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Full text of "A key to the classical pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture proper names; in which the words are accented and divided into syllables exactly as they ought to be pronounced ... To which are added terminational vocabularies of Hebrew, Greek, and Latin proper names ... Concluding with observations on the Greek and Latin accent and quantity .."



LD 
CJ 



GIFT OF 
Felix Flflgel 




A KEY 






TO THE 

CLASSICAL PRONUNCIATION 

or 

Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names; 

IN WHICH 

THE WORDS ARE ACCENTED AND DIVIDED INTO SYLLABLES 

EXACTLY AS THEY OUGHT TO BE PRONOUNCED, 

ACCORDING TO RULES DRAWN FROM ANALOGY AND THE BEST USAGE. 
TO WHICH ARE ADDED, 

TERMINATiONAL VOCABULARIES 

OF 

HEBREW, GREEK, AND LATIN PROPER NAMES, 

IN WHICH 

THE WORDS ARE ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THEIR FINAL SYLLABLES, 
AND CLASSED ACCORDING TO THEIR ACCENTS ; 

By which the General Analogy of Pronunciation may be seen at one view, and 
the Accentuation of each word more easily remembered. 

CONCLUDING WITH 

Observations on the Greek and Latin Accent and Quantity; 

WITH 

SOME PROBABLE CONJECTURES ON THE METHOD OF FREEING THEM 

FROM THE OBSCURITY AND CONFUSION IN WHICH THEY AKE 

INVOLVED, BOTH BY THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS. 



Si quid novisti rcctius istis, 
Candidas imperti ; si non, his utere mecum. Hor. 



The SEVENTH EDITION. 



BY JOHN WALKER, 

AUTHOR OF THE CRITICAL PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY, &C. 

LONDON : 

PRINTED FOR T. CADELL, LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME, AND BROWNE, 

BALDWIN, CRADOCK, AND JOY, J. ROBINSON, G. ANI> W. B. 

WH1TTAKER, AND SIMPKIN AND MARSHALL. 

1822. 



W3 
l&li 



J. M 4 Crery, TookvCourt, 
Chnc*rr-Lan, London. 



l.t. 



PREFACE. 



1 HE Critical Pronouncing Dictionary of the English 
Language naturally suggested an idea of the present 
work. Proper names from the Greek and Latin form 
so considerable a part of every cultivated living lan- 
guage, that a Dictionary seems to be imperfect with- 
out them. Polite scholars, indeed, are seldom at a 
loss for the pronunciation of words they so frequently 
meet with in the learned languages; but there are 
great numbers of respectable English scholars, who, 
having only a tincture of classical learning, are 
much at a loss for a knowledge of this part of it. It 
is not only the learned professions that require this 
knowledge, but almost every one above the merely 
mechanical. The professors of painting, statuary, 
and music, and those who admire their works 
readers of history, politics, poetry all who con- 
verse on subjects ever so little above the vulgar, have 
so frequent occasion to pronounce these proper 
names, that whatever tends to render this pronun- 
ciation easy must necessarily be acceptable to the 
Public. 

The proper names in Scripture have still a higher 
claim to our attention. That every thing contained 

a 2 



iv PREFACE. 

in that precious repository of divine truth should be 
rendered as easy as possible to the reader, cannot be 
doubted : and the very frequent occasions of pro- 
nouncing Scripture proper names, in a country 
where reading the Scripture makes part of the reli- 
gious worship, seem to demand some work on this 
subject more perfect than any we have hitherto 
seen. 

I could have wished it had been undertaken by a 
person of more learning and leisure than myself; but 
we often wait in vain for works of this kind, from 
those learned bodies which ought to produce them, 
and at last are obliged, for the best we can get, to 
the labours of some necessitous individual. Being 
long engaged in the instruction of youth, I felt the 
want of a work of this kind, and have supplied it in 
the best manner I am able. If I have been happy 
enough to be useful, or only so far useful as to in- 
duce some abler hand to undertake the subject, I 
shall think my labour amply rewarded. I shall still 
console myself with reflecting, that he who has pro- 
duced a prior work, however inferior to those that 
succeed it, is under a very different predicament 
from him who produces an after-work inferior to 
those that have gone before. 



ADVERTISEMENT 



TO 



THE SECOND EDITION. 



THE favourable reception of the first edition of this 
work has induced me to attempt to make it still 
more worthy of the acceptance of the public, by the 
addition of several critical observations, and parti- 
cularly by two Terminational Vocabularies of Greek 
and Latin, and Scripture Proper Names. That so 
much labour should be bestowed upon an inverted 
arrangement of these words, when they had already 
been given in their common alphabetical order, may 
be matter of wonder to many persons, who will na- 
turally inquire into the utility of such an arrange- 
ment. To these it may be answered, that the words 
of all languages seem more related to each other by 
their terminations than by their beginnings; that 
the Greek and Latin languages seem more particu- 
larly to be thus related ; and classing them accord- 
ing to their endings seemed to exhibit a new view 
of these languages, both curious and useful : for as 

a3 



vi ADVERTISEMENT. 

their accent and quantity depend so much on their 
termination, such an arrangement appeared to give 
an easier and more comprehensive idea of their pro- 
nunciation than the common classification by their 
initial syllables. This end was so desirable as to in- 
duce me to spare no pains, however dry and dis- 
gusting, to promote it ; and if the method I have 
taken has failed, my labour will not be entirely lost 
if it convinces future prosodists that it is not worthy 
of their attention. 



CONTENTS OF THE INTRODUCTION. 



PAGE 

THE pronunciation of Greek and Latin not so difficult 
as that of our own language * . . ix 

The ancient pronunciation of Greek and Latin, a subject 
of great controversy among the learned ibid. 

The English, however faulty in their pronunciation of 
Greek and Latin, pronounce them, like other European 
nations, according to the analogy of their own language x 

Sufficient vestiges remain to prove that the foreign pronun- 
ciation of the Greek and Latin letters is nearer to the 
ancient than the English (Note) ibid. 

The English pronunciation of Greek and Latin injurious 
to quantity xi 

No sufficient reason for altering the present pronunciation on 
these accounts xiii 

Rule for accenting Latin words xiv 

Rule for accenting Greek proper names xv 

Probable conjecture why the terminations tia and tio in Greek 
appellatives have not the same sound as in Latin (Note) xvi 

Importance of settling the English quantity with which we 
pronounce Greek and Latin proper names, and particu- 
larly that of the unaccented syllables xx 



INTRODUCTION. 



1 HE pronunciation of the learned languages is much more ea- 
sily acquired than that of our own. Whatever might have been 
the variety of the different dialects among the Greeks, and the 
different provinces of the Romans, their languages now being 
dead, are generally pronounced according to the respective ana- 
logies of the several languages of Europe, where those languages 
are cultivated, without partaking of those anomalies to which the 
living languages are liable. 

Whether one general uniform pronunciation of the ancient 
languages be an object of sufficient importance to induce the 
learned to depart from the analogy of their own language, and 
to study the ancient Latin and Greek pronunciation, as they do 
the etymology, syntax, and prosody of those languages, is a 
question not very easy to be decided*. The question becomes 
still more difficult when we consider the uncertainty we are in 
respecting the ancient pronunciation of the Greeks and Romans, 
and how much the learned are divided among themselves about 
it*. Till these points are settled, the English may well be al- 

* Middleton contends that the initial c before e and i ought to be pronounced 
as the Italians now pronounce it ; and that Cicero is neither Sisero, as the French 
and English pronounce it ; nor Kikero, as Dr. Bentley asserts ; but Tchitckero, 
as the Italians pronounce it at this day. This pronunciation, however, is de- 
rided by Lipsius, who affirms that the c among the Romans had always the 
sound of fc. Lipsius says too, that of all the European nations, the British alone 
pronounce the i properly ; but Middleton asserts, that of all nations they pro- 
nounce it the worst. Middleton De I*at. Liter. Pronun. Dissert. 

Lipsius, speaking of the different pronunciation of the letter G in different 
countries, says: 

Nos hodie (de Htera G loquente) quam peccamus? Italorum enim plerique 
nt Z exprimnnt, Galli et Belgia? ut J consonantem. Itaqne illorum est Lezere. 
Fuzere ; nostrum, Leiere, Fuiere (Lejere, Fvjere). Omnia imperite, inepte". 
Germanos saltern audite, quorum sonns hie germanus, Legere, Tegere ; ut in Le- 
go, Tego, nee unquam variant : at nos ante /, , IE, Y, semper dicimusqne Jem- 
mum, J&tulos, Jimjivam, Jyrum ; pro istis, Gemmam, Gatulos, Gingivaih, Gyrum. 
Mutemns aut vapulemus. Lipsius. De Rect. Pron. Ling. Lot. p. 71. Hinc 

factum 



X INTRODUCTION. 

lowed to follow their own pronunciation of Greek and Latin, as 
well as other nations, even though it should be confessed that it 
seems to depart more from what we can gather of the ancient 
pronunciation, than either the Italian, French, or German*. 
For why the English should pay a compliment to the learned 



factum est ut tanta in pronunciando varietas extiteret ut pauci inter se in liter- 
arum sonis conseutiant. Quod quidem mirnm non esset, si indocti tantum a 
doctis in eo, ac non ipsi etiam alioqui eruditi inter se magna contentions dissi- 
derent. Adolp. Meker. De Lin. Greec. vet. Pronun. cap. ii. p. 15. 

* Monsieur Launcelot, the learned author of the Port-Royal Greek Grammar, 
in order to convey the sound of the long Greek vowel , tells us, it is a sound 
between the c and the , and that Eustathius, who lived towards the close of 
the twelfth century, says, that #?, 03, is a sound made in imitation of the bleat- 
ing of a sheep ; and quotes to this purpose this verse of an ancient writer 
called Cratinus : 



Is fatuus perinde ac ovis, b, be, dicens, iacedit. 

He, like a silly sheep, goes crying ban. 

Caninius has remarked the same, Hellcn, p. 26. E longum, ciijus sonus in 
ovium balatu sentitur, ut Cratinus et Varro tradiderunt. The sound of the e 
long may be perceived in the bleating of sheep, as Cratinus and Varro have 
handed down to us. 

Eustathius likewise remarks upon the 499 v. of Iliad I. that the word 
BXo-J. fffrlv o TJ? xXe^vfrgttc n^os fu/u7f na.ro, ray <ff&\aia<; ; 8n EXJH 
f*il*o-iv Tr^arav <j>vf. Kgawo?. Bxty est Clepsydrae sonus, ex imitatione 
secundum veteres; et fa imitatur vocum ovium. Blops, according to the 
ancients, is a sound in imitation of the Clepsydra, as baa is expressive of 
the voice of sheep. It were to be wished that the sound of every Greek 
vowel had been conveyed to us by as faithful a testimony as the >mt ; we 
should certainly have had a better idea of that harmony for which the Greek 
language was so famous, and in which respect Quintilian candidly yields it the 
preference to the Latin. 

Aristophanes has handed down to us the pronunciation of the Greek diphthong 
aZ aZ by making it expressive of the barking of a dog. This pronunciation is 
exactly like that preserved by nurses and children among us to this day in bow 
wow. This is the sound of the same letters in the Latin tongue; not only in 
proper names derived from Greek, but in every other word where this diph- 
thong occurs. Most nations in Europe, perhaps all but the English, pronounce 
audio and laudo, as if written owdio and lowdo ; the diphthong sounding like ou 
in loud. Agreeable to this rule, it is presumed that we formerly pronounced 
the apostle Paul nearer the original than at present. In Henry the Eighth'* 
time it was written St. Poule'8, and sermons were preached at Poule'i 



INTRODUCTION. XI 

languages, which is not done by any other nation in Europe, it 
is not easy to conceive; and as the colloquial communication of 
learned individuals of different nations so seldom happens, and 
is an object of so small importance when it does happen, it is not 
much to be regretted that when they meet they are scarcely intel- 
ligible to each other*. 

But the English are accused not only of departing from the 
genuine sound of the Greek and Latin vowels, but of violating 
the quantity of these languages more than the people of any other 
nation in Europe. The author of the Essay upon the Harmony 
of Language gives us a detail of the particulars by which this 
accusation is proved : and this is so true a picture of the English 
pronunciation of Latin, that I shall quote it at length, as it may 
be of use to those who are obliged to learn this language without 
the aid of a teacher. 



Cross. The vulgar, generally the last to alter, either for the better or worse, 
still have a jingling proverb with this pronunciation, when they say, As old as 
Poules. 

The sound of the letter u is no less sincerely preserved in Plautus, in M enaech. 

page 622, edit. Lambin. in making use of it to imitate the cry of an owl 

"MEN. Egon'dedi? PEN. Tu, Tu, istic, inquam, vin' afferri noctuam, 
" Qua? tu, tu, usque dicat tibi? nam nos jam nos defessi sumus." 
" It appears here," says Mr. Forster, in his defence of the Greek accents, 
page 129, " that an owl's cry was tu, tu, to a Roman ear, as it is too, too, to an 
" English." Lambin, who was a Frenchman, observes on the passage^ * Alludit 
" ad noctuae vocem sen cantum, tu, tu, seu ton, *<m." He here alludes to the 
voice or noise of an owl. It may be farther observed, that the English have 
totally departed from this sound of the u in their own language, as well as in 
their pronunciation of Latin. 

* Erasmus se adfuisse olim commemorat cum die qnodam solemn conaplures 
piincipum legati ad ftfaximilianum Imperatorem salutandi causa advenissent ; 
Singulosque Gallum, Germanum, Danum, Scotum, &c. orationem Latinam, ita 
barbare ac vaste prommciasse, ut Italis, quibnsdam, nihil nisi risum moverint, 
qui eos non Latine sed sua quenique lingua, locutos jnrassent. Middleton, De 
Lat. Lit. Pronun. 

The love of the marvellous prevails over truth : and I question if the greatest 
diversity in the pronunciation of Latin exceeds that of English at the capital 
and in some of the counties of Scotland, and yet the inhabitants of both have 
no great difficulty in understanding each other. 



Xll INTRODUCTION. 

" The falsification of the harmony by English scholars in 
" their pronunciation of Latin, with regard to essential points, 
" arises from two causes only : first, from a total inattention to 
" the length of vowel sounds, making them long or short 
" merely as chance directs ; and, secondly, from sounding double 
" consonants as only one letter. The remedy of this last fault 
" is obvious. With regard to the first, we have already ob- 
" served, that each of our vowels hath its general long sound, 
" and its general short sound totally different. Thus the short 
lt sound of e lengthened is expressed by the letter a, and the 
" short sound of t lengthened is expressed by the letter e : and 
" with all these anomalies usual in the application of vowel 
" characters to the vowel sounds of our own language, we pro- 
" ceed to the application of vowel sounds to the vowel charac- 
" ters of the Latin. Thus in the first syllable of ridus and no- 
" m'en, which ought to be long ; and of miser and onus, which 
" ought to be short ; we equally use the common long sound of 
" the vowels ; but in the oblique cases, sideris, nominis, miseri, 
" onerisy &c., we use quite another sound, and that a short one. 
" These strange anomalies are not in common to us with our 
" southern neighbours the French, Spaniards, and Italians. 
" They pronounce sidus according to our orthography, seedus, 
" and in the oblique cases preserve the same long sound of the 
" i : nomen they pronounce as we do, and preserve in the oblique 
" cases the same long sound of the o. The Italians also, in their 
" own language, pronounce doubled consonants as distinctly as 
" the two most discordant mutes of their alphabet. Whatever, 
" therefore, they may want of expressing the true harmony of the 
" Latin language, they certainly avoid the most glaring and absurd 
" faults in our manner of pronouncing it. 

" It is a matter of curiosity to observe with what regularity 
" we use these solecisms in the pronunciation of Latin. When 
" the penultimate is accented, its vowel, if followed but by a 
" single consonant, is always long, as in Dr. Forster's examples. 
" When the antepenultimate is accented, its vowel is, without 
" any regard to the requisite quantity, pronounced short, as in 



INTRODUCTION. X1H 

" mirabile, frigidus; except the vowel of the penultimate be 
" followed by a vowel, and then the vowel of the antepenuhi- 
11 mate is with as little regard to true quantity pronounced long, 
" as in maneo, redeat, odium, imperium. Quantity is however 
" vitiated to make i short even in this case, as in oblimo, vinea, 
" virium. The only difference we make in pronunciation be- 
" tween vinea and venia is, that to the vowel of the first syllable 
" of the former, which ought to be long, we give a short sound ; 
" to that of the latter, which ought to be short, we give the same 
" sound, but lengthened. U accented is always before a single 
" consonant pronounced long, as in humerus, fugiens. Before 
" two consonants no vowel souud is ever made long, except that 
" of the diphthong au ; so that whenever a doubled consonant 
" occurs, the preceding syllable is short*. Unaccented vowels 
" we treat with no more ceremony in Latin than in our own lan- 
" guage." Essay upon the Harmony of Language, page 224. 
Printed for Robson, 1774. 

This, it must be owned, is a very just state of the case ; but 
though the Latin quantity is thus violated, it is not, as this writer 
observes in the first part of the quotation, merely as chance di- 
rects, but, as he afterwards observes, regularly, and he might 
have added according to the analogy of English pronunciation, 
which, it may be observed; has a genius of its own ; and which, 
if not so well adapted to the pronunciation of Greek and Latin 
as some other modern languages, has as fixed and settled rules for 
pronouncing them as any other. 

The learned and ingenious author next proceeds to show the 
advantages of pronouncing our vowels so as to express the Latin 
quantity. " We have reason to suppose," says he, " that our 
" usual accentuation of Latin, however it may want of many ele- 
" gancies in the pronunciation of the Augustan age, is yet suf- 
" ficiently just to give with tolerable accuracy that part of the 

* This corruption of the true quantity is not, however, peculiar to the English ; 
for Beza complains in his country : Hiuc enim fit ut in Graeca oratione vel nullum, 
vel prorsus corruptuin numerum intelligas, dum nuiltae breves producuntur, et 
contra plurimas longae corripiuntur. Beza de Germ. Pron. Grzecae Linguae, p. 50. 



XIV INTRODUCTION. 

" general Harmony of the language of which accent is the ef- 
" ficient. We have also a pretty full information from the poets 
" what syllables ought to have a long, and what a short quantity. 
" To preserve, then, in our pronunciation, the true harmony of 
" the language, we have only to take care to give the vowels a 
t* long sound or a short sound, as the quantity may require ; and 
" when doubled consonants occur, to pronounce each distinctly." 
Ibid, page 228*. 

In answer to this plea for alteration, it may be observed, that 
if this mode of pronouncing Latin be that of foreign nations, 
and were really so superior to our own, we certainly must per- 
ceive it in the pronunciation of foreigners, when we visit them, 
or they us : but I think I may appeal to the experience of every 
one who has had an opportunity of making the experiment, that 
so far from a superiority on the side of the foreign pronunciation, 
it seems much inferior to our own. I am aware of the power of 
habit, and of its being able, on many occasions, to make the worse 
appear the better reason : but if the harmony of the Latin lan- 
guage depended so much on a preservation of the quantity as 
many pretend, this harmony would surely overcome the bias we 
have to our own pronunciation ; especially if our own were 
really so destructive of harmony as it is said to be. Till, there- 
fore, we have a more accurate idea of the nature of quantity, 
and of that beauty and harmony of which it is said to be the ef- 

* By what this learned author has observed of our vicious pronunciation of 
the Towels by the long and short sound of them, and from the instances he has 
given, he must mean that length and shortness which arises from extending and 
contracting them, independently of the obstruction which two consonants are 
supposed to occasion in forming the long quantity. Thus we are to pronounce 
Manus as if written and divided into Man-nus; and Pannus as if written Pay- 
nus, or as we always hear the word Pom's (bread) ; for in this sound of Pannus 
there seems to be no necessity for pronouncing the two consonants distinctly or 
separately, which he seems to mean by distinctly, because the quantity is shown 
by the long sound of the vowel: but if by distinctly he means separately, that is 
as if what is called in French the schfaa or mute e were to follow the first con- 
sonant, this could not be done without adding a syllable to the word ; and the 
word Pannus would in that case certainly have three syllables, as if written 
Pon-e.Vnus. -See Observations on the Greek and Latin Accent and Quantity, 
sect. 24. 



INTRODUCTION. XV 

ficient in the pronunciation of Latin, we ought to preserve a pro- 
nunciation which has naturally sprung up in our own soil, and is 
congenial to our native language. Besides, an alteration of this 
kind would be attended with so much dispute and uncertainty as 
must make it highly impolitic to attempt it. 

The analogy, then, of our own language being the rule for pro- 
nouncing the learned languages, we shall have little occasion for 
any other directions for the pronunciation of the Greek and Latin 
proper names, than such as are given for the pronunciation of 
English words. The general rules are followed almost without 
exception. The first and most obvious powers of the letters are 
adopted, and there is scarcely any difficulty but in the position of 
the accent ; and this depends so much on the quantity of the 
vowels, that we need only inspect a dictionary to find the quantity 
of the penultimate vowel, and this determines the accent of all the 
Latin words ; and it may be added, of almost all Greek words 
likewise*. Now in our pronunciation of Latin words, whatever 
be the quantity of the first syllable in a word of two syllables, we 
always place the accent on it : but in words of more syllables, if 
the penultimate be long, we place the accent on that ; and if short 
we accent the antepenultimate. 

The Rules of the Latin Accentuation are comprised in a clear 
and concise manner by Sanctius within four hexameters : 

Accentum in se ips monosyllaba dictio ponit. 
Exacuit sedem dissyllabon onme priorem. 
Ex tribus, extollit pi imam pen ultima curta : 
Extollit seipsam quando est penultima louga. 

These rules I have endeavoured to express in English verse : 

Each monosyllable has stress of course : 
Words of two syllables, the first enforce ; 
A syllable that's long, and last but one, 
Must have the accent upon that or none ; 
But if this syllable be. short, the stress 
Must on the last but two its force express. 

The only difference that seems to obtain between the pronun- 
ciation of the Greek and Latin Languages, is that in the Latin ti 

* That is, in the general pronunciation of Greek ; for, let the written accent 
be placed where it will, the quantitative accent, as it may be called, follows the 
analogy of the Latin. 



Xvi INTRODUCTION. 

and si, preceded by an accent, and followed by another vowel 
forming an improper diphthong, are pronounced as in English, 
like sh or zh, as natio, nation ; persuasio, persuasion, &c. ; and 
that in the Greek the same letters retain their pure sound, as 
Q&awr'tcc, uyvuff'w, TrgoGa.Tw, x. r. A.* This difference, how- 
ever, with very few exceptions, does not extend to proper 
names ; which, coming to us through, and being mingled with, 
the Latin, fall into the general rule. In the same manner, though 
in Greek it was an established maxim, that if the last syllable 

* " The Greek language," says the learned critic, " was happy in not being 
" understood by the Goths, who would as certainly have corrupted the t in 
" etlrtct, am'ov, &c. into ula-ict, aa-iov, &c. as they did the Latin motio and 
" doceo into moshio and dosfcof." This, however, may be questioned ; for, if in 
Latin words this impure sound of t takes place only in those words where the 
accent is on the preceding vowel, as in natio, facio, &c. ; but not when the ac- 
cent follows the t, and is on the following vowel, as in satietas, societas, c. why 
should we suppose any other mode of pronunciation would have been adopted 
by the Goths in their pronouncing the Greek? Now no rule of pronunciation is 
more uniform in the Greek language than that which places an acute on the iota 
at the end of words, when this letter is succeeded by a long vowel ; and conse- 
quently if the accent be preserved upon the proper letter, it is impossible the 
preceding t and s should go into the sound of sh; why, therefore, may we not 
suppose that the very frequent accentuation of the penultimate / before a final 
vowel preserved the preceding v from going into the sound ofsk, as it was a 
difference of accentuation that occasioned this impure sound of t in the Latin 
language ? for though t at the end of words, when followed by a long vowel, or 
a vowel once long and afterwards contracted, had always the accent on it in 
Greek; in Latin the accent was always on the preceding syllable in words of 
this termination: and hence seems to have arisen the corruption of t in the 
Gothic pronunciation of the Latin language. 

It is highly probable, that in Lu clan's time the Greek t when followed by 
and another vowel, had not assumed the sound of a- ; for the Sigma would not 
have failed to accuse him of a usurpation of her powers, as he had done of her 
character: and if we have preserved the r pure in this situation when we pro- 
nounce Greek, it is, perhaps, rather to be placed to the preserving power of the 
accented i in so great a number of words, than any adherence to the ancient rules 
of pronunciation, which invariably affirm, that the consonants had but one 
sound ; unless we except the y before y, , ^, ; as ayfexoj, Apwga, *?#'*, 
*. T. x. where the y is sounded like v : but this, says Henry Stephens, is an errour 
of the copyists, who have a little extended the bottom of the v, and made a y of it ; 
for, says he, it is ridiculous to suppose that v was changed into y, and at the same 

time 
t Ainsworth on the letter T. 



INTRODUCTION. 

\vas long, the accent could scarcely be higher than the penulti- 
mate; yet in our pronunciation of Greek, and particularly of 
proper names, the Latin analogy of the accent is adopted : and 
though the last syllable is long in Demosthenes, Aristophanes, 
Theramenes and Deiphobe, yet as the penultimate is short, the 
accent is placed on the antepenultimate, exactly as if they were 
Latin*. 

As these languages have been long dead, they admit of no 
new varieties of accent like the living languages. The common 
accentuation of Greek and Latin may be seen in Lexicons and 
Graduses ; and where the ancients indulged a variety, and the 
moderns are divided in their opinions about the most classical 
accentuation of words, it would be highly improper, in a work 
intended for general use, to enter into the thorny disputes of the 
learned ; and it may be truly said, in the rhyming adage, 

When Doctors disagree, 
Disciples then are free ? 

This, however, has not been entirely neglected. Where there 

time that y should be pronounced like v. On the contrary, Scaliger says, that 
where we find a v before these letters, as avxt^a, it is an error of the copyists, 
who imagined they belter expressed the pronunciation by this letter; which, as 
Vossius observes, should seem to demand something particular and uncommon. 

It is reported of Scaliger, that when he was accosted by a Scotchman in Latin, 
he begged his pardon for not understanding him, as he had never learned the 
Scotch language. If this was the case with the pronunciation of a Scotchman, 
which is so near that of the Continent, what would he have said to the Latin 
pronunciation of an Englishman ? I take it, however, that this diversity is 
greatly exaggerated. 

* This, however, was contrary to the general practice of the Romans : for 
Victorinus in his Grammar says, Graca nomina, si iisdem literis proferuntur, 
(Latine versa) Grcecos accentus habebunt : nam cum diciinus Thyas, Nais, acutiim 
habebit posterior accentum; et cum Themistio, Calypso, Theano, ultimam ciiv 
cumflecti videbimus, quod utrumque Latinus sermo non patitur, nisi admodum 
raro. " If Greek nouns turned into Latin are pronounced with the same letters, 
" they have the Greek accent: for when we say Thyas, Nais, the latter syllable 
" has the acute accent ; and when we pronounce Themistio, Calypso, Theano, 
" we see the last syllable is circnmflexed ; neither of which is ever seen in Latin 
" words, or very rarely." Servius. Forstcr. Reply, page 31, Notes 32, bott, 

b 



xviii INTRODUCTION. 

has been any considerable diversity of accentuation among our 
prosodists, I nave consulted the best authorities, and have some- 
times ventured to decide : though, as Labbe says, " Sed his de 
" rebus, ut aliis multis, malo doctiorum judicium expectare, 
" quam meam in medium proferre sententiam." 

But the most important object of the present work is settling 
the English quantity, (see Rules 20, 21, 22) with which we 
pronounce Greek and Latin proper names, and the sounds of 
some of the consonants. These are points in a state of great un- 
certainty ; and are to be settled, not so much by a deep know- 
ledge of the dead languages, as by a thorough acquaintance with 
the analogies and general usage of our own tongue. These must, 
in the nature of things, enter largely into the pronunciation of a 
dead language ; and it is from an attention to these that the 
Author hopes he has given to the Public a work not entirely 
unworthy of their acceptance. 



RULES 



FOR 

PRONOUNCING THE VOWELS 

OF 

GREEK AMD LATIN PROPER NAMES. 



1. lli VERY vowel with the accent on it at the end of a syllable 
is pronounced as in English, with its first long open sound ; 
thus Co! to*, Philome 1 la, Ori' on, Pho' don, Lu' cifer, &c. have 
the accented vowels sounded exactly as in the English words 
pa! per, me' tre, spi' der, no' ble, tu' tor, &c. 

2. Every accented vowel not ending a syllable, but followed 
by a consonant, has the short sound as in the English : thus 
Man'lius, Pen'theus, Pin' darus, Col' chis, Cur' tius, &c. have 
the short sound of the accented vowels, as in man' ner, plen' ty, 
prin' ter, col' lar, Cur' few, &c. 

3. Every final i, though unaccented, has the long open 
sound : thus the final i forming the genitive case, as in Ma- 
gis' tri, or the plural number, as in De' cii, has the long open 
sound, as in vi f al ; and this sound we give to this vowel in this 
situation, because the Latin i final in genitives, plurals, and pre- 
terperfect tenses of verbs, is always long; and consequently 



* This pronunciation of Cato, Plato, Cleopatra, &c. has been but lately 
adopted. Quin, and all the old dramatic school, used to pronounce the a in 
these and similar words like the a in father. Mr. Garriok, with great good 
sense, as well as good taste, brought in the present pronunciation, and the pro- 
priety of it lias made it now universal. 

b<2 



XX RULES FOB PRONOUNCING 

where the accented i is followed by i final, both are pronounced 
with the long diphthongal /', like the noun eye, as Achi' 'vi*. 

4. Every unaccented i ending a syllable not final, as that in 
the second of Alcibiades, the Hernici, &c. is pronounced like e, 
as if written Alcebiades, the Herneci, &c. So the last syllable 
but one of the Fabii, the Horatii, the Curiatii, &c. is pro- 
nounced as if written Fa-be-i, Ho-ra-she-i, Cu-re-a-she-i; and 
therefore if the unaccented i and the diphthong & conclude a 
wordy they are both pronounced like e, as Harpyi<Z t Har- 

tsf*** 

5. The diphthongs & and a , ending a syllable with the ac- 
cent on it, are pronounced exactly like the long English e t as 
Casar, (Eta, &c. as if written Cee' sar, E' ' ta, &c. ; and like the 
short e, when followed by a consonant in the same syllable, as 

, (Edipus, &c. pronounced as if written Deddalus, 
j &c. The vowels ei are generally pronounced like long 
if. For the vowels eu in final syllables, see the word Idome- 
neus: and for the ou in the same syllables, see the word An- 
tinous, and similar words, in the Terminational Vocabulary. 

6. Y is exactly under the same predicament as i. It is long 
when ending an accented syllable, as Cy' rus ; or when ending an 
unaccented syllable if final, as JE 1 ' gy, M' py, &c. : short when 
joined to a consonant in the same syllable, as Lye' idas ; and 
sometimes long and sometimes short, when ending an initial syl- 



* This is the true analogical pronunciation of this letter when ending an ac- 
cented syllable ; but a most disgraceful affectation of foreign pronunciation has 
exchanged this full diphthongal sound for the meagre, squeezed sound of the 
French and Italian i, not only in almost every word derived from those languages, 
but in many which are purely Latin, as Faustina, Messalina, &c. Nay, words 
from the Saxon have been equally perverted, and we hear the i in Elfrida, Ed- 
wina, &c. turned into Elfreeda, Edioecna, Sac. It is true this is the sound the 
Romans gave to their i ; but the speakers here alluded to are perfectly innocent 
of this, and do not pronounce it in this manner for its antiquity, but its novelty. 

t See Elegeia Hygeia, &c. in the Terminational Vocabulary of Greek and 
Latin Proper Names. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXI 

lable not under the accent, as Ly-cur' gus, pronounced with the 
tirst syllable like lie, a falsehood ; and Lysimachus, with the first 
syllable like the first of legion; or nearly as if divided into Lys- 
Ma-chus,&c. See Principles of English Pronunciation pre- 
fixed to ihe Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 117, 118, &c. 
and 185, 186, 187. 

7. A y ending an unaccented syllable, has the same obscure 
sound as in the same situation in English words ; but it is a 
sound bordering on the Italian a, or the a infa-ther, as Dia' na, 
where the difference between the accented and unaccented a 
is palpable. See Principles of English Pronunciation pre- 
fixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 92, and the 
letter A. 

8. .E final, either with or without the preceding consonant, 
always forms a distinct syllable, as Penelope, Hyppocrene, Evoe, 
Amphitrite, &c. When any Greek or Latin word is anglicised 
into this termination, by cutting off a syllable of the original, it 
becomes then an English word, and is pronounced according 
to our own analogy : thus Acidalius altered to Acidale, has the 
final e sunk, and is a word of three syllables only : Proserpine, 
from Proserpina, undergoes the same alteration. Thebes, and 
Athens, derived from the Greek 0^1? and A0j^, and the Latin 
Theb& and Athena, are perfectly anglicised; the former into a 
monosyllable, and the latter into a dissyllable: and the Greek 
KJTJ and the Latin Greta have both sunk into the English 
monosyllable Crete : Hecate likewise pronounced in three sylla- 
bles when Latin, and in the same number in the Greek word 
Exar*j, in English is universally contracted into two, by sinking 
the final e., Shakspeare seems to have begun as he has now 
confirmed this pronunciation by so adapting the word in Mac- 
beth: 

" Why how now, Hecat'? you look angerly." Act IV* 
Perhaps this was no more than a poetical licence to him : bat 
the actors have adopted it in the songs in this tragedy : 
" He-cat c, He-cate, come away" 



RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

And the play-going world, who form no small portion of what 
is called the better sort of people, have followed the actors in this 
word: and the rest of the world have followed them. 

The Roman magistrate, named Mdilis, is anglicised by pro- 
nouncing it in two syllables, M'dile. The capital of Sicily, Sy- 
racuse, of four syllables, is made three in the English Syr' a- 
cuse; and the city of Tyrus, of two syllables, is reduced to a 
monosyllable in the English Tyre. 

Rules for pronouncing the Consonants of Greek and Latin 
Proper Names. 

9. C and G are hard before a, o, and u, as Cato, Comus, Cures, 
Galba, Gorgon, &c. and soft before e, i, and y, as Cebes, 
Scipio, Scylla, Cinna, Geryon, Geta, Gillus, Gyges, Gymnoso- 
phista, &c.* 

10. T, S, and C, before ia, ie, ii, io, iu, and eu, preceded by 
the accent, in Latin words, as in English, change into sh and zh, 
as Tatian, Statius, Portius, Portia, Sodas, Caduceus, Accius, 
Helvetii, M&sia, Hesiod, &c. pronounced Tashian, Stasheus, 
Porsheus, Porshea, Sosheas, Cadusheus, Aksheus, Helveshei, 
Mezhea, Hezheod, &c. See Principles of English Pronuncia- 
tion prefixed to the Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 357, 450, 45 1 , 



* That this general rule should be violated by smatterers in the learned lan- 
guages in such words as Gymnastic, Heterogeneous, &c., it is not to be wondered 
at ; but that men of real learning, who do not want to show themselves off to 
the vulgar by such innuendoes of their erudition, should give in to this irregula- 
rity, is really surprising. We laugh at the pedantry of the age of James the 
First, where there is scarcely a page in any English book that is not sprinkled 
with twenty Greek and Latin quotations ; and yet do not see the similar pe- 
dantry of interlarding our pronunciation with Greek and Latin sounds; which 
may be affirmed to be a greater perversion of our language than the former. 
In the one case, the introduction of Greek and Latin quotations does not inter- 
fere with the English phraseology ; but in the other the pronunciation is dis- 
turbed, and a motley jargon of sounds introduced, as inconsistent with true 
taste as it is with neatness and uniformity. 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXlli 

459,463. But when the accent is on the first of the diphthongal 
vowels, the preceding consonant does not go into sh, but preserves 
its sound pure, as Miltiades, Antiates, &c. See the word Sa- 
tiety in the Crit. Pron. Diet. 

11. T, and S, in proper names, ending in tia, sia, cyon, and 
sion, preceded by the accent, change the t and s into sh and zh. 
Thus Phocion, Sicyon, and Cercyon, are pronounced exactly in 
our own analogy, as if written Phoshean, Sishean, and Sershean: 
Artemisia and Aspasia sound as if written Artemizhea, and As- 
pazhea : Galatia, Aratia, Alutia, and Batia, as if written Ga- 
lashea, Arasheaj Aloshea, and Bashea : and if Atia, the town 
in Campania, is not so pronounced, it is to distinguish it from 
Asia, the eastern region of the world. But the termination tion 
(of which there are not even twenty examples in proper names 
throughout the whole Greek and Latin languages) seems to pre- 
serve the t from going into sh, as the last remnant of a learned 
pronunciation ; and to avoid, as much as possible, assimilating 
with so vulgar an English termination : thus, though AZsion, 
Jasion, Dionysion, change the s into z, as if written Mzion, Ja- 
zion, Dionizion, the z does not become zh : but Philislion, Gra- 
tion, Eurytion, Dotion, Androtion, Hippotion, Iphition, Orny- 
tion, Metion, Polytion, Stration, Sotion, JEantion, Pallantion, 
Mtion, Hippocration, and Amphyction, preserve the t in its true 
sound : Hephastion, however, from the frequency of appearing 
with Alexander, has deserted the small class of his Greek com- 
panions, and joined the English multitude, by rhyming with 
question ; and Tatian and Theodotion seem perfectly anglicised. 
With very, very few exceptions, therefore, it may be concluded, 
that Greek and Latin proper names are pronounced alike, 
and that both of them follow the analogy of English pronun- 
ciation. 

12. Ch. These letters before a vowel are always pronounced 
like k, as Chabrias, Colchis, &c ; but when they come before 
a mute consonant at the beginning of a word, as in Chthonia, 
they are mute, and the word is pronounced as if written Thonia. 
Words beginning with Sche, as Schedius, Scheria, &c. are pro- 



XXIV RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

nounced as if written Skedius, Skeria, &c. ; and c before n in 
the Latin praenomen Cneus, or Cn&us is mute ; so in Cnopus, 
Cnosus, &c. and before t in Cteatus, and g before n in Gnidus 
pronounced Nopus, Nosus, Teatus, and Nidus. 

13. At the beginning of Greek words we frequently find the 
uncombinable consonants MN, TM, &c. ; as Mnemosyne, Mne- 
aidamus, Mneus, Mnesteus, Tmolus, &c. These are to be pro- 
nounced with the first consonant mute, as if written Nemosyne, 
Nesidamus, Neus, Nesteus, Molus, &c. in the same manner as 
we pronounce the words Bdellium, Pneumatic, Gnomon, Mne- 
monics, &c. without the initial consonant. The same may be ob- 
served of the C hard like K, when it comes before T; as Ctesi- 
phon, Ctesippus, &c. Some of these words we see sometimes 
written with an e or i after the first consonant, as Menestius, Ti- 
molus, &c., and then the initial consonant is pronounced. 

14. Phj followed by a consonant, is mute, as Phthia, Phthio- 
tis, pronounced Thia, Thiotis, in the same manner as the natu- 
ralized Greek word Phthisick, pronounced Tisick. 

15. Ps: p is mute also in this combination, as in Psyche, 
Psammetichus, &c. pronounced Syke, Sammeticus, &c. 

16. Pt, p is mute in words beginning with these letters when 
followed by a vowel, as Ptolemy, Pterilas, &c. pronounced 
Tolemy, Terilas, &c. ; but when followed by /, the t is heard, 
as in Tlepolemus : for though we have no words of our own 
with these initial consonants, we have many words that end with 
them, and they are certainly pronounced. The same may be ob- 
served of the % in Zmilaces. 

17- The letters S, X, and Z, require but little observation, 
being generally pronounced as in pure English words. It may, 
however, be remarked, that 5, at the end of words, preceded by 
any of the vowels but e, has its pure hissing sound ; as mas, 
dis, as, mus, &c. but when e precedes, it goes into the sound 
of 2 ; as pes, Thersites, vates, &c. It may also be observed, 
that when it ends a word preceded by r or n it has the sound 
of z. Thus the letter s in metis, Mars, mors, &c. has the 
same sound as in the English words hens, stars, wars, &c. X 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXV 

when beginning a word or syllable, is pronounced like z ; as 
Xerxes, Xenophon, &c. are pronounced gerkzes, Zenophon, &c. 
Z is uniformly pronounced as in English words: thus the z 
in Zeno and Zeugma is pronounced as we hear it in zeal, zone, 
&c. 

Rules for ascertaining the English Quantity of Greek and 
Latin Proper Names. 

18. It may at first be observed, that in words of two sylla- 
bles, with but one consonant in the middle, whatever be the 
quantity of the vowel in the first syllable in Greek or Latin, we 
always make it long in English : thus Crates the philosopher, 
and crates a hurdle ; decus honour, and dedo to give ; ovo to 
triumph, and ovum an egg ; Numa the legislator, and Numen 
the divinity, have the first vowel always sounded equally long by 
an English speaker, although in Latin the first vowel in the first 
word of each of these pairs is short*. 

19- On the contrary, words of three syllables, with the ac- 
cent OH the first and with but one consonant after the first sylla- 
ble, have that syllable pronounced short, let the Greek or Latin 
quantity be what it will ; thus regulus and remora, mimicus and 
minium, are heard with the first vowel short in English pronuncia- 
tion, though the first word of each pair has its first syllable long 
in Latin : and the u in fumigo and fugito is pronounced long in 
both words, though in Latin the last u is short. This rule is 
never broken but when the first syllable is followed by e or i fol- 
lowed by another vowel : in this case the vowel in the first sylla- 
ble is long, except that vowel be i : thus lamia, genius, Libya, 
doceo, cupio, have the accent on the first syllable, and this syllable 
is pronounced long in every word but Libya, though in the origi- 
nal it is equally short in all. 

20. It must have frequently occurred to those who instruct 
youth, that though the quantity of the accented syllable of long 
proper names has been easily conveyed, yet that the quantity of 

* The only word occurring to me at present, where this rule is not observed, 
is Canon, a Rule, which is always pronounced like the word Cannon, a piece of 
ordnance. 



XXvi RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

the preceding unaccented syllables has occasioned some em- 
barrassment. An appeal to the laws of our own language would 
soon have removed the perplexity, and enabled us to pronounce 
the initial unaccented syllables with as much decision as the 
others. Thus every accented antepenultimate vowel but u, even 
when followed by one consonant only is, in our pronunciation of 
Latin, as well as in English, short : thus fabula, separo, diligo, 
nobilis, cucumis, have the first vowels pronounced as in the Eng- 
lish words, capital, celebrate, simony, solitude, luculent, in direct 
opposition to the Latin quantity, which makes every antepenul- 
timate vowel in all these words but the last long ; and this we 
pronounce long, though short in Latin. But if a semi-consonant 
diphthong succeed, then every such vowel is long but i in our 
pronunciation of both languages ; and Euganeus, Eugenia, Jilius, 
folium, dubia, have the vowel in the antepenultimate syllable 
pronounced exactly as in the English words satiate, menial, deli" 
nous, notorious, penurious; though they are all short in Latin 
but the f, which we pronounce short, though in the Latin it is 
long. 

21. The same rule of quantity takes place in those syllables 
which have the secondary accent : for as we pronounce lamenta- 
tion, demonstration, diminution, domination, lucubration, with 
every vowel in the first syllable short but u, so we pronounce 
the same vowels in the same manner in lamentatio, demonstratio, 
diminutio, dominatio, and lucubratio : but if a semi-consonant 
diphthong succeed the secondary accent, as in Ariovistus, Heli- 
odorus, Gabinianus, Herodianus, and Folusianus, every vowel 
preceding the diphthong is long but i; just as we should pro- 
nounce these words in the English words amiability, mediatorial, 
propitiation, excoriation, centuriator, &c. For the nature of 
the secondary accent, see Principles prefixed to the Critical Pro- 
nouncing Dictionary, No. 544. 

22. But to reduce these rules into a smaller compass, that 
they may be more easily comprehended and remembered, it 
may be observed, that as we always shorten every antepenulti- 
mate vowel with the primary accent but u, unless followed by 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXV11 

a semi-consonant diphthong, though this antepenultimate vowel 
is often long in Greek and Latin, as JEschylus, Mschines, &c. 
and the antepenultimate i, even though it be followed by such a 
diphthong : as Eleu&inia, Ocrysia, &c. so we shorten the first 
syllable of JEsculapiw, JEnobarbus, &c. because the first syl- 
lable of both these words has the secondary accent : but we pro- 
nounce the same vowels long in Ethiopia, Mgialeus, Halt- 
artus, &c. because this accent is followed by a semi-consonant 
diphthong. 

23. This rule sometimes holds good where a mute and liquid 
intervene, and determines the first syllable of Adrian, Adriatic, 
&c. to be long like ay, and not short like add: and it is on this 
analogical division of the words, so little understood or attended 
to, that a perfect and a consistent pronunciation of them de- 
pends. It is this analogy that determines the first u to be long 
in stupidus, and the y short in clypea, though both are short in 
the Latin ; and the o in the first syllable of Coriolanus, which is 
short in Latin, to be long in English. 

24. The necessity of attending to the quantity of the vowel in 
the accented syllable has sometimes produced a division of 
words in the following vocabulary, that does not seem to convey 
the actual pronunciation. Thus the words Sulpitius, Anicium, 
Artemisium, &c. being divided into Sulpit' i-us, A-nicf i-um, 
Ar-te-mis f i-um, &c. we fancy the syllable after the accent de- 
prived of a consonant closely united with it in sound, and 
which, from such a union, derives an aspirated sound, equiva- 
lent to sh. But as the sound of t, c, or s, in this situation, is so 
generally understood, it was thought more eligible to divide the 
words in this manner, than into Sul-pi' ti-us, A-ni' ci-um, Ar-te- 
mi' si-urn, as in the latter mode the i wants its shortening con- 
sonant, and might, by some speakers, be pronounced, as it ge- 
nerally is in Scotland, like ee. The same may be observed of c 
and g when they end a syllable, and are followed by e or i, as in 
Ac-e-ra' tus, Ac-i-da' li-a, Tig-el-li 1 nus, Teg'y-ra, &c. where 
the c and g ending a syllable, we at first sight think them to 
have their hard sound ; but, by observing the succeeding vowel 



XXviii RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

we soon perceive them to be soft, and only made to end a syl- 
lable in order to determine the shortness of the vowel which pre- 
cedes. 

25. The general rule therefore of quantity indicated by the 
syllabication adopted in the vocabulary is, that when a conso- 
nant ends a syllable, the vowel is always short, whether the accent 
be on it or not ; and that when a vowel ends a syllable with the 
accent on it, it is always long : that the vowel u, when it ends 
a syllable is long whether the accent be on it or not, and that 
the vowel i (S) (4) when it ends a syllable without the accent, is 
pronounced like e ; but if the syllable be final, it has its long 
open sound as if the accent were on it : and the same may be 
observed of the letter y. 

Rules for placing the accent of Greek and Latin Proper 

Names. 

26. Words of two syllables, either Greek or Latin, whatever 
be the quantity in the original, have, in English pronunciation, 
the accent on the first syllable : and if a single consonant come 
between two vowels, the consonant goes to the last syllable, 
and the vowel in the first is long; as Cato, Ceres, Comus, 
&c. See Principles of English Pronunciation prefixed to the 
Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 503, and the word 
Drama. 

27. Polysyllables, adopted whole from the Greek or Latin 
into English, have generally the accent of the Latin : that is, 
if the penultimate be long, the accent is on it, as Severus, 
Democedes, &c. ; if short, the accent is on the antepenultimate, 
as Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Posthumus, &c. See Intro- 
duction. 

28. When Greek or Latin Proper Names are anglicised, 
either by an alteration of the letters, or by cutting off the latter 
syllables, the accent of the original, as in appellatives under 
the same predicament, is transferred nearer to the beginning 
of the word. Thus Proserpina has the accent on the second 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXIX 

syllable ; but when altered to Proserpine, it transfers the accent 
to the first. The same may be observed of Homerus, Virgi- 
lius, Horatius, &c. when anglicised to Homer, Firgil, Horace, 
&c. See the word Academy, in the Critical Pronouncing Dic- 
tionary. 

29. As it is not very easy, therefore, so it is not necessary to 
decide where Doctors disagree. When reasons lie deep in 
Greek and Latin etymology, the current pronunciation will be 
followed, let the learned do all they can to hinder it : thus, after 
Hyperion has been accented by our best poets according to 
our own analogy with the accent on the antepenultimate, as 
Shakspeare : 

Hyperion's curls, the front of Jove himself." Hamlet. 

il that was to this 

" Hyperion to a Satyr." Ibid. 

" next day after dawn, 

4 * Doth rise and help Hyperion to his horse. Henry Vth. 

So Cooke, in his translation of Hesiod's Theogony, follows the 
accentuation of Shakspeare : 

Hyperion and Japhet, brothers, join ; "\ 

Thett and Rhea of this ancient line \ 

Descend ; and Themis boasts the source divine. 1 

The fruits of Thia and Hyperion rise, 
And with refulgent lustre light the skies. 

After this established pronunciation, I say, how hopeless, as 
well as useless, would it be to attempt the penultimate accentu- 
ation, which yet ought undoubtedly to be preserved in reading 
or speaking Greek or Latin compositions; but, in reading or 
speaking English, must be left to those who would rather appear 
learned than judicious. But Acrion, Arion, Amphion, Echion, 
Orion, Ixion, Pandion, Asion, Alphion, Mrion, Ophion, Me- 
thion, Axiori) Eion, Thlexion, and Sandion, preserve their penul- 
timate accent invariably: while Ethalion, a word of the same form 
and origin, is pronounced with the accent on the antepenultimate, 



XXX RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

like Deucalion and Pygmalion : and this, if I mistake not, is the 
common pronunciation of a ship in the British navy, so called 
from the name of the Argonaut, who accompanied Jason in his 
expedition to Colchis to fetch the golden fleece. 

30. The same difficulty of deciding between common usage 
and classical propriety appears in words ending in ia ; as 
Alexandria, Antiochia 9 Selemia, Samaria, Iphigenia, and several 
others which were pronounced by our ancestors, as appears from 
their poetry, according to our own analogy, with the accent on 
the antepenultimate syllable; and there is no doubt but every 
word of this form would have fallen into the same accentuation, 
if classical criticism had not stepped in and prevented it. A phi- 
losophical grammarian would be apt to think we are not much 
obliged to scholars for this interruption of the vernacular cur- 
rent of pronunciation : but as there is so plausible a plea as that 
of reducing words to their original languages, and as a know- 
ledge of these languages will always be an honourable distinction 
among men, it is strongly to be suspected that these words will 
not long continue in their plain homespun English dress. This 
critical correction, however, seems to have come too late for 
some words, which, as Pope expresses it, have " slid into verse," 
and taken possession of our ears ; and therefore, perhaps, the 
best way of disposing of them will be to consider them as the an- 
cients did the quantity of certain doubtful syllables, and to pro- 
nounce them either way. Some, however, seem always to have 
preserved the accent of their original language, as Thalia and 
Sophia : but Iphigenia, AntiQchia, Seleucia t and Samaria, have 
generally yielded to the English antepenultimate accent ; and 
Erythia, Deidamia, Laodamia f Hippodamia, Apamia, Ilithyia, 
and Orythia, from their seldom appearing in mere English 
composition, have not often been drawn aside into plain English 
pronunciation. The same may be observed of words ending 
in nicus or nice: if they are compounded of the Greek nun, 
the penultimate syllable is always long, and must have the ac- 
cent, as Stratonicus, Berenice) &c. ; if this termination be what 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES, XXXI 

is called a gentile, signifying a man by his country, the penulti- 
mate is short, and the accent is on the antepenultimate ; as Mace- 
donicus, Sardonicus, Britannicus, &c. See ANDRONICUS. 

31. Thus we see many of these proper names are of dubious 
accentuation : and the authorities which may be produced on 
both sides sufficiently show us the inutility of criticising beyond 
a certain point. It is in these as in many English words : 
there are some which, if mispronounced, immediately show a 
want of education ; and there are others which, though not 
pronounced in the most erudite manner, stamp no imputation 
of ignorance or illiteracy. To have a general knowledge, there- 
fore of the pronunciation of these words, seems absolutely ne- 
cessary for those who would appear respectable in the more re- 
spectable part of society. Perhaps no people on earth are so 
correct in their accentuation of proper names as the learned 
among the English. The Port-Royal Grammar informs us, 
that, " notwithstanding all the rules that can be given, we are 
" often under the necessity of submitting to custom, and of 
" accommodating our pronunciation to what is received among 
" the learned according to the country we are in." " So we 
" pronounce," says the grammarian, " Aristo' bulus, Basi' lius, 
" Ido' Hum, with the accent on the antepenultimate, though the 
" penultimate is long, because it is the custom : and, on the 
" contrary, we pronounce Andre? as, ide' a, Mari' a, &c. with the 
" accent on the penultimate, though it is short, because it is the 
" custom of the most learned. The Italians," continues he, " place 
" the accent on the penultimate of antonomasi' a, harmoni' a, 
" philosopM a, theologi' a, and similar words, according to the 
" Greek accent, because, as Ricciolus observes, it is the custom 
" of their country. Alvarez and Gretser think we ought always 
" to pronounce them in this manner, though the custom, not only 
" of Germany and Spain, but of all France, is against it : but 
" Nebrissensis authorizes this last pronunciation, and says, that it 
" is better to place the accent of these vowels on the antepenulti- 
" mate syllable ; which shows," concludes the grammarian, 
" that when we once depart from the ancient rules, we have but 



RULES FOR PROM OUN CING, &C. 

ft little certainty in practice, which is so different in different 



countries." 



But however uncertain and desultory the accentuation of many 
words may be, it is a great satisfaction to a speaker to know that 
they are so. There is a wide difference between pronouncing 
words of this kind ignorantly and knowingly. A person who 
knows that scholars themselves differ in the pronunciation of these 
words, can always pronounce with security: but one who is unac- 
quainted with the state of the accent, is not sure that he is right 
when he really is so, and always pronounces at his peril. 



* # * It is hoped the candid peruser of this work will make 
allowances for an occasional error in dividing a syllable, or 
placing an accent, when he reflects on the difficulty with which 
such a work must necessarily be attended. The Author flatten 
himself, however, that such attention has been paid both to the 
compilation and the proofs, that the fewest errors imaginable 
have escaped him. 



PRONUNCIATION 

OF 

GREEK and LATIN PROPER JVAMES. 
INITIAL VOCABULARY. 



*** When a word is succeeded by a word printed in Italics, the latter word 
is merely to spell the former as it ought to be pronounced. Thus Abansheas is 
the true pronunciation of the>preceding word Abantias ; and so of the rest. 

*** The Figures annexed to the words refer to the rules prefixed to the 
Work. Thus the figure (3) after Achcei refers to Rule the 3d, for the pronun- 
ciation of the final i; and the figure (4) after Abii refers to Rule the 4th, for 
the pronunciation of the unaccented i, not final; and so of the rest. 

*** When the letters Eng. are put after a word, it is to shew that this word 
is the preceding word Anglicised. Thus Lu'can, Eng. is the Latin word Lucn- 
nuSy changed into the English Lucun, 



AB AB AB 


A' BA and A' BJE 


A- ban' she- as 


A'bas(l) 


Ab'a-a 


Ab-an-ti'a-des(l) 


A-ba'sa(l)(7) 


Ab' a-ba 


A-ban' ti-das (4) 


Ab-a-si'tis (7) (1) 


Ab-a-ce'ne (8) 


A- ban' tis 


Ab-aa-se'na(l) (7) 


Ab' a-ga 


Ab-ar-ba' re-a (7) 


Ab-as-se' ni 


Ab'a-lus(20) 


Ab' a-ri (3) 


A-bas'sus (7) 


fA-ba' na (7) 


A-bar' i-mon (4) 


Ab'a-tos (7) 


A-ban' tes 


Ab'a-ris(7) 


Ab-da-lon'i-mus (4) 


A-ban'ti-as (10) 


A-ba'rus(l) 


Ab-de'ra(l)(7) 



* Every a ending a syllable, with the accent upon it, is pronounced like the 
a in the English words fa-vour, ta-per t &c. See Rule the 1st, prefixed to this 
Vocabulary. 

f Every unaccented , whether initial, medial, or final, ending a syllable, has 
an obscure sound, bordering on the a in father. See Rule the 7th, prefixed to 
this Vocabulary, 

B 



AB 



AC 



AC 



Ab-de' ri-a(l) (4)(7) Ab-u-li' tes (1) ' Ac' e-la (24) 


Ab-de-ri'tes (1) j Ab-y-de'ni (6) Ac-e-ra' tus (27) 


Ab-de' rus (1) Ab-y-de'nus (6) 


A-cer' bas 


A-be' a-taa (7) ( 1) (5) A-by' di (6) 


Ac-e-ri'na (1) 


A-bel'la(7) A-by'dos(6) 


A-cer' rae (4) 


Ab-el-li' nus 


A-b>'dus 


Ac-er-sec' o-mes 


A'bi-a (1) (4) (7) 


Ab'y-la(6) 


A'ces(7) 


A-ben'da (7) 


Ab'y-lon (6) 


A-ce'si-a (10) 


Ab'ga-rus 


Ab-ys-si'ni (1) 


Ac-e-si' nes ( I ) 


A' !;i-i (4) 


Ab-ys-sin'i-a (6) 


Ac-e-si' nus (1) 


Ab'i-la(4)(7) 


Ac-a-cal' lis (7) 


A-ce' si-us (10) 


A-bis'a-res (7) 


Ac-a-ce' si-um ( 10) 


A-ces' ta (7) 


A-bis'a-ris(7) 


Ak-a-se' zhe-um 


A-ces' tes 


Ab-i-son'tes (4) 


A-ca'ci-us (10) 


A-ces' ti-um (10X 


Ab-le'tes (1) 


A-ka f she-us 


A-ces-to-do' rus 


A-bob' ri-ca (4) 


Ac-a-de' mi-a (7) 


A-ces-tor' i-des 


A -bo' bus 


Ac-a-de' mus 


A-ce' tes 


A-boec'ri-tus (5) 


Ac-a-lan' drus 


*Ach-a-b/tos (12) 


Ab-o-la'ni(3) 


A-cal' le (8) 


A-cha/ a (7) 


A-bo'lus(7)(l) 


A-ca-mar' chis (7) 


A-chaj' i (3) 


Ab-on-i -tei' chos (5) 


Ac' a- mas (7) 


A-cha/ i-um 


Ab~o-ra'ca (1) (7) 


A-camp'sis (7) 


A^chaem' e-nes 


Ab-o-rig'i-nes (4) 


A-cau'tha (7) 


Ach-ae-me' ni-a 


A-bor'ras(7) 


A -can' thus (7) 


Ach-ae-men' i-des 


Ab-ra-da' tas ' 


Ac'a-ra (7) 


A-chae' us 


Ab-ra-da' tes 


A-ca'ri-a (7) 


A-cha'i-a(7) 


A-bren' ti-us (10) 


Ac-ar-na' ni-a (7) Ach' a-ra (7) 


A-broc' o-mas 


A-car'nas (7) Ach-a-ren' ses 


Ab-rod-i-ae' tus (4) 


A-cas' ta (7) i A-char' naa (4) 


A-bro' ni-us (4) 


A-cas'tus(7) A-cha' tes 


A-bron'y-cus (6) 


Ac-a-than' tus (7) | Ach-e-lo' i-des (4) 


Ab'ro-ta(7) 


Ac' ci-a (10) (7) Ach-e-lo' ri-um 


A-brot' o-num | Akf she-a 


Ach-e-lo' us 


A-bryp' o-lis (6) 


Ac'ci-la (7) A-cher'dus 


Ab-se' us 


Ac' ci-us (10) i A-cher' i-mi (3) (4) 


Ab*sin' thi-i (4) 


Ak' she-us \ Ach' e-ron 


Ab' so-rus 


Ac'cu-a (7) 


Ach-e-ron' ti-a (10) 


Ab-syr' tos (6) 


A'ce(8) 


Ach-e-ru' si-a (11) 


Ab syr'tus (6) 


Ac-e-di'ci (3) (24) 


Ach-e-ru' si-as (11) 



* Achabytos. CA, in this and all the subsequent words, have the sound of k, 
Thus Achabytos, Achcea, Achates, 5fc. are pronounced as if written Akabytos. 
Akaa, Akutts, &c. See Rule the 12th. 



AC AD TEA 3 


A-che' tus 


A-cra' tus 


Ad' a-mas 


A-chil'las 


A'cri-as (4) 


Ad-a-mas'tus 


A-chil' le-us 


Ac-ri-doph'a-gi (3) 


A-das' pi-i (4) 


Ach-il-le'a(7) 


A-cri'on (11) 


Ad'a-tha 


Ach-il-lei-ei/ ses 


Ac-ris-i-o'ne 


Ad-de-pha' gi-a 


Ach-il-le' is 


Ac-ris-i-o-ne' us 


Ad'du-a(7) 


A-chil'les 


Ac-ris-i-o-ni' a-des 


A-del' phi-us 


Ach-il-le'um 


A-cris'e-us (10) 


A-de' mon 


A-chi' vi (4) 


A-cri'tas (1) 


A'des, or Ha' des 


Ach-la-dae' us 


Ac-ro-a' thon 


Ad-gan-des' tri-us 


Ach-o-la'i (3) 


Ac-ro-ce-rau' ni-um 


Acl-her' bal 


Ac-ra-di'na (7) 


Ac-ro-co-rin' thus 


Ad-her' bas 


Ach-o-lo'e 


A'cron (1) 


Ad-i-an'te (S) 


Ach-ra-di' na 


Ac-ro-pa'tos 


A-di-at'o-rix 


Ac-i-cho' ri-us 


A-crop' o-lis 


Ad-i-man' tus 


Aoi-da' li-a (8) 


Ac'ro-ta 


Ad-me'ta (7) 


Ac-i-da' sa 


A-crot' a-tus 


Ad-i-me' te 


A-cil'i-a 


Ac-ro' tho-os 


Ad-me' tus 


Ac-i-lig' e-na (24) Ac' ta (7) 


A-do' ni-a 


A-cii'i-us Ac-tae'a (7) 


A-do'nis 


A-cir la (7) Ac-tae' on (4) 


Ad-ra-myt' ti-um 


A'cis 


Ac-tae'us (4) 


A-dra'na (7) (1) 


Ac' mon 


Ac'te (8) 


A-dra'num 


Ac-mon'i-des (4) 


Ac'ti-a(lO) 


A-dras' ta 


A-coe' tes 


Ac' tis 


A-dras' ti-a 


A-co' nas (4) 


Ac-tis' a-ues 


A-dras' tus 


A-con' tes 


Ac'ti-um (10) 


A' dri-a (23) 


A- cor/ te-us 


Ac' ti-us (10) 


A-dri-a' num 


A-con' ti-us (10) ! Ac' tor 


A-dri-at'i-cum 


A-con-to-bi/ ius Ac- tor' i-des 


A-dri-an-oj/ o-lis 


A-co' ris Ac-to' ris 


A-dri-a' nus 


A' era 


A-cu' phis 


A' dri-an (Eng.) 


A'crae 


A-cu-si-la' us 


Ad-ri-me'tum 


A-crse' a (7) i A-cu' ti-cus, M. 


Ad-u-al' i-ci (4) 


A-cra?ph'ni-a (7) ; A' da (7) 


A-dyr-ma-chi'dae 


Ac-ra-gal-li'dae (4) A-da/us 


*^'a(7) 


Ac' ra-gas (7) ' Ad-a-man-tae' a (7) 


jfE-a-ce'a 



* JEa. The diphthong is merely ocular, for the a has no share in the sound, 
though it appears in the type. Indeed as we pronounce the a, there is no middle 
sound between that letter and e, and therefore we have adopted the last vowel, 
and relinquished the first. This, among other reasons, makes it probable that the 
Greeks and Romans pronounced the a as we do in water, and the e as \ve hear it 

U 2 



4 JEG JEG JEN 


JE-ac'i-das 


-^E-ge' le-on 


JE'gus 


-ZE-ac' i-des 


j?E-ge' ri-a 


^E'gy (6) 


fit! a-cus 


^E-ges' ta 


-Eg-y-pa' nes 


.ZE'ae 


-/E-ge' us 


JE-gyp'sus 


JE-a/a 
.ZE-an-te' um 


^E-gi' a-le 
^1-gi-aMe-us (22) 


^-gyp'ti-i (4) (10). 
JE-gyp' ti-um (10) 


.ZE-an'ti-des 


^E-gi-a'li-a (22) (4) 


JE-gyp' tus 


jiE-an' tis 


^E-gi'a-lus 


IE! li-a 


^S'as 


^E-gi' des 


^E-li-a'nus 


IE! a-tus 


^E-gi'la 


M' li-an (Eng) 


JEch-mac'o-ras 


^E-gil'i-a 


#yii-us and IE! li-a 


JEch'mis 


-^-gim'i-us 


JE-lu'rus 


.ZE-dep' sum 


^Eg-i-mo'rus 


^-mil' i-a 


JE-des' sa 


^-gi'na 


JB)-mil-i-a'nus 


^-dic' u-la 


.ZEg-i-ne' ta 


^E-mil' i-us 


Jvdi' les (8) 


^Eg-i-ne'tes 


.ZEm-nes'tus 


JE-dip' sus 


^1-gi'o-chus 


IE! mon 


^E'don 


j3E-gi' pan 


JEm' o-na 


JE'du-i, or Hed'u-i 


JE-gi'ra 


.ZE-mo'ni-a 


.ZE-el' lo 


^E-gir-o-es' sa 


JE- mon' i-des 


^-e' ta 


*^E' gis 


2ES mus 


jE-e'ti-as (10) 


jE-gis' thus 


JEt-myYi-a 


JE'ga 


^E-gi' turn 


^-myl-i-a' nus 


^E-ge' as 


^'gi-um 


-^E-myl'i-i (4) 


jE'gae(5) 


Mfk 


jE-myl'i-us 


.flE-gae' as 


JEg'les 


^E-nu'ri-a 


^-gae' on 


^E^-le' tes 


^E-ne' a 


./E-gae' um 


^Eg'lo-ge 


JE-ne' a-des 


^E-gae' us 


iE-gob' o-lus 


^E-ne'a-dse 


^E-ga' le-os 


JEi-goc f e-ros 


^E ne'as 


JE-ga' le-um 


jE'gon 


JE-ne'i-a 


^E'gan 


^E'gos pot'a-mos 


^E-ne'is 


^'gas (5) 


^Eg-o-sa' gas 


^-ne x i-des (4) 


^E-ga' tes 


jE-gos' the-na 


./E-nes-i-de' mus 



in where and then ; the middle or mixt sound then would be like o in father, 
which was probably the sound they gave to this diphthong. 

* JEgis. This diphthong, though long in Greek and Latin, is in English pro- 
nunciation either long or short, according to the accent or position of it. Thus, 
if it immediately precedes the accent, as in JEgeus, or with the accent on it, be- 
fore a single consonant, in a word of two syllables, it is long, as in JEgis; before 
two consonants it is short, as in JEgles ; or before one only, if the accent be on 
the antepenultimate, as ASropus. For the exceptions to this rule, see Rule 22, 



JES AG AG 5 


&-ne' si-us (10) 


-3E-se' pus 


Ag-a-me' tor 


JE-ne' tus 


^E-ser' ni-a 


Ag-a m- nes' tor 


M' ni-a 


^-si'on (11) 


Ag-a-nip' pe 


JE-ni' a-cus 


JE'son 


A-gan za-ga 


^E-ni'o-chi (12) 


.S-son' i-des 


Ag-a-pe' no 


JEn-o-bar' bus (22) 


^E-so' pus 


Ag-a-re'ni (3) 


JEn' o-cles 


M' sop (Eng.) 


Ag-a-ris'ta 


JE'nos 


^s ; tri-a 


A-gas' i-cles 


^E'num 


Ms' u-a 


A-gas' sae 


^E-ny'ra 


JE-sy' e-tes 


A-gas'the-nes 


JE-o'li-a 


j aEs-ym-ne / tes(21) 


A -gas' thus 


JE-o' li-as 


M-sym' nus 


A-gas'tro-phus 


^-ol'i-da 


^E-thal' i-des 


Ag' a-tha 


JE-ol' i-des 


JE-thi-o' pi-a (22) 


Ag-ath-ar' chi-das 


^E'o-lis 


^Eth'li-us 


Ag-ath-ar' chi-des 


jE'o-lus 


JB'thon 


Ag-ath-ar / cus 


^i'o-ra 


M' thra 


A-ga' thi-as 


^E-pa'li-us 


JE-thu'sa 


Ag'a-tho 


JE-pe'a 


^E'ti-a(lO) 


A-gath-o-cle'a 


^Ep'u-lo (21) 


-aS'ti-on(ll) 


A-gath'o-cles 


IE' py (6) 


J aE'ti-us*(10) 


Ag'a-thon 


jflEp'y-tus (21) 


JEt'na 


A-gath-o-ny' mus 


,E-qua' na (7) 


^-toMi-a 


Ag-a-thos' the-nes 


^'qui (3) 


JE-to' lus 


Ag-a-thyr 7 num 


.ZE-quic' o-li 


A'fer 


Ag-a-thyr'si (3) 


^q-ui-me' li-um 


A-fra' ni-a 


A-ga' ve 


I! ri-as 


A-fra' ni-us 


A-gau'i(3) 


^Er'o-pe 


Af'ri-ca(7) 


A-ga' vus 


^r' o-pus 


Af-ri-ca' nus 


Ag-des' tis 


jSSs' a-cus 


Af ri-cum 


Ag-e-e' na 


^E-sa' pus 


A-gag-ri-a' nae 


Ag-e-las' tus 


JE'sar, or ^E-sa'ras 


Ag-a-las' ses 


Ag-e-la' us 


lEd chi-nes (22) 


A-galMa(7) 


A-gen' a-tha 


.ZEs'chi-ron (12) 


A-gam' ma-tse 


Ag-en-di' cum 


JEs-chy-li 7 des 


Ag-a-me' des 


A-ge' nor 


JEs'chy-lus (21) 


Ag-a-mem' non 


Ag-e-nor' i-des 


JEs-cu-la 7 pi-us (22) 


Ag-a-mem-no' ni-us 


Ag-e-ri' nus 



* One of the G enerals of Valentinian the Third ; which Labbe tells us, ought 
properly to be written Aetius; that is, without the diphthong. We may observe, 
that as this word conies from the Greek, but is latinized, it is pronounced with 
the t like sh, as if written JEshius; but the preceding word JEtion, being pure 
Greek, does not confirm to this analogy. See Rule the llth and 29th. 



6 AG AL AL 


Ag-e-san 7 der 


Ag-ri-gen 7 tum 


A-las 7 tor 


A-ge'si-as(lO) 


A-grin 7 i-um 


Al 7 a-zon 


Ag-es-i-la 7 us 


A-gi i-o' ni-a 


Al'baSyl'vi-us 


Ag-e-sip 7 o-Iis 


A-gri 7 o-pas 


Al-ba 7 ni-a 


Ag-e-sis 7 tra-ta 


A-gri 7 o-pe 


Al-ba 7 nus 


Ag-e-sis 7 tra-tus 


A-grip 7 pa 


Al-bi 7 ci (3) (4) 


Ag-gram' mes 


Ag-rip-pi 7 na 


Al-bi-e 7 ta3 (4) 


Ag-gri 7 nae 


A-gris 7 o-pe (8) 


Al-bi' ni (3) 


Ag' i-d<e 


A 7 gri-us ( 1 ) 


Al-bi-no-va 7 nus 


Ag-i-la 7 us 


Ag 7 ro-las 


Al-bin-te-me 7 li-um 


A'gis 


A 7 gron 


Al-bi 7 nus 


Ag-la'i-a 


A-gro 7 tas 


Al 7 bi-on 


Ag-lay'a 


A-grot 7 e-ra 


Al 7 bi-us 


Ag-la-o-ni 7 ce 


A-gyl'e-us (5) 


Al-bu-cil 7 la 


Ag-la 7 o-pe 


A- g yi 7 la 


Al 7 bu-la 


Ag-la-o-phae' na 


Ag-yl-lae 7 us 


Al-bu 7 ne-a 


Ag-la 7 o-phon 


A-g> 7 rus 


Al-bur 7 nus 


Ag-la-os 7 the-nes 


A-gyr 7 i-um 


Al 7 bus Pa'gus 


Ag-lau' ros 


A-gyr 7 i-us 


Al-bu 7 ti-us (10) 


Ag-la 7 us 


A-gyr 7 tes 


Al-cae 7 us 


Ag 7 na 


A-ha 7 la(7) 


Al-cam 7 e-nes 


Ag'no 


A 7 jax 


Al can 7 der 


Ag-nod' i-ce 


A-i-do 7 ne-us (5) 


Al-can 7 dre 


Ag' non 


A-im 7 y-lus 


Al-ca 7 nor 


Ag-non 7 i-des 


A-i'us Lo-cu'ti-us 


Al-cath 7 o-e 


Ag-o-ua' li-a, and 


Al-a-ban 7 da 


Al-cath 7 o-us 


A-go' ni-a 


Al'a-bus 


Al'ce 


A-go 7 nes 


A-la3 7 a 


Al-ce 7 nor 


Ag 7 o-nis 


A-las'i (3) 


Al-ces 7 te 


A-go 7 ni-us 


A-lae 7 sa 


Al-ces 7 tis 


Ag-o-rac 7 ri-tus 


A-lae 7 us 


Al 7 ce-tas 


Ag-o-ran 7 o-mi (3) 


Al-a-go 7 ni*a 


Ai 7 chi-das(12) 


Ag-o-ra 7 nis 


A-la 7 la 


Al-chim 7 a-cus 


Ag-o-rae 7 a 


Al-al-com 7 e-nae 


Al-ci-bi' a-des (4) 


A'gra(l) 


A-la 7 li-a(7) 


Al-cid 7 a-mas 


A-gr* 7 i(3) 


Al-a-ma 7 nes 


Al-ci-da-me 7 a 


Ag 7 ra-gas 


Al-a-man 7 ni, or Al-ci-dam 7 i-das 


A-grau 7 le 


Al-e-man'ni Al-cid 7 a-mus 


A-grau 7 li-a 


A-la 7 ni Al-ci'das 


A-grau 7 los 


Al 7 a-res ;Al-ci 7 des 


Ag-rau-o-ni 7 tae 


Al-a-ri 7 cus Al-cid 7 i-ce 


A-gri-a 7 nes 


Al' a-ric (Eng.) Al-cirh 7 e-de 


A-gric 7 o-la 


Al-a-ro 7 di-i (3) (4) Al-cim 7 e-don 



AL AL AL 7 


Al-cin/ e-nes 


A-le' mon 


Al-ex-i' nus 


Al' ci-mus 


Al-e-rnu' si-i (4) 


A-lex'i-o 


Al-cin'o-e 


A' lens 


A-lek'she-o 


Al' ci-nor 


A'le-on 


Al-ex-ip'pus 


*Al-cin' o-us 


A-le'se 


Al-ex-ir' a-es 


Al-ci-o' ne-us (5) 


A-le'si-a (10) 


Al-ex-i i 7 ho-e 


Al' ci-phron 


A-le'si-um (10) 


A -lex' is 


Al-cip'pe 


A-le'tes 


A-lex' on 


Al-cip'pus 


A-le'thes 


Al-fa-ter' na 


Al'cis 


A-le'thi-a 


Al-fe' nus 


Al-cith'o-e 


A-let' i-das 


Al'gi-dum 


Alc-mse'on 


A-le' tri-um 


A-H-ac'mon 


Alc-mae-on' i-day 


A-le' turn 


A-li-ar'tum 


Ale' man 


Al-eu-a' das 


A-li-ar'tus 


Alc-me' na 


A-le' us 


Al'i-cis 


Al-cy' o-ne 


A'lex (1) 


A-li-e'nus (21) 


Al-cy-o' ne-us (5) 


A-lex-a-me' nus 


Al'i-fffi 


Al-cy' o-na 


JAl-ex-an'der 


Al-i-lae' i (3) (4) 


Al-des'cus 


Al-ex-an' dra 


Al-i-mer/ tus 


Al-du' a-bis 


Al-ex-an-dri'a^O) 


A-lin'daa 


A'le-a (1)(7) 


Al-ex-an'dri-des 


A-lin-do'i-a 


A-le'bas 


Al-ex-an-dri' na 


Al-i-phe' ri-a 


A-le' bi-on 


Al-ex-an-drop' o-lis 


Al-ir-ro' thi-us 


A-lec' to 


Al-ex-a' nor 


Al'li-a 


A-lec' tor 


Al-ex-ar'chus 


Al-li-e'nos 


A-lec' try-on 


A-lex' as 


Al-lob' ro-ges 


A-lec' tus 


A-lex' i-a 


Al-lob'ry-ges 


fA-le'i-us Cam' pus 


Jl-hk' she-a 


Al-lol' ri-ges 


Al-e-man' ni 


A-lex-ic' a-cus 


Al-lu'ti-us (10) 



* Alcinous. There are no words more frequently mispronounced by a mere 
English scholar than those of this termination. By such a one we sometimes 
hear Alcinous and Antinous pronounced in three syllables, as if written Al-ci-nouz, 
and An-ti-nouz, rhyming with vows; but classical pronunciation requires that 
these vowels should form distinct syllables. 

f Aleius Campus. 

Lest from this flying steed unrein'd (as once 
Bellerophon, though from a lower clime) 
Dismounted, on th' Aldan field I fall, 
Erroneous there to wander, and forlorn. 

MILTON'S Par. Lost, b. vii. v. 17. 

i Alexander. This word is as frequently pronounced with the accent on th* 1 
first as on the third syllable. 



8 AM AM 


A-lo'a 


Am-al-the'um 


Al-o-e' us 


Am' a-na 


Al-o-i'dae 


A-man' tes 


Al-o-i' des 


Am-an-ti'ni (3) 


A-lo'ne 


A-ma' nus 


Al' o-pe 


A-mar' a-cus 


A-lop' e-ce 


A-mar'di(3) 


A-lop' e-ces 


A-mar' tus 


A-lo'pi-us 


Am-bryl'lis 


A'los 


Am-ar-yn'ce-us (5) 


A-lo'ti-a(lO) 


Am-ar-yn'thus 


Al-pe' nus 


A' mas 


Al'pes 


A-ma'si-a (10) 


Alps (Eng.) 


Am-a-se' nus 


Al-phe'a 


A-ma' sis 


Al-phe' i-a 


A-mas' tris 


Al-phe' nor 


A-mas' trus 


Al-phe' nus 


A-ma' ta 


Al-phe-si-boe' a (5) 


Am-a-the' a 


Al-phe-si-bce' us 


Ani'a-thus 


Al-phe' us 


A-max-am-pe' us 


Al' phi- us 


A-max' i-a 


Al-phi'on(29) 


A-max' i-ta 


Al-pi'nus 


Am-a-ze' nes 


Al'pis 


A-maz'o-nes 


Al' si-urn (10) 


Am' a-zons (Eng.) 


Al'sus 


Am- a-zon'i-des 


Al-thaj'a 


Am-a^zo' ni-a 


Al-thaem' e-nes 


Am-a-zo' ni-um 


Al-ti' num 


Am -a-zo' ni-us 


Al'tis 


Am-ba/ ri (3) 


A-lun'ti-um(lO) 


Am' be-nus 


A'lus, Al'u-us 


Am-bar-va' li-a 


A-ly-at' tes 


Am-bi-a-li' tes 


Al'y-ba(6) 


Am-bi-a' num 


Al-y-cai' a 


Am-bi-a-ti'num 


Al-y-cae' us 


Am-bi-ga' tus 


A-lys' sus 


Am-bi' o-rix 


Al-yx-oth' o-e 


Am' bla-da 


A-mad' o-ci (3) 


Am-bra'ci-a (10) 


A-mad' o-cus 


Am-bra' ci-us (10) 


Am' a-ge 


Am' bri (3) 


Am-al-thae' a | Am-bro' nes 



AM 

Am-bro'si-a(lO) 
Am-bro' si-us (10) 
Am-bry' on 
Am-brys' sus 
Am-bul'li(3) 
Am' e-les 
Am-e-na' nus 
Am-e-ni' des 
A-men' o-cles 
A-me' ri-a 
A-mes' tra-tus 
A-mes' tris 
A-mic' las 
Am-ic-lae' us 
A-mic-lae' us 
A-mic' tas 
A-mi'da(3) 
A-mil'car 
Am' i-los (4) 
A-mim'o-ne, or 

A-mytn' o-ne 
A-min'e-a, or 

Am-min'e-a 
A-min'i-as 
A-min'i-us 
A-min' o-cles 
Am-i-se' na 
A-mis'i-as (10) 
A-mis'sas 
A-mi' sum 
A-mi' sus 
Am-i-ter' num 
Am-i-tha'on, or 

Am-y-tha' on 
Am-ma' lo 
Am-mi-a'nus 
Am' mon 
Am-mo'ni-a 
Am-mo'ni-i (3) 
Am-mo' ni-us 
Am-mo' the-a 
Am' ni-as 
Am-ni' sus (3) 



AM AN AN $ 


Am-oe-bae'us (5) 


Am-phis' the-nes 


A-na'cre-on (23) 


Am-o-me' tus 


Am-phis-ti' des 


An-ac-to'ri-a 


A'mor (1) 


Am-phis' tra-tus 


An-ac-to' ri-um 


A -mor' ges 


Am-phit'e-a 


j-An-a-dy-om' e-ne 


A-mor' gos 


Am-phith'e-mis 


A-nag' ni-a 


Am'pe-lus 


Am-phith'o-e 


An-a-gy-ron' turn 


Am-pe-lu'si-a 


Am-phi-tri'te (8) 


An-a-i' tis 


Am-phe' a (7) 


Am-phit' ry-on 


An' a-phe 


Am-phi-a-la' us 


Am' phi-tus 


An-a-phlys' tus 


Am-phi'a-nax 


Am-phot'e-rus 


A-na' pus 


Am-phi-a-ra'us 


Am-phot-ry-o-ni' a- 


A-nar' tes 


Am-phi-ar'i-des 


des 


A'nas(l) 


Am-phic' ra-tes 


Am-phry' sus 


An'cho-ra 


Am-phic' ty-on (1 1) 


Amp' sa-ga 


A-nat' o-le 


Am-phic- le' a 


Am-pys'i-des 


A-nau' chi-das (12) 


Am-phid' a-mus 


Am' pyx 


A-nau' rus 


Am-phi-dro' mi-a 


Am-sac' tus 


A'nax(l) 


Am-phi-ge' ni-a, or 


A-mu'li-us 


An-ax-ag' o-ras 


*Am-phi-ge-ni'a(29) 


A-myc' la 


An-ax-an' der 


Am-phil' o-chus 


A-myc' Ise 


An-ax-an'dri-des 


Am-phil' y-tus 


Am'y-cus 


An-ax-ar' chus (12) 


Am-phim' a-chus 


Am' y-don 


An-ax-ar' e-te 


Am-phim' e-don 


Am-y-mo' ne 


An-ax-e'nor 


Am-phin'o-me 


A-myn' tas 


A-nax'i-as (10) 


Am-phin'o-mus 


A-myn-ti-a' nus 


An-ax-ib'i-a 


Am -phi' on (28) 


A-myn' tor 


An-ax-ic' ra-tes 


Am-phip'o-les 


A-my' ris 


An- ax-id' a-mus 


Am-phip' o-lis 


A-myr'i-us 


A-nax'i-las (10) 


Arn-phip'y-ros 


Am'y-rus 


A-nax-i-la' us 


Am-phi-re' tus 


A-mys'tis 


An-ax-il' i-des 


Am-phir' o-e 


Am-y-tha' on 


An-ax-i- man' der 


Am' phis 


Am' y-tis 


An-ax-im'e-nes 


Am-phis-bae' na 


An' a-ces 


An-ax-ip' o-lis 


Am-phis' sa 


An-a-char' sis 


An-ax-ip' pus 


Am-phis-se' ne 


A-na'ci-um (10) 


An-ax-ir'ho-e 


Am-phis' sus 


A-nac're-on, or 


A-nax' is 



* Amphigenia. See Iphigenia, and Rule 30, prefixed to this Vocabulary. 

t This epithet from the Greek waXvu emergens, signifying rising out of the 
water, is applied to the picture of Venus rising out of the sea, as originally 
painted by Apelles. I doubt not that some, who only hear this word without 
seeing it written, suppose it to mean Anno Domini, the year of our Lord. 



10 AN AN 


AN 


A-nax'o 


An' des 


*An-dro-ni' cus (28) 


An-ca?' us 


An-doc' i-des 


: An-droph' a-gi (3) 


An-ca-li' tes 


An-dom' a-tis 


An-dro-pom' pus 


An-ca' ri-us 


An-drae' mon 


; An' dros 


An-cha'ri-a (7) 


An-dra-ga'thi-us 


An-dros' the-nes 


An-cha' ri-us 


An-drag' a-thus 


An-dro' tri-on 


An-chem' o-lus 


An-drag' o-ras 


An-e-lon' tis 


An-che-si' tes 


An-dram' y-tes 


i An-e-ras' tus 


An-ches' mus 


An-dre' as 


An-e-mo' li-a 


An-chi' a-la 


An' drew (Eng.) 


! An-e-mo'sa 


An-chi' a-le 


An'dri-clus 


An-fin' o-mus 


An-chi' a-lus 


An' dri-on 


An-ge'li-a 


An-chi-mo'H-us 


An-dris' cus 


An-ge'li-on 


An-chin'o-e 


An-dro' bi-us 


An'ge-lus 


An-chi' ses 


An-dro-cle'a 


An gi'tes 


An-chis'i-a(ll) 


An'dro-cles 


i An'grus 


An-chi-si'a-des An-dro-cli'des 


An-gu-it'i-a(ll)(24) 


An' cho-e 


An-dro' clus 


A' ni-a (7) 


An-chu'rus 


An-dro-c/des 


An-i-ce' tus 


An-ci'le 


An-drod'a-mus 


A-nic'i-a (10) 


An' con 


An-dro' ge-os 


A-nic' i-um (24) 


An-co' na 


An-dro' ge-us 


A-nic'i-us Gal'lus 


An'cus Mar'ti-us 


An-drog' y-nae 


An' i-grus 


An-c/le 


An-dro rn' a-che 


A' ni-o, and A' ni-en 


An-cy' 1 33 


An-drom-a-chi' dae 


An-i-tor' gis 


An' da 


An-drom' a-chus 


A' ni-us 


An-dab' a-tae 


An-drom' a-das 


An' na 


Ail-da' ni-a 


An-drom' e-da 


An-ni-a'nus 


An-de-ca' vi-a 


An' dron 

#> 


An' ni-bal 



* Andronicus. This word is uniformly pronounced by our prosodists with the 
penultimate accent : and yet so averse is an English ear to placing the accent on 
the penultimate t, that by all English scholars we hear it placed upon the ante- 
penultimate syllable. That this was the pronunciation of this word in Queen 
Elizabeth's time, appears plainly from the tragedy of Titus Andronicus, said to 
be written by Shakspeare; in which we every where find the antepenultimate 
pronunciation adopted. It may indeed be questioned, whether Shakspeare's 
learning extended to a knowledge of the quantity of this Gra?co-Latin word ; 
but, as Mr. Steevens has justly observed, there is a greater number of classical 
allusions in this play than are scattered over all the rest of the performances on 
which the seal of Shakspeare is indubitably fixed; and therefore it may be pre- 
sumed that the author could not be ignorant of the Greek and Latin pronuncia- 
tion of this word, but followed the received English pronunciation of his time ; 
and which by all but professed scholars is still continued. See Stophronicus. 



AN AN AP 11 


An'ni-bi(3)(4) 


An-thro-pi' nus 


An-ti ph'i-lus 


An-nic'e-ris (24) An-thro-poph'a-gi 


An' ti-phon 


An'non An-tbyl'la 


An-tiph' o-nus 


An-o-pae'a 


An-ti-a-ni ra 


An' ti-phus 


An' ser 


An'ti-as (10) 


An-ti-poe' nus (5) 


An-si-ba' ri-a 


An-ti-cle' a 


An-tip' o-lis 


An-tae'a 


An' ti cles 


An-tis' sa 


An-tae'as 


An-ti-cli' des 


An-tis' the-nes 


An-tae' us 


An-tic' ra-gus 


An-tis' ti-nus 


An-tag' o-ras 


An-tic'ra-tes 


An-tith'e-us 


An-tal'ci-das 


An-tic' y-ra 


An'ti-um (10) 


An-tan' der 


An-tid'o-tus 


An-tom' e-nes 


An-tan' dros 


An-tid'o-mus 


An-to' ni-a 


An-ter-bro'gi-us 


An-tig'e-nes 


An-to' ni-i (3) (4) 


An-te' i-us 


An-ti-gen' i-das 


An-to-m' na 


An-tem' nae 


An-tig'o na 


An-to-ni' nus 


An-te' nor 


An-tig' o-ne 


An-to-ni-op' o-lis 


An-te-nor'i-des 


An-ti-go' ni-a 


An-to' ni-us, M. 


An' te-ros 


An-tig' o-nus 


An-tor'i-des 


An-the' a 


An-til' co 


A-nu' bis 


An' the-as 


An-ti-lib' a-nus 


An' xi-us 


An-the' don 


An-til' o-chus 


An' xur 


An-the' la 


An-tim' a-chus 


An'y-ta 


An' the-mis 


An-tim' e-nes 


An' y-tus 


An' the-mon 


An-ti-noe' i-a (5) 


An-za' be (8) 


An' the- in us 


An-ti-nop'o-Hs 


A-ob' ri-ga 


An-the-mu'si-a (10) 


An-tin' o-us 


A-ol' li-us 


An-the' ne 


An-ti-o' chi-a, or 


A' on 


An-ther' mus 


*An-ti-o-chi' a (29) A' o-nes 


An' thes 


A n' ti-och (Eng.) A-o' ris 


An-thes-pho' ri-a 


An-ti' o-chis 


A-or' nos 


An-thes-te' ri-a 


An-ti' o-chus 


A-o'ti 


An' the-us 


An-ti' o-pe (8) A-pa'i-ta? 


An-thi' a 


An-ti-o' rus ! A-pa' ma (7) 


An' thi-as 


An-tip'a-ter A-pa' me (8) 


An' thi-um 


An-ti-pa' tri-a Ap-a-me' a 


An' thi-us 


An-ti-pat' ri-das Ap-a-mi' a 


An' tho 


An-tip' a-tris A-par'ni 


An-tho' res 


An-tiph'a-nes Ap-a-tu'ri-a 


An-thra'ci-a (10) 


An-tiph' a-tes Ap-e-au' ros 



* Antiuchia. For words of this termiuatioij|j|ee Iphigtnia, and No. 3() of 
the Rules prefixed to this Vocabulary. 



12 AP AP AR 


A-pe'la 


A-pol-li-na'res 


A-qua' ri-us 


A-pel'les 


A^-poMi-na' ris 


Aq-ui-la' ri-a 


A-pel' li-con 


Ap-ol-lin'i-des 


Aq-ui-le'i-a 


Ap-en-ni' nus 


A-pol' li-nis 


A-quil li-a 


A' per 


A-pol' lo 


A-quil' i-us 


Ap-e-ro' pi-a 


Ap-ol-loc'ra-tes 


Aq'ui-lo 


Ap' e-sus 


A-pol-lo-do' rus 


Aq-ui-lo'ni-a 


Aph' a-ca 


Ap-ol-lo' ni-a 


A-quin' i-us 


A-phae' a 


Ap-ol-lo' ni-as 


A-qui' num 


A 7 phar 


Ap-ol-lo-ni' a-des 


Aq-ui-ta'ni-a 


Aph-a-re' tus 


Ap-ol-lon-i'des 


A'ra(17) 


Aph-a-re' us 


Ap-ol-lo' ni-us 


Ar-a-bar' ches 


A'phas (1) 


Ap-ol-loph' a-nes 


A-ra' bi-a 


A-phel'las 


A-po-my-i' os 


A-rab' i-cus 


Aph' e-sas 


A-po-ni-a' na (7) 


Ar' a-bis 


Aph' e-tae 


A-po' ni-us, M. 


