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Full text of "La Campana"

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LACAMPANA 1981 




MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 
UPPER MONTCLAIR. N.J. 
VOLUME LXII 




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Table of Contents 

student Life V 18 

Dorms W 38 

Student Strike .... .Jf^. 52 

New Game Show — "Find A Parking Space". . . 56 

An Impetuous Exploit 66 

Valentine Weddings ^ 69 

MSC Spirit Week j^^ 70 

Carnival '81 ^^^. 74 

Reflections on the MSC Elections 79 

What's This Bulldozer Doing in My 

Parking Space 80 

Entertainment 1980-1981 i 81 

Alligator Chic ^^ .... 82 

Candids ^T 83 

Lectures 1. 1 02 

Plays J. 106 

Pedaling Through Pennsylvania ^ 113 

Sports ^^ \ 118 

Organizations 1 1 50 

Seniors ^1 202 

Graduation 9m 296 

Staff ^ 306 

Epilogue . . .||\l 310 

Credits 311 




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Campana I cam-pah' -nahj, f. 1. Bell. 2. La Campana was the 
name given to the yearbook in 1933 This name was inspired 
by the bells that are located in the tower of College Hall 



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51 



student Strike 



Student leaders of MSC asked students to boycott classes on Friday, September 26, and Monday, September 29, in protest 
of an assembly bill that would reallocate up to five million dollars originally earmarked for improvements at state colleges to the 
Tuition Aid Grant/TAG program which last year incurred a four and a half million dollar deficit. 

The student leaders at MSC made their decisions to strike the previous Tuesday and were followed by the New Jersey 
Institute of Technology/NJIT and Trenton State who decided that Wednesday to join MSC by rallying Friday and holding 
student strikes on their campuses on Monday. William Paterson College, Stockton State College, and Glassboro State 
College eventually joined the strike effort. On MSC's campus the class boycott was 90 to 94 percent effective. Demonstrations 
complete with picket signs halted traffic entering the school at Normal Avenue and Clove Road. The success of the action led 
to an amendment of the original bill. 

Although fifty percent of last summer's tuition increase was to be channeled to the TAG, only $1 .4 million would now be 
allocated. In addition two hundred thousand from management and administrative services of the department of higher 
education, one hundred thousand from aid to private colleges, and $1 .3 million from the general treasury fund were channeled 
into the TAG account. 

"No matter how you look at it, it's a victory," Ken Brown, student representative to the board of trustees, said. "At least the 
money that we do lose we'll lose to our own students, and not to out of state and independent colleges." 

"My first reaction to the amendment is that instead of getting two hundred lashes, we're getting one hundred lashes — and 
we're still not guilty, " Brian Cige, SGA president, said. "I guess for the time being we should accept the fact that we won a 
victory by making our point and saving as much for the students as we possibly could." 




52 




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New Game Show — 

"Find A Parking 

Space" 

Bzzzz. 6:00 a.m. Darkness en- 
velopes the room. Still groggy, 
unaware of what day It is. First 
thought enters — Economics 
exam at 10:00. If I awaken now, 
shower, and eat something in the 
car, I might grab a decent parking 
space. Why, I might even get a 
spot in the upper lots! 

Pity the poor commuter stu- 
dents. They go through the 
above scenario countless times 
every semester. Frazzled 
nerves, wasted gas, damaged 
cars, not to mention decreased 
sleep time, are all the result of 
playing the ridiculous and neces- 
sary game of "Find a Parking 
Space". Prerequisites for playing 
the game are: 

— Regulation Commuter Car 
MEN: Monte Carlo with ros- 
ary beads and a H.S. 
graduation tassel 
around the rearview 
mirror 

Women: Datsun, Toyota, or 
Firebird 

— 20/20 Vision 

— Masochistic Tendencies 
— Parking Decal (optional) 

The last of the above is option- 
al for the simple reason that 8200 
students can not possibly be 
assured of a space, when in fact 
only about 5000 such spaces 
exist. 

The daily conditions commu- 
ters face in trying to park their 
cars AND arrive to class on time 
range from being buried in mud 
slides in the west quarry to being 
swallowed up by massive 
potholes on the hill to the lower 



lots. To have gotten through the 
'80-'81 school year unscathed in 
the daily quest for a safe sanctu- 
ary for one's vehicle is a cause 
for celebration. 

In addition to proper mental 
makeup and constant obstacles, 
the players in this game must 
consider geographies when 
making their crucial decision. 
Successful negotiation of a 
space without recrimination from 
campus or municipal police re- 
quires thorough knowledge of 
where the "danger zones " are. 
Fines issued by Clifton, Little 
Falls, and Montclair men in blue 
range from five to twnety dollars. 
Due to frequent ticket blitzes, the 
author of this piece has accumu- 
lated over $1 00.00 in fines during 
the past three years. 

Montclair State is a commuter 
college first and foremost and; in 




all fairness to the administration, 
the parking situation has im- 
proved with the addition of the 
quarry lots. However, this is seen 
as a concession, rather than a 
concerted effort, by administra- 
tion to remedy the problem. As 
long as 5000 spaces are secured 
at ten dollars each, the winner of 
"Find a Parking Space" will not 
be the student. 




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Peggy Cass, Phys Ed Instructor. 



62 




Dr Sharon Spencer. English and Tom Marnson, Novelist 



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63 




Zaibette Maldonado, Anthropology. 



William L. Stanton, Philosophy. 



64 




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Florence Junda, bcwkkeeper of SGA. 




Business Revenue Personnel. 



65 



An Impetuous Exploit 

By Dr. D. McDermott 



"Good heavens, what have I gotten us into?" The words recurred again and again in my mind as we drove across Canada, 
down into the U.S. at Niagara, and onto Montclair. In one of the least orthodox moves I have made in ten years of college 
teaching, I agreed last spring to swap places for one year with a professor from Montclair State College. Here with a report on 
that swap and my impressions of it. 

For ten years I have been a faculty member at the University of Alaska Anchorage, a small, land-grant institution which has 
had phenomenal growth in the past decade. When I received a letter from a professor at Montclair State looking to come to 
Alaska, the thought of a swap entered my mind. We worked it out with our schools and — lo and behold — the thing actually 
happened! I am amazed because institutions tend not to do new things: I guess we convinced them this was an old thing in new 
guise. I call it the poor person's sabbatical. 

I knew nothing of Montclair State except its location near New York. Over the months of discussion and planning, there 
emerged the picture of a school offering a wide variety of programs in an interesting administrative set-up. This seemed to add 
all the more to my interest. 

We made the trip (we being Toni, my wife, Megan, 7, Andy, 5, and myself) from the West Coast in a Winnebago. We dubbed 
it the Gross-Mobile because it is a conspicuous consumer of gasoline. It has served us well, and even economically, because 
of the saving on accomodation and restaurant costs. And, in keeping with the American Dream, we have come to love our 
happy home on wheels. 

We have come, too, to love Montclair and all it has come to mean to us. Nobody loves an institution any more — that is passe. 
But we will remember long and fondly the good things about Montclair and this year. 

What are some of these good things? People, to start with. I have worked with some of the neatest students there are during 
this year. What do I like about Montclair State students? Well, you are refreshingly frank; there is less pretense than one might 
expect on a campus in 1 981 . You are bright; both in the sense of wise to the market-place and wise to things academic. And 
you are young — the average age of Anchorage undergrads is twenty-eight — so it has been a new world for me, working with 
people closer to twenty again. 

I have liked the faculty with whom I have worked. They have provoked my mind with new thoughts and proven to be 
sounding boards for my old thoughts. They have been most helpful. 

Overall, I would like to say that we have found a warmth and genuiness which both surprised and delighted us. It surprised 
us because there is not supposed to be any of that human quality left around big cities anymore. It delighted us because we 
enjoy working with people, and the kind of people we have met here — well, you are special. 

Thank you, then, for what will be a happy memory for years to come. We are richer for having known you. Come see us when 
you get to Alaska! 



66 




John J Sanz. director of Weekend College. 

# 




William Welsch. Counselor 



Ray Pars. Marketing 



67 




Robert R. Ruezinsky, director of Media Frank S. Kelland, Physics/Geoscience^ 

Center. 



68 



Valentine Weddings 




Dr. David W.D. Dickson, president of M.S.C., wed 
Barbara Chiles Mickey on Valentine's Day. The ser- 
vices, held at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Mont- 
clair, were officiated by Father Kenneth Herbster and 
Dr. Alfred Vail. 

In mid-April, they enjoyed their honeymoon on the 
island of St. Kitts in the West Indies. 

Mrs. Dickson has a Masters Degree in health 
education for the deaf and teachers at Vailsburg High 
School in New York. 

Dr. Dickson graduated from Bowdoin College in 
Marine and then to Harvard where he recieved both 
his Masters and Doctorate Degrees in English Litera- 
ture. 

Dr. Marie Frazee. a guidance counselor at Montclair 
State College for the Department of Mathematics and 
Computer Science married Dr. Anthony Baldassarre on 
February 14. 1981: Valentines Day. The services were 
held in the Chapel at the Newman House with Father 
Kenneth Herbster officiating. 

Both Frazee and Baldassarre enjoy traveling a great 
deal and were on a tour in Italy when they met in 1972. 

Dr. Baldassarre, who formerly taught foreign languages 
in the Massachusetts public school system, now teaches 
Spanish and French at the Essex Catholic High School for 
girls. 

Mrs Baldassarre graduated from Montclair State Col- 
lege in 1943. She was an English major, with a minor in 
French. She received her Masters Degree here in 1946 
and her Doctor of Education Degree from the Teachers 
College of Columbia, New York City in 1967. 



69 



MSC Spirit Week 





70 





"What seems to be the problem?" he 
gruffily inquired. 

"Well, sir. our campus has had a severe 
attack of apathy. It's been lingering for 
quite some time: can you suggest a 
cure?" 

"Certainly." he knowingly replied." 
Plaster the campus with red and white 
ribbons. Give out a large dose of free food 
and buttons, sponser educational and so- 
cial events, and finally, call it Spirit Week." 

Spirit Week, held between March 23 
and March 29. provided a much needed 
remedy for the mid-semester blues. 

Sponsored by student government, it 
was planned to dispel apathy and ac- 
quaint students with campus activities. 

Everyone enjoyed the gaily decorated 
campus, the rowdy gatherings in the 
quad, and the nightly entertainment. 

Everyone from SGA organizations to the 
pub and cafeteria got into the act. The 
week officially started with a balloon lift- 
off then grogressed to. among other 
things, Budweiser night. Reservoir Run, 
Spring Dance Festival, and Caberet 
Night. Ending this active week was the 
popular Weekend College Carnival. 



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CARNIVAL '81 

Latin Week at MSC 

During April, the Weekend College Student 
Organization held its 7th Annual Dance Fes- 
tival or "Carnival" commemorating Latin 
Week. 

A rich celebration of the diversity and rich- 
ness of the Hispanic Culture, the event was 
such a success that people were turned away 
at the doors to Memorial Auditorium. 

Professional as well as amateur perfor- 
mers, representing 18 of the 23 Latin Amer- 
ican countries, were arrayed in vivid native 
costumes. The audience was delighted by 
their grand entrance and by Channel 41 's 
beautiful and witty Marcia Julian, who served 
as Mistress of Ceremonies. 

The performances ranged from the Spanish 
flamenco dance and Mexican zapatiada to 
singing by Roy Brown, the internationally re- 
nowned folk singer from Puerto Rico. The 
program took a serious turn and photo- 
graphers flashed away as the dancers from El 
Salvador came on stage. Other countries in- 
cluded in the performances were Panama, 
Guatemala, Argentina, the Dominican Repub- 
lic, and Brazil. Food was sold by MSC's Span- 
ish Club. 




74 




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78 



Reflections on the M.S.C. Elections 



By Mike Sinatra 

In our Student Government elections, as in all political contests, there are winners and losers. The word "loser" 
carries a negative connotation. Losing implies failure, blasted dreams, unfulfilled hopes, ambushed aspirations. 
The agony of defeat is an inescapable part of all competitive situations in life and it certainly existed at the 
conclusion of this past election. 

In this past election, however, defeat did not carry with it the sting of failure as one might have expected. Any 
anguish which I may have felt because of my one-vote defeat was eclipsed totally by the incalculable positive 
revelations which came out of this campaign. True. I failed to win office, but I achieved something of far greater 
importance. I gained an insight into the kind of beautiful people who comprise the overwhelming majority of the 
students of Montclair State. Countless numbers of students who were, regretfully, only blank faces to me during 
my previous years at Montclair, suddenly became people of infinite value, every one a unique combination of all 
the good things which make people more precious than the most priceless treasure. My campaign enabled me to 
speak to these people, to get to know and understand them, which is a reward far greater than election to office. 
Perhaps the high point of the entire election was watching the campaign workers of victorious candidates 
dancing, drinking, and laughing with campaign workers of defeated candidates. Fnendships grew and were 
sealed as these people completely and permanently put aside all of the animosity generated between them 
during the previous two weeks. 

Montclair State College is truly blessed with people who personify humanity at its best. My defeat in this election 
was a tiny technical inconvenience when weighed against the inner rewards I received because of this campaign. 
The students in this school, diverse in perceptions yet united in spirit, individuals stnving for personal success yet 
a community concerned with the welfare of all. have shown me nothing but positive qualities, the best that people 
can be. Defeat in the election was an insignificant price to pay for the friends I've made, the insight I've acquired, 
and the good feelings I've received. Montclair State College is truly a place about which will always be "talking 
proud " because I am proud to be a part of a campus community comprised exclusively of beautiful people. 




79 



What's This Bulldozer Doing In My Parking Space? 

As everyone who has been on the MSC campus this year has probably noticed, there's been some construction going on. 
The construction of the 640-bed dorm, Blanton Hall, which started in March of 1 980, has eliminated over 400 parking spaces. 
With a shortage of parking on campus before the construction, this caused an increased number of illegally parked cars and a 
65% increase in the number of tickets issued in September of 1980 as compared to last year. 

However, approximately 1 200 new parking spaces have been paved in the Quarry and another 800 spaces across from the 
Clove Road apartments. 

Construction of the dorm was delayed and it is believed that it will not be completed by its August 1981 deadline. Boulders 
were encountered during excavation and instead of blasting them, it was decided that smaller machinery should be used, 
which would be a longer process. 

The new dorm will contain a new cafeteria, to replace Bohn Hall's inadequate one, a new health center, and facilities to host 
summer conferences, which help keep the cost of student housing down. The dorm will be fully carpeted and air conditioned. It 
is designed to utilize solar energy during both the summer and winter. The roof will have special lighting features to capture the 
winter sun, but exclude the summer sun. 

It is expected that Blanton Hall will increase MSC's housing by 47 percent, from 1 ,375 to 2,01 5, and it will cost approximately 
$10 million upon completion. 

The construction of a Student Center Annex has been under way. This annex will include new offices for the SGA and Class I 
organizations, and it will cost $2 to $3 million. 

The general construction contractors have been Solart Construction Company of Monroe, New York for Blanton Hall, and 
Mahieu Construction Company of Prospect Park for the Student Center Annex. Other independent contracts have been 
awarded for mechanical and electrical items by the Educational Facilities Authority. 




80 



Entertainment: 1980-1981 

The life of a student can be quite boring at times. The seemingly endless lectures, countless homework assignments, and 
stress-filled exams leave us dazed, bored, and in dire need of some sort of temporary diversion. However, a chronic lack of 
money, so common to the typical student, severely limits us in our quest for that diversion. 

The easiest, and cheapest, way to escape from the pressures of school is television. The new shows presented by the 
networks in the fall seemed to be designed for the person seeking an hour or two of mindless entertainment. The major 
networks' show line-up this year seemed bent on avoiding any subject that required the audience to use its mind. 

CBS gave us more "Dukes of Hazzard " with its never-ending car chases, scantily clad, although virginal, women, and gee 
whiz, aw shucks, golly gee. down home boys. To add insult to injury, the network presented "Enos ". a spin-off featuring the 
former deputy of "Hazzard" in a country boy goes to the big. bad city format. 

The return of "Dallas" andthecontinuingsagaof whoshot J.R. was greeted with an unprecedented amount of fanfare. This 
prime-time soap opera received worldwide atlention from magazines and newspapers. Even bookies got involved by giving 
odds and taking bets on the suspects most likely to have shot the infamous J.R. Ewing. By the time the show revealed J.R.'s 
assailant, the whole world was asking "Who shot JR.''". The much awaited episode drew the largest audience for a regularly 
scheduled show in the history of T.V. In the final analysis though, who really cared'!' 

