(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "L'Agenda 1937"

'M rut 







-«* 1)< -^ -^r: -^. .^ x,,-^' -i^ ^.j ,^^ .^5f .>,^ 

•^ -vs -^K •« i •*« •*;? -^^ i^ 4-' .4-, 4v,-t^- 



.'5<(«K« ■» 



^■•^>.-??£'^-ii6?'- •HS^.:^.i!j^'.^-;a:»; A.. 



» , » » V i 



' r'^.F'RE?;*!' 



;f.«Mk-:,ita«Bt«i*>-A>iJ9:^a;<>ji:-^-^.-r.: 



I 



K-: 



m 



i% «>«■* ♦< •«,- 



■ < 1 5 ■-»:■•■: -M < 



t'', i' ;■ ^:^ -*V fi "W *: -is -(fv; .*.; ,^ ^; .^_ .^^i .^j. .4. ^^. .^; .^ ^^^ .^j .,.. .j: 



f-dS^r^* 



^Ss-at^' 



..■:x2r.'.''-jsa;?: Ji.; -ifta .-*», 



y-r ^'r 



ttaaassi^W- 



\\ 




i 



^^ 










•%r*i-^s<^-|rf- 



VIRG/LLs 



^/7/. 



^0/> 



^S'. 



'\. 



■^s- 

*>■«>, 



% 



< 









en 

TO 



■*/:,;. -:!.v?j^ 



••«i(i&> jLi sift n*'-* itii 



i^.T^^'^r 






,svrpir!'':>3(!?B\t 



im 



(r.'/\4 -.ti.n.r^- 



<, % \ % 




en 



■ 9 3 # 







A 






. Irff 



■ -sfv -^ -jjii, .^;y -ax ,4,, ..^.j:,^^ 



?;f*¥ 



^■%^^4;' ?*s4-^ "??, VH:i 4! 



■«f >;.- -i^» .V ■»■' 



*?%V: 


-?*: 


>l 


#•**.' V 


?S." 


'a s 








■'«(■'<« ■': 



N OCTOBER. 19^5, Arnaud C. Marts first began his task 

as the acting president of Bucknell University. Because he 

is president of Marts and Lundy, Inc., his executive duties in 

this connection do not permit him to devote more than half of 

his time to the affairs of this institution. 

Nevertheless, Mr. Marts, during his short stay at Bucknell, 
has fostered numerous progressive projects, including the fur- 
thering of the college building program, resulting in the recon- 
struction of Old Main, and the formulation of a new prepay- 
ment plan by means of which parents may more adequately 
plan for the future education of their offspring. In addition, 
he has sponsored a unique "Design for Living" series of chapel 
programs, which has renewed student interest in the chapel. 

In spite of these great tasks, Mr. Marts has not neglected 
to cultivate intimate personal relations with students and triends 
of the University, and has therefore made a niche for himself 
in the hearts of all Bucknellians. To him. our friend and 
kader. the Class of 19^7 respectfully dedicates this book. 



••??i;^^-«g^s^ll^.:^^Si^a& A.-*ii .^^4 ^: 



■VMmr^id-AiKifr.ri ! ■ - 'j-.-.'»i:L-;;^ -r/-c7-^-^»wt • • 




i 






t« -*-•: -^-i f-JV.-t^' 






w. -i^iii ^Itr-ij-r" 





'"*^«"»'"r 



"*it'-s:<?.iiig%N.'fl8^.^.;^;>^^ii^^^ .^i':^ ^ 



V . » » ,- 



vl-'lUt ti.XVf-'f 



• j>'> :;" v^i«ff ■ 



"Enjoying isolation 
in preparation 
for a vocation ..." 

THE almost voluntary isolation of an 
academic institution tends to estab- 
lish it as a community in itself, not 
complete, but still a community. View- 
ing it objectively, one may note its cul- 
tural activity — music, art, drama, lit- 
erature: its commerce — classes, lectures: 
its social life — dances, teas, parties. 
The University is a community. 

As a group the College is different 
from any other community; ever- 
changing, but always with one purpose 
— the preparation for a vocation. This 
is a common goal to which everyone 
works. 

This annual, the first yearbook of the 
Senior Class, depicts the school as a 
community. It has stopped the ma- 
chinery for a split-second in which to 
secure a conglomerate, but comprehen- 
sive, panorama of the whole. We see 
the student as he appears attending 
classes, prom-trotting, relaxing or work- 
ing in his home, playing, emoting, 
singing. 

To represent modern youth in an ap- 
propriate manner, layouts in the modern 
tempo have been employed exclusively: 
to represent the student as he actually 
is, informality has been emphasized: to 
make the book truly representative, stu- 
dent art work has been used. Combin- 
ing these typical qualities, L' Agenda of 
1937 has presented a vivid cross-section 
of student life. 



l: 



m 



U. 



■'^ '=!< 'H -M 



v-^?-\«5=c-^:^..T;«3Jft'Aysia?: a^-a:* .. 



.•':•: rt!"-:-.*ff<1?ir 



',.>MBWw4i''iV^W c*ve« -i t^-^ ^' •«—■ 




m 



m 



■i<.-H 






■-^F ^V ■«, -«T, 41,.;? ^i ,4,, 



^ ^^ ^ ^ ^V/* ^ ^ -*v fS *^ *; .«? ^< .*, .^^^^ . v^ti -ii -*v .^^ 4i «. 






-w ■•♦<l I'.' 




BUCKNELL HALL 



^;*awiiiA*'-. '•Hi--a;..^;..^'^^«ii?'. ■,«»..••<>& ,^'a -v-. 



'^?.t-^^ 



■ -iXI--. ^' >i* -kil^t t-'^.: .1 <>■.« ^■.■M'., ;■-;>■•> .^ "■■- -^it^rx 







'»»F^ 




/'■ 



'h '^ 



i 


}.- ■ 


h 


i'- ■.•.: 


i-y-:. 


i: Ci 


fe^ 






•.^^' 



;? 




OBSURVA roRV 



?i£-,i 






■-m: 



mm 



««*v/ 










r 




'ni 


fl"^^ 


W- 




1 


*., 


f 


J 1 








LOWER 



» » ♦ . k 'i-. - ■ 
"■ i^ ?'* ^' ^"^ ?^ -*''"•* »^ •"' ■<< 






H 1JSLii.'iril;''!'iff^<' \-lW,^\'!^1'^- 







'■ ' '" S-r. 



CAMPUS 







r. %5 


f ■■■ 




c.-^-'.. 


B 


?;^^> 


.'., ■ -i 


■'^..V; 






■t^<\ 



*.>. •^* -!?.■. « -^V 



*. % %% ^,^i :^ :^ ;!«^ ,y ^ 4; ,^ 4^ 



■*if-fs-*^-f!i'V-: 








01. D MAIN 






%' -4'", -^-li 



^- -(JlJi .^ 



*■ . * ♦ V i » 



ii,^^ 



''"-"^'~'' 




?>!. 



T.L^-. 



Hf-i 



■^ I 



..M 



At- 






II 1 






#W^ 



-jp^- 



m 




f 


p 




1 

i 




...1-— --*% 



LARISON HALL 




« V^ -'« '%.i 







- S' 









4 t « '# 4 

• /•#<( 

♦ # » « » J 



8=^_,-*f^f4.j. 



iHI •*«■*»• -ia 









■ jiT-ti^-»^.^::v1v..vy..v- 



■■■■ wgxT«>;-'.'; 




m 




flOfninisiRfliioii 



Within an atmosphere of mortar board and gown. 

of intelligent planning and supervision. — 

an efficient preparation of youth 

for the needs and exigencies of life 



■■*;< -«(?■ •*,$ ^.,y 



*' -ii- -{■•> «rf yr- 



^V*u^^-,. 




ACTING-PRESIDENT 
ARNAUD C. MARTS 

n GRADUATE of Obcrlin Col- 
lege, holder of a Doctor's 
degree and a Phi Beta Kappa key, 
and a long time trustee of Buck- 
nell University, Arnaud C. Marts 
came to Bucknel! in 193 5 as ex- 
president Rainey's successor. He 
also heads the firm of Marts and 
Lundy, an extremely successful 
and unique organization for the 
purpose of raising funds for vari- 
ous philanthropic and educational 
institutions. Since his affiliation 
with the University he has proved 
a true friend and adviser of the 
students, and he has been of in- 
dispensable aid in the raising of 
the reconstruction fund of Old 
Main. 



VICE-PRESIDENT 
ROMEYN H. RIVENBURG 

Dr. R. H. Rivenburg, a graduate 
of Buckncll University in the 
class of 1897. has served his Alma 
Mater as Dean of the College since 
September, 1923. and since De- 
cember, 193 5 as Vice-President of 
the University. For thirteen years 
he has offered students many valu- 
able suggestions concerning their 
curriculum, and has kindly helped 
them with their problems. 



Twenty 



•■if .- ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ■ 






./•^ 



DEAN DOROTHY T. DYER 

Mrs. Dorothy T. Dyer, form- 
erly assistant to the junior dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
OhicT State University, and also 
graduate and holder of the B. S. 
degree in home economics from the 
same university, assumed her duties 
here since February, succeeding 
Mrs. Paul G. Stolz. who had been 
acting dean of women. Mrs. Dyer 
has specialized in personnel and 
guidance, and has done graduate 
work in psychology at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. Her varied 
experience is very valuable in as- 
sisting her in the job she has 
undertaken, and for which she is 
so well equipped. 



ACTING-DEAN 
MRS. PAUL G. STOLZ 

Born on Wood Island, Kadiak, 
Alaska, educated at Linnefield. 
Oregon, and Bucknell. and holder 
of an MA. degree from Columbia, 
Mrs. Stolz came to Bucknell after 
having been assistant dean of 
women at Harrisonburg State 
College for Women in Virginia. 




■■*^^^l 



'■.;:' 



Twenty-one 



t t t 4 



■» '■» "■■»' •• '» '<«'.i 



■?'~ -air ^j 



'«s -*7 -i^y ^ -i.: f'i .ii,: ffl 
■*■•• Vi? .^i 'V^•' ■?'i -*i ■< 
-< 'if, v^-; ■ j»s. 



%5i<^%««|^^4^*.,,* 



«*.<* ^ -iv- .-i.-l, W t . 



eDdliniSIRflTORS 




Ranek 



Eisley 



Munt 



Griffith 



H. W. HOLTER 
1 he Registrar's office is using special registration 
cards and grade blanks designed by Mr. Holter. The 
grade cards are far more economical in that they can be 
revised at will, the original carbons being put on file in- 
stead ot having to be destroyed as formerly happened. 

D. L. RANCK 
Through Mr. Ranck's office flows all the school 
business, amounting to three quarters of a million dollars 
annually. At present, he is following the plan of Dr. 
Judd, his predecessor, in an attempt to bring all the old 
University business records into satisfactory order. 

T. E. EISLEY 
Miss Eisley. Editor of the University News Service, 
edits all Bucknell news mailed from her office. She also 
keeps a file of student and faculty data. 

M. H. HUNT 
Miss Hunt finds her new office a great help in at- 
tending tc5 the vast amount of undergraduate records and 
alumni records for applications ot which she is in charge. 

B. W. GRIFFITH 

Professor Griffith, as business head for Bucknell 
athletics, finds his greatest difficulty in attempting to 
reconcile alumni and undergraduate ideas on sports with 
his limited budget. 

C. McD. MORRIS 

Mr. Charles McD. Morris has changed the Alumni 
Monthly from a newspaper into a magazine in an attempt 
to popularize the faculty, make the pages more interesting, 
and keep the members in touch with one another. 

Tuenly lu'd 



Morris 






& -^ 'A^ - 'XA -w 



inask 



uULLiiH 



. ■W.-Xt'Tr .; 



THf BOARD Of IfiUSTttS 



THE Bucknell University Trustees, forty in 
number, and provided for by the first school 
charter, are the governing body of the school 
The Board meets bi-annually by provision of 
the charter, but there are many special and com- 
mittee meetings throughout the year. The 
members are divided into committees whose 
duties include the business, policy planning, and 
administration of both the University itselt 
and the Junior College. It is in the Board of 
Trustees that all final decisions pertaining to 
University affairs rest. 




'M 



\. ^'arren Davis, Affiii^-Chuir 



TRUSTEES 



Amerman, Ralph A. 
Baldrige, Thomas J. 
Bostwick, Roy G. 
Burpee, David 
Davis, John W. 
Decker, Oliver J. 
Evans, Milton G. 
Franklin, J. H. 
Franks, Charles B. 
Greene. Edward M. 
Harris, Miss Mary B. 
Hastings. Berkley V. 
Henderson. Joseph W 
Hopper. Harry B. 
HuUey. Elkanah B. 
Hunt, Emory W. 
Johnson. Albert W. 
King. William I. 
McClintock, Gilbert S. 
McLean, William S. 



Scranton, Pa. 

Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Trenton, N. J 

Williamsport. Pa. 

Lewisburg. Pa. 

Chester. Pa. 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 

Alderson, W. Va. 

Milton, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

McKeesport, Pa. 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



Macklin. J. F. 
Marts. Arnaud C. 
Morton. Earl A. 
Padelford, Frank W. 

Ne 
Rainey, Homer P. 
Ranck. Dayton L. 
Reynolds. Dorrance 
Richards, Earl M. 
Roberts. Daniel C. 
Rooke. Robert L. 
Rummage, L. C. 
Shirley. John T. 
Smith, Harvey T. 
Sordoni. Andrew J. 
Stern. Julius L. 
Stetson. John B. 
Walls. William C. 
Wilson. John M. 
Wolfe. Mary M. 

Twenly-lhrL't' 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

wton Centre. Mass. 

Washington, D. C. 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

New York City 

Kingston, Pa 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kingston, Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewisburg. Pa. 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 

Laurelton, Pa. 



;.."i| 

',';."*l 












«»«'*(• 



« -fr, f(ry -»^ 

4 ^ '"' -•-■ 



V*» *. !%'. ■ 



,/• ^»rt ijr-s _'»' ..-j.^ ^^ . 










fflcuLiy... 






Clothed in mortar board and gown — 
Symbol of higher education — 
a learned and benign guidance 
to increased knowledge 



I / I « « I 



^r; % % ii- ?« $^ 4x 4fr ^,< :^,> . ; 



-*.f' ■ «« ■.;■.- -(-■•■ w/ jT. 



t* -v; -*•• fyj.'H'-i 



■ '-'■ .1,,, 



%'^-:- -I- 



^^^'A'- •i'^-^. 



fflcuLiy fiDvisoRy couhcil 




l*.ii;c, i'Lint, H.irnni:in. Drum, Ncwland, Peterson, Rich-irdson. ( ^olcni.m. Ruck well. Stew si 





ADMINISTRATION 


ArnauD C. Marts - - Acting President 


ROMEYN H. RiVENBURG - Vice-President 


J. H. ElSENHAUER - Director of Junior Collec/e 


and Summer Extension 


H. W. HOLTER - - - Registrar 


D. L. Ranck - - - Treasurer 


FACULTY 




Rudolph Peterson C. H. Richardson 




R. E. Page \V H. Coleman 




J. D. Plant B J. Miller 




N. H. Stewart Paul Gies 




T. E. Newland F. Ballentinc 




P I Harriman M. 1 . Drum 




/ ict-nUf-six 



-^ ^'i -^f. ^^. x-i j*.,-_,t ;w -i^ 4, . . 



iS' i»i .*.' 



'^,*-v^ 



£M& 



.a.-<'.'i'»>r.>'-t«<\.,-- 



faculty Advisory Committee 



T HE Faculty Advisory Committee consists of 
' twelve members, who represent the curricular 
groups of the University. The members are elected 
for two year terms, one half of the membership 
changing each year. 

This committee has no administrative duties, but 
is concerned with general faculty problems that may 
be referred to or originated by it. Its function is to 
investigate and recommend policies concerning matters 
such as faculty administrative policies, study of 
effects of required courses on student distribution and 
faculty loads, admissions, and inter- faculty and 
trustee relations. The committee serves as spokesman 
on matters that are better undertaken by a group 
than by individuals. 



\i^ 



■m 




■4a 



Faculty Meeting in BuckncU Hall 



TiUi-nly Si-Cen 






■i(.\ -j^ •^^■. ^4 -.1^ iff, ^s i-i i-: ^jj .^; ^, 



•4 ■•^ -*>t ■'{■•^ '*!! M "^i *» -4^; •^■. 4v. -i- 




{nglish Department 




Top; Robbins 

Stillman, Phillips, Robbins, Coleman, Sniitli, Gregory, Tbciss 



THE primary purpose of college work in 
English is practical rather than cultural; but 
it inclines toward the establishment of general 
principles and practices rather than toward 
specialization in any field of application. The 
secondary purpose is decidedly cultural however. 
While they arc planned definitely to avoid pre- 
mature limitation, all the courses offered will be 
found to have their place in some scheme of 
specialization. 

The English department at Bucknell Uni- 
versity offers more than fifty courses, providing 
ample material for an undergraduate major in 
English and a graduate major for the Master's 
degree. The work is distributed in four divi- 
sions: (1) composition, (2) journalism, (3) 
public speaking, and (4j literature. In each 
of these divisions there are elementary courses 
serving as an introduction to the later work. 

TawKi/i-u//)/ 




rr-i'- -.-. 



foreign Language Department 







Top: Ballentine 

McCro&scn, Calkins, Ballentine, Frant?, Griftith 




THE Study of foreign language, because of its 
varied cultural and practical values and in 
particular its importance for linguistic train- 
ing, forms an essential part of a liberal educa- 
tion. It is by the mastery of a second language 
that one is really able to know his own speech 
and to clearly understand and interpret foreign 
civilizations. 

Provision is made for foreign language study 
with six to eight courses extending throughout 
the year in each of the four languages — German, 
French, Latin, and Spanish. Greek also has been 
restored to the curriculum with an offering of 
two years' work. 

For aesthetic values, as well as these reasons, 
foreign languages continue to hold a dominant 
position in present day education. 



~-'?5'^ 



Twenty-nine 



? -^ -a^ -^j -^ .,.j ^^ -^-'ii -*! ^ 4^ 4- *5 <^ jjr 4i ■•^■i ^v ^v^' ^' 
' f'^-' ■*•' -'^: •='■?-*'••*■? it -^ 'Sf* 't^ ^•- ' 



Commerce and finance 




Top: Matz 

Bottom: Eislcy, Biscoe, Peterson, Matz, Sears 



THE department offers a Bachelor of Science 
Degree for three c]istinct groups of courses. 
The General Business Course, the Secretarial 
Course, and the Commercial Teacher Training 
Course. In addition to the three groups indi- 
cated, majors and minors are offered for Bachelor 
of Arts students. 

It is the aim of the department to give a 
broad but definite grasp of economic principles 
and the fundamental operations of modern busi- 
ness. In order to achieve this end. courses of 
study are offered in general accounting, cost ac- 
counting and auditing, statistics, taxation, 
credits and collections, shorthand and typewrit- 
ing, money, banking, marketing, advertising, 
business law. salesmanship, finance, investments, 
commercial education, office practice, personnel 
work, management, insurance, reports and cor- 
respondence, publicity, research work, public 
utilities, and business problems. 

Thirty 




Social Science Department 




Top: Sutherland 

Left to Right: Nimkoff, Cachings, Ohphant. Pago. Peterson, Karraker. Hillman 




T HE expansion of social services undertaken by 
I the national and local governments has created 
the need for a great body of trained social 
workers, in addition to well-informed citizens. 
Consequently, the number of college students 
attracted to social studies is steadily increasing. 
In order to qualify as a skilled social worker, 
one or more years of graduate work in an ac- 
credited school of social work is needed in 
addition to actual experience in, this field. 
Schools of Bucknell's size offer little in pre- 
liminary training, which the social work schools 
recommend, but the departments of social science 
at Bucknell are strengthening their courses with 
more extensive training possibilities in view. 

Thirty-one 



'■'*! 
..»i 



: ■'*'>•'*< % -l^'V ••*> -^-. 



* ■%?. '*-' -*<; * ; -V .*•/ ._»,': ^-j ;*i 4:, z^, ..^4 '4^. .-^ _^ . 



* -«-. *1 ■•»'' 



•^'•?^ *»-i-;-^-. 




Top Bond: 

Bottom: Lawson. Boiul, Iljrrinian, Guninio 



THE four academic departments wliich comprise 
this group arc closely related in history and 
purpose. The department of Philosophy is, 
in a certain sense, the parent of the other de- 
partments, although each has developed its par- 
ticular techniques unhampered by traditional 
loyalties. Taken together, they offer a broad 
avenue of investigation into the avenues of truth, 
the functions of mind, the discovery of highest 
values, and the appreciation and production of 
beauty. 

Thirty-two 





Top: Stolz 

Bottom: LcMon, Stickney, Cook, Melrose, Gics, Jenkins, McRac 




THE Department of Music affords the intellec- 
tual, talented, and eager student the 
opportunity to enjoy the provisions made 
for music study as an element of general culture 
or as a professional accomplishment. 

Because of the complete character of its 
equipment and the high musical standard of its 
faculty, students can enjoy all the benefits of 
the Carnegie Musical Library, equipped with 
phonograph records and the best musical litera- 
ture, concerts by the Bucknell String Quartets, 
Glee Club, Mixed Chorus, Symphony Orches- 
tra, Organ Recitals, Oratorio, and Opera, all of 
which have a dominating influence in one's 
musical appreciation and general cultural 
growth. 



Thirly-lhree 



I- 



m 



^'^ 



.z:.tIi:l'r\nf^'f'r.^r;:M-V:^ 



}, -Jstf •«.•. *TS ■•v 



.«U^ 



Bioloqical Science Department 




Top: Davis 

Bottom: Stewart, Eystcr, Fowlc, Rice, Davis 



THE Study of the Biological Sciences has 
attained a dominant position in the College 
Curriculum. Its purpose is to train students 
for laboratory work, teaching, and specialized 
work in medicine. For the liberal arts group, 
there is a general information course whicii 
acquaints students with the fundamental knowl- 
edge of themselves and other living organisms. 

Biology is an essential requirement of all 
well-rounded college courses, because it helps 
man to realize that he is a living organism of 
everyday life, which he must understand if he 
wants to have health and happiness. 

Thirli/four 




Physical Science Department 




Top: Simpson 
Bottom: Gold, Legault, Simpson, Miller, Lowry 




N presenting physics to the students ot 
Bucknell, the department recognizes two 
aspects of the subject, the cultural and the 
professional. The first year course lays a 
foundation upon which the advanced student 
may build up his work along either line of 
study. 

Our lecture room is equipped with many 
pieces of apparatus built especially for the pre- 
sentation of the subject by demonstration, and 
includes projection apparatus of the most ad- 
vanced type, many lantern slides, moving picture 
films and sound films which are especially 
adapted to illustrate many difficult problems. 

Wc aim to maintain the work in physics on 
a high and up-to-date plane. The laboratory 
is complete in its appointments, with apparatus 
of the latest type, as well as many pieces having 
historical interest in the development of the 
science. 



Thiriy-Rve 






1^ 



-'y* 




fflatheinatics and flstronomy 



Top: Richardson 
Bottom: Drum, Rich.irdson, MacCrcadit 



♦' (iff J ... 



THE courses in m.iilxmatics at Buckmll arc 
developed to meet the needs of two classes 
of students: those who may enter careers and 
fields of work where more or less mathematical 
training is necessary and those who may wish 
to study mathematics for its own sake. 

In the first class may be mentioned the stu- 
dents who plan to be teachers of mathematics 
or science, physical scientists, social scientists, 
biologists, engineers, actuaries, statisticians, busi- 
ness men, accountants, and lawyers. In the 
second class are those students who have an 
appreciation of the mathematical mode of 
thought. 

The courses in astronomy are mainly cul- 
tural, and it is their aim to give to the students 
a more profound appreciation of and a deeper 
insight into the physical universe in which we 
live. 




Thirty -six 



Engineering Department 




Top: Irland 

Bottom: Gardner, Irland, Rhodes, Kintncr, Kunkcl. Garman, Griffith, Ogburn, Drum, Shatter, Burpee 




PROGRESS in engineering during the past year 
has been very encouraging. Revisions in 

curriculum have been made to keep abreast 
of advancement in science and invention. Total 
enrolment in engineering is the best in five years. 
and the number of chemical engineering students 
is the largest in the history of the department 
Almost all of last year's class secured employ- 
ment in engineering very soon after graduation 
and the others found positions later. 

This year a committee of Visiting Engineers 
was formed to promote the interests of engi- 
neering at Bucknell in every possible way. The 
members of this committee are well qualified in 
their profession and are working with great 
enthusiasm. Their guidance and help should 
prove very profitable to the engineering 
departments. 

Thimj-seoen 









fl 



■y? 






: -*;• 'if, .*R -*,,? ■»'. 




TOf 



Davis 



Newiand 



THE Bucknell Department of Education takes responsi- 
bility for the professional training of all persons desiring 
to enter the field of education. Undergraduates may 
train for teaching any of the academic or commercial sub- 
jects in high school or for teaching in the elementary 
school. In the graduate field Bucknell has the distinction 
of being one of the five institutions accredited for the pro- 
fessional training of superintendents and principals for the 
public schools of Pennsylvania. Recent developments in 
the field of guidance have prompted the Education Depart- 
ment to plan a program of training for guidance workers. 



PHysicei fDUCfliion 



RECOGNIZING the need of every student for 
a healthy body as the instrument of a keen 
and alert mind, the Physical Education De- 
partment has organized a thorough course in 
general physical training and gives opportunity 
to participate under the direction of skilled 
coaches in various forms of competitive athletics 
for the education and training values that come 
from such experience. The extension among 
all students in various forms of competitive 
athletics is vigorously promoted through a large 
variety of intramural and intercollegiate contests, 
both indoors and out. 




Top: Musser, Plant, Dcrr 

Bottom: joe Reno, ,i;v'H iiiilrlirlor, lakes roll 



Thiriijciqht 



y-r**^*- 



LIBRflfiy 




Eliza J. Martin 



THOUGH one of the smaller buildings on the campus, 
the library is quiet and pleasant. The book-lined walls 

with open shelves for part of the collection attract the 
student to more than the required reading. In the peri- 
odical and in the reference rooms there is always interested 
aid for those seeking special material. Suggestions and 
guidance for assigned readings at the reserve desk save much 
time for the uninitiated student. The general circulation 
service is liberal with a number of books allowed. 

The collection is adequate for undergraduate require- 
ments, though there are many fields in which further 
material is desirable. To meet this need friends and alumni 
have formed a supporting group called "The Friends of the 
Bucknell University Library." Many valuable gifts from 
this source are being received. 




Wright 



Williamson 



Zerby 



Brungarc 



Jientlcy 



Thirty-nme 



'': ■^' -n ■■%< •m -'•»*■%'> ".*!;.»■* %i' 



4 •« -4^ «V -i; 4''-i^-.^<-4; J(r4^. 
-M' -rC'iT 'i,' -t'* ■*■•■ -«=•■. ■■ ■.■■■■ 






it v.^;. 









.■ A\r^-* 



, -••-/- >•' >»'? -•• ■• 



*. M-*-\ A ' >:, •>J -yt '*• 







-.-■r-^ 






iM 






'* -^ i^; -|*^ -fl -i)^ -^ J5'* '«; ■ . . 



f-rr^^ 



yif. ^'■■. :^ •*: 



^7i:f-^ 




sfnioRS.. 



Having completed four years preparation 
Tor a life that is a question mark . . . 



-}■■;■ 



^ 



V*? ^*<i '*^ ^ ^ .|^ ,V >^ v«; .^^ . ^i .^ 
<■ #■ ♦> «.«■■#. •' • *' ■ ^- '* "^' ■'*^»' ■■*** '*5 •4< ■ - 



-k -if: h 4ir ^^ .*; i^^ ,♦. 




SfOIOfi 

CLASS 

OfflCERS 



Morgan 
Corrin 



n NOTHER cpocli has passed in the hfc of the Seniors. Four years ago they 

" embarked on a new career, — that of going to college. Now their journey 

is almost over, and they are ready to confront the world with the knowledge 
they have gained. 



Fnrlii-foiir 



'i ■ 






v-^irii v' 



mm 

CLASS 
HISIORy 



THOSE of '37 entered the hillside campus in the fall of 
'33 when Bucknell began an experiment by introduc- 
ing a new plan of education, the survey courses. This 
class may be facetiously regarded as Bucknell's "guinea 
pigs", for it was submitted to many new courses and tests 
under the guidance of Dr. Rainey, a Liberal Arts 
enthusiast. 

Jack Filer, one of our outstanding football players, 
successfully led the new Bucknellians through their Fresh- 
man year. They well survived the Water Parade and the 
Freshman-Sophomore Scrap, showing the upperclassmen 
real spunk. 

Clinton Condict was president during the Sophomore 
year. In keeping with their collegiate progress, the Sopho- 
mores were able to arrange a scintillating Cotillion, Mai 
Hallct's Band furnishing the rhythm. 

As Juniors, the class elected Thomas Speck to lead 
them. "Stu ' Smith brought glory to '37 with his ex- 
cellent lootball playing. In the social world, the class 
provided a gala Prom, properly enriched with the strains 
of Glen Gray's Casa Loma Orchestra. 

With George Crousc at the helm, '37 ncars the end 
of its course, marking the social chart with a Senior Re- 
ception, at which Acting-President Marts, aided by the 
faculty, was a genial host. This was the first time that 
such a pleasant "get-together" had been planned for the 
Seniors. 

The Senior players contributed much to the success 
of the plays of the school year, "The Young Idea", "Death 
Takes a Holiday", and "Hamlet". The Senior Ball, 
which featured versatile Hal Kemp's Orchestra, was a 
fitting climax to the social affairs of '37. 




Senior Ball Committee, Standing: Lowry, Miller, Beiswinger, Reynolds, Van Why, Palmisano. Lanni 
Seated: Speck, Walker, Crousc, McMahan, Monahan 



Forty-five 



;t '%? ■*^'. -*s -^f ■-*>"■ '*'•■■ 



l-»^ il*^^^ 4c :j.5^^ 



* J .*?. -*.? -»5 «fr -i.-: 4; ►j.i. -i- 



Julius Altman 
wilkes-barre, pa. 
A. B. in Economics 

Pi Sigmj Alpha. 




L'BGfllDe 



George W. Anthony 
wilkes-barre. pa. 

B. S. m Commerce and Finance 

International Relations Club; Student 
I-.iculty Congress (4); Cabinet Member 
(3. 4); Forum: Student Council (3). 



Russell N. K. Appleby 
harrisburg, pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

A.B. in English 

Bucknellian (2. 3, 4): L'Agenda 
Staff. Business Manager (3. 4) ; Art 
Editor (4); Glee Club (I, 2, 3): Cap 
and Dagger (3. 4) : Artist Course Com- 
mittee (3. 4) ; Art Club (2, 3, 4). 




1931 



Jean E. Armstrong 

wilkes-barre. pa. 

Phi Mu 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

\V. A. A. (1, 2. 3, 4). 



Forty -six 




t I i J 



» ♦ V - 






L'flGfODfl 



Ralph H. Axthelm 
new york. n. y. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
B.S. m Commerce and Finance 

Thcta Alpha Phi (2. 3. 4). President 
(4) : Cap and Dagger (1. 2, 3. 4) ; 
Football ( 1 ) . 



B 

U). 



George T. Ballard 

mt. lebanon. pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

B.S. in Biology 

askctball ( I ) ; Varsity Basketball 






William G. Beiswinger 

wilkes-barre. pa. 

Thcta Upsilon Omega 
B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon (4) : A. I. E. E. (4) 
Mens Glee Club (3. 4). 



Elmer R. Biddle 

plainfield, n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Glee Club (I, 2. 3) : Fraternity Treas- 
urer (3): Commerce and Finance Club 
(3) : Mixed Chorus (I, 2. 3). 



Forty-seven 



193/ 



m 



* t t * I 



I ' i * ji 



* ■■'^i -v; .^n .-ip; 




L'fiGtnOfl 



Esther E. Bishop 

cape may. n. j. 
A.B. in English 

Student Christian Fellowship ( 1 ) ; C. 
A. (1. 2, 5, 4) : W. A. A. (1. 4); 
Bazaar Committee (2). Chairman (3. 
4) ; Peace Action Committee ( 3) ; Fresh- 
man Week Committee (4) ; Senior Coun- 
selor (4). 



Allen Z. Bogert 

bogota. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Economics 

Intramural Tennis Champion (2); 
Track (2); Soccer (2. 3. 4); Arti&l 
Course Committee (3. 4) : Commerce and 
Finance Club (3): Bucknellian (4). 



Alexander A. Bolton Jr. 

NEWARK. N. J. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

B.S. in Biology 

Basketball ( 1 ) : Varsity Basketball 
(2); Football (1); Varsity Soccer (2, 
3. 4): Glee Club: Intramural Council: 
Junior Prom Committee: Senior Ball 
Committee: LAgenda Staff (4). 



133] 



Robert Bonn 

scranton, pa. 

Kappa Delta Rho 

B.S. in Chemical Enginvucing 

Sophomore Cotillion Committee (2) : 
Varsity Track Manager Ch): Fraternity 
President (4). 



Forty-eight 




'^^r«''>.v*-^v 



L'flGfOOfl 



Gertrude Breinlinger 

grantwood, n. j. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Social Science 

May Day (1. 2. 3 ) : C. A. Cabinet 
(2): Senior Councilor (4); Freshman 
Week Committee (4) : President of Senior 
Women (4). 




/) 



Sarah H. Broomhall 
auburn, n. y. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in English 

May Day (2. 3) ; W. A. A. (4). 




Charles N. Burns 

wilkes-barre. pa. 

B.S. in Biology 



James M. Burns 

wilkes-barre. pa. 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 



At 



193J 



Forty-nine 






. . iA 



-■?-» -^K ■?« -Jsif -^i . 



K M V-' '■f! '^•': '^^ '^ -^^ ^i 'M_ '' 



4 'Wi -4t» .« * -JjlS •*.»•■»'. ** 




L'flGtnOfl 



Margaret M. Butchko 
hunlocks creek 

B.S. in Biology 
C. A. (2, 3); W. A^ A. (2). 




Kathryn Butchko 
scranton, pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

A.B. in German 

Delta Phi Alpha (2, 3, 4), President 
(3) ; W. A. A. (1, 2. 3, 4): C. A. (I. 
2, 3. 4) ; May Day (I, 2. 3). 



Arthur F. Butcosk 

sunbury. pa. 

B.S. in Education 



Richard A. Butcosk 

SUNBURY, PA. 
B.S. in Education 

Band (3, 4). 



193] 



Fifty 



1** 




t 


• »».-». • ». 


r 


i**'."*' Ak ■*•■ 





:'-^ :»ii A * :;*' -.•irX -i 



L'eGfnofl 



Margaret E. Campbell 

marietta. pa. 

B.S. in English 

Thcta Alpha Phi: Tau Kappa Alpha; 
Sigma Tau Delta; Cap and Dagger (2, 3, 
4): May Day (2). Mixed Chorus (L 
2. 3); Glee Club (1, 2. 3); Sophomore 
Essay Prize; Comprehensive Exam Prize. 







Thomas H. Carey 

wilkes-barre. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Track (2. 3. 4) ; Cap and Dagger (2 
3. 4). 




Robert S. Carter 
olyphant. pa. 

B.S. in Education 

Kappa Phi Kappa (2. 3. 4). Vice- 
President (3). President (4); Cap and 
Dagger (4). 




Ruth B. Cherrington 
catawissa. pa. 
A.B. in English 



1037 



Fifty-one 









tl^i'-TTT t^.¥¥ii^ "^.^ ^"^ •« ^-^ -'^ '^ -4 4« ■*« -i^^ -^^ i* ^ 4-i 



Lynnford E. Claypoole 
kittanning. pa. 

Kappa Sigma 
B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Band (1. 1. 3 ) : Bjnd Manager ( 2. 3. 
4): Mens Glee CUib Manager (3. 4); 
Model League of Nations ( 1 ) : A. I, E. E. 




L'aetoofl 



William B. Clemens 
milton, pa. 

Thcta Upsilon Omega 
B.S. in Biology 

Plii Sigma (3. 4). President (4): 
Kappa Phi Kappa (3. 4): Delta Phi 
Alpha (4) ; Glee Club (1. 2. 3. 4) ; 
Mixed Chorus (1. 2. 3. 4): Debating 
(3. 4) ; Sophomore Cotillion Committee: 
Senior Ball Committee; Buckncllian (I, 
2): Cap and Dagger (1. 2. 3): Fresh- 
man Week Committee (2); L'Agcnda 
(2, 4). 



George A. Coleman 

BOONTON. N. J. 

Thcta Upsilon Omega 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 






v^^ 




1931 



Clinton A. Condict 

POST mills, vt. 

Alpha Chi Mu 

A.B. in Sociology 

Tau Kappa Alpha: Freshman Hop 
Committee: Sophomore Class President: 
School Spirit Committee. Secretary (2): 
Sophomore Public Speaking Prize: Sopho- 
more Cotillion Committee: Varsity Soccer 
(2. 3. 4) : Student Church Council (2) : 
C. A. (1. 2. 3. 4). President (3. 4) : 
Artist Course Committee (3. 4) : Student 
Faculty Congress (3. 4). President (4): 
Debating Team (3): Exec. Comm.. Stu- 
dent Christian Movement of the Mid. 
Atl. Region (3. 4). Vice Chairman (3). 
Chairman (4): National Intercollegiate 
Christian Council (3, 4): Bucknellian. 



>- ^-i T^ v; «>< ^-i ..J .j,: 



M: ?(•' rJ>! -i^ 
• \ ■ 



:>'-.-iH^« ■uUtS'ir -^- 



L'fiGfnOfl 



Jean H. Corrin 

franklin. pa. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in Sociology 

May Day (1. 2. 3) : C. A. (1. 2. 3. 
4): Women's Student Senate (2): Pan- 
Hellenic Council (4) ; Senior Class Treas- 
urer. 




Mary Kathryn Crabb 
lewisburg. pa. 
A.B. in Mathematics 
May Day ( 1 ). 




George W. Grouse 
smithton. pa. 

Sigma Ghi 
B.S. in Biology 



Gloc Club (1. 2): Student Faculty 
Congress, Vice-President (4): Intcrfra- 
ternity Council. Treasurer (4): School 
Spirit Committee (4); Senior Class 
President: Football (1. 2. 3. 4). 



Georgiana Cru.vi 
altoona. pa. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon (2. 3. 4); W. A. A. 
( 1 . 2. 3, 4) : C. A. (1. 2) ; Pan-Hcllcnic 
Council (2. 3. 4). Treasurer (2. 3). 



Fif Ill-three 



193] 



^1 



% 



T f- f\pfrff{-f -f ? -rs -^^ ^r:^ -^i ^. ^ ■^.■. .^, .i^ ^^ *« ■•<■> 

T Pjf'T.T'^. *: ■** 1' '^^ -f^ -^ --k ■ V^' fi 4~ '♦V '^^i i ■ 



Katherine B. Davis 

glenside. pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Delta Mu Delta (3. 4); Bucknellian 
( 1 ) : Alpha Chi Omega, Treasurer (4). 




L'flGOOa 



Sarah E. Davis 

mount carmel. pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Social Science 

Mixed Chorus (1, 2. 3, 4): Women's 
Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Chapel Choir (1, 
2): May Day (3); C. A. (3, 4); W. 
A. A. (1, 2, 3, 4). 



Eari.e W. Deacon 

bordentown. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. m English 

Tennis (2. 4); Class Vice-President 
(4) ; Senior Tribunal (4) : Senior Ball 
Committee: Varsity Tennis (3): Varsity 
Soccer ( 4 ) . 




937 



Olive R. Decker 

slatington. pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in English 

May Day (1 ) : W. A, A. (1. 2. 3, 
4) ; C. A. ( I. 2. 3, 4) ; Senate (4). 



Fiflq Unir 




. 4 I .^'~^y- 



i>-^;fv;l-Mv*-J-K 



L'eGfnofl 



Samuel A. DeMuro 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. M. E.. President (4) ; Band (3, 
4): Boxing (3, 4); Cross Country (3, 
4). 





Frederick S. Derr 
williamsport, pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
B.S. in Biology 





Walter L. Dillinger 

point marion. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Theta Alpha Phi; Cap and Dagger (I. 

2, 3. 4). 



ESTELLE E. DiPETRILLO 

PATERSON, N. J. 

Phi Mu 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

C. A. (2, 3. 4); W. A. A. {1. 3, 4) ; 
May Day (2. 3 ) . 



Fiflil-fii'c 



I I I 



1931 






J ■^, ■^.' '^: If- .'hk! ;*■.■• 



Marjorie G. Dirlam 
pelham manor. n. y. 

Alpha Chi Omega 
A.B. in Biology 



Joseph C. Duddy 

plains, pa. 

B.S. m Chemical Engineering 




IBGEnOfl 



FRANK W. Dunham 

MEADVILLE. PA. 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Beta Epsilon Sigma (2. 3. 4). Treas- 
urer (3. 4): Pi Mil Epsilon. President 
(4) : A. S. C. E. ( I. 2. 3, 4), Secretary- 
Treasurer (3). President (4); Varsity 
Tennis (1. 2. 3. 4): Captain and Man- 
ager (3, 4 ) : Intramural Council (3. 4 ) : 
Intramural Tennis Champion (1). 



193] 



Madeleine F. Earnest 

hu.mmelstown. pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Social Science 

C. A. (I. 2. 3. 4): W. A. A. (1.2. 
3. 4) : May Day (1, 2. 3) ; Kappa Delta. 
Secretary (4). 



Fit I ti- six 




rf'i» 



* » V 



^;t^y:^-^^-y 



L'flGfOOa 



Alida M. Eglit 
philadelphia. pa. 

B.S. in Education 

W. A. A. (1, 2. 4) : C. A. (1. 2, 3, 
4) ; Student Church Council (4) : Bazaar 
Committee (2, 3. 4): Freshman Week 
Committee (3, 4): Student Christian 
Fellowship ( 1 ) . 




William E. Elcome 
philadelphia. pa. 

Delta Sigma 
A.B. in Economics 

Fraternity President (4) : Interfrater- 
nity Council (3, 4), Secretary (3); In- 
tramural Council (3, 4) ; Symphony Or- 
chestra (1. 2); Varsity Soccer (2. 3. 4), 
Captain (4): Varsity Basketball (3); 
Varsity Tennis (2.3,4). 





Dora L. Elleni 

pittston. pa. 

Phi Mu 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon: W. A. A. ( 1. 2. 3. 
4): Theta .Alpha Phi: Cap and Dagger 
(3. 4). Business Manager (4) ; May Day 
(3). 



Marguerite L. Engelhart 

lansdowne. pa. 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon. Treasurer (4) ; Delta 
Phi Alpha: C. E. A.. Secretary (4) : May 
Day (I. 2. 3). Chairman (3): C. A. 
(1. 2. 3. 4) : W. A. A. (I. 2. 3). 



ie37 



Fifty-seven 



».'. -Js* ■« 







I'ftGfllDfl 



Jeanette C. Evans 
haddon heights. n. j. 

Kappa Delta 
A.B. in English 

Sigma Tau Delta (3. 4). Secretary- 
Treasurer (4) : C. E. A. (4) ; May Day 
( 1, 2, 3) : W. A. A. (1, 2, 3. 4) : C. 
A. (1. 2. 3, 4). 




