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Full text of "Lake Forest College stentor"




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The Stentor 






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Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. OCTOBER 3, 1919 



NUMBER 1 



CONVOCATION 

EXERCISES 

The annual Convocation services 
for Lake Forest College, Ferry Hall, 
and the Academy were lield at the 
Presbyterian church on Sunday Sep- 
tember twenty-first. The prayer and 
song services were condncled hy Dr. 
Thomas. The sermon, wliich was 
very fitting to the occasion, was de- 
livered by Dr. Wright. He explained 
that after all, tlie main thing in life 
was the pursuit of knowledge, and 
that upon that principle had the col- 
leges of the United States been 
founded. For a number of years the 
social and other activities of the 
campus have rather cast the real ob- 
ject of the college into the back- 
ground. Dr. Wright urged all stu- 
dents tn piy speci.il atlnntion to their 
books duiing the coming year so that 
Lake Forest might turn our graduates 
who would become leaders among 
men and women. 

The morning was an unusually 
beautiful one and the church was 
well filled with the students of the 
three branches of Lake Forest L^ni- 
versity. Everyone who attended the 
service should have left with an in- 
spiration to make the most out of his 
college year. Lake Forest should be 
bigger and better this year than ever 
before. 



OPEN HOUSE 

The shades of night were falling 
fast, the longed-for hour had come at 
ladt. The crowd they liailed from 
near and tar. Each glil had liroiiaht 
her chosen beau; some were quick, 
some were slow (at dancing.) When 
thru the portals they had come; and 
checked their coats and greeted some; 
they all meandereil to the hall where 
he grabbed her, and she grabbed him; 
and madly swearing roniul about they 
danced until it was whispered ronnd 
that refreshments were ready. .Mer- 
rily they gathered round the punch 
bowl. When this had pai'tiy been 
consumed the dancing was again re- 
sumed. A great success was called 
wliolly worthy of Lois Hall. 



LAKE FOREST 12; 
GREAT LAKES 

Say son, did you see that there 
gang of sea-going red-and-blackers 
put the kibosh on the aerial outfit of 
LTncle Sam's Navy? The Red and 
Black defeated the team represent- 
ing the aviation branch of the Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station Satur- 
day by a score of 12 to 0. Much 
speculation took place on the side- 
lines by interested Lake Foresters be- | 
tcire the fracas in regard to the class 
of our team, and it was not until the 
gobs were on the offensive that the 
Reds and Blacks showed their true 
worth. The gobs found it impossible 
to plunge throngh our line and when 
it came to the wings, they suffered 
losses. Although the game was 
loosely played, it brought out just 
who's who to the coach's satisfaetion, 
and his smile indicated that his work 
had not been amiss. 

The first real thrill came when the 
Navy had taken the ball to our one 
yard line, and had four dowjis (o 
go over. But the old Lake Forest 
spirit was in evidence, and the gobs 
couldn't push it over. The ball went 
to L. P. when Berg*-!! and Hause 
threw a sailor half-back for a 10 yard 
hiss on an attempted end run. The 
climax came when Beddoes grabbed 
a fumble, and, although stopping 
once or twice for fuel, succeeded in 
crossing the goal line. He was given 
A-1 interference by his mates. 

The first half ended wilh the score 
6-0 in our favor. Both teams came 
back with a i ush in the acccuid half, 
— the gobs making a vain attempt to 
plunge our lines. Through a forward 
pass from Eddy to Kyndberg and 
good plunges by Bergen and Captain 
Woods, Bergen carried the hall over 
for the second count. The game 
ended with both teams fighting hard 
in the middle of the field. 

Although outweighed Hligh(l_y, tlie 
Red and Black had the edge on the 
jacks when it came to stopping line 
rushes, and the work of MeColley and 
House at ends indicated that there 
won't be much nee<l to worry in the 
future, if opponents depend on end 
runs for their gains. The pluuging 
of Bergen and the tackling of Dick 
Johnson also were features. 



PRESIDENT'S 

RECEPTION 

Last Friday evening the "Frosh" 
made their debut into Lake h'orest 
College society at the Presiddnt's re- 
ception. Everyone was met by Miss 
Margaret Mill and decorated with his 
or her name. 

Dr. Wright welcomed all most cor- 
dially making everyone immediately 
feel at home. 

The various activities of the Cam- 
pus were well represented by Misa 
Balhert, Mi-s Ryno, Miss Werner, 
Mr. Stewart, Mr. Moore and Mr. 
F^ddy. Miss Coau and Mr. Derby 
representing the women's and men's 
athletics gave promise to a most ener- 
getic year for all students. It is 
hoped that this year will be marked 
by an increased interest in all cam - 
pus oi-ganizations. 

Mr. Hirschy's playing of the violin 
added much to the evening's enjoy- 
ment. 

Miss Clark sang ver}' beautifully 
and all were delighted when she will- 
ingly responded to an encore. 

Those who love the Jazz band will 
agree that the selections played by 
Mr. Lohdell, Mr. Waisou and Mr. 
Were exceedingly fine. 

The music furnished by the Lois 
Hall sextet was very much enjoyed. 

After the program a short time 
.■W-a.-J spent in getting acquainted. The 
evening closed with informal dancing. 



K.lly: "Where's Shick?" 
Barrick: "In bed again. He's 

majoring in sleep and miuoring in 

eat this year." 



The 1 


ne-up for Lake Forest 


R. E. 


Hause 


R. T. 


Johnson 


R. G. 


Kees, Russell 


C. 


Burns, Hale 


L. G. 


Legner 


L. T. 


Framberg 


L. E. 


McCoUey 


Q. B. 


Beddoes, Eddy 


R. H 


Kyndberg 


L. H. 


Bergen 


V. B. 


Woods, Captain. 



■ykX'^\ 



THE STENTOR 



IS THAT SO? 

Lois Hall Frosh:— "What does that 
curly headed professor over there 
teach. 

George Beard:— "That Is Professor 
Moore and he teaches Household Eco- 
nomics." 

Lois Hall Frosh:— "I'd just adore 
studying with him " 



Professor Vau Steenderen will re- 
turn to the loser a well worn pair of 
Paris garters, if said loser will take 
them off of his chandelier in the 
French class room. 



Coach Derby would like to have the 
brilliant students of our institution 
help the men who are out fur football. 
What is a fellow going to do if he is 
neither a football player nor a brill- 
iant student? 



Bill Taylor (collecting subscrip- 
tions for the Stentor) — "Buckingham, 
I want you to subscribe for the col- 
lege paper.'' 

Buckingham:--"! would rather wait 

until one of the girls asked me for my 

subscription and then I can get the 

, paper and maybe a date with her at 

the same time." 



Professor:— "Will you please com- 
pare the adjective SICK?" 

Freshman: — "SICK, WOESE, 
DEAD." 



Armstrong making an announce- 
ment at the Commons — "All youse 
guys that ain't got a dame for the 
dance Saturday can receive the same 
by applying to Martin." 



L'onard, inviting cue of the Frosh 
over to the rooms, received the fol- 
lowing reply. "You see, my room 
mate is out for football and I have 
to get Ills lissoiis for him and with 
my own studying to do too, I hardly 
find time to visit the fellows. " 



The Theta Psi's announce the pledg- 
ing of Coach Derby's di_ig. 



James, the quiet, unassuming, sel- 
dom seen around Frosh, laws as how 
he is going to try out forcheer It-ader. 
Look out Army, jou have a rival. 



You sure have to hand it to that 
Frosh, who eats over at the Commons, 
for being clever with his knife. The 
way he gets that knife ill and out of 
his mouth is a marvel to me. So far 
he hasn't cut himself, very badly. 



NEW STUDENTS 

WOMEN 

Alcott, Virginia E., Chicago. 
Anderson, Mary D., Lake Forest. 
Antrim, Kenturah, Pontiac. 
Axton, Alice L., (Junior), Mt. Morris. 
Bartel, Kathryn J., Richmond, Ind. 
Boggis, Alma E. (Music) Mt. Carmel. 
Bradley, Frances L., Rockford. 
Burch, Ramona, Pecatonica. 
Burrus, Alberta, Little Rock, Ark. 
Campbell, Marjorie A., Independence, 

Iowa. 
Catterlin, Opha. Clinton. 
Church, Florence E. (Junior) Aledo. 
Conklin, Lois M., Oak Park. 
Daggett, Ruth E., Ottumwa, la. 
Day, Mildred Ann, Columbus Grove, 

Ohio. 
Deutch, Rose Irene, Canton. 
Eggemeyer, Helen C, Richmond, Ind. 
Eickoff, Elizabeth. La Salle. 
Enyart. Edna L., Agency, la. 
Fassett, Adrlenne L., Mendota, 
Goldstein, Dorothy (Music School), 

T.vler, Texas. 
Graham, Esther L., Rock City. 
Graham, Mildred L., Durand. 
Griffith, Margaret G., Lake Forest. 
Harmison, Henrietta R., Geneseo. 
Hatfield, Lillian M., Canton. 
Hopkins, Virginia J., Princeton. 
Joyner, Sarah C, Norfolk, Va. 
Knox, Ellen A., Lake Forest. 
Kratsch, Virginia M., Chicago. 
Laing, Dorothy E., Highland Park. 
Loop. aMry E., (Sophomore) Craw- 

fordsville, Ind. 
MacGowen, Wilma, West Liberty, la. 
Macindoe, Clara B., Cherokee, Iowa. 
Macintosh, Mildred, Chicago. 
Magee, Dorothy H., Oak Park. 
McConnell, Beatrice, Richmond. 
McDowell, Gladys G. Logansport, Ind. 
Meents; Mardelle R., Ashkura. 
Merchant, Josephine I., Waukegan. 
Metzger,. Mary A. (Junior) Moline. 
Miller, Florence M., Marcus, Iowa. 
Mohr, Martlia L., (Sophomore) Pauld- 
ing, Ohio. 
Randolph, Ruth Fitz, Canton. 
Roberts, Josephine F., Lake Forest. 
Rossiter, Laura V., Lake Forest. 
Sillars, Margaret, Troy Grove. 
Smith, Francelia, (Music School), 

Lansing, Mich. 
Spaulding, Sue, Princeton. 
Torreyson, Elizabeth A., (Sophomore) 

Conway, Arkansas. 
Tilly, Doris, New York, N. Y. 



ME> 

Abernethy, Richard M., Batavla. 
Alano, Calixto, Lake Forest. 
Alexander, Arthur L., Edinburg. 
I Anderson, John F., Lake Forest. 
Barlow, Charles- W., Chicago. 

Barlow, John W., Chicago. 

Bergen, Paul D., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Buckingham, Leroy H., Urbana. 

Burns, Ross J., (Junior), Little Rock, 
Arkansas. 

Byrum, Arthur W., Canton. 

Carlson, Mortimer E., Erie. 

Casjens, L. Stanley, Orange City, la. 

Cooney, Robert E., Lake Bluff. 

Davidson, John A., Gary, Ind. 

Dunlap, Albert W., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dussen, Herman V., Lake Forest. 

Fitzimmins, Terry L., Benton Har- 
bor, Mich. 

Gardner, Kenneth M., Arnold. 

Geer, Eugene H., Browning. 

Gibbs, Winsor M., Princeton. 

Granzano, Raymond E., Benton Har- 
bor, Mich. 

Harris, Robert E., Chicago. 

Hause, Don B., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Ives, Charles G., Jr., Pecatonica. 

James, Karl Edward, Denver, Colo. 

Johnson, Hershel J., (Sophomore) 
Canton. 

Jones, George D., Newton, Kans. 

Jowett, Jack R., (Sophomore) Clin- 
ton, la. 

Judson, William L., Lake Forest. 

Kelley, Theodore T., Marengo. 

Kynberg, Frank E., Waukegan. 

Lareau, Noah J., Beaverville. 

Manning, Prentice H., Jerseyville. 

Marsolf, Harold E., N. Chicago. 

Matthews, Edward T., New York. 

MeColley, William G., (Junior) Say- 
brook. 

McCoy, John C, (Senior), Evanston. 

Moore, Berwyn C, Farmington. 

Morley, William L., Antioch. 

Noble, Karl, Rockford. 

Pittinger, William, Smithfleld 

Potter, Marcus L., Kankakee 

Schreurs, Vincent C, Highland Park. 

Sheehan, William E., Lake Villa. 

Smith, Leland C, Lake Forest. 

Virgil, John Raymond, Dushville. 

Virgil, William Hall, Rushville. 

Former Students Keturned 

Babcock. Delia R., Chicago. 
Beard, Charles E., Lake Forest. 
Beard, George M., Lake Forest 
Coleman, Vincent, F., Elgin. 
Hendrickson, Ruth M., Mt. Morris. 
Henshaw, James C, Clarina, la. 
Holden, Leonard P., Elgin. 
Johnson, Richard H., Rockford. 
Pagett, Harry L., Keokuk, la. 
Robertson. Wm. K., Chicago. 
Russell, Raymond C, Lake Forest. 
Van Sickle, Edson C, Canton. 
Woods, Donald Carmel, Pontiac. 



T Fi E S T E N T O R 




DR. ALBERT R. ELUXGWOOD 

Like a great many of us, Dr. El- 
lingAvood was born in Iowa. He left 
that state when he was five years old 
and moved to Colorado. He graduat- 
ed with the degree of A. B., from 
Colorado college, at Colorado Springs, 
in 1910. The same year, he went as 
Rhodes Scholar to Oxford (Mertoii 
College,) where he remained three 
years, taking the degree of Bachelor 
of Civil Law. On his return to Am- 
erica, he studied a year at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, then taught 
five years at Colorado college. In 
1918 he took his doctor's degree at 
the U. of Pennsylvania. His tliesis 
was the subject of "Departinonlal 
Co-operation in State GovernnuMit." 

Mrs. Ellingwood and the young son, 
not quite a year and a half old, 
were scheduled to arrive in Lake For- 
est September 30. The Ellingwoods 
will live in tlie old Burnap house. 



i NEW FACULTY 

! MEMBERS 

I 

, DocTrtR Albert R. Ei.i.in'owood 
I Holilical ^eieiiee and Economio!- 

' Mr. S. R. Derby - Men's AlhleticH 
I Miss Coan - - Women's Athletiei- 
! Mr. T. I. Hfck 

Instructor, Modern Lanfjuages 

Mis.s Coan is properly a citiz.n of 
I many place;^. When qurslioneil a.s In 
her home >lio first replies Minneapo- 
lis, and, if any of her friends are 
present and look surprised, sIk; adds, 
"and I'l'isia." She was born in thai 
country and lived there until shi 
was 1-1, when she came to America 
to school. Her senior year in Higl. 
School, she captured a cup offered 
for the best girl athlete. This in- 
I terested her in athletics and led her 
lo take the course in physical edu- 
cation at Wellesley in addition to 
the regular college work, She grad- 
uated from Wellesley in 1918, and 
from the Hygiene department tliere 
this June. Her work .at Wellesley 
included every woman's sport. She 
was Junior year secretary of her 
class and Senior year a "village Sen- 
ior" in charge of some 40 Freshmen. 
She was a member of the Agora, one 
of the six local societies at Welles- 
ley, and made Phi Beta Kappa. She 
therefore counts to Lake Forest with 
a scholaslic as well as athletic repu- 
lat ion. 




MR, T. I. BECK 



Mr. Beck is a native of Denmark. 
He graduated from Snroe College in 
that country with the degree of A.B 
in 19(11. The next eight years he 
spent at Copenhagen University, 
where he received the degrees of M. 
A., L. L. B., and Master of Laws. Af- 
ter that he studied at the Univei'sity 
(if Berlin and the Sorbonne, in Paris, 
During the years 1909-1910 he was 
Fellow of Comjiarative Literature at 
! CoUuniiia U. He then spent one yeai 
as instructor in Lincoln Memorial 
University, Tennesee; two yeai's a- 
student and instructor in tlie i\Ier- 
chanl's College, Copenhagen, ami 
three years as Professor of Modern 
Languages at Hanover College, Indi- 
ana. He also took the summer gra- 
duate (■(Uirses at Columbia and Chi- 
cigii. Since leaving Hanover he has 
lirrw fullilling the requirements for 
I lie doctor's degree at Columbia, ami 
is now writing his thesis. 
[ Mr. Beck is a member of the So- 
i ciety for the Advancement of Sean- 
[ dinavian Study in the United States, 
and was the first scholar sent to this 
country by the American-Scandinav- 
I ian Foundation. 




( OVCH S. I!. im:i{i$v 

Coach Derb\ is a nallM' of Laruont, 
111. He gradiiati'd in l:il.', from the 
Univer'sity, wlicie be made the 
Freshman eleven and, the last three 
years, the varsity. In b.isket-baH, he 
pl.'iyed 2 yeiirs on I be \arsily squad 
and coached Hie I1111 iipii- <-ent Sopho- 
nioi'e ti\c bis Senior ye.-ir. 

l'''rinn the fall of 19ir> until his en- 
lislmi'Ul in the \';ny, April 7, 1917, 
he coached ;it Lombard .iinl :it Ben- 
ton HarlHU', Miebigan. 

He st.ii-teil in till' .\',-ivy as lands- 
man (declriciau alMi.inl the U, S. S. 
Iowa. In Ma.\, 191s, In- was maile an 
ensign, following which he had 
charge of athletics, besides regular 
line iluties, at several na\al bases; 
l)i'(Uight a ship from Canada to Bos- 
l(ai: and comm.-inded a "mother ship" 
lo a subniai'ine as well as various 
^nb-cb.-iserj. When discharged in 
.iuly of this year he had been recom- 
mended for a .innior lieutenancy. 




3IISS COAX 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest C^oUege. 

Board of Editors: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Lois Ryno, assisted by the women 
of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
• Henry Kunz, '22. 

Professor \V. R. Bridgman 

t- acuity and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Like 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



After all, a good start is half the 
battle. And we have a good start this 
year. By a good start, we mean tliat 
in all the things which go to make 
up College Life, more energj-, more 
pep is being manifested on the cam- 
pus than ever before in our exper- 
ience. 

For one thing, our numbers are 
larger. That in itself is a good thing, 
for we can do things on a larger 
scale. College Life this year should 
be bigger and fuller for the same rea- 
son that lite is bigger and fuller in a 
city than in a small town. The mere 
fact of numbers, with the consequent 
bustle and corapetiliun, surcharges 
the air with enthn ia^^m. Things 
move. 

Perhaps the first "activity" we 
should mention is that of school 
work— studies. To us it seems unde- 
niably true that I here is more in- 
terest in ihat line, — more sense of the 
real value of tlie classruoui work— 
than we have ever seen before at the 
beginning of the jear No doubt this 
is largely due to the war, in which 
many of us faced problems whicli 
showed us the real value of adequate 
cullege training. 

Then come athletics. We feel con- 
fident that this will be a big year 
athletically, loo. We have a larger 
number to pick from. There are 
more new men with good athletic 
records behind them. Mr. Derby 
and Miss Coan are both very capable 
people, and they bring us new enthu- 
siasm. We will agree with Coach 
Derby that the football prospects were 
rather discouraging the first week, 
but the men are coming out now, as 



we knew they would after they got 
straightened around. 

Judging from the success of last 
year and the promising new material, 
the Garrick Club will do big things 
the coming season. Ray Monre has 
plans, and promises tcr their realiza- 
tion, too, which indicate an excellent 
Glee Club, with a grand tour in the 
spring. 

The Stentor, as far as material suc- 
cess goes, depends upon advertising 
and subscriptions. The girls have 
been very successful so far in solicit- 
ing advertising, and there is every 
prospect of a big subscription list. We 
are so sure of getting the paper on a 
sound financial basis that we have al- 
ready planned more pages, more 
illustrations, and a better paper gen- 
erally than last year, which was the 
banner year. 

For social and fraternal aciivlties, 
witness the President's Reception, 
the First Open House, the Sophomore 
dance, and the lively rushing The 
Student Council, Y. W., and Y. M. 
C. A. are well officered, and will be 
active contributors to the life of the 
College. 

We have mentioned all these activ- 
ities at some length, because each 
one is a reason for being optimistic 
for the future. Of course, there are 
many things we can't enumerate, but 
everything looks bright. We have a 
good start,— let's keep it up. Here's 
to the best year Lake Forest College 
ever had. 



TO THE ALUMNI 

Once again the Stentor manage 
ment calls upon the alumni of the 
college for subscriptions. This is an 
activity in which the alumni can 
especially he\f» The individual cost 
is not great, but in the aggregate it 
amounts to so ranch that it can be 
the determining factor in success or 
failure. It is not a one sided proposi- 
tion either, for the Stentor keeps 
the alumnus in touch with "the love 
and friends of Alma Mater," old and 
new. As usual, a large feature of 
the paper will be news notes of the 
alumni, furnished by Mr. Bridgman, 
who keeps actively in touch with the 
old students. We feel sure that our 
call for support will meet a ready 
response. 



what difficult for the class of '21, but 
we assure them of our loyal support 
and assistance. A college as good as 
Lake Forest needs an Annual, and 
we will do our best to put it over. 
But tradition and custom rule that 
the chief work of organizing and pro- 
moting be done by the Junior class, 
ire are looking to the Juniors. 



THE BLUEST DAY 



A Freshman sat in his lonely 
room. He had the homesick blues. 
And the strange thing about it was 
that he didn't think he was homesick. 
It was just a vague, though powerful, 
dark blue feeling. 

He had lived a busy lite the past 
week. The packing-up at home; the 
saying good-bye; coming through the 
city; arranging for baggage transfers; 
unpacking and fitting up his room ; 
registration and first classes; ragging; 
President's Reception and Open 
House; with an introduction to a new 
person or a new custom at every 
turn. 

That is the outstanding fact. Every- 
thing is new. No matter how readily 
the Freshman takes lo College life, 
— and some do more than others — be 
it boy or girl, there is bound to come 
a reaction sooner or later. 

Probably you have experienced it 
already. If you haven't, you will. 
We never knew anyone yet who es- 
caped. And you're blue. It's the 
bluest day of your life. You think 
you haven'ta friend on earth (outside 
your old home town) and that the 
difficulties of college are too much 
for you. But its simply the natural 
reaction from the newness of the 
place. You'll get over it, and the 
experience will have been a good 
thing for you. 



THE '21 FORESTER 

We are looking to the Juniors this 
year for a Forester. Tlie last one 
was put out in the spring of 1917, so 
the three classes whicli entered since 
then have not seen the production of 
the annual. This vifill make it some- 



AN APPRECIATION 

Lake Forest and the whole north 
shore is a mighty good place to get 
back to afttryou've beuu gone three 
months or longer. It; is one of the 
most beautiful and attractive spots 
in the Middle vN est. 

The campus itself is looking espec- 
ially well this fall, owing largdiy, we 
think, to the efforts ot Mr. Huhnke. 
The grass has been kept mowed, and 
ei'erything in trim. U helps a lot 
and we take this opportunity to ex- 
press our appreciation of what Mr. 
Huhnke has doue. 



Have you bought jour chapel 
ticket'? 



THE STENTOR 



^iippoi'l, will he matip a strong feature uf 



ATTENTION, ALl-UM! 

To the Alumni: 

This is YOUR special department, ami with yinir pncouragomoiit ami 
the Stentor during the coming year. 

IN RESPONSE to the Alumni Bulletin sent out in mid-summer to some 120U alumni and non-graduates, and to 
the follow-up letter sent later, some 600 have so far returned the post card saying they are WITH US. To all 
these this issue of the paper is .sent. A numl>i-r, who evidently did mjt receive the Bulletin, have asked what it 
is all about. Briefly, many of the Chicago alumni have come to see how much the college needs alumni sup- 
port and have set about to win it. Some of the things already done are as follows: 

(1) FREQUENT MEETINGS of those interested; during the past three months a group of varying numbers 
from 6 to 20 havemet weekly at luncheon on Wednesdays at the Palmer House. 

(2) ADDED REPRESENTATION on the Board of Trustees, so that now six of the members are alumni. Sev- 
eral of these men have spent a great deal of time in sizing up the situation and in making plans for action. 

(3) A fund of some $1,500.00 was raised in .luae, which has beeti spent on two main, objects. 

(a) Promoting this Autumn's enrollment of students, through advertising and the sending into our field uf 
a special agent. 

(b) Reaching and rousing the attention and interest of the aknnni hody thi-ough correspondence and the 
Alumni Bulletin. 

(4) PLANS are being made for a Rally Day on the occasion of the Beloit game on November 1 for a series 
of chapel talks chiefly about vocation, by alumni and others, foi- the continuance of the weekly luncheons at a 
fixed time and place, where any outsiders happening to he in Chicago will be more than welcome. Already the 
student who did field work in the summer, Gordon Sumner, '21, has been appointed to work regularly through 
the year as "liaison officer" between STUDENTS and alumni. 

Your Trustees feel tliat their lirst olj.icct, in order to .iustil'y (heir iictivity and success la the Board, Is to se- 
cure your OlUxAMZATlON aud ('O-OrKIt A'I'ION. 

You ask, "How can we help'?" Well, here are a few answers: 

(1) SUBSCRIBE NOW FOR THE STENTOR. :!il wi'ckly numbers, price $2. Address the business manager. 
Keep thus in touch with the campus life and with your fellow alumni. Write for and to the paper. 

(2) When possible, suggest names of potential students, with all possible information about them, to Pro- 
fessor Bridgman, and don't stop at this, but follow them up yourself. The summary given elsewhei'e shows that 
alumni influence is most potent in bringing recruits to the college. 

(3) When in (",i-a!o register at the headquarters at A. S. Wentworth's office, G9 W. Randolph, attend the 
weekly luncheon at the Hardware Club, hunt up some Trustee and .speak your mind. 

(4) Visit the campus — you are welcome tliere. 

(5) Co-operate in any secondary organization of your class or of your fraternity, and especially of your lo- 
cality for the promotion of the interests OF THE COLLEGE. The c(dlection of local alumni associations In the 
catalog has become a morgue. Several of tliem have been promising babes, but have died in infancy. Get the 
cenous of Lake Foresters in your town and vicinity from the college office. 

(6) Subscribe money? No, not yet, until we can prove to you it's worth while. 

(7) Above all, write freely to one of the Alumni Trustees, to Professor Bridgman, to Gordon Sumner, the 
alumni's student delegate (Harlan Hall), any constructive suggestions you may have about any question affect- 
ing the college that may interest you such as the following: 

(a) The best way to get a live alumni organization. 

(b) Why does interest in the college so often deteriorate when we leave the campus? 

(c) What can we do for the students and what can they do to interest us? 

(d) Educational needs which the college should supply. 

It and after you have read so far, many may naturally ask the question, where do the women come in? 
That's another question to be discussed and solved — it has not been laid away on the shelf. 



Special Notice to the Jlen 

Arrangements have been made at 
the Hardware Club, lllh Floor, State 
and Lake Building to take care of 
the Lake Forest luncheons on Wed- 
nesday noons, beginninl" Wednesday, 
October 8, 1919, at 12:30 o'clock. 

The price of the Luncheons will be 
sixty-five cents. There is no place in 
the City of Chicago where they serve 
as good luncheons as at this Clul). 
It is "sure home cooking" and real- 
ly enjoyable. We shall have a pri- 
vate room and the accommodations 
should greatly increase our attend- 
ance. 



Addresses livery Alumnus .Slioiild 
Know 

President's Office, or same (W. R. 
B.), Lake Forest. 

Room 1005—50 W. Randolph, Chi- 
cago Headquarters, Alumni Associa- 
tion. Address list and registration 
there. 

Box 245, Lake Forest, Alumni Box. 
Trustees. 

C. B. Moore. '96,— SO E. Jackson 
Blvd., (Also president of Alumni As- 
sociation for 1919-1920.) 

B. M. Linnell, M. D., '89, 25 E. Wa- 
bash Ave. 

John H. S. Lee, 3S, S. Deaborn St. 

John H. Jones, '96, with Allyn and 
Bacon, 1006 S. Michigan Ave. 



M. W. Woolsey, '96, 151 155th Blvd., 
Harvey. 

Earnest Palmer, 'iiT, 216 Hotel La 
Salle. 

Gordon Sumner, '21, (Alumni Stu- 
dent Representative) Harlem Hall, 
Lake Forest. 



LAKE hOKEST DRAMATIZATION 
OH SHAKESPEARE 

1. "Comedy of Errors."— Frosh. 

2. "Much Ado about Nothing." — 

Sophs. 

3. "As You Like It."— Juniors. 

4 "All's Well that Ends Well.''— 
Seniors. 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So.- Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



Hartman & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 



Lake Forest, 



Illinois 



WE WANT MEN 

Miicli talk has been made about 
coming; out for the team and it may 
be iiuneeessary to say this. But the 
bos3 wants noes and newses we've 
got to get. Every man in scliool 
ought to feel indebted to the team to 
get out and help them get in shape 
for the coming conference games. 
You underclassmen mast get into 
some kind of physical training and 
football should be your choice. If 
you come out now, even though j'ou 
don't make tlie team, in one or two 
years you ought to be winning your 
monogram. Perhaps the coach is 
working the n.cn hard, but if you no- 
tice the "dope" from Stagg's field 
and the other Big Ten schools, you 
will find that the men are working 
both afternoons and evenings. So all 
yon tea-hounds and lake sightseers 
show a little life and come on in — the 
water's tine! 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Ossear Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r am I n g 



I.AHI<: K<*K !':»»■'. 



II. I. 



FRANK J. WEN3AN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas~Cigars--Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coijmutation 

Tickets 

;ta itKKHPAXH, >»i<;s'i' 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaninfj, fressiiiy. HepairiiKj 



The Original 

''M A B LE S Y K ES" 

DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 I\ortli State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts. ) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY -CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Plionu C'entral S3-4 1 



THE STENTOR 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Dressmaking. 

Aiitlersini Biiiltliii(/, I'liniie Sr>5 
LAKE FOKKST, TLL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

W^e Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00--10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FreticK's Drufi Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 

L. H. ^A^. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

NOTARY PUBLIC | 

CLEANING, REPAIRING, PRESSING] 

Tel. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. | 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

UN AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

.\i;k.vt 
Lake Purest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



jC.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIS r 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

If its B.iked at HU.VrrinxS u'^ Baked Kit'ht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Fraternity Pins 
Rings, Novelties 
Stationery- 
Dance Programs 

SPIES BROS. 

27 E. Monroe St. 

at Wabash Ave. 

ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask" Any Good Dresser in 
LAKK FOKKST 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

HAS OPENED A MODERN RETAIL STORE AT 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 

All kinds of Bread, Rolls and Coffee Cake 
Are Baked Before Your Eyes 



Lake Forest Photographic Service 

12 Market Square 

DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING 

COPYING FLASHLIGHTS 

Films Left Before Noon one day are Ready the 
Following Afternoon at Four 



THE STENTOR 



Jilllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllliilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger eurollmeut tliaii ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business trainiug, (2^ fnll reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. Tlie student body comes from an unusually wide territory. AU students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to §400 for men; $350 to |450 lor women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about anj' department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OHHICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



m 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiM^^^^^^^ 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C.W.YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12;00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

'"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g 



ownaw 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectioiierij 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CA /> Lj a ■!' 

CNeili's Hardware Store 

v\ HKN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 



C i(»tliiiig and 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

II K no liEFAIliiyG 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



V 



^-. 



"/■ 






'/. 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. OCTOBER 10, 1919 



NUMBER 2 



FIRST MUSIC SCHOOL COiNCERT 
GREAT SUCCESS 



The first Concert of The Mu!=ic 
School series was given at tlie Art j 
Institute last Saturday evening l\v | 
Miss Milinowski, head of tlie Music | 
School, and Mr. Robert Iiiinndt, tlio | 
new instructor in violin. 

The program was beautifully played 
and for the outsider had the addition- 
al charm of comprehensiljility. Mo?t 
of thenumbers held an interest other 
than purely professional or antiquar- 
ian and were such as the uninitiated, 
such as ourselves, might enjoy. There 
was a Schuman sonata and one of 
Cesar Franck's; Beethoven's Andante 
in P Major and Brahms' Hungarian 
Dance Number 5. These and a cradle 
ionsi dedicated to Jlr. Imandt by 
Joseph Noyon, one of the most pi-om- 
inent of the modern French compos- 
ers, have an appeal to all, whether 
we are expert in musical descrimi- 
nation or not. 

It was an evening very much 
wortli while. We hope that more of 
the college people \\\\\ take advan- 
tage of this oppoi'tnnity the Music 
School is bringing us in these con- 
certs. 



CLA.SS ELICTIONS 

Senior 

President, Francis McFcrran, 
Vice President, Delia Babcock 
Secretary. Anne Merner 
Treasurer, Ralph Slewart 

,Tiiiiitir 

President, Lawrence Mapelsden 
Vice President, Florence Van Steen- 

deren. 
Secretary, Beatrice Worthley 
Treasurer, Gordon Sumner 

Soi)Iiniiion' 

President, Charles Beard 
Vice President, Irene F.ii-well. 
Secretary, Kathryn Horton 
Treasurer, Loveridge Martin 

Freslinian 

President, Marcus Potter 
Vice President, Lois Conklin 
Secretary, Margaret Sillars 
Treasurer, Lee Smith 



Avi:i,(o:iii: frosh! 

The old students of Lake Forest 
College, including your friendly en- 
emies, the sophomores, wish to ex- 
lend n mosl hearty welcmne to each 
one of you freshmen. 

Hazing is over and Old Father 
Time is li-yiiig his best tn hurry 
things on tn the oblivion of the first 
hard week entirely, in spite of the 
attractive green caps. Each and 

every one of yon is now a meniiier 
of this in-litution and we wish yon 
tr> feel so. There are great promises 
in the air and the freshmen are part 
of those promises. We are looking to 
.\ou to hi'lp us make our college, 
yours and mine, the very best of its 
kind. 

So in conclusion allow me to add 
to my welcome a strong appeal to 
you (ill for your cooperation, loyalty, 
and love. If you would try to make 
your lunne the best nf liomes. m;ike 
your college the best of colleges, ti. 
your ability. We want you to feel at 
home. \\'elcnme; 



Coach Derby has a genuine greiv- 
ance. Not enough men are coming 
out for foolball practice. He should 
have a squad of at least thirty men 
out every night. 

Now here is the trouble: Aljout 
Ihirly men have come out, but they 
don't >lay with it. One practice they 
come oiu and the next they don't. 
It is hard to accomplish anything be- 
cause attendance is not consistent. 

The first need is that all men who 
have signified their intention should 
be faithful - come out to every prac- 
tice and work with and for the team. 
The men who can't come out and the 
wopien too can help by taking an in- 
terest in individual men getting out 
to practice; by attending the practices 
and by helping the football men not 
to break training. 

A winning team was never built up 
without the support of the whole 
-chool behind it. We've all got to get 
in and boost. 



L. F. VERSUS 

FT. SHERIDAN 

The Ri'd and Black downed the 
he.ivy Fort Sheridan team last Satur- 
day t:iiu Bergen's ability to kick goal 
while the doughboy's kicker was un- 
successful. The Fort Sheridan team 
outweighed the Red and Black some 
fiii-ty pounds to the man but this did 
not hindei- the backfield from plung- 
ing thru for large gains. The first 
half started with the Fort carrying 
the ball and the Red and Black were 
on the defensive most of this period. 
The Coach kept his linemen fresh by 
shifting t.-ickles and guards at the end 
of each (luarter. In this way practi- 
cally every man on the squad had an 
opportunity to show his worth and 
some of the new men did excellent 
work. The first half ended with the 
score to 0, after the Fort Sheridan 
team had fought their way down to 
our five yard line and had mot the 
stonewall defense cif the Red and 
Black. Both teams came back strong 
in the second half and the doughboys 
were determined to score. By using 
line plunges and wide end runs they 
succeeded in scoring in the third 
quarter but failed to kick goal. This 
di<l not discourage our gang any but 
rather set them on edge and soon af- 
ter receiving the kickoff they carried 
the ball over thru the good work of 
McColley who captured two short 
pa-ses in succession from Granzau. 
Bergen kicked goal. Here the referee 
who seemingly never officiated at a 
game before but depended upon the 
rule book for each decision, decided 
that the goal was not O. K. as Lake 
Forest was offside. But as every one 
had seen that both the Fort and the 
Red and Black men were offside the 
kick should have been allowed and 
Lake Forest can claim the victory 
with a clear conscience. It was evi- 
dent that the Fort men were not in 
the best of condition, many substitu- 
tions had to be maile, while the Red 
and Black men did not have a man 
removed because fif being hurt. 

.Vniiiher impurtant factor was the 
fight shown by the Red and Black 
against a team that towered over 
them in height and weight. When- 
ever a doughboy was carrying the 
ball he was sure of being tackled by 



THE STENTOR 



at least three men and there were 
only a few of them that played thru 
the entire game. It is hard to say 
who featured for the team, as every 
man was fighting hard and it was 
their team-work that counted in the 
end. But McCnlley got away with 
numerous tackles and his receiving 
of forward passes was unexcelled. 
Bergen also carried the hall for many 
gains. All in all, the prospects for 
the coming conference games is very 
promising and the Red and Black 
will he proud of her team captained 
by Don Woods. Next Saturday the 
team plays Wlieatim at Wheaton and 
when they return Co nut fail In give 
them the glad hand. One thing lack- 
ing last Saturday was co-operation on 
the part of the crowd to get together 
and yell for the team. It is hoped 
that at the next game the cheerlead- 
er will get the crowd together and 
give the team their support. 

LAKE FOREST 

L.E. — McColley 

L.T. — Framberg. Morley 

L.G. — Lagner 

C. — Hale, Russell 

R.G. — Rees, Ives 

R.T. — Johnson. 

R.E. — Hause 

R.H.— Eddy 

L.H.— Bergen 

Q.B. — Beddoes, Granzau 

F.B. — Woods 



The Y. W. C. A. has been oisa:;ized 
for the year with Ruth Pahlert as 
President, Helen Sanders, Vice Presi- 
dent, Sara Fisher, Treasurer and 
Margaret Mills, Secretary. A very 
happy and interesting year is being 
planned with the aid of the follow- 
ing cabinet members: 

Vera Pettigrew, chairman of social 
committee. 

Rebecca Armstrong, cliairman nf 
membership committee. 

Ruth Kennedy, chairman of social 
service committee. ■ 

Flora Schattnck, chairman of 
World Fellowship committee. 
Beatrice Worthley, chairman of In- 
formation committee. 

Miss Ruth Stolte, student Y. W. C. 
A. secretary for the states of Wiscon- 
sin, Michigan, Illinois and Indiana, 
spent last Wednesday and Thursday 
in Lake Forest suggesting to the cab- 
inet the most interesting religious 
meetings and many very delightful 
social entertainments. Miss Stolte 
also gave a very interesting talk to 
the girls on work which is done at 
summer conferences held at Lake 
Geneva. Plans are being made to 
take in new members very soon. 



IS THAT SO? 

That story about the Bee and the 
Cow hit the campus earlier than 
usual this year. 

Profesur in Zoology. "Who was 
Agassiz?" 

Student. He was the man who dis- 
covered the first amusement museum. 

Old Tunk Goon just back from the 
farm dropped in and sez that the lat- 
est war news that he can find is that 
the RUSSI.-\N season is on. 

Florence h.nd a little dog 
And it lo Philosophy did stray. 
The Prof hailed Duke and to him 

said. 
Take that there dog away. 

All the world loves a lover accord- 
ing to Burnap. 

The men come here and he does 
not blame them for falling in love 
with the place and all that goes witli 
it. The young ladies come here and 
expect to be placed in that group of 
people who love lovers. 

Coach Derby tells the girls that 
lie would like to have them come 
out and watch the boys practice. He 
says that the language is such that 
the girls will enjoy. I hope our girls 
do not use that kind of language. 

It sure is liar to be a Prosli, 

It's one gay lifel say by gosh; 

The Gym pond wtih its waters grey. 

Make us the Sophomore clas obey. 

Profesor: 'Johnson, is your nature 
simple or complex?' 

Jolinso'n: "Simple" 

Professor: "I am afraid you are 
right." 

Old man Tracey failed to make 
Rho Gamma on liis last trial. 

If at first you don't succeed, try, 
try again. 



KQIAL RIGHTS! OH! II.VXJ 

I wish I were a boy. Guess I'm 
jealous. Oh! Um! I've got a broken 
nose — feel abused — I'm neglected. Oh! 
so miserable. I wanta study — wanta 
study in the library — wanta study at 
nite. I can't study at Lois Hall — 
start studying — tap-tap — girl comes 
visitin' — put up "Don't Disturb" — tap 
tap — Frosh walks in — Oh! Um! I'm 
so popular — cant' study at Lois Hall. 

What's the use of a reference book? 
I go to Libr. in mornin' — boy usin' it 
— go in afternoon — another boy usin' 
it — go peepin' arund Libr. windows 
at nite — reference book very lonely. 
Wish I were a boy. Saw some nice 
big fat worms down near the "Gym 
Pond.' Oh! U— M— M!!! 



THR DlSCrSSIOX CLUB 

During some of the many discus- 
sions that have taken place among 
tlie men on the campus this year, a 
curious, not to say alarming, fact has 
come to our notice, namely the fact 
of our ignorance of the everyday 
questions of life. Naturally being 
busy securing a foundation with 
wliich to face life, we have little 
time to inquire into the practical 
questions of our everyday life. These 
(luestions are widely discussed in our 
newspapers, but it is surprising to 
find how many college men owe their 
information upon the.se subjects to 
the headlines. Many of us are or 
soon will become citizens and will be 
entitled to a vote and a voice in set- 
tling these questions. We as college 
men should be the leaders, not the 
followers, in the matter of opinions, 
l)acked by knowledge of our subject. 
Aside from the point of duty, it is 
really embarassing to find yourself 
completely outclassed in a discussion 
among men who lack the opportunity 
and preparation we are privileged to 
liave. In other words, the college 
man should he a better informed 
man than he is. 

Acting in accordance with this feel- 
ing, the Student Council met and or- 
ganized a club for the purpose of 
discussing various questions which 
are confronting the people today. The 
club is to be composed of the mem- 
bers of Student Council and an ad- 
ditional number chosen from a list 
of applicants, by the council. Meet- 
ing are to be held the first and third 
Wednesday evenings of eacli month 
and limited to one and one half hours 
in length. 

Til is club is purely a student move- 
ment. Information upon the chosen 
subjects is to be obtained by the 
student and the views of well inform- 
ed men discus.sed. Those will be real 
discussions, not the dry paper read- 
ing, lecture variety and give prom- 
ise of some heated and interesting 
discussions. 

In addition to the regular meetings 
the club plans upon having three or 
four men of reputation, as' well in- 
formed and interesting speakers, give 
talks upon the more vital questions 
to which the public will be invited. 



Frosh (after the steak Wednesday 
night) "I've got a piece of steak in 
my pocket." 

Soph, in surprise, 'What are you 
going to do with it?" 

Frosh — "That's wliat I'd like to 
know." 

Dorothy Magee spent the week end 
at her home in Oak Park. 



THE STENTOR 



"Let's (ill!" 

Come on everybody, and let,s go to 
all the football games, and everything 
else that the college puts up against 
ether schools. Why should a mere 
handful), as many girls as boys at 
that, have to represent n whole col- 
lege of two hundred. Repre.-enI did 
I say? They did perhaps when tiiey 
could be seen, a spot of black or 
color (the Freshman caps were quite 
cheering) among the swarms of kahki 
lads frt.m the Port. But not a peep 
did 1 hoar from any of them. Wherf 
are your voices people, iind wliei'c tlie 
cheer lender? And couliln't we lin\( 
at least a drum to raise some enthus- 
iasm wlien the team is going for a 
touchdown? I confess it was n 

dissappoiiitment to me, that anuic 
last Saturday, and not at all on ac- 
count of the playing. 1 was tliorough- 
ly interested in it and liked tlie fight 
It was tlie woeful lack of entlui^iasni 
and the spirit of support in the col- 
lege representatives. We must have 
some cheering under a good lively 
leader, some jolly songs, some riotou.- 
yelling and aljove all the crowds. 
Every single student in tlie college 
ought to be out on the field at every 
home game. Don't e er make Chi 
cage an excuse. W.i,\, you don't seem 
to realize the fact that you have all 
day Saturday fi'ee and most of you a 
great pait of Friday as well. There- 
fore lackof time or the city have no 
weight as an excuse. And I know 
you can make noise too. The sere- 
nades frcnn their two points of view 
prove that. So what's left to do is 
simply to let that big dormant Lake 
Forest spirit get every one of us out 
there boosting along the team and 
the college. And get into the habit 
of that spirit in all your work in all 
your athletics and make the year a 
ripping one for yourselves and Lake 
Forest. So lol her go. 



Class S((»iios 

Frosh — Emerald 
Soph. — Blarney stone. 
•Junior — Grind stone. 
Senior — Tomb stone. 



Manning: "Say, James,they had 
'Solid Gold Soup' at tlic Commons 
to-day. I wonder wliat it was made 
of" 

James: "Why, fourteen carrots, you 
bum." 



Theta Psi entertained Marjory Mc 
Cullom over the week end. 

Virginia Hopkins and Sue Spauld- 
ing spent the week end at their home 
in Princeton. 



(aitItU K (Ml! 

Witli the reopening of school the 
Cari'ick Club looks forward optimis- 
tically to a year of llonri.-liing ilr-a- 
nialic life. This year the cliih plans 
a rejuvenation of this popular acti\ ity 
wliirh heciHise of adversities of var- 
ii.us kinds has lost some of its jjrc-- 
lige. Ijast year \v:is an e.'-iiccially 
diseoui-aging one for the club. Tin 
usual routiui' of ac.-idemic life wa- 
disrupted by the military regime nf 
the S, A. T. C: and the estra-cidleg- 



policy, it will be compelled to pur- 
sue the plan, which proved to be so 
renumeratlve last year. It will de- 
vote its time to the iiroduct iiui of 
well known plays professionally suc- 
ces>fnl tud or' three seasons ago in 
New Y(u-k and Chicago. Some of 
these will be frivelDiis farces :iiid 
light crnneilie.^, hut one heavier nn.il- 
ei'ii play will also lie given. Slmnld 
tlie finances of the club permit, an 
out-of-door production of Sb.-ikespeai'i' 
in tlie spi-ing is al.-o an alt r.icl i\ e 



i.'ite activities suffered severely dnr- j possibi.lity concerninL: the .-iclual 
ing this period. It was a year of [list of iilays, the f'lnl) has i;i\i'ii the 
truggle but not unmarked 'Stent :r" no infurni.-il ion. The sidn-d- 



dreai-y 

by some success, both "Officer (ir.i;' 
and ".lack Straw" ha\ing been pre 
SI' n ted commendably. 

But these successes, though Hatter 
ing, were in no way a true manifi'- 
tation, of the I'eal abilily of the or 
ganizat inn. 

It is iipim the present year whici 



ule of d.ates is ah 
tlll'e pillllicilt i(ni. 



o reserved for fii- 



Phi Eta Alpha aiinmin' 
ino; of Jack Jnwel t. 



Idetlg- 



L. Wesley Almy was a visitor at 
Phi Eta Alplia the lirst week-end of 
has opened so auspiciously that the j the college year, 
club is eagerlv waiting to be judged. 

With especial hopefulness it looks up- i Smith, after tubbing Bill Morley: 
on the increased attendance in col- 
lege as an indication of what it 
may e.xpect in its prospective sue- ! 
cess. Such a large enrollment of i 



me'?" 



Sheehan gays there is no darned use 
I of changing sheets every two months. 



! 



students will un<loubtedly give some 
new dramatic material to the cam- 
I)us. Even preliminary reports an 
encouraging: many of the women, and 
even a few of the men, bring willi 
them from their respective liii^ 
chools enviable dramatic i-eputatioiis, 
augur well for their subsequent ac- 
hievements in college. It istliisnew 
talent which the club is eager to de- 
velop, and this work will begin in 
al)uut a week. At that time belli iiirii 
and women nspirnnts for dranintic 
recognition will be given an opportun- 
ity to di-play their abilily: from tliis 
competitive tryiiut, upon the bnsi- 
of exhibited abilily the club wi'l ini- ' six days in the we,. k, wil hoot wasting 



Jones, the amateur pawnbroker is 
going to hang out three balls. He 
says it pays to advertise. Ask 
Hirachy. 

College certainly enlarges your 
vocabulary, if you ne^er get a thing 
out of classes. Km' instances, the 
explanation of the system of chapel 
excuses: "Excuses must fall within 
certain categories in cu'iler to he 
'. valid." 

Guess who said Ibis: ''No, Hale, 
[ find I can learn enough of the Devil 



liartially select the members of llir 
first cast. 

Especially encouraging to the new 
students should be the fact thai 
there will be littlecompet it ion frnni 
establislied players. This fact the 
club is eager to impress upon all 
new competitors for hoiioiv. It is 
hoped that tliey may realize the ex- 
ceptional possibilities being offered 
and that they may appear in great 
numbers at these preliminary trials. 

The policy of the club in produc- j 
tioiis this year will be maintained as 
it was last year. It was discovereil 
tliat good modei-n plays well per- 
formed wei'c more interesting to the 
general public than were those of 
greater literary merit. And inas- 
much unfortunately the club is iiec- 
' essarily influenced by mercenary cnn- 
I sideration in the maiaienance of it.i 



ni V time cui Sniulav. 



John Hcdnie Dorii, one of the cele- 



brated members 



the faculty, tells 



us that he does iint have to wait until 
the holidays to take a bath, as has 
been the case heretofore. The rea- 
son for so much good news is that 
two more tul)s has been added to the 
supply at (College Hall. 

Lois: "You interest me strangely, 
Bob, as no other man ever has." 

Bob: "You sprang tliat on me last 
night." 

Lois : 



'Oh, was it you'?" 



Mr. Buriiap: "It is supposed that 
Cliarles the F rsl was crazy. At least 
we must admit that he lost his head." 



THE STKNTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '2L 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Rosa Deutehe, '23. 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post oflRce of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as senond class 
matter. 



ALUMNI 
NOTES 



Mildred Day has been entertaining 
her mother for the past week. Her 
two sisters from Northwestern were 
also in Lake Forest on Sunday. 

Professor Sibley has had as his 
guests, his mother and sister from 
Massachusetts and his aunt from 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Martha Mohr spent the week end 
with friends at Northwestern. 

Sigma Tau's were hostesses at lea 
on Thursday afternoon. 

Word has been received of tlie 
pledging of Mildred Gerlach to the 
Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority at 
Madison. 

Elsie Engle spent the week end 
with relatives in Chicago. 

Dorothy Brown, Ruth Conkey and 
Alice Douglas were guests of Sigma 
Tau during the past week. 

Kathryn Horton entertained her 
mother over the week end. 

Kathryn Bartel is rccnvering from 
a severe case of tonsilitis. 

Mary Alice Metzgar spent the past 
week end with relatives in Chicago. 

Sigma Tau announces the pledging 
of Mardelle Meets, and Mary Alice 
Metzgar. 

Theta Psi announces the pledging 
of Elizalieth Torreyson, Martha Mohr 
and Margaret Griffith. 

Kappa Kappa Chi announces the 
pledging of Florence Russell and 
Florence Metzger. 



IfllS. Miss Erma Seller was mar- 
ried in February to Truman P. Moote, 
a graduate in engineering of tlie Uni- 
versity of Illinois. He is now with 
the Universal Portland Cement Co., 
of Pittsburg. Home address, 250 Barr 
Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

lyiy. Geo. L. Moulton was so un- 
fortunate some time since as to be 
severely burned by an explosion of 
alcohol in connection witli his work 
in the Bureau of Standards at Wash- 
ington, but is back at his job now. 

An early issue of the Stentor will 
contain changes of addresses made 
known to us in the alumni campaign 
this summer. We hope during the 
year to issue a revised address list. 
The service list is well in towards 
completion, so far as we have learn- 
ed the names of those engaged in the 
service. 

Lieut. Cecil Brown, adjutant ul our 
S. A. T. C, received his B. A. at 
Marietta College in June and has a 
scholarship in Chemistry at the Univ- 
ersity of Missouri this year. 

1884. Wc have just received word 
uf the death of H. H. Clark yf Kan- 
sas City, May IS, 191S. 

ISill. Edward F. Dodge was in war 
'ervlro from July, ItllS, to August. 
I'Jlti. Since then he has taken the 
position of executive manager of a 
campaign to raise $500,000 for the 
Baptist Memorial Hospital, Baylor 
Medical College, School of Pharmacy 
and College of Dental Surgery at Dal- 
las, Texas, and is located there fur 
the present. His pormanent address 
is Union League Club, Oil W. Jackson 
Blvd.. Chicago. 

1IMI2. Married at Los Angeles, Cal- 
ifiu-nia. August 2(1, Miss Edwina Pash- 
er Held and George L. Mallory. Home 
address, l:i2t Center St., Little Rock, 
Arkansas. Mallory received commis- 
sion as Second Lieut., at Fort Root 
in July. 1017, was later made 1st. Lt. 
and ill June, Itll.s Captain, and serv- 
ed in France as Adjutant, ?.12d Train 
Hdqrs. 

1002. Rev. Jacob Spoolman, Rain- 
ier, Washington, did a varidy of in- 
direct war servi<>e as a four-minute 
man, as a school teacher, and in a 
munition factory. 



closed his connection with the can- 
tonment work at Washington and has 
joined the staff of Olmsted Bros., 99 
Warren St., Brookline, Mass. This 
is the leading firm of landscape ar- 
chitects in the country. 

1910. On leaving' for his vacation 
this summer. Rev I. E. Bradfleld of 
the Forest Ave., Church, Detroit, was 
presented with an automobile by 
members of his congregation. 

1913. On his journey west C. C. 
Mather came upon Gerald Massey act- 
ing as the "very efficient" clerk at 
the Hotel Muclebach, Kansas City. 
It will be remembered that he was 
clerk at the Deerpath Inn while in 
college; later he ran a hotel of his 
own on the south side in Chicago, 
which he sold out the outbreak of the 
war. SubseQuently while waiting his 
call foi' the draft he was in the Alton 
dining room car service. 

1011. Miss Maud Abernethy of Ba- 
tavia. 111., is now Mrs. D. W. Grie- 
wold, 108 Harvard Place. Ithaca, N. 
Y. 

1915. Harry Amsterdam is at pres- 
ent acting as an interpreter for the 
War Risk Insurance Bureau at Wash- 
ington, After enlistment he served for 
some months as a cavalryman — a 
horseman of the .\pocalypsp — on the 
Mexican bordei-. At the date of the 
armistice he was just about to go to 
Russia in military intelligence work, 
but instead did some library work in 
Texas Camps. We should like to hear 
at first-hand his opinion of the course 
Tf events in Russia. 

Married at Lansing. Mich., Sept. 
27, Miss Helen Bissinger and Burton 
Jameson. Mr. Jameson was in 

M. A. C. 'IS.kft c. liege to enter 
naval aviation, did patrol work on 
the .Atlantic coast. lie is now com- 
pleting his course at M. A. C. , 
making horliculturo a specially. Mrs 
Jameson will continue for a time 
teaching in the Lansing High School. 
Mr. and i\!rs. Jameson are setting an 
excellent example to Lake Foresters 
spending their week's honeymoon at 
the Moraine and making several 
visits III the campus. 

lOK), The engagement is announc- 
ed of Lieut. Layard G. Thome and 
Miss Irene Hummel of Sandwich, III. 

I!il7, Donalil C. Carr is teaching 
Ili-l(ii-y and Coninicrcial Law in the 
Mai-inclle, Wis., Iligli School. 

1917. Lieuts. W, liter J. Bryant 
and Layard G. Thorpe have formed a 
partnership and are starting in busi- 
ness in Aurora, the first of October. 



THE S T K N T O R 



ODDS AND ENDS 

The Alfalfas went ciimnsso to a 
week end dance at Waukegaii. Re- 
ports differ as to how they returned. 

Frosh Casjens, speaking to the 
Sophomoi'e delegation at midnight; 
"You see fellers it's like this; I felt 
I ought to stand by him, you know 
how a feller feels." The se(|uence; 
He stood by him — liiu per cent po- 
tential, and went in after him. 

Seven in one. 
Seven in all, 
If there be less 
You'll sui'ely fall. 

Irwin Hirschy waited in vain at 
Forest Park Sunday afternoon, — for 
two hours. No! For one North-Hall- 
er. 

Joseph Sicux. '21, visited friends 
over the week end. 

R. Burnell Phillips, 'IS, visilod 
Kappa Sigma last week end. 

Ewart Hall, Gene Durr, and Poc 
Burchell were out Saturd.i.w 



Bud Pi arce mis. e 



week. 



Pete Gilroy lias severed his pun- 
nection with Butler Brothers. There 
seems to be some doubt as to wlio did 
the severing, howevei'. 

Deac; Is this man Oai'dner a good 
student? 

Kelly; Can't toll; he hasn't stud- 
ied yet. 

Kappa Sigma announces the pledg- 
ing of Ekhvard T. Matthews. 

You are all invited to call on the 
Kappa Sig parrot and help along 
with his education. 

Phi Pi anno\inces the pledging of 
W. G. McCauley and GUnn Ihddon. 

I'm an Indian — whoop! 



Pittinger is anxiously awaiting the 
next snipe hunt. In speaking of the 
last one Red said, "pleasant dreams." 

Earle Ryan will begin school this 
week. Lucius Lobdell will probably 
follow suit. 

Abernathy woke up at 9:05 the 
other evening when Pittinger noise- 
lessly ascended the fire-escape, tliink- 
ing the doors were locked at 9 p. m. 
Please keep the Lois Hali regula- 
tions away from the Frosh at this end 
of the campus, 



My dear mother: 

Mother dear, as I look back over 
the last few months and compare my 
present miseralile existence as a fr;sli- 
man with that of last June as a sen- 
ior it seems as if I shall never be able 
to reconcile myself to the difference. 
Oh, if I were only to tell you all of 
I be terrible insults and indignities 
your little daughter has suffered since 
she left home you would come right 
after her and never, never, never let 
me return again. 

Well, to begin at the beginning, 
after I had gone threugh all the 
necessary red tape and was safely 
registered and my room arranged and 
I was just getting ready to settle 
down and let the girls realize my 
station but mother, I had reckoned 
witliont the sophomores. Though I 
never did shine in gefimetry I am cer- 
tain that the axiom which states tliat 
a sophomore is the natural born 
enemy of a freshman is absolutely 
true. 

Tuesday night, as I was sitting in 
my room busily engaged in looking 
over my program someone knocked 
at the door and when I said "come 
in" a sophomore entered and in no 
genlte tones commanded me (yes, 
mother, commanded me) to come 
down in room two in three seconds. 
Without any thought of danger I 
walked down to the second floor and 
was unceremoniously usliered iiite a 
room full of sophomores and fresh- 
men. They, tlie sophomores, made 
iTie take my hair down and bow my 
head, sit on the floor, and not dare to 
smile. Well mother, I had a very 
acute attack of the giggles and by the 
time they had finished calling us such 
things as "pussilanimous and dun- 
derpates", I was almost hysterical. 
Before I go any further mother, I 
must say that a sophomore has iu> 
sense of humor, and after tliat ex 
planation I will say that every time I 
smiled the tiniest bit an oiled floor 
mop was rubbed over my face. Ugh ! 
I can recall the taste of that oil mop 
to this mmute. They made all us 
freshmen go tlirongb all sorts of cere- 
monies. We had to address them 
with the utmost politeness and bow 
when we were addressed. I cannot 
conceive why they picked on one so 
much but they made me get up and 
"shake like dice" also to sing a 
laundry bill to the tune of "Smiles". 
Can you bl me me for becoming 
angry? ft would hav? tried the 
patience of a saint and I never pre- 
tended to be one, so I just told one of 
tlie sophotnores just what I thought 
of her and oh, mother! they tubbed 
me for it and sent me to bed. 
The next daj' they compelled us to 



wear one white and one black hose, 
our hair outlandislily braidetl and 
tied with green ribbons, green rib- 
bons around the left ankle, no pow- 
der, rouge or jewelry and black marks 
all over our face. They lined us up 
in prison fashion and made us scream 
at the top of our voices "Cuckoo, I'm 
a frosh" all the way tochapelin front 
of all those professors and men. I 
was never so completely mortified in 
all my life. 

I just cannot describe to you any 
more of tlie injustices we had to live 
through but let it sutlice me to say 
that I would rather do fifty pages of 
algebra than apeak to a sophomore. 
They are a blotto the fair name of 
any institution and I for one will 
never become reconciled to them. I 
pray for the day to come when the 
word "sophomore" will be no more. 
I shall devote my life to further that 
end. Until then I remain. 

Your long suffering daughter, 
"Frosh" 28. 



Digamma announces the pledging 
of Ross J. Burns and Herschel John- 



Kred and Lyle Bates were recent 
visitors on the campus, spending- sev- 
eral days with Digamma. Their 
many friends here were quite grieved 
recently to hear of the death of their 
fattier, which occurred in Riishvillo. 
111., about two weeks ago. George 
Bates was also a recent caller in Lake 
Forest, but has returned to his studies 
at Harvard. "Dad" Bites is at home 
in Rushville now, while Kred and 
Lyle are employed in the Federal 
Reserve Bank at C hieago. 

Jack Rees, '19, is now in St. Paul, 
Minn., wtiere is is engaged in coach- 
ing work during the present school 
year. 



I'm V\ P.MtTV 

Sunday afternoon the Phi Pi gave 
a delgilitfnl party in their rooms. 

"When one goes to a Phi Pi party 
one — " "What does one do? One has 
a mighty good time. I'll say. After 
spending an enjoyable hour in the 
fraternity rooms the entire crowd went 
riowu to "Ned's"' where a wonderful 
dinner wes served. It was such a 
lengthy procession going down that 
such remarks as "Where's the fun- 
(>ral?" or "Who's the bi-ide?" were 
heard from all sides. Coming home? 
Well, it wasn't quite such a proces- 
sion as a few decided to take a walk 
by themselves. Needless to say every 
one had a wonderful time as one u.?- 
ually does at a Phi Pi party. 



THE STENTOR 




My name is Lit-tul Pe-lix. 

I live in Ot-tum-ma — 

Tlie best town in I-oway. 

I liave been liere two weeks. 

I have seen some ver-y qu-eer tilings. 

I will i-e-late a few. 

I be-long to the Fresh-men class. 

The first tiling I did here was reg- 

is-try. 
It was ver-y com-pli-cat-ed. 
I got my cards mix-ed. 
I know u boy nam-ed 
Hen-ner-ry. 
I like Hen-ner-ry. 
Hen-ner-ry is a Soph-o-more. 
He has been a-round. 
He is a He-Wamp. 
He keeps the squir-rels 
From hur-ting me. 




Tins IS HEN-NER-RY 

The Hon-or-able Soph-o-mores are 

rough lit-tul boys. 
They made me kiss the sac-red steps 

of Lo-is Hall. 
It was ver-y dir-ty. 
I al-£0 smell-ed the brook. 

here. 
They ueeJ to laugh at pee-pul from 

Ot-tum-\va. 
Now wf have a ri-val. 
There are two gir-ruls fro Ar-kan- 

saw. 
The dances are pe-cu-liar. 
They have some-thing 
Called the shim-mie. 
They shake it in cor-ners. 



There was a lot of no-ise here Fri- 
day. 

It was the Frosh Pres-i-dent's sox. 

Hop-ing he will change them before 
I see yon a-gain. 

I am, yours Kin-cere?ly. 

Lit-tul Felix. 



A Letter From Japan. 

(The following letter from a 
graduate of 1905, just received, 
shows what lapse of time and 
distance can not do.) 

Dear Professor:- 

Your kind letter and a bundle of 
the Stentor have reacched me duly, 
for viiich I tliank you very much, 

Willi gi-oat delight and some dear 
feeling I have read them over and 
over, finding here and there the 
names still familiar to me. in spite 
of ecads rolled on. My memory has 
conjured up sweet past - - - dear old 
personnels and pleasant back 
grounds - - - all environed by the 
College and the town. The most 
lamentable news the Stentor brought 
me is the passing away of Dr. Hal- 
sey. I cannot express just how sad 
and miserable I feel about even this 
moment thinking over the great loss 
you and I, nay L. F. C. at large, sus- 
tained. 

You would not take it as merely 
an idle talk if I try to tell you how 
the personality of this idol of L. F. 
C. impressed a Forester of different 
nationality like me. I should ven- 
ture to say that he was one of tlie 
most great-liearted but also the most 
prudent personages I ever met - - - 
who was always kind in heart and 
sincere in deeds. To me he was the 
very first person in Lake Forest to 
whom I was Introduced in 1897 to be- 
gin there my academic life. To 
him and Mr. Welch, then principal 
of L. F. A., I was greatly indebted 
materially and spiritually in making 
my way through the scli.ools. Both 
these gentlemen never showed me a 
slight mood of discrepancy on ac- 
count of my nationality, but treated 
me perfectly square as a student or 
a gentleman from Japan, not as a 
Heathen or as something like a Chi- 
nese coolie. No illusion of the so- 
called yellow fever seemed to bo- 
ther them at least as it now influen- 
ces Ml'. Hearst and some of your 
Senators. 

I should think, if Lake Forest Coll- 
ege ever aspires to become larger as 
your Alumni are now planning it 
must be free from it's local colours 
as much as possible and be opened 
internationally as well as nationally 



— that is to say, not merely as an 
Illinois Presbyterian college but also 
as an American national institute in 
a broad meaning with the thorough 
equipments and accomodations which 
may be good enough to attract every 
student to come over there to school. 
To undertake this sort of reform for 
the College, every Alumnus would, 
I am sure, greatly miss Dr. Halsey 
fur it's Faculty. 

The war ceased. This is the age 
of Reorganization for every thing. 
It should be every Forester's sincere 
wish to see the Greater L. F. C. in 
some future days, tor bringing forth 
(if which lie must do his own part as 
well as operating with others. 

I am buite confident and greatful 
for that you members of the Faculty 
are always co-operating with the Al- 
umni and looking forward to the 
wider progressing world and doing 
best toward pushing dear old Alma 
Mater to the front. 

Again thanking you for your kind- 
ness of lately communication and 
wishing you best regards, 

I beg to remain, dear Professor, 
Yours very sincerely, 

SOSHICI ASADA 
Thirty-Fourth Bank 
Asraka, .Tapaii 
Aug. 19, 1919. 



iliddle aged man — "Well. I think 
I'm doing pi-etty good. I've been 
teaching for fifteen years and if I 
get a I'aise this year I'll be getting 
as much as the milkmen. On the 
strength of that I think we'd better 
have a teacher's strike. 



Before July 1st they used to call 
him "Lantern" because he was al- 
ways"all lit up". Now they call 
him "the light that failed". 



Itcssie .Wasn't That Kind. 

"I wouldn't drink out of that cup" 
said little Johnnie to the well- 
dressed young stranger: "that's Bess- 
ie's cup and she's very particular 
who drinks out of it." 

"Ah." said the young man as he 
drank I he cup dry, "I feel honored 
to diink out of Bessie's cup. Bessie 
is your sister, isnt she?" 

"Not much! Bessie is my dog." 



Verna Ruddy of Joliet was the 
guest of Florence Metzger over the 
week end. 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small None Too Large 

A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence lib 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



A Sonnet 

I love o'er smoothly gleaming 
floors to glide, 

I love to feel the pulsing music 
heat 

Upon my senses antl to feel my 
Feet 

Respond in measured rytlim, as we 
Slide 

A fair and graceful partner hy 
my side, 

Thi-ongh mazy steps and hesita- 
tions sweet 

Through lingering one steps and 
the fox trot fleet, 

The music breaking on us in a 
tide 

Of harmonies that will not lie de- 
nied, 

I P)Ut must expression find in soul 
I And mind :ind body, every atom 
plied 



1? 1 1 Q C <^ 1 1 ^ 'f"l 1 ri 1 r~^ ' '^" ''"^^ itself in music and be part 
JXU.OOCII OLU.VJ.iW I ^,,,1 p,-„.(.ei of a world of estacy 

REPUBLIC BLDG. And part of universal harmony. 

209 S. State Street 

CHICAGO ,,, , , i:vf";.v '"'■•"i"". 

Tbc clock explodes, 
■" '" ■■ — — — I Y,,j| biiiii(^ you yawn: 

SIDNEY BURRIDGE ; ^"" '^^"'•^^' .somewhat. 

It's not yet dawn; 

21 Market Square i you dose the window, 

Wi-athful mood; 

Throw on your clothes. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 
Jewelry- 



Oscar l*ierfSoii 

Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r am in e 



i.AKi<: K(>iti<;<si' 



11. 1. 



FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 



You don't know how; 
Run like — well — 
You're late for chow. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

M(i tuii/er 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest CouimiUation 
Tickets 



McColley: — What would you do if 
i you were in my shoes? 



312 Deerpath Ave. 



Phone 66 Bergen: — Get a shine. 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleatiiiifi, Vreiisinii. liejmiriiK/ 



m 



m 



i i 



The Original 

M A B LE S Y K ES" 



DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 

140 IVorth State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 
Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF H\'- CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Plionc C'entiral 534^1 



THE STENTOR 



Hartman & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 



Well I'll de sworn but I did re- 
ceive the best little sliock this eve- 
nin'. Here Mahitable and me 

thought like we had send our daugii- 
ter Betty to a institution where they 
make real ladies out of them. You 
know our Bettie was a euttin' up like 
a tomboy until Mahitable and me 
thought like she was gettin' to old 
for to be makin' monkey shines all 
the time so we send her to "I^ois 
Hair to make her grow up linick and 
be a help to her maw. 

Early this niornin' I liitched up the 
Old Gray Mare and Jake drove me 
down to the depot where I took the 
train for Lake Forest. I just thought 
it would be right fun to surprise 
Betty witlj some nice Jam her maw 
made. 

Well I tell you it was a sorry sight 
that met my eyes when I sat in the 
waitin' room of that institution. I 
tell you the frost killin' all my field 
corn last fall wern't no sorrier. 

Well I sat there a' waitin' for my 
Betty when a bell went ker ding just 
like the fire bell they have at 
"Hickory Center." I grabs the jam 
and jumps up and by heck along 
comes a troop of youngsters a' laugli- 
in and atalkin' down the hall way. 
There were all kinds of kids coming- 
kids w th long cui-ls ahangin' down 
their backs, kids witli dolls and — 
why you know I just stood there and 
gasped and kinda thought perhaps, 
I had taken just a little bit too mucli 
hard cider before I left home. I 
stood there a wonderin' what kind 
of a kindergarten I liad got into 
when along came a real party little 
kid who kinda reminded me of my [ 
Betty and she looked at me and then ! 
the first thing I knew she had her 
arms around my neck and was asayin 
"My this surprise sure is narve 
(narve? I ain't ever heard that sayin' 
before. Well it was my Betty and 
I tell you I were mighty ashamed to 
see her rigged up like she were. She 
had a dress on that wouldji't have 
fitted her little sister Ann and her 



liair was all a flyin' round in curls 
with a big tie on top of it. I just 
gut real angry like and I take her by 
her hand and I says: "See here 
Betty you ain't agoin' to make a fool 
out of yourself like this - you are 
agoin' right back to Hickory Center 
and your goin to help your maw 
wasli dishes and ain't agoin' to make 
monkey shines like this no more. 
Then she began to cry like and said 
"Shush Pa, we're havin' a Kid's 
Party touite. We don't always dress 
this way we're just pretenin' we're 
kids - it's a party. 

Well there I woke up and hehawed 
and I got to tliinkin' that there were 
some mi'ghty party kids at the party. 
Betty took me in to supper and how 
those kids did sing after they ate 
their meat and t.nters. They sang 
"School Days", "Smarty Rmart.\". 
"Mary Had A Little Lamb" and a 
lot of other kid songs. Thy sure 
sounded like a happy bunch of 
youngsters. 

After supper the kids were taken 
into a big room by a nice smiley 
nursein a white apron and cap and 
there a nice boy played lots of games 
with them. I tell you them kids did 
cut up cnppers Iho. Tliere was a 
little boy and n little girl from Ark- 
ansas who sure were cute. My you 
should: of seen them give off some 
Opery House stuff. The dancin was 
swell, so was the singin'. 

After a while all them kids gave 
a lot of whoopla's and went out of 
the front vei-andy to the front yard 
where they turned on a big search 
light and played more kid games. 

I tell yiin I ain't agoin' to tell ! 
Mahitable ab(jut tliat there party but 
Betty promised to write and tell me 
if they ever calculate on having an- 
other. I tell you kid parties are | 
great — I reckon the're marve. 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Dressmaking. 

Aiitlei-miii liiiililitKj. fliotie 855 
LAKE Foniisr. ILL. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00—10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 

GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



CHICAGO N. U. 

•Northwestern University is .start- 
ing a campaign foi' an endowment of 
twenty-flve million dollars this fall. 
Six and a half millions of this will 
be used for a campus and buidings 
in the city, at the corner of Chicago 
Avenue and Lake Shore Drive. On 
this campus will he 'located the de- 
partments of Law, Commerce, Medi- 
cine and Dentistrv. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 
MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



It it's Baked :Jt HU.N'l'i M i.N's 11 - HaUfd Right 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Fraternity Pins 
Rings, Novelties 
Stationery 
Dance Programs 

SPIES BROS. 



27 E. Monroe St. 

at Wabash Ave. 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLL^NCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



T HE S T K N T O R 



WE NEED YOUR HELP 
Getting nut tliosp fii-st tun i> = nps 
of The Stpiilnr Iin-^ licpii n lii- t;i>l- 
Getting the Ihiiic: stni-lod anil !;i\iii- 
it mnnii'nlum i>' nlwnys Die must iliT 
ficult part (>r lie work. Last woil. 
in additinii In ninljilizhiL; all I In 

ne\\>:, edlloi'lals, ami olhor cnpy, all 
the ailverl ising hail tn he suliciled. 
set up, and arrangnd llirnngli tin 
paper. This week we aie ailding 
four more pages, and that al the last 
minute. In conseQuenee, this issue 
will be late in, coming out and some- 
what scattered in arrangement. 

We ask .vour lenience for the pres- 
ent, and your co-operation for the fu- 
ture. While it is necessar.v tn have 
an nrganizat inn confined tn ,n, coni- 
parativel.v small number of editnrs 
and repnrters. The Stentnr should be 
representative. This can be achieved 
through contributions. Whenever \ on 
have an idea or an opinlmi or new- 
er jokes, put them in writing and 
hand them to one of the editnrs or 
reporters, wliom ynu will find listed 
on anotlii-r page. It will help the 
paper immensely and it will be gnnd 
practice for you. We are trying tn 
make T'l-' Stent "■ :' publication 
of LaliO Forest College, and to do 
this we need your help. 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store." Market Square 




Dry Goods 

_ iShop/or 
F \Vompnst.Childrcn5 fijrnishinqs 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
wrhoso aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



BLOUSES, SEPERATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS. PETTI- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Lines of Merchan- 
dise. I 



PHONE 881 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 




Tin; ( ALMN DUILVM) CO.^IMONS 

The Cnmmnns is doing very well 
this veal-. Some say that it is bet- 
ter nnw than it ever was. We ari' 
certain that it is better tlian it ha.s 
lieen for three years. The lunches 
and dinner.s especially ai'e well chos- 
en, have gnnd variety, and are well 
cnolied. or cniirse there never was 
.inything sn perfect that a persnn sn 
di.~posed cnuld not find something tn 
kick abc.iit, but the comment on the 
whnle is very favorable and shnw- 
tliat tiie men are sincerely appi-ecia- 
tive. 



Chicago University is the seat of 
ine of the military schools which 
the government is establishing at 
various universities. The department 
It Cliic:ign will be entirely devoted 
;o arlillei'v. A three-inch battery. 
' wn 7.5's, and a iJ.T millimeter gun 
'i.-ve already been installed. Tin 
stuilents will be civilians, nnt sub- 
ii ct to military discipline, but tlie 
(•nurse will lead to a commission in 
liie ol"l leer's reserve corp.s. 



IT PAYS lo i;i:ai) 

on? ai)Vi:i{Xismi:nts 

You've nftin heard the saying, "it 
pays tn advirtise." That is true. And 
it alsn pays tn read advertisements — 
pays- ynu. If ynu read advertisements 
consisteidly for any length of time 
you will agree that this statement 
is also true. 

It pays ynu in money saved. There 
:u'e many real bargains offered from 
lime to lime in the advertisements 
aijpearing in this paper. Watch for 
them. 

It pays you in satisfaction. When 

a. merchant asks you to come to his 

store he obligates himself to sell you 

'jiiality goods "as advertised." A'ou 

li.ave a right to expect satisfaction 

fi-nm what ynu buy. ami you get it. 

II |iays ynu in time saved. When 

ynii knnw exactly what you want to 

bu.v and where you want to buy it, 

[ ynu don't have to "look around" and 

I waste time finding It. 

Be sure of t;ctting satisfactory ser- 
I vice and quality goods every time 
! you go into a store. Read our ad- 
I \ertisements and patronize tne stores 
I which can serve you best. 



Phone Randolph 3392 190 N. State St. 



BLOOM 

STATE-LAKE Bl-DG. 

CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEG AN 

The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimbull Hall 
.TaM<si>n ami ^>' abash 

Fraternity ;iiicl Soroity 
Work Our Specialty 

Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

AMt'initinilc Supi»li*^s H;iL'i-':i?e Tr:uis.f erred 

Se\-pn P;isst'nf:ei- t'ar^ to Rent bv Ti ip or Hour 

L. OREENBURG ' 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

35 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 

PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIPE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



s-w^^wiVT/^^ SUCCESSFULLY 

JLF 1 1 x> It done .... 

DRY CLEANING DONE IN 24 HOURS 

WALTER LeFlLS, Tailor 



34 Forest Ave, 



Phone 289 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 
A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

bb.e:ad cakes rolls 

1 Birthduy unci Oilier Special Cakes to Order 



THK RTENTOR 





XS 




The "Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first 
battleship of any nation to be electri- 
cally propelled, is one of the most important 
achievements of the scientific age. She not 
only develops the maximum power and, 
with electrical control, has greater flexibility 
of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, 
but also gives greater econ- 
omy. At 10 knots, her 
normal cruising speed, she 
will steam on less fuel than 
the best turbine-driven ship 
that preceded her. 



The electric generating 
plant, totaling 28,000 horse- 
power, and the propulsion equipment of the 
great super-dreadnaught Vv^ere built by the 
General Electric Company. Their operation 
has demonstrated the superiority of electric 
propulsion over old-time methods and a 
wider application of this principle in the 
merchant marine is fast making progress. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 

Length— 624 feet 

■Width— 97 feet 

Displacement — 32,000 tons 

I^'uel capacity — a milUon gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power — 28,000 electrical horse- 
power 

Speed— 21 knots 



Six, auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen- 
erators of 400 horsepower each, supply 
power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, 
fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun- 
dry appliances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea 
marks the advancement of 
another phase of the elec- 
trical industry in which the 
General Electric Company 
is the pioneer. Of equal 
importance has been its 
part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, 
transforming the potential 
energy of waterfalls for use 
in electric motors, develop- 
ing the possibilities of electric lighting and 
many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications 
of electricity to the needs of mankind that 
scarcely a home or individual today need 
be without the benefits of General Electric 
products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the "New Mexico." entitJed, 
"The Electric Ship," will bi sent upon request. Address 
General Elec:r.:c Company, Desk 44, Schenectady, New York. 







General Office 
Schenectady, N.Y. 





IC 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 



9S-108O 



THE STENTOR 



ALUMNI NOTES, ETC. 

'19 — Harriet E. Hnrris is leacliing 
botany and zoology in (lio Dan\ill,o 
hig^li school this winter. Hei- address 
is 212 Gilbert St. Baer and Knrrak- 
er of former Lake Forest classes arc 
assisting her in maintaining the edu- 
cational standards of nan\ino, sd 
that we are not surprised at Iier cnn- 
clusion that the high school is pret- 
ty good. 

'16 — Elizabeth Krafka, who receiv- 
ed her M. A. from the University of 
Wisconsin last year, is leaching zool- 
ogy in Springfield High this winter. 
She reports the proud possession of 
a greenhouse in a perfectly new high 
school building. Her sfroet address 
is 500 Sth St. 

'15 — After taking the degree of Ph, 
D., last spring at the Uiii\(.'rsily (jf 
Illinois, Joseph Krafka was appoint 
ed assistant professor in the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Mrs. Edmund L. Rendtorff enter- 
tained the memliors of the college 
and academy faculty at tea frdui 4 
to 6, October 9. Miss Hamilton and 
Mrs. Brown served the tea. and 
punch. 

Dr, and Mrs. Wright entertained a 
few members of the University at 
cards Friday evening. 

Warm weather and the harvest 
moon proved Quite too potent for the 
younger members of tlie faculty Wed- 
nesday night. Without a struggle for 
their disappearing dignity they load- 
ed themselves to the scuppers with 
doughnuts, bacon and hamburger and 
proceeded to the beach. Driftwood 
burned well and the niarshniallows 
puffed lusciously; Dr. EUingwood and 
Miss Coan sang round the world and 
back again, landing at last in an in- 
credible amount of grand opera. It 
was the general sense of the home- 
ward bound party that the pleasant 
thing would be to serenade Black- 
stone and Harlan, using the coffee 
pot as a drum; this was reluctantly 
decided against on the grounds that 
it was nearly ten o'clock and it 
would be inconsiderate to wake the 
doubtless slumbering student body. 



Photo Supplies, Developing j 
Stationery and Candy 
lit 

FretfcK's DruR Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 

L. H. W. SPEIDEL ' 
Gents' Furnishings 




»^ UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OF .AMKRK'A 
T. L. Eastwood 

ACKN'I' 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

NOTARY PUBI,IC 

CLEANING, REPAIRING, PRESSING 

Tel. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Gnod Dresser in 
LAKK FOREST 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

HAS OPENED A MODERN RETAIL STORE AT 

22 DEERPATH, ^A/EST 

All kinds of Bread, Rolls and Coffee Cake 
Are Baked Before Your Eyes 



Lake Forest Photographic Service 

12 Market Square 

DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING 

COPYING FLASHLIGHTS 

Films Left Before Noon one day are Ready the 
Following Afternoon at Four 



THE STENTOR 



llll||l|llllll||ll|{|llllllllllllllllllllll!!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllllll!llllllllllll!lllllim^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the fealurea of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economies, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2J full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest aiul co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully jirovided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, I5!325 to $100 for men; JS.'JO to $l.'iO for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for lioys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmcTii, address 

PRE.SIDENT'S O^MCK 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiimiii!iiiiiiiiiiiim^ 



^'" Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR, C.W.YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMIIH; 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to r2;00 m.- 1:00 p. m.to5p m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"iVIARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE ra 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectioiierij 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'NeiU's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VU'TROLA 

Kiibelslcy 

C lotliIii{| and 
l*\ii*iii»«liiiigH 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 



U E DO lUiPAIlilXO 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 




HE STENTOR 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Vnlnnip XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, I ILLINOIS. OCTOBER 17. 1919 



NUMBER 3 



AV(>Mi;.\"s sixca.Ks tkxms 

['ISHKR WIWKl? 

In spite of the Tew inex'itabe 
drfnnlls, tlic women's tennis tourna- 
ment ol' sixteen entries \v;is run off 
in good st.vle (luring tlie Inst two 
woelvs witli llie exciting wind-up la-t 
Wediiesdiiy. The Inst lliree mntelics 
were all well fought games, (which 
deserved the applause of the specta- 
tors.) The match between Miss Pisli- 
er anil Miss Merner was the closest 
of the tiiurnnnient with the scores of 
S-f), (;-2, in favor of the foa-mer. Ex- 
cellent placing with a, good deal of 
volle.v piny from Miss Fislicr were 
features of llie vnalcli. iNIiss Russell 
and Miss Newcomh i^layed a good 
match; here the former sho:ved her 
superiority in steady play and in 
her base line game. Neither took 
the net so that the game was ratlier 
a series of long stndces with few 
hrilliaiil ila^hes. 7 h." finals were l)e- 
tweeu .Miss Russell, champion of the 
North liore towns and Miss Fisher. 
Both played a steady game, altho 
Miss Russell quite frequently mis- 
.iudge'd the base line placing her 
drives out. Miss Pisher scored many 
an ace on her swift vfdlcy plays. 
Neiflier player took advantage of her 
oppcuiciit's rather weak backhainl; 
there was also little bobbing, the 
game being rather one of long drives 
generally Miss Pisher put up an ex- 
cellent game winning by a sccu'e of 
0-2, r,-1. The point of the tourna- 
ment, oulside of tlie good sport of 
the game, was to enable Miss Coan 
to .iudgo of the playing qualities of 
the Lake Forest girls, in order to de- 
cide on a team to send to the Little 
Five Intercollegiate Tennis Tourna- 
ment at Knox College. The team, 
consisting of Miss Tlussell, singles 
player, and Miss Worthlcy and Miss 
Fisher doubles, goes to Galeshurg 
Friday the 17th playing on Saturday 
both preliminaries and finale. As 
Beloit could not enter this fall there 
will be but four, and possibly three 
colleges competing, each having one 
singles player and one team of doub- 
les. Intercollegiate athletic competi- 
tions are practically a new thing 
among women; we hope, however, 
that this exceriment will justify its 
novelty byi producing excellent spirit 
of 'good sport sjmanis hip, fair play, and 
college loyalty which will raise the 
standard of athletics for women. 



LAST V i:\irs STllDKNTS AM) 

WHAT thi:y aim; doinu 

Harriet E. Harris ex. '19 is teach- 
ing botany and zoology in the Dan- 
villie high school this year, S'he lives 
at 212 Gilbert St. 

Rutli Sto]iimcl '19, who received the 
Lake Forest gi-aduate .scholarsliip at 
the Uniiversity oif Illinois, is studying 
at Urbana for her M. A. in English. 
Her .streiet address is 911 W. Illinois 
St. 

William Teves, '19 is in the hank- 
ing business ini New York City. 

Lilil'ian Evans '19 isj teaching the 
third grade in one of the public 
schools of Racine, Wis. 

James Mei-le McEvoy '19, has a pos- 
iti(ni, with the Joliet Steel and Bridge 
CtmipaiUy in Joliet Illiniois. He ex- 
p'ects to change to the Standard Oil 
C(jm,pany ^•ery soon. 

Lyd'ia Sprec-her ex. '19, tenches Eng- 
lisli and French in. the Spring Valley 
High School, She lives at 213 Da- 
kota St. 

Gweuidolyu Massey ex. '19, is the 
head of tlie Spnnisli department at 
Butlei- Brothel's in tli'e- city. 

Mildred Zenos ex. '19, is at her 
home at 2 Cha,lmers Place, Chicago. 

Pliilip Speidel ex. '19, has a. position 
with Swift nnid Co. 

Lucie Knox ex. '19 is teaching 
Mathemnties and English in the Bnr- 
ringloin High School. 

Mary Merchant ex. '19 is at her 
Irome in Wauk'egan. 

CheFterd Davis ex. '19, is working 
for an M. A. degree at the University 
of Illinois. 

Agmes Hoffman, ex. '19, teaches Bi- 
ology in fhe Dyer High School of 
wliich she is an alumna, in Dyer, 
Indiana. 

Ma.i'garet Horton ex. '19, has a pos- 
ition with Ryei'.-'cii's in the city. 

Erniest Cob'erly ex. '19, is back at 
Lake Forest doing graduate woi'k. 

Ivorine McAllister is teaching in 
j tlie south. 

John Rces ex. '19, is coac'hing 
floothnll in St. Paul. 

Elinor Gohle ex. '21. is studying at 
the University of Illinois tliis year. 

Sara Moore ex. '21 is teaching 3rd 
grade in Aurora. 



LAKE F<mi:sT Tiinrs 

AVHKATOX 

The Lake Foi-est eleven defeated 
Whcaton College at Wheatou last 
Saturday, 19 to fi. The gamo was 
ratlior slow, as Coach Derby's men 
were playing a defensive game. Both 
team.« played sti-aiglit football the 
greater part of the game and Whca- 
ton was outclassed in every quartei-. 

McColley stai'led tlie scoring by 
picking up a funililo in the fir.-t few 
minutes of phay and dashed fifty 
yards for a touch<lown. Hause also 
succeeded in grahhiug a fumble on 
Wheaton's thirt.y-yard line and 
score. Bergen put over the final 
count by plunging tlirough Whea- 
ton's line. Jack Morley was put out 
in the first few minutes of play with 
a bad knee. 



I.,ike Fori'st in 

l-T.-mse 

.Ti)Iinson 

Rees 

Russell C. 

I^eyner 



Whcaton r, 

R.K. D.-ivis 

Il.T. Cnloni.in 

r.i;. Frpiloi-iolcs 

M. Cunlcy. Wechold 

T^.d. Polk 



Mniley. \-,in Sickle ]^.T. 

AfcCollfv I,.!:. 

Cianzau Q.n. 
i:dily 11.1-1. 

r.iM's-en T..TT. 

w'.icnis, (■,-ii-,t. ]\r,. 



Smilli 

Vining 

.7. Conlo.v 

Aiitisdci 

Kirk 

Sykes 

Tlic Itoniaiiiiiig Schedule 
Oct. IS— V. M. C. A, College at 
Chicago. 

Oct. 2.'i — Monmouth College here. 
Nov. 1 — Beloit College here. 
No^■. S — Knox College at Galeshurg. 
Nov. 1." — Xorthwestern College 
here. 

With Burn-. Framherg, Morley, 
Kyudherg, nnil P.eddoes on the in- 
jured line-np, tlie conch is very 
nuicli in need of material and it is 
hoped that every man able to get 
out will feel it his duty to come out 
and helj) make the season of 1919 a 
clianijiinnsliip afair. Come on, let's 
knock 'em fiU' a gooi ami bring home 
tlie rag to the Red and Black!! 



Buster ^IcKee visited Kappa Sig- 
ma Saturday and Sunday. During the 
war, he was a captain in the Pioneer 
Infantry (Ne.gi'o). He is now in charge 
of empto.vment in. a foundry in Joliet, 
an interesting position just at pres- 
ent. 

There was an informal and quite 
un.iiinounced "Family Dinner" at 
tlie Cnoiimons Tuesday noon. 

Kilby visited Shick over the week 
end. "He's just a sample, like all 
the rest." 



THE STENTOR 



CAJIPUSITIS 

Tlie liiiit of a moon in five golden 
leaves 

Comes trailing as whispers of even's 
tide; 

A loniging unaniswered these moon- 
beams call, 

And dr-ift to the d'esiert where drea.ms 
abide. 

Tlie breath of a gale in the sloping 

IvillB 
Comes fres'hing and blowing from 

sweeps atar; 
A challenge unshackk'd these north- 

mein bring, 
And float into silence with mem'ry's 

star. 

W. G. McCOLLEY '21 



A MOHD TO Tin: I'At'ULTY 

"School Spirit!" "Interest in Activ- 
expressions of some of onr Olympi- 
ans. What we want to know is how 
we are ever going to get coopera- 
tion and iiijterest in activities if 
members Oif the faculty wont set an 
exampl'e by doing their bit to sup- 
port them. 

One of the greatest if not the 
greatest activity on tlic campus is 
the college paper. This more than 
any other activity sets our standard 
aa a college among other institu- 
tions. Our Glee Club, Dramatic Club, 
and AtliTetic Games all help a lot in 
formimg our position as a college but 
hotliing forms public opinion more 
than our college paper. 

We are doing our bit to make that 
papei- the best that it has ever been, 
show enough spirit to subscribe. 
All we ask of the faculty is that it 
does not iS'ceim consistent for a facul- 
ty to keep crying out for cooperation 
and more interest In activities from 
the student and then in the next 
breath refuse to do so small a thing 
as subfcrlbe to the STENTOR. 



IS THAT SO? 

Chuck Barlow (passing the library 
after S.OO P. M.) looks in and notices 
a figure very much like that of a 
woman: pulls that boneheaded fresh- 
man stunt by asking the sophomore 
at his side if the building is the 
womens gymnasium. Said individual 
rightly belongs to THE ORDER OP 
THE GREEN CAP. 

Mr. Robertson of the Sophomore 
Class is very much put out over the 
fact that there is no evidence of pub- 
licity shown, when a certain young 
lady, a former student of the insti- 
tution, came upon the campus. He 
wishes also to let the campus popu- 
lation know that he had a date with 
that young lady. Mr. Robertson in- 
tends to enter the Lake Forest Col- 
lege some time in the near future. 
.More power to you Kenneth. Mr. 
Robertson also said that he would 
not take the paper unless his name 
appeared in its columns. 

T:ilk about school spirit! 1 think 
that that man Martin has the proper 
sort. He has ai'ranged with Thayer 
to h)(ik luit f(jr his maiden fair while 
he goes out for football. Thayer 
shuhl come in fin- a little credit 
here, altho I figure that he is get- 
ting the best of the bargain. 

Tank Goon sez sez he that the 
weather and the world's series of 
the last week sure showed up the 
fact lliat the Sox had a lot of su]) 
li(ir(.rf. 



Glndys PLPichert spent the week 
end at lier home in Aiistin, 

Margaret MilliSi sipenit the week end 
at her home in Ravenswood. 

Virginia Allcot's parents visited 
her this week. 

Vera Pettigrew .spent the week 
end at 'hier home in Harvey, They say 
that she returned willi a keepsake. 
We wonder w'hati it is. 

Virginia Wale.= spent the week 
end at herd nhdome in Winnetka, 

.To Alartin has been ill this week 
We 'hope to see lier around the cam- 
pus soon, 

Virginia Kratch has l)een ill this 
week, Florence Russell, Bea Worthley 
and Sara Fisher leave Friday night 
for Knox, We wish them luck. 



I'lcslimcn .liiistle. 

I sec a chiuU arising; 

It's spreading o'er the sky. 
It would not be surpriping 
If ruin was very nigh. 

Chuck Beard, while visiting Lois 
Hull last week, got burned. Chuck, 
>nu must stay away from fire. 

Coach Derby is all for having the 
girls come out for football. He hopes 
to line them up against the boys. 
He figures if this plan of .his does 
not l)i'ing out material among the 
boys, lliat it is useless t(j try. More 
power to you Bro. D'erljy. Maybe you 
can do it; I don't know 

That plan of Derby's ought to 
bring out a Linnch of new tackles. 

News Note. — Armstrong went to 
bed at aliout nine P. M. on Thursday 
evening. 

News Nole. — Mr. Lobdell was a vis- 

II (jr al the Kappa Sigs' house on Sun- 
d;ay last. 



Willliiin Slliiilii'S|ii'iir vs. 

)VniI:im Troiitman 

Mr. Troutman's class in Shakes- 
peare is learning a great deal about 
the drama. In fact the knowledge 
gained has been of such great value 



that iwe feel duty bound to sketc'h a 
hit of hfe wisdom for the benefit of 
those unfortunate readers who have 
not been able to gain it in class along 
with us. 

In the first place we have finally 
come into possession of the marvel- 
ous fact that the mod'ern theatre 
is not copied from the olid Roman 
Coliseum as our real stars were wont 
to believe at firet, but that they are 
modeled after the theatre of the awe- 
inspiring Shakespeare's time. 

It was quite a surprise to some of 
our bright lights to learn that the 
modern "Orph" originated during the 
time of Shakespeare. But what puz- 
zled us most was wheiie the audience 
sat as Mr. Troutman, after drawing a 
wonderful sketch of tihe theatre, told 
us that the seats ran around in the 
galleries. Evidently this was an in- 
stance of perpetual motion over- 
looked by some of our .scientists. But 
to proceed to the audience. 

IF the seat^ were in perpetual mo- 
tion where could the audience have 
sat? We thought it must have had a 
dizzying effect on them but we had 
no idea how bad it was until we 
asked about it and our fond instruc- 
tor a^^sured us that they sat around 
in tiers. We don't blame them any. 
It must be enough to make any one 
weep to have the seats running around 
during the performance. 

The audience of the sixteenth cen- 
tury may need our sympathy, but 
not a;-, much as our pocjr actors do. 
Jii.<t think wliat a teri'ible effect a 
racing, weeping audience would have 
en a stage-frightened actor. You frosh 
probably know 'how it feels to have 
an audience listening to you at all. 
What would you do if it was a 
racing, weeping one? 

But then how are we to judge? 
None of u« are real actors. Maybe 
dhey enjoyed it all. We are only or- 
inary audiences who have been prop- 
erly bi'ouglit up in comfortable homes 
while the.se pool- actors were of an 
entirely different Character. Accord- 
ing to Iht- knowledge we gained, we 
find that back of the stage they had 
a b(jx where fhey raised the charac- 
ters. Imagine the effect upon a per- 
son's \ ii w^lolnt fhat being raised in a 
o\ wmilcl have. No wonder they were 
able to perform before such an extra- 
ordinai'.\' audience. 

If y(iu would become wiser, join 
this marvellous class and read with 
u>j the plays that these actors, raised 
in lioxes, played and this extraordi- 
nary audience, sitting in tiers, en- 
joyed. 



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THE S T K N T O R 



MATHKK (JOKS TO 
ANN AH150K 

Edwin J. Mather, '10, director of 
atililetics here in 1915-1917, and well- 
linown to mo'St of us since 1907, has 
l)eeii called to Michigan University 
as assist. ant athletic directcn', and is 
already on I lie job. He has full 
charge of freshman foothall anid gives 
some attention, to the hackfield work 
of the University squad. He will 
he Jiead coach for basketihaM. a'nd will 
baseball as to football, working un- 
der Lnndgren. He reports that he 
likes his associates and his work 
very much, and the monthly cheque 
is very satisfactory. Generous pro- 
vision was also made foi' his moving 
expenses. 

Mr. Mather was a notable player 
and a leader in all sports while in 
college, captain in football and b:is- 
ketliall fill' tAvo years, IHUS-lo, and in 
baseball, 1909-10. After leaving col- 
lege he was engaged in engineering 
work for some thing more than a 
year and Vheu went to Ivalaniazoo 
College as athletic dii'eetor. He 
was most successful in bringing up 
athletics there and turned out sev- 
erdal champion, leaiuis. Coniin,g back 
to Ijake Fco'est in 191", he did good 
wurk for two ye:.r^, uinler the ad- 
verse conditions created by wai\ 
Since 1917 he has done some further 
athletic work at the Great Lake? 
Station and for some time last 
.Spring at the University of Arkan- 
sas. 



On Friday evening, the student 
body gathered around a large bon- 
fire just east of the Common,?. Here, 
an old fashioned revival toidi place 
in wliicli many were revi\ed, ami 
others were awakened to the school 
spirit of Lake Fonest College. After 
songs, speeches, a,nd weird dances 
tliere was a vast amount of new i'n- 
thiislasim aroused in athletics. As a 
result, our f.j. F, C. boys carried off 
the vie;ury at Wheaton, Saturday 



One end of tlve attic had been 
screiened off with while canvas and 
wires tio form a real iliuiing car and 
some clover artist hiad drawn' in col- 
ors the windows anid the rural scenes 
outsidie. Like all diners, this had 
tables in rows along an aisle and 
each table had a s'luuled lamp ami 
everything. Even lanterns hung from 
thie oeilrngs. The menu was nn- 
equaled (that was wou'derful salad, 
Joe) and there was special Kappa 
Sigma freiiich pastry aird thrce-cidor 
ice cream! What a ti'^at! 

The clock s.tj-uck twelve and, cov- 
ered with ribbon and confetti, all the 
CindereUas had to leave fairyland. 



I THE KAI'PV SKaiA PARTY 

' To begin with, we were curious for 

a week over the my.sterious invita- 

jtioiis. \Vc pictured n "Gi'and Toui'" 

j in a, tliousaiid ways but when the 

time came, none of us were even 

"warm," 

.\o\v this is what happened. We 
were first of all; ushered into thie 
chaptei- room where they divided the 
crc'Wd intiod three sections for a 
trur around the world. We were all 
provided with round trip ticltets 
which were to be punched and torn 
off at every stop. 

The upper hall was cleverly con- 
veyed into a I'egular day coach 
with aisles of seats, a conductor, "and 
evor.vtiving." At liast, all aboard, we 
left Alpha, Chi station for Ii'eland 
and "That Tumbledown Shack in 
Athlone" wheie we were given 
.-ihamrocks and clay pipes (whicli 
wiere reially fans in disguise) for 
souvenirs. 

At every stop we decended to the 
chapter rooms to dance and while 
away the time between trains while 
a three-piece orchestra provided e\- 
ccptionally go(d. music. 

We were not conducted to France 
and according to tlve customs there, 
we d(ninied the m,ake-up now in vogue: 
The men, those charasteristic mus 
laches and the girls, a. plenty of 
rouge, lip stick, and eye brow pen- 
cil. En route there, a boy, Duke, 
himself, came down the aisle selling 
peanuts and candy and against our 
better judgment we all indulged. 

Riding through Spain, we were all 
i-bill'ed and tlhi'illied by a sure-enough 
bidd-ui). The lights were snapped off 
:in(l a man came dashing throu.gh 
I he coach witli a gun a^nd searched 
for \alu,-ibles. His hai'k, though, 
pio'.eil worse th.-in bis liite, for we 
ail lived to teli of it. 

Passing from Sp.ain to Egypt, we 
vere dela.ved by tliat obstacle, mosi 
annoying to travelers, the customs 
houi?e. Each' couple was presented 
with a, bag the eonten'fcs of which 
were to be publicly searched and dis- 
played and many were the painful 
i!i-coveries of that loathsome officer. 
We wene indeed sadly shocked at the 
belongings of some of the people we 
had once recognized as friends while 
rosy cheeks Avcre more than popular. 

In Turkey we committed ourselves 
lo some special turkish cigarette,-. 
Shiocking! Keep it dark! It was at 
Kappa Sig's e.xpense. But the best is 
yet to come. 

Whien tihe first call to the diner 
c.-une. we welcomed it with shouts of 
joy and adjourned to the I'ear of the 
li-ain. The diner was the artistic 
mastei-piece of the evening and was 



the crowning success, in fact the con- 
\incing proof of the boys' untiring 
I'ffoi-ls and clever originialtity. 



ti:a at kout shrkidax 

Last Sunday afternoon about a doz- 
en Lois Hallers served tea in .Mrs. 
Mason's Tea Room at Port Sheridan. 
Sandwiches, cake .aind tea were served 
to khaki clad convalescents. At in- 
tervals when the continual .^tream of 
men: who caine into the tea room 
seemed to t'hin out the girls sang and 
pla.ved the songs wh'ich are most lov- 
ed today. 

When th'6 tea room closed tlic girls 
were escorted through the Port where 
they gained a great deal of welcome 
information. They visited the differ- 
ent wards and shops where disabled 
men create with their hands things 
of great beauty au'd usefulness. Tlie 
trip was a very educatiomal one aside 
from, the great pleasure that it af- 
forded in giving the girls an oppoi'- 
tunity to do something wbieb they 
considered one of the worth while 
things. 

All who went spent such an enjoy- 
able afternoon that they are eagerly 
Looking forward to a time when their 
,-erviees will ag'ain be needed. 



Humorous Lapses. 

Not every connni'iicenient spenkT 
has said precisely what he wished to 
say to the young iieopL before him. 
Gne was tripiied liy a most unhappy 
lapsus linguae at a ymmg ladies' semi- 
nary. 

He meant to say: "But I 
have talked too long, and I do 
not wish to speak to weary 
benches." Insi d of which he .said 
"beery wenche-. Thereby reminding 
us of Tut(U- S|H-onei- of Oxford, who 
llius a<lilress(Ml a meeting of farmers: 
"It is gratifying to me to behold so 
many tons of soil." 

I'ut a univeisity lecturer lately 
lualc-biMl thise infelicities when he 
said: "I'm not going lo talk vei-y 
hiug, but if you li'et what I'm going to 
say in ,\'oni' heads you'll have the 
whole Iliiiig in a nulshell." 

'there's niauy a true word spoken in 
ie-t. 



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THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly duriiiK t'lf col- 
legiate year by the atudenls of Lake 
Horesl i'dUejje. 

Board of Editors: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Ralpli Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

James Lennard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

^ acuity and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Iliiiioia, as sec'ond class 
matter. 



SPEVKINfi OF ACTTYITTES 

Last spring a new society burst in- 
to bloom about which we have hearU^ 
very little since. Tlicre you have 
tlie "wlien", now for the "why." lAir 
some time brains and intellect have 
been roaming around over the cam- 
pus hardly noticed or recognized. If 
you had them or a clever streak tliat 
made you s'hine in Garrick, Stentor 
ord Glee Club, — what was the use of 
exhibiting it? Nio one cared anyway. 
So the path of least resistance, that 
of the "just enough to get by with" 
loomed up in a most alluring way. 

Bui alas and alack those days of 
ease are over. Somebody had a 
bright idea and it clothed itself in 
the form of Kappa Alpha Society. 
No more will buddiing genius be ig- 
nored and slighted. It will be set 
upon the pedestal wlw-rcon it lie- 
longs, and receive all honor and rev- 
erence due it. 

The charter members are a group 
of girls from last year's senior class 
who were chiosen by the faculty. 
The^', together with a committee of 
the faculty, chosfe girls from the 
two upper cliasses who were elegible. 
"What y'mean eligible?" — you say. 
Yes, that's just where your genius 
comes in. A girl isn't eligible until 
the middle of her sophomore yeni- 
and then she must have a certain 
number of points for sludent activi- 
ties plusi an average gi-ade of at least 
B, and a lot of other intangible 
things such as, a worthwhile char- 
acter, a personalitiy tliat is felt on 
the campus and a deal of school 
spirit :md pep. Too much? Oh I 



should say not too much to expect 
of a really alive all round college 
girl. Any how isn't, it worth striving 
for? We think it is. Tliat's why we 
are telling the new girls about it 
so that they will start working for 
it mow. Tills is one place where a 
pulll doesn't count, you get In abso- 
lutely oin your merit. 

The present members are ta be dis- 
tinguished by the fact tlhat they wear 
a tiny little key — by this label ye 
s'hiall know them. 

There are a number of ways in 
whicli this organization plans to 
make itself felt on the campus this 
year. They are giving a cup to the 
girl who has the highest average in 
studies plus student activities and 
who exhibits the best; school spirit. 
Any girl outside of the society is eli- 
gible. 

Now here's the road to fame, pop- 
ularity and a good "rep" with the 
faculty. Let's get busy and make the 
competition keen. The big aim of 
Ka.ppa Alphfa are to raise the 
scholarship standard. Increase inter- 
est in outside activities and to pro- 
niiile a new and better school spirit. 
It's on/e of the thinj^ that will make 
for a better Lake Forest — "Are you 
with us?" 



PLANS FOR A NfcW 

CHICAGO CAMPUS 



Northwestern University Plans 

$2,700,000 Buildings on Nine 

Acre Lake Shore Drive Tract 



Ncnthweslern University has taken 
an option on nine acres of land at 
the southwest corner of Lake Shore 
drive and Chicago av. for a Chicago 
campus. 

Buildings will lie erected at a cost 
of $2,700,000. One will be a million 
dollar hospital. The others will house 
departments of law, commerce, medi- 
cine and dentistry. 

The new buildings will be known as 
the Chicago Campus of the Univers- 
ity and will follow architectually the 
plans for the new houlevai'd link ar- 
chitects. 

The plans are contingent upon the 
cjutcome of a $25,000,000 financial 
campaign, whict was started with 
two gifts, one of $500,000, the largest 
single donation ever made to the uni- 
versity, and one of $50,000 made by 
a woman. 

The names of the donors were not 
made public. 



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OUR VISITORS 

One of the most attractive things 
about Lake Forest is the number and 
kind of visitors we have. We are 
fortunate in being so easily accessible 
to Chicago — near enough that it is 
not difficult for old students and 
others to drop out to see us. These 
visitors bring us tidings from the 
world outside — the world of "after I 
graduate." We get in touch with con- 
ditions nd problems which we will 
face, with some hint of their solu- 
tions. 

But aside from this advantage, 
there is a purely narrative interest 
in the careers of these former stu- 
dents. What thrilling stories some 
of them tell! Especilly now, when 
there is so much doing in the world, 
equal in excitement to "The Three 
Musketeers," yet thoroughly modern 
in every detail. 

Two visitors of the past week call 
themselves to mind in this connec- 
tion. Felix Beauchamp, '18, late of 
the Royal flying Corps, had his 
plane shot down behind the German 
lines and was a prisoner in several 
different prison camps until the 
signing of the armistice. Being an 
officer, he received comparatively 
good treatment at the hands of the 
enemy. The story of this adventure 
and of his life in Canada, England, 
and Prance, presents "a tale which 
holdeth children from play and old 
men from the chimney corner." 

Woon H. Lyuh brings us a story 
fi'diii the other side of the world, 
fi'om Koi'ea. He i.s one of the 
groups of Christians who have been 
so persecuted by the Japanese in 
the past few years. He is now rep- 
resenting the cuse of Korean iiule- 
pendence in this country. The in- 
cidents of his getting out of Korea 
and Japan, dodging the Japanese 
secret service in order to attend the 
Peace Conference, are as tlirilling as 
any Sunday Supplement story, but 
with tlie added merit of being true. 

There ane many others, whom 
lack of space forbids us to mention. 
They are an interesting lot, pre- 
senting life fnom many different ang- 
les. Nowhere are you likely to find 
a more intenesting set of men than 
the visitors of Lake Forest College. 



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THE S TK N T O R 



WHAT ikh;s si:m'-(;(>> i:itN.>ii:NT 

MKAJV 

Tlie plan of self-goveninipnt is 
rapinlily being introduced into liii' 
large coHieges amd universities. Vas- 
sal', Wieilltesiliy, Wiisconein, and almost 
all] of tihe oblier large collloges of the 
country have tried the plan and found 
it liiigilirli)- successful. 