CBS was not alone NBC and ABC also made an art out of insulting the viewers intelligence. We could wallow in the sleaze 
of NBC's "Flamingo Road " and "Harper Valley P.T.A. ". ogle at ABC's T and A sitcoms, and even learn about transvestites 
watching "Bosom Buddies' . The award for tastelessness must go the ABCs "That's Incredible " and NBC's "Real People ". 
These two shows, wrth a freak of the week format, demonstrated that no matter how bad television is. it can always get worse. 

The television season was not without its bright spots. Richard Chamberlain and "Shogun" has us turning Japanese in 
September as the mini-senes drew record audiences. In the spring. ABC presented Masada — the story of a group of 900 Jews 
who chose mass suicide rather than surrender to the Romans. The mini-series told both sides of the story with compassion 
and intelligence Peter O'Toole gave a powerful performance as the leader of the Roman troops and Peter Strauss gave an 
equally fine performance as the leader of the beseiged Jews. These two shows demonstrated what commercial television can. 
and should, be. 

It was a banner year for the news departments of the three major networks. The prolonged hostage crisis in Iran and the 
Presidential election in the fall provided an ample supply of material for special reports and features. ABC's "Nightline" was a 
direct result of the need for comprehensive news coverage of the hostage situation The late night news program was born 
dunng the early days of the crisis and became so popular that it remained after the crisis ended. 

The election of Ronald Reagan as Chief Executive was not greeted with much enthusiasm on campus. It is likely that few of 
us would have watched his inauguration had it not been for the hostages' release during the ceremony. The pictures of the 
hostages stepping off the planes in Germany, the parade from the airport in New York to West Point, and the millions of yellow 
ribbons tied to everything in sight were responsible for countless tears shed in front of television sets across America. The 
ordeal through which we suffered was finally over. After 444 days, the people we knew only through television and press 
coverage were free. 

The television press were not infallible. The coverage of the assassination attempt on President Reagan was filled with 
errors and rumours reported as facts After watching the video tape of the attempt in slow motion, stop motion, and frame by 
frame, we were told that the President was not wounded, that he might have been grazed by a bullet, and. finally, that he had in 
fact been shot. 

The most grievous error occurred, however, when all three networks reported that Press Secretary James Brady had died 
from his wounds It was not until later that we learned he was in surgery and not dead as had been previously reported. 

For those that found television's fare not to their liking, Hollywood offered a wide range of films during the year. Robert 
DeNiro portrayed fighter Jake Lamotta in "Raging Bull " and garnered the Oscar for best actor. In another biographical film. 
Sissy Spacek won the best actress award for her performance as Loretta Lynn in "Coal Miners Daughter ". 

Robert Redford made his debut as a director in fine fashion, winning best director for "Ordinary People". The film, starhng 
Mary Tyler Moore and Donald Sutherland, showed a family torn by tragedy and lacking in love and understanding. Timothy 
Hutton won the best supporting actor award as the son. 

There was a plethora of horror films to scare us this year. "Friday the 1 3th " was the most popular, demonstrating some very 
ingenious ways to do away with people In addition to "Friday the 13th " horrors, we could be eaten by an albino amphibian 
lurking in sewers in Alligator , have our heads explode by "Scanners' , or be slashed by a crazed Iransvestite psychiatnst in 
"Dressed to Kill 

"The Empire Strikes Back", the second in the Star Wars series, was the blockbuster o( the year while Michael Cimino's 
"Heaven's Gate " was the most expensive, $40 million, flop in history. Cimino pulled the movie after one day of release in 
November to edit and try to salvage the film When it was rereleased in the spring, one reviewer said that now, instead of it 
being the longest, most expensive, worst movie in history, it is just the most expensive, worst movie. 

Outgrossing all movies, however, was Penthouse's "Caligula" The film followed the rise and fall of Caligula Ceasar and set 
new marks for depravity in film. 

81 



Alligator Chic 



The image has been around for decades, although the word 
"Preppy" was first introduced to us by Erich Segal in heartwarming 
book "Love Story" in 1970. This year's best-seller list included 
"The Official Preppy Handbook", a complete guide to dressing and 
acting preppy without ever attending an Ivy League school or 
getting one's Topsiders wet at the yacht club. As did many things in 
the nation this year, fashion got back to basics. 

The preppy look is what today's fashion conscious men and 
women are wearing; some don't realize it's the look that fashion 
unconscious men and women have been wearing for years. Some- 
what of a rebellion to label-consciousness, preppies don't need a 
designer because they already have good taste in clothing. 

Men and women dress very much alike and clothing for either sex 
denies specifics of gender. Primary colors and pastels are worn 
indiscriminately by both sexes. The wearing of hot pink and electric 
green together is the surest way to pick out a true preppy in any 
crowd. 



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Senator Birch Bayh 

February 10, 1981 

"Moral Majority" 



Dr. Emanuel Lottem 

March 31, 1981 

'Middle East Update" 




102 



LECTURES 




Melba Tolliver 

March 2, 1981 

"Women and Minorities in 

the Media ■ 



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Peter Lance 

March 24. 1981 

The Making of 20 20" 



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Pedaling Through Pennsylvania 




112 



Early in June fen students met in Panzer Gym for what promised to be one of the 
more unusual courses of the summer session, a bicycling and camping trip through 
eastern Pennsylvania. Under the guidance of Peggy Cass, two days were spent 
refurbishing and equipping the bikes as well as plotting routes that avoided major 
highways while cutting through the scenic farmland. Following that, early the next 
morning, everyone met down at Rutgers and set off in the direction of Princeton, 
Washington's Crossing and beyond. Five minutes later, before anyone adjusted to 
carrying an array of tents, sleeping bags, and cook sets on the bikes. Charlie called 
the first rest stop with the first of many flat tires. 

Although there were ideas of earning three credits without much effort initially, 
they didn't last very long. Transporting all that weight was no simple feat especially 
up the apparently never-ending hills. Still, despite rumors of forming a lynch mob for 
Peggy if the elevation kept going upward, no one had a problem maintaining a sense 
of humor. Campsites ranged from outhouse to heated pool. Peggy seemingly knew 
the location of every ice cream stand west of the Delaware and every bar became an 
oasis of civilization. Each supermarket was a pleasant surprise allowing for Done 
and Bob's top-rated Chinese dinner When only a campground general store was 
available, however, Cathy and Ruth showed some ingenuity and served up some 
standard fare as well as a sampling of the regional cooking. Everyone took in the 
local sights, the Amish and Menonite farms, the Lititz Pretzel Factory, Valley Forge, 
and the outdoor flea markets. Somewhere along the line six people disappeared in 
transit causing momentary panic until someone in that group remembered that they 
should have taken a left instead of a right. And one morning Rich announced he was 
old enough to see the more earthy aspects of life and headed for the towns of 
Intercourse and Blue Ball. Solarcaine and insect repellent became constant com- 
panions and a can of beer was a trip staple. As New Jersey drew close again, the 
bets were on to see if Charlie could go through one day with his tires intact. 

Despite the return to the land of Born To Run", bicycle fever didn't end Since 
Pennsylvania, trips have been taken by a few to local sights and a race in Central 
Park saw representation A reunion barbecue, months in the planning, took place 
during Fall Registration Week allowing everyone to catch up with each other and 
hear about Peggy's bike tour across Europe As the sky got darker, more and more 
talk centered on the possibility of doing it all again next summer. So with a little bit of 
luck f^SC will sponsor another trip next year, but with an addition — passports. 



113 




114 




115 




116 




117 




119 




120 



BASEBALL 



Back to back 10th inning losses to 
William Peterson College deprived 
MSC of a chance to repeat as the New 
Jersey State College Athletic Confer- 
ence champions. Nevertheless. Coach 
Fred Hill had to be pleased with his 
team's 18- 10 performance for the 1981 
campaign. 

After scoring two in the top of the 
10th at William Paterson College on 
May 1, the Indians ace reliever Bnan 
Cloney gave up three in the bottom half 
of the inning to give the victory and 
forced MSC into a must situation 
in their season finale the following day 
at Pittser Field. 

Again, however, the game went into 
the 10th inning and again WPC took 
the decision. This time 10-9, knocking 
the Tribe out of the state playoff pic- 
ture. 



The Indians started the season like a 

house on fire, scoring 65 runs and hit- 
ting 1 7 homers during a five game stmt 
the first week in April. They broke the 
MSC record for combined home runs in 
a game when they and Rider College 
cracked 10 in MSC's 10-9 win at Rider. 
Bill Schoenig (2), Bob Fortunate, Tony 
Sabato, Mark Baker, and Ray Morelli 
tallied for the Tribe. 

At the seasons end, second base- 
man Schoenig was named the team's 
Most Valuable player. His .367 batting 
average combined with his four hom- 
ers and 17 RBI's eamed him the honor. 
The MSC junior who was drafted last 
season by the Cleveland Indians, also 
scored 31 runs, stole four bases, and 
hit eight doubles while making just 
eight errors in 27 games. His career 
batting average at MSC is an awesome 



.363. 

Cocaptain Bob Fortunato's .396 
average earned him a nomination to 
the Region 2 All-American Division III 
baseball team. In 107 at bats, the hard 
hitting third baseman fanned just four 
times. He also led the Tnbe in runs 
scored with 26. 

Outstanding dedication and lead- 
ership earned Fortunate the Charles 
Turek Award given annually to an MSC 
player. He was also a first team 
NJSCAC selection. 

MSC's other cocaptain, Vin Tiber! 
won the Lee Walsky Award for the 
second straight year The award is 
given annually to the MSC player who 
demonstrates the best team spirit. The 
MSC catcher also received a second 
team nomination on the NJSCAC all- 
star team. 



PITTSER FIELD 




Men's Basketball 



A series of spectacular victories 
gave Coach OIlie Gelston's Indians the 
New Jersey State College Athletic 
Conference championship and made 
his team the most talked about thing on 
campus in mid-March. 

After the JV basketball team went an 
astonishing 22-0 with a 66-65 victory 
over Glassboro State College on Feb. 
21 , and leading scorer Jeff Johnson left 
the varsity squad for a job with the IRS 
a week earlier, it appeared that the 
team would have to take a back seat 
again. 

Captain Fred Hill and Co. had other 
ideas, however. 

They were nicknamed the "Cin- 
derella" Indians and were considered 
the basketball version of Rocky. They 
upset some of the top Division III bas- 
ketball teams in the Northeast while 
going through the regular season with 



a 14-11 record. 

A 52-51 victory over Glassboro on 
Kevin Barry's last second foul shot 
gave them the NJSCAC cham- 
pionship. This was the Indians first 
NJSCAC title in 10 years and gave 
them their first NCAA Division III berth 
since 1970-71. 

Before they won the opportunity to 
meet Glassboro, the fourth ranked In- 
dians faced William Paterson College, 
the number one ranked team in the 
conference tournament and a team 
that had beaten them twice (87-85 in 
20T and 64-57) during the regular sea- 
son. This didn't mean anything to the 
determined Indians, however, and they 
upset the Pioneers 64-58 giving them 
the championship shot at Glassboro. 

The victory over the Profs vaulted 
the Thbe into the South Atlantic Re- 
gional Tournament vs. three teams, if 



combined, had won 63 times and lost 
only 12 times all year. 

The Indians had the seemingly un- 
fortunate task of facing Roanoke Col- 
lege of Virginia, the second ranked Di- 
vision III team in the nation with a 26-1 
record, but f^SC made believers out of 
them. 

With 1 1 seconds left. Hill drove the 
lane, twisted in mid-air and banked a 
shot with two seconds left giving MSC 
a 57-55 victory setting up a confronta- 
tion between 13th ranked Upsala Col- 
lege. 

The Indians were soundly beaten 
(86-84) by a much taller Upsala team, 
but they had nothing to be ashamed of. 
They showed a tremendous amount of 
character, poise, and determination in 
playing their hearts out, and showing 
the rest of the teams that the Indians 
were for real. 





122 




123 




The future for MSC women's 
basketball looks very promising 
with four of the five starters of this 
year's 16-11 team returning. 
Tracey Brown, Sharon Ross, Mar- 
guerite Dempsey, and Bebbie 
O'Brien are all two year starters and 
should continue to provide a good 
nucleus for the coming year. 

As was the case last season, the 
Squaws were eliminated in the first 
round of the Northeast Regional 
Tournament by Cheyney State Col- 
lege. In what was perhaps their 
best played game of the year, MSC 
fell 81-59. 

The Squaws opened their cam- 
paign by taking their second Dial 
Classic in as many years by routing 
the University of Wyoming (86-47) 
and Villanova (68-62). 

A thirteen game road trip that 
lasted from mid-December 1980 to 
the end of January 1981 took the 
Squaws to Utah, Michigan, Califor- 



nia, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, and New 
York. MSC defeated the University of 
Utah 79-61; Michigan State 82-66; San 
Jose State 65-58; Washington State 65- 
53; Rhode Island 77-63; the University of 
Massachusetts 79-63; and the University 
of Connecticut 75-54. 

Brown led the team in scoring, averag- 
ing 19,6 points per game and in assists 
with 94. Ross led MSC in steals (72) and 
senior Pat Fixter was the top rebounder 
with 159. 

Freshman Fran Sivolella posted the 
best free throw percentage (.857) and 
O'Brien did likewise with a .475 field goal 
percentage. 




124 



Women's Basketball 




125 



Men's Cross Country 




Coach James Harris' harriers compiled an outstanding 1 4-3 overall record in 1 980 and an equally strong New Jersey State 
College Athletic Conference (NJSCAC) mark of 5-1. 

The Tribe's lone conference setback came in MSC's second meet, a 50-15 rout by champion Glassboro State College. 

Captain Ian Gordon paced MSC along with standout Steve Boyle. Charlie Cilwik proved to be the Indians' most pleasant 
surprise and one of the team's most devoted runners. 



126 



Women's Cross Country 



Pat Salmon paced the women's cross country team in 
1 980 as MSC ran past Kings College 22-36 and Manhattan 
1 5-45. The Squaws also looked sharp at West Point where 
they finished third and at the New Jersey Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (NJAIAW) cham- 
pionships where they also finished in the number three 
position. 

Salmon's season high 18:58 gave her a seventh place 
individual finish in the NJAIAW meet while her 19:49 and 
19:47 gave her first place honors at both Southern Con- 
necticut State College and Manhattanville. In the Eastern 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 
(EAIAW) division III Northeast regionals, she finished 29th 
with a time of 20:05.9. 

Gen Pomeranz. Linda Gloshinski. and Pat Cavallero 
also had fine seasons for MSC. 




127 



Fencing 




Captain Sandi Heinze, Michele Pilger, Di- 
ane Flynn, and Kathy Rippey led the MSC 
women's fencing team to a 4-8-1 record in 
1981. 

After taking their first three matches in 
impressive fashion — 11-5 over Caldwell 
College, 1 0-6 over Drew University, and 1 0- 
6 over Queens College — the Squaws 
appeared to be headed for a spectacular 
season. 

The rest of their schedule, however, pre- 
sented many talented Division I and II oppo- 
nents. MSC held their own against such 
powerhouses as St. Peter's College, Princ- 
ton University, and Hofstra University. 




128 




Field Hockey 



129 




Field Hockey 



span, the Squaws dropped consecutive decisions 
College (1-0), and Rutgers University (6-0). 

Also this season, MSC opponents scored 35 goal 
1979 (31.) 

Goalie Gudewicz cannot bear all of 
the blame for this embarrassing statistic 
however, as her young defense fre- 
quently found themselves open for 
attack. 

May Johnson and Mary Zoeller 
accumulated three points apiece for 
MSC, and Pat Connor and Diane Tyson 
tallied two each on the season. 

The Squaws' most impressive victory 
came vs. Kings College (4-0), at 
Brookdale Park. Popadaniec scored 
twice, and Connor and Dietrich added 
one each. Gudewicz made 1 1 saves en 
route to what was her third shutout in 
the Squaws' first four games. 



A young and improving field hockey team just missed the 
.500 mark, finishing their 1980 campaign with a 7-8-1 record. 

When the season began. Coach Donna Olsen wasn't sure 
who would replace last year's standout goalie Evelyn Jackson. 
When red headed Ronnie Gudewicz took the net on opening 
day, however, all doubt was gone. 

After blanking MSC's first two opponents — Southern Con- 
necticut State College (2-0) and Adelphi University (2-0), she 
went on to make 174 saves while posting an impressive 2.25 
goals against average. She also added three more 
whitewashes to give her total of five shutouts for the year. 

On offense, Judy Popadaniec and Debbie Dietrich provided 
most of the scoring punch. 

Popadaniec knocked in 10 goals while assisting on four 
others, to give her the team's scoring title with 14 points. 
Dietrich netted five goals and assisted on five to place her a 
close second. 

