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Full text of "Klers' violin repository of dance music : comprising reels, strathspeys, hornpipes, country dances, quadrilles, waltzes &c."

Il 






THE GLEN COLLECTION 
OF SCOTTISH MUSIC 
Presented by Lady Dorothea Ruggles- 
Brise to the National Library of Scotland, 
in memory of her brother, Major Lord 
George Stewart Murray, Black Watch, 
killed in action in France in 1914. 
28(/i Januarii 1927. 




X "" 



iyU. --^^ CL 



[BOO. second.] KOHLERS' 

VIOLIN EEPOSITORT 



DANCE MUSIC. 



COMPRISING 



%xA%, %\xi%%%ti% fl0rn]^ip5, Countrg ganas, 



QUADRILLES, WALTZES, &g. 



EDITED BY 

A. PROFESSIONAL PLAYER. 



, ■ OF SCOTLAND ^ 

EDINBURGH: ERNEST KOHLER & SON, MUSIOSELLERS, 11 NORTH BRIDGE. 
MORISON BROTHERS, 99 BUOHANAN STREET, GLASGOW. 

MARTIN, ABERDEEN. MENZIES & CO., EDINBURGH. 

J. CUNNINGHAM, DUNDEE. J. M. MILLER, PERTH. WILLIAM DEAS, KIRKOALDy. 

JAMES HORSBURGH, 73 GEORGE STREET, DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND. 

LONDON : CATTY & DOBSON, 14 PILGRIM ST., LUDGATE HILL. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 with funding from 

National Library of Scotland 



http://www.archive.org/details/klersviolinrepos02rugg 



CONTENTS. 





Page. 


No. 


A GiiM New Tear, Song, 


. 144 


18 


Air from Guillaiime Tell, 


. 184 


23 


Albert Hornpipe 


. 161 


19 


Albert Hornpipe, 


. 188 


24 


Alexandria Schottische, . 


. 112 


14 


Ball March, .... 


. . 178 


23 


Beautiful Danube Waltzes, . 


. 130 


17 


Bedding of the Bride Reel, . 


. 172 


22 


Beeswing Hornpipe, 


. 133 


17 


Belladrum House Strathspey, 


. 103 


13 


Be Sharp before it's Dark. 


. UC 


10 


Billy Mill 


. I'Ju 


16 


Black, but Comely, Reel, 


. 126 


16 


Black Cock of Wickam, . 


. . 116 


19 


Brechin Castle Strathspey, 


. . 168 


20 


Broadsword Hornpipe, . 


. 160 


10 


California Hornpipe, 


. ISO 


23 


California Hornpipe, 


. 143 


18 


Cease not to Row, Brave Boys, 


. 1C8 


21 


Champion Hornpipe, 


. . 126 


16 


Chase Polka, .... 


. . 97 


13 


Choeur des Chasseurs, 


. 122 


16 


Clach na Cudain Strathspey, . 


. 102 


13 


Comely Garden Reel, 


. 119 


15 


Comet Hornpipe, 


. 175 


22 


Condor Valse, .... 


. 113 


16 


Confusion Hornpipe, 


. 108 


14 


Conquest— Contre Dance, 


. 120 


16 


Conway Hornpipe, . 


. 130 


17 


Countess of Cassillis's Reel, . 


. 127 


16 


Countess of Cassillis's Strathspey, 


. 127 


16 


Cross of Inverness Reel, . 


. 107 


21 


Cuckoo Valse 


. 112 


14 


Cumberland Reel, . 


. 134 


17 


Dairy House Strathspey, . 


. 126 


16 


Dead March in Saul, 


. 129 


17 


Deil among the Meal Men, 


. 07 


13 


Doctor Strathspey, . 


. 121 


10 


Donald Quaich's Reel, . 


. 110 


14 


Duke of Albany's Schottische, 


. 174 


22 


Duke of Gordon's Strathspey, 


. 118 


15 


Duke's Hornpipe, . . . . 


. 164 


21 


Dumb Man of Manchester Reel. . 


. 160 


10 


Dunfermline Races 


. 127 


18 


Dunkeld House Jig, . 


. 162 


1 


Earl Marshal's Reel, 


. 101 


24 


Earl of Dalhousie's Welcome Strat 


lispey, 168 


20 


Earl of Eglinton's Strathspey, 


. 118 


15 


Edinbro' Castle Strathspey. . 


. 141 


18 


Edinbro' March, 


. 179 


23 


Electric Polka, 


! 123 


16 


Emerald Hornpipe, . 


. 188 


24 


Enterprise Hornpipe, 


. 117 


16 


Fancy Clog Hornpipe, . 


. 181 


23 


Fashions which the Lasses have—] 


leel, 166 


21 


Favourite Hornpipe, 


. 175 


22 


Feather Bed Reel 


. 147 


19 


Fiddler's Fancy Hornpipe, . 


. 108 


14 


Fire Cross Song 


. 168 


21 


Fisher's Hornpipe 


. 166 


20 


Flying Dutchman Hornpipe, . 


. 116 


16 


For a' that an* a' that— Reel, . 


. 103 


13 


Forest where the Deer resort. 


. 182 


23 


Gaiety Hornpipe, . 


. 180 


23 


Gardner Lads' Hornpipe, 


. 143 


18 


General M'Donald's Reel, 


. 136 


17 


Girnigoe Castle Strathspey, . 


. 148 


19 


Grape Vme Twist Hornpipe, . 


. 189 


24 



Page. No. 

Green Fielda of America— Reel, . . 104 13 

Grey Daylight Strathspey, . . . 148 19 

Hart's Tenth Set of Quadrillea, . . 138 18 

Hawk Hornpipe 125 14 

Hearty Lassies o' Shields, . . .108 14 

Highlandman in Paris Strathspey, . 168 20 

Highland Dress and Armour, . . 172 22 

Hiprh Road to Fort Augustus— Reel, . 173 22 

Hoop Her and Gird Her Jig, . . .152 19 

Hunter 130 17 

Huntsman's Choriis, . . . . 122 16 

I '11 Break your Head for you Reel, . 183 23 

Irish Air Jig, 152 19 

Irish Girl Jig 192 24 

Irishman's Fancy Hornpipe, . . .188 24 

Jack Dobson's Reel 142 18 

Jiybii-d'a Hornpipe, 164 21 

John Diamond's Hornpipe, . . . 189 24 

Johnny Lad— Reel 118 15 

Johnny Steel's Strathspey, . . .172 22 

Kilchatton Wedding Reel, . . .182 23 

Killiecrankie, -with variations, . . 161 21 

Lady Betty Boyle's Reel, . . . . 121 10 

Lady Doll Strathspey, . . . . 190 24 

Lady Mauchlin's Reel Ill 14 

Lady M'Kenzie of Coul's Reel, . . 103 13 

La Verre en Main Polka, . . .155 20 

Lena 154 20 

Lord Binniug's Reel, . . . . 119 15 

Lord Blantyre's Strathspey, . . .134 17 

Lord Eglinton's Hornpipe, . . . 124 IG 

Lord President Forbes' Strathspey, . 166 21 

Lovat's Restoration Strathspey, . . 133 23 

Maggie Gowloch's Reel, . . . . 103 13 

Maggie Lauder, with variations, . . 98 13 

Margaret M'Donald's Strathspey, . . 107 21 

Maids of Isla Strathspey, . . .126 16 

Marchmout House 120 16 

March from Bellini's Opera, "Norma," 170 22 

March of the Conscript 136 17 

Marquis of Waterford's Hornpipe, . 142 18 

Marseillaise Hymn, 178 23 

Martha 186 24 

May's Quadrilles 114 16 

Mazurka, 137 18 

Meg Merrilees' Hornpipe, . . ,156 20 

Mein Schatzerl 144 18 

Merivu Polka 174 22 

Milanese Contre Dance 133 17 

Miss Elphinston's Strathspey, . . 119 15 

Miss Gordon's Reel, 141 18 

Miss Jessie Smith's Strathspey, . . 102 13 

Miss Polly Skinner's Reel, . . , 100 24 

]\Iiss Skeen's Strathspey, . . . . 139 18 

Miss Stewart Menzies' Strathspey, . 1 40 18 

MoyhallReel 173 22 

Mi\ M 'Neil of Oakfield's Reel, . 150 20 

Mrs. Loch's Favourite Jig, , . .128 16 

Mrs. Murray's Strathspey. . . .149 19 

Mrs. Parker's Reel, U!) 19 

lyirs. Rigg's Jig 128 16 

Mrs. Tullouh'sJig, 192 24 

My ain kind Dearie, 162 21 

My Wife she 's ta'eu the Gee Strathspey, 135 17 

Nantasket Hornpipe, . . . . 181 23 

Napoleon's March 179 23 

Nelse Mowbray's Reel . . . . 1G4 21 

New Bob Reel ill 14 





Page 


No. 


New Dick Hornpipe, 


. 132 


17 


New TiiriiT Hunt Reel, . 


. 141 


18 


New Varsoviana 


. 160 


20 


Now is the Time Reel, . 


. 165 


21 


Oh, Hey Johnny Lad Strathspey, . 


. 110 


14 


Oh, if Jocky would but Steal me— Kee 


, 169 


20 


Old Cambridge Hornpipe, 


. 180 


23 


Original Varsoviana, 


. 145 


19 


Pain's First Set of Quadrilles, 


. 106 


11 


Parks of Kilburnie Strathspey, 


101 


21 


Peacock's Fancy Hornpipe, . 


. 116 


15 


PeaStrae, 


120 


15 


Peggy up the Burn Reel, . 


147 


10 


PerriwigKeel 


101 


24 


Petrie's Frolic Strathspey, 


111 


14 


Pleyel's Hornpipe 


167 


20 


Pop goes the Weasel Reel, 


. 120 


16 


Pride of the North Valses, . 


169 


22 


Prince of Wales' Strathspey, . 


134 


17 


Prince Charlie's Strathspey, . 


166 


21 


Queen's Triumph Reel, . 


140 


18 


Ranting Lads of Sunderland, 


m 


15 


Red Lion Hornpipe 


176 


22 


Rendezvous Reel 


107 


21 


Rocky Road to Dublin Reel, . 


147 


19 


Rose of Denmark, .... 


142 


18 


Roxburgh Ball Reel, 


168 


20 


Roxburgh Valse, .... 


186 


21 


Russian National Anthem, . 


184 


23 


Scotch Hornpipe 


180 


21 


Soups Come Hornpipe 


176 


22 


Second Star Hornpipe, . 


100 


11 


Shattuck's Reel 


176 


22 


Shepherdess 


168 


21 


Shuter's Hornpipe 


167 


20 


Sir J. Henderson's Jig, . . . . 


102 


24 


Sir John Malcolm's Strathspey, . 


110 


14 


Sling the Hatchet Reel 


176 


22 


Snow Drift Valses, 


177 


23 


Soldier's Joy, 


133 


17 


Source of Spey Strathspey, . 


189 


24 


South Shore Hornpipe 


117 


15 


Splitwood Hornpipe, . . . . 


165 


21 


Sportsman's Hunt Strathspey, 


173 


22 


Stephenson's Fancy Hornpipe, 


104 


13 


Stephenson's Monument, 


116 


15 


Stockport Hornpipe, . . . . 


109 


14 


Stoney Steps Hornpipe, . . . . 


156 


29. 


Strangers' Hornpipe 


121 


16 


Sucky bids me-Reel 


148 


19 


Swamp Angel Hornpipe, 


181 


23 


Sweet's the Name of Peggy— Reel, 


146 


10 


The Three A's Hornpipe, . 


161 


19 


Three Farthings for a Halfpenny, . 


160 


10 


Three Graces' Hornpipe 


165 


21 


Trip to Paris Jig 


128 


16 


Tullymet Hall Reel 


135 


17 


Tyke Side, 


133 


17 


Tynemouth Castle Hornpipe, . 


104 


13 


Vica Hornpipe 


109 


11 


Weaver has a Daughter Strathspey, . 


182 


23 


Wedding in the West Reel, . 


146 


19 


We'ilallbeWedinour AuIdClaes, . 


143 


18 


West End Hornpipe 


124 


16 


Wheatsheaf Schottische, . . . 


186 


21 


WittleDean 


147 


19 


Wood's Hornpipe 


167 


20 


Vfs or No Valse, 


106 


11 



KdHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 13.] 



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KoHLEKS' "ViOLIK EePOSITOEY," 11 NOETH BRIDGE, EDINBUKOH. 



Fine. 



104 
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V Up Bow. 

KOhlebs' "Violin Reeositoby," 11 Nobth Beitge, Edinbueoh, 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 14.] 



Price 4d. 



[Copyright. 



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-joi-i 



YES, OR NO!— Valses. %R. M. Tatlok. 

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KoHLEEs' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



106 



1. PAIN'S FIRST SET OF aUADRILLES. 



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KoHLEEs' "Violin Repository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



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. Two Up or Down Bows. 



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KOhlees' "Violin Kepositoky," 11 Noeih Beidge, Edinbuegh. 



108 
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KOhlbrs' "Violin Repository," 11 North Bridge, Bdinbueoh. 



109 
SECOND STAR HORNPIPE. 



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KijHLEEs' "Violin Repositoey," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh, 



110 



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Segue Reel. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. -: 

KbHLEKs' "Violin Eepositobt," 11 Nokih Beidge, Edihbukgh. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



112 



THE ALEXANDRIA SCHOTTISCHE. Composed hy 3. DKvimo^. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. — : — J— Two Up or Down Bows. 

KOhlees' "Violin Eepository," 11 Noeth Bbidge, EDiNBDuaH. 



B.C. 



kOhlers' violin repository. 



No 15.] 



Prick 4d. 



[Copyright. 



1. 






n 



THE CONDOR VALSE. Composed hy J. Davidson, Violinist. 
Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. — ^ — ?_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KoHLEES' "ViouN Eepositoet," 11 NofiTH Bkidge, Edinbukoh. 



114 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. -: 

KOhlbks' "Violin Repository," 11 North Beidgb, Edinburgh. 



115 



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n Down Bow. 



. Two Up or Down Bows, 



D.C. 



KoHLEKs' '^Violin Eeposiiory," 11 North Bridge, EoiNBUEaH. 



116 



THE FLYING LUTCHMAN-Hornpipe. By James Hill. 






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V Up Bow. 
KOhlees' "Violin Kepositoey," U North Bridge, Edinburgh, 



117 



THE RANTING LADS OF SUNDERLAND-Hornpipe. 



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KOhlees' "Violin Kepositokt," 11 North Beidge, Edinburgh. 



118 



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THE DUKE OF GORDON'S STRATHSPEY. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. -^ ?_ Two Up or Down Bows, 

KoHLERs' "Violin Eepositoey," 11 North Bridge, Edinbukgh. 



no 



LORD BINNING'S REEL. 






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V Up Bow. 
KaHUBKs' "ViOLiH Repository," 11 North Beidgb, Edinbukgh. 



120 



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THE CONaUEST-Contre Dance. 



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(To be continued.) 

V Up Bow. ri Down Bow. 

EbELEBs' "VioUN Ekpository," 11 North Bkidgb, Edinbuegh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 16.] 



Prick 4d. 



[Copyright. 



THE DOCTOR-Strathspey. 

Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 








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K.OHLEKS' "Violin Eepositoby," 11 Nobth Bridge, Edijsborgh. 



122 



Allegro. 



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KtiHLEKs' "Violin Kepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh, 



123 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _! ?_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KOhlees' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bkibge, Edinburgh. 



124 



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KChlees' "Violin Eepositort," 11 Nobth Bridge, Edinburgh. 



125 



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THE HAWK— Hornpipe. ^y James Hill, ITewcastle. 