Ar'abs 


Aph' i-das (4) 


Ap' o-nus 


Ar' a-bus 


A-phid'na 


Ap-os-tro'phi-a 


A-rac'ca, or 


A-phid' nus 


*A-poth-e-o' sis 


A-rec' ca 


Aph-oe-be' tus 


Ap-o-M o-sis 


A-rach' ne 


A-phri'ces(l) 


Ap'pi-aVi'a 


Ar-a-cho' si-a 


Aph-ro-dis'i-a 


Ap-pi' a-des 


Ar-a-cho' tae 


Aph-ro-di' sum (1) 


Ap-pi-a' nus 


Ar-a-cho' ti 


Aph-ro-di' te (8) 


Ap' pi-i Fo' rum 


A-rac' thi-as 


A-ph/te(8) 


Ap' pi-us 


Ar-a-cil'lum 


A' pi-a (1) (4) (7) 


Ap' pu-la 


Ar-a-co' si-i (4) 


A-pi-a' nus 


A' pri-es 


Ar-a-cyn' thus (4) 


Ap-i-ca' ta 


A' pri-us 


Ar' a-dtis 


A-pic'i-us (24) 


Ap-sin' thi-i (4) 


A'r(17) 


A-pid' a-nus 


Ap'si-nus 


A'rar(17) 


Ap' i-na 


Ap'te-ra(20) 


Ar' a-rus 


A-pi' o-la 


Ap-u-le' i-a 


Ar-a-thyr' e-a 


A'pi-on(l) 


Ap-u-le'i-us 


A-ra' tus 


A' pis 


A-pu' li-a 


A-rax' es 


A -pit' i-us (24) 


Ap-u-sid' a-mus 


Ar-ba'ces, or 



* Apotheosis. When we are reading Latin or Greek, this word onght to have 
the accent on the penultimate syllable ; but in pronouncing English we should 
accent the antepenultimate : 

Allots the prince of his celestial line 
An Apothtms and rites divine. GARTH. 



AR AR AR 


*Ar' ba-ces Ar-ches' tra-tus 


Ar 7 chy-tas 


Ar-be' la Ar-che-ti' mus 


Arc-ti' nus 


fAr' be-la 


Ar-che'ti-us(lO) 


Arc-toph' y-lax 


Ar'bis 


Ar' chi-a 


Arc' tos 


Ar-bo-ca'la 


Ar' chi-as 


Arc-to' us 


Ar-bus'cu-la 


Ar-cbi-bi' a-des (4) 


Arc-tu'rus 


Ar-ca'di-a Ar-chib'i-us 


Ar' da-lus 


Ar-ca' di-us Ar-cbi-du' mi-a (29) 


Ar-da' ni-a 


Ar-ca' num ! jAr-cbi-da' mus, or 


Ar-dax-a' nus 


Ar' cas 


Ar-chid'a-mus 


Ar' de-a 


Ar'ce-ua 


Ar'chi-das 


Ar-de-a' tes 


Ar' cens Ar-chi-de' mus 


Ar-de-ric' ca 


Ar-ces-i-la' us : Ar-chi-de' us 


Ar-di-ae'i (4) 


Ar-ce' si-us (10) | Ar-chid'i-um 


Ar-do'ne-a 


Ar-chae'a 


Ar-chi-gal' lus 


Ar-du-en'na 


Ar-chae' a-nax 


Ar-chig' e-nes 


Ar-du-i'ne 


Ar-chae-at' i-das 


Ar-chil' o-cus 


Ar-dy-en' ses 


Arch-ag' a-thus 


Ar-chi-me'des 


Ar'dys 


Ar-chan' der 


Ar-chi' nus 


A-re' a 


Ar-cban' dros 


Ar-chi-pel 7 a-gus 


A-re-ac' i-dae 


Ar'che (12) 


Ar-chip' o-lis 


A' re-as 


Ar-cheg' e-tes (24) 


Ar-chip' pe 


A-reg' o-nis 


Ar-che-la' us 


Ar-chip' pus 


Ar-e-la' turn 


Ar-chem' a-chus 


Ar-chi' tis 


A-rel'li-us 


Ar-chem' o-rus 


Ar' ebon 


Ar-e-mor'i-ca 


Ar-chep'o-lis 


Ar-chon' tes 


A' re 


Ar-chep-tol'e-mus 


Ar'chy-lus(6) 


A-re' te 



* Arbaces. Lempriere, Gould man, Gesner, and Littleton, accent this word 
on the first syllable, but Ainsworth and Holyoke on the second ; and this is so 
much more agreeable to the English ear, that I should prefer it, though I have, 
out of respect to authorities, inserted the other, that the reader may choose 
which he pleases. Labbe has not got this word. 

t Arbela, the city of Assyria, where the decisive battle was fought between 
Alexander and Darius, and the city in Palestine of that name, have the accent 
on the penultimate ; but Arbela, a town in Sicily, has the accent on the ante- 
penultimate syllable, 

t Archidamus. Ainsworth, Gouldman, Littleton, and Holyoke, place the 
ace MU on the antepenultimate syllable of this word, but Lempriere and Labbe 
on the penultimate. I have followed Lempriere and Labbe, though, in my 
opinion, wrong : for as every word of this termination has the antepenultimate 
accent, as Polydamas, Theodamas, &c. 1 know not why this should be different. 
Though Labbe tells us, that the learned are of hraopinion. 



14 AR AR AR 


A-ren' a-cum 


Ar-gil 7 lus 


Ar-i-ci 7 na 


Ar-e-op-a-gi 7 tae 


Ar'gi-lus 


Ar-i-dae'us 


*Ar-e-op 7 a-gus 


Ar-gi-nu 7 sae 


A-ri-e 7 nis 


A-res' tae 


Ar-gi 7 o-pe 


Ar-i-gae 7 urn 


A-res'tha-nas 


Ar-gi-phon' tes 


A-ri 7 i (4) 


A- res-tor' i-des 


Ar-gip'pe-i (3) 


Ar 7 i-rna 


A're-ta 


Ar-gi 7 va 


Ar-i-mas 7 pi (3) 


Ar-e-tae'us 


Ar-gi 7 yi (3) 


Ar-i-mas 7 pi-as 


Ar-e-taph'i-la 


-\Ar'gwes (Eng.) 


Ar-i-mas 7 thae 


Ar-e-ta 7 les 


Ar'gi-us 


Ar-i-ma 7 zes 


A-re'te 


Ar'go 


Ar 7 i-mi(3) 


A-re 7 tes 


Ar-goK i-cus 


A-rim 7 i-num 


Ar-e-thu'sa 


Ar' go-lis 


A-rim' i-nus 


Ar-e-ti'num 


Ar' gon 


Ar-im-phae 7 i 


Ar 7 e-tus 


Ar-go-nau' tae 


Ar 7 i-mus 


A' re-us 


Ar-go 7 us 


A-ri-o-bar-za 7 nes 


Ar-gag 7 us 


Ar' gus 


A-ri-o-man 7 des 


Ar' ga-lus 


Ar-gyn' nis 


A-ri-o mar 7 dus 


Ar-gath'o-ua 


Ar'gy-ra 


A-ri-o-me 7 des 


Ar-ga-tho'ni-us 


Ar-gy-ras'pi-des 


A-ri 7 on (28) 


Ar'ge(9) 


Ar'gy-re 


A-ri-o-vis 7 tus (21) 


Ar-ge 7 a 


Ar-gyr' i-pa 


A 7 ris 


Ar-ge-a 7 thae 


A'ri-a 


A-ris 7 ba 


Ar-gen'num 


A-ri-ad'ne 


Ar-is-taEn 7 e-tus 


Ar'ges 


A-ri-as' us 


Ar-is-tse 7 uin 


Ar-ges 7 tra-tus 


A-ri-a'ni, or 


Ar-is-tas 7 us 


Ar-ge 7 us 


A-ri-e' ni 


Ar-is- tag 7 o-ras 


Ar'gi(9)(3) 


A-ri-ari' tas 


Ar-is-tan 7 der 


Ar-gi'a 


A-ri-am'nes 


Ar-is-tan 7 dros 


Ar'gi-as 


A-ri-a-ra 7 thes 


Ar-is-tai 7 che 


Ar-gi-le 7 turn 


Ar-ib-ba3 7 us (5) 


Ar-is-tar 7 chus 


Ar-gil 7 i-us 


A-ric 7 i-a (24) ' Ar-is- ta-za 7 nes 



* Areopagus. Labbe tells us, that the penultimate syllable of this word is 
beyond all controversy short ; qnidquid nonnnlli in tant& luce etiamniim caecu- 
tiant. Some of these blind men are, Gouldman, Holyoke, and Littleton ;- 
but Lempriere and Ainsworth, the best authorities, agree with Labbe. 

f Argives. I have observed a strong propensity in school-boys to pronounce 
the g in these words hard, as in the English word give. This is, undoubtedly, 
because their masters do so ; and they will tell us, that the Greek gamma should 
always be pronounced hard in words from that language. What, then, must we 
alter that long catalogue of Words where this letter occurs, as in Genesis, genius, 
Diogenes, JEgyptus, &c. ? The question answers itself. 



AR AR AR 15 


A-ris' te-as 


Ar-is-tot' e-les 


Ar-sam-o-sa' ta 


A-ris' te-rae 


Ai J is-to-tle (Eng.) 


Ar-sa' nes 


A-ris' te-us 


Ar-is-to-ti'mus 


Ar-sa' ni-as 


A-ris'the-nes 


Ar-is-tox' e-nus 


Ar-se'na 


A-ris' thus 


A-ris'tus 


Ar' ses 


Ar-is-ti' bus 


Ar-is-tyl' lus 


Ar' si -a 


Ar-is-ti' des 


A' ri-us 


Ar-si-dae' us 


Ar-is-tij/ pus 


Ar' me-nes 


Ar-sin'o-e 


A-ris' ti-us 


Ar-me'ni-a 


Ar-ta-ba' nus 


A-ris' ton 


Ar-men-ta' ri-us 


Ar-ta-ba'zus 


Ar-is-to-bu'la 


Ar-mil' la-tus 


Ar'ta-bri (3) 


Ar-is-to-bu' lus 


Ar-mi-lus'tri-um 


Ar-ta-bri'tae 


Ar-is-to-cle'a 


Ar-min' i-us 


Ar-ta-cae'as 


A-ris' to- cles 


Ar-mor' i-cae 


Ar-ta-cae' na 


A-ris-to-cli' des 


Ar'ne (8) 


Ar' ta-ce 


Ar-is-toc'ra-tes 


Ar'ni (3) 


Ar-ta-ce' ne 


Ar-is-to' cre-on 


Ar-no' bi-us 


Ar-ta' ci-a 


Ar-is-toc'ri-tus 


Ar'nus 


Ar-tae'i (3) 


A-ris-to-de'mus 


Ar' o-a 


Ar-tag'e-ras 


Ar-is-tog' e-nes 


Ar' o-ma 


Ar-ta-ger' ses 


Ar-is-to-gi' ton 


Ar' pa-ni 


Ar-ta' nes 


Ar-is-to-la' us 


Ai'pi (3) 


Ar-ta-pher'nes 


Ar-is-tom' a-che 


Ar-pi'nuai 


Ar-ta' tus 


Ar-is-tom'a-chus 


Ar-rje'i (3) 


Ar-ta-vas' des 


Ar-is-to- me' des 


Ar-rah-bae'us 


Ar-tax' a 


Ar-is-tom' e-nes 


Ar'ri-a 


Ar-tax' i-as 


A-ris-to-nau' tie 


Ar-ri-a' mis 


Ar-tax' a-ta 


Ar-is-to-ni' cus 


Ar'n-us 


Ar-ta-xerx' es 


A-ris' to-nus 


A' ri-us 


Ar-tax' i-as 


Ar-is-ton' i-cles 


Ar-run'ti-us (10) 


Ar-ta-yc' tes 


Ar-is-toiV y-inus 


Ar-sa' bes 


Ar-ta-yn' la 


Ar-is-toph'a-nes 


Ar-sa' ces, or 


Ar-ta-yn' tes 


A-ris-to-phi-li' des 


*Ar'sa-ces 


Ar-tem-ba'res 


A-ris' to-phon 


Ar-sac'i-dae 


Ar-tem-i-do' rus 


A-i is' tor 


Ar-sam' e-nes 


fAr' te-mis 


Ar-is-tor' i-des 


Ar-sam' e - tes Ar-te-mis' i-a (11) 



* Arsaces. Gould man, Lempriere, Holyoke, and Labbe, accent this word 
on the first syllable, and unquestionably not without classical authority ; but 
Ainsworth, and a still greater authority, general usage, have, in my opinion, 
determined the accent df this word on the second syllable. 
f Artemis.-~- The sisters to Apollo tune their voice, 

And Artemis to thee whom darts rejoice. 

COOKK'S Hesiod. Theog. v. 17. 



16 AS AS AS 


Ar-te-mis' mum 


As-ca' ni-us 


As-ple' don 


*Ar-te-mi' ta 


As-ci'i (3) 


As-po-re'nus (4> 


Ar'te-mon 


As-cle' pi-a 


As'sa 


Arth' rni-us 


As-cle-pi' a-des 


As-sa-bi' nus 


Ar-te'na 


As-cle-pi-o-do' rus 


As-sar' a-cus 


Ar-tim' pa-sa 


As-cle-pi-o-do' tus 


As-se-ri'ni (3) 


Ar-to-bar-za' nes 


As-cle' pi-us 


As' so-rus 


Ar-toch' rnes 


As-cle-ta' ri-on 


As' sos 


Ar-to' na 


As'clus 


As-syr' i-a 


Ar-ton' tes 


As-co' li-a 


As'ta 


Ar-to' ni-us 


As-co' ni-us La'be-o 


As-ta-cce'ni (5) 


Ar-tox' a-res 


As' era 


As'ta-cus 


Ar-tu'ri-us 


As' cu-lum 


As' ta-pa 


Ar-ty' nes 


As'dru bal 


As' ta-pus 


Ar-tyn' i-a 


A-sel'li-o 


As-tar'te (8) 


Ar-tys' to-na 


A'sU(10)(ll) 


As' ter 


Ar' u-ae 


A-si-at' i-cus 


As-te' ri-a 


A-ru'ci 


A-si' las 


As- te' ri-on 


Ar-va' les 


As-i-na' ri-a 


As-te' ri-us 


A-ru'e-ris 


As-i-na' ri-us 


As-te-ro' di-a 


Ar-ver' ni 


As' i-na 


As- ter' o-pe 


Ar-vir' a-gus 


As' i-ne 


As-te-ro' pe-a 


Ar-vis' i-um 


As' i-nes 


As-ter-o-pae' us 


Ar-vi' sus 


A-sin'i-us Gal'lus 


As-ter-u' si-us (11) 


A' runs (1) 


A' si-us (11) 


As- tin' o-me 


A-run'ti-us (10) 


As-na' us 


As-ti'o-chus 


Ar-u-pi' mis 


A-so' phis 


As'to-mi (3) 


Arx' a-ta 


A-so' pi-a 


As-trae'a 


Ar-y-an' des 


As-o-pi' a-des 


As-trae' us 


Ar'y-bas 


A-so' pis 


As'tu 


Ar-yp-tae' us 


A-so' pus 


As' tur 


A-san' der 


As-pam' i-thres 


As' tu-ra 


As-ba-me'a 


As-pa-ra' gi-um 


As'tu-res 


As-bes' tae 


As-pa'si-a (11) 


As-ty' a-ge 


As' bo-lus 


As-pa-si' rus 


As-ty' a-ges 


As-bys' tse 


As- pas' tes 


As-ty' a-lus 


As-cal' a-phus 


As-pa-thi' nes 


As-ty' a-nax 


As' ca-lon 


As-pin' dus 


As-ty-cra'ti-a (10) 


As-ca' ni-a 


As' pis 


As-tyd' a-mas 



* Artemita. Ainsworth places the accent on the antepenultimate syllable of 
this word ; but Letnpriere, Gouldman, and Holyoke, more correctly, in niy 
opinion, on the penultimate. 



AT AT AU 17 


As-ty-da-mi' a (SO) 


Ath-e-nae' us 


At'ta-lus 


As' ty-lus 


Ath-e-nag'o-ras 


At-tar'ras 


As-tym-e-du' sa 


Ath-e-na'is 


At-te'i-us Cap'i-to 


As-tyn'o-me 


A-the' ni-on 


At' tes 


As-tyn'o-mi 


A-then'o-cles 


At' this 


As-tyn'o-us 


Ath-en-o-do' rus 


At' ti-ca 


As-ty'o-che 


A' the-os 


At' ti-cus 


As-ty-o-chi 7 a (30) 


Atl/e-sis 


At-ti-da' tes 


As-ty-pa-lae'a 


A'thos (1) 


At'ti-la 


As-typh' i-lus 


Ath-rul'la 


At-til' i-us 


As-ty' ron 


A-tliym' bra 


At-ti' nas 


As'y-chis 


A-ti'a (11) 


At'ti-us Pe-lig'nus 


A-sy' las 


A-til'i-a 


At-u-at' i-ci (4) 


A-syl'lus 


A-tiKi-us 


A' tu-bi (3) 


A-tab'u-lus 


A-til'la 


A-ty'a-dae 


At-a-by' ris 


A-ti'na 


A'tys(l) 


At-a-by-ri' te (6) 


A-ti' nas 


Av-a-ri' cum 


At'a-ce(8) 


A-tin' i-a 


A-vel' la 


At-a-lan' la 


At-lan' tes 


Av-en-ti' nus 


At-a-ran' tes 


At-lan-ti' a-des 


A-ver'nus, or 


A-tar'be-chis(ll) 


At-lan' ti-des 


A-ver' na 


A-tar' ga-tis 


At' las 


A-ves' ta 


A-tar' ne-a 


A-tos' sa 


Au-fe' i-a a' qua 


A' tas, and A' thas 


At' ra-ces 


Au-fi-de'na 


A' tax 


At-ra-myt' ti-um 


Au -fid' i-a 


A'te(8) 


Al'ra-pes 


Au-fid' i-us 


A-tel'la 


A' trax ( 1 ) 


Au'fi-dus 


At' e-na 


At-re-ba'tae 


Au'ga, and Au'ge 


At-e-no-ma' rus 


*At-re-ba'tes 


Au-ge' a 


Ath-a-ma' nes 


A-tre'ni 


Au' ga-rus 


Ath' a-mas 


At' re-us 


Au'ge-ae 


Ath-a-man-ti' a-des 


A-tri'dae 


Au'gi-as, and 


Ath-a-na' si-us (10) 


A-tri' des 


Au' ge-as 


Ath' a-nis 


A-tro' ni-us 


Au'gi-lse 


A' the-as 


At-ro-pa-te'ne 


Au-gi'nus 


A-the'na 


At-ro-pa'ti-a (11) 


Au'gu-res 


A-the'na3(8) 


At'ro-pos (1Q) 


Au-gus' ta 


Ath-e-nae' a 


At'ta 


Au-gus-la'li-a 


Ath-e-nae' um 


At-ta'li-a 


Au-gus-ti'nus 



* Atrebatei. Ainsworth accents this word on the antepenultimate syllable ; 
but Lempriere, OouldniaH, Holyoke, and Labbe, on the penultimate ; and this 
is, in my opinion, the better pronunciation. 

c 



13 AU AU AZ 


du-gus' tin (Eng.) 


Au-run' ce (8) 


Au-tom' a-te 


Au-gus' tu-lus 


Au-run-cu-le'i-us 


Au- torn' e-don 


Au-gus' tus 


Aus-chi'sae (12) 


Au-to-me-du' sa 


A-vid-i-e' nus 


Aus'ci(3) 


Au-tom'e-nes 


A-vid'i-us Gas' si-us 


Au'ser 


Au-tom' o-li 


Av-i-e' nus 


Au' se-ris 


Au-ton' o-e 


A' vi-um 


Au' ses 


Au-toph-ra-da' tes 


Au-les'tes 


Au' son 


Au-xe'si-a (11) 


Au-le' tes 


Au-so' ni-a 


Ax' e-nus 


Au'lis 


Au-so' ni-us 


Ax-i' o-chus 


Au' Ion 


Au' spi-ces 


Ax-i' on (29) 


Au-lo'ni-us 


Aus' ter 


Ax-i-o-ni' cus (30) 


An' lus 


Aus-te'si-on 


Ax-i-o' te-a 


Au' ras 


Au-to-bu'lus, or 


Ax-i-o' the-a 


Au-re' li-a 


At-a-bu'lus 


Ax' i-us 


Au-re-li-a' nus 


Au-ta-ni'tis 


Ax' ur, and An' xur 


Au-re' li-an (Eng.) 


Au-toch' tho-nes 


Ax' us 


Au-re' li-us 


Au' to-cles 


A'zan(l) 


Au -re' o-l us 


Au-toc'ra-tes 


A-zi' ris 


Au-ri'go 


Au-to-cre' ne (8) 


Az' o-nax 


Au-rin'i-a 


Au-tol' o-lae 


A-zo'rus (11) 


Au-ro'ra 


Au-tol'y-cus 


A-zo' tus 


BA BA BA 


BA-BIL'I-US 


Bac'chkutn Bae'bi-us, M. 


Bab'i-lus 


Bac' chi-us Bae' tis 


Bab'y-lon 


Bac' chus 


Ba3' ton 


Bab-y-lo' ni-a 


Bac-chyl' i-des 


Ba-gis' ta-me 


Bab-y-lo'ni-i(4) 


Ba-ce' nis Ba-gis' ta-nes 


Ba-byr'sa 


Ba'cis Ba-go'as, and 


Ba-byt' a-ce 


Bac'tra 


Ba-go'sas 


Bac-a-ba'sus 


Bac'tri, and 


Bag-o-da' res 


Bac' chae 


Bac-tri-a'ni (4) 


Ba-goph' a-nes 


Bac-cha-na' li-a 


Bac-tri-a' na 


Bag'ra-da 


Bac-chan' tes 


Bac' tros 


Ba'i-je 


Bac'chi (3) 


Bad' a-ca 


Ba'la 


Bac-chi'a-das 


Ba'di-a 


Ba-la' cms 


Bac' chi-des 


Ba' di-us 


Bal-a-na' gra3 


Bac' chis 


Bad-u-hen' nse 


Ba-Ja' nus 



BA BA BE 


Ba-la'ri 


Ba'ri-um 


Bat' is 


Bal-bil'Ius 


Bar' nu-us 


Bat' tus 


Bal-bi'nus 


Bar-si' ne, and 


Bat' u-lum 


Bal'bus 


Bar-se' ne 


Bat' u-lus 


Bal-e-a' res 


Bar-za-en' tes 


Ba-tyl' lus 


Ba-Ie'tus 


Bar-za' nes 


Bau' bo 


Ba'li-us 


Bas-i-le'a 


Bau' cis 


Ba-lis'ta 


Bas-i-li' da? 


Ba' vi-us 


Bal-lon'o-ti (3) 


Bas-i-li' des 


Bau'li(3) 


Bal-ven'ti-us (10) 


Ba-sil-i-o-pot' a-mos 


Baz-a-en' tes 


Bal'y-ras 


Bas'i-lis 


Ba-za' ri-a 


Bam-u-ru' se 


Ba-sil'i-us(Sl) 


Be' bi-us 


Ban'ti-ae(4) 


Bas' i-lus 


Be-bri' a-cum 


Ban'ti-us, L. (10) 


Bas' S3? 


Beb'ry-ce(6) 


Baph'y-rus (6) 


Bas-sa' ni-a 


Beb' ry-ces, and 


Bap' tae 


Bas-sa' re-us 


Be-bryc'i-i(4) 


Ba-rae'i 


Bas' sa-ris 


Be-bryc' i-a 


Bar' a-thrum 


Bas' sus Au-fid' i-us 


Bel-e-mi' na 


Bar'ba-ri 


Bas-tar'nae, and 


Bel-e-phan'tes 


Bar-ba' ri-a 


Bas-ter' nae 


Bel'e-sis 


Bar-bos' the-nes 


Bas'ti-a 


Bel'ge 


Bar-by th' a-ce 


Ba'ta 


Bel'gi-ca 


Bar'ca 


Ba-ta' vi 


Bel'gi-um 


Bar-cae'i, or 


Ba'thos 


Bel'gi-us 


Bar' ci-tse 


Bath'y-cles 


Bel' i-des, plural. 


Bar' cae 


Ba-thyl'lus 


Be-li' des, singular 


Bar' cha 


Bat-i-a' tus 


Be-lis'a-ma 


Bar-dae'i 


Ba'ti-a(ll) 


Bel-i-sa' ri-us 


Bar'di 


Ba-ti' na, and 


Bel-is-ti'da 


Bar-dyl'lis 


Ban-ti' na 


Bel'i-tae 


Ba-re'a 


Ba'tis 


Bel-ler 7 o-phon 


Ba' re-as So-ra' nus 


Ba'to 


Bel-le'rus* 


Ba' res 


Ba' ton 


Bel-li-e' nus 


Bar-gu' si-i (3) 


Bat-ra-cho-my-o- 


Bel-lo'na 


Ba-ri' ne 


mach'i-a 


Bel-lo-na'ri-i(4) 


Ba-ris' ses 


Bat-ti' a-des 


Bel-lov' a-ci 



* Bellerns. All our lexicographers unite in giving this word the antepenulti- 
mate accent : but Milton seems to have sanctioned the penultimate, as much 
more agreeable to English ears, in his Lycidas: 

Or whether thou, to our moist vows denied, 
Sleep'st by the fable of Bellems old. 

Though 
C 2 



20 Bl BL BO 


Bel-lo-ve'sus 


Bib'Ji-a,aiidBil'n-a 


Blai'sus 


Be' Jon 


Bib' lis 


Blan-de-no' na 


Be'lus 


Bib-li'na 


Blan-du' si-a 


Be-na' cus 


Bib'lus 


Blas-to-pho3-ni' ces 


Ben-e-did'i-uin 


Bi-brac' tae 


Blem' my-es 


Ben' dis 


Bib' u-lus 


Ble-ni' na 


Ben-e-ven' turn 


Bi'ces 


Blit'i-us(lO) 


Ben-the-sic'y-me 


Bi'con 


Blu'ci-um (10) 


Be-pol-i-ta' nus 


Bi-cor' ni-ger 


Bo-a-dic'e-a 


Ber' bi-caj 


Bi-cor' nis 


Bo'ae, and Bo'e-a 


Ber-e-cyn' thi-a 


Bi-for' mis 


Bo-a' gi i-us 


Ber-e-ni'ce(SO) 


Bi' frons 


Bo-ca' li-as 


Ber-e-ni' cis 


Bif bi-iis 


Boc' car 


Ber' gi-on 


Bi-ma' ter 


Boc' cho-ri 


Ber-gis' te-ni 


Bin'gi-um 


Boc' chus 


Be' ris, and Ba' ris 


Bi'on 


Bo-du' ni 


Ber' mi-us 


Bir' rhus 


Bo-du-ag-na' tus 


Ber'o-e 


Bi-sal' la* 


Bce-Wia 


Be-roe' a 


Bi-sal' tes 


Bce'bi-a 


Ber-o-ni'ce(SO) 


Bi-sal' tis 


Bo-e-dro' mi-a 


Be-ro' sus 


Bi-san' the 


Boe-o-tar'chae 


Ber-rhoe' a 


Bis' ton 


Boe-o' ti-a 


Be'sa 


Bis' to-nis 


602-0' tus 


Be-sid'i-ae 


Bi' thus 


Boe-or-o-bis' tas 


Be-sip' po 
Bes'si (3). 


Bith'y-a? 
Bi-thyn' i-a 


Bo-e' thi-us 
Bo'e-tus 


Bes' sus 


Bit'i-as 


Bo' e-us 


Bes' ti-a 


Bi'ton 


Bo'ges 


Be'tis 


Bi-tu'i-tus 


Bo'gud 


Be-tu' ri-a 


Bi-tun' tuui 


Bo' gus 


Bi'a 


Bi-tur' i-ges 


Bo'i-i(S) 


*Bi-a' nor 


Bi-tui y i-cum 


Bo-joc' a-lus 


Bi'as 


Biz' i-a 


Bo' la 


Bi-bac' u-lus 


Bls'oa 


Bol'be 


Bib'a-ga 


Bl'si-i(4) 


Bol-bi-ti'num 



Though it must be acknowledged that Milton has in this word deserted the clas- 
sical pronunciation, yet his authority is sufficient to make us acquiesce in his 
accentuation in the above-mentioned passage. 

* Bianor. Lempriere accents this word on the first syllable : but Labbe 
Ainaworth, Gouldmau, and Holyoke, on the secondhand these agree with 
Virgil, Eel. ix. Y. 60. 



BR BR BU 2 


Bol' gi-us 


Brau' ron 


Bry' ges 


Bo-li'na 


Bren'ni, and 


Bry'gi(3)(5) 


Bol-i-nae' us 


Breu' ni 


Bry' se-a 


Bo-lis'sus 


Bren' nus 


Bu-ba-ce' ne 


Bol-la' nus 


Bren'the 


Bu-ba'ces 


Bo'lus 


Bres' ci-a 


Bu' ba-ris 


Bom-i-en' ses 


Bret'ti-i(3) 


Bu-bas-ti' a-cus 


Bo-mil 7 car 


Bri-a' re-us 


Bu' ba-sus 


Bom-o-ni' cae (30) 


Bri' as 


Bu' bon 


Bo-no' ni-a 
Bo-no' si-us 


Bri-gan'tes 
Brig-an-ti' nus 


Bu-ceph' a-la 
Bu-ceph' a-lus 


Bo-no' zhe-us 


Bri' mo 


Bu-col'i-ca 


Bo-o-su' ra 


Bri-se' is 


Bu-col' i^cuni 


Bo-o' tes 


Bri' ses 


Bu-co' li-on 


Bo-o' tus, and 


Bri-se' us 


Bu' co-lus 


Boe' o-tus 


Bri-tan' ni 


Bu'di-i (3) 


Bo're-a 


Bri-tan' ni-a 


Bu-di' ni (3) 


Bo-re' a-des 


Bri-tan' ni-cus (30) 


Bu-do' rum 


Bo' re-as 


Brit-o-mar' tis 


Bu' lis 


Bo-re-as' mi (3) 


Brit-o-ma' rus 


Bul-la'ti-us(lO) 


Bo' re-us 


*Brit'o-nes 


Bu' ne-a 


Bor' ges 


Brix-el' lum 


Bu' nus 


Bor-go' di 


Brix' i-a 


Bu' po-lus 


Bor' nos 


Bri'zo 


Bu' pha-gus 


Bor-sip' pa 


Broc-u-be' us 


Bu-pho' ni-a 


Bo'rus 


Bro' mi-us 


Bu-pi a' si-um 


Bo-rys' the-nes 


Bro' mus 


Bu'ra 


Bos' pho-rus 


Bron' tes 


Bu-ra' i-cus 


Bot'ti-a 


Bron-ti' nus 


Bur' rhus 


Bot-ti-ae'is 


Bro' te-as 


Bur'sa 


Bo-vi-a' num 


Bro' the-us 


Bur' si-a 


Bo-vil'lse 


Bruc'te-ri (4) 


Bu'sae 


Brach-ma' nes 


Bru-ma' li-a 


Bu-si' ris 


Brae' si-a 


Brun-du' si-urn 


Bu'ta 


Bran-chi' a-des 


Bru-tid' i-us 


Bu' te-o 


Bran' chi-da3 


Bru'ti-i(4) 


Bu' tes 


Bran-chyi'li-des 


Bru' tu-lus 


Bu-thro' turn 


Bra' si-ae 


Bru' tus 


Bu-thyr' e-us 


Bras' i-das 


Bry' as 


Bu' to-a 


Bras-i-de'i-a 


Bry-ax' is 


Bu'tos 


Brau're 


Bry'ce 


Bu-tor 7 i-des 



* Britones. Labbe tells us, that this word is sometimes pronounced with the 
penultimate accent, but more frequently with the antepenultimate. 



22 BY BY BY 


Bu-tun'tum 


Byb'li-i(4) 


Byz-an-ti' a-cus 


Bu' tus 


Byb'lis 


By-zan' ti-um 


Bu-zy'ges 


Byl-li' o-nes 


By' zas 


Byb-le' si-a, and 


Byr' rhus 


By-ze' nus 


By-bas' si-a 


Byr'sa 


Byz' e-res 


Byb'li-a 


By-za' ci-um 


Byz' i-a 


CM C#l CA 


CA-AN'THUS 


Cae-cil-i-a' nus 


Cae-so' ni-us 


Cab'a-des(20) 


Cae-cil' i-i (4) 


Caet' o-brix 


Cab'a-les(20) 


Caec' i-lus 


Ca}t' u-lum 


Ca-bal'i-i(4) 


Cae-cil' i-us 


Caa'yx 


Cab-al-li' num 


Cae-ci'na Tus'cus 


Ca-ga' co 


Cab-a-li' nus 


Caec' u-bum 


Ca-i-ci'nus 


Ca-bar' nos 


Caec' u-lus 


Ca-i' cus 


Ca-bas' sus 


Ca3-dic'i-us(JO) 


Ca-i-e'ta 


Ca-bel'li-o(4) 


Cas' li-a 


Ca' i-us, and Ca' i-a 


Ca-bi' ra 


Cffi'li-us 


Ca'i-us 


Ca-bi'ri(3) 


Caem' a-ro 


Cal'ab-er, Q. 


Ca-bir' i-a 


Cae'ne 


Ca-la' bri-a 


Ca-bu'ra(7) 


C'<ef ne-us 


Cal' a-brus 


Cab'u-rus(SO) 


Caen'i-des 


Cal-a-gur-rit ; a-ni 


Ca'ca 


Cas-ni' na 


Cal'a-is 


Cach' a-les (20) 


Cae' nis 


Ca-lag' u-tis 


Ca'cus 


Cae-not' ro-pae 


Cal' a- mis 20) 


Ca-cu' this 


Cae'pi-o 


Cal-a-mi' sa 


Ca-cyp' a-ris 


Cae-ra' tus 


Cal' a-mos 


Ca'di(3) 


Cae' re, or Cae' res 


Cal'a-mus(20) 


Cad-me'a 


Casr'e-si(3) 


Ca-la' nus 


Cad-me' is 


Cae' sar 


Cal'a-on 


Cad' mus 


Caes-a-re' a 


Cal'a-ris 


Ca'dra(7) 


Cae-sa' ri-on 


Cal-a-tha'na 


Ca-du'ce-us(lO) 


Cae-se' na 


Ca-la' thi- on 


Ca-dur'ci (3) 


Cae-sen' ni-as 


Cal' a-thus 


Ca-dus' ci 


Cae-ce'ti-us (10) 


Cal'a-tes(20) 


Cad'y-tis 


Cae' si-a (10) 


Ca-la' ti-a 


C3e'a(7) 


Cse' si-us (10) 


Ca-la' ti-ae( 10) 


Ce'ci-as(10) 


Cae' so 


Ca-la'vi-i(4) 


Cs-cil'i-a 


Cse-so' ni-a 


Ca-la' vi-us 



CA CA 


Cal-au-re'a, and 


Cal-lim' a-chus (12) 


Cal-au-ri'a 


Cal-lim' e-don 


Cal'bis 


Cal-lim' e-des 


Cal'ce 


Cal-li'nus 


Cal' chas 


Cal-li'o-pe(S) 


Cal-che-do' ni-a 


Ca!-Ii-pa-ti'ra(30) 


Cal-chin'i-a(12) 


Cal' li-phon 


Cal' dus Cae' li-us 


Cal'li-phron 


Ca'le 


Cal-lip'i-dae 


Cal-e-do' ni-a 


Cal-lip' o-lis 


Cu-le' nus 


Cal' li-pus 


Ca'les 


Cal-lip' y-ges 


Ca-le' si-us (10) 


Cal-lir' ho-e (8) 


Ca-le'ta3 


Cal-lis'te 


Cal ; e-tor (20) 


Cal-lis-te'i-a 


Ca'lex 


Cal-lis' the-nes 


Cal-i-ad'ne 


Cal-lis'to 


Cal-i-ce' ni 


Cal-lis-to-ni' cus 


Ca-lid'i<us, M. 


Cal-lis' tra-tus 


Ca-lig' u-la, C. 


Cal-lix'e-na 


Cal'i-pus 


Cal-lix' e-nus 


Ca'lis 


Ca'Ion 


Cal-laes' chrus 


Ca'lor 


Cal-la'i-ci(4) 


Cal' pe 


Cal' las 


Cal-phur' ni-a 


Cal-la-te' bus 


Cal-phur' ni-us 


Cal-la-te ; ri-a 


Cal-pur' ni-a 


Cal-le'ni 


Cal'vi-a 


Cal'li-a 


Cal-vi' na 


Cal-li'a-des 


Cal-vis'i-us(lO) 


Cal'li-as 


Cal-u-sid' i-us 


Cal-lib'i-us 


Cal-u'si-um(lO) 


Cal-li-ce'rus 


Cal'y-be(8) 


Cal-lich' o-rus 


Cal-y-cad'nus 


Cal'li-cles 


Cal'y-ce(8) 


Cal-li-co-lo' na 


jCa-lyd' i-um 


Cal-lic'ra-tes 


Ca-lyd' na 


Cal-lic-rat' i-das 


Cal'y-don(6) 


Cal-lid'i-us 


Cal-y-do' nis 


Cal-lid' ro-mus 


Cal-y-do' ni-us 


Cal-li-ge' tus 


Ca-lym' ne 



CA 2 

Ca-lyn'da 
Ca-lyp' so 
Ca-man'ti-um (10) 
Cam-a-ri' na 
Cum-bau'les 
Cam' bes 
Cam' bre 
Cam-bu' ni-i (4) 
Cam-by' ses 
Cam-e-la'ni (3) 
Cam-e-li' tag 
Cam' e-ra (7) 
Cam-e-ri'num, and 

Ca-me'ri-um 
Cam-e-ri'nus 
Ca-mer' ti-um 
Ca-mer' tes 
Ca-mil'la 
Ca-mil'Ji, and 

Ca-mil' Ize 
Ca-mil' Jus 
Ca-mi'ro 
Ca-mi'rus, and 

Ca-mi'ra 
Cam-is-sa' res 
Cam' ma 
Ca-moe' nae 
Cam-pa'na Lex 
Cam-pa' ni-a 
Cam' pe (8) 
Cam-pas' pe 
Camp'sa 

Cam' pus Mar' ti-us 
Cam-u-lo-gi' nus 
Ca'na 
Can' a-ce 
Can'a-che(]2) 
Can' a-chus 
Ca'na! 
Ca-na'ri-i(4) 
Can' a-thus 



24 CA CA CA 


*Can'da-ce 


Ca'pi-o(4) 


Ca' res 


Can-da' vi-a 


Cap-is-se' ne 


Car' e-sa 


Can-dau' les 


Cap'i-to 


Ca-res' sus 


Can-di' o-pe 


Ca-pit-o-li' nus 


Car-fin' i-a 


Ca' nens 


Cap-i-to' li-um 


Ca'ri-a 


Can-e-pho' ri-a 


Cap-pa-do' ci-a (10) 


Ca'ri-as 


Can'e-thum 


Cap' pa-dox 


Ca-ri' a-te 


Ca-nic-u-la' res di'es Ca-pra'ri-a 


Ca-ri' na 


Ca-nid'i-a 


Ca' pre-ae 


Ca-ri' na? 


Ca-nid' i-us 


Cap-ri-cor' nus 


Car-i' ne 


Ca-nin-e-fa' tes 


Cap-ri-fic-i-a' lis 


Ca-ri' nus 


Ca-nin' i-us 


Ca-pri' na 


Ca-ris' sa-num 


Ca-nis'ti-us(lO) 


Ca-prip' e-des 


Ca-ris' turn 


Ca' ni-us 


Ca' pri-us 


Car- ma' ni-a 


Can' nse 


Cap-ro-ti'na 


Car- in a' nor 


Ca-nop' i-cum 


Ca' prus 


Car' me 


Ca-no' pus 


Cap' sa 


Car-me' lus 


Can' ta-bra 


Cap' sa-ge 


Car-men'ta, and 


Can' ta-bri (3) 


Cap' u-a 


Car- men' tis 


Can-ta' bri-a? (4) 


Ca'pys 


Car-men-ta' les 


Can' tha-rus (20) 


Ca' pys Syl' vi-us 


Car-men-ta' lis 


Can' thus 


Car-a-bac' tra 


Car 7 mi-des (6) (20) 


Can'ti-um (10) 


Car'a-bis (20) 


Car'na Car-din' e-a 


Can-u-le' ira 


Car-a-cal' la 


Car-na' si-us (10) 


Can-u-le' i-us 


Ca-rac' a-tes 


Car-ne' a-des 


Ca-nu' li-a 


Ca-rac'ta-cus 


Car-ne' i-a 


Ca-nu'si-um (10) 


Ca'rse 


Car' ni-on 


Ca-nu' si-us 


Ca-ra/ us 


Car' nus 


Ca-nu' ti-us( 10) 


Car' a-lis 


Car-nu' tes 


Cap'a-neus, 3 sy\\. 


Car' a- nus (20j 


Car-pa' si-a (11) 


Ca-pel' la 


Ca-rau' si-us (10) 


Car-pa' si-um (11) 


Ca-pe' na 


Car' bo 


Car' pa- thus 


Ca-pe' nas 


Car-che'don(12) 


Car' pi-a (7) 


Ca-pe'ni(3) 


Car-ci' nus 


Car' pis 


Ca' per 


Car-da' ces 


Car'po 


Ca-pe' tus 


Car-dam' y-le 


Car-poph' o-ra 


Ca-pha' re-us 


Car' di-a 


Car-poph' o-rus 


Caph'v-a? (4) 


Car-du'chi(l2;(3) 


Car'ra?, and Car'rhae 



* Cundace. L^mpriere, Labbe, and Ainsworih, accent this word on the first 
syllable, but Gouldman and Holyolte on the last ; and I am much mistaken 
if the general ear has not sanctioned this latter pronunciation, and given it the 
preference. 






CA CA CE 25 


Car-ri-na' tes 


Cas-ta' li-a 


Cau' i li-us 


Car-ru 7 ca 


Cas-ta' li-us fons 


Cau' nus 


Car-se' o-li (3) Cas-to'lus 


Cau' ros 


Car-ta' !i-as Cas-ta' ne-a 


Cau' rus 


Car-th ae' a Cas-ti-a-ni' ra 


Ca'us 


Car-tha-gin-i-en'ses Cas' tor and Pol' lux 


Ca-y'ci(3)(6) 


Car th a' go Cas-tra' ti-us (10) 


Ca-y' cus 


Car' tttage (Eng). Cas' tu- lo 


Ca-ys' ter 


Car-tha' sis Cat-a-du' pa 


Ce'a, or Ce'os 


Car-tei'a, 3 syll. Cut-a-meri'te-les 


Ce'a-des 


Car-vil' i-us Cat' a-na (0) 


Ceb-al-li'nus 


Ca'rus Cat -a-o' ni-a 


Ceb-a-ren' ses 


Ca'ry-a(6)(7) 


Cat a-rac'ta 


Ce'bes 


Car-y-a' tae 


Cat' e-nes 


Ce' bren 


Car-y-a' tis 


Ca-thas'a 


Ce-bre' ni-a 


Ca-rys' ti-us 


Cath'a-ri(3) 


Ce-bri' o-nes v 


Ca-rys' tus 


Ca'ti-a(ll) 


Cec'i-das 


Ca' ry-um 


Ca-ti-e'na 


Ce-cil' i-us 


Cas' ca 


Ca-ti e'nus 


Cec' i-na 


Cas-cel' li-us 


Cat-i-li' na 


Ce-cin'na, A. 


Cas-i-li' num 


Cat' i-line (Eng.) 


Ce-cro' pi-a 


Ca-si'na Ca-si'num 


Ca-til' li (3) 


Ce-crop' i-da; 


Ca' si-us (10) 


Ca-til'lus, or 


Ce' crops 


Cas-me' nae 


Cat'i-lus 


Cer-cyph'a-lae 


Cas- mil' la 


Ca-ti' na 


Ced-re-a' tis 


Cas-pe' ri-a 


Ca' ti-us (10) 


Ce'don 


Cas-per' u-la 


Cat'i-zi(S) 


Ce-dru'si-i(3) 


Cas-pi-a' na 


Ca'to(l) 


Ceg' lu-sa 


Cas'pi-i(4) 


Ca' tre-us 


Ce'i(3) 


Cas'pi-um ma' re 


Cat' ta 


Cel'a-don 


Cas-san-da' ne 


Cat' ti (3) 


Cel'a-dus 


Cas-san' der 


Cat-u-H-a' na 


Ce-lse'nae 


Cas-san' dra 


Ca-tul'lus 


Ce-ls'no 


Cas-san' dri-a 


Cat' u-lus (20) 


Cel'e-ffi(4) 


Cas'si-a (10) 


Cav a-ril'lus 


Ce-le'i-a, and Ce'la 


Cas-si' o-pe 


Cav-a-ri' nus 


Cel-e-la'tes 


Ca-si-o-pe' a 


Can' ca-sus 


Ce-len'drae 


Cas-si-ter' i-des 


Cau' con 


Ce-len'dris, or 


Cas-si-ve-lau' nus 


Cau' co-nes 


Ce-le' de-ris 


Cas' si-us, C. (10) 


Cau'di, and 


Ce-le' ne-us 


Cas-so' tis 


Cau' di-um 


Ce-len'naCe-la'na 


Cai-tab' a-la 


Ca'vi-i(3) 


Ce'ler 


Cas'ta-bus 


Cau-lo' ni-a 


Cel ; e-res 



26 CE 

Cel' e-trum 
Ce'le-us 
Cel' mus 
Cel' o-nae 
Cel' sus 
Cel'tas 
Cel-ti-be'ri 
Cel'ti-ca 
Cel' ti-ci 
Cel-til'lus 
Cel-to'ri-i(4) 
Cel-to/ cy-thae 
Cem' me-nus 
Cem'psi (3) 
Ce-nae' urn 
Cen'chre-aB(12) 
Cen'chre-is 
Cen' chre-us 
Cen' chri-us 
Ce-nes' po-lis 
Ce-ne'ti-um(lO) 
Ce' ne-us 
Cen-i-mag'ni 
Ce-ni' na 
Cen-o-ma' ni 
Cen-so' res 
Cen so-ri'nus 
Cen' sus 
Cen-ta-re' tus 
Cen-tau'ri(S) 
Cen-tau' rus 
Cen-tob' ri-ca 
Cen' to-res (20) 
Cen-tor' i-pa 
Cen-tri' tes 
Cen-tro' ni-us 
Cen-tum' vi-ri (4) 
Cen-tu' ri-a 
Cen-tu' ri-pa 
Ce' os and Ce' a 
Ceph' a-las 
Ceph-a-le' di-on 
Ce-phal' len 



CE 

Ceph-a-le' na 
Ceph-al-le' ni-a 
Ceph'a-lo 
Ceph-a-loe'dis (5) 
Ceph' a-lon 
Ceph-a-lot' o-mi 
Ceph-a-lu' di-um 
Ceph'a-lus 
Ce-phe' us 
Ce-phe' nes 
Ce-phis'i-a (10) (20) 
Ceph-i-si' a-des 
Ce-phis-i-dc/ rus 
Ce-phis'i-on(lO) 
Ce-phis-od' o-tus 
Ce-phis' sus 
Ce-phi' sus 
Ce' phren 
Ce'pi-o 
Ce'pi-on 
Cer'a-ca 
Ce-rac' a-tes 
Ce-ram' bus 
Cer-a-mi' cus 
Ce-ro' mi-urn 
Cer'a-mus^O) 
Ce'ras 
Cer' a-sus 
Cei 7 a-ta 
Ce-ra'tus 
Ce-rau' ni-a 
Ce-rau' ni-i (4) 
Ce-rau' n us 
Ce-rau' si-us (10) 
Cer-be' ri-on 
Cer'be-rus 
Cer' ca-phus 
Cer-ca-so' rum 
Cer-ce' is 
Cer-ce' ne 
Cer-ces'tes 
Cer'ci-des 
Cer' ci-i (4) 



CE 

Cer' ci-na 
Cer-cin' na 
Cer-cin' i-um 
Cer'ci-us(lO) 
Cer-co' pes 
Cer' cops 
Cer'cy-on(lO) 
Cer-cy' o-nes 
Cer-cy'ra, or 
Cor-cy'ra 
Cer-dyl' i-um 
Cer-e-a'li-a 
Ce'res 
Ce-res' sus 
Cer'e-tae 
Ce-ri-a' lis 
Ce'ri-i(4) 
Ce-ril'lum 
Ce-rin' thus 
Cer-y-ni' tes 
Cer-ma'nus 
Cer' nes 
Ce'ron 

Cer-o-pas' a-des 
Ce-ros' sus 
Cer 7 phe-res 
Cer-rhze'i(S) 
Cer-sob-lep' tes 
Cer' ti-ma 
Cer-to' ni-um 
Cer-va' ri-us 
Cer'y-ces(6) (20) 
Ce-ryc' i-us 
Cer-y-mi' ca 
Cer-ne'a 
Ce-ryn'i-tes 
Ce-sel'li~us 
Ce-sen' ni-a 
Ces'ti-us(lO) 
Ces-tri' na 
Ces-tri' nus 
Ce'tes 
Ce-the'gus 



CH CH CH 27 


Ce' ti-i (4) (10) i Chal' co-don 


Cha'ris 


Ce'ti-us(lO) j Chal' con 


Cha-ris'i-a 


Ce'to 


Chal'cus 


Char'i-tes 


Ce' us, and Cae' us 


Chal-da'a 


Char' i-ton 


Ce'yx 


Chal-d33'i(3) 


Char' mi-das 


Cha' bes 


Cha-les' tra 


Char' me, and 


Che' a* (1 2) 


Chal-o-ni' tis 


Car' me 


Cha-bi' nus 


Chal'y-bes, and 


Char' mi-des 


Cha' bri-a 


Cal'y-bes 


Char-mi' nus 


Cha' bri-as 


Chal-y-bo-ni' tis 


f Char-mi' o-ne 


Chab'ry-is(6) 


Chal'ybs 


Char' mis 


Chae-an' i-t33 (4) 


Cha-ma' ni 


Char-mos' y-na 


Chae' re-as 


Cham-a-vi' ri (4) 


Char' ino-tas 


Chaer-e-de' mus 


Cha'ne 


Char' mus 


Chae-re' mon 


Cha' on 


Cha' ron 


Chaer' e-phon 


Cha' o-nes 


Cha-ron' das 


Chae-res' tra-ta 


Cha-o' ni-a 


Char-o-ne' a 


Chae-rin' thus 


Cha-o-ni'tis 


Cha-ro' ni-um 


Chae-rip' pus 


Cha' os 


Cha' rops, and 


Chse'ro 


Char' a-dra 


Char' o-pes 


Chae-ro' ni-a 


Cha-ra' dros 


Cha-ryb' dis 


Chae-ro-ne' a, and 


Char' a-drus 


Chau' bi, and 


Cher-ro-ne'a 


Cha-rae'a-das 


Chau' ci 


Cha-lae'on 


Char-an-dae' i 


Chau' la (7) 


Chal-cse' a 


Cha' rax 


Chau' rus 


Chal' ce-a 


Cha-rax' es, and 


Che'lae 


Chal-ce' don, and 


Cha-rax' us 


Che'les 


Chal-ce-do' ni-a 


Cha' res 


Chel-i-do' ni-a 


Chal-ci-de' ne 


Char'i-cles 


Chel-i-do' ni-ae 


Chal-ci-den' ses 


Char' i-clo 


Che-lid' o-nis 


Chal-cid' e- us 


Char-i-cli' des 


Chel'o-ne 


Chal-cid' i-ca 


Char-i-de' mus 


Chel' o-nis 


Chal-cid' i-cus 


Char'i-la 


Chel-o-noph' a-gi 


Chal-ci-oe' us 


Char-i-la' us, and 


Chel-y-do're-a 


Chal-ci' o-pe 


Cha-ril'lus 


Chem' mis 


Chal-ci' tis (3) 


Cha-ri'ni, and 


Che'na(7) 


Chal' cis 


Ca-ri'ni(3) 


Che'naa 



* C/ua. The ch in this and all words from the Greek and Latin, must be 
pronounced like k. 

f Charmionc. Dry den, in his tragedy of All for Love, has anglicised this 
word into Charmion ; the ch pronounced as in charm, 



28 CH CH CI 


Che' ni-on 


Choer' e-ai 


Cliry-so'di-um 


Che' ni-us 


Chon' ni-das 


Chry-sop' o-lis 


Che' ops, and 


Chon' u-phis 


Chry-sor' rho-ae 


Che-os' pes 


Cho-ras' mi (3) * 


Chry-sor' rho-as 


Che' phren 


Cho-rin' e-us 


Chrys' os-toin 


Cher-e-moc' ra-tes 


Cho-roe' bus 


Chrys-oth'e-mis 


Che-ris' o-plius 


Cho-rom-nae' i (3) 


Chryx' us 


Cher' o-phon 


Chos' ro-es 


Chtho'ni-a(12) 


Cher'si-as(lO) 


Chre' mes 


Chtho' ni-us (12) 


Cher-sid' a-mas 


Chrem' e-tes 


Chi' trum 


Cher' si-pho 


Chres' i-phon 


Cib-a-ri' tis 


Cher-so-ne' sus 


Chres-phon' tes 


Cib'y-ra 


Che-rus'ci (3) 


Chres' tus 


Cic' e-ro 


Chid-nae'i(3) 


Chro' mi -a 


Cith'y-ris 


Chil-i-ar' chus 


Chro' mi-os 


Cic' o-nes 


Chil' i-us, and 


Chro' mis 


Ci-cu' ta 


Chil'e-us 


Chro' mi-us 


Ci-lic'i-a(lO) 


Chi'lo 


Chro' ni-us 


Ci-lis'sa 


Chi-lo' nis 


Chro' nos 


Ci'lix 


Chi-mae' ra 


Chry' a-sus 


Cil' la 


Chim' a-rus 


Chry'sa, and 


CiMes 


Chi-me' ri-utn 


Chr/se 


Cil'lus 


Chi-om' a-ra 


Chrys' a-me 


Cil' ni-us 


Chi' on (1) 


Chry-san' tas 


Ci'lo 


Chi'o-ne(8) 


Chry-san'thi-us 


Cim'ber 


Chi-on' i-des 


Chry-san' tis 


Cim-be' ri-us 


Chi' o-nis 


*Chry-sa' or 


Cim' bri (3) 


Chi' os 


Chrys-a-o' re-us 


Cim'bri-cum 


Chi' ron 


Chry-sa' o-ris 


Cim' i-nus 


Chit' o-ne (8) 


Chry' sas 


Cim-me'ri-i (4) 


Chlo'e 


Chry-se' is 


Cim' me-ris 


Chlo' re-us 


Chry-sei / mus 


Cim-me' ri-um 


Chlo'ris 


Chry'ses 


Ci-mo'lis, and 


Chlo' rus 


Chry-sip'pe 


Ci-no' lis 


Cho-a-ri' na 


Chry-sip' pus 


Ci-mo' lus 


Cho-as' pes 


Chry' sis 


Ci' mon 


Cho'bus 


Chrys -o-as' pi-des 


Ci-nae' thon 


Choar' a-des 


Chry-sog' o-nus 


Ci-nar' a-das 


Cho3r' i-lus 


Chrys-o-la' us 


Cin' ci-a (10) 



* Chrysaor. Then started out, when yon began to bleed 
The great Chrysaor, and the gallant steed. 

COOKE'S Hfsiod. Theog. 



CI CL CL 29 


Cin-cin-na' tus, L. Q. 


Cis'si-ae(ll) 


Cle'o-bis 


Cin'ci-us(lO) 


Cis' si-des 


Cle-o-bu'la 


Cin' e-as 


Cis-sces' sa (5) 


Cle-ob-u-li' na 


Ci-ne'si-as(ll) 


Cis'sus 


Cle-o-bu' lus 


Cin' e-thon 


Cis-su' sa 


Cle-o-cha' res 


Cin'ga 


Cis-tae' ne 


Cle-o-cha'ri-a 


Cin-get' o-rix 


Ci-thse' ron 


Cle-o-dae' us 


Sin-get' o-rix 


Cith-a-ris' ta 


Cle-od' a-mas 


Cin'gu-lum 


Cit'i-um (10) 


Cle-o-de' mus 


Cin-i-a' ta 


Ci-vi'lis 


Cle-o-do' ra 


Ci-nith'i-i(4) 


Ci'us 


Cle-o-dox' a 


Cin'na 


Ciz' y-cum 


Cle-og' e-nes 


Ciu' na-don 


Cla' de-us 


Cle-o-la' us 


Cin' na-iuus 


Cla'nes 


Cle-om' a-chus 


Cin-ni' a-na 


Cla'nis 


Cle-o-man' tes 


Cinx' i-a 


Cla'ni-us, or Cla'nis 


Cle-om' bro-tus 


Ci' nyps, and 


Cia'rus 


Cle-o-me'des 


Cin' y-phus 


Clas-tid' i-um 


^Cle-om' e-nes 


Cin' y-ras 


Clau' di-a 


Cle' on 


Ci'os 


Clau'di-a 


Cle-o'nae, and 


Cip' pus 


Clau-di-a' nus 


Cle'o-na 


Cir'ce 


Clau-di-op' o-lis 


Cle-o'ne 


Cir-cen'ses lu'di 


Clau' di-us 


Cle-o-ni' ca 


Cir'ci-us (10) 


Clav-i-e' nus 


Cle-o-ni' cus (30) 


Cir'cus 


Clav'i-ger 


Cle-on' nis 


Ci' ris 


Clau' sus 


Cle-on' y-mus 


Cir-rae' a-tuni 


CJa-zom'e-nae, and 


Cle-op' a-ter 


Cir' rha, and 


Cla-zom' e-iia 


fCle-o-pa'tra 


Cyr'rha 


Cle'a-das 


Cle-op' a-tris 


Cir' tha, and Cir' ta 


Cle-an' der 


Cle-oph' a-nes 


Cis-al-pi' na Gal' li-a 


Cle-an' dri-das 


Cle-o-phan' thus 


Cis'pa 


Cle-an' thes 


Cle' o-phes 


Cis' sa 


Cle-ar' chus 


Cle-oph' o-lus 


Cis' se-is 


Cle-ar' i-des 


Cle' o-phon 


Cis-se' us 


Cle' mens 


Cle-o-phy'lus 


Cis'si-a(ll) 


Cle'o 


Cle-o-pom' pus 



* Cleomenes. There is an unaccountable caprice in Dryden's accentuation 
of this word, in opposition to all prosody ; for through the whole tragedy of this 
title he places the accent on the penultimate instead of the antepenultimate 
syllable. 

f Cleopatra. The learned editor of Labbe tells us this word ought to be 
pronounced with the accent on the antepenultimate, Cle-op' a-tra, though the 
penultimate accentuation, he says, is the more common. 



30 CL CO CO 


Cle-op-tol' e-mus 


Clon'di-cus 


Coc'a-lus 


Cle' o-pus 


Clo' ni-a 


Coc-ce' i-us 


Cle-o'ra 


Clo' ni-us 


Coc-cyg' i-us 


Cle-os' tra-tus 


Clo'tho 


Co'cles,Pub.Horat 


Cle-ox' e-nus 


Clu-a-ci' na 


Coc'ti-ae, and 


Clep'sy-dra 


Clu-en'ti-us (10) 


Cot' ti-ae 


Cle'ri(3) 


Clu' po-a, and 


Co-cy' tus 


Cles'i-des 


Clyp'e-a(23) 


Co-dom' a-nus 


Cle'ta 


Clu' si-a (11) 


Cod'ri-dffi 


Clib' a-nus 


Ciu-si'ni fon'tes 


Co-drop' o-lis 


Cli-de' mus 


Clu-si'o-lum 


Co'drus 


Clim' e-nus 


Clu'si-um (10) 


Coe-cil' i-us 


Cli' nas 


Clu' si-us (10) 


Coe'la 


Clin' i-as 


Clu'vi-a 


Coe-lal'e-tae 


Cli-nip' pi-des 


Clu'vi-us Ru'fus 


Coel-e-syr' i-a, and 


Cli' nus 


Clym'e-ne 


Coe-lo-syr' i-a 


Cli'o 


Clym-en-e'i-des 


Coe'li-a 


Cli-sith' e-ra 


Clym' e-nus 


Cce-li-ob' ri-ga 


Ciis' the-nes 


Cly-son-y-mu' sa 


Coe' li-us 


Cli'UB 


Clyt-em-nes' tra 


Cce'lus 


Cli-tar'chus 


Clyt'U, or Clyt'i-e 


Coe'nus 


Cli' tse 


Clyt'i-us(lO) 


Goer' a-nus 


Cli-ter' ni-a 


Cly'tus 


Co'es 


Clit-o-de' mus 


*Cna-ca' di-um (30) 


Coe' us 


Cli-tom' a-chus 


Cnac' a-lis 


Cog' a-mus 


Cli-ton'y-mus 


Cna' gi-a 


Cog-i-du' nus 


Clit' o-phon 


Cne'mus 


Co'hi-bus 


Cli' tor 


Cne' us, or Cnae' us 


Co'hors 


Cli-to'ri-a 


Cni-din' i-um 


Co-lae' nus 


Cli-tum'nus 


Cni'dus, or 


Co-lax' a-is 


Cli'tus 


Gni' dus 


Co-lax' es 


Clo-a-ci' na Cno' pus ( 1 3) 


Col'chi(12)(3) 


Clo-an' thus Cnos' si-a (11) 


Col'chis, and 


Clo'di-a Cno'sus 


Col'chos 


Clo'di-us Co' os, and Cos 


Co-len' da 


C!CE' li-a Co-a-ma' ni 


Co'li-as 


Cloe' li-ae (4) Co-as' trae, and 


Col-la' ti-a 


Cloe' li-us Co-ac' trae 


Col-la-ti'nus 


Clo'nas 


Cob' a -res 


Col-li'naf 



* Cnacadium. C before N ,in this and the succeeding words, is mute j and 
they must be pronounced as if written Nacadium, Nacalis, &c. 

f Collina. Lempriere accents this word on the antepenultimate ; but 
worth, Gouldman , and Holyoke, more properly on the penultimate? 



CO CO CO 31 


Col-lu' ci-a 


Con-cor' di-a 


Co-po' ni-us 


Co'lo 


Con' da-lus 


Cop' ra-tes 


Co-lo' nse 


Con' da-te 


Co' pre-us 


Co-lo' ne 


Con-do-cha' tes 


Cop' tus and Cop' tos 


Co-lo' nos 


Con-dru' si (3) 


Co'ra 


Col'o-phon 


Con-dyl' i-a 


Cor-a-ce' si-um, and 


Co-los'se, and 


Co'ne(7) 


Cor-a-cen' si-um 


Co-los' sis 


Con-e-to-du' nus 


Cor-a-co-na' sus 


Co-los' sus 


Con-fu'ci-us (10) 


Co-ral' e-tae 


*Col'o-tes 


Con-ge' dus 


Co-ral'li(S) 


Col' pe 


Co' ni-i (3) 


Co-ra r nus 


Co-lum' ba 


Con-i-sal' tus 


Co'ras 


Col-u-mel'la 


Co-nis'ci(3) 


Co' rax 


Co-lu' thus 


Con-ni' das 


Co-rax' i (3) 


Co-\y t' tus 


Co' nen 


Cor' be-us 


Com-a -ge' na 


Con-sen' tes 


Cor' bis 


Com-a-ge' ni 


Con-sen' ti-a 


Cor' bu-lo 


Co-ma' na 


Con-sid'i-us 


Cor-cy' ra 


Co-ma' ni-a 


Con-si-1i' num 


Cor'du-ba 


Com' a-ri (3) 


Con'stans 


Cor-du-e'ne(S) 


Com' a-rus 


Con-stan' ti-a (11) 


Co' re (8) 


Co-mas' tus 


Con-stan-ti' na 


Co-res' sus 


Com-ba' bus 


Con-stan-ti-nop' o- 


Cor' e-sus 


Com' be 


lis 


Cor' e-tas 


Com' bi (3) 


Con-stan-ti' nus 


Cor-fin' i-um 


Com-bre' a 


Con' stan-tine (Eng.) 


Co'ri-a(7) 


Com' bu-tis 


Con-stan' ti-us ( 10) 


Co-rin' e-um 


Co- me' tes 


Con' sus 


Co-rin' na 


Com' e-tho 


Con-syg' na 


Co-rin' nus 


Co-min' i-us 


Con-ta-des'dus 


Co-rin' thus 


Co-mit'i-a(lO) 


Con-tu'bi-a(7) 


Co-ri-o-la r nus (23) 


Co' mi-us 


Co' on 


Co-ri'o-li, and 


Com' mo-dus 


Co' os, Cos, Ce'a 


Co-ri-ol' la 


Co' mon 


and Co 


Co-ris' sus 


Com-pi-ta' li-a 


Co'pse 


Cor'i-tus 


Comp'sa-tus 


Co-phon' tis 


Cor' mus 


Com-pu' sa 


Co'phas 


Cor' rna-sa 


Co' mus 


Co'pi-a(7) 


Cor-ne' li-a 


Con'ca-ni(3) 


Co-pil'lus 


Cor-ne'li-i(4) 



* Colotes. Ainsworth and Lempriere accent this word on the antepenulti- 
mate syllable; bin Labbe Gouldman, and Holyoke, more agreeably to the 
general ear, on the penultimate. 



32 CO CR CR 


Cor-nic'u-lum 


Co-sin' gas 


Crat-e-sip' pi-das 


Cor-ni-fic / i-us(10) 


Co' sis 


Cra-te' vas 


Cor' ni-ger 


Cos' mus 


Cra' te-us 


Cor-nu' tus 


Cos'se-a (7) 


Cra' this 


Co-roe' bus 


Cos' sus 


Cra- ti' nus 


Co-ro' na 


Cos-su' ti-i (4) 


Cra-tip' pus 


Cor-o-ne' a 


Cos-to-bce'i (3) 


Crat' y-lus (6) 


Co-ro' nis 


Co-sy' ra 


Crau'si ae(ll) 


Co-ron' ta 


Co' tes, and Cot' tes 


Crati' sis 


Co-re/ nus 


Co'thon 


Cra-ux' i-das 


Cor-rha'gi-um 


Co-tho'ne-a(7) 


Crem' e-ra 


Cor' si (3) 


Cot' i-so 


Crem' ma 


Cor' si-ae 


Cot-to' nis 


Crem' my-on, and 


Cor'si-ca(7) 


Cot' ta 


Crom' my-on 


Cor'so-te 


Cot' ti-ae Al' pes 


Crem' ni, and 


Cor' su-ra (7) 


Cot' tus 


Crem' nos 


Cor-to' nae 


Cot-y-aj'um (6) 


Cre-mo'na 


Cor-vi' nus 


Co-ty'o-ra 


Crem' i-des 


Cor-un-ca' nus 


Cot-y-lae' us 


Cre-mu'ti-us(lO) 


Co'rus 


Co-tyl'i-us 


Cre'on 


Cor-y-ban'tes (6) 


Co'tys 


Cre-on-ti' a-des 


Cor' y-bas 


Co-tyt' to 


Cre-oph'i-lus 


Cor-y-bas' sa 


Cra' gus 


Cre-pe' ri-us 


Cor' y-bus 


Cram-bu' sa 


Cres 


Co-rye' i-a (24) 


Cran'a-i(3) 


Cre'sa, and Cres'sa 


Co-rye' i-des 


Cran' a-pes 


Cre' si-us (11) 


Co-rye' i-us (10) 


Cran' a-us 


Cres-phon' tes 


Cor'y-cus(6) 


Cra' ne 


Cres' si-us (11) 


Cor' y-don 


Cra-ne' um 


Cres' ton 


Cor' y-la, and 


Cra' ni-i (4) 


Cre' sus 


Cor-y-le'um 


Cra' non, and 


Cre'ta 


Co-rym'bi-fer 


Cran' non 


Crete (Eng.) (8) 


Cor' y-na 


Cran' tor Cre-tae' us 


Cor-y-ne' ta, and 


Cra-as-sil'i-us (10) 


Cre' te (8) 


Cor-y-ne' tes 


Cras' sus 


Cre' te-a (7) 


Cor-y-pha' si-urn 
Cor-y-then' ses 


Cras-ti'nus 
Crat' a-is 


Cre' tes 
Cre-te' us 


Cor' y-hus 


Cro- tae' us 


Cre' the-is 


Co-ry'tus(G) 


Cra' ter 


Cre' the-us 


Cos 


Crat't-rus(20) 


Creth'o-na 


Co'sa, and Cos'sa, 


Cra' tes 


Cret' i-cus 


or Co'sae 


Crat-es-i-cle'a 


Cres' sas 


Cos-co' ni-us 


Crat-e-sip'o-lis 


Cre-u'sa(7) 



CR CY CY 


Cre-u' sis 


Cru'sis Cy-a'ne-a3 (4) 


Cri'a-sus 


Crus-tu-me' ri (4) Cy-an' e-e, and 


Cri-nip' pus 


Crus-tu-me' ri-a 


Cy-a' ne-a 


Cri' nis 


Crus-tu-me' ri-um 


Cy-a' ne-us 


Cri-ni'sus and 


Crus-tu-mi' num 


Cy-a-nip' pe 


Cri-mi' sus 


Crus-tu' mi-um 


Cy-a-nip' pus 


Cri' no 


Crus-tu' nis, and 


Cy-a-rax' es, or 


Cri' son 


Crus-tur-ne' ni-us 


Cy-ax' a-res (6) 


Cris-pi' na 


Cry' nis 


Cy-be'be 


Cris-pi' nus 


Cte' a-tus 


Cyb'e-la, and 


Crit' a-la 


Ctem'e-ne(l3) 


C)b-e'la 


Crith'e-is 


Cte'nos 


Cyb-e'le 


Cri-tho' te 


Cte' si-as 


Cyb'e-lus 


Crit'i-as(lO) 


Cte-sib'i-us 


Cyb' i-ra 


Cn' to 


Ctes'i-cles 


Cy-ce'si-um (11) 


Crit-o-bu'lus 


Cte-sil' o-chus 


Cych' re-us (12) 


Crit-og-na' tus 


Ctes'i-phon(13) 


Cyc' la-des 


Crit-o-la' us 


Cte-sip' pus 


Cy-clo' pes 


Cri' us 


Ctim' e-ne 


Cy' clops (Eng.) 


Cro-bi' a-lus 


Cu' la-ro 


Cyc' nus 


Crob'y-zi(3) 


Cu' ma and Cu' mas 


Cy'da(6) 


Croc'a-le 


Cu-nax'a (7) 


Cyd'i-as 


Cro' ce-se 


Cu-pa' vo 


Cy-dip' pe 


Croc-o-di-lop' o-lis 


Cu- pen' tus 


Cyd' nus 


Cro' cus 


Cu-pi' do 


Cy' don 


Croe' sus 


Cu-pi- en' ni-us 


Cy-do'ni-a 


Cro-i' tes 


Cu' res 


Cyd' ra-ra 


Cro' mi (3) 


Cu-re' tes 


Cyd-ro-la' us 


Crom' my- on Cu-re' tis 


Cyg' nus 


Crom' na Cu' ri-a 


Cyl'a-bus 


Cro' mus Cu-ri-a' ti-i (4) 


Cyl'i-ces 


Cro'ni-a(7) Cu'ri-o 


Cy-lin' dus 


Cron'i-des Cu-ri-o-sol' i-tae 


Cyl-lab' a-rus 


Cro' ni-um Cu' ri-um 


Cyl' la-rus 


Cro' phi (3) Cu' ri-us Den-ta' tus 


Cyl'len 


Cros-sae'a Cur'ti-a (10) 


Cyl-le'ne 


Crot' a-lus Cur-til' lus 


Cyl-le-ne'i-us 


Cro' ton ! Cur'ti-us (10) 


Cyl-lyi'i-i (3) (4) 


Cro-to'na(7) Cu-ru'lis 


Cy' Ion 


Crot-o-ni' a-tis Cus-sge' i (3) 


Cy' ma, or Cy' mae 


Cro-to'pi-as Cu-til'i-um 


Cy-mod' o-ce 


Cro-to' pus Cy-am-o-so' rus 


Cy-mod-o-ce' a 


Cru'nos Cy'a-ne(6)(8) 


Cy mod -o-ce' as 



34 CY CY CY 


Cy' me, and Cy' ino 


Cyn-os-se' ma Cyr' nus 


Cym'o-lus, and 


Cyn-o-su' ra 


Cyr-raB'i(S) 


Ci-mo'lus 


Cyn' o-sure (Eng.) 


Cyr' rha-dae 


* Cym-o-po-li' a 


Cyn x thi-a 


Cyr'rhes 


Cy-moth' o-e 


Cyn' thi-us 


Cyr' rhus 


Cyn' a-ra 


Cyn' thus 


Cyr-ri-a'na(7) 


Cyn-a3-gi' rus 


Cyn-u-ren' ses 


Cyr-si' lus 


Cy-nae' thi-um 


Cy'nus 


Cy' rus 


Cy-na' ne 


Cyp-a-ris' si, and 


Cy^rop 7 o-lis 


Cy-na' pes 


Cyp-a-ris'si-a(U) Cy' ta 


Cy-nax'a 


Cyp-a-ris' sus 


Cy-tae'is 


Cyn' e-as 


Cyph' a-ra 


Cy-the' ra 


Cy-ne'si-i (4), and 
Cyn' e-tae 


Cyp-ri-a'nus 
Cy' prus 


f Cy th-e-rae' a, or 
Cy th-e-re' a 


Cyn-e-thus'sa 


Cyp-sel' i-des 


JCyth'e-ris 


Cyn'i-a 


Cyp' se-lus 


Cy-the' ri-us 


Cyn'i-ci(S) 


Cy-rau' nis 


Cy-the' ron 


Cy-nis' ca 


Cy're 


Cy-the' run 


Cy'no(6) 


Cy-re-na' i-ca 


Cyth' e-rus 


Cyn-o-ceph' a-le 


Cy-re-na' i-ci (3) 


Cyth'nos 


Cyn-o-ceph'a-li 


Cy-re'ne(8) 


Cy-tin' e-um 


Cyn-o-phon' tis 
Cy-nor' tas 


Cy-ri' a-des 
Cy-ril' lus 


Cyt-is-so' rus 
Cy-to' rus 


Cy-nor'ti-on (11) 


Cyr'il (Eng.) 


Cyz-i-ce' ui 


Cy'nos 


Cy-ri' nus 


Cyz' i-cuni 


Cyn-o-sar'ges 


Cyr'ne 


Cyz' i-cus 



* See Jphigenia, Neptune, wh shakes the earth, his daughter gave, 
Cymopolid) to reward the brave. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. Theog. v. 1132, 



f Cylhcrca. 



-Behold a nymph arise, divinely fair, 
Whom to Cythera first the surges bear ; 
And Aphrodite, from the foam, her name, 
Among the race of gods and men the same; 
And Cytherea from Cythera came. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. Theog. v. 299. 



Cytheris. 



Mere poetry 



Your Roman wits, your Gallus and Tibullus, 
Have taught you this from Cytheris and Delia. 

DRYDEN, All for Love. 



DA 



DA 



DE 





Da-moc' ri-tus 


UA'JE Da'hse 


Da' mon 


Da'ci, and Da'cae 


Dam-o-phan' tus 


Da'ci-a(ll) 


Da-moph'i-la 


Dac'ty-li(3)(4) 


Da-moph'i-lus 


Dad' i-cae 


Dam' o-phon 


Daed'a-!a 


Da-mos'tra-tus 


Dae-da' li-on 


Da-mox' e-nua 


Died' a-lus 


Da-myr'i-as 


Dae' mon 


Da'na(7) 


Da'i(4) 


Dan' a-e 


Da'i-cles(l) 


Dan'a-i(S) 


Da'i-dis 


Da-na'i-des (4) 


Da-im'a-chus 


Dan' a-la 


Da-im' e-nes 


Dan' a-us 


Da'i-phron (1) 


Dan'da-ri, and 


Da-i'ra(l) 


Dan-dar'i-da3 


Dal'di-a 


Dan' don 


Dal-ma'ti-a(lO) 


Da-nu' bi-us 


Dal-ma'ti-us(lO) 


Dan' ube (Eng.) 


Dam-a-ge' tus 


Da' o-chus (12) 


Dam' a-lis 


Daph' nae 


Da' mas (1) 


Daph-nae' us 


Dam-a-sce' na 


Daph'ne 


Da-mas'ci-us (10) 


Daph-ne-pho' ri-a 


Da-mas' cus 


Daph' nis 


Dam-a-sip' pus 


Daph' nus 


Dam-a-sich' thon 


Dar'a-ba 


Dam-a-sis'tra-tus 


Da' raps 


Dam-a-sith' y-nus 


Dar'da-ni (3) 


Da-mas' tes 


Dar-da' ni-a 


Da' mi-a 


Dar-dan' i-des 


Da-mi p' pus 


Dar' da-nus 


Da' mis 


Dai ' da-ris 


Dam'no-rix 


Da' res 


Da' mo 


Da-re' tis 


Dam' o-cles 


Da-ri' a 


Da-moc' ra-tes Da-ri' a-ve& 


Da-moc' ri-ta Da-ri' tag 


D '2 



Da-ri' us 
Das' con 

Das-cyl-i' tis 

Das' cy-lus 

Da' se-a 

Da'si-us(ll) 

Das-sar' e-tre 

Das-sa-re' ni 

Das-sa-ri' tae 

Das-sa-rit'i-i (3) (4) 

Dat' a-mes 

Dat-a-pher' nes 

Da' tis 

Da'tos, or Da' ton 

Dav'a-ra(7) 

Dau'lis 

Dau'ni(3) 

Dau' ni-a 

Dau' nus 

Dau'ri-fer, and 

Dau' ri-ses 
De-ceb' a-lus 
De-ce' le-um 
Dec'e-lus 
De-cem' vi-ri (4) 
De-ce'ti-a (10) 
De-cid'i-tis Sax'n 
De-cin' e-us 
De'ci-us(lO) 
Oe-cu' ri-o 
[)ed-i-tam'e-nes 
[)ej-a-ni'ra 
3e-ic' o-on 
3e-id-a-mi'a(3Q) 
3e-i-le'on 
)e-il' o-chus (12) 
)e-im'a-chus 
)ej' o-ces 
)e-i' o-chus 



36 DE DE DI 


De-i' o-ne 


De-me 7 tri-us j De-ru-si-ae 7 i(3) 


De-i-o' ne-us 


De 7 mo |De-sud 7 a-ba 


De-i-o-pe 7 i-a 


Dem-o-a-nas 7 sa Deii-ca 7 li-on (28) 


De-jot' a- rus 


Dem-o-ce 7 des Deu-ce 7 li-us (10) 


De-iph 7 i-la 


De-moch 7 a-res j Deu 7 do-rix 


De-iph' o-be 


Bern 7 o-cles Dex-am 7 e-ne 


De-iph' o-bus 


De-moc 7 o-on i Dex-am 7 e-nus 


De 7 i-phon De-moc 7 ra-tes | Dex-ip 7 pus 


De-i-phon 7 tes De-moc 7 ri-tus Dex-ith'e-a 


De-ip' y-le (6) (7) De-mod' i-ce (4) (8) Dex 7 i-us 


De-ip 7 y-lus De-mod' o-cus i Di 7 a ( 1 ) (7) 


De-ip 7 y-rus De-mo 7 le-us 


Di-ac-o-pe'na 


Del 7 don 


De-mo 7 le-on 


Di-ac-tor 7 i-des 


De 7 li-a 


De 7 mou 


Di-ae 7 us 


De-li 7 a-des 


Dem-o-nas 7 sa 


Di-a-du-me-ni-a' 


De 7 li-uin 


De-mo 7 nax 


nus 


De 7 li-us 


Dem-o-ni 7 ca (1) 


Di 7 a-gon, and 


Del-ma 7 ti-us (10) 


Dem-o-ni 7 cus 


Di 7 a-gum 


Del-min 7 i-um 


Dem-o-phan 7 tus 


Di-ag 7 o-ras 


De'los 


De-moph 7 i-lus 


Di-a'lis 


* Del 7 phi 


Dem' o-phon 


Di-al 7 lus 


Del 7 phi-cus 


De-moph 7 o-on 


Di-a-mas-ti-go 7 sis 


Del-phin 7 i-a 


De-mop 7 o-lis 


Dia 7 na(7) 


Del-phin 7 i-um 


De' mos 


Di-an 7 a-sa 


Del 7 phus 


De-mos 7 the-nes (18) 


Di-a 7 si-a(ll) 


Del-phy 7 ne(6) 


De-mos 7 tra-tus 


Di-cae 7 a 


Del'ta 


Dem 7 y-lus 


Di-cae 7 us 


Dem 7 a-des 


De-od 7 a-tus 


Di'ce(8) 


De-maen'e-tus 


De-o 7 is 


Dic-e-ar 7 chus 


De-mag 7 o-ras 


Der 7 bi-ces 


Di-ce 7 ne-us 


Dem-a-ra 7 ta 


Der 7 ce 


Dic 7 o-mas 


Dem-a-ra 7 tus 


Der-cen 7 nus 


Die 7 tae 


De-mar 7 chus 


Dei^ce-to, and 


Dic-tam 7 num, and 


Dem-a-re 7 ta 


Der 7 ce-tis 


Dye- tin 7 na 


Dem-a-ris 7 te 


Der-cyl 7 li-das 


Dic-ta 7 tor 


De 7 me- a 


Der-cyl 7 lus 


Dic-tid-i-en 7 ses 


De-me 7 tri-a 


Dei 7 cy-nus 


Dic-tyn 7 na 


De-me 7 tri-as 


Der-sse 7 i (3) 


Die 7 tys 



* Delphi. This word-* was, formerly, universally written Delphos; till Mr. 
Cumberland, a gentleman no less remarkable for his classical erudition than his 
dramatic abilities, in his Widow qf Delphi, rescued it from the vulgarity in 
which it had been so long involved. 



DI DI DO 3 


Did' i-us 


Di-og-ne' tus 


Di-plior' i-das 


Di'do 


Di-o-me' da 


Di-pce' nae 


Did'y-ma 


* Di-o-me' des 


Dip'sas 


Did-y-mae' us 


Di-o-me' don 


Di'ra 


Did-y-ma' on 


Di'on (3) 


Dir'ce 


Did'y-me(6)(8) 


Di-o-nae' a 


Dir-cen' na 


Did' y-mum 


Di-o' ne 


Dir' phi-a 


Did' y-mus 


Di-o-nys'i-a (11) 


Dis-cor' di-a 


Di-en' e-ces 


Di-o-ny-si' a-des 


Dith-y-ram' bus 


Di-es' pi-ter 


Di-o-nys' i-as (11) 


Dit'a-ni (3) 


Di-gen'ti-a (10) 


Di-o-nys'i-des 


Div-i-ti' a^cus 


Dig' ma 


Di-o-nys-i-o-do' rus 


Di'vus Fid' i-us 


Di'i(3)(4) 


Di-o-nys' i-on (11) 


Di-yl'lus 


Di-mas' sus 


Di-o-ny-sip' o-lis 


Do-be' res 


Di-nar'chus (12) 


Di-o-nys' i-us (11) 


Doc'i-lis 


Di-nol' o-chus 


Di-oph'a-nes 


Doc'i-mus (24) 


Din'i-ae(4) 


Di-o-phan' tus 


Do'cle-a 


Din'i-as 


Di-o-pi' tes 


Do-do' na 


Din'i-che(12) 


Di-o-pre' nus 


Dod-o-nae' us 


Di-noch' a-res 


Di-op' o-lis 


Do-do 7 ne 


Di-noc' ra-tes 


Di-o' res 


Do-don' i-des 


Di-nod' o-chus 


Di-o-ry' tus 


Do'i-i(4) 


Di-nom' e-nes 


Di-o-scor' i-des 


Dol-a-bel'Ia 


Di' non 


-f-Di-os'co-rus 


Dol-i-cha'on 


Di-nos' the-nes 


JDi-o-scu'ri(3) 


Dol'i-che(l)(12) 


Di-nos' tra-tus 


Di-os' pa-ge 


Do'li-us 


Di-o'cle-a 
Di' o-cles 


Di-os' po-lis 
Di-o-ti'me(l)(8) 


Dol-o-ine'na 
Do' Jon 


Di-o-cle-ti-a' nus 


Di-o-ti' mus 


Do-Ion' ci (3) 


Di-o-de f fr'-aw(Eng.) 


Di-ot' re-phes 


Dol' o-pes 


Di-o-do' rus 


Di-ox-ip' pe 


Do-lo' phi-on 


Di-o' e-tas 


Di-ox-ip' pus 


Do-lo' pi-a 


Di-og' e-nes 


Di-pae' ae 


Do' lops 


Di-o-ge' ni-a 


Diph'i-las 


Dom-i-du' cus 


Di-og' e-nus 


Diph'i-lus 


Do-min'i-ca 



* Diomedes. All words ending in f.des have the same accentuation; as Archi- 
medes, Diomedes, &c. The same may be observed of words ending in ides and 
odes; as Ipkieles, Damocles, Androcles, &e. See the Terminational Vocabulary. 

t Dioscorus. An heresiarch of the fifth century. 

t Dioscuri. The name given to Castor and Pollux, from the Greek Ate? and 
pro Kogo?, the sons of Jove. 



38 DO DR DY 


Do-mit'i-a(lO) 


Dos-se' nus 


Dry' mo 


Do-mit-i-a' nus 


Dot' a-das 


Dry' mus 


Do-mit' i-an (Eng.) 


Do' to 


Dry' o-pe 


Dom-i-til'la 


Do' tus 


Dry-o-pe' i--a (5) 


Do-mit'i-us (10) 


Dox-an' der 


Dry' o-pes 


Do-na' tus 


Dra-ca' nus 


Dry'p-pis, and 


Don-i-la' us 


Dra' co 


Dry-op' i-da 


Do-nu' ca 


Dra-con' ti-des 


Dry' ops 


Do-ny' sa 


Dra' cus 


Dryp' e-tis 


Do-rac' te 


Dran' ces 


Du-ce' ti-us (10) 


Do' res 


Drari-gi-a'na (7) 


Du-il'li-a ' 


Dor'i-ca(4)(7) 


Dra' pes 


Du-il'li-usNe'pos 


Dor'i-cus 


Drep'a-na, and 


Du-lich'i-um 


Do-ri-en' ses 


Drep'a-num 


Dum' no-rix 


Dor'i-las 


Drim' a-chus 


Du' nax 


Dor-i-la' us 


Dri-op' i-des 


Du-ra'ti-us (10) 


Do' ri-on 


Dri'os 


Du' ri-us 


Do'ris 


Dro'i(3) 


Du-ro'ni-a 


Do-ris' cus 


Dro-mae' us 


Du-um'vi-ri (4) 


Do' ri-um 


Drop' i-ci (4) 


Dy-a-gon' das 


Do' ri-us 


Dro' pi-on 


Dy-ar-den' ses 


Do-ros' to- rum 


Dru-en' ti-us, and 


Dy'rnaa 


Dor-sen' nus 


Dru-en'ti-a(lO) 


Dy-m'i(3) 


Dor' so 


Dru'ge-ri (3) 


Dy' mas 


Do' rus 


Dru'i-da3 


Dym' nus 


Do-ry' a-sus (6) 


Dru' ids (Eng.) 


Dy-nam' e-ne 


Do-ry' clus 


Dru-sil'la Liv'i-a 


Dyn-sa' te 


Dor-y-lae' um, and 


Dru' so 


Dy'ras(6) 


Dor-y-lse' us 


Dru' sus 


Dy-ras' pes 


Dor' y-las 


Dry' a-des 


Dyr-rach' i-um 


Dor-y-la' us 


Dry' ads (Eng.) 


Dy-sau' les 


Do-rys' sus 


Dry-an-ti' a-des 


Dys-ci-ne' tus 


Dos'ci(3) 


Dry-an' ti-des 


Dy-so' rum 


Do-si' a-des 


Dry-mas' a 


Dys-pon' ti-i (4) 


EA EB EC 


E A-NES 


Eb'do-me 


Ec-a-me' da 


E-a' nus 


E-bor'a-cum 


Ec-bat'a-na 


E-ar' i-nus 


Eb-u -ro' nes 


Ec-e-chir'i-a 


E-a' si-um 


Eb' u-sus 


Es-e-kir' i-a 






EL 

E-chec'ra-tes 

E-kek' ra-tes 

Ech-e-da' mi-a (30) 

E-chel' a-tus 

E-chel' ta 

Ech'e-lus 

E-chem'bro-tus 

E-che' mon 

Ech'e-mus 

Ech-e-ne' us 

Ech'e-phron 

E-chep' o-lus 

E-ches' tra-tus 

E-chev-e-then'ses 

E-chid'na 

Ech-i-do'rus 

E-chin'a-des 

E-ehi' non 

E-chi'nus 

Ech-i-nus'sa 

E-chi' on (29) 

Ech-i-on' i-des 

Ech-i-o' ni-us 

Ech'o 

E-des'sa, E-de'sa 

E-dis'sa 

E'don 

E-do'ni(3) 

E-dyl'i-us 

E-e'ti-on (10) 

E-gel' i-das 

E-ge' ri-a 

E-ges-a-re 7 lus 

Eg-e-si' nus 

E-ges' (a 

Eg-na'ti-a(lO) 

Eg-na'ti-us(lO) 

E-jo' ne-us 

E-i'on (26) 

E-i' o-nes 

E-i-o' ne-us 

El-a-bon' tas 

E-la'a 



EL EN 


E-he'us 


E-lis' sa 


El-a-ga-ba' lus, or 


El-lo'pi-a 


El-a-gab' a-lus 


E-lis' sus 


El-a-i'tes 


E-lo' rus 


E-la' i-us 


E'los 


El-a-phi-ae'a 


El-pe' nor 


El' a-phus 


El-pi-ni' ce 


El-a-phe-bo' li-a 


El-u-i' na 


El-ap-to' ni-us 


El'y-ces 


E-la'ra 


El-y-ma' is 


El-a-te' a 


El'y-mi (3) 


E-la' tus 


EKy-mus 


E-la'ver 


Ei'y-rus 


E'le-a 


E-lys' i-um 


E-le-a'tes 


E-raa' thi-a 


E-lec'tra 


E-ma' thi-on 


E-lec'trae 


Em' ba-tum 


E-lec' tri-cles 


Em-bo -\\ f ma 


E-lec' try-on 


E-mer'i-ta 


E-le'i 


E-mes' sa, and 


El-e-le'us 


E-mis' sa 


E' le-on 


Em-me'li-us 


El-e-on' turn 


E-mo'da 


El-e-phan' tis 


E-mo'dus 


El-e-phan-topb' a-gi 


Em-ped' o-cles 


El-e-phe' nor 


Em-pe-ra'mus 


El-e-po' rus 


Em-po'clus 


E'le-us 


Em-po' ri-a 


E-leu' chi-a 


Em-pu' sa 


El-eu-sin'i-a(22) 


En cel x a-dus 


E-leu' sis 


En-chel / e-a;(12) 


E-leu'ther 


En' de-is 


E-leu'the-ra 


En-de' ra 


El-eu-the' ri-a 


En-dym' i-on 


E-leu'tho 


E-ne' ti 


E-leu-ther-o-cil'i- 


En-gy' um 


ces 


En-i-en' ses 


E-lic'i-us(10)(24) 


En-i-o' pe-us 


El-i-en'sis, and 


E-nip' e-us 


E-li'a-ca 


E-nis'pe(8) 


El-i-me' a 


En'na 


EMis 


En' ni-a 


El-is-pha' si-i (4) En' ni-us 



40 EP ER ER 


En' no-miss 


Ep-i-dam 7 nus 


Er'a-to 


En-nos-i-gae 7 us 


Ep-i-daph'ne 


Er-a-tos' the-wes 


En' o-pe 


E-pi-dau' ri-a 


Er-a-tos 7 tra-tus 


E' nops 


Ep-i-dau 7 rus 


E-ra' tus 


E'nos 


E-pid'i-us 


Er-bes' sus 


En-o-sich 7 thon 


Ep-i-do 7 tae 


Er'e-bus 


E-not-o-coe 7 tae 


E-pig 7 e-nes 


E-rech 7 the-us 


En-tel' la 


E-pig' e-us 


E-rem'ri(3) 


En-tel'lus 


E-pig 7 o-ni (3) 


E-re 7 mus 


En-y-a' li-us 


E-pig' o-nus 


Er-e-ne 7 a 


E-n/o(6) 


E-pi'i, and E-pe 7 i 


E-res 7 sa 


E'o-ne 


E-pil 7 a-ris 


E-rech 7 thi-des 


E'os 


Ep-i-mel 7 i-des 


E-re 7 sus 


E-o'us 


E-pim 7 e-nes 


E-re 7 tri-a 


E-pa' gris 


Ep-i-men 7 i-des 


E-re 7 turn 


E-pam-i-non' das 


Ep-i-me' the-us 


Er-eu-tha'li-ou (29) 


Ep-an-tel' i-i (4) 


Ep-i-tne'this 


Er 7 ga-ne 


E-paph-ro-di' tus 


E-pi'o-chus (12) 


Er-gen 7 na 


Ep 7 a-phus 


E-pi'o-ne (8) 


Er 7 gi-as 


Ep-as*nac' tus 


E-piph' a-nes 


Er-gi 7 nus 


E-peb' o-lus 


Ep-i-pha' ni-us 


Er-gin 7 nus 


E-pe'i(3) 


E-pi' rus 


Er-i-boe 7 a 


E-pe 7 us 


E-pis' tro-phus 


E-rib 7 o-tes 


Eph 7 e-sus 


E-pit 7 a-des 


Er-i-ce 7 tes 


Eph'e-tae 


E' pi-um 


E-rich' tho 


Eph-i-al' tes 


Ep 7 o-na 


Er-ich-tho 7 ni-us 


Eph 7 o-ri(3) E-po'pe-us 


Er-i-cin 7 i-um 


Eph' o-rus 


Ep-o-red' o-rix 


Er-i-cu 7 sa 


Eph 7 y-ra 


Ep 7 u-lo 


* E-rid 7 a-nus 


Ep-i-cas' te 


E-py t' i-des 


E-rig 7 o-ne 


Ep-i-cer 7 i-des 


Ep' y-tus 


E- rig' o-nus 


Ep-i-cha' i-des 


E-qua-juj> 7 ta 


Er-i-gy' us 


E-pich 7 a-ris 


E-quic 7 o-lus 


E-ril 7 lus 


Ep-i-char 7 mus 


E-quir 7 i-a 


E-rin 7 des 


Ep' i-cles 


E-quo-tu' ti-cum 


E-rin 7 na 


Ep-i-cli 7 des 


Er 7 a-con 


E-rin 7 nys 


E-pic 7 ra-tes 


E-rae'a 


E-ri' o-pis 


Ep-ic-te 7 tus 


Er-a-si 7 nus 


E-riph' a-nis 


Ep-i-cu 7 rus 


Er-a-sip 7 pus 


E-riph' i-das 


E-pic' y-des (24) 


Er a-sis 7 tra-tus 


Er-i-phy 7 le 



* Eridanus. Alpheus and Eridanus the strong, 

That rises deep, and stately rolls along. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. Tkeog. v. 520. 