Two MSC field hockey records were broken this season — 
both, however, were on the negative side. 

The longest losing streak for an MSC team is now four, 
breaking the previous record by one. During the eight day 
to Temple University (3-0), C.W. Post College (5-1), William Paterson 

Is on the Tribe — an all time high. The previous record was established in 




130 



Football 




131 



Football 




For the first time in three years, Coach 
Fred Hill's Indians failed to capture the 
New Jersey State College Athletic Con- 
ference (NJSCAC) football crown. A 26- 
13 loss to Trenton State College eight 
games into the season gave the Tribe 
their second setback of the season and 
eliminated all hopes for a division III play- 
off bid and the title. MSC finished the sea- 
son at 8-2. 

When all-conference kicker Keith 
Sahlin missed a field goal with :03 left to 
play in MSC's opening night loss to Wag- 
ner College, 12-10, the Tribe knew that a 
playoff berth would be difficult to obtain. 
But, in typical Fred Hill fashion, they made 
a valiant try. 

Their next six games were all MSC as 
they blanked East Stroudsburg State Col- 
lege 16-0, routed Kean College 28-13, 
Ramapo College 38-3, Seton Hall Uni- 
versity 28-16, William Paterson College 
28-0, and division II powerhouse Central 
Connecticut State College 14-6. 

When conference rival Trenton came to 
Sprague Field the following week, howev- 
er, the MSC magic wasn't evident as the 
Lions mauled the Tribe 26-13 and MSC's 
title hopes were all but gone. 

Nevertheless, the Indians closed 
out in a fury, crippling Jersey State 
College 24-7 in Jersey City, and stun- 
ning Glassboro State College 32-12 
in their finale. 

At the season's end, eight Indians 
were honored as NJSCAC all-stars. 

Linebacker Sam Mills' 127 tackles 
impressed enough people to get him 
the conference honor as well as an 
all-American selection. Mills ended 
his career with an unbelievable 501 
tackles. 



Senior Bill Grundy ran for a team high 
1,005 yards and now hilds MSC's all- 
time career rushing record with 2,152 
yards. His 80 yard burst during the 
scrimmage vs Central Connecticut is 
the longest in Indian history. 

The all-conference tailback also set 
new MSC marks for touchdowns in a 
season (14) and points scored in a sea- 
son (84). 

Tight end Hubert Bond's incredible 
blocking ability and his 21 receptions 
(tops for MSC) earned him the NJSCAC 
honor along with center Joe Hughes, 
and defensive tackles Doug Roberts 
and Mike Popek. 

Sahlin, known as "Ice" by his team- 
mates, was a perfect 29-29 on extra 
point tries. He also added four field 
goals en route to his conference 
nomination. 

Defensive back/kick returner Mike 
Smith was the Tribe's eighth selection. 
The MSC senior averaged 1 7. 1 yards in 
14 kickoff returns while accumulating 
87 yards in 28 punt returns. 

Coach Hill will lose 24 players due to 
graduation this year. 




132 



Golf 



If it weren't for two old nemisises, the golf team would have become MSC's second undefeated team in 1 980-81 (the 
JV basketball team went 22-0). Fairleigh Dickinson University (Madison) and Ramapo. however, proved too strong for 
the Tribe and handed them their only three losses (Ramapo beat the Indians twice) of an awesome 13-3 season. 

Pat Romano and Jim Shubert were the Indian's aces in the hole during the season. They had strong support from 
teammates Mark McCormick and Dave Fedor, all four averaging in the low to mid-70s. 

John Casalino, George Macaloso, and Gene Lowe also contributed to Coach Pete Famiano's successful club. 



133 



Gymnastics 



The MSC women's gymnastics team over-came three consecutive 
early season defeats and posted a .500 mark at 6-6. A 109.6-82.0 
rout of Kean College broke the ice and gave the Squaws their initial 
victory, four meets into the 1980-81 season. 

The highlight of the year for MSC was a second place finish in the 
EAIAW division II gymnastics championships held in Connecticut. 
The Squaws scored a school record 122.05 points. 

Renee Massey proved to be MSC's best all-around performer, 
posting team high scores in the vault, (8.25 vs Maryland), the uneven 
bars (7.7 vs Trenton State College), the floor exercises (7.9 vs 
Nassau Community College), and overall score (30.25 vs Trenton 
State College). 

Senior Joan Hayes set a school record with an 8.0 on the balance 
beam in a meet vs Towson State College and the University of 
Connecticut. 

Stefanie Grohoski, Donna DeKluyver, Margie Breznak, Sharon 
Bakunas, Meloney Kiegel and Jill Mandell also showed promise for 
the Squaws. 










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134 




135 




136 




Men's Lacrosse 



Following back to back losses as the 1981 
season opened, the men's lacrosse team 
went on a scoring rampage to take nine out of 
their final 12 games and captured the confer- 
ence title 

Scores of 23-2 (over Stevens Institute of 
Technology), 18-2 (over FDU/Teaneck) and 
18-5 (over Kean College) were familiar sights 
to MSC fans. The mam reason for this was 
MSCs scoring machine — George Nucera. 

Nuceras 40 goals and 1 9 assists proved to 
be the key to the Tribe's success. His single 
game performances were devastating to 
opposing teams: 7 goals vs Stevens, 6 vs 
Drew University, 5 vs Morgan State, and 4 
each vs C.W. Post, Kean College and Lehigh 
University to name a few Only twice was 
number 10 held in check (vs Villanova and 
FDUTeaneck). 

Goalkeeper Jerry Buonocore helped key 
the defensive end of the Stickmen s game, 



coming up with 246 saves in 14 games — an 
average of 19 per game His 26 stops vs both 
Penn State Universtiy and C.W. Post College 
were game highs for the year. 

Other Indians put on impressive scoring ex- 
hibitions. Kevin Oxiey netted five goals vs 
Legigh and four vs FDU Teaneck. Four goal 
performances were the most frequent, 
however, for the Tribe. Sal Guastella posted 
two such performances as did Jerry Jacob 
and Doug Mathews. Alan Geissel also had 
one. 




137 



Women's Lacrosse 



In just their second year playing on a varsity level, Jan Biber's women's lacrosse team posted a winning record at 
4-3. 

Senior Roslyn Goldschmidt started the season by scoring all eight goals in a heartbreaking 9-8 overtime loss to 
Rutgers University. From there, she continued her unstoppable scoring spree and, at the season's end, was named to 
AIAW all star squad. 

Alisa Ramierz proved to be a pleasant surprise in goal for the Squaws, consistently coming up with the big stop 
when it was needed most. 




138 




Soccer 



They were billed as the "new In- 
dians" when the season began and 
"new" they were. A new coaching 
staff headed by former professional 
player Phil Santiago, new scarlet 
Adidas uniforms, shiny new blue 
and white Tango soccer balls, a 
new home field (Sprauge) and a 
new low for wins in a season — 
three. 

When the Indians closed out their 
season with a 0-0 tie vs Rutgers 
University (Newark), it brought their 
season record to a disappointing 
3-10-2. 

The absence of a prolific goal 
scorer was the main reason for the 
Tribe's horrendous year. MSC tied 
two games where they scored only one goal, lost four games by a one goal margin, and four others by only two. 

In the New Jersey State College Athletic Conference (NJSCAC). MSC finished in the cellar with an 0-6-1 mark. In fact, the 
Tribe failaed to beat a NJ team this season. Their victories came against NY's Pratt University (3-2), New York University (3-1 ), 
and Pennsylvania's Kings College (5-0). 

A heartbreaking 1 -0 loss in double overtime on opening night at Sprague Field was perhaps the Indians' best game For 1 1 
minutes, the Tribe played their hearts out, never easing off the supposedly more powerful Mercy College team. 

After falling to 1-7, the booters went on a "warm " streak. They beat NYU (3-1), proceeded to rounce Kings (5-0). and tie 
Ramapo College (1-1) in a downpour — three straight games without a defeat. 
The Indians, however, lost three out of their last four games while being shutout twice. 

This season, the Indians averaged a dismal 1 .33 goals per game. Junior Alvaro Tarrago led the team in scoring with seven 
goals and four assists. 

Sweeper Paul Liddy, the team's most valuable player, leaves MSC after four outstanding years of play. The 5 foot 10 inch 
Clark, NJ native will be the most missed of all the graduating players. His coolness under pressure and extraordinary skills 
should have secured him a spot on the New Jersey College Athletic Conference (NJSCAC) all-star team but he was 
unexpalinably overlooked at the season's end. 

Nutley's Jeff Gruelich was the surprise of the year when Santiago moved him from fullback to the front line midway through 
the season vs Kean College. His aggressive play continually kept opposing 
defenses on their toes and goalkeepers on the ground. 

Senior Joe DaRocha set an MSC "record" when he knocked out a Kean 
fonward with one punch, after being hit in the face during the Tribe's 4-0 
setback. It was the quickest "decision " on record at MSC. 

Goalkeeper Mike Tropeano proved that he could still play up to his all-state 
(Roselle Catholic High School) potential after three years on the bench His 
1 .55 goals against average was exceptional considering the pressure he was 
under all season long Sophomore Paul Huegel filled in adequately as the 
Tribe's number two keeper in his first season for MSC. 




139 



Softball 







140 




*> 





141 



Men's 
Swimming 



It's not often that a freshman comes 
along and dominates a collegiate athletic 
team but this happened to be the case in 
1981 as Scott Worswick came to MSC 
and became the star of the men's swim- 
ming team. 

The team's 5-4 record was oversha- 
dowed by Worswick's heroics: most not- 
able of which was an invitation to the Divi- 
sion III swimming and diving cham- 
pionships at Dedar Rapids, Iowa. His 
tenacious backstroke shattered numer- 
ous MSC records. 

The Tribe posted victories over Kean 
College, Ramapo State College, Seton 
Hall University, Stockton State College, 
and the New Jersey Institute of Technolo- 
gy while dropping a heartbreaker 57-56 to 
William Paterson College. 

MSC finished fourth behind Rider College, Mon- 
mouth College, and Glassboro State College in the 
New Jersey College Swimming and Diving Cham- 
pionships to conclude their season. In the cham- 
pionship, Worswick took two third place finishes (100 
and 200 backstroke) and a seventh in the 22 freestyle. 

Cocaptain Steve Dempsey took seventh place 
finishes in both the 100 and 200 breaststroke. Calvin 
Taylor, cocaptain Corey Jewett, Pat Farley, Ken 
Dioguardi, Kevin Pyhel, Jim Schmidt, and Ken Fer- 
nandez also turned in good years for MSC. 





142 



Women's Swimming 




Coach Greg Lockard pulled double duty this 
season as he instructed both the men's and 
women's swimming and diving teams. In his first 
year heading the girl's team, Lackard's Squaws 
posted a 3-7 record. An opening win over Kean 
College. 61-79. and a 97-33 drowning of St. 
Peter's College highlighted MSC's season. A 
69-53 victory over Seton Hall University 
accounted for the Tribe's other win. 

Freshman diver Mickey David was the 
Squaws' most dangerous weapon and has unli- 
mited potential for the future at MSC. Her scond 
place finish in the three meter dive in the state 
championships surprised few people that had 
watched David all year. 

Lisa Clark impressed a lot of people when 
she, too, took a second place finish in the 
states. Her time of 2:44.60 in the 200 breast- 
stroke gave her the place. 

Sue Taylor, Cindy Tandanza. Trish Walling, 
Nancy Graebener, and Maria Nappo helped the 
Squaws to fourth, fifth, and sixth place finished 
in the 200 free relay, the 400 free relay, and the 
200 medley relay respectively. 




143 



Women's Tennis 




A 5-4 victory over Kean College put the women's tennis team over 
the .500 mark for the 1 980 season as the Squaws finished with a 7-6 
record. 

After streaking to a 3-0 record with victories over Fairleigh Dickin- 
son University (6-3), Upsala College (5-4), and Monmouth College 
(5-4), MSC was outclassed in their ensuing three matches. Their 
record sank to 3-3 as West Point smashed them 9-0 followed by 
drubbings at the hands of the University of Bridgeport (6- 1 ) and Seton 
Hall University (7-2). 

From there, it was an up and down season for the Squaws as they 
battled to stay ahead in the wins column. 

Sue Dobosh (8-5), Mary Lynn DeFeo (9-4), and Mary Tuffy (7-6) 
were MSC's singles leaders. 

Dobosh and Tuffy also dominated the doubles action, posting an 
impressive 8-3 mark. 




144 



Men's Tennis 




First year coach Chet Mazula's men's tennis team had an up and down year as they 
closed out their '81 season at 6-10. 

Larry Davidson and Ted Kristek turned in outstanding individual performances for MSC 
as did the doubles team of Randy Stem and Steve Jasko. 

In the New Jersey State College Athletic Conference Championships, Davidson beat 
Trenton State College s Brian Peters 6-4, 3-6, 6-1 and Kristek netted the Lion's Dennis 
Blake 6-3. 6-3 to close out the season. 

Stem and Jasko got past Jersey City State College (6-3, 1-6, 6-3) and Ramapo State 
College (6-3, 6-3) before faltenng in the championship final vs Trenton State College (6-4, 
6-4). 

The Tribe's most impressive victory of the season was an 8-1 rout of Monmouth College 
on their own courls. 



145 



Women's Track 

Under the direction of Coach Miechelle Wil- 
lis and Assistant Coach Jeff Holt, the 1981 
Women's track team had many outstanding 
performances. They competed at Rutgers in 
the New Jersey Association for Intercollegiate 
Athletics for Women (NJAIAW) meet. Picking 
up third place honors were captain Fran Har- 
well in the heptathlon, Laura Frisch in the 400 
meter run, and captain Kim Shelley in the 
discus event. 

Qualifying for the Eastern Association for 
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (EAIAW) 
were Laura Frisch, Fran Hanwell, Mary La 
Duca, and Gaye Noval along with captains 
Pat Salmon and Kim Shelley. The team per- 
formed remarkalby well at the Regionals held 
at Keene College, N.H. Kim Shelley held 
steady and, once again, placed third in the 
discus event. The 800 medley relay team con- 
sisting of Laura Frisch, Fran Harwell, Mary La 
Duca, and Gaye Noval came in sixth. Gaye 
Noval's spectacular timings all season en- 
abled her to qualify for the AIAW Nationals 
held at California State — Hayward. She com- 
peted against over 300 athletes from more 
than 100 colleges from all over the US. 

Completing the Squaw's roster were Sandy 
Cipriani, Janet Hirsch, Cathy Grimshaw, and 
Amy McLaughlin. "Pooch" 



j;;;^;,,^!^''? 






146 



Wrestling 




147 





Continued improvement was the story of the MSC wrestling team 
this season as they cuminated the '80-81 campaign with an impress- 
ive 17th place finish at the Division III Nationals in Cleveland, Ohio. 
There were 92 teams in the field. 

Senior captain John Antosiewicz and junior Rodney Smith re- 
ceived Ail-American honors for the second consecutive year to lead 
the grapplers. For both of them, it was their third trip to the Nationals. 

For Antosiewicz, his sixth ranking was his second in a row and 
highlighted his four years as a member of the team. His All-American 
ranking was well earned as he decisioned number one seed Brick 
Mock of Trenton State College in the 167 poind weight class. Smith, 
an All-American for the past three years, earned a seventh place 
ranking in his weight class of 126 pounds. 

In the NCAA regional tournament, MSC qualified six grapplers — 
Smith (126), Dan DaCunto (142), Dave Drozjak (150), Antosiewicz 
(167), Chuck Bronder (190), and heavyweight Art Sopelsa. 



Wrestling 




148 




Copynghi 1981 

DC Comics Inc. 

Warner Brothers 



149 



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ORGANIZATIONS 





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African Student Organization 




152 



Alpha Kappa PSI 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENTS 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 
RECORDING SECRETARY 
TREASURER 
MASTER OF RITUALS 



Linda Lamonica 

Diane Kerestes 

Ken Hollasch 

Dorothy Pietrucha 

Chrysa Radice 

Dominic Vacarello 

Mano Bochna 



Alpha Kappa Psi is the national, professional business fraternity on campus Unity is developed between students who have 
the common bond of working towards a career in business. Interaction between business students and professional business 
people is provided by this fraternity. Business symposiums, regional conferences, and national conferences are attended by 
the members Extensive participation by Alpha Kappa Psi in school activities is evident Members have been involved in the 
Alumni phone-a-thon. SILC intramural volleyball and Softball leagues, and the volleyball marathon. Events sponsored include 
a banquet, homecoming balloon lift-off for cancer, fundraising drives, and a vanety of social trips. 