The stud'ents, unidler the sc!lf-govern- 
ment system,, are placed on thuir lion- 
or, knowing that sliould they inlringe 
upon till.' ru lies of tlir hall (luy will 
be looked down upon, by their fel- 
low sudents and be hroughit to trial 
befoire themi. The obserVaince of quiet 
liouis, amd a pride in the appearance 
of the 'halll become the respf;nsibil il.v 
of each individiual. 

For the purpose of furtlieiiiig (he 
init^erev^ts of sie'Ilf-governnieiit, a con- 
vention is lielid evei'.v .vear a; one nl 
the iM'ser coWeges or universil ies, al 
wJiich ideas are exchanged and new 
plans are iiiitrodiuced. T'his eonvcn 
tion gives each college an oppii'tun- 
ity to bring up its own inohlcnis fm 
dlS'Cll,S'Sion and advice. In this \v:i.\ a 
broadier fiel'd is covered by the self- 
gov'eirniniienti plaii, because it brings 
.girlis fre,™ all pai'ts of the couuh',\ 
togetlier whore their ii'iealis can be 
e.xchang il. A'lil tli' e ^es a bi.gger 
mofe deiuocratic spirit among col- 
lege women amd serve's to ni.ake them 
feel as if they were a part of a 
great body of progressive women in- 
stead of mdmibensi of some one iso- 
lated"" coMege In senile corner of the 
cinimti-y. 

Colleges or iMiiversities having an 
entei'in'g cliaiSiS of fifty or more are 
eligible to send delegates to the con- 
vention. Althou.gili Lake Forest is ncit 
eligiblie to send a didegate to Ann 
Arbor w'lvere the convention will be 
held next year, it is sincerely hoped 
that we may at least send a visitiui:: 
represe'nt;ati\ e who will report to n^ 
all the matters which arie discus^sed. 
Ill this way Lake Forest will obtain 
seme new ideas whicli will help in 
making even strounger self-go ve mm ent 
association of T.oi.s Hall, and when 
we grow big enough to have ,a real 
dieliegate we wilil be ready to take 
our place among the big colleges of 
the United States. Let all the girls 
of Lake Forest work to make our 
iself-goveniinwnt its very liest and to 
make its standard unsurpassable. 



E. Lyle Bates was tlir week-end 
guest of Digamma. 

Digamima announces the initiation 
of Ross J. Burns and Herschel V. 
Johnson. 

Elaine Kellogg spent the week end 
at 'her home in Austin, 



rtx rsi\(; tin: uhai.x 

A convex lens two inches in diam- 
eter will gatlier the .sun's rays which 
e.oinnirl ably warm t'lie back of one's 
hand, bring them to a focus and 
scorch the skin. 

Could an in.strument be devised to 
rays of tlrought emaimting from the 
brain, if we may so speak, gieniuses 
would be as common. as barred 
I'ock cliiickens. Seriously speaking, 
concentration is not genius, of course; 
but it is certainly one of its attrib- 
utes; and concentration without gen- 
ius can make a very pretty s'howing 
for itself. 

Out we-st thei'e lives a great inven- 
tor wlio when he feels the stirring 
of a new idea takes his pipe, gun 
and dog, stroWs out to the woods 
and seats himself at the base of a 
tree. Soon pipe, gun and dog are for- 
gotten. One by one the inventor con- 
jures into mental visibility the parts 
iif the potential mechanism. With hi,s 
mind's eye he watt-lies tfccir recipro- 
cal pla.'- upon one another; the di.stri- 
liutiou of the motive power; tihe 
Iransf.er of motion; the checks and 
accelerators; the play of spring's; the 
retardations by friction, until the 
whole complex is photographed up- 
on his brain. Then, he gK>es home and 
with forge, lathe and drill trans- 
forms these tenuous figments into 
sulid steel. 

This man is John M. Browning of 
Ogden, Utah, the inventor of the 
Iji'owning machine guns, tihe Colt 
automatic pistols and other types of 
self-load'ing arms. A single day in se- 
clusion, without pencil or paper, pro- 
duced his first automatic rifle. 

He is a. dreamer whose dreams 
come true. He makes them come true. 
He focus-es with his brain. Most of us 
dcm't. It is too hard work. Then, too, 
we have no faith that anything 
would happen if we did focus. X<i 
doubt a thousand men before Brown- 
ing dreamt of an automatic gun. But 
they saw it from the outside — saw 
it s(|uirting lead as a garden hose 
s(|uirts water, Browning started from 
the inside. 



Sri;NTOI{ DFLIVF.RTICS 

The matter of delivering The 
Stentor to the men on the south 
campus has been mixed up for the 
first two isisues becaaiise there was 
r,i) one specificaWy in charge of it. 
Tlie following m'en have consented to 
lake charge of thi.s work; 

Wilford Taylor, Blackstone Hall 
Frederick Kelley, Harlan Hall 
James Leonard, Phi Bta Alpha 
Irvin Hirschy, College Hall 
Hereafter, if yon don't receive your 
Stentor, inquire of the man for your 



irmitory and he will see that you 



do. 



.MlSrc SCHOOL NEWS 

Organizations 

1. House Government. 

Vesta \'otaw President 

June Suckling Secretary 

Martiha Prickett 
Ruth Randolph Faculty Advisor 

2. "New Girls," 

Iim Updegraff President 

Ruby Mnnger Sec. and Treas. 

■■',. "Old Girls." 
Dorcithy Antrim President 

Margaret Duraiid Sec. and Treas. 

Initiatiun 

"Poequired: — a lemon ami plenty of 
strong wire." 

Tills was the beginning of llic, 
Prosh initiation. "The day after the 
night before" dawned and eleven 
freshies marched to breakfast, each 
with eight stiffle wireidi pigtails, mid- 
dys backward and lemon in hand. 

Other rules and regulations were; 

1. Bow to an upper cla.ssman 
whenever met. 

2. No leaving of campus without 
permission. 

'i. Eat with sipoons. 

-1. Neither cosmetics or slang con- 
sidering the pain of it all, the girls 
were all "good .sports." 
Dinner Pnrty 

The pre.sence of a new dining- 
room this .vear with the attractive 
color scheme of yellow and black, 
made more initiation neee.ssary. So 
the Music School's season of pleas- 
ures opiened with a dinner party giv- 
en for the new girls, by the "old 
.^irls," September the 2Gtli. 

The dining-room was beautifully 
decorated with purple and gold, the 
school colors. Cut flowers and shrub- 
ber.v were added to this. By means 
of dainty bluebird . place, cords, 
places and partners wore fonnd. The 
dinner consisted of: 

Fruit Cocktail 

Creamed Chicken in Patties 

Creamed Peas- French Fried Potatoes 

Rolls Butter 

Fruit Salad 

Tri-colored Ice Cream Cakes 

The remainder of the evening was 
spent in dancing over at North Hall. 

First Girl. — "Are you very fond of 
fish balls'.'" 

Second Girl. — "I don't know. I 
never atteinled any." 



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Our 

Advertisers 



THE STENTOR 




LITTUL FELIX 

As yoiut see 

Hen-ner-ry is not with us. 

Ru-mor has it that 

He went to K'enro-islia 

I have nev-er been, to Ken-o-sha. 

Some-thing has made 

It fam-ous 

Henrner-ry is in-ter-est..ed 

111, fam-o'us places. 

Hen-ner-ry hias tra-vel-led. 

He is still tra- veil-ling. 

I en-coun-ter-ed the faculty 

Tliis week. 

I go to all my class-es now. 

I a/-rise earl-y for Bib. Lit. 

It is ver-y qu-eer. 

The tea-eher tells me to "Come, 

Come." 
But I have nev-er gol-lin there. 
All I learni-ed from my 
Sun-day School teacli-er is 
0b-90-lete. 

I think my Eng-lish teach-er 
Is ind love. 

He looks out of the wiu-dow 
Con-tin-u-al-ly. 
May-be slie is a Frosli. 
There is a-nioth-er teach-er 
Whom they call Tront-ie 
He sounds fi.sh-y to me . 
I am ta-king French. 
Pro-fes-.9or Van Stien-der-en 
Is my teach-ei'. 
He says the bal-loon 
Is our class em-blem. 
I won-der what 'he meant. 
I would like to tell you 
But this has to pass 
A-bout Mr. Bur-nap 
The ceu-sor. 

As us-u-al yours. 
LIT-TUL FE-LIX 



THE INC'UB.VTOR 

by 
(Mrs. Henry Bul'f Orpiiigton) 

1. It is the purpose of this colunm 
to hatc'h out the remedies for all 
the ailments that are wont to bother 
the fair (an otherwise) natives of 
this illustriou.9 campus. Through this 
marvelous column, Which we have 
at last been, able to bring to the 
Stentor, you may get any informaion 
needed, psychic or otherwise. 

Owing to the newness of the col- 
vimn there are not many questionis 
this week but do not hesitate to hand 
in your questiaus. If there is any- 
t'hing that is bothering you at all 
just make a note of it and see that it 
is put in the Stentor box in Lois Hall 
Dear Incubator: 

Ever since the Hast prom I haive 
been, ailing. At first I thought that 
it was the kick in the punch, but the 
lady whom I took with me does not 
seem to be effected at all. I fee-l as 
if I had the colic. What remedy 
would you advise? 

Screamingliy Yours, 
J . A. Z. Baml 
Dear J. A. Z. B. 

Turpentine'! It is the best paint 
remover I have as yet discovered. 
Heheaftier be careful of taking so 
much of the country bloom frcim; your 
fair partner's visage. She may re- 
sent it when she looks in the mirror. 

H. B. O. 
Dear H. Q. 0. 

My Siweetheart's hair is turning 
gray. What can be the cause of it? 
He is quite a young man andi has al- 
ways lead a temperate life. Is there : 
any remediy for it? It is naturally 
a bpautiful auburn and I hate to 
think of its changing. 
Anxiously, 

Augusta Wind. 
Dear Augusta Wind: 

Soimeone must be watching him for 
it is a psychological fact that if one 
looks at an objecj. long enough it wilil 
turn gray. Are you sure that he has 
always lead a temperate Hie? You 
had better look around and see who is 
watching him. You may be able to 
ward off the detective' yet. 

The only remedy I know of is to 
dye his hair a beautiful kelly green 
and then stare at it for three hours 
without bliinkinig and it will become 
the attractive ishadie of red j'ou spoke 
of, as psychology teaches us that if 
one looks at a green object long 
enough it will become red. 
Yours, 

H. B. O. 



ODDS AND ENDS 

Oh Tannenbaum! Oh Tannenbaum! 
Did you see it Jen^ — did you see 
Van's Christmas tree? Ballons 'n 
'everything. Of counse it couldti't be 
a girl's chapeau that adorned the 
l)rassy branches of our notorious tree 
— they're scarce articles — you know 
only milkniiiln's aud. conductor's 
daughters can indulge in such lux- 
uries this fall. • 

Oh! Jen I'm so worried — yep — 
worried.. If the frosh only numbered 
five or six it iwouldiv't be so bad but 
Jiminie — Spring's only six montlis 
off and here the Frosh start off with 
poetry now. What will it be when 
the little birdies start singing and 
the sweet flowers start springing? 
Just imagine that mighty band ry- 
Ing to write poetry, when the spring 
breezes hit us. 

Oil! Tliou aching lieart be still 
'Tis true 'he does not love thee 
But just a little pleasant be 
Then perchance that maybe he 
Could learn to love you. 

Your frowning face .does all but 

please. 
Your ruddy lips should upward turn 
To win the love for which you yearn. 
Look up sweet maid you must but 

learn 
To wi,n tlie love of he — 

Oh! Sophs turn on the tub — 
Ehuff— Enuff — 



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MINSTREL SHOW 

Y. M. C. Home Talent Minstrel 
Show October 22-23. Everybody out. 

A Minstrel Show — one of the real 
old time affairs — local talent — for 
the benefit of the Y. M. C. Only two 
nights, October 22-23. Better get 
your tickets at once because every- 
body will want to see it and you 
simply must not miss it. 

Y. M. C. Minstrel Show October 
22-23. 



Tlic I'diu'crt 

The first subscription concert was 
giviein by the two Music School artists 
— Marta Melinowijki and Robert 
luiiandt, on Saturday evening, October 
4, at the Durand Art Institute. It 
is needless to aay ib was a great suc- 
cess and einjoyed beyond measure by 
every one. Wie are now looking for- 
ward to liearing the great harpist, 
Carlos Salzedo, whose conicert will be 
given Tuesday evenimng, November 
25, 1919 at the Durand Institute. 

"Hang onto life! You'll never get 
a second grab." 



Patronize our advertisers. 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 220 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stati inery, Invitations, Dance Program:", 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 
5 So. \A/abash Ave. 

CHICAGO ( 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO , 



WinifEU I VCLLTV HMVCir 
I'AHTY 

Evidently the f:icult,v be:ioli party 
Weilnc.-dny niglit was a great success, 
;it least certain niemlnprs enjoyed it 
enimgli to have another one on Sat- 
urihiy. The moon, you will reniemh- 
er \\:i- unusually i)e:iutiful and it 
must liiive been an inspiring sight 
to \v:itcli it i-ise while tile huge 
Ijonfire on bhe shore cast its re- 
riectiou into the sky. 

The fire \vas not imly beautiful 
Init it w:is also useful in that it 
served as a fire to toiist the mai'sh- 
ma.l'liows witicli were dev^oureil 
e:igerly by thie hungry faculy. 

All reported a wonderful time, and 

sh they :ill mention the 

iieauly of tlie ntcou. 



COMMUNITY ShRVICK 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



The speaker at the Comimunity 
Sei-vice on Sunday evening will be 
I he Reverend Douglas H. Cornell of 
(ileneoe. Mr, Cornell has been for 
eighl years the efficient and active 
l';ist(ir of the Union Church of Glen- 
eoe, and is a man of much ewergy 
:iik1 great ability. His message is 
iiways simple :ind direct and one iiol 
easily forgotten. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 



i.AKi<: i<<»ki:hi. 



II. I. 



romze 



vertisers 



FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars- -Candies 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SULK.TiS YOUU HUSINKSS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATE U. 

.SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FUF.EST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Ohieagn-Lake Eoresi (_'ni.iniulaiiun 

Tickets 

aa iiKKKi'Ai'ii. %VK»»r 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cletnii III/, I'll ■isi III/. Ui'jiiiiiiiii/ 



i 6 



The Original 

MABLE SYKES'' 



DIAMOiND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 N<»i«ili Niuio S<i»e«'l 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY -CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

l*li<»iie C'eiiifiil S^S 1 1 



:^-^^ 



THE STENTOR 



Hartman & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 



Lake Forest, 



Illinois 



ALUMNI NEWS 

1884. We have only just now been 
informed of the death, on May 18, 
1918, of Herbert H. Clark of Kansas 
City. 

18fl6. A. 0. Jackson is now witli 
Buck and Raynor, 2 S. State St., 
where Walter A. Kratft, is manager. 

1908. Miss Frances Davidson has 
ercently returned to her station at 
Sappro, Japan, after spending a year 
in California for the rttuperaticin of 
her health. 

1908. Harry W. Otto is located at 
Naples, N. Y., mainaging a produce 
warehouse. A snuall daughter has 
recently been added to his family. 

1909. John D. Hubbard has return- 
ed to his former position as legal ad- 
viser for the American Medical 
Assoc, 535 Dearborn Ave.. Chicago. 
Home address, 1922 Sheridan Road, 
Evanston. 

1910. Miss Lida Gourley has been 
for two years at I lie Wesley Hospi- 
tal, 2449 S. Dearliorn St., Chicago, 
taking the nurses' training course. 
Her sister Helen, is there witli her. 
Their home address I'eniain- Hit;li- 
land Park. 

1911. James P. Coyle of the I.ane 
Techinioal High School has settled 
permanently in Ciiicago, if having 
bought a house at 6555 N. Asliland 
Ave. constitutes this. 

1912. Otis Holfrich is new with the 
Erwiin-Waisey Advertising Co., 58 E 
Washington St., Chicago. 

1912. L. H. Sharp wa.-- Science 
teacher and coacli al Albany, Ore- 
gon, high school 1912-11. In 1914-15 
he attended Leland Staufcjrd Univer- 
sity and took an M. A. in Chemistry, 
continuing his work for a doctor 
ate the ne.\t year, after spending the 
summer with the Stanford Geologic 
Survey, 191fi-17 (until September) 
chemist for Parish Co., San Francis- 
co, and for another company. After 
enlistment transferred to Aviation, 
sent to Prance in March, 1918, and 
spent six months in the Tout section 



in photographic work with air 
sQuadi'ons. Later transferred to 
Chemical Warfare Servie. Demobi- 
lized with grade of First Sergeant to 
enter Red Cross where he was still 
wiorking on Sept. 9. Will probably 
"stop over" in L. P. some time soon. 

1914. Chas. A. Logan is now assoc- 
iated with the law firm of Cutting, 
Moore, and Sibley, 5 No. LaSalle St. 

1916. Edward Hawkes, Jr., is now 
with a Steel Sales agency in Chica- 
go (the; La Clede Steel Co.) and is 
living at 2727 Leland Ave. 

1915. Rev. Zoltan Irshay, who held 
the Lake Forest scholarship at the 
University of Hlinois last year, re- 
ceived his M. A. in June, having ma- 
joi-ed in philosophy, with Psychology 
and Sociology as minors. In July he 
married, his wife having previously 
been assistiant in Domestic Science at 
Lincoln College, Lincoln. He is now 
pastor of the Presbyterian Churcli a! 
Georgetown, 111., a few miles south of 
Danville. 



A LETTKU Fl!<r>I OR A It.WILLIAMS 

Kikungshan, Honau, China, 
Aug. 17, 1919 
Pi-of. Waiitor R. Bridgman, 

Lake Forest, III. 
Dear Sir, 

A short time ago your letter and 
a bundle of Stentors were forwarded 
to me from Sbanighai. YOiU may be 
sure they were welicome and were 
read with interest. It scarcely seems 
possible fhat it is now twelve years 
since I graduated fi'om Lake Forest 
Coldlcge, but I was impressed with 
the flight of time when I discovered 
that it was omly here and there in 
the papers that I recogaiized a fa- 
miliar naime, and when I saw in fhe 
faculty picture only three or fo'ur 
who had been my fcjrmer teachers. I 
was sorry to liear of Dr. Halsey's 
death. 

Perhaps you would Like to hear a 
little about what I have been seeing 
and doing since I left America. 

We set sail! from San Francisco on 
September fourteenth, 1914. Among 
the other passengers were about sixty 
missionaries, tweny-one of whom be- 
longed to our parly. We made short 
stops at Honolulu and Yokohoma. 
The Hawaiian Islands with their 
mild climate, semi-tropical vegeta- 
tion and dream.v music were very 
interesting. Suc'h flowers and fruits 
we had never seen before! Our slay 
was alli too short. 

As soon ais we arrived at Yoloo- 
hom.a our party walked to the busi- 
ness part of the city to pui'chase can- 
dies, fruits and nuts. To the Japan- 
ese children we seemed a great cur- 
iosity and some of them followed 



J. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Anilersdii Biiililitif/. fhoiie fioo 
LAKE FOUEST, ILE. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. IB. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



If Us linked ;a IlLXTLHiX S it -^ Haked Klghc 

"W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Fraternity Pins 
Rings, Novelties 
Stationery 
Dance Programs 

SPIES BROS. 

27 E. Monroe St. 

at Wabash Ave. 

ELECTRICAL 
APPLL^NCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STENTOR 



us for blocks. We Wiilked I'iglit in t1ie 
midid'lie of the streets for there were 
almost no liorses and very few auto- 
mobiles. On some streets we were 
surprised to find real street cars. At 
Yokolioniia we h'ad our first ricksha 
ride. To be drawn around by a man 
was quite a t|ueer sensation at first. 

On, October sixth we arrived at 
SlvainKai. I was iKot at all sVii-ry to 
reach I'lie iiaiid wliicli was to lie my 
futui'e home, fof 1 liad not proved 
to be a vei'y good sailor. When we 
saw the crowd gathered on the wharf 
we tliiought that there was plenty of 
matei-ial for missionary work right 
there. Tlie people were dirty, un- 
kepit, ;ind half clad. Some begged 
while others sold toys, fruits 
cakes, and caindies. It woul'd not have 
be'cn safe to buy nmythinig to eat, for 
over 'here where there is so much 
diii-ease e\ierythiing must be scalded 
or sterilized in some way before it 
is eaten. 

Foui' llaniiiliiics of our party were to 
remain in Ohina. Our lieavy baggage 
consisting of over tweivty pieces was 
loaed on a cart, and drawn by Cool- 
ies out to our compound two or three 
miles away. The grunting of the 
cooliies as they started off amused 
us vei-\ nuuh, but -'n >■ we have be- 
come quite accustomed to the queer 
noises miadie by China's burden 
bearers. For the transportation 

of all our l)agi;age we only 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 




Dr y Goo ds ; 

'/Shop /or 
F\Vi)m(^n5;.nii[clrfiisrumishinqs 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
who so aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently 



BLOUSES, SEPERATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Lines of Merchan- 
dise. 



—PHONE 881 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



had to i).-iy about $1.5(1. Labor is 
so cheap in China. We ourselves were 
driven to the compound in real car- 
riages. There are a good many of 
the latter in Shanghai, also a great 
many automobiles. Gasoline was then 
about a dollar a gallon. 

Slian.ghai is an international port 
and lias become so forei.gn tiiat it 
do( s not difl'er much from the big 
cities in the U. S. We spent five 
weeks there and so had an opportu- 
nity to visit places of interest. One 
day we went to ■w'hat is called the 
"old city." Here we came in 

toucli; with crooked streets 

ci'owded with people. noise and 
odours on every hand, heat'hen 
temples witli .smoke of incense 
llirough w'liich the .gnds could be 
ilimly seen, an, everjiwhere beggars 
either crawling along, striking their 
heads on the pavement, or in some 
crowd. We should have never founkl 
our way out of the hubbub had we 
not had an interpreter and' guide. 

About the midd'le of Novemiber we 
sailed up the beautiful Yangste river 
to Hankow, the Chicago of China. We 
went there to study the laniguage. At 
Shanghai a dialect is spoken. As we 
wished to study Mandarin, we wanted 
to lie in Mandarin speaking territory 
where we could converse with the 
people. During our stay a Hankow 
we learned much about thde strange 
customs ou the Chinese. There are 
some very wealthy Chinese, but by 
far the greater majority are poor, 
very poor. Our Hankow compound is 
located just outside the city. The 
Chine.s'e farmers I'ound about live in 
small huts .niiade of straw or mat- 
ting. These have one door and no 
windows or floor. The chickens, pigs, 
and dogs, all spenil a great deal of 
I heir time in tlie hut with the family. 
.lust outside is the water buffalo 
which (k)es the farm work. The 
fodil of tlie Chinese consists mostly of 
greens' and rice. Tliey have no stoves, 
liut co(d< o\er charcoal pots. In some 
parts of China Chinese can afford to 
use charcoal, hut at Hankow it was 
hii,'li so they used bean stalks ami 
weeds fen' fuel. They have no way of 
keeping warm in winter. 

Since we have been in China wo 
Iwive fared well. So far where we 
luive lived we have been able to 
l)uy a great va.riety of fruits anil 
vegetables at a very reasonable price. 
I had ahva.vs supposed t'hat anyone 
who lived in Cliina would have to 
live ford the most part on rice, but 
it is very little of it I have e.aen. Eggs 
arde plentiful and at present are 
aljout fifteen cents a dozen. All im- 
ported things are very high. Our 
butter comes from California and 
costs $1.25 a pound. 



Phone Randolph 3392 190 N. State St. 



BLOOM 

STATE-LAKE BLDG. 

CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 

TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 



The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimhall Hall 
•Jackesoii aii<l ^i uliaMh 

Pralernily iind Soroity 
Work Oisr Specialty 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

AuLtjmobilt: Supplies li;ij:;,'age Tiansl'erred 

Seven Piisseutter ijiiis Oi R^iu ti.v Trip or Hour 

L. GREEN BURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 

1^ X^ F 1Vf t ' SUCCESSFULLY 
U 1 1 iM ilt DONE .... 

DRY CLEANING DONE IN 24 HOURS 

WALTER Le FILS, Tailor 



34 Forest Ave. 



Phone 289 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Hom e Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 

A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BB-EAD CAKES ROLCS 

Binliday iind Other Special Ualies to Order 



THE STENTOR 



The Inst of April we came 'here to 
the mountains to continue our lang- 
uage studj- during the summer. "VVe 
brouvhmt our Chinese teacher anid 
serv-ants with us. It iisi not safe for 
the foreigner to remain on the plains 
during t'he summer where the heat is 
so iiitenj^e amd where there is so 
much diisease. The niame of this 
mountain is Gigungshan which trans- 
lated mea.ns "rooster comb moun- 
tain." About one thousand people, 
missionaries and business people, 
come Ivere every sumnrer. 

About the middle of September we 
s.hal'I return to the plains, this time 
to Yenchfiig, I-lonan where we 
shall take up our future woi'k. Mr. 
Williams will have charge of our 
mission training sc'hool at that 
place. I expect to supervise the work 
for the Chinese girls and teach 
music. We attended the closing ex- 
ercise^l of this school in May, and 
were very muc'h pieaised with the 
school anid its suri-oun dings and are 
looking forward to cuir work during 
the coming year. One of tlie best 
ways of g-etting the gospel to the 
people is to train the natives and 
then send them out to work for llii'ir 
feilow co'Unty-ni'en. 

Thanking yoii for the papers and 
wishing for the college a prosperous 
year, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

ORA R. WILLIAMS 
S. D. A. Mission, Yenelieng, Ilnnan, 
China. 



AX OPEN LKTTER 

Dear Henmery, 

I hate to write you this for fe.nr 
of annoying you, but the linie has 
come wVietii I must ask you a sorions 
question — the contemplation of wliich 
has caused me nights of restlessness 
and corresponding days oif anxiety. 

You Willi' uniderptnnd tny reluctance 
in relating troubles, but you will np- 
preciato its importance when I tell 
you that your life ami mine have 
been upset by siniil.-ir troublos. Still, 
I fear should kmnv the worst at 
once, but in all. it may meniU life 
or deafh to me. I do nut cave o com- 
municate the state of my miinl tn 
fli;=iintercsted friends, frn- they are not 
i^eliable in, the.se times, — so in my 
distress I apply to you, knowing that 
you value my peace of miml. 1 
know I am asking a great dial of 
you to put aside all work ami so- 
cial pl(^asnre, to devote your time 
and attention of this question. 

I hardly dare sign my name rot- 
fear others may see this letter. 

Once more I ask you from the full- 
ness of my heart and friends'hip for 
you to decide this question: 



Do you think that Jeff will ever 
be as tall as Mutt? 

Anxiously yours, 
THE SHE-VAMP 



i'eritv halt, ci-i.kbimti.s fifti- 
i;th anmvkusary 

Ferry Hall is busily enigaged in 
preparing for the cellebration of the 
fiftiet'h anniversary of the founding 
of the school, iwhich will occur on 
October 17, IS, 1919. From Friday 
until Monday former students will 
come back from all over the country 
to take pait in the festiviiei!', Fri- 
day n;iglit there will be a reception, 
on Saturday a meeting of t^he alumni 
a.siS'Cciation, outdoor plays by stu- 
d'ents of the school:, in the evening an 
anniversary dinner at which there 
will be speeches made by people in- 
terested in the sc'hool from various 
viewpoint.s'. Among the speakers will 
be Mayor Rumsey, Dr. Wright, Mr. 
Ernest Palmer of Evanston, Mrs. 
Ciishmaii Brown, a f(H-mer teacher at 
Ferry Hall, Miss Sizer of the present 
faculty atiid Mrs. GnttTred represent- 
ing tlie alumni association. 

Ci?ngratuliary messages will be reail 
from the Board of Trustees, former 
various colleges and schools. 

The present students of Ferry Hall 
have written song's for the occasiim 
which will be> sang on Saturday eve- 
ning together with some of fhe olil 
Perry Halli songs. The celebratio-n 
will be eiuled by Vesper Services in 
fhe FeriT Hall Chapel Sunday at 
which Dr. McClure will preach. 
Since Ferry Hall is crowded to its 
utmost iMiiacity the entertainment ol' 
the guests bias been a difficult preli- 
1em luit has been solved through the 
lio-pil ality of friends of the school in 
Lake Forest, who have kindly opened 
their homes to returning pupils anil 
teachers. 



We hail .some errors in punctita- 
tion la-t issue. We haul sicveral com- 
ments oiti them too. There are a lot 
of t^hingis we do not know about thn.s'e 
plaguey llttlie marks. There is also 
I'pportittiity' for a wide difference of 
oninion as to .just which one should 
1)0 usL'd. We think the best way lo 
arrange so ever.Mine will be satis- 
fied Willi be to put ill an extra sup- 
ply, so every fellow can punctuate 
to suit himselif. Here you are. Help 
yourself am) d'istribute them as best 

suits ynu ;;; ::; 

- ??? ((( ))) W$ 

!!! $$.$ Cw@ &&&& **« 

ir the compositor has any that are 
not on this typewriter, he can supply 
those, too; these are all we have. 



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STENTOn-KUNZ 

Also earlier than usual. Frosh: 
"What time does the 12:2S leave?" 

The Kappa Sig Parrot haisn't any- 
thing oil Dr. Alice's trained sala- 
manid, which persists in climbing the 
fire-escape and serenading the Col- 
lege-Hall Professors. The salamand- 
er's ability to climb fire-escapes can 
easily be accounted! for, when it is 
recalled that last .vear it was lo- 
cated within a stone's throw of Lois 
Hall. Dr. Alliee will have to get a 
padlock for this precocious pupil, or 
he will be lial)le to get a vote of 
centsiire from the faculty. Expecta- 
tions — Mr. Troutman. 

The used-to-was Quartet made its 
first informal appearance of the year 
pa Monday e\'ening. The Alfalfas were 
in the receiving line. 

The Colleg«-Hall Knitting Society 
still ha;> its headquarters in room 
202. Prospective members may ap- 
ply and receive preliminary instruc- 
tii.'nts any week-day. 

"Slow but sure" is Johm Heinle 
Dorn's motto when it comes to dec- 
orating the College-Hall social room. 

Professor Sibley entertaijied the 
College-H.all men Monday evening at 
m ii.formal smoker. Cider of this 
.vear's vintage, and many other deli- 
cacies were served. The boys all ap- 
preciated the Profiessor's hospitality. 

Yet tliey live! Waiter: "Coffee or 
milk?" S'liphomore: "Tea please." 

Pittinger was looking for the stu- 
ilent ceuncil last week. He was very 
desirous of speaking to him. 



PERSONALS 

Hazel Scguin ex. '21, Anne Sillars 
ex. '21, and Mildred Gerlach ex. '22, 
are at Mailisoii this year. 

Maijerie McCullom ex. '21 is at the 
Ciiiversily of Chicago this year. 

iLiitli Keuyon ex. '22 is taking up 
wni-k .-It the Elgin High School. 

Eililli Wise ex. '22 is at her home 
ill Freeport, Illinois. 

Lillian SteVi ns e\. '22, is teaching 
in Linirm, X. D. 

Anna Glenn ex. '21, is teaching at 
Cutler Indiana. 

Il.irriel Davis is taking up Kinder- 
garten WMi-k at Alma College, Alma, 
Mich. 

Paul Gffenheiser ex. '21, is study- 
i!!'-,' a( i'lic University of Illinois. 

Katlieriiie Bartcl has left for her 
home on .-lec-ouiit of illness, 

Mardelle Meents has left for her 
home, 

Marion Pre.-ton spent the week end 
ato her home in Chicayo, 



THE STENTOR 




RED CROSS ASKS 
FOB VOLUNTEERS 



Two hundred and fifty thousand 
volunteer workers will be needed in 
the Central Divi- 
sion to conduct the 
third roll call of 
the American Red 
Cross, November 2 
to 11. 

An appeal la 
iuade from Cen- 
tral Disisiun headquarters in Chicago 
calling upon the men and women of ev- 
ery community to enlist for the ten-day 
campaign to secure dollar annual 
memberships. With approximately 
600 cliupters in the division, this num- 
ber will allow for about -100 workers to 
a cha|)ter. Every chapter will be a 
recruitirg office for these v/orkers. 
Workers Will Wear Badges. 
Each worker will be supplied with a 
badge proclaiming that the wearer is a 
volunteer worker for the Red Cross 
The success of the campaign will, in 
reality rest upon the shoulders of 
these volunteer workers, as the third 
roll call cannot be a success without 
a complete organ!":, lion. 

The purpose of tne campaign is to 
obtain, as nearly as possible, a univer- 
sal enrollment in the lied Cross as an 
expression of confidence in the past 
performances of the Red Cross and a 
reaffirmation of allegiance to the prm- 
ciples which will guide its work in the 
future. In order to do this every man 
and wonian in the territory of each 
chapter must be asked to join the Red 
Cross, and this will require the serv- 
ices of hundreds of workers. The 
Central Division wants at least 4,000,- 
1)00 enrolln iits for 1920. Special 
stress during the campaign will be 
placed upon the annual one-dollar 
memberships in order to mak-e the roll 
call an appeal to all the people. 
Past Campaigns Successful. 
Success has attended all Red Cross 
activities in the Central Division in 
the past. In the the last war fund 
drive this division, v.'itli a quota of 
$13,800,000, subscribed ?21,307,0O2.88. 
In the second roll call, more than 4,- 
000,000 were enrolled. 

The money quota for the Central 
Division is $3,000,000. Throughout the 
nation, the Red Cross will enlist 20,- 
000,000 members and raise .?15000,000 
to carry on its international, national 
and local work. 



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Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



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The Federal System of Bakeries 

HAS OPENED A MODERN RETAIL STORE AT . 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 

All kinds of Bread, Rolls and Coffee Cake 
Are Baked Before Your Eyes 



ETJc j LAKE FOREST 

CALVERT FLORAL CO. PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICE 

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Films Left Before Noun one day 

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Afternoon at Four. 



TBB STENTOR 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures of the new year are (1) a new 'Professor of Economies, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (i) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Okib. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territury. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 to $400 for men; |350 to |150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFUCK 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, IllinoU 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 



Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

OfBce Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g^ 



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Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectioiiera 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL A T 

CNeill's Hardware Store 

U HEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

Kiilielslcy 

C lotliiiig aiifl 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Special 'y 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

i; /'J />o inj:i'Aniixo 

Phone TlS) Wi^stern .^v^. Lake Forest 





TENTOR 



OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, t ILLINOIS. OCTOBER 24, 1019 



NUMBER 4 



PROMINENT 

ENGLISHMAN 
TALKS IN CHAPEL 



The Right Honorable John William 
Gullanct, Memiber of Parl.iament since 
liKli; and Junior U>vd of the Treas- 
ury under the A^quibli government, 
iTipoke to tlie combiined stiiulent l>odie^ 
of tine CoUliege ainidi the acad€m>' in 
Ohapel last Friday. The chapel peri- 
cidl was extended to 'half an hour, which 
tiimie proved all too short. Mr. Gal 
land talfcecV simply and well, a combi- 
nation of qualiities w'liich we arc told 
is quite commiani in public speaking 
in England tliough rare in America 

He first compared Brltisli and 
Amieicain methods of government, 
pointing out the difference.- witli con- 
siderable skiill,. "Naturally" he said, 
"each of uf think? Ivs own the bet- 
ter." 

Then he dwelt for a few momenta 
on Mr. Lloyd George, Mr. Balfour. 
and Mr. Asquith. Of the latl-r In 
gave some intimate nersonal details, 
in regard to his family, and an ap- 
preciation, of his micrits n? a states- 
man. 

Of the league of nations lie said 
in siubstance, that there niiut l)0 :i 
league, if not the league. In chisins. 
he expressed as his sincere.-it wi?! 
tlhaiU the bond of friendship between 
Great Britailn and tihe United States 
might be ini:'re;i singly and permanent 
l;y strengtihened. 



Y. M. V. A. JFEETIXCi 

The firstt regular imieeting of tlie 
Coliliege Y waig h.e!id lia.s* Thursiila,.\- 
evening at seven o'clock in the Cal- 
vin Dur,anid Com:mo'nis. A good number 
wa.s in ait'teinidance amd the address 
giiven by Rev. Drake of Elgin was 
greatly enjoyed and appreciiated liy 
all. He sipoke at length upen "Tlie 
Word Problems," aiud gave to tlie 
college studients their duties as true 
American mien. A cabimet meeting 
was held immediiately following the 
Y. M. C. A. Meetiing and a Y con- 
ference was helld on Tuesdy even i nig 
of fihiis 'w«ek at the home of Dr. 
Wright, ait w'hich meetings plaiii? for 
the ensiulnig year were discussed and 
mapped oiut. The next regnlar Y. M. 
C. A. nieetinig wilil be held at the 
Commons on next Thursday evening, 
October 30th. 



GIRLS TENNIS 
TOURNAMENT 

AT KNOX 



liiikc ToK'st Hiiiiiici'-ii|> in Siimlcs 
and Diiiililcs 

The first intercolilegi.nte tennis 
tourn,anient for the girls of the 
"Little Five" colleges took place on 
Satuulay, Ocloper the ISth at Galos- 
iiurg. The Lake Forest team, com- 
liosed of Florence Russell, single.s, 
.-ara Pislver, siingles amid doubles, and 
Beatrice Woitliiley, doubles, went 
down with Miss Coa'n Friday after- 
noon, and were entertaimod during 
rlieir .-lay at the girliS dormitfiry of 
Knox College. Saturday morning at 
ten tlic drawings were raad>e on the 
rouits de'icrmining the order of 
miatclve.^ and the byes. Only three 
colleges entered teams, Moiinioatli 
sending two girls. Miss Meredith and 
Viijs Douglas, and Knox putting on 
Miss A.erdian and Miss Brouhard, 
oatli one of the four girls playing 
ijoth ,-iingles and double.s. In the 
..!oul)les, Lake Forest drew the bye, 
'jid in singles .Monmoutli. The sing- 
les was however changed later to a 
I'nund robin tournament giving each 
college the opportunity to play both 
if the others, and requiring less 
lime tlian the regulation elimination 
tournament. Thie competition sitartod 
with the doubles between Knox and 
Moiiinnulh. which resulted in a vict- 
jiy fer the former, with a score of 
Ci-i, S-G. La.to in the afUernoon thi 
uoulil'es finials were played off, 
Kr.'ox ngaiuHt Lake Pore.st. It was 
a (iliose maiteh parttcularly in the 
iliird sot, Laike Forest 'having won the 
first with the eaisj- score of 6-1 and 
loist the siocond set 6-2, a change of 
tactics witlhout siufficie'nt experience 
in nine new s4:yle beiing largely re- 
.sporlHitole Por tibis ki.=js. In the third 
-( t Lake Forest started in the lead, 
but soon fell to the position of liold- 
'lig lilieir own. Almost every point 
was vigorously contested so that it 
W.-1S impossiible to fort«^ll the oiit- 
conre as the set progre-i-ied. During 
illie playing the girls were in compe- 
tition with a hiilarions foothalil gani'e 
r, few yards disant, a bnrkiiiig dog, a 
racing horse and an aeroplane. The 
finisihing sta-w was the di^ti'action of 
Miss Worthley's wpt"!). whicili kept 
(Continued on Page Two) 



RED AND BLACK 
MEETS THEIR 
FIRST DEFEAT 



The Red a;nd Black, crippled by 
the absence of Johnson, Morley, and 
Framborg, met the Chicago Y. M. C. 
A. College in Chicago last Saturday 
morning, and were taken into camp, 
til I I II. Willi a weak line, Coach 
Derby had' to rely upon a defensive 
game, but the Y nren were soon 
able to find the weak spot and made 
consistent gains through the center 
of our line. 

With only one tiouchdown scored in 
the first h.ilf, the Y vets came back 
with a rush in the second half, and 
largely through line plunges succeed- 
ed in putting two more men over 
the goal line. Lake Forest attempted 
^o open up in this half, but could 
not prevent the Y linemen from 
breaking through. Eddly gave the 
Y a scare when he caught a long 
p;iss in the finial period, but fumbled 
when tackled. Xiwr Sickle was 
knocked out in this 'half and Cas- 
.ieiis w^ent to left guard. Johnson took 
Lngner'B place in the final period. 

The line-up: 

Hause R.E. Jame.?, Beard 

Legiier, JoihinsonR.T. Morrow 

Reos R.G. Ellis 

Hale C. Bland 
Van Sickle, 

Cnsjens L.G. Patrick 

i;us.-:eW, L.T. Rasmussen 

MfC:dley L.E. Bowman 

Granzow Q.B. Johnson 

Eddy R.H. Stauffer 

•':',ergni L,H. Toutjhton 

Woods, Cnpt. F.B. Hess 

Tonclidiewns— Hess (2), Stauffer 
Goal frem touchdown — Stauffer. 



i'LTiMu: m<;ht (m T(H5E1{ 31 

At a meeting hold Tuesday noon, 
liie Student Council set Fridiay, Oc- 
tr.bcr 31 a-i the date for pledge night. 
On that night all freshmen are to 
1)0 in their rooms between 7:0n and 
sitli), when tliey will receive sealed 
invitations from the fraternities and 
return soalied answers. The other 
gieneal rules adopted were that all 
frrshm'Oiii are to eat dinner at the 
Commons on that night, and that 
there is to be no rushing done after 
6:00 P. M. pledge night. 



THE S T E N T O R 



TOURNAMENT AT KNOX 

(Contiiiiued from Page One) 

showing her that Che game must end 
qui.cklli' or sihie could never catch 'her 
train hamle. The m-atcji. finia.ll'y ended 
wlCh the hard won ficore of 8-6, in 
favor of Knox. 

The PJingliea matcliea started witli 
Lake Forest pllaiying each of tihe col- 
lieges. Mdsis Pisilier puts up a gplendlid 
game against MIsjS Me<rdia-n of Knox 
who li'ad been quite oamfiident of win- 
ning, defeiatlng hier 6-4, 6-4. This 
was the most Interesting of al'l the 
Eiingles matiches with greater vari- 
ety and more briilJ iancy of pliays. 
Mlsa Fisher had an adlvaotage in be- 
ing lighter aaiid swifter than her op- 
ponent, scoring liargiely on her plao- 
i'nig amid ovei''heiad liobs when Miss 
Merdiian was up at the net. Miss 
RuBSie'll piliayed Miss Douglas of 
Monmouth at the same time win- 
niing after a longier and steadier 
period of pliay at 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. Mon- 
mouth and Knox tlhen had a singles 
contest between Miss Meredith and 
Miss Brouhiard. Whillie fhie latter 
was superior in form and repertoire 
of etrolties, Mi's)3 Meredith was re- 
mairkaMly quick and sure,, covering 
the entire court. She worn the match 
at 9-7, 6-2. Later thiese same strong 
points won her t'hie fimals against 
Fllorenice Russellt-. Mi.^l^ RusBiell won 
the first se* easily, but Hater lost 
steadily, weairiine.sis being hier chief 
ad\rer.S'ary. The morniing had been 
Eb cold alnd frostly that all the 
pillaij'erig except those on the court 
bad been thoroly dhillHeld, an.d es- 
peoialliy she. The score stood 1-6, 
6-2, 6-3. This match was the last 
of the long progra.m finishing a'bout 
6:00 o'clock. The referee of the day 
was Mr, E. M. Hollliand, a Galesburg 
maini, who has won maniy tennis 
c'hampionships at variiouia times. 

To s'uim up the contest then, Mon- 
moulih won first place in th'e singles, 
and third in the doubles, Knox first 
in the c'loublles aind thiird in tliie aing- 
Jies, ainic'j Lake Forei t second iin both.. 
The day's work showed excellent 
teninlis tlhroughout with splendid 
spirit of good srportLsmaiisbip on every 
side. 

In conclusion I feetl that like a 
doctor I should dliiagnoise the faults of 
Lake Parer.it in order that aiiiy suc- 
ceeding tournament may beneifit by 
this first one. In the fin^t place the 
players sHiowed lack of highest, phys- 
ical Pitness^ — trainii;nig in its technical 
senisie. The aetual amount of gaime.-i 
plUayed should not h'ave tired eveiw- 
onB — I Include our opponejnta as weld, 
for some of them were more tired 
than our girlsi — out as completely 
as they did. The trouble lav of 



course in I'ate hours for days previ- 
ous, anid In umsystematic and irregu- 
!iar living. There ilsi no reiason. why, 
if girla eniuer intercollegiate contests, 
or in fact any sort of atlhlletlc event, 
thiey should not keep the same sort 
oif trainJmig that men do in slmiliar 
circumatainlces. In the woman's col- 
Iieige.g in tihe East aU piliayers on 
teami=l are required to keep training 
for three weeks before a coimpeti- 
tion, this tra4',niing comsistaiig of going 
to beid at 10 and .staying tihere till 
6:30, c.f rei.5ting 20 minutes during the 
day, eating nothi:ng between meals but 
fruit, eating three regular mealls a 
dlay iwith no ca.ndj', tea or coffee al- 
lowed, and taking a cold plunge every 
mornilnig. This sort of llife giets tIhe 
pKayers in tihe best sort of trim for 
the coming contest.. 

In the second place, there was in- 
.S'U'fficient preparation, especially in 
the dlouble-s play. The shortness of 
tiniie, aniid Jupiter Pluvius were pa.rtjy 
i'espon.9ible, but not wholly. Doubles 
play requires the highest sbrt of 
team work — therein lies much of its 
benefit — and time and practice allone 
can gain this. 

And ftnaWy tihere was a division of 
i:nter©st at Ijhe time of playing. No 
one can win a hard contest who does 
not devote himse'lf whole-heartedflly 
to the wininiimg of the same. 

Hence intercoiiegiate athlietics to 
be successful, aind worth.x- of Ijeiing 
Qcir.ltinued, muist demand a strict 
ayi.'item of training for eligibility, and 
faithfulness and diOvotion in practice 
and playimig. Such athletics offer tre- 
mtlim'.ioua opportunities in the develop- 
mlpint of character and' discipline if 
properly carried out. This experi- 
ment fiiiould thereifore be of great 
value to alll i(he participating colleges 
and I hiope may be the first of many 
tennis tournaments. 

KATHERINE C. COAN 



CHANCai; IN STKNT(M{ IJOARD 

Because of iiis otiier duties,, which 
iincl'udie a heaviy schediule of school 
work besides tennis and tlie orgainiza- 
tion of tllie Gliee Club, Ray Moore has 
g!v«n up his position on the editorial 
boand of Thie Stentor. He will con- 
tilnue to contribute 6he column bead- 
ed "Is Thiat So?" Leonard Holden, 
'20, has been chosen by tlie board 
to take Ray's place. 



Ovenvorked 

'22— The more I read on the sub- 
ject the le-i=t I seem to kiibw about 
It. 

Prof. — I see you have been reading 
a great deal. — Chapparal. 



IS THAT SO? 

Gu.si=i,e Torreyson is very much put 
ouit over the fact that Professor Sib- 
lley wrote on her Ehgli'lh paper that 
she did not have any style. Prof. 
SibHtey may be riglht, for It was only 
llaisit week thiat I heard Senator Cox 
of College HaM say, "The Lake For- 
est girls aint got no style." 

Theaie will) be no more fires at 
Colllege Hall according to the an- 
nouincemnt made Ini chapel last Mon- 
day. The boys over there haven't 
liearned how to act at a fire. 

Someone ought to inform that 
fresinman woman who this RSVP 
person is tihat sihe is going to the 
dance with. 

Thi,^ Eddiy boy is sure a sensitive 
guy; he don't like to have the fresh- 
men wink at him u'lven they pass 
him. And for th love of Mike! don't 
wave a hiandkerebief at him. 

Robertson didn't get enough gas 
wlliile he was iji the "big fight," so 
he hag to go to the hospital at Port 
Sheridan every now and then and get 
a llittlie more. 

Don't you ever start anytlbing with 
this man B'urniap, for he will raise 
you five every time. 

One Prof, tells us that heaven Is 
a place for comfort and tIhe "bad 
pllace" is good for company. 

The Rho Gammas are ordering 
pins? Better get your order placed. 

Somebodly tpok t|he French emblem 
from Van's roou to Chicago Saturday. 
Pliease retui-'n. 



(iARRRiv PLANS 

Ml'. Troutmian is planning to have 
I'he Garrick Ollub produce "A Pair of 
Sixes" sometime this fall. This 
p!ay I'an la year in New York City 
and Irad a very successful run in 
Chiieago two years ago. He also 

hopes to stage a College vaudeville 
before Christmias. We feel sure that 
botlh tliese undfertaklngs will be suc- 
cessful under Mr. Troutman's able 
leiadership. 



Ray McAllister and Jack Carr 
sifiopped overnight last week. They 
are driving Mac's Cadillac 8 through 
to California, wlhere Mac will attend 
Leiand Sllainford. Jack had not de- 
cided ,Unt what he would do. 

Tom says that when he goes to a 
dance and draws a girl he likes, 
she's imposed on; if she likes him, 
lie's impo-red on. 

Sclilattsczyx Van Sickle and Knutt- 
S'Cyx Hall visited Kappa Sigma Sat- 
urday. 



Patronize our advertisers. 



Modern profiteering — Coach Djrby 
and his Heads I win. Tails you lose 
bets. 



THE STKNTOR 



MEN 1;<>SK IN TENNIS 

While tllic women's tennis team 
iwaa losing to Knox col It-go, the 
mens' tiemnis team also wore camuig 
thru the smialll enil of tlie horn im 
their game wTth Knox on tTio home 
Courtis. The games were only prac- 
tice gaimles, but tlhey w"ere a;b'!e to 
tlhow botlli isichools just what they 
had in the way of nvaterial for the 
games in tihe spring. Weihl and 
Swoop rep3'epieinit»?cl Knox; Morire nnil 
Atano for Lake Forest. Alano put up 
a ciiaclving good ga.me, but was al- 
way;d on tihc defensive. AlaiiiD is a 
very ateady player and with a little 
more hnnwledge of the game, h will 
make a 'goodi imember of the tenn:is 
teami. Moore played under a handi- 
cap, as he was swPfeni'ng w^ith a bad 
rib: com-iequelnt.lV lie did not play the 
game he i« capable oif. The doubles 
show Hack of practice on the part 
of Lake Forest, how"ever Knox had to 
fight h-ard to take t'he bacon. If 
tlie girls encountered as good sports 
araoinig the Knox players as tdie men 
diid, thy were indteed fortuinnte. Too 
mue^h cannot be said in reference to 
the good spiriit) s/hown, by the Knox 
team. Dr. EUingwood refereed the 
matchica a'-d -sati-fiod everyone con 
cermed. 



Y. W. INSTALLATION 

A very pretty Y. W. instaHation 
ceremony wias hielid last Tluirsidni.\- 
evening, when thirty-one new mem- 
beri3 were taikien in. The mieeting be- 
gan when the new miembei's marched 
into tihe big room carrying lighted 
candles, lied by the President, Ruth 
Baihlert, who had a much larger one, 
sig.nifying tihie "Light oif Service." 
During the ceremony the smalle'* 
canid'lles, the lights of self, were 
b'lowin out ainid were reHghted by tliif 
"Light of Service." The pledge was 
repiEiaittedl and sii.gned wlien each giiM 
received a white rosie, signifying 
purity. 

Flora SOhiattuck deliigihiVed evei'vone 
with her singing after which mem- 
bers of the cabinet gave short talks 
on their particular work. Helen 

Sandi;ri?, vice-pesident, gave a gen- 
eral idea of what the devotional 
meetings for thie year will be like. 
Ruth Kennedy, chiairman of tlio 
social service committee, made a re- 
ouest for all girlB to help her com- 
mittee In the muc'n needed social 
and relief work. Flora Schattuck, 
chairman of the World-Felilowship 
committee gaife an idea of what her 
committee will do. while Vera Petti- 
grew, chairman of tihe social com- 
mittee, promised many good times 
during the year. 




HEAD^IASTER MATIIEK 

;\t tli:e risk of making the Stentor 
[■all. or Mathery we continue this week 
;lie r.amals of the Matlier family, with 
the .statemient that Charles C. Mather, 
1 I, hia« gone to Mesa, Arizona, to 
ake the heaidmiastersihip of the E\ans 
cliodi there. It will be remembered 
that he was master in German and 
Rnglish in this sdhool for the year 
ifter his graduation. We li-appen to 
kiUow that his mew position does not 
)U.-. lo get him back there ever since, 
■ind at last, retiring from active 
itliarge of the school, he has miade 
\Ir. Mather the commanding officer. 
lOierret Krucgi'r '1.') has also been a 
ina.-ter in the school for two years 
:'iiiid may go back for a time tihis 
'vintcr. Lake Forest has decidedly 
inadc good, thanks to thr,-*e mien, in 
lirt (|uarler of Arizoini,a 

For riic (iresent student body it is 
lot necessary tn go into particuhars 
■i.b;;'Ut Mr. Matllrer formerly. Upper- 
-,'ia3.='micn know him as playwright. 
■ita\go m.a.nia.ger, ".■Jitar" Comedian, and 
r.ttorly as an .ithlotic coacli getting 
resuVs by quiet courteous met'hodis 
lliru euiergy and .apparently during 
Mio past ;Munimcr all the students. 
injw and olid,, have been getting at 
fcasl wco'iily communiications from 
liiui. In all his loyal effective 
■,vi:rK for t'lie college he has been 
imseilisli, ful'l of initatlve, cheerful 
—always keeping himself and those 
lifint him Ik good temper. 

His friends will be interested to 
know that Mr. Evanis has been anxi- 
mcan his aliandoning his dra- 
matic wor1\. Hisi school year erds 
in May and he will con.sequonUy 
li.avc at least five monthiS here each 
summer for working up material and 
'j^eltinig into the market, more oppor- 
tunity t'ha.n he has heretofore had. 
We hope that Lake Forest will al- 
v.ayg be a principal "control sta- 
tion" in his journey- f- and fro be- 
tween the de.sert a -d the Rialto. 



i>iS< ISSION Vhlli HOLDS 

FIRST iMEETINO 

On Wed'netsidiay evening of last 
v.i'ck-. (!he Discussion Club opened 
it.') year with a lively hour and a 
half, crammed full of debate and dis- 
cussion. There iwas not a dull minute 
from the tinne McFerran fipened the 
meeting with roll-cnll to the abrupt 
motion of ;i,djournheiit. 

The topic was an interesting one: 
"Tlie Rights and Wrongs of the Steel 
Strike." Bill Taylor, who hail.-i from 
Ga|-y, started off with a few words 
telling of his personal experienc-^es. 
rc seems that BUS has had time, 
during his varied career, to spend 
a, litlle tiime as worker and foreman 
in tliie millls 'himself, so his word,s 
had great weight with the rest of 
us. But Dick Johnson, who knows 
the contractor's game hy heart, 
started out to tell us wiicroin the 
uinions work harm to the working 
man as well a^i to the emplo.ver. 
This view promptly found its oppon- 
ents, and the discus'sioni was on. 
Nearly every one of the members 
presient took part, and S:30 came 
around with suprising rapidity. The 
mieeting was promptiliy adjourned, 
and the Phi Phi rooms closed their 
doors on oni" of the most interesting 
meetings of the year.. 

The Club will m,oet the first and 
tliird WcdJies.daysi of each mointh. 
Thia members as chosen for the 
present year are: 

McFerran, Armstrong, Woods, Her- 
rcke, Schreur.s, Boswortlh, Tucker, 
Marsh, Kuntz, Taylor, McColley, 
Holden, Maplesden, R. Moore, Stew- 
art, Leonard. .Johnson, Montgomery, 
and Legner. 

The following officers were elected: 
Prcsidient, McFeiran: Vice-Presidents, 
Aririistrong .and Woods. 



Carlton H. Casjens, Horace Horton, 
William J. Buirchill, Fred E. Bates, 
E. Lyle Bate-i, William Wilson, and 
William Wildeman were the week- 
eiiid guests of Digamma. 

Harold Eickhoff, the worthy foot- 
ball miaiiagor, has been on the sick 
list tHiis week. 

Herschel Johnson enertained rela- 
tives from Canton. III., over the 
week -end. 

Boh Framberg spent the week-end 
wiith Digamma and attended their 
Tenth Annual High-Jin.x Saturday 
evening. 

Mondiay evening — Coach Derby's dog 
and Prof. Troutman's cat pay a visit 
to Bobby Burns. 11:.'30 a.nd all was 
well!! 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Hori'st i'dllege. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Rajmond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor \V. R. Bridgman 

l-'aeullyand Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



A NEW BRAND OF P1,P 

has been exhibited on the camipus 
this year. Surely It isn't much like 
thiait "good olid Lake Forest pep" that 
we have been lueiaring so miuc'h about 
of late. Some returned students 're- 
member tihe diays when the spirit of 
Lake Forest hadi iniade it famoufi and 
won for it a name to bQ proud of 
among other colleges'. These peiople 
alomg with tihe faculty have been hop- 
ing for a return of that olid time at- 
mosphiere on tihe campus but so far 
thia year the brand of spirit e.xhibit- 
ed dloeisn't .seem to liave miuch to com- 
mend it. 

Now let's stop tryiny to kid our- 
selves along into thinking -we are a 
real colliege with am ideal spirit but 
Let's be good isiports and look the 
facts squane in Chie face. Some how 
we get tired) of alii this vague tiailk 
about "pep" amd "school spirit", it's 
so theoretical aind highsoundiiug. 
What can. we do to have it? and what 
good wil.l it dio us whien we get it? 

Answers to tfhe first two ques/tions 
cam best bia given by concrete iWus- 
tratioinisi. On Saturday iast we pliayed 
oft a teJnmis tOiUimameiit with Kiuox. 
You Glidiii'iii know it.'? I don't wnirder 
No aninouncement in chapel about it 
— and say why can't one chapel per- 
iod out of over one hundred and fifty 
be given to explaining the plan of 
'iatercoil.liegial'e eonitests in the "Littlle 
Five?" And the Stentor didn't even 
mention the fact that a toui'nnment 



was coming off on Saturday when it 
shoulid have come out with blazing 
headlines to the effect that ■ a big 
event of Clue coMiege year was to be 
puilifd off anid siupport was expected. 
Saturdiay aftei'rtoon saw about a doz- 
en people lined up on the courts — 
not so many but thiat they could all 
get on tihe space between the two 
courts without even interfering with 
th!0 prognesH of either game. We 
ali.'O noticed thiat the ;mien mostiy oc- 
cupieid comfortable chairs while the 
CO c'dls reposied on the grass. Ju'.st 
how the cihairs got out onto the 
tennis court we don't know but we 
can bear te.sjtimony to the fact that 
they were much ill evidence on the 
courts on Sunday afternoon. 

Now I wioiulld suppose tlhiat at a real 
pep meeting (he team Chamiselwes 
would be presient woulldln't you? Itls 
a pity to give the Fros'h such im- 
possible tasks as "get him frosh" 
when he is over in the dorm or 
down town dating. I imiagine the ob- 
ject of a pep meeting is to make the 
fellows feel Khat we are backing 
them, to cheer them on and to let 
thiem know we appreciate what they 
are doling for Lake Forest. Now how 
aire we going to dto that littlle thing if 
the ieillows areno' ti vere f'-Kmiaelne', u 
isin't any fun to yel'l to the moon, 
BesideB if the team reallly desires 
the support of the student body it 
woul'd help out worlds to have just 
a word or two from each member. 
It's just a point in politics you know 
to hiave the hero present when iwe are 
there to worship hiirai. And say gii'ls 
a pow-wow is I'eal'ly lobs of fun if 
you'll forget the date you're going 
to have on the way honiie long enough 
roallLy to jo8n into thie thing. A 

rumor to the effect hl\at t'hiiee faculty 
members 'were especially asked to 
oome has baen reported but we were 
iible to find only one actually pres- 
ent. Now see hene, we are going to 
oall your blluff on that present in 
spirit ar proxy stuff. When the next 
pep meeting comes alloing let's have 
Uhat team out if we have to do it by 
maim strelrjgth and awkiwardness, let 
the faculty lend dignity to the oeca- 
I Hion and the girls some real pep, 
make it short anid snappy. Let there 
be a definitie purpose for our pep 
meetlng-9 and go after them like you 
I'.T "Phiycihie'is" quizzes. 



Tin: COLLE(JE SONGS 

Appai'eniMy the only college songi; 
anybodiy can think of when there is 
occn^ion iis "Lake Fore'=t Dear Our 
A'Jniia MaPler," genera.l'y linown as 
"The Colilege Song" Wo have two 
others which we should like to hear 
more often. One is "To .\lma Mater," 



Bet to tune 420, which we have heard 
only once this year. The ot'her be- 
gins "Here's a Song for OM Lake 
Forest." Thiig one we have not heard 
sung publicly since school opened, 
aimd we have missed it. It is tune- 
ful amd would afford variety. Of 
course it i.s not appropriate for ail 
occasions, but there are times w'hen 
it could be usied, and should! be used 
I'll order tlhat it might not be for- 
got tien. 

We hiave hear rumors that we are 
to 'h'ave a new sang — one with 
enough ginger in it to be used at 
gamies. We hope this rumor will pan 
out, for we need something of the 
kind. And while iib may not be ad- 
visabile to hun-y t'he artistic tempera- 
menitl, we iwiU isuggest tihiat it would 
be da.=iirable to hiave the new song 
competed for the homecoming on 
November first. 



AND THE PEBBLES WERE 
DIAMONDS 

The fai-imers of Kimberley were 
disisatis'fied'. They said tihey couldn't 
miake a living from their farms. And 
all the time thieir children in the 
fields were pteying with' diamonds. 

But they didn't know. They thought 
tlbey were peb'l>les. They died poor. 
Lots of people are just Mke those 
Kiimiberliey farmers. They look for op- 
portunity with a tele'scope, in some 
far-away place, when it is really so 
close thiat they could reach out their 
hianids amd graisp it. 

Don't miss t)he valuable columns of 
the Steintor and above all don't miss 
the adv'ertisemenls. They tell not 
only of valines that you might never 
know if they were not there to guide 
you, but also represent the financial 
backbone of our college publications. 
Read the Sbenitor!!! 



CONSIDER THE ACORN 

It is a nut, yet w'hen it falls from 
the tree it has wrapped up In its 
shell ain nnaltierablie resolution to 
produce an oak tree. 

It is a nut, but it needs only the 
einvironmient of earth, warmth and 
moisture, to accomplish its job. 

It is a nut, but it never produces 
a string bean vine, a lemon tree or 
a huckleiberry bush. 

It is a nut but it specializes on 
oak trees ajiid never fails. 

You, too, miay be a nut, but if you 
specialize you will win. 

You, too, may be a nut, but if you 
have the acorn's same high purpose, 
the iflame firm resolve, no human 
power can stop you. 

Consider Che acorn; it, too, is a 
nut!! 



THE STENTOR 



EVKKVOXK OIT I'OH 

THE AIONMOLTH (iVMK 

Lake Forest ain't wliat she used 
to be? What, no pep? Yes, just as 
much pep, just as rtiiuch spirit as 
ever — oiiliy not organized. Let's pull 
together. Tlve big issue now is 
fijotball. For the next six weeks, 
■H-e wjil^l Ivave footlial.l constantly be- 
fore us. Champioini-ihip of the Little 
Five is wliat we want. And ehampi- 
ons'hip is wlvaiB we will get if wt 
conti:n;ue to give -ciur team tilio sup^ 
port tilvey have been getting the 
la-t couple of weeks. Have you no- 
ticed the girls out on tihe field? We 
have, and it is a fine siglit, too. 

This Satiurday, we play Monmoutli 
Clin our own gmun.ds. Tlie rooting 
body will he out en nia.ss*>, lettint 
out aM the pent-up energy tliat ha-- 
been accumuliating during the two 
weeks the team has played awny 
from home. If tlie entire student 
body get.'i dUlU on She field before tin 
game,, we can start our boys off on 
the riglh't foot. The bleachers are 
out tJiere for a. purpose — to afford a 
suitiable place where we may viBw 
the entire gaime and vet be together. 
If we :i'" l')gethfr, we ran send tlie 
old colillege yelte ringin.g ncro.ss the 
field, putting llife and pep into the 
team and putting spirit back into 
us. EVERYONE OUT FOR THE MON- 
MOUTH GAME! 



WOULD IMnVIOR AND THE 
VOhLVUT. MAX 

"Show me a family of readers and 
I ^vill allow you the family who 
rules t(he worllil." said Napoleon. The 
greatest niii'iitiaristi* Header in the 
history of France, if not in the entire 
work), realiize<l tliio imiiortiance of 
the spiritual in tlve life of man. If 
we taliie a few momemts to look back- 
war.'l we will ea.slly remember that 
in all! tlliie great things of tliis life ft 
has been the u-nseen rather than the 
.<;'Een tbrat'hrs played the grea'er part; ■ 
the material tihi,n'gs wliich seem so 
all important to the majoa-ity of us 
are in reality fair less important thaln 
tlvcy appear to be. 

"Ultimate power is spiritual. It 
cons'ists, not in l>ein,g aljle to force 
otlierS' to liive for you, but in living 
so a.s to Head othieirs to live better 
Lives for tlvemse'l'ves." 

"He whic would save his life shall 
lose it, and he who givetli his life 
shall save it." 

"The first shial! be last, and the 
last shal;l be first." 



Wli.at is yo.ur colliege education dn- 
ing foa- yo.u?' Yo«r colileye education 
it th.c bigge-t tihing in your present 
life and will bo the greatest factor in 
dieternrining the course of your later 
MPe. Yo.'U are eitiher developing in 
your' e!;P great posisibiliities for world 
power, for power to govern others, 
Oil- .you are graduallly beaklng down 
what power you liave until you will 
a.t Hast become a miere machirie to go 
only at the bi'didiinig of otliers. The 
s.a.'ddiest thiin.g in tlie w'orlld is the 
fact that none of us can .=tand still. 
We must a 111 either progressi or drift 
backwardl=. Are you d'eveliop'ing a 
.greater cip-atcity for power oi' are you 
allln'n-ing what power you have to 
.grow wfeakicr and weaker through 
hick of use? 

Your attitude toward the material 
tlhings of jour colllege liife wild have 
a great deal to do with the answer 
to thii.^ question!. If you are taking 
up n. coflicigs course for the mere pur- 
po-e of a;ppend1ng to your naine a dei- 
gree, or for the sole pu-i-pose of mak- 
ing yourseillf a bed of roses uoin whiah 
you moiy diream away a worthless 
f|xi..-tienice, you liave chosen the wrong 
cciurse. But, on th-e otlrer hand, if 
vou liave come to coilillege with a 
fixed puiTios'e to make the most of 
your work, to Live together harmoni- 
ru--i]y wifh other people, to come in 
contact with thief probllems of others 
pu'tj to heiltp them to soOive the.sie prob- 
liemtS', tlven yiour coMege life will be 
of some va.llue not only to yourselif 
but a.lso to the world at large. You 
wi'il gain >iou.r reward in satisfaction 
tihjit you wi]l have in leading a. life 
that is i-eaily worth whilte. 

Studients often scrtHf at thie.se at- 
tempts ait idieaillisini! and sentimentali- 
'sni .IS "goody-goody" bunk. If th'e:-ie 

■mc -T^'offers would onily look into 
tliioir histories, they would find t'liat 
it is upon aiiil tjhici.s;e things of spiritual 
A-aluo tliat thie world has beeh pro- 
gircpsing t^irong*hout the centuries.. 
Eduo.ition slioul/d be broa<:le.n,ing, amd 
tliie colfipge man who.^e miiind! ii=^ hani- 
pif>red liy peBty predjuions is still in a 
I'liniitive sitate of education. Spirit- 
u.il and menbail growth are necessary 
li the liil>erali-m':ndied, well edaicateid 
niian. 

"Free tlioug'lit and an opem miml 
are t'lie fir.=it reqiuisites of a real ed- 
ucntinn." 



( (M>K MAY LKVVK 

Consternation reignisd supreme on 
tliio soutli campus Moniday, when it 
was toairned that the cook at tlie 
Commonis might leave. It seems 
tliat an ini.-ipectLon of the kitichen and 
I he icebox had been niadle without 
consulting her, anid that sihe deter- 
mincil to quit November 1. 

The Stentor goes to press too early 
foi- us to learn the outcome, but we 
simcerely hope that "Cook" will 
stay. The m;eals hia\e lieen excel- 
lently cooked this year, much bettor 
than tliey have been for several 
.\ears and are Mkely to l>e again if 
we have to get a mew cook. 

Tlio opiniion of the waiter.s, wlio 
are in a position to see things as 
they a.ro, seemis to l:e that th'e cook 
has been inipo.sed upon. Her position 
is a very difficult one, subject to a 
great many irritations, such as too 
many bos)&e.=i, and it is not strange 
that the strain shoulid prove too 
mtich. The remedy which suggests 
itselif is tliiat tihe cook should be 
given more leeway and sihould be 
given, absoliute dominion in the kitch- 
en. 



Y. CVXTEEX WORKER TALKS 

On the aflternoon of Wednesday Oc- 
to:her 16th Miss B.llon Holt was at 
home to the college women to in- 
troduce to tlhem Mi.'iis May Willard, a 
former coillege claisismate of hers, 
who served more than one yar with 
thie Y. M. C. A. in France, Before 
returning to tlie drawing room to 
hear M.isisi Willard speak, delicious 
refrshments were served wh'ic'h were 
■cnlly the beginning of a wonderful 
a.ntennloon. To give a truly natural 
Sitting to Miss Wizard's story of her 
war experiences, she had dtecorated 
the draiwing room witli Frcncli war 
pesters whicli tol*! many a tale 
hheniselvet In her picturesque Y. M. 
C. A. uniform she vividlly dciscribed 
the lilfe of a caiiitieen worker near the 
front, whnse problems were to feed as 
many as 20,000 men in two or three 
hours, or to ma.ke l,0O0 doughnuts 
in utenisils iwit?li a capacity for .S. It 
was ii-Jdeed a pleaisture to meet Miss 
Willard, as a true soldier who helped 
win the wai', and the \vamei> of the 
college thank Miss Holt for giving 
them the opportunity through her 
kind hospitality. 



Aduice from Wa.shington to the 
Uni\'ersity of Chicago athletic de- 
partimcnt is thnt college football 
fames are no longer within the 
limits o} amusement law and are 
txempt from war tax. 



I OKd Tunk Goon .seiys that the fel- 
! low who stops .studying to congratu- 
1 late himself on getting 90 in the first 
quizz will never pass the course. 



THE STENTOR 




You prob-ab-^lly 

Do not linow it yet 

But Hen-iier-ry 'has 

Re-turnied 

Hen-ner-ry is not well, 

So 'he is coTirfiin'-ing 

Hiim-selit to his room 

This week. 

Hen-ner-ry was vis-it-ed 

By the stu-dle'nti coun-cil. 

The St'u-dienit coumi-cil is 

Ver-y in-ter-est-ed in 

Hen-ner-i'y 

I think Hen-ner-ry is worth 

Be-ing in.4ier-es(t^ed in. 

I feaive bieein told tlhat 

An-i^mals sloime-times 

Have 'hu-man in-tiel-ll-ge'nce. 

Any-liow the ones at 

Lake For-e;it h-ave. 

The Snipes here are 

Uin-ua(u-allhly gifted 

They un-der-stBind *nipe-hiunt->. 

Aind flee a-way. 

The diogs a-re even bright-er 

At least tlhey have 

Loif-ty nm-bi-tlons. 

We hiave a d»g 

In our French cliass. 

He is e-ven smart-er 

Than the pu-pils. 

He doeg not try to 

Re-cite, a.nd the 

Rest of us do. 

Hem-nier-ry ilg caAl-ing 

For Wat-er. 

I fly; 

Hias'tni-lty yours, 

LIT-TUL FE-LIX 



DIGA3IMA PARTY 



Saturday eveUiing October 19, li)19 
aoun'da of fun a'nd gayety came from 
the ex It enid of HarJan Hall where 
the Diiigainmia pinirty was in ful'l sway. 

On entering the haW, one found a 
liarge vai;ie of pink roses and ferns 
from whiiciii leiacili gue.sit was allowed 
tio cliioois one for her.=ieM. The fra- 
teruilty roomis were diecorated with 
palmis and fer'ns. As a w'hol'e tihe gen- 
erall effect was very pretty. Down- 
stairs, in a rootn decorate'd in the 
Digaimmia oolionsi, diancinig wn,s feat- 
ured to tliie strains of tha Victrola, 
which was rivalled upsitairs by "The 
Vamp" pllayed by Casjens. Our foot- 
ball stars induliged in cards. 

Last but not lieiast were the dolici- 
oius reifi'eshmenits. The hour of 

adieu oamia ail too quicklts'. 



THE DIARY OF A CHANDELIER 

Paul of Re\ere was a noble man. 
And he rode right well ere the war 

began; 
His was a tale of daring to do. 
But its not the talie I'll teH to you. 

This is the talle of a cal/mer day, 
Of soiiigg of peace, and the minstrel's 

lay; 
Perchance you silept in a moated 

tower. 
So here ia the tale, with ten tlie 

hour. 

Som'6 fooiisih lads, for a deed to do, 

Helld splvere's of tin with a winding 

screw. 
The)' first 'had toyed with a length 

of hoise, 
AHais, poor John, and his evening 

doze. 

Thesje shades of the imp ran here 
and there; 

Tliiey sihouted of fire alnd soused tlie 
j .stair. 

The Dean wias out, so our Johnnie 
j bold, 

Came striding fortli, though his feet 
I were cold. 

But I have digre;«ed, I spoke of ten, 
j OP numbered arcs In a twisting den; 
: Your wondiering grows; you wish to 
1 hear? 

Y'es, ten was tilie hour. Good niglit, 
I my dear. 



is to be made up entirely of Lois 
Ha'.'l girls. There is now a miember- 
sihip of twer»ty-fchree with the pros- 
pect of more. It is the earnest de- 
sire of the club membere to have 
evisry one available join. If you have 
any ability along that line try out 
niext Wedne.sdaiy at the regular meet- 
ipg\ Every one work to make thie 
Cliub the biggest and best club Lois 
Hall has ever had! 

The officers are: 
President Garnette Higbee 

Sec. & Treas. Vera Pettigrew 

Librarian Ruth Hendrickson 

Direcor Mr. Phillips 

'fhe meetings are held every Wed- 
nesday afternoon at four o'clock in 
the big rooim at Lois Hall. 



DARTMOUTH. 150 YEARS OLD 
OCT. 20. HOLDS CELEBRATION 



THE LOIS HALL GLEE (LI 15 



' For sieveral years the Girls' Glee 
-cliub has been made up of girls from 
The Music School, Ferry Hnll and 
Lois Hall. But this, year the Club 



Hanover, N. H., Oct. 20~Studie'nts 
and alumni of Dartmio/uth college, 
who a;!sembled in a large tient on 
the campus today to ceilebrate the 
IGOth anniversary of the college 
hieard Justice Wiendlaiil P. Stafford of 
the Supreme ooiurt of the District of 
Columbia define tlie college spirit as 
"a bold and hardy determination t(o 
cultivate and discipline our powers, 
iwitlh the aid of all that men have 
learinied before u?, and then t|o pour 
the whole stream of our power into 
the noble tasks of our own time." 

Ju-itlce Stanford spoke on "The 
College a Training School for Public 
Service." After euliogizing Daniel 
Webser and other great sons of 
Dartniioulih, he continuedi; 

"We now stand face to face with 
a neiw riddlle of thie siphinx. The 
ciue.sition it propounds is one that 
we must answer it free government 
is tlo survive. That questioini is, How 
are tliie masses of men and women 
who labor with their hand's to be 
slecured out of tlie products of their 
soil iwlvat they feel to be and will 
be in fact a fair return? Until 
We can answer t'hat question we 
shall have no peace; and if we fail 
to answer it 'we shall 'have a revo- 
lution-. 

"Our pnfetly can only be found in a 
policy that treats all men as broth- 
ers, all equally entitled to the fruits 
of tliieir labor, all equally entitled to 
raise themslelve^ as high as possible, 
eac'h in his own place williouti doing 
wrong to niay of the rest. It is the 
spirit of justice and fraternity that 
must be our guide. And' where are 
we to look for leadership if not in 
institutions such as this:" 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 

John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stati' nery. Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



'The 



ODDS AND ENDS 

Hnw Terriblel 

Prom a seuteince by :i Fros'h 
buy who was kilUoil, tMeil — ." 

Fi-osh solve bhi.s. 

Fi-oin the customs of tb* Bpyptian 
people: "If a cat iiii tlitc family dies, 
the men ciiit off their hair; if a rcl.a- 
live diles. tlie men let tlieir hair 
gronv Iiung." Suppose botli die at the 
sn.me lime? 

X (Jrci'ii CoiikmI.v in (hio Act. 

First Frosb; "Didja hear of Van's 
wciilid be pliaii?" 

RecTiimt Frosb; "Nope. \Vha,t is it?" i 

F. F. "Weil be tbiiiUi-, it oiiglit to I 
be a law that every I'aidy team to I 
speak Spain isih and be compelled to 
i-jpeak only Spanish after ten belli- 
r?very evenimg." 

S F. "That so? Whafs the idea?" 

F. F. "Oh boy! Picture friend hus- 
ijau'd pranciinig- liome lB.te at night — 
Witie compelled to speak only Span- 
isli — Her vocab only numbers "deiz 
palabna.s"— PreUty soft for Hubby, I'd 
say. 

S. F. "HaIHa! Pretty good. But list- 
I n, "Greeny," it ought to ble compul- 
sory th'at friend husband' may only ' 
speak Spanish duriny mealvsi." 

F. F. "Why so?" 

S. F. "Lmagi'ne burnt .-Iteak or so.g- 
gy biscuits- — husband woul'd have a 
nice time arranging Spanish "blank- 
cty blank" words for his wife's ben- i 
efit." 

MORAL: Aint some of our Profs 
Uhiiukin' men thouglh? 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 
Jewelry 



1»: 



Oscar A'lerisoii 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 

I. AUK I'<)KI<:N 1', . . HA., 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SULK Its YOUR BUSINES.S 

CONVIiNIENTl-Y LOCATED. 

SPLEISIJIULY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Weatfrn Ave. 

LAKE FUIUO^T, ILLINOIS 

THOIVIAS H. HORAN 

iMtiiirif/rr 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coinnmtatioii 

Tickets 

:iu iiioititi'A'rii. MKST 

Suits Catted for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cledniiiij, I'rcssintj. Kep<tiriit<i 



i k 



The Original 

MABLE SYKES" 



DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 North Ntate iSiroet 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY -CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

I'lioiic C'eiifrul S3-1 1 



THE STKNTOR 



VIA MNI NOTRS 



1S93. Robert H. Crozler has been 
elipfitO'd pre'sideiiit oif tJie University 
Oliub ait Poi'tlanldi, Oregoln, having Itong 
been aiotive to tihe affaiTs of the cl'Ub, 
and Ilattieirlly vice-presidient. "Univer?.- 
i.t(y Ollub" ife his permajient address. 

1897. Miaiupicie K. Bia.ker is now 
vice'-Prlss-iide/nt of the Guaranty Trus't 
Co., Kansas Ciitiy, Mo., in charge oi 
the bon.d diapartmeint. 

1899. Cyirus W. Kcouff is now man- 
ager oif tihe eidiucationaili department of 
the American Crayon Co., Saniduslcy 
Ohio. 

1900. Boirn August 14, 1919, to Rev. 
and Mirs. Ch.a.rlies Edward Rath of 
Taclioben, Leyte Island, P. I., a son, 
Cliar'IitD Bdiwaird Rath, Jr. 

1907. Miss Marguerite Robie'rtson's 
pernifllUieait adidiress is now 621 N. 
KeniilM'ortli: Ave., Oali Parli. Owinfg 
to the fact thiait sihe expects to be 
ahsont in Caliifornia or the South 
mucli of tliie coaiiiaug yeiar, she has 
felt obligeid to rielsiiign from the secre'- 
tary^hiip of the Ailluimni Association, to 
whioh she was elected liast siim.mer. 

1907. Howard A. Shroyer, after his 
diiscltarge from service, went back 
to Portliand, Oregon, where he is now 
wiitlh tlhia Cliark & Kendalll Co., bond 
dealters. 

1908. Miisis Joseiphine Wagner is 
teaohinig this yiear in the Genieseo, 
Hiiinois, High School. 

1919. Miss Adah Taylor 'was graili- 
uatied from Radteiiffe Oolllege in June, 
halving specialized in Economic^, and 
is tieadhing this year in, tlve Bucking- 
ham School iin Oaimibridlge, Mass., a 
private sicihool far young chi'lldren; the 
patrons of this scool are largely 
Harvard prcfe~i-i3rs anidi clergymen o/f 
the viciniity. Ad'dress, 8 Chauncy 
St., Oam,blridigei 

1912. Lesliie H. Sharp was in town 
cm Tuesi!iaiy fllie 20tih cvni his way back 
from Pranioe to hi i falher'a home in 
Rftd Dliuff, Oalif., .'■,00 Orlttenrten St., 
vvhiich Willi .sierve as his permanent 
aid'direi.'^s. He expects to return to 
work in ooimimerciai c'liiemtistry in the 
San Fra.nicisco regiion in the near 
future. As recently stated in tlhieee 
notes, he h-ais, in his nea.i'liy two 
years in Prance, seen fier\-ice in 
aerial bombing, chemical warfare, 
and llatterliy in the Rield Gross, whiere 
he was a member of one of the last 
uniills to return. He reports t'hat he 
saw a large pairt of France, and at 
this Ilasit just imiased out in being 
seint for relief work to the "Near 
East." 



Prambei'g plama to spend the week- 
end with hiis parents in Chicago. 
No aliibi i.s neoesii^iary this ti,me, Bob! 



.SLANG 

"All choice of word's i'l slang; it 
marks a class," said Fred Vinoy in 
George Eiliiat's "Miididllemarch." "Cor- 
recli Bnglislh is tliie slang of the 
prigs who write history and essayt," 

Fred Viincy was a radical young 

man aiurd the epigram quoted is 
somewhiat of an exaggeration. Never- 
theleis's, we think tJhat his definition 
appiliies tD tiwo contrasting modes of 
expre=Eilon whidh arose in connection 
with the College Hall incident. Both 
mark a class. 

"Participation in such a disturb- 
a:nice will be considiered sufficient 
groiunidb for elimination firom our 
midfeiti." 

"It you yelll fire jutt to be funny, 
you'll giet fired." 



nartmaii & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Aiulerxiin Biiililitif/. I'/iinie Siiii 
LAKE l-i}l!lisr, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 

GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



A Mother's Advice. 

There is a vein of true philosophy 
!n the Russian even of the peasant 
clas.s — though it is a philosophy that 
too easily degenerates into fatalLsra. 
In Ivan Siieaks, by Mine. Fedorchenko, 
we read of a soldier who told what 
were the parting words of his mother 
when he was called to leave his home: 

"Our liiother sent for us all. I came 
from the factory, and these were her 
uords: 

"'Live, my son, long; but live so 
that .vour life may not seem long to 
anyone else.' " 

Could a hotter sermon be preached 
in fewer words? 



Patronize our advertisers. 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

If its U;iked at HIINTOONS il-^ Huked Kisiht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones; 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STENTOR 



STUDENTS TO Bl Y 

OWN EXAM PAPER 

We IteaHii throuigh faculty cliamielis 
that in the fuibure, stiul'emts wilit bo 
expecteiil to fumisih their own paper 
for examinatioin.s. Thie truisifcees liave 
calicul.at'ed that tibe practice of sup- 
plyitig tffie paper hias cost about $150 
a year, amid they propose to do away 
with this expense; 

The stamdlaird sewed papers, such 
as have been ueied before, wiill be on 
sale at the Colitege Book Store at 
two centis each,. 



SHE RAMUl.ES 

■Puff! Chug! Bang! There it goes 
— no, wait a moment — hold your 
breath. A cloud of smoke (muchly 
like a screen usied tb hide battle- 
ships') arjss, a'nd as it clears we 
see Psyc'he with a straiined expres-siom 
on hlM uf'ualily tranquil countenance, 
fumble miajdCly with tlie brakes, wlnile 
his terrifiiled! faimiily hold tightly to 
tihie back sieat. Aha! After much hesi- 
tation and a sicreech oif misused 
"•""irs, Psyche, Mrs. Psyche, and the 
litt.le Payehea ride forth i'nto the 
world in a sihiny new Fordi. 
May. the Gods protect tlliem all! 



In an interview wiith tlie Vicp- 
Presidemt, we learn that a puncli- 
bowl, ladllie, and a haindlretl glasses 
have beeh secured for parties at the 
Instlitiute. The cost oif all tliis is 
about thirtty dollars, which is ex- 
pected to be defrayed by subscriptions 
from the students. The girls have 
alreadO" paid their sha.re, and the 
men a,re asiked tio come tlirnugh 
prompt l|y. 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 
5 




nop /or 
r WotnensiChildrcns Tumishinqs 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff 
whoe aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently 



BLOUSES, 


SEPERATE 


SKIRTS, 


NEGLIGEES, 


SWEATER 


COATS, LIN- 


GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- | 


COATS, 


UNDERWEAR, 


HOSIERY, 


BATH ROBES, 


NECKWEAR, GLOVES \ 


and Many 


Other Lines of 1 


Merchandise. 



THE INCIJ5AT0K 

by 
(Mrs. Ilcnr.y Biifl' Orpiiiffton) 

Den-r Incubator: — 

What woulld happen if our t!hought 
woulid bo read:? 

Youns, 

M. T. DOME 

Dear M. T. Dome:— 

Our faee'?i would probably be redder, 
MRS H B. ORPINGTON 

Dear Mrs. H. B. Orpingloni: — 

I am a youhig liady of refined tastes. 
Do you thiinik it rig'ht for Professor 
Burnap to swear before mie? I am 
worried. Pleaise hatch this for me. 
Temperatelly yours, 
PRUDENCE PARSONS 

Dear Prudetnee: — 

Decidiedtliy not! If he were a gentle- 
mian hia wouW liet you swear first. 

H^ B, 0. 

Dear H. B. O. 

Can you advise me? I have a fond- 
mesa for man.ual training and have 
often sharpened a penci,l and studied 
p!oine geometry. Can you tell me in 
Wliiat proifei-islwn I will make the 
givjatest siuccess? 

AnxiousiKy yours, 
REGINALD KANE 

Dear Roggie: — 

Medicine! You're a born doctor. 
H. B. O. 

Dear Incubator: — 

Please enliightien me at once, I 
dearly l;o\ie paper and seize every 
stray piece. What will this adapt 
me for? 

Youi-s kniowinglvv, 
AMBROSIA SMALE 

Dear Ambrosia: — 

Literature! You are a born poet. 
Save aMi of the paper you can for you 
wilt need it to kieiep warm later on. 

H. B. O. 

Dear H. B. O. 

I am in great diifficulty. At L. F. 
I studied onail expreission but have 
no dhance to use it. Pliea.-ie advise 
me as to the best business for my 
talenit. 

A.'i always, 
AUGUSTA WIND 

Dear Augusta: — 
Get married! 

H. B. O. 



Phone Randolph 3392 190 N. State St. 



BLOOM 

STATE-LAKE BLDG. 

CHICAGO 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



The Best Place 
to EAT \x\ 

WAUfJEGAN 

The ROOT STUDIO 

Kiiiihall Hall 
Jacktjou and ^Vabash 

Fraternity and Soroity 
Work Onr Specialty 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Automobile Supplies l:i;it-'t,';igu Tninsferred 

Seven P;is.srnt.'er Car."; lo Rent by Trip or Hour 



L. Gf^EENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 

PERFECT VENTILATION 
I ABSOLUTELY FIPE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 

DRY CLEANING DONE IN 24 HOURS 

WALTER Le FILS, Tailor 



-PHONE 881 



Dear Incubator: — 

Could you telil me who Orion is? 
Gazi.ngly yours, 

STELLA SKYE 

Dear SteMla:— 

A noted IrLstimun now in the cnmdy 
business. 

H. B. O. 



34 Forest Ave 



Phone 289 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DLERPATH 

A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BREAD CAKES ROLLS 

Hiilhduy ;iiiJ OlUir Special C;il«s to Order 



'-•TTTE STENTOR 



'ici;!i^w^v ^., -^ i MMi^wiiii^mumtimw^i^'^ifsKn^ 



•Pr 









-s4 !' 








wJ^^S^uj)^ ""ii^^ ■-'j^ii.J/iSi. 



'U^Sl^^^jg^ 



The '^Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first 
battleship of any nation to be electri- 
cally propelled, is one of the most important 
achievements of the scientific age. She not 
only develops the maximum povv^er and, 
■with electrical control, has greater flexibility 
of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, 
but also gives greater econ- 
omy. At 10 knots, her 
normal cruising speed, she 
will steam on less fuel than 
the best turbine-driven ship 
that preceded her. 



The electric generating 
plant, totaling 28,000 horse- 
power, and the propulsion equipment of the 
greet super-dreadnaught were bui^t by the 
Gensral Electric Company. Their operation 
has demonstrated the superiority cf tlectric 
propulsion over old-time methods and a 
wider application of this principle in the 
merchant marine is fast making progress. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 

Length— 624 feet 

■Width— 97 feet 

Displacement — 32,000 tons 

Fuel capacit}' — a n:iillion gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power — 28,000 electrical horse- 
power 

Speed — 21 knots 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen- 
erators of 400 horsepower each, supply 
power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, 
fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun- 
dry appliances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea 
marks the advancement of 
another phase of the elec- 
trical industry in which the 
General Electric Company 
is the pioneer. Of equal 
importance ha^ been its 
part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, 
transforming the potential 
energy of waterfalls for use 
in electric motors, develop- 
ing the possibilitios of electric lighting and 
many other similar achievements. 

As a result, eo general are the applications 
of electricity to the needs of mankind that 
scarcely a home or individual today need 
be without the benefits of General Electric 
products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the "iVew Mexico," entitled, 
'*The Electric Ship," V7iil bj sent upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Deck 44, Schenectady, New York. 







Ji 




General Office 
Schenectady N.Y. 



'IIMIU)^ 



ric 



^Y Sales Offices in '''"'^ 
all large cities. 



THE STENTOR 



THE CHARM OF FOOTBALL 

At the WieconBiii' — Nortiliwester.n 
ga,mie: 

The 'first ^he: "There's Jeanette — 
tbey say s'he is goi^ng Kappa Kappa 
G;\;mimia." 

The otihier isihe: "Oh! How is it 
poEisiibls? Wihy the kidia bouj^ht li-er a 
sunicliae I'ast week; I introdiieed her 
to Bay yesterday; and she accepteid 
it without blinking. Now, when 1 
come to thiinik of it, she diid talk to 
him, in a tone tjhat woulld niake you 
thiinik S'h'e'di been aiiraumd fwr momtjhs 
— ^yO'U know, sort of iimlposing like, the 
oat! Why they siay slue g'ot hier new 
coat at Tfhie Pair, and they told me 
the car she had last week was only 
her unole's." 

The first she: "Oh, look at Willis 
get tihiat mian! (As the doctor rusihes 
on the field) He must have liet him- 
self drop too hiard' — that's iwhat he got 
for not stopping w'henj WilllMs came 
after him." 

The other sihe: "WiMis is s,uch a 
gentle fellliow. I was introdU'Ced to 
him Tuesiday. They say he's going 
Sigma Nu. 

The next hour: In front of us — a 
footb:'ii gnmie; to the rear — they say, 
they sa.y. 



A mew strong man has made his 
appearaince on the oampu!-i. Alil 
former feats were sui'passed wlien 
he liiftied Aber-niethiy, Pititin,ger, and 
Dunlllap at the same td^me. An un- 
co mpreihemcliiing spectator: "There 
must be a vacuum somewhere." 

The Used -to- was Quartette will soon 
have a pia.no to start thiem oiff. One 
thing thiat wili thein be lacking is an 
effective meains to sihivt) thiem off. 

Coltege HaiM al'arm clocks are at 
ttie repair sihop this week. Faculty 
pleasie take note arad give proper con- 
sidiei'atioin to absemteea from early 
mi'jrniing cliaeiseij. 

Phii Eta Alpiha amnounces tihe pledg- 
ing of Irvih Hirschy and tMi.e initia- 
tion oif Jack Jowett. 

Someone ia aliwaiys taking tihe joy 
out of life: Sheehia,n, thoughtfully to 
Jowett: — "I was just thinking what 
would happetn if tihat chiminiey blew 
over." 

I\rori!iey was missiii® Monldmy, All 
eyes were an the marriage license 
notices. 

Jack Jowett visited Sheehan at 
the latter's home over the week- 
end. 

Ralph Dean, Merle McEvoy, and 
Bob Wenban visited Omega Psi over 
the week-end. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencH's Urvtfi Store 




UNITED 
II CIGAR STORES 

OK AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

A(;EN'r 
Li.ke Forest, Ulim i.s 



W. II. iiUSSBV 0( Co. ^^°'"^"P '° WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

COAL WOOD i George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

I Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

I Leslie W. George 
I C.G. Wenban & Son 

j TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 

L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

SUITS MADF, TO ORDER 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

CLEANING, REPAIRING, PRESSING 

Tel. 644 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOKEST 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

HAS OPENED A MODERN RETAIL STORE AT 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 

All kinds of Bread, Rolls and Coffee Cake 
Are Baked Before Your Eves 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 
MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs A'l Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SLASON 



I 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
1 Specialty 



THE 



S T E N T O R 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feauires of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of wliose courses will give tlie fundamentals of business training, {2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive iiiterest and co-opcralion of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The .HJtnation of Lake Forest is convenient lo Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. AU students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $32.^ to if-100 for men; ^350 to §450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF IWUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmem, address 

PRESIDENT'S OHHICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniw 



The 



equality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone llO! 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

'•MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Contectioiiery 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

CNeill's Hardware Store 

W HEN IN NEED OP 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

Knbelsky 

Clothing and 
l^'urnlsliings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

U h: DO HEfAIHISO 

Ptione7u9 Western Avp. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. OCTOBER 3L UU9 



NUMBER 5 



MONMOUTH WINS 



TRIM RED AND BLACK 
TWENTY TO SIX 



PEP MEETING ERESHMAN DANCE 



Monmouth College defeated the 
Red and Black last Saturday on 
Farwe'U FleJd 20 to 6. Tlie Mon- 
mouth team i^howed they had a well 
coached eleven and ' were in fine 
pihyeicaili sihape. The Red and Black 
began with a defensive game and 
Monmouth took the offensive. They 
found a weak spot in tilie center of 
thie line amd time aftier time made 
galna through there. The quarter- 
back either used poor judgment or 
else his men could not stiand the 
pounding as he tried to mix in end 
rums and forward psr.'^irs. They suc- 
ceeded in getting away with two 
long pa£is«s but lost much ground 
when attempting to get around Mc- 
Oolley or Hause. After a shift was 
made in t!he center of our line the 
Monmouth backs began striking the 
guards and it sieemed impossible to 
stop them only when they were on 
our five-yard line. The first half 
was alH in favor of Monmouth, and 
w'hen the second half started it was 
evident tlie Red and Black men were 
sihowing signs of life. Time after 
time McColil'ey and Hause pulled 
down on Monmouth's 10 or 20 yard 
line it looked as though poor judg- 
ment was used iin picking the plays. 
The Red and Black scored their 
touchdown on a long pass to Kynd- 
berg, a pass to MeCoUey and Beddoes 
counted by diving over Monmouth's 
line. 

It can be said that we were beat- 
en by a bettier team but yet the 
breaks of the game went to Mon- 
mouth, — they were almost given two 
of their toudhdowme. The fact that 
they were the better team may be 
due fcD tlie fact that the Red and 
Black did not get going until the 4th 
quarter or was it due to' the fact 
that they eaUered the game keyed 
up too high and intstead of being 
ready to knock the world for a goal 
were only out t?here to resist and 
not to attack. They certainly 

lacked a good offense — it was noticed 
every time a back carried the ball 
on an end run that he ran into his 



OLD TIME SPIRIT 
REVIVED 



The pep meeting held during chap- 
el last week was the liveliest meet- 
ing we have had this year. "Chuck" 
led the yells In his usual fine style 
and the student body supported him 
enthusiastically. Captain Woods gave 
a short but well worded talk on stud- 
ent support of the team. Professor 
Coffin was also called upon to talk, 
but he escaped before even the nim- 
ble "Frosh" could capture him. 
Caach Derby gave a short talk that 
acted like cold water on the spirits 
of us alL More yells were then 
given and the college songs sung 
after which we adjourmed for classes. 

Tliat's the kind of sipirit Lake For- 
est wants. The kind that causes 
you to cheer lustily whenever our 
football team is mentioned, but that 
alone is far from being enough. We 
need tlie pep that takes everyone 
out to the games, backing our boys 
\vit,h just the same spirit that we 
used in backing the yellis at tlie 
meeting. If we do our share the 
boys on the team will do their share. 
Come on. Lake Forest — let's go! 



own interference; his interference 
did not get their men, they merely 
Ijrushed them and let them get Ijy. 

The student body turned out in 
good shape anid lied by Bea.rd, the 
cheerleader, responded well in, root- 
ing for the team. Thej' certainliy 
showed signs of increased pep when 
during the halves the girls and fel- 
lows joined in a snake dance on tlie 
field. 



Lake Forest 6 


Monmouth 20 


Hause, Legnor r.e. 




Jones 


Russell, Johnson r.t. 




Trimbel'l 


Van Sickle r.g. 




Dyer 


Hale, Rus.^U, c. 




Earp 


Framberg, Joyett l.g. 




Firth 


Legner, Virgil l.t. 




Scott 


McCoUey I.e. 




Frazell 


Beddoea q.b. 




Mulburg 


Bergen, Ives ihb. A 


'.der 


son. Reed 


Eddy, Kyndberg rhb. 




Black 


1 Woods, Capt. fb. 




Paterson 



THE CLASS OF '23 
ENTERTAIN 



Nime Rahs for the Freshman 
class; The class of '23 may be 
green buO they are "right there" 
w'hen it come.s: to giving a dance. The 
prograniis were clever and the music 
was geat. But on their eats the 
fre.s^hmen surpa.s.-ied arnj-tbing that 
liias been done for a long time for 
instead of the usuail pale liquid 
French Pastry was served and oh 
but it wai3 good. 

.Mi.-B Hamilton, Miss Coan, and 
Mr. Derby watched the corners. 
E\-er.\'one seemed to hiave a big time 
— especiallly the Fresihman president 
who wore a sunny smile the entire 
evening — diue probably to his hos- 
pitable nature. 



>IISS C'O.W TALKS AT Y. AV. 



Every fifth meeting of the Y. W. 
is in charge of the World Fellowship 
Committee. The first of these meet- 
ings was held last Thursday night 
when Flora Schattuck, chairman of 
the committee led. 

Miss Coan, who has spent fourteen 
years in Persia, told many interest- 
ing storia^ abuut the climate, coun- 
try people and missionary work in 
that di^tant land. We were inter- 
i.-s1<'d to learn that a sure cure for 
sore eyes, according to the Persians, 
is much brick dust sprinkled in 
tliem. 

The last charming feature of the 
program was Mildred Day's violin 
soln. 



MH.S. (;R1FFES TF^l'HES SIXDAT 
SCHOOL 



Dr. Roberts 'has organized a Sunday 
Schoail class for college women with 
Mrs. Griffes as teacher. About a doz- 
en of the gii''ls, who have already at- 
tlended report very interesting meet- 
ings. Mrs. Griffes will be glad to 
have any girl who wishes, join her 
class. 



THE STENTOR 



FACULTY NOTES 



After somie diflcusBiion as to the 
advisability of clianging its policy 
on programs, Uiie Unlversiity club has 
madle out its plane fbr the coming 
winter oin tihie usiual basis, with some 
iintierestinig aldid'iitioms. Vhe club mem- 
bers foundl t.hiemls|e'll\"es ini geJiiea'al oip- 
posekj to diiiscatrding the olid se^mi- 
fio-riinftl meetings wit'h papers and dilsi- 
cussioni. T'heire are, consiequentlly, 
to be S'i_x on- eight of these meetings 
for which sfpieakena will be secured 
by a comn^ittiee coinsistiing of Dr. 
Alliee from thie College and Miss 
Tremaln amid Miss Brown from Peri-y 
Hallt 

111 addition, tlhi-ee meetings of a 
more social and perha-ps imagiaiative 
(iilaiture ar© to b-e \heik\, in charge, re- 
spectively, of ProfesKor Van Steeni- 
dlemeji and Dr. Ellingfood fixmu the 
COilllege and Mr. Brnwn, fli'om the 
Acadlemy, with a committee in each 
case to help. Beynnd t'he .statement 
that these gatherings are t(o be in- 
formal, there lis no deifiniite informa- 
tion as to wlhiat oine may expect, al- 
tlhough tihiere lare rumors of pl'ays 
and ,musi calls and even counti-y 
dances. 



Profesfior and Mrs. Bridgman had 
as t,heir guelsit on Friday James Nor- 
miaiii Hall, aviator aJnd author of 
"High Adtventiure" and othier Atlantic 
sketclnes. M,r. HIall and Ray Bridg- 
m'an wei-e comrades in fhe Lafayettie 
EJscadrillle. Mr. Hialll hias tlie furth- 
er interesting diistinction oif being a 
GrininS'll colJiege alumnus. 

Mrs. Wrighit entertained at tea 
Th'ursdlay aftlernoon ini hioiiior of Mrs. 
Bllingwoiold and Mrs!. Bllinjgwood'.=i 
niotlher, Mrs. Schimpel'er from Ken- 
tucky. The appointments were of 
black aind orange i!ni a.pip.ropriahe aut- 
uiminial affect. Ooiffee and cocoa were 
poured by Mrs. RelndtorBf, Mrs. 
Rotoei-ts, Mi-s. Coffin and Miss Powell. 



The Rev. Mr. Paul Turner will be 
a visitor on the campus Monday. 



Mrs. L. E. Lewis of West Liberty, 
Iowa, visited her si.-siter, Wihiija Mc- 
Gowain last Sunday. 

Raymond Kaslier of Pontiac is vis- 
iting the colltege over the week end. 
Miss Vi-\-iani Hemdrickson, a SeU'ior 

in Mount Morris High, is the guest 
of her aistler, Rufih Hendtickson. 



YOIT AND ME 



We tliinks it stirange tihat the Sig 
Room \a alKvaysi taken by 7:15 on 
Sunday evening. We wondter if 5:30 
dliinniers 'have flnyt.hing to do with 
it. Ask Army or Mac. 

We hiaidln't hieard that Loveridge 
M'artin had been ellected Caniipus 
Jesiier but from all appearances we 
take lit he has. Congratulations, 
Loveridge. 

Tiwn Oil- three new vamps have ap- 
peared this year. Do you siipposie 
they took a course this S'ummer. 

Too l>ad. Vera, tihat Horace is a 
woj-king mian, but cheer up, Cliicago 
is Jiieaa-. 

Have you decided, Katlhryn? We're 
all i niterested. 

Some of tlie men on the Saut'h 
Oampua seem to have a hard time 
beiaig friendliy with Lois Hall. 

Let's all buy Beth a fountain pen. 

Your job is np bed Oif roses, Eloise. 
No wonder you've Idst your smile. 

Thi.s new fraternity sounds inter- 
e-tiing but let's hiave some more dope, 
boys. 

In thie sit.iH watches of tihe night, 
Marion cam be beard practicing. 
Do you suppoise it looks promiisiiag 
|io|i' a serenade on the South Campus? 

Miiis Hasipee, remember tihat when 
we are expecting a liong distance caW 
we don't retire at 9:30. 

We're glad to have you back, 
Mudige. Looks lilce olkl times to see 
.vou and Betty on the Cadpus. 

We dio wilsih McEray would hurry 
up and make his millions so Bea 
w.juldsn't have tio go home every week 
end. 

Ad\-ice to the buxom lassies. — Be- 
fore anid aftier. Look at Merner. 

Ruth, do tell us where you con- 
ceal that "shusher" and hoiw does 
it work 'Sio well. 

Does it pay to come clear across 
the campus for breakfa.'t of a bris'k 
morn., girls? We rather doubt it. 

Suite II Seems to have a veiled 
attraction this year. 



SHOP VERY EARLY 



Shopping for Christmas must be 
done unusually early this season. 
This is imperative to those who wish 
to avert di;siappointnient and to avoid 
tIhe probability of paying even high- 
er prices for nierchandrise than are 
prevalent today. 

Heretofore the reason advanced for 
earliy shopping has been to prevent 
congestion which places an entirely 
unnecessary burden on salesjpeople 
and shopkeepers. This year the ex- 
treme slhontiage of merchandiisie offers 
a more impelling reason. The pub- 
lic has been informed of the nation's 
urgent need for increased pix)duction. 
The better things are scarce. 

Tlijs promises to be an old-fash- 
ioned Christmas' — one vi^hlch will be 
generally and wholeheartedly cele- 
brated. There unpuestionabllj' will be 
a tremendous demand for what 
merchandise there is. The law of 
cause and effect will teach you that 
this demand and shortage will pro- 
duce even higher prices before 
Ohristmas. 

Watch the columns of The Lake 
Forester for offerings and buy when 
the goods are advertised. Don't be 
fooled into thinking that you can 
just as well! buy later. Ask our local 
merchanta about] it and be convinced. 



THE S.MILE THAT COUNTS? 



"The smile that counts 

Is one you wear. 
When clouds obscure 

The heavens fair." 

"When the wind is cold 

Aind the sky is dreiar, 
•Taint the smite that counts 

"Tiis the unideiTvear." 

MONMOUTH ORACLE 



To Potter 



To South America he goes 

He's pawned his watch and sold his 

clothes 
Is it because he is in debt? 
Or just because the land is wet? 



THE STENTOR 



A MESSAGE mOJI BA(JUAl) 



Adller leLiviiiig coillege in. Jainivary, 
1918, hiaving complete*,!' the required 
crediits, Sanvuel S. Isa .wias employed 
in Ohticngo for <a short ti,me, hut sno'ii 
we nit tin Engliaiiiid aiiil einliilsted in, tlie 
BritiKih army feeilimg himself tlo he 
in a seimse a Britiislier after the talk- 
ing of B'aigdiacl. Our lupt won] from 
him was writtlen from a Biitisli 
traini'rig caimp ahout a yenr ngo. 
There fcllili^ws some extracts from n 
Letter just receiveid-, mailed in Bag- 
diad September 1. Surely the iiiiteres' 
of !vis friendlsi liere wilt span the 
long diisitanice, anidi, iwe hiopp, will ex- 
pi'esB itijieillf in words. 

"It is fuilily a montlh since I nr- 
rivetl home. My people were all sn.fe, 
but they had suffered very much 
during Bhie war. Naturall'liy tlhey 
were vei-y g'liad tio slee me aigaiin aflei' 
ten jie'ars' absence. I was n<it long 

. at 'home before I wa.s appointed Li- 
brarian anid Stiore keeper of the Edu- 
cation Department. I have been very 
busy makinig invemitoiry, ai'ranging, 
sorting neiw books amd systematizing 
We have a small Re^ferenee Library 
npw but i'n la fiew .monthiS we are go- 
ing to have a goud-sizcd llibrai'y as 
tibe Director of Bdlucatiion has a fe-w 

'diays ago gone tia Lionidbn. andl ia going 
to send us a very Inrge number of 
books. I am almost sure tlhat some 
dlay, t'houg'h distiant it may be, 1 
sthall come back to the Uuiited Sta/tes. 

-I am enclO«iii>g you hiei-ewithi a money 
order to tihe valiuie of ten sthiillingis, 
being tihe price of subscription to the 
Sbeinltor lior dnie year. I s'hould, like 
ta receive tihe fulil numberei of the 
coming year; i. e., 1919-1920. 

Trusting to receive a.ni early reply 
fro,m you, as I am very an^xious to 
hear about Lake Forest. My best 
regan'dls to all the professors, and my 
friemds, I beg tlo remain 

Reispectfiul'ly yours, 
SAMUEL S. ISA 



NEWS 



Seven of the Lois HaH girls spent 
Sunday afternoon entertaining 
wounded soldiers at Fort Sheridan. 

The Rev. iGiomp, a friend aind cliass- 
maite of Pnclfesisor Sibley's, spoke in 
chapel Tuesdiay. He urged ail of us 
to teach oursielKies to enjoy reading. 
We enjoyed his talk very much and 
hOfpe he wilil visit us again. 

Gee, but tihose weenies were gocid 
after chapel Tuesday. Here's hoping 
the Y. W. will have lots of sialea 
in the near future and more weenies 
to seill. 



smile-<)-(;r.\?hs 



Old Gemtleman (in street car) — 
4as any one here dropped a roll of 
hililis with n niliber clastic around 
them? 

"Yes, I have!" cried a dozen at 
once. 

Old Gcntli'man (calmly) — Well I've 
just piikrd up tlie elastic. 



Nora was applying for a pliace as 
cuok, a.niil' when askoid for a reference, 
pro ienit,ed the fo!(lowin,g: 

"To Wliiuim It Maiy Concern: This is 
ti'j certify that Nora FoLey has 
woirked fo.r us a week and we arc 
ruti! Ified." 



Mother (to Itattored son.) Willie, 
Iiow' (iften. ha\'e I tolid you to .stop 
before fighlting and count up to a 
liiunidred? 

Baf.tere(l son Thiat's w'hat I did, 
but Charley Jones' mother only toOid 
him to count ten. 



Mistress — Have you any referen- 
ces? 

Applicinit — \o, mum; I bore 'em 
up. 

MiiSltlress — Why, how foolislh. 

Appllicant — Yez wouMn't Chink so 
if yez hiad seem 'em, mum. 



Daughter — Everett kissed me last 
night. 

Motlier (indignantly) — Tliat is out- 
rageiO'Us. Did you sit on him for it? 

