(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "KPFK folio"

This is a 
complimentary 

Program Folio 
for 

n^ncPnfOrmist 

thinkers— 
searching, 
sensitive, 

culturally attuned 
people. 

MORE * 



KPFK9O.7 F.M. Au£. 19-Sept. 1, 1963 



a listener sponsored 



e in radio 



The PROGRAM FOLIO, a service to KPFK subscribers, is published bi-weekly by 
KPFK (FM 90.7 mc) which serves Southern California. KPFK broadcasts 17 hours 
a day of music, drama, public affairs and programs for children. The station pro- 
motes discussions of all points of view, but endorses none. 

Anyone can listen, but those who want creative and provocative programming sup 
port KPFK. The basic annual subscription is S12.00. Contributions are tax-deduct- 
ible because KPFK is non-profit. Sustaining, $25.00; Contributing, $50.00; Patron, 
$100.00; Participating, $250.00; Lifetime, $1,000; Student, $5.00 (six months); 
Introductory, $3.00 (three months). Subscriptions are transferable to KPF.\, serving 
Northern California (2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley) and WBAI, serving the New 
York area (30 E. 39th St., N.Y. 16). 

KPFK and these two other listener-subscription stations form Pacifica, a non-profit 

corporation. KPFK programming has been favorably reviewed by The Saturday 

VOL. FIVE, NO. 3 Review, The Los Angeles Times, The Nation. The New Yorker, The Christian 

Science Monitor and numerous other publications. KPFK has received broadcasting's three 

most outstanding awards: a PEABODY, an OHIO STATE AWARD and the AFRED I. 

duPONT RADIO AND TELEVISION AWARD FOR 1961. 

KPFK transmits from Wt. Wilson uith a pouer of 110,000 uatts. The mai/ins address is KPFK, Los Angeles 

38, California. Studios and offices are located at 3729 Cahuenga Blvd., Morth Hollvuood. 

TR 7.5583, ST 1-0150. 




tU 



shows a reproduction of ED SAYLAN's 1st prize winner (color) of our 
C4y^^t\ Images of the Faire contest to put you in the mood for Echoes of the 

Faire scattered through this Folio. 



P^C^^lAffx J^iClc 



Two special events highlight this Folio: a live stucdio concert, to which you 
are invited, an(d an interview with music of the Freedom Singers. The studio 
concert features Donna Burrow, the comely redhead you heard at our Pleasure 
Faire and IsAay Market. Saturday, August 31, beginning at 9:30 p.m.. Donna 
will sing Irish, English, and Scots songs of all periods in our Studio D. 
Arrive at the station about 9:00 and welcome. 

Donna's concert is part of our Echoes of the Faire series in this Folio — re- 
capturing the best moments of the two-day extravaganza. Other Echoes, 
tape-recorded, can be heard Friday, August 23, Saturday, August 24, and 
Thursday, August 29. 

The Freedom Singers are four young men and women who perform the 
songs of the civil rights movement to raise funds for the Student Non-Violent 
Coordinating Committee. They will appear at the Ash Grove in Los Angeles 
in August and September. On August 19, Monday, we will interview them in 
our studios; that interview will be rebroadcast on Sunday, August 25. AND, 
Ed Perl of the Ash Grove has gi^en us 150 tickets to hear the Freedom 
Singers on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, August 30 and 31, and September 1. 
Two of these tickets will be given free with each new $12.00 subscription 
during this Folio period. If you are an old subscriber and want to take advan- 
tage of this offer, get a friend to subscribe, and we will give you or your friend 
the two tickets. 

Still, yet, and another highlight: seven programs from the controversial 
convention of the Young Republican National Federation in San Francisco in 
June. Senator Barry Goldwater leads off the series Friday, August 30; the 
remaining six programs are on Saturday, August 3 1 , and Sunday, September 1 . 

We have finally raised some money to keep a Pacifica correspondent in the 
South full-time this summer. Dale Minor will be sending reports and pro- 
ducing documentary programs in the spirit of Birmingham and Jackson 
masterpieces. These reports will be aired under the title From the South, 
an hour set aside the first Monday evening of each Folio. Additional programs 
on civil rights will be programmed on the Wide-Open Hour Saturdays, and 
The Eleventh Hour on Thursdays. 

Page 2 



BROADCAST HOURS: 7 a.tu. to 12:00 midnight, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 
12:00 midnight Saturday and Sunday. Dates of future broadcasts appear in BOLD 
FACE, caps anil parentheses. Example: (DECEMBER 30 )n Dates of original broadcasts 
in light face and in parentheses. Example: (December 30). ISumbers in parentheses 
following listing of musical selections refer to time, in minutes. 



MONDAY, August 19 

8:00 A.M. BAROQUE CONCERTOS— I 

VIVALDI Flute Concerto Op 10 No 2 

Masi/Hute; Orch San Pietro/Ruotola (Decca 

10062) (11) 
CORELLI Harpsichord Concerto Xo 11 in E. 
Op 5 

Canino/harps; Gli Accademici/Eckertsen (Vox 

423-3) (8) 
A. SCARLATTI Concerto No 3 in F 

Scarlatti Orch/Caracciolo (Ang 35141) (8) 
BACH Harpsichord Concerto No 1 in d minor 

Kirkpatrick/harps, Lucerne Strings/Baum- 

gartner (Arc 3132) (24) 
HANDEL Oboe Concerto No 3 in e minor 

Tabuteau/oboe, Philadelphia Orch / Ormandy 

(Col 4629) (10) 
BONPORTI Concerto No 6 in F, Op 11 

I Musici (Epic 3542) (12) 
ALBINONI Oboe Concerto in d minor. Op 9 No 2 

Lardrot/oboe, Wiener Solisten/Bottcher (Van 

1100) (12) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAI. FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XI: Leonid Belozubov teaches, and it's 
not too late to order the lesson syllabus — call 
us at the station. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Hallock Hoffman. (Aug. 18) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — I: The drama, poetry, 
prose, and music of Elizabethan England, as- 
sembled by Lee Whiting and heard weekday 
mornings in this Folio. 

.9:45 SCHUMANN CELUO CONCERTO: The con- 
certo in A minor for cello and orchestra. Op 129. 
Leonard Rose is the cellist and the New York 
Philharmonic is conducted by Leonard Bern- 
stein. (Col 5653) (24) 

10:15 FEDERAL AID TO EDUCATION: Consultant 
Wilson Riles, Congressman George Brown, and 
LA Board of Education member Mary Tinglof. 
(Aug 8) 

11:00 A SCOTS QUAIR — V: Miss Fredi Duncan 
reads the Lewis Gassic Gibbon story weekly at 
this time in 26 episodes. 

11:30 TEACHER-PUPIL CONCERT #3 

RAVEL Chansons Madecasses 

Fi.'-cher-Dieskau, Ens (13) (DGG 18615) 
VAUGHAN-WILLIAMS O Clap Your Hands 

Columbia U Chapel Choir-Chorus. Organ, 

Brass, Percussion (4) (Kapp 9057) 

Motet-O taste and see 

St. Paul's Cathedral Choir/Bower (3) 
(Ang 35138) 
BALAKIREV Piano Sonata 

Ryshna (27) (SFM 1007) 
RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Capriccio Espagnol 

London Symphony/Martinon (15) (LM 2298) 
STRAVINSKY Song of the Nightingale 

Suisse Romande/Ansermet (22) (Lon 1494) 

1:00 TOMORROW'S WILDERNESS — I: First of 
five programs recorded at the 8th Wilderness 
Conferen:e held in March this year under the 
auspices of the Sierra Clulj. In this program. 



Stephen Spurr of the I'niversit.v of Michigan 

tells of "The Value of Wilderness to Science." 

The other four talks will be heard weekdays 
at this time. 

1:30 THE SILENT REVOLUTION — I: Creative 
man in contemporary society, discussed by six 
speakers recorded at San Francisco's 1st Uni- 
tarian Church. Here, Frank Barron, research 
psychologist, talks of "The Creative Imagina- 
tion." The other five programs will air weekly 
at this time. (Jun 16) 

2:40 ANTON BRUCKNER: Willem Van Otterloo 
conducts the Vienna Symphony Orchestra in a 
performance of Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 in 
E major. (Epic 6006) (63) 

3:45 SYNANON REVISITED: The founder and di- 
rector of the unifiue narcotics addiction rehab- 
ilitation project talk with KPFK's Art Wads- 
worth. (Aug 10) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: Se? page 6. 

6:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS: Wil- 
liam Mandel with report and comment. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: John Ohliger, Mike Hodel. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Marvin Schacter. (Aug 20) 

7:00 FROM THE SOUTH: A special program time 
left open each two weeks during this summer 
of protest for reports from our correspondent 
in the South, Dale Minor. 

8:00 THE FREEDOM SINGERS: This group of 
young men and women now tours the country 
presenting the music of the civil rights move- 
ment, the most dynamic reflection of the folk 
process in America today. This program is an 
interview, with music, programmed to coincide 
with the Freedom Singers' appearance at the 
Ash Grove in Los Angeles. (See program talk) 
(AUG 25) 

9:30 SEX AS RELIGION: Critic and poet Marjorie 
Farber on a "new variety of cultism" found in 
the novels and films of Mailer. Baldwin, and 
Truffaut. Her talk is adapted from a paper 
she presented this year before the Association 
of Existential Psychology and Psychiatry. 

10:00 THE GOON SHOW: The Spanish Suitcase. 

Ned Seagoon, at the request of Senor Mori- 
arty, takes Major Bloodnok's place in a Span- 
ish prison. No, we don't understand it either, 
but Peter Sellers and Spike Milligan claim to. 

10:30 MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood with 
something called "Round Midnight," variations 
on a theme. (ACG 20) 

11:00 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF KENNETH 
REXROTH: The San Francisco belles-lettrist con- 
tinues. 

11:.30 ALBERT J. GUERARD: Dr. Guerard. novel- 
ist and professor at Stanford University, is 
interviewed by Dale Harris about the novel 
today. Dr. Guerard's latest work is The E.xiles, 
a novel of Latin America. 



Page 3 



TUESDAY, August 20 

7:00 A.M. RICHARD STRAUSS CONCERT 

Horn Concerto No. 1 in E flat 

Brain/Philharmonia/Galliera (Col 4775) (15) 
Serenade in E flat. Op 7 

Eastman Winds/Fennell (Mer 50173) (8) 
Oboe Concerto 

Goossens/Philharmonia/Galliera (Col 4775)(22) 
Burleske 

Janis/Chicago/Reimer (Vic 2127) (20) 
Taillefer, Op 52 

Cebotari/Ludwig/Hotter/Cho & Radio Berlin 

Orch/Rother (Ur 7042) (18) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XII: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Marvin Schacter. (Aug 19) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — II: Lee Whitiner presents 
beautiful noises from Elizabethan England. 

9:45 DIE SCHONE MULLERIN: Schubert's song 
cycle complete with prologue and epilogue, texts 
by Wilhelm Muller. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau is 
the baritone with Gerald Moore, piano. (Ang 
3628 3s) (65) 

10:45 TWO STORIES: Burton Raff el reads two un- 
published works: "How They Carried the Prize 
from Stockholm to Oshkosh" and "Snow." 