153 



Alpha Phi Omega 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENTS 



SECRETARIES 
TREASURER 



Joseph Natoli 

Mike Ruggiero 

John Burns 

Nick Parisi 

Jim Dixton 

Dean De Pice 

Steve Ferguson 



Alpha Phi Omega (APO) is a national service fraternity associated with the 
Boy Scouts of America. They have sponsored a used bookstore, a lost & found, 
a blood drive, the Ugly Professor on Campus contest, and other such events. 
Outstanding services provided by APO for the campus include delivery of the 
Montclarion, the giving of campus tours, and participation in the Alumni phone- 
a-thon. Profits from all events are donated to charitable groups. 




154 



Biology Club 



PRESIDENT 
VICE PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Marie Russo 

Hossam Ahmed 

Sandy Resch 

Diane Lent 




155 



Black Student Cooperative Union 




PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

ADVISOR 



Michael Smith 

Richard Shorter 

Juanita Brown 

Cynthia Etheridge 

Prof. Percy Johnston 



^^\ - ' i. 






The Black Student Cooperative Union's objective is to 
build respect and cooperation between students, faculty, 
and administration on the MSC campus. Another purpose of 
BSCU is to build understanding of all races' histones and 
lifestyles. 

BSCU's activities consist of the drama workshop, cultural 
affaris, academic affaris, strive community, Kitabu commit- 
tee, Montclair State Contemporary Gospel Ensemble, and a 
variety of lectures. 




156 



Council On International And National Affairs 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SERETARY 
TREASURER 



Beth McNeilly 

Barbara Kucinski 

Judy Echevena 

Claire Caffrey 



The Council on International and National Affairs (CINA) is a chartered Class I organization of the SGA. Through the use of 
lectures, discussions, films, seminars, and trips, CINA brings relevant events into focus for the average college student Noted 
speakers who have lectured at MSC this past school year and been sponsored by CINA include Wilson Bryan Key. Birch Bayh, 
Melba Tolliver, and Peter Lance CINA is open to all students and welcomes their input. 



157 



Circle K 



Circle K, currently comprised of twentyone students, is a co-ed service club. This organization performs community 
services for both social and charitable purposes. The 1980-81 events sponsored by Circle K include Special Olympics, 
Blood Bank Drive, Dance-A-Thon, and Texas Cookout. 




PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

HISTORIAN 



Michele Shambelan 

Kim Armengol 

Tracy Gibbons 

Marty Beck 

Sandy Cipriani 



158 



Class I Concerts 




159 



College Life Union Board (Club) 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Joe Sebolao 

David Breslauer 

Diane Rocinski 

John P. Burns 



A Class I organization to which all MSC students belong is College Life Union Board (CLUB). Committees, which all 
students are invited to join, include cinema, lectures, entertainment, and catacombs. Two popular CLUB events are the Winter 
and Spring Balls. CLUB's purpose is to coordinate social, cultural, and educational student programs. 



160 



Computer Science Club 



The Computer Science Club brings together people interested in computers and programming. It provides information 
about the field to the campus community. A trip to Prudential in Roseland, where they were given a tour of the computer 
facilities, was one of the highlights of the year. The Computer Club also sponsored the Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM) Chapter Dinner at which chapters from the northern New Jersey area attended. The unique Computer Dating Party 
provided a novel way for students to meet each other. 



PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

COORDINATOR 



Frank S. Palmieri 

Kevin Mackemull 

Kathy Reilly 

Margaret Harkin 

Jeff Raskin 




161 



Conservation Club 










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162 



Dance Club 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Marsha Riley 

Patty Peilegrin 

Nadine Whiting 

Melissa Giovenco 



Dance Club, a Class II Organization, gives people on campus an opportunity to get involved in dance. The members, dance 
majors, as well as non-majors, sponsor and organize Master Workshops. Professional teachers from the community and New 
York, teach classes in their various specialties, thus providing a wide assortment of techniques Many fund raisers are held to 
pay for the workshops This year bake sales, T-shirt sales and coupon booklets sales were held. An annual trip to New York 
City to see a dance company is the highlight of the club's events. 



163 




164 



Distributive Education Clubs Of America 

(DECA) 

The Distributive Education program at MSC is affiliated with the Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA). This 
program prepares students to either teach or work in distributive occupations such as buying, selling, managing, and 
advertising. 

Fundraising activities run by Montclair State's DECA Club includes raffles, carnation sales, bake sales, and candy 
sales. Particular mention needs to be given to the annual DECA Fashion Show coordinated by the students. 

Each year members from DECA attend the State Conference held in Cherry Hill, NJ. They also participate in the 
national conference which this year was held in Anaheim, CA. 




PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY 

REPORTER 

TREASURER 

HISTORIAN 



Adnenna Eider 

Carol Emering 

Kathy Rung 

Marlene Duskalovitz 

William Ramirez 

Adam Shapiro 

Paul Resnick 



165 



Drop-In Center 




PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

TREASURER 

PERSONAL COORDINATORS 



Ralph Giarrusso 

Pamela Wood 

Diane Bullo-Cooney 

Anania Molina 

Linda Rauh 



The Drop-In Center provides peer counseling, information, and referral ser- 
vices to any student who so desires these benefits. Some activities for the 
1980-81 school year have been an Open House, Planned Parenthood display 
in the Student Center, dorm presentations, and an alternatives to pregnancy 
presentation. Those at the Drop-In center have also contributed to the Health 
Fair, the Rape Seminar, and Freshman Orientation. The Drop-In Center is 
located between the Student Center and the Math/Science Building. It has 24 
hour walk-in service and telephone service. 



166 




167 



Geoscience Club 




168 



Greek Student Union 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Bellos Grigorios 

Sofras Eleflherios 

Fakourelis Nickolaos 

Bellos Tylianos 



A Class II organization, the Greek Student Union attempts to unite the student population by establishing new ties and 
friendships between Greeks, Greek-Americans, and non-Greeks on campus. They teach and promote the Hellenic culture, 
history, and traditions through social and educational activities, both on and off campus. During the 1980-81 academic year, 
GSU participated in a trip to the National Art Gallery in Washington, D.C., a lecture about "Phillip II of Macedonia", and CINA 
film festival, and the International Fellowship of MSC festival. 




170 




Home Economics Association 

Executive Board 



171 



Human Relations Organization 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Judi Paolella 

Cindy Bink 

Joanne Condo 

Cara Myers 



The Human Relations Organization, better known as HRO, is a Class I organization. They endeavor to improve communica- 
tion skills between groups and individuals. Various workshops are sponsored to actively improve communication skills. The 
principal activity is The Laboratory Weekend. It provides an environment which is conducive to learning communication skills. 
Other workshops include Psychodrama, Likwid Theater, and Relax Your Mind. 



172 



Industrial Arts Club 



The Industrial Arts Club offers various activities pertaining to industrial education and technology. This Class II organization 
provides useful cannpus articles such as dorm keytags and guest passes. The highlight of this year's events was the American 
Industrial Arts Association Convention in Pittsburgh, attended by sixteen MSC representatives. 



PRESIDENTS 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Len Litowitz 

Marty Marshal 

David Press 

Mark Teshkoyan 

Dorothy Kurkiel 

Marty Wall 




173 



IOTA Gamma XI 




A social sorority, lota Gamma Xi attempts to bring together 
women at Montclair State College. Moreover, this organization 
helps to increase school and community spirit, lota participates 
in school activities like Spring Day, volleyball marathon, and 
the Alumni phone-a-thon. Each year the sorority sponsors trips 
to Vermont in January, to Florida during spring break, and to 
the Jersey shore during the summer. Finally, lota Gamma Xi 
sponsors a foster child and donates to various charities. 

PRESIDENT Carol Centanni 

VICE-PRESIDENT Chris Ochal 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY Jan 

Christian 
RECORDING SECRETARYConnie Centanni 
TREASURER Laura Benson 

CO-HISTORIANS Edie Duggan 

Cindy Phillippe 




174 



Italian Student Organization 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Nicola D'uva 

Linda Martelli 

Maria Lentino 

Carmelina Romanlello 



The Italian Student Organization was formed in 1969 at Montclair State. Educating students 
about Italian culture and strenghtening ties between MSC students of different etfinic back- 
grounds are the goals of ISO. Special events for the 1 980-8 1 school year were a trip to Little Italy, 
Chnstmas banquet, Festive Italiano, Italian Day, a trip to Atlantic Ctiy, and Spring Dinner Dance. 



175 



Delta Theta PSI 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Suzanne Signer 

Shah Bardo 

Rosemarie Platoff 

Conchita Bellu 



The sorority, Delta Theta Psi, aims at promoting friendship and harmony. This Class III organization boasts being the oldest 
social sorority. Delta Theta Psi, composed of twenty-three girls, has held events such as a wine and cheese party, a potluck 
dinner, a cotillion, and a spring picnic. 



176 



Psychology Club 




177 



Jewish Student Union 



The purpose of the Jewish Student Union is to further the cultural, spiritual, and social ideals of Jewish life in relation 
to the college environment. This Class III organization has conducted many beneficial activities this year. A few of 
these functions include a Chanukah Cocktail Party, student conferences, Israeli dancing, Sukkah Building and 
decorating, and a Passover Model Seder Dinner. 




PRESIDENT 
PROGRAM BOARD 



Steve Elkin 
Felicia Balk 
Lorraine Netko 
Mark Spiro 
Andy Perry 



178 




179 



Kappa Sigma RHO 




180 



Koei-Kan Karate Club 




For those interested in the martial arts, there is a Koei-Kan Karate Club at 
Montclair State College This organization attempts to help members im- 
prove themselves both physically and mentally. The Karate Club success- 
fully competed in the International Koei-Kan Tournament held at Fairleigh 
Dickenson University in Rutherlord Two first place trophies and two 
second place trophies were garnered in this competition. 



PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 



Lee A. Miller 

Amy Rosamilla 

Rodney Baltimore 




181 



Latin American Student Organization 

The Latin American Student Organization, commonly referred to as LASO, is a Class I organization. Their roster shows 
membership of thirty-five students. Bringing Latin culture to Montclair State College is the goal of LASO. 



PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARIES 

TREASURER 



Bolivar Gonzalez 

Barbara Bonilla 

Winnie Lloyd 

Anania Molina 

Sonia Rodriguez 




182 



Middle Eastern Organization 




183 



Montclarion 




The Montclairon is the weekly student newspaper of Montclair State College. It seeks to provide a means of communication 
within the college through a journalistic medium. Another function of this Class I organization is to assist its members in the 
comprehension of journalistic techniques. A noteworthy accomplishment of the Montclarion is that it is a six time winner of the 
Assoicated Collegiate Press' All American Award. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
MANAGING EDITOR 
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 
TREASURER 



Paul Heugel 
Nora De Palma 

Chris Carroll 
Diane Kerestes 



184 



Music And Arts Organization Commission (MAOC) 




The Music and Arts Organization Commission, a Class II organization, strives to instill an awareness of the cultural arts of 
classical music and art through discussions, concerts and informal performances. The group attended concerts in Essex 
County and New York City. One informal performance was a flute recital by president Joan Helwig. 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Joan Helwig 

Laune G. 

Karen 

Norman 



185 




186 



Phi Chi Theta 



Phi Chi Theta is a national business fraternity. Their purpose is to promote women in business and economics. 
Events sponsored by this organization throughout the year are lectures, workshops, and symposiums. All are geared 
to helping women in the business environment. 




PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 

RECORDING SECRETARY 
HISTORIAN 



Agostina Paglialunga 

Dorothy Massaros 

Debra Wallace 

Roberta Weeden 

Kathy Leonard 



187 



Platform Tennis Club 



The Montclair State Platform Tennis Team excelled as the National Collegiate runner up. Falling just one point short of the 
national championship title, held by MSC last year, the team had a twelve month winning streak. A team of substantial caliber, 
our team lost only three matches for a record of 1 6-3 in the past two years. We can expect the team to have a commanding bid 
for next year's championship title. 




188 




Political Science Club 



189 



Riding Club 




The MSC Riding Club is a Class II organization. They sponsor a fourteen member equestrian team whom competes in the 
New Jersey-New York region. On October 26, 1 980 the club held its own horse show in which twenty-six other college teams 
competed. Fundraisers held by this organization are bake sales, stationery sales, and a variety of raffles. 



PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

CAPTAIN 



Virginia Steindl 

Amy Raskin 

Kathy Reilly 

Lori Maviglia 

Joanne Farrell 



190 



Sigma Delta PHI 




Sigma Delta Phi is one of the sororities on the Montclair State campus. The purpose of this sorority is. simply, to improve 
relationships between commuters and residents of the college. This social organization is a participant in various social events 
throughout the year. 



PRESIDENT 


Lisa Corbo 


VICE-PRESIDENT 


Wendy Duda 


SECRETARY 


Lois Nalasco 


TREASURER 


Amy Rosamilia 



191 




192 




The Student Government Association (SGA) serves approximately 12,000 undergraduates and has accumulated 
nearly one million dollars in assets. Our SGA is unique in that it is the only New Jersey SGA to be student run. A total of 
about seventy students are appointed or elected to represent each department and school on campus. 

SGA's main responsibilities entail approving appointments made by the President, submitting and discussing 
legislative bills, reviewing charters, reviewing and appropriating budgets, and, most importantly, protecting the 
interest of the student body. 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 
REPRESENTATIVE TO 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



Brian Cige 

Karen Dalton 

Laura Pedalino 

Scott Garrett 

Ken Brown 



193 



student Intramural And Leisure Council (SILC) 




The Student Intramural and Leisure Council (SILC) has the unique distinction of being one of the few student run intramural 
programs in the country. Throughout the year SILC runs leagues for men and women in touch football, soccer, softball, 
bowling, basketball and volleyball. 

For those who don't want to participate in the competitiveness of the various leagues, SLC also runs tournaments in the 
areas of Ping Pong, Billiards, Wrestling and Tennis. 

One of the most important and enjoyable areas of their Intramural Programming is Special Events. This facet of their 
program offers "something for everyone, " including special one day activities and evening trips (to professional sporting 
events including the Yankees, Rangers, Knicks and Cosmos games.) 

The special one-day events are held at noon on various days of the week and include such memorable activities as the 
Water Balloon Toss Puff Basketball Contest, Coin-catching Contest, and all time favorite Munchkin Eating Contest. (Current 
record is 24 in 60 seconds.) Major special events include Spring Day and the 24 hour Volleyball f^arathon. 

Evening activities consist of a roller skating night, an ice skating night, and an evening of Candlelight bowling. There are trips 
to professional sporting events including Yankees, Rangers, Knicks and Cosmos games. Tickets are available in the SLC 
office and free transportation is provided for these special evening events. 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Ann Marie Miskewica 

Mike Ritz 

Lisa Dibiseglie 

Mike Pucciarelli 



SPECIAL EVENTS CHAIRPERSON 



Carol Snow 



194 



Tau Kappa Beta 




Tau Kappa Betas major concern is to better social life at MSC and to reduce student apathy on campus. To 
accomplish their task, this Class II organization has done the following; co-sponsored and participated in a 24 hour 
dance marathon for fvlultiple Scelerosis, participated in the Alumni phone-a-thon. passed out buttons for MSC Spint 
Week, cleaned the wall in front of the Student Center, organized a plant sale for earth day, and participated in a 
volleyball marathon for the American Cancer Society. 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENTS 



SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Rick Messina 

John Ruskan 

Alvaro Tarrago 

Susan Brovarone 

Mary Jo Tort 

Sandy Schlanger 



195 



Turkish Student Association 




The Turkish Student Assoication is a Class II organization with a 1980-81 roster of twenty-three. Activities range from 
lectures by the Turkish U.N. Ambassador to soccer competitions among various ethnic clubs on campus to trips to Turkish 
restaurants. By sponsoring these activities, the Turkish Student Association allows the college community to observe different 
aspects of the culture, history, and life of Turks. 



PRESIDENT 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

SECRETARY 

TREASURER 

ADVISOR 



Susan Aybaz 

Mehmet Cecen 

Sevgi Kaya 

Maria J. Perez 

Dr. S. Sisik-Leveen 



196 



Weekend College Student Association 







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The Weekend College Student Association's main purpose is to organize 
activities such as The Annual Latin-American Dance Festival", trips to Hispa- 
nic plays, and much more. 



PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
SECRETARY 
CORR. SECRETARY 
TREASURER 



Franz E. Buchhalter 
Carlos Manrique 
Ana Elsie Baires 
Angela Restrepo 
Victor Niedbalski 



p 




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■■ 'i 



197 



WMSC 90.3 FM 




Operating on a frequency of 90.3 FM in stereo is Mont- 
clair State's own radio station, WfVlSC. Tfiis student-run 
radio station services the campus and Northern New 
Jersey. WMSC's objectives include training students in the 
field of radio broadcasting and being a medium of public 
relations between the campus and surronding areas. The 
station specializes in music, entertainment, educational 
news and features. 



