed Linens. 

In quite another category are the 
double width printed linens, at two dol- 
lars and seventy-five cents a yard. 
These, too, have a natural linen ground, 
but they are very flexible and will last 
a generation, improving with time. They 
harmonize beautifully with mahogany 
furniture and with brown toned oak, and 
would seem to be just the thing for a 
Craftsman bedroom, of not too extreme 
a sort. One of the newest printings is 
the many colored palm leaf pattern of 
the old French cashmere shawls. 
Willow Furniture. 

It is surprising how little summer fur- 
niture is seen in anything but green. One 
big New York house carries a stock of 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



377 



Kraft 

Novel texture, durable, sun-proof this newest 
Wiggin Creation is distinctive for unique, effective 
wall decoration. Kraft Ko-Na is of the famous 




FAB-RIK-O-NA 

line of highest grade woven wall coverings, which 
include Art Ko-Na, Kord Ko-Na, etc., and the finest 
quality Fast Color Burlaps. Send for booklet of samples 
mentioning goods desired. 

H. B. WIGGIN'S SONS CO., 214 ARCH ST.. BLOOMFIEIO. N. J. 
This Trade Mark on back of every yard. Patent applied for. 




HESSHiaOCKER 



HPHE only modern Sanitai 

1 Medicine Cabinet or 

Handsome beveled mirror door. Snow 
white, everlasting enamel,insideandout. 




FOR YOUR BATHROOM 



Costs less than wood and is better. Should be 
in every bathroom. Is dust, germ and vermin 
proof and easily cleaned with warm water. 

Made in four styles and three sizes. Price 
$7.00 and up. 

Send for illustrated circular. 

HESS, 717 L TBComm Bid., Chicago 

Makers of the Hess Steel Furnace. 
Sold on Approval. Free Booklet. 




The ONLY WAY is the 

PHENIX WAY. 

Screens and Storm Sash 
are as easily hunger re- 
moved from inside as 
you would hang a picture 
Hangers only, retail at lOc 
Hangers and Fasteners re- 
tail at 15c and 25c 
Our Specialties: Rust Proof 
Fly Screens for Good 
Buildings. 

For Descriptive Catalogue address 

PHENIX MFG. CO. 

048 Center St. Milwaukee. Wis. 




For the Craftsman Style 

of architecture and interior finish, 
the designs and construction of 
Morgan Doors are in perfect keeping. 
They are finished in the white and 
may be stained any color. 



\ 



MORGAN 
DOORS 




are perfect doors, light, remarkably 
strong and built of several layers of cross 
grained wood, pressed together with water- 
proof glue, making shrinking, warping or 
swelling impossible. Veneered in all va- 
rieties of hard wood Birch, plain or 
quarter-sawed red or white Oak, brown 
Ash, Mahogany, etc. 

Morgan Doors are the highest standard of 
door quality; made in one of the largest and 
most progressive factories in the country. 

Each Morgan Door is stamped "MORGAN" 
which guarantees quality, style, durability and 
satisfaction. 

In our new book--"The Door Beautiful "--MOR- 
GAN DOORS are shown in their natural color and 
in all styles of architecture for Ulterior or exte- 
rior use, and it is explained why they are the best 
and cheapest doors for permanent satisfaction 
in any building. A copy will be sent on request. 

Architects: Descriptive details of Morgan Doors 
may be found in Sweet's index, pages 678 and 679. 

Morgan Company, Dept F. Oshkosh, Wis. 

Distributed by Morgan Sash * Door Co.. Chicago 

Morgan Millwork Co. , Baltimore, Md. 
Handled by Dealers who do not substitute. 



378 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



q-olden brown willow, also some of the 
uncolored pieces, but everywhere else, 
except in some small and exclusive 
shops, the bulk of the stock is green, of 
a distinctly olive tone. Occasionally it 
is brightened by upholstery of colored 
cretonne, but more often cushions and all 
arc green. 

It is possible to get almost every 
article of furniture in wicker, but it must 
be admitted that the desks and tables and 
bookcases are far less satisfactory and 
more costly than the corresponding 
pieces of wood. There is no possible 
comparison between the wicker table 
costing twelve dollars in green, and the 
hardwood table with a swinging top 
which can be bought for the half of that 
sum and stained to match chairs and set- 
tle. And a wicker muffin stand costs 
about the same as mahogany. 

Here and there one finds something 
especially dainty in wicker furniture in- 
tended for a bedroom or a summer sit- 
ting room. For instance, a set of chairs 
and settle is painted a delicate blue and 
fitted out with cushions of a French 
cretonne in a pattern of lilacs and their 
leaves in pastel shades. A set of chairs 
in the natural color of the willow is high- 
ly varnished and given cushions of an 
English chintz with a pattern of spring 
flowers in green and yellow. 

For real service, for loose cushions, 
for summer furniture, there is nothing 
quite equal to the hand woven Indian 
linens, forty-five inches wide, at a dollar 
a yard. They fade, as what does not, 
but they fade so harmoniously that their 
last estate is their best, and their artis- 
tic qualities leave nothing to be desired, 
either in texture or color. They are not 
popular with the general trade and must 
be sought in by corners, but they are 
worth an effort. 

Also, the Morris cretonnes combining 
blue and green are most effective with 
green willow furniture. They, too, fade 
well, are reversible and not expensive, 
costing about sixty-five cents a yard, 
sometimes less. 

Chinese Willow Furniture. 
The searcher for cheap willow furni- 
ture will hunt out the furniture depart- 
ment of a big Oriental shop. There he 
will find hour glass chairs from Canton, 



of distinctive charm, for five dollars 
apiece. A larger chair, with the same 
wide arms, but square instead of round, 
costs seven, and long cane lounging 
chairs about ten. Outline, proportions, 
workmanship, all are delightful, wonder- 
fully different from the occidental chairs 
turned out by the hundred. Add cush- 
ions of bright colored Java cotton, blue 
and orange or a Persian pattern with 
much red in it, and install your bit of 
the Orient where it will have the best 
opportunity to display its charms. 

Chinese willow furniture compares 
specially well with old mahogany. It was 
one of the things the captains in the In- 
dia trade used to bring home to the old 
houses in Salem and New Bedford and 
Nantucket, along with a hogshead packed 
with blue Canton ware, or the more 
choice green India, which we know as 
Chinese Medallion ware. 

New Wall Treatments. 

The French block printed cotton, men- 
tioned above, was used in a bedroom fur- 
nished in dull finished mahogany. A 
width was carried around for a frieze, 
above a side wall of fawn-colored grass 
cloth. More of the cretonne was used 
for hangings at doors and windows and 
for spreads for the twin beds. The rug 
was a velvet in two shades of fawn and 
there was no upholstery, the chairs hav- 
ing rush seats. 

In another room, this an upstairs sit- 
ting room, the many pieces of white ma- 
hogany were effectively relieved by a 
wall of satin striped paper in two tones 
of old red, with an Oriental rug repeat- ! A 
ing the lighter tone of the red in com- 
bination with duller colors. The adjoin- 
ing bedroom had the same paper and 
white^enameled furniture. In both rooms 
the pictures were old prints with mar- 
gins, not mats, and narrow gilt frames. 

To be laid above a side wall of Jap- 
anese grass cloth, in a tan or golden 
brown shade, there is a landscape frieze 
of considerable depth which represents a 
vista into a forest at sunset. The trees 
are in their autumnal foliage and the 
whole is a study in warm tones of orange 
and brown. This frieze, which was men- 
tioned in these pages some months ago, 
as being used in a den, above a wainscot 
of splint work, comes in two widths, 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



379 



Decoration and FurntohlnK Continued 

twenty-four and thirty-six inches, in 
lengths of forty-five inches, costing re- 
spectively eight-five cents and a dollar 
and a quarter. The separation between 
the two parts of the wall is defined by a 
wide strip of dark wood, studded with 
ornamental nails. 

The very latest thing in wall papers, 
intended for bedrooms, or for country 
house parlors, is a side wall paper of 
white or cream, with a fabric effect, 
broken occasionally by a small sprig of 
flowers. This flower is repeated in a 
cut out border of two widths, one for the 
top of the wall, the other to be laid above 
the surbase, and both borders reproduce 
the pattern of a cretonne for draperies. 
The matching of the two materials is 
absolutely perfect, unusual with papers 
and cretonnes of moderate price. In low 
studded rooms, only the narrower border 
is used and it is carried entirely around 
each wall, making a panel effect. 

Moorzuk Rugs. 

Intended primarily for the piazza, but 
available for indoors in summer houses 
are the Algerian rugs, woven of some 
hempen fibre. Most of them are exceed- 
ingly bright, the designs rather primitive 
like those of the Navajo rugs, but there 
are some in two tones of brown or green 
which are very good. Eight by fourteen 
feet, a porch size, they cost eighteen dol- 
lars and seventy-five cents ; nine by 
twelve, eighteen dollars. 

Antimony. 

The Japanese shops show a variety of 
small objects, picture frames, boxes, 
trays, etc., in what looks like dull silver 
but is said to be antimony. They are 
elaborately ornamented in relief, in a pe- 
culiarly Japanese fashion, and are very 
reasonable in price, a photograph frame 
costing sixty-nine cents, other pieces in 
proportion. The saleswomen caution 
buyers not to use silver polish on them 
when tarnished, but to rely upon soap 
and water. 



= LAWN FENCE 

Many Styles. Sold on trial at 
wholesale prices. Save 2O 
to 3O per cent. Illustrated 
Catalogue free. Write today. 
KITSELMAN BROS. 
Boz33O Muneie, Indiana. 





Choose 
I Hardware 
In Keeping 
With the House 



If you are building or remodel- 
ing a home, the selection of the hardware 
should have your personal attention. Let 
the architecture be taken into consideration 
in determining the Style of the hard-ware, 
but let your own taste dictate the particu- 
lar design to be used. Quality, of course, 
as well as distinctiveness and durability, 
are prime requisites 

Sargent's 

Artistic 

Hardware 

combines all three in the highest degree, and 
moreover offers you the widest latitude 
of choice. 

All styles and finishes are represented, 
each by several different patterns, so that 
every period and architectural style are 
adequately provided for. 

Sargent's 'Book of Designs 
Sent Tree 

illustrates over seventy of these artistic patterns. 
This book will prove invaluable in determining the 
right Hardware for your new home. If interested in 
the Colonial. Sargent's Colonial Book will also 
be sent on request. It describes Cut Glass Knobs. 
Door Handles. Knockers, etc. Address 

SARGENT & COMPANY 
161 Leonard Street, New York 






380 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of 
Keith's Magazine. Inquiries pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the 
attention of an expert in that line. 

Letters Intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing De- 
partment, and be accompanied by a diagram of floor plan. 

Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general interest 
will be published in these columns. 



E. E. S. I enclose draft of room for 
suggestions. The stairway is open and 
goes straight up. All the woodwork is 
golden oak. This is our general living 
room and front doors open into it; no 
hall. I plan to have a small coat cup- 
board next to stairs, then mantel and 
then built in book shelves. It is nine feet 
from the stairs to dining room door and 
thus the space would be filled. What 
sort of mantel would you suggest? 
Brick, stone, wood, high or low top, with 
or without glass. I want to use brown 
and green with a touch of dark blue in 
color scheme. Is the ceiling too low for 
ceiling beams? I want the furnishing to 
be plain, something of the arts and crafts 
style; dull finish on furniture. I would 
like the room to be in good taste and as 
simple as possible. Please suggest cur- 
tains. The bay window consists of two 
plain sash at sides, evenly divided, center 
large pane, lower sash open narrow sash 
of dark blue art glass. I would like to 
have the upper sashes all changed to 
leaded glass, but hardly think I can at 
present. 

E. E. S. Ans. We are sending you 
an answer by mail to your letter of the 
19th asking for suggestions on the in- 
terior decoration question and hope that 
the same may prove of good practical 
value to you. 

An examination of the sketch shows 
the ceiling to be not quite 8 feet in height 
and too low for ceiling beam. It is ad- 
vised not to break the wall height in any 
way and to place the picture molding at 
the ceiling angle. In regard to finish of 
woodwork, it is suggested to use a fumed 
brown or weathered stain, rather than 
golden oak, as this would be in better 
harmony with furniture of the arts and 
crafts style in dull finish. 

Brick facings would look well for the 



fireplace and the brick could be either 
an ecru colored, smooth surfaced brick 
or one of the new effects in broken faced, 
vitrified brick, in mottled greens and dull 
reds. In the latter case, tile must be used 
for the hearth. The style of mantel 
should be plain and craftsman like. An 
excellent model for your use would be 
the fireplace shown on page 30 of the 
January KEITH'S. Such a plaster panel 
above the shelf would be in far better 
taste than a mirror. You will find 9 
feet not enough space to get in the chim- 
ney breast, a bookcase and coat closet. 
Why not partly enclose with plain board 
paneling, part of the space under the stair 
and use that for a coat closet, having a 
door in the paneling. This will still 
give you the open stairway effect. 

In the bay window, a seat across would 
add much to this nook, especially if cush- 
ioned to match the color scheme. The 
blue art glass is much to be deprecated. 
Why not use the plain, leaded glass in 
that one narrow center sash? As the 
room is not so very light, it is advised to 
use a soft ecru color on the walls, slight- 
ly lighter tone on ceiling and green in 
the furnishings. This with the brown 
woodwork and furniture will give you the 
desired color scheme. Two of three 
brown wicker chairs upholstered in a 
cretonne showing green and blue on a 
cream ground will add much and the 
same cretonne used on the window seat. 
Nothing could be prettier for curtains in 
such a room than the sheer, barred scrim 
in pale ecru edged with narrow fringe or 
a finished edge either one costing 5 cts. 
a yard only, but adding much to the ap- 
pearance of the curtains. 

C. H. F. We have two rooms where 
the wood is finished with paint grained 
in dark oak one where it is just dark 
paint. We wish to finish them differently 



pleasures 

and 
palaces 



i 
noplace 

ilike 



It is the 
interior furnishing 






and finishing that makes 
a house a house that makes 
a home the most delightful place in 
the world. Even more important than the furnishing is 
the finishing of the woodwork. 

The finest oak or the costliest mahogany, unless properly 
finished with the right materials, will prove a poor invest- 
ment. On the other hand, ordinary pine, where properly 
finished, is both beautiful and attractive. 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

will develop the natural beauty of any woood costly mahogany, finest 
oak, or ordinary pine. They emphasize Nature's artistic markings of 
the grain, and never raise, obscure or cloud them. 

Men who know wood finishing architects, builders, furniture, piano 
and car manufacturers, etc., use Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes in 
preference to all others. They give a smooth, tough, elastic finish 
that will stand the test of time without signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

"MODERN WOOD FINISHING' 'Write for it. 

This book was prepared by our corps of expert wood finishers. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with plates of finished 
wood in natural colors. Every builder should have a copy of this book. 

Simply write the request on a post card and 
we will send you the book by return mail. 



The BRIDGEPORT Wo6o FINIS 



NEW MILFORD. CONN. 

CHICAGO 



BOSTON 



382 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Plenty ) 
of Water 
At the Right Pressure 




For Skyscraper or Cottage 

Whether the problem be to supply 
greater pressure for high buildings, or 
running water for farms and suburban 
residences, it can be easily solved at a 
surprisingly low cost by the 

"Paul" Pump 

used with one of the Fort Wayne water 
supply systems. 

^ The pump at the bottom of this ad- 
vertisement can be run by an electric 
motor or by belt from any other power. 
So compact it can be placed in the cellar 
operates automatically. 
tf The pump and tank shown at the top 
make up our pneumatic system of water 
supply ideal for any climate gives per- 
fect fire protection. Water is stored under 
air pressure and delivered under constant 
pressure and at an even temperature the 
year 'round. 

Our engineering advice on your water supply 
problem is free to you if you write for our Book- 
let No. 12021, giving the superior points of the 

"Paul" Pump and the details of our systems. 

Fort Wayne Engineering & Mfg. Co. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 




Answers to Questions Continued 

but I do not like white paint or enamel, 
as there is so much woodwork many 
doors and windows, and two very large 
folding and sliding doors. 

Can you give me any idea as to what 
can be done other than using white or 
ivory, or removing all the paint and fin- 
ishing natural, which I am afraid could 
not be done, as the woodwork is not all 
alike. I enclose piece of wall decoration 
for sitting room and library. 

Ans. C. H. F. In regard to your inte- 
rior woodwork, it is advised to re-paint it 
rather than try to remove the old finish. 
In the living room and library the wood- 
work should be made a warm brown, a 
shade darker than the paper. You want, 
if possible, to convey the feeling that it is 
an intentional part of the scheme, and to 
make these rooms a harmony of brown 
tones. An important point, however, is 
the treatment of the ceiling, which should 
be a deep-warm cream, or all is lost. If 
the ceilings are high, the cream tint 
should be brought down a foot or more 
on the side wall and brown picture 
moulding placed at the joining. 

It is strongly advised to take the fold- 
ing doors off their hinges and to keep the 
sliding doors usually open, using draper- 
ies of brown velour or rep in their place. 
This will diminish the amount of painted 
wood surface and help greatly. The rugs 
should be cream, not white. The d : ning 
room woodwork may be painted an olive 
or bronze green, the shade of the paper 
or burlaps. But do not get a bright 
green nor yet a dark green. There are 
warm olives that will give you a very 
delightful room and will be in harmony 
with the brown of the other rooms. 




MALLORY'S 

Standard 
Shutter Worker 

The only practical device to 
open and close the Shutters 
without raising windows or 
disturbing screens. 
Can be applied to old or new houses, whether brick, stone 
or frame, and will hold the blind firm in any position. 
Perfectly burglar proof. 

Send for Illustrated Circular if your hardware dealer 
does not keep them, to 

MALLORY MANUFACTURING CO. 

251 Main Street Flemington, New Jersey. U. S A. 



Use the CRESCENT SASH FASTENER 

and 




Costs no more than others, made in five sizes and 
all Builders' Hardware Finishes. 

The H. B. IVES CO., New Haven, Conn. U. S. A. 

88-page Catalogue and Sample of the Ives Pat- 
ent Stop Adjuster mailed upon request. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



383 



THE ART, SCIENCE AND SENTIM 
HOME BUILDING 

300 Illustrations, 3O Chapters 



;NT OF 




One of Several Hundred Appreciations 



"Problems about homebuilding are taken up 
in detail and treated with sound common tense. 
Nearly all questions that can be anticipated are 
answered, and the book should prove a great 
help for those who are planning homes." 

Duluth Herold. 

405-7-9 Lumber Exchange 



Index of revised and improved third edition as follows: 

Description of Designs-Practical Homebuilding-rlome* 
of Distinctive Character-Homes for Special Places-Guide 
Posts for the Homebuilder- Pennies Saved. Dollars 
Wasted-How to Save Money when Building-Planning 
the Country Home-Letting the Contract-Planning the 
Duplex House-Koofs-Flannme the Farm Home-Brick 
and Cement Exteriors-Brick Houses-Porches-Bunga- 

lows-The Cottage-Exterior Building Mate. ials-Jnteiior .. 

Building Mate ials- That Front Door Problem -That A monthly supplement. Practical Home- 
Window Problem-Thai Fireplace Problem-Hand Paint- building," sent gratis for one year follow- 
ed T:le Fireplaces-That Stairway Problem-Kitchen and j n ~ sa j e () f 1)0(1 j. 
Pantry Pioblems-Those Little Problems-Tnat Fre^ 
Air P. oblem-That Dormer Problem. Seat ost| aid for $1.00 




ARTHUR C. CLAUSEN, 

ARCHITECT 



A booklet, "The Planning of It," sent 
upon request 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Plumbing 
Supplies 

AT 

Wholesale 
Prices 




Everything in the 
Plumbing Line 

I guarantee to save you 20% to 40% on high class goods. 
No seconds, only first quality. Write and let me prove to 
you the money I can save you. Illustrated catalogue free. 

B. K. KAROL, 768 to 772 West Harrison Street, Chicago, III. 



"DIRECT FROM FACTORY" 

fan approval] 
PRICE ON THIS 

Piano-Finish, Selected Figurt, 
Quarter-Sawed Oak Mantel is 

$29. 4O 

Dealers' price $40 to |50. 

It is 82 in. high, 60 in. wide. 36x18 French 
Bevel Mirror, four elaborate capitals. 

Includes Tile Facing. 60x18 Hearth, Plat- 
ed Frame and Club House Grate. 