11:30 TWO RUSSIAN PIANISTS: 

HAYDN Sonata No 20 in C minor 

Richter/piano (Artia 1550) (24) 
CHOPIN Etudes Nos 1-12. Op 10 

Ashkenazy/piano (Artia 203B) (30) 
Ml'SSORGSKY Pictures at an Exhibition 

Richter/piano (Artia 154) (30) 

1:00 TOMORROW'S WILDERNESS— II: Wilder- 
ness and Wildlife. Carl W. Buchheister. presi- 

1:30 THREE INDONESIAN POETS: Sitor Sirumo- 
rang. Toto Sudarto Bachtiar and W. S. Rendra, 
from a forthcoming anthologj' of Indonesian 
poetry edited and presented by Burton Raffel. 

2:00 MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood. (Aug 
19) 

2:30 THE NERVE OF FAILURE: Dr. Thomas 
Billings, former assistant professor of education 
at Sacramento State College. (Jul 10) 

3:15 DONAUESCHINGEN FESTIVAL — I: From 
the Southwest German Radio. Boulez's Pli seloit 
pli (Portrait de .Mallamie), conducted by the 
composer. (Jun 10) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6. 

6:00 RACF: REL.ATIONS NEWS: Daniel Panger 
and Maureen Mcllroy. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Henry Barzilay. John 
Ohliger. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 CO.M.MENTARY: R()l)ert Gaston. (.Vl'G. 21) 

7:00 .MRS. GBS: Janet Dunl)ar. author of a re- 
cently published l)io;;raphy of George Bernard 
Shaw's wife, Charlotte, talks with Frances 
Barry. 

7:45 ISENHKI.M CONCERT: All. the music .so far 
availal)h- from Hindemith's operatic masterpieie, 
.MathiN der .>Ialer, about Mathias Grunwald, 
painter of the famous Ist-nheim altarpiece. Pilar 
Lorenger. soprano, baritone Dietrich Fischer- 
Dieskau and tenor Donald (Jrobe aie soloist.s 
with Leopold Ludwig and the Berlin Radio 



orchestra. The Berlin Philharmonic under 
Hindemith add their bit as well, and "William 
Malloch ties the musical fragments with story 
line. 

9:00 FKO.M THE CENTER: Is Individualism Es- 
sential to Democracy? Elmo Roper, chairman of 
the famous poll-taking organization and vice- 
chairman of the Fund for the Republic, has 
spent a lifetime finding out what other people 
think. In thi.s program he answers riuestions 
from an adult education group about the future 
of American democracy. (AUG 22) 

10:00 MEET YOU AT THE STATION: KPFK goes 
folk again, with collector and enthusiast Alan 
Hjerpe biweekly at this time. Tonight Uncle 
Dave Macon and his heirs are discussed. 

11:00 THE LONELINESS OF FEAR: Three Ameri 
can poet-s — Stanley Kunitz. Muriel Rukeys. : 
and Lenore Marshall — comment on the role 
the poet in the nuclear age. The commen 
are in verse and informal discussion. 

11:40 THE BAKER'S STORY: One of a series 
Enzo the Barber stories written and read in 
Bronx Sicilian dialect by writer Joe Papale. 



WEDNESDAY, August 21 

7:00 .\.M. STR.WINSKY CONCERT 

Ragtime for 11 Instruments 

Columbia Sym/Stravinsky (Col 5772) (5) 
Four Norwegian Moods 

NY Phil/Stravinsky (Col 4398) (8) 
Octet for Wind Instruments 

Members of Columbia Sym/Stravinsky (Col 

5672) (16) 
Ebony Concerto 

Woody Herman Orch/Stravinsky (Col 4 398) (9) 
Renard 

Soloists/Memb's Col Sym/Stravinsky 

(Col 5772) (16) 
Les Noces 

Soloists/Barber, Copland. Foss. Sessions, pi 

anos/Columbia Ens/Stravinsky (Col 5772 (25) 
Circus Polka 

NY Phil/Stravinsky (Col 4398) (4) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SL\N — XIII: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 CO.M.>IENT.\RY: Robert Gaston. (Aug 20) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — III: Elizabethan prose 
poetry and music — and non-Elizabethan Lee 
Whiting. 

9:45 Ml SIC OF TOCH .AND COWELL: Firs?t 
Toch's Five Pieces for Winds and Penussion 
Op 83; then Cowell's String Quartet No 5 
(1962). followed by Toch's Sonatinetta foi 
Flute, Clarinet and Bassoon. Op 84. The Phil- 
adelphia Woodwind Quintet performs the Todi 
and the Beaux-Arts String Quartet the Cowell. 
(Col 5788) (45) 

10:30 \ VISIT TO COl NT TOLSTOY: Willard 
Trask reads an 1SS7 article by George Kennan, 
grandfather of the iliplomat (.\ug 2) 

11:30 A K.VTIll.KKN FERRIKR SONCJ RKCIT.VL 

sen r.M A.N.N l-'iauenliobo und Lebcn 

Ferrier/contralto. Newmark/piano (Lon 5020) 

(22) 
lOngllsh Songs and Folksongs 

Feiricr ( ontialto. Spurr/i)ian() (Lon 5411) (44) 
IJU.Ml.MS \icr Krnste tlesange 

l'\'iiicr iiintralto. Newmark piano (Lon 5020 



Page 4 



1:00 TOMORROW'S WILDERNESS— III: Wilder- 
ness In Western Culture. Paul Brooks, editor- 
in-chief, Houghton Mifflin Co. 

1:30 ECONOMIC PLANNING FOR DISARMA- 
MENT: Arthur Carstens. professor of indus- 
trial relations at I'CLA; RAND economist Allen 
Ferguson; and Paul Schrade of the UAW dis- 
cuss, and are moderated by architect Joseph 
Belser. 

2:30 EVENINGS ON THE ROOF: Peter Yates. 
(Aug 18) 

3:30 THE BLACK MANS REVOLUTION: Con- 
gressman Adam Clayton Powell of New York. 
(Aug 7) 

4:00 HIROYIKI IWAKIS TCHAIKOVSKY 
FIFTH: The Japanese conductor leads the 
Nippon Hoso Kyokai Symphony Orchestra in a 
performance of the Russian's Opus 64. (Nivico 
JV 2001) (47) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6. 

6:00 FROM THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD: 

Daniel Panger. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Mike Hodel, John Ohliger. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Phil Kerby. (AUG 22) 

7:00 MARTINU'S FIELD MASS: A 19 39 work, 
written in honor of the Czech war dead on 
the heels of the Hitler invasion. Performers 
are Teodor Srubar, baritone, the chorus of the 
Vit Nejedly Army Ensemble, V. J. Sykora, 
piano, organist M. Kampelsheimer and soloists 
of the Czech Philharmonic under Bohumir 
Liska. (Sup 10387) (27) 

7:30 LADY MACBETH — MORAL SCAPEGOAT: 

John Monteverde, associate professor of English 
at San Diego State College, challenges the tra- 
ditional view of Lady Macbeth as goader and 
prodder. This interpretation returns the focus 
of the play to Macbeth as tragic hero, engineer 
of his own downfall, and places the moral re- 
sponsibility for the tragedy entirely upon Mac- 
beth himself. 

8:15 MACBETH: In case you don't agree with the 
previous speaker, lislen for yourself as the 
Marlowe Society does it. (Lon A4343) 



AND RUS- 



10:30 JAZZ ARCHIVf:S: Phil Elwood spends a he 
hour with Ethel Waters. (AUG 22) 



11:00 CAPITAL PUNISHMENT: William Graves, 
former prison physician at San Quentin peni- 
tentiary, speaking against the death penalty 
with some graphic first-hand observations. 



THURSDAY, August 22 

:00 A.M. FRENCH VOCAL MUSIC 

FAURE Lo Bonne Chanson, Op 61 

Cuenod/tenor, Holetschek/piano (XWN 18707) 

(22) 
DI-PARC SONGS 

Simoneau/tenor, Rogers/piano (XWN 18788) 

(23) 
FRENCH TROUBADOUR SONGS 

Cuenod/tenor. Leeb/lute (XWN 18638) (22) 
FRANCAIX Le Diable Boiteaux 

Cuenod/tenor. Conrad/bass, Inst Ens/ Fran- 

caix (XWN 18543) (19) 



8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH 

SIAN — XIV: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Phil Kerby. (Aug. 21) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — IV: The arts of the 
era of the Virgin Queen. 

9:45 FOLK SONG COLLECTORS: Bill Faier talks 
with Frank and Anne Warner about Sue 
Thomas, Tink Tillet and Joseph Henry Johnson 
and the songs and stories they've collected from 
them. (45) 

10:30 FROM THE CENTER: (Aug 20) 

11:30 LITTLE-KNOWN CHAMBER MUSIC: 

MENDELSSOHN Quartet in E flat 

Westwood String Quartet (SFM 1001) (20) 
VIOTTI Quartet in B flat 

Baker String Quartet (SFM 1006) (24) 
MICHAEL HAYDN Quintet in C 

Roth Quartet. Halleux/viola (SFM 1005) (20) 
GLINKA Quartet in F 

Westwood String Quartet (SFM 1001) (18) 

1:00 TOMORROW'S WILDERNES»S— IV: Man and 

the Land, J. Ralph Audy, professor of human 
ecology at the UC Medical School. 

1:30 THE BUTTERFLY AND THE TRAFFIC 
LIGHT: Cynthia Ozick reads her short story 
which first appeared in Literary Review. 

2:00 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood. (Aug 21) 

2:30 THE .ALLIANCE FOR PROGRESS: US am- 
bassador Teodoro ^loscoso and Mexican agrarian 
economist Edmundo Flores give different prog- 
noses for the Alliance. (Aug 9) 

3:30 READINGS FROM EUGENE O'NEILL: Jason 
Robards, Jr., with excerpts from four of the 
plays. (Aug 14) 

4:10 STRAVINSKY AT THE KEYBOARD: Vintage 
Stravinsky recordings, with the composer at 
the keyboard, performing Piano Ras Music, 
Serenade en la, and Capricoio for Piano and 
Orchestra — the latter with the Walther Straam 
Orchestra, conducted by Ernest Ansermet. (45) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6. 

6:00 SPECL-\L REPORT: Background to the 
news. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEV 

Ohliger. 

6:40 CALEND.\R OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 



Erwin Rosen, John 



:45 COMMENTARY: 

23) 



Dr. Norman Bailey. (AUG 



7:00 THE .4RMED FORCES AS EDUCATOR: 

Speaking at the recent meeting of the Na- 
tional Philosophy of Education Society in San 
Francisco. William H. Boyer finds armed 
forces educational fare rather less than worthy. 
Dr. Boyer is a University of Hawaii professor. 

7:30 BERLINER .MILLJOH: A background report 
on the times in which the Brecht-Weill collabo- 
rations took place, prepared by William Malloch 
and Dr. Richard Raack, assistant professor of 
history at Long Beach State College. (Jul 7) 

8:30 THE ELEVENTH HOUR: No psychologists 
here, but open time for late program arrivals 
and topical fare. 