V.., I 




{dOj 



198 



Inter-Sorority Council 



One of the Class III Organizations at MSC is the Inter-Soronty Council. Coordination of the four MSC social 
sororities is a primary function of the council. The main event of the year is a formal dinner dance during which each 
sorority presents its new sisters. 

PRESIDENT Valerie Perugini 

VICE-PRESIDENT Laura Benson 

SECRETARY Luann Villano 

TREASURER Shan Bardo 

ADVISOR Beth Sharp-Webber 







P ayers 




Players is a Class 1 


organization of the SGA 


Bringing theatrical events to the students on campus is the mam 


purpose of Players Th 


s is accomplished through plays, workshops, and Forensics. Three plays are 


produced each 


year This year's plays 


were "A View From the Bridge". "Shenandoah!", and "Heaven Can Wait" 


All were totally 


student produced and designed. 






The Forenslcs team 


is currently number one in the state of New Jersey. Moreover, it is number f 


ve on the Great 


Eastern Circuit. 










PRESIDENT 


Leo Hudzik 






VICE-PRESIDENT Troy Eric West 






SECRETARY 


Mary Ellen Argentieri 






TREASURER 


Dennis Bnto 






HISTORIAN 


Larry Vanella 






FORENSIC CHAIRPERSON Jeffrey Weiser 





199 





Sigma 


Phi Mu 




Sigma 


Phi Mu, a math club and Class II organization, provides a forum for the exchange of ideas relevant to those 


who have a sincere interest in mathematics. Sigma Phi 


My also serves as a link betw/een students and faculty. 


Among 


some of the events sponsored by this math club are related films, guest lectures 


bake sales, and socials. 




PRESIDENT 


Silvana Serafini 






VICE-PRESIDENT 


Cathy Bumbaco 






SECRETARY 


Diane Forgione 






TREASURER 


Janet Griffiths 






ADVISORS 


Dr. Kenneth Wolff 
Prof. Thomas Carrol 





Zeta Phi Beta 



Zeta Phi Beta sorority is a member of Xi lota chapter. This is a Class IV organization of the SGA. The purpose of this 
f\/ISC sorority is to stress education, service, sisterly love, and finer womanhood among all. Activities include 
elementary tutoring. International Foreign Students Dinner, "Finer Womanhood Day Luncheon", fundraising for the 
Atlanta children's cause, and a splash pool party. 

PRESIDENT Karen Wood 

VICE-PRESIDENT Monique Johnson 

SECRETARY Cynthia Kojas 

TREASURER Lynne Henderson 



200 




IT mi Iff 





201 



202 




S 




\ 





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SENIORS 





Phyllis Abbatiello 
Chemistry 



Nancy Jean Adamczyk 
Business Management 



Abebaye Abegaz 
Chemistry 



Caryn Fran Abel 
Recreation Professions 



Karen Elaine Abercrombie 
Fine Arls 



Donna L. Ackerman 
Communication Sciences 




Tracey llene Adams 
Community Health 



Babatunde A, Adedeji 
Biology 



Gerardine Antionette Aerts 
Nutrition 



Fredrick Jerome Agle 
General Business 




204 




Wannes Agopian 
French and Italian 



Stanley Alcala 
Business Administration 



Kevin Lee Allen 
Speech and Theater 



Pura M A^uilera 
Distributive Education 



Joann C. Ahart 
Business Administration 



Andrew Aiello 
Music Education 



Helen Jean Albano 

Accounting 




Timothy H. Alessi 
Accounting 



Frank Allano 
Business Administration 



Philip John Alfien 
Business Administration 



■.; i 

Susan Alfien 
Psychology 




Richard William Allen 
Environmental Studies 



Susan Alli 
Accounting 



Lori Jean Altiero 
Marketing 



Beatriz Alvarado 
Business Administration 




Jorge E Alvarado 
Business Administration 



Maria D Alves Nneka F Amaechina Stephanie Mane Amato 

Spanish and English Envlronmenlal Management Business Adminislralian 



Patncia L Amendola 
Community Health 



205 




Paul A. Amoroso 
Physics 



David R^ Anderson 
Broadcasting, Poli. Sci. 



Lisa G. Andolina 
Sociology 



David Andrews 
Marketing/Mgmt 



Julia M. Andrews 




Joseph G. Angiolini 
Business Administration 



Arthur M. Antonucci 
Accounting 



John Peter Antosiewicz 
Marketing 



Gary R. Anzovino 
Marketing 



Gerard A. Appall 
History 




Mehrdokht Ardebili 
Finance 



Vincent F. Arfuso 
Marketing/Mgmt 





Lawrence Arillo 
English 



Eileen Susan Arnold 
Music Education 



206 




David James Arthurs 
Industrial Arts 



James Arthurs 
Business Administration 



Susan E- Artmann 
Accounting 





Julie Ann Ascenzo 
Communication Sciences 



Mary Diane Askins 
Psychology 



Camille A. Astalos 
Home Economics 




Kathleen R Auriemma 
English 



Maria A Aviles 
Sociology 



Shelley A Avola 
Psychology 



Susan H Aybaz 
Biology 



Stephen Charles Babbitt 
English 



207 




Cynthia Marie Bacon 
Food and Nutrition 



Angel Baghdassarian 
Accounting 



Walter F, Baginsky 
Chemistry 



Bonnie Lynn Bahr 
Political Science 



Deanna H. Baron 
Environmental Studies 



Jean Barracato 
Business Administration 



Dena L. Barry 
Psychology 



Debra R Barter 
Psychology 



Catherine R. Bataille 
Psychology 



Elaine H. Bator 
Mathematics 



Margaret P. Baver 
Business Administration 



Cindy J. Bauman 
Chemistry 



Steven Timothy Bauman 
Business Administration 



Keith T. Becker 
Finance 



Beth Ann Beer 
Nutrition 



Mark S, Behnke 
Psychology 



Rodney Stephan Baltimore 
Speech and Theater 




Elizabeth Ann Barth 
Business Administration 




Susan Marie Bauman 
English 




Patricia M. Beici 
Allied Health 



208 





Mary Ann Bellina 
OHice Syslems Admin 



Marianne Elizabeth Betlizzi 
Sociology 



Ernestine Bembry 
Home Economics 




^^^M 



Petrona Olga Bello 
Spanish 



Grigonos K Bellos 
Computer Science 



Stylianos K Bellos 
Economics 




Esther D Benard 
Fine Arts 



Chery Renee Bender 
Biology 



Beverly Lemonne Benjamin 
Home Economics 



Jane Benneltson 
Marketing 



209 




Laura Marie Benson 
Political Science 



Nancy Ann Benson 
Home Economics 



Carol Olivia Bentinck Mark Salvatore Bentivegna Joseph Stephen Bergen, Jr. 

Business Administration Accounting Accounting 




Karen E, Bergmann 
Home Economics 



Helen J. Bernadino Steven B. Beubis 

Office Systems Administration Business Administration 



Vilma Hortensia Beverly 
Business Administration 



Robert M. Beyer 
Accounting 




210 




Beth Ann Biglin 
Fine Arts 



George P. BIglin 
Business Administration 



Thomas C Biglin 
Business Administration 



Anneiiese Binger 
Office Systems Admin 



John Anthony Binko 
Management 




Suzanne L Biondi 
Therapeutic Recreation 



Kathleen M, Bisselt 
Computer Science 



Elizabeth A, Black 
Environmental Science 



Janice Paula Black 
Therapeutic Recreation 



John J Black 
Psychology 




Halhi Ellen Blackman 
Anthropology 



Debra Ann Blades 

Family Child Studies 



EllenJane Blanck 
Physical Education 



Beth A. Block 
Political Science 



Cheryl A Blondina 
Business Administration 




Robert John Bloodgood 
Poiilical Science 



Oebra S BluoniliuliJ 
Food and Nutrilion 



Dennis Bloshuk 
English 



Kathleen M Bolan 
Home Economics 



Linda Anne Soman 
French 



211 




Hubert M. Bond 
Communication and Theory 



Janet A. Bongiorno 
English 



Deborah Denise Boone 
Business Administration 



Paula A Boone 
Political Science 



Tracy D. Boorman 
Poll. Sci./History 




Perry Alan Borch 
Marketing 



Walter F. Bordonaro 
Business Administration 



Joseph F. Borges 
Political Science 



Donald Vincent Borkowski 
Physical Education 



Maria Borrelli 
Business Administration 




Sossi Boyadjian Jeffrey John Boyajian 

Business Administration Business Administration 





Anne Marie Boyle 
Recreation Professions 



Angela M. Brand 
Spanish 




212 




Inez Lynne Brandon 
Community Health 



Diane J Bristol 
Accounting 



Richard C hn.iuK', 
Business Administration 



Kevin P, Breen 
Biology 



Jill C Breslin 
Nutrition 





Susan L. Brodow 
Sociology 



Dorothy K. Bronstein 
Home Economics 




Kathleen C Brophy 
Food and Nutrition 



Susan M Brovarone 
Home Economics 



Gloria Ann Brown 
Psychology 



James A Brown 
Accounting 




Jonathan McConnell Brown 
Recreation 



Kenneth M Brown 
English Poll, Scl. 



David Michael Browne 
Physical Ed Health 



Michael J Brownell 
Industrial Arts 



Linda Jean Bruno 
Psychology 



213 




uJil 




Fred Augustine Brusco 
Philosophy-Religion 



Rubina Bubani 
Spanish 



Robert A Buccino 
Physical Education 



Mark Francis Buckley 
Mathematics 



Donald James Budd 
Recreation 



Christopher John Budesa 
Biology 



Catherine A. Bumbaco 
Math/Computer Science 



Laura Jean Bunin 
Allied Health 



Gerald T. Buonocore 
Biology 



Julie Ann Buras 
Music Therapy 



Diane M. Burghardt 
Community Health 



Anne Marie Burke 
Home Economics 



William C. Burke 
Accounting 



Robert M. Burner 
Environmental Studies 



Sylvia Ada Burts 
Office Systems Admin. 



Wayne Calvin Bushell 
Geo Science 



Thomas R. Buckley 
Business Administration 




Lora A. Buono 
Marketing 




Lucia H. Burke 
Spanish 




Dianne N. Byrnes 
Accounting 



214 





Dennis William Byron 
Physical Education 



Laura Mane Byrouty 
Home Economics 



Wilson R Babilonia 
Marketing 



Francesca Cacciaguerra 



Tom R Caden 




Toni-Lynne Calabrese 
Home Economics 



Robert Joseph Calaman 
Chemistry 



Jody Calamilo 
Fine Arts 



Spanish 


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Barbara Ann Caloca 
Accounting 


Kevin William Callaghan 
Music Education 




215 




Gerald Joseph Campbell 
Geography/Urban Studies 



Michael P. Campbell 
Physical Education 



Robert F Campo 
Accounting 



Arturo Canales 
Economics 



Mary G. Cancellieri 
Communication Sciences 




Albert J. Candelmo 
Accounting 



Donna Ann Cangelosi 
Distributive Education 



Martin James Cannon 
Marketing 



Cynthia E. Canova 
Family/Child Studies 



Debra E. Cantor 
Communication Sciences 




216 




1^ 1^ 



Carol-Lynn Capizzi 
Business Administration 



Ronald W. Capko Michelle Elaine Caporelli 

Business Administration Family Child Studies 



Marianne Cappuccio 
Physical Education 



V. James Cartx) 
Commu" 'Sciences 




Beth S Carbone 
Business Administration 



Sharon A. Carey 
Fine Arts 



Joanmarie Carlone 
Communication Sciences 



Laura Ann Carnazza 
Marketing 



Jeffrey M. Carollo 
Business Administration 




Maryann Caromil 
Mathematics 



Michelle C Carpenter 
English 



Lisa Louise Carrier Kathleen M Carroll 

Communication Sciences Business Administration 



Thomas C Canjccio 
Accounting 




Ellen Cassanno 
Business Education 



Mary M Cassulis 
Communication Sciences 



Louis Anthony Caslaldo 
Business Administration 



Francisca M Castillo 
Business Administration 



Lynne Diane Calrambone 
Fine Arts 



217 




Nancy E. Cattle 
Business Administration 



Patricia Jean Cavallaro 
Business Education 



Mehmet Cecen 
Computer Science 



Anthony Celeste 
Business Administration 



Carol Ann Centanni 
Accounting 




Ernest Christopher Cerino 
Political Science 


Michael Robert Chadzivtko 
Business Administration 




91 


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William Ronald Chaky 
Industrial Arts 



Nancy Irene Chambers 
Industrial Arts 



Barbara P. Chang 
Computer Science 



Joan Mane Channell 
Business Administration 


Elaine Catherine Chelak 
Speech and Theater 


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Physical Education 



Elaine M. Cherekjian 
Computer Science 



218 




Kathy T. Chiaramonte 
Business Administration 



Anthony Joseph Chairo 
Business Management 



Kathryn L Chisholm 
English 




Philip W, Chrashewsky, Jr 
Physical Education 



Dorothy T Chnstman 
English 



Sharon Marie Chura 
Biology 





Steven A Ciesia 
Business Administration 



Teresa R Ciezobka 
Communication Sciences 



Brian Mitchell Cigc 
Political Science 



John Charles Cioffi 
Mathematics 



Celeste G Clark 
Business Administration 




Jill Renee Clark 
Business Administration 



Lisa Mane Clark 
Consumer Affairs 



Scolt T Clark 
Broadcasting 



Kevin Brent Clause 
Marketing 



Maureen Anne Clavin 
Consumer Affairs 



219 




Bab G. Clifford 
Industrial Education 



Ellen M. CodlspotI 
Home Economics 



J. Bricin Coffey 
Speecfi and Theater 



Michele R. Cohien 
Family/Child Studies 



Susan Marie Colazzo 
Communication Sciences 



Rose Colella 
Business Administration 



William CollettI 
Computer Science 



Maria V. Coman 
Home Economics 



Barbara Ellen Conry 
Business Administration 



Lorraine A. Conte 
Fine Arts 



Heidi A. Conti 
Business Administration 



Debbie Lynn Cook 
Business Administration 



Molly F. Cornell 
German 



Cheryl Ann CorradettI 
Foods and Nutrition 



Patricia Correa 



Alison Mary Corry 
Sociology 



Wendy S. Cohen 
Anthropology 




Maryallce Condon 
Mathematics 




Paul W Cooper 
Music Therapy 




Catherine Corsano 
Psychology 



220 




T ^ 



-53 




Cynihia Diane Corsen 
Psychology 



Richard E Costa 
Accounting 



Hoben Edward Cosia 
Business Administration 



William J Cote 
Marketing 



Paula Cotlingham 
Fine Arts 




Annette Marie Coward 
Music Education 



Patrick E Cox 
Accounting 



Sabina Hose Coyle 
General Humanities 



Elizabeth C Crann 
English 



Kevin Joseph Crosby 
Business Administration 



221 




Maureen Crost 
Fine Arts 



Barbara A. Cruitt 
Home Economics 



Sandra Cruz 
Office Systems Admin. 



William J. Cubellis, Jr. 
Industrial Education 



Gregory A. Cugliari 
Business Administration 




Cyntfiia Anne Cullari 
Home Economics 



Kathileen J. Cuneo 
Physics 



Carol Ann Cunningham 
Home Economics 



Georgianna Gloria Cuntala Thomas A. Cupo 

History Marinating 




222 




Cheryl Lynn Cushine 
Music Therapy 



Dianne P Czarkowski 
Home Economics 



Lynn D Dadika 
Psychology 



Christina Lynn Dages 
Business Administration 



Karen L. Dalton 
Anthropology 




Mane E Daly 
Home Economics 



Michael Stephen Daly 
History 



Patrice E Daly Lydia Dorothy Damato Rayanne Mutek Damlano 

Accounting Recreation English 




Maria P Daniele 
Languages 



Brett N Daniels 
Business Administration 



Donna M Dann 
Business Education 



Diane Lynn D Apolilo 
Psychology 



Lisa Anne D'Arpa 
Business Administration 




David M Davenport 
Accounting 



Michael Francis Davino 
English 



Edward F Davis 
Marketing Mgmt 



Chnslina M Davitt 
Recreation 



Gillian Rosamond Day 
English Education 



223 




Gita Dayal 
Food and Nutrition 



Rosalia DeAngelis 
French/Italian 



Robert R. Dearing 
Industrial Education 



Diane Debellis 
Business Administration 



Charles Anthony Dec 
Economics/Poli. Sci. 