HARDWOOD FLOORS 
AND PARQUETRY 

will last as long as the house. Any car- 
penter can lay it easier than ordinary floor- 
ing. Get our prices. 

TILE AND MOSAICS 

fcr everywhere, WALLS, FLOORS, ETC. 

Write for catalog of Mantels, Grates, Tiles for floors and baths. Slat* 
Laundry Tubs, Grilles, etc. It is free. Or send 10 cents to pay postage on 
our Art Mantel Catalog. Mantel Outfits from $12 to S2M. Made to order 
Fly Screens for doors and windows. 



W. J, OSTENDORF, 2923 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



DIAMOND 



ON CREDIT 



GIVE YOUR SWEETHEART A LOFTIS "PERFECTION" DIAMOND RING a MOUTHS TO 

Send (or our beautiful catalog containing over 1500 illustrations. Whatever you select therefrnm we send on approval. If yon like it pay I 
THE OLD RELIABLE ORIGINAL DIAMOND I one-fifth on delivery, balance in eight equal monthly payments. Your credit is good. Our 
AND WATCH CREDIT HOUSE I prices are lowest. A Diamond increases in value 10 to 20 per cent annually. Send today for 

Depl. C -68 . 82 to 98 State St.. Chicago, III. Branches: Pittsbnrg, Pa., ft St. Louis. Ho. I a free copy of the Loftia Magazine. | 



We Can Prove Every Claim! 



Ghe 



Sign 



"When we say that 

UNDERFELT 

Roofings are a little bit better than any other Ready Roofing: at the 
price, we stand ready to prove it. All we need is a trial order from you. 
Sand. Granite and Burlap. 

Have Complete Stocks of Building Papers. 



^x^ 



"Underfelt" comes in Rubber, 



McCLE,LLAN PAPE,R COMPANY 

"The Home of Quality" DULUTH 

MINNEAPOLIS LA CROSSE 



384 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




HOUSEHOI/D ECONOMICS fp 




Plus or Minus Friction. 

HEORETICALLY everyone 
knows the immense waste in all 
the manufacturing processes 
caused by friction. It is this 
loss of power through friction that makes 
the attainment of perpetual motion a 
vague chimera of the imagination, in- 
stead of a possible end of inventive skill. 
But how many people appreciate the loss 
from human friction? The frittering 
away of time, the needless irritation, the 
nervous waste caused by the attrition of 
human beings, of a single day in the 
household, can hardly be estimated. 
Multiply the single item by three hun- 
dred and sixty-five and you have an ap- 
palling total. 

As long as the solitary are set in fami- 
lies, some friction must be accepted as 
one of the conditions of living, but by no 
means the common amount. This neces- 
sary friction is to be borne with such 
patience as one may summon, but the 
unnecessary friction is at our own dis- 
posal, only waiting the needful command 
to disappear. 

The necessary friction arises .from the 
conflict of temperament between the 
members of the family, a conflict which 
is not simplified by the extreme develop- 
ment of individuality incident to modern 
life, also by the varying standards of 
taste of different individuals. Its only 
remedy, and that not always an effectual 
one, is the cultivation of a spirit of mu- 
tual concession on minor points and of 
respect for each other's idiosyncrasies. It 
is not always an effectual one, because 
there are some people with whom it is 
impossible to live on any sort of terms. 
Paul said, "As far as in you lies, live 



peaceably with all men," evidently rec- 
ognizing that the task was well nigh im- 
possible. And some people are so con- 
stituted that they resent concessions and 
toleration, as indicating a lack of interest 
in themselves. 

But the needless friction can be les- 
sened greatly, if not entirely obviated. 
Some of it will depart in the wake of re- 
division of the labor of the household. 
I am thinking of the servantless house- 
hold, where two or more very unlikely 
people try to share the same processes. 
Everyone has seen the slow woman and 
the rapid woman dividing the dish wash- 
ing, one washing and the other wiping, 
the rapid woman spending half her time 
waiting for the other, the perversity of 
things ordaining that the slow one al- 
ways insists on washing. A redistribu- 
tion of the household tasks with some 
regard to the preferences and capacities 
of the different laborers will help. So, 
too, will the assignment of one division 
of the housework to one person, another 
to another, even if it is only from week 
to week, with frequent changing off. Too 
few households recognize the fact that 
different sorts of housework are easier, 
for one than another, that a woman may 
be an excellent cook and a futile cleaner, 
with a happy oblivion of cobwebbed cor- 
ners and dusty rafters, with the result 
not only of friction but also of much 
household discomfort. If the science of 
housekeeping were not greatly behind 
others, the principle of specialization 
would be more generally recognized and 
applied. 

Another source of friction will depart 
when less is made of the social tradition 
of the household. Blood makes a dif- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



385 



REAL HOMES FOR REAL PEOPLE 




No. 1137 as built in Ohio 

Floor plans and description in 207 book scheduled 
below. 



KEITH 



MQNT . 




A fine home of a practical and sensible type; one that 
will wear well and always sell. This is often very im- 
portant. See books 207 and 172 for others of this type. 

As built at Lake 

Minnetonka 



Keith's No. 1125 




Part front above and rear approach of Rose Farm. 
Plans in 172 book, scheduled below. 




Our latest books of plans, giving views, sizes, costs, etc.. are: 

$ .00 

.60 

.00 



100 Small Cottazes and Bungalows. 

98 Costing $800 to $120: 

$1200 to $1600 



186 $1600 to $2000 1.00 

226 ' $2000to$2500 1.OO 

191 $OOto$fOOO 1.OO 

207 $1000 to $4000 I.OO 

172 ' $4000 aud upwards 1.00 

Tho RllilHinn nf It 128 P a e M ' Illustrated, a practical guide 

I HO DUIIUmy Ul ll so you can recognize and remedy faulty 



work, thus super 



ag the construction of your own home 91 .OO 



THE KEITH CO., Architects, 



1721 Hennepin Ave. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 




PROSLATE ROOFING and SIDING 



For residences of all kinds you will not find a more attractive, 

more economical, more serviceable roofing and siding than PROSLATE. 

DURABILITY: 

PROSLATE is not an uncertainty its base is our regular 
PAROID ROOFING which has stood the test of time in every 
climate it wears as well as the best shingles. 

ECONOMY: 

PROSLATE costs less than food shineles and clapboards and 
the cost of laying is much less. Anyone can lay PROSLATE. 

ATTRACTIVENESS: 

PROSLATE is a rich, reddish brown in color. We can furnish 
PROSLATE with either straight or ornamental edges. The 
latter gives the effect of a slate or shingle roof. 
Your buildings will be the most attractive in your neighbor- 
hood if covered with PROSLATE and you will save money. 



F. 



ESTABLISHED 1817 

EAST WALPOLE. MASS. 



Don't 
Carry 
Water 




You need never carry another pail of water or even go 
out of the house on stormy days. Put running water in your 
home in the kitchen bathroom toilet and have an 
adequate supply in the barn for watering stock washing 
carriages, harness for the lawn garden or for protection 
against flre besides. A 



makes this possible. It eliminates the unsightly elevated water 
tank that freezes in Winter or dries out in Summer. The com- 
pressed air in a Leader Steel tank does all the work. In your 
cellar or buried in the ground it cannot freeze, and it solves the 
water problem forever. A complete system costs $48.00 upwards 
and you can install it yourself, if you like. 

Booklet and Catalogue Free Sign and mall the coupon 
below and the booklet 'How I Solved the Water Supply Prob- 
lem" and complete catalogue will be sent you by return mail. 
Leader Iron Works, 1707 Jasper St., Decatur, 111. 
Room 817 15 Wlfliam St., New York City. _^^ 

Leader Iron Works, 1 70 7 Jasper St., Decatur, Ill- 
Send me free your book and catalogue 
of Leader Water Systems. 

Name 

Address 

Town... State 




386 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Household Economies Continued 



ference, it is true, but not the closest 
ties of kindred can make people at oppo- 
site mental and spiritual poles congenial. 
Why impose continual contact upon 
people wholly unlike? If you want to 
see the highest development of family 
feeling, of Attachment to the home and 
the family, you should seek it not in in- 
dividuals who have never been away 
from it, all of whose interests have been 
bound up in it, but among those who 
liave been forced to leave it, only return- 
ing at infrequent intervals. In too many 
households there is an insistence upon 
the forms of a common life which is irk- 
some in the extreme. One member of a 
family must make an early start in the 
morning, therefore half-a-dozen cross and 
sleepy people breakfast at seven in the 
dark of winter mornings. The entire 
family must gather around the evening 
lamp no matter what hobby or pleasure 
invites in some other part of the house. 
Domestic friction always results from 
the deprivation of personal liberty. It is 
not in the nature of things that any of 
us should indulge to the full the innate 
craving for liberty, but any reasonable 
being is content with freedom in the 
non-essentials of daily life. To secure 
that freedom for each individual member 
should be the aim of every family. When 
that is done, most of the unnecessary 
friction will have disappeared. 

Housework Halved 

by using the 

"Easy" Vacuum Cleaner 

Hand or Electric 




it, most efficient, simplest, strorg- 
Je. Write for particulars and 
easy payment plan. 
I>ODGE & ZUILL, 
542 E Biltoje Bldj.. Sjrmc,N 1. 



Mfr- 



Attractive Home Decoration 

need not cost any more than the most commonplace, but 
it requires unusual taste and expert knowledge of color 
effects. We will furnish you an original color scheme 
which will suit your individual needs, if you will send 
us a pencil sketch of your house plan or describe arrange- 
ment of rooms, giving color of woodwork and purpose 
of each room. Our charge for this service is 

ONE DOLLAR 

On receipt of your remittance, we will promptly for- 
ward complete color scheme suitable for tint, oil or paper 
treatment, showing color for each room. Money gladly 
refunded if color scheme is not entirely satisfactory. 

INTERIOR DECORATING CO. 

1219 Corn Exchange Bank Bldg. CHICAGO 



Artificial Fuel. . 

At the time of the coal strike a few 
years ago we were promised the intro- 
duction of the artificial fuel long familiar 
to European countries. During the past 
year it has been put upon the market in 
considerable quantities, and has been in 
use long enough for some pronounce- 
ment upon its merits. 

As far as cost goes, it may be said at 
the outset that boulette coal is very little 
if any cheaper than ordinary hard coal. 
Its combustion is more rapid, thus bal- 
ancing the difference of a dollar and a 
half a ton, between it and ordinary coal. 

On the other hand it is much cleaner, 
as it burns out to a fine brown ash, with 
hardly any solid residuum, obviating the 
need for sifting, and the ashes being 
heavier fly less. The difference in heat 
is very perceptible. The surface of the 
range or stove is exceedingly hot. Irons 
will heat in about half the time required 
when ordinary coal is used, and all the 
cooking processes are more rapid. One 
sensible advantage is that it ignites 
quickly, ten minutes sufficing to get up a 
hot fire, if all the drafts are left open. 
Like most improvements it requires to be 
managed with discretion and it would be 
very extravagant in the hands of most 
servants. The same thing is true of gas 
cooking. 

People, who have experimented with 
it, say that it gives admirable results 
when mixed with an equal quantity of 
hard coal. The writer can testify to its 
staying qualities when a fire is to be kept 
over night. People who are willing to 
give its use personal supervision will find 
it worth trying. 

Bleaching Out. 

One sort of clothing left-overs seems 
particularly hopeless. What is it pos- 
sible to do with faded muslins? Boiling 
them in a strong solution of cream of 
tartar will discharge all the remaining 
color, leaving them white. A visit to a 
public laundry will complete the bleach- 
ing process. Heavier cottons, after be- 
ing boiled can be dyed with vegetable 
dyes and utilized for pillow covers for 
the piazza. Vegetable dyes, with direc- 
tions for their use, can be had of the 
New York Society of Arts and Crafts. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



387 



New 
Roofing Discovery 

Works Wonders in Beautifying Home! 




For Simplest and Grandest Homes 

CHARMING Moorish beauty and dig- 
nity of appearance of Metal Spanish 
Tile gives an air of distinction to the 
home graced by this wonderful new and 
practically indestructible roofing. 

It has taken home builders of America by 
storm, for it is the modernization of the 
wonderfully beautiful roofs of historic Span- 
ish edifices. 

The art of making this roofing, left behind 
by fleeing Moors driven out of Spain cen- 
turies ago, until 1910 could not be made 
practical for the modern home, despite its 
alluring beauties. 

After years of experiment, we have hit 
the solution That is why today we are able 
to offer American homes the amazing at- 
tractiveness of 

Metal Spanish Tile Roofing 

Its scores of vital, practical advantages cost no 
more than common roofing, yet mean tremendous 
economy it needs no repairs and outlasts several 
ordinary roofs because of its practically indestruct- 
ible metal construction. 

It is absolutely wind, weather, storm, fire and 
lightning proof. 

Easy to apply. No soldering, no special tools 
any ordinary mechanic can apply it. Interlocking 
system by which tiles dovetail into each other makes 
the roof absolutely water tight and provides for ex- 
pansion and contraction perfectly summer and 
winter. It is guaranteed non-breakable. 
HOMEBUIUJERS-Simply send us today the dimensions 
of your building: and we will tell you by return mail exact 
cost of all material. Our new 1910 book on beautifying 
the modern American home by use of Metal Spanish Tile 
is yours for the asking. A postal will bring; it. Address 

The Edwards Manufacturing Co. 

The Largest Makers of Steel Roofing 
and Metal Shingles in the World 

520-540 Culvert St. Cincinnati!, Ohio 




The Question That 
Counts 

J It is a mistake, in making arrange- 
ments for the painting of a house, to 
merely ask the painter two ques- 
tions, "How much?" and "How long?" 
meaning, how much will he charge 
and how long will he take to do the 
job. 

<I The real vital question the "acid- 
test" of tho painter's reliability is: 
"What kind of paint are you going 
to use on my house?" 
^f If the answer to this question is 
"Pure white lead and pure linseed 
oil paint mixed for the job" then 
you may be reasonably sure that 
good materials are going on your 
house. If the painter adds that he 
uses the white lead with the Dutch 
Boy Painter trade-mark you may 
be sure the white lead he uses is 
free from adulteration. 
His workmanship, too, is apt to bo 
excellent, as good workmanship and 
good materials go hand in hand. 
][ Remember, the inexperienced 
painter does not know how to mix 
lead and oil paint 
<J Ask your painter if he is a "white-leader," 

National Lead Company, 

New York Boston Buffalo Chicago 
Cincinnati Cleveland St. Louis 

(John T. Lewis A Bros. Company, Philadelphia) 
(National Lead <t Oil Company. Pittsburgh) 



388 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SO/A e MA MEAT THAT CANNA CAT-AMD 5OAN 6 WOULD CAT TMAT WANT IT 
BUT W 6 MA M6ATAND W 6 CAN CAT 
5A L6T TM e LORD B THANKIT 





TABLE: OMAT 



Table Linens. 

One hears a good deal about the re- 
turn to favor of colored embroideries for 
the table, but the number of them shown 
in the shops is comparatively small. On 
the other hand there is the greatest va- 
riety of lace trimmed and embroidered 
linens in plain white. More of them than 
in former seasons are in eyelet embroid- 
ery, used by itself without other work, 
except the scalloped edge. They are very 
durable, and for ordinary use less pre- 
tentious than the lace trimmed ones. In 
embroidering them for one's self, care 
should be taken to select a firmly woven 
linen, as otherwise the edges of the eye- 
lets are likely to pull out. Ten cents a 
yard in the price of the linen may mean 
a great saving in durability. 

Where color is used it is apt to be in 
the form of shading to solid embroidery 
in white, oftener in pale green than in 
any other color, although grayish blue 
dots are often added to a piece of linen 
with lace insertions, to be used with 
blue china. Certainly the old fashion of 
using bright colored centers and doyleys 
with any sort of china has entirely dis- 
appeared. 

A pretty idea for finger bowl doyleys 
is to copy the pattern of the dessert 
plates or after dinner coffee cups. If 
these are of flowered china, the principal 
motif of the decoration can be copied, 
worked at one side of the small doyley. 
Or a solid band of lemon yellow, apple 
green, or turquoise blue, matching that 
on the china, can be embroidered just 



inside the lace edge of the doyley. The 
exceedingly fine lace, in narrow widths, 
sold by the Syrian women, is a satisfac- 
tory edge for these tiny doyleys. Or a 
narrow gold lace may be used, but it 
must be taken off when the doyleys are 
washed. 

Making Salads on the Table. 

It is a pleasant custom at an informal 
dinner or supper to dress the salad on 
the table. If you happen to have one of 
the sectional dishes, used for hors 
d'oeuvres, you can divert it from its orig- 
inal purpose, filling one section with 
chopped whites of egg, another with the 
yolks run through a press, a third with 
tiny onions, sliced, the fourth with 
shredded celery. The salad bowl of crisp 
lettuce hearts stands in front of you. At 
your right hand is a small bowl and all 
the ingredients for the French dressing. 
Beat the oil and vinegar and seasoning to 
a thick emulsion, using three times the 
quantity of oil you do of vinegar. Empty 
the contents of the sectional dish into 
the salad bowl, stir in the dressing and a 
delicious salad is ready for the maid to 
pass. 

Salad in Shells. 

In the department store groceries you 
can buy pastry shells of all shapes and 
sizes, from the tiniest timbale to those 
five or six inches in diameter. While 
these are intended primarily for vege- 
tables and various creamed mixtures, 
they are nice for the salad course. You 
may fill them with chicken, shrimp or 
lobster, dressed with a mayonnaise, or 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



389 



r 

Beauty 
and 



Quality 

The original Rogers Bros, silver- 
ware identified by the trade 
mark "1847 ROGERS BROS." has 
expressed the highest type of silver- 
plate perfection for 62 years. 

On forks, spoons, fancy serving 
pieces, etc., is the mark 

I847 ROGERS BR0S.T& 

Whether the desired style he sim- 
ple or ornate, it may be procured 
in "]8 ROGERS BROS." ware. 
Combining the maximum of du- 
rability with rare beauty of de- 
sign, this renowned ware is the 
choice of purchasers who de- 
sire only the best. 

Leading dealers everywhere sell 

this famous "S Hirer "Plate 
that Wears. " Send for 
Catalogue ' S-35 showing 
the many auractive 
designs. 

MERMEN 
BRITANNIA COMPANY 

(International Silver 
Company, Successor) 

MERIOEN. CONN. 
New York 
Chicago 

San 
Francisco 



390 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Table Chat Continued 



with a highly seasoned cream cheese. 
With the latter filling, set the shells on 
a bed of lettuce leaves and pass a French 
dressing in a silver pitcher. Setting your 
pitcher in a coaster will tend to keep the 
cloth free from oil stains, which are 
rather nasty to get out. 

If one is out of range of the big shops, 
satisfactory pastry cases can be made by 
cutting long strips of puff paste, rolled 
as thin as possible, and winding them 
around horns of buttered cardboard, 
browning them delicately in the oven. 
When they are cold the horn of card- 
board will slip out easily. Inspection of 
what bakers call a cream roll will give 
the modus operandi, but the paste should 
be as thin as possible. 

Pastry Cases for Dessert. 

When pastry cases are used for serv- 
ing different sorts of dessert, all sorts of 
delightful combinations are possible. 

When strawberries or raspberries are 
scarce, mix a few with whipped cream, 
mashing and sweetening them first, and 
fill the shells, or use the fruit alone with- 
out the cream. 

Old fashioned lemon honey is another 
filling, made by cooking the juice and 
rind of a lemon, a cup of sugar and a 
beaten egg, until they thicken, adding at 
the last a bit of butter. 

Or make a stiff arrowroot custard, 
flavoring it with bitter almond, strong 
coffee extract, or orange, or stirring in 
enough grated chocolate to make it dark. 
Another filling is a stiff wine jelly broken 
into small pieces and put into the shells. 
Still another is whipped cream mixed 
with crushed macaroons and chopped 
walnuts. 

In Asparagus Time. 

There is a woeful ignorance as to the 
proper way to serve asparagus. The only 
satisfactory way to eat it is in one's fin- 
gers, but how is one to do so decently if 
the whole thing is covered with a more 
or less sticky dressing? As for the toast 



so many people insist upon, it is a relic 
of the days when people cut up the vege- 
table with a knife. Serving most things 
upon toast is a custom more honored in 
the breach than the observance. It is 
best limited to small birds. 