Daughter— I did. 



He — Are you fond of iinidoor sports? 
She — Yes, if they knlow when to 
1^0 home. 



I ai-ikod a Lake PoCest lady ho>w 

old sihie was, ainid she told me the 

truth — sihe siaid it was none of my 
bu.--iinie-:is. 



Ca.sey wa.s buying a clock at Mitch- 
ell's .vestieirday whic'h he intended 
presenting to his wife as a Christ- 
mas present. "Would you liike a 
French clock?" asked Mr. Mitchell. 
"The diivil take yer Princh clock," 
said Casey. "Shure, I wants one that 
me woiife can under- it and \yhin it 
stroikes." 



A pair of Lage Bluff lovers were 
to meet in the moon light at the 
Park, upon breaking away the male 
Uinatiic asked "If it is not moonlight 
won't you meet me in the gaslight?" 
"No," said the fair ycung thing. "I'm 
no gas meter." 



An old gentleman, known Bar his 
clo-senesB, asked a friend to recom- 
mend a physician. The friend named 
a certain speciiaiii.st noted for wit as 
wfll as professiontl skill. 

"Are his fees very liigh?" asked 
tlie old fellow. 

"Not very. Ho will cliiaa'ge you 
five dollars for the first vis'it and 
throe dollars for each onie after 
that." 

Not long afterward the old gentle- 
man waiked into the office of the 
physician, and upon being admitted 
to (he cninsulting room, laid down 
three dollars and remarked, "Well, 
doctor, here I am again." 

The doctor coo.ly picked up the 
nioniey and put into a drawer, which 
lie locked. The patiient looked on, 
expectantly, awaiting. 

"I am ready to be examined," he 
^'aid at length. 

"It is liardly necessiary," said the 
physician. "Just continue with the 
same mediicine. Good day, sir." 



It Avas in a small town in New 
England. In their morning walk lit- 
tle I.siabel and her mother passied the 
'home of a woman who iwas so ill 
that a quantity of .=Xraw had been 
strewn over the street that the noise 
of the highway might be deadened. 
This straw excited the curiosity of 
the chikl, and slie asked many ques- 
tions concerning it. 

"Why, dearie," said the mother, 
"it has been put there because last 
week they brought a little boy baby 
to the lady who lives there." 

At tlhis Isabel looked at the 
straw with renewed interest. 

"Well, mother," she concluded, "I 
must siay they brought him well 
packed." 

I. O. U. 



.MV KOOJI-MATE 



My room-niatle is the cieverest 
thing that ever was a,nd as for be- 
i!ng tiny and cute' — I feel like a cow 
\yhen I'm with her. She bias the 
cutest little voice andi is never still 
a minute. Tiie boys Mke her but the 
girls have a fit when sihe is' around 
— probably due to jealousy. She does- 
n't bother me, tho, because she never 
sleeps (With me and never eats in the 
daytim'e. The only time she does 
annoy nie is when I wake up at 
night and hear her eating a raid- 
night supper — in my wastebasket. 



Davy Reea was operated upon for 
appendicitis last week. We Ijope he 
will be out again soon because every- 
one misses "Crabby" like the dick- 
ens. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
forest {:ollege. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor W. R. Bvidgman 

faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as pecond class 
matter. 



DO YOr HAVE ENOUGH TO DO? 



Nece?Jsiit(y is certaimliy the mother 
of somehtlng or otlier. And it seems 
that the more we have to do, the 
better we do iit. Conrveiisely, the 

people who dioin't have enough to 
do are t,h>e ones who do nothing 
well. Of coiunse, thia is not true 
without limit, but few of us reach 
the liimit. 

A senior w'ho has worked his way 
tlirougli colliege and who has at the 
fame time engaged ini a great many 
nfludient and siocial activities and has 
d'cne well above the average in 
c'llasses, said to u.s t-lie ot'her day: "1 
can't undei'sta.nd these felllows wiio 
don't have to work, who never go out 
forr any activit'Jes, whio liave all 
kilniill-i of time, yet keep on failing in 
their work." 

We 'h.ave always witili us a sizable 
representation of this clas:i. Notli- 
i,ng to (Ilo but their stiidiies, yet tliey 
don't even, dto those creditably. Are 
you in tlhls class? If you are, we 
suggest thiat you go into more ac- 
tivities. The sense of added respon- 
siibiliity i.g a sitimulus to increased ef- 
fort. T'ho result is that one really 
works, and doe.? everytliing better. 
At least, that has been our experi- 
ence. 



The liutiest fad — Hot dogs witliout 
wee'nles. 



HEARKEN, YE FROSH! 



Of course, you know what this is 
about and are probably tired of thie 
"sanve did line" but you can't be 
any more bored than the writer is 
tlo hiave to remind you. 

Not so long ago you heard and 
read ceilain rules. Of coiurse, they 
iwere utterly ridicuilfclus amd to be 
forgotten as soon as possible. The 
sophomore girlis didn't realWy e-xpect 
you to oibey those rules — how absurd! 
Don't kid yourselves, little green 
things, e'\»ery rule was made for a 
purpose. Most of thie rules are just 
things that people of breeding are 
supp'Cfr:'ed tlo know. For instance, go- 
ing thru dlooirs first a\nd letting your 
elders follliow lias never been done 
anywhere. Another little point, it 
doesn't dio any Inarm tlo open the 
door yoursellf. Don't kid yourself 
into thinking the sophamore doesn't 
notice iwhe'u yoai siieak thru ahead 
of heir. Altiho sihe slays nothing she 
puts you diown ais needing a little 
more hiome traini'nig. 

There seems to be a lack in the 
spirit of a great many of the fresh- 
men girls. Perhaps they are getting 
thiail! diread diisease whic'h starts with 
the letters E-G-O, so prevalent in the 
eairliy faJli of each year. Don't get 
worried, girls, you'll recover altho it 
may be a painfull procesB. Ju8t about 
now lots of you are thinking of going 
to Mr. Riclnmian to get your money 
back. Net that you want to Heave — 
oh no — but you are beginning t|o 
lliitnlt t>he collage owes you some- 
tliiiig fioir your presence. Yes, I knmv 
the upper classmen admire yoai im- 
mensely, niiaybe one gave you a t. 1. 
that you were the pretitiest girl in 
t,lie class. It may be they ask you 
to come aind see them often-. Of 
(■(.ur?ie, it is only natural for you to 
l)egin to tliink tliat the follksi at 
home didn't realize what a classy 
person you were and tiTat the old 
school simply couldn't get along 
without yO'U. You're unusual — that's 
it. You're sio different! There is 
siometbinig irresistible about you — 
majbe it'g your personality or your 
-inile. Aw gee, you can't explain it 
— but all the girls are just crazy 
about you. 

AVhen you get to this stage of the 
difjcase you need to do one thing — 
haing on to the earth! Maybe the 
SJOphiC'raore Sieems to be a "sweet but 
siim.ple miaid" Who looks up to you. 
Thie leaa slve say.^i often denotes the 
more She is thinking. I've even 
known these girls getting tired of 
liearing popular freshmen tell of "I" 
and "he" all the time, sometimes 



M\Y FENCE FARAVELL FIELD 



There hais been a movement on the 
part cif the Athletiic Board to have 
Farwell Field fenced off, in order 
dhab admission to gamee may be 
charged and atlblietics be put on 
more of a slelif-supporting basis. The 
plan as proposed is to build a sub- 
stantial fence, seven feet higli, sur- 
roundiing the fieln. 

Dr. Alliee has been very energetic 
in this project, and we have him to 
thank that its successful completion 
is alimo t assured for next year. His 
idtea is to secure a loan of tlhie $2000 
or $2500 necesisary, paying it off in 
installnienltia from aidmiasion proceeds. 
At a meeting iwitih some of the trus- 
teies the first of the week. Dr. Allee 
received such eneouragemeint for his 
plan that he believei it will go 
through in time for Uhe football sea- 
son next fall. 



GOOD LOSERS 



It is eajsy enough to be a good 
wiuiuer but very hard to be a good 
lloser. Our foloiball men went out 
Saturday to fight a hard gaime 
againist men \v'ho greatly outweighed 
them and Lake Foa-esid was battling 
pitrongeir to win at tihe last whistle 
than on the kick off. Yet we lost. 

Did the rootera begin to cat call 
and hooB when t^hey saw the ball 
going down the field in the wrong 
direction? No, there was good clean 
rooting and the Monmouth men went 
back with t'he feeling thiat the team 
wais a hard fighting aggregation 
backed up by men anid women who 
can take a whipping gracefully. Let's 
keep up our reputation as a school 
where gentlemanly spirit prevails. 

Let's get out there t'hls week for- 
getting all tIhe events of last week ' 
except the lessons we leiarned and 
Elhow reniewed pep and tJenacity for 
the husky battliera I'ni the offing. 



they resent having clever freshmen 
bosg them a little, perhaps they are 
not exactly plieas-ed when a freshman 
refu-ies to do something asked of her. 
That is where this year's freshmen 
seem 'lacking. They don't always 
seem willing to accept the responsi- 
bility of being members of the 
school. Enough for this time but 
just remember to "Hang onto the 
earth — because the water is cold" — 
in the tubs. 



THE STENTOR 



FOURTH ANNUAL CARNIVAL 



The carnival of New Orleans 
Has tripped thru m.aJny a year; 
The Proplict VelKed of Louis' town. 
Has danced with careless cheer: 
These fetes were gay with merri- 

mielnt, 
With Quip and collor hriglit, 
And just as fch-ese was Epsilon, 
With revels thru the nlglnt. 



have been sio many of them of liate, 
but his rendition wasi both sympa- 
thetic and musical. Stokesi was .more 
dcfiniitie, wiith his desert and three 
trees, 'thiere, and there, anid there.' 
I suppose house rules are quite 
necessary and esse)ntial, the they are 
judged Dtlherw'iee at timei^. This was 
one af t'hoso 'times'. 



Have you ever blown one of thoBe 
s.malil tii'n horns that grind and 
screech as gears gone amiss. And 
'have you worn a jaiuiity clieckered 
cap aet sliantiwise upon your head in 
deftance of a*l things save irrespon- 
sibility? 

The chaperoaies, Professor and 
Mrs. Bridigeman, Professor Sib ley a.iild 
Dean Bamilitlon diid just this, and are 
Eitil'l chuckiliing over it all. 

Phi Pi held its Fourth Anmual 
Oarnival liast Saturday night, anid 
while memory sttll prejudices judge- 
ment, I agree with Rdldy that 'it wai.^ 
just the berries.' The events are still 
a hurly-burly of exotic racing hither 
and yoe, of laughter and riotous 
music, and so logical and orderly 
description is well nigh impossible. 
However, did you ever cast your for- 
tune unto the capricious wheel of 
chiance, oir listen to magic divina- 
tions concerning the 'dark la.dy,' or 
the Uight genitJeman?' If your reply 
is negative, I would advise that you 
array yourself with a fool's cap a.n.d 
horn, and try it. Then join the liadid 
of forty-nine at the fountain of 
Ponce die Leon anid imbibe a concoc- 
tion that will lilt your head in en- 
thusiagtiic ,accord with the blare of 
a saxoplhone. A dance, a laugh at 
the antics of the latest wlnite hope, 
three shots at the face in the 'hole, 
anioither whirl at the wlieel of for- 
tune, and' — off for the winter garden. 

Would picture a mellowed cluster 
of Autumn moons, mingling light 
with the shadowed streamers of the 
leaves, swaying silently over an a.isle 
of gold anid blue, ailong whose sides 
were tables, while a stage grew fan- 
wise Srom the e.xpanding opening at 
the far ein4. Such was the winter 
garden.. There was blackface and 
ballet, burlesque and art. Quite cos- 
mopolitan, you see, with a saitiisfying 
bit for the taste of everyone. Ploberg 
was the queen of the dance, and 
quite a lady he was. Moore sang 
something about Mary. I do not 
know whch Mary it was, for there 



.vim: mi; (ji:tti>'(; uack our tep? 



For ia few years Lake Forest has 
liad no regular atihletic supervisor 
for tihe men. Thie .spirit of Lake Por- 
eilb, which wws at one time at the 
\-ery top of fllie ladder suffered gradu- 
ally from this lack. Little by little 
our beam l>eca)me weaker and weaker 
until the people on the side lines 
camie to "tlhie realization that it was 
no longer wortlh while to back the 
men iin the field. The men who 
might have come out for football 
ceais.ed to db so; thiey turned tiheir 
thoughts anid their efforts into other 
t'lraiuinels. They began to tlidnk more 
of social functions ratlher than of 
athlleticsi. T'his was a perfectly nat- 
ura.l reaction. Yet this was not for 
the be.st/. Lake Forest last a great 
dieal by this change iiu spirit. There 
was a definite change in the atmos- 
phere of the school, a change which 
was not for the belltter. But in a 
-way even, .more seriou-si was the 
cJMinige in tflie feeling of other col- 
legei.=i toward Lake Forest. 

Lake Foreist became a name tO' be 
scofJed at by dtiher colleges, colleges 
whiich posisessied teams of merit. Oc- 
cafiioniaillly .some one would stir the 
schiaoi spirit of t!i.e .'Itnd'ent body of 
Lake Forest to a higlier pitch, but 
always the spirit would fall back to 
itis did leveK 

This year Lake Forest hais a phys- 
ical director for mien and there has 
been renewed enthusiasm in athlet- 
ics. Our director has had many di.-:i- 
appaiintments and we all feel deeply 
tliat he bias been justified in feeling 
as he 'has. We realize that he has 
a hard task betore him anid that the 
schiool haa not dome its best to furtli- 
er the cause. 

Last Saturday we lot the game, 
but we put up a hardl fight. It does 
seem that the "pep" of Lake Forest 
is returning even if it is coming by 
slow degrees. Lake Forest will live 
up to her niame which is the symbol 
of streinigtih and beauty. We hope that 
Mr. Derby will not be too discouraged 
and tlhat his bad opinion of Lake 
Forest will soon change for the bet- 
ter. Let us make good his faith! 



HOME COMING DAY 



Saturday is "Home Coming" day at 
the college when, every person who 
has ever attiemded the college is ex- 
pected to return for the day if pos- 
sible. 

A game between Lake Forest and 
Beioit colleges, which in itself is al- 
ways an interesting event has been 
arranged to help entertain the old 
studentB. As Beioit alavays brings a 
good bunch of rooters this game is 
likely to be an interesting event. 

A large attendance of former 
students of the college is expected 
and everyone is Invited to come to 
the game and meet old friends. 



I\ THK LIAIK-LKJHT AGAIN 



There were roug'h house doings at 
Lake Forest OolUege several nights 
this week. Yesterd'ay morning the 
president of the student council lec- 
tured the students anid warned t'hem 
that a conltlinuation of such antics 
would mean expullsiion. Some of the 
students then said he had better see 
that the barrel of alcohol in the 
Chemistry laboratory was locked up. 
Prof. Fletcher B. Coiffin liurried to 
the barrel at once. He found it had 
licen 'lialf emptied." — Chicago Tribune 



The Physics class enjoyed a trip 
to the Electrical Show at the Coli- 
seum illast Thiursdlay. Besides seeing 
an initeresitli,ng and educational ex- 
hibit, all received a review on the 
various laws of ellectricty. Professor 
Rendtonff proved himsielf to be an 
amiable chaperon. 



HOAV TEHRTBLE 



Beck: — "I am sorry I failed to 
liave the papers corrected, but I did- 
n't get up until 4:30 this morning." 

Question: — What's wrong with Mr. 
Beck's bed? 

Leon, McFerra.n, Harold and Her- 
Ijert Peterson, Hoover, Uden, Hall 
and Speidel were among the visitors 
of the Phi Pi last week. 

Tlie 19iy Platform: 
Beers and light wines. 
Bars and light fines. 
Cheers and bright lines. 



THE STKNTOR 




LIT-TUL FELIX 



I am get-tiinig might-y 
Tir-ed lof standt-ing 
Up here \\'it(h my lianidB 
Pltip-ping a-rounid 
But ev-ery poge 
Is ex-pen^sive and 
The moni-ey in itlhis 
Pa-per's cof-fer ia too 
Dog-gone low for 
Me to be chamig-ing 
So much. 
' May-be I had bet-ter 
Not make re-markia 
How-ev-er 
They 

May put me out 
Ati-to-getih-er if I dio. 
I have at Last 
Found out iW'hiait runs 
This in-Stii-tu-tion! 
I was i'ni-.foirin-ed at 
Thie foot-ball game 
Lasli Sat-ur-day. 
I had been Ifead to 
Be-Qlieve it wias Psy-c'he. 
I was mis-lleia:d. 
I do not diance but 
Be-ing a loiy-al 
Preslh-man, I was 
Prasi-ent at the latrug-glie. 
Fri-day ev-ein-ing. 
I won-d'er what was 
In tlhi5,t French pas-try. 
Heu'-ner-ry says 
I am too young to know. 
May-be I can find 
Out from tihe 
In-cu-ba-tar. 

Iiiu-quir-iMig-ly yours 

LIT-TUL FE-LIX 



Vera Pettigrew and Bea Worthley 
Fpent tlie week-end a* their homes. 

Amine Meirner speinti the week-^end 
at the University of Uliniois. 

Blizabeth Torreyson anid Josephinie 
Merchiaint speint Sunday wit!h Virginia 
Alcott at Iter home in Chicago. 

Wlhait was bhat fable about "after 
Juilly fir.-;t?"' 



AVELL! 



Dr. Wrigliit (in, pipycholiogy) What 
Is seattierbraininiess'? 

Fi-amberg: — Weill, it's not normal! 
Dr. W.— Is that so? 

Ill speakiimg of the fact that an 
infant was d/eaf when born, Dr. 
Wirig'ht received conisiderable aid 
frcim Sumner. Sum.ner states that 
tile infaait is ailso blind at first. 

How abwu* it, Dooly, are you 
Eipeiaking fro-m observatioin' or e.xperi- 
emce? 

Lost: on Caupus: — An oM Analytic 
Geometry text — broiwn; back — Prof. 
McNeil's niame insidte cover. Finder 
plieiaee notify Stieetor Board'. 



Barney hind an angel cake 
For her darling Charley's sake. 
For his diear s.ake. 
Cftiarliey ate i* every crumb. 
Then he h«ard an angel's drum, 
Oalllliing softly, "Charlley come," 
And Charley went. 



The Kappa 9ig Parrot was not 
given five diays notice at the last 
faculty meeting. It is either mighty 
clever, or else the course of iu'- 
sltiructilom ii.^ easiy. 

Revere'nid Cox was f}he guest of 
Rieverenid Edwards, Tuesiday evening 
aiti the Onwent.sia. 

At a mteeting held at the College 
Hall Civic Center, Moniday evening, 
'a resolution to allllloiw only stiraight 
dlainicinig in the social center was of- 
ficially adoptedi — shimmying will be 
absoluteiy proihiibited. At the time 
otf going to press, Vice-President 
Dorn 'hia^i not been imterviewed, but it 
iig ha.rdllly likely that he will veto 
the measure. 

Dean Biairrick: "SlnaLl we sing 
bioys?" 

Refrain: "Let's put tihe proposition 
to a vote after chapel." 

Pn:(feseor AMIee has fallen in love 
with thie mew piano in the soutih end 
of t'he campus^ He inspected It 
Momdlay a.ftiernoon preparatory to 
leasing it for his aoo. Recent oc- 
curences iiave m^aide him deem it ad- 
viislable to supply some fiorm of music, 
to keep thie fnimates from strolling 
into other Professor's departments 
and apartments in search for it. 



'AI.VT IT THE BKRKIES" 



"Tlie riper the bi'rr,y the sweeter the 
Juiele." 



Lambda Delta announce, by means 
of the Sacred Drum, tihe pledging of 
Chuck Barlow. 

"Bai'nle" and "Prain'' are out scout- 
iinig for nenv Beta Alphas. 

(So is all the South Campus) 

Brother Barrick claims that the 
worst! 'habit Kappa Sig has acciulred 
is the new parrot. 

Pledge Bro, Barlow is going to feat- 
ure hiis new spats for the entertain- 
ment of Beta Alpha, our sister 
chapter. 

Rho Gamma announce tlhat they 
will! be uniable to initiate niew broth- 
ers because of the loss of their 
chapter house. 

Professor? Burnap and Van Steen- 
dferen aire being comsiidered for hon- 
orary .membersihip in Lambda Delta. 
Now girlB cajn yon guesis w'hat it is? 

We wonder if new material could- 
n't be found at Ferry Hall? 
.Poibtler tlidnks so. 

Alter a Innig and heated wrestle it 
was decidted that Ann Merner could 
not be adimittedi to Beta Alpha. 

Bea called our atten,tioin t o the 
foUowing advertisement In Sunday 
"Trib." 

"Period furniiture. Dining Room 
Suite, Queen Anin legs, delicately 
carved and decorated." 

(How do they get that way?) 

All Krafft'a lounge lizards will be 
required to watch more closely for, 
and respoinid more quickly to, the 
sign of the 'banidikerchief. 

Mat'hews and Manning seem to 
have an argument badJly in need of 
siettUing. Allow us to suggest cream 
puffs at forty paces.- We would also 
suggesb soft cream and long paces. 

We have several back scores to 
settle with Ray but we are waiting 
iov that copy of the Sbentor wihich 
is mot censored by tihe faculty. 

What he said about us had all the 
ear marks of a dirty dig. 

Are you wondering about Beta 

Aip'ha? See our next. 

The Berry Twins, Ras and Black 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 

Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 

SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



AFT!-]|{ THK PAHTY 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



"Geo, I'm gliad I'm up — 1 fully cx- 
pectled that tlhere dwoi- to open anil 
Mi.-- 81 ." 

Df.n't finish it. — my iioiugo is turn- 
ing pale at t;liic tliouglit. 

But llhe d'OGir was locked . 

Yf«, K.tl.'llie imnloeenfie, of course, 
Speaking ahout rouge turning paile 1 
nimnst passed nut when MeFcrran 
li;nw!iO(l me that roll of hills. 1 
tliouglit he had hcen robhing a bank 
and was giving it all to me. 

What'?] a mere bank robbery thc".=ie 
days? 

Oh, that didn't phase me — it waiS 
the idea of MeFtM-ran giving it away. 

Didn't Ray Moore act at home at 
I lie bar, tlho? 

My dear, diidi you ever hear a laug'b 
liike Puck Eddy's? 

Well, no wondier he lauglicd. 
"Loosih" was enough to ,ma-ke an 
BngM-shmaiu hy.sterical. Wonder if 
he: caught any flliies. 

Say, if Gene Floburg comes here to 
sclnnO'l I do hope lie wears trouisiers 
'cause we girls won't have a chance 
wiitih that smile. 

Don't blush, but didn't Kit Hoover 
have the cutest legs? 

Put hier out.!! 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



P" 



Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r am I n g 



i.AKi<: i-'<»iti<:N I', . 



ii>i. 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars--Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLIOITS YOUR BU.SINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPI^ED. 

Deerpalh and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Marga.ret Cremer of Ottumwa visit- 
ed Ruth Daggett the past week. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

MtUKi ijir 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coi.inuitation 

Tickets 

:t:> i»i-:i':iti>A'i'ia. m'kki' 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

Ia. w. zengler 

' CleanitKj, frcssliif/. liejHiirhu/ 



i i 



The Original 

M AB LE S Y K ES'' 



DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 North State Street 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Est-ablished at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY -CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

Phono C'eiitrul S3-1 1 



THE STENTOR 



ALUMNI NOTES 



1898. Alfred C. Smith Tias recently 
succeeded Iris father as Pi'esid'ent of 
the City National' Bank oif Clinton, 
Iowa, on tihe resignlation of his fath- 
er after nearly fifty years of service 
in tlhie Bainik. 

1899. M'ii;ls Grace Coliemian is teach- 
ing at presieint in tihe High School at 
Sand^vich, her horne town. 

1901. Dr. Christian P. Carstens, 
now eaptaiiiii of reserves, is engaged 
at thie Rood Hospital, Hibbing, Mimn- 
esotai. 

1905. Roy L. Hein'diel is city sup- 
er initeiidenit anid, under the Wisconsin 
Systiem, alllso principal Oif the high 
isiehiool at Viroicqua, Wisconsin. In a 
tiCTOTO of about 3,000 there are ncarliy 
500 In fhe grade schools an-d 300 in 
the high school. During the war 
Mr. Heiiideil] was a niember of the 
Seliective Service Board for his 
county, which registered some 6,000 
men and sent 1,000 into sier\'ice. 

1911, P. E. Allliemoing is working 
as a "comimunlty orgainizer" under 
tihie direction of the Community 
Service Co., New York Citiy, Perma- 
nent address, 3544 La.wrence ave., 
Chicago. 

1913. The permanent adidresis of 
Carl E. Carstens, after November 1, 
will be care of Anaconda Copper 
Mining Co., Potrerilllos, Chili, S. A. 

1913. W. R. Dunemore is noiw es- 
tablislhed at 501 S. Virgil ave., Los 
Angeilleis, Oalllifornia, and quite ready 
to make the acquaintance of other 
Lake Foresters there. If Trustee 
John H. Jones visita Los Angeles in 
the near future, as he now expects 
to dio, rwouildln't it be a good time lor 
a "round-up?" 

1913. Chas, S. Jacobson is apparent- 
ly tihe motive power of the Jacobson 
Mfg. Co., 589 Downer ave., Milwau- 
kee, manufacturing the "rotary glue 
spreader." 

1915. W. G. Brombacher has re- 
ceived an appointment as instructor 
in Physics at Johns Hoipkina Univer- 
sity, Baltimore, and "likes the work 
increasingllly." In sending his sub- 
scription, he s'ays, "I hope thie staff 
do as well! in maniaging the paper 
as last year, and, most of all send 
them out as regularly to subscribers 
as was done last j^ear. 

1915. Pred Dunsmore's present ad- 
dreaa is Sterling, Kansas, care of 
Cooper College, presumably coach- 
ing there. 



1918. Miiisis Ruth Conkey is teach- 
ing in thie High School at Porreston, 

m. 

1919. Russell A. Locke is looking 
forward with eagernesis to the State 
Bar Association examiinationa in De- 
cemlber. He is at present employed 
in, the law office of As'hcraft and 
Ashcraft, 1520-134 S. La Salle St. 



JOHNS WEAK CHARACTER 

(Kansas City Times.) 



J. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Aiitlersiiu Biiililiii(/. Flume 855 
hAKK t'OUKST, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 
Pies and Cakes 

I STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

I 

! 509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



Joihn Jones fears he is a very weak 
ebaracter, i|f not, inldleed, feeble mimd- 
ed. He is on good terms with the 
milkman ajud doesn't even tlhink his 
groceir is tryinm to gouge him. He 
believes the iceman is delivering full 
wei'g'nt. The Shoe dealer has ac- 
tually convinced him that he isn't 
profiteering wihen he siellils a moder- 
ate priced pair of shoes. Son Tam 
had some bad teetih filled t'he otlner 
day and the dentist's bill impressed 
him as reasonable. Daugliter Mary 
had tio luaive her tonisils out and 'he 
figured llliat the suirgeom's bill hadn't 
kept pace with the lower purc'has^ 
ing power of the dollar. T'he familly 
took a little trip around the country 
in the car last summer and the ho- 
telkeepers seemed to be real 'human 
be'ings in their charges. They stopp- 
ed at a small town garage to have 
a littlie work done on the car and the 
man said he guesised a quarter would 
be about right. 

Jones liiais coine tio tihe conclusion 
there is sometihing wrong inside his 
head. He knows he ought to de- 
nounce all the peoplle be deals with 
as pirates and robbers. But they 
aeem to ihim to be about the siame 
sort of people hie is arid he doesn't 
think of 'himself as a pirate. Yes, 
Jcniaa must be an exceedingly feeble 
aoul. 



tiartman & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 



Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIS r 

Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

If its Bakfil .It [lU.MTDOX .s it'-^ Haked Kitiht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE POOREST, ILL. 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST. 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 



Lake Forest, 



Public Service Co. 

Illinois! OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCl IJATOU 



There have been ?to many birth- 
days on the campus (Jhat we feeil 
that probably there are many who 
woulid be iniaerested in knowing how 
the pliainiets have arranged things 
for tih'Pim. Here is the saered s<=cret. 
See liiow it fi.ts you October clilldren. 

Your sign ia that of Libra .or tli:e 
scales. Polks born under this sigin 
have greaia literary talents. (Woo 
is me! The Imcubator wasn't born iiu 
Octoiber.) They miake exee^llent en- 
tei-tiainems and usually lead a happ.\' 
liife. They are ambitious in .-ipitie 
of aH tho=ie gifts and iwill go tlhrougli 
an ob.-?tacle if they can't go around 
it. 

Dear Incubator: 

I 'ha\e been bothered for gome 
time now with direadifui hieadach^es 
upon, arising iti the morning which 
do not subside until after breakfast 
Wiliat can it be, I am quite troub- 
led. 

Yoair?, 

I. B. STOAITLOCKS 

Dear FtrnMItaicks: 

Your naime remains tlie sa.me in 
gplte cf tlhe tifiK factM-y on the top 
of your head. Can it! If you must 
have a kink in your, wool use electric 
curlers amid then you will not have 
the kinks in your head which you 
ccimp'liain of as el.-^ctricity i,=i very 
soothing to thie nervous jystem, 

H. B. O. 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Excluaive Dry 
Goods Store." Market Square 




^Sfiop/or 
'%men5t.Childrcn5 Turnishinqs 



Offer the Services of a Connpetent Staff 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug 
gestions n^ay be followed confidently 



BLOUSES, 


SEPERATE 


SKIRTS, 


NEGLIGEES, 


SWEATER 


COATS, LIN 


GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- | 


COATS, 


UNDERWEAR, 


HOSIERY, 


BATH ROBES, 


NECKWEAR, GLOVES | 


and Many 


Other Lines of 1 


Merchandise. 



Dear Incubator: 

Do we run because wo are af ra Id 
or afraid because we run? 

Yours, 
EGYPTIAN 

Dear Eg.vptian: 
Ask the Sphinx. 

H. B. O. 

Dear Mrs. H. B. Orpin.ijton: 
Is iignicirancc Ijli.'^iS? 

Yours inquiringly, 
ARCHIE ANGELL 

Dear Archie: 

Yau ought to be abfc to answer 
that qu*ition your.-lolf. I should 
flay mo. If it were there would be 
a lot more happinesis on, this campu- 
if not in the I'e.st of the world. 

MRS. Or!PIi\GTO\ 

Dear H. B. O. 

How was iron ore first discovered;? 
Yours, 
A. MINOR 

Dear Minor, 

I believe they smelt it. 

H. B. O. 



T^iie fulilhack job ho held quite woll 
Winon first he entered coliltege. 
And a.s a sophomore he gliowed 
Some fancy halfback knowKedge; 
And as a junion- quarterback 
He was quite cellebrated' — 
Be was a crippled humpback when 
At liafiit he graduated. 

U. OF I. SIREN 



PERSONALS 



Sigma Tau eniterliaincd Alice Dnus- 
lias lia-t week end. 

^I'.ieta Psi entertained Gwen Mas- 
sey Friday. 

Marion Joyce of Roekford was the 
guest of Prainces Bradley over the 
week-eiiid. 

Sigma Tau entertained Mardelle- 
Meents for the pasS week. 

Milidired Day spent the week-end in 
E\'anifton with hier sisiters. 



IF YOU AKl-: -\ 

BIOLOGY TEACHER 

\Vi' rul\'is<:* v<'u lo UmjU uj) 
The General Biological Supply House 

rious Kimbark Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

All Kimlsof Biolot'ical Supplies 

and Appui'iitus. 



THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 

The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimball Hall 

Jackson and \%'al>ash 

Fraternity and Soroity 
Work Our Si>ecialty 



Telephone 14 

hor Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

AuloDiobiU- Supplios But.'i.':i;;(? Ti'iin.sferred 

•Sevi-n PassPiiL'er (_';us lo Rent b> Trip or Hour 



L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 

PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIPE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



CCEbSFULLY 
DONE .... 



DYING ^"o 

DRY CLEANING DONE IN 24 HOURS 

WALTER Le FILS, Tailor 

34 Forest Ave. Phone 259 



TELEPHONE 1039 
Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DttRPATH 

A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BR.E,Ar> CAHES ROLLS 

I!ih1i.1mv :.ii.1 ritljir ^ii' i-;::! l,';iki-s to Clrdi-r 



-PHONE 881 



STYLES THAT PLEASE 
for COLLEGE MEN aitd WOMEN 

UA81MU88EN 13KOS. BOOT SHOP 

M A R K E 1' .S Q U .A. R E 



THR STENTOR 




The "Constitution** of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first 
battleship of any nation to be electri- 
cally propelled, is one of the most important 
achievements of the scientific age. She not 
only develops the maximum power and, 
with electrical control, has greater flexibility 
of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, 
but also gives greater econ- 
omy. At 10 knots, her 
normal cruising speed, she 
will steam on less fuel than 
the best turbine-driven ship 
that preceded her. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 



The electric generating 
plant, totaling 28,000 horse- 
power, and the propulsion equipment of the 
great super-dreadnaught were built ty the 
General Electric Company. Their operation 
has demonstrated the superiority of electric 
propulsion over old-time methods and a 
wider application of this principle in the 
merchant marine is fast making progress. 



Length— 624 feet 

Width— 97 feet 

Displacement — 32,000 tons 

Fuel capacity — a million gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power — 28,000 electrical horse- 
power 

Speed — 21 knots 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gen- 
erators of 400 horsepower each, supply 
power for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, 
fans, shop machinery, and kitchen and laun- 
dry appliances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea 
marks the advancement of 
another phase of the elec- 
trical industry in which the 
General Electric Company 
is the pioneer. Of equal 
importance has been its 
part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, 
transforming the potential 
energy of waterfalls for use 
in electric motors, develop- 
ing the possibilities of electric lighting and 
many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications 
of electricity to the needs of mankind that 
scarcely a home or individual today need 
be without the benefits of General Electric 
products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the " New Mexico," entitled, 
"The Electric Ship," wijl Li sent upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Uesii 44, Schenectady, New York, 




General Office 
Schenectad3^ N.Y. 







Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 



95-108D 



THE STENTOR 



ODDS AND ENDS 



Anotlver adivantage in being a seni- 
or — Professor Sibiley's Tea Parties. 

It's bad eiiiuff wlien taking exams 
but jlmiinile now we liave to pay to 
take tlliiem — yieplli — ^two eenrts. 

ImagBne coraiing in fro.m a Ijrisli 
forty -"five minute tennis practice and 
being met im tlve hialll by a sopli who 
gazes at your glloiwering visage and 
tliein remairkis: 

"My dear, I never knew t'liait you 
were such a gooid artielt." 

P. S. Ain't sopihs siwspieious crea- 
tures tliio? 

We alio, heard tell about how the 
"Dean, of Men" treated tlve CoHegc 
Hall boys to a smoiker amd cider — 
now we «aiin't a hinitlim' but we s-ure 
are a 'wislhin' t'hat our "Dean" wouhl 
foilllow suit. We ain't so keen aljout 
the sinioke part biut t,hen cider ils 
cilder. 

They were surely lucky girls who 
dlrew Mias Pawei]|l''si taliil'e i'ly Sei3tie,ml>- 
er — Thiur.S'dlay might — Birtlid'ay cako 
n' ewerytlii ng. Now all joiai in the 
chorus: 

"Happy Rhthdjay t/i yr.u 
Happy Birtihdiay to you 
Happy Birthidiay Miss PowelOi 
Happy Bii-tihidlay to you." 

P. S. Repeat for Rebecca Arm- 
stroing and Ruth Kenn:edy. 

We hoilld the same sentiment as 
the Prosih who being engaged into 
the briny deptihs of a tub for t.he 
Hhird tiime remarked: "This ceases to 
be funny" really all merriment 
ceases wliien "Van" announ.ces in 
Spanisih clIaisB, "We willi have a 
written lesson today." 



AVOODLA.M) HOURS 



The woodlianidls were in revelry, 

Last eve as tihere I troid; 

A fantasy of crimson lleaves 

O'eir mole and burnished sad. 

Their ohiilidren fluttered down as rain, 

A S'WiSt and' lighltisome rilll, 

In happy niockeriefi flung t'lieir 

Ih.uglh, 
With jesit for wiinter's ill. 

These nvoodllanids breatiie as com- 
rades true. 

Each hour while I roam; 

A t'lious'anid balms has liunger's need, 

Each dale a welcome home; 

With quip and dance they spurn each 
loss. 

My pain tlhiey chide with glee; 

A merry band of golden elves 

Are Autumn's leaves to me. 

W. G. McCOLLEY, '21 



Photo Supplies, Developing 

Stationery and Candy 

lit 

FrencK's Drti^ Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

i)K AMI^RICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

ACKNT 

Luke Forest, Illinois 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 



Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Homelike and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



For That Eleven O'clock Feeling 



HOT ROLLS 
COFFEE CAKES 



BISCUITS 
DOUGHNUTS 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



U/ye 



The Biackler Market Co. 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. Corner Oeerpath and Weste^Aves. 

o. triebwasser, Prop. Everything of the Choicest in 

LAKE forest, ILL. j FrQSh 3 P Cl 

Salt Meats 
Game and 



Phone 17 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 
MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
a Specialty 



THE STKNTOR 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilll!!llll!llllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllll!llllllllllllllliy^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1!)13-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever hefore. Some 
of llie features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of vvliOMe courses will ^ive the fundamentals of business training, (i) full reor- 
ganization of atliletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive inl crest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare ot the students and the 
colleg.', (41 special inter'^st in thri Glee (Jlub and the Garricli (dramatic) Club. 

'riiR situation of Lake Korest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are ful!>' provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $:^2.5 to $400 for men; |350 to |J50 for women. Both men and women have an 
aciivi' sliare, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'.S Ql-I ICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 






aiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii^^ 



The 



(Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C.W.YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH: 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: j 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5p. m ' 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS ; 



FUiST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



U S L g 



ownaw 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectioneru 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

CNeill's Hardware Store 

W HEN IN NEED OP 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

Clotliinfl and 
l'^ui*iiisliiiigs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
I SHOES 

I u /J oo lihf lUiixo 

i Piione 7i 9 Western .\ve. Lake ForeSj; 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKK FORKSr, II,[JNOIS. NOVEMBER 7, 1919 



NUMBER 6 



LAKE FOREST HOLDS BKLOIT 
TO TIE 



Do you remember, maybe you 
do and maybe you don't, any- 
way last winter when our north- 
erners were figuring' on cast- 
ing- off the woolens and basket- 
ball had come in to their grasp 
by playing one or two of the con- 
ference teams they began build- 
ing air castles forthis year? And 
they did build 'em, — built "em 
so high that Stork Legner could- 
n't have reached the top. It was 
going to be an easy matter for 
them to clean Wisconsin and 
Northwestern in the Big Ten 
and teams in the Little Five 
would be easy meat. Well, Be- 
loit came down here with full 
expectations of carrying asvay 
an easy victory, (they haven't 
had many this year.) 

The Red and Black surely 
must have pleased the hearts of 
the Alumni returned for Home- 
coming Day when they saw them 
hold their Ole Oleson rivals 
without a score The day was 
perfect for football with the ex- 
ception of a muddy field, but you 
could feel the zip in the air that 
made you feel that a real football 
game was to be plaved. Look- 
ing over the two teams at the 
kickoff it could be seen that P.e- 
loit had the edge in weight and 
seemed to have a much heavier 
line. But our outweighed line 
did not seem to be bothered by 
that fact as they broke through 
their opponent's line time after 
time on defense and stopped Be- 
loit's rushing with the exception 
of the last qrarter. 

Both teams could not gain much 
in the tirst quarter, neitheropen- 
ing up. but used straight and de- 
layed bucks through the line. 
Towards the end of the second 
quarter our delayed bucks were 
(Continued on Page 2) 



HOME COMING A GKEAT 
SICCESS 



Saturday, November the first 
1920 will always stick in our 
memories as one of the most suc- 
cessful Homecomings of Lake 
Forest College. Many of the 
old students were back and with 
pep so contageous that it fairly 
took the present student body 
off its feet. Everybody was hap- 
py, everybody felt at home and 
everybody knew everybody else. 
If half of the little tots that 
were present intend to marticu- 
late at Lake Forest when they 
are old enough, we will have to 
enlarge our institution to make 
room for them. 

In the afternoon we were all 
treated to a crackerjack of a foot- 
ball game. It was no doubt the 
best game of Ihe season and was 
indeed a classic; just the kind of 
a game that the Alumni could 
enjoy. The old fellows asked 
like a bunch of Freshmen, every 
time the ball got close to the 
enemy's goal, and they surely 
showed the present bunch just 
what spirit was. The crowd 
was the largest that has been 
seen on Farwell Field for some 
years. 

In the evening the men and 
the Alumni all gathered in the 
Commons and ate as in days of 
yore. During the dinner, some 
of the old timers sang songs that 
used to delight the fair maidens 
at Lois Hall. Some of the sing- 
ing was raw in spots, but then 
time does wear on one, and warp- 
ed music boxes don't give the 
best music. Then on came the 
Jazz Four. Moore with his whis- 
key tenor, Becky with his Soda 
Fountain lead. Beard with his 
best baritone and .Army with his 
Commons bass made a good com- 
(CoiUinuKl ui. Pdge 3) 



FRESHMEN WIN BY A FLUKE 



(By a Sophomore) 



By a fluke in the first quarter 
of the Sophomore - Freshman 
game last Saturday the Frosh 
won by a score of six to noth- 
ing. The game was a clean hard 
fought battle from start to fin- 
ish. The Sophomore team al- 
though rather unprepared for 
the contest nevertheless came in 
strong the last half and but for 
inopportune fumbles would have 
scored two touch-downs in the 
last quarter. The Frosh team 
scored a touch-down in the first 
quarter when Frosh .James se- 
cured a free fumble and ran 
through an open field for twen- 
ty-five yards for the Sophomore 
goal. 

The Sophomore dope-hounds 
account for the defent in anum- 
ber of ways. It is asserted that 
defeat was due to the lack of 
material since so many of the 
members of the Sophomore class 
have secured positions on the 
Varsity Squad. Lack of prac- 
tice is also believed to have 
been a great factor in tlie final 
result. The second year aggre- 
gation had lieen assembled in but 
one practice previous to the bat- 
tle while the Frosh had gone 
through a srenuous week of 
training. The ruling that Frosh 
may not smoke cigarettes on 
the campus may have had a ma- 
terial effect upon the physical 
condition of that organization. 

The stars in the contest were, 
Rice, Schick, and Frieble for the 
Sophomores and James Kelly, 
and Smith for the Frosh. Rice 
made long plunges through the 
Frosh line and his punting was 
a big feature of the event. 
Schick and Frieble both made 
numerous gains around the 
{Continued on Page 2) 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FHREST HOLDS BELOIT 
TO TIE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



used successfully and Kyndberg- 
made first down two or three 
times. This quarter belonged 
to Lake Forest and Beloit could 
not make more than one first 
down. The second half started 
with each team resorting- to more 
open play, but due to the soggy 
field and a wet ball forward 
passing was impossible and 
straight football had to be re- 
lied on. Beloit seemed strong 
in this quarter but Lake Forest 
fought stubbornly and with the 
exception of one long dash thru 
the line, Beloit could not make 
more than two first downs. The 
first break of the game came 
when Bergen fumbled when go- 
ing thru the line on our twenty- 
five yard line and a Beloit man 
fell on the ball. Unable to gain 
first down, Beloit's quarter-back 
attempted a drop kick from the 
twenty yard line but it dropped 
short. Lake Poorest then punted 
out of danger and Beloit lost an- 
other chance to come back when 
one of their men grabbed hold of 
Hause when the latter attempted I 
to tackle Lansing, running with 
the ball. The game ended with 
the ball out of bounds in the 
center of the field. 

Such fight among the Red and 
Black was unknown to the root- 
ers and the way they stubbornly 
resisted the attempts of the Be 
loit backs to plunge their line 
was sure an eyeopener worth re- 
telling. Russell stopped many 
again thru the center of the line 
and on offense made a good sized 
hole. Legner and Casey were 
there to the finish and "Brick 
ley" got thru and made some 
good tackles. The work of 
Hause and McColley at ends 
could not be improved upon, and 
an end run around Mac was al 
ways a loss for the Blue and 
Gold. Captain Woods backed 
up the line in his usual knock- 
em-cold manner while Kyndberg 
not only made first down a num- 



ber of times on his delayed 
bucks but stopped many a gain 
thru our right side of the line. 
Bergen's kicking along low punt 
resulted in a hard catch or pick- 
up for the Beloit safety man and 
almost every time he was downed 
in his tracks by our ends. Van 
Sickle showed his fighting spirit 
when he had a ligament wrench- 
ed in the first quarter and kept 
right on fighting. 

The crowd was unusually 
large, there being about 1500 
present to see old time scores 
settled. And you can tell the 
gang is backing the team by the 
pep shown on the sidelines. Led 
by Beard and Lobdell they re- 
sponded nobly with yells and 
the snake dance in between 
halves showed the alumni that 
the school is awake and up at 
'em. Let's have it the same \7ay 
when Northwestern comes here 
November 15th for the last game 
and help the team knock the 
Northwestern gang for a cuckoo. 



FRESHMEN WIN BY A FLUKE 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Lake Forest— Beloit — 

McColley L. E.' Saxbie 

Legner L. T. tlrawford 

Framberg; L. G. Wooten 

Rnssell C. Wilburn 

Van Sickle R. G. Schaclit 

(jasjens R. T. Zeibel 

Hause R. E. Beimer 

Beddoes Q B. Lansing', Capt 

Bergen L. H. McCarttiy 

Kyndberg R. H. Phillips 

Woods, Capt. F. B. Thompson 

Referee— Henry, Kenyon. 

LTuipire— Benbrook, Michigan. 

Head Linesman— Morton, Michigan 



The following Alumni spent 
the week end with Omega Psi. 
Morris Mudge 
Robert Scholz 
J. M. Mac Evoy 
Robert Wenban 
Stanley Anderson 
Ralph Dean 
Layard Thorpe 
S. T. Hansen 
E. E. Benson 
A. W. Cook 
A. E. Cook 
C. S. Jackson 
Dr. D. T. Howard 
C. R. Gould 



Frosh ends. James, Kelly and 
Smith made all the gains for the 
Frosh and most of these were 
made by long end runs. 

In the last quarter Martin af- 
ter playing a very consistent 
game was injured sufficiently to 
necessitate his being taken from 
the game. This greatly injured 
the chances of the Sophomore 
since Martin was a great ground 
gainer and sure in receiving for- 
ward passes. 

The Freshmen changed their 
line-up considerably throughout 
the game, while not a single sub- 
stitution was made in the Sopho- 
more line-up except when Mar- 
tin was laid out in the last few 
minutes of play. 

The line-up was as folows: — 



Sophomores 




Freshmen 


Martin 


Kunz 


R.E. 


Alano 


Hale 




R.T. 


Gardner 
Johnson 


Horan 




R. G. 


Potter 
Manning 


Tracy 




C. 


Davidson 


Smith 




L.G. 


Virgil 


Lillis 




L.T. 


Barlow 
Johnson 


Thayer 




I.E. 


Jones 


Schick 




Q.B. 


L. Smith 
(Capt.) 


Rice (Capt.) 


F. B. 


Casjens 


Johnson 




R.H.B 


Kelley 


Frieble 




L.H.B. 


James 


Referee- 


—Derby 


. Umpire — Sum- 


ner. 









Y. W. C. A. Girls Sell Hot Dogs 
At Beloit Game 



The Y. W. C. A. girls put on 
another hot dog sale at the Be- 
loit game Saturday. The sn-tp 
in the air at ,^ the I'vercise from 
I heeriiig iPiist Jiuve given thc- 
cr>.wd a great ari'tte and a 
considerable sum v.as reali^;:>d 
a'ld not a sirigle dog remained. 
The demand :-f'='ired to oe 
stri'ijc'tr at the e.nc of the sal:; 
than at first. 



THE :STENTOR 



HOME COMING A GRKAT 
SUCCESS 

(Con tin nod from Pagr 1) 



bination. The music from their 
fair young- throats was a delight 
to all, and the only reason they 
stopped was because they had 
used up their repertoire. Lillis 
and Noble gave the very thick 
soup a good start wih their jazz. 
Moore sang a couple of senti- 
mental ballads that made tears 
come to the listeners' eyes 
which spoiled their dessert. 

After dinner Mr. Jones of '92 
gave a very interesting talk on 
what the Alumni committee was 
doing and their plans for the 
future. His idea of making 
Lake Forest the Princeton of the 
West was heartily applauded. 
Lake Forest is thirty miles from 
Chicago and Princeton is thirty 
miles from New York and there 
is no reason why Lake Forest 
can not be the Princeton of the 
West, if all the Alumni get back 
of it and show more than a pass- 
ive interest. After Mr. Jones 
finished, Mr. Woolsey the power 
behind the throne asked that 
every one get back of Lake For- 
est and BOOST. Mr. Schwartz 
was glad that he did not have to 
wear skirts to the Homecoming, 
and that those who wished to 
make a woman's colleg-e out of 
Lake Forest had failed. Jones 
told him to forget it and he sat 
down. The meeting broke up 
with the College song. 

The Hard Times Party was a 
good climax for the day. It was 
surprising to see what a hard 
bunch we had. Hirshey was elab- 
orately dressed in a tight jjair of 
white trousers, a sailor blouse 
and some Gerard special glasses. 
Miss Heckensweiler came dress- 
ed as a gypsy. Stan. Went- 
worth, s kid was afraid that she 
was going to run away with him, 
so he stuck close to the old man. 
Miss Coan had arranged a couple 
of good plays that delighted the 
audience. One of the young ladies 
put on a very snakey dance and 



FRATERNITY PLEDGES 



Kappa Sigma Pledges: 

Don B. Hause 
Frank E. Kyndberg 
Theodore T. Kelly 
Kenneth M. Gardner 
Maurice R. O'Connell 
Mortimer E Carlson 
John A. Davidson 
Ingvald Johnson 



Omega Psi announces the 
pledging of the following men: 

John Anderson 
Windsor Gibbs 
Howard Manning 
David Jones 



The Phi Pi Epsilon announces 
the pledging of the following 
Freshmen: Charles N. Barlow, of 
Chicago; LeRoy H. Buckingham, 
or Urbana; Charles G. Ives, Jr., 
of Pecatonica; William L. Jud- 
son of Lake Forest; Berwyn C. 
Moore, of Farmington; Leland C. 
Smith, of Lake Forest; and Karl 
Noble, of Rockford. 



That Pledge Pin 



Digamma announces the pledg- 
ing of the following men: Paul 
D. Bergen; Stanley L. Casjens, 
Eugene H. Geer, Marcus L. Pot- 
ter, John R. Virgil and W. Hall 
Virgil. 



The Phi Eta Alpha announces 
the pledging- of Lucius Lobdell. 



The Perpetual Smelling' Brooli 

All cool and limpid del flow 
Down to the winding river. 
For booze may come 
And booze may go. 
But I go on forever. 

was applauded often. Every- 
Ijody danced and had a good time. 
With the playing of Home Sweet 
Home the party broke up, and 
the usual gathering around the 
steps of Lois Hall followed. 



Have you Jiotieed little : ■ -shie 
With that pledge pin on his 
coat? 
Looking very high and mighty, 
Don't he kinder get your goat? 
He may feel the world he's con- 
quered. 
With that pledge pin nestled 
there, 
But the fellow who's without it. 
Need not give up in despair. 

True, we all want recognition. 

And would like to join a Frat, 
But in sports we are not winners 

Or our pocketbooks are flat; 
We're poor at rushing Lois Hall, 

And at dancing are at bay; 
Our clothes are not the latest 
cut. 

But we'll make our mark some 
day. 

The Tree of Knowledge is our 
goal. 
And we're sti-iving now to 
climb 
To its very topmost branches, 
And its taking all our time. 
We will work hard in our stud- 
ies; 
Profs will not upon us frown; 
You will gladly call us brothers, 
When we've won fame or re- 
nown. 

We are holding no resentment 

To the fellows in the Frat, 
Who have failed to offer pledge 
pins, 
And have thought they left us 
flat. 
We are here for bigger business. 

As you all can clearly see; 
For we're part of that great 
Spirit, 
Of our dear old L. F. C. 

Ray Moore, '20 



James — "Does Coach Derby 
live here at Lois Hall?" 
1 Miss Hamilton — "No, indeed 
i not, but his dog does." 



TBE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Korest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 

Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor VV. R. Bridgman 

faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



whole student body is necessary 
for winnings this game. The 
[ men whoareon the team showed 
! in the Beloit game that they have 
the stuff in them to win when 
they have real backing. Those 
well filled, cheering bleachers 
were a big factor in the glorious 
fight our men put up that day. 

Of coLirse, we won't have so 
many of the alumni to help us 
out next Saturday as for the 
Beloit game, but we can mobilize 
what we do have into a solid and 
successful unit of support. And 
we can — and will — win that 
game! 



BEAT 



NORTH- 
WESTERN 



Blaekstonese 



Next Saturday, November 15, 
we play Northwestern College 
here. We want to win that 
game. It will be a hard old fight 
and it will require the supreme 
effort of the whole school The 
Northwestern team always 
comes well supported. One time 
that they played here, they 
brought a hundred or more root- 
ers and actually had a larger 
number on the sidelines than the 
home team. They won the 
game. 

We can't let that happen this 
year. We can't face North 
western on our own grounds 
with weaker support than the 
visitors bring with them. This 
game means as much to us as it 
does to them, and more. If they 
can bring a hundred people fifty 
miles, we can surely get eyery 
man and woman in school out 
there to hold down our side of 
the field. 

We said that the effort of the 



This is one of the numerous 
languages of America, but is em- 
ployed chiefly by lawmakers, 
courts and lawyers. By some it 
is confused with English, but 
the following example will show 
the fundamental difference: — 

"All persons are hereby warn- 
ed, cautioned, admonished and 
advised not to sit, stand, lie, 
crouch, or kneel, or to assume or 
adopt any other posture or at- 
titude whatsoever, or to be; or 
to attempt or appear to sit, 

I stand, lie, crouch, or kneel, or to 
assume or adopt any other pos- 
ture or attitude whatsoever, or 

I to be on this platform while the 

' train is in motion." 

The English for it is: "KEEP 
OFF!" 



When you feel blue, awful 
blue, and the world seems upside 
down, then's the time you want 
to understand that it's you and 
not the world. Who said that — 
Shakespeare or Booth Tarking- 
ton? It's the truth, neverthe- 
less!! 



You may dejiend upon it, the 
best antiseptic for decay and dis- 
interest is an active interest in 
human affairs and in college ac- 
tivities. If you feel yourself 
slipping, jai loose and knock 
'em cold. Those live longest 
who live most. 



Among the alumni who spent 
the week-end with Digamma 
were: A. Duane Jackman, Charles 
Long, Abe Hennings, Elmer 
Franzen, Charles Logan, William 
Wilson, Fred E. aBtes. Other vis- 
itors at Digamma over the week- 
end were: James Dougan, E. Lyle 
Bates, Neal Snellgrove, and John 
Rees. 

Robert Framberg entertained 
his brother from Chicago last 
week. 

Jack Rees has returned to St. 
Paul, Minn., to resume his work 
as coach, after being called here 
by the serious illness of his 
brother Dave. 

Mrs. Bergen of Milwaukee, 
Wis., was the week-end guest 
of her son Paul. 

Kappa Sigma announces the 
initiation of Edward T. Mat 
thews. 



Visitors at Kappa Sigma dur- 
ing the Homecoming: 
H. J. Hansen, '00. 
S. Biggs, '01 
E. G. Banta, '02 
W. C. McKee, '09 
H. W. Hildebrand, '12 
R. J. McKee, '13 
Ewart Hall, '15 
J. C. Milton, '16 
W. T. Pearce, '17 

E. L. Gilroy, '18 

F. L. Miller, ex '19 
R. H. Morrow, ex '20 
A. S. Nichols, ex '22. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Dareh, '12 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Smith, '15 



Robert Crawford is visiting 
Lake Forest College this week 



Mr. Troutman is organizing a 
Boccaccio Dramatic Club. 



Tryouts will be made soie 
some time this coming week 



Angry subscriber of Stentoi to 
reporter — "You're printing a 
bunch of lies about me." 

Reporter — "Yes, but ow 
would you like to have me pint 
the truth?" 



THE STENTOR 



"Ain't It The Berries" 



1-2-3-4-5-6-7-89-10 Redlight! 
Thayer and Moore ai-e quite 
playful lately. 

B. L. T. says a lot of things 
we don't — but then he hasn't 
a faculty to censor him. 

'Sno fair Lambda — We're 
laboring under a handicap. 

Our weekly conundrum. 
Why fs a mouse that spins? h 

G. Beard: Say, Frieble. how 
often do you go out for gym? 



F. 
G. 
F. 
G. 
F. 



Oh, tri-weekly. 
B : How do you spell 'tri'? 

When do you go out? 
B.; Tri-weekly. 

How do you spell 'weekly'? 



Kelly says the best way to 
stop smoking is to confine one- 
self to Pall Mall's, King size. 
One would have to stop soon if 
he (or she) had our income. 

So Chuck says to her "How do 
you get that way?" and she did- 
n't have NO comeback. 

How about it? We bite. 

By the way, Rho Gamma is 
now national, Runkel heading 
our Madison Chapter. 

Squirrel Stuff. 
We understand Miss Kratch 
has been running around with a 
man from the nut house. 

Legner says, "Now me and 
Brickley - - ". We bite — which 
is Brickley? 

Prof. Sibley is looking for a 
woman who is either homely and 
virtuous or beautiful and vicious. 
May we not suggest Theda Bare- 
back, than whom there is none 
whomer. 

It's a horse on us. 

Mike, Barlow and Noble, our 
Djer-Kiss hounds, visited Wau- 
kegan last Friday. 

Tell us Mister when is a faii-j' 
not a fairy. 

Perrigo to "PeP"berst, who is 



smoking a short stub of a cigar, 
"Oh Mister, your chewing tobaco 
is on fire!" 

We have discovered Gibb's 
first name at last — Windsor! 
"Fag" for short we suppose. 



We caught you Dick! 
make Lambda Delta. 



You 



Sweet Gushing-Young-Thing 
(who has forgotten her partner's 
name and thinks of brilliant idea 
for getting it again) "Really, I 
can't remember whether your 
name is spelled with an 'e' or an 
'i' 

He-thing "With an 'i'. 'Hill' " 

The Berry Twins, Ras and Black. 



, Holden: What did that woman 
do when her pet dog jumped on 
you and bit you? 

Chuck: She gave me a very re- 
proachful look, then ordered the 
dogs' valet to give it a bath. 



Customer: "Give me a dozen 
fried oysters, waiter' 

Waiter: ?"Sorry, sah, but we's 
all out of shell-fish, 'ceptin eggs, 
sah" 



Mr. Trontman (to members of 
cast:; If you have anything to 
say about a mule, say it to his 
face. Its dangerous to talk Ije- 
hind his back. 



What would our campus do 
without James, Lobdell, Man- 
ning and Hirshey? 



Casjens, you stay away from 
Lois Hall this week. Give us 
a chance. 



Tell us Anne, why does Chuck 
Beard like that Garrick Club 
part so well? 



Sigma Tau entertained Carol 
Sampson, Hazel and Clara Clarke, 
Alice Douglas, Mrs. Shepherd, 
Lillian Evans. Mrs. Larry 
Thorpe, Mr. and Mrs. H. Awe, 
Mr. and Mrs. Babcock and Made- 
line Hoover this week end. 



Theta Psi entertained Gwen- 
dolyn Massey, Mildred Zenos, 
Sarah Moore, Gertrude Loop, 
Carol Welch and Marie Sedge- 
wick this week end. 



Kaiijia Kappa Chi entertained 
Clara Johnson of the University 
of Illinois this week end. 



Kappa Kappa Chi announces 
the initiation of Florence Russell 
and Florence Metzger. 



Rose Deutch spent the week 
end in Chicag'o and had a won- 
derful time. 



Francis Bradley and Mildred 
Day drove to Evanston Sunday 
afternoon. 



Alice Axton spent the week 
end at her home in Mt. Morris, 
Illinois. 



Lillian Hatfield's parents have 
been visiting her during' the 
past week. 



Lois Ryno's mother has come 
from Canton to visit her daugh- 
ter. 



Vivian Hendrickson from Mt. 
Morris has been visiting her sis- 
ter Ruth. 



Virginia Kratch spent the 
week end at her home in Chi- 
cago. I 



Ramona Birch spent the week 
end at her home in Pecationia, 

111. 

The Phi Eta Alpha announces 
the pledging of the following 
freshmen, Wm. Morley and 
Richard Abernathy. 

Army— Hey Morley, I got a 
paper bill here. 

Morley — Wish I had a hundred 
of them. 



T h:e s t e n t o r 




Little Felix 

I had a date 

With a Lo-is Hall girl 

The o-tlier night. 

I will re-late 

The de-tails to you. 

First she took me 

Up town to Kraft's. 

The food at the Hall 

Must be fierce 

Judging from what 

She ate — and 

Also I now 

Re-alize the 

High cost of liv-ing. 

Tlien she lured me 

To the beach. 

This is what she said. 

Is not the lake be-yu te-ful? 

It makes me feel 

So pa-thet-ic" 

It did not make me 

Feel that way. 

May-be she had put 

On her win-ter flan-nels 

And could feel sub-lime. 

I had not; I was chil-ly 

Then we sat on a bench. 

She told me I was 

So old for my age 

And that she had 

Fall-en for my line. 

She said she was cold 

I gave her my coat. 

She didn't say much more 

We came home. • 

Hen-ner-ry says I 

Am still very young. 

Yours ruly, 
Little Felix. 



Tlio Incubator 



(By Mrs. ?iein-y Bu.ff Orpington) 



As we don't seem to have any 
Topsies on the campus and every 
one seems to have birthdays vv'e 
find that by printing the horo- 
scope for last weelv we plunged 
into deeper waters than we had 
hoped for, as every one wants to 
know what the stars have in 
store for them. 

The sign of this week is that 
of Scorpio; the birthstone is the 
topaz, denoting fidelity; the flow- 
er, the crysanthenuim and the 
colors are dark blue and red. The 
people born during this week 
are great readers, ready conver- 
sationalists and always appear at 
ease. They are very adaptable, 
quick-witted and able, and trust- 
worthy to the last detail. Don't 
become too conceited if you are 
born under these lucky stars for 
there is still another side to the 
story. They are abrupt, impul- 
sive and subject to moods. Also, 
their judgment is severe and 
critical and their punishment of 
wrong very often too severe and 
relentless. 

Prize Lover's Contest 

Since it is the custom of this 
column to deal with correspond- 
ence and to answer questions we 
feel duty bound to give a certain 
amount of our precious??? col- 
umn to one of our noted Olymp- 
ians. Professor Dunlap has in- 
formed us that throughout all 
his historical investigations he 
has never yet succeeded in read- 
ing a love letter as classical and 
well deserving of praise as the 
first letter he himself ever wrote. 

Our worthy pedagogue is so 
anxious to see how near any of 
the students can come to produc- 
ing a parallel masterpiece that 
he has actually offered .a prize of 
five dollars to the best love let- 
ter any student has written 
without tlie idea of publication. 

This ought to be the luundation 
for a close contest. Hand in your 



letters. The one published in 
next week's incubator will be the 
prize winner. 

Watch for the next issue! 



Dear Incubator: — 

The professors say that my 

brains are scattered. Is this a 

very common ailment? Could 

you tell me what I can do for it? 

Yours worridly, 

M. T. Scull. 

Dear M. T. Scull:— 

Get a magnate. Perhaps that 
will draw them together. 

Mrs. H. B. 0. 

Dear Mrs. H. B. 0.:— 
Is life an empty dream? 
Yours, 
I. B. Kurious. 

Dear I. B. Kurious: — 

Not for every one. Those who 
term it so very frequently make 
it a howling nightmare for the 
others. 

H. B. 0. 

Dear H. B. 0.:— 

What happens to gold when it 
is exposed to air? 

Yours, 
(^ A. Miser. 

Dear Miser: — 

That's easy. It's u s u a 1 1 3' 
stolen. 

The Incubator. 

Dear Incubator: — 

Who invented the toothpick? 
Yours interestedly, 

A. Timber. 

Dear Mr. Timber:— 

I couldn't say who invented 
tiiem but Mohammed is said to 
have made the use of the tooth- 
pick almost a religious ordin- 
ance. There you have my main 
reason for not being a follower 
of Mohammed. 

H. B. 0. 



THE rs T K N T O R 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



CLUB DISCllSSKS I. AND K. 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 

John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 
Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS j 

Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties | 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" I 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS i 

5 So. Wabash Ave. i 

CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 I 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



The men's Discussion Club 
held its second meeting' at the 
Kappa Sis:ma rooms a week a^ro 
Wednesday eveninyf. The sub- 
ject was the Initative and Refer- 
endum and theprojected changes 
to the State Constitution. The 
case for the I. R. was found to I 
be so strong- that no opponents 
appeared, so the time was spent! 
in setting forth the meaning and ! 
advantage: of the proposed. I 
There was time also for throw 
ing sidelights on various other' 
issues of present interest. 

Since most of those present 
admitted that theirideas of these 
measures had been rather hazy 
until this meeting gave them oc- 
casion to look them up, we pre 
sume that the same applies to a 
number of other students. 
Therefore we will give briefly 
the definitions: "The Initiative" 
is a method whereby laws can be 
enacted by the people at general 
elections. The "Referendum" 
is a method of repealing existing 
j legislation by direct vote of the 
j people. The "Recall" is a means 
jof discharging, by direct vote, 
I officers and representatives who 
(Continuf'd on page nine) 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 

Oscar Piersoii 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 



i>Aiii<: i'(»i{i<:*s I' 



II. I. 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpatli and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Ci)L.iruutation 

Tickets 

:ta i>ii:KKi>A.xii. west 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaiihitj, I'ffssiiig. HepairitK/ 



The Original 

"MABLE SYKES'' 

DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 IVorth N<aU> Nti'eel 

(Opiiosite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF HY -CLASS PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 



11= 



m 



THE STENTOR 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



The changes of addresses giv- 
en herewith are taken from the 
post cards returned to the Alum- 
ni Association committee. Where 
they seem to be temporary, in 
connection with employment in 
teaching, or in business the per- 
manent address is added, if 
we should be glad to have more 
known. In many of these cases 
information to impart did we 
have it. From which it fol- 
lows — — — ! 

George B. Bergen, '85, 
115 So. Joliet St., 
Joliet, 111. 

Rev. J. W. Doughty, '86, 
908 Malone St., 
West Hoboken, N. J. 

Mrs. John J. Hennings, 

(Elizabeth Williams) 

395 Second st., Albany N. Y. 

Charles B. Moore, '96, 
339 Railway Exchange, 
Chicago. 

Ralph B. Kyle, '98, 

6032 Vernon Ave., Chicago. 

John A. Biggs, '02, 
Mandan, N. D. 

Mrs. Frank R. Hale, '02, 
(Margaret Talbot) 
88 Downer PL, Aurora 111. 

Jeannette R. Gault, '04 
Elkton Md., R. F. D. 4. 

Lloyd C. Smith, '05, 
Chenoa, 111. 

Mrs. M. L. Sloan, Jr., '10 
(Jane Hunter) 

3115 E. Overlook Rd. 

East Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rub.y A. Holstrom, 

Palisades, Mich. (Joliet) 

Eldon N. Prentice, '11, 
Lone Tree, Iowa. 

Wilhelmina Schaffer, '11, 
15024 Columbia Ave., 
, Harvey, 111. (Lake Forest) 

Howard B. Jones, '12, 
1006 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago. 



W. R. Dunsmore, '13, 
501 S. Virgil Ave., 
Los Angles, Califoi'nia. 

Floyd H. Mayme, '14, 
Atlanta, Ind., R. F. D. 3 

Chas. E. Long, '14, 
5815 S. Maplewoood Ave., 
Chicago, (Charleston 111.) 

Cyrus H. Karraker. '16, 

402 Hazel Ave. Danville 111. 
(Jonesboro, 111.) 

Eugene B. Durr '17, 
230 N. Webster Street, 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
(Taylorville, 111.) 

James C. Baher, '18 
12 N. Sheridan Road, 
Highland Park. 

W. A. Mansur, '18, 
Grand Ridge 111. 

1898 A welcome visitor at the 
L. F. C. Luncheon in Chicago on 
the 29 th was George C. Rice, 
now publisher of "The Missou- 
lian and Sentinel" at Missoula, 
Montana. His paper has a wide 
sphere of influence, as Missoula 
is the commercial center for 
much of western Montana. 

1909 The engagement has just 
been announced of Miss Clarissa 
J. Claster of 2001 North Third 
St. TIarrisburg, Pa. and Jacob 
Schwartz. Miss Claster is a 
graduate of Wellesley College 
and also a conservatory gradu- 
ate in Music. The acquaintance 
dates back to nearly ten years 
ago when Mr. Schwartz was in 
the Harvard Law School after 
his graduation here, and Miss 
Claster was a freshman at Well- 
esley. Mr. Schwartz was com- 
missioned an ensign during the 
war and saw active service on a 
transport. He is now back with 
the law firm of Mayer, Meyer, 
Austrian and Piatt, and engaged 
largely in court practice. 

1912 David E. Walker has been 
assistant superintendent of sch- 
ools at Evanston since Septem- 
ber, 1918. 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Ajutemon BnlUHiKj. Phone 855 
LAKE FOHESr, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

■We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00—10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 

GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



DR. E. E. graham 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



If it's Baked at HUNTOON'S it« Baked Right 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: - 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STKNTOR 



CLUB DISCUSSES I. AND R. 

(Continued from Pagi- 7) 



have been elected by the people 
and found unsatisfactory. As 
the Illinois State Constitution 
now stands, it can be amended 
only with great difticulty. One 
barrier to change and progress 
is that but one amendment at a 
time can be brought up. The 
"Gateway Amendment" would 
remove the numerical restric- 
tion. 

Although the controversy was 
not so keen in this meeting as in 
the first, on the Steel Strike, still 
it was distinctly worth while for 
it gave all the men present a 
clearer and fuller understanding 
oi this present-day forward 
movement. 



1916 Miss Ann McNeill has a 
position in the public library at 
Hibbing. that remarkable tax 
free town in Minnesota. They 
have a. $250,000 library building 
and an appropriation of $6,500 
annualy for the purchase of 
books. 



1919 John Rees is teaching- 
English and coaching football 
teams at the Johnson Hig-h 
School, St. Paul, Minn. We are 
informed that his team has been 
winning its games. 



L \V. Almv was a visitor at 
the Phi Eta Alpha over the week 
end. He is taking some work at 
Northwestern University and 
also working on the Presbyter- 
ian Extension board. 



Patronize 

Our 

Advertisers 



IK ^'l ir Ai;i: a 
BIOLOGY TEACHER. 

Wr ad\ i-f v.iu tn l.iuk ili) 
The General Biological Supply House 

'■rMX KilMliurk Avi'.. I'liicii:;.!. 111. 
All Kinds ot Hi..|ci!;ic;il Supplies 
ami Apparatus. 
CATALOfiS KUKE. 

Hartman & Ilartman 

•■THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 



TELEPHONE 1039 




Lake Forest Home 


Bakery 


38 DEERPATH 




A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 


BR-EAD CAKE5 


ROLLS 


HhlluUiv and i Ull'-i- Sjircial Ca 


;f^s l(, LMder 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

mulle:r\s 

TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 



Tlie ROOT STUDIO 

Kimball Hull 
iTackson aud WahaHli 

Fraternity and Soroity 
Work Our Specialty 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Automobilf Supplies liatr^'at^e 'I'ransferred 

Seven I'assen-ej' Lais lij Rent h\ Trip vr Htjur 



L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry j 
Goods Store. '' Market Square | 



\et^ 



l^^j Dry Goods_ 

^'fShopJor 

F\Vomfn5t,Oiildrcns Tumishinqs 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



O'Leary wouldn't have a chance 
with Coach Derbv. Ask Ray 
Moore. 

Mr. Beck to class: "'I wan't to 
get some statistics." Will all the 
men and women who are mem- 
bers of families without children 
please raise their hands?" 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS PETTf. 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



PHONE 881 



Spalding Sweaters 




A STYLE IN THE 
TRL'E ATHLETIC 
.BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR- 
POSE 

Send for 
Catalofjue 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



UASMU8JSEN BKOS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



T h:e s t e n t o r 



RED CROSS DRIVE 



The Red Cross is going- to 
have another drive for funds to 
replenish the rather depleted 
treasury. This drive is going- 
to be like all those other drives 
which we had during the war, 
but this time the Red Cross will 
use the money to finish the work 
■which it so nobly did during the 
period of the war. 

Few of us, no doubt, realize 
that there is still a tremendous 
amount of work for the Red 
Cross to do. Now that the war 
is over we need not think that 
all the suffering which was 
brought on by the war has been 
alleviated. We still have men in 
France and Russia, and our own 
country abounds in hospitals 
which are tilled with the men 
who have fought in the war and 
have been seriously wounded. 
These wounded soldiers have to 
be cared for, and cared for by 
the Red Cross. The Red Cross 
cannot carry on this work with- 
out funds and so the United 
States is going to be asked in a 
few days to open its pocket book 
to these men who have given so 
much for the cause. 

Besides the giving of monej^ 
the Red Cross is in need of help- 
ers, people who will giye their 
spare time to the caring for the 
sick and doing service of many 
kinds. We can do a great deal 
at Fort Sheridan and the Great 
Lakes. Fort Sheridan is tilled 
with soldiers who are in such a 
pitiable condition that anyone 
who had once seen them would 
wish to do all that thej' could to 
help. The girls can serye 
through the Y. W. C. A. Every 
afternoon a group of women 
serve cake and sandwiches to 
the soldiers at the tea room at 
Fort Sheridan and in this way 
try to help out the Red Cross. 
The college girls can do this 
work and at the same time spend 
a pleasant afternoon. 

Along the line of service the 
Red Cross is begging the wo- 



men of the country, who gave 
such excellent service during 
the war, to organize classes in 
Red Cross work. All the forms 
of relief work which were carried 
on during the war will be con- 
tinued in these classes, and if 
any of the girls feel that they 
have the time to spend they can 
spend it very profitably in this 
way. 

When the Red Cross makes 
its appeal for money and service 
let us hope that Lake Forest 
will answer the call with gener- 
osity and an eagerness to help 
in every way possible. Now 
that the war is oyer let us not 
think that all the possibilities 
for service are over. Lake For 
est are you going to answer the 
call in the same spirit that you 
answered the call during the 
war? Remember the results of 
the war have not been entirely 
swept away. 



MEN PREEENT AT HOME COMING 



IT HAPPENS IN THE BEST REGU- 
LATED FAMILIES 



Sob Stuff 

(Prom The RocUtord Star) 



The band played "We're loyal 
Dear Rockford, we're loyal to 
you,'' while a thrill ran over the 
audience, and some where in the 
crowd a girl sobbed. It must 
have been home coming for Dick 
and Keith. 

The Alfalfas insist on rushing 
the Hall this year. Mostly Col- 
lege at that. 

A reminder of S. A. T. C 
days — the passwords at the Mu- 
sic School party last Friday 
evening. "The Hour is Late." 

Abernathy has completed the 
preliminary course of instruc- 
tion given by the College Hall 
Knitting Society. Anyone who 
is fond uf knitting, but who per- 
sists in dropping stitches will do 
well to apply at once at room 
202 fur further particulars. 

Whitey Thayer: What's the 
dope Chuck, do I bat very high 
with her?" 



B. M. Lennell, '89. 
Fred A. Hayner, '95. 
John H. Jouea, '96. 
M. W. Woolsey, '96. 
U. B. Moore, '96. 

A. O. Jackson, '96. 
D. S. Wentworth, '99. 
H. B. Hanson, '00. 
John F. Haas, '00. 

D. F. Biggs, '01. 

E. G. Banta, ,02. 
George T. Rogers, '02. 
A. Duane Jackman, '06. 
J. Schwartz, '09. 

R. A. Scott, 09. 
A. J. Henuings, 09. 
Aubrey Warren, '98. 
H. Ames Babcock, '09. 
E. T. Howard, 'U7. 
E. Palmer, '07. 
H. D. Marquis, '11. 
Edgar C. Cook, '11. 
0. R. Goold, 11. 
Ralph A. Bush, '11. 

D. E. Walker, '12. 
Allan W. Cook, '12. 
J. F. Darch, '12. 
W. C. MeKee, '08. 
Tom Beveridge, ']1, 
Otto Sehaffei, '13. 
A. J. Hansen, '13. 

H. U. Hilderbrand, '13. 
R. McKee, '13. 
Chas. S. Jackson, '13. 
H. E. Bates, '14. 

C. E. Long, 14. 
Charles A. Logan, '14. 
Ernest J. Smith, '15. 
John Milton, '15. 
Ewart Hall, '15. 

E. Franzen, '16. 
L. G. Thorp, 'id. 

<-\ . R. Wilson, '16. 

Tom Krueger, '16. 

R. H. Dean, '16. 

C. H.Thayer, Jr. '16. 

W. T. Pearce, '17. 

Hugh S. WaplesUen, '17. 

Howard Gibson, '16. 

H. H. Bersl. '18. 

Leon McFerran, 18. 

E. L. Gilroy, '18. 

R. W. Hugues, '18. 

E. L. Bates, '18- 

Jack Bees, '19. 

L. W. Almy, '19. 

James F. Kindlay, '19. 

Neal F. Suellgrove, '19. 

P. L. Speidel, '19. 

Lt. trancis Miller, '19. 

Total men present sixty. 



THE STENTOR 



RED CI 
FOR VOLUHl 




Two hundred and fifty thousand 
volunteer workers will be needed in 
the Centrul Divi- 
sion to conduct the 
third roll call ol 
the Aiuerioau Red 
Cross, November 2 
to 11. 

An appeal Is 
made from Cen- 
tral DiMsiuu headquarters iu Chicago 
calling upon the men and women of ev- 
ery community to enlist for the ten-day 
campaign to secure dollar annual 
memberships. With approximately 
600 chapters in the division, this num- 
ber will allow for about 400 worke;'s to 
a chapter. Every chapter will be a 
recruitirg office for these workers. 
Workers Will Wear BadgeR. 
Each woi-ker will be supplied wltl; 5 
badge proclaiming that the wearer is a 
volunteer worker for the Red Cross 
The success of the campaign will, in 
reality rest upon the shoulders of 
these volunteer workers, as the third 
roll call cannot be a success without 
a complete organizn.tinn. 

The purpose of aie campaign is to 
obtaiu, as nearly as possible, a univer- 
sal enrollment iu the Red Cross as an 
expression of confidence in the past 
performances of the Red Cross and a 
reaffirmation of allegiance to the prin- 
ciples which will guide its work in the 
future. In order to do this every man 
and woman iu the territory of each 
chapter must be asked to join the Red 
Cross, and this will require the serv- 
ices of hundreds of workers. The 
Central Division wants at least 4,000,- 
000 enrollni ats for 1920. Special 
stress during the campaign will be 
placed upon the annual one-dollar 
memberships in order to make the roll 
call an appeal to all the people. 
Past Campaigns Successful. 
Success has attended all Red Cross 
activities in the Central Division In 
the past. In the the last war fund 
drive this division, with a quota of 
?13,S00,000, subscribed $21,307,002.83. 
In the second roll call, more than 4,- 
000,000 were enrolled. 

The money quota for the Central 
Division Is $3,000,000. Throughout the 
nation, the Red Cross will enlist 20,- 
000,000 members and raise $15000,000 
to carry on its international, national 
and local work. 



Patronize 

Our 

Advertisers 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencH's Dru^' Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL V^OOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OK AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 
Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 

Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



For That Eleven O'clock Feeling 



HOT ROLLS 
COFFEE CAKES 



BISCUITS 
DOUGHNUTS 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
a Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiH 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college j'ear 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) anew Professor of Economies, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2; full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (41 special interest in the Glee Club and the Qarrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to |400 for men; $350 to |450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinoi* 



iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnuiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiy^ 



The 



equality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

'"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



HH BOWf\0N' 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectionery 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROLA 



Kubelsky 

Clothing and 
l^^urnicsliings 

Cleaning anof Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

»H DO KEPAfRIXO 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. NOVEMBER 14, 1919 



NUMBER 7 



NEW RULES PASSED BY THE 
FACULTY 



1 Illness may be allowed as an 
excuse for a student's absence 
when said illness is reported at 
the time, in the case of women 
students to Miss Hamilton, in 
the case of men to Mr. Sibley. 

(Note: "At the time'' means 
at the time — not next week or 
even next day- Barring extra- 
ordinary accidents, it should be 
possible for a student who is ill 
to have that illness reported 
while he is still absenting- him- 
self from classes on the jjfround 
of illness.) 

Important family happenings 
— such as wedding-s, deaths — 
may similarly be billowed as 
excuses. 

(Note: Whenever possible for 
a contemplated absence of this 
kind permission should be ob 
tained before hand.) 

2 Unexcusedj absences to a 
number not to exceed ten per 
cent of the total number of class 
exercises under students regis- 
tration shall be allowed without 
subjecting him to the laws of 
college credit. In calculating 
this credit, the rest of this 
semester will be reckoned as 
having ten weeks. 

(Note: A student's allowance 
of unexcused absences can be 
determined by multiplying his 
registration in hours by the ten 
weeks still remaining; a student 
registered for fifteen hours a 
week will thus be couuted as 
having loO class exercises and an 
allowance of fifteen unexcused 
absences ) 

3 For every eight unexcused 
al sences, a part thereof, in ex- 
cess of the ten per cent allow- 
ance of unexcused absences, 
one hour of requirement shall be 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



NORTH CAMPUS DISCUSSION 
CLUB 



Although the men were the 
first ones to get into the game 
this year when it comes to this 
sort of activity, they were not 
the first ones to think of the 
plan. Last year the women 
who were of course more free 
than the men organized such a 
club. The work of last year 
consisted of a study of Wild's 
"Democracy" and proved to be 
very interesting. However the 
majority of the women this year 
favor the taking up of current 
events for discussion, in prefer- 
ence to the reading of a book. 
A definite plan has been mapped 
out and seems to be working out 
very well. The topics of major 
interest in the world today will 
all be taken up during the 
course of the years work. Sev- 
eral meetings will be given over 
to each topic. Just now, strikes 
and the problem of the labor 
union are under consideration 
and the dicsussion of this ques- 
tion will continue as long as the 
interest is alive and the material 
seems quite unexausted. A 
leader presides at each meeting 
but while she in no sense at- 
tempts to dominate the meeting 
she does make a special effort to 
be well informed herself on the 
topic and takes her main task in 
the intelligent direction of the 
discussion and that of keeping 
everyone alive and interested. 
The meetings are to be entirely 
informal. All who are interest- 
ed in keeping in touch with the 
problems of the day (and every 
college woman should be) are 
welcome to join the club. How- 
ever the chief aim of the club 
is to get a group of women, even 
tho it be a small group, every 
member of which will contribute 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



MR. ROBERTS TALKS 
AT Y. W. C. A. 

At the regular weekly meeting 
of tffe Y. W. C. A. the young 
women were given a very inspir- 
ing talk from Mr. Roberts, last 
Thursday. He pointed out the 
necessity for us to go to our 
Heavenly Father who can con- 
sole us as an earthly father com- 
forts his children. Sometimes 
we grow a bit discouraged after 
having worked conscientiously 
at some duty and find that the 
results aren't what we had ex- 
pected they would be or that 
seemingly no body cared for 
our efforts. , Mr. Roberts would 
have us remember that there is 
One who does care, and it is He, 
our Heavenly Father, whom we 
should strive to please. 

The girls feel very much in- 
debted to Mr. Roberts and are 
eager to have him talk in Y. 
W. again. 

Before the meeting closed Sara 
Joyner played a yery pretty 
plana solo. 

A Y. W. C. A. membership 
pen, which is very popular among 
different associations, has been 
sent for and will arrive very 
soon. 

Last Monday Chapel time was 

given to the Y. W. to solicit 

membership for the Red Cross. 

I The girls were very much 

I pleased in the way the men re- 

jsponded to this worthy cause, 

and also with the response they 

received from Lois Hall after 

lunch the same day. 



Runkel was down from Madi- 
son this week in the interest of 
the nationalization of Rho Gam- 
ma. 



THE STENTOR 



NEW RULES PASSED BY THE 
FACULTY 

(Contiiiuetl frmu Page One.) 

added to the general academic 
credit required of the student 
so absent. 

(Note: This means that a 
student takinjj lifteen hours may 
have fifteen unexcused absences 
during the remainder of this 
semester; if he has sixteen or 
more, to twenty-four, he will be 
required to make one hour more 
for graduation; if he has twenty- 
four to thirty-two two hours 
more will be required for 
graduation; and so on.) 

Note ! ! ! ! ! This new rule 
does not mean that a student is 
expected or encouraged to take 
his maximum of unexcused ab- 
sences. Every depiirtnic-iit will 
deal with absences within that 
department precisely as the 
head of that department sees fit. 
This new rule does , not excuse 
anyone from any department 
requirement. It has to do solely 
with the general credit of the 
student and his lota! number of 
absences. And note.' The indi- 
vidual instructor cannot excuse 
from this general rule; excuses 
must be presented to Miss Hamil- 
ton and Mr. Sibley. Conversely, 
Miss Hamilton and Mr. Sibley 
have no power to excuse anyone 
from any requirement imposed 
by individual departments from 
either excused or unexcused 
absences. 



Tbc Ka]j|»ii Siiiiiiii Dame 



George Beard, Leon Noel, Ed- 
ward Hiscox, Ernest Coberly, and 
Charles Beard attended a Kapiia 
Sigma dance at tlie Sisson Hotel 
last Saturday night. The dance 
was given by the Qhicago Chapt- 
er and a great many Kappa Sigs 
from Michigan and Iowa were 
also present. Helen Barthouse 
and Sarah Joyner were the Lois 
Hallers there. Pledge Gardner 
who was listed as present, said 
every one returned wearing that 
satisfied smile. 



NORTH CAMPUS DISCUSSION 
CLUB 

{rontimieil fi-om T.TSe One.) 

something of real value to the 
life of the organization. 

Tlie officers are: Lois Ryno, 
President and Ruth Bahler, Vice 
president. A secretary is yet 
to be elected. It is hoped that 
the women can succeed in mak- 
ing the work in the club of such 
a standard that participation in 
its meetings will mean real 
effort and advancement on the 
part of its members. If this 
can be done it is highly probable 
that membership in the club 
will count as a point toward 
making Kappa Alpha. 

The meeting this week will be 
lead by Delia Babcock and the 
early history of strikes and la- 
bor unions will be taken up. 



More Spirit 



The Pull 



A boy went out to fly a kite. 
He let out ball after ball of 
string until the kite was lost in 
the clouds, "And how do you 
know your kite is up there?" 
asked a friend. 

"Because I can feel it pull", 
replied the boy. 

Many men and women have 
given unaccountable kindnesses 
until the objects of their help 
have been lost in the crowd. No 
doubt there are many who would 
ask them how they know their 
goochiess is appreciated. The an- 
swer would be pretty near the 
same as that of the little boy — 
"they can feel the pull". 

One never knows when a good 
deed is coming home to roost, 
and the more you have out on 
interest the more returns you'll 
ihave. In fact, and in that alone, 
one finds that other and bigger 
angle of doing good — the more 
you do the better you feel and 
the belter yo'u feel the happier 
you are, 



Friday morning Lake Forest 
witnessed one of the most re- 
markable and exciting events of 
the year. Lake Forest students 
had a leave of absence for a few 
minutes from their eight o'clock 
classes in order to see its husky 
football warriors leave for Knox. 

Cold weather? Well, I guess 
yes! 

Pep frozen? Not on your 
life! 



A Vit'tini of Taxation 

Good Mr. Skunk has read the 
news. 
And fainted dead away. 
"The tax on luxuries," he said, 
"Will take effect to-day." 

Such things as ices, fancy drinks. 
Powders, creams, and lotions 

Were to be taxed but what of 
that? 
He never used such notions. 

'Twas when he saw the fatal 
words, 
"A tax on perfumes, too." 
"It's bankrupcy for me!" he 
wailed. 
"What is a Skunk to do?" 

The Youths Companion 



We're all for a new song. 
How's this if it were set to some 
lively music? 
Of all the schools in all the lands 

I tell you boys what's fine 
It ain't a boys' school nor a girls' 

Aco-ed school for mine. 
Three ciieers for L. F. C, Coed, 

Three cheers for L. F. C. 
A coed school's the only school, 

A coed school for me. 



Kappa Alpha entertains the 
women of the college at a tea in 
Lois Hall on Thursday. 



Thomas W. Mayo of St. Anne, 
111., was the guest this week of 
his son Kenneth. 



THE STKNTOR 



Tln^ FIdwtM- Show 



Thursday the Durand Art In- 
stitute was so g-oirgeously decked 
out with huge chrysanthemums 
that it was almost beyond recog- 
nition. The stage and main 
room were filled with flowers of 
great size, some of them meas- 
ing nine inches in diameter. 
All colors and varieties of chrys- 
anthemums were displayed to 
large crowds of people who came 
to see the flowers show. 

During the afternoon and 
evening while the people were 
visiting the exposition, Mr. Lob- 
dell and Mr. Hirshey rendered 
very fitting music. The whole 
effect was a very beautiful one 
and Lake Forest should feel 
proud of her flower show. 

The girls of the college were 
featured in great numbers when 
the photographers came to take 
pictures of the flowers. Pictures 
were tal<on of i^irls among the 
chrysanthemums, of girls with 
the flowers, and of girls with 
huge boquets of roses. After the 
show was over the college girls 
gathered large numbers of the 
chrysanthemums which the men 
were so kind as to give them. 
We feel that the college benefit- 
ed greatly by the coming of the 
flower show to Lake Forest. 

Besides flowers, however, we 
feel it our duty to mention the 
great ninuhers of vegetables 
which were displayed on the bal- 
cony. Cucumbers, squasihes, tur- 
nips, tomatoes, and pumpkins of 
unusual size were placed all 
about the balcony. The size of 
these vegetables was e.xtremely 
great and caused quite a bit of 
excitement. It was noticed 
that the girls of Lois Hall much 
prefered chrysanthemums to 
turnips no matter how wondei'- 
ful they happened to be. 



Wiitcli Is (J row- 



Mr. A. Rees and Miss Luclla 
Rees of Elgin, 111.', spent the 
week-end witii Dave Rees. who 
is still confined to Alice Home. 



Prospects for a bigger Lake 
Forest College are certainly 
looking up. Our alumni are do- 
ing things. Our field corp is 
getting well organized. It looks 
as though the school would be 
larger than ever next year, with 
a goodly percentage of the pres- 
ent student body back and a 
large list of new recruits. But 
the question arises: What are 
we going to do with them? 

All the dormitories are full. 
Lois Durand Hall being filled to 
capacity, a dozen girls are living 
in various houses on the campus. 
P^very room in Blackstone, Har- 
lan, and College Halls are oc- 
cupied, with several men doub- 
ling up in order to get them all 
in. We might wish that we had 
our old North Hall back, but the 
Music School has come to stay 
and far be it from us to wish it 
to leave. With the prospect of a 
constantly increasing attend- 
ance, all the available dormitory 
room is already taken. 

Three solutions to the prob- 
lem present themselves. We 
might establish a waiting list. 
The fraternities and sororities 
might find other accomodations. 
Or we miglit, in a year or two, 
have new dormitories. 

The first suggestion is hardly 
W(irlh liringing up. It is un- 
heard of for a college no larger 
than Lake Forest to turn stud- 
ents away. We want to grow, 
to become 'the Princeton of the 
West." 

One of the finest things about 
Lake Forest is that, thougii 
there are fraternities, they ai-e 
not cliques living entirely to 
themselves, as in most schools. 
If the Greek letter organizations 
lived and ate separately, off the 
campus, the present intimacy 
would be destroyed. Then too, 
it would be very difficult, from 
a financial standpoint, for the 
fraternities to buy or rent, and 
maintain separate houses. 



The last alternative seems to 
be the only one, and of course, 
it can not be accomplished in a 
day. But if Lake Forest ever 
increases in size, or in fact re- 
tains its present enrollment, we 
must have two new dormitories, 
— one for men and one for wo- 
men. If we have these, it will 
build up. Th^- faculty and al- 
unnii who have influence should 
cxei't it toward this end. Give 
UK i-oom and watch us grow. 



()(l<ls And l<:ii(1s 

Have y(ni heard about Psyche's 
new car and how he got it? Well 
he got it for a song, that is he 
gave a bunch of notes for it. 



Here's another; 
Frosh to another Frosh, "Do you 
support the Stentor?" 
Second Frosh, "Goodness no! The 
Stentor has a staff." 



Van, "Your brother leads the 

class in procrastination. Miss 

Martin." 

•Jo (enthusiasticly) "I'm so glad 

to hear that the boy is grasping 

so easily such a difficult suliject." 



One of our bright Frosh in- 
forms us that her father has no 
use for prevaricators, but she 
thinks them nuich better than 
the old fasiiioned coffee pots. 



Have you noticed that Sumner 
and Bei-gen have blossomed forth 
in new ovei'coats? 



Have you heard the birdies 
singing, little one? 



Van wonderes if complexions 
are ever transparent. We think 
so. At least some of them can 
easily be seen through. 



Oh gii'ls! How do you like our 
new maid? The middle of the 
table or the foot is certainly a 
fitting place for the potatoes. 



That red and black skull cap 
that someone is parading around 
the campus is some hat. eh? 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during tiie col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest (!ollege. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



Are You ii Voice or nil Et-lio? 



The human race falls easily 
into two ditsinct groups or types 
of people. The people who belong- 
to the first type are the people 
who "make the world go round", 
the people with the push and 
the foresight to keep things 
from falling into a state of 
chaos. The people who belong 
to the second type are the peo- 
ple who follow in whichever di- 
rection the current of least re- 
sistnce crries them. These peo- 
ple bungle everything which 
they attempt to do without the 
guiding hand of .someone else to 
supervise the work. These are 
the mass of people, the people 
over whom the few rule. These 
people have no initiative, no 
push, no power to forge ahead 
without the aid from some other 
person. 

Which class do you belong to? 
The struggling, incapable, major- 
ity, do they claim you? Do you 
follow in the footsteps of some- 
one else or are you emblazoning 



a pathway before you? If you 
belong to this great mass of peo- 
ple your college education means 
nothing to you. If, through 
your higher education, you have 
not enabled yourself to be one 
of the few powerful people, your 
education has been of no avail 
and you have spent your time 
foolishly. 

Do you belong to the class of 
people who are capable of "car- 
rying on"? They are competent, 
ambitious, full of vigor, and 
hard workers. Are you willing 
to sacrifice anything for the 
good of some few who need your 
help? The people worth while 
are the people who are willing 
to sacrifice to the last degree for 
the happiness of some one else? 
Your college education should 
broaden you until you are look- 
ing forward toward life as a life 
of service because after all the 
greatest thing in the world is 
the helping of some one else. 

These people who are the nat- 
ural leaders of the world may 
be compared to voices. When 
God wished to describe John the 
Baptist he did not call liim man 
or even a spirit. He called him 
a "Voice." If one stops to think 
it is possible to see just how 
much meaning there is in that 
one word. A "Voice" is some- 
thing to guide, to lead, and to 
help the world. Are you one of 
the people who may be classed 
as "Voices?" 

For oveiy voice there is an 
echo. The echo is always vastly 
different and yet so like the 
voice itself. There is always, 
however, a false note, a some- 
thing which tells us that this is 
not the real voice, only a mock- 
ing .something which reminds us 
of the voice. Are you merely 
the echo of someone else's voice 
or are you a voice that stands 
out clearly alone? 



First course for dinner served 
in the Chemistry loclui'e room 
at eleven thirty on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. 



The Final Game 



Come on Lake Forest — Hang it 
on, ihang it on Northwestern. 
We're for Lake Forest no mat- 
ter what happens as we know 
"not failure but low aim is 
crime." 

The boys have been aiming and 
aiming real hard to make our 
team a success, so lets all get out 
Saturday and root for them. 
Come on team, hit them hard — 
we're all for you — Hoop la! 
Hoop la! A— I— M. 

Girls wake up and help the 
boys — Root — it won't hurt your 
delicate vocal cords but it will 
put pep into the players. 

Yes, there will be an "Oppen 
House" Saturday evening, but 
don't spend your afternoon sit- 
ting around manicuring your 
dainty fingers and curling your 
fair tresses — get out and R-o-o-t 
and the vim of our players and 
the open air will make you 
bloom anew for the evening- 
dance — Come on girls — fill up the 
sidelines— R-O-O-T. 



Sportsmaiisliii) 

The best difinition of one who 
"plays the game" is one who 
takes his beating like a sport 
and never whimpers. Do you 
qualify? Are you willing to 
give the victor the credit due 
him? 

Not alone does sportsmanship 
apply to the individual. It ap- 
plies also to the College. Does 
like a good sportsman? She 
does. 

When our team does not come 
out victorious we do not hunt 
up worthless excuses; do we 
blame the field or tlie other 
College for the defeat? No. 

Did not they also have the 
same obstacles to overcome? 

We will play the game; we 
will not make sluring remaarks 
about our oppoonents; we will 
give them all the credit they de- 
serve. We are too proud to 
lower ourselves by means of 
slander. 



THE STENTOR 



Ain't It Till' Bniies 



The riper the berry the sweet- 
er the jiuce. 



We wish to bring to the atten- 
tion of the whisky sniffers the 
fact that a certain somebody in 
New York has perfected a 
"Breathograph' 'which will de- 
tect whisky, rum, cordials, toil- 
et water, and other alcoholics at 
forty paces. 



We don't ordinarily print anon- 
ymous contribs but this was too 1 
good to let pass; 

I took her in my new canoe 

As the summer daylight to 
evening drew, 

A wooful, bashful lover. 

I kissed her on the lips divine 

And asked her softly to be 
mine 

When that (?!?!?!?'?!';) boat 

turned over. 



Clara Johnson entertained 
Kappa Kappa Chi at luncheon 
Saturday, in Chicago. 



Lillian Hatfield, Gladys Mc- 
Dowell, Rosa Deutch, Ruth Bah- 
lert, Helen Sanders, Esther Loop, 
and Alice Axton went into the 
city Friday evening to see Mac- 
beth. 



"Just enough Turkish!" 
That's a good one to siiring 
now while it's new. 



Ora Seaman of Rockford col- 
lege, visited Clara Macindoe over 
the week end. 



'S'omebody's always taking- 
etc." 



Gee Barnie you missed the 
chance of your sophomore year. 
Alberta gets late permish every 
night during rehearsals. 



Answer to last weeks: 
Tlie higiher the fewer. 



B. T. has abandoned because 
of disagreements concerning the 

(lualificatioiis. 

The Berry Twins, Ras and Black 



Mrs. Paul Turner (Elizabeth 
Catterlin) visited her sister 
Opha las week. 



Personals 



Much like cigarettes we say. 



This weather has inspired the 
following: 

Oh spring 

By jing 

You're the thing. 
The author refuses to sign. 



Ruth Conkey visited Sigma 
Tau over the week end. 



Florence Metzger was called 
home suddenly last week on ac- 
count of sudden illness. We hope 
that the ill members of the fam- 
ily will soon recover. 



Mary Alice Matzgar went 
home to Moline for the week 
end. 



Margai'et Mills has been con- 
cpicuous by hei" absence from 
school on account of illness. We 
hope she will recover soon. 



Lois Conklin spent the week 
end at her home in Oak Park. 



Mary Alice Metzger returned 
from her home in Moline Mon- 
day evening. She was sudden- 
ly taken ill Tuesday and is in 
quite a serious condition. We 
hope that she will be able to re- 
main in school. 



Irene and Zelma Farwell visit- 
ed Mrs. Helfrich this week end. 



Madame, we can't tell you 
about B. A. It's a secret. 



We would like to call your at- 
tention to our supplementary 
column whicli appears evei-y day 
in the Trib and is signed "B. L. 
T." We run some very good stuff 
there also. 

The Fraternity (iliost 

Bill— There goes the fraternal 
skeleton. 

Tom — Wacha mean? 

B. — George just went out with 
my hat, your shoes, Jim's sox. 
Jack's spats, Hank's suits, Mike's 
cane, and his own smile. 



Katherine Horton's brother 
Warren visited her over the 
week end. 



News comes to us that David 
Rees is very seriously ill. We 
sincerely hope that he will have 
a .speedy recovery. 



Beth Thayer spent the week 
end at her home in Chicago. 



Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong of 
Ottumwa, Iowa, are visiting 
Rebecca and Amy. 



Virginia Hopkins and Sue 
Spaulding spent the week end 
at home in Princeton. 



"Doc" O'Leary spent the week- 
end with Digamma. 



Beatrice Worthley made her 
customary visit to Joliet this 
week end. 



Edsono VanSickle spent the 
week-end at his home in Canton 
III. 



Jo Merchant spent the week 
end at her home in Waukegan. 



Don Woods was the guest of 
relatives in Avon, 111., over the 
week-end. 



Virgina Kratch spent 
week end in Chicago. 



the 



Marcus Potter spent the week- 
end with relatives in Chicago. 



THE STENTOR 




Lit-tnl Fc-lix 



I am writ-ing 

This on peace day 

But I am not 

In peace. 

The pro-fess-ors 

Of Lake Fo-rest Col-lege 

Have an i-dea 

Wihat the way 

To cel-e-brate 

Peace day is 

By sing-ing 

The Star Spang-led Ban-ner 

And Am-er-i-ca 

In Chap-el 

And mak-ing 

An-nounce-ments 

The sights on this 

Camp-US are gett-ing 

Stran-ger and strang-er 

Tlie girls have start-ed 

Tak-ing gym 

And wo-man is 

A mys-ter-y no more 

I would draw a pic-ture 

Of some of them 

On-ly I might get 

Per-son-al 

Will stop at this point 

Yours in the 

Lit-tul Fe-lix 



Tlie Incubator 



(By Mrs. Henry Buff Ofpington) 



We have decided to continue 
the horoscopes which we started 
so unceremoniously two weeks 
ago because everyone seems in- 
terested to know just what fate 
through the stars has decreed 
for him. 

For the week beginning No- 
vember ninth the stars predict 
the following: You are persistent 
and determined, and will never 
acknowledge defeat. You seldom 
take any one into your confi- 
dence and like to work out your 
own plans in your own way. Your 
home life will be tranquil and 
happy and you will receive love 
that is whole-souled and deep. 
You will have many friends and 
are loyal and faithful in your 
trusts. You like to read, and 
will never fill a secondary place 
if you can possibly forge your 
way to the front. You love trav- 
el, and like to read books of the 
better sort. You are quiet, self- 
contained and proud, fond of the 
society of your own sex, and gen- 
erally populor. You are fond of 
being out of doors. 

Birthstone, Topaz- Fidelity. 

Flower, Chrysanthemum 

Colors, Dark blue and red. 



when we will be together. Oh, 
my peaches, if you were only 
here, the burden of my heart 
would be lifted. Could I but see 
thofse dreamy eyes; gaze on your 
bright and shining countenance; 
and feel you nea m, I should be 
the happiest person in the world. 
Darling, you cannot dream of 
how much I love you and how I 
I long to take you in my arms for 
one fond embrace. I would give 
all I possess for one kiss from 
those ruby lips, which are so 
dear to me. 

I have been wondering if you 
too, were dreaming of the time 
when we should be united, never 
to part. I would be in Paradise 
could I but know that you were 
planning a cosy home, where we 
could share our joys and sorrows 
of life together. 

And now, as I bring this short 
letter to a close. I hope that you 
may realize a small portion of 
my great love and my devotion 
to you. 

Your most devoted. 

Amour. 



Professor Burnap claims that 
he has a medicine which, if you 
buy it from him and pay cash 
for it and always shake the 1 
bottle well before taking the ; 
medicine, will keep you in ' 
perfect health during your \ 
whole collegiate course. 

Why does'nt he take it? 



L. Stanley Casjens was a ',,'un- 
day guest of friends in Chicago. 



We have decided from the 
great hosts of love letters that 
have been submitted to us upon 
the request printed in our last 
issue, that the letter which we 
print here is the best and is 
worthy of the prize. We hope 
that Professor Burnap will find 
in this letter a work which even 
his own masterpiece cannot over- 
whelm. The letter reads as fol- 
lows: 

My dear darling snookums: 

As I sit before the crackling 
logs and hear the wind whistling 
round the corners of the house, 
my thoughts are all of thee. My 
heart beats up and down like a 
churn, as I dream of the time 



Dear Incubator: 

TIhe other day, Miss Hamilton, 
illustrating the length of human 
"infancy" as compared with that 
of lower animals, said, "Just 
think of it! A Iviten becomes a 
i cat in a very short time." What 
do you think she inferred? 

I. M. It 

Dear I. M. It: 

Presumably it takes a woman 
longer. 

H. B. 0. 

Dear Mrs. H. B. Orpington: 

I am unable to eat the food 
that is placed before me. What 
do you think is the matter? Am 
I ^in love? 

Worried. 

Dear Worried: 

I do not think you are in love. 
A great craving for pickles al- 
ways accompanies the symptoms 



THE sti-:ntor 



No Job Too Small 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating i 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. I 

Phones: Office 398 



1 I 

None Too Large j of love sickness. Pmbably the ' 
food, not you, is at fault. 



Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons i 

REAL ESTATE RENTING ! 

All Branches Insurance Written 
Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 i 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS ! 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Statiiinery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Dear Inculjator: 

Why do certain young men 
seem to like to rest their feet 
in the wash bowl in the Chemis- 
try lecture room? It seems aj 
very queer custom and I have 
been very perplexed as to the j 
reason. Is it gentlemanly to do j 
such a thing? 

Up in the Air. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 
Jewelry 



P: 



Furniture Repairing 



Picture Framing 



■ .AK.K F<>Ui<:nl' 



11,1.. 



Dear Up in the Air: 

Seeing that the Chemistry 
lecture room is a place for ex- 
periment, no doubt these young , 

Russell Studio men feel at perfect liberty to c^ 

as you mention above. Certainly 
this is something new, evidently j 
along the line of experiment. | 
Under the circumctances I pre- 
sume that it can be excused. Of 
course under any other circum- 
stances this would not be con- 
sidered good form. ', 



REPUBLIC 3LDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 



CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



Boys, we hope the rule about 
communication from windows 
hasn't discouraged the serenades. 



Scandall Dr. Thomas proposed 
to Elizabeth Torreyson. 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas—Cigars— Candies 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS Y<n"H BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpalh and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicagn-LaUe F(-)rest Coiiinuitalion 

Tickets 

Sa IJKKKI'ATH, M'ESX 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cledtii iiij^ I'ifssiiKj. JiejxiiriiKi 



i 6 



M 



The Original 

BLE SYKES" 



DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
1 40 r^'ortJi State Stret't 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

M x\ K E R OF H Y - C L A S S PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 

l*Iioi:ie C'entral o3-l 1 



THE STENTOR 



ali;mnt notes. 



1888. Calvin H. French, re- 
cently president of Rollins Col- 
lege at Winter Park, Florida, is 
now one of the secretaries of the 
Interchurch World, Movement 
residing at 155 Audubon ave., 
New York City. 

1905. Ray F. Frazer is pub- 
lisher at the "Dispatch," Meri- 
dan, Miss. 

1911. Neil C. Arvin is spend- 
ing the present year in study in 
Paris. Address, Ih bis rue d' 
assos rVI) chez Mme. Caviet. 

1911. Through later report 
we are informed that Ralph H. 
Bush did not accept the super- 
intendency of the Joliet Town- 
ship High School offered to him 
in the summer, preferring to re- 
main in his former position of 
assistant principal and head of 
the Junior College. 

1911 Julia Clymeris employe d 
in the office of Scott, Foresman, 
and Co., 633 S. Wabash ave., Chi 
cage, residing at 144!) E. 55th 
Street. 

1913. Virginia Abry is now 
school principal at Allendale, 111. 

1913. Maud Chamberlain has 
for some time been head of the 
Child Placing Bureau for the 
Children's Protective Society of 
Minneapolis. 

1913. In August Ruth Holm- 
stroin resigned her position in 
Washington with the Bureau of 
War Risk Insurance, and is now 
temporarily in Pasadena, Calf., 
417 Maylon St. Home address 
still. 

1913. The engagement has 
been announced of Marion C. 
Stuart and Norton R. White of 
Grand Rapids, Mich., and the 
wedding is likely to be in the 
near future. Mr. White is the 
brothor of Stewart Edmond 
White, the writer. 

1913. Carleton H. Casjens is 
studying law at the University 
of Chicago Law School. 



1914. Marie Bissell is teach- 
ing at Highland, Illinois. 

1915. Margaret Bridgman is 
head teacher of English in the 
Roycemore School at Evanston, 
residing at 2207 Sherman ave. 
The school is a large private 
school for girls, with an attend- 
ance of some one hundred and 
seventy-live and a fine etiuipment. 

1918. On his discharge from 
the aviation force, where he got 
the R. M. A. rating, Graham 
Sillars worked for a time at 
Ranger, Texas, in the oil fields, 
but latterly has been a selling 
agent for live counties in East- 
ern Texas for the Standard 
Paint and Lead Co,, of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. He hopes to visit 
the campus some time in Decem- 
ber. 



Yoii and Me 



Thank you Katherine. We 
know now. 



It's getting late in the season 
and still some of the Freshmen 
forget to shift their oars. 



J. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Anderson liiilUliiKj. Fhoue S35 
LAKE tonHSr, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 



Why the sudden rush on ear 
muffs? Tell us the secret, 
Delia and Sue? 