Sal J. Fazio 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 

Sigma Chi 

B.S. in Education 

Kappa Phi Kappa; Glee Club (I) 
Football ( 1. 2. 3. 4;. 



John D. Filer 

woodbury. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in Economics 

Freshman Class President: Football (1. 
2. 3. 4). Co-Captain (4); Basketball 
(1. 2. 3, 4); Student Faculty Congress 
(4). 




Bernard J. Finklestein 

LUZERNE. PA. 
B.S. m Biology 



193] 




t'llni'i'iaht 






^l. 



laetnofl 



Norman Flachs 

newark. n. j. 

Sigma Alpha Mu 

A.B. in Biology 

Band (1. 2. 3): Symphony Orchestra 
( 1 , 2. 3 ) : Bucknellian ( 1 , 2 ) : L'Agenda 
(2. 4) ; Freshman Hop Committee: Soph- 
omore Cotillion Committee: Freshman 
Week Committee (4) : Interfraternity 
Council (3. 4 ) . 




Elwood L. Foltz 
sunbury. pa. 
B.S. in Biology 

Delta Phi Alpha (4): Symphony Or- 
chestra (1. 2. 3, 4) : Artist Course Com- 
mittee (3. 4). Secretary-Treasurer (3): 
Band (1, 2). 





Mary E. French 

NYACK. N. Y. 

A.B. in English 

Mixed Chorus (1. 2. 3 ) : C. A. ( 1. 
2, 3, 4) 




Walter D. Geier 
hazleton. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Theta Alpha Phi: Alpha Chi Sigma: 
Cap and Dagger ( 1 . 2. 3 . 4 ) . 



Fit til -nine 



1931 



■*< -?^ ~i« -^S -:»<! -ii «t-. 
;.''-W % -U ^l ijis ■*; *'. ■*{ 



.^V, M -fS, vVs 



*v •^•t \: 4 



-; -A^ '*? -^H ■*,'<:: *', -Nj^f ajt ■*«{ -*•* -*J-Jfs •«;.•-*'. ** • 



Eugene J. Gillespie 

HAZLETON. PA. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

B.S. in Biology 




laetpofl 



Morris L. Gillet 

north bergen. n. j. 

Phi Lambda Theta 

A.B. in Economics 

Apple Cart. Editor-in-Chief (4) : 
L'Agenda, Associate Editor (4) : Cap and 
Dagger (1. 2. 3) : Art Club (4). 



Clementine L. Gordon 

HILLSIDE. N. J. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in French 

May Day <2) : \V. A. A, (1, 1. V 
4) : Committee of 100 (2) ; Junior Class 
Treasurer; Junior Prom Committee: Pan 
Hellenic Council. Secretary ( M . President 
(4): Sorority. President (4). 




193? 



Florence N. Green 

COLWYN. PA. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon (3. 4). Secretary (41: 
May Day (1. 2. 3): Eathers Day Com 
mittce (2); Secretary of Sophomore 
Class: Sophomore Cotillion Committee: 
Senior Counselor (4): \V. A. A. (I. 2. 
3. 4). Secretary (3) : Sorority. Treasurer 
(4): C. A. (1. 2. 3. 4). 

Si. XI II 







L'flGtOOe 



Raymond J. Green 

MOUNT CARMEL, PA. 

Sigma Chi 

B.S. in Education 

Football (1. 2. 3. 4). 



Edith H. Griesinger 

plainfield. n. j. 

Kappa Delta 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

May Day ( 1 . 3 ) : President of Sopho- 
more Girls: Commerce and Finance Club 
(3. 4) : Senior Counselor: W. A. A. (1. 
2. 3. 4) : C. A. (I. 2. 3. 4). 





Ellen D. Gronemeyer 

scranton. pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Social Science 

Symphony Orchestra (L 2. 3. 4): 
Bach Orchestra (4): Committee of 100 
( 2 ) : LAgenda (2. 4 ) : Cap and Dagger 
( 4 ) : C. A. Cabinet ( 1 . 2 ) , Class Repre- 
sentative (3): May Day (2); W. A. A. 
(1, 2. 3, 4). 



Robert C. Gundaker 
upper darby, pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in Economics 

Track (2. 3. 4) : Glee Club (2. 3, 
4) : Commerce and Finance Club (3). 



193? 



Sixty-one 



■?»•, --4^, ifi ..«; -su .^i -jnfit^f, =.^ 



'*< -^1 -^V ■•** •^-■. « --t^' i(.>: •■i('V -i^ -»^y ^; 






-*.♦ ■« * .#,? •*..: xt', ** -fc- >. , 




L'flGtooe 



Laura E. Haines 

LEWISBURG. pa. 
A.B. in Biology 

Phi Sigma (2, 3). 




Leslie D. Hammer 
north catasauqua, pa. 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Ddtj Mil Delta: Commerce and Finance 
Club: Business Manager of BuckncUian; 
Men's Dormitory Counselor. 



James Hanisky 

ringtown, pa. 

B.S. in Biology 

Varsity Football (1. 2) ; Varsity Track 
(1, 2. 3); Class Boxing (1, 2): New- 
man Club (4). 



1937 




Edward G. Hartmann 
wilkes-barre, pa. 

A.B. in History 

Kappa Phi Kappa (3. 4): Delta Phi 
Alpha (3, 4), President (4): Men's Glee 
Club (3): Forum (3, 4): International 
Relations Club (4) ; Cap and Dagger (3. 
4). 



Sixty -I wo 



L'flGfOOfl 



'ii/t\Z 



Harry A. Hebberd Jr. 

ROCKVILLE CENTER. N. Y. 

Theta Upsilon Omega 
A.B. in Political Science 

Pi Sigma Alpha (4;. President (4); 
Interfraternity Council (3. 4); Men's 
Glee Club (2, 3 ) : Freshman Week Com- 
mittee (3, 4): Fraternity President (4). 



Leigh E. Herman 

williamsport. pa. 

B.S. tn Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Symphony Orchestra (1, 
2, 3, 4), Manager (3. 4): Band (2. 3. 
4): Varsity Boxing (3). 



-4 "^ 







Charles G. 

SALEM. 
B.S. in Civil 

Pi Mu Epsilon (2. 
(1, 4) ; Football (1) 



Hewitt 

N. .J. 

Engineering 
4): A. S. C. E. 




B. Joan Hill 

LEWISBURG. pa. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in Sociology 

C. A. (3. 4): Cap and Dagger (4) 
Art Club (3). 



Sixty -three 



mi 



y 



-Fi •%», -?fs -&,' fti 
:♦:■!■■••■ ; ' 



'*';■'*« i"^ -^^ ** -4^ t* -!t?> *fr, H -i/' 



?^- Vi -as* >•,:; .♦v:-^:}-^, 
" ■ >t. i* -i.-- ■4-. fi-j. -i- , 




Rita T. Holbrook 
jersey shore, pa. 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Tau Kappa Alpha. President (4) : May 
Day ( 1. 2) : \V. A. A. (1. 2. 3): C. A. 
(1. 2. 3. 4); Peace Committee (2. 3): 
Women's Debating. Manager (4) ; Cap 
and Dagger (3. 4); Forum (2); Art 
Club (2): Broadcast on Co-education 
(4) : Delegate to State Debating Conven- 
tion ( 3 ) . 



L'flGfOOfl 




Frank G. Ingalls 

staten island. n. y. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in English 

Glee Club ( 1 . 2. 3.4); Assistant Man- 
ager. Bucknellian Circulation (1): Sym- 
phony Orchestra (2); C. A. (1. 2, 3. 
4): Father's Day Committee (3). 



Elsie Inslee 

brooklyn. n. y. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in Sociology 

Delta Phi Alpha (2. 3. 4) ; W. A. A. 
(2. 3. 4). 



1031 




Hazel M. Jackson 
danville. pa. 

Delta Delta Delta 
A.B. in Psychology 

Mu Phi Epsilon. President (4) : Pi 
Mu Epsilon; C. E. A.. Treasurer (4): 
Women's Student Senate (3. 4). Treas- 
urer (3). Vice-President (4); Junior 
Class. Treasurer; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee: Symphony Orchestra (1. 2. 3, 4): 
May Day (1. 2); Girl's Glee Club and 
Mixed Chorus (1. 2); C. A. (1. 2. 3. 
4) : W. A. A. (1. 2. 4) : L'Agenda Staff 
(4) : Senior Counselor: Freshman Week 
Committee (4) ; Biology Club. 

Sixly-four 






' • \ > 



^ > ) 4 



leefiiDfl 



Milton Jacobson 
westfield. pa. 
B.S. in Biology 







Beverly J. Jones 

FORTY FORT. PA. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in English 

C. A. (4): Cap and Dagger (4): 
May Day (3). 




Sidney Kanengiser 

NEWARK, N. J. 
A.B. in Sociology 

Varsity Soccer; Varsity Basketball: In- 
terfraternity Council; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Bucknellian (3); L'Agenda (3). 




Elwood Kerstetter 
shamokin, pa. 
A.B. in Botany 

Delta Phi Alpha. Treasurer (4) ; Kappa 
Phi Kappa; Varsity Soccer (2. 3, 4); 
C. A. (1. 2. 3. 4). 



Sixty-Rvc 



193? 






rTF 



. V>*'^-«;4l 



„. J* .,.;.-. ^^ ,,^ ,^^ ,^. ; , ^ , y.; ^ ; 




"1 



L'BGtnOB 



Margaret D. Keys 
williamsport, pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 
B.S. in Biology 

Phi Sigma (2. V 4), Secretary-Treas- 
urer (4); Delta Phi Alpha (4); Buck- 
ncllian ( 1 ) : Cap and Dagger ( 1 ) : Class 
Vice-President (1); L'Agenda Staff (4). 



Miriam T. Kitchen 

watsontown, pa. 
A.B. in Social Science 




Martha Knights 

williamsport, pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. m Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon (3, 4) ; Cap and Dag- 
ger (1, 2. 3, 4): Special Girl's Chorus 
(2, 3); Secretary of Junior Girls: Glee 
Club (2. 3). 



1931 



Ida Laura Lange 

williamsport. pa. 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon: May Day (3) ; C. A. 
(1. 2. 3. 41 : I. 'Agenda (4;. 



Sixty -six 



"^ 



^^ 


r 


r 


fi >i 


*■->■ 


• 


r- '^ r 






rr 



^ 



L'fiGtnOfl 



Virgil Lanni 
woodbridge. n. j. 
Phi Lambda Theta 
A.B. in Economics 

L'Agcnda (2. 3, 4). Editor-in-Chief 
(3. 4): Bucknellian (1. 2. 3); Apple 
Cart. Business Manager (4) ; Cap and 
Dagger (2. 3) : Junior Prom Committee: 
Senior Ball Committee: Fraternity Presi- 
dent (4); Intcrfratcrnity Council (4); 
Art Club (4). 




WiLLARD LEAVITT 

WOODCLIFF. N. J. 

Thcta Upsilon Omega 

A.B. in Economics 

Pi Sigma Alpha (4) : Football Manager 
(4) : Glee Club (1. 2. 3) ; Mixed Chorus 
(1. 2); Symphony Orchestra (1, 2): 
Freshman Week Committee: Junior Prom 
Committee: Senior Tribunal (3, 4); In- 
tramural Champion, Boxing and Wres- 
tling ( 1 ) : Commerce and Finance Club. 




John J. Lenker 

SUNBURV. PA. 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Alpha Chi Sigma: Band (3). 



Thorwald E. Lewis 

edwardsville, pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

B.S. in Education 

Band: Symphony Orchestra. 



Sixty-seven 



103J 



^al 



Ifz t - ^ '^' """ "^^ ^1 '^"-*^ -^■' ^^ ^? ^ ^^ ^^^ ^ '^^ M -^ - 

ills " " '^:1if^-^^^'^-^-T^-^-f^v-tv*^-v.^:.^^. ,;.... 

^ -<f«i -iut -^^ -« .^ -^ 






L'flGfOOe 




Vincent P. Loftus 

LARKSVILLE, PA. 
A.B. in Social Science 
Band (3, 4). 




James S. Logue 
south williamsport, pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

6.5. in Biology 

Bucknellian (1): L'Agenda St.iff, 
Sports Editor (3) ; Student Faculty Con- 
gress (2). Secretary-Treasurer (2); 
Chairman of Sophomore CotilHon Com- 
mittee; Glee Club (1, 2. 3, 4); Mixed 
Chorus (1, 2) : Freshman Week Com- 
mittee (4) ; Bucknell Novelty Quartet 
(4): C. A. (1, 2, 3. 4). 



Marion D. Long 

pittsburgh. pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

A.B. in English 

Sigma Tau Delta (3. 4), Vice-Presi- 
dent (4): May Day (1): Bucknellian 
(1, 2, 3, 4) : L'Agenda (2. 3. 4) ; C. 
A. (1, 2. 3, 4) : W. A. A. (1, 2. 3, 4); 
Mixed Chorus (1. 2. 3. 4). 





193] 



Joseph Lord 

WILKES-BARRE. PA. 

A.B. in Sociology 

Theta Alpha Phi (3. 4): Cap and 
Dagger (3. 4) . 



Sixty-eight 













L'flGfODfl 



Nicholas A. Lorusso 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 

A.B. in Biology 

Band (3, 4): Symphony Orchestra 
(5). 






Charles Lose 3rd 
cranford, n. j. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
B.S. in Commerce and Finance 









Wladimir Lotowycz 
jersey city. n. j. 

Sigma Chi 
A.B. in Economics 

Football (1. 2. 3) : Basketball (I) : 
Track (1. 2. 3. 4); Intramural Wres- 
tling Champion — 175 lb. 



Melvin R. Lytle 

altoona. pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Football (1); Basketball (2. 3): 
Commerce and Finance Club (1. 2. 3. 
4). Vice-President (4): Intramural Box- 
ing Champion — 128 lb. (1). 



Si.xti/ninc 



193J 



^ 



r* 'p. -fi -W -^t -»<! .»-i -*;! 




L'flGtIlDfl 



William G. McDonald 

nanticoke, pa. 

B.S. in Chemical Fnqineenng 





John McDonough 

WILKES-BARRE. PA. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
A.B. tn Philosophy 

Tennis (3, 4). 



M 


ARY Evelyn McLucas 




LEWISBURG. PA. 




Phi 


Mu 




A.B. in 


English 



Mu Phi Epsilon (2. 3, 4), Secretary 
f4) : Mixed Chorus (2. 3, 4) : Glee Club 
(1. 2. 3. 41: Special Chorus (1, 2, 3. 
4); Student Church Choir. 



103] 




Elizabeth McMahan 

TROY. PA. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in Mathematics 

W. A. A. (1. 2. 3, 4) : C. A. (1. 2, 
3. 4). Board of Women's Division (2): 
Executive Board C. A. (3); Women's 
Student Senate (2. 3. 4). Secretary (2). 
President (4): Girls Glee Club (3): 
Student Faculty Congress (4 ) : Senior 
Counselor; Mixed Chorus (3 I 



Sei'enly 



•<-.i*i. . ■ <.'*«swW'!S:hit?yiKi£ 



L'flGfOOe 



Joyce MacLeod 
elizabeth. n. j. 

n Sociology 

May Day (1. 2. 3); Mixed Chorus 
(1. 2. 3) : Women's Student Senate (4) ; 
C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4) ; House President (4). 



M. Elizabeth MacNamara 

HUNTINGDON, PA. 

Phi Mu 

A.B. in French 

C. A. ( 1. 2. 3. 4) : May Day (1) : 
W. A. A. (1. 2, 3, 4): LAgenda Staff 
(4). 




M. Donald Markley 

SCHWENKSVILLE. PA. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

B.S. in Biology 

Men's Glee Club. 



Lyetta Marshak 
bayonne. n. j. 

Delta Delta Delta 
B.S. in Biology 

Theta Alpha Phi (3, 4) : Mathematics 
Prize ( 1 ) ; Pi Mu Epsilon Prize for In- 
tegral Calculus: W. A. A. (1. 2): May 
Day (1): Cap and Dagger (2, 3, 4). 



Sevenly-one 



193J 



'■f»:% •■•■»< -^i ^-i "W 4K •*--< 



^ ^ -«« 4? 4i -5^ >^ -i»< > 



^xm 



■ '■. iivt i^; -« H -V ^.sl -as" ;i;i .t^^l -i;-?- ^ ! J • ■: 




L'flUfllDa 



George Marshall 

towaco. n. j. 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 



Charles L. Maurer 

collingsvvood. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 



Thomas J. Mayock 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. 
A.B. in Biology 

Kappa Phi Kappa (3, 4): Debating 
(1, 2. 3) ; Forum (3. 4). President (4) ; 
Model League of Nations Delegate (1, 3). 







193] 



Reginald P. Merridew 

PECKVILLE. PA. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in Education 

Theta Alpha Phi; Glee Club (1, 2): 
Cap and Dagger ( 1 . 2. 3, 4) ; C. A. ( I . 
2. 3. 4): Mixed Chorus: Sophomore 
Cotillion Committee: Senior Tribunal 
(4). 



Sei'enli/ lu'i) 




'"* iV. r« ,v-. 



r^rr^s 



'^m:^.-^''^rmmm 



V7Kitif^i^'>''i iiN*^*.-Mi;.Tti'x,, 



L'fleoofl 



Frances H. Miles 
milton. pa. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in Psychology 

W. A. A. (1. 2, 3. 4). Secretary (2) ; 
President of Freshmen Women ; Mixed 
Chorus ( 1 ) ; Treasurer of Junior Wo- 
men: May Day (2. 3): House President 
(4) ; L'Agenda Staff (4) : Senior Coun- 
selor: C. A, {L 2, 3, 4). 




Marlyn C. Miller 
donaldson. pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Baseball (2. 3). Captain (4); Soccer 
(4) : Intramural Wrestling Champion (1, 
2). 




Robert G. Miller 

elmira. n. y. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

A.B. in Political Science 

Pi Sigma Alpha (4) : C. A. (\): 
Junior Prom Committee; Sophomore Co- 
tillion Committee: Freshman Hop Com- 
mittee: Interfratcrnity Council (3. 4). 




Frances E. Mills 
staten island, n. y. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon (3. 4); House Presi- 
dent (4) ; V/. A. A. (I. 2. 3. 4) : C. A. 
(1. 2. 3. 4); May Day (1); Sorority 
Secretary. 



St'Venlu-lhnv 



133J 



,.,,,... ,^"^ '1-^^^^~« .^-^ ^fi^sk- 







L'BBfOOe 



George Moll Jr. 
jenkintown, pa. 

B.S. in Rioloqii 




James L. Mollahan 
wilkes-barre. pa. 

Sigma Chi 
B.S. in Social Science 



Emmet M. Molloy 

DRUMS. PA. 
A.B. in Political Science 







193] 



Raymond F. Monahan 

springfield. mass. 

Sigma Chi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

CU.SS Vice-President i\) : Freshman 
Hop Committee; Foottull (!. 3); Base- 
ball (2. ^) : Ba.skctb.ill {]. 2. 'S. 4). 



Sevenly-fnur 




. *.' ■;*»: 



M-V'orrt wi 



'r$^r-r^< 



.■c,»v-«V'^'i»'i*II'' 



(iJEa^iSOTKJsettixSiiB-s'i i >r.j-^-.-p j-j 



L'flGfOOe 



Helen L. Morgan 

nanticoke. pa. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in Psychology 

Vice-President of Sophomore Women: 
Secretary of Junior Class: Cap and Dag- 
ger (1) : W. A. A. (1. 2. 4) : Sorority 
President (4). 




m 



Herbert W. Morreall Jr. 

MOUNT CARMEL. PA. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon; Alpha Chi Sigma. 





Charles O. Morris 

collingswood. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon: Alpha Chi Sigma; 
Symphony Orchestra (1. 4); Band (1 
1): Glee Club ( D ; Bucknellian (2. 3. 
4 ) : Cap and Dagger. 



Thayer D. Moss 

westville. n. j. 
B.S. in Education 

Varsity Baseball (2. 3. 4): Varsity 
Soccer (2. 4). 



193J 



Si'Ven!y-live 



T T. T^f "Jr "?■' fi "i^-*^: i" t^ i* - 







L'flGtnDfl 



Carlos J. Nelson 

NESQUEHONING. PA. 

Theta Upsilon Omega 

B.S. in Education 

Bjnd (1. 2) : Boxing (1. 2) : F 
m.in Hop Committee; C. A. { L 2. ? 



resh- 
. 4). 



Miriam O. Newman 

lewisburg. pa. 
A.B. in Muthematicf^ 
Pi Mu Epsilon. 



Isaac O. Nissley 
harrisburg. pa. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
A.B. in Political Science 

Freshmjn Basketball Manager: Varsity 
Basketball Manager I -4). 




mi 



Clyde M. Noll 

new providence. n. j. 

Alpha Chi Mu 

A.B. in Social Science 

Varsity Soccer ( 2. 3. 4 ) : C. A. (1 . 2. 
3. 4) : 1. Agenda Staff (2). Associate Edi- 
tor (3, 4 ) : Junior Prom Committee: In- 
tcrfratcrnity Council: Vice President of 
.Iiinior Class. 



Sn'enlysi.x 




... k 



r-r^r 



.^J •:*«•*> -ir: -a,- ."». 






,^^.yM;^^^mmmm 



^hxJltis^kbS''^'^ ■ i??>il.^-rttrjr. i 



L'flGfODe 



Mabel B. Nylund 

yeadon. pa. 

A.B. in Biology 

May Day (1. 2. 3) ; C. A. (1, 2, 3, 
4); Student Church (3, 4); Freshman 
Week Committee (2, 3, 4). 



John C. O'Donnell 

wilkes-barre, pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in English 

Glee Club (3) ; Cap and Dagger (4) ; 
Golf Team (3). Captain (4j. 





Alice W. O'Mara 

millburn. n. j. 

A.B. in History 



C. A. (1. 2. 4). 
(4) : W. A. A. (1, 2. 
retary (4) ; May Day 
of Sophomore Women 
2, 4) : Delegate to C. 



Executive Council 
4) ; S. C. C. Sec 
( 1 . 2 ) : Secretary 
; Debate Club (1, 
A. Summer Con- 



ference ( 1 , 2) : 
Essay Prize (4). 



"Design For Living' 



William R. Orlandi 

nanticoke. pa. 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Debating Team (1. 2, 3. 4). 



MM 



1931 



Seventy -seven 










Ruth Ortt 

quakertown. pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

B.S. in Biology 

C. A. (I. 2. 3, 4) : W. A. A. (I. 2. 
3. 4) : May Day (1. 2, 3) : Father's Day 
Co-Chairman (2); Mothers Day Com- 
mittee (3): Senior Counselor: Freshman 
Week Committee. 



L'flGfnOfl 




ViNCHNT PALMISANO 

SUNBURY. PA. 

B.S. in Biology 

Deha Phi Alpha (4) : C. A. (1, 2. 
3, 4): BuckncU Scouting Club (I. 2): 
S. C. C, Vice-President (3): Student 
Faculty Congress. 



Albert F. Peterson 

nesquehoning. pa. 

B.S. in Education 



1937 




Jean E. Peterson 

lewisburg, pa. 

Phi Mu 

A.B. in English 

Mu Phi lipsilon (2, 3. 4) : C. E. A.; 
Cap and Dagger (3): C. A. (1. 2. 3, 
4): Glee Club (I. 2, 3, 4): Mixed 
Chorus (I, 2. 3. 4); Pan-Hcllcnic (1. 

2. 3. 4) : Student Church Choir (1. 2. 

3. 4) : Special Chorus (1. 3. 4) : May 
Day fl. 2. 3): Senior Counselor: Fresh- 
man Week Committee (4) ; Phi Mu 
President (3). 

Seventy-eight 



rf'^-;*- 



•••t:Ki«f 4< 



'rr^ 



.<?«». v!>»t'%7,»v'«;B 



ftj^^iBij8«' »!a»<>3imac«» 



L'fiGfllDe 



John Petherbridge 

haddonfield. n. j. 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

C. A. Cabinet. Treasurer (3) ; Student 
Faculty Congress (4) : Glee Club (2. 3) ; 
A. S. M. E. 



Irene Piszczek 

plymouth, pa. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

A.B. in English 

Thcta Alpha Phi (3. 4) ; Cap and 
Dagger (1. 2. 3. 4): Girl's Glee Club 
(2. 3 ) : Mixed Chorus ( 1 . 2, 3 ) : Artist 
Course Committee (3. 4): C. E. A.: 
Secretary of Student Faculty Congress: 
Associate Editor of Freshman Handbook 
(3) : C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4). 







Marian Pursley 

lock haven. pa. 

Pi Beta Phi 



A.B. 



Art 



Theta Alpha Phi: Art Club (I. 2, 3. 
4), President (4): Bucknellian Staff (1, 

2) : W. A. A. (1. 3.4): May Day (2. 

3) : Cap and Dagger (3. 4) : Apple Cart 
Staff (4) : L'Agenda Staff (4). 



John W. Raker 

kutztown. pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

B.S. in Biology 

Pi Mu Epsilon (3): Band (1. 2. 3); 
Symphony Orchestra (2). 



1031 



Seventy-nine 



■ --^ * ••W VS--'*'- ««* ,«1 iL^ .V, 'iXl 'i>. -.J ■ 1 ■■ .. , V 






'*: i;^ ,1^; .«i-f 



-*••»*.,[•.*,*,»• j* i.' 




M. Charlotte Rathbun 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in Mathematics 

Pi Mu Epsilon (3, 4j : Theta Alpha 
Phi (3, 4) : W. A. A. (1. 2, 3, 4) ; C. 
A. (1. 2. 3. 4); May Day (1); Mixed 
Chorus (1, 2): Cap and Dagger (2, 3, 
4). 



L'flGfflOfl 




Elizabeth S. Reiff 
east greenville, pa. 

Phi Mu 

A.B. in Social Science 

C. A. (I. 2, 3, 4) ; W. A. A. (1, 2, 
3. 4), Vice-President (3) ; May Day (1. 

2. 3). 



/ 



WiLMA A. Rettmer 
BAY SHORE. L. I.. N. Y. 
A.B. in Chemistry 
May Day (I. 2. 3). 



193J 




Allen N. Reynolds, Jr. 
ridgefield, conn. 

Sigma Chi 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

A. I. E. E.; Assistant Football Manager 
(1. 2) : Sophomore Cotillion Committee: 
Junior Prom Committee; L'Agenda StafT 
(4). 



Eighty 




■»wi!!«ri5 



taiaiSj^aiiav^-': 



L'BGfODfl 



Kathryn E. Rice 
bradford. pa. 

Phi Mu 
A.B. in History 

Thcta Alpha Phi: Cap and Dagger (1 

2. 3. 4) : May Day ( 1 ) ; C. A. ( 1 . 2, 

3. 4): Sorority Treasurer (3). 




y 



George W. Richards 

UPPER darby, pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Sophomore Cotillion Committee: Jun- 
ior Prom Committee: LAgcnda Staff (2. 
4 1 : Track M. 2. 3) : Soccer (2. 3). 





Thomas B. Richards 
scranton. pa. 

Kappa Sigma 
A.B. in English 

Student Faculty Congress ( I ) : Chair- 
man of Freshman Hop Committee: Inter- 
fraternity Council (2. 3): Glee Club (2. 
3. 4): C. A. (1. 2. 3. 4): C. A. Coun- 
cil (2): Fraternity President (I. 3): 
Mixed Chorus ( 2 ) : University Quartet 
(3, 41: Freshman Week Committee (2. 
4). 



Joseph F. Rickards 
roselle park. n, .j. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Glee Club: Freshman Hop Committee: 
Sophomore Cotillion Committee: Com- 
merce and Finance Club: Mixed Chorus. 



Eighty-one 



193/ 



hi. * • 



J^^>%< *^'W-V^.;^4^--l*-a;!.^ 













Alfred R. Ricigliano 

newark. n. j. 

Alpha Phi Delta 

B.S. in Biology 

Class Treasurer ( 2 ) ; Student Faculty 
Congress (3): Senior Tribunal (4); 
Freshman Hop Committee; Sophomore 
Cotillion Committee; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; School Spirit Committee (-4); 
Baseball (I. 2, 3). 



lOGfODfl 




Robert A. Riemensnyder 

WILKES-BARRE. PA. 
A.B. in Social Science 




William L. Roberts 
glen rock. n. j. 

Phi Gamma Delta 
B.S. in Biology 

Delta Mu Delta. President ('4): Com 
merce and Finance Club. President (4); 
Glee Club (1. 2. 3); Mixed Chorus (I. 
2. 3); Track (2, 3): Bucknellian (3). 



-^ -f^ T' 



' » ' . ! !' ^> . 




193] 



John H. Robertson 

JHRSEY city. N. J. 

Sigma Chi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Delta .Mu Delta; Commerce and Finance 
Club. 



Eighty-two 





»*!•.»•! :^' *;;-* 



.t.* •** ♦/ .to 



,-.1 iK ;^ v; 



''ifSI??®^ 



ijr^ UJASi.'iKfttt^n ■*■*--•- -* 



L'flGfOOfl 



Frances E. Rockwell 
hamilton. n. y. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in English 

DfU.1 Phi Alpha (1. 2. 3. 4), Secre- 
tary (2. 3): Student Church Council 
(2) : Girl's Glee Club and Mixed Chorus 
( 1 , 2. 3 . 4 ) . Manager ( 3 , 4 ) ; May Day 
(1. 2. 3): Secretary of Forum (4); 
Secretary of Peace Action Committee (3 ) ; 
L'Agenda Staff ( 4 ) ; C. A. ( 1 . 2. 3, 4) , 



Albert F. Rohlls 
wilkes-barre, pa. 

Theta Upsilon Omega 

B.S. m Electrical Engineering 

Beta Epsilon Sigma (2, 3, 4) ; Pi Mu 
Epsilon (4) ; A. L E. E. (3, 4). 





Franklin P. Romberger 

PITMAN. N. J. 
Theta Upsilon Omega 
B.S. in Civil Engineering 
A. S. C. E. (4). Secretary (4). 



Virginia Root 
larchmont. n. y. 
Delta Delta Delta 
A.B. in Economics 



193J 



Eighiy-three 






•»*.«?■ -V •■»'- 



m^SaJ^ aofjxufj. 



'♦5 'M *■ J,-, 

ft..- fc 




L'flGfdOe 



Joseph 


H. 


ROSATI 


RED 


BANK. N. J. 


S 


»g 


Tia Chi 


B.S. 


in 


Education 


Football ( 1 , 
3 ) : Track ( 1 . 


7 

2. 


V 4) : Boxing (1,2. 
3. 4). 


0k 


1 


i 


Jean Roser 

PITTSFIELD. MASS. 


^ ^^ a 


1 


r 


Alpha Chi Omega 


'^ " 


P 


' 


A.B. m Sociology 


x;£^4 






C E. A, (4) : C. A, (1. 2. 3. 4) : 
W. A. A. (1, 2, 3. 4): Larison House 



President (4): May Day (1. 2. 3). 



John P. Ruta 
wilkes-barre. pa. 

Kappa Delta Rho 
A.B. in Biology 



mi 




Joseph Salsburc, 
wilkes-barre. pa. 

A.B. in French 

Theta Alpha Phi (3. 4). Vice-Presi- 
dent (4); Kappa Phi Kappa (3. 4); 
Samuel L. Ziegler Prize for Junior Eng- 
lish: Samuel L. Ziegler Prize for Con- 
versational French. 



Eighly-lour 






' -^tr. .•»-, .V . 






■'.I :« :«' vx 



•• -^^ -jr. <|^? ^** -«: i'.. 



t \ \ n 



•WB^SSSfSS 



ilSsSSLSSSiiJiX-i- 



L'flGfODfl 



Ambrose Saricks 
wilkes-barre. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 
A.B. in Education 

Delta Phi Alpha. President (3) ; Kappa 
Phi Kappa. President (3. 4); Theta 
Alpha Phi: Cap and Dagger (3, 4): 
Drama Editor of Apple Cart (4). 




Marie M. Schaff 

chambersburg. pa. 

A.B. in English 

Apple Cart (4) : C. A. (3, 4). 




M. Catherine Schatz 

DANVILLE. PA. 

Delta Zeta 

B.S. in Biology 

House President (4); Pan-Hellenic (3. 
4); Women's Student Senate (3. 4); 
May Day (1. 2). 




Betty Schilling 

lansdowne. pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Psychology 

May Day (2. 3) : Chairman of Phila- 
delphia Division Committee of 100 (2) : 
Reception Committee for Faculty Tea 
I 1 ) : Sorority Treasurer (5). 



193J 



EiiihtU'five 



T-^>''p/p.~f^'^.. f!'-'^^-' 



« ifc' ■■» 4i 







leetoofl 



Isaac R. Schumaker Jr. 

KINGSTON, pa. 

Theta Upsilon Omega 

B.S. in Electrical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon ( 1 ) : A. I. E. E. (3, 
) , Ch.iirman ( 4 ) . 




Eleanor E. Scureman 

kingston, pa. 

Pi Beta Phi 

A.B. in Psychology 

Delta Phi Alpha (3, 4) ; Theta Alpha 
Phi (3, 4) : C. E. A. (4) ; Cap and 
Dagger (3, 4): May Day (3); W. A. 
A. (3. 4) ; C. A. (3. 4). 



Adelaide O. Seaton 
williamsport. pa. 

A.B. in English 

May Day (1 ) ; C. A. (I, 2. 3, 4) : 
W. A. A. (2. 3. 4): Mixed Chorus (3, 
4) : Girl's Glee Club (3, 4). 



Freas Semmer 

WANAMIE. PA. 
B.S. in Electrical Engineering 
A. 1. H. E.; Band 



193] 



F.iqhfynl.x 



rr$*.r^- 



-•.***j f- 



-1 :K v*'* *.-X 



■ ■: ry vt 



1:^!:ttf;^lij!!l;^ri'l«!fffl^ 



ifleoofl 



Betty Shaw 

camp hill, pa. 

Kappa Delta 

A.B. in Psychology 

Art Club (1): Committee of 100 
{2) : May Day (1. 2. 3) : W. A. A. 
(1, 2. 3. 4): C. A. (1, 2, 3, 4) : Wo- 
men's Student Senate (2, 3); Senior 
Women's Vice-President; Sorority Vice- 
President (4). 



Carolyn I. Shaw 

HYANNIS. MASS. 
B.S. in Biology 

Theta Alpha Phi: May Day (1. 2|: 
Art Club (1. 2. 3, 4) : Cap and Dagger 
(1, 2. 3. 4): Bucknellian (1): Model 
League of Nations: Dance Committee 
(1) : W. A. A. (1. 3. 4) : C. A. (1, 2, 
3. 4). 





Arthur C. Sheldon 

philadelphia. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Football (1. 2 ) : Baseball (2). 




% 




Elizabeth M. Shimer 

delano. pa. 

A.B. in English 

W. A. A. ( I. 2, 4) : C. A. ( 1. 2, 3. 
4), Executive Committee (4). Bazaar 
Committee ( 3j 4): S. C. C. Executive 
Committee (4): Freshman Week Com- 
mittee (41: May Day ( I ) . 



:J-i?J 



Ml 



193] 



EightyufCfn 



- -Id .*!• ■-*■.• ■«* . 



%t%fi^^-!§: 




John G. Sholl. 3rd 

pitman. n. j. 

Delta Sigma 
B.S. in Biology 

Fraternity Vice-President (4); Buck- 
nellian (1. 2); Cap and Dagger (1. 2); 
Sophomore Cotillion Committee; C. A. 
(2. 3. 4). Executive Committee (3, 4). 
Treasurer (4): I 'Agenda Staff (4). 



L'fletODfl 




Clifford L. J. Siegmeister 

NEWARK, N. J. 
A.B. in Political Science 

Pi Sigma Alpha; L'Agenda Staff. 
Photographic Editor (3. 4); 126 lb. 
Wrestling Champion (2. 3); Soccer 
Squad (4); Cap and Dagger ; Bucknellian 
(I. 2) : Sophomore Cotillion Committee; 
Golf Team: C. A. (4). 



Emmanuel I. Sillman 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Phi Lambda Thcta 

B.S. in Biology 

Cap and Dagger (2, 3): Assistant 
Baseball Manager (2); Baseball Manager 
(3); Assistant Editor. L'Agenda (3. 4); 
C. A. ( 1. 2) : Forum (1. 2. 3) ; Dele- 
gate to Model League of Nations: Peace 
Action Committee ( 3 ) . 



93] 




Harold J. Simon 

NEWARK. N. J. 

Sigma Alpha Mu 

A.B. in Biology 

Bucknellian (1. 2); L'Agenda (2) 
Baseball III: Foul Shooting Medal O) : 
Basketball ( 1 ) . 



Eighlii-i'iqhi 




.«■-' :**• «i -in 



•^ iv. vfi >-, 



r^rr 



^n:■•^^i;?'i1¥?■WpWSRa" 



L'eefiiDa 



Sidney A. Simon 

JERSEY SHORE. PA. 

Sigma Alpha Mu 

A.B. in Economics 

Dclt.i Phi Alpha: Pi Sigma Alpha: 
Basketball (11: Bucknellian ( 1 ) : Junior 
Prom Committee. 




Harland G. Skuse 
wanamie. pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
B.S. m Electrical Engineering 

American Institute of Electrical Engi 
neers. 





Stuart M. Smith 

MONTOUR falls. N. Y. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Football (2, 3. 4). Co-Captain (4) 
Basketball (2. 3, 4): Intcrfraternity 
Council: Fraternity President. 




Tho.mas W. Speck 

tuckerton. n. j. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in English 

Sigma Tau Delta. President (4) : Class 
Secretary ( I ) : Frosh Hop Committee; 
Sophomore Cotillion Committee: Class 
President (3): Junior Prom Chairman: 
C. A. Council (3. 4): Student Faculty 
Congress (3. 4). Vice-President (3): 
Freshman Vigilance Committee (2. 3. 4). 
Chairman (4): Interfraternity Council 
(3. 4): Varsity Soccer (4): Interfra- 
ternity Athletic Council (3. 4); Mens 
Glee Club (1. 2. 3): Mixed Chorus (I. 
2): School Spirit Committee (4). 

Eiyhtii-ninc 



mi 



■•*^ "*i ■:^< i 







L'flGfOOfl 



Harriet O. Sphyer 
roselle park. n. j. 

Delta Delta Delta 

A.B. in English 

Cjp and Dagger (I. 2, 4): May Day 
(1); Forum (1); Girl's Glee Club (1. 
2, 4) : Class Treasurer ( 1 ) ; Chapel 
Choir (1 ). 



Richard W. Spiro 
tuckahoe. n. y. 

A.B. in Economics 

Pi Sigma Alpha; Commerce and Fi- 
nance Club: Varsity Soccer (2): Varsity 
Track (2). 



Edwin S. Stebbins 
wellsboro. pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Symphony Orchestra { 1 . 2 ) ; Band 
fl. 2, 3. 41 : Glee Club (2. i ) : Junior 
Prom Committee; Track (1. 2. 3. 4). 
Captain (4); Commerce and Finance 
Club; I. 'Agenda Staff (4). 




Carolyn B. Stryker 

wii.i.iamsport, pa. 

A.B. in English 

C. A. (1, 2. 3. 4) ; 'W. A. A. (\. 3. 
4); Peace Action Group (4): Mixed 
Chorus (3. 4) ; Girl's Glee Club (4). 




193J 



A 



/^ 



h'inelii 






yA-J^-^i^<rt 



. > I > 



'■'-■^Tsmff^T 



iKMtai-j^^'^^WisijtiiKy'V.j Wt'^t'B- •■ 



L'BGtflDB 



Clarence J. Sweeney 

WEST PITTSTON, PA. 

Beta Epsilon Sigma 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 



Elizabeth A. Talley 

WILLIAMSPORT. PA. 
A.B. in Biology 

Delta Phi Alpha, Secretary (3) : Theta 
Alpha Phi: C. E. A.. Secretary (4) ; May 
Day (1) ; Cap and Dagger (1. 2. 3. 4) : 
Student Faculty Congress (3): Mixed 
Chorus (1 . 2. 3 ) : Girl's Glee Club ( 3 ) : 
Women's Student Senate (3): Freshman 
'Week Committee (4) ; Senior Counselor. 





Alden S. Thompson 

gloucester. mass. 

Phi Gamma Delta 

B.S. in Biology 



H. D. Troutman 

MILTON. PA. 
B.S. m Chemical Engineering 

Alpha Chi Sigma: Beta Epsilon Sigma: 
Band (1. 2): Symphony Orchestra (2. 
3. 4). 






193] 



NtnetU'One 



; T. T. T ~?« *' -^-^i -%;' V 




L'BGfOOe 



Joseph Valentino 

brooklyn. n. y. 

A.B. in Lutin 

Football (I. 2, 3, 4): Baseball (1. 2, 
3. 4) : Boxing (1, 2. 3. 4). Captain (4). 





Ruth Van Leuven 

westfield. n. j. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

B.S. in Biology 

Delta Phi Alpha (2. 3. 4): Theta 
Alpha Phi (3, 4); Student Faculty Con- 
gress (3. 4): Cap and Dagger (1. 2. 3. 
4): Mixed Chorus (1. 2): Women's 
Special Chorus (1. 2); May Day (1. 2, 
5 ) : Senior Counselor. 



John B. Van Why 

winsted. conn. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 




Anthony Vasquez 
philadelphia. pa. 

A.B. in Philns,itphii 

Cap and Dagger: President of Pre- 
Ministerial Group. 



1931 



Nineliilu.'o 



^r^-: 



?r- .**. :ti y-^ 






iiferttt«g^i-»,a-fe ii 



L'flGfODfi 



Charles I. Vogel 

CALDWELL. N. J. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in Biology 

Glee Club (i. ?. 4); Mixed Chorus 
(2); University Quartet (4); Wrestling 
Champion — 165 lb. (2). 



John C. Walsh 

carbondale. pa. 

Phi Kappa Psi 

B.S. in Political Science 




Paul R. Walton 
kingston, pa. 

Kappa Delta Rho 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Alpha Chi Sigma: Mathematics So- 
ciety ( 1 . 2) . 



Alphonse Warakomski 

nanticoke. pa. 

B.S. in Biology 



193? 



Ninely-rbree 



■: 'f. ■%< V -it! 'f,J -♦<'•«■ 

' ---' '#' .-'»> i».- .%'■ ••*• **i 4? -lis.!' -wj 'H^j ... •. 



^i -^If -^-r. fl ^t*» Jffl; •■«•*• i-l; fv ^^ 




L'ftGtnDfl 




Philip H. Watson 

philadelphia, pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Commerce and Finance 

Mens Glee Club (1. 1. 3, 4): Mixed 
Chorus ( 1 . 2, 3. 4 ) ; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee: C. A. (1. 2, 3, 4). 



Anne E. Weatherby 

woodstown. n. j. 

Kappa Delta 

B.S. in Education 

Thcta Alph,i Phi (3, 4): Cap and 
Dagger (2. 3. 4) : Art Club (2. 3). Sec- 
retary-Treasurer: Committee of 100 (2); 
May Day (1, 2) : W. A. A. (1, 2, 3, 
4) ; Sorority President (3). 



Eleanor A. Weber 

BRIDGETON, N. J. 
B.S. in Education 

3uckncllian (2); Apple Cart (4). 