If you want to have asparagus at its 
best have it carefully drained and put 
onto the table at the last minute, passing 
with it a Hollandaise or melted butter 
sauce, not a cream sauce. If you do not 
want to bother with a sauce, which is 
quite conceivable, lay the stalks very 
evenly upon a platter, buttering the 
green ends liberallv. The dishes which 
come specially for asparagus are so use- 
ful that it is a pity they are almost al- 
ways so exceedingly ugly. The very 
worst German taste has been exercised 
to make them superlatively impossible to 
anyone of even ordinary good taste. 

Asparagus Soup. 

In cooking asparagus, after the stalks 
have been trimmed to a convenient 
length, have the cut-off ends cooked as 
well. Do not use more water than is 
necessary, strain it and set it away until 
the next day. Boil it up, add a thicken- 
ing of butter and flour, a cup of milk, 
pepper and salt and a lump of butter, and 
you have an excellent soup at slight ex- 
pense. 

For a summer luncheon, cold aspara- 
gus, with a mayonnaise dressing, and 
canned salmon is a good combination. 
With hot rolls, coffee and fruit it is quite 
good enough for even the expected guest. 
Bisque Figures. 

The latest French conceit in the way 
of table ornamentation is the bisque fig- 
ure, perhaps nine inches high, represent- 
ing a lady in the court costume of the 
seventeenth century. These figures are 
set at different points on the dinner table, 
alternating with the bon bon dishes. Of 
these latter, the newest are tall and 
rather large, shallow trays mounted on 
a tall standard, and of cut glass. 




ALADDIN HOUSE $ 298; 



COMPLETE 
k 5 ROOM 



DWELLING HOUSES, BARNS, SUMMER COTTAGES 

Aladdin Knocked Down Houses axe shipped everywhere. Every 4 
olece of material comes to you out and fitted and ready to nail in 
place. No skilled labor required. Permanent, attractive, warm 
and lasting. Not portable. Price includes all lumber out to fit, 
shingles, doors, windows, glass, patent plaster board. Interior trim 
and finish, paint, nails, locks, hardware and complete instructions. 

H onses from to 19 rooms, Save four profits by buying direct from 

mill. *end stamps for catalog *V. NORTH AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION CO., BAY CITY, MICH. 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



391 



Perfect Light for the Country Home 

Combination 
Gas Machine 



Bin. in 



Hero Is lighting system that not 
only means good profits for you but 
It will give the most satisfactory 
service to your customers. 
The best light for residences, 
schools, churches, factories, etc., 
especially where city gas or electricity 
are not available. 

This system of lighting Is cheaper 
than any other form of light and gives 
perfect results. A gas plant complete 
in itself right in the house. Perfectly 
safe. Examined and tested by the 
Underwriters' Laboratories and listed 
by the Consulting Engineers of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
The gas is in all respects equal to city 
coal gas, and is ready for use at any 
time without generating, (or illu- 
minating or cooking purposes. The 
standard for over 40 years. Over 
15,000 in successful operation. 

The days of kerosene lamps are 
over. Why not sell this light in your 
community? Write for information, 
prices and 72-page book, 
"Light for Evening Hours" 

DETROIT 
Heating & Lighting Co. 

362 Wight St. DETROIT, MICH. 



Write for Our Free Book on 

Home Refrigeration 



This book laid how to *- 
lict the homo Refrigerator. 
Low to know the poor from 
i >o good, how to keep down 
I ) bills, how to keep Re- 
f Ijerator sanitary and 
tweet lots of things you 
should know before buying 
ANY Rofrlgorator. 

It also tells all alxnit the 
"Monroe." the Refrigerator 
with inner walls made in one 
piece of solid, unbreakable. 
White Porcelain Ware an inch 
thick and highly glazed, with 
every corner rounded. No 
cracks or crevices anywhere. 
The "Monroe" is as easy to 
keep clean as a china trawl. 




Always sold 
'DIRECT and at 
'Factory Prices; never 
through dealers. 



Gb* Monroe" 



Most other Refrigerators have cracks and corners which cannot be- 
cleaned. Here, particles of food collect and breed countless yerms. These 
germs get into your food and make it poison, and the family suffers from, 
no traceable cause. 

The "Monroe" can be sterilized and made germlessly clean in an instant 
by simply wiping out with a cloth wrung from h. it water. It's like "washing" 
dishes," for the "Monroe" is really a thick porcelain dish inside. 

The high death rate among children in the summer months could her 
greatly reduced if the Monroe Refrigerator was used in every home where 
there are little folks. 

The "Monroe" is installed in the best flats and apartments, occupied by 
people who CARE and is found today in a large majority of the VERY" 
BEST homes in the United States. 1 he largest and best Hospitals use it 
exclusively. The health of the whole family is safeguarded by the use ofc 
a Monroe Refrigerator. 

When you have carefully read the book and know all about Home Re- 
frigeration, you will know WHY and will realize how important it is to- 
select carefully. Please write for book today. 

Monroe Refrigerator Co., Station 6, Cincinnati, 0. 




COLONIAL 
MANTELS 

Made of Orna- <t 1 O and 
mental Brick I Ji* U P 

fll Last longest look best are not too costly. 
^11 There's no other kind so good so pleasing. 

II Our Sketch Book tells all about them. 

'|| Write for it before you build or remodel. 

PHILADELPHIA & BOSTON FACE BRICK CO, 

P. O. Box 8518, BOSTON. MASS. 




Our Beautiful Booklet, " Pergolas" 

Illustrated with views of some of the most attractive new 
homes and grounds showing exceedingly artistic results 
in pergola treatment. This booklet is right off the press, 
and is yours for the asking. Ask for Booklet K-27. 

Proportions in columns make or mar the success and ar- 
tistic effectof the pergola. That is why a pergola built with 

ROLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

made in classic proportions, will insure your getting a 
charming and beautiful pergola. They are equally suitable 
for porches or interior work and are made exclusively by 

HARTMANN-SANDERS COMPANY 

Elston and Webster Aves., Chicago, 111. 
Eastern Office: - - 1 123 Broadway. N. Y. City 



392 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



-v'-;- >" I -- '-- L: : :-'>---VS 





Press Bulletin. 

FFORTS are being made in all 
parts of the country to promote 
the use of solid reinforced con- 
crete in residence construction. 
This branch of the cement industry has 
been much slower in development than 
the others for architects and contractors 
have been slow to realize the wonderful 
possibilities of this adaptable building 
material. This type of construction ap- 
proaches nearer to the ideal than any 
other, for a concrete house offers many 
advantages over every other form of con- 
struction. It can be built to conform to 
any builder's idea of a beautiful design 
besides possessing the advantages of 
fireproofness, permanency and extremely 
low maintenance expense. Artistic ef- 
fects can be secured both in interior and 
exterior decorations which are impossible 
with any other building material. All of 
the interior trim may be made of con- 
crete and the novel effects secured in 
this manner possess an atmosphere of 
refinement not obtainable with anything 
but concrete. 

For the purpose of furthering concrete 
residence construction, the Pittsburg 
Architectural Club conducted a competi- 
tion for securing designs of a suburban 
concrete residence and garage, using ce- 
ment construction wherever possible. 
The competition was open to practically 
all of the architects in the country and 
prizes amounting to $500.00 were con- 
tributed by the Universal Portland Ce- 
ment Co. The designs are at present be- 
ing exhibited at the Fifth Annual Art 
Exhibition at the Carnegie Institute Gal- 
leries at Pittsburg, and will probably be 
published later in booklet form by that 
Company. 



Reinforced Concrete Helps Steel 
Industry. 

Reinforced concrete construction has 
been a benefit and- not an injury to the 
steel industry, according to an editorial 
discussion of the subject in the Iron Age. 
The statement is based on reports from 
the important bar mills, which made 
their largest output in June and July, al- 
though steel mills generally are not run- 
ning at full capacity. This condition was 
due to the fact that from a quarter to a 
third of the production has been steel 
for reinforcing concrete, much of which 
commanded high prices because of the 
diversity of length of the bars, the va- 
rious chemical requirements and the spe- 
cial rolls that have been needed in some 
cases. There has also been a rather 
large business in wire fabric and steel 
lath, due solely to the demands for such 
products for concrete. It is gratifying 
to see this estimate of the relative posi- 
tions of the reinforced concrete and steel 
interests in a journal so thoroughly iden- 
tified with the latter. A great deal of 
apprehension has been aroused unneces- 
sarily among structural steel contractors 
by the unwarranted statements of con- 
crete enthusiasts. There is a neutral 
land where both will always be com- 
petitors, but it has been apparent for 
some time that reinforced concrete is 
mainly a competitor of timber and brick, 
and that the steel-cage structure was not 
threatened in a serious manner by the 
new method of construction. 
Reinforced Concrete as a Fire Resistant 

A short time ago there occurred in 
Dayton, Ohio, a fire which gave an op- 
portunity to test reinforced concrete as a 
fireproof material. It occurred in a fac- 
tory where motor cars were made. The 
main portion of the building was of mill 
construction and five stories and base- 
ment adjoined by a reinforced concrete 
building, U-shaped in plan and six stories 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



393 




Asbestos "Century" Shingle Roof Residence of Mrs. William Edgar, 
Newport, Rhode Island; John Melville, Newport, Contractor 

Asbestos "Century" Shingles 

"The Roof that Outlives the Building" 

"\\7HAT roofing could the architect or builder recommend if not 
Asbestos "Century" Shingles? 

Dense and elastic sheets of asbestos fibre-cement, formed 
and compacted under hydraulic pressure. 

Weather-proof Dampness matures the cement. Elasticity defies 
changes of temperature even continuous freezing and thawing. 

Fire -proof Asbestos and cement do not support combustion. 

Accident -proof Asbestos fibres reinforce the cement in every 
direction. 

Uniform in size and shape. Easily and quickly laid. Need no 
painting for appearance or preservation, and no repairs. 

The first cost is the final cost. 

Three attractive colors Newport Gray (silver gray), Slate (blue 
black) and Indian Red. Numerous shapes and several sizes. Ask your 
Roofer for new quotations. Write for Booklet, "Reinforced 1910." 

The Keasbey & Mattison Company 

FACTORS 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 



394 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Cement Continued 



and basement in height. The two build- 
ings were practically made a continuous 
unit,* as the walls of the brick building 
served as the boundary of the concrete 
building on the open side of the U, com- 
munication being afforded between the 
two buildings by doors on each floor. 
When the fire department arrived, the 
fire had extended over the entire fourth 
floor of the concrete building. The con- 
tents of this floor were destroyed, but 
the building escaped with slight dam- 
age. Through the absence of fire doors 
and the inability of the department to 
withstand the intense heat and smoke, 
the fire was communicated through an 
opening to the adjoining five-story brick 
building and was confined to the two 
upper floors. 

The report of the chief of the Dayton 
Fire Department brings out some sug- 
gestions as to reinforced concrete con- 
struction, from which the following is 
taken : 

"First: That the reinforcing steel 
should be covered with at least two 
inches of concrete, because the fire, hav- 
ing penetrated the lower inch of concrete, 
would have affected the strength of the 
structure had it not been for the rigidly 
attached diagonals. 

"Second: That the finishing cement 
surface should be put on when the floor 
is being laid, thereby forming a solid 
mass; because the finished surface was 
destroyed wherever the heat was intense, 
the slab underneath being uninjured. 

"Third: We were hampered greatly 
in handling our ladders and several of 
our firemen had a very narrow escape 
from being injured or possibly killed by 
falling sashweights, and we were com- 
pelled to force into the buildings all win- 
dow frames that had not already fallen 
before we could use our ladders to ad- 
vantage. I would suggest that in the con- 
struction of a building an iron pipe be 
imbedded in the concrete for the weights 
to fall into, in case the window frames 
are destroyed by fire." 




Concrete Houses in Quake Districts. 

The village of Favellani in south Italy 
was entirely rebuilt in reinforced con- 
crete after the earthquake of 1905, and 
its houses, as well as several of those in 
Messina of the same material, were found 
to have escaped the late disaster. An 
Italian engineer, M. Danusso, finds that 
reinforced concrete buildings hold to- 
gether longer and fall but slowly, so that 
the dwellers have time to escape. The 
shock produces bending and cracking at 
first, which gives warning of the disaster. 
Cellars should not be used, according to 
the principles he deduces for construc- 
tion, and a smooth cement surface on 
the soil is best as a platform for build- 
ing the structure. He thinks that one 
or two stories should be the limit. M. 
Cesare Pesenti, another Italian engineer, 
prescribes separating the building com- 
pletely so as to make it independent of 
the ground platform, resting on it simply, 
and this with as small a surface as pos- 
sible of contact between the building 
and the platform, so as to allow for dis- 
placement and to deaden the vibration. 

The Cracking of Floors. 

The cracking of floors is so common an 
occurrence that it has come to be looked 
upon as almost, if not quite, inevitable by 
the average home owner, but in many in- 
stances it can be prevented by the exer- 
cise of proper precautions. The excuse 
given in almost every case is, that it is 
due to the "settling" of the building. As 
a matter of fact, 99 cases out of every 
100 of cracked floors are due to the qual- 
ity of the cement used in laying them, 
even when no adulteration has been 
made by added lime. In very many of 
the cements now on the market, a cer- 
tain amount of shrinkage is developed in 
its use, and some shrink very much more 
than others. This fact should be kept in 
mind when purchasing cement for the 
laying of floors, and if the proper kind 
is used there will be a wonderful dimin- 
ution in the number of cracked floors. 
The Home Beautiful 

Many people imagine they are too poor 
or have not time to keep their homes a 
credit to the neighborhood. Shrubbery 
costs almost nothing if bought when 
small. Flowers practically nothing, and 
a little paint goes a long way. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



395 



Keep the Heat 



HEATING a house in winter in 
this climate is a costly prop- 
osition. Building paper and back- 
plaster are unable to afford suffi- 
cient insulation to prevent the es- 
cape of a large percentage of heat 
through walls. The modern, most 
efficient and economical method of 
retaining heat in winter or exclud- 
ing it in summer is to insulate 
walls with the same material that 
has proven wonderfully successful 
in 30,000 refrigerator cars and 
thousands of buildings over the 
country 



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strong selling point to say "My building is 
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Send for our New Book 
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This book should be in 
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320 Fibre Ave., Winona, Minn. 
THE PHILIP CAREY CO., 
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Branches and Warehouses i( 
all the large cities of the United 
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ATLAS 

CEMENT 

LIBRARY 

"Concrete Houses and Cottages" 

Vol. I, Large Houses, $1 .00 Vol. II. Small Houses, $ 1 .00 
Atlas Cement Library Other Books 

Concrete Construction about the Home and on the Farm - - Free 
Concrete in Highway Construction - - ..... $1.00 

Reinforced Concrete in Factory Construction (delivery ci arfe) .10 
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Concrete Country Residences (out of pr.nt) ------ 2.00 

Concrete Garages -------- ... Free 

THE books in this library contain the 
most complete and exhaustive infor- 
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They have been compiled at an enormous 
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Over 50.000 bun-els per day 




396 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



FINISHIN 



PAINTING 




How to Protect Structural Metals 

Courtesy of 0. C. Harn 

(Continued from the April Number) 

Formulas. 

PRIMING AND BODY COATS. 

No. 1. Pure Red Lead Priming- Coat: 
1 gallon linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 
raw; or all raw oil with ]/2. pint turpen- 
tine drier added.) 33 pounds pure red 
lead. 

No. 2. Red Lead Coat, Tinted : 1 gal- 
lon linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 raw; 
or all raw oil with */2 pint turpentine 
drier added.) 33 pounds pure red lead ; 
1 ounce lamp black in oil. 

No. 3. Red Lead Coat, Tinted : 1 gal- 
lon linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 raw; 
or all raw oil with ^2 pint turpentine 
drier added.) 33 pounds pure red lead; 2 
ounces lamp black in oil. 

FINISHING COATS. 

No. 4. Red Lead Coat, Tinted : 1 gal- 
lon linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 raw; 
or all raw oil with YZ pint turpentine 
drier added.) 33 pounds pure red lead; 
4 ounces lamp black. 

No. 5. Black Coat: A good black 
paint of finely ground graphite or lamp 
black with a small percentage of varnish 
added. 

No. 6. Dark Olive : 100 pounds pure 
white lead; 16 pounds French ochre; 46 
pounds medium chrome yellow; 19 
pounds lamp black in oil. (This gives 
the properly tinted pigment. Linseed oil 
and drier must be added in sufficient 
quantities to bring it to painting consis- 
tency.) 

No. 7. Dark Brown : 1 gallon linseed 
oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 raw; or all raw 
oil with J4 P m t turpentine drier added) ; 
27 pounds pure red lead; 1 pound lamp 
black in oil. 

No. 8. White Gloss Finish for Ex- 
terior: 3^2 to ^ l /2 gallons raw linseed oil; 
1 pint pure turpentine; 1 pint pure tur- 



pentine drier; 100 pounds pure white 
lead. 

No. 9. White Gloss Finish for Ex- 
terior: (Slightly flatter than No. 8.) 2*/ 2 
gallons linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 
raw oil or all raw linseed oil with y 2 pint 
turpentine dried added) ; 1 gallon turpen- 
tine; 100 pounds pure white lead in oil. 

No. 10. White Flat Finish for In- 
terior: *4 gallon raw linseed oil; 1^4 
to 2 gallons pure turpentine ; 1 pint pure 
turpentine drier; 100 pounds pure white 
lead. 

No. 11. White Enamel Finish for In- 
terior : 1 gallon light enamel varnish ; 3 
pounds pure white lead. (Break up the 
white lead first with a little turpentine to 
a thick paste, then mix well with the 
varnish.) 

No. 12. Ship Hold Finish: 1 gallon 
linseed oil; (1-3 boiled oil, 2-3 raw; or 
all raw oil with y 2 pint turpentine drier 
added); 22 pounds pure red lead; 11 
pounds pure white lead. 

Note. The formulas for white fin- 
ishes can be adapted to any tint desired 
by putting in the proper tinting material 
and adding thinners equal to one-half 
the weight of the tinting material. 

Note. When red lead is mentioned in 
these formulas, dry red lead is meant. 
On the contrary, when white lead is 
mentioned, white lead-in-oil, as usually 
furnished to the trade, is meant. 

Painting the Floor of the Porch. 
Great differences of opinion exist re- 
garding the best composition for .paint- 
ing the floor of the porch, and as to 
what should be done under certain con- 
ditions. In one case where the porch 
faces the South, and a portion extends 
around the west side of the building, 
the owner used ready mixed oil paint, 
but the result was that it soon blistered 
and had to be scraped off. The floor 
was then painted with a well-known 
floor paint, which is sold ready for use. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



397 



THE NATI 




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Besides this, each number has other houses 
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The writers, selected by Architect Fred T. 
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Pleasing interiors are within 
the reach of all. A tasteful 
color scheme and discriminate handling 
of materials are essential. 

But back of these, and more important, is 
the finish of walls, ceilings and woodwork. 
If you select 




e "High Standard " of Flat Finishes 

you will have the rich beauty of water 
colors and the service of oil paint com- 
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The ideal background for pictures. Does 
not fade. Soap and water removes all 
trace of dirt without injury. 

Mellotone comes ready to use in fourteen 
colors. Any desired tint may be produced 
by proper blending, and two or more colors 
combined for contrast or harmony. 

Learn More About Mellotone before you de- 
cide on the usual finishes. If not at your 
dealer's, tell us his name, and we will send 
color card, showing effects you can get and 
giving full particulars. Also on 
request, "Common Sense _ About 
Interiors," or for ?5c, "Good 
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with suggested color schemes 
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Boston, New York, Chicago, Kansas City // Protection 




398 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Painting; and Finishing; Continued 



This did not blister, but within two 
months it came off in flakes. The floor 
is of yellow pine, and the ground in its 
vicinity is somewhat damp, the ventila- 
tion under the porch being rather poor. 
The Painters' Magazine, to which the 
owner of the porch stated his troubles, 
makes these suggestions: 

"We would advise you to. provide 
proper ventilation, if possible, under the 
porch floor, because we think the original 
blistering was due to the dampness un- 
der the floor. That the second painting 
flaked was not unlikely due to inferior 
varnish in the paint and an insufficiency 
of oil to bind it. Before applying more 
paint the floor should be well cleansed 
and permitted to dry thoroughly. Then 
a thin coat of pure lead in oil, tinted to 
nearly match the finish desired, and 
thinned two parts raw linseed oil to one 
part turpentine and a very little drier, 
should be applied and well rubbed into 
the wood. Allowing this to become 
hard two coats of a high grade exterior 
floor paint should be given, each coat 
carefully brushed out, or a first-class 
ready-mixed house paint that is some- 
what reduced with turpentine could be 
used in place of floor paint. 