9:30 CINEMA REVIEW 



Page 5 



9:45 NOT-SO-SILENT MOVIES MUSICS: Before 
talkies, each movie scene had its own high- 
lighting- music. When electrical recording came 
in. automation drove pianists and organists 
out of work. Fortunately for us. William 
Malloch has kept some of the circa 1926 re- 
cordings with titles like "Implorations" and 
"Hurry No. 3"; he gathers a nosegay of them 
of those who were there and those who wish 
they had been there when it was all like it was 
really happening. 

10:15 BIRTHSUIT: A documentary produced by 
South African radio on a decompression device 
to ease the pres.sure on the uterus during de- 
livery, thus shortening labor. Included is a re- 
cording of an actual birth. 

10:45 THE WORLD IS MY COUNTRY: Anne Mor- 
rissett talks about "world citizen" Gary Davis, 
and belatedly reviews Davis's book. 

11:00 LOTTE LEHMANN'S FAREWELL CON- 
CERT: The great lieder singer gives a stunning 
concert, then really stuns her audience by tell- 
ing them they have just heard her for the last 
time. Enterprising fans secretly recorded this 
Town Hall performance. (62) 

FRIDAY, August 23 

7:00 A.M. SCHUMANN FOR THE YOUNG: 

Waldscenen. Op 82 

Haskil/piano (Epic 3358)) (20) 



Scenes of Childhood. Op 15 

Gieseking/piano (Col 4540) (18) 
Fairy Tales. Op 132 

Demus/piano. Wlach/clarinet. Weiss/viola 

(XWX 18494) (15) 
Kinderscenen. Op 15 

Haskil/piano (Epic 3358) (17) 
Carnaval. Op 9 

Rachmoninoff/piano (Cam 396) (23) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XV: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Dr. Norman Bailey. (Aug 22) 

9:15 AN ACiE OF SONG— V: Lee Whiting with 
things F:iizubethan. 

9:45 HO.AIOSEXUALS AND THE LAW AND SO- 
CIETY: A frank discussion among an attorney 
an officer of the Mattachine Society, and a 
public health official. (Aug 17) 

11:30 A CHARLES IVES CONCERT: 

Three IMaces in New England 

Eastman-Rochester Orch/Hanson (Mar 50149) 
Washington's Birthday 

Imperial 'Phil of Tokyo/Strickland (CRI 163) 
Hallowe'en; The Pond; Central I'ark in The 
Dark 

Members of the Oslo Phil Orch/Strickland 

(CRI 163) (23) 
Second Piano Sonata "Concord" 

I'appa-Stavrou/piano, Lichter 'flute (CRI 150) 



FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 


5:00 MONDAY. August 19 




5:00 MONDAY. August 26 


Tell-ME-AC.AIN Tale 




TELL-:\IE-AGAIN Tale 


Ruth Prince 




Ruth Prince 


WHEN WE SING 




OUNCE. DICE. TRICE 


Ernie Sheldon Plus Two 




lieadings from Alistair Reid 


BLUEY'S RUNAWAY KANGAROO— XI 




A LIGHTHOUSE IS A LONESO.ME PLACE 


Irene Hilton 




Written and read by Eric St. Clair 


5:00 TUESDAY. August 20 




5:00 TUESD.AY. August 27 


TI.ME FOR RHYME 




TIME FOR RHYME 


Rachel Weller 




Rachel Weller 


MUSIC OF MANY LANDS 




MUSIC OF .MANY LANDS 


Gerald Zelinger 




Gerald Zelinger 


BLUEY'S RUNAWAY KANGAROO— XII 




NIXIES. PIXIES AND LEPRECHAUNS 


Irene Hilton 




Read by Eric St. Clair 


5:00 WEDNESDAY. August 21 




5:00 WEDNESDAY, August 28 


FOREST LORE: Ferns 




FOREST LORE: Wild Animals vs. Tame Ones 


Josh P>arkin 




Josh Barkin 


MOTHER (JOOSE 




,11 ST PEANUTS 


Cvril Rilchard. Celeste Holm. Boris Kar 


off 


Kaye Ballard and Arthur Siegel (CL1743) 


BLUEY'S RUNAWAY KANGAROO— XIII 




THE L.\ST OF THE (il.VNTS: .\ modern fair> 


Irene Hilton 




tale — read by Christopher Terry 


5:00 THIRSDAY. August 22 




5:00 THIRSD.VV. August 29 


SIGNPOST: To Invisihlp (iiaiitH 






J. Niikelsl)urg — A. Sagan 




SHJNPOST: To One of .Man's First Friends 






MUSIC FOR YOUNC; LISTENERS 




J. Nickelsburg— A. Sagan 
iMISIC FOR YOl NG LISTF^NERS 


Robert Martin. Children's Music Center 






BLUEY'S RUNAWAY KAN(JAROO— XIV 




Robert Martin. Children's .Musii' (\>nter 
THREE PR1N( ES AND A DRA(iON 


Irene Hilton 






5:00 FRIDAY. August 23 




Another modern faiiy tale read by 


FOLK TALES FROM INDONESIA 




Chiistopher Terry 


Told by Harold Couriandrr ( l'M'7 1 02) 




5:00 FRIDAY. August 30 


HOW WOFLI) vol DO IT? 




FOLK TALES FROM INi>ONESlA 


Maureen Hooper and students stage Ba 


llet 


Tohl by Harold Courlander 


Suite from "Rodeo" by Copland. 




(iilLDREN'S SON(;S FROM SPAIN 


BLUEY'S Rl NAWAY KANCJAROO- XV 




I.salM'lita Alonso and Karen James (FC771t;> 


Final episode lead by author, Irene Hilt 


on. 


.MOBY Dl( K 


10:00 A.M. SATIRDAY. August 24 




With Charles Laughton as Capt. Ahab 


THE (JREAT REBELLION— I: Mary Stolz 




10:00 A..>i. SATIRDAY. August .M 


Read by Ruth Piincc with assistance fi 


om 


THE (iRE.VT REBELLION— (ondnsion 


Mitchell Harding iind Paul Stein. 




Ruth Prince 



Page 6 



1:00 TOMORROW'S WILDERNESS — V: Exploita- 
tion of the Sea. Athelstan Spilhaus, dean of 
the University of Minnesota's institute of tech- 
nology-. 

1:80 STATUS OF INDIAN WOMEN: Mrs. Norman 
Coliver, staff member of the Asia Foundation, 
interviews Madame Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay. 

i:00 ANTIGONAE: Carl Orffs music, Holderin's 
translation into the German of Sophocles, and 
I a German performance. (DGG 18717-19) (Aug 

11) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6 

6:00 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: KPFK 
manager Jerome Shore. 

6:15 PACIFICW NEWS: John Ohliger. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 COM.MENTARY: Theodore Edwards. 

7:00 MUSIC FROM GERMANY: David Berger and 
the Association of German Broadcasters pre- 
sent German music of all periods. This evening, 
the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra under Karl 
Munchinger play Handel's Concerto Grosso No. 
18 in B flat major and the Mainz Chamber 
Orchestra plays Mozart's "Ah, lo previdi" with 
vocal soloist Anna de Lisa. 

8:00 SIGMUND FREUD'S FAITH: Dr. Harry B. 
Scholefield speaking to the American Humanist 
A.s^ociation in San Francisco. Dr. Scholefield 
has made an extensive study of Freud's "arti- 
cles of faith," the principles which guided 
Freud's investigations. This is the topic for the 
Community Discussion Project — call HO 2-1171 
for details. 

9:00 ECHOES OF THE F.AIRE — I: Beginning a 
recap of our wond'rous May event, we hear 
light-hearted montage of interviews and enter- 
tainment originally broadcast live from the 
Renaissance Faire. Carl Reiner, Gary Merrill, 
Herschel Bernardi. the Glengary Highlanders. 
Quartetto di Medici. Pro Musica of Van Nuys. 
Immaculate Heart Baroque Ensemble, Neo- 
Renaissance Singers. Vicki Bond and Donna 
Burrow are heard from David Ossman and Mike 
Dayton produced this program, and credit goes 
also to Harve Bennett. Jerry Zelinger. Lee 
Whiting. Jack Hirschman. John Ohliger. Fred 
Haines and Dave Ossman — you hear their 
voices. Mike Dayton. Paul Stein. Marc Okrand. 
William Malloch. Phyllis Patterson, and floor 
manager Jane Bennett made their presence 
appreciated. 

10:15 CIVIL RIGHTS CONFERENCE: Four speak- 
ers discuss Federal legisaltion and actions at a 
California Democratic Council meeting in June. 
You hear from Congressman Edward Roybal, 
assistant US attorney— general Norbert Schlei, 
LA councilman Tom Bradley and Reverend H. 
H. Brookins. George Seros moderates; Rome 
Ronconi recorded. 

11:30 DMITRI SHOSTAKOVICH: Eugene Mravinsky 
conducts the combined Choirs and the State 
Orchestra of the I'SSR in a performance of 
the composers Sons of the Forest, Op 81. 

Petrov is the tenor and Kilichevsky is the bass. 
(Van 422) (33) 



some highlights in 



music 

FESTIVALS 

LISZT-BARTOK-l-7 p.m. Sat 24 

11-2:40 p.m. Sun 25 

III-7 p.m. Thur 29 

OPERAS 

GLI UGONOTTI (Les Huguenots) 



9 p. 



Sun 25 



VOCAL 

MARTINU'S FIELD MASS-7 p.m. Thurs 21 

SERIES 

NEW AAUSIC-BBC-l-7 p.m. Fri 30 

NEW RELEASES- 

TOSCANINI AND THE PHILADELPHIA- 

7 p.m. Sat 31 

MUSIC FROM GERMANY-7 p.m. Fri 23 

MEET YOU AT THE STATION- 

Alan Hjerpe and Uncle Dave— 10 p.m. Tues 20 

HAL HOOTS AT THE ICE HOUSE- 

10 p.m. Tues Aug 27 

SPECIALS 

ISENHEIM CONCERT-7:45 p.m. Tues 20 
NOT-SO-SILENT MOVIES MUSICS 
9:45 p.m. Thurs 22 
ECHOES OF THE FAIRE 
I— Miscellaneous artists 9 p.m. Fri 24 
II— UCLA Collegium Musicum— 
Gilbert Reaney-2:45 Sal 24 
III— Neo-Renaissance Singers- 
Michael Agnello-9:45 p.m. Thurs 29 
IV— Donna Burrow Live Concert— 
9:30 p.m. Sat Aug 31 
MUSIC OF THE AUVERGNE-8:15 p.m. Men 26 
MUSIC FROM SOUTH AFRICA-8:20 p.m. Tues 27 



SATURDAY, August 24 

9:00 A..M. VANESSA: The Pulitzer Prize-winning 
opera in four acts by Samuel Barber. The 
libretto is by Gian-Carlo Menotti and the solo- 
ists are Steber, Gedda, Elias, Tozzi and Resnik. 
Mitropoulos conducts the Metropolitan Opera 
Orchestra and Chorus. (RCA 6138) (113) 

10:00 FOR VOING PEOPLE: See page 6. 