Why not have a new song? In- 
stead of "We're from Ottumwa" 
let's hear "We're from Rockford" 



Tiie Tri-Nuts seem to have de- 
veloped a craving for country 
scenery. We want to know the 
reason. 



How do you suppose Whitey 
qualified for Lambda Delta? 



Who is "Squirt"? Ask Mag. 



The latest sport seems to be 
conoeing in October. Ruth, how 
do you do it? 

Betty, from window, "Oh, 
Morris, What's in that box?" 



Is that the way they dance in 
Arkansas? We like it. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



It it's Baked at HUXTOONS if-; Baked Right 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 

Telephones: - - 37, 38, 39, 51 
LAKE FOREST, - - ILLINOIS 

DeSuxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STKNTOR 



We think some of the men on 
the South Campus have taken 
to marcelling their hair. 



I put oi'f my work 'till Sunday, 
From Sunday I postpone it 'till 

Manday, 
And so thro the year ,1 bluff 

without fear, 
Tho I know I'll get caught at 

it some day. 



Patronize | 
Our 
Advertisers 



"Does anyone want to take 
Greek next semester? 

"Why should we; are we going 
to run a fruit store?' 



Can he make her blush? I'l 
say he can! 



Soiii;- of llic Fl linker 



Lake Forest. 'tis of thee, 
Sweet land of Slavery, 

Or thee I sing. 
Land where my heart was sunk 
Land where my work was punk 
Land where I always flunlv 

In evervthing. 



Heavenly music, very thrilling. 
E.Loo]), "You remind me of one 
of Whitcomb's poems." 
Hirshey, "Wliich one''" 
E. L. , "Oh, any one at all. You 
know the feet are all mixed up 
in them." 



Heard at Anderson's 

Bright Frosh, "Have you nny- 

thing in the shape of cucumbers 

to- day?" 

Clerk, "Nothing but bananas. 

Miss." 



Say Bea, come over and develop 
the kraving. The latch key is al- 
ways ont. Come over to see us. 
Any old time will do. 



Evavesdroppesr beware! 
Don,t scratch the brass plate! 



All's well that ends well they 
do say. 



Ill'' VI >r Ai;i-: a 
BIOLOGY TEACHER. 

\V'- aih ivf vmi lo lui.l; up 
The General Biological Supply House 

:i.'.ii,s Kimb;irk Ave.. Chicarn. 111. 
All Kimls of IJioln^'iciil Supplies 
Lillii Al>p:ir:ilus. 
CATAr.OGS FRKK. 

liartman & Hartman 

■THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 

TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 

A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BREAD CAKES ROLLS 

Binluhiy und OthiT Spr-cial Ciikes to OrdPr 

LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. '' Market Square 



Patronize Our Advertisers 

mulle:r\s 

TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 

The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimball Hall 
•lacksou aii<l Wabash 

Fraternity and Sorolty 
AVork Our Specixilty 

Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

I WILLIAM BURGESS 
I Garage and Auto Livery 
I LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



I Autocpijljilf SupijjiP 



H;i:-'tra;^'L' Traosferred 
. K. neiu by Trip or Huur 



I L. GREENBURG 

! Electric Shoe Repairing 
NEW SHOES 
RUBBERS 



55 Deerpath Ave. 



LAKE FOREST 




^A Shop/or 

F\Vbmi"n5t.(Tiilclrcasrurnishinq5 



Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



BLOUSES, 


SEPARATE 


SKIRTS, 


NEGLIGEES, 


SWEATER 


COATS, LIN- 


GERIE, CORSETS. PETTI- | 


COATS, 


UNDERWEAR, 


HOSIERY, 


BATH ROBES, 


NECKWEAR, GLOVES j 


and Many 


Other Lines of f 


Merchandise. 



PHONE 881 



Spalding Sweaters 



/,-: A STYLE IN THE 

, ""■'' TRUE ATHLETIC 

BUILD FOR EVERY 

OUTDOOR PUR. 

POSE 

S^ihI for 
Calnloiiii'^ 

A. G, SPALDING & BROS. 



RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



THE STENTOR 



POET'S CORNER 



Approaeliiiig Food 



Thanksgiving's coming', Oh! Yum! 

Yum! 
Then good eats we shall get 
And will we till our tuni tum"s 

up? 
Well I should say you bet. 

No Spanish rice on that gay day 
As we will homeward trot 
For every thing from soup to 

nuts, 
To Turky piping hot — 

Then three cheers for the glor- 
ious day 
That comes but once a year 
But for the ones left in the hall 
We shed a solemn tear. 

And so we count the weary days 
Until the day approaches 
When we shall grab our trusty 

grips 
— Dash for the railroad coaches. 

— T. N. 



Twilight Time 



When twilight glows o'er land 
and sea 
Tis tilien dear heart I think of 
thee 
For twilight breathes of peace 
and love 
And harmony sucli as above 
And thou art all of these to me 
To me, peace, love, and har- 
mony. 

The stillness of this twilight 
time 
Seems to inspire this soul of 
mine 
With loving thoughts of tJiee my 
own 
And as I sit here all alone 
I would tliat thou were by my 
hearth 
Wlien twilight gathers o'er the 
earth. 



In ^leinoriani 



THE RAMBLINGS OF A FROSH 



I woke to look upon a face 
Silent, white, and cold. 

Oh friend' The agony I felt 
Can never half be told. 

We lived together but a year 
Too soon I seemed to see 

Those gentle hands outstretched 
and still 
That toiled so hard for me. 

My waking thought had been of 
one 
Whom now to sleep had drop- 
ped. 
Imagine how I felt, dear friend. 
My Ingersoll ihad stopped. 



Stentor Reporter: "Give me 
some news for the Stentor." 

Lois Hall Student: "Can you 
say something about the spoon- 
ful of ice cream portioned out to 
us for Sunday dessert?" 

(It speaks for itself) 



To A Beautiful Coed 



As deep as the canyons 
As deep as the sea 
So deep am I running 
In debt over thee! 

There are metres of accent 
There are metres of tone 
But the best way to meter 
Is to meter alone. 

There are letters of accent 
There are letters of tone 
But the best way to letter 
Is to letter alone. 



Pay Day 



'Twas the night before pay day 
When all through my jeans 
I was searching in vain 
For the price of some beans. 
But nothing was doing 
The nulled edge had quit 
Not a penny was stiring 
Not even a jit. 
Backward, turn backward 
Oh time in thy flig-ht 
Make it tomorrow just for to- 
night! 



We're glad to learn that 
Watson's "fliver" can hold four- 
teen provided they are all con- 
genial. 



I Upperclass Women 

Can you look far back, oh Jun- 
iors and Seniors, to the days 
when you were but a Freshman 
at college? And can you recall 
how lonesome and awkward you 
felt, for you didn't know a soul? 
And can you remember the 
emotions you passed through 
upon being totally ignored by 
an upper classmen? "Nuff said" 

And now, look back upon the 
I past few days and recall those 
, Freshmen you passed without 
even as much as a civil word of 
greeting. Perhaps jou \\onder- 
ed why they looked at you so 
queerly. A Freshman naturally' 
feels as if it were your place 
to make advances. What if she 
isn't a girl that your sorrority 
intends rushing. You could be 
"nice" to her. at least. It may 
be that you are just another rea- 
son for her wishing that she 
were home and had neyer come 
to the College. 

Think it over — upperclassmen 
— it is food for thought. 



Talk about college spirit! A 
few of the men at the Commons 
are certainly a personification of 
that rather scarce article! Can 
you picture to yourself men who 
receive the college paper regu- 
larly every week and yet have 
shown no signs of any willing- 
ness to pay for it? If need be, 
we can publish their worthy 
names and the student body will 
take up a collection for their 
benefit. 



Vera: Just think I made my 
bed before I came down to break- 
fast!" 



THE STENTOR 



Sarah: "'J^hat's nothing'', I 
made my bed yesterday!" 
tCNow Sarah <iuit your kiddlnV 

! I've come to the conclusion 
that a Freshman is indeed an 
object worthy of special consid- 
eration. Books have been writ- 
ten for our special benelit and 
we even study them in our Eng- 
lish classes. .'J^he mighty ''Sten- 
tor" Editor wants articles writ- 
ten about them. 'IMie faculty 
loves us and makes the upper 
classmen walk the straight and 
narrow path so that we may 
have useful models before us. 
The Sophomore class is espec- 
ially created as the object of our 
derision and amusement! Yes, 
I agree with you — the world was 
constructed for the use of col- 
lege Freshmen. Frosh applaud! 
Passed by the National Bored 
Sophomores. (Signed per Frosh ) 



Photo Supplies, Developing 

Stationery and Candy 
lit 

FrencK's Drtag Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 
L. H. W.SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing [ 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

I Leslie W. George 

j__ ^ ^ 

iC.G.Wenban&Son 

i 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



SUBSCRIPTKlN CONCKRT 

In the srrnnd subscription concert 
of the season on tlie evening of Tues- 
day, November twentj -fiftli, the Uni- 
versity Seliool of Music is presenting 
Carlos Salzedo, the great Spanish 
Harpist who holds two first awards of 
the Paris Conservatoire, one for piano 
and one for harp which he obtained 
at the age of sixteen. It is only logi- 
cal, therefore, that he should today 
rank as one of the greatest harp virt- 
tuosos existing. He has established 
a higher reputation for the harp as a 
solo instrument as much by the as- 
tonishing extent ol liis repertoire as 
by his brilliant mnsicianly playing. 
Instead of the usual rapid variations 
he offers programes of rare research, 
balance and poetry. They range 
from Bach to the ultra modernists 
and in the hands of Salzedo tlie beau- 
tiful, golden instrument becomes a 
thing of wonder, lull of ji sonaiU'C, 
shading and emotion. 

Carios .Salzedo Is sclKMhiled to ap- 
pear as soloist will) the (I'hiciigo Sym- 
phony Orchestra. To hear him in 
Lake Forest first more intimate ly will 
be a state occasion ir.deed. 

Seats at §2, ^1 60 and Jl 00 lor this 
concert may be reserved at the School 
of Music or by telephoning Lake 
Forest 999. 



Lake Forestj " — 

LAUNDRY iKO D AK 



F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FORKST 



KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



For That Eleven O'clock Feeling 



HOT ROLLS 
COFFEE CAKES 



BISCUITS 
DOUGHNUTS 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kiods Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 

a Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrolliuent than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Qarrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to $400 for men; |350 to $150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9;00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE 



BownaN 



P( 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectionerij 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

CNeiil's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

i NEW RECORDS 

j FOR YOUR VICTROLA 

I Clotliliig and 

I 1^^ II nil killings 

I Cleaning and Tailoring; a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 



irjy OO REPAIRING 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, II^I.IXOIS. NOVEMBER 21, 1919 



NUMBER 8 



I1)AH(» 1»R1]S1- 

DENT SPEAKS 



Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of 
the University of Idaho, spoke in 
Chapei last Thursday morning-. 
His subject was "The American 
Standard." The tallt was keenly 
analytic and it gave all who 
heard it food for further thoug-ht, 
to judge from comments since 
heard on the campus. 

"The American Standard" was 
described not as an established, 
cut-and-dried thing, but rather 
as a development still going on. 
"The Gospel of Endless Improve- 
ment" is what he preaches. He 
traced its growth from the days 
when it existed only as an ideal 
in the minds of a few men like 
Emerson and Lowell, down to 
the glorious exemplification of 
that ideal at Chateau Thierry. 
"The American Standard" was 
the keynote of the cleanest and 
finest army that ever went into 
battle." 

The war helped to clarify and 
define the characteristics of this 
national sentiment. Those which 
Dr. Lindley distinguished are, we 
think, worth restating here: 

Allegiance to law. 

Treatment of human beings as 
men, not as things. 

High moral standards. 

Hatred of caste. 

Consideration of persons, not 
as they are, but as they are 
capable of becoming. 

A test was proposed which 
links the college student with 
the American Standard. "Do 
you," he said, "when you go 
home, feel a new interest and 
sympathy with the people in 
your old surroundings, or do you 
hold yourself aloof as one to be 
looked up to simply because you 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



PHI PI (ilVES 

OPEN HOUSE 



A precedent was inaugurated 
last Saturday evening. November 
15, when the Open House was 
given by the men of Phi Pi Ep- 
silon. It has been customary in 
the past, when enough people 
felt the dance impulse, to have 
an Open House, apportioning the 
expense prorata among those at- 
tending. The Phi Pi's chose this 
plan because it is less bother 
than the old plan of collecting 
from those present. It remains 
to be seen whether the plan will 
be taken up generally. 

There was good music, consist- 
ing of violin, piano and drums- 
Programs were also in evidence. 
The evening was cool enough to 
give zest to the dancing. Fin- 
ally, the football men were with 
us, after a period of abstinence 
during the footba.U season. Ev- 
erything combined to make one 
of the most enjoyable social 
events of the year. Phi Pi is to 
be congratulated on "throwing a 
g(3od party-" 



HAVE SOO T(>\S OV COAL 

Ilfiitiiii; Plant Has Enoiiiili Kiicl 
l''(ir Til TOO M'eolis 



In ;i,n interview with Mr. 
Huhnke on Mondajr, we learned 
tliat the University heating 
plant had at that time about 
eight hundred tons of coal on 
hand — enough to last three 
weeks in ordinary November 
weather. The normal daily con- 
sumption at this time of year is 
something over thirty tons a 
day 

Unfortunately, seven carloads 

(Continued on Page Ttvo.) 



LAKE FOREST, 0: 

NOKTHWESTEPN (> 



Northwestern College invaded 
Lake Forest Saturday for the 
last game, of the season, with 
full intentions of leaving with a 
victory to their credit. A good 
sized crowd of loyal Northwest- 
erners journeyed up with the 
team and were considerably dis- 
appointed when their outfit could 
not cop the bacon. 

Northwestern appeared to have 
the heaviest team, both in line 
and in back field. Soon after the 
whistle was blown, however, it 
could be seen that their advan- 
tage in weight was greatly les- 
sened by the lack of teamwork 
they displayed. Tlie Red and 
Black, after getting the ball, 
found it comparatively easy to 
gain through Northwestern's line. 
After working the ball down to 
Northwestern's three yard line 
by line plunges and long passes 
to Hause and Eddy, the Red 
and Black could not put the oval 
over and the whistle blew for 
the half as they had their fourth 
tlown. Poor judgment was used 
when a foi'wa.rd pass was used 
on this fourth down. With the 
secondary defense drawn in to 
stop a line buck, a right end run 
appeared to be the logical play. 

The second half was a repeti- 
tion of the first, with Lake For- 
est carrying the ball most of the 
lieriod. Another golden oppor- 
tunity was passed up when Eddy 
and Kyndberg were free from 
any Noi-thwestern men on a for- 
ward pass pla,y in the third quar- 
ter, the ball being tossed in the 
general direction of the left end. 
The Red and Black weakened in 
the fourth quarter, and North- 
western carried the ba.ll to Lake 
Forest's ten yard line, but could 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



THE STENTOR 



LAKE FOREST, 0; 

NORTHWESTERN 

(Continued froin rage One.) 

not carry it over. Tlie game 
ended with the two teams batt- 
ling in midfield. 

The game was marked by con- 
siderable rougli tactics on North- 
western's part, but were not as 
bad as was expected. The Red 
and Black fought hard on de- 
fense and showed good team- 
work. Their offense, however, 
was bad in spots, and the game 
should have resulted 12 to in- 
stead of a tie. Captain Woods, 
Kyndberg, Eddy and Ha.use did 
well on offense, while Legner, 
Russell, Hause and Eddy broke 
up many of Northwestern's plays. 
Reed and Ritan showed up best 
for Northwestern. 



Reed, Krafft 
Meachtle 
Trapp 
Stauffer 
Haumerson 
Kaiser 
r. e. Kluckh'm Capt 
Beddoes, Ives q. b. Schwab, 

Nierga.th 
Bergen 1. h. b- Gathes 

Kyndberg r. h. h. Dissenger 
Woods, Capt. f . b. Ritan 



The lineup 


: 


Hause 


I.e. 


Legiier 


l.t. 


Framberg 


l.g. 


Russell 


c. 


Van Sickle 


r. g. 


Casjens 


r. t. 


Eddy 


r. e. 



HAVE SOO TONS OP CO VL 

(Continued from P;ige One.) 

of coal wdiich we had in transit 
were confiscated by the govern- 
ment, or we should liave enough 
to last for some time. However, 
it will do no good to complain. 
We simply must get along as 
best we can with what we have. 
Mr. Huhnke asks that the stud- 
ents do what they can to con- 
serve fuel, principally by not 
leaving their windows open in a 
a vain attempt to heat all out- 
doors. Tliis is a serious matter, 
and all of us must cooperate- 



IDAHO PRESI- 
DENT SPEAKS 

(Continued from Page One.) 

have been to coUeige?" If you 
take the former attitude, your 
college course has been a suc- 
cess; if the latter, it has been 
worse than a failure. 

In conclusion, the speaker con- 
nected the idea of continuous de- 
velopment with the present pop- 
ular slogan: "100% American." 
"No one is a 100% American," he 
said. We have come far- We 
may well do homage to 'the glory 
of the imperfect., But we do 
not stop here. We must strive 
on to a fuller realization of the 
ideal Americanism. 

It was an excellent talk, and 
one that will not soon be for- 
gotten. Considerable specula- 
tion has arisen on the campus as 
to whether Dr. Lindley's visit, 
accompanied by some of the more 
prominent alumni, has any con- 
nection with the search for a 
pi'esident. 



DAVE REES RECOVERING 



JUNIORS ELECT FORESTER 
BCrVRl) 

Are we to have a Forester this 
year? This is a question that 
has been confronting the faculty 
and student body for some time, 
but the Junior class settled that 
at their meeting Monday after- 
noon- After due consideration 
of all the pi'oblems in connection 
therewith, the class unanimously 
decided that with the aid anh co- 
operation of the student body 
and faculty, they would be able 
to put out an annual at Lake 
Forest this year which will not 
only do justice to this College, 
but will be a Forester which we 
shall all be proud to own and 
show to our friends. The fol- 
lowing men were selected at the 
meeting this week, and they 
will choose the remainder of the 
board to assist in getting out 
the annual: 

Editor-in-Chief, Tommy Tucker 
Business Manager, Thomas Hale 
Athletict Editor.. 

Lawrence B. Maplesden 



It is with great pleasure that 
the Stentor is able to report in 
this issue, the rapid improve- 
ment of David Rees at Alice 
Home, after a serious illness of 
more than three weeks. 

To be exact, it was just four 
weeks ago yesterday that Dave 
came in from the football field 
suffering from a serious attack 
of appendicitus. He gradually be- 
came worse and on the following 
Sunday evening he was removed 
to Alice Home where he under- 
went a very serious operation. 
Since that time he has had a 
hard battle and suffered consid- 
erably more than just the ef- 
fects of the operation. In fact 
the doctor and nurses expressed 
considerable anxiety over his 
condition at times, as did his 
Digamma Brothers and in fact 
the entire campus. 

However, it may now be said 
with consnderable degree of ac- 
curacy that Davey is on the sure 
road to recovery and expects to 
leave the hospital within the 
next week or ten days. This 
news will come to the student 
body as quite welcome and pleas- 
ing, since ihis kind personality 
and congenial smile have been 
missed by all- In all his school 
activities and duties he has al- 
ways been quite faithful and he 
was especailly missed from the 
footba.U lineup during the latter 
part of the season. We hope, 
nevertheless, to see Davey out 
again soon, taking his place and 
performing his duties in Lake 
Forest in the usual pleasing and 
agreeable way. Here's to your 
health, Dave!!! 



Dr. and Mrs- Armstrong, of 
Ottumwa, came last Tuesday for 
a visit with Rebecca and Army. 
The doctor returned home Thurs- 
day but Mrs. Armstrong stayed 
until Monday. They ma,de many 
friends among tjie students, who 
look forward to their being here 
again at Commencement time. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



I{ASKI-]TI5ALL SE\S(>\ STARTS 
3I0M)AY 



Basketball practice beg'a.n Mon- 
day, the 17th, at 3:30 P. M., and 
by all indications there sliDuld 
be many candidates for this 
year's team. Four men are back 
who played on last year's team, 
Captain Maplesden, Eddy, Marsh 
and Schick. In addition to these 
men tliei'e are Sumner and Van 
Sickle from the year before last, 
and promising candidates in Mc 
Colley, Robertson, Kyndberg, 
Thayer and others. As the dope 
looks now, Beloit, Knox and Lake 
Forest a.ppear t" have the 
strongest teams in the Little 
Five, and the Red a.nd Black are 
confident they can bring home 
the bacon this year. 



Y. M. (". A. OIUJAMZKS 



The Y- M. C. A. Cabinet met 
last Monday evening and made 
the following nominations for 
officers for the coming year: 

President Warren D. Schreurs 

Vice-Pres Wilford H. Taylor 

Secretary Albert W. Dunlap 

Trea.suer Eugene W- Tucker 

At the regular meeting of the 
Y. M. C. A. on last Wednesday 
evening the aliove nominations 
were presented and ratified. 
Plans were made for the coming- 
year and arrangements com- 
pleted for a number of good 
speakers who will address the 
college Y. M. C- A. at va.rious 
meetings during the winter. 
The Y. M. C- A. rooms in College' 
Hall have been fitted up and all 
meetings will he held there in 
the future. 



fin. The affair was well attended 
by the Freshman girls of the 
college and of the School of Mu- 
sic. After a dainty luncheon 
and social hour an entertainment 
was enjoyed. Sarah .Joyner ren- 
dered several selections on the 
piano- She was followed by Mar- 
garet Sillars who charmed us 
with a reading. The girls en- 
joyed the occasion and take this 
as a means of thaiiking those 
who helped us to spend such a 
pleasant afternoon. 



VWOM (OAIMITTKK CHOSEX 



Who's gonna run the Junior 
Pi'om this year? This is another 
question that has been puzzling 
the student body this fall, so the 
.Junior class, believing in doing 
things up just about right, also 
settled that question at their 
meeting this week. The Junior 
Prom committee will be as fol- 
lows: 

Lloyd Bechtel, Chairman. 
Harold Eickhoff 
John Morley 
Beatrice Worthley 
Florence . Van Steenderen 

The date for the Prom, and 
other (let;i,ils connected with it 
will be announced later — but 
the Prom this year bids fair to 
be one of the fiiiest ever given 
at Lake Forest, so you better 
ari'ange those dates before vaca- 
tion! 



KAPPA AIJMIA TKA 



FRESHMAN TEA 



Mrs. Coffin and Mrs- AUee 
proved delightful hostesses at a,n 
informa.l tea given Tuesday af- 
ternoon at the home of Mrs. Cof- 



Kappa Alpha invites all Lois 
Hall girls to a tea on Thursday 
afternoon from foiu' till six. 

Such was the invitation given 
us during chapel exercises. Joy 
reigned supreme. 

What a transformation met our 
eyes as we entered the "Big- 
Room" the appointed a,fternoon. 
The usual rather dismal room 
was turned into a comfortable 



home-like place. Flowers, com- 
fortable chairs, inviting pillows, 
a bright fire place with soft liglht 
over the whole scene, gave an at- 
mosphere of domestic comfort — 
' just like home. 

Miss Hamilton met us at the 
door in her usual gracious man- 
ner which made us feel at home 
immediately. The Kappa Alpha 
! girls served us with most deli- 
j cious refreshments, consisting of 
sandwiches, cakes and coffee. 
During- the course of the after- 
noon. Miss Newcomb, a member 
of Kappa Alpha, gave a very 
earnest, well-worded talk in 
in which she wlcomed the 
guests. She also told us of the 
origin, growth and aim of Kappa 
Alpha in Lake Forest. It was an 
inspiring talk, and I believe that 
it caused more than one girl to 
leave with the idea that she 
would do her utmost to become 
worthy of membership. 

Mrs. Newcomb delighted us 
with several beautifully render- 
ed piano solos. We hope that 
she will play for us again- 

The rest of the afternoon was 
spent in general conversation. 
Groups merged with other goups 
and circles widened. Underneath 
it a,ll was a feeling of general 
goodfellowship and comradesiip 
that is so often found lacking 
around tlie campus. 

We remained as long as prop- 
riety allowed and then bade Miss 
Hamilton and the Kappa Alpha 
girls a "pleasant afternoon." 

Kappa Alpha may indeed have 
reason to be proud of her first 
social event. 

Raymond Ridgeway, ex '19. 
who is now a student at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, lias been elected man- 
aging editor of "The Voodoo," 
the college paper. 



Mr. and Mrs- W. 0. Kellogg, of 
Chicago, visited their daughter 
Elaine Sunday. 



THE 



S TE N T R 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly chn-iiiK the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Horest C'dllegp. 

Bjard of Etlitors: 

Leonard Holder), '20 
Ralph Stewart, 2a. 
Elaine KpHor, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor W. R. Brid^man 

Haculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



FOOTBALL SEASON 1!H<) 



Lake Forest lias not liad really 
first class football material since 
1915 and that year poor coaching 
kept us from having a winning 
combnation. Wtli all fairness to 
every one, it must be admitted 
at the outset that the material 
this year has been the poorest of 
all the lean seasons since 1915. 
On the other hand the squad has 
more nearly all of its possibili- 
ties developed than in other 
years. 

In other words they appea.red 
from the side lines to be the 
best coached eleven that has rep- 
resented Lake Forest since the 
days of Kennedy. 

At times the attack showed 
flashes of cleverness which has 
been lacking in the work of re- 
cent teams. These flashes were 
usually eclipsed by the slow op- 
eration of the plays. With our 
light tea.m the playing shouM 
have been a third faster than it 
was. 



The team has maintained the 
the best physical condition thru- 
out the season of any I have seen 
represent Lake Forest. This is 
the only team in the last five 
seasons that wa,s both willing 
and able to play hardest in the 
last quarter of a closely fought 
game. Usually the men appear- 
ed less fagged after a game than 
after a, practice session which is 
as it shoud be. The men seemed 
stale in the Monmouth game but 
in that they came back brilli- 
antly in the last quarter. 

In both the Beloit and North- 
western games the team was on 
edge. 

The s'tudent support at the 
games was also better than in 
recent seasons and helps to ac- 
count for the good showing made 
in the home games. The student 
attitude between games gives 
one the impression that football 
at Lake Forest is no longer an 
intercollegiate sport but rather 
a duty that sits lightly unless 
there is a good oportunity of 
making the team. From sporting 
comments I a,m inclined to be- 
lieve that this condition is not 
limited to Lake Forest. 

In the work of the team and 
of the individuals there were 
few changes in the early season 
indications. The biggest upset 
came when McColley, a star per- 
former at end, proved a victim 
of overdeveloped individuality. 
His loss was not keenly felt be- 
cause with Hause and Eddy, the 
end positions were well served- 

In the backfield. Captain Woods 
lived up to his reputation of be- 
ing a hard a,ggressive player and 
showed a decided improvement 
since his last appearance in 1917, 
particularly in keeping his head 
during games. He deserved to 
captain a better eleven. Bergen 
at half slowed down in his run- 
ning game as the season advanced 
but developed more versatility 
in his attack. Kyndberg made 
steady improvement in his play- 
ing and gives promise of becom- 
i ing a real half back. Beddoes, 



at quarter, played such a gritty 
ga,me that one dislikes to criticise 
his work. He did not get the 
snatp into the team play, nor did 
he run the team wih the audac- 
ity and assura,nce that mark the 
real field general. 

The line from tackle to tackle 
was weak both physically and in 
football experience. They fre- 
quently failed to charge on the 
defense and usually failed to open 
holes for their bacjcs on the of- 
fence. When ha,rd pressed they 
put up a good brand of last 
ditch fighting but could be 
counted on for one quarter of 
loose play per game. In all 
fairness it must be said that 
they were outweighed by every 
team they faced. Legner at 
tackle deserves commendation 
for his steady improvement dur- 
ing the sea,son. In the North- 
western game he appeared to 
good advantagie. 

The most spestacular feature 
of the season's play was the work 
of Alano as waterboy. Both he 
and the crowd enjoyed every ap- 
pearance. 

The most encouraging aspect 
of 1919 football is the number 
of experienced players who will 
be rea.dy to start the season of 
1920. 

W. C. Allee 



(iilt ami (iold 



Have you ever noticed how it 
sometimes happens that the 
strong, interesting personality 
who held you enthralled upon 
your first meeting oftimes proves 
positively dull upon further ac- 
quaintance, so that you find 
yourself marvelling how you ob- 
tained your first enthusiastic im- 
pression? 

The reason is not far to seek. 
It is easy to be brilliant and in- 
teresting for an hour or so, but 
it is quite another matter to con- 
tinue that interest over days and 



THE 



S T E N T R 



weeks and years. After one has 
skimmed the surfa,ce cream of 
some people one finds very thin 
milk underneath. 

It is the most natural thing in 
the world to be swept away by 
the glamour of a new personality 
simply because it is new. The 
new is always interesting. It is 
so full of possibilities- The 
trouble wth some personalities is 
tliat they are chock full of poss- 
ibilities that never materialize. 

How often does one meet the 
indi\'i(lual who touches li g'htly 
upon so ma.ny subjects that one 
imagines him to be most astound- 
ingly widely i-ead and learned in 
the ways and philosophies of life, 
only to find, when one attempts 
to penetrate his soul, that it is 
hollow, and that all this vivacity 
and show of wisdom is merely - 
veneer. 

Usually one doesn't get swept 
away by the refj true souls. One 
meets and talks with them and 
never, perhaps, really comes to 
know them. They are like buds 
that open petal by petal, very 
slowly and very sweetly, in the 
sunlight of fricndsliip and under- 
standing. 

The most interesting people 
are not always the ones who cre- 
ate the most striking first im- 
pression. Their souls are too 
deep to be quickly plumbed; 
their thoughts too rich to bo 
vulgarly displayed; there is no 
startling revelation of themind; 
one comes to know them quietly 
and gradua.ly and when at last 
tlie full beauty of their iierson- 
alities has been fathomed there 
is always something beyond their 
soul's horzon which keeps inter- 
est alive. 

"Veil after veil will lift, but 
there must be veil upon veil be- 
hind." 

The secret of eternal interest 
is eternal wonder! "Men cea,se 
to interest us when we find their 
limitations," says Emerson. The 



as you once come up with a 
man's Imitations, it is all over 
with him, Has he talents? Has 
he enterpi-ise? Has he knowl- 
edge? It boots not. Infinitely 
alluring and attractive was he 
I to you ycstei-day, a great hope, 
a sea to swim in; now you have 
found his shores, found it in a 
pond, and you care not if you 
ever never see it again." 

Gilt shines as brightly as gold 
whilst it is new, but it .soon be- 
comes shabby; gold alone en- 
dui'es. 

There ai-e many gilt souls in 
the worhl and theii- glaniuur is 
the transitory glamour of the 
footlights — but the beings with 
souls of puest gold— tha,nk good- 
ness for them, for they come 
quietly into the grayne.ss of the 
everyday to enrich and beautify, 
and th(Mr lirightness lasts for all 
time. 



PEUSOWLS 



l\S!»ll!KI> BY A eOXYERSV- 
TION 

And such is love, you say, 
Whei'ein two moi'tals moon and 

pine. 
And scai'cely know the night 

from day? 

Aye, such is love, my friend, 
And would that I niight darkly 

sigh 
When one is gone and sha.dows 

fly 

Et tu a slave, you say, 
A menial to love's beck and call, 
And helpless when her glances 
play? 

Nay, such is hope, my friend. 
Who breathes to ape the calmly 

wise; 
A man lives once and once he 

dies. 

W. G. McCoHey, '21 



A\ EXPLANATION 



Roljert Elakesley, of Canton, 
visited Barrick last Saturday. 



Beati'ice Woi'thlcy was at her 
■home in .Joliet for the week end. 



Mai'tlia Mohr spent the week 
rnd \n Champaign. 



Kappa Sigma amiounces the 
pledging of A. Winston Dunlap- We started to collect material 

for this issue of The Stentor last 
weelv, because in our past e.xperi- 
ence there has alwa,y's been a de- 
ficiency at the last minute which 
had to be made up out of our 
ov.'u slender stock of ideas, and 
which caus(xl the paper to come 
out late. This week every one 
I'csponded unusually well, with 
the result that the printer tells 
us two days before going to press 
that we have enough copy for 
two Stentors. So some of it has 
I to be left out of this issue, but 
it will he used later. We are se- 

! lee ling for publication such mat- 

Joscpliine Clarlc visited Mary | er as won't keep— current news, 
Burnett, in Waukegan, over the and so forth. Also some other 
week end. copy which happened to be set 

up early 

Katherine Sprechcr of, of Mt. I ^^ yo" wrote something for 
Morris, spent Fi-iday with her '[ th's week that doesn't appear, 
niece Alice Axton. don't feel slighted. We are very 

much indebted to you and we 



Madaline Hoover wa,s the guest 
of Si '-"'ma Tau for the week end. 



Mary Alice Metzger visited 
friends in Evanston Saturday 
and Sunday- 



Margaret Petit from North- ' appreciate your co-operation, 
western spent Sunday with Vir- i And your efforts will find publi- 
only sin is limitation. As soon | ginia Hopkins. I cation in a later issue. 



THE STENTOR 




LIT-TIL FELIX 



Hen-ner-ry is in 
Love. 

When one is in 
Love, one sinng-s songs 
At nig-ht. 

I went with Hen-ner-ry 
To ser-e-nade Lo-is Hall 
The o-ther night. 
Hen-ner-ry in-sis-ted 
It would be in-struc-tive 
But I have play-ed 
Lon-don Bridge 
Fre-quent-ly at home. 
Some of the songs were 
Qu-eer. 

When they were qu-eer 
Some of the fel-lows 
Shout-ed that they 
Did not care for 
That one. 

Which made it eas-y 
For the rest. 
Hen-ner-ry told the 
Gir-ruls they 
Could sing an-y-thing 
They want-ed. 
May-be I shall be 
A bold bad man 
Some day. 
Dar-ing-ly yours, 
Lit-tul Fe-lix. 



That same paper also had 
these lines, "The bride was 
dressed in a beautiful white sat- 
in gown and the bridegroom in 
the usual dress suit. The church 
was decorated by loving hands 
with palms." 



THE INCl BATOR 



(By Mis. Henry Buff Oipintoii) 



Horoscope for Week 
November 16-22 
You have a deep spiritual na- 
ture. You are intellectual, cap- 
able and discerning. You have 
good judgment, are a careful 
manager and a shrewd manipu- 
lator. You are fond of g'ood lit- 
erature, a pleasant, fluent talker 
and quite convincing- You never 
make any pretext of liking 
people who do not interest you, 
but you are a very satisfactory 
companion and you have many 
warm friends. You should marry 
early in life- You love your 
home and will strive to make it 
bright and cheerful and harmon- 
ious. You are quite fond of chil- 
dren. Your love is strong and 
true, and you will receive strong 
love in return. 

Dear Inky: — 

Where does a snake begin to 
wag its tail? 

Yours, 
A. STEWDENT. 

Dear Stewdent: — 

You will find the answer to 
that question at the railroad sta- 
tion where the elephant checks 
his trunk. 

Gracefully, 

Mrs- H. B. 0. 

Dear Incubator: — 

Besides being the eleventh 
month in the year, what ' is No- 
vember noted for? 

Yours, 

OSCAR. 

Dear Oscar: — 

Otherwise tlian following Oct- 
ober and acting as a warning 
that Christmas is coming, and 
your pocket book going, Novem- 
ber is noted for the following 
world fa.mous events and indi- 
viduals: 

Guy Fawkes, by trying to blow 
up the king and Parliament, 
made the fifth of November fa- 
mous. 



The twenty-second of Novem- 
ber is set aside for the particu- 
lar worship of the musician, St. 
Cecilia. 

The Pilgrims landed in Amer- 
ica and christened a certain spe^ 
cies of poultry in this illustrious 
month. 

The turkey became the enemy 
of man in November. 

Wiliam Cullen Bryant (not the 
grape juice William — this one 
has tea added to his name in- 
stead) and the great columnist, 
Mrs. H. B. 0., chose November 
as the proper time to be intro- 
duced to the world. 

The armistice which brought 
the war in Europe to the United 
States was signed under bleak 
November skies- 
Sarah Fisher just left word 
that she belongs to this illustri- 
ous list also. 

Evidently November is respon- 
sible for divers characters (al- 
though no particularly great 
divers, have, as yet, been attrib- 
uted to this month); tennis 
champion, literary genii, colum- 
nists (not B. L. T.), musicians, 
saints and anarchists. 

Thrillingly, 

H- B. 0. 

Dear H. B. 0.:— 

What makes the wildcat wild? 
Anxiously, 
THOMAS KATT. 

Dear Tom: — 

This is question that calls for 
deep thought and investgation. 
After searching through many 
dusty volumes, I have come to 
the conclusion that a wildcat is 
wild in order to keep out of the 
hands of lawyers. 

I base this conclusion on a 
note which states that in the 
middle ages wild animals were 
amenable only to ecclesiastical 
law, but domestic animals were 
subject to civil law 
Yours, 

The Incubator. 



Ewart Hall, '15, and Pete Gil- 
roy, '18, visited Kappa Sigma 
last Saturday. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Phones: Office 398 



Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Statii'nery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. j 

209 S. State Street | 

CHICAGO i 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS—CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 I 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



PVNTZ. 

Pantz wuz maid four men and 
not four wimen. Wimen wuz 
maid four men and not four 
pantz. Wen a man pantz four a 
wumen and a wumen pantz four 
a man, tliey is a pair of pantz. 
Such pantz dont la.st long. 

Pantz is like molases — they is 
thicker in cold wetlier and thin- 
ei- in. hot. Men is often mistook 
in pantz; such mistakes is 
breeches of promise. 

Their has been much discush- 
in whether pantz is singailar or 
plurel. Seems to me wen men 
ware pantz it is plurel and wen 
men don't ware pantz it is sing- 
uler. Men go on a tare in there 
pantz and it is all right, but wen 
the pantz alone go on a tare it is 
all rong. If you want to make 
pantz last, make the cote furst. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscsir l*iersoii 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 



i.AKi^: k(>i<«<:hi'. 



II. I. 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars--Candies 



Mr- Sibley entertained in hon- 
or of Mrs Armstrong last Friday 
evening. 



Ihe Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Wtstern Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 

MitiKitjer 

' Modern Laundry Company 

, Cliicago-Lake Forest Cui.iiiuitatiou 
I Tickets 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 



j Mr. Sililcy entertained the ' 
j freshmen of Mr. Troutman's En- j 
[glish division last Tuesday eve-; 
j ning- Pie, cakes, and cider were p^ VV. ZENGLKR 
SCI vecL lleintiiKj, /'i< s.s(//y. liejxiiiiiK/ 



i i 



The Original 

MABLE SYKES" 



DIAMOND MEDAL ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER 

OF INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION 
140 Xorth Niatc> Nireet 

(Opposite Fields — cor. State and Randolph Sts.) 

Established at present location since 1906 

MAKER OF H Y - C L A S S PORTRAITS 

Not connected with any other firm of similar name 



THE STENTOR 



DO IT NOW ! ! ! 

There is one activity on the 
Lake Forest campus of which 
every student should be a mem- 
ber. You wonder what it is, it 
is The Stentor. Well, you say, 
"I can't write" or "I am not 
clever" or you will say"I have so 
many duties I haven't time". 
But there is one way in which 
every student can help and that 
is by subscribing- for Tlie Stentor 
and PAYING your subscription 
in advance. Next week we are 
going- to beg-in another campaig-n 
for the payment of your sub- 
scriptions. Let everyone g'ladly 
respond with his two dollars 
without any excuse. 
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTIOM 
NOW ! 



er 31, 1919, to January 4, 1920. 
Ruth Bahlert and Winston Dun- 
la.p were chosen from the stiulent 
body and Miss Coan as a faculty 
representative. 

We hope that our representa- 
tives will brinig* back to us much 
information which will help in 
making- our Y. W. C. A. and Y. 
M. C. A. bigger and better organ- 
izations tha,n ever before 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Aiiilei'son liiiililitKj. I-'/iinie fiiiii 
LAKE FOItKST, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



Let Gold Dust Twins Do Youi 
Work, And You 
Come To Y. W. 



Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are SJiown 

Shows 7:00 — 10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 



Student Delegates Chosen 

A joint meeting- of the Y. W. 
C. A- and Y. M. C. A.cabinets was 
held in Lois Durand Hall Tues- 
day evening- Dr. Wright also 
represented the faculty. The 
The purpose of the meeting was 
to appoint two sudnts and a fac- 
ulty member to repi-esent Lake 
Forest College at the Volunteer 
Student Convention to be held in 
Des Moines, Iowa, from Decemb- 



After a short song service last 
Thursday night, the Y. W. enjoy- 
ed a talk from Mrs. Bridg-man. 
She reminded us that, since hab- 
it is formed simply by the repe- 
tition of a certa.in act, it is, 
therefore as easy to form g-ood 
habits as it is to form bad ones. 
Much time can be saved and en- 
erg-yexpended upon other things 
if the one little habit of punct- 
uality were learned. The most 
profitable way you can spend 
three quarters of an hour of your 
time you save is by attending 
Y. W. every Thursday evening-. 
You owe it to yourself. 



Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 

DR. E. E. graham 



DENTIST 



ce3ce:«:*oc«3jsC8:b5i:y»>CM>ooc<<)<K>c«cb:>o.05^ 




Blackler Bidg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

It it's HaUril lit IirNTOriN's iiv liaketl Kit'ht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Christmas Greetino: Cards t 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



We offer an unusual attractive selection 
for the coming season and urge that you 
place your order inmiediately. 

Cards and envelopes, including amend- 
ing with your name and address; prices 
ranging from $2.00 per 100 upward. 

THE LAKE FORESTER 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

«»^»»«CtCtC^OSW»2C«5«Cb:«OCe5Ci^^ OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE STENTOR 



•AI.XT IT THE UKKUIES" 

" The riper the berry the 
sweeter the juice-" 



We're sorry girls, liut tlic col- 
umn wout be so g'ood this week. 
The faculty locked up our bi- 
cycle and we couldn't get around 



Laml:>da gave a serenade last 
week but our program was cut 
short because of lack of appre- 
ciation. 



Whitey riualified for Lambda 
the same way Barney qualified 
for Beta Alpha — Naturally. 



Them's the Orchids. 



Barnie says she puts more 
feeling in "Woozey" than in any- 
thing else. 

We bite, who is "Woozey." 



Red Manning- (at open house) 
"Will you please get off my 
feet?" 

Buckingham, "ure. is it much 
of a wa.lk?" 



MULLER\S 

THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 

The KOOT STUDIO 

Kiinltuli Hull 
, «Tarksoii ami ^i'ahasli 

Fraternity and Soroity 
Work Our Si>ecialty 

TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake F orest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPAl H 

A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BREAD CAKES ROLLS 



IF YlIU ARE .-^ 

BIOLOGY TEACHER 

W <■ ;h]\ 1^1- y<iu 1(1 \v"k up 
The General Biological Supply House 

n.'iliK Kimball; ,\ve.. riiica'jd. 111. 
All Kinds of lliulo;.'it-jl Suplilifs 
aiiii .\pp:iratus. 
f'A'i'Ar.Oi;.'; prkr. 

Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

I WILLIAM BURGESS 
i Garage and Auto Livery 
j LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

I Autorrobile Supplies lia^'tjiige Ti-imsfoi-red 

I Sevf-n PaNS'-u;,'er Car^ tu Kent Ity Ti-ip or Hour 



HilUi.lav 



ial rak'-s tu ( mler 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 




"London bridge is falling 

etc.," seems to lie replacing "1 — 
2-.3~3— 4— 5— 6— 7— 8~ 9—10 
— Relight" as the campus sport. 

We don't care foi' tliat. 

We're lookin' fer de skoit 
whats trowin' all dat hockey ei-- 
bout de Lambdas. 

A certain sorority at Beloit, so 
we understand, publishes a 
monthly paper called the "Star 
and Ca.ndle." Well lit ui). we 
suppose. 



Idrcas fijmlshinqs 



Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS. PETTi- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKVv'EAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



PHONE 881 



L. OREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 



55 Deerpath Ave. 



LAKE FOREST 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



SpaMIiig Sweaters 



;•, A STYLE IN THE 

.,is;t^ f TRUE ATHLETIC 

nUlLDFOREX'ERY 

- OUTDOOR PUR. 

POSE 

Srvdfor 
Ciilalo'tiir 

'a. G. .SPALDING & BROS. 



Have you noticed all the boys 
hanging around Omega Psi en- 
trance? 



KASMUSSEN BROS. HOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



i\I A R K R r SQUARE 



What shall we sing now girls? 
— Oh I guess we don't know 



that so well. 



Lambda is about to publish tlie 
following musical hit: 

"She has lots of speed but no 
control-" 



The Berry Twins, Ras and Black 



r^ cs F=? /3^ \/ 1 ^sI (s 



F=F=?II^ 



■I^s,i' 



I r-j \/ IT A. ~r I CZ3 r--i ■^ 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



"A PAIR OF SIXES" 



The Garrick Clul) will inaug- 
urate the sea.son of college dra- 
matics Friday evening, Decem- 
ber 5, with the production of the 
delightful comedy, "A Pair of 
Sixes." This play comes from 
the literary workshop of Ed- 
ward Peple, an author famed for 
the creation of such profession- 
al successes as "The Littlest Reb- 
el" and "The Prince Chap." 
Wlien originally staged, the com- 
edy ran for a year at the Long- 
acre Theatre, New York, where 
it occasioned such fuores of 
laughter and praise as have nev- 
er been exceeded in the history 
of metropolitan theatricals. Such 
an astounding popularity may 
seem strange, for in what has 
been termed 'our national winter 
sport," a pair of sixes is not or- 
dinarily a winner. But in this 
dramatization of Hoyle, the 
author has created a farce quite 
justly deserving of the title 
"Royal Flush" in the matter of 
comedy distinction. In Thespian 
gambles, "A Pair of Sixes" prov- 
ed to be one of the most profi- 
table achievements of the con- 
temporary American stage. The 
favor which it received in New 
York has since been duplicated 
in Chicago, and in fact, in every 
city in which it has been seen- 

For the presentaton of the 
play, the Garrick Club has se- 
lected a well bala,nced cast of un- 
usual excellence. Every mem- 
br of the company has received 
a part suitable to his or her par- 
ticular talents. Unlike so many 
amateur plays, this offering will 
distribute the honors equally 
among all the players. Thei-e will 
be no individuail stars to steal 
the majority of the laurels. 
With such a parity of ability on 
the part of all the cast, the re- 
hearsals seem to promise that 
this play will be the most gen- 
erally satisfactory of any given 
by the college for several sea- 
sons. 



IS THAT SO? 



Now, why didn't James go to 
the dance? 

Well, Ives has his garters and 
Ilolden had his pants. 

Under these conditions it 
would have been a calamity for 
James to attempt to appear at 
such a function. Buckingham 
was all for giving him his short 
ones, but James only had socks, 
and the Scottish styles do not go 
well at our dances. 



The old way of bringing the 
boys to, wihen they have been 
knocked out on tlie football field 
has been tabooed. Instead of 
giving a strong stimulant, they 
give them nine rahs and their 
name on the end of that, and 
Ijoys, she sui'e does the work. 



Which reminds me- The other 
day one of the near stars of the 
game said, "We played a good 
game didn't I?" 



Prof. Van. (To a certain young- 
man who was trying to recite 
and chew gum at the same 
time.) "My young man you can't 
work the upper part of your 
head successfully when you are 
working your lower part." 



Prof. Burnap, to Class: "Now 
there is a young lady with grey 
matter to tie her switch to." 



Tunk, Goon sez.sez he, that 
them there campus lites sure do 
lead the dissipated life, they are 
out all day and are lit up very 
nite. 



B. Moore says that his college 
education has not been neglect- 
ed, because he used to take it 
half and half and now he takes it 
straight. 



If them berries get any riper, 
they will have to be picked. 



They Laugli At This In Other 
Collesres 



First Darkey: "Ah done heard 
dat dey fin' Columbus' bones." 
Second Darkey: "Ah never know- 
ed he was a gamblin' man." 



I stole a kiss the other night 
My conscience hurts, alack; 
I think I'll go again tonig-ht 
And put the blamed thing back. 



Early Frost 
Shivers More, '23, of Mississippi, 
has been pledged to Kappa Sigma. 
The Colorado College Tiger 



There is more than one kind 
of smokeless powder that is fatal 
to mankind. 



Instructor: "Mr. C, how long did 

you study last night?" 

Student: "Two hours, railroad 

time." 

Instructor: "What do you mean?" 

Student: "That is, including 

stops and delays." 

Teacher.who is very particular 
about note liooks: "When was 
the loose leaf system first used?" 
Soph: "Eve used it to keep track 
of her party gowns." 



Words That Upset The Canoe 
"Let's change seats." 
"Look at the fish." 
"Throw me a pillow." 
"I love you." 



Miss B: "Give me an example of 

a compound sentence." 

Dick: "It was a rainy day, and 

Webster was a great orator,; 

therefore Columbus discovered 

America." 



When stepping out at night 

alone, 
A girl should have a chaperone; 
Until in time to come, 
She calls some chap her own. 



Katherine Taylor of Northwes- 
Ross J. Burns entertained his tern was the guest of Dorothy 
father this week. | Magee Sunday 



THE STENTOR 



WITH (U U ('(>\TEMIMM!AI{rKS 



Through a bequest of $120,000 
by an alumnus, Knox College is 
to have a new men's doi'mitory. 
Work has already been started 
on the building and it is hoped 
to have it completed for the be- 
ginning of school next fall. It 
will have three stories, the first 
given over to a Commons and 
Y. M. C- A. rooms, the second 
and third to student's rooms, 
forty in number. 



Northwestern College at Na- 
perville is looking forward to a 
big season in Intercollegiate 
Debate. 

The men of Knox College have 
subscrilicd a .$300.00 fund for the 
maintenance of the Y. M. C- A. 
during the coming vear. 



Beloit is displaying its tradi- 
tional interest in Intercollegiate 
Oratory. It claims to be the 
leading college of the Middle 
West in this activity. 



Northwestern College is sub- 
stituting organized class scraps 
in place of individual hazing. 
The latest is a tug of war across 
the DuPage River. The Soph- 
omores carried away the honors. 

The Knox Student records the 
interesting fact that all the 
freshmen of that institution are 
being given mentality tests. 



Thirty-two of the forty-two 
college publications in Wiscon- 
sin have subscribed to a plan for 
an association which will deal 
with the problems of college 
journalism, 



James, (saying prayers): "Dear 

God, please make crayfish have 

four legs." 

Harris (listening): Say, James, 

why do you want the crayfish to 

have four legs?" 

James: "Because I wrote that in 

my Zoology paper today." 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

FrencK's Drug Store 



. H. Hnssey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

(JK .A.MKHICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGEN't' 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

/^/^TT-pv T T T T\ yr ID O II> '' '* C)a'nty. Home like and as Attractive 

as any Big City Restaurant. 



FEED AND 

Building Material 

L H W.SPeTdeL " 
Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



For That Eleven O'clock Feeling 



HOT ROLLS 
COFFEE CAKES 



BISCUITS 
DOUGHNUTS 



The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 



O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 



Phone 17 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH S.\LT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 

a Specialty 



THE 



S T E N T R 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (di-araatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. AH students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to $400 for men; |350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



iniiHiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim^^^^^ 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR, R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours; 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE 



.ownaN^ 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : ; : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectioiierij 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'Neilt's Hardware Store 

V\ HEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 



Kiibelsliy 



Clotliiiig and 
l^^iiriiiHliiiijlM 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

II H DO UEFAlHiyG 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. DECEMBER 5, 1919 



NUMBER 9 



LAKi: FOIM ST STIDENT l{i»l)\ 
HAS ADOPTED A SISTKU 
COLLEGE 



A VISIT<H{ FIKni 'W-i 



The students of Lake Forest I 
College have expressed their de- 
sii-e to participate in the great 
reconstruction work now going 
on in Europe, by adopting Con- 
stantinople College for women 
as our sister college. 

In 1871 Constantinople College 
began as a mission school for 
Armenian girls and has contin- 
ued its work ever since. In 1890 
it secured a charter from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and has become a full-fledged 
college, granting an A. B. degree 
to all gi-aduates. It has a fac- 
ulty of American women and 
near Eastern scholars. Its cur- 
riculum is based on those of the 
best women's colleges in this 
country, and it holds the unique 
position of being the highest in- 
stitution for learning for women 
in the wh(jle of the near East. 

Turkish women who in the 
past have been kept at home in 
the strictest seclusion, taken care 
of by their male relatives and 
excluded from any outside occu- 
pation, have been forced by war 
conditions to break away from 
custom and tradition and to be- 
come wa.ge earners. For centur- 
ies they have received the very 
slight education required for 
their limited sphere. With this 
poor equipment, many are now 
trying to earn a living. The 
time has come when Turkish 
women need education, desire 
education and will be allowed by 
their families to obtain an edu- 
cation. 

It was to strengthen the po- 
sition fo the college and increase 
its influence in the Near East 
that we pledged to raise $300. 



A welcome visitor to the camp- 
us on Tuesday Avas R- H. Crozier, 
'93, of Portland, Oregon, now gen- 
eral passenger agent of the 
North Ba,nk R. R. from Portland 
and Astoria to Spokane, and in- 
cidentally president of the Lhii- 
versity Club of Portland. No 
man among the Alumni has been 
more steadfastly loyal to the col- 
lege. For example, he has been 
a constant subscriber to The 
Stentor since graduation. From 
1905 to 1909 he ha,s been a mem- 
ber of our community as assist- 
ant to the president and secre- 
tary of the' university, and con- 
sequently probably has a wider 
acquaintance among the alumni 
than any other. His brief ad- 
dres in cha.pel displayed mod- 
esty, constancy and good man- 
ners in the widest and best 
sense. 



NEWS El{(nr DK. XOLLEN 



\vi:ll kxovw i:\n'Eiiso.\A- 

TOI? VISITS CAMI'lS 

The College was I'ortunate in 
having Miss Hortense Nielsen 
jn the campus Monday. Miss 
Nielsen is the sister of the fam- 
ous opci'atie star Alice Nielsen. 
Miss Hortense dra.matized Is- 
ben's "A Doll's House" Monday 
evening.. Her reading was very 
much enjoyed and we lnvpe she 
will visit us again. 

p]\'ery girl pledged to give at 
lea.st one dollar toward this fund, 
and the two representatives from 
the men, who attended the meet- 
ing in the Big Room of Lois Hall, 
said they were sure the men 
would respond as generously 
when they are asked. The Y. W. 
C. A. will have a drive for this 
purpose very soon. 



The following extracts from 
a recent letter, explaining the 
nature of Dr. NoUen's work in 
Italy, will be of interest. His 
address is: Via Francesco Crispi 
4, Rome. 

We are now in the final stages 
of our war work with the Ital- 
ian army, but shall be closing 
this department of our activity 
ivith the end of December. It 
may sound strange to you that 
I am still talking about war 
work a full year after the arm- 
istice was signed but, as you 
doubtless know, the peace com- 
mission has not yet gotten to 
the point of finally settling the 
Italian frontier and, as long as 
there has been a guestion about 
what was to be done in the re- 
diemed territory, it has natur- 
ally been necessary to retain 
large bodies of troops along the 
armistice line and these troops 
have been even more in need of 
')ur service than they were dur- 
ing the period of actual fighting. 
Meanwhile there have also been 
large numbers of troops in the 
barracks in cities and these too 
have been very appreciative of 
lur continuing the service. We 
j have, however been demobilizing 
I rather rapidly ourselves and at 
the present time there ure only 
about sixty of us left in Italy of 
a total of about four hundred 
who first and last have done 
service in this territory. 

' With the first of January we 
sliall be starting out with a 
small group of American secre- 
t;n-ies on a new venture, that oi 
ostahlishing permanent Y. M. C. 
A. service in Italy more or less 

' of the same type that has been 
carried on for so long in peace 
times in the American cities. It 

, is the plan to have a small group 

{Continued on Pagre Two.) 



THE STENTOR 



NEWS Fliim DR. NOLLEN 

(Continued from Page One.) 



of American secretaries in each 
of five or six Italian cities to de- 
monstra.te the permanent pro- 
gram of the association and, pro- 
fiting by the very widespread in- 
terest aroused in the association 
by our war service, to raise up 
as many friends as we can find 
to help in the permanent estab- 
lishment of the association cen- 
ters. 

The first stages of the work 
will be mostly in the industrial 
field and with university stu- 
dents a,nd boys. Full fledged 
city associations will have to fol- 
low somewhat later. 

The Student Federation al- 
ready existed in Italy before the 
war and the Italian secretary of 
the federation is now allied with 
us for the development of stu- 
dent work. He was, of course, 
an officer during the war, more 
than once wounded and gassed, 
and for ma.ny months in hospital 
even after the cessation oi hos- 
tilities. 

There is no question in my 
mind about the possibility of de- 
veloping a high grade of associa- 
tion service in Italy. The real 
ciuestion is whether we shall 
succeed with the personnel at 
our command in solving the al- 
ways difficult and delicate prob- 
lem of establishing a new enter- 
prise in a foreign land. We do 
have natura.lly the advantage of 
counting among our pioneers, a 
few men who, through war serv- 
ice, have become well acquainted 
with the country and with its 
language. 

We found a great deal of difPi- 
culty in getting settled here in 
Rome because of the extreme 
scarcity of apartments but we 
finally found very comforta.ble 
quarters and the children are 
now well started in a little 
French school, where they are 
doing their various school sub- 



THI\(iS THAT NEVER 
HAPPEN. 



Fran]\ie not greeting you with 
"Hi". 

Bea spending a week-end in 
Lois Hall. 

Having late permission Thanks- 
giving. 

Herrcke and Burns having 
dates. 

A game of tennis without Mr. 
Ellingwood. 

Alberta Burrus refusing to 
shimmie. 

Chuck Beard elected Y. M. 
president. 

.Jo Martin not studyinci. 

Marga.ret Mills becoming a 
sylph. 

Burnap lieing impartial. 

Dances lasting 'till midnight. 

Ruth Daggett forgetting about 
Biloxi. 

K. Horton getting "enthused". 

Glee Club without Marion Pres- 
ton. 

Mike not cleaning his diamond 
in Political Science. 

Ldveridge Martin having a 
date with a Theta Psi. 

Liz Torreyson losing her voice. 

Tommy Tucker six feet tall. 

"Sib'" shaking the shimmy. 

Potter without his line. 

Keith Marsh without liis black 
tie. 

Whitey acting a bit cordial. 

Davy falling in love. 

Opha using the fire escape. 



Y. AV. C. A. PRO(iRESSIYE 
PARTY 



jects in the French language. 
They are also geting some Ital- 
ian tutoring in the afternoon by 
being constantly immersed in 
the atmosphere. 

John S. Nollen. 



You know when a gal can't 
just get at her ma's cooky jar 
or panti-y she appreciates any- 
thing in the line of food be- 
tween meal times. Well, we 
girls of Lois Hall gave three 
cheers for the Y. W. C. A. in the 
Annual Progressive Party last 
Tuesday evening. At 9 o'clock, 
just at the time when we are 
lonin' to be home and have just 
a wee bit between our studies 
the Y. W. summoned us up to 
the third floor and treated us 
to sandwiches.. After having 
some lively songs sung to the 
music of Sara Fisher's mandolin, 
we went down to the second 
floor. Ah, here we received the 
R-E-A-L treat. Ah, we smacked 
our lips over the delicious bev- 
rage — cider — and we felt so joy- 
ous and happy the rest of the 
evening. Next, we went down 
to the big room and sat around 
the large fire and ate popcorn 
like we used to when the circus 
came to town. Here we sang 
and had a very enjoyable time 
around the fire. When we at 
last meandered upstairs wo 
went with a prayer of thanks- 
giving to the Y. W. C. "a. for 
giving us such appreciated alms. 



ATHLETIC DANCE 



One of the most successful 
dances of the season was given 
Saturday, November 22, for the 
oenefit of our athletics. The 
music could not have been other 
than grea,t with Carl Noble at 
the piano, and as everyone had 
lots of pep, a good time was 
iiad. Mr. and Mrs. Allee chap- 
eroned and had a good g'ame of 
chess in the bargain. 



Why is it that fat men are so 
good natured? 

Because they are too fat to 
fight and can't run — Yale Record. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



XKAV STIDEXT HOLL 



Some analysis of the new stud- 
ent roll, with reference to geo- 
g-raphical distribution and the 
influences which seem to have 
brought these recruits here, may 
Ije interesting-- There are 98 in 
the list, not counting- men re- 
turned from service after long- 
er or shorter absence, of whom 
there are 13- The totals for the 
last five years, not counting- 1918 
(S. A. T. C. yea.r) have been 88, 
95, 92, 92, and 89. This is there- 
fore, the largest new enrollment 
to date- 
As to geopraphical origin, the 
record runs as follows: 

Totals 
Ilinois, 89; Iowa. 8; Indiana, 6; 
Arkansas, .3; Ohio, 2; Michigan, 
2; New York, 2; Colorado, 1; Kan- 
sas, 1; Pennsylvania,, 1; Texas, 
1; Virginia, 1; Wisconsin, 1. 

The proportion iVom Illinois 
runs considerably higher than 
before and that from Iowa and 
Wisconsin less. Tlie "scattering" 
ones are about as usual. 

An analysis of the influences 
which led the new comers to 
Lake Forest, made up from the 
bla.nks lianded in at the time of 
registration, gives the following 
results: 

Men Women Totals 
Influence of: 

Former students 19 26 4.'S 

Present Studs. 14 .5 21 

Local Residence 5 7 12 

Inquiry 1 3 4 

Interscholastic 3 3 

Miscellaneous 8 .5 13 

'Miscellaneous' includes 2 from 
the Academy, 2 thi'ough kin in 
Academy and Ferry Hall, 3 
girls through other girls already 
coming, 1 through a clergy- 
man, and 1 through advertising. 
Of course, "fornier students" in- 
cludes both alunini and non-grad- 
ua.tes, and the influence comes 
about through kinship or resi- 
dence in the same town, more 
often the latter. 6 women and 



10 men are near kin of jiresent 
or fornici- students- 

The numbei- due to the under- 
graduates holding over is seem- 
ingly below what it should be, 
e.specially in view of the prizes 
ofl'ered in tlie summer. None 
of the men's fraternites has 
brought its C|Uota of new men 
brought its quota of new men up 
to the point necessary to meet 
the requirement laid down by 
Mr. Mather's proposition of last 
■June. For the a.lumni prizes of- 
fered for the ndividuals who 
should be responsible for new 
men, no one, with one exception, 
seems to have lirought more 
than one reci-uit. Raymond 
Moore, '20, however, is charge- 
able with four, and is recom- 
mended to the Alunini Com- 
mittee for the first jirize of .$.50. 
It is further recommended that 
the second and tliii-d prizes be 
not awarded, but that the money 
be used in some othch way. 



V\\<U \( KMi;\ TS 

Sigma Tau announces the ini- 
tiation of Mary Alice Metzgar. 

Thet;^ Psi announces the initi- 
ition of Margai-et Griffith, Mar- 
tha Mohr, and Elizabeth Torrey- 
son. 

Sigma Tau announces the pled- 
ging of the foUo-vving: Mildred 
Day, Frances Bi-adley, Sarah Joy- 
iiei', Helen Eggemeyer and Lois 
Conklin. 

'J'heta Psi announces the pledg- 
ing of the following: Sue Spa.uld- 
ing, Vii-ginia Hopkins, Alberta 
Burrus, Virginia Alcott. Ruth 
Daggett, Josephine Merchant, 
Edna Enyart and Virginia 
Ki'atsch. 

Kapiia Kappa Chi announces 
the pledging of the following: 
Opha Catterlin. Esther Graha,m, 
Mildrred Graham and Ellen 
Knox. 



CHESTIMl DAVIS STAKS AT 
ILLINOIS 



A "Pair of Queens," a comedy, 
was presented by Mask and 
Bauble, the Univei-sitj' of Illinois 
Dramatic Clulj. Chester Davis, 
Lake Forest, '18, evidently did 
much credit to his Alma Mater, 
accordiiig to the following clip- 
ping of the mini: 

"CAST AVELL |{ALAM'EI) 

The cast was not one of scintil- 
lating stars, rather it was well 
balanced. 

The male leads — being those 
around which the action centeretl 
— were C. R. Davis as Peter 
Cranby. and F. W. Meyer, as the 
brother-in-law . The latter has 
evidenced his ability as an actor 
liefore university audiences so 
many times that it is enough to 
say that he was well adapted to 
the part and we'll look forward 
to seeing him again in the next 
Mask and Bauble production. 

Davis made his first appear- 
ance as a campus player. Even 
without the marcelled locks of 
Joe SantleV, who played the part 
in the original professional com- 
pany, he assimilated expostula,- 
tive nervousness, annoyance, 
despair and finally joy in a man- 
ner which ])leased the audience 
md marks hini for future refer- 
?nce. 



WOKLl) I'l-LLOWSHIP (O.M- 
^UTTEi: HAS CHAHfii: OF 

Y. v.. .mep:ti\(; 

Miss Flora Shattuck, Chairman 
)f the World Fellowship Com- 
mittee, was fortunate in secur- 
ing Mrs. Griffis to talk at the 
second meeting of the year which 
'lei- committee has charge of. 
Mrs. Griffes has spent seven 
I years in the Philipine Islands 
' and she told in a very interest- 
ing nianner the work that is go- 
,ng on in those islands among the 
World Fellowship workers. She 
has also traveled in China and 
•Japan and the gii'ls were glad to 
have her tell them of the work 
which is being done for the peo- 
; pie of those countries. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Horest t'dllege. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Alberta Burris '23 
Rosa Deutch '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson '22 

Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor VV. R. Bridgman 

Hacultyand Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



Incoiisideration 



Friendship is a fine thing-, and 
we instinctively try to cultivate 
it. This is na.tural and the right 
thing- to do. So far as frendship 
is a help it is most desirable; 
when friendship means giving 
aid to someone who is in need of 
ti, it is a lieautfid thing- Bnt. 
when friendshp becomes so 
familiar that all care and con- 
sideration for one another's feel- 
ings die, then it is time that the 
friendship cease or take on in 
some degree a new enthusiasm. 

If true friendship means con- 
sideration of the rights and feel- 
ings of others, then it is the part 
of a good friend to consider the 
fact that there are times when a 
person wishes to be alone. This 
can be applied particularly to 
the times when one wishes to 
study. At Oxford every room is 



furnished with two doors, an in- 
ner and an outer door. Of course 
Lake Forest is not Oxford, and 
we have not as yet advanced to 
that stage, but we could be more 
careful about entering other 
people's rooms without knocking, 
and never go in over a "Don't 
Disturb" sign. Of course we re- 
alize that the "Don't Disturb" 
sign has become very common, 
and that it is a great tempta- 
tion to ignore it when we desire 
some important information, but 
people do not make it so evident 
that they do not wish to be dis- 
turbed without some reason, no 
mater how trivial it may be. 

Consideration extends to num- 
erous other fields beyond that of 
the study room. Politeness plays 
a large pai-t in the field of frien- 
ship. Some times one is ignor- 
ant of the polite thing to do be- 
cause of faulty home conditions, 
but surely after being at college 
for a few months, there is no 
reason in the world why one 
could not by observation pick up 
these little essentials. That an 
upper classman should be re- 
spected is right, not only be- 
cause it is a tradition of all 
colleges, but because the mere 
fact of a difference in age, no 
matter how slight it may be, 
should demand respect from ev- 
ery one. Politeness on the cam- 
pus is at all times very appar- 
ently lacking. If one really re- 
spects another one will be court- 
eous at all times. True friend- 
ship cannot be separated from 
respect and when respect is lack- 
ing it is evident that the bond 
i.if friendship is not very strong. 

Because fi'iendship, respect and 
consideration are so closely al- 
lied, it is only right that tliey 
should never be separated. Fa- 
miliarity is all right at times, 
but wlien one becomes so famil- 
iar with a friend that all respect 
is h'x-king, then the friendship is 
not true. Let us try to prove 
that we do really respect our 
friends. 



KAPPA ALPHA 



For many years, almost since 
colleges were founded, there 
have existed various societies, 
election to which was considered 
a great honor, because such high 

standards of schlorshis and 
character were maintained by 
their members. Also this elec 
tion was a means of bestowing 
recognition aoid honor upon all 
those students worthy of such. 
The need for such organizations 
has been felt for long, and met 
in a variety of ways by various 
colleges and universities. 

For several years the need for 
a society which would be a rec- 
ognition for high scholarship and 
high ideals of character has 
grown in our own dear Alma 
Mater, so that last spring the 
climax was reached when a com- 
mittee of the faculty called to- 
gether the Senior and Junior 
girls for an open discussion of 
the question. As a result of sev- 
eral meetings, plans were formu- 
lated and carried out to organize 
KAPPA ALPHA, which we hope 
may live through many yea,rs of 
honoi- in Lake Forest College. 

It was decided that KAPPA 
ALPHA should gain its members 
not entirely on the basis of schol- 
;i,rship and good character, but 
on the basis of a happy combina- 
tion of high scholarship college 
activities, outside the class room, 
and that intangible something 
which gives one good character 
aiid a pleasing personality. It 
was accoi-tling to the a.bove qual- 
ifications that four senior girls 
of the class of 1919 were chosen 
by the i'aculty, and that they 
upon recommendation of the fac- 
ulty elected the present members 
of Kappa Alpha, from the Soph- 
omore and .Junior classes. At 
ihc time of the election to Kappa 
Alpha, several girls were eligible 
in grades but not in activities, 
and vice versa. It is therefore 
our intention that every new, 
and old girls, too, understand 



THE STENTOR 



clearly that it is the combination 
of high scholai-ship, and student 
activites which, make one eligible 
to Ka,ppa Alpha, and we hope 
that all girls will faithfully try 
to attain the highest standard 
possible in both, for it is truly 
only by having a wide scope of 
activities and interests that one 
reaps the benefits of a, rich and 
full life. 

To encourage this zeal on the 
part of all girls Kappa Alpha 
this year offers a silver cup to 
the girl who proves her loyalty 
to Lake Forest College, and 
shows the best and truest college 
spirit by wa;y of entering college 
activities, by living up to the 
idea.ls of honor and scholarship, 
and by showing a true demo- 
cratic and unselfish spirit about 
the campus toward her fellow 
comrades. 

As for student activities — 
there are so many of them that 
on first thought o'ic wonders 
wiien there is tune for lessons; 
and they are so varied that no 
one need claim that her partic- 
ular taste cannot be satisfied. 
First of all come athletics in all 
its forms under the able leader- 
ship of Miss Coan. Then there 
is Garrick Club, Discussion Club, 
Y. W. C. A., Glee Club, Stentor, 
Student Government, certain 
class offices, the va.rious prize 
contests, and the May Day Fes- 
tival. No one need ask wondcr- 
ingly, "What activities are there 
beyond those of the class room," 
for there is a place for every giid. 

The past few years have been 
strenuous ones, full of anxiety 
and work, such as many of us 
have never before o.ppreciated. 
Some of us wonder what we did 
with our days before dire war 
called on us for all our stored up 
energy, and a full measure of 
sacrifice.. Now that the press- 
ure of war is over and we are 
looking soon for an industrial 
peace, what will become of our 
energy? Has it been exhausted 
by the past few years' strain, 
will it be stored in idleness, or 
will it be turned into fresh chan- 



nels for helpfulness, and the fur- 
thering of lionor and altruism? 
In the confusion that follows 
war, the nations of the world are 
looking to America for help. Will 
we fail them in their needs, or 
shall we. Young America, be pre- 
pared to be helpers in the world's 
work? You answer "We will not 
fail." Therefore, we must make 
the most of our college life, that 
we may be prepared for the work 
that is before us. 

It is a personal matter that 
each one of us strive for honor, 
and the ideals that will not only 
keep our Alma Mater's lamp 
burning, but which will cause it 
to shine bright among all col- 
leges, and some day bring us the' 
honor of a chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa for 'To him that hath 
shall be given." 

May I close with a quota.tion? 
"If we are, to be happy with the 
spontaneous joy of deep-breathed 
i^-ladness, we must be busy, and 
not only busy, but busy serving, 
for service is life's most glorious 
pi-ivilege. To serve we must be 
wurthy, forgetting self in great 
desii'e to help, and lieing worthy 
keeps us busy." 

FLORENCE NEWCOMB. 



Tlio C'lowiis Perform 



Thcta Psi entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. N. R. White (Marion 
Stuai'l) Tuesday. 



Helen Bardhousc, Iluth Da.g- 
gett. Alberta Burrus, Rebecca 
Armstrong, Zelma Farwell, Sai'a 
Fishei-, Lois Ryno, stayed at the 
hall during Thanksgiving week. 

J\Tai-garet Griffith entertained 
Elizabeth Tin'reyscm over 
Thanksgiving. 



Oh! Jen — been down to the 
Gym lately? You oughta go. 
Talk a,bout Ringling's — well — 
Ain't it a terrible sight, Jen, 
To see them tii-y and dance; 
Ain't it a terrible sight, Jen, 
As 'round the Gym they 
prance? 
They dance the lite fantastic toe. 

Yet some of them ain't lite; 
They fall and stumble on the 
floor, 
They surely are a site. 
They throw their arms ab(jve 
their heads. 
In Grecian poses smart; 
They stiffly bow and kick their 
heels. 
As 'round the Gym they start. 
Yet on next May day, you will 
see 
Them dancing- on the green; 
They now are only practicing 
For a clownish May day scene. 



Sara.li Joynei- spent Thanks- 
giving at the home of Virginia 
Phillips at Pontiac. 



How about your prom dates? 
Remember January 17th is'nt so 
far away, and some other fellow 
may beat you to it. 



Mary — When is enuff enuff? 

Jen — When it's bread pudding. 
Dear Dean ,we pray thee. 

Have no more "Pink Teas;" 
Dear Dean, please hear us. 

Listen to our pleas — 
When the Kappa Alphas 

Had a tea last week, 
riiere was bread left over 

That people didn't eat. 
And the cook she got it, 

Ma.de some pudding fine; 
Now it's pudding, pudding, 

Bread pudding all the time. 
Lois Hall is praying 

Bread will soon give out — 
If it don't, we all will 

Die of pudding gout. 
So Dean, we pray thee. 

Have no more Pink Teas; 
But if you must have them, 

Don't have bread, don't — 
please. 



Before he was married 
We called him a dude. 

But now that he's wed, why, 
He's only subdued. 

— Cornell Widow. 



THE STENTOR 




'^•^ "^ *'>-^^>*4=»» ^ --V'tg 



^^--^ 



A Gateway — Electrical 



ONLY a forty-foot gateway bounded by 
two brick pilasters and ornamental 
lamps, but unlike any other gateway in the 
entire world. 

For back of it is the General Electric Com- 
pany's main office building, accommodating 
2300 employees. And just next door is its 
laboratory with the best equipment for test- 
ing, standardizing and research at the com- 
mand of capable engineers. Then do'wn the 
street — a mile long — are other buildings 
where everything electrical, from the small- 
est lamp socket to the huge turbines for 
electrically propelled battleships, is made 



by the 20,000 electrical workers who daUy 
stream through. 

What a story this gate would tell, if it could, 
of the leaders of the electrical industry and 
business, of ambassadors from other insti- 
tutions and from foreign lands. 

The story would be the history of electric 
lighting, electric transportation, electric in- 
dustrials and electricity in the home. 

This gateway, as well as the research, en- 
gineering, manufacturing and commercial 
resources back of it, is open to ail who are 
working for the betterment of the electrical 
industry. 



Illustrated bulletin, Y-863. describing ths company's 
several p/an-^, will 03 mailed upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Desk43, Schenectady, NewYork 





General Office (T^ , r- > ^-r 
5chenectady,N.Y. V-_ 




^^•'ir 



imipaini 






Sales '. 'iiioos in 
all larre cities. 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 865 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stati inery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



DID IT KVEK HAITK.N TO YDl ? 



A pretty girl .sat in a railroad 
train, 
A.s lonesome as could be; 
And slie said to herself with a 
little sigh, 
"It he'll only talk to me." 
The young man sat just across 
the aisle. 
From tlie girl with the pretty 
stare, 
And he said to himself, "If I sit 
with her, 
I wonder if she would care." 
Stanza here 
And so they rode the whole day 
long, 

X X X .X X 

And neither of them knew. 
Just what the other was think- 
ing- of; 
Did it over happen to you? 

— Penn State Froth. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 

Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r am in g 



l>AKK KOKIOSr, 



Il.L, 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



Delia Babcock, Eloise Brown. 
Zelma Farwell a,nd Josephine 
Martin informally entertained 
Mason Armstrong, Francis Mc 
Ferran, Vincent Coleman and 
Carl Noble at tea Sunday even- 
ing in Lois Durand Hall. 







9. 

'A 

■1 



Christmas Greeting Cards 



We offer an unusual attractive selection ^ 

for the coming season and urge that you § 

place vour order immediately. g 

Cards and envelopes, including amend- § 

ing with your name and address; prices ^ 

ranging from $2.00 per 100 upward. 5 

THE LAKE FORESTER f 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars--Candies 



Ihe Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

•SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 

M<(ii<i(/ef 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coiiimiitation 

Tickets 

;ta 1»KKKPATII. MKST 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cl('<iiihii/, I'll fisiiii/. IieiHiiritt(i 

ir if.s BakeJ ;]t liUNTOi'NS if^ Hbkeci KigLt 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 

Telephones: - ■ 37, 38, 39, 51 
LAKE FOREST, - ILLINOIS 



Patronize 

Our 

Advertisers 



THE STENTOR 



ALIMM NOTES 



1905— Miss Mary An d e r s o n, 
whose permanent home address 
remains Hudson, Wis., expects, 
in January, to ta.ke a position at 
the University of Wisconsin. 

1909— Rev. Henry White has ac- 
cepted a call to the Presbyterian 
Church at Clyde, N. Y., and will 
enter on his duties at once. 
1907-1908-'-Mr. and Mrs. (Mary 
Bockhoff) Joseph H. McCrea 
have left Colorado Springs and 
have removed to Richmond, Ind., 
where Mr. McCrea is now in 
business with Mrs. McCrea's fa- 
ther. 

191.5 — Mr. and Mrs. (Daisy 
Clarke) F. G. Hovey, since Mr. 
Hovey returned from national 
service, having ta.ken a house in 
Independence, la., expecting- to 
make their permanent h o m e 
there. 

1915 — Ernest Krueger has just 
returned from Havana, Cuba, 
where he has been playing ball 
with the Pittsburg National 
League Club. At present he is 
in New York City, 853 St. Nich- 
olas Ave., considering a, choice 
between several business oppor- 
tunities. 

1916— Ralph H. Dean, recently 
back from Panama, where he 
has been in army duty, upon 
getting his discharge has taken 
a position with Mariner & Hos- 
kins, 36.3 Erie St., Chicago, 
r.nalytical chemists. This is in 
line with thhe work which Mr. 
Dean did in chemistry both 
here and at the University of 
niinois 

Mrs. Madge Spencer Bovard 
is teaching in the Seneca, 111., 
High School. 

Ruth Talcott is to be found 
tills year at 319 Jackson St., 
Oshkosh, Wis. We infer that 
she is teacing there. 



ODDS AND ENDS 



Savvy? 

I believe that that Catterlin cliild 
Has been to some medicine 
shows; 
She lias salves for your head. 

Salves for your hands, 
And a wonderful salve for your 
toes; 
Oh! yes — and a marvelous salve 
for your nose. 
But where she got them no one 
knows — 
I BET she's been to some med- 
icine shows. 



All Dro.^sod Up for tlio AVintci 



Ain't girls the funny creatures, 
tho, 
I'd sa,y so — I'd say so; 
They buy their ears some little 
muffs, 
They're all concealed beneath 
some puffs; 
Nof girls. Oh girls, take care, 
take care — 
For muff's for hands, they 
aint for hair — 
Along comes strong wind, Oh! 
beware. 
Beware, take care! 



John Heinle says, in answer to 
an inciuiry as to how the sub- 
scriptions for the punch-bowl 
are coming: "Der fellows haf 
give 55 cents und 18 dollars. Der 
girls — Hmm, I dond know." 
Student (in heated argument): 
"You're the biggest bum I ever 
saw." 

Teacher: "Fellows, fellows! You 
forget that I am in the room." 



Mr. and Mr. Conrad Hibbeler 
are now living in Cleveland, 0. 
Mr. Hibbeler is acting as the 
representa.tive in that district 
of the Mercury Mfg. Co., of Chi- 
cago, builders of tractors, with 
an office in the Engineer's build- 
ing. 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

AiKlernaii Hiiihliiifi. I'lioiie SoS 
LA Tit: t'OimST, ILL. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
.Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 




j Hams and Bacoe | 

j are mild, | 

j sweet, tender. | 

j Each piece is care- | 

I fully selected and j 

I cured to give it the | 

I distinctive "Premium" | 

j flavor. I 

M Ask.jor"Preniiurn"Pro(hir!s 1 

I Swift & Company | 

I U. S. A. I 



THE 



S T E N T R 




LIT-TIL FK-LIX 



Hen-ner-y and I 

Have had a ver-y 

Thank-ful Thanks-giv-ing, 

I us-ed to be 

Thank-ful for food 

And clotliing 

But now I ex-press 

My thanks for tlie 

Rar-er joys of life. 

Ot-tum-wa is a 

Diz-zy i)lace to 

Spend Thanks-giv-ing in- 

How a-bout it Trout-ie? 

When I awoke 

The oth-er morn-ing 

The ground wa,s white 

It re-mind-ed Hen-ner-y 

Of a po-em — 

"See the snow. 

The bee-yut-i-ful sno-ow" 

Dern the snow. 

I must close now 

My brain is dis-turb-ed 

With what Hen-ner-y 

Terms a Hang-ov-er. 

I can no long-er think — 

Hoping you are the same. 

LIT-TUL FE-LIX. 



While Jajck Morley is trying to 
get his brother up in the morn- 
ing Sheehan and Leonard enter. 

Bill: "I'll get up, here's comes 
the wrecking crew." 



Professor McNeil's tallv on as- 
tronomy has aroused a keen in- 
terest in the heavenly bodies. A 
few of the men even remain up 
all night to study them. 



TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 

TheKOOT STUDIO 

Kliiihiill Hall 
•Ije«'UH<Mi ami ^^'iiUiinIi 

FraitTiiity jiinl Soroity 
Work Our Specialty 



TELF.PHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 
A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

br.e:a.d cahes rolls 

Hiialiihiy aiiU OlliPr Speriul C;iki's in Urilei' 

LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 




,4 Shop/or 
rcns ruriibhinqs 



Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently 



IF YOU AUls A 

BIOLOGY TEACHER. 

\Vr ;u.l\ist' \(jii Lo look ui) 
The General Biological Supply House 

■"i.'>iiK Kiuibiirk Avo., Cliiciife'o. 111. 

.\]] Kinds of iJiologicul Supplies 

:nnl Appiiratus. 

('ATAr.n.:^ kkke. 

Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

AuLonioliilc SuppjK^s Hutrt'age Transferreci 

Sc\fn l*assrni*,'er Cars to Rent b>' Trip or Hour 

L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 

PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



PHONE 881 



JpaldiPj Sweaters 



^'^ A STYLE IN THE 

TRUE ATHLETIC 

RUILDFJR EVERY 

OUTDOOR PUR. 

POSE 

i ; Send/or 

'■ Colalno"'' 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS, 



RASMUSSEN IMiOS. HOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOHS of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



M A K K K L' SQUARE 



N CS F? A W I INI <S 



p='r=?iisiT'irNe? 



^ ~r yo^ -r I CD rsi e; F? Y 
I r~>i V I ~r /v -r ] CD INI ^ 



HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 



HOWARD WOOD, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



THK I\Cl BATOn 



(By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 

Horoscope for week beginning- 
November 23rd, and ending Nov- 
ember 29tli. 

You are forceful, venturesome 
to the verge of recklessness, and 
positive in your manner. When 
you know a tihing to be so, it is 
next to impossible to move you. 
Some of your friends accuse you 
of stubbornness. Your are just, 
upright, and exacting. You are 
original and aggressive, and 
have ability to lead whether it 
be society or business. You love 
to excell, and put the same vig- 
or into an athletic game that 
you put into your most serious 
undertakings. 

Marry early in life because 
you are a strong lover and need 
love and devotion in return. 
Your home life will be very 
happy and pleasant. You love 
your home abofve all else and are 
always looking for an opportun- 
ity to add to the happiness of 
vour loved ones. 



Dear Incubator: — 

Why do the heads of certain 
people turn so easily? 

Lovingly, 

Ima Lemon. 

Dearest Ima: — 

This popular ph e n o m e n o n 
seems to fit in with the troub- 
lous times which we are living 
under. Revolutions seem to be 
the tihing in this day a,nd age 
which you speak are very desir- 
ous of being in "style". O'n the 
other hand the revolving may 
be due to a composition of rub- 
ber in the neck which proceeds 
the head and makes it impossi- 
ble for the Owner to hold the 
head still in even the slightest 
breeze. We hope that we have 
satisfa.ctorily answered your 
query. 

Affectionately yours, 

Buffy. 



Dear Mrs. Orpington: — 

Could you tell me what kind 
of a hen lays longest? 

A. Farmer. 
Dear Farmer: — 
A dead (hen. 

H. B. 0. 



Dear H. B. 0.:— 

Could you tell nie how much 
it cost to erect the Louvre? 

Archie Tect. 
Dear Archie: — 

About ten dollars. It was 
built for one soverign and fin- 
ished for another. 

Inky. 



Dear Incubator: — 

Who first introduced salt pork 
into the navy? 

A. Gob. 
Dear A.: — 

Noah, when he took Ham into 
the ark,. 

H. B. 0. 



Dear H. B. 0.:— 

What is the best way of mak- 
ing a coat last? 

Taylor. 
Dear Taylor: — 

Make the trousers and waist- 
coat first. 

Mrs. H. B. 0. 



psych(>l(k;k'AL tests 



l{y :>riirk Henry 

Columbia University has doped 
out a new system of selecting its 
inmates. They give 'em psycho- 
logical tests now instead of the 
old-fashioned examinations. 

By means of psychological tests 
the profs can tell whether your 
l>rain hits regularly on all six 
cylinders or whether it goes dead 
when it hits a stiff grade. 

They shoot trick questions at 
you, like " Why go to college 
when a hodcarrier can make more 
money tha.n a college president?" 
and if you sa,y, "Seai-ch me!" they 
pin a medal on you for picking 
the right answer. 



If the professor snaps out 

"Corned beef and " and asks 

you to say what comes next, and 
you come back with "cabbage," 
it's a sign you're a quick thinker 
and you're immediately admitted 
to the privilege of dodging soph- 
omores. But if your idea for 
what comes after corned beef is 
something else, it shows you are 
lacking in observation, co-ordin- 
ation and boarding- house exper- 
ience, and are not yet ready for 
higher learning. 

They pull stop watches on you 
to see how long it takes your 
brain to telegraph orders to your 
muscles. They'll say, "Raise your 
right foot" and make a record of 
the fractional part of a second 
it takes you to do it. Next they 
tell you to raise your left foot 
Then they'll tell you to raise 
and jot down your speed record, 
both feet, and if you try to do 
it they'll tell you you're a boob 
and tie a can to you. 

Hereafter the guy who can tell 
when Columbus discovered the 
land of prohibition a,nd the home 
of the luxury tax won't have as 
good a chance of getting into 
Columbia as the lad who's there 
with the answer to "How would 
you square yourself with the 
wife if you had bet a month's 
pay on the White Sox?" 

The way the profs look at it, 
the first c.hai) just memorized 
like a pai-rot, but the second boy 
shows he can think fast in an 
emergency. Personally, we think 
the guy who can answer that 
question and keep peace in the 
family has no need of a college 
educatioii. 

You may be as fannliar with 
the tal)le of lijgarithms as you 
are with the dining-room table, 
and you may know more about 
solid geometry than a baseball 
manager knows about solid ivory, 
but if you can't answer in less 
than tiiree-fifths of a second 
when the prof asks, "What shoe 
do you put on after the right 
one?"you ha.ven't got a chance. 



THE STENTOR 



('OLLE(JK EXPENSES IN lS4r>. 



In these clays of high prices 
it may be interesting- to know 
tilie small cost of education a 
few years ago. The following- 
term bill was issued to a stu- 
dent at Bowdoin College as 
short a time ago as 1845. 

To the president and Trustees 
of Bo-wdoin College, Dr. 

To his first term bill, ending 
December 18, 184.5. 

Interest to be ]iaid, if not dis- 
charged within one moiith af- 
ter the commencement of the 
next term. 

Tuition ._$ 8.00 

Chamber Rent .3.34 

Repairs .10 

Average of Repairs .69 

Sweeping and Bed-ma,king l.Od 

Library .50 

Monitor .11 

Catalogues, Order of E.xer- 
cises, and Connnence- 

ment Dinner .50 

Books .50 

Bell 1.20 

Reciting Room and lights. .85 

Chemical Lectures .25 

Wood 

Library Fine 

Assessnient for absence 

from College 

Advance Standing 

Commons 

$16.68 

The recipient of the bill ap- 
parently was a well-behaved 
youth, for neither fines nor ass- 
essments are charged against 
his name. But it is entirely pos- 
for "repairs" and "average of re- 
pairs" are the only remaining 
evidence of some long forgotteii 
story of undergradun.te escap- 
ade. 



The wild, ferocious lunatic 
Can only rave and cui'se; 
And while they try to nurse his 

brain. 
He tries to brain his nurse. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
I Stationery and Candy 

FrencH's Dr\x^ Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

Ol' .AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

.\IJKN-1' 

Luke Forest, Illinoia 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing! 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC t 



' Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

I George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

' Try my Sunday Evening 
I Dinner 

I Leslie W. George 

I .„ , 

jC.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Lake Forest" — 

LAUNDRY Kodak 



F. J. HELD, Prop. 

Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Di'esser in 
LAKE FOREST 



KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 



Is on the bread, 
look" lor the word 



F e: 



e: ra l 



It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



'Uhe 



The Blackier Market Co. 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. ComerDeerpathandWestemAve.. 

o. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. Everythmg of the Choicest m 

Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. FfeSh 3 R Cl 

Telephone 582 Telephone 584 I SaltlVieatS 

RAPP BROS. I Game and 

MARKET Fish 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS p^^,£ gUTTER and EGGS 
roultry and Lggs All ivinds rish j 

GAME IN SEASON [ '^ Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii{iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college _year 1!IU)-1920 upene with a larger enrollment than ever hefore. Some 
of tlje features ol the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2; full reor- 
ganization of athletics, witli competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation tif the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) 'special interest in the Glee Olul) and the Garrick (dr.imatic) (JIub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with l)oth room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to §400 for men; |350 to §450 lor women. Both mm and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1S68. 

FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC—offering superior advantages. 

For infoi'mation about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'.S OKl-ICK 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



m 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!!^ 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



i, c. w. rooN^sju, 0, SMITH I g^g p„t Confectionery 



200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: I 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to5p. m 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS ; 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g^ 



i>( 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL, AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

W niCX IM NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROL.-V 



1^ tii*iii»<>liiii8M 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Special}' 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 



III!: !>(> liEi'Minsa 

Phone 7u9 Western Av^-. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXEV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. DECEMBER 12, 1919 



NUMBER JC 



Chicago Attorney Speaks 



I 



The speaker at the regular bi- 
weekly meeting of the Men's Dis- 
cussion Club, held last Wednes- 
day evening in the Phi Pi rooms, 
was Mr. Chas. II. Hamill, of the 
Chicago law firm of Rosenthal, 
Ilamill and Wormser. Mr. Hamill 
is one of the delegates elect to the 
convention which will meet in the 
ne;ir future to draw up a new con- 
stitution for the State of Illinoi.s, 
and his informal sketch of the 
problems that convention must 
face was both interesting and in- 
structive. 

He began by reviewing very 
succinctly the constitutional his- 
tory (if Illinois from the days 
when it formed part of the North- 
west Territory. After a brief con- 
sideration of the work done by 
earlier constitutional con\-entions, 
starting with that of 1818, and the 
bestowal of a few words on the 
salient features of the present con- 
stitution, he described the recent 
moxement for constitutional re- 
vision, and examined one by one 
the more important questions in- 
volyed. 

He was not sure that m;iny 
things in the ci.nistitution we now 
have ought to be changed. Under 
it on the wIkjIc the State had 
prospered and the go\ernment 
had functioned fairly well. At 
least we should be very cautious 
about suggested innox'ations. But 
one thing he was (|uitc sure 
shciuld be modified. All property 
in the State of Illinois is now 
taxed at the same rate and in the 
same manner; this places an un- 
fair burden upon the holders of 
tangible or corjioreal propert}', 
permitting and in fact encourag- 
ing the owners of tangible prop- 
erty that can be easily concealed 
to evade the tax in part or whole. 

Continued on Page Two.) 



I'HILOSOI'HV CIA IJ. 



Dr. Scliaiil» Visits L. K. 

For the last few years, the up- 
percLi.ssnien and women have 
I been org'fliiized into what is 
I known as the Philosophy Club, 
I with headquarters at the home 
I of Dr. and Mrs. Wright. 
I This year tlie club has again 
I been revived and on last Wed- 
nesday evening- the first meeting 
of the year was held at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. Wright. A good- 
ly jH-oportion of the memers 
were present and they were 
honored to have with them Dr. 
and Mrs. Edwa.rd L. Schaub of 
Evanston. Dr. Schaub is head 
of the department of Philoso- 
phy at Northwestern Univer- 
sity, but during- the war was em- 
ployed in government war work 
at Washington, D. C. He spoke 
on the social and ethical prob- 
lems arising- from the war, and 
dwelt a length upon tlie prob- 
lems which came to him in his 
official capicity as Adjustor of 
Rentals, Property Rights, Etc., 
while in the nationaal capitol. 
Tlie meeting- was quite infor- 
mal and following the splendid 
talk by Dr. Schaub, a general dis- 
cussion of the problems and 
their possible solution by ethical 
principles was held. 

The very pleasant evening- was 
closed with refreshments served 
by Dr. and Mrs. Wright, who 
proved themselves niost worthy 
host a,nd hostess. All the mem- 
bers present enjoyed the even- 
ing in every respect and express- 
' ed their hearty interest and 
synipatliy in the kind of meet- 
ings held by the Philosophy 
Club. 

For a nuniber of years Dr. 
Wright has beeen greatly inter- 
ested in and has beeii the chief 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



A Pair of Sixes 



A cheerful and approving audi- 
ence last Friday night saw the 
(i.-irrick Club present "A Pair of 
Sixes," the first play of the sea- 
son. 

The play is a one-time popular 
farce, of ncjne too great weiglit or 
wit, but well adapted to broad 
characterizations, that never quite 
reach the custard pie stage, l)Ut 
permit considerable gymnastics. 

The cast was thoroughly capa- 
ble : they made the most of all the 
opportunities offered them. Mr, 
froutman is to be congratulated 
on jjresenting a play in which not 
only lines but extremely compli- 
cated stage business had been 
learned to perfection. This indi- 
cates an intelligence and industry 
on the part of the club that should 
make it interesting to follow 
through the }-ear. 

Mr. Dunlap and Mr. Beard, the 
unhappy partners in pill produc- 
tion, came in for the greater part 
of the work and honors, which 
they shared quite equally. Mr. 
Beard's Ijright smile haunts us 
still, but -Mr. Dunlap was consis- 
tently dcsi)on<lent, even after he 
had reduced his partner to the 
rank (if butler. 

Mr. Dunlap was not onl}- bur- 
dened with the business but a 
wife, played by Miss \'irginia 
Ki-atsch, and, much as we hate to 
say it, it was often a question 
which w;is the bitterer pill. Miss 
lvr;itscli not only was delightful 
Ui the e}-e, and therefore to be 
jealously watched lest she flirt 
with the butler; she was also ca- 
llable of hysterics, mounting at 
least to high (!, and requiring im- 
mediate and large concessions of 
cash and time and adoration. 

In all these tribulations Mr. 
Holden, as the family lawyer, was 

(Continued on Pag:e Two.) 



THE STENTOR 



Chicago Attorney Speaks 

(Continued from Pagp One.) 



make the constitution a short, 
concise embofHment of lunda- 
It promotes dishonesty on the mental princi]iles, in the old style, 
part of the citizen, and since ex- I rather than a statutciry code. It 
cessively high rates are the re- is ardently to he hoped that a 
suit, it really sanctions the failure maj<irity of his fellow delegates 
on the part of officials to enforce : will agree with him and that we 
laws that in fact are altogether [ may ha\e a State constitution 
unjust and impossible. It will be ' which will be a model, 
difficult to find a satisfactory solu- I 
tion of this problem. Admittedly, ' 



A Pair of Sixes 

(C'i)ntiniieil fnun l'*age One.) 

the incidence of taxation is one of dut\' bound to act as referee; and 



the most complicated questions of 
economics. 



for all his labors he was obliged 
to see Mr. Beard the proud 



The State has not been redis- fiance of the lady both of them 
tricted since 1901. No action was j loved. 

taken after the 1910 census be- ' Doubtless you have already 
cause the down-State people are guessed it. Yes, Miss Merner 
reluctant to relinquish more in- was the charming young person 
fluence to Chicago with its large ] dear to the heart of Mr. Beard and 
percentage of foreign illiterates. Mr. Holden, and willingly toler- 
For the same reason he doubted ated even by the much-married 
whether the convention would at- Dunlap. We beg to state that 
tempt any readjustment, and, in Miss Merner plays as well as she 
fact, he thought it probable that has ever done. Rather better, in 
they would try to make it con- fact. "A Pair of Sixes" gave her 
stitutionally impossible for any a bigger and more varied part 
legislature so to redistrict the than the ingenue often finds. 
State that Chicago coukl outvote j Miss Burrus as the J'jiglish 
the down-State representation. maid of all work, was a surprise 

Some judicial reorganization is and a chuckle. Her makeup was 
desirable, to secure greater sim- an inspired dream of homeliness 
plicity, efiectiveness and justice, j and her Ijlandishments were spon- 
Judge Gilbert's proposals contain taneous and comic. Myron Thay- 
much that is meritorious, especi- ! er, pla}-ing the bookkeeper, kept 
ally the idea of appointing the his part in key and carried out the 
Chicago justices rather than elect- comed}- much better for no at- 
ing them. There should be de- 1 tempt t(j be funny. 
vised, too, a simpler method of. Miss Hecketsweiler, a marvel of 
amending the constitution than i curiosity, polished finger nails and 
that which now e.xists. Mowever, : empty-headedness, presented the 
the Hearst "Gateway" is alto- ! stenographer, and Berwyn Moore 
gether too simple; it makes it al- was the rather unnecessarilv 
most as easy to change the con- ; nasty little office boy. Earl James 
stitution as to change a statute. ! ga\'e a fearfullv dressed, earnest 
The initiative and referendum, he salesman of whom the audience 
thought, were of doubtful \alue, afipro\'ed greatly, 
though doubtless some forms had .\n excellent musical program 
greater merit than others ; there is kept everyone amused between 
one grave t>bjection to them on acts. Josephine Clark, Margaret 
principle — they lift much of the I Best - Durand and Raymond 
weight of legislative responsibility j Moore sang. Sarah Jtjyner gave a 
from the shoulders of our legisla-' piano solo and Irvin Hirschy 
tors, and by permitting them to played the violin with Miss Col- 
"pass the buck" to someone else ' ton as accompanist. Margaret 
when they are in trouble place a , Sillars gave also a child reading 
premium upon indecision. from Edward \'ance Cook that 

Mr. Hamill gave evidence of a^ was quite as clever as anything j 
most commendable disposition to 1 dune on the stage. 



PHILOS(>PHY CLUB. 

(Continneil on Page Two.) 

sponsor for the Philosophy Club. 
j It has now reached the place, 
I within the respect of the stu- 
dent mind, that it is considered 
( a privilege to be alowed to at- 
tend its meetings. This year a 
number of very interesting in- 
foi-mal meetins will be held, 
similar to the one held last week 
with a number of modern top- 
ics in Philosophy as the subjects 
of interest, and new fields of in- 
tei-ests will be opened to its 
members. 

This Club is open to those 
taking adva,nced work in the De- 
partment of Philosophy, and Dr. 
Wright is to be thanked for the 
time and work which he spends 
in the interest of the students 
in this line. 

The January meeting of the 
club will be held in the Digamma 
Fi-aternity rooms soon after the 
Christmas vacation, at which 
time a topic of general interest 
will be taken up and elaborated 
upon. 



After being confined to the 
Alice Home Hospital for more 
than five weeks, Davey Rees 
was able to be on the Campus 
again last Friday with his old- 
time smile and pleasant greeting 
for all. It sure did seem good 
to see Davey out again, after 
the hard battle he has just been 
thru, and we a,re hoping that he 
will soon be in classes again 
with us. 

He left for his home in Elgin 
Saturday afternoon, where he 
will remain until after tire 
Christmas vacation and then 
return to Lake Forest and re- 
sume his work. Davey came 
out of the struggle somewhat 
tliin but nevertheless much 
stronger and just as ready as 
ever to take part in college ac- 
tivities. 



Fred E. Bates spent Sunday 
with Digamma. 



THE STENTOR 



THK FOKKSTKH. 



Some time ago the Junior 
class met and chose three mem- 
bers of the baord whose duty it 
would be t o arrange for a For- 
ester this year. This Ijoard 
met a few days ago a.ntl chose 
the remaining members of the 
board to assist in this work, so 
that the official Forester Baord 
for this year will consist of: — 

Editor-in-chief Tommy Tucker 
Business Manager T. Hale 
Athletic Editor L. B. Maples- 
den 
Lois Hall EditorsFrancis Weis 

Rachel Hecketsweiler 
Art Editor Ruth Hendrickson 

The above named people wil 
have charge of the work for the 
annua,l and will do all in their 
power to make it the best For- 
ester that has ever been pub- 
lished in Lake Forest College. 
However, in order to accomplish 
this, the board must have the 
assistance and co-operation of 
each ami every member of the 
student body and the faculty, as 
well as the support of the alum- 
ni. Some people have the idea 
tha.t when the board has been 
chosen, all the work is done; but 
such people are either living un- 
der a mental illusion or di'own- 
ing in the sea of optimism! This 
article was not begun with the 
purpose of knocking the enter- 
prise or discouraging the idea, 
l)ut with the hope of gaining 
moi-al support from all who road 
the Stentor. 

The board hopes to have the 
Forester off the press and ready 
for distribution by April, but it 
must have the backing and co- 
operation of the students and 
faculty alike. Whenever a mem- 
ber of the board approaches you 
concerning some work, give 
them at least a pleasant word 
whether you are in favor of the 
project or not. If you have 
any good suggestions to offer or 
new ideas that might lie worked 
out, just feel free to let loose 



with them for they will be ac- 
cepted with pleasure. Members 
of the boa.rd realize the big 
task liefoi'c them and moreover 
they i-ealize the necessity of 
student co-operation; so let us 
all combine our foi-ces and have 
as oui' motto: "A Record-break- 
ing Forester by April 1, or 
BUST. 



v\ vrr \nv\L 



A school superintendent in a 
southern California city was in- 
specting one of the primary 
schools and paused for a moment 
in an infant class to instill a few 
of the rudiments of politeness 
into the childish minds. 

"When some one makes an un- 
pleasant i-emark," he said "nev- 
er call attention to it. Pass it 
by or change the subject." 

Just at that moment the room 
teacher spoke up sharply: "Mab- 
el, did I see you whispering"? 

"Please tea,ciher," said Mabel, 
"do we get a vacation at Eas- 
ter"? 

"Mabel, I asked you if you 
wei-e whispering!" 



"Am I goin' to get a good re- 
poi-t cartl"? persisted the little 
one. 

"Mabel, why don't you answer 
my question"? demanded the ex- 
aspei-ated teacher. 

"Please ma'am, 'the superin- 
tendent said if the conversation 
was uniileasant to change it". 



That's Wliere iMy Money Goes! 



McFerren — Cigars and dinners, 
Herrcke — Camels and Cokes. 
Becihtol — Junior Prom programs 
Tom Hale- -Printers, Engravers, 

and Book-binders 
Eickhoff — Hair tonic and car 

fare to Waukegan 
Coach Derby — Dog biscnits 
Holden — Business Law books 
Burns — Sweet Caps, and Raisins 
Gardner — Hair perfume and 

Murads 
Robertson — Gasoline. Tutoring 
Geer — Schuyler County 
Casjens — Texas Oil stock 
Eddy — Paxton Ice Co. 
Troutman — A Pair of Sixes 
Phi Eta Alpha's — Road and 

Sewer Taxes. 
John Dorn — Punch bowl 
Everyone — Bursar Richman 



The outstanding event of the 
week's College-Hall Log as re- 
corded by mate McColley: Po- 
tential Dougherty gets up for 
breakfast — his watch was six 
hours fast. Not satisfied with 
this a,ccomplishment, he broke 
his previous high score by bowl- 
ing 69. 



Noah Loreau has accepted a 
position with the Eva,nston Pub- 
lic Service Company. 



What Do Voii Mean; 

She: "Oh! Here's your pencil 
dear. I really didn't intend to 
keep it so long." 



Earl Rvan was a week-end 
THE DIFKEKKXCK visitor in Evanston. 

"When a white pusson has any 
trouble", said a Southern negro, 
"he sets down and gets to study- 
in' 'bout it and worryin'. Then 
firs' thing you know he's done 
killed hisse'f. But when a black A birdseye view of the week 
man sets down to think about ! as seen by Montgomery: Off 
his troubles, why, he jes' nacher- again, in again gone again, sick 
ly goes to sleep." again. 



Mr. Troutman is back at the 
college Inn after a several weeks 
sojourn in the Art Institute. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Alberta Burris '23 
Rosa Deutch '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson '22 

Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT 



The Christmas Spirit — that 
is somethink we all talk about, 
some of us understand and a 
few practice. What is there 
embodied in that phrase? 

Two thousand years ago thei'e 
was given to this world a gift, 
full and free, a gift which to 
the world today is inestimable 
in value. With it came peace, 
joy and hope to a universe black- 
ened by sin. With it came 
modern civilization and Christ- 
ianity — although in these times 
of unrest and uncertainty these 
seem things in name only, ideals 
relegated to the dark nitahes of 
time. 

It should mean to us, how- 
ever, primarily an altruistic 
brotherhood. Here is a com- 
mon .bond of union, binding us 
all closely togather in a large 



Christ. In the recent war we 
saw so-called Christian nation 
fighting aga,inst nation. It 
seemed that Christianity and Eu- 
ropean civilization were a fail- 
ure. But it was only in so far 
as this brothei'hood of Christ 
had been neglected, as the spirit 
of the Christmas season had 
been replaced by the selfish, 
jealous, fiendish spirit of hom- 
icide and false patriotism, in 
just so far had Christianity 
failed. 

If men could get deeply im- 
pressed in their heails the spirit 
which came not to take life but 
to "give it more abundantly", 
the spirit which says, "it is 
more blessed to give than to re- 
ceive" then truly would the 
swords be made into pruning 
hooks. 

This is not a spirit whish is 
felt only in the large enterpri- 
ses of the nation a,gainst nation, 
state against state, principle 
against principle, it is not a 
mental abstraction which is 
pleasant to contemplate but im- 
possible to practice. It is a de- 
finite, conci'ete thing, an ideal 
pei'haps.but a practical one at 
that. Why not in our dealings 
with our fellow students adopt 
this spii'it of altruism, of free 
gift, not for a shoi't period set 
aside by the customs of nations 
but foi- the entire year? Why 
son a halo of self-righteons- 
asume at the Christmas sea- 
ness? Why not for the entire 
year practice the true Christ- 
mas , Christia.n spirit? 



Wet Humor. 

One of our Contribs mentions 
the fact that Mona.han has his 
place decorated with fish and 
birds. He adds that every time 
we go we are fish. We mite add 
that we caught a Lois Haller 
taking the hint and eating like 
birds. 



You are all going home next 
Thursday! ! so it might be in 
oi-der to hand out a little friend- 
ly advice to you in this issue of 
the Stentor in regard to boost- 
ing: Lage Forest! ! BOOST! ! 
BOOST! !BOOST! ! ! 

You Freshmen especially, you 
who are nearer the hig'h school 
seniors tha.n the others, talk Lake 
Forest, YOUR Lake Forest, ^nd 
interest at least one of cour 
friends in Lake Forest, then all 
you will have to do is to keep 
U]) the interest and there will 
be one more Lake Forest Booster 
in your town next year. And 
incidentally, one of the best 
ways to boost is your conduct at 
home. Remember, you are the 
representative of this college in 
your community, maybe the 
only one, and your friends will 
natui'ally look upon you as a 
specimen of a Lake Forest man 
oi' woman. Keep up your Lake 
Forest standa.rds, talk Lake For- 
est aggressively, look forward 
to January sixth when you will 
be back again, and your Lake 
Forest civics will be perfect. 



In nna,y business where credit 
is given, a varying proportion 
of outsta.nding amounts is sure 
to be paid. The dofference be- 
tween the full amount and the 
amount of 'money collected 
measures the success or failure 
of the business. The STENTOR 
is just such a business. In pre- 
vious years the financial failure 
of the paper may in large part 
be ascribed to unpaid subscript- 
ions. Will not you, alumnus or 
alumna or student, neglect this 
matter no longer a,nd i)ay up if 
your financial status warrants it? 



Lambila hasn't scored lately. 
Patience is the better haalf of 
virtue tho. 