"If you prefer to mix your own paint 
we would suggest that you mix white 
lead and zinc in equal proportions, tint 
to color desired and reduce for applica- 
tion with six parts raw linseed oil, three 
parts turpentine and one part drying 
japan. This will do for both second and 
third coats, but for the latter coat the 
addition of a small portion of hard dry- 
ing varnish would be an improvement." 

Wax Finishing. 

In wax finishing hardwoods, use a 
paste filler and shellac varnish to get a 
good surface. Of course, the wax may 
also be rubbed into the unfilled wood, 
but that gives you quite a different ef- 
fect from the regular wax polish, says a 
correspondent of Wood Craft. With soft 



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woods you first apply a stain, then ap- 
ply a liquid filler or shellac, according to 
the quality of work to be done. The 
former for the cheaper job. The usual 
proportion of wax and turpentine is two 
parts of the former to one part of the 
latter, melting the wax first, then adding 
the spirits of turpentine. For reviving 
or polishing furniture, you can add three 
or four times as much turpentine as wax, 
all these proportions to be by weight. 
To produce the desired egg-shell gloss, 
rub vigorously with a brush of stiff 
bristles or woolen rag. 

Painting a Dwelling with Tuscan Red 
with White Trim. 

In a case where it was desired to paint 
a house with pure Tuscan red for the 
body and the trim white lead the ques- 
tion was asked if the painter should thin 
the Tuscan red with linseed oil the same 
as he would white lead, and what should 
be the proportions. 

In reply to the query of its correspond- 
ent a recent isse of The Painters' Maga- 
zine said : If the job is one of repainting, 
we would suggest that you thin the Tus- 
can red, which, we suppose, you buy 
ground in oil, as follows : To 10 Ib. Tus- 
can red in oil, after beating the same to 
an even consistence, add l / 2 pint of best 
brown japan, 1 pint of turpentine and 1 
gal. pure raw linseed oil for the first 
coat, applying the paint evenly and well 
brush out. 

For the finish, mix in same way, but 
use only one-half as much turps, but be 
sure that the first coat has thoroughly 
dried. 

If the job is a new one and the wood 
has not yet been primed, would suggest 
that you use pure white lead tinted with 
lampblack to medium lead color as a first 
or priming coat, thinning the tinted lead 
with 5 qt. of raw linseed oil and 1 gill of 
liquid drier for every 25 Ib. of the lead. 
Over this priming apply your Tuscan red 
in the same manner as for old work. Not 
knowing the brand or quality of Tuscan 
red you propose to use, we cannot give 
you more explicit directions for thinning. 
Pure fire-boiled linseed oil might be bet- 
ter for thinning the red for the finish than 
raw oil, on account of holding its gloss 
longer. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



399 



New Designs in 

Wood Carpet and 
Parquetry Flooring 

THIS is the best season of the year for 
parquetry flooring and wood carpet. 
The new designs and the attractive 
you can show your customers from the Fos- 
ter-Munger book 108 will make 
lasting friends for you and your 
business. 

<J No other house on earth can 
compete with our style, our per- 
fect workmanship and thoroughly 
dry seasoned stock and our prices. 
This is your cue to ' 'get busy. ' * 



AMERICA'S GREATEST -SASH ti DOOR HOUSE 

If you haven't book 108, send for it and our 
catalogue and prices on wide stile dours. 







ATTENTION TO DETAILS 

Will 

Insure Comfort 

IN YOUR HOME 
See that Your Doors are hung with 

STANLEY'S 

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No creaking of doors 
No need of oiling 
No sagging 

ARTISTIC BOOKLET FREE 

THE STANLEY WORKS 

Dept. T, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 





Paint 

Made-to- 

Order 



O a great many 
people paint means 
just "paint." The 
ingredients of which 
it is composed are 
an unknown quantity. 
jj To every good painter, and 
to every well-informed prop- 
erty owner, paint always 
means fture white lead, freshly 
mixed with pure linseed oil 
for each individual job. Paint 
made of these two standard 
materials has the exclusive 
peculiarity of "flowing to- 
gether," and such paint gives 
a durable, beautiful surface, 
free from brush marks. 
J To be sure of purity and 
quality in white lead, look for 
the "Dutch Boy Painter" 
trade-mark on the side of the 
steel keg. 

9 Anyone interested in paint- 
ing can get reliable informa- 
tion about paint made-to-order 
from our "Dutch Boy Paint 
Adviser No. KE which also 
includes booklets on interior 
decoration and landscape gar- 
dening Free. 

National Lead Company 

An office In each of the following cities: 

New York Boston Buffalo Cincinnati Chicago 

Cleveland St. Louis 

(John T. Lewis & Bros. Co., Philadelphia) 
(National Lead & Oil Company, Pittsburgh) 



400 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



^,^,^ 
AND PLVMBING 




Short -Cut Furnace Rules Often Hurtful. 



OHE warm-air furnace, says Mas- 
ter Sheet Metal Workers Jour- 
nal, is a mighty important piece 
1 of household furniture in cold 

weather. When the plant is installed 
it is put in to stay for years, not a few 
days. Some individuals, poising as au- 
thorities, have remarked that the furnace 
dealer wants (not needs, mind you) some 
rule of thumb to determine quickly (and 
mostly regardless of accuracy) the size 
of furnace required. This is a very bad 
doctrine to advocate. The importance of 
the warm-air furnace in the house de- 
mands that the dealer shall accurately de- 
termine the size of furnace, piping and 
registers. To hastily arrive at these re- 
sults by an inaccurate, short-cut rule, 
simply because it saves a few figures, is 
positively wrong and those who say it is 
this kind of rule that the dealer should 
have are working an injury to the fur- 
nace business. If the dealer is not will- 
ing to take the time to do the necessary 
accurate figuring, as to the cubical con- 
tents, glass and wall exposures, furnace 
sizes, etc., then he ought not to install 
warm-air furnaces. Steam and hot-water 
plants are not installed on any such 
flimsy, slipshod rules. 

Accurate calculations are being rapidly 
applied to warm-air furnace heating. The 
furnace dealer is entitled to all the tech- 
nical knowledge necessary in simple 
form. Heretofore he has never had it. 
Strange to say, there are those now who 
declare he don't need it, and would, if 
they could, withhold it from him. 
Noises in Pipes. 

Summing up many contributions to 
Domestic Engineering from practical 
men in the trade concerning the causes 
of noises in pipes and how to overcome 
this difficulty, the following resume cov- 
ers the matter in a nutshell: 

Cause : High pressure of water. Rem- 



edy: Substitute tank pressure; partial 
remedy, casing in the pipes and packing 
in tightly either mineral wool or asbes- 
tos fibre. Another remedy is to put in 
a pressure regulator near the cellar wall 
where the water supply enters the build- 
ing .and still another is to put discs at 
each one of the cocks on the premises. 
It is claimed that these prevent water 
hammer and splash as well as noise. An- 
other remedy is the use of air chambers 
on the hot and cold supply to the fix- 
tures. 

Cause : Partial stoppage in the service 
pipe by an obstruction such as galvaniz- 
ing partly filling the pipe and causing 
vibration when water is passing through 
with great velocity. Remedy: Takeout 
pipe from main to the point where first 
branch is taken off and replace with a 
good smooth-bore pipe. 

Cause : Too great vibration caused by 
velocity of the water. Remedy: A bit 
of rubber packing used between joists or 
studding or between pipe and hangers. 
The water pipe should not be allowed to 
rest against soil or heating pipes, as they 
will carry the sound. 

Cause : Loose packing on faucets. 
Remedy: Do not use rubber packing; 
use fibre or hard leather. 

Cause : Corporation stop at main too 
small or choked with sediment. Remedy : 
Examine it and repair defects. 

Cause : Service pipe too small, ends 
not reamed out. Each successive end 
with burr telephones the noise ahead. 
Remedy : Self-evident. 

Cause : Air-chambers become water- 
logged and each stroke of the faucet can 
be heard distinctly. Remedy: Draw off 
the water from the building. 

Loose washers in fixture faucet may 
be the cause of the noise. 

If noise has developed recently the 
cause has recently developed also and is 
probably a loose part in a faucet or valve. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



401 



Save 60^ of Your Fuel Bill 



BY USING AN 



ALDINE FIREPLACE 

And Get Four Times as Much Heat as You Can Get from Any Other Grate 




The Aldine saves the expense of your 
furnace in the Fall and Spring, or heats the 
house that has no furnace at this big saving 
in cost. It can be installed and used in an 
old house already built just as satisfactorily 
as in a new one. 

Fifty thousand Aldines are now doing 
this in two thousand towns in this country 
and Canada. There are probably Aldines 
in your own town where you can see them. 

Write us now for the Aldine Blue book, telling 
a plain, clear story which proves the above facts. 



Rathbone Fireplace Mfg. Co. 



5617 Clyde Park Ave. 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Manufacturers of All Kinds of Fireplaces and Trimmings 



PRACTICAL HOUSE DECORATION 



The book for all who intend to decorate either a new 
or old home. Written by experienced decorators. 
162 pages, profusely illustrated. Contains many dec- 
orative schemes for a moderate cost Chouse, giving 
treatment for each room. A gold mine of artistic 
suggestions. Size 7 x 9 1 A inches, printed on fine 
enameled paper, limp covers. Price $1.00. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



for one year, both for $2.00 including three extra 
recent numbers of the Magazine offered with all new 
subscriptions. Order your copy today. 




M. L. KEITH, Publisher, Minneapolis 



402 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Heating: and Plumblnff Continued 



Pipes fastened to wood should have some 
non-conducting material between. 

Risers not well anchored with non-con- 
ducting material between them and wood 
would cause vibration of the entire pipe. 

Stopcock may be partly closed. After 
opening it wide there may be no noise. 

Supply pipe may be too small so that 
when a number of faucets are opened 
the water must necessarily travel 
through the small pipe at a high veloc- 
ity. 

If when the stopcock is shut off the 
noise ceases, look for a leak between 
the stopcock and the main. 

Air Locks in Water Pipes. 

The effect of the sagging of a lead 
pipe between its supports, is that air 
will collect in the high parts of the bends, 
and will form air locks. These air locks 
will greatly impede the flow of water 
through the pipe. If the pressure is 
light, and the sags are many, they may 
stop the flow entirely. A long waste pipe 
suffering from these conditons might ut- 
terly prevent the passage of water and 
give the impression that it was choked 
by refuse, while, as a matter of fact, the 
real trouble was due wholly to the air 
locks which- had formed. 

If air has accumulated in the upper 
bends, the water will rise on one side 
of the bend and slightly compress the 
air which has been entrapped at differ- 
ent points. The air will depress the wa- 
ter on the other side of the bend and 
raise its surface at the next upper bend. 
The difference in level between the sur- 
faces of the water on the opposite sides 
of a bend, is the measure of the resist- 
ance which the air in that bend offers to 
the passage of the water in a steady flow. 
The effects of the air accumulation are 
chiefly observed in low pressure systems, 
such as those which are supplied with 
water from house tanks. 



The reason for this is, that the pres- 
sure due to the head between the air 
locks and the tank is usually too low to 
force the air out of the pipe. It is differ- 
ent when the system is under high 
pressure, because then the pressure 
is generally sufficient to force the air 
out of the pipes, with the water. 
A common cause of air lock in a build- 
ing is the running of a lead hot water 
pipe over the floor beams for a consid- 
erable distance, the pipe not being sup- 
ported uniformly throughout its entire 
length. Exchange. 

Insulating Steel Water Pipes. 

One of the disadvantages found to be 
connected with the use of steel pipe for 
water, conduits and other purposes is the 
dange'from electrolysis, since, owing to 
the thinness of the shell, a small amount 
of pitting is a serious matter. -An effort 
to overcome this has been made in the 
case of the two 30-inch steel water pipes 
which are to be laid under the Connecti- 
cut River on the line bringing the Little 
River supply to Springfield, Mass. In 
this case the lines will be of steel pipe 
for the entire length, except that at each 
end the pipe will be a length of wood- 
stave pipe, which will act as an insulator 
to prevent stray electric current from 
entering the section of pipe line between 
them. A gap of 3 feet is left in the steel 
pipe line where the wood joint is to go, 
on each side of which a casting is at- 
tached to the pipe, on the outside surface 
of which are cast three beads spaced 
about 5 inches apart. The wood staves, 
assembled so as to include these castings, 
are forced down onto them by eight 
welded hoops of 1 by 4-inch steel, which 
are tightened up sufficiently to cause 
the beads to sink into the staves and at 
the same time to bring the staves into 
close contact to prevent leakage between 
them. The staves are 2 inches thick at 
the ends and 4 inches at the middle. 




SEDGWICKS 

Better Homes Cost Leg* you find, when you examine Sedgwitk plans. 

The years you are to spend in your home, the enjoyment you are 
to get out of it, the money you put into it, all make it plain that you 
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Price $1. OO, New, large and improved 8th edition just off the 
press. To those interested, a New Book of Churches FREE. 
CHAS.S. SEDGWICK, 1028 K, Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



403 



COUNTRY HOUSE HEATING 

In no other field has the Kelsey System of Hot Air Heating scored 
greater success than in the heating of large, fine country homes 

Kelsey Warm Air Generators 

are heating hundreds of country homes of prominent 
people with from 20 to 40 rooms in high altitudes, 
and exposed to high winds, so satisfactorily that 
many builders of other homes have considered Kelsey 
Heating only. 

Country house owners like Kelsey Heating be- 
cause there are no pipes and radiators to freeze up 
and burst or leak and cause damage and vexatious 
delay to repair, if necessary to close up the house 
and the water is not carefully drawn off. 

They like Kelsey Heating because the whole 
house can be warmed in a few minutes in zero weather and the Kelsey is always ready 
for business. 

THERE'S NO SYSTEM OF HEATING FOR CITY OR COUNTRY HOMES THAT IS 
SO HEALTHFUL, ECONOMICAL AND EASY TO MANAGE AS KELSEY HEATING 




KELSEY HEATED-MORRISTOWN. N. J. 
Ludlow & Valentine, Architects, New York 



KELSEY HEATING CO. 



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and book of "Opinions" FREE. 



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102 E.Fayette St., Syracuse, N. Y. 



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156 C. Fifth Ave. 



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THE DEALER'S PROFIT 



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you ought to have a copy of 
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ought to know how we 
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saving you all of the deal- 
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at a small advance over fac- 
tory cost. The 
Jahant Down Draft Furnace 
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the patented "down draft" 
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every particle, leaving no 
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We design complete outfit for your house, ship it prepaid 
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With each outfit we supply special plans, full directions 
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by the terms of which we agree to take the furnace and 
refund your money if a year's trial does not convince 
you that it is the best furnace you ever used. 

Write for catalog today and learn all the 
' facts about this unique furnace proposition. 

The Jahant Heating Company 

, 202 Howard St. Akron, Ohio 




$25.85 



For this elegant, 
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oak or birch, ma- 
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"FROM FACTORY 

TO YOU" 

Price includes our 
"Queen" Coal 
Grate with best 
quality enameled 
tile for facing and 
hearth. Gas Grate 
$2. 50 extra. Man- 
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high, 5 feet wide. 
Furnished with round or square columns, 
full length or double as shown in cut. 
Dealers' price not less than $40. 

CENTRAL MANTELS 

are distinctive in workmanship, style and 
finish and are made in all styles Colonial to 
Mission. CATALOGUE FREE Will send 
our new 112 page catalogue free, to carpen- 
ters, builders, and those building a home. 

Central Mantel Company 

1227 Olive Street ST. LOUIS, MO. 



"REPUTATION AND 
QUALITY COUNT" 



404 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS 



D 



A Correction. 

HE following letter is self ex- 
planatory and is published in 
that spirit of fairness which 
should characterize a magazine 
wishing to afford a hearing at least, upon 
matters about which there may be a dif- 
ference of opinion. Ed. 

Editor of Keith's Magazine, 
Dear Sir: 

We have before us the current issue 
of your valued magazine, and note with 
interest in your Department entitled 
"Questions Answered on Construction," 
the inquiry of "H. B." on "The Quality 
of Sand-Lime Bricks," and your reply 
thereto. 

We beg leave to correct some of the 
statements made in the above mentioned 
article. 

We note in the first place your state- 
ment that Sand-Lime (or Silicate) 
bricks have the fault, when used in resi- 
dence work of being "More difficult to 
lay than clay bricks because they do not 
have the same suction." In this con- 
nection we wish to call your attention to 
the following extract from a report made 
Feb. 27, 1908, by Mr. J. P. Whitney, of 
the Whitney Engineering Co., Tacoma, 
Wash., viz.: 

"As compared to clay brick they will 
absorb far less moisture, their appear- 
ance is superior to the very best clay 
brick on the market. They can be made 
into any color desired. They will stand 
a far greater fire test and not crumble. 
On account of there being no warped 
faces to the brick they are much easier 
laid. They can be broken with a trowel 
square across, thus eliminating , waste. 
Their adhesive qualities to mortar are 
wonderful. They are clean, sanitary and 
free from effervescing, so common to 
clay brick." 

Furthermore, our experience of nine 
years in manufacturing Sand-Lime bricks 
for residence as well as other work, has 
proved conclusively the truth of the 
above statement, especially as regards 



the adhesive qualities of these brick to 
mortar. 

In the second place, we wish to take 
exception to the following statement in 
your article, "In factory buildings they 
have been a failure because the vibration 
from machinery and the slamming of 
heavy doors causes the mortar to loosen." 
Enclosed herewith is a printed folder 
showing the new mill of the Clarke Tex- 
tile Co., at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., in 
which over 500,000 Sand-Lime bricks, 
made under our process, were used, and 
have proved satisfactory in every re- 
spect. In this particular case the vibra- 
tion of the mill machinery is very severe, 
yet this has not injured the brick work 
in the slightest degree. 

Lastly, referring to your statement 
that "The best lime for the purpose is 
rich in magnesia, which must be fresh." 
We wish to say that the first part of this 
statement shows that you must have 
been misinformed as to this point, for, 
as a matter of fact, it is absolutely im- 
possible to produce a high grade brick 
by using lime rich in magnesia, as such 
a lime is very slow to hydrate, and for 
our purpose it is necessary to have a 
very pure, fresh, quick calcium lime. 

We also enclose herewith a partial list 
of the buildings in New York City, in- 
cluding residences, office buildings, 
municipal buildings, etc., constructed out 
of Silicate brick made under our process, 
and we wish further to call your atten- 
tion to the fact that the new Hammer- 
stein Opera House in Philadelphia, Pa., 
is faced entirely with our Silicate brick. 

Very truly yours, 
International Sand-Lime Brick and 

Machinery Company. 

Squatter Rights on National Forests 
Recognized. 

Secretary Wilson has just issued an 
order providing for a more liberal treat- 
ment of bona fide squatters upon unsur- 
veyed land which has been included 
within national forests since the time of 
actual occupancy of the land by the 
squatter. The order is as follows: 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



405 




That Bungalow 

which you intend to build this Spring 
will need the soft, artistic tones of 

Cabot's Shingle Stains 

to make it harmonize with its surroundings. 
They are for shingles and all other exterior wood 
work, and preserve the wood thoroughly from de- 
cay and insects. 50% cheaper than paint, 100% 
handsomer , and any intelligent boy can apply them . 

Send for samples of Stained Wood and Circular*. Fret 

Samuel Cabot, Inc., 

Agents at all central points. 



Sole Manufacturers 
BOSTON. MASS. 



> Woodruff Leeming, Architect, New York 



THE CELEBRATED FURMAN BOILERS 




Valuable Catalogue on Modern Steam and Hot Water Heat- 
ing, mailed free. Address 
The Herendeen Manufacturing Company 



5 NORTH ST. 



GENEVA, NEW YORK 



As an Investment, Furman Boilers return Large Dividends 
in Improved Health, Increased Comfort and Fuel Saved. 



No. 296 PEARL ST. 