ES EU EU 4t 


E'ris 


Et-e-ar' chus 


Eu-bu 7 li-des 


Er-?i-sich 7 thon 


E-te'o-cles 


Eu-bu 7 lus 


Er'i-thus 


E-te'o-clus 


Eu-ce 7 rus 


'E-rix 7 o 


Et-e-o-cre' tae 


Eu-che 7 nor 


E-ro 7 chus 


E-te' o-nes 


Eu 7 chi.des 


E-ro 7 pus, and 


E-te-o'ne-us 


Eu-cli 7 des 


Jr 7 o-pas 


Et-e-o-ni' cus (30) 


Eufclid(Ens.} 


E'ros 


E-te'si-se(ll) 


Eu'clus 


E-ros 7 tra-tus 


E-tbaMi-on (29) 


Eu' cra-te 


E-ro'ti-a(lO) 


E-the 7 le-um 


Eu 7 cra-tes 


Er-ru'ca 


Eth' o-da 


Eu 7 cri-tus 


Er'se 


E-the' mon 


Euc-te 7 mon 


Er' y-mas 


E'ti-as(lO) 


Euc-tre' si-i (4) 


Er'xi-as 


E'tis 


Eu-dae 7 mon 


E-ryb 7 i-um 


E-tru 7 ri-a 


Eu-dam' i-das 


Er-y-ci 7 na 


Et 7 y-lus 


Eu' da-mus 


Er-y-man 7 this 


E-vad 7 ne 


Eu-de 7 mus 


Er-y-man 7 thus 


Ev 7 a-ges 


Eu-do 7 ci-a 


E-rym' na3 


E-vag 7 o-ras 


Eu-doc 7 i-mus 


E-rym'ne-us 


E-vag 7 o-re 


Eu-do' ra 


Er'y-mus 


E'van 


Eu-do 7 rus 


*Er-y-the 7 a 


E-van 7 der 


Eu-dox'i-a 


Er-y-thi'ni (4) 


E-van'ge-lus 


Eu-dox 7 us 


Er'y-thra 


Ev-an-gor 7 i-des 


E-vel 7 thon 


Er'y-thra 


E-van' thes 


Eu-e-mer 7 i-das 


E-ryth 7 ri-on 


E-var 7 chus 


E-vem' e-ru$ 


E-ryth 7 ros 


E 7 vas 


E-ve 7 nus 


E'ryx 


E'vax 


Ev-e-phe 7 nus 


E-ryx'o 


Eu 7 ba-ges 


Ev'e-res 


E-ser'nus 


Eu-ba 7 tas 


E-ver 7 ge-tae 


Es-quil 7 i-ae, and 


Eu 7 bi-us 


E-ver 7 ge-tes 


Es-qui-li'nus 
Es-sed' o-nes 


Eu-boe 7 a (7) 
Eu-bo 7 i-cus 


Eu-ga 7 ne-i (3) 
Eu-ge 7 ni-a (20) 


Es' su-i (S) 


Eu 7 bo-te 


Eu-ge' ni-us 


Es'u-la 


Eu 7 bo-tes 


Eu' ge-on 


Es-ti-ai'a (7) 


Eu-bu'le(8) 


Eu-hem'e-rus 



* Erythca. Clirysaor, Love the guide, Callirbe led, 

Daughter of Ocean, to the genial bed. J. 

Whence Geryon sprung, fierce with his triple head ; J 
Whom Hercules laid breathless on the ground 
In Erythea, which the waves surround. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. Theog. v. 523. 



*2 EU EU EU 


Eu' hy-drum 


Eu-phan' tus 


Eu-ry-crat' i-das 


Eu'hy-us 


Eu-phe'me 


Eu-ryd'a-mas 


E-vip'pe(8) 


Eu-phe' mus 


Eu-ryd' a-me 


E-vip' pus 


Eu-phor'bus 


Eu-ry-dam' i-das 


Eu-lim' e-ne 


Eu-pho' ri-on 


Eu-ryd' i-ce 


Eu-ma'chi-us (12) 


Eu-phra'nor 


Eu-ry-ga' ni-a 


Eu-mae' us 


Eu-phra'tes 


Eu-ry' le-on 


Eu-me' des 


Eu' phron 


Eu-ryl' o-chus 


Eu-me' lis 


Eu-phros'y-ne 


Eu-rym' a-chus 


Eu-me' Jus 


Eu-plae' a, or 


Eu-rym' e-de 


Eu' me-lus (King) 


Eu-ploe' a 


Eu-rym' e-don 


*Eu' me-nes 


Eu' po-lis 


Eu-rym' e-nes 


Eu-me'ni-a 


Eu-pom' pus 


Eu-ryn' o-me 


Eu-men' i-des 


Eu-ri-a-nas' sa 


Eu-ryn' o-mus 


Eu-me-nid'i-a 
Eu-me' ni-us 


Eu- rip' i-des 
Eu-ri' pus 


Eu-ry' o-ne 
Eu' ry-pon 


Eu-mol' pe 


Eu-ro' mus 


Eu-ry p'y-le 


Eu-mol' pi-dae Eu-ro' pa (7) 


Eu-ryp'y-lus 


Eu-mol' pus Eu-ro-pae'us 


Eu-rys' the-nes 


Eu-mon' i-des Eu' rops 


Eu-rys-then' i-dae 


Eu-nae'us Eu'ro-pus 


Eu-rys' the-us 


Eu-na' pi-ua ! Eu-ro' tas 


Eu' ry-te 


Eu-no' mi-a Eu-ro' to 


Eu-ryt' e-as 


Eu' no-tnus 


Eu' rus 


Eu-ryt' e-le 


Eu' nus 


Eu-ry'a-1e(8) 


Eu-ryth' e-mis 


Eu' ny-mos 


Eu-r/a-lus 


Eu-ryth' i-on, and 


Eu' o-ras 


Eu-ryb'a^tes 


Eu-ryt' i-on( 11) 


Eu-pa' gi-um 


Eu-ryb'i-a 


Eu' ry-tus 


Eu-pal' a-mon 


Eu-ry-bi'a-des 


Eu'ry-tis 


Eu-pal' a-mus 


Eu-ryb' i-us 


Eu-se' bi-a 


Eu' pa-tor 


Eu-ry-cle' a 


Eu-se' bi-us 


Eu-pa-to' ri-a 


Eu' ry-cles 


Eu'se-pus 


Eu-pei' thes 


Eu-ry-ch'des 


Eu-sta' thi-us 


Eu' pha-es 


Eu-ryc' ra-tes 


Eu-sto'H-a 



* Ewnenes. It is not a little surprising that so elegant a writer as Hughes 
should, throughout the whole tragedy of the Siege of Damascus, accent this 
word on the penultimate syllable ; especially as there is not a single proper 
name of more than two syllables in ihe Greek or Latin languages of this termi- 
nation which has the penultimate syllable long. Lee has done the same in the 
tragedy of Alexander, which would lead us to suppose there is something na- 
turally repugnant to an English car in the antepenultimate accentuation of 
these words, and something agreeable in the penultimate. 



EU EU EX 43 


Eu-sto' li-us 


Eu-thy' mus 


Eu-xan' thi-us 


Eu-taj'a (7) 


Eu-trap' e-lus 


Eux' e-nus 


Eu-tel' i-das 


Eu-tro' pi-a 


Eu-xi' nus Pon' Mis 


Eu-ter' pe 


Eu-tro' pi-us 


Eu-xip' pe 


*Eu-tha' li-a 


Eu' ty-ches 


Ex-a' di-us 


Eu-tha' li-us Eu-tych' i-de 


Ex-ae'thes 


Eu-thyc' ra-tes Eu-tych' i-des 


Ex-ag' o-nus 


Eu-thy-de' mus Eu' ty-phron 


Ex-om' a-tra3 


FA FE FL 


r AB'-A-RIS 


Fa-ven'ti-a (10) 


Fi-bre' nus 


Fa'bi-a(7; 


Fa-ve' ri-a 


Fi-cul' ne-a 


Fa-bi-a' ni (3) 


Fau'la 


Fi-de'na 


Fa'bi-i(4) 


Fau' na 


Fi-de' nas 


Fa' bi-us 


Fau-na' li-a 


Fi-den' ti-a 


Fab-ra-te' ri-a 


Fau'ni(3) 


Fi'des 


Fa-bric' i-us (24) 


Fau' nus 


Fi-dic' u-lae 


Fa-bul'la 


Fa' vo 


Fim' bri-a 


Fa'dus 


Fau' sta 


Fir' mi-us 


Faes' u-lae 


Fau-sti'na (3) 


Fis-cel'lus 


Fal-cid' i-a 


Fau' sti-tas 


Fla-cel'li-a 


Fa-le'ri-i(4) 


Fau' stu- lus 


Flac'cus 


Fal-e-ri' na 


Fau' tus 


Fla-cil'la M'\\-a 


Fa-ler' nus 


Feb'ru-a 


Fla-min' i-a 


Fa-lis'ciCS) 


Fec-i-a' les 


Fla-min'i-us, or 


Fa-lis 7 cus 


Fel' gi-nas 


Flam-i-ni' nus 


Fa' ma 


Fen-es-tel'la 


Fla'vU-a 


Fan' ni-a 


Fe-ra'li-a 


Fla-vi-a' num 


Fan / ni-i(4 > ) 


Fer-en-ta' num and 


Fla-vin' i-a 


Fan' ni-us 


Fe-ren' turn 


Fla-vi-ob' ri-ga 


Far' fa-rus 


Fe-re' tri-us 


Fla' vi-us 


Fas' ce-lis 


Fe-ro'ni-a 


Flo'ra 


Fas-eel' li-na 


Fes-cen' ni-a 


Flo-ra'li-a 


Fau-cu' i-a 


Fes' tus 


Flo'rus 



* Euthalia. Labbe observes, that this word does not come from the muse 
Thalia, as some suppose, but from the masculine Euthaliits, as Eulatia, Eumenia, 
Eustolia, Eutropia, Emmelia, &c. which are professedly accented on the ante- 
penultimate. See Rule 29. 



44 FR FU FU 


Flo-ri-a' nus 


Fren-ta'ni (3) 


Ful'vi-a 


Flu-o' ni-a 


Frig' i-dus 


Ful'vi-us 


Fo'li-a 


Fris' i-i (4) 


Fun-da' nus 


Fon-te' i-a (5) 


Fron' ti-nus 


Fun'di(3) 


Fon-te' i-us Cap' i-to 


Fron' to 


Fu'ri-a 


For' mi-ae 


Fru' si-no 


Fu' ri-ae 


For-mi-a'num 


Fu-ci' na 


Fu'ri-i(4) 


For' nax 


Fu-ci' nus 


Fu-ri' na 


For-tu' na 


Fu-fid'i-us 


Fu-ri' nae 


For' u-li 


Fu' fi-us Gem' i-nus 


Fu' ri-us 


Fo' rum Ap' pi-i 


Ful-gi-na' tes 


Fur' ni-us 


Fran'ci(3) 


Ful-gi' nus 


Fus' cus 


Fre-gel'la(7) 


Ful' li-num, and 


Fu / si-a(ll) 


Fre-ge' nae 


Ful'gi-num 


Fu' si-us (10) 


GA GA GA 


V3f AB' A-LES 


Gal'a-ta(7) 


Gal-lo-grae' ci- a 


Gab' a-za 


Gal'a-tae 


Gal-lo' ni-us 


Ga-be'ne, and 


Gal-a-tae'a, and 


Gal'lus 


Ga-bi-e' ne 


Gal-a-thae'a 


Ga-max' us 


Ga-bi-e' nus 


Ga-la'ti-a (10) 


Ga-me' li-a 


Ga'bi-a(4) 


Ga-lax'i-a 


Gan-da-ri' tag 


Ga-bi' na 


Gal' ba 


Gan'ga-ma 


Ga-bin'i-a 


Ga-le' nus 


Gan-gar'i-dae 


Ga-bin-i-a' nus (20) 


Ga-le' o-lae 


Gan' ges 


Ga-bin' i-us 


Ga-le' ri-a 


Gan-nas'cus 


Ga'des, and 


Ga-le' ri-us 


Gan-y-me' de 


Gad'i-ra 


Ga-le' sus 


Gan-y-me' des 


Gad-i-ta' nus 


Gal-i-lae'a 


Gan'y-mede (Eng.) 


Gae-sa'tae 


Ga-lin-thi-a'di-a 


Ga-rae' i-cum 


Gae-tu' li-a 


Gal' li (3) 


Gar-a-man' tes 


Ge-tu' li-cus 


Gal' li-a 


Gar-a-man' tis 


Ga-la'bri-i(4) 


Gal-li-ca' nus 


Gar'a-mas 


Gal-ac-toph' a-gi (3) 


Gal-H-e' nus 


Gar'a-tas 


Ga-lae' sus 


Gal-li-na' ri-a 


Ga-re' a-tae 


Ga-lan' this 


Gal-lip' o-lis 


Ga-re-ath'y-ra' 



GE GL GO 4.5 


* Gar-ga' nus 


Ge-or'gi-ca 


Glaph' y-rus 


Gar-ga' phi-a 


Geor' gics (Eng.) Glau'ce 


Gar'ga-ra(7) 


Ge-phy'ra Glau-cip'pe 


Gar' ga-ris 


Ge-phyr'ae-i(S) 


Glau-cip' pus 


Ga-ril' i-us 


Ge-ra' ni-a 


Glau' con 


Gar-git' ti-us 


Ge-ran' thrae G lau-con' o-me 


Gar-i' tes 


Ge-res' ti-cus 


Glau-co'pis 


Ga-rum'na 


Ger'gi-thum (9) 


Glau'cus 


Gas' iron 


Ger-go' bi-a 


Glau' ti-as 


Gath'e-ae (4) 


Ge' ri-on 


Gli' con 


Ga-the'a-tas 


Ger-ma'ni-a 


Glis' sas 


Gau'lus, Gau'le-on 


Ger-man'i-cus 


Glyc' e-ra 


Gau' rus 


Ger-ma' ni-i (4) 


Gly-ce' ri-um 


Ga'us, Ga'os 


Ge-ron' thrse 


Gly' con 


Ge-ben' na (9) 


Ger 7 rhai 


Glym' pes 


Ge-dro'si-a(ll) 


Ge'rus, and 


Gna'ti-a (13) (10) 


Ge-ga' ni-i (4) 


Ger 7 rhus 


Gni'dus 


Ge'la 


Ge' ry-on (9), and 


Gnos'si-a(lO) 


Ge-la' nor 


Ge-ry' o-nes 


Gnos' sis 


Gei'li-a 


Ges'sa-tse 


Gnos' sus 


Gel'li-as 


Ges' sus 


Gob-a-nit'i-o (10) 


Gel'li-us 


Ge'ta (9) 


Go' bar 


Ge'lo, Ge'lon 


Ge'ta 


Gob' a-res 


Ge'lo-i(3) 


Ge-tu'li-a 


Gob'ry-as 


Ge-lo' nes, Ge-lo' rii 


Gi-gan' tes 


Gol'gi 


Ge'los 


Gi-gar' turn 


Gom' phi 


Ge-min' i-us 


Gi' gis 


Go-na' tas 


Gem' i-nus 


Gil' do 


Go-ni' a-des 


Ge-na' bum 


Gil'lo 


Go-nip' pus 


Ge-nau' ni 


Gin-da' nes 


Go-noss' sa 


Ge-ne' na 


Gin'des 


Go-nus'sa 


Ge-ni' sus 


Gin'ge 


Gor-di-a'nus 


Ge' ni-us 


Gin-gu'num 


Gor'di-um 


Gen' se-ric 


Gip' pi-us 


Gor' di-us 


Gen'ti-us(lO) 


Gis' co 


Gor-ga' sus 


Gen'u-a 


Gla-di-a-to'ri-i(4) 


Gor'ge(8) 


Ge-nu'ci-us(lO) 


Gla' nis 


Gor' gi-as 


Ge-nu' sus 


Glaph'y-re, and 


Gor' go 


Ge-nu'ti-a(ll) 


Glaph'y-ra Gor'go-nes 



* Gargannt. And high Garganus, on the Apulian plain, 
Is mark'd by sailors from the distant main. 

WILKIE, Epigonwd. 



46 GR GR GY 


Gor-go' ni^a 


Gra' i-us Gy' a-rus, and 


Gor-go' ni-us 


*Gra-ni' cus, or Gy' a-ros 


Gor-goph' o-ne 


Gran' i-cus 


Gy'as 


Gor-goph' o-ra 


Gra' ni-us Gy-gae' us 


Gor' gus 


Gra'ti-ae(lO) \ Gy'ge 


Gor-gyth' i-on 


Gra-ti-a'nus (21) 


Gy'ges(9), or 


Goi / tu-ae 


Gra-tid' i-a 


Gy'es 


Goi 7 tyn 


Gra'ti-on(ll) 


Gy-lip' pus 


Gor-ty' na 


Gra'ti-us(lO) 


Gym-na'si-a (11) 


Gor-tyn' i-a 


Gra'vi-i(4) 


Gym-na' si-um (11) 


Gor'tys 


Gra-vis'cae 


Gyrn-ne' si-ae (U) 


Got'thi(S) 


Gra' vi-us 


Gym' ne-tes 


Grac'chus (12) 


Gre-go'ri-us 


Gym-nos-o-phis' tae 


Gra-di' vus 


Grin'nes 


Jim-nos' o-phists 


Grse'ci(3) 


Gro' phus 


(Kng-) (9) 


Grse'ci-a(ll) 


Gryl'lus 


Gy-na:' ce-as 


Grae'ci-a Mag'na 


Gry-ne' urn Gyn-ae-co-thoe' nas 


Grae-ci' nus 


Gry-ne' us : Gyn' des 


Grae' cus 


Gry-ni' um Gy-the' um 


HA HA HA 


HA' BIS 


Ha-le' sus 


Ha-lim'e-de 


Ha-dri-a-nop' o-lis 


Hal'a-la 


Hal-ir-rho'ti-us(10 


Ha-dri-a' nus (23) 


Hal-cy'o-ne (8) 


Hal-i-ther'sus 


Ha-dri-at' i-cum 


Ha'les 


Ha'Ji-us (20) 


Has' mon 


Ha-le' si-us (11) 


Hal-i-zo'nes (21) 


Hae-mo' ni-a 


Ha'li-a 


Hal' mus 


Hae' mus 


Ha-li-ac'mon(21) 


Hal-my-des' sus 


Ha'ges 


Ha-li-ar'tus(21) 


Ha-loc' ra-tes 


Hag' no 


Hal-i-car-nas' sus 


Ha-lo'ne 


Hag-nag' o-ra 


Ha-lic / y-2e(11)(24) 


Hal-on-ne' sus 


Ha-lae' sus, and 


Ha-li'e-is 


Ha-lo'ti-a(lO) 



* Granicus. As Alexander's passing the river Granicus is a common subject 
of history, poetry, and painting, it is not wonderful that the common ear should 
have given into a pronunciation of this word more agreeable to English analogy 
than the true classical accent on the penultimate syllable, The accent on the 
first syllable is now so fixed, as to make the other pronunciation savour of pe- 
dantry. See Andronicus. 



HE HE HE 47 


Ha-lc/tus 


He' brus 


Hel-i-ca' on 


Ha'lus 


Hec'a-le 


Hel'i-ce 


Hal-y-ae' tus 


Hec-a-le' si-a 


Hel' i-con 


Hal-y-at' tes 


Hec-a-me' de 


Hel-i-co-ni' a-des 


Ha'lys 


Hec-a-tae' us 


Hel-i-co' nis 


Ha-ly/i-aOl) 


Hec'a-te (8), or 


He-li-o-do' rus (21) 


Ham-a-dry' a-des 


Hec' ate (Eng.) 


fHe-li-o-ga-ba' lus 


Ha-max' i-a 


Hec-a-te'si-a (li) 


He-li-op'o-lis 


Ha- mil' car 


Hec-a-tom-bo'i-a 


He-lis' son 


Ham' mon 


Hec-a-tom-pho' ni-a 


He' li-us 


Han' ni-bal 


Hec-a-tom' po-lis 


He-lix' us 


Har' ca-lo 


Hec-a-tom' py-los 


HeUan'i-ce 


Har-ma-te' Ji-a 


Hec' tor 


Hel-lan'i-cus 


Har 7 ma-tris 


Hec' u-ba 


Hel-la-noc' ra-tes 


Ha-mil' lus 


Hed' i-la 


Hel' las 


Har-mc/ di-us 


He-don' a-cum 


Hel'le(8) 


Har-ma'ni-a 


Hed'u-i(S) 


Hel'len 


Har-mon' i-des 


He-dym' e-les 


Hel-le' nes 


Har'pa-gus 


He-gel' o-chus 


Hel-le-spon' tus 


Har-pal'i-ce 


*He-ge' mon 


Hel-lo' pi-a 


Har-pa' li-on 


Heg-e-si' nus 


Hel-lo'ti-a(lO) 


Har'pa-lus 


Heg-e-si' a-nax 


He-lo'ris 


Har-pal'y-ce(8) 


He-ge' si-as 


He-lo' rum, and 


Har-pal' y-cus 


Heg-e-sil' o-chus 


He-lo' rus 


Har' pa-sa 


Heg-e-sin' o-us 


He'los 


Har' pa-sus 


Heg-e-sip'pus 


He-lo' tae, and 


Har-poc' ra-tes 


Heg-e-sip' y-le 


He-lo' tes 


Har-py' i-ae (4) 


Heg-e-sis' tra-tus 


Hel-ve'ti-a (10) 


Har' pies (Eng.) 


Heg-e-tor' i-des 


Hel-ve' ti-i (4) 


Ha-ru'spex 


Hel'e-na(7) 


Hel'vi-a 


Has'dru-bal 


He-le' ni-a 


Hel'vi-i(4) 


Ha-te' ri-us 


He-le' nor 


Hel-vi'na 


Hau' sta-nes 


Hel' e-nus 


Hel' vi-us Cin'na 


Heb'do-le 


He-ler'ni Lu'cus 


He'lum 


He' be (8) 


He-li' a-des 


Hel' y-mus 


He-be' sus 


He-li-as' tae 


He-rna' thi-on 



* #fg-<?mon. Gouldman and Holyoke accent this word on the antepenulti- 
mate syllable, but Labbe and Lempriere more classically on the penultimate. 

Helwgabalus. This word is accented on the penultimate syllable by Labbe 
and Lempriere; but in my opinion more agreeably to the general ear by Ains- 
worth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on the antepenultimate. 



48 HE HE HI 


He-mith' e-a 


Her' i-lus He-roph' i-lus 


He' mon 


Her' ma-chus 


He-ros' tra-tus 


He' mus 


Her' m& 


Her' pa 


Hen'e-ti (3) 


Her-mae' a 


Her'se 


Heni'o-chi (3) 


Her-mae' um 


Her-sil'i-a 


He-phaes' ti-a 


Her-mag' o-ras 


Her'tha, and 


He-phajs' ti-i (4) 


H er-man-du' ri 


Her'ta 


He-phaes' ti-o 


Her-man' ni 


Her'u-li 


He-phaes' ti-on (11) 


Her-maph-ro-di' tus 


He-sae' nus 


Hep-ta-pho' nos 


Her-ma-the' na 


He-si' o-dus 


Hep-tap' o-lis 


Her-me' as 


He? zhe-od(En.)(i(>) 


Hep-tap' y-los 
He'ra(7) 


Her-me' i-as 
Her'mes 


He-si' o-ne 
Hes-pe' ri-a 


Her-a-cle' a 


Her-me-si' a-nax 


Hes-per' i-des 


Her-a-cle' i-a 


Her-mi'as 


Hes' pe-ris 


He-rac' le-um 


Her-min' i-us 


Hes-per' i-tis 


He-rac-le-o' tes 


Her-mi' o-ne 


Hes' pe-rus 


Her-a-cli' dae 


Her-mi' o-ni-ae 


Hes' ti-a 


Her-a-cli' dis 


Her-mi-on' i-cus Si' 


Hes-ti-se'a(7) 


Her-a-cli' des 


nus 


He' sus 


*Her-a-cli' tus 


Her-mip' pus 


He-sych' i-a 


He-rac' li-us 


Her-moc' ra-tes 


He-sych' i-us 


He-ra'a 


Her-mo-do' rus 


He-trie' u-lum 


He-rae' um 


Her-mog' e-nes 


He-tru'ri-a 


Her-bes' sus 


Her-mo-la' us 


Heu-rip' pa 


Her-ce' i-us 


Her-mo-ti'mus 


Hex-ap' y-lum 


Her-cu-la' ne-um 


Her-mun-du' ri 


Hi-ber'ni-a, and 


Her'cu-les 


Her' mus 


Hy-ber' ni-a 


Her-cu' le-um 


Her' ni-ci (4) 


Hi-bril' des 


Her-cu' le-us 


He'ro 


Hic-e-ta'on (24) 


Her-cy' na 


He-ro'des 


His-e^taf on 


Her-cyn' i-a 


He-ro-di-a'nus (21) 


Hi-ce'tas 


Her-do' ni-a 


He-rod' i-cus 


Hi-emp' sal 


Her-do'ni-us 


He-rod' o-tus 


Hi'e-ra 


He-ren' ni-us Se-ne' 


Her' o-es 


Hi-e-rap' o-lis 


ci-o 


He-ro' is 


Hi' e-rax 


He' re-us 


He'ron 


Hi'e-ro 


He-ril' lus 


He-roph' i-la 


Hi-e-ro-ce' pi-a 



* Heraclitus. This name of the weeping philosopher is so frequently con- 
trasted with that of Democritus, the laughing philosopher, that we are apt to 
pronounce both with the same accent ; but all our prosodists are uniform in 
giving the antepenultimate accent to the latter, and the penultimate to the fi 
mer word. 



HI HI HO 4C 


Hi-er'o-cles 


Hip-pob' o-tes 


Hip-pos' tra-tus ' 


Hi-e-ro-du' lum 


Hip-pob' o-tus 


Hip-pot' a-des 


Hi-er-om' ne-mon 


Hip-po-cen-tau' ri 


Hip' po-tas, or 


Hi-e-ro-ne'sos 


Hip-poo' o-on 


Hip'po-tes 


Hi-e-ron' i-ca (30) 


Hip-po-cor-ys' tes 


Hip-poth'o-e 


Hi-er-on'i-cus 


Hip-poc'ra-tes 


Hip-podi'o-on 


Hi-e-rori' y-mus Hip-po-cra' ti-a (11) Hip-poth-o-on' tis 


Hi-e-roph'i-lus *Hip-po-cre'ne (7) Hip-poth'o-us 


Hi-e-ro-bol' y-ma Hip-pod' a-mas 


Hip-po'ti-on (11) 


Hig-na' ti-a Vi' a Hip-pod' a-me Hip-pu'ris 


Hi-la' ri-a Hip-po-da-mi'a (30) Hip' pus 


Hi-la' ri-us Hip-pod' a-mus 


Hip' si-des 


Hi-mel'la 1 Hip-pod' i-ce 


Hi'ra 


Him'e-ra Hip-pod'ro-mus 


Hir-pi' ni (4) 


Hi-mil' co Hip'po-la 


Hir-pi'nus, Q. 


Hip-pag' o-ras Hip-pol'o-chus 


Hir'ti-a(lO) 


Hip-pal' ci-mus Hip-pol'y-te (8) 


Hir'ti-us An' Ins 


Hip'pa-lus Hip-pol'y-lus 


Hir'tus 


Hip- par' chi-a ( 1 2) Hip-pom' a-chus 


His' bon 


Hip-par'chus Hip-porn' e-don 


His-pa' ni-a 


Hip-pa-ri' mis i Hip-pom' e-ne 


His-pel'lum 


Hip-pa' ri-on Hip-pom' e-nes 


His'po 


Hip' pa-sus 


Hip-po-mol'gi 


His-pul' la 


Hip'pe-tis 


Hip'pon,andHip'po 


His-tas'pes 


Hip' pi (3) Hip-po'na 


His'ter Pa-cu'vi-us 


Hip'pi-a 


Hip'po-nax 


His-ti-ae'a 


Hip' pi-as 


Hip-po-ni' a-tes 


His-ti-ab'o-tis 


Hip' pis 


Hip-po' ni-um 


His-ii-ae'us 


Hip' pi-us 


Hip-pon'o-us 


His' tri-a 


Hip' po 


Hip-pop'o-des 


Ho'di-us 



* Hippocrene. Nothing can be better established than the pronunciation of 
this word in four syllables, according to its original; and yet such is the licence 
of English poets, that they not unfrequently contract it to three. Thus COOKF, 
Hesiod. Theog. v. 9. 

And now to Hippocrene resort the fair ; 

Or, Olmius, to thy sacred spring repair. 

And a late translator of the Satires of Persius : 

Never did I so much as sip, 
Or wet 'with Hippocrene a lip. 

This contraction is inexcusable, as it tends to embarrass pronunciation, and 
lower the language of poetry. 

E 



50 HY HY HY 


Hoi' o-cron 


Hyb' re-as 


Hy-pa' tes 


Ho-me' rus 


Hy-bri' a-nes 


Hyp' a-tha 


Ho'mer(Eng.) 


Hyc' ca-ra 


Hy-pe' nor 


Horn' o-le 


Hy'da, andHy'de 


Hy-pe-ra'on 


Ho-mo' le-a 


Hyd'a-ra 


Hy-per 7 bi-us 


Hom-o-lip' pus 


Hy-dar' nes 


Hyp-erbo' re-i 


Hom-o-lo' i-des 


Hy-das' pes 


Hy-pe're-a, and 


Ho-mon-a-den' ses 


Hy' dra 


Hy-pe' ri-a 


Ho-no'ri-us 


Hy-dra' mi-a (30) 


Hyp-e-re'si-a(l 1) 


Ho'ra 


Hy-dra-o' tes 


Hy-per' i-des 


Ho-rac'i-tse (24) 


Hy-droch' o-us 


Hy-pe' ri-on (29) 


Ho'r* 


Hy-dro-pho' ri-a 


Hyp-erm-nes' tra 


Hor-a-pol'lo 


Hy'drus 


Hy-per'o-chus 


Ho-ra' ti-us 


Hy-dru' sa 


Hy-per-och' i-des 


Hor' ace (Eng.) 


Hy' e-la 


Hy-phae' us 


Hor'ci-as(lO) 


Hy-emp'sal 


Hyp' sa 


Hor-mis' das 


Hy-et' tus 


Hyp-se' a 


Ho-ra' tus 


Hy-ge' i-a 


Hyp-se' nor 


Hor-ten'si-a(lO) 


Hy-gi-a' na 


Hyp-se' us 


Hor-ti' num 


Hy-gi' nus 


Hyp-si- era- te' a 


Hor- ten' si-us (10) 


H/la, and Hy' las 


Hyp-sic' ra-tes 


Hor-to' na 
Ho' rus 


Hy-lac' i-des 
Hy-lac' tor 


Hyp-syp' y-le 
Hyr-ca' ni-a 


Hos-til'i-a 


Hy'he 


Hyr-ca'num ma' re 


Hos-til'i-us 


Hy-la'us 


Hyr-ca' nus 


Hun-ne-ri' cus 


Hy' las 


Hyr'i-a 


Hun-ni' a-des 


Hy'lax 


Hy-ri' e-us, and 


Hy-a-cin' thi-a 


Hyl'i-as 


Hyr'e-us 


Hy-a-cin' thus 


Hyl-la' i-cus 


Hyr-mi' na 


Hy' a-des 


Hyl'lus 


Hyr' ne-to, and 


Hy-ag' nis 


Hy-lon' o-me 


Hyr 7 ne-tho 


Hy'a-la 


Hy-loph'a-gi(S) 


Hyr-nith' i-um 


Hy-ara' po-lis 


Hym-e-nae' us, and 


Hyr' ta-cus 


Hy-an' thes 


Hy' men 


Hys'i-a(ll) 


Hy-an' tis 


Hy-met' tus 


Hys' pa 


Hy-ar'bi-ta 


Hy-pae' pa 


Hys'sus, and 


Hy'as 


Hy-p2e'si-a(ll) 


Hys' si (3) 


Hy'bla 


Hyp' a-nis 


Hys-tas' pes 


*Hy-bre'as, or 


Hyp-a-ri' nus 


Hys-ti-e' us 



* Hybreas. Lempriere accents this word on the penultimate syllable ; but 
Labbe, Gouldman, and Holyoke, more properly, on the antepenultimate. 



( 51 ) 


IA 1C ID 


I' A 


Jar' chas 


Ich-o-nu' phis 


I-ac'chus 


I-ar 7 da-nus 


Ich-thy-oph' a-gi (3) 


I-a'der 


I-as' i-des 


Ich' thys 


I-a-le' mus 


I-a'si-on (11), and 


I-cil'i-us 


I-aK me-nus 


I-a' si-us 


Ic'i-us (10) 


I-al' y-sus 


Ja' son 


1'cos 


I-am' be 


1'a-sus 


Ic-ti'nus 


I-am' bli-cus 


I-be'ri 


I'da 


I-am' e-nus 


I-be'ri-a 


I-d<e'a 


I-am' i-dae 


1-be'rus 


I-dze' us 


Ja-nic' u-lum 


F bi (3) 


Id' a-lus 


I-a-ni' ra 


I'bis 


Id-an-thyr'sus 


I-an' the 


Ib'y-cus 


I-dar' nes 


I-an' the-a 


I-ca' ri-a 


I' das 


Ja' nus 


I-ca' ri-us 


fld'e-a(28) 


I-ap-e-ron' i-des 


Ic' a-rus 


1-des'sa 


*I-ap' e-tus 


Ic'ci-us (10) 


I-dit-a-ri' sus 


I-a' pis 


Ic'e-los 


Id' mon 


I-a-pyg'i-a 


I-ce' ni 


l-dom' e-ne (3) 


I-a' pyx 


Ic' e-tas 


I-dom-e-ne' us, or 


I-ar'bas 


Ich' nae 


Jl-dom'e-neus 


I-ar'chas, and 


Ich-nu'sa 


-do' the-a 



* lapetus. Son of lapetus, o'er-subtle go, 

And glory in thy artful theft below. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. 

t Idea. This word, as a proper name, I find in no lexicographer but Lem- 
priere. 

The English appellative, signifying an image in the mind, has uniformly the ac- 
cent on the second syllable, as in the Greek tSia in opposition to the Latin, which 
we generally follow in other cases, and which, in this word, has the penultimate 
short, in Ainsworth, Labbe, and our best prosodists ; and according to this ana- 
logy, idea ought to have the accent on the first syllable, and that syllable short, 
as the first of idiot. But when this word is a proper name, as the daughter of 
Dardanus, I should suppose it ought to fall into the general analogy of pro- 
nouncing Greek names, not by accent, but by quantity ; and, therefore, that it 
ought to have tt.e accent on the first syllable; and, according to our own ana- 
logy, that syllable ought to be short, unless the penultimate in the Greek is a 
diphthong, and then, according to general usage, it ought to have the accent. 

t Idomeneus. The termination of nouns in eus was, among the ancients, some- 
times pronounced as two syllables, and sometimes, as a diphthong; in one. Thus 

E 2 Labbe 



52 IL IL IN 


I-dri' e-us 


I-li'a-des I-man-u-en' ti-us 


I-du'be-da 


Il'i-as 


(10) 


I-du' me, and 


11' i-on 


flm' a-us 


Id-u-me'a 


I-li'o-ne 


Im'ba-rus 


I-dy'i-a 


Il-i-o'ne-us, or 


Im-brac'i-des 


Jen' i-sus 


*I-li' o-neus 


Im-bras'i-des 


Je' ra 


I-lis'sus 


Im' bra-sus 


Je-ro'mus, and I-lith-y-i'a 


Im'bre-us 


Je-ron'y-mus Il'i-um or 


Im'bri-us 


Je-ru'sa-lem I i' i-on 


Im-briVi-ura 


I-e'tse j Il-lib'e-ris 


Im' bros 


Ig' e-ni Il-lip' u-la 


In'a-chi(3)(12) 


Jg-na'ti-us (10) Il-li-tur'gis 


l-na' chi-a 


Il-a-i' ri Il-lyr' i-cum 


I-nach'i-dae 


11' ba 


U' ly-ris, and 


I-nach' i-des 


Il-e-ca' o-nes, and 


Il-lyr' i-a 


I-na' chi-um 


Il-e-ca-o-nen'ses 


Il-lyr' i-cus Si' nus 


lD'a-chus(l2) 


I-ler'da 


Il-lyr'i-us 


I-nam'a-mes 


Il'i-a, or Rhe'a 


Il'J-a(7) 


I-nar'i-me (8) 


I-li'a-ci Lu'di(S) 


l-lyr'gis ! In'a-rus 


I-li' a-cus 


I'lus 


In-ci-ta' tus 



Labbe tells us, that Achilkiis, Agyleus, Pharaleiis, Apsirteiis, are pronounced 
commonly in four syllables, and Nereiis, Orpheus, Porteus, Tereiis, in three, with 
the penultimate syllable short in all; but that these words, when in verse, have 
generally the diphthong preserved in one syllable : 

Eumenidum velnti demens videt agmina Pentheus. VIRG. 
He observes, however, that the Latin poets very frequently dissolved the 
diphthong into two syllables: 

Naiadum coetu, tantum non Orpheiis Hebrum 
Pcenaque respectus, et nunc rrianet Orpheus in te. 

The best rule, therefore, that can be given to an English reader, is, to pro- 
nounce words of this termination always with the vowels separated, except an 
English poet, in imitation of the Greeks, should preserve the diphthong: but, in 
the present word, I should prefer Ldom'e-neus to I-dom~e-ne? MS, whether in 
verse or prose. 
* See Idomcneus. 

f Iwwus. All our prosodists make the penultimate syllable of this word short, 
and consequently accent it on the antepenultimate ; but Milton, by a licence 
he was allowed to take, accents it on the penultimate syllable : 
As when a vulture on /mails bred, 
Whose snowy ridge the roving Tartar bounds. 



IN 


1O 


IP 58 


In-da-thyr'sus 


l'o(l) 


Jop' pa 


In' di-a 


I-ob' a-tes, and 


I' o-phon 


In-dig' e-tes 


Jo-ba' tes 


Jor-da' nes 


In-dig'e-ti (3) 


I'o-bes 


Jor-nan' des 


In'dus 


Jo-cas'ta 


I' OS 


rno(l) 


l-o-la'i-a 


Jo-se'phus Fla'vi-us 


I-no' a (7) 


I'o-las, or 


Jo-vi-a' nus 


1-n o' pus 


I-o-la' us 


Jo'vi-an (Eng.) 


I-no' us 


-ol'chos 


Ip' e-pae 


I-no' res 


'o-le(i)(8) 


Iph-i-a-nas' sa 


In'su-bres 


'on 


Iph' i-clus, or 


In-ta pher'nes 


-o'ne(8) 


Iph'i-cles 


In-te-ram' na 


-o' nes 


I-phic'ra-tes 


In-ter-ca' ti-a (11) 


-o' ni-a 


I-phid' a-mus 


In' u-us 


-o' pas 


Iph-i-de-mi'a 


I-ny' cus 


' o-pe, and 


* Jph-i-ge-ni' a 



* Iphigenia. The antepenultimate syllable of this word had been in quiet 
possession of the arc* nt for more than a century, till some Greeklings of late 
have attempted to place the stress on the penultimate in compliment to the ori- 
ginal Ifiyku*. If we ask our innovators on what principles they pronounce this 
word with the accent on the t, they answer, because the i stands for the diph- 
thong E(, which, being long, must necessarily have the accent on it : but it may 
be replied, this was indeed the case in the Latin language, but not in the Greek, 
where we find a thousand long penultimates without the accent. It is true, one 
of the vowels which composed a diphthong in Greek, when this diphthong was 
in the penultimate syllable, generally had an accent on it, but not invariably; for 
a long penultimate syllable did not always attract the accent in Greek as it did 
in Latin. An instance of this, among thousands, is that famous line of dactyls 
in Homer's Odyssey, expressing the tumbling down of the stone of Sisyphus ; 

Auru; Iftlita, r!Jov&g Kv\ivhro Xaa? avaiM/;. OdySS, b 11. 

Another striking instance of the same accentuation appears in the two first 
verses of the Iliad : 

MijviV 0,61^6 Qea. 



I know it may be said, the written accents we see on Greek words are of no 
kind of authority, and that we ought always to give accent to penultimate long 
quantity, as the Latins did. Not here to enter into a dispute about the authority 
of the written accents, the nature of the acute, and its connexion with quantity, 
which has divided the learned of Europe for so many yearstill we have a clearer 
idea of the nature of the human voice, and the properties of speaking sounds, 
which alone can clear the difficulty for the sake of uniformity perhaps it were 

better 



54 IR 


IS 


IS 


*Iph-i-me-d/a 


-re 7 sus 


I-sau' ri-cus 


1-phim' e-don 


7 ris 


I-sau 7 rus 


Iph-i-me-du' sa 


'rus 


Is-c,he 7 ni-a(12) 


I-phin 7 o-e (8) 


s 7 a-das 


Is-cho-la' us 


I-phin 7 o-us 


-sa> 7 a(7) 


Is-com' a-chus 


F phis 


-sae 7 us 


Is-rhop'o-lis 


I-phit'i-on (11) 


s' a-mus 


Is 7 ia(13) 


Iph'i-tus 


-san'der 


Is-de-ger 7 des 


Iph 7 thi-me 


-sa' pis 


Is-i-do 7 rus 


Ip-se'a (29) 


7 sar, and Is'a-ra 


Is' i-dore (Eng.) 


l'ra(l)(7) 


7 sar, and I-sae'us 


Tsis 


I-re'ne 


-sar'chus (12) 


Is 7 ma-rus, and 


Ir-e-nae 7 us 


I-sau 7 ri-a 


Is 7 ma-ra 



better to adopt the prevailing mode of pronouncing Greek proper names like 
the Latin, by making the quantity df the penultimate syllable the regulator of 
the accent, though contrary to the genius of Greek accentuation, which made 
the ultimate syllable its regulator ; and if this syllable was long, the accent could 
never rise higher than the penultimate. Perhaps in language as in laws, it is 
not of such importance that the rules of either should be exactly right, as that 
they should be certainly and easily known ; so the object of attention in the 
present case is not so much what ought to be done, as what actually is done; 
and as pedantry will always be more pardonable than illiteracy, if we are in 
doubt about the prevalence of custom, it will always be safer to lean to the side 
of Greek or Latin than of our own language. 

* Iphimedia. This and the foregoing word have the accent on the same sylla- 
ble, but for what reason cannot be easily conceived. That Iphigenia, having the 
diphthong E( in its penultimate syllable, should have the accent on that syllable, 
though not the soundest, is at least a plausible reason ; but why should our pro- 
sodists give the same accent to the i in Iphimedia 'I which coming from ;cj>t and 
/uE^Ett, has no such pretensions. If they say it has the accent in the Greek word, 
it may be answered, this is not esteemed a sufficient reason for placing the ac- 
cent in Iphigenia; besides, it is giving up the sheet-anchor of modern prosodists, 
the quantity, as the regulator of accent. We know it was an axiom in Greek 
prosody, that when the last syllable was long by nature, the accent could not 
rise beyond the penultimate ; but we know too that this axiom is abandoned in 
Demosthenes, Aristoteles, and a thousand other words. The only reason there- 
fore that remains for the penultimate accentuation of this word is, that this syl- 
lable is long in some of the best poets. Be it so. Let those who have more 
learning and leisure than I have find it out. In the interim, as this may perhaps 
be a long one, I must recur to my advice under the last word ; though Ainsworth 
has, in my opinion, very properly left the penultimate syllable of both these 
words short, yet those who affect to be thought learned will always find their ac- 
count in departing as far as possible from the analogy of their own language in 
favour of Greek and Latin. 



IT JU IX 5, 


Js-me'ne (8) 


I-tem' a-les 


Ju'li-i (4) 


Is-me' ni-as 


Ith'a-ca 


Ju-li-o-ma' gus 


Is-men' i-des 


I-thob'a-lus 


Ju-li- op' o-lis 


Is-me' nus 


I-tho' me 


Ju'lis 


1-soc'ra-tes 


Ith-o-ma'i-a 


Ju'li-us Cae'sar 


Is'sa(7) 


I-tho' mus 


I-u' lus 


Is'se(S) 
Is' sus 


Ith-y-phal' lus 
I-to' ni-a (7) 


Ju' ni-a (7) 
Ju'no 


Is'ter, and Is'trus 


I-to' nus 


Ju-no-na'li-a 


1st' hmi-a 


It-u-rae' a 


Ju-no' nes 


Ist'hmi-us 


I-tu' rum 


Ju-no' ni-a 


Ist'hmus 


It'y-lus 


Ju-no'nis 


Is-ti-ae' o-tis 


It-y-rae'i (3) 


Ju' pi-ter 


!&' tri-a 


i'tys 


Jus-ti' nus 


Is-trop' o-l is 


Ju'ba 


Ju-tur'na 


I'sus 


Ju-dae' a 


Ju-ve-na' lis 


I-ta'li-a (7) 


Ju-gan' tes 


Ju' ve-nal (Eng.) 


It' a-ly ( Kng.) 


Ju-ga' ri-us 


Ju-ven' tas 


I-tal' i-ca 


Ju-gur' tha 


Ju-ver' na, or 


I-tal'i-cus 


Ju'li-a(7) 


Hi-ber' ni-a 


It'a-lus 


Ju-li' a-des 


Ix-ib' a-taa 


I-tar' gris 


Ju-li-a' nus 


Ix-i' oil 


It'e-a(20) 


Ju' li-an (Eng.) 


Ix-i-on' i-des 


LA LA LA 


JLiA-AN'DER 


La-bi' cum 


Lac-e-das' mon 


La-ar' chus 


La-bi-e' nus 


Lac-e-dae-mo' ni-i 


Lab' a-ris 


Lab-i-ne' tus 


Lac-e-daem' o-nes 


Lab' da 


La-bo' bi-us 


Lac-e-de-mo' ni-ans 


Lab' da-cus 


La-bob' ri-gi (3) 


(Eng.) 


Lab' da-Ion 


La-bo' tas 


La-cer' ta 


La'be-o 


La-bra' de-us 


Lach' a-res 


La-be' ri-us 


Lab-y^rin' thus 


La'ches(l)(l2) 


La-bi'ci(4) 


La-cae' na 


*Lach' e-sis 



* Lachesis. Clotho and Lachesis, whose boundless sway, 
With Atropos, both men and gods obey. 

COOKE'S Hesiod. Theog. v. 335. 



o(i LA LA LA 


Lac' i-das 


La'gi-a(SO) 


Lamp'sa-cus, and 


La-ci'des 


Lag' i-des 


Lamp' sa-chum 


La-cin'i-a 


La-cin' i-a 


Lamp-te' ri-a 


La-cin-i-en' ses 


La' gus 


Lam' pus 


La-cin'i-um 


La-gu' sa 


La' mus 


Lac' mon 


La-gy' ra (6) Lam' y-rus 


La'co(l) 


La-i'a-des(S) 


La-nas' sa 


La-cob' ri-ga I La'i-as 


Lan'ce-a(lO) 


La-co' ni-a, and 


La' is 


Lan'ci-a (10) 


La-con' i-ca 


La' i-us 


Lan' di-a 


Lac' ra-tes Lai' a~ge 


Lan' gi-a 


Lac' ri-nes | La-las' sis 


Lan-go~bar'di (3) 


Lac-tan' ti-us (13) 


Lam' a-ehus 


La-nu' vi-um 


Lac' ter 


La-mal' mon 


La-o-bo'tas, or 


Lac' y-des 


Lam-bra' ni (3) 


Lab' o-tas 


Lac'y-dus (24) 


Lam' brus 


La-oc' o-on 


La' das 


La' mi-a 


La-od' a-mas 


La' de (8) 


La-mi' a-cum bel' 


La-o-da' mi-a (30) 


La'des 


lum 


La-od' i-ce (8) 


La' don 


La' mi-ae 


La-od-i-ce' a 


Lae' laps 


La'mi-as M li-us 


La-od-i-ce' ne 


Lse'li-a 


La-mi-' rus 


La-od' o-chus 


LaB-li-a'nus 


Lam' pe-do 


La-og' o-nus 


Las' li-us, C. 


Lam-pe'ti-a (10) 


La-og' o-ras 


Lae'na, and 


Lam'pe-to, and 


La-og' o-re (8) 


Le-ae'na 


Lam' pe-do 


*La-o-me-di'a(30) 


Lae' ne-us 


Lam'pe-us, and 


La-om' e-don 


Lae' pa Mag'na 


Lam' pi-a 


La-om-e-don' te-us 


La-er' tes 


Lam' pon, Lam' pos 


La-om-e-don-ti' a- 


La-er' ti-us Di-og'e- 


or Lam' pus 


d* 


nes 


Lam-po-ne'a 


La-on' o-me (8) 


Lae-stryg' o-nes 


Lam-po' ni-a, and 


La-on-o-me' ne 


Lae'ta 


Lam-po' ni-um 


La-oth' o-e (8) 


Lae-to' ri-a 


Lam-po' ni-us 


La' o-us 


Lae' tus 


Lam-prid' i-us 


Lap' a-thus 


Lag' vi (3) 


J' li-us 


Laph' ri-a 


Lae-vi' nus 


Lam' pro-cles 


La-phys' ti-um 


La-ga' ri-a 


Lam' prus 


La-pid' e-i 



* Laomedia. 



See Iphigenia. 



-Evagore, Laomedia join, 
And thou Polynome, the numerous line. 

COOKE'S Hesiod, Theog. v. 399. 



LA 


LE 


LE 57 


La-pid 7 e-us 


La-she-a! ris 


Le-an 7 der 


Lap 7 i-thae 


La-ti'ni(3)(4) 


Le-an' dre 


Lap-i-thae'uni 


La-tin' i-us 


Le-an'dri-as 


Lap'i-tho 


La-ti' nus 


Le-ar'chus (12) 


Lap' i-thus 


La' ti-um 


Leb-a-de' a 


La'ra, or La-ran' da 


La' she-urn 


Leb 7 e-dus, or 


La-ren'ti-a, and 


La' ti-us (10) 


Leb'e-dos 


Lau 7 ren-ti-a (10) 


Lat' mus 


Le-be 7 na 


La' res 


La-to'i-a 


Le-bin'thos, and 


Lar'ga 


La-to' is 


Le-byn' thos 


Lar' gus 


La-to' us 


Le-chae' um 


La-ri 7 des 


La-to' na 


Lec'y-thus (24) 


La-ri' na 


La- top' o-l is 


Le'da 


La-ri' num 


La' tre-us 


Le-dae' a 


La-ris' sa 


Lau-do'ni-a 


Le'dus 


La-ris' sus 


La-ver' na 


Le 7 gi-o 


La' ri-us 


Lau-fel'la 


Le 7 i-tus (4) 


Lar' nos 


Lav-i-a' na (7) 


Le'laps 


La-ro' ni-a 


La-vin' i-a 


Lei 7 e-ges 


Lar'ti-us Flo'rus 


La-vin' i-um, or 


Le'lex , 


Lar-to-laBt' a-ni 


La-vi' num 


Le-man' nus 


Lar' vae 


Lau' ra 


Lena' nos 


La-ryni'na 


Lau' re-a 


Le-mo'vi-i (3) 


La-rys'i-um (11) 


Lau-ren-ta 7 li-a 


Lem' u-res 


Las'si-a(lO) 


Lau-rei/tes a'gri 


Le-mu' ri-a, and 


Las'su.s, or 


Lau-ren'ti-a (10) 


Le-mu-ra 7 li-a 


La' sus 


Lau-ren-ti' ni (4) 


Le-nae' us 


Las' the-nes 


Lau-ren' turn 


Len'tu-lus 


Las-the 7 ni-a, or 


Lau-ren' ti-us (10) 


Le'o 


*Las-the-ni'a 


Lau' ri-on 


Le-o-ca'di-a 


Lat' a-gus 


Lau' ron 


Le-o-co' ri-on 


Lat-e-ra'nus Plau' 


La 7 us Pom -pe 7 i-a 


Le-oc 7 ra-tes 


tus 


Lau 7 sus 


Le-od 7 a-mas 


La-te' ri-um 


Lau-ti 7 um (10) 


Le-od' o-cus 


La-ti-a' lis 


Le 7 a-des 


Le-og 7 o-ras 


La~she-a' lis 


Le-ee'i(3) 


Le'on 


La-ti-a' ris 


Le-ae' na 


Le-o 7 na 



* Lasthenia. AH the prosodists I have consulted, except Aiuswortli, accent 
Ibis word on the penultimate syllable; and though English analogy would pre- 
fer the accent on the antepenultimate, we must necessarily yield to such a de- 
cided superiority of votes for the penultimate in a word so little anglicised by 
use. See Iphigenia. 



58 LE LI LI 


*Le-on' a-tus 


Leu' cas 


Li-ber 7 tas 


Le-on' i-das 


Leu-ca' tes 


Li-be' thra 


Le-on'ti-um, and 


Leu-ca'si-on (11) 


Li-beth' ri-des 


Le-on-ti'ni (4) 


Leu-cas'pis 


Lib' i-ci, Li-be' ci-i 


Le-on-to-ceph' a-lus 


Leu' ce 


Lib-i-ti'na 


Le-on' ton, or 


Leu'ci(3) 


Li' bo (I) 


Le-on-top' o-lis 


Leu-cip' pe 


Li' bon 


Le-on-tych' i-des 


Leu-cip' pi-des 


Lib-o-phoe-ui'ces 


Le'os 


Leu-cip' pus 


Li'bri(4) 


Le-os' the-nes 


Leu' co-la 


Li-bur' na 


Le-o-tych' i-des 


Leu' con 


Li-bui 7 ni-a 


Lep' i-da 


Leu-co' ne (8) 


Li-bur' ni-des 


Lep'i-dus 


Leu-co' nes 


Li- bur' num ma' re 


Le-phyr'i-um 


Leu-con' o-e 


Li-bur' nus 


Le -pi' nus 


Leu-cop' e-tra 


Libs 


Le-pon' ti-i (4) 


Leu' co-phrys 


Lib'y-a 


Le' pre-os 


Leu-cop' o-lis 


Lib' y- cum ma' re 


Le' pri-um 


Leu' cos 


Lib'y-cus, and . 


Lep' ti-nes 


Leu-co' si-a (11) 


Li-bys' tis 


Lep' tis 


Leu-co-syr' i-i (4) 


Li'bys 


Le' ri-a 


Leu-coth' o-e, or 


Li-bys'sa 


Le-ri'na 


Leu-co' the-a 


Lie' a-tes 


Ler'na 


Leuc' tra 


Li'cha 


Le'ro 


Leuc' trum 


Li'chas(l) 


Le'ros 


Leu' cus 


Li'ches 


Les' bos 


Leu-cy-a' ni-as 


Li-cin' i-a 


Les' bus, or Les' bos 


Le-vi' nus 


Li-cin' i-us 


Les'ches (12) 


Leu-tych' i-des 


Li-ci' nus 


Les-tryg' o-nes 


Lex-o' vi-i (4) 


Li-cym' ni-us 


Le-ta' num 


Li-ba' ni-us 


Li'de(l8) 


Le-thae' us 


Lib' a-nus 


Li-ga' ri-us 


Le'the 


Lib-en- ti'na 


Li-ge' a 


Le'tus 


Li'ber 


Li'ger 


Le-va' na (7) 


Lib'e-ra(SO) 


Li'ger, or Lig'e-ris 


Leu' ca 


Lib-er-a' li-a 


Lig / o-ras 



* Leonatus. In the accentuation of this word I have followed Labbe and 
Lempriere : the former of whom says Quanquam de hac voce amplius cogitan- 
dum cum eruditis viris existimem. Till, then, these learned men have considered 
this word, I think we may be allowed to consider it as formed from the Latin 
Ico and nahts, lion-born, and as the a in natus is long, no shadow of reason can 
be given why it should not have the accent. This is the accentuation constant- 
ly given to it in the play of Cymbeline, and is in my opinion the best. 



LI LO LU 59 


Lig ; u-res 


Lis'ta 


Lo'tis, or Lo'tos 


Li-gu' ri-a 


Lit' a-brun 


Lo-toph' a-gi (3) 


Lig-u-ri' nus 


Lit' a-na 


Lo' us, and A' o-us 


Li'gus(18) 


Li-tav' i-cus 


Lu'a(7) 


Lig'y-es 


Li-ter' nura 


Lu' ca 


Li-gyr' gum 


Lith-o-bo' li-a 


Lu' ca-gus (20) 


Li-la/ a 


Li' thrus 


Lu-ca' ni (3) 


Lil-y-bae' um 


Li-tu' bi-um 


Lu-ca' ni-a 


Li-mae' a 


Lit-y-er' sas 


Lu-ca' ni-us 


Li-me'iri-a 


Li v' i-a Dru-sil'la 


Lu-ca' nus 


Lira' nae 


Liv-i-ne' i-us 


Lu f can (Eng.) 


Lim-naB' urn 


Li-viNa 


Lu-ca' ri-a, or 


Lim-na-tid' i-a 


Li' vi-us 


Lu-re' ri-a 


Lim-ni' a-ce 


Lw'y (Eng.) 


Luc-ce' i-us 


Lim-ni-o' tae 


Lo' bou 


Lu' ce-res 


Lim-no' ni-a 


Lo'ce-us (10) 


Lu-ce' ri-a 


Li' mon 


Lo' cha 


Lu ce'ti-us (10) 


Lin-ca'si-i (4) 


Lo' chi-as 


Lu ci-a' nus 


Lin' dus 


Lo'cri 


Lu' ci-an (Eng.) 


Lin'go-nes 


Lo' cris 


Lu'ci-fer 


Lin-ter'na pa'lus 


Lo-cus' ta 


Lu-cil' i-us 


Lin-ter' num 


Lo-cu'ti-us (10) 


Lu-cil'la 


Li' nus 


Lol'li-a Pau-li'na 


Lu-ci'na 


Li' o-des 


Lol-li-a' nus 


*Lu'ci-a 


Lip'a-ra 


Lol' li-us 


Lu'ci-us(lO) 


Lip' a-ris 


Lon-di' num 


Lu-cre'ti-a (10) 


Liph'Jum 


Lou' don (Eng.) 


Lu-cret'i-lis 


Lip-o-do'rus 


Lon-ga-re' nus 


Lu-cre' ti-us (10) 


Li-quen' ti-a 


Lon-^im' a-nus 


Lii-cn' num 


Lir-cae' us 


Lon-gi' nus 


Lu-cn' nus 


Li-ri'o-pe 


Lon-go-bar' di 


Luc-ta' ti-us (10) 


Li' ris 


Lon' gu-la 


Lu-cul' le-a 


Li-siu'i-as 


Lon-gun' ti-ca 


Lu-cul' lus 


Lis' son 


Lor'di(3) 


Lu' cu-mo (20) 


Lis' sus 


Lor'y-ma 


Lu' cus 



* Lucia. Labbe cries out loudly against those who accent this word on the 
penultimate, which, as a Latin word, ought to have the accent on the antepe- 
nultimate syllable. If once, says he, we break through rules, why should we 
not pronounce Amtnia, Anastasia, Cecilia, Leocadia, Natalia, &c. with the 
accent on the penultimate, likewise? This ought to be a warning against our 
pronouncing the West-India island St. Lu'cia as we sometimes hear it St. 
Luci' a. 



60 LY LY LY 


Lug-du' ntmi Ly' ce (8) 


Lyg'i-i(4) 


Lu'na(7) Ly'ces 


Ly' gus 


Lu'pa 


Ly-ce' um 


Ly-mi're 


*Lu-pei' cal 


Lych-ni'-des 


Ly' max 


Lu-per-ca'li-a 


Lyc'i-a(lO) 


Lyn-ci' des 


Lu-per' ci (3) 


Lye' i-das 


Lyn-ces' tae 


Lu-per' cus 


Ly-cini'na 


Lyn-ces' tes 


Lu' pi-as, or Lu'pi-a 


Ly-cim' ni-a 


Lyn-ces' ti-us 


Lu' pus 


Ly-cis' cus 


Lyn-ce' us 


Lu-si-ta' ni-a 


Lyc'i-us(lO) 


Lyn' cus, Lyn-cae' us, 


Lu-so' nes 


Lyc-o-me' des (0) 


or Lynx 


Lus' ii i-cus 


Ly' con 


Lyn-ci' dae 


Lu-la'ti-us 


Ly-co' ne (8) 


Lyr' cae 


Lu-te' ri-us 
Lu-te'ti-a (10) 


Lyc'o-phron 
Ly-cop' o-l is 


Lyr-cas' us 
Lyr-ce'a 


Lu-to' ri-us 


Ly-co' pus 


Lyr' cus 


Ly-ae' us 


Ly-co' ri-as 


Lyr-nes'sus 


Ly'bas 


Ly-co' j is 


Ly-san' der 


Lyb'y-a, or 


Ly-cor' mas 


Ly-san' dra 


Ly-bis' sa 


Ly-cor' tas 


Ly-sa' ni-as 


Lye' a-bas 


Lyc-o-su' ra 


Ly'se(8) 


Lyc-a-be'tus 


Lye' tus 


Ly-si' a-des 


Ly-cae' a 


Ly-cur' gi-des 


Lys-si-a-nas' sa 


Ly-cae' uni 


Ly-cur'gus 


Ly-si' a-nax 


Ly-cae' us 


Ly' cus 


Lys'i-as (11) 


Ly-cam' bes 


Ly'de(8) 


Lys' i-cles 


Ly-ca' on 


Lyd' i-a 


Ly-sid' i-ce 


Lyc-a-o' ni-a 


Lyd'i-as 


Ly-sim' a-che 


Ly' cas 


Lyd' i-us 


Lys-i-ma' clii-a 


Ly-cas'te Ly'dus 


Ly-sim' a-chus 


Ly-cas' turn Lyg' da-mis, or 


Lys-i-mach' i-des 


Ly-cas' tus Lyg' da-mus 


Lys-i-me' li-a 



* Lupercal. This word is so little iqterwoven with our language, that it 
ought to have its true Latin accent on the penultimate syllable. But wherever 
the antepenultimate accent is adopted iu verse, as in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, 
where Antony says, 

You all did see that on the Lu'percal 
I thrice presented him a kingly crown 

we ought to preserve it. Mr. Barry, the actor, who was informed by some 
scholar of the Latin pronunciation of this word, adopted it in this place, and 
pronounced it Lttper'wtJ, which grated every ear that heard him. 



LY LY LY 


61 


Ly-sin' o-e (8) 


Ly' sis 


Ly'so 




Ly-sip' pe 
Ly-sip' pus 


Ly-sis' tra-tus 
Ly-sith' o-us 


Ly-tae' a 
Ly-za' ni-as 





MA 



MA'CJE 


Maem-ac-te' ri-a 


Ma' car 


Maen' a-des 


Ma-ca' re-us 


Maen' a-la 


Ma-ca' ri-a 


Msen' a-lus 


Mac' a-ris 


Ma?' ni-us 


Ma-ced' nus 


Mae'non 


Mac' e-do 


Mae-o' ni-a 


Mac-e-do' ni-a 


Mae-on'i-dae 


Mac-e-don'i-cus(30) 


Mae on'i-des 


Ma-cel'la 


Mae' o-nis 


Ma' cer ^E-myl' i-us 


Mae-o' tae 


Ma-chae' ra 


Mae-o' tis pa' lus 


Ma-chan' i-das 


Mffi'si-aSyl'va(ll) 


Ma-cha' on 


Mae' vi-a 


Ma' era 


Mae' vi-us 


Mac-ri-a' nus 


Ma' gas 


Ma-cri'nus, M. 


Ma-gel' la 


Ma' cro 


Mag'e-tae 


Ma-cro' bi-i (4) 


Ma'gi 


Ma-cro' bi-us 


Ma'gi-us 


Mac' ro-chir 


Mag'na Grae'ci-a 


Ma-cro' nes 


Mag-nen' ti-us (10) 


Mac-to' ri-um 


Mag' nes 


Mac-u-lo' nus 


Mag-ne'si-a (11) 


Ma-de 7 tes 


Ma' go 


Mad'y-es 


Ma' gon 


Maudes' tes 


Mag-on-ti' a-cum 


Mae-an' der 


Ma' gus 


Mae-an'dri-a 


Ma-her' bal 


Mae-ce' nas 


Ma' i-a 


Mae' di (3) 


Ma-jes' tas 


Mae' li-us 


Ma-jo-ri-a' nus 



MA 

Ma-jor' ca 

Ma' la For-tu'na 

Mal'a-cha 

Ma-le'a 

Mai' ho, or 

Ma'tho 
Ma'^ li-a 

Ma'lis 

Mal'Ie-a,orMal'li-a 
Mai' li-us 
Mal'los 
Mal-thi' nus 
Mal-va' na 
Ma-ma' us 
Ma-mer' cus 
Ma- mer' thes 
Mam-er-ti' na 
Mam-er-ti'ni(4)(S) 
Ma-mil' i-a 
Ma-mil' i-i (4) 
Ma-mil' i-us 
Mam-mae'a 
Ma-mu' ri-us 
Ma-mur' ra 
Ma-nas' ta-bal 
Man-ci' nus 
Man-da' ne (8) 
Man-da' nes 
Man-.de 7 la 
Man-do' ni-us 
Man' dro-cles 



62 MA MA MA 


Man-droc 7 li-das 


Mar-do' ni-us 


Mars 


Man'dmn 


Mar'dus 


Mar'sa-la 


Man-lu'bi-i (4) 


Mar-e-o 7 tis 


Mar-sae' us 


Man-du-bra' ti-us 


Mar-gin' i-a, and Mar'se(8) 


Ma' lies 


Mar-gi-a'ni-a Mar' si (3) 


Ma-ne' tho 


Mar-gi'tes Myr-sig'ni (3) 


Ma 7 m-a 


^Ma ri'a or Ma'ri-a Mar-sy'a-ba 


Ma-ml'i-a 


Ma-n'a-ba Mar'tha 


Ma-ni i 7 i-us 


Ma-ri-am'ne 


Mar'ti-a(lO) 


Man 7 1- mi (4) 


Ma-ri-a'na3 Fos'sae 


Mar' she- a 


Man 7 li-a 


Ma-ri-an-dy' num 


Mar-ti-a 7 lis 


Man'li-us Tor-qua 7 Ma-ri-a'nus 


Mm* ti-al (Eng.) 


tus Ma-ri' ca 


Mar-ti-a' nus 


Man 7 nus 


Ma-ri'ci (3) 


Mar-ti 7 na 


Man-sue' tus 


Mar' i-cus 


Mar-tin-i-a'nus 


Man-ti-ne 7 a 


Ma-ri' na 


Mar 7 ti-us (10) 


Man-ti-ne' us 


Ma-ri' nus 


Ma-rul 7 lus 


Man 7 ti-us (10) 


Ma 7 ry-on 


Mas-ae-syl 7 i-i (4) 


Man' to 


Ma 7 ris 


Mas-i-nis 7 sa 


Man 7 tu a 


Ma-ris 7 sa 


Mas' sa 


Mar-a-can 7 da 


Mar' i-sus 


Mas 7 sa-ga 


MarVtha 
Mar' a-thon 


Ma-ri 7 ta 
Ma 7 ri-us 


Mas-sag 7 e-lag 
Mas-sa'na (7) 


Mar 7 a-thos 


Mar' ma-cus 


Mas-sa' ni (3) 


Mar-eel' la 


Mar-ma-ren 7 ses 


Mas' si-cus 


Mar-cel-li'nus Am- 


Mar-mar 7 i-ca 


Mas-sil' i-a (7) 


mi-a 7 nus 


Mar-mar' i-dae 


Mas-sy'la 


Mar-eel' lus 


Mar-ma' n- on 


Ma-su 7 ri-us 


Mar'ci-a (10) 


Ma 7 ro(l) 


Ma' tho 


Mar-ci-a' na 


Mar-o-bud' u-i (3) 


Ma-ti-e' ni 


Mar-she-a f na 


Ma 7 ron 


Ma-ti'ns 


Mar-ci-a-nop' o-lis 


Mar-o-ne 7 a 


Ma- tis' co 


Mar-ci-a 7 nus (10) 


Mar-pe'si-a (10) 


Ma-tra'li-a 


Mar 7 ci-us Sa-bi'nus Mar-pes 7 sa 


Ma-tro' na 


Mar-co-man 7 ni Mar-pe 7 sus 


Mat-ro-na'li-a 


Mar 7 cus 


Mar 7 res 


Mat~ti'a-ci (3) 


Mar 7 di(3) 


Mar-ru 7 vi-um ? or 


Ma tu' ta 


Mar'di-a 


Mar-ru 7 bi-um 


Ma' vors 



* Maria. This word, says Labbe, derived from the Hebrew, has the accent 
on the second syllable ; but when a Latin word, the feminine of Marius, it has 
the accent on the first. 



ME ME ME 63 


Ma-vor'ti-a (10) 


Med-o-bith' y-ni 


Me-la' ne-us 


Mau'ri (3) 


Me-dob' ri-ga 


Me-lan' i-da 


Mau-ri-ta' ni-a 


Me' don 


Me-la' ni-on 


Mau' rus 


Me-don'ti-as (10) 


Mel-a-nip' pe 


Mau-ru'si-i(4)(ll) 


Med-u-a' na 


Mel-a-nip' pi-des 


Man-so' lus 


Med-ul-li' na 


Mel-a-nip' pus 


Max-en' ti-us (10) 


Me'dus 


Mel-a-no' pus 


Max-im-i-a' nus 


Me-du' sa 


Mel-a-nos' y-ri 


Max-i-mil-i-a'na 


Me-gab'i-zi 


Me-lan' thi-i (4) 


Max-i-mi'nus 


Meg-a-by' zus 


Me-lan' thi-us 


Max'i-min (Eng.) 


Meg' a-cles 


Me-lan' tho 


Max' i-mus 


Me-gac' li-des 


Me-lan' thus 


Maz' a-ca 


Me-gae' ra 


Me' las 


Ma-za'ces 


Me-ga' le-as 


Mel-e-a' ger 


Ma-zae' us 


Meg-a-le'si-a(ll) 


Mel-e-ag' ri-des 


Ma-za' res 


Me-ga' li-a 


Mel-e-san' der 


Maz' e-ras 


Meg-a-lop' o-lis 


Me'les 


Ma-zi' ces, and 


Meg-a-me' de (8) 


Mel'e-se 


Ma-zy' ges 


Meg-a-ni' ra 


Mel-e-sig' e-nes, or 


Me-cha' ne-us 


Meg-a-pen' thes 


Mel-e-sig' e-na 


Me-cis' te-us 


*Meg' a-ra 


Me'H-a 


Me-coe'nas, or 


*}-Meg-a-re' us 


Mel-i-bce' us 


Me-cae' nas 


Meg' a-ris 


Mel-i-cer' ta 


Mec' ri-da 


Me-gar' sus 


Mel-i-gu' nis 


Me-de' a 


Me -gas' the-nes 


Me-li' na 


Me-des-i-cas'te(S) 


Me' ges 


Me-li'sa(7) 


Me'di-a(7) 


Me-gil'la 


Me-lis' sa 


Me'di-as 


Me-gis' ta 


Me-lis' sus 


Med' i-cus 


Me' la Pom-po'ni-us 


Mel'i-ta 


Me-di-o-ma-tri' ces 


Me-gis' ti-a 


Mel'i-te 


Me-di-o-ma-tri' ci 


Me-lae' nae 


Mel-i-te'ne 


Me-di-ox' u-mi 


Me-lam' pus 


Mel'i-tus, Accuser 


Med-i-tri'na 


Mel-anch-lae' ni 


of Socrates 


Me-do'a-cus, or 


Me-lan' chrus 


Me'li-us 


Me-du' a-cus 


Mel' a-ne 


Mel-ix-an' drus 



* Mfg-ara. I have in this word followed Labbe, Ainsvvorth, Gouldman, and 
Holyoke, by adopting the antepenultimate accent in opposition to Lempriere, 
who accents the penultimate syllable. 

f Megareus. Labbe pronounces this word in four syllables, when a noun sub- 
stantive ; but Ainsworth marks it as a trisyllable; when a proper name ; and 
in my opinion incorrectly. See Idomeneus. 



04 ME ME ME 


*Me-lob' o-sis 


Me-nes' thi-us Mes-o-po-ta' mi-a 


Me' Ion 


Men' e-tas 


Mes-sa' la 


Me'los 


Me-nip' pa 


Mes-sa-li' na (3) 


Mel' pi-a 


Me-nip' pi-des 


Mes-sa-li' nus 


Mel-pom' e-rie (8) 


Me-nip' pus 


Mes-sa' na (7) 


Me-mac' e-ni 


Me' ni-us 


Mes-sa' pi-a 


Mem' mi-a 


M en' nis 


Mes' sa-tis 


Mem' mi-us 


Me-nod'o-tus 


Mes'se (3) 


Mem' non 


Me-nce'ce-us (10) 


Mes-se' is (5) 


Mem' phis 


Me-nce'te 


Mes-se'ne, or 


Mem-phi' tis 


Me-nce' ti-us (10) 


Mes-se' na 


Me'na or Me'nes 


Me' non 


Mes-se' ni-a 


Me-nal'cas 


Me-noph'i-lus 


Mes' tor 


Me-nal' ci-das 


Men' ta or Min' the 


Me-su'la 


Men-a-lip'pe 


Men' tes 


Met' a-bus 


Men-a-lip' pus 


Men-tis' sa 


Met-a-git' ni-a 


Me-nan' der 


Men' to 


Met-a-ni'ra 


Me-na' pi-i (4) 


Men' tor 


Met-a-pon'tum 


Men' a-pis 


Me-nyl' lus 


Met-a-pon' tus 


Me'nas 


Me'ra 


Me-tau' rus 


Men-che'res(12) 


Me'ra, or Moe'ra 


Me-tel'la 


Men' des 


Mer-cu 7 ri-us 


Me-tel'li(3) 


Me-nec' les 


Mer 1 cu-ry (Eng.) 


Me-thar' ma 


Men-e-cli' des 


Me-ri' o-nes 


Me-thi' on (29) 


Me-nec' ra-tes 


Mer' me-rus 


Me-tho' di-us 


Men-e-de'mus 


Merm' na-dae 


Me-tho'ne(S) 


Me-neg' e-tas 


Mer'o-e(S) 


Me- thy d' ri-um 


Men-e-la' i-a 


Mer'o-pe (8) 


Me-thym'na 


Men-e-la' us 


Me' rops 


Me-ti-a-du' sa (21) 


Me-ne' ni-us 


Me'ros 


Me-tiKi-a 


A-grip'pa 


Mer' u-la 


Me-til'i-i(4) 


Men' e-phron 


Me-sab' a-tes 


Me-til' i-us 


Me' nes 


Me-sa' bL-us 


Me-ti'o-chus 


Me-nes' teus, or 


Me-sa'pi-a 


Me'ti-on(ll) 


Me-nes' the-us, or 


Me-sau' bi-us 


Me' tis 


Mnes' the-us( 13) 


Me-sem' bri-a 


Me-tis' cus 


Men-es-the'i For' 


Me-se' ne 


Me' ti-us (10) 


tus 


Mes-o-me' des 


Me-to3'ci-a(10) 



* Melobosis. In this word I have given the preference to the antepenulti- 
mate accent, with Labhe, Goiildman, and Holyoke; though the penultimate, 
which Lempriere has adopted, is more agreeable to the ear. < 



MI MN 


Me' ton 


Min-nae' i (3) 


Met'o-pe(S) 


Mi-no' a 


Me' tra 


Mi-no' is 


Me-tro' bi-us 


Mi'nos 


Met' ro-cles 


Min-o-tau' rus 


Met-ro-do'rus 


M in' the 


Me-troph' a-nes 


Min-tur' nae 


Me-trop'o-lis 


Mi-nu'ti-a(lO) 


Met'ti-us(lO) 


Mi-nu'ti-us (10) 


Me-va' ni-a 


Min' y-ae (6) 


Me' vi-us 


Min' y-as 


Me-zen'ti-us (10) 


Min'y-cus 


Mi-ce' a 


Mi-ny'i-a(()) 


Mi-cip' sa 


Min' y-tus 


Mic'y-thus (24) 


Mir' a-ces 


Mi' das 


Mi-se' num 


Mi-de' a of Argos 


Mi-se'nus 


Mid'e-a of Boeotia 


Mi-sith' e-us 


Mi-la' ni-on 


Mi' thras 


Mi-le'si-i(4)(ll) 


Mith-ra-da' tes 


Mi-le' si-us (10) 


Mi-thre'nes 


Mi-le'ti-a(lO) 


Mith-ri-da' tes 


Mi-le' ti-um (10) 


Mith-ri-da'tis 


Mi-le' tus 


Mith-ro-bar-za' nes 


Mil'i-as 


Mit-y-le'ne, and 


Mil'i-chus(12) 


Mit-y-le' nae 


Mi-li'nus Mi' tys 


Mil-i-o' ni-a Miz-ae' i 


Mi'lo |Mna-sal'ces(13) 


Mi-lo'ni-us Na-sal' ces 


Mil-ti' a-des Mna' si-as (11) 


Mil' to Mnas'i-cles 


Mil' vi-us Mna-sip' pi-das 


Mil' y-as Mna-sip' pus 


Mi-mal' lo-nes Mna-sith' e-us 


Mi' mas Mna' son ( 1 3) 


Mim-ner' mus 


Mna-syr' i-um 


Min'ci-us(lO) 


Mne ; rnon 


Min' da-rus 


Mne-mos' y-ne (3) 


Mi-ne' i-des 


Mne-sar' chus 


Mi-ner' va 


Mne-sid' a-mus 


Min-er-va' li-a 


Mnes-i-la'us 


Min' i-o 


Mne-sim' a-che 


F 



MO 65 

Mnen-sim' a-chus 
M ties' ter 
! M lies' the-us( 13) 
Mnes' ti-a 
, Mnes'tra , 

1 Mne' vis 
Mo-a-pher' nes 
Mo'di-a 

i Mce'ci-a(5)(10) 
Moe' nus 
Moe-rag' e-tes 
Mce' ris 
Moe'di 
Moe' on 
Moe-on' i-des 
Moe'ra 
Moe' si-a 
Mo-gy' ni 
Mo-Ie' i-a 
Mo-li'o-ne 
i Mo'lo 
I Mo-loe'is 
I Mo-lor'chus (12) 
Mo-los'si(S) 
Mo-los'si-a, or 

Mo-los' sis 
Mo-Jos' sus 
Mol-pa' di-a 
Mol' pus 
Mo'lus 
Mo-Jyc' ri-on 
Mo-mem' phis 
Mo' mus 
Mo'na 
Mo-nae' ses 
Mo-ne' sus 
Mo-ne'ta 
Mon'i-ma 
Mon' i-mus 
Mon' o-dus 
Mo-noe' cus 
Mo-no' le-us 
Mo-noph' i-lui 



66 MU MU MY 


Mon-ta'nus 


Mul'ci-ber 


Mu-tus'cae 


Mo-noph'a-ge 


*Mu-hi'cha 


My-ag'rus or 


Mon'y-chus(6)(12) 


Mul' vi-iis Pons 


My'o-des 


Mon' y-mua 


Mum' mi-us 


f-Myc'a-le 


Mo' phis 


Mu-na'ti-us (10) 


Myc-a-les' sus 


Mop' si-urn (10) 


Mun' da 


My-ce' nae 


Mop-so' pi-a 


Mu-ni' his 


Myc-e-ri'nus 


Mop' sus 


Mu-nych' i-ae (4) 


Myc-i-ber' na 


Mor-gan' ti-um (10) 


Mu-rae'mi 


Myc' i-thus 


Moi 7 i-ni 


Mur'cus 


My' con 


Mor-i-taj/gus 


Mu-re' tus 


*t*Myc' o-ne 


Mo' ri-us 


Mur-gan'ti-a (10) 


My' don 


Mor'phe-us 


Mur-rhe'nus 


My-ec' pho-ris 


Mors 


Mur'ti-a (10) 


My-e' nus 


Mo' rys 


Mus 


Myg 7 don 


Mo'sa 


Mu'sa An-to' ni-us 


Myg-do' ni-a 


Mos'chi(3)(12) 


Mu'sae 


Myg' do-nus 


Mos'chi-on 


Mu-saj'us 


My-las' sa 


Mos'chus 


Mu-so' ni-us Ru'fus 


M/le, or My' las 


Mo-sel'la 


Mus-te' la 


My'les 


Mo'ses 


Mu-thul'lus 


My-lit' ta 


Mo-sych' lus 


Mu'ti-a (10) 


Myn' dus 


Mos-y-nse' ci (3) 


Mu-tii'i-a 


My' nes 


Mo-tho' ne 


fMu' ti-na 


Myn' i-ae 


Mo-ty' a 


Mu-ti' nes 


My-o' ni-a 


Mu-ci-a' nus 


Mu-ti'nus, or 


Myr-ci' nus 


Mu'ci-us(lO) 


Mu-tu' nus 


My-ri' cus 


Mu' cra3 


Mu'ti-us (10) 


JMy-ri' nus 



* Mulucha. This word is accented on the antepenultimate syllable by Labbe, 
Lempriere,and Ainsworth; and on the penultimate by Gouldman and Holyoke. 
Labbe, indeed, says ut volueris ; and I shall certainly avail myself of this per* 
mission to place the accent on the penultimate ; for when this syllable ends 
with u, the English have a strong propensity to place the accent on it, even in 
opposition to etymology, as in the word Arbutus. 

t Mycale and Mycone. An English ear seems to have a strong predilection for 
the penultimate accent on these words ; but all our prosodists accent them on the 
antepenultimate. The same may be observed of Mutina. See note on Or yua. 

t Myrinus. Labbe is the only prosodist I have met with who accents this 
word on the antepenultimate syllable ; and as this accentuation is so contrary to 
analogy, T have followed Lempriere, Ainsworth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, with 
the actent on the penultimate. See the word in the Terminutivnul Vocabulary. 



MY MY MY 6 


My-ri' na 


My-stal' i-des Myr' ta-le 


Myr'i-ce 


Myr' sus Myr-to' us 


Myr-mec' i-des 


Myr' te-a Venus ! Mys' tes 


Myr-mid' o-nes 


Myr-te' a, a City Mys' i-a ( 1 1 ) 


My-ro' nus 


Myr' ti-lus My-so-ma-ced' o- 


My-ro-ni-a' nus 


Myr-to' um Ma' re nes 


My-rot/ i-des 


Myr-tun' ti-um (10) i My' son 


Myr'rha 


Myr-tu'sa Myth'e-cus 


Myr' si-lus 


My- seel' lus 


Myt-i-le' ne 


Myr'si-nus, a City 


Myr'tis My' us 


NA NA NE 


NAB-AR-ZA'NES Nas'i-ca Nau-sith' o-us 


Nab-a-thae' a 


Na-sid-i-e' nus Nau' tes ( 1 7) 


Na'bis 


Na-sid' i-us Nax' os 


Na-dag' a-ra 


Na' so Ne-ae' ra 


Nae' ni-a 


Nas' sus, or Na' sus Ne-ae 7 thus 


Nae' vi-us 


Nas'u-a(lO) Ne-al'ces 


Naev' o-lus 


Na-ta'lis Ne-al'i-ces 


Na-har'va-li (S) 


Nat' ta Ne-an' thes 


Nai' a-des 


Na-ta'li-a Ne-ap'o-lis 


Na'is 


Na' va Ne-ar' chus 


Na-pae' ae 


Nau' co-lus 


Ne-bro' des 


Naph' i-lus 


Nau' cles 


Ne-broph' o-nos 


Nar 


Nau' cra-tes 


Ne'chos 


Nar'bo 


Nau' cra-tis 


Nec-ta-ne' bus, and 


Nar-bo-nen' sis 


Na' vi-us Ac' ti-us 


Nee-tan' a-bis 


Nar-cae' us 


Nau' lo-chus 


Ne-cys'i-a(lO) 


Nar-cis'sus 


Nau-pac'tus, or 


Ne'is 


Nar'ga-ra 


Nau-pac' turn 


Ne'le-us 


Na-ris'ciCS) 


Nau' pli-a 


Ne'lo 


Nar' ni-a, or Nar' na 


Nau' pli-us 


Ne-mae' a 


Nar-the' cis 


Nau' ra 


Ne-me' a 


Na-ryc'i-a(lO) 


Nau-sic' a-ae 


Ne-me-si-a'nus (21) 


Nar' ses 


Nau' si-cles 


Nem' e-sis 


Nas-a-mo' nes 


Nau-sim' e-nes 


Ne-me' si-us ( 10) 


Nas' ci-o, or Na' ti-o 


Nau-sith' o-e 


Nem-o-ra' li-a 


F 2 



68 NE Nl NI 


N-em 7 e-tes 


Ne-re' i-us 


Ni-ca' nor 


Ne-me'us 


JNe 7 re-us 


Ni-car 7 chus 


*Ne-o-bu 7 le 


Ne-ri'ne 


Nic-ar-thi 7 des 


Ne-o-caes-a-re 7 a 


Ner' i-pbus 


Ni-ca' tor 


Ne-oeh 7 a-bis 


Ner'i-tos 


Ni'ce(8) 


Ne 7 o-cles 


Ne'ri.us 


Nic-e-pho 7 ri-uni 


Ne-og 7 e-nes 


Ne'ro 


Nic-e-pho 7 ri-us 


Ne-om 7 o-ris 


Ne-ro 7 ni-a 


Ni-ceph 7 o-rus 


Ne'on 


Ner-to-brig 7 i-a 


Nic-er-a 7 tus 


Ne-on-ti'cbos(12) 


Ner 7 va Coc-ce 7 i-us | Ni-ce 7 tas 


Ne-op-tol'e-mus 


Ner' vi-i (3) 


Nic-e-te 7 ri-a 


f-Ne 7 o-ris 


Ner 7 u-lutn 


Nic 7 i-a (10) 


Ne'pe 


Ne-sae 7 a 


Nic 7 i-as(10> 


Ne-pha'li-a 


Ne-sim 7 a-chus (12) 


Ni-cip 7 pe 


Nepb'e-le 


Ne-si-o 7 pe 


Ni-cip' pus 


Neph-er-i'tes 


Ne-she~o'pe 


Ni'co 


Ne'pbus 


Ne-so 7 pe 


Ni-coch 7 a-res 


Ne 7 pi-a 


Ne'sis 


Nic 7 o-cles 


Ne 7 pos 


Nes 7 sus 


Ni-coch 7 ra-tes 


Ne-po-ti-a'nus(12) 


Nes 7 to-cles 


Ni-co 7 cre-on 


Nep 7 thys 


Nes 7 tor 


Nic-o-de 7 mus 


Nep-tu 7 ni-a 


Nes-to 7 ri-us 


Nic-o-do' rus 


Nep-tu 7 ni-uni 


Nes 7 tus, or Nes 7 sus 


Ni-cod 7 ro-nuis 


Nep-tu 7 ni-us 


Ne 7 turn 


Nic-o-la 7 us 


Nep-tu 7 nus 


Ne 7 u-ri 


Ni-com 7 a-cha 


Nep' tune (Eng.) 


Ni-cae 7 a 


Ni-com 7 a-chus 


Ne-re 7 i-des 


Ni-cag 7 o-ras 


Nic-o-me 7 des 


Nef re-ids ( Eng.) 


Ni-can 7 der 


Nic-o-me 7 di-a 



* Neobule. Labbe, Ainsworth, Gouldman, Littleton, and Holyoke, give this 
word the penultimate accent, and therefore I have preferred it to the antepe- 
nultimate accent given it by Lempriere ; not only from the number of authori- 
ties in its favour, but from its being more agreeable to analogy. 

f Nem-is. The authorities are nearly equally balanced between the penulti- 
mate and antepenultimate accent; and therefore I may say as Labbe sometimes 
does, ut volueris: but I am inclined rather to the antepenultimate accent as more 
agreeable to analogy, though I think the penultimate more agreeable to the ear. 

$ Nereus. Old Nereus to the sea was born of earth 

Nereus who claims the precedence in birth 
To their descendants ; him old god they call, 
Because sincere and affable to all. 

GOOKE'S Hesiod, Theog, v. 357, 



NI NO NU 69 


Ni' con 


Ni-to'cris 


No'vi-us Pris'cus 


Ni-cc/ ni-a 


Nit'ri-a 


Non' nus 


Nic'o-phron 


No' as 


Nox 


Ni-cop'o-lis 


Noc' mon 


Nu-ce' ri-a 


Ni-cos' tra-ta 


Noc-ti-lu'ca 


Nu-ith' o-nes 


Ni-cos' tra-tus 


No' la 


Nu'ma Pom-pil' i-us 


Nic-o-te' le-a 


Nom-en-ta' nus 


Nu-ma' na 


Ni-cot' e-les 


Norn 7 a-des 


Nu-man'ti-a 


Ni' ger 


No' mae 


Nu-man-ti' na 


Ni-gid'i-us Fig'u- 


No-men' turn 


Nu-ma' nus Rem'u- 


lus 


No'rni-i(3) 


lus 


Ni-gri' tae 


No' rai-us 


Nu' me-nes 


Ni'le-us 


*No-na'cris 


Nu-me' ni-a, or 


Ni'lus 


No' ni-us 


Ne-o-me'ni-a 


Nin' ni-us 


Non' ni-us 


Nu-me' ni-us 


Nin' i-as 


No' pi-a, or 


Nu-me-ri-a' nus 


Ni'nus 


Cno' pi-a 


Nu-me' ri-us 


Nin'y-as 


No'ra 


j-Nu-mi' cus 


Ni'o-be 


No' rax 


Nu' mi-da 


Ni-phae' us 


Nor' ba 


Nu-mid'i-a 


Ni-pha' tes 


Nor-ba'nus, C. 