10:30 WORKING MEN — XIII: World War II and 

After — the New Era. John Ohliger's adaptation 
in song and words of Sid Lens' Ijook on Ameri- 
can labor. 

11:00 JCSSI BJORLING: Opera is icumen in, so we 
will let Fred Hyatt spin discs from his Bjorling 
collection and tell us of the late Swedish tenor. 

11:30 THE DEED: Dick Elman interviews Gerold 
Frank, author of a recent Simon and Schuster 
book on the assassination of Lord Moyne, Brit- 
ish High Commissioner in the middle East, by 
two young Palistinians in 1944. 



Page 7 



12:00 SCOPE OF JAZZ: Martin Williams and others. 

12:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ: Martin Williams 
continues his series devoted to jazz of the 
advanced guard of the late '30's. 

1:00 THE LIVELY ARTS: From Ken Eisler of 
San Diego State College, another look at the 
arts. 

1:15 SLIGHTLY RADIOACTIVE AND VERY 
CONFUSING: Jean Thompson, a high school 
science teacher, gives his view of the prob- 
lems of the citizen in coping with public ques- 
tions where a knowledge of science is needed. 
As a case in point, he presents some testimony 
recorded when the LA Water Board asked per- 
mission of the County Planning Commission 
to build an atomic power station in Malibu. 

2:30 FAREWELL TO THE MODEL T: Richard 
Strout and E. B. White's 1936 memoir. "Fare- 
well. My Lovely." read by Onslow Stevens. 

2:45 ECHOES OF THE FAIRE — II: The UCLA 
Collegium Musicum appeared at KPFK's recent 
Elizabethan romp, directed by Gilbert Reaney. 
Here they are in performance elsewhere, doing 
it up on an amazing variety of instruments. 

4:00 THE GREATEST ADVENTURE: Mitchell 
Harding with thought and information on the 
problems of a technological age. 

4:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher presents 
the graceful and underrated French baritone 
Andre Bauge (1893- ) in excerpts from op- 

eras by Gounod. Massenet and Rossini and 
lighter works by Adam. Audran and Lecocq. 
plus a remarkable performance of Gounod's 
Serenade. 

5:00 WIDE-OPEN HOUR: Open time for inter- 
esting programs arriving too late for Folio 
scheduling, 

6:00 LETTERS FROM LISTENERS: Comment on 
your comment. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Steve Kahn. 

6:30 UNCOM.MON SENSE: Lawrence Carmen and 
Steve Kandel with nuclear informatio. 

6:45 CO.M.MENTARY: To be announced. 

7:00 LIZST-BARTOK FESTIVAI.— I: The Hun- 
garian State Concert Orchestra under Constan- 
tin Iliev. with violist Paul Lucas. 
XICOLOV Concerto for Strings 
PROKOFIEV Chout (The Clown) — ballet suite 
MILHACD Viola Concerto 

8:00 HISPANIC-AMERICAN REPORT: Another 
program from the Institute of Hispanic-Amer- 
ican and Luso-Hrazilian Studies at Stanford, 
on an aspect of Latin America today. 

8:30 JEAN SHEPHERD: The original night peo- 
ple'.s humorist in performance at New York's 
One Sheridan S(iuare. 

8:45 AN ELIZABETH SCHWARZKOPF SON(J 
RFX'ITAL: Miss Schwarzkopf sings songs of 
Bach, Gluck, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, 
Schumann, Brahms, Wolf and Strauss. Her 
accompani.st is Gerald Moore. (Ang 35023) (45) 

9:30 SHOl LD THE IS ESTABLISH FRIENDLY 
RELATIONS WITH (ASTRO?: Vint.nt Hal- 
linan. nottMl attorney and chairinan of the Bay 
Area Fair I'lay for Cuba Committee, in heated 
debate with Edward Heavey, also an attorney, 
world traveler and lecturer. Recorded in S.in 
Franci.sco in July. 



SUNDAY, August 25 



:00 A.M. BACH CANTATAS 

Cantata No 17. "Wer Dank opfert, der preiset 
mich" (18) 

Soloists, orch, and chorus/Thamm (Can 

641210) 
Cantata No 33, "AUein zu dir" 

Orch & Orch of Radio Denmark/Woldike 

(BG 603) (25) 
Cantata No 68, "Also hat gott die welt geliebt" 

Soloists, orch, & chorus/Thomas (Odeon 

80609) (19) 
Cantata No 133, "Ich freue mich in dir" 

Vienna Orch & Choir/Gielen (BG 523) (23) 
Cantata No 140, "Wachet auf, ruft uns die 

Stinime" Shaw Chorale, RCA orch/Shaw 

(Vic 1100) (30) 



10:00 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: 

Manager Jerome Shore. (Aug. 23) 



KPFK 



10:15 A RENUNCIATE: A member of the oldest 
monastic order in the world, the Indian order 
Sanyas Ashram, talks to Elsa Knight Thomp- 
son about his life and his impressions of 
America. 

11:00 SEEN AT THE GALLERIES: Earl "We will 
beret you" Carter talks of art. exhibitions, and 
artists, and sometimes to them. 

11:30 THE FREEDOM SINGERS: An interview, 
with music, of the civil rights music-makers. 
(Aug 19) 

1:00 JOHN CROWE RANSOME: The poet and j 
critic reads and comments on his poetry to an j 
audience at the University of California. 

2:40 LISZT-BARTOK FESTIVAL — II: The Hun- | 
garian State Concert Orchestra, conducted by { 
Vilmos-Komor, with David Oistrakh, violin. ! 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 9 
PROKOFIEV Violin Concerto No. 1 
KADOSA Divertimento No. 1 
BARTOK Violin Concerto No. 1 
Note this last entry, not the wel-known Bartok 
concerto, numbered 2. but a rediscovered earlier 
work in the same form. 

4:30 THE REITII LECTURES. 1962 — V: Living 

and Partly Living. G. M. Carstairs in the BBC 
broadcast series on England now. 

5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLl TION: 

Gunther SchuUer. 

6:00 ADDENDA TO THE REITII LECTl RES: A 

reading of two items on the above lectures, both 
culled from the Observer of London. The first 
is a news story, the second a comment by dis- 
tinguished sociologist Lady Wooton. 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Gil Robinson. 

6:30 THIS WEEK .\T THE UN: From IN radio, 
a weekly repoit. 



6:45 CO.M.MENTARY 



d L 



(Ai (; 



Hi) 



:45 NI(;HTS0UNDS: 

proof of uUiinalc a 



.More of the Berkclcy-Hclk i 
)Hur(iity. 



7:00 FREEDO.M NOW!: A rebroadcast of Dale i 
.Minor's eyewitness program on Birmingham, 
selected — we pioudly point out— as the Ameri- 
can entry in tlie I'lix Italia competition. the< 
Cannes »)f radio. 

9:00 (JLl U<JONOTTI: Ov. The Hiiciienots. by Mey- 
erbeer. Not thi' lackluster commenial version, 
but an Italian Radio masterpiece with Lauri- 
\'oll>i. Tozzi. Taddei. Formichini. and the RAI 
orchestra and chorus under Seralini. (Uesclied- 
uled fiom July 7) 



Page 8 



MONDAY, August 26 

7:00 A.M. BAROQUE CONCERTOS— II 

VIVALDI Bassoon Concerto Xo. 17 In C 

Walt/bassoon. Zimbler Sinfonietta (LM 2353) 
TORELLI Concerto for Strings in D. Op. 6, No. 

10. Societas Orch of Copenhagen (BG 566) (6) 
BACH Concerto for Three Pianos in C 

Fischer. Smith, Matthews/pianos; Philhar- 

monia Orch Fischer (LM 1004) (18) 
HANDEL. Organ Concerto No. 5 in F, Op. 4 

Moe/organ. Unicorn Orch/Liepmann (Kapp 

9018) (16) 
MANFREDINI Concerto No. 12 in C. Op. 3 

I Musici (Epic 3514) (10) 
ALBINONI Oboe Concerto in D, Op. 7, No. 6 

Zanfini/oboe, Virtuosi di Roma/Fasano (Ang 

45019) (9) 
CORELLI Harpsichord Concerto Xo. 9 in A, Op. 5 

Canino/harpsichord. Gli Accademici/Eckertsen 

(Vox 423-3) (14) 

8:30 CONYERSATION'AL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XVI: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Sidney Lens. (Aug 25) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — VI: Lee Whiting presents 
the music, poetry, and prose of Elizabethan 
England. 

9:45 DONAUESCHINGEN FESTIVAL — II: The 

Southwest German Radio orchestra under Hans 
Rosbaud presents an all-Stravinsky program of 
pieces composed between 1915 and 1944. (Jun 24) 

11:00 A SCOTS QUAIR — VI: Miss Fredi Dundee 
with another chapter from the Lewis Gassic 
Gibbon work, regarded as a classic of modern 
Scotland. 

11:30 SCHNABEL WRITES. SCHNABEL PLAYS 

SCHNABEL Duodecimet 

Monod Ensemble (Col ML 5447) 
SCHUBERT Piano Sonata in D. Op. 53 

Artur Schnabel (Ang COLH 83) 
SCHNABEL Rhapsody for Orchestra 

Kletzki, Philharmonic Orch. (Eng. Col.) 
BEETHOVEN Sonata No. 23 in F for piano 
(Appassionata) 

Artur Schnabel (Vic LM 2153) (84) 

1:00 THE CHANGING COMPLEXION OF PSY- 
CHOTHER.\PY — I: First in a series of four 
programs to be heard daily at this time, pre- 
pared by Dr. Arthur Burton, psychotherapist. 
This program. "The Analysis of Existence," is 
a talk by Dr. Burton. 

1:30 THE SILENT REVOLUTION— II: Consoious- 
iiess-ExpandinR Druss. Author, scientist and 
philosopher Gerald Heard. 

2:30 DVORAK'S STABAT MATER: A new record- 
ing, with soloists, chorus and the Czech Phil- 
harmonic under Vaclav Smetacek. (DGG 818/9) 
(JUN 15) 

4:00 BACK STAGE WITH HERMIONE GINGOLD: 
Intrepid Herbert Feinstein at the mike. (Aug 7) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6. 
6:00 SOVIET PRESS AND PERIODICALS: Re- 
port, with comment, by William Mandel. 

6:15 P.\CIFICA NEWS: Mike Hodel, John Ohliger. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

45:45 C0.M:MENTARY: Helen Nelson. California's 
consumer counsel, joins this series to talk of 
getting value for your money. (AUG 27) 



7:00 ISHERWOOD AT WORK: Speaking at the 
Pacific Coast Writers' Conference at LA State 
College. Christopher Isherwood reads from and 
talks about his novel-in-progress and answers 
audience questions. 

8:15 MUSIC OF THE AUVERGNE: Lucie De Vi- 
enne Blanc. French-Canadian folklorist. sings 
French Auvergne songs just naturally, with 
and without accompaniment by Jean Paul 
Vinay's oboe or English horn. Each song is fol- 
lowed by its setting for soprano and orchestra 
by Joseph Canteloube (1879-1957). These set- 
tings are sung by Madeleine Grey and the Is- 
raeli concert star. Netania Davrath. 