NEW YORK CITY 



THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL 

COMPLIMENTARY PORTFOLIO OF COLOR PLATES 



NOTABLE EXAMPLES OF 

INEXPENSIVE DECORATION AND FURNISHING 

"THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" is an illustrated monthly 
magazine, which gives you the world's best authorities 
on every feature of making the home beautiful. 

It is invaluable for either mansion or cottage. It 
shows you wherein taste goes farther than money. Its 
teachings have saved costly furnishings from being 
vulgar; and on the other hand, thousands of inexpen- 
sive houses are exquisite examples of superb taste from 
its advice. It presents its information interestingly and 
in a very plain, practical way. Everything is illustrated. 

"THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" is a magazine which no 
woman interested in the beauty of her home can afford 
to be without. It is full of suggestions for house build- 
ing, house decorating and furnishing, and is equally 
valuable for people of large or small income. 

ELLEN M. HENROTIN, 
Ex. Pres. Nat. Federation of Women's Clubs. 

Its readers all say it is a work remarkably worthy, 
thorough and useful. The magazine costs $3.00 a year. 

But to have you test its value, for $1.00 we will send you the 
current number and "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL" Portfolio gratis, 
on receipt of the Five Months' Trial Subscription coupon. The 
Portfolio is a collection of color plates and others of rooms in 
which good taste rather than lavish outlay has produced charming 
effects. The Portfolio alone is a prize which money cannot ordina- 
rily purchase. Enclose gi.oo with the coupon filled out and send to 

HERBERT S. STONE, Publisher of THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL 




A "House Beautiful" illustration greatly reduced 



THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL, 238 Michigm Are., Chicago 

You may send me your Portfolio of Notable Examples of 
Inexpensive Home Decoration and Furnishing, and a copy 
of the current issue of "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL." I 
enclose herewith $1.00 for a siiec-al rate five-month trial 
subscription to the "THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL." 



TOWN OR CITY 



406 




OF HEATING 

The "Jones" Sidewall Registers are 

made to be placed in the side wall, where 
they will not be walked over, and where 
they will not be a receptacle for dust and 
sweepings, especially when not in use, as is 
the case with the common floor registers. 

The meritous principle of the ' JONES" 
SYSTEM is that by it one room on the first 
floor and one room on the second floor are 
heated from the same basement pipe. \Vhen 
the saving in basement pipe and fittings as 
well as tinners' time are considered, these 
registers can be installed as cheaply as the 
other kind and the furnace will give better 
satisfaction with LESS FUEL, for with fewer 
angles and pipes in the basement, less heat 
is wasted from loss by friction and radiation. 

Space will not permit us to go into details 
here but a postal to us will bring particulars. 

Write for Our Prices and Booklet, "Home. Sweet Home." 

U. S. REGISTER CO., 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

BRANCHES: 

Minneapolis, Minn. Des Moines, la. 

Kansas City, Mo. Toronto, Can. 



Splinters and Shavings Continued 

"A person who has settled upon and 
continuously occupied unsurveyed lands 
within a National forest before its crea- 
tion and is at the present time occupying" 
such lands in good faith and is in all 
respects complying with the homestead 
law, has the right to include within the 
lines of his homestead 160 acres after 
the land is surveyed. Therefore, if the 
land is occupied for agricultural pur- 
poses, and is not more valuable for its 
timber than for such purposes, and 
there are no circumstances which 
would in the opinion of the Dis- 
trict Forester tend to discredit the bona 
fides of the claimant, he should be al- 
lowed to make application for the patent- 
ing of such lands under the Act of June 
11, 1906, and the examination for listing 
should be made with a view of listing 
160 acres of land where possible. The 
tracts as listed should conform so far as 
practicable to the form of the public land 
surveys. The listing of lands as above 
should not in any way govern the de- 
termination of the total area or amount 
of non-cultivable land listed for appli- 
cants under the Act of June 11, 1906, 
who were not residing upon the land be- 
fore the creation of the forest. 

"In cases where less than 160 acres of 
land has been listed to a person who 
settled upon the lajid prior to the crea- 
tion of the forest, an additional area suf- 
ficient to complete the homestead entry 
may be allowed upon proper application." 



A New Explosive. 

An Englishman is said to have in- 
vented a new explosive which is to be 
used in the work of blasting for the Pana- 
ma canal, and is expected to save scores 
of lives. The explosive is of greater 
power than dynamite and cheaper to 
manufacture. Its great advantage, how- 
ever, is that it will explode only when 
a small platinum wire just inside the 
open end of the cartridge containing it is 
heated by an electric spark or fuse. Ham- 
mered with a sledge, shot into with a 
rifle, burned in the open air the new ex- 
plosive does not explode. It should come 
into general use for blasting. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



407 







FINELY PRINTED NEW CUTS 



This is Stencil Design No. 11, Suitable for Curtain and 
Wall Decoration 

An ordinary and uninteresting 
room can be made delightful by 
a different color scheme, proper 
hangings and floor coverings. 

Our portfolio, sent free, gives the proper colors 
and the kinds of finishes to be used upon walls, 
ceilings, floors and woodwork for every room, 
together with the hangings, rugs and furniture 
that will produce the best result. Write for this 
portfolio if you have a house or even a room 
to be, decorated. The sending of the portfolio 
puts you under no obligation to use the pro- 
ducts of the Sherwin-Williams Co., except 
that you cannot produce satisfactory results 
without using them. 

"Your Home and Its Decoration" 

is an attractive 200-page book filled with practical hints on 
home decoration. Contains 12 beautiful color plates and 130 
other illustrations. Everyone interested in correct home 
decoration should have a copy of this book. Price $2.00. 
Postage 15c extra. 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 

PAINTS 6- VARNISHES 

Address all inquiries to Decorative Department, 
629 Canal Road, N. W., Cleveland, Ohio. 




IF EVER YOU INTEND to BUILD 
\ SEND tor the ABOVE BOOK NOW - 

ARTISTIC HOMES 



A 1OOO-PAGE BOOK OF OVER 15OO PLANS, HAND- 
SOMELY BOUND, PRICE $1.OO. FORMER PRICE $2 OO 
EXPRESS PREPAID FOR 25C. PURCHASERS OF 
THIS NEW EDITION WILL NEED NO OTHER, AS IT 
CONTAINS BY FAR THE LARGEST NUMBER OF 
HOUSE DESIGNS EVER PUBLISHED. 

-THE BOOK CONTAINS-- 

409 ONE AND TWO-STORY COTTAGES OF S300 TO $150O, 340 RESI- 
DENCES OF $1200 TO S1SOO; 379 RESIDENCES OF S 1 5OO TO S2SOO; 
225 RESIDENCES OF S250O TO S9000; 1OO CALIFORNIA BUNGALOWS. 
I HAVE DESIGNED CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, LIBRARIES,' THEATRES, STORES, 



HERBERT C. CH I VE,RS 

In 836 CONSULTING 1638 cn Bid,. 

Sr.Louis.Ma ARCHITECT 





The Jackson Ventilating Grate 

will make your fireplace a perpetual pleasure. Burns wood, coal or 
gas. Unlike the ordinary grate it produces an even temperature 
thruout one or several rooms, and gives four times the heat of the 
ordinary fcrate. Its special feature is a fresh air pipe which draws 
pure air from outdoors and sends it heated into the room, while the im- 
pure air passes up the chimney. Perfect ventilation is thus assured. 

SE /VD FOR OUR FREE BOOK "K" 

It fully explains the principle of the Jackson Crate, shows the numer- 
ous styles and gives fuil information with prices. 

Special catalog of andirons and 

fireplace fittings mailed on request 

. A. Jackson & firo., 25 Beekman St., New York 



408 




DO 
YOU 

WANT 
THE 

BEST? 

Round Hot 
Water Heater. 

__ ^ Sectional 

JxOVcil Steam and 

* Water Heaters. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Hart & Grouse Co. 

Utica, N. Y. 
80 LAKE ST., CHICAGO 




FURNACE 




We will deliver a complete heating 
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test it during 60 days of winter weather. 

The entire outfit must satisfy you or 
you pay nothing. Isn't this worth looking 
Into ? Could we offer such liberal terms 
If we didn't know that the Hess Furnace 
excels in service, simplicity, efficiency, 
economy ? 

We are makers not dealers and will 
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Your name and address on a fast card 
is sufficient. 

HESS, 717 Tacoma Bldt., Chicago 



IXL ROCK 
MAPLE AND 
BIRCH 
FLOORING 




Selected Red Birch 
Bird's-eye Maple and 
Cherry Flooring 



One important feature 
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after smoothing, an advan- 
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any other manufacture. 

Our method of air-seasoning 
and kiln drying has stood 
the test for twenty years. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET 



Wisconsin Land & Lumber Go, 

HERMANSVILLE, MICHIGAN 



BOOK NOTICES 



Mary Gary. 
By Kate Langley Bosher. 

Mary Gary is a bright little orphan 
girl, with a keen sense of humor, who 
describes the orphans' home in a very 
touching and at the same time very 
amusing way. The different characters 
are drawn true to life as seen in the east- 
ern states or elsewhere for that matter. 

The child's devotion to her teacher 
and her successful matchmaking, are de- 
lightful passages of the book. The dis- 
covery of her parentage and the marriage 
of her beloved teacher make a happy con- 
clusion. It is a bright, wholesome little 
story. Harper and Brothers, New York, 
Price $1.00. 



The Lantern of Luck. 
By Hudson Douglas. 
Oswald Ingersoll is a young New 
York club man who suddenly loses his 
fortune through the ill-advised manage- 
ment of his partner. Ingersoll pays out 
every dollar of his fortune to satisfy the 
creditors. The girl to whom he is en- 
gaged is forced by her guardian to slight 
him publicly and announce her accept- 
ance of his rival, a man with whom the 
guardian is secretly engaged in a busi- 
ness venture, that was largely respon- 
sible for the failure of Ingersoll's firm. 
The young people plan to elope but fail. 
The girl is carried off by her guardian on 
his yacht. The lover starts in pursuit. 
All are shipwrecked and are picked up by 
a ship whose captain is in the pay of the 
rival, who is also on board. The captain's 
ward, a beautiful girl of unknown par- 
entage, aids the lovers and they eventu- 
ally arrive at Nicazuela, an imaginary 
Central American republic, whose Presi- 
dent is in league with the rival and is 
about to leave with all the money and 
securities he has stolen, leaving all his 
associates in the lurch. The story deals 
largely in love, intrigue, and a pacific 
blockade of the seaport town of Nica- 
zuela. It is intensely interesting and 
eventually ends happily in Paris amid 
general satisfaction of the fittest sur- 
vivors. W. J. Watt & Company, New 
York, Price $1.50. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

ON HOME BUILDING 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATED 

The Journal of Modern Construction 

MAX L. KEITH, Publisher, 

525 Lumber Exchange Minneapolis, Minn. 

Eastern Office: No. 1 Madison Ave.. New York City 

Contents for June 



EDITORIAL 

THE UNUSUAL LOT - -,, - -* 

THE SAD TALE OP THE FRONT DOOR - .. 

A GARDEN ROOM - - - 

PROBLEMS IN CONCRETE 

A SUBURBAN HOME - ->"v.- - 

NOTES ON GARDENING 

DESIGNS FOR. THE HOME-BUILDER .. 

DEPARTMENTS 

DECORATION AND FURNISHING '"' f- - - ^*~*~ > 
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON INTERIOR DECORATION^. 

HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS .... - - - - - v / 

TABLE CHAT - - : ' . 

CEMENT - 'W - - * -'- 1 - -"rTSS 

PAINTING AND FINISHING - .'V - - - '">- 

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON CONSTRUCTION - '' ! 
HEATING AND PLUMBING - " - - - - 
SPLINTERS AND SHAVINGS - 
GLIMPSES OF BOOKS - - W : -- 



410 
413 

416 
417 
420 
424 
428 
43D 



442 
448 
452 
456 
460 
464 
468 
472 
476 
480 



CAUTION 



remittances, whether through news agent, or by money order, draft, 
check or in currency, are made at the sender's risk. We take every possible 



precaution to save subscribers from deception and fraud, but we must have their co-operation to - 
the extent that they, themselves, be fairly prudent and cautious. See that your letters give fu-fl 
name and address, including street number, plainly written. Many persons forget to sign their names. 
Subscribers wishing a change in address must send the old as well as the 
new address to which they wish the magazine sent. 

DISCONTINUANCES If a ub8 ct>er wishes "Keith's" discontinued at the expiration of 

^^ ^^ his subscription, notice to that effect shou' j be sent. Otherwise 
it is assumed that a continuance is desired. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

In the United States, per year, in advance, $ 1 .50 
In Canada, per year - - -. - 1.75 

Foreign Countries, per year - - 2.00 

Single Copies, by Mail - - - .15 

Single Copies, at News Stands - - .15 



ADVERTISING RATES 

$75.00 per page ... one issue 

37.50 per % page ... one issue 

18.75 per % page - one issue 

34 cents per agate line. 



No person, firm or corporation, interested directly or indirectly in the production or sale of build- 
ing materials of any sort, has any connection, either editorially or proprietary with this publication. 
For gale by all News Dealers in the United States and Canada - Trade supplied by American News Co. and Branches 



Entered Jan. I, 1899, at the 'Postoffice in Minneapolis, Minn., for transmission through the mails as second-class matter 

COPYRIGHTED 1910 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Vol. XXIII 



JUNE, 1910 



No. 6 



The Unusual Lot 

By Kate Randall 




"A LOT WHICH WE HAD ALL CONSIDERED IMPOSSIBLE." 




BOUT the time one thinks the 
subject of bungalows thoroughly 
exhausted, some genius buys a 
lot we have all considered im- 
possible, and builds a bungalow harmon- 
izing so perfectly with its unusual sur- 
roundings that every one envies him the 
scorned lot and his artistic sense of pos- 
sibilities. This artistic sense is very valu- 
able in a new town, particularly if the 
town is in the foothills, or any broken 
ccaintry. One whole section of our home 



city, Pasadena, Cal., has lain unimproved 
for many years because the lots did not 
seem to have any regularity. One sloped 
to the east, and its neighbor to the south 
and west, and, perhaps, the next one was 
quite level, but an artist took one of the 
least promising and showed what could 
be done, and now the whole section is 
full of the most picturesque homes. 

I remember particularly one lot, bought 
because it was cheap. A very shal- 
low lot on the crest of a steep little hill; 



414 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



nature had done her best to make the 
place charming. The view from the back 
was beautiful, and the hillside covered 
with fine trees, but the new owner was 
a very "level-headed" man and so he 
graded and rilled. He did not make 
the lot level ; that was quite im- 
possible, but he did make it ugly and 
commonplace, and he sacrificed several of 
his fine trees. A lot identically like his, 
en the same crest, was bought by an ar- 
tist, who set his house just where it 
commands the finest view, regardless of 
grade. He utilized the level as far as it 
was level, and then built right out into 
space, with a high cobblestone basement 
below, which probably cost no more than 
the other man's grading and filling, and 
above this are his living rooms. One 
whole side of the dining room is prac- 
tically of glass and like Peter Pan, the 



fortunate owner has his home in the tree 
tops. One of the homes illustrated- shows 
how a clever builder utilized a very nar- 
row ridge sloping steeply each way, and 
unique in its combination of trees. At the 
south, where one looks down on a grove 
of live oaks, the house is low, but at the 
back, where great sycamores cover the 
hill and the banks of the stream below, 
the beautiful concrete house has a high 
basement. The seclusion is so perfect on 
the small hight, that from the road be- 
low, the beauties of the garden and court 
about the house are not seen a low bal- 
iustrade heavy with ivy surrounds it 
and all shade loving plants flourish in the 
cool shade. 

One lot has a fine tree in the center, 
just where the everyday man thinks he 
must set his foundation and the tree 
comes out but the genius when he Sfets 




"A NARROW RIDGE SLOPING STEEPLY EACH WAY AND UNIQUE IN ITS COMBINATION OP 

TREES." 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



415 




"A SHALLOW RESERVOIR LOT, TEN OR FIFTEEN FEET ABOVE THE DRIVE." 



his beautiful tree, lays out, first of all, a 
court of honor about it, here the family 
gathers at all hours. It is the heart of 
the home, and the mere living rooms 
group themselves above it in the most 
natural manner. Or perhaps the tree is 
too near the front of the lot to make a 
court possible, but a porch clasps the 
great trunk, and almost no other roof 
than the spreading boughs is needed and 
indeed the court is possible even here. 
Build the house behind the tree, and let 
projecting wings form the sides of the 
court, open in front. One such house 
has wide porches on three sides and on 
the open side to secure privacy from the 
street, is built a latticed screen, covered 
with vines. The effect is quite charming. 
One house is built so near a large live 
oak tree that an upper porch, at the back, 
is ingeniously woven into the boughs, 
only a very few being thinned out. What 
an inestimable loss such a tree would have 



been, both to the passersby and to the 
imaginative children of the family, who 
live in the fairy tales they read. I have 
in mind a most unique and artistic home 
on a lot that is practically one side of a 
reservoir. From the reservoir the hill- 
side slopes steeply for several hundred 
feet down to the banks of the river. Some 
seventy feet from the top a road was cut 
in the bank, leaving these shallow reser- 
voir lots ten or fifteen feet above the 
driveway. Trees covered the whole hill- 
side, many of them well worth saving. 
The owner built a high cobblestone and 
burnt brick retaining wall, surmounted 
by a latticed fence. Stone steps were most 
cleverly designed, and the bungalow at 
the top is one that we have all seen il- 
lustrated many times. Directly in front 
and overhanging the retaining wall is one 
of the trees worth saving. Here is set 
the tea table where friends gather of an 
afternoon. Though it is directly on the 



416 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



street, and one could almost drop his cup 
from the tea table into the passing- car- 
riage, the privacy is surprising. They sit 
above the passerby and look off over the 
road and river, into the setting sun. 

Really the grading of lots as it affects 
existing trees is a fruitful subject for 
all civil engineers, and fortunately, we 
see more and more the work of the artist 
in this line where a slight deviation from 
the line and compass style, has left some 
fine tree, and we remark on the charm 
of the whole neighborhood, and yet we 
sit passively by and see the bungler fell 
trees at our very door, that have been our 
joy for half a century, because we lack 



the courage to insist on some better way. 

When you buy a lot or better still, 
long before you buy it study it from all 
sides before you touch a tree or change 
a level. I know of a lot where a veritable 
forest of young sycamores fills the back 
such a lot is not for the man of straight 
walks and formal beds. Let him seek for 
himself an open lot, where he may revel 
in his angles, and leave the sycamores 
for the other man, who may positively 
need them as a haven of rest after a day 
of grind. 

By a little forethought we may do some 
veritable mission work as well as please 
ourselves. 



The Sad Tale of the Front Door 

"Let's have a new front door, " 

My wife suggested: 

"This old one's marred with many a scratch, 
Its broken glass has many a patch, 
Our house is good, our door should match, " 
So I invested. 



new front door is smooth and bright, 
find best of all 

Is its artistic glass, to light 

Our dar^ front hall; 
Such rare glass I ne'er saw before 
Why should my mother-in-law feel sore 
j4t me for "showing her the door" 
her last call? 



Qertrude <Z%CcKenzie. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



417 




PANELLED FRIEZE IN SHADES OP GRAY WITH STENCILED CORNERS IN GREEN AND 

ROSE. 



A Garden Room 

By Arthur E. Gleed 




GARDEN room is a modification 
of a conservatory or greenhouse, 
by which it is made to serve the 
dual purpose of a light and airy 
place to grow flowering plants and also 
the pleasantest of sitting rooms. A con- 
servatory is designed entirely to suit the 
requirements of plant life, and is not 
usually the place in which to make a pro- 
tracted stay, owing to the excess of light 
and heat. A greenhouse might almost be 
considered the workshop of the horticul- 
turist, where floral wonders are produced 
which are enjoyed elsewhere. A garden 
room is built on the lines of a serviceable 
sitting room, with the addition of many 
windows and properly fitted window 
boxes and plant stands, to serve the re- 
quirements of plant life. 