Eleanor DeCandia 
Psychology 



Julianne M. DeFaIco 
Business Administration 



Nii^holas Deilora 
Business Administration 



Thomas B. Degraw, Jr. 
Business Administration 




Cheryl L. Delancey 
Communication Sciences 



Ralph Matthew DeLibero 
Physical Education 




Audrey Diane Deile 
History 




Laurie DeLillo 
Business Administration 



Gilda Delmonte 
Sociology 



224 




Patricia Jule Delplato 
Home Economics 



Kathryn I, DeLuca 
Speech and Theater 



Ivette DelRio 
Spanish 



Charles J. DeLuca 
Physical Ed. Health 





Claire M, Del Vecchio 
Accounting 



Douglas Joseph DeMarco 
Industrial Education 




Carolann Mane DeMarlino 
Home Economics 



Gen DeMayo 
Music Education 



Rosemary M Deming 
Home Economics 



Michael P Demkowicz 
Chemistry 



Lawrence S Dempsey 
Recreation 




Mary DeMuro 
Business Education 



Diane Demyanovich 
Business Administration 



Kathleen Ann Dengel 
Psychology 



Irving L Dennis 
Accounting 



Michael DePalma 
Marketing 



225 




Steven T. DePalma 
Business Administration 



Ivana DePasqua 
Marketing 



Ann DeRosa 
Management 



Mary A. DeStefano 
Business Administration 



Robert Louis Diana David Joseph DiCarlo Laura Lynn DiCioccio 

Business Administration Engiisti/Speech and Theater Finance 



Edward Adonis Dickerson 
Industrial Studies 



Donna Lynn DiCostanza 
Business Administration 



Denise A. DiGiovanni 
Sociology 



Karen Mary DiLorenzo 
Home Economics 



Sharon M. DiSalvo 
Food Service Mgmt. 



Thomas E. Diveny 
Recreation Professions 



Anne M. Diverio 
Home Economics 



fiichdid M Diiihy 
Marketing, Mgmt. 



Nancy S. Dobak 
Psychology 



Thomas William Devine 
Physical Education 




Val S. Dickerson 
Recreation 




Michael Discafani 
Accounting 




Nick Dobrowolski 
Economics 



226 





Eileen M Do'> 
Home Economics 



Joan Ellen Donnelly 
Biology 



Anionia Dolcimascolo 
Home Economics 



Dan Dolinsky 
Physical Education 



Edvie Marie Dollbaum 
Communicalion Sciences 



Magdalena Dominguez 
Economics 




David Scoll Donlen 
Accounling 



Lisa N Don/ulla 
Accounling 



Joseph C Dold 
Industrial Technology 



James Allen Dougherty 
Chemistry 



227 




Janet A. Dougherty 
Office Systems Admin 



Joanne B. Dougherty 
Office Systems Admin. 



Eileen A. Dowling 
Accounting 



Carol Anne Doyle 
Computer Science 




Max C. Dreisbach 
Accounting 



Sarah Suzanne Drumm Dawn A. Duca 

Physical Education Food Service Management 




Wendy Elise Duda 
Speech and Theater 



Michael George Duderich 
Accounting 



Kenneth William Duff 
Speech and Theater 




228 




Jo-Anne Duffy 
Marketing 



Patricia Anne Danatos 
Home Economics 



Rose L. Salomon DuFresne 
Community Health 



Maureen Dulski 
English 



Patricia Durkin 
Broadcasting 



Glenn Richard Durocher 
Fine Arts 



Nicola R D Uva John Michael Dworak Glenn Stephen Dwyer Glenn Dyke Michael Dziedzic 

Marketing Mgmi Math Computer Science Distributive Education Business Management Business Management 




Luz M Echavarria 
Spanish 



Jorge E Echevarria 

Business Administration 



John Charles Edgar 
Political Science 



Ann L Egan 
Therapeutic Recreation 




Christopher George Egan Steven J Eisenstein 

Business Administration History 



James W Elder 
Business Admimslralion 



Mariechen J Elia 
Distributive Education 



Steven Elkin 
Business Administration 



229 




H. Scott Ellis 
Accounting 



Paul John Endler 
Economics 



Kenneth William Elwood Michele Ann Emberger 

Political Science Home Economics 



Anthony V. Emering Eugene Joseph Emering 

Business Administration Business Administration 




John Salvatore Ettore 
Finance 



Paul M. Esposito 
Sociology 



Philip A. Esposito Mary Elizabeth Esskuchen Jannett G. Estrella 

Business Administration Office Systems Admin. Business Administration 




David John Eula 
Psychology 





Nancy C. Fader 
Home Economics 



Cynthia R. Fadil 
Business Administration 



230 




Robert George Fairchild 
Psychology 



Lars Erik Fallman 
Geoscience 



Giselle Falcon 
History 



Judith A. Faley 
Industrial Education 





Susan Frances Faschan 
Accounting 



Kenneth Gerard Fass 
Business Administration 




Theresa Mary Favo 
Business Administration 



Allan Edward Fegely 
Industrial Art 



Edwin Feliciano 
Marketing 



Gisela Felipe 
Psychology 



Kelly A Fenior- 
Business Education 




Anthony Peter Feola 
Political Science 



Herenia Ferreiro 
Sociology 



Hocco Ferrigno 
Biology 



Carolyn Fersch 
Home Economics 



John M Fesia 
Allied Health 



231 




Paul Joseph Fierro 
Marketing 



Chris J. Filbert 
Mathematics 



Susan F. Fiiippone 
Home Economics 



Dion C. Finch 
Business Administration 



Raymond Robert Finnegan 
Marketing 




Scott H, Fischer 
Business Administration 



Barbara A. Fisher 
Foods and Nutrition 



Patricia E, Fitzgerald 
Business Education 



Carol A. Fitzmaurice 
English 



Patricia Lynn Fixter 
Physical Education 




Sue-Ellen Flaxman 
English 



Irene Lynn Fleitell 
Home Economics 



Marlene P. Flynn 
Physical Education 



Nancy Ann Foczmanski 
Marketing Mgmt 



Richard C. Fogarty 
Physical Education 




Carlos Fojo-Prieto 
Management 



Joan Marie Foley 
Business Administration 



Doris Ann Folkes 
Home Economics 



Frances Fontana 
Home Economics 



Margaret Forbes 
Sociology 



232 





Auguslin Formoso 
Accounting 



Margaret Kalherine Forrer 
Business Administration 



Shelly H Foxman 
Home Economics 



Rafael J Fiaquela 
History 



Jean Ann Franco 
An Education 




Christina Franko 
Home Economics 



Janlne Renae Fraser 
French 



Miguel A Frias 
Business Adminislralion 



Linda S Friedland 
Business Administration 



Joseph W Frilch 
Induslnal Studies 



233 




Katharine Lee Fuellhart 
Office Systems Admin. 



Rebecca Ann Fuellhart 
Communication Sciences 



Diane Milo Fuhrmann 
Fine Arts 



Ellen L. Fulton 
Marketing/Mgmt 



Robert B. Gabriele 
Accounting 




Mona Gadallah 
Marketing/Finance 



Kim Gaddis 
Business Administration 



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Vivian Gahtan 
Psychology 




Diane Gairala 
Business Administration 



Aileen Mary Galianese 
Business Administration 




234 




Richard P Gallagher. Jr 
History Economics 



Mark Gannon 
Accounting 



Dorothy Garfinkel 
Speech and Theater 



Teresa E. Gatto 
English 



Ted W Gallagher 
Spanish 



Jane M. Gallina 
French 



Kathleen M Galvin 
Communication Sciences 



Angela Garcia 
Communication Sciences 



Donna M Garcia 
Psychology 



John F Garda 
Allied Health 



Lou Ann Gambino 
French 




Lisa J Gardner 
LIrban Studies 




Ernest Scott Garrett 
Political Science 



Barbara J Gasior 
Psychology 



James W Gaspanni 
Business Administration 



Carol A Gasparovic 
Business Administration 




Debra L Geddle 
Home Economics 



Ann Mane Gentile 
English 



Nick J Georges 
Computer Science 



Donna L Gerard 
History 



235 




Mildred P. Gerhard 
Psychology 



Donald M. Gibson 
Chemistry 



Joan Marie Glasser 
Political Science 



June Ellen Geyer 
English 



Gale Giacalone 
Communication Sciences 



Karen Ann Giacobbe 
Recreation Professions 



Nicola G. Giancaspro 
Computer Science 




Nancy J. Gildred 
Office Systems Admin. 



Kathleen Gillen 
Political Science 



Robert Gilsenan 
Psychology 



John W. Ginste 
Accounting 




Hugh J. Gleason 
Geoscience 





ouban F. Glini^a 
Biology 



Susan E. Gockeler 
Business Administration 



236 




Steven Godine 
Business Administration 



Claire Golden 
Psychology 



Rosalyn Goldschmidt 
Recreation 





Eric Goldstein 
Business Administration 



Mindy Goldstein 
English 



Nancy C. Goldstein 
Dance 




Frederick F Golz 
Health Education 



Agnes Gomezmaicas 
Physical Education 



Marianne Gomulinsky 
Recreation 



Isabel M Goncalves 
Business Administration 



Carol L u . i • . 
Business Adminislrdtion 




Eneida Gonzalez 
Business Education 



Esperanza Gonzalez 
Finance 



lleana O Gonzalez 
Sociology 



Mercedes M Gonzalez 
Psychology 



George A Gordon 
Induslnal Education 



237 




Ian Keith Gordon 
Accounting 



Lorraine C. Gracie 
English 



Jeanne M. Grady 
French 



Ann Marie Greto 
Art Education 



Kathleen A. Griffin 
Home Economics 




Janet E. Griffiths 
Mathematics 



James J. Grimaldi 
Industrial Education 



Robert D. Grimaldi 
Accounting 



Kathy Ann Grimm 
Business Administration 



Donald D. Gross 
Industrial Technology 




John F. Gross 
Accounting 



Robert A. Grudzinski 
Accounting 



Glenn L. Grusinski 
Management 



Alma Guadalupe 
Home Economics 



Lisa J. Guglielmi 
Business Administration 




Geraldine C. Gunn Antonio Guzman 

Business Administration Business Administration 



Maria E. Guzman 
Personal Services 



Sharon B. Haas 
Physical Education 



Charles A. Haeberle 
Business Administration 



238 





Christine J Haerens 
Accounting 



Diedenck W Haerens 
Marketing 



Linda Susan Hahn 
Mathematics 



Patricia Hahner 
Home Economics 



Elizabeth M Hale 
Computer Science 




Velma J Haley 
English 



Thomas G Hallock 
Business Administration 



Carol A Hamilton 
Business Administration 



Arthur E Hamm 
Business Administration 



Wendi Beth Hammer 
Spanish 



239 




Virginia M. Hanley 
Sociology 



William Harkley 
Industrial Arts 



Anna May Hansen 
Biology 



George L. Hansen 
Physical Education 



Edward Happle 
Political Science 



James J. Harold 
Marketing 



Phyllis Carol Harris 
Distributive Education 



Susan Lynne Harris 
Computer Science 



Margaret Harkin 
Mathematics 




Patricia E. Hart 
Marketing 




240 




Dennis Hartigan, Jr. Thomas A Hartmann 

Business Adnninistratlon Business Administration 



Barbara S Hausman 
Office Systems Admin. 



Naedlne J Hazell 
English 



Peter J Healy 
Business Administration 




Jeriiynn A i-ieigi Nancy E. Heinrichs 

Business Administration Office Systems Admin 



Jennifer L. Helm 
Recreation Professions 



Joan Elizabeth Helwig 
Spanish 



John Patnck Henry 
Industrial Arts 




Sherri A Herborn 
Office Systems Admin 



Carol F Herkert 
Business Admin 



James L Hernandez 
Business Administration 



Joe Hernandez 
Marketing 



Joseph Ht 
Markeiing 




Josephine F Hernandez 
Accounting 



Donna P Herold 
Computer Science 



Laura Mane Herting 
Psychology 



Jamos W Hespo 
Biology 



Barbara Hoss 
Speech and Theater 



241 




Marion Hillmann 
Business Administration 



Arthur Mines 
General Humanities 



Luann Hladil< 
Psychology 



Jane K. Homey 
English 



Sharon A. Homiek 
Business Administration 




John T. Hooey 
History 



Randy Gene Hoogerheyde 
Accounting 





Julie C. Hopler 
Home Economics 



Kim T. Horn 
Business Administration 



242 




Antoinette Hrotko 
Business Administration 


Mary Jean Huertner 
Accounting 


William P Huff 
Business Administration 


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Wendy L. Hull 
History 



Kathy Hunt 
Communication Sciences 



Sonja Husby 
Accounting 



Carol A Huston 
Home Economics 



K.Ki'ii hill, hc'son 
Home Economics 



Kathleen M Hyland 
Computer Science 





Lisa Ann lacovelli 
Speech and Theater 



Karen A lacullo 
Accounting 




Cynthia A ladanza 
Recreation 



Joanne landiono 
Fine Arts 



Gary landoli 
Accounting 



Geraldine V lannini 
Home Economics 



Patricia S Ibarra 
Accounting 



243 




Keith T. Ignance 
Marketing 



MaryLou llgandi 
English 



Carolann M. Imm 
Computer Science 



Michael F. Imparato 
Accounting 



Mary Jo lorlano 
Psychology 



Mark D. Irwin 
Political Science 



Allison J. Isaac 
Marketing 



Naomi E. Isakson 
Distributive Education 



Ronald P. Jackey 
Business Administration 



Dolores Jackson 
Home Economics 



Rhonda L. Jackson 
Home Economics 



Jill A. Jacobi 
History 



Robert J, Jacques 
Psychology 



Diane A. Jahsen 
Computer Science 



Evelyn Jakubovitz 
Business Administration 



Cynthia A. Jancz 
Physical Education 



Okon E. Inyang 
Industrial Technology 




Gary J. Ivankevich 
Biology 




Susan F. Jacobs 
Fine Arts 




Joanne Janiak 
Home Economics 



244 





Mindy I Jaslove 
General Humanities 



Janet Johansen 
Home Economics 



Donna L Jencsik 
Home Economics 



Don Jervis 
Management 



Teresa M. Jesionka 
Accounting 



Maria A John 
Communication Sciences 



Deborah J Johnson 
English 



Elizatjelh A Johnson 
Communication Sciences 



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Jane Johnson 
Business Administration 



245 




Jeffrey L. Johnson 
Business Administration 



Karen L. Johnson 
Business Administration 



Kathleen Ann Johnson 
Business Administration 



Monique C. Johnson 
Business Administration 



Thomas F. Johnson 
Physical Education 




Dennis E. Johnston 
Business Administration 



K/lary E. Johnston 
Recreation 



Janel J. Jones 
Spanish 



Hans E Josephsen IV 
Psychology 



Therese M. Junta 
f^^athematics 




246 




Mary Ellen Juzefyk 
Business Administration 



Joan L. Katlun 
Psychology 



Martha S Kelly 
Physical Education 



Gerard K. Kalajlan 
Geography 



San L Kalomeer 
Home Economics 



James J Kane 
Psychology 



Susan M. Kapalln 
Home Economics 




William K. Kaufman 
English 



Kathleen Kays 
English 



Ellen A, Kazalski 
Accounting 



Dwayne O Kearney 
Office Systems Admin. 