193] 



Joseph Wik.iuman 

laureldale. pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

A.B. in Biology 

Soccer Manager (3. 4) : I. 'Agenda Staff 
(4). 



Ninety-four 




»**♦•< JM .*'.->« 



^ :**■♦■! A* »--4» 



i-i-v. rrt V. 



^3* .^*.>-'i- 






L'OGfUDfl 



Sarah E. Weller 

kingston. pa. 
A.B. in English 

Pi Mu Epsilon: Tbeta Alpha Phi; C. 

A. ( 3 ) : Cap and Dagger (3. 4 ) . 




4 



Ward Whitebread 
nuangola. pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
B.S. in Chemical Engineering 
Alpha Chi Sigma. 







Frederick H. Wilson 

trout run. pa. 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
B.S. in Economics 

Baseball (3, 4 ) ; Commerce and Finance 
Club. 



Agnes R. Wolfe 
benton. pa. 

Delta Delta Delta 
A.B. in English 

Thcta Alpha Phi (3. 4l: Delta Phi 
.Mpha (3. 4). Vice-President (4): Cap 
and Dagger (3. 4) : C. A. (3. 4). 



931 



Ninety-five 






■'^ ■'*'^■<^ -*^ '^V ■^* ^.•. r5 -.f^,' J^r -^i -i-X •».; 



«i >J^ .«f .,«. .^ .^ ^,. ,^^ -^ i^-ix ^ 




Thomas Wood Jr. 

MUNCY. PA. 
Phi Gamma Delta 
A.B. in Economics 

Phi Mil Alpha Sinfonia; Bucknclliar 
(1. 2, 3. 4). Editor (3); Student Fac- 
ulty Congress (3. 4): L'Agenda (2): 
X'ice-President of Intcrfraternity Council 
(4) : Symphony Orchestra (2). 



L'flGEODfl 




John F. Worth 

ocean grove. n. j. 

Kappa Delta Rho 

A.B. in English 

Kappa Phi Kappa: Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Fraternity President (4): C. A. 
( I. 2. 3. 4) : L'Agenda Staff (4). 



Elizabeth Wray 

baltimore. md. 

Alpha Chi Omega 

A.B. in Biology 

Class Treasurer ( 1 ) ; Frosh Hop Com- 
mittee: W. A. A. (1. 2. 3. 4), Treas- 
urer (2. 3). President (4): President of 
.lunior Women: May Day fl, 2. 3): 
Senior Counselor: Freshman Week Com- 
mittee (4): Women's Student Senate 
(4): Sorority Vice-President (4): Pres- 
ident of C. E. A. (4). 




Anthony Yodis 
nanticoke. pa. 

B.S. in Chemical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon: Beta Epsilon Sigma. 
Secretary (4) . 



f^ 



193J 




Ninely-six 



rr^r^-! 



m;«S!i8}Ki l^^ .V' ft:---a:: . :-.-t-r>y .^^r^^^t^ ■-» 



I'flGfooe 



Jack C. Young 

benton, pa. 

Kappa Sigma 

B.S. in Education 

Pi Mu Epsilon; Cap and Dagger; 
Freshman Hop Committee: Freshman 
Baseball; Varsity Soccer (2). 



WiLLARD D. Zimmerman 

SUNBURY. PA. 
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

A. S. M. E.. Vice-President (4). 




(Photographs Not Avditable] 



Donald P. Bean 
Ernest S. Cramer 
Kent Leinbach 
Justin E. O'Donnell 
Eleanor G. Owens 
John F. Quakers 
John S. Rodgcrs 
Edward J. Salansky 
Lawrence G. Wellivcr 
Howard S. Whipkey 
May Jo Williams 



Port Chester, Pa. 

Haddonfield. N. J. 

Watsontown. Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Ashley, Pa. 

Allentown, Pa. 

DuPont, Pa. 

Wellsburg, N. Y. 

Conncllsville, Pa. 

Houtzdale, Pa. 



133] 



Ninety-seven 






fi-'% ■'' . I 



'^^ v; i.r* , 



-^-■^^♦x 



li^*>.->^:K 



SI' yaij^-^'jati'MiJste-K.- sv.r^t'^'i-a 





^<i^ t/?Z/Uny<L^ 



^•■y'> 



•>J V. -.»< 



trrt 




• 1 » » 



''^s i'K'^; Nifls^' ■ ■ilBim???^'!^ 




■ r I-' '■ 

« • ^ f • I 

W '..>:v,;lr..>.. ;a.i;J,:'/ 


-*;■ •■*■■>< 

,-■ ' A : 


^.■t ..'»*, ^..- >iv »► 




i^ 




^^-^ 




1.--' 








1 


^ 




t \ \ \ . 






'.rr.'s r^'^-.ii?'^:;'f«^sf?*3?'!S 



fiasiis«''^'> '^.;»»r*-ii 



ru55 Qp 



plebu /^ 











)' S-*' *4 Jfi-** ^ ■ 



M-3^x^*%i<-~ 



rr^r 



^y :^.-^^-y 



'Smrvm^'^w??^?f^i!^ 



^i'i l^^^s_*B-1te.-.N^■- -'"---- 




juniORS... 



SOPHOmORfS... 

ffifSHfiifn... 



Enjoying isolation 
in preparation 
for a vocation . . . 






'•^1-^-'^ ■^■:..p..i,( ..wr^.^^j.^f V 






vAtf V ■ ••>»'■ ^V V 5W ■*! 4 




Top: Ut'L'gjn 



Frit'dman 



Webb 



SchuU/ 



Joseph Deegan 
Daniel Friedman 
Ruth Webb 
Kathryn Shui.tz 



OFFICFRSOFTHECLASSOF 19-^8 

JUNIOR YEAR 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Arthur Calvin 
Robert Streeter 
Grace Gault 
Frnfst Mueller 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Hobart Parsons 
Ira Fox 
Ruth Dunlap 
David Sellers 



freshman year 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

1 reasurer 



One llurilrfj .Via 



m$ 



tv^ffe^tfti^a^^ti'ws^'i-::^<.'a.v^:jttv..-^f^*r'4 



T O THE smooth, sophisticated rhythms of Ray Noble's 
' Orchestra, the Junior Class once more glided into the 
social limelight. As usual the most popular dance of the 
year was held in the Women's Dining Room, with its 
cheerful atmosphere. The Prom was especially gay and 
sparkling this year, the colorful spectacle being enhanced 
by the girls in trailing evening gowns bedecked with cor- 
sages, and their escorts in tails and tuxes. 

The Class of 19 38 owes much to the efforts of the 
Prom Committee, headed by Joe Deegan, which was im- 
portant in making a brilliant success of one of the year's 
social highlights. 




Junior Prom Committee, Standmg: Zager, Ledden, .■Vllcii. \\ orth, Rubens 
Seated: Bowman, Friedman, Deegan, Webb, Wallace 

One Hundred Seven 



Um %!. 4:< ^' ■*; ii -, 

•■'•--*;> -.v- ',: \., -j^; ,, 




sopfiomoRts 




Top: Lewis 



Policclli 



Stcckcr 



Christopher 



THE Class of 'V) invaded the campus last year with a definite 
spirit, and they have carried it through this year in exactly the 
same manner. They marked the beginning of the era of increased 
enrollment at Bucknell. with a large class. They brought with them 
an air of vivacity which still characterizes each one of them. 

Now. as Sophomores, we find that their record still shows them 
as they were when they entered. The year began with a defeat in 
the Water Tower Battle at the hands of the Freshmen, marked by a 
hard, long fight. 

They originated the new policy of having smaller bands tor 
their dance, the Sophomore Cotillion. This year the dance was 
held in January, and Howard Gale's Orchestra from Harrisburg 
furnished the music. The dance was a big success in spite of the 
engagement of a lesser-known band. 

The Sophomores have a great many men on both the Varsity 
Football and Basketball teams, which shows that their perseverance 
and spirit is not limited to any one class of activities. 

Oiji' //ii"i/rci/ I'.uihl 



M-^'A:-. 



l^^tjjtaixiiteJSKJtiiSNV'^Jtw^^ 




Fisher 



Eyler 



Lcpperd 



Top: Lowe 



T HE Class of 1940. the largest in the history of our Alma Mater, 
' made its verdant entrance into Bucknell's gates last fall. An en- 
thusiastic start was rather dampened by the traditional "Water 
Parade" imposed upon the boys by their traditional foes, the Sopho- 
mores. 

Yet, no such moist welcome from their Seniors could waylay 
the zealous spirits of the "green-topped caps." The Frcshies turned 
the tables on those superior Sophomores, when they successfully 
blotted out haughty " '39" and replaced it with their emblem. " '40 ' 
on the Water Tower, and other convenient spots on and off the 
campus. 

The Freshman class again showed their prowess by over- 
whelming the Sophomores with their multitudinous numbers during 
the Freshman -Sophomore Scrap. 

Socially the neophytes made their debut on Hallowe'en with a 
gala masquerade party, and did not shirk from participating in all 
of the social and extra-curricular activities which are a part of the 
campus life. 

One Hundred Nine 



: ^f'': '¥. -f^ -•^.'tf -*<? -ft =*;' '*';•** -*t 'f^- «■? ■4-' « -tV tft- ■ 

" "i -^.y ■*■.■• ■•*■* '•»■■; -^\i .J.-, -•,■: --.j^f -vT. ,.},'>: ..>,t .j, -■ .,-r. ,«, » ..^ j,^ i.' j. 



« 4 > '. 



■Tt'^r- 



fe^ y ( ««^^^^^'^•^l1!^.'H::^'t lfe>^■:^;-^^.; ■?.<'Tiiv 







■■'^<i ^, -m -^i -^t'i «?*; ■«i, .*, 



y-^A *i Mi-** 



Myi'A* i:-- 



:« '^r -.•:•»•*- - 



.*-':** *:t ■■^- 



i"ti«'« « 



XJ'>^^^:K^ 



i^s-t^'^;^i!is^-irnip«???^'8S 





puBucfliions 



Crystallizing 

activities of college days 

into lasting form 

in black and white . . . . 









': r r , T T 'f"^f 'T^ 'V =*^ '*^' -^^ -^r ^%A ** •*-: 




I'flGEflDfl 



N'irgil Lanni, Eililor-in-Chief 



L 'AGENDA makes its appearance this year as Bucknell's first Senior 
yearbook. With the issuance of Memorial L' Agenda last year, the 
annual passed through a transitional stage from a Junior to a Senior 
publication. 

1937 L' Agenda is characterized by several changes in the staft 
setup and the general layout of the book itself. 

The Editorial staff was revamped to include the addition of a 
Junior staff, a Photographic department, and an Art staff. The latter 
two staffs were added in an attempt to encourage more student effort 
in the production of the book. The Junior staff, competing for the 
editorship, is directly under the supervision of the editor. 




One Hundred Fourteen 



Edilur Lanni cxpUins layuut oi 



pr^-r 



^-v- iv 



guu¥m»M« 



jjJEJaaaiai&AMayv' 



/ # 



0F193J 




RusscU Appleby, Busini-ss Miitiu^cr 



The editors in their selection of a theme attempted to present a 
crystallization of the everyday campus life, during the course of the 
college year, in a modern motif. L' Agenda is the product of student 
art. photography, and original layout ideas. A liberal use of candid 
camera photographs set in the latest expression of balance, combine to 
make L' Agenda a modern publication. 

L' Agenda attempts to go beyond the mere collection of photo- 
graphs and copy. It has woven a pattern of many expressions through- 
out the main and sub-divisions by the effective use of art and verse. 



'^«^'"^1>H 



1937 V Agenda to entire staff 



One Hundred Fiiteen 












■ iij .»: ■«,».-ii'. 




IHEBUCI^ 



J 



Harvey Travis, Edtlor-hi-Chicf 

T HE Bucknellian is the weekly newspaper of the University. This eight-pjgc 
• journal, published on Thursday of each week, is handled entirely by stu- 
dents. It is an active laboratory for journalism students. The staff members 
are chosen, on a competitive basis, by the Board of Publications. Students 
serving in the capacity of editor, business manager, news editor, and managing 
editor are awarded credit hours for their work. 

1937 marks the fortieth anniversary of the Bucknellian and a special 
memorial issue was prepared by the staff to celebrate that event. An eight- 
page supplement was added to the regular issue, containing a reprint of the first 
issue and special feature articles concernmg the life and times of 1897. 




Standing: Ilopkini, Uurkc, Robcrlsun 

Seated: Broznian, Maloncy, Lon);, Strccter, Travi^, UDrk, Hires. Wi 



One Hundred Sixteen 



)d, Goi>d 



j^r^f 4i-4» 



rir., -.-i-K ■*- 



K r*i( v-t 



■K«Rfi?r:f^i^'iii«!??«s:'l 



!il1**.4iiat;'^-iJs;-A' ''-•' 




William Work, Biisitn\% Mtiiici^^ci 

H MEMBER of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Association, The Bucknellian 
was awarded second place in the editorial contest of the I. N. A. It was also 
given honorable mention in regard to news and makeup. Last year the paper 
won first class honor rating from the National Scholastic Press Association 
ratings. 

Increased use of pictures and feature articles have done much to enhance 
the excellence of the newspaper. Thumbnail sketches of professors with accom- 
panying interviews, and the "Undergraduate" column dealing with current 
events of student interest written by a campus leader, serve to increase reader 
enthusiasm. 




Thursday afternoon . . . Staff prepares Biiiktirllians for circulation 



One Hundred Seventeen 



■'.cv. 





*, •••»«' -*^>- 05 4i« jii 4^ ^,: ..«. 

:»« ^ ^>- %; -^ ;. 




: , ■ ■^~* 


%4^^vV»bi 




Gillet. Editor 
Lanni, Business Manager 



m flPPLf CflRI 

T HH Apple Cart is the student literary maga- 
' zine on the Bucknell campus. 

Before the appearance of the Apple Cart last 
year, Bucknell had had only one other maga- 
zine for students, the Belle Hop. a humorous 
publication. However, it was recognized last 
year, that there was a need on the campus for 
a magazine supplying good literary entertain- 
ment. The Apple Carl also serves the purpose 
of encouraging literary expression among the 
students, and provides them with an outlet for 
it. 

There were two issues this year. The first 
issue, which appeared in November, contained 
short stories, sketches, and poetry contributed 
by students, and articles and reviews on music, 
drama, art, and books. The other issue appeared 
in May and featured spring activities on the 
campus. 




Gillec, Lanni, Ferber, Slavin, Bcntlcy. Purslcy, Travis, Saricks 
Onr llumlnd F.iqhleen 



-f^-^-t 






ii!ffk!.j4MWytig(i Afc>>«< «ta^ -5a^£ ^ 



BOARD Of PUBLICflllOnS 




I rjvts, Lanni, Appicrb)', 1 heis^ (Chairman), S\ urk, liuittr 



THE Board of Publications guides and directs the courses 
of the various campus pubUcations. It selects the staff 
members and places its stamp of approval on any new 
literary venture. 



IHf mmm HfldDBOOti 



THE Freshman Handbook, presented by the Christian 
Association to the incoming freshman class, is a compre- 
hensive guide to Bucknell campus life. 

This small book contains an inclusive account of the 
traditions, activities, organizations, and rules of the Univer- 
sity. Pictures of faculty and campus leaders, and important 
organizations are included. 

The staff is selected from those applying to the Christian 
Association office and approved by the Board of Publications. 

Onf Hundred Nim-livn 









1 '^A t<5* ^ ■ ,.«: flj.j; -^.i^ -«c 1^?; 



< 



•^?4;^ 



?•:♦* *j -ir: 



Kikwi'lii 




TICS... 



Lights 

play upon actors 
depicting emotions 
dramatically interpreted 



With his magic wand 
summoning forth sounds 
woven into a beautiful 
fabric of melody 



'*«,.-*t '^ -Jr? •^-. « -.tfe' *■>; *4' .^.i »,.• .j^'x 



cflpefio 





Top, pages 122-123: "Death Takes a Holiday", starring Joe 
Salsburg, Cap and Dagger's first presentation of the year. 
Left, center: Cap and Dagger meeting in Bucknell Hall 
Rathbun, technician, tests lights. liottom: Otficers of the 
first semester, Hinton. Axthelni (President), Piszc/ek; orticcrs 
of the second semester, Roseile. Renville (President), Both. 
Page 123, center: Staff prepares scenery for "Hamlet." 
Right, upper left: Saricks, Director, explains scene to actors. 
Upper right: Staff sets "props" on stage for "Hamlet". 
Lower left: "Hamlet" cast studies between cues during re- 
hear^JK. Lower right: John Korsht (Hamlet) in scene with 
George Both (Polonius). 

One HunJri'J I Wt-ntij liuo 



r^r 



-.« ^ v-i tJ 



it-»tt^iW?«#K^ftifeM«at>^%ii-^ ^ 



r,'=!ri?^ipaf'-i« 




OeGGER 



To foster interest among the students and to provide 
opportunity for work in dramatic art is tlie purpose 
of Cap and Dagger. Bucknell's dramatic society. 
A variety of human emotions was expressed this 
year in the plays of Cap and Dagger. "Death Takes 
a Holiday, " the mystical dramatization of Death, 
was produced for the annual Father's Day Celebration 
last fall. The entertaining comedy, "The Young 
Idea," by Noel Coward, was the next production. 

The climax of the year's dramatic offerings was 
"Hamlet," produced by Cap and Dagger with the 
cooperation of the Artist Course committee. De- 
clared by many to be the finest thing Bucknell has 
seen, the acting, setting, and costumes were all out- 
standing. John Forsht, a former Bucknell student, 
returned to the campus to take the part of Hamlet. 



One Hundred Twenty three 









'^"'■.'V 't'' ■•** ■^■' *■* -V^' ■*^'^: ^.'V -^-i »> 

• ■•« i^ ■«: ;^,t -iv' J ' 




Paul Gies 

Symphony Orchestra Director 



musicflL ofiGenizfliions 






THE Scliool of Music was organized on this campus in 1888. 
Since then, through its orchestra, band, glee clubs and througli 
private lessons, it has been a large factor in enriching the lives 
i/l those students who come in contact with it. 

The musical groups have earned an enviable reputation in 
the surrounding territory of Lewisburg and are often called upon 
to give concerts out of town. They also feature largely in campus 
life with their many recitals and the special music they offer at 
other meetings. 

The Symphony Orchestra is composed of musically-minded 
students who desire to cultivate attitudes toward profound music. 
The study of compositions by the masters of the classical and 
romantic periods, and the presentation of these works by the Sym- 
phony Orchestra are two of the main objectives of this organiza- 
tion. 

During the past season, two chai^el concerts were presented — 
one, a program of the works of Bach, and the other, a Christmas 
program. 

On March 17, the main symphony concert of the year was 
presented under the auspices of the Artist Course. The guest 
artist was the famous English baritone, Mr. Arthur Fear, who 
appeared in Wagner's "Die Meistcrsinger. " The major part of 
the concert was devoted to a special arrangement of a portion of 
that musical drama. 

Another imptirtant event was the Bach concert given at the 
Spring Festival. 1 he Symphony Orchestra also furnished the music 
for 'Hamlet." which was sponsored by the Artist Course. 

One llunilrcil Tuvnly four 






a**!te*ie8iiS5»terj<».-;.-i 



coutGiufn 
musicuiii 




Gies, Stickney, Schaef, Blumcnson, Henderson, Lewis, Strub 



THE Collegium Musicum, an off- 
spring of the Symphony 
Orchestra, consists of a small group 
of musically-minded students who, 
in order to appreciate the music 
of the Renaissance, play it on in- 
struments of that period. It is 
conducted by Professor Paul Gies. 







■m 



Symphony Orchestra 



One Hundred Twenty -five 



. v'- 7" ''^"■' ■*" ■'^'' ■^' ~'^ ~'*^ 



■ - -ri ^ -ff. '*r^ -n, -i-i -f^ T'> •^< *■- ■ V' ■-' ■ -t ■ J , 
" •: "i!< --K "*' ^^t 4^ 4': -lis" M -♦^ ■ i-f • ^': i t ■■« ; 



t i 



_-:-sA 




Paul G. Stolz 
Dirccior of "Mcssia/y 



niXfD CHORUS 



THE Mixed Chorus, a group of 150 men and 
women voices, is the largest choral organization 
on the campus. Directed by Miss Grace Jenkins, 
the group gives several major concerts. On March 
17 it sang on the Artist Course program featuring 
Arthur Fear, noted baritone. For the Spring Fes- 
tival, the Mixed Chorus will sing Bach Cantata, 
"Singers Awake". At Commencement, the singers 
presented Mendelssohn's "Hymn of Praise." 

Each year at Christmas time the group sings, 
under the direction of Dr. P. G. Stolz, Handel's 
"Messiah." 

Three hours of practice each week are required of 
the members of the Mixed Chorus for which one 
credit hour a year is given. 



One Hundred [wenty-six 






siiisa.aaiiM&:jfev' 









-miuri^ff 



Frantz, Davis, Balbirnie, Oaks 

mtLROSf OUflRItT 

THE Melrose Quartet consists of four members of Phi 
Mu Epsilon national honorary music fraternity and 
is directed by Miss Melicent Melrose. The quartet 
sings in various churches and sang at the Melrose recital. 
It was organized to develop the musical taste of the 
performers and their listeners and specializes in the early 
Italian and German music. 



IllfILt QUafilfll 



THE Male Quartet, directed by Professor Melvin 
LcMon, is a branch of the Men's Glee Club. The 
quartet appears with the Glee Club and gives programs 
by itself. It sings on high school and chapel programs, 
and assisted in a service over WJZ, the national 
broadcasting company. 




Speck, Richards, LeMon, Kelchner, Vogel 
One Hundred Twenty-seuen 






:i^TT. T\'f T 'V f{ ?' I^- 1^ =^ *> ^^ « 

't' ■'■'■ •»^- -V; •^: v- ■ ^■ 



^ ?^? ^. W ^ V 4> ^:. .5:^ 'W. 4: V 




LcMon 



Claypoole 



GLEE 



T HE Men's Glee Club was re-organized by 
' Assistant Professor Melvin LeMon in the 
spring of 193 3. Before that time it consisted 
of those male students who were taking vocal 
lessons. 

Mr. LcMon organized the club as an extra- 
curricular activity and started out with forty 
voices. In that year only local concerts were 
given. Ten boys were added the next fall and 
the club took its first long tour up in New ^'ork 
State, visiting Rochester, Buffalo, Altoona, and 
Pittsburgh. They also became increasingly in 
demand locally. 

A total of sixty members was reached in the 
years 1934-1935. In that year the club took 
its first trip to metropolitan New York and gave 
its first national broadcast. Thirty-two con- 
certs were given this year. 

During the years 1935-1936 the Glee Club 
gave forty-seven concerts including a successful 
tour of the neighboring states. The club re- 
ceived national recognition as they gave five 
broadcasts, three ot which were national hook- 
ups. 

The club has gained the enthusiastic support 
of the students and administration, and acts as 
a connecting link between the School and 
Alumni. It is noteworthy for the fine music 
it presents to its public and cooperates with all 
other musical organizations, singing in ora- 
torios, operas, and with orchestral concerts. 



One HuJ}dred Ticenly-eight 



■ir,, ■_•;■< ^ 



sa^!&fesSMi!a4&«ai-^i»*>''*'J-«'''*'«'^' 



CLUB 



T HIS year the Glee Club has continued and 
' enhanced its previous record. Fifty-five 
men presented twenty-five concerts in an eight- 
day tour of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, 
singing over stations KYW, WABC. and WOR. 
The group this year featured the singing of 
Pennsylvania Folk Song, which, with the 
specially arranged College songs, were the most 
popular on their program. 

Besides the tour, the group gave many other 
concerts and sang in the University's production 
of "The Messiah." and the Artist Course pre- 
sentation of Arthur Fear and "Die Meister- 
singer." Singing at the Father's Day banquet, 
in church on Mother's Day, at the Spring Fes- 
tival, and at Commencement, has become tra- 
ditional for the Glee Club. 









Top Row: Matweejha, Johnson. Rabc, Mutchlcr, Tcrnll, Hughes 

Second Row: McDowell, Baldwin, Larscn, West, Picrson, Fox, G. Moll, Gunlac 

Third Row: RaUtor.. Shupe, Lowe, Kelley, Weissman, Rishel, Bagcnstose, Meistcr, C. Clemens, H. Moll, Berstein 

Fourth Row: Sherwood, Fcrd, Gundaker, Scott, Laughlin, Ingalls, Watson, Beiswinger, Greene, Pauly 

Bottom Row; Claypode, Richards, Schmick, Vogcl, Buckalew, LeMon, W. Clemens, Smith, Rapp 

0/)l' Hundred Tivcnlu-nini: 






•*« '*'( --^v -^j •«.: t-i -.tV 4t.Y .-s-j' .^.1 -»^- ^v 




Bcrnice Henry 



BUCIiflELL 



ITHIN two years, the Buckncll Band has been 
increased to contain seventy persons. It owns its 

own uniforms and instruments, and is now organiz.ed 

into a year-round organization. 

Much of the success of the band is due to Lynnford 
Claypoole. student manager, who engineered the 
finances for uniforms, equipment, and instruments, 
which had been burned in the Old Main fire. 

The band, once merely an extra-curricular activity. 
has now been given academic standing which insures 
credit for those who participate. 

The band, in addition to its music during the 
football season, also gave concerts during the winter. 
Their concert at the Spring Festival has become a 
tradition. 




Van ^"ic Ml-Ii/lt I It-nry 

One Hundred I hirly 



.Minium Bund 



Hhh 



!•">. ^ >-X 



Sfirsi t»>A.*)iaii=N=tT J 



BeOD 




LeMon 



RNEW innovation was the introduction of girls 
into the band. The band has become nationally 
known through its popular drum-major. Bernice 
Henry, for a while believed to be the only girl drum- 
major in the country. 

The band won first prize in the Pennsylvania 
Firemen's parade, held in Williamsport, in competi- 
tion with fifty other bands. 

This spring the band conducted all-College sings 
which were held on the Women's College Quad- 
rangle. The sings lasted about three-quarters of an 
hour, during which time the band gave a short con- 
cert, and then played for the group singing. 

In addition to playing for every home football 
game, the group went to Philadelphia, and State 
College with the team. 



Claypoole 




f_Jpf Hiiniticd 1 hirly nm' 



8,1 ■"*■:!-»•( =*;* ■^^■>*i ^Tl *><. vir* •« 



.#.'• j^ .Kit ^, 



I 



» » i ! 



\*\t 



i^rr^j* 



r^'«-.^?^-ir'i«???'!Wffl''8S 



aiy^;m-^'iia!aifc-viiag.v-;.t«v.--^ t^v. 





mm... 



cfiRiSTifld flssocieTion... 



"Be it resolved 

that the question be not begged 

and the rebuttal devastating . . . 



Combining 

ideals of Christian living 

with a definite activity . 



^ -^ ri -^^^ % ^ W ^ Vc ;., :i; C ;. ■ .:: .L .1; .^. .« .i, ... 






-■^ -w .^;, •V--' •?! ->s -*'. ^ 
-i -h -^z it- •?«.■ .'^t-': ••*• 

V- >;**!: ■•»•• -w •'.»■" -'^» .-,--'. ys 





Lee F. Lybarger, Debate Coach 



DfBflIf 



THE climax of Bucknell's debating season 
was reached in a two weeks' tour of 
mid-western colleges. The team, debating 
that Congress should be empowered to fix 
minimum wages and minimum hours for 
industry, showed up favorably against a 
formidable list of opponents. 

Two dual debates with the Bucknell 
Junior College were held in March. Other 
debates were held with Penn State, Uni- 
versity of Tulsa, Western Maryland, 
Villanova. and Swarthmore Colleges. 
Some of the schools they met in the mid- 
west were Carnegie Tech, University of 
Pittsburgh, Western Reserve University, 
Purdue University, Ohio Wesleyan Col- 
lege, University of Cincinnati, and Loyola. 

Special recognition came to the Bucknell 
debating squad this year when its leader 
C. H. Richardson and Rita Holbrook, 
were asked to represent Bucknell over the 
National Broadcasting Company on the 
three-cornered debate between Mt. Hol- 
yoke, Colgate, and Bucknell on the ad- 
vantages of a girls' school, a boys' school, 
and a co-educational instiuiiion. 

The coach of the debating squads, both 
boys and girls, is Mr. Lee Francis 
Lybarger, Jr., who graduated from Buck- 
nell in 1928. 

The student manager is C. H. Richard- 
son. Robert Burke, William Clemens, 
Robert Jones. Thomas Leinbach, William 
Orlandi. and ,Iohn Duffy are on the squad. 



( Inv llurnlrcJ I hirly IHiir 




Richardson 

Men's Captain 



Holbrook 

Women* s Captain 



UJOmfO'S DfBflTf 



THE Women's Debating Squad, managed by Rita Holbrook, also had a suc- 
cessful season. In many cases they held a dual debate with the boys' team. 
They, too, made a mid-west trip meeting such colleges as University of Pitts- 
burgh, University of Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Illinois, 
Ohio Wesleyan University, University of Akron, Juniata College, Pennsyl- 
vania College for Women. Allegheny, Ursinus, Lebanon Valley, Cedar Crest, 
and Albright Colleges. 

The girls accompanied the boys' team to the debating conference which 
was held at Penn State. Members of the debate squad were: Rita Holbrook, 
Maxine Askey. Margaret Campbell, Lorcna Kyle, Doris Loos. Celia Markis, 
Henrietta McCausland. Mary McClelland, and Margaret Perrin. 




Standing: Loos, Askey, Marcus, McCousland, Orlandi, Burke, Campbell, Perrin 
Seated: Lybarger, Clemens, Holbrook, Leinbach, Kyle. Jones, McClelland, Richardson 



One Hundred Thnlq-five 



■' r #• T' T- T T if '^■V ^=! '*^' •*<' ■*T- v>-^ ■^'■ 

■^f■.■^■^■^MUU^^%i^ki :^, .*i .^ h .;; .v,^ 



^?%y^vVSy!f.;i-i 




f^ ^ ^' 




left to right: I'arker, Condict, Pctlu-rbridgc, Shields. Fox, 
Shiill, O'M.ira, Brown, McKcnna, Speck, Griffith, Shinier 



CHRISIIfld flSSOCIBTIOn 

T HE Christian Association, guided by its 
' executive secretary, Forrest D. Brown, is one 
of the largest organizations on this campus. 
Inspiration, fellowship, and service bind its 
members together as they seek to realize the 
finest qualities of religion and apply it in their 
everyday living. Men and women students 
combine with faculty and churches in a unified 
program in an effort to attain that ideal. 

The Christian Association is associated with 
the Student Christian Movement of the Middle 
Atlantic States which has national and world 
affiliation. 

An executive committee of ten students, aided 
in many ways by an Advisory Committee of 
students, faculty and ministers, leads the Chris- 
tian Association. The activities of the C. A. 
are many and varied, ranging from conferences 
with Student Church leaders to folk dancing 
and outings. The Association is one of the 
strongest in the Student Christian Movement. 
Its president, Clinton Condict, is chairman 
of the Regional Ct^uncil. 




A scene from "Into Th) Kinydum", staged by the C-. .\. I)r.im.i Group 



One Hiiniri'il Thirli/six 



v^r^r 



>»ti'^!iV&JWxaxrrim 



eLONG cherished dream of the Christian Association has 
come true in the acquisition of a cabin site. A plot 
of 28 acres of woodland and fields about 7 miles from 
town has been bought, upon which a lodge will be built 
as soon as possible. Later sleeping quarters will be added. 

The C. A. this year sponsored a Leadership Training 
Council at which representatives from Penn State, Lock 
Haven, and Juniata were present. A mining inquiry, 
which brought two miners from Scots Run to Bucknell 
and ended in Wilkes-Barre. was also instigated by the 
organization. 

A new interest in folk dancing was fostered by the 
C. A., which, during the year, sponsored an outing led 
by Gene Durham. An afternoon of folk dancing led by 
Mr. Wilbut Kews of Penn State, and an exhibition fol- 
lowed by instruction by Ukrainian dancers from Penn 
State. 




Students Jnd Fjculty members visit proposed site of c:ibin. architect's 
sketch of which is pictured below 



One Hunilrcil Thirly-seven 



I. .*» •*' 



■ :'*.' -*« >•. 



;V .St- •?>.?• 




SIUDffll GOVfRlldlfllT 



Avoiding autocracy — 
retaining democracy- 
through the practice 
of self-representation 













Left to right: Richnrdson, Pethcrbiidge. Wood, Filer, Dcegan, Speck. Lewis, Stolz, McMahan, Condict, G.itiiings, 

lirown, Gies, Page, Piszczek, Porter, Tlieiss 



SIUOfOT-fflCULiy conGRtss 



THE Student-Faculty Congress serves to foster the best interests 
of the various campus groups. It also creates a channel for 
democratic expressions of student opinion and has become in- 
creasingly interested in projects of all-college interest. 

The apportioning of the Student Budget, freshman rules, 
pep meetings and athletic cooperation, social functions and the 
Artist Course committee are all under the jurisdiction of the 
Congress. 

Each organization of student activities elect student repre- 
sentatives who meet with faculty advisers to make up the Congress. 

After investigating the possibilities of the National Student 
Federation of America, the Congress decided to remain independent 
of that group. 



One Humlrcd Forlii 



1 ' » 




Left to right: Nicholls, Decker, Naumann, O'liricn, Dilts, Jackson, Stolz (Acting Dean of "Women), McMalian, 

McLcod, Schatz, Collins, W'ray, Rca. 



iDOditn's STuofni GOVfBnmtni 

THE Women's Student Government Association is the governing 
body of the women students. Every girl who is under the 
regulations of the dormitories is a member of the W. S. G. A. 
Tlie Women's Student Senate is a representative body chosen by 
the girls from the four classes and the sorority and non-sorority 
organizations. It acts as the executive and legislative body for 
the group. 

Each year the W. S. G. A. sponsors a student-faculty ban- 
quet — the girls acting as hostesses to the faculty members. 

A series of teas at which the Women's College is at home 
every Wednesday afternoon to the boys and faculty members, is 
sponsored by the W. S. G. A. 

Meetings of the entire W. S. G. A. are held once a month at 
which time prominent speakers address the group. Moving-up 
Day is a tradition of W. S. G. A. at which time the members of 
each class officially become a class higher with the increased 
privileges which go with it. and new officers are installed. 



One Hundred Forly-one 



■:^ i i 



■4,-:' -i.^ -4^ 4? n^i 4; 4' 



5w V V ?** ^t 4 A^ 4-; ^j J?,^ i 



■ M^ .((.« .V-*: .'Svi 4y. vffi -i^. .j^- .»■,•?■ 






I 









aafeas&ai-jjq 




t 



i:'!\ 




Highlight of SPRING FHSTIVAL. May Djy . . . Eliza- 
beth Druckcmillcr, '36, May Queen (center circle) . . . 
Seniors receive degrees at the Eighty-sixth annual COM- 
MENCEMENT . . . Newton D. Baker and Roger Wil- 
liams Straus, guest speakers. 



'rr^i^i 



s.'> ;.'i- y> «■, 






M.---:&-^, 








\\ 



State folk lore presented at PENNSYLVANIA FOLK 
FESTIVAL, held at Bucknell, July 30. 3 1 -August 
1,2... Early fall: FROSH put through their paces 
. . . Water parade . . . Tower painting . . . Frosh- 
Soph fight. Frosh victors. 



r T P- r ■ ■?* T "f ^ P T ''■ ' ^*=: -^ •^'f -^ =fA *^ -«- ^'i ^^ *^ *i iA -^^ <^ -^^ ^^-f -i* -4* 4^ 
*' 'T A^.^^^^'f f--t''f- *' '** -^ ■ • -^'-i -'^^ -«^ M- -^vv '^^^ -*• i'i ■*>>. -ii ■ k^ .i 5 ••» 1 ,. -i .^> 



■i< -^i -Jtv •»>> -ik? ■*■ 



A^ ?** ^* ■i> !■ -t: ^ii^.- 




HOMECOMING . . . Frats display ■Welcome" to Alum- 
ni ... to Villanova Wildcat . . . Frosh clown before 
large Homecoming crowd . . . "Doc " Hoskins returns to 
"pep" team . . . Bison triumphs over Wildcat. 6-0 . . . 
FATHERS DAY banquet . . . students greet parents . . . 
CONVOCATION ... Dr. Frank Kingdon, President of 
University of Newark, guest speaker. 






'* ;.i v> Yfp 








Candid Camera Catches: At the Lewisburger . . . Refreshments . . . 
CLASSES . . . Waiting for classes to change . . . JUNIOR PROM . . . 
Ray Noble (lower circle) and his Orchestra . . . SENIOR BALL . . . 
Featuring Hal Kemp's syncopation . . . Dean Rivenburg. Acting 
President Marts at the Prom. 






-i ,♦,<: %?■ ^^ ^1 --t«,' *v .V4> -{.V »^;- 4^ .»^- ..«..r .i^' .i- .4^ >••, .»; 4- 



r;-<* •<>> -«.■; -:„; ~jv, -.».•; ja^. vx t,-^ -i* j'i -»»; •*•( 



•,j«ir»«-ii»»-„^ ^ 




State Band forms "B" . . . Chcrundolo I State Cap- 
tain) shakes with Filer (Bison Co-Captain) before 
whistle . . . Gay Russell displays new Chrysanthe- 
mum creation from Professor Eyster's laboratory . . . 
Cap and Dagger presents novel publicity . . . The 
Library . . . Lowry. Social Adviser, negotiates for 
Prom Orchestra . . . Girls practice archery . . . Frosh 
hold Halloween Masquerade party. 



■la -in -»: .414 






■tii,iSiJ:|W:.;V^^«'«^;(| 









#■ 



.\' 




I .uiirmjn Mariontuts in Ibsen's "Peer Gym". AR! IS I 
COURSE highlight . . . Moscow Cathedral Choir . . . 
Arthur Fear. English Baritone, sings with Symphony 
Orchestra . . . John Forsht. former Bucknell Cap and 
Daggcritc. returns to campus lo plav leading role of 
Hamlet. 



k 



« .v; :fcj ■ .-. 



n)aSp'!?**u'?^">i,--i:vi^'ai.'^ 







- -f i'wal ^ \IdMMB' -K'H*' 






^<^^^ 



-^A.v^^iC" ^ 





>^ 







Architect's sketches of iv 



ture Buckncll 
Qiudrangle . 



Lib 



rary 



. . The 
. Chapel 
Bucknell 



Inn . . . Gy 



mnasium. 



P 



K T P- T' T' '^ "-'^' ''^^ '*' '*•' ^"^^ -^ m- '^ -^f. h ^ *^ 4-i 41 

n P Tf t^-Tphr^f' ^' ■ ■' - -^-^ -^ '^^ -^^ 4^ -V .^: .t^ 
^^^ ^^^j 4^ V ^ -V ^ ^ .. • ■ ^< -i^ ..^ i^. .*^ =;.. ..^i.; i.: 



*„, * ♦ ,, « .. » 



J 1" -»: ■«< 

1 ■ V 



fii .Vi :iv •.-. 



(WiBi^t'-.'-;;.-! '^ItJ^.tl^ 







ic"-'^ -v' -^ -4*; \ 






i^m>^m^ 





vflfisiiy spofiis 



Straining muscles — 

perspiring bodies — 

in perfect team work 

for the name of their school 



^'i T' t^' f '^:\' -^'V' "*' 'V •*** "fi •■>'' ■■** "^ 

, -^r • SW t*, -Jk V^ 'f?,S Vw 4P. -*4 -f- . *>i .^ ^ -it ■ V. 



■ij 'vfi iiW -j«' 







fOOIBflLL 



Grirtith. (.\nuluah Athlrlii M,iiiay.fr 









I 



l.cavut, SlnJml AluHj.t;' 



One IlnnJrvii riltit-six 



i5>j'nii5F":r«C^::iitc-'-^:^*^'**li>"^ 



fOOTBflU RfSUUlf 



THE Buckncll Bisons of 1936 proved to be an unpredictable eleven, displaying 
a perfect command of everything that a great football team must have one 
week, and playing like a scholastic eleven the next. Composed mostly of 
Sophomores, the Herd was a team of great potential ability, a potentiality that 
was realized only in spots. 

Working with a small, inexperienced squad. Coach "Hooks" Mylin pro- 
duced a machine that forged through a nine game schedule with^a record of 
four wins, as many losses and one tie. ^^ 

Opening the season with victories over Ursinus and Lebanon Valley, the 
Bisons displayed a reversal of form in dropping the next two contests to Miami 
and Georgetown, but came back to trounce the Prexies of Washington and 
Jefferson, and then reached the heights of the season by downing Villanova 
on Homecoming Day. , «■ 

Journeying to Detroit the following week, the Herd hit tne depths in 
losing to the Titians 7-3 3. and on the next Saturday were far outplayed by 
one of the best Penn State elevens in recent years. '^^j^JlMr^^ 

In the final game of the season, the Bisons again displayed some of the 
form that brought them the victory over Villanova in holding the mighty 
Temple Owls to a scoreless deadlock in the mud of Thanksgiving Day. 




IL 



y:^^^'. 



:wfg^m --v«:5!Sfeiy«.7^.«\- , 



i».'-»K»;^i2SaEi6^J*&*X 



Top Row: Bosze, Jones, Kanter, Plant, McFate, Kling, Berk, Griffith, Sturgeon, Lynn, Manrodt 
Second Row: Leavitt, Zigarelli, Summers, Mazanek, Bowman, Lane, Tomasctti, Otlowski, Quick 
Bottom Row: Griffiths, Conti, Green, Rosati, Filer, Stephanou, Pfeiffcr, Valentino, Mylin 



One Hundred Fifly-seven 



' ■ -V %^ %i ■% ■*.■■ -U %i ^< 
♦..♦♦.» « • * • ' « 




I 



Bisons open season againsl Ur- 
sinus in a night tilt . . . Stu 
Smith scores lone tally in last 



fe 



w minutes o 



f thi 



c game- 



Bucyaie URSinuso 

H STUBBORN defensive eleven from Ursinus held the Bucknell attack 
in check for three quarters, and although most of the game was 
played deep in Ursinus territory, the Bisons were unable to score until 
the last few minutes of the game when Co-Captain Stuart Smith swept 
around end for the touchdown. Lou Tomasetti was the outstanding 
performer of the evening for Bucknell. 

BUCKIlfLL20 LtBflnon VflLLfy 

THE Bisons put on a convincing display of scoring power, combining 
a deadly passing attack with a strong running game to score in each 
of the last three quarters and rout Lebanon Valley 20-0. Tomasetti 
and Smith again led the Bison attack, while Quick contributed the 
longest run of the game by breaking through the middle of the Lebanon 
Valley line and dashing 42 yards. 




^r-: 



One llunilred Fil III ciahl 



■*J • ♦? -!» 



A hurricane from Miami be- 
wildered the Bisons, handing 
them their first defeat. 6-0. 



H^\ 



-TvJT_. 




Conti 



pcyaio miflffiiB 

T HE Hurricane from the University of Miami gained revenge for a 
' defeat administered to them by the Bisons in an Orange Bowl game 
by handing the Thundering Herd its first defeat of the 1936 season. 
The Southerners completely outplayed the Bisons in the first three 
quarters, scoring their touchdown in the second on a pass from Panker 
to Masterson, a play that covered 5 3 yards. Bucknell muffed two 
scoring chances in the last few minutes of play by fumbling once when 
the ball was on the Miami 12, and again when the oval rested on the 
visitor's four yard line. 