A garden room should not prove cost- 
ly, for fine finish or expensive furniture 
would be entirely out of place, in fact a 
certain rusticity is looked for, and an ex- 
isting room could perhaps be adapted to 
the purpose by the addition of extra win- 
dows. An ideal garden room built onto 
a house is shown in the illustration. En- 



tering the room from the house, on the 
left are two large glass doors through 
which is seen a vista of lawn and garden. 
On either side of the door is a high win- 
ow, placed about four feet from the 
ground, and fitted with ample window 
boxes. The opposite wall has similar 
windows, as they leave useful wall space 
below for chairs or small tables. The 
end of the room is devoted entirely to 
a spacious bay window which has a built- 
in bench or shelf, the top of which is cov- 
ered with green glazed tiles to accommo- 
date a number of flower pots. 

Practically no wall decoration is needed 
in a garden room, for it is the flowers 
themselves which decorate, and the best 
effect is got by providing a neutral back- 
ground to show them to advantage. In 
the room illustrated the rough plastered 
walls were finished with flat oil paint in 
shades of pale gray, and the standing 
woodwork was stained a light gray-green 
and oil finished. Above the windows the 
bare wall was relieved by a light wooden 
panelling, stained gray-green, and the 
small square spaces at the corners of the 



418 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



larger panels were filled by a primitive 
stencil design in shades of green and rose. 
A further note of color was added to the 
room by fitting to the top lights of the 
bay window and the glass doors, stained 
glass of simple design in tones of dull 
green and rose. 

All the furniture in the room was eith- 
er of wicker or rattan. This can now 
be obtained in such artistic shapes and 
is so comfortable for use, that it has ev- 
erything to recommend it, and it its soft 
shades of green, brown and buff, it har- 
monizes perfectly with a floral or leafy 
background. Japanese straw mats on the 
oil finished floor completed what might 
be considered the sitting room part of 
the furnishing. 

As flowering plants are the main fea- 
ture of the room, it is necessary to pro- 
vide substantial means for growing them, 
that they may at all times look neat and 
tidy. In the case illustrated the high 
windows were each fitted with a long box 
to take a row of medium sized pots, the 
bottom of the boxes being lined with zinc 
to catch superfluous water. On the green 
tiled bench of the bay window, ordinary 
red earthenware pots were used with 
good effect. A light trellis was built 
round the window on which was trained 
quick-growing creepers, and as these 
were needed as thrifty and large as pos- 
sible, an ample sized box was placed at 
each end of the bench at the foot of the 
trellis, to accommodate the roots. An in- 
teresting item in the room was an aquar- 
ium placed in front of the bay window. 
P'or this a specially constructed stand was 
made, and in the form of a substantial 
table. The top was in the form of a 
box, and allowed for a space of about six 
inches round the base of the aquarium, in 
which could be grown ferns. By care- 
fully stocking the aquarium with gold , 
fish, water plants, and water snails, it 
was made practically self-supporting and 
self-cleaning, in fact, it represented a 
miniature water-world. A singing bird 
in its cage hanging from the trellis com- 
pleted the bay window, making that end 
of the room particularly charming. 

If birds were a hobby of the owner of 
such a room, a large cage or aviary could 



be placed in the center of the room, and 
if mounted on a stand with plants around 
it, similar to the aquarium, it would be 
very effective. 

Specimen plants about the room were 
provided with large boxes and tubs, 
which were fitted with handles for con- 
venience in moving them. The entrance 
to the garden by the glass doors, was 
given importance by two somewhat for- 
mal evergreens, planted in large square 
boxes. All the receptacles for plants, 
where constructed of wood, were stained 
gray-green to match the other woodwork 
of the room. 

Selecting the plants for a garden room 
should be a pleasant task for the lover 
of flowers. It will be advisable perhaps 
not to favor too much those of an exotic 
nature, but rather to select those which 
will thrive under ordinary conditions. 
Much might be said for many of the out- 
door garden favorites, which will grow to 
delicate perfection with the extra atten- 
tion they receive in a room. The sun- 
niest windows must be reserved for 
roses, geraniums, heliotrope and tube- 
roses. Begonias, fuschias, petunias and 
campanulas will thrive where they receive 
sunshine only part of the day. Around 
the aquarium, plants which like a moist 
situation should be planted such as ferns, 
cyperus, callas, and the leopard plant 
with its beautiful spotted leaves. Climb- 
ing plants can be used to great advantage 
round all the windows. An excellent one 
for a constant show of fresh green leaves 
is the German ivy or Senecio scandens. 
The plumbago with its clear sky blue 
flowers, stephanotis, and passion flower, 
are all flowering vines which will make a 
beautiful show against the gray wall. 
Oleanders, lilies, palms, hydrangeas, and 
hibiscus, will lend color and grace as 
specimen plants about the room. 

It is perhaps during the seasons of fall, 
winter, and spring that the room will be 
most appreciated, for in summer the 
pleasantest place is out of doors. Ade- 
quate heating arrangements should there- 
fore be provided, that an actual winter 
garden may be possible. Ventilation is 
also an important point to be considered, 
for at all times the room should be red- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



419 




olent with fresh air. The light, too, will 
need regulation, and this can be done 
either by means of outside sun blinds or 
linen curtains at the inside of the win- 
dows. 

Considering that there need be no 
great initial expense in adapting a room 
to garden purposes, the resulting pleas- 



ure should amply repay, and make it well 
worth while spending time and thought 
over the matter. In spring time alone 
the owner would find his reward, for 
whilst the out-door world was still half 
frozen, he in his garden-room would be 
enjoying fully matured spring blossoms 
and manv flowers. 



420 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 

Problems in Concrete 

By H. Edward Walker 
(Continued from the Jlpril Number) 




Courtesy of Johnson, Jackson & Corning 
SOME CONCRETE SURFACES. 




ARTICLE XVII. 
Concrete Surfaces Continued. 

PROPOS of the previous ar- 
ticle dealing with surfaces pro- 
duced upon the concrete, other 
than stucco, emphasizing the 
beauty of the contained aggregates. It 
is not enough that portions of the wall 
are of even color and uniform scale of 
aggregate. The whole surface should be 
free from any suggestion of joints be- 
tween pourings, or other like imperfec- 
tions. Uniformity of color is to be de- 
sired but is not essential if variations are 



harmonious and sufficiently frequent to 
indicate intention, rather than accident. 
One or two variations in color on the 
side of a building are simply spots and 
blemishes and cannot be considered ar- 
tistic or excusable in a first-class job. 

Granolithic Surface. 
This is a surface that makes it pos- 
sible to produce almost any color de- 
sired. A metal frame or granolithic 
plate is inserted between the concrete 
and the surface of the form. The plates 
are usually made of sheet-iron, 12 inches 
high and 6 feet long, and are kept 1 inch 
away from the outside form by 1-inch 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



421 



angles riveted to the face. There is .a 
3-inch flange bent backward on the top, 
on which are handles to make the plates 
readily movable. The plates lap when 
in position and shorter lengths are used 
to fill out the wall evenly. The concrete 
and the finishing mixture are poured at 
the same time but the latter is kept high- 
er in the forms to prevent any of the 
former reaching the face of the wall. 
A bucket is used to pour the granolithic 
finish which is mixed wet. By raising 
the plates up, their top edge is always 
kept from 6 to 8 inches above the con- 
crete. The concrete should be placed in 
6-inch layers to accommodate this. The 
forms are taken down in from 24 to 36 
hours after the concrete has been placed 
and the surface is washed down to re- 
move the sand and cement from between 
the grits. This allows the latter to stand 
out and it looks very much like granite 
finish. For the next three days or longer 
as the weather requires the wall is pro- 
tected from the sun and is wet down 
twice daily. A good method in washing 
down is to remove only enough of the 
form to require about twenty or thirty 
minutes work to complete and if this is 
done within twenty-four hours after plac- 
ing, an ordinary bristle scrub-brush may 
be used for very rapid work. 

The scrubbing becomes difficult if al- 
lowed to stand thirty-six hours after 
placing, or is allowed to stand after the 
forms are removed. A wire brush must 
then be used and the progress is slow. 
A constant stream of water should be 
kept running down the surface being 
washed and care must be used to make 
the scrubbing uniform, as uneven pres- 
sure will make no little difference in the 
appearance of the finished surface. 
White cement and crushed marble make 
a beautiful white surface. Marble dust 
and ordinary cement produce a light 
gray. Crushed red granite gives an at- 
tractive permanent color. 

Coloring Matter in Cement. 
It requires considerable knowledge and 
experience to properly color cement. The 
early attempts of the most able men in 
the local field were not at all satisfactory 
and the use of pigments was particularly 
unfortunate. For this reason work in 
communities where the work must be 
largely experimental upon the part of 



the local cement worker, should be very 
carefully studied by the owner from sam- 
ples of generous size. The cement mor- 
tar appears several shades darker when 
wet than after it has dried out. Strong 
colors may be obtained by mixing five 
pounds of coloring matter with a bag of 
cement as follows: 

Raw iron oxide will give a bright red. 

Roasted iron oxide will give brown. 

Ultramarine will give bright blue. 

Yellow Ochre will give from buff to 
yellow. 

Carbon black or lampblack will give 
gray to dark slate. 

Manganese dioxide will give black. 

The latter should be in proportion of 
eleven pounds of color per bag of ce- 
ment. 

Carbon black and red iron ore in equal 
parts gives dull reds. One-quarter to one- 
third of the above quantities will pro- 
duce much lighter shades. Great care 
should be taken with proportions to pro- 
duce the exact shade. Even if the exact 
quantity is known it may be a difficult 
matter to "match up" a shade. For this 
reason it would be well to mix enough 
cement sand and coloring matter in the 
first place to provide for the whole job, 
thus producing uniformity of tint on all 
sides of the structure. The aggregate 
can be kept dry until ready for use, at 
which time the water can be added. In 
this way what is needed at a given time 
can be used, but the remainder will be 
of the same proportions and may be ex- 
pected to produce the same results. 

The addition of mineral colors to ce- 
ment causes a loss of strength, but as it 
is applied to the surface only, the loss is 
unimportant. For a surface layer about 
24 of an inch thick, the expense of color- 
ing will vary from half a cent to two 
cents per square foot. 

Surfaces Applied After Concrete Has Set. 

Some criticism has been made of sur- 
faces produced upon the concrete that 
are not part of the original pouring, on 
the plea that they are a sham and there- 
fore not truly artistic. Some of the fin- 
est furniture that has been produced is 
open to this objection, yet it is accepted 
everywhere as a proper and practical 
method of construction. Some very 
beautiful surfaces can be produced by us- 
ing aggregates of different sizes ap- 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



plied by special methods. Uniformity 
of surface and texture is something that 
can be better controlled when these 
methods are employed. The aggregates 
can be more carefully graded and their 
exact position determined better than 
when placed at the same time as the 
concrete. 

Crushed limestone, gravel and even 
crushed brick is used for aggregates in 
dashed cement surfaces. The limestone 
is soft and brittle, making it hardly ideal 
for the purpose. Brick, if sufficiently 
hard, has been used with good results, 
the color often being an aid in producing 
the general tone of the surface tint. 

Gravel is the most satisfactory, in the 
judgment of the writer, it being very 
strong, procurable in any size and has 
color and individuality in its component 
parts. Washed sand and gravel is a rec- 
ognized product, many companies mak- 
ing a specialty of this in all parts of the 
United States at this time. Gravel that 
is free from clay and dirt, of even sizes 
and in many colors can be obtained for 
dashed work, producing a surface of sur- 
passing beauty. The method of applying 
surfaces of this kind is shown in the il- 
lustration. At the top in the wire lath, 
used only on veneered structures, next is 
the scratch coat which is applied in any 
case no matter what the wall construc- 
tion, and lastly the finished coat, illus- 
trating the pebble dash finish. This is 
thrown on from a paddle or with a sink 
brush. When the brush is used the ma- 
terial may 'be taken from a pail, but for 
a paddle it is better to provide the work- 
man with a receptacle shaped like a 
mitre box with one end closed. The pad- 
dle will more readily take up its supply 
from this than from a pail. The mixture 
should be just wet enough to spatter well 
without running down when it is thrown 
on. It requires considerable practice to 
produce a nice even texture over a large 
wall surface. Several different textures 
are shown. Number 1 is a simple sand 
finish treated with a float. This is used 
where a comparatively smooth finish is 
required and is viewed from a short dis- 
tance. 

Numbers 2, 3, 4 and 5 are all surfaces 
of the same kind, applied in the same 
manner but using different sized aggre- 
gates. Number 6 is produced with a 



trowel by suction. Lifting the trowel 
from the surface in the wet cement draws 
it outward, giving an unusual and ef- 
fective surface. Number 7 is an effect 
obtained by stippling and is very pleas- 
ing for work seen close at hand. At a 
distance, however, it could not be distin- 
guished from the surface shown in No. 1. 

These surfaces have been painted with 
specially prepared paint and have a very 
soft and pleasing appearance. Browns, 
greens, yellows and reds are used, each 
panel being completely covered with the 
exception of number 7, the lower part of 
which is left natural cement. Color ef- 
fects obtained in this way are rapidly 
growing in favor for cement, chiefly be- 
cause each and every portion of the sur- 
face comes out in exactly the same tint, 
something that is hard to get when the 
coloring material is mixed with the ce- 
ment coating. The paint comes ready 
mixed, requiring skill only in its appli- 
cation and that not beyond the ordinary 
craftsman. The tile shown in the center 
of number 2 is in beautiful and harmoni- 
ous colors. As artistic cement construc- 
tion develops, more and more tile will be 
used in this way, it being in good taste 
and very effective. 

The surfaces illustrated were placed 
upon plaster board, a method employed 
instead of wire lath. The board is nailed 
carefully to the sheathing over building 
paper and its face given a coat of water- 
proofing solution of any standard make. 
Upon this is placed the scratch coat and 
finally the outer dashed or finishing coat. 
Some manufacturers of finishing prod- 
ucts will give a guarantee with this kind 
of construction. 

For houses of the kind in which our 
readers are chiefly interested many of 
the surfaces described in these articles 
could be used to advantage. Not only 
has the subject been carefully considered 
as to its constructive side but also as to 
its appropriate use. As a promising field 
of usefulness it may.be said that the con- 
tractor who has "ideas" and can work 
out the mechanical difficulties attendant 
to the artistic production of them, can 
create a demand for his services on a 
constantly increasing scale and at a 
greater price. Not the least benefit is 
that of the general advancement of ce- 
ment as an artistic building material. 
(To be continued.) 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



423 




Courtesy of The Atlas Portland Cement Co. 
METHOD OF APPLYING PEBBLE DASH FINISH 



424 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



A Suburban Home 



By M. M. Selim 





A HOME IN HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA. 




ORTUNATE, indeed, is the man, 
who, after a hard day's work in 
the city, can board the trolley, 
and in a half hour find himself at 
home among the lemons, oranges, and 
roses of a suburb as attractive as "beauti- 
ful Hollywood." 

The acme of the art of the architect is 
here, too, for it is a city of homes. 

Mission, Spanish, Colonials, and all 
sorts and sizes of bungalows are repre- 
sented, modified to suit the climate, the 
environment, and particularly the finan- 
cial status of the owner. 

The house illustrated here is one that 
is used with modifications by many build- 
ers, it being adaptable in many ways, to 
change. 

The plan, however, has been much ad- 
mired in this arrangement. 



It is a house of full two stories and at- 
tic, this making the second floor rooms 
much cooler in summer than those of 
the so-called "story and a half" bunga- 
low, which seems so popular. 

The house is painted Colonial yellow 
with white trimmings, which has a very 
pretty effect among the green of the lem- 
on and orange trees. The broad porch 
extends nearly across the front of the 
house with low wide steps at the left 
making an easy entrance. The floor of 
the porch, the steps and walk are made 
of red cement. 

Passing in at the front door we find 
ourselves in the hall, out of which the 
stairway leads up on the left to the land- 
ing; then turns at right angles and leads 
tc the second floor. The hall, though not 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



425 




THE LIVING ROOM. 

, .,;*, jx&f *,;** ..,- ; ;. 

large, makes quite an addition to the liv-' left of the stairway, giving the hall which 

ing-room from which it is separated by is usually dark, plenty of light and venti- 

columns at either end of the opening be- lation. 

tween them. A built-in seat next to the stairway is 

There are casement windows at either suitable for the storage of rubbers and 

side of the front door, also a pair at the umbrellas. 



R*r 



COPp. 

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CQ^D 



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m IiO- o-re-yo, 


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426 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




THE DINING ROOM. 



Another convenience is a full-length 
mirror in the door leading to the back 
hall, where one can give the final adjust- 
ment to garments before starting out. 

The hall, also the living room, dining 
room, and den are finished in the beauti- 
fully marked Oregon pine, so much used 
for interiors in southern California. 

These rooms all have beamed ceilings 
and a four-foot wainscoting as a finish. 

The floors are all of wax finished oak. 
At the farther end of the living room, is 
a modest fireplace of cream pressed brick. 
I say "modest" fireplace, for we notice in 
some houses such ornate affairs, built in 
of cobble stone, cut granite, etc., built to 
the ceiling and entirely out of place in 
small or moderate sized rooms, that this 
low fireplace although six feet wide, 
seems indeed modest in comparison. On 
either side of the fireplace are built-in 
book cases with leaded glass doors; 
above these are casement windows, 
which with the large eight-foot window 
facing the porch, makes light for this 
room. 

Just back of this is the dining room, 
with three windows at the south, in a 
slight bay, and a casement over the china 



closet. A large sliding door is used be- 
tween these two rooms. 

Every housewife likes plenty of room 
for her china, and here the cupboards are 
large and convenient. Both the china- 
closet and buffet are finished with leaded 
glass doors. The buffet is complete with 
six drawers for table linen. 

In the den, which is just back of the 
dining room, we have another book case 
built quite across one end, and if this 
space is not needed for books, the doors 
may be draped on the inside, and papers, 
magazines, games, etc., may find a place 
seldom provided for. 

Here, too, is a built-in seat, extending 
all along one side under the windows. It 
has covers which lift, providing nice 
"hide-a-way" places for the odds and 
ends which are always accumulating. 
There are French doors at the south end 
of the room leading out to a small por- 
tico. 

The" rooms are all finished in tinted 
plaster; hall, olive green; living room, 
"burnt leather"; dining room, "burnt 
orange"; and the den in dull red. 

The kitchen leads out from the dining 
room on the left, and having a north ex- 
posure is tinted in pale yellow with white 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



427 



enameled woodwork, and blue and white 
linoleum for a floor covering. 

There is a "swing door" between these 
rooms, which has a happy faculty of stay- 
ing open, if one desires. 

The white enameled cupboards extend 
to the ceiling, and under these a broad 
shelf goes quite across one side of the 
kitchen. 

The sink is in the center of this just 
under a low broad window. Below the 
broad shelf are the cupboards, drawers, 
molding boards, and flour bins. 

The screen porch is just back of the 
kitchen and is furnished with stationary 
tubs, a toilet, also another closet for 
brooms and the various homely utensils 
which a house must possess to keep it 
ii 1 good order. 

The little hall between the front hall 
and the kitchen, is furnished with a coat 
closet, and also leads down to a landing 
with an outside door; a few steps farther 
down brings us to the furnace-room with 
its cement floor and plastered walls. 

The fuel used is "distillate" or crude 
oil, which furnishes enough heat for this 
climate, and is cheaper and cleaner than 
wood or coal. 

A back stairway from the kitchen leads 



up to the front stairway landing, and 
from this place the same stairway is used 
to go to the second floor. Here we enter 
a small square hall, with linen closet and 
drawers, and which leads to all the 
rooms. 

This floor is finished in white enamel 
with tinted walls and maple floors. The 
walls in the guest room are pink, in the 
family room light green, daughter's room 
light blue, bath room, darker blue, and 
the sewing room old rose. 

The family room is very pleasant, be- 
ing well lighted, as are all the rooms, and 
having French doors which lead out on a 
small balcony. From here we get the 
''view" dear to the heart of every Califor- 
nian, a glimpse of the ocean, if the day 
be clear. 

There are doors also from the two back 
rooms leading out to a large balcony 
where one may spend a comfortable 
afternoon in summer, as it is on the east 
side. This might be utilized for one or 
two out-of-door bed rooms if desired, and 
could be screened in very nicely. 

There is also room in the attic for two 
more bed rooms if necessary, and so the 
plan may be adapted for the use of a 
large or small family. 




A BEDROOM CORNER. 



428 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Notes on Gardening 




A POND OP WATERLILIES. 



Spiraea Family of Shrubs. 