Patricia E Kenney 
Chemistry 



James F Kenny 
Industrial Arts 



Teresa M. Kerr 

Philosophy 



Mary A Kerngan 
Communication Sciences 




Julius M Kioko 
Computer Sciences 



Mary f Kr.r.lica 
Art I (Ini .ilion 



1- III Kish 

Busii ' -^ : • inistration 



Barbara A Kiss 
Physical Education 



Uenise Kissane 
Business Education 



247 




Karen Klemm 
Home Economics 



Leona L. Kohn 
Psychology 



Frances Kllkier 
Business Education 



Linda M. Klim 
Communication Sciences 



Ronald P. Klimik 
Religion/Philosophy 



Deborah A. Kline 
Sociology 




Karlene Knaub 
Political Science 


Cheryl A. Knig 
English 


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French 



Kathy A. Kocinksy 
Biology 



Gigi C. Kohl 
Distributive Education 



Robin D. Koller 
Allied Health 





Sharon E. Koon 
Business Administration 



Janine Korsakoff 
Chemistry 



248 




Karen Koruda 
Home Economics 



Gary G. Koseyan 
Political Science 



Stephanie E. Kostyk 
Psychology 




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Patricia A Kraak 



Business Administration Office Systems Admin 



Adrianne M Kramer 
Home Economics 




David M Krchmar 
Business Administriitinn 



David H Kreismer 
Industrial Studies 



Tove Brock Krislottersen 
Physical Education 



John P Kruger 
Business Administration 



Dorothy M Krukiel 
Business Administration 




Veronica L Kubicka 
English 



Diane Kuchonbrod 
Accounling 



Barbara E Kucinski 
French 



Karen Kwinlkowski 
Health Education 



M.iuroon Kyle 
MarKeling 



249 




Cheryl L. LaConte 
Accounting 



Maritza Lago 
Psychology 



Loren J. LaGuerre 
Communication Sciences 



Gizella V. Lake 
Music 



Kathleen Lancaster 
Communication Sciences 




Joel E. Landberg 
Linguistics 



Glen S. Landesman 
Biology 



Lena D. Lanfranca 
Recreation 



Denise M Lanza 
Recreation Professions 



Robeert J. Lanza 
Broadcasting 




Timothy J. LaPointe 
Finance 



Susan J. Larkm 
Recreation 



Elizabeth Larkins 
Home Economics 



Lois LaScala 
Marketing 



Dorothy H. Lasek 
Management 




Mary Jo Lasorsa 
Communication Sciences 



Lynn Dawn Laster 
Allied Health 



Thomas Latchford 
Business Administration 



Anna L. Latona 
Recreation 



Julie D. Laub 
Anthropology 



250 





Louis J Lavelle 
English 



Ida M Mollis Lawson 
Home Economics 



Dennis James Lear 
Psychology Sociology 



Belinda J Lee 
Home Economics 



Janice-Lynn Leftelbine 
Math Speech & Theater 



Edward L Leikowilz 
Speech and Theater 



Randi C I .' '•" 
Speech and U.mIii 



Kathleen M Lemtwrger 
Finance 



Donna Lee 
Physical Education 




Aiacely LemusVega 
Business Administration 



251 




Jean B. Lenthe 
English 



Paul M. Lewandowski 
Chemistry 



Madeline Lenzo 
Accounting 



Kathleen M. Leonard 
Business Administration 



Dianne Leonard! 
Home Economics 



JoAnn Leone 
Business Administration 




Silverine R. Lewars 
Home Economics 



Maria I. Lewie 
Political Science 



Sharon M Lewis 
Finance 



Donna M. Leyland 
English/Comm. Sciences 




252 




Paul A, Liddy 
History 



Lori Jane Lieberman 
Home Economics 



Linda M. LiJol 
Business Administration 



Frank L ^ ' 
Bioiogy 



Sharon Link 
Psychology 




Jean M. Linke 
Psychology English 



Monica Lintott 
Psychology English 



Sarah V. Lipani 
History 



Michael Lisbona 
Fine Arts 



Rosann Liva 
Psychology 




Robin S Livingston 
Home Economics 



Deborah A Lizolle 
Fine Arts 



Osvaldo Llanes 
Business Administration 



Glona E Lloyd 
Home Economics 



David S Lowenstein 
Business Administration 




Michael G Long 
Accounting 



Elizabeth A Longo 
Psychology 



Antonio R Lopez 
Political Science 



Beltr.ir i 
Politic,)! •„ 



Denise Lopez 
Chomislry 



253 




August Lorio 
Physical Education 



Helene Ludwig 
Home Economics 



Cloe Lupo 
History 



James T. Loverde 
Health Ed/Biology 



Eugene A. Lowe 
Marketing 



Linda L. Lucarella 
Business Administration 



William J. Ludwig 
English Education 



Patrick J. Lundy 
Business Management 



Stephen Luongo 
Business Administration 




SAUSAGE 
PtPPERONI 
ONION 
PEPPER 



Denise Lynch 
Business Administration 




Theresa E. Ludt 
Recreation 




Ann Marie Lupo 
Home Economics 




Diane Macaluso 
Chemistry 



Paul J, Maccaro 
History 



254 




Theresa Maccia 
Distributive Education 



Marion C. Machucici 
Consumer Affairs 



Laurie A Mackevich 
Sociology 





Anna M Magllacano 
Home Economics 



Therese M Magath 
Nutrition 



Carol A. Mahler 
Nutrition 




Diane M. Makouiy 
Accounting 



Anne S Malmquisl 
Comnnercial Recreation 



Jose J Maldonado 
Sociology 



Stanley S Malecki 
Accounting 



Hugh R Mallack 
Computer Science 



Debra A Malmgren 
Physical Education 




Kevin M Malmud 
Business Administration 



Mark J Maloney 
Business Management 



Paul J Maloney 
History 



Frank Mancmelii 
Fine Ans 



255 




Richard Macinelli 
Political Science 



Barbara A, Mancuso 
Psychology 



Laurie Mandara 
Home Economics 



Karen Maneri 
Biology 



Susan A. Manfre 
Psychology 




JoAnn Mantione 
Psychology 



Carolyn J. Marano 
English 



Linda March 
Home Economics 



Rose Marchionda 
Marketing 



Carol Ruth Marchione 
Psychology/Sociology 




Stephen M. Maret 
History/Psychology 



Anthony A. Marino 
Speech and Theater 



Donna M. Marino 
English 



Jane Ellen Marra 
Community Health 



Linda Martelli 
English 




Christine M. Martin 
English 



Sterling A. Martin 
Business Administration 



Peter Martino 
Art History 



Denise Martone 
French 



Elena M. Martone 
Business Education 



256 











Ann Mane Martucci 
Fine Arts 



Gordon Thomas Marzzacco 
Geography 



Valerie E. Mascia 
Home Economics 



Pamela L Mason 
Psychology 



Dorothy S Massaros 
Business Adminislralpon 




Renee Massey 
Psychology 



Diane Massina 
Foods and Nulrllion 



Miiriii J M.isuc'ci 
Homo Economics 



Anie M MalP 
Biology 



Mary H Malhis 
Economics 



257 




I arsia Matrakas 
Physical Education 



Debra L. Matthews 
Home Economics 



Lorraine Matthews 
Nutrition 



Adalberto L Maurell 
Business Administration 



Shelley B. Maurice 
Business Administration 




Lynn Marie Mauro 
Finance 



Michele Mauro 
Anthropology 



Ann Marie Mawhinney 
Home Economics 



Kathleen Maxwell 
French 



Todd E, May 
Accounting 




258 




Valerie M Mayer 
Commercial Recreation 




Pamela J. Mazer 
Accounting 



Geraldine A. Mazza 
Communication Sciences 



Maria C, Mazzarone 
Psychology 



Paula M. Mazzei 
Accounting 






Cynthia Mazzeo 
Marketing 


Catherine M. McBroom 
Business Administration 


Diane M. McCarty 
Fine Arts 


Andrew P McCormick 
Political Science 


William J McCormick 
Psychology 


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Melinda D McDonald 
Psychology 



Lori Anne McDonough 
Home Economics 



Theresa McDonough 
Home Economics 



James A McElhinney 
Management 



Barbara J. McGraw 
Psychology 




Marlene A McUraw 
Office Systems Admin 



Nancy McGrory 
Business Administration 



Rett)) A McGuigdii 
Accounting 



Maura E McHugh 
Business Administration 



Debra McKeever 
Psychology 



259 




Brian T. McLaughlin 
Office Systems Admin. 



Ellen M. McLaughlin 
English Education 



John M. McLaughlin 
Business Administration 



Laurence C. McNamara 
Geography 



Susan A. McNamara 
Business Administration 




Beth McNeilly Daniel McNeilly 

Communication Sciences Business Administration 



William C. McPherson 
Distributive Education 



Gisele M. McQueeney 
Business Administration 



Kathleen McRell 
Business Administration 




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Kathleen M. Mechan Kevin J. Meehan 

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Business Administration 



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Michael V. Melillo 
Physical Education 



260 




David M Mellone 
Health 



Carlos A Mendoza 
Political Science 



Abraham A Mensah 
Business Administration 






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Recreation Therapy 



Edward R- Merchant 
Industrial Education 



Ellen C Mercuric 
Home Economics 




Beverly L Merritt 
English 



Cynthia D Mersier 

Business Administration 



Mary L Mesce 
Business Education 



Charles R Messina 

Sociology 



Paul V Messina 
Political Science 




Richard J Messina 
English 



Jan Meyer 
Speech and Theater 



Jill Meyers 
Communication Sciences 



John McDermoll 
Biology 



Joseph D Mieie 
Business Administration 



261 




Yvonne M. Migliaccio 
English 



John Mihalo 
Business Administration 



Regina N. Mihm 
Recreation Professions 



Eugene A. Mikijanic 
Industrial Studies 



Catherine D. Miller 
Marketing 




Elizabeth Miller 
Sociology 



John J. Miller III 
Health Education 



Keith J^ Miller 



Annette K. Minassian 
Art Education 



Manelic Minaya 




Joseph S. Mirabelli 
English 



Lenore Miraglia 
Psychology 



Karen A. Misajet 
Psychology 



Ann Marie Miskewicz 
Business Administration 



Sharon Mitchem 
Psychology 



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Mark W. Moede 
Acting/Directing 



Karen E. Molenaar 
Biology 



Greg Mondadori 
Communication 



Denise M. Montera 
French 



Caryn C. Mooney 
Home Economics 



262 





Lucrecia B Mora 
French 



Sandra L Morrison 
Fine Arls 



Michael J Moroz Ellen Maria Morra 

Physical Education Communication Sciences 



Edna Morrell 

Political Science 



Frances T Morris 
Accounting 





M/dii4it. 



Daniel R Morse 
Poll Sci Ind Ed, 



Donald F Moll 
Computer Science 



Mary V Molli 
Fine Arts 



263 




Thomas Moyer 
Accounting 



Kerry Mullin 
Industrial Education 



Julius Muinde 
Geography 



MaryJo Mule 
Communication Sciences 



Paul E, Mullen 
Business Administration 



Lucille Muller 
Business Administration 




Gail Mullins 
Broadcasting 



Christine Murk 
Office Systems Admin. 



Donna Murphy 
Office Systems Admin. 



Maureen Murphy 
Business Administration 




264 




Sean P, Murphy 
Political Science 


Susan E. Murray 
Business Administration 


Colleen A Murtha 
Psychology 


Carol C. Muscio 
Home Economics 


Vito A. Muti 
Home Economics 




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Laura J Myers 
Geoscience 



Drew G Nagel 
Business Administration 



Vera M Nakoneczny 
Political Science 



Lois A. Nalasco 
Home Economics 



Lorraine A Nalesnik 
Psychology 




Sweeta A Nanwani 
Business Administration 



Ronald J Naples 
Speech & Theater Poll Sci 



Susan Napollello 

Home Economics 



Joseph A Naloli 

Psychologv 



Roberto Negron 
Sociology 




Kathleen A Nelson 
Home Economics 



Linda Ncniolh 
Home Economics 



Francos R Neppel 
English 



Margaret M Nevins 
Home Economics 



Tina Nicholaides 
Psychology 



265 




Nick C. Nicolaou 
Psychology 



Janice Marie Nidds 
Home Economics 



Robert A. Niemela 
Biology 



JoAnn Nieradka 
Business Administration 



Connie F. Nieto 




Anna Gina Nigido 
Accounting/Psychology 



Concetta M, Nigro 
Italian 



Robert John Nisivoccia 
Marketing 



Diane Marie Noah 
Foods and Nutrition 



Patrice Suzanne Noah 
Political Science 




Denise M. Normyle 
Health Education 



Andrea Notare 
Psychology/Religion 





Anna G. Notarberto 
Business Administration 



Rhonda Sue Novack 
Business Education 



266 




George G Nucera 
Biology 



Halina Obremski 
Office Systems Admin 




Linda Lou Ocejo 
Psychology 



Elizabeth A O'Connor 
Physical Education 



Kimberly Rose Odom 
Communication Sciences 




Susan Patricia O Donnell 
English 



Carl N Oerke, Jf 
Biology 



Wayne John O Hara 
Computer Science 



Grace Chi Okator 
Community Health 



Michael f-'jncis O Keete 
Sociology Poll Sci 




Nancy A OKeefe Marian Chineld O'Keke Denise C O'Larle 

Community Health Services Home Economics Biology 



Carol Ann Oldakowski 
Accounting 



Linda B Olivio 
English 



267 




Mark E. Olson Patricia Elizabeth O'Neill 

Business Administration Chemistry 



Nancy Ellen Orrico 
Home Economics 



Nancy E O'Shea 
Business Administration 



Wendy Marie Ostrov 
Psychology 



Waldemar J. Ostrowski 
Business Administration 



Michael M. Padovano 
Math/Computer Science 



Michael J, Padula 
Marketing/Mgmt 



Gloria M. Osorio 
Sociology 




Agostina Maria Paglialunga 
Business Administration 



Doris H. Pahl 
Psychology 



Teresa Marie Palisi 
Marketing 



Peggy A. Pallis 
English 



Patricia S. Paganelli 
Physical Education 




Steven Paul Pancoast 
Computer Science 




DIna Papadakos 
Office Systems Admin. 



Harriet Papadakos 
Office Systems Admin. 



Joanna Papaioannou 
Home Economics 



Linda S, Papazian 
Computer Science 



Thomas Anthony Pappalardo 
Business Administration 



268 





Chris Pappas 
Marketing Mgml 



Gerard A Paradise 
Spanish 



Naomi Parciasepe 

^' i- ■■try 



Alan Leonard Pans 
Biology 



Nan Mary Pascale 
Mathematics 



Carta Mane Passerini 
Political Science Psych 



Jill ArniMi.i P.islcf 
Homt» F 1 onuniics 



Theodore J Pali 
Business Administration 



Loraine Parohe 
Psychology 




t leaner Anne Paulus 
Business Administration 



269 




Thomas Pawlicki 
Business Administration 



Anthony Salvatore Pecci 
Geoscience 



Lisa Morgan Peck 
Music Therapy 



Concetta A. Peduto 
Marketing/Mgmt 



Arthur A. Penny 
Political Science 



Pedro C. Peraza 
Political Science 



Maria D Perez 
Home Economics 



Rosario J. Perez 
Psychology 



Vincent Gerald Pelleher 
Business Administration 




Albert A. Perrella 
Psychology/Sociology 




270 





Nancy J. Peters 
Business Administration 



Althea Patricia Peterson 
Accounting 



William Michael Peto 
Psychology 



MaryAnn Petrlello 
Psychology 



Judith A. Petti 
English Psychology 




Michael Petrizzo 
Fine Arts 



Michele Peyko 
Physical Education 



Merry! Anne Pfaft 
Home Economics 



Paul August Pfefferle 
Biology 



Mark Christopher Phelan 
Speech and Theater 




David A Philhower 
Office Systems Admin 



H James Phillips 
Community Health Services 



Patricia Ann Picano 
Marketing 



Alice Jean Pickhardt 
Accounting 



Sara Angela Picone 
Business Administration 




Michele Retina Pilger 
Physical Education 



Rosalind D Pinkney 
Sociology 



Raymond D Pinney 
Political Science 



Mann A Pino 
Sociology 



Pina Pipino 
English 



271 




Tina Marie Pisa 
English Education 



Peter S. Piszczatoski 
Political Science 



Caria Celeste Pitale 
French 



Patricia Leigh Pitale 
Psychology 



Michael Pitts 
Political Science 




RoseMarie Theresa Platoff 
Consumer Affairs 


Diane E. Plocinski 
Sociology 




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Harriet Christine Pocai 
Home Economics 



Laura Polese 
Poll. Sci ./Broadcasting 



Nina Polizzano 
Psychology 



Michael John Popek Deborah Popola 

Political Science/English Business Administration 





Craig S. Porter Patricia Porter 

Business Administration Office Systems Admin. 