Nu-mid'i-us 


Ni'phe 


Nor' i-cum 


Nu' mi-tor 


Nir' e-us 


Nor-thip' pus 


Nu-mi-to' ri-us 


Ni'sa 


Nor'ti-a (10) 


Nu-mo' ni-us 


Ni-sse' a 


No' thus 


Nun-co' re-us 


Ni-sae' e 


No' nus 


JNun'di-na 


Ni-se' i-a 


No'ti-um (10) 


. Nun' di-nae 


Nis'i-bis 


No' tus 


Nur' sae 


Ni'sus 


No-va' tus 


Nur' sci-a 


Ni-s/ ros 


No-vi-o-du' nuni 


Nur'si-a(l9) 


Ni-te' tis 


No-vi-om' a-gum 


Nu' tri-a 



* Nonacris. Labbe, Ainswortb, Gould man, and Holyoke, give this word the 
antepenultimate accent; but Lempriere, Littleton, and the Graduses, place 
the accent, more agreeably to analogy, on the penultimate. 

f Numicus. Our fleet Apollo sends 

Where Tuscan Tyber rolls with rapid force, 

And where Numicus opes his holy source. DRYDEN. 

t Nundina. Lempriere places the accent on the penultimate syllable of 
this word; but Labbe, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on the antepenultimate. 
Ains worth marks it in the same manner among the appellatives, nor can there 
be any doubt of its propriety. 



70 NY NY NY 


Nyc-te' is 


Nym-phae' um 


Ny' sa or Nys' sa 


Nyc-te' li-us 


Nym-phae' us 


Ny-sae' us 


Nyc' te-us 


Nym-phid' i-us 


N/sas 


Nyc-tim' e-ne 


Nym' phis 


Ny-se' i-us 


Nyc' ti-mus 


Nym-pho-do' rus 


Ny-si' a-des 


Nym-bse 7 um 


Nym-pho-lep' tes 


Ny-sig' e-na 


Nym' pha? 
Nymphs (Eng.) 


Nym' phon 
Nyp' si-us 


Ny-si' ros 
Nys 7 sa 


OC OD OE 


O'A-RUS 


Oc' nus 


Od' o-nes 


O-ar'ses 


O-cric' u-Ium 


Od' ry-sa3 


O' a-sis 


O-crid' i-on 


O-dys'se-a 


O-ax'es 


O-cris'i-a 


Od'ys-sey (Eng.) 


O-ax' us 


Oc-ta-cil' li-us 


fCE-ag' a-rus, and 


Ob-ul-tro' ni-us 


Oc-ta' vi-a 


CE' a-ger (5) 


O-ca'le-a, or 


Oc-ta-vi-a'nus 


GE-an'tha3, and 


O-ca' li-a 


Oc-ta 7 vi-us 


CE-an' thi-a 


*O-ce' a-na 


Oc-tol' o-phum 


CE'ax(5) 


O-ce-an' i-des, and 


O-cy'a-lus 


CE-ba'li-a 


O-ce-an-it' i-des 


O-cyp' e-te (8) 


GEb'a-lus^) 


O-ce' a-nus 


O-cyr' o-e 


CEb'a-res 


O-ce' i-a 


Od-e-na'tus 


CE-cha' li-a 


O-cel'lus 


O-des' sus 


CE-cli'des 


O-ce' lum 


O-di'nus j CEc'le-us 


O'cha 


O-di' tes | CEc-u-me' ni-us 


O-che' si-us (11) 


Od-o-a' cer CEd-i-po' di-a 


O'chus(12) 


Od-o-man' ti (3) CEd' i-pus (5) 



* Oceana. So prone are the English to lay the accent on the penultimate of 
words of this termination, that we scarcely ever hear the famous Oceana of Har- 
rington pronounced otherwise. 

t (Eagarus. This diphthong, like <e, is pronounced as the single vowel e. If 
the conjecture concerning the sound of was right, the middle sound between 
the o and e of the ancients must, in all probability, have been the sound of our 
a in water. See the word Ma. 



OG 


OL ON 71 


(E 7 me (8) 


*0g 7 y-ges 


O-lym-pi-o-do' rus 


(E-nan 7 thes 


O-gyg' i-a 


O-Iym-pi-os 7 the- 


(E'ne 


Og 7 y-ris 


nes 


CE 7 ne-a 


O-ic 7 le-us 


O-lym' pi-us 


OE'ne-us 


O-il 7 e-us 


O-lytn 7 pus 


CE-ni'des 


O-i-li 7 des Ol-ym-pu' sa 


(En 7 o-e 


Ol 7 a-ne (8) 


O-lyn 7 thus^ 


CE-nom' a-us 


O-la 7 nus 


O-ly'ras 


CE 7 non 


OKba, orOl'bus 


O-ly 7 zon 


<E-no'na(7) 


Ol 7 bi-a 


O-ma 7 ri-us 


CE-no'ne (8) 


Ol 7 bi-us 


Oin 7 bi (3) 


CE-no'pi-a 


Ol-chin 7 i-urn 


Om 7 bri (3) 


CE-nop' i-des 


O-le 7 a-ros, or 


Om 7 o-le 


CE-no 7 pi-on 


Ol 7 i-ros(20) 


Om-o-pha'gi-a 


CEn'o-tri(S) 


O-le' a-truni 


*f*Om 7 pha-le 


GE-no' tri-a 


O'ien 


Om 7 pha-los 


CEn' o-trus 


OKe-nus, or 


O-n3C 7 um, or 


CE-nu'sae 


Ol 7 e-iiuni(20) 


O-ae 7 ne-uin 


CE 7 o-nus 


Ol'ga-sys 


O-na 7 rus 


CEr 7 o-e (8) 


Ol-i-gyr' tis 


O-nas 7 i-mus 


CE' ta (7) 


O-lin 7 thus 


O-na 7 tas 


CEt 7 y-lus, or 


Ol-i-tin 7 gi 


Ou-ches 7 tus 


<Et 7 y-lum 


Ol 7 Ii-us 


O-ne 7 i-on 


O-felMus 


Ol-lov 7 i-co 


O-nes 7 i-rnus 


7 fi(3) 


Oi 7 mi-us 


On-e-sip 7 pus 


Og-dol 7 a-pis 


O-lin 7 i-ae 


O-ne 7 si-us (10) 


Og-do 7 rus 


Ol-o-phyx 7 us 


On-e-tor' i-des 


Og 7 mi-us 


O-lym 7 pe-um 


On-e-sic 7 ri-tus 


Og 7 o-a(7) 


O-lym' pi-a 


O' ni-um 


O-gul 7 ni-a 


O-lym 7 pi-as 


On 7 o-ba(10) 



* Ogyges. This word is by all our prosodists accented on the first syllable, 
and consequently it must sound exactly as if written Odd'je-jez; and this, how- 
ever odd to an English ear, must be complied with. 

t Omphale. The accentuation which a mere English speaker would give to 
this word was experienced a few years ago by a pantomime called Hercules and 
Omphale: when the whole town concurred in placing the accent on tiie second 
syllable, till some classical scholars gave a check to this pronunciation by 
placing the accent on the first. This, however, was far from banishing the 
former manner, and disturbed the public ear without correcting it. Those 
however, who would not wish to be numbered among the vulgar, must take 
care to avoid the penultimate accent. 



72 OR OR OR 


O-noch' o-nus 


Or-be'lus 


O-ri'tae(o) 


On-o-mac' ri-tus 


Or-bil'i-us 


O-rith-y-i' a 


On-o-mar' chus 


Or-bo' na 


O-rit'i-as(lO) 


On-o-mas-tor' i-des 


Or' ca-des 


O-ri-un' dus 


On-o-mas' tus 


Or-cha' lis 


Or' me-nus (20) 


On' o-plias 


Or' cha-mus 


Or' ne-a 


On' o-phis 


Or-chom' e-nus, or 


Or' ne-us 


On-o-san' der 


Or-chom' e-num 


Or-ni' thon 


On'y-thes 


Or' cus 


Or 7 ni-tus 


O-pa'li-a 


Or-cyn' i-a 


Or-nos' pa-des 


O-phe'las 


Or-des' sus 


Or-nyt'i-on(ll) 


O-phel' tes 


O-re'a-des 


O-ro' bi-a 


O-phen' sis 


O' re-ads (Eng.) 


O-ro'des 


O' phi-a 


O're-as 


O-rae' tes 


O-phi'on(29) 


O-res'ta? 


O-rom' e-don 


O-phi-o' ne-us 


O-res' tes 


O-ron' tas 


O-phi-u' cus 


O-res' te-um 


O-ron' tes 


O-phi-u'sa 


Or-es-ti' dae 


Or-o-pher' nes 


Op'i-ci 


Or' e-tse 


O-ro' pus 


O-pig' e-na 


Or-e-ta' ni (3) 


O-ro' si-us (11) 


O'pis 


Or-e-til' i-a 


*Or'phe-us 


O-pil' i-us 


O-re' um 


Or-sed' i-ce 


Op'i-ter 


Or' ga, or Or' gas 


Or-se' is 


O-pim' i-us 


Or-ges' sum 


Or-sil'lus 


Op-i-ter-gi' ni 


Or-get' o-rix 


Or-sil' o-chus 


O-pi'tes 


Or'gi-a 


Or'si-nes(4) 


Op' pi-a 


O-rib' a-sus 


Or-sip' pus 


Op-pi-a' nus 


Or'i-cum, or 


Or'ta-lus, M. 


Op-pi' di-us 


Or' i-cus 


Or-thag' o-ras 


Op' pi-us 


O' ri-ens 


Or' the (8) 


O'pus 


Or' i-gen 


Or-thae'a 


Op-ta' tus 


O-ri' go 


Or'thi-a(4)(7) 


Op' ti-mus 


O-ri' nus 


Or'thrus 


O'ra(7) 


O-ri-ob' a-tes 


Or-tyg' i-a 


O-rac' u-lum 


O-ri' on (29) 


Or-tyg'i-us 


O-rae'a 


O-ris' sus 


O'rus 


Or' a-sus 


Or-i-sul'la Liv'i-a O-ry-an'der 



* Orpheus. See Idomeneus. 



OS OV OZ 


73 


*O-ry' us 


Os-y-man' dy-as Ox-ar' tes 




O'ryx 


Ot-a-cil' i-us Ox-id' a- tes 




Os-cho-pho' ri-a 


O-ta' nes Ox' i-mes 




Os'ci(3) 


Oth' ma-rus Ox-i' o-nae 




Os'ci-us(lO) 


O'tho, M.Sal' vi-us Ox' us 




Os'cus 


Oth-ry-o'ne-us Ox-y'a-res 




O-sin' i-us 


O'thrys Ox-y-ca'nus 




O-si' ris 


O' tre-us 


Ox-yd' ra-cae 




O-sis' mi-i 


O-tri' a-des 


Ox'y-lus 




Osf pha-gus 


O-troe'da 


Ox-yn' thes 




Os-rho-e' ne 


O' tus Ox-yp' o-rus 




Os'sa 


O' tys Ox-y-rin-chi' tae 




Os-te-o' des 


O-vid' i-us i Ox-y-ryii' chus 




Os' ti-a 


Ov'^(Eng.) O-zi'nes 




Os-to'ii-us 


O-vin'i-a ! Oz' o-lae, or 




Os-tro'go-thi 


O-vin'i-us Oz'o-li 




PA PA PA 




JL A-CA-TI-A'NUS 


Pa-du' sa 


Pag' a-sa 




(21) 


Pae'an 


Pag' a-sus 




Pac'ci-us(lO) 


Pa'di-us 


Pa'gus 




Pa'ches(12) 


Pe-ma'ni(S) 


Pa-la' ci-um, or 




Pa-chi' nus 


Pae'on 


Pa-la' ti-um (10) 


Pa-co' ni-us 


Pae' o-nes 


Pa-lss'a 




Pac' o-rus 


Pae-o' ni-a 


Pal-ae-ap' o-lis 




Paoto'lus 


Pae-on' i-des 


Pa-lae' mon, or 




Pac' ty-as 


Paa'os 


Pal'e-mon 




Pac' ty-es 


Pas' sos 


Pa-laep' a-phos 




Pa-cu' vi-us 


Paes' turn 


Pa-laeph' a-tus 




Pa-da'i (3) 


Pae-to' vi-um 


Pa-laep' o-lis 




Pad' u-a 


Pae' tus Cse-cin' na 


Pa-las' te 




Pa'dus 


Pag'a-sae, or 


Pal-ae-sti' na 





* Ort/us. And, at once, Broteas and Oryus slew : 
Oryus' mother, Mycal, was known, 
Down from her sphere to draw the laboring moon. 

GARTH'S Ovid. Met. 



74 



PA 



PA 



Pa-lae-sti' nus 


f*Pam' me-nes 


Pal-a-me' des 


Pam' mon 


Pa-Ian' ti-a ( 10) 


Pam' pa 


Pa-Ian' ti-um (10) 


Pam' phi-lus 


Pal-a-ti' nus 


Pam' phos 


Pa'le-is or Pa' he 


Pam' phy-la 


Pa'les 


Pam-phyl'i-a 


Pal-fu'ri-us Su'ra 


Pan 


Pa-li' ci, or Pa-lis' ci 


Pan-a-ce'a 


Pa-lil'i-a 


Pa-nse'ti-us (10) 


Pal-i-nu' rus 


Pan' a-res 


Pal-i-sco' rum, or 


Pan-a-ris' te 


Pal-i-co' rum 


Pan-ath-e-nae' a 


Pal'la-des 


Pan-chae' a, or 


Pal-la' di-um 


Pan-che'a, or 


Pal-la' di-us 


Pan-cha' i-a 


Pal-lan-te' urn 


Pan' da 


Pal-Ian' ti-as 


Pan' da- ma 


Pal-Ian' ti-des 


Pan-da' ri-a 


Pal-lau' ti-on (28) 


Pan' da-rus 


Pal' las 


Pan' da-tes 


Pal-le'ne(8) 


Pan-de' mus 


Pal' ma 


Pan'di-a 


*PaI-m/ra 


Pan'di-on (11) 


Pal-phu' ri-us 


Pan' do-ra 


Pal-mi' sos 


Pan-do' si-a( 11) 



PA 

Pan' dro-sos 
Pan' e-nus, or 

Pa-nae' us 
Pan-gae' us 
Pa-ni' a-sis 
Pa-ni-o' ni-um 
Pa' ni-us (20) 
Pan-no' ni-a 
Pan-om-phae' us 
Pan' o-pe, or 

Pan-o-pe' a 
Pan' o- pes 
Pa-no' pe-us 
Pa-no' pi -on 
Pa-nop' o-lis 
Pa-nor' mtis 
Pan'sa, C. 
Pan-tag-nos' tus 
Pan-ta'gy-as 
Pan-ta' Je-on 
Pan-tau' chus 
Pan' te-us 
Pan' thi-des 
Pan-the' a 
JPan' the-on 
Pan' the-us, or 



* Palmyra. Nothing can be better fixed in an English ear than the penulti- 
mate accentuation of this word : this pronunciation is adopted by Ainsworth and 
Lempriere. Gouldman and Holyoke seem to look the other way ; but Labbe 
says the more learned give this word the antepenultimate accent, and that this 
accent is more agreeable to the general rule. Those, however, must be pe- 
dantic coxcombs, who should attempt to disturb the received pronunciation 
when in English, because a contrary accentuation may possibly be proved to be 
more agreeable to Greek or Latin. 

f Pammenes.I find this word no where but in Lempriere, who accents it on 
the penultimate ! but as all words of this termination have the antepenultimate 
accent, till this appears an exception I shall venture to alter it. 

$ Pantheon. This word is universally pronounced with the accent on the 
second syllable in English, but in Latin it has its first syllable accented ; and 
this accentuation makes so slight a difference to the ear, that it ought to have 
the preference. 



PA 



PA 



PA 



75 



Pan' thus 


Pa-ra'si-a (11) 


Par' the-non 


Pan-tho'i-des (4) 


Pa-ra' si-us (11) 


Par-then-o-pae' us 


Pan-ti-ca-pae' um 


Pa/ cae 


Par-then' o-pe (8) 


Pan-tic' a-pes 


Par' is 


Par'thi-a 


Pan-til' i-us 


Pa-ris' a-des 


Par-thy-e' ne 


Pa-ny' a-sis 


Pa-ris'i-i(4) 


Pa-rys' a-des 


Pa-ny' a-sus 


Par' i-sus 


fPar-y-sa'.tis 


Pa-pae' us 


Pa' ri-um 


Pa-sar' ga-da 


Pa-pha' ges 


Par' ma (1) 


Pa' se-as 


Pa'phi-a^ 


Par-men' i-des 


Pas'i-cles 


Paph-la-go' ni-a 


Par-me'm-o 


Pa-sic'ra-tes 


Pa'phos 


Par-nas' sus 


Pa-siph' a-e 


Paph'us 


Par' nes 


Pa-sith' e-a 


Pa-pi-a' nus 


Par-nes' sus 


Pa-sit' i-gris 


*Pa'pi-as 


Par'ni(3) 


Pas' sa-ron 


Pa-pm-i-a' nus 


Pa'ron 


Pas-si-e' nus 


Pa-pin' i-us 


Par-o-re' i-a 


Pas' sus 


Pa-pir' i-a 


Pa'ros 


Pat'a-ra 


Pa-pir' i-us 


Par-rha'si-a(lO) 


Pa-ta' vi-um 


Pap' pus 


Par-rha' si-us (10) 


Pa-te/ cu-lus 


Pa-pyr'i-us 


Par-tha-mis' i-ris 


Pa-ti/i-thes 


Par-a-bys' ton 


Par-tha' on 


Pat' mos 


Par-a-di' sus 


Par-the' ni-a 


Pa' tree 


Pa-raet' a-cae 


Par- the' ni-a?, and 


Pa'trq 


Par-ae-to' ni-um 


Par-the' ni-i (4) 


Pa-tro' cli 


Par'a-li(S) 


Par-the' ni-on 


Pa-tro' cles 


Par' a-lus 


Par-the'ni-us 


JPa-tro' clus 



* Papias. This is the name of an early Christian writer, who first propagated 
the doctrine of the Millennium; and it is generally pronounced with the accent 
on the second syllable, but I believe corruptly, since Labbe has adopted the 
antepenultimate accent, who must be well acquainted with the true pronuncia- 
tion of ecclesiastical characters. 

+ Parysatis. Labbe tells us that some prosodists contend that this word 
ought to be accented on the antepenultimate syllable, and we find Lempriefe 
has so accented it ; but so popular a tragedy as Alexander, which every where 
accents the penultimate, has fixed this pronunciation in our own country be- 
yond a doubt. 

| Patroclus. Lempriere, Ainsworth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, accent the 
penultimate syllable of this word ; but Labbe the antepenultimate ; our gra- 
duses pronounce it either way ; but I do not hesitate to prefer the penultimate 
accent : and till some good reason be given for the contrary, I think Fa- 
froclathe historian and Patrocli a small island, ought to be pronounced with 
the same as the friend of Achilles. 



76 PE PE 


Pat-ro-cli' des 


Pe'li-on 


Pa' tron 


Pe' li-um 


Pat'ro-us 


Pel' la 


Pa-tul'ci-us(lO) 


Pel-la' na? 


Pau'la 


Pel-le'ne 


Pau-li' na (7) 


Pel-o-pe' a, or 


Pau-li' nus 


Pel-o-pi'a 


Pau'lus -ZE-myl'i-us 


Pel-o-pe' i-a 


Pa'vor 


Pe-lop' i-das 


Pau-sa' ni-as 


Pel-o-pon-ne' sus 


Pau'si-as(ll) 


Pe'lops 


Pax- 


Pe'lor 


Pax' os 


Pe-lo' ri-a 


Pe'as 


Pe-lo'rum, or 


Pe-da'ci-a(lO) 


Pe-lo 7 rus 


Pe-dae' us 


Pe-lu' si-urn (10) 


Pe-da'ni 


Pe-na' tes 


Pe-da' ni-us 


Pen-da' li-um 


Paed' a-sus 


Pe-ne'i-a, Pen'e-is 


Pe-di' a-dis 


Pe-ne'li-us 


Pe-di' a-nus 


Pe-nel' o-pe 


Pe'di-as 


Pe' ne-us, or 


Pe'di-usBlae'sus 


Pe-ne' us 


Pe'do 


Pen' i-das 


Pe' dum 


Pen-tap' o-lis 


Pe-ga' i-des 


Pen-the-si-le' a 


Peg'a-sis 


Pen' the-us 


Peg 7 a-sus 


Pen'thi-lus 


Pel' a-gon 


Pen' thy-lus 


Pe-lar'ge 


Pep-ar-e' thos 


Pe-las'gi(3) 


Peph-re'do 


Pe-las'gi-a, or 


Pe-r'a(7) 


Pe-las-gi' o-tis 


Per-a-sip' pus 


Pe-las' gus 


Per-co'pe(S) 


Pel-e-thro' ni-i (4) 


Per-co' si-us (11) 


Pe' le-us 


Per-co'te 


Pe-li'a-des 


Per-dic' cas 


Pe'li-as 


Per'dix 


Pe-li'des 


Pe-ren'na 


Pe-lig' ni 


Pe-rei/ nis 


Pe-lig' nus 


Pe' re-us 


Pel-i-nae' us 


Per'ga 


Pel-i-nje'uni 


Per' ga-inus 



PE 

Per'ge(8) 
Per' gus 
Pe-ri-an' der 
Pe-ri-ar' chus 
Per-i-boe'a 
Per-i-bo' mi-us 
Per'i-cles 
Per-i-clym' e-nus 
Pe-rid'i-a 
Pe-ri-e-ge' tes 
Pe-ri-e' res 
Pe-rig'e-nes 
I Pe-rig'o-ne 
Per-i-la'us 
Per-i-le'us 
Pe-riKla 
Pe-ril' lus 
Per-i-me' de (8) 
Per-i-me' la 
Pe-rin' thus 
Per-i-pa-tet' i-ci (3) 
Per' i-pa-tet-ics 

(Eng.) 

Pe-riph' a-nes 
Per'i-phas 
Pe-riph' a-tus 
Per-i-phe' mus 
Per-pho-re' tus 
Pe-ris' a-des 
Pe-ris' the-nes 
Pe-rit' a-nus 
Per'i-tas 
Per-i-to' ni-uin 
Pe'ro, or Per'o-ne 
Per' o-e (8) 
Per-mes' sus 
Per' o-la 
Per-pen'na, M. 
Per-pe-re' ue 
Per-ran' thes 
Per-rhae' bi-a 
Per' sa, or Per-se' is 
Per'sa? 



PE PH PH 77 


Per-sa' us 


Peu-ci'ni (4) 


Pha-le' ris 


Per-se'e 


Peu-co-la' us 


Pha-le' ron, or 


Per-se' is 


Pex-o-do' rus 


Phal' e-rum 


Per-seph' o-ne 


Pha' a 


Pha-le' rus 


Per- sep' o-lis 


Phse-a'ci-a(lO) 


Pha'li-as , 


Per' se-us, or 


Pha' ax 


Phal'li-ca 


Per'ses 


Phaed'i-mus 


Pha-lys'i-us (10) 


Per' se-us 


Pha' don 


Pha-na 7 us 


Per'si-a (10; 


Pha'dra 


Phan-a-rse 7 a 


Per' sis 


Pha'dri-a 


Pha 7 nes 


Per 7 si-us Flac' cus 


Pha'drus 


Phan' o-cles 


Per' ti-nax 


Phged' y-ma (3) 


Phan-o-de' mus 


Pe-ru'si-a(lO) 


Phae-mon' o-e 


Phan-ta'si-a(lO) 


Pes-cen' ni-us 


Phan-a-re' te 


Pha' nus 


Pes-si' nus 


Pha' ni-as 


Pha' on 


Pe-ta' li-a 


Phaen'na 


Pha'ra 


Pet' a-lus 


Phan' nis 


Pha-rac'i-des(24) 


Pe-te'li-a 


Pha-oc' o-mes 


Pha'ar, or Phe'ra 


Pet-e-li' nus 


Phas' a-na 


Pha-ras' ma-nes 


Pe-te' on 


Phas 7 turn 


Pha 7 rax 


Pe' te-us 


Pha' e-ton 


Pha' ris 


Pe-til' i-a 


Pha-e-ton-ti' a-des 


Phar-me-cu' sa 


Pe-til' i-i (S) 


Pha-e-tu 7 sa 


Phar-na-ba' zus 


Pe-til' i-us 


Pha' us 


Phar-na' ce-a 


Pet-o-si' ris 


Pha-ge'si-a(lO) 


f-Phar-na 7 ces 


Pe'tra 


Pha' la 


Phar-na-pa 7 tes 


Pe-tra' a 


Pha-lae'cus 


Phar-nas 7 pes 


Pe-trei' us 


Pha-la 7 si-a (11) 


Phar 7 nus 


Pe-tri' num 


Pha-lan 7 thus 


Pha 7 ros 


Pe-tro'ni-a 


Phal 7 a-ris 


Phar-sa 7 li-a 


Pe-tro' ni-us 


Pha 7 nas 


Phar 7 te 


Pet' ti-us 


Phal'a-rus 


Pha' rus 


Peu'ce(8) 


Phal' ci-don 


Pha-ru 7 si-i, or 


Peurces' tes 


Pha 7 le-as 


Phau-ra 7 si-i(4) 


Peu-ce'ti-a(lO) 


* Pha-le 7 re-us 


Pha 7 si-as 



* Phakreus. There is some doubt among the learned whether this word 
ought to be pronounced in three or four syllables ; that is, as Phal-e-reus, or 
Pha-le-re-us. The latter mode, however, with the accent on the antepenulti- 
mate, seems to be the most eligible. 

t Pharnaces. All our prosodists accent the antepenultimate syllable of thi* 
word ; but an English ear is strongly inclined to accent the penultimate, as in 
Arbacts and Arsaces, which see. 



78 PH PH PH 


Phar' y-bus 


Phic'o-res PhiMo 


Pha-ryc' a-don 


Phid' i-as Phil-o-boe' o-tus 


Phar'y-ge 
Pha-se'lis 


Phid' i-le Phi-loch' o-rus 
Phi-dip' pi-des Phil' o-cles 


Pha-si-a' na 


Fhi-dit' i-a (10) Phi-loc' ra-tes 


Pha'sis 


Phi' don Phil-oc-te' tes 


Phas'sus 


Phid'y-le Phil-o-cy' prus 


Phau'da 


Phig-a' le-i Phil-o-da-me' a 


Phav-o-ri'nus 


Phi' la Phil-o-de' mus 


Pha-yl'lus 


Phil-a-del'phi-a 


Phi-lod'i-ce 


Phe'a,orPhe'i-a 


Phil-a-del' phus 


Phil-o-la'us 


Phe-ca' dum 


PhiM 


Phi-lol' o-gus 


Phe'ge-us, or 


Phi-las' ni 


Phi-lorn' a-che 


Phle'ge-us 


Phi^lae'us 


Phi-lorn' bro-tus 


Phel'li-a 


Phi-lam' mon 


*Phil-o-me' di-a 


Phel'lo-e 


Phi-lar'chus(12) 


Phil-o-me' dus 


Phel'lus 


Phi-le' mon 


Phil-o-me'la 


Phe'mi-us 


Phi-le' ne (8) 


Phil-o-me' lus 


Phe-mon' o-e (8) 


Phi-le' ris 


Phi'lon 


Phe-ne' um 


Phil'e-ros 


Phi-Ion' i-des 


Phe' ne-us (lacus) 


Phi-le' si-us (19) 


Phil' o-nis 


Phe' raj 


Phil-e-tae' rus 


Phi-Ion' o-e (8) 


Phe-rae' us 


Phi-le' tas 


Phi-Ion' o-me 


Phe-rau'les 


Phi-le' ti-us( 10) 


Phi-Ion' o-mus 


Phe-rec'lus 


Phil'i-das 


Phil'o-nus 


Phe-rec' ra-tes 


Phil'i-des 


Phi-lop' a-tor 


Pher-e-cy' des 


Phi-lin' na 


Phil' o-phron 


Phe-ren-da' tes 


Phi-li'nus 


Phil-o-poe' men 


Pher-e-ni' ce (29) 


Phi-lip'pe-i 


Phi-los'tra-tus 


Phe' res 


Phi-lip' pi 


Phi-lo'tas 


Phe-re'ti-as(lO) 


Phi-lip' pi-des 


Phi-lot' e-ra 


Pher-e-ti'ma 


Phi-lip' po-lis 


Phi-lot' i-mus 


Pher' i-num I Phi-lip-pop' o-lis 


Phi-lo'tis 


Phe'ron Phi-lip' pus 


Phi-lox' e-uus 


Phi'a-le Phi-lis'cus 


Phi-lyl'li-us 


Phi-a' li-a, or Phi-lis' ti-on (1 1) 


Phil'y-ra 


Phi-ga'li-a Phi-lis' tus 


Phil'y-res 


Phi'a-lus Phil'lo 


Phi-lyr' i-des 



Philomedia. 



Nor less by Philomedia known on earth ; 
A name derived immediate from her birth. 

COOKE'S Hesiod, Tkeog. v. 311 



PH PH PI 


Phioe' us 


Phoi y mis 


Phyl-la'li-a 


Phin'ta 


Pho-ro' ne-us 


Phyl-Ie'i-us 


Phin'ti-as(lO) 


Pho-rc/ nis 


Phyl'iis 


Phla 


Pho-ro' ni-um 


Phvl'li-us 


Phleg'e-las 


Pho-ti' nus 


Phyl-lod'o-ce 


Phleg'e-thon 


Pho'ti-usClO) 


Phyl'los 


Phle' gi-as 


Phox'us 


Phyl' lus 


Phle'gon 


Phra-a' tes 


Phy-scel'la 


Phle'gra 


Phra-at' i-ces 


Phy-rom' a-chus 


Phle'gy-e(6)(8) 


Phra-da' tes 


Phys' co-a 


Phle'gy-as 


Phra-gan' de 


Phys' con 


Phli' as 


Phra-ha' tes 


Phys' cos 


Phli' us 


Phra-nic' a-tes 


Phys' cus 


Phlce'us 


Phra-or' tes 


Phy-tal' i-des 


Pho-be' tor 


Phras' i-cles 


Phyt' a-lus 


Pho-cae' a 


Phras' i-raus 


Phy' ton 


Pho-cen'ses, and 


Phra' si-us (10) 


Phyx' i-um 


Pho'ci-ci(3)(10) 


Phra-ta-pher' nes 


Pi' a, or Pi-a'li-a 


Pho-cil' i-des 


Phri-a-pa'ti-us(lO) 


Pi' a-sus 


Pho'ci-on(lO) 


Phrix' us 


Pi-ce' ni (3) 


Pho'cis 


Phron' i-ma 


Pi-cen'ti-a(lO) 


Pho'cus 


Phron' tis 


Pic-en-ti' ni (4) 


Pho-cyl' i-des 


Phru' ri (3) 


Pi-ce' num 


Phce'be 


Phry'ges(6) 


Pi' era 


Phce' be-um 


Phryg' i-a 


Pic'tae, or Pic'ti 


Phceb'i-das 


Phry'ne(6)(8) 


Pic-ta' vi, or 


Phoe-big' e-na 


Phryn' i-cus 


Pict' o-nes 


Phce' bus 


Phry' nis 


Pic-ta' vi-um 


Phoe' mos 


Phry'no 


Pic' tor 


Phoe-ni' ce (29) 


Phryx'us 


Pi' cus 


Phoe-nic'i-a(lO) 


Phthi'a (14) 


Pi-do' rus 


Phce-nic' e-us 


Phthi-o' tis 


Pid'y-tes 


Phce-uic' i-des 


Phy'a 


Pi'e-lus 


Phcje-ni' cus 


Phy'cus 


Pi'e-ra 


Phoen-i-cu' sa 


Phyl' a-ce 


Pi-e'ri-a 


Phoe-nis' sa 


Phyl' a-cus 


Pi-er 7 i-des 


Phoe' nix 


Phy- lar' chus 


Pi'e-ris - 


Phol' o-e 


Phy'las 


Pi' e-rus 


Pho'lus 


Phy'le 


Pi'e-tas 


Phor'bas 


Phyl' e-is (20) 


Pi'gres 


Phor 7 cus, or 


Phv-le' us 


Pi-lum' nus 


Phor' cys 


Phyl'i-ra 


Pim'pla 


Phor' mi-o 


PhylMa 


Pimrple' i-des 



79 



80 PI PI PL 


Pim-ple' e-des 


Pi-si' di-a 


Pit-u-la'ni(S)* 


Pim-pra' na 


Pi-sid'i-ce 


Pit-y-*'a 


Pin'a-re 


Pi' sis 


Pit-y-as' sus 


Pi-na' ri-us 


Pis-is-trat' i-dae 


Pit-y-o-ne ; sus 


Pin' da-rus 


Pis-is-trat' i-des 


Pit-y-u'sa 


Pin' da-sus 


Pi-sis' tra-tus 


Pla-cen'ti-a(lO) 


Pin-de-nis' sus 


Pi' so 


Plac-i-de-i-a' nus 


Pin'dus 


Pi-so' nis 


Pla-cid'i-a 


Pin'na 


Pis'si-rus 


Pla-cid' i-usr 


Pin'thi-as 


Pis' tor 


Pla-na'si-a (10) 


Pi-o' ni-a 


Pi' sus 


Plan-ci' ua 


Pi-rse' us, or 


Pi-suth' nes 


Plan' cus 


Pi-rae' e-us 


Pit'a-ne 


Pla-tae'a 


Pi-re' ne 


Pith-e-cu'sa 


Pla-tae' 


Pi-rith' o-us 


Pith' e-us 


Pla-ta' ni-us 


Pi'rus 


Pi'tho 


Pla'to 


Pi'sa 


Pith-o-la' us 


Plau' ti-a (10) 


Pi'sa 


Pi-tho' le-on 


Plau' ti-us 


Pi-sse' us 


Pi' thon 


Plau-ti-a' nus 


Pi-san' der 


Pi'thys 


Plau-she-a* 'nus 


Pi-sa'tes, orPi-sae'i Pit'ta-cus 


Plau-tii'la 


Pi-sau' rus 


Pit'the-a 


Plau'tus 


Pi-se' nor 


Pit-the'is 


*Plei'a-des 


Pis' e-us 


Pit'the-us 


Plei'o-ne 


Pis'i-as(lO) 


Pit-u-a' ni-us 


Plem-myr'i-um 



* Pleiadts. 

When with their domes the slow-pac'd snails retreat, 

Beneath some foliage from the burning heat 

Of the Pleiades, your tools prepare; 

The ripen'd harvest then deserves your care. 

COOEB'S Hesiod, Works and Day*. 

The translator had adhered strictly to the original nxmafc?, in making this 
word four syllables. Virgil has done the same: 

Pletadas, Hyadas, claramque Lycaonis Arcton. 

GEORGIC. I. 

But Ovid has contracted this word into three syllables : 
Pleiades incipiunt humeros relevare paternos. 

FASTI, iv. p. 169. 

The latter translators of the Classics have generally contracted this word to 
three syllables. Thus in Ogilby's translation of Virgil's Georgics, b. 1 . 

First 



PL PL PCE 81 


Plem'ne-us (29) 


Plis-to-ni' ces (30) 


Pnig'e-us (13) 


Pleu-ra' tus 


Plo' tte 


Pob-lic'i-us(24) 


PJeu' ron 


Plo-ti' na 


Pod-a-lir' i-us 


Plex-au' re 


Plot-i-nop'o-lis 


Po-dar' ce (8) 


Plex-ip' pus 


Plo-ti' nus 


Po-dar' ces 


Plin'i-as 


Plo'ti-us(lO) 


Po-da'res 


Plin'y (Eng.) 


Plu-tar'chus 


Po-dar' ge 


Plin-thi' ne i Plu' larch (Eng.) 


Po-dar 7 gus 


Plis-tar'chus 


Plu'ti-a (10) 


Poe'as 


Plis' tha-nus 


Plu' to 


Pcec'i-le(<24) 


Plis' the-nes 


Plu-to' ni-um 


Poe' ni (3) 


Plis-ti' nus 


Plu' tus 


Pee' on 


Plis-to' a- nax 


Plu' vi-us 


Pce-o'ni-a 


Plis-to' nax 


Plyn-te' ri-a 


Pre'us 



First let tlie eastern Pleiades go down, 
And the bright star in Ariadne's crown. 
The Pleiades and Hyades appear ; 
The sad companions of the turning year. 

CREECH'S Manilius. 

But Dryden has, to the great detriment of the poetical sound of this word, 
anglicised it, by squeezing it into two syllables : 

What are to him the sculpture of the shield, 
Heaven's planets, earth, and ocean's wat'ry field. 
The Pleiads, Hyads, less and greater Bear, 
Undipp'd in seas, Orion's angry star ? 

OVID'S Met. b. 12. 

This unpleasant contraction of Dry den's seems not to have been ranch fol- 
lowed. Elegant speakers are pretty uniform in preferring the trisyllable ; but a 
considerable variety appears in the sound of the diphthong ei. Most speakers pro- 
nounce it like the substantive eye ; and this pronunciation is defended by the 
common practice in most schools of sounding the diphthong si in this manner in 
appellatives ; but though Greek appellatives preserve the original sound of their 
letters, as qiXavria., 9Tf>ottT<oy, x. T. x, where the t does not slide into sh, as in 
Latin words ; yet proper names, which are transplanted into all languages, par- 
take of the soil into which they are received, and fall in with the analogies of 
the language which adopts them. There is, therefore, no more reason for pre- 
lerving the sound of et in proper names, than for pronouncing the c like k in 
Phocion, Lacedamon, &c. 

But perhaps it will be said, that our diphthong ei has the sound of eye as well as 
the Greek si. To which it may be answered, that this is an irregular sound of 
these vowels, and can scarcely be produced as an example, since it exists but in 

- G either 



82 PO PO % PO 


Po' gon 


Pol-y-bo' tes 


Pol-y-la' us 


Po'la 


Pol-y-ca' on 


Po-lym' e-nes 


Pol-e-mo-cra' ti-a 


Pol-y-car' pus 


Pol-y-me'de 


Pol' e-mon 


Pol-y-cas' te 


Po-lym' e-don 


Po-le'nor 


Po-lych' a-res 


Pol-y-me' la 


Po' li-as 


Pol-y-cle'a 


Pol-ym-nes' tes 


Po-li-or-ce' tes 


Pol'y-cles 


Pol-ym-nes' tor 


Po-lis' ma 


Pol-y-cle' tus 


Pol-y-ni' ces 


Po-lis' tra-tus 


Po-Iyc' ra-tes 


Po-lyn' o-e 


Po-li' tes 


Pol-y-cre' ta, or 


Pol-y-pe'mon 


Pol-i-to' ri-um 


Pol-y-cri' ta 


Pol-y-per' chon 


Pol-len'ti-a(lO) 


Po-lyc' ri-tus 


Pol-y phe' mus 


Pol-lin' e-a 


P0-lyc' tor 


Pot' y-pheme (Eng.) 


Pol'li-o 


Pol-y-dae' mon 


Pol-y-phon' tes 


Pol'lis 


Po-lyd' a-mas 


Pol'y-phron 


Pol' li-us Fe' lix | Pol-y-dam' na 


Pol-y-poe' tes 


Pol-la' ti-a (10) 


Pol-y-dec' tes 


Po-lys' tra-tus 


Pol' lux 


Pol-y-deu-ce' a 


Pol-y-tech' nus 


Po'lus 


Pol-y-do'ra 


Pol-y-ti-me' tus 


Po-lus'ca 


Poky-do' rus 


Po-lyt'i-on (10) 


Pol-y-ae'nus 


Pol-y-aa-mon' i-des 


Po-ly t' ro-pus 


Pol' y-nus 


Pol-y-gi' ton 


Po-lyx' e-na 


Pol-y-ar' chus 


Po-lyg' i-us 


Pol-yx-en' i-das 


Po-lyb' i-das 


Pol-yg-no' tus 


Po-lyx' e-nus 


Po-lyb' i-us, or 


Po-lyg' o-nus 


Po-lyx' o 


Pol'y-bus 


Pol-y-hym'ni-a and 


Pol-y-ze' lus 


Pol-y-boe'a 


Po-lym' ni-a 


Pom-ax-ae' thres 


Pol-y-boe' tes 


Pol-y-id' i-us 


Po-me'ti-a (10) 



either, neither, height, and sleight. The two first words are more frequently and 
analogically pronounced eether, neether ; and height is often pronounced, go as to 
rhyme with weight, and would, in all probability, be always so pronounced, but 
for the false supposition, that the abstract must preserve the sound of the verb 
or adjective from which it is derived ; and with respect to sleight, though Dr. 
Johnson says it ought to be written slight, as we sometimes see it, yet, if we 
observe his authorities, we shall find tbat several respectable authors spelt the 
word in this manner ; and if we consult Junius and Skinner, particularly the 
last, we shall see the strongest reason from etymology to prefer this spelling, as 
in all probability it conies from sly. The analogical pronunciation therefore of 
this diphthong in our own language is either as heard in vein, rein, &c. or in 
perceive, receive, &c. The latter is adopted by many speakers in the present 
word, as if written Pleeades; but Plyades, though less analogical, must be owned 
to be the more polite and literary pronunciation. See note on Elegeia in the 
Terminational Vocabulary. 



PO 

Po-me'ti-i (3) 
Pom-e-ti' na 
Po-mo'na 
Pom-pei' a (o) 
Pom-pei-a' nus 
Pom-pei' i, or 
Pom-pei' um 
Pom-pei-op'o-lis 
Pom-pei' us 
Pom-pil'i-a 
Pom-pi I' i-us Nu'ma 
Pom-pi' lus 
Pom-pis' cus 
Pom-po' ni-a 
Pom-po' ni-us 
Pom-po-si-a' nus 
Pomp-ti'ne 
Pomp' ti-nus 
Pom' pus 
Pon'ti-a(lO) 
Por/ ti-cum ma' re 
Pon'ti-cus 
Pon-ti' na 
Pon-ti' nus 
Pon'ti-us (10) 
Pon' lus 

Pon'tus Eu-xi'nus 
^Po-pil' i-us Lae' nas 
Pop-lie' o-l a 
Pop-pae'a Sa-bi'na 
Pop-pae'us 
Pop-u-lo' ni-a 



PO 

Por'ci-a(JO) 
Por'ci-us (10) 
Po-red'o-rax 
Po-ri' na 
Por-o-se-le' ne 
Por-phyr' i-on 
Por-phyr'i-us 
Por' ri-ma 
Por-sen'na, or 

Por' se-na 
Por'ti-a, and 

Por'ti-us (10) 
Port' mos 
Por-tum-na' li-a 
Por-tum' nus 
Po'rus 
Po-si' des 
Pos-i-*de' um 
Po-si' don 
Pos-i-do' ni-a 
Pos-i-do' ni-us 
Po'si-o (10) 
Post-hu'mi-a 
Post-hu' mi-us 
Post-ver' ta 
Pos-tu' mi-us 
Po-tam'i-des 
Pot' a-mon 
Po-thi'nus 
Po' thos 
Pot-i-dae' a 
Po-ti'na 



PR 83 

Po-tit'i-us(24) 

Pot' ni-ae 

Prac'ti-um (10) 

Prae'ci-a (10) 

Prag-nes'te 
i Prae'sos 
1 Praj' sli (3) 
: Prae' tor 

Prae-to' ri-us 

Prae-ti/ti-um (10) 

Prat' i- nas 

Prax-ag' o-ras 

Prax' i-as 

Pi ax-id' a-mas 
i Prax-id' i-ce 
i Prax' i- la 
i Prax-iph'a-nes 
! Prax' is 

Prax-it'e-les 

Prax-ith'e-a 
I Pre-u'ge-nes 

Prex-as'pes 

Pri-am' i-des 

Pri' a-mus 
1 Pri-a' pus 

Pri-e'ne 
i Pri' ma 
Pri' on 
'Pris-cil'la 
I Pris' cus 
| Pris'lis 
I Pri-ver'nus 



* Popilius Lanas. Nothing can shew the dignity of the Roman common- 
wealth and the terrour of its arms more than the conduct of this man. He was 
sent as an ambassador to Antiochus, king of Syria, and was commissioned to 
order that monarch to abstain from hostilities against Ptolemy, king of Egypt, 
who was an ally of Rome. Antiochus, who was at the head of his army when 
lie received this order, wished to evade it by equivocal answers ; but Popilius, 
with a stick which he had in his hand, made a circle round him on the sand, 
and bade him, in the name of the Roman senate and people, not to go beyond 
it before he spoke decisively. This boldness intimidated Antiochus : he with- 
drew his garrison from Egypt, and no longer meditated a war against Ptolemy. 

G 2 



84 PR PR PT 


Pri-ver' num 


Pro-me' the-i 


fProt-o-ge-ni' a 


Pro'ba 


Pro-me' the-us (29) 


JPro-to-me-di'a 


Pro' bus, M. 


Pro-me' this, and 


Prot- o-me-du' sa 


Pro'cas 


Prom-e-thi' des 


Prox' e-nus 


Proch' o-rus 


Prom' e-thus 


Pru-den' ti-us (10) 


Proch' y-ta 


Prom' u-lus 


Prum' ni-des 


Pro-cil' i-us 


Pro-nap' i-des 


Pru'sa 


Pro-cil' la 


Pro' nax 


Pru-sae' us 


Pro-cil' lus 


Pron' o-e 


Pru'si-as(lO) 


Proc'le-a 


Pron' o-mus 


Prym' no 


Pro'cles 


Pron' o-us 


Pryt'a-nes 


Proc'ne 


Pron' u-ba 


Pryt-a-ne' um 


Pro-cli'dae 


Pro-per' ti-us 


Pryt' a-nis 


Proc-on-ne' sus 


Pro-poet' i-des 


Psam' a-the (15) 


Pro-co' pi- us 


Pro-pon' tis 


Psam' a-thos 


Pro' cris 


Prop-y-le' a 


Psam-me-ni' tus 


Pro-crus' tes 


Pros-chys' ti-us (10) 


Psam-met' i-chtis 


Proc'u-la 


Pro-ser'pi-na (28) 


Psam' mis 


Proc-u-lei' us (5) 


Pros' er-pine (Eng.) 


Psa' phis 


Proc'u-lus 


Pros-o-pi'tis 


Psa' pho (15) 


Pro'cy-on 


Pro-sym' na 


Pse'cas 


Prod'i-cus 


Pro-tag' o-ras 


Pso' phis 


Pro-er'na 
Proit' i-des 


Prot-a-gor 7 i-des 
Pro'te-i Co-lum'nas 


Psy'che(12)(15) 
Psych' rus 


Proe'tus 


Pro-tes-i-la' us 


Psyl'li(3)(15) 


Prog' He 


Pro'te-us 


Pte'le-um(l6) 


Pro-la' us 


*Pro-tho-e'nor 


Pter-e-la' us 


Prom'a-chus 


Pro' the-us 


Pte'ri-a 


Pro-math' i-das 


Proth'o-us 


Ptol-e-der' ma 


Pro-ma' thi-on 


Pro' to 


Ptol-e-ma2' um 


Prom' e-don 


Prot-o-ge-ne' a 


Ptol-e-mse'us 


Prom-e-nae' a 


Pro-tog' e-nes 


Ptol' e-my (Eng.) 



* Prothoenor. 

The hardy warriors whom Boeotia bred, 

Peneleus, Leitus, Prothoenor led. POPE'S Horn. Iliad. 

\ See Iphigenia. 
J Protomtdia. 

Nisaea and Actaca boast the same, -\ 

Protomedia from the fruitful dame, 

And Doris, honour' d with maternal name. J 

COOKE'S Heaiod. Theog. v. 483. 
See Iphigenia. 



PY PY PY 85 


Tol'e-me(\6) 


Py-lar' ge 


Pyr'rhi-as 


Ptoi-e-ma'is 


Py'las 


Pyr'rhi-ca 


Ptol'y-cus 


Py-le'ne 


Pvr' rhi-cus 


Pto'cuS' 


Pyl'e-us 


Pyr'rhi-dfc 


Pub lic'i-us(lO) 


Pyl'le-on 


Pyi'rho 


Pub-lie' i-a (24) 


Py'lo 


Pyr'rhus 


Pub-lie' o-la 


Py'los 


Pys' te 


Pub' li-us 


Py'lus 


Py-thag' o-ras 


Pul-che'ri-a(12) 


Py'ra 


Pyth-a-ra' tus 


Pu' ni-cum bel' lum 


Py-rac' mon 


Pyth'e-as 


Pu' pi- us 


Py-rac' mos 


P/thes 


Pu-pi-e'nus 


Py-raech' mes 


Pyth'e-us 


Pup' pi-us 


Pyr' a-mus 


Pyth'i-a 


Pu-te' o-li (3) 


Pyr-e-nae' i 


Pyth'i-as 


Py-a-nep' si-a (ICf) 


Pyr-e-nae' us 


Pyth'i-on 


Pyd'na 


Py-re' ne 


Pyth'i-us 


Pyg'e-la 


Pyr'gi (3) 


Py'tho 


Pyg-mae'i 


Pyr'gi-on 


Py-thoch' a-ris 


Pyg-ma' li-on (29) 


Pyr' go 


Pyth'o-cles 


Pyi'a-des 


Pyr-got' e-les 


Pyth-o-do'rus 


Py'he 


Pyr' gus 


Pyth-o-la' us 


Py-laem' e-nes 


Py-rip' pe 


Py'thon 


Py-lag' o-rae 


Py'ro 


Pyth-o-ni' ce (30) 


Py-lag' o-ras 


Pyr'o-is 


Pyth-o-nis' sa 


Py-la'on 


Py-ro' ni-a 


Pyt'na 


Py-lar' tes 


Pyr'rha 


Pyt'ta-lus 



QU 



Qua'di 
Qua-dra' tus 
Quad' ri-frons, or 

Quad' ri-ceps 
Quaes-to'res 
Qua'ri(3) 
Qua' ri-us 
Quer' cens 



QU 

Qui-e' tus 

Quinc-ti-a'nus (10) 
Quinc-til'i-a 
Quinc' ti-us, T. 
Quin-de-cem' vi-ri 
Quin-qua' tri-a 
Quin-quen-na' les 
Quin-til-i-a' nus 
Quin-til' i-an (Eng.) 



QU 

Quin-til' i-us Va' rus 
Quin-til' la 
Quin-til' lus, M. 
Quin' ti-us (10) 
Quin'tus Cur' ti-us 
Quir-i-ua' li-a 
Quir-i-na'Jis 
Qui-ri' nus 
Qui-ri'tes (!) 



( 86 ) 


RH RH RU 


KA-BVR'I-US Rha'ros j Rho-sa'ces 


Ra-cil'i-a j Rhas-cu' po-ris Rho'sus 


Rae-sa' ces 


Rhe'a 


Rhox-a' na, or 


Ra-mi' ses 


Rhe'bas,or Rhe'bus 


Rox-a' na 


Ram' nes 


Rhed' o-nes 


Rhox-a' ni (3) 


Ran' da 


Rhe'gi-um 


Rhu-te'ni, and 


Ra'po 


Rhe-gus' ci (3) 


Rhu-the'ni 


Ra-scip'o-lis 


Rhe'mi(3) 


Rhyn' da-cus 


Ra-ven'na 


Rhe'ne 


Rhyn' thon 


Rav' o-la 


Rhe'ni(3) 


Rhy' p 


Rau-ra' ci (3) 


Rhe'nus 


Ri-phaj'i (3) 


Rau-ri' ci 


Rlie-o-rni' tres 


Ri-phe' us 


Re-a' te (8) 


Rhe'sus 


Rix-am'a-rae 


Re-die' u-lus 


Rhe-tog'e-nes 


Ro-bi'go, or 


Red' o-nes 


Rhet'i-co 


Ru-bi'go 


Re-gil'lae 


Rhe-u'nus 


Rod-e-ri' cus 


Re-gil-H-a' nus 


Rhex-e' nor 


Ro' ma 


Re-gil'lus 


Rhex-ib'i-us 


Rome (Eng.) pro- 


Reg 7 u-lus 


Rlii-a' nus 


nounced Room 


Re' mi (3) 


Rhid' a-go 


Ro-nia'ni (3) 


Rem' u-lus 


Rhi-mol' a-cles 


Ro-ma' nus 


Re-mu' ri-a 


Rhi'on 


Ro-mil' i-us 


Re' mus 


Rhi'pha^rRbi'phe 


Rom' u-la 


Re'sus 


Rhi-pha3'i (3) 


Ro-mu'li-dae 


Re-u-dig'ni (3) 


Rbi-pbe' us 


Rom' u-lus 


Rha'ci-a(lO) 


Rhi' inn 


Ro' mus 


Rba' ci-us 


Rhod' a-nus 


Ros' ci-us (10) 


Rha-co' tis 


Rho' de 


Ro-sil' la-nus 


Rhad-a-man' thus 


Rho'di-a 


Ro' si-us (11) 


Rhad-a-mis' tus 


Rbod-o-gy' ne, or 


Rox-a' na 


Rha'di-us 


Rbod-o-gu' ne 


Rox-o-la' ni (3) 


Rhse' te-um 


Rho'do-pe, or 


Ru-bel'li-us 


Rhae'ti, or Rae'ti 


Rfio-do'pis 


Ru'bi (3) 


Rhae'tU(lO) 


Rho' dus 


Ru' bi-con 


Rham-nen' ses 


Rhodes (Eng.) Ru-bi-e'nus Lap' pa 


Rharn' nes 


Rhoa' bus 


Ru-bi'go 


Rham-si.-iii ; tus 


Rhoe' cus 


Ru' bra sa' xa 


Rham' nus 


Rho?' te-um 


Ru' bri-us 


Rha ; nis 


Rhoe' tus |Ru'di-a; 



RU RU RU 


87 


Ru'faj 


Run-ci'na 


Ru'ti-la 




Ruf'fus 


Ru-pil' i-us 


Ru' ti-lus 




Ru-fil'lus 


Rus'ci-us (10) 


Ru-til' i-us Ru' 


fus 


Ruf-fi' nus 


Rus-co' ni-a 


Ru'tu-ba 




Ru-fi' nus 


Ru-sel' laa 


Ru f tu-bus 




Ru' fus 


Rus' pi-na 


Ru' tu-li (3) 




Ru'gi-i(4) 


Ru-te'ni 


Ru' tu-pae 




Ru' mi-nus 


Rus' ti-cus 


Ru-tu-pi'nus 





SA 



SA 



OA'BA 


Sad' a-les 


Sa' li-us 


Sab'a-chus, or 


Sa' dus 


Sal-lus' ti-us 


Sab' a-con 


Sad-y-a' tes 


Sal' lust (Eng.) 


Sa'ba? 


Sag' a-na 


Sal' ma-cis 


Sa-ba'ta 


Sag' a-ris 


Sal-mo' ne 


Sa-ba' zi-us 


Sa-git'ta 


Sal-mo' ne-us 


Sab' bas 


Sa-gun' turn, or 


Sal' mus 


Sa-bel' la 


Sa-gun' tus 


Sal-my-des' sus 


Sa-bel'li(S) 


Sa'is 


Sa'lo 


Sa-bi' na 


Sa'la 


Sa-lo'me (8) 


Sa-bi'ni(3)(4) 


Sal' a-con 


Sa' Ion 


Sa-bin-i-a' nus (^Jl) 


Sal-a-min' i-a 


Sa-lo'na, or 


Sa-bi' nus Au x lus 


Sal' a- mis 


Sa-io' nag 


Sa' bis 


Sal-a-mi' na 


Sal-o-ni' na 


Sab' ra-cae 


Sa-la' pi-a, or 


Sal-o-ni' nus 


Sa-bri' na 


Sa-la' pi-ae 


Sa-lo' ni-us 


Sab' u-ra 


Sal' a-ra 


Sal' pis 


Sab-u-ra' nus 


Sa-la' ri- a 


Sal' vi-an 


Sab' ra-ta 


Sa-las'ci(S) 


Sal-vid-i-e' nus 


Sa' bus 


Sa-lei' us (5) 


Sal'vi-us 


Sac' a-das 


Sa-le' ni (3) 


Sa-ma'ri-a (30) 


Sa'cffi 


Sal-en-ti' ni (3) 


Sam-bu' los 


Sa' cer 


Sa-ler'num 


Sa' me, or Sa' mos 


Sach-a-li' tes 


Sal-ga' ne-us, or 


Sa' mi-a 


Sa-cra'ni 


Sal-ga' ne-a 


Sam-ni' tae 


Sa-cra' tor 


Sa' li-i (3) (4) 


Sam-ni' tes 


Sa-crat' i-vir 1 Sal-i-na' tor 


Sam' nites (Eng.) 



88 SA SA SC 


Sam' ni-um 


Sar' di (3) 


Sav' e-ra 


Sa-mo' ni-um 


Sar' des 


Sau-fei' us Tro' gus 


Sa'mos 


Sar-din'i-a 


Sa' vo, or Sav-o' na 


Sa-mos' a-ta 


Sar'dis, or Sar' des 


Sau-rom' a-tae 


Sam-o-thra' ce, or 


Sar-don' i-cus (SO) 


Sau' rus 


Sam-o-thra' ci-a 


Sar-i-as' ter 


Sa' vus 


Sa' mus 


Sar-ma'ti-a (10) 


Saz'i-ches (la) 


Sa' na 


Sar-men' tus 


Sea/ a 


San' a-os 


Sar'ni-us 


Se'a 


San-cho-ni' a-thon 


Sa' ron 


Scae' va 


* San-da' ce 


Sa-ron' i-cus Si'nus 


Se' va 


San-da' li-uni 


Sar-pe' don 


Seas' vo-la 


San' da-nis 


Sar-ras' tes 


Sev' o-la 


San' da-nus 


Sar' si-na 


Seal' pi-um 


San-di'on (11) 


Sar-san' da 


Sea-man' der 


San-dre-cot' tus 


Sa' son 


Sea-man 7 dri-us 


San'ga-la 


Sa-tas' pes 


Scan da' ri-a 


San-ga' ri-us, or 


Sa'ti-ze(lO) 


Scan-di-na'vi-a 


San' ga-ris 


Sat-i-bar-za'ne 


Scan-til' la 


San-guin'i-us 


Sa-tic' u-la, and 


Scap-tes'y-le 


San-nyr' i-on 


Sa-tic'u-lus 


Scap'ti-a(lO) 


San' to-nes, and 


Sa' tis 


Scap'ti-us(lO) 


San' to-na? 


Sat-ra-pe' ni 


Scap' u-la 


Sa'on 


Sa-tri' cum 


Scar' di-i (S) (4) 


Sa-pa' i, or Sa-phae' i 


Sa-trop' a-ces 


Scar-phi' a, or 


Sa' por 


Sat' u-ra 


Scar' phe 


'j-Sa-po' res 


Sat-u-rei' um, or 


Scau' rus 


Sap' pho, or Sa' pho 


Sa-U/ re-urn 


Seed' a-sus 


Sap' ti-ne 


Sat-u-rei'us 


Scel-e-ra' tus 


Sa-rac' o-ri (3) 


Sat-ur-na' li-a 


Sche' di-a 


Sa-ran' ges 


Sa-tur' ni-a 


SkSdi-a 


Sar-a-pa' ni (3) 


Sat-ur-ni' nus 


Sche'di-us (12) 


Sai 7 a-pus 


Sa-tur' ni-us 


Sche' ri-a 


Sar' a-sa 


Sa-tur 7 nus 


Scbre' ne-us 


Sa-ras' pa-des 


Sat' u-rum 


Schoe'nus, or 


Sar-dan-a-pa' lus 


Sat'y-rus 


Sche' no 



* Sandace. A sister of Xerxes, which I find in no lexicographer but Lcm- 
priere, and in him with the accent on the first syllable ; but from its Greek 
original Zav&tujoi it ought certainly to be accented on the second syllable. 

f- Sapores. This word, says Labbe, is by Gavanttis and others, ignorant of 
the Greek, accented on the first syllable. 



SC SE SE 89 


Sci'a-this 


Scy' lax Se-du'ni(S) 


Si'a-this 


Scyl' la Se-du' si-i (3) 


Sci'a-thos 


Scyl-lae' urn 1 Se-ges' ta 


Sci'dros 


Scyl' li-as 


Se-ges' tes 


Scil' lus 


Scyl'lis 


Se-gob' ri-ga 


Sci' nis 


Scyl' lus 


Seg'ni(3) 


Scin'thi(S) 


Scy-lu' rus 


Seg' o-nax 


Sci-o' ne 


Scyp'pi-tim 


Se-gon' ti-a, or 


Sci-pi' a-dae 


Scy'ras 


Se-gun'ti-a(lO) 


Scip'i-o(9) 


Scy' ros 


Seg-on-ti' a-ci (3) 


Sci'ra(7) 


Scy' thae 


Se-go' vi-a 


Sci-ra' di-um 


Scy'thes, or 


Se-gun' ti-um (10) 


Sci' ras (3) 


Scy' tha 


Se-ja' nus IE,' li-us 


Sci' ron 


Scy th' i-a 


Sei'us Stra'bo 


Sci' rus 


Scy th' i-des 


Se-lem' nus 


Sco'lus 


Scy-thi' nus 


Se-le' ne 


Scorn' brus 


Scy' thon 


Sel-eu-ce' na, or 


Sco' pas 


Scy-thop' o-lis 


Se-leu' cis 


Sco' pi-urn 


Se-bas' ta 


*Sel-eu'ci-a(29) 


Scor-dis' ci, and 


Se-bas' ti-a 


Se-Ieu'ci-dae 


Scor-dis' cae 


Seb-en-ny' tus 


Se-leu' cis 


Sco-ti' nus 


Se-be' tus 


Se-leu' cus 


Sco-tus' sa 


Se-bu-si-a' ni, or 


Sel'ge 


Scri-bo' ni-a 


Se-gu-si-a' ni 


Se-iim'nus 


Scri-bo-ni-a' nus 


Sec-ta' nus 


Se-li'nuns, or , 


Scri-bo' ni-us 


Sed-i-ta'ni, or 


Se-li' nus 


Scyl-a-ce' urn (9) 


Sed-en-la'ni (3) 


Se-la' si-a 



* Seleucia. Lempriere and Labbe accent this word on the penultimate ; but 
Ainswortb, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on the antepenultimate. As this word, ac- 
cording to Strabo, has its penultimate formed of the diphthong E<, zexeuxsi*, 
this syllable ought to have the accent; but as the antepenultimate accent is so 
incorporated into onr tongue, i would strongly recommend the pronunciation 
which an English scholar would give it at first sight, and that is placing the ac- 
cent on the M. This is the accent Milton gives it : 

Eden stretch'd her line 

From Auran eastward to the royal tow'rs 

Of great Seleucia, built by Grecian kings. 

Par. Lost, b. 4. 

If, however, the English scholar wishes to shine in the classical pronunciation 
of this word, let him take care to pronounce the c like s only, and not like sh, 
which sound it necessarily has, if the accent be on the antepenultimate syllable. 
See Rules 10 and 30. 



90 SE SE SY 


Sel-le'is 


Seq' ua-na 


Ser'vi-usTul'li-us 


Sel'li(3) 


Seq' ua-ni 


Ses' a-ra 


Se-lym' bri-a 


Se-quin'i-us 


Se-sos' tris 


Sem' e-le 


Se-ra' pi-o 


Ses' ti-us 


Sem-i-ger-ma' ni 


*Se-ra' pis 


Ses' tos, or Ses' tus 


Sem-i-gun' tus 


Se'res 


Se-su' vi-i (3) 


Se-rnii y a-inis 


Ser-bo' nis 


Set'a-bis 


Sem' no-iies 


Se-re' na 


Se' thon 


Se-mo' nes 


Se-re-ni-a' nus 


Se'ti-a(lO) 


Sem-o-sanc' tus 


Se-re' nus 


Se-ve' ra 


Sem-pro' ni-a 


Ser-ges' tus 


Se-ve-ri-a' nus 


Sem-pro' ni-us 


Ser' gi-a 


JSe-ve' rus 


Se-mu'ri-um 


Ser'gi-us 


Seu' ihes 


Se'na 


fSer-gi' o-lus 


Sex' ti-a 


Se-na' tus 


Se-ri' phus 


Sex-til' i-a 


Sen'na, or 


Ser' my-la 


Sex-til' i-us 


Se' na 


Ser-ra' nus 


Sex' ti-us 


Sen' e-ca 


Se' ron 


Sex' tus 


Sen' ones 


Ser-to' ri-us 


Si-bi'ni(3) 


Sen'ti-us(lO) 


Ser-vae' us 


Si-bur' ti-us 


Sep-te' ri-on 


Ser-vi-a' nus 


Si-byl'lse 


Sep-tim' i-us 


Ser-vil' i-a 


Si'ca 


Sep-ti-mu-lei' us 


Ser-vil-i-a' nus 


Si-cam' bri, or 


Sep' y-ra 


Ser-vil 7 i-us 


Sy-gam' bri (3) 



* Serapis. There is not a dissenting voice among our prosodists for the pro- 
nouncing of this word with the accent on the penultimate syllable j and yet, to 
show the tendency of English pronunciation, when a ship of this name had a 
desperate engagement with one of the French, which attracted the attention of 
the Public, every body pronounced it with the accent on the first syllable. Milton 
has done the same in his sublime description of the grandeurs of Pandemonium -. 

Not Babylon 

Nor great Alcairo such magnificence 
EqualFd in all their glories to enshrine 
Belus or Serapis their gods ; or seat 
Their kings, when Egypt with Assyria strove, 
In wealth and luxury. 

Par. Lost, b. i. v. 717. 

f Sergiolus. I find this word in no dictionary but Lempriere's and there the 
accent is placed upon the penultimate instead of the antepenultimate syllable. 

t Severus. This word, like Serapis, is universally mispronounced by the mere 
English scholar with the accent on the first syllable. 



SI SI SO 9 


Si-ca' ni (3) 


Sil-va' nus 


Sir' i-us 


Si-car'ni-a 


Sim-briv' i-us, or 


Sir' mi-um 


Sic'e-lis 


Sim-bruv'i-us 


Si-sam' nes 


Si-eel' i-des 


Si -me' thus, or 


Sis' a-pho 


Si-chae' us 


Sy- me' thus 


Sis'e-es 


Si-cil'i-a 


Sim'i-lae 


Si-sen' na 


Si-cin'i-us Den-ta' 


Sim' i-lis 


Sis-i-gam'bis, or 


tus 


Sim'mi-as 


Sis-y-gam' bis 


Si-ci' nus 


Si' mo 


Sis-o-cos'tus 


Sic'o-rus 


Si' mo-is 


Sis'y-phus 


Sic'u-li (3) 


Sim-o-is'i-us (10) 


Si-tal' ces 


Sic' y- on 


Si' mon 


Sith' ni-des 


Sishf e-on 


Si-mon' i-des 


Si'thon 


Sic-y-o' ni-a 


Sim-plic'i-us (24) 


Si-tho' ni-a 


Sish-e-o' ne-a 


Sim' u-lus 


Sil'i-us (10) (24) 


Si'de(8) 


Si' mus 


Sit' o- nes 


Si-de' ro 


Sym'y-ra 


S me' nus 


Sid-i-ci' num 


Sin'di 


Smer'dis 


Si' don 


Sin-gas' i (3) 


Smi'lax 


Si-do' nis 


Si' nis 


Smi' lis 


Si-do' ni-us 


Sin' na-ces 


Smin-dyr' i-des 


?!'g a 


Sin' na-cha 


*Smin' the-us 


Si-gae' urn, or 


Sin' o-e 


Smyr'na 


Si-ge' urn 


Si' non 


So-a' na 


Sig' ni-a 


Si-no' pe 


So-an' da 


Sig-o-ves' sus 


Si-no' pe-us 


So-a' nes 


Si-gy'ni, Sig'u-nae 


Sin' o-rix 


Soc' ra-tes 


Si-gyn' nae 


Sin'ti-i(3)(4) 


Soe A mi-as 


Si' la, or Sy' la 


Sin-u-es'sa 


Sog-di-a' na 


Si-la' na Ju'li-a 


Siph' nos 


Sog-di-a'nus 


Si-la' nus 


Si-pon'tum, Si' pus 


Sol' o-e, or So' li 


Sil' a-ris 


Sip'y-lum, and 


So-loe' is 


Si-le' nus 


Sip'y-lus 


So' Ion 


Sil-i-cen' se 


Si-re' nes 


So-lo' ni-um 


Sil'i-us I-tal'i-cus 


5t'rw(Eng.) 


So'lus 


Sil'phi-um 


Si' ris 


ol'y-ma, and 



* Smintheus. This word, like Orpheus, and others of the same form, has the 
accent on the first syllable ; but poets often contract the two last syllables into 

one ; as Pope 

O, Smintheus, sprung from fair Latona's line, 
Thou guardian pow'r of Cilia the divine ! 
See Idomeneus. 



92 SO SP ST 


Sol'y-mae 


So-sip' a-ter 


Spac-te'ri-ae 


Som' iius 


So' sis 


Sphe'rus 


Son'chis (12) 


So-sis' tra-tus 


Sphinx 


Son-ti' a-tes 


So' si- us (10) 


Spi'o 


Sop'a-ter 


Sos' the-nes 


Spho' dri-as 


So' phax 


Sos' tra-tus 


Sphra-gid'i-um 


So-phe' ne (8) 


Sot' a-des 


Spi-cil'lus 


Soph' o-cles 


So'ter 


Spin'tha-rus 


Soph-o-nis' ba 


So-te'ri-a 


Spin' ther 


So' phron 


So-ter' i-cus 


Spi-tam' e-nes 


*So-phron' i-cus 


So' this 


Spi-thob' a-tes 


Soph-ro-nis' cus 


So'ti-on(ll) 


Spith-ri-da' tes 


So-phro' ni-a 


So'ti-us(lO) 


Spo-le'ti-um (10) 


So-phros' y-ne 


So' us 


fSpor' a-des (20) 


Sop' o-lis 


Soz'o-men 


Spu-ri' na 


So'ra 


Spa' co 


Spu' ri-us 


So-rac' tes, and 


Spar' ta 


Sta-be' ri-us 


So-rac' te 


Spar' ta-cus 


Sta' bi-ae 


So-ra' uus 


Spar' tae, or Spar 7 ti 


Sta-gi'ra(l) 


So' rex 


Spar-ta'ni, or 


Sta' i-us 


So-rit'i-a(lO) 


Spar-ti-a' tae (22) 


Staph'y-lus 


So'si-aGal'la(lO) 


Spar-ti-a' nus 


Sta-san' der 


So-sib' i-us 


Spe'chi-a(12) 


Sta-sil'e-us(29) 


Sos'i-cles 


Spen' di-us 


Sta- til' i-a 


So-sic' ra-tes 


Spen' don 


Sta-til' i-us 


So-sig' e-nes 


Sper-chi'us(12) 


Stat' i-nae 


So'si-i<3)(10) 


Sper-ma-toph' a-gi 


Sta-ti'ra 


Sos' i-lus 


Speu-sip' pus 


Sta' ti-us (10) 



* Sophronicus. I find this word in no prosodist but Labbe ; and he places the 
accent on the penultimate syllable, like most other words of this termination : 
unless, says he, any one thinks it more likely to be derived from Sophron, than 
from victory ; that is, by uniting a general termination to the root of the word. 
than by combining it with another word significant of itself; but as there is a 
Greek adjective zvtyovutocy signifying ordained by nature to temperance ; it is 
much more probable that Sophronicus is this adjective used substantively, than 
that it should be compounded of 2o<j>g<wv and wxo?, conquering temperance ; and 
therefore the antepenultimate accent seems preferable. 

t Sporades. This word has the accent placed on the first syllable by all our 
prosodists ; but a mere English ear is not only inclined to place the accent on the 
second syllable, but to pronounce the word as if it were a dissyllable, Spo-rades ; 
but this is so gross an errour, that it cannot be too carefully avoided. 



ST SU SY 93 


Sta-sic ; ra-tes 


Stra' bo 


Sue' vi-us 


Sta'tor 


Stra-tar' chas 


Suf-fe' nus 


Stei-la'tes 


Stra' to, or Stra' ton 


Suf-fe' ti-us, or 


Stel'li-o 


Strat' o-cles 


Fu-fe' ti-us 


Ste' na 


Strat-o-ni'ce 


^Sui'das 


Sten-o-boe' a 


Stra-to-ni'cus(SO) 


Suil' i-us 


Ste-noc' ra-tes 


Stron' gy-le 


Sui' o-nes 


Sten' tor 


Stroph' a-des 


Sul'chi 


Steph'a-na 


Stro' phi-us 


Sul' ci-us 


Steph'a-nus 


Stru-thoph' a-gi Sul' mo, or 


Ster' o-pe 


Stru' thus Sul' mo-na 


Ster' o-pes 


Stry' ma Sul-pit' i-a 


Ste-sich' o-rus 


Strym' no 


Sul-pit' i-us, or 


Ster-tin' i-us 


Stry' mon 


Sul- pic' i-us (24) 


Ste-sag' o-ras 


Stym-pha' li-a, or Sum-ma' nus 


Stes-i-cle'a 


Stym-pha' lis 


Su ni-ci 


Ste-sim' bro-tus 


Stym-pha' lus 


Su' ni-des 


Sthen'e-le 


Styg' ne 


Su'ni-um 


Sthen' e-lus 


Sty' ra 


Su-o-vet-au-rir* i-a 


Sthe' nis 


Sty'rus 


Su' pe-rum ma' re 


Sthe'uo 


Styx 


Su'ra JS-myl'i-us 


Sthen-o-boe' a 


Su-ar-do' nes 


Su-re' na 


Stii'be, or Stil'bi-a 


Su-ba' tri-i (3) (4) 


Sur-ren' turn 


Stil' i-cho 


Sub-lie' i-us (24) 


Su' rus 


Stil'po 


Sub'o-ta 


Su'sa 


Stim' i-con 


Sub-ur' ra 


Su' sa-na 


Stiph' i-lus 


Su' cro 


Su-si-a'na, or Su'sis 


Sto-bae' us 


Sues' sa 


Su-sa' ri-on 


Stoech' a-des 


Sues' so-nes 


Su' tri-um 


Sto' i-ci 


Sue-to' ni-us 


Sy-ag' rus 


fc/fci(Eng.) 


Sue' vi 


Syb'a-ris 



* Suidas. This word is generally heard, even among the learned, in two syl- 
lables, as if written Sui-das. Labbe, however, makes it three syllables, and ac- 
cents the first; although, says he, by what right I know not, it is generally pro- 
nounced with the accent on the penultimate. It may be observed, that if we 
place the accent on the first syllable, the i in the second most be pronounced 
likee; and that the general pronunciation which Labbe complains of, that of 
placing the accent on the second syllable, must, in our English pronunciation of 
Greek or Latin words, preserve the t in its long open sound, as in idle: if, there- 
fore, we pronounce the t in this manner, it is a sufficient proof that we place the 
accent on the penultimate syllable ; which, though common, is, as Labbe ob- 
serve*, without good authority. 



94 SY SY SY 


Syb-a-ri' ta 


Syl' vi-a 


Sy-phas' um 


Syb f a-rite (Eng.) 


Syl' vi-us 


Syr' a-ces 


Syb' o-tas 


Sy' ma, or Sy' me 


Syr-a-co'si-a (10) 


Sy-cin' nus 


Sym' bo-lum 


Syr-a-cu'sae (8) 


Sy' e-dra 


Sym' ma-chus 


Syr' a-cuse (Eng.) 


Sy'e-ne(8) 


Sym-pleg' a-des 


Syr' i-a 


Sy-e-ne'si-us (10) 


Sy'nius 


Sy' rinx 


Sy-en-i' tes 


Syn-cel' lus 


Syr-o-phoe' nix 


Syg' a-ros 


Sy-ne' si-us (10) 


Syr-o-phoe-ni' ces 


Sy-le'a 


Syn'ge-lus 


Sy' ros 


Syl' e-us 


Syn'nas 


Syr' tes 


Syl'la 


Syn-na-lax' is 


Sy'rus 


Syl'lis 


Syn' nis 


Sys-i-gam' bis 


Syl' o-es 


Sy-no'pe 


Sy-sim' e-thres 


Syl' o-son 


Syn' ty-che 


Sys'i-nas 


Syl-va' nus 


Sy' phax 


Sy' thas 


TA 

TA-AI/TES 


TA 

Ta'lus 


TA 

Ta-phi-as'sus 


Tab'ra-ca 


Tarn' a-rus 


Tap-rob' a-ne 


Ta- bur' nus 


Ta' mos 


Tap'sus 


Tac-fa-ri'nas 


Ta-ma' se-a 


Tap'y-ri (3) 


Ta-champ'so 


Tarn' pi-us 


Tar'a-nis 


Ta'chos, or Ta'chus 


Tarn' y-ras 


Ta' ras 


Tac'i-la(24) 


Tarn' y-ris 


Tar-ax-ip' pus 


Tac' i-tus (24) 


Tan' a-gra 


Tar-bel' li (3) 


Tse'di-a 


Tan'a-grus, or 


Tar-che' ti-us (10) 


Taen'a-rus 


Tan' a-ger 


Tar' ebon 


Ta' ni-as 


Tan'a-is 


Ta-ren'tum, or 


Ta'ges 


Tan'a-quil 


Ta-ren'tus 


Ta-go' ni-us 


Tan-tal' i-des 


Tar'nae 


Ta' gus 


Tan'ta-lus 


Tar' pa 


Ta-la' si-us (10) 


Ta-nu' si-us Ger' mi- 


Tar-pei' a (5) 


Tal' a- us 


nus (10) 


Tar-pei/' us (5) 


Ta-la'y-ra(6) 


Ta'phi-se 


Tar-quin' i-a 


Tal'e-tum 


Ta' phi-us 


Tar-quin' i-i (3) 


Tal-thyb'i-us 


Ta'phi-us, or Tar-quin' i-us 



TA TE 


Tar-quit' i-us (27) 
Tar' qui-tus 


Ta-y-ge' te 
*Ta-yg' e-tus, or 


Tel-e-phas' sa 
Tel'e-phus 


Tar-ra-ci'na 


Ta-yg' e-ta 


Te-le'si-a (10) 


Tar' ra-co 


Te-a' num 


Te-les' i-clas 


Tar-ru'ti-us(lO) 


Te' a-rus 


Tel-e-sil'la 


Tar' sa 


Te-a'te-a,Te'a-te,or 


Tel-e-sin' i-cus 


Tar' si-us (10) 


Te-ge' a-te 


Tel-e-si' nus 


Tar' sus, or Tar' sos 


Tech-mes' sa 


Tel-e-sip' pus 


Tar' ta-rus 


Tech' na-tis 


Te-les' pho -rus 


Tar-tes'sus 


Tec' ta-mus 


Tel-e-stag' o-ras 


Tar-un'ti-us 


Tec-tos' a-ges, or 


Te-les' tas 


Tas-ge' ti-us 


Tec-tos' a-gse 


Te-les' tes 


Ta'ti-an 


Te' ge-a, or Te-gse' a 


Te-les' to 


Ta-ti-en' ses 


Teg' u-la 


Tel'e-thus 


Ta' ti-us (10) 


Teg'y-ra (7) 


Tel-e-thu' sa 


Tat' ta 


Te'i-tis(5) 


Te-leu' ri-as 


Tau-lan'ti-i (3) 


Te' i-um, or Te' os 


Te-leu' ti-as 


Tau' nus 


Tel' a-mon 


Tel-la' ne 


Tau-ra' ni-a 


Tel-a-mo-m' a-des 


Tel'li-as 


Tau-ran' tes 


Tel-clii'nes 


Tel'lis 


Tau' ri (3) 


Tel-chin' i-a 


Tel'lus 


Tau'ri-ca Cher-so- 


Tel-chin' i-us 


Tel-mes' sus, or 


ne' sus 


Tel'chis 


Tel-mis' sus 


Tau'ri-ca (7) 


Te'le-a(7)(19) 


Te' Ion 


Tau-ri'ni(3) 


Te-leb'o-as 


Tel-thu'sa 


Tau-ris' ci (3) 


Te-leb' o-se, or 


Te'lys(26) 


Tau' ri-um 


Te-leb'o-es 


Te-ma' the-a 


Tau-ro-min' i-um 


Tel-e-bo'i-des 


Te-me' ni-um 


Tau' rus 


Te-lec'Jes,or 


Tem-e-ni' tes 


Tax'i-la 


Te-lec'lus 


Tem'e-nus 


Tax'i-lus, or 


Tel-e-cli' des 


Tem-e-rin' da 


Tax'i-les 


Te-leg' o-nus 


Tem' e-sa 


Tax-i-maq' ui-lus 


Te-lem' a-chus | Tem' e-se 


Ta-yg' e-te, or 


Tel' e-mus j Tern' nes 



* Taygetus and Taygete. All ourprosodists but Lempriere accent these words 
on the antepenultimate syllable, as if divided into Ta-yg' e-tus and Ta-yg' e-te. 
J am, therefore, rather inclined to suppose the quantity marked in his dictionary 
an errour of the press. The lines in Lily's Qu<e Genus will easily call to the 
recollection of every scholar how early he adopted the antepenultimate pronun- 
ciation. 

Tartara, Taygetus, sic Tcencra, Massica, et altus 

Gargarus . 



96 TE TH TH 


Tem'nos 


Te-trap'o-lis 


Thau-inan'ti-as, and 


Tem'pe 


Tet'ri-cus 


Thau-man' tis 


Ten'e-dos 


Teu'cer 


Tau'mas 


Te'nes(26) 


Teu'cri(S) 


Thau-ma' si-us 


Ten'e-sis 


Teu' cri-a 


The' a 


Te'nos(26) 


Teuc'te-ri(S) 


The-ag' e-nes 


Ten'ty-ra, Egypt 


Teu-mes' sus 


The-.a'ges 


Ten-ty'ra, Thrace 


Teu' ta 


The-a'no 


Te'os, orTe'i-os 


Teu-ta' mi-as, or 


The-a' num 


Te-re'don 


Teu' ta-mis 


The-ar'i-das 


Te-ren' ti-a 


Teu 7 ta-mus 


The-ar' nus 


Te-ren-ti-a' nus 


Teu'tas, or 


The-a-te'tes 


Te-ren' tus 


Teu-ta' tes 


The'bse(8) 


*Te' re-us 


Teu'thras 


\-Thebes (Eng.) 


Ter-ges' te, and 


Teu-tom' a tus 


Theb' a-is 


Ter-ges' tarn 


Teu'to-ni, and 


The' be, or The' ba> 


Te'ri-as(19) 


Teu'to-nes 


The'i-a 


Ter-i-ba'zus 


Tha-ben' na 


The'i-as(5) 


Te-rid'a-e(l9) 


Tha'is 


Thel-e-phas'sa 


Ter-i-da'tes 


ThaMa 


Thel-pu' sa 


Ter'i-gum 


Thai' a-me 


Thelx-i'on(29) 


Ter-men'ti-a(lO) 


Tha-las 7 si -us 


Thelx-i' o-pe 


Ter-me'rus(27) 


Tha'les 


The-rae'si-on(ll) 


Ter-me'sus(27) 


Tha-les'tri-a, or 


The' mis 


Ter-mi-na' li-a 


Tha-les'tris 


The-mis' cy-ra 


Ter-mi-na' lis 


Tha-le'tes(27) 


Them' e-nus 


Ter' mi-nus 


Tha-li'a(30) 


Them' i-son 


Ter'mi-sus, or 


Thai' pi-us 


The-mis' ta 


Ter-mes' sus 


Tham' y-ras 


The-mis' ti-us 


Ter-pan'der 


Tham' y-ris 


The-mis' to-cles 


Terp-sicb' o-re (8) 


Thar-ge'li-a 


Them-i-stog' e-nes 


Terp-sic' ra-te 


Tha-ri' a-des 


The-o-cle' a 


Ter-ra-ci'na 


Tha' rops (26) 


The' o-cles 


Ter-ra-sid' i-us 


Thap' sa-cus 


The' o-clus 


Te/ ti-a (10) 


Tha' si-us, or 


The-o-clym' e-nus 


Ter'ti-us(lO) 


Thra' si-us (10) 


The-oc' ri-tus 


Ter-tul-li-a'nus 


Tha' sos (26) 


The-od' a-mas, or 


Te'thys(26) 


Tha' sus 


Thi-od' a-mas 



* Tereus. For words of this termination, see Idomeneus. 
t Thebes. Thebes in Egypt was called Hecatom' pylosjrom having a hundred 
gates ; and Thebes in Greece Heptap'ylos, from its seven gates. 



TH TH TH 9" 


The-o-dec'tes 


Ther' i-tas Tlies-ti' a-de, and 


The-od-o-re'tus 


Ther'ma Thes-ti' a-des 


The-od' o-ret (Erig.) 


Thermo' don Thes' ti-as 


The-od-o-ri' tus 


Ther-mop' y-lse Thes' ti-us 


The-o-do' ra 


Then 7 mus Thes' tor 


The-o-do'rus 


The-rod' a-mas Thes' ty-lis 


The-o-do' si-us (10) 


The'ron The'tis 


The-od' o-ta 


Ther-pan' der 


Theu'tis, or 


The-o-do' ti-on (11) 


Ther-san' der 


Teu'this 


The-od' o-tus 


Ther-sil' o-chus 


Thi'a 


The-og-ne' tes 


Ther-sip' pus 


Thi'as 


The-og' nis 


Ther-si'tes(l) 


Thim' bron 


The-om-nes' tus 


Thes-bi' tes 


Thi-od' a-mas 


The 7 on 


The-se'i-dae 


This' be 


The-on' o-e (8) 


The-se' is 


This'i-as(lO) 


The'o-pe 


The'se-us 


This'o-a 


The-oph' a-ne 


The-si'dae 


Tho-an'ti-um (10) 


The-oph' a-nes 


The-si'des 


Tho'as 


The-o-pha' ni-a 


Thes-moph-o' ri-a 


Tho'e(8) 


The-oph' i-lus 


Thes-moth' e-tae 


Thorn' y-ris( 19) 


The-o-phras' tus 


Thes-pi' a 


Tho'lus 


The-o-pol x e-mus 


Thes-pi' a-dae 


fThon 


The-o-pom' pus 


Thes-pi' a-des 


Tho'nis 


The-o-phy-lac' tus 


Thes' pi-ae 


Tho' on 


The-oph' i-lact(Eng.) 


Thes' pis 


Tho' o-sa 


The-o'ri-us 


Thes' pi-us, or 


Tho-o' tes 


The-o-ti' mus 


Thes' ti-us 


Tho-ra' ni-us 


The-ox' e-na 


Thes-pro'ti-a(lO) 


Tho' rax 


The-ox- e'ni- a 


Thes-pro' tus 


Tho' ri-a 


The-ox -e'ni-us 


Thes-sa'li-a 


Thor'nax 


The' ra 


Thes-sa' li-on (29) 


Thor' sus 


The-ram' bus 


Thes-sa-li' o-tis 


Tho' us 


The-rani' e-nes 


^Thes-sa-lo-ni'ca 


Thra'ce 


The-rap' ne, or 


(30) 


Thra' ces 


Te-rap' ne 


Thes'sa-lus 


Thra'ci-a 


The'ras 


Thes'te 


Thrace (Eng.) 


The-rip' pi-das 


Thes'ti-a 


Thrac'i-dae(19) 



* Thessalonica. This word, like every other of a similar termination, is sure 
to be pronounced by a mere English scholar with the accent on the third sylla- 
ble ; but this must be avoided on pain of literary excommunication. 
f Than, a physician of Egypt. Milton spells this word with the final e, 

making 
H 



98 TH TI 


Thra'cis 


Thym 7 bron 


Ti-gel'li-us 


Thra'se-as(ll) 


Thym' e-le 


Ti-gra' nes 


Thra-sid' e-us 


Thy-mi' a-this 


Tig-ran-o-cer' ta 


Thra' si-us (10) 


Thy-moch' a-res 


Ti'gres 


Thra' so 


Thy-moe' tes 


Ti' gris 


Thras-y-bu'lus 


Thy-od' a-mas 


Tig-u-ri'ni(S) 


Thras-y-dae' us 


Thy-o'ne 


Til-a-tae'i(4) 


Thra-syl' lus 


Thy-o' ne-us 


Ti-mae'a 


Thra-sym' a-chus 


Thy' o-tes 


Ti-mae' us 


Thras-y-me'des 


Thy' re 


Ti-mag' e-nes 


Thras-y-me' nus 


Thyr'e-a 


Ti-mag'o-ras 


Thre-ic'i-us (24) 


Thyr'e-us 


Ti-man' dra 


Thre-is'sa 


Thyr'i-on(29) 


Ti-man'dri-des 


Threp-sip' pas 
Thri-am' bus 


Thyr-sag' e-taa 
Thys'sos 


Ti-man' thes 
Ti-mar'chus (12) 


Thro' ni-um 


Thy' us 


Tim-a-re' ta 


Thry' on 


Ti'a-sa(l) 


Ti-ma'si-on (11) 


Thry'us 


Tib-a-re'ni 


Tim-a-sith' e-us 


Thu-cyd' i-des 


Ti-be'ri-as 


Ti-ma' vus 


Thu-is' to 


Tib-e-ri' nus 


Ti-me' si-us (11) 


Thu'le(8) 


Tib'e-ris 


Ti-moch'a-ris(l2) 


Thu'ri-ae, or 


Ti-be'ri-us 


Tim-o-cle' a 


Thu' ri-um 


Ti-be' sis 


Ti-moc' ra-tes 


Thu' ri-nus 


Ti-bul'lus 


Ti-mo' cre-on 


Thus / ci-a(10) 


Ti'bur 


Tim-o-de' mus 


Thy' a 


Ti-bur'ti-us(lO) 


Tim-o-la' us 


Thy' a-des 


Ti-bur'tus 


Ti-mo' le-on 


Thy' am-is 


Tich'i-us(12) 


Ti-mo' lus (13) 


Thy'a-na 


Tic'i-da 


Ti-mom' a-chus 


Thy-a-ti'ra 


Ti-ci'nus 


Ti'mon 


Thy-bai / ni 


Tid'i-us 


Ti-moph' a-nes 


Thy-es'ta 


Ti-es'sa 


Ti-mo' the-us 


Thy-es' tes 


Tif'a-ta 


Ti-mox' e-nus 


Thym'bra 


Ti-fer' num 


Tin'gis 


Thym-brae' us 


Tig'a-sis 


Ti'pha 


Thym' bris 


Tig-el-li'nus(24) 


Ti' phys 



making it one syllable only, and consequently pronouncing it so as to rhyme 
with tone: 

Not that Nepenthe, which the wife of Thone, 

In Egypt, gave to Jove-born Helena, 

Is of such power to stir up joy as this 

Comus. 



TI 

Tiph'y-sa 

Ti-re'si-as (10) 

Tir-i-ba'ses 

Tir-i-da'tes 

Ti'ris (18) 

Ti'ro 

Ti-ryn' thi-a 

Ti-ryn'thus 

Ti-sse' um 

Ti-sag' o-ras 

Ti-sam'e-nes 

Ti-san' drus 

Ti-sar'chus(12) 

Ti-si' a-rus 

Tis'i-as(lO) 

Ti-siph' o-ne 

Ti-siph' o-nus 

Tis-sam' e-nus 

Tis-sa-pher'nes 

Ti-tae'a 

Ti'tan, Ti-ta'nus 

Tit'a-na 

Ti-ta' nes 



Ti-ta' ni-a 
Ti-tan' i-des 
Ti-ta' nus, (a giant) 
Tit'a-nus, (a river) 
Tit-a-re' si-us (10) 
Tit' e-nus 
Tith-e-nid'i-a 
Ti-tho'nus 
Tit' i-a 09) 
Tit-i-a'na(21) 
Tit-i-a' nus 
Tit'i-i (3) (19) 
Ti-thraus' tes 
Ti-tin'i-us 
Tit'i-us(10)(19) 
Ti-tor'mus 
Ti-tu' ri-us 
Ti' tus 
Tit' y-rus 



TR TR 


Tit'y-us(19) 


Tre-ba'ti-us(lO) 


Tle-pol'e-mus(l6) 


Tre-bel-li-a'nus 


Tma'rus 


Tre-bel-li-e'nus 


Tmo'lus(13) 


Tre-bel'li-us 


Troch'a-ri 


Tre'bi-a 


To-ga' ta 


Tre'bi-us 


Tol' mi-des 


Tre-bo'ni-a 


To-lo' sa 


Tre-bo' ni-us 


To-lum' nus 


Treb'u-la(19) 


To'lus 


Tre'rus 


To-mae' um 


Trev'e-riCS) 


Tom'a-rus (19) 


Tri-a'ri-a 


Tom'i-sa 


Tri-a'ri-us 


To' mos, or To' mis 


Tri-bai' li (3) 


Tom'y-ris (19) 


Trib' o-ci 


To'ne-a 


Tri-bu'ni 


Ton-gil'li 


Tric-as-ti'ni(3) 


To-pa'zos 


Tric'cae 


Top'i-ris, or 


Trick' se 


Top'rus 


Tri-cla'ri-a 


Tor'i-ni(S) 


Tri-cre' na 


To-ro'ne 


Tri-e-ter / i-ca 


Tor-qua' ta 


Trif-o-li' nus 


Tor-qua' tus 


Tri-na' cri-a, or 


Tor' tor 


Trin' a-cris 


To'rus 


Tri-no-ban' tes 


Tor'y-ne 


Tri-oc' a-la, or 


Tox-a-rid'i-a(19) 


Tri' o-cla 


Tox'e-us 


Tri'o-pas, or 


Tox-ic' ra-te 


Tri' ops 


Tra'be-a 
Trach'a-lus(12) 


Tri-phyl'i-a 
Tri-phil'lis(l) 


Tra'chas 


Tri-phi'lus 


Tra-chin' i-a 


Trip' o-lis (19) 


Trach-o-ni' tis 


Trip-tol' e-mus 


Tra'gus 


Triq' ue-tra 


Traj-a-nop' o-lis 


Tris-me-gis' tus 


Tra-ja' nus 


Trit'i-a(lO) 


Trafjan (Bug.) 