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THE CHAMPION HORNPIPE. 



By James Hill. 






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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

KoHLEEs' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



-^-^- 



126 



DAIRY HOUSE-^Strathspey. 




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KoHLEKs' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



B.C. 

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Segue Reel. 



127 






DUXFERMLINE RACES. 



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KoHLEEs' "Violin Repository," 11 Noeth Bridoe, Edinburgh. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. -± — 1_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KbHLEEs' "Violin Repository," 11 Nokth Bbibgk, Edinburgh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 17.] 



Prick 4d. 



[Copyright. 



n Andante. 



THE DEAD MARCH IX SAUL. 

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130 

1. BEAUTIFUL DANUBE- Waltzes. 

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KbHLEEs' "Violin Eepositort," 11 Nobth Bridge, Edinbueoh. 




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KOHLEEs' "Violin Eepository," 11 Noeth Bbidge, Edinbukqh, 



132 
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KOhlees' "Violin EEPosrroEy," 11 Noeth Bbisqe, EDiNBtrKoa 



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KoHiBEs' "Violin Eepositobt," 11 North Bbldgb, Edinbuboh. 



134 
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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _ = :_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KOhleks' "Violin Eepositoet," 11 Nokth Bridge, Edinburgh. 



135 



TULLYMET HALL-Reel. 



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Kohlees' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



136 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. — i :— Two Up or Down Bows. 

KoHLEBs' "Violin Eepositoey," 11 North Biodge, Edutburgh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 18.] 



Price 4d. 



[Copyright. 



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No. 2 MAZURKA. 

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J).C. 



KoHLEBs' "Violin Kepository," 11 North BktdgEj Edinburgh. 



1. 



138 
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KcHLEEs' "ViOlIN KePOSITORY," 11 NoRTH BRIDGE, EdINECRGH. 



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KOhlees' "Violin Repositobt," 11 North Beidob, Edinbitrgh, 



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KeHiMs' "Violin Bepositorv," 11 North Bridge, Edinbdtioh. 



. Two Up or Down Bowa. 



141 



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EDINBRO' CASTLE-Straths^y. 



D.C. Fine. 






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V Down Bow. — : — =_ Two Up and Down Bows. 

KoHCKRS' "Violin Repositokv," 11 North Bbidge, Edinburgh, 



Fine. 



143 



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MAnauis or waterford's hornpipe. 



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THE ROSE OF DENMARK. 

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By R. Stephenson. 



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JACK DOBSON-Reel. 



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JSy H. Shaw. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



KoHLEKs' "Violin Eepositort," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh, 



143 
CALIFORNIA HORNPIPE. By James Hill, Newcastle. 



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THE GARDNER LADS-Hornpipe 



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WE'LL ALL BE WED IN OUR AULD CLAES-(Very Old). 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

EiiHLERs' "VioLijf Eeposiioby," 11 NoBTH Bricok, Edikbvroh, 



144 



A llegretto. 



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MEIN SCHATZERL. 



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A GUID NEW YEAR-Song. 

Moderato. 

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^* ^^ D.O. 



(To be continued.) 

*This Song may be had at Messrs. Kohler & Son, 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. Price 2d. 

V Up Bow. |-) Down Bow. 

KOHtEtts' "Violin Repository," 11 Nopth Bkipge, Euiniwroh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 19.] 



Prick 4d, 



[Copyright. 



THE ORIGINAL VARSOVIANA. 

Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 






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V Tip Bow. n Down Bow. _! 

KoELBKs' "Violin Eepository," 11 North BwDuii, Euiubobgh, 



B.C. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



146 



SWEET'S THE NAME OF PEGGY-Reel. 




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BE SHARP BEFORE ITS DARK-Reel. 



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WEDDING IN THE WEST-Reel. 



D.O. 



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THE BLACK COCK OF WICKAM. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

KeHLEKs' "Violin Eepositoey," 11 Nobth Bridge, EDiNBUBaa 



£>.a 



147 



FEATHER BED-Reel. 



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ROCKY ROAD TO DUBLIN-Reel. 



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PEGGY UP THE BURN-Reel. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

KoHLEKs' "Violin Eepositort," 11 North Bkidge, Edinbukoh. 



148 



I 



V 



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GIRNIGOE CASTLE-Strathspey. 



33 ?:^ ^± ^ ^^^3^J^^^Ff3 g ^ i^ 



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By Bain, Wick 

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SUCKY BIDS ME-Reel. 



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GREY DAYLIGHT-Strathspey. 



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D.C. 



V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



Segue Reel, 



KShlees' "Violi>' Repositort," 11 NoETH Bridge, Edinburgh, 



149 



MRS. PARKER-Reel. 




••^t^ 



D.C. Fine. 



MRS. MURRAY-Strathspey. ^ ^ 



^=;J:ifi^_-=^=g:*i.— 




Segue Red. 



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MRS. PARKER'S REEL. 

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^r=^gz:f^=^=p=gz|zf^.zpz:P-pzzp-f^=pzzpz|zp=^-^g -^^ 



V Down Bow. -1 :_ Two Up and Down Bows. 

KoHLEES' "Violin Repositokv," 11 ISTokth Bkldoe, Edinbukgh. 



D.O. Fine. 



150 



THE BROADSWORD HORNPIPE. 




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DUMB MAN OF MANCHESTER-Reel. 



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THREE FARTHINGS FOR A HALFPENNY. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

KoHLEBS' "Violin Eepositoet," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



151 
THE THREE A'S HORNPIPR 

{Composed and played hy "Waiter Kadpobd of Manchester, at Ben Lang's Casino, but has never been played since.) 

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ALBERT HORNPIPE. {Composed hy Radford, brother of the above.) 



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(To be continued.) 

V Up Bow. n Down Bow. — ? ^- Two Up or Down Bows. 

KbHLEKs' "Violin Eepository," 11 Nokth Bkidge, Edinburgh, 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 20.] 



Price 4d. 



[COPTRIGHT. 



1. 



LENA. Composedly J. 0. Paton, Organist, Udifibttrgh. 
Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _: :_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KOHLBES' "VlOUN KePOSITORY," 11 NOBTH BslDGE, EDINBURGH. 



154 



3. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _! •— Two Up or Down Bows, 

KOHLERs' "Violin Bepositokv," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



Fine. 



165 



LA VEKBE EN MAIX FOLEA. 



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Piano Part, 3d, 
EOhlbes' "Violin Befosiiobt," 11 North Bbisqe, Eoinbuboh. 



156 



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KOHLBiia' "Violin SBPOsiTORTf," 11 North Bbisg-e, EDiNBtraoH. 



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KOHLEKs' "Violin Repository, " 11 North Bricse, Edinbukoh. 



158 



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THE HIGHLAXDMAN IN PARIS-Strathspey. 




V Up Bow. n Oowa Bow. 



Two Up or Down Bows. 



KOhlers' "Violin Kepository," 11 North Bridoe, Edinburoh. 



159 



"OH, IF JOCKY WOULD BUT STEAL ME "-Reel. 




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KOHLEKs' "Violin Kbpositobv," 11 Kobtb BbidoSj EcISbcrgh. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



D.C. 



160 





THE NEW VARSOVTANA. 






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V Up Bow. n I'o^\n Bow. _; •— Two Up or Dowu Bows, 

Pvmo Part, 3d. No. 701 "Musical Bouquet," 
Koblebs' "Violin Bsfositohy," 11 Kobth BBisaE, Edinbuboh, 



L.a 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 21.] 



Price 4d. 



[Copyright. 



Moderato. 
V 



KILLICRANKIE-With Variations. 

Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 



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KOhlees' "Violin Repositoby," 11 Noeth Bbidqi, Bdinbdrgh. 



162 
MY AIN KIND DEARIE-With Variations. 



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KoHLEKS' "Violin Eepositoey," U Nokth Bridge, Edinbueqh. 



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KOHLERs' "Violin Repository," 11 Nokth Bridge, JEdinbuboh, 



164 
THE JAYBIRD'S HORNPIPE. 




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KtiELEKS' "ViOUN BeFOSITORY," 11 KoRTB BbICOE, EdUTBVBOE, 



166 
SPLIT WOOD HORNPIPE— American Dance. 



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K0HL£B3' "VioUN BBFOStlOmr," 11 KOBTH BXIDaB, I^INBUBOB. 



166 



LOUD PRESIDENT FOBBES' STBATHSPET. 



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KoHLERs' "Violin Eepositobt," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



D.O. 



167 



THE CROSS OF INVERNESS-Reel. 



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KoHLKKS' "Violin Repository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh, 



168 
THE SHEPHERDESS. 




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V V 




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(To be continued.) 

V Up Bow, n Down Bow. s s_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

EijHLBBs' "Violin Eepositort," 11 Korth Bbidoi, Edinburgh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 22.] 



Price 4d. 



[Copyright. 



P 



V 



THE PRIDE OF THE NORTH VALSES. Composed hy Wm. Findlay. 
Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 



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-I— Two Up or Down Bows. 



KOhleks' "Violin Eepository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



170 
* MARCH FROM BELLINI'S OPERA "NORMA." 

r^i "3~~2 -— - . . Arranged by W. B. Laybourn. 



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* No. 2324 Musical Bmiqitet, Piano Part 3d. 
KOhler's "Violin Kepositoky," 11 Nopth Bridge, Edinburgh. 






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KoHLEBS' " Violin Bsrit&iioRv/' 11 North Bbidoe, Edinbuboh. 



172 



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KoHLEEs' "ViotiN Repository," 11 North Bridge, EDiMBtrRoa, 



173 
MOTHALL REEL. 



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KoHLEBs' "Vioi/iN Eepositoet," 11 NoRTH Beidoe, Eoikburgh. 



-•_ Two Up or Down Bows. 



174 




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THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S SCHOTTISCHE. 

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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _i — i_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

KbHLERS' "VioLiH Kepositoby," U Nobtb Bridob, Edinbuboh. 



175 
THE COMET HORNPIPE. 



By Wm. Findlat. 




THE FAVOURITE HORNPIPE. % Wm. Findlat. 



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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. 

(To be continued.) 

KBhlees' "Violin Repository," 11 North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 23.] 



Price 4d. 



[Copyright. 



THE SNOW DRIFT VALSES. (Newly out, 1883.) Gomj^osed by Wm. Findlat, 

1. Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. UAYBOURN. 



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KOhlebs' "Violin Rbpo3itoey," 11 North Bkidgb, Edinbukgh, 



178 



THE BALL MARCH. (New.) 



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Two Up or Down Bows. 



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KOhleb's "VioLrtf Eepositobt," 11 North Bmbob, Edikburgh. 



179 



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. Two Up or Down Bows. 



KoHLEKs' "Violin Kepositoky," 11 North Bkidge, Edinbukoh. 



180 



THE GAIETY HORXPIPE. By W. G. Paton, Edinburgh. 




OLD CAMBRIDGE HORNPIPE. 



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Kohleks' "Violin Ekpositoey," 11 North Bkidoe, Edinbpkgh. 



181 



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KoHLEEs' "Violin Kepositort," 11 Nobth Bridge, Edinbueoh. 



l82 
THE FOREST WHERE THE DEER RESORT— Strathspey. 



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KoHLEKs' "Violin Repository ," 11 Nokth Bkidqe, Edinburgh. 



. Two Up or Down Bows. 



183 



"I'LL BREAK TOUR HEAD FOR YOU "-Reel. 







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Kohlbr's "Violin Rkpositobt," 11 North Bbidob, Edinburgh. 



. Two ITp or Down Bows. 



Fine. 



184 



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(To be continued.) 
KOhleks' "Violin Rbpositort," 11 Nobth Bridob, Edinbukgh. 



KOHLERS' VIOLIN REPOSITORY. 



No 24.] 



Prick 4d. 



[Copyright. 



THE WHEATSHEAF SCHOTTISCHE (New). 

Bowing and Fingering arranged by W. B. LAYBOURN. 

Comjwsed hy D. Wilkinson, Edinhicrgh. 



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. Two Up or Down Bows. 



K.OHLERS' "Violin Repository," U North Bridge, Edinburgh. 



m 



186 

1. Tempo di Valse. MARTHA (Newly OUt). Composed hy "W. 0. Paton. 

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V Up Bow. n Down Bow. _• 1_ Two Up or Down Bows. 

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MUSICAL TREASURY. 

Published by ERNEST KOHLER & SON, II North Bridge, Edinburgh. 

YEARLy, Post Free, 23. 6d. 

1885. 



OOTOBER.-IT0. 77. 



SECULAE. 



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INVENTIONS EXHIBITION, 

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A Variety of Letter- Mote Publications and Appliances on View. 

IMPORTANT TO ALL TEACHERS OP SINGING 11 

The Simplest and Easiest Method of learning to Sing at Sight from the Staff, is hy means of the LETTER-NOTE SYSTEM 
comhlning the advantages of the TONIC SOL-FA with the acknowledged Superiority of the OLD NOTATION. 

Key E. Round for Jf voices. 



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THE MUSICAL TREASVB7. 



A LESSON IN LOVE. 

A TALE. 

" What is the matter, little woman ? " 

" Only tired, John." 

Lina Reynolds looked up as she spoke, to smile bravely 
into the face bending anxiously over her. 

"Tired, Lina?" he said, lifting the little figure as he 
spoke, and taking his wife like a child upon his knee. 
" What have you been doing to tire you?" 

"Only the day's work. Don't worry, John," for a 
shade passed over the kindly face. 

"I don't worry; but I can't see what makes you com- 
plain so often of being tired. I am sure the housework 
ain't so much. Other women do it ! " 

There was just a little fretfulness in John's tone, though 
he did not mean to be unkind. 

" I know they do. Mrs. Harper has four children, and 
takes care of them in addition to housework, besides doing 
pUes of sewing. Perhaps, John, it is because I have not 
had experience in country work, and don't manage weU, 
I will learn better after awhile. Now, tell me what you 
did in town. " 

" I did quite well. Sold the whole crop of wheat at a 
good price, and put another instalment in the bank for the 
Stanley farm." 

" Your heart is set on that farm, John." 

" Indeed it is ! Let me once own that clear of debt, and 
I shall be a happy man. It is the best land in the country, 
and the house is twice as large as this ! " 

Lina thought of larger floors to scrub, more rooms to 
clean, and additional work of all kinds, and swallowed a 
little sigh that nearly escaped her. 

"John," she said, rather timidly, "don't you think if 
you spent part of the money on this house we might be 
very hajipy here ? " 

"Spend money on this house?" cried the astonished 
John. " Why, what on earth ails this house ? " 

' ' I mean in things for it. Now, the parlour looks so 
stiff, and is always shut up. I was thinking if we had a 
pretty carpet and some curtains of white muslin or lace, 
and a set of nice furniture, and — and — a piano. Oh, John, 
if I could have a nice piano." 

John Reynolds looked at his wife as if she had proposed 
to him to buy up the crovm jewels of Russia. 

' ' A piano ! Do you know what a piano costs ? " 

" No. Aunt Louise had one, you know, ever since I 
can remember. But I think if we had a pretty parlour to 
rest in, in the evening, I could play for you and sing. 
You never heard me play and sing, John?" 

" I have heard you sing, but not lately," said John, 
rather gloomily. 

" Oh ! that was just humming around the house. I 
mean real singing. I have lots of music in my trunk." 

" But you are only a farmer's wife now, Lina. I thought 
you understood when we were married that you were not 
to have any city finery or pleasure." 

"So I did, John. I don't want any finery. I don't 
want any pleasure but your love, John. Don't scowl up 
you face so. I am silly to think of these things at all. 
i'here, kiss me and forget it. I am nicely rested now, 
and I will get your tea in ten minutes." 