9:00 THE CHINESE-RUSSIAN DIVORCE: Joseph 
Starobin, writer and political analyst, former 
Comunist party member and for many years 
foreign editor of the Daily Worker, believes that 
the estrangement opens the way for several 
forward moves by the US. He is interviewed 
by Elsa Knight Thompson. 

10:00 THE GOON SHOW: Forog. London is fogged 
artificially with a substance that makes people 
think the best of one another — the capital's 
commercial life is threatened. 

10:30 MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood with 
the second of two programs "Round Midnight." 
variations on a theme. (AUG 27) 

11:00 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF KENNETH 
REXROTH: Raconteur, poet, critic — and 
enough of the-^e to publish a self-study this fall, 
of which he gives us a preview. 

11:30 RAVEL'S DUO: A performance prepared espe- 
cially for KPFK by Stanley Plummer, violin, 
and cellist Howard Coif. An exciting and oddly 
enough, little-known work. (Jun 20) 



THURSDAY, August 29 

7:00 A.M. STERN PLAYS BRAH.MS: Sonatas 2 
and 3 are played by violinist Isaac Stern and 
pianist Alexander Zakin, along with the Trio 
No. 1 in B Op. 8 performed by Stern. Pablo 
Casals and Myra Hess. (COL 202) (COL 4719) 
(83) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XVII: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Helen Nelson. (Aug 26) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG— VII: Elizabethan jam 
sessions, pre-peanut butti>r. 

9:45 THE BUDDHIST MAJORITY: Chris Koch 
interviews a South Vietnamese Buddhist monk 
on the persecution of his faith in that country. 

10:15 LES NUITS D'ETE: Eleanor Steber sings 
Berlioz's song cycle. Mitropoulos conducts the 
Columbia Symphony. (Col 5843) (32) 

10:45 SOUTHERN INFLUENCE IN NATIONAL 
POLITICS: Howard Zinn. professor of history 
at Spelman College, Atlanta. Georgia. (Aug 3) 

11:30 CHORAL CONCERT 

CARISSLMI Jephte 

Feyerbend. Schwarzweller. Ens/Wolters (Arch 

3005) (23) 
SCHUTZ Requiem 

Soloists. Heilbronn Schutz Chorus/Werner 

(We.^t 18467) (40) 
^LA^F^CELLO Psalm XVIII 

Turn Cho. Milan Orch/Janes (West 18837) 

(24) 



Page 9 



1:00 THE CHANGING COMPLEXION OF PSY- 
CHOTHERAPY — II: In this program, Dr. Arthur 
Burton interviews two patients now in therapy. 

2:00 MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood. (Aug 26) 

2:30 CRICKETS* FICTION: Luther Link reads his 
own poetry in the WBAI studios. 

3:10 WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?: From 
Jackson. Mississippi, another Pacifica documen- 
tary on the freedom movement. The conflicts in 
the Jackson civil rights organization, the death 
of Medgar Evers, and the determination of 
Jackson's Negro citizens are treated. (Aug 10) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6 

6:00 MISCELLANY 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Henry Barzilay. John 
Ohliger. 

6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 CO.MMENTARY: Marshall Neel. (AUG 28) 

7:00 MAX RAFFERTY: The California superin- 
tendent of public instruction speaks of modern 
art, drama and literature, the Dictionary of 
American Slang, and the future of California 
education. Recorded at the Crescenta Valley 
High School under auspices of the American 
Freedom Academy. 



7:50 THE JEWISH WIFE: Viveca Lindfors stars 
in the Brecht play from the "Brecht on Brecht" 
production. (Col OL 2278) 

8:20 MUSIC FROM SOUTH AFRICA: Anton Hart- 
man conducts the South African Broadcasting 
Corporation Symphony in a program of Belgian, 
Dutch and South African music. 
MARCEL POOT Overture: "Joyeuse" 
HENK BADINGS Variations on a South Afri- 
can Theme 
ARNOLD VAN WYK Symphonic Suite: "Prima- 
vera" 

9:10 LETTER FROM BIRMINGHAM JAIL: Martin 
Luther King, Jr.'s, April 15 letter to his fel- 
low clergy is ready Ijy Theodore Roszak, as- 
sistant professor of history at Alameda State 
College. 

10:00 HAL HOOTS AT THE ICE-HOUSE: Hal 

Lynch and others at the well-known thing. 

11:00 ANGER AS A FINE ART: Choleric disposition 
and satiric literature, discussed by professor 
of English Edward Rosenheim of the University 
of Chicago, specialist in the Augustan period. 

11:45 HUMOR IN SPACE: Orson Bean, Jonathan 
AVinters, Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks view the 
astronautical scene. 



WEDNESDAY, August 28 
GOETHE'S BIRTHDAY 



7:00 A.M. FAUST 3IUSIC— I 

WAGNER A Faust Overture 

Southwest German Radio Orch/Horenstein 

(Vox 10902) (8) 
BERLIOZ The Damnation of Faust — Suite 

Concertgel)ouw Orch/Mengelberg (Cap L8127) 

(13) 
LISZT A Faust Symphony 

Southwest German Radio Orch/Horenstein 

(Vox 10902) (67) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL PRENCH AND RUS- 
SI.VN — XVIII: Leonid Belozuliov. 

9:00 CO.M."MENTARY: Marshall Neel. (Aug 27) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — VIII: Lee Whiting and 
the noises Shakespeare heard. 

9:45 FAUST Ml SIC — II 

SCHT.MANX Faust — Overture 

DDR Orchestra (DDR) (8) 
SMETANA Music to a puppet play, "Doktor 
F'aust' ' 

FOK Sym Orch/Vaclav Smetacek (I'LT 41203) 
GOrXOD Faust— Ballet Music 

Boston Pops/Fiedler (RCA 2141) (15) 
GINASTERA Overture to the Creole "Faust" 

p:astnian Rochester Orch/Hanson (Mer 50257) 

10:30 POVERTY IN A.MERICA: Pulitzer Prize-win- 
ner Edgar May talks with Philip Merwin. 
(Aug 17) 

11:30 FAUST .Ml SIC — III: MAULERS EIGHTH: 

The second movement of this work Is a setting 
of Part II of Goethe's Faust, for soloists, 
chorus and orchestra. We hear the entire two- 
movement work, the first part of which is a 
setting of the Latin h.vmn, Veni Creator .Spiritiis. 
performed by soloists, the Comiiincd Ilotterdain 
Choirs and Rotterdam Philliannonic under I'M- 
uard Flip.^-e. (Kpic SC-6004) (89) 

1:00 THE CHANGING COMPLEXION OF PSV- 
CHOTIIER.VPY — III: Discus.sing family therapy. 



Dr. Burton interviews Dr. Jon Jackson, MD. 
director of the Mental Research Institute of 
the Palo Alto Clinic. 

1:45 COASTLINES LITERARY MAGAZINE: Se- 
lections from the latest issue. (Aug 8) 

2:30 CONTE.AIPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION: 

Gunther SchuUer. (Aug 25) 

3:30 THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC IN TRANSI- 
TION: Peter Odegard. professor of political 
science at the I'niversity of California. (Aug 4) 
5:00 FOR YOUNCJ PEOPLE: See page 6 
6:00 FRO.M THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD: 
Daniel Panger. 

6:15 PACIFIC.V NEWS: Mike Hodel, John Ohliger. 
6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 
6:45 CO-M.-MENTARY: Dorothy Healey. (AUG 29) 
7:00 SO.ME FOLK WITH SONGS: How many folk 

songs would a folksonger song if a folksonger 

. . . never mind. 

7:30 FAUST: The Tragedy, First Part, by Goethe 
in the CJruendgen Production of the Dusseldorf 
Theatre. An English introduction and commen- 
tary is provided by Walter Bodlander and Har- 
old Innocent. (DGG NK 201/20.3) 

10:30 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood and a half 
hour of Leadl)elly. (.\U(; 29) 

11:00 POLITICS AND THE EN(iLISIi LANCil .\(;E: 

Orwell's 1946 essay, read by Bernard .Mayes and 
others, and produced with effects by John Mc- 
Intyre. Orwell thinks l);i(l prose and sloppy 
jjolitics are symbiotic. 

11:40 F.VUST Ml SIC— IV: MEFISTOFELE PRO- 
LOGl'E: Arluro Toscanini conducts the Colum- 
l)us Boy-Choir, the Robert Shaw Chorale and 
the NB(^ Symphony in the opening scene of 
Hollo's opera. Nicola Moscona plays The Evil 
One. (RCA 1S49) (26) 



Page 10 



THURSDAY, August 29 

7:00 G & S's lOLAXTHE: Ifs trouble in the House 
of Lords again. Seems those Peers didn't know 
their place even then, mixing it up with the 
Fairies and all. All is not only sung, but also 
explained verbally. Talk and songs are all. of 
course, by D'Oyly Carte. John Reed is the 
highly susceptible Chancellor. (Lon A 4242) (90) 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XIX: Leonid Belozubov. 

9:00 COMMENTARY: Dorothy Healey. (Aug 28) 

9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — IX: Pentameter, prose 
and music of Elizabethan England. Who's a 
pentameter? Iamb. 

10:00 :\IAl RICE MAETERLINK — PELLEAS ET 
MELISANDE: Today is the playwright's birth- 
day, so we celebrate by presenting various 
composers' music to his play. 
FAURE Pelleas et Melisande — Suite 

Suisse Romande/Ansermet (Lon 9289) (16) 
DEBUSSY Pelleas et Melisande — Interludes 

Cleveland Orch/Leinsdorf (Col 4090) (27) 
SIBELIUS Pelleas et Melisande — Suite 
I Lon Cym/Collins (Lon 1277) (14) 



:00 TELE ME A MOVIE: Seller 
and one-man movie scripts. 



Winters, Bruce 



11:30 BEETHOVEN OVERTURES 

Leonore Xo. 2, Op. 72a 

Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18273) (14) 
Creatures of Prometheus, Op. 43 

Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (5) 
Coriolan. Op. 62 

Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (8) 
Egmont. Op. 84 

New York Phil/Walter (Col 5232) (8) 
Consecration of the House, Op 124 

Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (11) 
Ruins of Athens. Op. 113 

Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (6) 
Fidelio. Op. 72c 

Chicago Sym Orch/Feiner (Vic 1991) (7) 
m_ King Stephen, Op. 117 

K Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (8) 

^f Namensfier, Op. 115 

K Vienna Orch/Scherchen (West 18294) (6) 

H Leonore No. 3, Op. 72b 

New York Phil/Walter (Col 5368) (14) 

1:00 THE CHANGING COMPLEXION OF PSY- 
CHOTHERAPY — VI: Dr. Arthur Burton con- 
cludes the series with observations on employ- 
ment, unemployment, and mental health. 

1:45 POEMS OF GEORGE BOGEN: The poet reads 
work which has appeared in Nation, Noble Sav- 
age, and The Contemporary Reader, 

2:00 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood. (Aug 28) 

'2:30 RADIO FREE DIXIE: An aircheck from Ha- 
vana Radio of one of Robert Williams' regular 
programs beamed to the American South. Wil- 
liams was a Negro leader in South Carolina 
before going to Cuba. 