272 




Mary Catherine Possett 
Poll Sci, Economics 



Theresa A Powell 
Speech Pathology 



Luann Prestifilippo 
Home Economics 





Joan C Pritchard 
Business Administration 



Kevin Thomas Pryor 
Music 



Michael Steven Pucciarelli 
Accounting 




Laura Jean Punderson 
English 



Helen M Purcell 
Accounting 



Joseph Lawrence Purcell 
Psychology 



Mary Jane Puskas 
Psychology 



Joseph O Quaye 
Business Administration 




Carol Lisa Uuinn 
English 



David William Quinn 
Speech and Theater 



John Leonard HadomaKof 
Business Administration 



Tarryk Wildo Rainford 
Speech and Theater 



Susan L Rallo 
Induslnal Arts 



273 




Pilar A. Ramirez 
Management 



Ruth Raymond 
Communication Sciences 



Linda J. Reed 
Mathematics 



Jeffrey S. Raskin 
Accounting 



Deborah L Rathnow 
Home Economics 



Kathryn Rau 
Business Administration 



Joyce Raymond 
Home Economics 




Margarit A. Reaso 
English 



Joseph L. Rebholz 
Business Administration 



Joann M. Recchia 
Home Economics 



Carolyn Ann Reddington 
Mathematics 




Coleen Reilly 
Business Education 



Caryn Donna Reineke 
Communication Sciences 



Stephen H. Reltberger 
Physical Education 



Edward B. Renz 
Business Education 




Luis F. Restrepo 
Mathematics 



Maryanne B. Revel 
Mathematics 



Violeta Reyes 
Business Administration 



Amelia M. Ribero 
Home Economics 



Neyda Ricardo 
Sociology 



274 



VALLEY 



MONTCLAIR 
PATERSON 



CLEVELAND I 







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Christine Ann Rice 
Biology 



Cynthia T Richardson 
Music Education 



Michael E Riggi 
Recreation Professions 



Katherine J Rippey 
Foods and Nutrition 



Kevin J Ritter 
Gpoqraphy 




Z^'.^. 




Judy Robbins 
English 



Douglas Frank Roberts Kristie S Robertson 

Business Administration Communication Sciences 



Christopher S Robinsor. 
English 



Howard Rodrigue; 
Fine Arts Poll Sci. 



275 




Elizabeth Anne Roeser 
French 



Patricia Ann Roettger 
English Education 



Deborah B. Rogers 
Transcultural Studies 



Matthew Rohsler 
Sociology 



Carol Rosamilia 
Home Economics 



Cheryl A. Rose 
English 



Marybeth Ann Rosin 
Home Economics 



Marie Rovetto 
Sociology 



Glenn C. Romaglia 
Psychology 




Susanne F. Roy 
Psychology 




276 




Michael Rozek 
Computer Science 



Shari Lee Rummel 



Michael J Sabalmo 
Economics 



Coy R. Rudd 
Economics 



Joyce Mane Rudolph 
Accounting 



Rosemarie J. Rufo 
Office Systems Admin. 



Joan P. Russo 



Physical Education Business Administration 



Maria Theresa Russo 
Foods and Nutrition 



Mel Joseph Russo 
Biology 



Angela Rosary Sabato 
Speech and Theater 



Leslie Rose Sacks 
Home Economics 



Loiraino Ann Sadiv 
Business Adminislralion 



Diane Rullo-Cooney 
Psychology 




Rosemaiv B. Russo 
English 




[;onna Mane Ryan 
Sociology 


Mai 
Office 


'lanne E Ryan 
Systems Admin 


Ann Mary Rykowski 
Accounting 


George A Saba 
Accounlinq 


Lisa Ann Sabat 
Psychology 


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Music Education 



277 




Joanne Helen Sakmyster 
English 



Doreen Frances Sale 
Distributive Education 



Joseph Salfelder 
Chemistry 



Marianne Salvatore 
Business Administration 



Michael Richard Samples 
Business Administration 




Dawn M. Samra 
Business Administration 



John Samra 
Business Administration 



Scott R. Sansolo 
Business Administration 



Carmen E. Santiago 
Marketing 



Linda M, Santiago 
Home Economics 




Tom V. Santulli 
Mathematics 



Laurie Ann Sarro 
Communications Sciences 





John A. Sarti 
Business Administration 



Nicholas Henry Sartiano 
Business Administration 



278 




Carol Ann Sautner 
Business Administration 



Michael Savignano 
Industrial Technology 



Antoinette Mane Savino 
Sociology 





Efthmoula Mary Sawides 
Business Administration 



Regina Aurora Sbrocco 
Speech and Theater 



Donna Leah Scarpone 
Mathematics 




Paul F Scatlergood 
Business Administration 



Annette Rose Schillaci 
Office Systems Admin 



Bruce Steven Schimmel 
Business Administration 



Bellina Elisabeth Schinke 
French German 



Beverly A Schlamp 
English 




Mark Anthony Schmidl 
Physical Education 



Susan Kay Schmidt 
Music Therapy 



John James Schmitt 
Biology 



Susan Helen Schnaidt 
Business Administration 



Nancy Schneider 
Communication Sciences 



279 




MaryLou Schnur 
Sociology 



Nancy Dara Scholle 
Physical Education 



Scott M. Schron 
Biology 



Glenn Fredric Schulman 
Recreation Professions 



Thomas Schumacker 
Marketing 



Irene Ruth Schwager 
Business Administration 



Donna Carol Schwankert 
Fine Arts 



Michael I. Schwartz 
Political Science 



Letitia Broome Schwarz 
History 



Barbara Schwerin 
Communication Sciences 



Carmela Sciabica 
Retail Management 



Valerie Scorsone 
Fine Arts 



Janice N. Scrudato 
Business Education 



Lori A. Scutti 
Nutrition 



Joseph Sebolao 
Marketing/Mgmt. 



Steven Sedlak 
Business Administration 



William Joseph Schuiz, Jr. 
Business Administration 




Eric R. Schwartzberg 
Marketing 




Joseph S Scrifflgnano 
Biology 




Howard J. Sehulster 
Biology 



280 



Mimm 





Kann S Seidel 
MarkRiinq Mrjnit 



Gary A Senor 

History 



Silvana Serafini FrancmeB.r: i i Shabel 

Malh and Compuler Science Physical Cducalion 



Suzanne Shapiro 
Music 



Nancy G Shaw 
Foods and Nutrition 



Kathleen Mary Sheber 
Psychology 



Karen Ann Sheerins 
English 



Manam ShahroKh 
Business Education 




David George Sheridan 
Music 



281 




Geraldine G. Sherman 
English 



Ross Martin Sherman 
English 



Richard Preston Shorter 
Political Science 



Bernard J. Slebel 
Business Administration 



Ralph M. Siegel 
Sociology 




Andrew George Slegeltuch 
History 



Ellecer Sllva 
Business Admlnlstralon 



Sheila K. Silverman 
Business Administration 



Christine Sllvestrl 
Physical Education 



Wrensford F. SImmonds 
Biology 




282 




Paul A Simons 
Industrial Arts 



Ada Louise Sinacore 
Music 



Annette Sisco 
Psychology 



Matthew D, Skelley 
Political Science 



Glenn A Skidmore 
Management 




Mitchell Jay Slachman 
Business Administration 



William Adam Slawinski 
Business Administration 



Gerj Ellen Smit 
Music Therapy 



Barbara Lynn Smith 
Business Administration 



Diana Elizabeth Smith 
Music Therapy 




George Christian Smith 
Business Administration 



Michael Smith 
Sociology 



Robert F Smorol 
Accounting 



Dana L 
Allied 




Susan Snyder 
Business Administration 



Vivianf" I .' ,.ii" 
Business Administration 



Eiettherio Solras 

Computer Science and 

Biology 



Donna Mane Sv 
Business Adminis 




Maria G. Spataro 
History 



Kathy Irene Stanley 
Physical Education 



AnnMane Speranza 
Family/Child Studies 



Elizabeth! Ann Spiegel 
Home Economics 



Alan Stagg 
Accounting 



John T. Stanton 
Marketing 



Paul J. Stapleton 
Psychology 



Donna Marie Stas 
Business Administration 



Richard August Stahnke 
Music Performance 




Lauren Elizabeth Steel 
Marketing/Mgmt. 




Jeff Stein 
administration 




Jam Michael Stern 
Biology 





Heather Dawn Steewart 
Music Education 



Elizabeth Strauss 
Foods and Nutrition 



Barbara Jeanne Strollo 

Environmental and Geo 

Studies 



John Daniel Stouter 
English 



Linda Marie Strasser 
Psychology 




Phyllis Strauss 
Business Education 



Lawrence Paul Strohmeyer 
Biology 



John W Struble 
Chemistry 



Ruth S Stryker 
Business Administration 





Jay R Stuan 
Business Administration 



Ibrahim Suarez 



Spanish 




Roman S Suarez 
Business Administration 



Linda Suljic 
Business Administration 



Dawn Margaret Sullivan 
Psychology 



Frank W Sullivan 
Economics 



Michael Suscavage 
Psyc^oloQy 



285 




Dianna J. Swan 
Accounting 



Randolph L. Swickle 
Food Service 



Karen S, Sydoryl< 
Home Economics 



Karen Szepietowski 
Business Administration 



John J. Szupiany 
Business Administration 




Fatemeh Tabassi 
Computer Science 



Roy S. Tamargo 
Industrial Studies 



Margaret C. Tanis 
Marketing 



Steven Bart Tann^nbaum Simone C. Taylor 

Office Systems Admimslralion Communication Sciences 




William Alan Taylor 
Business Administration 



Martin S. Teich 
Accounting 



Halimat Tekelani 
Accounting 



Sandra Lee Terrell 
English 



Karen Ann Testa 
Psychology 




Valerie D. Testa 
Home Economics 



Evelyn M, Thomas 
Home Economics 



Karen Gwen Thomas 
Accounting 



Beverly June Thompson 
Business Administration 



Janet M. Thompson 
Foods and Nutrition 



286 





Kann Lee Thorns 
Political Science 



Cathy L Thomsen 
Psychology 



Debra Ann Thomson 
Broadcasting 



Renee M Thurnes 
Communication Sciences 



Daniel E Timpen 
Recreation 




Karen Joy Iippenrailor 
Biology 



[)i;ini' I rm.i Iir(),ik 



Heidi B TobacKman 
Foods and Nutrition 



Susan M Tobie 
Communication Sciences 



Michael Stephen Tomcho 
Computer Science 



287 




Marina C. Torrecuso 
French/ltalian/Spanish 



Linda Rosa Torres 
Psychology 



Lisa Marie Torricelli 
Accounting 



Janine M, Torsiello 
English 



Arnold Steven Trauth 
Psychology 




Anthony Tricarico 
Business Management 



Tammy Sue Trimble 
Fine Arts 



Michael Anthony Tropeano Nicholas Frank Tropiano Charles Franklin Truesdale 
Business Administration Sociology Home Economics 



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286 




Lynn Marie Trunfio 
Political Science 



Mary C Tuffy 
Recreation 



Kathleen Uber 

Physical Education and 

Health 



Patricia Donegan Uchitel 
Sociology 



Robert Charles Uhl 
Recreation Professions 




Allyson Rose Urspruch 
Business Administration 



Deborah L Ustas 
Sociology 



Valene Vaccaro 
Accounting 



Cynthia A. Valente 
Distnbutive Education 



Jo-Ann Valentine 
Communication Sciences 




Steven Mark Valvano Robert Vamvas Elisabeth Jane Vandermey Kenneth J Van Dongen Annemane VanHemmen 

Business Administration Communication Theory and Home Economics Education Business Administration French 

Practices 




Arthur John VanHoulen 
Business Administration 



Konstantinos Vanikiolis 
Computer Science 



Al V VJUi 'lliilj 



, i>n Vasilenko 
1 .•glish 



Nancy Mane Vees 
Music Therapy 



289 




Carole A. Velardi 
Business Administration 



Robert Andrew Vendetti 
Industrial Arts and Education 



Collette S. Venturella 
Chemistry 



Cynthia Roseann Verdolina 

Speech and Theater 

Education 



LuAnn E. Villano 
Biology 




Lorie A Vuyosevich 
Recreation Professions 



Carrie EInora Walker 
Music Therapy 



290 




Debra A, Wallace 
Business Administration 



Alice Dolores Waller 
Physical Education 



Karen Wallo 
Psychology 





William V, Wambach George G. Wangelien Gerard C Ward 

Mathematics'Comp. Sci Business Administration Business Administration 




Susan Ward 
Industrial Studies 



William A Ware III 
Music 



Willie J Warren 
Psychology 



Marilyn S 
OHice Systems 



Wataha 
Administration 



Nick J Watsik 
Marketing Mgml 




Klaus D Weihenig Reid WemtTidn buuui.i-^ »'»<>iiinirtnn 

Business Administration History and Political Science Accounting 



Kathleen Mary Wen 
Outdoor Recreation 



Family Child Services 



291 




Doris Welfel 
Spanish 



Laure J. Wells 
English 



April L. Wenig 
Home Economics 



Gail A. Werner 
Allied Health 



Pamela Jeanne Werts 
Psychology 



Charles Glenn White 
Business Administration 



Joan C. Widmer 
Marketing Mgmt. 



Donna Wiedman 
Recreation Professions 



Dianne Evelyn Wigertz 
Accounting 



Susan E. Willar 
Home Economics 



Paulette Felicia 
English 



Russel Craig Wilson 
Accounting 



Evelyn Werthan 
Fine Arts 




Barry Wiesenfeld 
Music Performance 




Victoria Lynn Wilson 
Business Administration 




Bob Charles Winter 
Accouting 



Robert J. Wojtowicz 
Accounting 



Anne Mane Wolanski 
Accounting 



Nancy Gail Wolfskeil 
Computer Science 



Julia Marie Wood 
Business Administration 



292 





Michael David York 
Accounting 



t-ernando Zabaiaga 
Business Adminislralion 



Leslie Ann Zand 
Foods and Nulrilion 



Richard Joseph Zatrilio 
Marketing Mgmt 



Annette Zielinski 
Physical Education 



293 




Bonnie Susan Zients 
Communication Sciences 



Diane Zimmerman 
English 



James Victor Zimmerman 
Mathematics 



Lawrence Joseph 

Zimmerman 

Speech and Theater 



Frank B. Zinno 
Management 




Richard K. Zipf 
German 




Patricia Ann Zuber 
Communication Sciences 




Janice B. Zwingli 
Home Economics 







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Portrait Photographer. Merin Studios 



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GRADUATION 





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La Campana 1981 




307 




308 



I had originally intended to write a lengthy essay on the trial and tribulations 
involved in producing this yearbook but, after giving it some thought, decided to 
discard the notion in favor of something completely different. After all. I believe that 
the content of this book speaks for itself and the hard work that went into it: if it needs 
me to tell you why you should appreciate it. this yearbook should not have been 
published, 

I'm very proud of my staff, for they alone deserve credit for the copy and layout — 
a far cry from previous years when the editors labored without assistance to do all 
the work. Any undergraduates who read this by accident should take note that La 
Campana's staff is always looking for people who are interested in taking pictures, 
writing articles and stories, typing, doing layout, or simply contributing ideas. Every 
year, due to the high rate of turnover, there is a great demand for new members, so I 
hope word will spread that the yearbook is still a 'land of opportunity".' 

My heartfelt thanks go to Meeta Pate! who took charge of completing the book 
upon my graduation, Naedine Hazell for her ingenuity and durable sense of humor, 
and Rich Hango, the man who supplied the T-shirts. Thank you, thank you. thank 
you's" are in order for my incredible staff, the S.G.A. (their organization makes this "? 
one possible), and naturally the students of MSC who keep us in business. 




%i 



Robert Clifford 
Editor-ln-Chief, 1981 



P.S. Rich, Excelsior! 

•893-4346, yes, that's 893-4346. Call today for a free appointment or just listen to 
our strange answering service — no purchase necessary. 



309 



The Cast 



Editor-in-Chief 

Robert G! Clifford 
Managing Editor Treasurer 

Meeta Patel 
Seniors Editor 

Naedine Hazell 
Copy Editor 

Laura Laniewski 
Photography Editor 

Edgar Pineros 
Senior Portraits 

Merin Studios. Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania 
Advisor 

David Fogg 



Staff 

Pietro Anastasio 
Rekha Das 
Scott Falkenberg 
Mona Gadallah 
Elsa Jimenez 
Elizabeth Larkins 
Jeanette Pinkney 
Rosalind Pinkney 
Anjali Sangani 
Janet Wojtanzek 
Harold Thompson 
Sue Chauvette 



Photo Staff 
Cindy Bacon 
Rich Hango 
Jay Harold 
Pat Hart 
Wayne T Roth 
Klaus Weihenig 
Bonnie Ziemkiewicz 



Cover Design 
Pietro Anastasio 



Divider Pages 
Tony Calderon 



Color Thanks To: 
Larry Clifford 
Robert G! Clifford 
David Fogg 
Rich Hango 
Larry Morgan 
Robin Witek 
Edgar Pineros 
Alan Stagg 

The 1981 La Campana is a Class One Organization 
of the Student Government Association. 

Published by the Hunter Publishing Company, 
Winston-Salem. North Carolina. 



311 




Back Page 



312 



" And you guess you won't be going 
back to school anymore." 

— Billy Joel 



313 



^H 



• Win.sfon-Salerr 

HUNTER PUBLISHING COMPANY 

• North Carolina 

Sieve Menn, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Represenalive 




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^ 1981 

■'3i- Tercey. ^tate Teachers Colle<y« 

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La Canpana.