Trit-o-ge-ni'a(SO) 


Trafles 


Tri' ton 


Trans-tib-er-i' na 


Tri-to'nis 


Tra-pe' zus 


Tri-ven' turn 


Tra-sul' lus 


Triv'i-a 


H 2 



99 



100 TR TU TY 


Triv' i-ae an' trum 


Try' phon 


Tur' nus 


Triv'i-ae lu'cus 


Try-pho'sa 


Tu' ro-nes 


Tri-vi' cum 


Tu'be-ro(19) 


Tur' pi-o 


Tri-um'vi-ri (4) 


Tuc'ci-a (10) 


Tu-rul' li-us 


Tro'a-des 


Tuk'she-a 


Tus-ca' ni-a, and 


Tro'as 


Tu'ci-a (10) 


Tus'ci-a(lO) 


Troctfo-is(12) 


Tu'der, or 


Tus'ci(3) 


Trce-ze'ne 


Tu-der'ti-a(lO) 


Tus-cu-la' num 


Trog'i-lus(24) 


Tu'dri(3) 


Tiis' cu-lum 


Trog-lod' y-tae 


Tu-gi'ni, or 


Tus'cus 


Tro'gus Pom-pe'i- 


Tu-ge'ni 


Tu'ta 


us 


Tu-gu-ri' nus (22) 


Tu'ti-a(lO) 


Tro'ja 


Tu-is'to 


Tu' ti-cum 


Troy (Bog.) 


Tu-lin'gi(3) 


Ty'a-na 


*Tro'i-lus 


Tul'la 


fTy-a'n^flfe, or 


Trom-en-ti' na 


Tul'li-a 


Ty-a-ne' us 


Troph' i-mus 


Tul-li' o-la 


Ty-a-ni' tis 


Tro-pho' ni-us 


Tui'li-us 


Ty' bris 


Tros 


Tu-ne'ta, orTu'nis 


Ty' bur 


Tros' su-lum 


Tun'gri 


Ty'che(12) 


Trot' i-lum 


Tu-ra' ni-us 


Ty'ke 


Tru-en' turn, or 


Tur'bo 


Tych'i-us(lS) 


Tru-en-ti / num 


Tur-de-ta' ni 


Tych'i-cus (12) 


Tryph' e-rus 


Tu-re' sis 


Ty'de 


Tryph-i-o-do' rus 


Tu'ri-us 


fTyd'e-us 



* Troilus. This word is almost always heard as if it were two syllables only, 
and as if written Troy' lus. This is a corruption of the first magnitude : the 
vowels should he kept separate, as if written Tro'e-lus. See %oilus. 

f Tyaneus. This word is only used as an adjective to Apollonius, the cele- 
brated Pythagorean philosopher, and is formed from the town of Tyana, where 
he was born. The natural formation of this adjective would undoubtedly be 
Tyaneus, with the accent on the antepenultimate syllable. Labbe, at the word 
Tyana, says, " et inde deductum Tyaneus; quidquid sciam reclamare nonnullos 
sed immerito, ut satis norunt eruditi." 

The numberless authorities which might be brought for pronouncing this 
word either way, sufficiently show how equivocal is its accent, and of how little 
importance it is to which we give the preference. My private opinion coin- 
cides with Labbe; but as we generally find it written with the diphthong, we 
may presume the penultimate accent has prevailed, and that it is the safest to 
follow. 

t Tydeus. This word, like several others of the same termination, was pro- 
nounced by the Greeks sometimes in three, and sometimes in two syllables, the 



TY 

Ty-di'des 
Ty-e' nis 
Tym' her 
Ty-mo' lus 
Tym-pa'ni-a 
Tym phee'i (3) 
Tyn dar'i-des 
Tyn'da-ris 
Tyn' da-rus 
Tyn' ni-chus 
Ty-phoe'us, or 
Ty-phoe'os, sub. 



TY 

Ty-pho'e-us, adj, 
Ty'phon 
Ty-ran-ni'on 
Ty-ran' nus 
Ty'ras, orTy'ra 
Ty'res 
Tyr-i-da' tes 
Tyr'i-i(4) 
Ty-ri' o-tes 
Ty'ro 

Ty-rog' ly-phus 
Ty'ros 



TY 



101 



Tyr-rhe'i-dae 
Tyr-rhe'i-des 
Tyr-rhe' ni 
Tyr-rhe'num 
Tyr-rhe' nus 
Tyr 7 rhe-us 
Tyr-rhi' dae 
Tyr'sis 
Tyr-tse'us 
Ty'rus, or Ty'ros 
Tyre (Eng.) 
Tys'i-as(lO) 



VA 



VA 



VA 



VAC-CJE'I (3) 


Va' lens 


Va-U' ri-an (Eng.) 


Va-cu'na 


Va-len'ti-a(lO) 


Va-le' ri-us 


Va'ga 


Val-en-tin-i-a' nus 


Val'e-rus 


Vag-e-dru' sa 


Va-len-tin 1 i-an, 


Val'gi-us 


Va-gel' li-us 


(Eng.) 


Van-da'li-i(3)(4) 


Va-ge'ni(3) 


Va-le' ri-a 


Van-gi' o-nes 


Va'la 


Va-le-ri-a' BUS 


Van' ni-us 



m considered as a diphthong. When it was pronounced in three syllables, the 
penultimate syllable was long, and the accent was on it, as we find it in a verse 
of Wilkie's Epigoniad : 

Venus, still partial to the Theban arms, 

Tydeus* son seduc'd by female charms. 

But the most prevailing pronunciation was that with the antepenultimate 
accent, as we generally find it in Pope's Homer. 

Next came Idomeneus and Tydeus 1 son, 
Ajax the less, and Ajax Telamon. 

POPE'S Horn. b. iL v. 50. 
See Idomeneus, 



J02 VE VE VE 


Va-ra' nes Vel-le' i-us 


Ve-ro' nes 


Var-dae 7 i *Ve-na 7 frum 


Ver-o-ni'ca(SO) 


Va'ri-a Ven'e-di 


Ver-re-gi'num 


Va-ri'ni(S) Ven'e-li 


Ver're^C. 


Va-ris'ti Ven 7 e-ti(3) 


Ver' ri-tus 


Va 7 ri-us Ve-ne'ti a (10) 


Ver' ri-us 


Var'ro 


Few'ce(Eng.) 


fVer-ru' go 


Va'rus 


Ven' e-tus 


Ver 7 ti-co 


Vas-co 7 nes 


Ve-nil' i-a 


Ver-ti-cor 7 di-a 


Vat-i-ca' nus 


Ve-no' ni-us 


Ver-tis 7 cus 


Va-tin 7 i-us 


Ven-tid' i-us 


Ver- turn 7 nus 


Vat-i-e 7 nus 


Ven'ti (3) 


Ver-u-la 7 nus 


U'bi-i (4) 


Ven-u-le' i^us 


Ve 7 rus 


U-cal 7 e-gon 


Ven' u-lus 


Ves 7 bi-us, or 


U'cu-bis 


Ve' nus 


Ve-su 7 bi-us 


Vec'ti-us(lO) 


Ve-nu'si-a, or 


Ves-ci-a 7 num 


Ve 7 di-usPol 7 li-o 


Ve-nu'si-um (10) 


Ves- pa- si- a 7 nus 


Ve-ge'ti-us(lO) 


Ve-ra' gri 


Fes-pa' si-an (Eng.) 


Ve'i-a 


Ve-ra' ni-a 


Ves-cu-la 7 ri-us 


Ve- i-a 7 nus 


Ve-ra 7 ni-us 


Ves'e-ris 


Ve^i-en'tes 


Ver-big' e-nus 


Ve-se 7 vi-us, and 


Ve-i-en 7 to 


Ver-cel'las 


Ve-se ; vus 


Vefi-i(3) 


Ver-cin-get' o-rix 


Ves'ta 


Vej' o-vis 


Ver-e'na 


Ves-ta 7 les 


Ve-la 7 brum 


Ver-gil' i-a 


Ves-ta 7 li-a 


Ve-la 7 ui-us 


Ver-gas-il-lau' nus 


Ves-tic 7 i-us (24) 


Ve'li-a 


Ver-gel'lus 


Ves-til 7 i-us 


Vel'i-ca 


Ver-gil' i-ae 


Ves-til 7 la 


Ve-li'na 


Ver-gin' i-us 


Ves-ti 7 ni(3) 


Ve-li' iium 


Ver 7 gi-um 


Ves- ti 7 nus 


Ve-li-o-cas' si (3) 


Ver-go-bre' tus 


Ves 7 u-lus 


Vel-i-ter 7 na 


Ver'i-tas 


Ve-su 7 vi-us 


Ve-li'tra 


Ver-o-doc'ti-us(lO) 


Vet 7 ti-us 


VeKia-riCS) 


Ver-o-man' du-i 


Vet-to 7 nes 


Vel'le-da 


Ve-ro' na 


Vet-u-lo 7 ni-a 



* Venafrwn. Though the accent may be placed either on the antepenulti- 
mate or the penultimate syllable of this word, the latter is by far the prefer- 
able, as it is adopted by Lempriere, Labbe, Gouldman, and other good autho- 
rities. 

f Verrugo. I have given this word the penultimate accent with Lempriere ; 
in opposition to A ins worth, who adopts the antepenultimate. 



VI VO 


Ve-tu'ri-a 
Ve-tu' ri-us 


Vir-gin' i-us 
Vir-i-a'thus 


Ve'tus 


Vir-i-dom' a-rus 


U'fens 


Vi-rip' la-ca 


Uf-en-ti' na 


Vir'ro 


Vi-bid'i-a 


Vir' tus 


Vi-bid' i-us 


Vi-sel' li-us 


Vib'i-us 


Vi-sel'lus 


Vi'bo 


Vi-tel'li-a 


Vib-u-le' nus 


Vi-tel' li-us 


Vi-bul' li-us 


Vit 7 i-a (10) 


Vi'caPo'ta 


Vit 7 ri-cus 


Vi-cen'ta, or 


Vi-tru' vi-us 


Vi-ce'ti-a(lO) 


Vit' u-la 


Vi-cel' li-us 


Ul-pi-a'nus 


Vic' tor 


Ul'pi-an, (Eng.; 


Vie-to' ri-a 


U'lu-brse 


Vic- to' ri-us 


U-lys 7 ses 


Vie-to -ri' na 


Um'ber 


Vic-to-ri' nus 


Um' bra 


Vic-tum' vi-ae 


Urn' bri-a 


Vi-en' na 


Urn-brig' i-us (24) 


Vil'li-a 


Um' bro 


Vil' li-us 


Un'ca 


Vim-i-na' lis 


Un'chaj 


Vin-cen' ti-us (10) 


Un-de-cem' vi-ri (3) 


Vin 7 ci-us 


U-nel'li(3) 


Vin-da' li-us 


Unx'i-a 


Vin-del' i-ci (4) 


Vo-co 7 ni-a 


Vin-de-mi-a' tor 


Vo-co' ni-us 


Vin'dex Ju' li-us 


Vo-con'ti-a(lO) 


Vin-dic'i-us(lO) 


Vog' e-sus 


Vin-do-nis' sa 


Vol-a-gin 7 i-us 


Vi-nic'i-us(lO) 


Vo-la'na 


Vi-nid' i-us 


Vo-lan' dum 


Vin 7 i-us 


Vol-a-ter'ra 


Vin 7 ni-us 


Vol'cae, or 


Vip-sa' ni-a 


Vol'gaB 


Vir'bi-us 


Vo-log' e-ses 


Vir-gil'i-us 


Vo-log 7 e-sus 


Vir 9 gil (Eng.) 


Vol'scens 


Vir-gin' i-a 


Vol'sci,or Vol'ci 



vu 



103 



Vol-sin' i-um 
Vol-tin'i-a 
Vo-lum'nae Fa'num 
Vo-lum' ni-a 
Vo-lum' nus 
Vo-lum' ni-us 
Vo-lup' tas, and 

Vo-lu' pi-a 
Vol-u-se' nus 
Vo-lu-si-a'nus 
Vo-lu' si-us (10) 
Vol' u-sus 
Vo'lux 
Vo ma' nus 
Vo-no 7 nes 
Vo-pis' cus 
Vo-ra' nus 
Vo-ti-e' nus (22) 
U-ra' ni-a 

U-ra' ni-i, or U' ri-i 
U' ra-nus 
Ur-bic 7 u-a 
Ur'bi-cus 
U'ri-a 
U'ri-tes 
Ur-sid' i-us 
Us' ca-na 
U-sip'e-tes, or 

U-sip' i-ci 
Us-ti' ca 
U'ti-ca 
Vul-ca-na' li-a 
Vul-ca'ni 
Vul-ca' ni-us 
Vul-ca' nus 
Ful'can(Eng.) 
Vul'ca-ti-us(lO) 
Vul'so 
Vul'tu-ra 
Vul-tu-re'i-us 
Vul-tu' ri-us 
Vul-tur'num 



104 VU 


ux 


uz 


Vul-tur' nus 


Ux-el-lo-du' num 


Ux-is' a-ma 


Vul-si' num 


Ux'i-i(3) 


U'zi-ta 



XE 



XE 



XY 



yVAN'THE (1?) 


Xe-nar' chus 


Xen-o-do'rus 


Xan' thi 


Xen'a-res 


Xe-nod' o-tus 


Xan' thi-a 


Xen' e-tus 


Xe-nopfy' a-nes 


Xan' ihi-ca 


Xe'ne-us 


Xe-noph'i-lus 


Xan-thip' pe 


Xe-ni' a-des 


Xen' o-phon 


Xan-thip' pus 


Xe'ni-us 


Xen-o-phon-ti' us 


Xan'tho 


Xen-o-cle' a 


Xen-o-pi-thi' a 


Xan-tho-pu' lus 


Xen' o-cles 


Xerx'es (17) 


Xan' thus 


Xen-o-cli'des 


Xeu' xes 


Xan'ti-cles 


Xe-noc' ra-tes 


Xu' thus 


Xan-tip' pe 


Xe-nod' a-nius 


'X/chus 


Xan -tip' pus 


Xe-nod' i-ce 


Xyn' i-as 


Xe-nag' o-ras 


Xe-nod' o-chus 


Xyn~o-ich' i-a 



ZA 



ZA 



ZE 



AB'A-TUS (19) 



Zab-di-ce' ne 
Za-bir' na 
Zab' u-lus 
Za-cyn' thus 
Za-grae' us 
Za' grus 
Zal'a-tes(19) 
Za-leu'cus 



Za' ma, or Zag' ma 
Za' me-is 
Za-mol' xis 
Zan' cle 
Zan' the-nes 
Zan' thi-cles 
Za' rax 
Zar-bi-e' nus 
Zar-i-as' pes 
Za'thes 



Ze-bi'na 

Ze'la, orZe'li-a 

Ze'les 
| Ze-loi'y-pe 

Ze'lus 

Ze'no 

Ze-no' bi-a 
! Zen' o-cles 

Zen-o-cli' des 
' Zen-o-do'rus 



ZE 


ZO ZY 105 


Zen-o-do' ti-a 


Zeu-xip'pe 


Zo-pyr' i-o 


*Ze-nod' o-tus 


Zeu'xis 


Zo-pyr' i-on 


Ze-noth' e-mis 


Zeu' xo 


Zop'y-rus(19) 


Ze-noph' a-nes 


Zi-gi'ra 


Zor-o-as' ter 


Ze-phyr' i-um 


Zil'i-a, or Ze'lis 


Zos' i-mus 


Zeph' y-rus 


Zi-my' ri 


Zos' i-ne 


Zeph' y-rum 


Zi-ob' e-ris 


Zos-te'ri-a 


Ze-ryn' thus 


Zi-px' tes 


Zo-thraus' tes 


Ze' thes, or Ze' tus 


Zmil'a ces(l6) 


Zy-gar/ tes 


Zeu-gi-ta' na 


fZo' i-lus (29) 


Zyg' e-na 


Zeug' ma 


Zo-ip'pus 


Zyg'i-a 


Ze'us 


Zo'na 


Zy-gom' a-la 


Zeux-id' a-mus 


Zon' a-ras 


Zy-gop' o-lis 


Zeux' i-das 


Zoph' o-rus Zy-gri' tae 



* Zenodotus. All our prosodists but Lempriere give this word the antepenul- 
timate accent ; and till a good reason is given why it should differ from Herod- 
otus, I must beg leav to follow the majority. 

+ Zoilus. The two vowels in this word are always separated in the Greek 
and Latin, but iit the English pronunciation of it they are frequently blended 
into a diphthong, as in the words oil, boil, &c. This, however, is an illiterate 
pronunciation, and should be avoided. The word should have three syllables, 
and be pronounced as if written Zo f e-lus. 



BY inspecting the foregoing Vocabulary, we see that, notwith- 
standing all the barriers with which the learned have guarded the 
accentuation of the dead languages, still some words there are 
which despise their laws, and boldly adopt the analogy of English 
pronunciation. It is true the catalogue of these is not very nu- 
merous : for, as an error of this kind incurs the penalty of being 
thought illiterate and vulgar, it is no wonder that a pedantic ad- 
herence to Greek and Latin should, in doubtful cases, be gene- 
rally preferred. 

But as the letters of the dead languages have insensibly 
changed their sound by passing into the living ones, so it is 



( 106 ) 

impossible to preserve the accent from sliding sometimes into the 
analogies of our own tongue ; and when once words of this kind 
are fixed in the public ear, it is not only a useless, but a perni- 
cious, pedantry to disturb them. Who could hear without pity 
of Alexander's passing the river Grant' cus, or of his marry- 
ing the sister of ParyJ atis ( t These words, and several others, 
must be looked upon as planets shot from their original spheres, 
and moving round another centre. 

After all the care, therefore, that has been taken to accent 
words according to the best authorities, some have been found 
so differently marked by different prosodists, as to make it no 
easy matter to know to which we shall give the preference. In 
this case I have ventured to give my opinion without presuming 
to decide, and merely as an 'Hwnxov, or Interim, till the learned 
have pronounced the final sentence. 



PREFACE 



TO THE 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY. 



TAKING a retrospective view of language, or surveying it in 
its terminations, affords not only a new but an advantageous 
view of all languages. The necessity of this view induced me, 
several years ago, to arrange the whole English language ac- 
cording to its terminations ; and this arrangement I found of in- 
finite use to me in consulting the analogies of our tongue. A 
conviction of its utility made me desirous of arranging the 
Greek and Latin proper names in the same manner, and more 
particularly as the pronunciation of these languages depends 
more on the termination of words than any other we are ac- 
quainted with. Of such utility is this arrangement supposed 
to be in the Greek language, that the son of the famous 
Hoogeven, who wrote on the Greek particles, has actually 
printed such a dictionary, which only waits for a preface to 
be published. The labour of such a selection and arrange- 
ment must have been prodigious ; nor is the task I have under- 
taken in the present work a slight one ; but the idea of render- 
ing the classical pronunciation of proper names still more easy, 
encouraged me to persevere in the labour, however dry and fa- 
tiguing. 

I flattered myself I had already promoted this end, by di- 
viding the proper names into syllables upon analogical princi- 
ples ; but hoped I could still add to the facility of recollecting 
their pronunciation by the arrangement here adopted; which 



( 108 ) 

in the first place, exhibits the accent and quantity of every word 
by its termination. 

In the next place, it shows the extent of this accentuation, by 
producing, at one view, all the words differently accented, by 
which means may be formed the rule and the exception. 

Thirdly, when the exceptions are but few, and less apt to be 
regarded, by seeing them contrasted with the rule, they are im- 
printed more strongly on the memory, and are the more easily 
recollected. Thus, by seeing that Sperchius, Xenophontius, and 
Darius, are the only words of that very numerous termination 
which have the accent on the penultimate ; we are at perfect 
ease about all the rest. 

Fourthly, by seeing that all words ending in enes have uni- 
versally the antepenultimate accent, we easily recollect that the 
pronunciation of Eumenes, with the accent on the penultimate, is 
radically wrong, and is only tolerated because adopted by some 
respectable writers. Thus, too, the numerous termination in 
ades is seen to be perfectly antepenultimate ; and the ambiguous 
termination in ides is freed in some measure from its intricacy, 
by seeing the extent of both forms contrasted. This contrast, 
without being obliged to go to Greek etymologies, shows at one 
view when this termination has the accent to the penultimate i, 
as in Tydides; and when it transfers the accent to the antepe- 
nultimate, as in Thucydides ; which depends entirely on the 
quantity of the original word from which these patronymics are 
formed. 

And lastly, when the number of words pronounced with a dif- 
ferent accent are nearly equal, we can at least find some way of 
recollecting their several accentuations better than if they were 
promiscuously mingled with all the rest of the words in the lan- 
guage. By frequently repeating them as they stand together, 
the ear will gain a habit of placing the accent properly, without 
knowing why it does so. In short, if Labbe's Catholici Indices, 
which is in the hands of all the learned, be useful for readily 
finding the accent and quantity of proper names, the present 
Index cannot fail to be much more so, as it not only associates 



them by their accent and quantity, but according to their termi- 
nation also ; and by this additional association it must necessa- 
rily render any diversity of accent more easily perceived and re- 
membered. 

To all which advantages it may be added, that this arrangement 
has enabled me to point out the true sound of every termina- 
tion ; by which means those who are totally unacquainted with 
the learned languages will find themselves instructed in the true 
pronunciation of the final letters of every word, as well as its ac- 
cent and quantity. 

It need scarcely be observed, that in the following Index 
almost all words of two syllables are omitted : for, as dissyllables 
in the Greek and Latin languages are always pronounced with 
the accent on the first, it was needless to insert them. The same 
may be observed of such words as have the vowel in the penul- 
timate syllable followed by two consonants : for, in this case, 
unless the former of these consonants was a mute, and the 
latter a liquid, the penultimate vowel was always long, and 
consequently always had the accent. This analogy takes place 
in our pronunciation of words from the Hebrew, which, with 
the exceptions of some few have been anglicised, such as 
Bethlehemite, Nazarene, &c. have the accent, like the Greek 
and Latin words, either on the penultimate or antepenultimate 
syllable. 

It might have been expected that I should have confined my- 
self to the insertion of proper names alone, without bringing in 
the gentile adjectives, as they are called, which are derived from 
them. This omission would, undoubtedly have saved me immense 
trouble ; but these adjectives being sometimes used as substan- 
tives, made it difficult to draw the line ; and as the analogy of 
accentuation was, in some measure, connected with these adjec- 
tives, I hoped the trouble of collecting and arranging them would 
not be entirely thrown away. 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY 

OF 

GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. 



AA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

A BAA*, Nausicaa. 

BA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ababa, Desudaba, Alaba, Allaba, Aballaba, Cillaba, Adeba, 
Abnoba, Onoba, Arnoba, Ausoba, Hecuba, Gelduba, Corduba, 
Voluba, Rutuba. 

ACA ECA ICAf OCA UCA YCA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cleonica, Thessalonica, Veronica, Noctiluca, Donuca. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ithaca, Andriaca, Malaca, Tabraca, Mazaca, Seneca, Cjre- 
na'ica, Belgica, Georgica, Cabalica, Italica, Maltilica, Bellica, 
Laconica, Leonica, JVIarica, Marmarica, Conimbrica, Merobrica, 
Mirobrica, Cetobrica, Anderica, America, Africa, Arborica, 
Aremorica, Armorica, Norica, Tetrica, Asturica, Illyrica, Nasi- 



* As the accent is never on the last syllable of Greek or Latin proper names, 
the final a must be pronounced as in English words of this termination ; that is, 
nearly as the interjection ah! See Rule 7, prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary. 

f Of all the words ending m ica, Cleonica, Veronica, and Theualonica, are the 
only three which have the penultimate accent. See Rule the 29th prefixed to 
the Initial Vocabulary, and the words Andronicus and Sophronicut$ 



ca, Esica, Corsica, Athatica, Bcetica, Ceretica, Anaitica, Celti- 
ca, Salmantica, Cyrrhestica, Ustica, Utica, Engravica, Oboca, 
Amadoca, Aesyca, Mutyca. 

DA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abdeda, Hecameda, Diomeda, Amida, Actrida. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aada, Adada, Symada, Bagrada, Suada, Idubeda, Andromeda, 
Ceneda, Agneda, Voneda, Candida, Egida, Anderida, Florida*, 
Pisida. 

JEA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Dicaea, Nicaea, and all words of this termination. 

EA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Laodicea, Stratonicea, Cymodocea, Medea, Ligea Argea, 
Amathea, Alphea, Erythea, Ethalea, Malea, Heraclea, Amphi- 
clea, Theoclea, Agathoclea, Androclea, Euryclea, Penthesilea, 
Achillea, Asbamea, Alcidamea, Cadmea, Elimea, .ZEnea, Man- 
tinea, Maronea, Chaeronea, JEpea, Barea, Caesarea, NeocaBsarea, 
Cytherea, Ipsea, Hypsea, Galatea, Platea, Myrtea (a city). 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pharnacea, Ardea, Tegea, ^Ethea, Dexithea, Leucothea, Alea, 
Doclea, Dioclea, Elea, Marcellea, Demea, Castanea, Aminea, 
Ficulnea, Albunea, Boea, Clupea or Clypea, Abarbarea, Chaerea, 
Verrea, Laurea, Thyrea, Rosea, Odyssea, Etea, Tritea, Myrtea 
(a name of Venus), Butea, Abazea. 

GEA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Meleboea, Euboea, and all words of this termination. 



* Labbe tells us that some of the most learned men pronounce this part of 
America with the accent on the penultimate syllable. 



GA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abaga, Bibaga, Ampsaga, Aganzaga, Noega, Arabriga, Ao- 
briga, Segobriga, Coeliobriga, Flaviobriga. 

HA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Malacha, Pyrrhicba, Adatha, Agatba, Badenatha, Abaratha, 
Monumetha. 

AIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Achaia*, Panchaia, Aglaia, Maia. 

BIA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arabia, Trebia, Contrebia, Albia, Balbia, Olbia, Corymbia, 
Zenobia, Cornubia. 

CIAf 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Nicacia, Dacia, Salacia, Wormacia, Thaumacia, Connacia, 
Ambracia, Thracia, Samothracia, Artacia, Accia, Gallacia, 
Gra?cia, Voadicia, Vindelicia, Cilicia, Libyphoenicia, Aricia, 
Chalcia, Francia, Provincia, Cappadocia, Porcia, Muscia, Ascia, 
Iscia, Thuscia, Boruscia, SeleuciaJ, Tucia, Lycia. 

DIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Iphimedia^, Laomedia, Protomedia. 



* The vowels in this termination do not form a diphthong. The accent fa 
upon the first a, the i is pronounced like y consonant in year, and the final a 
nearly like the a in father, or the interjection ah /See Rule?. 

t Words of this termination have the da pronounced as if written she-a. See 
Rule 10, prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary. 

t See Rule 30, and the word in the Initial Vocabulary. 

$ See Ipldgenia in the Initial Vocabulary. 

\ 



( "4 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Badia, Arcadia, Leucadia, Media, Iphimedia, Nicomedia, 
Polymedia, Eporedia, Corsedia, Suedia, Fordicidia, Numidia, 
Canidia, Japidia, Pisidia, Gallovidia, Scandia, India, Burgundia, 
Ebodia, Cbdia, ^Erodia, Longobardia, Cardia, Verticordia, Con- 
cordia, Discordia, Herephordia, Claudia, Lydia. 

EIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Elegeia*, Hygeia, Antheia, Cartheia, Aquileia, Pompeia, 
Deiopeia, Tarpeia, Carteia. 

G1A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sphagia, Lagia, Athanagia, Cantabrigia, Ortigia, Norvigia, 
Langia, Eningia, Finningia, Lotharingia, Turingia, Sergia, Or- 
gia, Pelasgia, Fugia, Kugia, Ogygia, Jopygia, Phrygia, Zygia. 

HIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sophia, Xenopithia, Anthia, Erythia, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Valachia, Lysimachia, Centauromachia, Inuchia, Xynsichia, 
Antiochia, Amphilochia, Munychia, Philadelphia, Apo&trophia, 

* The ancients sometimes separated the vowels ci in this termination, and 
sometimes pronounced them as a diphthong. The general mode of pronounc- 
ing them with us is to consider them as a diphthong, and to pronounce it as long 
or double e ; which from its squeezed sound, approaches to the initial t/, and 
makes these words pronounced as if written El-e-je" yah, Uy-j& yah, &c. This 
is the pronunciation which ought to be adopted, but scholars who are fond of 
displaying their knowledge of Greek will be sure to pronounce Elegeia, Hygeia, 
or rather Hygieia, Anthtia, and Deiopeia, with the diphthong like the noun eye; 
while Cartheia, or Carteia, Aquileia, Pompeia, and Tarpeia, of Latin original, are 
permitted to have their diphthongs sounded like double e, or, which is nearly 
the same thing if the vowels are separated, to sound the e long as in equal, and 
the i as y consonant, articulating the final a. See note on Achaia. 

For a more complete idea of the sound of this diphthong, see the word 
Pleiades, in the Initial Vocabulary. To which observations we may add, that 
when this diphthong in Greek is reduced to the single long i in Latin, as in 
Iphigenia, Elegia, &c. it is pronounced like single i, that is, like the noun eye. 



( "5 ) 

Scarphia, Acryphia, Emathia, ^mathia, Alethia, Hyacinthh, 
Carinthia, Tyrinthia, C)nthia, Tyryuthia, Paithia, Scythia, 
Pylhia. 

L1A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Thalia, Aristoclia, Basilia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

CEbalia, Fornicalia, Lupercalia, Acidalia, Vandalia, Podalia, 
Megalia, Robigalia, Fugalia, CEchalia, Westphalia, .ZEthalia, 
Alalia, Vulcanalia, Paganalia, Bacchanalia, Terminalia, Fonti- 
nalia, Veriumnalia, Portumnalia, Agonalia, Angeronalia, Satur- 
nalia, Faunalia, Portunalia, Opalia, Liberalia, Feralia, Fioralia, 
Lemuralia, Salia, Pharsalia, Thessalia, ^Etalia, Italia, Cornpita- 
lia, Carmontalia, Laurentalia, Castalia, Attalia, Psytalia, Mam- 
blia, .ZElia, Caelia, Belia, Celia, Decelia, Agelia, Helia, Corne- 
lia, Cloelia, Aspelia, Cerelia, Aurelia, Velia, Anglia, Caecilia, 
Sicilia, -3Egilia, Cingilia, Palilia, Emilia, ^Enilia, Venilia, Pa- 
rilia, Basilia, Absilia, Hersilia, Massilia, Atilia, Anatilia, Petilia, 
Antilia, Quintilia, Hostilia, Cutilia, Aquilia, Servilia, Elapho- 
bolia, Ascolia, Padolia, JEolia, Folia, Natolia, Anatolia, j^Etolia, 
Nauplia, Daulia, Figulia, Julia, Apulia, Gaetulia, Getulia, Tri- 
phylia, Pamphylia. 

MIA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

* Deidamia, Laodamia, Hippodamia, Astydamia, Apamia > 
Hydramia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lamia, Mesopotamia, Cadmia, Academia, Archidemia, Eu- 
demia, Isthmia, Holmia, Posthumia. 

N IA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Amphigenia, Iphigeniaf, Tritogenia, Lasthcnia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albania, Sicania, Hyrcania, Arcania, Lucania, Dania, Co- 
dania, Dardania, Epiphania, Alania, Mania, Cannania, Ger- 

* See Rule 30. t Sec this word in the Initial Vocabulanj. 

I 2 



( 116 ) 

mania, Normania, Ciunania, Acarnania, Campania, Hispania, 
Pomerania, Afrania, Urania, Bassania, Actania, Edetania, Lale- 
tania, Occitania, Ossigitania, Mauritania, Lusitania, Titania, 
Sexitania, Alentania, Contestania, Mevania, Lithuania, Tran- 
silvania, Azania, .ZEnia, Actaenia, Aberdenia, Ischenia, Tyrrhe- 
nia, Parlhenia, Diogenia, Menia, Acliaemenia, Armenia, Nenia, 
Ncenia, Poenia, Cebrenia, Seriia, Arnagnia, Signia, Albinia, 
Lacinia, Dinia, Sardinia, Fulginia, Virginia, Bechinia, Mach- 
linia, Ciminia, Eleusinia, Tinia, Lavinia, Mervinia, Lamnia, 
Lycemnia, Polyhymnia, Alemannia, Britannia, Fescennia, Aonia, 
Lycaonia, Chaonia, Catalonia, Laconia, Glasconia, Adonia, 
Macedonia, Marcedonia, Caledonia, Mygdonia, Aidonia, Asi- 
donia, Posidonia, Abbendoriia, Herdonia, Laudonia, Cydonia, 
Maeonia, PaBonia, Pelagonia, Paphlagonia, Aragonia, Antigonia, 
Sithonia, Ionia, Agrionia, Avalonia, Aquilonia, Apollonia, Colo- 
nia, Polonia, Populonia, Vetulonia, Babylonia, Acmonia, ^Emo- 
nia, Haemonia, Tremonia, Ammonia, Harmonia, Codanonia, 
Simonia, Pannonia, Bononia, Lamponia, Pomponia, Cronia, 
Feronia, Sophronia, Petronia, Antronia, Duronia, Turonia, 
Caesonia, Ausonia, Latonia, Tritonia, Boltonia, Ultonia, Han- 
tonia, Vintonia, Wintonia, Bistonia, Plutonia, Favonia, Sclavonia, 
Livonia, Arvonia, Saxonia, Exonia, Sicyonia, Narnia, Sarnia, 
Dorebernia, Hibernia, Cliternia, Lindisfornia, Vigornia, Wigor- 
nia, Liburnia, Calphurnia, Saturnia, Pornia, Daunia, Ceraunia, 
Acroceraunia, Junia, Clunia, Neptunia ; Ercynia, Bithynia, 
Macrynia. 

OIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Laioia. 

PIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Apia, Salopia, Manapia, Messapia, Asclipia, Lampia, Olym- 
pia, Ellopia, Dolopia, CEnopia, Cecropia, Mopsopia, Appia, 
Lappia, Oppia, Luppia, Antuerpia. 

RIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Daria. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Aira, Baria, Fabaria, Columbaria, Barbaria, Caria, Ficaria, 



( 117 ) 

Calcaria, Sagaria, Megaria, Hungaria, Pharia, Salaria, Hilaria, 
Allaria, Mallaria, Sigillaria, Anguillaria, Samaria*, Palmaria, 
Planaria, Enaria, Maenaria, Gallinaria, Asinaria, Carbonaria, 
Chaunaria, Colubraria, Agraria, Diocaesaria, Pandataria, Cota- 
ria, Nivaria, Antiquaria, Cervaria, Petuaria, Argentuaria, Cala- 
bria, Cantabria, Cambria, Sicambria, Mesembria, Fimbria, 
Umbria, Cumbria, Selymbria, Abobria, Amagetobria, Trina- 
cria, Teucria, Molycria, Adria, Hadria, Geldria, Andria, Sca- 
mandria, Anandria, Cassandria, Alexandria, .ZEria, Egeria, Ae- 
ria, Faberia, Iberia, Celtiberia, Luceria, Nuceria. ^Egeria, 
JEtheria, Eleutheria, Pieria, Aleria, Valeria, Ameria, Numeria, 
Neria, Casperia, Cesperia, Hesperia, Hyperia, Seria, Fabrateria, 
Compulteria, Asteria, Anthesteria, Faveria, Lbcegria, Iria, 
Liria, Equiria, Oschoforia, Daphnephoria, Themophoria, Anthes- 
phoria, Cliilmoria, Westmoria, Eupatoria, Anactoria, Victoria, 
Praetoria, Arria, Atria, Eretria, Feltria, Conventria, Bodotria, 
CEnotria, Cestria, Cicestria, Circestria, Thalestria, Istria, Aus- 
tria, Industria, Tablustria, Uria, Calauria, Isauria, Curia, Duria, 
Manduria, Furia, Liguria, Remuria, Etruria, Hetruria, Turia, 
Apaturia, Baeturia, Beturia, Asturia, Syria, Coelesyria, Coelosyria, 
Leucosyria, Assyria. 

SI Af 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Asia, Chadasia, Lasia, Seplasia, Amasia, Aspasia, Therasia, 
Agirasia, Austrasia, Anastasia, Arbsia, ^Esia, Caesia, Maesia, 
^Idesia, Artemesia, Magnesia, Mcesia, Merpesia, Ocresia, Eu- 
phratesia, Artesia, Suesia, Bisia, Calisia, Provisia, Hortensia, 
Chenobosia, Leucosia, Pandosia, Theodosia, Arachosia, Ortho- 
sia, Rosia, Thesprosia, Sosia, Lipsia, Nupsia, Persia, Nursia, 
Tolassia, Cephissia, Russia, Blandusia, Clusia, Ampelusia, An- 
themusia, Acherusia, Perusia, Bysia, Sicysia, Mysia, Dionysia. 

TIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sabatia, Ambatia, Latia, Calatia, Galatia, Collatia, Dalmatia, 

* For the accent of this word and Alexandria, see Rule 30, prefixed to the 
Initial Vocabulary. 

t The s in this termination, when preceded by a vowel, ought always to be 
sounded like zfc, as if written Amazhia, Aspazhia, &c. Asia, Theodosia, and 
Sosia, seem to be the only exceptions. See Principles of English Pronuncia- 
tion, No. 453, prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary of the English, 
Language. 



( "8 ) 

Sarmatia, Egnatia, Aratia, Alsatia, Actia, Caetia, Rhaetia, Anse- 
tia, Vicetia, Peucetia, Pometia, Anetia, Clampetia, Lucretia, 
Cyretia, Setia, Lutetia, Helvetia, Uzetia, Phiditia, Angitia, An- 
drolitia, Sulpitia, Naritia, Delgovitia, Baltia, Bantia, Brigantia, 
Murgantia, Almantia, Numantia, Aperantia, Constantia, Pla- 
centia, Picentia, J^ucentia, Fidentia, Digentia, Morgentia. 
Valentia, Pollentia, Polentia, Terentia, Florentia, Laurentia, 
Consentia, Potentia, Faventia, Confluentia, Liquentia, Druentia, 
Quintia, Pontia, Acherontia, Alisontia, Moguntia, Scotia, Boeotia, 
Scaptia, Martia, Tertia, Sebastia, Bnbastia, Adrastia, Bestia, 
Modestia, Segestia, Orestia, Charistia, Ostia, Brattia, Acutia, 
Minutia, Cossutia, Tutia, Clytia, Narytia. 

VIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Candavia, Blavia, Flavia, Menavia, Scandinavia, Aspavia, 
Moravia, Warsavia, Octavia, Juvavia, JEvia, Cendevia, Menevia, 
Suevia, Livia, Trivia, Urbesalvia, Sylvia, Moscovia, Segovia, 
Gergovia, Nassovia, Cluvia. 

XIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Brixia, Cinxia. 

YIA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
llithyia*, Orithyia. 

ZIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sabazia, Alyzia. 

ALA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ahala, Messala. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abala, Gabala, Castabala, Onobala, Triocala, Crocala, Ab- 
dala, Daedala, Bucepbala, Abliala, Astyphala, Maenala, Avala. 

* The vowels ia in these words must be pronounced distinctly in two sylla- 
bles, as if written Il-ith-C'i 1 ah, 0-rtth>e-i' ah ; the penultimate syllable pro- 
nounced as the noun eye. 



( 119 ) 
CLA 

decent either the Penultimate or Antepenultimate syllable. 
Amicla. 

ELA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Arbela (in Persia), Acela, Adela, Suadete, Mundela, Philo- 
mela, Amstela. 

ELA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Arbela (in Sicily). 

OLA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Publicola, Anionicola, Junonicola, Neptunicola, Agricola, 
Baticola, Leucola, JEola, Abrostola, Scaevola. 

ULA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abula, Trebula, Albula, Carbula, Callicula, Saticula, Adula, 
Acidula, jEgula, Caligula, Artigula, Longula, Ortopula, Me- 
rula, Casperula, Asula, .^Esula, Foesula, Sceptesula, Scepterisula, 
Insula, Vitula, Vistula. 

YLA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Idyla, Massyla. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abyla. 

AMA EMA IMA OMA UMA YMA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cynossema, Aroma, Narracustoma. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pandama, Abderama, Asama, Uxama, Acema, Obrima, Per- 
rima, Certinaa, Boreostoma, Decuma, Didyma, Hierosolyma, 



( 120 ) 

A NA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Albana, Pandana, Trajana, Marciana, Diana, Sogdiana, Dran- 
giana, Margiana, Aponiana, Pomponiana, Trojana, Copiana, 
Mariana, Drusiana, Susiana, Statiana, Glottiana, Viana, Alana, 
Crococalana, Eblana, jElana, Amboglana, Vindolana, Quercu- 
lana, Querquetulana, Amana, Almana, Comana, Mumana, Bar- 
pana, Clarana, Adrana, Messana, Catana, Accitana, Astigitaua, 
Zeugitana, Meduana, Malvana, Cluana, Novana, Equana. 

ANA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abana, Fricana, Concana, Adana, Cispadana, Sagana, Ach- 
ana, Leuphana, Hygiana, Drepana, Barpana, Ecbatana, Catana, 
Sequana, Cyana, Tyana. 

ENA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Labena, Characena, Medena, Fidena, Aufidena, Ageena, 
Comagena, Dolomena, Capena, Caesena, Messena, Artena. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Phoebigena, Graphigena, Aciligena, Ignigena, Junonigena, 
Opigena, Nysigena, Boetigena, Trojugena, jEgostheiia, Alena, 
Helena, Pellena, Porsena, Atena, Polyxena, Theoxena. 

IN A* 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Arabina, Acina, Cloacina, Tarracina, Cluacina, Coecina, 
Kicinu, Kuncina, Cercina, Lucina, Erycina, Acradina, Achra- 
dina, jEgina, Bachina, Acanthina, Messalina, Catalina, Fascelina, 
Mechlina, Tellina, Callina, Meduliina, Cleobulina, Tutulina, 
Caenina, Cenina, Antonina, Heroiua, Apina, Cisalpina, Trans- 
alpina, Agrippina, Abarina, Carina, Larina, Camarina, Sabrina, 
Phalacrina, Acerina, Lerina, Camerina, Terina, Jamphorina, 
Caprina, Myrina, Casina, Felsina, Abusina, Eleusina, Atina, 
Catina, Metina, Libitina, Maritina, Libentina, Adruruentina, 

* Every word of this termination with the accent on the penultimate syllable, 
has the i pronounced as the noun eye. See Rules 1, 3, and 4, prefixed to the 
Initial Vocabulary. 



Ferentina, Aventina, Aruntina, Potina, Palaestina, Mutina, Fla- 
vina, Levina. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Acina, Fascellina, Proserpina, Asina, Sarsina. 

ON A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abona, Uxacona, Libisocona, Usocona, Saucona, Dodona, 
Scardona, Adeona, Aufona, Salona, Bellona, Duellona, J-Etmo- 
na, Cremona, Artemona, Salmona, Homona, Pomona, Flanona, 
^Enona, Hippona, Narona, Aserona, Angerona, Verona, Ma- 
trona, ^Esona, Latona, Antona, Dertona, Ortona, Cortona, Al- 
vona, Axona. 

UNA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ituna. 

OA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Aloa. . 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Anchoa. 

IPA OPA UPA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Argyripa, Europa, Catadupa. 

ARA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abdara. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abara, Acara, Imacara, Accara, Cadara, Gadara, Abdara, 
Megara, Machara, Imachara, Phalara, Cinara, Cynara, Li para, 
Lupara, Isara, Patara, Mazara. 

CRA DRA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Lepteacra, Cliaradra, Clepsydra. 



ERA 

decent the Penultimate. 

Abdera, Andera, Cythera (the island Cerigo, near, Crete). 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Libera, Glycera, Acadara, Jadera, Abdera, Andera, Aliphera, 
Cythera (the city of Cyprus), Hiera, Cremera, Cassara. 

GRA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Tanagra, Beregra. 

HRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Libethra. 

IRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daira, Thelaira, Stagira, JEgira, Deiariira, Metanira, Thy- 
atira. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cybira. 

OR A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Pandora, Aberdora, Aurora, Vendesora, Windesora. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ebora. 

TRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cleopatra. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Excetra, Lucopetra, Triquetra. 

URA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cabura, Ebura, JSbura, Balbura, Subura, Pandura, Baniura, 
Asura, Lesura, Isura, Cynosura, Lactura, Astura. 



YRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ancyra, Cercyra, Corey ra, Lagyra, Palmyra*, Cosyra, Ten- 
tyra. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Laphyra, Glaphyra, Philyra, Cebyra, Antic)'ra. 

ASA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abasa, Banasa, Dianasa, Harpasa. 

ESA ISA OSA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Ortogesa, Alesa, Halesa, Namesa, Alpesa, Berresa, Mentesa, 
Ampbisa, Elisa, Tolosa, .ZErosa, Dertosa, Cortuosa. 

USA YSA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pharmacusa, Pithecusa, Nartecusa, Phoenicusa, Celadusa, 
Padusa, Lopadusa, Medusa, Eleusa, Creusa, Lagusa, Elaphusa, 
Agathusa, Marathusa, ^Ethusa, Phoethiisa, Arethusa, Ophiusa, 
Elusa, Cordilusa, Drymusa, Eranusa, Ichnusa, Colpusa, Aprusa, 
Cissusa, Scotusa, Dryusa, Donysa. 

ATA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Braccata, Adadata, Rhadata, Tifata, Tiphata, Crotoniata, 
Alata, Amata, Acmata, Comata, Sarmata, Napata, Demarata, 
Quadrata, Grata, Samosata, Armosata, Congavata, Artaxata. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Chaerestrata. 

ETA IT A OTA UTA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

JEta, Caieta, Moneta, Deniareta, Myrteta, Herbita, Areopa- 
gita, Melita, Abderita, Artemita, Stagirita, Uzita, Phthiota, 
Epirota, Contributa, Cicuta, Aluta, Matuta. 

* Palmyra. See this word in the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 124 ) 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Damocrita, Emerita. 

AVA EVA IVA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Clepiduva, Abragava, Calleva, Geneva, Areva, Atteva, Lu- 
teva, Galliva. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Batava. 

UA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Accua, Addua, Hedua, Heggua, Armua, Capua, Februa, 
Achrua, Palatua, Flatua, Mantua, Agamzua. 

Y A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Libya, Zerolibya, j^Ethya, Carya, Marsya. 

AZA EZA OZA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abaraza, Mieza, Baragoza. 

AE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Nausicae, Pasiphae. 



Accent the Penultimate. 
Maricae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Colubae, Vaginiacae, Carmocae, Qxydracae, Gallicae, Hieronicge, 
Coricae, Anticae, Odrycae. 

AD^E 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
, Baccbiadae, Scipiadaa, Battiadae, Thestiadae. 



Accent the Penultimate. 
Proclidae, Basilkjae, Orestidag, Ebudae, 



( 125 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Labdacidae, Seleucidae, Adrymachidae, Branchidae, Pyrrhi- 
dae, Basilidae, Romulidae, Numidae, Dardanidae, Borysthenidae, 
Ausonidae, Cecropida?, Gangaridae, Marmaridae, Tyndaridse, 
Druidae. 

jE#l EM FJE G^ H^E 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Achaeae, Plataeae, Napaeae, Allifae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Diomedeae, Cyaneae, Cenchreae, Capreae, Plateae, Callifae, 
Latobrigae, Lapithae. 



Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Baiae, Graiae, Stabiae, Ciliciae, Cerciae, Besidiae, Rudiae, 
Taphiae, Versaliae, Ficeliae, Encheliae, Cloeliae, Cutilias, Esqui- 
liae, Exquiliae, Formiae, Volcaniae, Araniae, Armeniae, Britan- 
niae, Boconiae, Chelidoniae, Pioniae, Gemonise, Xyniae, Ellopiae, 
Herpiae, Caspiae, Cuniculariae, Canariae, Purpurariae, Chabriae, 
Feriae, Laboriae, Emporiae, Caucasiae, Vespasiae, Corasiae, Pra- 
siae, Ithacesiae, Gymnesiae, Etesiae, Gratiae, Venetiae, Piguntia?, 
Selinuntiae, Sestiae, Cottiae, Landavia?, Harpyiae. 



Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pialae, Agagamalac, Apsilae, Apenninicolae, ^Iquicolae, Apiolae, 
EpipolaB, Bolbula?, Anculae, Fulfulae, Fesulae, Carsulae, Latulae, 
Thermopylae, Acrocomse, Achomae, Solymae. 

AN^E EN^E 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Africanae, Clodianae, Valentinianae, Marianae, Valentianae, 
Sextianse, Cumanae, Adiabenae, Mycenae, Fregenaa, Sophenae, 
Athenae, Hermathenae, Mitylenae, Acesamenae, Achmenae, Clas- 
somenae, Camoenae, Convenae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Apenninigenae, Faunigenae, Ophiogenae. 

* See Rule 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 126 ) 

INM ON^S UNJE ZOM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Salinae, Calaminae, Agrippina?, Caiina?, Taurinae, Philistine, 
Cleonae, Veunonae, Oonae, Vacunae, Androgunae, Abzose. 

IPJE UP^E 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Centuripae, Rutupae. 

ARJE ER^E UBR^ YTHR^E OR^E ATR^E ITRjE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Adiabarae, Andara?, Ulubrae, Budor?e, AlachoraB, Coatrap, 
Velitrae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Eleutherse, Biiterae, Erythrae, Pylagorae. 

AS^E ES^E US^E 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Syracusae, Pithecusae, Pityusae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Pagasae, Acesae. 

AT^l ETJE 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Maeatae, Abrincatae, Lubeatse, Docleatae, Pheneatae, Aca- 
peatae, Magatae, Olciniatae, Crotoniatae, Galatae, Arelatae, Hylatae, 
Arnatae, laxamatae, Dalmatse, Sauromatas, Exomataj, Abriualae, 
Fortunatae, Asampatae, Cybiratae, Vasatae, Circetai, ^Isymnetae, 
Agapetae, Aretae, Diaparetae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ttiyroageta?, Massagelai, Aphetrc, Denseletye, Coeletae, De- 



decent the Penultimate. 

Ascitae, Abraditae, Acbitae, Aboniteichitae, Accabacotichitae, 
^\rsagalita3, Avalita?, Phaselilae, Brullitae, Hierapolitae, Anto- 
niopolitae, Adriauapolita?, Metropolitae, Diouysopolitae, Adulita; ; 



Elamitae, Bomitae, Tomitas, Scenitae, Pionitae, Agravonitae, 
Agonitae, Sybaritae, Daritae, Opharitae, Dassaritae, Nigritae, 
Orita?, Aloritae, Tentyritae, Galeota?, Linmiotae, Estiotae, Am- 
preutae, Alulae, TroglodytaB, or Troglod' y taa. 



Accent the Penultimate. 
Durcabrivae, Elgovas. Durobrovae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Mortuae, Halicya?, Phlegyae, Bitbyae, Ornilhyae, Milyae, 
Minyae. 

QBE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Deiphobe, Niobe. 

ACE ECE ICE OCE YCE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Phcenice, Berenice, Aglaonice, Stratonice. See Rule 30. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Candace, Phylace, Canace, Mirace, Artace, Allebece, Alo- 
pece, Laodice, Aguodice, Eurydice, Pyrrhice, Helice, Gallice, 
lllice, Deniodice, Sarmatice, Erectice, Getice, Cymodoce, 
Agoce, Harpalyce, Eryce. 

EDE 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Agamede, Perimede, Alcimede. 

JEE 

Accent the Penultimate. 



NEE AGE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cyanee, Lalage. 

* The termination of yce, with the accent on the preceding syllable, must be 
pronounced as two similar letters ; that is, as if spelt Halic-e-e, Min-e-e, &c. 
See Rule 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 128 ) 
ACHE ICHE YCHE 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Ischomache, Andromache, Canache, Doliche, Eutyche. 

PHE THE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Anaphe, Psamathe. 

IE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Gargaphie*, Uranie, Meminie Asterie, Hyrie, Parrhasie, 
Clylie. 

ALE ELE ILE OLE ULE YLE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Neobule, Eubule, Cherdule, Eriphyle. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acale, Hecale, Mycale, Megale, Omphale, JEthale, Noven- 
diale, ^Egiale, Atichiale, Myrtale, Ambarvale, Hyale, Euryale, 
Cybele, Nephele, Alele, Semele, Perimele, Poecile, Affile, 
CEmphile, lole, Omole, Homole, Phidyle, Strongyle, Chtho- 
nophyle, Deipyle, Eurypile. 

AME I ME OME YME 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Apame, Inarirae, Ithome, Amymome, CEnome, Amphinome, 
Laonome, Hylonome, Eurynome, Didyme. 

AN E 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Mandane, jEane, Anthane, Achriane, Anane, Drepane, Acra- 
batane, Eutane, Roxane. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Taprobarie, Cyane, Pitane. 

* The i in the penultimate syllables of the words, not having the accent, must 
be pronounced like e. This occasions a disagreeable hiatus between this and 
the last syllable, and a repetition of the same sound ; but at the same time is 
strictly according to rule. See Rule 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 129 ) 
ENE 

decent the Penultimate. 

Acabene, Bubacene, Damascene, Chalcidene, Cisthene, 
Alcisthene, Partbiene, Priene, Poroselene, Pallene, Tellene, 
Cyllene, Pylene, Mitylene, .ZEmene, Laonomene, Ismene, 
Dindymene, Osrhoene, Troene, Arene, Autocrene, Hippo- 
crene, Pirene, Cyrerie, Pyrene, Capissene, Atropatene, Cor- 
duene, Syene. 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Helene, Dynamene, Depamene, Nyctimene, Idomene, Mel- 
pomene, Anadyomene, Armene. 

INE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabine, Carcine, Trachine, Alcanthine, Neptunine, Larine, 
Nerine, Irine, Barsine, Bolbetine. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Asine. 

ONE YNE 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Methone, Ithone, Dione, Porphyrione, Acrisione, Alone, 
Halone, Corone, Torone, Thyone, Bizone, Delphyne. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mycone, Erigone, Persephone, Tisiphone, Deione, Pleione, 
Chione, Ilione, Hermione, Herione, Commone, Mnemosyne, 
Sophrosyne, Eupbrosyne. 

O E (in two syllables) 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Amphirboe, Alcatboe, Alcithoe, Amphithoe, Nausithoe, Lao- 
tboe, Leucothoe, Cymothoe, Hippotboe, Alyxothoe, Myrioe, 
Pholoe, Soloe, Sinoe, Mnoe, Arsinoe, Lysinoe, Antinoe, Leu- 
conoe, Theonoe, Pliilonoe, Phaemonoe, Autonoe, Polynoe, 
Beroe, Meroe, Peroe, Ocyroe, Abzoe. 

APE OPE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
lotape, Rbodope, Cbalciope, Candiope, JEthiope, Calliope, 



( 130 ) 

Liriope, Cassiope, Alope, Agalope, Penelope, Parthenope, Si- 
nope, jErope, Merope, Dryope. 

ARE IRE ORE YRE 

decent the Penultimate. 
Lymire. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Becare, Tamare, JEnare, Terpsichore, Zephyre, A pyre. 

ESE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Melese, Temese. 

ATE ETE ITE OTE YTE TYE. 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ate, Reate, Teate, Arelate, Admete, Arete, Aphrodite, Am- 
phitrite, Atabyrite, Percote, Pactye. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hecate, Condate, Automate, Taygete, Nepete, Anaxarete, 
Hippolyte. 

AVE EVE 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Agave. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Nineve. 

LAI* NAI (in two syllables) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Acholai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Danai. 

BI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Acibi, Abnobi, Attubi. 

ACl 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Segontiaci, Mattiaci, Amaci, -ZEnaci, BettovacL 
* For the final i in these words, see Rule the 4th of the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 131 ) 
ACI ICI OCI UC1 

decent the Penultimate. 

Rauraci, Albici, Labici, Acedici, Palici, Marici, Medoma- 
trici, Raurici, Arevici, Triboci, Aruci. 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Callaici, Vendelici, Academic!, Arecomici, Hernici, Cynici, 
Stoici, Opici, Nassici, Aduatici, Atuatici, Peripatetici, Cettici, 
Avantici, Xystici, Lavici, Triboci, Amadoci, Bibroci. 

GDI YDI 

\ 

decent the Penultimate. 
Borgodi, Abydi. 

JEI 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Saba?i, Vaccaei, and so of all words which have a diphthong in 
the penultimate syllable. 

E I (in two syllables) 

: decent the Antepenultimate. 

Lapidei, Candei, Agandei, Amathei, Elei, Canthlei, Euganei, 
CEnei, Mandarei, Hyperborei, Carastasei, Pratei. 

GI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acridophagi, Agriophagi, Chelanophagi, Andropophagi, An- 
thropophagi, Lotophagi, Struthophagi, Ichthyophagi, Decem- 
pagi, Novempagi, Artigi, Alostigi. 

CHI THI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Heniochi, ^Enochi, Henochi, Ostrogothi. 

IP 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abii, Gabii, and all words of this termination. 

* See Rule 3 and 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 
K 2 



( 132 ) 
ALI ELI ILI OLI ULI YLI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abali, Vandali, Acephali, Cynocephali, Macrocephali, At- 
tali, Alontegeceli, Garoceli, Monosceli, Igiigili, JEquicoli, 
Carseoli, Puteoli, Corioli, Ozoli, Atabuli, Graeculi, Pediculi, 
Siculi, Puticuli, Anculi, Barduli, Varduli, Turduli, Foruli, 
Gaetuli, Bastuli, Rutuli, Massesyli, Dactyli. 

AMI EMI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Apisami, Charidemi. 

OMI UMI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cephalatomi, Astomi, Medioxumi. 

ANI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Albani, Cerbani, ^cani, Sicani, Tusicani, &c., and all words 
of this termination, except Choani and Sequani, or such as are 
derived from words terminating in anus, with :he penultimate 
short ; which see. 

ENI 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Agabeni, Adiabeni, Saraceni, Iceni, Laodiceni, Cyziceni, 
Uceni, Chaldeni, Abjdeni, Comageni, Igeni, Quingeni, Ce- 
pheni, Tyrrheni, Rutheni, Labieni, Alieni, Cileni, Cicimeni, 
Alapeni, Hypopeni, Tibareni, Agareni, Rufreni, Caraseni, 
Volseni, Bateui, Cordueni. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Origeni, Apartheni, Antixeni. 

INI* 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Gabini, Sabini, Dulgibini, Basterbini, Peucini, Marrucini, 

* When the accent is on the penultimate syllable, the i in the two last syl- 
lables is pronounced exactly like the noun eye; but when the accent is on the 
antepenultimate, the first t is pronounced like e, and the last like eye* See 
Rule 3 and 4 of the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 133 ) 

Lactucini, Otadini, Bidini, [Jdini, Caudini, Budini, Rhegini, 
Triocalini, Triumpilini, Magellini, Entellini, Canini, Menanini, 
Anagnini, Amiternini, Sattirnini, Centuripini, Paropini, Irpini, 
Hirpini, Tibarini, Carini, Celaiini, Citarini, Illiberini, Acherini, 
Elorini, Assorini, Fellrini, Sutrini, Eburini, Tigurini, Cacyrini, 
Agyrini, Halesini, Otesini, Mosini, Abissini, Mossini, Clusini, 
Arusini, Reatini, Latini, Calatini, Collatini, Calactini, Ectini, 
JEegetini, Ergetini, Jetini, Aletini, Spoletini, Netini, Neretini, 
Setini, Bantini, Murganiini, Pallantini, Amantini, Nuraantini, 
Fidentini, Salentini, Colentini, Carentini, Verentini, Florentini, 
ConsentJni, Potentini, Faventini, Leontini, Acherontini, Sagun- 
tini, Haluntini, .Slgyptini, Mamertini, Tricastini, Vestini, Faus- 
tini, Abrettini, Enguini, Inguini, Lanuvini. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Lactucini, Gemini, Memini, Morini*, Torrini. 

ONI UNI YNI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Edoni, Aloni, Nemaloni, Geloni, Aqueloni, Abroni, Gorduni, 
Mariandyni, Magyni, Mogyni. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Epigoni, Theutoni. 

UPI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Catadupi. 

ARI ERI IRI ORI URI YRI 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Babari, Chomari, Agactari, Iberi, Celtiberi, Doberi, Algeri, 
Palemeri, Monomeri, Hermanduri, Dioscuri, Banuri, Paesuri, 
Agacturi, Zimyri. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abari, Tochari, Acestari, Cavari, Calabri, Cantabri, Digeri, 

* Extremique hominum Morini, Rhenusqne bicornis. 

VIRG. Mn. vii. 727. 

The Danes, unconquer'd offspring, march behind ; 
And Morini, the last of human kind, 

DRYDEN. 



( 134 ) 

Drugeri, Eleutheri, Crustumeri, Teneteri, Brueteri, Suelteri, 
lYeveri, Veragri, Treviri, Ephori, Pastophori. 

USI YSI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Hermandusi, Condrusi, Nerusi, Megabysi. 

ATI ETI OTI UTI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abodati, Capellati, Ceroti, Thesproti, Carnuti. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Athanati, Heneti, Veneti. 

AVI EVI IVI AXI UZI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Andecavi, Chamavi, Batavi, Pictavi, Suevi, Argivi, Achivi, 
Coraxi, Abruzi. 

UI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abascui, JEdui, Hedui, Vermandui, Bipeditnui, Inui, Cas- 
truminui, Essui, Abrincatui. 

IBAL UBAL NAL QUIL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Promonal. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Annibal, Hannibal, Asdrubal, Hasdrubal, Tanaquil. 

AM 1M UM 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Adulara, JEgipam, Aduram, Gerabum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abarim. 

UBUM ACUM ICUM OCUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cornacum, Tornacum, Baracum, Camericum, Labicuni, 



( 135 ) 

Avaricum, Antricum, Trivicum, Nordovicum, Longovicum, 
Verovicum, Norvicum, Brundsvicum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Caecubum, Abodiacum, Tolpiacum, Bedriacum, Gessoria- 
cum, Magontiacum, Mattiacum, Argentomacum, Olenacum 
Arenacum, Bremetonacum, Eboracum, Eburacum, Lampsa- 
cum, Nemetacum, Bellovacum, Agedicum, Agendicum, Gly- 
couicum, Canopicum, Noricum, Massieum, Adriaticum, Sa- 
benneticun), Balticum, Aventicum, Mareoticum, Agelocum. 

EDUM IDUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Manduessedum, Algidum. 

^:UM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Lilybseum, Lycaeum, and all words of this termination. 

EUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Syllaceum, Lyceum, Sygeum, Amatheum, Glytheum, Didy- 
meum, Prytaneum, Palanteum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Heracleum, Herculeum, Rataneum, Corineum, Aquineum, 
Dictynneum, Panticapeum, Rhoetum. 

AGUM IGUM OGUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Noviomagum, Nivomagum, Adrobigum, Dariorigum, Allo- 
brogum. 

IUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albium, Eugubium, Abrucium, and all words of this termi- 
nation. 

ALUM ELUM ILUM OLUM ULUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Anchialum, Acelum, Ocelum, Corbilum, Clusiolnm, Oracu- 



( 136 ) 

him, Janiculutn, Coruiculiim, Hetriculum, Uttriculum, Ascu- 
lum, Tusculum, Angulum, Cingulum, Apulum, Trossulum, 
Batulum. 

MUM 

decent the Penultimate. 

Amstelodamum, Amstelrodamum, Novocomum, Cadomum. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdamum, Cisamum, Boiemum, Antrimum, Auximum, 
Bergomum, Mentonomum. 

ANUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Albanian, Halicanum, Arcanum, .^Eanum, Teanum, Trifa- 
num, Stabeanum, Ambianum, Pompeianum, Tullianum, For- 
mianum, Cosmianum, Boianum, Appianum, Bovianum, Me- 
(Holanum, Amanum, Aquisgranum, Trigisanum, Nuditanum, 
Usalitanum, Ucalitanum, Acoletanum, Acharitanum, Abziri- 
tanum^ Argentanum, Hortanum, Anxanum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. f 
Apuscidanum, Hebromanum, Itanum. 

ENUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Picenum, Calenum, Durolenum, Misenum, Volsenum, Dar- 
venum. 

Accent 'the Antepenultimate. 
Olenum. 

I NU M 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Urbinum, Sidicinum, Ticinum, Pucinum, Tridinum, Londi- 
num, Aginum, Casilinum, Crustuminum, Apenninum, Sepi- 
num, Arpinum, Aruspinum, Sarinum, Ocriuum, Lucrinum, 
Camerinum, Laborinum, Petrinum, Taurinum, Casinum, Ne- 
mosiuum, Cassinum, Atinum, Batinum, Ambiatinum, Petinum, 
Altinum, Salentinum, Tollentinum, Ferentinum, Laurentinum, 
Abrotinum, Inguinum, Aquinum, Nequinum. 



( 137 ) 
O NU M 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cabillonum, Garianonum, Duronum, Cataractonum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ciconum, Vindonum, Britonura. 

UNUM YNUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Segedunum, Lugdunum, Maridunum, Moridunum, Arcal- 
dunum, Rigodunum, Sorbiodunum, Noviodunum, Melodunuiu, 
Camelodunum, Axelodunum, Uxellodunum, Brannodunum, 
Carodunum, Caesarodunum, Tarodunum, Theodorodunum, Ebu- 
rodunum, Nernantodunum, Bekmum, Antematimum, Andoma- 
tunum, Maryandynum. 

GUM GPUM YPUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Myrtbum, Europum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Pausilypum. 

ARUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Agarum, Belgarum, Nympharum, Convenarum, Rosarum, 
Adulitarum, Celtarum. 

ABRUM UBRUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Veiabrum, Vernodubrum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Artabrum. 

ERUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Caucoliberum, Tuberum. 

AFRUM ATHRUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Venafrum. 



( 138 ) 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Barathrum. 

IRU M 

decent the Penultimate. 
Muziruin. 

ORUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cermorum, Ducrocortorum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Dorostorum. 

E T R U M 

Accent either the Penultimate or Antepenultimate. 
Celetrum. 

URUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Alaburum, Ascurum, Lugdurum, Marcoduriim, Lactodurum, 
Octodururn, Divojurum, Silurum, Saturum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Tigurum. 

ISUM OSUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Alisum, Amisum, Janosum. 

ATUM ETUM ITUM OTUM UTUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Atrebatum, Calatum, Argentoratum, Mutristratum, Eloce- 
tum, Quercetum, Caletum, Spoletum, Vallisoletum, Toletum, 
Ulmetum, Adrumetum, Tunetum, Eretum, Accitum, Duro- 
litum, Corstopitum, Abritum, Neritum, Augustoritum, Nau- 
crotitum, Complutum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sabbat um. 

AVUM IVUM YUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Gandavum, Symbrivum. 



( 139 ) 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Coccyum, Engyum. 

MIN AON ICON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Helicaon, Lycaon, Machaon, Dolichaon, Amithaon, Didy- 
inaon, Hyperaon, Hicetaon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Salamin, Rubicon, Helicon. 

ADON EDON IDON ODON YDON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Calcedon, Chalcedon, Carchedon, Anthedon, Asplcdon, 
Sarpedon, Thermodon, Abydon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Celadon, Alcimedon, Amphimedon, Laomedon, Hippomedon, 
Oromedon, Antomedon, Armedon, Eurymedon, Calydon, 
Amydon, Corydon. 

EON EGON 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Pantheon, Deileon, Achilleon, Aristocreon. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aleon, Pitholeon, Demoleon, Timoleon, Anacreon, Timo- 
creon, Ucalegon. 

APHON EPHON IPHON OPHON 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agalaphon, Chaerephon, Ctesiphon, Antiphon, Colophon, 
Demophon, Xenophon. 

THON 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agathon, Acroathon, Marathon, Phaethon, Phlegethon, Py- 
riphlegithon, Arethon, Acrithon. 



( 140 ) 
ION 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pandion, Sandion, Echion, Alphion, Amphion, Ophion, Me- 
thion, Arion, Oarion, ^Erion, Hyperion, Orion, Asion, Metion, 
Axion, Ixion. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albion, Phocion, Cephaledion, JEgion, Brigion, Adobogion, 
Brygion, Moschion, Calathion, Emathion, Amethion, Anthion, 
Erothion, Pythion, Deucalion, Daedalion, Sigalion, Ethalion, 
Ereuthalion, Pigmalion, Pygmalion, Cemelion, Pelion, Ptelion, 
Iliou, Bryllion, Cromion, Endymion, Milanion, Athenion, Bo- 
ion, Apion, Dropion, Appion, Noscopion, Aselelarion, Acrion, 
Chimerion, Hyperion, Asterion, Dorion, Euphorion, Por- 
phyrion, Thyrion, Jasion, JEsion, Hippocration, Stration, Ac- 
tion, ^Etion, Metion, ^Eantion, Pallantion, Dotiou, Theodo- 
tion, Erotion, Sotion, Nephestion, Philistion, Polytion, Ornytion, 
Eurytion, Dionizion. 

LON MON NON OON PON RON PHRON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Philemon, Criumetopon, Caberon, Dioscoron, Cacipron. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalon, Abylon, Babylon, Telamon, Ademon, ^Egemon, Po- 
lemon, Ardemon, Hieromnemon, Artemon, Abarimon, Orome- 
non, Alcamenon, Tauromenon, Deiccoon, Democoon, Laocb'on, 
Hippocoon, Deraophoon, Hippothbon, Acaron, Accaron, Pa- 
paron, Acheron, Apteron, Daiptorori, Chersephron, Aleiphron, 
Lycophron, Euthyphron. 

SON TON YON ZON 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Theogiton, Aristogiton, Polygiton, Deltoton. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Themison, Abaton, Aciton, Aduliton, Sicyon, Cercyon, 
.flLgyon, Cremmyon, Cromyon, Geryon, Alcetryon, Amphitryon,. 
Amphictyon, Acazon, Amazon, Olizon, Amyzon. 

ABO ACO ICO EDO IDO 

Accent the Penultimate^ 
Lampedo, Cupido. 



Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Arabo, Tarraco, Stilico, Macedo. 

BEO LEO TEO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Labeo, Aculeo, Buteo. 

AGO IGO UGO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Carthago, Origo, Verrugo. 

PHO THO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Clitipho, Agatho. 

BIO CiO DIO GiO LIO M1O NIO RIO SIO T1O VIO 

X10 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arabic, Corbio, Navilubio, Senecio, Diomedio, Regio, 
Phrygio, Bambalio, Ballio, Caballio, Ansellio, Pollio, Sirmio, 
Formio, Phormio, Anio, Parmenio, Avenio, Glabrio, Acrio, 
Curio, Syllaturio, Occasio, Vario, Aurasio, Secusio, Verclusio, 
Natio, Ultio, Deventio, Versontio, Divio, Oblivio, Petovio, 
Alexio. 

CLO 1LO ULO UMO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Chariclo, Corbilo, Corbulo, JEpulo, Baetulo, Castulo, Anu- 
mo, Lucumo. 

ANO ENO INO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Theano, Adramitteno. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Barcioo, Ruscino, Fruscino. 

APO IPO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sisapo, Olyssipo. 



( 142 ) 
ARO ERO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Vadavero. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Bessaro, Civaro, Tubero, Cicero, Hiero, Acimero, Cessero. 

ASO ISO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Carcaso, Agaso, Turiaso, Aliso, Natiso. 

ATO ETO ITO YO XO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Enyo, Polyxo. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Erato, Derceto, Capito, Siccilissito, Anaphitryo. 
BER FER GER TER VER 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Meleager, Elaver. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Calaber, Mulciber, Noctifer, Tanager, Antipater, Marspater, 
Diespiter, Marspiter, Jupiter. 

AOR NOR FOR TOR ZOR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chrysaor, Alcanor, Bianor, Euphranor, Alcenor, Agenor, 
Agapenor, Elpenor, Rhetenor, Anterior, Anaxenor, Vindemiator, 
Rhobetor, Aphetor. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Mafcipor, Lucipor, Numitor, Albumazor, or Albumazar. 

BAS DAS EAS GAS PHAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Alebas, Augeas (king of Elis), JEneas, Oreas, Symplegas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Dotadas, Cercidas, Lucidas, Timaichidas, Alcidamidas, 



( 143 ) 

Charmidas, Leonidas, Aristonidas, Pelopidas, Mnasippidas, The- 
aridas, Diagoridas, Diphoridas, Antipatridas, Abantidas, Suidas, 
Cratixidas, Ardeas, Augeas (the poet), Eleas, Cineas, Cyneas, 
Boreas, Broteas, Acragas, Periphas, Acyphas. 

IAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ophias. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Caecias, Nicias, Cephalaedias, Phidias, Herodias, Cydias, 
Ephyreas, Pleias, Minyeias, Pelasgias, Antibacchias, Acro- 
lochias, Archias, Adarchias, Arcathias, Agathias, Pythias, Pe- 
lias, Ilias, Damias, Soemias, Arsanias, Pausanias, Olympias, 
Appias, Agrippias, Chabrias, Tiberias, Terias, Lycorias, Pelo- 
rias, Demetrias, JDioscurias, Agasias, Phasias, Acesias, Agesias, 
Hegesias, Tiresias, Ctesias, Cephisias, Pausias, Prusias, Ly- 
sias, Tysias, ^Etias, Bitias, Critias, Abantias, Thoantias, Phae- 
thoutias, Phaestias, Thestias, Phoestias, Sestias, Livias, Artaxias, 
Loxias. 

LAS MAS NAS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Acilas, Adulas, Maecenas, Mrecenas (or, as Labbe says it 
ought to be written, Mecoenas), Fidenas, Arpinas, Larinas, Atinas, 
Adunas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Amiclas, Amyclas, Agelas, Apilas, Arcesilas, Acylas, Dory- 
las, Asylas, Acamas, Alcidamas, Iphidamas, Chersidamas, 
Praxidamas, Theodamas, Cleodamas, Therodamas, Thyodamas, 
Astydamas, Athamas, Garamas, Dicomas, Sarsinas, Sassinas, 
Pitinas. 

OAS PAS RAS SAS TAS XAS YAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Bagoas, Canopas, Abradaras, Zonaras (as Labbe contends it 
ought to be), Epitheras, Abradatas, Jetas, Philetas, Damostas, 
Acritas, Eurotas, Abraxas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Teleboas, Chrysorrhoas, Agriopas, Triopas, Zonaras, Gya- 
ras, Chrysoceras, Mazeras, Chaboras, Orthagoras, Pythagoras, 
Diagoras, Pylagoras, Demagoras, Timagoras, Hermagoras, 



. ( 144 ) 

Athenagoras, Xeuagoras, Hippagoras, Stesagoras, Tisagoras, 
Telestagoras, Protagoras, Evagoras, Anaxagoras, Praxagoras, 
Ligoras, Athyras, Thamyras, Cinyras, Atyras, Apesas, Pietas, 
Felicitas, Liberalitas, Lentulitas, Agnitas, Opportunitas, Clari- 
tas, Veritas, Faustitas, Ci vitas, Archytas, Phlegyas, Milyas, 



BES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Chalybes, Armenochalybes. 

CES 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Arbaces, Pharnaces, Samothraces, Arsaces, Phoenices, Liby- 
phoeuices, Olympionices, Plistonices, Polynices, Ordovices, Le- 
movices, Eburovices. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Axiaces, Astaces, Derbices, Ardices, Eleutherocilices, Cappo- 
doces, Eudoces, Bebryces, Mazyces. 

ADES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Icades, Olcades, Arcades, Orcades, Carneades, Gorgades, 
Stoechades, Lichades, Strophades, Laiades, Naiades, Alcibiades, 
PleiadevS, Branchiades, JDeliades, Heliades, Peliades, Oiliades, 
Naupliades, Juliades, Memmiades, Cleuiades, Xeniades, Hun- 
niades, Heliconiades, Acrisioniades, Telamoniades, Limoniades, 
Acheioiades, Asclepiades, Asopiades, Crotopiades, Appiades, 
Thespiades, Thariades, Otriades, Cyriades, Scyriades, Anchisi- 
ades, Dosiades, Lysiades, Nysiades, Dionysiades, Menoetiades, 
Miltiades, Abantiades, Atlantiades, Dryantiades, Laomedonti- 
ades, Phaetontiades, Laertiades, Hepha3stiades, Thestiades, Bat- 
tiades, Cyclades, Pylades, Demades, Nomades, Ma?nades, 
'Ecbinades, Cispades, Cbcerades, Sporades, Perisades, Hip- 
potades, Sotades, Hyades, Thyades, Dryades, Hamadryades, 
Othryades. 

EDES 
Accent the Penultimate. . 

Democedes, Agamedes, Palamedes, Archimedes, Nicomedes, 
Diomedes, Lycomedes, Cleomcdes, Ganymedes, Tbrasymedes, 



( 145 ) 
IDES 

decent the Penultimate. 

Alcides, Lyncides, Tydides, JEgides, Promethides, Nicar- 
thides, Heraclides, Teleclides, Epiclides, Anticlides, Andro- 
clides, Meneclides, CEclides, Cteseclides, Xenoclides, Chari- 
clides, Patroclides, Aristoclides, Euclides, Eurydides, Belides 
(singular), Basilides, Nelides, Pelides, ^Eschylides, Snides, 
Antigenides, CEnides, Lycbnides, Amanoides, Japeronides, 
Larides, Abderides, Atrides, Thesides, Aristides. 

Actent the Antepenultimate. 

Epichaides, Danaides, Lesbides, Labdacides, ^Eacides, Hyla- 
cides, Ph^lacides, Pharacides, Imbracides, Myrmecides, Phoe- 
nicides, Antalcides, Lvncides, Andocides, Ampycides, Thucy- 
clides, Lelegeides, Tynheides, Pimpleides, Clymeneides, Mi- 
neides, Scyreides, Minyeides, Lagides, Harpagides, Lycur- 
gides, Ogygides, Iriachides, Lysimarhides, Agatharchides, Ti- 
marchides, Leulychides, Leontychides, Leotychides, Sisyphides, 
Erecthides, Promelhides, Cretbides, Scythides, CEbalides, 
^Ethalides, Tantalides, Castalides, Mystalides, Phytalides, Te- 
leclides, Meneclides, CEclides, Ctesiclides, Androclides, Eu- 
clides, Euryclides, Belides (plural), Sicelides, Epimelides, 
Cypselides, Anaxilides, ^Bolides, Eubulides, Pbocylides, Pria- 
mides, Potamides, Cnemides, ^Esimides, Tolmides, Charmides, 
Dardanides, Oceanides, Amanides, Titanides, Olenides, Achae- 
menides, Acbinienides, Epimenides, Parmenides, Ismenides, 
Eumenides, Sithnides, Apollinides, Prumnides, Aonides, Do- 
donides, Mygdalonides, Calydonides, Moeonides, CEdipodioni- 
des, Deionides, Chionides, Echionides, Spercbionides, Ophioni- 
des, Japetionides, Ixionides, Mimallonides, Pbilonides, Apoilo- 
nides, Acnionides, ^monides, Polypemonides, Simonides, Har- 
monides, Memnonides, Cronides, Myronides, /Esonides, Aris- 
tonides, Praxonides, Liburnides, Sunides, Teleboides, Panthoi- 
des, Acbeloides, Pronopides, Lapides, Callipides, Euripides, Dri- 
opides, CEnopides, Cecropides, Leucippides, Philippides, Ar- 
gyraspides, Clearides, Taenarides, Hebrides, Timandrides, An- 
axandndes, Epicerides, Pierides, Hesperides, Hyperides, Cassi- 
terides, Anterides, Peristerides, Libelhrides, Dioscorides, Pro- 
togondes, Melhorides, Antenorides, Actorides, Diaf torides, 
Polyctorides, Hegetorides, Onetorides, Antorides, Acesiorides, 
Thestorides, Aristorides, Electrides, CEnotrides, Smindyrides, 
Philyrides, Pegasides, lasides, Imbrasides, Clesides, Diony- 



( 146 ) 

sides, Cratides, Propoetides, Prcetides, Oceanitides, JEantides, 
Dryantides, Dracontides, Absyrtides, Acestides, Orestides, 
Epytides. 

ODE UDES YDES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

JEgilodes, Acmodes, Nebrodes, Herodes, Orodes, Habudes, 
Harudes, Lacydes, Pherecydes, Androcydes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sciapodes, CEdipodes, Antipodes, Hippopodes, Himanto- 
podes, Pyrodes, Epicydes. 

AGES EGES IGES OGES YGES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Theages, Tectosages, Astyages, Leleges, Nitiobriges, Duro- 
triges, Caturiges, Allobroges, Antobroges, Ogyges, Cataphryges, 
Sazyges. 

ATHES ETHES YTHES IES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ariarathes, Alethes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Onythes, Aries. 

ALES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Novendiales, Geniales, Compitales, Arvales. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Carales. 

ACLES ICLES OCLES 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Daicles, Mnasicles, Iphicles, Zanthicles, Charicles, Thericles, 
Pericles, Agasicles, Pasicles, Phrasicles, Ctesicles, Sosicles, 
Nausicles, Xanticles, Niocles, Empedocles, Theocles, Neocles, 
Eteocles, Sophocles, Pythocles, Diodes, Philocles, Damocles, 
Democles, Phanocles, Xenocles, Hierocles, Androcles, Man- 
drocles, Patrocles, Metrocles, Lamprocles, Cephisocles, Nes- 
tocles, Themistocles. 



ELES ILES OLES ULES 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Ararauceles, Hedymeles, Pahiteles, Praxiteles, Pyrgoteles, 
Demoteles, Aristoteles, Gundiles, Absiles, Novensiles, Pisa- 
tiles, Taxiles, ^Eoles, Autololes, Abdimonoples, Hercules. 

AMES OMES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Priames, Datames, Abrocomes. 

AN ES 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Jordanes, Athamanes, Alamanes, Brachmanes, Acarnanes, 
JEgipanes, Tigranes, Actisanes, Titanes, Ariobarzanes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Diaphanes, Epiphanes, Periphanes, Praxiphanes, Dexiphanes, 
Lexiphanes, Antiphanes, Nicophanes, Theophanes, Diophanes, 
Apollophanes, Xenophanes, Aristophanes, Agrianes, Pharas- 
manes, Prytanes. 

ENES* 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Timagenes, Melagenes, Sosigenes, Epigenes, Melesigenes, 
Antigenes, Theogenes, Diogenes, Oblogenes, Hermogenes, 
Rhetogenes, Themistogenes, Zanthenes, Agasthenes, Lasthenes, 
Clisthenes, Callisthenes, Peristhenes, Cratisthenes, Antisthenes, 
Barbosthenes, Leoslhenes, Demosthenes, Dinosthenes, Andros- 
thenes, Posthenes, Eratosthenes, Borysthenes, Alcamenes, The- 
ramenes, Tisamenes, Deditamenes, Spitamenes, Pyleinenes, 
Althemenes, Achaemenes, Philopoemenes, Daimenes, Nausi- 
menes, Numenes, Antimenes, Anaximenes, Cleomenes, Hippo- 
menes, Heromenes, Ariotomenes, Eumenes, Numenes, Poly- 
inenes, Geryenes. 

INES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Telchines, Acesines. 

* All the words of this termination have the accent on the antepenultimate. 
See Eumenes in the Initial Vocabulary. 

L 2 



( 148 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Aborigines, ^Eschiues*, Asines. 

ONES 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Calucones, Agones, Antechthones, lones, Helleviones, Vo- 
lones, Nesiniones, Verones, Centrones, Eburones, Grisones, 
Auticatones, Statones, Vectones, Vetones, Acitavones, Ingoe- 
vones, I staevones, Axones, JExones, Halizones. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lycaones, Chaones, Frisiabones, Cicones, Vernicones, 
Francones, Vascones, Mysomacedones, Rhedones, Essedones, 
Myriiiid<nes, Pocones, Paphlagones, Aspagones, La3strigones, 
Lingone*, Lestrygones, Vangiones, Nuithones, Sithunes, Bali- 
ones, Htrmumes, Biggeriones, Meriones, Suiones, Minmllones, 
Senones, Meinnones, Pannones, Ambrones, Suessones, An- 
sones, Pictones, Teutones, Amazones. 

O ES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Heroes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Chorsoes, Chosroes. 

APES OPES 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Cynapes, Cecropes, Cyclopes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Panticapes, Crassipes, Esubopes, ^Ethiopes, Hellopes, Do- 
lopes, Panopes, Ster6pes, Dryopes. 

ARES ERES IRES ORES URES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cabares, Balcares, Apollinares, Saltuares, Ableres, Byzeres, 
Bechires, Diores, Azores, Silures. 

* Labbe ays, that a certain anthologist, forced by the necessity of his vere, 
has pronounced this word with the accent on the penultimate. 



( 149 ) 
Accent tJie Antepenultimate. 

Leochares, JEmochares, De mocha res, Abisares, Cavares, 
Insubres, Luceres, Pieres, Astabores, Musagores, Centores, 
Limures. 

ISES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Anchises. 

ENSES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ucubenses, Leonicenses, and all words of this termination. 

OCES YSES 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Cambyses. 

ATES 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Phraates, Atrebates, Cornacates, Ceracates, Adunicates, Ni- 
sicates, Barsabocates, Leucates, Teridates, Mithridates, Atti- 
dates, Osquidates, Oxydates, Ardeates, Eleates, Bercoreates, 
Caninefates, Casicenufates, ^Egates, Achates, Niphates, Deci- 
ates, Attaliates, Mevaniates, Cariates, Quariates, Asseriates, 
Euburiates, Antiates, Spartiates, Celelates, Hispellates, Stel- 
lates, Suillates, Albulaies, Focimates, Auximates, Flanates, 
Edenates, Fidenates, SufFenatcs, Fregenates, Capenates, Senates, 
Coesenates, Misenates, Padinates, Fulginates, Merinates, Ala- 
trinates, ^siriates, Agesinates, Asisinates, Sassinates, Sessinates, 
Frusinates, Atinates, Altinates, Tollentinates, Ferentinates, In- 
teramnates, Chelonates, Casmonates, Arnates, Titernates, In- 
fernates, Privernates, Oroates, Euphrates, Orates, Vasates, Co- 
cosates, Tolosates, Antuates, Nantuates, Sadyates, Caryates. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Spithobates, Eurybates, Antiphates, Trebiates, Zalates, Sau- 
romates, Attinates, Tornates, Hypates, Menecrates*, Phere- 
crates, Iphicrates, Callicrates, Epicrates, Pasicrates, Sras iates, 
Sosicrales, Hypsicrates, Nicocrates, Halocrates, Dam nates, 
Democrates, Cheremocrates, Timocrates, Heiniocraies .Steno- 

;f All words ending in crates have the accent on the antepenultimate syllable. 



( 150 ) 

crates, Xenocrates, Hippocrates, Harpocrates, Socrates, Iso- 
crates, Cephisocrates, Naucrates, Eucrates, Eulhycrates, Poly- 
crates. 

ETES 1TES OTES UTES YTES YES ZES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Acetes, Ericetes, Cadetes, ^Eetes, Mocragetes, Caletes, Phi- 
locletes, jEgletes, Nemetes, Cometes, Ulmanetes, Consuanetes, 
Gymnetes, JEsymnetes, Nannetes, Serretes, Curetes, Theatetes, 
Andizetes, Odiies, Belgites, Margites, Memphites, Ancalites, 
Ambialites, Avalites, Cariosuelites, Polites, Apollopolites, Her- 
mopolites, Latopolites, Abulites, Stylites, Borysthenites, Teme- 
nites, Syenites, Carcinites, Samnites, Deiopites, Garites, Cen- 
trites, Thersites, Is! arcissites, Asphaltites, Hydraotes, Hera- 
cleotes, Boeotes, Helotes, Bootes, Thootes, Anagnutes, Ari- 
mazes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dercetes, Massagetes, Indigetes, Ilergetes, Euergetes, Au- 
chetes, Eusi petes, Abalites, Charites, Cerites, Praestites, An- 
dramytes, Dariaves, Ardyes, Machlyes, Blemmyes- 

A I S 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Achais, Archelais, Homolais, Ptolemais, Elymais. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Thebais, Phocais, Aglais, Tanais, Cratais. 

BIS CIS DIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Berenicis, Cephaledis, Lycomedis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acabis, Carabis, Setabis, Nisibis, Cleobis, Tucrobis, Tiso- 
bis, Ucubis, Curubis, Salmacis, Acinacis, Brovonacis, Athracis, 
Agnicis, Carambucis, Cadmeidis. 

EIS^ ETHIS ATHIS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Medeis, Spercheis, Pittheis, Crytheis, Nepheleis, Eleleis, 

* These vowels form distinct syllables. See the termination EIUS. 



Achilleis, Pimpleis, Cadmeis, .52neis, Schoeneis, Peneis, Acri- 
soneis, Triopeis, Patereis, Nereis, Cenchreis, Theseis, Briseis, 
Perseis, Messeis, Chryseis, Nycteis, Sebethis, Epimethis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Thymiathis. 

ALIS ELIS ILIS OLIS ULIS YLiS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Andabalis, Cercalis, Regalis, Stympbalis, Dialis, Latialis, 
Septimontialis, Martialis, Manalis, Juvenalis, Quirinalis, Fonti- 
nalis, Junonalis, Avernalis, Vacunalis, Abrupalis, Floralis, 
Quietali.s, Eumelis, Phaselis, Eupilis, Quiuctilis, Adulis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

CEbalis, Hannibalis, Acacalis, Fornicalis, Androcalis, Lu- 
percalis, Vahalis, Ischalis, Caralis, Thessalis, Italis, Facelis, 
Sicelis, Fascelis, Vindelis, Nephelis, Bibilis, Incibilis, Leucre- 
tilis, Myrtilis, Indivilis, JEeolis, Argolis, Cimolis, Decapolis, 
Neapolis, and all words ending in polis. Herculis, Thestylis. 

AMIS EMIS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Calamis, Salamis, Semiramis, Thyamis, Artemis. 

ANIS ENIS INIS ONIS YNIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Mandanis, Titanis, Bacenis, Mycenis, Philenis, Cyllenis, 
Ismenis, Cebrenis, Adonis, Edonis, ^Edonis, Thedonis, Sido- 
nis, Dodonis, Calydonis, Agonis, Alingonis, Colonis, Corbu- 
lonis, Cremonis, Salmonis, Junonis, Ciceronis, Scironis, Coro- 
nis, Phoronis, Turonis (in Germany), Tritonis, Phorcynis, 
Gortynis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sicanis, Anticanis, Andanis, Hypanis, Taranis, Prytanis, 
Poemanis, Eumenis, Lycaonis, Asconis, Maeonis, Paeonis, Si- 
thonis, Memnonis, Pannonis, Turonis (in France), Bitonis, 
Geryonis. 



( 152 ) 
OIS* 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Minois, Herois, Latois. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Symois, Pyrois. 

APIS OPIS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
lapis, Colapis, Serapitrf*, Isapis, Asopis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Acapis, Minapis, Cecropis, Meropis. 

ARIS ACRIS ATRIS ERIS IGR1S IRIS 1TRIS ORIS 
UR1S YRIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Balcaris, Apollinaris, Nonacris, Cimmeris, Aciris, Osiris, 
Petosiris, Busiris, Lycoris, Calaguris, Gracchuris, Hippuris. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abaris, Fabaris, Sybaris, Icaris, Andaris, Tyndaris, Sagaris, 
Angaris, Phalaris, Elaris, Caularis, Taenaris, Liparis, Araris, 
Biasans, Caesaris, Abisaris, Achisaris, Bassaris, Melaris, Au- 
taris, Trinacris, Illiberis, Tiberis, Zioberis, Tyberis, Nepheris 
Cytheris, Pieris, Trieris, Auseris, Pasitigris, Coboris, Sicoris, 
Neoris, Peloris, Antipatris, Absitris, Pacyris, Ogyris, Porphyris, 
Amyris, Thamyris, Thomyris, Tomyris. 