BUCKIlfLLO GfOfiGflOUIH 19 

THE Bucknell gridmen played ragged ball in dropping a 19-0 decision 
to the Hoyas of Georgetown. The Hoyas scored one in the early 
minutes of the game on a drive by Keating, and twice in the second 
half, on a pass from Keating to Nee. and again on a spinner play by 
Barabas. The Bisons were far outplayed, making only nine first downs 
against 17 for the Hoyas. and gaining only 59 yards from scrimmage 
against 221. The rugged defensive play of Filer and Smith were the 
bright spots in Bucknell's performance. 



Pfeiffer 



Bowman 




I! 





One Hundred Fitly-nine 



/m 







♦ •\.'«f*"*V\^ 



#i 



>v 




A lighting W'lldcjt stubbornly 

checks a Bison line plunge . . . 

Lane carries ball. 



BUCKOai 6 



D EFORH 10.000 Homecoming Day fans, the Ihundcring Herd reached 
" the heights of the 1936 season to hand the hitherto unbeaten, untied. 
Villanova Wildcats a stunning 6-0 defeat. Led by Tomasetti and 
Smith the Bison attack rolled up 229 yards from scrimmage, while 
limiting the 'Cats to 60. After completely outplaying the Villanova 
eleven in all departments of the game, the Herd scored late in the fourth 
quarter. With the ball in their possession near mid-field, the Herd 
shook Tomasetti loose, and the Sophomore star dashed 46 yards to the 
Villanova four yard line, from which point Smith plunged over tor 
the score. 



B()!i/.e 



Oilowiki 



M.iiirudt 




One HunJri'd Sixty 



'- -ar >.» y4 



>» Vh v> 



' y^i^-^ 



'•'f-r^ s^vi.f 



fi^aB^iji^iWwtfrtll^ 



iiisin^in^in 



An end run - . . Stellar Bison 
blocking . . . Bucknell com- 
pletely outplayed Villanova be- 
fore a large Homecoming crowd 




. aauiu »» .^•'jfcj 



T HE entire Herd eleven played great ball and for once realized the 
' potential ability that was theirs. Tomasetti was the outstanding 
offensive player for the Herd with his stellar running and passing, while 
Smith did yeoman work on defense and backing up the line. Stopper, 
with his great kicking and passing, and Raimo, with his ball carrying, 
were the bright spots in the Villanova team. 



Canarick 



Lvnn 



Rcrk 




One Hundred Sixty-one 






..1 -l^^ m "■ 




Bowman, on an off tackle play, 

makes slight gain . . . Penn State 

thwarts all Bison efforts. 



BUCytLL 26 IDflSHinGTOn & JffffRSOn 6 

SMARTING under the defeat administered to them by Georgetown 
the Thundering Herd stampeded over the Prexics of Washington and 
Jefferson, 26-6. Hitting on all cylinders the Bison machine combined 
a passing attack with a potent running game, scoring once in the first 
quarter and third quarter and twice in the second quarter on long gain- 
ing plays. Tomasctti dashed off tackle for 78 yards, during the second 
period, in the most spectacular play of the game. The Prexies scored 
in the last quarter on an 80-yard drive, climaxed by a pass from 
Szcwezyk to Croft, who ran 3 2 yards for the score. 

BOCtiOtLL] DfIfiOII33 

H GAINST the Titans of Detroit the Herd displayed a complete 
reversal of form to put up their worst game of the year. The De- 
troiters scored almost at will through the sluggish Bison defense, espe- 
cially after Smith was removed from the game with a knee injury. The 
Bisons were weak in all phases of the game, and seemed badly confused 
by the aerial attack of the Motor City club. The only Bucknell score 
came in the second period when, after Otlowski had intercepted a 
Detroit aerial, Tomasetti passed to Smith for a touchdown and Ray 
Green converted the extra point. 

Jones Quick M.i/anck 




I 



•■>« *; •*< ' 



One Hundred Sixty-two 



•*- >.' >* 



■i'fr> '^'i-t- 



yc ii.-"^^' i^r- 



A determined Nittany Lion 
avenges series of defeats by 
smashing Bisons in 12-0 victory. 




BucyfLLO pfnnsTflifu 

N their traditional battle with State, the Herd continued their lacka- 
daisical play and were lucky to escape with the score only 14 points 
against them. The feature play of the game was a 95-yard run on the 
return of kick-off for a touchdown by Patrick of State. The play 
occurred on the initial play. Patrick plunged over for State's second 
touchdown in the third period to culminate an 80-yard drive. Bucknell 
made its only offensive threat in the third quarter when they penetrated 
to the State 26-yard line. The punting of Lane and the running of 

"Herb" Bowman were the outstanding features of the Herd's play. 

BUClilltLLO IfmPLfO 

H GAINST the Temple Owls in their annual Turkey Day clash, the 
Herd ended their string of defeats by holding the vaunted Warner- 
men to a scoreless tic. Displaying the same spirit that brought them 
the victory over Villanova. the Bisons threw back the Temple offense 
time after time, and once when the Owls were inside the Bucknell five 
yard line on a first down, the stalwart Herd line held. The superb 
long-distance punting of Bill Lane, and the defensive work of tackle 
Sturgeon were important factors in the upset deadlock. 



Sturgeon 



Zigarelli 



Summers 




One Hundred Sixtu-three 



- T f^> T T ■'^ '*^'^' "▼' '♦■' '■*• '*^-*< -^i =** 'i* • 




Reno 



Wcightman 



SOCCER 





THE 


SQUAD 




Peebles 


F 


Duffy 


LF 


Miller 


IL 


C. Condict 


RF 


Finklestein 


IR 


Friedman 


G 


Elcomc (C. ) 


OL 


Phillips 


IR 


Bolton 


OR 


Eyster 


OL 


Moss 


CH 


Brumberger 


RH 


Fox- 


LH 


Noll 


RH 


Quick 


RH 


E. Condict 


LF 



I 



Smith 



B. U . Opponents 

1 East Stroudsburg Teachers 3 H 

Penn State 6 A 

Army .3 A 

1 Western Maryland 2 A 

2 Lafayette 3 H 

3 Dickinson 2 H 
1 Temple 1 A 




loft: In ,1 closely fought Homecoming contest Rcnomen defeat Dickinson ^-2 in overtime period 
Right: StJte outplays Bucknell hooters winning by a 6-0 score. 

One Hundred Sixty -four 



■■J,^ '.V* •?•*■■ 




Standing: Ziegler, Bagenstose, Eyster, Speck, Duffy, Friedman, Bogert, Brumbcrger, Condict, Smith. Reno 
Seated: Fox, Peebles, Noli. Quick, Miller, Condict, Finklestein 



socce fifsymt 



THE Bucknell soccer team was the "hard-luck" team of the year. Time 
after time Bison Booters carried the battle into overtime periods, 
only to lose. Despite the fact that they displayed a good brand of ball 
on all occasions, the season's record shows but one win and one tie. 

The Bisons opened against the crack East Stroudsburg Teachers, 
and handicapped by the mud. dropped a 3-1 decision. In their next 
game, the Renomen bowed 6-0 to Penn State, one of the best soccer 
clubs in intercollegiate circles, and were then shut out again by Army, 
3-0. After a wobbly first half in which the Army booters scored all 
their points, the Bisons settled down and outplayed the Kaydets, but 
were unable to score. 

Against Western Maryland the Renomen flashed a vastly im- 
proved brand of ball and were barely nosed out 2-1. This improve- 
ment was carried over into the Lafayette game, a heart-breaker, in which 
the Renomen were downed. 3-2. 

On Homecoming Day. the Bisons reached their peak to defeat 
Dickinson 3-2, and then wound up their season by holding the highly- 
rated Temple team to a 1-1 tie. 

The Bisons improved greatly as the season progressed and, as the 
majority of last year's team returns, a successful season is anticipated 
next year. 

One Hundred Sixui-tlve 



rt?* 



■^ •»■. -^f* « ter. 
I' ♦;■»:■ iT- i- 



■•«■ ^5 ■*■; 




Musser 



Nissley 



BeSHfTBflLL 



Malcolm Musser 
I. Ober Nissley 



Coach 
Manaqer 



THE SQUAD 



Foltz 
Filer 
Hawkins 
S-iger 



. c 

g 

g 

f 
Summers 
Smith 

Kolanowsky 
Deegan 



Monahan 
Carpenter 
W. Lane 
G. Lane 
c 

g 
f 
f 



SEASON S RECORD 



Date 

January 

January 

January 

January 

February 

February 

February 

February 

February 

February 

February 

February 24 

February 26 

March 3 

March 5 

March 10 



11 
14 

II 

23 
6 

q 

10 
1 1 
12 

17 



H 
H 
H 

A 
A 
A 
A 
A 
H 
H 
A 
H 
A 
A 
A 
H 



B. U. 

n 

43 
37 
31 
19 
23 
47 
14 
48 
36 
49 
46 
30 
28 
37 
35 



Opponent 
Williamsport 
Lafayette 
Susquehanna 
Gettysburg 
Penn State 
Temple 
Delaware 
Villanova 
Muhlenberg 
Dickinson 
Lebanon Valley 
Juniata 
Susquehanna 
Juniata 
Muhlenberg 
Lebanon Valley 




28 
27 
29 
50 
42 
40 
28 
37 
45 
33 
52 
33 
29 
27 
33 
40 



549 TOTAL 575 

34.31 GAiVlE AVERAGE 35.93 



Bisons cmtTgc winner in first intcrci)IU'giati- h.iski-lh.ill CDnlt-st .i^ainst I .itayctlc, 43-27 



One lliirnlrtil Sixlii-six 



:^,^'^]$. 




Deegan 



Kaluiiowski 



W. Lane 



Sager 



G. Lane 



Carpenter 



BflSKETBflLL RfSUmt 



THE Bucknell cagers rounded out a 
fairly successful season, winning nine 
out of sixteen games. 

In a pre-season game, the Bisons 
were nipped by a fast-stepping Wil- 
liamsport team. 27-28. However, the 
Mussermen returned to the victory 
column with victories over Lafayette 
and Susquehanna. The cagers were de- 
feated by Gettysburg, Penn State, and 
Temple, before again returning to the 
top by trouncing Delaware, 47-28. 
After being downed by Villanova. 14- 
37, in a stoutly contested game, the 



Bisons registered victories over Muhlen- 
berg, Dickinson, Juniata, and Susque- 
hanna, and suffered defeat at the hands 
of Lebanon Valley. The victory over 
the highly-rated Dickinson team was a 
highlight of the season. 

Bill Foltz, center, remained the high 
scorer for the team for the second con- 
secutive year, netting 173 points, 
slightly less than his previous year's 
total. Other outstanding performances 
were contributed by Sager, forward, 
Hawkins, guard, and Carpenter, for- 
ward. 




One Hiindriii Sixlij seven 




Summers 






■n M •■*-; 



-^i -»v ^'5. •»!,:- .->■■■? • 




Joe Reno 

Francis Gentile 



Coach 

Studvnl Manager 



Ren,, 




1 I 5 lb. Class 

125 lb. Class 

135 lb. Class 

145 lb. Class 

155 lb. Class 

165 lb. Class 

175 lb. Class 



LETTERMEN 

Walter Gcyer 

Steve Stephanou 

William Androski 

Walter Ballard 

Richard Reider 

Joseph Valentino 

Martin Quick 



I 



Gencilc 



SEASON S RECORD 



Opponent 

Lock Haven 3 

Temple 2 

Army 6 

West Virginia 3^ 

W. and J. IVi 

Villanova 7 

Pittsburgh 5 

Carnegie Tech 
ney — B. U. first place 

(The tournament included fighters from Temple, Pittsburgh. 

C. C. N. Y., and West Virginia) 



Date 






B 


U. 


January 


15 






5 


February 


5 






6 


February 


13 






2 


February 


19 






4^2 


February 


23 






5K2 


February 


26 






1 


March 


2 






3 


Cancelled 








April 


3-4 


Confe 


re nee 1 




After one nmiutc and forty seconds of the first round, Valentino scores technical knockout 

of Lock Haven 

One liundci'd Sixty eight 



lulltr 



*j -nn -*; .«■! 



irir 





» 




Kf-A-ii*-'. 


■■■■•■1 


t;::l! i'j'w ^fiS**!!;*, 




m^m^- 




Relder 



BalLird 



Guyer 



White 



THf SfflSOn 



THE season of 19 W brought to a close the tenth season of boxing as an inter- 
collegiate sport at Bucknell. It has indeed been a decade of progress for the 
Bisons in the fistic world, and fitly enough. Bucknell concluded its schedule by 
emerging as the Conference champions. 

Under the careful and experienced hand of coach Joe Reno, the squad 
turned out to be the most successful team Bucknell has ever had. This in spite 
of the fact that all but one of the meets were fought without a representative 
in the heavyweight division, and that there was difficulty in finding a man for 
the 115 lb. class. 

The season's record shows Bucknell with four victories besides the Con- 
ference tournament as against three defeats. The season's record was even better 
than the figures indicate, as is the case of the Pitt meet which Bucknell lost be- 
cause of two forfeits, but had as many actual victories as did their opponents. 
Two men, 'Valentino and Quick, completed the season with but a single defeat, 
and another. Ballard, finished the regular schedule without a loss, but with two 
draws. 

At the Conference championship bouts. Androski. Valentino, and Quick 
emerged as individual champions. 




Wilcntino 



Quick 



Androski 



Sceph.i 



One Hundred Sl\ni-nine 



Ml 






t\ '*y < 



♦. . ♦ ♦ # » 




Sillman 



mmii 



E. E. MYLIN - . - . Coach 
EMMANUEL SILLMAN - - Manacjer 

LETTERMEN 

Allen Pitcher 

L.aucrman ----- Catcher 
Ruoff ----- Pij-^t Base 
Miller (Captain, 1Q37) - Second Base 

Moss Shortstop 

Valentino - - . - Third Base 
Sitarsky . - . . Center Field 
Dobie (Captain, I9^6j - Right Field 
Thomas - - - - [^efl Field 

Sillman ----- Manager 



THE SEASON S RECORD 



B. U. 


Opponents 






7 


Dickinson 


6 


A 


2 


Dickinson 


18 


H 


14 


Susquehanna 


7 


H 


6 


Gettysburg 


8 


H 


7 


Drexel 


10 


H 


10 


Ursinus 


4 


U 



2 


Lebanon Valley 


n 


A 


() 


Susquehanna 


5 


A 


^ 


Penn State 


9 


A 


5 


Temple 


n 


H 


1 


Juniata 


14 


A 


/ 


Army 


12 


A 


1 


Penn State 


s 


H 




\f yltimun C(KU]iict Sustiucli.i una (>ns.idcrs in niiil-SLMson lioim* cunicvt 
One llitniirvd Swcnly 







Ritmensnyder 



BflStBflU Rfsumt 



THE 1936 Buckncll baseball team. 
' handicapped by weak pitching and a 
sporadic attack, were able to chalk up only 
four games out of the seventeen played, 
massing only 81 runs to 124 for the 
opposition. 

The Bisons opened their campaign 
against the Red Devils of Dickinson, and 
although Pete Sivess, now with the Phil- 
adelphia Phillies, was in the box for the 
Red Devils, the Bisons scored a 7-6 victory. 

The Bisons bowed to Dickinson in a 
return game, and then returned to the vic- 
tory trail by downing Susquehanna. 14-7. 
after which game they remained victory- 
less until the Ursinus game. 



The Mylinmen bowed to Gettysburg, 
8-6. and then scored their final victory of 
the year, a 6-5 win over Susquehanna. 
From that time, the Bisons were battered 
from post to post, although in the final 
game of the year, they displayed a good 
game of ball in bowing to Penn State. 5-1. 

Captain Dobie. Sitarsky. Lauerman, and 
Valentino led the Bison attack, while 
RuolT turned in some timely long distance 
hitting. Chuck Allen was the most ef- 
fective pitcher on the Bison's wobbly 
mound staff, although Bowman, Sitarsky, 
Riemensnyder, and Monahan all had their 
moments. 




Mille 



Sitarsky 



Ruoit 



Zigjrclli 



Ljiiernun 



One HuiulicJ Sfivnnj unc 



^k^r^Hs^^^^Vir 



• If.'- %i ?*i .^. 




ifnnis 



FLOYD BALLENTINE 
FRANK DUNHAM 



Ballentine 



Coach 

Manacier 



PLAYERS 
Frank Dunliam (Capt.) 
John McDonough John Neefe 

James Everett William Bowler 

George Campo William Llcome 

Carroll Nesbit 



Dunha 















THE SEASON'5 


, RECORD 






B. U. 


Opponents 


















7 
8 
4 


Lehigh 
L.afayettc 
Temple 
Lebanon Va 


Ik 


■y 


9 

2 
1 

5 


A 

A 
H 
A 


Penn State 

7 Susquehanna 

5 Dickinson 

7 Western Maryland 


.9 

4 
2 


A 
A 
A 
H 


2 


Georgetown 






,7 


H 


40 Totals 


39 








ignn 


1 


Mi 


m 




- *^ ;^ . '^fv^^.. 


—2 






Bison tcnni-; tc.im tops Ttniplf nctnifii by score of 8-1 



One llundn'd Scvcjitifticn 







iJuiiluun 



Nesbic 



McU.)ni)Ugh 



itnnis 



UNDER the guidance of Professor F. G. 
Ballentine. the 19'i6 tennis team com- 
pleted a fairly successful season by winning 
five out of nine matches. 

Lehigh handed the Bison raqueteers a 
9-0 whitewashing in the inaugural en- 
counter, but a 7-2 victory over Lafayette, 
and an overwhelming 8-1 shellacking ad- 
ministered to Temple made amends for the 
disastrous debut. 

The courtsters met rough going in their 
match with a determined Lebanon Valley 
team that downed the Bisons 5-4. A 



powerful Georgetown outfit then handed 
the Bisons a 7-2 thrashing, and a merci- 
less Penn State aggregation swept the tired 
Bucknell courtsters into submission with- 
out allowing them a single match. 

The Bisons returned to form to shut 
out Susquehanna 7-0. and then upset 
Dickinson 5-4. in a match decided by the 
doubles team of Elcome and Nesbit in 
extra sets. In the finale, the Orange and 
Blue netters displayed their best form of 
the year in turning back Western Mary- 
land at will. 








Deacon 



Elcome liuv.lcr 

One Hundred Seventy-three 



^ /^ '^ T ^ V ^ '♦■' ^ '*'^-«^ -fi t^ =*> -^ 



t t t i i ■ > 



^; A.- ,j;.i -'i- 




Bonn 



IfiBCK flUD fItLD 



John Plant 


- 


- 


Coach 


Robert Bonn 


- 


- 


Manager 




THE 


SQUAD 




William Wilkinson 






Arthur Marvin 


Edwin Stebbins 






William Roberts 


Daniel Friedman 






Thomas Wood 


Wladimir Lotowycz 






Robert Gundakcr 


Phillip Miller 






Enio Conti 


Charles Eycr 






Thomas Carey 


Hoover Rhodes 






Clyde LaBrakc 


Holly Carpenter 






Joseph Rosati 




THE RECORD 





Bucknell 67 Juniata 59 

Buckncll 88 Susquehanna 3 8 

Middle Atlantic Championship 1 

Mile Relay Penn Relay 

Special One Mile College Relay J 

Second in Central Pennsylvania Intercollegiate 
Track and Field Meet (held at Swarthmore 
College) 




Wilkinson 



Juniata win hi^li hurdles but drop meet in Pl.imnu'n in opening contest 
One Hundred Seventy-four 



» • » > 

♦j ••s -*; .*< 



■• • > i 




Middle Atlantic Relay Champions: Stcbbins. Carpenter. Plant (Coach), Friedman, 

Wilkinson 

Rtsunf Of THf stflson 

THE 1936 season proved to be a successful one for the trackmen. Buck- 
nell's one mile relay team, composed of Holly Carpenter. Dan Fried- 
man, Edwin Stcbbins. and Bill Wilkinson, won the Middle Atlantic 
Championship, and a special one mile college relay at the annual Pcnn 
Relays held at Franklin Field, Philadelphia. April 24 and 25. The 
championship was assured after the Plantmen had defeated a finely 
trained and favored Rutgers relay team. 

At the annual Track and Field meet at Swarthmore. a small 
Bison squad placed second, losing to a powerful Rutgers squad. 

In the only two dual intercollegiate contests of the year, the Bisons 
emerged the victors at the expense of Susquehanna and Juniata. 

In the initial contest of the season against Juniata. Stcbbins shat- 
tered the Bucknell dash record, clocking 100 yards in 9.7. The Bisons 
ended on top, 67-59. In the final meet of the year the Bisons admin- 
istered an 88-38 defeat to Susquehanna, sweeping first places in all but 
two of the field and six of the track events. 




Rosati 



Gundaker Carey 

One Hundred Seventy-lice 



Conti 



Miller 



*; / '' 7" "^ -*< •?"' "vi -r» -^f '»^- -^^ -*-i n^,'. •*» ^: ■ 



*.. * * 



mmu 



I 



fOOTBflLL 



n PROMISING Freshman football squad, coached by Johnny Sitarsky, com- 
" piled a record of two victories and two defeats against tough competition 
Irom near and far. 

The Bisonettes lost to the Army Plebes, 6 to 0, in their inaugural con- 
test. Although the little Bisons completely outplayed the "future lieutenants", 
the greater weight, experience, and numbers of their adversaries tired the small 
Bucknell squad and the Pointers completed a last minute pass for a touchdown. 

The Yearlings again suffered defeat in their annual Father's Day scrap, 
this time to the Temple Frosh who were awarded a 7 to verdict after sixty 
minutes of smashing football. 

The initial success of the season was gained at the expense of Penn State's 
Frosh whose team included nine prep school captains. The Orange and Blue 
scored on an early touchdown drive, sparked by the broken field running of 
halfback Frank Funair and the plunging of fullback George Kiick who bucked 
the line for the only score of the game. 

The Frosh flashed their best form in the last contest of the year against 
the hard-fighting Keystone Junior College eleven, in scoring a 21 to victory. 




Top Row: J. Sitarsky, Cannestro, Wcnncr, H. Sitarsky, Spcctor, Gcreckc, Zager, Scott 
Second Row: Quinn, Kiick, Sirinck, Pcgg, Barron, Spencer, Pocius, Hcnning 
Bottom Row: hunair, Davis, Edwards, Houser, Spectre, Price, Van Wctcring, Gricco 



One Hundred Seventy-six 



rtSC^CttoO^JtisCTMO;^' 



SP0RI8 



BBSKflBflLL 



THE 1937 Buckncll Frosh Basketball team enjoyed a most successful season 
garnering twelve victories in fifteen games, for a total of 609 points as against 
their opponent's 524. 

The yearlings were tied for first place in the newly organized Northeastern 
Pennsylvania freshman intercollegiate basketball league at the conclusion of 
their regular schedule. A post season game with St. Thomas Junior College 
for the undisputed championship of the league resulted in a 56 to 38 victory 
for the Scranton boys. The Bisonettes. behind most of the game, fought a 
valiant struggle and forced their opponents to win the game in an overtime 
period. 



BOKine 



nLTHOUGH the 19 37 boxing team failed to win either of their two matches, 
their season may be considered successful, for coach Joe Reno was able to 
unearth many promising youngsters to bolster his 1938 varsity ring team. 

In their inaugural match, the Orange and Blue tied the Penn State fresh- 
men 4-4, largely through the efforts of Curtis Henning and Frank Funair who 
won the last bouts of the evening. 

The yearlings were sadly outclassed by the older and more experienced 
plebes from West Point 7-1, but were every inch their equal in courage and 
intestinal fortitude. Frank Funair. the sole Bucknell victor, achieved his second 
straight one round K. O. of the season. 




Left to Right: Schnure, Kanncngiscr, Eshelman, Kiick, Knox, 
Diblin, Grecnman, Riley, Heffner, Davis, Allen, Hazeltine 



Top: Reno, "Vl'aite, 1-ergubon. Childs, 
Bottom: Valker, Henning, Fish 



One Hundred Sevenlu-seven 



»« -*l f^}. -^ ^V fi 




«M -IM -»: .VJ 



'iWir.ViW'iV'iWv^i.-;: 'iW'fi 



\ \ 



\^ 



X 




iniRfldiuReLS 



A friendly civil war 
replete with sportsmanship 
for a healthy mind 
in a healthy body 



-Mt\ 



"■'T J^' '/'* ^' '^ ''*^'^' "^'♦■' '^' ''*'^ •**" '*'^ t^- ■■** * 
^ Ji ^- f^ * ^ W^ V * i« -r: ■*> 4^-^ .^ -v. 

ii 'in V '*« -V^ *r .t,' -V 'i/ .« ri • „/! .,v* '.:,^ .,.- . :,. .... 

^ * * 



** N(-^ ' 




Top: Plant, Musscr, Rcnu, Elcome. Speck 
Bottom: Bolton, Duiiliam, Dcc^jn, Zagcr. Leddcn 



s 



L 



- 


1 

r 





MANAGERS 






SENIORS 


junior assistants 


/■((// Spot l.s 


Frank Dunham 


Joseph Deegan 




Sandy Bolton 


Abraham Zager 


Winti'v Sports . . 


Thomas Speck 


John Wallace 


Spring Sports 


William Elcome 


Lewis Ledden 



SINCE 1932 a council of students under the supervision of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department has been in charge of the men's intramural sports pro- 
gram. It is their duty to render decisions on disputable contests, arrange 
schedules, select judges and referees, and to award cups and medals to both indi- 
vidual and group champions. 

Under the chairmanship of the fall manager are: Soccer Mid Cross Country; 
the winter sports: Basketball, Volleyball. Boxing, and Wrestling: the spring 
sports: Baseball, and Track. Besides these sports for which points count to- 
wards the annual trophy, there arc: Foul Shooting, Horseshoe Pitching. Tennis. 
Handball, and Golf, in which the contestants may compete for individual medals 
only. 

One Hundred Eighty 



'•(*»^.-Vtl,.»'^r;»l>'<.- 







f% 



Derr 



Bacliman 



Wray 



UlOIHfll'S llTHLfTIC flSSOCIflllOn 



COUNCIL 



Betty Wray 
Mary Bachman 
June Grim 
Ruth Ballentine 
Edith Lipphardt 
Lois Monie 
Mary Bachman 
Gertrude Skublicki 
Sylvia Derr 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

7 reasLirer 

Hockey Munager 

Basketball Manager 

Tennis and Ping-Pong 

Baseball Manager 

Director 



THE Women's Athletic Council consists of the Director of Physical Education 
for Women, one representative from each sorority, and one representative 
from the girls of the Student Campus Club. The purpose of this organization 
is to create interest in sports, and to supervise all competitive athletic activities 
among the women. 

Features of the year, 19^6-37, were contests in baseball, hockey, tennis, 
basketball and ping-pong. This year the Woman's Athletic Association added 
four new bicycles for girls to the gymnasium equipment. 



One Hundrfd Eighty-one 



f-.Ty.f ?^ ■*' ■^•♦■* ^^ '*'- -^^ -*t t^ ** -^ 






"S 




1 


1 t 




lu^^ 




r-'Tiii 1 ftA II '"^ 


ml 







''^'^ 




upper left: Intramural trophies for 1915-36. Upper right: Eyer easily wins mile in 5:4.4. Lower left. Pule vjiilt event 
taken by Wood (P. G. D.). I-cwer ri,^ht: Jones (S. C) breaks tape in 10.6 to take KM) y-inl dash event 



fllfiflUlURflL SPORTS 



THE fine program of sports for those not of varsity calibre or inclina- 
tion, which has been recently expanded at Bucknell, is gaining 
greater interest and keener competition every year. 

With a revision of the program, and the inclusion of several new 
sports on the intramural calendar, there lias appeared stiff comj^etition, 
which has uncovered a wealth of talent and ability, not to mention the 
fine spirit of sportsmanship and code of honor it has developed. 

The aim of intramural sports is to secure an opportunity for com- 
petition for all. "A sport for every individual" has grown from a mere 
slogan to a wonderful reality. It is in this type of activity, with our 
own acquaintances, that there arise innumerable opportunities to test 
not only the skill of an individual, but his character as well. 

The program is by no means complete, and it remains only for 
better resources, in the form of a more spacious and adequate gymna 
sium, for the activities to become even more inclusive. It is with this 
thought in mind that the students speak as one in their praise of Mr. 
Plant. Mr. Musser, and Mr. Reno, for their fine work in placing before 
the student body such a splendid field of diversion. The work of Miss 
Derr and Miss Toome with the women students is also noteworthy. 



Onr llunJriil P.iiihlu Iwo 



r 







^ 
















Upper left: Hawkins (T. U. O.) wins javelin event by throw of 1-49.3. Upper right: Phi Gams defeat Kappa Sigs to take soccer 
championship. Lower left: Buckalcw (K. S.) captures high hurdle event. Lower ri);lu: Bowman ( S. A. E.) loses to Daniels 

(S. C. ) in high jump contest 



mm tvfdis 



BASEBALL 

THE final game, of a three game series, proved to be a duel from the 
mound between Hawkins. T. U. O. and Bill Raymaley. P. K. P.. 
with the latter backed by a slightly better balanced team, which helped 
greatly to win the cup. 

WOMEN'S BASEBALL 

THE team of Phi Mu was defeated for the first time in three years in 
its efforts to win the championship in the women's baseball league. 
The champions this season proved to be the non-sorority team who 
had a well-balanced and ably led group. 

TRACK 

ITH a well-balanced team, both on the track and the field, the 
Sigma Chi team won the 19 36 meet and with it the all-year trophy 
and the Pangburn trophy cup as well. The Phi Gamma Delta group 
finished a close second in the meet, with the summary as follows: 
120 yard hurdles — Buckalew. K. S.. — Time, 19 sec. 
100 yard dash — Jones, S. C. — Time. 10.6 sec. 

OriL- Iliiniln-J liiiihui three 



^ ,v; -v. V w ~V«. V -. . ,. . 
t » t t t ■■, . 




Candid camera catches some interesting action on Nt)rth Field. P. G. D., soccer champions, in action, in lower photos. Upper 
right; S. C. C. women takes baseball championships by defeating Plii Mii, liolder of the titU' for three years 

1 mile run — Eyor, S. C. C. — Time. 5:4.4 

220 yard dash — Baldwin, K. S. — Time. 2^.5 sec. 

2 mile run — Dunham, S. C. C. — Time, 1 1 :^9.4 
440 yard dash — Reider, P. G. D. — Time. 55.4 sec. 
220 low hurdles — Whipkey. S. C. — Time, 28.6 sec. 
880 yard dash — Brumberger. P. K. P.— Time. 2:13.8 

Discus — McDonough. S. C. and Rhodes. S. C. C. — Distance. 

107 ft., 2 in. 
Pole Vault — Wood, P. G. D. — Height, 10 ft.. 3 in. 
High Jump — Daniels, S. C. — Height. 5 ft., 4 in. 
Shot Put — H. Rhodes. S. C. C. — Distance, 39 ft., 4 in. 
Javelin — Hawkins. T. U. O. — Distance. 149 ft.. 3 in. 
Broad Jump — Roberts, P. G. D., — Distance, 19 ft., 5 in. 
Mile Relay — S. A. E. (Bowman, Gault, Tomasetti, Kamicnski) — 

Time. 3:59.2 

feu fvtoTS 

CROSS COUNTRY 

T HE non-fraternity group again won the cross country cup by placing 
< four runners in the first ten places. Charles Eyer repeated his in- 
dividual victory of last year. The first ten men in order of their posi- 
tion were: Eyer. S. C. : Schrieber, A. C. M. : Cohen, S. C. C. : Ziegler, 
K. S.; Dunham, S. C. C: Skuse, S. A. E. : Wat.son, K. S : Rapp. S. C. 
C: Kierce, S. C. C. : and Frith, S. A. E. 

One lliirnlrctl Fiqhlu ("iir 



fu ■♦< -a: .v{ 



'•■■■-:?■ '. V''- ■• '■' '^l'- 




Upper left: A strong Phi Mu team defeats Tri-Delts to capture the hockey crown. Cameraman stops some fast action in 

intra-sororlty tilts 



(i 



SOCCER 
FTER playing two tie games the Kappa Sig's finally outfought the 
Sigma Chi club in the third game of the semi-finals, and entered the 
finals against the Phi Gam's. 

After each team had garnered a victory, the Phi Gamma Delta 
group won the cup by defeating a scrappy Kappa Sigma outfit. 

HOCKEY 

HFTER losing to the non-sorority team in the finals last year, the 
group representing Phi Mu returned to the field of battle with a 
strong team, and after a hard fought season, emerged the champions. 

Phi Mu defeated a stubborn Tri Delt team in the third and de- 
ciding game of the finals. 



iDinitR fvfnis 



BASKETBALL 

THE quintet wearing the colors of Sigma Alpha Epsilon were again 
victorious in the battle for the basketball trophy, as they defeated 
the Kappa Sigma team by the decisive score of 34 to 20 in the deciding 
game of the three which comprise the finals. 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

HFTER a long and fiercely fought season which was featured through- 
out by the play of the Tri Delt, Phi Mu. and Non-Sorority teams, 
the Phi Mu group won the championship. 

One HiinJrfJ EiLihty five 



'T P' T- T- T "T-T "r*' "/' '*'• '*'"** ^ *■ ■■** ^' *^ ■■■*■' '^'^ **' "^\ '^' '^^-- ■'^ "*■'•■ "** ■■*■- 
"^ ;^ ^' '?* ?^ "f f ^ ^ ^ f^ -M '?•• -^^ -f^ 4; -k 'V^ ■** -*i -V ^r; J^,^.-\-.i,^ i'i ■•■ ^- 

■ -»'"' -''• -— -^.' vC .i>js -ffJ -i„- ~ii'. .,,.•• i,,. .5.- »/ ..i,. i,:-; »!.; .J.; V ; : -j ■• ■ .. - 



.^'■^:»i.4,:. 




stiiassfeE* 




tit J 




■ !••■^>-vi•• 







fRflTffiniTltS 



. . . and in their living room 
dim-lit by a crackling fire 
they find refuge from 
the matter-of-factly 
routine college life 







PHI liflPPfl PSI 

Founded at Jefferson College. 1852 

PENNSYLVANIA GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established. 1855 

BUCKNELLS oldest fraternity continues to 
hold a prominent position on the campus by 
participating in the many social and academic 
events of the year. 

The Phi Psi men represent a diversity of ac- 
tivities. Ralph Axthelm has been an outstand- 
ing Cap and Daggerite in the past four years. 
Ambrose Saricks holds several top positions in 
honorarics. Pfeiffcr is a varsity football man. 
Carey. Quick. LaBrakc. and Carpenter, form 
the nucleus of the varsity track team. In intra- 
mural boxing, Horace Lowe. Freshman Class 
President, won the 145 lb. championship. 

A highlight of the year's activities at the 
house was a reception held in early March for 
Lcverett S. Lyons. Grand National President of 
the fraternity. In addition to the regular dances 
of the year, featuring houseparty, a series of 
open houses were held at the Chapter house. 

ARTHUR SHELDON, 

President. 




' ^' G c » a p e^.. ^ (^ ^ o. 

o f^ C' c 9 TA n. e ^ r^' /^ f^ 

c^ p -^^ a r .^ Qm^^ c, ^ c 

Top Row: Axthelm^ Carey, Ucrr, McDonough, Richards. Saricks, Sheldon, Van Why, Walsh, Lose, Gcier, Allen 
Second Row: Baldwin, Campman, Everett, Gcniilt-, I.aBrakc, Laubachcr, Nicholson, Picrson, Pficffcr, Quick, Mayock, Ranucy 
Third Row: Stephanou, Van Duren, Yohn, Carpenter, Brumbcrger, Fuglcstad, Gocizc, Gunicr, Helton, Kohlbcr>;cr, Lcofllcr, Martin 
Bottom Row: Moser, Scott, Reese, Wcidncr, Williams, Chllds, Lombard, I.owc, Lyon, Mearns, Prouty, Rcid, Thornlcy 

One Hundred Ninety 






'•i^ij-viw^'fiW'/i 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

William C. Bartol. A.M.. Ph.D. 
William G. Owens. A.M.. Ph.D. 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



Ralph H. Axthelm Charles Lose 

Thomas H. Carey John C. McDonough 

Frederick S. Derr George W. Richards 

Walter R. Geier Ambrose Saricks 



JUNIORS 

George A. Allen Francis J. Gentile 

Mason Baldwin Clyde R. LaBrake 

Frederick Campman Charles C. Laubacher 
Holly R. Carpenter James C. Nicholson 
J. Frederick Everett Earl B. Pierson 

William B. PfeifTer 



C. Arthur Sheldon 
John B. VanWhy 
John C. Walsh 



Joseph T. Quick 
James C. Ramsey 
Stephen Stephanou 
William VanDuren 
Frederick O. Yohn 



SOPHOMORES 

Robert Brumberger Robert Helton Fred Reese 

Arne T. Fuglestad Joseph W. Kohberger Howard I. Scott 

Arthur C. Goetze J. Scverne Loeffler Harold Weidner 

Robert Gunter Henry A. Martin David Williams 

Frank C. Moser 



Raymond Allison 
Ralph Childs 
George C. Cohan 
Ralph Ford '38 
John M. Garrison 
Frederick C. Green 
Paul Green 



PLEDGES 

William Hassclbcrger 
Warren Higgins 
Calvin Lombard 
Horace Lowe 
David S. Lyon 
Robert Mayock '38 
Frank L. Mearns 



Roger Moke 
Frederick C. Price 
John Prouty 
Joseph Reed 
William Schultz 
Roy Thornley 
John Stevens 



One Hundred Ninety-one 



M ^*i 'm *t V' V •**■■ ■■ : ... :;. 



^^?ia..»i'I 



■rf^. v -*' 




Founded at Miami University, 185 5 
KAPPA CHAPTER 
Established. 1864 

SIGMA CHI monopoliz.ed the winter program 
in intramural sports by annexing two cham- 
pionships, boxing and volleyball. Besides being 
represented in the athletic program at Bucknell, 
Kappa men are found in the many other ac- 
tivities on the campus. 

The feature of the dance calendar was the 
annual Bowery Brawl, held in February. A 
dinner before the Senior Ball, a Christmas 
Dance, a Pledge Dance, several open houses, and 
the spring Houseparty, formed a full social pro- 
gram for the year. 

The Presidency of the Senior Class is held by 
a Sigma Chi. The football lineup includes 
Jones, Lane, Bosze, Green, Rosati. Otlowski, 
and Fazio. On the varsity basketball squad. 
Monahan, Sager. Summers, and Lane represent 
Sigma Chi. 

GEORGE GROUSE. 

President. 






ffinf!^,p 



•»- r» J f=»^ w=z u!Jf, 




Top Row: Crousc, Fazio, Green, Lotowycz, MolKihan, Memin^er, Mon.iIi.in. Rosati, Reynolds, Robertson 

Second Row: Bos/c, Cheponis, Lane, K. Maifiias, R. Mathias, McDonou>;h. Otlowski, Slicrwood, Wagner. Foriner. Mac^X'iIliani< 

Bottom Row: Babbit, Barron, Drayton. Gibson, Griffin, Hart, Houser, Moore. Spencer, Walker, ^'i!liamson 

One Hundred Ninety- tivo 



yi :»J -.*-, *.. ,^ ^ 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Nelson F. Davis. Sc.D. 

George A. Irland, Sc.M. in E.E. 

Malcolm E. Musscr. Sc.B. 

Harold F. Shaffer. A B.. Sc.M. in E.E. 

Frank A. Simpson. Sc.M. 

Alfred G. Stoughton, A.B. 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 

George Grouse Howard Mcmingcr John H. Robertson 

Salvatore Fazio Raymond F. Monahan Howard Whipkey 

Raymond Green James Mullahan Joseph Rosati 

Wladimir Lotowycz Allen Reynolds 



Kenneth Allen 
Cecil Ranck 



Joseph Bosze 
Charles Eyer 
Robert Heckler 
John Johnson 
Willis Jones 



JUNIORS 

Harold LeRoy Sager 
Jack Stewart 



SOPHOMORES 

Donald Kline 
William Lane 
Martin Maloncy 
Earl Mathias 
Roy Mathias 



Robert Summers 



Thomas McDonough 
Pat McWilliams 
Ray Otlowsky 
Frank Sherwood 
Martin Wagner 



Herbert Anderson 
Walter Babbitt 
Edgar Barron 
Barr Cannon '39 
Charles Drayton 
Donald Fortner '39 
WMlIiam Gibson 



PLEDGES 

Charles Edwards 
Bud Griffin 
Everett Hart 
Robert Houser 
John Keil 
John Lichtenfels 
Frederick Marsh 



John Moore 
Richard Rehling '39 
Richard Snyder 
Craig Waldncr 
Donald Walker 
Fred Williamson 
Larry Spencer 



One HunJn-d Ninery-thra' 






. *.'■ a0! -an 




PHI Gflfllfllfl DfLIfl 

Founded at Jefferson College, 1848 

PENNSYLVANIA DELTA CHAPTER 

Established. 1882 

N the fifty-fifth year of its life on Bucknell's 

campus. Phi Gamma Delta continues as an 
outstanding social organization devoted to the 
welfare of Bucknell and her students. Scholas- 
tically, socially and athletically the "Fijis" have 
participated. 

During the past fall, Delta swept all opposi- 
tion aside to win the intramural soccer cham- 
pionship. On the squad were "Sandy" Bolton, 
Bill Peebles, Jerry Finkelstein, and Bill Eyster, 
the last three of whom will return next season. 

Four members of the chapter were active on 
the varsity boxing squad. Walt Ballard, inter- 
collegiate 145-lb. champ, along with Bill 
Androski. Dick Reider, and Jack Bailey entered 
the ring for the Bisons. In track and field the 
"Fijis" were represented by Dick Reider, Pete 
Wood, Tony Wolfe. Bill Roberts, and Sandy 
Bolton. 

During the past year. Phi Gamma Delta has 
been represented in the Commerce and Finance 
Club, Bucknellian. Glee Club, and honorary 
and professional fraternities. 

THOMAS WOOD. 