John put her down with a very tender kiss, and straight- 
way fell into a reverie. 

Lina Rivers had been a district school teacher in Scottfield 
just four months, when John Reynolds offered her his hand 
and heart. She was an orphan fx'om infancy, but her 
father's sister had adopted and educated her in a lie of 



luxury, and died without altering a will made years before, 
leaving her entire fortune to a charity asylum. Lina, left 
alone, had thankfully accepted the position of county 
school teacher, procured for her by her friends, and was 
thinking life a hard burden, when John came to brighten 
it. She gave her whole gentle little heart into his keeping 
at once, aijpreciating at their full value his honest, true 
heart, his frank nature, his sterling good qualities, and 
looking with the most profound adrniration upon his tall, 
strong frame and handsome face. 

It was a perfect love match, for John fairly worshipped 
the dainty, refined little beauty he had married. And, 
having married her, he took her to his home, and, in all 
ignorance, proceeded to kill her. 

There was no blame to be laid upon him. Living in the 
old farm-house where he had spent his entire Hfe, the one 
ambition of his heart was to own land, stock, barns, and 
a model farm. 

He had seen his mother cook, churn, feed poultry, and 
drudge all her life; all the women he knew did the same; 
and if Lina made odd mistakes she put a wi llin g heart into 
her work and soon conquered its difficulties. Surely, he 
thought, it was an easier life to be mistress of his home, 
■ivith the Stanley farm in prospect, than to toil over stupid 
children in a district school. He had never seen velvet 
carpets and lace curtains, grand pianos, dainty sUks, and 
other surroundings that were Lina's from babyhood. He 
had never heard the wonderful music the little white 
hands, all rough and scarred now, could draw from the 
ivory keys of an organ or piano, or the clear, pure voice in 
song. It was an unknown world to John where his ivife's 
memory lingered as she scoi^red tins, strained milk, and 
cooked huge dishes of food for the farm hands. He would 
have thought it wicked waste, if not positive insanity, to 
draw from the bank his hard-earned savings to invest them 
in beautifying his plain, comfortable home. 

And Lina iashed her conscience sharply, telling herself 
she was ungrateful, repining, and mcked. Was not John 
tender, true, and loving ? Wiere among her city friends 
was there a heart like his ? Had she not known he was 
only a farmer ? 

And so the loving little woman toiled and slaved, under- 
took tasks far beyond her strength, worked early and late, 
until, just one year after his wedding day, John Reynolds, 
coming home to liis tea, found lying upon the kitchen floor 
a little, senseless figure, with a face like death, and hands 
that sent a chill to his very heart. 

The doctor, hastily svunmoned, looked grave, and advised 
perfect quiet and rest. A girl was hired, and John ten- 
derly nursed the invalid, but, though she grew better, she 
was still pale and weak. 

" Take her away awhile," said the doctor. " Try change 
of air. She is overworked." 

"But," said honest, puzzled John, "she does nothing 
but the housework for us two. She has no child, and our 
sewing is not much." 

The doctor looked into the troubled face. "You are a 
good man, John Reynolds, and a strong one," he said; 
" will you let me tell you a few truths ? " 

"Yes. About Lina?" 

"About Lina. You remember, do you not, the tiny 
antelope you admired so much in the menagerie we had 
here last summer ? " 

" Certainly," said John, looking more puzzled than ever. 

" Suppose you had bought that little creature, and yoked 
it with one of your oxen to a cart to do the same work ? " 

"I'd been a fool, "cried John, "thathttle thing couldn't 
work. It is just made pretty to look at and i)lay ^vith." 



TEE MUSICAL TBEASTIRT. 



3 



"That's it, Jolin. Now, I don't think God ever made 
a woman to look pretty and play, but he made some for 
the rough work of the world and some for the dainty places, 
some to cook and scrub, and some to draw men's souls to 
heaven by gentle loveUness. Your wife is one of the 
latter. If you were a poor man I would have held my 
tongue, but you are a rich one. Give your ^vife a servant, 
let her have books, music, pretty things around her. Let 
her rest from toil, and you may keep her by your .side ; 
put her back in her old place and you may order her tomb- 
stone, for she will soon need it. Don't put your antelope 
beside your oxen, John." 

"I will not! Thank you ! I understand. Poor, loving, 
patient heart ! " 

" That's right. Take her now for a little pleasure trip, 
and get back her roses ." 

Lina clapped her hands when John asked her if she 
would lilce to spend a week in New York, and really 
seemed to draw a new Hfe from the very idea. 

It was delicious fun to see John's wide-open eyes as they 
entered the ])arlour of the great city hotel and were sho\vn 
into the bed-room, whose beauties were c|uite as bewil- 
dering. 

" The best room," he told the landlord, and Lina could 
not repress a cry of delight, at the vista of a cosy sitting- 
room with a piano standing uivitingly open. 

"0, John ! " she said, "won't you go in there and shut 
the door for five minutes, please ? " 

John obeyed, of course. John, she thought gratefully, 
refused her nothing now. 

"How lucky I brought some of my old dresses ! " Lina 
thought. "I have not worn them since I was a school- 
marm. Fancy Mrs. Keynolds scrubbing the floor in this 
dress ! " 

John rubbed his eyes and pinched himself as a figure 
sailed in the sitting-room, made him a sweeping courtesy, 
and went to the piano. 

Was that the little woman who had worn prints and sun- 
bonnets so long? The fair hair was fashionably dressed, 
and bands of blue velvet looped the golden curls. A dress 
of blue silk, with softest lace trimmings and ornaments of 
pearls, had certainly made a fine lady of Lina. The piano 
was yielding its most bewitching tones to the skilled httle 
fingers, and John's bewilderment was complete when a 
voice of exquisite sweetness, though not powerful, began 
to sing. 

Only one song, fuU of thrOls and quavers, and then Lina 
rushed from the piano into John's arms. 

" John, darhng," she said, " hold me fast. Don't let me 
sUp from you ! " 

" 0, Lina ! " he groaned, " I was not fit to marry such 
a dainty bird ! But I loved you, little one." 

" And I love you, John ; rough old John. Let me sing 
again. I am very happy to-day, my husband." 

But the wonderful thrills filled the little room now. In 
a clear, pure voice, fuU of expression, Lina sang — 

'* I know that my Eedeemer liveth." 

Every word fell like hot tears on poor John's heart ; 
until, as the last chord trembled upon the air, Lina turned 
to him, stretching out her arms. 

"Taieme in your arms, John !" 

He took her tenderly to the room she had quitted so 
gaily, and replaced her finery by a white wrapper whose 
lace trimmings looked like fairy work to his unaccustomed 
eyes. 

" Are you tired, love?" he asked, with a great spasm of 
terror at his heart, as he looked at the white, wasted face. 



" Yes, very, very tired, but happy, John ! " and with a 
little sigh of entire content, Lina nestled down against the 
warm heart whose every throb she knew was all her own. 
The white Uds fell softly over the violet eyes, and she slept 
jieaoefuHy as a child. 

Softly as she rested, the faint pink flush gathered on her 
fair cheek and a smile crept over her lips, while John, 
bending over her, lifted his heart in earnest prayer for the 
life that made his own so bright. 

Mrs. Reynolds was to experience her share of astonish- 
ment during her holiday, and it commenced by the appari- 
tion of John the next day in a suit of handsome clothes 
that well became his manly figure. There was no foppery, 
but he looked a gentleman, though he made more than one 
grimace before he got, as he said, "well shaken into store 
clothes." 

Can I describe that week ? Wliat was new to John was 
old familiar ground to Lina. Central Park was not soon 
exhausted, and the little guide grew stronger and rosier 
every day in John's thoughtful care, that provided plenty 
of pleasant excitement, but guarded against fatigue. 

It was early in the afternoon of a sunny day, when the 
train drew up at Scottfield station, and Johii handed his 
wondering wife into a neat little one-horse carriage waiting 
for them. 

"A new purchase, dear!" he explained. "We are to 
have a drive every afternoon. Dr. Greyson prescribed it. " 

The house was where it had always been, but Lina 
rubbed her eyes and wondered if she had been suddenly 
carried into fairy-land. 

The duU httle sitting-room had been papered, carpeted, 
curtained, and transformed into a cosy dining-room. The 
stiff parlour was a very bower of beaiity, with a fine piano, 
the daintiest of furniture, soft muslin curtains, and a 
carpet covered with boquets of exquisite flowers ; the bed- 
rooms were carpeted brightly, and rejoiced in cottage sets, 
and in the kitchen the most good-natured of stout German 
girls fairly shed tears when Lina addressed her in her own 
langTiage. 

"But, John!" she cried, "the Stanley farm?" 

" Is sold, dear. You were right ; we wiU make this 
home so lovely the Stanley farm ivill never cost me a sigh. 
Dr. Greyson and his vrife took all the trouble here, and I 
have hired two new hands, so as to have a little more 
leisure." 

" But, John," the httle wife said earnestly, "I do not 
want you to think me a fine lady — a doU to wear fine 
clothes and live in idleness. I want to be truly a helpmate 
to you." 

" So you wUl be, Lina. God meant no one to be a drone 
in the busy hive of the world. You are not strong, but 
you will find plenty to keep you busy in superintending 
indoor arrangements and directing Gretchen. And in our 
drives, love, we will see if we cannot find some poorer than 
ourselves to comfort and aid. That mil be my thank- 
offering for your hfe, my little wife." 

The neighbours stared and wondered. Comments upon 
John's foDy and improvidence fell from many lips, and old 
men, shaking their heads, prophesied ruin for the Reynolds 
farm. 

But John was as much astonished as any of them, when, 
after a few years, he found the farm yielding him a larger 
income than ever before. 

"I do beheve, Lina," he said one day, to a matronly 
Kttle woman, who was dressing a crowing baby, " that 
your flower garden last year was worth a hundred pounds 
to me." 

"John!" 



THE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



"You see it was to get you the information about 
flowers that we first began to subscribe to The Ar/ricul- 
turist : there I found so many hints that I began to think 
I knew nothing about farming. One book after another 
crept into the house, and the time I thought would be 
wasted, taken from farm-work, Avas spent in reading. 
Now, look at the labour-saving machines I have bought ! 
See the new stock ! My orchard is going to be the best in 
the country, too. " 

"And my poultry-yard, John! it was the papers and 
magazines that first gave me the idea of a model poultry- 
yard. What fun we had, John, getting it started ! " 

"Yes, indeed. That New York trip was the best in- 
vestment I ever made, Lina. I saw so many things there 
that I recognised as old friends when I met them again in 
print— the threshing machine, the rotary harrow, the 
improved plough." 

"And," said Mrs. Reynolds, mischievously, " the Milton 
watch, the sewing machine, the corals for Johnnie ! 

"Come, are you ready for your drive?" 

"As soon as I put on my hat and get the basket of 
things for Mrs. Good^vin ." 

"It beats me, John," said his uncle, one bright day, 
" where you find so much money for tomfoolery, new- 
fangled nonsense, and fallals for Lina, and yet give so 
much in charity. I thought you were crazy to buy the 
Stanley farm." 

" I was once, but I Iiave something better now than the 
Stanley farm. I have learned how to manage my antelope. " 

"What?" But to this day John has never explained 
that riddle to his puzzled relative. 

PROMENADE CONCERTS. 
The indoor or outdoor promenade concert, which is grow- 
ing in favour with the populace, has cost a great many 
tears and some wrath to the "genuine musician." The 
whole-souled man who gets up at five to write a concerto, 
or to practise for a private quartette, and who sits up till 
twelve writing his impressions of the last masterpiece of 
the last musical phenomenon, is apt to be rather sarcastic 
when the promenade concert is mentioned. It has the 
dreadful taint of popularity about it, the "hoi polloi" 
seem to enjoy it, and for that reason, if that alone, it is out 
of the category of music proper. To his mind there is 
somewhat of desecration in playing real music to pro- 
menaders. Auditors may sit, or they may stand. Sitting 
is best, for then the eyes can be more conveniently closed, 
all the muscles relaxed, and the bodily frame bx-ought into 
a highly receptive state, and become an unobstructed 
channel for the passage of the current from the musical 
batteries in the orchestra to the musical Swan-Ughts in the 
brain. Standing is allowable where a chair is not to be 
had, and is, indeed, more respectful in the case of certain 
classes of music. But to walk about is a kind of profana- 
tion, which causes him sore distress- Therefore it is that 
he has noted with dismay the increasing support given to 
"go-as-you-please " concerts, for he does not exactly know 
where it will land the country. It is meet that we should 
look a little into this matter, and find out, if possible, the 
raison d'etre of the promenade concert. There is a soul of 
good in most things evil, we are told, and perhaps we may 
discover even in this phenomenon a little utility. In the 
first place, we find that the promenade concert is at once 
an assertion and a recognition of the great English prin- 
ciple of the liberty of the subject. When you have had 
enough music you can go away, without making yourself 
am object of observation or disturbing anybody. At the 
promenade concert you can fish out the morceaux you 



would like to listen to, and you can lounge through the 
rest. AVe should not object to see the principle extended. 
It would be very nice if, at the theatre, we might walk out 
when the sorrowful heroine comes on, and have a bell rung 
in the adjoining smoking-room when it was time for the 
funny man, or vice versa, according to taste. Then, if we 
could skip the scientific lecturer's theoretical instruction, 
and just walk in to his experiments, his explosions, his 
making a wheel go round very fast, his throwing of 
coloured lights upon the ladies, and his magnifying a 
million times the ramifications of a toad's hind leg, it would 
be very agreeable indeed- We should be very thankful, 
too, for the same liberty at the public meeting, so that we 
might hear the movers of resolutions, and cut the seconders 
and supporters, and leave at any moment when a man 
began to talk about his reluctance to appear on that 
occasion, or when we were threatened with " just one word 
more," or the plate. Then the promenade concert, if it be 
a hindrance rather than a help to one art, has the merit of 
promoting another. This may be thought to be rather a 
negative virtue, but still we must extract what good we 
can from a thing, though it be not the particular good we 
seek. Promenade music thaws the frozen tongue. It in- 
spires ideas. It enables people really to enjoy one 
another's society. To this end, of course, it requires to be 
pretty loud— as much sound in the music, so much talk 
among the auditors. A roaring quadrille stirs up the most 
sluggish imagination, and a blast of a trumpet reminds 
the dullest of a good anecdote. Amateurs hate .anything 
loud, of course, but we really cannot see any reason in the 
nature of things why music should not be loud as well as 
low. The fact is, the more cultured people get, the softer 
and smaller they like everything : subdued colours in 
pictures, whispers in oral communication, mere hints in 
the conveyance of ideas, and (so they say) microscopic 
helpings of food, till there is a danger of everything being 
whittled away to nothing. Green grass and blue sky are 
too glaring, ordinary accents too grating, common language 
too redundant, and a slice of beef much too sensual, for a 
great many people already ; and if this process is to con- 
tinue without check, life will become the shadow of a 
shade. So the promenade concert comes to the rescue in 
its own jjrovince, and vindicates the merits of loudness, 
fulness, and depth as a correction to culture. There are 
some incidental advantages of the promenade concert which 
deserve a note. They benefit only select portions of the 
community, it is true, but even these should not be 
slighted. Some people's receptivity is never fully de- 
veloped when they are sitting or even walking, but only 
when they are leaning against something. Those who 
have been brought closely into contact with the British 
workman, know that he is never so happy as when he is 
propping up a wall. All through the coimtry you may 
see miles of him propping up the houses and the street 
walls, the garden fences and the village pumps. This is 
not due, as might at first sight appear, to the instinct of 
self-preservation and the fear that the walls might tumble 
down, but to the fact that this peculiar posture encourages 
a state of receptivity of the mind, and when in it the work- 
man can more readUy imbibe the latest local and imperial 
intelUgence. No doubt this is the case with many besides 
the British workman, so that when we see a gentleman at 
the promenade concert taking a chair up, and leaning with 
his arms on the back, or trying to screw his shoulder 
through the wood-work of the orchestra, or leaning back 
over the balustrade till his face is out of sight, we may con- 
clude that this is a physical condition of receptivity, and 
that the music only reaches him when it is fulfilled. 