If only a small amount of money is 
available for shrubs, spiraeas of different 
kinds will be a wise selection. There 
are over fifty varieties, of which some are 
hardy shrubs, others are hardy herb- 
aceous perennials and in either case must 
be considered in relation to the climate. 
Those mentioned are hardy shrubs and 
can be safely planted in most of the 
northern states. 

The most satisfactory of all for ordi- 
nary gardens is Spiraea Anthony Wa- 
terer. It has beautiful diskheads of car- 
mine-crimson flowers, that will literally 
cover a healthy bush of 2y 2 feet in 
height, so that nothing can be seen of 
it except glimpses here and there of its 
tender, exquisite foliage. These rich 



blossoms will come out day after day, 
just as long as the fading ones are cut 
off, and they will stay in this full bloom 
from June till November. No insects 
have ever been seen on it. It has had 
less care than most of the other shrubs 
in the garden, because it has never called 
for any except to supply it with fertilizer. 
It never has fungus diseases or blights. 
Truly it may be said that this shrub 
grows "like a weed." Its low growing 
habit makes it available for any purpose ; 
the backs of borders or beds, corners, 
isolated situations, etc. 

Next in value and beauty comes 
Spiraea Van Houtteii. This has only a 
short flowering period, bursting into full 
bloom in June, and bearing no blossoms 
after that : but while it blossoms it is a 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



429 



white glory, for it stands as if covered 
with snow. Its foliage is superb and 
thick through the whole season, and as 
it grows six feet high it will form an ef- 
fective shrubbery. 

Spiraea prunifolia is the shrub better 
known as bridal wreath, whose exquis- 
ite double white flowers delight the eye 
in May and June. It is more delicate 
in structure than the others and very 
charming. 

Plants three years old and two feet 
high are sold by growers for 25 cents 
each. Three plants of each variety will 
make a respectable shrubbery by them- 
selves. They will thrive in almost any 
kind of soil so long as it is worked fine 
and deep and well fertilized. They will 
do as well in partial shade as in full 
sun. 

Propagation of Plants. 

Few persons have so many plants that 
more would not add to the beauty of the 
home. The necessary pruning that takes 
place each year produces a great many 
cuttings that may be set out to advan- 
tage and in time will give good returns 
for the care taken. Not only are they 
available to set out in positions as desired 
to extend the garden, but are valuable 
as small income producers. A good idea 
of value can be obtained of any nursery- 
man. The larger the plant the more 
costly it will be. If no profit is desired, 
it will be a pleasure to supply interested 
friends who are beautifying their home 
grounds. 

If it is at all possible, set aside some 
waste part of your place, even if it is 
only a few feet square, for a place to 
plant all cuttings that come away in 
pruning shrubs and other plants. 

The hydrangea paniculata grandiflora 
will root splendidly from cuttings five or 
six inches long, set in the ground any 
time before June. If the soil is mellow 
and soft all that is necessary is to stick 
the cutting in. As pruning is beneficial 



for this variety of hydrangea, you will 
get many cuttings even from one plant. 
There is no reason why dozens of plants 
should not be raised from them. 

The larger clippings from California 
privet hedges will root with equal ease. 
Willows of all sorts, poplars, catalpa and 
almost all the hardy shrubs will root 
well. To get a tall background or a 
screen quickly and cheaply, nothing is so 
easy as to plant poplar branches close 
together. Five out of six poplar cuttings 
will thrive, even if they are as long as 
five feet when thrust into the ground. 
Peel away a few inches of bark at the 
bottom. They will often have quite a 
showing of leaves within a few weeks 
after planting. 

Catalpa is another wonderful grower. 
Catalpa trees, cut into lengths for fence 
posts, often take root and become fine 
trees. 

Most hardy roses will propagate well 
from cuttings, though not so easily as 
the plants that have been named. Wel- 
gelia and forsythia propagate well un- 
der favoring conditions, but are not ab- 
solutely certain. 

Locust, when grown for a hedge, can 
be made to increase itself by frequent 
pruning and planting of the cuttings. 
Woodbine and all the varieties of honey- 
suckle will grow freely, particularly if a 
good portion of vine be planted its whole 
length in a trench so that it may send out 
lots of suckers. 

If there is an unattractive vacant lot 
behind your garden or anywhere where 
it spoils the view, plant all your cut- 
tings there, and in addition throw there 
all seed that you can't use and all old 
roots. 

Only a few minutes need be devoted 
to this, for you need simply stick the 
cuttings into the ground. 

An ugly plot can be changed into a 
beautiful wild garden and a nursery that 
will provide hundreds of plants. 



430 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Designs for the Home -Builder 




DMEBUILDERS everywhere are very 
busy people at this time. Those who 
got an early start have their homes well 
along and are asking questions of a 
practical nature, in quantities that would sur- 
prise the average reader. Those who have 
just broken ground and those who are still 
undecided as to plans are equally anxious for 
information, showing a degree of building ac- 
tivity greater than any previous June. 

Realizing that this department is eagerly 
scanned by thousands of readers of varying 
financial standing, each anxious to receive 
help, a special effort is made to make it of 
service to all. The designs are not only prac- 
tical, but are artistic and pleasing externally, 
a combination too often neglected. 

A home, however small, should possess in- 
dividuality if it is to impress its inmates with 
what it stands for to them as a family. With 
this idea in mind these designs have been care- 
fully selected and presented. 

Design "B 150." 

Construction. Outside walls 1:3:5 concrete 
treated with waterproof compound (R.I.W. or 
similar) on interior and plastered; dash finish 
on exterior. There is to be basement under 
kitchen and dining room portion only, with 
reinforced concrete floor over. Other portion 
of first floor on filling. Floors 2d and 3d 
stories and stairs of reinforced concrete, 1:2:4 
mix. To have sleepers with cinder concrete 
filling and hardwood finished floors. Parti- 
tions supporting floors and stairs to be of 
concrete; others either solid cement plaster or 
blocks plastered. Roof framing of steel chan- 
nels; roof of patent metal lath plastered both 
sides. All overhanging portions and barge 
boards finished the same. All to be painted 
waterproof cement paint. Wood ceiling and 
roof framing on porches; all stained. Metal 
roofs on porches. Trim of oak on first floor 
and halls 2d and 3d story. White enamel 
or oak for bedrooms and bathroom. Yellow 
pine in servant's quarters. 3d floor, stained 
and waxed. 

Cost. The folk>wing estimate is for house 
only. No driveways or walks included and 
no plumbing or sewers outside of building. 

The designers estimate the cost at $7,600. 



Concrete work and plastering $5,000.00 

Carpentry, mill work and glazing 1,400.00 

Plumbing 350.00 

Heating (furnace) 200.00 

Painting and decorating 275.00 

Electric light wiring 100.00 

Hardware 50.00 

Metal work 100.00 

Electric fixtures 125 .00 



Total $7,600.00 

Design "B 151." 

A brick house on symmetrical lines is al- 
ways in good taste if of good detail. In this in- 
stance we have a house severely plain yet 
carefully studied in all its external motifs of 
design and also as to its internal arrange- 
ment. The reception hall is spacious and 
very attractive with its beamed ceiling. Con- 
necting with it by large openings are library, 
drawing room, dining room and the staircase 
hall which leads to the porte cochere. Ad- 
jacent to drawing room and dining room is a 
solarium affording a pleasing vista from either 
room. The kitchen and pantry are well ap- 
pointed and of more than ordinary size. On 
the second floor are five large chambers with 
a bathroom and two private lavatories. The 
attic is large and may contain a billiard room 
and chambers if desired. The basement is 
complete with boiler room, fuel rooms, laun- 
dry and storage rooms. The billiard room 
could be located in the basement. The finish 
is very elaborate, the library being in Circas- 
sian walnut, the hall and drawing room in 
mahogany. The dining room is in quar- 
ter sawed white oak and the solorium in 
quarter sawed red oak with a tile floor. 
The second story chambers are in birch, bird's 
eye maple and white enamel. The house is 
48 ft. wide and 42 ft. deep, basement is 7 ft. 6 
in. high, the first story 10 ft. and the second 
story 9 ft. The architect states that the house 
costs $14,000 with heating and plumbing in- 
cluded, but on a less pretentious scale could 
be built for much less. 

Design "B152." 

This residence is of the Swiss Chalet type 
enclosing an arrangement which has an air 
of /western comfort and hospitality. The 
house is built on a solid ledge, being set high 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



431 



up on a foundation 'of rustic rock to eliminate 
the expense of a deep excavation. The base- 
ment contains a good sized den with brick 
fireplace, paneled wainscoting, casement win- 
dows, etc., also a well equipped laundry, lava- 
tory, vegetable room and heater room. En- 
trance is made from a veranda 39 ft. by 8 ft. 
to a vestibule directly off the living room. 
The first floor consists of a living room, din- 
ing room, butler's pantry, kitchen, two bed- 
rooms and bath. The second floor contains 
three bed rooms and a good sized sleeping 
balcony. The house contains an exceptional- 
ly large amount of closet space, as will be not- 
ed by the plans. All the rooms on the first 
floor are particularly well lighted. All rooms 
throughout, except the two bedrooms, kitch- 
en and pantry, have casement windows, the 
balance are double hung. The finish of the 
living room, dining room and vestibule and 
den in basement is of curly fir, stained, var- 
nished and rubbed down. Finish floors of 
main rooms, of maple. Balance of finish 
floors of fir. Fireplace and hearth in living 
room of pressed brick, on either side of which 
are built-in bookcases. The dining room is 
connected with the living room by a wide 
opening. The walls to a height of 5 ft. 6 in. 
are finished in burlap paneled wainscoting, 
plate rail, beamed ceiling, etc. There is a 
built-in sideboard, simple but tasty. A cluster 
of five casement windows furnish light for 
this room. The kitchen is separated from 
the dining room by a butler's pantry which 
has a large work ledge, china closet, cup- 
boards and drawers for utensils, etc. The 
kitchen is of good size and well arranged. Di- 
rectly off the kitchen is a screened-in back 
porch with ample room for a refrigerator. A 
spacious hall is located in the center of the 
first floor. Opening into living rooms, bed- 
rooms, bath, kitchen and stairs to second floor 
and basement. The exterior presents a very 
pleasing appearance. The foundation walls 
are of moss covered rustic rock, the walls 
above the foundation are of cedar shingles 
spaced 6 l /2 inches to the weather, stained dark 
brown. Roofs shingled and stained dark 
green. All sash painted whito on the exterior, 
giving a very pleasing contrast against the 
brown walls. Chimneys, where exposed on 
the outside and above the roof are faced with 
clinker brick laid in black mortar. 

Cost of house as designated, about $6.000. 

Design "B153." 

A better arranged house for a good sized 
family would be hard to find. To commence 
with, the porch is especially large, being 10 
ft. wide by 39 ft. long, the full width of the 
house. The vestibule is of good size and has 
a coat closet at eac'h side. To be practical, a 
vestibule should always be large enough to ac- 
commodate at least two people at one time, 
and still allow for the swing of the door. The 
entrance hall opens into the stair hall, living 
room, and dining room, through wide open- 
ings which can be closed when desired by slid- 
ing doors. Off of the living room is the 
library, which can also be secluded by a slid- 
ing door. The library is very cozy. It has a 
fireplace, book cases, and a window seat. On 
the second floor are four bedrooms, a bath- 



room, sewing room and many closets. The 
sewing room would make a small bedroom if 
desired. The plans show a wood rail and 
balustrade. Size of house, 29 ft. by 39 ft. 
Height of first floor, 9 ft. 5 in.; height of sec- 
ond floor, 8 ft. 3 in. Estimated cost, with pine 
finish, $3,850, not including heating and plumb- 
ing. 

Design "B154" 

A cottage of cement with low sloping roof 
and simple dormer windows may be a very 
pleasing addition to the neighborhood. The 
cottage of the illustration is of this type. Its 
roof shingles are red, its trim stained a dark 
brown and its walls of rough cast grey cement 
upon expanded metal. There is a living room 
across the entire width of the house in front, 
with a recessed seat, a brick fireplace and 
bookcase built in. Adjacent to the vestibule 
is a coat closet. A dining room is separated 
from the living room by an opening equal 
to its entire width, and contains a built-in 
dresser. The kitchen is at the rear and is 
completely fitted up with sink, cupboard, gas 
stove, etc. The refrigerator is located con- 
veniently in the entry. 

An unusual feature for our day is a cham- 
ber on the first floor. It is provided with a 
clothes closet and a toilet room. A short 
passage connects the chambers and dining 
room, from which also the stairs lead up to 
the second floor. There are two ample cham- 
bers, each with a closet, a large studio for the 
owner, who is an artist. The studio would 
make a very fine chamber, it being the larg- 
est room upstairs. There is a good bath room 
with linen closet and a stair from the hall 
leads to the attic above. At the rear is an- 
other screened porch equal in size to the one 
directly under it on the first floor. The liv- 
ing room and dining room are finished in 
plain white oak and floor. The finish and 
floor of the kitchen, studio and chamber are 
of birch. The second story chambers have 
finish of pine to paint and birch floors. The 
basement is 7 ft. 6 in. high, the first floor 8 
ft. 6 in. and the second floor 8 ft. The house 
is 30 ft. wide and 34 ft. deep. The cost is 
estimated at $2.900. 

Design "B155." 

This little cement coated cottage is designed 
with the idea of producing an artistic con- 
venient home at a moderate cost. The gable 
ends and external wood trim are to be 
stained a rich brown with either green or red 
shingles. The cement is g : ven a pebble dash 
surface of an ecru tint. The plan is unique 
but very practical. At the right after passing 
the vestibule is a chamber of good size with 
a closet, the stair is in front and at the 
left is a large living room carefully arranged 
as to furniture and well lighted. Wide doors 
at the rear open upon a screened porch were 
the dining room table may be placed in sum- 
mer, serving directly from the kitchen. Of 
ample size the kitchen is well appointed, with 
ready access to bathroom and basement. The 
bathroom is located between the chamber and 
the kitcheji with a door to each. On the sec- 
ond floor are two good bedrooms, ample stor- 
age space and a balcony. The finish of first 
floor except bathroom and chamber is Georgia 



432 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Courtesy Universal Portland, Cement Co. 



FRANK W. CHURCH, 
WALTER S. CHURCH, 



A Craftsman House in Cement 



DESIGN "B 150" 




wrai 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



433 




Cottage Ilesignn for the Home-Builder Continued 



pine stained and natural Georgia pine floors 
throughout. All other finish in the house is 
pine to paint with pine floors in second story. 
The height of first story is 8 ft. 6 in., and a 
minimum height of 6 ft. at sides of bedrooms 
with 8 ft. in the center. The house is 30 ft. 
wide and 29 ft. deep. The architect estimates 
the cost at $1,500 with an additional cost of 
$300 for heating and plumbing. 
Design "B156." 

In the half timber design herewith illus- 
trated, we have on the first floor a large hall 
connected by a double columned archway to 
the reception room, making really one large 
room. The parlor is connected to the hall by 
folding doors. This will be found a very 
pleasant room, amply lighted by four win- 
dows, and the fireplace will add much to the 
coziness of the room. All rooms on the first 
floor, except the kitchen part, are finished in 
oak, and hardwood floors are included for the 
entire first floor. On the second floor are four 
nice chambers, bath, closet, etc. The chamber 
over the parlor has a fireplace with red 
pressed brick facings and hearth. All rooms 
of the second floor are finished in pine or pop- 
lar, also the kitchen. Hardwood floors in sec- 
ond story front hall and bath. There is a full 
basement with cement floor, outside cellar 
entrance, coal bin, ash pit and hot air heater. 



There is ample room in attic for one or two 
rooms, if same are desired. Foundation wall 
is of brick, but in localities where stone is 
cheaper an 18 inch stone wall may be substi- 
tuted. 

Cost, $4,800. Width, 38 ft. 6 in.; depth, 32 
ft.; height of basement, 7 ft; first story, 9 ft. 
5 in.; second story, 8 ft. 3 in. 
Design "B157." 

From the general appearance of this house 
no one would think it was a duplex. It looks 
like one of the larger private residences, a 
fact which will recommend it to many. It is 
of frame construction, covered with cement on 
metal lath, with trimmings of wood painted 
white. 

The first floor contains vestibule, reception 
hall, living room, alcove with closet, dining 
room, pantry, kitchen, two chambers and a 
bath room. The second floor is almost iden- 
tical, the entrance and the location of the al- 
cove closet being different. Each apartment 
has a front porch, a screened rear porch and 
a rear stair, the basement portion of which is 
used in common. The basement contains sep- 
arate heating plants and a laundry. The finish 
and floors are of birch. 

The house is 29 ft. wide and 45 ft. 6 in. 
long. Basement. 7 ft. 6 in., and upper stories 
9 ft. high. Estimated cost, about $6,000. 



434 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




ARTHUR C. CLAUSEN, Architect 



A Weil-Proportioned Brick House 



DESIGN "BiSl" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



435 




KEITH & WHITEHOUSE, Architects 



A Very Artistic Swiss Chalet 



DESIGN "B 152" 





>-e* 






436 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




Journal of Modern Construction Series 



A Pleasing Exterior and Unique Plan 



DESIGN "B 153" 




CH A MBO?H CHAMBER 

/a. x li. 



T?OOM 



HALL 



CHAM BUT? 



C MAMBE.T? 





ROOM 



SEICOMp TLOOR 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



437 




DOWNS & EADS, Architects 



An Artistic Cement Design 



DESIGN "B 154" 




R>i 





1 

- 1 




r 



438 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




EDWINS & EICHENFELD, Architects 



A Cement Cottage in Craftsman Style 



DESIGN "B 155" 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



439 




THE KEITH CO., Architects 



In English Half-Timber Style 



DESIGN "B 156" 




5ECOND FLOOR 




KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




From "Duplex Houses and Flats." 



A Duplex House of Cement 



DESIGN "B 157" 



15-14-19. 





KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



441 



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442 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 





Conducted by Eleanor Allison Cummins, Decorator Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Concerning Dining Rooms. 

The dining room seldom receives the 
intelligent thought as to its situation and 
arrangement, which is its due. Not in- 
frequently, of course, the first is deter- 
mined by the construction of the house, 
but an unfortunate exposure can be 
remedied by a judicious color scheme. 

In the matter of its general arrange- 
ment, it should be remembered that the 
dining room is inseparable from a certain 
formality. Cozy corners, studio effects, 
and eccentric decorations are manifestly 
out of place. Nor should the dining room 
be in any sense gay. Its function is that 
of a background or a setting, and it 
should have a certain sobriety of color 
and outline. 

Not that a dining room should be dull. 
We all remember the grained yellow oak 
woodwork and chocolate brown paper 
considered suitable for dining rooms, 
twenty or thirty years ago. Happily all 
that has been changed. Still there is 
room for improvement and some of the 
most modern and expensive dining rooms 
sin greatly in this respect. 

The Exposure of the Dining Room. 

The ideal dining room has windows on 
all sides, but the north, and is always 
sunny except in stormy days. It is bright 
in the first hours of the winter day and 
catches the last rays of the setting sun 
for the late summer dinner. Such a din- 
ing room is only possible when it is in 
an extension, and, when it exists, is apt 
to have the kitchen beneath it, so it may 
be dismissed as out of the question for 
the average house. For practical pur- 
poses, a south and east exposure is al- 
most as good as the room is sunny for 
breakfast and luncheon and the evening 
meal is eaten by artificial light during the 



greater part of the year. This exposure 
has another advantage in that it adapts 
itself to almost any color scheme. South- 
ern windows will light up even the heavy, 
dark woodwork of a craftsman dining 
room, and give an added value to every 
bit of polished metal. 

A Dining Room in Mahogany. 

Mahogany dining room furniture claims 
the allegiance of most people, and cer- 
tainly it combines dignity and beauty of 
tone as no other wood does. It is less 
sombre than oak and it has a more aristo- 
cratic tradition back of it. Add to its 
merits that it is superior to all the 
chances and changes of fashion and you 
have a charter of aristocracy indeed. 
Even its counterfeit, stained birch, is de- 
lightful, although a clever eye can de- 
tect the difference in grain. 

One difficulty with mahogany is that it 
really needs either white painted or ma- 
hogany woodwork. It is hardly in accord 
with the popular oak finishes. 

The writer knows a room in which this 
difficulty was overcome by the use of a 
somewhat complex color scheme. In this 
case the woodwork of the room, and 
there was a good deal of it, was a rather 
light golden oak. 