ASIS ESIS ISIS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Amasis, Magnesis, Tuesis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Bubasis, Pegasis, Parrhasis, Paniasis, Acamasis, Engonasis, 
Griecostasis, Lachesis, Athesis, Thamesis, Nemesis, Tibisis. 

ENSIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Genubensis, Cordubensis, and all words of this termination. 

* These vowels form distinct syllables. 

t Serapis. See the word in the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 153 ) 
OSIS USIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Diamastigosis, Enosis, Eleusis. 

ATIS ETIS ITIS OTIS YTIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Tegeatis, Sarmatis, Caryatis, Miletis, Limenetis, Curetis, 
Acervitis, Chalcitis, Memphitis, Sophitis, Arbelitis, Fascelitis, 
Dascylitis, Comitis, JEanitis, Cananitis, Circinitis, Sebennitis, 
Chaonitis, Trachonitis, Chalonitis, Sybaritis, Daritis, Calenderitis, 
Zephyritis, Amphaxitis, Rhacotis, Estiaeotis, Moeotis, Tracheotis, 
Mareotis, Phthiotis, Sandaliotis, Elimiotis, Iscariotis, Casiotis, 
Philotis, Nilotis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Atergatis, Calatis, Anatis, Naucratis, Dercetis, Eurytis. 

OVIS UIS XIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Amphaxis, Oaxis, Alexis, Zamolxis, Zeuxis. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Vejovis, Dijovis, Absituis. 

ICOS EDOS ODOS YDOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abydos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Oricos, Tenedos, Macedos, Agriodos. 

EOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Spercheos, Achilleos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Audrogeos, Egaleos, ^galeos, Hegaleos. 

IGOS ICHOS OCHOS OPHOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Melampigos, Niontichos, Machrontichos. 



( 154 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Nerigos, ^Egiochos, Oresitrophos. 

ATHOS ETHOS 1THOS IOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sebethos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Seiathos, Arithos, Ilios, Ombrios, Topasios. 

LOS MOS NOS POS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Stymphalos, JEgilos, Pachinos, Etheonos, Eteonos, Hepta- 
phouos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Haegalos, JEgialos, Ampelos, Hexapylos, Sipylos, Hecatom- 
pylos, Potamos, JEgospotamos, Olenos, Orchomenos, Auapau- 
omenos, Epidicazomencs, Heautontimorumenos, Antropos. 

ROS SOS TOS ZOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Meleagros, Hecatoncheros, ^gimuros, Nisyros, Pityonesos, 
Hieronesos, Cephesos, Sebetos, Haliaeetos, Miletos, Polytimetos, 
Aretos, Buthrotos, Topazos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sygaros, JSgoceros, Anteros, Meleagros, Myiagros, Absoros, 
Amyros, Pegasos, Jalysos, Abates, Aretos, Neritos, Acytos. 

IPS OPS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
JEgilips, ^thiops. 

LAUS MAUS NAUS RAUS (in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Archelaus, Menelaus, Aglaus, Agesilaus, Protesilaus, Nico- 
laus, lolaus, Hermolaus, Critolaus, Aristolaus, Dorylaus, Am- 
phiaraus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Imaus*, Emmaus, CEnomaus, Danaus. 



* JmavA See the word in the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 155 ) 
BUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agabus, Alabus, Arabus, Melabus, Setabus, Erebus, Ctesibus. 
Deiphobus, Abubus, Polybus, 

ACUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abdacus, Labdacus, Rhyndacus, ^Eacus, Ithacus. 

IACUS* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

lalciacus, Phidiacus, Alabandiacus, Rhodiacus, Calchiacus, 
Corinthiacus, Deliacus, Peliacus, lliacus, Niliacus, Titaniacus, 
Armeniacus, Messeniacus, Salaminiacus, Lemniacus, loniacus, 
Sammoniacus, Tritoniacus, Gortyniacus, Olympiacus, Caspia- 
cus, Me^embriacus, Adriacus, Iberiacus, Cytheriacus, Siriacus, 
Gessoriacus, Cytoriacus, Syriacus, Phasiacus, Megalesiacus, 
Etesiacus, Isiacus, Gnosiacus, Cnossiacus, Pausiacus, Amathu- 
siacus, Pelusiacus, Prusiacus, Actiacus, Divitiacus, Byzantiacus 
Thermodontiacus, Propontiacus, Hellespontiacus, Sestiacus. 

LACUS NACUS OACUS RACUS SACUS TACUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Benacus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ablacus, Medoacus, Armaracus, Assaracus, .ZEsacus, Lamp- 
sacus, Caractacus, Spartacus, Hyrtacus, Pittacus. 

ICUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Caicus, Numicus, Demonicus, Granicus, Atidronicus, Stra- 
tonicus, Callistonicus, Aristonicus, Alaricus, Albericus, Rode- 
ricus, Rudericus, Romericus, Hunnericus, Victoricus, Ama- 
tricus, Henricus, Theodoncus, Ludovicus, Grenovicus, Var- 
vicus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Thebauus, Phocaicus, Chaldaicus, Bardaicus, Judaic us, 
Achaicus, Lecliaicus, Pancbaicus, Thermaicus, Naicus, Pana- 

* All words of this termination have the accent on the t', pronounced like 
the noun eye. 



( 136 ) 

thenaicus, Cyrenaicus, Arabicus, Dacicus, Samothracicus, Tur- 
cicus, Areadicus, Sotadicus, Threcidicus, Chalcidicus, Alaban- 
dicus, Judiciis, Ciondicus, Cornificus, Belgicus, Allobrogicus, 
Georgicus, Colchieus, Delphicus, Sapphicus, Parthicus, Scy- 
thicus, Pythicus, Stymphalicus, Pharsalicus, Thessalicus, Ita- 
licus, Attalicus, Gallicus, Sabeilicus, Tarbellicus, Argolicus, 
Getulicus, Camicus, Ceramicus, Academicus, GraBcanicus, 
Cocanicus, Tuscanicus, jEanicus, Hellanicus, Glanicus, Atel- 
lanicus, Amanicus, Honuuucus, Germanicus, Hispunicus, Aqui- 
tanicus, Sequanicus, Poenicus, Alemannicus, Britannicus, La- 
conicus, Leticonicus, Adonicus, Macedonicus, Sandonicus, 
lonicus, Hermionicus, Babylonicus, Samonicus, Pannonicus, 
Hieronicus, Plalouicus, Santonicus, Sophronicus, Teutonicus, 
Amazonicus, Hernicus, Liburnicus, Eubbicus, Troicus, Sloi- 
cus, Olympicus, ,#thiopicus, Pindaricus, Baleancus, Marma- 
ricus, Bassaricus, Cimbricus, Andricus, Ibericus, Trietericus, 
Trevericus, Africus, Doricus, Pythagoricus, Leuctricus, Ad- 
gandesiricus, tstricus, Isauricus, Centauricus, Biluncus, Illyri- 
cus, Syricus, Pagasicus, Moesicus, Marsicus, Persi<-us, Corsi- 
cus, Massicus, Issicus, Sabbaticus, Mithridaticus, Tegeaticus, 
Syriaticus, Asiaticus, Dalmaticus, Sarmaticus, Ciovraticus, 
Rhaeticus, Geticus, Gangeticus, ^gineticus, Rhoeticus, Creti- 
cus, Memphiticus, Sybariticus, Abderilicus, Celticus, Atlanti- 
cus, Garamanticus, Alenticus, Ponticus, Scoticus, Ma?oticus, 
Bceoticus, Heracleoticus, Mareoticus, Pbthioticus, Niloticus, 
Epiroticus, Syrticus, Atticus, Alyatticus, Halyatticus, Medi- 
astuticus. 

OCUS UCUS YCUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Ophiucus, Inycus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lauodocus, Amodocus, Amphilocus, Ibycus, Libycus, Bes- 
bycus, Autolycus, Amycus, Glanycus, Corycus. 

ADUS EDUS IDUS ODUS YDUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Lebedus, Congedus, Alfredus, Aluredus, Emodus, Andro- 
dus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Adadus, Enceladus, Aradus, Antaradus, Aufidus, Algidus, 
Lepidus, Hesiodus, Commodns, Monodus ; Lacydus, Polydas. 



( 157 ) 

MUS GEUS 

decent the Penultimate. 

Niobaeus, Meliboeus, and all words of these terminations. 

BUS* 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Lycambeus, Thisbeus, Bereniceus, Lynceus (the brother of 
Idas), Simonideus, Euripideus, Pherecydeus, Piraeeus, Phege- 
us, Tegeus, Sigeus, Ennosigeus, Argeus, Baccheus, Motor- 
chetis, Cepheus, Ripheus, Alpheus, Orpheus (adjective), 
Erectheus, Prometheus (adjective), Cleantheus, Rhadamantheus, 
Erymantheus, Pantheus (adjective), Daedaleus, Sophocleus, 
Themistocleus, Eleus, Neleus (adjective), Oileus (adjective), 
Apelleus, Achilleus, Perilleus, Luculleus, Agylleus, Pimpleus, 
Ebuleus, Asculeus, Masculeus, Cadmeus, Aristophaneus, Ca- 
naneus, CEneus (adj. 3 syll.), CEneus (sub. 2 syll.), idome- 
neus, Schoeneus, Peneus, Phineus, Cydoneus, Androgeoneus, 
Bioneus, Deucalioneus, Acrisioneus, Salmoneus (adjective), 
Maruneus, Antenoreus, Phoroneus (adjective), Thyoneus, Cyr- 
neus, Epeus, Cyclopeus, Penelopeus, Phillippeus, Aganippeus, 
Meuandreus (adjective), Nereus, Zagreus, Boreas, Hyperboreus, 
Polydoreus, Atreus (adjective), Centaureus, Nesseus, Cisseus, 
CEteus, Rhoeteus, Auteus, Abanteus, Phalanteus, Theiodaman- 
teus, Polydamanteus, Thoanteus, Hyanteus, Aconteus, Laome- 
doiueus, Thermodonteus, Phaethonteus, Phlegethonteus, Oron- 
teus, Thyesteus, Phryxeus. 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Gerionaceus, Meno3ceus, Lynceus (adjective), Dorceus, 
Caduceus, Asclepiadeus, Paladeus, Sotadeus, Tydeus, Orpheus 
(substantive), Morpheus, Tyrrheus, Prometheus (substantive), 
Cretht us, Mnesitheus, Dositheus, Pentheus (substantive), Smin- 

* It may be observed, that words of this termination are sometimes both sub- 
stantives and adjectives. When they are substantives, they have the accent on 
the antepenultimate syllable, as N leus, Prom theus, Salm6 neus, &c. ; and when 
adjectives on the penultimate, as Neltus, Prometheus, Salmontus, &c. Thus, 
CEneus, a king of Calydonia,is pronounced in two syllables ; the adjective (Enius, 
which is formed from i , is a trisyllable ; and CEneius, another formation of it, is 
a word of four syllables. But these words, when formed into English adjectives, 
alter their termination \\ith the accent on the penultimate : 

With other notes than to the Orphean lyre. MILTON. 

The tuneful tongue, the Promethean band. AKENSIDE. 

And sometimes on the antepenultimate, as 

The sun, as from Thyestian banquet turn'd. MILTON. 



theus, Timotheus, Brotheus, Dorotheas, Menestheus, Eurys- 
iheus, Pittheus, Py theus, Daedaleus, ^Egialeus, Maleus, Tanta- 
Jeus, Heracleus, Celrus, Eleleus, Neleus, Peleus, Nileus, 
Oileus (substantive), Demoleus, Romuleus, Pergameus, 
Euganeus, Melaneus, Herculaneus, Cyaneus, Tyaneus, Ce- 
neus, Dicaneus, Pheneus, CEneus, Cupidineus, Apollineus, 
Enneus, Adoneus, Aridoneus, Gorgoneus, Deioneus, Ilioneus, 
Mimalloneus, Salmoneus (substantive), Acroneus, Phoroneus 
(substantive), Albuneus, Enipeus, Sinopeus, Hippeus, Aristip- 
peus, Areus, Macareus, Tyndareus, Megareus (substantive), 
Capharens (substantive), Briareus, ^sareus, Patareus, Cythe- 
reus, Phaiereus, Nereus (substantive), Tereus, Adoreus, Mento- 
reus, Nestoreus, Atreus (substantive), Caucaseus, Pegaseus, 
Theseus, Perseus, Nicteus, Argenteus, Bronteus, Proteus, 
Agyeus. 

AGUS EGUS IGUS OGUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Cethegus, Robigus, Rubigus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

JEgopbagus, Osphagus, Neomagus, Rothomagus, Niomagus, 
Noviomagus, Casaroniagus, Sitomagus, Areopagus, Harpagus, 
Arviragus, Uragus, Astrologus. 

ACHUS OCHUS UCHUS YCHUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daduchus, Ophiuchus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Telemachus, Daimachus, Deimachus, Alcimachus, Callima- 
chus, Lysimacbus, Antimachus, Symmachus, Andromachus, 
Clitomachus, Aristoniachus, Eurymachus, Inachus, Jamblichus, 
Demodochus, Xenodochus, Deiochus, Antiochus, Deilochus, 
Archilochus, Mnesilochus, Thersilochus, Orsilochus, Antilo- 
chus, Naulochus, Eurylochus, Agerochus, Polyochus, Monychus, 
Abronychus. 

APHUS EPHUS IPHUS OPHUg YPHUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Josephus, Seriphus, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalaphus, Epaphus, Palaepaphus, Anthropographus, Tele- 
phus, Absephus, Agastrophus, Sisyphus. 



( 159 ) 
ATHUS ^THUS ITHUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Si ma? thus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Archagathus, Amathus, Lapathus, Carpathus, Mychithus. 
AIU S 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cams, Laius, Graius. See Achaia. 

AB1US IB1US OBIUS UBIUS YBIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Fabius, Arabhis, Bsebius, Vibius, Albius, Amobius, Macro- 
bius, Androbius, Tobius, Virbius, Lesbius, Eubius, Danubius, 
Marrhubius, Talthybius, Polybius. 

CIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acacius, Ambracius, Acracius, Tbracius, Athracius, Samo- 
thracius, Lampsacius, Arsacius, Byzacius, Accius, Siccius, 
Decius, Threicius, Cornificius, Cilicius, Numicius, Apicius, 
Sulpicius, Fabricius, Oricius, Cincius, Mincius, Marcius, 
Circius, Hircius, Roscius, Albucius, Lucius, Lycius, Bebry- 
cius. 

DIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Leccadius, Icadius, Arcadius, Palladius, Tenedius, Albidius^ 
Didius, Thucydidius, Fidius, Aufidius, Eufidius, jEgidius, 
Nigidius, Obsidius, Gratidius, Brutidius, Helvidius, Ovidius, 
Rhodius, Clodius, Hannodius, Gordius, Claudius, Rudius, 
Lydius. 

E I U S* 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Daneius, Cocceius, Lyrceius, JEacideius, Lelegeius, Si- 
geius, Baccheius, Cepheius, Typhoeeius, Cretheius, Pittheius, 

* Almost all the words of this termination are adjectives, and in these the 
vowels ti form distinct syllables ; the others, as Coccenw, SaUiu*, Proculenis, 

Canultw*, 



( 160 ) 

Saleius, Semeleius, Neleius, Stheneleius, Porculeius, Septimu- 
leius, Canuleius, Venuleius, Apuleius, Egnatuleius, Sypyleius, 
Priameius, Cadmeius, Tyaneius, ^Eneius, Clymeneius, QEneius, 
Autoneius, Schoeneius, Lampeius, Rhodopeius, Dolopeius, 
Priapeius, Pompeius, Tarpeius, Cynareius, Cythereius, Ne- 
reius, Satureius, Vultureius, Cinyreius, Nyseius, Teius, He- 
cateius, Eluteius, Rhoeteius, Atteius, Minyeius. 

GIUS 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Valgius, Belgius, Catangius, Sergius, Asceburgius, Oxygius. 

CHIUS PH1US THIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sperchius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Inachius, Bacchius, Dulichius > Telechius, Muuychius, 
Hesychius, Tychius, Cynipliius, Alphius, Adelphius, Sisyphius, 
Einathius, Simselhius, Acithius, Melantliius, Erynmnthius, Co- 
rinthius, Zerynthius, Tirynthius. 

AL1US ^LIUS ELIUS ILIUS ULIUS YLIUS. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

CEbalius, Idalius, Acidalius, Palsephalius, Stymphalius, Mae- 
nalius, Opalius, Thessalius, Castalius, Publius, Heraclius*, 
jElius, Caelius, Laelius, Delius, Mclius, Cornelius, Coelius, 
Clselius, Aurelius, Nyctelius, Praxitelius, Abilius, Babilius, 

Canuleius, Apuleius, Egnatuleius, Schancius, Lampeius, Vultureius, Atteius, and 
Minyeius, are substantives ; and which, though sometimes pronounced with the 
ei forming a diphthong, and sounded like the noun eye, are more generally heard 
like the adjectives ; so that the whole list may be fairly included under the 
same general rule, that of sounding the e separately, and the t like y consonant, 
as in the similar terminations in eia and ia. This is the more necessary in these 
words, as the accented e and unaccented i are so much alike as to require the 
sound of the initial or consonant y, in order to prevent the hiatus, by giving a 
small diversity to the two vowels. See Achaia. 

* Labbe places the accent of this word on the penultimate, , as in Heraclitus 
and Heradid<z; but the Roman emperor of this name, is so generally pronounced 
with the antepenultimate accent, that it would savour of pedantry to alter it. 
Nor do I understand the reason on which Labbe founds his accentuation. 



Carbilius, Orbilius, Acilius, Caecilius, Lucilius, JEdilius, Virgilius, 
jEmilius, Manilius, Pompilius, Turpilius, Atilius, Basilins*, 
Cantilius, Quintilius, Hostilius, Attilius, Rutilius, Duilius, Ster- 
quilius, Carvilius, Servilius, Callius, Trebellius, Cascellius, Gel- 
Jius, Arellius, Vitellius, Tullius, Manlius, Tenolius, Nauplius, 
Daiilius, Julius, Amulius, Parnphylius, Pylius. 

MIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Samius, Ogmius, Isthmius, Decimius, Septimius, Rbemmius, 
Memmius, Mummius, Nomius, Bromius, Latmius, Postbu- 
niius. 

ANIUS ENIUS INIUS ENNIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Anius, Libanius, Canius, Sicanitis, Vulcanius, Ascanius, Dar- 
danius, Clanius, Manius, Afranius, Granius, ^Enius, Maenius, 
Genius, Borysthenius, Lenius, Valenius, Cyllenius, Olenius, 
Menius, Acbaemenius, Armenius, Ismenius, Poenius, Sirenius, 
Messenius, Dossenius, Polyxenius, Troezenius, Gabinius, Al- 
binius, Licinius, Sicinius, Virginius, Tracbinius, Minius, Sala- 
minius, Flaminius, Etiminius, Arminius, Herminius, Caninius, 
Tetritinius, Asinius, Eleusinius, Vatinius, Flavinius, Tarquinius, 
Cilnius, Tolumnius, Annius, Fannius, Elannius, Ennius, Fes- 
cennius, Dossennius. 

ONIUS UNIUS YNIUS OIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aonius, Lycaonius, Chaonius, Machaonius, Amythaonius, 
Trebonius, Heliconius, Stiliconius, Asconius, Macedonius, Chal- 
cedonius, Caledonius, Sidonius, Alcbandonius, Mandonius, 
Dodonius, Cydonius, Calydonius, Maeonius, Paeonius, Ago- 
nius, Gorgonius, Laestrygonius, Lestrygonius, Trophonius, 
Sopbonius, Marathonius, Sithonius, Ericthonius, Aphtbo- 
nius, Argantbonius, Tithonius, lonius, OEdipodionius, Echio- 
nius, Ixionius, Salonius, Milonius, Apollonius, Babylonins, 

* Tliis word, the learned contend, ought to have the accent on the penul- 
timate ; but that the learned frequently depart from this pronunciation, by 
placing the accent on the antepenultimate, may be seen, Rule 31, prefixed to 
the Initial Vocabulary. 

M 



( 162 ) 

JEmonius, JLacedieniouius, Haemonius, Paltemonius, Ammonius, 
Strymonius, Nonius, Memnonius, Agamemnonius, Crannonius, 
Vennonius, Junonius, Pomponius, Acronius, Sophronius, Sciro- 
nius, Sempronius, Antronius, /Esonius, Ausonius, Latonius, 
Suetonius, Antonius, Bistonius, Plutonius, Favonius, Amazonius, 
Esernius, Calphurnius, Saturnius, Daunius, Junius, Neptunius, 
Gortynius, Typhoius, Acheloius, Miub'ius, Troius. 

AP1US OPIUS IPIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agapius, ^Isculapius, JEsapius, Messapius, Grampius, Pro- 
copius, CEnopius, Cecropius, Eutropius, ^Esopius, Mopsopius, 
Gippius, Puppius, Caspius, Thespius, Cispius. 

ARIUS ERIUS IRIUS ORIUS URIUS YRIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Darius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arius, Icarius, Tarcundarius, Ligarius, Sangarius, Corinthi- 
arius, Larius, Marius, Hierosolymarius, ^Enarius, Taenarius, 
Asinarius, Isinarius, Varius, Januarius, Aquarius, Februarius, 
Atuarius, [mbrius, Adrius, Evandrius, Laberius, Biberius, Ti- 
berius, Celtiberius, Vinderius, Acherius, Valerius, Numerius, 
Hesperius, Agrius, CEagrius, Cenchrius, Rabirius, Podalirius, 
Sinus, Virius, Bosphorius, Elorius, Fiorius, Actorius, Anacto- 
riusj Sertorius, Caprius, Cyprius, Arrius, Feretrius, CEnotrius, 
Adgandestrius, Caystrius, Epidaurius, Curius, Mercurius, Du- 
rius, Furius, Palfurius, Tliurius, Mamurius, Purius, Masurius, 
Spurius, Veturius, Asturius, Atabyrius, Scyrius, Porphyrius, 
Assyrius, Tyrius. 

ASIUS ESIUS ISLUS OSIUS USIUS YSIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Asius, Casius, Thasius, Jasius, ^sius, Acesius, Coracesius, 
Arcesius, Mendesius, Chesius, Ephesius, Milesius, Theume- 
sius, Teumesius, JEnesius, Magnesius, Proconnesius, Cherso- 
nesius, Lyrnesius, Marpesius, Acasesius, Melitesius, Adylisius, 
Amisius, Artemisius, Simbisius, Charisius, Acrisius, Horten- 
sius, Syracosius, Theodosius, Gnosius, Sosius, Mopsius, Cas- 



( 163 ) 

sius, Thalassius, Lyrnessius, Cressius, Tartessius, Syracusius, 
Fnsius, Agusius, Amathnsius, Ophiusius, Ariusius, Volusius, 
Selinusius, Acherusius, Maurusius, Lysius, Elysius, Dionysius, 
Odrysius, Amphrysius, Otbrysius. 

ATIUS ETJUS ITIUS OTIUS UTIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Xenophontius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Trebatius, Catius, Volcatius, Achatius, Latins, Caesenatius, 
Egnatius, Gratius, Horatius, Tatius, Luctatius, Statius, Actius, 
Vectius, Quinctius, Aetius, ^Etius. Pansetius, Praetius, Cetius, 
Caeetius, Vegitius, Metius, Moenetius, Lucretius, Helvetius, 
Saturnalitius, Floralitius, Compitalitius, Domitius, Beritius, 
Neritius, Crassitius, Titius, Politius, Abundantius, Paeantius, 
Taulantius, Acamantius, Teuthrantius, Lactantius, Hyantius, 
Byzantius, Terentius, Cluentius, Maxentius, Mezentius, Quin- 
tius, Acontius, Vocontius, Laomedontius, Leontius, Pontius, 
Hellespontius, Acherontius, Bacuntius, Opuntius, Anintius, 
Masotius, Thesprotius, Scaptius, ^Egyptius, Martius, Laertius, 
Propertius, Hirtius, Mavortius, Tiburtius, Curtius, Theslius, 
Themistius, Canistius, Sallustius, Crustius, Carystius, Hymet- 
tius, Bruttius, Abutius, Ebutius, ^Ebutius, Albutius, Acutius, 
Locutius, Stercutius, Mutius, Minutius, Pretutius, Clytius, 
Bavins, Fiavius, Navius, Evius, Maevius, Naevius, Ambivius, 
Livius, Milvius, Fulvius, Sylvius, N-ovius, Servius, Vesvius, 
Pacuvius, Vitruvius, Vesuvius, Axius, Naxius, Alexius, Ixius, 
Sabazius. 

ALUS CLUS ELUS ILUS OLUS ULUS YLUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Stymphalus, Sardanapalus, Androclus, Patroclus, Doryclus, 
Orbelus, Philomelus, Kumelus, Pliasaelus, Phaselus, Ciysi- 
lus, Cimolus, Timolus, Tmolus, Mausolus, Pactolus, jEtolus, 
Atabulus, Praxibulus, Cleobulus, Critobulus, Acontobulus, 
Arislobulus, Eubulus, Thrasybulus, Getulus, Bargylus, Mas- 
sylus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abalus, Heliogabalus, Corbalus, Bubalus, Cocalus, 

M '2 



( 164 ) 

daius, Idalus, Acidalus, Megalus, Trachalus, Cephalus, Cyno- 
cepbalus, Bucephalus, Anchialus, Maenalus, Hippalus, Harpa- 
lus, Bupalus, Hypalus, Thessalus, Italus, Tantalus, Crotalus, 
Ortalus, Attains, Etuyalus, Doryclus, Stiphelus, Sthenelus, 
Eutrapelus, Cypselus, Babilus, Diphilus, Antiphilus, Pam- 
philus, Theophilus, Damophilus, Troilus, Zciilus, Choerilus, 
Myrtilus, ^goboltis, Naubolus, Equieolus, ^olus, Laureolus, 
Anchemolus, Bibulus, Bibaculus, Caeculus, Grasculus, Sicu- 
lus, Saticulus, ^Equiculus, Paterculus, Acisculus, Regulus, 
Eomuhis, Venulus, Apulus, Salisubsulus, Vesulus, Catulus, 
Gtetulus, Getulus, Opitulus, Lentulus, Rutulus, ^Eschyltis, 
Deiphylus, Demylus, Deipylus, Sipylus, Empylus, Cratylus, 
As ty lus. 

AMUS EMUS IMUS OMUS UMUS YMUS 

decent the Penultimate. 

Callidemus, Charidemus, Pethodemus, Philodemus, Phano- 
demus, Clitodemus, Aristodemus, Polyphemus, Theotimus, 
Herrnotimus, Aristotimus, Ithomus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdanius, ArchidamuSj Agesidamus, Apusidamus, Anaxi- 
damus, Zeuxidamus, Androdamus, Xenodamus, Cogamus, Per- 
gamus, Orchamus, Priamus, Giniiamus, Ceramus, Abdiramus, 
Pyramas, Anlhemus, Telemus, Tlepolemus, Theopolemus, 
Neoptolemus, Phaedimus, Abdalonimus, Zosiiuus, Maximus, 
Antidomus, Amphinomus, Nicodromus, Didymus, Dindymus, 
Helymus, Solymus, Cleouymus, Abdalonymus, Hieroriymus, 
Euonymus, jEsymus, 

ANUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Artabanus, Cebanus, Thebanus, Albanus, Nerbanus, Ver- 
banus, Labicanus, Gallicanus, African us, Sicanus, Vaticanus, 
Lavicanus, Vulcanus, Hyrcanus, Lucanus, Transpadanus, 
Pedanus, Apidanus, Fundanus, Codanus, Eanus, Garganus, 
Murhanus, Baianus, Trajanus, Fabiaous, Accianus, Prisci- 
anus, Roscianus, Lucianus, Seleucianus, Herodianus, Claudi- 
anus, Saturciantis, Sejanus, Carteianus, ^Elianus, Afflianus, 



Lucilianus, Virgilianus, Petilianus, Quintilianus, Catullianus, 
Tertullianus, Julianus, Ammianus, Memmianus, Formianus, 
Diogenianus, Scandinianus, Papinianus, Valeiitinianus, Justini- 
anus, Trophonianus, Otlionianus, Pomponianus, Maronianus, 
Apronianus, Thyonianus, Trojanus, Ulpianus, jEsopiamis, 
Appianus, Oppianus, Marianus, Adrianus, Hadrjanus, Tibe- 
riamis, Valerianus, Papirianus, Vespasianus, Horlensianus, 
Theodosianus, Bassianus, ' Pelusianus, Diocletianus, Domitia- 
nus, Antianus, Scantianus, Terentianus, Quintianus, Sestianus, 
Augustianus, Sallustianus, Pretutianus, Sextianus, Flavianus, 
Bovianus, Pacuvianus, Alanus, Elanus, Silanus, Fregellanus, 
Atellanus, Regillanus, Lucullanus, Sullanus, Syllanus, Car- 
seolanus, Pateolanus, Coriolanus, Ocriculanus, ^Esculanus, 
Tusculanus, Carsulanus, Fassulanus, Querquetulanus, Ama- 
nus, Lemanus, Surnmanus, Romanus, Rhenanus, Amenanus, 
Pucinanus, Cinnanus, Canipanus, Hispanus, Sacranus, Vena- 
franus, Claranus, Ulubranus, Seranus, Luteranus, Coranus, 
Soranus, Serranus, Suburranus, Gauranus, Suburanns, Ancy- 
ranus, Cosanus, Sinuessanus, Syracusanus, Satanus, Laletanus, 
Tunetanus, Abretanus, Cretanus, Setabitanus, Gaditanus, Tin- 
gitanus, Caralitanus, Neapolitans, Antipolitanus, Tomita- 
nus, Taurominitanus, Sybaritanus, Liparitanus, Abderitauus, 
Tritanus, Ancyritanus, Lucitanus, Pantanus, Nejentanus, 
Nomentanus, Beneventanus, Montanus, Spartanus, Paestanus, 
Adelstanus, Tutatms., Sylvanus, Albinovanus, Adeantuanus, 
Mantuanus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Libanus, Clibanus, Antilibanus, Oxycanus, Eiidanus, Rho- 
daiuis, Dardanus, Oceanus, Long im anus, Idiimanus, Pripanus, 
Caranus, Adranus, Coeranus, Tritanus, Pantanus, Sequanus. 

E NU S 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Characenus, Lampsacenus, Astacenus, Picenus, Damasce- 
nus, Suifenus, Alienus, Alplienus, Tyrrhenos, Gabienus, La- 
bienus, Avidenus, A menus, Pupienus, Garienus, Cluvienus, 
Calenus, Galenus, Silenus, Pergamenus, Alexamenus, Isme- 
rnis, Tbrasyraenus, 'Frasymenus, Diopoenus, Capenus, Cebrenus, 
Fibrenus, Serenusj Palmy renus, Amasenus, Tibisenus, Misenus, 
Evenus, B)zeius. 



( 166 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ambetius, Helenus, Olenus, Tissamenus, Dexamenus, Dia- 
dutnenus, Clymenus, Periclymenus, Axenus, Callixenus, Phi- 
loxenus, Timoxenus, Aristoxenus. 

INUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Cytainus, Gabintis, Sabinus, Albinus, Sidicinus, Aricinus, 
Sicinus, Ticinus, Mancinus, Adminocinus, Carcinus, Cosci- 
nus, Marrucinus, Erycinus, Acadiims, Caudinus, Cytainus, 
Rufinus, Rheginus, Erginus, Opiturginus, Auginus, Hyginus, 
Pachinus, Echinus, Delphinus, Myrrhinus, Pothiuus, Face- 
linus, Velinus, Stergilinus, Esquilinus, ^squilinus, Caballinus, 
Marcelliuus, Tigellinus, Sibyllinus, Agyllinus, Solinus, Capi- 
tolinus, Gerainus*, Maximinus, Crastumiuus, Anagninus, 
Signinus, Theoninus, Saloninus, Antoninus, Amiterninus, Sa- 
turninus, Priapinus, Salapinus, Lepinus, Alpinus, Inulipinus, 
Arpinus, Hirpinus, Crispinus, Rutupinus, Lagarinus, Chari- 
nus, Diocharinus, Nonacrinus, Fibrinus, Lucrinu.s, Leandri- 
nus, Aiexandrinus, Iberinus, Tiberinus, Transtibeiitms, Ame- 
rinus, JEserinus, Quirinus, Censorinus, Assorimis, Favoiinus, 
Phavorinus, T"aurinus, Tigurinus, Thurinu.s, Seinuunus, Cy- 
rinus, Myrinus, Gelasinus, Exasinus, Acesinus, Halesinus, 
Telesinus, JSepesinus, Brundisinus, Nursinus, N;iKiisinus> 
Libyssimis, Fuscinus, Clusinus, Venusinus, Perusinus, Susi- 
nus, Ardeatinus, Reatinus, Antiatinus, Latinus, Collatinus, 
Cratinus, Soractinus, Aretinus, Arretinus, Setinus, Bantinus, 
Murgantinus, Phalantinus, Numantinus, Tridentinus, Ufenti- 
nus, Murgeutinus, Salentinus, Pollentinus, Polentinus, Ta- 
rentinus, Terentinus, Snnentinus, Laurentinus, Aventinus, 
Truentinus, Leontinus, Pontinus, Metapontinus, S.iguntinus, 
Martinus, Mamertinus, Tiburtinus, Crastinus, Palaestinus, Prae- 
nestinus, Atestinus, Vestinus, Augustinus, Justinus, Lavinus, 
Patavinus, Acuinus, Elvinus, Corvinus, Laimvinus, Vesuvinus, 
Euxinus. 



* This is the name of a certain astrologer mentioned by Petaviiu, which 
Labbe says would be pronounced with the accent on the antepenultimate by 
those who are ignorant of Greek. 



( 167 ) 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Phainus, Acinus, Alcinus, Fucinus, JEacidinus, Cyteinus, 
Barcliiims, Morinus*, Myrrhinus, Terminus, Ruminus, Earinus, 
Asinus, Apsinus, Myrsinus, Pometinus, Agrantinus. 

ONUS ONUS YNUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Drachonus, Onochonus, Ithonus, Tithonus, Myronus, Nep- 
tunus, Portunus, Tutunus, Acindynus, Bitbynus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Exagonus, Hexagonus, Telegonus, Epigonus, Erigonus, 
Tosigonus, Antigonus, Laogonus, Chrysogonus, Nebrophonus, 
Aponus, Carantonus, Santonus, Aristonus, Dercynus, Acindynus. 

ous 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aoiis, Lnoiis, Sardous, Eoiis, Geloiis, Acheloiis, Jnolis, Mi- 
noiis, Naupac toiis, Arctoiis, Myrtoiis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hydrochoiis, Aleaihoiis, Pirithous, Nausithoiis, Alcinoiis, 
Sphinoiis, Antinoiis. 

APUS EPUS IPUS OPUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Priapus, Anapus, ^Esapus, Messapus, Athepus, JEsepus, 
Euripus, Lycopus, Melanopus, Canopus, Inopus, Paropus, 
Oropus, Europus, Asopus, ^Ssopus, Crotopus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sarapus, Astapus, CEdipus, Agriopus, ^Sropus. 

* The singular of Morini. See the word. 

As the i in the foregoing selection has the accent on it, it ought to be pro- 
nounced like the noun eye ; while the unaccented a in this selection should b 
pronounced like e. See Rule 4th prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary. 



( 168 ) 

ARUS ERUS IRUS ORUS URUS YRUS 

decent the Penultimate. 

Cimarus, .ZEsarus, Iberus, Doberus, Homerus, Severus, 
Koverus, Meleagrus, CEagrus, Cynaegirus, Camirus, Epirus, 
Achedorus, Artemidorus, Isidorus, Dionysidorus, Theodoras, 
Pythodorus, Diodurus, Tryphiodorus, Heliodorus, Asclepi- 
odorus, Alhesiodorus, Cassiodorus, Apollodorus, Demodorus, 
Hermodorus, Xenodorus, Metrodorus, Polydorus, Alorus, 
Elorus, Helorus, Pelprus, ^Egimorus, Assorus, Cytorus, Epi- 
curus, Palinurus, A returns. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abarus, Imbarus, Hypobarus, Icarus, Pandarus, Pindarus, 
Tyndarus, Tearus, Farfarus, Agarus, Abgarus, Gargarus, 
Opharus, Cantharus, Obiarus, Uliarus, Silarus, Cyllarus, 
Tamarus, Absimarus, Comarus, Vindomarus, Tomarus, 
Tsmarus, Ocinarus, Pinarus, Cinnarus, Absarus, Bas.sarus, 
Deioiarus, Tartarus, Eleazarus, Artabrus, Balacrus, Charadrus, 
Cerberus, Bellerus, Mermerus, Terrnerus, Hesperus, Craterus, 
Icterus, Anigrus, Glaphirus, Deborus, Pacorus, Stesicborus, 
Gorgophorus, Telesphorus, Bosphorus, Phosphorus, Heptapo- 
rus, Euporus, Anxurus, Deipyrus, Zopyrus, Leucosyrus, Salyrus, 
Tityrus. 

ASUS ESUS ISUS OSUS USUS YSUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Parnasus, Galesus, Halesus, Volesus, Termesus, Theuine- 
sus, Teurnesus, Alopeconnesus, Proconnesus, Arconnesus, 
Elaphonnesus, Demonesus, Cherronesus, Chersonesus, Arcten- 
nesus, Myonnesus^ Halonesus, Cephalonesus, Peloponnesus, 
Cromyonesus, Lyrnesus, Marpesus, Titaresus, Alisus, Paradisus, 
Amisus, Paropamisus, Crinisus, Amnisus, Berosus, Agrosus, 
Ebusus, Amphrysus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Oribasus, Bubasus, Caucasus, Pedasus, Agasus, Pegasus, 
Tamasus, Harpasus, Imbrasus, Cerasus, Doryasus, Vogesus, 
Vologesus, Ephesus, Anisus, Genusus, Ambrysus. 



( 169 ) 

ATUS ETUS ITUS OTUS UTUS YTUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Rubicatus, Baeticatus, Abradatus, Ambigatus, Viriatus, Elatus, 
Pilatus, Catugnatus, Cincinnatus, Odenatus, Leonatus, Aratus, 
Pytharatus, Demaratus, Acratus, Ceratus, Sceleratus, Serratus, 
Dentatus, Dualus, Torquatus, Februatus, Achetus, Polycletus, 
./Egletus, Miletus, Admetus, Tremetus, Diognelus, Dyscinetus, 
Capetus, Agapetus, lapetus, Acretus, Oretus, Hermaphroditus, 
Epaphroditus, Heraclitus, Munitus, Agapitus, Cerritus, Bituitus, 
Polygnotus, Azotus, Acutus, Stercutus, Coruutus, Cocytus, 
Berytus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Deodatus, Palaephatus, Inatus, Acratus, Dinocratus, Eches- 
tratus*, Amestratus, Menestratus, Amphistratus, Callistratus, 
Damasistratus, Erasistralus, Agesistratus, Hegesistratus, Pisis- 
tratus, Sosistratus, Lysistratus, Nicostratus, Cleostratus, Da- 
mostratus, Demostralus, Sostratus, Philostratus, Dinostratus, 
Herostralus, Eratostratus, Polystratus, Acrotatus, Taygetus, 
Demaenetus, lapetus, Tacitus, Jphitus, Onomacritus, Agora- 
critus, Onesicritus, Cleocritus, Damocritus, Democritus, Aris- 
tocritus, Antidutus, Theodotus, Xenodotus, Herodotus, Cephi- 
sodotus, Libanotus, Leuconotus, Euronotus, Agesimbrotus, 
Stesimbrutus, Theombrotus, Cleombrotus, Hippolytus, Anytus, 
ACpytus, Eurytus. 

AVUS EVUS 1VUS UUS XUS YUS ZUS XYS U 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Agavus, Timavus, Saravus, Batavus*f-, Versevus, Siievus, 
Gradivus, Argivus, Briaxus, Oaxus, Araxus, Eudoxus, Trapezus, 
Charaxys. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Batavus, Inuus, Fatuus, Tityus, Diascoridu. 

* AH words ending in stratus have the accent on the antepenultimate syllable. 

t This word is pronounced with the accent either on the penultimate or an* 
tepenultimate syllable : the former, however, is the most general, especially 
among the poets. 



( 170 ) 

DAX LAX NAX RAX RIX DOX ROX 

decent the Penultimate. 
Ambrodax, Demonax, Hipponax. 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Arctophylax, Hegesianax, Hcrmesianax, Lysianax, Astyauax, 
Agonax, Hierax, Caetobrix, Eporedorix, Deudorix, Ambiorix, 
Dumnorix, Adiatorix, Orgetorix, Biturix 7 Cappadox,, Allobrox. 



RULES 



FOR THE 



PRONUNCIATION 



OF 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



( 172 ) 



ADVER TISEMENT. 



1 HE true pronunciation of the Hebrew language, as Doctor Lowth observes, 
is lost. To refer us for assistance to the Masoretic points, would be to launch 
us on a sea without shore or bottom: the only compass by which we can pos- 
sibly steer on this boundless ocean, is the Septuagint version of the Hebrew 
Bible ; and as it is highly probable the translators transfused the sound of the 
Hebrew proper names into the Greek, it gives us something like a clew to 
guide us out of the labyrinth. But even here we are often left to guess our 
way: for the Greek word is frequently so different from the Hebrew, as 
scarcely to leave any traces of similitude between them. In this case custom 
and analogy must often decide, and the ear must sometimes solve the difficulty. 
But these difficulties relate chiefly to the accentuation of Hebrew words : and 
the method adopted in this point will be seen in its proper place. 

I must here acknowledge my obligations to a very learned and useful work 
the Scripture Lexicon of Mr. Oliver. As the first attempt to facilitate the 
pronunciation of Hebrew proper names, by dividing them into Syllables, it de- 
serves the highest praise : but as I have often differed widely from this gen- 
tleman in syllabication, accentuation, and the sound of the vowels, I have 
thought it necessary to give my reasons for this difference, which will be seen 
under the Rules: of the validity of which reasons the reader will be the best 
judge. 

N. B. As there are many Greek and Latin proper names in Scripture, par- 
ticularly in the New Testament, which are to be met with in ancient history, 
some of them have been omitted in this selection : and therefore if the inspector 
does not find them here, he is desired to seek for them in the Vocabulary of 
Greek and Latin Names. 



RULES 

FOR PRONOUNCING 

SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



1. IN the pronunciation of the letters of the Hebrew proper 
names, we find nearly the same rules prevail as in those of 
Greek and Latin. Where the vowels end a syllable with the 
accent on it, they have their long open sound, as Na f bal, Je' hu, 
Si' rack, Go' shen, and Tu' ' bal. (See Rule 1st prefixed to the 
Greek and Latin Proper Names.) 

2. When a consonant ends the syllable, the preceding vowel 
is short, as Sam' u-el, Lem' u-el, Sim' e-on, Sol' o-mon, Sue' cot h, 
Syn' a-gogue. (See Rule 2d prefixed to the Greek and Latin 
Proper Names.) I here differ widely from Mr. Oliver ; for I 
cannot agree with him that the e in Abdiel, the o in Arnon, and 
the u in Ashur, are to be pronounced like the ee in seen, the o in 
tonej and the u in tune, which is the rule he lays down for all 
similar words. 

3. Every final i forming a distinct syllable, though unaccented, 
has the long open sound, as A' i, A-ris' a-i. (See rule the 4th 
prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names.) 

4. Every unaccented i, ending a syllable not final, is pro- 
nounced like e, as A' ri-el, Ab'di-el; pronounced A' re-el, 
Ab f de-el. (See Rule the 4th prefixed to the Greek and Latin 
Proper Names.) 

5. The vowels ai are sometimes pronounced in one syllable, 
and sometimes in two. As the Septuagint version is our chief 
guide in the pronunciation of Hebrew proper names, it may be 
observed, that when these letters are pronounced as a diphthong 
in one syllable, like our English diphthong in the word daily, 
they are either a diphthong in the Greek word, or expressed by 
the Greek e or , as Ben-ai' ah, Bavau*; Hu f shai, Xa* ; Hu'rai, 
Ovgi, Sec. ; and that when they are pronounced in two syllables, 
as Sham' ma-i, Shash' a-i, Ber-a-i' ah, it is because the Greek 
words by which they arc translated, as af*a*, Zeo-ls, Bag***, 
make two syllables of these vowels. Mr. Oliver has not always 



174 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

attended to this distinction: he makes Sin' a-i three syllables, 
though the Greek make it but two in ,?. That accurate 
prosodist Labbe, indeed, makes it a trisyllable; but he does 
the same by Aaron and Canaan, which our great classic Milton, 
uniformly reduces to two syllables, as well as Sinai. If we were 
to pronounce it in three syllables, we must necessarily make the 
first syllable short, as in Shim' e-i; but this is so contrary to the 
best usage, that it amounts to a proof that it ought to be pro- 
nounced in two syllables with the first i long, as in Shi' nar. 
This, however, must be looked upon as a general rule only : 
these vowels in Isaiah, Graecised by HraVac, are always pro- 
nounced as a diphthong, or, at least with the accent on the a, 
and the i like y articulating the succeeding vowel ; in Caiaphas 
likewise the ai is pronounced like a diphthong, though divided 
in the Greek KaVa<pa$; which division cannot take place in 
this word, because the i must then necessarily have the accent, 
and must be pronounced as in Isaac, as Mr. Oliver has marked 
it; but I think contrary to universal usage. The only point ne- 
cessary to be observed in the sound of this diphthong, is the slight 
difference we perceive between its medial and final position ; 
when it is final, it is exactly like the English ay without the ac- 
cent, as in holyday, roundelay, galloway ; but when it is in the 
middle of a word, and followed by a vowel, the i is pronounced 
as if it were y, and as if this y articulated the succeeding vowel : 
thus Ben-ai' ah is pronounced as if written Ben-a' yah. 

6. Ch is pronounced like k, as Chebar, Chemosh, Enoch, &c. 
pronounced Kebar, Kemosh, Enoch, &c. Cherubim, and Rachel, 
seem to be perfectly anglicised, as the ch in these words is always 
heard as in the English word cheer, child, riches, &c. (See 
Rule 12 prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names.) The 
same may be observed of Cherub, signifying an order of angels ; 
but when it means a city of the Babylonish empire, it ought to 
be pronounced Re' rub. 

7. Almost the only difference in the pronunciation of the 
Hebrew, and the Greek and Latin proper names, is in the sound 
of the g before e and i : in the two last languages this consonant is 
always soft before these vows, as Gellius, Gippius, &c., pro- 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 175 

nounced, Jellius, Jippius, &c ; and in the first it is hard ; as 
Gera, Gerizim, Gideon, Gilgal, Megiddo, Megiddon, &c. This 
difference is without all foundation in etymology ; for both g 
and c were always hard in the Greek and Latin languages, as 
well as in the Hebrew, but the latter language being studied so 
much less than the Greek and Latin, it has not undergone that 
change which familiarity is sure to produce in all languages: 
and even the solemn distance of this language has not been able 
to keep the letter c from sliding into s before e and i, in the 
same manner as in the Greek and Latin : thus, though Gehazi, 
Gideon, &c. have the g hard, Cedrom, Cedron, Cisai, and Cittern, 
have the c soft, as if written Sedrom, Sedron, &c. The same may 
be observed of Igeabarim, Igeal, Nagge, Shage, Pagiel,\vi\h theg 
hard ; and Ocidelus, Ocina, and Pharacion, with the c soft like s. 

8. Gentiles, as they are called, ending in ines and ites, as 
Philistines, Hivites, Hittites, &c. being anglicised in the trans- 
lation of the Bible, are pronounced like formatives of our own, 
as Philistins, Whitfiddites, Jacobites, &c. 

9- The unaccented termination ah, so frequent in Hebrew 
proper names, ought to be pronounced like the a in father. The 
a in this termination, however, frequently falls into the indis- 
tinct sound heard in the final a in Africa, JEtna, c. ; nor can 
we easily perceive any distinction in this respect between Elijah 
and Elisha : but the final h preserves the other vowels open, as 
Colhozeh, Shi/oh, &c. pronounced Colhozee, Shilo, &c. (See 
Rule 7 prefixed to the Greek and Latin proper Names.) The 
diphthong ei is always pronounced like ee: thus Sa-mei' us is 
pronounced as if written Sa-meef us. But if the accent be 
on the ah, then the a ought to be pronounced like the a in father; 
as Tah'e-ra, Tah' pe-nes, &c. 

10. It may be remarked that there are several Hebrew pro- 
per names, which, by passing through the Greek of the New 
Testament, have conformed to the Greek pronunciation ; such as 
Aceldama, Genazareth, Bethphage, &c. pronounced Aseldama, 
Jenazareth, Bethphaje, &c. This is, in my opinion, more 
agreeable to the general analogy of pronouncing these Hebrew 
Greek words than preserving the c and g hard. 



176 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

Rules for ascertaining the English Quantity of the Vowels in 
Hebrew Proper Names. 

11. With respect to the quantity of the first vowel in dissyl- 
lables, with but one consonant in the middle, I have followed the 
rule which we observe in the pronunciation of such dissyllables 
when Greek or Latin words. (See Rule 18 prefixed to the 
Greek and Latin Proper Names :) and that is, to place the ac- 
cent on the first vowel, and to pronounce that vowel long, as 
Ko 1 rah, and not Kor'ah, Mo' loch and not Mol'och, as Mr. Oli- 
ver has divided them in opposition both to analogy and the best 
usage. I have observed the same analogy in the penultimate of 
polysyllables ; and have not divided Balthasar into Bal-thas' ar, 
as Mr. Oliver has done, but into Bal-tha' sar. 

12. In the same manner, when the accent is on the antepe- 
nultimate syllable, whether the vowel end the syllable, or be fol- 
lowed by two consonants, the vowel is always short, except fol- 
lowed by two vowels, as in Greek and Latin proper names. 
(See Rule prefixed to these names, Nos. 18, 19, 20, &c.) 
Thus Jehosaphat has the accent on the antepenultimate sylla- 
ble, according to Greek accentuation by quantity, (see Intro- 
duction to this work) and this syllable, according to the clearest 
analogy of English pronunciation, is short, as if spelt Je-hos' a- 
phat. The secondary accent has the same shortening power in 

OthoniaSj where the primary accent is on the third, and the se- 
condary on the first syllable, as if spelt Oth-o-ni'as: and it is on 
these two fundamental principles of our own pronunciation, 
namely, the lengthening power of the penultimate, and the 
shortening power of the antepenultimate accent, that I hope I 
have been enabled to regulate and fix many of those sounds which 
were floating about in uncertainty ; and which, for want of this 
guide, are differently marked by different orthoepists, and often 
differently by the same orthoepist. See this fully explained and 
exemplified in Principles of English Pronunciation prefixed to the 
Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, Nos. 547, 530, &c. 

Rules for placing the Accent on Hebrew Proper Names. 

13. With respect to the accent of Hebrew words, it cannot 
be better regulated than by the laws of the Greek language. I 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. J?7 

do not mean, however, that every Hebrew word which is Grae- 
cised by the Septuagint should be accented exactly according to 
the Greek rule of accentuation ; for if this were the case, every 
word ending in el would never have the accent higher than the 
preceding syllable ; because it was a general rule in the Greek 
language, that when the last syllable was long the accent could 
not be higher than the penultimate : nay, strictly speaking, were 
we to accent these words according to the accent of that language, 
they ought to have the accent on the last syllable, because AdiA 
and icr%oiv)h, Abdiel and Israel, have the accent on that syllable. 
It may be said, that this accent on the last syllable is the grave, 
which, when on the last word of a sentence, or succeeded by an 
enclitic, was changed into an acute. But here, as in words 
purely Greek, we find the Latin analogy prevail : and because 
the penultimate is short, the accent is placed on the antepenul- 
timate, in the same manner as in Socrates, Sosthenes, &c. though 
the final syllable of the Greek words Ewx^arjj?, rwo-fi/Mj?, &c., is 
Jong, and the Greek accent on the penultimate. (See Introduc- 
tion prefixed to the Rules for pronouncing Greek and Latin 
Proper Names.) It is this general prevalence of accenting 
according to the Latin analogy that has induced me, when the 
Hebrew word has been Gragcised in the same number of 
syllables, to prefer the Latin accentuation to what may be called 
our own. Thus Cathua, coming to us through the Greek 
Kafitfa, I have accented it on the penultimate, because the 
Latins would have placed the accent on this syllable on account 
of its being long, though an English ear would be better pleased 
with the antepenultimate accent. The same reason has induced 
me to accent Chaseba on the antepenultimate, because it is 
Grsecised into Xac-ga. But when the Hebrew and Greek word 
does not contain the same number of syllables, as Mcs' o-bah, 
Meo-uGia, Id' u-el, i5>jAo ? , it then comes under our own analogy, 
and we neglect the long vowel, and place the accent on 
the antepenultimate. The same may be observed of Mordecai, 

from Ma^o^a?o?. 

14. As we never accent a proper name from the Greek on the 

N 



178 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING 

last syllable, (not because the Greeks did not accent the last 
syllable, for they had many words accented in that manner, but 
because this accentuation was contrary to the Latin prosody :) so 
if the Greek word be accented on any other syllable, we seldom 
pay any regard to it, unless it coincide with the Latin accent. 
Thus in the word Gede' rah I have placed the accent on the pe- 
nultimate, because it is Graecised by rqga, where the accent is 
on the antepenultimate; and this because the penultimate is long, 
and this long penultimate has always the accent in Latin. (See 
this farther exemplified, Rule 18, prefixed to the Greek and 
Latin Proper Names, and Introduction near the end.) Thus 
though it may seem at first sight absurd to derive our pronun- 
ciation of Hebrew words from the Greek, and then to desert the 
Greek for the Latin ; yet since we must have some rule, and if 
possible, a learned one, it is very natural to lay hold of the 
Latin, because it is nearest at hand. For as language is a mix- 
ture of reasoning and convenience, if the true reason lie too 
remote from common apprehension, another more obvious one is 
generally adopted; and this last, by general usage, becomes a 
rule superior to the former. It is true the analogy of our own 
language would be a rule the most rational ; but while the ana- 
logies of our own language are so little understood, and the Greek 
and Latin languages are so justly admired, even the appearance 
of being acquainted with them will always be esteemed reputable, 
and infallibly lead us to an imitation of them, even in such points 
as are not only insignificant in themselves, but inconsistent with 
our vernacular pronunciation. 

15. It is remarkable that all words ending in ias and iah have 
the accent on the i, without any foundation in the analogy of 
Greek and Latin pronunciation, except the very vague reason 
that the Greek word places the accent on this syllable. I call 
this reason vague, because the Greek accent has no influence on 
words in ael, iel, ial, &c. as io-g^ A<^J?W BeAta*, K. r. A. 

Hence we may conclude the impropriety of pronouncing 
Messias with the accent on the first syllable according to Lab be, 
who says we must pronounce it in this manner, if we wish to 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 1?9 

pronounce it like the French with the os rotundum et focundum. 
and, indeed, if the i were to be pronounced in the French man- 
ner like e, placing the accent on the first syllable seems to have 
the bolder sound. This may serve as an answer to the learned 
critic, the editor of Labbe, who says, " the Greeks, but not the 
French, pronounce ore rotundo ;" for though the Greeks might 
place the accent on the i in Mto-riaf, yet as they certainly pro- 
nounced this vowel as the French do, it must have the same 
slender sound, and the accent on the first syllable must, in that 
respect, be preferable to it ; for the Greek i, like the same letter 
in Latin, was the slenderest of all the vowel sounds. It is the 
broad diphthongal sound of the English * with the accent on it 
which makes this word sound so much better in English than it 
does in French, or even in the true ancient Greek pronunciation. 

16. The termination aim seems to attract the accent on the a, 
only in words of more than three syllables : as Ephf ra-im and 
Miz'ra-im have the accent on the antepenultimate; but Ho-ro- 
na r im, Ram-a-tha' im, &c. on the penultimate syllable. This is 
a general rule ; but if the Greek word has the penultimate 
long, the accent ought to be on that syllable, as Phar-vaf im, 
$ag8ju, &C. 

17. Kemuel, Jemuel, Nemuel, and other words of the same 
form, having the same number of syllables as the Greek word 
into which they are translated, ought to have the accent on the 
penultimate, as that syllable is long in Greek; but Emanuel, 
Samuel, and Lemuel, are irrecoverably fixed in the antepenulti- 
mate accentuation, and show the true analogy of the accentuation 
of our own language. 

18. Thus we see what has been observed of the tendency of 
Greek and Latin words to desert their original accent and to 
adopt that of the English, is much more observable in words 
from the Hebrew. Greek and Latin words are fixed in their 
pronunciation, by a thousand books written expressly upon the 
subject, and ten thousand occasions of using them ; but Hebrew 
words, from the remote antiquity of the language, from the pau- 
city of books in it, from its being originally written without 

N 2 



180 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES, 
points, and the very different style of its poetry from that of 
other languages, afford us scarcely any criterion to recur to for 
settling their pronunciation, which must therefore often be irre- 
gular and desultory. The Septuagint, indeed, gives us some 
light, and is the only star by which we can steer; but this is so 
frequently obscured, as to leave us in the dark, and to force us 
to pronounce according to the analogy of our own language. It 
were to be wished, indeed, that this were to be entirely adopted 
in Hebrew words, where we have so little to determine us ; and 
that those words which we have worn into our own pronunciation 
were to be a rule for all others of the same form and termina- 
tion ; but it is easier to bring about a revolution in kingdoms 
than in languages. Men of learning will always form a sort of 
literary aristocracy; they will be proud of the distinction which a 
knowledge of language gives them above the vulgar ; and will be 
fond of showing this knowledge, which the vulgar will never fail 
to admire and imitate. 

The best we can do, therefore, is to make a sort of compro- 
mise between this ancient language and our own ; to form a kind 
of compound ratio of Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and English, and 
to let each of these prevail as usage has permitted them. Thus 
Emanuelj Samuel, Lemuel, which, according to the Latin ana- 
logy and our own, have the accent on the antepenultimate syllable, 
ought to remain in quiet possession of their present pronunciation, 
notwithstanding the Greek E/^am^, Sa^^, Ae/xtA* ; but 
Elishua, Esdrelon, Gederah, may have the accent on the pe- 
nultimate, because the Greek words into which they are trans- 
lated, EAwae, 'Eerfyv>*v[A, Fa&jpa, have the penultimate long. If 
this should not appear a satisfactory method of settling the pro- 
nunciation of these words, I must entreat those who dissent from 
it to point out a better : a work of this kind was wanted for ge- 
neral use ; it is addressed neither to the learned nor the illiterate, 
but to that large and most respectable part of society who have 
a tincture of letters, but whose avocations deny them the oppor- 
tunity of cultivating them. To these a work of this kind cannot 
fail of being useful ; and by its utility to these the author wishes 
to stand or fall. 



PRONUNCIATION 

OF 

SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 



INITIAL VOCABULARY. 



%* When a word is succeeded by a word printed in Italics, this latter word 
is merely to spell the former as it ought to be pronounced. Thus Asfe-fa is the 
true pronunciation of the preceding word Ac? i-pha; and so of the rest. 

%* The Figures annexed to the words refer to the Rules prefixed to the Voca- 
bulary. Thus the figure (3) after Ab' di refers to Rule the 3d, for the pronun- 
ciation of the finali; and the figure (5) after A-bishf a-i refers to Rule the 5th, 
for the pronunciation of the unaccented ait and so of the rest. 

\* For the quantity of the vowels indicated by the syllabication, see Nos. 
18 and 19 of the Rules for Greek and Latin proper Names. 



AB AB AB 


A'A-LAR 


Ab'a-dah 


A'bal 


*A'a-ron(5) 


A-bad' don 


Ab'a-na (9) 


Ab 


Ab-a-di'as(15) 


fAb' a-rim 


Ab' a-cue 


A-bag' tha 


Ab' a-ron 



* Aaron. This is a word of three syllables in Labbe, who says it is used to 
be pronounced with the accent on the penultimate : but the general pronunti- 
ation of this word in English is in two syllables, with the accent on the first, and 
as if written A'ron. Milton uniformly gives it this syllabication and accent. 
Till by two brethren (those two brethren call 
Moses and Aaron) sent from God to claim 
His people from inthralment. Par. Lost, b. xii. v. 170. 
t Abarim. This and some other words are decided in their accentuation by 
Milton in th following verses : 

From 



182 AB AB AC 


Ab' ba (9) 


A'bi-el(4)(12) 


Ab' i-sum 


Ab'da 


A-bi-e'zer(12) 


Ab'i-tal 


Ab'di(3) 


A-bi-ez' rite 


Ab' i-tub 


Ab-di'as(lS) 


Ab'i-gail 


A-bi'ud 


Ab'di-el(4)(13) 


A b' i-gal 


Ab'ner 


Ab'don 


Ab-i-ha'il 


*A' bram, or 


A- bed' ne-go 


A-bi'hu 


A' bra-ham 


A'bel(l) 


A-bi' hud 


Ab' sa-lom 


A'bel Beth-ma' a-cah 
A'belMa'im 


A-bi'jah (9) 
A-bi'jam 


A-bu' bus 
Ac' cad 


A'bel Me-ho'lath 


Ab-i-le' ne 


Ac' a*ron 


A'bel Mis' ra-im (16) 


A-bim'a-el(lS) 


Ac' a-tan 


A' bel Shit' tim 


A-bim' e-lech (6) 


Ac' ca-ron 


Ab'e-san(ll) 


A-bin' a-dab 


Ac'cho(6) 


Ab'e-sar(lS) 


A-bin' o-am 


Ac' cos 


A'bez 


A-bi' ram 


Ac'coz 


Ab'ea-rus(12) 


A-bi' rom 


A-cel'da-ma(lO) 


A'bi(3) 


A-bis' a-i (5) 


A-sei' da-ma 


A-bi' a, or A-bi' ah 


Ab-i-se'i 


A'chab(6) 


A-bi-al'bon(12) 


Ab' i-shag 


A' chad 


A-bi' a-saph 


A-bish' a-i (5) 


A-cha' i-a (5) 


A-bi' a-thar 


A-bish' a-har 


A-cha' i-cus 


A' bib 


A-bish' a-loni 


A' chan (6) 


A-bi'dah(9) 


A-bish' u-a( 13) 


A' char 


Ab' i-dan 


Ab' i-shur 


A'chaz(6) 



From Aroar to Nebo, and the wild 

Of southmost Abarim in Hesebon, 

And Horonaim, Seon's realm, beyond 

The flow'ry dale of Sibma, clad with vines, 

And ElealS to th' Asphaltic pool. Par. Lost, b. i. v. 407. 



Yet his temple high 



Heard in Azotns, dreaded through the coast 

Of Palestine, in Gath and Ascalon, 

And Accaron and Gaza's frontier bounds. 



Ib. 463. 



* Abram or Abraham. The first name of two syllables was the patriarch's 
original name, but God increased it to the second, of three syllables, as a pledge 
of an increase in blessing. The latter name, however, from the feebleness of 
the h in our pronunciation of it, and from the absence of the accent, is liable 
to such an hiatus, from the proximity of two similar vowels, that in the most 
solemn pronunciation we seldom hear this name extended to three syllables. 
Milton has but once pronounced it in this manner, but has six times made it 
only two syllables : and this may be looked upon as the general pronunciation. 



AD AD AH 183 


Ach'bor 


Ad'a-sa(Q) 


A-du'el (13) 


A-chi-ach' a-rus 


Ad'a-tha (9) 


A-dul'lam 


A'chim(6) 


Ad'be-el(lS) 


A-dum' mini 


A-chim' e-lech (6) 


Ad' dan 


A-e-di'as(15) 


A'chi-or 


Ad'dar 


^'gypt 


A-chi'ram 


Ad'di(3) 


^E-ne' as. Virgil. 


A'chish 


Ad' din 


JE'ne-as. Acts 9. 


Ach'i-tob, or 


Ad' do 


./E'non 


Ach' i-tub 


Ad'dus 


^'nos 


A-chit'o-phel 


A'der(l) 


Ag' a-ba 


A-kit' o-fel 


Ad'i-da 


Ag' a-bus 


Ach' me-tha 


A'di-el(lS) 


A'gag(l)(ll) 


A'chor 


A' din 


A' gag-ite 


Ach'sa(9) 


Ad'i-na(9) 


A' gar 


Ach' shaph 


Ad'i-no 


Ag-a-renes' 


Ach'zib(6) 


Ad'i-nus 


Ag'e-e (7) 


Ac' i-pha 


Ad' i-tha (9) 


Ag-ge'us (7) 


^//a(7) 


Ad-i-tha'im (16) 


Ag-noth-ta' bor 


Ac'i-tho 


Ad'la-i(5) 


A'gur 


A-cu'a(lS) 


Ad' mah 


A'hab 


A' cub (11) 


Ad' ma-tha 


A-har'ah(9) 


A' da 


Ad 7 na (9) 


A-har'al 


A' dad 


Ad'nah(9) 


A-has'a-i (5) 


Ad' a-da, or 


*Ad'o-nai (5) 


A-has-u-e' rus 


Ad' a-dali (9) 


Ad-o-ni'as (15) 


A-ha' va 


Ad-ad-e' zer 


A-do-ni-be' zek 


A'haz 


Ad-ad-rim' mon 


Ad-o-ni'jah(15) 


A-haz'a-i(5) 


A'dah 


A-don' i-kam 


A-ha-zi'ah (15) 


Ad-a-i'ah (9) (15) 


A-don-i' ram 


Ah' ban 


Ad-a-li'a(15) 


A-don-i-ze' dek A' her 


Ad' am 


A-do' ra (9) 


A'hi(S) 


Ad' a-ma, or 


Ad-o-ra' im ( 1 6) 


A-hi' ah 


Ad'a-mah 


A-do' ram A-hi' am 


Ad'a-mi(3) 


A-dram' e-lech A-hi-e' zer 


Ad'a-miNe'keb 


A' dri-a (2) (9) ( 1 2) A-hi' hud 


A'dar(l) 


A'dri-el (IS) A-hi'jah 



* Adonai. Lal)be, says his editor, makes this a word of three syllables 
only ; which, if once admitted, why, says he, should he dissolve the Hebrew 
diphthong in Suda'i, Sina'i, Tolma'i, &c., and at the same time make two syllables 
of the diphthong in Casleu, which are commonly united into one ? In this, says 
he, he is inconsistent with himself. See Sinai'. 



184 Al 


AM 


AN 


A-hi' kam 


Ai' ja-lon 


A-mal' da 


A-hi'lud 


Adfja-lon 


Am' a-lek 


A-him' a-az 


Aij' e-leth Sha' bar 


Am' a-lek-ites (8) 


A-hi' man 


Ad'je-kth 


A' man 


A-him' e-lecli 


A' in (5) 


Am' a-na 


A-hini' e-lek 


A-i'oth 


Am-a-h' ah (15) 


A-hi' moth 


A-i' rus 


A-ma' sa 


A-hin'a-dab , 


Ak'kub 


A-mas'a-i (5) 


A-hin' o-am 


Ak-rab' bim 


Am-a-shi' ah (15) 


A-hi'o 


A-lam'e-lech (6) 


Arn-a-the'is 


A-hi'ra(9) 


Al' a-meth 


Am' a-this 


A-hi' ram 


Al' a-moth 


Am-a-zi' ah 


A-hi'ram-ites(8) 


Al'ci-mus 


*A' men' 


A-his'a-mach (6) 


Al'e-ma 


A' mi (3) 


A-hish' a-hur 


A-le' meth 


A-miri' a -dab 


A-hi' sham 


Al-ex-an' dri-a 


A-mit' tai (5) 


A-hi' shar 


Al-ex-an' dri-on 


A>miz' a-bad 


A-hi'tob 


Al-le-lu'jah 


Am' mah 


A-hit' o-phel 


Al-le-lu'yah (5) 


Am-rnad' a-tha 


A-hi' tub 


A-li'ah 


Am' mi (3) 


A-hi'ud 


A-li'an 


Am mid'i-oi (4) 


Ah'lah 


Al' lorn 


Am' mi el (4) 


Ah'lai(5) 


Al' Ion Bac' huth 


Am-mr* hud 


A-ho' e, or A-ho' ah 


Al-mo'dad 


Am-i-fshad' da-i (5) 


A-ho'ite(8) 


Al'mon, Dib-la- 


Am'mon 


A-ho'lah 


tha'im (15) 


Am' mou-ites 


A-hol' ba 


Al' na-thau 


Am' non 


A-hol' bah 


A' loth 


A' mok 


A-ho'li-ab 


Al'pha 


A'mon 


A-hol' i- bah (9) 


Al-phe' us 


Am' o-rites (8) 


A-ho-lib' a-mah 


Al-ta-ne' us 


A' mos 


A-hu'ma-i (5) 


Al-tas'chith ((j) 


Am'pli-as 


A-hu' zam 


Al'te-kon 


Am' ram 


A-huz' zah 


Al' vah, or Al' van 


Am'ram-ites (8) 


A' M3) 


A' lush 


Am' ran 


A-i'ah(lo) 


A' mad 


Am' ra-phel 


A'i-ath 


A-mad' a-tha 


Am 7 zi (3) 


A-i'ja 


A- mad' a- thus 


A' nab 


A-i'jah 


A'mal 


An'a-el(ll) 



* Amen- The only simple word in the language which has necessarily two. 
successive accents. See Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, under the word. 



AN AR AR 185 


A'nah An-tip'a-tris 


A-ra 7 bi-a 


An-a-ha 7 rath An' ti-pha 


A'rad 


An-a-i'ah (5) (15) 


An- to 7 ni-a A 7 rad-ite (8) 


A'nak 


An-to-tbi 7 jah (15) 


Ai 7 a-dus 


Ai/a-kims 


An 7 toth-ite (8) 


A'rah(l) 


An'a-mim A 7 nub 


A' ram 


A-narn 7 e-lech (6) Ap-a-me 7 a 


A 7 ran 


A' nan 


Aph-a-ra' im (16) 


Ar' a-rat 


An-a 7 ni 


A-pbar 7 sath-chites 


A-rau 7 nah 


An-a-ni'ah (15) 


A-phar' sites (8) 


Ar 7 ba, or Ar' bah 


An-a-ni 7 as 


A 7 phek 


Ar 7 bal 


A-nan'i-el (13) 


A-phe 7 kah 


Ar-bai' tis 


A 7 nath 


A-pher'e-ma 


Ar-be 7 la, in Syria 


*A-nath' e-ma 


A-phei ' ra 


Ar-bel 7 la 


An 7 a-thoth 


A-phi 7 ab (15) 


Ar 7 bite(8) 


An' drew 


Apb'rah 


Ar-bo 7 nai (5) 


A 7 item, or A'nen 


Apb' ses 


Ar-che-la 7 us 


A 7 ner A-poc 7 a-lypse 


Ar-ches 7 tra-tus 


A 7 nes A-poc 7 ry-pha 


Ar 7 che-vites (8) 


A'neth 


A-pol' los 


Ar 7 chi(3) 


An' a-thoth-ite (8) 


A-pol 7 ly-on 


Ar-chi-at 7 a-roth 


A 7 ni-ain 


A-pol' yon 


Ar-chip 7 pus 


A' nim 


Ap 7 pa-im (15) 


Arch 7 ites(8) 


An 7 na (9) 


Ap'phi-a(3) 


Ard 


An'na-as 


Aph' e-a 


Ar 7 dath 


An' nas 


Ap'phus 


Ard 7 ites(8) 


An-nu'us (13) 


Aph' us 


Ar 7 don 


A' nus 


Aq' ui-la A-re 7 li (3) 


An-ti-lib' a-nus 


Ar A-re 7 lites 


An'ti-och (6) 


A 7 ra A-re-op 7 a-gite (8) 


An-ti' o-chis 


A 7 rab j f A-re-op 7 a-gus 


An-ti 7 o-chus 


Ar' a-bah A 7 res 


An 7 ti-pas 


Ar-a-bat 7 ti-ne Ar-e 7 tas 



* Anathema. Those who are not acquainted with the profound researches of 
verbal critics would be astonished to observe what waste of learning has been 
bestowed on this word by Labbe, in order to show that it ought to be accented 
on the antepenultimate syllable. This pronunciation has been adopted by 
English scholars ; though some divines have been heard from the pulpit to give 
it the penultimate accent, which so readily unites it in a trochaic pronunciation 
with Maranaiha, in the first Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians : "If any 
" man love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be Anathema maranatha.*' 

t Areopagus. There is a strong propensity in English readers of the New 

Testament 



186 



AR 



AS AS 


Ar' pad, or Ar' phad 


A-se' as 


Ar' sa-ces 


As-e-bi' a 


Ar-phax' ad 


A-seb-e-bi'a(15) 


Ar'te-mas 


As' e-nath 


Ar'vad 


A'ser 


Ar'vad-ites (8) 


A-se' rar 


Ar 7 u-both 


Ash-a-bi' ah (15) 


A-ru'mah (13) 


A' shan 


Ar'za 


Ash' be-a 


A'sa 


Ash'bel 


As-a-di' as 


Ash'bel-ites(8) 


As'a-el(lS) 


Ash' dod 


As'a-hel 


Ash' doth-ites (8) 


As a-i' ah (5) (15) 


Ash' doth Pis' gah 


As' a-na 


A' she-an 


A' saph 


Ash'er 


As' a-phar 


Ash' i-math 


As' a-ra 


Ash' ke-naz 


A-sar'e-el(lS) 


Ash' nah 


As-a-re' lah 


A' shon 


As-baz' a-reth 


Ash' pe-naz 


As' ca-lon 


Ash'ri-el(13) 



A-re' us 
Ar'gob 
Ar'gol 
A-rid' a-i (5) 
A-rid' a-tha 
A-ri'eh(9) 
A'ri-el(4)(12) 
Ar-i-ma-the'a 
A'ri-och(4) 
A-ris'a-i(5) 
Ar-is-to-bu' lus 
Ark' ites 
Ar-ma-ged' don 
Ar-mi-shad' a-i 
Ar* mon 
Ar' nan 
Ar' ne-pher 
Ar' non 
A' rod 
Ar'o-di(3) 
Ar 7 o-er 
A'rom 



Testament to pronounce this word with the accent on the penultimate syllable ; 
and even some foreign scholars have contended that it ought to be so pro- 
nounced, from its derivation from "Ag EI? Tmyav, the Doric dialect for -m^v, the 
fountain of Mars, which was on a hill in Athens, rather than from "A^ rrayo?, 
the hill of Mars. But Labbe very justly despises this derivation, and says, 
that of all the ancient writers none have said that the Areopagus was derived 
from a fountain, or from a country near to a fountain ; but all have confessed 
that it came from a hill, or the summit of a rock, on which this famous court of 
judicature was built. Vossius tells us, that St. Augustine, De Civ. Dei, 1. x. 
cap. 10, calls this word pagum Martis, the village of Mars, and that he fell into 
this error because the Latin word pagus signifies a village or street ; but, says 
he, the Greek word signifies a hill, which, perhaps, was so called from naya. or 
7ryj, (that is, fountain,) because fountains usually take their rise on hills.- 
Wrong, however, as this derivation may be, he tells us it is adopted by no less 
scholars than Beza, Budaens, and Sigonius. And this may show us the uncer- 
tainty of etymology in language, and the security of general usage ; but in the 
present case both etymology and usage conspire to place the accent on the an- 
tepenultimate syllable. Agreeably to this usage, we find the prologue to a play 
observe, that 

The critics are assembled in the pit, 

And form an Areopagus of wit. 



AS AT AZ 


Ash' ta-roth 


As-si-de'ans (13) A' va 


Ash' te-rnoth 


As' sir Av'a-ran 


Ash' ta-roth-ites (8) As' sos A' ven 


A-shu'ath 


As' ta-roth Au' gi-a (4) 


Ash'ur 


Ash' ta-roth A' vim 


A-shu'rim(13) 


As-tar' te 


A' vims 


Ash' ur-ites (8) ' As 7 tath 


A'vites (8) 


A' si-a A-sup' pirn 


A'vith 


As-i-bi' as (15) A-syn' cri-tus 


Au-ra-ni 7 tis 


A a si-el(13) 


A' tad 


Au-ra' nus 


As' i-pha 


At' a-rah 


Au-te' us 


As 7 ke-lon A- tar' ga-tis 


Az-a-e' lus 


*As'ma-dai(5) At' a-roth 


A'zah 


As' ma-veth ! A' ter 


A'zal 


As-mo-de' us 


At-e-re-zi' as (15) 


Az-a-li'ah(15) 


As-mo-ne'ans 


A'thack 


Az-a-ni'ah (15) 


As' nah 


Ath-a-i'ah (15) 


A-za' phi-on 


As-nap' per 


Ath-a-li'ah (15) 


Az' a-ra 


A-so' chis (6) 


Ath-a-ri'as (15) 


A-za' re-el 


A'som 


Ath-e-no' bi-us 


Az-a-ri'ah (15) 


As' pa-tha 


Ath' ens 


Az-a-ri'as (15) 


As' phar 


Ath'lai(5) 


A'zaz 


As-phar' a-sus 


At' roth 


fA-za'zel 


As'ri-el(lS) At'tai(5) 


Az-a-zi'ah (15) 


As-sa-bi' as (15) At-ta-li' a (15) 


Az-baz' a-reth 


As-sal' i-moth At' ta-lus 


Az'buk 


As-sa-ni' as ( 1 5) At-thar' a-tes 


A-ze' kah (9) 



* Asmadai. Mr. Oliver has not inserted this word, but we have it in 
Milton : 

On each wing 

Uriel and Raphael his vaunting foe, 

Though huge, and in a rock of diamond arm'd, 

Vanquish'd, Adramelech and Asmadai. 

Par. Lost, b. vi. v. 365. 

whence we may guess the poet's, pronunciation of it in three syllables; the 
diphthong sounding like the ai in daily. See Rule 5, and the words Sinai and 
Adonai. 

t Azazd. This word is not in Mr. Oliver's Lexicon ; but Milton makes use 
of it, and places the accent on the second syllable : 

that proud honour claim'd 

Azazel as his right ; a cherub tall. 

Par, Lost, b. i. v. *34. 



188 AZ AZ AZ 


A'zel ' A'zi-el(lS) 


Az'ri-kam 


A'zem A-zi'za 


A-zu' bah 


Az-e-phu' rith Az' ma-veth ! A' zur 


A'zer Az'mon Az'u-ran 


A-ze' tas Aa' noth Ta' bor Az' y-mites 


Az'gad 'A'zor Az'zah 


A-zi' a (15) A-zo' tus Az' zan 


A-zi'e-i Az'ri-el(13) Az'zur 


BA BA BA 


JL>AAL, or Bel 


Ba' a-ra 


Bal-tha'sar (11) 


Ba'al-ah 


Ba' a-sha (9) 


Ba' mah 


Ba' al-ath 


Ba ; a-shah 


Ba' moth 


Ba'al-ath Be' er 


Ba-a-si'ah(15) 


Ba' moth Ba' al 


Ba'al Be' rith 


Ba'bel 


Ban 


Ba' al-le 


Ba'bi(3) 


Ba'ni(3) 


Ba'alGad' 


Bab'y-lon 


Ba'nid 


Ba'al Ham' on 


Ba'ca 


Ban-a-i'as (15) 


Ba'al Han' an 


Bach' rites (8) 


Ban' nus 


Ba'al Ha' zor 


Bac-chu' rus 


Ban' u-as 


Ba'al Her'non 


Bach' uth AY Ion 


Ba-rab' bas 


Ba'al-i (3) 


Ba-go' as 


Bar' a-chel (6) 


Ba'al-im. Milton. 


Bag'o-i(3)(5) 


Bar-a-chi'ah (15) 


Ba'al-is 


Ba-ha' rum-ite (8) 


Bar-a-chi' as 


Ba'al Me' on 


Ba-hu' rim 


Ba'rak 


Ba'alPe'or 


Ba'jith 


Bar-ce' nor 


Ba'al Per'a-aim 


Bak-bak' er 


Bar' go 


Ba'al Shal'i-sha 


Bak' buk 


Bar-hu' mites (8) 


Ba'al Ta'mar 


Bak-buk-i'ah(15) 


Ba-ri'ah(15) 


Ba'alZe'bub 


Ba la-am (16) 


Bar-je' sus 


Ba'al Ze'phon 


*Ba'lam 


Bar-jo' na 


Ba'a-na 


Bal'a-dan 


Bar'kos 


Ba'a-uah 


Ba' lah (9) 


Bar' na-bas 


Ba' a-nan 


Ba'lak 


Ba-ro' dis 


Ba' a-nath 


Bal' a-mo Bar' sa-bas 


Ba-a-ni'as(15) 


Bal'a-nus Bar' ta-cus 



See Canaan, Aaron, and Israel. 



BE BE 


Bar-thol' o-raew 


Be-er' she-ba 


Bar-ti-me' us 


Be-esh' te-rah 


Ba'ruch(6) 


Be' he-moth 


Bar-zil' la-i (5) 


Be' kah (9) 


Bas' ca-ma 


Be' la 


Ba'shan, or 


Be' lah 


Bas' san 


Be' la-ites (8) 


Ba' shan Ha' voth 


Bel' e-mus 


Fa'ir 


Bel'ga-i(5) 


Bash' e-math 


Be'li-al(lS) 


Bas'lith 


Bel'ma-im(l6) 


Bas' math 


Bel' men 


Bas' sa 


Bel-shaz' zer 


Bas'ta-i(5) 


Bel-te-shaz' zar 


Bat' a-ne 


Ben 


Bath 


Ben-ai'ah(5) 


Bath' a-loth 


Ben-am' mi (3) 


Bath-rab' bim 


Ben-eb' e-rak 


Bath' she-ba 


Ben-e-ja' a-kam 


Bath'shu-a(lS) 


Ben' ha- dad 


Bav' a-i (5) 


Ben-ha' il 


Be-a-li'ah (15) 


Ben-ha' nan 


Be' a-loth 


Ben' ja-min 


Be' an 


Ben' ja-mite (8) 


Beb' a-i (5) 


Ben'ja-mites 


Be' cher 


Ben' i-nu 


Be' her (6) 


Ben-u'i(3)(14) 


Bech-o' rath 


Be' no 


Bech' ti-leth 


Be-no' ui (3) 


Be' dad 


Ben-zo' heth 


Bed-a-i'ah(15) 


Be' on 


Be-el-i' a-da 


Be' or 


Be-el' sa-rus 


Be' ra 


Be-el-teth' mus 


Ber'a-chah(6)(9) 


Be-el' ze-bub 


Ber-a-chi'ah (15) 


Be'er 


Ber-a-i'ah (15) 


Be-e'ra 


Be-re' a 


Be-e' rah, or Be' rah 


Be' red 


Be-er-e' lira 


Be'ri(3) 


Be-e' ri (S) 


Be-ri'ah(15) 


Be-er-la-ha' i-roi 


Be' rites (8) 


Be-e' roth 


Be'rith 


Be-e' roth-ites (8) 


Ber-ni'ce 



BE 



189 



Be-ro' dach Bal' a- 

dan 

Be' roth 
Ber'o-thai(5) 
Be-ro' thath 
Ber'yl 
Ber-ze' lus 
Be' zai (5) 

Bes-o-dei'ah(9)(15) 
Be' sor 
Be' tah 
Be' ten 
Beth-ab' a-ra 
Beth-ab' a-rah (9) 
Beth' a-nath 
Beth' a-noth 
Beth' a-ny 
Beth' a-ne 
Beth-ar' a-bah (9) 
Beth' a-rani 
Beth-ar' bel 
Beth-a' ven 
Beth-az' ma-veth 
Beth-ba-al-me' on 
Beth-ba' ra 
Beth-ba' rah (9) 
Beth' ba-si (3) 
Beth-bir' e-i (3) 
Beth' car 
Beth-da' gon 
Beth-dib-la-tha' im 
Beth' el 
Beth' el-ite 
Beth-e' mek 
Be' ther 
Beth-es' da 
Beth-e' zel 
Beth-ga' der 
Beth-ga' mul 
Bcth-hac' ce-rim (7) 
Belli-hak' ser~im 
Beth-ha' ran 
Beth-hog 7 lah (9) 



190 BE 


Bl 


BU 


Beth-ho' ron 


Beth-su'ra (14) 


Bin'nu-i (3) (14) 


Beth-jes' i-moth 


Be-thu' el (14) 


Bir'sha 


Beth-leb'a-oth 


Be'thul 


Bir' za-vith 


Beth' le-hem 


Beth-u-li'a(5) 


Bish'lam 


Beth' le-hem Eph' 


Beth' zor 


Bi-thi'ah(la) 


ra-tah 


Beth' zur 


Bith' ron 


Beth' le-hem Ju'dah 


Be-to' li-us 


Biz-i-jo-thi'ah(5) 


Beth' le-hem-ite (8) 


Bet-o-mes' tham 


Biz-i-jo-thi'jah 


Beth-lo' mon 


Bet' o-nim 


Biz' tha 


Beth-ma' a-cah (9) 


Be-u'lah 


Blas'tus 


Beth-mat' ca- both 


Be' zai (5) 


Bo-a-ner'ges 


Beth- me' on 


Be-zal'e-el 


Bo' az, or Bo' oz 


Beth-nim'rah (9) 


Be'zek 


Boc' cas 


Beth-o' ron 


Be' zer, or Boz' ra 


Boch' e-ru (6) 


Beth-pa' let 


Be' zeth 


Bo'chim(6) 


Beth-paz' zer 


Bi' a-tas 


Bo' han 


Beth-pe' or 


Bich'ri(3)(6) 


Bos'cath 


*Beth'pha-ge (12) 


Bid'kar 


Bo' sor 


Beth' fa-je (\Q) 


Big' tha 


Bos' o-ra 


Beth' phe-let 


Big' than 


Bos' rah (9) 


Beth' ra-bah (9) 


Big' tha-na 


Bo' zez 


Beth' ra-pha (9) 


Big' va-i (5) 


Boz' rah 


Beth' re-hob 


Bil' dad 


Brig' an-dine 


Beth-sa' i-da (9) 


Bil'e-am 


Buk'ki(3)' 


Beth' sa-mos 


Bil'gah (9) 


Buk-ki'ah (15) 


Beth' shan 


Bil'ga-i(5) 


Bui, rhymes dull 


Beth-she' an 


Bil' ha, or Bil' hah 


Bu' nali 


Beth' she-mesh 


Bil' ban 


Bun' ni (3) 


Beth-shit' tah (9) 


Bil' shan 


Buz 


Beth' si-mos 


Bim' hal 


Bu'zi(3) 


Beth-tap' pu-a 


Bin' e-a (9) 


Buz' ite (8) 



* Bethphage. This word is generally pronounced by the illiterate in two 
syllables, and without the second A, as if written Beth' page. 



CA 



CA 



CH 



CAU 


*Ca' na-an 


Car' mel-ite (8) 


Cab' bon 


Ca' na-an-ites (8) 


Car' mel-i-tess 


Cab' ham 


Can' nan-ites 


Car' mi (3) 


Ca'bul.- See Bui. 


Can' neh (9) 


Car' mites (3) 


Cad'dis 


Can' nee 


Car'na-im (15) 


Ca'des 


Can' veh (9) 


Car' ni-on 


Ca' desh 


Can' vee 


Car' pus 


Cai'a-phas(5) 


fCa-per' na-um (16) 


Car-she' na 


Cain 


Caph-ar-sal' a- ma 


Ca-siph' i-a 


Ca-i' nan 


Ca-phen' a-tha (9) 


CasMeu 


Cai' rites (8) 


Ca-phi' ra (9) 


Cas' lu-bim 


Ca'lah 


Caph' tor 


Cas' phor 


Cal' a-mus 


Caph' to-rim 


Cas' pis, or 


Cal' col 


Caph' to-rims 


Cas' phin 


Cal-dees' 


Cap-pa-do' ci-a 


Ca-thu'ath (IS) 


Ca'leb 


Cap-pa-do' she-a 


Ce' dron (7) 


Ca'lebEph'ra-tah 


Car-a-ba' si- on 


Cei'lan 


Cal'i-tas 


Car-a-ba' ze-on 


Ce-le-mi'a(9) 


Cal-a-rnol'a-lus 


Car 7 cha-mis (6) 


Cen' cre-a (6) 


Cai'neth 


Car'che-mish (6) 


Cen-de-be' us 


Cal' no 


Ca-re' ah (9) 


Cen-tu' ri-on 


Cal' phi (3) 


Ca'ri-a 


Ce'phas 


Cal r va-ry 


Car'kas 


Ce'ras 


Cat' va-re 


Car-ma' ni-ans 


Ce'teb 


Ca' mon 


Car' me 


Cha'bris(6) 


Ca'na 


Car'mel 


Cha'di-as 



* Canaan. This word is not unfrequently pronounced in three syllables, with 
the accent on the second. But Milton, who in his Paradise Lost has intro- 
duced this word six times, has constantly made it two syllables, with the accent 
on the first. This is perfectly agreeable to the syllabication and accentuation 
of Isaac and Balaam, which are always heard in two syllables. This suppres- 
sion of a syllable in the latter part of these words arises from the absence of 
accent : an accent on the second syllable would prevent the hiatus arising from 
the two vowels, as it does in Baal and Baalim, which are always heard in two 
and three syllables respectively. See Adonai. 

f Capernaum. This word is often, but improperly, pronounced with the ac- 
cent on the penultimate. 



192 CH CI CY 


Chae're-as Cher'u-bim 


Clau'da 


Chal' ce-do-ny Cries' a-lon 


Cle-a' sa 


Chal' col Che'sed 


Clem'ent 


Chal-de' a 


Che'sii 


Cle' o-phas 


Cha'nes 


Che' sud 


X^lo'e 


Chan-nu-ne' us 


Che-sul' loth 


Cni' dus 


Char-a-ath' a-lar 


Chet' tim 


Ni'dus 


Char'a-ca Che'zib 


Col-ho'zeh (9) 


Char' a-sim Chi' don 


Col'li-us 


Char'cus Chil'le-ab 


Co-los' se 


Cha're-a Chi-li' on 


Co-los' si-ans 


Char' mis 


Chil' mad 


Co-Iosh f e-ans 


Char' ran 


Chin/ ham 


Co-ni'ah (15) 


Chas'e-ba(lS) 


Chis'leu, Cas'leu, 


Con-o-ni'ah 


Che' bar (6) 


or Cis' leu 


Cor 


Ched-er-la' o-mer 


Chis' Ion 


Cor' be 


Che'lal 


Chis'lothTa'bor 


Cor' ban 


Chel'ci-as 


Chit' tim 


Co' re 


Kel' she-as 


Chi'un 


Cor'inth 


Chel' lub 


Chlo'e 


Co-rin' thi-ans 


Che'lod 


Cho'ba 


Co' sam 


Che' lub 


Cho-ra'sin, or 


Cou' tha 


Chel'li-ans 


Cho-ra' shan, or 


Coz 


Chel'lus 


Cho-ra'zin 


Coz' bi (3) 


Che-lu' bai (5) 


Chos-a-me' us 


Cres' cens 


Che-lu' bar 


Cho-ze' ba 


Crete 


Chem' a-rims 


CHRIST 


Cre'tans 


Che' mosh 


Chub (6) 


Cretes 


Che-na' a-nah (9) 


Kub 


Cre'ti-ans 


Chen'a-ni (3) 


Chun 


Cre' sh e-ans 


Chen-a-ni'ah (15) 


Chu' sa, or Chu' za 


Cu' bit 


Che'phar Ha-am' 


Chush' an Rish-a- 


Cush 


mo-nai (5) 


tha'im (15) 


Cu' shan 


Cheph-i'rah(6)(9) 


Chu' si 


Cu'shan Rish- 


Che' ran 


Cin' ner-eth, or 


tha'im (15) 


Che' re- as 


Cin' ner-oth 


Cu'shi (3) 


Chei' eth-ims 


Ch'a-ma Cuth, or Cuth'als 


Cher' eth-ites (8) 


Ci' sai (5) Cu' the-ans 


Che'rith, or 


Cis'leu C/a-mon 


Che' risli 


Cith'e-rus |Cy-re'ne 


Cher' ub (6) 


Cit' tims Cy-re' ni-us 



( 193 ) 



DA 



DI 



DU 



DAB' A-REH (9) 


Da'vid 


Dil'e-an 


Dab' ba-sheth 


De'bir 


Dim' nah 


Dab'e-rath 


*Deb'o-rah 


D/mon 


Da' bi i-a 


De-cap' o-lis 


Di-mo'nah (Q) 


Da-co' bi (3) 


De'dan 


Di'nal>(9) 


Dad-de' us 


Ded' a-nim 


Di'na-ites(8) 


Da' gon 


Ded' a-nims 


Din' ha-bah (9) 


Dai' san (5) 


De-ha'vites (8) 


Di-ot' re-phes 


Dal-a-i' ah (5) 


De'kar 


Di'shan 


Dal'i-lah 


Del-a-i'ah (5) 


Di'shon 


Dal-ma-nu' tha 


Del'i-lah 


Diz'a-hab 


Dal' phon 


De' mas 


Do'cus 


Dam' a-ris 


Der'be 


Dod'a-i(5) 


Dam-a-scenes' 


Des' sau 


Dod' a-nim 


Dan 


De-u'el(17) 


Dod'a-vah(9) 


Dan'ites(S) 


Deu-ter-on' o-my 


Do' do 


Dan-ja' an 


Dib'la-im(l6) 


Do' eg 


Dan'i-el(lS) 


Dib'iath 


Doph' kah (9) 


Dan' nah 


Di' bon 


Dor 


Dan' o-brath 


Di' bon Gad 


Do'ra 


Da'ra 


Dib' ri (3) 


Dor' cas 


Dar'da 


Dib'za-hab, or 


Do-rym' e-nes 


Da' ri-an 


Diz'a-hab 


Do-sith'e-us 


Dar' kon 


Di' drachm 


Do'tha-im, or 


Da' than 


Di' dram 


Do' than (16) 


Dath' e-mah, or 


Did' y-mus (6) 


Du' mah (9) 


Dath' mah 


Dik'lah, orDil'dah 


Du'ra 



* Deborah. The learned editor of Labbe tells us, that this word has the pe- 
nnltimate long, both in the Greek and Hebrew ; and yet he observes, that our 
clergy, when reading the Holy Scriptures to the people in English, always pro- 
nounce it with the accent on the first syllable ; " and why not," says he, " when 
they place the accent on the first syllable of orator, auditor, and successor?" 
" But," continues he, " I suppose they accent them otherwise, when they speak 
Latin," Who doubts it ? 