THE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



CHURCH CHOIR TRAINING. 

By William de Manbt Seegison. 
Bad music in large cliurches is a great national evil. I 
have visited some with a reputation for performing a fine 
musical service, and have found organ and choir equally 
out of tune throughout, and endless mistakes ; in fact, 
very bad. Under such circumstances thousands of per- 
sons are being given "stones for bread" without knowing 
it, they are being accustomed to listen to, enjoy, antl 
even praise, music that is not music, and to take bad for 
good. So, gradually, popular taste, and the national ear 
are being vitiated and debased instead of being cultivated 
and improved. I never hear such a service as thi.s in a 
large church where there is a wealthy congregation with- 
out feeling inexpressibly indignant and grieved. 

Quietness and reverence should be the watchword. If 
it is possible to avoid it, the attention of the congregation 
should never be distracted. The waring of a hand is 
imnecessary, except sometimes in an unobtrusive manner 
for unaccompanied singing. Even with a full orchestral 
service in church, the beat of the conductor should be 
quiet with no superfluous flourish. 

The choir-trainer organist should have some one under 
him who can occasionally take the organ at rehearsal, so 
that he may hear the choir at a distance and personally 
correct individuals, which can always be done quietly and 
unostentatiously, without giving pain. The choir should 
enter into the spirit of every part of the service they have 
to sing, and should endeavour to feel, and bring out, the 
meaning of the words by appropriate delivery and hearty 
earnestness. AU eccentricities should be studiously 
avoided and corrected at rehearsal (the organist indeed 
must watch himself closely in this respect). Sharpness 
of attack, crisp clearness should be attained by voices and 
organ. There should not be (to nse Mr. Barnby's e.x- 
pression) any " ragged edges " to be heard. 

The accompanist at the organ in church is also the 
conductor. To be a good one he must have certain quali- 
fications—anticipation, sharpness, idealism, heart, or what 
is called soul, the power of touching a responsive and 
.sympathetic chord in the hearts of jiis hearers through 
his medium, the organ. He must have a power of keeping 
people together, which should be felt both in congre- 
gational and in chorus music, so that the hearers should 
not be in fear, when the music is intricate and difficult, 
that things must inevitably go to pieces. In this branch 
of the choirmaster organist's work, the old saying of A rs 
est celarc artem, holds good; and, if he is the "secret wire- 
puller behind the scenes," never unduly obtruding himself, 
but always ready to help and command, he will fill both 
choir and congregation with a sense of security and con- 
fidence. One very important quaUty in an accompanist 
is the conductor's intuitive power of hitting the right 
time and rhythm of everything he attacks at once at first 
starting. No good effects can be obtained unless the 
starts are firm, steady, and decided. 



THROAT DISEASES. 
Every one is familiar with the symptoms of sore throat. 
These are, the irritation and soreness, the feverish con- 
dition, hoarseness, difficulty of swallowing and speaking, 
&c- Some persons immediately upon entering a room or 
railway carriage fiUed with tobacco-smoke experience a 
tickling and irritation of the throat, producing an irre- 
pressible hacldng and coughing, results which are apt to 
follow the smoking of tobacco ; and alcohol, especially 
■when ardent spirits are indulged in, -svith many persons 



will produce a well-known and distressing soreness of 
throat. When iDredisposition to sore throat and cold 
jjrevails, it is a good iJau to bathe the surface of the body 
every morning upon rising. The shower-bath or regular 
ordinary immersion bath may be employed, or the body 
may be mopped with a wet towel or sponge, care being 
taken that the water is }iot too cold. 

Great care should be exercised mth regard to imder- 
clothing when persons are susceptible to the affection 
under discussion. The undershirt and drawers should be 
of flannel or of a mixed material in which wool is con- 
tained, such as swan's-down, which is far less irritating to 
the .skin. Some persons are extremely intolerant of flannel, 
which in them produces much irritation. If it can be 
afforded, silk is the best form of under garment. This 
article of dress should be of loose textirre, and should 
admit of being easily washed and rendered clean. 

The climate of this country being so subject to variations 
of temperature, it may be advisable to have three kinds 
of weight of the underclothing — one of somewhat heavy 
texture for the mnter and early spring, a second of medium 
texture for the spring and autumn, and a third, the 
lightest texture, to be obtained for the extreme heat of 
summer; but the heavy fabric should not be changed 
for the lighter until the change of season is positively 
present. All imderclothing worn during the day should 
be removed at night, and turned inside out, so as to be 
thoroughly dried and ventilated before the following 
morning. The underclothing worn during the day should 
never be slept in, and that worn at night should never be 
worn in the day. 

It is well for individuals who are specially susceptible 
to cold to keep the mouth well closed whilst in the open 
air, and in many cases a resijirator will be found useful. 
With respect to the remedies for sore throat, it may be 
stated briefly that it is difficult to lay down any hard and 
fast rules, as the medical attendant will be the best 
person to consult ; but it may be said that warmth is of 
the greatest importance, and, if it be possible, the sufferer 
should be kept in a warm room, at a temperature of 
70° Fah. 

Inhalation of steam is very valuable. This is most 
conveniently carried out by means of a proper steam 
inhaler ; but if this is not easily available, boiling water 
may be placed in a suitable vessel and the steam inhaled. 
Lozenges of tannin, chlorate of potash, tolu, ratany, and 
others are often used. Astringent gargles may also be. 
employed, of which common alum is perhaps the best. 

The term sore throat, in a restricted sense, implies an 
affection which is limited to a small part of the throat, 
such as the pharynx, or merely the back of the throat 
and soft palate, and known by the name of pharyngitis ; 
or it may indicate far more extensive mischief, and 
embrace a far larger area, extending to the tonsils, and 
even to the larynx and vocal chords. 

Probaljly in the slightest ordinary cold there is always 
a certain amomit of inflammation of the pharynx present, 
and this is comparatively of mild significance, but when 
the deeper structures are involved the case becomes of 
far more serious character. —il/MSicaZ Standard. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN CHURCH. 
By Henky Maskell, Bkecon. 
There still remains in the opinion of many people a 
doubt as to whether instrumental music should or should 
not be used in church ; and, though this is not always 
publicly expressed, yet, nevertheless, it is occupied in the 



« 



THE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



ininda of many. Even that noble church instriunent, the 
organ, comes in for a share of adverse criticism, it being 
sometimes looked upon as an intruder (some say an idol) 
in the house of God, and no aUowauce is made for the 
great amount of assistance which the singing receives 
from the instrument, or how lamentably poor the general 
effect (in most cases) would be mthout it. It is, I think, 
a very little plea (though perhaps laudable in itself) that 
the voice alone is sufficient in church, and that an instru- 
ment is not needed ; but let the holders of this idea 
consider whether this does not often proceed more from a 
want of taste for music rather than from any other cause. 
The voice is certainly of the first importance in the render- 
ing of any kind of music, but in the majority of cases it is 
in want of a sustaining power— a foundation ujjon which 
it can rely. How often the singing would become flat, 
dry, and unmusical, were it not for the help it receives 
from the organ ; besides, bright, hearty, well-rendered 
music is a chief means of attracting good attendances ; and 
few will deny that our congregations in church might not 
be made larger. But while the organ is by many allowed 
to be a necessary and proiser means of elevating and im- 
proving church music, the introduction of striug and other 
instruments into the service would be looked upon as very 
objectionable, and probably cause a general exodus among 
the congregation. Let lis see whether this would be right. 
In looking at the subject from its true point, we find in 
the Scriptures that many, and jierhaps all the then known 
kinds of insti-uments were used in the old Jewish Church. 
David, in the Psahns, urges us to praise God with all 
kinds of instruments— the sound of the trumpet, psaltery, 
harp, timbrel, and with the loud-soundinj cymbals ; and, as 
these were to be \ised as a means of praise to God, where 
could a more fitting place be found for them to render 
such service than in His own house ? To say that when 
Christ came to the world the ancient law departed is 
certainly true, but this applies to the abolition of the 
types and shadows of our Saviour's first coming rather 
than to the alteration of the manner of praise in His 
temple. Since such is the case, why exclude the use of 
instrumental music from the church ?— why banish those 
things which in ages gone by were used as means of 
praise to God? To the reverent worshippers the sound of 
music, rather than diverting the soul from the service, 
materially adds to a devotional frame of mind. While on 
this subject we may notice the objections which some have 
to the performance of oratorios and other sacred works in 
church. In my opinion, the people who raise such objec- 
tions are inflaenced more by their own narrow-mindedness 
— not to say ignorance— rather than by a sincere desire to 
maintain the sacredness and perfect pm-ity of the church. 
To argue that such works are given for the pleasure and 
vanity of man is hardly sufficient reason to justify the 
promoters of such performances in giving serious considera- 
tion to the views of the ' ' unco guid," who are happily 
fast becoming an unimportant minority incapable of doing 
much harm. It is now universally admitted that the use 
of instrumental music in church is a right and orthodox 
medium for the praise of God ; but, whUe rejoicing that 
this is so, I would say, let us be careful that we neglect 
not to worship with our hearts as well as with the feeling 
of devotion induced by the "heavenly sounds" of sacred 
melody. 

ANTONIN DVORAK. 
One of the most prominent of the coming men of music 
indisputably is Aitonin Dvorak. Although not by birth 
one of our own countrymen, his celebrity is almost entirely 



British. Until he won Ms first great success in this 
country, when about three years ago his " Stabat Mater " 
came in the light of a revelation to English audiences, he 
was deemed merely one of the Dii minores of modem musical 
Germany. He was patronised by Brahms and championed 
by Joacliim, but few beyond a certain circle were familiar 
even with his name. Antonin Dvorak is duly grateful for 
the position the good taste of British music lovers has 
enabled him to acMeve. He has devoted himself as- 
siduously to the study of our manners and language. AU 
the most important of his forthcoming compositions are 
written specially for England, and part of each year vnU 
henceforth be spent by him in this country. 

The career of Antonin Dvorsik reads like a volume of 
romance. His fame is far too recent to warrant the ad- 
mittance of his name to the pages of our standard bio- 
graphical dictionaries. The composer is, however, himself 
by no means averse to referring to the humbleness of _ his 
origin. Antonin Dvoriik was l3orn in 1841 in the neigh- 
bourhood of Mulhausen, or, as it is called in the Bohemian 
dialect, Nelahozeves, a village with a few hundred in- 
habitants. His father combined the offices of village 
slaughterman and rural tavern-keeper. Young Dvorak 
himself in his early years served as pot-boy at the inn, 
and assisted his father to slaughter, skin, and dress cattle. 
By the laws, even the poorest lad in the meanest Bohemian 
village is compelled to learn music as a jjart of his iirimary 
education. Dvorilk was taught at the village school, and 
roughly learned the rudiments, and to sing and fiddle on 
the vioHn. When he could play a little he belonged to 
the village band, which was wont to strike up the dance 
for the lads and lasses of the neighbourhood after church 
was over on Sundays. The dancers contributed a few 
pence each to the expenses of the band, and these slender 
earnings were divided among the members. When D vorJik 
was thirteen he went to work for his uncle at the village 
of Zlonic, close by Schau. There the village schoolmaster 
was a somewhat superior musician. Dvor;tk used to sing 
in the choir, and his master gave him a few lessons on 
the organ. Finding him an apt pupil the schoolmaster 
allowed him to copy music, and even to play old ecclesias- 
tical services from a figured bass, an .art which the young 
musician taught himself. He also had a few piano lessons, 
and was initiated into the rudiments of counterpoint. 

When Dvorak was sixteen he was sent to Pra.gue to 
study at the College of Organists, then directed by Joseph 
Pitsch. Antonin Dvorak only spoke the Bohemian dia- 
lect, and his first difficulty was to teach himself German. 
Then he was compelled to live upon the scanty allowance 
of a little over fifteen shillings per month. The struggles 
of a young man, even at Prague, to lodge, feed, and clothe 
himself on about £10 per annum can only be imagined. 
When Pitsch died he was succeeded by a far kinder master, 
one Kreyci, and under his guidance young Dvorak first 
made the acquaintance of the music of Mozart, Mendel- 
ssohn, and Beethoven. He says the first real orchestral 
work he ever heard was when he stole into a rehearsal of 
Beethoven's choral symphony, under Spohr. In 1860, 
when Dvorak was nineteen, he became a violinist in a band 
which played at atfes and dancing halls, and his wages 
were £25 per annum. He earned a Httle overtime by 
playing in a sextet in order to amuse the insane in a 
private lunatic asylum. In 1862 he obtained a post in the 
band of thu'ty-six at the new Bohemian Opera House at 
Prague, under Mayer, and it was about this time that his 
friend Bendl for the first time lent him the score of the 
Beethoven septet. In 1871 he left the theatre, in order to 
try and get a living of at least £50 per annum by teaching. 



TEE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



During this struggle Dvorak was not idle. To shortly 
after this period (in 1873) belongs the " Patriotic Hymn," 
announced for the last Worcester Festival, but since given 
in London. He also wrote an opera, " Konig and Ktihler," 
avowedly in the style of the " Meistersinger." It was 
tried by the orchestra, unanimously " protested," and 
withdrawn. 

Dvorak was shortly afterwards appointed organist .at 
Adelbett Church, Prague. He sent in his opera and his 
symphony in F to the Minister in Vienna, and for these 
he obtained the enormous Government grant of £40. 
Flushed with success, Dvorak married, and has since lived 
a very happy wedded life. A year later he made a second 
attempt, sending in an opera entitled "Wanda" and his 
"Stabat Mater." Both were ignominiously rejected. 
The " Stabat Mater " — which estidilished his fame among 
a more intelligent community, and has set the musicians 
of two hemispheres wondering whether we have or not 
discovered a second Beethoven — %yas not deemed worthy 
an encouraging grant of £40 by Austrian bureaucracy. 
He tried again, and got £50. Eventually he sent in several 
works, and among them the pianoforte concerto in G 
minor, first introduced in this country by Mr. Manns at 
the Crystal Palace in October, 18S3. Br.ahms hapjieued 
to see it, and he and the renowmed Viennese critic, Han- 
slick, exerted themselves sufficiently to obtain for Dvorak 
a gr.ant of £60. Besides this. Brahms asked Siinrock, of 
Berhn, to publish some of the Bohemian composer's works, 
.and thus they were brought to the notice of Joachim. 
' Mr. Manns had already introduced some of Dvorak's Slav 
music at the Crystal Palace. But his very name was 
almost unknown. Joachim's will is, however, puissant at 
the popular concerts, and when he recommended the pro- 
diiotion of Dvorak's Sextet in A, Mr. Chappell at once 
accepted it. The work, first given Feb. 23, 1880, made a 
great impression, but it was not until 1883, when the 
" Stabat Mater " was produced here, that the name of the 
composer came prominently to the front. 

