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The iQng's Koya] Rifle 
Corps chronicle 



"Celer et audax" Club, London. Historical Committee 



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THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UBRARIK'^^s''' 



Cbe Kind's Ropal Ririe Corps Cbronlcle 
for 19M, 



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Photo by W. & D. Downey,] [57 & 61 Ebury Street, S.W. 

GENERAL H. R. H. GEORGE F. E. A. PRINCE OF WALES AND 

DUKE OF CORNWALL AND YORK, K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.M.G., G.C.V.O., LS.O., 

COLONEL-IN-CHIEF. 



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THE 

KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS 
CHRONICLE. 



1904. 



(Rammitttz. 

COLONEL H. R. MENDS. 

LIEUT.-COLONEL SIR GUY CAMPBELL, BART. 

CAPTAIN THE HON. R. M. STUART WORTLEY, D.S.O 

Uottorarj iJecretarj anh Sreaaurer. 
MAJOR T. M. RILEY, Rifle Dep6t, Winchester. 



Uiturfreater : 

WARREN AND SON, PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS. HIGH STREET. 

1905- 



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PREFACE, 



The Committee desire to express their sincere thanks 
to all who have so kindly helped to make the Chronicle 
a success. 

His Royal Highness the Colonel-in-Chief has been 
graciously pleased to allow his photograph to be inserted 
in \S\^ Calendar and Chronicle, We hope at some future 
date to be able to publish another in the uniform of 
the Regiment. 



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CONTENTS. 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Calendar, 1905 i 

List of Officers, 1904 15 

List of Officers, 1804 18 

List of Battalions and their Stations from 1756 to 1904 ... 22 

Promotions, Appointments, etc 34 

Extracts from Garrison Order Book, Halifax, N. S 36 

Regimental Records- 
is! Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps 50 

2nd ,, ,, ,, ,, ... 61 

3rd „ „ „ „ 73 

4th „ ,, ,, ,, 82 

Rifle Dep6t Records 88 

Memoir of R. Ernest Reade, d.s.o. 93 

Expedition to Khartoum 98 

Three Months Leave in Ladakh 107 

Trout Fishing in Canada 119 

Shooting — by H. A. V 122 

The Manoeuvres of 1904 126 

The Canadian Military Institute 131 

The Memorial Homes for Disabled Riflemen at St. Cross ... 134 

List and Services of Officers who died in 1904 150 

Record of Service of the Harrington Family 152 

List of Past Officers 155 

Notice to Correspondents 160 



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ILLUSTRATIONS. 



H. R. H. The Prince OF Wales ... Frontispiece 

PAGE 

Officers 3RD Battalion at Abdin Barracks, Cairo, 1883 ... to face 73 



Lieutenant-Colonel F. A. Fortescue 

Officers 4TH Battalion at Distribution of Medals, Gosport 
Warrant Officers and Sergeants ,, ,, 

Cups won by 4TH Battalion at Harrismith 

Colonel E. W. Herbert, c.b. 

Sergeant-Master-Tailor G. Simpson 

Leh Bazaar 

Leh 

ZoGi La Pass 

Shapu 

SiND Valley from Zogi La Pass 

Beaters at a Bear Drive 

Paddling along the Shore of Lake St. John 

PortXging 

A Lost Bird in the Chillies 

Call Birds 

Beaters in Line ... 
Guns and Beaters 
The Tiffin Juggah 
Crossing the River 

Stone erected in Memory of Lieutenant Basil Dunbar, 
Oswego, U. S. A. 

Prince Christian Victor Memorial Cottages 
King's Royal Rifles Memorial Cottages 
The Harrington Family 



82 

84 
86 

87 
88 
90 
107 
107 
112 
112 
117 
117 
119 
120 
122 
122 
123 
123 
124 
124 

131 
134 
138 
152 



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^ 



Cbe Kind's Ropal Ririe corps Caknaar 

1905. 

Compiled by Major T. M. Riley. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



JANUARY, 


Day 


Date 


TABLE OF EVENTS 


Son 


1 


1857— Enfield Rifles issued to 1st Bn. 1878.— Helmets issued 
to 1st Bn. 


U 


2 


1877. — 1st Bn. landed in England from Halifax. 


Tu 


3 




W 


4 




Til 


5 


1827. — Duke of York died. Duke of Cambridge appointed 
Colonel-in-Chief. 


P 


6 


1838. — 1st Bn. moved from Corfu to Zante. 1900. — Heavy Boer 


S 


7 


attack on Ladysmith (1st and 2nd Bns.). 
1879. — Surrender of Kandahar. 


Sim 


8 


1879. — 2nd Bn. entered Kandahar first time (Afghan War). 


M 
Tu 


9 
10 


1819. — 1st Bn. South Africa to West Indies and thence to 

England. 
1812. — %i\\ Bn. at commencement of siege Ciudad Rodrigo. 


W 


11 




Th 


12 




P 


13 


1895. — 2nd Bn. left Gibraltar for Malta. 1900. — 9th Bn. to 
South Africa. 


S 
Sun 


14 
15 


1897. — Wreck of the Warren Hastings, with Head Quarters and 

four Companies of ist Bn. 
1873. — Martini-Henry Rifles issued to ist Bn. 


M 


16 


1809. — 2nd Bn. at Corunna under Sir John Moore. ' 


Tu 


17 


1809. — 2nd Bn. moved from Spain to the Channel Islands. 


W 


18 


igoi. — 2nd Bn. arrived in India. 


Th 


19 


1812. — Assault and capture of Ciudad Rodrigo (5th Bn.). 


P 


20 


i860. — Eight Victoria Crosses given to 1st Bn. for Indian Mutiny. 


S 


21 


1900. — Tugela River crossed (3rd Bn.). 


Sun 


22 


1849.— Capture of Mooltan (Sikh War— ist Bn.). 


U 


23 




Tu 


24 


1900. — Battle of Spion Kop (3rd Bn.). 


W 


25 




Th 


26 




P 


27 


1852. — 2nd Bn. engaged in destroying Kaffir farms, etc. 


S 
Sun 


28 
29 


1854. — Lord Gough appointed Colonel-in-Chief. 1881. — Action 
of Lciings Nek (3rd Bn.). 


U 


30 


1841. — Brunswick percussion Rifles issued to 1st Bn. 


Tu 


31 


i86s.^Dep6t of 2nd Bn. joined Service Companies at Aldershot. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



FEBRUARY. 



Day Date 



TABI^B OP EVENTS 



w 


1 


Th 


2 


P 


3 


S 


4 


Sun 


5 


U 


6 


Tu 


7 


W 


8 


Th 


9 


P 


10 


S 


11 


Son 


12 


M 


13 


Tu 


14 


W 


15 


Til 


16 


P 


17 


S 


18 


Son 


19 



20 



Tu 


21 


W 


22 


Til 


23 


P 


24 


S 


25 



Sun 26 



27 



Tu 28 



866. — 2nd Bn. moved from England to Ireland. 
901. — 1st Bn. in action at Roodepoort, South Africa. 



762. — Capture of Port Royal, Martinique (3rd Bn.). 1900. — Cap- 
ture of Vaal Kraantz (3rd Bn.). 
810. — Capture of Guadaloupe (2nd and 4th Bns.). 

807. — Capture of Fort Dessaix Martinique. 1881. — Ingogo 

(3rd Bn.). 
818. — 6th Bn. disbanded at Portsmouth. 
895.— 3rd Bn. Parkhurst to ShornclifFe. 
850. — Expedition against AfFreedees (ist Bn.). 
797. — ^4 Companies 3rd Bn. sent from Tobago against Trinidad. 
762. — 3rd Bn. at Capture of Martinique. 
877. — New pattern knapsack issued to ist Bn. 

900. — Cingold (3rd Bn.). 

809. — 3rd Bn. at capture of Martinique. 

900. — Monte Christo (3rd Bn.). 1900. — Paardebergr. 

862. — 3rd Bn. moved from India to Burmah. 1879. — 3rd Bn. 

sailed for South Africa. 1901. — 4th Bn. Mounted Infantry 

Company embarked for South Africa. 

759. — Gold Medal issued to Officers ist Bn. for service against 

Indians. 
849. — Battle of Goojerat. 
849. — 1st Bn. started from Thelum to Rawal Pindi and Pesha- 

wur (Sikh War). 
814. — 5th Bn. at Passage of the Adour. 
862. — 2nd Bn. arrived at Portsmouth from China. 

852. — Wreck of Birkenhead^ 31 Riflemen lost. 1825. — "Albuera," 

•' P)rrenees," " Nive " granted. 
814.— Battle of Orthes (5th Bn.t. 1900.— Battle of Pieter's Hill 

(3rd Bn.). 
860. — 2nd Bn. started for China. 1900. — Relief of Ladysmith 

(ist, 2nd and 3rd Bns.). 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



MARCH. 

TABLE OF BVBNTS 

1884. — 3rd Bn. present at Relief of Tokar. 

1830. — 2nd Bn. arrived from West Indies. 

1869. — Field-Marshal H. R. H. Duke of Cambridge appointed 
Colonel-in-Chief. 1779. — Engagement at Hudson's Ferry. 



i860. — V.C. granted to Lieutenant A. Heathcote and 6 Riflemen 

for Indian Mutiny. 
1866. — ist Bn. moved from Ireland to Malta. 1900. — Royal Rifle 

Reserve Battalion formed at Portsmouth. 



1852. — 2nd Bn. formed part of a Force to attack Iron Mountains, 

South Africa. 
1841. — 2nd Bn. moved from Mediterranean to West Indies. 

1895. — Maxim Gun ('303) issued to ist Bn. 1884. — ^3rd Bn. at 

Tamai. 
181 1. — Skirmish at Pombal. 

181 1 . — Action of Casa Nova. 1879. — 3rd Bn. arrived at the Cape. 

1895. — ist Bn. detailed for Chitral Relief Force. 1904. — 3rd Bn. 

moved from Cork to Bermuda. 
P 17 i860. — ist Bn. moved from India to England, and was thanked 

by Grovernor-General for services. 1904. — Death of H.R.H. 

the Duke of Cambridge. 
S 18 1812. — 5th Bn. at siege of Badajos. 1901. — 4th Bn. Mounted 

Infantry Company embarked for South Africa. 

1879. — 3rd Bn. arrived at Natal. 
1794. — Capture of Martinique. 

1879. — 3rd Bn. started on Zulu Campaign. 1903. — 3rd Bn. ar- 
rived from South Africa. 

1862. — 3rd Bn. arrived at Thayetmyo from India. 1866. — Batta- 
lions at home reduced from 12 to 10 Companies. 

1846. — 1st Bn. started to Scinde. 

1876. — 7th or Depot Bn. broken up. 

1 89 1. — ist Bn. started on Hazara Expedition. 

1844. — 2nd Bn. moved from West Indies to Canada. 

1895. — ist Bn. started on Chitral Relief Expedition. 1904. — 

Dep6t moved from Gosport to Winchester. 
1828. — 1st Bn. embarked at Lisbon for Ireland. 

1855. — 3rd Bn. raised in Dublin (4th time). 



Bay 


Date 


w 


1 


Th 


2 


P 


3 


S 


4 


Son 


5 


U 


6 


Tu 


7 


W 


8 


Th 


9 


F 


10 


S 


11 


Sun 


12 


M 


13 


Tu 


14 


W 


15 


Th 


16 



Son 


19 


M 


20 


Tu 


21 


W 


22 


Th 


23 


P 


24 


S 


25 


Sun 


26 


U 


27 


Tu 


28 


W 


29 


Th 


30 


P 


31 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



APRIL. 



TABLE OF EVENTS 

1863. — Viscount Melville appointed Colonel Commandant. 
1874. — Busbies issued. Ahmed Khel, Kandahar, Afghan- 
istan, and South Africa granted 1881. 

1879. — 3rd Bn. at Battle of Ginghilovo. 

1879.— Relief of Ekhowe (3rd Bn.). 1895.— Malakand Pass, 

Chitral (ist Bn.). 
1794. — Capture of St. Lucia f3rd Bn.). 
1856. — 2nd Bn. detachments in KafFraria relieved by German 

Legion. 
1812. — Storming of Badajoz (5th Bn.). 
1891. — 1st Bn. started on Miranzai Expedition. 
1795. — 3rd. Bn. moved from Channel Islands to West Indies. 

1800. — Clothing Warrant issued allowing green clothing to 5th Bn. 
1814. — Battle of Toulouse. 

1809. — Capture of the Islands of Les Saintes, Guadaloupe (3rd 
and 4th Bns.). 

1814. — Repulse of sortie from Bayonne (5th Bn.). 
181 1. ^Surrender of Olivenza. 

1825. — Duke of York's button given to ist Bn. 
1 781. —Skirmish at Hobkirks. 1858. — Action of Bagawallah. 
1858. — Capture of Nugeelabad. 1815. — Peninsula granted. 
1880.— Battle of Ahmed Khel (2nd Bn.). 

1858. — Action of Nugena. Relief of Moradabad and Dojura. 
1794. — Capture of Guadaloupe. 

1880. — Action at Arzu (Afghan War — 2nd Bn.). 

i860. — 2nd Bn. arrived at Hong Kong from Calcutta. 

1760. — Second Battle of Quebec. 

1760. — 2nd and 3rd Bns. at Plains of Abraham, Canada. 
1780. — ist Bn. at Capture of Fort St. John, Nicaragua. 
1804. — Capture of Surinam. 



Day 


Date 


S 


1 


Son 


2 


M 


3 


Tu 


4 


W 


5 


Th 


6 


F 


7 


S 


8 


Sun 


9 


U 


10 


Tu 


11 


W 


12 


Th 


13 


F 


14 


S 


15 


Son 


16 


U 


17 


Tu 


18 


W 


19 


Th 


20 


F 


21 


S 


22 


Sun 


23 


M 


24 


Tu 


25 


W 


26 


Th 


27 


F 


28 


S 


29 


Sun 


30 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



MAY. 



Day Date TABLE OF EVENTS 

M 1 1872. — Valise equipment issued to ist Bn. 1904. — H.R.H. The 

Prince of Wales appointed Colonel in Chief. 

Tn 2 1797- — Attack on Porto Rico. 1896. — Rifle Company Mounted 
Infantry embarked for South Africa. 

W 3 1811.— Combat of Fuentes d'Onor (5th Bn.). 

Th 4 

P 5 181 1.— Battle of Fuentes d'Onor (5th Bn.). 

S 6 1758.— 16 Rifled Fusils issued to 1st Bn. 1858.— Capture of 

Bareilly (ist Bn.). 
StUI 7 1864. — 2nd Bn. received Whitworth hexagonal-bore Rifles in 

place of 5-groove Rifles. 

M 8 1845.— Companies distinguished by letters instead of numbers. 

Tu 9 

W 10 181 1. — Repulse of sortie at Badajos. 1857. — Outbreak of Indian 
Mutiny at Meerut (ist Bn.). 

Th 11 1858.— Relief of Shahjehanpore. 

P 12 1809. — Passage of the Douro and Capture of Oporto (5th Bn.). 

S 13 1850. — New pattern cap pockets issued to ist Bn. 

Sun 14 

M 15 1858. — Head Quarters of 2nd Bn. landed at Calcutta from 

South Africa. 
Tu 16 1811.— Battle of Albuhera. 1760.— ist and 3rd Bns. at Quebec. 
W 17 1847. — 2nd Bn. moved from Nova Scotia to England. 

Th 18 1760. — The French forced to raise the Siege of Quebec. 1763. — 

3rd and 4th Bns. disbanded. 
P 19 181 2. — Action of Almarez. 
S 20 1870. — Red River Expedition started (ist Bn.). 

StUI 21 1844. — 2nd Bn. Dep6t disembarked at Glasgow. 
M 22 1844. — 2nd Bn. Dep6t arrived at Stirling from Ireland. 

Tu 23 

W 24 1858. — Capture of Forts Bunnai and Mehundee (ist Bn.). 
Th 25 1846. — 2nd Bn. Dep6t embarked at Leith for Chatham. 

P 26 

S 27 1863. — 2nd Bn. moved from Portsmouth to Aldershot. 

Sun 28 1864. — Whitworth Rifles issued to ist and 2nd Bns. 

M 29 

Tu 30 1857. — Action of the Hindun (ist Bn.). 
W 31 1858.— Capture of Shahabad (ist Bn.). 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps ChronicU. 



JUNE. 



Bay Date 



Th 


1 


P 


2 


S 


3 


Son 


4 


M 


5 


Tu 


6 


W 


7 


Th 


8 


P 


9 


S 


10 


San 


11 


M 


12 


Tu 


13 


W 


14 


Th 


16 


P 


16 


S 


17 


Sun 


18 


K 


19 


Tu 


20 


W 


21 


Th 


22 


P 


23 


S 


24 



Sun 25 

H 26 

Tu 27 

W 28 

Th 29 

F 30 



TABLE OF BVBNTS 

835. — Service and Dep6t Companies 2nd Bn. separated. 
758. — 2nd and 3rd. Bns. arrived before Louisburg. 

841. — 2nd Bn. arrived at Jamaica from Ionian Islands. 
759. — 2nd and 3rd Bns. started for Quebec under Wolfe. 
864. — ist Bn. moved from England to Ireland. 
857. — Battle of Badlee Ki Serai and Capture of Heights before 
E>elhi (ist Bn.). 

840. — 1st Bn. arrived in England from Corfu 

796. — Defeat of Caribs at Vigic in the Island of Grenada. 



893. — Indian Medal and Clasp Hazara issued to ist Bn. 
760. — Grenadiers 2nd and 3rd Bns. started for Montreal. 
808.— Sth Bn. started for Portugal. 



812.— 5th Bn. at Siege of Forts St. Cayetano, St. Vincent, La 

Murcede, and Salamanca (Peninsula). 
829. — New pattern knapsack issued. 
757. — Expedition under Colonel Boquet to borders of South 

Carolina. 1798. — Engagement at Goff's Bridge. Rifles 

first used in action by 5th Bn. 
813.— Battle of Vittoria (5th Bn.). 
869. — 4th Bn. moved from New Brunswick to England. 

817. — 7th Bn. disbanded. 



824.- 



-Regiment made a British Corps and title changed to 
" Duke of York's Own." 



861. — 4th Bn. moved from Ireland to Canada. 

arrived at Gosport from South Africa. 
763. — ^4th Bn. disbanded. 

860. — 2nd Bn. landed in China. 



1904. — 4th Bn. 



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Day 


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TABLE OP EVENTS 



S 15 
Sun 16 



M 


17 


Ta 


18 


W 


19 


Th 


20 


P 


21 


S 


22 


Sun 


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U 


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Tu 


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Th 


27 


P 


28 


S 


29 


Sun 


30 



31 



—Title of Corps changed from 6oth Rifles to King's Royal 
Rifle Corps. 



1759. — Repulse of the French at Oswego (4th Bn.). 

873. — Glengarry caps issued to ist Bn. 

850. — H.R.H. Duke of Cambridge, Colonel-in-Chief, died. 

887. — ist apd 2nd Bns. present at Jubilee Review at Aldershot. 

858. — 2nd Bn. arrived at Dinapore for service against mutineers. 

845. — 1st Bn. moved from Ireland to India. 

799. — 6th and 7th Bns. raised. 

836. — 1st Bn. moved from Malta to Corfu. 

851. — 2nd Bn. moved from Ireland to Kaffraria. 1824. — 2nd Bn. 

became Rifles. 
874. — ^4th Bn. moved from Portland to Devonport. 1896. — 2nd 

Bn. from Malta to South Africa. 
882. — 3rd Bn. disembarked at Alexandria from Malta. 
812. — Skirmish at Castragon. 
817. — 2nd Bn. moved from West Indies to Nova Scotia. 

896. — Rifle Company Mounted Infantry engaged in action with 

Matabele. 
759. — 1st Bn. formed part of Force for invasion of Canada. 
812. — Battle of Salamanca (5th Bn.). 



759. — Capture of Fort Niagara. 1813. — Battle of the Pyrenees. 

1818.— 5th Rifle Bn. disbanded. 
758. — Capture of Louisburg. 1800. — ist clothing warrant 

issued for dress of Regiment. 

758. — Capture of Fort Frontenac. 1857. — ^4*^ ^n. raised at 

Winchester, "4th time." 
809.— Battle of Talavera (5th Bn.). 
809. — Battle of Pyrenees (5th Bn.). 



1759. — Motto of Celer et Audax given by Wolfe to the Regiment 
at attack of Montmorenci. 



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lO 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



AUGUST. 



Day Date 



Tu 


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Sim 


6 


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Tu 8 
W 9 



Th 


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S 


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M 


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Tu 


16 


W 


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TABLE OF EVENTS 

856. — Double-breasted tunic issued. 

860.— Capture of Peh-Tang (2nd Bn.). 

860. — 2nd Bn. formed part of Force at Peh-Tang, China. 

857. — 3rd Bn. moved from Ireland to India. 

758. — Part of 2nd and 3rd Bns. started for Prince Edward's 

Island. 
857.— 3rd Bn. embarked for Madras. 1900. — ist Bn. in action, 

Amersfoot. South Africa. 

880. — 2nd Bn. started on march from Cabul to Kandahar under 
Roberts. 

879. — 3rd Bn. arrived at Ulundi. Zulu War. 

762. — Capture of Havannah. 1901. — Battle near Lydenburg, 

South Africa (ist Bn.). 
860. — Capture of Fort Tanghu (2nd Bn. present). 
850. — H. R. H. Prince Albert appointed Colonel-in-Chief. 
808. — Action of Lorinda (5th Bn.). 
808.— Battle of Roleia (5th Bn.). 

856.— Enfield-Pritchett Rifles issued to 2nd Bn. 

799. — Part of 5th Bn. at Surinam. 

808.— Battle of Vimiera (5th Bn). 1 860.— Capture of Taku 
Forts (2nd Bn.). 

797. — H. R. H. Duke of York appointed Colonel-in-Chief. 
1799. — Reduction of Surinam. 

814. — 2 Companies 7th Bn. started for Penobscot River, Maine. 
1900. — 1st Bn. in action, Geluk, South Africa. 

760. — Capture of Fort Isle Royale. 1775. — 3rd and 4th Bns. 
raised. 



879. — Capture of Ketchwayo. 



880. — Termination of march from Cabul to Kandahar. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, II 



SEPTEMBER. 


Day 


Bate 




TABLB OF EVENTS 


P 

s 

Sun 


1 

2 
3 


i88o. 
1870. 
1884. 


—Battle of Kandahar (2nd Bn.). 1813.— 7th Rifle Bn. 

raised in Guernsey. 
— 4th Bn. moved from Colchester to Aldershot. 1900. — 

Mounted Infantry Conipany in action (ist Bn.). 
—3rd Bn. arrived at Mount Troodos, Cyprus. 


H 


4 






Tu 


5 


1867.- 


— 1st Bn. moved from Mediterranean to Canada. 


W 


6 


1760. 


— 1st and 4th Bns. at siege of Montreal. 


Th 


7 






F 


8 


1760. — Capture of Montreal (2nd and 3rd Bns.). | 


S 


9 


1882.- 


—Action at Kassassin (3rd Bn.). 


Sun 


10 






H 
Tn 


11 
12 


1863.- 


— " Delhi " granted. 1855.— 2nd Bn. supplied with Pritchett 
rifles. 


W 


13 


1759- 


—Battle of Quebec (2nd and 3rd Bns.). i860.— Capture of 
Pekin (2nd Bn.). 1882.— Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (3rd Bn.). 


Th 


14 


1867.- 


—2nd Bn. moved from Ireland to India. 


P 


15 






S 
Sun 

H 


16 
17 

18 


1759- 
1759- 

1899.- 


—Grenadiers of 2nd, 3rd and 4th Bns. at Capture of Savan- 
nah. 

—Capture of Quebec (2nd and 3rd Bns.). 1901. — Action 
at Blood River Poort, South Africa (Mounted Infantry 
Company 4th Bn.). 

—2nd Bn. embarked at Calcutta for S. Africa. 


Tu 


19 


1812.- 


—Capture of Fort St. Michael near Burgos (5th Bn.). 


W 


20 


1857-- 


—Assault and Capture of Delhi (ist Bn.). 


Th 


21 






P 


22 


1787.- 


—3rd and 4th Bns. raised at Chatham. 1902. — ist Bn. em- 
barked for Malta. 


S 
Sun 


23 
24 


1852.- 
1858.- 


—General Viscount Beresford, g.c.b., appointed Colonel-in- 

Chief. 
—Wing of 2nd Bn. moved from Kaffraria to India. 


H 


25 


1811.- 


-Combat at El Bodon (5th Bn.). 


Tu 


26 


1892.- 


— 1st Bn. started on Isazai Expedition. 


W 
Th 


27 
28 


1810.- 


-Battle of Busaco r5th Bn.). 181 2.— Skirmish at Aldea 
de Pontac (Sth Bn.). 


P 


29 


1821.- 


—Peninsular honors granted. 


S 


30 


1758.- 


—General, afterwards Lord, Amherst, k. b., appointed 
Colonel-in-Chief. 



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12 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



OCTOBER. 



Bun 


1 


K 


2 


Tu 


3 


W 


4 


Th 


5 


P 


6 


S 


7 


Sim 


8 


K 


9 


Tu 


10 


W 


11 


Th 


12 


P 


13 


S 


14 


Snn 


15 


K 


16 



Bay Bate TABLE OF BYBNTS 

873. — Busbies and Glengarries issued to 4th Bn. 

790. — Battle of Bergen. 

879. — 3rd Bn. returned to Natal from Zulu War, 



860. — New pattern chako issued to ist Bn. 

803. — ist Bn. moved from South America to Nova Scotia. 

813. — Passage of the Bidassoa (5th Bn.). 

858. — Action of Bark-ka-Gong (ist Bn.). 

779. — Repulse of the French attack on Savannah. 

783. — 3rd and 4th Bns. disbanded at Halifax, N. S. 

870. — 2nd Bn. started on Maori Expedition. 

870. — ist Bn. returned from Red River Expedition. 

824. — Steel scabbards sanctioned for Officers. 

794. — 2 Companies 4th Bn. at siege of Fort Matilda, Guadaloupe. 

824. — Motto, " Celer et Audax" resumed. 

852. — One Company 2nd Bn. while escorting convoy attacked 

by Kaffirs. 
834. — 1st Bn. moved from Gibraltar to Malta. 1902. — ist Bn. 

arrived at Malta. 
858. — ist Bn. started on Oude Campaign. 
858. — Action of Pusgaon. 
874. — Martini-Henry Rifles issued to 3rd and 4th Bns. 1899. — 

Battle of Talana Hill (ist Bn.). 
812. — Capture of Burgos (Peninsula) — 5th Bn. 
835. — 2nd Bn. moved from Ireland to Mediterranean. 
837. — 2nd Bn. ordered from Gibraltar to Corfu. 

858. — Action of Rissoolpore. 



759. — Brigade-General The Hon. J. Murray appointed Governor 

of Quebec. 
811. — Action of Arroyo del Molinos (5th Bn.). 
851. — 3 Companies 2nd Bn. started for Kaffir War. 
867. — 2nd Bn. disembarked at Calcutta from England. 1899. — 
Battle of Lombard's Kop (ist and 2nd Bns.). 
Tu 31 Battle of Brakenlaagte (25th M. I.). 



Tu 17 



w 


18 


Th 


19 


P 


20 


S 


21 


Snn 


22 


M 


23 


Tn 


24 


W 


25 


Th 


26 


P 


27 


S 


28 


Snn 


29 


K 


30 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 13 



NOVEMBER. 



Dw 


Date 


w 


1 


Th 


2 


P 


3 


S 


4 


Snn 


5 


M 


6 


Tu 


7 


W 


8 


Th 


9 


F 


10 


S 


11 


Son 


12 


K 


13 


Tu 


14 


W 


15 


Th 


16 


P 


17 


S 


18 


Sun 


19 


K 


20 


Tu 


21 


W 


22 


Th 


23 


P 


24 


S 


25 


Sun 


26 


M 


27 


Tu 


28 


W 


29 


Th 


30 



TABLE OF EVENTS 

1892. — Lee-Metford Rifle issued to ist Bn. 

1842. — Sir W. G. Davey appointed Colonel-Commandant. 

1 761. — Act of Parliament passed naturalizing foreign subjects to 
serve in the Regiment. 

1899. — 3rd Bn. embarked for South Africa. 

1859.— Capture of Fort Mittowlee (ist Bn.). 

i860. — Pekin evacuated by British Troops. 

1813. — Battle of Nivelle. 181 2. — Skirmish at Alba de Formes. 

1871. — i.st Bn. moved from Quebec to Halifax. 

181 3. — Battle of St. Jean-de-Luz. 1755. — Act of Parliament 
29th, Geo. II, Cap. 5, authorizing the raising of Regiment. 

1813. — 8th Rifle Bn. raised at Lisbon. 



1865. — 3rd Bn. moved from Burmah to India. 



1809. — 2nd Bn. moved from Channel Islands to West Indies. 



1880. — 2nd Bn. returned from Afghan War. 

1758. — Capture of Fort du Quesne (Pittsburg). 

1858. — Action of Dumoriagunge (ist Bn.). 

1778. — Part of 4th Bn. started on Expedition to Georgia. 

1801. — 6th Bn. moved from England to West Indies. 

1 87 1. — 3rd Bn. moved from India to Aden. 

1806. — ^3rd Bn. moved from Portsmouth to Channel Islands. 



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14 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



DECEMBER. 



Day Date 

P 1 

S 2 

Sun 3 



H 

Tu 

W 

Th 

P 

S 



H 

Tu 

W 

Th 

P 



W 
Th 
P 
S 



4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 



Sun 10 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



S 16 

Sun 17 

H 18 

Tu 19 



20 
21 
22 
23 



Sun 24 



Tu 

W 

Th 

P 

S 

Sun 31 



25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



TABLB OF BVBNTS 

858. — Action of Mehundee and Biswah (ist Bn.)- 

861. — China Medals issued to 2nd Bn. 

849. — 1st Bn. started on EuzuflFzie Expedition. 

851. — Passage of the Great Kei (2nd Bn). 

892. — 4th Bn. arrived in England from Burmah. 

813. — 8th, 9th, and loth Bns. authorized. 

871. — 3rd Bn. embarked for Aden from India. 

891. — 2nd Bn. disembarked at Gibraltar from Dublin. 

13th. 1813.— Battle of Nive (5th Bn.). 

896. — 1st Bn. to Cape and Mauritius from India. 

849. — Capture of Luggoo. 

891. — 3rd Bn. arrived in England from Gibraltar. 
849.— Capture of Pallee Zoormundie and Thear Khana. (ist Bn.) 
835. — Half 2nd Bn. embarked for Gibraltar from Cork. 1899. - 
Battle of Colenso. 



1858.— Short Enfield Rifles issued to 3rd Bn. 

1894. — Winchester Barracks, including Quarters of Dep6t, 

destroyed by fire. 
1852. — Punjab, Mooltan, and Goojerat granted. 
1807. — Capture of the Danish Isles. 

1894. — Dep6t moved from Winchester to Portsdown Forts. 
1858. — Action of Toolespore (ist Bn.). 
1880. — ist Bn. moved from Aldershot to Ireland. 



1755. — Regiment raised. 
Colonel-in-Chief. 



Earl of Loudoun appointed first 



1757. — Major-General Abercrombie appointed Colonel-in-Chief. 
1S41. — Part of 2nd Bn. employed in quelling riots, Jamaica. 
1829. — 2nd Bn. moved from West Indies to Isle of Wight. 

1797. — 5th Bn. raised at Cowes, Isle of Wight, clothed in green, 
and armed with Rifles. 



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15 



LIST OF OFFICERS, 1904. 



Rifle Depot— Winchester. 

" Celer et Audax." 
' Louisburg," " Quebec, 1759," " Roleia," "Viniiera." "Martinique," "Talavera,' 

"Busaco," " Fuentes d'Onor, "Albuhera," "Cuidad Rodrigo," "Badajoz," 
'Salamanca," "Vittoria," "Pyrenees," "Nivelle," "Nive," "Orthes," "Toulouse,' 

"Peninsula," "Punjab," "Mooltan," "Goojerat," "Delhi," "Taku Forts," 

•Pekin," "South Africa, 1851-2-3, 1879," "Ahmed Khel," "Kandahar, 1880,' 

"Afghanistan, 1878-80," " Egypt, 1882, 1884," Tel-el-Kebir," "Chitral." 



Uniform — Green, 
ist Battalion (6oth Foot) - 
and „ ( „ „ ) - 
3rd .. ( .. .. ) - 
4th „ ( „ „ ) - 



Facings — Scarlet. 

Malta. 

Gharial, for Sialkot, Punjab. 

Bermuda, 

Gosport. 



Colonel-in-Chief - 



Colonels Commandant - 



General H.R.H. George F. E. A., Prince of 
Wales and Duke of Cornwall and York, 
K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.M.G., G.V.O., 
/.SO., Col -in-Chief R. Fus.. R.W. Fus., 
R. Mar. and Cam'n Highrs. ... 

/ tP.C. Buller, Gen. , Pt. Hon. SirR. H. , G. C.B. , 

G.C^.G. [R], istBatt. 
Grenfell, General F. W. , Lord, G. C. B. , 

G.C.A/.G. [R], J., 2nd Batt. - 
Williams, Maj.-Gen. (Hon. Lt.-Gen.) H. F., 

3rd Batt. 

.Hinxman, Maj.-Gen. R. W., 4th Batt. 

Oj^cer Commanding Rifle Dep6t - Herbert, Col. E. W., C.B. 

cot. 

Adjutant, Rifle Depdt - - Armytage, Capt. G. A., K.R.R.C. 

Quarter-Master, Rifle Depdt - - Riley, T. M. - 

hon. major 



I May 

13 July 



1904 



1895 



1898 
1903 
1901 
1903 



7 Aug. 
C 29 July 
I 6 Oct. 

29 July 

25 May 1904 

15 Oct. 1902 

16 May 1903 

8 Feb. 1888 
27 Sept. 1882 

I Jan. 1903 



1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th 
Battalions. 

Lieutenant-Colonels (4). 
4 Fortescue, F. K.,p.s.c. 15 Oct. 1902 
2 Kays, W. S. 



3 McGrigor, C. R. R., 
C.B., p.s.c. 



21 Oct. 1903 
29 Nov. 1900 

25 Jan. 1904 
29 Nov. 1900 
18 Mar. 1904 



I Markham, C. J. 

Majors (4). 
(2nd in command). 

I Prendergast, G. N. ... 12 Sept. 1903 
29 Dec. 1898 

3 Nugent, O. S. W., D.S.O., 

p.s.c. ... 21 Oct. 1903 

21 Oct. 1899 



Majors — (continued). 



4 Henniker, F. B. M. 
2 Blewitt, A. 



Majors (12). 

1 Pakenham, H. F. 
Clark, C. A. G. 

2 Oxley, R. ^., p.s.c. 



25 Jan. 
7 Jan. 
18 Mar. 
17 Mar. 1900 
16 Nov. 1898 



1904 
1900 
1904 



18 Mar. 1900 
14 Aug. 1901 
26 Oct. 1 901 
29 Nov. 1900 
e.a. Watson. J. K., CM.G., 

D.S.O. ... 15 Oct. 1902 

6 Nov. 1898 

1 Jervis, Hon. St. L. H., 

D.S.O. ... 21 Feb. 1903 

2 Chaplin, C. S. ... 13 May 1903 
4 Douglas-Pennant, F. i June 1903 

3 Hare, S. W. ... 21 Oct. 1903 



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i6 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



Majors — (continued). 

4 Brownlow, Hon. J. R. 25 Jan. 1904. 
5, 3 Montagu-Stuart- Wortley, 

Hon. A. R., D.S.O., 

p.s.c. ... 4 May 1904 

V. 3 Northey, E. ••3 Aug. 1904 

s. Gosling, C. ... 14 Sept. 1904 

m. Robertson-Eustace, C. L. E. , 

D.S.O. ... 12 Oct. 1904 



Captains (25). 

s. Warre, H. C, Z>.5.a 
</. 3 Hope, J. A. 
5. Pearce-Serocold, £., 
p.s.c. 

3 Briscoe, H. A. W. ... 

bt. maj. 
s.c. SackvilU- Westy C. J. 
bt. maj. 
I Wilson, C. W.,D.S.O. 
p.s.c. 

4 Byron, R., D.S.O. ... 
s.c. Philips, L. F. 

bt. maj. 
s. Blore, H. R. 

bt. maj. 
4 Shakerley, G. C, 
D.S.O. 
d.i Cumberland, L. B. ... 
s. St. Aubyn, G. S. 

bt. maj. 
m. Allgood, W. H. L. ... 
<f.2 Barnett, W. 
V. Manners, Lord R. W. 

D.S.O. 
V. Long, W. J. 

3 Scratchley, V. H. S., 

D.S.O. 
s. c. 3 Hordern , G. V., adjt. 
bt, maj. 
V. Herbert Stepney, C. C. 

4 Green, H. C. R. 
d. 4 Wyndham, W. F. G. 



23 Jan. 1895 

21 Aug. 1897 

II Dec. 1897 
31 Dec. 1897 
29 Nov. 1900 
27 Jan. 1898 
29 Nov. 1900 

27 Jan. 1898 

27 Jan. 1898 
18 May 1898 

22 Aug. 1902 
14 Sept. 1898 

28 Nov. 1900 

29 Dec. 1898 
29 Dec. 1898 

8 Mar. 1899 
29 Nov. 1900 

8 Mar. 1899 
17 May 1899 
O., 

17 May 1899 
21 Oct. 1899 



4 Porter, M. L. 

2 Ward, E. F., adjt. ... 

2 Crum, F. M. 

bt. maj. 
V. Balfour, C.^., D.S.O. 
CO. Master, R. C. 

bt. maj. 
I Mott, S. F. 

bt. maj. 
V. Jelf, R. G. 

3 Rennie, G. A. P., D.S. 



22 Oct. 
4 Dec. 

29 Nov. 

7 Jan. 

7 Jan. 
25 Feb. 

23 Feb. 
17 Mar. 

24 May 
I Jan. 

22 Aug. 
13 Jan. 

13 Jan. 

14 Jan. 
13 Jan. 
22 Aug. 
13 Jan. 

,0. 

25 Feb. 



1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 

1903 
1900 

1900 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1901 

1901 



Captains— {conimvLtd). 

2 Widdrington, B. F. ... 10 Mar. 1901 
s.c. Blundell-Hoilinshead- 

Blundell, D. H., M.V.O. 

19 Mar. 1901 
Armytage, G. A., adjt. 

DepSt ... 26 June 1901 

2 Hankey, G. F. B. ... 26 June 1901 
m. Lynes, IV. P. ••• 3 July 1901 
m. Paine, A. /., D.S.O. 20 July 1901 

3 Foljambe, H. F. F. B. 20 July 1901 

3 Johnstone, R. ... 18 Sept. 1901 
I Pratt, M., D.S.O. ... 24 Sept. 1901 

V. Majendie, B. J 9 Oct. 1901 

4 Bircbam, H. F. W. ... 25 Oct. 1901 

1 Davidson, J. //., D.S.O., 

adjt. ... 25 Oct. 1901 

p.b. I Kay, W. A. I. ... 11 Dec. 1901 

2 Cathcart, A. E. ... 7 Jan. 1902 
4 Wake, H, V.S.O., adjt. 7 ]a.n. 1902 
I Johnson, H. C, A 5.0. 7 Jan. 1902 
4 Seymour, C. H. N. ... 7 Jan. 1902 

1 W.C. Price-Davies, L. A. E. 

D.S.O. ... 7 Jan. 1902 

s.c. Sims, R. F. M., D.S.O. 7 Jan. 1902 

2 Priaulx, G. K. ... 22 Jan. 1902 
V. Legard, D. A. ... 14 June 1902 

2 Makins, G. ... 2 Jan. 1904 

3 White, H. H. R. ... i Apr. 1904 

4 Kennedy, H. B. P. L. 4 Aug. 1904 



Jan. 1900 

Jan. 1900 

Jan. 1900 

Feb. 1900 

Feb. 1900 

Mar. 1900 

Mar. 1900 

Mar. 1900 

Nov. 1900 

Nov. 1900 

Nov. 1900 

Nov. 1900 

Jan. 1901 

Jan. 1901 

Jan. 1901 

May 1900 

Feb. 1901 

Feb. 1901 

Feb. 1 90 1 

Feb. 1901 



Lieutenants (3 


9)- 


I Martin, G. H. 


7 


f.o. Stirling, R. G. 