Gone for Good 



A fashion expert is declaring 
that the white shirt will come 
back soon. Alas he doesn't know 
our laundry. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



Every year, in this interval be- 
tween vacations, the same unrest 
and discontent is evident in the 
younger memljers of the student 
body. There is a certain im]Ki- 
tience for the coming of the 
Christmas hohdays, which in 
some cases is voiced in strange 
expressions of restlessness. One 
judges that the average under- 
classman's ideal college would 
have two weeks' vacation every 
fortnight. 

But as one nears the close of his 
ciillege course, this attitude 
changes. Four years, which once 
appeared an interminable period, 
how short it now seems ! Each 
day brings us nearer the dreaded 
moment when we must stand 
where so man_\- classes have stood 
before us and bid farewell forever 
to our college days. 

"The most care-free, happiest 
days of your life," a graduate told 
us when we were about to begin 
them. The nearer we approach 
the end of tlmse years, the more 
we api)reciate that. College life 
is not entirely without its cares 
and responsibilities, and the com- 
ing vacation — we hope it has been 
earned — will be welcome. But we 
would not willingK' lose one pre- 
cious da}- in the all too short cal- 
endar, nor sacrifice one hour of 
our allotted time. 



•Tho Hi per Tlic H.'ny The 



SwfctiT TIk' .liiice!" 



Mai-tiii: "Oh yes I had a dress 
suit made to order for $140.00 
But then you can get cheap 
ones. 

You understand, of course, 
that Martin is working his way 
thru school this year and can't 
affoi'd to spend much for his 
clothes. $1200.00 per annum is 
merely fag money we suppose. 



Business End of 
"A Pair of Sixes" 



INCOHERENT HAH 1$ VELA I) 



"Why is it that Mac doesn't 
take yoti to the movies any 
moi'e", queried K. 

"Well you see it rained one 
evening and we sat in the par- 
lor " 

"Yes?" 

"And ever since then — oh well 
don't you think the movies are 
an awful bore anyway?" 

Mike: "Seeing is believeing 
you know." 

Fran: "Well I'm not so sure. 
I see you an awful lot but I sel- 
dom believe you." 

Watch for oui- great mystery 
story "The Mystery of the 
Wall-eyed Prune". It starts in 
our next. 



A plumber started out to plumb 

With ihis apprentice gay: 
And while the former laid a 

pipe, 
The latter piped a lay. 

I took a train for New York 

town 
From old Vermont, by heck: 
And when I went to check my 

bag, 
Some rascal bagged my check. 

When men are blue and out of 

sorts 
They're apt to sulk a,nd frown. 
And try to keep their spirits 
up by putting spirits down. 



Coberly; "Burnap doesn't give 
anything but 'C's' 



Kacky: "The h-L he doesn't. 
I got a 'D' " 



We found a beautiful luscious 
looking berry the other day 
but on tasting it, it was so bit- 
ter we decided to save it for a 
stag party. 



Life is a bluff spclt"P-l-u-c-k" 



The Berry Twins, Ras and Black 



Cast of Characters 

George B. Nettleton, A. Winston 

Dunlap, '23 
T. Boggs Johns, Chas. Beard '22 
Business Partners 

Kronie, their book-keeper 
Myron Thayer, '22 

Miss Sallie Parker 

their stenographer, 
Rachel Hecketsweiler '21 

Thomas J. Vanderholt, 
their lawyer, 
Leonard Holden '21 

Tony Toler, their salesman, 
Karl Jamjes '23 

Mr. Applega,te, 

Ing-\'ald Johnsen '23 

Office Boy, Berwyn Moore '23 

Shipping Clerk, W. H. Virgil '23 

Mrs. George B. Nettleton, 
Virginia Kratsch '23 

Miss Florence Cole, 
Anne Merner '20 

Coddles, English maid of all work 
Alberta Burrus '23 

Musical Program 

Song Josephine Clark 

Readin, Margaret Sillars 

Piano Solo Sarah Joyner 

Song Margaret Best-Durand 

Violin Solo Irvin Hirshey 

Song Raymond Moore 

Director W. Chilton Troutman 
Business Manager Thomas Tucker 
Stage Manager Robert Harris 

Robert Harris' stage managing 
proved smooth-running, and the 
scener_\- was rather more lavish 
than Lake Forest has lately dis- 
played. We trust that Mr. 
Tucker, who seems by the pro- 
gram to have adopted the stage 
name (jf Thomas, can bring in an 
equally hopeful report as business 
manager. 



THE STENTOR 




A Gateway — Electrical 



ONLY a forty-foot gateway bounded by 
two brick pilasters and ornamental 
lamps, but unlike any other gateway in the 
entire world. 

For back of it is the General Electric Com- 
pany's main office building, accommodating 
2300 employees. And just next door is its 
laboratory with the best equipment for test- 
ing, standardizing and research at the com- 
mand of capable engineers. Then down the 
street — a mile long — are other buildings 
where everything electrical, from the small- 
est lamp socket to the huge turbines for 
electrically propelled battleships, 13 made 



by the 20,000 electrical workers who daily 
stream through. 

What a story this gate ■would tell, if it could, 
of the leaders of the electrical industry and 
business, of ambassadors from other insti- 
tutions and from foreign lands. 

The story would be the history of electric 
lighting, electric transportation, electric in- 
dustrials and electricity in the home. 

This gateway, as well as the research, en- 
gineering, manufacturing and commercial 
resources back of it, is open to all who are 
working for the betterment of the electrical 
industry. 



Illustrated bulletin, Y-863. describing the company's 
several plants, ^-ill ba mailed upon request Address 
General Electric Company. Desk 43, Schenectady, NewYork 




ij 



mera 



General Office 
Schenectady,N.Y. 



^^ 







ctric 



Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



ILM MI\VTI\(i IHUITVTKJX 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 225 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Static 'nery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 



hla incidentally indicates in- 
terest in ices. Irving', impres- 
sionable, infatuated, injudiciously 
invests. Ida's indulgence in ices 
is inordinate, insatiable. Irving, 
impecunious, ineptly introduces 
inexpensive innovations. Ida, 
instantly irate, in impatient irri- 
tation indignantly impeaches Ir- 
ving's iterated infatuation, insin- 
up.ting indffei'ence, inurlianity. 
Ida's infantile inelegant invec- 
tive illuminates Irving's inner- 
most intelligence, inhibiting in- 
fatuation, intercepting inten- 
tions. — Youth's Companion. 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Office and Residence 



312 Deerpath Ave. 



Phone 66 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



o^:K>ixaoy>oo<>ooo<>iC(<xi<K>000O0Og 






o 




Christmas Greeting Cards 



We offer an unusual attractive selection 
for the coming season and urge that you 
place vour order immediately. 

Cards and envelopes, including amend- 
ing with your name and address; prices 
ranging from $2.0U per lUO upward. 

THE LAKE FORESTER | 

§ s 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 
Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscsir Piersoii 

Furniture Repairing 



Picture Framing 



B.Aiii<: i<<iKi<:Kr 



li.i.. 



FRANK J. V/ EN BAN 

PHARMACISi 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, UI. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpalh and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

THOMAS H. HORAN 

Mil niH)i r 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago. Lake Forest C'oi.imntatinn 
Tickets 

Sa IHiKKI'ATH. VKSr 

Suits Ce'Isd for 
and .Delivered 

A. V/. ZENGLER 

ClriniiiKj. l^ii nuiiiij. lieiniiritti/ 



Ifils Li;il!ed at llUXTiKiXS ir>i Bilked Hlght 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST. 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



Patronize 

Our 

Advertisers 



THE STENTOR 



A Wail 



Some time ago 

I contributed to the Stentor 

And I put S(jme jokes in, 

Thinking it would be all right. 

But I also put names to the jokes 

Which was bad judgment. 

And now everybody knows 

Who did it. 

It seems 

That people do not like to read 

Jokes about themselves. 

The boys 

Do not want Lois Hall to know 

That they are addicted 

To liquid refreshment. 

And the ladies — 

Oh, my! 

I have no friends any mnre 

Ex'erybody hates me. 

It is a cold and cruel world. 

Sometimes I wonder 

If the lake, too, is very cold. 



UEALLY RICH 



Or A Pitchfork 

Harris : How do 30U like that 
cigar I gave you, old man. For 
two hundred bands of that kind 
they give you a Yictrola. 

Kelly: You don't say! If I 
smoked two hundred of those 
cigars, I'd want a harp. 



More Labor Trouble 

Holden: Can't you find some- 
thing to do? 

Buck : Gee whiz ! Am 1 ex- 
pected to do the work and find it 
too? 



Why They Do It 

Water, we read in The Even- 
ing Post, is said by some authori- 
ties to l3e a deadl)' poison. Some 
of the boys on the South Campus 
must be ardent disciples of these 
authorities. 



James (trying to catch a train) : 
I say, cabby, can't you go faster? 

Ancient Jehu : Sure I could, 
sir, but I can't leave the cab. 



Do you like me Lady? 



Two small bo>s, says the Port- 
land Telegram, were boasting, 
after the man-ier of cliildven, 
about the wealth of their re- 
spect] v..; fathers. 

"My pa," said Kay, "lia.s so 
much money tliat he doesn't 
know how to spend i'.' 

"That's no';i)mg," said Roy, 
"My pa's got so much iponey 
t-hat ma can t spe id it." 



A (JIESTION (►!' LTIQli TTE 



The mistress of the house, says 

the Arganaut, engaged a new 
f- vant and ;-rv-( In ; iiiitruc- 
\\( n- how X? be!'„\e wlion (^.n- 
L,v ( 1 ing her I'C.!'. O..0 evening 
'iiio rang for a glass of millv, and 
"a- s^urprise 1 to s e Mania ap- 
peal- with a glass grasped in her 
hand. "Oh Martha, she said, 
"always bring the milk to nie on 
a tray." 

Martha apologized and promis- 
ed to remember in the future. 

A week later the mistress rangi 
and made the same request. This 
time Martha a.ppeared with the 
tray and the milk emptied into 
it. Anxious to please, she curt- 
sied and inquired, "Shall I bring 
a spoon, ma'am, or will you lap 
it up"? 



[J. B. VeselsKy 

' Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

I Atulersnii Biiihliiii/. Flitme 853 
LAKE FOUEST, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home- Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Par 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00 — 10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



Locals 

The Phi Eta Alpha announces 
the initiation of Lucius Lobdell 
and lr\in llirshey. 

jack JLiwett entertained Ered 
Sheehan over the Thanksgiving 
vacation at his home in Clinton, 
Iowa. 

Hirshe_\- and Lobdell were the 
guests of Leland \\'atson for the 
Thanksgi\ing vacation. 

.Vrthur Hollatz was the guest of 
the Phi Eta Alpha for the Ath- 
letic dance. 

Sheehan has qualified for Lam- 
ba Delta. 



:llli!IIII!IIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 




Premiom" 



I Hams and Bacon | 

= s 

I are mild, | 

I sweet, tender. | 

I Each piece is care- | 

I fully selected and | 

I cured to give it the | 

I distinctive "Premium" | 

I flavor. I 

1 Ask, for" Premium" Products 1 

I Swifl & Company | 

I U. S. A. I 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



THE 



S T E N T R 



The Des Moines Convention 



During Xmas vacati(jn, the Y. 
W. C. A. re]3resented liy Ruth 
Bahlert and tlie Y. AI. C. A. rep- 
resented by W. Dunlap, are going 
to attend the "Student Volunteer 
Movement of I'cireign Missions" 
at Des Moines, Iowa. This meet- 
ing is held for the purpose of ac- 
tually facing the situation in the 
world today and of considering 
the responsibilities of the Amer- 
ican college men and women in 
regard to the serious problems 
which must be solved. If the col- 
leges were true in their protesta- 
tions of interest in world service 
during the war they will further 
that interest by sending delegates 
to Des Moines. That is the rea- 
son that Lake Forest is sending 
delegates — to prox-e that their in- 
terest in our countr\-'s war was 
sincere. 

Six tho'.isantl chosen students 
and piofe.^sors from nearly every 
college and university of the 
United States and Canada will 
meet in Des Moines for five days 
this coming New Year's. Seven 
similar student con\'entions have 
been held in the past at four-year 
intervals. This is the first which 
has been held for six years. It is 
also the first large gathering of 
students since the war. 

Lake Forest is extremeh- well 
represented by Miss Bahlert and 
Mr. Dunlaj) and we are certain 
that the}- will bring back to us 
man\- new ideas in regard to this 
great con\-ention. Fridav night 
the Y. W. and Y. M. are giving 
a dance for the purpose of raising- 
money for this trip. It is the duty 
of every Lake Forest student to 
attend this aiifair not only to raise 
money but to jirove to our dele- 
gates that we are supporting 
them. j 

We want to see you at the 
dance. Are you going? 



MULLER\S 

TKe Be^t Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 

The ROOT STl DIG 

Kiiiilmll Hull 
JiK'kHoii iiiwl ^^'abanli 

Frateriiily and Soroily 
M'^ork Our Specialty 



IF Y< II' AKK .\ 

BIOLOGY TEACHER 

\\-<- :i>\\ i^p yi'ti t'l luok up 
The General Biological Supply House 

•Viiis Kinil.arl; .\vp.. fliiciitjo. ni. 
All Ivinilsof Hioloffical Supplies 
iinii App:n:itus. 
rATAI,( I. IS KRKF.. 



Herschel V. Johnson, Bob 
Framburg-, and Mickey Beddoes 
spent the week end with friends 
in Chicago. 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 

A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BB.EAD CAHES ROLLS 

ISiilluUiy arnl Oilier Spii-hii I 'iilif.s tn Oriler 

LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store." Market Square 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

j LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

1 Aiiluiriol.ilf .SupiJiifs liaj/fyKL' 'rriins.ferreJ 

! .Se\eii [•u.sspii^'ei- Cars lu Rent b> Trip or Huur 

L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 




er^ 



Dry_Goods^ 

.4 Shop /or 
} Wom^ns ufhildrcns rurnishmqs 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTl- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



PHONE 881 



Spalding 


Sweaters 


w*^ 


A STYLE IN THE 




TRL'E ATHLETIC 


i3|K%^£ 


BUILD FOR EVERY 


wni^w^' 


OUTDOOR PUR- 


m HH#^' 


POSE 


ly^m^ 


Send for 


^ffllgl 


Calahxjur 


A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



KASMl SSKN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



M .\ t! K !•: L^ S (.1 r .\ R K 



F=I=?IIS!~ri WC^ 



h: isi <s F=? /\\/ 1 isi (s 

\yi^iTir-4cs crAP=?i 

^"T A.~r icDiM e: i=e Y 
I r^ \/ 1 ~r /3i. -r I CD r--i ^ 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



The Incubator. 



(Mrs Henry Buff Orpington) 



Special Christmas Feature 



Owing to the nearness of the 
Christmas holidays and to the 
fact that the world is supposed 
to end next Wednesday, we have 
decided to give this entire col- 
umn to the publicaton of some 
letters, which divers individuals 
have submitted to our tender 
care. The foUowng letters, 
although not literary sparks in 
all cases, a.re so important that 
their authors have submitted 
them to us in case that the 
postmen might take it into tlieir 
iheads to go on a strike and they 
would never reach Santa Claus 
in time. 



Dear santa: 

Please send me a box of home 
made fudge. I know there is a 
scarcity of sugar but tliat is all 
I shall ask for. Don't you 
think you could smuggle a little 
as long 33 I will be satisfied with 
that? 

Yours anticipatingly, 
Robert Harris 



P. S. 

If you could get a Lois Haller 
to make it I would appreciate 
it even more. 

R. H. 



Dear Santa: 

Have you anything to make 
me beautiful while I sleep in 
class? 

Mayeau. 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Please send me some grass so 
that the sign will be of some 
avail. 

Yours, 

Phi Eta Alpha 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Could you spare an old foot- 
stool? It would come in awful- 
ly handy in Chemistry class. 



The wash boul is awfully hard 
on the feet, really. 
Yours, 

Paul Bergen 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Since you brought me my 
Christmas tree early in hte year, 
there is hardly anything else I 
should desire. 

Professor Vansteenderen 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Please bring me some topics 
for Discussion Club. Topics 
that can be looked up in the 
library. 

Lois Ryno 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Do you think that you could 
send me that penknife that you 
pi-oniised me last year? I 
should appreciate it very much. 
Also, if it is not too much to 
ask of you, could you send me 
some budding Sarah Bernhardts 
and one or two Forbes Robin- 
sons? 

Yours, 
W. C Troutman 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Please send me a few million 
reams of theme paper, enough 
individual reference libraries to 
yo around, an equal amount of 
bottles of ink, and a few extra 
centuries of time. 

Yours desperately. 
The Shakespear Class 



Dear Old Nick: 

Could you spare about a dozen 
invitations to Christmas dinners? 
If you could I should reach my 
zenith of happiness. 

Yours, 

Professor Burnap 

P. S. 

I foi-got to ask you to see that 
they didn't all come at the same 
time. That would lireak my 
heart indeed. 

W. L. B. 



Dear Santa Claus: 

Could you send us some 
witches potion that will scare 
away hosts? They sound so 
wierd moaning about at night 
If you can't do that, could you 
at least keep them away until 
after midnight? 

Yours, 
The Faculty Dancing Class 



Not Too Healthy 

"It ishealthier to be cremated," 
sa_\'s an English physician. 

Maybe so, but for our part, we 
know we should never be the 
same man again. 



\\'e read that the men who 
make the best husbands are those 
who possess the knotty type of 
foot with scjuare toes. 

But one of our young friends, 
addicted to stopping late, says 
they make the worst kind of pros- 
pective fathers-in-law. 



Caddish Caddy 

White}- : Uocs it make any dif- 
ference which club I use? 
Caddv: Not to me, it don't. 



Concerning L. F, football teams, 
Too oft it comes to pass. 

The man who's halfback in the 
f^eld 
Is 'way back in his class. 



Unnecessary 

Pay your debts, boy, and keep 
your credit good. 

White}- : Aw, u hat's the use of 
credit if I gotta pay up all the 
time? 



Terrible 

I\es: I'm smoking a terrible 
lot of cigars lately. 

Tracy : You certainly are, if 
that's one of them ! 



Something Else Again 
Norm: Don't bother hunting 

in the long grass for the ball. 

Some other golfer's sure to find 

and return it. 

W'hitey : It wasn't a ball I lost ; 

it was m}' flask. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



The Christmas Spirit 



As the h()li(la_\'s ap])roacli, uur 
thoughts naturally turn tci Christ- 
mas and the spirit of doing good 
that accompanies it. Thanksgiv- 
ing and Christmas are the two 
days in the year on which the 
heart of humanity g<_)es out to the 
poor with a greater s])irit of gen- 
erosity than at any other time in 
the year. This is a beautiful spirit 
and one which is the biggest fac- 
tor in making the world go 
'round. h^or many }'ears the 
Christian races have made Christ- 
mas a time for the giving of pres- 
ents, ncit (iuly to the poor but also 
t(.( the members of their own fam- 
ilies. 

At times it seems that in the 
wild rush for gifts and gi\'ing the 
real spirit of Christmas has been 
lost. Christmas has almost be- 
come a time when e\'eryone tries 
to outdo each other in giving the 
most .attractive gifts rather than a 
time when the spirit of jieace and | 
contentment should come into the ' 
hearts of men. It is one of the 
greatest losses that the world has 
suffered that this great, big heart- 
edness has been gradually grow- 
ing smaller. 

If we could only bring back the 
former beaut_\- of Christmas, 
which has since the great war 
been returning gradually, so that 
this spirit would become a living 
factor of everyday life throughout 
the world, the real mission of the 
Cliristian religion would be in 
great part accomplished. If we 
could begin right among our own 
friends to hold this spirit of kind- 
liness, our lives would mean so 
much more to ourselves and to 
exeryone else that we would find 
nuich more satisfaction in our 
most habitual tasks. 

Let us try to make this Christ- 
mas the very best and biggest 
Christmas that we have ever lived 
to see and come back to college 
after the vacation with a deeji 
founded determination to be our- 
selves and to be true to the trust 
which has been placed in us. 



Photo .Supplies, Developing 

Stationery and Candy 
lit 

FrencK's DruR' Store 

N. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 
L. H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

. WHY? 

Ask Any (iotid Uresser in 
LAKK FOREST 



Cr&ARS; 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

.MJIONT 

Laki^ Purest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 
C. G. Wenban & Son 

TAXI CABS 



Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look' for the word 

F E: D B RA L 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



Uhe 



The Blackier Market Co. 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. Corner Deerpatha„dWe.t.rnAv« 

o. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. Everything of the Choicest m 

Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. ^ FfCSH 3 H CJ 

Salt Meats 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 
Poultry and Eggs Ail Kinds Fish i 

GAME IN SEASON l 



Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
1 Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college j-ear 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever hefore. Some 
of the fealures of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2; full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare ot the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, §325 to |400 for men; |350 to $150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departraem, address 

PRESIDENT'S CHUCK 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



miiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 



The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiitectionerij 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VH'TROLA 

Kiibelslcy 

Clotliiiig aiid 
Kiiniisliiiigs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

irt; i>o liicFAiiiisG 

Phone 709 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volnme XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. JANUARY 9, 1919 



NUMBER 11 



CHRISTMAS MUSICALE 



On December nineteenth, Lois 
Hall was decked in her annual 
Christmas robe, consisting of 
beautiful potted flowers and ev- 
ergreens. The Hall was a scene 
of Christmas festivity when the 
guests arrived, with its formal 
air of Christmas time displayed 
in the beautiful decorations. 
The Glee Club presented a short 
program of Christmas carols 
which were beautifully rendered 
under the leadeship of Mr. Phil- 
lips. The program was as fol- 
lows: 

I. Three traditional Christ- 
mas Carols: Holy Night! Peace- 
ful Night!; God Rest You Merry 
Gentlemen; The First Noel. 

—The Glee Club. 

n. Violin Solo: Andante Re- 
ligioso, Earnest Gillet. 

Irvin Hirshey. 

HI. Vocal Solo: Christmas, 
Shelley. 

Josephine Clarke. 

IV. The Snow, Elgar; Holly 
Song, Pike. 

—The Glee Club. 

The vocal solo by Josephine 
Clarke was a beautiful addition 
to the program. 

Mr. Hirshey's violin selections 
gave great pleasure to the aud- 
ience. 

After the program, a short so- 
cial hour was enjoyed by the 
guests until the music for danc- 
ing began. Then everyone ad- 
journed to the big room and the 
dining room which had been 
beautifully decorated for the oc- 
casion. In these two rooms the 
guests danced until eleven 
o'clock when much to the sor- 
row of everyone the music was 



THE FOOTBALL BANQIET 



On the evening of Wednesday, 
December 17, the first annual 
foot-ball banquet was held at 
the Moraine Hotel, Highland 
Park. The banquet this year 
was made possible through the 
gift of fifty dollars to the team 
by Mr. Woolsey. During the 
course of the dinner, Coach Der- 
by acted as toastmaster and 
called on Dr. Wright, Dr. AUee, 
Capt. Woods, Capt.-Ellect Rus- 
sell and Messrs. Casjens and 
Legner, all of whom responded 
with short talks, more or less 
befitting to the occasion. Those 
present were very grateful to 
Mr. Woolsey and to Coach Derby 
for making the banquet possible 
and all endeavored to show their 
appreciation by allowing nothing 
in the shape of food go to waste. 
We noted that in this attempt 
all were successful. 

Following is the menu 

Cream of Tomato 

Salted Crackers 

Olives, Radishes, Celery, 

Salmon Hollandaise 

Candied Yams, Buttered Rolls, 

Roast Turkey with Cranberry 

Sauee, Sage Dressing, 

French Peas 

Heart of Lettuce 

Thousand Island Dressing 

Hot Mince Pie 

Demi Tasse 

Jewish Pail-Malls 

discontinued. 

We feel that the Glee Club 
and Mr. Phillips should be con- 
gratulated for the splendid 
work which they did and thank- 
ed for the good time which we 
all enjoyed. 



THE Y. JL-Y. W. DANCE 



Lake Forest is going to be 
among the several hundred in- 
stitutions represented at the 
Des Moines Missionary Conven- 
tion during the Christmas holi- 
days. This is as it should be, 
and we hope that dear old Lake 
Forest will be one of the best 
represented colleges there. 

Sending delegates so far away 
and for so long a period as a 
week means the expenditure of 
a great deal of money. The 
money should be raised from the 
student body, because the dele- 
gates are their representatives. 
The Y. M.-Y. W. Cabinets tho't 
it wise to give the subscribers-^ 
a return for their money which 
they could actually perceive anct 
enjoy, so a Benefit Dance was de- 
cided upon for Friday evening, 
December the 12th. 

The dance was very well man- 
aged, the orchestra played excel- 
lently, and there were just 
enough dancers to fill the Insti- 
tute without crowding. The 
Cabinet would ha,ve liked to 
have seen the Hall jammed of 
course, for that would have fill- 
ed their somewhat empty treas- 
ury. But, sad to say, there was 
not enough money raised to 
send even one delegate. The 
balance of the money will have 
to be obtained in some other 
way. We know that those who 
came to the dance enjoyed it, 
and we thank them for their 
support. Those who did not 
come will be given an oppor- 
tunity to subscribe for this 
gi-eat world - wide missionary 
movement at another time. 



Speaking of hash, do you 
know how it is made? Well, it 
isn't made; it accumulates. 



THE STENTOR 



IMERCOLLEOIATE 

TREATY REFERENDUM 



What is your opinion of the 
ratification of the Peace Ti-eaty? 

Next Tuesday the Col lege Stu- 
dents of the United States are 
to be given a chance to vote and 
thus show their opinion of the 
Peace Treaty which has been 
the biggest thing which the 
public has had to face for a long 
time. This movement is being 
furthered by the Inter-Colleg- 
iate Treaty Referendum, headed 
by tihe editors of the student 
journalistic publications of Yale, 
Harvard, Columbia and Prince- 
ton Univei'sities. 

This vote is being taken, not 
to influence public sentiment in 
any way, but merely to stimu- 
late discussion of the subject 
and to bring it before the maj- 
ority of the people as it has not 
been brought before. The move- 
ment is highly endorsed by the 
leading senators and tIhe presi- 
ent who feels that by a-spirit- 
ed discussion of the subject and 
a vote upon it by the educated 
people of the country, more 
headway can be made toward a 
final culmination of the great 
argument which has confronted 
the nation. 

Tlieer are four propositions to 
be voted upon next Tuesday. 
Every student as well as the 
members of the faculty, will be 
asked to declare himself or her- 
self upon one of the four. They 
are as follows: 

I am in favor of one of the 
following propositions: 

1. I favor the ratification of 
the League and Treaty without 
reservations or amendment. 

2. I am opposed to the rati- 
fication of the League and 
Treaty in any form. 

3. I favor the ratification of 
the Treaty, but only with the 
Lodge reservations. 



4. I favor a compromise be- 
tween the Lodge and the Dem- 
ocratic reservations in order to 
facilitate the ratification of the 
Treaty. 

Votes will be taken by sign- 
ing either Yes or No. The re- 
sults of student and faculty 
votes will be kept separate and 
reported at once to New York 
where the votes taken in all in- 
stitutions will be compiled and 
published. 

It is now up to the student 
body of L. F. C. to brush up a 
bit so that we will know just 
what our opinions really are 
wlien the vote is put to us next 
Tuesday. 



PERSONALS 



Ruth Stommel was the guest 
of Kappa Alpha the week before 
Christmas. We were all glad in- 
deed to see her. 



Mrs. C. W. Trowbridge, of 
Marsailles, Illinois is visiting 
her sister, Anne Merner. 



Miss Wilma Conklin was the 
guest of her sister, Lois for 
Christmas Musicale. 



Mr. and Mrs. Reginald York 
visited Delia and Amy for 
Christmas Musicale. 



Sara .Joyner visited in Wauke- 
gan, Oak Park, and Watseka 
during the holidays. 



Irene and Zelma Farwell vis- 
ited Mt. Morris during the holi- 
days. 



Katherine Horton entertained 
Marion Norton on Monday. 



Francis Bradley visited in 
Morton Grove during the holi- 
days. 



Eloise Brown was detained at 
home on account of illness. 



"EVANGELIZATION OF 
THE WORLD IN 

THIS GENERATION" 



Miss Coan, Ruth Bahlut and 
Winston Dunlap have returned 
from the Student Voltinteer 
Convention held in Des Moines, 
during the holidays. They are 
now preparing to report upon 
the Convention in which Lake 
Forest was one of the thousand 
colleges represented and since 
the convention was international 
forty different nations had dele- 
gates. 

The sessions began Wednes- 
day, December 31, when John 
P. Mott made the opening ad- 
dress, a business like statement 
blended with the spirit of relig- 
ion and this was followed by a 
wonderfully inspiring address by 
Dr. Robert E. Speer. 

All the meetings and speeches 
made, demonstrate that the 
troubles of the world can be 
solved better by the religion of 
the gospel than by resolutions 
declaring for a change in the 
form of government and de- 
manding a correction of the ex- 
penses of human existance. 

The privilege of attending a 
Convention like this one comes 
but once in a, student generation 
since they are held only every 
four years, and the slogan of 
this one was the "Evangeliza- 
tion of the World in the Gener- 
ation." 

The Lake Forest delegates 
were forced to realize how lit- 
tle our college has thought 
about the vital problem of the 
world which greatly concerns 
students in other colleges as 
was demonstrated by the 8,000 
students in Des Moines. 



Garnette A. Higbee has not as 
yet returned. She is detained 
at home on account of serious 
illness. 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOll 



(By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 



Happy New Year to you! 

Happy New Year to you! 
Happy New Year everybody! 

Happy New Year to you! 

It isn't spring- yet but this is 
just a gentle reminder that it's 
coming and that it will soon be 
here with its song-birds and 
songbards. Besides its a good 
thing to start out the year with 
a song. 

Well, how does it feel to be 
back? Ain't it a grand and 
glorious feelin'? It sure is! 
Look what a bright time you 
have before you. Beautiful, 
blissful exams in the future, but 
what about the present? Don't 
mistake me, I'm not asking 
what you have done with your 
Christnins presents or to whom 
you finally gave them. I'm 
merely asking what you are go- 
ing to do now. I suppose you 
are making the usual resolutions 
and beginning to break them in 
the usual speedy ma.nner. Per- 
haps you are in the same boat, 
I am. Can't find anything to 
make resolutions about. Haven't 
any faults anyway. 

Well, no matter what you are 
doing, resolving to be better or 
trying to become experienced as 
a ha.rpist, I will bid you all a 
Happy New Year and proceed to 
"me solemn dooty," to-wit, an- 
swering the questions of my 
harassed diocese. 

Dear Mrs. H. B. 0.— 

The season suggests turning a 
new leaf. I have done this 
so many times but find it hard 
to keep my resolutions. Could 
you advise me? 

A Perplexed Won. 

Dear Won: — 

The best way I know of keep- 
ing resolutions is to have them 
carved out in stone and then 
put them in a safe vault. I feel 
certain that they will keep in 



this way and be as good as ever 
next year. 

H. B. 0. 

Dear H. B. 0.:— 

Wihat is the best way to serve 
grapefruit? 

A Housekeeper. 



Dear Housekeeper: 
With goggles. 



H. B. 0. 



Dear Mrs. Orpington — 

Who was the gi-eater Dickens 
or Shakespeare? 

A Stewd. 

Dear Stewd: — 

Dickens of course! Sha.ke- 
speare wrote well but Dickens 
wrote Weller. 

The Incubator. 

Dear Incubator: 

What is the proper attitude 
for a freshman to have and just 
how should he act to gain the 
love and admiration of everyone 
in college? 

Conscientiously, 

I. B. A. Frosh. 

Dear Frosh: — 

This is quite a difficult ques- 
tion to answer but I shall en- 
deavor to do my best. 

First of all learn all the house 
rules and immediately proceed 
to break them. 

Make all the noise you can 
possibly muster during quiet 
hours. 

Slam all doors. The harder 
the better. Always walk in 
such a manner as to cause peo- 
ple to believe that an army is 
coming. 

Never, under any circiun- 
stances allow an upper class- 
man to go out the door before 
you. 

Always slam the front door in 
the Dean's face or the face of 
any member of the faculty. 

Always leave all classes when 
the bell rings whether the pro- 
essor is in the midst of a lec- 
ture or not. 

Never allow a meal to pass 



without grumbling about the 
food. 

Never attempt to earn your 
credits and by no means allow 
a professor to grade you high- 
er than D. High grades get you 
in bad with the faculty. 

Never agree with Dr. Thomas 
under any circumstances. Nev- 
er sit in the front row of his 
classes. He doesn't approve it. 

See that you never get to any 
of your classes on time. The 
professors like five or ten min- 
utes to rest every now and 
then. 

Take all the cuts allowed you 
and as many more as you can 
get away with. All the faculty 
will admire you for it. 

These are only a few rules 
but perhaps they will be suf- 
ficient for the present. At any 
rate I believe that if you fol- 
low them carefully you will be- 
come very popular with every 
one on the campus. 
Yours truly, 

The Incubator. 

Note: There was no horo- 
scope given last month because 
of the lack of space but anyone 
wisihing a copy of it may obtain 
one by sending in a stamped, 
self addressed envelope to the 
Incubator, care of The Stentor, 
Lois Hall. 

Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington. 



KKOSH AS WE HAVE COME 
TO KNOW THEM 



Most democratic — Sue Spauld- 



mg. 



Most snobbish — V. Alcott. 
The wittiest— M. Sillars. 
Most popular — L. Conklin. 
Most unassuming — Kit Antrim 
The tomboy — F. Bradley. 
Best dancer — A. Burris. 
Class baby — E. Enyart. 
Quietest — Mildred Graham. 
Most childish — Lillian Hatfield 
Class musician — S. Joyner. 
Haughty— V. Kratch. 
Brainiest — R. Deutch. 
Linguist — D. Lange. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
■women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Alberta Burris '23 
Rosa Deutch '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson '22 

Lawrence Mapelsden, '21 
Football 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS 



About the first day of January 
the divine Mr. Andy Gump is in 
the habit of appearing in the 
Tribune witli a long face and 
solemn bearing, evincing the 
fact that he will be making his 
usual New Year's resolutions 
which everyone knows he will 
never keep. Of course the fact 
that Andy (or any other comic 
character for that matter) never 
keeps his resolutions makes 
good material for further humor 
on the part of the cartoonist, 
but it also to a great extent por- 
trays the weakness of human 
nature. The New Year's reso- 
lutions have been a huge joke 
for many a year, but we must 
not forget that there are a se- 
lect few who do really make 
resolutions and who do live up 
to them. 



The why and wherefore of the 
New Year's resolutions is usual- 
ly based on the fact that every 
individual has certain faults 
which are particularly evident, 
and of which all of his friends 
and relatives are more or less 
conscious, which he has a grea,t 
desire to part with if he can 
possibly do so. He, therefore, 
very devoutly and with the best 
of intentions solemnly vows that 
from this day fortlh, and this day 
is usually the first day of Jan- 
uai-y, he will not, so far as he 
is conscious of his action, com- 
mit this particular sin. Nearly 
every person on earth has had 
this experience and knows what 
is meant by this pledge taken in 
all seriousness. 

But, sad to relate, almost all 
of these brave resolutions fall 
one by one, along the wayside 
until by the time that the next 
first of January is approaching 
the man, woma.n, or child who 
has thus failed, is about ready to 
begin to vow the same things all 
over again. And so these peo- 
ple go on making new resolu- 
tions evei'y year with the usual 
result that by the time svunmer 
has come they have forgotten 
that they ever made them, and 
when December comes everyone 
has the laugh on them because 
of their failure to live up to 
their given word. 

There are a good ma.ny resolu- 
tions that Wfc as college students 
might make and have made from 
year to year. I wonder how 
many of them we have kept. 
Here is a list that perhaps will 
adequately fill the requirements 
for the College students New 
Year's Resolutions. 

1. I will study hard during 
the coming yea.r and try to make 
an A card, but will not let a 
mark fall below B. 

2. I will spend my time prof- 
itably. 

3. I will look for the good in 
everyone with whom I come in 
contact, and will try to overlook 



anything which seems unpleas- 
ant. 

4. I will not form any bad 
habits and I will discourage the 
bad ones that I have already 
formed. 

5. I will stand up for the 
right under all circumstances. 

These resolutions in a general 
way cover about all of the things 
which pertain to college life. 

Have you made resolutions like 
these other years and have fail- 
ed to keep them? Of course you 
have. Do you think that you 
could keep them if you would 
only exert your will power a 
little more than heretofore? 
Undoubtedly you could. Under 
such favorable circumstances as 
we are all living under do you 
think that we are really getting 
the most out of our college life? 
Think it over and see if you can 
convince yourself that there are 
some New Year's resolutions 
that are worth while that you 
are willing to make an unusual 
effort to keep. If we would all 
do this, would not Lake Forest 
become a college noted for the 
famous people that it has grad- 
uated? Think about it. 



TALK IT UP 



The Christmas holidays, long 
looked forward to, are upon us. 
Now for a good vacation, free 
from the ever impending prep- 
a.ration for classes and the con- 
stant demands of outside inter- 
ests. College life is a strenuous 
life and we need the vacation. 
Most of us will catch the first 
train after our last class with a 
feeling of great relief. 

But we will be equally glad to 
get back on January sixth, for 
it is a wonderful place after all. 
That is the side you should bear 
in mind while you are at home. 
Let it be the aim of every stu- 
dent who goes home for Christ- 
mas to "talk up" Lake Forest to 
prospective students for next 



THE STENTOR 



year. Now is the time to get 
busy. 

By "talking- up Lake Forest" 
we do not mean the "biggest 
elephant on earth" line of talk 
that circuses are noted for. Mis- 
representation is entirely un- 
necessary. 

Just stop to thinlc what we 
have here: A small college, 
where the individual of average 
talents is not lost in the mob 
and where he has an opportunity 
to participate in practically all 
the activities that any college 
offers; situated in the most 
bea,utiful spots in the middle 
west, less than an hour's ride 
from Chicago. The life of the 
ordinary student here is broad- 
er than in a large university be- 
cause of the greater relative im- 
portance of the individual and 
because of the greater intimacy 
of association. Yet the faculty 
and equipment are equal in 
quality to those of any of the 
far larger undergraduate schools 
here in the west. 

There are many advantages 
which will occur to any Lake 
Forester on a moment's reflec- 
tion. All you ha.ve to do is to 
present these advantages to the 
prospective college students and 
send their names and addresses 
to Mr. Bridgman, who will see 
that they receive literature. 

To secure at least one new 
student for Lake Forest next 
year should be just as important 
a feature of the Christmas vaca- 
tion as the Christmas dinner, or 
the Christmas dance, or what- 
ever you are looking forward to 
with greatest expectation. 



THE HARTT OF IMJOFVMTY 



"No other form of indecency 
is so common in some walks of 
life as profane language. Pro- 
fanity is about as safe to flirt 
with as a live wire," says a Chi- 
cago daily. 

It is not often that such sen- 
timent comes from the pen of 



newspaper editors, and when it 
does, one is compelled to con- 
sider the matter seriously. The 
writer of the quoted words vei-y 
likely did not refer to college 
communities, where the atmos- 
phere of highest culture would 
preclude any possibility of inde- 
cency of mind. He was think- 
ing of the lower strata of our 
modern society, degraded pool 
rooms, and street brawls. We 
would not want this editor to 
come to some of our college 
communities unannounced, for 
he might change his mind about 
the influence of a cultured at- 
mosphere. 

Profanity in college is the re- 
sult of rude environment, want 
of reverence, and a general dis- 
regard for people's finer sensi- 
bilities. Or it may be caused by 
a poverty of language or mental 
laziness. A fellow wishes to be 
emphatic and hasn't the courage 
to talk it through, so he short- 
cuts with a brilliant barrage of 
verbal shells which smash ev- 
erything in the way. He has 
secured emphasis, but not the 
verdict. The hearer is not con- 
vinced. Certainly, those who 
employ such cheap language are 
not so coarse as they appear to 
be. The poor fellows are the 
victims of habit and e.xample, 
just as those who are bound by 
the shackles of slang and sole- 
cism. 

Profanity weakens argument, 
distorts thought, prevents the 
use of fine language, degrades 
and makes ridiculous the ones 
who use it. Everyone has ex- 
perienced a peculiar revulsion 
of feeling on hearing an old 
man use profanity. In earlier 
manhood it is a disgrace, in 
youth it is folly, in women it is 
intolerable. Those who are 
breaking away from the habit 
are taking a step forward, gain- 
ing self respect, and , asserting 
a more worthy manhood. 



A Knox alumnus has given his 
college an interfraternity schol- 
arship cup. 'i . ■ 



'•THE LORD BE WITH THEE' 



Tuesday, in the first chapel 
service after the holidays, we 
were greatly edified by the cor- 
relation of the hymn, the re- 
sponsive reading, and the no- 
tices. In connection with the 
notice that semester exams were 
only three weeks away, and urg- 
ing students to make the most 
of the rest of their time, we 
sang "Fight the good fight, with 
all thy might," then read "The 
Lord hear thee in the day of 
thy trouble." Another line in 
the selection was "The Lord ful- 
fill all thy petitions," after 
which Dr. Wright announced, 
"there will be a faculty meet- 
ing at 4:30 this afternoon, at 
v/hich petitions will be receiv- 
ed." 



SOAP 

Soft soap, hard soap, soap 
with the smell that kills, we 
know all the varieties. We 
might say the difference be- 
tween barbarism and civilization 
lies in that little word. Soap 
stands for cleanliness. Do we 
ever stop to think what we 
would do or how we would look 
without it? Yet, we take it day 
by day forgranted. There are a 
thousand and one things we take 
forgrajited besides soap. Did 
we remember to thank Mary, 
John or Harry when they took 
all that trouble to do that little 
favor for us. Did we write that 
letter home to Mother this 
week? Do we show our appre- 
ciation to our school for what it 
is doing for us, do we in return 
give our talents, our energies 
and our all to that school? We 
may appreciate a,ll that is done 
for us. Ah, yes, no doubt we do. 
But let's get busy and show 
them we do. Not next month or 
next year but NOW. Our school 
is what we make it. Let's show 
•our appreciation in ACTION. 



THE STENTOR 





'Electric monorail cxane 
for hoisting coal 



Motor-generator set mounted on crar.e 
supplying power for lifting magnet. 



Elwrtiically-beated glu^t-lMts 

are lued in pattern shops 

end elsewhere- 




Magnetic sortmg 
machine, oper* 
ated by a two 
horsepower mo 
lor,' separates 
brass (rom iioa 



Electricity— 

the Master Force in Manufacturing 

THE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our manu- 
facturing industries. With belts and pulleys replaced 
by electric motors operating automatic — almost human — 
machines, many a slow and tedious process has been elimi- 
nated. The factory worker's task of yesterday is made 
pleasant by his command of this magic power. 

The Crane Company's plant at Chicago — electrical through- 
out — is a model of industrial efficiency. Its 1 0,000 horse- 
power of driving energy is brought by three small wires 
from a distant power plant. Then electricity drives the 
machinery which handles the coal for heating, cuts the steel, 
sifts the sand and sorts the material — in fact does everything 
from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock. 

Such an institution is marvelous— superhuman — made thus 
by the man-multiplying force of electricity. The General 
Electric Company has been instrumental in effecting this 
evolution. First, by developing successful electric gener- 
ating and transmission apparatus to furnish economically 
this modem form of power. Secondly, through many years 
of active co-operation with hundreds of manufacturers, it 
has mastered the art of applying the use of electrical energy 
to a multitude of needs. And finally, through branch 
offices and other distributing channels, its products are 
made accessible to all. 



[ 




Machine operated by motor 

attached to lamp socket 

scrubs Hoorsi 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small None Too Large 

A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Dangerous Advice 



Dick: You should be careful! 
D(jn't you know that drink is 



mankind's worst 



lemy ! 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Statinnery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Russell Studio 

REPUBLIC BLDG. 

209 S. State Street 
CHICAGO 



Bill : Yes ; . but doesn't the 
Bible say for us to love our 
enemies? 

ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 



Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 

DeSuxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTlSr 



Blackler Bldg. Tel 3t0 
LAKE FOREST. ILLINOIS 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



BE SURE YOU ARE 
CORRECTLY DRESSED 




Between Season Sale 



37, 38, 39, 51 , 
- ILLINOIS I 



and Extra Trousers 
$50, $65, $70 

And Upwards 

Overcoat Prices Dropped 

$5 $10 $13 

Jerrems" consevative 
Tailoring: ffives you 
that air of individual- 
ity, that necessary 
personality, that keeps 
(ine's apperance from 
bein.3' commonplace. 

Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalleSt. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 

Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 



Picture Framing 



I.AKK KOKI':»»T, 



II.I>, 



FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas~Cigars--Candies 



Ttie Lake Forest Tryst & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

-Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

32 DEERPATH. WEST 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

t'leaniiKj, l^rtsshiff. Repaifhiq 



fiartman & Hartman 

•'THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 



' Lake Forest, 



Illinois 



It ii's Uiik.'il :it HUNTOON'S it« Hailed Rljrht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THE STENTOR 



ECHOES 



Love and the moonlight is float- 
ing to me, 

Floating as silver o'er terrace 
and lea; 

Love and the shadows that hal- 
low the night 

Drifting and swaying in glim- 
mering flight. 

Love and the moonlight is call- 
ing to me, 

Calling with saffron o'er ripple 
and sea; 

Love and the wavelets that 
flicker the shore, 

Crooning and sighing at mem- 
ory's door. 

As I lie in the glade whei'e the 

smoke curls blow. 
In the wandering mist where 

the shadows grow, 
I think of the old, of its rack 

and toil. 
Of the easy way and the flaccid 

spoil. 

As I lie in the glade while the 
memories throng, 

In the quickening lilt of an 
idle song; 

I think of the new, of its doubt 
and fear. 

Of a hope to dream, and a maid- 
en's cheer. 

— W. G. McColley, Jr. 



Auburn (Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute) is to adopt a system 
of student rule to handle all 
cases of discipline other than 
cheating in examinations. It 
will be under the joint direction 
of faculty and student body, the 
latter predominating in num- 
bers. The system of government 
to be organized has two main 
branches, namely, the Student 
Body Council, and the Discipline 
Court. The former draws up 
and publishes the regulations by 
wihich students shall govern 
their conduct, while the latter 
must try all offenders and pro- 
nounce the necessary punish- 
ment. 



ALUMNI NEWS 



The inquiries sent out early 
in December, in anticipation of 
a new almuni address list, have 
brought a large number of in- 
teresting replies, fr^jm wliK-Ji 
the following rather prosaic 
notes are made, with no regard 
to class order. A matter of 
special interest in connection 
with these replies is that two 
or three, who had the use of 
scholarships while in attend- 
ance here, have either already 
made contributions to provide 
like help for "another fellow," 
or expressed the intention of 
doing so. One man has sent his 
cheque for $.300.00 to be added 
to the Alumni Fund and used 
for sholarships. 

1887. Rev. John Hammond of 
Scranton, Pa., has been made 
moderator of the Welsh Presby- 
terian Church in the U. S.; this 
branch is probably to be united 
Yidth the main Presbyterian body 
at the 1920 General Assembly. 

1907. Howard R. Shroyer, 
since his discharge from the ar- 
my has gone back to Portland, 
Oregon, where he is now with 
the Clai-k A. Kendall Co., Board 
of Trade. 

1910. Robert Hall is in the 
dry goods business at 105 Main 
Str., Batavia, N. Y. 

1914, H. L. Brannon is in the 
law offices of Pratt & Scholes, 
Jefferson Bldg., Peoria, 111. 

1916. Dorice D. Shumway is 
in the banking business at Edin- 
burg. 111. 

1916. Miss Elizabeth Krafka 
is teaching Botany and Zoology 
in the Springfield, 111., High 
School. 

1917. Eugene Durr is with 
Lembold & Co., Stock Brokers, 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

1918. Lawrence Stuart was 
married on Sept. 17 last to Miss 
Lorraine Hompe of Grand Rap- 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Atidersoii Bitililini/. Phone 865 
LAKK FOltliST, ILL. 

flPToJFs CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

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THE STENTOR 



ids, where their home is at pres- 
ent at 23 S. College Str. He is 
in business with the Royal Fur- 
niture Co. 

1919. John P. Hohnstein is in 
a sanitarium at Akron, Colorado, 
able to move about a good deal 
and to do some reading, but not 
yet up to sustained work. 

Following are some new ad- 
dresses secured from the Kappa 
Sigma mailing list: 

1910. Bell, Glen C, residence 
500 Washington Ave., Winnetka. 

1902. Clark, Lawrence A., 24-36 
W. 3d Place, Chicago. 

1911. Cone, Leroy, 217 Spring 
Str., Seattle, Washington. 

1918. Gregg, Walter B., care 
i'tyerson & (]o., 16th & Rockwell 
Strs. Chicago. 

1913. Hildebra,nd, Glen, Bond 
Salesman, Cavsey & Co., Peoria, 
111. 

1910. Igov, Wm. A., with 
Washburn-Crosby Co., Minneap- 
olis, Minn. 

1901. Kennec^y, John E., 1802 
W. 11th Ave., Spokane, Washing- 
ton. 

1909. Lindsay, Charles E., 
Livingston, 111. 

1908. McKee, W. C, M. D., 
408 Foster Ave., Chicago. 



1910. Stark, Theodore 
Smith's Ferry, Idaho. 



J.. 



1909. Victor G. Heller, wish- 
ing to continue study and at the 
same time, if possible, be near 
his parents, resigned the princi- 
palship of the Covington, Ky., 
High School in June and has this 
year taken a position as instruct- 
or in inorganic chemistry at the 
Iowa, State College at Ames, at 
the same time being a candidate 
for the Ph. D. 

1895. John G. Coulter, after 
a brief stay in this country has 
returned to France to finish up 
some work there and will re- 
turn here in the spring. 



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HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD. Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



1913. James E. McDade is 
now principal of the D. S. Went- 
worth School, Chicago, residing 
at 8108 S. Green Str. He is at 
present the secretary of the Chi- 
cago Pedag-ogical Club. 

1903. Miss Ida M. Francis, 
whose home address is now 258 
W. Marquette Road, Chicago, has 
for some years been a teacher of 
stenography in the Chicago High 
Schools, at present in the new 
Lindbolm School. 

1902. It is worthy of even so 
late a record that on April 11, 

1918 the family of Roy D. Bald- 
win was increased by two, Duane 
and Catherine. Mr. Baldwin is 
now advertising manager for the 
Simonds' Mfg. Co. of Fitchburg, 
Mass., with which he has been 
connected for many years. 

1904. Oliver S. Thompson is 
now principal of the Union High 
School at Compton, California. 

1902. Clifford H. Williams 
has cjhanged his residence ad- 
dress to Glencoe, his business 
address remains 72 W. Adams 
Str., Chicago. 

1889. Rev. Gerhart A. Wilson 
is now pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church at Hadlyme, Conn. 

1914. Miss Marinda Bissell of 
Joliet was for the years 1917- 

1919 principal of the High 
Scihool at St. Anne, Illinois, and 
this year has a similar position 
at Highland, 111. 

1891. Miss Florence S. Ray- 
mond completed last June her 
25th year of teaching at the El- 
gin Academy and was granted a 
year's leave of absence at full 
salary. She is spending the 
year with iher mother at Dixon. 

1907. Robert H. Hood has re- 
turned to Chicago from Pitts- 
burg where he was with the 
Gulick-Henderson Co., as district 
manager of the same company, 
431 S. Dearborn Str., and resid- 
ing at 909 Leland Ave. 

1915. Miss Emily Evans was 



graduated from the Chicago Nor- 
mal College in 1916, and is at 
present a primary teacher in the 
Kenwood School, Chicago. Resi- 
dence, g515 Kimbark Ave. 

1908. L. D. Callahan is now 
permanently located at 1101 Col- 
cord Bldg., Oklahoma City, of 
whicli building, "the finest office 
building in the south-west," he is 
the manager, as well as of other 
business buildings. For avoca- 
tion he plays with oil lands. 

1894. Harvey L. Bird is now 
telegra,ph copy editor on the 
Chicago Daily News. 

1911. Miss Marion Tremaine 
is teaching this year in Salt Lake 
City; address, Richmond Apts. 
Her permanent address remains 
Charlotte, Mich. 

1909. Harleigh H. Hartman, 
after two and a ha,lf years as 
Digest Clerk and Librarian of 
the Public Utilities Commission, 
has resigned that office and is 
now engaged in the practice of 
public utility and corporate law 
at 532 Reisch Bldg., Springfield. 
He is professor of corporation 
and constitutional law at the 
Lincoln College of Law, Spring- 
field, and lecturer on public 
utility law at the Northwestern 
Univ. Law School. 

1918. R. B. Phillips, now dis- 
charged from the Navy, is at 
present "agriculturing" near Pon 
tiac. 

1919. W. M. Teves has a posi- 
tion with the Federal Reserve 
Bank, New York City, living at 
home, 555 Madison Str., Brook- 
lyn. He intends to go on with 
further study at Columbia as 
soon a,s possible. 

1911. Mrs. Robert M. (Maude 
Sass) Niven's address is 504 W. 
Moulton Str., Pontiac. She has 
a daug;hter Marjorie Jean, now 
about three years old. 

1916. Only now can we chron- 
icle the marriage in June, 1917, 
of Miss Leone Weston and How- 



ard V. Martin, a graduate of the 
Wharton School of Finance, Phil- 
adelphia. Mr. Martin is a mem- 
ber of the firm of I. S. Martin 
Co., Sioux City, Iowa, and a de- 
partment store manager. The 
residence address is 1822 Sum- 
mit Ave. 

1917. The engagement has 
been announced of Miss Alice 
Douglas of Waukegan and Paul 
L. Markley, Jr. 

1896. Miss Sarah Cotton con- 
tinues still in her position of 
secretary to the president, But- 
ler College, Indianapolis. 

1916. Since September, 1918, 
Miss Flora Andei'son has been 
teaching French in the Joliet 
Township High School. She has 
done some graduate study at the 
University of Chicago. 

1915. Stuart Bishop has just 
been made assistant cashier of 
the Metropolitan branch of the 
Traveler's Insurance Co., 76 Wil- 
liam Str., N. Y. City. He is to 
be married on January 24 to 
Miss Peyton Putski, of Washing- 
ton, D. C. His naval service 
from June, '17 to August, '19 
will appear in our service record 
la,ter. 

lidl. We have never made 
record here, we believe, of the 
marriage some years since of El- 
den W. Prentice of Lone Tree, 
Iowa, and Anna C. Helenstein, a 
graduate of the four years' mu- 
sic course at Tabor College. 
Prentice enlisted in July, 1918, 
but had only training service, 
and was discharged in January, 
1919. 



W'c have made a record of the 
recent reorganisation of the Chi- 
cago Alumni Club with the fol- 
kiwing ofiicers : 

President — Stewart D. Marquis, 
'11, care of Erwin-Wasey Advt. 
Co., 58 E. Washington St. 

Vice-President — Cedric Smith, 
'17, care of Cable Piano Co., 301 S. 
Wabash Ave. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



Sec.-Treas. — Edwin L. Gilroy> 
'18, care of A. B. Dick Co., 736 
W. Jackson Blvd. 

The Club continues to meet 
each Wednesday at 12:30 for 
luncheon at the City Club, 315 
Plymouth Court, and out-of-town 
Alumni are especially urged to 
drop in at that place and time. 
The Club proposes to discuss in 
an informal way each week some 
phase of the life and work of the 
college. 

1901_W. M. Lewis' official des- 
ignation at Washington, D. C, is 
Director Savings Division, War 
Loan Organization. 

1913 — Married, at the home of the 
bride. Grand Rapids, Mich., on 
Saturday, Nov. 29, Miss Marion 
Stuart and Norton R. White of 
Grand Rapids. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. Charles 
Stuart of the Garrett Biblical In- 
stitute at Evan:ton, the bride's 
uncle. The maid of honor was 
Miss Frances Thompson of Evan- 
ston, Victor Stuart, '15, was mas- 
ter uf ceremonies, and Charles 
Stuart, '16, and Barry Stuart, 
were among the ushers. Other 
former Lake Foresters in attend- 
ance were Canfield Eddy and Rus- 
sell Hicks. 

Mr. White is a graduate of 
Princeton, 1913, a brother of 
Stewart Edward White, the 
writer, and in busijiess in Grand 
Rapids. After returning from 
their wedding journey, which has 
made the Moraine a center and in- 
cluded visits to the campus, Mr, 
and Mrs. White will be at home 
on Robinson Road, Grand Rapids. 

1915 — Joseph Krafke, Jr., is prof- 
essor of zoology at the University 
of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. 

1915 — \'ictor Stuart is now with 
the Berkey and Gay Furniture 
Co., Grand Rapids. 

1917 — Cedric Smith is in business 
in Chicago with the Cable Piano 
Co.. 301 S. Wabash Ave. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

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M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL ^AAOOD 
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FEED AND 

Building Material 




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T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



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Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing | 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC I 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-like and Bs Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



IC.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F e: D e: ra l 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



Uhe 



The Biackler Market Co. 



Phone 17 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



CALVERT FLORAL co. ,"°^"",^."^^"';t'';r- ^''"• 

o. TRlEBWASSER, Prop. Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 

a Specialty 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 
MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



THE STENTOR 



iiMiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the fealurea of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at mo.derate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 to |400 (or men; $350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDENT'S OKHCE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



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The 



Quality Tire Co. 

Market Square 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



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200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



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STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



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Telephones: Glcncoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



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Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

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WHEN IN NEED OF 

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Jensen & Sundmark 
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Phone 709 Western A vp. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. JANUARY 16. 1920 



NUMBER 12 



UNCONDITIONAL RATIFICATION WINS 



93 Studenls, 3 Faculty, Vote For Ratification Without Reservations 



170 students of Lake Forest 
College and 10 faculty members 
voted for one of the four prop- 
ositions in the Intercollegiate 
Treaty Referendum which was 
held in several hundred colleges 
and universities over the coun- 
try on Tuesday, January 13. 
Out of this number. Proposition 
One, which read: "I favor the 
ratification of the League and 
Treaty without reservations or 
amendments," polled a ma.jority 
of 5 to 2 over the nearest com- 
petitor. 

Proposition Four came second, 
with 34 student votes and 4 
from the faculty. It read: "I 
favor a compromise between the 
Lodge and the Democratic res- 
ervations in order to facilitate 
the ratification of the Treaty." 

Proposition Three: "I favor 
ratification of the Treaty, but 
only with the Lodge reserva- 



tions" secured 1 faculty and 31 
student votes. Only 12 students 
and 2 of the faculty were op- 
posed to the ratification of the 
League and Treaty in any form, 
as stated in Proposition Two. 

The student ballots were pass- 
ed out and collected in Chapel, 
but those who did not attend 
that session were given an op- 
portunity to vote later at the 
Library. The faculty vote was 
taken in the weekly meeting, 
which regularly falls on Tuesday 
afternoon. The ballots were 
cassified and counted by Holden, 
Casjens and Schreurs, then 
turned over to Dr. Wright, who 
wired the results to the nation- 
al headquarters of the Referen- 
dum in New York City. 

The National results of the 
referendum had not been receiv- 
ed at the time The Stentor went 
to press. 



DR. McAfee speaks 



Dr. William McAfee, of McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary, ad- 
dressed the student body in a 
"long chapel" period on Monday. 
Dr. McAfee did not announce 
his sublect, but a fitting title 
would seem to be "Christian 
Idealism in Practice." 

First he spoke of the League 
of Nations, apropos of the bal- 
lot to be taken next day. He 
urged his hearers to take the 
matter very seriously, pointing 
out that they were of the gen- 
eration that must do a large 
share of the constructive work 
demanded by present-day condi- 



tions. "We must not thiidv, as 
some have thought, that the end 
of the war will be the begin- 
ning of the Kingdom of Heaven." 
He compared the war to the pre- 
paratory blasting operations in 
building a railroad; leaving much 
to be done before the work is 
I completed. 

] Dr. McAfee was in Paris dur- 
[ ing most of the Peace Confer- 
j ence negotiations. He is con- 
vinced, he saifl, of the wisdom of 
adopting the League and the 
Treaty. Though he did not spec- 
ifically state, we judge that he 
meant without amendments or 
reservations. 

The keynote of the talk was 
I expressed in the statement: "The 

I Continued on Pag-e Two.) 



L. F. LOSES 

TO MONMOUTH 



The Red and Black basket-ball 

five lost the first conference 
game of the season to Mon- 
mouth on the home floor last 
Saturday evening by the score of 
13 to 10. Our team was crippled 
by the large list of ineligibles, 
including Robertson, Marsh, 
Sumner and Schick and by the 
loss of Red Coleman, who is out 
of the game until the second 
semester, owing to an operation 
for appendicitis. 

In spite of these losses and 
the fact that the squad had 
practiced together as a team but 
once and was using a new style 
of play, things were decidedly 
in our favor all through the 
first half. Although the half 
ended with the score 5 to 5, only 
one of our points was made on 
a free throw, while three of the 
Monmouth tallies were secured 
in that manner. But in the sec- 
ond half, with Maplesden out, 
the pace of the home team 
slackened and the game ended 
with Monmouth three points 
ahead. 

Eddy was the chief performer 
among the Red and Black forc- 
es, but he shared the general 
slump in the second half. He 
handled the free throws, scoring 
two out of seven. Of the four 
baskets, Eddy made three and 
Manning one. 

For Monmouth, Lawrence, 
Bern, Smiley and Gillespie made 
one basket each. Gillespie made 
five free throws out of eleven 
trials. 

So, with the number of bas- 
kets equal on each side, the 
game was lost on fouls. Lake 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



THE STENTOR 



L. F. LOSES TO 3ION310LTH 

(Continued from Page One.) 

Forest should have won if any- 
one of the several factors men- 
tioned had been favorable. The 
home team excelled on the de- 
fensive, compelling the visitors 
to make a great many long and 
often desperate shots. On the 
other hand, we missed too many 
baskets that we should have had 
especially in the second half. 

Coach Derby is far from dis- 
couraged over the outlook from 
now on. "With the constant im- 
provement that practice will 
bring, increased familiarity with 
the style of play, and moi-e of 
the old guard among the elig- 
ibles. Lake Forest will be a for- 
midable candidate for the Little 
Five honors. 

There was a large and enthu- 
siastic crowd out for the game, 
not only the College, but Ferry 
Hall and the Academy being 
well represented. 

The lineups: 

Lake Forest 10:— Eddy, rf; 
Maplesden, If; Manning, If; Rus- 
sell, c; Kyndberg, rg; A. Hale, Ig: 

Monmouth 13: — Lawrence, rf; 
Smiley, If; Blick and Bern, c; 
Gillespie, rg; Wallace, Ig. 



will as the Shantung, Danzig 
and Fiume settlements. 

As for the opportunities in an 
idealistic life of uplift, we doubt 
if they exist in conventional 
channels as much as Dr. McAfee 
thinks. The person who can 
make Christian idealism practi- 
cal and can uplift without de- 
veloping into the stereotyped 
"uplifter" is rare indeed. At 
any rate, many of us will gravi- 
tate to teaching, as a last resort, 
but comparatively few of us, we 
fear, have the qualifications for 
the ministry. 



A'ARSITY BASKET- 
BALL SCHEDULE 



DR. McAFEE SPEAKS 

(Continued from Pasre One.) 

man who is out for himself alone 
is just that much more load for 
the rest of humanity." Dr. Mc- 
Afee applied this both as warn- 
ing us against adopting a selfish- 
. ly national attitude toward the 
League and as a guide to the 
student in choosing his life 
work. The sequence from the 
first application was to ratify 
the Treaty; from the second to 
choose the ministry or teaching. 
All this is very well, but we 
are tempted to make some ob- 
jections. In the first place, one 
must admit that "a lack of con- 
fidence in the good will of the 
peoples of the earth," which he 
says is the reason for a vote 
against the League, is somewhat 
justified by such evidence of ill 



SOPHS DEFEAT SENIORS 

The Sophomore five trimmed 
the Seniors in the first inter- 
class game of the season last 
Friday night. Referee Maples- 
den called three fouls in the be- 
ginning of the game but they 
came so thick and fast from 
both sides that he gave it up as 
hopeless, thereby probably es- 
tablishing a precedent for the 
series. It was a lively game. 

The line-ups with number of 
baskets: 

Seniors 13: — Schreurs, 2, rf; 
Mayeau, 2, If; Legner, 1, c; Arm- 
strong c; Woods, rg; Casjens, 1, 
Ig; free throw, Mayeau, 1. 

Sophomores 30: — Robertson, 5, 
rf; Beddoes, 6, If; Kunz, 4, c; 
Jowett and Ericson, rg; G. Beard 



Jan. 10, Monmouth at Lake 
Forest. 

Jan. 17, Northwestern at L. F. 

Jan. 23, Armour in Chicago. 

Jan. 24, Valparaiso at Valpar- 
aiso. 

Jan. 30, Beloit at L. F. 

Jan. 31, Knox at L. F. 

Feb. 6, Monmouth at Mon- 
mouth. 

Feb. 7, Knox at Galesburg. 

Feb. 11, Wheaton at L. F. 

Feb. 14, Northwestern at Nap- 
erville. 

Feb. 17, Valparaiso at L. F. 

Feb. 21, Beloit at Beloit. 

Feb. 25, American College of 
Physical Education at L. F. 

Jan. 28, DePauw U at Green- 
castle. 

March 2, Armour at L. F. 

March 6, Wheaton at Wheaton. 



MISS CHEEK VISITS US AGAIN 



IXTER-CLASS BAS- 
KETBALL SCHEDULE 

Jan. 9, Seniors vs. Sophomores. 

Jan. 10, Juniors vs. Freshmen. 

Jan. 12, Seniors vs. Freshmen. 

Jan. 14, Juniors vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Jan. 16. Seniors vs. Juniors. 

Jan. 17, Sophomores vs. Fresh- 
men. 

Jan. 19, Seniors vs. Freshmen. 

Jan. 21, Juniors vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Jan. 23. Seniors vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Jan. 27, Juniors vs. Freshmen. 

Jan. 29, Sophomores vs. Fresh- 
men. 

Jan. 30, Seniors vs. Juniors. 



Last Thursday we enjoyed an- 
other visit from Miss Mary 
Cheek of the Presbyterian Board 
in Chicago. After a conference 
with the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
she talked in the Big Room to 
all the girls who are interested 
in Home Missions. She showed 
us the need for workers among 
"the poor white trash" in Ken- 
tucky, among the Indians, and 
even among the poor in our own 
home towns. 



ALUMNI NE«S 



During the holidays five wom- 
en members of the class of 1919, 
met for luncheon at Field's and 
attended a matinee together, af- 
terwards. They were Gwendo- 
lyn Massey, Lucie Knox, Harriet 
Harris, Agnes Hoffman and Mar- 
garet Horton. In their conver- 
sation they tried to make plans 
for occasional meetings, fairly 
regular at least two or three 
times a year — perhaps in the 
holidays, in the late summer be- 
fore teachers take up their 



THE STENTOR 



work, and in the spring, as well 
as at Commencement. Indeed, 
the question arose why some 
such plan should not be devel- 
oped for all alumnae in this vi- 
cinity, an organization co-ordin- 
ate with the men's Chicago Club 
and co-operative with it on oc- 
casion. We happen to know 
that the men's club would wel- 
come such an organization and 
has in fact discussed somewhat 
how to get the women into ac- 
tive touch with present activi- 
ties. Obviously the women 
must have some sort of a sep- 
arate status, but their interest 
and support is necessary and de- 
sired. Certainly all the litera- 
ture issued by the men in the 
past six months has been sent 
to them, as will be the new bul- 
letin, soon to be issued. Indeed 
it is hoped that some of the 
women will assist in the edit- 
ing of forthcoming bulletins. 

Copies of this issue of the 
Stentor are sent to a number of 
alumnae and former students 
living in and about Chicago. 
May we suggest that any women 
interested in the formation of 
a Chicago L. F. Women's Club, 
write one of the following, with 
a view to further steps in the 
matter: 

Mrs. George (Rena Oberne) 
Campbell, 14, 5947 Kenmore 
Ave. 



Mrs. V. C. (Blanche Haughey) 
Musserl Highland Park, 737 
Ridgewood Drive. 

Miss Carol Welch, '16, 14 Chal- 
mers Place. 

Miss Gwendolyn Massey, '19, 
1452 Fargo Ave. 



ITie Kappa Sig parrot is a re- 
formed bird. During vacation 
he spent several days in Dun- 
lap's room and devoured several 
copies of "Tlie Christian Endeav- 
or World" and "The Sunday 
School Times." Now he's so sub- 
dued you can't have any fun 
with him at all. 



PERSONALS 



Marion Preston, Elaine Kellog 
and Gladys Reichert spent the 
week end at their home in Chi- 
cago. 

Garnette Higbee has returned 
to school. 

Ruth Bi-idgeman spent the 
week end at Northwestern Uni- 
versity with Mary Fiedler of 
Ottumwa. 

Elsie Engel visited relatives 
in Chicago over the week end. 

Mildred Day and Helen Egge- 
meyer spent Saturday and Sun- 
day with friends in Willard Hall 
at Northwestern University. 

Lois Conklin visited at her 
home in Oak Park during the 
week end. 

Dorothy Magee visited friends 
at Northwestern, Saturday and 
Sunday. 



NO COAL SHORTAGE 



There seems to be no danger 
of the university heating plant 
again becoming dangerously 
short of fuel. At the end of 
last week, according to Mr. 
Huhnke, we had on hand about 
600 tons, with plenty on order, 
and no prospect of delay in get- 
ting orders filled. 



ALUMNI i^SAY 

PUBLISH BULLETIN 



Plans are on foot whereby the 
alumni may get out a monthly 
bulletin, the purpose of which 
will be to keep the some eight 
hundred alumni more closely in 
touch with the college and with 
each other. This bulletin would 
be a good thing for all concerned 
and we heartily approve of the 
plan. Edwin Gilroy, '18, who 
visited on the campus last Sun- 
day, and others of the younger 
alumni are handling the scheme. 



RITH BAHLERT REPORTS 
ON STUDENT VOL- 

UNTEER CONVENTION 



At the weekly Y. W. meeting 
last Thursday, Ruth Bahlert gave 
her report on the Student Vol- 
unteer Convention, held at Des- 
Moines during the Christmas 
holidays. She began by telling 
how Lake Forest's delegates ar- 
rived in Des Moines on Decem- 
ber 31, on one of the nineteen 
special trains, which carried 
delegates from over a thousand 
different colleges. They were 
met by Boy Scouts, who took 
them to the Coliseum, where 
eight thousand students assem- 
bled at meetings every morning 
and evening. 

The remainder of the report 
was on the opportunities for self 
development in Latin America. 
South America is sorely in need 
of teachers, doctors, nurses, phar- 
macists, agriculturists, and there 
are also wonderful opportunities 
in commercial lines. It is hoped 
that Christian people will take 
up this work and we as true 
Americans ought to be inter- 
ested in seeing that our Ambas- 
sadors and men in diplomatic 
service in those countries are 
men of the right stamp. 

Miss Bahlert said that there 
were two things about the con- 
vention which impressed her 
most. One was the fact that the 
five hundred men and women 
who had returned from foreign 
fields for the convention were all 
so eager to return to their work, 
saying that they are happier in 
their foreign home than in the 
United States. The second was 
the stress put upon intercession 
and the absolute need for, and 
power of, prayer. 

After the report, she announc- 
ed that Mission Study classes are 
to be formed, not only for the 
religious value, but for the 
broader outlook and the intellec- 
tual benefits to be derived. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year bj' the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
Alberta Burris '23 
Rosa Deutch '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson '22 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

^ acuity and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



THE NEAV YEAR 



Tlie old year has had its joys 
and sorrows, its hopes and dis- 
appointments, its successes and 
failures, its loves and hates, its 
peace and war. What it has 
been, has been worked into hu- 
man life and destiny. It has 
become a part of us individually 
and part of us as a nation. In 
a sense we never put off the 
past; it is ourselves. We are 
simply a product of what we 
have thought and felt and seen. 
With deft hands and silent 
stroke time is weaving into our 
lives the experiences of each 
separate day as we pass through 
it. The swift and silent shut- 
tle of the weaver no more sure- 
ly fashions the many colored 
web into a harmony and unity 
of design than does the unseen 
hand of time with his unseen 
shuttle, fashion our lives into 
our personalities. 

A great poet has told us some- 



thing about a "divinity that 
shapes our ends, rough hew 
them how we will." As we look 
over the past we are painfully 
conscious of the fact that this 
has been true in our experienc- 
es. Few, if any of us have re- 
alized in our later years the 
hopes and aspirations of child- 
hood. Fortuitous circumstances 
have cast our lots in strange 
places. Where we have come to 
stand in the college world and 
what we have come to be is the 
result of the operation of many 
conflicting forces. At best life 
is a sort of a mosaic. It can be 
said of none of us that the music 
of our souls constitutes a sweet 
symphony unmarred by discords. 

A kind providence, however, 
seems to preside ovei the lives, 
of most of us. There is some- 
thing in our make-up that clings 
to the optimistic. If we have 
half a chance we are disposed to 
be happy and hopeful. Though 
the lines may not always fall 
onto us in pleasant places, the 
human soul has the happy al- 
cliemy of transforming the ad- 
verse things of life into real 
benefits and pleasures and turn- 
ing the dark cloud inside out to 
reveal the silver lining. It is 
for this reason that at the be- 
ginning of this new year, al- 
though the days, weeks and 
months of the past have not 
been without their regrets and 
failures, there is that within our 
hearts that bids us cheerfully 
to push forward to that high 
mark which we have set in our 
strivings for an education. The 
old year will leave few scars 
and little will it detract from 
our enjoyment and usefulness of 
the future, if with Tennyson, 
we can sing — 

"Ring out the old, ring in the 

new; 
Ring out the false, ring in the 

true; 
Ring in the valiant man and 

free 
The larger heart, the kindlier 

hand; 



Ring out the darkness of the 

land; 
Ring in the Christ that is to 

be." 



THE COLLEGE REPUTATION 



There was a time not so far in 
the past, when one was proud 
to say that one was a student 
at Lake Forest College, but to- 
day one is almost ashamed to 
tell ones friends and acquain- 
tances that Lake Forest is one's 
Alma Mater. Why has the de- 
plorable condition come about? 
Has your conduct had anything 
to do in the matter? 

For instance in the matter of 
Athletics, any man will laugh 
when you say that you are a 
student at Lake Forest and he 
will gracefully deliver something 
not meant for a eulogy either. 
Why is it that we seem never to 
win a game and only once in a 
while tie with our opponent? 
We are allowing the small fac- 
tions in the school to govern our 
actions rather than our own per- 
sonalities and the school spirit 
whioh should hold us loyal to our 
college rather than to just our 
own particular group in that 
college. We have lost athletic 
contests merely because we 
could not overlook some petty 
grievance and were not strong 
enough to overlook it for the 
good of the whole ocllege. Re- 
member you are going to be 
judged by tihe name which the 
college will receive rather than 
the name which your own group 
has in the years to come, when 
you are out in the world and 
away from all yoin- college as- 
sociates. 

Athletics is only an example 
of the many things in which we 
are failing. People are begin- 
ning to say things about the 
characters of the students and 
we cannot afford to have these 
things said about the college. 
The reputation of the college is 
going to mean to a great extent 



THE STENTOR 



your reputation in the world and 
you cannot afford to have slan- 
derous things said about you 
when you are trying to make 
your mark in the world. Even 
if you do not care at all about 
your own standing in this world 
you might have enough self re- 
spect not to cast shadows of 
doubt upon others who are try- 
ing to do everything that is hon- 
orable and right. Remember 
they have to suffer with the rest 
no matter what happens. 

Let us try during the com- 
ing year to blot out the name 
which Lake Forest has ol)tained 
during the past few years and 
make it a personal matter with 
eaoh one of us to do the right 
thing even if it hurts, for the 
good of the college and the peo- 
ple with whom we are living. It 
is only the right and Christian- 
like thing to do under the cir- 
cumstances. Let us not allow 
any action of ours t(i cast in any 
way a shadow upon the name of 
our college and let us woi'k for 
the college as a whole rather 
than for our own individual 
benefits. Cannot we all unite 
for the good of Lake Forest to 
make her one of the leading col- 
leges in all the things that are 
really worth while? We will 
need a lot of energy and not 
just talk. Are you willing to 
work to help the cause? Let's 
make 1920 worth while. 



FAITH 



Absolute, unconquerable Faith 
is one of life's essential concom- 
itants, therefore, one of the 
greatest secrets of Success. We 
must realize that we carry our 
Success or our Failure with us 
and that it depends not upon 
outside conditions. Faith in our 
country. Faith in our College, 
Faith in our faculty and fellow- 
students, and last, but by no 
means least Faith in our own 
ability to do, to dare to accom- 
plish, to achieve! 



PUT PEP IN YOUR 

CONVERSATION 



THE C03IING PERIL 



There are, in general, two 
kinds of conversation. One 
might be called camouflage and 
the other genuine. The camou- 
flage conversation lacks sincerity 
and tloes not have the full sound 
which is necessary to show that 
a man means what he says. The 
genuine conversation contains 
everything the other lacks. 
Two men say exactly the same 
thing, for illustration, one in a 
half-hearted manner and the at- 
titude of indifference which 
fails to put hi.s words across the 
plate. He lacked faith in his 
words, likewise did you! Anoth- 
ei- man said it and cveiy word 
rang true. 

Talk as if you mean it! Do 
not be afraid to say what you 
think, so long as the thoughts 
are honest and sincere, and put 
lots of "pep" in your conversa- 
tion. It pays dividends. 



BLUES 

What are they? We don't 
know. We all have them and 
we don't want them. Who does? 
But here's to the man or girl 
who can conquer them and pre- 
sent a smiling, winning face to 
the world. You know several 
who do. Isn't it an inspiration 
to be around those kind of peo- 
ple? Well, do you suppose we 
inspire anybody when we go 
around with a face that would 
cause the cream to sour? Well, 
if you think we do, we don't. 
Maybe you have a grouch. 
Probably your room mate has 
one too. Don't you think it 
would make him very happy 
for you to unload your grouch 
on him. too. If you know he is 
blre, cheer him up and you will 
be astonished to find that you 
have forgotten your grouoh. 
Try it. You know this little 
line "The man worth while, is 
the man who can smile, when 
everything goes dead wrong." 



Only two weeks off. Are 
your knees getting wobbly ev- 
ery minute? You're scared stiff 
starting to cram and using the 
midnight oil. 

In the first place if exams are 
a perfectly just thing, you 
shouldn't go through such tor- 
tures. I say they are, even 
though I am one of the suffer- 
ers. If you can't remember the 
essential things in a course for 
four or five months, just how 
nuich of a working knowledge 
do you have of the subject 
which you are studying? You 
can't expect to go through life 
with a note book in your hand. 
Of course you can't remember 
every little detail but you should 
be able to discuss intelligently, 
the main facts in your field of 
study. 

If the man who studied civil 
engineering forgot at the rate 
which most of us do he wouldn't 
get very far in his profession. It 
wouldn't be very handy for him 
to carry all his note books and 
reference books along out in the 
desert. 

If you have done your work 
as the daily assignments came 
along, . conscientiously and con- 
sistently you'll have no fears 
for any exam. You'll be crying 
for an exam instead of about 
one, so that you can show your- 
self up to be a conqueror in a 
mental field. It's a chance to 
show the Profs, what you can 
do. Have you the stuff in you 
to stand a real test without any 
cribbing or questions to study 
before hand or well informed 
neighbors? There's something 
mighty admirable in being every 
inch a ninn, even if it is only in 
an exam, instead of a man in 
spots, and reverting to a crook 
when exams come along. 



For fiirls Only 

(Read backwards.) Didn't you 
if gild a be wouldn't you. it read, 
would you knew we. 



THE STENTOR 



A RHAPSODY 



Here it is ladies! Here's 1920 
all bedecked in the usual charms 
of a leap year. She's even 
sweeter than her sisters for we 
™en had to put all signs of the 
good old Schlitzes out of the 
scope of her bewitching eyes. 
She sure is a demure lass. If 
she doesn't become a bit more 
lively we'll be hiding our good 
old corncobs too. 

Well, as I was saying ladies, 
here's your chance. Make good 
use of it. We fellers need a rest 
anyway. Maybe you could start 
the custom of having the ladies 
foot the bills during the year 
too. It would come in a bit 
handy just now and maybe we 
could save enough loose change 
during the intervening twelve 
months to take in a real show 
next year instead of the custom- 
ary movies and gumdrops. 

Don't be afraid fellers. We'll 
still have our gumdrops and 
movies next year. This is mere- 
ly a suggestion and I'm afraid 
it won't take. But you can't 
teli what they're liable to do. 
1921 might bring about the ab- 
olition of all sorts of recrea- 
tion. Just when we're getting 
accustomed to g-umdrops too. 

Well fellers, if the worst 
c".'"-^ to the worst, you can 
.ioifi me on my south sea isle 
where the sirens can't get us. 



3iI8EKABLE PEOPLE 



Beloit College has been given 
a genuine ihonor through the in- 
stallation of the Chi Epsilon 
Chapter, one of the sixty chap- 
ters of Pi Beta Phi, the oldest 
national college sorority in the 
United States. The University of 
Wis. is the only other school 
in the state having a chapter. 
Phi Beta Phi was foimded at 
Monmouth College in 1867. 



A straw vote shows which 
way the hot air blows. 



1. Girls with new hats on 
rainy days. 

2. Men without women. 

3. An editor. 

4. The rejected. 

5. Women without men. 

6. Mac without Eloise. 

7. "Sib" without his watch 
chain. 

8. Preston with her heart. 

9. Mayeau wide awake. 

10. Girls trying to collect 
Stentor bills from the men. 

11. Tracy without a cigarette. 

12. Phi — Eta's witout a deck 
of cards. 

13. Derby's hound. 

14. Trouty, without cushla to 
get to Champaign. 

15. Mills without a joke. 

16. Gladys, without Elaine. 

17. Spanish class minus Ray 
Moore. 

18. Holden without his les- 
son. 

19. Sam vinthout Van. 

20. Loveridge without his 
check. 

21. Florence Metzger without 
a frat pin. 

22. Esther without the South 
Sea Islanders. 

23. Opha without her medi- 
cine chest. 

24. Harris without fudge. 



THE BL00:MT0WN HOTEL 



Board 50 cents per square foot, 
meals extra,, 

Breakfast at five, dinner at six, 
supper at seven. 

Guests aer requested not to 
speak to the dumb waiter. 

Guests wishing to get up with- 
out being called can have 
self-raising flour for supper. 

The hotel is convenient to all 



cemeteries. Hearses to hire 

at 25 cents a day. 
Guests wishing to do a little 

driving will find hammer 

and nails in the closet. 
If the room gets too warm, open 

the window and see the fire 

escape. 
If you become thirsty during the 

night, lift the mattress and 

find the spring. 
Baseballists desiring a little 

practice will find a pitcher 

on the stand. 
If the lamp goes out, take a 

feather out of the pillow; 

that's light enough for any 

room. 
Anyone troubled with nightmare 

will find a halter on the bed 

post. 
Don't worry about paying your 

bill; the house is supported 

by its foundation. 

— Finis. 



HEART THROBS 



I'se an awful funny chap. 

Got a heart that goes pit pat. 

Not like other folks go. 
It beats very fast — not slow. 

If I ever jump or run 

My ma sighs and says, "Now 
Son," 
Mustn't run you know like that; 

It is bad for that pit pat." 

Mustn't play like other boys. 
Mustn't shout and make a 
noise. 
Always, always, I do hear, 
"Careful of your heart my 
dear." 



Noel, reading of the disap- 
pearance of Miss Jeanne De Kay: 
"What kind of a hotel is this 
Hull House? Hasn't it a good 
reputation?" 



He: "Each hour I spend with 
you is like a pearl to me." 
She: "Quit stringing me." 



THE STENTOR 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Vanety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 

SIDNEY BURRIDGE I 
21 Market Square i 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES j 

BILLIARDS I 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



Keith : Why haven't you 
shaved this morning. 

Loveridge : Didn't I ? 

Keith : Nope. 

Lo\'eridge : Well then, yon see, 
there were six of us using the 
same mirror, and I must have 
shaved somebody else. 



Lady Marketer: "Wliat is the 
price of these chickens?" 

Marketman: "A dollar and a 
quarter apiece." 

Lady Marketer: "Did you 
raise them uourself?" 

Marketman: "Yes ma'am, they 
were a dollar ten last week." 



BE SURE YOU ARE 
CORRECTLY DRESSED 




DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel 310 
LAKE FOREST. II.I.INOIS 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: - 
LAKE FOREST. 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



Between Season Sale 

^ LJ I 

and Extra Trousers 

And Upwards 

Overcoat Prices Dropped 

$5 $10 $15 

Jerrems" consevative 
Tailoring- gives you 
that air of individual- 
ity, that necessary 
personality.tbat Iceeps 
one's apperance from 
being commonplace. 




Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalle St. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 

FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
Tickets 

32 DEERHAXH, WESX 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

CleatiuKj, I'ressiiif/. Repairimi 



Hartman & Hartman 

•THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 

If its l!al;.(1 ut nUN'TOCiX'!? ll'v Halied RUhc 

V^. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 



By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington 

Horoscope for weeks begin- 
ning January 1st and ending, 
January 20th. 

If fate has so decreed tliat 
you find yourself under the in- 
fluences of Capicorn you are stu- 
dious and original, and possess 
considerable executive ability. 
You have self respect and the 
ability to draw people to you. 
You have great affection for 
your family, and would make 
any sacrifice for your loved ones. 
Adaptability should be one of 
your chief characteristics, l)ut 
considerable care is necessary 
that you do not allow a tenden- 
cy to criticize others to over- 
come it. Restrain your inclina- 
tion to be exacting and domi- 
neering, and do not give way to 
anger. You will achieve your 
highest success in life by keep- 
ing your thougli's steadily fixed 
on that sterling maxim: "Be the 
master of your own success." 

The birthstone for this month 
is the Garnet, denoting constan- 
cy and fidelity. The flower is 
the snowdrop and the colors, 
black and dark blue. 
Dear Incubator: 

Why is it that Shakespeare's 
works are not more popular 
among the masses? 

Yours wonderingly, 

Mr. Troutman. 

Dear Mr. Troutman: 

Perhaps it is because they con- 
tain "Much Ado About Noth- 
ing." 

The Incubator, 

Dear H. B. 0.: 

I am not particularly talent- 
ed but should like to become a 
professional man. Which of the 
professions do you think would 
be the easiest for me to follow? 
Yours, 

I. Tawkalot. 

Dear Tawkalot: 

Theology. It is easier to 
preach than to practice. 

H. B. 0. 



Dear Mrs. Orpington: 

Which travels fastest, heat or 
cold? 

A. Stewdent. 
Dear Stewdent: 

Heat! You can often catch 
cold. 

H. B. 0. 
Dear H. B. 0.: 

I am unable to decide upon 
what I am going to wear to the 
Junior Prom. Could you help 
me out? Tliey say that blue or 
lavender are more becoming to 
me than pink but I like pink 
much better. What do you think 
is most likely to become a fair- 
haired woman? 

Yours contingly. 

Angel -face. 
Dear Angel-face: 

A fair-haired little girl. 

The Incubator. 



Do They? 

Frosh: "Say those Seniors are 
after all quite ordinary people, 
aren't they?" 

Soph: "Yes — keep their en- 
gagements, eat plain food, pay 
their bills, and all that sort of 
thing." 



James, taking English exam, 
should be awarded the brown 
derby for his definition of "hor- 
izon," which is as follows: "The 
horizon is where the sky and 
the water meet — only they 
don't." 



An alumna wrote us the other 
day that she had just brought 
home a new girl from the in- 
telligence office and was in- 
structing her in her duties. 

"And do you have to be called 
in the morning?" she asked. 

"I don't have to be, mum." re- 
plied the new girl hopefully, 
"unless you jest happens to 
need me." 



A lot of the boys came back 
with splendid resolutions of var- 
ious natures — quit smoking, 
study hard, and so on, but one 
by one they are sliding back. 



J. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Aiuternoii liiiihtitiff, fhone 855 
LAKE FOHHST, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Par 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00 — 10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 

GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros., Goods LAKE FOREST 



=i|lllllllllllllilllllllllllliilllllllll!!ill':ill:liilllll 




I Hams and Bacon j 

I are mild, | 

I sweet, tender. j 

I Each piece is care- | 

I fully selected and | 

I cured to give it the | 

I distinctive "Premium" | 

I flavor. I 

M As}^for"Premium"ProcIuc!s i 

I Swifts Company f 

I U. S. A. I 



THE 



S T E N T R 



TALES 



An author turned out his table 
lamp with a sigh and said "My 
tale is told." A thoughtless boy 
sat his young brother on a cake 
of ice. Tlie young brother felt 
funny and slid off. "My tale is 
told,' he said. Which goes to 
prove that there are two kinds 
of tales. A cat-o-nine-tales is a 
cat with nine tales. Most cats 
have only one tale. So do most 
guinea pigs. Maybe we had one 
once, but thereby hangs another 
tale. Tales are mostly long and 
skinny, except on rabbits and 
hogs, where they grow in cir- 
cles. Tliere are also fish tales, 
but we never found any yet in 
the pond. Somebody found 
some in Iowa and northern 
Maine. Some tales are interest- 
ing, especially the ones which 
are short and grow in circles. 
Others make us sleepy, especial- 
ly the long skinny ones. Some 
people cut off dogs' tales, I 
guess to make them interesting. 



Frosh: "I work, my algebra on 
tissue paper." 

Second Frosh: "Why so?" 

First Frosh: "That's the only 
way I can see through it." 



"And what do you propose to 
do now, William?" asked the 
father of the son who .had just 
came home after graduation at 
college. 

"Oh," yawned the optimistic 
young man, "I think I'll go over 
to New York and look for a po- 
sition at five thousand per — you 
understand? At five thousand 
per." 

"Oh yes," said his father, "I 
understand, you mean at five 
thousand per — ihaps?,. 



On the front page of one of 
the Chicago papers were the fol- 
lowing lines, "A little boy nine 
years of age was shot in the 
suburbs." 



THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUKEGAN 



IP YOU AEE A 

BIOLOGY TEACHER. 

We advise you to look up 
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Fraternity jiiid Sorority 
Work Our Specialty 

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A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

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PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 



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I r--I -ST- IT A. T- I CD IW ^ 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD V700D, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



EXCHANGES 



In the near future Oberlin 
College will start an extensive 
building program. Five new 
buildings are to be erected with- 
in the next two years at the ap- 
proximate cost of $1,000,000. 
One-half of this amount will be 
expended on a new auditorium, 
which will be an exceptionally 
fine structure. 



GOO-BYE 



WELL IT AIN'T 



It ain't the girl with the ruddy 
cheeks. 

Put there by rouge you know, 

It ain't the girl with the beau- 
tiful clothes, 

That's the real girl— Oh! No! 

It ain't the girl with the high- 
heeled boots. 

Who can dance just like a 
queen; 

No it ain't the girl in the social 
whirl, 

Most respected by the "Dean." 

For a real girl ain't known by 

her clothes; 
It's her face we notice most; 
It's the things she does; not the 

things she wears, 
And money ain't her boast. 



The Freshman Class at North- 
western College has presented 
the college with a Webster's 
New International Dictionai-y, 
realizing the necessity in writ- 
ing freshman English themes. 



Speaking of Hash, see if you 
can digest this. It came from 
our Monmouth friends: A dorm 
inmate describes hash — a con- 
course of food particles assidu- 
ously organized by a culinary ar- 
tist for the purpose of assuag- 
ing hunger at a minimum of ex- 
pense, generally resulting in a 
modicum of satisfaction. 



If and S and an I and an and 

a U, 
With an X at the end spells 

"soo", 
And ai:ii E and a Y and an E 

spells I, 
Pray what is the editor to do. 

Then if an S and an I and a G 
And a H E D, spells Side, 
There's nothing for Ye Ed to do, 
But to commit SIOUXEYE- 
SIGHED. 

— Bon Jour. 



Young ladies' faults are many; 

Young men have only two, 
Everything they say 

And everything they do. 



'22: "How many men are there 
in the freshman class?" 

Also: "About thirty." 

'22: "Is that all?" 

Also: "Yes, but the rest will 
grow up eventually." 



Danprer! Dodsf! 

"Have you a warning signal on 
the front of your car?" 

"Yes, I have a little round 
thing that says 'Dodge Broth- 
ers.' " 



Speaking of Literature 

Frosh: "Have you read 'Freck- 
les?' " 

Co-ed: "No, that's just my 
veil." 



Ye Ed: "I see you are smiling 
at our jokes?" 

Student: "Well, you know it's 
polite to smile when you see 
old friends." 



"S — loves to dance, doesn't 
he?" 

"Judging from the way he 
holds that girl, I'd say he danc- 
es to love." 



She: "I'll marry you on one 
condition." 

He: "That's easy. I entered 
college on four." 



Rather A,ppropriate in These 

Trjing Times: Poisons 

and Antidotes 



Wood alchohol down the throat 
Always needs an antidote; 
Take some soap-suds or some 

lime. 
If you have sufficient time. 

Mercury and all its salts 
Help to fill the family vauts; 
Mucilages, whites of egg. 
Help to pull the sexton's leg. 

Ammonia is very bad. 
Taken by a growing lad; 
Lemon-juice in water's best, 
That will stop his going West. 

— Punch. 



Tlie first big event in 1920 is 
the Junior Prom. Don't miss a 
good time and get that Prom, 
date early. Tickets will be on 
sale by the committee after 
Christmas vacation. 



EXCHANGE LIST 



The Round Table, Beloit Col- 
lege. 

The Vidette, Normal College. 

The Torch, Valparaiso Univer- 
sity. 

The Monmouth College Oracle. 

The College Chronicle, North- 
western College. 

The Knox Student. 

Rollins Sandspur, Rollins Col- 
lege. 

Ashville School Review, Ash- 
ville College. 

Mt. Holyoke News, Holyoke 
College. 

The Clintonian, Clinton High 
School. 

The Pennant, Canton High 
School. 

The Mirror, Elgin High School. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



FUTURE OCCUPATIONS 



Photo Supplies, Developing 

Stationery and Candy 
lit 

FrencH's Dru^ Store 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 



FEED AND 



Ray Moore, instructor in Mys- 
teries of Masonry. 

Betty Torreyson, movie vamp. 

Raymond Russel, football 
coach. 

Fran Bradley, vaudeville star. 

Don Woods, official bell ringer 
in German cathedral. 

James Henry Leonard, famous 
Parisian importer. 

Helen Barnthouse, portrait 
painter. 

Karl James, assistant "Bib. 
Lit.", instructor at L. F. 

Lillian Hatfield, dean of high 
class finishing- school. 

Kellogg and Reichert, manag- ' , . _, . . _ 

i- " 1 ■ 1 J. i„ „ Lleanme, Kepairing, rressmg 

ers of exclusive beauty parlors s> k &> & 

Eddy, insomnia specialist. 

Lois Conklin, head of matri 
monial bureau. 

Mayeau, sleeping beauty in 
side show. 

Rose Deutch, president of the 



iCIGAR 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

Lake Forest, lUinoia 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 



COKE LUMBER Jt is Oaimy, Home nke and as Attractive 



Building Material 
L. H.W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 



Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



" Lake Forest 



I as any Big City Restaurant. 

I 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 
C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



LAUNDRY K O D AK 



U. S. A. 

Tommy Tucker, example of 
perpetual optimism. 

Joe Clark, star in musical 
comedy. 

Chuck Beard, a married man. | 

Katherine Horton, heartbreak- 
er. 

Ralph Stewart, batching- with 
Sibley. 

Gertrude McLaren, keeper of 
pony farm. 

Jack Morley, instructor in the 
"princely gait." 



F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Asl% Any Gnod Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



A Jlistakeii Idea 



MacFerran: "What did you 
want to ask me, Buck?" 

Frosh: "Mac, who discovered 
the first talking machine? Ives 
says it was Edison." 

Mac: "He's wrong, my boy. 
It was Adam who discoverd the 
first talking machine." 

And knowingly he patted 
Buck on the bean. 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 



F e: D e: ra i_ 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



^/je 



The Biackler Market Co. 



Phone 17 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



CALVERT FLOHAL co.;,^°"\^;^^''"';""'^;r."^'": 

o. TRiEBWASSER, Prop. Everything of the Choicest m 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 

a Specialty 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



THE STENTOR 



liniiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, {2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garricli (dramatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided wilh both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to |400 for men; |350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 

FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OKHCE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



giliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12;00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



ni^ BOyHtAHN 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave- 



Lake Forest Coiifectionery 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

C lotliing and 
Kuniisliliigs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

» a; l>o uef airing 

Plione7C9 Western Ave. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. JANUARY 23, 1920 



NUMBER 13 



SLPPOIIT THE FORESTER 



The Stentor joins with the 
Forester board in urging that 
every student subscribe for the 
annual as soon as possible. It 
will require about fifteen hun- 
dred dollars to put out the For- 
ester this year and some of that 
money must be available before 
the books are sold. Therefore 
the management is asking that 
half the subscription price, or 
$2.00, be paid with the subscrip- 
tion. 

The class of 1921 is the first 
in three years that has had the 
courage to go ahead and give us 
an annual in the face of present 
prices and other difficulties. It 
is the duty of every one of us 
to support the Juniors in their 
venture, not merely by buying 
an annual, for every one will 
want one when they come out, 
but by subscribing now. So the 
next two dollars you get hold of, 
subscribe, even if it means going 
without something else. 



JLMOR FROM 



PHI PI SLEKJH-RIT>E 



Friday evening the Phi Pi's 
entertained with the joUiest 
kind of a sleigh ride. Everyone 
piled on the sled, with Fort 
Sheridan as the destination. By 
the time it was reached every- 
body had been off in the snow at 
least once, thanks to Loveridge 
and Miss Coan. About ten thir- 
ty the party returned to the 
Phi Pi rooms, where steaming 
coffee, oyster stew, sandwiches, 
and cake were served. 



Supreme Court decisions are 
dry reading.—Wall Street- Jour- 
nal. 



On last Saturday evening Du- 
rand Institute was the scene of 
the Annual Junior Promenade. 
The decorations were carried out 
in purple and white, the class 
colors. The ceilings of both 
rooms were most effectively 
lowered by purple and white 
streamers, while purple shaded 
lights cast soft shadows over the 
hall. The stairway was banked 
with palms and hothouse plants. 
Receiving were: Mr. Lawrence 
Maplesden, 'with Miss Mildred 
Yale, Miss Hamilton, Professor 
and Mrs. Van Steenderen, Pro- 
fessor McNeil, Professor Sibley, 
and Dr; Wright. At eight 
o'clock the doors of the big room 
were thrown open for the grand 
march, led by Mr. Lloyd Bechtel 
and Miss Beatrice Worthley. 
The music was furnished by 
Benson's orchestra of Chicago. 
One of the features of the even- 
ing was the Junior extra, dur- 
ing which a purple "21" was 
flashed on the stage. Frozen 
punch and cake was served be- 
tween dances. At eleven thirty 
the last dance was played, to the 
disappointment of everyone, who 
went home declaring the first 
formal of 1920 to be one of the 
best in the history of Lake For- 
est. 



To the subscribers who are 
looking for light reading in this 
week's Stentor, we would sug- 
gest that they apply at some 
public utilities company for a 
position as meter reader. 



iVORTHWESTERN 23; 

LAKE FOREST 18 



Northwestern College of Nap- 
erville defeated the home five 
here last Saturday afternoon by 
a score of 23 to 18. The Red 
and Black showed considerable 
improvement over the Mon- 
mouth game and things looked 
hopeful when the first half end- 
ed 11 to 11, but Northwestern 
won by long shots, for which 
they were given too much oppor- 
tunity to get set and take ac- 
curate aim. Grantman and Ed- 
dy were removed during the 
course of the game for personal 
fouls. 

The line-ups: 

N. "W. 23: Grantman and 
Noernberg, rf; Stenger, If; Bau- 
ernfeind, c; Kluckholm, rg; Ri- 
tan, Ig. 

L. F. 18: Eddy and Noel, rf; 
Manning, If; Russell, c; Kynd- 
berg, rg; A. Hale, Ig. 

Baskets: Eddy, 2; Manning, 3; 
Russell, 2; Grantman, 4; Steng- 
er, 2; Kluckholm, Ritan, Noern- 
berg. 

Free Throws: Eddy, 4 out of 
11; Kyndberg, out of 2; Steng- 
er, .5 out of 10. 



Sigma Tau entertained Ruth 
Conkey, Virginia Philips, Mar- 
jorie Etnyre, Gretchen Hurst, 
and Madeline Hoover over the 
week end. 



A ruliber stamp and a Happy 
New Year. 



Theta Psi entertained Mildred 
Yale, Elizabeth Perrigo, Virginia 
Howells, Une Green, Gertrude 
Loop, Carol Welch, Mildred Zen- 
os and Mignon Bryant over the 
week end. 



THE STENTOR 



THE W03IAN OF TOMOKUOW 



(By Helen M. Winslow) 

If you can keep your head when 

others praise you, 
Or, haply, point out flaws in all 

you do; 
K you can calmly trust when 

others doubt you, 
And make allowance for their 

doubting, too; 
If you can keep your courage 

high, and bravely 
Go on with all the tasks that 

come your way; 
Or march along in face of sad 

disaster, 
And change the darkling night 

to light of day. 

If you can hide your heartbreak 
and your sorrow. 

And help some weaker soul along 
the road; 

If shifting over your familiar 
burden, 

You lighten cheerfully another's 
load; 

If you can lead a stumbling, sin- 
ning sister — 

Nor look with scorn upon her 
past mistake. 

If home is held forever dear and 

sacred. 
Remember 'tis there the nation's 

bred; 
If country's honor and your duty 

to it 
Allegiance hold of heart and 

hand and head; 
If riches and prosperity can't 

spoil you, 
Nor poverty make hopeless all 

your life; 
If love shall ever brighten your 

horizon, 

And shut out all discouragement 
and strife. 

If you can dream and make your 
dreams uplift you; 

If you can see the things you've 

given your life to. 
Go wrong, and still keep steady 

on the way; 



If you can leave behind you all 

the grudges. 
And petty jealousies and hatreds 

and all such; 
If you can mix with crowds on 

friendly footing. 
Or walk with kings, nor lose the 

common touch. 

If you can meet the everlasting 
moment 

As if 'twere happiest fortune 
drawing near, 

You'll own the earth and every- 
thing upon it — 

The Woman of Tomorrow will 
be here. 



SOPHS LEAD IN 

INTERCLASS SERIES 



Sophomores, won .3, lost 0, per 
cent, 1000. 

Juniors, won 1, lost 1, per 
cent, 500. 

Freshmen, won 1, lost 2, per 
cent 333. 

Seniors, won 1, lost 3, per 
cent, 250. 

The games are as follows: 
.1 a Hilary 12 

Seniors 4: Schreurs, f; Mayeau, 
f; Legner, c; F. Casjens, g; Woods 

Freshmen, 23: Hause, f; Berg- 
en, f; J. Virgil, c; Ives, g; S. Cas- 
jens, g. 

Baskets: Mayeau; Virgil, 2; 
Hause, 2; Bergen, 4; S. Casjens, 

Free Throws: Schreurs, 2; Vir- 
«il. 

January 14 

Juniors, 12: McColley, f; May- 
eau, f; Morley, c; Van Sickle and 
T. Hale and Pagett, g. 

Sophomores, 23: Noel, f; Rob- 
ertson, f; Kunz, c; Beddoes and 
Ericson, g. 

Baskets: McColley, 2; Mayeau, 
3; Noel, 2; Robertson, 2; Kunz, 
5; Beddoes. 

Free Throws: McColley, 2; Rob- 
ertson, 2; Noel. 



January 16 

Seniors, 1: Schreurs, f; Bos- 
worth, f; Casjens, c; Woods, g; 
Armstrong and Stewart, g. 

Juniors, 29: Van Sickle, f; 
Mayeau, f; Morley, c; T. Hale, g; 
Pagett, g. 

Baskets: Van Sickle, 6; Mayeau 
6; Morley; Hale. 

Free Throws: Bosworth; Van- 
Sickle. 

January 17 

Sophomores, 14: Noel, f; Rob- 
ertson, f; Kunz, c; Ericson, g; 
Beddoes, g. 

Freshmen, 3: Hause, f; Bergen, 
f; J. Virgil, c; S. Casjens, g; Ives, 

8"- 

Baskets: Noel, 3; Robertson, 2; 
Kunz, 2; J. Virgil. 

Free Throws: Bergen. 

Januai-y 19 

Seniors, 10: Woods, f; Kelly, f; 
F. Casjens, c; Stewart, g; Beard 

g. 

Freshmen, 7: Hause, f; Jones, 
f; S. Casjens, f; J. Virgil, c; Ber- 
gen, g; Ives. g. 

Baskets: Stewart, 2; Woods; 
F. Casjens; Hause; J. Virgil; Ber- 
gen. 

Free Throws: Woods, 2; Ber- 
gen. 



( OMPROMISE AVINS 

NATIONAL VOTE 



The national returns from the 
Intercollegiate Treaty Referen- 
dum, including 410 colleges and 
universities, showed a small ma- 
jority for a compromise between 
the Lodge and the Democratic 
reservations in order to secure 
ratification of the Treaty. There 
was a total of 139,788 votes cast, 
divided as follows: 

Lodge — Democratic compro- 
mise, 49,653. 

Without reservation, 48,232. 

With Lodge reservations, 27,- 
970. 

Opposition to the Treaty in 
any form, 13,933. ' 



THE STENTOR 



DISCUSSION CLLB 



At the Discussion Club meet- 
ing of January 14, Professor El- 
lingwood gave a very interesting 
informal talk on the St. Louis 
convention of the conniiittee of 
forty-eight, which was held in 
December. 

The committee of forty-eight 
does not consist of only forty- 
eight people as the name im- 
plies, but of many prominent 
citizens from all the states of 
the union, who, disgusted with 
the practices of the two leading 
parties, have decided to find out 
what the public sentiment is in 
regard to running an independ- 
ent candidate in the coming 
Presidential election. 

The most important work ac- 
complished by the 300 some odd 
delegates was the drawing up of 
a tentative platform which large 
ly embodies the oft expressed 
principles of George L. Record 
of New Jersey, who, by the way, 
was the guiding and the leading 
light of the convention. 

The platform is for the most 
part based on economic reforms. 
The concensus of opinion having 
been that the manifold ills that 
now afflict us will for the most 
part disappear as soon as the 
economic difficulties are adjust- 
ed. Some of the reforms incor- 
porated in the platform are the 
public ownership of railroads 
and public utilities. Besides 
greater economic justice, the 
platform promises social justice 
to all, an item which for some 
years has been largely a minus 
quantity. 

Another convention will be 
held the coming summer for the 
purpose of nominating a candi- 
date if the results of a thorough 
canvass now being made justify 
it. 

William Jennings Bryan wants 
a candidate to advance who will 
suitably carry out reforms: one, 



FRIENDSHIP 



Friendship was the subject of 
the last Association meeting of 
the Y. W. Miss Helen Sanders 
was leader, but several other 
girls gave interesting reports of 
the friendships of eminent peo- 
ple in different periods in his- 
tory. Florence Metzger gave a 
short account of the friendship 
between David and Jonathon; 
Elizabeth Torryson told of the 
love betwen a brother and sis- 
ter, Dorothy and William Words- 
worth; Elaine Kellogg read of 
Damon and Pythius; Margaret 
Sillars narrated the story of 
Sydney Carton's sacrifice for his 
friend Charles Eviemond; Ruth 
Kennedy read the chapter on Per 
sonal Associations from "King's 
Laws of Friendship and Lois 
Ryno recited "The House by the 
Side of the Road." ■ 

The meeting was one of the 
most interesting and inspiring 
held during the year, and it was 
by far one of the largest in at- 
tendance with the possible ex- 
ception of the Christmas Song 
Service, held just before vaca- 
tion. 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULES 



IN THE PSYCHOLOGY CLASS 



Dr. Wright: "We don't have 
to be urged to eat all we want 
and not let anyone else get our 
share. That is instinct. 

L. Martin: "That is James' 
theory. 

two, three, and four as advocat- 
ed by him. Alas! Who is there 
to carry them out but William 
Jennings himself. 

George L. Record is evidently 
net a candidate either. Like 
Bryan he only wants a candidate 
to advance, who can carry out 
reforms, one, two, three and 
four as advocated by him. 



Monday, Jan. 26 
8:00 to 9:50 

Mathematics L 
8:00 a. m. Section. 
11:25 a. m. Section. 

]0::}0 to 12:20 
Mathematics, (9 a. m. Section) 
Latin L 
Bib. Lit. .5 
French 3. 
History 1. 
Philosophy 5. 
Education 1. 
Economics 1. 
German 3. 

2:00 to .3:50 
Household Administration. 
French 13. 

Tuesday. Jan. 27 

S:00 to 0:50 
English. 

10:30 to 12:20 
Astronomy. 
Latin 3. 
Bib. Lit. 7. 
French 7, 5. 
History 3. 

2:00 to .3:50 
Bib. Lit. 11. 
English 29. 
French 7. 
Chemistry 11. 

Wednesday, Jan. 28 

S:00 to 9:50 
German 1. 
Bib. Lit. 1. 
English 25. 
Philosophy 1. 
Economics 3. 
Latin a. 

10:30 to 12:20 
English 23. 

2:00 to 3:50 
Botany. 
Physics 3. 
English 27. 

Thnrsday. Jan. 27 

S:00 to 9:50 
Mathematics 3. 
Bib. Lit. 4. 
Philosophy a. 

10:30 to 12:30 
Mathematics 7. 
Italian 1. 
English 15. 