P 



3:30 DONAUESCHINGEN FESTIVAL — III: A 

concert of contemporary music from the South- 
west German Radio orchestra under Hans Ros- 
baud, with Jeanne Deroubai.x, mezzo— soprano, 
and Maria Bergmann, piano. (Jul 8) 

5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6 

6:00 SPECI.\L RETORT: News in depth. 

6:15 PACIFIC.\ NEWS: Erwin Rosen, John Ohliger. 



6:40 CALENDAR OF EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Thomas Francis Ritt. (AUG 
30) 

7:00 LISZT-B.VRTOK FESTIVAL — III: An all- 
Kodaly program performed in Hungary by the 
"Philharmony" Orchestra under Miklos Lukas. 
Soloists are Imre Pallo, baritone, and Robert 
Ilosfalvy, tenor. Pallo. incidentally, is the man 
who created the role of Hary Janos on the 
operatic stage. Kodaly works performed are: 
Hary Janos: Suite 
Kadar Kata: Folk Ballad 
Galanta Dances 
Psalmus Hungaricus 

8:30 THE ELEVENTH HOUR: Held open for ex- 
citing and last-minute programs. 

9:30 THE.YTER REVIEW 

9:45 ECHOES OF THE FAIRE — III: Neo-Renais- 
sance Singers. Another group from the central 
stage at our Pleasure Faire, directed by Michael 
Agnello in a program of medieval and baroque 
music. 

10:45 THE HIDDEN, THE UNKNOWABLE, THE 
UNTHINKABLE: Captain Sir Richard Francis 
Burton. KCMG, was a journalist, ethnologist, 
translator and linguist. Lee Whiting reads an 
essay of his exploits by Fawn M. Brodie, ac- 
tually an introduction to her edition of Burton's 
The City of the Saints, to be published shortly 
by Knopf. 

11:40 NETHERLANDS SOLOISTS — IV: This time 
we hear two violinists, Willem Xoske and Jo 
Juda. Xoske plays Pieter Hellendaal's Sonata 
in G minor. Op. 1, Xo. 3 and Three Romantic 
Pieces by Dvorak. Juda plays Max Reger's 
Sonata for solo violin, Op. 4 2. (Radio Xeder- 
land) (26) 



FRIDAY, August 30 



7:00 A.M. PRIMITIVE MUSIC/EXPERIMENTAL 
^lUSIC: Strangely compatible incompatibles 
from either end of the musical spectrum. Coun- 
tries covered include Africa, the Philippines, 
Hawaii, Xew Guinea, Indonesia, India, Bolivia. 
People covered include Varese, Birger— Blomdahl, 
Bussotti, Raa.vmakers, Berio, Badings. Pre- 
pared by Arnold Schwarzwald of Universal 
Studios. 

8:30 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH AND RUS- 
SIAN — XX: Leonid Belozubov. 



9:00 COMMENTARY 

(Aug 29) 



Thomas Francis Ritt. 



9:15 AN AGE OF SONG — X: The final program in 
Lee Whiting's series on Elizabethan England. 

9:45 RACH.MANINOFF'S QUARTET IN G MINOR: 

He seems to have written two. in part, that is. 
In each case he left behind two completed 
movements and (^ketches for the others. This 
one, written in 1889, consists of a Romance and 
Scherzo only. The Guilet String Quartet plays. 
(MGM E3133) (25) 

10:15 INNOVATION AND REACTION IN HIGHER 
EDUCATION: Famed sociologist David Kiesman 
at Cal Tech. (Aug 4) 



Page 11 



11:30 MUSIC FOR HORN 

MOZART Horn Concerto No. 3 in Eb. K 447 

Linder/horn, Vienna Orch/Swarowsky (Van 

1069) (15) 
DUKAS Villanelle for Horn and Piano 

Stagliano/horn, Ulanov. sky/piano (Bos 212)(8) 
SCHUBERT Auf Dem Strom, Op. 119 

Bloom/horn, Valente/sop, Serkin/pf (Col 5643) 
MOZART Concerto No. 4 in Eb. K 495 

Linder/horn, Vienna Orch/Swarowsky (Van 

1069) (16) 
GLAZOUNOV Reverie, Op. 24 

Stagliano/horn, Ulanowsky/piano (Bos 212) (4) 
BRAHMS Horn Trio, Op. 40 

Bloom/hn, Tree/vln, Serkin/pf (Col 5643) (30) 

1:00 JEWISH FOLKLORE: Another program in 
Lila Ha.ssid's monthly series in Yiddish and 
English. 

1:30 MINORITIES AND GOVERNMENT: Wilson 
Record, professor of sociology at Sacramento 
State College, interviewed by Elsa Knight 
Thompson. 

2:30 LA TRAVIATA: Verdi's opera, with Renata 
Scotto as Violetta, Gianni Raimondi as Alfredo, 
and Ettore Bastiani as Giorgio. (DGG 18832-4) 
(Aug 18) 



4:30 OF COCKNEYS. 
CHI.MNEYS WEEPS: 

innkeeping couple, ii 



COSTERMONGERS AND 

Connacht Davis and an 
London. 



5:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 



:00 REPORT TO THE 

Manager Jerome Shore. 



SUBSCRIBER: 

(SEP 1) 



6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: John Ohliger. 

fi:40 CAL?:NDAR of EVENTS: Clair Brush. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Roger Kent. 

7:00 NEW MUSIC — I: First of three BBC pro- 
grams: in this one works by Dorothy Gow and 
Richard Rodney Bennett are presented in per- 
formance l)y Yfrah Neaman, violin, and the 
Amici String Quartet. 

8:00 YOl NG REPUBLICANS: Barry Gold water. 

The Senator from Arizona, addressing the na- 
tional convention of the Young Republicans on 
June 27. Listen tomorrow and Sunday for six 
more programs from the convention. This one is 
the topic for the Community Discussion Project 
—call HO 2-1171 for details. 

0:00 TREASl RY OF THE 78: .Muck coiidiirts Wag- 
n«T. Karl Muck, the outstanding turn-of-thc- 
century Wagner conductor, leads the Boston 
Symphony in an earl.v recording of the Prelude 
to Act III of Lohengrin, and the Berlin State 
Opera Orchestra in the I'reludc to Tristan, with 
Wagner's own <(jri( crt ending, Uie Overture to 



The Fb'ing Dutchman, Siegfried's Rhine Jour- 
ney and Funeral Alarch from Gotterdainnierung 
and the Prelude to Die Meistersinger. 

10:00 BLUES IN THE MISSISSIPPI NIGHT: Three 
delta blues men discuss life on the river around 
1940, in a recording by pioneer folklorist Alan 
Lomax. 

11:00 REMINISCENCES OF MR. DOOLEY: Finley 
Peter Dunne's saga of the streets, portrayed 
by Mark Hammer, talks of "The Victorian 
Era" and "The Vice-Presidency." 

11:15 COPLAND'S SECOND HURRICANE: Little 
children lead us, with Leonard Bernstein's help, 
through a spirited performance of a condensed 
version with story line of Copland's unmistak- 
ably 30's product. They are the soloists and 
chorus of the New York High School of Music 
and Art. The New York Philharmonic helps out 
too. (Col 5581) (48) 



SATURDAY, August 31 



8:00 A.M. VINGT REGARDS SUR L'ENFANT — 
JESUS: Yvonne Loriod. carefully watched over 
by the composer, plays Olivier ^lessiaen's 
twenty pieces gathered together under the above 
title. (West 18469/70) (117) 

10:00 FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See page 6. 

10:30 WORKING MEN— XIV: Unfinlshe<l Tasks. The 

last episode in John Ohliger's adaptation of Sid 
Lens' l)ook on American labor, published by 
G. P. Putnam's Sons. 

11:00 GIOVANNI MARTINELLI: Anticipating the 
San Francisco opera season, F'red Hyatt tells of 
the fabulous Italian tenor, and we find out what 
we are missing. 

11:30 YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Senator Jack Miller. 

From Iowa, at the San Francisco convention. 

12:00 TIGHT LIKE THAT: Joe Boyd with gospel, 
blues and records. 

1:00 POETS' POTPOl'RRI: Ben Wright and Rachel 
Weller read listener-suggested poetry. 

l:3(^ BR.VH.MS: Francescatti plays Violin Concerto 
under Leonard Bernstein. (Col. 5871) 

2:10 THE DISCOVERY OF MEANINCJ: Evelyn 
Ames, a poet her.self and an author, relates the 
poetry of today to a search for moaning. She 
illustrates with reading from contemporary 
poets. 

3:00 YOUN(i RKPl BUCANS: Donald E. "Buz " 
Lukens. The man elected to lead the YR's is 
interviewed on his platform and the resolutions 

a<I()pt('(l by the convention. 



^^^^^^ Discover the Best'. 

■ ^CHILDREN'S MUSIC CENTER, INC 



a treasure house of records, books and gifts 
for children of all ages, their parents, too*. 
Phone or write - a staff of experts to serve you 



5373 W. PICO BLVD.. LOS ANGELES 19, CALIF. / WEbster 71825 

Closed Saturdays July and August 



Page 12 



4:00 THE SOUL OF THE WHITE .4lNT: A poetic 
interpretation of the habits of the termite, 
written by Eugene Marais. one of South Africa's 
most gifted writers, adapted by Cecil Jubber 
with music by Stephen O'Reilly. From South 
African Broadcasting Corporation and our 
Archives. 

4:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher presents 
the most feminine and captivating of sopranos. 
Lucrezia Bori (1887-1960), in a gallery of 
opera's enchanting gjirls; Violetta. Despina, 
Juliette. Musetta, Magda and Xorina, with the 
male assistance of Beniamino Gigli and Giu- 
seppe de Luca. 

5:00 AVIDE-OPEN HOUR: Open for programs 
which we think should be heard in advance of 
regular Folio scheduling. 



Praise and 



I 



6:00 LETTERS FROM LISTENERS: 

high dudgeon. 

6:15 PACIFIC A NEWS: Steve Kahn. 

6:30 UNCOM.AION SENSE: Lawrence Carmen and 

Steve Kandel. 

.6:45 COMMENTARY: Lewis Parker Miller. 

7:00 NEW RELEASES: Toscanini and the Phila- 
delphia. A recording of Schubert's Great C 
Major Symphony, the first ever issued of a 
famed series made by this combination in 1942. 
The recordings were never released because, 
due to a processing disaster, the masters had 
become pitted. Technicians are now able to re- 
move such blemishes by deft snippings and splic- 
ings of taped copies of the masters. An RCA 
Soria series release. U5) 

8:00 YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Senator Hugh Scott: 

June 28 was the day, the Young Republican 
convention the place, for this talk by the 
Senator from Pennsylvania. 

8:30 THE ONE-WOMAN THEATER: Ruth Draper, 
who is, presents "Three ^Vomen and Mr. Clif- 
ford." (Spoken Arts 800) 

9:30 ECHOES OF THE FAIRE — IV: Donna Bur- 
row Live Concert. From our Pleasure Faire 
comes a young lady to sing again before a live 
audience. Any of you who care to come and sit 
among the fallen splendor of Studio D and hear 
English, Irish, and Scots ballads of all sorts 
are welcome. AVilliam Malloch will interview 
her at half time. 