7 


3 Acland Troyte, G. J. 


25 


3 Leith, A. R. 


23 


I Hawley, C. F. 


23 


I Crichton, R. E. 


13 


I Dalby, T. G. 


17 


2 Willan, F. G 


28 


2 Culme-Seymour, G. ... 


14 


3 Maclachlan, A. F. C. 




D.S.O. 


14 


I Dalrymple. R. F. ... 


14 


rf.3 Hodgson, A. T. 


14 


I Parker-Jervis,W.S.W 


. I 


CO. Bradford, E. A. 


13 


4 Howard, C. A. 


19 
9 

5 


4 Barnett, G. A. 


^. 2 Harker. T. H. 


19 


3 Kelly. G. C. 


19 


2 Curling, B. J. 


19 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



17 



Lieutenants — (continued). 



1 Seymour, B. 

2 Heseltine, J. E. N. 
I Seymour, R. H. 

3 Rose, I. S. C. 

3 Yeats Brown, F. V. 
d. 4 Lee, G. T. 

1 Pardoe, F. L. 

2 Abadie, R. N. 

2 Vernon, H. A. 

4 Edwards, F. W. L. 
rf.4 P06, C. V. L. 

4 Watson, H. W. M. 
I Eyre, C. D. 

3 Blewitt, G. T. 

3 Temple, R. D. 

4 Wynne Finch, G. 

1 Mellor, J. G. G. 

2 Denison, E. B. 
2 Thornhill. H. T. 
2 Beaumont, G. A. H. 
2 Cookson. G. 

4 Wingfield, C. J. T. R. 

2nd Lieutenants 
I Bonham-Carter, A. E. 



25 Feb. 1901 
10 Mar. 1901 
18 Mar. 1901 

18 Mar. 1901 

19 Mar. 1901 
15 Apr. 1901 
15 Apr. 1901 
15 Apr. 1901 

9 May 1901 
10 June 1901 
24 June 1901 

26 June 1901 
3 July 1901 

20 July 1901 
24 Sept. 1901 

9 Oct. 1 901 
20 Dec. 
20 Dec. 

7 Jan. 
23 Apr. 

8 Aug. 



1901 
1 901 
1902 
1904 
1904 



16 Nov. 1904 



4 Soames, A. A. 

2 Grenfell, F. O. 
4 Hunter, A. J. 
CO. Barber, W. D. 
4 St. Aubyn, E. G. 

2 Clements, M. L. S. 
4 Mure. G. A. S. 

4 Porter, H. C. M. 
4 Aylmer, L. 

3 Deedes, W. H. 
3 Gosling, H. M. 

1 Evans, A. P. 

3 Atkinson, G. M. 

2 Davis, W. J. 



(28). 

20 Mar. 
8 Jan. 

23 Mar. 
8 Jan. 
4 May 
4 May 
4 May 
4 May 
4 May 
4 May 
8 May 
8 May 

14 Sept. 

19 Oct. 
4 Dec. 

18 Jan. 

18 Jan. 



1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1902 



2nd Lieutenants — (continued). 



3 Borton, A. D. 
3 Wormald, J. 

1 Deedes. H. W. 

2 Willan, R. H. 
2 Bond, R. H. 

2 Herbert-Stepney, G. S. 
I Hope, J. F. R. 

3 Oppenheim, A. C. ... 

1 Grice, T. G. 

3 Flower, H. J. 

4 Clinton, W. L. 

4 Ponsonby, H. C. 
4 Mellor, J. S. 
3 Brooke, F. H. 

2 Blake, M. F. 
(4) Pearse, J. F. B. 

1 Hargreaves, J. G. 

2 Howard-Bury, C. K. 
(4) Parish, F. W. 



18 Jan. 1902 

29 Jan. 1902 

30 Apr. 1902 
7 May 1902 
7 May 1902 
7 May 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

22 Oct. 1902 

19 Nov. 1902 
II Mar. 1903 
10 Oct. 1903 

7 May 1904 

14 May 1904 

18 May 1904 

3 Aug. 1904 



Adjutants. 

2 Ward, E. F., capt. ... 16 Nov. 1901 

1 Davidson, J. H., D.S.O. 

capt. ... 3 Sept. 1902 

4 Wake, H., D. S. O., 

capt. ... 27 June 1903 

3 Harris, Hon. A. F. W. 10 Dec. 1904 

Quarter- Masters. 

m. Holmes, IV., ... 14 Apr. 1886 

hon. maj. i Jan. 1903 

2 Dwane, J. W. ... 15 Feb. 1888 

hon. maj. 29 Nov. 1900 

m. OSfua, T. ... 10 Jan. 1894 

hon. capt. 10 Jan. 1904 

3 Harrington, W. C. , hon. It. 

26 Nov. 1898 

I Feb. 1898 

I McNally, T. C.,hon. It. 22 Mar. 1899 
m. Wilkins, W. J., hon. It. 

7 Feb. 1900 

4 Judge, W., hon. It. ..11 Feb. 1903 



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i8 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



LIST OF OFFICERS, 1804. 

Six Battalions. 
West Indies— North America— South America. 



Rank and Name Rank in Regt. 

Col. 'in-Chief— 
H.R.H. Fred., Duke of 
York. K.G. ... 23 Aug. 1797 

Rankin Army, YK^^'^^"^' lo Feb. 1795 



Cols. -Command ant — 
William Rowley 

Rank in Army, Gen. 
Thomas Carleton 

Rank in Army, Gen. 
Peter Hunter 
Rank in Army, Lt.-Gen. 
William Gardiner 
Rank in Army, Lt.-Gen. 
Robert Brownrigg 
Rank in Army, Maj. -Gen. 
Tho. Slaughter Stanwix 
Rankin Army, Lt.-Gen. 

Lieut. -Colonels— 
James Adolph. Harris ... 
Rank in Army, Maj. -Gen. 
George Prevost 

Rank in Army, Col. 

Duncan Mackintosh ... 

Rank in Army, Col. 

George William Ramsay 

Rank in Army, Col. 

Fr. Baron de Rottenburg 

Rank in Army, 

Lachlin Maclean 

Rank in Army, 
Fitz. J. Grafton Maclean 
Rank in Army, Col. 
Robert Lethbridge 

Rank in Army, 
Gabriel Gordon 

Rank in Army, 
C. L. Theodore Schoedde 
Rank in Army 
Gervaise Rainey 
Francis Streicher 
Rank in Army, Lt.-Col. 



3 Oct. 1787 

1 Jan. 1798 
6 Aug. 1794 

25 Sept. 1803 

2 Aug. 1796 
29 Apl. 1802 
II Mar. 1799 

26 Jan. 1799 

25 July 1799 
29 Apr. 1802 

9 May 1800 

26 June 1799 



16 June 1788 

I Jan. 1798 

6 Aug. 1794 

I Jan. 1798 

I Sept. 1795 

25 Sept. 1803 

30 Dec. 1797 

25 Sept. 1803 

30 Dec. 1797 

25 June 1796 

25 July 1799 

I Jan. 1798 

5 Feb. 1801 

25 Sept. 1803 

II Feb. 1802 

I Jan. 1800 

9 Mar. 1802 

I Jan. 1800 

25 Apr. 1802 

16 May 1800 

20 Apr. 1803 

30 Dec. 1797 

29 Apr. 1802 



Rank and Name 
Xiajors — 
L. Mosheim 

Rank in Army, Lt.-Col. 
Edward Codd 
Edward Drummond ... 
Thomas Austin 
George Mackie 
John Pringle Dalrymple 
Thomas Clark 
James Lomax 
James Wheeler Unwin 
Rank in Army, Lt.-Col. 
James Bathurst 
Robert Campbell 
Rank in A rmy, Lt. -Col. 



Rank in Regt. 

30 Dec. 1797 
29 Apr. 1802 
25 Dec. 1800 
II June 1 801 
3 July 1801 
8 Mar, 1802 
13 Mar. 1802 
24 June 1802 

20 Apr. 1803 

21 Apr. 1803 
29 Apr. 1802 

I Oct. 1803 

24 Nov. 1803 

I Jan. 1800 



Captains— 
John Robertson 
George Fourneret 
Thomas McKee 
Colin Campbell 

Rank in Army, Major. 
James Grant 
John Galiffe 

Rank in Army, Major. 
Benedict Simon 
Ferdinand Crust 
Francis St. Mart 
Anthony Rumpler 

Vorstadt 

Francis Gomer 
Charles de la Houssaye 

Imturn 

Charles Tauriac 

Gand 

Lewis Schneider 
Gasper Rouvray 

Braun 

Ambrose Hillerick 
William Marlton 
Daniel Dixon 
William J. O'Connor ... 
Rank in Army, 
Charles de Saluberry ... 



10 Sept. 1795 
16 Dec. 1795 
20 Feb. 1796 
8 June 1796 
25 Sept. 1803 
25 Apr. 1797 

30 Dec. 1797 

31 Oct. 1796 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 

... 30 Dec. 1797 

...30 Dec. 1797 

...30 Dec. 1797 

...30 Dec. 1797 

...25 Oct. 1798 

25 Nov. 1798 

24 Jan. 1799 

I Oct. 1794 

10 July 1799 



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Rank and Name 
Captains (continued) — 

William Frazer 

Rank in Army, 

William Fraser 

Walter Johnson 

John William Aldred ... 

Daniel Hutchins Cairns 

William Goodlad 

William Gabriel Davy... 

Joseph Twigg 

Rank in Army, 

H. C. Appelius 

Rank in Army, 

William Drummond ... 

Charles Gordon 

George Bent 

William Batteley 

Rank in Army, 

John Welsford 

Rank in Army, 

William Woodgate 

William White 

Rank in Army, 

Kenelm Chandler 

William Plenderleath ... 

James Mc Arthur 

Robert Hazen 

David Joly 

Alex. Andrews 
Alexander Deiken 

Rank in Army, Lt.-Col. 
John Campbell 
Donald Mc Neill 
John Cummings 
George Cartwright 
James Bunting 

De Mangin 

Philip Mauriage 
William Williams 
Richard Buthe 

Gran 

Rank in Army, 
Geo. H. Duckworth .., 
JohnMcMahon 
Thomas Hames 



Rank in Regt, 

15 July 1799 

26 Feb. 1797 

25 July 1799 

5 Jan. 1800 
19 Nov. 1800 

24 July 1 801 
II Dec. i3oi 

I Jan. 1802 
31 Mar. 1802 
28 Mar. 1800 

28 Apr. 1802 

21 Aug. 1801 

16 July 1802 

6 Aug. 1802 
8 Sept. 1802 

15 Mar. 1803 

5 Oct. 1795 

16 Mar. 1803 

27 Dec. 1796 

6 Apl. 1803 

26 May 1803 

25 Oct. 1794 

29 May 1803 

28 May 1803 

17 Sept. 1795 

18 Sept. 1795 
16 Dec. 1795 

2 June 1803 

22 June 1803 
22 June 1803 
25 June 1803 
25 June 1803 
25 June 1803 
25 June 1803 
25 June 1803 
25 June 1803 

2 July 1803 

3 July 1803 

4 July 1803 
12 July 1803 
24 Nov. 1800 
17 Aug. 1803 

29 Aug. 1803 
12 Nov. 1803 



Rank and Name Rank in Regt, 

Lieutenants (continued) — 



Lieutenants — 
Thomas Durham 
W. H. Quast 
Thomas Henderson ... 
Chas. Cranstoun Dixon 
Lewis de Ratsenhausen 
Michael de Wendt 



I Sept. 1796 

23 May 1797 
9 Aug. 1797 

24 Aug. 1797 
30 Dec 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 



Hamelin 
Hubert de Salve 
Alex, de Conders 

Scheding 

Adolph. Munstal 
Charles Kinsinger 
Lewis Initum 
Adam Krien 
Peter Blossiere 
George F. de Virna 

Killenpach 

John Woolff 
F. de Renauld 
Frederic Gilse 
Charles de Vigny 

Schmidt 

Franchaffon 

L. de Bosse 

Brook 

Charles Hinkeldy 

Schulties 

John Fitzmaurice 



30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
... 30 Dec 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
... 30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
,..30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
,..30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...30 Dec. 1797 
...29 Mar. 1798 
.. 25 Apr. 1798 
,..25 Apr. 1798 
14 Feb. 1799 



Rank in Army, 21 Dec. 1796 
James Campbell ... 19 May 1799 

Ch. Baron de Selchow 
James Erskine Bell 



John D. Pluncher 
John L. Gallie 

Rogers 

de Caracres 

Thomas Walsh 
Charles du Sable 
J. N. Loth 
Henry Boone Hall 

Rank in Army, 
Geo. P. Schneider 
Anthony Stamba 

Mertens 

Kellerman 

Henry Petrie 
C. W. H. Koch 
Conrad Kemmeter 

Myers 

George Henry Zulke 

Berger 

Friess 

George W: Avenar 
A. Ostman 
Baron d'Oya 
H. Baron Adelsheim 
Charles Hawke 
Charles Dixon Green 



1800 
1800 
1800 
1800 



I June 1799 
. 8 Oct. 1799 
. II July 1800 
. 12 July 1800 
. 14 July 1800 
. 15 July 1800 
. 18 July 
. 20 July 
. 21 July 
23 July 

1 May 1797 
,. 24 July 1800 
. 25 July 1800 
. 28 July 1800 
. 29 July 1800 
. 30 July 1800 

2 Aug. 1800 
. 3 Aug. 1800 
. 5 Aug. i8oo 
. 6 Aug. 1800 
. 7 Aug. 1800 
. 8 Aug. 1800 
. 9 Aug. 1800 
. 9 Aug. 1800 
, 10 Aug. 1800 

II Aug. 1800 

. 13 Aug. 1800 

14 Aug. i8oo 



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The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



Rank and Name 
Lieutenants (continued) — 
Wm. McKinnon 

Rank in Army, 
Florence Mc Carthy . . . 
Frederic des Barres 
James Le Grice 
James Moore 
Wm. Yates Johnson 
Allan Maclean 
Anthony Suasso 
Richard R. Nugent 
John Herbert 

Rank in Army, 
Henry Fischbach 
J. Blathfield 
Wm. Ackland Gilland ... 

Rank in Army, 
Thomas Ellis 

Rank in Army, 
Abraham Logan 
William Murray 
John White 

Rank in Army, 
William Walther 

Rank in Army, 
Lewis Rnmann 

Rank in Army, 
J. H. Schoedde 

Rank in Army, 
Alexander Mackenzie ... 

Rank in Army, 
Francis Holmes 

Rank in Army^ 
Richard Philbin 

Rank in Army, 
Richard Cochran 

Rank in Army, 
Godrick Sarda 
J. B. Kerrison 
Orange Balneavis 
David Balneavis 
Robert Thompson 
A. Henry Kelsey 
Richard Daly 

Rank in Army 
Francis Cockburne 
Edward Byrne 

Rank in Army, 
J. N. MuUer 
Robert Hawthorne 

Rank in Army, 
V. J. Ravenscroft 
Thomas Frazer 



RafUt in Regt. 

1 8 Sept. 1800 
28 May 1800 

16 Oct. 1800 

20 Oct. 1800 

21 Oct. 1800 

22 Oct. 1800 

24 Oct. 1800 

26 Oct. 1800 

27 Oct. 1800 

20 Dec. 1800 

25 Dec. 1800 

4 Nov. 1795 

28 Jan. 1801 

5 Feb. 1 801 

14 May 1801 

21 Dec. 1796 

15 May 1 801 

29 Jan. 1801 

17 July 1 801 

17 Sept. 1801 

6 Apr. 1802 
29 Jan. 1 801 
25 Apr, 1802 
28 June 1800 
25 Apr. 1802 

7 Aug. 1801 
25 Apr. 1802 

8 Oct. 1801 

25 June 1802 

27 Feb. 1796 
13 Aug. 1802 

28 Aug. 1801 

29 Oct. 1802 

22 Oct. 1799 

18 Dec. 1802 

19 Sept. 1801 

19 Dec. 1802 

20 Dec. 1802 

21 Dec. 1802 

22 Dec. 1802 

23 Dec. 1802 

24 Dec 1802 
10 Feb 1803 

26 June 1801 
6 Apr. 1803 

4 May 1803 
12 Aug. 1801 

5 May 1803 

26 May 1803 

27 June 1801 

28 May 1803 

29 May 1803 



Rank and Name 
Lieutenants (continued) — 
David Gordon 
Redmond Walsh 
Daniel Page 
George F. Gibson 
William Brooke 
James Landells 
Carew Reynell 
Robert Gordon 
Godfrey Stark 
Thomas Coleman 
Melville Glennie 

Redmond 

Archibald Campbell ... 
Everard Baring 

Rank in Army, 
C. F. Baring 
James Nethery 
Edward Llewellyn 
John Jackson 
William Farrand 

Rank in Army, 
Thomas Rowland 
Robert Thompson 

Rank in Army, 
Richard Henry Hughes 
Peter Irwine 

Rank in Army, 
John Boardman 
G. Ramsay 
J. Rimer 

Rank in Army, 
J. Eckhard 

Rank in Army, 
J. Trumback 
J. Hammer 
J. Bartoli 
Henry Dibbey 
John Watson 
William Hobart 
T. Franchini 
Francis Bretze 
Charles Appelius 
Robert Johnson 
Jacobus Hazel 
John Terry 
Edward Schultz 

Ensigns — 
Valentine Riechard 

Malaspina 

Schemmelkehl 

Von Lindenberg ... 

R. K. Mews 



Rank in Regt. 

30 May 1803 

31 May 1803 

1 June 1803 

2 June 1803 
25 June 1803 

25 June 1803 

26 June 1803 

27 June 1803 

28 June 1803 

29 June 1803 

30 June 1803 

1 July 1803 

2 July 1803 
12 Nov. 1803 

7 Aug. 1 801 
12 Nov. 1803 
12 Nov. 1803 
27 July 1800 
22 Oct. 1800 
19 May 1801 

16 Dec. 1799 

27 May 1 801 

28 July 1 801 

14 May 1 801 

15 Aug. 1 801 

2 Oct. 1801 
12 June 1800 
30 Oct. 1801 
30 Nov. 1801 
25 Apr. 1802 

7 Aug. 1 801 
25 Apr. 1802 

8 Aug. 1801 
28 Apr. 1802 
28 Apr. 1802 
28 Apr. 1802 
25 June 1802 
25 June 1802 

17 Dec. 1802 

22 Dec. 1802 

23 Dec. 1802 

24 Dec. 1802 
24 Mar. 1803 

19 June 1803 

20 June 1803 

22 June 1803 

23 June 1803 

24 June 1803 

3 Aug. 1803 

4 Aug. 1803 
6 Aug. 1803 



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Rank and Name 
Ensigns (continued)— 
Frederick W. Kyth ... 
Rank in Army, 
Charles Richardson 

Rank in Armv, 
George Jack 

Klinkerfuss 

William Willermin 
Henry Lodge 

Mclntire 

Lewis Poincy 

Sawassky 

Charles Rausch 

Paymasters — 
Fred. Sam. Pohl 
James Lawson 
James Nolan 
Fra. E. Matx 

Adjutants — 
L. de Bosse 
Rank in Army, Lieut. 

Hamelin 

Rank in Army, Lieut. 
John Moore 
Henry Dibbly 
Rank in Army, Ensign 
Willam Murray 

Rank in Army, Lieut. 
Frederic Gilse 

Rank in Army, Lieut. 
- John Watson 

Rank in Army, Ensign 



Rank in Regt. 

12 Aug. 1803 
28 Sept. 1803 
27 Aug. 1803 

13 Nov. 1789 
3 Sept. 1803 

13 Nov. 1803 

14 Nov. 1803 

15 Nov. 1803 
15 Nov. 1803 
17 Nov. 1803 
19 Nov. 1803 

8 Dec. 1803 



28 Feb. 1798 
5 Apr. 1798 
2 Oct. 1800 
2 May 1803 



22 Mar. 1798 
30 Dec, 1797 

4 July 1798 
30 Dec. 1797 

9 Aug. 1799 

5 Feb. 1800 
2 June 1802 

24 Mar. 1800 
17 Sept. 1 801 
14 Apr. 1800 
30 Dec. 1797 

25 Oct. 1800 
25 June 1802 



Rank and Name 
Quartermasters — 

Kem meter 

Dennis Alexander 
Joseph Chattoway 
Peter Child 
Richard Marriott 

Surgeons — 
Anthony Reifer 
John Feries 
Samuel Cathcart 
Robert Mc Int)rre 
F. Fielder 
William Powell 

Assistant Surgeons — 

Felling 

Frederic Midike 

Little 

David Brown 
Edward Jarvis 
John Murton 
John Carroll 
J. Adolphus 

Jackson 

Gilles Tucks 



Rank in Regt, 

. 30 Dec. 1797 

. 5 Sept. 1799 

3 July 1800 

3 July 1801 

. 21 Mar. 1803 



30 Dec. 1797 
21 Dec. 1800 
28 Mar. 1 801 
I Oct. 1801 
25 Dec. 1802 
25 Mar. 1803 



31 Dec. 

I Mar. 

3 Jan. 
30 Sept. 
13 Dec. 
13 Aug. 
18 Nov. 
10 Oct. 
12 Oct. 
18 Nov. 



1797 
1800 
1 801 
1801 
1801 
1802 
1802 
1802 
1802 
1802 



Regimentals — Red, facings blue, white 

lace, two blue stripes. 

5th Rifle Battalion Green. 

Agents — Messrs. Greenwood & Cox, 
Craig's Court. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



LIST SHOWING THE NUMBER OF BATTALIONS 
AND THEIR SEVERAL STATIONS 

FROM 1756 TO 1904. 



3rd. 
4th. 



The 62iid, or the Royal Amerioan 

Regiment of Foot. 

1766. 

Four Battalions. 

New York, Albany, Philadelphia. 

Employed on different Expeditions 
to Forts Pitt, Lancaster, and 
William Henry, and on the 
Lakes. 

Ditto. 

Ditto. 



ist. 
2nd. 



Depots — Albany and New York. 

The 60th, or the Royal American 

Regiment of Foot. 

1757. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. New York, Charleston Expedition, 

Lancaster, Philadelphia. 
2nd. New York, Halifax, Expedition to 

Louisboiirg, Philadelphia. 
3rd. Albany, Forts William Henry, 

Hunter, and Edward's. 
4th. New York, Halifax, Expedition to 

Louisbourg, Expedition to Crown 

Point, Ticonderoga. 
Depot — ^America. 

1758. 

Four Battalions. 

ist. Charleston, Philadelphia, Ticon- 
deroga, Pittsburg, New York, 
Niagara, Detroit, Frontenac, and 
Albany. 

2nd. Halifax. Louisbourg, Expedition to 
Bay of Fundy. 

3rd. Albany, New York, Boston, Hali- 
fax, and Louisbourg. 

4th. Expedition to Ticonderoga, and 
Fort Niagara, Crown Point, 
Frontenac, Albany. 
Depot —America. 

1759. 

Four Battalions. 

ist. Albany, Niagara, Pittsburg, Ticon- 
deroga. 

2nd. Louisbourg, Camp at Orleans Is- 
land, and Quebec. 



3rd. 



Louisbourg, Camp at Orleans Is- 
land, and Quebec. 
4th. Oswego, Niagara, & Detachments. 
Depot —America. 



1760. 

Four Battalions. 

Pittsburg, Quebec, Four Companies 
at Carlisle. Forts Bedford, Li§o- 
nier, and Niagara, 5 Companies 
at Montreal, and Detachments 

Quebec. 

Quebec. 

Oswego, Fort Ontario, and Detach- 
ments at Montreal. 
Depot— America. 



2nd 
3rd. 
4th. 



2nd. 
3rd. 
4th. 



2nd. 
3rd. 

4th. 



2nd. 



3rd. 
4th. 



1761. 

Four Battalions. 
Five Companies at Pittsburg, Forts 
Bedford, Ligonier, and Niagara; 
and Carlisle, Five Companies at 
Montreal, and Detachments 
Quebec and Pittsburg. 
Quebec, New York, Barbadoes. 
Montreal, and Detachments. 
Depot — ^America. 

1762. 

Four Battalions. 
Pittsburg, Detachments on the 
Ohio, Philadelphia, and on Lakes 
Michigan and Superior. 
Quebec and Pittsburg. 
Barbadoes, Martinique, Havannah, 

and Pensacola. 
Montreal, and Detachments. 
Depot — America. 

1763. 

Four Battalions. 

Pittsburg. Forts Littleton, Bedford, 
Presq'ile, and Niagara. 

Quebec, Detroit, Pittsburg, Ni- 
agara, New York, and Detach- 
ments. 

Pensacola and New York. 

Montreal, and Detachments. D. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 



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ISt. 



2nd. 
3rd. 



1764. 

Three Battalions. 

Fort Pitt. New York. Expedition 
to Lakes of Forts Ontario. Lan- 
caster, and to Detroit, and De- 
tachments. 

Quebec, and Detachments. 

New York. D. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



ist. 



1765. 

Two Battalions. 
Pittsburg. Forts Stanwix, Fort 
George. Albany, New York. 
2nd. Quebec, Montreal. New York. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 



1766. 

Two Battalions. 

New York, Quebec, Jamaica. 

New York, and Detachments. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



ISt. 

2nd. 



2nd. 



1767. 

Two Battalions. 

Jamaica. Three Companies in South 
Carolina. 

New York, Niagara, and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 



1768 to 1771. 

Two Battalions. 

I St. Jamaica. 

2nd. New York, Niagara, and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1772. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Jamaica, New York. 
2nd. New York, Six Companies at St. 

Vincent, Four to Antigua. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1773 to 1774. 

Two Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 
2nd. Six Companies at St. Vincent, Four 

at Antigua. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1775. 

Four Battalions. 
1st. Jamaica, Pensacola. 
2nd. Six Companies at St. Vincent, Four 
at Antigua. 



3rd. Raised this year in England, pro- 
bably in Isle of Wight. 

4th. Ditto. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1776. 

Four Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. Three Companies, South 

Carolina, Georgia. 
2nd. St. Vincent, Antigua, St. Augustine, 

Isle of Wight. 
3rd. Isle of Wight, Pensacola, Jamaica, 

St. Augustine. 
4th. Isle of Wight, St. Augustine. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1777. 

Four Battalions. 
ISt. Jamaica. 

2nd. St. Vincent. Antigua, St. Augustine. 
3rd. Pensacola, St. Augustine, Jamaica. 
4th. Si. Augustine. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1778. 

Four Battalions. 
ISt. Jamaica. 

2nd. St. Vincent, Antigua, St. Augustine. 
3rd. Jamaica, Charleston. 
4th. St. Augustine. Georgia. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1779. 

Four Battalions. 
ISt. Jamaica. 
2nd. St. Vincent, Antigua, St. Augustine, 

Georgia. 
3rd. Charleston. 
4th. St. Augustine, Georgia. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1780. 

Four Battalions. 
ISt. Jamaica, Expedition to Nicaragua. 
2nd. Antigua. St. Augustine, Georgia. 
3rd. St. Augustine. New Yoik. 
4th. St. Augustine, Charlestown, New 

York. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1781. 
Four Battalions. 
ISt. Jamaica. 

2nd. Barbadoes, St. Augustine, Georgia. 
3rd. West Florida, New York. 
4th. New York. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



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1782. 

Four Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 

2nd. Barbadoes, St. Augustine. 
3rd. New York. 
4th. New York. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1783. 

Four Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 

2nd. Barbadoes, St. Augustine, Grenada. 
3rd. New York, Halifax. D. 
4th. Ditto. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1784. 

Two Battalions, 
rst. Jamaica. 
2nd. Barbadoes, St. Augustine, Grenada, 

St. Vincent. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1785. 

Two Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 
2nd. Grenada, St. Vincent. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1786. 

Two Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 
2nd. Grenada. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1787. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Halifax, Quebec, Niagara, New- 
foundland. 
2nd. Grenada, Montreal. 
3rd and 4th. Raised this year at Chatham, 
England. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1788. 

Four Battalions. 

ist. Niagara, Montreal, Detroit, and 
Detachments. 

2nd. Detroit. 

3rd. Chatham, Four Companies and 
Headquarters Barbadoes, Four 
Companies at Dominica, Two 
Companies at Montserrat. 

4th. Chatham, Barbadoes. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



1789. 

Four Battalions. 

ist. Niagara. 

2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 

3rd. Headquarters and Four Companies 
Barbadoes, Four Companies Do- 
minica, Two at Montserrat. 

4th. Barbadoes. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1790. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Niagara. 

2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 
3rd. Barbadoes, Dominica, Montserrat, 

Antigua. 
4th. Barbadoes. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1791. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 
3rd. Antigua. 
4th. Barbadoes, Tobago. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1792. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 
3rd. Antigua, Tortola. 
4th. Barbadoes, Tobago. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1793. 

Four Battalions. 
1st. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara, Quebec. 
3rd. Antigua, Tobago, Guernsey. 
4th. Tobago, Barbadoes. 

Depot — Isle of Wight. 

1794. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 
3rd. Guernsey. 
4th. Tobago, Guadaloupe. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1796. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Montreal. 
2nd. Detroit, Montreal, Niagara. 



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3rd. 


Guernsey, Barbadoes, St. Vincent. 




1801. 


4th. 


Tobago. 




Six Battalions. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


ISt. 


Jamaica. 






2nd. 


Barbadoes. 




1796. 


3rd. 


Tobago. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Martinique. 


ISt. 


Montreal. 


5th. 


Surinam. 


2nd. 


Quebec. 


6th. 


Jamaica. 


3rd. 


St. Vincent, Tobago. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


4th: 


Tobago, Lyinington, Guernsey. 








Depot— Isle of Wight. 




1802. 

Six Battalions. 






ISt. 


Jamaica. 


ISt. 

2nd. 


1797. 

Five Battalions. 
Montreal. 
Quebec. 


2nd. 
3rd. 
4th. 
5th. 
6th. 


Barbadoes, Tobago. 
Tobago, Grenada. 
Martinique, Jamaica. 
Surinam. 


3rd. 


Tobago, Trinidad, Porto Rico. 


Jamaica. 


4th. 


Guernsey, Grenada, Jamaica, 






Tobago, Martinique. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


5th. 


Raised this year at Cowes. 








Depot— Isle of Wight. 




1803. 

Six Battalions. 




, 


ISt. 


Jamaica. 


ISt. 


1798. 

Five Battalions. 
Guernsey. 


2nd. 
3rd. 
4th. 


Barbadoes, Tobago, St. Vincent 
Tobago, Grenada, Antigua. 
Jamaica. 


2nd. 


.Quebec. 


5th. 


Surinam, Halifax. 


3rd. 


Tobago. 


6th. 


Jamaica. 


4th. 
Sth. 


Martinique, St. Domingo. 
Cowes, Goff' s Bridge, Clonmel. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 




Depot-Isle of Wight. 




1804. 

Six Battalions. 




1799. 


ISt. 


Jamaica. 




Six Battalions. 


2nd. 


St. Vincent, Surinam. 


ISt. 


Guernsey. 


3rd. 


Grenada. 


2nd. 


Quebec, Montreal. 


4th. 


Jamaica. 


3rd. 


Tobago. 


5th. 


Halifax. 


4th. 


Martinique. 


6th. 


Jamaica. 


5th. 


Clonmel, Cork. Martinique, and 
Surinam, 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


6th. 


Raised this year in Isle of Wight, 




1806. 




two Companies in Holland. 




Six Battalions. 




Depot-Isle of Wight. 


ISt. 


Jamaica. 






2nd. 


St. Vincent. 




1800. 


3rd. 


Grenada. 




Six Battalions. 


4th. 


Lymington. 


ISt. 


Barbadoes, Jamaica. 


5th. 


Halifax, Portsmouth. 


2nd. 


Quebec, Barbadoes. 


6th. 


Jamaica. 


3rd. 
4th. 


Tobago. 
Martinique. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


5th. 


Surinam. 




1806. 


6th. 


Jamaica, Cowes. 




Six Battalions. 




Depot— Isle of Wight. 


ISt. 


Jamaica. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



2nd. St. Vincent. 

3rd. Granada. Portsmouth, Guernsey. 

4th. Lyniington, Cape of Good Hope. 

5th. Portsmouth. 

6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1807. 

Six Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica. 
2nd. St. Vincent, Jersey. 
3rd. Guernsey, Barbadoes, Danish Isles. 
4th. Cape Town, and Detachments. 
5th. Portsmouth, Cork. 
6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1808. 

Six Battalions. 
I St. Jamaica, Spain, Portugal. 
2nd. Jersey. 
3rd. Barbadoes. 

4th. Cape of Good Hope, Barbadoes. 
5th. Cork, Portugal, Spain. 
6th. Jamaica, and Detachments. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1809. 

Six Battalions, 
ist. Jamaica, Maroontown, Savannah. 
2nd. Corunna, Guernsey, Barbadoes. 
3rd. Antigua, Martinique, Les Saintes. 
5th. Corunna, Detachments in Spain. 
6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1810. 

Six Battalions, 
ist. Jamaica, Guadaloupe, Cowes. 
2nd. Barbadoes, Guadaloupe. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe. 
4th. Martinique, Guadaloupe. Dominica, 

Antigua, Lymington. 
5th. Spain, and Detachments. 
6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1811. 

Six Battalions, 
ist. Cowes, Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe. 
4th. Lymington. 
5th. Spain, and Detachments. 
6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



1812. 

Six Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe. 
4th. Lymington, Dominica. 
5th. Spain, and Detachments. 
6th. Jamaica. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1813. 

Eight Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope 
2nd. Barbadoes. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe. 
4th. Dominica. 
5th. Spain and France. 
6th. Jamaica. 

7th and 8th raised this year. 
7th. Guernsey. 
8th. Lisbon. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1814. 

Eight Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe. 
4th. Dominica. 
5th. France, Cork. 
6th. Jamaica. 
7th. Guernsey, Halifax, Expedition to 

Penobscot. 
8th. Lisbon, Gibraltar. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1816. 

Eight Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes. 
3rd. Martinique, Guadaloupe, Dominica, 

St. Lucia. 
4th. Dominica. 
5th. Cork, Butte vant. 
6th. Jamaica. 
7th. Halifax, Annapolis. 
8th. Gibraltar. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1816. 

Eight Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes. 

3rd. Dominica, St. Lucia, Halifax, 
Annapolis, Prince Edward's Isle. 



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27 



4th. Demerara. 

5th. Buttevant, Cowes, Gibraltar. 

.6th. Jamaica. 

7th. Halifax. 

8th. Gibraltar. D. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1817. 

Seven Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Barbadoes, Halifax, Quebec. 
3rd. Halifax. 
4th. Demerara. 
5th. Gibraltar. 
6th. Jamaica, Portsmouth. 
7th. Halifax, N.S. D. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1818. 

Six Battalions. 

ist. Cape of Good Hope. 

2nd. Rifle Battalion — Quebec, and De- 
tachments. 

3rd. Light Infantry — Halifax. 

4th. Demerara. 

5th. Gibraltar, Isle of Wight. D. 

6th. Portsmouth. D. 

Depbt— Isle of Wight. 

1819. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Cape of Good Hope. 
2nd. Rifle Battalion — Quebec. 
3rd. Light Infantry — Halifax. 
4th. Demerara, Portsmouth. D. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1820. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Rifle Battalion — Five Companies 

at Quebec, Five at Isle aux Noix. 
2nd. Light I nfantry— H alifax, Annapolis. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1821. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Right Wing — Annapolis ; Left 

W ing — Bermuda. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1822. 

Two Battalions. 
ist. Montreal, and Detachments. 
2nd. Right Wing— Halifax ; Left Wing 

Bermuda. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



1823. 

Two Battalions. 

ist. Kingston, Ontario. 

2nd. Right Wing— Halifax. Newfound- 
land ; Left Wing — Bermuda. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

The 60th, or the Duke of York's Own 
Rifle Corps and Light Infantry. 
1824. 
ist. Kingston, Quebec, Chatham (Eng- 
land), Canterbury. 
2nd. Right wing— Newfoundland, Bar- 
badoes, and Demerara ; left 
wing— Bermuda and Demerara. 
Depots — ist, Chatham. 

2nd, Isle of Wight. 

1826. 

Two Battalions. 

ist. Rifle Battalion— Canterbury, Chat- 
ham, Weedon, Manchester. 

2nd. Rifle Battalion— Right wing, Bar- 
badoes, Berbice ; left wing, 
Demerara. 
Depot— Isle of Wight. 

1826. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Manchester, and Detachments, 

Plymouth. 
2nd. Right wing— Barbadoes, Berbice; 
left wing — Demerara. 
Depot — 2nd, Isle of Wight. 

1827. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Lisbon. 

2nd. Right wing— Barbadoes, Berbice; 
left wing — Demerara. 
Depots — ist, Plymouth. 

2nd, Isle of Wight. 

1828. 

Two Battalions, 
ist Lisbon, Fermoy, Limerick, and 

Detachments. 
2nd. Right Wing — Berbice; Left Wing— 

Demerara. 

Depots — ist, Plymouth. 

2nd, Isle of Wight. 

1829. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Limerick, and Detachments. 
2nd. Right Wing — Berbice ; Left Win g — 

Demerara, Isle of Wight. 

Depot— Isle of Wight. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



1830. 

Two Battalions. 

ist. Limerick, Cork, Gibraltar. 

2nd. Isle of Wight, Weedon, Man- 
chester. 
Depot — ist, Portsmouth. 

The 60th, or the King's Royal 

Rifle Corps. 

1831. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Gibraltar. 

2nd. Manchester, Dublin, and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot — ist, Portsmouth. 

1832. 

Two Battalions. 

ist. Gibraltar. 

2nd. Naas, Templemore, and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot — ist, Portsmouth. 

1833. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Gibraltar. 

2nd. Naas, Templemore, Dublin. 
Depot — Portsmouth. 

1834. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Gibraltar, Malta. 
2nd. MuUingar, Kilkenny, and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot — Portsmouth. 

1836. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Malta. 

2nd. Kilkenny, Buttevant, Cork, Gib- 
raltar. 

Depot — Stockport. 

1836. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Malta, Corfu, Vido. 
2nd. Gibraltar. 
Depots— ist, Newcastle ; 2nd. Jersey. 

1837. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Vido, Corfu. 
2nd. Gibraltar, Corfu, Vido. 
Depots — ist, Sunderland ; 2nd, Jersey. 



1838. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Corfu, Zante, Vido, and Detach- 
ments. 
2nd. Vido, Corfu. 

Depots — ist, Hull ; 2nd, Jersey. 

1839. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Vido, Zante, and Detachments. 
2nd. Corfu. 

Depots — ist, Hull ; 2nd, Jersey. 

1840. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Zante, Woolwich, Windsor. 
2nd. Corfu. 

Depot — 2nd, Clonmel. 

1841. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Windsor, Bolton, and Detachments. 
2nd. Corfu, Jamaica. 

Depot — Naas. 

1842. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Bolton, Manchester, and Detach- 
ments. 
2nd. Jamaica. 

Depot— Dublin. 

1843. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Manchester, Naas, Dublin. 
2nd. Jamaica. 

Depot — Newry. 

1844. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Dublin, Kilkenny, Waterford, and 

Detachments. 
2nd. Jamaica, Quebec. 

Depot— Belturbet. 

1846. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Fermoy , and Detachments, Poonah. 
2nd. Quebec, St. John, Lacrosse. 
Depot — ist, Chatham ; 2nd, Dundee. 

1846. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Poonah, Kurrachee, Scinde. 
2nd. St. John, Montreal, Halifax, N.S. 
Depot — ist, Chatham ; 2nd, Paisley. 



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1847. 

Two Battalions. 
ist. Kurrachee. 

2nd. Halifax, Portsmouth, Chichester, 
and Detachments. 
Depot — Chatham. 

1848. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Kurrachee, Punjaub. 
2nd. Preston, Bolton, Manchester, Bury, 
Dublin, Kilkenny. 
Depot — Chatham. 

1849. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Punjaub. 

2nd. Dublin, Kilkenny, and Detach- 
ments. 

Depot— Chatham. 

1860. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Peshawur, Kussowlie. 
2nd. Dublin, Templemore, and Detach- 
ments. 

Depot — Chatham. 

1851. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Kussowlie, Subattoo. 
2nd. Templemore. Kilkenny, and De- 
tachments, Cork, British Kaf- 
fraria. 
Depot— ist, Chatham ; 2nd, Naas. 

1862. 

Two Battalions. 
ist. Jullunder. 
2nd. British Kaffraria. 

Depot — ist, Chatham ; 2nd, Naas. 