President. 





g ffl pcr>. .!^ (f» f^ p c D 

^ ,.0 ^ O .T> Q. ^ .^, ^ ^' 




jft .f^ a --v. » a n p. o fit 

Top Row: G. Billard, Bolton, Hopkins, Marklcy, Morreall, Rickards, Roberts, Nissley, A. Thompson, T. ^Ji'ond 
Second Row: Akc, Androski, Bailey, W. B.illard, Dennis, Druckc miller, Finkelstein, I.esher, Peebles, Bruce 
Third Row: Eyster, Godshall, Good, Rabe. Reider. Tebbs, H. Thumpson. Mi'oll. H. Wood. \i'rigley 
Bottom Row: Brumbcrger, Davis, Dent, Distel, Gallagher, Kesslcr, King, Mowry, Towner, Wilt 



One Hundred Ninely-four 



V> »»-'*J »«.- 



% ■.■■*:* 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Floyd G. Ballcntinc. Ph.D. 
William H. Eyster, Ph.D. 
Romeyn H. Rivenburg, A.M., LL.D. 
Lewis E. Thciss. Ph.B., Litt.D. 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



George T. Ballard 
Alexander A. Bolton 
Thomas O. Hopkins 
M. Donald Markley 
Herbert W. Morreall 



Harold N. Ake 
William A. Androski 
John F. Bailey 
Walter A. Ballard 



Joseph F. Rickards 
I. Ober Nissley 
Alden S. Thompson 
Thomas Wood. Jr. 
William L. Roberts 

JUNIORS 

Chester A. Dennis 
Donald E. Druckemiller 
Gerald Finkelstein 
William M. Lesher 
William R. Peebles 



SOPHOMORES 



Richard B. Bruce 
William H. Eyster 
C. Harold Godshal 
Edward F. Rabe 
Richard K. Reider 



Paul I. Tebbs 
Hamilton O. Thompson 
Anton O. Wolf 
Harry P. Wood 
R. Alexander Wrigley 



PLEDGES 

Richard A. Brumberger I. William Distel Frank L. Mowry 

Osborne W. Davis Norman R. Gallagher Virgil L. Towner 

C. LaRue Dent John A. Kessler Robert D. Wilt 

Norman R. King 



One Hundred Ninely-five 






v: -«.» <;: .*" .*< 




Mi 



SIGHIB flLPHfl fPSILOn 

Founded at the University of Alabama, 1856 

PENNSYLVANIA ZETA CHAPTER 

Established. 1893 

DURING the past year, Pennsylvania Zeta 
Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon has con- 
tinued to hold its prominent position among 
Bucknell fraternities. The variety of the char- 
acters of its members and the diversity of their 
interests and activities has again justified S. A. 
E.'s claim to be a general representation of 
college life. 

Besides having members in various musical 
organizations such as the Band, the Bucknellian. 
and the Glee Club, the S. A. E.'s have the office 
of Junior Class President. The fraternity has 
membership in honorary fraternities on the 
campus as well. Harvey Travis is the Editor- 
in-chief of the Bucknellian and William Work 
is Business Manager of the same publication. 

In athletics. S. A. E. claims the captains of 
three major sports at Bucknell, football, base- 
ball, and track. In addition it has members 
participating in all varsity sports, as well as in 
the intramural league of the campus. The cap- 
tain of the Freshman football team is an S. A. 
E. pledge. 

JOHN RAKER. 

President. 



I 



f^ ^f> OCO fT^^I^ Pf^--' 






iP (?^ v* O ^' ^ D- f> D 

(T, r* ^ o a ie .<?? c 

lb 



o 





Top Ruw: S. Smith, .^ppltb), Liwis, Skusc, Vk hilcbrcad, Vk iKon, Sdlibins, R.ikir. Millir. .\li;.\jndi.T. lull/. Kiib 
Second Row: Dclafrangc, Zott, Bronncr, Rusin, Swick, Decgan, Tr.ivis, VJork, Hoffm.in, Kamiiinki, I'rilh, Cooke 
Third Row: Ciault, Hcrt?, Quick, McKcc, Kcndrick, Burkh.irl, Sway/c. V.irtis.in, C. Smith, Gardner, ^"acncr 

One Hundred Ninety-six 



M&'sasiHi&sfeBiWi 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

William H. Coleman. A.M. 
Henry W. Holter. A B . Registrar 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



^aS-'. ■ 



1^ )"!■:>' /.vr t 







Russell Appleby 
Thorwald Lewis 
Marlyn Miller 



John Raker 
Harland Skuse 
Stuart Smith 



JUNIORS 



Edwin Stebbins 
Ward Whitebread 
Fred Wilson 



Frank Alexander 
Herbert Bowman 
Nellis Bronner 
Joseph Deegan 



William Foltz Alexander Rusin 

William Hoffman Howard Swick 

Edward Kamienski Harvey Travis 

Leo Kob William Work 



Kenneth Delafrange Robert Rcitz 



Fred Zott 



III 



Ralph Cooke 
James Frith 



SOPHOMORES 

Jack Gault 
Dick Hertz 
Jack Lynn 



Martin Quick 
Kurt Manrodt. Jr. 



William Allen 
Joseph Burkhart 
Vic Cannestro 
Ted Gardner 
Curtis Henning 



PLEDGES 

Harold Kendrick 
George Kiick 
Ken McKee 
Frank Pocius 
Harry Sitarsky 



Charles Smith 
Alden Swayze 
James Tyson 
James Vartigan 
Jerry Wagner 



One Ihindred Nincly-scven 



?^ JS^; ->i V ?^ 3«.?ft{ ^,5 .,1 =•*: 




KflPPfl SIGfllfl 

Founded at the University of Virginia, 1869 

PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA PHI CHAPTER 

Established, 1896 

OUTSTANDING in campus activities in the 
past, the Alpha Phi Chapter of Kappa Sigma 
has this year, more than ever, manifested itself 
as one of the leading fraternities at Bucknell. 
Realizing the purpose and ideals of Bucknell, 
Alpha Phi has whole-heartedly contributed to 
the many social and academic activities of the 
campus. 

Kappa Sigma has been well represented in 
varsity athletics as well as in the intramural 
athletic league. The house has placed men on 
almost every varsity team, including captains in 
three different sports. 

Kappa Sigma's participation in athletics has 
been balanced by a similar activity in every phase 
of campus life. It has members in the Glee Club, 
Band. Christian Association, honorary fra- 
ternities, dramatics, and publications. 

THOMAS SPECK, 

President. 





fC R, r^, fm!! 3" 



tMmmnMk 

/^ n ^f^ ft a '^ p i^ Cft e e p c '^i 

Tup Row: Biddlc, Bo);crt, Deacon, Feiser, Filer, Gundakir, Ingalls, Lo^uc, Lyllc, Mjurcr, Mcrridcw, Morris, O'Donncll. Kitlnrdv 

Speck 
Second Row; Vogcl, Weisluman, Waison, Younj;, Clemens, Fletcher, Fox, Mj);ill, MiILr, Phillips, Scur^eon, Baxensiose. Baldwin, 

Both, Buckalew 
Third Row: Coulbourn, Duffy, Harris, Hushes. Kelchner. Lcinbach, Meister, Mu^ler, Roberts, Shupe, Smith, Van 'K'elerinK. 

VC'eidemann, ^'est, Zicgler, Black 
Bottom Row: Bland, Fdwards, FerRUson, Fish, Ciray, Grcenman, I lickie, Johnson, McKec, I'auly, I'eters. I'ulford, Sehnure, Terrill, 

White. Yarnall 




One Humlretl Ninety eight 



ti -tn -3*. .« ^ 



^jfea^ftisisAtBtjiiyi 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Benjamin W. Griffith, Ph.D. 
Charles A. Lindemann, Sc.D. 




ADMINISTRATION 
Paul A. Hightower, Secretary to President 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Elmer R. Biddle 
Allen Z. Bogert 
Earle W. Deacon 
Leonard F. Feiser 
John D. Filer 
Robert C. Gundaker 



Clyde G. Clemens 
David W. Fletcher 



SENIORS 

Frank G. Ingalls 
James G. Logue 
Melvin R. Lytle 
Charles L. Maurer 



Thomas B. Richards 
Thomas W. Speck 
Charles I. Vogel 
Philip H. Watson 



Reginald P. Merridew Joseph Weightman 
Charles O. Morris Jack C. Young 

John C. O'Donnell 



JUNIORS 

Ira G. Fox 
Frank W. Magill 
Edward M. Miller 

SOPHOMORES 



Arnold R. Andrews 

David R. Bagenstose 

William S. Baldwin 

George A. Both 

Gordon W. Buckalew 

Thomas D. Coulbourn James H. Meister 

John J. Duffy Daniel J. Mugler 



Henry M. Harris 
David W. Hughes 
William H. Kelchner 
Thomas C. Leinbach 
John D. McConnell 



Charles B. Bernhart 
Gordon S. Black 
Jack F. Bland. '39 
Charles R. Edwards 
Frank C. Ferguson 
Douglas L. Fish 



PLEDGES 

Elmer D. Gray 
Allan Greenman 
Gilbert R. Hickie 
Ralph K. Johnson 
William S. McKee 
Howard A. Pauly 



Claude R. Phillips 
James G. Sturgeon 



William H. Roberts 
David R. W. Shupe 
Robert E. Smith 
George D. VanWetering 
Walter Weidemann 
Donald P. West 
David Zieglcr 



Walter G. Peters 
James B. Pulford 
Robert B. Schnure 
Robert M. Terrill 
Thomas P. White 
Wayne B. Yarnall 



One Hundrfd Nincliinine 



I- / , i 

, . , •«- -v. •*.' 

^ -^i -y *r U^' -V -V r,A fi 



-*T *A •*> -i 




OfLTfl SIGHfl 



Established at Buckncll. 180Q 

DELTA SIGMA has continued its past interest 
in campus affairs with representation in 
nearly every extra-curricular activity. This in- 
terest has not been maintained at the expense 
of scholarship, for during the past two semes- 
ters the fraternity has stood second scholastically 
among Bucknell Greek letter societies. 

William Elcome captained the varsity soccer 
team last fall, Havard Griffith played with the 
varsity football eleven, and George Lane repre- 
sented Delta Sigma on the basketball squad. On 
the Staff of the Bucknellian. Robert Streeter 
served as Managing Editor, and Paul Sifvius as 
Advertising Manager. Jack Sholl was Treasurer 
of the campus Christian Association. 

Delta Sigma, one of the few fraternities to 
present a play as a part of its regular program, 
presented this year, "The Poor of New York," 
a melodrama, before an invited audience. 

JOHN SHOLL. 

Presidfnl . 



^ 



^^^^O <T> O t^ ^ D 1^ ^' 

f^ o f^ o OjQ o. f^, fj f^ 
» fHC c^ iS^ #^. r^ r: :?!> 

ill ji^tti^ ^ js^^^ a 



Top Row: Elcomi-, Sholl, Ikcrs, l.j.ii;c, Mtrruiil, Silvius, Sprout, StrccUT, T^lom.l^, C .llvin 

Second Row: Booth, Calxl, Crilhlh, Howill, I.jnc, Xcsbit, Sjvidgc, Shipman, \<'. Smith, Stillman 

Boctoni Row: Sunimcrs);ill, 1). Wilkinson. Abbott, Howt-r, Brown, Din.hinc-. Kalilcy, R. Smith, Stevenson, T. Wilkinson 

Two Hiindreil 



Tr~ >.• !i* 1 ; 



-m^w i 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Frank G. Davis. Ph.D. 
Martin Drum. Ph.B. 
John Eiscnhaucr. A.M. 
Lester P. Fowle. M.D. 
Blanchard Gummo. B.F.A. 
Frank R. Hamblin. Ph D. 
John W. Rice. Ph.D. 
Charles W. Smith. A.M. 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 
WilUam E. Elcome, Jr. John G. Sholl, III 



Robert O. Beers 
Ward E. Gage 



JUNIORS 

H. Joseph Merrion 
W. Paul Silvius 
Carl M. Sprout 



SOPHOMORES 



Robert E. Streeter 
Stanley C. Thomas 



Winfield S. Booth, Jr. 
Albert V. Cabal 
Havard E. Griffith. Jr. 
Harry R. Howell 



George L. Lane 
Carroll C. Nesbit 
Robert M. Savidge 
Robert H. Shipman 



William C Smith 
Clifford S. Stillman 
Travis L. Summersgil! 
Dan W. Wilkinson 



PLEDGES 



H. Edward Abbott 
A. Kermit Bower 
Richard F. Brown 
James H. Duchine 



Warren K. Eister 
John W. Fithian. 
Robert H. Kahley 
Edward A. Kandle 
John C. Link. Jr. 



Joseph A. Link 
•39 Robert W. Smith 

Robert E. Stevenson. '39 
Theodore J. Wilkinson 



TiCn Hundred One 



»5; -J« Sfi -<if<;.fj i^:' 
■'■tf- -%\ ivi nti «i, ■*< 

. .. ♦-. • : I. * ■ f 







LfldlBDfl CHI eiPHO 

Founded at Boston College, 1909 

PENNSYLVANIA DELTA ZETA CHAPTER 

Established, 1913 

HT the beginning of Delta Zeta's autumn 
season, eight students were pledged, all of 
whom have entered into Buckncll's fraternity 
life. 

Well represented in social and athletic affairs. 
Lambda Chi has Charles Beckworth and Charles 
Gundel in the musical organization, the "Buck- 
nellians. " Jesse Schmick. James Laughlin, 
Charles Mutchler. Metro Matweecha, and 
Charles Scott represent the fraternity in the 
Glee Club. Lewis Ledden serves on the intra- 
mural committee, and Fred Zigarelli plays foot- 
ball and baseball. In addition to their social 
and athletic pursuits, several members of the 
fraternity are associated with honorary frater- 
nities. 

ROBERT MILLER, 

President. 




^ O B ^- ^ ^ f^^nM 

g» O.^. O (^.. o o .,^ 
fTj. C% tj C^. O ,C>, ft. 



Pup Row; Milicr, Gillespie, N'jvikjs, Portfr, Schmick. I.ctldcn, Mjtwcccha. Tihansky 
Second Row: Blanche. Zij;arelii, Shore, Mutchler. Mills, Gundel, Reckworth, laughlin 
Bottom Row: Rohrs, P. Gerard, R. (icrard, Biehn. Memin>;, Scott, Roe 

7 a'o Hundred Tivo 



■% 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Henry T. Colestock, Ph.D. 

(Professor Emeritus) 
Robert L. Matz, Ph.D. 
Harry W. Robbins. Ph.D. 
Dayton L. Ranck, Comptroller 



Eugene Gillespie 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
SENIORS 



Ernest Blanche 
Lewis Ledden 
Metro Matweecha 



Robert Miller 
Victor Navikas 



JUNIORS 

George Porter 
Jesse Schmick 
William Shore 



Lawrence Welliver 



Theodore Tihansky 
Fred Zigarelli 



SOPHOMORES 

Charles Beckworth Charles Gundel 
Harold Brown James Laughlin 

Lemar Mills 



Charles Mutchler 
Walter Rohrs 



PLEDGES 

Leon Arbogast. "50 John Fleming 
Llewellyn Baer. '38 Frank Paul 
Gerald Biehn Donald Drum 



Leo Roe 
Charles Scott 



Two Hundred Thr 







HflPPfl DfLIfl RHO 

Founded at Middlcbury College, 1905 

PENNSYLVANIA IOTA CHAPTER 

Established. 1921 

HLONG with other Greek organizations on the 
campus. Iota Chapter of Kappa Delta Rho 
has fostered a well-rounded collegiate program 
for its chapter. 

Members of the fraternity have participated 
in almost every form of athletics on the cam- 
pus, among which are track, cross-country, bas- 
ketball, soccer, baseball. In addition, Charles 
Schaef is a member of the Glee Club, Mixed 
Chorus, Collegium Musicum. and Symphony 
Orchestra. Paul Walton is a member of Alpha 
Chi Sigma, and John Worth is a member of 
Kappa Phi Kappa, both of which are honorary 
fraternities. 

Spring Houseparty was the highlight event 
of lota's social calendar for the year. 

.JOHN WORTH, 

President . 




Top Row: lican. lioiid. Ruta 



Bouom Row: Walton, 'S'ortli. Mueller, Slucf 



7 a'o Hundred Four 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Dalzcll M. Griffith. Ph.D. 
Voris B. Hall. M.S.. A.M. 
Donald G. Stillman, A.M. 
Welles N. Lowry. Ph.D. 
Rudolph Peterson. Ph.D. 




Donald P. Bean 
Robert Bonn 



Walter A. Batog 
George M. Craig 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



John F. Worth 
John P. Ruta 



JUNIORS 

Ernest C. Mueller 
John F. Quakers 



Paul R. Walton 



Charles J. Schaef 
David M. Williams 



PLEDGES 

Joseph Bankovich Harle W. King Robert W. W. Wal 

Eugene C. Tedesco 



Two Hundred Five 






*j L!j» Jj-: *3s t*: *»■^; 'f^ 
•^ •%» .#;. 'Vo- - ■ 



■vT: 'i.<: -r- » ■ .»■■ ■*• -V- K 



X 



II 



Founded at Buckncll University. 1921 

HFTER spending the forepart of tlie autumn 
renovating the house and conducting rush- 
ing for the chapter, Alpha Chi Mu entered full 
swing into school activities. Most of the active 
members and a large proportion of the pledges 
engaged in extra-curricular activities. 

Clinton Condict was president of the Chris- 
tian Association as well as president of Student- 
Faculty Congress. The band claims members 
from our group. Edward Robertson and Clyde 
Noll are members of the Bucknellian and 
L' Agenda staffs respectively. 

Alpha Chi Mu is at the top scholastically, 
winning highest honors among the fraternities 
for the twentieth semester in the last twenty- 
three. Clinton Condict and Clyde Noll were 
senior members of the varsity soccer team. 

The fraternity also held its annual pledge 
banquet and a dance. 

CLYDE NOLL, 

President. 



ft f>. f^ -jf^ (^- f^ 




i 



g^.of>o ^j. c^ 




Top Row: C. Condict, Null, Robt;rtsun, V-ui Nuys, t. Condict, Lcwii 

Bottom Row: Limyansky, Rhoads, Sicbcr, Bracken, Fairgravcs, Perez, .Schreiber 



Two Hundred Six 



r^rr-t 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Bruce J. Miller, A.B., Ph.D. 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 
Clinton A. Condict Clyde M. Noll 



JUNIORS 
W, Edward Robertson. Jr. Maxwell VanNuys 



SOPHOMORES 

T. Chubb Condict George Limyansky Frederick C. Sieber. Jr. 

Robert B. Lewis Walter D. Rhoads. Jr. 



PLEDGES 

Carl A. Bennett A. John Geuder 

Charles O. Bracken Wayne E. Knouse 
Robert J. Fairgraves Robert C. Perez 

F. Charles Schreiber 



Richard C. Shultz 
Donald C. Ward 
Donald S. Williams 



Two Hundred Seven 



*.-< ^ .**A 4( V- ■^' •%! *'».^' 4-- 



Jtf «,j ..»?.^, ^:< ,».-: .4<- .*^ *j. ^ 




IfitTfl UPSILOn OIUfGfl 

Founded at New York University, 19 23 

PENNSYLVANIA ZETA ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established at Bucknell. 1924 

T HE Zeta Alpha Chapter of T. U. O. has this 
' year actively participated in various extra- 
curricular activities such as football, basketball, 
baseball, track, debating, glee club, band, or- 
chestra, and dramatics. 

One of the campus highlights was the 
Apache Dance, which together with the Pledge 
Dance, Christmas Formal, House Party, and 
numerous open houses, rounded out a successful 
social season. 

In addition to social activities, T. U. O. 
managed to maintain a high scholastic average, 
ranking first among the national fraternities on 
the campus. 

RUSSELL VAN TYLE. 

Presulenl . 




^mm^ 1^ ^ ^ 

fm,J ,v^J. U-^*' -- • »* ^ '-="-< 









Tup R.Av: HcblHrd, C,olcm.,n, Kclhls, Vluim.ikcr. IWisw.n.tcr, C Ilmk-ms. I.civm, Nclv.n. Rombcrccr, \ .iil 
Second Row: >X'alUcc, V.in Tylc. Tomlinson. McH.ilc. Hawkins. Humpliriys. Cook, W'ynn, >X'..Kncr. I).ivis 
Bottom Row: McBrian, Quinn, Kr.iu»cr, Uunmirc. Kcllcy. Tress Icr, Thomas, ISythcway, McDowell, Gcarhart 

7 ao Hundred Eight 






FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Paul Gies 

John S. Gold, Sc.B.. A.M. 
Ralph E. Page, A.M. 
William H. Schuyler, Sc.M. 




GRADUATE MEMBER 
Thomas F. Fagley 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



William G. Beiswingcr 
William B. Clemens 
George A. Coleman, II 
Harry A. Hebberd, Jr. 
Willard H. Leavitt 



Russcl D. VanTylc 



James R. Hawkins 
Harry H. Wagner 



Carlos J. Nelson 
Albert F. Rohlfs 
Franklin P. Romberger 
I. Ripple Schumaker, Jr. 



JUNIORS 



John R. Wallace 



SOPHOMORES 



Dale R. Wynn 
Edgar A. Tomlinson 



PLEDGES 



J. Edward Bytheway 
Glover H. Cook, '39 
Wilbur E. Davis, '39 
J. Richard Dunmire 
Robert M. Gearhart 
H. LeRoy Humphreys, '39 
Ward W. Kelley 



Howard F. Krausser 
John E. McBrian 
Lester L. McDowell 
Edward T. McFate, 
Edward E. Quinn 
George W. Thomas 
Isaac J. Tressler 



39 



Two Hundred Nine 



•V- T> -^'^ 







PHI mm THtTfl 

Founded nt Pennsylvania State College, 1920 
GAMMA CHAPTER 
Established, 1925 

PHI LAMBDA THETA initiated a successful 
year with a Tea Dance, an annual event, 
held during "Rush" week. The dance program 
for the first semester was closed with a Christ- 
mas dance. A colorful Houscparty topped 
Gamma's social program for the second semester. 

As part of the general Phi Theta social pro- 
gram, a series of smokers were held during the 
year, at which time members of the faculty di- 
rected informal discussions. 

Members of Gamma are active in many of 
the extra-curricular activities on the campus. 
Gamma is represented in baseball by Charles 
Hickman and Gerald Overbagh. Morris 
Gillct is editor of the Apple Cart. Other posts 
and activities, participated in by Phi Thetes, 
include the Editorship of L' Agenda. Business 
Manager of the Apple Cart. Manager of the 
10^6 baseball team, Cap and Dagger, and the 
International Relations Club, 

VIRGIL LANNI, 

President. 



^ fSf^ 





lop Row: L.inni, Gillct. Sillman, Osborn, Hickman, Ovcrb.l^li 

Boicom Row: Armold, Waldman, Priggcr, Fcrbcr, Petrick, Beaver, Ritter 




Two HuriiircJ Ten 






FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Frank E. Burpee, A.M. 
William T. Johnson, A.B. 
George M. Kunkcl, Sc.M. in M.E. 
Paul G. Stolz 




GRADUATE MEMBER 
James Ritter 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
SENIORS 
M. Lee Gillet Virgil Lanni Emmanuel I. Sillman 

.JUNIOR 
Carroll E. Osborn 



SOPHOMORE 
Charles J. Hickman 



PLEDGES 



John D. Armold 
George W. Beaver 
Alexander B. Ferber 
John J. Kovski 



Gerald H. Ovcrbagh 
Paul J. Petrick, Jr. 
William Prigger, Jr. 
Murray Waldman 



Two Hundred Eleven 



W r; .'».! -Vi ^t? ^t- 

» ■ ♦■ » >" . i 

. , ■ . *v fV; .W JB •■" 

• ♦ . ♦ 




flLPfifl PHI OfLie 

Founded at Syracuse University, 1914 

PENNSYLVANIA BETA EPSILON CHAPTER 
Established, 1930 

ITH the advent of September, 19 3 6, came 

the acquisition of a new home for Beta Epsi- 
lon of Alpha Phi Delta. In addition, the num- 
ber of actives, totaling six last year, has been 
augmented to eight, while four pledges increase 
the entire membership to twelve. 

It is evident that the limitations set by the 
smallness of the chapter are effective in reducing 
the degree of active participation in campus ac- 
tivities. Yet, although comparatively new on 
the Bucknell campus. Beta Epsilon has pro- 
gressed steadily, through the persistent efforts 
of all of its members. 

The chapter has taken part in all intramural 
sports. In addition, Enio Conti is on the var- 
sity football team, Alfred Ricigliano was ap- 
pointed to the Senior Tribunal, and Anthony 
Policelli is the Vice-President of the Class of 
1939. 

Thus, this year has served as another firm 
layer of a base upon which a strong superstruc- 
ture, now in view, will be placed. 

JOSEPH SBEDICO, 

President. 



t^<0 !^ C <^- ^ 

O ,/•? O ^ i!^. ,(f^ 



l^^l^ 



■^w 





Top Row: Ricijftiano, Biscontini, Conti. Sbcdico. Addimanda, Bonanno 
Bottom Row: Circlli, Policelli. Caporalctti, lacurto, Pinto, Maiorino 

Tao Hundred Twelve 




FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIOR 
Alfred Ricigliano 



JUNIORS 
Arnold Biscontini Enio Conti 



Joseph Sbedico 



SOPHOMORES 
Christian Addimanda Frank Bonnano Anthony Policelli 

Louis Cirelli 



Steve Caporaletti 



PLEDGES 
John lacurto Anthony Pinto 

Joseph Maiorino 



7 u'o Hundred Thirlcen 



1 - 7- ■;"• '^ 




SIGfllfl HLPHfl mu 

Founded at the College of the City of 
New York, 1909 

PENNSYLVANIA SIGMA PHI CHAPTER 

Established, 19^2 

HLTHOUGH the yongest fraternity on the 
campus, Sigma Alpha Mu has contributed its 
members in every field of college activity. It 
has recently initiated at its chapter house a 
weekly meeting of Jewish services and forum to 
cultivate a better and closer understanding be- 
tween Jewish and Non-Jev/ish students and 
organizations. 

In addition to the chapter's social activities, 
it has members in football and soccer, including 
next year's football manager. S. A. M. claims 
membership in Pi Sigma Alpha, honorary 
Political Science fraternity. 

NORMAN FLACHS. 

President. 



I 




^ O o ^ 

^ i( Wk^ mai^ mli% 

o p ,a ^ o. f^. f^. 





•'^z^ 





Top Row: Flachs, H, Simon, S. Simun, K.ipl.in, .Vloslcr. Koslikin, Zlotkin 

Second Row: Zager, Fruchter, Hampic, Hirsh, Hcchtkopf, Rabinowiiz, Pearlman 

Bottom Row: Canarick, Vjndcrwart, Berk, jaffc. Miller, Lewis, Friedman, Ranter, Xjthjn<iwi 



Tt'o Hundred Fourteen 



,fr V> »>-4-J 




Norman Flachs 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
SENIORS 
Harold J. Simon Sidney A. Simon 



Daniel Friedman 
Jack Fruchter 
Milton J. Hample 
Leon Kanter 



JUNIORS 

Seymour Kaplan Sidney Tomberg 

Frederick H. Koshkin Abraham J. Zager 

Herman B. Mosler Louis Zlotkin 
Alvin Nathanowitz 





SOPHOMORES 




Sidney Canarick 


Emanuel Hirsh 


Donald Rabinowitz 


Fabian S. Hechtkopf 


Emanuel Pearlman 
PLEDGES 




Paul Albert 


Melvin Jaffe 


Jack Stadler 


Leon Berk '39 


Edward Lewis 


Floyd V'andcwart 


Bernard Brooks 


Gerald Miller 






Ta'o 


Hundred Fit teen 






^^^>^..^:\, 




inTtRffiflitRniiy council 



THE Interfratcrnity Council, consisting of a 
representative from each fraternity on the 
campus, is an organization which serves to 
foster a cooperative spirit among the fraternities. 
All interfraternity relations are under the direc- 
tion of this Council. 

Each year the Interfraternity Council holds 
an Interfraternity Pledge Banquet at which 
Pledges, representing all fraternities, meet and 
become further acquainted as Bucknellians. 

This year part of the fraternity initiation 
policy was changed with the abolishment of 
the traditional Hell Week. 

Through the Interfraternity Council the fra- 
ternities are united in a program to improve 
college spirit, and to contribute toward a finer 
life at Bucknell. 



Lett, troni top: 
P. K. P.: Sheldon 
S. C: Crouse 
P. G. D.: Wood 
S A. E.: Raker 
K. S.: Speck 
D. Z.: Sholl 
L C. A.: Miller 

Right, from top: 
K. D. R.: Bonn 
A. C. M.: Noll 
T. U. O.: Hcbberd 
P. 1.. T.: L.inni 
.\. P. D.: Sbedicii 
S. A. M.: 11.kIu 



Tit'n Hundred Sixteen 







IHllTApFli 



♦ ♦ . • » ■ > . ■ , 



■fi •^- .ic. • 1-- 




■V./it .Vr'ri> iw^'J-i- 




tAXM 



^^7^f-Ti"<fi^7^'fl'^i^''^f''1^ 



5?^V 



.■K', -^ ^;. ■ V 



•+« ■*« -^^ -ft ' 



V " 






.** :». -.r 



EMtaii2W«B 







X 





SORORITIfS 



Enjoying feminine companionship 
in the cozy, congenial comfort 
of their suites 






■^ -^i-^'-V' 




PI BfTfl Pill 



Founded at Monmouth College, 1867 

PENNSYLVANIA BETA CHAPTER 

Established. 189 5 

T HE Pi Beta Phi's held four dances — a pledge 
' dance, a formal dinner dance, a spring infor- 
mal, and the Settlement School dance. One of the 
highlights of the year was a luncheon held in 
Harrisburg in conjunction with the Dickinson 
Pi Beta Phi Chapter. An entertainment was 
held celebrating the twenty-fifth anniversary 
of the founding of the Settlement School. 

At Eall Convocation, Lois Chapin won a 
prize for excellence in voice, and Hannah Mer- 
vine won one for superiority in Latin. Marian 
Purslcy's painting won a mural contest spon- 
sored by the Hotel Lewisburger. In the "Design 
for Living" essay contest the first two prizes 
were won by Peggy Davis and Carol Lee Davis, 
respectively. Irma Hewitt and Eleanor Scure- 
man had the leading feminine roles in three Cap 
and Dagger productions. Pi Beta Phi has mem- 
bers in honorarics, C. A 
well as members on 
L' Agenda staffs. 



, and the Art Club, as 
the Bucknellian and 



I-RANCES MILES. 

President . 





f^ (^ ^. ^C 




^3 

1^ 


Bf 9 
^^^ 


o ^ f? ^> ^ 


19 


>^^ 


o 



Top Row: Crum, J. Hill, Jones, E. McM.ili.in, .Miles, Purslcy, Scurcnian, A. Anderson, Hlix, Bloeeker, Ch,ipin 

Second Row: C. Davis, Grim, Hewict, Hudson, Kaufman, Mack, Martin, j. McMahan, Parker, Ranck, Raymond 

Third Row: R.-L. Shuhz, Wiseburn, M. Anderson, Evans, G. Gardner, M. Hill, Mcrvinc, Millward, Naumann. Peterson, Snivcly 

Bottom Row: Snyder, Theiss, Winder, Barr, Belles, Edwards, J. Gardner, Ludwig, Marsh, K, Shultz, Wallen 



Tu.o Hundred Twentylivo 






^.^p 



SORORES IN FACULTATE 

Mrs. Jennie Phillips. A.M. 
Eliza J. Martin, Sc.M. 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 



Gcorgiana Crum 
Joan Hill 



SENIORS 
Beverly Jones 
Betty McMahan 
Frances Miles 



Marian Pursley 
Eleanor Scureman 



Alice Anderson 
Dorothy Blix 
Alma Blocckcr 
Lois Chapin 
Carol Lee Davis 
June Grim 



JUNIORS 
Irma Hewitt 
Mary Hudson 
Harriet Kaufman 
Louise Mack 
Kathryn Martin 
Janet McMahan 



Ruth Parker 
Marion Ranck 
Jane Raymond 
Kathryn Schultz 
Marian Wiseburn 



SOPl-IOMORES 
Margaret Anderson Hannah Mervine June Snively 
Margaret Evans Dorothy Millward Jane Snyder 

Jane Gardner Betty Nauman Ruth Wmder 

Marjorie Hill Esther Peterson 



Dorothy Barr 
Blanche Belles 
Claire Burke 



PLEDGES 
Peggy Davis 
Eleanor Edwards 
Grace Gardner 
Edna Marsh 



Barbara Ludwig 
Rac-Louise Shultz 
Carolyn Wallen 



Two Hundred Twenty- three 



^■^^M^ 5tJ V 4<|/ri 4:' V 4^ -*1 ^ 4* - 




DfLTfl DRTfl DfLTIl 

Founded at Boston University, 1888 

TAU CHAPTER 

Established. 1904 

TAU is trying to follow the leadership of its 
national organization in the development of 
the cultural phase of college life. The estab- 
lishment of a chapter library, the fostering of 
relationships with faculty and town friends, 
as well as entertaining campus friends at cozies, 
teas, and dances, and the improvement of the 
sorority suite play a part in this new concept of 
the meaning of the sorority. 

In addition to being runner-up for the hockey 
plaque and the Pan-Hellenic Scholarship Cup. 
as a group, individuals have also taken part in 
campus activities. The chapter is represented in 
Cap and Dagger, Theta Alpha Phi, Mu Phi 
Epsilon, C. E. A.. Delta Phi Alpha, Pi Mu 
Epsilon, Symphony Orchestra, Mixed Chorus, 
and Christian Association. Members of Tri 
Delta hold the following offices: President of 
Mu Phi Epsilon, Vice-President and Treasurer 
of W. S. G. A., Treasurer of W. A. A.. Treas- 
urer of C. E. A., Treasurer and Secretary of the 
Senior Class, and Treasurer of Pan-Hellenic. 

HELEN MORGAN, 

President. 



4f> :ff ^«^ ig( ^m ^- - ^" ^ 

Top Row: Broomhall, Corrin, Inslcc, Jackson, M.irsh.ik, Morgan, Ralhbun, F. Rockwell, Root, Spcycr, \(olfc 
Second Row: Ballentinc, Culbcrtson, Dilts, Hinton, Lapc, S. Rcifsnydcr, Weaver, Caretta, Henry, Kroether, O'Leary 
Third Row: M. Rockwell, Stone. Borncman. I{dwards, Gottschall, Hamilton, Jiilinson. La Cirande, Nardy, Noecker, Oaks 
Bottom Row: Patterson, Richardson, E. Reifsnyder, Rosellc, Smith, Scharfenberg, Trinkhaus, ^X'eineck, 'Ci'hite, U'ilson 

7'tt'o Hundred Twcniy-four 




rtrW-M 









Saiah Broomlial 
Jean Corrin 
Elsie Inslee 
Hazel Jackson 



Ruth Ballentine 
Anne Culbertson 



Eleanor Carretta 
Bern ice Henry 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 



Lyetta Marshak 
Helen Morgan 
Charlotte Rathbun 
Frances Rockwell 

JUNIORS 

Eugenie Dilts 
Sallie Hinton 
Bess Lape 



Virginia Root 
Harriett Spcyer 
Agnes Wolfe 



Sally Reifsnyder 
Helen Weaver 



SOPHOMORES 

Doris Kroether Marguerite Rockwell 

Helen Louise O'Leary Marion Stone 



PLEDGES 



Ruth Borneman 
Eleanor Edwards 
Dorothy Gottschall 
Harriette Hamilton 
Mary Louise Johnson 
Helen LaGrande 
Christine Nardy 
Helen Noecker, '39 
Dorothy Oaks 



Katherine Patterson 
Esther Reifsnyder, '39 
Marian Richardson. '38 
Ethel Roselle, '39 
Doris Scharfenberg, '39 
Arrena Smith, '38 
Ruth Trinkaus 
Mae Weineck, '38 
Dorothy White 



■Virginia Wilson 



Tix'o Hundred Twenty -Hvq 



-%^-*<4-44 «.T 




li 



KBPPfl DfLIfl 



Founded at Virginia State Normal School, 1897 

PHI TAU CHAPTER 

Established, 1915 

PHI TAU ushered in its season by pledging 
thirty girls at the end ot its rushing period. 
With the added impetus of the successful pledg- 
ing, the chapter was well able to participate in 
Bucknell life to the fullest. 

Following out its social service interests. 
Kappa Delta along with the Phi Gamma Deltas, 
gave a Christmas party for the children of 
Lewisburg. 

Prominent offices held by Kappa Deltas this 
year were: President of Pan-Hellenic, Secretary 
of W. A, A., and Pi Mu Epsilon, Secretary- 
Treasurer of Sigma Tau Delta, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Freshman class, three offices of 
Junior women, and four offices of Senior 
women. 

CLEMENTINE GORDON, 

President. 



<5'^ ff #/i^. f^^^^ ^f^ o ^ f! 9 



> ^'i y- 








4^ ^ ^- ^ # > y ^ ' ^ ^ fy 

Top Row: Brcinlingcr, Davis. Decker, Krncst, Kvans, Gordon. Green, Griesin^er. Gronemeyer, Kni);lus. Scliillinf;, Sh.iw, V^^'eatlicrby, 

Atkins, Bachman 
Second Row: Dooley, Hires, Kr.iutter, IJoyd, O'Brien, RusscI, Sonicrs, ^ illitli. Hjstedo, Clasen, Colletl, Heller. I.ucas, Price, 

Shumakcr 
Third Row: Vi'ilkinson, Armstron;;, de Beck, Boquist. Bowen, Brinknian, Cox. Cublurly, Danhy, Danneniann, Doling. Fvans, 

Eyicr, Fisher, Follmer 
Bottom Row: Haire, Hutchinson. Johnstone. Koshland. Krcider, I.cishnian. I.ev.in, Mcckler. Miller, Pcacluy, Rolfe, Stollcr. Stycr. 

Talmadgc, Towner 



Two Hundred Ta.'enly-six 



^hh: 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 
SENIORS 

Gertrude Brcinlingcr Jcanncttc Evans 
Sarah Davis Clementine Gordon 

Olive Decker Florence Green 

Madeleine Earnest Edith Gricsinger 
Ellen Gronemeyer 



Martha Knights 
Elizabeth Schilling 
Betty Shaw 
Anne Weatherby 



Sue Atkins 
Mary Bachman 
Thelma Brooks 
Emily Dooley 



JUNIORS 

Clementine Hires 
Constance Krautter 
Margaret Lloyd 



Ruth OBrien 
Gay Russell 
Lillian Somers 
Carol Willich 



i \ 



Marjorie Bastedo 
Lois Clascn 
Grace CoUett 



SOPHOMORES 

Betty Jane Heller 
Kay Lucas 



Dorothy Price 
Bonnie Shumaker 
Arlene Wilkinson 



Jcannette Armstrong 
Betty dc Beck 
Edith Boquist 
Ora Bowen 
Betty Brinkman 
Ruth Cox- 
Edna May Cubberly 
Virginia Danby 
Alma Dannenmann 
Dorothy Dolmg 



PLEDGES 

Grace Evans 
Mary Elizabeth Eyler 
Virginia Fisher 
Alice FoUmer 
Grace Haire 
Mary Hutchinson 
Janet Johnstone 
Betty Koshland 
Annabel Kreider 



Carlyn Lcishman, 
Jean Levan 
Floretta Meckler 
Jean Miller. '38 
Helen Peachey 
Jeanne Rolfe 
Judy StoUer 
Peg Styer 
Jeanne Talmadgc 
Bette Towner 



Two Hundred Twenty -seven 



■'^i -na %t U - 



'■*r -M -4* *T • 



'•*'i'fi '< 









HLPflB Cfil OIUfGfl 

Founded at Dcpauw University. 1885 

ETA CHAPTER 
Established, 1898: Reorganiz.ed, 1921 

fTA of Alpha Chi Omega has representatives 
in every extra-curricular activity and nearly 
every honorary fraternity on the campus. We 
hold the offices of Secretary of the Junior Class. 
Treasurer of the Freshman Class. President of 
the W. A. A.. President of the C. E. A.. Asso- 
ciate Editor of the L'Agenda. Assistant Manag- 
ing Editor of the Bucknellum. President, Vice- 
President, and Secretary-Treasurer of the Fresh- 
men Women, and Vice-President of Sigma Tau 
Delta. We have representatives in Phi Sigma. 
Theta Alpha Phi. Sigma Tau Delta, Delta Phi 
Alpha, Delta Mu Delta. Pi Mu Epsilon. Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Art Club. Mixed Chorus. 
Girls' Glee Club, Cap and Dagger, and Senior 
Counsellors. In the fraternity at large. Eta this 
year won recognition when one of her members 
won the poetry award given each year by the 
National Council. 

Our social activities have included teas, two 
successful dances, bridge parties, and suppers. 
Founders' Day was celebrated by a banquet and 
an appropriate program re-enacting the founding 
of our fraternity. 

RUTH M. ORTT, 

President. 






<(' 




* 




<5§©^ g\^,p.f^^ 



I 



Top Row: Butchko, Davis, Dirl.im, Keys, Long, Mills, Ortt. Pis/c/ck, Roscr, Van Lcuvan, Wray, Gcdncy 

Second Row: Morrow, Niclmlls, Sw,in, H. Webb. Thirkicid, Cleaves, Cioos, Cornellier, Cunliffc, Harris, Llewellyn, Myers 

Third Row: Noll, Osborne, Sheet/, Stabler, Van Vl'ie, Zerbola, Feltner, Balbirnie, Bjstian, Bortz, Gcisscl. Davis 

Bottom Row; George, Kran/.ley, Lepperd, .Mayhew, Stein, Strawn, Talbot, \('ilcy, K. Vi'ebb 

I wo Hundred Twenty-eight 



» ; » V ■ »■ ; 

V t « I t 






Kathryn Butchko 
Katherine Davis 
Marjorie Dirlam 
Margaret Keys 



Jeanne Gedney 
Ann Morrow 



Marjorie Cleaves 
Margaret Cloos 
Virginia Cornellier 
Helen CunlifFe 
Helen Harris 




SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 

Marion Long Irene Piszczek 

Frances Mills Jean Roser 

Ruth Ortt Ruth Van Lcuvcn 

Eleanor Owens Betty Wray 



JUNIORS 

Marjorie Nicholls 
Elinor Reeves 
Julia Swan 



SOPHOMORES 

Ruth Llewellyn 
Helen Myers 
Charlotte Noll 
Betty Osborne 
Evelyn Sheetz 



Betty Webb 
Margaret Thirkield 



Mildred Stabler 
Ruth Van Why 
Dorothea Zerbola 
Ruth Feltner 



Helen Balburnie 
Catherine Bastian 
Margaret Bortz 
Margaret Davis 
Katherine Geissel 



PLEDGES 

Helen George Virginia Strawn 

Arlene Kranzley Betty Talbot 

Ruth Lepperd Marguerite Wiley 

Mary Louise May hew Katherine Webb 
Henrietta Stein 



Two Hundred Twenty-nine 







«<s" r- ■^ *er -V' a; -♦! 


■fl '-''i 


•;:#••«••»• » ■- ."■ -■ ■ 




■*,'•>«♦>• - ■ ► 


.»! •* 


i%r*^t 


, * 



■« -friv -;jH.- .ft 



i 



Founded at Wcsleyan College, 1852 

BETA KAPPA CHAPTER 

Established at Bucknell, 1922 

BETA KAPPA CHAPTER of Phi Mu, look- 
ing over the past year, feels that it has 
enjoyed success. The sorority began the year 
with a vengeance when it won the hockey cham- 
pionship. Among the social events have been 
three dances. The pledges held a swimming 
party for the rest of the chapter. 

Phi Mu's have been active in many organi- 
zations including Cap and Dagger. Debating. 
Mixed Chorus, Symphony Orchestra, and the 
Bucknellian and L' Agenda staffs. Among the 
honors which have come to our girls are the 
Presidency of the Sophomore Class, election to 
positions on the C. A. Cabinet, and member- 
ship in Theta Alpha Phi, Pi Mu Epsilon, Sigma 
Tau Delta, and Mu Phi Epsilon, all honorary 

fraternities. 