(Continued on page 8) 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters : 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
W. G. McCoUey, '21 
Alberta Burris '23 
Rosa Deutch '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson '22 

Professor W. R. Bridgman 

Faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post ofHce of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class 
matter. 



LET GEORGE DO IT— 
AND GEORGE DOES IT 



Universal custom of "Passing 
the Buck" is high compliment 
to this someone who does things 
in the world — every community 
has it's "George" — why not be a 
"George" in your College? 

History has given to mankind 
the record of the achievements 
of many men, but a careful per- 
usal of its pages will show us 
that while there have been 
many men who have become fa- 
mous for having done some one 
thing, there is but one man who 
is famous as having done every- 
thing. 

It's an enviable place in his- 
tory — to be the one man who 
has done everything — but one 
man has really done just that. 
As you think it over, you will 
find that the statement is true, 



that just one page of the his- 
tory. He did.it, not because he 
wished to do it, but because the 
other fellow did not wish to do 
it. You begin to see now who 
this wonder-worker is. Sure! 
You're right. It's George! 

No, not George Washington 
who i-eally did things; nor 
George Creel, who talks about 
them — just George! When the 
first laziest-man-in-the-world in- 
vented that famous indoor and 
outdoor sport of "passing-the- 
buck" — he made George the re- 
cipient of the honor, for honor 
it was. Think of the credit of 
having done all of those things 
which come under the category 
of that much used and little con- 
sidered expression, "Let George 
do it!" Why, fellow-students, 
to have the buck passed like 
that, and then go out and do it, 
is the greatest honor in the 
world. 

The ideals of thinkers and na- 
tions have most often been 
brought to a full accomplish- 
ment, not by the first to pro- 
pose the thing, but by George. 
As late as our own war, we find 
that the work was passed over 
to George in so many cases that 
George is coming into his own. 
The dolar-a-year man was 
George. The man in the trench 
was George. The man in the 
shipyard was George. When we 
needed — or did not need a new 
department or bureau created, 
George was given the job. 
When later an investigation of 
that same bureau was needed, 
who investigated? Wliy, it was 
George, of course. 

Now then, fellow-student, it 
comes out that you are over- 
looking the biggest bet of the 
day, the softest piece of easy 
money, glory, honor, and best of 
all, personal satisfaction. Be 
the George of your college and 
let your college be the George 
of the middle west. A real 
George knows that his most im- 



portant duty to the college, and 
to himself, is to co-operate with 
his fellow workers. He knows 
that, regardless of his ability, 
his efforts must mesh without 
function in with the other gears 
of the college machine of which 
he is a part if he is to be of 
value to the Lake Forest College 
Community. 

When you say, "Let George 
do it," you are paying him the 
biggest compliment that one 
man can pay another. You are 
recognizing his power and abili- 
ty to do it. In other words, you 
ackno'wledge his power for ser- 
vice — and what is Lake Forest, 
your Lake Forest and my Lake 
Forest, but service? 

The trouble is we have too 
few Georges here and too many 
"passers of the buck." As a re- 
sult George is getting over work- 
ed and underpaid, so it is time 
to shift the scenery, put on an 
optimistic front, and play the 
part of George from this time 
forward! 



THE ('0LLE(;E REl'UTATION 



It may not be inappropriate to 
the subject to ask ourselves 
three questions: 

What is a College? 

What should I give to a Col- 
lege? 

What should a College give to 
me? 

Though an individual should I 
not pretend an ability to answer 
these questions conclusively 
from even a personal point of 
view, there are, however, cer- 
tain general fundamentals which 
have withstood the test of time 
so successfully that they may be 
regarded as at least partial 
truths. 

What is a College? It is an 
institution for the advancement 
of knowledge, of culture, of 



THE STENTOR 



broadmindednes, and, as the last 
and greatest characterization, an 
inculcator of the courage to 
stand for the moral principles 
embodied in the preceding. I 
was very sorry to observe the 
childish not which occasionally 
crept into the like entitled edi- 
torial of last week, for no friend 
of morality would intelligently 
urge an individual, or group of 
individuals to do lest they lose 
a thing external to the question 
at hand, and for extrinsic gain. 
Unconsciously, I believe the 
writer of the editorial expressed 
the attitude which is the root of 
much of the trouble. For thir- 
ty pieces of silver you shall do 
this; lest you be judged to your 
detriment afterwards, you shall 
do that. Principle asks no remu- 
neration, nor does it need any. 

Again, What is a College? Is 
it an institution where young 
people gather for: (j), the pro- 
cess of study and class attend- 
ance; (2), the taking part in 
mental pursuits extraneous to 
the curriculum; (3), the partici- 
pation in contest with foreign 
institutions? Undoubtedly these 
are active and necessary parts, 
but not so fundamental as the 
conditions before set forth. In 
the genesis of College life, ath- 
letics, for example, was entirely 
intra-mural, its function was 
that of our presently inoperative 
system of physical education, 
its duty, the keeping of men 
(the student body) in proper 
condition for the ordinary re- 
quirements of life. Eventually, 
group organization called for in- 
tercollegiate activities, and that 
as such demanded its quota of 
semi-professional warriors so 
necessary for foreign wars. 
Just as a soldier can bo little 
more than a soldier, so a man 
under a militaristic system of 
coaching can be but little more 
than a semi-professional athlete. 

What do I owe a College? If 
the College is a true part of life. 



I owe it my best. Then, of 
course. What is my best — What 
is a College? If it is of learn- 
ing, I owe it the duty of intelli- 
gent observation and thought, 
if it is of culture, I owe a duty 
of gentleness and honesty, if it 
is broadminded, 1 owe a duty of 
consideration and respect for 
the opinions of others, and to- 
gether with this, the greater 
duty to live, the principles of 
each with all the moral stamina 
at my command. Progress is a 
matter of internal growth. The 
value of external opinions de- 
pends upon the expressor and 
not upon the quantity, for opin- 
ion ixs mere bulk has nothing to 
do with an idealistic wealth of 
principle, though we continually 
persist in conceiving poverty as 
a dearth of mass. James writes 
pertinently, 'We have lost the 
power of teven imagining what 
the ancient idealization of pov- 
erty could have meant — the lib- 
eration from material attach- 
ments; the unbribed soul; . . . 
the paying our way by what we 
are, or do, and not by what we 
have; ... in short the mor- 
al fighting shape.' 

What does a College owe me? 
It may reasonably be said to owe 
the duty of furnishing a faculty 
of men of learning, of culture, 
of broadmindedness, of convict- 
ions, and the will to stand for 
their beliefs. If any man of 
them fails as such, I, the student 
must suffer. Faultless men are 
not, indeed no one would recog- 
nize them even if such existed, 
and are not to be expected. Pro- 
gressive men in a constructive 
sense should be, however, for 
it is clearly the duty of College 
to compose its faculty of men 
whom the student can respect. 

It is to be admitted that Ath- 
le'ics in Lake Forest College is 
a very sick man. It is possible 
that this indisposition may con- 
tinue. I do not feel that the 
disease may be remedied by ob- 
viating 'petty grievances' or the 



disruptive actions of small 
groups. I am also certain that 
any attempt at coercion must 
likewise fail, for men, if men, 
will not barter their interpreta- 
tion of principle and right for 
fear of either today or tomor- 
row. 

W. G. McColley, Jr. 



ODDS AND ENDS 



And now we know them by 
their "presents." 

Lois Haller: "I don't see why 
my new wrist watch don't go. 
Why I've oiled it every day since 
Cliristmas." 

Another Coed: "To think— car- 
riage boots — and I can't even 
say "James the flivver." 

Third Coed: "Yes six break- 
fast caps. Three pink and three 
blue and here I don't get up for 
breakfast." 

Fourth Coed: "Oh! Some sta- 
tionary and he forget to erase 
the price. Yes $2.75. I've my 
suspicions that he put the two 
before the $.75 and I gave him 
a $1.00 tie too. I ought to col- 
lect a quarter." 

Fifth Coed: "I got the most 
adorable dictionary. I don't be- 
lieve that I ever received such 
a bothersome present." 

Sixth Coed: "Grandmother sent 
me the dandiest box of chips." 

First Coed: "What say? A 
minister's wife believing in poJc- 



er! 



I" 



Sixth Coed: "Oh! Silly no! Po- 
tato chips." 



He: "When is a joke not a 
joke?" 

She: "Well?" 
He: "Usually." 



Tommy: "You are the breath 
of my life." 

Peg: "Then hold your breath 
for awhile." 



THE STENTOR 



JOAX 

Lobdell's favorite passage from 
They're All Quakers: "Old Broth- 
er Morgan, pounding up the or- 
gan." 



He: "Why did you call your 
baby, Bill?" 

She: "Because he came on the 
first of the month." 



' "Does he speak any language 
besides English?" 

"Yes, he speaks Golf fluently 
and has a smattering of Auto- 
mobile." 



Host: "Would like some of my 
wife's angel-cake?" 

Guest: "Will it make me an 
angel?" 

Host: "Tliat depends upon 
what kind of a life you have 
been living." 



to 



Old Father Hubbard went 

the cupboard 
To get his poor self a drink 
But when he got there the cup 

board was bare. 
So he had to go to the sink. 



Delia: "I don't believe there 
is any chicken in this soup." 

Miss Hospes: "Chicken? Of 
course not. If you ordered cot- 
tage pudding, you wouldn't ex- 
pect to find a cottage in it, 
would you?" 



A preacher came to a negro 
settlement one day to baptize a 
certain child. The preacher 
said: "What are you going to call 
him?" 

The father's reply was "Weath- 
erstrip." 

"Why are you going to call 
him that?" queried the preach- 
er. 

"Becuz he dun kept me out o' 
the draft," answered the father. 



D. Milo Rees is back on the 
campus, having come for the 
Junior Prom last Saturday even- 
ing — and spent the week-end 
with Digamma. He plans to 
register and return for the sec- 
ond semester. 



Horace B. Horton, of Chicago 
spent the week-end with Digam- 
ma. 



Bob Framberg became very 
reckless last week, forgot the 
train was on the track, so spent 
Sunday with Digamma. 



Paul Bergen wishes it an- 
nounced that Victor Berger of 
Milwaukee, the dethroned con- 
gressman, is not his uncle, or 
cousin either. 



'20: "How are the Frosh co- 
eds?" 

'21: "Striking!" 

'20: "Aw, a bunch of Bolshe- 
vists, eh?" — Penn. State Froth. 



With :\rcrolley"s Regrets: Oh 
Thiit Wicked Eje! 



The devil sends the blessed 

winds 
That blow the skirts knee-high. 
But the Lord is just and sends 

the dust. 
That blinds the wicked eye. 

— Nebraska Angwan. 



Degrees in Oreek 

1. Professor Boggs teaches 
Greek: fiften hundred dollars a 
year. 

2. Nick Pappadopolis wheels 
a barrow: twenty one hundred 
dollars a year. 

3. Mile. Valette (otherwise 
Sarah Prouty) dances "Greek" 
dances: one thousand dollars a 
performance. — Life. 



CLASSIFED 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



WANTED— Subscribers for the 
Forester. See the editors. 



WEEKLY Auction Sale in Jo 
Merchant's room. Be sure and 
be there. There will be plen- 
ty of bargains. 



WANTED — More information 
about New York berries. See 
Edna Enyart. 



FOR information on College Gos- 
sip and Scandal see Elaine 
Kellogg and Gladys Reichert. 



WANTED— Ladies to learn the 
art of "Hair Dresing." To be 
in correct style have it marcel- 
led. My price is reasonable. 
Merner, Lois Durand Hall. 



WANTED — An easy course. See 
M. Griffith. 



WANTED— A cast iron sofa that 
is guaranteed against rough 
usage. See the Sunday-nite 
suitors. 



TO LET— A perfectly good brain. 
Practically new. See Whitey 
Thayer. 



WANTED— Some new rules. See 
the sophomores. 



WANTED— More apparatus v/ork 
in gym. See Helen Barnt- 
house. 



WANTED— A good crib. See 
the Political Science Class. 



WANTED— A course in Bib. Lit. 
to find out who is the father 
of Ebanezer's son. See Betty 
Wales. 



WANTED— Some furniture for 
the big room. See Inmates of 
L. Hall. 



WANTED— A little peace and 
quiet. See Scandal. 



THE STENTOR 



No'Jjb Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 

SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



WANTED—A few more Monday 
afternoon dancing classes. See 
the basketball team. 



WANTED— More time for skat- 
ing. See Miss Coan. 



WANTED— A reliable safety pin 
for the next basket-ball game. 
Important. See Don Woods. 



WANTED— More Spanish classes 
to sleep in. See K. Marsh. 



FOR SALE— A few prof.'s 
Cheap. Want to get rid of 
them this week. The Stu- 
dents. 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 3 1 
LAKE FOREST. ILLINOIS 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST. 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



BE SURE YOU ARE 
CORRECTLY DRESSED 



h-U^^^ 




Between Season Sale 



xjr I 

and Extra Trousers 
$50, $65, $70 

And Upwards 

Overcoat Prices Dropped 

$5 $10 $15 

Jerrems" consevative 
Tailoring gives you 
that air of individual- 
ity, that necessary 
personality. that keeps 
one's apperance from 
being commonplace. 



leU€^. 





Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalleSt. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry- 



Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r ami n g 



i.AKi<: i<'<>Ki<:»« r, . 



11.1^ 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas—Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

M (I II tiger 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 
Tickets 

aZ ItEKRPATH. WEST 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cli'iiiiiiu/, I'nssitKj. Hepairinq 



Hartman & Hartman 

THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 

If ifs Baked at HUNTOON'S il'-^ Baked RIgbt 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THE STENTOR 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



(Continued from page 3) 

French 1, (12:25 Section.) 
Education. 
History 5. 
Political Science 1. 

2:00 to 3:50 
Physics 1. 
English 21. 

Friday. Jan. 30 

8:00 to 9:50 

10:30 to 12:20 

Greek 1. 

Bib. Lit. 9. 

Chemistry 1. 

English 11. 

Spanish 3. 

French 1, (11:.30 Section.) 

History 7. 

2:00 to 3:50 
Biology 3. 
Biology 5. 
Spanish 1 (Van.) 
Spanish 1, (Beck.) 
Political Science 3. • 
Latin 5. 
Chemistry 3. 



ILLINOIS WOMEN 

ENLISTING FOR EDUCA- 
TIONAL PURPOSES 



Girls — just girls — will be the 
i main interest of hundreds of Il- 
linois women during the last 
week of February, when the Ed- 
ucational Campaign and Finance 
Drive of the Young Women's 
Christian Association is launched 
throughout the country. 

Under the efficient leadership 
of Miss Grace Dixon, chairman 
for Illinois, an advisory commit- 
tee from the entire state is ar- 
ousing interest in the work of 
the organization, which has 
greatly increased its scope dur- 
ing the war. It is now present- 
ing a world program which 
seeks to serve not only girls in 
the congested cities but in the 
rural communities, in industries 
and in foreign countries. 

Serving on the Advisory Com- 
mittee from Lake Forest is Mrs. 



Wanted ! 

At the Lake Placid Summer Camp for Boys 
in the Adirondack Mts., from the Lake 
Forest School. Must be athletic; of good 
character, and possess business ability. 
Compensation for the summer $500.00, 
and expenses. Applicants should write 
immediately to 

C. T. Beaven, Treas* 

Office of Lake Placid Camp 

27 Ware Street, 
CAMBRIDCJE, I\IASS. 



J. B. VeselsKy 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Aiuteisoii Buililiiif/. Phone 855 
LAKK FOUEST, ILL. 

"^Pf ON'S CAFE 

'We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Par 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00—10:35 p. in. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros., Goods LAKE FOREST 

iiiii!iiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iii:iii!niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiK 




I dWlftS 

I Premium" 






i Hams and Bacon | 

I are mild, | 

I sweet, tender. | 

I Each piece is care- | 

I fully selected and | 

I cured to give it the | 

I distinctive "Premium" | 

I flavor. I 

1 As}^ for "Premium" Products = 

I Swift & Company | 

I U. S. A. I 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



THE STENTOR 



Keene Addington. Many other 
women from the different cities 
of Illinois are also serving- on 
this committee. 

Resolutions indorsing- the cam- 
paign and the work of the or- 
ganization have been passed by 
the Illinois Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs. In many communi- 
ties the club women will be in 
charge of the funds to finance 
the program for 1920. Mrs. John 
D. Rockefeller, Jr., of N. Y., is 
chairman of the nation-wide 
campaign. 

A speaking campaign is now 
under way. Mrs. Edward H. 
Taylor of Chicago, chairman of 
the Speakers' Bureau of the 
Woman's Committee of the State 
Council of Defence is in charge 
of this branch of the work. Mrs. 
Henry P. Davison of New York 
is one of the women of national 
note who is expected to address 
a series of meetings in the state 
in the near future. 

Miss Grace Dixon, who heads 
the campaign committee in Illi- 
nois, was chairman of the Wom- 
an's Liberty Loan Committee of 
the Seventh Federal Reserve 
District during the last four 
loan drives. 



mullf:r\s 

THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 



IF YOU ARE A 

BUOLOGY IXyCHEB. 

We advise you to look up 
The General Biological Supply Houae 

5508 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, 111. 
All Kinds of Biological Supplies 
and Apparatus. 
CATALOGS FKEE. 



The KOOT STUDIO ^^'nr Jo'od Taxi Service Call 

Kimball iiaii WILLIAM BURGESS 

JacKHoiiauu vVabasn ^ 

Fraternity and Sorority 
Work Our Specialty 



Everyone regrets the absence 
of Irene and Zelma Farwell from 
school. They were called home 
about ten days ago by the sick- 
ness of their mother. Mrs. Far- 
well has pneumonia but is do- 
ing as well as can be expected. 
The girls do not know whether 
they will be able to return to 
school or not. They are greatly 
missed by everyone and here is 
hoping it won't be long before 
they are back in school. 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 
A. BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

br.e:ad cakes rolls 

liirllulLiy ;ind Otbf^r Spr-L'ial L'ake,^ to Ui'der 

LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 

MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for Womens and Childrens 
Furnishings 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff, 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLl.GEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- 
CO ATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Aulotrobile Supplies BaKgage Transferred 

Seven Paysent,'cr Cars to Rent by Trip or Hour 



L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



PHONE 881 



Spalding Sweaters 




A STYLE IN THE 
TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR- 
POSE 

Send for 
Catalooi'c 



SPALDING & BROS. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



Iv/ 



(ASMUSSEN I3HOS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 

P H O N E 6 1 2 M .\ R K E T S Q U A R E 



E: IW O F=? iC^ \/ I [NT (^ 



r=»i=?ir>j~riiNi<s 



Yris.i"rii^o cz:a.f=?i3)^ 
^ "T A. -r I cz> ^sI e: FR Y 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 



By Mrs. Henry Buff Orijingrton 
Quizzes to the right of us. 

Quizzes to the left of us, 
Quizzes in front of us, 

Written and thundered. 

Stormed at with "why" and 
"tell" 

Boldly we write — and well. 
But into the jaws of death. 

Into the mouth of hell. 
Ride our perfect A's. 



More poetry! Don't despair. 
We assure you there won't be 
much more of it. In fact if we 
survive the coming battle at all 
we should consider ourselves 
very fortunate but should we, 
by any chance, have any 
thoughts left (even such as 
these) we should feel gi-ejitly in- 
debted to the clemency of our 
honored Olympians. As things 
stand at present it seems that 
if we were to write all our 
knowledge of everything there 
would still be a good deal of re- 
peating to be done before the 
final was over. Well don't wor- 
ry, the worst is vet to come. 
Cheer up and be merry. Vv^e 
can at least be thankful that it 
is cold enough to cool if not 
freeze our fevered brow. 

A voice from the gallery 
warns "Enuff! Enuff!" So we 
shall "on with the dance'' and 
"let the jazz be unrestrained." 



Dear Incubator: 

It is now time to register for 
gymnasium. Could you advise 
me as to what particular kind of 
gymnastics would be best for 
me as I am anxious to lose 
weight. Is horseback riding 
good for reducing? 

Yours, 

Lotta. 
Dear Lotta: 

That depends. I have a sister 
who took horseback riding to re- 
duce her weight. She gained 
sixty pounds and the horse lost 
a hundred and eight. 

The Incubator. 



Dear H. B. 0.: 

I am in a great difficulty sa 
write to you. How can you boil 
water in a fireless cooker with- 
out burning it? 

Yours perplexedly, 

Henry Peck. 
Dear Henry: 

I should recommend the use 
of "fire water." A fireless cook- 
er is too dangerous a vehicle and 
too delicate of constitution for 
mere man to contemplate. Bet- 
ter devote your time to a more 
simple life, as you will be in 
hot water soon enough. 

Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington. 

Dear H. B. 0.: 

Since my wife has been drawn 
into the modern movement of 
the equality of women, I have 
found it necessary to attend sev- 
eral lectures on domestic zo-ol- 
ogy but do not understand why 
a suffocating odor should arise 
when I turn the knob on the 
gas stove. Can you enlighten 
me? 

Yours distressingly, 

Archibald. 
Dear Archie: 

This could never occur unless 
the operator should happen to 
be a tightwad, to tight to pur- 
chase the necesary match. I am 
greatly puzled about your cir- 
cumstances as it appears that 
you have already struck one 
match. Better light another. 

H. B. 0. 



RE:\rE;\iBER you alavays 

AVERE A GOOD DANCER 



Don't forget your gum. If 
you don't feel like talking, just 
chew it a while. 

And don't call her up for a 
date until after dinner. She 
might waste too much time in 
anticipation of it. Remember, 
she is here for work. You 
wouldn't w^ant your sister to be 
spending any time at dances or 
parties. 



Dear Old Pal of Mine:— Now 
I know, I've go the Alchoholic 
Blues, but I don't want a Doc- 
tor, I want a Beautiful Girl, for 
a Pretty Little Girl is like a 
melody. 

Dear Heart: — I know what it 
means to be lonesome, for the 
Rose of Araby, but Oo La La, 
take me to the land of Jazz, in 
Bubble Land, for I'm always 
chasing rainbows, and building 
castles in the air. 



Mandy, poor butterfly, is a Fly 
Girl now, but wait and see, the 
dear little boy of mine, for no- 
body knows and nobody seems 
to care, but the hand that rocks 
the cradle rules my heart, and 
I've got my captain working for 
me now. 

Somewhere a voice is calling, 
Yo-San, the Vamp, out of the 
East, where the lanterns glow, 
but, tell me, why do they call 
them Wild Women, when, I used 
to call her Baby, but wait till 
we get them up in the air boys, 
near the moon, that's worth 
waiting for, and, what could be 
sweeter. 



Dear old daddy long-legs, and, 
Mary, danced naughty walzes, at 
the High Brown Baby's Ball, 
but, anything is nice if it comes 
from Dixie Land. Ragging the 
chop sticks, and that ain't all. 
You'd be surprised. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



THE 



S T E N T R 



Chemistry Quiz 

1. How many boards in Col- 
lege Hall? 

2. What is the price of spin- 
ach on Mars? 

3. How many bottles did Cobe 
put in his pocket? 

4. Add together the answers 
of No.'s 1, 2, 3, and give the re- 
sultant alcoholic content. 



"How tall are you Soph?" 
"Five feet, ten inches." 
"My, I didnt know there was 
a' hunk of cheese that big." 



Pittenger and Dunlap are the 
proud possessers of derbies. Is 
it because the times are out of 
joint, or because of the new 
year? 



What next — Hershey reports 
that an entire mouse family call- 
ed the other evening to pay 
their respects. He says they're 
welcome, but not when he is 
trying to sleep. 



The only indication of a fall 
in prices we have seen recently 
is the award of $39 to an Ohio 
girl in a breach-of-promise case. 
— Boston Shoe & Leather Report. 



Ill the Course of a Week 

South Campus, calling up Lois 
Hall: "Is that you Miss ?" 

Lois Haller: "Yes." 

South Campus: "Have you a 
date for this evening?" 

Lois Haller: "Yes, I have a 
date — I'm sorry." 

South Campus: "Oh, that's all 
right, you ought to be darn glad 
you have one." 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 
ADVERTISERS 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencH's Dru^ Store 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL \A^OOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORSE 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and at Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



I 

Lake Forestj 
LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

j TAXI CABS 

■; Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F e: D e: ra i_ 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, V\^EST 



5>6e 



The Biackler Market Co. 



Phone 17 



LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. /^-"- ^;-p-'; -' ^-"" ^'": 

o. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. , Everythmg of the Choicest m 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Came and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
a Specialty 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



THE 



S T E N T R 



lUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college j'ear 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 Ui $400 for men; |350 to $t50 for women. Both mon and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



^ 



gliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR, C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g 



O'WniriN 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectioiiern 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

Clothing and 
fr<^u rn i i>« li i n }|s 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

UK no REPAIRING 

Phone 709 Western A vf. Lake Forebt 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. KEBRUARY 6, 1920 



NUMBER 14 



L. F. WINS FROM THE 

FAST ARMOUR TEAiAI 25-21 



The championship form dis- 
played by the Red and Black 
Basket-Ball team in its game 
with Armour last Friday evening 
is a fore-runner of what may be 
expected in the future. The 
Valparaiso game which has in- 
tervened can hardly be taken as 
a fair example of the work which 
the boys are capable of doing. 

Fast and snappy play by both 
sides featured the entire game in 
spite of the poorly ventilated 
condition of the gymnasium. The 
Armour management had adver- 
tised on big- posters that it was 
alarm clock for Christmas. 

All of the members of the 
team showed the distinct im- 
provement that they have made 
since the preliminary games. It 
would be hard to pick an indi- 
vidual star. Eddy featured with 
his dribbling and good basket 
shooting, Hyndberg with his 
clever pivots in carrying the 
ball out from under the oppo- 
nents basket, and Manning with 
his follow shots and tipping into 
the basket, Russel with two 
baskets played his usual steady 
game. Hale dazed the opponents 
by his snappy recovery on out 
of bounds. 

Close guarding forced all of 
the Armour men to take their 
shots from the center of the 
floor — unusual luck at this, ac- 
counts in a large measure for 
the closeness of the score. At 
half-time Lake Forest led 14 to 
10. Although the referee called 
everything close, a large num- 
ber of fouls were not made by 
either side. 



HOT SHOTS FROM 

DES MOINES 



"Only that Christianity that 
preaches the Gospel of the King- 
dom of God will prevent conflict, 
and to this Gospel the students 
are being appealed to." — Dean 
Brown. 

"Now take the holders of the 
good things of this world, the 
land owners, the possessors of 
the great natural resources, and 
stand them off there in great 
multitude. Write over them 
and see how appropriate it 
5eems — Blessed are the meek for 
they shall inherit the earth." — 
Bishop Francis R. McConnell. 

"Men all over are concerned 
'low the church can save the 
world." — Dr. Foulks. 

"God has prepared the church 
for the task of the Evangeliza- 
tion of the World in this Genera- 
tion. The opportunity is ours 
now to follow up the work of 
Evangelization." — Dr. J. C. 
White. 

"We owe them (our aliens) 
something more than language, 
changed customs and clothes. 
Let us show the aliens the real 
America, and make their Amer- 
icanization a spiritual adven- 
ture."— Mrs. F. S. Bennett. 

"Service is the test of life and 
its true interpretation." 

"You cannot Avith impunity be 
indifferent to any human crea- 
ture."— Dr. Truitt. 

"Christianity is a life, not a 
religion in the sense of other re- 
ligions." 



Herschel V. Johnson, Jr., spent 
the week end at Galesburg, at- 
tending the Junior Prom at 
Knox on Friday night. 



NEW PHYSICAL 

TRAINING RULES 



The following rules governing 
physical training for men have 
been adopted by the faculty: 

1. Physical training is to 
have a place on the program of 
classes and is to be assigned by 
class officers and signed for as 
any other subject. Classes are 
to be arranged for in the 10:30- 
12:.30 periods, after consultation 
with the women's athletic direc- 
tor, as well as in the afternoon. 

2. Physical training classes 
shall be required for two hours 
per week during the entire col- 
lege year during the Freshman, 
Sophomore, and Junior years. 
Men engaged in the regular in- 
tercollegiate sports are exempt 
from this requirement during 
the period of training only. 

3. Regular out-door, physical 
work for definite periods may 
be substituted for the required 
physical training work by peti- 
tion to the faculty comittee on 
athletics on the recomendation 
of the Physical Director for men. 

4. Tlie work in physical 
training may not be deferred, 
but men doing outside work in 
self-support may be allowed or 
required by their class officers 
to reduce the number of hours 
of college work to 12 hours. 

5. Class attendance in physi- 
cal training shall be subject to 
the same rules as attendance in 
other classes of the college and 
the uniform cut system shall ap- 
ply to these classes. 

6. The full plan will go into 
effect in September 1920, but 
the work for Freshmen and 
Sophomores will begin under 



(Coniinued on Pag-e Two.) 



THE STENTOR 



this plan with the second semes- 
ter of the current year. 

7. In its relation to eligibility 
of students to participate in col- 
lege activities or to remain in 
college, work in physical train- 
ing shall be regarded in the 
same way as Chapel attendance. 

8. Failure to secure credit in 
physical training during the re- 
quired period shall automatically 
extend the requirement into the 
senior year. (In case of migrant 
students the Lake Forest re- 
quirement shall begin with their 
residence here.) If, at the time 
of graduation, the student shall 
have failed to receive credit for 
one or more semesters, his dip- 
loma shall be withheld until as 
many semesters have elapsed as 
remain unfulfilled. 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



The January meeting of the 
Philosophy Club was held on 
last Wednesday evening, Jan- 
uary 21, in the Digamma Frat- 
ernity rooms, with Don Woods 
and Tommy Tucker as hosts to 
the members of the Club. The 
meeting was in charge of Dr. 
Wright, and the subject for dis- 
cussion was "Relativity," with 
special consideration of Ein- 
stein's theory. 

Several assigned readings were 
reported upon and the various 
theories of Relativity were pre- 
sented at the meeting, with 
their application to Modern Phil- 
osophical Problems. The meet- 
ing closed with a genral discus- 
sion of Philosophy and Problems 
in Education, after which sump- 
tuous refreshments were served. 
The meeting was handicapped 
by the absence of a number of 
active members of the club, but 
a most animating spirit of phil- 
osophy pervaded the discussion 
of the theories presented at the 

meeting, and it was a decided 
success in every respect. 



THE Y. W. C. A. 



The Y. W. C. A. held its last 
meeting of the first semester, 
Thursday evening. Rebecca Arm- 
strong read a letter from Miss 
Elizabeth H. Dunning, Y. W. C. 
A. student secretary in Tokyo. 
Miss Dimning gave a very inter- 
esting description of Japan and 
the work which she was doing 
among the Japanese girls. An- 
other outstanding feature of the 
evening was a beautiful vocal 
solo by Helen Eggemeyer. 

The girls have all been very 
enthusiastic toward the Y. W. 
this semester, but let us turn 
over a new leaf and make the 
Y. W. C. A. of our college the 
biggest and best in the Central 
Field. 



PROFITEERING 



Profiteering may be not ex- 
clusively of the financial sort. 
There is a moral profiteering as 
well which when it betrays it- 
self, although less odious than 
the purely avaricious form, de- 
serves unfavorable recognition. 
The candidate for office who ap- 
peals for votes because he had 
relatives in the service, or the 
woman who utilizes her service 
in Red Cross or other work, to 
obtain social prestige are equal- 
ly unworthy of recognition and 
are in a sense profiteers. 



His Bit 



Little Boy: "What did you do 
in the great war, daddy?" 

Father: "I had to nurse you 
while your mother sold flags. 



Mape: "You smoke, don't you? 
Now, this is something like a 
cigar." 

Ives: "Yes, this is something 
like a cigar. What is it?" 



THE JOB OF A MAN 



It isn't the work we intend to 
do, 

Nor the work we've just begun 
That puts us right on the ledger 
sheet; 

It's the work we've really done. 
Our credit is built on the things 
we do. 

Our debit on things we shirk: 
The man who totals the biggest 

plus 
Is the one who completes his 

work. 
Good intentions do not pay bills, 
It's easy enough to plan; 
To wish is the play of an office 

boy, 
To do is the job of a man. 

— System. 



WRONG AGAIN 



One of the reminiscences that 
former President Taft delights 
in, relates to one of his maiden 
speeches, in which he came off 
second best. The seeker was on 
that easiest of all easy tasks, at- 
tacking the government, when 
the heckler cried out, "You're 
wrong, sir!" 

A little nettled Mr. Taft con- 
tinued without heeding. Pres- 
ently, in answer to another 
strong assertion, came again: 
"You're wrong, sir!" 

Mr. Taft scawled, but contin- 
ued ihis speech. "You're wrong, 
sir!" agcdn rang out the voice. 

Angrily addressing the persis- 
tent interrupter, Mr. Taft cried, 
"Look here, I could tell this man 
something about the government 
that would make his hair stand 
on end!" 

"You're wrong again, sir!" 
came from the critic, as amid 
the roars of laughter from the 
assemblage, he stood up and re- 
moved his hat. 

His head was. as bald as a bil- 
liard ball. 



THE STENTOR 



DEAE BRUTUS 



If you ever spend money on 
the theatres, and have paid your 
Stentor bill and subscribed for 
The Forester, we advise you to 
invest in a seat (or two) for 
Dear Brutus, now playing at the 
Illinois. It differs from the 
kind of show you are accustom- 
ed to see in having a new and 
clearly defined idea. A number 
of people who are disappointed 
in life are given the chance to 
see what they would have been, 
if at the critical period of their 
lives they had taken another 
course. What Might Have Been 
is pictured upon the stage, and 
with one exception the charac- 
ters find that they would not 
have fared better in any event. 
The title is taken from Shake- 
speare: 

"The fault, dear Brutus, is not 

in out stars, 
But in ourselves, that we are 

underlings." 

There are great opportunities 
in this idea, and Barrie has made 
the most of them. The dia- 
logue and general treatment are 
exceedingly clever, as his plays 
usually are. The acting of Mr. 
Gillette (who is the one person 
who would have been happier 
in What Might Have Been) is 
superb. The rest of the cast, ex- 
cepting possibly one or two, sup- 
port him admirably. We think 
it safe to say that this is the 
best play that has come to the 
city this year, and if you are a 
theatre-goer at all you will make 
a mistake in missing it. 



The Millenium 



A college paper is a great inven- 
tion, 
The college gets all the fame; 
The printer gets all the money, 
The staff gets all the blame. 

—Ex. 



Weary Warbler: "Say, Dick, 
what's your idea of Heaven?" 

Lazy Dick: "A million worms 
and no bean-sihooters!" 



SUCCESS 



A lecturer on literature in a 
certain college once made this 
interesting statement: "One of 
the familiar sights of old Now 
York was to see that dignified 
figure (Wm. Cullen Brj'ant) 
sweeping up the boulevard with 
his long white whiskers." 



Men judge you by the men 
you associate with. Pigeons fly 
with pigeons and eagles with 
eagles; sheep do not flock with 
wolves and pigs grunt together 
in a sty. Lake Forest College 
contains a lot of men whose as- 
sociation are worth while. Flock 
with them more and you will 
soon begin to think with them, 
think uplift, think service, think 
right, think a better Lake For- 
est. 



A Literal Iiiteri)retatioii 



Fred and Jimmy Bates spent 
the week end with Digamma. 



A young Swede in South Dak- 
ota, who was not familiar with 
all the oddities of American 
speech, says the American Le- 
gion Weekly, was sent out to 
collect bills for the general 
store. He returned with this 
report: 

"Yon Erown, he say he pay 
when he sell his wheat; Ole Ole- 
son, he say he pay when he sell 
his oats; and Yon Yonson, he say 
he pay in Yanuary." 

"In January?" repeated the 
proprietor, surprised. "Why, he 
never set a date before. Are 
you STire he said January?" 

"Veil, Ay tank it bane Yan- 
uary. He say it bane cold day 
when you get your money."- — 
Youth's Companion. 



Tliere is not a man among us 
who does not wish to succeed, 
yet are all looking for success 
in different directions. 
"Space is ample, east and west, 

But two cannot go abreast, 
Cannot travel in it two." 

We have come to college in 
order to help us succeed, to be- 
come masters in our own fields 
of work. 

Some of us will count our suc- 
cess in dollars, some in service 
without return, others in great 
structures and organizations 
reared, still others in thinking 
and the acceptance of their 
thought. 

But not all will succeed in the 
eyes of the world. Many will 
fail of acquiring their goal — 
money, power, influence, good 
done. Nevertheless, the world 
is not always right in its judg- 
ments. We, ourselves may suc- 
ceed, although the world brands 
us "Failure." An honest man 
who has done his best succeeds, 
.and should not be disheartened 
because the world has failed in 
its blindness to see his success. 



Repeating a story you do not 
Ijelieve, is a cowardly way of ly- 
ing. 



If you are good, for Goodness' 
sake be grateful 

And mind your Manners! — 
don't make Virtue hateful. 



The man who strictly obeys 
I the laws honors his country. — 
Youth's Companion. 



He spent two years in Paris, 
yet he doesn't know a word of 
French. 

Tliat's nothing, I've lived five 
years in Chicago and can't speak 
English yet. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Publisliecl weekly during tlii> oul- 
legiate year by the studenU (il Lake 
Horest Clollege. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralpli Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted hy tlie 
women of Lois Durand HkII. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kniiz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
W. G. McColley, '21 
Alberta Barris '23 
Rosa Deuteh '23 
Elizabeth Torreyson "22 

Professor W. R. Bridgnian 

faculty and Alumni. 

Entered at the post office of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as secnind class 
matter. 



RED AND BLACK 



It would seem that the world 
of the uneducated and of the un- 
thinking had gone mad! It 
would seem, from all appear- 
ances, that Bolshevism, Anarchy, 
and Radical Socialism were 
sweeping everything before 
them and would take the world 
by storm! Red flags have taken 
the place of Old Glory even in 
our own country, to a certain 
extent, and one is led to believe 
that such radical reactionary 
measures might possibly spell 
ruin, and desolation for the so- 
called "World-Democracy" which 
we were supplied to have won 
in the recent war. Be that as 
it may, however, such pygmie- 
minded actions on the part of 
the greedy minded ignoramuses 
in this country is a mighty poor 
exnmple for young men and 
women in college to be follow- 
ing. 



Lake Forest College is just as 
much an institution for the bet- 
terment of this country as is 
the Federal Government itself — 
yet we find right in our own 
midst, students, mind you, who 
are Bolshevists to Lake Forest 
and traitors to the very college 
upon which they are dependent 
at the present time. Bolshe- 
vism is spelled the same the 
world over — and it means the 
same thing, whether in revolt 
against capital and labor, or in 
revolt aaginst Lake Forest meth- 
ods or Lake Forest athletics. 

There are, in this school, stu- 
dents (men especially, and you 
know whom the are) who are 
carrying only the Red of the 
school colors and simply refuse 
to recognize the good old Red 
and Black of Lake Forest Col- 
lege, let alone fight for the prin- 
I ciples which the school and its 
I colors stand. To be frank, they 
are Bolshevists to Lake Forest 
and red flag carriers just as 
much as any soviet or any fol- 
I lower of Lenine and Trotzky. In 
1 fact one is led to believe at 
times that possibly there is a 
Lenine or a Trotzky right here 
in school — for certainly there 
are those among the student 
body who stand for the very 
identical principles in this col- 
lege that the above mentioned 
soviet leaders have stood for in 
Russia! 

Much comment and criticism 
has been made of Lake Forest, 
' of the faculty, of the coach, of 
athletics, and in fact of every- 
thing — even down to the Fores- 
ter which hasn't even gone to 
the press yet. What a day may 
bring forth on this campus, no 
one is wise enough to prophesy. 
We can only stand bewildered 
and aghast at the movements of 
tremendous forces that appear 
to be as much beyond the con- 
trol of men as are the earth- 
quake and the whirlwind. 

It behooves every man in an 
hour like the present to sit 
steady in the boat. We may not 



be able to control athletics and 
win every conference title, but 
we can do our best and at least 
give the willing ones a chance; 
we may not be able to control 
class assignments and myster- 
ious workings of the professors, 
but we can keep steadily at our 
jobs and put out the maximum 
production of which we are cap- 
able at our particular work; we 
may not be able to suppress bol- 
shevism and red flag carriers in 
our own school life, but we can 
each one preserve the peace in 
our own particular bailiwacks 
and observe the laws and cus- 
toms of Lake Forest College. We 
must have faith in the sanity 
and good sense of all the people 
in the college community, at 
least giving them a chance to 
put over the plans they have in 
view. At any rate, let us lay 
away the red flags, lay away the 
bolsheviki principles, and let us 
have instead, more of that spir- 
it of our Alma Mater, as em- 
bodied in our college song some- 
thing like this: 

The Red and Black floats proud- 
ly o'er. 
While in thy glory we rejoice! 



WHY GO TO COLLEGE? 



The average salary per year of 
the non-educated man in the 
j United States is $400. The av- 
erage salary of the high school 
graduate is $1,000 yearly. The 
average college graduate of the 
United States receives $1,800 an- 
nually. Hence for the outlay 
of the four years of high school, 
according to averages, a man re- 
ceives about two dollars a day 
for the rest of his life, and for 
money returns on the four col- 
lege years the graduate by av- 
erages is due to add $700 a year 
to his income until he dies. 



John Dougherty evidently pre- 
fers hot tea to exsmiinations. 



THE STENTOR 



THE SERENADES 

For many years one of the 
most beatiful customs of Lake 
Forest was the serenades which 
the men gave to the girls of 
Lois Hall. There is no music 
more beautiful than that of 
mens' voices as it rises on the 
midnight air. The girls have al- 
ways been very enthusiastic 
about the serenades and surely 
the men were repaid for their 
trouble even though they seem- 
ed at times to have expended 
effort which was not appreciat- 
ed. Any girl in the hall would 
be considered a slacker if she 
would not get up for a serenade 
and this form of entertainment 
was always a much talked of 
one. 

There have always been spe- 
cial serenades after special oc- 
casions such as the serenade af- 
ter Christmas Musicale and after 
many of the formals. The girls 
have not yet ceased to talk about 
the wonderful serenade that was 
given last year after the Musi- 
cale. 

The girls who are at Lake 
Forest for the first time this ■ 
year have not had the opportu- 
nities to hear any of our real 
college serenades. We have had 
a couple this year but they were 
not as well organized as they 
were last year and the years be- 
fore. We girls were certainly i 
thankful for these few and we ' 
want the men to know that we 
appreciate their efforts. 

For some reason or other the 
serenades have not been as fre- 
quent as last year and we hope 
that the girls have not been to 
blame for this sudden falling off 
of one of the most beautiful cus- ' 
toms of our college life. We 
girls have looked forward all 
year to the serenades and have 
met with disappointment. We j 
hope that when spring comes 
and the cold weather is past, 
that the men will once more be- 
come enthusiastic over this cus- 
tom. You know "a thing of 
beauty is a joy forever." 



STEREOTYPED LPLIFTERS 

What the world needs is ster- 
eotyped uplifters; that is — up- 
lifters who are uplifters day in 
and day out; uplifters when the 
uplifting is good and when it is 
hard; uplifters whom the world 
will not mistake for something- 
else; uplifters who are willing 
to submit to routine, realizing 
that big accomplishments in life 
come as a result of patient, per- 
sistent plugging away at one's 
job. No other kind can fill the 
bill or stand the strain. 

Wlien Jesus was deciding upon 
the way to perform his ministry, 
he went out into the quiet of 
the wilderness to think, and 
there met with temptation. The 
tempter suggested that he do 
something spectacular — that he 
cast himself down from the pin- 
nacle of the temple, and thereby 
gain notoriety and a following. 
Again it was suggested that he 
become a world political figure 
and receive the prominence and 
power this would afford. 

Upon these alluring sugges- 
tions he turned his back, facing 
rather that grim prospect of a 
modest, plodding life of service, 
knowing full well that his pop- 
ularity would steadily diminish 
until all would finally forsake 
him and flee, leaving him to face 
the cross alone. Was he a ste- 
reotyped uplifter? Better per- 
haps to say that he was the ar- 
chetype uplifter. The stereo- 
typed uplifter comes later, but 
needs not apologize for not do- 
ing something flashy and novel; 
he may be content if he is sin- 
cerely trying to "follow in His 
steps." 

What Dr. McAfee meant when 
he said that all roads lead to 
Calvary was that for doing any 
real service one must pay a 
price. Perhaps it is in becoming 
a stereotyped uplifter — ^who 
knows? Not all of us may have 
inclination for this business; we 
may begrudge the price; but let 
us not misunderstand the prop- 
osition. 

J. C McCoy. 



HERE AND THERE 



Van hit precisely upon the 
thought we had in mind when 
he said, at the end of the pro- 
gram he and Ray Moore gave in 
Chapel "I think that's not so bad 
for a small college." Our foot- 
ball team may never win a game. 
Our basket-ball squad may not 
set the world on fire. Some- 
times we may feel that this is 
the jumping-off place and that 
Lake Forest College does not 
justify its present form of ex- 
istence. But just when we are 
most pessimistic, .an alumnus 
who is the salt of the earth or 
one of our present number who 
possesses striking talents or per- 
sonality comes to our attention 
and makes the whole thing 
worth while. Truly, this is a 
place of -wonderful associations, 
of golden opportunities. "The 
love and friends of Alma Mater, 
our richest treasures shall re- 



main. 



IS MARS ON THE WIRE? 



Marconi says that something 
extraordinary is happening to 
the wireless. He doesn't know 
what it is. The messages are 
undecipherable. Signals are 
queer. New York gets them 
and so does London, with equal 
intensity. 

Marconi believes that the ori- 
gin might be at a great dis- 
tance. Eruptions on the sun 
might cause electrical distur- 
bances which would affect the 
wireless. When he was asked if 
he would rule out the possibility 
of Martian attempts to commu- 
nicate with the earth he said 
he would not. 

We have enough altruism to 
hope that the Martians are not 
in a state of mind over the af- 
fairs of the earth. They are, if 
they exist, presumably a highly 
perceptive, inteligent, sophisti- 
(Contmued on page Eight) 



THE STENTOR 




LIT-TL'L FE-LIX 



Hen-ner-ry did not 
Re-turn to school 
Til yes-ter-day. 
I am safe in 
Say-ing we were 
Missed last week 
But I am bash-ful 
. And do not want 
All the hon-ors 
A-lone. 

We are get-ting 
Ex-cited a-bout 
Tlie Prom now. 
Hen-ner-ry is 
Worry-ing o-ver 
His low pocket-book 
And spir-its. 
I am not wor-ried 
O-ver any-thing 
Ex-cept my suit. 
Tlie suit is all-right 
But we do not fit. 
I am too short or 
It is t-oo long. 
I had it re-duced 
But I fear now 
That the tay-lor 
Had ma-lice 
A-fore-thought. 
Of course it is 
A triv-i-al matter, 
Nev-er-the-less 
T am going 
To in-ves-ti-gate. 

Yours sus-pic-i-ous-ly, 

LIT-TUL FE-LIX. 

As Yoii Were 
Sweet Sixteen (to mother): 
"I've worn short skirts all my 
li^'e and I'm not going to wear 
them any longer." 



THE INCUBATOR 



By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington 

Horoscope for weeks begin- 
ning January 21 and ending 
January 31. Those born during 
this period are under the influ- 
ences of Acquarius. They are 
inclined to be obstinate and dif- 
ficult at times but can easily be 
ruled by those who know their 
weaknesses. They are independ- 
ent, tactful, diplomatic and self 
reliant, fond of dressing well 
and generally careful of appear- 
ances. They are secretive in 
their dealings, but never to the 
extent of trickery. They are 
generally well liked and have 
the respect of all who know 
them. 



Dear Inky: 

Are marriages really made in 
Heaven? 

Sweet Sixteen. 



Dear Sweet Sixteen: 

Tliat is a question I cannot 
answer myself as I am not in 
the matrimonial profession but 
I have been fortunate enough to 
find the answer to your perplex- 
ing question through the aid of 
Professor Burnap, the greatest 
twirller of matrimonial bureaus 
in this country. It seems that 
he believes not. At least, he 
says, if they are. Heaven must 
be corrupted by labor imions too 
for they turn out pretty poor 
goods sometimes. 

The Incubator. 



Dear Incubator: 

Who did the most executing 
at Waterloo? 

Yours, 
An Historian. 



Dear Historian: 
The Highlanders 



Dear H. B. 0.: 
Why is money like dough? 

A. Stewdent. 
Dear Stewdent: 
Because we need it. 

H. B. 0. 



Moore: "Buck! What was 

Shakespeare?" 

Buckingham: "An Anomaly." 
Moore: "What was liquor?" 
Buckingham: "A disease." 
Moore: "Well then, what was 

near-beer?" 

Buckingham: "You've got me." 



Speaking of glass arms, we 
will all have to admit that they 
were more or less of a handicap 
this week. 



In the future we suggest the 
substitution of well trained par- 
rots when it comes to taking 
Poly Science examinations. 



Army training does help out 
now and then: Russell on a train 
coming into the Union Depot 
hears a big racket behind him 
and turns about to find that it 
is nothing but a woman talkmg 
and giggling in her natural tone 
of voice. 

The noisy one seeing Russel 
glance around: "As you is!" 
Russell: "As you were!" 
The noisy one: "As you am!" 
Russell: "As you ought to be!" 
Strange to say — silence. 



The Chicago Tribune reporter 
who last week was quite surpris- 
ed to hear that many of North- 
western Universities' star ath- 
letes were planning to migrate, 
probably was not aware of the 
fact that the annual season al- 
ways opens the latter part of 
January. 



A Bad Fix 



of course! 



E\'ery man of them had one kilt 
before the battle began. 

The Incubator. 



Study of your date-book 
Ruins your pocket-book 
But using your note-book 
Ruins your social outlook. 



THE STENTOR 



No J Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



Lab. Assistants 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

in Great Variety and 
\ at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



How are you going to keep 'em 

down in the Lab, 
After they've been out doors; 
How are you going to keep 'em 

away from sunshine, 
Jazzing around and gadding the 

town. 
How you going to keep 'em 

down by the fire 
Tliat's the mistery. 
They'll never want to see a tube 

or flask 
They'll never want to see or 

hear of gas. 
How you going to keep them 

down in the Lali, 
After they've been out doors. 

— Exchange. 



Telephones: - 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



g 



Sprini 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 



i 







-:eUe9^i 



Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalleSt. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 
Jewelry 

Oscar PiersoD 

Furniture Repairing 



Pict 



ure 



r amin g 



■ >AUi<: i<'4>iti<:«i» i\ 



■ ■.i>. 



FRANK J. \VENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas—Cigars— Candies 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Chicagd-Lake Forest CoLimiitation 
Tickets 

S2 DEKRHAXH. WEST 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

< IcdtiiiKj, I'rissiiif/. RepairitK/ 



Hartman & Hartman 

■THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 



Lake Forest, 



Illinois 



It its Baked at HUNTOOX'S li» Baked Rlgbt 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THE STENTOR 



cated people. The difference 
between a hairy Ainu and Presi- 
dent Lowell of Harvard is prob- 
ably very slight as compared 
with the difference between 
President Lowell and a Martian 
day laborer. Their powers of 
observation, perception, under- 
standing and accomplishment 
being beyond our comprehension, 
we and our affairs may be en- 
tirely within their comprehen- 
sion and they may be trying to 
exercise a planetary mandate 
to bring us to order and civil- 
ization. 

We are the planetary Armenia 
and must cause a widespread dis- 
tress among people who wish 
nothing for themselves that they 
do not wish for the whole cos- 
mic system. A desire to make 
the cosmos safe for cosmopoli- 
tans- must be a very lively agony 
on a civilized sphere which has 
been cognizant of earthly go- 
ings on for the last five years 
and sees that the victory with- 
out peace is having deadlier re- 
sults than the war without 
mercy . 

It would be agony to have 
such perceptions and to be try- 
ing vainly to break into the com- 
prehensions of earth people with 
warnings, advice and good coun- 
sel. The breaking of the heart 
of the world is nothing to what 
such a torture might be to an 
intelligent, kindly people on 
Mars. 

A benevolent old gentleman 
seeing a blind man walking di- 
rectly into a coal hole, shouting 
at him but unable to make him 
hear, would be painfully affect- 
ed. It probably would spoil his 
entire day. We may imagine 
the Martian state of mind, with 
a mandate which it cannot exe- 
cute. The emotions of the Eng- 
lish contemplating the Irish 
question would be regarded in 
Mars as placid. 

If there are two parties on 
Mars, one of them no doubt is 
realistic and is advising against 



further prosecution of this in- 
sane intervention in the affairs 
of a world which has nothing to 
do with the price of things at 
home, and we can imagine the 
indignation of the more altruis- 
tic party exclaiming upon these 
contemptible quitters. 

If we ever get these wireless 
manifestations decoded and find 
that they come from Mars we 
know the first injunction will be: 
"Whatever you are doing, quit 
it." — Selected. 



WILL HAVE SORORITY 
IIOl SES AT NORTHAVESTERN 

Evanston, 111. — Yoo hoo, oh 
girls, come on over to the house. 
The faculty of Northwestern 
University went on record by a 
vote of two to one as favoring 
the sorority house system at 
Northwestern. 

Plans are as yet indefinite. 
Money and a few other neces- 
sary details must be arranged. 
The only sure fact is that a sys- 
tem of women's open and soror- 
ity houses similar to that of the 
men has been approved and that 
they will be erected as soon as 
it is possible. 

The constructional matters 
will be in the hands of the uni- 
versity trustees. Matters of 
government and operation of 
the houses are still to be deter- 
mined. 



Good Swimmers 



Two gesticulating Jews were 
accidentilly pushed overboard. 
Neither knew how to swim. 
Nevertheless they got to shore. 
"But you told me you couldn't 
swim," said a fellow hock shop 
owner. "We couldn't. We just 
kept on talking." 



J. B. VelesKys 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Anilersoii liiiihling. Photie 855 
LAKE FOliEST, 11, L. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

503 Central Ave. Highland Par 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00—10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 
GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



^11!! 



r:;!i!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiE 




Diagamma announces the 
pledging of Charles Horan. 



I bwitt s 

I Premium 

I Hams and Bacon | 

I are mild, 

I sweet, tender. 

1 Each piece is care- 

i fully selected and 

I cured to give it the 

I distinctive "Premium" 

I flavor. 

i Asli for "Premium" Products 

1 

I Swift (^Company 

I U. S. A. 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllllttllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIlfi 



THE 



S T E N T R 



WE FOUND THIS— WE AGREE 



Don't take a girl to the dance. 
Meet her there, and walk home 
with her after the dance. What's 
the use of taking that long walk 
twice? 

Don't ask her to dance until 
the music starts. Then make a 
wild rush towards her. You 
don't want her to feel too con- 
fident. 

Don't take a girl back to her 
seat after you are through dan- 
cing with her. Leave her in the 
middle of the floor. She knows 
best where she wants to go. 

Don't thank her for the dance 
She realizes that the pleasure 
was ajl hers. 

Don't speak to her ne.xt time 
you see her, if she doesn't want 
you to take her home. Just 
show her that your attentions 
aren't to be trifled with. 

Don't make a martyr out of 
yourself if the girl isn't a good 
dancer. Dance the encore with 
someone else. 



Or Maybe Died of Shock 



Although the man found dead 
in a bath tub has not been posi- 
tively identified, it is certain 
that he was not a member of 
the Bolsheviki. 



Husband: "That new maid cer- 
tainly is quiet. You wouldn't 
know she was about the place." 

Wife: "She isn't. She left this 
morning." 



Employer (to Lee Smith): 
"Look here. Smith, if you would 
devote as much energy to your 
work as you do to asking me to 
raise your salary, I'd raise your 
salary." 

Red: "What was the last card 
I dealt you?" 

Gibbs: "A spade." 

Red: "I knew it. I saw you 
spit on your hands before you 
picked it up." 



MULLERvS 

TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 



The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimball Hall 
«Ta<^l\»<>ii and ^%'ahaMh 

Fraternity Jiiid Sorority 
Work Our Specialty 



TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 
A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

br.e:a.d cakes rolls 

Birtljduy iiud Otbcr Spfcial Cakes tu (Jrdet- 



LAKE FORESTS Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 

MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for W'omens and Childrens 
Furnishings 

Offer the Services of a Competent Staff 
whose aid in selecling and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

AuLumnliile Supplies Bap^age Transferred 

Sf'\'i:-u Passenp'-r (J;irs lo Kt-nt b\ Trip or Hour 



L. GREENBURG 

j Electric Shoe Repairing 
NEW SHOES 
RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave LAKE FOREST 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



Spalding Sweaters 



A STYLE IN THE 
TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR. 
POSE 

Send for 
Calalogtie 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



-PHONE 881 



RASMUSSEN VAIOS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



i^F^iisnrii^* 



E:^sl(^F=?/\\/I^s[(S 

^-r>i£VT~ icDi^i e: F=? V 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD, Lake Forest Agent 



THE STENTOR 



PERSONALS 



Alice Axton has been very ill 
and we are glad to know that 
she is now recovering rapidly. 



A Sensitive "Native Son" 



Opha Catterlin spent the week 
end in her home in Clinton. 

Rose Deutch spent the week 
end in Chicago. 



Gladys McDowell is leaving 
second semester for Chicago 
University. We are sorry to see 
her go. 



Gertrude Gifford is leaving 
school second semester. More 
than one are sorry to see her go. 



Alberta Burras left on Monday 
for her home in Arkansas. Her 
mother's illness was the cause 
of her departure. We hope that 
her mother's condition will im- 
prove so that Alberta may re- 
turn before the school vear ends. 



When the Calumet and Hecla 
mines were opened nearly all 
the miners were Cornishmen. 
Gradually, however, immigrants 
from Central Europe began to 
find employment. The Cornish- 
men looked upon them with dis- 
favor, and at last one of the old- 
er men went to Mr. Aggasiz, the 
president of the company, and 
said that something would have 
to be done; there were altogeth- 
er too many "foreigners" coming 
in. 

Mr. Aggasiz, who was himself 
a Swiss by birth, listened sym- 
pathetically, and said: "I think 
you're right, John. If this kind 
of thing continues, you and I 
will have to go back to the old 
country." 



Ruth Bahlert has been ill last 
week. 



The "Zoo" :Moiise 



Vera Pettigrew has been ill 
with a severe attack of the 
grippe. 



Helen Learnerd from Nasli- 
ville, Tennessee has recently 
come to be one of our Lake For- 
esters. We welcome her and 
hope that she will soon be at' 
home here. 



Josephine Merchant has our 
deepest sympathy in the loss of 
her father. 



Margaret Griffith leaves with 
her mother for Hot Springs 
Her mother's health has '-een 
poor which necessitates the trip. 



Jock, fresh from the High- 
lands, was visiting the London 
"Zoo." Seeing so many strange 
animals, he called out to an at- 
I tendant: 

I "Here, mon! Ye micht tell's 
the names o' thae bit beasties." 

"Certainly,'" said the attend- 
ant. "Tliat large black one is a 
bear." 
! "Ay!" 

"And that one with the small 
horns is a wapiti." 
"Ay!" 

"And that one with the large 
' horns is a moose." 

"A moose! Awa', mon! If 
that's a moose, then what are 
f yer rats like?" — Youth's Com- 
panion. 



Paul Bergen and Bob Fram- 
berg have left school. 



Beatrice wothley leaves this 
semester to prepare for her ap- 
proaching wedding. The Tlieta's 
gave a shower for her on Wed- 
nesday. Lake Forest wishes her 
joy. 



Pat Scores Again 



British papers are fond of 
printing jokes in which repre- 
sentatives of all the divisions 
of the United Kingdom — and 
sometimes a man from Wales — 



bear a part. Needless to say, 
the Irishman rarely comes off 
second best, whenever quickness 
of wit is required. 

Pat was serving in the army, 
and his two companions happen- 
ed to be an Englishman and a 
Scotsman. These two gave their 
Irish friend a lively time with 
their jokes and teasing. 

One day Pat was called away, 
and left his coat hanging on a 
nail. The Englishman and the 
Scotsman, seeing some white 
paint near, seized the opportu- 
nity of painting a donkey's head 
on the back of Pat's coat. 

The Irishman soon returned, 
and, looking first at his coat and 
then fixing his eye on his 
friends, said slowly, "Begorra, 
and which one of you two has 
been wiping your face on my 
coat?" — Youth's Companion. 



THRIFT IN THE SANCTUARY 



An English periodical tells the 
story of a clergyman who was 
asked to supply, for a Sunday 
or two, in a quiet country vil- 
lage. When he went to the 
church the verger asked him to 
preach from the chancel. 

"Why, my good man," he in- 
quired. 

"Well, its like this," said the 
verger. "I have a duck in the 
pulpit seting on fourteen eggs." 



Mac: "What are you working 
at?" 

B. Moore: "Intervals, sir." 

Whitey: "Did you see Santa 
Claus?" 

Dick: "It was too dark to see 
him, but I heard what he said 
when he bumped his toe on the 
bedpost." 



A man was found dead, near 
the street car track in Chicago. 
Probably starved to death wait- 
ing for a car. 



THE STENTOR 



TEN BELOW NOTHING 



The shades of night were slump- 
ing some 

And prospects for more coal 
were bum 

When down the bleak street 
passed a jay 

And this was all he had to say: 
"Ten Below Nothing!" 

The reader knows, of course, our 

hero 
Meant ten below the well known 

zero, 
No matter what the reader 

knows, 
Again that angui^ed voice 

arose: 

"Ten Below Nothing!" 

"That's nothing!" said a damsel 

fair 
Who saw that cold jay passing 

there. 
The cold jay hurried to her side; 
"It's worse than nothing!" he 

replied, 

"Ten Below Nothing!" 

But little more remains to say 
In this well chosen, frozen lay. 
So we will write (we might do 

worse) 
Below this next-to-nothing verse 
"Ten Below Nothing!" 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencK's Drtift >$tore 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 
L. H.W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC \ 

— ^^^ I 

] 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORSE 

OP AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

L « ke Forest, IllinoU 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 
C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



TO KILL A NEWSPAPER 



Don't subscribe for the paper, 
but read it over your neighbor's 
shoulder. 

Promise to write for the paper, 
but kindly forget to write the 
article. 

Never say a good word for 
the paper, but always against it. 

Never hand in an article your- 
self but criticize the work of 
others. 

Never patronize our advertis- 
ers, but go to those who do not 
advertise. 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F e: D e: ra l. 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, V^EST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
[ a Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^ 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures ot the new year are (1) a new Profesaor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2^ full reor- 
ganization of athletics, witl) competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and eo-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The studL^nt body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to S^OO for men; §350 to §-150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatorj' school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

I'or information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OKHICH 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 






DeEuxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C.W.YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH. 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 ! 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 

Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g 



ownaN' 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectioneru 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

W HEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 

Clotliiiig and - 
l^^urnlsliiiigs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

ilK UO ItKl'JIHING 

Phone 709 Western Avp. Lake Forest 



The Stent 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 




Volume XXXIV. 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS. FEBRUARY 13. 1920 



NUMBER 15 



3Iiisit' fScliool Oives Foiiiial 



The Lake Forest School of 
Music g-ave its second annual 
formal at the Durand Art Insti- 
tute, Saturday evening, Febru- 
ary seventh. About fifty couples 
were present, with the College 
well represented and a goodly 
number of visitors. 

The programs were attractive 
oblongs of g-rey celluloid, dis- 
playing the initials L. F. U. S. M. 
After receiving these, the guests 
filed through the receiving line, 
which was made up of Miss Mil- 
inowski, Miss Hamilton, Dr. 
Wright, Miss Antrim, and Mr. 
Ives. The grand march was led 
by Margaret Durand and Mr. 
Coberly. Tlie Dorn family serv- 
ed frozen punch in the lobby. 

The glow of the lights shaded 
by a large Japanese parasol in 
the center of the ceiling a id 
smaller ones in the corners, and 
the irresistible rhythm of Hir- 
vey's Orchestra from the stage 
threw an oriental glamour over 
the occasion which made the 
twelve dances seem all too short 
and eleven thirty, the zero hour, 
came very quickly. Tlie Mu^ic 
School is to be congratulated on 
a delightful party. 



MR. SCOILLER'S VISIT 



Mention should be made, even 
if belated, of the recent brief 
sojourn on the campus of Janies 
L. Scouller, '01 — practically his 
first visit to Lake Forest since 
he went out to the Phillipines 
with the first shipload of 600 
teachers. Intending to stay hut 
three years, he actually remain- 
ed 15, advancing from post to 
post until in 1917, when he was 

(Continued on page 2) 



Win From Monmouth; 

Lose to Knox 



The Red and Black warrioiT 
journeyed down-state last week- 
end and came out fifty-fifty, 
trimming Monmouth Friday 
night 24-18 and lieing trimmed 
by Knox 39-30. The ease of the 
victory over Monmouth and the 
larger score piled up against 
Knox showed considerable im- 
pi'ovement in the team since the 
games lost to these rivals on the 
home floor. 

Lake Forest took things easy 
at Monmouth and saved up en- 
ergy for the following night, as 
it was evident soon after the 
start of the game that there 
would be little difficulty in car- 
rying off the victory. The 14-S 
score established in the first half 
gave a lead of 6 points which 
was maintained in the seccnd 
period. 

The Knox affray was more 
closely foug'ht. Both sides made 
baskets freely in alternate in- 
tervals. The first half end.ed 
17-12 in favor of Knox. In the 
second, Knox opened up with 
rapid fire and brought thsir 
score to 31 before L. F. t^ot 
started. Then tlie Red and 
Black took a hand, adding 16 
points to their tally while Knox 
stood still. Knox took time out 
and came back for eight mure 
counts. Russell threw a baslcet 
in the last minute of play, leav- 
ing the final reckoning 39-30. 

February (> 

Lake Forest (24) 

I Eddy, rf . 4 4 

! Manning, If. 2 

Russell, c 4 



Sumner, rg. 
Maplesden, rg'. 
Hale, Ig. 
Legner, Ig. 

Monmouth (18) 
Smiley, rf. 
Wallace, rf. 
Wright, If. 
Lawrence. If. 
Ady, c 
Blick, c. 
Baer, c. 
Reed, rg. 
Reeves, rg. 
Axline, Ig. 
Bear, Ig. 



1 



1 2 2 

1 
4 
1 

1 1 

1 



February 7 

Knox (39) G. F. P. T. 

Tim'pe, rf. 4 1 

Albro, If. 8 11 

Murphy, c. 5 1 
Rhinde, c. 

Hoover, rg. 1 1 

Crabbe, Ig. Ill 



Lake Forest (30) 

Eddy, rf. 6 

Manning, If. 3 

Russell, c. 5 

Sumner, rg. 1 
Hale, If. 



1 3 



1 1 



SENIOR PARTY 



Ray Moore and Mr. Sibley en- 
tertained the Senior men in. the 
latter's College Hall apartments 
last Friday evening. After a 
supper of oyster stew, sandwich- 
es, ice cream, cake, and coffee, 
the evening was spent at Bridge. 
Lady Nicotine was the only fem- 
inine spirit present. 



THE STENTOR 



MR. SCOILLER'S VISIT 



(Continued from Page One.) 



called back by Governor Lowden 
to take the superintendency of 
the Illinois State Reformatory 
at Pontiac, he was Superintend- 
ent of Schools at Manila. 

Addressing the University 
Club in the evening, Mr. Scoul- 
ler talked of his work at Pontiac. 
He first met some of the diffi- 
culties voiced in the newspapers 
and by the courts and police. 
Then he took up the positive 
features, the psychological and 
psychiatric studies, the workings 
of the parole law, the incentives 
within the institution to good 
conduct, the records of gi'ad- 
uates, etc. 

At chapel assembly the next 
morning, Mr. Scouller gave some 
of his experiences in the Philli- 
pines, prefacing his talk with 
the advice that a teachership 
out there was perhaps hardly 
worth while in itself; but as an 
experience in life, especially tak- 
ing into account the journey 
around the world, very valuable. 
The general impression among 
all of us is that there is no one 
among the Alumni of whom we 
have better reason to be proud 
for past accomplishment and 
promise of solid influence. 



PERSONALS 



Elsie Engel spent the week 
end at her home in Ottawa. 

Esther and Mildred Graham 
visited in Chicago on Saturday. 

Katherine Horton, Lois Con- 
klin, Francis Bradley, Flora 
Shattuck, and Mary Alice Metz- 
gar spent the week end in Ash- 
kum, Illinois, as the guests of 
Mardelle Meentz. 

Irene and Zelma Farwell have 
returned to school. We are glad 
to see them back. 

Helen Eggemeyer visited her 
home in Richmond, Indiana over 
the week end. 



SOPHS WIN 3IEN'S 

IXTERCLASS SERIES 



The Sophomore men put the 
finishing touches to a season 
without defeat in the interclass 
basketball series when they 
trimmed the Frosh, their near- 
est competitors, by a score of 
33 to 8, on January 29. The 
Sophs made a total of 132 points 
to their opponents 51. Of these, 
Kunz secured 41, Robertson 39, 
and Beddoes 20. The percent- 
ages for each class are as fol- 
lows: 

W. L. Pet. 
Sophs 6 1000 

Frosh 3 3 500 

Seniors 1 4 200 

Juniors 1 4 200 

January 21 

Juniors (11): 
Mayeau, f. 
Leonard, f. 
Morley, c. 
Hale, g. 
Van Sickle, g. 

Sophs (16): 
Erickson, f. 
Robertson, f. 
Kunz, c. 
Beard, g. 
Beddoes, g. 

Baskets: Morley, 2; Van Sickle 
2; Mayeau; Erickson, 2; Kunz, 2; 
Robertson, 4; Mayeau. 

•Tainiarj' 23 

Sicniors (4): 
Casjens, f. 
Kelly f. 
Legner, c. 
Stewart, g. 
Woods, g. 

Sophs (16): 

Beddoes, f. 
Erickson, f. 
Robertson, c. 
Martin, g. 
Beard, g. 

Baskets: Casjens, 2; Erickson, 
4; Robertson, 3; Beddoes. 



January 29 

Sophs (33): 
Robertson, f. 
Lobdell, f. 
Kunz, c. 
Beard, g. 
Beddoes, g. 

Frosh (8): 
Hause, f. 
Bergen, f. 
Virgil, c. 
Kelly, g. 
Ives, g. 

Baskets: Kunz, 8; Lobdell, 4; 
Robertson, 2; Beddoes; Virgil, 3; 
Kelly. 

Free Throws: Robertson, 3. 



GIRLS' INTERCLASS 

BASKET-BALL 



Each of the three lower class- 
es are able to boast a girls' bas- 
ket-ball team, which makes up 
for want of the skill and organ- 
ization possible only through 
continued practice, by a great 
amount of entJiusiasm and most 
energetic playing. A fourth 
team is to be made up of Seniors 
plus three girls of the Music 
School. Each team is to play 
every other team at least once_ 
and preferably twice. It may 
be advisable later to pick one 
especially good team from the 
entire number of players. Take 
notice, please! 

The first game was a practice 
one between Sophomores and 
Juniors, two of whom had not 
played before this year. No one 
kept score; so we shall call the 
game a tie. The first real game 
occurred on Tuesday evening of 
this last week. Freshmen against 
Juniors. It was a game distin- 
guished especially by close 
guarding so that but few bas- 
kets were made. At times it 
degenerated almost into a fight 
in the exuberance of the play- 
er's zeal. The final outcome 
was a 14-6 victory for the Fresh- 
men. Friday afternoon the 
Sophomores played the Juniors, 
who this time won their laurels 



THE STENTOR 



in a score of 26-18. The guard- 
ing in this game was much in- 
ferior, and the ability to shoot 
baskets correspondingly improv- 
ed. Witli more practice there 
is a good outlook for improved 
team work and technical skill. 
The line-ups were as follows: 

Juniors (first game) 

B. Worthley, f. 
V. Wales, f. 
R. Hendrickson, c. 
L. Ryno, g. 
E. Lichty, g. 

(Socoiul jjamc) 
L. Ryno, f. 
V. Wales, f. 
R. Hendrickson, c. 
R. Hecketsweiler, g. 
E. Lichty, g. 

Fresliineii 

K. Antrim, f. 
M. Campbell, f. 

D. Magee, c. 

E. Knox, g. 
D. Laing, g. 

Sophomores 

M. Mohr, f. 
V. Pettigrew, f. 
J. Clarke, c. 
R. Bridgeman, g. 
R. Kennedy, g. 
Referee and "would-be coach" 
— Miss Coan. 



G.IRRICK CLIB 3IEETS 



Y. W. C. A. 



Florence Newcomb, who is the 
Undergraduate Field Repres3n- 
tative of the Young Womens' 
Christian Associations of Law- 
rence, Milwaukee, Downer, Be- 
loit, and Lal^e Forest Colleges, 
made her visit to our associa- 
tion last Thursday evening. 
There was a general discussion 
on the proposed amendment to 
the constitution, for meml er- 
ship in the association, which is 
to be voted on in the National 
Convention to be held in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, in April. No defi- 
nite conclusion was reached so 
the discussion will he continued 
in our next association meeting. 



The Garrick Club met in the 
Chemistry lecture room at one 
p. m., Tuesday. Alberta Burrus, 
Rachel Hecketsweiler, Virginia 
Kratsch, Chai'les Beard, and Win- 
ston Dunlap were chosen as 
members for work done in "A 
Pair of Sixes." 

Other matters taken up were 
the election of a secretary and 
the question of joining a national 
dramatic society. Elsie Engel 
was elected to the secretarial 
post and instructed to carry on 
correspondence with a view to 
going national. 



THE Y. M. ('. A. BIBLE CLASS 



The first meeting of this new 
organization in Lake Forest was 
held last Wednesday evening 
with a big attendance, and ev- 
eryone had a lively, enjoyable 
time discussing timely religious 
questions of the day with Dr. 
Roberts. 

At the second meeting Hie 
subject will be "God." It v/ill 
be interesting to hear the .Ua- 
cussion on this everlasting, nev- 
er settled topic. All who hive 
ideas to express relating to tlie 
problem or who want to h?ar 
others' opinions are cordially in- 
vited. 



PERSONALS 



Florence Russell entertained 
the Kappa Kappa Chi's at her 
home on Sheridan Road, Sunday 
afternoon and evening. 

Lois Ryno, Esther Loop ;ind 
Rose Deutch heard Kreisler at 
the Auditorium Sunday after- 
noon. 

Elizabeth Blaisdell from Tvlil- 
v.aukee, spent the week end 
with Marjorie Campbell. 

Mr. Henry Graham visited his 
daughter Esther, Thursday. 

Gwendolyn Massey, Geraldine 
Massey and Sara Moore visited 
Theta Psi during the week end. 



KAPPA ALPHA FLECTrON 



Kappa Alpha takes pleasure 
in announcing the election of 
Delia Babcock to membership. 
Through her life at Lake Forest, 
she has maintained an excellent 
scholarship record and has 
shown a diversity of ability and 
splendid school spirit by her in- 
terest in student activities. 
Kappa Alpha feels proud to 
have such a member added to 
its ranks. 

Tuesday evening Florence 
Newcomb entertained the soci- 
ety at a very pretty little Val- 
entine Dinner for Miss Babcock. 
There were cunning little place- 
cards that gave evidence of a 
rc^al poet soniewhei'e in the fam- 
ily and in her own each girl saw 
herself as others characteristi- 
cally tliink of her. As a result 
of this get-together a great deal 
of enthusiasm for the future of 
the organization was aroused. 
The next and annual election of 
members takes place in May and 
the honors awarded will be an- 
nounced at commencement time. 
Tlie basis for election of new 
members will soon be announced 
and although the requirements 
may be somewhat higher this 
year than last it seems there 
are a number of strong possi- 
bilities for new members. Some 
of the coming tilings in which 
you may find a chance to gain 
student activity, points are, the 
operetta given by the girls glee 
club, the spring athletic events 
and new Garrick. tryouts. Next 
year Kappa Alpha is to have a 
room of its own in the Hall and 
we hope soon a strong honorary 
alumni chapter. 



Florence Coleman, of Indepen- 
dence, Iowa, was the guest of 
Josephine Clarke over the week 
end. 

Rebecca Armstrong visited 
friends in Oak Park over the 
week. end. 

Esther Loop spent the week 
end in Maywood, 111. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during Ihe ci^ 1- 
legiate year by the studenls of Lalie 
I'orest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20 
Ralph Stewart, 20. 
Elaine Kellog, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy assisted by the 
women of Lois Durand Hall. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herrcke, '20 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
W. G. MeColley, '21 
Alberta Burris '2H 
Rosa Deutoh '23 
Elizabeth Torre>s.in "22 

Professor W. R. Hridynian 

I- aeully and Alumni. 

Entered at the post c flicc of LmUp 
Forest, Illinois, as s-econd c■hls^ 
matter. 



THE PRIXC'll'LES OF PEACE 



The world is at peace. Some- 
times it seems that this cannot 
be true because there is almost 
more unrest now that the hos- 
tilities are over than there was 
when the war was actually rag- 
ing-. The world is fighting- a 
great battle now, a battle as 
severe as any which was fought 
during the war. On every side 
we hear people talking about 
the good old days. It is because 
of this appalling spirit of rest- 
lessness that has swept over the 
world that people are looking 
Ijackward with a longing for the 
peaceful times that we once en- 
joyed. The people of to-day are 
craving- something of the peace 
which the people of the eigh- 
teenth centui'y enjoyed. This 
century was one of restfulness, 
the spirit of which is reflected 
through all the literature of the 
time. It is too bad that we 



cannot lose some of this high 
strung nervousness that is un- 
dermining the happiness of the 
human race. 

This spirit of unrest has not 
been lacking in our own college 
community. We have all felt 
that there is nothing peaceful 
about the atmosphere on our 
campus. This is of course the 
nat'ural result of the trend of 
the times which has brought 
about all these undesirable con- 
ditions. Let us hope that we 
will soon see this turmoil be- 
coming quiet and a friendly spir- 
it again maintained toward all. 

There is no reason why we 
cannot help the hastening of 
this day by an earnest attempt 
to work together in oneness of 
purpose and of thought. This 
is the one thing that has been 
lacking and the one thing which 
would make for a bigger, better 
college community. We have 
everything that is necessary to 
bring about this ideal condition 
if we would only work together. 
The secret of it all is that of 
pulling together and losing our- 
selves in the work for the com- 
mon good. 

Note: The above was inspir- 
ed by the editorial in last week's 
Stentor, entitled " Red and 
Black." We agree. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT— AGAIN 



School spirit is a topic of vital 
interest to all students and one 
which is frequently discussed. 
Perhaps to some outsider the 
term school spirit might seem 
vague, but every student should 
know so well the meaning of 
those words that a definition 
would be unnecessary. Spirit is 
a manifestation of life or en- 
erg-y. Spirit is animation and 
cheerfulness. Therefore school 
spirit is a manifestation of en- 
ergy or life on behalf of one's 
school or college. Wherever 
there are young people, there 
is life, energy, and enthusiasm 



to a certain extent; but some 
have more of this spirit than 
others. One of the finest things 
to be said in praise of a school 
is that the students love their 
school so much that everywhere 
they go, they carry enthusiasm 
and praise for their Alma Mater. 
If a student body has strong 
school spirit there is sure to be 
contentment and happiness. It 
is the duty of every student to 
work first of all for his college. 
Sororities or fraternities often 
divide a student's interests so 
that sometimes sorority or frat- 
ernity spirit dominates school 
spirit, arid where this occurs the 
school is sure to suffer. The 
above mentioned organizations 
are important, to be sure, in the 
social life of a school, and when 
they fulfill their purpose, name- 
ly "the improvement of the col- 
lege as a whole through the bet- 
terment of their individual 
members" they are a great as- 
set to school spirit; but the dan- 
ger that these organizations 
might allow politics to enter in- 
to school life has to be guarded 
against. 

Of course when we say school 
spirit we immediately think of 
some game at which special in- 
terest, enthusiasm, and lots of 
pep were displayed — but this is 
not the only way we can show 
school spirit, even though it is 
of the best and rnost manifest 
ways of showing our interest in 
school life. There are countless 
other ways, though less appar- 
ent, in which to show interest — 
little deeds of kindness and 
helpfulness which seem perhaps 
too small to be noticed but 
which count so rnuch toward a 
richer, fuller life. No indeed! 
Tlie football field is not the only 
place we need spirit. Every 
day we can show spirit by be- 
ing respectful to our faculty by 
attentiveness and earnestness in 
our classes and in our work; by 
being cheerful rather thaii 
grumbling; by entering into 
school life with energy. Not 



THE STENTOR 



merely in class do we need more 
energy, but in all activities of 
school life we should make the 
most of our surrounding's by us- 
ing every available advantage. 
Why are there not more contri- 
butions to our school paper ? 
Are we asleep waiting for some- 
one to arouse us from our day 
dreams or just passively using 
the "watchful waiting policy" 
while we allow others to sur- 
pass us? Letting George do it 
all, eh? 

Let it not be said that Lake 
Forest College lacks spirit! 
Therefore let us he loyal in word 
thought and action to Lake For- 
est College! 



NOW TS THE TDIE 



Examinations come all too 
soon and we find it necessary to 
take inventory of our knowl- 
edge. The result is discourag- 
ing. We begin to wonder if we 
have ever studied, and if so, 
why can't we remember any- 
thing? The answer is plain 
enough. We have studied, per- 
haps, but not in seriousness. 
What we have learned we hf.ve 
tried to retain just long enough 
to get us safely through a reci- 
tation. It was not the knowl- 
edge itself we worked for, it 
was merely the mark which the 
knowledge would bring. We did 
not take into consideration that 
we come to college to gain in- 
formation which may be of use 
to us in our after years, things 
which will give practical help 
in the solving of life's difficul- 
ties and problems. But how can 
we hope to benefit by a Colloge 
Education when Ave mistreat it 
as we do — learning from day to 
day, and forgetting in the same 
manner? And then suddenly 
exams are upon us and we fnd 
ourselves up against it! The 
worst of it is that we have noth- 
ing to show as a profit for the 
things we did when we sho dd 
have been studying. They wore 



pleasures of the moment, noth- 
ing more, and most of them so 
trifling as to be already forgot- 
ten. Of course, a person can 
"cram" at the last moment and 
possibly pass a fair examination. 
He may even get a "B" in the 
course. But after all, what is 
the result of such studying? It 
will not stay with us, and a re- 
port card, even with "A's" and 
"B's" will be of little use when 
you are out of college! Then it 
is that you will find that it is 
knowledge itself which counts 
for most. This is the time for 
the making of new resolutions. 
This is your opportunity; make 
it count! June, and another ser- 
ies of final examinations come 
unbelievably soon. Why not 
have some actual knowledge in 
reserve for that time, and evei-y 
other as well? 



THOSE GALOSHES 

We often wonder what a girl 
is thinking about when she 
comes toddling across the cam- 
pus with those overshoes flop- 
ping open and attracting the at- 
tention of everyone she meets. 
Is it a sign of superior intelli- 
gence, is it custom, or is it sim- 
ply a new fangled idear? What- 
ever it is, we are sure that it 
is the most disgusting new idear 
that has struck this campus in 
a long while. It stands to rea- 
son that if those overshoes had 
been intended to be worn as 
they are on our campus, then 
the makers would have left all 
the fasteners off and thus saved 
you something on the price of 
aforesaid article. As it is how- 
ever, the fasteners were' put 
there for a purpose — so let's use 
them! 

As a matter of fact, a little 
more attention to one's dress 
and general appearance on the 
campus might be given by the 
men as well as the women. It 
is a thing which counts for very 
little in reality, but which 
means much in this day and age, 



due to the demands of custom 
and prestige. At any rate, let 
us make the best of the material 
we have to work with, put on 
a bold front and face the world 
squarely; but above all, either 
fasten up those overshoes and 
wear them as they should be 
worn, or else leave them at 
honie!!! Thank you! 



EMOTIONALISM 

VS. 
REASON 



Among the differing classes 
of people niet with in the ebb 
and flow of daily life, there are, 
together with the many others, 
two distinct and opposite per- 
sonalities. 

One of these is the logician. 
He may not possess skill of an 
extraordinary degree, but nev- 
ertheless his forte is reason. 
He is the individual who at- 
tempts to state a case clearly 
and dispassionately. He never 
attempts to stampede judge- 
ment by pandering to the fears 
of his fellows 

Opposed to the logician is the 
sensationalist, or, in conformity 
with the sul)ject, the emotional- 
ist. In this connection it may 
be well to question, "What is 
emotionalism — how is it possible 
to differentiate and classify sen- 
sationalism in its various kinds 
and degrees?" Emotion, accord- 
ing to psychology, is a mass of 
sensations, organic and tactual, 
set up by instinctive reaction. 
It then follows that that which 
stirs within the individual a 
vague and unclarified resent- 
ment or fear; or by soaring 
gaudily into the heights of 
propaganda, seeks to dethrone 
reason is sensationalisni. It is 
physical as opposed to psychical 
or mental. It is the tour de 
force of the politician when 
seeking to sway ignorant or un- 
thinking people. It is bombas- 
tic, rather than possessed of the 
restraint of good breeding. Its 

Continued on Pape Six.) 



THE STENTOR 



chief delight is the exclamation 
point. 

At times it would oeem that 
certain contributors of The 
Stentor are tempted to indulge 
in tornadic verbiage. If quota- 
tion is permissible, two extracts 
from the article 'Red and Black' 
which appeared in the issue of 
last week, are exemplary bits 
of evidence. The first read as. 
follows: "What a day may bring 
forth on this campus, no one is 
wise enough to phrophesy. We 
can only stand aghast at the 
movements of tremendous for- 
ces that appear to be as much 
beyond the control of men as 
are the earthquake and the 
\\hirlwind." From any point of 
view such stuff is sentimental 
tommyrot, or worse. If taken 
in connection with world prob- 
lems, for which the Hearst ed- 
itorial from which this was lift- 
ed, was intended, it might be 
justifiable. This is perhaps to 
be expected, however, for his- 
tory has scarcely ever shown 
the emotionalist to be an indi- 
vidual of particular scruple. 

To say what part the writer 
of the article in question played 
in the World War is not possi- 
ble, but it is a safe venture to 
assert that the "World-Democra- 
cy which we were supposed to 
have won in the recent war," 
is the remark of one whose part 
was extremely negligible, for 
otherwise there would have 
been certain qualifications. 

Thus far, this comment has 
been largely negative in tone, 
and in conclusion it is advisable i 
to return to the positive aspect 
as displayed by reason. 

As all animals have emotions, 
it is the ability to reason that 
distinguishes the man from the 
brute. Reason is intellectual; 
a calm and analytic endeavor to 
classify conditions and facts. 
Reason may even be said to 
plead for a hearing of the facts, 
of all the facts, and nothing 
but the facts. 



Space, however, forbids an ex- 
tension of this article at the 
present time, though in passing 
it might be appropriate to say 
that it is indeed pleasing to feel 
the force of conviction so strong- 
ly that the appending of one's 
name thereto is considered an 
honor 

W. G. McColley, Jr. 21. 



AVHAT IS SIN? 



The word "sin" is used in tv.'o 
significations. Sometimes sin is 
an act and sometimes i'. is a 
state. As an act it is a trans- 
gression of the law. We all 
know what sin as an act is. It 
is a lie, a theft, a bitter word, 
a cruel deed, some specific move- 
ment of heart, or mind, or 
tongue, which, brings upon us 
the sense of condemnation. 
However it is the sins of action 
which trouble our conscience 
most when we are young. But 
sin of action is not all. There 
is a sin of condition. We may 
be sinners and still be doing no 
sinful act. This vitiated condi- 
tion of our nature is due in part 
to our own repeated wrong 
choices and actions, and it is due 
in part to the continued trans- 
gressions of our ancestors. Sin 
is self-registering, and every 
wrong choice leave its mark up- 
on the fibre of the man that 
makes it. 

As we get older it is not the 
sin of act that disturbs us most. 
It is not the individual sin, but 
the sin of state or condition that 
should cause us to worry. None 
of us can exist and live our life 
entirely without sin, but let us 
be thankful that we can so keep 
our manhood that we can regret 
our faults and go on with a new 
resolution to avoid them in the 
future. If we preserve the at- 
titude of hating sin, we can 
largely overcome it. Sin is not 
a necessity. If it be a necessity, 
then man is nothing but a pup- 
pet, a tool, a puny weakling not 



responsible for his doings, not 
capable of meriting penalty or 
reward. But it is not a neces- 
sity. The saneheaded Shake- 
speare declared that it was the 
foppery of the world to say that 
men are sinners by heavenly 
compulsion. "Man is free; man 
is responsible; man is created 
in God's image; he can create a 
heaven, he can create a hell. 
He will stand some day before 
God's judgment bar and receive 
the deeds done in the body." 



Those who are satisfied with 
what they have accomplished 
will never become famous for 
what they might accomplish . 

No first class phonograph is 
ashamed of its record. 

Laugh and the world laughs 
with you; growl and the world 
laughs at you. 

The Avise man adroitly tries to 
conceal his ignorance, while the 
fool awkwardly attempts to dis- 
play his knowledge. 



"Son. why are you always be- 
hind in your studies?" 

"So that I may pursue them, 
father." — Ex. 



Virginia Hopkins spent the 
week end at her home in Prince- 
ton, 111. 

Florence Coleman of Inde- 
pendence. Iowa visited from 
Thursday until Saturday with 
Josephine Clark. 

R. Burnell Phillips, '18, visit- 
ed Kappa Sigma last week-end. 

Charles Thayer, '16, and Chas. 
Perrigo, ex. '19, were Phi Pi vis- 
itors Sunday. 

Mr. Irwin T. Gilruth, of Chi- 
cago, was the guest of Mr. Sib- 
ley over the week-end. 

Phi Eta Alpha announces the 
initiation of Harold Marsolf and 
Earl Ryan. 



THE STENTOU 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Large 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Statiiinery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLL^NCES 

in Great Vai-iety and 
at Attractive Prices 
at our Salesrooms 

Public Service Co. 

OF NORTHERN ILLINOIS 



THE POOR UNDERGRAD 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 

Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 

DR. E. E. GRAHAM 



DENTIST 



If he doesn't like his profs, 
he is a crab; if he says he does, 
he is looking f(jr a soft mark. 

If he admits he likes girls, he 
is a ladies' man; if he doesn't 
admit it, they say he is conceal- 
ing something. 

If he makes a team, he has 
a pull with the coach; if he 
doesn't make it, he must be 
pretty poor. 

If he studies, he is a grind; if 
he doesn't study, he's stupid. 

If he says he doesn't like col- 
lege, no one listens to him; if 
he says he does, no one believes 
him. 



Blackler Bldg. Tel. 310 
LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind v.'e 
have in our store. 




-eUe^M- 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 5 1 
- ILLINOIS 



Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalle St. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscar l*iei*iioo 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 

l>AKI<: l^-«»KI<:»T. . , ILL. 

FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath .ind Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago. Lake Forest Commntation 

Tickets 

:ta ItRKRHAXH. WEST 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaiiiiif/, I'rissinij. Tlepairinij 



Hartman & Hartman 

■THE LAKE FORESTER" 

PRINTERS 
DESIGNERS 
ENGRAVERS 

Lake Forest, - - Illinois 

1 its Baked ;it HUN' I'd 'MS it-i Haked Rlgbt 

W. G. HUNTOON . 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



i 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 



By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington 
Well here we are back to 
peace time once more. Now for 
the reconstruction after the war. 
I suppose you are all recon- 
structing' your new year's reso- 
lutions to make good. It's a big 
problem ain't it? Don't worry 
though, if you have any troubles 
just send them in to The Incu- 
bator and all will be well. 

It sure must look like a pretty 
hard year ahead for the dear 
boys, with leap year and the 
presidential election both leap- 
ing upon them at the same time 
Love and politics never did mix 
well anyway. 

Perhaps things wouldn't look 
so bad if you still had old John 
with you, but then cheer up 
boys, even if we ladies have tak- 
en to smoking black cigars, you 
still have your old corncobs and 
grapejuice. On with the fray. 
The coming battles can't be any 
worse than the past week of 
storm. 
Dear Incubator: 

My sweetheart insists upon 
calling me dear. What do you 
think he means by it? Do you 
suppose he wants me to pro- 
pose? It's leap year I know, 
but he isn't usually bashful. 
Please tell me why he calls me 
dear? 

Yours demurely, 

Blue-eyes. 
Dear Blue-eyes: 

Perhaps it's because he's been 
footing the bills for some time. 

H. B, 0. 



Dear Knnutt: 

If you spend a few more years 

mastering the Arabic tongue you 

would be best fitted to become 

a telephone operator in Egypt. 

Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington. 



J. B. Veselsky 

Ladies' and Men's Tailor 
Cleaning and Pressing 

Attder.'oiii liiiildhu/. J'lioiif- 855 
LAKK ton EST. I LI.. 



Dear H. B. 0.: 

I am about to receive my doc- 
tor's degree. I am particularly 
well versed in the English, 
French, Italian and Greek lang- 
uages and have a smattering of 
the Arabic. What line of life 
do you think I am best suited 
for? 

Yours anticipatingly. 

Eve ret Knnutt. 



'Tis a grand and glorious feelin,' 
When exams are drawing nigh. 
And you wish your marks were 

high; 
When reviews are in full swing; 
And you sit up late at nights, 
Wastin' coin on 'lectric lights: 
And your mind you vainly cram 
For that history exam; 
Then to school you sadly come 
Feeling very, very glum; 
And your teacher says that ye 
i Have passed iij history. 
Tlien there's joy beyond conceal- 
in' 
'Tis a grand, a glorious feelin'. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 

STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

5 09 Central Ave. Highland Par 

Pearl Theatre 

SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the Best of Pictures are Shown 

Shows 7:00-10:35 p. m. 

Matinee Saturday 2:30 p. m. 

Phones 341, 342, 343 

C. T. GUNN CO, 

GROCERS 

The Place to Get Good Things to Eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies 
Curtice Bros.. Goods LAKE FOREST 



^IIIIIHIIIII 



lll'lllli 



It ain't the guns nor armorment 
Nor the funds that they can pay, 
It's the close co-operation 
That always wins the day. 
It ain't the individual. 
Nor the army as a whole; 
It's the everlastin' team work 
Of ever' bloomin' soul. 

Let's see, who was it that said 
this? Well, it doesn't matter. 
But anyway, let's apply it to 
Lake Forest College. 




Word comes from Carl W. 
Hellberg, '18, that he plans to 
leave within a very short time 
for Japan in connection with the 
Uuited tSates Consular Service 
in that country. 



Some of our young people 
who were wont to follow the 
straight and narrow path last 
year, seem to be deviating from 
the path of rectitude. For par- 
ticulars see Gertrude Gifford. 



Is she a highbrow? 
No, a low neck. 



Hams and Bacon i 



I are mild, | 

I sweet, tender. | 

I Each piece is care- | 

I fully selected and | 

I cmed to give it the | 

I distinctive "Premium" | 

1 flavor. 

1 Ask, for ' 'Premium" Products 

j Swift & Company ; 

I U. S. A. I 



^illlllillllilllllllillllilillllllilllllilllllilllliiillillllilllilllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiila 



THE STENTOR 



ALL >INI NEWS 



1893. Albert Woelfel, M. D., 
5327 University Ave., Chicaoro, 
died January 31 after a brief 
illness. Born at Mon-is, 111., in 
1871, he was a student here in 
1889-91, afterwards studied medi- 
cine at John Hopkins and var- 
ious European universites. For 
a number of years he was in 
charge of the physiological lab- 
oratory at the University of Chi- 
cago, and active in research 
work, but latterly he has been 
director of the Physicians' Rad- 
ium Association of Chicago and 
a specialist in bacteriology. Dr. 
Woefel married Gertrude Ross of 
Morris, as tudent here in 1899- 
1900, and leaves her a son and 
two daughters. 

1895. We have only recently 
received the painful news of the 
death by drowning or exposui'e, 
on November 12 last, of Howard 
and Burton, sons of Mrs. G. T. 
(Hattie Phelps) Blamer, of Inde- 
pendence, Iowa. The boys, 18 
and 14, had started out early f ir 
duck-hunting, as they had oft'^n 
done before. It was very cold 
and windy, and the presumption 
is that their boat filled, so that 
they had to swim for safe'y 
(both good swimmers) but were 
chilled to death rather than 
drowned. The older boy was a 
Senior in high school, a leader in 
all school activities, and of high- 
ly regarded character, and the 
younger of similar promise. Mrs. 
Blamer 's Lake Forest friends 
who have not previously knor.'n 
of this disaster will wish to ex- 
tend to her their deepest sym- 
pathy. 

1919. Miss Gwendolyn Mass3y 
is in charge of the correspond- 
ence and advertising of the for- 
eign department of the Chicago 
Tailors' Association, 515 S Frank- 
lin Str., Chicago, residing with 
her family at 1452 Fargo Ave. 



MULLER'vS 

TKe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 



The ROOT STUDIO 

Kimball Hall 
Jackson and Wabash 

Fraternity and Sorority 
Work Our Specialty 

TELEPHONE 1039 

Lake Forest Home Bakery 

38 DEERPATH 

A BERTSCHINGER, Proprietor 

BREAD CAKES ROLLS 

Hirtluhiv Mnii Other Spf.iijl i';il;i-- In ( irdi-r 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. '^ Market Square 

MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for Womens and Childrens 
Furnishings 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 

Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Auton'obile Supplies Baggage Transferred 

Seven Passenger C'lus to Rent by Trip or Hour 



L. GREENBURG 

Electric Shoe Repairing 

NEW SHOES 

RUBBERS 

55 Deerpath Ave. LAKE FOREST 



PERFECT VENTILATION 
ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF 

Academy Theatre 

WAUKEGAN 

BEST PICTURES AND STARS 
BEST MUSIC AND COMFORTS 



Offer the Services of a Competent ftaff 
whose aid in selecting and whoce tvg- 
geslions may be followed confidently 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN 
GERIE, CORSETS. PETTI- 
COATS, UNDERWEAR. 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



-PHONE 881 



Spalding Sweaters 




A STYLE IN THE 
TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR- 
POSE 

Send for 
Cataloffuc 



SPALDING & BROS. 



KASMUSSEN 15R0S. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



M .\ R K E T SQUARE 



INI (S F=? A V I ISI <S 



i=>F=?ii^"rirsf<^ 



■<uri=.i"rir^'cs c:z/\r=irD'^ 

^ ~r A. -ri CD iM e: i=? Y 
11^ vi-r.A -^ICID^-l^ 

HIGHLAND PARK PRESS 

HOWARD WOOD, Lake I'orest Agent 



THE STENTOR 




Gener?.tor rt-om of one of the hydro-electric 
plants which L-appIy powei iothe C. M. t St. P. 



The Power of Electricity 
in Transportation 



Some Advantages of 
Railroad Electrification 

Savinti the Nation's coal 
Lower maintenance costs. 

Gron'er reliability and fewer 

tlelays. 

Ability to haul smootlily 
l.c.ivier trair.9 at higiier 
speed. 

Operntion of electric locomo- 
tives unaffected by extreme 
cold. 

Abili'y to brake trains on 
liescendinj; grades by re- 
t J ruing po\A/er to the trolley. 



■pLECTRICITY has leveled out 
-'--' the Continental Divide. The 
steam locomotive, marvelous as it is 
after a century of development, can- 
not meet all of the presentdemandsfor 
transportation facilities. Its electric 
rival has proved to be far superior. 

On the mountain divisions of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway — the world's greatest elec- 
trification—giant electric locomotives 
today lift an ever increasing freight 
tonnage over the mile-high Rockies 
and also make traveling clean and 
comfortable. They utilize the abun- 
dant energy of distant waterfalls and 
then, by returning some of this 
power to the trolley, safely brake the 
trains on descending grades. And 
their capabilities are not impaired 
by excessively cold weather when the 
Steam engine is frozen and helpless. 



Electricity is the power which 
drives the trains of New York City's 
subway and elevated systems. It 
operates the locks and tows the ships 
through the Panama Canal. It pro- 
pels the Navy's latest super-dread- 
naught, the iVew Mexico. Electric 
mine locomotives have replaced the 
slow-moving mule and the electric 
automobile has also come to do an im- 
portant service. Such achievements 
were made possible by the extensive 
research and manufacturing activities 
of the General Electric Company. 

Electricity has become the universal 
motive power. It has contributed 
efficiency and comfort to every form 
of transportation service and in this 
evolution General Electric apparatus 
has played a large part — from 
mighty electric locomotives to 
the tiny lamp for the automobile. 





General Office 
Schenectady, N.Y. 



Sales Offices in 

all latge cities 9j-u8d 



THE STENTOR 



DID YOU EVER STOP 

TO THINK THAT 



Tennyson could take a worth- 
less sheet of paper, write a 
poem on it, and make it worth 
$65,000. That's Genius. 

Some men can sign a check for 
$50,000 and make it worth it. 
That's Capital. 

The U. S. Government can 
take silver worth 50 cents and 
make it worth one dollar. That's 
Money. 

A mechanic can take material 
worth $5.00 and make it into a 
watch spring- worth $50.00. 
That's Skill. 

Howard Chandler Christy can 
take a 50 cent piece of canvas 
and paint a picture on it worth 
hundreds of dollars. That's Art. 

A merchant can take an arti- 
cle worth 75 cents and sell it 
for $1.00. That's Business. 

A girl can buy a hat for $29.99. 
Tliat's Vanity. 

Some fellows can go to col- 
lege four years and know less 
than when they entered. That's 
Foolishness. 

Lenine and Trotzky, claim 
they can make all their follow- 
ers happy, as a maximum of 
only six hours a week is requir- 
ed. That's Bolshevism. 

The author of this Jinide 
could write a check for $90,000, 
but it wouldn't be worth a cent. 
That's Tough. 

The Jester. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencK's Drufi Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 

L.H.W.SPEIDEL 
Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



WHAT MEN LIKE IN WOMF.N 



Looks 

Brains 

Looks 

Money 

Looks 

Flattery 

Looks 

Responsiveness 

Less Lux 

Looks 



CIGARS 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORSE 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

L = ke Forest, Illinois 



( 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

•t is Dainty, Home like and at Atlractiv» 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



C.G.Wenban&Son 

TAXI CABS 

Phone 22 LAKE FOREST, ILL 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 



F e: D 



RA L 



It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST. ILL' 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
a Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



llllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllM 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economic?, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2; full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Korest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territury. A\[ students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to |400 for men; §350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, are 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDENT'S OKHICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



111 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C.W.YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH. 

Dentists i 

200 Westminister East Telephone 110: 

Office Hours: j 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p, m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS j 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 


STATE BANK of LAKE 


FOREST 


"MARKET SQUARE' 




Combined Capital and Surplus 


$140,000.00 



TI S E 



.own^N' 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 

* in the country. Safeguarded from 

Cow to Consumer. : : 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectionerg 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

W HEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VU^'ROLA 

Clutliiii;! and 
I^^ii rii i M li i II gs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Special'y 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

UK />(> UEl'AlltlNO 

PhuiiP 709 Western .'\ve. Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, FEBRUARY 20, 1920 



NUMBER 16 



RED AND BLACK HOLDS VALPO 



LOIS HALL HAS 

NEW FURNITUKE 



At last it ihas come. No, not 
Universal Women's Suffrage — 
nothing so inimportant as that 
— but furniture for the "Big 
Room" of Lois Hall. 

Tuesday the doors were 
thrown open to a scene that 
Lois Hallers have dreamt about 
and told would-be Lois Hallers 
about (with a guilty feeling) 
for years. The room was fur- 
nished. There wore curtains, 
cushions, a gray rug, mahogany 
chairs, a beautiful table, and 
best of all a davenport. 

The girls are already dating 
up the sofa for Sunday nights. 
One freshman said she was [o- 
ing to do without dinner in or- 
der to get it for her suitor aid 
herself. 

All of us wish to thank Miss 
Hamilton for her efforts in get- 
ting the furniture. Everyone 
is invited over to the Hall to be 
properly impressed by it. No, 
we're not fishing for dates. 



NEWS 

Sigma Tau announces the in- 
itiation of Lois Conklin, Sarah 
Joyner, Helen Eggemeyer, rnd 
Katherine Bartel. 

Theta Psi announces the initia- 
tion of Alberta Burrus. 

Mary Alice Metzger spent the 
week-end with Lois Conklin in 
Oak Park. 

Sue Spaulding entertained her 
mother part of last week. 



Indiana Team Wins After Hard Fought 
Game With Lake Forest 



Playing the best game of ball 
seen on the local floor this year, 
the Red and Black held the liig 
team from Valparaiso to a 25 
to 28 score. 

Valparaiso is one of the best 
of the smaller University teams, 
having defeated Purdue Univer- 
sity early in the season. 

The pace was fast throughout, 
and began to tell on the Val- 
paraiso boys in the last half. 
Lake Forest scored first, Eddy 
shooting a foul. Valpo then 
took the lead when Gilbert scor- 
ed a neat field basket. He soon 
repeated, making them 3 points 
ahead, but the score was scon 
tied at seven all. Lake Forest 
threatened to take the lead lait 
two fouls caged by Bradley put 
the Valpo team out of danf;er 
for the time being. The first 
half ended with Valparaiso lead- 
ing 16 to 10. 

The Red and Black opened the 
second half, full of fight and de- 
termined to win. A long field 
shot and two from the foul line 
by Eddy soon cut down the lead. 
Bradley caged two long ones and 
Valpra'aiso led liy six points 
again. Coleman replaced Hale 
and Eddy was placed at guard. 
Red made a neat basket and re- 
peated, placing Lake Forest 
within three points of victory. 
A basket by Sumner and one by 
Goheen balanced and we still 
lacked three points. Manning- 
caged a difficult shot and the 



crowd went wild, but our team 
lacked the final punch to score 
another basket. Captain Brad- 
ley located the basket for anoth- 
er two points and the game end- 
ed with Valparaiso three points 
to the good. 

The foul shooting of right for- 
ward Bradley was the deciding 
factor of the game. He made 
eight points out of sixteen at- 
tempts. 

The team work and fighting 
spirit of the Red and Black was 
the best displayed by the team 
this year and they certainly de- 
serve credit for the fight they 
put up against a larger and more 
experienced team. 

There was no outstanding star 
on either team as team work 
played a more important part 
and has improved the playing 
of our men. 

Lake Forest 25: 

B. F. P. T. 

Eddy, rf. 2 4 12 
Manning, If. 2 10 1 

Coleman, rf. 2 1 

Russell, c. 3 2 

Sumner, rg. 10 3 2 

Hale, Ig. 11 



Valparaiso 


28: 








B. 


F. 


p. 


T. 


Bradley, rf. 


4 


8 








Gilbert, If. 


2 





1 


4 


Haas, c. 


2 





2 





Bandelet, rg. 








3 





Gaheen, Ig. 


2 








2 



THE STENTOR 



MATERIAL NEEDED 

FOR THE FORESTER 



At a meeting of the Forester 
Board this weelt, it was found 
that there is great need for 
student co-operation in many 
ways for the next few weeks, in 
order that the Forester may be 
sent to press on time and that 
it may come up to tlie standard 
which the board has set for tlie 
1921 Forester. 

First of all, every Senior anil 
Junior in the school is asked to 
turn into the Forester board the 
following information, just as 
soon as possible: Full name, date 
and place of birth, college activ- 
ities in full, and any other in- 
formation that might be desir- 
able in writing up their person- 
al history for the Forester. If 
anyone feels so inclined, they 
may write up their own history 
and it will be acceptable with- 
out a doubt. The idea is to get 
this detailed information ii: the 
hands of the board some time 
before February 25th. Then 
the board wants any amount of 
snap-shots that would be fit to 
use in the Forester, as well as 
some jokes, bit of art, and any- 
thing that will add to the at- 
tractiveness and interest of the 
college annual. 

The Forester Board is work- 
ing under numerous difficulties 
this year, with no foundation or 
working basis for the current 
annual; so it is up to the stu- 
dent body to get busy and give 
them a lift or else let the mat- 
ter drop entirely and fall back 
into the war-time rut. 

Finally, there are a number 
of students who have not sub- 
scribed to the Forester as yet 
and a number of others who 
have not paid their subscription, 
as well. This is one of the es- 
sential elements that go to make 
up a good publication, so let's 
get busy and back up Mr. Hale 
as business manager of the For- 
ester. It has been suggested 
that a "black-list" be run in the 



DON WOODS LEAVES 



With the close of the first 
semester and the graduation of 
Donald C. Woods, Lake Forest 
College lost one of its most ac- 
tive and popular students. 

Donald Woods entered Lake 
Forest in the fall of 1915 and 
took an active part in all college 
activities during his first three 
years here. During 1918, Mr. 
Woods was an ensign in the 
United States Navy, returning 
to c(jllcge this fall to complete 
his course. Don won his first 
letter in football during his 
sophomore year and took a very 
active part in athletics through- 
out his college career. He was 
captain of the Varsity football 
team this year and an active 
member of the Athletic Board 
of Control. He has been a mem- 
ber of the men's Glee Club 
throughout his four years here, 
was business manager of the 
Stentor for two years and help- 
ed get out the Forester in 1917. 
As a matter of fact. Woods was 
one of those students who was 
always willing to do his part in 
all college activities and is a 
man who will be greatly missed 
by the college as well as by the 
men of his fraternity. 

Nevertheless he goes with 
the best wishes of the faculty 
and the student body at large, 
for his success and happiness in 
the future. 



Stentor of those who did not 
sul)scribe for the Forester. That 
is rather a drastic measure, but 
it has been done, and might 
work well here as a last resort. 
Let us hope, however, that 
the finance, co-operation, and 
contributionss will be forth- 
coming without further urging; 
so that we can get the Forester 
out of the way before the spring 
rush overtakes us. 



Davy (gazing upward): "Does 
the moon affect the tide?" 
Edna: "No, only the untied." 