1863. 

Two Battalions, 
ist. Jullunder. 

2nd. British Kaffraria, King William's 

Town, and Detachments. 

Depot— ist, Chatham, 2nd, Birr. 

1864. 

Two Battalions. 
1st. Jullunder 

2nd. King William's Town and Detach- 
ments. 
Depot — ist, Chatham ; 2nd, Limerick. 



1866. 

Three Battalions, 
ist. Jullunder, Meerut. 
2nd. King William's Town, and De- 
tachments. 
3rd. Raised this year at Dublin. 
Depot — 1st, Chatham ; 2nd, Dublin. 

1866. 

Three Battalions, 
ist. Meerut. 

2nd. King William's Town, and De- 
tachments. 
3rd. Curragh, Dublin. 
Depot— ist, Chatham. 

2nd, Athlone, Sligo, Curragh, 
Jersey. 

1867. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Meerut, Delhi. 
2nd. King William's Town, and De- 
tachments. 
3rd. Dublin, Madras, Bangalore, and 

Detachments. 
4th. Raised this year at Winchester. 
Depot — ist. Chatham. 

2nd, Jersey, Winchester. 
3rd, Jersey, Chatham. 

1868. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Delhi, Meerut, Rohilcund, Oude. 
2nd. King William's Town, Arrah. 
3rd. Bangalore, Mysore, Bellary. 
4th. Winchester, Dover. 

Depot — ist and 3rd, Colchester. 
2nd and 4th, Winchester. 



1869. 

Four Battalions. 
Benares, Allahabad, Dum-Dum, 

Calcutta. 
Right wing. Benares ; left wing, 

Arrah. 
Bangalore, Jackatalla. 
Dover. 

Depot — Wmchester. 



2nd. 

3rd. 
4th. 



1860. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Dover, Calcutta. 
2nd. Benares, China. 
3rd. Jackatalla. 

4th. Dover, Waterford, Kilkenny, and 
Detachments. 
Depot — ^Winchester. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



1861. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Dover, Aldershot. 
2nd. Tien Tsin. 
3rd. Jackatalla. 
4th. Dublin, Quebec. 

Depot— Winchester. 

1862. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Aldershot. 
2nd.. Portsmouth. 

3rd. Jackatalla, Thayet-Myo, Tonghoo. 
4th. Quebec. 

Depot— Winchester. 

1863. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Aldershot, London. 
2nd. Portsmouth, Aldershot. 
3rd. Tonghoo, Rangoon, and Detach- 
ments. 
4th. Quebec, Montreal. 

Depot— Winchester. 

1864. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. London, Curragh, Dublin. 
2nd. Aldershot. 

3rd. Rangoon, and Detachments, Anda- 
man Islands. 
4th. Montreal. 

Depot— Winchester. 

1866. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Dublin, Curragh, Newry, Ennis- 

killen, Derry. 
2nd. Dover. 
3rd. Rangoon, Madras. 
4th. Montreal, New London, N.B. 
Depot— Winchester. 

1866. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Newry, Enniskillcn, Dublin, Malta. 
2nd. Dover, Dublin, Curragh, Cork. 
3rd. Madras. 
4th. New London. 

Depot— Winchester. 

1867. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Malta, Montreal, Quebec. 
2nd. Cork, Calcutta. 



3rd. Madras. Bellary. 
4th. New London. 

Depot — ^Winchester. 

1868. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Point Levi (Quebec), Montreal 
2nd. Calcutta. 

3rd. Madras, Bellary, Bangalore. 
Depot — ^Winchester. 

1869. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto. 
2nd. RightWing—Seetapore; Left Wing 

— Btnares. 
3rd. Bellary. 

4th. New London, St. John, N.B., 
Aldershot. 
Depot — Winchester. 

1870. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Ottawa, Toronto, Red River Expe- 
dition, Montreal, Quebec. 
2nd. RightWing—Seetapore ; Left Wing 

— Benares, Peshawur. 
3rd. Bellary. 

4th. Aldershot, Colchester. 
Depot— Colchester. 

1871. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Quebec, Halifax, N.S. 
2nd. Peshawur. 
3rd. Bellary, Aden. 
4th. Colchester, Winchester. 
Depot — ^Winchester. 

1872. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Halifax. N.S. 
2nd. Peshawur, Nowshera. 
3rd. Aden, Shorncliffe. 
4th. Winchester. 

Depot — ^Winchester. 

1873. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. Halifax. 
2nd. Rawul Pindee, Kuldannah, and 

Detachments. 
3rd. Shorncliffe. 
4th. Portland. 

Depot— Winchester. 



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1874. 


3rd. 


Natal. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Agra, Bengal. 


I St. 


Halifax. 




Depot— Winchester. 


2nd. 


Kuldannah, and Detachments. 






3rd. 


Shorndiflfe. Chatham. 




1881. 


4th. 


Portland, Devonport, Dublin. 




Four Battalions. 




Depot— Winchester. 


ISt. 


Athlone. 






2nd. 


Natal. . 




1875. 


3rd. 


Natal. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Dagshai, Bengal. 


I St. 


Halifax. 




Depot— Winchester. 


2nd. 


Kuldannah. and Detachments, 
Delhi. 






3rd. 


Chatham. 




1882. 


4th. 


Dublin. 




Four Battalions. 




Depot— Winchester. 


ISt. 


Curragh. 






2nd. 


Winchester. 




1876. 

Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


Malta. 




4th. 


Ferozepore, Bengal. 


ISt. 


Halifax. 




Depot— Winchester. 


2nd. 


Delhi, Meerut, Futtehghur. 






3rd. 


Winchester. 




1883. 


4th. 


Dublin, Agra. 




Four BattaHons. 




Depot —Winchester. 


ISt. 


Dublin. 






2nd. 


Winchester. 




1877. 


3rd. 


Egypt. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Ferozepore. 


ISt. 


Portsmouth. 




Depot— Winchester. 


2nd. 


Delhi, Meerut, Futtehghur. 






3rd. 


Aldershot. 




1884. 


4th. 


Agra. 




Four Battalions. 




Depot— Winchester. 


ISt. 


Dublin. 






2nd. 


Winchester. 




1878. 


3rd. 


Egypt. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Ferozepore, Bengal. 


ISt. 

2nd. 


Portsmouth, Winchester. 
Meerut, Futtehghur. 




Depot— Winchester. 


3rd. 
4th. 


Aldershot, Colchester. 
Agra. 

Depot— Winchester. 


ISt. 


1885. 

Four Battalions. 
Limerick. 




1879, 


2nd. 


Devonport. 




Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


Cyprus. 


ISt. 


Winchester. 


4th. 


Peshawur, Bengal 


2nd. 


Bengal. 




. Depot— Winchester. 


3rd. 


Colchester. 






4th. 


Bengal. 




1886. 




Depot— Winchester. 




Four Battalions. 






ISt. 


Kinsale. 




1880. 


2nd. 


Devonport. 




Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


Cyprus. 


ISt. 


Winchester. 


4th. 


Peshawur. 


2nd. 


Candahar Field Force. 




Depot— Winchester. 



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32 


The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 




1887-88. 


3rd. 


Parkhurst. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Gosport. 


1st. 


Parkhurst. 




Depot— Winchester. 


2nd. 


Shorncliflfe. 






3rd. 


Gibraltar. 




1896. 

Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Peshawur, Bengal. 






Depot— Winchester. 


ISt. 


Peshawur. 






2nd. 


Gibraltar (for Malta). 




1889. 


3rd. 


Parkhurst (for Shorncliffe). 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Dover. 


ist. 
2nd. 


Aldershot. 
Enniskillen. 




Depot— Gosport. 


3rd. 


Gibraltar. 






4th. 


Meerut. 




1896. 




Depot — Winchester. 


ist. 


Four Battalions. 
JuUunder, Bengal. 






2nd. 


Malta. 




1890. 


3rd. 


Shorncliffe. 




Four Battalions. 


4th. 


Dover. 


ISt. 

2nd. 


Aldershot. 

Enniskillen (for Dublin). 




Depot— Gosport. 


3rd. 


Gibraltar. 






4th. 


Camp Pur, Bengal. 




1897. 




Depot — Winchester. 


ISt. 


Four Battalions. 
Mauritius. 




1891. 

Four Battalions. 


2nd. 


South Africa. 




3rd. 


Shorncliffe. 


ISt. 


Rawal Pindi, Bengal. 


4th. 


Aldershot. 


2nd. 


Dublin. 




Depot— Gosport. 


3rd. 


Gibraltar. 






4th. 


Burmah. 




1898. 




Depot— Winchester. 




Four Battalions. 






ISt. 


Mauritius. 




1892. 


2nd. 


Cape. 




Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


Aldershot. 


1st. 


Rawal Pindi. 


4th. 


Aldershot. 


2nd. 


Gibraltar. 




Depot — Gosport. 


3rd. 


Parkhurst. 






4th. 


Burmah. 




1899. 




Depot— Winchester. 




Four Battalions. 






ISt. 


Mauritius (for Natal). 




1893. 


2nd. 


Wynberg (for India). 




Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


Kilkenny. 


1st. 


Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 


4th. 


Cork. 


2nd. 


Gibraltar. 




Depot — Gosport. 


3rd. 


Parkhurst. 






4th. 


Portsmouth. 




1900. 




Depot— Winchester. 




Four Battalions. 






ISt. 


South Africa. 




1894. 


2nd. 


South Africa. 




Four Battalions. 


3rd. 


South Africa. 


1st. 


Peshawur, Bengal. 


4th. 


Cork. 


2nd. 


Gibraltar. 




Depot — Gosport. 



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1901. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. South Africa. 
2nd. Ceylon. 
3rd. South Africa. 
4th. Cork. 
Details. Templemore. 

Depot — Gosport 

1902. 

Four Battalions, 
ist. South Africa. 
2nd. Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 
3rd. South Africa. 
4th. South Africa. 
Details. Cork. 

Depot — Gosport. 





1903. 




Four Battalions. 


ist. 


Malta. 


2nd. 


Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 


3rd. 


Machadodorp, Transvaal. 


4th. 


Harrismith, O.R. Colony. 


Details. Cork. 




Depot —Gosport. 




1904. 




Four Battalions. 


ist. 


Malta. 


2nd. 


Rawal Pindi, Punjab. 


3rd. 


Bermuda. 


4th. 


Gosport. 




Depot— Winchester. 



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34 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



PROMOTIONS, APPOINTMENTS, ETC. 



Capt. A. J. Lainson, D.S.O., retired on retired pay to serve in Militia. 
20th January, 1904. 

Lieut.-Col. and Brevet-Col. W. P. Campbell, A. D.C. (extra) to the 
King, on completion of service in Command of Battalion is 
placed on half pay. 25th January, 1904. 

Major and Brevet-Lieut.-Col. C. R. R. McGrigor, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
vice W. P. Campbell, A. D.C. 25th January, 1904. 

Super.-Capt. Hon. A. R. Montagu- Stuart- Wortley, D.S.O., Captain, vice 
A. J. Lainson retired. 20th January, 1904. 

The undermentioned Captains are seconded whilst Students at the 
Staft College. Dated 22nd January, 1904: — 

Brevet-Major L. F. Philips. R. F. M. Sims, D.s.O. 

The undermentioned Supernumerary Captains to be Captains. Dated 
22nd January, 1904 : — 

C. W. Wilson, D S.O., vice L. F. Philips. 

W. F. G. Wyndham, vice R. F. M. Sims, D.S.O. 

Capt. Hon. J. R. Brownlow, Major, vice Brevet-Lieut-Col. C. R. R. 
McGrigor, promoted. 2$th January, 1904. 

Capt. C. C. Herbert- Stepney is seconded for service as Adjutant of 
Volunteers. 5th February, 1904. 

Capt. and Brevet-Major H. R. Blore is seconded for service on the 
Staff. 13th June, 1904. 

Lieut.-Col. and Brevet-Col. R. C. A. B. Be wicke- Copley, C.B., on 
completion of service in Command of a Battalion is placed 
on half pay. i8th March, 1904. 

Major C. J. Markham, Lieutenant-Colonel, vice Brevet-Col. R. C. A. B. 
Bewicke-Copley, C.B. i8th March, 1904. 

Capt. W. J. Long is seconded for service as Adjutant of Volunteers. 
14th March, 1904. 

Super.-Capt. L. C. D. Jenner, Captain, vice W. J. Long. 14th March, 
1904. 

Lieut. C. A. Blacklock resigns his Commission. 23rd April, 1904. 
2nd Lieut. K. L. Waterlow resigns his Commission. 27th April, 1904. 
Capt. L. C. D. Jenner, retired on retired pay. 4th May, 1904. 
Lieut. G. Makins, Captain, vice Brevet-Major L. F. Philips, seconded. 
22nd January, 1904. 

The undermentioned Supernumerary Lieutenants to be Lieutenants. 
Dated 23rd March, 1904. 

H. H. R. White, vice G. Makins, promoted. 

G. J. Acland-Troyte, vice C. A. Blacklock, resigned. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 35 

Gent. Cadet John Francis Brise Pearse, from R. M. College, 2nd 
Lieutenant. Dated 7th May, 1904. 

Gent. Cadet Julian Gilderdale Hargreaves, from R.M. College, 2nd 
Lieutenant, 14th May, 1904. 

Gent. Cadet Charles Kenneth Howard-Bury, from R. M. College, 2nd 
Lieutenant. i8th May, 1904. 

Capt. Hon. A. R. Montagu-Stuart- Wortley, D.S.O., Major, vice Brevet- 
Colonel T. L. N. Morland, C.B., D.S.O., promoted Lieutenant- 
Colonel half pay. 4th May, 1904. 

Capt. C. E. Balfour, D.S.O., is seconded for service as Adjutant of 
Volunteers. 7th May, 1904. 

Super.-Capt W. A. L Kay, Captain, vice L. C. D. Jenner retired. 
22nd June, 1904. 

Super.-Capt. V. H. S. Scratchley, D.S.O., Captain, vice C. E. Balfour, 
seconded. 28th June, 1904. 

Major C. Ashburnham, retired, receiving a gratuity. 3rd August, 1904. 

Capt. E. Northey, Major, vice C. Ashburnham. 3rd August, 1904. 

The undermentioned Supernumerary Lieutenants to be Lieutenants, 
on augmentation. Dated ist April, 1904 : — 

G. H. BarnetL G. C. Kelly. 

Lieut. Francis Woodbine Parish, from 3rd Battalion Royal Sussex 
Regiment, 2nd Lieutenant. 3rd August, 1904. 

Lieut. H. H. R. White, Captain, on augmentation, ist April, 1904. 

Lieut. H. B. P. L. Kennedy, Captain in succession to Major Hon. 
A. R. Montagu-Stuart- Wortley, D.S.O., who holds a Staff appoint- 
ment. 3rd August, 1904. 

2nd Lieut. G. A. H. Beaumont, Lieutenant, vice G. A. Blacklock| 
resigned. 23rd April, 1904. 

2nd Lieut. G. Cookson, Lieutenant, vice H. B. P. L. Kennedy, pro- 
moted. 3rd August, 1904. 

Capt. C. Gosling, Major, to complete establishment. 14th Sept- 
ember, 1904. 

Major Hon. St. L. H. Jervis, D.S.O., retired on retired pay. 12th 
October, 1904. 

Lieut. H. T. Thomhill resigns his Commission. i6th November, 1904. 

2nd Lieut. C. J. T. R. Wingfield, Lieutenant, vice H. T. Thomhill, 
resigned. i6th November, 1904. 



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36 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



extracts from tbe earrlson Order Book, 
balifax. XL%. 

Relative to tbe DIsbanaina of the 3ra and 4tD Battalions 
60tD Kina's Jlmerkan Realment 



Head Quarters, New York. 

2 1 St April, 1783. 
Orders. 

All recruiting, British and Provincial, to be discon- 
tinued till further Orders. 

14th May, 1783. 

The Commander in Chief has so far pardoned several 
English deserters as to allow them to return within these 
lines, and to send them home : but their dishonour is not 
done away : no Regiment here shall receive them, nor shall 
they again serve in this Army. 

Tis recommended to the Soldiers of ev'ry British, and 
to the Soldiers of every British American Corps to kick all 
such Rascals out of their quarters should they have the 
impudence to come in among them. 

Embarkation Returns to be sent as soon as possible to 
the Adjutant General's Office. 

19th August, 1783. 
The British American Regiments are immediately to 
^\v^ in their Abstracts for subsistence to the 24th October. 

Embarkation Returns of the several British and 
American Regiments, specifying the No. of Women and 
Children, to be made up and sent to the Adjutant General 
by Monday the 25th Instant. 

O.C"^. De Lancey, 

AdjK GenK 

The 3rd and 4th Battns. of the 60th, the King's American 
Regiment, Queen's Rangers, British Legion, Detachmt. of 
the Garrison Battn. New York Volunteers, British Legion 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 37 

Infantry, Loyal Americans, ist, 2nd, and 3rd New Jersey 
Volunteers, ist and 2nd De Lancy's Prince of Wales's 
American Regt., Pennsylvania and Maryland Loyalists, 
American Legion and Guides and Pioneers, and the men 
who wish to be discharged and remain in America are to 
hold themselves in readiness to embark for Nova Scotia, 
where on their arrival those Corps will be disbanded, unless 
any of them should chose to be dismissed at this place. 

The Non-commissioned Officers and Private Men of 
the Land Forces who may be reduced in Nova Scotia, and 
wish to become Settlers in that Province, will be allowed 
Grants of Land at the rate of 200 Acres to every Non- 
commissioned Officer, and 100 Acres to every Private Man, 
exclusive of what he shall be entitled to in Right of his 
Family, discharged of all fees of Office and Quit Rents for 
the first Ten years, and as a farther inducement to them to 
become settlers, each Man shall be furnish'd out of the 
Public Stores with the usual Rations of Provisions allowed 
to him for one year, and shall be permitted to retain his 
Arms and Accoutrements. 

Returns to be given immediately to the Adjutant Gen^ 
of all such Men as are entitled to their discharges, specifying 
whether they mean to go to Great Britain or Nova Scotia. 



1 8th August, 1783. 
The British American Regiments will prepare to Embark 
for the River St. Johns as soon as possible. 

iSth August, 1783. 
List of Promotions received from the War Office, 
3rd Battalion 60th Regiment. — Ensign William 
McKinnon to be Lieutenant, vice Mcintosh promoted in 
4th Battalion, 28th May. 

Leaves of Absence, 
Lieut. Bailing, 3rd Battalion 60th Regiment, six months 
from 3rd May, 1783, on his private affairs ; Lieut. McDonald, 
4th Battalion 60th Regiment, six months from 3rd May, 
1783, for his health. 



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38 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

17th August, 1783. 
The Commander-in-Chief has received the following 
instructions from His Majesty which are to be entered into 
the regimental books of the several corps,and His Excellency- 
makes no doubt but the contents will be strictly complied 
with. 

G. R. — Whereas we have thought fit that our forces 
under your command in North America be forthwith 
reduced ; our will is, that in the doing thereof, you, or the 
person, or persons appointed by you for this service, do 
cause the following instructions to be duly observed and 
complied with, and all officers and soldiers of our said troops 
are hereby required to yield obedience thereto, as they 
shall answer the contrary at their peril. 

1st. — The 3rd and 4th Battalions of our 60th or Royal 
American Regiment of Foot commanded by our right 
trusty and well-beloved counsellor General Lord Amherst, 
the 2nd Battalion of our 84th Regiment or Royal Highland 
Emigrants, commanded by yourself, and our four corps 
respectively commanded by our trusty and well-beloved 
Colonel Edward Fanning ; our trusty and well-beloved 
Lieut-Colonel Robert Donkin, our trusty and well-beloved 
Lieut-Colonel Banastree Tarleton, and our trusty and well- 
beloved Lieut.-Colonel John Graves Sancoe, are to be 
entirely disbanded as soon as the same can possibly be 
done. 

2ndly. — Our several regiments of Foot, respectively 
commanded by our trusty and well-beloved Lieut-General 
G. Morrison, our right trusty and well-beloved cousin and . 
counsellor Earl Cornwallis, our trusty and well-beloved 
Lieut-General Sir Eyre Coote, our trusty and well-beloved 
Lieut-General Mariscoe Frederic, and our trusty and well- 
beloved Lieut.-General John Campbell ; and the 1st Battalon 
of our 42nd or Royal Highland Regiment of Foot com- 
manded by our trusty and well-beloved General John 
Murray, commonly called Lord John Murray, are to be 
forthwith reduced according to the plan hereunto annexed, 
and it is our will and pleasure that you, or such person or 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 39 

persons appointed by you for this service, do as soon as 
possible take care that each of the said regiments be 
formed and consist of the numbers mentioned in the said 
annexed plan, and no more, and that all the non-com- 
commissioned officers and private men of our said regiments 
over and above those numbers, and who are less fit for 
service, be discharged. In the doing thereof, as likewise in 
the disbanding the several battalions and corps specified 
in the first Article of these our instructions, the following 
directions are to be duly observed. 

3rdly. — Before such disbanding and reduction you are 
to cause an exact muster to be taken (or in case that 
cannot conveniently be done) effective rolls to be taken of 
each troop and company of our said regiments and 
battalions and corps, and to transmit to our Secretary at 
War for our information an account of their conditions and 
numbers at the time of disbanding and reduction, together 
with a list of the names; and rank of the commissioned 
officers hereby to be disbanded, specifying also if any of 
them hold other commissions to which pay is annexed. 

4thly. — Our intention being only to pay off at present 
and clear the non-commissioned officers and private men of 
our said regiments and battalions and men of our corps 
(and give an allowance of half-pay to the commissioned 
officers entitled thereto from the time of their disbanding) 
you are to take care before the disbanding and reduction 
that the quarters of each troop and company be duly 
cleared, that the accounts between the men and their 
officers be made up ; and that they be fully satisfied and 
paid their arrears, stoppages, bounty, and all other just 
pretentions up the day of their discharge inclusive, whereof 
the said officers are to take acquittances and discharges 
from them, respectively distinguishing each head of pay- 
ment. 

Sthly. — You are to take care that the arms delivered 
out of our stores of ordnance to the disbanded men and 
indented for, be returned thither again and acquittances 
taken for the same. 



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40 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

6thly. — You are to take care that each non-commisioned 
officer and private man hereby to be disbanded be permitted 
to carry away with him his clothes and knapsack which he 
now wears ; the dragoons are to be allowed their clothes 
and cloaks now in wear. 

7thly. — You are to provide a passage for all the dis- 
banded commissioned officers and for as many non-com- 
missioned officers and private men discharged from the 
regiments which are to be reduced in their establishment 
according to the plan hereunto annexed as shall be desirous 
of returning to Great Britain either by hiring of vessels or 
otherwise as you shall find best for your service, and least 
expensive to the public ; and cause them to embark with 
their wives and children, under the command of such 
discrete officers as you shall think necessary to take care 
of them on their passage during which they are to be 
subsisted. 

8thly. — And we being pleased to allow each non-com- 
missioned officer and private man of the battalions and 
corps hereby to be disbanded fourteen days subsistence as 
of our royal bounty, to carry them to the places of their 
former residence, and the like bounty to such of the non- 
commissioned officers and private men of the regiments 
hereby to be reduced as shall desire to continue in America. 
Our will and pleasure is that the said bounty money be 
paid to them respectively on the day of their discharge and 
to such of them belonging to the said regiments last 
mentioned as shall desire to return home, the like bounty 
money is to be paid upon their disembarkation in 
this kingdom (except to the men who may have been 
enlisted in Scotland or Ireland, to whom, in consideration 
of their homes being more distant, we are pleased to allow 
twenty-eight days subsistence, and receipts are to be taken 
for the said bounties, all which acquittances, discharges, 
and receipts are to be transmitted to the agents of the said 
corps to be produced to our Secretary at War as vouchers 
for the several payments herein directed. 

9thly. — You are to order the commissioned officers 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 41 

whom you shall appoint to take care of the men on their 
passage to send to our Secretary at War an authentic list 
attested in the best manner of the names of the non-com- 
missioned officers and private men when dismissed in Great 
Britain, and to give them passes in case they should desire 
the same to the places of their former residence, allowing 
them a reasonable time to repair thither, and strictly 
charging them not to travel with any arms nor more than 
three in company together upon pain of the severest 
punishment. 

And to the end the said non-commissioned officers and 
private men may be sensible of the care we have taken 
upon their dismission, you are to cause these our directions 
to be read at the head of each troop and company, for 
a more ready compliance with our pleasure being signified. 

Given at our Court at St. James this 9th day of June, 
1783, in the twenty-third year of our reign. 

The 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 60th Regiment, the 
King's American Regiment, Queen's Rangers, British 
Legion, Detachment of the Garrison Battalion New York 
Volunteers, British Legion Infantry, Loyal Americans, 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd New Jersey Volunteers, 1st and 2nd De 
Lancey's Prince of Wales's American Regiment, Pensyl- 
vania and Maryland Loyalist, American Legion, and 
Guides and Pioneers, and the men who wish to be dis- 
charged and remain in America, are to hold themselves in 
readiness to embark for Nova Scotia, where on their 
arrival those corps will be disbanded, unless any of them 
should choose to be dismissed at this place. 

The non-commissioned officers and private men of the 
Land Forces who may be reduced in Nova Scotia and wish 
to become settlers in that province will be allowed grants 
of land at the rate of 200 acres to every non-commissioned 
officer and 100 acres to every private man, exclusive of 
what he shall be entitled to in right of his family, discharged 
of all fees of office and quit rent for the first ten years, and 
as a farther inducement to them to become settlers each 



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42 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

man shall be furnished out of the public stores with the 
usual rations of provisions allowed to him for one year, and 
shall be permitted to retain his arms and accoutrements. 
By His Majesty's Command. 

(signed) R. FiTZPATRlCK. 



Halifax, 20 August, 1783. 
Lieut. Mar Bladen Tinker of 38th Regiment to be 
Captain by purchase vice Rivers, who retires 19th August, 
1783. 

Halifax, 7th October, 1783. 
The 3rd and 4th Battalions 60th or Royal American 
Regiment to be disbanded at Halifax. 

The forms of the certificates to be given in by the 
commanding officers of the corps disbanded will be given 
them by the Town Major (Lyons). 

The certificates will be sent to Brigadier-General Fox, 
as soon as possible. 

Halifax, 8th October, 1783. 
The officers and men of the 60th, 84th, and Royal 
Garrison Battalion Regiments who wish to go to Europe 
are to remain in barracks at Halifax which will be pointed 
out to them by the Barrack-Master. 

The non-commissioned officers and men discharged to 
be delivered to the senior officers of their respective corps, 
who go to Europe which will be delivered to the men with 
the advanced pay allowed them by Government from the 
day of their disembarkation in England. 

Head Quarters, New York. 

29th September, 1783. 
His Majesty has been pleased to direct that when the 
reduction of the 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 60th 
Regiment shall take place the eldest officers of each rank 
throughout the battalions of the said regiment shall be con- 
tinued upon the establishment, and that the youngest. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 43 

without regard to the particular battalions expressed in 
their respective commissions, shall, agreeable to a former 
precedent, be reduced. 

(signed) Officer Commanding De Lancey, 

A djutant- General, 



Adjutant-General's Office, New York. 

I October, 1783. 
Sir, — Finding a vessel on the point of sailing for Nova 
Scotia, I take the opportunity of acquainting you that by 
the arrival of the last packet the Commander-in-Chief is 
informed that the British American officers are to receive 
half-pay and permanent provincial rank in America. 
I have the honour to be. Sir, 
Your most obedient and most humble servant, 

(signed) Officer Commanding De Lancey, 
A djutant' General, 
The Honourable Brigadier-General Fox, &c., &c. 



Halifax, 9th October, 1783. 

The 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 60th Regiment 
and the companies of the Garrison Battalion to be under 
arms at 12 o'clock to-morrow on the Grand Parade at 
Halifax. 

The non-commissioned officers and men of the 60th 
Regiment who are returned to settle in this Province are 
to remain in the barracks they now occupy until a ship is 
ready to take them to their destination. 

The Commanding Officer will order proper persons to 
take charge of their arms, which will be delivered them 
with their discharges and the balances paid them on the 
day they embark, which will be in a few days. 

Halifax, 12th October, 1783. 
The arms of the non-commisioned officers and private 
men of the 60th Regiment, Royal Garrison Battalion, and 
Orange Rangers who are discharged in this Province, but 



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44 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

who do not avail themselves of the lands allotted them by 
His Excellency the Governor, will be delivered to the 
Ordnance Store-keeper. 

The officers and men of the Battalion of the 6oth 
Regiment who go to Europe are to do duty under the 
command of Colonel Glazier ; he will give in returns of his 
strength as soon as possible. 

Those corps whose companies are on an establishment 
of above 58 officers and privates will draw provisions for 
the women at allowance of one woman to every effective 
twelve men. 

Halifax, 13th October, 1783. 
The 3rd and 4th Battalions of the 60th Regiment will 
receive the camp equipage lately arrived for them upon 
application to the Deputy Commissary General. 

October 15th, 1783. 
A general court martial, consisting of three field 
officers, four captains and six lieutenants, Lieut-Colonel 
Glazier, 60th Regiment, President, to assemble at 1 1 o'clock 
on Friday morning at the 70th Mess Room for the trial of 
such prisoners as shall be brought before it. 

The names of the members, with the dates of their 
commissions, to be sent to the Deputy Judge Advocate as 
soon as possible. 

October i6th, 1783. 
The officers and men of the 60th Regiment that have 
given in their names to embark to the lands allotted them 
are to embark at the Commissaries Wharf on Saturday 
morning ; they will be mustered after they embark, after 
which the necessaries mentioned in the Orders will be 
issued to them. 

The barrack bedding and furniture in their possession 
at present to be taken on board ; they will receive pro- 
visions from the Deputy Commissary General to the 24th 
October. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 45 

October 17th, 1783. 
The certificates of the 60th Regiment to be given in to 
the Deputy Quartermaster General after he has mustered 
the men on board agreeable to the form given out. 

October i8th, 1783. 
Proceedings of a garrison court martial, of which 
Captain Dunlop, 82nd Regiment, is president. 

Prisoner John Hallam, soldier in the 60th Regiment, 
4th Battalion, confined by Sergeant Binnie of the said 
regiment for saying he had stopped ten shillings of his pay 
at Hampstead, Long Island, and threatening revenge when 
the regiment was disbanded. 

The Court, having considered the evidence against the 
prisoner with his defence, is of opinion he is guilty in 
breach of the ist article of the 7th section of the Articles 
of War, and do therefore sentence him to beg Sergeant 
Binnie's pardon, and be confined four days in the guard 
house. 

October 19th, 1783. 
The Quartermasters of the 60th, 70th, and 82nd 
Regiments will assemble at 9 o'clock on Monday morning 
to survey part of a cargo of flour, which will be shown 
them by the Assistant Commissary General. 

Head Quarters, New York. 

15th September, 1783. 
The Commander in Chief has been pleased to make the 
following promotions : — 

60th Regiment, 4th Battalion. — Captain Ludwick 
Colquhoun from 74th Regiment to be Major, vice New- 
marsh, who retires 15th September, 1783. 

22nd October, 1783. 
Embarkation returns to be given in as soon as possible 
from the 60th, 70th, 82nd and 84th Regiments, British 
recruits. Garrison Battalion, and Provincial Corps, of such 
officers and men who are to embark for Europe. 



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46 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Brigadier-General Fox begs the above returns may be 
correct, as no alteration will be allowed of afterwards. 

23rd October, 1783. 
A return to be given in immediately by the commanding 
officers of the British American Corps in Nova Scotia of 
the officers' rank and names, place of nativity, situation 
previous to obtaining a commission, length of service, if 
before in the Army, whether sold out, at what time, and 
the occasion, observations. 

The form of the above return is at Town Major Lyon's 
office. 

The returns to be sent to Major of Brigade Williamson's 
office. 

Halifax, 24th October, 1783. 
Proceedings of a garrison court martial, of which 
Captain Bale is president. 

Edward Russell, private soldier in the 4th Battalion 
60th Regiment, confined by order of Lieut-Colonel Glasier 
for refusing to sign his discharge and making an improper 
charge against the regiment. 

The Court, after considering the evidence for and 
against the prisoner, is of opinion that he is guilty of the 
first part of the charge respecting his not signing his dis- 
charge, he having been paid for one year's clothing which 
he alleged was due, do therefore sentence him to receive 
three hundred lashes in the usual manner ; and with 
respect to the prisoner's making an improper charge 
against the regiment the Court is of opinion that the 
prisoner is not guilty of the crime alleged against him, as 
his accusation was not against the regiment, but against 
Mr. Wright, Paymaster, whose note of hand he produced 
to the Court for thirty-one pounds nineteen shillings and 
sixpence. 

Brigadier-General Fox approves of the above sentences 
and orders the sentence of Edward Russell to be put in 
execution by the drummers of the Garrison at 10 o'clock 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 47 

on Monday morning at the head of the pickets, on the 
exercising ground behind the Citadel. 

The Field Officer of the Day will please to attend. 

Halifax, 4th November, 1783. 
The officers and men of the 60th Regiment who wish 
to go to Europe to hold themselves in readiness to embark 
in the course of this week — " Stafford " transport. 

7th November, 1783. 
Thirty-seven non-commissioned officers and men of the 
60th B.egiment are to embark on board the" Mary " instead 
of the discharged men of the 38th Regiment. 

8th November, 1783. 

The officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of 
the 60th Regiment that actually embark for Europe to be 
subsisted to 24th December inclusive. The Commanding 
Officer will order one month's pay to be retained in the 
hands of the Paymaster for the purpose of clearing with 
the men's paying them that fourteen or twenty-eight days 
pay according to His Majesty's regulations, and the 
stoppage for provisions during the passage, any surplus in 
the hands of the Paymaster to be repaid into the hands of 
their agent. The stoppages for provisions to be paid here 
till Saturday the 15th instant. 

The officers who have charge of the divisions of British 
recruits and the soldiers of British regiments going to 
Europe will receive their subsistence to 24th December 
from their different officers who do not embark with them, 
they will charge them for provisions during the passage, 
which stoppage, as well as any overplus pay or pay due to 
them, they will remit or draw upon their different agents, 
as circumstances may require, after paying them their 
fourteen or twenty-eight days' pay as they may be entitled 
to by His Majesty's instructions. 

14th November, 1783. 
Necessaries will be delivered to the British American 
Regiment agreeable to the following list transmitted from 



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48 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Head Quarters, after deducting such articles as they have 
already received on former orders. 

The Commander in Chief has also ordered that 
necessaries, agreeable to the following list, to be delivered 
to such of the disbanded men of the British regiments as 
are to become settlers in this Province. 

The Commander in Chief acquaints Brigadier-General 
Fox that this distinction is made in consideration that the 
men of the British regiments remain in this country of 
choice, having (if they please) a home to go to, but that the 
men of the British American Regiment have sacrificed 
their whole, and have no other alternative. 

A list of necessaries, etc., given by order of His 
Excellency the Commander in Chief to the British 
American corps gone to settle in Nova Scotia. 

The barrack beds and bedding, pots, shovels, tongs, dog 
irons, camp equipage, heretofore in use with the respective 
corps. 

To each corps : — 

6 iron stoves. i battan. 

4 hand saws. 12 pickaxes. 

2 cross cut saws. Cask of nails. 

I whip saw. 6 scythes complete. 

Carpenter's tools to each corps : — 

I broad axe. i pair iron compasses. 

I adz. I drawing knife. 

I hammer. 12 gimblets. 

I narrow chissel. 3 whip saw files. 

I large and one small auger. 6 hand saw files. 

1 jack plane. 

To each man : — 

2 pair stockings. 5 lb. gunpowder. 

2 pair mittings. 25 lb. shot and ball 

I pair shoes. 12 gun flints. 

I cap. 5 lbs. iron. 

I haversack. i axe. 

I stock. I spade or shovel. 

I wooden canteen. i hoe. 

A set of smith's tools for the whole. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 49 

List of necessaries given by order of His Excellency 
the Commander in Chief to the discharged men of British 
regiments gone to settle in Nova Scotia : — 

2 pairs mittings. i axe. 

2 pairs stockings. i spade. 

I pair shoes. 

to each man. 

15th November, 1783. 

Officers commanding disbanded corps will collect the 
names of men who are to settle in differents parts of this 
province and make one general return for provisions and 
necessaries, as in future no orders will be given to 
individuals or small parties, and General Fox desires it 
to be understood that it is only to such men to whom land 
is allotted and who have actually become settlers in this 
Province that are entitled to provisions, and that the 
bounty of Government will not be extended to those of the 
disbanded soldiers who hire themselves as labourers in 
the town of Halifax. 

Commanding officers of posts are desired to have the 
greatest care taken of boats allotted them as their corps 
will be accountable for them. 

17th November, 1783. 

All the disbanded corps will receive the sixteen days 
battalion and forage money upon application to the 
Deputy Quartermaster General. 

19th November, 1783. 
All officers and men of disbanded regiments and others 
who have claims for passages for Europe are to give in 
their names to Brigade Major Williamson on or before 12 
o'clock on Friday next. 

Any application for passages afterwards will not be 
attended to. 



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50 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



REGIMENTAL RECORDS. 



Ut Battalion King's Ropal Ririe Corps. 

From ist January to 31st Decembtr^ 1^04, 



1st December. — Captain M. Pratt, D.S.O., Lieut. C. F. 
Hawley, and Lieut. Pardee rejoined from leave. 

2nd December. - An exchange having been sanctioned 
between Captain and Brevet-Major F. S. Mott, 2nd 
Battalion, and Captain and Brevet-Major F. M. Crum, the 
latter embarked for India. 

5th December. — Major G. N. Prcndergast rejoined from 
leave. 

loth Decenriber. Captain and Brevet-Major F. S. Mott 
joined the Battalion and took over command of F company. 

22nd December. — Sergeant -Master-Tailor* W. Syer 
joined the Battalion. 

23rd December. — Major A. Blewitt joined the Battalion. 

24th December. - Sergeant A. G. Harrington promoted 
Colour-Sergeant, vice Colour-Sergeant Taylor posted to 
Permanent Staff of Volunteers. 

29th December. — The Battalion moved to Ghain Tuffieha 
for company training. 

30th December. — Captain L. B. Cumberland, having 
been posted for duty at the Depot, embarked for England. 

14th January. — Rifleman H. Willingham died of fever 
at Civita Vecchia Hospital. 

15th January. — H.E. the Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief arrived in the evening and inspected the Battalion in 
an Outpost Scheme by night. After dinner, he acted as 
umpire in a war game, arranged by Colonel Bewicke- 
Copley, C.B. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 51 . 

i6th January. — In the morning H. E. the Governor 
witnessed an inter-company musketry competition. General 
idea as follows :— Companies at half-hour intervals to make 
a forced march of five and a half miles to repel a force 
landing. Landing force is represented by a sectional target, 
range and position unknown. Magazines to be charged 
with ten rounds before moving off, and the march and 
shooting to be completed within an hour of starting. The 
company obtaining the best percentage of hits for number 
of men starting become the holders of the Admiral's Cup. 
Result — 1st, A Company ; 2nd, G Company ; 3rd, C 
Company. After the inspection the following Special 
Order was published (extract from Battalion Orders) : — 
Special Order by H.E. the Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief: — "Thank you for the very instructive training 
I have witnessed. The keenness and intelligence, displayed 
by all ranks during the outpost scheme last night, were 
a treat to see, and the way in which the war game was 
conducted last night and the musketry competition this 
morning shows what a good spirit there is right through 
the Battalion, and my visit has convinced me that genuine 
good work is being done, and it is a downright pleasure to 
me to tell you so." 

20th January. — Captain H. C. Johnson, D.S.O., and 
Lieut. T. G. Dalby embarked for Somaliland, having been 
selected for service with the King's Royal Rifle Corps 
Mounted Infantry Company there. 

22nd January. — A " tile " competition took place between 
the four best shots of each company. Result: — ist, H 
Company ; 2nd, C Company. 

23rd January. — A sectional " time and shooting " com- 
petition took place. Result: — ist, Sergeant Schoon's 
section, E Company ; 2nd, Sergeant Casey's section, E 
Company. 

25th January. — Lieut. R. F. Dalrymple proceeded to 
Imtarfa for a course of instruction in ballooning. 

26th January. — The right half Battalion proceeded to 



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52 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Pembroke for the annual course of musketry. The left 
half Battalion returned to Floriana. 