10:45 NIGHT SOUNDS: The boys from Berkeley 
make therapeutic noises. 



SUNDAY, September 1 

:00 A.M. MUSIC BY SCANDINAVL\N COM- 
POSERS 

BERWALD Estrella di Soria — Overture 

Stockholm Royal Op Orch/Frykberg (HMV- 

Z310) 
ALFEN Symphony No. 3 in E major. Op. 23 

Stockholm Concert Ass Orch/Alfen (HMV- 

DB11026/9) 
NIELSEN Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 

Menuhin violin, Danish Nat Or/Woldike 

(Od MOAK-7) 
JOHANSEX Symphonic Music. "Pan" 

Oslo Phil/Granger-Hegge (Mer 90002) 
HALVORSEX Norwegian Rhadsody Xo. 1 

Oslo Phil Fjelstad (Mer 10150) 



LUMBYE Drmmebilleder (Dream Pictures) 
Danish St Rad Or/Grndahl (HMV-Z345) 

SVEXDSEX Fest — Polonaise 

Danish St Rad Or/Malko (HMV-Z341) 

10:00 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: Our man- 
ager Jerome Shore. (Aug 30) 

10:15 THE VIEW FROM HARLEM: Four young 
people from Harlem, ages 18 to 26, discuss 
civil rights, racial conflict, and their views of 
the future. The program is moderated by Ray 
Rogers, public relations director of Harlem 
Youth Opportunities Board, a federally-sup- 
ported planning project in Central Harlem. 

11:30 YOUNG REPUBLIC.\NS: William Knowland. 

The former Senator from California. 

12:10 DON GIOVANNI: Mozart's, performed by 
Mario Stabile as the not-so-good Don, Alois 
Pernerstorfer as Leporello. The Vienna State 
Opera Chorus and Vienna Symphony are con- 
ducted by Hans Swarowsky. Requested by a 
lady from Pomona Valley. 

3:00 YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Philosophy of a 

Republican. A panel workshop held during the 
June Young Republican National Convention in 
San Francisco. The speakers are: Hon. Bill 
Brock, Tennessee; Hon. Ed Foreman, Texas; 
Hon. Catherine May, VTashington; Hon. Thomas 
B. Curtis, Missouri; Hon. Fred Schwengel. 
Iowa; Hon. Frank Ferrar. attorney-general of 
South Dakota, and John Grenier, Alabama GOP 
State chairman. 

4:30 THE REETH LECEURES. 1962— VI: Unde- 
veloped Potentials in Personality. G. M. Car- 
stairs concludes his six lectures on Britain 
today. 

5:00 EVENINGS ON THE ROOF: Peter Yates talks 
about and plays music from the Swedish Radio. 
Bergt Hambraens plays his Constellations for 
Organ — Version I, and then you'll hear Con- 
stellations — Version II, which is an electronic 
version of Version I. (Al^G 4) 

6:00 MISCELLANY 

6:15 PACIFICA NEWS: Gil Robinson. 

6:30 THIS WEEK AT THE UN: From UN Radio, 
another report on the world organization. 

6:45 COMMENTARY: Hallock Hoffman. (SEP 2) 

7:00 A POET .\MONG SCIENTI.STS: Robert Graves 
lecturing this spring at the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. Recorded for us by 
WGHB. 

8:00 YOUNG REPUBLICANS: Governor Mark 

Hatfield of Oregon. At the June convention. 

8:45 ROMEO AND JULIET: Prokofiev's version, 
the complete ballet in three acts, performed by 
the "Ballets Russes Orchestra," possibly a 
Yugoslavian group, under Mladen Bashich. 

10:30 PAUL ROCHE: The poet and translator reads 
from his book of poems. The Rank Obstinacy 
of Things, talks about the problems of trans- 
lating Greek tragedy, and reads some of that. 

11:30 THE CYCLE CYCLE: The big wheel turns 
while the little wheel plays: 
MOZART Symphony Xo. 4 in D major. K 19 

London Phil/Leinsdorf (West 18861) (14) 
BEETHOVEX String Quartet in C minor. Op. 
18. Xo. 4 

Amadeus String Quartet (West 18533) (20) 
SCHUBERT Piano Sonata in C major (1815) 

Friedrich Wuhrer (Vox VBX 9) (16) 



Page 13 



FOLIO CLASSIFIED 

No advertisement in this Folio is to be construed 
as endorsement of any organization or business by 
KPFK or vice versa, 

RATES per insertion: 25c per word. 10-word mini- 
mum, special rate <^^or 6 or more continuous inser- 
tions: 20c per word. Send printed or typewritten 
copy with check or money order to KPFK, Program 
Folio, Los Angeles 38. Deadline four weeks prior 
to publication date. 

ALTERATIONS — BUILDING 

Need room added? Home built? Panelling? Sliding 
doors? Patio? Complete Service. Responsible crafts- 
man. Licensed contractor. You listen to KPFK while 
watching us work. A. Osheroff. EX 9-6884. 

General Contractor — Licensed — Insured — Bonded; 
Fast, Reasonable Custom Cabinetwork and Remodel- 
ing of Offices and Homes, Best Terms. Call Louis, 
VE 7-4741 

AUTOMOBILES 

1964 Porsche. Jaguar & Mercedes. 1964 V.W.* BE- 
LOW RETAIL? We're licensed auto brokers and 
save you money. AX 5—6122. IN'TC. *A11 American 
.specifications! 

INTERESTED IN NEW RAMBLER? In honest 

prices sans double talk? Call fellow KPFK listener, 

Ed Richmond. AX 2-0187. 

AUTO REPAIR 

Fair prices for quality repairs on foreign and do- 
mestic automobiles. Air conditioning .'sales and serv- 
ice. Ruth and Bert's Automotive, 4.35 8 Woodman 
Ave., Sherman Oaks. ST 8-0347. 

BOOKS 

LOCATE ANY BOOK! No obligation. Send "wants" 
list. Describe books and contents, if possible. 
Aardvarks Bookfinders, Box 668-K, San Diego 12, 
Calif. 

Big Stock Liberal and Marxist Books — Pamphlets — • 
Periodicals. Progressive Bookshop, 1806 W. 7th St., 
L.A. 57. HIT .3-8180. 

Over a *4 Million Books. 
PICKWICK BOOKSHOP, 674 3 Hollywood Boulevard 

CARPET AND UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 

~* • • FAIR PRICES 

• • • PROMPT SERVICE 

• • • MA.NY WRITTF:N RF^COMMENDATfONS 

RALPH MEYP:R. ST 5-104 4 

COMMUNITY DISCUSSION PROJECTS 

We are interested in what you have to say — join an 
informal discussion of diverse views or form a 
group with friends. Write: P.O. Box 27131, L.A. 27, 
.NO 1-0222, HO 2-1171. Whitticr 699-6479. 

FUNERAL REFORM 

Join L.A. Funeral Society, Inc. (Non Profit) To 
Fight the High Cost of Dying. Plan now to I'rotect 
Your Survivors. 
Call 732-0491. Write 1714 So. Ardmore. L. A. 6 



HI Fl 



HEALTH FOODS 



\'i tain ins — ^Restaurant — Library — Herlial Cigarettes. 
OAHIS i)V HEALTH, 4854 Fountain, Hollywood 29. 
.NO 2-6097. 



Organic walnuts, tree dried. 
Route 1. Box 127. Ojal. 



50c lb. -f" postage. 



HELP WANTED 



KPFK needs a full or part-time experienced book- 
keeper for salaried staff position. Prderal.ly on* 
who speaks KPP^K. 

TR 7-5583 or ST 1-0150 



HI-PACIFICA listeners! Benev Electronics rents 
tape recorders and services your Hi-Fi components. 
Call KPFK supporter: AT 8-2555. 



INSURANCE 



PREFERRED RISKS AND KPFK LISTENERS 

20% discount on auto and fire insurance. H. Starr. 

OLive 3-6380. 

BRl'SH AREA — Fire Insurance now uvailable. Call 
H. Starr, OL 3-6380. 



LANDSCAPING 



Wanted. EXCELLENT CLIENTS for excellent land- 
scape design. Keforences, Brochure; i'l'L'-1171, 
evenings. 



LIBERAL RELIGION 



FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH OF LOS ANGELES. 
2936 W^est Eighth Street, (just East of Vermont 
Avenue). A liberal center for those of every race, 
and from every creed. Stephen H. Fritchman. minis- 
ter. Church School, youth groups, social organiza- 
tions. Weekly newsletter on request. 

BURBANK UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP, 320 East 
Magnolia Blvd. Sunday services; church school. 
TH 8-8684. 

New ORANGE COUNTY Unitarian I'niversalist Fel- 
lowship. Write P.O. Box 2606. Fullerton. for church 
services, religious education, and public affairs 
meetings information. 

ETHICAL CULTURE — A contemporary, non-creedal 
approach to thoughtful living, focussing on human 
values and relationships; program for adults and 
children. West Coast Council for Ethical Culture, 
293 N. Euclid, Pasadena. SY 6-5546. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



HARPSICHORDS and Baroque Instruments. Sales, 

Rentals, Repairs. Discount to KPFK subscribers! 

DU 8-3088. 

FOR SALE: SPANISH CONCERT GUITAR. First 
rate concert instrument made in 1960 by Ignacio 
Fleta of Barcelona, #179. Excellent condition and 
l)layed l)y only one person. Full details and picture 
ui)()n retiuest. Make your best offer to: Matbanya 
Ophee. I'uidoux tlare Goay. VD Switzerland. Phone 
(021) 56 17 20. 



PAINTING 



PAINTER WHO LIKES HIS WORK 

Licen^sed. Insured — John Godel 

NO 6-0179 

Attiiin savings in i)ainting by quality results at 
fair prices. Call Vime Perillo. ST 9-0789. 



PERSONALS 



If interested in pian( 
advanced, call ST 4- 



(iuct playing, intermediate 

5867. 



ELECTROLYSIS. The Hair You Hate Gone Forever. 

Latest Scientific .Method. Physician-apprt)ved. Mem- 
Iyer Ameriian Electrijlysis Association. Free Con— 
sultiition. WE 1-3S77. 6241 Wilsbire Blv.l. 

WA.NTEI) HO.MES for my CERA.MICS and etc. In- 
expensive. PR 2-4271. i'aula, 2500 South Street. 
Anaheim. 

sr.M.MER SUN AND FUN dry your hair? Special- 
izing In reconditioning, hair coloring and perma— 
nent.s: Call SYLVIA at HO 2-9277. 

HAVE YOU EVEJt WISHED you could arrange a 
b.ttei- FA.MILY C().\STELL.\TIO.\ — bccau.se your 
own was iib.sfnt, or just plain impossible? You can. 
Writ.' SPIV Society, 524 H- So. St. Louis, L.A. 33. 