The evening of March 10, 1883, may hereafter be deemed 
historical. Very few of the small audience had the 
smallest knowledge of the work, the vocal score of which 
was placed in the hands of most of them as they entered 
St. James' HaU. Yet another "Stabat Mater," rejected 
by the Austrian Minister, was not likely to interest those 
who attended as a business duty, expecting to chronicle 
yet another pretentious failure. But a very few minutes 
after Mr. Barnby had lifted his hAton served to stifle the 
small talk, and to concentrate the attention of the audience 
upon the music now heard. Rarely in our time has such 
a master work from a totally unexpected source been 
sprung upon a sceptical public. Dvorak leaped at a bound 
into fame. The Philharmonic Society, sorely in need of a 
lion, invited him to come to England. Messrs. Novello's 
firm, who had published his " Stabat Mater," warmly and 
generously, according to their wont, looked after his 
interests. Dvorak came here, conducted at the Philhar- 
monic, and directed a gala performance of his " Stabat 
Mater " at the Albert Hall. The senior partner of 
Novellos gave a jHt in his honour at Norwood, and 
Dvorak declared he had never before seen such a congre- 
gation of beautiful ladies. But his tastes were not amid 
the garish lights of society. He was at home at Mr. 
Oscar Beringer's, and vastly preferred his laager beer, his 
pipe, and his chat mth friends. Dvorak returned last 
autumn to direct his " Staliat Mater" at the Three Choirs 
Festival, and again this summer to conduct at the Phil- 
harmonic his new symphony ia D minor, expressly com- 
posed for thia coimtiy; 



Hitherto most of the music we have heard from the pen 
of Dvorak has been that composed in his early years, 
when the yoimg married man was struggling for an artist's 
stipend of £40. Now, however, for the first time he comes 
before us at the greatest of our festivals — that of Birming- 
h.am — with a cantata specially written for this country. 
He has in hand an English oratorio on the subject of 
" Samson and Delilah," and other works. He thus, having 
cast in his lot with us, has a special title to be considered 
as a Coming Man. In the judgment of many, he is one ot 
the sole sur^ving hopes of continuing the long line of 
gi'eat Continental composers. The star of Brahms is on 
the wane ; Kaff and Wagner are dead ; Gounod is well 
stricken in years ; Verdi cannot, and Boito will not, write 
any more. The j)osition of the younger generation of 
French, German, and Italian writers is overshadowed, 
both here and abroad, by the advance of the composers of 
England, from Mackenzie, Vilhers Stanford, Goring 
Thomas, and Coweu downwards. It is to Dvorak that 
the eyes of Europe turn in expectation of hailing another 
of the race of really gi-eat Continental musicians. There 
are some who are nervous lest .adulation and the process 
of " academising " should injure that which promises to be 
a great and original genius. On this point it would be the 
veriest nonsense to attempt prophecy. The result of the 
liighly important essay at the Birmingham Festival will, 
to a certain extent, tend to indicate whether high hopes 
are justified or otherwise. 

The success ot the Birmingham Festiv.al was indisput- 
ably won by Herr Dvorak's cantata, " The Spectre's 
Bride." Despite a ghoulish libretto,.and a puerile English 
version, distilled from the original Bohemian through a 
German translation, the swing of Dvorak's music carried 
all before it. Anything more exciting than the chain of 
choruses — led by Mr. Santley, descriptive of the terable 
march of the spectre and his Lady love, and relieved by 
the duets of the unfortunate couple — has rarely been 
heard. This work (the first choral composition ever 
written by DvorAk for an English festival) shows the 
Bohemian composer at his very strongest. The choral 
parts are somewhat difficult, but it will doubtless be the 
privilesre of many choral societies in the provinces to over- 
come them. — Fi'jaro. 



A GREAT obstacle to any improvement in our English 
sacred mu.sic is the prejudice which many peoiile still 
retain to what they call a "performance" in Clmrch — 
ignoring the fact that the clergyman always "performs" 
not only the sermon but a great deal of the service. They 
do not object to the vicarious offering of prayer by one 
man ; but they are shocked by the idea of a fairly repre- 
sentative number of people discharging, in the name of 
tlae congregation, a duty for which the others have not 
taken the trouble to quality themselves. And the very 
.assistance they mil not accept in Church, they dehght to 
have in the concert-room. For. in England, there are 
thousands of people, destitute of general musical pro- 
clivities, who, at least annually, attend " performances " 
of the "Messiah;" and do so distinctly as a religious 
exercise, yielding their sympathies freely to the influence 
of its sublime strains, and consciously warmed and ele- 
vated in spirit by the increased pathos and power with 
which the music endows the words. How funnily moulded 
our "principles" are?— Zlr. Hiles, in the " Quarti 
Musical Kcviev)." 



TEE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



/Ibuslcal ^reasut^, 

EDINBURGH, OCTOBER 1, 1885. 

ADVERTISEMENTS. 
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Quarter page, . . .060 
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Three lines, . . 10 

Advertisements must reach the Treasury Office not la,ter 
than the 20th of each month. 



NOTICE. 

11 tI ■'^'^''''^'tisemeiiU appear in the " Musical Star " and 

Musical Treasury." 

As both journals hare a larpe and increasimj circulation, 
advertisers can hardbi fail to appreciate the advantages 
ofiered by the "Star" and "Treasury" as advertising 
mediums, only one charge being made. 

The "Musical Star" and "Musical Treasury" may he 
obtained through all Bookseller.-i and Nezosagents, or from 
the Office, 11 Nm-th Bridge, Edinburgh. 



BELLS. 

Aetemtjs Ward, having upon one occasion stated a 
most abstruse and at the same time ridiculous pro- 
blem to a London cabman with the object of con- 
fusing him and enjoying his confusion, was met by the 
query, "Now, then, guv'uor, don't you think that's 
rather a dry subject ? There's a good deal to be said 
on both sides." The same may with much propriety 
be said of the subject of this article, at least in so far 
as the abundance of controversial material is concerned. 
Our literature abounds with references to bells, the 
poets naturally and as matter of covirse dealing with 
bells ill their pleasantest connections. Is it of the 
Sabbath bells they speak? — they are " sweetly calling 
unto prayer. " Do they wish to convey to our minds 
the hilarity of a party?— then "all went merry as a 
marriage bell ;" or to inspire us with thoughts of the 
exhilarating delights of sleighing ?— then the sleigh- 
bells "tinkle, tinkle, tinkle m the icy air of niglit." 
We are not unmindful that the poets also keep in mind 
the more sombre and mournful occasions in which bells 
are brought into requisition, nor do we forget that the 
" wild tocsin" appears in effective verse, but jji-obably 
the bells are referred to more frequently in their joyous 
than in their sorrowful associations. It is not our 
purpose in this short sketch to treat of bells either 
from the poetical point of view or from the point of 
view of those who regard bells of every size, colour, 
and tone as an unmitigated evil, but to endeavour to 
preserve an even balance in the matter. Church bells, 
being more particularly concerned with the public 
weal and the puWic woe, naturally demand our first 
consideration. From our childhood we have been 
accustomed to regard a bell as an almost indispensable 
portion of ecclesiastical equipment. Most of us can 
recall a youthful period at which we were disinclined 
to admit the claim of a building to the name of church 



which did not possess a bell of some description. 
Probably many people will be of opinion that the 
present proportion of churches without bells is by no 
means too large. In country districts, church bells, 
rung at regular times, have for generations been of 
great usefulness. The ringer of the church bell is in 
some villages regarded, and justly regarded, as a public 
benefactor. Does he not leave his cosy bed at an early 
hour in all sorts of weather to announce to the working 
people of the district the approach of the hours of 
work, and is there not a sense of satisfaction when in 
the summer evenings the eight o'clock curfew intimates 
that there are still some hours of leisure in store for the 
villagers ? Apart from this utilitarian point of view, 
however, there is a solemn peacefubiess about the 
church bell as its chime reaches us across the meadow 
on a summer morning, or as it calls the worshippers 
to service in the c^uiet evening hours. This indeed 
seems to us to be the most fitting mission of the church 
bell. Were it not that it is usually the only available 
alarm in the country, it would certainly be released 
from its incongruous duties of announcing indiscri- 
minately a fire or a meeting of heritors ! We in 
Scotland have hitherto been served principally, though 
not exclusively, by the single bell, while in England 
chimes are preferred, and consequently much more 
common. Here is a point in regard to which we may, 
like Artemus Ward's cabman, remark that there is a 
good deal to be said on both sides. The manipulation 
by skilled ringers of a really good peal of bells, say in 
a suburban district of London on a quiet evening, 
produces what we are inclined to regard as the perfec- 
tion of bell music. 

We have thus dealt in a general way with what may 
be called the more agreeable aspects of the subject. 
We cannot overlook the fact that there are other views 
which probably deserve as much atteutiou as those we 
have stated. In towns we not infrequently meet with 
people who entertain out-and-out abolitionist views in 
regard to bells. If they had their will, bells of every 
description would be ruthlessly rooted out from the 
midst of the community. All of us feel at times the 
abolitionist spirit upon us, for is not .'■'olomon's dictum 
that "there is a time for everything" often absolutely 
ignored? Many of those who have charge of bells 
have an unhappy knack of fixing upon the wrong time 
for theh' performances. We have in our mind a certain 
London street in which an ardent campanologist per- 
sists in playing " Abide with me," and other suitable 
melodies for hours on end, and that in spite of emphatic 
neighbourly remonstrances. Again, it is all very well 
to ring in the New Year, but when your church is 
situated in a populous locality in which probably there 
are not a few sick people, it becomes a question whether 
the sentimental ought not to give way to the practical. 
It may be doubted whether a church situated among 
rows of houses is quite the place for musical bells, and 
yet do we not continually hear in such a situation the 
notes chasing each other up and down the scale, the 
reverberations caused by the proximity of the Jiouse 
rendering the sounds well-nigh insupportable. Some 
bells, too, which are meant to be musical, are nothing 



THE MUSICAL TREASUBY. 



9 



more than a miserable jingle. In towns, the single bell 
is probably on the whole the more tolerable as bells go. 
At the same time it can scarcely be said that this is a 
comfort to the hater of bells. No one who has lived in 
Edinburgh can have failed to hear the frightfully un- 
musical effects produced by single bells at a little 
distance from one another. There is no doubt but that 
in some districts they have constituted tliemselves a 
nuisance wliich ought to be got rid of. It has often 
struck us that the best way out of the difficulty would 
be to have a really good resounding bell for each 
district, which should serve all the churches. The 
time of day is past which required frequent daily bell- 
ringing. 

An amusing episode occurred last month in the 
Glasgow Town-Council, the occasion being a recom- 
mendation that the salary of the bell-ringer in Black- 
friars church should be increased from the munificent 
yearly £10 to £12 in consideration of the fact tliat the 
artist also played tlie cliimes in the cluirch spire I One 
councillor described the music as " unpleasant, " and 
thought the young man should be dissuaded from 
attempting liymn-tunes on a cliime of five bells ! A 
bailie suggested tliat the councillor's ear was deficient, 
whereupon that gentleman vindicated liis musical 
character. Another bailie said they could not expect a 
tine tune for £12. He thought the man was playing 
up to his wage. This latter idea was too much for the 
grave assembly, which consequently relieved itself with 
a hearty laugh ; but the whole discussion, which ended 
in the preservation of the status quo, only proved how 
true it was that a " good deal could be said on both 
sides." 



^be XctteivBoy. 

A TONIC SOL-FA COLLEGE FOR SCOTLAND. 

Edinburgh, \Uh Sept., 1885. 

Sir, — Seeing you have solicited an expression of opinion 
regarding the desirabUity of establishing a Tonic Sol-fa 
College for Scotland, I venture to offer a few remai'ks 
thereanent. There cannot be the sHghtest doubt that but 
for the introduction of the tonic sol-fa system, the know- 
ledge of music would have l)een much less generally 
diffused in Scotland than it happily is at the present time. 
In numerous rural districts, up to quite a recent date, 
there was comparatively little interest shown in the study 
of music, in consequence of the difficulty experieuced in 
mastering tlie technicaUties of the old notation, added to 
the fact that few persons located in sucli districts had then 
the necessary knowledge combined with the faculty for 
lucidly explaining the principles of music to the average 
rustic mind. The new notation has quite revolutionised 
this state of affairs, being now eagerly studied by large 
numbers of our country cousins. 

It certainly seems absurd to think that, with such a good 
worlc going on in Scotland, we should still require to go 
across the Border for our certificates of merit ; and I trust 



the proposal you have now put forward will be taken up 
heartily and energetically until that anomaly ceases to 
exist, and we have our own Tonic Sol-fa College. 

Scotland — usually in the van — seems to be wofuUy be- 
hind in matters musical. Even although we have a 
Professor and a College of Music attached to our 
University, yet degrees cannot be conferred upon the 
students who attend until they also pass an examination 
in England or Ireland. Surely in sol-fa matters we could 
beat this sham college, at least in some respects ! 

I would suggest that, before any meeting is held or any 
action taken, the subject should be thoroughly well ven- 
tilated, through the medium of your admirable paper, by 
the free expression of opinion. A great deal mil be gained 
if correspondents will study moderation of language and 
avoid personaHties and recrimination, as these only prevent 
the great bulk of ordinary readers from perusing an other- 
wise useful discussion . 

It seems to me the chief obstacle in the way will be the 
rooting out of the prejudices and petty jealousies of the 
numerous sections into which those who might combine for 
such a useful purpose are divided — upon such matters as 
the scope of the college, and even as to its location. The 
former, of course, would be subject for debate at a meeting 
convened for that object ; and as to the latter, I cannot 
conclude without suggesting that Edinburgh would be a 
most suitable centre for the establishment of such a college. 
Most institutions nowadays require a paper or journal to 
convey to the general public a record of the work engaged 
in and the results obtained ; and I am certain it would be 
most desirable and beneficial to incorporate such particulars 
within the Musical Ti'easurij and Star, which have already 
such a wide-spread and well-deserved circulation. 

Do-Bat-Me. 



Glasgow, Sept. 15, 1885. 

Dear Sir, — I am very pleased to see such a lively dis- 
cussion in the Treasury over the proposal to establish a Tonic 
Sol-fa College north of the Border. I think the proposal 
is good, and the sooner it is given effect to the better for 
Scotland. Every such efi^ort must tend to do good, and 
should be very cordially welcomed by every genuine sol- 
faist. 

Why " Musicus " should have been thrown into such a 
naughty fright over it one can only guess "Musicus" 
has long ago ceased to have any influence in musical 
circles here, and his clumsy and selfish efforts to pose as 
an authority in teaching music are rated by your corre- 
spondents at their true value. Do not let the cause of 
progress suffer because some fossiUsed stiok-inthe-mud 
has become alarmed lest his craft should be endangered 
by this movement. 

Glasgow is not such a hot-bed of these gentry as your 
Galashiels correspondent seems to think. There are more 
men in Glasgow than "Musicus" — men who have quite as 
good a claim to be heard, and who know more about teach- 
ing and notation than he with all his sneers at the lessons 
in the Treasury. I do not wish to be held as sympathis- 
ing in the least with the views " Musicus "gave expression 
to, and beg to assure you that I, at least, shall be very 
pleased to see such a college established soon for the 
benefit of musical students and for the good of sol-fa. — I 
am, &c., A Glasgow Teacher. 

Edinburgh, lUh Sept., 1885. 
Sir,— On page 8 of the Musical Treasury ior September, 
there appears an article advocating the establishment of a 
Tonic Sol-fa College for Scotland, In that article every 



10 



TEE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



effort is made to convey tlie impression that the Tonic Sol- 
fa College, London, is an exclusively "English " institution. 
Nothing could be further from the truth. Lite our Army, 
Navy, Postal Service, Parliament, &c., it is British, though 
its headquarters are in London ; hence the writer in the 
Treasury betrays either great ignorance or an intention to 
■willfully mislead his readers. It can hardly be ignorance, 
so, in the_ belief that it is misrepresentation, I may remark 
that Tonic Sol-faists, as a class, are too intelligent to be 
hoodwinked so easily ; and it may be safely predicted that 
any attempt, by such questionable means, to establish a 
rival College to that in whose solid worth they have justly 
so much confidence will utterly fail. 