2nd February. — Sergeant P. W. Newton appointed 
Orderly Room Sergeant vice Q.M.S. A. E. Williams. Cor- 
poral Corban. D Company, and Sergeant Teddar, G 
Company, have been awarded ist and 2nd class certificates 
respectively for gymnastics. 

8th February. — The left half Battalion proceeded to 
Pembroke for musketry and the right half returned. 
Extract from London Gazette : — " Brevet-Major L. F. Phillips 
is seconded whilst a student at the Staff College." 

22nd February. — The left half Battalion returned from 
Pembroke. Seventeen N.C.O.s and Riflemen invalids 
embarked for England. E Company won the "Grenfell 
Cup " for the second time, G Company being second. The 
shooting of the Battalion was not up to the average owing 
to most of the N.C.O.'s and Riflemen of the Battalion 
having been in hospital with Mediterranean or Malta fever 
during the past twelve months. 

26th February. — Sergeant J. James, D Company, and 
Sergeant Cattermole, E Company, promoted Colour- 
Sergeants. 

29th February. — A draft of 200 N.C.O.'s and men joined 
the Battalion from the 4th Battalion in South Africa. On 
this date the Island was mobilized. A combined Naval 
and Military scheme had been arranged with the object 
of ascertaining whether an invading army, supported by 
a Naval force, could land on the Island. Colonel Bewicke- 
Copley, C.B., was in command of the invading force, which 
consisted of E Company under Captain M. Pratt, D.S.O., 
representing 10,000 men. This force embarked on H.M.S. 
Tyne, and put out to sea escorted by half the Fleet then in 
harbour. The remainder of the Fleet and the Garrison 
defended the Island. The Battalion was responsible for 
the coast line between Marsa Scirocco, a bay south-east 
of the Island, and a point about fifteen miles, west. The 
operations, owing to very rough weather, lasted for three 
days, and at the end of that time Colonel Bewicke-Copley 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 53 

had not only effected a landing near St Paul's Bay, on 
the north-west coast, but had penetrated the Island's first 
line of defence on the Binjemma Ridge. 

3rd March. — A Battalion barber's shop was started for 
the first time and promises to prove a great success. For 
the sum of 3^. a month a man is able to have his hair cut, 
be shaved or shave himself with materials provided in the 
shop, as often as he likes. 

loth March. — To the great regret of all ranks Lieut.- 
Colonel Bewicke-Copley, C.B., left for England on leave of 
absence pending the completion of his term of command. 
He published the following farewell order : — " In taking 
leave of the Battalion, Lieut.-Colonel Bewicke-Copley, C B., 
wishes to thank all ranks for their loyal and generous 
co-operation, which has made his period of command of 
the 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps such a happy 
one. He knows that with such Officers, Warrant-Officers, 
N.C.O.'s, and Riflemen, the good spirit of the old Regiment, 
of which he is so proud, will be kept up." Lieut. Dalrymple 
and party rejoined the Battalion from Imtarfa on comple- 
tion of their course in Siege Ballooning, for which they 
were awarded certificates. 

nth March. — A large party of time-expired men and 
invalids left the Battalion on board the H.T. Dunera for 
England under the command of Captain Porter, 4th 
Battalion. Major Prendergast assumed command of the 
Battalion. 

14th March. — The Battalion marched out to Mellieha 
Camp to carry out the Annual Field Training. 

19th March. — The Battalion football team, who had 
already beaten the Royal Engineers by two goals to one 
in the first round of the Governor's Cup, went on the Marsa 
to play the R.A. Eastern in the second round, and were 
beaten after a good game by two goals to love. In order 
to enable some of the men to watch the match, two tugs 
were hired to convey them round to the Marsa and back 
by sea. The team, who have not quite played up to 



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54 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

expectations, finished fourth in the Garrison League. With 
the aid of several players who have recently joined us from 
the 4th Battalion, it is hoped that they will do much better 
next season. 

25th March. — The following extract from the London 
GajseUe of iSth March was published in Orders to-day: — 
"Major Charles J. Markham to be Lieut-Colonel vice 
Brevet-Major R. C. A. Bewicke-Copley, C.B." 

28th March. — The Battalion returned to Floriana from 
Mellieha Camp. 

30th March. - The General Officer Commanding Infantry 
Brigade made his annual inspection of the Battalion. 

31st March. — No. 41 12, Rifleman R. Walley, A Company, 
died of Mediterranean fever at the Station Hospital, 
Valletta. 

1 2th April. — The Battalion being under orders to 
change their barracks from Floriana to Imtarfa, a com- 
mencement was made to-day by the right half Battalion 
moving up there under the command of Major Mott. 

15th April. — A commencement was made with the first 
round of the polo tournament, and our first team met the 
eventual winners, the Royal Navy, in the first round, and 
were beaten by three goals to one, after a particularly fast 
and interesting game. The Battalion team consisted of 
Lieut. A. P. Evans, i ; Lieut. R. H. Seymour, 2 ; Major 
S. F. Mott, 3 ; Lieut. G. H. Martin, Back. In the second 
round our B team, who had drawn a bye in the first round, 
also met the Royal Navy and were rather easily defeated. 
The Battalion team had lost a valuable member a short 
time before, when Lieut. T. G. Dalby left us to go to 
Somaliland. 

2 1st April. — The headquarters of the Battalion now 
moved up to Imtarfa, with the exception of G Company, 
who were left behind for a short time longer. Imtarfa 
Barracks are situated on a hill 600 ft. above the sea, about 
six miles from Valletta : they are, comparatively speaking, 
new, and much better in all respects than our old ones 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 55 

at Floriana. They are also a great improvement from a 
health point of view, and we expect to be, comparatively 
speaking, immune from the Mediterranean fever, which we 
had so much of at Floriana last summer. Major Blewitt 
struck off the strength of the Battalion on appointment as 
Second-in-Command of the 2nd Battalion. 

22nd April. — Captain Long appointed Adjutant of 
Volunteers. 

28th April. — The annual race for Colonel Mc Call's 
Challenge Cup took place at the end of one of the day's 
racing of the Malta Racing Club. The distance this year 
was seven furlongs, and the conditions, weight for age and 
inches with penalties and allowances. It could hardly have 
been run under more unpleasant conditions, as a bad dust 
storm was blowing, which the ponies would hardly face. 
Lieut. R. H. Seymour won it for the second year in suc- 
cession on " Lottery," three lengths ahead of Captain 
Price-Davies' " Dervish." Eleven runners. The following 
was the order of the first three : — 

1. Lieut. R. H. Seymour's ** Lottery," aged, I3st. 5 lbs., Owner. 

2. Captain Price-Davies' "Dervish," aged, list. Qlbs., Owner. 

3. Lieut. C. D. Eyre's " Detective," aged, 9st. nibs., Lt. Kennedy. 

30th April. — C Company won the Inter- Company 
Football League, having gone through their programme 
without losing or drawing a match. 

1st May. — The summer season commenced. During 
the hot weather very little is done ; all parades have to be 
over by 8 a.m. 

14th May. — Lieut-Colonel C. J. Markham assumed 
command of the Battalion. 

iSth May. — Captain C. W. Wilson, D.S.O., joined the 
Battalion. 

24th May. — The funeral of Major E. J. Crane, 3rd 
Royal Garrison Regiment, late Quartermaster in the Regi- 
ment, took place. He had suffered a prolonged illness 
from Mediterranean fever. 



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#N 



56 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

8th June. — Major Hon. St. L. H. Jervis posted to the 
Battalion. 

Nothing of any interest occurred during July. 

4th August. — Major Mott and Lieut Martin rejoined 
from leave. 

7th August. — Cricket match, Officers of the Imtarfa 
Garrison v. Sergeants. The latter won by 121 to 112; 
Sergeant Spencer, 30, and Sergeant Allen, 30 not out, were 
the best scores for the winners, whilst Major Mott, 43, was 
the best for the losers. 

1 2th August. — 2nd Lieuts. Evans and Hope proceeded 
on leave to England. 

1 8th August. — Lieut. -Colonel Markham proceeded on 
leave ; Major G. N. Prendergast took over command. 

2Sth August. — Captain Price-Davies, v.c, D.S.O., and 
Lieut. Kennedy took a party of 3rd Class and Casuals to 
Pembroke for musketry. 

29th August. — Rifleman Lightfoot, E Company, died of 
enteric fever at Imtarfa Hospital. 

9th September. — Extract from London Gazette^ dated 
2nd September, 1904: — "Lieut. Henry B. P. L. Kennedy 
to be Captain, in succession to Major the Hon. A. R. 
Montague-Stuart Wortley, D.S.O., who holds a staff appoint- 
ment dated 8th August, 1904." 

iSth September. — Captain Price-Davies, v.c, D.S.O., 
proceeded on leave to England. Captain Johnson, D.S.O., 
rejoined from leave. 

2 1 St September. — The " Celer et Audax " Dramatic 
Troupe gave a varied and successful entertainment in the 
Imtarfa Theatre. The short sketch, entitled "The two 
Convicts," written by Rifleman Pointon, was a great 
success. 

1st October. — Captain W. A. I. Kay joined on posting 
to the Battalion. 

7th October. — 2nd Lieut. J. G. Hargreaves posted to 
the Battalion. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 57 

1 2th October. — Captain and Brevet Major Mott, who 
exchanged with Captain Kennedy, proceeded by H. T. 
Dilwara to join the 4th Battalion. Sergeant Allen and 
14 Riflemen embarked for discharge or transfer to the 
Army Reserve. Sergeant Cresswell proceeded to Hythe 
for a musketry course. 

13th October. — The competition for the best shot of the 
sergeants and lance-sergeants resulted in a win for Sergeant 
Dearman, H company, 108 points ; Sergeants Armstrong 
and Taylor being the next best scores, 95 points each. 
The best shot of the corporals and Riflemen resulted in a 
tie between Corporal Stokes and Rifleman Pearson, lOi 
points, the latter winning on the shoot off. Bandsmen 
Conson and Deasy were next with 97 and 93 respectively. 

iSth October. — Captain Johnson, D.S.O., and 2nd Lieut. 
Bonham-Carter took a party of casuals to Pembroke for 
musketry 

1 8th October. — Extract from London Gazette^ dated 
nth October, 1904, Major the Hon. St. L. H. Jervis, D.S.O., 
retires on retired pay, dated 12th October, 1904. 

2 1 St October. — The ** Celer et Audax " Dramatic Troupe 
gave a very successful entertainment in the Imtarfa Theatre. 

28th October. — Lieut-Colonel Markham rejoined from 
leave and resumed command of the Battalion. 

31st October. — Captain and Adjutant J. H. Davidson, 
D.S.O., and Lieut. Parker-Jervis rejoined from leave. 

1st November. — The training season commenced, and 
all officers returned from leave. The Battalion football team 
this year proves to be a very strong one, and is in a fair 
way to win the Garrison League, not yet having been 
beaten. There has, as yet, been little polo on account of 
the rain. Orders have been received that the Battalion 
will be split up into three portions, as follows : — Head- 
quarters and 400 rank and file, Crete (A, B, and C 
companies) ; 100 rank and File, Cyprus (E Company) ; 
remainder at Malta. 



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58 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

2 1 St November. — A bicycle competition took place for 
a cup presented by Messrs. Singer & Co. Each company 
entered a team of four men, the course bein^^ about fourteen 
miles over bad and hilly roads. The result was as follows : 
— B Company, ist; E Company, 2nd. Rifleman Burnett, 
C Company, covered the course in the shortest time, 
namely, i hr. 2 min. 5 sees. 

23rd November. — An excellent entertainment was given 
by the " Celer et Audax " Troupe. A very amusing piece 
entitled "The Burglar and the Judge" was acted : — 

The Judge ... Major Brooke, Yorks L. I. 

The Butler ... Lieut. B. Seymour. 

The Burglar ... Armourer Staff-Sergeant Hunt. 

27th November. — A draft of 210 N. C. Officers and 
Riflemen arrived from the Rifle Dep6t. The following 
officers arrived with the draft : — Lieut. R. E. Crichton, 
Lieut. T. G. Dalby, 2nd Lieut. T. G. Grice, and 2nd Lieut. 
J. Hargreaves. 

29th November. — The Right-half Battalion proceeded 
to Pembroke Musketry Camp to fire the annual course. 



1ST Battalion K. R. R.— Warrant Officers. 
Sergeant- Major J. L. Kemp. Bandmaster T. Brown. 

Staff- Sergeants. 

Quarter-Master-Sergeant - - - J. P. O'Rafferty. 

Orderly-Room-Sergeant - - - P. W. Newton. 

Sergeant- Bugler - - - - - J.Mitchell. 

Band-Sergeant W. Reynolds. 

Cook-Sergeant J. Tomlinson. 

Pioneer-Sergeant - - - - J. Haslam. 

Sergeant- Master-Tailor - - - W. Syer. 

Color- Sergeants. 

A Company J. H. Price. 

B „ ..... w. Beck. 



C 
D 
E 
F 
G 
H 



G. Ross. 
J. F. James. 
A. Cattermole. 

A. G. Harrington 

B. Dalton. 
G. Wyatt. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 59 

Good Conduct Badges. 

Men in possession of i badge 437 

„ „ 2 badges - - - - - 117 

» » 3 »"■""■ " 

» » 5 »"■■"" ^ 

Good Conduct Medals. 
No. 7569 - ■ - Rifleman J. Simpson. 

War Medals. 

No. of N.C.O.'s and Riflemen in possession - - - 457 

Re-Engagements. 

Total No. re-engaged 50 

No. re-engaged during year- 11 

Extensions. 

Total No. Extended to 12 years ----- 33 

« « » 8 „ 506 

Extended during year to 12 years 14 

»> » »» 8 „ 506 

Increase. 

1st February, 1904, Draft from 4th Battalion - - 201 

1 8th November, 1904 209 

From Depdt and other Corps - - - - - 10 

Total Increase 420 

Decrease. 

Deaths 6 

Discharged 8 

Transferred to Army Reserve 2 

„ to other Corps 7 

Sent Home for Discharge and Transfer to A. R., etc. - 186 

Total Decrease 209 



CERTIFICATES OBTAINED. 



Musketry. 
Sergeant-Major J. L. Kemp. Color- Sergeant G. Wyatt. 

Color-Sergeant H. Price. Sergeant J. Clarke. 

„ A. Cattermole. „ H. Moulsher. 

„ G. Harrington. Lance-Sergt. J. Thompson. 

„ B. Dalton. „ A. Davies. 



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6o The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

Transport. 
Sergeant-Major J. L. Kemp. Color-Sergeant H. Price. 

Signalling. 

Sergeant G. Hale. Sergeant H. Spencer. 

Lance-Sergeant W. Kerrison. 

Gymnastics. 
1st Class — Aldershot - - No. 8361, Corporal J. Corban. 
2nd „ „ - - No. 9980, Sergeant H. Tedder. 

Educational. 
1st Class — 5. 2nd Class — 162. 3rd Class— 147. 



MUSKETRY CLASSIFICATION. 



A Company 


- 174 


E Company - 


- 188 


B „ 


- 1711 


F „ 


- 1768 


c „ 


- 182-4 


G „ - 


- i8s 


D „ 


- 177-5 


H „ - 


- 174 



Best Shots in Battalion. 

Sergeant F. Dearman - - - H Company. 

Rifleman J. Pearson - - - H „ 

Best Shots in Companies. 

Rifleman A. White - - - - A Company. 

Sergeant J. Tomlinson - - - B 

„ F. Taylor- - - - C 

Rifleman W. Douglas - - - D 

„ W. Bates . . . E 

Corporal G. Evans - - - F 

Color- Sergeant B. Dalton - - G 

Sergeant F. Dearman - - - H 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 6i 



REGIMENTAL RECORDS. 



2nd Bafiallon King's Ropal Ririe Corps. 

On the 30th December, 1903, a draft of two sergeants 
and one corporal joined the Battalion from England. 

On the 1st January, 1904, the Battalion paraded for the 
usual Ceremonial Parade to fire a feu-de-joie, to commemo- 
rate the assumption of the title of" Empress of India" by 
Her Majesty the late Queen Victoria. 

On the 7th February the Battalion took part in a 
Divisional Parade for the inspection by the Lieut-General 
commanding the Punjab Forces. 

On the 17th February Lieut. -Colonel W. S. Kays joined 
from England and assumed command of the Battalion. 

On the 28th February the Battalion paraded for the 
Annual Inspection by the Colonel of the Staff Commanding 
at Rawal Pindi (Colonel H. M. Rose, D.S.O.). 

Captain A. J. Lainson, D.S.O., retires on retired pay, to 
serve in the Militia, under the provisions of Article 509, 
Royal Warrant, London Gazette^ 19th January, 1904. 

In January, an Indian Army Order was published 
abolishing the present pattern helmet, and substituting 
a Wolseley pattern helmet made of cork (khaki) with 
khaki puggri, to be worn by all British troops. British 
officers are directed to retain the present pattern white 
helmet with fittings, for wear on ceremonial occasions when 
not on duty with troops. 

In accordance with Army Order 88 of May, 1903, 
which had been made applicable to India, the following 
equipment carried by Pioneers was returned to the Arsenal 
in March, as it had been decided that they were no longer 



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62 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

to be carried : — axes, billhooks, shovels, and small tools. 
No equipment was issued to replace what had been 
returned. 

On the 2nd of March a draft from the 4th Battalion in 
South Africa joined the Battalion. Strength, 2 Sergeants, 
3 Corporals, and 115 Riflemen. Total, 120. 

On the isth of March a draft consisting of two boys 
joined the Battalion from England. Major R. S. Oxley 
is posted to the Battalion on absorption. — Authority, War 
Office Letter, No. 112/ 60/ 1542, dated 9th March, 1904. 

On the 13th April Major C. J. Markham left on pro- 
motion, to take over command of the ist Battalion at 
Malta. 

Extract from the London Gazette, dated nth March : — 
" Captain and Brevet-Major H. R. Blore is seconded for 
service on the Staff in India." 

On the iSth and i6th April the Battalion in two parties 
marched out of the Left Infantry Lines, West Ridge, 
bound for Gharial for the hot weather months, both parties 
marching into the latter place on the i8th April. 

On the 1st April, Army Order ^ of 1902, granting 
certain increases of daily pay to Warrant Officers, N.C.O.'s, 
and Riflemen, came into force. 5 Sergeants and 766 Rifle- 
men extended service to complete eight years with the 
colours, in order to qualify for service pay. 

The following table shows the rates at which Warrant 
Officers, N.C.O.'s, and Riflemen assumed the above pay : — 

Class I at 7^. - 4CX) 

Class I at 6^/. 337 

Class II at 5^/. 32 

Class II at 4^. 139 

Numbers who did not elect - - - - - 162 
Number ineligible under 20 years of age - - 9 

Total 1079 

Major A. Blewitt posted to the Battalion as second in 
command. — Authority, War Office Letter No. 82603/ 24/ 
A. G. 8, dated 12th April, 1904. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 63 

Captain G. Makins posted to the Battalion on promotion. 
—Authority, War Oflfice Letter No. 112/ 60/ 1552/ A. G. 8. 
dated i6th May, 1904. 

Captain H. H. R. White posted to the Battah'on on 
absorption. — Authority, War Office Letter, No. 112/ 60/ 
1553/ A. G. 8, dated 17th May, 1904. 

Extracts from Results of Annual Inspection of Army 
Signallers of British Units in the Punjab Command, 
1903-4 : — Figure of Merit, 846'97. 

While at GhariaK before the breaking of the monsoon, 
water was very scarce, and on the 28th June all water was 
turned off, except for two hours in the morning and again 
in the evening for the same time. On the 15th July this 
was further reduced to only one and a half hours morning 
and evening. Shortly after the long delayed monsoon 
broke, and the water famine was over. 

During August, a very successful dog, vegetable, and 
flower show was held, the exhibits of vegetables and flowers 
being particularly good, not only in quality but in the large 
number of entries in each class. The undermentioned 
prizes were awarded for soldiers' gardens by the Station 
Board, which assembled on the 8th August, 1904 : — 

Best Garden in the Battalion. — No. 85 Rifleman Walsh. 

Second Best Garden in the Battalion, — No. 43 Rifleman Edgson. 

In addition to the above, three prizes per company were 
also awarded. 

On the 18th and 19th October, 1904, the Battalion 
left Gharial in two parties for West Ridge, Rawal Pindi, 
arriving there on the 20th and 21st October, and went into 
the Left Infantry Lines This stay is only a short one, as 
on the 31st October two companies were due to proceed 
by route march to Amritzar, and the remainder of the 
Battalion were to move to Sialkot on the 14th November. 
However, on the 2Sth October the moves were stopped, 
and the Battalion was informed that they were probably 
to proceed to Ranikhet, but up to the I2th November no 
definite orders had been received. 



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64 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

2nd Lieut. M. F. Blake posted to the Battalion. 
Authority, War Office Letter, No. 1 12/60/1570, A.G., 8, 
dated 30-9-04. 

On the 1 2th November, the Battalion received orders 
that they would proceed by rail to Bareilly, being due at 
that place about the 7th December, and at the same time 
were ordered to despatch an advanced party of i Officer 
and 84 Riflemen to Ranikhet to take over barracks and 
form the winter section in that place. 



2ND Battalion K. R. R.— Warrant Officers. 
Sergeant-Major — T. Maple. Bandmaster — J. H. Sage. 

Staff- Sergeants. 

Quarter-Master-Sergeant - - - T. A. Addyman. 

Orderly-Room-Sergeant, Col.-Sergt. - G. Potier. 

Orderly-Room-Clerk, Sergeant - - W. H. Heath. 

Sergeant-Bugler W. Gull. 

Pioneer- Sergeant T. Lanceley. 

Musketry-Sergeant - - - - J. Hoefling. 

Cook-Sergeant G. Clarke. 

Canteen-Sergeant J. Brewis. 

Officers- Mess-Sergeant - - - - A. Hindelang. 

Band-Sergeant M. Try horn. 

Sergeant-Instructor of Signalling - - H. Taylor. 

Color- Sergeants. 

A Company A. Robinson. 

B „ J. W. Street. 

C „ E. Scutt. 

D „ T. Gascoyne. 

E „ W. H. Brettell. 

F „ R. Axford. 

G „ T. Perkins. 

H „ H. Bird. 

Good Conduct Badges. 

No. of Riflemen in possession of i badge - - - 395 

„ „ „ 2 badges - - 338 

» »» » 3 » - - o 

Total - - 741 
Good Conduct Medals. 
Sergeant-Major T. Maple. Bandmaster J. H. Sage. 

Color-Sergeant T. Gascoyne. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 65 

War Medals. 

Officers 21 

W. O.'s, N. C. O.'s, and Riflemen - - - - 753 

Re - Engagements.— 14. 

Extensions. 

To Eight Years 815 

To Twelve Years 22 

Increase. 

From Regimental Dep6t - 5 

From 4th Battalion 224 

From other Corps i 

Attested i 

Total - - 231 

Decrease. 

Died I 

To Army Reserve Abroad 3 

Discharged Abroad 5 

To other Corps 12 

To Unattached List 4 

Sent Home : — 

Time Expired 11 

To Army Reserve 94 

Invalids 9 

Prisoners 9 

To Home Establishment 7 

155 



CERTIFICATES OBTAINED. 



Musketry. 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. S. Kays - 

Major A. Blewitt 

„ R. S. Oxley 

„ C. S. Chaphn Hythe. 

Captain and Adjutant E. F. Ward - - Changla Gali. 
„ B. F. Widdrington - - - Hythe. 
„ A. E. Cathcart ... - Changla Gali. 
„ G. K. Priaulx . - - . 

„ G. Makins 

Lieutenant F. G. Willan - . - - 
„ G. Culme-Seymour - - - 
„ B. J. Curling - - - - 



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66 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



Lieutenant R. N. Abadie - - - - Changla Gali. 

,, H. A. Vernon - - - - „ 

2nd Lieutenant G. A. H. Beaumont - - „ 

„ M. L. S. Clements - - Hythe. 

R. H. Willan - - - „ 

„ . Y, O. Grenfell - - - „ 

Major and Quarter- Master J. W. Dwane - „ (N.C.O.) 

Sergeant-Major T. Maple - - - - „ 

Color-Sergeant G. Gascoyne - . - - „ 

„ „ E. Scutt - - - - Changla Gali. 

„ „ J. Street - - . - „ 

„ „ A. Robinson - . - ^^ 

„ „ W. H. Brettell - - - „ 

„ „ R. Axford - - . ,, 

„ „ T. Perkins - - . ^^ 

„ „ H. Bird .... „ 

Sergeant A. H. Collier ... - Hythe. 

„ A. Cooke „ 

„ G. H. Wilson ... - Changla Gali. 

„ J. Hoefling „ 

„ A. Hoare „ 

„ T. Mc Lachlan . - - . „ 

Transport. 
Captain B. F. Widdrington. Rifleman W. Prosser. 

Lieutenant R. N. Abadie. „ J. Leonard. 

Sergeant H. Wood. „ J. Palin. 

„ R. C. Parrott. „ T. Edley. 

„ R. Evans. „ C. Simmons. 

„ E. E. Field. „ H. Blackledge. 

„ T. Cooling. „ T. H. Cook. 

Lance- Sergeant L. Buzza. „ C. T. Read. 

Corporal S. Hulford. „ E. Bakewell. 

Lance-Corporal J. Laycock. „ H. Windley. 

„ „ A. Owen. „ J. Robinson. 

„ „ W. Messenger. „ S. Baker. 

Rifleman A. Pettitt. „ A. Jones. 

„ E. Burn. „ J. J. Wilden. 

„ H. Smith. 

Telegraphy. 
Lance-Corporal Richardson. Rifleman Cunlifle. 

Piatt. „ Glegg. 

Rifleman Pollard. „ Mansell. 

„ Rockhey. „ Collins. 

„ Clairemont. „ Smith. 

„ Adams. „ ■ Mason. 

„ Golton. „ Meadowcroft 

„ Kilby. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 67 

Educational. 

First Class 24 

Second Class 256 

Third Class 533 

Total . - 813 
In addition to the above, fifteen have passed Group I for First Class. 

Army Signalling. 

Lieutenant R. N. Abadie. Sergeant H. Taylor. 

„ H. A. Vernon. Corporal C. Thomas. 

2nd Lieutenant W. J. Davis. Lance-Corporal A. Taylor. 

Color- Sergeant A. Robinson. „ „ B. Smales. 

Gymnastics. 
Sergeant R. Banks. Lance- Corporal J. Kellard. 

„ S. Hall. „ „ J. Lee. 

Lance-Sergeant F. Wademan. „ „ W. Martin. 

Corporal E. Saunders. Rifleman J. Miley. 

Lance-Corporal E. Goleby. 

Veterinary. 
2nd Lieutenant R. H. Bond. Rifleman S. Beach. 

Rifleman J. Bagshaw. „ J. Broadhurst. 

Field Butchery. 
Rifleman G. Williams. Rifleman H. Dunn. 

„ H. Bowen. „ R. Gilding. 

„ J. Keen. „ A. Floyd. 

„ J. Davis. „ F. Stephenson. 

„ S. Edley. 

Chiropody. 
Rifleman W. Panter. Rifleman A. Snell. 

„ J. Walsby. „ W. Rees. 

Victualling Duties. 
Lance-Corporal W. Frith. Lance-Corporal A. Gray. 

„ „ R. Logan. Corporal S. Hulford. 

Other Certificates. 

Rifleman S. Byrne - - - Master Tailor. 

Sergeant Lanceley - - - Pioneer Sergeant. 

„ G. Clarke - - - Cookery. 

„ „ ... Military Engineering. 

Color-Sergeant J. W. Street - „ „ 

Sergeant A. Styles . - - ,, „ 

„ A. H. Collier - - Acting Schoolmaster. 



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68 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Other Certificates— continued. 

Sergeant W. Stickland - - Acting Schoolmaster. 

Rifleman S. Glover - - - ,, ,, 

Mounted Infantry— 77. Machine Gun— 27. 

Stretcher Bearers — 34. 

Musketry Classification. 

A Company — Captain and Brevet-Major Cnim - 230*1 

B „ Major Chaplin 232*0 

C „ Captain Cathcart - - - - 231*4 

D „ „ Priaulx 231*2 

E „ „ Makins- . . _ . 225*4 

F „ „ Hankey 234*0 

C „ „ Widdrington - - - - 233*0 

H „ „ Major Oxley - - - - 226*9 

Best Shot in Battalion. 

Sergeants Color- Sergeant Robinson. 

Rank and File - - - - Rifleman Goodall. 

Best Shots in Companies. 

A Company - - . . Color-Sergeant Robinson. 

B „ . . - . Rifleman Freestone. 

C „ .... Sergeant Gozzett. 

D „ .... Rifleman Abel. 

E Company .... Rifleman Devoy. 

F „ .... Color-Sergeant Axford. 

G „ .... Lance-Corporal Duggan. 

H „ .... Rifleman Farrell. 



rourree football Cournamentt I904f. 

The above Tournament, for which eleven teams were 
entered, took place early in June. The Battalion team 
succeeded in beating successively the Dorsets by 5 goals to 
I, the Irish Fusiliers by 4 goals to nil, and the Wiltshires 
by I goal to nil, and then had to meet the Gordon High- 
landers in the final. The latter were slightly the better 
team and won by 2 goals to nil, thus making it the fourth 
successive time the Battalion team had competed in finals 
unsuccessfully, including football and hockey. Battalion 
Team : — Rifleman Hall, goal ; Riflemen Haywood and 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 6g 

Evans, backs ; Riflemen Mc Queen, Mowatt, and Page, 
halves ; Rifleman Higney, Lance-Corporal Curtis, Lance- 
Corporal Clayton, Riflemen Ramsdell and Whitehead, 
forwards. 



murree Rockep Cournatnentt I904f. 

This took place early in October. It was a very good 
Tournament, twenty-three teams being entered, and some 
very good play was seen. 

The Battalion entered two teams — an A Team, which 
included the best men available, and a B Team selected 
from the next best. 

In the first round our A Team beat a team selected 
from two batteries by 7 goals to nil, and our B Team beat 
the Irish Fusilier team, brought up from Rawal Pindi by 
2 goals to I. They unfortunately had to meet each other 
in the second round, and B Team was scratched. 

In the third round we had our hardest game in the 
tournament against the Somersets. We got a goal soon 
after the start of the game, and hit the post twice after- 
wards, but failed to increase the score before half-time. 
On resuming play, and for the remainder of the game, with 
one or two exceptions, the Somersets pressed hard, and, 
owing chiefly to their superior condition, nearly managed 
to score frequently, but our backs and goalkeeper played 
splendidly and kept them out. In the semi-finals we 
easily defeated the Munsters by five goals to nil, and then 
met the North Staffords, the holders of the "All India 
Championship" last year, in the final. In the first half 
Upson saved three grand shots, and, there being very little 
to choose between the teams, the score at half-time 
remained nil. In the second half, however, our team got 
together, and, playing splendidly, went right away and 
won by four goals to nil, thus, we hope, putting an end to 



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JO The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

the hard luck that has persistently stuck to us for the last 
two years. 

Our team was a very good one, but lacked combination. 
However, they had had very few opportunities of playing 
together: once only before the commencement of the 
tournament, and, with more practice, ought to be able to 
hold their own against any team in India. Team : — Rifle- 
man Upson, goal ; Riflemen Higney and Mowatt, backs ; 
Riflemen Freestone, Whitehead, and Lance-Corporal Curtis, 
halves ; Rifleman Goodman, Lance-Corporal Casey, Rifle- 
men Mc Manus, Ramsdell, and Stevenson, forwards. 



Jl sbort Resume or Cricket 
Plapca Dp tbc 2na Battalion aurina 1904* 

During the cold weather, 1903-4, the Battalion played 
only two matches at all noteworthy, though G. Cookson 
went down to Lahore during Christmas week, and there 
compiled an exceptionally good 200 odd. 

The first of these two was against the Gordon High- 
landers for the " Punjab Commission Cricket Cup." We 
went in first and made 196, of which Cookson got 128. 
The Gordons answered with only 94, thanks to Sergeant 
Lowe's excellent slow bowling. In the second innings we 
only got 1 13, as we nearly all fell victims to G. H. S. Fowkes' 
lobs. Still they had 128 to get to win, but, unfortunately 
for us, the wicket had changed, and was a good deal easier 
than it had been the day before. Nothing that we did 
made any impression on F. Maitland, 129 not out, and 
G. H. S. Fowke, 81 not out, and so we were beaten by ten 
wickets : a most disastrous match. 

The second of the two was between a team of the 
Greenjackets and the Gurkha Brigade, and was almost as 
disastrous as the first. The Rifle Brigade very hospitably 
put up five of us and Sergeant Lowe who went down to 
Meerut. The Gurkhas won the toss, went in first, and 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 71 

made 279, of which L. P. CoHins, the Oxford Blue, made 
119, though he was missed out in the country when he had 
only made about 50. We made 173, and then, in their 
second innings, having made 217 for two (Collins 115 and 
Captain C. B. Champain 93), declared. We could only 
make 127, though Cookson and Shaw (R. B.) made a great 
effort to stave off defeat, making 66 and 33 respectively. 
Captain Brodhurst bowled well for them, getting thirteen 
wickets in the match. This second venture ending in 
a defeat by 296 runs. 

However, after we went up to Gharial in the Murree 
Hills, things went a little better for us, though we were 
beaten in our first match by the Changla Gali Musketry 
Class, notwithstanding a loi by Major Blore for us. 
Cookson, our mainstay, had gone home, but R. N. Abadie 
had come out, and Major Oxley came later. The second 
match we played at Gharial was against Topa and 
Kuldana. They went in first and made 306 for nine, when 
they declared, leaving us about three hours to get the runs : 
Abadie and F. G. Willan got 80 in the first half hour, and 
then, after Willan (47) and Blore got out, Abadie and 
Curling knocked off the runs with half an hour to spare, 
getting 14s and 105 respectively. 

Later on the Gordons came over from Thobba, but 
they had neither Fowke or Maitland playing for them. 
However we turned the tables on them this time, beating 
them by ten wickets. Abadie and F. G. Willan both made 
centuries for us, and A. L. Davis 147 for them. 

Five of us played for the Murree Cricket Club against 
a strong team from Abbottabad, which included W. M. 
Turner the old R. M. A. and Essex player. Captain 
C. B. Champain, 5th Gurkhas, and Captain Lathbury, R.E. 
To their 376 we only made 245, though Major Oxley and 
Curling got 150 for the first wicket when Curling got out 
for 75. Oxley was unfortunate in missing his century by 
only one run. They declared their innings closed with 
eight wickets down for 276, and we staved off defeat thanks 
to a brilliant stand for the eighth wicket by Barker and 



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72 The King*s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Clarke (ist Wiltshire Regiment). Later in the season in 
the Murree and Peshawar match Major Oxley got a good 
68 not out, and Sergeant Lowes a fine 64. The match 
ended, as is' usual at Gharial, in a draw, Murree having 
rather the best of it. 

The disappointing feature of the Battalion cricket is 
that we never seem to be able to get a full side, as with 
Major Oxley, G. Cookson, Harker, Grenfell and Denison 
to head the lot, we should have a very strong Battalion 
team. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 73 



REGIMENTAL RECORDS. 



3ra Battalion King's Ropal Rifle Corps. 

Frofn 1st January to jist December^ IQ04, 



1st January. — Lieut. A. D. Borton and twenty-eight 
N.C.O/s and Riflemen completed a satisfactory course of 
instruction in Mounted Infantry duties. 

8th January. — Draft of eighteen recruits from Rifle 
Depot. 

24th January. — Colonel W. P. Campbell, A.D.C., relin- 
quished command of the Battalion. The following farewell 
order was published 24th January : — " In bidding farewell 
to the Battalion Colonel W. P. Campbell, A.D.C., wishes to 
thank the Officers for their most cordial support, the 
Warrant and N.C. Officers for the ready and willing way 
they have always done their work, and the Riflemen for 
their good behaviour. Colonel W. P. . Campbell, A.D.C., 
hopes that during his period of command he has made all 
ranks as happy when serving under him as they have made 
him happy in commanding them. He wishes every one 
the best of good luck and success in the future, and feels 
sure that they will always do their utmost to keep up the 
reputation of the good Regiment in which he has served 
for the last twenty-eight years. 

26th January. — London Gazette: — Major and Brevet- 
Lieut-Colonel C. R. R. McGrigor to be Lieut-Colonel vice 
W. P. Campbell, A.D.C., 25th January. 

28th January. — Lieut-Colonel C. R. R. McGrigor arrived 
and took over command of the Battalion. 

5th February. — Draft of loi recruits from Rifle Depot. 

20th February. — Twelve Riflemen to Rifle Depot. 



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74 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

9th March. — Draft of forty-one Riflemen from Rifle 
Depot. 

14th March. — Battalion inspected by H.R.H. the Duke 
of Connaught, K.G., etc., etc., who was much pleased with 
the turn-out of the Battalion. 

i6th March. — The Battalion embarked at Queenstown 
on SS. Dilwara for passage to Bermuda, there to be 
stationed. Strength, 23 Officers, 831 W.O.'s, rank and file. 
Details : — one officer and 92 rank and file were left at Cork 
and posted to Rifle Depot. 

27th March. — Arrived Bermuda. 

28th March. — Battalion disembarked F, G, and H 
Companies proceeded on detachment to St. George's 
Island, C and D Companies on detachment to Warwick 
Camp, Head Quarters and A, B, and E Companies to Boaz 
Island. 

nth April. — The Battalion was inspected by H. E. 
Lieut.-General Sir H. Le G. Geary, K.C.B., Commander-in- 
Chief, Bermuda. 

20th May. — The Battalion was inspected by H.E. Lieut.- 
General Sir R. M. Stewart, K.C.B., on taking over the com- 
mand of Bermuda. 

24th June. — London Gazette-, — To be Ordinary Member 
of the Military Division of the Third Class, or Companions 
of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath : — Lieut.-Colonel 
C. R. R. McGrigor. 

28th June. — Five Riflemen (invalids) embarked on SS. 
Beta for passage to England. 

15th July. — Three N.C.O.'s arrived per SS. Orinoco from 
Rifle Depot. 

24th August. — H.E. the G.O.C. Bermuda directed the 
Commanding Officer to communicate to No. 564, Rifleman 
Comery, H.E.'s approval of the manner in which he per- 
formed the first aid to the wounded, thereby saving the life 
of No. 468, Rifleman Hird. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 75 

9th September. — Five Riflemen (invalids) embarked on 
SS. Beta for passage to England. 

October. — Medal for " Long Service and Good Conduct " 
(without gratuity) awarded to No. 3600, Sergeant-Major 
A. C. Watkins. — A. O. 172 (C) of October, 1904. 

29th November. — Draft consisting of three Officers, one 
Sergeant, one Corporal, and eighty-three Riflemen arrived 
per SS. Mongolian from 4th Battalion.— Disembarked 30th 
November. 



3RD Battalion K. R. R. — Warrant Officers. 
3600 Sergeant-Major A. C. Watkins. 
4227 Bandmaster J. Slattery. 

Staff Sergeants. 

Quarter- Master-Sergeant - - - W. Humphries. 

Instructor of Musketry, Col.-Sergt. - H. Eldred. 

Orderly-Room-Sergeant, „ - J. E. Saunders. 

Sergeant-Bugler C. Caulfield. 

Sergeant-Cook M. McDermott. 

Pioneer-Sergeant - - - - W. Addison. 

Band-Sergeant W. Austin. 

Sergeant- Master-Tailor - - - G. Burgess. 

Orderly-Room-Clerk, Sergeant - - H. Wilson. 

Officers' Mess-Sergeant - - - R. Hurley. 

Armour-Quarter-Master-Sergeant - E. Webster, A.O.C. 

Color-Sergeants. 

A Company 973 A. Harman. 

B „ 2364 F. Waters. 

C „ 8114 J. Bainbridge. 

D „ 2258 F. Clay. 

E „ - . - - - 7452 W. Marston. 

F „ 4331 H. Rowlinson. 

G „ 1864 A. Bennewith. 

H „ 2991 F. Roads. 

Color-Sergeant A. Harman has since been promoted Sergeant- 
Major. 

Good Conduct Badges. 

Men in possession of i badge 234 

„ „ 2 badges 72 

>j » 3 »""■■■ o 

» » 4 »■"■■" 2 

Good Conduct Medals.— 6. 



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76 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



War Medals. 

- 104 Four - 

- 191 Five - - - 
7 Six - - - 

Re-Engagements. — 1 1. Extensions.— 291. 

Increase.— 398. Decrease.— 282. 