JANET McKENNA, 

President. 




a^s^Uf'^f 



( 
A 



// 








Top Row: Riift, M.icNnmara, Pc-tcrson, McLucas, Rice, di Pctrillo, F.llcnl, Armstrong, Corke, Crjnnur, McKcnna. Monic 

Second Row: Shlcldi, liaran/tlli, Bt-nnett, Brown. Copcbnd, Gr.lbau, Graliam, Circcn. Machanur. Perry. Rea, Specht 

B,.lt..m Row: WohKen. Abbotts. Allen, Ashman. Frant/. Ciallup. H.ill. \ls( lell.Hul. MeQuav, Murrav. Shannon. Siannert. Sllllman 

7 WO Hundred Thirly 



^,,»<-« 






« -;*s-%:^: 




I! 



Jean Armstrong 
Estelle DiPetrillo 
Dora Elleni 



Marion Corkc 



SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIORS 

Elizabeth MacNamara Elizabeth RcifF 
Mary Evelyn McLucas Kathryn Rice 
Jean Peterson 



JUNIORS 

Janet McKcnna 
Nancy Shields 



SOPHOMORES 



Alda Baranzelli Winifred Cranmer 

Nancy Bennett Lois Grabau 

Ruth Brown Helen Graham 

Josephine Copeland Mildred Green 

Gladford Machamer 



Lois Monie 



Ruth Perry 
Vera Rea 
Helen Specht 
Ruth Wohlsen 



PLEDGES 



Dolly Abbotts 
Lorrayne Allen 
Catherine Ashman 
Janet Gallup 



Evelyn Frantz 
Maybelle Hall. '39 
Mary McClelland 
Emma McQuay 



Esther Murray 
Elizabeth Shannon 
Jane Stannert 



Til'o Ihindrvil Thirly-one 









0. 4fi :»^ r^ ^if, : 



» * < 




DfLTfl zfie 



Founded at Miami University. 
BETA THETA CHAPTER 
Established, 1Q30 



902 



nCTIVE in campus affairs since its founding 
on the Bucknell campus in 1930, Beta Thcta 
chapter of Delta Zeta has continued this activity 
and lively interest into the present year. Al- 
though the youngest sorority on the campus, 
Delta Zeta has continued her share toward 
making campus life meaningful. 

Delta Zeta has numbered among its accom- 
plishments the winning of the Rhodes Scholar- 
ship, Presidency of Student Government, 
winning of a library priz.e, winning of the W. 
A. A. cup. a Mathematics prize and a Music 
award. 

Present members of Beta Theta Chapter are 
also active in extra-curricular activities, having 
representatives in Pan Hellenic, W. A. A., 
Women's Student Government, Mixed Chorus, 
Bucknell Christian Association, and Delta Zetas 
hold the offices of Vice-President of the Sopho- 
more Class and Secretary of the Sophomore 
Class. 

Delta Zeta entertained Dean 
her honor shortly after her 
campus late in February. 

HILDA FRYLING. 

President 



Dyer at a tea in 
arrival on the 



1 



I 







Top Row: Schatz, Lipphardt, Farquliar, Crossctt, Collins, Davis 

Bottom Row: Robinson, Posscssky, Savich, Stcckcr, Howe, Ten Brocck 

TiVo Hundred 1 htnutivo 






SORORES IN COLLEGIO 

SENIOR 
Catherine Schatz 



Mary Farquhar 



JUNIORS 
Hilda Fryling 



-•■•■,'1 .♦.'i">> Wi-'S''- 

'■■'■•J 4>-V**.I- >i: 







Edith Lipphardt 



SOPHOMORES 

Janet Collins Kathryn Possessky Jean Stecker 

Inez Crossett Dorothy Robinson Rosetta TenBrocck 

Betty Davis Vera Savich 



PLEDGE 
Claire Howe 



Tivo Hundred Thirty-three 



* It 



II 



fl% 


Pi 


-■■■ • 


9 



PflO-fiRLfniC flSSOCIflTIOfl 

THE Pan-Hellenic Association of Bucknell 
University is organized by the Pan- 
Hellenic Council, composed of two representa- 
tives from each of the national sororities: Alpha 
Chi Omega. Delta Delta Delta. Delta. Zeta, 
Kappa Delta, Phi Mu. and Pi Beta Phi. 

The purpose of the organization is to en- 
courage cooperation among the sororities, and 
to provide an agency of mutual benefit for the 
discussion of problems common to the partici- 
pating groups. During rushing week the Coun- 
cil, acting as governing body for the sororities, 
enforces the rules set forth by University 
authorities. 

Each year the Pan-Hellenic Council sponsors 
a tea for all Freshmen women. During the tea 
the girls are entertained for a few minutes at 
each of the sorority suites. 



p. B. P.: Cruni, Anderson 
D. D. D.: Corrin, Uilts 
K. D.: Gordon, Bachman 
A. C. O.: Van Leuvjn, \X'cbb 
P. M.: Di Pctrlllo, Green 
U. Z. : Lipphardl, Crussct 



TiVd Hundred Thirty-four 



^?r 







i.i^^^a; 










mm] 

CfllUPUS 
CLUB 



Smirnow, PrtsiJcn/; Kephjrt, Trcusurer 
pL-cherbridge, yui--Prt\iili-ut\ O'Mara, Secretary 



I 



THE Student Campus Club, through a social and athletic 
program, has presented to the unaffiliated student of the cam- 
pus some very definite opportunities. In the field of athletics 
both men's and women's teams have ranked high in intramural 
activities, the men's team having won the cross-country run, 
and the women's team ranking high in hockey and basketball. 

The two main events of the social program were a Fall 
Dance, and a Spring Swing. Not only were these affairs social 
successes for the members themselves, but they afforded an op- 
portunity for the unaffiliated student to extend a good time to 
fraternity friends who had favored them with bids. 

With a spirit of friendship, cooperation, and congeniality, 
the organization looks forward to an even more progressive 
program for next year. 



Two Hundred Thirly-six 



>.;'i .Vi---J3>S^'t.f'&v 



Student Campus Club 



Reading from left to right: P. Adams, 
J. Altman. M. Alpert, G. Anthony, L. 
Arncy, M. Askey. M. Bailey. J. Bcidler. 
E. Beihl, E. Bishop. M. Blumenson. B. 
Bond, T. Boguszeuski, J. Bowman, S. 
Bratton, S. Briggs, J. Brozman. J. 
Brugler. A. Buckley. P. Burke. R. 
Burke. C. Burns. J. Burns, M. 
Butchko, A. Butcosk, R. Butcosk, E. 
Beitler. R. Campbell. M. Campbell. G. 
Campo. H. Carson. R. Carter, L. 
Chapen, R. Cherington, K. Christopher, 
K. Claus, J. Clouser, M. Clouser, D. 
Cohen, L. Cook, M. Crabb, R. Griese- 
mer, R. Croft, P. Dunham. M. Deaner. 
C. DeGruchy. D. DePierro. S. DeMuro, 
W. Drozdiak, J. Duddy. 








O A 1^ ^#? 






€*^ ^^ ^-mJ 

t^ ^' il^ ^ • 






Two Hundied Thirty-seven 




*e^>!^ 



*-^fatf *iV- 



■^ Us. 4 




^3 

--"^K. ^\1:' 4k>^ ^ 










.-r-<. 



ifp^ r>. c^. fi ^ 




student Campus CiuJ] 



Reading from left to right: C. Dunham. 
R. Eckert, W. Egee. A. Eght. A. Elh- 
cotta. M. Englehart. C. Englcrth, G. 
Eshclman, J. Falbo, D. Fenton. B. 
Finkelstein, P. Fishel, J. Fisk. R. Fitz, 
H. Fletcher. B. Flower, E. Foltz. R. 
Ford, D. Former (S. C. ) , M. French, 
L. Friedman, D. Friedman (S. A. M. ) , 
N. Fuller, H. Frisoli. L. Fultz, J. Gar- 
rity. G. Gault, R. Gcmberling, J. Ger- 
ard (L. C. A.), M. Gilmour, W. Gold- 
farb, D. Gulnac, E. Guscon, I. Gusky. 
W. Guyer. A. Hall. A. Hamburg, I.. 
Hammer, L. Haines. J. Hanisky. R. 
Harris, E. Hart, E. Hartman. 1'. Hea- 
ton. R. Hechlor, C. Henderson, L. Her 
man. C Hewitt. J Hewitt. P Hewitt. 



Two Hundred Thirlueiuhl 



student Campus Club 



Reading from left to right: R. Herz- 
fclder. C. Hewitt. R. Higgins. M. Hill. 
R. Holbrook, C. Holderman. D. Holota. 
H. Hostettcr. M. Hughes. W. Hulbcrt. 
H. Humphrey (T. U. O. ) , C. Hunter. 
S. Hyman. B. Ifill. L. Ingcrsoll. M. 
Jacobson. E. Jamison. W, Jenkins. J. 
Johnson, J. Jones, L. Kanter (S. A. 
M,), H. Kaplan, E. Kaplan, R. Kcenan, 
B. Kephart, E. Kerstctter, H. Kicrce, K. 
Kilgallon, J. Kirby, M. Kitchen, A. 
Kline, R. Klinetob, E. Klinetob, L. 
Kalonowski. S. Kraft. C. Kunzweilcr 
(D. Z.I, M. Lange. C. Larsen. N. 
Lorusso. J. Latch, B. Lautenschlager, 
P. Lcfland, M. Leining. J. Lcnker. L. 
Lilly, H. Locke. V. Loftus, A. Lohr, 
L Lange, D. Loos. 








Tu,'o Hundred Thirty-nine 



C^ .O ft 



^■^] 









1 r # » 






^^;i.. 



wW ||-*4 ^^ 


















student Campus Club 



Reading left to right; J. Lord. R. 
Lowther, M. McCarthy, H. McCaus- 
land. W. McDonald, G. McGoc, B. 
McGraw, M. McKcage (K. D. ) . E. 
McQuay, J. MacLeod, H. MacMulland. 
G. Marshall, C. Martin, T. Mayock, 
H. Mcon. J. Mctzgar, D. Meunicr, J. 
Meyer, F. Michel, V. Milanick, R. 
Minium, G. Moll, M. Moore (P. K. 
P.), A. Moore, T. Morgan, M. Morri- 
son, T. Moss, H. Mulford. G. Murphy, 
A. Nathanowitz (S. A. M. ) . J. Nelson. 
R. Newman. M. Newman. E. Nichols, 
C. Northrup (T. U. O. ) . V. Nork. 
R. Minium. J. Nuttall, M. Nylund, 
E. Owens. W. Orlandi. D. OLeary. A. 
O'Mara. V. Palmisano. M. Parey. 
H. Potter. }-'. Pearson, R. Pearce. 
J. Petherbridge. 



Tit'o Hundred Torlt/ 



.8.. y> iS..fl^.'^ 

vV >* ■Vi'-^t'-'- 



Student Campus Club 



Reading from left to right: A. Peterson, 

B. Poinier, G. Powell, L. Pyle, E. Rapp, 
E. Rausak, R. Reese, E. Reeves, P. 
Reiff, R. Riemensnyder, S. Reitz, R. 
Renville (P. K. P. ) , W. Replogle, W. 
Rettmer, D. Reynolds, C. Richardson, 
R. Rishel, G. Rohman, M. Romweber, 
D. Rothermel, C. Roughgarden, M. 
Roversi, M. Russo. B. Rupp, W. Ryder, 

C. Sober, J. Salsburg, H. Sanders, A. 
Sandler, M. Shafl', J. Schumacher, V. 
Schurtz, G. Schwcikle ( K. S. ) , A, Sea- 
ton, R, Seers, R. Seiderman, F. Scmmer, 
J. Simsohn, M. Sharis, C. Shaw, B. 
Sheimer, R. Shiffer, B. Sidler, C. Sieg- 
meister, W. Silverman, T. Sirinek, G. 
Skublicki, T. Slack, A. Slade, G. Slavin. 




Two Hundred Fortu-one 






" ' i - 











^^ ^*"^ ^ ^^ ^^ 






•^ (^ p f^,. 





student Campus Clut) 



Reading left to right: F. Sloff. V. Smir- 
now. A. Smith. A. E. Smith, E. Smith. 
R. Spiro. C. Strykcr. B. Stead. L. Stein- 
berg. R. Stit7.er, L. Stolarz, A. Suway. 
C. Sweeney. P. Talips, E. Tallcy, M. 
Teitelbaum. M. Thomas, H. Thornton. 
R. Tiffin, B. Thompson. H. Troutman. 
P. lucker. F. Vandewart ( S. A. M.). 
A. Vasquez. F. Waite, A. Wallace, R. 
Walmslcy. A. Warakomski. R. Werner, 
K. Weaver. E. Weber, M. Wein, R. 
Weisgerber, S. Weller, M. Welsh, H. 
Welch, R. Wheeland, J. K. White, M. 
Williams. Kay Wolfe. M. WolfT, R. 
Wynn (T. U. O.). A. Yodis. W. Zim- 
merman, G. Zinck. J. Leiser. H. Dule- 
bohn (P. M.), M. Deancr, A. O'Mara. 



Two Hundred Forty-two 



^,,**.« 




HOOOfiOfilfS 



"For liaving achieved distinction 
in your respective endeavor — 
you now join others who have 
attained similar honor " 







Top 
Scco 
Butt 



Row: Kintncr. Rlch.irdv, Gcicr, Punslioti, Burns, Duddy 
nd Row: Lcnkcr, McDonald, Morreall, Morris, Sweeney, Troutman 
Row: Walton, Whitebrcad, Talips, Wood, Hclmbacli, Harris 

flLPHfl CHI SIGfnO 



BETA ALPHA CHAPTER of Alph.i Chi Sigma, national professional 
Chemical fraternity, was founded at Bticknell on January 25. 1932. It 
is composed of those students who intend to make applied or theoretical 
chemistry their life work. The fraternity aims to promote friendship among 
chemistry students, to advance the cause of chemistry both as a science, and 
as a profession, and to aid future chemists in the attainment of their ambitions. 



OFFICERS 



Charles Sweeney 
Harvey Troutman 
H. W. Morreall 
P. R. Walton 
R A. Harris 
w. w. Whitebread 
\v. G. McDonald 



U M. Richards 



,). M. Burns 
,1, C. Duddy 
.lohn .J. l.enker 



Master Alchemist 

Vice-Master Alchemist 

Reporter 

Recorder 

Treasurer 

Master of Ceremonies 

Historian 



faculty members 

Dr. R. C. Kintncr Dr. Bruce J. Miller 



PROFESSIONAL MEMBERS 
Walter Gcicr 

SENIORS 

W. G. McDonald 
H. W. Morreall 
C. O. Morris 
H. D. Troutman 



1 homas l^unslion 



P R Walu.n 
W. W. Whitebre.ul 
C. J. Sweeney 



R. J. Bechtel 



JUNIORS 

P. Talips 

A. L. Hcinbach 

SOPHOMORE 
R. A. Harris 



H. P. Wood 



Two Hundred Forty-four 






ffflyf?/? 




Top Row: Irland. lieiswinger, Herman, Marshall, Reynolds. Rohlfs 
hut torn Row : Schiinuker. Semmer, Skuse, Bisconcini. Stolarz, SilvJus 



fllfilCflfl IflSIIIUIf Of fLfCIfilCt fUGIIlHfiS 



THIS local group became affiliated with the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, a national society, many years ago. It seeks to establish con- 
• tacts for its members with the electrical engineering world by sponsoring 
outstanding speakers, including a representative of the General Electric 
Company. 





OFFICERS 




I. R. SCHUMAKER 


. 


President 


W. H. Dauberman 


. 


Secretary 


Prof. G. A. Irland 


SENIORS 


Faculty Adviser 


W. G. Beiswinger 


A. N. Reynolds, Jr. 


F. E. Semmer 


L. E. Herman 


A. F. Rohlfs 


H. G. Skuse 


G. L. Marshall 


I. R. Schumaker 
JUNIORS 




A. L. Biscontini 


R. C. Oberdorf 


L. D. Stolarz 


W. H. Dauberman 


W. P. Silvius 





Two Hundred Forty five 






f^- O. f^ ^c 






'W^j '7'^<^ y^^^-> 





Top Row: DeMuro, Petherbridge, Zlmniernun, Kob, Crawford, Ltwis, Mclstcr, Ryder, West 
Bottorr. Row: Moon;, Fish, Petrick, Smith, Schricber, Distcl, McDowfll, Pjuly, Scott 



fliRicflfi socim (iifCHonict mwmm 

N 1915 this fraternity became a member of the American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers, a national organization. This .society seeks to 

bring certain pertinent but neglected problems before the engineers. 

Stressing initiative and the importance of speaking, thi.s society sponsored an 

active program for the year. 



S. A. De Muro 
w. D. Zimmerman 
L. B. Kob 
Prof. F. E. Burpee 



Prof. F. E. Burpee 



S A De Muro 



R. W. Groover 
W. M. Rombcrger 



W. D. Crawford 
R. B Lewis 
H. Rhodes 
C. R. Weaver 



J. A. Adams 
D. L. Fish 
J. C. Link 
R. D. McLain 
P. J. Petrick 
A. R. Smith 



OFFICERS 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. W, D. Garman 

SENIORS 
J. H. Petherbridge 

JUNIORS 

L. B. Kob 

R. L. Summers 

SOPHOMORES 

J. H. Gundrum 
J. H. Meister 
W. L. Ryder 
D. P. West 



FRESHMEN 

L. Autcn 
C. Gciss 
J. Link 
E . M u ro 
C. Schrcibcr 
C. Stevens 
B. Whyte 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Honorary Chairman 



Prof. G. M. Kunkel 



W. D. Zimmerman 



C. L. Ranck 



W. L. James 
M. E. Moore 
R. L. Taylor 



I. W. Dislel 
J. L. Herrold 
L. L. McDowell 
H. A. Pauly 
C. R. Scott 
A. E. Wenzel 



Two Hundrt'il Forty-six 



iM-r'. 




Top Row: Belswinger, Dunham, Sweeney 
Bottom Row: Troutman, Yodls, Punshon 



Bfiii fPsiLon siGine 

BETA EPSILON SIGMA, the local honorary engineering fraternity, is one 
of the most recent groups on the campus, having been founded in 1931. 
It recognizes by election to its membership students from the three upper 
classes who have achieved high scholarship. Beta Epsilon Sigma works in 
conjunction with the other engineering groups on the campus m makmg 
general contributions helpful to all engineers. 



Professor w. D. Garman 
Professor D. M. Griffith 
Professor R. C. Kintner 
Professor G. A. Irland 
Albert Rohlfs 
Frank Dunham 
Anthony Yodis 



officers 



Ai/i.'(soriy Board 



President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 



FACULTY members 
Prof. R. C. Kintner Prof. \V. D Garman 

Prof. G. a. Irland Prof. D. M. Griffith 



William Beiswingcr 
William Kramer 



seniors 

Frank Dunham 
Albert Rohlfs 
Anthony Yodis 



Clarence Sweeney 
Harvey Troutman 



JUNIORS 
William Dauberman Cecil Ranck 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Thomas Punshon Louis Ulmer 

Ta'o Hundred Fnrly-seven 






V'^ 





Tup Row: Wray, Englehart, Jackson, Roser, Evans 
Hntioni Row: Piszczek, Peterson, Talley. Scurenun 



C. f. fl. 



CE. A. is an honorary fraternity lor outstanding women. Its members 
, are elected on the basis of distinction in scholarship, activities, and service. 
The members, while active in all campus activities, devote much of thei r 
time to such problems as social service. 



OFFICERS 



Bhttv Wray 


- 


. 


- 


President 


Marguerette 


Engelhardt 


- 


Secretary 


Hazel Jackson 


- 


- 


Treasurer 






members 






Jean Roser 




Jean Peterson 




Eleanor Scureman 


Jeanctte Evans 




Betty Wray 




Hazel Jack.son 


Irene Pisczczek 




Elizabeth Talley 
Marguerette Engelha 


rdt 





Two Hundred Forty-eight 



s*<r- 



s t> l.ifc- V> »"«--i^)- 
•i.'!* ;<■*/ >* •J.*' •'-'•■ 






D Q ,!!^, ft (^ 





2i#J#k 




Top Row: Martin. Butchko, Clemens, Englehart. Foitz, Hartman, Inslee, Kaplan 

Second Row: Kerstetier, Morrison, Mayock, Palmisano, Pierson, Rothermel, Rapp, Rohlfs 

Bottom Row: Saricks, Stahler, Van Leuven, Van Duren, Weller, Wcis^erbtr. Wolfe 



Oaifl PHI flLPfifl 



PHI CHAPTER of Delta Phi Alpha, national honorary German fraternity, 
was established on Bucknclls campus on April 20. 19'!2. It seeks to 
interest its members in German language and culture. For this purpose, 
the society each year sponsors a program of speakers and German moving 
pictures. 



OFFICERS 



Daniel Rothermel 


. 


P resident 


Agnes Wolf 




- 


Vice-President 


Sally Weller 




- 


Secretary 


Elwood Kerstetter 


- 


Treasurer 






FACULTY MEMBERS 




Dr. Adolph Frantz. 


Adviser 


Dr. V. McCrossen 


Prof. Paul Gies 




MEMBERS 


Miss E. Martin 


Katharine Butchko 




Elwood Kerstetter 


Mildred Staihler 


William Clemens 




Marcia Morrison 


Ambrose Saricks 


Marguerette Engelh 


irdt 


Robert Mayock 


Ruth Van Leuven 


Elwood Foltz 




Vincent Palmisano 


William Van Dorn 


Edward Hartman 




Francis Pierson 


Sally Weller 


Elsie Inslee 




Daniel Rothermel 


Ruth Weisgerber 


Emil Kaplan 




Edward Rapp 
Walter Rolphs 


Agnes Wolf 


Tit'o Hundred Forly 


nine 





«r ->i 'Y »«: -■ 






•>'• 4^ •»>. -V*:- 





f5 D. fs, es.. ,P 






Top Row: Davis, Rivcnburt;, Duck. Moody, Hartman, Ritter 
Second Row: Carter, Clemens, Fazio, Moss, Mayock, Peterson 
Bottom Row : Riemensnyder, Salsburg, Saricks, Valentino, Wor lli, Beidler, Rot her md 



HflPPfl PHI HHPPfl 



KAPPA PHI KAPPA, the honorary professional education fraternity, is one 
of our most active organizations on the campus. This year it sponsored 
a series of smokers, at which speakers drawn from its graduate memliership 
were presented. 

ADVISER 

Frank G. Davis 



Ambrose Saricks 
Robert Carter 
William Clemens 
James Beidler 



Dr. Frank G. Davis 
Dean R. H. Rivenburg 
Donald Stillman 



OFFICERS 

President 
- - - - Vice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Dr. T. Ernest NcwLind 
Asst. Prof. Walter H. Sauvain 
Malcolm E. Musser 
Charles Morris 



Charles W. Duck 



Robert S. Carter 
William B. Clemens 
Salvatore J. Fazio 
El wood Kerstetter 



James H. Beidler 



GRADUATE MEMBERS 

Edward G. Hartman 
Kenneth A. Moody 

SENIORS 

Thomas J. Mayock 
Thayer D. Moss 
Albert F. Peterson 
Robert A. Riemensnyder 

JUNIORS 
Daniel A. Rothermel 



James H. Ritter 



Joseph H. Salzburg 
Ambrose Saricks 
Joseph R. Valentino 
John F. Worth 



Twi) Hundred Fifty 










4*' 





^^ f"^ ^ .O 








Top Row: Kintner, Griffith, Richardson, Duck, Punshon, Beiswinger, Cruni, Duddy. Dunham, Fllcni 
Second Row: Englehart, Green, Hewitt, Klinetob, Knights, Lange, Mills, Raker, Rohlfs, Sweeney 
Bottom Row: Weller, Yodis, Young, Beidler, Blanche, Egee, Everiti, Harris, Richardson, Smith 



PI mu fPSiLon 



PI MU EPSILON, national honorary Mathematics fraternity, was preceded 
by a local Mathematics Club. The fraternity was established at Syracuse 
University in 1914, and the local group received its charter in March. 
1925. Members are elected only from the Junior group, and to be eligible 
must have an average of eighty-five in mathematics, a general average of at 
least eighty, and a major or minor in mathematics or engineering. 



OFFICERS 



Prof. C. H. Richardson 
Frank Dunham 
FLORENCE Green 

MARGUERITE ENGLEHART 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Prof. Frank E. Burpee 

Prof. M. L. Drum 

Prof. W. D. Carman 

Prof. D. M. Griffith 



Mary Walker 
Charles W. Duck 



William Beiswinger 
Georgiana Crum 
J. C. Duddy 
Fr; nk Dunham 
Dora EUeni 
M;iguerite Engelhart 



Ja i,es Beidler 
Ernest Blanche 
Mirgaret Carl 
William Dauberman 



Director 

Vice-Director 

Secretary 'Treasurer 

Editor 



Prof. G. A, Irland 

Prof. W. T. MacCreadie 

Prof. C. H. Richardson 

Prof. J. S. Gold 



Edward Hetzel 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Thomas Punshon 
Thomas Fagley 

SENIORS 

Eloise Klintob J. R. Shundler. Jr. 

Martha Knights C. J. Sweeney 

Ida Laura Lange Sarah Weller 

Frances Miles Anthony Yodis 
Herbert W. Normall. Jr. Jack Young 

Charles Morris Albert Rolphs 
John Raker 



JUNIORS 

Warren Egec 
Frederick Everitt 
R. A. Harris 
Cecil Ranck 



C. H. Richardson 
Edwin W, Smith Jr. 
Robert E. Summers 



Tivo Hundred Fifty-one 



t%f%^%,t. 



i^' :i^, rA, ,>- 




'^- O ^ /? ^- 

-air -T 







1^ 




D. O ,f^ ?^ 



i\ 



ii'€ 



Top Row: Aitman. Hehberd. Leavitt. Miller. Molloy, Sicgmcister, Simon 
Bottom Row: Spiro, Laiib.icher, l.Lslur. Nicholson, Rt-nvillL-, R ich.irdMin, Zager 



PI SIGHlfl HLPHe 



PI SIGMA AI-PHA. honorary Political Science fraternity, purposes to foster 
the spirit of democratic government and liberal thinking among its mem- 
bers. The activities of this group are accordingly directed toward under- 
.standing the principles of democratic government. 



HONORARY MEMBER 
President Arnaud C. Marts 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. Ralph E. Page. Faculty Adviser Prof. James L. Gathings 





OFFICERS 


HARRY A. HEBBERD 


PresiiletK 


James F. Nicholson 


\'ne-Pres:Jcnl 


William E. Lesher 


Sccrelary 


Charles C. I.aubacher 


Treasurer 




SENIORS 


Julius M. Altman 


Robert G. Miller Clifford 1.. J. Sicgmeister 


Harry A. Hcbberd 


Emmet M. MoUoy Sidney A. Simon 




Richard W. Spiro 




JUNIORS 


Charles C. Laubacher 


James F. Nicholson C. H. Richardson. Jr. 


William I". I csher 


Robert O. Renville Abrah.im .1. /ager 




/ a'l) Hundred I-tllij two 



I 



!• :.?U l.i- v> y*-,^.i- ^.«» 




-m 



Top Row: Campbell, Davis, Evans, Gault, Long 
Bottom Row: Snively, Speck, Streeter, Travis 



SIGdlfl TBU oaifl 



tPSILON BETA CHAPTER of Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary 
English fraternity, was installed on the campus in 19 27. An active 
organization, it attempts to promote a mastery of written expression, 
encourage worthwhile reading, and foster a spirit of fellowship among stu- 
dents of the English language and literature. Its interesting programs, and 
sponsorship of Bucknell Verse, are significant contributions to campus life 
at Bucknell. 

MEMBERS 

OFFICERS 
THOMAS SPECK ,,. Presi'dent 

MARION LONG ------ Vice-Prestder,! 

JEANNETTE EVANS Secretary-Treasurer 

CAROL LEE DAVIS ------ Editor 

TENTH DEGREE 
Lewis Edwin Theiss. 02. Founder 

EIGHTH DEGREE 
Prof. George MacKcndrick Gregory Prof. Harry W. Robbins. Advisor 

SIXTH DEGREE 
William Henry Coleman _ _. |Ch.irl« Willard Smith 

Jennie Davis Phillips, '01 Donald Gale Stillman 

FOURTH DEGREE 

Trennie Elizabeth Eisley. '31 

THIRD DEGREE 

Marion D. Long. '37 
Margaret Campbell. '3 7 

SECOND DEGREE 

Thelma Viola Slack. '38 



Jeanctte C. Evans. '3 7 
Thomas ^'. Speck. '3 7 



Carol Lee Davis. '3 8 
Grace Gault. '3 8 



Frances E. Bennett. '39 



Harvey W. Tiavis. 
FIRST DEGREE 



Robert Eugene Streeter. '38 



•3S 



June Snively, '39 



Edward A. Moloney. '39 



Tu;o Hundred Fifty -three 









-lift 



Top Row: Lynn, Ax t helm, Campbell. Dillingcr, ElJcni, Gcicr, \'.in Llu\ vii. Lord. .NLir;.h.ik,, McrriJcw 

Second Row: Piszczck, Pursley, Rath bun. Rice, Salsburg, Saric ks, Scureman, Sliaw, Spcycr, Talley 

Bottom Row: Wcaihcrby, Wcllcr, Wolfe, Alexander, Hewitt, Laubacher, Morrow, Both, Clouscr, Perry, Rea 



Tfiflfl HLPfifl PHI 



PENNSYLVANIA ALPHA CHAPTER of Thcta Alpha Phi, nationjl 
honorary dramatic fraternity, was established at Bucknell in 1919, the 
year in which the national organization was founded. As it exists on our 
campus the special functions of the fraternity are to act in an advisory capa- 
city regarding all dramatic activities on the campus, and to recognize by 
election to its mcmbeiship students who have achieved distinction in acting 
and stagecraft. 

OFFICERS 



Charles Laubacmfr 


- 


- 


President 


IRMA Hewitt 


. 




Vice-Presideni 


Mildred Clouser 


. 


- 


Sarclary -Treasurer 


Ruth Perry 


FACULTY MEMBERS 




Historian 


Prof. C. Willard Smith 


GRADUATE MEMBERS 




Blanchard Gummo 


Elizabeth Bentley Margaret Ly 


nn 




SENIORS 






Leonard Dillingcr 


Walter Gcicr 




Charlotte Ralhbun 


Eleanor Scureman 


Elizabeth Talley 




Ralph Axthelm 


Margaret Campbell 


L^yella Marshak 




Irene Piszczek 


Marion Pursley 


Kathryn Rice 




Jo.seph Salsburg 


Ambrose Saricks 


Sara Wellcr 




Carolyn Shaw 


Agnes Wolfe 


Ann Weatherby 




Dora Elleni 


Joseph Lord 


Reginald Merridew 
Ruth Van Leuven 

JUNIORS 




Harriett Speycr 


Ann Morrow 


Prank Alexander 
Irma Hewitt 

SOPHOMORES 




Charles Laubacher 


George Both 


Vera Rea 
Mildred Clouscr 




Rulh Perry 




Two 


Hundred Fifly-four 






■^ >-^-/< 




1^ ^f^ ft .Ci jP ^ 



O 

'^-> 



ID 




Top Row: Addimanda, Anthony, Barr, Campo, DeMuro, Frisoli, Garrity, Hanisky, Kierce 
Second Row: Kilgallon, Lorusso, Maiorino, Milanick, Nardy, O' Mara, Quick, Reynolds, Roselle 
Bottom Row: Roversi, Scharfenberg, Shannon, Valentino, Wara komski, Warner, White, Wilkalis 




[ifiijnen club 



THE NEWMAN CLUB, a fraternity of Catholic students, was founded in 
1897 at the University of Pennsylvania, and instituted on the Bucknell 
campus. October, 1935. Business meetings, question forums, and socials 
are held fortnightly in the recreation room of the Sacred Heart Chapel. The 
aims of the club are to benefit the student religiously, intellectually, and so- 
cially. Outstanding events sponsored by the organization this year were 
prc-Christmas and prc-Easter Communion Services. 

SPIRITUAL ADVISER 
The Reverend Joseph J. Schweich 

FACULTY ADVISER 
Professor Vincent A. McCrossen 



OFFICERS 



Harold Frisoli 
Joseph Garrity 
Alice O'Mara 
Ethel Roselle 
Martin Quick 
Marie Roversi 



Christian Addimanda 
George Anthony 
Dorothy Barr 
George Campo 
Samuel De Muro 
Harold Frisoli 
Joseph Garrity 
James Hanisky 
Harold Kierce 



MEMBERS 

Katherine Kilgallon 
Nicholas I.arusso 
Joseph Maiorino 
Vera Milanick 
Christine Nardy 
Alice O'Mara 
Martin Quick 
Doris Reynolds 
Ethel Roselle 



President 

First Vice-President 

Second Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 



Marie Roversi 
Doris Scharfenberg 
Charles Schreibcr 
Elizabeth Shannon 
Joseph Valentino 
Alphonse Warakomski 
Richard W^arncr 
Thomas White 
Mary Wilkalis 



Tu-'o Hundred Fifty-five 






PHI fPSILOn 



U PHI EPSILON. a Music Honor Society for women, was founded at 
the Metropolitan College of Music. Cincinnati. Ohio, in 1903. The 
object of this sorority is the promotion of musicianship, scholarship, and 

friendship among music students in American colleges and schools of music. 

Psi Chapter was installed at Buckncll in 1916. 



OFFICKRS 



Hazel Jackson 

Ruth Eisley 

Marie Evelyn McLucas 

Jean Peterson 

Inez Robison 



Charlotte Armstrong 
Lois Chapin 
Ruth Eisley 
Hazel Jackson 
Vera MacCrcadic 



MEMBERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Corresponding Secretary 

Recording Secretary 

Treasurer 



Marie Evelyn McLucas 
Nellie McLucas 
Melliccnt Melrose 
Frances Nimkoff 
Jean Peterson 
Martha Riggs 



Inez Robison 
Mary Steele 
Ragnhild Stillman 
Lulu Stolz 
Ruth Walters 



IflU KflPPB flLPHfl 



'AU kappa ALPHA is one of the three great national honorary forensic 
fraternities. Members are selected in recognition of outstanding work on 
the varsity debating squad. 



Rita Holbrook 
Carroll Osborn 



Prof. A. Biscoe 
Trennie Eisley 



Kiia Holbrook 
Alice O'Mara 



OFFICERS 



faculty 

Dr. G. Gregory 
Prof. W. Coleman 

MEMBERS 

ACTIVES 

Margaret Campbell 
Clinton Condict 



President 
Vice-President 



L. W. Lybargcr. Jr. 



C. H. Richardson 
Carroll E. Osborn 



flfneicflo socifiy of civil fiiGiiifffls 

THE American Society of Civil Engineers is an undergraduate org.ini/alion 
with the purpose of contacting its members with their profession 

OFFICERS 

Frank Dunham ...... President 



FRANK ROMBERGER 


" 




FACULTY 


Secretary-Treasurei 


Prof. D. M. GrifTith. 


Adviser 




MEMBERS 


Prof. M. L. Drum 


Frank Dunham 
D. L. Drum 
J. \V. Foresman 
M. Gadimus 
R. A. Gardner 




C. 
H. 
F. 
H. 
R. 


J. Hewitt 

R. Howel 

Leiler 

E. McKcIlncy 

K. Rhodes 


Frank Rombcrgcr 
J. N. Seccary 
C. M. Waldner 
W. B. Yarnall 



Two Hundred Filty-six 






REVIEIU8 






..? .^. 4,? .*-: 



HIGHLIGHTS Of THf yfflfi 

(Recorded from the Sprinci of 1936 lo the Spring of 1937) 

APRIL 

April 2-3 — Bisons place second in Boxing Conference Championships. Mitt- 
men capture 115 lb. and 145 lb. Championships. 

April 23 — Dr. Kagawa. famed Japanese Christian and Social Leader, leads four- 
day religious convocation that featured three internationally-known 
speakers. 
Fraternity Hell Week conducted simultaneously. 

April 30 — Bucknell One-mile Relay Team captures the Middle Atlantic Cham- 
pionship Trophy in Annual Penn Relays at Franklin Field, Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

MAY 

May 8, 9. 10 — The third annual Spring Festival presented in conjunction with 
Mother's Day. Exhibits, play, varsity, and intramural sports hold the 
spotlight. Nearly one thousand visit the campus. 

May 19 — Reconstruction of "Old Main " begins. 

Trackmen place second in the Middle Atlantic Track and Field Tourna- 
ment. Small Bison team makes fine showing. 

May 28 — Marty McAndrews resigns as Assistant Football Coach. 

JUNE 

June 8 — 175 Seniors receive diplomas at Eighty-sixth Annual Commencement. 
Roger Williams Straus, prominent New York industrialist, delivers an 
inspiring address. Newton D. Baker. Secretary of War under President 
Wilson is a distinguished guest. 

SEPTEMBER 

September 10 — Largest incoming Freshman class in history oriented by Fresh- 
man Week program. They numbered 392. 

September I 2 — D. C. Roberts gives .1i40.000 to Old Mam I'und. 

September 15 — Cla.sses resumed for students at 8:00 A.M. College enrollment 
highest since 19 30. 

September 21 — Rushing season begins for the thirteen fraternities. 

OCTOBER 

October 1 — William McRae, famed pianist, comes to the Bucknell campus 
under the sponsorship of the Artist's Course. 



Two Hiinilnd Filty-ciahl 






>•>»■^t^ Wv 



October 8 — Bucknellian polls political views — Landon gets 59% of the vote. 

October 16 — Education Conference convenes here for the week-end with Frank 
Kingdon. President of the University of Newark, as guest speaker. 

October 24 — Cap and Dagger, Campus Dramatic Society, presents its annual 
Father's Day play. Alberto Cassella's "Death Takes a Holiday", star- 
ring Joseph Salsburg. 

October 31 — Homecoming — Alumni renew old acquaintances — 10,000 spec- 
tators watch BucknelTs Bisons trample Villanova's Wildcats 6 to 0. 

NOVEMBER 

November 2 — Dean Rivcnburg and the administration move into their new 
offices in West Wing. 

November 10 — Largest single donation to date given to Old Main Fund. The 
sum of $62,000 was donated anonymously. 

November 12 — The Moscow Cathedral Choir visit Bucknell's campus under 
the auspices of the Artist's Course program. 

November 13 — Noel Coward's "Young Idea" was presented by Cap and 
Dagger. 

Bucknellian awarded first place in the editorial contest, second place, and 
honorable mention respectively by the Intercollegiate Newspaper Asso- 
ciation, which convened in Allentown, Pa. 

November 19 — Frosh easily defeat Sophs and are rewarded by lifting of Dink 
and Black Tie restrictions. 

Pep bonfire rages on Loomis Field in preparation for the annual 1 emple 
tilt on Thanksgiving Day. 

November 26 — Bucknell ties highly tooted Temple team. to 0. 






DECEMBER 

December 4 — Bison Soccer squad ties Temple Owls 2 to 2 in the final game of 
intercollegiate competition for 1936. 

December 15 — Edward E. "Hooks"' Mylin, Bison football coach, elected to 
the executive board of the Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Conference 
at their annual meeting. 

December 27 — Dr. F. G. Davis elected to the executive committee of the Penn- 
sylvania Educational Research Association and also appointed a member 
of the legislative committee of the Association of Liberal Arts Colleges 
of Pennsylvania. 

December 31 — Bucknell Debate leaders participate in a college symposium with 
Colgate and Mt. Holyoke over station WJZ. Acting President Arnaud 
C. Marts was chairman of the gathering. 

.JANUARY 

January 8 — Sophomore Cotillion proves to be a social success as students 
"swing" to the music of Howard Gale. 

Ta'o Hundred Fifly-nine 






ft' t , 



January 15 — Bison boxing team triumpli over Lock Haven Stale Teachers to 
the tunc of 5 to 3. 

January 14 — Baskctcers hand Lafayette Leopards 4 3 to 17 lacing in Tustin 
Gym. 

January 30 — Bucknell University Men's Glee Club begins its presentation of 
23 concerts and three radio broadcasts throughout the East. 

FEBRUARY 

February 5 — Bison fighters score easy win over Temple's squad by winning 
the meet. 6 to 2. 

February 9 — Rear Admiral Harold R. Stark turns over Wilkes-Barre home as 
gift to Bucknell. Estimated value, $100,000. 

February 12 — Junior Prom of 19 37 proves huge success as the merrymakers 
danced to the rhythms of Ray Noble and his band. 

February 17. 19, 20 — Cap and Dagger presents Shakespeare's "Hamlet" with 
John Forsht, former Bucknell actor, in the title role. 

MARCH 

March 4 — The Tatterman Marionettes present Ibsen's "Peer Gynt ", sponsored 
by the Artist Course. 

March 1 1 — The Buckncllian celebrates 40 years of college journalism, 
Hal Kemp signed for Senior Ball, scheduled for April 3rd. 

March 1 5 — Sigma Chi fraternity annexes Intramural Boxing Championships. 

March 18 — Bucknell fraternities agree to modify traditional "Hell "Week" ac- 
tivities. Decision of Interfraternity Council is unanimous. 



Two Ilundrcil Sixty 






univffisiiy 



III 



(PAGES 20-30) 
OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



(PAGES 20-23) 

Arnaud Cartwright Marts, LL.D. 

Romeyn Henry Rivenburg, A.M., LL.D. 

Lulu Coe Stolz, A.M. 

Dorothy Tunell Dyer, B.S. in H.E. 

Eugene Shedden Farley, Ph.D. 

Director of the Buckiielt Umversity Junior Colie(/e at Wilkes-Barre 

Frank Garfield Davis, Ph.D. . . 

Director of the Siiininer School und of the Exteiision Division 



Acting President 

Vice-President and Dean of the College 

Acting Dean of Women 

Dean of Women 



Floyd George Ballentine, Ph.D. 
Dayton Leo Ranck, A.M. 
Henry Walter Holter, A.B. 
Mary Helen Hunt, A.B. 
Frank Eugene Burpee, A.M 
Nelson Fithian Davis, Sc.M 
-John Steiner Gold, A.M. 
John D. Plant 
Lester Perham Fowle, M.D. 
Charles McDowell Morris, A.M 
Forrest David Brown, A.M. 
Jens Frederick Larson, A.M. 
Eliza Johnston Martin, Sc M. 