Page 14 



When responding to FOLIO ads, please mention KPFK FOLIO. 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



Fine Commercial/Advertising Photography, 
assured satisfaction. Camhi/Bardovi Photography 

ST 5-5770 

For the grand-parents who "have everything" . . . 
a PHOTOBIOGRAPHY of your child; a series of 
candid pictures taken at your home. 
LOTTE XOSSAMAX. CR 5-3506, or at KPFK. 



PIANO TUNING 



No matter how lousy you play, it sounds even worse 
when your piano needs tuning — and it usually does! 
If you're a music lover, call JOE GLOVER. 934-1769. 

PRINTING AND LITHOGRAPHY 

Commercial, organizational and political printing of 
any description from a letterhead to a catalogue. 
Snap-out forms. Estimates without obligation. Jim 
Burford and Mort Newman. 118 South Vermont 
Ave.. L. A. 4. DU 5-7500 



RADIO-TV 



GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR HI-FI 

Hollywood Radio & T^' — Estab. 19 31 

CAR-RADIOS REPAIRED 

while U wait 

7742 Santa Monica Blvd. OL 4-6000 



REAL ESTATE 



YES. INDEED! This ad has paid off in delightful 
new friends and mutually beneficial business trans- 
actions! So. if you are buying, selling or investing 
\n real eatate, our many years of city— wide experi- 
ence is at your disposal. Free consultation. 
FRAXCHI REALTY — XO 3-9561 



RECORDING TAPE 



Limited supply. 1800' MYLAR. 7" reel. Lists for 
over $6.00. Only $2.00 from Dick Johnson. 
GR 7-4929 ^evenings) 



RESORTS 



APARTMEXTS OX BEACH: Linen furnished — dis- 
cussions optional. ALT A MAR. 308 S. Strand, 
Oceanside. Calif. 722—5725. 

Ql-IET RURAL ATMOSPHERE near Mt. Palomar. 
Walk, swim, picnic,- rest here: Gold. Gem hunting. 
Restaurants nearby. Pauma Valley Motor Lodge, 
Hwy. 76, Pauma Valley. Calif. 742-3155, Area 714. 



RESTAURANTS 



DISCOVERY IXX — TOPAXGA 

Xatural Foods to a Gourmet's Taste. GL 5-S290 

Rich and Marj Dehr 

THE XIXE MUSES RESTAURAXT Serves 100 
European and East Indian dishes at under $2, from 
5-10 p.m. Closed Monday. 1016 North Vermont. 
NO 2-354 2. 

SCHOOLS AND INSTRUCTION 

JEAX BEXXETT Folk Guitar Instruction. Children 
and Adults. Private or Group. XO 1-5258, HO 4-2831 

CHARLES LEWIS 
Teacher of Piano — over 30 years 
Modern, practical method — encourages creativity. 
Studio: STate 8-6454 

LOU MAURY, Class Piano. Fastest way to learn. 
One hour per week, $15 month. 4354 Tujunga, Xorth 
Hollywood. TR 7-3S47 769-4523. 



CREATIVE DAXCE FOR CHILDREX 
Eve Adamson Jones. HO 7-8742 

THE MIDTOWN SCHOOL 
"Dedicated to the continuing growth of the individ- 
ual." 4155 Russell Avenue, Los Angeles 39, 
NOrmandy 3-3101. Ages 2 and over. 

STRYKER SCHOOL 

Music, Art, Dance. Creativity stressed. 

Lee Stryker, Ph.D. OX 6-0510 

HEXIA HAIDEX CHILD HOUSE— Pre-school and 
Kindergarten. Emphasis on Arts, Crafts and Music. 
French. 20 years of experience. Only college trained 
staff. SUMMER CAMP 3-8 yrs. old. 7451 Hayven- 
hur.'^t Ave.. Van Xuys. STate 0-3412. 

WALDEX HIGH SCHOOL 
Small classes. Individual attention. Therapeutic 
orientation. Grades Seven through Twelve. 
1019 West LA PALMA AVE.. AXAHEIM, 772-1350 

ILMARI ROXKA. author-teacher of Trumpet, Trom- 
bone, French Horn, Tuba. Former soloist under 
Toscanini. Weekly: S15 month. Telephone 763-7875 
eveninsrs. 

PIAXO LESSOXS by concert pianist and former 
U.C.L.A. instructor. Beginners and advanced. 
661-9219 

JUDITH HAMILTOX: Pianist-Composer (Lester 
Horton, USC, UCLA) HO 7-5788. 

HASKELL'S RASKELLS provides an after school 
and all day Saturday creative arts, drama, work- 
shop, horseback and overnight camping program. 
Ensenada (Mex.) trip Sept. 8-12. For information 
ct:ll: PO 1-1087. TR 7-4514. 

CREATIVE SUMMER PROGRAM till Sept. 13. In- 
tensive exploration, instruction all painting, sculp- 
tural media, creative dramatics, music. Swim in- 
struction 5-9 years. Rancho Co-op School. Pearl 
Wellins. director. EX 7-3729. 

READIXG IXSTRUCTIOX — Pre-school beginners; 
remedial all grades. Accredited teacher. OL 2-6168. 
The acquirement of piano virtuosity takes patience, 
guidance, and work! Have you the desire? Call 
Berkman — VErmont 7-4998. 

CREATIVE SUMMER PROGRAM till Sept. 13. In- 
tensive exploration, instruction all painting, sculp- 
tural media, creative dramatics, music. Swim in- 
struction 5—9 years. Rancho Co— op School. Pearl 
Wellin-. director. VE 9-0S19 or EX 7-3729. 
Ql'AKER HIGH SCHOOL. Coeducational, boarding 
10th. 11th grades opens mid-September. Apply: 

John Woolman School. Xevada City. Box J 26 
Instruction in SCULPTURAL Fl'XDAMEXTALS 
LEADIXG TOWARD CREATIVE SELF EXPRES- 
SIOX. HO 2-5531. 

SERVICES 

TH E A TR A-C ALL 

A Xew & Unique 24-Hour Message & Mail Center 

$3.00 per month 

OL 1-0411 OL 1-0341 

Our Operators Know Their Business 

and Take Care of Yours. 

TRAVEL 

ALAX WATTS Japan Tour 6 week Autumn 1963. 
Write Society for Comparative Philosophy, Room 
601, 323 Geary Street, San Francisco. 



io 

>!/ WE ACCEPT 



• All records fully guaranteed 

• Charge accounts available 

• Open daily-10:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. 
Fri. -Sat. -10:00 A.M. to Midnight 
Sunday-10:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. 

Discount Records, Inc. 

(CHESTERFIELD MUSIC SHOP) 

BR 2-9649 -CR 5-7712 • 9393 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, California 



All records featured on 
KPFK at low discount 
prices. ALSO Bestsellers 
at discount in our neic 
BOOK DEPARTMENT. 



BANKAMERICARD 



When responding to FOLIO ads, please mention KPFK FOLIO. 



Page 15 



DACIFICA 
POUNDATION 



3729 CAHUENGA BLVD., NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 
Postmaster: Return requested. 



DATED 
PROGRAM 

(fi) 1963 Pacifica Foundation 



some highlights in 

public affai 



airs 



THE ARMED FORCES AS EDUCATOR 

7:00 p.m. Thurs 22 

CIVIL RIGHTS CONFERENCE 

10:15 p.m. Fri 23 

SLIGHTLY RADIOACTIVE 

1:15 p.m. Sat 24 

MAX RAFFERTY 

7:00 p.m. Tues 27 

YOUNG REPUBLICANS 

Weekend of Aug 30-Sep 1 



drama and 
literature 



AN AGE OF SONG 

9:15 a.m. Mon 1 9 - Fri 23 

Mod 26 - Fri 30 

MACBETH AND THE LADY 

7:30 p.m. Wed 21 

ISHERWOOD AT WORK 

7:00 p.m. AAon 26 

THE JEWISH WIFE (Brecht) 

7:50 p.m. Tues 27 

lAGO AND OTHELLO 

7:30 p.m. Wed 28 

RUTH DRAPER 

8:30 p.m. Sat 31 



monie/tey 




SEPTEMBER 20, 21, 22 

MODERN JAZZ QUARTEI wth LAURiNDO ALMtlDA - DAVE BRUBECK 

GERRY MULLIGAN - THELGNIllS MONK - DIZZY GILLESPIE 

HARRY JAMES - PEh WEE R'JSSELL with JACK & CHARLIE TEAGARDEN 

GERALD WILSON ALL-STAR BIC^ PAND -■ onri nmny others 

FOR RESERVATIONS AND HOUSING 

WRITE P. O. BOX "JAZZ ", MONTEREY 



/ want to support KPFK; 

here is my subscription for one year 

I understand that I will receive the 

KPFK program Folio every two weeks. 



1. FOLD IN ▼ 



NAME 



ADDRESS 


CITY 


ZONE 


STATE 




Check enclosed 

$12 $25* 


$50* 




More* 



(Regular) 

$5 



(Sustainim) 



(Stiidrrtt subscription for 6 months) 

$3 

(Introductory subscription for 3 months) 

■f Contributions above $12 are tax-deductible. 



(Contributing) 

Q. 

D 

Q 

J 

b. 

cvi 



(Patron) 



I am interested in the concept of commercial- free radio. 
Please send: 



D The next Folio 
D I have FM 
n I am buying FM 
n More information 



▲ Ni anod I 



Support 

listener subscription radio 

in Southern California 



KPFK 

90.7 mc FM 



Mail your subscription to KPFK in 
this handy fold-up envelope. 

Hold paper with subscription form facing you and sealed flap at top. 1. Fold in 
narrow side panels. 2. Fold up bottom panel. 3. Fold down top and seal. 



Recent ajvards to KPFK 



ALFRED I. duPONT RADIO 
& TELEVISION AWARD 
for 1961, to KPFK, the first 
non-commercial station ever to 
ivin this award: "... its effort, 
in spite of financial limitation, 
to make radio a positive and 
creative force in the cultural and 
intellectual life of its 
community ..." 



PEABODY AWARD 
'' . . . to KPFK for superior 
locally produced programming ." 
April, 1961. 



OHIO STATE AWARDS 
For two winning programs: 
" ... a tour-de- force in radio . . . 
truly impressive ... a 
significant contribution ..." 
April, 1961. 



^ 


^ 


§ 


O 






^ 


Co 


(5 


Oo 




"V^ 


Cs 


o 


00 


i>0 


o 




sa 








o 

Co 



?5 






o 


td 

a 

CO 








o 


5 








w 


K 








f-h 


w 








B 


w 








^ 










(D 


^ 








3 


w 








CD 


^ 








O 


r 








00 


Kj 








w 










P 

^ 


•> 
> 








^. 


r 








*-^ 










B 










p_ 






























(D 










o. 










^J, 










3 










rt- 










!=r 










ft> 










(^ 










3 




















<-t- 










(X> 










o- 










w 










r+- 






"^"^ 






o 

Co 










S 

^ 


H 


^ 






2 


Z 

P 


CO 








CO 


n 
r 






CD 


> 








00 


C/2 



i^^/7 your subscription to KPFK in 
this handy fold-up envelope 



Hold paper with subscription form facing you and sealed flap at top. 1. Fold in 
narrow side panels. 2. Fold up bottom panel. 3. Fold down top and seal.