One - 

Two 

Three 



CERTIFICATES 

musketry.~i3. 

Master Tailors.— i; 

Ambulance Class.— 13. 

Transport. — 34. 

Field Works, Chatham.— 4. 



OBTAINED. 

School of Cookery.— 2. 

Mounted Infantry. — 95. 

Signalling.— I. 

Cold Shoers.— 4. 

Gymnastic— 3. 







Educational. 




1st Class- 


— IL 

Ml 


\. 2nd Class— 113. 3rd Class- 


-196. 




JSKETRY CLASSIFICATION. 








Part I Part II 


Practice 


A Company 


197-4 66*5 


19-2 


B 




205-9 79*8 


18-5 


c 




192-4 72-4 


22*7 


D „ 




203-4 71*4 


12-3 


E 




1954 67-0 


19*3 


F „ 




199-5 728 


221 


G 




198*9 69*1 


20-5 


H „ 




175-9 72-6 
Best Shots in Companies. 


14-6 


A Company- 


-3240 Corporal Ramsey 


355 


B „ 




9074 Sergeant Warner 


394 


c „ 




8 114 Color-Sergeant Bainbridge 


389 


D „ 




3946 Rifleman Long 


370 


E „ 




9283 Sergeant Wenham - 


359 


F „ 




9971 Lance-Sergeant Yates 


378 


G „ 




1864 Color-Sergeant Bennewith- 


383 


H „ 




4179 Lance-Corporal Meetcham 


354 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, Jj 

Report on ti)c Bermuda Rifle meetina. 

Held at Warwick Camp, Bermuda, on i8th, igth, 20th, 
2ist, and 22nd April, 1^04, 



The Bermuda Rifle Meeting was held at Warwick 
Camp on i8th, 19th, 20th, 21st, and 22nd April, three 
weeks after our arrival. Considering our want of practice 
and the short time we had been in the island we did pretty 
well on the whole as the prize list will show. We lost the 
Bermuda Championship by a bad score at 500, but Colour- 
Sergeant Bainbridge had the best score down the range 
— 96. The Sailors had a good team and pulled up well 
after being 12 behind at 200 yards. Colour- Sergeant 
Bainbridge also made a very good fight for the Champion- 
ship Cup, making a possible at 800 yards (ten shots), and 
only lost by one point. It was an exciting finish, as, had 
W. O. Hallett, of H.M.S. Ariadne, made anything but 
bullseyes with his last three shots, he would have lost. 
One of our teams made a specially good show in Team 
Competition No. 24, — a plate-breaking competition against 
another team. In their first tie they smashed all the plates 
of the opposing team in their first eight shots. 

The chief prizes were as follows : — 

Competition No. i. — Rank and File, 200 yards. Winner, Lance- 
Sergeant Buckle, score 33 ; roth, Rifleman Hird, score 30. 

Competition No. 2. — Sergeants, 200 yards. 3rd, Colour-Sergeant 
Benewith, score 32. 

Competition No. 6. — All Comers, 500 yards, ist, Colour- Sergeant 
Benewith, score 34 ; 7th, Captain Johnson, score 32. 

Competition No. 9. — Rank and File, 500 yards. 6th, Lance.-Sergeant 
Yates, score 31. 

Competition No 10. — Sergeants, 500 yards. 2nd, Colour- Sergeant 
Bainbridge, score 32 ; 4th, Sergeant Reynolds, score 31. 

Competition No. 12. — Team Competition, vanishing targets, 120 yards. 
King's Royal Rifle Team ist score, 25 ; Prize Cup and £2 
Team : — Colour- Sergeant Bainbridge, Lance-Sergeants Buckle, 
Yates, Schofield, and Russell, and Corporal Charles. 

Competition No. 17. — Team Competition, snap-shooting behind cover. 
King's Royal Rifle Team, 2nd, score 27. Team : — Colour- 



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yS The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Sergeant Bainbridge, Lance- Sergeants Buckle, Yates, Schofield, 
and Russell, Corporal Charles, Riflemen Wright, Cavanagh, 
and Comery. 

Competition No. i8. — Bermuda Championship, 200, 500, and 600 
yards. King's Royal Rifle Team, 2nd, score 511. Teams: — 
Colour-Seargents Bainbridge, Benewith, and Rawlinson, Ser- 
geant Reynolds, Lance-Sergeant Yates, and Captain Johnson. 
This team also got special prizes for best score at 600 yards. 

Competition No. 22. — Rank and File, 600 yards, ist, Lance-Sergeant 
Yates, score 31 ; 5th, Rifleman Hird, score 28. 

Competition No. 23. — Sergeants, 600 yards. 3rd, Sergeant Reynolds, 
score 30. 

Competition No. 24. — Team Competition Plate Breaking. King's 
Royal Rifle Team ist, prize, cup, and £2, Team : — Sergeant 
Reilly, Lance- Sergeants Yates, Buckle, Russell, and Schofield. 

Competition No. 29.— Officers, W.O.'s, 600 yards. 3rd, Captain 
Johnson, score 29. 

Competition No. 31. — Team Competition, Brinsmead. King's Royal 
Rifle Team ist, score 19 ; prize, cup and £2. Team : — Colour- 
Sergeant Bainbridge, Lance-Sergeants Yates, Buckle, Russell, 
and Schofield, Corporal Charles, and Rifleman Cavanagh. 

Competition No. 32. — Championship Cup. 7 shots, 200, 500, 600, 10 
shots 800. 2nd, Colour-Sergeant Bainbridge, score 141 (possible 
at 800). 
Several smaller prizes were gained which are not shown in the 

above list. 



The Competition for the best shot of sergeants and 
lance-sergeants and for the best shot of the rank and file 
of the 3rd Battalion came ofif at Warwick Camp, Bermuda, 
on the loth December. 

The practices consisted of deliberate firing at 400 and 
600 yards, also of rapid firing and firing at vanishing 
targets. 

These practices had been selected by Lieut.-Colonel 
McGregor so as to test who were the best all-round shots 
in the Battalion, and the best shots certainly came to 
the front : seven rounds at each practice were fired. 
Nearly all the sergeants of the Battalion are marksmen, 
consequently there was a large number of competitors. 
Those who scored 80 points and upwards are as follows : 



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Ike King's 


Royal Rifle 


Corps 


Chronicle. 


7 










200 Yds. 






200 Yds. 


2JO Yds. 


600 Yds. 


Vanis. 


Total 


Rank and Name. 


Co. Rapid 


Delib. 


Delib. 


Target 


Score 


Col.-Sergt. J. Bainbridg 


e C 24 


24 


24 


21 


93 


Col.-Sergt. A. Benewith 


G 22 


25 


23 


21 


91 


Sergt. A. Warner 


.. B 27 


24 


18 


21 


90 


Col.-Sergt. F. Clay 


.. D 25 


23 


21 


18 


87 


Sergt. J. Schofield 


.. E 22 


23 


20 


21 


^ 


L.-Sergt. H. Yates 


... F 15 


24 


25 


21 


85 


L.-Corpl. W. Tansley 


... B 24 


23 


22 


21 


90 


Rifleman B. Stevens 


.. F 21 


25 


19 


21 


86 


L.-Corpl. E. McVittie 


.. F 23 


23 


21 


18 


85 


Bugler W. Buchanan 


.. A 18 


22 


25 


18 


83 


Rifleman G. H. Tack 


.. A 26 


22 


22 


12 


82 



Crtcket Club. 

No fresh talent was brought to light in the season of 
1904, and the Battalion had to depend on the old hands. 
No doubt the reason for this is that the Battalion being 
divided into three parts, no one part being easily accessible 
fn)m the others, it was found almost impossible to raise 
enthusiasm by company matches ; and during the latter 
part of the summer, the relaxing climate, combined with 
the heat, made cricket rather a weariness than a pleasure. 
We were also somewhat limited in our list of opponents, 
for, after the departure of the fleet in May, there were only 
five white teams to compete against. We were wonderfully 
short of bowling, yet on every occasion but three we 
managed to get rid of the other side for a small score, 
perhaps owing to our fielding, which was very fair. 

The Battalion played ten matches, of which they won 
six, lost three, and the remaining one was drawn. The 
following are the scores : — 



Versus 




Opponents' Score 


Rifles' Score 


Result 


Navy ... 






. 133 .. 


... 181 


.. won 


>i ••• 






. 50 and 82 


... 248 


.. won 


7th Fusiliers (3rd) .. 


. 112 ... 


... 130 


.. won 


R. A. and R. 


E. 




. I2S ... 


... 164 


.. won 


Hamilton 






. 77 ... 


... 70 


.. lost 


Fusiliers ... 






. 180 ... 


... 87 


.. lost 


Hamilton 






. 276 ... 


... 78 


.. lost 


Fusiliers ... 






. 209for9wkts. 


... 173 for 6 wickets 


.. drawn 


II 






. 79 -. 


... 128 „ 3 „ 


.. won 


II 






. 105 and 124 


... 84&i49for8wkts.. 


.. won 



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8o The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



Ulater $porr$. 

On November 7th, at Boaz, Bermuda, water sports were 
held by the 3rd Battah'on. The heats for some of the 
events took place on the two previous days, in time for 
which competitors from the two detachments at Warwick 
Camp and St. George*s had come in to Headquarters at 
Boaz. The band of the 3rd Battalion Royal Fusiliers 
played a selection of music during the afternoon. The 
Governor and Lady Stewart were amongst those present, 
and at the close of day Lady Stewart kindly presented 
the prizes. 

The following is a list of the events and the prize 

winners : — 

100 Yards, 

1. Bandsman Prudence, Band. 3. Boy Allen (5612), Band. 

2. Rifleman Davies, E Coy. 4. Corporal Bottomley, B Coy. 

100 Yards Race for Boys, 

1. Boy Beale, Band. 3. Boy O'Donnell, Band. 

2. „ Allen (6040), Band. 4. „ Tipping „ 

Quarter-Mile, 

1. Bandsman Woods, Band. 3. Rifleman Shann, F Coy. 

2. Rifleman Grizzell, G Coy. 4. Corporal Bottomley, B Coy. 

V, C, Race, 

1. Bandsman Woods and Bugler 3. Riflemen Ball and Sims. 

Buchanan. 4. Lance-Corporals Frogley and 

2. Riflemen Saunders and Harrop. Willing. 

Royal Fusilier^ Band Race. 

1. Bandsman Harrison. 3. Bandsman Saunders. 

2. „ Strickland. 4. Sergeant Harris. 

Tug'Of- War, 
I. Band. 2. F Company. 

Team Race, 
I. Band, 65 points. 2. D Company, 51 points. 

3. B Company, 48 points. 

Water Football, 
I. Band. 2. F Company. 

Diving, 

1. Rifleman KilcuUen, A Coy. 3. Bugler Buchanan, A Coy. 

2. „ Jones „ 4. Boy Beale, Band. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 8 1 

Boat Race, 
I. F Company. 2. E Company. 

lOO Yards {open to Army and Navy). 

1. Bdsmn. Prudence, 3rd K.R.R, 3. Rifleman Benson, E Coy., 

2. Gunner Burrows, R.G.A. 3rd K.R.R. 

Egg <^^d Spoon Race, 

1. Bandsman Woods, Band. 3. Corporal Bottomley, B Coy. 

2. Bugler Buchanan, A Coy. 4. Rifleman Davies, E Coy. 

Obstacle Race, 

1. Rifleman Davies, E Coy. 3. Rifleman Hyden, A Coy. 

2. „ Jones, A Coy. 4. Bandsman Harper, Band. 

Quarter-Mile {open to Army and Navy), 
I. Bandsman Prudence, Band, 2. Rflmn. Kilcullen, 3rd K.R.R. 
3rd K.R.R. 3. „ Benson, 3rd K.R.R. 

Hobby-Horse Race, 

1. Rifleman Wilson, H Coy. 3. Rifleman Treasure, D Coy. 

2. „ Harrop, D „ 

Greasy Pole, 

1. Rifleman Regan, A Coy. 3. Rifleman Chapman, A Coy. 

2. „ Dunn, B „ 

The judges were Lieut. A. Leith, Lieut. Hon. A. F. W. 
Harris, 2nd Lieut. R. M. Gosling, Schoolmaster Smith, 
Sergeant Mc Dermott, Sergeant Wilson, Lance-Sergeant 
Ramsey. Starter — Sergeant-Major Watkins. Clerk of 
the Course — Color-Sergeant Harman. 



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82 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



REGIMENTAL RECORDS. 



4tl) Battalion Kind's Ropal Rifle Corps. 

From 1st January to 31st December^ 1^04, 



13th January. — Young Soldier's Cup. — The following 
has been received from D. A. A. G. H. D. : — " The G. O. 
Commanding directs me to congratulate you and the 
Battalion under your command on your most gratifying 
success in this contest. Would you kindly have this con- 
veyed to the * young soldiers * concerned ? " 

20th January. — A draft of 120 sent to 2nd Battalion, 
India. 

1st February. — A draft of 200 sent to ist Battalion, 
Malta. 

5th May. — Brevet-General C. J. Blomfield, D.S.O., com- 
manding H.D., held a parade to take leave of the Battalion, 
prior to its departure for England. The team sent to 
represent the Battalion at the Transvaal Bisley Rifle 
Meeting won the Field Firing Competition, and Sergeant 
Whitley was fourth in the Governor's Cup, and fifth in the 
Grand Aggregate. 

7th May. — The O.C., having telegraphed congratulations 
of all ranks of the Battalion to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 
K.G.,on his appointment as Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment 
in succession to His late R.H. the Duke of Cambridge, K.G., 
has received the following reply : — " Prince of Wales sin- 
cerely thanks all ranks 4th Battalion King's Royal Rifles 
for kind message." 

7th May. — A Company under command of Lieut. 
G. A. Howard and a small party of F Company proceeded 
on detachment to Pietermaritzburg for duty pending 
departure of Battalion for England. Colour-Sergeant H. 



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LIEUTKNANT-COLONEL F. A. FORTESCUE. 

Commanding 4th Battalion. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 83 

Lamond has been awarded the Silver Medal for Long 
Service and Good Conduct 2nd Lieut. H. C. Ponsonby 
posted to Battalion. 

31st May. — The Battalion under command of Lieut- 
Colonel F. A. Fortescue, strength 17 Officers, i W.O., and 
772 N.C.O.'s and Riflemen, left Harrismith on ist June for 
Durban en route to England and embarked on H.M.T. 
Sicilia, Arrived and disembarked on 28th June at 
Southampton, and entrained for Gosport, there to be 
stationed. 

Names of Officers. 

Lieut.-Col. F. A. Fortescue. 2nd Lieut. A. J. Hunter. 

Major F. Douglas- Pennant. „ E. G. St. Aubyn. 

Captain W. H. L. Allgood. „ L. Aylmer. 

„ C. H. R. Seymour. „ W. L. Clinton. 

Lieut. C. A. Howard. „ H. C. Ponsonby. 

„ G. T. Lee. „ J. S. Mellor. 

„ F. W. L. Edwards. Capt. and Adjt. H. Wake, 

„ G. Wynne-Finch. D.S.O. 

2nd Lieut. C. J. T. R. Wingfield. Lieut and Qr.-Mr. W. Judge. 

nth August. — The M.L Company of the Battalion 
arrived home on the SS. Malta from active service in 
Somaliland. 

17th August. — The Battalion furnished a guard of 
honour and band under command of 2nd Lieut. A. A. 
Soames on the occasion of the opening of the Riflemen's 
Cottage Homes, Winchester, by H.R.H. Princess Christian 
of Schleswig Holstein. 

30th August. The Battalion was inspected by H.R.H. 
the Duke of Connaught, K.G., etc., Inspector^-General to the 
Forces. 

31st August. — Lieut-Colonel F. A. Fortescue received 
sanction of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, K.G., etc., etc., 
Colonel-in-Chief King's Royal Rifle Corps, for the " Duke 
of York's March " being played as the " Inspection tune." 
d/ Marlboro House, 20th August. 

6th September. — The Battalion paraded this day for 
the presentation of South African War Medals by General 



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84 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Right Hon. Sir R. H. Buller, v.C, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., Colonel 
Commandant King's Royal Rifle Corps. Lieut-Colonel 
F. A. Fortescue was in command, and the strength of the 
parade was as under : — Officers, 27 ; W.O.'s, 2 ; Sergeants, 
52 ; Rank and File, 759. There were 312 medals presented, 
and at the conclusion the Battalion formed up in quarter 
column and the General complimented the Battalion on 
their general appearance, smartness of drill, and good 
behaviour. The following officers formerly connected with 
the Regiment were present : — General Pemberton, General 
R. S. R. Fetherstonhaugh, C.B., Brigadier General W. Pit- 
cairn Campbell, A.D.C., Colonel A. Morris, Colonel H. R. 
Mends, Colpnel E. W. Herbert, C.B., Commanding Rifle 
Dep6t ; also Major- General R. A. Montgomery, C.B., 
Commanding Southern District, and Brigadier- General 
E. S. Browne, V.C, C.B., Commanding Xlth Brigade. 

9th September. — Extracts from London Gazette, 6th 
September: — "The King has been graciously pleased to 
give orders for the D.S.O. in recognition of the services of 
the under-mentioned officer. To a companion of the 
'Distinguished Service Order,* Captain Geoff"rey Charles 
Shakerley. The King has further been pleased to approve 
of the grant of the medal for Distinguished Conduct in the 
Field to No. 2556, Rifleman J. Miller, 4th Battalion King's 
Royal Rifles." The CO. congratulated both recipients on 
gaining these distinctions. 

nth October. — A draft of 102 N.C.O.'s and Riflemen 
proceeded to India to join the 2nd Battalion. 

17th October.— A draft of 84 N.C.O.'s and Riflemen 
proceeded to Bermuda to join the 3rd Battalion. 

30th October.— The G.O.C. Xlth Brigade (Brigadier 
General Browne, V.C, C.B.) presented the medal awarded to 
Rifleman J. Miller for Distinguished Conduct in the Field, 
and addressed the Battalion. 



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> 2 
a ^ 

2 ^ 



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The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



8s 



4TH Battalion K. R. R.— Warrant Officers. 
Sergeant-Major L. Owen. Bandmaster A. Parkes. 

Staff- Sergeants. 

Quarter-Master-Sergeant - - - - A. J. Saville. 

Orderly- Room- Sergeant, Q.-M.-Sergt. - T. J. Jones. 

Sergt.-Instructor of Musketry, Col.-Sergt. - C. Smith. 

Sergeant- Bugler E. Bates. 

Sergeant-Master-Cook - - - - G. Archer. 

Pioneer-Sergeant H. Wear. 

Orderly Room Clerk, Sergeant - - - J. Cam. 

Color - Sergeants. 

A Company H. Paul. 

B „ J.Kelly. 

C „ W. Wagstaff. 

D „ W. Jackman. 

E„ H. Morgan. 

F „ H. Lamond. 

G „ B. AUwork. 

H „ J. Barber. 

Supernumerary ------ J. Hogan. 

Good Conduct Badges.— 668. 

Good Conduct Medals.— 5. 

War Medals. 
Queen's, South Africa - 426 West Africa - - i 

King^s, „ „ - 70 Indian - - - 19 

Chitral- - - - i Somaliland - - 92 

Rhodesia - - - i Distinguished Conduct i 

Re-Engagements.— 14. Extensions.— 261. 

Increase. 
Officers - - - 12 N.C.O.'s and men - 231 

Decrease. 
Officers - - - 6 N.C.O.'s and men - 758 



CERTIFICATES OBTAINED. 



Musketry. 
Sergeant-Major L. Owen. 
Quar.-Master-Sergeant T. J. Jones. 
Sergt Ins. Mus., Col.-Sergt. C. Smith. 
Sergeant W. Heath. 
Color-Sergeant J. Barber. 
,, J. Kelly. 



Color- Sergeant H. Morgan. 

Sergeant G. Goymer. 
„ H. Whitley, 
„ A. Harvey. 
„ T. Lycett 

Color-Sergeant B. Allwork. 



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86 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Transport. 

Sergeant A. Frostick Sergeant L. Rabnett 

And eight men. 

Telegraphy. 
Sergeant R. Stevens. 

Signalling. 
Sergeant A. E. Astrop. Corporal J. Walker. 

„ T. Shillito. Color-Sergeant W. Wagstaff. 

Corporal C. Rose. Sergeant R. Stevens. 

Rifleman J. Beaumont. 

Gymnastic. 
Color-Sergeant W. Wagstaff. Sergeant Read. 

„ „ J. Barber. „ Grew. 

Sergeant Madeley. Corporal Nuttall. 

Educational. 
1st Class— 15. 2nd Class— 178. 3rd Class— 88. 



MUSKETRY CLASSIFICATION. 


A Company 


- 


199 E Company - - 190 


B 


- 


202 F „ -. - 199 


c „ 


- 


204 G „ - - 193 


D „ 


- 


191 H „ - - 186 




Best 


Shot in Battalion. 


Of Sergeants 




- Sergeant A. E. Harvey. 


Of Rank and File 


- Corporal J. Wilson. 




Best 


Shots in Companies. 


A Company 


- 


- Col.-Sergt. Instr. Musketry C. Smith. 


B 


- 


- Rifleman F. Chowns. 


c 


- 


„ F. Jeffery. 


D 


- 


- Corporal A. Smith. 


E 


- 


- Lance-Corporal W. Murphy. 


F 


- 


- Corporal E. Machin. 


G „ 


- 


- Color-Sergeant B. AUwork. 


H „ 




„ „ J. Barker. 



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Cuds won bp 4tD Battalion at Rarrismitb 

durino their last pear there. 

HarriMnith Polo Cup. 
Won 1902 and 1903. 

Natal Football 
Young Soldiers' Cup, Subalterns' Polo Tournament, 1902. Association Cup, 

1903. All S. Africa played at Standerton. 1903-4. 

Transvaal Transvaal 

Bisley. Bisley. 



Transvaal Bisley 
Transvaal Inter Regimental Cup, Transvaal 

1904. Bisley. 



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The King's Royal Rtfle Corps Chronicle, 87 

Rims' uiaikind matcb. 



The officers of the 4th King's Royal Rifles, stationed at 
the New Barracks, Gosport, challenged the sergeants to a 
walking match, which the latter immediately accepted. 
It was soon arranged that there should be four officers and 
four sergeants, and that they should travel by train to 
Winchester, and walk from there to Gosport. Drill order 
was the dress, and this consists of belt, side arms and rifle. 
There was no preliminary training, and the walk took place 
on November 8th, 1904, a start being made from the 
Cathedral City at 9.40. 

The competitors started oflF very fast, but soon found 
their lack of training and slowed down somewhat, although 
no stop was made during the journey. The roads were a 
bit heavy in places, but on the whole good. The distance 
is nearly twenty-six miles, and this was covered in just 
under five hours, which is certainly an exceptionally good 
performance. 

The first man to arrive at the barracks was Lieutenant 
Watson, at 2.30 p.m.. Sergeant Lycett followed about three 
minutes later, and the others arrived in this order : Lieu- 
tenant Soanes, Sergeant Brasie, Sergeant Gardener, Ser- 
geant Fleming, Lieutenant Wingfield, and Lieutenant 
Ponsonby, who was timed at 2.50 p.m. 

The walk elicited much interest among the men, and 
there was a large gathering to witness the arrival of the 
walkers, who appeared in no way fagged. 



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88 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 



RIFLE DEPOT RECORDS. 



7th January. — A draft of 21 recruits oflF strength to 
3rd Battalion. 

20th January. — Captain A. J. Lainson, D.S.O., off 
strength. 

23rd January. — Major L. F. Philips off strength to 
Staff College. 

24th January. — Captain L. B. Cumberland on strength. 

3rd February. — A draft of 102 recruits off strength to 
3rd Battalion. 

nth February. — Major F. B. M. Henniker off strength. 

1 2th February. — Captain Hon. J. R. Brownlow promoted 
Major. Extract from London Gazette dated 9th February, 
1904. 

17th February. — Captain J. A. Hope on strength. 

loth March.— A draft of 40 N.CO.'s and men off 
strength to 3rd Battalion. 

22nd March. — A party of 100 N.CO.'s and men under 
the command of Lieutenants Hodgson and Poe proceeded 
to London to attend the funeral of His late Royal Highness 
the Duke of Cambridge. 

28th March. — The Rifle Dep6t moved from Gosport to 
Winchester. 

Sth May.— General H. R. H. the Prince of Wales 
appointed Colonel-in-Chief. 

13th May. — The Rifle Dep6t was inspected by the 
G.O.C. Southern District. 

25th May. — Colonel H. R. Mends off strength. 

2Sth May. — ^Colonel E. W. Herbert, C.B., assumes 
command of Rifle Depdt. 



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COLONEL E. W. HERBERT, C.B. 

Commanding Rifle Dep6t. 



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The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 89 

1st July. — A draft of 130 N.C.O.'s, riflemen, and recruits 
ofif strength to 4th Battalion. 

13th July. — Lieutenant F. H. Nugent (R.B.) appointed 
Assistant Adjutant of the Rifle Dep6t 

15th July. — All recruits under command of Lieutenants 
C. V. L. Poe (K.R.R.) and F. St. John Blacker, and 50 
N.C.O.'s and riflemen under Major the Hon. J. R. Brownlow, 
formed a Guard of Honour on the occasion of H.R.H. 
the Duke of Connaught and H.R.H. Princess Christian of 
Schleswig Holstein opening the Memorial Cottage Homes 
at St. Cross. 

30th August. — Captain W. F. Wyndham and Lieutenant 
G. T. Lee on strength. 

17th October. — Lieutenant G. C. Kelly on strength. 

1 8th November. — Lieutenant R. E. Crtchton off" strength. 

1 8th November. — 212 N.C.O.'s and recruits off strength 
to 1st Battalion. 

loth December. — A draft of 22 recruits off strength to 
4th Battalion. 

13th December. — Lieutenant R. H. Seymour on strength. 

20th December. — Lieutenant T. H. Harker off strength. 

29th December. — Lieutenant C. V. L. Poe off strength. 



Staff-Sergeants. 

Quarter-Master-Sergeant - - - - W. Line. 

Orderly-Room-Sergeant - - - - J. Jackson. 

Officers' Mess-Sergeant - - - - A. Fuller. 

Sergeant-Master-Tailor - - - - G. Simpson, 

Color-Sergeants. 

A Company A. Arno. 

B „ J. Barnes. 

c „ 

D „ T. Sear. 

E „ 

F „ A. Davis. 

G „ H. Horlock. 

H „ R. J. Kensdale. 



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90 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

I INCREASE 
{During the year igo4)\ 

Recruits joined 562 

From Desertion 7 

„ Army Reserve 4 

„ Other Corps 4 

„ Home Batttalions 148 

„ Service Companies abroad - - - - 414 

Re-enlistment i 

Total - - - - 1 140 

Decrease 
(During the year 1904). 

Discharged 166 

Deserters 10 

To Army Reserve 220 

„ Other Corps 13 

„ Auxiliary Forces 7 

„ Home Battalions 485 

„ Battalions abroad 20 

Total - - - 921 



MUSKETRY, 1904. 



Figure of Merit. Best Shot. Score. 

1st Depot. 178*1. Rifleman Shillam. 257. 

2nd „ 203*8. C.-Sergt. McKey 273. 

3rd „ 192*4. Sergeant Challen. 258. 

4th „ 188*6. „ Holmes. 256. 

Marksmen. ist ClasS;. 2nd Class. 3rd Class. No. Exercised. Figure of Merit. 
20 50 34 10 114 190*7. 

The Prince of Wales' Cup, — 200^ joOj 600 yards (no sighters). 

Inter- Regiment Dep6t Team Match. 

The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Dep6t Team won the Second Prize, 
£^ losing the Cup by only one point. 

Sergeant Holmes 95 

„ Challen 94 

Colour- Sergeant McKey - - - - 94 

Quarter- Master-Sergeant Line - - - 86 

Colour-Sergeant Davies . . . . 84 

Lieutenant Lee 79 

Average 88*6. 



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SERGEANT -MASTER -TAILOR G. SIMPSON, RIFLE DEPOT. 

Born in 3rd Battalion K. R. R., served twenty-one years in Regiment and Depdt, and five years 

in the Rifle Brigade. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 91 



The above Team Match and Musketry Course were shot in 
November in unfavourable weather. 

Army Rifle Meeting (Alderskot), — 200^ j(X>, and 600 yards. 

Points Prize 

" All Comers "—Sergeant Challen - - 95 - los. 
Color- Sergeant Mc Key - 93 - 10^. 

Army Sixty Rifle Meeting (Bisley). 
Color-Sergeant Mc Key tied 3rd prize 478 - 95*6 - £$- los. 
Sergeant Challen, 14th prize - - 463 - 92 6 - £2, los. 

National Rifle Association Meeting (Bisley), 

"All Comers." 

" Graphic," 500 yards— Sergeant Challen - - 34 - £1 

" Tyro," 200 and 500 yards— „ „ - - 67 - £i'S^' 

" Hour Glass," 600 yards — Color- Sergeant Mc Key 32 - £1 

Methuen Cup, 
The "Green Jacket" Team were 2nd ; average 90. Color-Sergeant 
Mc Key, Sergeant Challen, and Whiteley shot in the Team, and scored 
84, 91, and 94 respectively. 

Southern District League Challenge Cup, 

Open to teams of Army and Navy in Southern District. 500, 600, 
and 800 yards. The Rifle Depot Team defeated the following teams, 
winning the Cup and nine Silver Medals for the second time. 



Team Average Team 

2nd Middlesex Regt. - - 78*5 Rifle Dep6t 
Sergeant Challen, Rifle Dep6t, 98. 

Royal Marine Artillery - 84-8 Rifle Dep6t 
Color-Sergeant Mc Key, Rifle Depot, 92. 

5th V. B. Hants Regt. - 89*3 Rifle Depot 
Color-Sergeant Mc Key, Rifle Depot, 97. 

Browndown Army and Navy Rifle Meeting, 

200 yards. — Quarter-Master-Sergeant Line 
Color- Sergeant Mc Key - 
Sergeant Challen - - 
Color- Sergeant Kensdale 

500 yards. — Sergeant Challen - 

Color-Sergeant Mc Key - 

600 yards. — Color-Sergeant Mc Key - 

800 yards. — Sergeant Challen - 

Color-Sergeant Mc Key - 



Average 

- 90*2 

- 85-8 

- 92*2 



33 P 


omts 


- 


10^. 


33 


V 


- 


\os. 


31 


J? 


- 


Ss, 


31 


jj 


- 


Ss. 


34 


>» 


- 


\os. 


33 


» 


- 


\os. 


28 


» 


- 


IS, 


43 


»> 


- 


5J. 


41 


»> 


- 


5^. 



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92 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Aggregate— 200^ ^oo^ 600, and 800 yards. 

Color- Sergeant Mc Key - - - i35 points - \os. 
Sergeant Challen - - - - I33 » - ioj. 

Portsmouth Town Challenge Shield, 

The Rifle Dep6t Team were 4th ; average 88*5. Top score — 
Sergeant Challen, 96. 

The "Angus Steward," "Sir Guy Campbell," " Buchanan-Riddel V' 
and " London Rifle Brigade " Challenge Cups were not competed for 
in 1904. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 93 

memoir or R. €rnest Reade, D.S.O. 



Robert Ernest Reade, known to his friends as 
** Ernest," was born on April i8th, 1879, and spent his 
early years at Wilmont, County Antrim (near Belfast), 
the residence of his father, R. H. Reade. He was the 
second of a family of five, having one brother older, 
and three sisters younger than himself. 

At the age of eleven he was sent to a private school, 
kept by the Rev. Mr. Wilkinson, at Waynefleet, and on 
reaching fourteen he passed to Harrow, where, with his 
brother George, who had preceded him, he was placed 
in the ** Grove," the house of Mr. E. E. Bowen. He 
remained there until he was eighteen, having, during his 
last year, been Head of the House and in the Sixth Form. 

The impression he produced on those to whom he 
was known during this period will be found by reference 
to the touching article which appeared in the school 
journal, the Harrovian, of March 30th, 1901, published 
soon after the news of his death was received. 

Here he gained the friendship of his house-master, 
E. E. Bowen, brother of Lord Bowen, a man of original 
and versatile character, who, under successive head- 
masters, was an abiding influence in the school. He 
wTOte its songs, he took an active interest in its games, 
he devoted his life to promoting Its success, and his 
fortune at his death to increasing its revenues. 

From Harrow Ernest went up to Cambridge for the 
purpose of qualifying for the Army. He entered Trinity 
College in June, 1897, ^^d in 1898 passed the General 
Examination, taking a first class. After this he studied 
for a short time with Mr. Courtenay Welch at Alder- 
shot, and in the spring of 1898 he entered for examina- 
tion and passed fifth in the list of University candidates. 

Having obtained a commission in the 60th (King's 
Royal Rifle Corps), dated August 2nd, he received 



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94 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

orders to be ready to sail for South Africa on October 
2nd to join the ist Battalion, but seeing that a conflict 
with the Boers was probable, he wrote to the War Office 
offering to start at any time he was required. His offer 
was accepted, and he sailed on September 17th from 
Southampton, in the Tantallon Castle, the ship which 
carried Sir George White and his staff. 

On the voyage he made the acquaintance of three 
other young officers, all of whom, as well as himself, 
were destined to die gallantly in South Africa. These 
were Marsden, of the ist Battalion King's Royal Rifles, 
and Field and Lafone of the Devons. With Marsden 
he formed a friendship, and deeply felt his death at the 
battle of Farquhar's Farm, early in the siege of Lady- 
smith. Field and Lafone perished at the battle of 
Waggon Hill, close to the spot where he was engaged. 
The last to survive of these four promising young 
soldiers was Ernest. 

By sailing September 17th instead of on the date of 
his original orders, he reached his battalion just in 
time to take part in the battle of Talana Hill on October 
20th, of which he wrote home a most interesting account, 
accompanied by maps and sketches of positions. 

He was in the retreat to Ladysmith, and in Lady- 
smith during the siege. Owing to the heavy loss at the 
battle of Talana Hill, his battalion was so short of officers 
that, although only a junior second lieutenant, he was 
placed in charge of a company. And it was in this 
capacity that at the battle of Waggon Hill, in one of the 
hottest encounters of the day, he rallied his men at a 
critical moment, and saved the situation in that part of 
the field. For this service he was mentioned in Sir 
Geo. White's despatches for ** conspicuous gallantry," 
and received the ** Distinguished Service Order." He 
did not live to hear of the distinction conferred on him. 
For although two devoted friends, knowing the intense 
pleasure the news would give him, wired it to him from 
London the day it appeared in the Gazette, it arrived 
too late. He had been mortally wounded on that day, 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 95 

the 2ncl February, 1901, and never quite regained con- 
sciousness until his death on the 4th. 

At the time (January 6th, 1900) that he earned this 
distinction, he had held his commission for only five 
months, and had been with his regiment less than three. 

The journal which he kept throughout the whole 
period of the siege, is written in so cheerful a strain that 
it is only by the light of later and fuller accounts one 
can realise how great were the sufferings and privations 
borne by the besieged. It was evident that he had been 
very ill during the last month of the siege, but he 
touched lightly on this subject. 

Two days after the siege was raised he was ordered 
into hospital with enteric fever. That his life was saved 
at that time was due to the skill and attention of the 
doctors and nurses, but more especially to the tender 
care of Mrs. Knox, wife of Colonel (now General Sir 
William) Knox, C.B., r.a., who came into Ladysmith 
immediately after the relief, and acted the part of a 
ministering angel to the soldiers in hospital in that 
ghastly place, at that terrible and trying time. 

As soon as he was convalescent he ^as conveyed by 
an invalid train to Durban, and on arrival there was 
still so weak that he had to be carried on board the 
steamer Orcana. By the time he reached the Cape he 
was just able to crawl on deck. When he arrived at 
Southampton, so wonderful was the effect of the sea air 
upon a youthful constitution, that although not up to 
his usual standard of strength, he was apparently almost 
well. 

He reached home early in May, and remained until 
the following November. Although deeply attached to 
his family and his home, and much enjoying the 
hospitality extended to him by friends in the neighbour- 
hood, he became impatient to return to South Africa, as 
fighting was still going on. 

When, therefore, in October, the Medical Board, 
which some time before had refused to pass him, pro- 



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g6 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

nounced him fit for active service, he was quite elated 
at the prospect of returning to his regiment. 

He sailed for the second time to Capetown by the 
transport Aurania. After some delay there, and after 
travelling via Durban, Pietermaritzburg, and Pretoria, 
where he saw Madam Kruger sitting at her door, he 
succeeded in reaching his headquarters at Middelburg on 
Christmas Eve, and met with a most cordial welcome 
from his colonel and brother officers. Colonel (then 
Major) Campbell and he had been thrown much together 
during the siege of Ladysmith. Colonel Campbell was 
so kind and encouraging to his junior lieutenant that 
Ernest became much attached to him, and formed an 
admiration for his fine soldierly character and military 
capacity. 

To his great delight he was immediately appointed to 
the Company of Mounted Infantry, and sent to a small 
station called Pan, some miles from Middelburg, with 
forty men under his command. 

The total number at the station was about 400, con- 
sisting of 200 Berkshire, some of the Royal Irish Regi- 
ment, and a battery of Artillery. Marsden set to work 
with characteristic ardour to perfect the fortifications on 
his side of the camp. 

On January 30th he received notice that he was to 
join a column under Colonel Campbell, despatched in 
pursuit of the Boers. On February 2nd the column 
encountered some of the enemy. He was sent in com- 
mand of a party of eleven men to support a small body 
of the i8th Hussars, and advanced to attack about thirty 
Boers extremely well posted. 

On being almost immediately wounded in three 
places, viz., in both arms and one wrist, he ordered his 
men to retire, but only four or five were able to do 
so, all the rest having been killed or wounded. His 
sergeant. Burton, who was an admirable soldier and a 
very superior man (a reservist on the eve of returning 
to his wife and family), most gallantly remained with 



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The King's Royal ^ Rifle Corps Chronicle, 97 

his officer to bind his wounds, and was found beside 
him shot dead. The Boers came up and robbed Ernest 
of his pistol, glasses, belt, etc. They gave him a drink 
of water, but would not bind his wounds. The artery of 
one arm had been cut, causing profuse bleeding. When 
the Boers were driven off by reinforcements he was found 
in an utterly exhausted and semi-conscious state. The 
three surgeons on the spot considered, from the appear- 
ance presented by the wounds, that they had been 
inflicted by soft-nosed bullets. They amputated a little 
finger, but feared, in the state of extreme debility to 
which he was reduced, to operate on the arm. He died 
on the afternoon of February 4th of weakness caused by 
loss of blood and the shock. 

He was laid to rest by his colonel and his comrades, 
on the lonely veldt, near a place called Bochmanfontein. 
A rude wooden cross marked the spot, which has since 
been replaced by a marble and granite cross erected by 
his father. Ernest's name is to be found in the list of 
Harrow boys killed in the war, in the new transept in 
the School Chapel. Memorial windows are also to be 
seen in Drumbeg Parish Church and the C.I. Cathedral, 
Belfast. 

Such is a bare outline of the life, brief, but full of 
promise, of one who, early cut down, will be long re- 
membered by many friends, never forgotten by some. 

One who was not a relation, but who knew him 
well, wrote thus: — ** So passed away one of the most 
perfect characters I have ever known, one who attracted 
affection and admiration wherever he moved, who, even 
at such a moment as this, it is a delight to have known. 
Simplicity and pureness of mind, courage, and honour, 
unselfishness quite uncommon, delightful industry, 
playfulness and high capacity for enjoyment." 



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98 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



expedition to KDartoutn. 

On board Steamer en route to Omdurman. 

Sunday, 26th November, 1899. 

W. H. and I arrived at Fachi Shoya on the evening of 
the 20th. All the troops for the expedition were present, 
and consisted of one squadron of Cavalry under B.T., 
six Field Guns and six Maxims, B. (two of the Maxims 
with galloping teams ready, if necessary, to operate with 
mounted troops) ; 250 Camel Corps, H. ; 9th Soudanese, 
D.; 13th Soudanese, M.; 1,000 Irregulars, G. (these 
were all prisoners, whom we captured at Omdurman; 
they were armed with Remingtons, and carried their own 
water and supplies on their backs and on donkeys) ; 800 
transport camels, H.; and one company of the 2nd 
Egyptian Battalion. The force left Fachi Shoya on the 
afternoon of the 21st about 4 p.m., taking three days 
water and eight days' supplies. By 5.30 we were clear 
of the thick bush which borders the river, and bivouacked 
in the following formation : — 

/3^ Soudanese 



<r 



.1 



^ 



^^^ 



Camel 

CORPS 


/ 



TRANSPORT 



TRANSPOm 



/ 




IRREGULARS 



I omitted to mention that L. was in command of the 
Infantry, with D. as Brigade-Major. 