AL13INI PUBLISH BULLETIN 



The first issue of a new pub- 
lication, of which the main pur- 
pose is to work for the best in- 
terests of our College, appeared 
last week. Its slogan is: "Boost 
for a bigger and better Lake 
Forest." Its name is The Lake 
Forest College News-Bulletin. 

Stewart D. Marquis is editor 
of the new paper. H. L. Bird, 
S. E. Gruenstein, and Miss Carol 
Welch are associate editors. It 
will be published monthly and 
mailed to everyone of the alumni 
whose address is known. In ad- 
dition to news of the upbuild- 
ing movement, there will be in 
each issue a department for per- 
sonal items of the doings of the 
alumni. 

As the slogan suggests, the 
aim of this new publication is 
to build up and improve Lake 
Forest College in every particu- 
lar. Elsewhere in this Stentor 
you will find an admirable state- 
ment of the things which need 
doing under the head "What 
Lake Forest Needs." Every un- 
dergraduate should read this ar- 
ticle. All of us at some time or 
another have more or less has- 
tily formed and expressed ideas 
of what the Colleeg needs. Here 
for once we have a careful an- 
alysis of the situation which we 
should all study in order to help 
out in what we can now, and to 
have a definite program in mind 
when we ourselves have become 
alumni. 

We cannot select a President, 
we cannot increase the endow- 
ment, now; but we can bring 
students here and we can im- 
prove "every present college ac- 
tivity." Let us, too, "Boost for 
a Bigger and Better Lake For- 
est." 



Lois Hall's flocked by men ga- 
lore. 
But the man whom all adore, 
Is the man who bears a sack 
Full of letters, on his back. 



THE STENTOR 



TWO CREEDS 



To live my life in my own way,, 

Unhelped by other men; 

To dig out fortune with my 

hands, 
To pay my bills — and then — 
To face life's trials in my own 

strength, 
To bear the brunt alone; 
To taste the joy; to stand the 

pain 
As other men have done — 
That is my plan 

To take the blame for any loss 
My errors make for me; 
To whimper none; to ask no aid; 
Expect no sympathy; 
To rule myself in every sphere 
My lot may hap to fall; 
To share no social order's fun; 
Be left alone — that's all — 
That is my aim 

And when it comes to death's 

last call. 
To answer like a man; 
To stand upon the record made 
In life by my own plan; 
To have no fears, r morse or 

shame 
For anything I've done; 
To ask but this: 'That I be left 
As I have lived — alone' — 
That is my hope 

II 

To live my life with other men 
Where they are wont to live; 
To work with hand and brain 

and will; 
To pay my bills — and give 
What little surplus strength I 

have 
Toward making burdens light; 
To share men's joys' to know 

their pain; 
And help them bring in right — 
That is my plan 

To recognize the debt I owe 
For things that I possess; 
To realize that Freedom's price 
Was other men's distress; 
To ask not to be humored, but 



Y. AV. C. A. TAKES 

STRAAV VOTE ON 
MEMBERSHIP 

A3IENDMENT 



The regular associated meet- 
ing of the Y. W. last Thursday 
was a combination of a song ser- 
vice and a business meeting. 
After singing old favorite songs 
a straw vote was taken on the 
amendment to the constitution 
for a new basis for membership, 
which is to be voted on at the 
National Convention in April. 
The local association is opposed 
to the amendment: there were 
twelve votes for it and twenty- 
one against it. 



A C'iJiMMON (H'CL'RIJENCE 



He knelt before me a perfect- 
ly groomed figure, with a look of 
earnest pleading on his smooth- 
shaven face. His black brows 
were slightly raised, and his 
large, expressive eyes searched 
mine. His sleek black hair was 
parted in the center on a line 
with his straight nose. Mis 
mouth and chin had a look of 
determination that made me 
feel powerless before him. 

"Well, I'll take the shoes," I 
said. 

He arose, bowing courteously. 

'T thank you madam." — Life. 



To minister as one 
Who is a part of social life 
And not recluse, alone — 
That is my aim 

And when my service ]\ere is 

done, 
I ask no higher good 
Than just to share the service 

there 
Where all's a brotherhood; 
To make no blatant boast of 

worth 
For good works I have done. 
But trust the grace of God, and 

thank 
Mankind — not self alone — 
That is my hope 

J. C. McCoy. 



COLLEGE DAY 



Sunday, February 29, will be 
College Day at the Methodist 
Sunday School. Special atten- 
tion will be given to people from 
the college on that day. All of 
you are cordially invited to at- 
tend. Service begins at 9:45. 



SUPPOSE AVE TRY IT 



The Monmouth College Oracle 
recently tried the following 
unique method of getting its 
subscriptions paid: "If the young 
man who was seen kising a cer- 
tain girl on the steps of the 
dormitory last Friday evening 
will pay his Oracle subscription, 
nothing further will be said 
about the matter." 



The lips that touch liquor shall 

never touch mine," 
Said the damsel with, oh! such 

a fervor divine. 
Then retorted the man in the 

wickedest glee, 
"The girls that kiss poodles, 

shall never kiss me." 

— Judge. 



The University of Kansas re- 
cently organized a new frater- 
nity for ugly men under the 
name of "The Ugly Ducklings 
and the Gooey Goslings." They 
are planning a vanity fair dance 
as their first social whirl in the 
university. The co-ed winner of 
the vanity fair will be awarded 
a dance with the homliest duck- 
ling. This new organization, 
however, has close rivals at the 
University of Minnesota in the 
"Clock Stoppers," termed by 
themselves a "fraternity of 
homely men and beautiful wom- 
en." 



AND SPEAKING OF DEGREES 

A man can't get both a girl 
and an education in college but 
he can get a girl with an edu- 
cation. 



,#. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Boiird of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
- Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

IJiisiiie.ss Maiu-jgemeiit: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Keporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Heniry Kiinz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
• Rosa Deutch, '23. 
Elizabeth Torreyson, '22. 

Faculty and .VlumiiiL 

Professor W, R. Bridgman. 

Entered at the postoffice of Lake 
Forest, Illinois, as second class mat- 
ter. 



THAT STENTOF. 

SriiSCRIPTIOX 



Does this seem altogether the 
right thing to do? All these 
papers have to go through the 
hands of our business manager; 
this is no little trouble for her, 
and yet she is not even paid for 
the work of seeing that you get 
your paper every week. 

This matter of paying your 
Stentor bill is a mighty small 
one after all but it does, never- 
theless, have just as much bear- 
ing upon the honesty of the per- 
son as do many other debts of 
greater size. What sort of a 
reputation do you wish to have 
on the campus? Little as this 
matter seems, it will surely help 
out your standing in Lake For- 
est College to be among those 
who havp paid up. Don't be a 
slacker and allow somebody else 
to pay your debts for you and 
don't wait for a personal invi- 
tation to give us the two dol- 
lars. Let us see how soon every 
Stentor bill can be paid. All 
chec!:s or cash will be gratefully 
received by the business manag- 
er. Thank you! 



Money is a very difficult thing 
for us to get our hands on at the 
present time. This is a state- 
ment that is acknowledged as 
true by everyone. But — there 
is another thing which we are 
all willing to assent to readily. 
That is the fact that a good 
many of us spend this hard 
earned money in a good many 
ways that might be termed fool- 
ish, while we allow our debts to 
accumulate. One of the debts 
which a good many of us have 
allowed to grow is that of our 
Stentor bill. This bill was only 
two dollars and yet only about 
twenty of the men on the cam- 
pus who subscribed for the col- 
lege paper have as yet paid 
their bill. More than this, they 
have been receiving their copy 
of the Stentor regularly and 
have been enjoying the privi- 
lege of reading it every week. 



DOFS IT PAY? 

It seems to me that intercol- 
legiate athletics, to justify t'^e 
time, interest, and money ex- 
pended, should at least develop 
good sportsmanship. If I am 
not mistaken, that is the most 
important, most lasting benefit 
which those who do not play can 
derive from athletic contests 
As I conceive it, good sports- 
manship is made up of two 
things: fair play and freedom 
from pettiness' in our rivalry. 

Having attended all but one 
of the home games of the pres- 
ent school year in both football 
and basketball, I think it may 
fairly be said that our snorts- 
manship was at its lowest ebb in 
the game with Wheaton last 
Wednesday night. It seems to 
me that it was only poetic jus- 
tice that we lost that game. 

I pass over the dirty playinp- 
on the floor and address mvself 



to the people in the balcony. As 
far as the playing was concern- 
ed, and it was about as dirty as 
it has ever been my lot to wit- 
ness, it seemed to be quite ev- 
enly divided. Wheaton appar- 
ently started it. Of course, the 
other fellow always does start 
that kind of thing. But that 
was after the game commenced. 
If our conduct had been flawless, 
we could with perfect consist- 
ency have hissed down the first 
unsportsmanlike action from the 
other side. But our conduct 
was not flawless. 

Before the game, we started 
the yelling with a big Lake For- 
est. Good. Wheaton replied 
with one of their yells. Later, 
as was only common courtesy, 
they gave a cheer for Lake For- 
est As we were the home tepm 
it would have been proper f'^i' 
us to have given them a ye^l 
first. But we didn't even re- 
turn their greeting. An 1 s-ib- 
senuently, when tl^e Whea+on 
aggregation, which w?s smaller 
than ours, attempted to give n 
yell or two. we yelled t^em 
down. If that is good sn^rt^- 
manshi'i, we will h-^ve to .T-'-^nt 
a new definition. It isn't evn 
ordinary decency. 

If anv of us ever accrmnaniel 
our teams away from h^^me, w" 
would be more broad-minded 
and wou'd have known better. 

The nuestion is, can we i'- 
ford to nf po'>'' snorts? Doe? i' 
nav? We gain nothing bv our 
meanness and we lose a ere" I 
deal, for we lose the nuality of 
being fair, of beino- tolerant, of 
l-ems' p'o^d winners or "'ood 'oth- 
ers It is a qualitv wbich do^s 
much to ease the trials -I'-e ha^•^ 
and shall have to face. 

J. Ralph Stewa't 



Sie-ma Tau entertained Made- 
line Hoover and Mar'-uerite Mar- 
tin last veek-end. 

Virpinip Kratsch entertained 
Oertrude Leihsenring last week. 



THE STENTOR 



WHAT LAKE FOREvST NEEDS 

From the Alumni News-Bulletin 

Lake Forest needs, first of all, 
a president. No school, no busi- 
ness, no army can long keep to 
a high point of efficiency with- 
out a leader. 

Lake Forest has been drifting 
along for a long time. No doubt 
it has done well under the cir- 
cumstances. But the present 
unfortunate situation cannot ex- 
ist forever. 

Lake Forest needs a live-wire 
president — and needs him right 
now. 

Lake Forest needs more stu- 
dents. Every present college 
activity — athletics, dramatics, 
music — is hampered by a lack of 
material. 

More students would provide 
more matei'ial, increase the col- 
lege activities, enliven student 
interest and heighten morale. 
More students would make Lake 
Foi'cst a bigiicr and better edu- 
cational institution from every 
standpoint. 

Moreover, more students 
would tend to reduce the per- 
student operating expense of 
the school, thus decreasing the 
present yearly deficit in the 
school's finances. 

Lake Forest needs a larger 
endowment fund. The present 
income is not sufficient to meet 
expenses. Each year certain 
good-hearted trustees disc into 
their pockets and make up the 
deficit. This should not be nec- 
essary. A large enough fund 
should be provided to more than 
care for every expense of opera- 
tion. 

Lake Forest needs a more ac- 
tive Alumni body. The Alumni 
should be an organized, progres- 
sive force — continually mani- 
festing an interest in the affairs 
of the school, continually de- 
fending its good name, continu- 
ally rendering moral and physi- 
cal support to the school's ev- 
ery activity. 

Lake Forest needs a factor of 
individuality about it — some- 



fulfillment of a definite schedule, 
thing in its plan or makeup that 
will force it head and shoulders 
above other schols of its size 
and character. 

Lake Forest should be in the 
public eye. It should make a 
marked reputation along definite 
lines. In at least one respect it 
should be the best college in the 
country. 

Of what that factor of indi- 
viduality consists, matters little. 
But let it be there— and Lake 
Forest will enjoy a respect, a 
repute, a prestige, a fame that 
will do more to further its suc- 
cess than any other one thing. 



EVOLUTION 



The man who discovered the 
fact of evolution had some 
head. This principle is prob- 
ably one of the most interest- 
ing and significant truths the 
mind of man has ever hit upon. 
No wonder it affords a seem- 
ingly inexhaustible thrill for 
real thinkers! 

But for most of us it must 
probably remain a matter of 
secondary importance. 

A little boy stood by a rail- 
way track and saw the Limited 
go dashing by. "0 papa, look!" 
he cried in ecstacy of discovery 
and admiration, "see the wheels 
go 'round, and that rod on the 
engine shoot back and forth, 
and the smoke stream out of 
the stack!" 

"Yes, son; isn't that fine?" 
replied the father with mingled 
pride and indulgence. He could 
not fully share the boy's enthu- 
siasm, because his interest in 
the train lay in the fact that 
it was laden with human beings 
and that it was bound for the 
metropolis. His admiration, in- 
stead of being centoreil in 
wheels and drivers, went out to 
the science of the engineer who 
spanned the rivers and tunnel- 
led the mountains, and to the 
skill of the dispatcher who sat 
in his office and guided this 



train over the road in punctual 
Evolution explains the mach- 
inery of life — the way by which 
the simple becomes complex — 
but most of us are more inter- 
ested in human souls that are 
going to their destinies, in the 
terminals toward which they are 
speeding, and perhaps in the 
Dispatcher who is ever directing 
them. 

But though evolution is of 
secondary interest, yet it is of 
great value — aside from its ben- 
efits as a working principle of 
science — for it convinces us that 
our universe is run along ration- 
al, orderly, methodical lines, and 
this in turn enhances our ad- 
miration for the wisdom, the 
science, the dependability and 
the patience of the Power who 
conceived this wonderful way of 
working. 

Events, we learn, are result- 
ants of antecedant events, but 
much more than that. They are 
steps in the unfolding purpose 
in the mind of God. Just as 
the railroad train is in its pres- 
ent location in virtue of its hav- 
ing traversed the track behind 
and for the purpose of going to 
the city ahead, so events are 
the results and outgrowths of 
what has gone before, but for 
the higher purpose of what is 
yet to be. Browning's lines are 
full of this confidence: 
"Grow old along with me! 
The best is yet to be, 
The last of life, for which the 

first was made: 
Our times are in His hand 
Who saith, "A whole I planned, 
Youth shows but half; trust 

God: see all not be afraid." 
Contributed. 



A handsome young lady from 

Lynee, 
Had a wart on the end of her 

Chynne, 
The dear little cutey 
Was stuck on her butey, 
So she pushed the pesky wart 

ynne. — Ex. 



THE STENTOR 



ATHLETICS 



FRATERNITY LEAGUE 



The Inter-Fraternity League 
opened its 1920 season Monday 
night when the Kappa Sigs de- 
feated the five Omega Psis' in a 
rather rough game cliaracteriz- 
ed by the lack of team work. 

The League games tend to be 
rather interesting as there is a 
little spirited rivalry among the 
different groups and some scrap- 
py games are sure to result. 
. The strength of some of the 
teams will be reduced a little as 
no men who have won a basket 
ball letter in College competi- 
tion, who are on the team at 
present or who have played on 
the Varsity this year, are allow- 
ed to compete. 

Standing 

Won Lost Pet 
K-appa Sigma 1 1000 

Phi Pi 0000 

Barbs 0000 

Diagamma 0000 

Phi Eta Alpha 0000 

Omega Psi 1 0000 

The rest of the games will be 
played as follows: 

Feb. 18, Omega Psi vs Barbs. 

Feb. 20, Phi Pi vs Phi Eta Al- 
pha. 

Feb. 2.3, Digamma vs. Kappa 
Sigma. 

Feb. 25, Omega Psi vs. Phi Pi. 

Feb. 27. Phi Eta Alpha vs. 
Barbs. 

Mar. 1, Omega Psi vs. Digam- 
ma. 

Mar. 3, Kappa Sig. vs. Phi Eta 
Alpha. 

Mar. 5, Phi Pi vs. Digamma. 

Mar. 8, Barbs vs. Kappa Sig- 
ma. 

Mar. 10, Kappa Sig. vs. Phi Pi. 

Mar. 12, Barbs vs. Digamma. 

Mar. 15, Phi Eta Alpha vs. 
Omega Psi. 

Mar. 17, Barbs vs. Phi Pi. 

Mar. 19, Digamma vs. Phi Eta 
Alpha. 



AVHEATON OUTCLASSES 

US IN A ROUGH GA3IE 



Before one of the best crowds 
which has turned out for a bas- 
ket ball game this season, the 
Orange and Black defeated us 
30-18. The game was rough 
throughout, in the second half 
Referee Brown had his hands 
full keeping the boys apart. 

Wheaton started with a rush 
and ran up six points before 
Eddy scored with a foul. The 
work of the Methodist guards 
was above the average. Lake 
Forest did not have a clean shot 
at the basket during the first 
half. 

Eddy played a wonderful 
game at forward, although 
playing on a team which was 
outclassed at all points of the 
game he shown above any of 
his opponents. Of the 18 points 
gathered by our boys "Puck" 
was responsible for fourteen of 
them, 12 coming from the foul 
line. 

Sykes at right guard for 
Wheaton played a star game un- 
til put out on personal fouls 
late in the second half. 

Coleman inducted a little pep 
into our boys for the few min- 
utes he was in the game, but 
he was soon sent to the showers 
by Brown roughing it with one 
of the Wheaton boys. 

About twenty-five rooters ac- 
companied the Wheaton team 
and entertained us between 
halves with a few of their col- 
lege yells and songs. 

Lake Forest 14: 





B. 


F. 


P. 


T. 


Eddy, rf 


1 


12 


4 


2 


Manning, If. 











1 


Russell, c. 


1 








1 


Sumner, Ig. 


1 





3 


1 


Hale, rg. 








2 


2 


Coleman, If. 








1 





Noel, If. 








1 






LOSE AT NAPERVILLE 



Saturday night at Naperville 
the Red and Black lost their 
second game of the week to 
Northwestern College. 

The Naperville boys were at 
home on their own floor and 
were able to locate the basket 
with ease. 

Lake Forest did not get a bas- 
ket until late in the second half 
when Coleman replaced Man- 
ning at forward, and caged two. 
After Red gets in better condi- 
tion he will be able to play reg- 
ular forward and will strength- 
en the team as their weakest 
point is in not having a man for 
"Puck" to work with on the 
floor. 

Stronger at forward for 
Northwestern played star game 
caging four fieldbaskets and 
three free throws. 

Novtlnvesteni 29: 

B. F. P. T. 
Grantman, rf. 3 2 

Stenger, If. 4 3 2 2 

Brauenfiend, c. 3 2 
Kluckholm, rg. 10 10 
Ritan, Ig. 12 

Kraft, If. 10 

Norenberg, rf. 
Lake Forest, 8: 

B. F. P. T. 
Eddy, rf. 3 11 
Manning, If. 

Coleman, If. 2 3 1 

Russell, c. 

Sumner, rg. 1 

Hale, Ig. 10 

Kunz, rf. 
Wheaton 30: 

B. F. P. T. 

Vinning, If. 4 2 

Coleman, rf. 4 1 

Newberry, c. 2 3 

Sykes, Ig. 5 3 3 

Smith, rg. 10 4 1 

Vinning, rf. 1 

Polk, Ig. 1 
Hyatt, rg. 1110 



THE STENTOR 



ALUMNI NOTES 



1907. Elliot R. Andrews fig- 
ures in the issue of the Chicago 
Tribune of February 3, being as- 
sessed damages of $25,000.00 in 
a breach of promise suit brought 
against him by a music teacher 
of St. Louis, where he formerly 
resided. Mr. Andrews was mar- 
ried in 1917 to Miss Gertrude 
Moore, and is now located in 
Chicago as treasurer of the Syg- 
node System. 

1908-10. A basis of Lake For- 
est acquaintance is responsible 
for agreeable association in 
Cleveland, Ohio, of L. G. and 
Mrs. (Helen Cutler) Dickey, '08, 
and Mrs. Sommei-s, and Mr. and 
Mrs. M. L. Sloane, (Jane Hunter, 
'10), who meet together quite 
frequently. They contemplate 
a gathering before very long of 
all the Lake Foresters in Cleve- 
land. Among the others are 
Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Hibbeler, 
(Susie Hall, teacher at Ferry 
Hall in the late '90's); Mr. Hib- 
beler was a valued teacher at 
the Academy and took some 
work in the college. 

1909. A. J. Hennings, after 
seven years work in the legal 
department of Peabody, Hough- 
teling an-d Co., of Chicago, has 
formed a co-partnership with 
Frederick A. Thulin, lecturer on 
Federal taxation at N. W. Uni- 
versity School of Commerce, un- 
der the firm name of Hennings 
and Thulin, with offices at 10 S. 
La Salle St. The firm will spec- 
ialize in the law of corporations, 
investment securities, and fed- 
eral taxation. Mr. Hennings re- 
sides in Evanston at 2714 Cen- 
tral St. 

1915. Married at Washington 
D. C, January 24, Stuart A. 
Bishop and Dorothy Peyton 
Putzki. 

1917. Cedric Smith has join- 
ed Marquis, '11, and Helfrich, in 



Adv. Co., 58 E. Washington St., 
Chicago. Two-thirds of the pres- 
ent officers of the Chicago Al- 
umni Club, therefore, have the 
same address. 

1914. Mrs. W. H. (Florence 
McCandless) Schulzke, is settled 
again in her own home, 1611 
27th St., Moline. Through 1918 
Mr. and Mrs. Schulzke lived in 
Washington and in Cleveland, 
Ohio, while Mr. Schulzke was 
working with the Bureau of Air- 
craft Production. 

1907. Geo. E. Michael is now 
associated with Hughes and 
Dyer, bond brokers, at 50 Bond 
St., N. Y. City, residing at -340 
Highland Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. J. 
Mrs. Michael, it will be remem- 
bered was- Marian McCandless. 
1910. 

1916. Miss Ruth Talcott evi- 
dently believes in seeing?- the 
country. For two yeai-s after 
graduation she tauglit in Her- 
ington, Kansas, in 1918-1919 at 
E. Waterloo, Iowa, and this year 
she is "critic" in the Oshkosh 
State Normal College at Osh- 
kosh, Wisconsin. 

1894. Rev. E. A. Drake is 
now in the tenth year of his 
pastorate in Minneapolis, ad- 
dress 3113 Fremont Ave., North. 

1909. Dr. E. J. Berkheiser en- 
listed in July, 1917, for the other 
orthopedic surgery section. He 
was called to active duty in De- 
cember, 1917, and in charge of 
his specialty at Camp Jackson, 
S. C, for eight months. Subse- 
quently in similar work at Fort 
Sheridan, with rank of Captain, 
until his discharge about a 
month ago. He is now associa- 
ted with Dr. Ridlon at 7 W. Mad- 
ison St., Chicago, doing orthop- 
edic surgery only. 

1918. Leon McFerran has 
taken his foot off the ladder at 



the force of the Erwin-Wasey : Swift and Co.'s, and is now city 



salesman for a south side lum- 
beer company, living at 1425 
Emerson St., Evanston. 

1910. Keith Jones was mar- 
ried on August 8, 1919 to Miss 
Marian C. Felix, a graduate of 
the University of Wisconsin. 
Since his discharge from the air 
service he has been for a time 
a reporter on the Daily News, 
but is now an advertising writer 
for the Gundlach Co., 122 S. 
Michigan Ave. 

1896. During the period of 
the war Charles Thom "stuck to 
his civil service job, examined 
many thousands of packages of 
food offered for the army, and 
incidentally condemned train- 
loads, in the belief that this 
work was better than any other 
service he could give." He is 
the joint author of the "Book 
of Cheese," a copy of which has 
been put in the library, and the 
writer of a good many minor 
papers. His Washington ad- 
dress is 1703 21st St., N. W. 



Owing to the illness of his 
parents, and having completed 
the work necessary for his A. B. 
degree, Ernest L. Coberly has 
left college and returned to his 
home in DeMotte, Indiana. 

Carl H. Casjens, '13, spent the 
week-end with Digamma. He 
is now attending law school at 
the University of Chicago. 

Digamma announces the pledg 
ing of Henry Kunz. 

Katherine Horton is leaving 
for her home. Her mother's ill- 
ness is the cause. We are very 
sorry to see her go. 

We wonder why Mr. Cox did- 
n't take off his coat. 

Why didn't Garnette take off 
her hat? 



Lee: "Tell me in plain terms 
what you think of my picture." 

Irene: "I can't. To speak of 
your picture in plain terms 
would be impossible." 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 



(By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 
Horoscope for weeks begin- 
ing February 1 and ending Feb- 
ruary 19: 

People born during this per- 
iod have a powerful personality, 
capable of great good or evil but 
inclined to waste a good deal of 
time through dreaming. They 
are excellent conversationalists 
and lean towards culture and re- 
finement. They are fond of 
travel and change of scene. 
They are careful and thrifty, 
good planners and have excel- 
lent executive ability. Their 
main faults are building air 
castles and an over sensitiveness 
which causes them to underes- 
timate their true ability. 

The birthstone for this month 
is the Amethyst, denoting sin- 
cerity. The flower is the Prim- 
rose and the colors, light blue 
and yellow. 



Dear Incubator: 

You appear to be "all wise." 
Can you answer this one? How 
is it that trees can put on new 
dresses without opening their 
trunks? Smartie. 

Dear Smartie: 

Maybe you think you stumped 
me but you will have to ask 
something harder than that one 
if you do. It's because they 
leave out their summer clothing 
of course. H. B. 0. 



Dear H. B. 0.: 

Could you tell me what the 
origin of our word Jack tar is? 
I am particularly interested. 

A. Gobb. 
Dear Gobb: 

From the latin jactari, to be 
tossed about. 

Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington. 



Dear Mrs. Orpington: 

I am a farmer but do not seem 
to be getting on as successfully 
as I had hoped for. What are 
the most economical things a 
farmer can keep? 
Yours desperately, Silas Straw. 



Dear Silas: 

Poultry by all means! For 
every grain they give a peck. 

The Incubator. 



lils IJ.ik.-d at UUNTOONS if" Uttked Rlstht 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headqua rters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Mtin<ifi( r 

Modern Laundry Company 

Cliieasjn-L;ike Fc)rp>t. Ceuiniutiition 
:t2 IIKRKPAl'H. WKST 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

ClfOiiiiKj, I'll ssni'j. lleixiiritKi 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
Wliite Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 




Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalle St. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



J. B. VeselsKy 

LADIES' AND MEN'S TAILOR 

CLEANING AND PRESSING 

AuilersDn BaUdlnij . flione 855 

LAKK lOUKST, Il.L. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Speciahze in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

PEARL THEATRE 

South First St. 
HItillLAND PARK, ILL. 

Wliere the best of pictures are shown 
Shows: 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 
Phones: 341, 342. 343. 

C. T. GUNN CO. 
(iR(HERS 

The place to get good things to eat 

Agency Huyler's Candies, 

Curtice Bros. Goods. LAKE FOREST 



i!ll!illllii:il{|liillll!lllllllllllllllllliiilll!l!lllllllillllli|{||llllllllllllllilllllllllllllll|l|||||i 




5illll!ll 



Hams and Bacon I 



are mild, 

sweet, tender. 

Each piece is care- 
fully vselected and 
cured to give it the 
distinctive "Premium" 
flavor. I 

Ask for ' 'Premium ' 'Products a 

Swift & Company I 

U. S. A. I 

lliill!IIIIUI!lllillll!IIIIIillll!llilllill||l!l;ill!iilllllillllilliillllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 



THE STENTOR 



CLARENCE 



If you wish to have good laughs, 

See Clarence. 
If you have the blues, 
See Clarence. 
If you wish to see a good case 
of hysterics. 

See Clarence. 
If you want to see a chap who 
was expelled from the 
schools. 

See Clarence. 
If you want to see a captivating 
governess. 

See Clarence. 
If you want to see Clarence, 

See Clarence. 
Gosh! if you've got the price, 
See Clarence. 



mulle:r\s 

TKe Be^t Place 
to EAT in 

WAL REGAN 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 
21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 

Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Autorrnbile Supplies B;it'i.r^ge Trunsferred 

Seven Pa.ssenger Cars to Rent b,y Trip or Hour 



No J >b Too Small 



None Too Larg 



ELIMINATE THE BELL 
OR THE CLASS 



Trying to keep a recitation 
going after the first bell has 
rung is a noble but wasted ef- 
fort. 

Tucker: "Have you stopped 
smoking?" 

Rees: "Yep, sworn off." 

Tucker: "Why?" 

Rees: "It's getting to be so 
darned effeminate." 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store." Market Square 

MEYER'S 



Dry Goods 



A Shop for Womens and Childrens 
I Furnishings 

I Offer the Services of a Competent Staff 
; w^hose aid in selecting and 'whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 

John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Danca Prog^rams 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 



THOrOFTFT T fiTPT, 



Army: "As our engagement is 
to be a secret, I won't give you 
an engagement ring at present." 

Delia: "Oh, I could wear it on 
my right hand." 



PATRONIZE 



OUR 



ADYERTTSEKS 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN- 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI 
COATS, UNDERWEAR. 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



PHONE 881- 



FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, TIL 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Spalding Sweaters 




A STYLE IN THE 
TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EN'ERY 
OUTDOOR PUR- 
POSE 

Send for 
Caialoffitc 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 

t.AKE KURRST. . . ILI^ 



RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



THE STENTOR 



LOVE 

Love is a most potent bug, of 
a species known since the time 
of the Garden of Eden. Throug'h 
the ages of man it has passed, 
new, yet old. It is no respecter 
of race, persons or conditions. 
Its domain stretches throughout 
the universe and its will is su- 
preme. 

Persons of the susceptible age, 
those between the tender age of 
sixteen and the ripe, old age of 
ninety-nine should knov/ and un- 
derstand the various character- 
istics and habits of this bug. 

There are two stages in its de- 
velopment — the "puppy-love," 
and the "realthing" stages. 
Some lucky humans do not pass 
through this first stage, but 
■when they are bitten, and the 
symptoms developed, they sutfer 
greatly, not being, of course, ex- 
perienced in dealing with such 
a disease. 

P^rst, let us consider the 
"puppy-love" stage. The love 
bug is most prevalent during 
the lovely spring months. Two 
agencies are needed — or perhaps 
we might call them victims — a 
"Charming One" and a "Manly 
Being." Then wicked, little bug 
bites "Charming One" and "Man- 
ly Being," and the symptoms 
are caught. The disease devel- 
ops rapidly, and then, after sev- 
eral weeks, it disappears as sud- 
denly as it was taken. Some- 
times, the disease lingers a year 
or so. Persons in this stage are 
gay, laughing, talkative, happy 
creatures. "Charming One" has 
sweet words, and smiles for 
"Manly Being," who responds 
with "Er — have some candy?", 
"Let me carry your books?", etc 
etc. "Charming One" of this 
stage is also very feeble and 
must be supported by a strong 
arm of "Manly Being." To those 
who are old pals of the love 
bug, the actions of a newly-l>it 
ten pair are very ludicrous, for- 
getting, of course, their first 
bite. Yet this biting does not 



seem to grow old for to "Manly 
Being" each new "Charming 
One" is sweeter than the last, 
or vice versa. Thousands and 
thousands of sweet sixteens, and 
on up the teens, catch and re- 
cover from this disease, so com- 
mon that it is hardly noticed 
now. 

Now let us get at the "realth- 
ing" stage. The love bug, as I 
have said, has no regard or con- 
sideration for any person, not 
even the love-proof professor, 
the so-called man-hater, etc. 
None of these species are im- 
mune. The best season for this 
stage is spring, or summer, per- 
haps the other two seasons, but 
just whenever Mr. Bug takes a 
notion to pierce some fair lady's 
heart, or the armour of some 
stern gentleman. The same 
process is gone through with in 
this stage, as in the first, so 
that I need not repeat it here. 

"Mr. Man" usually has four 
questions to ask when he is de- 
bating whether to confess that 
he has been bitten, and these 
are: first, "Can 'Fair She' cook?", 
second, "Can 'Fair She' keep 
house?", third, "Can 'Fair She' 
sew?", fourth "Is 'Fair She' al- 
ways neat?" 'Fair She' usually 
has one or more questions: "Has 
'Mr. Man' money?" Sometimes, 
"Mr. Man." does not consider 
these four important points, 
but just 'fesses up with those 
time-worn, yet good-as-new 
three little words, and 'Fair She' 
answers that one important lit- 
tle word, positive or negative. 

Sometimes the love-bug is 
cruel and breaks hearts by bit- 
ing one "Fair She" and two "Mr. 
Mans," or two "Fair Shes" and 
one "Mr. Man." Usually, though, 
he is very decent about his bit- 
ing. He delights in tragedies, 
but "loves" comedies. He finds 
a short, fat "Fair She" and a 
tall, lean "Mr. Man," or he se- 
cures an extremely large "Fair 
She" and a poor, little, runty 
"Mr. Man," and then bites. 



STAND BY YOUR SCHOOL 

If you think your school's the 
best. 

Tell 'em so. 
If you'd have her lead the rest. 

Help her grow. 
When there's anything to do, 
Let the fellows count on you — 
You'll feel bully when it's 
through. 

Don't you know? 

If you're used to giving knocks, 

Change your style: 
Throw bouquets instead of rocks 

For a while. 
Let the other fellow roast, 
Shun him as you would a ghost. 
Meet his banner with a boast 
And a smile. 

When a stranger from afar 

Comes along. 
Tell him who and what you are, 

Make it strong. 
Needn't flatter, never bluff, 
Tell the truth, for that's enough: 
Join the boosters — they're the 
stuff. 

Sing your song! 

—Ex. 



A KLSS 

A kiss is a peculiar proposi- 
tion of no use to one. Yet it is 
absolute bliss for two. The 
small boy gets it for nothing, 
the young man has to steal it, 
the old man has to buy it. 'Tis 
the baby's right, the lovers priv- 
ilege, the hypocrite's mask. To 
a young girl it is faith, to a 
married woman it is hope, and 
to an old maid, charity. — Normal 
Star. 



But "for a' that and a' that" 
he is an important, necessary 
little bug, for what would life 
be without some kind of love^ 
brotherly, filial, or something? 
Indeed, he is the little bug that 
moves the universe, that makes 
life worth living, and brings 
peace and happiness. I say: 
"Hurrah for the love-bug! Long 
may he live!" 



THE STENTOR 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencK's Dru^ Store 



SWEARING OFF IN LENT 

Joe Merchant — studying. 

Micky Beddoes — dating. 

Helen Learnard — kidding- the 
men. 

Jin Hopkins — cussing. 

Fran Bradley — vaudeville. 

Whitey Thayer — reciting in Am- 
erican Lit. 

Ray Moore — entertaining the 
girls. 

Eloise and Mac — decorating the 
landscape together. 

Barney and Anne — playing soli- 
taire. 

Loveridge — getting A"s in 
French. 

Miss Coan — skating. 

Miss Powell — pursuing lost 
books. 

Vera — betting at Solitaire. 

Davy — scowl i ng. 



AVHO SAYS THIS? 



My Galli Curci. 

Just a matter of time. 

By cracky. 

It's time all dogs were dead. 
Ain't you sick? 

Hi. 

Can you tie that. 

That dude. 

Any mail for me? 

Aw now kid. 

Them's the berries. 

If you please. 

There ain't no sucli animal. 

Come, come. 

Pray thee. 

Please dispense with the cafe- 
teria. 

Lie down, Sam. 

I hope to tell you. 



HAVE 

YOU 

PAID 

YOUR 

SUBSCRIPTION 



? ? '? 



M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL \A/OOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OK AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

L^ke Forest, Illinois 



L. H. W. SPEIDEL 



Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing j 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Di-esser in 
LAKE FOREST 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Homelike and at Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

/ Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 

ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
General Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



K oda k 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F B D El RA l_ 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BR0 5. 
MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Ki ids Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Western Aves. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
a Specialty 



THE 



S T E N T R 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2^ full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 to §100 for men; |350 to |150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ar 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



I 

V 
X 
Y 
t 
X 
V 
t 

y 

Y 

? 
y 
•»• 
y 

I 
i 

i 
t 
y 
y 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 

t 



t 
t 

X 
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i 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR, R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Coiifectionern 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL, AT 

O'NeiU's Hardware Jore 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROLA 

Clotliiii^ mid 
KuniiNliiiigs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

II H l>0 liEl'AiniNG 

Phuiie 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, FEBRUARY 27, 1920 



^rUMBER 17 



LAKE FOREST TEAM BEATS CHICAGO COLLEGE 



SHALL L. F. REMAIN IN 

LITTLE FIVE? 



An interesting and opportune 
discussion relative to the possi- 
ble future athletic affiliations of 
Lake Forest College was held in 
the Digama Rooms, Wednesday 
evening. 

Most Lake Forest students are 
probably aware of the fact that 
Beloit College will drop out of 
the Little Five at the end of the 
year. Therefore the question 
arises as to whether a suitable 
school should be asked to fill 
Beloits place or whether a rad- 
ical change should be made by 
forming new athletic affilia- 
tions. 

The concensus of opinion of 
the members of the Discussion 
Club was that the Little Five 
should be continued on the old 
basis by inducing Armour Tech. 
to re-enter. Of course this does 
not definitely settle the matter 
and any students who have sug- 
gestions to make should speak to 
Dr. Allee, the Lake Forest fac- 
ulty representative at once. 

The Chicago papers announced 
last Friday that Armour Tech. 
has acquired an eighty acre tract 
for a new campus through the 
generosity of Mr. Armour. With 
a new athletic field and gymna- 
sium assured, athletic connec- 
tions with Armour Tech will be 
the more desirable. 



The Phi Pi's announce the in- 
itiation of: LeRoy H. Bucking- 
ham, Charles G. Ives, Jr, William 
L. Judson, Berwyn C. Moore, Le- 
land C. Smith. 



Big Crowd Sees Fast Chicago Boys Go 
Down in Defeat 



The American College of Phys- 
ical education was no match for 
the Red and Black and were 
easily defeated 37 to 30. 

The Chicago boys started the 
game with a rush and scored 
four points a few minutes after 
the game started on two long 
baskets by Armitage. 

Tw^o baskets by Manning and 
a ringer from the foul line by 
Eddy gave Derby's men the lead, 
which they held for the remain- 
der of the game. 

The play of both teams lagged 
after the opening of the second 
half, and Lake Forest with an 
eight point lead seemed to lose 
their pep. The S. A. P. E. boys 
started a rally with two baskets 
by Klee and long shot from the 
center of the floor by Armitage', 
and Derby's men started to play 
with their usual spirit and soon 
regained their early end. 

Armitage was the best per- 
former for the Chicago team, 
playing a good floor game and 
caging four baskets, and two out 
of ten from the foul line. 

Eddie and Red Manning star- 
red for the Lake Foresters. Red 
shot seven baskets from the 
field and Purk gathered 13 for 
his men, ten coming from the 
field and 3 across the foul line. 
Russell played a good floor game 



and located the basket for ten 
points. 

Derby saved "Red" Coleman 
and Sumner for the game with 
De Paw University, Saturday, as 
they are both on the sick list. 



Lake 


Forest 








B. 


F. 


P. 


T. 


Manning, rf. 


7 





1 





Kurtz, If. 








2 





Russell, c. 


5 











Eddy, rg. 


5 


3 


6 


3 


Hale, Ig. 








1 





Noel, If. 











1 


A. C. 


P. E. 










B. 


F. 


P. 


T. 


Klee, rf. 


5 





3 





Armitage, If. 


3 


6 








Bessler, c. 














Murphy, Ig. 


2 











Pease, rg. 


1 





1 





Williams, c. 


1 





1 





Merkee, rg. 














Referee: Brown. 








Fouls missed: 


Armitage 8, 


Ed- 


die 4. 











Phi Eta Alpha announces the 
initiation of William Morley, 
Richard Abernathy, and William 
Sheehan. 

The Omega Psi Fraternity an- 
nounces the initiation of: Ray C. 
Tracy, Prentice Howard Man- 
ning, John F. Anderson, George 
David Jones, Windsor McCoy 
Gibbs. 

Kendall M. Shankland, Edwin 
E. Benson and Ralph Dean visit- 
ed Omega Psi over the week-end. 



THE STENTOR 



DO YOl WANT A FORESTEK? 



Last week the Forester Board 
sent through the columns of the 
Stentor an appeal to the stu- 
dent body to come to- the rescue 
in the matter of material for 
the college annual. They asked, 
especially, that the Juniors and 
Seniors give the >)oard certain 
information necessary before 
copy can be prepared and sent 
in to the printers. The board 
urged that this matter be look- 
ed after by the 25th of this 
month, but up to that night 
there had been no response 
whatever. Is this the true spir- 
it of co-operation? Is this the 
way to get out a live college an- 
nual before next summer? Do 
you want a Forester for Lake 
Forest College again, or shall 
we let the matter drop here? 

It would seem that when the 
board asks for a wee bit of your 
time and kindly co-operation, 
you should be more than willing 
to help out; for the members of 
the Forester Baord are not do- 
ing this for their health or for 
tihe money that might be de- 
rived from same. Come on now, 
let's get together and put this 
thing across, or else drop it in 
the lake and have it there for all 
time to come. 



Love is an expert magicion, 
but it can't transform nickels 
into dollars. 



The best idea is worth noth- 
ing until it is set to work. One 
idea in operation is worth two 
in the brain. 



It is stated that if the appe- 
tite of a man were as great as 
that of a sparrow in proportion 
to his size, he would eat a whole 
sheep at one sitting. Yes, but 
did you ever see Duly Sumner 
eat? Excuse us. Duly. 



MEETING OF 

PHILOSOPHY CLUB 



Tlie regular monthly meeting 
of the Philosophy Club was held 
at Lois Durand Hall on Tuesday 
evening of this week, with Miss- 
es Eloise Brown, Josephine Mar- 
tin, and Zelma Farwell as hos- 
tesses. The subject of the even- 
ing was "Evolution," with parti- 
cular reference to part which 
consciousness plays in evolution. 
Practically every member of the 
club was present, including Dr. 
and Mrs. H. W. Wright and a 
number of guests. The discus- 
sion was a most lively and inter- 
esting one, covering the various 
theories of evolution, including 
an exposition of the recent Bald- 
win theeory of Evolution. 

At the close of the discussion, 
dainty refreshments were served 
and a very pleaasnt social hour 
enjoyed by all. 



Shear Nonsense 

A Model Young Man: "You 
don't mean to tell me that young- 
Van made all that money by the 
sweat of his brow!" 

"Dear no — by the Set of his 
brow. He poses for all those 
collar ads. 



A Dimnuitive 

Betty: "I can't imagine what's 
the matter with me, doctor, I'm 
continually thinking about my- 
self." 

Tut, tut — you must stop wor- 
rying over trifles. 



Her ■Mistake 

She (soulfully): "Our spirits 
are in harmnoy. I can sense an 
aura about you^ — " 

He: "Tliat isn't an aura, lady, 
that is hair tonic. 



Answered 

"Wliat's the difference be- 
tween an old man and a worm?" 

"No difference. Chickens get 
them both." 



Ain't It the Berries? 

The riper the berry the sweet- 
er the juice. 

Pardon, reader, old dear, but 
after hibernating for some time, 
during which my partner depart- 
ed from the Campus Beautiful, 
I take the pleasure in coming 
forth with this marvellous piece 
of literature. 



Oh goody! Spring is here. 



I held a little hand last night, 
So dainty and so neat, 

I thought my heart would burst 
within. 
So wildly did it beat. 



No other hand unto my soul, 
Could greater solace bring 

Than that I held last night, 
Four aces and a king. 



B. Moore: "Well, this must be 
personified, because you can't 
love anything that don't love 
you. 

Bill Troutman: "I'm not so 
sure about that." 

Give this the once over: 



At 10 a child, at 20 wild; 
At 30, tame if ever; 
At 40 wise, at 50 rich; 
At 60 great or never. 



Thanking the Lois Hall cush- 
ion Hounds for their kind atten- 
tion, I will close. Will be with 
you enxt week bigger and better 
than ever. 

The Berry Twin, 

Ras. 

P. S. — Look for the great nov- 
el, the Mystery of the Hoot-Owl, 
by Liz Torreyson, beginning in 
our next. 



Miss Gertrude Sibley visited 
her brother, R. P. Sibley last 
Saturday and Sunday. Miss Sib- 
ley was on her way from Spring- 
field, Massachusetts to Bozeman, 
Montana, where she will teach 
in Montana State College. She 
was entertained during her stay 
at the home of Dr. Coffin. 



THE STENTOR 



The Service You Demand 



You will get from your mem- 
ory just the sort of service you 
insist on. If you are satisfied 
with half-remembering, with 
careless, intellectual work, that 
is the sort you will get. Any 
memory will be inaccurate and 
unreliable if the owner is will- 
ing that it should be so. When 
a man says, "I can't remember 
dates," or "It is so hard for me 
to remember names," he is ac- 
knowledging intellectual lazi- 
ness. Dates may be harder for 
you to remember than music or 
the stories you read or the 
names of flowers, but difficulty 
is not synonymous with impos- 
sibility. Your memory will do 
just what you demand of it, and 
no more. 



Vera: "I heard Whitey Thayer 
was on probation." 

Anne: "Oh no, he was initia- 
ted into Phi Pi last year. 



Bangs are back! 



What would we do without 
our little Raymond in Spanish? 
He's such a devil with the girls! 
Makes them blus/h n' everything. 



Robertson: "What church do 
you go to?" 

Marsh: "I don't go to any. My 
baptism didn't take." 



"Young man," said a pompous 
individual. "I did not always 
have this carriage. Wlien I 
first started in life I had to 
walk." 

"You were lucky," remarked 
the youth. "When I first start- 
ed in life I couldn't walk." 



Mrs. Shattuck: "What kind of 
a student are you. Flora?" 

Flora: "Oh, I'm an A student. 
I got D in Political Science. 



Winners or Losers 

Some men when they want a 
thing, make themselves and 
their friends miserable when 
they do not get it. Others when 
they want something, go to work 
and get it. Most people could 
be classified as winners or wliin- 
ers. Which are you? 



A permanent wave— Stars and 
Stripes. 



The time you spend fretting 
over yesterday's failure is just 
so much lost out of today. 



Learn to look back happily 
and to look forward hopefully. 



The man who conquers self- 
distrust will find all other con- 
quests easy. 



When everybody else admits 
that he is wrong and that you 
are right the millennium will be 
in full bloom. 



Judicious diet and exercise 
will frequently improve a man's 
opinion of his neighbors. 



If you would win the applause 
of the world you must liave the 
price. 



Be Johnny on the spot when 
there is an opportunity to be 
grasped, otherwise you may find 
it missing. 



Too many men talk an hour 
when they could say all they 
have to say in a minute. 



Ask Ray to pull that one about 
the greatest draw-back in north- 
ern Africa. 



STUDENTS ENTERTAIN 

AT FORT SHERIDAN 



Tuesday afternoon the Misses 
French, Antrim and Prickett of 
the Music School, and Messrs. 
Moore, Hirschy, Watson, Schreurs 
and Noble entertained the psy- 
chopathic ward at Ft. Sheridan. 
The occasion was a Washington 
birthday party given for the 
shell-shocked soldiers. Deserv- 
ing special mention were Mr. 
Moore's humorous solo, "At the 
Yiddish Wedding" and in instru- 
mental trio, "Somewhere a Voice 
is Calling," by Miss Antrim and 
Messers. Hirschy and Watson. 



When a young man is convinc- 
ed that there is nothing too good 
for a girl he offei's himself to 
her. 



Famous Works of Art 



ITW 



. ,< f^ „„: , Mill 




Bronze doors in the Capitol at Wach- 
Ington. The subject Is the ovati»n 
tenderi'd to the first president, at Tren- 
ton, N. J., in 1733. - 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Bu.siiiess Management: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Ijeonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Marian Preston, '21. 
Ruth Bahlert, '22. 
W. G. Mc Col ley, '21. 
Rosa Deutch, '23. 
Elizabeth Torreyson, '22. 



HANDS 

We are in the habit of look- 
ing into a person's face for 
traces of character, and have be- 
come so accustomed to this 
method that we have come to 
overlook a feature which dis- 
plays far more character than 
a face does. It is perfectly pos- 
sible to so control our feelings 
that we show not the slightest 
thought in our faces, the En- 
glish are good examples of this 
type, but it is absolutely impos- 
sible for us to disguise the char- 
acter which lies so evidently in 
our hands. The hand is the in- 
strument which performs every 
action which is willed by our 
minds. This hand takes on char- 
acter with the accomplishment 
of every act and comes to de- 
velope characteristics and lines 
which show far more of our 
characters than a good many of 
us would care to have known. 

It is more possible to judge 



the man or woman by his or her 
hands than by any other means. 
By the mere act of shaking 
hands we can gain quite a store 
of information. Be careful 
about your friendship with a 
person whose hand seems to 
slip from yours when you grasp 
it in greeting. The person with 
such a handshake is inclined 
toward the deceptive and treach- 
erous. The soft fat hand indi- 
cates the indolent or lazy per- 
son; the firm hand is the sign 
of an energetic, reliable nature. 
A very thin hand denotes a rest- 
less energetic disposition, but 
one that is given to worry, and 
fretting is generally discontent- 
ed. A thin hand that feels list- 
less in one's grasp denotes a 
weak constitution that has only 
sufficient energy to live. A cold 
clammy band is also a sign of 
poor health, but generally that 
of a very sensitive and nervous 
person. A person who keeps 
his hands closed while talking 
is distrustful in his nature, has 
little self-reliance and can sel- 
dom be relied on by other. A 
man or woman who gives a firm 
grasp of the hand, is self-confi- 
dent, energetic, and generally 
reliable. When all the fingers 
(especially if the fingers be 
long) are seen always clinging 
sticking, as it were, or folding 
over one another it denotes a 
very doubtful quality in the na- 
ture of their possessor and a de- 
cided tendency towards thieving 
and general lack of moral prin- 
cipal. 

"Remember that the hands are 
the immediate servants or in- 
struments of the brain. There 
are more motive and sensory 
nerves from the brain to the 
hand than to any other portion 



of the body, and, whether sleep-. 
iiiS' or waking, they continually 
and unconsciously reflect the 
thought and character of the 
mind or soul of the individual." 

If we would only follow the 
knowledge that we can so easily 
gain from observing the hands 
of the people that we meet, we 
could gain a great deal ef assist- 
ance in our dealings with people. 

Note: References taken from 
works by Cheiro. 



Society does not take any 
man's estimate of himself. It 
measures him, weighs him, tests 
him, classifies him and desig- 
nates him. In the thought of 
the Orient, even to this day, 
there is a peculiar relationship 
between teacher and pupil. The 
teacher is conceived of as one 
who knows. He is the master 
of his subject. The pupil is one 
who does not know but who 
would learn. The teacher un- 
dertakes to lead the pupil into 
the truth. The pupil wholly 
submits himself in faith and obe- 
dience to the guiding of the 
teacher. In Christ's day, the 
pupil gave to the teacher the 
reverence indicated by his title, 
"Rabbi." It was the intuitive 
attitude of ignorance toward 
knowledge. It was the lost 
child unhesitatingly placing its 
little hand in the strong grasp 
of the man who knew every foot 
of the road. Have we lost that 
attitude today? Do we feel its 
presence here in Lake Forest 
College. And if we do no long- 
er maintain the old intimate re- 
lationship between professor and 
student, we may well ask our- 
selves, "Have we lost anything 
vital?" 



The Sour One 

"How did you like the girl 
you took home from the dance?" 
"Awful!" 
"I couldn't kiss. her either." 



THE STENTOR 



TRACK 

Iiiterclass Track Meet to be Held 
March 20, 1920 



The first Tnterclass Track Meet 
will be held on the afternoon of 
March 20, 1920 in the College 
Gym. 

Men who are expecting- to try 
for the Varsity team this year 
will be given a chance to show 
the coach just what they are 
capable of doing in competition. 

The prospects of having a suc- 
cessful team this year are un- 
usually bright and it is hoped 
that every man who has any in- 
terest in Track will try out in 
the Interclass meet. 

So far the Freshman and Soph- 
omores have each won a Class 
Championships. The Freshmen 
in football and the Sophs in bas- 
ket-ball. 

Coach Derby has decided to 
award the members of the win- 
ning team monograms, instead 
of giving a pennant or shield as 
has been the custom. These 
will be in the form of class nu- 
merals the same as are given to 
the members of class teams in 
the larger Universities. 

In order that each class have 
as many men out and as much 
interest aroused as possible each 
class is requested to elect their 
class Track captain as soon as 
they can have a meeting. All 
track work will count on Gym 
credit the same as basket-ball. 

Nine Track and Field events 
and a one-half mile relay will 
be held. On account of the size 
of the Gym some of the regular 
events will have to be omitted. 
Four men will compete for each 
class in the relay, each man run- 
ning three laps. 



The following events will be 
held: 

25 yd. dash. 

25 yd. low hurdles. 

440 yd. dash. 

880 yd. run. 

One mile run. 

Shot Put. 

High Jump. 

Standing Board Jump. 

Relay Race. ' 



Pat: "What's that piece of 
blank paper in your hand?" 

Mike: "A letter from my 
wife." 

Pat: "What do you mean? 
There's no writing on it." 

Mike: "Sure! The missus and 
I are not on speaking terms." — 
Ex. 



No Point 

A funny old man told this to 

me, 
I fell in a snowdrift in June said 

he, 
I went to a ball game out in 
the sea, 
I saw a jelly fish float up in 

a tree, ■ • 

I found some gum in a cup of 

tea, 
I stirred my milk with a brass 

key, 
I opened my door on my bended 

knee, 
I beg your pardon for this, said 

he, 
But 'tis true when told as it 

ought to be, 
'Tis a puzzle in punctuation you 

see. 



By tlie Way 

Someone asked a green clerk 
in a seed store for some sweet 
potato seeds. Upon finding none 
and appealing to the boss he 
was told he had been fooled. A 



little later, a lady came in and 
asked for bird seed. He decid- 
ed he wouldn't be fooled again 
and replied: "Aw gwan! You 
can't kid me, birds is hatched 
from eggs." — Ex. 



YES? 

Merry Brown-eyes, limbed so 

free, 
Prithee, would you dance with 

me? 
Dance as ripples o'er the wind, 
Pretty Brown-eyes, pray be 

kind. 

Happy Brown-eyes, cheeks the 

same. 
Would you tell what others 

name? 
Breathe your whisper very slow, 
For, oh Brown-eyes, I would 

know. 

Modest Brown-eyes, not to speak, 
Cause is yours, if cause you 

seek; 
Watch but once this eager gaze; 
Timid Brown-eyes, you amaze. 

Lightsome Brown-eyes, dimples 

twain; 
Sweet the query not in vain. 
Yet, lest you my wit beguile. 
Caution, Brown-eyes, when you 
smile. 

W. G. McColley, Jr. '21. 



Spice of Life 

They had just become engag- 
ed. 

"I shall love," she cooed, "to 
share all your troubles." 

"But darling," he pined, "I 
have none." 

"No," she agreed," but I mean 
when we are married." — Ex. 



(roing Some 

Freshman: "I woke up last 
night with a terrible sensation 
that my watch was gone. Im- 
pression was so strong, I got up 
and looked." 
Soph: "Well was it gone?" 
Fresh: "No it was going." 



THE STB^fTOR 



BELOIT BOWS TO RED AND BLACK 

Lake Forest Defeats old Rivals on Own Floor 



PHI PI HEATH OMEGA PSI 



Wednesday night the Phi Pi's 
met the Omega Psi boys in a 
game where the smaller frater- 
nity put up a plucky fight. The 
final score of 29 to 5 shows the 
brilliancy of the Phi Pi basket 
tossers but it fails to indicate 
the persistent fighting on the 
other side. The brilliant play 
of Robertson and the consistent 
floor work of McColley coupled 
with good team work explain 
the victory of the Phi Pi's. 
Jones and Friebely starred for 
the losers. 



Standing 

W. 
Kappa Sigma 2 

Phi Pi 2 

Omega Psi 1 

Digamma 

Phi Eta Alpha 

Barbs 



L. Pet. 

1000 

1000 
2 333 

1 000 
1 000 
1 000 



Games Next AA'eek: 

Monday, March 1 — Omego Psi 
vs. Digamma. 

"Wednesday, March 3— Kappa 
Sigma vs. Phi Eta Alpha. 

Friday, March 5— Phi Pi vs. 
Digamma. 

Results of last weeks Games: 
Omega Psi, 15 — Barbs, 13 
Phi Pi, 18— Phi Eta Alpha, 7.1 
Digamma, 8 — Kappa Sigma, 12. | 
The hardest fought game of . 
the past week was played when 
the Digamma and Kappa Sigma 
met on Monday night. The 
teams were evenly matched and 
played hard to win. Mickey i 
Beddoes and Virgil were the best 
for Diganmia while the Kappa 
Sigma played better as a team i 
with no particular stars. , 

Phi" Pi had a comparatively | 
easy game with the Phi Eta Al- 



pha, winning 18 to 7. The Phi 
Pi have the best team work 
shown so far and if they play 
true to form should win the 
Fraternity Championship. 

Displaying the same team 
work and fighting spirit they ex- 
hibited against Valporaiso, the 
Red and Black defeated the Gold 
on their home floor, by the close 
margin of one point. 

This is the first athletic con- 
test in which Lake Forest has 
triumphed over Beloit in three 
years and the first basket-ball 
victory in seven. 

Beloit was prepared for our 
team. They had a special de- 
fense to stop Eddy, but Derby 
out-guessed the Beloit mentor 
and started "Puck" at standing 
guard. The Wisconsin boys 
watched him pretty close and 
Kunz, who started at right for- 
ward, slipped in a field basket 
for the first two points. They 
then played him and allowed 
Manning to score, the captain 
called for "time out" and got 
his team together and our for- 
wards were given no more free 
shots at the basket. 

The floor was very slippery 
and slowed the game up some- 
what but did not dampen the 
fighting spirit of either team. 

The score was tied for the 
greater part of the game, neith- 
er team being more than two 
points ahead at any time. 

Eddy's skill at shooting fouls 
again put us on the wnining side 
of the game. He made five 
points out of seven attempts. 
Manning made the feature shot 
of the game, and also the win- 
ning basket when he caged a 
basket from the center of the 
floor in the closing minutes of 



the game. "Red" Coleman scor- 
ed four points during the few 
minutes he was in the game, be- 
ing taken out as he could not 
stand the pace. 

Lansing at guard played the 
best game for the Gold, being 
responsible for the Red and 
Black being held to such a close 
score. 

The score: 

Lake Forest 21: 

B. F. P. T. 

Manning, rf. 2 10 

Kunz, If. 10 

Russell, c 2 10 

Sumner, Ig. 10 3 

Eddy, rg. 5 2 

Coleman, If. 2 2 

Hale, rg. 10 

Beloit 20: 

B. F. P. T. 

Wen'der, rf. 3 3 

Blake, If. 10 10 

Wilburn, c. 2 2 

Paul, rg. 10 

Lansing, Ig. 4 2 

Schack, If. 

Rice, Ig. 10 

Referee: Henning. 

Free throws missed: Eddy 2, 
Wilburn 3, Lansing 1. 



The mind is most alert and 
clear in the morning hours. Did 
you ever try setting the alarm 
an hour early and getting to 
work before "the others" are 
up? You might find it exhiler- 
ating. 



We've decided Mr. Ellingwood 
doesn't like to teach large class- 
es. Does anybody want to know 
what has made us deduct that? 



How about those snap-shots 
for the Forester? 



THE STENTOR 



ALUMNI NOTES 



1883. Mrs. Paul D. (Mary Mc- 
Kinney) Bergen is living tem- 
porarily in San Diego, Califor- 
nia, the Haleiwa Apartments. 
Aledo, Illinois will best serve 
as her permanent address. Her 
son Paul vi^as graduated from 
Yale in the class of 1915, volun- 
teered as private in the war 
and made a lieutenant's bar. 

1885. Rev. S. F. Vance, D. D. 
was given the honorary degree 
of L. L. D. by Cumberland Uni- 
versity, Tenn., in 1916. Since 
1917, in addition to his duties 
at Lane Seminary, he has been 
lecturer on Biblical Literature 
at the University of Cincinnati. 

1888. The temporary address 
of Miss Harriet S. Vance is 
care Y. W. C. A., Pekin, China, 
where she will be until next 
June. Previously to her going 
to China last year she had been 
general Y. W. C. A. secretary at 
Kansas City. 

1889. Miss Caroline Griffin 
contiues in her old position of 
editor for the American Book 
Co., N. Y. City, residence 254 W. 
25th St. 

1896. Miss Alice Keener is 
teaching Spanish at the Nichol- 
as Senn High School, Chicago, 
still residing in Evanston. 

1896. Miss Katharine Ken- 
aga, instructor in history at the 
Polytechnic High School, Pasa- 
dena, .California, up to last June, 
is spending the winter at Tyron, 
North Carolina. Her permanent 
address remains Kankakee, 150 
N. Wildwood Ave. 

1901. Frank A. Crippen con- 
tinues as teacher of physics in 
the Central High School, St. 
Louis, residing at 538 Sunnyside 
Ave., Webster Groves. He has 
one daughter born in April, 1916. 

1901. The present address of 
Rev. Charles A. Stanley, is Hsi- 
ko, Tientsin, China. Rev. Stan- 
ley has been a missionary in 
China since about 1905. He re- 
ports that in exchange a gold 



dollar purchases but 89 cents 
silver when formerly it bought 
$2.57. Political turmoil is rife, 
and they have been for many 
months in the midst of the stu- 
dent agitation. 

1906. Rev. C. D. Erskine, of 
Sturgis, S. D., was strongly urg- 
ed to accept the nomination for 
Congress recently in the third 
congressional district of the 
State, which would have been 
his on a platter. But, as once 
before, he preferred to stick to 
his chosen work in a community 
where he has gained a wide in- 
fluence through long service and 
active participation in many pub 
lie affairs. 

1907. Mrs. Wm. P. Knapp 
(Pearl Barclay) is now residing 
at Blandinsville, Illinois, having 
moved there from Macomb in 
1918. She has two children, 
James, now four and a half, and 
Ralph, born in June, 1918. 

1908. E. E. Shannon during 
1917-19 taught science at Rust 
College, Holly Springs, Mississ- 
ippi, but has now returned to 
his home at New Philadelphia, 
Illinois, where he is engaged in 
farming. 

1908. Raymond G. Talcott has 
changed his residence from Riv- 
erside to 148 N. Austin Ave., 
Oak Park, in order to be nearer 
his work in the Maywood Hig'h 
School. 

1909. Miss Edith A. Bailey 
was director of physical train- 
ing for women at the Indian 
State Normal, Terre Haute, from 
1910 to Sept., 1918. Lately she 
has been a graduate student at 
Smith College, and for the pres- 
ent year holds a fellowship 
there. Present address, 93 Pros- 
pect St., Northampton, Mass.; 
permanent address, 3 Queen St., 
Wellsboro, Pa. 

1911. Mrs. R. A. (Olive Keith- 
ley) Wheeler is living at 191 
Broadway, Newport, R. I., Vv'here 
Capt. Wheeler is now in charge 
of the Engineer District office. 
During the war he was in Fi-ance 



in command of a regiment, with 
full colonel's rank. 

1912. Aside from his military 
record, we should state some 
salient facts as follows concern- 
ing Joseph L. Thomas: He was 
graduated at Illinois University 
in 1917 in the school of Land- 
scape Architecture with the de- 
gree of B. S. and L. A. Since 
his discharge from the army he 
has been with Root & HoUister, 
Landscape Architects, 1115 Ma- 
sonic Temple, Chicago, and liv- 
ing at 1029 Grove St., Evanston, 
where he is also a member of 
the University Club. 

1912. The address of John T. 
Thomas is Box 485, Pasadena, 
California, care Mrs. B. Herring- 
ton. 

1.^13. Mrs. Charles D. (Lela 
Jimison) Eldred's address is 403 
S. Eastern Ave., Joliet. Mr. El- 
dred was graduated from Yale 
in 1910, and later from the 
Northwestern University Medi- 
cal School. He has been in ser- 
vice over-seas with the rank of 
Captain. 

1914. Charles E. Long, dis- 
charged from army July 31, 
1919, is now employed as a chem 
ist with Swift & Co., Chicago, 
and living at 5815 S. Maplewood 
Ave. His home and permanent 
address is changed from Charles- 
ton, Illinois, to 1120 Edwards 
Str., Springfield. 

1915. Dewitt L. Clearman 
was married in October to Miss 
Marie Julian, a former student 
at Hastings College, Nebraska, 
and the Kansas State Agricul- 
tural College. Mr. Clearman has 
taken a position with Wells and 
Wade, Wenatehee, Wash.; his ad- 
dress after April 1 will be 903 
Okanagon Ave. 

1915. Miss Genevieve C. Ev- 
ans, 5515 Kimbark Ave., Chica- 
go, was graduated at Chicago 
University in 1916 with degree 
of Ph. B., and at present is work 
ing in the cataloging department 
of the university library. An- 
nouncement has been made of 



THE STENTOR 



her engagement to Paul B. 
Pierce, Ph. B, Chicago 1914, a 
Lieutenant in the Royal Flying 
Corps during the war. 

1915. Ernest J. Smith has 
been an automobile salesman in 
Chicago since last November, 
with house address 7141 Wabash 
Ave. It may be of interest to 
add the new and permanent ad- 
dress of his father, known to 
many of us, Henry C. Smith, 
South River, Ontario, Canada. 

1916. The business address of 
Layard A. Thorpe is Bryant 
(Walter J.) and Thorpe, 2.5 Fra- 
zier Bldg., Aurora. He was 
married on October 18, last, to 
Miss Irene Hummel, of Sand- 
wich; the house address is 214 
Palace St., Aurora. 

1917. Mrs. Frank S. (Dorothy 
Cooper) Whiting's present ad- 
dress is 2221 E. 70th St., Chica- 
go. 

1917. Dcui J. Kinsey enlisted 
in May, 1918, was discharged 
with rank of 2nd Lieut, in De- 
cember of the same year. For 
thfe past six months he has been 
a reporter on the Los Angeles 
Evening Express, residing with 
two or three other Lake Forest 
men at 624 Bixel St. 

1918. The business address of 
C. Sherwood Baker is 140 S. 
Dearborn St., Chicago. 

1918. Walter B. Greig is now 
with the Continental Casualty 
Co., 810 S. Michigan Ave., Chica- 
go. 

1918. Rev. Zoltan Irshay, now 
pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church at Georgetown, Illinois, 
was married in July, 1919, to 
Miss Emily C. Cardliff, of Cald- 
well, Kansas, and a student at 
Lincoln College, Lincoln, Illinois. 

1918. Miss Marie Sedg-wick 
has a position with the Reinforc- 
ing Bar Association, 38 S. Dear- 
born St., Chicago, residing with 
her parents at 504 N. Leaming- 
ton Ave. 

1920. Frank C. Jones, enlist- 
ed in April, 1917, went to Eu- 
rope in August, entered trenches 
in February, 1918, with 2nd Mar- 
ine Division, and continued with 



them through five major cam- 
paigns, concluding service with 
seven months in Germany with 
the army of occupation. 



lits Baked at HUN"TOaN'S if= liaked Right 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 
Modern Laundry Company 

Cliicago-Lake Forest Coiarautation 

Tickets 

33 UEERPAXil. M'KSI" 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleatiing, Frfssiiig. Kejtairiru/ 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 



i 







-£U£^i 



Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalle St. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



J. B. Veselsky 

L.VDIES" AND MEN'S TAILOB 

CLE.i^NING AND PRESSING 

Atulerson Build itig. Phoue855 

LAKE rOHEST, IL,L. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

'We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 
STRICTLY H0:ME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

PEARL THEATRE 

South First St. 
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the best of pictures are shown 
Shows: 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 
Phones: 341, 342, 343, 



C. T. GUNN CO. 
OROCERS 

The place to get good things to eat 

Agency Huyler's Candies, 

Curtice Bros. Goods. LAKE FOREST 








I "Swift's 

I Premium ' '" "^ 

I Hams and Bacon 

I are mild, 

I sweet, tender. 

I Each piece is care- 

j fully selected and 

I cured to give it the 

I distinctive "Premium" I 

I flavor. 

I Ask. for "Premium" Products 

II Swill & Company | 

I U. S. A. I 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIMIIIHIIIIIIIIli 



THE STENTOR 



Taking Time for Yesterday 

"Now" is probably the most 
emphasized word in the Ehiglish 
language in this twentieth cen- 
tury. Young people are contin- 
ually being warned against look- 
ing forward, and against looking 
back. They are reminded early 
and late that the only tense that 
need interest them is the pres- 
ent. Left to itself youth is not 
especially concerned with yester- 
day, and that characteristic is 
intensified by the ceaseless em- 
phasis laid upon living in the 
present. It is a matter of prin- 
ciple as well as of instinct, to 
devote one's self to today and 
let yesterday alone. 

And yet the fact remains that 
a good deal can be learned from 
yesterday. The republics that 
have risen to greatness and gone 
down to ruin have a message for 
the citizens of the greatest re- 
public the world has ever known. 
History is more than a record 
of things past and gone. It is 
full of guideposts pointing the 
way to safety, of red lanterns 
marking the dangerous places. 
The good American can afford to 
take time for yesterday. 

And what is true of us as cit- 
izens, is equally true of us as 
individuals. We cannot afford 
to slight yesterday. Its failures 
show the things to avoid. Its 
successes make further success 
possible. Take time to learn its 
Igsson, to profit by its inspira- 
tion. Take time for yesterday. 

Have 



You Paid 



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21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 

Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



LAKE FORES I 'S Only "Exclu.iva Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 

MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for Woinens and Childrens 

Furnishings 
Offer the Services of a Competent Staff 
whose aid in selecting and whose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
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PHONE 881 



FRANK J. WEN BAN 

PHARMACIST 

Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, IIL 

Sodas— Cigars— Candies 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

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SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Telephona 14 

For Good Taxi Sarvic* Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
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LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Automobile Supplies Baggage TraDS(*rr«4 

Seven Piissenner Cars to Rent bj Trip or Ho«r 



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Nona Too Larg 



A. J. ITRICH 
Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Raaldanca 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Iniurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Resldsnce 126 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Frpternity Jewelry and Noveltiei 

Staii nery, Invitations, Danes Programs 

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5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



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James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscap Piei*«oii 

F urniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 



RASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 512 



MARKET 8QU ARB 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCIBATOR 



(Mrs. Henry Buff, Orpington) 

Horoscope for weks bginning 
February 26 and ending Febru- 
ary 29: 

People born during this period 

have exceptional opportunities 
offered them, both in love and 
business, and can reach the sum- 
mit in their career. Their in- 
clination is toward mechanics or 
handicraft. They are faithful, 
plodding, and reliable, and con- 
scientious in all they do for oth- 
ers. They are studious, serious 
and self-contained, a lover of 
good books and of the finer 
things of life. Looking upon 
the dark side of life, and worry- 
ing about what may happen is 
one of their faluts. Tliey sholud 
instill into their life more sun- 
shine and cheeriness, and should 
hold themselves in higher es- 
teem, for they are capable of 
greater deeds than they realize 
after they have overcome their 
selfconsciousness and become 
sure of themselves. 



Dear Incubator: 

What does one remember af- 
ter fishing, the surroundings of 
the pond as Thoi-eau maintains 
or is it the fish one catches? 

Yours fishingly, 

A. Angler. 

Dear Angler: 

Neither! One usually remem- 
bers the li ttle fish market 
around the corner the most viv- 
idly. H. B. 0. 



Dear H. B. 0.: 

I am suffering with a disease 
of the heart commonly called 
love sickness. I have done all 
that I can think of to cure my- 
self of this fateful malady, in- 
cluding the Science of Health, 
but do not seem to have accomp- 



lished anything. Could you ad- 
vise me as to the best course to 
take? H you fail me I fear I 
shall have to give it up as im- 
possible so you see how utterly 
essential it is that I write to 
you. 

Yours piningly, 

Ernest Cox. 

Dear Mr. Cox: 

Your condition sounds very 
serious. I should suggest mar- 
riaeg as the best sure cure, but 
if you do not feel equal to such 
drastic measures just at present 
perhaps you could derive a good 
deal of help from three bottles 
of Dr. Burnaps' "Sure Cure for 
all Ailments." 

The Incubator. 



Dear Mrs. H. B. 0.: 

I am trying to find a subject 
for a story in advanced composi- 
tion. What would be the best 
type of a title to choose? It is 
very important that it should be 
carefully chosen so I come to 
you for advice. What do you 
think would please the instruct- 
or most? 

Yours poetically, 

Rosamond Dolittle. 

Dear Rosamond: 

Name it after yourself. The 
name of Rosamond is quite sen- 
timental and Dolittle suggests a 
ground for moralizing, the two 
essentials of writing if you 
would seek the aproval of your 
instructor. 



Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington. 



PATRONIZE 

OUll 

ADVKRTISEnS 



Why Do You Do It Girls? 



In a famous art gallery in an 
eastern city two busts stood side 
by side one afternoon when a 
young man visited the collection, 
and as he stood before them, his 
eyes went from one to the other. 
One was a head of Venus after 
classic models, the features all 
perfect, the curve of the cheek 
exquisite, the modeling of the 
neck worthy an old Greek artist. 
On the next pedestal was the 
bust of Lucretia Mott. The el- 
derly face under the Quaker 
cap, was lined and seamed, but 
such beauty and gentleness and 
strength seemed to radiate from 
the marble, that the man found 
it difficult to turn his eyes away. 
He looked again at the Venus 
and felt dissatisfied, for the ex- 
quisite curves gave no sugges- 
tion of soul. When he passed 
on, it was the memory of the 
delicate old face bearing the 
signature of many years nobly 
lived, that went with him as a 
new ideal of beauty. 

The attempt to put on from 
the outside is a failure more of- 
ten than not. Some modern 
girls who try it only succeed in 
making themselves look like car- 
icatures of girlhood. But if 
there is beauty within, you need 
not fear that it will fail to work 
its way out to the surface. 



Answered 



"You know," said the lady 
whose motor car had run down 
a man, "you must have been 
walking very carelessly. I am a 
very careful driver. I have been 
driving a car for seven years." 

"Lady, you've got nothing on 
me. I've been walking for 54 
.^,^ year." — Punch. 



THE STENTOR 



A DEFENSE OF GALOSHES 



In a recent Stentor there was 
an editorial about the girls who 
wear galoshes and wear them 
open. This editorial criticized 
severely the wearers of said gal- 
oshes. Now it seems to me that 
the writer of the editorial was 
very "hard up" for material 
when he determined to "pick on" 
the poor, harmless galoshes and 
those fortunate enough to own 
them. He might have chosen so 
many topics more in need of at- 
tention, such as crime, immoral- 
ity, etc. of the world at large. 

In the second place the writer 
probably never owned galoshes 
and more probably has no im- 
agination about them. Only 
those who have worn tliem open 
can understand the thrill there 
is to them. I have heard said 
that the greatest things in life 
were often the small, undefin- 
able things. When galoshes are 
closed they are just the ugly ov- 
ershoes despised in our child- 
hood days but when they are 
open — only the fortunate few 
can understand. 

Last of all, there is so little 
in this school to really thrill one 
(so few of us are in love as yet) 
that if any of our fair coeds can 
get enjoyment out of an inno- 
cent, sensible pair of galoshes 
don't discourage them, please. 
Just suppose they swore or did 
something really bad. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 






Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

at 

FrencH's Drup> Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL V\^OOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OH AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



L H.W. SPEIDEL 



Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home like and a* AttractiTe 
at any Big City Rattaurast. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



ANDERSON BROS. 
I ry Good, Groceries and 
G e n e ra 1 Merchan dise 



1 clephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F E: D E RA l_ 

It's the sign of thebest bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 Telephone 584 

RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



The Blackler Market Co. 

Corner Deerpath and Wettarn Ava*. 

Everything of the Choicest in 

Fresh and 
Salt Meats 
Game and 
Fish 

FINE BUTTER and EGGS 

ci Specialty 



THE STENTOR 



y 

♦ 

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? 

y 
? 
y 

I 

y 
♦ 

I 

f 

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y 
y 
y 
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5: 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, seversi 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2> full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 to |400 for men; $350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ar 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL — a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any departmeni, address 

PRESIDKNT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



i 

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f 
t 
y 
y 

5* 

y 

X 

y 

:«: 

y 
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f 

y 
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Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g 



ownaN' 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest ConfeGtionern 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROLA 



Kiibelslty 

Clothing and 
Kurnisliings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

it H OO HEFAIRING 

Phone 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



The Stentok 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MARCH 5, 1!)2U 



NUMBER 18 



TOO MANY STUDENTS 
LEAVING THE COMMONS 



SHOW POOR SCHOOL SPIRIT 



AU Should Support School lEat- 

ing House; Athletes Are 

Partially Depeiul- 

ent Ou it 



It is inevitably true tliat some 
time during every school year it 
becomes necessary to remind the 
men students that they should 
support the Comomns better. 
Some time during each year the 
tendency to desert the Commons 
for some better (?) eating house 
becomes manifest, and in a like 
manner the rumor always comes 
that the Commons will have to 
be closed and all the men wlli 
have to seek their daily rations 
elsewhere. Of course this is 
very seldom done, and the stu- 
dents take the reprnnand from 
the college authorities as mere- 
ly a matter of course; even 
tlfough the matter may be a 
serious one. 

This year we are very fortu- 
nate in having an excellent cook, 
good kitchen help, and excep- 
tionally good food at the Calvin 
Durand Commons. In spite of 
this fact, however, we find those 
"wandering few" who feel that 
the Commons is a little too com- 
mon for them and they must go 
up town in order to maintain 
their self-respect and prestige 
on the campus. In nine cases 
out of ten, however, those who 
do sally forth in quest of better 
food usually wind up at Ned's 
with a hot beef sandwich, or 
"bismarcks and coffee." 

All very -well and good! But 
what about the Commons in the 
meantime? We have those on 
(Continued on page five) 



IS PROHIBITION ACT 

CONSTITUTIONAL] 



Barrick, Moore, Duulap and 

Tucker Debate Question 

in Chapel 



Wednesday morning a long 
chapel was held and Dean Bar- 
rick, Ray Moore, Tommy Tucker, 
and Winston Dunlap spoke on 
the much argued question of 
Proiiibition. 

The talks were very interest- 
ing as was the fact that Winston 
Dunlap should speak against tlie 
eighteenth Amendment and for 
the Wets. 

Barrick, Moore and Tucher all 
defended the Prohibition act and 
spoke in detail of the many ben- 
efits the Public has derived since 
its enforcement on July 1, 1919. 

It is impossible to name the 
winner as the Judges have not 
made known their decision as 
yet. 

Next week another discussion 
on nn up-to-date subject will be 
held and it is hoped that enough 
students will report to Mr. Sib- 
ley to make it a success. 



BLUE TRIANGLE TEA 

ROOM IN LOIS HALL 

Everybody come out next 
Tuesday afternoon to the Blue 
Triagle Tea Room in the Big 
Room of Lois Hall, from 3:30 un- 
til 5:00 o'clock. There will be 
regular waitresses to serve you 
anything or everything on the 
menu printed below. 

Besides anyone who so desires 
can entire the informal dancing. 

The money raised will go into 
the Constantinople College fund, 
therefore your loyalty to Lake 
Forest will bring you out, so 
that the $300 we have pledged 
to raise will soon be attained. 



ARMOUR TECH. REVENGES 
DEFEAT BYUKE FOREST 

REI> ( OLEMAN IS THE STAR 

Armour Game Clo.ses Season Oa 

Home J'loor; Play at 

Wheaton Saturday 

Night 



Armour took their revenge 
Tuesday night for tlie defeat we 
handed them earlier in the seas- 
on by outplaying the Red and 
Black to the tune of 50 to 34. 

Lake Porests' defeat lies in 
the fact that they were not able 
to stop Armours' right forward 
Bready. He caused the Red and 
Black a great deal of trouble un- 
til ruled out of the game with 
Eddy for having a little physi- 
cal argument. 

Lake Forest at times showed 
all of thfe pep, fighting spirit 
and team work which they ex- 
hibited against Valporaiso but 
lagged at times and let Armour 
get a commanding lead which 
they could not overcome. 

Red Coleman started a Forest- 
er ralljy in the second period 
which netted the Red and Black 
six points before the Chicago 
guards could cover him. "Red" 
played a stellar game through- 
out and was easily the star. He 
outplayed his opponent at all 
times and scored eight field bas- 
kets and two fouls. "Dooley" 
Sumner played a good floor 
game, after having been out a 
week on account of sickness. 

The Armour game is the last 
of the season on the home floor. 
Lake Forest closes the season 
Saturday night at Wheaton. 
(Continued on page nine) 



THE STENTOR 



Y. W. BIRTHDAY PARTY 



Ain't it grand that every four 
years the gods give us an extra 
da.y when we can celebrate just 
as we chose, and have Leap Year 
parties 'en everything? This 
last February 29 we all had an 
extra birthday, not that we're 
anxious to grow old but we want 
to grow old graciously. The Y. 
W. gave the Birthday Party, 
Monday night at 9:30, when all 
we Lois Hallers brought as much 
coi|n as w© ahd spent years in 
this dwelling place of mortals. 
The money goes toward the Con- 
stantinople College fund. A 
cozy fire in the grate and the 
new furniture gave the Big 
Room such a cozy air that we 
all joined in singing the old, old 
college songs. 



At the Y. W. Association meet- 
ing last Thursday we enjoyed a 
report on Hull House by Doro- 
thy Laing. She had visited the 
Settlement House several times 
and gave a most interesting ac- 
count of her experiences there. 



Digamma announces the initia- 
tion of Charles R. Horan. 



Floyd M. Casjens spent the 
week-end with Digamma. At 
present he is employed with 
Stewart-Warner & Co., in Chica- 
go. 



Kappa Sigma announces the in- 
itiation of John A. Davidson, 
Frank Kyndberg, Maurice R. 
O'Connell, A. Winston Dunlap, 
Kenneth M. Gardner, Mortimer 
E. Carlson, and Theodore Kelly. 

H. L. Wilson, J. C. Cunning- 
ham, Frank Blythe, Frank Fen- 
nan, Ernest Smith, John Milton, 
Walter Hall, R. L. Burchell, E. L. 
Gilroy and Richard Morrow vis- 
ited Kappa Sigma last Saturday. 

On a mule we find two legs be- 
hind, 
And two we find before; 
We stand behind before we find 
What the two behind are for. 



THE INCUBATOR 



(By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 
"The flowers that bloom in the 

spring tra la 
Have nothing to do with the 

case." 

It may not seem exactly ap- 
propriate to quote Koko just 
now but at any rate we are sure 
that it isn't any mere flower that 
causes this serious case of spring 
fever, which we have heard is 
inflicting the freshmen. Such 
poetry as has come within our 
supervision has proven that it 
would be much more appropriate 
to paraphase a bit and say: 
"The moon that shines in the 

spring tra la 
Has all to do with the ease." 

At any rate the moon and star 
gase point seem to be the main 
disgTiise that is used to cover 
the slushyness of the usual 
freshman theme. 

Yep methinks that its here. 
As proof of the matter we have 
decided t(i| run another contest. 
This time, although many of the 
poems that have read are merely 
mild proposals, the contest will 
differ from that of the fall edi- 
tions in a^ much as the contes- 
tors will write in verse and be- 
long to the fairer sex. 

Come on ladies! Here's your 
chance! You can win one of the 
entrancing prizes and maybe 
catch him with the same verse. 
The prizes to be awarded will be 
first, a portable flivver, pocket 
size, in which to elope before he 
has a chance to leap; second, a 
beautifully crepe paper bound 
edition of Mr. Burnap's latest 
book on "How to Keep Him Af- 
ter You Get Him," and third, a 
crocheted picture frame just the 
right size for your sweetheart's 
picture. 

Watch for the next edition! 

Dear Incubator: — Some time 
ago I was told that Ibeat Janis 
all to pieces. That I was more 
like a cylinder with an hexagon- 
al base. 'What did she mean? 
How many sides has a cylinder 



with an hexagonal base? 
Yours syruply, 

A. Gossip 

Dear Gossip: — As to the mean- 
ing of your friend aluding to 
Janis would naturally lead one to 
believe that you were two faced 
but she has made things vague 
by saying that you "beat Janis 
to pieces." As to your last ques- 
tion, I should answer that it has 
two sides, an inside and an out- 
side. 

H. B. 0. 



Dear H. B. 0.:— 'Who did Peter 
pick out to distribute the com- 
mon fund among, the Grecian 
widows, the Hellenists or the 
Hebrews? 

Seriously yours, 

Preacher James 

Dear Parson: — According to 
Miss Preston, the noted author- 
ity, he picked out the Hellish 
men. We presume that she al- 
ludes to the Hellenists as she is 
possesed with a peculiar brogue 
that she insists upon calling 
Irish. 

Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington 



If 

A fellow who 

Loves books 

Is called a bookworm, 

Is 

A fellow who 

Likes to 

Stay in bed 

A bed bug? 



"You look like a fool," thun- 
dered the disgusted father to 
his son just returned from col- 
lege. "More like a conceited, 
helpless, fool every year." 

Just then an acquaintance of 
the old gentleman entered the 
office and saw the youth. 

"Hello, Charlie, back, eh!" ex- 
claimed the visitor. "You're 
looking more like your father ev- 
ery year." 

"Yes," said Charlie," that's 
just what the governor has been 
telling me." 



THE STENTOR 



UNSATISFIED 



Amid the cities constant din 
A man who round the world has 

been; 
Who mid the tumult and the 

throng, 
Is thinking-, thinking all the day 

long; 
"Oh could I only tread once more 
The Campus poth to the Com- 
mons door, 
Dear old Lois Hall could I see 
How happy, how happy 
How happy I would be." 
Lake Forest Campus, with paths 

so wide, 
And beautiful trees on either 

side; 
A bright eyed student who looks 

from out 
The window with woodbine 

wreathed about, 
And wishes this one thought all 

the day; 
"Oh if I could but fly away 
From thid dull spot, the world 

to see, 
How happy, how happy 
How happy I would be."^D. B. 



Treason 

Br-r-r-n-n-g 

"Hellow." 

"Francis there?" 

"Talking." 

"It's Vinton; can I have a date 
tonight?" 

"No." 

"Why?" 

"I ate onions for supper." 

"I don't mind, I ate them too." 

"And you dare ask me for a 
date? I like the nerve!" 

Bang!!! 



The Tribulations of the Colleg^e 
Bell Hop 



Gone But Not Forgotten 

"Are caterpillars good to eat?" 
asked little Jimmy at the dinner 
table. 

"No," said his father. "What 
makes you ask a question like 
that while we are eating?" 

"You had one on your lettuce 
but it's gone now, replied Jim- 
my. 



PERSONALS 



Burr zing-flip! "Ye Gods, 

it's a quarter to eight and I set 
that crazy alarm for a quarter 
to seven! Only five minutes to 
get over to College Hall to ring 
that bloomin' bell at ten min- 
utes of eight." By a superhu- 
man effort, after dropping into 
his clothes, the hop hopped over 
to the Hall at sixty miles per 
and got there at one half min- 
ute to eight. 

With a sigh of relief he open- 
ed the rope box, took hold of the 
rope and gave one mighty pull. 
But to his dismay the rope re- 
mained as it was and he pulled 
some splinters instead. Some 
fool must be holding the rope 
upstairs. So the hop tied the 
rope securely and dashed madly 
up six flights of steps and broke, 
sweating and panting, into the 
room through which the rope 
passes. 

There was only a quarter of a 
minute to go, and instead of 
someone holding the rope, there 
it was twisted and tied around 
a wash stand. Furiously and 
with muttered imprications he 
unfastened the rope, kicked the 
washstand away so hard that it 
broke the plaster oft" the oppo- 
site wall, and then found that 
he couldn't pull it again because 
he had tied it down stairs. 
Hang those pestiferous barbar- 
ians! 

At a dangerous rate he de- 
sscended the six flights, almost 
a flight at a time, and at nine 
minutes to eight the trusty and 
always accurate bell began to 
toll, but Professor Burnap arriv- 
ed on the scene a few minutes 
later, pulled out his unerring 
time-piece and commented to 
the red faced, pufl'ing bell hop 
that the bell was a minute late, 
and the hop apologized and 
promised to ring the bell on 
time next day. Down with the 
barbarians! 



Margaret Griffith has return- 
ed to college after an extended 
visit to Hot Springs, Arkansas. 



Alberta Burrus is still in 
Little Rock, Arkansas. 



Laura Rossiter spent the week 
end in Wilmette. 
Sue Spaulding spent the week 
end at her home in Princeton, 
Illinois. 



Joe Martin left us last Thurs- 
day to spend the rest of the 
week at home, recuperating from 
her illness. She returned Sun- 
day and \ve are glad that she is 
so much improved. 



Mary Alice Metzgar spent the 
week end at her home in Moline, 
Illinois. 



Opha Catterlin was entertain- 
ed Monday evening at the home 
of Captjain' and Mrs. Weeks of 
Highland Park. 



Kappa Kappa Chi announces 
the initiation of Opha Catterlin, 
Esther Graham, Mildred Graham 
and Ellen Knox. 



Martha Mohr spent the week 
end in Chicago at the home of 
Virginia Kratch. 



Virginia Hopkins spent the 
week end in Evanston. 



Beth Thayer spent the week 
end, at hert home in Chicago. 



"\'era Pettingrew spent the 
we ik end in Rogers Park. 



/.nne Merner visited with her 
mother and sister in Chicago ov- 
er the week end. 

Ruth Bridman and Elsie Engel 

spent the week end skating. 



I'igamma announces the initia- 
tion of Henry J. Kunz. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
B«th Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Marion Pi'eston, '21. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Ruth Bahlert '22. 



SPRING WEATHER 

Now that the balmy spring 
days seem to be coming with all 
the slush of melting snow and 
rain and all the things that ac- 
company them, we are all feel- 
ing very happy in the thought 
that Lake Forest will soon step 
out of her mourning garments 
and become arrayed in all the 
glorious beauty of the spring 
and summer. To we folks who 
have been here to enjoy the 
beauty of a spring in this fairy- 
land the thought is a most com- 
forting one; to those who have 
never witnessed the sight the 
idea must be one which has been 
imagined for many months and 
which will soon be realized. 

Could any college have a cam- 
pus more beautiful than we 
have? Is there any place in the 
whole world more ideally situat- 
ed for the advancement of learn- 
ing, more inspiring lo the stu- 
dent who is working tc gain the 
knowledge that will advance him 
in later life? 

In later years we will look 
back upon these glorious spring 
days that we are about to spend 
here, with feelings of joy and 
memories that we would not 
trade for anything else in the 



world. Right now we are in- 
clined to forget how much we 
really think of our college when 
we become discouraged over our 
work or over the chilly weather, 
when for so many months we 
have been praying for spring to 
come. 

We are apt to think that when 
the long looked for spring weath- 
er does arrive we will not feel 
like pursuing our studies, but 
on the other hand when the time 
does really come we will be 
urged on by the beautiful sur- 
roundings to make the most of 
the opportunities that are 
stretched out all about us, and 
work to even better advantage 
than during the winter. 

With the spring will come our 
outdoor festivals, and particular- 
ly our May Day which we all re- 
member was started so success- 
fully last year and which we 
feel sure will be even better this 
year after the experiencs of last 
year. It is truly a wonderful 
thing that we are looking for- 
ward to and we will certainly be 
happy when the dear old Spring 
comes to make Lake Forest the 
garden spot of the United States. 



ARMORED VESSELS 



They say that the work of 
man is copied from nature and 
that nature shows the way in 
all things. This is not always 
true. Experiments for heavier 
armor on fighting ships are ev- 
er being made. If Naval Con- 
structors took their lessons from 
Mother Nature they would try 
for heavier armor, for Nature 
has experimented with ai'mor 
for millions of years. 

In the olden days there were 
tremendously armored animals, 
monsters of greater size than 
any living animal today. Tre- 
mendous lizards and huge croco- 
diles roamed the world of ouf 
prehistoric ancestors. But who 
is king of the jungle today? 
Tlie lion and the tiger, with no 
defensive armor on either one 



of them. And what has become 
of the armored monsters? They 
are gone. Wiped off the face of 
the earth, with the exception of 
a few sleepy alligators and the 
little armandillo, a vest pocket 
edition of the dinosaur of Ad- 
am's time. According to Dame 
Nature the animal that can hit 
first, hardest and most frequent- 
ly is the winner in Nature's do- 
main, on the earth, in the sea 
and in the air. 



PRETTY EYEBROWS 



Poor eyebrows, like poor ex- 
cuses, are better than none, but 
befitting eyebrows are a boon to 
beauty. The eyebrows are 
thickened flesh, muscle, skin 
and stiff hairs, resting upon a 
bony ridge of the forehead, just 
above the eye socket. Eye- 
brows are distinctly human. 
They have not been observed in 
animals. It may be more than 
a coincidence that highly intel- 
lectual as well as beautiful 
women and handsome men have 
enviable eyebrows. Greater 
than the delicate penciling, 
which the eyebrows give to 
beauty, is the useful part they 
play in protecting the eyes by 
serving as a ridge or gutter to 
collect and drain off perspiration 
and dust. 

Facial expressions are in no 
small degree influenced by the 
eyebrows. Various shades of 
emotion are portrayed by each 
little movement of these living, 
camels-hair brushes. Women 
who are very fair often exhibit 
eyebrows of a very fine, delicate- 
ly penciled type. In deeply 
brunette persons they may be 
luxuriant. Swarthy men, par- 
ticularly, have long, thick, bushy 
eyebrows, which give them at 
time a fierce appearance. -Ladies' 
Home Journal. 



The Forester Board once more 
makes an appeal to the students 
to get busy with those snap- 
shots and grinds for the college 
annual. 



THE STENTOR 



REPORT OF THE 

DES MOINES CONVENTION 



The Conventions of the Stu- 
dent Volunteer Movement for 
Foreign Missions have "literally 
marked epochs in the missionary 
and religious life of the students 
of Canada and of the United 
States." Of the series which be- 
gan in 1891, the Eighth Conven- 
tion has just been held in Des- 
Moines, Iowa. Certainly it was 
the greatest of the series in the 
number of students and profes- 
sors present, in the number of 
institutions represented and in 
the number of students from 
foreign lands who shared in its 
great sessions. Moreover, as a 
result of the new vision coming 
to students growing out of the 
great War and its aftermath of 
world unrest, combined with the 
vision of the world's spiritual 
need and Christianity's answer 
thereto, as set forth in the ad- 
dresses and discussions at Des- 
Moines, this last Convention 
gives promise of being fully as 
epochal as those which have 
gone before. 

Convention messages, as pre- 
sented in platform sessions and 
in section meetings, will be made 
quickly available both for dele- 
gates and for those not privileg- 
ed to be at Des Moines, in a re- 
port volume for which orders 
received at the Student Volun- 
teer Movement Headquarters, 
25 Madison Avenue, New York 
City, before March 15, and ac- 
companied by remittance, will 
be accepted at $2.00, carriage 
prepaid. The price of the vol- 
ume when published will be 
$2.50. 



Through Love's Ej'es 



Time: Saturday afternoon. 

Place: Paulson's barber shop. 

Setting: D. Milo Rees in chair. 

Dave: "Say Paulson, my hair 
is falling out! Have you got 
anything good to keep it in?" 

Paulson: "Sure! A cigar box is 
always good." 



I 

My daddy needs some spectacles, 
His eyes don't seem quite right. 
There's something really wrong 

with them 
Although they look so bright. 

II 

He can't tell what is big or 
small. 

It's really quite a shame 

The way he gets things all mix- 
ed up; 

I can't think what's to blame. 
Ill 

Each night when he comes home 
from town 

I meet him in the hall. 

He always calls me his BIG 
MAN, 

But I'm not very tall. 

IV 

I'm just a little boy of six. 
And sometimes when I cry. 
My daddy says, "You GREAT 

BIG MAN, 
You'll soon be big as I." 

V 
"My little girl," he always says 

When greeting Mother dear, 
But she's a great big lady tall. 
His eyes are bad I fear. 

VI 
We'll have to get him spectacles 
'Cause he can't see quite right 
There's something really wrong 

with them 
Although they look so bright. 



TOO MANY STT DENTS 

LEAVING THE COMAIOXS 

(Continued from page one) 



the campus who are dependent 
upon the Commons for part of 
their support while in collegt 
and it is no more than fair to 
them thcit they should receive 
the entire support of the men 
students. This is not an attack 
upon outside eating places, but 
just an appeal to the men to 
support one of the best college 
institutions, while it is at its 
best! 



"Tliink-O-That" 

The aim of every woman of 
the Burmese tribe of Padung is 
to elongate the neck as much as 
possible, and to effect this a fe- 
male child has a brass wire fit- 
ted around her neck to which 
additional rings are added as the 
years go by until she is 15, when 
she is valued by the length of 
her collar and purchased as a 
wife. Girls with necks over a 
foot long are not uncommon. 



♦Toor Dog Died" 

Last night he died, 

And those who loved him; 

All loyal Theta Psi, 

Knelt by his side 

Slowlv the evening shadows 

crept; 
His eyes dimmed, 
And then he slept. 



A speaker was irritated by the 
noise made by the assemblage. 
"Silence!" he roared. "I want 
this hall to be so still you can 
hear a pin drop." There was a 
deathly quiet for a moment; 
then an irrepressible youth 
piped up: "Let 'er drop." 



Lois Ryno. Alice Axton, Ruth 
Bahlert, Ruth Kenendy, Rose 
Deutch, Lillian Hatfield and Mar- 
garet Sillars spent the week end 
with Helen Sanders, at her home 
in La Grange. 



Mrs. Bridgman entertained at 
Tea, in her home in Red Bird 
Cottage, on Tuesday afternoon, 
Mrs. Ellingwood, Lois Ryno, Al- 
ice Axton, Ruth Kennedy, Ruth 
Bahlert, Esther Loop, Helen San- 
ders, Rose Deutch, Lillian Hat- 
field and Margaret Sillars. 



A. J. Hennings, '09 was a guest 
of Digamma this week. He is 
now practicing corporation law 
in the city of Chicago with Dr. 
Thulin of Northwestern Univer- 
sity; both having recently sev- 
ered relations with Peabody, 
Houtelng & Co. 



THE 



S T E N T R 




Someofthe General Electric Company's 
Research Activities During the War: 

Submarine detection devices 
X-ray tube for medical service 
Radio telephone and telegraph 
Electric welding and applications 
Seaichlights for the Army and Navy 
Electric furnaces for gun shrinkage 
Magneto insulation for air service 
Detonators for submarine mines 
Incendiary and smoke bombs 
Fixation of nitrogen 
Substitutes for materials 



The Service of an Electrical 
Research Laboratory 

The research facilities of the General Electric Company 
are an asset of world-wide importance, as recent war 
work has so clearly demonstrated. Their advantages 
in pursuits of peace made them of inestimable value 
in time of war. 

A most interesting story tells of the devices evolved which sub- 
stantially aided in solving one of the most pressing problems of 
the war — the submarine menace. Fanciful, but no less real, were 
the results attained in radio communication which enabled an 
aviator to control a fleet of flying battleships, and made possible 
the sending, without a wire, history-making messages and orders 
to ships at sea. Scarcely less important was the X-ray tube, 
specially designed for field hospital use and a notable contribution to 
the military surgical service. And many nher products, for both com- 
batant and industrial use, did their full share in securing the victory. 

In the laboratories are employed highly trained physicists, chemists, 
metallurgists and engineers, some of whom are experts of inter- 
national reputation. These men are working not only to convert 
the resources of Nature to be of service to man, but to increase 
the usefulness of electricity in every line of endeavor. Their 
achievements benefit every individual wherever electricity is used. 

Scientific research works hand in hand with the development of new 
devices, more efficient apparatus and processes of manufacture. It 
results in the discovery of better and more useful materials and ulti- 
mately in making happier and more livable the life of all mankind. 

Booklet, Y-863, describing the company's plants, 
v^ill be mailed upon request. Address Desk 37 




General Office 

Schenectady^ N.Y. 



'0 ^.i^M, 





Sales Offices in «'*<«> 
all large cities. 



THE STENTOR 



AT HLETICS 



FRESHMAN GIRLS WIN 
FROM MUSIC SCHOOL 



DOROTHY ANTRUM STARS 



Senior Team Composed of Tlirce 

Seniors and Two Girls 

From the Music 

School 



The girls of the Class of 1923 
upheld the Freshman reputa- 
tion and defeated the Senior 
girls 26 to 9 in a slow game of 
basket ball, Wednesday night. 

The Senior team was com- 
posed of three Seniors and two 
girls from the Music School as 
there are not enough girls in the 
Senior class to make up a team. 

Campbell and Antrum at the 
forwards for the Freshman play* 
ed a star floor game and shot 
baskets at will. Ant rum should 
give a few of the boys on Der- 
by's team instructions in the art 
of putting the ball through the 
basket. She made eight field 
goals, which is remarkable con- 
sidering the rules under which 
the girls have to play. Smith 
at center and Merner at guard 
played the best for the Seniors. 

The line-ups were: 

Freshman (26): 

B. F. P. T. 

K. Antrum, rf. 8 2 10 

M. Campbell, If. 4 

L. Rossiter, c. 

D. Lamy, rg. 10 

E. Knox, Ig. 

Seniors (9): 

B. F. P. T. 

G. Smith, rf. 3 10 1 

D. Antrim, If. 10 

A. Merner, c. 

M. Prechett, rg. 

J. Martin, Ig. 3 

F. Russell, Ig. 2 



FRATERNITY LEAGUE 



Stai 


iding 








W. 


L. 


Pet. 


Phi Pi 


3 





1000 


Phi Eta Alpha 


2 


1 


500 


Kappa Sigma 


2 


1 


500 


Omega Psi 


1 


3 


250 


Digamma 





2 


000 


Barbs 





2 


000 



Last Weeks' Results 

Phi Pi 28— Omega Psi 5. 

Digamma 13 — Phi Eta Alpha 
15. 

Phi Eta Alpha 30— aBrbs 14. 

The Phi Eta Alpha's certain- 
ly upset the dope in last weeks 
inter-fraternity games by de- 
feating Digamma and Kappa 
sigma in hard fought games. On 
Monday they out played Digam- 
ma and won 15-13 while on Wed- 
nesday the margin of the vic- 
tory over Kappa Sigma was one 
point. The Digammas were 
weakened by the losss of Bed- 
does while the Phi Eta's with 
Morley leading played a real 
game of basket ball. The foul 
slTooting of Bosworth was re- 
sponsible for their defeating 
Kappa Sigma, as losers made 
more field baskets. 



Games Next Week 
Monday: Barbs vs Kappa Sig- 
ma. 

Wednesday: Phi Pi vs. Kappa 
Sigma. 

Friday: Digamma vs. Barbs. 



DONT FORGET THE 
TNTER(LASS TRACK-MEET 
]\LiRCH 20 



GREENCASTLE TEAM 
OUTPLAYS FORESTERS 



OVERCOME RY STAGE FRIGHT 



DePauw Rooters Turn Out 1,500 

Strong With a Band 

of Forty Pieces 



The Foresters journeyed to 
Greencastle last Saturday night 
and returned with the short end 
of a 50 to 14 score. 

Til.: De P'auw University team 
is ranked with the best in the 
west, some of the Chicago sport- 
writers claiming they are in the 
same class with Chicago, Illinois 
and Purdue. Against such a 
team we could not expect our 
boys to make a very wonderful 
showing by way of field basekts. 

Lake Forest was completely 
lost on the large floor and were 
unable to break up the Green- 
castle combinations. "Red" 
Colemna played a star game for 
Derby's men, scoring three field 
baskets in the second half. 

Curtis, Miller and Cannon 
starred for DePauw with six 
baskets each. 

Line-ups: 

Lake Forest (14): 

B. F. P. T. 

Manning, rf. 10 

Kunz, If. 2 

Russell, c. 

Eddy, rg. 2 

Hale, Ig. 

Coleman, If. 3 2 



De 


Pauw 


(50): 








Curtis, rf. 




G 











Cannon, If. 




6 


1 








Miller, c. 




7 








1 


Uendenhall, 


Ig. 


1 





1 





Gipan, rg. 




1 


1 








Carlisle, If. 




2 





1 


1 


Bills, Ig. 




1 





1 






THE STENTOR 



EXCHANGES 



"Aren't you afraid of the ocean 

wild?" 
Asked the bather by her side. 
"Oh, no! " she answered, "because 

you see, 
I know the ocean's tide." 



She: "That must be a very 
fashionable restaurant, over 
there. Just look at all those 
swell cars." 

He: "Yes, it is. All the chauf- 
fers eat there." 



A man went in to get a job 
and the clerk asked him to fill 
out the registration blank, and 
this is the way he did it: 

Q. Born? — Ans. Yes, once. 

Q. Date? — Ans. Yesterday 
was the eighth. 

Q. Married or Single? — Ans. 
Have been both. 

Q. Parents alive? — Ans. Not 
yet. 

Q. Former employment ? — 
Ans. None. 

Q. Business? — Ans. Rotten. 

Q. Do you drink? — Ans. Not 
in dry states. 

Q. Why do you want a job? — ■ 
Ans. My wife won't work any 
more. 



Conductor (to colored lady): 
"You'll have to get that suitcase 
out of the aisle." 

Colored lady: "Say conductor, 
dat all ain't no suit case, dat all 
am my foot." 



Student (before exam.): "Do 
you think we ought to know this 
for the exam?" 

Professor: "I don't think; I 
know." 

Student: "I don't think I know 
either." 



When yon get your date for 
Tnesday afternoon brinir lior to 
the Bine Triang:le Tea at Lois 
Hall. 



them through five major cam- 
paigns, concluding service with 
seven months in Germany with 
the army of occupation. 



lit's Baked at HUNTOON'S It's Baked Klght 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakerv Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Muimger 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coiomutation 

Tickets 

32 UERRPAXH. M'BST 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

Cleaiihtg, I'res.sitirf. Kepairiruf 



J. B. Veselsky 

LADIES' AND MEN'S TAILOR 
CLEANING AND PRESSING 
Atntersoii Building. PhoneSSS 
LAKE FOKEST, ILL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 



PEARL THEATRE 

South First St. 
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the best of pictures are shown 
Shows: 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. ra. 
Phones: 341, 342, 343. 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 




Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalle St 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



C. T. GUNN CO. 
OROCERS 

The place to get good things to eat 

Agency Huyler's Candies, 

Curtice Bros. Goods. LAKE FOREST 



gllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllllllllllllg 




I "Swift's 

I Premium 

I Hams and Bacon 

I are mild, 

I sweet, tender. 

I Each piece is care- 

I fully selected and 

I cured to give it the 

I distinctive "Premium" 

I flavor. 

1 Ask for "Premium" Products 

■Si 

I Swifts Company 

I U. S. A. 

illlHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillHIHUHIIIIIIIIli 



THE STENTOR 



ARMOUR TECH. REVENGES 
DEFEAT BY LAKE F0I5EST 

(Continued from page one) 
Line-ups: 

Lake Forest (34): 

B. F. P. T. 
Manning, rf. 3 3 

Kunz, If. 10 10 

Coleman, If. 8 2 10 

Russell, <iV 2 

Eddy, \g. 3 12 

Hale, Ig. 

Sumner, rg. 2 2 

Armour (50): 

B. F. P. T. 
Bready, rf. 6 6 2 1 



Kuehn, If. 
Erickson, c. 
Olebeck, rg. 
May, Ig. 
Shoemaker, rf. 
McCofFney, Ig. 



5 2 

2 2 2 
4 2 

3 2 
3 2 
10 





FOR 


• • • o 

SALE 




• Special 


3A Folding 


Eastman • 


I Kodak 


with 


carryi 


ng case. * 


• Price $2 


5.00. 


See Mi 


. Tucker, • 


• at Book 


Store 


or 


Telephone • 


I 580-J. 




) • • •• 





LITKRART ASSISTANCE 

Scholarly service extended to 
speakers, debaters, fraternity 
men, writers. We have helped 
thousands on their special sub- 
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service rendered at moderate 
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us your specific requirements, 
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THE STENTOR 



A LETTEK FROM 

C HATFIELD TAYLOR 



In a letter from Otis Chatfield- 
Taylor, who is attending school 
at Yale University this year, he 
states: "Life down here is the 
most intricate thing that you 
could imagine. The lessons are 
about three or four times as 
hard as at Lake Forest, and in 
addition to that they don't think 
much of anybody who is not out 
for three or four extra-curricu- 
lum activities. At the present 
time, when I am not studying, 
playing tennis, or rehearsing for 
the Apollo, Glee or Mandolin 
Club, I am heeling the news, 
which doesn't take a bit more 
than seven hours a day of one's 
time. All of which leaves me 
almost fifteen minutes a day to 
myself. Today I am spending 
that in writing to you, and I 
hope that you are not so much 
annoyed at my previous failure 
to remit that this epistle will 
not bear fruit. Say "Hello" to 
all the boys and girls for me, 
and believe me. 

Yours sincerely, 
Otis Chatfield-Taylor." 



LITERARY ASSISTANCE 



Scholarly service extended to 
speakers, debaters, fraternity 
men, writers. We have helped 
thousands on their special sub- 
jects .and themes. Our research 
service rendered at moderate 
charge quite promptly. Write 
us your specific requirements, 
and obtain our estimate, with 
list of endorsements from our 
patrons. Authors' Research Bu- 
reau, 500 Fifth Ave., New York. 



ALIMM NOTES 



1915. Ray McAllister is study- 
ing law at his home in Oconto, 
Wisconsin, preparatory to re-en- 
tering the Harvard Law School, 
which he left upon enlistment, 
next Autumn. 