After a sentence, in which the \vriter gets considerably 
"mixed" in regard to "notation" and "music," not 
seeming to be aware that they are different things, he 
begins his second paragraph by saying — "As most of our 
readers know, our English neighbours are in advance of 
us in the matter of higli-class tonic sol-fa education. " This 
may be met by the counter statement that, probably "most 
of our readers Icnow " the very reverse to be the case — 
namely, that in proportion to the niunber of its inhabitants, 
Scotland possesses more highly-educated tonic sol-faists 
than England and Ireland taken together. 

That there is some inconvenience caused to Scottish 
tonic sol-fa students by their College being in London, 
may be admitted ; but this could be obviated, and the 
whole question solved, by forming branches of the parent 
College wherever it might be practicable. 

Tothe late lamented John Curwen there were neither 
English, Irish, nor Scotchmen ; there were only his fellow- 
men whom he wished to benefit. So it comes to-day that 
"The Tonic Sol-fa College for the People," the found- 
ing of which was the crowning achievement of his life, is 
open to aU on equal terms, without distinction of race, 
country, colour, or creed. Therefore, to speak of the 
Tonic Sol-fa College as being " English," is as unjust as it is 
imgenerous — at once an outrage upon truth and a libel on 
the memory of a truly philanthropic and noble-minded man . 

Trusting that these remarks may recall the true state of 
the case to the minds of such tonic-sol-faists as may have' 
forgotten it — if any such there be, — I am. Sir, &c., 

Thos. Young. 

Edinburgh, Idtli Sept., 1885. 
SiK, — The proposal now being ventilated through your 
columns to establish a Tonic Sol-fa College in Scotland, 
^vill never come to anything. I am positively certain of 
this. The reasons are not far to seek. -Any proposal or 
suggestion — it matters not a jot how disinterestedly it is 
made — having reference to sol-fa matters, emanating fi-om 
Edinburgh , will not be supported, or even countenanced, 
by the great men of Glasgow. On the other hand, they 
will strive with might and main to ignominiously crush any 
scheme that is set afoot ; and they will do this without 
giving the slightest consideration to the fact that such 
scheme might do a vast amount of good to promote the 
interests and welfare of the sol-fa movement. It is well 
enough known that there is no profession imder the sun 
where more bUnd jealousy exists than in the musical pro- 
fession ; and while this applies to miisicians of all types 
and classes, the evil is seen at its very worst amongst those 
who are connected with the tonic sol-fa. I state this fear- 
lessly and challenge contradiction. Any such proposal, 
therefore, I believe to be altogether out of the question, 
more particularly as it comes from the Metropolis. Glas- 
gow sol-faists have a very poor opinion of their brethren in 
Edinbiurgh ; and though they will cheerfully submit to be 



led by the nose by any other town or institution outside 
their own country, they would make any sacrifice rather 
than co-operate with their friends in the capital — no matter 
how great the benefit to them might be. 

You win no doubt receive the support of a certain sec- 
tion of sol-faists who are wise enough to see that Scotland 
is ripe for something more substantial than a branch of an 
English college ; but as that section, I am afraid, wiU be 
small in number, it will not go for much. I would faiu 
wish you success, but the case is too hopeless. — Yours, &c., 
Jakvis. 

Edinburgh, 25th Sept., 1885. 
Sir, — I have read with interest your short articles, and 
the letters which they have called forth, in reference to the 
provision of a Tonic Sol-fa College for Scotland. I am 
always pleased to see anything which has for its end our 
improvement in matters musical, and I feel certain no one 
will regret the discussion in your columns. Perhaps you 
will allow me to say, however, that I think the present 
College in England meets all the requirements of the case. 
If there were anything distinctive in Scottish tonic sol-fa, 
as compared with English sol-fa, then there might be some 
reason for the founding of an institution which should bear 
testimony to our national characteristics ; but, seeing that 
sol-fa is sol-fa and nothing else, why should we bother about 
rearing an institution which would merely do what the 
English College is at present efficiently doing, i.e., putting 
its students through a course of training, and then per- 
mitting them to affix foiu- letters to their names. So far 
as the sending of cash across the Border is concerned, I 
think we need not vex ourselves m>ich about it. Tonic 
sol-faists are certainly a very enthusiastic class of people, 
but I am inclined to advise them to temper their zeal with 
discretion. If it were resolved to have a Tonic Sof-fa 
College for Scotland, sol-faists would require to be prepared 
to thi-ust their hands into their pockets to some purpose, 
unless they were content to merely rent a room in some of 
the less brilliant parts of the City in which to carry on col- 
legiate operations. To put the Quaker question — "Do the 
sol-faists sympathise £20 each or so?" — Yours, &c., 

Musicus No. 2. 

6 Tannadice St., Dundee, lOlh Sept., 1885. 

Dear Sir, — I was very sorry at reading the correspon- 
dence in this month's Treasury, anent the opening of an 
Edinburgh College for the propagation of tonic sol-fa, to 
find that Mr. J. C. Grieve had been very unwarrantably 
brought into the correspondence. But doubly sorry was I 
that men talented to write such letters would waste such an 
amount of paper, ink, and time — that most valuable 
adjunct of all — in running down such a novice as the one 
who styles himself "Musicus" must be. Let us live the 
like of him down. First, as to Mr. J. C. Grieve ; he is a 
man I have had correspondence with, but never saw. He 
has done me so much good, however, that, should I ever 
meet him, I shall at least shake him most warmly by the 
hand. I have WTitten the tests which "Musicus" has 
taken iipon himself to call confusion, and have found them 
very beneficial confusion indeed. 

But, Mr. Editor, we want proposals for the working of 
our Scottish College, and not for the confounding of an 
ignoramus. I would not have the thing hurriedly gone 
into, but have aU points considered. Would it not be 
better to include staflf notation as well? Would it not 
also l^e as well to have all sorts of instrumental music 
wrought up ? These, and many others, are points well 
worthy our attention, and will better repay us. — Truly 
yours, BEiMBOElAir. 



TEE MUSICAL TBEASUR7. 



11 



The following letters appeared in the Glasgmo Mail : — 
TONIC SOL-FA COLLEGE FOR SCOTLAND. 

Sir, — In my last letter it appears I have most un- 
wittingly and unintentionally given offence to a gentleman 
in Edinburgh, whose name I did not even know. There 
is not a syllable personal to any one in my letter ; I merely 
offered, as requested, some suggestions in reference to an 
article in the Mimical Treasury, for which pubhcation I 
onl3' knew the editor as resi^onsible. Why this should have 
brought down upon me such a severe personal attack I 
really cannot imagine. No exceijtiou is taken to my 
remarks upon the proposal contained in this article, and 
all that I have said in reference to the " new notation " is 
admitted by Mr. Grieve, but he adds that what I com|ilain 
of is " intentional.'' I highly approve of musical problems 
being submitted for solution, but I hold very strongly that 
all such should be set in a musical manner, so that they 
can be sung and resolved coiTectly. Neither of these 
requirements can be apiJied to those at page IS of the 
Treasury. They are intended to embrace the niceties of the 
enharmonic scale, though these are frequently used in a 
very peculiar manner, but they can only be even apparently 
resolved by using all the imperfections of the tempered 
scale. This, I need hardly say, is no true musical solu- 
tion, but destroj's the problem altogether. It is, further, 
very confusing to the student, leading to the idea that the 
enharmonic and tempered scales are convertible. If so, 
why trouble them with the enharmonic scale at all ? I am 
very pleased to see attention called to the niceties of 
musical notation. Nothing has so liindered the progress 
of vocal music as imperfect notation and illegitimate 
transition, the necessary and constant causes of the rough 
singing and falUng in pitch so destructive to our choral 
music. — I am, &c., Musions. 

Aug. 19. 

Sir, — " Musicus " in his second letter says I admitted 
in my last all that he said in his first letter. I scarcely 
think I did. However, I cannot admit all that he says in his 
later epistle. He asserts that the examples on i^age 1.5 of 
the Treasury are not set in a musical manner, as they can 
neither be sung nor resolved prox^erly ; and he makes some 
remarks upon the niceties of the enharmonic scale in such 
a general way as may be taken to mean anything or 
nothing, just as one chooses. What, I would ask, has the 
enharmonic scale to do with the examples, as examples? 
They are written in tonic sol-fa notation (at least, they are 
supposed to be), and that notation — nor, indeed, any nota- 
tion under the sun — cannot depict properly the niceties of 
the enharmonic, nor yet of the chromatic — no, nor even of 
the diatonic scale correctly. Certain niceties of intonation 
are often implied in the tonic sol-fa, as well as in other 
notations, although they are not definitely expressed ; and 
I hold that the notation of the tests is as conformable to 
tonic sol-fa principles as to -m-ite 1 1 s in a cadence tran- 
sition when m r d are the actual sounds represented. As 
to the tests not being singable, that will depend on the 
singer. The exactness of the sounds produced by the 
singer does not depend upon whether the notes are named 
m f e or m bah, but upon the perception and appreciation 
of the vocaUst concerning the interval he is required to 
produce, and his ability to produce it. " The imperfec- 
tions of the tempered scale,'' which " Musicus " says are 
necessary for the proper resolution of the tests, have 
really nothing to do in the matter. How these " imper- 
fections " are to be employed in the resolution is a kind of 
a puzzle, as the notation cannot represent them, and it is 



only by means of the notation that the resolution is to be 
arrived at. " The imperfections of the tempered scale " 
can only exist in the imagin.ition, so to speak, of any one 
looldng at a piece of tonic sol-fa music ; and the nature o£ 
these " imperfections " will depend on the individual 
interpretation put upon the sol-fa syllables. I maintain 
that the tests are not only practical, but that they are 
scientifically coiTect. Had this been a musical journal I 
would have sent you ,a minute analysis of the tests com- 
plained of, showing that no tempered intervals are neces- 
sary for their proper solution, but that every interval 
employed may be strictly in accordance with just intona- 
tion. I thoroughly agree ivith " Musicus " in his con- 
cluding sentence, that "imperfect notation and illegitimate 
transition " have seriously " hindered the cause of vocal 
mu.sic ; " and I would only add it is for the very purpose 
of enabling students to understand those imperfections 
and illegitimacies that the Treasury test problems are partly 
designed.— I am, &c., John C. Gbieve. 

8 EankeiDor Street, Edinburgh, Aug. 24. 



AN EVENING AT CHOPIN'S. 
It is about nine o'clock in the evening. Chopin is seated 
at the i^iano, the room is dimly lighted by a few wax- 
candles. Several men of brilliant renown are grouped in 
the luminous zone immediately around the piano. 

Heine, the sad humorist, leans over his shoulder, and 
as the tapering fingers wander meditatively over the ivory 
keys, asks " if the trees at moonhght sang always so har- 
moniously ? " 

Meyerbeer is seated by his side ; his grave and thoughtful 
head moves at times with a tacit acquiescence and delight, 
and he almost forgets the ring of his own Cyclopaean 
harmonies in listening to the deUeate Arabesque-woven 
mazourkas of his friend. 

Adolphe Nourrit, the noble and ascetic artist, stands 
apart. He has something of the grandeur of the Middle 
Ages about him. In his later years he refused to paint 
any subject which was wanting in true dignity. Like 
Chopin he served art with a severe exclusiveness and a 
passionate devotion. 

Eugene Delacroix leans against the piano, absorbed in 
meditation — developing, it may be, in his own mind, some 
form of beauty, or some splendid tint, suggested by the 
strange analogies which exist between sound and colour. 

Buried in a fauteuil, with her arms resting on a table, 
sat Madame Sand, curiously attentive, gracefully subdued. 
She is listening to the language of the emotions — fascinated 
by the subtle gradations of thought and feelings which she 
herself delighted to express. It is in memory of sonie such 
golden hours that she %vrites :— "There is no mightier art 
than this to awaken in man the subhme consciousness of 
his own htmaanity — to paint before his mind's eye the rich 
splendours of nature — the joy of meditation — the national 
character of a people — the passionate tumult of their hopes 
and fears — the languor and despondency of their sufferings. 
Eemorse, violence, terror, control, despair, enthusiasm, 
faith, disquietude, glory, calm — these and a thousand other 
nameless emotions belong to music. Without stooping to 
a puerUe imitation of noises and effects, she transports us 
in the spirit to strange and distant scenes. There we 
wander to and fro in the dim air, and, like j^neas in the 
Elysian fields, all we behold is greater than on earth — god- 
like, changed, idealised." 

One evening towards sunset, Chopin, who had lain in- 
sensible for many hours, suddenly rallied. He observed 



12 



THE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



the Countess draped in white standing at the foot of the 
bed. She was weeping bitterly. " Sing ! " murmured the 
dying man. She had a lovely voice. It was a strange 
request, but so earnest a one that his friends wheeled the 
piano from the adjoining parlour to his bedroom door, and 
there, as the twilight deepened, with the last rays of the 
setting sun streaming into the room, the Countess sang 
that famous canticle to the Virgin, which it is said once 
Baved the hfe of Stradella. "How beautiful it is!" he 
exclaimed ; " My God, how beautiful ! Again, again ! " In 
another moment he SAvooned away.—//. B. Haweis. 



MECHANICAL STREET MUSIC. 
It is commonly believed that street-organs, hurdy-gurdies, 
and kindred instruments are looked upon with particular 
dislike by all orthodox musicians. It appears, however, 
that the common belief is an inaccurate one. In 1861 the 
celebrated advocate, Adolphe Cr^mieux, was engaged to 
plead the cause of certain organ-grinders who were indicted 
in Paris as public nuisances ; and, in order to obtain mate- 
rials for the defence, he appUed to three of the leading 
composers of the day for their opinions about street-organs 
and hurdy-gurdies. Two of the replies have recently been 
discovered among a large collection of autographs that was 
left by the great lawyer, and the letters are printed in 
the current number of the Bevuc Politique ct Litleraire. 
J. F. Halevy wrote : — " I do not believe that any composer 
mil admit that his reputation suffers when a few of his 
melodies are reproduced on the street-organs and other 
musical boxes to which you allude ; I believe, on the con- 
trary, that airs which are thus made public not only do not 
lessen the reputation of the composer, but give it an 
additional popularity which is not unwelcome. Of course, 
the composer likes great singers — celebrated tenors and 
illustrious prima donnas — yet there is good in the rox 
po2ndi, and he is far from despising it." Eossini was next 
appealed to, but his reply is not given. It was evidently 
much to the same effect as Halfevy's, for Auber, who 
was the third composer to whom the question was referred, 
wrote : — " I entirely agree mth Eossini and Halfevy, and 
I beg to add my testimony to theirs. The success of the 
street is not the least flattering of all." Not one of these 
distinguished musicians went so far as to declare that the 
strains of a hand-organ were soothing to him, or that he 
had an active liking for the lugubrious outpourings of a 
hurdy-gurdy ; and therefore it may not be festhetically 
incumbent upon a mere every-day lover of music to go 
into raptures whenever Giovanni Giovanelli elects to 
chum out discordant fragments of opera within hearing. 
It may be added that the composers of the advanced 
school, writing with a sublime contempt for, or neglect of 
melody, are not likely to suffer from "grinding," or to 
gain popularity after this manner. 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Mr. John M'Laken, leader of psalmody in St. Bryce- 
dale Free Church, has been appointed teacher of music 
under Kinghorn School Board. 