At 1 1. 15 p.m. we marched on again, men having 
filled water bottles and horses and mules had a drink. 
We marched in the above formation, except that the 
Cavalry formed a screen about 500 yards in front, sup- 
ported by one company of the 9th Soudanese and the two 
galloping Maxims. My post was to watch over the right 
and half of the rear face, and keep W. informed if the 



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The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 99 

formation was being kept correctly or otherwise. The 
front face marched in company fours at fronting distance, 
the side face in fours, and the rear face in line two deep. 
Camel Corps about 500 yards out on both flanks, and 
one company C.C. covering rear face, at about the same 
distance. The track led through the centre of a very 
shallow depression, the CC on either side being just 
on the top of the higher ground, for the most part most 
excellent going, almost as good as on a cinder track, 
though here and there we came on spells of tussocky 
white grass and cracked ground. The sides of the rising 
ground sparsely covered with small trees, which occa- 
sionally developed into thicker cover and shrub, but 
there was never the slightest difficulty in marching on 
the broad front we had taken up. 

I must explain that at this time our intelligence was 
that Fedil was probably at c, and the Khalifa at Gedid. 
An hour before daylight we halted at b, and the Cavalry 
and Arab Mounted Scouts pushed on to reconnoitre. 
As soon as it was light we advanced, left the transport 
on a hill just to the left of the track, with the 
company of the 2nd Battalion and 150 Irregulars 
as escort, while the Infantry got in fighting for- 
mation. From the high ground where the transport 
was one commanded a good view, and even the 
fact of being up most of the night could not prevent 
one from enjoying the sight. But unfortunately, even 
with the best of glasses, no sign could be seen of a 
dervish. When we were some little way, or about half 
way between b and c, M. came back from the front to 
say the beggars had gone, gone the previous day. Very 
annoying; however, a few minutes later in came news 
that the Arab Scouts, who had shoved on ahead when 
the Cavalry found c evacuated, had found a dervish on 
the track who said that Fedil's force was at Abu Aadel 
(marked d on the map, about four miles beyond c). 
As already stated, the transport had been left behind ; 
they were, however, now sent for, and M. with the 
Cavalry, Camel Corps, two guns, and four Maxims, 
supported by the Irregulars, was directed to push on as 



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IC» The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

quickly as possible, to endeavour to hold the enemy (at 
d) until the remainder of our force could get up. You 
see they could not be sent on, as it was necessary to water 
them from the transport, which was still some distance 
in the rear. W. directed me to accompany M.'s force. 
At c we found the evacuated Dervish camp, a fair 
amount of grain and a small and filthy pool, which, 
however, enabled us to give the horses and mules a bit 
of a drink. At 8.45 we started on (in the direction of d). 
It was the most ideal manoeuvring country. The track, 
as before, ran at the bottom of a very slight depression, 
along which we marched. Cavalry scouting out in front, 
and with them some of our Arab horsemen. About 9.15 
we made out twenty or thirty horsemen on the top of a 
slight ridge running at right angles to the track. These 
gradually fell back as we advanced, and in a few minutes 
we were on the ridge with our Cavalry. In front, some 
300 yards off, lay a second ridge, on which again were 
their scouts, in fact the view in front of us was rather as 
below : — 




A few of Arab horsemen, under Captain Mahmud 
Hussein (Egyptian Cavalry), now pushed on at a brisk 
canter along the track. A few shots were fired, and 
came galloping back to say that the Dervish camp was 
in thick trees and bush (shown in sketch), that the enemy 
were there lying down ready for us. The high ground 
at H evidently commanded the camp, so we pushed on 
and seized it, and at once got the two guns and Maxims 
to work; Camel Corps (dismounted) on the left of the 
guns, their camels being left behind the hill. The 
Jehadia (Irregulars) were coming along in two lines a 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. loi 

few hundred yards in rear. ^ Our appearance on the hill 
top (which was only 300 yards from the edge of the 
** dem ") at once drew their fire. A native officer in the 
CC went down, hit in the head, and a man got one in 
his leg ; but for the most part they whistled and whined 
away over our heads. Owing to the trees and bush, it 
was difficult to make the enemy out, but guns, Maxims, 
and Camel Corps put in a heavy fire into the ** dem." 
And now a really wonderful thing happened, a display of 
devil-may-care gallantry. Some 200 of them sprang out 
of the bush, and with curses and shouts came straight up 
the bare hill side (really up a gentle slope) right bang at 
the guns. The nearest they got was ninety-five yards. 
I paced it afterwards, and don't think half-a-dozen of 
them got back to the **dem." They simply came on 
till they fell. The two who got nearest were lying 
huddled side by side, their wrists firmly bound together, 
and later a prisoner told us they had boasted that they 
would die hand in hand. 

At this moment the 9th and 13th and remainder of 
the guns arrived, but it was all over bar the shouting, 
and our whole force swept through the **dem" and 
bivouacked on high ground (at e). We captured a very 
large amount of grain, for Fedil had been to the river 
on a foraging expedition, and was returning with what 
he had taken to the Khalifa. These supplies were to 
feed his force on their march to retake Omdurman. It 
seemed incredible they should ever attempt such a move, 
but in the light of what has since occurred, I can under- 
stand they were prepared to do anything, cost what it 
might. In the ** dem " was another filthy pool, but so 
bad that every animal wouldn't drink it. We must have 
killed some 300 of the enemy, and a very large number 
of wounded subsequently came into our bivouack, where 
they were treated by our doctors. Our casualties were 
trifling; three killed and half-a-dozen wounded. 

Our information now pointed to the Khalifa being at 
Gedid, or somewhere between that and Homara, which 
is eighteen miles south of Gedid; so, at 11.30 p.m., we 
started off again in the same formation. Owing to the 



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I02 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

trees and bushes, undulating ground and the uncertain 
light, we had some difficulty in preserving our forma- 
tion, and (as you will see by the sketch) we had to skew 
round a bit to get on the track. To do this in the dark, 
with a square about 250 yards side, and a mass of animals 
in the centre, is rather a hard job, and it wasn't 
till we got to the point where the road joins the 
Gedid Road that we got settled down properly. Here 
the country opened out again, and except for occasionally 
thick bits of scrub and trees, the ** going " was excellent. 
And sleepless nights tell, and the moment the force 
halted for five minutes most of the men were sound asleep. 
Daylight came at last, but we were still seven or eight 
miles from Gedid, and the men wanted water, but as yet 
no news as to whether Gedid was occupied. At 7 a.m. 
(23rd) we halted, and all the men had a drink served out, 
and we managed a brew of cocoa (with a dash of the 
** craater " in it). Half an hour later we were on the 
move again, and a few minutes later came news from the 
Cavalry that Gedid was unoccupied, but there was a 
good pool of water, and several closed wells which our 
well diggers would probably be able to open up. The 
force got in there about 10 a.m. The last two hours had 
been very hot, sun on the men's backs and not a breath 
of air. They were done, but stuck to it well. As far as 
the troops were concerned the rest of the day was devoted 
to rest, cooking food, filling up water tanks, and water- 
ing all animals. The troops bivouacked in fighting 
formation, facing south-east : — 



9^ Sot/DANESE APTlLLOfr t5^ SOUDANESE 




□ ■ 



"-^ 



^'^'f. 



'c^ 



ffiPECULAIfS 


//V TWO UNC3 




1 




X 


1 


CAVALIfy 








TRANSPORT 



-'CU, ^>. ' — 150 /RREGULAPS 



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Ihe King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 103 

That pool of water was the saving of us ; without it, 
it would have been impossible to proceed beyond Gedid. 
I forgot to mention some 240 empty water camels were 
sent back from d to Fachi Shoya, with orders to fill up 
from the river and return to d, by morning of the 24th. 
We also opened up four of the disused wells at Gedid. 
In the meantime Captain Mahmud Hussein, with a few 
of the Arab Cavalry, were out reconnoitring, and re- 
turned at 3.30 p.m. to say that they had located the 
Khalifa's dem at Umdebreikat, about seven or eight 
miles off. W. decided to attack at dawn next day. We 
slept that night just to the left of the Cavalry (x, see 
diagram). At 12.20 a.m. on the 24th the force started. 
Cavalry, as usual, in front. Camel Corps on the flanks. 
After about a mile we began to get into thick trees and 
bush. However, there was no undergrowth, and the 
troops were able to march in formation shown above, 
though the cutting tools had to be used at times, and the 
pace was necessarily slow. Our transport, with its 
escort of one company of the 2nd Battalion and 150, was 
left behind at Gedid, with orders to follow at 4 a.m. At 
about 3 a.m. we reached a point a mile and a half short 
of the enemy (f). Our foremost scouts had pushed 
on almost on to the top of the enemy (just beyond f), 
and we could distinctly hear their drums beating to 
quarters. We now were in a somew^hat more open spot, 
and the force was deployed. This only meant bringing 
up the Irregulars between the guns and the 13th. We 
now pushed on very slowly and as quickly as possible. 
I was sent on ahead two or three times to the Cavalry, 
and it was curious to note the odd noise our troops made 
when one was half-a-mile or so ahead. The night was 
very very still, but one had to stand quite still to hear it 
at all. It was just like the sea on a shingle beach, not 
another sound, except perhaps now and again the neigh 
of a horse. Just before 4 o'clock we halted, lay down, 
and awaited the dawn. We were behind very gradually 
rising ground, grassed fringed and scattered with small 
trees. Caivalry scouts were withdrawn and replaced by 
Infantry picquets. 



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I04 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

At 5 a.m., in the uncertain light preceding dawn, we 
saw our sentries coming in, and a moment later the word 
went round quietly to stand to arms, for they were 
coming. Even in the semi-darkness we could see them 
swarming in the bush in front. At 5.15 the Maxims 
opened the ball, followed by the guns; then, as it got 
lighter, for daylight comes quickly, the Infantry began 
putting in volleys, and the enemy, still, to a great extent, 
screened from view, answered with a warm fire. They 
were mostly high though, and, like the dog, their bark 
was considerably worse than their bite. On our left the 
bush was nearer and somewhat thicker, and we could 
make out some of them trying to get round on our left 
flank ; but, )vith the two supporting companies of the 9th 
wheeled up, and on their left again a company of Camel 
Corps dismounted, our flank was as right as rain. Two 
Maxims, too, at the angle. This must have lasted about 
ten minutes, when a sort of final effort to rush was made. 
But it could not outlive our fire, and then we advanced. 
A few yards only brought us to the first of them, 100 
yards further on they lay in rows, the Khalifa's body- 
guard killed to a man, with their faces to their hated 
enemies. Some thirty yards further was a huddled heap 
of some forty dead and dying. In the centre lay thp 
Khalifa Abdullah on his face. Round this group was a 
mass of the victorious 9th. I happened to be with them. 
There seemed an idea the Khalifa was there. Amongst 
them was a lad of fourteen, the Khalifa's nephew. Poor 
little beggar ; he got hold of my hand and wouldn't leave 
me, and told me which the Khalifa was. We had him 
carried a little apart. I put a guard over him and sent 
wprd to W. Round the Khalifa lay practically all his 
leading Emirs, including Ahmed Fedil, Yunes, and very 
many others. Behind them were their horses, mostly 
shot dead. It was a wonderful sight never to be for- 
gotten ; but we had to get on to the ** dem," which was 
still a couple of miles ahead. This was found full of 
Jehadieh, who apparently took part in the fight. They 
retreated on our advance. They surrendered almost at 
once. There were simply thousands of women and 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 105 

children in the **clem,' which, thank heaven, had not 
been reached by our fire, quantities of arms, Remingtons 
and spears, and a large amount of live stock, but little 
grain. By 7 o'clock it was all over, barring old Osman 
Digna, who was reported to have gone when we first 
opened fire. There was really no one to pursue. I only 
wish I could half do justice to the scene, or give you any 
idea of the extraordinary dramatic death of the Khalifa 
and his Emirs. However tyrannical, cruel, and brutal 
their lives may have been, one could not but deeply 
admire the way thiey faced death. Under our super- 
vision the Khalifa was buried by his own people close 
to the spot where he fell. From what we heard, it seems 
that Fedil arrived at the Khalifa's camp about 6 p.m. 
on the 22nd. He was wounded, and brought the news 
of his defeat and the loss of all his supplies. It must 
have been grave intelligence for the Khalifa. Behind 
him a country already devasted and waterless, no 
supplies with him, and in front our force. The follow- 
ing afternoon his horsemen brought news of our arrival 
at Gedid, and he determined to stay and fight once and 
for all. 

By 10.30 a.m. W. had written his despatch (our 
losses again were trifling, six killed, thirty odd wounded) 
and told me to take it in as soon as possible. C. in the 
Navy (one of the best little chaps that ever stepped) came 
with me. We got away at 1 1 a.m., taking a native guide 
and four troopers with us. We went, of course, by the 
direct road (see sketch), a lonely country, undulating, 
grass covered (yellow, not green), scattered with trees 
and bushes; good going under foot, quantities of ante- 
lope, hartebeast, and guinea fowl. It was hot work. 
We reached e at 2 p.m. There we found the water 
convoy ; watered, fed, and shoved on again at 3 p.m., but 
I left the Cavalry behind, as their horses were done. 
We eventually got into Fachi Shoya at 8 p.m., having 
done forty-five miles in nine hours, having been twenty 
hours in the saddle, barring short halts on the march, 
and an hour in the Dervish **dem." We would have 



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lo6 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

been in sooner, but the guides' horses gave out, and we 
had to do the last five or six miles at a foot's pace. I 
got a steamer at once and went across to the other bank 
(Abba Island), where the telegraph office is. W. and 
H. got in about noon next day, 25th, and w^e left the 
same evening for Omdurman, which we reached at 10 
p.m. the following night. 

The Sirdar was delighted, as you can well imagine, 
and received telegrams of congratulation from the Queen 
and many others. 

Mahdism received its death blow that Friday morn- 
ing, after a reign of close on nineteen years. 



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LEH BAZAAR. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 107 



Cbree months' Ceaoe In Cadakb. 

By G. C. S. 

W. AND I left Pindi on the 13th April. We were 
both very keen to go to Ladakh, which, though further 
off than Kashmir, has a larger variety of game. I had 
a Rigby's .350 and a Mannlicher, the former kindly lent 
me by a brother officer. 

We stopped at Murree the same night, and reached 
Srinagar on the evening of the 15th. The next day was 
employed in getting everything together for the journey, 
and about 11 a.m. on the 17th we started off in a 
** doonga " for Islamabad, about thirty-four miles off, 
arriving there on the evening of the i8th. 

The following day brought us to our first camp at a 
place called Changas, and on the 21st we arrived at 
Inshin, in the Wardwan Valley, after crossing the 
Margan Pass of 11,600 feet. Going over this pass we 
had a hardish time owing to the snow, which, melting 
in the sun, made the going very soft, and consequently 
tiring. The coolies suffered badly from snow blindness, 
many of them having to be led about the next morning. 

My own servants, consisting of a Shikari, by name 
** Subhana," a tiffin cooley, and five permanent coolies, 
besides the cook, were supplied with goggles, and so did 
not suffer. 

W. had been seedy since starting, and now, feeling 
no better, we decided to wait two or three days at Inshin 
before going on. Our idea in crossing to the Wardwan 
first instead of proceeding along the regular road to Leh, 
the capital of Ladakh, was that we expected to be able 
to seize the Zais Nullah, which had been closed for six 
years, and was now open for the first time, and supposed 
to contain some very good ibex. 

Unfortunately, on arrival at Inshin, we heard that 
it was already taken, so there was nothing to do but to 
get on to the Leh road as soon as possible. 



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lo8 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

On the 23rd I went down the valley to a nullah called 
Pursil, on the chance of a red bear, for which this 
nullah is celebrated. However, having no luck, I re- 
turned to Inshin two days later, W. having settled on 
returning to Srinagar to see a doctor. I next day went 
up the valley to Suknes, the last village passed until 
Suru in Ladakh is reached. To get there from Suknes 
is a three days' march over snow, at this time of the 
year, thus making fine weather almost a necessity. On 
the third day the Bhot Khol Pass of 14,370 feet is 
crossed. As luck would have it, on the day after my 
arrival at Suknes, it snowed so hard that we could not 
start, and it was two or three days before W. (who had 
changed his mind and rejoined me) and I, could make a 
start. We then had three hard days of it, and were 
exceedingly glad when we eventually sighted Suru. We 
saw some ibex on the way, but nothing big, so did not 
disturb them. The last day the coolies had a very bad 
time, not getting into Suru until between 11 p.m. and 
2 a.m. that night, although they had started off in the 
morning before 5 a.m. W. and I slept in a small room 
in the ** Serai," containing innumerable bugs, which 
successfully disturbed our night's rest. 

At Suru we saw Christian's grave. He died here 
from an attack of typhoid, after an illness of only five 
days, when on his way to Leh. 

From Suru on, the baggage was carried on ponies 
instead of by coolies, and we were able to ride the whole 
way to Leh. Here also we discarded the grass shoe and 
took to **chupplies" or boots. What struck us most 
about the Ladakhis was that they were extremely dirty 
and very ugly. The men wear pig-tails, and the women 
have small caps with a strip of red cloth, covered with 
rough turquoises. The men always seemed willing to 
work, and were very useful in helping to put up the 
tents, etc. The country changed completely after leaving 
Suru, the road passing through rocky and stony 
mountains, with no sign of the grass and numerous trees 
of Kashmir, and there was very little snow. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 109 

We arrived at Kargil, on the Leh Road. It would 
only be waste of time to try and say anything about this 
road, except that for the most part it is the ugliest and 
most monotonous it has been my luck to travel over, 
there being nothing but sand or shingle, except for 
patches of green near the villages, wherever one looks. 

We were very glad when we eventually arrived at 
Leh, about five days from Kargil, a distance of 117 
miles. 

I should mention that before arriving there we saw a 
number of shapu, but, like the ibex, they were small, 
and we passed on. This animal is called the **Ovis 
Vignei," and is found anywhere from Moulbeck, on 
the Leh road, to well beyond Leh up the Indus Valley, 
generally low down, and in early mornings and late 
evenings often on the plains bordering the river. It is 
considered by many people to be identical with the 
•* Urial " of the Punjab. 

Among the other animals we hoped to shoot 
were : ** Ovis Ammon " (Hodgsoni), ** Burhill " (Ovis 
Nahura), ** Thibetan antelope " (Chiru), and ** gazelle " 
(Goa). The former is the ** Nyan " of Ladakh, and is 
only found at a great altitude, seldom under 16,000 feet. 
They are nearly, if not quite, the largest sheep existent, 
one big one weighing 280 pounds, and standing forty- 
seven inches. A good one nowadays has horns of about 
forty-five inches, but in years past they ran much bigger, 
the record being fifty-seven inches, which is, however, 
seven inches bigger than any other that has been shot. 

The ** burhill" is the plentiful animal in Ladakh. 
Their skins are bluish, and they are very hardy and 
active, living higher up the mountains than ** shapu," 
but not as high as ** ammon." They are generally met 
with from 12,000 to 15,000 feet, but sometimes go higher. 

The ** Thibetan antelope " is only found in Chang- 
chenmo, the Karakoram, and in Thibet. It is met with 
at great heights, the lowest being about 15,000 feet, and 
the highest 18,000 or 19,000 feet; he is, as a rule, very 



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no The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

difficult to approach, owing to his generally inhabiting 
open and stony plains. The natives declare that they 
may be approached down wind as easily as up wind, but 
I did not try it, and have no intention of doing so, even 
if I had the chance. 

The ** gazelle " or **goa" is found more south in 
the country towards Hahle. 

Before proceeding to shoot anywhere in Kashmir or 
Ladakh the purchase of a licence is necessary. This 
contains numerous rules, a list of closed nullahs, also 
gives the numbers of each, species one may shoot, and 
the size limit of the horns. 

This year only one ammon and one gazelle were 
allowed, six burhill, six antelope, and four shapu, and 
wolves and leopards as many as one might have the luck 
to get near enough to shoot. 

At Leh we had some difficulty in getting flour for 
our servants, but after a delay of a couple of days we 
got away on the 12th May, and followed the track up 
the banks of the Indus. The next day we separated, W. 
following up the Indus, whilst I went south-west towards 
Miru and Gya, beyond which place I hoped to get an 
ammon. 

On our way we saw four wolves trying to stalk a 
young female burhill, which was on a small ledge of 
rock some yards below them. I had a shot at one of the 
wolves at about 400 yards, of course missing, and they 
all went off, allowing the burhill to escape. They were 
the common grey wolf, and from what we could see had 
very good skins. 

At Gya I met H. of the 3rd Hussars. He had 
shot a forty inch ammon two days before, with a very 
nice thick head. This had been one of three, and he 
told me where he thought the other two had gone to, and 
we went off the next morning. 

That day we saw nothing, but the day after Subhana 
went out and tried to find them, with orders that 
if he did so, and there was one good enough to shoot, to 



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The King*s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, iii 

send for me at once. Late in the evening he arrived, 
after I had spent a very cold day waiting, with the news 
that he had seen four, two, he thought, bigger than 
H.'s, and two smaller. This sounded all right, and 
next morning, with a temperature of nineteen degrees, 
we started off. Our road lay up a long nullah, with a 
steady climb up at the further end, the top being covered 
with snow. On the way up we saw two small ammon, 
which Subhana thought must be the ones he had 
seen the evening before, but there was no trace of the 
big ones. It was a very hard climb up, and we took four 
hours getting to the top, owing to our having constantly 
to stop from shortness of breath. On arriving there we 
could see nothing but snow. We were now over 17,000 
feet, and after about three hours I developed a violent 
headache, with a desire to be sick. On its becoming 
worse I was all for the tent, and we started back. After 
going about 600 yards we saw in the snow the tracks of a 
leopard crossing the path by which we had come up, 
all leopards being ** Snow Leopards" in these parts. 
I was considerably excited. We proceeded very 
cautiously, expecting to see him every second, when, on 
looking over the edge of a steep incline, Subhana, who 
was leading, suddenly crouched down, and I at once 
followed his example. With much whispering and 
many signs he explained that there were ** Ovis 
Ammon " just below. For a second or two I was dis- 
appointed, as a leopard is an animal not often met with, 
but it lasted no longer, when, peering over the edge, I 
saw eight ammon lying down close to one another. 
There was only one which we thought big, and Subhana 
thought he must be forty inches. This I thought was 
good enough ; we were well above them, and about 150 
yards off. They, having no idea of our presence, I had 
plenty of time to take a good aim, using the rocks as a 
rest. My first shot with the Mannlicher hit him in the 
stomach. They all got up at once and ran in our 
direction. I hit him again in the leg, when he singled 
himself out and came in towards us, when I finished him 
off with the .350 at about seventy yards. The remainder, 



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112 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

not understanding the proceedings, had been running 
in all directions, but now went off at full speed, and were 
soon out of sight. 

I had hardly fired the last shot, when Subhana and 
Carina, the tiffin cooley, were alongside the animal and 
executing the ** Hallal." This is supposed to be done 
before the animal is dead, or else they may not eat him. 
Whether he was dead or not I do not know, but there 
was no doubt about his throat being cut or that they 
meant to eat him. The horns were not nearly so big as 
Subhana had thought, only thirty-seven inches, but the 
girth measured \^\ inches, and I was very pleased, it 
being my first. I considered myself very lucky, and 
next day we were off again back to Gya. 

On the 23rd May, near Miru, I got a shapu with 
horns 26^ inches long and \2\ inches thick. We 
managed to get very close, and I had a very easy shot, 
as he was running straight away. 

Next day I went up another nullah after burhill. 
We saw three; one good one. On getting close I was 
unable to see the big one over a rock, as if I had looked 
over one of the other, still closer, would have seen me 
and given the alarm. We waited in the hope of his 
showing himself, when the Ladakhi cooley, who was 
close behind me, moved a stone, setting them off at once. 
I had a shot at the big one, hitting him in the leg and 
afterwards in the stomach, but he went straight on, and 
though I sent men after him next day to see if he was 
dead, they never found him. 

On the 26th we moved to Upshi on the Indus; the 
following day we crossed the river and went to Kulnug. 
After crossing the bridge, whilst waiting for the ponies, 
Subhana suddenly saw about twenty shapu on the plain 
600 yards off. The wind was wrong, and we had to make 
a long detour before we were able to get into a small 
nullah running close up to where they were grazing. 
There was nothing very big, though there were one or 
two fair heads. We crept nearer, and when within about 
fifty yards I decided to have a shot. On raising my 



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ZOGI LA PASS. 
SIND VALLEY TO LADAKH. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 113 

head slightly above the edge of the nullah, I found myself 
confronted by a young female staring straight at me. I 
could not move, or they would all have been off, so I had 
to squint and glance round until 1 could find one big 
enough to shoot. At last I got a glimpse of one about 
forty yards off, and raised the rifle as quickly and as 
quietly as I could. I suddenly turned my head and fired. 
He half fell, but went on, and though I hit him again, 
he, like the burhill, got away, and we never saw him 
again. This was fairly sickening, and I determined to 
use the .350 always in future. I had found the Mann- 
licher good enough for blackbuck and chinkara, but 
here, with these bigger animals, it seemed useless, for 
though the wounded ones were certain to die, yet it could 
not stop then. Two days after I got a shapu with horns 
2%\ inches long and loj inches thick. 

Next day we went on to Ugu, but saw nothing. 

I then settled to go on at once to Changchenmo and 
try for antelope, returning afterwards for shapu and 
burhill. 

On the 31st May I arrived at Chimray, a village at 
the bottom of the nullah leading up to the Chang-la 
Pass, the first on the Changchenmo Road, and 17,600 
feet high. Next day we crossed over, and three days 
later, travelling as quickly as the baggage animals would 
allow us, arrived at the last village in this direction, 
called Phobrang. Here we had to procure yaks and 
supplies of all sorts to last us until we should return. 
We expected to be away about fourteen or fifteen days. 

Two days after we crossed the Marsenik Pass of 
18,420 feet high, getting in late owing to the soft snow. 
On the way up we saw a number of kyang (wild asses) 
and some small ammon. The former are very common, 
and become at times a great nuisance, owing to their 
habit of trotting or cantering round in a circle, getting 
nearer and nearer, and then suddenly dashing off at a 
gallop and disturbing everything else there may be in 
the neighbourhood. Wolves abound all over Ladakh, 
and in Changchenmo is found the black variety. They 



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114 ^^^ King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

are, however, very rare, their skins being almost as much 
prized as those of the snow leopard. 

r had news of three one morning, and went after 
them, but although on arriving at the spot we saw eight 
grey wolves, there were none of the black variety. 

On the 9th June we arrived at Tatour Nullah, w'here I 
saw my first antelope. There were four buck and three 
does grazing well out in the centre of the nullah. After 
having a good look at them through the telescope, I 
decided to try and get near enough to get a shot. It was 
a difficult place for a stalk, the ground being very open, 
and covered with stones and shingle. We had to go a 
long way round, but they gradually grazed away, and 
on arriving at the spot were I had hoped to get a shot, 
we found them just as far away as at first. The wind 
was, as it always is in Ladakh, very shifty, and we were 
in constant terror of their scenting us. We followed 
them for over five hours along the side of the nullah and 
on to the plain, but eventually lost them, they, I suppose, 
having at last got our wind, for they suddenly dis- 
appeared and we saw no more of them . However, about 
half an hour after, on going to where we thought they 
might have gone, we saw two more buck and one doe» 
We had better luck this time, and managed to get fairly 
close. I fired at one and missed, but got him with the 
other barrel. His horns only measured seventeen inches. 
We then returned to camp, and in the afternoon went 
out in the opposite direction. We saw one lot of ante- 
lope, but two kyang kindly gave them warning, and 
they went off down the nullah, and after a bit stopped 
and lay down in the open, where it was impossible to get 
at them. Whilst we were watching them a grey wolf 
appeared, and on seeing the antelope started stalking 
them. It was a very curious sight. The antelope dis- 
covered him when he was about forty yards off, and 
came on towards us, but on the other side of the nullah. 
The old wolf followed steadily, shambling along and not 
trying to catch them, but, I suppose, wishing to see the 
direction they would take, so as to be able to satisfy his 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 115 

hunger later on. In a short time the antelope passed 
us at a distance of about 300 yards. There was nothing 
big amongst them, so we waited for the wolf. When he 
was almost opposite us he stopped for a second or two, 
and I let drive, hitting the ground just beneath him. He 
turned about and was out of sight in no time. The 
antelope, not understanding the shot, stood in the 
middle of the nullah, looking in all directions. They 
stopped thus for about ten minutes, when they retraced 
their steps, and on getting to the place from where the 
wolf had bolted, they followed up his tracks for a short 
way, and then, seemingly satisfied, went back to where 
they had been first disturbed. 

Next day was a real day out for me. I had the luck to 
get four antelope in one stalk. On looking through the 
telescope up the nullah we saw seven buck in one place, 
and opposite to them, on the other side of the nullah, 
one good buck and a doe. 

On getting nearer and looking round we could not 
find the seven, and so began going after the other buck, 
but we hadn't gone far before we saw the other seven 
round the corner of a small hill jutting out from the side 
of the nullah. We at once determined to go after them, 
as there looked to be two or three good ones. For these 
parts it was a good place for a stalk, as long as the wind 
kept right, which it did not. We had to go back some 
way, and then were able to cross the dangerous zone 
higher up than the antelope, and thus avoid their getting 
our wind. They were now on the far side of the small 
hill, and we made straight for it as hard as we could get 
along, which was not fast, owing to our getting blown 
so often. We went right up the side of the nullah, over 
the top of the small hill, and down the other side. We 
then had to push ourselves along on our backs over the 
sharp stones, feet first, so as to be able to rise and shoot 
at once should they discover us. When within about 
thirty yards I took first place, Subhana letting me pass, 
and got ready in case they jumped up. When within 
about fifteen yards I unfortunately, in trying to get rid 



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Il6 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

of a particularly sharp stone, alarmed them, and two 
rose. I fired at once and hit the nearest, when the rest 
jumped up and I hit another, but didn't stop him. They 
did not seem able to make it out at all, and wandered off 
slowly, now walking, and then trotting, and constantly 
stopping and turning round, as if wondering why the 
other two did not go on. On my firing again they went 
off at a steady canter, all in a bunch, and describing a 
semi-circle round us within fifty yards. I fired two or 
three more shots, and two antelope fell to one shot, 
though one had been previously wounded. The re- 
mainder now went off hard, but stopped again about one 
hundred and thirty yards off, and I got another. This 
was good enough. I completed circles in the air, while 
Subhana flew in all directions to ** Hallal Karo." The 
horns measured 24, 21J, 21J, and 17 inches respectively. 
Another good one of about twenty-four inches got away, 
but the other two were both small ones. 

We started off to camp at once, which had been shifted, 
owing to our sending back after some hours of fruitless 
searching for antelope, and thinking that we should not 
find any. The result was that we got in very late, and 
the Ladakhi, with the heads, did not arrive till the next 
morning. We could not take any of the meat with us, 
but it was very welcome to C. of the 15th and his party, 
who passed us soon after. 

Next day we only saw one, which went off. I then 
decided to go back towards Leh and try for some burhill 
and shapu. On the way we caught numbers of small 
fish in the streams, which are generally found near the 
villages. 

I shot two burhill, one with horns 25J inches long, 
12J inches thick, and 26J tip to tip, and the other 25 J 
inches long and loj thick. 

I was also out another day, when I unfortunately 
wounded two late in the evening, who got away. Space 
does not allow of any details. 

On the 24th June I arrived back at Leh, and left early 
next day. 



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SIND VALLEY PROM ZOGI LA PASS. 



BEATERS (coolies) AT A BEAK DRIVE, AT KANGAN, SIND VALLEY. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 117 

Early on the 27th I got to a place called Saspul, 
above which I had heard there were some good shapu. 
The next morning I saw three, one of which looked a 
very good one. The stalk was, however, spoilt by our 
baggage appearing round a corner, setting the shapu 
off. We followed them all day, having to climb up and 
down some stiff places, but I did not succeed in getting 
a shot until late in the evening, when the three had been 
joined by two more. I hit the big one badly my first 
shot, and he half fell, but, recovering himself, went off 
after the others. We at once followed, but could find 
no trace of them, there being no blood, and the rocks 
and stones hiding any footmarks there might have been. 

We then started off home, and decided to send men 
out in the morning. We had not gone far when we saw 
four shapu high up, and looking in the direction from 
which I had fired. The glasses were out at once, and 
proved them to be the same minus the big one. This 
seemed all right, and Subhana and a cooley went up to 
get him while I wandered on. They, however, arrived 
in camp late without having found him. We sent men 
out early next morning, and about three hours after they 
returned with the head and skin, the latter having very 
luckily escaped injury at the hands of the wolves or 
vultures. The horns measured 32J inches round the 
front curve, and were loj inches thick. 

The next two days were easy ones, for though on the 
second I saw some good shapu, they went off into a 
nullah, where a number of Llamas dwelt, who said it 
was forbidden any ** sahib " to shoot there. So having 
got a good one, and not wishing to have a row, 
I left them, and the next day continued my journey 
towards Kashmir. The day after arrived at Hiniscoot, 
on the Leh Road, and got a 24 J inch shapu there. 

I had now got my four, and made tracks as hard as I 
could go for Kashmir to try for black bear before my 
leave was up. After passing the Zpgi-la Pass, we 
arrived in the Sind Valley, at the bottom of which I was 
joined by W., who had had fair sport, but had been 



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Ii8 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

hampered by being seedy nearly all the time. We had 
a bear drive together, but without success, only seeing a 
large boar, which got away. 

To Gunderbal, and then on by boat to Srinagar, saw 
the end for me of one of the best times I had ever had. 

Though the country in Ladakh is in places absolutely 
desolate, and though the heights of the mountains make 
one liable to ** Mountain sickness," yet the shooting, 
though, of course, heads are not as big as they used to 
be, is really good. We were unfortunate in not leaving 
Leh for the first time until a month of our leave had gone 
by, as it consequently lessened the number of days for 
shooting. If we had gone straight up the Leh Road 
from Srinagar, I think that we might have arrived at the 
former place in ten days, and counting on ten days for 
the return journey, we should have had over two months 
actual shooting. 

The road is a good one, and rideable all the way to 
Leh, with bungalows greatly improved at every stage. 
It is absolutely necessary to take an old saddle, unless 
one wishes to return a cripple. 

Kashmir itself is being rapidly shot out, in spite of 
game laws and licences, but there is still plenty of shoot- 
ing to be got if one does not mind going a little further. 



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PADDLING ALONG THE SHORE OF LAKE ST. JOHN. 



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The King's Royal Rtp Corps Chronicle, 119 

Crout ?)$l)ln9 In Canada. 



So much have I heard of the wonders of Canadian fish- 
ing, that for long I have wished personally to prove the 
quality of the sport. My chance came last July, when 
two of us got five weeks leave from Bermuda to travel in 
Canada. Much valuable time was spent in the journey, 
but after six days by land and sea we reached Quebec. 
Here we only remained long enough to purchase suitable 
flies and tackle, and again taking the train due north, 
arrived at Roberval, Lake St. John, on July 30th. Next 
day we crossed the lake to a small hotel built on an island 
near which the Saguenay flows out of the lake towards 
the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This is one of the few places 
where the ouananiche or land locked salmon is found. 
These silvery fish, which run from \\ lbs. to 5 lbs., 
much resemble a salmon, the main difference being that 
their tails and fins are far more powerful in comparison 
to their size. They are thus enabled to live in a rapid 
where most fish would be crushed to death. 

At 7 a.m. on the ist August we started operations. 
Each embarking in a canoe with two guides, we started 
down the river. Within five minutes' paddle of the house 
we shot our first rapid, experiencing a novel and most 
exciting sensation. Below this, owing to another rapid, 
in which no canoe could live, it was necessary to portage 
or carry our canoes for a mile through the forest, and 
then again struck the river where the fishing is supposed 
to be best. The guides had told us that sport in August 
was always very poor; however, we were well content 
with the way things turned out. 1 consider that the 
salmon himself can hardly make a fiercer fight for free- 
dom than a four pound ouananiche on a ten foot trout 
rod. No sooner is he hooked than he dashes off with 
forty or fifty yards of line, ending up with a leap of about 
three feet out of the water. After this first rush he is 
never still, making alternate dash and leap, until, after 
a fight of from ten to fifteen minutes, he is at last brought 
to the net. 



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I20 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

The usual routine of the day was : — Breakfast at 6 
a.m. ; fished from about 7 a.m. till mid-day; knocked off 
for about an hour and a half for lunch, which usually 
consisted chiefly of fried ouananiche and bacon ; after 
lunch fished again until 7.30 p.m.; back for dinner at 
8 p.m. 

After a week of this sport we inquired as to whether 
the trout fishing was worth troubling about. Oh ! yes, 
the guides knew of a lake within a day's journey where 
150 trout up to 21 lbs. in weight had been killed during 
the previous week by one rod. Consequently we deter- 
mined to give the place a trial, and started off next morn- 
ing in two canoes, with the necessary camping kit, etc. 
A four hours' paddle along the shore of Lake St. John 
brought us to a village called St. Jerome, where we 
obtained transport for ourselves and canoes, to take us 
the remaining sixteen miles to the lake in question. The 
roads in that district were the worst tracks I have ever 
seen. For the first few miles we managed to hold our- 
selves on to the trap; after that all idea of driving was 
given up, and we walked the last ten miles. The trail 
running through the most magnificent scenery of virgin 
forest, brought us at 6 p.m. to the banks of a long and 
narrow lake, which was our destination. We decided 
to camp close to the trail, and so, while the guides were 
preparing our bivouac, we set about supplying supper 
for the party. Our first start off was promising. Between 
6 and 7 p.m. we killed fifty-six trout, but the majority of 
these were very small, few being over half a pound. 
We were, however, ravenous by this time, and the six 
of us easily accounted for the lot. Before we were up next 
morning one of the guides killed forty more small ones 
for breakfast. After this meal a start was made at 8 a.m. 
for a small stream, which flowed into our end of the lake. 
Here we fished all day, but were somewhat disappointed, 
for although any number of fish were killed, few were of 
any weight. Out of 104 which we landed only about a 
dozen came up to the pound. Next day we tried a stream 
further up the lake, and fished hard from 9 a.m. till mid- 
day without killing more than twenty fish. Just as we 



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portAging. 



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ai 
H 

sp 

ho 

f4an 

\'isit: 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 12 1 

were giving up for lunch we met a couple of two 
pounders in a big bend of the stream. Immediately 
after lunch we returned to this spot. We were soon both 
very busy with a heavy trout, one of which scaled over 
three pounds. Well, to cut a long story short, we 
remained in that bend the remainder of the day, throwing 
back everything of one pound and under. One could 
hardly call it sport, but it was at any rate a marvellous 
experience. Again and again we killed two fish in one 
caste. The two heaviest killed together weighed 2| and 
two pounds respectively. Between 1.30 and 2.30 p.m., 
when we finally gave up, eighty-seven trout had found 
their way into the canoes, of which three turned the scale 
at four pounds, and over thirty went between 2\ and 3J 
pounds. On returning we met another angler and two 
local guides, who remarked that they had not seen a 
heavier catch in that lake. As they were going down 
the trail to St. Jerome, they relieved us of all we did not 
ourselves need for supper. Next day we again tried the 
same stream, and although the fish were not so heavy as 
on the previous day, we had excellent sport, killing 120 
trout weighing from f lbs. to 2J lbs. 

This finished our successful trout expedition. During 
the three days we landed and kept 480 trout, and put 
back 200 more. We returned to the Saguenay next day, 
and continued fishing for another week with very fair 
sport. 

As our time was now rather short, we determined to 
spend the remainder of our leave in seeing a bit of the 
country. Therefore, leaving Lake St. John with many 
hopes that we should again caste a line on those 
marvellous waters, we travelled down to New York via 
Quebec and Montreal, and so back to broiling Bermuda. 

I have written this account in the hope that it may 
interest some of the readers of the Chronicle, but I 
greatly fear that many will read it with a smile and label 
it the liar. All I can advise is that if anyone has a like 
chance of going to Canada, he will be well repaid by 
visiting Lake St. John with complete angling equipment. 



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122 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

Sboorind.— Bp B. n. V. 