A wall paper was found in stripes of 
golden brown and green, the latter a 
rather bluish shade. Above the plate rail 
was laid a paper of very intricate design, 
of the style of William Morris, combining 
tan, green and reddish brown. The rug 
was Oriental, its general tone reddish 
brown. A better choice would have been 
a Donegal, or velvet, of the tone of the 
green in the wall paper. At doors and 
windows were hangings of a figured ma- 
terial in two shades of bluish green, with 
an edging of antique gold braid. A square 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



443 



Kraft 




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know the vital importance of Oak Flooring in a home, and are fast learning the dif- 
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Write us for further information. 

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404 Hammond Building 



Detroit, Michigan 



444 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 



of the-saine material partly covered the 
mahogany table when not in use, and this 
too was banded with gold braid. The 
leather seats of the chairs were in dark 
green Spanish leather. 

Manifestly china was out of place 
against a paper of bold design, so the 
plate rail bore only pieces of pewter and 
silver. Below it hung a collection of 
steins, the sort with cream colored 
grounds and highly colored decorations. 
The side board and serving table held 
only silver and glass, and not much of 
either, and both had covers of heavy lace, 
lather gray in tint, as the dead white of 
linen would have been too striking. The 
chimney piece carried a green jar of pea- 
cock's feathers, a copper flagon and a red 
chalk drawing in a black frame. The 
trick of the whole, if trick there was, 
ether than the exercise of an exceptional- 
ly good color sense was in keeping all 
three colors in the proper proportion, so 
that no one of them obtruded itself. An- 
other good point was that while the con- 
tact of the oak doors and window frames 
with the green and tan wall paper was 
not particularly happy, the strong pattern 
of the upper third of the wall, carried the 
eye upward where it noted the agreeable 
contrast of the figured wall and the oak. 
From time to time the floral decorations 
of the table are made to carry out one or 
other of the color notes. Sometimes a 
jar of tawny and buff chrysanthemums is 
used, at others merely dark green ferns, 
and sometimes brownish red wall flowers 
or nasturtiums. In summer time, just 
outside the bay window are boxes filled 
with brown coreopsis with a line of ferns 
next the room. 

The Dining Room which is also a Living 
Room. 

No room is quite so hard to manage as 
this. It is generally neither one thing 
nor the other, and in every way unsuc- 
cessful. The display of silver and china 
suitable for a dining room makes a liv- 
ing room looks jiggery; the ordinary 
comforts of the living room are out of 
keeping with the room of a single func- 
tion. 

The most successful way of solving the 
problem would seem to be to effect some 
sort of a division of the room, using one 



end as a sitting room, the other for the 
dining table and other furniture, but this 
supposes a large, or at least long room, 
equally lighted at both ends. Another 
way is to dispense with the regulation 
dining room furniture, sideboard, serving 
table and china closet, using the table for 
other purposes between meals. Or bet- 
ter still have one of the circular tables 
whose top swings over and makes a set- 
tle. Their size is limited, but they are 
quite large enough to accommodate four 
people, and the lower part is a secure 
place for table linen and small silver. 

There is a dining table which is spe- 
cially made for small rooms which has a 
circular top. The chairs which match it 
are so constructed that when slipped un- 
der it their backs are on a level with its 
top and fit its edge. Such a table and 
four chairs in oak, in any of its various 
finishes, cost about thirty-five dollars. 
Oak tables with a swinging top can be 
Mad in any finish for ten dollars. 

A Breakfast Room. 

In the house of many rooms it is some- 
times possible to have a breakfast room, 
as well as a dining room. In the city 
house with a dining room on the main 
floor there is sometimes a breakfast room 
in the basement, and it is a sensible sav- 
ing of steps. 

The decoration of the breakfast room 
admits of more variety than the dining- 
room. Almost any scheme of decoration 
which is cheerful is admissible. It is 
quite proper to invent a color arrange- 
ment to match the pattern on the break- 
fast china. 

For Blue and White China. 

Suppose you use for breakfast willow 
pattern china, Canton or Staffordshire. 
Paint the woodwork white and cover the 
walls with cartridge paper in a light 
bluish gray, tinting the upper two-fifths 
a lighter shade, and on the separating 
ledge range your plates and jugs and 
platters. Ebonize the table and some 
sort of a serving table, also a table in 
two stories to hold the tea and coffee 
at the hostess's right hand. Get high 
backed splint chairs, ebonize the wood- 
work and supply them with loose cush- 
ions of blue and white, not white and 
blue, Japanese crepe, using the same for 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



445 




"Doors Without a Fault' 

Architects and builders unite in praising 
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may lie found in Sweet's Index, pages 702 and 70). 

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AN ALDINE FIREPLACE 

Will Save You 60% of Your 

FUEL BILL 

And Give You Four Times as Much Heat as 
a Common Grate 

There is a great difference between a common grate and 
an ALDINE fireplace. A common grate is simply an opening 
in a chimney where a fire can be built. 85% of the heat is 
wasted up the chimney, because it is a direct draft. 

The Aldine Fireplace is really an indirect draft stove in 
fireplace form set into a chimney. 85% of the heat is thrown 
out into the room, only 15% is wasted up the chimney and one 
scuttle of coal is enough to give a cherry red fire for 24 hours. 
The expense and trouble of a furnace fire is saved six 
weeks in Spring and Fall if there is an ALDINE in the house. 
You pay no more for this wonderful ALDINE than for any 
first class direct draft grate. It can be slipped in any chim- 
ney opening, no special chimney construction is necessary; no 

pipe to connect; in standard size with big fire pot; made in seven patterns. 
Send for our free booklet, and see how an ALDINE fireplace is suited to 
your particular conditions and requirements. 

The ALDINE is guaranteed to do as we claim or your money back. 
50,000 ALDINES now in satisfactory use. 

Rathbone Fireplace Mfg. Co. 

A. D. RATHBONE, President 
5618 Clyde Park Ave- Grand Rapids, Mich. 




THffOVGtf Wff/fH Tfft ffU> A/ff /3 

piuiiw o/r TVf fzaar AW tuff Mr 




446 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 




This is the Pump ^ 

that 
Keeps the Tank Full 

][ Ever spend a hot after- 
noon filling the attic tank 
with an ordinary back- 
breaking hand pump? 
Then you will appreciate the conven- 
ience, simplicity and low cost of the 

"Paul" Pump 

the pump that does away with all this 
drudgery. Just pipe the pump to your 
water supply well, cistern, spring, etc., 
and it will automatically keep the tank 
full. So simple, so well built it requires 
practically no attention or repairs. Dif- 
ferent in every way from any other pump 
sold for this kind of work. 
tj The "Paul" Pump can be run by an 
electric motor or by belt from any other 
power at a surprisingly low cost. 
J When used with our pneumatic system 
of water supply, the "Paul" Pump will 
give an abundance of water for house or 
farm and at a pressure high enough to 
give perfect fire protection. 
4J If you want the best possible water supply 
system write for our expert advice and Booklet 
No. 12021 telling all about the "Paul" Pump. 
Both are free to you. 

Fort Wayne Engineering 4 Mfg Co. 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 



WELL.SPRING 
OR CISTERN 




HESSJliaOCKER 



HPHE only modern Sanitary Steel 

1 Medicine Cabinet o- Locker. 

Handsome beveled mirror door. Snow 

white, everlasting enamel, inside and out. 




FOR YOUR BATHROOM 



Costs less than wood and is better. Should be 
in every bathroom. Is dust, germ and vermin 
proof and easily cleaned with warm water. 

Made in four styles and three sizes. Price 
$7.00 and up. 

Send for Illustrated circular. 
HESS, 717 L Tacoma Bid., Chicago 

Makers of the Hess Steel Furnace. 
Sold on Approval, Free Booklet. 



Decoration and Furnishing Continued 

curtains. Have the floor stained a very 
dark walnut and highly polished and dis- 
pense with rugs and pictures. 

Or you may use a very grayish green 
wall, the same furniture and woodwork, 
but a blue and green rug, blue and green 
linen instead of the crepe, and alternate 
bits of brass with your blue china. This 
latter scheme is a good one with Canton 
china. Pewter may be substituted for 
brass. 

With Green or Yellow. 

Suppose a breakfast set of green and 
white or of some of the flowered designs 
which combine yellow flowers and green 
leaves. You may cover the walls with 
a pale buff paper in stripes of self tone, 
omitting the plate rail. The necessary 
tables will be of oak, rather light brown, 
the woodwork the same, the floor a little 
darker. Get bamboo chairs with straight 
backs and circular seats. Then for cush- 
ions and curtains use an English cretonne 
with 'a pattern of overlapping yellow 
flowers and green leaves. This and the 
bamboo chairs are standard goods and 
easily obtained. 

Pink and Green. 

A breakfast set in pink flowered china 
is an excuse for an effective scheme in 
pink and green. Use the same gray 
green wall as for the Canton china, but 
have the woodwork painted a somewhat 
darker green. Carry a pink nosegay bor- 
der around the surbase, and edging the 
doors and windows, finishing the ceiling 
line with a very narrow wooden mould- 
ing. Then have furniture in green stained 
oak and window curtains of a pink flow- 
ered cretonne, as well covered , as pos- 
sible. 

Aside from its special purpose a break- 
fast room is convenient as a place -for the 
service of some specially late or early 
meal, for the parting or arriving guest, 
or for the children's midday dinner, in 
fact for any use a bit out of the common. 



/R**r5vRv 




LAWN FENCE 

I Many Styles. Sold on trial at 
wholesale prices. Save 20 
to 3O per cent. Illustrated 
Catalogue free. Write today. 

KITSELMAN BROS. 
"~" Bui 330 Muncie, Indiana. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



447 




Our Beautiful Booklet, "Pergolas" 

Illustrated with views of some of the most attractive new 
homes and grounds showing exceedingly artistic results 
in pergola treatment. This booklet is right off the press, 
and is yours for the asking. Ask for Booklet G-27. 

Proportions in columns make or mar the success and ar- 
tistic effectof the pergola. That is why a pergola built with 

ROLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

made in classic proportions, will insure your getting a 
charming and beautiful pergola. They are equally suitable 
for porches or interior work and are made exclusively by 

HARTMANN-SANDERS COMPANY 

Elston and 'Webster Aves.. Chicago, III. 
Eastern Office: - - 1 123 Broadway, N. Y. City 



^ 

About Plastering 

The average person knows but little of 
this very important item in the construction 
of houses, flats, etc., yet more trouble conies 

irom poor plastering than from any other one thing 

connected with building. 

Climax Wood Mortar 

We want to send you our free booklet explaining what 
Climax Wood Mortar is and how much better and safer 
It is than lime and sand. 



Climax Wood Mortar will insure perfect and perma- 
nent plastering save future expense and the inconven- 
ience and aggravation of having your house taken 
possession of by the plasterers and covering the loon. 
finished wood work and windows with waste mortar! 
Protect against expense prevent trouble 
-profit from experience; plaster with 
Climax Wood Mortar. Send for our 
Free Booklet. ' ' A postal card will do. 

Grand Rapids Plaster Company, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Makers of 

Climax Wood Mortar Hercules Wall Plaster 

Superior Wood Fibre Plaster Gypsum Wall Plaster 

Sales Agents for Sackett Plaster Board 
for a!0 by tu dealers In Builder's Supplies 




Right House 



Elaborately designed hard- 
ware is entirely out of keep- 
ing with a house of rather plain 
architecture. To secure har- 
monious results, consult your architect 
as to the Style of hardware trimmings 
you should select, then from among the 
seventy and more patterns of 

Sargent's 

Artistic 

Hardware 

you can choose the particular design that 
appeals to your sense of the appropriate. 
Sargent's Hardware is famous for its 
beauty as well as for its durability and 
splendid workmanship. If you are build- 
ing a new home, or remodeling the old 
one, you should write for 

Sargent's 'Book of Designs 
Sent Tree 

This book illustrates nearly fourscore of 
the most beautiful patterns ever designed 
for hardware trimmings. Every style 
and period of Architecture is represented 
by several designs. 

Those interested in the Colonial should also re- 
quest a free copy of Sargent a Colonial Book. 
Address 

SARGENT & COMPANY 

161 Leonard Street, New York 



448 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS 

ON INTERIOR DECORATION 



Editor's Note The courtesies of our Correspondence Department are extended to all readers of 
Keith's Magazine. Inquiries pertaining to the decoration and furnishing of the home will be given the 
attention of an expert in that line. 

Letters Intended for answer in this column should be addressed to Decoration and Furnishing De- 
partment, and be accompanied by a diagram of floor plan. 

Letters enclosing return postage will be answered by mail. Such replies as are of general Interest 
will be published in these columns. 



C. H. P. Enclosed please find a sketch 
of one flat office building now in process 
of construction. The ceilings are 9 ft 
high and building faces west. The brick 
fireplace is of reddish brown brick. The 
woodwork in sitting room, reception room 
and dinging room is to be of oak stained 
fumed brown. The dining room has a 
beamed ceiling and is panelled up 5 ft. 
with rough plaster between panel strips. 
All finished in rough plaster. Bedrooms 
are finished in natural stained birch, 
kitchen the same and bathroom, white 
enameled. 

For my sitting room I have a new body 
brussels rug in brown and tan ground 
with brick red and dark green in the 
small all over design. 

One fumed oak rocker with leather 
seat, one brown rattan rocker, one golden 
oak Morris chair which needs new 
cushions, please suggest color, and a 
number of bookcases all to be refinished 
in brown stain. The reception room we 
shall use as a kind of writing room and 
have my husband's small mission desk 
there. We want a davenport or couch 
with leather cushions to be made in the 
arts and crafts department of the high 
school. Which would be the more suit- 
able in the sitting room? I want browns, 
dull orange and tans to prevail in these 
rooms with a touch of green in dining 
room, but I do not know how to blend 
them. 

C. H. P. Ans. Your idea of keeping 
the main living rooms in tones of brown, 
dull orange and tan is very good, with 
your brown stained woodwork and fur- 
niture. As you do not want dark effects, 
however, it is best to use a soft tan or 
ecru on living room wall, deepening it 
in hall to a rich brown. The couch could 
have cushions of brown mottled leather. 
The desk would fit into nook beside vesti- 



bule in hall. The Morris chair could be 
re-upholstered in tapestry leaf design in 
shaded browns with red and green 
touches. 

As the dining room faces south, it is 
suggested to use a rich green stain on the 
plaster panels between wood strips of 
lower wall, and the same soft ecru as liv- 
ing room on wall above, also between 
ceiling beams. Then stencil a decoration 
on upper wall space, introducing greens, 
orange, browns, in a leaf design. 

In the child's bedroom, a plain blue 
chambray paper could be used six feet up, 
capped by a picture moulding or a card 
rail of white wood, with one of the 
charming bird friezes about 8 in. wide 
just under the moulding. Tint the wall 
and ceiling above plain ivory. Use yel- 
low in one of the north bedrooms and 
put your birdseye maple there ; Dutch 
pink with white woodwork in the other. 

The student's room should not have 
white woodwork nor white enamel beds. 
Paint woodwork a warm olive green with 
deep cream walls and bed green or wood- 
work a dull sage green with bright red 
wall or brown with grey wall and scarlet 
furnishings. 

Paint your exterior deep cream and 
stain roof shingles and trim the rich red- 
dish brown of the chimney. 



T. W. C. "Will you help me in decid- 
ing about paint, paper, curtains, furni- 
ture, etc., of my home which has lately 
been remodeled, and is now ready for 
paper, etc? I enclose the plan. 

First, we will take the living room, with 
E. W. and S. exposure. I had thought 
of delft or old blue for this room, blue 
paper, white ceiling, brought down 
20 in. on side wall and a moulding. White 
woodwork, birch doors, stained mahog- 
any and mahogany furniture. 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



449 



Home 

o/your 

T /f / jj 

Hearty 




Heart 




Home 



'T~ V HE interior wood finishing of your home is the 
last touch of refinement or abuse. Nothing so 
beautifies a home as properly finished woodwork whether it be of ordinary 
pine, finest oak or costly mahogany. 

On the other hand, nothing so mars a home as improperly, finished wood- 
work. But it is easy to have beautiful woodwork. Simply insist on the use of 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes 

Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes develop the natural beauty of the wood 
and never cloud or obscure it. They emphasize Nature' s artistic markings 
of the grain and never raise it. 

And Bridgeport Standard Wood Finishes give a smooth elastic finish 
that will stand the test of time and changes in temperature, without 
signs of wear or loss of beauty. 

Write for "Modern Wood Finishing* 
Our corps of experts have prepared an excellent book on 
Wood Finishing. Every home builder should have it. It 
tells all about wood finishing and is illustrated with 
plates of finished wood in natural colors. 

Simply tear out this ad. and write 
your name and address on the border 
and we will send you 
this book. 



NEW M.LFORD, CONN. 



450 



KEITH'S MAGAZINE 



Answers to UucNtioiis on Construction Continued 



Now, if I do use the blue, please sug- 
gest finish of floor, which is hard pine, 
can it be waxed, if so, how shall I pro- 
ceed? Same as hard wood? What color 
shall I stain it, and what colors shall the 
rug be, also portions between this room 
and hall, etc? 

T. W. C. Ans. In reply to your re- 
quest for advice, it is suggested to use 
the large S. W. room as a family room 
and to treat the small room on north of 
hall as a parlor or more formal reception 
room. The dining room opening from it 
should have the same woodwork and a 
white trim with mahogany furniture is 
best suited to this room also. We would 
advise for the family living room in lieu 
of the delft blue, a toned paper on the wall 
in almost invisible pattern with cream 
ceiling. With this livable background, a 
large 12x14 rug in rich blue and green 
combined, two green wicker chairs with 
seats of plain, rich blue corduroy and a 
couch or divan upholstered in an English 
worsted in the same blue. Seat cushions 
of English cretonne in deep blues and 
greens ; curtain, at the casement of Sun- 
dure in an indescribable bluish green 
tone and at the large windows of cream 
barred scrim. No over-draperies are need- 
ed in this room but all windows should 
have shades. The other pieces of furni- 
ture you mention would seem to be suf- 
ficient ,and could be either mahogany or 
brown fumed wood. 

This will give you a restful and service- 
able family living room which will open 
beautifully into the hall done in white 
paint with mahogany stair-rail and rich 
deep green rug and stair carpet. Very 
appropriate block patterns in figured lace 
come for door and side lights. There 
should be silvery green velour draperies 
in the opening. There is a hall paper in 
soft greys and white that would make a 
charming background for the green; for 
the parlor, there is a delightful silvery 
grey paper in leaf design for the wall and 
with this use a rose colored rug and white 
lace curtains with rose silk or velour over 
draperies. Mahogany furniture, some of 
it upholstered in plain rose or rose and 
pearl. As doors into dining room will be 
usually closed, no draperies are necessary. 
The dining room wall with white wood- 
work will be charming in a broad center 



panel of gay birds and foliage on a cream 
ground, with a plain deep blue Eltonbury 
silk fibre paper below it up to a chair rail 
and cream color ceiling coming down to 
meet it. A round mahogany table, buffet 
and chairs and a rug of mottled blue 
Mossdale, not expensive and very dur- 
able. All floors stained nut brown, then 
shellacked, waxed and polished just as 
for hardwood. 

H. L. P. Enclosed find sketch of 
house we are building. I would be very 
grateful for some advice about the wood- 
work. 

The vestibule, living room and library 
are planned for quarter sawed white oak, 
stained to a medium darkness. The din- 
ing room is planned for a beamed ceiling 
with a light tint between the beams and 
down to 2y 2 ft. below ceiling. I would 
like all the woodwork in the dining room 
white and the walls below the moulding 
of old blue to harmonize with walls and 
furnishings in living room, etc, 

H. L. P. Ans. Regarding your in- 
quiries as to treatment of dining room, 
the question of the woodwork would be 
governed largely by the dining room fur- 
niture. If this is mahogany, then white 
woodwork with birch doors stained ma- 
hogany and mahogany beams, would be 
very delightful in this northeast dining 
room. You could then tint the plaster 
between the beams, the upper side wall 
a deep ivory with old blue below the 
moulding. A frieze decoration, either 
stencil or paper in rich colors, on the 
ivory upper wall would be an addition. 
The sliding door could be mahogany 
stained on dining room side and brown 
on the other. But if the dining room 
furniture is oak, then white woodwork 
would not be a good setting for it. In 
this case, the woodwork best be oak also, 
and the walls done in old blue or in soft 
brown bel