Mr. William G. Dunsjiore (late of Holyrood F. C), 
has been elected precentor of CampbeltoAvn U. P. Church. 
After hearing a leet, which were chosen out of the twenty- 
eight applications sent in, the precentor's Committee gave 
in their report at a meeting held for that purpose. Bx- 
Provost Greenlees moved, and Mr. A. Colville seconded, 
that Mr. W. G. Dunsmore, of Edinburgh, be elected pre- 
centor. The motion was put and carried imanimously. 



A Hint tor Pianists. — A foreign medical man counsels 
those who practise frequently on the piano, harp, and 
stringed instruments generally, to submit to a surgical 
operation, which consists in dividing the tendon of the 
annulary or ring-finger. Pianists are aware that, out of 
the five fingers composing the hand, the fourth one, as it 
is termed, is the most rebellious in action, being alike the 
weakest and least flexible of all the others. I'his feeble- 
ness proceeds from the lateral tendons that join the anntr- 
lary to the other fingers, and in a measure paralyses its 
movements. It seems that the operation is not painful, 
the patient loses but little blood, and the fingers become as 
free as the others, and can work upon the key-board or 
music-strings with equal force and facility. 



Negro Festivities. — Negro festivities, as represented 
on the stage, are cheerful and jovial proceedings, replete 
with fun and good temper; but in sober reaUty they are 
not unfrequently scenes of disputes and bloodshed. The 
negroes carry knives and razors, and use them on the 
slightest j)rovocation, and "desperate frays at negro 
gatherings" is a stock heading in American journals. It 
is not often, however, that the cause of dispute is as slight 
as that which set the "sons and daughters of Moab" by 
the ears at a picnic near Richmond, Virginia. The trouble 
had its origin in a misunderstanding about which tune 
the brass band should play. Anthony and some of his 
friends insisted it should be "Wait till the clouds roll 
by." Another faction demanded a livelier air, called 
"Dancing Jimmy." The two factious became greatly 
excited, and in the melee a dozen razors were flashed 
in the sunhght. A coloured constable on the ground 
arrested the fighters. Anthony attempted to rescue his 
friends from the officers. The constable, after repeated 
warnings, drew an old, rusty, pepperbox revolver, and 
shot him. Several other men were severely wounded in 
the fray. The negro has always been fond of music, but 
it would hardly have been thought that whether "Wait 
tin the clouds roU by" or " Dancing .Timmy " should be 
played first was a question of sufficient importance to 
cause a score of sober enthusiasts to go at each other's 
throats with deadly weapons. 

General Grant and Mdsic— Amongst other reminis- 
cences of the late General Grant is one concerning his 
singularly intense dislilie for music. Many persons do 
not care for music; others only like certain kinds of music; 
but General Grant positively detested it in any and every 
foi'm. The narrator who recalls this curious trait in his 
character remarks that, when Marshal MacMahon was 
President of the French Republic, he had frequently an 
opportunity of seeing the patient endurance of the Ameri- 
can hero put to a severe test. Being on a visit to the 
French capital, the Marshal used often to^ place the 
Presidential box at the Grand Opera at his disposal, and 
etiquette prevented him from dechning the proffered 
courtesy. He could not stay away, but what he endured, 
we are told, in the cause of politeness on such occasions 
can best be understood by those who knew him intimately. 
He would sit passively enduring what to him was real 
suffering throughout an opera ; not a muscle of his face 
would change or betray him ; but afterwards he would 
confess to a friend the reality of the sufferings he had 
undergone. His dislilce for music also caused him real 
inconvenience when in society. Those who knew of it 
took care that if the General was at a "soiree" there 
should be neither singing nor piano-playing; but in many 



TEE MUSICAL TREASURY. 



13 



instances his host and hostess were unacquainted with this 
peculiarity, and amateur vocalists and pianists would 
insist on performing for his benefit. His answer to 
"What shall I sing, or what shall I play to you, General'/" 
in such oases was the discouraging one, " Something 
short." 



IRew fIDusic. 

J. 'WiGHTM.\N & Son, 13 South Castle Street, Edinburgh. 
My Harp is upon the Willow. Sacred Song. Words 
by Newton. Composed by W. P. Gale, Price 2s. 
Although sacred songs are not in great demand in the 
musical market, a composition of this class, mth any 
claim to merit, rarely fails to secure a fair measure of 
success. My Harp is upon the Wilioiv, the composer of 
which is known in Edinburgh as a clever organist and 
choirmaster, is distinguished by a melody and harmony 
that are at once simple and effective. Mr. Gale has been 
especially happy in the selection of his words, and displays 
excellent taste and unmistakable ability in their treatment. 
Key E flat ; compass B flat to E. 

T. H. Barnett, 40 Poland Street, London, W. 
The Finished Sow/. Words by E. Sydney. Composed 
by Orsino Salari. Price 2s. An admirable song with a 
pleasing melody and highly elaborate, if somewhat heavy, 
accompaniment. The words are of more than average 
merit. Two keys — E flat and F. 

C. B. Tree, 132 Petherton Eoad, Highbury, New Park, 
London. 
Our Darling. Song. Words by Eay Lotinga. Com- 
posed by Lindsay Proctor. Price 2s. There is a simple 
pathos in this prettj' little ballad that should make it 
popular. Three keys — F, G, and B fiat; compass B 
flat to D. 

Obsbokn & TuoKWOOD, 64 Berners Street, London, W. 
Tlie Vesper Voluntaries for Ori/an, Harmonium, or 
American Organ. Book Seven of this series is assuredly 
one of the best shilling's worth offered to the public in this 
age of cheap music. Young organists and harmoniumists 
will find in this numljer many beautifully harmonised 
themes that are really a pleasure to play. The book 
deserves a large sale. — Driicie : Dance for the Pianoforte. 
Price Is. 6d. By A. J. Carpenter. An easy and tuneful, 
if not very original piece. — The Freebooter. Song. Words 
by Lindsay Lennox. Composed by Morton EUiott. 
Price 2s. net. The composer has been successful in 
hitting off the rollicking joviality which is generally 
associated with members of the "freebooter" fraternity. 
It is a capital song for a baritone. Two keys — F and E 
flat; compass C to F or D. — Danse Entransing. Com- 
posed by E. Boggetti. A sprightly and pleasing piano 
sketch. It is not at all difficult, and being extremely 
" catchy," it is just the sort of piece to attract and interest 
young executants.— Puf/ Polka. Price 2s. By the same 
composer, is somewhat unequal, but the trio move- 
ment is bright and pretty. The frontispiece is neatly 
illustrated. — Once in a While. Song. Words by G. 
Clifton Bingham. Composed by Arthur J. Greenish. 
Price 2s. The fashion set by the popularity of Smiie 
Day has induced many song-writers to imitate, with 
more or less success, this style of drawing-room ditty. 
Once in a While is a charming example of this class, the 
melody being fresh, and the accompaniment uncommonly 
good. There is a violin obbligato. Two keys— C and A ; 
compass G to F. 



Geokge Elliott Kent, Askern, Doneaster. 
Britannia's Heroes of the Nile. Written and composed 
by George Elliott Kent. Price 23. There is an appalling 
recklessness about the following lines (which are a fair 
specimen of the words of this patriotic song) that cannot 
fail to satisfy the most sanguinary jingo : — 
Let Hicks and Gordon be your cry ; 
Braye British heroes to Khartoum hie ; 
The' death and hell before you lay, 
There Britain's flag must tioat to-day, 
Tho' reek and blood fld up the \vay. 

The music is appropriately vigorous and spirited. Key A ; 
compass E to 1). 

Henky Klein, 3 Holborn Viaduct, London, E.G. 
Patdine Lucca Waltz. Price 2s. Botschafter (Ambas- 
sador) Waltz. Price 2s. By Henry Klein. These two 
sets of waltzes are excellent examples of this prolific com- 
poser's best workmanship. Both are admira,ble dance 
measures, and possess considerable musical interest. — 
'J he Last Muster. Song. Words by Juba Kennerley. 
Composed by Henry Poutet. Price 2s. There is genuine 
artistic beauty both in words and music of this song. The 
former belong to the best class of song poetry, and Mr. 
Pontet has dealt with them in a manner well worthy of 
his reputation as an accomplished and skilful musician. 
There is an ad lib. harmonium accompaniment. Three 
keys — B flat, C and E flat; compass, B flat to D. — 
Earth's Secret. Song. Words and Music by Uonagh. 
Price 2s. Simplicity and prettiness are the chief features 
in this petit ballad. Key B flat ; compass E to G. 



flDusical (Boseip. 

New music, and matters of interest for notice in this column, shonld 
be addreesed, Editoe, Musical Treasury, U iN. Bridge, Edinburgh. 

UN i' riday, lUt;2Sth August, tlie uieinbera ut \'> uud- 
side Church Choir, Glasgow, m et and presented Mr. ,T. Clap- 
perton with a handsome epergne, as a token of the high 
esteem in which he was held by them, and as a mark of their 
appreciation of his services in the capacity of organist and 
choirmaster of Woodside Church. Mr. Wilson, in a few 
words, made the presentation, Mr. Clapperton replied in 
suitable terms, and thereafter a pleasant and harmonious 
evening was spent. Mr. Clapperton (who was recently ap- 
pointed organist of Sandyf ord Church) has also been elected 
to Belmont Established Church, the duties of which he will 
carry on in addition to those of Sandyford. 

The (jlasgow St. Andrew's i\iusical Assooiatiou, 
under its clever conductor, Mr. D. S. AUan, will shortly be 
in full swing, and is even now engaged in weekly rehearsals. 
During the coming season, this Society will, judging from 
its scheme, not only sustain, but add to, the high reputa- 
tion won in past years. Strong in membership, with many 
first class voices, and led by the beat of so aisle a con- 
ductor as Mr. Allan, much good work may be anticipated. 

After the presentation in Dublin to Madame Marie 
Rose of a gold bracelet by Major Macfarlane and twenty- 
three ladies and gentlemen of the Irish capital, the crowd 
outside wished to draw the p rima donna's carriage to the 
hotel, and in the struggle somebody purloined a silver 
cigarette case out of Colonel Henry Mapleson's side 
pocket. There is something like a isrecedent for this, 
as it seems when the Dublin crowd wished to drag the 
late Mdlle. Titiens home in triumph, the horses were 
never returned, and Lieut. -Colonel J. H. Mapleson and 
Titiens had subsequently to arrange the matter with the 
prosaic livery stable-keeper. 



u 



TBE MTTSICAL TREASURY. 



Ibonoutablc /lOentton Certificate. 

Test No. 5 (New Notation). 

a. Construct as many common chords, in yarious poaitiona, ae 
you can, using r in the key of G as the bass note in every case. 

6. Harmonise the following bass, making f-iur-part harmony; no 
note shorter than o/iepulse to be used in the added parts: — 

Key B flat. 



{|di :s, 


Id 


.ti ,li : 


si^i.nii,ri|di 


ji,Pli:fi^i.fi,nii} 


{|ri .ni ,fi :s 


,li . 


Sl ,fl 


hi .fi,8 


:li ,ti .li ,si 


} 


{|fi,ri.ni^i:si .82 


di 




- — 


: 


1 


c. Tell what keys 
clioidB of. 
a. KeyE. 


the chorda in 
Solution of 


requirement a 
Test No. i. 


would be B, or 


L 


{.s |d .n :s 


,fe 


8 .,re : n .,ti 


d .r :n .f 


} 


{|s ,n/:s,l.f 


s 


.l,t 


dip-i.t d' 


:- .di 


} 


{|f .1 :di.,t 


|d. 


.,86 


1 .,n |f 


.8 :1 .ta 


} 


{|di.l,ta:di,ri.ta| 


di .,di 


di,s.l,t 


di .t,l:s/.n,r |d :- 


•11 


6. Key E flat. 


1 — 















{d |d :JTj|s :n |d':t |l ||1 [s :t^|r' : t |s :n |r 



{r |r :nj|pi :s |f :n |r ||r |n :f\8|l :f 



PI :r 



1. Cadence modulation. 

2. Transition^ to the dominant of the first shai-p key. 

3. JixUnded transitional modulation. 

4. Passing transition to the sub-dominant of the original bey. 
c. Kev E flat. B flat. t. 



{d 


d 


■.nS 


s 


:P1 


Id' 


:t 


|1 llT 


d 


:M 


3 :P1 


d :1, 


s, 


li 


d.f 


. A flat. 


L A li is F. 




Eflat 


t. 


f . A flat. 


E flat, t 






H 


li 


tud 


|t, 


: r 


Id 


ti 


Illll'T 


PI 


:i_dj 


»l:f 


|P1 :r 


Id 


II 



The following is the explanation of a few points wherein some of 
the test-papers were wrong: — 

In the first line of the test this passage occurs:— 
re I n .,ti : d .,sei 1 1| 
Divested of what we may consider its embellishments, the passage 
would stand plainly thus: | Pl :d I 1|< the-e being the three 
notes of the minor chord. Each of ihe notes is approached in the test 
byasemiione Irom below. The notes of approach being ^uar/er- 
pulse tunes, may be considered as non-essential; they are, in fact, 
incidental guiding notes, or meloiic leading notes, directing the ear 
to the three principal notes already mentioned, n .d .1|- In the 
major, the parallel passage to R . d . 1| is s . PI . d ; and if we 
oraament this laiter passage similar to the minor passage in the 
test, the result should be what we have given in the above solution at 
a. There is another point. The ta's given in our solution were, in 
most of the papers, set down as t's; this is wrong. The test is 
written in the "improper method." Had it been put in the 
"better method," the key would have been changed at the last 

note of the second line, thus: ' imf ^^ ; because if twenty 
notes are taken in succession, beginning at this point, they will be 
found to be the very same in effect, and in relation, as the first 
twenty notes olthQtest; showing thar the first passage of twenty 
notes is repeated further on in another key. If the test were 
written in the "better method," the fourth last measure, for 
example, would appear thus: lPl.d,r:Pl,f.riPl, and the 
major parallel would be this: | s .PI ',f :s ,1 .f t s; in the im- 
proper method the above extiact appears in the test thus: 
|1 .f ,s :1 ,td .s| 1, and its mfl^or parallel should appear in the 
solution as we have given it. 

Several of the candidates mentioned that they did not know 
exactly how to work the 6 requirement, being puzzled as to how 
to make the necessary changes of key without using accidentals. 
Seeing that it was only the melody of the psalm-tune tnat was to be 
written, it need only be explained that th ■ key may change with- 
out any of the distinguishing tones appearing in the melody. In the 
solution of this r6q,uir6ment, aa given above, none of the distin- 



guishing tones appear in the melody, but they are nevertheless 
implied, and would, of course, be introduced, if the melody were 
harmonised, in some of the parts. J. C. G-. 



PASS LIST. 



Airdrie, Robert Houston. 

Barrow-in-Furness, J W. Dudley. 

„ T. Mawdsley. ■ 

Cambuslang, Andrew Archi bald. 
Carfin, Thomas M'Grady. 

Carnwath, William Prentice. 

Castle- Douglas, John Welsh. 
Edinburgh, James S. Monro. 
„ David Mitchley. 

John Strathie. 
Forfar, John Esplin. 



Glasgow, 



Xieslie, 

London, 

Perth, 

Slamannan, 

Strathbuugo, 



Kobert Gray. 
Alex. Stirling, 
Hugh Smith. 
William Turnbull. 
James Y.Piukerton. 
W. S. Stephenson. 
Chas. Iseard. 
George Archibald. 
James Storrar. 
Robert Wilson. 



CorresponDtng Class. 

For conditions, see '' Star"- for October, 18S4. 