( 194 ) 



EL 



EL 



EL 



E'A-NAS 


E'lath 


El-i-hob'na-i(5) 


E'bal 


El-beth'el 


El-i-ho'reph 


E'bed 


El'ci-a 


E-li'hu 


E-bed'me-lech 


El' she- a 


E-li' as (15) 


Eb-en-e' zer 


El'da-ah 


E-li'jab (9) 


E'ber 


El' dad 


El'i-ka 


E-bi' a-sapli 


E'le-ad 


E'lim 


E-bro' nah 


E-le-a'leh(9) 


E-lim'e-lech (6) 


E-ca' nus 


E-le-a' le. Milton. 


E-li-oe'na-i(5) 


Ec-bat' a-na 


E-le'a-sah(9) 


E-li-o' nas 


Ec-cle-si-as' tes 


E-le-a' zer 


El'i-phal 


Ec-cle-si-as' ti-cus 


E-le-a-zu' rus 


E-liph'a-leh(9) 


Ed 


El-el-o'hels'ra-el 


El'i-phaz 


E'dar 


E-leu' the-rus 


E-liph'e-let 


E'den 


El-eu-za'i (3) (5) 


E-lis'a-beth 


E'der 


El -ha' nan 


El-i-sae'us 


E'des 


E'li(3) 


E-li'sha(9) 


E'di-as 


E-li'ab 


E-li' shah 


Ed'na 


E-li'a-da 


E-lish' a-ma 


E'dom 


E-li'a-dah 


E-lrsh' a-mah 


E' dom-ites (8) 


E-li' a-dun 


E-lisli' a-phat 


Ed' re-i (3) 


E-li'ah(9) 


E-lish' e-ba 


Eg'lah 


E-li' ah-ba (9) i El-i-shu' a ( 1 3) 


Eg'la-im(l6) 


E-li'a-kim 


E-lis'i-mus 


Eg'lon 


E-li'a-li(3) 


E-li'u 


E'gypt 


E-li'am 


E-li' ud 


E'hi (3) 


E-li' as (15) 


E-liz' a-phan 


E'hud 


E-li' a-saph 


El-i-se' us 


E'ker 


E-h'a-shib 


E-li' zur 


Ek're-bel 


E-li'a-sis 


El'ka-nah 


Ek'ron 


E-li'a-tha, or 


El'ko-shite(a) 


Ek'ron-ites(8) 


E-li'a-thah 


El'la-sar 


E'la 


E-li-a'zar 


El' mo-dam 


El'a-dah 


E-li' dad 


El' na-am 


EMah 


E'li-el(13) 


El' na-thau 


E'lam 


E-li-e'na-i (5) 


E'lon 


E'lam-ites(S) 


E-li-e'zer 


E'lon-ites(8) 


El' a-sah (9) 


E-li'ha-ba 


E'lon Beth' ha-ivan 



EN ES EZ 195 


E'loth 


Ei/ she-mesh 


Esh' ka-lon 


El' pa-al 


En-lap' pu-ah (9) 


Esh'ta-ol 


El' pa-let 


Ep' a-phras 


E^/tau-lites (8) 


El-pa' ran 


E-paph-rodi' tus 


Esh-U>m' o-a 


El'te-keh (9) 


E-pen'e-tus Esl/te-moth 


El'te-keth 


E' phah Esh' ton 


El' te-kon 


E' phai (5) 


Es' li (3) 


El'to-lad 


E'pher 


Es-ma-chi'ah (15) 


E'lul 


E' phes-dam' min 


E-so' ra 


E lu'za-i (5) 


Eph'lal 


Es' ril 


El-y-ma'is 


E'phod 


Es' rom 


El'y-mas 


E' phor 


Es-seties' (8) 


El' za-bad 


Eph' pha-tha 


Est' ha-ul 


El'za-phan 


E'phra-im (16) 


Es' ther 


Em-al-cu'el (I?) 


E'phra-im-ites (8) 


Es' ter 


E-mar/u-el (1?) 


Epl/ra-tah 


E' tarn 


E' minis 


Epl/raih 


E' tham 


* En/ ma-us 


Epl/ rath-ites (8) 


E' than 


Em' mer 


E' phron 


Ell/ a-nim 


E'mor 


Er 


Eth' ba-al 


E' nam 


E'ran 


E' ther 


E' nan 


E' ran-ites (8) 


Eth' ma 


Ei/ dor 


E-ras' tus 


Eth' nan 


En-eg-la'im(l6) 


E'rech (6) 


Eth'ni(S) 


En-e-mes' sar 


E'riCS) 


Eu-as' i-bus 


E-ne' ni-as 


E'sa 


Eu-bu'lus 


En-gai/nim 


E-sa'i-as(5) 


Eve 


En'ge-di(7) 


E' sar-had' don 


E' vi (3) 


En-had' dah (9) 


E'sau 


E'vil mer-o'dach 


En-hak'ko-re 


Es'dras 


Eu' na-ihan 


En-ha' zor 


Es-dre'lon (13) 


Eu-n/ ce 


En-misl/pat 


Es'e-bon 


Eu-o' di-as 


E' noch (6) 


E-se'bri-as 


Eu-pol'e-tnus 


E'nock 


E'sek 


Eu-roc' ly-don 


E'non 


Esh'ba-al 


Eu' ty-chus 


E'nos 


Esh' ban 


Ex'o-dus 


E' nosh 


Esh' col 


E'zar 


En-rim' mon 


E' she-an 


Ez'ba-i(3)(5) 


En-ro'get (13) 


E'shek 


Ez' bon 



* Emmuus. This word is very improperly pronounced in two syllables, as if 
divided into Em' maus. 



O 2 



196 EZ EZ EZ 


Ez-e-chi' as 


Ez-e-ri'as(15) 


Ez'ra-hite(8) 


Ez-e-ki'as 


E-zi'as(15) 


Ez'ri(3) 


E-ze'ki-el(lS) 


E-zi'on Ge'fbar, or 


Ez'ri-el(13) 


E'zel 


E' zi-on-ge' ber 


Ez'ril 


E'zem 


Ez'nite(8) 


Ez' ron, or Hez' ron 


E'zer 


Ez'ra 


Ez'ron-ites(8) 


GA GE GE 


G A' A L Gam' ma-dims 


Ge'der 


Ga'ash 


Ga' mul 


Ge-de'rah (14) 


Ga'ba 


Gar 


Ged'e-rite(8) 


Gab'a-el(lS) 


Ga'reb 


Ge-de'roth(13) 


Gab'a-tha 


Gar' i-zim 


Ged-e-roth-a'im(l6) 


Gab'bai(o) 


Gar' mites (8) 


Ge'dir 


Gab' ba-tha 


Gash' mu 


Ge'dor 


Ga' bri-as 


Ga' tarn 


Ge-ha'zi(7)(13) 


Ga'bri-el(13) 


Gath 


Gel'i-loth 


Gad 


Gath He' pher 


Ge-mal' li (3) 


Gad'a-ra 


Gath Rim'mon 


Gem-a-ri'ah(l5) 


Gad-a-renes' (8) 


Gau' Ian 


Ge-ne'zar(lS) 


Gad'des 


Gau'lon 


Ge-nes'a-reth (7) 


Gad'di-el(lS) 


Ga'za 


Gen' e-sis 


Ga'di(3) 


Gaz' a-bar 


Jen' e-sis 


Gad' ites (8) 


Ga-za'ra 


Gen-ne' us 


Ga' ham 


Ga'zath-ites (8) 


Gen-u'bath 


Ga' bar 


Ga'zer 


Gen' tiles (8) 


Ga' i-us 


Ga-ze'ra(lS) 


Jen' tiles 


Ga'yus 


Ga' zez 


Ge'on 


Gal'a-dad 


Gaz' ites (8) 


Ge'ra 


Ga'lal 


Gaz'zam 


Ge' rah (9) 


Gal'e-ed 


Ge'ba (7) 


Ge'rar 


Gal'ga-la 


Ge'bal 


Ger'a-sa(9) 


Gal'i-lee 


Ge' bar 


Ger'ga-shi (3) 


Gal' lira 


Ge'ber 


Ger'ga-shites(8) 


Gal'li-o 


Ge' bim 


Ger-ge-senes' (8) 


Gam'a-el(l.S) 


Ged-a-li'ah(15) 


Ger'i-zim(7) 


Ga-ma'li-el(l3) 


Ged'dur 


Ger'rin-i-ans 



GI GI GLJ 19 


Ger-rae' ans 


Gid'del 


Glede 


Ger' shorn 


Gid'e-on(7) 


Gni'dus 


Ger'shon 


Gid-e-o' ni (3) 


Ni'dus 


Gei'shon-ites (8) 


Gi'dom 


Go'ath 


Ger' shur 


Gi'er Ea'gle 


Gob 


Ge'sem 


jy er Eagle 


Gog 


Ge' shan 


Gi'hon 


Go' Ian 


Ge'shem 


Gil'a-lai(5) 


Gol'go-tba 


Ge' shur 


Gil'bo-a 


Go-li'ah (9) 


Gesh" U-T! (3) 


Gil'e-ad 


Go-li'ath 


Gesh' u-rites (8) 


Gil'e-ad-ite(S) 


Go' mer 


Ge'thur 


Gil' gal (7) 


Go-mor'rah 


Geth-o-li'as(15) 


Gi'loh(9) 


Go'pher-\vood 


Gelh-sem'a-ne 


Gi'lo-nite(8) 


Gor' gi-as 


Ge-u'el(17) 


Gim' zo 


Gor'je-as 


Ge'zer 


Gi'nath 


Gor' ty-na 


Ge'zer-ites (8) 


Gin' ne-tho 


Go'shen 


Gi'ah 


Gin' ne-thon 


Go-thon'i-el(lS) 


Gib' bar 


Gir' ga-shi (3) 


Go' zan 


Gib' be-thon 


Gir'ga-shiles (8) 


Gra'ba 


Gib' e-a (9) 


Gis'pa(9) 


Gre'ci-a(9) 


Gib'e-ah(9) 


Gil' tab He'pber 


Ore' she-a 


Gib'e-ath 


Git'ta-im (15) 


Gud'go-dah 


Gib' e-on 


Git' tite 


Gu'ni(3) 


Gib'e-on-ites (8) 


Git' lites (8) 


Gu'nites(S) 


Gib'lites(S) 


Git'tith 


Gur 


Gid-dal'ti(3) 


Gi'zo-nite(8) 


Gur-ba'al 



HA 

HA-A-HASH'TA-RI 

Ha-bai'ah(5) 

Hab'a-kuk 

Hab-a-zi-ni'ah(15) 

Ha-ber' ge-on 

Ha'bor 

Hach-a-li'ah(15) 

Hach'i-lah 



HA 

Hach' mo-ni (3) 
Hach'mo-nite (8) 
Ha' da 
Ha' dad 
Had-ad-e' zer 
Ha' dad Rim'mon 
Ha'dar 
Had'a-sbah 



HA 



Ha-das'sa(9) 
Ha-das' sah 
Ha-dat' tab (9) 
Ha' did 
Had'la-i(5) 
Ha-do' ram 
Ha'drach(6) 
Ha' gab 



]<J8 HA 

Hag'a-bah (9) 

Hag'a-i(5) 

Ha' gar 

Ha-gar-enes' (8) 

Ha'gar-ites (8) 

Hag'ga-ri(5) 

Hag'ge-ri (3) 

Hag'gi(3) 

Hag-i'ah(l5) 

Hag'gites(8) 

Hag'gith 

Ha' i (5) 

Hak'ka-tan 

Hak' koz 

Ha-ku / pba(13) 

Ha'lah (9) 

Ha' lac 

Hal'lul 

Ha'Ji(3) 

Hal-le-lu'jah 

Hal-le-lvf yah 

Hal-lo'esh 

Ham 

Ha' man 

Ha' math, or 

He' math 
Ha' math-ite (8) 
Ha' math Zo' bah 
Ham' math 
Ham-med'a-tha 
Ham' e-lech (6) 
Ham' i-tal 
Ham-mol' e-keth 
Ham'mon 
Harn'o-nah 
Ha'mon Gog 
Ha' mor 
Ha' moth 
Ha' moth Dor 
Ha-mu'el (17) 
Ha'mul 

Ha' mul-ites (8) 
Ha-mu'tal 



HA 

Ha-nam'e-el(13) 

Ha' nan 

Ha-nan'e-el (13) 
; Han'a-ni (3) 

Han-a-ni'ah (15) 
I Ha' nes 
I Han'i-el (13) 
! Han'nah (9) 
I Han' na-tbon 
| Han'ni-el(13) 

Ha'noch 

Ha'noch-ites (8) 

Ha' nun 

Hapb-a-ra'im (15) 
JHa'ra 

Har'a-dah(9) 

Har-a-i'ah(lo) 

Ha' ran 

Ha'ra-rite(S) 

Har-bo' na 

Har-bo' nah 

Ha'reph 

Ha'Velh 

Har x has 

Har'ha-ta(9) 

Har'hur 

Ha' rim 

Ha' riph 

Har'ne-pher 

Ha' rod 

Ha'rod-ite(S) 

Har'o-eh(9) 

Ha 7 ro-rite (8) 

Har' o-sheth 

Har'sha(9) 

Ha' rum 

Ha-ru'maph 

Ha-ru' phite (8) 

Ha'ruz 

Has-a-di'ah(15) 

Has-e-nu'ah (13) 

Hash-a-bi'ah(15) 

Hash-ab'nah(9) 



HE 

Hash-ab-ni'ab (15) 
Hash-bad' a-na (9) 
Ha'shem 
Hash-mo' nah (9) 
Ha'sbum 
Ha-shu'pha (9) 
Has',,,!, 

Has-se-na'ah (9) 
Ha-su' pha (9) 
Ha' tach Cl) 
Ha' tack 
Ha'thath 
Hal' i-ta 
Hat' til 
Hat-ti' pha 
Hat' tush 
Hav 7 i-lah (9) 
Ha'voth Ja'ir 
Han' ran 
Haz'a-el (13) 
Ha-zai'ah (5) 
Ha'zar Ad'dar 
Ha'zar E'nan 
Ha'zar Gad'dah 
Ha'zar Hat'ti-con 
Ha'zar Ma' veth 
Ha-za'roth 
Ha'zar Shu' el 
Ha'zar Su'sah 
Ha'zar Su'sim 
Ha'zel El-po'ni(3) 
Ha-ze'rim 
Ha-ze'rolh 
Ha'zer Shu' sim 
Haz' e-zon Ta' mar 
Ha'zi-el (13) 
Ha'zo 
Ha'zor 

Haz'u-bah (9) 
He'ber 

He'ber-ites (8) 
He' brews 
He'bron 



HE HO HU 199 


He' bron-ites (8) 


He-ro' di-as 


Ho' dish 


Heg'a-i(5) 


He-ro' di-an 


Ho-de'va(9) 


He'ge (7) 


He'seb 


Ho-de' vah (y) 


He' lah (9) 


He'sed 


Ho-di'ah(15) 


He'larn 
He! 7 bah (9) 


Hesh' bon 
Hesh'mon 


Ho-di'jah (16) 
Hog' lah 


Hel'bon 


Heth 


Ho' ham 


Hel-chi'ah (15) 


Heth'lon 


Ho' len 


Hel'da-i(o) 


Hez'e-ki (3) 


Hol-o-fer' nes 


He'leb 


Hez-e-ki'ah(l5) 


Ho' Ion 


He' led 


He'zer, or He'zir 


Ho' man, or 


He'lek 


He-zi'a 


He' man 


He'lek-kes(8) 


He'zi-on 


Ho' mer 


He'lem 


Hez'ra-i(15) 


Hoph' ni (3) 


He'leph 


Hez'ro 


Hoph' rah 


He'lez 


Hez' ron 


Hor 


He'li (3) 


Hez'ron-ites(8) 


Ho' ram 


Hel'ka-i(o) 


Hid' da-i (5) 


Ho'reb 


Hel'kath 


Hid'de-kel 


Ho'rem 


Hel'kathHaz'zu- 


Hi' el 


Hor-a-gid' dad 


rim 


Hi-er'e-el(l3) 


Ho' ri (3) 


Hel-ki'as(15) 


Hi-er'e-moth 


Ho' rims 


He' Ion 


Hi-er-i-e'lus 


Ho' rites (8) 


He' man 


Hi-er' mas 


Hor' mah 


He' math, or 


Hi-er-on'y-mus 


Hor-o-na'im (15) 


Ha' math 


Hig-gai' on (5) 


Hor' o-nites (8) 


Hem' dan 


Hi'len 


Ho ; sa, or Has' ah 


Hen 


Hil-ki'ah(15) 


Ho-san' na 


He'na(9) 


HilMel 


Ho-se' a (9) 


Hen' a-dad 


Hin 


Ho-zef a 


He'noch(6) 


Hin'nom 


Hosh-a-i'ah(15 


He'pher 


Hi' rah 


Hosh' a- ma 


He'pher-ites(S) 


Hi' ram 


Ho-she'a (8) 


Heph' zi-bah (9) 


Hir-ca'nus 


Ho' tham 


He' ram 


His-ki'jah(l5) 


Ho' than 


He' res 


Hit' tites (8) 


Ho'thir 


He'resh 


Hi' vites (8) 


Huk'kock 


Her' mas 


Ho' ba, or 


Hul 


Her-mog' e-nes 


Ho' bah 


Hul'dah(9) 


Her' mon 


Ho'bab 


Hum'tah 


Her' mon-ites (8) 


Hod 


Hu'pham 


Her'od 


Hod-a-i'ah(15) 


Hu' pham-ites (8) 


He-ro' di-ans 


Hod-a-vi'ah(lo) 


Hup' pah 



200 HU 


HU HY 


Hup' pirn 


Hu'shai(5) 


Huz 


Hur 


Hu' sham 


Hu'zoth 


Hu'iai (5) 


Hu'shath-ite(8) 


Huz'zab 


Hu'ram 
Hu'ri(3) 
Hu'shah (9) 


Hu'shim 
Hu'shub 
Hu' shu-bah (9) 


Hy-das' pes 
Hy-e'na(9) 
Hy-men-e'us 



JA 



JA 



JA 



JA' A-KAN 


Jad-du' a (9) 


Ja'keh (9) 


Ja-ak' o-bah (9) 


Ja' don 


Ja'kim 


Ja-a' la 


Ja'el 


Jak' kirn 


Ja-a'lah (9) 


Ja'gur 


Ja'lon 


Ja-a' lam 


Jah 


Jam' bres 


Ja' a-nai (5) 


Ja-ha'le-el(13) 


Jam'bri (3) 


Ja-ar-e-or' a-gim 


Ja-hal'e-lel (13) 


James 


Ja-as-a-ni'a 


Ja' hath 


Ja' min 


Ja'a-sau 


Ja' haz 


Ja'min-ites (8) 


Ja-a' si-el (13) 


Ja-ha' za 


Jam' lech (6) 


Ja-a'zah (9) 


Ja-ha'zah (9) 


Jam'na-au 


Ja-az-a-ni' ah (15) 


Ja ha-zi'ah (15) | Jam'ni-a (9) 


Ja-a' zar 


Ja ha'zi-el (13) 


Jam'nites (8) 


Ja-a-zi'ah (15) 


Jah'da-i (5) 


Jan' na (9) 


Ja-a'zi-el (13) 


Jah'di-el(13) 


Jan' nes 


Ja'bal 


Jah' do 


Ja-no'ah (9) 


Jab' bok 


Jah'le-el 


Ja-no'hah (9) 


Ja'besh 


Jah'le-el-ites(S) 


Ja'num 


Ja'bez 


Jah'ma-i(5) 


Ja'phet 


Ja' bin 


Jah'zah (9) 


Ja'pheth 


Jab'ne-el(13) 


Jah'ze-el(13) 


Ja-phi'ah (15) 


Jab'ueh(9) 


Jah'zi-el(13) 


Japh'Jet 


Ja'chan 


Jah' ze-el-ites (8) 


Japh'le-ti(3) 


Ja' chin 


Jah'ze-rah (9) 


Ja' pho 


Ja' chin-ites (8) 


Ja'ir 


Jar 


Ja' cob 


Ja'ir-ites (8) 


Ja'rah (9) 


Ja-cu'bus(13) 


Ja' i-rus Ja' e-rus 


Ja'reb 


Ja'da Ja'kan 


Ja'red 



JE 

Jar-e-si'ah (15) 

Jar' ha (9) 

Ja' rib 

Jar'nmth 

Ja-ro'uh (9) 

Jas'a-el (13) 

Ja' sheni 

Ja' sheii 

Ja'sher 

Ja-sho' be-am 

Jash'ub 

Jash' n-bi Le' hem 

Jash'<rb-ites(8) 

Ja'si-ef (13) 

Ja-M/ bus 

Ja'tal 

Jath'm-el (13) 

Jat' tir 

Ja' van 

Ja' zar 

Ja'zer 

Ja'zi-el (13) 

Ja'ziz 

Ib'har 

Ib'le-am 

Ib-nei' ah (9) 

Ib-m'jah(9) 

Ib'ri(3) 

Ib'zan 

Ich' a-bod 

I-co' ni-um 

Id'a-lan(9) 

Id' bash 

Id' do 

Id x u-el(13) 

Id-u-ma?' a (9) 

Id-u-niae'ans 

Je' a- rim 

Je-ai' e-iai (5) 

Je-be.-e-chi'ah(15) 

Je' bus 

Je-bu'si (3) 

Jcb' u-sites (8) 



JE 

Jec-a-mi'ah (15) 
Jec-oli'ah(15) 
Jec-o-ni'ah (15) 
Je-dui'a(5)(9) 
Je-dai' ah (5) 
Jed-de' us 
Jed' du 
Je-dei'ah(9) 
Je-di'a-el (13) 
Jed'i-ah 
Jed-e-di'ah (15) 
Je'di-el(13) 
Jed' u-tliun 
Je e'li(3) 
Je-e' zer 
Je-e' zer-ites (8) 
Je' gar Sa-ha-du' tha 
Je-ha'le-el (13) 
Je-hal'e-el(l.S) 
Je-ha'zi-iel(13) 
Jeli -del' ah (9) 
Je-hei' el (9) 
Je-hez' e-kel 
Je-hi' ah (9) 
Je-hi'el 
Je-hi'e-li^S) 
Je-hish'a-i (5) 
Je-his-ki'ah (15) 
Je-ho' a-dah 
Je-ho-ad' dan 
Je-ho' a-haz 
Je-ho' ash 
Je-ho' ha-dah (9) 
Je-ho' ha-nan 
Je-hoi'a-chin (6) 
Je-hoi' a-da 
Je-hoi'a-kim 
Je-hoi' a-rib 
Je-hon'a-dab 
Je-bon'a-than 
Je-ho' ram 
Je-ho-shab' e-ath 
Je-hosh'a-phat(lS) 



JE 201 

Je-hosh' e-ba 
Je-hosh' u-a 
JE-HO' VAH 
Je-ho' vah Ji'reth 
Je-ho'vah Nis'si 
Je-ho' vah Shal' lorn 
Je-ho'vah Sham' 

mah 
Je-ho' vah Tsid'ke- 

nu 

Je-hoz'a-bad 
Je' hu 
Je -hub' bah 
Je' hu-cal 
Je'hud 

Je-hu'di(3)(13) 
Je-hu-di'jah(15) 
Je' hush 
Je-i'el 

Je-kab'ze-el(13) 
Jek-a-me' am 
Jek-a-mi'ah(15) 
Je-ku'thi-el (13) 
Jem' i-mah 
Jem-u'el (1?) 
Jeph' thah 
Je-phun' nah 
Je'rah 

Je-rahm'e-el (IS) 
Je-rahm' e-el-ites 
Jer' e-chus (6) 
Je' red 

Jer' e-mai (5) 
Jer-e-mi'ah(15) 
Jer 7 e-moth 
Jer'e-mouth 
Je-ri'ah (15) 
Jer'i-bai(5) 
Jer'i-cho(6) 
Je'ri-el(13) 
Je-ri'jah (15) 
Jer' i-moth 
Je' ri-oth 



202 JE JO JO 


Jer'o-don 


Jez-li'ah (15) 


Jo' bab 


Jer' o-ham 


Jez 7 o-ar 


Joch'e-bed (6) 


Jer-o-bo'am 


Jez-ra-hi'ah (15) 


Jo' da (9) 


Je-rub'ba~al 


Jez' re-el (13) 


Jo' ed 


Je-rub' e-sheth 


Jez' re-el-ite (8) 


Jo' el 


Jer'u-el (1?) 


Jez're-el-i-tess 


Jo-e'lah(9) 


Je-ru' sa-lem 


I' gal Jo-e' zer 


Je-ru' sha (13) 


Ig-da-li'ah(15) Jog'be-ah 


Je-sai'ah (.3) 


Ig-e-ab'a-rim (7) Jog' li 


Jesh-a-i' ah (5) 


Ig'e-alt?) Jo'ba(Q) 


Jesh'a-nah 


Jib'sam Jo-ha'nau 


Jesh-ai' e-lah 


Jid' laph John 


Jesh-eb'e-ab 


Jim Jon 


Jesh-eb'e-ah (9) 


Jim' la, or Im' la Joi' a-da (9) 


Je'sher 


Jim'na, or Jim'nah Joi'a-kim 


Jesh' i-mon 


Jim'nites (8) 


Joi'a-rib 


Je-shish'a-i (5) 


I'jon 


Jok' de-am 


Jesh-o-ha-i' ah (15) 


Jiph'tah 


Jo' kim 


Jesh'u-a(lS) 


Jiph' thah-el 


Jok'me-an 


Jesh' u-run 


Ik' kesh 


Jok' ne-am 


Je-si'ah (15) 


I'lai(5) 


Jok' shan 


Je-sim' i-el 


Im 


Jok' tan 


Jes' se 


Im'lah (9) 


Jok'the-el(lS) 


Jes'u-a(J3) 


Im' mah (9) 


Jo' na (9) 


Jes'u-i(S) 


Im-man'u-el (1?) 


Jon'a-dab 


JE'SUS 


Im'mer 


Jo' nab (9) 


Je'ther 


Im'na, or Im'nah 


Jo' nan 


Je'theth 


im'rah 


Jo'nas 


Jeth' lab 


Im'ri(3) 


Jon' a-than 


Je' thro 


Jo'ab 


Jo'nath E'lim 


Je' tur 


Jo' a-chaz 


Re-cho'chim(6) 


Je'u-el(13) 


Jo-a-da'nus 


Jop' pa 


Je' ush 


Jo' ah 


Jo'ra 


Je'uz 


Jo'a-haz 


Jo'ra-i(5) 


Jew' He 


Jo'a-kim 


Jo' ram 


Jez-a-ni'ah(15) 


Jo-an' na 


Jor' dan 


Jez' a-bel 


Jo-an' nan 


Jor' i-bas 


Je-ze' lus 


Jo' ash 


Jo' rim 


Je'zer 


Jo' a- that u 


Jor'ko-am 


Je'zer-ites(S) 


Jo-a-zab' dus 


Jos' a- bad 


Je-zi'ah(15) 


Job Jos' a-phat 


Je'zi-el(ll) 


Jobe Jos-a-phi' as ( 1 5) 



IR 


IS 


JtJ COS 


Jo'se 


I 'ram 


Ish'tob 


Jos'e-dech(G) 


l'ri(3) 


Ish'u-a(g) 


Jo'se-el(l3) 


I-ri'jah (15) 


Ish' u-ai (5) 


Jo'seph 


Ir' na-hash 


Is-ma-chi'ah (15) 


J o 7 ses 


I'ron 


Is-ma-i'ah (15) 


Josh'a-bad 


Ir'pe-el(13) 


Is' pah 


Jo' shah (9) 


[r-she' mish 


^Is'ra-el 


Josh'a-phat 


I'm 


Is' ra-el-ites (8) 


Josh-a-vi'ah (15) 


I' sa-ac 


Is 7 sa- char 


Josh-bek'a-sha 


I'zak 


Is-tal-cu'rus (13) 


Josh 7 n-a (9) 


I-sai 7 ah (5) 


Is'u-i(3)(IS) 


Jo-si' ah (15) 


Is' cah 


Is 7 u-ites (8) 


Jo-si 7 as 


ls-car 7 i-ot 


Ith'a-i, or It'a-i (5) 


Jos-i-bi'ah (15) 


Is 7 da-el (13) 


It' a-ly 


Jos-i-phi' ah 


lsh'bah(9) 


Ith'a-mar 


Jo-si' ph us (1(2) 


Ish'bak 


Ith'i-el (IS) 


I-o'ta (9) 


Ish'bi Be' nob 


Ith'mah (9) 


Joi'bah(9) 


fsh 7 bo-sheth 


Ith' nan 


Jot' bath 


'shi(3) 


lth'ra(9) 


Jot 7 ba-tha 


shi'ah (15) 


Ith' ran 


Jo' tham 


-shi'jah (15) 


Ith 7 re-am 


Joz' a-bad 


Ish' ma (9) 


Ith 7 rites (S) 


Joz'a-char (6) 


si/ ma-el (13) 


It'tah Ka'zin 


Joz'a-dak 


sh' ma-el-ites (8) 


U'ta-i (5) 


lph-e-dei' ah (15) 


Ish-ma-i'ah (15) 


It-u-re'a(lS) 


Ir 


Ish' me-rai (5) 


I'vah 


1'ra 


1' shod 


Ju'bal 


I'rad 


I si/ pan 


Ju'cal 



* Israel This word is colloquially pronounced in two syllables, and not un- 
frequently heard in the same manner from the pulpit. The tendency of two 
vowels to unite, where there is no accent to keep them distinct, is the cause of 
this corruption, as in Canaan, Isaac, &c. : but as there is a ureater difficulty in 
keeping separate two unaccented vowels of the same kind, so the latter cprrnp- 
tion is more excusable than the former ; and therefore, in my opinion, thii 
word ought always in public pronunciation, especially in reading the Scripture, 
to be heard in three syllables. Milton introduces this word lour times in his 
Paradise Lost, and constantly makes it two syllables only. But those who un- 
derstand English Prosody know that we have a great number of words which 
have two distinct impulses, that go for no more than a single syllable in verse, 
such as heaven, given, &c. : higher and dyer are always considered as dissyllables ; 
and hire and dire, which have exactly the same quantity to the e<ir, but a*. 
monosyllables. Israel, therefore, ought always, in deliberate and solemn speak- 
ing, to be heard in three syllables. Tiie same may be observed of Raphael and 
Michael. 



204 JU IZ IZ 


Ju' dah 


Ju' ni-a 


Iz-ra-hi / ah(15) 


Ju' das 


Ju-shab' he-sed 


Iz'ra-bite 


Jude 


Jus' tus 


Iz-ra-i'ah, or 


Ju-dae' a 


Jut' tab (Q) 


Is-ra-i'ah(9) 


Ju'dith 


Iz'e-har(13) 


Iz' re-el (13) 


Ju'el 


Iz'har 


Iz'ri(3) 


Ju'li-a 


Iz'har-ite(8) 


Iz' rites (8) 


KE KI KU 


KAB 


Ke'nath 


Kir'jath Hu'zoth 


Kab'ze-elOS) 


Ke'naz 


Kir'jath Je' a-rim 


Ka'des 


Ken'ites(8) 


Kir'jath San' nab 


Ka' desh, CM* Ca' desh 


Ken'niz-zites 


Kir'jath Se'pher 


Ka'desh Bar'ne-a 


Ker-en-hap' puch 


Kir' i-otb (4) 


Kad' mi-el (13) 


Ker- en-hap 1 puk 


Kish 


Kad' mon-ites (8) 


Ke' ri-oth 


Kish'i(S) 


Kal'la-i(5) 


Ke' ros 


Kisb' i-on (4) 


Ka'nah (9) 


Ke-tu' ra 


Ki'shon, or 


Ka-re'ah (9) 


Ke-tu' rab (9) 


Ki' son 


Kar' ka-a (9) 


Ke-zi'a(l)(9) 


Kith'lish 


Kai 7 kor 


Ke'ziz 


Kit' ron 


Kar'na-im (16) 


Kib'roth Hat-ta'a- 


Kit' tim 


Kar'tan 


vah 


Ko'a(9) 


Kar'tah(9) 


Kib'za-im(J6) 


Ko'hatb 


Ke 7 dar 


Kid'ron 


Ko' hath-ites 


Ked'e-mah(9) 


Ki'nab(9) 


Kol-a-i'ah(15) 


Ked ; e-moth 


Kir 


Ko'rah (14) 


Ke'desh 


Kir-bar' a-seth 


Ko' rah-ites (8) 


Ke-h^l'a-thahCg) 


Kir'he-resh 


Ko'rath-ites 


Kei'lal^g) 


Kir'i-etb, or 


Kor'hite 


Ke-lai'ah(5) 


Kir'jath 


Kor'hites 


Kel'i-ta 


Kir'jath Ar'ba 


Kor' ites (8) 


Kel'kath-ha-zu'rim 


Kir'jath A'im 


Ko're 


Kem'u-el(13)(l7) 


Kir'jath A' rim 


Koz 


Ke'nah(9) 


Kir'jath A' ri-us 


Kush-ai'ab(5) 


Ke'nan 


Kir'jath Ba'al 





( 205 ) 


LE LO LY 


LiA'A-DAH(9) 

La' a-dan 


Leb-be'us(13) 
Le-bo' nah (9) 


Log 
Lo'is 


La 7 ban 


Le' chah 


Lo Ru' ha-mah 


Lab' a-na (9) 


Le' ha-bim 


Lot 


La' chish 


Le'hi 


Lo' tan 


La-cu'nus (13) 


Lem'u-el (1?) 


Loth-a-su' bus (13) 


La' dan Le' shem 


Lo' zon 


La' el Let' tus 


Lu' bim 


La' had Le-tu'shim 


Lu' bims 


La-hai' roi Le' vi (3) 


Lu' cas 


Lah' man Le-vi'a-than 


Lu' ci-fer 


Lah' mas 


Le'vis 


Lu' ci-us 


Lah' mi (3) 


Le' vites (8) 


Ltid 


La' ish 


Le-vit'i-cus 


Lu' dim 


La'kum 


Le-um'mim 


Lu'hith 


La'mech (6) 


Lib' a-nus 


Luke 


Lap'i-doth Lib'nah (9) 


Luz 


La-se'a(9) Lib'ni (3) 


Lyc-a-o' ni-a 


La' shah Lib'nites (8) 


Lye' ca 


La-sha' ron Lib' y-a (9) 


Lyd'da 


Las' the-nes 


Lig-nal' oes 


Lyd'i-a 


Laz'a-rus 


Li'gure(l) 


Ly-sa'ni-as 


Le'ah(9) 


Lik'hi(3) 


L>;s'i-a(9) 


Leb'a-nah (9) 1 Lo-am'mi (3) 


Lizh' e-a 


Leb' a-non 


Lod 


Lys' i-as 


Leb'a-oth 


Lod' e-bar 


Lys' tra 



MA 

MA'A-CAH (9) 
Ma'a-chah (6) 
Ma-ach'a-thi(3) 
Ma-ach' a-thites (8) 
Ma-ad' ai (5) 
Ma-a-di'ah(15) 



MA 

Ma-a'i(5) 
Ma-al'ehA-crab' 

bim 

Ma'a-nai(5) 
Ma' a-rath 
Ma-a-sei' ah (9) 



MA 

Ma-a-si'ah(15) 

Ma'ath 

Ma'az 

Mu-a-zi'ah(15) 

Mab'da-i(5) ' 

Mac'a-lon 



206 



MA 



Mac' ca-bees 
Mac-ca-bae' us 
Mach' be-nah 
Mach'be-nai (5) 
Mach-he'loth 
Ma'chi(3)(6) 
Ma'chir 
Ma'chir-ites(8) 
Mach' rnas 
Mach-na-de'bai (5) 
Mach-pe'lah (6) 
Ma' cron 
Mad' a-i (5) 
Ma-di'a-bun 
Ma-di'ah (lo) 
Ma'di-an 
Mad-mau'nah 
Ma' don 
Ma-e'lus (13) 
Mag' bi.sk 
Mag' da-la (9) 
Mag' da-leu 
Mag-da-le 7 ue 
Mag'di-el(13) 
Ma' gog 

Ma' gar Mis'sa-bib 
Mag' pi-ash (4) 
Ma'ha-lah (Q) 
Ma' ha-lalh 

Le-an' noth 
Ma' ha-lath 

Mat/chil (6) 
Ma-ha'le-el (13) 
Ma'ha-li(.S) 
Ma-ha-na'im (16) 
Ma'ha-neh Dau 
Ma'ha-nem 
Ma-bar 7 a-i (5) - 
Ma' nath 
Ma' ha-vites (8) 
Ma'haz 
Ma-ha' zi-olh 



MA 

Ma'her-shal'al- 

hash' baz 
Mah'lah 
Mah'li (3) 
Mah'lites(S) 
Mah' Ion 
Mai-an' e-as 
Ma' kas 
Ma'ked 
Mak-e'Ioth 
Mak^ke'dah (13) 
Mak'tesh 
Mal'a-chi(3)(6) 
Mai' chain 
Mal-chi'ah(l5) 
Mal'chi.el (13) 
Mal'chi-el-ites(8) 
Mai chi'jah 
Mal-chi'ratn 
Mal-chi-shu'ah(12) 
Mal'chom 
Mal'chus(6) 
Mai' las 
Mai' lo-thi (3) 
MalMuch(fJ) 
Ma-mai' as (5) 
Mam' mon 
Mam-ni-ta-nai' mus 
Mam' re 
Ma-mu'cus 
Mau'a-en 
Man'a-hath 
Man'a-heni 
Ma-na'heth-ites (8) 
Man-as-se'as (12) 
Ma-nas'seh(9) 
Ma-nas' sites (8) 
Ma'neh(9) 
Man-ha-na' im (16) 
Ma'ui(3) 
Man' na 
SI a -no' ah 



MA 

Ma'och(6) 
Ma' on 

Ma'on-ites (8) 
Ma' ra (9) 
Mu'rah (9) 
Mai y a-lah 
Mar-a-nalh'a 
Mar-do-che'us(G) 
Ma-re' shah 
Mark 

Mar' i-sa (9) 
Mar' moth 
Ma' roth 
Mar're-kah (9) 
Mar'se-na (9) 
Mar'te-na 
Mar' tha 
Ma'ry 
Mas'chil(6) 
Mas' e-loth 
Mash 
Ma'shal 
Mas' man 
Mas' moth 
Mas' re-kah (9) 
Ma'sa(9) 
Mas' sah (^) 
Mas-si' as (15) 
Ma'tred 
Ma'tri(S) 
Mat' tan 
Mat' tan-ah 
Mat-tan-i'ah 
Mat' ta-tha 
Mat-ta-thi 7 as 
Mat-te-na' i (>) 
Mat' than 
Mat' that 
Mat-the'las 
Mat' thevv 
Mat-thi' as ( 1 5) 
Mat-ti-thi'ah(15) 



ME 

Maz-i-li'as(15) 

Maz-za' roth 

Me' ah 

Me-a'ni (3) 

Me -a' rah 

Me-bu' nai (5) 

Mech'e-ralh(IS) 

Mecl/ e-rath-ite (8) 

Me' dad 

Med'a-lah(9) 

Me' dan 

Med' e-ba (9) 

Medes 

Me'di-a 

Me'di-an 

Me-e'da 

Me-gicl'do (?) 

Me-gid'don (?) 

Me-ha' li (3) 

Me-hei' a-bel 

Me-hi' da 

Me'hir 

Me-hol'ath-iteCS) 

Me-hu'ja-el (13) 

Me-hu' man (o) 

Me-hu' nim 

Me-hu'nims 

Me-jar 7 kon 

Mek' o-nah (9) 

Mel-a-ti'ah(lo) 

Mel'chi(3)(6) 

Mcl-chi'ah(6)(9) 

Mel-chi'as(lo) 

Mel'chi-el(lS) 

Mel-chis'e-dek 

Mel-chi-sbu'a(lS) 

Me-le'a 

Me' lech (6) 

Mel'li-cu 

Mel'i-ta 

Mel'zar 

Mem' phis 

Me-mu'can(i3) 



ME 

Men' a-hem 
Me' nan 

Me'ne 
Me'nilh 
Men'o-thai (o) 
Me-on' e-nem 
Meph' a-ath 
Me-phib' o-sheth 
Me' rab 

Mer-a-i'ah(lo) 
Me-rai'oth (5) 
Me' ran 
Mer'a-ri(S) 
Mer'a-rites(B) 
Mer-a-tha' im (16) 
Me' red 
Mer' e-moth 
Me' res 

Mer'i-bah(9)* 
Mer'i-bah Ka'desh 
Me-rib'ba-al 
Mer' i-moth (4) 
Me-ro'dach (11) 

Bal' a-dan 
Me' rom 

Me-ron'o-thiie(8) 
Me' roz 
Me' ruth 
Me'sech(6) 
Me' sek 
Me' sha 
Me' shach (6) 
Me' shech (6) 
Me'shek 
Mesh-el-e-mi' ah 
Mesh-ez' a-bel 
Mesh-ez' a-beel 
Mesh-il-la' mith 
Mesh-il' le-moth 
Me-sho' bah (9) 
Me-shul'lam 
Me-shul'le-mith 
Mes'o-bah(lS) 



MI 



207 



Mes' o-ba-ile (8) 

Mes-o-po-ta' mi-a 

Mes-si'ah (15) 

Mes-st'as(15) 

Me-te'rus (13) 

Me'theg Am'mah 

Meth're-dath 

Me-thu'sa-el 

Me-thu'se-Iah(9) 

Me-thu'se-la 

Me-u'nim (IS) 

Mez' a-hab 

Mi' a- in in 

Mib'har 

Mil/sam 

Mib'zar 

Mi'cah (9) 

Mi-cai'ah (5) 

Mi'cha(9) 

Mi'cha-el(15> 

Mi'chah(9) 

Mi-chai'ah 

Mi' cliel 

Mich' mas (6) 

Mik' mas 

M ich' mash 

Mkh'me-thah (9) 

Mich'ri(3) 

Mich' tarn 

Mid' din 

Mid'i-an 

Mid'i-an-ites (8) 

Mig'da-lel 

Mig' dal Gad 

Mig' dol 

Mig'ron 

Mij'a-min 

Mik' loth 

Mik-nei'ah(9) 



Mil' cah (9) 

Mil'chah(9) 

Mil'cha(9) 



208 MI MO MY 


Mil' com 


Mith'cah(9) 


Mom'dis 


Mil' Jo 


Mith'nite (8) 


Mo-o-si'as(13) 


Mi'na(9) 


Mith'ri-dath 


Mo'rash-ite(8) 


Mi-ni'a-min 


Mi'zar 


Mo'ras-thile 


Min' ni (3) 


Miz' pah (9) 


Mor'de-cai(5)(13) 


Min'nith 


Miz'peh (9) 


Mo'reh (9) 


Miph' kad 


Miz'ra-im (16) 


Mor'esh-eth Galh 


Mir'i-am 


Miz'zah (9) 


Mo-ri'ah (15) 


Mir' ma (9) 


Mna' son 


Mo-se'ra(9) 


Mis' gab 


Na' son 


Mo-se' rah (9) 


Mish'a-el(13)(15) 


Mo'ab 


Mo-so'roth 


Mi' shal (3) 


Mo' ab-ites (8) 


Mo' ses 


Mi' sham 


Mo-a-di'ah (15) 


Mo' zes 


Mi'she-al 


Mock' mur 


Mo-sol' lam 


Mish' ma (9) 


Mock' ram 


Mo-sui'la-mon 


Mish-man' na 


Mo' din 


Mo'za(9) 


Mish'ra-ites (6) 


Mo'eth 


Mo'zah 


Mis' par 


Mol'a-dah (9) 


Mup'pim 


Mis'pe-reth 


Mo' lech (6) 


Mu'shi(3) 


Mis' pha (9) 


Mo' lek 


Mu' shites (8) 


Mis'phah (9) 


Mo'H(3) 


Muth' lab-ben 


Mis'ra-im(l6) 


Mo' lid 


Myn' dus 


Mis' re-photh-ma' 


Mo' loch (6) 


M/ra(9) 


im(!6) 


Mo'lok 


Myt-e-le' ne 


NA - NA NA 


NA'AM 


Nab-a-ri' as 


Na' ham 


Na'a-mah(9) 


Na-ba-lhe' ans 


Na-ham'a-ni (3) 


Na'a-man (15) 


Na'bath-ites (8) 


Na-har'a-i(5) 


Na' a-ma-thites (8) 


Na'both 


Na'hash 


Na'a-mites(S) 


Na'chon(6) 


Na' hath 


Na' a-rah (9) 


Na'chor(6) 


Nah'bi(S) 


Na'a-rai(5) 


Na' dab 


Na'ha-bi(3) 


Na' a-ran 


Na-dab' a-the 


Na'hor 


Na' a-rath 


Nag'ge(7) 


Nah' shon 


Na-ash' on 


Na-ha'li-el(13) 


Na' hum 


Na'a-thus 


Na-hal'lal 


Na'i-dus(5) 


Na'bal 


Na'ha-lol 


Na'im 



NE NE NY s 


Na'in 


Ne'cho (6) 


Ne-toph' a-thites 


Nai' oth (5) 


Ne-co' dan 


Ne-zi'ah (15) 


Na-ne'a(9) 


Ned-a-bi'ah(15) 


Ne'zib 


Na' o-mi (3) 


Ne-e-mi'as 


Nib'bas 


Na'pish 


Neg'i-noth(7) 


Nib'shan 


Naph' i-si (3) 


Ne-hel' a-mite 


Nic-o-de' mus 


Naph'tha-li(S) 
Naph' thar 


Ne-he-mi'ah(9)(l5 
Ne-he-mi' as 


Nic-o-la'i-tanes 
Nic'o-las 


Naph'tu-him (11) 


Ne'hum 


Nim'rah 


Nas'bas 


Ne-hush'ta(9) 


Nim'rim 


Na' shon 


Ne-hush' tah 


Nitn' rod 


Na'sith 


Ne-hush' tan 


Nim'shi(S) 


Na'sor 


Ne'i-el (13) 


Nin' e-ve 


Na' than 


Ne'keb 


Nin'e-veh(9) 


Na-than'a-el (13) 


Ne-ko'da 


Nin'e-vites(8) 


Nath-a-ni'as (15) 


Nem-u'el(13)(17) 


Ni' san 


Na' than Me' lech (6) 


Nem-u' el-ites (8) 


Nis'roch(6) 


Na've 


Ne'pheg 


Ms'ro/b 


Na'um 


Ne'phi(3) 


No-a-di'ah (15) 


Naz-a-rene' 


Ne'phis 


No' ah or No'e 


Naz-a-renes' (8) 


Ne'phish 


Nob 


Naz'a-reth 


Ne-phish' e-sim 


No' bah (9) 


Naz'a-rite(8) 


Neph'tha-li(S) 


Nod 


Ne'ah 


Nep'tho-ah 


No' dab 


Ne-a-ri'ah (15) 


Neph' tu-im 


So'e-ba(9) 


Neb'a-i(5) 


Ne-phu'sim (13) 


NTo'ga, or No'gah 


Ne-bai'oth(o) 


Ner 


No' hah (9) 


Ne-ba'joth 


Ne' re-us 


Norn 


Ne-bal'lat 




tf om' a-des 


Ne'bat 


Ner'gal Sha-re'zer 


Non 


Ne'bo 


Ne'ri(3) 


Noph 


Neb-u-chad-nez' zar 


Ne-ri'ah(15) 


Noff 


Neb-u-chod-on' o- 


tfe-than'e-el(lS) 


N T o'phah(9) 


sor 


^eth-a-ni'ah 


No-me' ni-us 


Neb-u-chad-rez' zar 


^"eth' i-nims 


Nun, the father of 


Neb-u-chas' ban 


Ne-to'phah(9) 


Joshua 


Neb-u-zar' a-dan 


Ne-toph'a-thi (3) 


Nym' phas- 



209 





( 310 ) 




OM 


OP 


oz 


OB-A-DI'AH(IS) 


O'mar 


O'reb 


O'bal 


0-me'ga(9) 


O' ren, or O' ran 


O'bed 


O'mer 


O-ri' on 


O'bedE'dom 


Om'ri(3) 


Or' nan 


O'beth 


On 


Or' phah (9) 


O'bil 


O' nam 


Or'fa 


O'both 


O'nan 


Or-tlio-si'as(15) 


O'chi-el(lS) 


O-nes'i-mus 


O-sai'as(5) 


Oc-i-de' lus (7) 


On-e-siph' o-rus 


O-se'as 


Qi-i-de r lus 


O-ni' a-res 


O'see 


Oc'i-na(7) 


O-ni'as(15) 


O' she-a 


Os' i-na 


O'no 


Os' pray 


Oc'ran 


O'nus 


Os' si-frage 


O'ded 


O-ny' as 


Oth'ni(3) 


O-dol' lam 


On' y-cha 


Oth'ni-el(4)(l3) 


Od-on-ar' kes 


On'e-ka 


Oth-o-ni'as (15) 


Og 


O'nyx 


O'zem 


O'had 


O'phel 


O-zi'as(15) 


O'hel 


O'pher 


O'zi-el(4)(13) 


Of a-mus 


O'phir 


Oz'ni (3) 


O-lym' phas 


Oph / ni(3) 


Oz'nites(8) 


Om-a-e'rus (13) 


Oph' rah 


O-zo'ra(9) 


PA 


PA 


PA 


PA'A-RAI (5) 


Pal'lu-ites(8) 


Par' me-nas 


Pa' dan 


Pal'ti(3) 


Par' nath 


Pa' dan A' ram 


Pal'ti-elClS) 


Par'nach(6) < 


Pa' don 


Pai'tite(8) 


Pa'rosh 


Pa'gi-el(7)(13) - 


Pan' nag 


Par-shan'da-tha 


Pa' hath Mo' ab 


Par' a-dise 


Par' u-ah 


Pa'i (3) (5) 


Pa' rah 


Par-va / im(o)(l6) 


Pa'lal 


Pa' ran 


Pa'sach(6) 


Pal' es-tine 


Par' bar 


Pas-dam' min 


Pal'lu 


.Par-mash' ta 


Pa-se'ah (9) 



PE PH 


Pash'tir 


Per'iz-zites (8) 


Pas' o-ver 


Per' me-nas 


Pat' a-ra 


Per-u'da (9) (13) 


Pa-te'o-li 


Peth-a-hi'ah (Id) 


Pa-the'us (13) 


Pe'thor 


Pall/ ros 


Pe-thu'el (13) 


Path-ru'sim 


Pe-ui' thai (5) 


Pat' ro-bas 


Phac' a-reth 


Pa'u 


Phai' siir (5) 


Paul 


Phal-dai'us (,5) 


Ped'a-hel(lS) 


Pha-le'as (11) 


Ped' ah-zur 


Pha'leg 


Ped-ai'ah(5) 


Phal'lu 


Pe'kah(Q) 


Pl.al'ti (3) 


Pek-a-hi' ah 


Phal'ti-el (13) 


Pe'kod 


Pha-nu'el (13) 


Pel-a-i' ah (5) 


Phar'a-cim (7) 


Pel-a-h'ah 


Pha'ra-oh 


Pel-a-ti'ah(l5) 


Fa'ro 


Pe'leg 


Phar-a-tho' iii (3) 


Pe'let 


Pha'rez 


Pe'leth 


Pha'rez-ites(B) 


Pe'leth-ites(8) 


Phar' i-sees 


Pe-li'as(lo) 


Pha'rosh 


Pel' o-nite (8) 


Phar'phar 


Pe-ni'el (13) 


Phar'zites(S) 


Pe-nin'nah 


Pha'se-ah (13) 


Pen' ni -nnh 


Pha-se'lis(13) 


Pen-tap' o-lis 


Phas'i-ron 


Pen' ta-teuch (6) 


Phe'be 


Pen'ta-teuk 


Phe-ni'ce(13) 


Pen' te-cost 


Phib'e-seth 


Pen' te- coast 


Phi' col 


Pe-nu'el (13) 


Phi-la/ ches 


Pe'or 


Phi-le'moi^ll) 


Per'a-zini 


Phi-le'tus(ll) 


Pe'resh 


Phi-lis'li-a 


Pe'rez 


Phi-lis' tim 


Pe'rezUz'za 


Phi-lis'tines(8) 


Per'ga (9) 


Fi-lis' tins 


Per' "a-inos 


Phi-lol' o-gus 


Pc-ri'da(9) 


Phil-o-me' tor 


p 2 



PV * 

I Phin'e-as 
I Phin'e-has 
! Phi' son (1) 
j Phle' gon 
Pho'ros 

Phul, rhymes dull 
Phur 
Phu'rah 

Phut, rhymes nut 
Phu'vah 
Phy-geKlus 
Phy-lac' te-riea 
Pi-ha-hi'roth 
Pi' late 
Pi!' dash 
Pil'e-tha 
Pi!' tai (5) 
Pi' non 
Pi'ra 
Pi' ram 
Pir' a-lhon 
Pir' a-thon-ite (8) 
Pis'gah 
Pi' son (I) 
Pis' pah 
Pi'thon(l) 
Poch' e-reth (6) 
Pon'ti-us Pi' late 
Por'a-tha(9) 
Pot' i-phar 
Po-tiph' e-ra 
Proch' o-rus 
Pu'a, or Pu'ah 
Pu' dens 
Pu'hites(8) 
Pu!, rhymes dull 
Pu'nites(8) 
Pu' non 

Pur, or Pu' rim 
Put, rhymes nut 
Pu'ti-el(13) 
P}' 



RA 



RE 



RE 



RA' A-MAH (9) 


Ra' ma, or Ra' mah Re-el-i' as ( 1 5) 


Ra-a-mi'ah(15) 


Ra' math 


Ree-sai' as (5) 


Ra-am' ses 


Ra-math-a'im (!()) 


Re' gem, the g hard 


Rab' bah 


Ram' a-them 


Re-gem 7 me-lech 


Rab' bath 


Ra' math-ite (8) 


Re' gom 


Rab' bat 


Ra'mathLe'hi 


Re-ha-bi'ah(15) 


Rab' bi (3) 


Ra' math Mis' peh 


Re' hob 


Rab'bith 


Ra-me' ses 


Re-ho-bo' am 


Rab-bo'ni(3) 


Ra-mi'ah(15) 


Re-ho' both 


Rab' mag 


Ra' moth 


Re'hu 


Rab' sauces 


Ra'moth Gil'e-ad 


Re' hum 


Rab' sa-ris 


Ra'pha 


Re' i (3) 


Rab'sha-keh (9) 


*Ra'pha-el(lS)(15) 


Re' kern 


Ra'ca, or Ra'cha 


Ra'phel 


Rem-a-li'ah (15) 


Ra'cab(6) 


Ra' phah (9) 


Re' meth 


Ra'cal 


Raph'a-im (16) 


Rem' mon 


Ra' chab (6) 


Ra' phon 


Rem'mon Meth'o- 


Ra'chel(6) 


Ra'phu 


ar 


Rad'da-i(5) 


Ras'sis 


Rem' phan 


Ra'gati 


Rath'u-mus (12) 


Rem' phis 


Ra' ges 
Rag' u-a 


Ra'zis 
Re-a-i'ah(5) 


Re'pha-el(13)(15) 
Re' phah 


Ra-gu'el(lS) 


Re' ba (9) 


Reph-a-i'ah (15) 


Ra' hab 


Re-bee' ca (9) 


Reph'a-im (1 6) 


Ra' ham 


Re' chab (6) 


Reph' a-ims 


Ra' kern 


Re' chab-ites (8) 


Reph' i-dim 


Rak'kath 


Re'chah(9) 


Re' sen 


Rak'kon 


Ref ka 


Re'sheph 


Ram 


Re-el-ai' ah (5) 


Re'u 



* Raphael. This word has uniformly the accent on the first syllable through- 
out Milton, though Graecised by 'Pa^x j but the quantity is not so invariably 
settled by him ; for in his Paradise Lost he makes it four times of three sylla- 
bles, and twice of two. What is observed under Israel is applicable to this 
word. Colloquially we may pronounce it in two, as if written Raphel ; but in 
deliberate and solemn speaking or reading, we ought to make the two last vow- 
els to be heard separately and distinctly. The same may be observed of 
Michael, which Milton, in his Paradise Lost, uses six times as a word of three 
syllables, and eighteen times as a word of two only. 



RH 

Reu' ben 
Re-u'el(lS) 
Reu' mah 
Re'zeph 
Re-zi'a(15) 
Re' zin 
Re' zon 
Rhe' gi-uni 
Refje-um 
Rhe'sa 
Re'sa 
Rho'da 



RO 



RO 



213 



Rhod' o-cus 


Roh'gah (9) 


Ri' bai (5) 
Rib'lah 


Ro'ga 
R.O' i-nms 


Rim' mon 


Ro-mam-ti-e' zer 


Rim' mon Pa' rez 


Rosh 


Rin' nah (9) 


Ru'by 


Ri'phath 


Ru'fus 


Ri/fath 


Ru' ha-mah 


Ris'sah(9) 


Ru' mah 


Rith' mah 


Rus' ti-cus 


Ris'pah 


Ruth 


Ro-ge'lim (7) (13) 


Rootk 



SA 



SA 



SA 



SA-BAC-THA' NI* 


Sab'tah(Q) 


Sal-a-sad' a-i (5) 


fSab' a-oth 


Sab'te-cha(G) 


Sa-la'thi-el(13) 


Sa'bat 


Sa' car 


Sal'cah(9) 


Sab'a-tus 


Sad-a-mi'as (15) 


Sal'chah 


Sab' ban 


Sa' das 


Sa' lem 


Sab' bath 


Sad-de' us 


Sa'lim 


Sab-ba-the' us 


Sad' due 


Sal' la-i (5) 


Sab-be' us 


Sad' du-cees 


Sal'lu 


Sab-de' us 


Sa'doc 


Sal'lum 


Sab'di(3) 


Sa-ha-du'tha Je'gar 


Sal-lu'mus(13) 


Sa-be' ans 


Sa'la 


Sal' ma, or Sal' mah 


Sa'bi(3) 


Sa'lah(9) 


Sal' mon 



* Sabacthani. Some, says the editor of Lab be, place the accent on the an. 
tepenultimate syllable of this word, and others on the penultimate : this last 
pronunciation, he says, is most agreeable to the Hebrew word, the penultimate 
of which is not only long, but accented : and as this word is Hebrew, it is cer- 
tainly the preferable pronunciation. 

t Sabaoth. This word should not be confounded in its pronunciation with 
Sabbath, a word of so different a signification. Sabaoth ought to be heard in 
three syllables by keeping the a and o separate and distinct. This it must be 
confessed, is not very easy to do, but is absolutely necessary to prevent a very 
gross confusion of ideas, and a perversion of the sense. 



214 SA . SA SA 


Sal-mo' lie (13) ; 


San-a-bas' sa-rus 


Sar' de-us 


Sa' lorn 


San' a-sib 


Sar' dis 


Sa-lo / me(13) 


San-bal'iat 


Sar'dites(8) 


Sa'lu 


San'he-drim 


Sar' di-us 


Sa' lum 


San- san' nah 


Sar' dine 


San/a-el (13) 


Saph 


Sar' do-nyx 


Sa-mai' as (5) 


Sa' phat 


Sa're-a 


Sa ma'ri-a, or 


Saph-a-ti'as (15) 


Sa-i ep' ta 


Sam-a-ri'a 


Saph' ir 


Sar' gon 


Sa-mai' i-tans 


Sa'pheth 


Sa' rid 


Sam' a-ttis 


Sap-phi' ra (9) 


Sa' ron 


Sa-mei'us (9) 


Sap' phire 


Sa-ro'lhi (3) 


Sam 7 gar Ne'bo 


Sar-a-bi'as (15) 


Sar-se'chim (6) 


Sa'nn (3) 


Sa' ra, or Sa' rai (5) 


Sa'ruch(6) 


Sa' mis 


Sar-a-i'ah (5) 


*Sa' tan ' 


San/ lab (9) 


Sa-rai'as(5)(13) 


Sath-ra-ba/nea 


Sam'nius 


Sa-ian/a-el 


Sath-ra-bou-za'nes 


Samp' sa-mes 


Sar'a-mel 


Sav' a-ran 


San/ son 


Sa'raph Sa'vi-as (15) 


Sam'u-el(13)(17) 


Sar-ched' o-nus (6) i Saul 



* Satan. There is some dispute among the learned about the quantity of the 
second syllable of this word when Latin or Greek, as may be seen in Labbe, 
but none, about the first. TJiis is acknowledged to be short, and this has in- 
duced those critics who have great knowledge of Latin, and very little of their 
own language, to pronounce the first syllable short in English, as if written 
Sattan. If these gentlemen have not perused the Principles of Pronunciation, 
prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, I would take the liberty of 
referring them to what is there said, for full satisfaction for whatever relates to 
deriving English quantity from the Latin. But tor those who have not an op- 
portunity of inspecting that work, it may, perhaps, be sufficient to observe, 
that no analogy is more universal than that which, in a Latin word of two syl. 
lables with but one consonant in the middle, and the accent on the first syl- 
lable, leads ns to pronounce that syllable long. This is, likewise, the genuine 
pronunciation of English words of the same form ; and where it has been coun- 
teracted we find a miserable attempt to follow the Latin quantity in the English 
word, which we entirely neglect in the Latin itself, (see Introduction, page xiii,) 
Cato and Plato are instances where we make the vowel a long in English, where 
it is short in Latin ; and calico and cogito, where we make the a and > in the 
first syllable short in English, when it is long in Latin. Thus if a word of two 
syllables with one consonant in the middle and the accent on the first, which, 
according to our own vernacular analogy, we should pronounce as we do Cato and 
riuto with the first vowel long ; if this word, I say, happens to be derived from 
a word of three syllables in Latin, with the first short ; this is looked upon as 

a good 



SE SE 


SH 215 


See 7 va 


Se'ied 


Se'red 


Sefva 


Sel-e-rni'as(15) 


Se' ron 


Sche'chem (6) 


Sem 


Se' rug 


SM kern 


Sem-a-chi' ah (15) 


Se' sis 


Scribes 


Sem-a-i'ah (15) 


Ses' thel 


Scyth' i-ans 


Sem-a-i'as (5) 


Seih 


Syth f i-ans 


Sem'e-i(3) 


Se'thar 


Scy-thop'o-lis 


Se-mel'le-us 


Se' ther 


Scyth-o-pol'i-tans 


Se' mis 


Sha-al-ab' bin 


Se'ba 


Sen' a ah 


Sha-al'bim 


Se' bat 


Se' neh (9) 


Sha-al' bo-nite (8) 


Sec'a-cah 


Se' nir 


Sha' aph 


Sech-e-ni' as ( 1 5) 


Sen-a-che'rib(13) 


Sha-a-ra'im(l6) 


Se' chu 


Sen'u-ah 


Shar' a-im 


Sed-e-ci' as (15) 


Se-o'rim 


Sha-ash' gas 


Sed-e-si' as (7) 


Se' phar 


Shab-beth'a-i(5) 


Se'gub 


Seph' a-rad 


Shach' i-a 


Se'ir 


Seph-ar-va' im (16) 


Shad' da-i (5) 


Se'i-rath 


Se' phar-vites 


Sha' drach 


Se'la 


Se-phe' la 


Sha'ge(7) 


Se' la Ham-mah-le' 


Se' rah 


Sha-haz'i-math (13) 


koth 


Se-ra-i' ah (5) 


Shal'le-cheth 


Se'Jah (9) 


Ser' a-phim 


Sha' lem 



a good reason for shortening the first syllable of the English word, as in magic, 
placid, tepid, &c., though we violate this rule in the pronunciation of the Latin 
words, caligo, cogito, &c., which, according to this analogy, ought to be cale-i-go, 
coge-i-to, &c. with the first syllable long. 

This pedantry, which ought to have a harsher title, has considerably hurt the 
sound of our language, by introducing into it too many short vowels, and con- 
sequently rendering it less flowing and sonorous. The tendency of the penul- 
timate accent to open and lengthen the first vowel in dissyllables, with but one 
onsonant in the middle, in some measure counteracts the shortening tendency 
of two consonants, and the almost invariable shortening tendency of the ante- 
penultimate accent ; but this analogy, which seems to be the genuine operation 
of nature, is violated by these ignorant critics, from the pitiful ambition of ap- 
pearing to understand Latin. As the first syllable, therefore, of the word in 
question has its first vowel pronounced short for such miserable reasons as have 
been shown, and this short pronunciation does not seem to be general, as may 
be seen under the *ord in the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, we ought cer- 
tainly to incline to that pronunciation which is so agreeable to the analogy of 
our own language, and which is, at the same time, so much more pleasing to 
the ear .See Principles prefixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 
543, 544, &c., and the words Drama and Satire. 



216 SH 

Sha' lim 

Shal' i-sha 

Shal' lum 

Shal' ma-i (5) 

Shal 7 man 

Shal-ma-ne' ser 

Sha' ma 

Sham-a-ri'ah (15) 

Sha'med 

Sha' mer 

Sham' gar 

Sham' huth 

Sha' mir 

Sham' ma (9) 

Sham'mah(9) 

Sham' ma-i (5) 

Sham' moth 

Sham-mu' a (9) 

Sham-mu' ah (9) 

Sham-she-ra' i (5) 

Sha' pham 

Sha' phan 

Sha' phat 

Sha' pher 

Shar'a-i(5) 

Shar'ma-im (16) 

Sha' rar 

gha-re'zer 

Sha' rpn 

Sha' ron-ite (8) 

Sha-ru'hen 

Shash'a-i (5) 

Sha'shak 

Sha / veh(9) 

Sha'veth 

Sha'ul 

Sha'ul-ites(8) 

Sha-u'sha 

She'al 

She-al'ti-el(lS) 

She-a-ri'ah (15) 

She-ar-ja' shub 

She' ba, or She' bah 



SH SH 


She' bam 


She' rah 


Sheb-a-ni'ah(15) 


Sher-e-bi'ah(15) 


Sheb' a-rim 


She' resh 


She' bat 


She-re' zer 


She'ber 


She' shack 


Sheb' na 


She'shai(5) 


Sheb'u-el(IS) 


She' shan 


Shec-a-ni' ah 


Shesh-baz' zar 


She'chem(6) 


Sheth 


She' chem-ites 


She'thar 


Shech' i-nah 


She' thar Boz' na-i 


Shek' e-nah 


She' va 


Shed' e-ur 


Shib' bo-letk 


She-ha-ri'ah(15) 


Shib' mah (9) 


She'kel 


Shi' chron 


She'lah 


Shig-gai' on (5) 


She'lan-ites(8) 


Shi' on 


Shel-e-mi'ah(15) 


Shi'hor 


She'leph 


Shi'hor Lib'nath 


She'lesh 


Shi-i'im(3)(4) 


Shel'o-mi(3) 


She-i' im 


Shel' o-mith 


Shil' hi (3) 


Shel' o-moth 


Shil'him 


She-lu' mi-el (IS) 


Shil'lem 


Shem 


Shil'lem-ites (8) 


She' ma 


Shi'loh,orShi'lo(9) 


Shem'a-ah(9) 


Shi-lo'ah(9) 


Shem-a-i'ah(5) 


Shi-lo'ni(3) 


Shem-a-ri'ah(15) 


Shi-lo'nites(8) 


Shem' e-ber 


Shil' shah (9) 


She' mer 


Shim' e-a 


She-mi' da (13) 


Shim' e-ah 


Shem' i-nith Shim' e-am 


She-mir'a-moth Shim'e-ath 


She-mu' el ( 13) (17) Shim' e-ath-ites 


Shen 


Shim' e-i (3) 


She-na' zar 


Shim' e-on 


She' oir 


Shim' hi (3) 


She' pham 


Shi' mi (3) 


Sheph-a-ti' ah (15) 
She' phi (3) 


Shim'ites(B) 
Shim' ma (9) 


She' pho 


Shi' mon 


She-phu'phan (H) 


Shim' rath 



SH SH SI 217 


Shim' ri (3) 


Sho' choh (9) 


Shu'thal-ites(S) 


Shim' rith 


Sho' ham 


Si'a(l) 


Shim'ron 


Sho'mer 


Si'a-ka(l)(9) 


Shim'ron-ites (8) 


Sho'phach(6) 


Si'ba 


Shim'ron Me'ron 


Sho' phan 


Sib' ba-chai (5) 


Shim' shai (5) 


Sho-shan' nim 


Sib'bo-leth 


Shi' nab 


Sho-shan' nim 


Sib'mah(9) 


Shi'nar 


E'duth 


Sib'ra-im(l6) 


Shi' phi (3) 


Shu' a (9) 


Si'chem(l)(fj) 


Shiph' mite 


Shu' ah (9) 


Sid' dim 


Shiph'ra (9) 


Shu'al 


Si'de 


Shiph' rath 


Shu'ba-el(lS) 


Si' don 


Ship' tan 


Shu' ham 


Si-gi' o-noth (7) 


Shi'sha (9) 


Shu' ham-ites (8) 


Si' ha (9) 


Shi'shak 


Shu' hites 


Si' hon 


Shit'ra-i (5) 


Shu'lam-ite 


Si'hor 


Shit' tah (9) 


Shu' math-ites (8) 


Si' las 


Shit' tim Wood 


Shu' nam-ite 


Si!' la (9) 


Shi'za (9) 


Shu' nem 


*Sil'o-a 


Sho' a (9) 


Shu'ni(3) 


Sil' o-as 


Sho'ah (9) 


Shu' nites (8) 


Sil'o-ah, or 


Sho' ab 


Shu' pham 


Sil' o-am 


Sho' bach (6) 


Shu' pham-ite 


Sil'o-e(9) 


Sho' ba-i (5) 


Shup' pirn 


Si-mal-cu' e 


Sho'bal 


Shur 


Sin/ e- on 


Sho'bek 


Shu' shan 


Sim' e-on-ites (8) 


Sho'bi(S) 


Shu'shan E'duth 


Si' mon 


Sho' cho (6) 


Shu'the-lah(9) 


Sim'ri(3) 



* Siloa. This word, according to the present general rule of pronouncing 
these words, ought to have the accent on the second syllable, as it is Grsecised 
by Stxwa ; but Milton, who understood Its derivation as well as the present race 
of critics, has given it the antepenultimate accent, as more agreeable to the 
general analogy of accenting English words of the same form : 

Or if Sion hill 

Delight thee more, or Siloa's brook that flow'd 
Fast by the oracle of God 

If criticism /ought not to overturn settled usages, surely when that usage is 
sanctioned by such a poet as Milton, it ought not to be looked upon as a 
licence, but an authority. With respect to the quantity of the first syllable, 
analogy requires that, if the accent be on it, it should be short. (See Ruler- 
prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names, rule 19.) 



218 SO SU SY 


Sin 


Sod'om 


Suc'coth Be'noth 


*Si'nai(5) 


Sod' om-ites 


Su-ca' ath-ites 


Si' nim 


Sod' o-ma 


Sud 


Sin' ites (8) 


Sol' o-mou 


Su' di-as 


Si' on 


Sop' a-ter 


Suk' ki-ims (4) 


Siph' moth 


Soph' e-reth 


Sur 


Sip' pai (5) 


So'rek 


Su'sa 


Si'rach (1)(6) 


So-sip' a-ter 


Su' san-chites (6) 


Si' rali (9) 


Sos'the-nes (13) 


Su-san' nah (9) 


Sir' i- on 


Sos'tra-tus(13) 


Su' si (3) 


Sis-am' a-i (o) 


So' ta-i (5) Syc' a-mine 


Sis'e-ra(9) 


Sta'chys (6) 


Sy-ce' ne 


Si- sin' nes 


Sta' kees 


Sy'char(l)(6) 


Sit' nah 


Stac' te 


Sy-e'lus(12) 


Si' van 


Steph' u-nas 


Sy-e' ne 


So 


Steph' a-na 


Syn' a-gogue 


So'choh(6)(9) 


Ste' phen 


Syn' a-gog 


So'ko 


Su' ah (9) 


Syn' ti-che (4) (6) 


So'-'coh (9) 


Su'ba 


Syr' i-a Ma' a-.cah 


So' to 


Su'ba-i (5) 


Syr' i-on 


So' di (3) 


Sue' coth 


Sy-ro-phe-nic' i-a 



* Sinai. If we pronounce this word after the Hebrew, it is three syllables ; 
if after the Greek, 2(v, two only ; though it must be confessed that the liberty 
allowed to poets of increasing the end of a line with one, and sometimes two 
syllables, renders their authority, in this case, a little equivocal. Labbe 
adopts the former pronunciation, but general usage seems to prefer the latter : 
and if we almost universally follow the Greek in other cases, why not in this? 
Milton adopts the Greek. 

Sing, heav'nly muse! that on the secret top 

Of Oreb or of Sinai didst inspire 

That shepherd 

God, from the mount of Sinai, whose gray top 

Shall tremble, he descending, will himself, 

In thunder, lightning, and loud trumpets' sound, 

Ordain them laws. 

Par. Lost, b. xii. v. 227. 

Tfe ought not, indeed, to lay too much stress on the quantity of Milton, which 
is often so different in the same word ; but these are the only two passages in 
his Paradise Lost where this word is used ; and as he has made the same letters 
a diphthong in Asmadai, it is highly probable he judged that Sinai ought to be 
pronounced in two syllables. (See Rules prefixed to this Vocabulary, No. 5.) 



( 219 ) 



TA 

I A'A-NACH (5) 
Ta'a-nach Shi' lo 
Tab'ba- th 
Tab' baili 
Ta' be-al 
Ta'be-ei (13) 
Ta-bel'H-us 
Tab' era (9) 
Tab'i-tha 
Ta'bor 
Tab'ri-nion 
Tach' mo-nite 
Tad' mor 
IV lian 

$LY ban -ites (8) 
Ta-haph' a-nes 
Ta-hap'e-nes 
Ta' hath 
Tab' pe-ries (9) 
Tab' re-a (9) 
Tah'tim Hod'sbi 
Tal'i-iha Cu'mi 
Tal' mai (5) 
Tal' mon 
Tal' sas< 
Ta' uiah 
Ta'mar 
Tarn' muz 
Ta' nacli (6) 
Tan' hu-rneth 
Ta' nis 
Ta' phaih 
Taph'e-nes 
Tapb' nes 
Ta'phon 
Tap'pu ab(13) 
Ta' rah (9) 
Tar'a-lah (9) (13) 
Ta' re-a (9) 



TE 



TI 



Tar' pel-ites (8) 


Tel' narcb (6) 


Tar'bbis 


Thad-de'us(l) 


Tar'shish 


Tha' hash 


Tar-sbi' si (3) 


Tha' mah (9) 


Tar' .sus 


Tliam' na-tha 


; Tar'tak 


Tha' ra (9) 


Tar' tan - 


Thar'ra(9) 


Tal' na-i (5) 


1 bar' sbisb 


Te' bab (9) 


Thas'si(S) 


Teb-a-li'ah (15) 


The' bez 


Te' beth 


The-co'e 


Te-bapb' lie-lies 


Tile-las' ser 


Te-bin'nab 


The-ler' sas 


IV kel 


The-oc' a-uus 


Te-ko' a, or 


The-od' o-tus 


Te-ko'ab 


Tbe-oph'i-lus 


Te-ko'ites(8) 


The'ras 


Tel' a- bib 


Ther' me-leth 


Te' lab (9) 


Thes-sa-lo-ni' ca 


Tel'a-im(l6) 


Theu'das 


j Te-las' sar 


Thini' na-thatb 


Te'lern 


This' be 


Tel-ha-re'sha 


Thorn' as 


l Tel-bar' sa (9) 


Tom' as 


Tel' me-la (9) 


Thorn' o-i (3) 


Tel' me-lah (9) 


Thra-se'as 


Te'ma(9) 


Thum' mim 


. Te' man 


Thy-a-ti' ra (9) 


Tem'a-ni(3) 


Tib' bath 


Te' man-ites (8) 


Ti-be' ri-as 


Tem'e-ni(3) ! Tib'ni (3) 


Te'pho iTi'dal 


Te' rab (9) . Tig' latb Pi-lc' ser 


Tei y a-pbim 


Tik' vah (9) 


Te'resh 


Tik' vatb 


Ter' ti-us 


Ti'lon 


Ter' she-us 


Ti-me'lus(lS) 


Ter-tul'lus 


Tim'na(9) 


IVta 


Tira'nath (9) 



220 TI TO TY 


Tim'na-thah 


To' ah 


To'phel 


Tim' nath He' res 


To' a-uah 


To'phet 


Tim'nath Se'rah 


Tob 


To'u 


Tim'nite(8) 


To-bi'ah(15) 


Tfach-o-ni'tis (12) 


Ti-mo'the-us 


To-bi'as(l5) 


Trip'o-lis 


Tim' o-thy (Eng.) 
Tip'sah(9) 


To' bie (Eng.) 
To'bi-el(4)(13) 


Tro'as 
Tro-gyl' li-um 


Ti'ras 


To-bi'jah (15) 


Troph' i-mus 


Ti'rath-ites(8) 


To' bit 


Try-phe'na(12) 


Tir'ha-kah(9) 


To'chen(6) 


Try-pho'sa(12) 


Tir' ha-nah 


To-gar' mah 


Tu'bal 


Tir'i-a(9) 


To'hu 


Tu'balCa'in 


Tir'sha-tha 


To'i (3) 


Tu-bi'e-ni(3) 


Tir'zah (9) 


To' la (9) 


Ty-be'ri-as 


Tish' bite 


To' lad 


Tych' i-cus 


Ti'van 


To'la-ites(8) 


Tyre, one syllable 


Ti'za 


Tol'ba-nes 


Ty-ran' nus 


Ti'zite(S) 


Tol'mai(5) 


Ty'rus 


UN UT UZ 


VA-JEZ'A-THA(9) 


Voph' si (3) 


U'tha-i(5) 


Va-ni' ah (9) 


U'phaz 


U'thi(3) 


Vash'ni(S) 


U-phar' sin 


U' za-i (5) 


Vash'ti(3) 


Ui 7 ba-ne 


U'zal 


U'cal 


U'ri(3) 


Uz'za(9) 


U'el 


U-ri'ah(9) 


U/ zah (9) 


U'la-i (5) 


U-ri'as(15) 


U/zenShe'rah 


U'lam 


U'ri-el(4)(l4) Uz'zi (3) 


Ul'la(9) 


U-ri'jah (9) (15) Uz-zi' ah (15) 


Um'mah(9) 


U'rim 


Uz-zi' el (13) (15) 


Un'ni(S) 


U'ta(9) 


Uz-zi' el-ites (8) 


XA XE XY 


XA'GUS 


Xe'ne-as 1 Xe-rol'y-be 


Xan' thi-cus 


Xer-o-pha' gi-a | Xys' tus 



ZA 



ZE 



ZE 



ZA-A-NA'lM(l6) 


Za' moth 


Ze-bu'da(lS) 


Za' a-man 


Zam-zum' minis 


Ze' bul 


Za-a-nan' nim 


Za-no' ah (9) 


Zeb' u-lon 


Za' a-van 


Zaph-nath-pa-a-ne' 


Zeb' u-lon-ites (8) 


Za' bad 


ah 


Zech-a-ri'ah(15) 


Zab-a-dae' ans 


Za' phon 


Ze'dad 


Zab-a-dai' as (5) 


Za'ra 


Ze-de-ki'ah(15) 


Zab'bai(5) 


Zar' a-ces 


Zeeb 


Zab'ud 


Za'rah 


Ze'lah(9) 


Zab-de'us(12) 


Zar-a-i'as(15) 


Ze'lek 


Zab'di(3) 


Za' re-ah 


Ze-lo' phe-ad 


Zab'di-el(ll) 


Za' re-ath-hes (8) 


Ze-lo'tes(l3) 


Za-bi'na (9) 


Za'red 


Zel'zah 


Za' bud 


Zar' e-phath 


Zem-a-ra'im (1 6) 


*Zab'u-lon 


Zar' e- tan 


Zem' a-rite (8) 


Zac' ca-i (5) 


Za'reth Sha' har 


Ze-mi' ra 


Zac' cur 


Zar'hites(6) 


Ze'nan 


Zac-a-ri'ah(15) 


Zar' ta-nah 


Ze' nas 


Za'cher (6) 


Zar' than 


Ze-or'im (IS) 


Za'ker 


Zath' o-e 


Zeph-a-ni'ah (15) 


Zac-che'us(12) 


Za-thu'i(3)(ll> 


Ze'phath 


Zak-M us 


Zath' thu 


Zeph' a-thah 


Za(dok 


Zat' tu 


Ze' phi, or Ze' pho 


Za' ham 


Za' van 


Ze' phon 


Za'ir 


Za'za 


Zeph' on-ites (8) 


Za'laph 


Zeb-a-di'ah(15) 


Zer 


Zal' raon 


Ze' bah (9) 


Ze' rah (9) 


Zal-mo'nah(9) 


Ze-ba'im(13)(l6) 


Zer-a-hi'ah(15) 


Zal-mun' nah 


Zeb' e-dee 


Zer-a-i' a (5) 


Zam' bis 


Ze-bi' na 


Ze' rau 


Zam'bri(6) 


Ze-bo'im(lS) 


Ze' red 



* Zabulon. Notwithstanding," says the editor of Labbe, " this word in 

*' Greek) zaxiv, has the penultimate long, yet in our churches we always 

" hear it pronounced with the acute on the antepenultimate* Those who 

" thus pronounce it, plead that in Hebrew the penultimate vowel is short ; but 

" in the word Zorobabd, Zogoasx, they follow a different rule ; for, though the 

" penultimate in Hebrew is long, they pronounce it with the antepenultimate 

* accent." 



222 Zl Zl ZtJ 


Zer'e-da 


Zif 


Zi'na(l)(9) 


Zer'e-dah 


Zi / ha(l)(9) 


Zo'an 


Ze-red'a-thah 


Zik'lag 


Zo' ar 


Zer' e-ralh 


Zii'lah (9) 


Zo' ba, or 


Ze' resh 


Zil'-pah (9) 


Zo' bah 


Ze'reth 


Zil'thai(5) 


Zo-be'bah (9) (13) 


Ze'ri (3) 


Zin/ mah 


Zo'har 


Ze'ror 


Zim'ram, or 


Zo'he-leth 


Ze-ru'ah(13) 


Ziin'ran 


Zon' a-ras 


Ze-rub' ba-bel 


Zim'ri (3) 


Zo' peth 


Zer-uri'ah (15) 


Zin I Zo' phah 


Zer-vi'ah (15) 


Zi'na(l)(9) 


Zo' phai (5) 


Ze' tham 


Zi'on, or Si'onO) 


Zo' phar 


Ze' than 


Zi'or (1) 


Zo' phitu 


Ze'thar 


Ziph 


Zo^rah 


Zi'a(9) 


Zi'phah (1) 


Zo' rath-ites (8) 


Zi'>(9) 


Ziph' i-on (2) 


Zo' re-ah (9) 


Zib'e-on 


Ziph'ites (8) 


Zo' rites (9) 


Zib'i-on 


Zi'phron (1) 


*Zo-rob'a-bel 


Zich'ri(S) 


Zip' por 


Zu'ar 


ZiVri 


Zip-po'rah(13)(l6) 


Zuph 


Zid' dim 


Zith'ri(3) 


Zur 


Zid-ki'jah (15) 


Ziz 


Zu'ri-el(13) 


Zi' don, or Si' don 


Zi'za(l)(9) 


Zu-ri-shad' da-i (5) 


Zi-do' iii-ans 


Zi'zah(l)(9) 


Zu'zims 



* Zorobabel. See Zabulon. 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY 



OF 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 

E B A* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
BATHSHEBA, Elisheba, Beersheba. 

ADA IDA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Shemida. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Eliada, Jehoida, Bethsaida, Adida. 

EA EGA ECHA UPHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Laodicea, Chaldea, Judea, Arimathea, Idumea, Casarea, 
Berea, Iturea, Osea, Hosea, Omega, Hasupha. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cenchrea, Sabtecha. 

ASHA ISHA USHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Elisha, Jerusha. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Baasha, Shalisha. 

ATHA ITHA UTHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Jegar-Sahadutha, Dalmanutha. 

* For the pronunciation of the final a in this selection, see Rule the 9th. 



( 224 ) 

decent the Antepenultimate. 

Gabatha, Gabbatha, Amadatha, Hammedatha, Parshandatha, 
Ephphatha, Tirshatha, Admatha, Caphenatha, Poratha, Achme- 
tha, Tabitha, Golgotha. 

IA 

(Pronounced in two syllables,) 

decent the Penultimate. 

Seleucia*, Japhia, Adalia, Bethulia, Nethania, Chenania, 
Jaazania, Jamnia, Samaria, Hezia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Achaia, Arabia, Thracia, Samothracia, Grecia, Cilicia, Cappa- 
docia, Seleucia, Media, India, Pindia, Claudia, Phrygia, An- 
tiochia, Casiphia, Philadelphia, Apphia, Igdalia, Julia, Pamphy- 
lia, Mesopotamia, Armenia, Lycaonia, Macedonia, Apollonia, 
Junia, Ethiopia, Samaria, Adria; Alexandria, Celosyria, Syria, 
Assyria, Asia,^ Persia, Mysia, Galatia, Dalmatia, Philistia. 

IK A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Elika. 

ALA ELA ILA AMA EMA IMA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ambela, Arbela, Macphela. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Magdala, Aquila, Aceldama, Apherema, Ashima, Jemima. 

ANA ENA INA ONA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Diana, Tryphena, Hyena, Palestina, Barjona. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abana, Hashbadana, Amana, Ecbatana. 

* For this word and Samaria, Antiochia, and Alexandria) see the Initial Voca- 
bulary of Greek and Latin Proper Names. Also Rule 30th prefixed to the 
Initial Vocabulary, 



( 225 ) 
O A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Gilboa, Tekoa, Siloa, Eshtemoa. 

ARA ERA IRA URA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Guzara, Ahira, Sapphira, Thyatira, Bethsura. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Baara, Bethabara, Patara, Potiphera, Sisera. 

ASA OSA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cleasa, Tryphosa. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Adasa, Amasa. 

ATA ETA ITA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ephphata, Achmeta, Melita, Hatita. 

AVA UA AZA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Ahava, Malchishua, Elishua, Shamua, Jahaza. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jeshua, Abishua, Joshua. 

AB IB OB UB 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Eliab, Sennacherib, Ishbi-Benob, Ahitob, Ahitub. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abinadab, Aminadab, Jehonadab, Jonadab, Chileab, Aholiab, 
Magor-Missabib, Aminadib^ Eliashib, BUalzebub, Beelzebub. 

AC UC 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Isaac, Syriac, Abacuc, Habbacuc. 



( 226 ) 

AD ED ID OD UD 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Almodad, Arphaxad, Elihud, Ahihud, Ahiud, Ahilud. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Galaad, Josabad, Benhadad, Gilead, Zelophead, Zelophehad, 
Jochebed, Galeed, Icabod, Ammihud, Abiud. 

CE DEE LEE MEE AGE YCHE OHE ILE AME 
OME ANE ENE OE OSSE VE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Phenice, Bernice, Eunice, Elelohe, Salome, Magdalene* 
Abilene, Mitylene, Gyrene, Syene, Colosse, (Nazarene, pro- 
nounced in three syllables, with the accent on the last,) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Zebedee, Galilee, Ptolemee, Bethphage, Syntyche, Subile, 
Apame, Gethsemane, Siloe, Ninive. 

IT E*(in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Thisbite, Shuhite, Abiezrite, Gittite, Hittite, Hivite, Buzite. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Harodite, Agagite, Areopagite, Gergashite, Morashite, Ha- 
ruphite, Ephrathite, Bethelite, Carmelite, Hamulite, Benjamite, 
Nehelamite, Shulamite, Shunamite, Edomite, Temanite, Gilo- 
nite, Shilonite, Horonite, Amorite, Jebusite. 

Accent the Preantepenultimate. 

Naatnathite, Jezreelite, Bethlehemite, Ephraimite, (Canaanite 
generally pronounced in three syllables, as if written Can-an-ite.) 

AG OG 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abishag, Hamongog. 

* Words of this termination have the accent of the words from which they 
are formed, and on this account are sometimes accented even on the preautepc- 
nultimate syllable ; as Bethlehemite from Bethlehem, and so of others. Words 
of this termination, therefore, of two syllables, have the accent on the penulti- 
mate syllable ; and words of three or more on the same syllable as their primi- 
tives. See Rule the 8th, page 175. 



( 227 ) 

BAH CAH DAH EAH CHAH SHAH THAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Zobazibah, Makkedah, Abidah, Elishah. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dinhabah, Aholibah, Meribah, Abelbethmacah, Abadah, 
Moladah, Zeredah, Jedidah, Gibeah, Shimeah, Zaphnath- 
Paaneah, Meachah, Berachah, Baashah, Eliathah. 

AIAH EIAH 

(Ai and ei pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

*Micaiah, Michaiah, Benaiah, Isaiah, Jphedeiah, Maaseiah. 
(Ai pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Adaiah, Pedaiah, Semaiah, Seraiah, Asaiah. 

IAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abiah, Rheabiah, Zibiah, Tobiah, Maadiah, Zebadiah, Oba- 
diah, Noadiah, Jedidiah, Ahiah, Pekahiah, Jezrahiah, Barachi- 
ah, Japhiah, Bithiah, Hezekiah, Helkiah, Zedekiah, Adaliah, 
Gedaliah, Igdaliah, Athaliah, Hackaliah, Remaliah, Nehemiah, 
Shelemiah, Meshelemiah, Jeremiah, Shebaniah, Zephaniah, 
Nethaniah, Chenaniah, Hananiah, Coniah, Jeconiah, Sheariah, 
Zachariah, Zechariah, Amariah, Shemariah, Azariah, Neariah, 
Moriah, Uriah, Josiah, Messiah, Shephatiah, Pelatiah, Ahaziah, 
Amaziah, Asaziah, Uzziah. 

J A H 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aijah, Abijah, Jehidijah, Ahijah, Elijah, Adonijah, Irijah, 
Tobadonijah, Urijah, Hallelujah, Zerujah. 

* For the pronunciation of the two last syllables of these words, see Rule 
5th prefixed to Scripture Proper Names, page 173, 174. 