Secretary of the Faculty 

Treasurer and Comptroller 

Registrar 

Recorder 

D.Eng. - Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Sc.D. . . . - Curator of the Museum 

Director of the Observatory 

Director of Physical Education 

College Physician 

Alumni Secretary 

Secretary of the Bucknell Christian Association 

University Architect 
Librarian 



Biological Sciences 

N. F. Davis, Chairman 
Commerce and Finance and Economics 

Robert Matz, Chairman 
Education 

F. G. Davis, Chairman 
Engineering 

S. C. Ogburn, Chairman 
English, Journalism and Public Speaking 

and Curator for the Literature Build- 
ing 

Harry W. Robbins, Chairman 
Foreign Languages 

Leo L. Rockwell, Chairman 



FACULTY DEPARTMENTS 
(PAGES 28-39) 

Social Science, Sociology and Economics 

Robert L. Sutherland, Chairman 
Mathematics and Astronomy 

C. H. Richardson, Jr., Chairman 
Music 

Paul G. Stolz, Chairman 
Philosophy, Psychology, Religion and Art 

Charles M. Bond, Chairman 
Physical Education 

Malcom Musser, Chairman 

Physical Sciences 

Welles N. Lowry, Chairman 



FACULTY 



Acting President 
President Emeritus 



Arnaud Cartwright Marts, LL.D. - . . - 

Emory William Hunt, D.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 
William Cyrus Bartol, A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy, Emeritus, and Historian of the University 
William Gundy Owens, A.M., Sc.D. Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 
Nelson Fithian Davis, Sc.M., Sc.D. - - - Professor of Biology 

Charles Arthur Lindemann, A.M., Sc.D. - - Professor of Pure Mathematics 
Frank Morton Simpson, Sc.M. Professor of Physics 



Tu'o llunJnJ Si\iy one 



-*;■ -v. •*♦: -*!■%*'«»-*. 



Walter Kremer Rhodes, A.M., B.S. in E. E. - Pinfeasor of Electiical Etif/ineering 
Frank Eugene Burpee, A.M., D.Eng. - Profensor of Mechanical Enyineering 

Floyd George Ballentine, Ph.D. Profexnor of the Latin Language and Literature 

Martin Linnaeu.s Dium, Ph.B. . . . . . Professor of Surveying 

Norman Hamilton Stewart, Ph.D. . . - . Professor of Zoology 

Benjamin Williams Griffith, Docteur de I'Universite de Paris 

Professor of Romance Languages 

Paul George Stolz, A.M., Mus.l). - Professor of Music 

George Benedict Lawson, A.M., D.D. John Hoicaid Harris Professor of Philosophy 



Professor of Oral English 

Professor of Education 

Professor of English 

Professor of Joumalism 

Professor of Bacteriology 

Professor of Religion 

Professor of Botany 

Jiuncs M. Swartz Professor of Mathematics 



P. Vanghan Professor of Economics 
Professor of Economics 
Professor of Psychology 
Professor of Sociology 



James Primro.se Whyte, A.M. 

Frank Garfield Davis, Ph.D. 

William Harold Coleman, A.M., Litt.D. 

Lewis Edwin Theiss, Ph.B., Litt.D. 

John Winter Rice, Ph.D. 

Charles Martin Bond, A.M., B.D. 

William Henry Eyster, Ph.D. 

Clarence H. Richard.son, Ph.D. 

Robert Luke Matz, M.B.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Business Administration and Charles 

Rudolph Peterson, Ph.D. - - - - 

Philip Lawrence Harriman, Ph.D. 

Robert Lee Sutherland, Ph.D. 

Dalzell Melvin Griffith, Ph.D. 

Professor of Civil Engineering on the Albert Edward Foley Foundation 

Professor of Library Science 

Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Associate Professor of Sociology 

Associate Professor of Political Science 

Associate Professor of German 

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Associate Professor of Physics 

- Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Education 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



Eliza Johnston Martin, Sc.M. 

Charles Samuel Keevil, Sc.D. 

Meyer Francis Nimkoff, Ph.D. 

Ralph Emerson Page, Ph.D. 

Adolf Ingram Frantz, Ph.D. 

George Allison Irland, D.Eng. 

Welles Norwood Lowry, Ph.D. 

Paul Gies, Diploma of Music 

John Steiner Gold, A.M. 

Bruce Jones Miller, Ph.D. 

Eugene Shedden Farley, Ph.D. 

William Hilliard Schuyler, M.S. in Ch.E. 

Voris Blaine Hall, M.S. in E.E., A.M. 



Harold Augustus Shaffer, M.S. in E.E. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Drawing 
Jennie Davis Phillips, A.M. - - - Assistant Professor of English 

William Thomas MacCreadie, B.S. in M.E., Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



Charles Willard Smith, A.M. 

Warren De Witt Garman, M.E. 

Alvin Blocksom Biscoe, Ph.D. 

Thirl Ernest Newland, Ph.D. 

Clyde Elmore Burgee, A.M. 

James Anderson Gathings, A.M. 

Melvin William LeMon, Sc.B , Mus.M 

Cyrus Havreld Karraker, Ph.D. 

Robert Chester Kintner, Ph.D. 

James Olin Oliphant, Ph.D. 

Irving Lester Churchill, Ph.D. 

Wilfrid Harris Crook, Ph.D. 

Lester Perham Fowle, M.D. 

Daniel James Gage, A.M. 

Blanchard Stanley Gummo, A B., B.F.A. 

Roy Carleton Tasker, Ph D. 

Romeo Ralph Legault, Ph.D. 



AssLstant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Assistaiit Professor of I'Jconomics 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 

College Physician and Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Assistant Pralrssiir of Chemistry 



7 u'o llanJnd Si.xlij lu'i 






George MacKendrick Gregory, LL.B 

George Merrill Kunkel, Ph.D. 

William Thomas Johnson, A.M. 

Vincent Aloysius McCrossen, Ph.D. 

William Irving Miller, Ph.D. 

Walter Howard Sauvain, Ph D. 

John D. Plant 

Malcolm Eugene Musser, Sc.M. 

Gladys Ethel Calkins, A.M. 

Robert Anthony Gardner, B.S. in S 

Majel Keith Brooks, A.M. 

Charlotte Guion Armstrong, 

Grace Jenkins 

Melicent Melrose 

Charles Frederick Stickney, Mus.B. 

Harold Eugene Cook, Mus.M. 

Sylvia Mae Derr, Sc.B. 

Charles Augustus Godcharles, A.M. 

Donald Gale Stillman, A.M. 

Mildred Louise Sears, A.B., Sc.B. 

Elvifood John Disque, A.B. 

George Richard Faint, A.M., B.D. 

William Duncan McRae, Jr., A.B., 

Trennie Elizabeth Eisley, A.M. 

Eleanor Fowler Schooley, Sc.M. 

Paul Benson, Sc.M. 

Marguerite Alberta Forbell, A.M. 



Ph.D. - - Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Director of Physical Education 

Assistant Director of Physical Education 

Instructor in Frencli 

.E. - - Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Violin 

Instructor in Voice 

Instructor in Voice 

Instructor in Violin 

Instructor in Piano 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Instructor in Philosophy and Psychology 

Instructor in Englisli 

Instructor in Secretarial Science 

Instructor in German 

Instructor in English 

Mus.B. - - Instructor in Piano 

Instructor in Business English 

Assistant in Bacteriology 

Assistant in Mathematics and Astronomy 

Assistant in English 



Tii'u Hnndn-il SixliJ thm' 



ill 



.if 9 I 



•*5a«^K V 



■^;m^ »f. 



CLflSSfS 



(PAGES 44 109) 



STUDENTS 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Avery, Lloyd Davis, Sc.B. (Mniisfuld State Teachers) 

Williamsport 
Bertolette, Daniel Floyd K., A.B. Shamokin 

Brenner, Albert Edward, A.B. Kingston 

Burgee, Lois Montgomery, A.B. Lewisburg 

Butler, Rock LeRoy, Sc.B. (Grove Citii) Wellsboro 

Crediford, Eugene Emerson, Sc.B. Athens 

Daley, Edward Leo, A.B. (.S'(. Thomas) Mayfield 

Dallabrida, Victor Bruno, A.B. (Villatiova) Mt. Carmel 
Davies, Edwin Jacob, A.B. Nanticoke 

Dew, Robert S., Sc.B. (Blooiiishiui/ State Teachers) 

Nanticoke 
Dillon, .James Aloysius, A.B. {St. Thomas) Pittston 
Duck, Charles William, A.B. Lewisburg 

Earley, Francis Aloysius, Sc.B. (.S7. Botiaventio-e) 

Pittston 
Evans, Blythe Hurst, A.B. Plymouth 

Fagley, Thomas Fisher, Sc.B. Mt. Carmel 

Geiger, Margaret Sophia, A.B. Sunbury 

Goyne, Ruth Garner, Sc.B. (Wilson) Ashland 

Grady, Joseph A., A.B. (Susquehanna) Plains 

Halicki, Edward Henry, Sc.B. Askam 

Hankey, Carl August, Sc.B. 

(West Chester State Teachers) Wilkes Barre 

Harris, Philip Howell, A.B. (TemiAe) West Pittston 
Holland, John Samuel, Sc.B. (f'etinsi/lratiia State) 

Williamsport 

Hozempa, Alfonso Jo.seph, Sc.B. (St. Thomas) 

Edwardsville 
Keil, Philip George, A.B. (St. Thomas) Hudson 

Kennedy, Walter Bernard, A.B. (St. Thomas) Olyphant 
Knights, Frances Ellura, A.B. Williamsport 

Lahodney, William Joseph 

(United States Naral .{eademi/) Milton 

Lavender, Juanita, A.B. (Ohio \y,slei)aii) Lewisburg 



Litts, John Charles, Sc.B. 

(East Stroud.'<hur(i State Tencliers) Moscow 

Lynn. Mary Margaret, Sc.B. Philipsburg 

McCloskey, James Leo, A.B. (St. Thomas) Jessup 

Mallinson, Mary Alice, A.B. Williamsport 

Mattern, Jay Richard, Sc.B. (Susquehanna) Troxelville 
Mesics, Emil Adam, Ph.B. (.Miihlenbern) West Pittston 
Miller, Jacob Emery, Sc.B. Benton 

Miller, Lulu Gertrude, A.B. Lewisburg 

Miller, Warren Leonard, Sc.B. 

(Mansfield State Teachers) Mansfield 

Moody, Kenneth Arthur, Sc.B. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newfield, Leonard Layton, A.B. (Susqueltanna) 

Northumberland 
Newport, Floyd Darling, Sc.B. (Si/raeuse) 

Glen Falls, N. Y. 
Nudenberg, Walter, Sc.B. Newark, N. J. 

Piatt, John Elias, A.B. (Susqiuhanna) Wyoming 

Punshon, Jr., Thomas, Sc.B. Glen Lyon 

Rajnik, Stanley Louis, Sc.B. (St. Thomas) Plains 

Rank, John Edward, A.B. Lewisburg 

Reinhart, Phoebe Margaret, A.B. Milton 

Ritter, James Harry, Sc.B. Williamsport 

Robinson, Edward Emanuel, Sc.B. (Lafayette) 

Hazleton 
Rokosz, Sophie Theresa, A.B Nanticoke 

Swartz, Lloyd Monroe, A.B. (Siisquehinino) 

Millerstown 
Sweely, James Stewart, Sc.B. (Lafayette) Williamsport 
Sweeney, Thomas Francis, Sc.B. 

(East Stroudshury State Teachers) Wilkes Baire 
Swimley, Walter William, Sc.B. Kno.xville 

Vogt, Harry Bernard, A.B. Wilkes Barro 

Williams, Russell, A.B. (Siisqaehaima) Sugar Notch 
Williams, Thomas Stuart, Sc.B. Luzerne 

Wolfe, Lester Clymer, Sc K. (.Mnhlenhert/) AUentown 



/ uJo Hundred Sixlij-four 



SENIORS: CLASS OF 1937 
(PAGES 44-103) 



JUNIORS: CLASS OF 1938 



Ake, Harold Ney 
Alex, Anthony 
Alexander, Frank Thomas 
Allen, George Armstrong 
Allen, Margaret Eldreda 
Anderson, Alice Claire 
Androski, William Albert 
Antonelli, Francis Xavier 
Atkins, Sue Rebecca 
Bachman, Mary 
Baer, Llewellyn Amon 
Bailey, Jack Frederick 
Baldwin, Mason Williams 
Ballard, Walter Alexander 
Ballentine, Ruth Carolyn 
Beers, Robert Oren 
Beidler, Jr., James Herbert 
Belles, Blanche Lois 
Belsky, Frederick Charles 
Biscontini, Arnold Lawrence 
Blanche, Ernest Evred 
Blix, Dorothy Minna 
Bloecker, Alma Marie 
Bowman, Herbert Frederick 
Bronner, Jr., Nellis Baldwin 
Brown, Alice Gertrude 
Calvin, Arthur Cooke 
Candy, Jack Hatton 
Carl, Margaret Louise 
Carpenter, Holly Rawlings 
Chamberlain, Dallas Clinton 
Chapin, Lois Vivian 
Chimock, Emily Geraldine 
Clemens, Clyde Grater 
Clouser, Isabelle LaRue 
Conti, Enio 
Corke, Marion Jane 
Craig, George Mackenzie 
Cranmer, Winifred Stockton 
Culbertson, Anne Elizabeth 
Dauberman, William Herbert 
Davis, Carol Lee 
Davis, Dorothy Louise 
Deaner, Margaret Blair 
Deegan, Jr., Joseph Francis 
Delafrange, Kenneth Manuel 
DeMuro, Samuel Anthony 
Dennis, Jr., Chester Arthur 
Dickie, Kenneth Morgan 
Dilts, Louise Eugenie 
Dooley, Emily Elisabeth 
Druckemiller, Donald Edwin 
Eckert, Robert Burns 
Everett, James Frederick 
Egee, Walter Warren 
Farquhar, Mary Irene 
Fieser, Leonard Frederic 
Finkelstein, Gerald 
Fletcher, Jr., David Watson 
Fletcher, Hilda Dahl 
Foltz, William David 
Ford, Ralph Morgan 
Fox, Ira Gleason 
Friedman, Daniel 



Haddon Heights, N. J. 

Northumberland 

Kingston 

Harrisburg 

Williamsport 

Latrobe 

Scranton 

West Hazleton 

York 

Stroudsburg 

Scranton 

Elkland 

Wyoming 

Mt. Lebanon 

Lewisburg 

Dalton 

Ivyland 

Montoursville 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Glen Lyon 

Wallington, N. J. 

Collingswood, N. J. 

Westmont, N. J. 

Sherrill, N. Y. 

Little Falls, N. Y. 

Haddonfield, N. J. 

Pike, N. Y. 

Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Sayre 

Palmyra, N. J. 

Brockway 

Kingston 

Mount Carmel 

Harleysville 

New Bloomfield 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Somerville, N. J. 

Melrose Park 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Philadelphia 

Milton 

Milton 

Vineland, N. J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Camden, N. J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Westfield, N. J. 

Plymouth 

Sunbury 

Northumberland 

Allentown 

Rutledge 

Lewisburg 

Teaneck, N. J 

Sea Cliff, N. Y. 

Greencastle 

Wilkes-Barre 

Connellsville 

Edwardsville 

Narberth 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Fruchter, Jack 
Fryling, Hilda Elizabeth 
Gage, Ward Edward 
Garrity, Joseph John 
Gault, Grace 
Gedney, Jeanne Marion 
George, Helen 
Good, Charlotte Miriam 
Grim, June Nester 
Groover, Robert Wilson 
Hample, Milton Jacob 
Harris, Robert Alan 
Harrison, Jr., Harvey Wilbur 
Hebberd, Jr., Harry Atwood 
Heisen, Aaron Jerome 
Hewitt, Irma Lillian 
Hinton, Sarah May 
Hires, Clementine Elizabeth 
Hoffman, William Malick 
Holota, Dorothy Stephen 
Hopkins, Thomas Oliver 
Hudson, Mary Evelyn 
Hulick, George Stem 
Hyman, Seymour George 
Jones, i)ilys Martha 
Kamienski, Edward Paul 
Kanter, Leon Samuel 
Kaplan, Seymour Sidney 
Kaufman, Harriet Janet 
Kilgallon, Katherine Marie 
King, Grace Muriel 
Kirby, Jean Clayton 
Kob, Leo Bertram 
Kolanowski, Leon Thomas 
Koshkin, Frederick Herman 
Kotz, John Thomas 
Krautter, Constance Elaine 
Kurtz, Jeanne Catherine 
Lape, Bess Lee 
Latch, Joseph Sellers 
Laubacher, Jr., Charles Clemeni 
Ledden, Lewis Johnson 
Lesher, William Magruder 
Lipphardt, Edith Marjorie 
Lloyd, Margaret Louise 
McGee, George Vincent 
McKeage, Mary Belle 
McMahan, Janet Louise 
Mack, Louise 

Magill, Jr., Frank Weller 
Martin, Katherine Geraldine 
Mayock, Robert Lee 
Meminger, Howard Theodore 
Merrion, Howard Joseph 
Monie, Lois Estelle 
Morgan, Thomas Lewis 
Morrow, Ann Rachel 
Nathanowitz, Alvin 
Navikas, Victor Anthony 
Nesbit, Samuel Morrison 
Newman, Robert George 
Nicholls, Marjorie Lois 
Nicholson, James Frank 
Noll, Ruth Evelyn 



Newburgh, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Olyphant 

Wilkes-Barre 

Coudersport 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Philadelphia 

Lewisburg 

Lincoln University 

Lewisburg 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Milton 

Wilkes-Barre 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Philadelphia 

Forty Fort 

Carbondale 

Philadelphia 

Sunbury 

Newark, N. J. 

WajTie 

Windber 

Aldan 

Vineland, N. J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Passaic, N. J. 

Bordentown, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Hudson 

Olyphant 

Woodstown, N. J. 

Elizabeth town 

Nanticoke 

New Haven, Conn. 

Mocanaqua 

Newfoundland 

Reading 

Nanticoke 

Berwyn 

Altoona 

Trenton, N. J. 

Washington, D. C. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Harriman, N. Y. 

Milton 

Mahaffey 

Troy 

New York, N. Y. 

Danville 

St. George, N. Y 

Wilkes-Barre 

Juniata 

Berwick 

Moosic 

Blakely 

Uniontown 

Scranton 

Wilkes-Barre 

Lewisburg 

Danville 

Pittsfield, Mass. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 



Tivu Ilumlruil Si.xliJ-five 



Norbert, Chester Paul 
Oberdorf, Richard Calvin 
O'Brien, Ruth Davis 
Parker, Ruth 
Peebles, William Robert 
Petherbridge, John Hugh 
Pfeiffer, William Barnes 
Phillips, Jr., Claude Ralph 
Pierson, Earle Buchanan 
Porter, George Robbins 
Quick, Joseph Twinning 
Ramsey, James Aloysius 
Ranck, Cecil Leslie 
Ranck, Marion 
Raymond, Jane 
Reeves, Elinor Virginia 
Reifsnyder, Sally Adams 
Reitz, Robert Lewis 
Renville, Robert Otto 
Richardson, Jr. C H 
Richardson, Marian 
Rickards, Joseph Francis 
Riggs, Martha Ellen 
Robertson, Jr., William Edward 
Roski, Ben Peter 
Rothermei, Daniel Angstadt 
Rusin, Alex Allen 
Russell, Virginia Gay 
Ruta, John Peter 
Sbedico, Joseph Thomas 
Schmick, Jesse Elias 
Seely, Mary Constance 
Shannon, Edson Joseph 
Shields, Anna Katherine 
Shore, William Francis 
Shultz, Kathryn Mervine 
Silvius, Walter Paul 
Slack, Thelma Viola 
Smith, Arrena James 
Smith, Edwin William 



Kingston 

Washington, D. C. 

Bronxville, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Trenton, N. J. 

Haddonfield, N. J. 

Montgomery 

Upper Darby 

Plainfield, N. J. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Morrisville 

Wilkes-Barre 

Milton 

Lewisburg 

Corry 

New Lisbon, N. J. 

Norristown 

Lewisburg 

Luzerne 

Lewisburg 

Scranton 

Roselle Park, N. J. 

Northumberland 

Rahway, N. J. 

Plymouth 

Sunbury 

Aldan 

Westbury, N. Y. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Waverly, N. Y. 

Ashley 

Pittsburgh 

Freeport, N. Y. 

Trenton, N. J. 

Sunbury 

Lewisburg 

Nanticoke 

Plains 



Smith, Stuart Moore 
Somers, Lillian Ann 
Sopko, Joseph John 
Sprague, Harold Guy 
Stephano, Stephen John 
Stitzer, Roxie Mea 
Streeter, Robert Eugene 
Stui"geon, James Glenn 
Summers, Robert Ludwig 
Swan, Julia Emma 
Swick, Jesse Howard 
Szafran, Joseph Walter 
Thirkield, Margaret Gordon 
Thomas, Albert Duncan 
Tihansky, Theodore Basil 
Toone, Irnia Helen 
Travis, Harvey Winfield 
Troutnian, Harvey David 
Tucker, Paul Marlin 
Vail, Alfred Slocum 
VanDuren, William 
VanNort, Mary Cornwell 
VanNuys, Maxwell 
Wallace, John Robert 
Walter, Ruth Elizabeth 
Weaver, Helen Marie 
Webb, Ruth Elizabeth 
Weber, Eleanor Alice 
Weineck, Mae Amelia 
Weiss, Lazarus Heller 
Williams, David Morgan 
Willich, Carol 
Wiseburn, Marion 
Wolfe, Kenneth Dale 
Zager, Abraham Jerome 
Zigarelli, Fred Edward 
Zinck, Gertrude Leah 
Zlotkin, Louis 
Zott, Frederick DePauw 



Montour Falls, N. Y. 

Derby, Conn. 

Glen Lyon 

Campbell, N. Y. 

Norwich, Conn. 

Aristes 

Williamsport 

Oakdale 

Milton 

Black Lick 

Beaver Falls 

Plains 

Bala Cynwyd 

Kingston 

McAdoo 

Needham Heights, Mass. 

Endicott, N. Y. 

Milton 

Sunbury 

Scranton 

Paterson, N. J. 

Scranton 

Cranford, N. J. 

Swedesboro, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Scranton 

Atlantic City, N, J. 

Bridgeton, N. J. 

Nanticoke 

Wilkes-Barre 

Wilkes-Barre 

Sea Cliff, N. Y. 

Hackettstown, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Red Bank, N. J. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Penns Grove, N. J. 

Freehold, N. J. 

Carlstadt, N. J. 



SOPHOMORES: CLASS OF 1939 



Adams, Phyllis Frances 
Addimanda, Christian Louis 
Allen, Kenneth Alfred 
Anderson, Margaret Florene 
Arbogast, Jr., Lloyd Leon 
Askey, Maxine Louise 
Auten, John Robert 
Bagenstose, David Rutherford 
Baldwin, Jr., William Samuel 
Bankovich, Joseph Paul 
Baranzelli, Alda Mary 
Barnes, Bruce Walton 
Bashore, Isabel Jane 
Bastedo, Marjorie Lenora 
Bawden, Harriet Elizabeth 
Bechtel, Robert John 
Beckworth, Jr., Charles Henry 
Bennett, Frances Elizabeth 
Berk, Leon 
Birschtein, Benjamin 
Bland, Jonathan Fillmore 
Blunienson, Martin 
Bond, Betty Barbara 
Booth, Jr., Winfield Scott 
Borneman, Ruth Reeves 
Bosze, Jr., Joseph John 



Scranton 

Pittston 

Quincy, Mass. 

York 

Lewisburg 

Oil City 

Lewisburg 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clarks Summit 

Swoyerville 

East Elmhurst, N. Y. 

Norwalk, Conn. 

Port Royal 

Princeton, N. J. 

Johnstown 

Lewisburg 

East Lansdowne 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Upland 

Bernardsville, N. J. 

Wiconisco 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Millville, N. J. 

Hope Lawn, N. J. 



Both, George Alan 
Boyer, Wilbur Biehle 
Bracken, Charles Oliver 
Brown, Ruth Eleanor 
Brozman, Jeanne Rose 
Bruce, Everett Albert 
Bruce, Richard Barmore 
Brumberger, Robert Clarke 
Buckalew, Gordon Wanser 
Burke, Robert James 
Buss, Catherine Louise 
Cabal, Albert Valentin 
Campman, George Frederick 
Campo, Jr., George Joseph 
Canarick, .Sidney 
Cannon, Thomas Barr 
Carretta, Eleanor 
Carson, Harry LeRoy 
Cheponis, Albert John 
Christopher, Kathryn Margaret 
Clasen, Lois Muriel 
Claus, Karl Max 
Cleaves, Marjorie Corinne 
Cloos, Margaret Elisabeth 
Clouser, Mildred Evelyn 
Collett, Grace Elisabeth 



Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Northumberland 

Armagh 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Williamsport 

Sunbury 

Flushing, N. Y. 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Latrobe 

Dewart 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Jersey Shore 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Oakmont 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Watsontown 

Peckvillo 

Yorketown, N. J. 

Prospect Park 

Washington, N. J. 

Altoona 

New York, N. Y. 

New Bloomfield 

Bellmawr, N. J. 



Tu'ij Hundred Sixlii-six 



S&S^^iS 



Spsf;=4 ■■*■;*.■* 



Collins, Janet Hunt 
Condict, Trimble Chubb 
Cook, Glover Hardy 
Cook, Helen Lucile 
Cooke, Ralph Charles 
Copeland, Josephine Lawrence 
Coren, Lewis 
Cornellier, Virginia Mae 
Coulbourn, Thomas Dukes 
Crawford, William Dean 
Croft, Ruth Margaret 
Crossett, Inez Elizabeth 
Crouse, Dorothy Marie 
Cunliffe, Helen Lavina 
Currier, Laurence Meredith 
Davis, Betty Redelin 
Deaner, Marion Elizabeth 
DeBolt, Stanton Edwin 
Delluva, Adelaide Marie 
Dickey, Dorothy Louise 
Dobrof, Alfred 
Drozdiak, Walter Michael 
Duffy, John Joseph 
Dunham, Charles Vernon 
Eck, Jules James 
Edwards, Eleanor Florence 
Evans, Margaret Frances 
Eyer, Charles Rohland 
Eyster, Jr., William Henry 
Fairgraves, Robert James 
Fausak, Emma Rose 
Feldman, Lester 
Fishel, Pauline Emma 
Fisher, Samuel Scott 
Fithian, John William 
Flower, Betty Jane 
Friedman, Leonard 
Frisoli, Harold 
Frith, James Robert 
Fuglestad, Arne 
Fuller, Catherine Neoska 
Gardner, Jane Croyle 
Gault, John Clifton 
Gentile, Francis John 
Gerard, Paul Mason 
Geuder, Arthur John 
Goetze, Arthur Ferdinand 
Goldfarb, William 
Good, Roy Marlyn 
Grabau, Lois Estelle 
Graham, Helen 
Graham, Ruth Harriet 
Green, Mildred Edna 
Greene, John Newport 
Griesemer, Robert Daniel 
Griffith, Jr., Havard Evan 
Grossman, Howard Bruce 
Grow, George Lamar 
Gundel, Charles John 
Gundrum, John Harry 
Gunter, Robert Leon 
Guyer, Walter 
Hall, George Matthew 
Hall, Maybelle Johnston 
Hamburg, Allen Edward 
Hanson, William Clarence 
Harnish, Irene Gudykunst 
Harris, Helen Elizabeth 
Harris, Henry Mervin 
Hawkins, James Robert 
Hechler, Robert Frederick 



Wyncote 

Post Mills, Vt. 

Elberton, Ga. 

Vicksburg 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Mount Carmel 

Westfield, N. J. 

Denton, Md. 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Elwood City 

Hillside, N. J. 

Greensburg 

Baldwinsville, N. Y. 

Westfield, N. J. 

Alliance, O. 

Milton 

Mapletown 

Bethlehem 

Lock Haven 

Ventnor City, N. J. 

Shaniokin 

Trenton, N. J. 

Meadville 

York 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Towanda 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Erie 

Hightstown, N. J. 

Stamford, Conn. 

York 

Allenwood 

Williamsport 

Gouldsboro 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Newark, N. J. 

Williamsport 

Randall Manor, N. Y. 

Turbotville 

Johnstown 

Coudersport 

Summit, N. J. 

Blairsville 

Olean, N. Y. 

Newark, N. J. 

Port Chester, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Floral Park, N. Y. 

Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Granville, Ohio 

York 

Lewisburg 

Reading 

Harrisburg 

Philadelphia 

Shamokin 

East Lansdowne 

Muncy 

Danville 

Milton 

Williamsport 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hatboro 

Milton 

Allenwood 

Pittsburgh 

Washington, D. C. 

DuBois 

Mount Carmel 



Hechtkopf, Fabian Stanley 
Heller, Betty Jane 
Heller, William Jenkins 
Helton, Robert Addison 
Henderson, Charles Newton 
Henry, Alberta Bernice 
Hershey, Robert Kistler 
Hertz, Richard Rhine 
Hewitt, Ruby Pearl 
Hickman, Charles Joseph 
Higgins, Ruth Barbara 
Hill, Marjorie Jane 
Hinebaugh, Herbert Clyde 
Hirko, Anne 

Hohnbaum, Florence Elizabeth 
Hostetter, Pearl Henrietta 
Howell, Harry Robert 
Hughes, David Wheatley 
Humphrey, Harry LeRoy 
James, Jr., William Lewis 
Jenkins, Willard Warren 
Johnson, John Albert 
Jones, Willis Erwin 
Kayhart, Roger Ellsworth 
Kelchner, Jr., William Hayes 
Kephart, Stewart Bruce 
Kline, Donald LeRoy 
Kohberger, Jr., Joseph 
Kroether, Doris Irene 
LaBrake, Clyde Robinson 
Lane, George Leonard 
Lane, William Henry 
Laughlin, James Knowlton 
Leinbach, Thomas Calvin 
Leiser, John Young 
Leishman, Ruth Carlyn 
Leoffler, Jr., Severine George 
Lesher, Herbert Alfred 
Lewis, Robert Blauvelt 
Liebensberger, Sara Louise 
Limyansky, George 
Linnig, Frederic John 
Llewellyn, Ruth Eleanor 
Lucas, Katharine Elizabeth 
Lynn, John Pero 
McConnell, John DeWitt 
McDonough, Jr., Thomas Francis 
McFate, Edward Thomas 
McGraw, Bruce Gibson 
McKenna, Janet Irene 
Machamer, Gladferd Doris 
Maloney, Edward Alexander 
Maloney, Martin James 
Manning, Henry Wallace 
Manrodt, Jr., Kurt 
Martin, Carol 
Martin, Henry Arthur 
Mathias, Earl Pangburn 
Mathias, Roy Pangburn 
Matweecha, Metro Meh 
Mazanek, Anthony Peter 
Meek, Frances Jane 
Meister, James Herman 
Meltzer, Ray 
Mervine, Hannah Emery 
Miller, Edward McCague 
Miller, Jean Kirk 
Millward, Dorothy Eaton 
Minium, Kathryn Ruth 
Moore, Marshall Edward 
Morrison, Marcia Minnie 
Moser, Franklin Wattles 



Port Chester, N. Y. 

Mt. Ephriam, N. J. 

St. Clair 

Beechwoou 

West Chester 

Vandergrift 

Turtle Creek 

Milton 

Cortland, N. Y. 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Johnstown 

Shaniokin 

Plains 

Newark, N. J. 

Hanover 

Sewaren, N. J. 

Cape May, N. J. 

Philipsburg 

West Nanticoke 

Scranton 

Olyphant 

Elyria, O. 

Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Philadelphia 

Reading 

Shamokin 

Mount Pocono 

Bellerose, N. Y. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Long Branch, N. J. 

Philadelphia 

Merion 

Robesonia 

Lewisburg 

Lewes, Del. 

Washington, D. C. 

Northumberland 

Passaic, N. J. 

Lansford 

Manville, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnstown 

Frackville 

Kingston 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Ridley Park 

Philadelphia 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Franklin 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Newark, N. J. 

Aliquippa 

Hazleton 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

McAdoo 

East Vandergrift 

Allenwood 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Lock Haven 

Upper Darby 

Coatesville 

Milton 

Carlisle 

Montoursville 

Rochester, N. Y. 

York 



7 a'o Hundred Sixly-seven 



— ■ f^^ 






■W •*! -•^:- 



Mosler, Herman Benjamin 
Mueller, Ernest Conrad 
Mugler, Jr., Daniel John 
Mutchler, Charles Edward 
Myers, Helen Arlene 
Nathan, Richard 
Nauniann, Betty Louise 
Nelson, June Elizabeth 
Nesbit, Carroll Clifton 
Noecker, Helen Wilburetta 
Noll, Charlotte Rose 
Noll, Frank Henry 
O'Leary, Helen Louise 
Osborne, Elizabeth Grace 
Otlowski, Raymond 
Pearlman, Emanuel Edward 
Pearson, Frances M. Hamilton 
Perrin, Margaret Serrill 
Perry, Ruth Alma 
Peterson, Esther Margaret 
Poinier, Barbara Day 
Policelli, Anthony 
Possessky, Kathryn Helene 
Powell, Grace Amy 
Price, Dorothy Marion 
Quick, Martin Albert 
Rabe, Edward Frederick 
Rabinowitz, Donald Harold 
Rake, Norman 
Rapp, Edward 
Rea, Vera Margaret 
Reehling, Richard George 
Rees, Ralph 
Reese, Fred William 
Reider, Richard Koons 
ReiflF, Margaret Elizabeth 
Reifsnyder, Esther Elizabeth 
Rhoads, Jr., Walter Daniel 
Rhodes, Hoover 
Rhodes, Richard Kenyon 
Rishel, Robert Schuyler 
Robbins, Joseph C. 
Roberts, William Henry 
Robinson, Dorothy Grace 
Rockwell, Marguerite Ely 
Rogal, David 
Rohman, Gwendolyn 
Rohrs, Walter Frederick 
Roselle, Ethel Eileen 
Ryder, William Lewis 
Sandler, Irving 
Savich, Vera 

Savidge, Robert McCloughan 
Schaef, Charles Joachim 
Scharfenberg, Doris Ann 
Schumacher, Ida Alberta 
Scott, Howard Irving 
Seers, Robert Franklin 
Seiler, John Franklin 
Sheetz, Evelyn Marie 
Sherwood, Jr., James Frank 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Berwyn 

Chester, N. J. 

Shamokin 

York 

New York, N. Y. 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Oil City 

Lewisburg 

Renovo 

New Providence, N. J. 

Northumberland 

Pittsburgh 

Danbury, Conn 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Drexel Hill 

Media 

Lancaster 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

South Orange, N. J. 

Roseto 

Lost Creek 

Williamsport 

Newark, N. J. 

Philadelphia 

Watsontown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bushkill 

Philadelphia 

Christiana 

New Freedom 

Nanticoke 

Danville 

Schuylkill Haven 

Primos 

Jamaica, N. Y. 

Columbus, Ga. 

Milton 

Westbrookville, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Roebling, N. J. 

New Bethlehem 

Hamilton, N. Y. 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Shohola 

New York, N. Y. 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Lawrenceville 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Sunburv 

Strafford 

Belleville, N. J. 

Lindenwold, N. J. 

Providence, R. I. 

Milton 

Milton 

Halifax 

Farrell 



Shipman, Robert Henry 
Shupe, David Ralston Walkinshaw 
Sieber, Jr., Frederick Christian 
Silverman, William 
Skublicki, Gertrude Wanda 
Slavin, George Francis 
Smirnow, Virgil 
Smith, Robert Edward 
Smith, Robert Wellington 
Smith, William Clark 
Snively, Dorothy June 
Snyder, Jane 
Sober, Charles Townsend 
Specht, Helen Louise 
Stafford, Harold Rellinger 
Stabler, Mildred Louise 
Stecker, Jean Elizabeth 
Stevenson, Robert Edward 
Stewart, John Donald 
Stolarz, Lester Donald 
Stone, Marion Ditting 
Strub, Paul Theodore Weinert 
Summersgill, Travis Lowe 
Suway, Arthur Albert 
Talips, Philip 
Taylor, Robert Stuart 
Tebbs, Paul IngersoU 
TenBroeck, Rosetta Skeath 
Thomas, Stanley Caldwell 
Thompson, Hamilton Obergfell 
Thompson, Laura Jane 
Thornton, Helen Mary 
Toland, William Arthur 
Tomasetti, Louis Vincent 
Tomlinson, Jr., Edgar Allen 
VanWie, Ruth Harriett 
Wagener, Martin Curt 
Wallis, Aletta Anna 
Weaver, Clarence Roberts 
Weidemann, Jr., Walter 
Weidner, Harold Eugene 
Wein, Ada Mae 
Wein, Melvin 
Weinik, Leonard Benfield 
West, Donald Parker 
White, James Arlington 
Wilkinson, Arline Claire 
Wilkinson, Dan Philip 
Williams, David Morgan 
Williams, Lewis Gould 
Winder, Ruth Sarai 
Winter, William Edward 
Wohlsen, Ruth Keller 
Wolf, Jr., Anton Oscar 
Wood, Harry Peterman 
Work, William Swanney 
Wrigley, Robert Alexander 
Wynn, Dale Richard 
Zerbola, Dorothea Louise 
Ziegler, David 



Sunbury 

Saltsburg 

Wormleysburg 

West Orange, N. J. 

Camden, N. J. 

Newark, N. J. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Berwick 

AUentown, N. J. 

Hollidaysburg 

Altoona 

Danville 

Stoystown 

Detroit, Mich. 

Union City, N. J. 

Hazleton 

Vineland, N. J. 

Churchville, N. Y. 

Clifton, N. J. 

Hollidaysburg 

Williamsport 

Garden City, N. Y. 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Clifton, N. J. 

Emlenton 

Harrisburg 

Bayonne, N. J. 

Hazleton 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Douglaston, N. Y. 

Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Danville 

Old Forge 

Merchantville, N. J. 

Palatine Bridge, N. Y. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Glenside 

New Hyde Park, N. Y. 

Williamsport 

Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Seminole 

Millburn, N. J. 

C res son 

Vandergrift 

Franklinville, N. Y. 

Beaverdale 

Hollidaysburg 

Lancaster 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Muncy 

Endicott, N. Y. 

Mahaffey 

Derry 

Danbury, Conn. 

Drexel Hill 



FRESHMAN: CLASS OF 1940 



Abbott, Harlan Edward 

Abbotts, Ethel 
Adams, Donald John 
Albert, Paul Monroe 
Allen, Lorrayne Arden 



Rebersburg 

Trenton, N. J. 

Kane 

New York, N. Y. 

Westwood, N. J. 



Allen, William Ralph 
Allison, Jr., Raymond Bruce 
AJpert, Martin 
Anderson, Herbert Henry 
Andrews, Arnold Robert 



Coytesville, N. J. 

Cresson 

Williamsport 

Savona, N. Y. 

New York, N. Y. 



Two llunJrcJ Si.xlij vlijhl 



Hi 



,¥>> ;.t v> %!. 



Armold, John Davis 
Armstrong, Jeannette Cooke 
Ashman, Catherine Austin 
Auten, Jr., Clarence Leroy 

Babbitt, Walter Edward 

Baiada, Laurence Alonza 

Bailey, Madge Mary Esther 

Balbirnie, Helen Paton 

Barr, Dorothy Ann 

Barron, Edgar Eugene 

Barry, Dorothy May 

Bastian, Catherine Marie 

Beaver, George Wendell 

Beitler, Eugene Phelps 

Beneker, Helen Martina 

Bennett, Carl Allen 

Bernhart, Jr., Charles Baker 

Bernstein, Robert Erwin 

Berson, Harold 

Biehn, Gerald Lincoln 

Black, Gordon Smith 

Boguszewski, Theresa Margaret 

Bonanno, Frank Joseph 

Boquist, Edith Mathilda 

Bortz, Margaret Mae 

Bowen, Ora Lillian 

Bower, Arthur Kermit 

Bowser, Perry Frank 

Boyer, Lea Madison 

Bratton, Sara Martha 

Brelsford, John Dale 

Briggs, Sarah 

Brinkman, Betty 

Brooks, Bernard James 

Brooks, Evelyn Pauline 

Broome, Jr., Walter Gray 

Brown, Harold Ira 

Brown, Richard Fargo 

Brumberger, Richard Alfred 
Bucher, John Francis 
Buckley, Arthur Ray 
Burkart, Joseph Senior 
Burke, Mary Claire 
Burrows, Anne Emily 
Busso, Mary Ann 
Bytheway, John Edward 
Cannestro, Victor Joseph 
Caporaletti, Stephen Michael 
Catherman, Charles William 
Childs, Jr., Ralph 
Clayton, Martha Eloise 
Cohan, George Michael 
Cohen, David Daniel 
Cornwell, Elizabeth Margaret 
Cox, Ruth Myfanwy 
Crandell, Frank Russell 
Cubberley, Edna May 
Danby, Ruth Virginia 
Dannenmann, Alma Gretchen 
Davis, Donald L. 
Davis. Margaret Esther 
Davis, Margaret Louise 
Davis, Osborne W. 
Davis, Wilbur Evan 
deBeck, Sylvia Elizabeth 
Deihl, Eleanor Idella 
Dent, LaRue Corbett 
DePierro, Dorothy Ann 
Diblin, Joseph Armstead 
Distel, Jr., Irving William 
Doling, Dorothy Jane 
Drayton, Charles Franklin 



Plainfield, N. J. 
Paulsboro, N. J. 
Palmerton 
Lewisburg 
Franklinville, N. Y. 
Riverside, N. J. 
Philadelphia 
Philadelphia 
Altoona 
Youngwood 
Milton 
W. New Brighton, N. Y. 
Millerstown 
Huntington, N. Y. 
Truro, Mass. 
Montandon 
Lewisburg 
Emerson Hill, N. Y. 
Shenandoah 
Quakertown 
Pittsburgh 
Nanticoke 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Phillipsburg, N. J. 
Upper Darby 
Merchantville, N. .1. 
Berwick 
Knox 
Catawissa 
Lewisburg 
Muncy 
Shickshinny 
Lancaster 
New York, N. Y. 
Summit, N. J. 
Ventnor, N. J. 
Union City, N. J. 
Garden City, N. Y 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Sunbury 
Mount Union 
Hawthorne, N. J. 
Mahanoy Plane 
Picture Rocks 
Orange, N. J. 
Mooween 
Newark, N. J. 
Mocanaqua 
Montgomery 
Westfield, N. J. 
Hangchow, Chekiang, China 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Newark, N. J. 
Lionville 
Philadelphia 
Dushore 
Tenafly, N. J. 
Baltimore, Md. 
South Orange, N. J. 
Carnegie 
Glenside 
Lewisburg 
Kingston 
Ashland 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Stroudsburg 
South Williamsport 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Johnstown 
Shamokin 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Dreher, Mary ShiflFer 
Drumm, Donald Larue 
Duchine, James Howard 
Dunmire, John Richard 
Dunn, Jack Lamar 
Edwards, Charles Richard 
Edwards, Charles Robert 
Edwards, Eleanor Gertrude 
Eister, Warren Kenneth 
Elmen, Richard Spencer 
English, Lewis King 
Eshelman, Glenn Harrison 
Evans, Carlyle Griffith 
Evans, Grace Louise 
Eyler, Mary Elizabeth 
Eyster, Beulah Weiser 
Fahringer, John Conrad 
Fattaruso, Gaetano Thomas 
Feltner, Ruth Roberta 
Fenton, Dorothy Pauline 
Ferber, Alexander Bentley 
Ferguson. Jr., Frank Currier 
Fernandez, Orlando Agustin 
Fish, Douglas Llewellyn 
Fisher, Olive Virginia 
Fisk, Jean Meredith 
Fleming, John Richard 
FoUmer, Alice Marie 
Foresman. John Whitney 
Fortner, Donald Eugene 
Frantz, Evelyn Josephine 
Frantz, Jasper HofFa 
Funair, Frank Samuel 
Gallagher, Norman Knox 
Galloway, Evelyn Ruth 
Gallup, Janet Brooks 
Gardner, Edward DeWitt 
Gardner, Grace Latham 
Garrison, Jack McCaulay 
Gearhart. Robert Milton 
Geiger, Jr., John Raymond 
Geiss, Jack Chalmers 
Geissel, Mary Katharine 
Gemberling. Ruth Annie 
Gerard, Ralph McKinney 
Gerecke, Raymond Wesley 
Gibson, William Ford 
Godshall. Jr., Harold 
Gottschall, Dorothy Laura 
Grav, Elmer Don 
Green, Frederick Stroehman 
Green, Jacob Paul 
Greenman. Allan 
Greenwald, Jr., Martin Daniel 
Grieco, Joseph Victor 
Griffin, Howard Randolph 
Griscom, Elma Alice 
Gross, Jr., Charles Ralph 
Gulnac, Howard Dean 
Haire, Grace Louise 
Hall, Agnes Marian 
Hamilton, Harriette 
Hammer, Theodore Emmanuel 



Wellsboro 
Williamsport 
East Orange, N. J. 
Turbotville 
Berwick 
Freeland 
Hight.stown, N. J. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
Sunbury 
Leonia, N. J. 
Sunbury 
Palmyra 
Slatington 
Windber 
Pittsburgh 
Sunbury 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Newark, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia 
New York, N. Y. 
Astoria, N. Y. 
Havana, Cuba 
Trenton, N. J. 
Arlington, N. J. 
Suffern, N. Y. 
Philadelphia 
Milton 
Lewisburg 
Lewisburg 
Lewisburg 
Lewisburg 
Walston 
Glen Ridge, N. J. 
Lewisburg 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Canton 
Montrose 
Summit, N. J. 
Johnstown 
Williamsport 
Elizabethville 
Paoli 
Lewisburg 
Blairsville 
Bergenfield, N. J. 
Windber 
Philadelphia 
Baltimore, Md. 
Mt. Lebanon 
Harrisburg 
McKee 
Montclair, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Jersey Shore 
Bayside, N. Y. 
Trenton, N. J. 
Sunbury 
RidgAvay 
Maplewood, N. J. 
Floral Park, N. Y. 
Caldwell, N. J. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Pittsburgh 






Hart, Everett Martin 

Haseltine, Carl Wentzel ^^^ 

Hasselberger, William Ferdinand Mount Vernon, N. Y 

Healev, Alice Paul Philadelphia 

HefTner, David Beitler Fleetwood 

Henning, Curtis Erich Oreland 

Herrold, Jack Lee ^, ^, ?" xt'^v^ 

Herzfelder, Robert Kuh New \ ork, N. Y. 