FiEST Course— HARMONY. 

Text-boot— Novell o's Music Primer, "Harmony," by Dr. Stainer. 

Lesson XIII. 

Chap. S.,pag6 7fi. Study pars. llG-118, with intervening examples. 

jYofe.— In par. IIG we are told that the suspension 4 to 3 is rarely 
fouud on the sub-dominant and leading note. It is much more 
frequently employed on the sub-dominant than on the leading note. 
Stainer says the reason it is rarely used on the sub-dominant is 
because the fourth from the sub-dominant is an augmented fourth; 
this, in my opinion, is no valid objection^ as the fourth, being 
augmented, imd also by reason of its incisive character as the 
leading note, only renders the discord more piquant. The per- 
cussion and the resolution of the suspended fourth on the sub- 
dominant produce a strong and effective contrast of pungency and 
sweetness which cannot be so effectively and so simply obtained 
by any other means. Here is a common instance of the suspended 
fourth on the sub-dominant:— 



CI B B A 

E G F 

C| E F 

The suspended fourth on the leading note has less to recommend 
it, as the resolution must be effected on the chord of the leading 
note, which is not a completely consonant chord. The contrast 
between the percussion and the resolution of the suspended fourth on 
the leading note is not so great as in the previous exani]>le, neither 
is the result so satisfactory as in most other suspensions; never- 
theless, it might be employed thus:— 



G 
O 
C 



El 

F- 

F- 



DI 



The pupil is not advised to employ this, unless it be in a sequence. 

Exercise. — Instead of doing the exercise given after par. IIS, write 
4 to 3 suspensions on eveiy note of the scale, in the key of D. 

Study par. 119. 

Note.—T\xQ student may here be a littlo perplexed. In par. 
116 he is told that the 4 to 3 suspension is found on every 
degree of the scale, and in this par. he is told that when it 
occurs on the 5th degree of the scale it is not a suspension. This 
is a trifie paradoxical. Clearly, if the 4 to 3 on the dominant is 
prepared, it is a suspension ; because, having a proper preparation, 
percnssioti, and resolution, it follows the common rule of all 
suspensions. When the 4 to 3 on the dominant has no preparation, 
then it may be considered as an individual chord of the dominant 
eleventh. The dominant eleventh is the dommant ninth with 
another third superposed. With its full complement of notes it 
appears thus:— U— B— D— -F— A— 0. In four-part harmony it 
usually appears thus: — G — D — G — C, having its root doubled; or 
thus:— G— D — F— C, having its seventh introduced: in both ways 
we find the chord employed in Ex. 112, but there the discord C 
(that is the 4th), being prepared, it must be considered as a properly 
treated suspension. 

Study pars. liiO, 121, with intervening examples. 

i\'o(e.— From the former of these pars, it will easily be discerned 
that when the note of discord moves up to its resolution it is called 
ii ritardation ; this is in conti-actistinction to ^«57>e«5zon, which the 
device is called when the dissonant note moves down. 

Exercises.— ^iise SO, No. V.; page 119, Nos. 79, 82. 

Write a L.M. tune introducing 4 to 3 suspensions, J. 0. G, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



15 



KOHLERS' 

jfflJustcal Uceasut's, 

For October. 

No. 77— Staff Notation. Price 2d. 

Ho! Comrades, te whose Fathers fought. 
Blossoms. David Baxter, M.A. 
Softly see faded. G. F. Root. 



CONDUCTORS. CHOIRMASTERS, 

PRECENTORS, & OTHERS. 



Mr. F. Lattbach supplies Orcliestral Parties of 
ftny number, from lour or five upwards, for 
Oratorio or other Concerts. 

First-Class Artists. Teiims Moderate. 

Solo Singers Provided. 

Concert Parties Organised. 

Bands for Bazaars, Flower Shows, &c. 

ONLY ADDRESS— 

MtrSICAL AGENCY, 

5 DUNDAS STREET, 

EDINBURGH. 



S^SA^AN & CO.'S 
NEW & POPULAR PUBLICATIONS. 



3s. 



Barcarolle, for Violin and Piano, by if. Tolhurst, Sg 
Nocturne, „ „ „ Ss. 

Reverie, „ „ 

Berceuse, „ ,, 

Melodie, „ „ 

Impromptu, ,, ,, 

Romauce, „ ,, '„ 3s, 

Duo, for two Violins and Piano, hy S.Brandon, 3s. 
Farewell— Duet, ,, „ 3s. 

AH the above are Ori^nal Melodies, easily 
arranged, and Single Copies may be had, Post 
Free, Is. 6d. net. 



THE 



A Collection of Games with Tunes, Songa for 
tlie Little Ones, Quadrilles, Waltzes, Schottisches, 
Polkas, Country Dances. Vocal Marches. &c., &c., 
compiled and aiTanged for an Evening's Amuse- 
ment, by T. S. Gleadhill. 

Price Ova Shilling net. 

SWAN & CO., 4 Great Marlborough Street, 
London. 



SOL-FA DANCE MUSIC. 

A Collection of all the most popular Waltzes, 
Schottisches, Polkas, Horupipes, Jigs, Strath- 
speys, &c., in the Tonic Sol-fa Notation, for the 
Violin, Flute. Cornet, Accordion. Flutina, Melo- 
deon, Concertina, &c. Price Gd., of all book and 
Musicsellers; post free, 7 stamps. Every Sol- 
faist should send for the above. 



3sr. 



B 12, O "W InT, 



Musicselleb, 1 Graham Street, Bonnington, 
Leith. 



ADDRESS COLUMN. 

A. C. M'INTYRE, 46 Cockburn Street, Edin.. 

Teacher of the Violin, Viola.and Violoncello. 

Parties supplied. 
JOHN DAVIDSON, Violinist, 32 St. Mart 

Street, Edinburgh. Parties supplied. 
J. C. GRIEVE, 8 Rankeilor Street, Edin., 

Voice, Harmonium, and Piano. 
P. DAMBMANN, 18 Montague Street, 

Edinburgh— Teacher, Piano and Violin. 
MORISON graham, Baritone, 23 W. Majt- 

LAND STa££T| SDHtfiUfiGH. 



OLD FRIENDS WITH NEW FACES. 

KINDERSPIEL; 

A 

By J. C. GRIEVE, F.E.I.S. 

Sol-fa, 2d. Staff Notation, Symphonies and 

Accompaniments, Is. Gd, 

Now Readt, had op all Musicsellers and 

Newsagents. 

K.OHLEB. & Son, Edinburgh. 



NEW SACRED SONG. Price 2s. 

THE LOYING SHEPHEED. 

A Loving Shepherd is my Lord, 

My way of life he guideth ; 
No care have I, for in His word. 

My happy heart coufideth. 
In pastures green He feedeth me. 

My noonday walks attending : 
By pleasing streams he leadeth me. 

My midnight hours defending. 
Words by Miles Sandeys. 

Music by Bernard White. 

Kohler & Son, Edinburgh. 

JUST PUBLISHED, 

IN THE 

STAFF NOTATION WITH ACCOIVIPANIMENT, 

"The Marcli of the Cameron Men/' 

AND 

"Will ye no Come Back Again ? " 

Arranged as Part Songs by 
J-^A-ISiLIES "S'OE.ICSTOItT. 

3d. each. 

To he had also in Sol-fa Notation in Kohlers' 
" Musical Star," Nos. 3 and 133. Price Id. each. 



In Preparation. 
"The Auld House." 
"The Covenanter's Widow's Lament." 
*'The Auld Edinburgh Cries," &,c. 
Messrs. PATERSON & SONS, 27 George St., 

Edinburgh. 

Messrs. KOHLER & SON, 11 North Bridge, 

Edinburgh. 



CHRISTMAS PIECES IN "MUSICAL STAR." 

Sacred. No. 

Glory be to God on High, . . . Silclter, 16 

'Tis Night on the Silent Mountain, J, S. Tenney,3S 

Oil Ring the Merry Bells, 40 

Oh Come all ye Faithful {Adeste Fideles.) . 43 
To us a Child of Hope is Born, Lowell Mason, 49 
Glory be to God, ... J. H. Tcnney, 49 

What Bells are Those? . Brinley Bicliards, GG 
For unto us a Child is Born, . . Handel, 7G 
Hark! the Herald Angels Sing, Dr. Arnold, 78 
Hark ! what mean those Holy Voices, 

J. H. Tcnney, 78 
Ring out, ye Bells! . . E. Roberts, 1^ 

Hark! the ileva.\AA.nse\^^'m^,Brinlev Richards, 83 
The MeiTy Christmas Bells, . . 83 

Hark ! what mean those Holy Voices. 

Rev. Robt. Lowry, S3 

Good-will to Men, 83 

Sing unto the Lord, . . W.O. Perkins, 88 
Glory be to God in the Highest, Naomi, 88 

Glory to God, Good-will t ward Men, 

J. K. Scott, 88 
Hark ! the Herald Angels Sing, Mendelssohn, 88 

Who is He?. , , 88 

Secular. 
Christmas Bells, . . . . A. B. Git^, \b2 
The Christmas Tree, . . . Thos. Young, 162 
The Year's Last Horn- is Sounding, . Schultz, 162 
The Bright New Year, Hubert P. Main, 162 

The Bells' Sweet Chimes are Pealing, . , 152 
Each Number, One Penny. 

IN THE PRESS. 
Carol, sweetly Carol. 
Hail, joyous Christmas Mom ! 
Merry chiming Christmas Bells. 
Here again J 



IRoblers' /iDusfcal Star, 

No. 1G9— For October. 
Ho ! Comrades, ye whose Fathers fought (Part 

Songl. 
Blossoms (Part Song). David Baxter, M.A. 
Down bt the River Side I Stray (Song). 

J. R. Thomas. 
Gathering Shells bt the Shore (Song and 

Chorus). W. Thompson. 
Day Softly Dying (Duet). Zingarflli. 
Ocean Lullaby (Part Song). 

EDINBURGH 

TONIC SOL-FA COUNCIL 

IN CONNECTION WITH THE COUNCIL, 

WILL BE FORMED IN 

Hall under Eree Tron Church, 

CHAMBERS STREET, 

As under — 
Elementary and Intermediate Classes 
(Teacher. Mr. J. M. GRAHAM), on Monday 
Evenings, beginning 6tli October, 1885. 

Elementary Class meets at 8 o'clock. 

Terms, 2s. Gd. per quarter. 

Intermediate Class meets at 9 o'clock. 

Terms, 33, per quarter. 

Matriculation and Advanced Classes 

(Teacher, Mr. JMIES SNEDDON, Mus. Bac), 

on Tuesday Evenings, beginning 8th October, 

1S85. 

Matriculation Class meets at 8 o'clock. 

Terms, 7a. Cd. per quarter. 

Advanced Class meets at 9 o'clock. 

Terms, 10s. per quarfcei-. 

Fees Payable in Advancb. 

Members can he Enrolled by applying to the 

Secretarj', 

GEO. MORRISON, 
17 Parkside Street, Edinburgh, 
Or at tbe Hall on night of Meeting. 

FOR CONCERTS, RECITALS, &c. 
J. S. JACKSON, 

For Testimonials, Terms, and Dates, 
please Address — 

1 SPITTALFIELD CRESCENT, 

EDINBURGH. 



NOTICE. 

The Spohr Adjustable Chin-Holder 

FOR the 

VIOLIN OR VIOLA. 

G-EEATLY IMPEOVED MAKE. 
REDUCED PRICES, 

PATENTED IN ALL COUNTRIES. 



EEDtrOED PRICES. 

No. 1. Rosewood Top, Brass Fittings. . 3b, ffd, 
,, 2. Ebony Top, Nickel-plated Fittings, 6s. 
„ 3. Engraved Gilt or Plated Fittings, 
with selected Ebony or best 

Velvet Top^ 7a. 6d, 

,, 4. Solid Silver Engraved Fittings and 

real Ivory Top, .... 25a. 
(Forms a very handsome present.) 

Sole Wholesale Agent for Suoti,and— . 

Mbsbrs. kohler & SON, North Bridge, 

Edinburgh. 



16 



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MUSIC PUBLISHED BY 

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MUSICSELLERS AND PUBLISHERS TO THE QUEEN, 

27 GEORGE STREET, EDINBURGH. 



THE QtFEElSr'S EBITIOIT 

OF 

THE YOCAL MELODIES OF SCOTLAND. 

By FINLAY DUN and JOHN THOMSON. 

150 Songs, Full Music size, Cloth, .... ISs. 

Half-bound, 21s. 

Full Morocco (as supplied to Her Majesty), . . 42s. 

" This work has long been the most popular standard edition of 
Scottish National Songs, in virtue both of its admirable musical arrange- 
ments and of the excellent way it is got up." — Scotsman. 



THE YOCAL MELODIES OF SCOTLAND. 



106 OP THE MOST POPULAR SCOTCH SONGS. 

Arranged for Pia.no Solo, 
By A. C. MACKENZIE, 

Composer of COLOMBA, etc., etc. 

In Six Books, Is. 6d. each net ; or, in One Volume, 

Cloth, 7s. Cd. net. 

The best Collection of Scotch Airs published; carefully arranged by 
one who has made his mark in the musical world. 



LOAVE'S 

REELS, STRATHSPEYS, JIGS, k. 

In Six Books, 2s. each net ; or, One Volume, 
Half bound, 15s. 
This celebrated work is undoubtedly the best Collection of Keels, etc , 
offered to the public. 

Book I. is also arranged as Piano Duets, 2s. net. 
And for Violin, 6d. net. 



LAYS from" fr^RATH EARN; 

CONTAINING FORTY-FIVE OF 

104 pages, One Volume, Cloth, 7s. 6d. 

This collection should be in the hands of every true lover of Scottish 
music. 



Til MIS m Emrik. 

A Selection of Twestt-nde of the most 
PoPTTLAK Songs from 

THE VOCAL MELODIES OF SCOTLAND. 

One Volume Cloth, Full Music size, 7s. 6d. 



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j^j<riD 



PIANOFORTE. 

Promenade March, . . . Beaumont, 

Nell Gwynne (Gavotte), . . . Boggetti, 

On Gosamer Wings, . . . M. L. Hime, 

Old Times Mazurka, . . . .A.Stella, 

Argyll, .... W. S. Mverard, 



SONGS. 

Mary (Kind, kind, and gentle is she). 



Hazeldean, 

Auld House, .... 
Overture (Guy Mannering), 
National Medley Overture (Scotch), 
Flodden, 



Cunio, 

Bishop, 
Deivar, 

Cunio, 



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2s. „ 
2s. „ 

Is. 6d. ,, 

-b. ,, 

ls.6d. ,, 
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Home, 



Keys F & G, 
Auld Fisher, . 

Yes, Sir! (sequel to No, Sir!) 
Near the Sea-Birds' " 
The Olden Songs, 
A Lullaby, 
Auld House, . 
Flowers, 
Good Night, . 



T. Richardson, 

Elmo,, 

. Wahcjteld, 

. 0. Barri, 

. F. Abt, 

A. E. Simson, 

Lady Nairne, 

J. Kinross, 

Stella, 



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2s. 
2s. 

Is. 6d. 
Is. 6d. 
Is. 6d. 
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Is. 6d. 



IDJ^nSTCiE DVCTJSZO. 



Encore une fois Valse Lowthian. 

Viola Valse, J. M'Lachlan Key. 

Mona , ,, 

Souvenir de la jeunesse Valse, . . . P, Perrot. 

Eoseberry Polka Perry. 

Nettie Valse, ,, 

All the aboue 



0. Steinbach. 



W. L. Frost. 



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7BIXTED BT BELL AND BAIH, OLASQOW.