On September 4th four of us went down from Gharial 
to the heat of Rawal Pindi, for a quail shoot on Kanna 
Plain. Kanna is a small village about four miles from 
Pindi, and is, perhaps, one of the most fertile spots in 
the Northern Punjab. It produces a little of everything ; 
crops of all kinds, sugar cane, chillies, cotton, rice, grain 
of all kinds, and vegetables abound. There are two 
small Gheels close to the village and a river, and this spot 
is the happy hunting ground of the whole Pindi Garrison. 
Yet, small as the place is and much as it is shot, it is 
wonderful the amount of small game that is bagged there. 
Whenever a snipe is shot another seems to take its place. 
Ten couple of snipe, with perhaps a couple of duck, is 
quite an ordinary bag for a morning's shoot. Occasion- 
ally a goose is seen, but they are very hard to get near, 
as the river banks are so open, and only two have been 
bagged by the Regiment. The total bag shot by the 
Battalion at Kanna alone during our stay in Pindi is : — 
6,003 quail, 620 snipe, 49 teal, 20 duck, 2 geese, and a 
partridge. But to our shoot. 

We drove out from Pindi in Tum-tums, and arrived 
at about 7 o'clock. We had tried the river first for wild- 
fowl, but with no success. However, when we had just 
started after quail, our head shikari (a black faced, black 
bearded, beady eyed scoundrel, with eyesight like an 
hawk) spotted a teal sitting in a nullah about half-a-mile 
away. We all went after it, and after a most careful 
stalk arrived at the nullah. The teal rose, four guns 
went oflf almost simultaneously, and the unfortunate bird 
fell, leaving each of us assured that it was he that shot it. 
We then started after quail. The shikaris had, at early 
dawn, put out ten call-birds to attract the quail. A call- 
bird is a stick, to which is tied from six to ten cages, 
enveloped in cloth, each containing a separate quail 
especially taught to call and attract the flighting birds. 
These call-birds are supposed to be rather valuable com- 



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A LOST BIRD IN THE CHILLIES. 



' CALL BIRDS. 



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BKATKKS IN LINE. 



GUNS AND BEATERS. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 123 

pared with the ordinary quail, which is w^orth about one 
Anna. On one occasion, when out at Kanna, two officers 
fired at a quail in line with the call-bird stick, and 
peppered the cages, killing a good number, and, accord- 
ing to the ** Call-bird Wallah," rendering the remainder 
useless, as he declared they were too frightened to ever 
call again. The price demanded for these birds was 
Rs. 10 each. Needless to say, he didn't get it. 

Forming line with a shikari each and thirty beaters, 
we proceeded to tramp through the crops, many of which 
were very high, which made shooting rather difficult, and 
found quail in abundance. At about 9 o'clock, having 
bagged about 120 quail, a halt was called for breakfast. 

After breakfast we shot for a short time more in the 
crops, and then, crossing the river to a small oasis in the 
plain, a place of a few acres, abounding in all kinds of 
cultivation and surrounded by sugar cane, the garden of 
the headman of the village. Here we had great sport. The 
coolies forming line beat the sugar cane out towards us, 
and, though a great number of birds went back, those 
that faced the guns gave us the sporting shots. By 12 
o'clock we had finished the cartridges we had brought 
with us, and, as it was, by then, very hot, we wxre glad 
of a ten minutes' rest in the shade and a drink before 
returning home. Our total bag was 280 quail, two 
snipe, and one teal, which is, I believe, the record quail 
bag ever shot in Pindi. 

This, although it is the biggest bag procured, is only 
one of the many good days we have had at Kanna. 
During March and April, when quail are flighting north 
to escape the heat of the Indian summer, and during 
September and October when they return south, quail 
in abundance are to be found at Kanna. And, although 
perhaps quail shooting is not the highest form of sport, 
nor the hardest kind of shooting, yet who cares to go out 
during these months can let off 100 cartridges, and get 
a few hours' very good fun and some very nice shots. 

Apropos of shooting, no officer is supposed to go out 
unless he has passed the Lower Standard Urdu. For the 



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124 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

unfortunate soldier, the regulations and restrictions are 
so great that very few ever attempt a shooting expedition. 
The following, which appeared some months ago in the 
Pioneer, will give some idea of the difficulties with which 
the soldier has to contend when on sport intent : — 

SHOOTING REGULATIONS. 
[To be hung up in every Barrack Boom.] 

When the soldiers go forth shooting 

They shall not be less than four, 
With a bugler ever tootling 

And two N.C. — O.'s— or more 

They shall first receive instruction, 

As on parade they stand, 
On the heinousness of ructions 

With the natives of the land. 

On the sanctity of monkeys, 

And of peacocks, and of fowls, 
Of doves, and mice, and donkeys. 

Of elephants, and owls. 

They will then be marched by sections 

To the Quarter- Master's stores ; 
Where the Armourer makes inspections 

Of the arms, and sights, and bores. 

No guns will be permitted 

That will carry thirty yards. 
And the soldiers will be fitted 

With little printed cards. 

Their names, and age, and station, 

Their character, and size, 
A list of their relations. 

And the colour of their eyes. 

Then after admonitions. 

And the signing of each name, 
Having mastered the conditions. 

They go out in search of game. 

In a careful scoutlike manner. 

With tramping warlike tread. 
With a flaring crimson banner 

A hundred yards a-head. 



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THE TIFFIN JUGGAH. 



CROSSING THE KIVEK. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 125 

If a bird should be detected, 

Which may seem to be " Shikar," 
It first must be inspected 

By the nearest " Tehsildar." 

If he should give decision 

That the fowl be lawful game, 
Then aiming with precision. 

The squad may shoot the same. 

And on the word " cease fire," 

The bugle call will sound, 
And any bird expiring 

May be gathered from the ground. 

Each rule and regulation 

Will be fitted in a frame. 
For the welfare of our nation 

(And perhaps too of the game). 



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126 Thfi King's Royal Rtfle Corps Chronicle, 

Cbe IRanoeuores or 1904* 



I HAVE heard the Manoeuvres of 1904 severely criticised 
and condemned, and I believe the regimental officers and 
men did not consider they were worth the trouble and 
expense. Doubtless, if they were a failure, that must be 
owing to the fact that there were no rifle battalions there ! 
But I should like to put forward a plea for them, for to 
my mind they were the most instructive manoeuvres that 
have been held in England. People will say ** Yes, so 
far as the embarkations and disembarkations w^ere con- 
cerned, but what about the land operations? " Well, I 
reply, that the land operations showed us at any rate the 
extreme difficulty of operations in a nearly flat and very 
much enclosed country like Essex, and how^ in such a 
country the long range of modern guns and rifles loses 
much of its effect. For in a country like Essex it is next 
to impossible to get an artillery position that commands 
any distance of more than 600 yards, and owing to the 
very high hedges and small fields, I think it quite possible 
that in real war things might have come to the same pass 
as they did in the manoeuvres, i.e., infantry firing at one 
another across a field, neither being especially anxious 
to advance. However, I do not wish to enter into a 
military dissertation, as that is not quite suitable for the 
Chronicle. 

I went on H.M.S. Kent from Portsmouth, and we 
were the first ship to anchor at Clacton. I went ashore 
with the first party, and so I saw practically the whole 
of the disembarkation. 

I had a very good time on the Kent ; the sailors were 
hospitable and jolly as usual. Colonel Kitson was the 
only fellow passenger, and in fact I think that he, Sack- 
ville West, and I were the only K.R.R.'s at the 
manoeuvres. At least I saw no others, but I believe the 
Commandant of the Staff College was there. I have no 
doubt but that an exhaustive report on the manoeuvres 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronkle, 127 

will be published, so I shall confine myself to putting 
forward a few points which may be of interest to Rifle- 
men. 

I think it does no one any harm to hear more than 
one opinion on what is going on in military matters, arid 
as so few K.R.R.*s were there, the observations, though 
they may consist of superfluous and (in some cases) easily 
answered criticisms, may give some food for reflection. 
At any rate, that is my hope. 

First, I should remark for the benefit of those who 
were not there that the fleet consisted of ten transports 
escorted by cruisers. The fleet was subdivided into two 
** divisions," each escorted by three cruisers, and here 
comes the first of my remarks. The First Naval Division 
escorted the transports carrying the Second Military 
Division, and vice versa. This caused some little con- 
fusion at various times. The ships anchored some two 
to three miles from the beach in one long line parallel to 
the shore. The landing was done at two places about a 
mile apart, and in each place a captain, r.n., was in 
charge as beachmaster. At my end my skipper, Captain 
Gamble, r.n., was in charge, and he worked like a horse. 
Each of the three cruisers belonging to our (First Naval) 
division constructed a pier for the infantry to land on, so 
that they could land dry shod. 

The beachmasters had under them Naval beach 
parties, who were at it hard for thirty-six hours on end. 
Our lot left the Kent at 6.30 a.m., and did not get back 
till after 7 p.m. the next day, having worked right 
through the night. 

Here another remark. There was no military staff 
officer attached to the beachmaster, so that when the latter 
wanted a military fatigue party he didn't know whom to 
ask for it. The first Infantry landed at 8.15, and practic- 
ally all were on shore by 2 p.m. 

Here another remark. When the Infantry landed 
there was no staff officer to tell them where to go, and 
apparently no instructions had been issued on this point. 



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128 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

No military precautions of any sort, such as throwing 
out covering parties, etc., were taken, and many of the 
men landed carrying their equipments in their hands ! 

I was told this was because it was an unopposed land- 
ing, but it seems to me that as it was supposed to be an 
enemy's country, it is wrong in mock war to practise 
men to do things which, let us hope, would never be done 
in real war. 

I thought the Kent pier a very good one. It was 
made of two gun carriages lashed together, and so it 
could be wheeled up and down the shore as the tide rose 
and fell. But it was rather heavy, and took about an 
hour to make. The horses and vehicles were landed 
straight on to the beach in horseboats, and then the 
vehicles were hauled up by ropes. When the tide was 
out the landing of the vehicles had to be practically 
suspended, as the beach was very flat and the steamboats 
couldn't get close in. But the horses went on landing 
some 200 or 300 yards from the shore, and were ridden 
in. Several of the riders took severe tosses into the sea, 
which caused no little amusement to the large crowd of 
onlookers. Each steamboat towed from four to eight 
horseboats or loaded ships' boats. They took about two 
hours on a round trip with infantry, and about an hour 
longer with vehicles. 

By a round trip I mean from the time they left the 
ship's side till they left it again, having been to the 
beach, unloaded, and towed empties back. 

There were too few steamboats, and some (steam 
cutters) were not nearly powerful enough. I append a 
few figures, which will show the time it took to unload 
boats, etc. 

Another point is that units, especially mounted ones, 
should be separated port and starboard on a ship, not 
fore and aft. For when it is only possible to unload one 
side of a ship, the same unit can be unloaded at the same 
time fore and aft, and thus can be got off quicker. 

Another point in unloading is to see that the waggons 
are put in horseboats poles to stern of boat. Then they 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 129 

can be pulled straight out instead of being backed, since 
it is the stern that lets down to get the vehicles out. 

It is worthy of remark that in real war it would be 
impossible to denude the warships of three-quarters of 
their officers and men for beach parties, transport parties, 
etc., as was done on this occasion. Transports would 
have to carry steamboats specially provided, and have 
men to man them and to furnish beach parties. 

The night after we arrived the wind got up, and 
operations had to be practically suspended the greater 
part of the next day. 

Ordinarilv, I do not think it would be safe to depend 
on disembarking a division complete, horses, guns, 
waggons, transport, etc., in less than forty-eight hours, 
unless the resources were much greater than ours. 

It should be here remarked that in this case the 
batteries had not all their waggons, and there were no 
ammunition columns, nor was the Second Line Transport 
complete. 

There were in all thirty horseboats per division, but 
I should say at least sixty are required, and 100 would be 
better if there were plenty of steamboats. Many of our 
horseboats were wrecked in the gale of the second day, 
but they were crazy old things built in 1885. The sailors 
preferred them, however, to the steel ones, which, they 
said, wouldn't steer. 

I shall not go into a description of the land 
manoeuvres. Their interest was a good deal impaired 
by two things. First, that a large proportion of the 
country was marked out of bounds, and second, that the 
troops were much impeded in their operations by the 
public who crowded the roads, and by the numerous 
motor cars. 

The general impression left on most people by the 
manoeuvres was, I think, the great difficulty of carrying 
out the landing of a large force in a hostile country, 
even if you have got command of the sea. Here, at 
Ciacton, everything was in our favour, landing un- 



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130 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

opposed, no enemy on the sea, and one very fine day, 
yet it took two days to get the comparatively small force 
on shore. 

There is no doubt that a very few infantry would make 
landing very unpleasant, and to talk of a landing, covered 
by the fire of the ships, when the ships are as far off as 
they were at Clacton, seems to me nonsense. The fire of 
the ships would have very little effect against Infantry on 
shore. But at the same time, given command of the 
sea, a well organised expedition, and two days calm 
weather, a large force might land in England, and once 
landed it might not be so easy to get them out again. 
Men who knew that they had only the sea behind them 
would probably fight desperately. 

But if they did have to re-embark, it would be a 
difficult and unpleasant operation, and it is almost certain 
that they would have to abandon most of their animals 
and vehicles. 

I am sure I have already said more than enough. 
Here are a few figures : — 

Average time unloading a horseboat in disembarkation, eleven 
minutes. 

In disembarking Infantry, a tow of six boats disembarked the men 
and was in tow again empty in eight minutes. 

In two hours at three piers 2392 Infantry were disembarked. 

In four hours at three piers 3578 Infantry were disembarked. 

Roughly, an average of 300 men per pier per hour, but as one pier 
only worked for about an hour, I think 500 men per pier per 
hour would be quite fair, but with plenty of steamboats quite 
1000 men could be disembarked per pier per hour. 



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STONE ERECTED IN 

MEMORY OF LIEUTENANT BASIL DUNBAR, 

OSWEGO, U. S. A. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 131 

CDe Canadian IRIIUarp Insfliuie. 



The Canadian Military Institute, 

48, University Avenue, 

Toronto, 29th October, 1904. 
Dear Sir, 

On receipt of your letter of the 7th inst., I wrote 
Mr. W. B. McMurrich, who has a brother living at 
Oswego. Enclosed is his reply, as well as the two 
enclosures contained in his letter. In the meantime I 
have written thanking them for their prompt attention, 
and for the two photographs also now sent you. I pre- 
sume the corporal of the 55th was unearthed about the 
same time. Although this letter is dated from Toronto, 
I am not there at present, but on my return early in 
November will have a hunt in further papers there to see 
if I can get any clues. Americans are always very nice 
about these little things. We have at Lundy's Lane, in 
the Province, a number of re-interred bones of U.S. 
soldiers, and on these occasions U.S. soldiers are invited 
across, and with our own Militia they have quite a grand 
military funeral and speeches afterwards ! In the note 
on back of Dunbar photo I wonder where the author of 
Oswego County found his authority for the statement 
that he (Dunbar) was killed in the first duel fought there. 
Some Toronto local historians attributed his death to 
smallpox, but that was merely surmise, as they had no 
authority for saying so. 

Yours very truly, 

L. HoMFRAY Irving^ 
[Copy.] 
From J. B. McMurrich, Delaware and Hudson Com- 
pany, Oswego, N.Y., to his brother, W. Barclay 
Mc Murrich, k.c, Toronto, Oswego, 24th October, 
1904. 

I am in receipt of yours of 24th, enclosing Mr. 
Irving's letter to you, which I now return with such 



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132 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

information as gathered. This letter came to hand at 
an opportune time, as the U.S. Constructing Quarter- 
master, Captain Coulling, and Dr. Hervey, of this place, 
had already interested themselves in an effort to trace the 
parties whose tombstones were resurrected, especially that 
of the officer referred to, and they promptly furnished me 
with the photos and the correspondence. The latter 
you will please return to me after Mr. Irving has made a 
copy of same should he desire to do so. You will note 
that Lieutenant Dunbar had a history, and it was in an 
effort to get an authentic account of the duel that the 
correspondence occurred. You might say to Mr. Irving 
that the gentlemen will gladly furnish any further infor- 
mation on the matter that can be had from the other end, 
both as regards history of the Regiment, as well as of 
Lieutenant Dunbar. As it may interest someone, I have 
to say that in the enlargement of our Army Post here 
they have left the old ** Fort " as nearly as it was as 
possible. This Fort, of course, is not as of 1759, but a 
reconstructed one of about 1812, in the building of which 
the old cemetery was covered up, and it is the intention 
to erect the resurrected tombstones in a permanent 
manner in the Post Cemetery. My kindest regards to 
yourself and Mr. Irving, and hoping to see you soon. 

Note in lead pencil on back of Mr. Irving's letter to 
Mr. W. B. Mc Murrich :— 

Basil Dundas, 

21 Oct., i759» 

60th and not 62nd. 

Capt. Coulling, Con. Q.-M., intends to remount 

stones and re-bury bones of which there are now 

few in the Garrison Cemetery. Want to hear result 

of investigation. 

[Copy.] 
From Victor H. Paltsits, Assistant Librarian New 

York Public Library, Lenox Library Building, 5th 

Avenue, 170th St., New York, 14th October, 1904, 

to Dr. C. R. Hervey, Oswego, N.Y. 

I regret being unable to give you definite information 
about the duel you mention. It seems not to have been 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 133 

recorded in the New York newspapers of the time, for I 
have examined the October and November, 1759, issues 
of Wey man's liew York Gazette and Gaine's New York 
Mercury. There is also no mention of the persons 
named in the printed New York Colonial Documents. 
In Ford's ** British officers serving in America, 1754- 
1774," Boston, 1894, P- 35> I fii^d the following: — 

Name : Dunbar, Baziel. 

Rank : Lieutenant. 

Regiment : 62. 

Date of Commission : 12th January, 1756. 

I should advise you to inquire of the New York State 
Library (Manuscript Division), Albany, N.Y., also the 
Public Record Office, London, England, asking in the 
latter case whether any record is available in the Colonial 
Series, America and West Indies, or in the Military 
Rolls. Messrs. B. F. Stevens and Brown, Trafalgar 
Square, London, are good people to institute a search 
for pay. 

[Copy.] 

From A. J. F. van Laer, Archivist, State Library, 
Albany, N.Y., to Dr. C. R. Hervey, Oswego, N.Y., 
Albany, 19th October, 1904. 

In reply to yours of October 15th, I have examined 
our Colonial Manuscripts, the collection of Sir William 
Johnson papers, the Gentleman's Magazine for 1759 and 
subsequent years, the (British) Annual Register for 
1759 and later, and the Army List of Great Britain for 
1757) 1758, and 1760 (our set lacking 1759, 1761-65), but 
found nothing that throws light on the duel you mention. 
The Army List for 1757, 1758, and 1760 gives Baziel 
Dunbar as Lieutenant in the Sixtieth or Royal American 
Regiment of Foot, commissioned 12th January, 1756, 
and not in the 62nd Regiment, as stated in Ford's British 
Officers serving in America, 1754-74. I return enclo- 
sures. 



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134 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

Cbe memorial Romcs for Disabled Rinemen 
at St Cross* 

Dedication and Opening. 

Visit of the Duke of Connaught and Princess Christian 

TO Winchester. 

From the Hampshire Chronicle^ July i6th, 1904. 

The visit of Field-Marshal His Royal Highness the Duke 
of Connaught and Her Royal Highness the Princess 
Christian of Schleswig Holstein to Winchester on the 
occasion of the dedication and opening of the Cottage 
Homes for Disabled Riflemen that have been erected at 
St. Cross was on all points a distinct success. 

Delightful weather, a cordial welcome from the citizens, 
and a well-organised programme on the part both of the 
military and civic authorities, carried out without a hitch, 
combined to make the event one worthy to rank with other 
brilliant functions that have been associated with the old city, 
and of which recent years have seen not the least memorable. 
That Princess Christian should have carried out her engag'e- 
ment at a moment when she must have been deeply anxious 
as to the health of her eldest daughter was a particularly 
gracious act, and one more illustration of the devotion to 
public duty which animates every member of the Royal 
Family. The occasion, too, must have awakened sad 
thoughts, for it had to do with the memory of Her Royal 
Highness 's noble son. Prince Christian Victor, whose life 
was laid down at his country's call in South Africa, when 
serving with his regiment, the King's Royal Rifles, with 
whom he had volunteered for active service. And yet with 
sorrow must have been mingled pride for the gallant spirit 
that could not stand by with folded arms when soldier's work 
was to be done. 

In his army career of twelve years Prince Christian Victor 
accompanied his battalion to India, and saw service with the 
Miranzai Expedition in 1890, and two years later with the 
Isazai Expedition. On the outbreak of hostilities with 
Ashantee at the close of 1895 ^^ ^^ ^^^e volunteered, and 
took part in the advance on and occupation of Kumasi. It 



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Pi 

n 
•H 



< 

S 



Oi 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 135 

was during this campaign His Royal Highness Prince Henry 
of Battenberg fell a victim to West African fever, from which 
Prince Christian Victor also suffered severely. In the summer 
of 1898 he was a Special Service Officer under Sir Herbert 
Kitchener, and took part in the operations preceding the 
battle of Omdurman. In September, 1889, when the war 
with the Transvaal Republic seemed imminent, Prince 
Christian Victor again volunteered for active service, joining 
the Natal army under the command of Sir Red vers BuUer 
the following November. He took part in the fighting until 
Ladysmith was relieved, and in subsequent operations, first 
on the staff of Major-General Hildyard's Brigade, and after- 
wards as Deputy Assistant Adjutant General to the 7th 
Division. In August, 1900, he was appointed aide-de-camp 
to Field Marshal Lord Roberts, and proceeded to Pretoria, 
where early in October he was attacked by enteric fever, and 
passed away on the 29th of that month. In an obituary 
notice in The King's Royal Rifle Corps' Chronicle, brother 
officers thus write of His Highness Prince Christian Victor : 
** Of personal friends no one possessed more. He made 
them everywhere during his too short life of movement and 
activity, and amongst them the sad news that he had passed 
away was received with great grief. But although of a quiet 
and retiring disposition, appearing seldom in public, and 
living the same life as any officer in the regimeiit, his devo- 
tion to his profession, gallantry, and the number of campaigns 
in which he had, served were known throughout the land, and 
the grief everywhere felt was for a gallant Prince and good 
soldier, who in years to come might have filled the highest 
post in His Majesty's Army with honour to himself and 
benefit to his country. '* 

Many another good Rifleman laid down his life in South 
Africa, for on reference to regimental publications we find 
that of the King's Royal Rifle Corps no less than thirty-two 
officers and over 420 men were killed in action or died of 
wounds or disease, while of the Rifle Brigade the death roll 
shows the names of twelve officers and more than 130 men. 
The following were the officers of the King's Royal Rifles 
whose losses were mourned : — 

Lieut.-Colonel E. Gunning, Captain M. H. E. Pechell, Lieutenant 
Barnett, Lieutenant Taylor, Lieutenant Hambro, Major W. J. Myers, 
Lieutenant H. S. Marsden, Lieutenant J. L. Foster, Captain C. A. K. 



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136 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

Pechell, Major B. S. Bowen, Second Lieutenant F. H. Eaikes, Captain 
R. J. Vernon, Lieut.-Colonel B. G. Buchanan-Biddell, Lieutenant B, 
J. Grant, Second Lieutenant H. G. French-Brewster, Lieutenant Hon. 

F. H. S. Roberts, Major L. A. de V. Maunsell, Captain E. W. C. 
Dillon, Captain J. Dewar, Lieutenant E. Perceval, Captain Hon. B. 
Cathcart, Major H. E. Buchanan-Biddell, Brevet-Major F. Mack- 
worth (2nd Queen's), Lieutenant M. M. Tod (1st Cameronians), 
Lieutenant B. L. C. Hobson, Brevet-Major H. H. Prince Christian 
Victor, Lieutenant R. E. Reade, Lieutenant A. B. W. Spicer, Lieut. 
Sir Bose-Price, Bart., Lieutenant G. H. Davenport, Second Lieutenant 
S. M. Macnaughton, Captain A. B. Mildmay, Surgeon liieut. -Colonel 
J. Creagh. 

The Rifle Brig-ade officers who fell were : — 
Lieut.-Colonel J. Sherston, d.s.o.. Captain H. G. Majendie, Captain 
A. D. Stewart, Captain G. E. Paget, Captain S. Mills. Captain W. H. 
W. Steward, Captain G. L. Lysley, Captain E. G. Campbell, Lieut. 

G. C. D. Fergusson, Lieutenant L. D. Hall, Lieutenant S. Davenport, 
Second Lieutenant B. E. Lethbridge. 

It was fitting- that out of reflection on these losses should 
grow a desire to help some of the poor fellows to whom a 
maimed and broken life. was left as a legacy of the war, and 
that the assistance should be of a permanent character, bene- 
fitting in the future others of the Regiment upon whom 
disability might from any cause come. The idea assumed 
tangible form mainly through the instrumentality of the Rifle- 
men *s Aid Society — that excellent society which in twenty 
years has raised and disbursed in aid over ;^i 3,000, and with 
which Major T. M. Riley, Rifle Dep6t, Secretary and 
Treasurer, has been officially associated for eighteen years. 
Through the advocacy and work of the Society a scheme for 
Cottage Homes was developed, and has resulted in the build- 
ing and endowment of eight cottages for disabled Riflemen, 
at a total cost, when completed, of nearly ;;^6,ooo. The 
money has been subscribed by past and present officers of 
the Regiments and their friends, and it is pleasing to note 
that the non-commissioned officers and men have helped. 
There have been some handsome donations, one lady (Mrs. 
Lewis Hall) having given ;^500 towards the Rifle Brigade 
Cottage Homes, while £22^ was paid into the same fund by 
Mrs. Papillon, Hon. Secretary, Prince Christian Victor 
Cottage Memorial Home. The father and mother of Lieut. 
Lewis Duval Hall, of the 2nd Battalion Rifle Brigade, who 
was killed in action at Caesar's Camp, along with seventeen 
non-commissioned officers and Riflemen (of which fight 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 137 

General Sir George White said to the Lieut. -Colonel : ** Well 
done, well done, indeed, the Rifle Brigade. I am always 
congratulating you on your splendid Battalion '*) have built 
and endowed one of the cottages, and William Oxenden 
Hammond, Esq., late Rifle Brigade, of St. AJban's Court, 
Kent, founded another cottage. 

The Committee selected a site in Stanmore Lane, St. 
Cross, about a mile from the city, and within the extended 
Borough area — indeed, the boundary stone laid by Mr. 
Walter Bailey on the beating of the bounds in 1900 is by the 
roadside in the centre of the site. An acre of land was 
secured on lease for 999 years from the Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners ; it is on gently rising ground some yards west- 
ward of the railway embankment, and commanding charming 
views of St. Catherine's Hill and Deacon Hill, St. Cross and 
the City, the Barracks, Sleeper's Hill, and Oliver's Battery. 
It was taken out of the farm-holding of Mr. Stratton, and 
that gentleman kindly facilitated matters by giving his con- 
sent. The services of Messrs. Cancellor and Hill, of Win- 
chester, were retained as architects, and the contract for the 
work was given to Messrs. C. Grace and Son, of Clatford, 
near Andover, who were the lowest of eight or nine tender- 
ing. There is no doubt all the land hereabout will, before 
any great lapse of time, come into the market for building of 
better-class houses, and with this in view the Ecclesiastical 
Commissioners made certain stipulations which led to the 
buildings being more ornamented and substantial than is 
generally implied by the term ** cottages." Messrs. Can- 
cellor and Hill are to be congratulated on what is really a 
pretty as well as useful design, and that the cottages are 
substantially built is shown by the fact that they have cost, 
roughly speaking, ;^8oo a pair, the walls being of i6in. 
thickness. The architects' aim was to place the four pairs 
of cottages on the ground so as to divide the gardens fairly 
evenly for each cottage. They form a sort of quadrangle, 
enclosed within an oak fence, the boundary on the road side 
being unclimbable iron railings. The Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners made it a stipulation that if at any time the road 
should be widened 15 feet of the frontage should be given 
up, and the architects have therefore kept the entrance gates 
back that distance, so that if the necessity arises there will 
not be any difficulty in moving the railings. Each cottage is 



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138 The King*s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

intended for one family, and gives the same accommodation. 
There is a little hall, \o\ ft., by 8ft. 6 ins., with staircase out 
of it. The front sitting room is 11 ft. by 12 ft., behind this 
is a kitchen 13 ft. by 12 ft., a scullery 10 ft. by 8 ft. 6 ins., and 
outside a coal and wood house and w.c. ; upstairs are three 
bedrooms, lift. 4iins. by 12 ft., 12 ft. by 13 ft. 4^ ins., and 
9 ft. by 10 ft. 6 ins., each with an approximate height of 9 ft. 
There is a capital landing with cupboard, and under the stairs 
is a handy larder. Each bedroom has a fireplace, and in the 
kitchen there is a kitchener and a first-rate dresser. The 
staircase is broad and easy, and the handrail is of polished 
pitchpine. The rooms are excellently lighted with casement 
windows, and charming views are obtainable, particularly 
from the upper floor. A water supply is laid on from the 
Winchester Water Company's works. The drainage at 
present is into cesspits, but it can easily be connected when 
the city main is extended. The cottages are of red brick up 
to the first floor level, and above that weather tiling. Bishop's 
Waltham tiles are used. The outside painting is in white 
and dark Rifle green, and the painting of the sitting-room is 
in dark Rifle green as well. The walls throughout are dis- 
tempered on the inside. There is a neat porch to each house. 
On each pair of cottages there is a bronze badge affixed to a 
slab of Bath stone. The cottages run in numbers from the 
further, or westward, side, those in front being i to 4, and 
those in the rear 5 to 8. On the first pair the bronze is 
Prince Christian Victor's crest ; on the second pair it is the 
Rifle Brigade badge; on the third pair (behind the Prince 
Christian Victor cottages) the bronze is also the Rifle Brigade 
badge; and on the fourth pair it is a bronze of the King's 
Royal Rifles' badge. The bronzes, which are a striking 
feature, were made by Messrs. Lockerbie and Wilson, of 
Wolverhampton. The following inscriptions are to be placed 
on the cottages : — 

On the first pair .— " King's Royal Rifles* Cottage Homes. This 
cottage was founded in memory of Major His Highness Prince 
Christian Victor, of Schleswig Holstein, partly endowed by the 
warrant holders of their Royal Highnesses Prince and Princess 
Christian of Schleswig Holstein. 1904." 

On No. 3.— "Rifle Brigade Cottage Homes. In memory of Lieut. 
Lewis Duval Hall, this cottage was built and endowed by his father 
and mother, 1904." 

On No. 4 :— " Rifle Brigade Cottage Homes. This cottage was 
founded through the bounty of William Oxen den Hammond (late 
Rifle Brigade), of St. Alban's Court, Kent, 1904." 



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V b 



pi 
pi 



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Ihe King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 139 

On No. 5:— "Rifle Brigade Cottage Homes. The Bifle Brigade 
Centenary Cottage, 1904." 

On No. 6 :— " Rifle Brigade Cottage Homes. This cottage was built 
in memory of the Riflemen who died in South Africa, 1899-1902." 

On Nos. 7 and 8:— "King's Royal Rifles' Cottage Homes. This 
cottage was built in memory of the Riflemen who died in South Africa, 
1899-1902." 

There is a mound in the centre of the site on which it 
is proposed at some future day to erect an obelisk, with the 
names of all the men who died in South Africa. ' The slope 
of the g-round from west to east rendered it necessary to make 
a terrace for the two upper pairs of cottages. It is intended 
to plant trees along the inside of the boundary as soon as the 
season allows. The paths have been gravelled. T-here is a 
useful piece of garden to each cottage. The contract for 
the four pairs of cottages was ;;^3,250, and the fencing, 
roads, etc.. have cost about J^^^o. 

In the event of an inmate requiring furniture, or a money 
allowance, the same will be provided by the Riflemen's Aid 
Society. The following are the rules for the guidance of the 
Executive Council for the Cottage Homes : — 

1.— The Homes are the property of the Riflemen's Aid Society, 
and are under the care and supervision of the Executive Meeting, 
who have the power of electing candidates, and whose authority as 
regards all matters concerning the occupancy, repairs, etc., of the 
Homes shall be final. 

2.— Rates, levied by local authorities, will be paid by the Com- 
mittee, and the charge for water will also be paid, provided that the 
rules of the Water Company, as regards waste, etc., are complied 
with by the occupant. 

3.— Ordinary repairs to buildings entailed by fair wear and tear 
will be undertaken by the Committee. 

4.— Sub-letting of the whole or a portion of a cottage will, under 
no circumstances, be permitted. 

5.— No retail trade is to be carried on in the Homes, and no article 
to be exposed for sale in the windows. 

6.— Continued tenancy of one of the cottages will depend upon 
compliance with the rules and the good conduct of the occupant, his 
wife, and family. 

7.— On the death of an occupant, his widow and family may be 
required to vacate the cottage occupied by them within three months 
from the date of his death. 

It goes without saying, of course, that flags were flying at 
the various public buildings in the city, such as the County 
Council offices, the Westgate, the headquarters of the ist 
Volunteer Battalion Hampshire Regiment, etc., while they 
were also to be seen on the towers of the Cathedral and other 



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I40 Tlie King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

churches in the city. On the whole the citizens again proved 
themselves ready and willing" to rise to an important occasion, 
and they certainly presented the dear old capital wearing her 
best in what is bright and festive. 

Thus, on Friday, July 15th, between ten and eleven 
o'clock, people were assembling in the streets in ever- 
increasing numbers, and as the latter hour approached they 
began to congregate in the vicinity of the London and South- 
western Railway Station, where the special train conveying 
the Royal party from the modern capital to the ancient 
capita] of the country was expected to arrive at 11.26. The 
arrangements at the station were managed by Mr. A. Hayes 
(main line superintendent, Clapham Junction), in conjuncticHi 
with Mr. Tancock, the stationmaster, and everything went 
off without a hitch. A portion of the platform had been 
carpeted, and carpet was also laid through the gates to the 
spot where the carriages were in waiting. The train arrived 
punctually, and on alighting from the saloon carriage their 
Royal Highnesses were received by, and exchanged greetings 
with, Colonel Herbert, of the Dep6t, and the assembled 
officers. As soon as the Royal party came within sight of 
those outside, the band of the 4th Battalion, King's Royal 
Rifles, which occupied a position on Station Hill, struck up 
the National Anthem. The Duke of Connaught then pro- 
ceeded to inspect the Guard of Honour, which consisted of a 
detachment of the King's Royal Rifles, 100 strong, under 
Major Brownlow. This over, the Duke, Princess Christian, 
and the remainder of the party entered open carriages, and 
with an escort consisting of members of the Hampshire 
Imperial Yeomanry Carabiniers, under S. Sergeant-Major 
Ross, the procession to the Guildhall began, the streets being 
lined on either side with crowds of cheering people, while the 
military band and the soldiers following combined to com- 
plete a scene of a memorable character. 

Down High Street and at the Guildhall the spectacle was 
full of bright life and animation. The roadway from the 
corners of Jewry Street and Southgate Street was lined by 
Riflemen from the Dep6t, but the footways were thronged 
with people, and there was not a window but had occupants. 
Drawn up in front of the Guildhall was a Guard of Honour 
of the I St Volunteer Battalion Hampshire Regiment, of the 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 141 

customary strength of 100 men, under Major Woodham, the 
other officers present being Captain Willoughby and 
Lieutenants Colson and Davy. The Battalion Band attended, 
and a few extra men who had turned out helped the Rifles 
to line the bottom of the street. The Volunteers looked very 
smart and serviceable. The police and firemen lent useful 
assistance. Admission to the Guildhall itself was by ticket, 
but the steps and windows were occupied by representative 
citizens and their lady friends, those present including the 
Bishop of Guildford, Archdeacons Sapte and Haigh. On 
the platform, at the foot of the steps, were waiting the Mayor 
and Corporation in their robes, with the attendant mace- 
bearers. Those of the Corporation who supported his 
Worship were the ex-Mayor (Councillor Fort), Aldermen 
Stopher, Carter, Jacob, Dyer, and Marks, Councillors Gibb, 
Morgan, Forder, Holdaway, H. Harris, Salter, P. Shenton, 
Easther, Colonel Clowes, Robinson, Adams, C. Shenton, 
Captain Pearson, r.n., R. J. Harris, and Fear. The 
Mayoress (Mrs. G. Ward) — who was attired in a light blue 
costume with dark blue hat — had as companion her sister, 
Mrs. Fowler, and a third lady on the platform was Mrs. B. D. 
Cancellor, a former Mayoress, who accompanied her 
husband, the architect of the Cottage Homes. The City 
Recorder (C. A. Spencer Garland, Esq., k.c), in wig and 
gown, stood by the side of the Mayor, and near him was the 
Town Clerk (Mr. Holt), also wearing wig and gown. The 
Consulting Town Clerk (Mr. Walter Bailey), the Medical 
Officer of Health (Mr. T. C. Langdon), the Clerk to the 
Magistrates (Mr. Alfred Bowker), the Police Surgeon (Dr. 
McNalty), and the City Surveyor were among the other 
officials attending. Just after half-past eleven the near 
approach of the Royal visitors was made known, and the 
Royal Standard was unfurled on the pole at the Guildhall end 
of the platform. Immediately afterwards the carriage, in 
which rode the Duke of Connaught, Princess Christian, 
Princess Louise of Schleswig Holstein, and Colonel Con- 
greve, v.c, drew up, and was received with a salute by the 
Volunteers. Two other carriages with Rifle officers followed, 
a non-commissioned officer in each instance riding alongside 
the driver. Sir Redvers Buller and many others did not 
come to the Guildhall, but proceeded direct to St. Cross. The 
Royal carriage halted on the roadway by the side of the 



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142 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

platform, their Royal Highnesses remaining seated. The 
Duke, who was appointed Colonel-in-Chief of the Rifle 
Brigade in 1880, in place of the Prince of Wales (now the 
King), wore the uniform of the Regiment, and Princess 
Christian had her parasol tied with the King's Royal Rifle 
colours. The Duke smiled, and shook hands with the 
Mayor. The Recorder then read the following address : — 
To His Royal Highness Arthur Duke op Connaught and Strathbarn, 

K.Q., K.T., K.P., etc.. Field Marshal, Inspector General of the Forces, 

Colonel-in-Chief of the Rifle Brigade, etc. 

May it please your Royal Highness, 

We, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of the Ancient and 
Ix)yal City of Winchester, desire to offer to your Royal Highness a 
sincere and hearty welcome on your again visiting our city. 

The special object of your visit, to open the Homes for Disabled 
Riflemen, is another ^roof of the deep interest which you ever take 
in the welfare of the Army and the happiness of the people. 

We desire to avail ourselves of the present opportunity of express- 
ing our allegiance to our Sovereign King Edward. 

We most respectfully and earnestly desire that every happiness 
may be bestowed upon your Royal Highness, Her Royal Highness the 
Duchess of Connaught, and every member of your family. 

Given under our Common Seal this fifteenth day of July, one 
thousand nine hundred and four. 

Gboroe Ward, Mayor. 
Thomas Holt, Town Clerk. 

This was handed to His Royal Highness, and then the 
Recorder read the address to the Princess in the following 
terms : — 
To Her Royal Highness Helena, Princess Christian of Schleswig 

HOLSTEIN. 

May it please your Royal Highness, 

We, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of the Ancient and 
Loyal City of Winchester, gladly embrace the opportunity of welcom- 
ing your Royal Highness to our city. 

We fully recognise the kindness and sympathy which has prompted 
your Royal Highness to attend here to-day for the purpose of opening 
the Prince Christian Victor Memorial Home for Disabled Riflemen. 
This institution will be of lasting benefit, and will ever be associated 
with the revered name of your Royal son, who laid down his life in 
the seivice of his country. 

We earnestly pray that the blessing of Almighty God may be 
vouchsafed to your Royal Highness and every member of your Royal 
Family. 

Given under our Common Seal this fifteenth day of July, one 
thousand nine hundred and four. 

George Ward, Mayor. 
Thomas Holt. Town Clerk. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 143 

Her Royal Highness accepted the address with a smile 
and a how, and she seemed much pleased when the Mayoress 
was introduced and handed her a lovely bouquet of Malmaison 
carnations and tuberoses with trailings of asparagus fern, 
tied with streamers of Royal blue, on which were the City 
Arms in needlework. She took the bouquet with a smile, 
and shook hands pleasantly with the Mayoress. 