KAH LAH MAH NAH OAH RAH SAH TAH VAH 

UAH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Rebekah, Azekah, Machpelah, Aholah, Abel-meholah, Beu- 
lah, Elkanah, Hannah, Kirjath-sannah, Harbonah, Hashmonah, 
Zalmonah, Shiloah, Noah, Manoah, Zanoah, Uzzen-sherah, 
Zipporah, Keturah, Hadassah, Malchishuah, Shammuah, 
JEHOVAH, Zeruah. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Marrekah, Baalah, Shuthelah, Telmelah, Methuselah, Hachi- 
lah, Hackilah, Dalilah, Delilah, Havilah, Raamah, Aholiba- 
mah, Adamah, Elishamah, Ruhamah, Loruhamah, Kedemah, 
Ashimah, Jemimah, Penninah, Baarah, Taberah, Deborah, 
Ephratah, Paruah. 

ACH ECH OCH 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Merodach, Evil-merodach. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ahisamach, Ebed-melech, Abimelech, Ahimelech, Elime- 
lech, Alammelech, Anammelech, Adrammelech, Regemmelech, 
Nathan- melech, Arioch, Antioch. 

KEH LEH VEH APH EPH ASH ESH 1SH 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Elealeh, Elioreph, Jehoash. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rabshakeh, Nineveh, Ebiasaph, Bethshemesh, Enshemesh, 
Carchemish. 

ATH ETH ITH OTH UTH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Goliath, Jehovah-jireth, Hazar-maveth, Baal-berith, Reho- 
both, Arioth, Nebaioth*, Naioth, Moseroth, Hazeroth, Pihahi- 
roth, Mosoroth, Allon-bachuth. 



* The at in this and the next word form one syllable. See Rule 5, p. 173. 



( 229 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mahalath, Bashemath, Asenath, Daberath, Elisabeth, Dab- 
basheth, Jerubbesheth, Ishbosheth, Mephibosheih, Haroshetb, 
Zoheleth, Bechtileth, Shibboleth, Tanhumeth, Genesareth, 
Asbazareth, Nazareth, Mazzareth, Kirharaseth, Shelomith, 
Sheminith, Lapidoth, Anathoth, Kerioth, Shemiramoth, Kede- 
moth, Ahemoth, Jerimoth, Sigionoth, Ashtaroth, Mazzaroth. 

AI 

(Pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chelubai, Asmadai, Sheshai, Sliimsbai, Hushai, Zilthai, 
Berothai, Talmai, Tolmai, Sinai, Talnai, Arbonai, Sarai, Sippai, 
Bezai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Mordecai, Sibbachai, Chephar-Hammonai, Paarai. 

AI 

(Pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Zabbai, Babai, Nebai, Shobai, Subai, Zaccai, Shaddai, Ami- 
shaddai, Aridai, Heldai, Hegai, Hagg'ai, Belgai, Bilgai, Abishai, 
Uthai, Adlai, Barzillai, Ulai, Sisamai, Shalmai, Shammai, 
Eliaenai, Tatnai, Shether-boznai, Naharai, Sharai, Shamsherai, 
Shitrai, Arisai, Bastai, Bavai, Bigvai, Uzai. 

DI El LI MI NI 01 PI RI UI ZI. 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Areli, Lb'ammi, Talithacumi, Gideoni, Benoni, Hazeleponi, 
Philippi, Gehazi. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Engedi, Simei, Shimei, Edrei, Bethbirei, Abisei, Baali, 
Naphthali, Nepththali, Pateoli, Adami, Naomi, Hanani, Beer- 
lahairoi, Mehari, Haahashtari, Jesiii. 

EK UK 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Adonizedek, Adonibezek. 



( 230 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Melchizedek, Amalek, Habbakkuk. 

AAL EAL IAL ITAL UTAL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Baal, Kirjath-baal, Hamutal. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Meribbaal, Eshbaal, Ethbaal, Jerubaal, Tabeal, Belial, Abital. 

AEL ABEL EBEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Jael, Abel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Gabael, Michael, Raphael, Mishael, Mehujael, Abimael, 
Ishmael, Ismael, Anael, Nathanael, Israel, Asael, Zerubbabel, 
Zerobabel, Mehetabel, Jezebel. 

EEL GEL AHEL ACHEL APHEL OPHEL ETHEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Enrogel, Rachel, Elbethel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Tabeel, Abdeel, Japhaleel, Mahaleel, Bezaleel, Hanameel, 
Jerahmeel, Hananeel, Nathaneel, Jabneel, Jezreel, Hazeel, 
Asahel, Baracel, Amraphel, Achitophel. 

IEL KEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Peniel, Uzziel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abiel, Tobiel, Adiel, Abdiel, Gaddiel, Pagiel, Salathiel, 
Ithiel, Ezekiel, Gamaliel, Shelumiel, Daniel, Othniel, Ariel, 
Gabriel, Uriel, Shealtiel, Putiel, Haziel, Hiddekel. 

UEL EZEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Deuel, Raguel, Bethuel, Pethuel, Hamuel, Jemuel, Kemuel, 
Nemuel, Phanuel, Penuel, Jeruel, Bethezel. 



( 231 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
*Samuel, Lemuel, Emanuel, Immanuel. 

AI L 

(Pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
A bih ail. 

AIL 

(Pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abigail. 

OL UL 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Bethgamul. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Eshtaol 

ODAM AHAM IAM IJAM IKAM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Elmodam, Abijam, Ahikam. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abraham, Miriam, Adonikam. 

0AM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Rehoboam, Roboam, Jeroboam. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Siloam, Abinoam, Ahinoam. 

ARAM 1RAM ORAM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Padanaram, Abiram, Hiram, Adoniram, Adoram, Hadoram, 
Jehoram. 

* See Rule the 17th prefixed to Scripture Proper Nainei, page 179. 



( 232 ) 
AHEM EHEM ALEM EREM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
JMenahem, Bethlehem, Jerusalem, Beth-haccerem. 

AIM* 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chusan-Rishathaim, Kirjathaim, Bethdiblathaim, Ramathaim, 
Adithaim, Misrephothmaim, Abelmaim, Mahanaim, Manha- 
naim, Horonaim, Shaaraim, Adoraim, Sepharvaim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rephaim, Dothaim, Eglaim, Carnaim, Sharaim, Ephraim, 
Beth-ephraim, Mizraim, Abel-mizraim. 

BIM CHIM PHIM KIM LIM NIM RIM Z1M 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sarsechim, Zeboim, Kirjatharim, Bahurim, Kelkath-hazurim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

Cherubim, Lehabim, Rephidim, Seraphim, Teraphim, Elia- 
kim, Jehoiakim, Joiakim, Joakim, Baalim, Dedanim, Ethanim, 
Abarim, Bethhaccerim, Kirjath-je'arim, Hazerim, Baal-perazim, 
Gerizim, Gazizim. 

DOM LOM AUM IUM NUM RUM TUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Obededon, Appii-forum, Miletum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abishalom, Absalom, Capernaum, Rhegium, Trogyllium, 
Iconium, Adranvyttium, Galbanum. 

AAN CAN DAN EAN THAN IAN MAN NAN 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Memucan, Chaldean, Ahiman, Elhanan, Johanan, Haman. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Canaan, Chanaan, Merodach-baladan, Nebuzaradan, Elna- 

* In this selection the ai form distinct syllables. See Rule 16, page 179. 



( 253 ) 

than, Jonathan, Midian, Indian, Phrygian, Italian, Macedonian, 
Ethiopian, Syrian, Assyrian, Egyptian, Na'aman. 

AEN YEN CHIN MIN ZIN 

decent the Penultimate. 
Manaen, Bethaven, Chorazin. 

decent the Antepenultimate. 
Jehoiachin, Benjamin. 

EON AGON EPHON ASHON AION ION ALON 
ELON ULON YLON MON NON RON YON 
THUN RUN 

decent the Penultimate. 

Baal-meon, Beth-dagon, Baal-zephon, Naashon, Higgaion, 
Shiggaion, Chilion, Orion, Esdrelon, Baal-hamon, Philemon, 
Abiron, Beth-horon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gibeon, Zibeon, Gedeon, Gideon, Simeon, Pirathon, Hero- 
dion, Camion, Sirion, Ascalon, Ajalon, Askelon, Zebulon, 
Babylon, Jeshimon, Tabrimon, Solomon, Lebanon, Aaron, 
Apollyon, Jeduthun, Jeshurun. 

EGO ICHO HIO LIO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ahio. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abednego, Jericho, Gallio. 

AR ER IR OR UR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ahisar, Baal-tamar, Balthasar, Eleazar, Eziongeber, Tig- 
lath-pileser, Shalmaneser, Hadadezer, Abiezer, Ahiezer, Elie- 
zer, Romantiezer, Ebenezer, Joezer, Sharezer, Havoth-jair, 
Asnoth-tabor, Beth-peor, Baal-peor, Nicanor, Philometor. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Issachar, Potiphar, Abiathar, Ithamar, Shemeber, Lucifer, 
Chedorlaomer, Aroer, Sosipater, Sopater, Achior, Nebucho- 
donosor, Eupator, Shedeur, Abishur, Pedahzur. 



( 234 ) 

AAS BAS EAS PHAS IAS LAS MAS NAS OAS PAS 

RAS TAS YAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Oseas, Esaias, Tobias, Sedecias, Abadias, Asadias, Abdias, 
Barachias, Ezechias, Mattathias, Matthias, Ezekias, Neemias, 
Jeremias, Ananias, Assanias, Azarias, Ezerias, Josias, Ozias, 
Bageas, Aretas, Onyas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Annaas, Barsabas, Patrobas, Eneas, Phineas, Caiaphas, Cleo- 
phas, Herodias, Euodias, Georgias, Amplias, Lysanias, Ga- 
brias, Tiberias, Lysias, Nicolas, Artemas, Elymas, Parmenas, 
Siloas, Antipas, Epaphras. 

CES DES EES GES HES LES NES SES TES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Gentiles*, Rameses, Mithridates, Euphrates. 
Accent the ' Antepenultimate. 

Rabsaces, Arsaces, Nomades, Phinees, Astyages, Diotrephes, 
Epiphanes, Tahapanes, Hermogenes, Taphenes, Calisthenes, 
Sosthenes, Eumenes. 

ENES AND INES 

(In one syllable.) 
Accent the Ultimate. 
Gadarenes, Agarenes, Hagarenes. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Philistines, (pronounced like Philistins.) 

ITES 

(Pronounced in one syllable.) 

[Words of this termination have the accent of the words from 
which they are formed, which sometimes occasions the accent 
to be placed even on the preantepenultimate syllable, as 

* Gentiles. This may be considered as an English word, and should be pro- 
nounced in two syllables, as if written Jen-tiles, the last syllable as the plural 
of tile. 






( 235 ) 

Gileadites from Gilead, and so of others. Words of this ter- 
mination therefore, of two syllables, have the accent on the pe- 
nultimate syllable ; and words of three or more on the same syl- 
lable as their primitives.] 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Gadites, Kenites, Jammites, Levites, Hittites, Hivites. 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rechabites, Moabites, Gergeshites, Nahathites, Kohathites, 
Pelethites, Cherethites, Uzzielites, Tarpelites, Elamites, Edo- 
niites, Reubenites, Ammonites, Hermonites, Ekronites, Haga- 
rites, Nazarites, Amorites, Geshurites, Jebusites, Ninevites, 
Jesuites, Perizzites. 

Accent the Preantepenultimate. 

Gileadites, Amalekites, Ishmaelites, Israelites, Midianites, 
Gibeonites, Aaronites. 

OTES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Zelotes. 

IS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
ElimUis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Antiochis, Amathis, Baalis, Decapolis, Neapolis, Hierapolis, 
Persepolis, Amphipolis, Tripolis, Nicopolis, Scythopolis, Sa- 
lamis, Damaris, Vabsaris, Antipatris, Atargatis. 

IMS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Emims, Zamzummims, Zuzims. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rephaims, Gammadims, Cherethims, Anakims, Nethenims, 
Chemarims, 



( 236 ) 

AN S 
decent the Penultimate. 

Sabeans, Laodiceans, Assideans, Galileans, Idu means, Epi- 
cureans. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arabians, Grecians, Herodians, Antiochians, Corinthians, 
Parthians, Scythians, Athenians, Cyrenians, Macedonians, 
Zidonians, Babylonians, Lacedemonians, Ethiopians, Cyprians, 
Syrians, Assyrians, Tyrians, Ephesians, Persians, Galatians, 
Cretians, Egyptians, Nicolaitans, Scythopolitans, Samaritans, 
Libyans. 

MOS NOS AUS BUS CUS DUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Archelaus, Menelaus, Abubus, Andronicus, Seleucus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pergamos, Stephanos, Emmaus, Agabus, Bartacus, Achaicus, 
Tychicus, Aradus. 

EUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daddeus, Asmodeus, Aggeus, Zaccheus, Ptolemeus, Macca- 
beus, Lebbeus, Cendebeus, Thaddeus, Mardocheus, Mordo- 
cheus, Alpheus, Timeus, Bartimeus, Hymeneus, Elizeus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Dositheus, Timotheus, Nereus. 

GUS CHUS THUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Areopagus, Philologus, Lysimachus, Antiochus, Eutychus, 
Amadathus. 

IU S 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Darius. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Gaius, Athenobius, Cornelius, Numenius, Cyrenius, Apol- 



( 237 ) 

lonius, Tiberius, Demetrius, Mercurius, Dionysius, Pontius, 
Tertius. 

LUS MUS NUS RUS SUS TUS 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Aristobulus, Eubulus, Nicodemus, Ecanus, Hircanus, Aura- 
nus, Sylvanus, Ahasuerus, Assuerus, Heliodorus, Arcturus, 
Bar-jesus, Fortunatus, Philetus, Epaphroditus, Azotus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Attalus, Theophilus, Alcimus, Trophimus, Onesimus, Didy- 
mus, Libanus, Antilibanus, Sarchedonus, Acheacharus, Laza- 
rus, Citherus, Elutherus, Jairus, Prochorus, Onesiphorus, Asa- 
pharasus, Ephesus, Epenetus, Asyncritus. 

AT ET OT 1ST OST 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ararat, Eliphalet, Gennesaret, Iscariot, Antichrist, Pentecost. 

EU HU ENU EW MY 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Casleu, Chisleu, Abihu, Andrew. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jehovah- Tsidkenu, Bartholomew, Jeremy. 

BAZ GAZ HAZ PHAZ 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Mahar-shalat-hash-baz, Shaash-gaz, Eliphaz, 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jehoahaz. 






OBSERVATIONS 

ON THE 

GREEK AND LATIN 
ACCENT AND QUANTITY ; 

WITH SOME 

PROBABLE CONJECTURES 

ON 

THE METHOD OF FREEING THEM FROM THE OBSCURITY 
AND CONTRADICTION IN WHICH THEY ARE IN- 
VOLVED, BOTH BY THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS. 

" Nullius addict us jurare in verba magistri." Horace. 



( 240 ) 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



AFTER the many learned pens which have been employed on 
the subject of the following Observations, the Author would have 
been much ashamed of obtruding his humble opinion on so deli- 
cate a point, had he not flattered himself that he had taken a ma- 
terial circumstance into the account, which had been entirely 
overlooked by almost every writer he had met with. 

It is not a little astonishing, that when the nature of the human 
voice forms so great a part of the inquiry into accent and quan- 
tity, its most marking distinctions should have been so little 
attended to. From a perusal of every writer on the subject*, 
one would be led to suppose that high and low, loud and soft, and 
quick and slow, were the only modifications of which the voice 
was susceptible ; and that the inflexions of the voice, which dis- 
tinguish speaking from singing, did not exist. Possessed, there- 
fore, of this distinction of sounds, the Author at least brings 
something new into the inquiry : and if, even with this advantage, 
he should fail of throwing light on the subject, he is sure he 
shall be entitled to the indulgence of the learned, as they fully 
understand the difficulty of the question. 

* The only exception to this general assertion is Mr. Steele, the author of 
Prosodia Rationalis ; but the design of this gentleman is not so much to illustrate 
the accent and quantity of the Greek language as to prove the possibility of 
forming a notation of speaking sounds for our own, and of reducing them to a 
musical scale, and accompanying them with instruments. The attempt is un- 
doubtedly laudable, but no farther useful than to show the impossibility of it by 
the very method he has taken to explain it ; for it is wrapped up in such an im. 
penetrable cloud of music as to be unintelligible to any but musicians ; and the 
distinctions of sound are so nice and numerous as to discourage the most perse- 
vering student from labouring to understand him. After all, what light can we 
expect will be thrown on this subject by one who, notwithstanding the infinites- 
simal distinctions he makes between similar sounds, says, that the u in ugly, and 
the e in met and get, are diphthongs ; that the a in may is long, and the same let- 
ter in nation short ; and that the u in you, use, &c. is always acuto-grave, and 
the i in idle, try, fee. grave-acute? 



( 241 ) 

CONTENTS. 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

*-> PAGE 

I HE different states of the voice 244 

A definition of accent 245 

All the different modifications of the voice exemplified . . 247 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT ANT} 

QUANTITY. 

The necessity of understanding the accent and quantity of 
our own language before we attempt to settle the accent 
and quantity oj the Greek and Latin ...... 25 1 

What English quantity is . . . . . ..... .252 

That it is entirely independent on accent ib. 

Mr. Sheridan's erroneous opinion of English accent . . 253 
His definition of accent applicable only to singing in a mo- 
notone 255 

The true distinction between singing and speaking laid down ib, 
Singing and speaking tones as essentially distinct as motion 

and rest ib. 

Recitative real singing, and not a medium between singing 

and speaking ib. 

The true definition of English accent . 256 

Mr. Fowler's errour zvith respect to the nature of the Eng- 
lish and Scotch accent (Note) 257 

The true difference between the English and Scotch accent 26 1 
Some nt tempts to form a precise idea of the quantity of the 

Greek and Latin languages 262 

Dr. Gaily s idea of Greek and Latin quantity examined 263 
If quantity in these languages consisted in lengthening or 
shortening the sound of the vowel, it necessarily rendered 
the pronunciation of words very different, as they zoere 

differently arranged 265 

Opposite opinions of learned men concerning the nature of 

the Greek and Latin accent . . 

R 



242 CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

The definition which the ancients gave of the acute accent 
unintelligible, without having recourse to the system of 
the inflexions of the speaking voice 268 

An attempt to reconcile the accent and quantity of the an- 
cients, by reading a passage in Homer arid rirgil, ac- 
cording to the ideas of accent and quantity here laid down 272 

The only four possible ways of pronouncing these passages 
Without singing 273 

The only probable method pointed out ib. 

This method renders the reading very monotonous ; but this 
must necessarily be the case, let us adopt what system we 
will 274 

The definition of the circumflex accent, a confirmation of 
the system here adopted 275 

The monotony of the Greek and Latin languages not more 
extraordinary than the poverty of their music, and the 
seeming absurdity of their dramatic entertainments . . 276 

Probable causes of the obscurity and confusion in which this 
subject is involved, both among the ancients and moderns 282 



PREPAftAtOKY 



( 243 ) 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS 



As a perusal of the Observations on Greek and Latin Accent 
and Quantity requires a more intimate acquaintance with the na- 
ture of the voice than is generally brought to the study of that 
subject, it may not be improper to lay before the reader such an 
explanation of speaking sounds, as may enable him to distinguish 
between high and loud, soft and low, forcibleness and length, 
and feebleness and shortness, which are so often confounded, and 
which consequently produce such confusion and obscurity among 
our best prosodists. 

But as describing such sounds upon paper as have no definite 
terms appropriated to them, like those of music, is a new and 
difficult task, the reader must be requested to give as nice an at- 
tention as possible to those sounds and inflexions of voice, which 
spontaneously annex themselves to certain forms of speech, and 
which, from their familiarity, are apt to pass unnoticed. But if 
experience were out of the question, and we were only ac^. 
quainted with the organic formation of human sounds, we must 
necessarily distinguish them into five kinds : namely, the monotone, 
or one sound continuing a perceptible time in one note, which is 
the case with all musical sounds; a sound beginning low and 
sliding higher, or beginning high and sliding lower, without any 
perceptible intervals, which is essential to all speaking sounds. 
The two last may be called simple slides or inflexions ; and these 
may be so combined as to begin with that which rises, and end 
with that which falls, or to begin with that which falls, and end 



244 PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

with that which rises : and if this combination of different in- 
flexions be pronounced with one impulse or explosion of the 
voice, it may not improperly be called the circumflex or com- 
pound inflexion ; and this monotone, the two simple and the two 
compound inflexions, are the only modifications, independent on 
the passions, of which the human voice is susceptible. 

The different States of the Voice. 

The modifications of the voice which have just been enu- 
merated may be called absolute ; because they cannot be con- 
verted into each other, but must remain decidedly what they are ; 
while different states of the voice, as high and low, loud and 
soft, quick and slow, are only comparative terms, since what is 
high in one case may be low in another, and so of the rest. Be- 
side, therefore, the modifications of voice which have been 
described, the only varieties remaining of which the human voice 
is capable, except those produced by the passions, are high, low, 
loud, soft, quick, slow, forcible, and feeble. Though high and 
loud, and low and soft, are frequently confounded, yet, when 
considered distinctly, their difference is easily understood ; as if 
we strike a large bell with a deep tone, though it gives a 
very loud tone, it will still be a low one : and if we strike a 
small bell with a high tone, it will still be a high tone, though the 
stroke be ever so soft ; a quick tone in music is that in which the 
same tone continues but a short time, and a slow tone where it 
continues longer ; but in speaking, a quick tone is that when the 
slide rises from low to high, or from high to low, in a, short 
time, and a slow tone the reverse ; while forcible and feeble 
seem to be severally compounded of two of these simple states ; 
that is, force seems to be loudness and quickness, either in a 
high or low tone also ; and feebleness seems to be softness 
and slowness, either in a high or a low tone likewise. As to the 
tones of the passions, which are so many and various, these, 
in the opinion of one of the best judges in the kingdom, are 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 245 

qualities of sound, occasioned by certain vibrations of the orgnns 
of speech, independent on high, low, loud, soft, quick, slow, 
forcible, or feeble : which last may not improperly be called dif- 
ferent quantities of sound. 

It may not, perhaps, be unworthy of observation, how few are 
these principles, which, by a different combination with each 
other, produce that almost unbounded variety of which human 
speech consists. The different quantities of sound, as these dif- 
ferent states of the voice may be called, may be combined so as 
to form new varieties with any other that are not opposite to 
them. Thus high may be combined with either loud or soft, 
quick or slow ; that is, a high note may be sounded either in a 
loud or soft tone, and a low note may be sounded either in 
a loud or a soft tone also, and each of these tones may be pro- 
nounced either in a longer or a shorter time ; that is, more 
slowly or quickly ; while forcible seems to imply a degree of 
loudness and quickness, and feeble, a degree of softness and 
slowness, either in a high or a low tone. These combinations 
may, perhaps, be more easily conceived by classing them in con- 
trast with each other : 

High, loud, quick. 
Low, soft, slow. 

Forcible may be high, loud, and quick ; or low, loud, and quick. 
Feeble may be high, soft, and slow ; or low, soft, and slow. 

The different combinations of these states may be thus repre- 
sented : 

High, loud, quick, forcible. Low, loud, quick, forcible. 

High, loud, slow. Low, loud, slow. 

High, soft, quick. Low, soft, quick. 

High, soft, slow, feeble. Low, soft, slow, feeble. 

When these states of the voice are combined with the five mo- 
difications of voice above-mentioned, the varieties become ex- 
ceedingly numerous, but far from being incalculable : perhaps 



246 PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

they may amount (for I leave it to arithmeticians to reckon them 
exactly) to that number into which the ancients distinguished 
the notes of music, which, if I remember right, were about two 
hundred. 

These different states of the voice, if justly distinguished and 
associated, may serve to throw some light on the nature of 
accent. If, as Mr. Sheridan asserts, the accented syllable is only 
louder and not higher than the other syllables, every polysyllable 
is a perfect monotone. If the accented syllable be higher than 
the rest, which is the general opinion both among the ancients 
and moderns, this is true only when a word is pronounced alone, 
and without reference to any other word ; for when suspended at 
a comma, concluding a negative member followed by an affirma- 
tive, or asking a question beginning with a verb; if the un- 
accented syllable or syllables be the last, they are higher than the 
accented syllable, though not so loud. So that the true definition 
of accent is this : If the word be pronounced alone, and with- 
out any reference to other words, the accented syllable is both 
higher and louder than the other syllables either before or after 
it ; but if the word be suspended, as at the comma, if it end a 
negative member followed by an affirmative, or if it conclude an 
interrogative sentence beginning with a verb, in each case the ac- 
cented syllable is louder and higher than the preceding, and 
louder and lower than the succeeding syllables. This will be 
sufficiently exemplified in the following pages. In the mean time 
it may be observed, that if a degree of swiftness enters into the 
definition of force, and that the accented syllable is the most for- 
cible, it follows that the accent does not necessarily lengthen the 
syllable, and that if it falls on a long vowel, it is only a longer 
continuation of that force with which it quickly or suddenly com- 
menced ; for as the voice is an efflux of air, and air is a fluid like 
water, we may conceive a sudden gush of this fluid to continue 
either a longer or a shorter time, and thence form an idea of 
long or short quantity. If, however, this definition of force,, as 
applied to accent, should be erroneous or imaginary, let it be 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 247 

remembered it is an attempt to form a precise idea of what has 
hitherto been left in obscurity ; and that, if such an attempt should 
fail, it may at least induce some curious inquirer to show where 
it fails, and to substitute something better in its stead. 

If these observations are just, they may serve to show how ill- 
founded is the opinion of that infinite variety of voice of which 
speaking sounds consist. That a wonderful variety may arise 
from the key in which we speak, from the force or feebleness 
with which we pronounce, and from the tincture of passion or 
sentiment we infuse into the words, is acknowledged : but speak 
in what key we will, pronounce with what force or feebleness we 
please, and infuse whatever tincture of passion or sentiment 
we can imagine into the words, still they must necessarily be 
pronounced with one of the foregoing modifications of the voice. 
Let us go into whatever twists or zig-zags of tone we will, we 
cannot go out of the boundaries of these inflexions. These are 
the outlines on which all the force and colouring of speech is 
laid ; and these may be justly said to form the first principles 
of speaking sounds. 



Exemplification of the different Modifications of the Voice. 
The Monotone, the Rising Inflexion, the Falling Inflexion, 
the Rising Circumflex, and the Falling Circumflex. 

Though we seldom hear such a variety in reading or speaking 
as the sense and satisfaction of the ear demand, yet we hardly 
ever hear a pronunciation perfectly monotonous. In former 
times we might have found it in the midnight pronunciation of 
the Bell-man's verses at Christmas; and now the Town crier, 
as Shakspeare calls him, sometimes gives us a specimen of the 
monotonous in his vociferous exordium " This is to give notice /" 
The clerk of a court of justice also promulgates the will of the 
court by that barbarous metamorphosis of the old French word 



248 PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS* 

Oyez ! Oyez ! Hear ye ! Hear ye ! into O yes ! O yes ! in a per* 
feet sameness of voice, But however ridiculous the monotone 
in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters, in certain 
solemn and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderful pro- 
priety, and, by the uncommonness of its use, it adds greatly to 
that variety with which the ear is so much delighted. 

This monotone may be defined to be a continuation or same- 
ness of sound upon certain words or syllables, exactly like that 
produced by repeatedly striking a bell : such a stroke may be 
louder or softer, but continues in exactly the same pitch. To ex- 
press this tone, a horizontal line may be adopted ; such a one us 
is generally used to signify a long syllable in verse. This tone 
may be very properly introduced in some passages of Akenside's 
Pleasures- of Imagination, where he so finely describes the 
tales of horrour related by the village matron to her infant 
audience 



Breathing astonishment ! of witching rhymes 
And evil spirits ; of the death-bed call 
To him who robb'd the widow, and devoured 
The orphan's portion ; of unquiet souls 
Ris'n from the grave to ease the heavy guilt 
Of deeds in life conceal'd ; of shapes that walk 
At dead of night, and clank their chains, and wave 
The torcli of Hell around the murd'rer's bed. 



If the words " of shapes that walk at dead of night" are pro- 
nounced in a monotone, it will add wonderfully to the variety 
and solemnity of the passage. 

The rising inflexion is that upward turn of the voice we gene- 
rally use at the comma, or in asking a question beginning with a 
verb, as N6, say you ; did he say N6 ? This is commonly called 
a suspension of voice, and may not improperly be marked by the 
acute accent, thus ('). 

The falling inflexion is generally used at the semicolon and 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 249 

colon, and must necessarily be heard in answer to the former 
question : He did; he said N6. This inflexion, in a lower 
tone of voice is adopted at the end of almost every sentence, 
except the definite question, or that which begins with the 
verb. To express this inflexion, the grave accent seems adapted, 
thus 0). 

The rising circumflex begins with the falling inflexion, 
and ends with the rising upon the same syllable, and seems 
as it were to twist the voice upwards. This inflexion may 
be exemplified by the drawling tone we give to some words 
spoken ironically; as the word Clodius in Cicero's Oration 
for Milo. This turn of voice may be marked in this man- 
ner (v): 

" But it is foolish in us to compare Drusus Africanus 
" and ourselves with Clodius ; all our other calamities were 
" tolerable, but no one can patiently bear the death of 
C15dius." 

The falling circumflex begins with the rising inflexion, and 
ends with the falling upon the same syllable, and seems to 
twist the voice downwards. This inflexion seems generally to be 
used in ironical reproach; as on the word you in the following 
example : 

" So then you are the author of this conspiracy against me ? 
' It is to you that I am indebted for all the mischief that has 
" befallen me." 

If to these inflexions we add the distinction of a phrase into 
accentual portions, as 

Prosperity | gains friends | and adversity | tries them, | 

and pronouuce/ne/ids like an unaccented syllable of gains ; and 
like an unaccented syllable of adversity ; and them like an unac- 
cented syllable of tries; we have a clear idea of the relative 
forces of all the syllables, and approximate closely to a notation 
of speaking sounds. 



250 PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

For farther information respecting this new and curious 
analysis of the human voice, see Elements of Elocution, second 
edition, page 62; and Rhetorical Grammar , third edition, 
page 143. 



OBSERVATIONS 



( 251 ) 



OBSERVATIONS 



ON THE 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT, <trc. 



\. IN order to form an idea of the Accent and Quantity of the 
dead languages, it will be necessary first to understand what we 
mean by the accent and quantity of our own language*: and 
as quantity is supposed by some to regulate the accent in 



* It is not surprising that the accent and quantity of the ancients should be 
so obscure and mysterious, when two such learned men of our own nation as 
Mr. Forster and Dr. Gaily differ about the very existence of quantity in our 
own language. The former of these gentlemen maintains, that " the English 
" have both accent and quantity, and that no language can be without them/ 
but the latter asserts, that, " in the modern languages, the pronunciation doth 
" not depend upon a natural quantity, and therefore a greater liberty may be 
" allowed in the placing of accents." And in another place, speaking of the 
northern languages of Europe, he says, that " it was made impossible to think 
" of establishing quantity for a foundation of harmony in pronunciation. Hence 
" it became necessary to lay aside the consideration of quantity, and to have 
" recourse to accents. In these and some other passages, that writer," says 
Forster, " seems to look upon accents as alone regulating the pronunciation of 



252 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

English as well as in Greek and Latin, it will be necessary first 
to inquire, what we mean by long and short vowels, or, as some 
are pleased to term them, syllables. 

2. In English, then, we have no conception of quantity, aris- 
ing from any thing but the nature of the vowels, as they are pro- 
nounced long and short. Whatever retardation of voice in the 
sound of a vowel there might be in Greek or Latin before two 
consonants, and those often twin consonants, we find every 
vowel in this situation as easily pronounced short as long ; and 
the quantity is found to arise from the length or shortness we give 
to the vowel, and not from any obstruction of sound occasioned 
by the succeeding consonant. Thus the a in banish, banner, 
and banter, is short in all these words, and long in paper, taper, 
and vapour : the i long in miser, minor, and mitre, and short in 
misery, middle, and mistress : and so of the rest of the vowels ; 
and though the accent is on the first syllable of all these words, 
we see it perfectly compatible with either long or short quantity. 

3. As a farther proof of this, we may observe, that unac- 
cented vowels are frequently pronounced long when the accented 
vowels are short. Thus the o in Cicero, in English as well as in 
Latin pronunciation, is long, though unaccented: and the i short, 



" English, and quantity as excluded from it." Forster's Essay on Accent 
and Quantity, page 2S. 

As a farther proof of the total want of ear in a great Greek scholar Lord Moii- 
boddo says, " Our accents differ from the Greek in two material respects : 
" First, they are not appropriated to particular syllables of the word, but arc 
" laid upon different syllables, according to the fancy of the speaker, or rather 
" as it happens : for I believe no man speaking English does, by choice, give 
" an accent to one syllable of a word different from that which he gives to 
" another." 

" Two things, therefore, that, in my opinion, constitute our verse, are the 
" number of syllables, and the mixture of loud and soft, accordiug to certain 
11 rules. As to quantity, it is certainly not essential to our verse, and far less is 
" accent." See Steele's Prosodia Rationales, page 103. 110. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 253 

though under the accent. The same may be observed of the 
name of our English poet Lillo. So in our English words c6n- 
ctave, reconcile, chamomih, and the substantives confine, per- 
fume, and a thousand others, we see the first accented syllable 
short, and the final unaccented syllable long. Let those who 
contend, that the acute accent and long quantity are inseparable, 
call the first vowels of these words long, if they please ; but to 
those who make their ear and not their eye the judge of quantity, 
when compared with the last vowels, they will always be es- 
teemed short*. 

4. The next object of inquiry is, What is the nature of 
English accent ? Mr. Sheridanf , with his usual decision, tells 



* A late very learned and ingenious writer tells us, that our accent and 
quantity always coincide; he objects to himself the words signify, magnify, 
qualify, &c. where the final syllable is longer than the accented syllable; but 
this he asserts, with the greatest probability, was not the accentuation of our 
ancestors, who placed the accent on the last syllable which is naturally the 
longest. But this sufficiently proves, that the accent does not necessarily 
lengthen the syllable it falls on ; that is, if length consists in pronouncing the 
vowel long, which is the natural idea of long quantity, and not the duration 
of the voice upon a short vowel occasioned by the retardation of sounding two 
succeeding consonants, which is an idea, though sanctioned by antiquity, that 
has no foundation in nature ; for who, that is not prejudiced by early opinion, 
can suppose the first syllable of elbow to be long, and the last short? See Essay 
on Greek and Latin Prosodies. Printed for ROBSON. 

| The term (accent) with us has no reference to inflexion of the voice or 
musical notes, but only means a peculiar manner of distinguishing one syllable 
of a word from the rest. Lectures on Elocution, quarto edition, page 41. 

To illustrate the difference between the accent of the ancients and that of 
ours, (says Mr. Sheridan) let us suppose the same movements beat upon the 
drum, and sounded by the trumpet. Take, for instance, a succession of 
words, where the accent is on every second syllable, which forms an Iambic 
movement ; the only way by which a drum (as it is incapable of any change 
of notes; can mark that movement, is by striking a soft note first, followed 
by one more forcible, and so in succession. Let the same movement be 



254 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

us, that accent is only a greater force upon one syllable than 
another, without any relation to the elevation or depression 
of the voice; while almost every other writer on the .subject 
makes the elevation or depression of the voice inseparable from 
accent. When words are pronounced in a monotone, as the 
bellman repeats his verses, the crier pronounces his advertisement, 
or the clerk of a church gives out the psalm, we hear an ictus or 
accentual force upon the several accented syllables, which distin- 
guishes them from the others, but no more variety of tone than 
if we were to beat the syllables of the same words upon a drum, 
which may be louder or softer, but cannot be either higher 
or lower ; this is pronouncing according to Mr. Sheridan's defi- 
nition of accent : and this pronunciation certainly comes under 
the definition of singing : it is singing ill, indeed, as Julius Caesar 
said of a bad reader, but still it is singing, and therefore essen- 
tially different from speaking : for in speaking, the voice is con- 
tinually sliding upwards or downwards ; and in singing, it is leap-* 
ing, as it were, from a lower to a higher, or from a higher to a 
lower note : the only two possible ways of varying the human 
voice with respect to elevation or depression : so that when we 



Bounded by the trumpet in an alternation of high and low notes, and it will give 
a distinct idea of the difference between the English accent and those of the 
ancients. Art of Reading, page 75. 

I am sorry to find one of the most ingenious, learned, and candid inquirers 
into this subject, of the same opinion as Mr, Sheridan. The authority of Mr. 
Nares would have gone near to shake my own opinion, if I had not recollected 
that this gentleman confesses he cannot perceive the least of a diphthongal 
sound in the i in strike, which Dr. Wallis, he observes, excludes from the sim- 
ple sounds of the vowels. For if the definition of a vowel sound be, that it is 
formed by one position of the organs, nothing can be more perceptible than 
the double position of them in the present case, and that the noun eye, which 
is perfectly equivalent to the pronoun /, begins with the sound of a in father t 
and ends in that of c in equal. See Nares's English Orthoepy, page 2. 144. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 255 

are told by some writers on this subject, that the speaking of the 
ancients was a kind of singing, we are led into the errour of sup- 
posing, that singing and speaking differ only in degree, and not in 
kind; whereas they are just as different as motion and rest*. 

5. Whenever in speaking we adopt a singing tone, (which was 
formerly the case with Puritan preachers) it differs essentially 
from speaking, and can be pricked down upon paper, and be 
played upon a violin : and whenever in singing we adopt a speak- 
ing tone, the slide of this tone is so essentially distinct from 
singing as to shock the ear like the harshest discord. Those, 
therefore, who rank recitative as a medium between singing and 
speaking, are utterly ignorant of the nature of both. Recitative 
is just as much singing as what is called air, or any other species 
of musical composition. 

6. If we may have recourse to the eye, the most distinct and 
definite of all our senses, we may define musical notes to be ho- 
rizontal lines, and speaking tones oblique lines : the one rises 
from low to high, or falls from high to low by distinct inter- 
vals, as the following straight lines to the eye ; 



* It is not denied, that the slides iu speaking may sometimes leap, as it were, 
from a low to a high, or from a high to a low note ; that is, that there may be 
a very considerable interval between the end of one of those slides and the be- 
ginning of another; as between the high note in the word no in the question, 
Did he say No ? and the low note which the same word may adopt in the an- 
swer, No, he did not. But the sound which composes the note of speaking, as 
it may be called, and the sound which composes the note of singing, are essen- 
tially distinct ; the former is in continual motion, while the latter is for a given 
time at test. See Note to sect. 23. 



256 OBSERVATIONS ON THK 

the other slides upwards or downwards, as the following ob- 
lique lines,- / \ nor is the one more different to the eye 

/ \ 

than the other is to the ear. Those, therefore, who gravely tell 
us, that the enunciation of the ancients was a kind of musical 
speaking, impose upon us with words to which we can annex no 
ideas; and when they attempt to illustrate this musico-speaking 
pronunciation, by referring us to the Scotch and other dia- 
lects, they give us a rhetorical flourish instead of a real ex- 
ample ; for however the Scotch and other speakers may 
drawl out the accent, and give the vowel a greater length 
than the English, it is always in an oblique, and not in a 
straight line ; for the moment the straight line of sound, or 
the monotone, is adopted, we hear something essentially distinct 
from speaking. 

7. As high and low, loud and soft, forcible and feeble, are 
comparative terms, words of one syllable pronounced alone, 
and without relation to other words or syllables, cannot be said 
to have any accent*. The only distinction to which such 
words are liable, is an elevation or depression of voice, when 
we compare the beginning with the end of the word or syllable. 
Thus a monosyllable, considered singly, rises from a lower to 
a higher tone in the question No? which may therefore be 



* How the ancients could make every monosyllable accented, (that is, ac- 
cording to their definition of accent, pronounced with an elevated tone of 
voice,) without telling us how this elevation happened, whether it was an ele- 
vation of one part of the syllable above the other, or the elevation of one word 
or syllable above other words or syllables, how these distinctions, I say, so 
absolutely necessary to a precise idea of accent, should never be once men- 
tioned, can be resolved mto nothing but that attachment to words without 
ideas, and that neglect of experiment, which have involved the moderns in 
the sa'nie mist of ignorance and erronr. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 257 

called the acute accent, and falls from a higher to a lower tone 
upon the same word in the answer Nd, which may therefore be 
called the grave. But when the accented word or syllable is 
associated with unaccented words or syllables, the acute accent 
is louder and higher than the preceding, and louder and lower 
than the succeeding syllables, as in the question, Satisfactorily 
did he say ? and the grave accent both louder and higher than 
either the preceding or succeeding syllables in the answer 
He said satisfactorily. T nose wn wish to see this explained 
more at large may consult Elements of Elocution, page 183 ; or 
Rhetorical Grammar, 3d edit, page 77. 

8. This idea of accent is so evident upon experiment, as to 
defy contradiction ; and yet, such is the general ignorance of 
the modifications of the voice, that we find those who pretend 
to explain the nature of accent the most accurately, when they 
give us an example of the accent in any particular word, suppose 
it always pronounced affirmatively and alone*; that is, as 
if words were always pronounced with one inflexion of voice, 



* That excellent scholar Mr. Forster furnishes an additional instance of the 
possibility of uniting a deep and accurate knowledge of what is called the pro- 
sody of the ancients with a total ignorance of the accent and quantity of his own 
language. After a thousand examples to show how the English is susceptible of 
every kind of metre among the ancients, (though in all his examples he substL 
tutes English accent for Greek and Latin quantity) he proceeds to show the dif- 
ference between the English, the Irish, and the Scotch pronunciation. 

" The English join the acute and long time together, as in ll'berty : y short. 
" The Scotch observe our quantity, and alter our accent, liberty'; y short. 
" When I say they observe our quantity, I mean they pronounce the same s\\- 
" lable long which we do, but they make it longer. In respect to the ciicum- 
11 flex with which their pronunciation abounds : it may be remarked, that it is 
" not formed as the Greek, Latin, and English, of an acute and grave, but of a 
" grave and acute, vooc, ros, r6uud, English ; round, Scotch. 

" The Irish observe our quantity and accent too, but with a greater degree of 

*' spirit 
S 



<258 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

and as if there were no difference with respect to the nature of 
the accent, whether the word is an affirmation or a question, 
in one part of the sentence, or in another : when nothing can be 
more palpable to a correct ear than that the accents of the 



' spirit or emphasis, which Scaliger calls afflatio in latitudine, giving to most 
" syllables an aspiration." Essay on Accent and Quantity, page 75. 

Mr. Forster falls exactly into the mistake of Mr. Sheridan, though he has a 
quite different idea of accent. He supposes liberty always pronounced by an 
Englishman in one manner, and that as a single word, or at the end of a 
sentence : he has not the least notion of the different inflexion the same word 
may have accordingly as the accent is differently inflected, as we may plainly 
perceive in the following question : Is it liberty or licentiousness you plead for ? 
where the English raise the voice on the latter syllables, as the Scotch too fre- 
quently do. With respect to the quantity of the first syllable, which Mr. 
Forster says the Scotch preserve in this word, I must dissent from him totally ; 
for they preserve the accent, and alter the quantity, by pronouncing the first 
syllable as if written leeberty. If Mr. Forster calls this syllable long in the 
English pronunciation of it, I should be glad to be told of a shorter accented 
syllable than the first of liberty: if he says the accent being on it renders it 
long; I answer this subverts his whole system; for, if accent falling on any 
vowel, makes it long, the quantity of the Greek and Latin is overturned, and 
cano, in the first line of the YEneid, must be a spondee. 

This is the consequence of entering on the discussion of a difficult point, 
without first defining the terms ; nothing but confusion and contradiction can 
ensue. 

But I must give this writer great credit for his saying the Scotch pronuncia- 
tion abounds with the circumflex ; for this is really the case ; and the very cir- 
cumflex opposite to the Greek and Latin, beginning with the grave and ending 
with the acute. I am not, however, a little astonished that this did not show 
him how deficient the ancients were in this modification of the voice, which, 
though used too frequently in Scotland, is just as much in the human voice as 
the other circumflex ; and may be, and is often used in England, with the ut- 
most propriety. With respect to the common circumflex on Greek, Latin, and 
some French words, the accentual use of it is quite unknown, and it only stands 
for long quantity ; but both these circumflexes are demonstrably upon the 
human voice in speaking, and may be made as evident by experiment as the 

stress 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 259 

word voluntary in the following sentences are essentially different : 

His resignation was voluntary. 
He made a voluntary resignation. 

In both, the accent is on the first syllable. In the first sentence, 
the accented syllable is higher and louder than the other syllables ; 
and in the second, it is louder and lower than the rest. The 
same may be observed of the following question : 

Was his resignation voluntary or involuntary 

where the first syllable of the word voluntary is louder and 
lower than the succeeding syllables ; and in the word involun- 
tary it is louder and higher. Those who have not ears suffi- 
ciently delicate to discern this difference, ought never to open 
their lips about the acute or grave accent, as they are pleased to 
call them ; let them speak of accent as it relates to stress only, 
and not to elevation or depression of voice, and then they may 
speak intelligibly. 

9. A want of this discernment has betrayed Mr. Forster 
into obscurity and contradiction. To say nothing of his asserting 
that the English, Irish, and Scotch accents differ, (where accent 
cannot possibly mean stress, for then English verse would not 
be verse in Ireland and Scotland) what shall we think of his 



stress of an accented syllable by pronouncing the word on which it is placed. 
See Rhetorical Grammar, 3d edit, page 80. 

I must just take notice of the inaccuracy of Mr. Forster in saying the last 
syllable of liberty is short, and yet that it has the circumflex accent : this is 
contrary to all the prosody of antiquity, and contrary to the truth of the case 
in this instance ; for it is the length of the first syllable, arising from the cir- 
cumflex on it, which distinguishes the Scotch from the English pronunciation. 



260 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

telling us, that in England we pronounce the word majesty* 
with an acute accent, and long quantity upon the first syllable, 
and the two last syllables with the grave accent and short quan- 
tity ; and that in Scotland this word is pronounced with a grave 
accent, and long quantity on the first syllable, and with an acute 
accent and short quantity on the last ? Now, if by accent is meant 
stress, nothing is more evident than that the English and Scotch, 
with the exception of very few words, place the accent on the 
same syllable ; but if elevation be included in the idea of accent, 
it is as evident that the English pronounce the first syllable louder 
and higher than the two last, when they pronounce the word 
either singly, or as ending a sentence ; as 

He spoke against the king's majesty: 

and louder and lower than the two last when it is the last ac- 
cented word but one in a sentence, as 

He spoke against the majesty of the king : 

or when it is the last word in asking a question, beginning with a 
verb, as 

Did he dare to speak against the king's majesty ? 

10. Where then is the difference, it will be asked, between 
the English and Scotch pronunciation ? I answer, precisely ni 
this ; that the Scotch are apt to adopt the rising circumflex and 
long quantity where the English use the simple rising inflexion 



* Would not any one suppose, that by Mr. Forster's producing this word as 
an example of the English accent, that the English always pronounced it one 
way, and that as if it ended a declarative sentence? This is exactly like the 
mistake of Priscian in the word Natura. -See sect. 20, in the Notes. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 26 1 

and short quantity. Thus in the word majesty, as well as in 
every other of the same form, they generally adopt the rising 
inflexion, as in the two last sentences, whether it ends a ques- 
tion beginning with a verb, as, " Is this the picture of his 
majesty V or whether it ends an affirmative sentence, as, " This 
is the picture of his majesty" And it is the prevalence of 
this long quantity with the rising inflexion that forms the prin- 
cipal difference between the English and Scotch pronuncia- 
tion. 

1 1 . Having thus endeavoured to ascertain the accent and quan- 
tity of our own language, let us next inquire into the nature of the 
accent and quantity of the ancients*. 

12. The long quantity of the ancients must arise either from 
a prolongation of the sound of the vowel, or from that delay of 
voice which the pronunciation of two or more consonants in 
succession are supposed naturally to require. Now vowels 



* So much are the critics puzzled to reconcile the tragic and comic verses of 
the ancients to the laws of metre, that a learned writer in the Monthly Review, 
for May 1762, speaking of the corrections of Dr. Heath, in his notes or read- 
ings of the old Greek tragedians, says 

" These Emendations are much more excusable than such as are made merely 
" for the sake of the metre, the rules of which are so extremely vague and va- 
" rious, as they are laid down by the metrical critics, that we will venture to 
' say, any chapter in Robinson Crusoe might be reduced to measure by them. 
" This is not conjecture; the thing shall be proved. 

" As I was rummaging about her, lambicus dimeter hypercatalectus 

" I found several Dochmaicus 

" Things that I wanted, Dactyiicus dimeter 

" A fire shovel and tongs, Dochmaicus ex epitrito quarto et syllaba 

" Two brass kettles, Dochmaicus 

" A pot to make chocolate, Periodus brachycatalectus 

" Some horns of fine glaz'd powder, Euripideus 

'* A gridiron, and seve- Dnctylica penthimimeris 

** Ral other necessaries. Basis anapeestica cum syllaba." 



262 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

were said to be either long by nature, or long by position. 
Those long by nature* were such as were long, though succeeded 
by a single consonant, as the u in natura, and were a sort of 
exception to the general rule ; for a vowel before a single conso- 
nant was commonly short, as in every u in the word tumulus. 
Those vowels which were long by position were such as were 
succeeded by two or more .consonants, as the first o in sponsor : 
but if the long and short quantity of the ancients was the same 
distinction of the sound of the vowel as we make in the words 
cadence and magic, calling the first a long, and the second short, 
then the a in mater and pater *f- must have been pronounced 
like our a in later and latter ; and those vowels which were 
long by position, as the a in Bacchus and campus, must have 
been sounded by the ancients as we hear them in the English 
words bake and cane. 

J3. If therefore the long quantity of the ancients was no 
more than a retardation of voice on the consonants, or that du- 
ration of sound which an assemblage of consonants is supposed 
naturally to produce without making any alteration in the sound 
of the vowel, such long quantity as this an English ear has not 
the least idea of. Unless the sound of the vowel be altered, 
we have not any conception of a long or short syllable ; and the 



* If the long quantity of the Greek and Latin arose naturally from the re- 
tardation of sound occasioned by the succeeding consonants, the long vowels in 
this situation ought to have been termed long by nature, and those long vowels 
which come before single consonants should have been called long by custom : 
since it was nothing but custom made the vowel e in decus (honour) short, and 
in dedo (to give) long ; and the vowel o in ovum (an egg) long, and in ovo (to 
triumph) short. 

t I do not here enter into the question concerning the ancient sound of the 
Latin a, which I am convinced was like our a in water ; but whether it was like 
the a in paper, father, or water, is not of any importance in the present question j 
the quantity is the same, supposing it to have been any one of them. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 263 

first syllables of banish, banner, and banter, have, to our ears, 
exactly the same quantity. 

14. But if the long quantity of the ancients arose naturally 
from the obstruction the voice meets with in the pronunciation 
of two or more consonants, how does it happen that the preced- 
ing consonants do not lengthen the vowel as mugh as those 
which succeed ?* Dr. Gaily tells us, the reason of this is 
" that the vowel being the most essential part of the syllable, 
" the voice hastens to seize it ; and, in order to do this, it slurs 
u over all the consonants that are placed before it, so that the 
" voice suffers little or no delay. But the case of the consonant 
" that follows is not the same : it cannot be slurred over, but 
" must be pronounced full and distinct, otherwise it would run 
" into and be confounded with the following syllable. By this 
" mean the voice is delayed more in the latter than in the former 
" part of the syllable, and or' is longer than c-rgo, and w longer 
" than SnW 

I must own myself at a loss to conceive the force of this rea- 
sonings, I have always supposed the consonant, when it forms 
part of a syllable, to be as essential to its sound as the vowel : 
nor can I conceive why the latter consonants of a syllable may 
not be pronounced as rapidly as the former, without running the 
former syllable into the latter, and thus confounding them to- 
gether; since no such confusion arises when we end the first 
syllable with the vowel, and begin the following syllable with 
the consonants, as pro-crastino, pro-stratus, &c. as in this case 
there is no consonant to stop the first syllable, and prevent its 
running into the second; so that Dr. Gaily seems to have 
slurred over the matter rather than to have explained it : but as 
he is the only writer who has attempted to account for the man- 
ner in which quantity is produced by consonants, he is entitled to 
attention. 



* " Dissertation against pronouncing the Greek Language according to Ac- 
cents." Dissert, ii. page 50, second edition. 



264 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

15. In the first place, then, in words of more than one syllable 
but one consonant can belong to the preceding vowel, as the 
others must necessarily be considered as belonging to the succeed- 
ing vowel, and according to Dr. Gaily, must be hurried over ? 
that the voice may seize its favourite letter. As one consonant 
therefore does not -naturally produce long quantity, where is the 
delay if the other consonants are hurried over ? and, consequently, 
where is the long quantity which the delay is supposed to pro- 
duce ? This is Jike adding two nothings together to produce a 
something. 

16. But what does he mean by the necessity there is of pro- 
nouncing the latter consonant full and distinct, that it may not 
run into and be confounded with the following syllable ? Must 
not every consonant be pronounced full and distinct, whether 
we pronounce it rapidly or slowly, whether before or after the 
vowel ? Is not the str in stramen pronounced as full and dis- 
tinct as the same letters in castra, castrametor? &c. I know 
there is a shadow of difference by pronouncing the vowel in our 
short English manner so as to unite with the s, as if written 
cass; but if we make the preceding vowel long, as in case, and, 
according to the rules of syllabication laid down by Ramus, 
Ward, and the Latin grammarians, carry the consonants to the 
succeeding syllable, as if written cay-stray, we find these con- 
sonants pronounced exactly in the same manner : and this leads 
us to suppose that double consonants were the signs only, and 
not the efficients of long quantity : and that this same long 
quantity was not simply a duration of sound upon the conso- 
nants, but exactly what we call long quantity a lengthening of 
the sound by pronouncing the vowel open, as if we were to pro- 
nounce the a long in mater, by sounding it as if written may- 
ter; and the same letter short \npater, as if it were written patter*. 



* What exceedingly corroborates this idea of quantity is, the common or 
doubtful vowels as they are called j that IF, such as come before a mute and a 

liquid ; 



GREEK AND LATIfl ACCENT. 265 

17. The reason of our repugnance to admit of this analogy of 
quantity in the learned languages is, that a diametrically opposite 
analogy has been adopted in the English, and, I believe, in most 
modern tongues an analogy which makes the vowel long before 
one consonant, and short before more than one. 

18. If, however, the quantity of the ancients lay only in the 
vowel, which was lengthened and shortened in our manner by 
altering the sound, how strange must have been their poetical 
language, and how different from the words taken singly ! Thui 
the word nee, which, taken singly, must have been pronounced 
with the vowel short, like our English word neck in composi- 
tion, as in the line of Virgil, where it is long, 

" Fulgura, nee diri toties arsere cometae, 

must have been pronounced as if written neek; just as differently 
as the words proper, of, mankind, is, and man, in the line of 
Pope, would be pronounced by the same rule, 

" The proper study of mankind is man ; 

and as if written, 

" The propeer study ove mane-kind ees mane" 

When to this alteration of the quantity, by the means of succeed- 
ing consonants, we add that rule 

" Finale tu caesura brevem producere gaudet," 



liquid ; as the first a in patria, the e in refluo, &c. ; as in these words the vowel 
preceding the mute or liquid is either long or short, as the writer or speaker 
pleases to make it ; but if the consonants naturally retarded the sound of the 
syllable, so as to make it long, how could this be ? If the syllable was to be 
made long, did the speaker dwell longer on the consonants, and if it was to be 
made short, did he hurry them over? And did this make the difference in the 
quantity of these syllables? The utter impossibility of conceiving this to have 
been the case renders it highly probable that the long or short quantity lay only 
in the vowel. 



266 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

which makes the short or doubtful vowel long, that either im- 
mediately precedes the caesura, or concludes the hexameter 
verse what must be our astonishment at this very different 
sound of the words arising merely from a different collocation 
of them, and at the strange variety and ambiguity to the ear this 
difference must occasion* ! 

1 9. But if this system of quantity among the ancients appears 
strange and unaccountable, our wonder will not be diminished 
when we inquire into the nature of their accent. 

20. From what has been said of accent and quantity in our 
own language, we may conclude them to be essentially distinct 
and perfectly separable : nor is it to be doubted that they were 
equally separable in the learned languages : instances of this 
from the scholiasts and commentators are innumerable ; but so 
loose and indefinite are many of their expressions, so little do 
they seem acquainted with the analysis of the human voice, 
that a great number of quotations are produced to support the 
most opposite and contradictory systems. Thus Vossius, Hen- 
ninius, and Dr. Gaily, produce a great number of quotations 
which seem to confound accent and quantity, by making the 
acute accent and long quantity signify the same ; White, 
Michaelis, Melancthon, Forster, Primat, and many other men 
of learning, produce clouds of witnesses from the ancients to 
prove that accent and quantity are essentially different f. The 



* See this idea of the different sound of words, when taken singly, and when 
in composition, most excellently treated by the author of the Greek and Latin 
Prosodies, attributed to the present Bishop of St. Asaph, page 101. 

t It is not astonishing that learned men will wrangle with each other for 
whole pages about the sense of a word in Dionysius of Halicarnassus, upon the 
difference between singing and speaking sounds, when this difference is just as 
open to them by experiment as it was to him. Who can sufficiently admire the 
confidence of Isaac Vossius, who says" In cantu latius evagari sonos, quam in 
" recitalione aut communi sermone, utpote in quo vitiorum liabeatur, si vox 

" ultra 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 26? 

only thing they seem to agree in is, that the acute accent always 
raises the syllable on which it is placed higher than any other in 
the word*. This is certainly true, in English pronunciation, 
if we pronounce the word singly, and terminate it as if no other 
were to follow ; but if we pronounce it in a sentence, where it 
is the last accented word but one, or where it is at the end of a 
question beginning with a verb when we suspend the voice in 
expectation of an answer, we then find the latter syllables of 
the word, though unaccented, are pronounced higher than the 
accented syllable in the former part of the word. See No. 7. 

'21. But what are we to think of their saying, that every 
monosyllable is either aculed or circumflexedf ? If the acute 
accent signifies an elevation of voice, this, with respect to words 



-' ultra diapente seu tres tonos et semitonium, acuatur." In singing, the sound 
has a larger compass than in reading or common speaking, insomuch that in 
common discourse, whatever is higher than the diapente is held to be extremely 
vicious. 

* Thus Priscian. In unaquaque parte orationis arsis et thesis sunt velut in 
" hac parte natura : ut quando dico natu, elevatur vox et est arsis in tu: 
" quando vero ra deprimitur vox et est thesis." Any one would conclude from 
this description of the rising and falling of the voice upon this word, that it 
could only be pronounced one way, and that there was no difference in the 
comparative height of the vowel u in the two following sentences: 

Lucretius wrote a book De Rerum Natura. 
Lucretius wrote a book De Natura Rerum. 

Whereas it is evident that the word natura is susceptible of two different pro- 
nunciations : in the first sentence the syllable tu is louder and higher than the 
last ; and in the second it is louder and lower than the last ; and this confound- 
ing of loud with high, and soft with low, seems to be the great stumbling block, 
both of ancients and moderns. See No. 7, 8, &c. 

t Ea vero quae sunt syllabae unuis erunt acuta aut flexa ; ne sit aliqna vox sine 
acuta. Quinct. lib. i. c. 5. 



268 OBSERVATIONS ON THfl 

of one syllable, must mean elevated above some other word 
either preceding or succeeding, since elevation is a mere com- 
parative word ; but this is not once mentioned by them ; if it 
has any meaning, therefore, it must imply that the acute accent 
is the monosyllable, pronounced with, what I should call, the 
rising inflexion, or upward slide ; and then we can comprehend 
how a monosyllable may have the acute accent without refer- 
ence to any other word ; as when we begin a syllable low, and 
slide it higher, or begin it high, and slide it lower, it may be 
said to be acute or grave of itself; that is, when it is pronounced 
alone, and independent of other words. Unless we adopt this 
definition of the acute and grave, it will be impossible to con- 
ceive what the old grammarians mean when they speak of a 
monosyllable having the grave or the acute accent. Thus Di- 
omedes says on some words changing their accent " S\,post 
" adverbium cum gravi pronunciatur accentu, erit praepositio ; 
" si acuto erit adverbium, ut longo post tempore veni." 

22. It was a canon in the prosody of the Greeks and Ro- 
mans, that words of more than one syllable must have either an 
acute or a circumflex accent ; and that the other syllables, with- 
out an accent, were to be accounted grave : but if this be so, 
what are we to think of those numerous monosyllables, and the 
final syllables of those dissyllables that we see marked with 
the grave accent, as Ml*, rpo, o-t, @o?, 'AV^, *. r. A. ? " Why 
" these words," says Mr. Forster, " whatever Dr. Gaily may 
" conceive, had certainly their elevation on the last syllable :" 
and this opinion of Mr. Forster's is supported by some of the 
most respectable authorities.* 



* The seeming impossibility of reconciling accent and quantity made Herman 
tanderhardt, the author of a small treatise, entitled, " Arcanum Accentuum 
" Grtfeorum," consider the marks of Greek accentuation as referring not to syl- 
labic, but oratorical accent. But, as Mr. Forster observes, " if this supposition 

" were 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 

23. With respect to the power of the accent in both the 
Greek and Latin languages nothing can be better established 
by the ancient grammarians than that the acute accent did not 
lengthen the syllable it fell upon ; and that short syllables, re- 
maining short, had often the acute accent. This opinion has 
been irrefutably maintained by Mr. Forster*, and the author of 



" were true, we should not meet with the same word constantly accented in the 
" same manner as we see it at present. A word's oratorical accent will vary 
11 according to the general sentiment of the passage wherein it occurs ; but its 
" syllabic accent will be invariably the same, independent of its connexion with 
" other words in the same sentence, except in the case of enclitics and a few 
" others." Essay on Accent and Quantity, page 25. 

* But when Mr. Forster endeavours to explain how this is to be done, he has 
recourse to music. 

" Notwithstanding the reluctance of Vossius, Henninius, and thousands after 
" them, to admit the acute as compatible with a short time, if I could have them 
" near me with a flute in my hand, or rather with an organ before us, I would 
" engage to convince them of the consistency of these two. I would take any two 
" keys next to each other, one of which would consequently give a sound lower 
" than the other: suppose the word asih before us, or agougav; both which words 
" Vossius would circumflex on the penultimate, instead of giving an acute to 
" the first, according to our present marks : I would conformably to these marks 
" just touch the higher key for the initial a, and take my finger off immediately ; 
" and then touch the lower key, on which I would dwell longer than I did on the 
" higher, and that would give me a grave with a long time for the syllable si, 
11 the same lower key I would just touch again, and instantly leave it, which 
" would give me a grave with a short time for Je: atih. Now if this can be 
" done on a wind instrument within the narrow compass of two notes, it may be 
" done by the organs of human speech, which are of the nature of a wind iustru- 
" ment, in ordinary pronunciation. For the sounds of our voice in common 
" speech differ from those of such musical instruments, not in quality, but in 
" arithmetical discrete quantity or number only, as hath been observed before, 
" and is confirmed by the decisive judgment of that nice and discerning critic 
" Dionysius of Halicarnassus. Here then is, to demonstration, an acute tone con- 
**. sisteut with a short time, and a grave tone with a long one." P. 342, 343. 
To this I may add the observation made by the author of the Eisay on the Har- 
mony 



270 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

Observations on the Greek and Latin Prosodies ; though as 
strenuously denied by Dr. Gaily*, Isaac Vossius, and Hen- 
ninius ; and these last seem to have been persuaded of the in- 
separable concomitancy of the acute accent and long quantity, 
from the impossibility they supposed there was of separating 
them in any language. But if we make our ears and not our 
eyes judges of quantity, can any thing be more palpable than 
the short quantity of the accented syllables of proselyte, ano- 
dyne, tribune, and inmate ; and the long quantity of the final 
syllables of these words? And when we pronounce the Greek 
and Latin words, a-qxxXhu, fallo, aptpu, ambo, nothing can 
be more evident than the long quantity of the final vowel 



many of Language. " Strange it seems, that the author of this passage should 
" maintain an opinion so contrary to truth, so repugnant to his own purpose, so 
" belied by daily and hourly experience, as that the union of the acute tone, 
" with a short quantity, seldom occurs in English pronunciation, and is hardly 
" practicable by an English voice." And still more strange, I may add, is it, 
that these two authors should not see that the experiment, which is called a de- 
monstration, has nothing to do with the point in question. It regards tones that 
rise or fall by perceptible intervals, and not such as rise or fall by slides or im- 
perceptible ones. Let it once be allowed that the Greeks and Romans sung 
their language, instead of speaking it, and then the acute or grave accent, with 
long or short quantity, are easily conceived ; but it is not about musical, but 
speaking tones that we inquire: and though the authority of Dionysius of Hali- 
carnassns is cited for the nature of the speaking voice as distinct, in degree only 
and not in kind, from singing, I boldly assert that this is not matter of authority 
but of experiment, and that singing and speaking are as distinct as motion and 
rest. It is true some motion may be so slow as not to be perceived : but then 
it is to be considered as rest : as a curve may approach so near to a right 
line as not to be distinguishable from it ; but in these cases, where the senses 
and not the understanding are addressed, things are to be estimated for just 
what the senses value them at. De non apparentibus, et de non existentibus, 
eadam est ratio. 

* If the acute accent or stress, as Dr. Gaily calls it, made the short sylla- 
ble long, what becomes of the metre of verse? How will he scan '* Arma 
" virumquecano?" 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 2? 1 

though without the accent, and the short quantity of the initial and 
accented syllable. 

24. As to the long quantity arising from the succession of 
two consonants, which the ancients are uniform in asserting, if 
it did not mean that the preceding vowel was to lengthen its 
sound, as we should do by pronouncing the a in scatter as we do 
in skater, (one who skates) I have no conception of what it 
meant*; for if it meant that only the time of the syllable was 
prolonged, the vowel retaining the same sound, I must confess 
as utter an inability of comprehending this source of quantity in 
the Greek and Latin as in English. Banish, banner, and banter, 
have to our ears the first syllable equally short : the same may be 
observed of senate, seminary, sentence, and sentiment : and if, as 
an ingenious critic f has asserted, the ancients pronounced both the 
consonants in callidus,fallo, &c., that is, finishing one / by sepa- 
rating the tongue from the palate before the other is begun, such 
a pronunciation must necessarily augment the number of sylla- 
bles, nearly as if written calelidtis, falelo, &c., and is, therefore, 
contrary to all the rules of ancient prosody ; nor would this 
pronunciation to our ears give the least length to the preceding 
vowel, any more than the succeeding mute does in sentence and 
sentiment. 



* If the double consonants naturally made a syllable long, I should be glad 
to know how there could be exceptions to this rule ? How could Ammonius 
say that the second syllable of xaray^ua was long, when the word was used in 
one particular sense, and short in another ? And how could Cicero say, that the 
first letter of "mclytus was short, and the first of msanus and infelix long, if 
two succeeding consonants naturally lengthened the syllable? Dr. Forster, 
indeed, attempts to reconcile this contradiction, by observing that Cicero does 
not say, the first syllable of inclytus is short, but the first letter; but it may be 
demanded, what is it that makes the syllable long or short but the length or 
shortness of the vowel ? If the double consonants necessarily retard the sound 
of the vowel, the second syllable of Kara^a, and the first of inclytus, could 
not possibly be pronounced short ; and particularly the latter word could not be 
so pronounced, as it has the accent on the first syllable. See sect. 16, in the note. 

t Essay upon the Harmony of Language, page 228, 233. ROBSON, 1774. 



272 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

25. When these observations on the accent and quantity of 
the ancients are all put together, shall we wonder that the learu- 
ed and ingenious author of Elements of Criticism* should go so 
far as to assert, that the dactyls and spondees of hexameter verse, 
with respect to pronunciation, are merely ideal, not only with us, 
but that they were so with the ancients themselves ? Few, how- 
ever, will adopt an opinion which will necessarily imply that the 
Greek and Latin Critics were utterly ignorant of the nature of 
their own language : and every admirer of those excellent wri- 
ters will rather embrace any explanation of accent and quantity, 
than give up Dionysius of Haiicarnassus, Cicero, Quintilian, and 
Longinus. Suppose then, as a last refuge, we were to try to 
read a Greek or Latin verse, both by accent and qi antity in the 
manner they have prescribed, and see what such a trial will pro- 
duce. 

26. By quantity, let us suppose the vowel lengthened to express 
the long quantity ; and by the acute accent, the rising inflexion as 
explained above. 

Tityre, tu patulae re*cubans sub tegmine fdgi, 
Sylvestrem tenui musam meditaris avena. 

Tityre, tu patulae recubans sub tegmine fagi, 
Sylvestrem tenui musam meditaris avena. 

Tee"tyre to6 patulee rectibanes so6b tee"gmine fagi, 
Seelve6streem t6nui moosame meditaris av6ena. 



pvpt a^aloT? 

M^an-in a-eyc-de The-ay Pea-lea-e-a-dyo A-kil-lea-ose 
Ow-lom-m6n-een hee moo-re a-kay-ofes ail-ge 6th-ee-kee. 

* Elements of Criticism, vol. II. page 106. See also the Essay upon the Har- 
mony of Language, page 234. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 273 

37. Now there are but four possible ways of pronouncing 
these verses without going into a perfect song* : one is, to pro- 
nounce the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllable with the same inflexion in a lower tone, 
which is the way we pronounce our own words when we give 
them the accent with the falling inflexion : the second is, to 
pronounce the accented syllable with the rising inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllables with the same inflexion in a lower tone, 
which we never hear in our own language : the third is, to pro- 
nounce the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllables with the rising, in a lower tone : and the 
fourth, to pronounce the accented syllable with the rising in- 
flexion, and the unaccented with the falling, in a lower tone. 
None of these modes, but the first and last, do we ever hear in 
our own language : the second and third seem too difficult to per- 
mit us to suppose that they could be the natural current of the 
human voice in any language. The first leaves us no possible 
means of explaining the circumflex, but the last, by doing this, 
gives us the strongest reason to suppose that the Greek and Latin 
acute accent was the rising inflexion, and the grave accent the 
falling inflexion, in a lower tone. 



* This, I may be bold to say, is coming to the point at once, without hiding 
our ignorance, by supposing that the ancients had some mysterious way of pro- 
nouncing which we are utterly incapable of conceiving. Mr. Sheridan tells 
us, that " the ancients did observe the distinction of accents by an elevation 
" and depression of voice ; but the manner in which they did it must remain 
u for ever a secret to us : for, with the living tongue, perished the tones also ; 
" which we in vain endeavour to seek for in their visible marks." Lectures on 
Elocution, 4to edition, page 39. From these and similar observations in many 
of our writers, one would be tempted to imagine, that the organs of speaking 
in ancient Greece and Rome were totally different from those of the present 
race of men in Europe. 

T 



274 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

28. But if the reader were sufficiently acquainted with these 
inflexions of voice, or could be present while I exemplified them 
to him, I doubt not that he would immediately say, it was im- 
possible so monotonous a pronunciation could be that of the 
Greeks and Romans*: but when we consider the monotony of 
the Scotch, Welsh, and Irish, why should we wonder that 
other nations should be as monotonous ? Let us view the 
Greek and Latin pronunciation on which side we will, we must, 
to be consistent with their own rules, feel them to be extremely 
monotonous. According to the laws of ancient prosody, every 
unaccented syllable must be lower than that which is accented ; 
and if so, a most disagreeable monotony must necessarily ensue : 
for as every word in Latin, and almost every word in Greek, of 
more than one syllable, ended with the grave accent, that is, in a 
lower tone than the preceding syllables, almost every word in 
those languages ended with the same tone, let that tone have been 
what it would -f-. 

29- I am supported in this conjecture, notwithstanding all 



* Dr. Barney tells us, that Meibomius, the great and learned Meibomins, 
when prevailed upon at Stockholm to sing Greek strophes, set the whole court 
of Christina in a roar j as Naud6 did in executing a Roman dance. And Sea- 
liger observes, that if the nice tonical pronunciation of the ancients could be 
expressed by a modern, it would be disagreeable to our ears. 

t This is certainly too general an assertion, if we consider the real pronun- 
ciation of the Greek language according to accent ; as it must be allowed, that 
a great number of Greek words were accented with the acute or circumflex on 
the last syllable ; but when we consider the modern pronunciation of Greek, 
which confounds it with the Latin, we shall not have occasion to recall the 
assertion. To which we may add, that those words in Greek that were cir- 
cumflexed on the last syllable may very properly be said to end with the grave 
accent ; and that those which had a grave upon the final syllable altered the 
grave to an acute only when they were pronounced alone, when they came be- 
fore an enclitic, or when they were at the end of the sentence. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. '275 

the fine things* the ancients, and many of the moderns, say of 
the variety and harmony of the Greek and Latin languages, by 
the definition which they give of the circumflex accent ; which 
is, that it was a combination of the acute and grave upon the 
same syllable. This is so incomprehensible to modern ears, 
that scarcely any one but the author of the present Observations 
has attempted to explain it by experiment. It stands for nothing ' 
but long quantity in all our schools ; and, contrary to the 
clearest testimonies of antiquity, it has, by Dr. Gallyf, and a 
late respectable writer on the Greek and Latin Prosodies, been 
explained away into nothing more than the acute accent. But 
if it means a raising and falling of the voice upon the same syl- 
lable, which is the definition the ancients uniformly give of 
it, it is just as easy to conceive as raising and falling the voice 
upon successive syllables, or, in other words, as going from a 
lower tone to a higher upon one syllable, and from a higher to a 
lower upon the next: and this consideration leads me to con- 
jecture, that the acute accent of the ancients was really the rising 



* The Grecian sage (says Dr. Burney), according to Gravina, was at once 
a philosopher, a poet, and a musician. " In separating these characters," says 
he, " they have all been weakened ; the system of philosophy has been con- 
" tracted ; ideas have failed in poetry, and force and energy in song. Truth no 
" longer subsists among mankind ; the philosopher speaks not at present through 
" the medium of poetry ; nor is poetry heard any more through the vehicle of 
" melody." " Now to my apprehension," says Dr. Burney, " the reverse of 
"all this is exactly true: for, by being separated, each of these pi ofessions 
" receives a degree of cultivation, which fortifies and renders it more power- 
" fill, if not more illustrious. The music of ancient philosophers, and the 
" philosophy of modern musicians, I take to be pretty equal in excellence." 
History of Music, Vol. I, page J 62. Here we see good sense and sound philo- 
sophy contrasted with the blind admiration and empty flourish of an overgrown 
school-boy concluding his theme. 

f Dissertation against Greek Accents, page 53. 

T 2 



276 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

inflexion, or upward slide of the voice; for this being once 
supposed, nothing is so easy as to demonstrate the circumflex in 
our own language ; which, without this clew, it will be impossi- 
ble to do in the ancient languages ; and even with it, we must be 
astonished they had but one circumflex ; since it is just as easy 
to fall and raise the voice upon the same syllable, as to raise and 
fall it *. 

30. But our wonder at these peculiarities of the Greek and 
Latin languages will cease, when we torn our thoughts to the 
dramatic performances of the people who spoke these lan- 



* To add to our astonishment, that the Greek and Latin languages had but 
one circumflex, what can be more wonderful, than that among so many of the 
ancients who have written on the causes of eloquence, and who have descended 
to such trifling and childish observations upon the importance of letters and syl- 
lables, we should not find a single author who has taken notice of the import- 
ance of emphasis upon a single word ? Our modern books of elocution abound 
with instances of the change produced in the sense of a sentence by changing 
the place of the emphasis : but no such instance appears among the ancients. 
Not one poor Will you ride to town to-day ! 

Our wonder will increase when we consider that the ancients frequently men- 
tion the different meaning of a word as it was differently accented ; that is, as 
the acute or circumflex was placed upon one syllable or another ; but they never 
hint that the sense of a sentence is altered by an emphasis being placed upon 
different words. The ambiguity arising from the same word's being differently 
accented is so happily exemplified by the author of the Greek and Latin Pro- 
sodies, that I shall use his words. " Alexander Aphrodisiensis illustrates this 
" species of sophism, by a well-chosen example of a law, in which the sense 
" depends entirely upon the accuracy of accentuation. 'Era/pa. x.vtrta, si <pogoin 
" bnpoiria, la-tea. The word Svi^os-ia, with the acute accent upon the antepenult, 
11 is the neuter nominative plural, in apposition with ^vfia. And the sense 
" is, ' If a courtezan wear golden trinkets, let them (viz. her golden trinkets) 
" be forfeited to the public use.' But if the accent be advanced to the penult, 
" the word, without any other change, becomes the feminine nominative singu- 
< < lar, and must be taken in apposition with Ivaigo,. And thus the sense will be, 
tf * If a courtezan wear golden trinkets, let her become public property.' This 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 77 

guages. Can any thing astonish us more, than that all their 
tragedies and comedies were set to music, and actually accom- 
panied by musical instruments ? How is our laughter, as well as 
our wonder, excited, when we are told, that sometimes one actor 
gesticulated, while another recited, a speech, and that the greater 
admiration was bestowed upon the former ! Nay, to raise the 
ridicule to the highest pitch, we are informed that actors in their 
speech**:, and the chorus in their songs, accompanied the per- 
formances by dancing ; that the actors wore masks lined with 
brass, to give an echoing sound to the voice, and that these 
masks were marked with one passion on one side, and with a 
contrary passion on the other; and that the actor turned that 
side to the spectators which corresponded to the passion of the 
speech he was reciting. These extraordinary circumstances are 
not gathered from obscure passages of the ancients, picked up 
here and there, but are brought to us by the general and united 
voice of all antiquity ; and therefore, however surprising, or even 
ridiculous, they may seem, are undoubtedly true. 

31. Perhaps it will be said, is it possible that those who have 
left us such proofs of their good sense and exquisite taste in 
their writings, statues, medals, and seals, could be so absurd in 
their dramatic representations ? The thing is wonderful, it 
may be answered ; but not more so than that they should not 
have seen the use of stirrups in riding, of the polarity of the 
loadstone in sailing, and of several other modern discoveries, 



u is a very notable instance of the political importance of accents, of written 

" accents, in the Greek language. For if this law had been put in writing 

u without any accent upon the word ^npoa-ia there would have been no means 

" of deciding between two constructions ; either of which, the words, in this 

" state, would equally have admitted : and it must have remained an inexpli- 

" cable doubt, whether the legislator meant, that the poor woman should only 

" forfeit her trinkets, or become a public slave." 



278 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

which seem to have stared them full in the face without their 
perceiving it.* But is there any thing more common than to 
find, not only individuals, but a whole people, who, though re- 
markably excellent in some things, are surprisingly deficient in 
others ? So true is the observation of Middleton, who, speak- 
ing of those who have written on the pronunciation of the Greek 
and Latin languages, says : " Ab illis vero scriptoribus etsi 
" plurima ingeuiose atque erudite disputata sint, nonnulla 
" tamen deesse, multa dubie, quaedam etiam falso posita ani- 



* We have the strongest proof in the world, that the ancient Greeks made 
use only of capital letters, that they were utterly ignorant of punctuation, and 
that there was not the least space between words or sentences, but that there 
was an equal continuation of letters, which the reader was obliged to decipher, 
without any assistance from points or distances. Without the clearest evidence, 
could we suppose, that, while composition had reached the perfection it had 
done in Greece, orthography was in a state of barbarity worthy of the Cape of 
Good Hope ? 

Can any thing give us a more ludicrous idea, than the practice of the ancients 
in sometimes splitting a word at the end of the line, and commencing the next 
line with the latter part of the word ? This must have been nearly as ridicu- 
lous as the following English verses in imitation of this absurd practice. 

Pyrrhus, you tempt a danger high, 
When you would steal from angry li- 
Oness her cubs, and soon shall fly 

inglorious. 

For know the Romans, you shall find 
By virtue more and generous kind- 
Ness, than by force or fortune blind, 

victorious. 

Notwithstanding the hackneyed epithet of Gothic barbarity applied to verse in 
rhyme, is it not wonderful that a species of versification, approved by Italy, 
France, and England, in their best periods of poetry, should never once have been 
tried by the Greeks and Romans? that they should never have straggled, either 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 279 

" madverti ; idque hac in causa accidisse, quod in caeteris pie- 
"' risque solet, ut mortalium nemini detur rem invenisse simul 
" et perfecisse." De Lat. Lit. Pronun. 

32. That singing a part in a tragedy should seem so unna- 
tural* to us, arises chiefly from our being so litlle accustomed 
to it. Singing in the pulpit seems to the full as extraordinary ; 



by chance, or for the sake of change, into so pleasing a jingle of sounds? 
They who would write poems, and so lengthen or shorten the lines, as to form 
axes, wings, and altars, might, without any imputation on their taste, have, now 
and then, condescended to rhyme. In short, that the ancients should never 
have slid into rhyme, is a circumstance which would never have been believed, 
had it been possible to doubt it: and I fear it must be classed with that long 
catalogue of unaccountables, with which their prosody, their rhetoric, and 
their drama abound. 

* Perhaps our unwillingness to believe tha*t the ancient dramas were set to 
music, arises from a very mistaken notion we have of their skill in that art. It 
is true we have not the same materials for judging of their music as we have of 
their poetry and sculpture ; but their ignorance of counterpoint, and the po- 
verty of their instruments, sufficiently show what little progress they had made 
in it. Those very few remains of their music which have reached us, confirm 
m in this conjecture j and it is to the indefatigable pains of so good a scholar 
and so excellent a musician as Dr. Burney, that we are indebted for an illus- 
tration of it. 

" At the end of a Greek edition of the astronomical poet, Aratus, called Pha- 
" nomena," says Dr. Burney, " and their Scholia, published at Oxford in 1762 ; 
" the anonymous editor, supposed to be Dr. John Fell, among several other 
" pieces, has enriched the volume with three hymns, which he supposed to 
** have been written by a Greek poet called Dionysius; of which the first is 
" addressed to the muse Calliope, the second to Apollo, and the third to Ne- 
" mesis; and these hymns are accompanied with the notes of ancient music to 
" which they used to be sung. 

" I know not whether justice has been done to these melodies; all I can say is, 
" that no pains have been spared to place them in the clearest and most favour- 
" able point of view : and yet, with all the advantages of modern notes and 

*' modern 



280 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

and yet this song was so powerful about a century or two ago, 
and later in Scotland*, as to make mere speaking, though with 
the utmost energy, appear flat and insipid. Let the human 



" modern measures, if I had been told that they came from the Cherokees or 
" the Hottentots, I should not have been surprised at their excellence. 

" I have tried them in every key and in every measure that the feet of the 
" verses would allow; and as it has been the opinion of some, that the Greek 
** scale and music should be read Hebrew-wise, I have even inverted the order 
" of the notes, but without being able to augment their grace and elegance. 
" The most charitable supposition that can be admitted concerning them is, 
*' that the Greek language being itself accentuated and sonorous, wanted less 
" assistance from musical refinements than one that was more harsh and rough ; 
" and music being still a slave to poetry, and wholly governed by its feet, de- 
" rived all its merits and effects from the excellence of the verse, and sweetness 
" of the voice that sung or rather recited it : for mellifluous and affecting 
" voices nature bestows from time to time on some gifted mortals in all the ha- 
" bitable regions of the Earth ; and even the natural effusions of these must 
" ever have been heard with delight. But as music, there needs no other proof 
*' of the poverty of ancient melody, than its being confined to long and short 
** syllables. We have some airs of the most graceful and pleasing kind, which 
" will suit no arrangement of syllables to be found in any poetical numbers, 
* ancient or modern, and which it is impossible to express by mere syllables in 
" any language with which I am at all acquainted." 

Dr. Bmney's conjecture, that the Greek music was entirely subservient to 
verse, accounts for the little attention which was paid to it in a separate state ; 
it accounts for the effects with which their music was accompanied, and for the 
total uselessness of counterpoint. Simple melody is the fittest music to accont- 
pany words, when we wish to understand what is sung ; simple melody is the 
music of the great bulk of mankind ; and simple melody is never undervalued, 
till the ear has been sufficiently disciplined to discover the hidden melody, 
which is still essential to the most complicated and elaborate harmony. 

* The Rev. Mr. Whitfield was a highly animated and energetic preacher, 
without the least tincture of that tone which is called canting. When he went 
to Scotland, where this tone was in high estimation, though his doctrine was in 
perfect unison with that of his auditors, his simple and natural, though earnest 

manner 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 28 i 

voice be but in a tine tone, and let this tone be intensely im- 
passioned, and it will infallibly, as Milton expresses it, 



take the prison'd soul, 



" And lap it in Elysium ." 

33. What may tend to reconcile us still more to this dramatic 
music, is the sing-song manner, as it is called, of pronouncing 
tragedy, which very generally prevailed before the time of Mr. 
Garrick, and which now prevails among some classes of speakers, 
and is preferred by them to, what we call, the more natural 
manner. This drawling, undulating pronunciation, is what the 
actors generally burlesque by repeating the line, 

Turn ti turn ti, turn ti turn ti turn ti : 

and though this mode of declamation is now so much de- 
spised, it is highly probable that it was formerly held in esti- 
mation*. 

34. Now, if we suppose this drawling pronunciation, which, 
fhough very sonorous, is precisely speaking, and essentially dif- 
ferent from singing : if we suppose this to have been the con- 
versation pronunciation of the Greeks and Romans, it may pos- 
sibly throw some light upon the manner in which they pro- 
nounced by accent and quantity at the same time ; for though 



manner of speaking, was looked upon at first as a great defect. He wanted, 
they said, the holy tone. 

* This cant, which, though disgnstful now to all but mere rustics, on account 
of its being out of fashion, was very probably the favourite modulation in which 
heroic verses were recited by our ancestors. So fluctuating are the taste and 
practices of mankind! but whether tlie power of language has received any ad- 
vantage from the change just mentioned (namely, pronouncing words in a more 
simple manner) will appear at least very doubtful, when we recollect the stories 
of its former triumphs, and the inherent charms of musical sounds. The Art <\) 
delivering Written Language, page 73. 



282 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

we can sufficiently conceive, that in common speaking in our own 
language we can make the accented syllable short, and the unac- 
cented syllable long, as in the words qualify, specify, elbow, in- 
mate, &c. ; yet in the drawling pronunciation we have been speak- 
ing of, the long unaccented vowels in these words are made much 
longer, and consequently more perceptible. 

35. But, if the accent of our language is so different from 
that of the Greek and Latin, our pronunciation must necessarily 
be very different likewise. The acute accent of the ancients 
being always higher than either the preceding or succeeding syl- 
lables, and our accent, though always higher than the preceding, 
being sometimes lower than the succeeding syllables, (see sect, vii.) 
there must certainly be a wide difference between our pronunci- 
ation and theirs. Let us, however, explain the Greek and Latin 
accent as we will, let it be by singing, drawling, or common 
speaking, it will be impossible to tell how a monotony could be 
avoided, when almost every word of more than one syllable in 
these languages must necessarily have ended in the same tone, or, 
if you will, with the same grave accent*. 

36. After all, that the Greeks and Romans, in explaining the 
causes of metrical and prosaic harmony, should sometimes de- 
scend to such minute particularsf as appear to us trifling and 
imaginary, and at the same time neglect things which appear to 



* Where was all that endless variety with which the moderns puff off the 
Greek language, when it had but one circumflex? The human voice is just as 
capable of falling and rising upon the same syllable as rising and falling ; and 
why so palpable a combination of sounds as the former should be utterly 
unknown to the Greeks and Latins, can be resolved into nothing but (horresco 
referens) their ignorance of the principles of human speech. 

f Nee illi(Demostlieni)turpe videbatur vel optimis relictis magistris ad canes 
se conferre, et ab illis literae vim et naturam petere, illorumque in sonando, 
quod satis esset, morem imitari. Ad. Meker. de vet. et rect. Pron. Ling. Graces, 
page 14. 

It 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 

us so essential ; that they should be so dark, and sometimes so 
contradictory in their account of accent and quantity, as to 
furnish opposite systems among the modems, with ample quota- 
tions in favour of each ; is this more wonderful than that Mr. 
Sheridan*, who was so good an actor, and who had spent so 
much time in studying and writing on elocution, should say 
that accent was only a louder pronunciation of the accented syl- 
lable, and not a higher ? But as this same Mr. Sheridan, in his 
Art of Reading, has excellently observed, that our perception of 
Latin quantity is imaginary, and arises not from the ear, but only 
from association, like spelling ; so it may be observed, that the 



It is an observation of Chambers, author of the Cyclopaedia, that nonsense 
sounds worse in the English than in any other language : let us try the experiment 
by translating the above passage. " Nor did Demosthenes think it below him to 
" leave the company of the most respectable people of Athens, and go to the 
" dogs, in order to learn from them the nature of the letter r, and, by observing 
" the sound they gave it, to imitate, as much as was necessary, their manner of 
" pronouncing it." 

What encomiums do we meet with in Cicero, of the delicacy of the ears even 
of the common people of Rome ; who, if an actor on the stage made the least 
error in accent or quantity, were immediately sensible of it, and would express 
their disapprobation. But I am apt to think, that an English actor, who should 
pronounce theatre, senator, or conquest, with the accent on the second syllable, 
would not escape better than the Roman. 

* " The Scotchman utters the first syllable of battle, borrow, habit, in the 
" middle tone, dwelling on the vowel ; and the second with a sudden elevation 
" of the voice, and short : as bai-tle, bau-ro, ha-bit. The Englishman utters both 
" syllables without any perceptible change of tone and in equal time, as bat' tie, 
" bar' row, haVit." Art of Reading, page 77. The smallest degree of attention 
might have taught Mr. Sheridan, that though this is the prevailing, it is not the 
invariable, pronunciation of a Scotchman ; and that this elevation of voice, 
though more perceptible in a Scotchman from his drawling out his tones, is no 
less real in an Englishman, who pronounces them quicker, and uses them less fre- 
quently; that is, he mixes the downward inflexion with them, which prbduces 
a variety. But these two inflexions of voice Mr. Sheridan was an utter stranger 
to. See Elements of Elocution, part II. page 183. 



284 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

confusion and obscurity which reign among all our writers on 
accent and quantity seem to arise from an ideal perception of 
long quantity produced by double consonants ; from confounding 
stress and quantity, which are so totally different ; and from mis- 
taking loud for high, and soft for low, contrary to the clearest 
definitions of each*. 

37. But till the human voice, which is the same in all ages 
and nations, is more studied and better understood, and till a 



* Nothing is more fallacious than that perception we seem to have of the 
sound of words being expressive of the ideas, and becoming, as Pope calls it, 
an echo to the sense. This coincidence, as Dr. Johnson observes in one of his 
Ramblers, seldom exists any where but in the imagination of the readei. 
Dryden, who often wrote as carelessly as he thought, and often thought as care- 
lessly as he lived, began a commendation of the sweetness and smoothness of 
two lines of Denham in praise of the Thames 

" Though deep yet clear, though gentle yet not dull ; 
" Strong without rage, without o'erflowing full." 

and this commendation of Dryden's has been echoed by all subsequent writers, 
who have taken it for granted, that there is a flow in the lines similar to that of 
the object described ; while the least attention to those stops, so necessary on 
the accented and antithetic words, will soon convince us, that, however expres- 
sive the lines may be, they are as rugged and as little musical as almost any in 
the language. 

A celebrated critic observes " I am apt to think the harmony of the verse 
" was a secret to Mr. Dryden, since it is evident he was not acquainted with 
" the caesural stops, by which all numbers are harmonised. Dr. Bentley has ob- 
" served, the beauty of the second verse consists in the ictus that sounds on the 
" first syllable of the verse, which, in English heroics, should sound on the 
" second : for this verse is derived from the Trimeter Iambic, Brachycatalectic." 
Manwaring's Stichology, page 71. 

When I read such profound observations in such learned terms, it brings to 
my mind the Mock Doctor in the farce, who shines away to the illiterate knight 
by repeating Propria qua maribus, &c., and makes him most pathetically 
exclaim Oh, why did I neglect my studies ? 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 285 

notation of speaking sounds is adopted, I despair of conveying 
my ideas of this subject with sufficient clearness upon paper. I 
have, however, marked such an outline as may be easily filled up 
by those who study speaking with half the attention they must do 
music. From an entire conviction, that the ancients had a no- 
tation of speaking sounds, and from the actual experience of hav- 
ing formed one myself, I think I can foresee that some future 
philosophical inquirer, with more learning, more leisure, and 
more credit with the world than I have, will be able to unravel 
this mystery in letters, which has so long been the opprobrium et 
crux grammaticorwn, the reproach and torment of grammarians. 



THE END. 



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