Two Hundred Sixty-nine 



II 



J^^V^J^^^ 



?.V-iw-Vi4:- 



Hess, Russell Otterbein 
Hickie, Gilbert Roy 
Higgins, Warren 
Hill, Roland Hurdon 
Hirsh, Emanuel Louis 
Holderman, Carol Jean 
Horther, Edward Joy 
Houser, Robert Charles 
Howe, Claire Elizabeth 
Hower, John Franklin 
Hulbert, William Charles 
Hunter, Jr., Calvin Ralph 
Hutchison, Mary Elizabeth 
lacurto, John Daniel 
Ifill, Elizabeth Allendar 
Ingersoll, Lois Dorrit 
Johnson, Mary Louise 
Johnson, Ralph Keeler 
Johnstone, Janet Brayton 
Jones, James Robert 
Jones, Jr., Percy Lewis 
Jones, Robert 
Kahley, Robert Harry 
Kaiser, Herbert Henry 
Kandle, Edward Arthur 
Kanengiser, Irving 
Kaplan, Emil 
Kaplan, Herbert 
Kass, Bernard Maurice 
Kauffman, Carson Wesley 
Keenan, Jr., Charles Robert 
Keil, Howard John 
Keiser, William Lewis 
Kelley, Ward William 
Kendrick, Harold Philip 
Keshishian, Jacques 
Kessler, John Arthur 
Kettell, Robert Harry 
Kierce, Harold Frank 
Kiick, George Herman 
King, Harle Walter 
King, Norman Rock 
Klase, Robert Franklin 
Klein, Albert Lester 
Klinetob, Richard Hampton 
Knouse, Wayne Edmund 
Knox, Homer Charles 
Kohl, Eleanor .Jeannette 
Kornblatt, Benjamin 
Koshland, Elizabeth Eugenie 
Kovski, John Joseph 
Kraft, Stephen Jacob 
Kranzley, Arlene Schlicher 
Krausser, Howard Francis 
Kreider, Annabel Hoch 
Kyle, Lorena Maria 
LaGrande, Helen Frances 
T.aidacker, Fred Joe 
Lange, Margaret Louise 
Larsen, Carter Lawrence 
Lautenschlagcr, Elizabeth CI 
Lepperd, Alma Ruth 
Levan, Jean Morrison 
Levinson, Leonard Edgar 
Lewis, Charles Frederick 
Lewis, Edward 
Lewis, Jr., Edwards Butts 
Lichtenfels, John Ralph 
Lifland, Philip Paul 
Link, Jr., John Clark 
Link, Joseph Albert 
Lohr, Alice Elfreda 
Lombard, Calvin Choate 



Trenton, N. J. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Upper Darby 

Downingtown 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shenandoah 

Flushing, N. Y. 

Lewistown 

Bellwood 

Danielsville 

Orange, N. J. 

Harrisburg 

Ridgway 

Altoona 

Drexel Hill 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

East Orange, N. J. 

Mt. Carmel 

Nanticoke 

Plymouth 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Newark, N. J. 

Clifton, N. J. 

Dover, N. J. 

New York, N. Y. 

Selinsgrove 

Oakdale 

Oil City 

Watsontown 

East Rockawav, N. Y. 

Belleville, N. J. 

Port Washington, N. Y. 

Hunlock Creek 

Shamokin 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Ephrata 

Newton, N. J. 

Jamaica, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Newark, N. J. 

Milton 

Harrisburg 

Northumberland 

Clark's Summit 

Wilkes-Barre 

Lewistown 

Erie 

New York, N. Y. 

East Greenville 

Union City, N. J. 

Sharon Hi!l 

Yeadon 

Coytesville, N. J. 

Turbotville 

Glen Rock, N. J. 

Marlton, N. J. 

ara Philadelphia 

Pottstown 

Reading 

Woodmere, N. Y. 

Glen Campbell 

Camden, N. J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Pitcairn 

Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Lincoln Park, N. J. 

Washington, D. C. 



Loos, Doris Elizabeth 
Lowe, Jr., Horace Alvin 
Lowther, Ruth Parke 
Ludwig, Barbara 
Lyon, David Mansfield 
Lyons, Will 

McBrian, John Edward 
McCausland, Henrietta Louise 
McClelland, Mary Malone 
McCrina, Mary Theresa 
McDowell, Lester LaShelle 
McKee, Kenneth Bell 
McKee, Jr., Louis Edwin 
McKee, William Sloan 
McKelvey, Harold Edward 
McLain, Robert Delos 
McQuay, Emma Elizabeth 
MacWilliam, Thomas Adison 
Maiorino, Joseph Alfred 
Malick, Anna Ruth 
Malick, Howard Morgan 
Manker, Raymond Oscar 
Marcus, Celia 
Marks, Franklin Joseph 
Marsh, Edna 

Marsh, Frederick Anderson 
Martin, James Luther 
Mayhew, Mary Louise 
Mearns, Frank Chandler 
Meckler, Florretta Marie 
Metzger, John Clark 
Meunier, Dorothy Genevieve 
Michel, Frederick Albert 
Mick, Felix 
Milanick, Vera Elaine 
Miller, Margaret Permilla 
Mills, Leniar Charles 
Moke, Wilbur Roger 
Moll, Howard King 
Moore, Alice Christy 
Moore, Samuel John 
Mowry, Frank 
Muir, John Edi.son 
Mulford, Helen 
Murphy, Geraldine Harriet 
Murray, Esther Gertrude 
Nardy, Christine Anne 
Nichols, Elizabeth May 
Nichols, Emmabelle 
Nork, Vincent Hilary 
Oaks, Dorthey Wright 
O'Leary, Doris Jane 
Overbagh, Gerald Hoyt 
Owens, Eleanor Marie 
Patterson, Katharine LeVere 
Paul, Frank 
Pauly, Howard Almarin 
Peachey, Helen Elaine 
Pearce. Alferetta Ruth 
Pegg, Harold Clark 
Perez, Robert Cleaveland 
Peters, Walter Glendon 
Petrick, Jr., Paul Joseph 
Phillips, Lewis Eugene 
Pinto, .Anthony Roland 
Pocius, Frank Leon 
Posner, Ralph 
Price, Frederick Sheldon 
Prigger, Jr., William 
Prouty, John Azro 
Pulford, James Baldwin 
Quinn, Edward Eugene 
Reading, William Dufton 



Norristown 

Washington, D. C. 

West Orange, N. J. 

Swarthmore 

Bethesda, Md. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Port Washington, N. Y. 

Camden, N. J. 

Kutztown 

Williamsport 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Hanover, N. H. 

Altoona 

Montclair, N. J. 

Rural Valley 

Williamsport 

Emporium 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Trenton, N. J. 

Sunbury 

Sunbury 

Bernardsville, N. J. 

Scranton 

Selinsgrove 

Pottsville 

Montclair, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Ardmore 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Muncy 

Merchantville, N. J. 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Milford, Del. 

Frackville 

Lewisburg 

Warsaw, N. Y. 

Plainfield, N. J. 

Jenkintown 

Sunbury 

Dormont 

Aliquippa 

South Williamsport 

Newark, N. J. 

Bala Cynwyd 

Lewisburg 

Leechburg 

Elsmere, Del. 

Elsmere, Del. 

Nanticoke 

Summit, N. J. 

Johnstown 

Saugerties, N. Y. 

Altoona 

Wilkinsburg 

Trenton, N. J. 

Montclair, N. J. 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Irvington, N. J. 

Wilkes-Barre 

Scranton 

Wenonah, N. J. 

North Arlington, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Roseto 

Riverside, N. J. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Harrisburg 

Pedricktown, N. J. 

Newport, Vt. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Bloomfield, N. J. 

Clearfield 



Two Hundred Seventy 









SP^ISi««Siiiiffl[fJi!®:f 



Reid, Jr., Joseph Alexander 
Reitz, Raymond Edward 
Reitz, Spencer 
Replogle, Warren Henry 
Reynolds, Doris 
Rhodes, Harwood Jason 
Rice, John Miller 
Riley, William Oliver 
Robenolt. George Edward 
Rockefeller, George Richard 
Roe, Leo James 
Rolfe, Jeanne 
Romweber, Margaret 
Rothrock, David Roswell 
Roughgarden, Cornelius Robert 
Roversi, Marie Adele 
Ruigh, Alice Beatrice 
Rupp, Barbara Anna 
Sanders, Helen Laurene 
Schnure, Robert Bunnell 
Schreiber, Frederick Charles 
Schriver, Edwin Stanton 
Schultz, William Henry 
Scott, Jr., Charles Rose 
Seckary, Nicholas John 
Seiderman, Ruth Beatrice 
Sellers, Daniel Robert 
Shaner, Robert John 
Shannon, Elizabeth Mary 
ShifTer, Elmer 
Shiffer, Rhea-Ellen 
Shoemaker, Dorothy 
Shoff, John Frank 
Shroyer, Harlan Albert 
Shultz, Rae-Louise 
Shultz, Richard Carolus 
Sirinek, Theodore Robert 
Sitarsky, Harry Gregory 
Slade, Arthur Roland 
Sloff, Franklin 
Smith, Albert Eugene 
Smith, Arnold Remington 
Smith, Charles Brownley 
Snyder, Kenneth Glenn 
Snyder, Richard Craine 
Souden, Robert Russell 
Spector, Robert Frederick 
Spencer, Laurence Leroy 
Sprout, Carl Morton 
Stadden, Marjorie Ann 
Stadler, John 
Stannert, Mary Jane 
Stanton, Robert Lowry 
StauiTer, Carl 
Stein, Henrietta Catherine 
Steinljerg, Lois Dana 
Stephan, Jr., Atlee 
Sterner, George Nicely 
Stevens, John Conklin 
Stillman, Clifford Smith 
Stillman, Gladys Evelyn 
Stoller, Julia Norris 
Stolz, Donald Paul 
Strawn, Virginia Irene 



Westfield, N. J. 

Mt. Carmel 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Altoona 

Rockville Center, N. Y. 

Berwick 

Lewisburg 

Parsons, W. Va. 

Milton 

Sunbury 

East Paterson, N. J. 

Maplewood, N. J. 

Franklinville, N. Y. 

Milton 

Paterson, N. J. 

Kew Garden, N. Y. 

Metuchen, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Shamokin 

Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Ocean City, N. J. 

Philadelphia 

Harrisburg 

Philadelphia 

Scranton 

Neponsit, N. Y. 

Chambersburg 

Bloomsburg 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Ephrata 

Williamsport 

Lewisburg 

Madera 

Shamokin 

Trenton, N. J. 

Harrisburg 

Grantwood, N. J. 

Rutherford, N. J. 

Millville, N. J. 

Sykesville 

Philadelphia 

Woodmere, N. Y. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Sunbury 

South Orange, N. J. 

Shamokin 

Mt. Carmel 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Picture Rocks 

Milton 

New York, N. Y. 

Milton 

Honesdale 

Burnside 

Sunbury 

Altoona 

Philadelphia 

Dewart 

Camp Hill 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Queens Village, N. Y. 

Mt. Lakes, N. J. 

Lewisburg 

Quakertown 



Stryker, Weston Carlisle 
Stuck, Marian Ellora 
Styer, Marg-uerite Walton 
Swartz, Walter Zachariah 
Swayze, Alden Eugene 
Talbot, Betty Lee 
Talmage, Jeanne Margaret 
Tedesco, Eugene Carl 
Teitelbaum, Maurice Joel 
Teltser, Milton 
Terrill, Robert Mead 
Thomas, Donald William 
Thomas, George William 
Thomas, Hazel Madeline 
Thomas, Leighton John 
Thornley, Roy Hilton 
Tiffin, Ruth Constance 
Tompkins, Barbara Magruder 
Towner, Bette Bush 
Towner, Virgil Lloyd 
Tressler, Isaac Jacob 
Trinkhaus, Ruth Jean 
Turner, Mildred Alice 
Tyson, Jr., James Arthur 
V'andewart, Floyd 
VanNoy, Raymond 
Van Wetering, George Daniel 
Vartigan, James Richard 
Vogel, Jerome 
Wagner, Gerald Franklin 
Wagner, Jr., Harry Harvey 
Waite, Floyd James 
Waldman, Murray 
Waldner, Craig McConnell 
Walker, William Donald 
Wall, Robert William Wesley 
Wallen, Carolyn Keith 
Ward, Donald Clarence 
Warner, Richard Paul 
Weaver, Kathryn Irene 
Webb, Katherine Emma 
Weisgerber, Ruth 
Weissman, Seymour Jack 
Welsh, Howard Emory 
Welsh, Margaret Frances 
Wenner, Harry William 
Wetzel, Dorothy Jean 
White. Dorothy Wilson 
White, Thomas Patrick 
White, William Franssen 
Whyte, Jr., Robert Burns 
Wiley, Marguerite Pauline 
Wilkalis, Mary Jean 
Wilkinson, Theodore John 
Williams, Donald Shafer 
Williamson, Fred Brown 
Wilson, Virginia 
Wilt, Robert Dudley 
Winter, John Calvin 
Wolff, Marjorie 
Wurster, David Hugh 
Yarnall, Wayne Brown 
Yount, Richard Verlyn 



Williamsport 

Lewisburg 

Norristown 

Moscow 

Canton 

Wilmington, Del. 

Canadensis 

Peckville 

Newark, N. J. 

Orange, N. J. 

Conneautville 

Shamokin 

Lewisburg 

Huntington Mills 

Peckville 

Williamsport 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

Pittsburgh 

Herndon 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Honesdale 

Merion 

Pelham, N. Y. 

Canton 

Hackensack, N. J. 

Boston, Mass. 

Woodbridge, N. J. 

Milton 

Mt. Carmel 

Bellefonte 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Ashland 

Vandergrift 

White Haven 

Eldred 

Geneseo, 111. 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Milton 

Margate City, N. J. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Hillside, N. J. 

Summit, N. J. 

Danville 

Philadelphia 

Lewisburg 

New York, N. Y. 

Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Wellsboro 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Philadelphia 

Bayonne, N. J. 

Cresson 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Red Bank, N. J. 

Harrisburg 

Dormont 

Williamsport 

Corinth, N. Y. 

Williamsport 

Ventnor City, N. J. 

Knox 






SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Amerman, George Monroe, A.B. 
Bratton, Frank Richeson, A.B. 
Brungart, Lois Winifred 



Sunbury Bush, Jr., Peter Hance 

Lewisburg Cirelli, Louis 

Selinsgrove Claypoole, Lynnford Edwin 



Montgomery 

Camden, N. J. 

Kittanning 



Tivo Hundred Seventy-one 



^■'^n 



U **;^st' **t ■'*.; .'» 



•*t -*? ■*■■ ■*•; vj . 



" 



Dunkle, Brown Rote 
Eisenhart, Edward Eric 
Farrington, Metta Flora, A.B. 
Garman, Esther Selsam 
Graham, David Warner 
Hall, Jr., Robei-t Donald, Sc.B. 
Harrinian, Dessa Holman, A.B. 
Hobbs, Howard Blake 
Kantor, Jerome Herbert, Sc.B. 
Kling, Robert Merrill 
Lawson, Margaret Elizabeth 
McCrossen, Rose Bunnell 
Minium, Robert David 



Batog, Walter Andrew, '38 
Beck, Willmer L., '3!) 
Benson, Paul, Sp. 
Bisthne, Gladys Rebecca, Sp. 
Beatlev, Elizabeth A., Sp. 
Brooks, Thelma L., '39 
Cameron, Leon B., 
Dickey, Gretchen G., Gr. 
Easton, Emerson, '39 
Gardinis, Michael C., '40 
Gray, Jennie Bowie, Sp. 
Griffith, Daniel F., Gr. 
Grimshaw, Dorothy May, Sp. 
Groezinger, Dorothea L., Sp. 
Grone, Marion Leona, Sp. 
Harris, Daniel H., Sp. 
Heaton, Thomas Hoffman, '38 
JaiTe, Melvin, '40 
Judge, John Vincent, '39 
Keeney, Roger Deyo 
Sp. — Special Student Gr. 



Lewisburg 

Sunbury 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Picture Rocks 

Lewisburg 

Frackville 

Sunbury 

Newark, N. J. 

West Milton 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 



Novak, Mary Weeter, A.B. 
Orosz, Edward Attilio 
Phragmen, Eleanor 
Price, Robert St. Clair 
Ross, Elizabeth Dudly, A.B. 
Ross, Hollis Trevor, A.B. 
Thompson, Osmond B. 
Turnbeaugh, Madge 
Ulmer, Louis Simon, Sc.B. 
VonDorster, Herbert Rinard 
Weisser, Roland Joseph 
Williamson, Rachel Heim, A.B. 



NEW STUDENTS 
Entered Srcmul SciKentcr 



Allentown 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Milton 

Lewisburg 

A 1 toon a 

Wellsboro 

Lock Haven 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schuylkill Haven 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Lancaster 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Philadelphia 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wilkes -Barre 

Lewisburg 

-Graduate Student 



Lavender, Dew, Sp. 
McCormick, Betty Jav, '40 
MacCass, George R., '40 
Mettler, James W., Sp. 
Miller, Gerald Edgar, '40 
Moody, Kenneth A., Gr. 
Osborn, Carol E., '38 
Romberger, William M., '31 
Sager, Harold L., '38 
Schultz, Victoria A., Sp. 
Sears, Mildred L., Gr. 
Shinehouse, Jean L., '40 
Sidler, Beatrice K., '38 
Sitar.skv, John J., Sp. 
Theiss, Francis W., '39 
Tomberg, Sidney 
VanTvle, Russell D., '38 
Wick,' Elizabeth R., '39 
Wilson, Cooper J., Sp. 
Yohn, Frederick, '38 
Zehner, Mary E. 



Lewistown 

Montandon 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

Lewisburg 

St. George, Utah 

Lewisburg 

Sunbury 

Montgomery 

Lewisburg 



Lewisburg 

Ashland 

Arlington, N. J. 

Crowl 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hudson, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Smithton 

Mifflinburg 

Lewisburg 

Neponsit, N. Y. 

Milton 

Rutherford, N. Y. 

Lewisburg 

Kingston 

Weehauken, N. J. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Sunbury 

Danville 

Bloomsburg 



Two Hundred Sevenlylivo 



>• .*» »; 



flCIIVIIIfS 



(Pages 1 14-151) 



1937 L' AGENDA (Pages 114-115) 



Virgil Lanni 
Russell Appleby 
Clyde Noll 
Marion Long 
Morris Gillet 
Emanuel Sillman 
Clifford Siegmeister 
Harriet Kaufman 



STAFF members 

Editor-in-Chief 

Bus. Mgc. and Art Editot 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Photographic Editor 

Secretary 



Alma Blocckcr 
June Grim 



junior editors 

Carol Lee Davis 
Thelma Slack 



James Nicholson 



Marian Pursley 



ART STAFF 

Edward Miller 
Stephen Kraft 



Mary Louise Johnson 



Tu-'o Hundred Seventy-three 



r'^ii 



iil 



k!. *p - A:4 



EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS 

William Robertson Alda Baranzclli 

Grace Gault Mclvin Wein 

Clementine Hires Emanuel Hirsh 

George Slavin Fabian Hcchkopf 



Robert Renville 
Joseph Kohberger 
Leon Cameron 



SPORT STAFF 
Edward Maloney Thomas Cannon 



STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHIC STAFF 

Fred Belski Robert Lyons Lester McDowcl 

Walter Drozdiak 



Ralph Posncr 



Phi Kappa Psi 
Sigma Chi 
Phi Gamma Delta 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Kappa Sigma 
Delta Sigma 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



FRATERNITY REPRESENTATIVES 

G. Richards Kappa Delta Rho J. Worth 

A. Reynolds Alpha Chi Mu C. Noll 

A. Bolton yy^^,^^ Upsilon Omega W. Clemens 

E. StebbmS ^11 uj t-i h;i r-■^^ 

, ,,, ■ , Phi Lambda Theta M. Gillet 
J. Wcightman 

J Shoil Alpha Phi Delta A. Ricigliano 

L. Wellivcr Sigma Alpha Mu S. Simon 



Pi Beta Phi 
Delta Delta Delta 
Kappa Delta 



SORORITY REPRESENTATIVES 

F. Miles Alpha Chi Omega 
H. Jackson Phi Mu 
E. Gronemeyer Delta Zeta 



M. Keys 

E. MacNamara 

C. Schatz 



STUDENT CAMPUS CLUB REPRESENTATIVES 
Virgil Smirnow Ida Lange 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Russell Appleby Frank Alexander 

Business Manager Junior Business Manager 



H. W. Holtcr 

faculti/ Adviser 



Blanchard Gummo 

Art Adviser 



ASSISTANIS 



Robert Seers 



James frith 



Two Hundred Scvenly-four 






ilH^^S^H^^M:M!i£;iiii^ 



THE BUCKNELLIAN 

STAFF 



(Pages 116-117) 



Harvey Travis 
Thomas Wood 
William Work 
William Robertson 
Jeanne Brozman 
William Jenkins 
Kathryn Schultz 
Robert Streeter 
Marion Long 
Thomas Hopkins 
Roy Good 
Edward Maloney 
Clyde Clemens 
William Toland 
Paul Si vius 
Robert Burke 
Clementine Hires 



Editor-in-Chief 

Contributing Editor 

Business Manager 

News Editor 

Assistant News Editor 

Assistant News Editor 

Assistant News Editor 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Assistant Managing Editor 

Sports Editor 

Assistant Sports Editor 

Assistant Sports Editor 

Advertising Manager 

Circulation Manager 

Woman's College Editor 



Emanuel Hirsh 
Eugene Beitler 
Ruth Borneman 
James Duchine 
Harold Kierce 
Howard Krausser 
James MoUahan 
Theodore Sirinck 
Carl StaufFcr 
Fabian Hechtkopf 



reporters 

Dorothy Barry 
Clyde Clemens 
Russell Hess 
Norman King 
Floretta Meckler 
Henry Martin 
Harry Sitarsky 
Richard Warner 
Mary Zehncr 
Donald Rabinowitz 



Lois Ingersoll 
Richard Brown 
Joseph Diblin 
Jean Kirby 
Fred Michel 
Ruth O'Brien 
Carl Sprout 
Carol Willich 
James F. Nicholson 



APPLE CART (Page 118) 

BOARD OF PUBLICATIONS (Page 119; 

FRESHMAN HANDBOOK (Page 119) 



Two Hundred Seventy-live 



t< >'~ iti 






CAP AND DAGGER (Pages 

Robert Renville 
George Both 
Ethelle Roselle 
WiLLARD Smith 



Frank Alexander 
William Hilton 
Ralph Axthclm 
Mason Baldwin 
Alda Baranzclli 
Nancy Bennett 
Ruth Borncman 
Jean Brozman 
Margaret Campbell 
Thomas Carey 
Robert Carter 
Margaret Cloos 
Isabelle Clouser 
Margaret Clouser 
Anne Culbcrtson 
Dora EUeni 
John Fahringer 
Hilda Fletcher 
Ralph Ford 
Harold Frisoli 
Ellen Groncmcyer 
Bernice Henry 
Marion Pursley 
James Ramsey 
Frederick Green 
Carol WiUich 
Dorothy Barr 
Doris Scharfenburg 
Jack Garrison 
Frank Ferguson 
Sarah Liebensberger 
Mac Waeneck 
Ruth Leyrcd 
Ruth Lauthcr 



MEMBERS 
Charles Edwards 
Irma Hewitt 
Clementine Hires 
Rita Holbrook 
Dorothy Holota 
Sally Hinton 
Harriet Kaufman 
Lorena Kyle 
Carter Larsen 
Charles Laubacher 
Joseph Lord 
Margaret Lynn 
John MacDonough 
Lyetta Marshak 
Patricia McQuay 
Reginald Merridew 
Anne Morrow 
Dorothy Oaks 
Margaret Perrin 
Ruth Perry 
Jean Peterson 
Irene Piszczck 
Vera Rca 
Katherine Rice 
Robert Jones 
Harold Kiercc 
Ruth Seidcrman 
Ruth Ballentine 
Carol Lee Davis 
Jack O'Donnell 
Clifford Sicgmeister 
1 homas Hopkins 
Joseph Richards 
Frank Noll 
Horace Lowe 



22-121) 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Faculty Adviser 

Joseph Salsburg 
Ambrose Saricks 
Arthur Slade 
Harriet Speyer 
Margaret Thurkield 
George Thomas 
Ruth VanLeuven 
Ruth VanWie 
Sally Weller 
Agnes Wolf 
Anne Wcatherby 
Anthony Vasquez 
Jean Fiske 
Catherine Patterson 
Margaret Bortz 
Ray Louise Shultz 
Ward Kelley 
James Nicholson 
Agnes Hall 
Ruth Trinkaus 
Eleanor Carretta 
Calvin Lombard 
Robert Mayock 
Paul Tebbs 
Christine Nardi 
Edson Shannon 
Alex Rigley 
Mary Louise Johnson 
Carolyn Wallin 
Betty Koshland 
Harriet Hamilton 
David Lyon 
Dorothy DePierro 
Geraldinc Murphy 



i 



Two Hundred Seventy-six 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
officers 
Prof. Paul Gies 
Leigh Herman 
Ellen Gronemeyer 

double bass 
Edna Mae Cubberly 

FLUTES 
Edward Lewis 
Kenneth Dickie 



(Page 124 J 



FIRST VIOLINS 
Prof. Charles Stickncy 

Concertmaster 
Eugenic Dilts 
Hazel Jackson 
Arlene Kranzley 
Prof. Donald Stillman 
William Lyon 
Milton Teltzer 

SECOND VIOLINS 
Miss Charlotte Armstrong 

Second Concertmaster 
Ellen Gronemeyer 
Paul Kaplan 
Franklin Marks 

VIOLA 
Charles Schaef 

'CELLOS 
Lois Brungart 
Paul Strub 



OBOES 
Elwood Foltz 
Grace Gardner 

HARP 
Ruth Seiderman 

CLARINETS 
Paul Silvius 
Harvey Troutman 
John McDonough 

BASS CLARINET 
Charles Morris 

BASSOON 
Owen Rauck 



Conductor 
Manager 
Secretary 

FRENCH HORNS 
Bruce Kephart 
Robert Herzfelder 

TRUMPETS 
Frank Sherwood 
Robert Stanton 
Gerald Biehn 

TROMBONES 
Janet Gallup 
William Riley 

TUBA 
Leigh Herman 

TVMPANl 
Charles Henderson 
Martin Blumenson 

PIANO 
Robert Griesemer 



GLEE CLUB PERSONNEL (Pages 1 28-1 29 j 
OFFICERS 
Gibson LoguE . . . . Conjurer 

Melvin LeMon . - . - Conductor 

Lynnford ClaypooLE - - - Manager 

Charles Henderson - - - Pianist 



FIRST tenors 

Leonard Feiser 
Ralph Johnson 
Horace Lowe 
Edward Rabc 
Thomas Richards 
Jesse Schmick 
Charles Scott 
Frank Sherwood 
Ralston Shupe 
Donald Thomas 
Ralph Reese 

David Bagenstose 
William Beiswinger 
Gordon Buckalew 
Clyde Clemens 
William Clemens 

Ruth Eisley 



second tenors 

Mason Baldwin 
Ralph Ford 
Ira Fox 

Charles Henderson 
David Hughes 
James Jones 
Ward Kelley 
Charles Mutchler 
Robert Rishel 
Robert Terrill 
Seymour Weissman 
Donald West 

baritones 

David Fletcher James Laughlin 



Robert Gundaker 
George Ingalls 
Robert Keenan 
Carter Larsen 

soloists 
William Kelchner 



James Meister 
John McBrain 
Howard Moll 
George Moll 



basses 

Robert Bernstein 
John Greene 
Dean Gulnac 
William Kelchner 
Gibson Logue 
Lester McDowell 
Metro Matweecha 
Edward Rapp 
Carl Scheaf 
Albert Smith 

Almarin Pauly 
Earle Pierson 
Charles Vogel 
Herbert Watson 



John McBrian 



5SS 



Two llunJri'J Sevenly -seven 



ri V '-Jr ?j« **( V- 



BUCKNELL BAND (Pages noni) 

OFFICERS 

Lynnford Claypoole - - Manager 

Melvin LeMon - - - Director 

Bernice Henry - - Druni Major 

Lester McDowell - - Drill Master 



GIRLS 

Ruth VanWie 
Betty Heller 
Ray Meltzcr 
Ruth Minium 
Arline Wilkinson 
Jean Steckler 
Betty Bond 
Lorraync Allen 

BOYS 

Louis Zlotkin 
Robert Brumberger 
Richard Butcork 
Raymond Allison 
Frank Sherwood 
Seymour Frees 
William Winter 
Samuel DeMuro 
Robert Stanton 
Harold McKelvcy 



Harvey Harrison 
Charles Bukworth 
Edward Lewis 
Gerald Overbagh 
David Shupe 
David Martin 
Paul Strut 
Kenneth Dickie 
Warren Egee 
John Raker 
Allen Hamburg 
Walter Droziak 
William Roberts 
Richard Brumberger 
Nicholas Laruso 
Robert Minium 
Maxwell VanNuys 
Robert Gearhart 
Lester DeWire 
Walter Babbitt 
Howard Swick 
Edward Stebbins 

DEBATING TEAM (Pages n4-n5) 



Charles Keinan 
Robert Berstein 
Leigh Herman 
Robert Bechtel 
Lester McDowell 
John Gault 
Harry Carson 
Charles Catherman 
Leighton Thomas 
Robert Rishel 
William Riley 
Kent Leinbach 
James Beidler 
Herbert Anderson 
James Frith 
Robert Gunter 
Robert Eckert 
Frederick Schreiber 
Gerald Biehn 
Robert Hertzfelder 
John Armold 
Irving Wagner 



OFFICERS 

Francis Lybarger. Jr. - - Director 
C. H. Richardson. Jr. - Student Manager 
Rita Holbrook . . . . Secretary 



Thomas Leinbach 
C. H. Richardson, 



Margaret Campbell 
Maxine Askey 
Margaret Perrin 



MEN S TEAM 

John Duffy 
Robert Jones 
Robert Burke 

WOMEN'S TEAM 

Lorena Kyle 

Doris Loos 

Henrietta McCousland 

TAU KAI'I\\ ALI'llA 



William Orlandi 
William Clemens 



Celia Marcus 
Rita Holbrook 



RiTA Holbrook 
Prof. Alvin E. Biscoe 



President 
Secretary 



FACULTY MEMBERS 
Alvin E. Biscoe William H. Coleman George M. Gregory Trennie E. Eisley 



Margaret Campbell 



MEMBERS 
Alice O'Mara Carroll Osborn CJinion Condici 



Tuo Ilumlml SfCfnUj mjhl 



f • ■ • ' : ; . '■ ■■ 



SSiMs&^Sfeg^ 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION (Pages 136-137; 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Clinton A. Condict 
Ruth Parker 
John H. Petherbridge 
Nancy Shields 
John G. Sholl. hi 
Ira G. Fox . . - . 
Tom Speck Alice O'Mara 
Betty Shimcr 



President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

freasurer 

Student Church 

Janet McKenna 



D. M. Griffith - Chairman 

R. Peterson - Vice-Chanman 

Forrest D Brown 



Dayton L. Ranck - Treasurer 

Nancy Shields • - Secretary 

General Secretary 



C. M. Bond 

Mrs. John Bucher 

W. L. Crowding 

Mrs. W. L. Crowding 

E. L. Junkin 

J. B. Ostergren 

Ira G. Fox 



advisory council 

C. H. Richardson 
John D. Sholl. Ill 
Mrs. Dorothy Dyer 
Mrs. C. M. Bond 
C. E. Burgee 
Clinton A. Condict 
H. W. Holter 

student church council 



Malcolm E. Musser 
John Petherbridge 
Ruth Parker 
Harry E. Stein 
Mrs. Paul G Stolz 
Dr. Jus Gold 



Ira G. Fox 

Robert Fairgraves 
Josephine Latch 
John Gault 
Alvin Nathanowitz 
Ruth Graham 



Alida Eglit 
Mary McClelland 
Bruce McGraw 
Grace Gault 
Aaron Heisen 



Chairman 

Chas. M, Bond 
W. L. Crowding 
E. L. Junkin 
James B. Ostergren 



THE STUDENT-FACULTY CONGRESS (Page 140) 



Clinton Condict 
George Grouse 
Irene Piszczek 
Harvey Travis 

Interest 

Athletics 

Citizenship 

Dormitory Proctors 

Dramatics 

Forensics 

Hon. ^ Prof. Frats. 

Inter-Frat. Council 

Literary 

Musical 

Non-Fraternity 

Pan-Hellenic 

Publications 

Religious 

W. S. G. A. 

Senior Class 

Junior Class 

Sophomore Class 

Freshman Class 



Faculty Adviser 
Mr. M. E. Musser 
Prof. R. Peterson 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof Willard Smith 
Prof. Jas. Gathings 
Prof. George Irland 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. W. H. Coleman 
Prof. Paul Gies 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. Lewis Theiss 
Mr. F. D. Brown 
Dean A. E. Clark 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. Ralph Page 
Prof. Ralph Page 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Student Rep. 

John D. Filer 

George Anthony 

Irene Piszczek 
C. H. Richardson 

Tom Wood 

Tom Speck 

Paul Strub 

John Petherbridge 

Ruth VanLeuven 

Harvey Travis 

Clinton A. Condict 

Elizabeth McMahan 

George Grouse 

Joseph Deegan 

Robert Lewis 



m 






Two HunUn-J Sewnni-nirii' 



f' >•: V, V *<ii=^ -su %i -v 



WOMEN'S STUDENT SENATE (Page 141) 
OFFICERS 



Elizabeth McMahan 
Hazel Jackson 
Eugenie Diets 
Betty Naumann 



Olive Decker 
Janet McKcnna 
Ruth O'Brien 



MEMBERS 

Vera Rae 
Betty Wray 
Joyce MacLeod 
Marjoric Nichols 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 



Grace Gault 
Edith Lipphardt 
Janet Collins 



Twn lliindrctt l-ighly 



f> »*■•!■.-•.»» vyij- 



fllflLfTICS 



(Pages 156-185) 



Football 


Page 156 


Tennis 


Page 


172 


Soccer 


Page 164 


Track 


Page 


174 


Basketball 


Page 166 


Freshmen Sports 


Page 


176 


Boxing 


Page 168 


Men's Intramural Council 


Page 


180 


Baseball 


Page 170 
Intramural Sports 


Women's Athletic Association 
Page 182 


Page 


181 



ofiGflnizfliions 



SrSStfegSS-i 



i.\ 



(Pages 190-261) 
FRATERNITIES 



Phi Kappa Psi 






Page 190 


Kappa Delta Rho 


Sigma Chi 






Page 192 


Alpha Chi Mu 


Phi Gamma Delta 






Page 194 


Theta Upsilon Omega 


Sigma Alpha Epsi 


on 




Page 196 


Phi Lambda Theta 


Kappa Sigma 






Page 198 


Alpha Phi Delta 


Delta Sigma 






Page 200 


Sigma Alpha Mu 


Lambda Chi Alphj 






Page 202 


Interfraternity Council 


• 






SORORITIES 


Pi Beta Phi 






. Page 222 


Alpha Chi Omega 


Delta Delta Delta 






Page 224 

Page 226 

llcnic Council 


Phi Mu 


Kappa Delta 






Delta Zeta 


P 


in-He 


Page 234 


STUDENT CAMPUS 


CLUB 


HONORARIES 


(Pages 


236- 


243) 




(Pages 246-257) 



Page 204 



Page 
Page 
Page 
Page 
Page 
Page 



206 
208 
210 
212 
214 
216 



Page 228 
Page 230 
Page 232 



:'-.s? 



Tii'o Hundred Eighty-nnc 






flDVERTISEfDEniS 



« » 



,¥ ;» ^i■ V* »V-^:>*^ «^ :u»...?4 




Was 

Designed and Engraved by us. Williar? sport is 
just about forty-five minutes from Lewisburg thus 
insuring close co-operation at all times betv/een 
the L'Agenda staff and our artists and engravers. 

GRIT PUBLISHING COMPANY 



WILLIAMSPORT 



PENNSYLVANIA 




Ta'o Hundn'd Eighly-lhree 



III 
III 



' 4*> ■*: 4:- 




FINE Quality Printing is nowliere more essen- 
tial than in the college annual. The story 
told by the copy and engravings is worth- 
less unless the printed pages provide eloquent 
testimony of its truthful reproduction of 
campus life. Production of outstanding printing depends 
upon the masterful handling of such technical subtleties as 
presswork, make-ready and the choice of color and ink. 

Consistently good printing execution has been a pri- 
mary reason for the selection of our organization as the 
printers of L'AGENDA of Bucknell University for many 
years. And in addition each Staff has had an intelligent 
advisory service— thoroughly understanding their require- 
ments and representing an organization capable of meeting 
them. 



THE WILLIAMSPORT PRINTING 
and BINDING COMPANY 



specialists in the 

Tlanning and l^roducing 

of Trinting for Colleges 



WILLIAMSPORT 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Two Hundred HiyhlL) four 



> : S ' » Vi- v.* »•«■■ 



II 




THE COLLEGE INN 

Guy Payne, '09 - - - - Proprietor 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

MARTS & LUNDY, Inc. 



521 Fifth Avenue 



New York City 



mi 



Two Hundred Eighty-Uve 



.; «<•• ■!■ ■ *• 



^t%r-^V^^^^-. 



< < A 



Steininger's Cafe 

"A Qood Tlace to Eat" 

(!rc}h(iunil and Lakes-to-Sea 

Ikis Dt'ijot 

We Serve 

Reichard's Golden Velvet Ice Cream 



Herman & Leiser 

DRY GOODS 

NOTIONS and LADIES' 
Kl-'-AD^'-'ro-WKAR AIM'AKP'.I. 



BOOKS 
and STUDENT SUPPLIES 

at 

Keeler's Book Store 



("(ini|ilinu'nts nf 



Rea & Derick, Inc. 



!■: STLDI'LXTS DRUG S TOK 



Comiiliments 



Peerless Laundry 



Andrews' Hardware 

Athletic Goods 



xok riirMiii:RLA.\D 



I'A. 



L'(ini])linients of 

Smith Printing Co. 

WII.LIAMSPORT, I'A. 

Mimeograph Supplies 

Paper Towels Toilet Tissue 

and Drinking Cups 

for Schools and Offices 



Luniplinienls of 

The 
David J. Molloy Plant 

2N37 X . \\ estern A\e. 
niirACO, 11.1.. 

Desi5.;ner.s ot 

Mcilliiy Covers" used on this issue of 

l.'.Xijenda 



7 u'l) Hundnil Eighty-six 



The University 
Book Store 

JOSI'.ril .M. WOLFE, Proprietor 

Books and Stationery 

Office and School Supplies 

Draughting Material, Etc. 

I.I'.W iSBURG PENNA. 


BECHTEL'S 


Compliments 
of 

Flavio's 


Com])liments of 

Stroehmann Bros. Co. 

Makers of that 

Delicious KEW-BEE BREAD 

W II.l.lA.MSPORT I'EXNA. 


Compliments 
of 

Wagner's Cafe 


Reproductions in Early American 
Maple 

Dining; Room — Bed Room 
Chairs ancj Odd Pieces 

Lewisburg Chair & 
Furniture Co. 

LEWISBURG, PA. 


QUALITY 
FRUITS, VEGETABLES, Etc. 

"If it's grown anywhere in the world 
we have it" 

A. Nardi's Sons, Inc. 

W ILLIAAISPORT PA. 


Hotel Lewisburger 

"Made Famous by its 

Delicious Food" 

W . W. Watkins, Pro]). 
Vi. E. .^traul). .Mgr. 



1?J 



Two Hundred Etghty-seVen 



■/'■/ ■■ 



V^i^lf 



Ifl flPPRfClflTIOn 



L 'AGENDA, from the time the theme is conceived to the time it 
appears on the campus, passes through many processes from the 
preparation of material to the final engraving and printing. For 
their cooperation and efforts in the publication of this yearbook, 
I take this opportunity to express my appreciation to — 

The members of the editorial and business staff of the yearbook 
for their valuable assistance. 

Mr. H. W. Holter, Faculty Adviser. 

Assistant Professor B. S. Gummo, Art Adviser. 

Miss T. E. Eislcy. for data and photographs. 

Duncan-Mablcy, Inc., for photographs of Tatterman Mario- 
nettes. 

The Penn State Photo Shop. 

The Grit Publishing Co., for engravings. 

And the Williamsport Printing and Binding Co. 

The Editor. 



Two Ihimlred Eiiihlyeight 



tf> JV'i'^ 



t:M~^..ri-jie*SiUi-iiiMiiUm«ttm ir>- 






f..'.V;W!-*i.4:'-V 



■ 



■-.■>■ >t'>-i-i--'lai> >yrf-y 



oy-yif-t'O