The Duke of Connaught then spoke as follows : — Mr. 
Mayor, Aldermen, and gentlemen of the ancient city of 
Winchester, — In the name of my sister. Princess Christian, 
and in my own name, I thank you most warmly for the kind 
words of welcome that have just been read. We are not 
strangers amongst you. We have often had the advantage 
of being in your beautiful city ; but it is an especial pleasure 
to us to visit you on this occasion, when we have come to 
open the Homes that have been established for old Riflemen 
of the Rifle Brigade and the King's Royal Rifles, and in 
memory of those who so gallantly gave up their lives in the 
late war. For myself, as Colonel-in-Chief of the Rifle 
Brigade, and I can speak on behalf of the King's Royal 
Rifles, we very much appreciate the kindly feeling that has 
been shown on all pccasions — and they have been many, 
when the citizens of Winchester have testified their goodwill 
and kindness to the officers and men of those two distin- 
guished regiments. I thank you, Mr. Mayor and gentlemen, 
for the reception which you have given us in your own name, 
and in the name of the citizens of Winchester. 

The following MS. reply, bearing the autograph 
** Helena,*' was handed to the Mayor from the Princess 
Christian : — 

Schomberg House, Pall Mall, S.W., 

July ISth, 1904. 
To the Mayor, Aldermen, and Gouncillobs of the Borough of Win- 
chester. 

I thank you most warmly for your kind welcome to your loyal and 
ancient city. 

It is a true pleasure to me to come amongst you to-day for a purpose 
very near to my heart— that of opening homes for the use of disabled 
Riflemen of the regiment my dear son loved so well, and for which 
I always feel the deepest interest and affection. 

I thank you for your wishes for the welfare of my family, and 
hope that all prosperity may remain with Winchester and its inhabit- 
ants. 

Helena. 



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144 Th^ King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

Three hearty cheers for their Royal Highnesses, led by 
Councillor Forder, were given, the Duke and the Princess 
bowing acknowledgment. 

On the conclusion of the ceremony the Mayor introduced 
the Recorder and the Town Clerk, with whom the 
Duke smilingly shook hands. Then the Aldermen and 
the Councillors present were introduced in order of 
seniority, and His Royal Highness shook hands with every 
, one of them. As the Royal carriage moved away there 
was renewed cheering. Driving round the King Alfred 
statue, their Royal Highnesses returned back up the 
High Street, the Duke inspecting the Volunteer Guard of 
Honour as he passed, and saying a few words, apparently 
pleased, to Major Woodham. The Cathedral bells were 
merrily ringing as the Royal party drove away to St. Cross. 
In Southgate Street, beyond the line of Riflemen, the lads of 
the Trafalgar House School (Rev. W. Naish's) continued the 
alignment, and looked exceedingly smart and well-drilled, 
their picturesque kind of Zouave dress attracting attention. 
The Mayor and CorpK)ration followed in carriages to St. 
Cross. 

In attendance on the Duke during the day were Lieut. - 
Colonel Congreve, v.c. Sir J. Maxwell, k.c.b., and Major 
Holland, r.b. The ladies-in-waiting on the Princess were 
the Hon. Mary Hughes and Mrs. Dick Cunningham. Princess 
Christian wore grey trimmed with white, a white lace scarf, 
and a black and white toque ; the Princess Louise of Schleswig 
Holstein was daintily attired in white silk, with picture hat 
trimmed with pinks and roses. 

The carriage conveying the Royal party arrived at St. 
Cross Church shortly before noon for the purpose of attending 
the service arranged by the Master (the Rev. Canon Brod- 
rick) for the dedication of the Homes. When the Royal 
carriage turned into the gate outside Beaufort's Tower, the 
band of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade from Chatham played 
the National Anthem, which was the signal for the large 
congregation who were within the church to rise. The Duke 
then inspected the Guard of Honour drawn from the Rifle 
Brigade, and, proceeding, the Royal visitors were met at the 
west door by the Master, who was assisted in the service by 
the Chaplain to the Forces, the Rev. W. C. Parr. The 
Brethren of St. Cross headed the procession up the centre 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 145 

aisle, to the chancel where the Duke and the Princesses and 
some of the officers of the staff were accommodated. The 
Aldermen and members of the Town Council entered the 
Church by the door in the north transept, and occupied the 
choir stalls, the band being seated in the north transept. The 
body of the Church was filled with distinguished guests, those 
occupying the front pews being the Earl of Northbrook and 
General Sir Redvers Duller, together with Colonel Mends, 
Colonel Pemberton (c.s.o., Portsmouth), Colonel Herbert, 
Colonel Dugdale, and several other officers past and present 
of the Rifle Corps. The service opened with the singing of 
the hymn, ** Gracious Spirit, Holy Ghost," followed by 
Psalm xxiii. The lesson from Corinthians i. 13, was read 
by the Master, the Rev. W. C. Parr reading the prayers, 
among which was the following one, specially appointed for 
the service : — 

Almighty and Everlasting God, we humbly beseech Thee to accept 
our offering which we make in Thy Name and for Thy Glory. Grant 
unto all that shall dwell within these Homes the blessing of Thy 
Divine protection : Give Thy Holy Angels charge over them to keep 
them in all their ways : Be Thou their stay and comfort in sickness 
and in health : Keep their feet, O Lord, that th«y may walk along 
the narrow way that leadeth unto Eternal Life : Give them health of 
body and peace of mind; and bring them at last to Thine Eternal 
rest, through the merits and mediation of Thy Blessed Son, Jesus 
Christ, Our Lord. Amen. 

The remaining hymns were ** The Son of God goes forth 
to war *' and ** Onward, Christian Soldiers,'* the latter being 
sung to a new score for a band, which was sounded with 
great effect in the church. At the conclusion of the beautiful 
service the National Anthem was sung, and as the congre- 
gation left the church the band played a very pretty voluntary. 

The Duke and Princess then inscribed their names in the 
Visitors' Book as follows: — ** Arthur, Col. -in-Chief Rifle 
Brigade," and ** Helena." afterwards proceeding to the 
Brethren's Hall, where they inspected some excellent speci- 
mens of needlework done by the Brethren. The work was 
closely examined, and the Royal visitors expressed their 
appreciation of what they had seen. The noble Duke also 
asked to be shown the oldest ** Brother," and his request 
was complied with. Entering their carriage again, they were 
escorted by the Yeomanry to Stanmore Lane, where the 
Homes are situate. The Duke alighted, and first shook 



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146 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 

hands with Major Riley, who introduced to their Royal High- 
nesses Mr. B. D. Cancellor (the architect), who handed to 
His Royal Highness the silver-plated keys with which to 
open the doors. Their Royal Highnesses first visited the 
house erected and endowed by the family of the late Lieut. 
Lewis Hall, who fell in South Africa. After also seeing the 
other houses, His Royal Highness had a conversation with 
General Duller, and drove off to the Barracks. There was 
a very large company present, who availed themselves of the 
opportunity of looking over the Homes, and upon all hands 
admiration of their compactness and accommodation was 
expressed. When the visitors returned to their carriages the 
familiar face of General Sir Redvers BuUer was detected by 
the crowd of persons assembled in the lane, and the gallant 
General was vociferously cheered by the onlookers. A 
veteran, who was responsible for the first cheer being given, 
made no secret of the fact that ** he had come in on purpose 
to see General Buller. " His wishes must have been grati- 
fied, for the General repeatedly raised his hat in acknow- 
ledgment of the outburst of enthusiasm with which he was 
greeted. 

Several citizens took the opportunity, after the Royal 
visitors had driven off, of inspecting the Homes. Among 
those present were Mr., Mrs. and the Misses Clowser, Mr. 
Clowser having been for many years connected with the 
Rifles. 

The Royal party drove to the Barracks by way of South- 
gate Street, and through the Westgate to the Romsey Road 
entrance. In St. James' Street the Trafalgar House School 
Company were again lining the roadway, and as they pre- 
sented arms it was evident the Duke looked at them appre- 
ciatively. Across the Barrack Square to the Officers' Mess 
the men of the Rifle Dep6t lined the way, and as their Royal 
Highnesses drove on the square they were received with a 
Royal salute, the band of the 4th Battalion King's Royal 
Rifles playing the National Anthem. The Royal visitors left 
the carriages at the entrance to the Officers' Mess, but a few 
minutes later the Duke walked out, accompanied by Colonel 
Herbert, and inspected the recruits and dep6t staff, the whole 
of whom presented a well set-up and soldierlike appearance, 
bearing in mind the fact that some of the recruits were very 
young at soldiering. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 147 

The Royal visitors and a numerous party of guests were 
entertained at luncheon by the Officers of the Rifle Dep6t, 
the officers' mess of the Hampshire Dep6t being courteously 
placed at the disposal of Rifle Officers for the accommodation 
of their guests. At the Royal table, from left to right, were 
Sir Martin Dillon and Mrs. Mends, Sir Julius Glyn and Mrs. 
; Hall, Colonel E. Herbert, c.b., and Her Royal Highness 

Princess Christian, the Earl of Northbrook and Her Royal 
Highness Princess Louise of Schleswig-Holstein, Lady 
Alexander Russell and Sir Redvers BuUer, His Royal High- 
ness the Duke of Connaught and Mrs. Herbert, Lord Alex- 
ander Russell, Viscount and Viscountess Baring, Lady Glyn 
and General Pemberton, c.b. 

The other guests, as furnished us from the list of accept- 
ances, were : — 

The Marquis of Winchester, Sir J. Maxwell, k.c.b. 
Lady Campbell. 

Hon. Mrs. Willoughby Verner, the Hon. Mary Hughes, the Hon. 
Mrs. Brodrick, Mrs. Dick Cunningham. 

General Wombwell, General Lane. 

Major-General Battersby, Major-General Maclean, Major-General 
Fetherstonhaugh, Major-General Hinxman. 

Colonel Mends, Colonel Browne, Colonel Parkinson, Colonel Dug- 
dale, Colonel A. Boyle, Colonel Bewicke Copley, Colonel Willoughby 
Verner, Colonel Hare, Colonel J. A. Fergusson, Colonel A. Mont- 
i gomery. Colonel Pemberton, Colonel Fortescue, Colonel Le Eoy Lewis. 

Lieut.-Colonel Sir Guy Campbell, Lieut.-Colonel Mosse, Lieut.- 
Colonel W. Congreve, v.c. 
J; Major J. E. B. Martin, Major Russell, Major Riley, Major Turle, 

;^ Major Ellis, Major Crake, Major Clarke, Major Dorling, Major Hon. 

'^ J. R. Brownlow. 

^ Captain Armytage, Captain Barnett, Captain Hope, Captain 

'^ Travers, Captain Fryer, Captain Trethewy, Captain Faith, Captain 

^ Burford-Hancock, Captain F. Ames, Captain Thoornton, Captain 

g Cumberland, Captain Green, Captain Porter, Captain Lord Henniker. 

The Hon. and Rev. Canon Brodrick, the Rev. G. Crowdy, the Rev. 
W. C. Parr. 

r Miss Russell, Miss Boyle, Mrs. Travers, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. 

^ Fryer, Miss Battersby, Miss Crowdy, Mrs. Bewicke Copley, Miss 

Willoughby Verner, Mrs. Turle, Mrs. Hare, Mrs. and Miss Ellis, 
Mrs. Cripps, Mrs. Crake, Mrs. Clarke, Mrs. Trethewy, Mrs. Faith, 
Mrs. Burford-Hancock, Mrs. Dorling, Mrs. Mosse, Mrs. Parr, Mrs. 
Hinxman, Mrs. Lehmann, Miss E. Montgomery, Miss Herbert, Miss 
Doncaster, Mrs. Hampton, Mrs. Button, Mrs. and Miss Howard, Miss 
Hall, Mrs. Armytage, Mrs. Dugdale, Mrs. Russell, Miss Abercromby, 



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148 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Mrs. Barnett, Mrs. Fetherstonhaugh, Mrs. Riley, Miss Montgomery, 
Mrs. Fortescue, Miss Fortescue, Mrs. Cancellor, and Mrs. FaitMuU. 

Mr. A. G. Russell, Mr. Poe, Mr. Hodgson, Mr. Soames, Mr. 
Dumaresq, Mr. Crichton, Mr. Blacker, Mr. Tatton Sykes, Mr. Cripps, 
Mr. Howard, Mr. F. Faithfnll, Mr. B. D. Cancellor, and Mr. L. Hall. 

The catering was in the experienced hands of Messrs. A. 
Dumper and Sons, of Winchester, who served an excellent 
menu in admirable style. 

The fine band of the 4th Battalion King's Royal Rifles 
(under Mr. A. Parkes, bandmaster) rendered a fine selection 
of music. 

Civic hospitality was displayed at the Guildhall by the 
Mayor and Mayoress of Winchester, where his Worship and 
Mrs. Ward entertained some distinguished guests at 
luncheon. 

The concluding scene of yet another Royal visit to Win- 
chester was the departure of the special train between three 
and four o'clock. The train was timed to leave at 3.35, but 
crowds were assembling on Station Hill for a long time 
previous to that, until there was an immense congregation 
of expectant citizens standing several deep, but kept in good 
order by watchful policemen. A privileged few were able to 
get on to the platform itself, to whom a great cheer from 
outside eventually announced the arrival of the carriages 
bearing the distinguished visitors and their suite. A few 
words of farewell to the officers who accompanied them to 
the station, and the Royal party stepped into the saloon, and 
were soon passing out of the station, bowing their acknow- 
ledgments to the cheers of the people assembled on the 
platform, and which were re-echoed by the crowds outside. 
Thus terminated a brief but eventful visit, and one which 
Winchester will always be able to look back upon with pride 
and pleasure. 

The direction of the military arrangements during the day 
were of course in the hands of Colonel Herbert, but he was 
rendered great assistance in regard to matters of a secretarial 
character by Major Riley. Some of the Rifle Brigade Guard 
of Honour came from Chatham, and a portion of the King's 
Royal Rifles were from Gosport. 

Head Constable Felton (who himself did mounted duty 
during the day) organised the police arrangements with his 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 149 

customary tact and discretion, and the work was carried out 
in the quiet but efficient way which is characteristic of the 
Winchester City Police on all important occasions. The 
Duke of Connaught asked Colonel Herbert to express his 
satisfaction to the Head Constable at the arrangements made. 

The address to the Duke was illuminated on vellum by 
Miss Pamplin, of God Begot House, and that to the Princess 
was illuminated by Mr. W. H. Seargent, of the Square. They 
were both beautifully done, and a credit to Winchester skill. 



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150 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

£l$t ana Services or orricers or tDe Kina's Ropai 
Ririe Corps u)i)o aied durina tbe pear or 1904. 



H. R. H. George William Frederick Charles, Duke of 
Cambridge, k.g., k.t., k.p., g.c.b., g.c.s.i., g.c.m.g., g.c.le., 
G.C.V.O. Appointed Colonel-in-Chief 3rd March, 1869. 
Served in Crimea campaign 1854-5. Commanded ist Divi- 
sion at battles of Alma and Balaklava, sortie of 25 th October, 
1854, battle of Inkerman (horse shot), and siege of Sevas- 
topol. Medal with four clasps ; Turkish medal. Died 17th 
March, 1904. His Royal Highness' services are so well 
known both to the nation and the Regiment, that it is 
unnecessary to say more here, or to enlarge upon the heavy 
loss the Regiment has suffered by the death of its Colonel- 
in-Chief. 

Major E. J. Crane died at Malta on the 23rd May, 1904. He 
was promoted Quartermaster 15th March, 1879. Served in 
expedition to Manipur, 1891. Retired nth January, 1899. 
Recalled to service in 1900. Joined 2nd Battalion Royal 
Rifle Reserve. Appointed to Royal Garrison Regiment 
loth May, 1901. The following extract is taken from the 
Malta News : — 
On Monday, 23rd inst., there passed away at Imtarfa Barracks, to 
the g^eat and unfeigned regret of all who knew him, Major E. J. Crane, 
3rd Royal Garrison Regiment. The deceased had been in failing 
health for some months past, but, until quite recently, it was hoped he 
would be able to spend his last days in his native land. But Provi- 
dence had ordained otherwise, and so, by a strange coincidence, it 
fell to the part of his old corps — the King's Royal Rifles — which he 
had left many years previously, to perform the last duty towards him. 
The funeral took place on Tuesday, being attended by a large gather- 
ing of officers, sergeants, and others, representing the staff* and the 
various corps on the island. The cortege left deceased's quarters at 
4 p.m., headed by the band and a firing party of the King's Royal 
Rifles. As the sad procession wound its way down to the little 
military cemetery, Chopin^ s and Beethoven^s marches were impressively 
rendered. The religious ceremony at the graveside, conducted by 
the Rev. Moreton, was concluded with the hymn " Now the labourer's 
task is o'er." After the customary three volleys and the salute, the 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 151 

deceased was left to his long last sleep. Many beautiful floral wreaths 
and emblems were laid by the grave, a striking one being the large 
Maltese cross sent "With deepest sympathy from the Sergeants of 
his old Regiment." (ist 60th Rifles.) 

Colonel Edmund Lomax Eraser received first commission 
23rd June, 1863. Retired 29th May, 1889. Served in 
Red River expedition, 1870. South African war, 1879-80. 
Operations against Sekukuni. Medal with clasp ; brevet of 
Major. Egyptian expedition, 1882-4. — Reconnaissance at 
Ramleh, afifair at Tel-al-Mahuta, action at Kassassin, and 
battle of Tel-el-Kebir. Medal and clasp ; bronze star ; 4th 
class Osmanieh. Soudan, 1884. — Battles of Teb and 
Tamai. Medal with two clasps ; brevet of Colonel. 

Atholl C. J. LiDDELL, Earl OF Ravensworth, received first 
commission i6th May, 185 1. Retired rank of captain, 1864. 

Lieutenant-Colonel John Thomas Maguire, late 60th Rifles, 
a Military Knight of Windsor, died on nth January, 1904, 
after a prolonged illness, at his residence in Windsor Castle. 
Colonel Maguire, who was in his eighty-fifth year, had had a 
brilliant career. He served with the 55th Regiment in 
China, with the 60th Rifles throughout the Punjaub campaign 
of 1848-49, being present at the siege and storming of 
Mooltan, the battle of Goojerat, the pursuit of the Sikh 
army until its surrender at Rawul Pindi, the occupation of 
Attock and Peshawur, and the expulsion of the Afghan force 
beyond the Khyber Pass. He also served throughout the 
Rohilkund campaign and the Indian Mutiny. He was 
thrice mentioned in despatches, and was recommended for 
an unattached majority by Lord Clyde for service in the 
field, but in lieu thereof subsequently obtained the brevet of 
lieutenant-colonel. 



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152 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 

Record or Service or tDe l>arrinaton ?amiip. 



FATHER, JOHN WILLIAM. 
Joined 2nd Battalion (60th) K. R. R. at Dublin on the 5th 
October, 1854; posted to 3rd Battalion (on formation) ist April, 
1855; served with Battalion in India and Aden; G.C.M. ; dis- 
charged 14th February, 1879, Sergeant- Major. 

I.— ALFRED JOHN. 

Joined 3rd Battalion K. R. R. at Chatham, 26th April, 1875 \ 
promoted Color-Sergeant, 1879, served S.A. Zulu Campaign, 1879, 
Ginginlovo and Relief of Ekowie, medal and clasp ; Boer opera- 
tions, 1881 (after hostilities); Egyptian Campaign, 1882, Ramleh, 
Tel-el- Mahoota, Kassassin, Tel-el-Kebir, El Teb, and Tamaai, 
occupation of Suakim, medal, with three clasps, Khedive's Star; 
G.C.M., 1893; recommended for M.S.M., 1895; discharged, 
Color-Sergeant, 22nd June, 1893. 

2.— WILLIAM CHARLES. 

Joined 3rd Battalion K.R.R. at Chatham, loth May, 1875; 
served S.A. Zulu Campaign, 1879, medal and clasp; Boer 
operations, 1881, engaged at Lang's Nek and Ingogo; wounded 
at Ingogo and with dead and wounded, remained on the field 
all night. Being able to walk, next morning made all rifles left 
on the field unserviceable by taking out indicator from breech 
block, rendering them useless to the enemy who searched the 
field. Received the thanks of the Commanding Officer and a 
step of promotion ; no medal given. Egyptian Campaign, 1882, 
medal and Khedive's Star; Soudan, 1884, El Teb and Tamaai, 
occupation of Suakim, and pursuit of Osman Digna, two clasps 
to original medal; appointed Quarter-Master, 2nd Battalion 
Yoruba Regiment, West African Field Force, from Sergeant- 
Major, November 1898, medal and clasp (invalided); appointed 
Quarter-Master to his former Regiment, 3rd K.R.R. Transvaal 
Boer War, 1899 to 1903; Queen's medal, five clasps; King's 
medal, two clasps. Still serving. 

3.— HENRY AUGUSTUS. 

Joined 3rd Battalion K.R.R., at Aldershot, 1879 ; Boer 
operations (after hostilities); Egyptian Campaign, 1882 ; Ramleh, 



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THE HARRINGTON FAMILY. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 153 

5th August; Tel il Mahuta, 25th August; Kassassin, 28th August 
and 9th September; Tel el Kebir, 13th September; Cairo, 
Postmaster for Army of occupation, 1883-4; medal and clasp, 
Khedive's Star; Nile, 1886, additional bar to original medal; 
purchased discharge as Sergeant to accept offer of Egyptian 
authorities in Post Office; at present Postmaster at Suez. 

4.— ARTHUR GEORGE. 

Joined ist Battalion Lincoln Regiment at Aldershot, 22nd 
November, 1862. Changed to 3rd Battalion K. R. R., to serve 
with elder brother. Joined ist Battalion, December, 1898 ; 
present with Battalion at opening of Boer Campaign, and at 
Glencoe, Talana Hill, 20th October, 1899. Conspicuously 
noticed by his Commanding Officer, Lieut.-Colonel Gunning 
(see letter published in Aldershot News, 9th December, 1899, 
etc.). Siege of I^dysmith and subsequent operations; Queen's 
medal, five clasps ; King's medal, two clasps ; and Distinguished 
Conduct medal for Talana Hill. Color-Sergeant, still serving. 

5.— GODFREY. 

Joined 3rd Battalion K. R. R., at Winchester, 14th November, 
1891 ; Boer Campaign, December, 1899; served with Composite 
Battalion at operation on the Tugela for Relief of Ladysmith; 
promoted Sergeant; present at Relief of Ladysmith and sub- 
sequent operations ; Queen's medal, three clasps ; invalided home 
with enteric fever, 1902 ; to Army Reserve, 1903. 

6.— ALBERT WALTER. 

Joined 3rd Battalion K. R. R., 5th June, 1893; served with 
Battalion, Boer War, during operations for Relief of Ladysmith, 
Spion Kop, Pietershill, and Relief of Ladysmith ; invalided home 
with dysentery from Mooi River ; returned to Battalion in South 
Africa ; Queen's medal, five clasps ; King's medal, two clasps. 
Still serving. 

The Brothers, 2, 4, 5, and 6 met at the Relief of Ladysmith. 

This record of service was brought to the notice of Her Most 
Gracious Majesty, the late Queen Victoria, by Sir Guy Campbell, 
Bart., when the following letter, accompanied by an autographic 
photograph, was forwarded to Mr. Harrington, dated 13th 
November, 1900. 



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154 The King*s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



Service to 13th November, 1900 : — 

Father - - 24 years, 

No. I - - 25 

No. 2 - - 25 

No. 3 - - 7 

No. 4 - - 8 

No. 5 - - 9 

No. 6 - - 7 



still serving, 
still serving, 
still serving. 



Total - - 105 years. 



QUEEN'S LETTER. 

Windsor Castle, 

November 13th, 1900. 
Sergeant-Major J. W. Harrington, 

It having been brought to the Queen's notice that not only 
did you serve with distinction in the 60th Rifles, but that at the 
present time you have six sons now serving or who have served 
in that Regiment. 

The Queen was much interested to see the remarkable state- 
ment of the services of your sons, from which it appears that all 
have gained distinction, — one being a Quarter-Master, while the 
other five are Sergeants, and that not only have they all taken 
part in various campaigns, but that four of them are at present 
serving in South Africa 

I am commanded by the Queen to express to you the gratifi- 
cation with which her Majesty has learned of this splendid record 
of service by one family in the same Regiment of her Army, and 
as a mark of her appreciation to forward you the accompanying 
print. 

The Queen hopes that your sons who are out in South Africa 
will return to you safely. 

(Signed) F. A. Ponsonby. 



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TIu King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle. 155 



£lst or Past Officers. 



Name 

Major H. S. H. Prince Francis J. 

Addington, Major H. R 

Allan, Lleut.-Col. C. L 

Allfr^y, Capt. H 

Anderson, Major W. S 

Archer, Lieut.-Col. P. W. 
Ashbnrnham, Major-Gen. Sir C, 

K.C.B. 

Astell, Col. G 

Bagot, Captain A. G 

Banks, Major H. D. 

Barne, Capt. P. J. H. A 

Battersby, Major-Gen. J. P. 

Bajmes, Major G. S 

Beach, Major W. A. H 

Beadon, Lieut.-Col. R. H. 
Beaumont, Major F. M 

Beaumont, Capt. E. H 

Bedingfield, Capt. N. N 

Black, Col. G. R 

Blackwood-Price, Major J. N. ... 

Borrer, Major C 

Borthwick, Lieut.-Col. A., m.v.o. 

Boultbee, Major C. A. T 

Bower, Major R. L., c.m.g. 

Brander, Col. A. J. 

Brereton, F. S., Esq 

Brodie, Capt. E. W 

Brooke, Capt. E. W 

Browne, Col. H. D 

Buller, Gen. Rt. Hon. Sir R. H., 

V.C, G.C.B., O.C.M.O. 

Burstall, Lieut.-Col. J. H. 
Butler, Capt. L. W. G 

Calderon, Lieut.-Col. CM. 

Campbell, Capt. P. 

Campbell, Lt.-Col. Sir Guy, Bt. 
Canning, Major Hon. C. S. G. ... 
Carlisle, Major A 



Address 

L. P., of Teck, K.C.V.O., d.s.o., 7, 
Park Place. St. James's, S.W. 

Hazlewell Lodge, Ilminster, Somer- 
set. 

Barford, Warwick. 

Rudd Hall, Catterick, Yorks. 
Brooklands, Wellington, Salop. 

Moy House. Forres, N.B. 

Army and Navy Club. 
Oxney Court, near Dover. 
Naval and Military Club. 
Lyncroft, Weybridge. 
Wellington Club, S.W. 
Mancetfcer House, Atherstone. 

Buckland Court, Betchworth, 

Surrey. 
Whitley Beaumont, Huddersfield. 

Stranmills, Harrow-on-the-Hill. 

Saintfield, Co. Down. 

57, Brunswick Place, Hove. 

Chief Constable's Office, County 
Buildings, Edinburgh. 

The Moorlands, Kenilworth, War- 
wickshire. 

The West House, Thirsk. 

Hall Hill Cottage, Oxted, Surrey. 
Devonshire Club, 50, St. James' St. 
A. S. Corps, Gibraltar. 
Weeke, Winchester. 
Downes, Crediton. 

80, Cadogan Place. 
Ehrenburg Hall, Torquay. 

Army and Navy Club. 

Rottingdean. 

2, Ryder Street, St. James, S.W. 

Glandwr, Chandler's Ford, Hants. 



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IS6 The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



Name 

Carpenter, Major Q. 

Chalmer, Col. R., c.b 

Champion-de-Crespigny, Sir C, 

Bart 

Charley, Major-Gen. J 

Clarke, Lient.-Col. T. S 

Clowes, Major C. E. 

Cobbold, Capt. R. P 

Cole-Hamilton, W. M., Esq. ... 

Coulson, Capt. P 

Crawley, Major B. P 

Cripps, P. W. B., Esq 

Croft, Lieut.-Col. J. H. H. 

Crosbie, Lieut.-Col. J. Q 

Cunningham, Bde.-Surg. D. D., 

M.B., CLE. 

Davidson, Col. A., m.v.o., c.b. 

Dawson, Gen. P 

Dickenson, Major P. B. N. 

Dixon, Capt. W 

Du Pr6, W. B., Esq. 

Eaton, S. O., Esq 

Ellis, Major C 



Address 

Army and Navy Club. 

Champion Lodge, Heybridge, 
Maldon. 

Woodlands, Lynton, N. Devon. 

Junior Constitutional Club, Picca- 
dilly. 

Sussex Club, Eastbourne. 

The Grove, Ipswich. 



18, Sloane Court, S.W. 

Devon and Exeter Club, Exeter. 

c/o Sir C. McGrigor, Bart, and Co. 



Marlborough Club, Pall Mall. 
Aubervie, Pitville, Cheltenham. 
Siston Court, Bristol. 
177, Mitcham Lane, Streatham. 
Coxwell House, Cirencester. 

Tolethorpe, Stamford. 

Branksome Hall, nr. Bournemouth. 



Parmer, Lieut.-Col. G. L. M'L. 

Peilden, Capt. J. H. G 

Fenwick, Capt. C. H 

Fen wick. Major N. E. de B. 
Fetherstonhaugh, Major-Gen. R. 

S. R., C.B. 
Fetherstonhaugh- Whitney, Ma j . 

H. E. W . 

Fife, A. J., Esq 

Finch, Major J. S. Wynne 

Finch, S. A. G., Esq 

Fitz-Gerald, Lieut.-Col. Lord P. 
Fitz-Gerald, Capt. Lord W. ... 

French, G., Esq 

Fryer, Capt. C. G 



Army and Navy Club. 
Witton Park, Blackburn. 
Norton Grange, Malmesbury. 
25, High Street, Portsmouth. 
Ryde, I.W. 

New Pass, Rathowen, Co. West- 
meath. 

104b, Mount Street, W. 
Bachelors' Club, Piccadilly, W. 
Carton, Maynooth. 
Kilkea Castle, Mageney, Co. 
Eildare. 

Worthy Park, Winchester. 



Gathorne-Hardy, Col. Hon. C. G. 43, Lennox Gardens, S.W. 



Gilmour, Capt. J. P. E 

Golightly, Col. R. E., d.s.o. 
Gore-Browne, Lieut.-Col. H. 
Gormanston, Viscount, o.c.m.g. 

Gott, W. W. M., Esq 

Gray, J. R., Esq 

Green, Capt. W. D. H 



Naval and Military Club. 

7, Kensington Square. 
Balbriggan, Co. Meath. 
1, Sloane Gardens, S.W. 
Farley Hill House, Reading. 



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The King's Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 157 



Ncune 

Grenfell, Gen. F. W., Lord, g.c.b., 

O.C.M.G. 

Greville, Capt. Hon. A. H. F. ... 
Grimwood, Col. G. G 

Hare, Col. J , 

Harman, Bde.-Surgeon W. M. .. 



Address 

Royal Hospital, Dublin. 

52, South Audley Street. 
Agra. 

Blairlogie, Stirling. 

15, Cliristchurch Road, Winchester. 



Hamilton, Lt.-Col. Sir F., Bart. Barasel, Stratford-on-Avon. 

Hatchell, Major-Gen. G Finshade Abbey, Stamford. 

Heathcote, A. S., Esq., v.c. 
Hickman, Major R. J. 
Hinxman, Major-Gen. R. W. 
Hobhouse, Capt. C. E. 
Holland, Capt. Hon. C. T. 
Holmes, Capt. W. N. 

Hope, Capt. C. 

Hope-Edwardes, Lt.-Col. H. J. Netley Hall, Shrewsbury. 

Howard, Major H. C 

Howden, Major Jl D 

Huth, A. H., Esq 

Hutton, Major-Gen. Sir E. T. H., 

K.C.M.G., C.B. 

Hutton, Surgeon-Major G. A. ... 



44, Denbigh Street, S.W. 

Monkton Farleigh, Bradford, Wilts. 

Governor H.M. Prison, Canterbury. 

Tasmania. 

Cowdenowes, Earlston, N.B. 



Arthur's Club, London. 
34, Eaton Place, S.W. 



Innes, Surg.-Gen. Sir J. H. K., 

Irby, Capt. L. P 

Ireland, Capt. J 

Jacson, Lieut.-Col. J. H. F. 

Kennedy, Capt. W. H 

Killick, Capt. G. L. B 

Kinloch, Major-Gen. A. A. A., 

C B. 

Kitson, Col. G. C 

Legh, Major H. C 

Loftus, Capt. St. J. D. T 

Lord, N., Esq. 

Lovett, Major H. R. , 

Lysons, Major D. C. W 

MacCall, Col. H. B., c.b 

MacQueen, Capt. H. B 

McTavis, Brigade-Surg. A. C. .. 

Mallandaine, Capt. J. J 

Marling, Lieut.-Col. P. S., v.c. .. 

Marsham, Major F. S 

Marsham, Major H. S 

Martin, A., Esq 

Martin, Major J. E. B 



Army and Navy Club. 

Dunsland, Brandis Corner, Devon. 



Girtford House, Sandy, Beds. 

Logie, Kirremuir, Forfar. 
Commandant, Sandhurst. 



Carlow. 

38, Park Lane, W. 
Henlle Hall, Chirk. 
Raigersfield, Maidstone. 

Army and Navy Club. 

16, Eglington Crescent, Edinburgh. 



18th Hussars. 

Upper Holmwood, Cowes, I.W. 
Rippon Hall, Norwich. 
Kingsmead, Winchester. 
Manor Cott., Clewer Green, 
Windsor. 



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158 The King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle, 



Name 
Milborne-Swinnerton-Pilkington, 

Lieut.-Col. Sir T. E., Bart. 

Miles, Major A. E 

Moore, G. Greville, Esq 

Montagu-Stuart-Wortley, Lt.-Col. 

E. J., C.M.G., M.y.o., D.8.0. 
Montgomery, Sir B., Bart. 
Morris, Col. A 

Nevill, H. J., Esq 

Newton, Capt. H 

Nicholson, Capt. H. B 

Oliver, Dep. Surg.-Gen. W. S., m.d. 
Orde-Powlett, Hon. W. A. 
Overton, Major E. F 

Pakenham, Major E. T 

Pauli, Major N. J 

Pemberton, Major-Gen. W. L., c.b. 

Pepys, Capt. A 

Pepys, Hon. W 

Petre, Capt. C. B 

Peyton, J. E. H., Esq 

Philips, Capt. W. D 

Pigott, Major G. F 

Pixley, Major A. D. 

Pratt-Barlow, E. A., Esq. 



Address 

Chevet Park, Wakefield. 

14, Greville Place, S.W. 
Army and Navy Club. 
Highcliffe Castle, Christchurch, 

Hants. 
Kinross House, Kinross, N.B. 
19, Salisbury Road, Hove. 

157, Victoria Street, Westminster. 

43, Lowndes Street. 

2, South Audley Street, W. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Heasley Hall, Leyburn, Yorks. 
Albert Road, Southsea. 

Franklyns, Hay ward's Heath. 

Army and Navy Club. 

Abbot's Leigh, Hayward's Heath. 

Knole House, Budleigh Salter ton. 

46, Pilbeach Gardens, S.W. 

Hatchwoods, Winchfield, Hants. 

13, Fourth Avenue, Brighton. 

Army and Navy Club. 

9, Tedworth Square, Chelsea. 

Naval and Military Club. 



Rawlinson, Col. Sir H., Bart., c.b. 

Rhodes, Col. G 

Rhodes, Capt. J. W 

Rhodes, Capt. J. E 

Richardson, F. J., Esq 

Rickman, A. P. W., Esq. 

Riddell, Capt. H. S. H 

Robinson, Lieut.-Col. B. H. 
Ryder, Lieut.-Col. D. G. R. 

Ryder, Capt. C. J 

St. Aubyn, Capt. Hon. E. S. 

St. Leger, Major A. J. B 

St. Maur, Lord Edward 

Salmon, Major W. H 

Sanford, Major E. A 

Scudamo re-Stanhope, Capt. Hon. 
E.J. 

Sewell, Major C. F 

Shakerley, Capt. G. H 



Commandant, Staff College. 
Ambleside, Westmoreland. 
Hennerton, Henley-on-Thames. 
Wootton, Ryde, I.W. 

Kingstone Lisle, Wantage. 
Army and Navy Club. 
3, Harley Gardens, S.W. 
Old Fishery House, Boxmoor, 

Herts. 
Naval and Military Club. 

Bachelors' Club. 

Nightingale Road, Southsea. 

Brynglas Hall, Llanfair, Welsh- 
pool. 

Surbiton House, Sea View Terrace, 
Margate. 

Army and Navy Club. 

Hereford. 

Naval and Military Club. 



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Name 

Shakeiley, Col. Sir W. G., Bart. 
Smith, Major-Gen. Sir C. H., 

K.C.M.G., C.B. 

Smith, K. S.. Esq 

Soltau Symons, Capt. G. A. J. ... 
Somerset, Lt.-Col. The Duke of ... 

Spottiswoode, Capt. J 

Stanley, Capt. Hon. F. C, d.s.o. 

Story, Major R 

Stuart, Major W. D 

Templetown, Viscount 

Terry, Major-Gen. Astley 

Terry, Major A. H 

Thistlethwayte, Major E. W. ... 

Thome, Major C. R. B 

Thurlow, Lieut.-Col. E. H. 

Thynne, U. 0., Esq 

Tllden, Lieut.-Col. W 

Tollemache, Hon. S. H. R. L. ... 
Travers, Capt. F 

Treeve, Lieut.-Col. H. R 

Trotman, Col. G. H 

Troubridge, Capt. Sir T. H. C, 
Bart. 

Tufnell, Col. A 

Turle, Major W. G 

Tumour - Fetherstonhaugh, Lt.- 
Col. Hon. K. 



Address 

Somerford Park, Congle^on. 
Nurscombe Grange, Bramley, 
Guildford. 

Eton College. 

Maiden Bradley, Bath. 

Grenadier Guards. 

36, Hill Street, Berkeley Square. 

Marlborough Club, Pall Mall. 
123, St. George's Road, S.W. 
A. S. Corps, Ceylon. 
Naval and Military Club. 
10, Cambridge Park, Bristol. 
Mill Bank, Stiff ords Bridge, 

Malvern. 
21, Hans Place, S.W. 
1, St. James's Lane, Winchester. 

Argyle Place, The Park, Chelten- 
ham. 



66, Gloucester Gardens, Hyde Park. 

Weston, Bath. 
Newton Stacey, Hants. 
Up Park, Sussex. 



Vaughan, A. P., Esq. 
Vere, Lieut.-Col. H. 

Wade, Surgeon-Major-Gen. F. 
Wallace, Lieut.-Col. N. W. 

Walpole, Major H. 
Walsh, Capt. Sir H., Bart. 

Ward, Capt. E. F 

Ward, Major E. H. 
Ward, Capt. H. A. H. 

Wilson, Capt. R. C. D. ... 
Williams, Lieut.-Gen. H. F. 

Wood, F. J. A., Esq. 
Wortham, Lieut.-Col. C. ... 
Wylie, Col. H. P. M. 



Army and Navy Club. 



Army and Navy Club. 
Killaha, Beaconsfield Road, St. 

Albans. 
Heckfield Park, Winchfield, Hants. 
Ballykilcavan, Queen's County. 

Army and Navy Club. 

Haroldeane, Christchurch Road, 
Winchester. 

Preston Deanery, Northampton. 

1, Elliott Terrace, Tho Hoe, Ply- 
mouth. 

Hallow Park, Worcester. 

Boodle's Club, S.W. 

Chelmarsh Hall, nr. Bridgenorth, 
Shropshire. 



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NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



The Editor requests that all correspondents, and more 
especially those on the Committee who are responsible 
for Battalions, will post their contributions for the next 
number of the Chronicle at such a date as will ensure that 
they come to hand by November 30th, 1905, without fail. 

In the case of Battalions serving abroad, it is requested 
that the " Record," ** Musketry," etc., should be, in the first 
instance, completed up to November ist and sent off to 
the Editor, and that a supplementary " Record," etc., up to 
the end of the year, together with the Battalion State, should 
be posted on December 31st. 

Correspondents are requested to adhere to the following 
rules : — 

I. — All communications to be written on one side only 
of the paper, leaving a wide margin. 

2. — All names of persons and foreign places to be 
written in block type, thus: LADAKH. 

It is requested that all correspondence may be directed 
to Major Riley, Rifle Dep6t, Winchester, and marked 
" King^s Royal Rifle Corps Chronicle " outside. 

Those wishing to become annual subscribers to the 
Chronicle are requested to fill in the acconfipanying form 
and send it to the Honorary Secretary. 



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