1881. Rev. W. 0. Forbes' of- 
ficial designation is District 
Supt. S. S. of Washington, Ore- 
gon, Northern Idaho and Alaska, 
at present having ten mission- 
aries under his direction in Sun- 
day School field work. In his 
thirty-six years of service on the 
Coast he has been instrumental 
in establishing over 60 churches 
and more than 500 Sunday 
Schools. Address 1007 E. Marion 
St., Seattle, Wash. 



1884. H. D. Wolben's address 
is no longer Marengo, but 60 
Hickory St., Chicago Heights. 



1888. Through the kindness 
of one of its members, we are 
able to give the following items 
about the Davies' family, five of 
whose members attended the 
College and fared through to 
graduation, the record. (We be- 
lieve the Wilson family with 
four graduates and the Hen- 
nings with three graduates and 
one non-graduate, come next). 
Rev. L. J. Davies, '88, has dis- 
continued his connection with 
college teaching in China, and 
will return to evangelist! work, 
his preference. He has suffered 
a severe affliction recently in 
the accidental death of his little 
daughter while at play. The 
Misses Anna, '89, and Abigail, 
'95, are still in the College Set- 
tlement, 502 S. Front St., Phila- 
delphia, the former as head 
worker and the lattet in charge 
of the children's department. 
Miss Mary, '89, is spending the 
winter with her mother, who be- 
gins to feel the infirmities of 
age, on the family "farm" at 
Vineland, N. J. Chas. S., '93, is 
apparently making a record for 
a long pastorate at Fairbury, 
111., v/here he has been since he 
left the seminary. 



1898. Alexis J. Coleman, who 
was for some time in civilian 
war service in Washington, who 
with the raising of the age lim- 
it and other circumstances was 



finally encouraged to enter the 
Coast Artillery, but did not fi- 
nally enlist until November 2, 
1918, a few days before the 
armistice, being discharged two 
months later. He is now en- 
gaged on the publication board 
of the General Electric Co., at 
Schenetady, N. Y., residing at 
22 Eagle St. 

1904. Jean Clos is reported 
to be Assistant Manager for R. 
A. Tuttle & Co., 920 Broadway, 
N. Y. City, with address at Har- 
vard Club, 27 West 44th St. 
During the war he was assist- 
ant to the Chairman of the War 
Industries Board, in connection 
with which he was attached to 
the Inter-Allied Munitions Coun- 
cil at Paris, with rank of Cap- 
tain, Quartermasters' Corps. 



1912. Mrs. F. H. (Bertha Tor- 
chiani) Haessler, has an inter- 
esting history since her gradua- 
tion. Student of medicine in 
Chicago, 1912-1916; interne, Wom 
an's Hospital, Detroit, for a few 
months; interne Children's Mem- 
orial Hospital, Chicago, up to 
July, 1917; Bacteriologist, Louis- 
ville City Hospital, to May 1918; 
Contract Surgeon, U. S. Army, 
Hoboken, N. J., to January, 1919. 
In May, 1917, she married Fer- 
dinand H. Haessler, M. B. (Johns 
Hopkins), a graduate previously 
of W^isconsin University. Her 
permanent address is at 128 
Booth St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



1913. Miss Sarah J. Burchill 
is with the Industrial Relations 
department of the Internation- 
al Harvester Co., Harvester 
Bldg., residing at 1829 Kenil- 
worth Ave. 



1913. Miss Virginia Abry is 
now living at home 108 N. Third 
St., Vincennes, Ind., and teach- 
ing in the local high school. 



1914. Rev. Anton Koerenen is 
now located at New Castle, Pa., 
514 John St. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



1905. Miss Grace Killen con- 
tinues to have her home at New 
Kindsay, Alberta, Canada, and is 
now teaching- at McLaughlin in 
the same province. 



1907. Miss Elizabeth D. Wil- 
liams keeps somewhat in touch 
with her former home at Strea- 
tor, and can always be address- 
ed there, but spends much of 
her time in travel and tempor- 
ary sojourning in the South or 
West. This winter she is at 
Miami, Florida, 121 11th St. 



1909. Berkley M. Frazer is 
now purchasing- agent for the 
Troy Sunshade Co., Troy, 0. 



1909. David Thomson is first 
assistant surgeon for the Ari- 
zona Copper Co., Clifton, Arizo- 
na. He was married in 1915 to 
Miss Emilu C. Hollister, M. A., 
Ohio State University, 1910, in- 
structor in science Los Angeles, 
Californa, State Normal 1912- 
1915. (During the war he was 
vice-chairman Medical Examin- 
ing Board for local district.) A 
second son and a third child was 
born on the 12th of this Jan- 
uary. 



1911. Harold C. Lutz's perma- 
nent address is Fort Sam Hous- 
ton, Texas. He was commission- 
ed as 2nd Lieut, of Cavalry in 
December, 1911, promoted to 
1st Lieut., July, 1916, serving at 
the Phillippines and remained 
there until February, 1919. He 
holds the rank of captain since 
May, 1917. 



1912. Mrs. Paul M. (Emily 
Douglas) Gilmer is now resid- 
ing at her former home, Colfax, 
HI. She has one daughter four 
years old. Her husband has 
been professor of biology in 
various institutons. 



1915. During his final year at 
McCormick Seminary Paul Turn- 
er is acting as supply minister 
in the Presbyterian Church at 
Lowell, Indiana. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

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M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
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Lake Forest, Illinois 



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It is Dainty, Home like and as Attractive 
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Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

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Gents' Furniskings | 

Suits Made to Order \ 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing} 

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Lake Forest 
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LAKE FOREST 



ANDERSON BROS. 
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Tf'ephones: 
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KODAKS AND 
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KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

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look for the word 

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It's the sign of thebest bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



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MARKET 

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Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

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Game and 
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FINE BUTTER and EGGS 
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THE 



S T E N T R 






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LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2^ full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garricli (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |325 to 1-100 for men; |350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ar 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY — a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Uke Forest, llUnois 



I 

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Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



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Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m.to 5pm 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
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"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



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Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
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BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



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Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL, AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OF 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 



Kubelssky 

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I Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 

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Phone 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MARCH 12, 1920 



NUMBER 19 



DR. ALLEE DISCUSSES 
ATHLETIC PROGRESS 



Entitles Talk "The Twiliglit 

of Intercollegiate 

Athletics 



Dr. W. C. Allee, faculty mem- 
ber of the Athletic Board, gave 
an interesting talk on intercol- 
legiate athletics in Chapel last 
Friday. Dr. Allee has given a 
great deal of time to the study 
of athletic conditions, both in 
Lake Forest and the colleges 
which Lake Forest plays, and to 
the conferences of the larger col- 
leges and universities. He is, 
without doubt, better informed 
upon this subject than any man 
in Lake Forest. 

Dr. Allee suggested as the 
title for his remarks, "The Twi- 
light of Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics." He thinks that a change 
in the old system is inevitable 
and that the old regime is clear- 
ly on the defensive. The pres- 
ent tendency is toward greater 
stress upon intramural than up- 
on intercollegiate contests and 
the substitution of the spirit of 
the amateur for professionalism. 

At present, this movement ex- 
ists only as a tendency rather 
than as a definitely formulated 
system. Such a system is what 
is now being sought by colleges 
which hope for progress in ath- 
letics. Dr. Allee offered a ten- 
tative solution which he thought 
might well be tried by Lake For- 
est. In football, for instance, he 
would have all the men engage 
in intramural games until, say, 
the first of November. Then, 
from those who had shown up 
best in these games, he would 
choose a team to play a few 
games with other colleges. 



MRS. SIMON REID 



In the death of Mrs. Reid, 
which occurred on March 6th, 
the community loses one of its 
most active and useful citizens 
and the College one of its most 
constant benefactors. Student 
generations are brief and for 
some three years Mrs. Reid has 
been an invalid, but one need 
go back but a few years to find 
the student body knowing her 
better than any other person in 
the Lake Forest Community. 
The reasons for this will appeal' 
in what follows : 

Mr. and Mrs. Reid came to 
Lake Forest in 1869, the year in 
which Ferry Hall was opened. 
From the first, they, with their 
three daughters, and one son, 
progressively took an active 
interest in the schools, the 
church, and the welfare of the 
town. Mr. Reid was building up 
the business of Reid, Murdoch 
& Co., which still carries his 
name. The prosperity of that 
business enabled Mr. and Mrs. 
Reid to add generous gifts to 
personal interest and service. 
They were of the pioneer group 
in Lake Forest, whose interest 
centered around the church and 
the schools and whose children 
were largely educated here. In 
the 80's, the three daughters 
were in attendance at Ferry 
Hall and College; and the son, 
Arthur, after being graduated 
at the Academy, was for two 
years a member of '97. Not 
long after Mr. Reid's death in 
1891, Reid Hall at the Academy 
was built as a memorial of him ; 
and in 1899 the Lily Reid Holt 
Memorial Chapel and the 

(Continued on Page Two.) 



NEW SENIOR SOCIETY 
APPEARS ON CAMPUS 



Mystery Surrounds the New Or- 
ganization Which is Known 
as The Iron Key 



A new fraternity has appear- 
ed upon the campus. Or at least, 
it is publicly announced for 
the first time, as vague hints 
of such an organization have 
come out from time to time dur- 
ing the year. 

The name of the new society 
is The Iron Key. The badge is 
a small black key, bearing the 
Greek letters Omicron Sigma 
Kappa and Gamma Delta Pi. At- 
tached to the key by a silver 
chain is a guard pin consisting 
of the letter Sigma surmount- 
ed by a minute skull and cross- 
bones. 

The only other details which 
have been made known are the 
names of eight senior mem- 
bers. Five others are conceal- 
ed under pseudonyms, tho the 
identity of these five may be 
shrewdly guessed. The list is 
as follows: 

Mason G. Armstrong. 

Vincent F. Coleman. 

Vernon S. Downs. 

Lucius S. Legner. 

Francis A. McFerran. 

Raymond Moore. 

.J. Ralph Stewart. 

Donald C. Woods. 

Agni. 

Indra. 

Savitar. 

Surya. 

Ushas. 



Phi Eta Alpha announces the 
pledging of George Schenck. 



THE S T E N T R 



MRS, SILICN EL ID 



(Continued from rags cnc) 

Arthur Siir.ervilb Ec'd Library 
were erected in remembrance of 
the daughter, graduated in 
1884, and of the son. But these 
memorials are no more abiding 
in the minds of the faculty and 
students of all three depart- 
ments here than the constant 
and friendly relations between 
Mrs. Reid and her household 
and; themselves. Many of the 
women of the 80's, friends of 
her daughters, have always 
called on her when in Lake For- 
est. In the '90's, her house was 
always swarming, and her table 
surrounded, with friends of her 
son. Lideed, an outstanding 
characteristic of the house has 
been its wide and generous hos- 
pitality. For a number of years, 
practically the whole college 
body was entertained there once 
a year, when the Lois Hall Glee 
Club gave its spring concert at 
Mrs. Reid's, as rather the gala 
occasion of the year for the Uni- 
versity Club, of which she was 
the only honarary member. As 
to her generosity to college en- 
terprises and college students, 
in college and out in life, no one 
knows them all. The present 
writer remembers prizes at the 
Academy ; frequent support giv- 
en to the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. 
W. C. A.; subsci-iptions to the 
Lois Hall Glee Club endowment 
fund; decoration of the Chapel 
on many occasions and of the 
church at commencement; ;: 
Victrola for the use of a gradu 
ate, a missionary in Siam — in- 
deed most of the Lake Forest 
missionaries got help in theii 
work from Mrs. Reid; — an an- 
nual dinner for Ferry Hall sen 
iors ; reception for a new Presi- 
dent — who soon wore his own 
path to her door with no sense 
of hesitation, even if he ask 
her to open her purse. To this 
liberality with gifts, however, 
was added what is rarer and 
more precious, — a vivid interest 



n rerccr.s £.;:d in £.11 eTrrLs 

wl-ich ic:r:.td to hsr v/or:h7, 

rd a personal, las.ing friend 

hip. The triumphant note at 

Jti s. Leid s funeral on Tuesday 

was surely justified. 



BELOIT ALIMM IXVES- 
TIGATE FOOTBALL SLLMP 



When Beloit College failed to 
come up to its old-time stand- 
ard in football last fall, some of 
its alumni in Chicago decided to 
investigate. Following are 
some extracts from the report 
submitted by the alumni and 
published in The Beloit Round 
Table: 

"The failure of the 1919 team 

was due to Disi'egard for 

training rules and a lack of 
fighting spirit on the part of 
the team These immed- 
iate causes for Beloit's reverses 
are, however, based upon an- 
other and more deeply seated 
cause. The College as a whole 
did not, and does not, have the 
real desire to win. Tlie spirit 
on the campus is at low ebb. 
The faculty showed an even 
greater lack of interest in the 
team. 

We feel that the one 

thing above all others that has 
been undermining the spirit at 
Beloit is the great stress being 
laid upon social activities by the 
student body. The students as 
a whole are so deeply engrossed 
in dancing and "fussing" that 
anything that means red-blood- 
ed effort and application is 
avoided." 

Apparently things are in a 
bad way at Beloit. We do not 
believe they are quite so dis- 
tressing here. Still, after read- 
ing and hearing so many dis- 
cussions this year upon the sub- 
ject of "What is Wrong With 
Lake Forest," it is interesting to 
see in what particulars the al- 
umni of a sister institution 
criticize their Alma Mater. 



LOIS HALL GIVES 

LEAP YEAR OPEN HOUSE 



The girls of the Lois Durand 
Hall entertained at an Open 
House in the Art Institute last 
Saturday evening. The party 
was a Leap-Year affair and ap- 
parently not many of the girls 
had the courage to make the 
leap, as the number was rather 
smaller than usual. Part of this 
may be explained by the fact 
that the basket ball men were 
down at Wheaton. 

The music was furnished by 
Harvey. Those who were there 
enjoyed the occasion very much. 
The south campus takes this op- 
portunity to express their ap- 
preciation of the girls' entertain- 
ment. 



REPORT OF THE CON- 
STANTINOPLE COLLEGE 

SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Up to the present time the 
money which the Y. W. C. A. 
has been able to raise for the 
scholarship which was pledged 
to the Constantinople Women's 
College totals fifty dollars. This 
money has already been sent on 
its way, but we sincerely hope 
that more can be raised to help 
out the fund. The pledge was 
one for three hundred dollars 
which leaves us very much be- 
low the mark which we attenpt- 
ed to reach. The money raised 
so far has been the result of a 
tag day, a weinie sandwich sale, 
and the Blue Triangle Tea room 
We are all very sorry that we 
have not reached the goal and 
if any one wishes to give to the 
cause we are patiently waiting 
for donations. Large donations 
will be especially acceptable but 
of course we will be glad to get 
any amount that anyone is will- 
ing to give. It would be a won- 
derful thing if we could fulfill 
our pledge which was made in 
all good faith. 



THE STENTOR 



Y. W. C. A. ELECTS OFFICERS 



The annual business meeting 
of the Y. W. C. A. was held last 
Thursday evening when the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: 

President — Sara Fisher. 

Vice-President — Margaret Sil- 
lars. 

Secretary — Vera Pettigrew. 

Treasurer — Flora Shattuck. 

The new officers will be in- 
stalled at the next Association 
on Thursday. 



COLLEGE RECEIVES 

VALUABLE COLLECTION 



The National Association of 
Audubon Societies has sent the 
Department of Biology an as- 
sortment of confiscated feathers 
taken from smugglers, who at- 
tempting to bring them into 
this country in spite of the fed- 
eral law against their importa- 
tion. The collection includes a 
Lesser Bird-of-Paradise (male) 
in full plumage, four raw 
plumes of the same species in 
natural colors, two dyed plumes 
and a wreath of dyed bird-of- 
paradise feathers. There are al- 
so the Heron "Aigrette" feathers 
taken from one bird and a 
Goura crown, both in natural 
colors. 

The collection is a valuable 
one, it comes to the college with 
out expense and with the only 
provision that it be placed on 
exhibition with the legend stat- 
ing that the feathers were cap- 
tured from smugglers. The ex- 
hibit may be seen in the Biol- 
ogy Lecture Room after March 
thirteenth. 



FORMER PROFESSOR 

AROUSED BY ANARCHY 



The Charlotte (Mich.) Repub- 
lican says: "Prof. F. W. Stevens, 
an Eaton Rapids man, for many 
years associated with Lake For- 
est University, shows the think- 
ers to be alarmed with condi- 



tions when in a personal letter 
he says: 'I think a good many of 
us have our minds strongly di- 
rected to the rapidly growing 
and extensive anarchy prevalent 
in our country. It is much 
more dangerous and harmful 
than the unlicensed variety, be- 
cause it has its origin in and 
destroys the very machinery 
built and consecrated to the 
safe-gTiarding and protection of 
those liberties and traditions 
that have, in the past, charac- 
terized our Republic and its 
ideals. The rise of an autocracy 
within a republic, is much worse 
than an autocracy within a mon- 
archy. An autocracy within a 
republic is in opposition to ev- 
evry theory and method of pop- 
ular government and will ulti- 
mately destroy it. An autocra- 
cy within a. monarchy is sup- 
porting and helpful, and has 
been at times beneficient." 



DEAC HENSHAW LEAVES 



James C. Henshaw, of the 
class of 1920, left college last 
week, to accept a position with 
the interior furnishings firm of 
Watson and Walton, in Chicago. 
Deac entered college in the fall 
of 1914 and continued until June, 
1917. During that time, he was 
an editor of The Stentor one 
year and Editor in Chief of The 
Forester of 1917. In the fall of 
1917, he went to Camp Grant 
with the first detachment of 
Lake County men and was as- 
signed to the 332nd Infantry. 
After his discharge from the Ar- 
my, he remained at the camp 
for some time in the American 
Library Association service. He 
has been in similar work at 
Great Lakes during the present 
college year. Deac will be miss- 
ed by his many friends on the 
campus, but we hope to see him 
quite often, as he will live in 
Lake Forest and commute to his 
work in Chicago. 



PERSONALS 



Luella Harmon, of Rensselaer, 
Indiana spent the week end with 
Josephine Martin. 



Mardelle Meents was a guest 
of Sigma Tau for the week end. 



Beth Thayer, Marion Preston, 
Margaret Mills, Elaine Kellogg 
and Gladys Riechert spent the 
week at their homes in Chicago. 



Vera Pettigrew visited at her 
home in Harvey Saturday and 
Sunday. 



Alice Axton visited during the 
week end with Helen Lahman at 
Northwestern University. 



Helen Sanders spent the week 
end at her home in LaGrange. 



Agnes Hoffman of Dyer, In- 
diana visited in Lois Hall for the 
week end. 



Ora Seaman and Esther Wits- 
craft of Rockford College were 
guests of Clara Maclndoe. 



Mrs. Frank Whiting, Gertrude 
Loop and Carol Welsh were week 
end guests of Theta Psi. 



Gertrude Leihscenring was a 
guest of Virginia Kratch. 



Dorothy Magee spent the week 
end with Dorothy Laing in High- 
land Park. 



I know a man who before 
He came to college must 
Have been a tailor cause 
Every time something comes up 
Instead of making a few fitting, 
Comments he always makes 
Some cutting remark. 
I thank you. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Business Manag:ement: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Marion Preston, '21. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Ruth Bahlert '22. 



What with the fluctuating 
weather and the fact that copy 
written over the week-end is not 
pubHshed until the following 
Friday, we have a hard time 
keeping The Stentor up to date. 
F'rinsta'ice, last week we called 
to your attention "the slush of 
melting snow and rain," after a 
change in the weather two days 
before had brought Winter back 
to us again, with its cold and 
snow. And no doubt by the 
time this is published, we shall 
have had another change. Truly 
editorship has its trials. 



One of the most interesting of 
Mr. Burnap's many interesting 
lines of thought is that unfor- 
tunately all the eulogies of man- 
kind have been written by man 
Last week we informed you thru 
these columns that man's eye- 
brows are one of his exclusive 
superiorites over the other ani- 
mals. Possibly if one of the oth- 
er animals could have expressed 
imals. Possbly if one of the oth- 
himself upon the subject, he 
would have said that man is in- 
terior in this respect to all oth- 
er mammals, for their eyebrows 
begin just above the eyes and 
extend over the entire body. 



EMPTY HONOR 



Within the past few weeks, as 
usual at this time of year, a 
number of new fraternity pins 
have appeared upon the campus. 
When the new initiate looks up- 
on the capable men of other 
years with whom he shares the 
privilege of wearing the pin, he 
must feel it to be an honor in- 
deed. And if he is of the right 
sort of stuff, he will endeavor 
to make himself worthy. Honor 
without merit is a vain and 
empty thing. 

Too frequently we see the ten- 
dency in freshmen to feel that 
their summon bonum is accom- 
plished with the acquisition of 
the fraternity pin, and rest up- 
on their oars with serene com- 
placency. It manifests itself in 
a slump in studies, a disinterest 
in college activties, yet withal 
a heightened snobbishness. Some 
men never get over this atti- 
tude. That is why most non- 
fraternity men amount to more 
than some fraternity men. 

The new initiative should re- 
alize one thing; He has been 
taken in, not for what he has 
done, but for what he may do. 
Let him therefore do his best 
that the honor which has been 
conferred upon him may "ot be 
an empty honor — that he may 
make himself worthy. Other- 
wise, his fraternal connection 
will prove a detriment rather 
than a benefit. 



ARE WE CHILDISH? 



Dr. Wright's request for bet- 
ter attention in Chapel seems to 
have met little response. On 
both sides of the center aisle we 
still see the same ill manners 
displayed: the same noisy chat- 
ter from the beginning of the 
service to its end; the same 
shuffling and moving about; the 
same reading of letters, last 
minute studying, and anything 
but attention to the thought of 
the speaker. Psychology teaches 



us that the ability to pay atten- 
tion is one of the things which 
disinguishes adults from chil- 
dren. Yet we have all been ter- 
ribly ofi^ended when we thought 
the faculty showed the slightest 
disposition to regard us as chil- 
dren. 



INDIAN SIMMER 



The phrase "Indian Summer" 
is very interesting in its origin. 
The Indian is a great procrasti- 
nator and never does today what 
he can put off till tomorrow. So 
he hunts and fishes all through 
the summer days, and not till 
the snow falls is he frightened 
into preparation for the winter 
that is before him. The Indian 
Summer — the Indian's time of 
real anxiety and labor — comes 
only after the first fall of snow. 

There is some lesson in this 
for us. We are natural procras- 
tinators. What we dislike to do, 
we usually put off" until some fu- 
ture time. The only safety is to 
do at once what our hands find 
to do. "Do it now" has been the 
motto of some of our greatest 
men. Is it a good motto for the 
Lake Forest man, or woman? 



SUNDAY MORNINGS 



"In the old days going to 
church on Sunday was the all- 
important thing, but with the 
students in our colleges the day 
of rest is used in the strictest 
sense — sleeping. Worn out with 
the week's hard grind and the 
social activities that come in one 
bunch that come on Saturday 
and Friday, the student takes 
his Sunday morning in bed. 

"However there are a few stu- 
dents who do believe in getting 
up in time to attend church and 
they have found that the day is 
much pleasanter and more en- 
joyable than if they had stayed 
in bed. The brisk morning walk, 
the sweet music of the organ, 
and the homely message of the 
sermon gives one a new hitch 



THE STENTOR 



on life, and the restf ulness of an 
hour of worship has as many 
benefits as the Sunday morning 
spent in bed." 

— University Daily Kansan. 

How true are these words 
that come from another college 
paper. The above editorial has a 
direct bearing on our own col- 
lege as well as on the other col- 
leges of the United States. Some 
years ago, when the students of 
Lake Forest had their main in- 
terest in the church and in the 
college, there was but one 
church in Lake Forest besides 
the Catholic church. This was 
the Presbyterian church which 
is attended by college students, 
when they attend any church, 
for the main reason that it is so 
near. At this time the students 
took an active part in support- 
ing the church and attended the 
services regularly. The time has 
come when on going to church 
we look over the assembled 
people and find but a small hand- 
ful of college people there. It 
is a sad situation that we who 
have all the advantages of a 
beautifully sitauted college and 
one of the most beautiful 
churches in the country do not 
avail ourselves of these privi- 
leges more than we do. If 
we would only give up that one 
hour on Sunday morning (and 
when we consider what a little 
bit of time out of the week that 
really is, aren't we a little bit 
ashamed when we think of how 
seldom we give even that little 
bit of time to regular worship) 
we should feel refreshed and 
feel the inspiration to go on with 
more energy than ever. Let us 
see the college people come out 
a little more strongly on the 
side of the church, by attending 
some church service regularly. 



LOYALTY TO THE 

RED AND BLACK 



The Phi Pi entertained 
Charles Thayer, '16, over the 
week end. 



It is easy to criticize, and not 
difficult to pick flaws. Self in- 
terest and self seeking do not 
require manhood of robust pro- 
portions. One does not have to 
be high minded to be a heckler. 
But to be loyal is virtuous, and 
to be loyal through thick and 
thin, in hours of pessimism and 
darkness, is noble. Then it is 
that a man needs moral powers 
which only a big man is cap- 
able of possessing. 

Loyalty is a beautiful thing 
and one cannot but admire it, no 
matter how worthy or unworthy 
the object of the feeling. Cer- 
tainly men have been unswerv- 
ingly loyal to friends and caus- 
es that were the least deserving 
of loyal devotion. But do we 
not admire Cicero for his undy- 
ing, though foolish devotion to 
Pompey? Have we anything 
but the highest regard for Rob- 
ert Lee and Jefferson Davis? 

Yet, how can one be loyal to 
anybody or anything under sus- 
picion, through failure and times 
of defeat, unless the loyalty has 
been born true of love and 
friendship? Surely, first there 
must be something there to in- 
spire our loyalty. Does good old 
Lake Forest qualify in that re- 
spect? Princeton, N. J. is the 
only campus comparable in every 
respect to ours. There are few 
small colleges with such a line- 
up of teachers. Where can you 
find prettier buildings, more op- 
portunities for a well rounded 
education? 

Athletics? But, surely no col- 
lege gives its students athletics. 
That is for us to give the col- 
lege. If we haven't teams, the 
fault lies in us who come to col- 
lege. Our loyalty should take 
every man of us out to the grid- 
iron, to the gym floor, and the 
swimming pool. What matters 
it if we lose ourselves a while 
for the Alma Mater? No one 
ever becomes a power to cope 
with unless he loses himself in 



some cause, anyhow. 

Yes, Lake Forest is small, but 
let every loyal son say, as Daniel 
Webster said about his Dart- 
mouth in its early days: "She's 
small, but I love her." Or still 
better let us say: "She's small 
and I love her." Lake Forest 
cannot give a man his reputa- 
tion. The man gives his Alma 
Mater the reputation. Why are 
Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Am- 
herst, Bowdoin great? Their 
men made them great, and re- 
member that when the men who 
made them great matriculated 
those institutions were small. 

So let us stick by the old col- 
ors to the finish and don't give 
a single soul any other impres- 
sion than that we are Lake For- 
esters and that our whole life 
is wrapped up in its success and 
coming greatness. 

A. Winston Dunlap. 



Humoring- Her 

Old Dear: "Can I take this 
train to Tooting?' 

Porter: "Well, ma'am, the en- 
gine generally takes it, but I 
don't suppose anyone would ob- 
ject if you was to 'ave a try. — 
Lodon Tit-Bits. 



For Choice 

An Irishman journeying along 
a lonely road was stopped by a 
highwayman, who, thrusting a 
revolver in his face, said: "Your 
money or your life!" 

The Irishman, trembling from 
head to foot, exclaimed "Take 
me life! Take me life! I'm sav- 
in' me money for me old age." 



Flustered 

Newlywed to Hotel Clerk: "He- 
ab! I'd like a room with a wife 
for myself and bath." — Philadel- 
phia "Bulletin." 



A Joyful Journey 

Quoth the negro preacher: 
"Bredern, when I gets to de 
gates ob Heben, if dey shuts me 
out, I'll say, anyway, I had a 
good time gittin' dere." 



THE STENTOR 



INTEREST IN JOURNALISM 
GROWS 



The recent action of the De- 
Pauw University students in pe- 
titioning the faculty for a 
broader course in Journalism 
than the institution now offers 
is indicative of the great inter- 
est in this profession which is 
being displayed by college stu- 
dents throughout the country. 
For several years there has been 
a marked decrease in the num- 
er who have made a definite 
choice of newspaper work for a 
career, due largely to the small 
financial returns offered, com- 
pared with certain industrial en- 
terprises. Newspaper offices 
have noticed the falling off in 
the number of those who have 
obtained the rudiments of the 
"game" in school and who wish 
to graduate from the laboratory 
of a college publication to test 
their training in the actual 
newspaper field. 

Journalism, so called, is one 
of the few professions able to 
thrive in spite of long hours and 
meagre compensation except for 
those who enter the magazine or 
feature field. Tliere is a fasci- 
nation about the work which 
never diminishes and like the 
ball player who cannot resist the 
spring call of the diamond, the 
true newspaper man who be- 
comes innoculated with the 
"bug" rarely escapes. The pleas- 
ure of seeing one's story in 
print never grows old. There 
also is the joy of "digging up" 
a good story and getting it first. 
The reward comes in the feeling 
of satisfaction derived from 
work well done. Newspapers 
are little given to praise, prob- 
ably because the time is always 
too short to permit it. But the 
reporter knows when he has 
done a good bit of work and he 
realizes that others of his pro- 
fession know it. 

Those who are older in the 
game will doubtless look with 



interest on the efforts of the 
university students to obtain a 
more complete course before 
enering the world in the role of 
a "cub." With the demand 
steadily growing these courses 
are being added to the curricu- 
la of our leading colleges and 
universities. What of Lake For- 
est College? Could not a very 
good course in Journalism be 
added to our departments of 
English and Philosophy and thus 
supply the demands of many col- 
lege students today? With such 
a department of Journalism in 
Lake Forest College, it would be 
possible to give students actual 
experience of some practical 
value by work on the college 
publications (Stentor and For- 
ester); thus improving their 
abilities as journalists and evolv- 
ing, finally, a better class of pub- 
lications for the institution. 

At any rate, let us hope that 
this developement denotes a 
swing of the pendulum back to 
simpler ideals and away from 
the propensity to value life as 
consisting in the measure of 
material indulgence. Perhaps, 
after all, the professions may 
again be regarded with honor 
which has partly been taken 
from them by the passion for 
money, its display and its pride. 
Could Lake Forest College assist 
in any way, in regaining and 
maintaining this honor in the 
profession? 



THOSE TELL-TALE PATHS 



There are little tell-tale paths 
across the campus, 
Ugly short-cuts that were 
made by lazy feet 
And the silent tempters some- 
times slyly vamp us 
To forsake the indirectness 
of concrete. 
We are prone to be in far too 
big a hurry 
And we think that one more 
track will do no harm 



So we just increase our speed a 
bit and scurry 
Straight across (we always 
did it on the farm). 
Then again and again it was so 
easy, 
We repeat the little trick till 
after while, 
We go swagging across the lawn 
so breezy. 
That the sidewalks look a lit- 
tle out of style. 
Pretty soon the campus land- 
scape will be tinted 
With a shade of green, 
a bright, inspiring hue. 
Let us hope the loveliness will 
not be stinted 
By a thousand crazy path- 
ways cutting through. 
W. E. F. 
— The University Daily Kansan. 



THINK-O'-THAT 



My loves not like the red, red 

rose. 
Her nose towards Heaven doth 

mount, 
Shes pigen-toed, and cross-eyed, 

too. 
But, Oh, her bank account. 

'Joe" 



"T„«'> 



Heard at Monahan's 

Stude — Say, waiter, this does- 
n't taste any more like coffee 
than Bevo does. 

Waiter — Is that so? I sup- 
pose some little bird told you. 

Stude — Yes, swallow. 



"You are the first I've ever 
kissed" 

He swore and bowed his head. 

The girl looked up and moved 
away, 

"I want no amachoor," she 
said. 



An Optimist is one who looks 
over the percentage column and 
then exclaims, "Hurrah, Lake 
Forest is holding up the rest of 
the Little Five." 



THE STENTOR 



AT HLETICS 



RED AND BLACK LOSE TO 
WHEATON IN FAST GAME 



SCORE 33-34 



'Tuck" Eddy Stars Iii Last Game 
of Season at Wlieaton 



Playing- a fighting game to the 
last whistle the Red and Black 
went down to defeat before the 
heavier Wheaton five Saturday 
night. 

The game was featured by nu- 
merous attempts on the part of 
Wheaton to start "roughing it." 
They were not successful as our 
men kept their heads and refus- 
ed to make personal fouls. Ed- 
dy succeeded in playing the en- 
tire game without making a per- 
sonal foul. 

Sykes of Wheaton was injured 
in the second quarter and was 
removed from the game. 

Wheaton started by taking the 
lead, retaining- it throughout the 
game. Lake Forest threatened 
them during the first half and 
were at one time one point be- 
hind. The half ended with 
Wheaton leading- by two 
baskets and a foul. 

Lake Forest (24) 



FRATERNITY LEAGUE 


Standing 




Won 


Lost Pet. 


Phi Pi Epsilon 4 


1000 


Phi Eta Alpha 2 


1 666 


Kappa Sigma 3 


2 600 


Omega Psi ' 2 


2 500 


Digamma 


3 000 


Barbs 


3 000 



field 







B 


F 


P 


T 


Kunz 




1 











Eddy 




4 


8 








Russell 




2 





1 





Sumner 
















Coleman 




1 





2 





Wheaton 


(23) 








Vinning 




9 


1 


2 


1 


Davis 




4 





2 





Newberry 




2 











Smith 










2 


2 


Vinning, P. 










2 





Sykes 










1 





Hiatt 




1 











Free throws 


missed — 








Eddy, 5. 












Vinning, 3 












Davis, 3. 













Games Next Week 

Monday — Phi Eta Alpha. 
Omega Psi. 

Wednesday — aBrbs. 
Phi Pi Epsilon. 

Friday — Digamma. 
Phi Eta Alpha. 

Last Saturday night the Phi 
Pi Epsilon won a hard fought 
game from Digamma and came 
back Wednesday with a victory 
over Kappa Sigma. 

The Digamma game was tied 
at the end of the fourth period 
17-17 and a five minute over- 
time period had to be played. 
McColley and Robertson each 
caged a field basket while the 
Digamma could not score. 

The Kappa Sigma game was 
undecided until the last minute 
of play. The second half opened 
with the Phi Pi Epsilon leading 
9 to 5 but after a few moments 
of play the score was 12 to 13 
with the Kappa Sig's one point 
behind. Two field baskets gave 
McColley's men a five point lead 
and the game. 

By winning all four games 
played the Phi Pi Epsilon have 
won the Inter-Fraternity Cham- 
pionship. The games next week 
will have no bearing on the lead- 
er, but will give the Digam's a 
chance to beat the Barbs out of 
fourth place and the Phi Eta Al- 
pha a more secure hold as run- 
ner-up. 



PROSPECTS FOR VARSITY 
TRACK ARE VERY GOOD 



CANDIDATES ARE WANTED 



Inter-Class Track and Feld Meet 

to be Held March 20 

in College Gym 



The basketball season is over. 
Baseball does not start until af- 
ter spring vaaction. Now is the 
time to come out for track. The 
prospects are for an unusually 
good Varsity Track and Field 
team this year. 

The Coach must know the ma- 
terial he has to work with. 
March 20, an Inter-class Track 
and Field meet will be held in 
the gym. 

Nine events are to be contest- 
ed. Now is the time to start 
practicing. All men who are in- 
terested in Track are urged to 
! report at the gym every after- 
noon for practice. Show your 
class spirit by practicing and 
helping to make the Meet a suc- 
cess and your College spirit by 
trying to arouse a little interest 
in Track. 



PERSONALS 



James at Commons: "I don't 
propose to tell nature what to 
do, but why the hek is it that 
the frost that kills the peach 
crop never fazes a single dog- 
gone prune?" 

How about those snapshots 
for the Forester? Remember, 
that all copy for the annual 
must be in by March 20th, in or- 
der to insure piiblication. 

Howard Wood, Leon Noel, 
Dean Parrick, Maurice O'Connell 
Winston Dunlap, Kenneth Gard- 
ner, and Mortimer Carlson vis- 
ited the Chicago U chapter of 
Kappa Sigma last Friday. 



THE STENTOR 



AIN'T IT THE BERRIES? 



The riper the berry the sweet- 
er the juice. 

There are meters iambic, 
And meters trochaic, 
And meters in musical tone. 
But the meter that's sweeter. 
Is to meet her in the moonlight 

alone. 

Much concentration for that 
one. 



Why are some Lois Hall wom- 
en like Easter eggs? 
Ask the Pride of Paxton. 



Kenny R., after week-end par- 
ty: "Say, Rice, do you happen to 
know where I can get a pair of 
gloves for a one-handed guy?" 



By the way, Dick, how is bus- 
iness these days? 



Beth: "Why were you out af- 
ter ten last night?" 

Helen B.: "I wasn't. I was on- 
ly after one." 



The new "end of a perfect 
day": Dreaming that you are 
shipwrecked on the coast of 
Cuba. 



Lucky at cards, unlucky at love, 

Is a maxim ages old, 
But in every case it all depends. 

Upon the hands you hold. 



That's all. 

The Berry Twin, Ras. 



Have 



You Paid 



Your 



Subscription? 



S««8»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»3a 



WHALES USED TO WALK 



That is the statement of Prof. 
D'Arey Thompson, authority on 
fishes of the sea, in a lecture on 
that subject at the Royal Insti- 
tute, London. He said the whale 
originally had four feet or fins, 
but that the two hind ones had 
simply dwindled away. In by- 
gone ages ancestors of the pres- 
ent family of whales walked 
about much as seals do. 



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and Delivered 

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Shows: 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 
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THE STENTOR 



NORMAN ROSS 



The career of Norman Ross 
is an interesting one. He enter- 
ed Stanford university in 1916, 
where he proved the sensation 
of the year under the tutelage 
of Coach Ernst Brandsten. The 
lure of swimming proved to be 
the undoing of Ross' collegiate 
life, for he left the university at 
the end of his freshman year to 
contest for the Olympic club of 
San Francisco. During his so- 
journ with the Olympic club, he 
became nationally known as a 
"breaker of world's records," so 
famous in fact that he was sent 
to the inter-allied games in Par- 
is last summer. There he won 
every event in which he was en- 
tered, winning the swimming 
championship of the allied forc- 
es for the A. E. F. almost single 
handed. 

Upon his return he entrusted 
his future training to Coach 
William Bachrach of the I. A. C, 
and the wisdom of his move is 
now attested to by the fact that 
he holds nearly every world's 
record in free style swimming 
from the 40 yard up to the mile 
event, as well as several world's 
backstroke marks. 



That was a fine open-house 
you girls put on. Boys, let's hava 
more of them. 





FOR SALE 




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• • • • 







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SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 

SPLENDIDLY EQUIPPED. 

Deerpath and Western Ave. 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service Call 

WILLIAM BURGESS 

Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Automobile Supplies Baggage Trsn8(«rr«4 

Seven Passenger Cars to Rent by Trip or Hour 



No Job Too Small 



None Too Larg 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Wri«l«n 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 116 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Danes Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



Spalding Sweaters 



^• 



A STYLE IN THE 
TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR. 
POSE 

Scndfo7' 
Catalogue 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 

Jewelry 



Oscar Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 
Picture Framing 

LAKK FORKST. . , ILL, 



llASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 



PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 

by 
(Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 

Returns of Leap Year Contest 

In response to the announce- 
ment in last week's edition we 
have received so many propos- 
als that we have been unable to 
read them all, but of those we 
have already read, the four fol- 
lowing proposals seem to de- 
serve the most merit: 

To Joe Black 
I 

Say, Joe Black, you're a dear, 
sweet chap 
And my, how you can dance, 
You've got wonderful hair and 
wonderful eyes, 
You most kill me with a 
glance. 

H 
You truly like dates, don't you, 
pet? 
I mean Prom dates, don't you 
You're quite a dancer, yes I 
think 
Dear Joe that you will do. 

Florence Newcomb. 

To Ralph Stewart 
I 

Dear Stewart, you're a dandy 
lad. 
I like you — won't you too. 
Now don't you like my pretty 
locks ? 
I cut them oflf for you. 

n 

I look just like Miss Verne De 
Gas 
I dance just like her too. 
But say I need a partener 
And Ralphie, dear, you'll do. 
Rachel Mary. 

To "Whitey" Thayer 
I 
They say it's Leap Year. Dearie 
me! 
I've got to get a boy 
A short one — fat — or thin or 
tall 
To be my pride and joy. 

II 

Now I ain't so particular 
But he must be — let's see, 



A millionaire — a handsome 
chap 
Who'll fairly dote on me. 

Ill 

Now see that little chap called 
"Thayer" 
I think that he will do 
I'll throw my line out fixed with 
bait 
It's him — I'll now pursue. 

IV 

Oh ! Whitey Thayer, you darling 
thing 
Come please accept me please 
It's Leap Year and I want you, 
dear 
Come answer "YES," you 
tease. 

To Tommy Tucker 

I 

When I look down upon 

Thy smiling face 
My heart murmurs, anon 

"That's him, your grace! 

II 

We two would make a hit 

You, Tom, and I 
The long and short of it 
I hear them cry. 

Laura Rossitter. 
Watch for the next issue. The 
worst is yet to come! 

— The Incubator. 



ODDS AND ENDS 



21 : "The only thing for you 

to do is to go around and apoli- 

gize and ask her to forgive you." 

22: "But I was in the right!" 

21: "Then you'd better take 

some flowers and candy, too." 



Worth remembering: Tem- 
perament is an explanation of 
actions, not an excuse for ac- 
tions. We are as responsible for 
the use we make of tempera- 
ment as for anything else. 



A positive recommendation 
for Ethics. Found in Monday's 
class, my long lost life motto: 
"Eat, drink, and be merry, for 
— tomorrow — we die." 



Maplesden must realize that 
McColley enjoys what is known 
as poetic license. Example: 
"Brown Eyes." 



Johnny, watching the circus 
elephant: "Gee: That's a damn 
big animal, ain't it?" 

Mother : "Johnny ! How many 
times have I told you not to say 
'ain't?' " 



This is a free country, but 
there is no sense of everybody 
running for president in the 
same year. 



An Irishman dropped into a 
saloon, in the Good Old Days, 
and set his pail upon the bar. 

"Hello, brother," said the bar- 
tender. "You're a new customer. 
What's your name?" 

"Niver moind," said the Irish- 
man, "just Philip McCann." 



A Sad Joke 



Mother: "What's the matter, 
darling?" 

Small Boy: "P-p-pa hit his fin- 
ger with the hammer." 

Mother: "Don't cry about that; 
you should laugh." 

Small Boy: "I-I d-did." 



"Great bargains," remarked 
Mrs. Subbubs, poring over the 
Sunday paper. "I shall drive in- 
to town to-morrow and " 

"I see, and your drive will be 
followed by a counter attack," 
said her demobilized husband. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Among the visitors on the 
campus last week-end was our 
old friend, Norman Lillis. Lillis 
has been dangerously sick and 
is just now convalescing from 
the attack of typhoid fever 
which took him from us last No- 
vember. He seems to be nearly 
recovered now, and is taking a 
position with an advertising 
agency in Rockford. Our best 
wishes go with him in this work 
and we hope to have him back 
with us in the fall. 



THE STENTOR 



CALIFORNIA "U" LEADS 

IN TOTAL ENROLLMENT 



Columbia Largest in Graduate 

Department — Figures on 

Eight Largest 



That the Pacific coast can 
boast the largest university in 
the nation in point of students 
enrolled is disclosed by figures 
on this years' attendance. While 
strongest in nontechnical under- 
graduates it is only second in 
graduate study, and fourth in 
number enrolled in professional 
-schools. 

Columbia retains her suprem- 
acy in the graduate field, Illinois 
shining in the professional 
schools. Chicago has her usual- 
ly large proportion of graduates 
to undergraduates. 

Are Evenly Distributed 

The distribution, geographical- 
ly, of the the large universities 
is surprisingly even. The Middle 
West and the' East each claim 
three, with the Pacific Coast 
having two of the eight largest 
institutions. 

Following are the figures as 
furnished by respective regis- 
trars exclusive of university ex- 
tention or summer school stu- 
dents. 

Underg. 
Grad. Lit. & Prof. 
Instit. Stud. Art Schools Total 

Calif. 847 5247 3404 9397 

Colum. 1026 2390 4411 7827 
Minn. 250 3326 3613 7131 

Illinois 251 2314 4537 7102 
Corne. 301 1732 3119 5152 

Wash. 5056 

Harv. 476 2504 2037 5017 

Chic. 681 2522 1475 4408 



PERSONALS 



Howard B. "Cad" Jones, '12, 
now located in Evanston, spent 
the week-end with Digamma. 



Horace B. Horton, F. M. Cas- 
jens and L. S. Casjens were the 
week-end guests of Digamma. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



nt 



FrencH's Dru^ Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL W^OOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 
L. H.W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Nade to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J. HELD, Prop. 

Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



iCIGARS 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AGENT 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-Iilce and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
G e ne ra 1 Merchandise 

Telephones: - - 37, 38, 39, 51 
LAKE FOREST, - - ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

KODAKS AND 
SUPPLIES 

KRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 



F e: D 



RA L 



It's the sign of thebest bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs AH Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



If Its Baked at HUNTOON'S lf» Bsked Rlflit 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Cla ss 

Bakery Goods and Ice C ream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

MdiKiger 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Coinmiitation 

Tickets 

32 DEERPATB. WESX 



THE 



S T E N T R 



I 
I 

i 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, several 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Club. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, |326 to $400 for men; |350 to $150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ar 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDKNT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 






t 



t 

f 

X 

? 
i* 






Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C. W. YOUNG DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE 



a 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectionerg 

Home- Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OP 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROLA 



Kubelsk^ 

Clothing and 
Kurnishings 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

im no REPAIRING 

Phone 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



J 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MARCH ly, 1920 



NUMBER 20 



THE INTERCHURCH 

WORLD MOVEMENT 



COLLEGE VAUDEVILLE 



The Interchurch World Move- 
ment represents the largest meas 
ure of co-operation that has ever 
been undertaken by the Church- 
es of the United States. It aims 
at the adequate Christian occu- 
pation of America and of all 
other nations for which Amer- 
ica has responsibility. Surveys 
that have been in progress for 
the past year call for an advance 
that is unprecedented. Some 
Churches have already conduct- 
ed campaigns which have in- 
creased their financial resources 
for educational, missionary and 
benevolent work by 300 per cent 
in a single year. It is hoped 
that something like this may be 
done by most of the Churches, 
through co-operation in the In- 
terchurch World Movement. 
This rapidly expanding program 
calls for a large number of new 
leaders. For these, it is neces- 
sary and right to look to the 
Colleges and Universities. 

A very extensive plan of field 
work is being carried out during 
the month of March. Among 
many other features of the 
work, a three day campaign has 
been carried out in over .three 
hundred of the best Universities 
and Colleges of the United 
States. 

Lake Forest received her 
share of this campaign on Tues- 
day, Wednesday and Thursday 
mornings of last week, with Jay 
C. Field of South America, Royal 
J. Dye of South Africa, and Dr. 
C. Clark conducting successive 
long Chapel services. During 
the day these men conducted 
conferences in the upper Library 
for the men and women who 
wished to interview them. 



Last Friday night in the Art 
Institute there was evidence 
that there was quite a bit more 
talent in the College than lots 
of people gave it credit for. This 
talent showed itself in the form 
of a vaudeville. There were 
about fifteen acts given, each of 
a different and interesting char- 
acter. Very few knew what 
really strong men we had on the 
campus, but after the first act 
everybody would be willing to 
put up Beard and Watson 
against Dempsey, Carpentier, 
etc. No chance for them at all. 
Beddoes and ' "Miss Johnson" 
scored pretty high with their 
'interpretive dancing." Several 
people should feel highly hon- 
ored to be so complimented by 
such artists. Misses Hecketsvveil- 
er and Hendrickson gave a short 
.skit which became a little more 
"skitty" than they intended, 
but at that, got a hearty laugh. 
Some very good work was done 
by Miss Axton and Miss Alcott 
in two readings which pleased 
the crowd very much. 

When Miss Bradley appeared 
the entire crowd felt sure that 
they were seated in the Palace 
or Majestic listening to the real 
stuff, so well were the songs 
given. From the Palace we were 
transported to Japan by the 

(Continued on Viisse Two.) 



On Thursday evening the girls 
of Lois Hall were addressed by 
an interesting speaker from 
Chicago. On Thursday evening, 
when it was expected that a 
very interesting illustrated lec- 
ture would be delivered at Lois 
Hall, it was found impossible to 
set up the machine, so we were 
deprived of a very pleasant 
time. 



BLUE TRTANfiLE TEA 

ROOM (iUEAT SUCCESS 



The Blue Triangle tea room 
which was held under the aus- 
pices of the Y. W. C. A. on Tues- 
day afternoon of this week was 
very much a success. The big 
room of Lois Hall was charming- 
ly decorated and the furniture 
so artistically arranged that it 
was a pleasure to be allowed to 
come and spend the time there. 
There were seven small tables 
and as many small lamps which 
shed a soft glow over the room. 
The girls of the Y. W. served, 
while the guests had the pleas- 
ure of enjoying the excedingly 
palatable good things which 
were to be purchased, and danc- 
ing to music which was beauti- 
fully rendered by some of the 
young women of the association. 

The tea room was well filled 
all the time and we feel sure 
that everyone enjoyed the after- 
noon. The proceeds will go 
toward the fund for the scholar- 
ship for the Constantinople 
Women's College which was 
pledged by Lake Forest. We all 
feel that the Young Women's 
Christian Association will suc- 
ceed even better if it attempts 
to hold another tea room. Now 
that the people on the campus 
know how truly delightful such 
a tea can be, they will surely 
patronize a similar one and at 
the same time urge their friends 
to come if these friends were a 
little bashful about coming this 
time. 



J. Roger Sillers was in Lake 
Forest Thursday visiting his 
sister, Margaret. 



Miss Hamilton returned after 
a week in Cleveland, attending 
a Convention. 



THE STENTOR 



COLLEGE VAIDEVILLE 

(euo sSBd raojj panupuoo) 



lovely songs of Miss Clark and 
then brought suddenly into 
Fairyland by the charming 
dance of Miss Torreyson. It 
was well done and the effect was 
beautiful. 

What better jazz band could 
anyone want than the one we 
heard Friday night ? It filled ev- 
erybody with pep and the Rus- 
sian danseuse was more than 
could possibly have been anti- 
cipated. 

Miss Sillars' rendition of some 
children's poems was very good 
and showed a lot of talent. A 
very unusual feature next on 
the program was the life-like 
statues in bronze which were 
posed by Messrs. T. Hale, A. 
Hale, and Beauchamp. They 
were extremely good- as they 
were so realistic. 

Miss Bradley and Wales gave 
a Pierrot and Pierette dance 
which was very dainty and was 
enjoyed by everybody. 

Mr. Derby's act was very pro- 
fessional and made a great hit, 
especially his piece "The Drunk- 
ard's Curse." 

The final act given by Ray 
Moore was the hit of the even- 
ing. Everyone was very much 
impressed and excited about it. 
His six subjects were very sus- 
ceptible and caused a lot of 
amusement for the crowd. Some 
people were inclined to be skep- 
tical about the whole affair but 
one look at some of the men who 
were under his control was 
enough to convince a good 
many that it was no fake. 

On the whole the entire show 
was far better than the average 
and showed that there was a lot 
of good stuff to be developed on 
the campus. It was Mr. Trout- 
man's energy and ability that 
brought about such a good pro- 
gram. Let's try it again some- 
time! 



KAPPA SIG PARTY 



The Kappa Sig party was quite 

a success, 
As probably the most of you 

know. 
On Saturday night, the 13th of 

March, 
We went 'mid the slush and the 

snow. 

There was dancing and cards 

and everyone felt 
Assured of a very good time. 
Bridge was the game which was 

generally played — 
We tried to progress down the 

line. 

Some played very well and oth- 
ers sat 'round 

With a simple, blank look of 
dismay ; 

Oh, for a good hand, a few 
scattered brains : 

Then wonderful skill I'd dis- 
play. 

And as it grew later the food 

was brought on — 
The sandwiches, salad as well. 
As ice cream and cake and a 

number of things 
Of which we neglected to tell. 

A wonderful party in every re- 
spect ; 

I think every person will state 
Tho I've not told it, well, you 

prob'ly will know 
The good time I've tried to re- 
late. 



THE TRIP TO HULL HOUSE 



Too Much To Believe 



A critic was discussing John 
Singer Sargent the artist, with 
Chauncey Depew and remarked, 
"They say he painted a cobweb 
on a ceiling once, and it was so 
natural that the maid wore her- 
self out trying to brush it off." 

"What you say about the nat- 
uralness of the cobweb may be 
perfectly true," retorted Mr. 
Depew, "but there never was 
any such maid, I'm sure." 



Misses Sarah Fisher, Flora 
Shattuck, Eloise Brown, Delia 
Babcock, Ruth Bahlert, Esther 
Loop, Lillian Hatfield, Ruth 
Bridgeman, Opha Catterlin, and 
Elsie Engel visited Hull House 
last Saturday morning. They 
made a tour of the various 
buildings, including among oth- 
ers the Open Air school, the 
Mary Crane nursery, the Do- 
mestic Science and Weaving 
classes. 

The purpose of this charita- 
ble organization is to provide a 
center for a higher civic and so- 
cial life, to institute and main- 
tain educational and philan- 
thropic enterprises, and to in- 
vestigate and improve the con- 
ditions in the industrial dis- 
tricts of Chicago. 

Saturday at Hull House is a 
slack day but it was all very in- 
teresting and novel. The dirty 
but adorable little Greek and 
Italian youngsters with their 
quaint English were especially 
interesting. The walls of the 
rooms were covered with good 
pictures and the nursery and 
other rooms were artistically 
decorated. How wonderful that 
children from the slums could 
be brought in contact with such 
surroundings and with such 
large hearted people, who are 
teaching them to be true Amer- 
icans. Hull House is certainly 
doing a great work. 



We Often Wondered 



"Chaucer must have had a 
stenographer to dictate to." 
"Why do you think that?" 
"Look at the spelling." 

— Lehigh Burr. 



Early to Bed 



Prof. W.: "We have gorgeous 
sunrises here. Have you ever 
noticed them?" 

Sumner: "Nope, I'm always in 
before then." 



THE STENTOR 



A MODERN HAMLET 



To learn, or not to learn — 
That is the question; 

Whether 'tis harder for the 
mind to suffer 

The slings and anger of an 
outraged teacher, 

Or, to take arms round a stack 
of books, 

And by study learn them. To 
stand, to bluff 

No more. And thus we say we 
end 

The zeros, and gain hundreds, 
natural mark 

The shark is heir to. 'Tis 
a consummation 

Devoutly to be wished. To 
stand! To bluff! 

To bluff! Perchance to fail! 
Ah there's the rub. 

When we have shoveled off 
this awful toil. 

Must give us naughts. There's 
the respect 

That make calamity of some 
big bluff. 

For who would hear the slips 
and falls like thine. 

The teacher's wrong, the 
proud shark's conceitment. 

The pangs of unprized worth, 
the long delays, 

The awful lack of study, and 
the learning, 

Which the patient teacher off 
the non-worker takes, 

When he himself might his 
own lessons get? 

To work and fret all through 
a dreary hour, 

But that the dread of some 
horrible flunk 

That unhappy word, from 
whose grasp 

No one escapes, strengthens 
the will 

And makes us rather feel 
those smiles we see 

Than change to frowns we do 
not love. 

Thus teacher does make cow- 
ards of us all. 

And thus my present hesitan- 
cy. 
'Are all our sins discovered? 

M. A. T. 



3Iore Surprises 

Helen: "I once saw a man at 
a women's club." 

Keith: "That's nothing. I 
once saw a picture of Annette 
Kellerman with clothes on." 



WHAT WE WOLLI) MISS 



Rice: "Who is the best one in 



your class?" 

Martin: "Mamma told me not 
to boast." 



Wild itiid Wooly 

Mudge: "He leads a hair-rais- 
ing life out West." 

Betty: "Cow punching?" 
Mudge: "No, rabbit farming." 



Its Limits 

"What is heredity?" 
. "Something a father lielieves 
in until his son starts to act a 
fool.' 



IJnsiness and Ph^asiiro 

(Overheard at Lois Hall Mon- 
day afternoon). 

"Did you have a good time at 
the dance Saturday night?" 

"Yeah! Kinda." 

"Who was that handsome chap 
I saw you with just after the 
first intermission?" 

"He is a stranger here, im- 
ported, don't yOu know!" 

"Dashing, thrilling, isn't he?" 

"Nerviest bird I ever saw!" 

"I noticed that he had his 
arm rather tightly about you." 

"I didn't mind that so nuicli." 

"What then?" 

"Do you know why he had me 
clutched that way?" 

"No." 

"Well, would you believe it, 
he had me that way so I could- 
n't escape, and all the time we 
were dancing he was trying to 
sell me some life insurance." 



After one is out of school he 
begins to appreciate his school 
life and companions. Here are 
I a few things we would miss— 

j Loveridge's smile. 

Ray's arguments with the 
profs. 

Micky's serenades. 
Marion Preston's poetry. 
Edna Enyart's red hair net. 
Fran's vaudeville acts. 
The seat under the stairs. 
Helen Eggenieyer's singing. 
Van's jokes. 
Lois Conklin's laugh. 
Holden reciting for the class. 
Dr. Ellingwood forgetting his 
hat. 

Mi.ss Coan's crutches. 
Burnap's matrimonial bureau. 
Ophas medicine chest. 
Goldfish. 

Sibley's watch chain. 
Bookstore bills. 
Cockroaches. 



Van— What is a spiral stair- 
case? 

Ray Moor e — I'm afraid I 
might get all twisted up if 1 
told you. 



Wonder what Mrs. Burnap 
thinks of Mr. Burnap's hug- 
me-tite. 



New uses of the X-ray are 
many. It now detects the pres- 
ence of e.xplosives in bombs and 
suspicious packages that are 
turned over to the police, and 
reveals the safest way to render 
them harmless. During the war 
radiographs of bales of cotton 
that were about to be exported 
disclosed quantities of rubber 
that was to have been smuggled 
into Germany. In Ceylon the 
X-ray reveals the pearls in 'oys- 
ters and so prevents needlessly 
killing great numbers that can 
be replanted. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Business Management; 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Myron Thayer, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Marion Preston, '21. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Ruth Bahlert '22. 

"I WILL!" 

The great city to the south of 
us has for its slogan the phrase, 
"I Will!" As a slogan this phrase 
has the two necessary attri- 
butes. It is inspiring and it is 
easy to say. Ah, there is the 
trouble. It is so easy to say, 
"I will" and so hard to make 
good the promise. 

Every day we see a promise 
made and almost every day we 
see one broken. He is a rare 
person who consistently lives up 
to ihis agreements. Chicago, for 
all its glittering motto, frequent 
ly falls down in its performance 
of the contract which govern- 
ment implies. Here on the cam- 
pus we have our broken promis- 
es, too. We give our word to 
be somewhere at a certain time 
and fail; we borrow a book and 
promise to return it promptly 
and fail; we are constantly bind- 
ing ourselves to future action 
and constantly failing to keep 
our word. We are willina to 
promise anything: but perform- 
ance is a different matter. 

We have just witnessed the 
conspicuous failure of a prom- 
ise. The girls of Lois Durand 
Hall pledged themselves to con- 
tribute three hundred dollars to 
the Constantinople Women's Col- 



lege fund, and failed. That 
promise should never have been 
given in the first place. Some of 
the more sensible ones favored 
setting the pledge at the reason- 
able amount of fifty or seventy- 
five dollars, all that was or 
could be raised. But some who 
wanted to make a good showing 
suggested raising three hundred, 
which was eagerly welcomed by 
the representative. Three hun- 
dred dollars seemed so worth 
while! The majority fell in and 
Lake Forest College stood com- 
mitted to an agreement which 
could not be carried out. 

That is wrong. The college 
reputation suffers far more 
from making a large pledge and 
failing to make it good than 
than from a less imposing one 
actually paid. We should culti- 
vate a scrupulous regard for our 
agreements. Once we make a 
promise we should fulfill it at 
all costs. If we took this atti- 
tude we would not give our 
word so lightly. 



"High-Brow" and "Low-Brow" 

Neither of these expressions, 
which have attained currency in 
common speech, is quite compli- 
mentary in its connotation. 
"Low-brow" is obviously a term 
of disparagement. But why 
should a phrase designed appar- 
ently to convey an idea that the 
person to whom it is applied is 
intelligent, well-educated and 
generally a superior sort of per- 
son be tinged with mockery? 

The reason may perhaps lie 
in the fact that it is only a cer- 
tain type of intelligent, well- 
educated and superior person 
who is called a "high-brow," and 
that the word has come to be 
associated with the idea not so 
much of superiorly and intelli- 
gence as of consciousness of su- 
periority and intelligence. The 
priggish and supercilious person 
of cultivation is the "high-brow." 
It is unfortunate that a term 
apparently general in its mean- 
ing should be thus restricted in 
application, for confusion results 



in many minds, and prejudice 
against certain forms of educa- 
tional increases. 

A man who has a fondness for 
book learning and no taste for 
social intercourse is an unsatis- 
factory human being. Men may 
be reserved without being unap- 
proachable, and men may be 
learned without being pedantic; 
but when native tendencies jmd 
education together result in mak- 
ing a man unapproachable and 
pedantic, he is less useful in the 
world than a person with his 
equipment of scholarship ought 
be. 

The word "high-brow" has 
roused in many minds distrust 
of idealism as well as of scholar- 
ship. " HighTbrow " suggests 
idealist as well as scholar, and 
in that connection again the 
mocking connotation of the 
phrase does an excellent virtue 
a disservice. An earnest inter- 
est in criticizing other people 
for not being idealistic is as 
much idealism as some persons 
ever show; and "high-brow" is 
the term that is applied to that 
unworthy sort of idealist. — Con- 
ributed. 



To destroy a newspaper, even 
though it is a week old, shows, 
in the opinion of the Chinese, a 
gross lack of character; to crum- 
ple a printed advertisement 
shows the haste of unreason; to 
toss a book carelessly on the 
floor shows a tendency toward 
violence; to tear a printed page 
shows that you are mentally de- 
ficient. It is a sad commentary 
on the quality of much of our 
reading that we of the Western 
world, where illiteracy is rare, 
have so little reverence for the 
printed page. 



BOOST 



THE 



FORESTER 



THE STENTOR 



FLORENCE NEWCOMB IS 

FIELD REPRESENTATIVE 



Florence Newcomb attended 
the annual convention of Under- 
graduate Field Representatives 
of the Y. W. C. A. of the col- 
leges, universities, and normal 
schools of the four states — Wis- 
consin, Illinois, Michigan and 
Indiana— in Chicago, March 11 
to 13 inclusive. She was elected 
by the Y. W. C. A. of Lake For- 
est College to represent Beloit, 
Lawrence, Milwaukee - Downer, 
and Lake Forest Colleges, and 
during the past few weeks has 
visited all those colleges to dis- 
cuss with the various cabinets 
and advisory boards of the Y. W. 
C. A. especially those questions 
to be brought before the com- 
ing national convention of the 
Y. W. C. A. to be held in Cleve- 
land from April 13 to 20 inclu- 
sive, and also such questions and 
problems of the campus which 
a Y. W. C. A. might be looked to 
for answer and solution. 'J he 
following are a few of the ques- 
tions which each U. F. R. had 
to report on at the convention: 

I. What is the attitude of the 
campus toward the proposed 
basis for membership in the 
Y. W. C. A.? 

II. How deeply are the mem- 
bers of your campus informed 

a. How much are your stu- 
dent groups thinking in terms 
of their community? 

b. What things are being 
done to insure the college 
woman's determination to be 

a constructive community 
worker or influence? 

c. How much are students 
thinking about the church? 

1. Why are the students ac- 
tive or inactive in church work? 

2. What are the basic rea- 
sons given for and against the 
college students' determined 

• support of the church? Gen- 
eral prevailing attitude? 

3. Is the chapel period a time 



of joy and interest for the 
students? 

III. Is Jesus Christ's life real 
enough in the minds of the stu- 
dents to make his personality 
and doctrines a dominating 
force? 

IV. What is the attitude of 
your campus toward: Smoking, 
moving pictures on Sunday, Ul- 
tra-fashionable dressing, and vul 
gar dancing? 

The above questions should 
prove interesting to every girl 
in college, for upon the proper 
solution of the problems sug- 
gested by them, the future of 
the life of the girl, and even of 
the college, depends. Four of 
the last formative and construc- 
tive years of a girl's life are 
spent in college, and in these 
years she must get her ideals 
settled, and her inspiration for 
the work she is to do when her 
mental and physical vigor are 
at their height. Do your sur- 
roundings and college life fur- 
nish you with inspiration, and 
quicken your interest in the 
world, your fellows, and above 
all your God? If not, what can 
you do to help? Are you keen 
to respond to the best that is 
in you and in your surround- 
ings? Think about it! Let's 
keep the standards high! 



An Early Start 

"And we'll grow old together, 
dearest." 

Her Fathers voice from up- 
stairs (2 p. m.): "Well, you 
needn't start doing it down 
there, need you?" 



We hear that the New York 
women wish the summer season 
would hurry up so they can put 
on winter clothes. 



She: "You dance just like a 

poem.' 

He: "Yes, yes, go on!" 

She: "Like a poem of Amy 

Lowell's — the feet are all mixed 

up." 



An Odd Custom 

The very old custom of legal 
adoption in the Hawaiian Islands 
which originated when there 
were many tribes often at war 
with one another, was intended 
to bring peace among them. 
The cause has long since disap- 
peared, but the custom still per- 
sists. When a child is "spoken 
for" by some relative or friend, 
the little baby, as soon as it can 
leave its own mother, will be 
given to the foster mother and 
will be regarded as a sacred 
trust. One woman was the 
mother of eight children, seven 
of whom had been adopted by 
friends. When she was asked 
why she gave them away, she 
replied sadly, "It is a supersti- 
tion, I know, but if they are 
'asked for' and I refuse I fear 
some harm might come to them." 
The poor soul let them go just 
because she loved them so much! 

The custom leads to very 
amusing complications. One of 
the native princesses now living 
has given her baby to her own 
mother. The little girl is legal- 
ly adopted and therefore has be- 
come the grandmother's daugh- 
ter and the mother's sister! — 
Youth's Companion. 



Red Tape Forever 



A London newspaper says 
that a recently discharged sol- 
dier, who had unpleasant mem- 
ories of his military experience, 
took the first oportunity after 
resuming his civilian clothes to 
write to his former colonel: 

"Sir, after what I have suffer- 
ed for the last two years, it 
gives me much pleasure to tell 
you and the army to go to,^ — " 
a place to which only the wick- 
ed are consigned. 

In due course he got this re- 
ply: 

"Sir. Any suggestion or in- 
quii^ies cancerning the move- 
ment of troops must be entered 
on Army Form 2132, a copy of 
which I "inclose." 



THE STENTOR 



Poor Butterfly 

"Father's got you such a love- 
ly new toy, Helen!" said mother 
as she entered the garden, fol- 
lowed by father. 

Helen looked up expectantly 
from the game she was playing 
with a shabby velveteen cat. 
"0-0-0 daddee," she chortled, 
"what is it?" 

Father displayed his new pur- 
chase to the company. "It's a 
butterfly that really flies," he 
said. "Look! You wind it up 
so — round and round, and round 
and round. Now you catch it 
by the head and tail, like this, 
and then — let go." 

He freed the paper butterfly, 
which flew up into the air, 
knocked against the door of the 
tool shed, flew off in a new di- 
rection, dipping and soaring and 
dipping again, until the energy 
of the elastic was expended and 
it finally fluttered to the ground. 

Aunts Angela and Dorothea, 
who are aged fifteen and thir- 
teen respectively, clapped their 
hands with delight and said to 
their little niece: 

"Isn't that lovely? Tell dad- 
dy to do it again." 

Father needed no encourage- 
ment, and five more flights had 
been successfully executed be- 
fore the "grown-ups" noticed 
that Helen was absorbed in mak- 
ing the disreputable cat com- 
fortable in her pushcart. 

"0 Helen, you're missing it 
all!" said Aunt Dorothea, her 
voice full of commiseration as 
she wound up the butterfly for 
another flight. 

Helen did not look up, "I like 
pussy," she remarked. 

Uncle Arthur, just returned 
from school, was called out to 
witness a flight. "Extraordinar- 
ily natural!" he commented 
with a judical expression as he 
watched it. "I wonder why the 
aeroplane people don't go in 
more for vertical screws." He 
sent it on six flights before he 
surrendered it to his sisters 
again. 



Helen's bedtime came, and she 
was taken upstairs, still cling- 
ing to the disreputable cat; but 
the butterfly was brought into 
the dining room, where the many 
obstacles that deflected its 
course occasioned renewed inter- 
est. In a flight launched by 
Aunt Dorothea, the butterfly de- 
liberately circled the lamp like 
a real moth, and the others emu- 
lated this feat. 

Father let it off' at dinner 
from his end of the table, send- 
ing it under the lamp and over 
mother's head, to come to rest 
in a fold of the curtain of the 
French window. The next morn- 
ing as Aunt Dorothea hurried 
downstairs to the dining room 
she heard a fluttering punctuat- 
ed by taps. The butterfly was 
circling the room, and father 
was watching it with rapt in- 
terest. Breakfast time brought 
no rest to the butterfly; but 
Helen's attention during the 
meal was entirely given to per- 
suading pussy to eat her por- 
ridge. 

At ten the aunts were ready 
to go out. "We want to get 
Helen a toy," they announced. 
"What shall we get her? Do 
you think another butterfly? " 

"Yes," said father, "she would 
love that. And this one is get- 
ting a bit worn in one wing." 

Helen was making for the 
garden. "I'm going to take pus- 
sy out for a walk now, daddy," 
she announced. Father did not 
answer. He was busy examin- 
ing the damaged wing. — Windsor 
Magazine. 



Prof: "Johnny, sit down in 
front." 
Johnny: "I can't." 



A Warm Proposition 
Press me closer, closer still, 
With what fervor you can mas- 
ter; 
All my nerves responsive thrill- 
Press me closer — mustard plas- 
ter. — Punch Fowl. 



A Humble Veteran 

In an Irish courthouse an old 
man was called into the witness 
box, and, being confused and 
somewhat nearsighted, he went 
up the stairs that led to the 
bench instead of those that led 
to the box. 

"Ah, sure, yer worship," was 
the reply. "I'm an old man now 
and mebbe it's all I'm fit for." 



A Far Journey 

The little boy who thought his 
father had gone to heaven be- 
cause he had gone to Syke is 
matched by an aged cottage 
body of whom the London Morn- 
ing Post tells. One morning the 
old lady asked the Post's cor- 
respondent, who lodged with 
her, if it was far to Russia. He 
said some of it was much far- 
ther away than other parts and 
asked why she wanted to know. 
She said that they had sent her 
son — a fisherman who had join- 
ed the navy — there, and that she 
would never see him again, and 
with that she fell to sobbing. 
Her lodger did his best to com- 
fort her and told her that peo- 
ple came back from Russia as 
they did from other foreign 
parts. 

"Not from where they've sent 
him," she said. "I shall never see 
him again, not on earth." 

"But why?" 

"They've sent him," said she, 
"to the Archangels." 



And Tliey Object' 

Wife: "You'e been drinking 
again." 

Hubby: "I can't eat all the 
time." 



Judge (recognizing an old of- 
fender): "So, Johnson, you're 
back again? What brought you 
here this time?" 

Johnson: "Two officers, sir." 
Judge: "Drunk, I suppose?" 
Johnson: "Yes, sir, both of 
them." — Ex. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



AT HLETICS 



LAKE FOREST BASE-BALL 
PROSPECTS VERY BRIGHT 



CANDIDATES ARE AV ANTED 



Captain "Puck" Eddy And Six 

Base-Ball Bettier Men Are 

Eligible for 1920 



With six better men back, the 
prospects for a winning baseball 
team this year are very bright. 

Practice will start next week 
and it is hoped that the team 
will be able to get out of doors 
the week after spring vaaction. 

The old letter men who are 
back are all anxious to get into 
uniform again and many new 
men have expressed a desire to 
get back into the game. 

In Capt. Puck Eddy we have 
the best catcher in the Little 
Five. This will be his third year 
on the team and it is hoped a 
very successful one. Puck is an 
experienced man not only be- 
hind the bat but in handling 
the men on the field. 

The other letter men on 
whom we can put our hopes are : 
"Dooley" Sumner, first base; 
Jack Morley, pitcher; Mickey 
Beddoes, center field; L. Frie- 
bly, third base, and H. Eichoff, 
short stop. 

There are a great many new 
men in school with baseball ex- 
perience and it is hoped that 
they will get in touch with the 
coach as soon as possible in or- 
der that he may get a line on all 
available material. If you are 
interested in baseball just call 
and see Puck as he will be glad 
to meet you and the sooner we 
get our team lined up, the bet- 
ter team we will have. 

We did not win in football 
arid basketball. Now is our 
chance to get behind the team 
and push. 



ALL FRATERNITY BASKET- 
BALL TEAM 



Coach nei-l)y Selects Team \t 
tlie Close of Frater- 
nity League 
Season 



The Inter-Fraternity Basket- 
ball season is over and proved to 
be successful in every way. The 
teams after the opening games 
were very evenly matched and 
some very close and well played 
games were enjoyed by the 
crowds which usually turned out 
as large as at the Varsity 
games. 

After the close of any league 
it is the custom to select an 
honorary team from the mem- 
bers of the different clubs play- 
ing. The Coach was asked to se- 
lect such a team from the Fra- 
ternity League and responded 
with the following lineup: 
Robertson, RF, Phi Pi Epsilon 
Scheurs, LF, Phi Eta Alpha 
Hause, C, Kappa Sigma 
McGolley, LG, Phi Pi Epsilon 
Beddoes, RG, Digamma 



CHLRCH TEA3I DEFEATED 

BY PHr PI EPSILION 



If you missed seeing the game 
on Monday evening between the 
Phi Pi Five and the team from 
the Emerson Street Presbyter- 
ian Church of Evanson, you miss 
ed one of the closest and hard- 
est fought contests that has 
been staged this season. Before 
the game began it looked like 
the Phi Pi's would have a walk- 
away, but appearances are de- 
ceiving. The game was rip and 
tuck from the beginning until 
the final whistle, with the vis- 
itors having a point or two the 
advantage until the last two 
minutes of play. The final 
score was 36 to .33. 



BASKET-BALL LETTERS 
ARE AWARDED PLAYERS 



SEVEN MEN OIVEN L. F. 



Attendance Hoard of Control 

Meets and Selects Manas- 

ei-s for Next Year 



The Athletic Board of Con- 
trol met last Tuesday and 
awarded the Basketball team 
their letters for the past sea- 
son. The men honored were 
Acting Captain Eddy, "Red" 
Coleman, "Dooley" Sumner, 
"Pete" Russell, A. Hale, "Red" 
Manning and "Kakie" Kyn- 
berg. Kunz and Knoel, for their 
conscientious work in coming 
out to practice every day, were 
given the right to wear the red 
and black sweater without let- 
ters. The men will meet in a 
few days and elect their Captain 
for next year. 

The Board also eletced the 
basketball and track managers 
for the coming season. K. Gard- 
ner was appointed for basket- 
ball and the management of the 
Track team was given to James 
Leonard. 

Inasmuch as their were no 
Track letter men in school the 
Board appointed D. Hause as 
track captain of the 1920 team. 

Plii Pi Epsilon 

G. F. T. F. 

McGolley, rf. 4 8 3 

Robertson, If. 3 

Marsh, c 6 1 

Ives, rg. 

Thayer, rg. 10 

Legner, Ig. 1 
Emerson Street 

G. F. T. F. 

McFerran, rf. 6 .5 3 

Ashcroft, If. 6 

J. Tolzien. If. 2 

Brown, c 10 3 

M. Tolzien, rg. 10 2 

Culver, Ig. 



THE STENTOR 



AIN'T IT THE BERRIES? 



The Riper the Berry, the Sweet- 
er the Juice 

Overheard from a dim-lit cor- 
ner of Lois Hall: 

"How cold your nose is." 

"Go on home, Nip; that darn 
dog follows me everywhere." 

Rather a cold disposition, 
don't you think? 
Mother, may I go out to dance? 

Why, yes, my darling off- 
spring ; 
But stick to One Step, Jazz and 
Rag, 

And when waltzing, cut the 
shim. 

On with the dance. Let joy be 
unconfined. 

Good show. Bill, but why the 
"Folley" art? 

Yes, cries the angry mob, 
'Why, 0, Why?" 

If Miss Coan hurt her ankle, 
would Derby take her to the 
hospital? No, but Ellingwood. 

Pardon me while I blush over 
that one. 

We note by last week's Sten- 
tor that "Whales used to walk." 

That may be, but what did 
Jonah say? 

Five dollars, perhaps, for the 
best answer. 

The Berry Twins. 

Ras. 



Really Heavy Food 

The British Tommy takes his 
hardships lightly if we are to 
believe half the stories that 
came back from the front. One 
such represents two artillerists 
discussing some trench pudding 
that they had looked forward to 
as a treat, but that came to 
them half cooked and soggy. 

"This 'ere puddin' ain't half 
'eavy stuff,' said Alf with a 
grimance. 

"Oh, that's nothing!" replied 
Bill. "My missus made some 
pudding one day that we could- 
n't eat; so she gave it to our 
ducks. A few minutes later a 
little neighbor boy knocked at 
the door and said, 'Missus Jones, 
yer ducks have sunk!" 



A Bit of News for the Old Folks 

A Kensington boy of seven, 
was sent to a boarding school, 
according to a London paper, 
was instructed by his parents to 
write long letters to them, with 
all the news about himself, the 
school and his companions. His 
letters, however, proved to be 
noteworthy for brevity and for 
a finely impersonal touch. 
Among others he sent the fol- 
lowing: 

"My Dear Father and Mother. 
Do you know that salt is made 
of two deadly poisons? 

"Your loving son, John." 

Suits Called for 
and Delivered 

A. W. ZENGLER 

( leinil)i(i. fri'ssiiifi. liepiiiritit/ 



J. B. VeselsKy 

LADIES' AND JIEN'S TAILOR 

CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Aiitterstin Biiilditif/. I'hoiieSoS 

LAKE FOHKSr, ILL. 



TIPTON'S CAFE 

'We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 
STRICTLY H03IE COOTvING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

PEARL THEATRE 

South First St. 
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the best of pictures are shown 
Shows; 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 
Phones: 341, 342, 343. 

C. T, GUNN CO. 
GROCERS 

I The place to get good things to eat 
Agency Huyler's Candies, 
Curtice Bros. Goods. LAKE FOREST 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, 'Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 




Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7 N. LaSalleSt. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michignn Ave. 



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Hams and Bacon 

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I Each piece is care- 

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1 1 Ask for' 'Premium ' 'Products 

II Swill & Company 

! I U. S. A, 

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THE STENTOR 



It Worked 

A Japanese, Mr. Aisaku Wase- 
da, discusses Japanese humor in 
the Tourist, and offers the fol- 
lowing selection: 

Said an innkeeper's wife to 
her husband: 

"The guest who came this ev- 
ening carries a package that 
seems to contain things of great 
value. I wish he would leave it 
behind." 

"I have a good idea, " said the 
husband. "I will give him a 
great deal of myoga." 

The innkeeper carried out his 
plan and gave myoga, a spicy 
vegetable supposed to produce 
forgetfulness, in abundance to 
the guest with soup and with 
vegetables, and soon after the 
guest had departed he hopefully 
inspected the room. There was 
no trace of the coveted baggage. 

The landlady began to scoff at 
the inefficacy of myoga as an ob- 
livion producer, but her husband 
admonished her not to lose faith 
so easily. 

"The myoga has had its ef- 
fect," he declared. 

"What do you mean?" demand- 
ed the woman. 

"Why, he forgot to pay his 
bill," replied the husband. 



PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



• 
• 


FOR 


• • • • • 

SALE 




• Special 


3A Folding 


Eastman • 


; Kodak 


with 


carrying case. " 


• Price $25.00. 


See Mr 


Tucker, • 


• at Book 


Store 


or Telephone • 


; 580-J. 






• 



LITERARY ASSISTANCE 

Scholarly service extended to 
speakers, debaters, fraternity 
men, writers. We have helped 
thousands on their special sub- 
jects and themes. Our research 
service rendered at moderate 
charge quite promptly. Write 
us your specific requirements, 
and obtain our estimate, with 
list of endorsements from our 
patrons. Authors' Research Bu- 
reau, 500 Fifth Ave., New York. 



MULLER'vS 

THe Best Place 
to EAT in 

WAUREGAN 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Dr. Theo. S, Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

312 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service CaJI 

WILLIAM BURGESS 
Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Automobile Supplies Baggage Transfarr«4 

Seven Passenger Cars to Rent bj Trip or Hour 



No .Job Too Small 



None Too Larg 



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Plumbing and Heating 

LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
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MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for Womens and Childrens 

Furnishings 
Offer the Services of a Competent Staff 
whose aid in selecting and "whose sug- 
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John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence i26 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Statin nery, Invitations, Dance Programs 

J "BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 

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HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
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and Many Other Lines of 
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PHONE 881- 



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PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, UL 

Sodas— Cigars- -Candies 



Spalding Sweaters 




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TRUE ATHLETIC 
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OUTDOOR PUR. 
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Sendfor 
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THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College > 

Jewelry 



The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank j 

SOLICITS YOUR BUSINESS j 
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED. 
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PHONE 612 



MARKET SQUARE 



THE STENTOR 



THE INCUBATOR 

(By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington) 

The Spring seems to be doing 
its duty this year for propos- 
als are still coming in which 
means that the contest will have 
to be continued another week. 
The following sparks are our 
choice from the litter of fiery 
epistles which has been show- 
ered down upon us from ambi- 
tious fair maidens: 

To Lucius Legner 
I 
I say Lucius Legner 

You sure look good to me. 

Perhaps you'll laugh "Ho, Ho ! 

How could that ever be?" 

n 

Perhaps you think I don't know 
Just what I seem to say, 

But I really am quite sane 
I want you every day. 

ni 

I need you every day, dear, 

To help me in my climb 
Towards the higher things, 
dear, 
Which I must reach some 
time. 

Elsie Engle. 
To Robert Harris 
(With apologies to Oliver W. 

Holmes) 
Ah Harris ! when I saw thee last 

Trip down the campus walk 
I, turning when thy form had 
past 
Wondered how they'd talk. 
If through some very lucky 
chance 
I should be thy dame 
And with sweet fudge entrance 
Yon, and share thy fame. 
To Loveridge Martin 
Dear Sweet Loveridge — 
Knowest thou not how my heart 

doth ache 
To see thee while away the 

happy hours 
To see they my presence to for- 
sake 
To have thee escape my charm- 
ing powers 
To think that thou shouldst 

Sigma pledge 
That thou shouldst never hear 
my sigh 



But come, Til forgive thee for 

your pledge 
If you'll be mine. 'Tis all I cry. 
Anne Merner. 

In response to the hurried tel- 
egram from Mr. Thayer I wish 
to say that the anonymous pro- 
posal of last week was the ex- 
pression of Elizabeth Torrey- 
son's most sincere wish. 



ALU3INI NOTES 



1916. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. 
(Mary Roe) Babcock are living 
in San Francisco, California, 486 
Ninth Ave. Mr. Babcock is now 
Pacific Coast Manager for the 
Century Co. Publishers. Since 
their marriage in April, 1918, 
Mr. and Mrs. Babcock have trav- 
elley 20,000 miles by auto, in- 
cluding their original trip from 
Chicago to Seattle, and up and 
down the Coast from Canada to 
Mexico. 

1915. Miss Eunice LeVien's 
occupation in Washington is sec- 
retarial work in the Bureau of 
Internal Revenue. Previously 
she taught for three years at 
Greenville and LeRoy, 111. Her 
permanent address remains Ot- 
tumwa, Iowa, R. R. 5. 

1917. William J. Burchill was 
discharged from the army last 
October and is now in the em- 
ploy of the Fairbanks-Morse Co., 
Chicago, as an electrical engi- 
neer. Home address: 1839 Ken- 
ilworth Ave. 

1917. Miss Doris Merner was 
married August 24, 1918 to 
Cyrus P. Trowbridge, a druggist. 
Her present address is Mar- 
seilles, 111., but her permanent 
address remains Cedar Falls, 
Iowa. 

1917. Miss Irene Stevens 
taught in the Stillman Valley, 
111., High School for two years, 
and in February, 1919, was mar- 
ried to Percy H. Prior. Mr. and 
Mrs. Prior now reside in High- 
land Park. 
1 DOS- 
Ray F. Frazer is service man- 
ager of the Mobile, Ala., Regis- 
ter. 



H. B. Galbraith was commis- 
sioned Captain, August 15, 1917, 
went to France with 143d In- 
fantry, August, 1918, commis- 
sioned Major, October; mustered 
out July, 1919. He received ci- 
tation for Croix de Guerre, Octo- 
ber 8, 1918. He has now return- 
ed to his law practice at Browns- 
iville, Texas. Mrs. Galbraith, it 
will be remembered, is Maude 
Brombaugh, 15. They have one 
daughter, Frances Louise, born 
in October, 1917. 

Paul B. Sommers is in the in- 
surance business with E. P. Len- 
ihan & Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, 
1019 Rockefeller Bldg. We have 
never recorded here his mar- 
riage in 1914 to Miss Florence 
Adams a graduate of Kenwood 
Institute, Chicago, and the fact 
of three children between one 
and five. 

1 DOS- 
Miss Helen i licks, after some 
years of teaching in high 
iSchools, is now in the land de- 
(partment of the C. & N. W. R. R. 
working on the valuation report 
for the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. Her permanent 
home address is 1166 W. North 
St., Decatur, 111. 

Miss Grace Taylor is teaching 
in the high school at Virginia, 
Illinois, her home. 
1911— 

E. M. Stone's permanent ad- 
dress is Route A., Box 300, Port- 
land, Oregon, where he is now 
engaged in farming. He has 
two boys aged three and one. 
191-2— 

Since his return from foreign 
service Leslie H. Sharp has 
(Jan. 1) accepted a position as 
research chemist with the U. S. 
Bureau of Mines, Boulder, Colo., 
his permanent address remain- 
ing 500 Crittenden St.', Red Bluff 
California. Announcement has 
been made of his engagement to 
Miss Marian Allhands, of Port- 
land, Ore., a graduate of Leland 
Stanford in 1917. 

1892— 

Dr. Alex S. Wilson is at 



THE STENTOR 



present in this country, liv- 
ing at 124 Dale St., Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. 
1893— 

S. B. Hopkins is still in the 
service of the U. S. Govern- 
ment, as immigration inspector. 
After several years of service on 
the Mexican border, he was 
transferred to Tampa, Florida, 
in December, 1917. He owns 
his own home in Tampa and ex- 
pects to stay on there, — is an 
elder in the local Presbyterian 
Church. His daughter Julia is 
to be graduated in June from 
the Home Economics Dept. of 
the Florida State College for 
Women. His son, Clark, is a 
senior in high school. 

1894>— 

Thomas F. Marshall's pro- 
fessional designation at Hood 
College, Frederick, Md., is Pro- 
fessor of Education and Voca- 
tional Counsellor. 
1809— 

Miss Daisy Bell's most per- 
manent address is at J. Ster- 
ling Morton High School, Cicei'o, 
HI., where for ten years she has 
been at the head of the Com- 
mercial Dept. 

Mrs. W. J. (Lavina Moore) 
McKee resides at Hutchinson, 
Minn., where her husband is in 
the real estate business. Dur- 
ing the war she earned the two 
crosses and two stripes for work 
in the Red Cross. 

Miss May H. Rogers received 
the degree of B. S. from Sim- 
mons College, Boston, in 1919, 
and at present is a medical so- 
cial worker in the Mass. Central 
Hospital at Boston. 
1915— 

Miss Blanche Young has been 
teaching commercial subjects 
since September, 1918, in the 
Urbana, Illinois H. S. 
1916— 

Miss Martha Morris of Sisse- 
ton, S. D., has been since Octo- 
ber, a student at the American 
Academy of Dramatic Arts, New 
York City, residing at Hartley 
Home Settlement, 413 W. 46th 
St., as a volunteer worker there. 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 



lit 



FrencH's Dru^ Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 
L H. W. SPEIDEL 

Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 



CIGARS 




UNITED 
CIGAR STORES 

OK AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood 

AUENT 

Lake Forest, Illinois 



Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F. J HELD, Prop. 
Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FOREST 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home- like and at Attractive 
as any Big City Reitaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
G e ne ra 1 Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST, 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

I KODAKS AND 
I SUPPLIES 

IKRAFFT'S DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look for the word 

F B D e: ra i_ 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, WEST 



CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 ! 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



If its Bilked at HUNTDON'S if» Baked Right 

W. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakery Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

,Miiinif/er 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chif-agn-Lake Fore.st Commutation 

Tickets 

32 UEERPAXH. WK8X 



THE STENTOR 



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LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger eDroUment than ever before. Some 
of the feaiures of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Economics, severa' 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2^ full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both men and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garrick (dramatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to $400 for men; $350 to $450 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ar 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDiJNT'S OFFICE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 



I 



X 



I 



Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DR. C. W. Y0UN6 DR. R. 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12:00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : 

p. — ■ — - -■ - ■ __ • . 

BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Confectionerg 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 



CALL. AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHEN IN NEED OP 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VIOTROLA 



Kubelsky 



Clothing and 
Kurnlshln^s 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specially 



Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

ira oo itEPATRiyet 

Phone 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Volume XXXIV 



LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS, MARCH 26, 1920. 



NUMBER 21 



WILL LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 
BECOME A SCHOOL FOR WOMEN? 



QUESTION NOW BEFORE THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Alumni, Students and Part of the Faculty Oppose Change 

and Emphasize ObHgation to Maintain the 

Historic Character of the College 



The report in last week's Chicago 
papers that the trustees of Lake For- 
est College are considering the pog- 
sibHity of changing the institution 
into a woman's College has been 

widely commented upon throughout 
the local community. TTiis plan to 
make Lake Forest the outstanding 
woman's college of the central west, 
"the Wellesley of the West, has had 
Its supporters for many years in Lake 
Forest. They point to the crowded 
conditions and long waiting-lists of 
the well-known eastern women's col- 
leges, and say that the location and 
equipment of Lake Forest College are 
such as to make it peculiarly suit- 
able and attractive to young women, 
while the experience of the past 
years seem to show that in competi- 
tion with neighboring universities 
and colleges it is not particularly at- 
tractive to young men. It is further 
urged in support of the woman's col- 
lege plan that as a consequence of its 
location and equipment Lake Forest 
College is subject to unusually large 
overhead expense, which keeps the 
institution in constant financial diffi- 
culty and that t'here is no remedy for 
this difficulty until some way is 
found of offsetting this expense by 
using the Lake Forest location to 
draw to the institution a much larg- 
er number of students able to pay a 
reasonable yearly c'harge. The pos- 
sibility of connecting the college more 
closely wit^ Ferry Hall as a feeder 
and of absorbing the Ferry Hall 
junior college students into the col- 
lege student body is also urged in 
favor of the woman's college plan. 
No considerable change in the pres- 
ent college faculty is contemplated 



by those trustees who favor chang- 
ing the character of the institutioa 

The alumni of the institution, un- 
der the leadership of the Alumni 
Trustees are strongly opposed to this 
change, the men in particular feel- 
ing that it will rob them of their 
alma mater. The alumni urge the 
obligation to the founders of the col- 
lege, and to its former students, of 
preserving its historic character. 
They maintain that for an expendi- 
ture no larger than, if as large as, 
that required to make Lake Forest a 
first-class woman's college. It can be 
made to succeed as a coeducational 
institution. They ,say ithat the lack 
of growth during the last ten years 
has been due to a lack of high-grade 
leadership, and urge the immediate 
election of a president of pre-eminent 
educational leadership. 

This matter has of course excited 
warm and constamt discussion upon 
the campus. The students are natur- 
ally greatly opposed to a change in 
the character of the institution. Op- 
inion in faculty circles is divided: 
some think that the obligation to 
maintain the historic character of 
the institution is the supreme consid- 
eration; others believe that the add- 
ed financial support which is neces- 
sary for the future development of 
the institution can be obtained only 
by adopting the woman's college plan. 
Upon one point all are agreed, how- 
ever: the urgent necessity of deciding 
this question speedily, and finally. 
The present condition of uncertainty 
with the reports that are circulating 
broadcast are bound to hinder the 
developement of the institution, along 
present lines at least, for years to 
come. 



PHI PI GIVES 
FINE PARTY 



Every detail of the Phi Pi Ep- 
silon formal, Friday evening 
March nineteenth, marked it as 
a dance long to be remembered 
in the social annals of the Col- 
lege. The boys had expended a 
great deal of time and money in 
the preparations and the result 
was quite magnificent. The 
writer can truly say that it was 
the most elaborate party he has 
ever attended in Lake Forest. 

Much originality was display- 
ed in the decorations, for which 
we understand Mr. Lucius Leg- 
ner deserves especial credit. 
Both ceiling and walls were cov- 
ered with twisted crepe paper, 
with purple beams standing out 
against a background of yellow. 
In each yellow space between 
the beams was a replica of the 
Phi Pi eagle, which flew high 
that night. 

The programs were in the 
form of black leather cardcases, 
bearing the fraternity arms 
stamped in gold. The music 
was furnished liy five pieces 
from Harvey's and the quality 
seemed even better than the 
usual Harvey output, which is 
going some. The purple punch, 
served in the lobby by the Dorn 
family, was delicious. 

Miss Hamilton, Miss Brown, 
Miss Farwell, Mr. McFerran, 
and Mr. Coleman stood in the 
receiving line. The orchestra 
observed pleasantly short inter- 
missions, with the result that 
all but one of the sixteen dances 
on the program were completed, 
but they seemed all too few. 
Truly, a wonderful party! 



THE STENTOR 



THE CLASvSIC STILL 

IN THE KING 



Anyone who has had the idea 
that the great war has so shift- 
ed our educational ideas as to 
relegate what is called the "clas- 
sics" to the unlamented scrap- 
heap and the limbo of the ob- 
solete is very much mistaken. 
It is true that in France, in Eng- 
land and in the United States 
discussion is waxing warni on 
this issue and that the anti-clas- 
sicists have drawn much encour- 
agement from the great rush in- 
to engineering business and prac 
tical studies that has marked all 
ihigh-school and collegiate life 
since the war. But this is only 
one side of the shield. For ev- 
en in France and England, and 
in Germany, too, for that matter, 
the secondary schools are pre- 
paring for the more extensive 
use of the classics in vie'Y of the 
importance of cultural courses 
in the development of a deeper 
sense of nationality. Mr. Bal- 
four for instance, in discussing 
the value of science in Ene,land 
recently pointed out that the 
old doctrine that man does not 
live by. bread alone was still ef- 
fective, though he urged that ev- 
erything be done to promote re- 
search along practical lines. 

But it is Dean West, of Prince- 
ton, who is the great protagonist 
over here of the arguments for 
the classics and who, far from 
being discouraged by the out- 
look, believes that the American 
Classical League is just begin- 
ning to fight and that victory, 
not defeat is in sight. He has 
just pointed out at Pittsburgh 
that the latest report of he Col- 
lege Entrance Examination 
Board, with the facts brought 
down to September, shows that 
in the nine leading school stud- 
ies the order of excellence went 
to the students as follows: First, 
those in Greek; then those in 
French, Latin, mathematics, 
physics and chemistry, with the 



lowest three classifications being 
represented by students in Ger- 
man, English and history. Of 
this report Doctor West says 
that "the facts are startling, 
newly ascertained and unanswer 
able. No ingenuity can destroy 
the evidence of these facts as to 
the proved excellence of class!- 
al schooling." 

With all this ginger marking 
the campaign of one of the 
great educators of the country, 
it is plain we are in for a very 
lively controversy in an issue by 
no means "closed." In fact, in 
education there is nothing so 
certain as that those who pre. 
cipitately declare that the older 
standards are moribund are apt 
to find that the experiences of 
a wide range of schols will fail 
them just when they think they 
are most secure. 



OIR BISINESS MANAGER 



Ruth Kennedy was taken ill 
some time ago which culminated 
in a very serious operation Tues- 
day. She is doing as well as can 
be expected under the circum- 
stances. We sincerely hope for 
her speedy reovery. 

The many of us who have 
missed our Stentors for the past 
two weeks may realize now just 
how valuable a business manager 
she really is and how much the 
welfare of the paper depends 
upon her. 



Among the visitors to the cam- 
pus last week were: "Kit" Hoov- 
er '19, "Ink" Uden 19, Charles 
Thayer IT, "Gif ' Holden ex '19, 
"Chuck" Perrigo ex '19, Joe 
Thomas, "Herb" Petersen and 
"Swede" Petersen, McEv^oy and 
"Tom" Findley. 



Fred and Theodore Kelly, Har- 
ry Pagett, and Leon Noel drove 
new Fords from Chicago for the 
Kelley Garage, in Marengo, last 
Saturday. 



Two of our successful alumni, 
Mr. E. Lincoln Gilroy and Mr. 
Charles E. Beard visited on the 
campus last week end and bum- 
med a cigarette from ye editor, 
thereby proving that prosperity 
has not spoiled them. 

Don Woods, Horace Horton, 
and L. S. Casjens were the week- 
end guests of Digamma. 

Herschel V. Johnson and Ed- 
son VanSickle spent the week- 
end in Urbana, 111., where they 
attended the State Basket-ball 
Tournament. 

Charles Horan '22 was called 
home the first of this week for 
the funeral of his mother, who 
died on Satudary last. Our sym- 
pathy goes out to you. Chuck. 



EMBLEMS NOW RK4DT 



Emblems for members of 
women's auxiliaries of the Am- 
erican Legion are ready for dis- 
tribution. 

Notice to this effect was re- 
ceived at the Illinois Depart- 
mett office in Chicago today. 
All emblems are to be handled 
through national headquarters 
at Indianapolis. 

The insignia is similar to that 
worn by the Legionnaire. On 
the blue inner circle are the 
words "American Legion Wom- 
en's Auxiliary." The center is 
white and contains a star — gold 
for members who have lost a 
relative in service and blue with 
a gold border for all others. 

It is announced that the em- 
blems will be furnished to Post 
and Auxiliary Unit officers at 
the cost of 25 cents each by com- 
munication with the Emblem 
Division, National Headquarters, 
The American Legon, Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 

Women whose relatives saw 
service in the World War are 
taking a keen interest in the 
Legion, and new auxiliary units 
are being formed daily. One 
unit already reports a member- 
ship of nearly a thousand. 



THE STENTOR 



SUMMARY OF GIRLS' 

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 



Since Midyears there has been 
a series of six basi^eLball games 
between the different class 
teams, with two or three prac- 
tice games in addition. It was 
originally planned to have two 
games between each class, but 
lack of time with the popularity 
of the gymnasium for both men 
and Sunday Schools, and some 
disabling accidents reduced the 
number to one round except for 
the Sophomores who played but 
two games in all. The Juniors 
and Freshmen played each other 
twice, the latter winning ])oth 
times. With the progress of the 
series' the brand of game gener- 
ally improved although lack of 
training was especially evident 
in many games. The type of 
game has been the three division 
line game five players on a side. 
The, Freshmen and Sop'homores 
were the only two classes to 
have an adequate number out 
for practice in the sport of abs- 
ket-ball. The Juniors gathered 
together enough players for the 
games, but were handicapped by 
lack of practice other than that 
afforded by the games them- 
selves. The Senior team was 
composed of two Seniors plus 
three Music School girls, all of 
whom practiced. The signifi- 
cance of this practice is that the 
Freshman team who played most 
frequently and showed the great 
est loyalty and regularity in at- 
tendance came out as victors. It 
is hoped that another year may 
see a different system possible 
whereby there may be at least 
two hours a week in basketball 
instead of t)he meager one hour 
of this season, The 'following 
are the class teams from which 
the "varsity" six was picked. 
1920— 

R. F.— D. Antrim (M. S.). 
L. P.— G. Smith (M. S.). 
C. — A. Merner, Cp. 
R. G.— F. Russell. 
L. G.— M. Prickett (M. S.). 
Sub. — ^D. Babcock. 



1921— 

R. F.— Ryno. 

L. F.— Wales. 

C. — Hendrickson, Cp. 

R. G.— Liohty. 

L. G. — Hecketsweiler. 

1922— 

R. F.^Mohr. 

L. F. — Pettigrew. 

C.— Clarke. 

R. G. — Barnthouse, Cp. 

L. G. — Bridgeman. 

Sub. — Kennedy. 

1933— 

R. F.— K. Antrim. 

L. F.— Campbell. 

C. — Rossiter. 

R. G.— Laing, Cp. 

L. G.— Knox. 

Sub. — Magee. 

Varsity: 
K. Antrim— R. F. 
Campbell— L. F. 
Hendrickson — C. 
Clarke — S. C. 
Ryno— R. G. 
Laing — L. G. 

(2) 

Merner— R. F. 

Mohr— L. F. 

Rossiter — C. 

Wales— S. C. 

Russell— R. G. 

Barnthouse — L. G. 

The scores of the games were: 

Senior-Music School vs. Juniors, 
18-7. 

Senior-Music School vs. Fresh- 
men, 9-26, 

Juniors vs. Sophomores, 26-20. 

Juniors vs Freshmen, 6-14 and 
2-21. 

Sophomores vs. Freshmen, 6-25. 
The Freshmen won four games 

the Juniors one, and the Senior- 
Music School one. 



Nervous Employer: "Thomas, 
I wish you wouldn't whistle 
at your work." 

0. B.: "I ain't workin', sir, I'm 
only just whistlin'!" 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF 

FOOT-BALL SEASON 



Equipment $ 715 52 

Medical attention and 

supplies 168 36 

Contracts 780 00 

Officials 206.00 

Work on Athletic field 45 50 
Printing, scouting, mis- 
cellaneous 58 17 



$1973 55 
Credit gate receipts, etc. 209 08 



Total $1764 47 

Harold J. Euchoff, Mgr. 
S. R. Derby, Coach. 



Bachelor: "You fellows claim 
to have better halves, but we 
have some consolation. 

Benedict: And that is? 

Bachelor: Better quarters. 



Logical Food 

"What makes your cat so 
small?" 

"Oh, I brought him up on con- 
densed milk." 



Ox Trot 

Coed: You should change your 
style of dancing a little. 

Frosh: In what way? 

Co-ed: You might occasionally 
step on my right foot. 



The Devil finds mischief even 
for ideal hands to do. 



Do you think the love of mon- 
ey is the root of all evil? 

No, I think the love of matri- 
mony is the route of all evil. 



Modern woman wants the 
floor but she doesn't want to 
scrub it. 



The only course in which 
some fellows will ever graduate 
is the course of time. 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Board of Editors: 

Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Myron Thayer, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20. 
James Leonard, '21. 
EiUgene Tucker, '21. 
Marion Preston, '21. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Ruth Bahlert '22. 



MUSIC IN THE CHAPEL 



To many of us the Chapel ser- 
vice every day is an ordeal, a 
half hour of real misery. We 
are all in the habit of bewailing 
our fates for being- compelled to 
attend so regularly. The trou- 
ble is that we talk a lot and do 
nothing. 

One of the most wretched fea- 
tures of our Chapel service is 
the music. To be sure we have 
a choir and an excellent organ- 
ist, and we do manage to eek 
out some three or four verses of 
a doleful hymn each morning. 
Why do we not have more spec- 
ial music by the choir and as- 
sembly? One of our most beau- 
tiful Chapel services of this 
year was the one which was con- 
ducted by Professor Van Steen- 
deren with the assistance of Mr. 
Moore and Mr. Black. Every- 
one keenly enjoyed this service, 
more, perhaps, than the partici- 
pants realized at the time. Such 
things are good, very good, and 
add vigor to the college spirit. 

Why do we not have more of 
this type of Chapel service? 
Why do we not press our Choir 
into service and have a musical 
number at the opening of the 
service about twice a week? At 



any rate it would surely do no 
harm to try some such arrange- 
ment and then we would know 
just how well such a plan would 
work out. Good music should 
do a great deal to make Chapel 
something to look forward to 
rather than to regret. 



Nowadays a fellow can't count 
the cost unless he has stiidied 
higher mathematics. 



Wonder if Ireland would like 
to borrow our Declaration of In- 
dependence? 



THE STIFF COLLAR RULE 



Some misapprehension as to 
whether Freshmen can be re- 
quired to wear stiff collars to 
dinner at the Commons during 
the whole year has arisen during 
the last week or two. Some of 
the Freshmen have openly vio- 
lated the rule and the Sopho- 
mores whether from fear or 
from a sense that the tradition 
is not worthy of being carried 
out, have ignored the breach. 

Now the old tradition may be 
all wrong. It is not our pur- 
pose here to argue that. But 
no tradition of the old Lake For- 
est is to be killed in any such 
let-it-slide fashion by a bunch 
of cocky Frosh and apathetic 
Sophomores. 

There are just two things to 
do: Either abolish the rule by 
action of the Student Council, 
or enforce it in the traditionally 
vigorous manner. And until 
the rule is abolished by the Stu- 
dent Council, it shail be enforc- 
ed. It is the place of every 
Senior, Junior, and Sophomore 
to see that the rules for Fresh- 
man conduct are carried out. 
The active enforcement is dele- 
gated to the Sophomores, but 
the two upper classes stand be- 
hind them and will take an ac- 
tive part if necessary. In a 
case of this kind it is not the 
Frosh against the Sophs, but 
the Frosh against the whole 
school. 



Lake Forest College Bible: 
The New Republic 



Why are the angels all ladies? 

Because they are always harp- 
ing on something, always up in 
the air, and never have anything 
to wear. 



Junior Wright says they were 
out in the Ford the other day, 
it got stuck in the mud, and the 
Ford did the "shimmy." 



A clergyman in a western city 
was boasting to a Chicago friend 
of his record as a "marrying par- 
son." "Why do you know I mar- 
ry about 30 couples a week, 
right here in this parsonage.^ 

"Parsonage?" echoed Chicago 
man, "I should call it the Union 
Depot." 



EDUCATION AND 

CIVILIZATION 

(Secretary of Interior) 



Western civilization hangs to- 
day in the balance. Every gain 
that the race has made is threat- 
ened with destruction. Only a 
thin line separates France and 
England and Italy from the men 
ace of barbarism. Upon our Na- 
tion may devolve the responsi- 
bility of keeping the torch 
aflame. Upon the trained intel- 
ligence, the clarified insight and 
the disciplined will of our peo- 
ple in all likelihood will depend 
the fate of the world in the de- 
cades that are to come. First, 
last, and all the time it is an 
educational problem. It is your 
problem and my problem; your 
duty and my duty. At no time 
in the history of our profession 
has the need for devoted, con- 
secrated, and united action been 
so imperative as it is to-day. 
Let us stand shoulder to shoul- 
der with unbroken ranks and see 
the battle through to glorious 
victory. 



THE STENTOR 



Y. W. BASKETBALL 
TEAM DEFEATS 
MIXED COLLEGE TEAM 



Tlie Lake Forest Y. W. C. A. 
played the return game with 
the picked girl's team of the 
college Monday nigiht, with rath- 
er disastrous results for Lake 
Forest. Contrary to the under- 
standing, the game was not 
strictly girls rules but rather a 
mixture of the men's and the 
line game, which at the start 
was disconcerting, especially to 
'the college girls. The game was 
. however, a fast one, and clean. 
Miss Conway the visiting center 
•■b^ing the only one disqualified 
for personal fouls. The out- 
standing feature of the game 
■ was the brilliant playing of Myr- 
■;tle Kelley, the Y. W. right for- 
ward who made eight field bas- 
kets and two fouls. Her field 
shots were long and accurate and 
it was only the vigilant activity 
of her guard, Lois Ryno that 
prevented her from getting the 
ball, and so scoring, oftener. The 
Lake Forest guards and center 
^3Te especially strong, but the 
forwards and the basket had ap- 
parently had a feud, for not one 
-field basket was made, even 
though the ball was in the col- 
lege territory a large share of 
the time. Keturah Antrim made 
two free throws and Marjorie 
Campbell one, giving the Lake 
Forest score of 3 against the 
Y. W. score of 22. The score of 
the previous game played in the 
Young Men's Club Gymnasium 
four weeks ago was 21 to 10 in 
favor of the Y. W. 

Mr. Harry Pertz of Highland 
Park was the referee for both 
games. It is unusual to find a 
man who is sufficiently acquaint- 
ed with the rules of the Line 
game to be a capable referee. 
The following is the line-up: 

Y. W. C. A.: 

Kelley, rf, 18 points. 

Carlson, If (first half), 2 points. 

Hunter, If, (second half). 



Conway, c, (first half). 
Carlson, c, (second half). 
Thompson, rg. 
Kriesant, Ig. (first half). 
Fitzgerald, Ig, (second half). 

Ltake Forest: 
Campbell, rf, 1 point. 
K. Antrim, If, 2 points. 
Merner, If, (last quarter). 
Hendrickson, c. 
Ryno, rg. 

Laing, Ig, (first half). 
Russell, Ig, (second half). 



Father: "I'm delighted to hear 
of your success on the school 
baseball team, son, but you must 
remember there are other things 
in life besides baseball." 

Son: "Yes I know, but hang it 
all! I'm afraid I'm too light for 
football or rowing." 



NEW EYES FOR 

BOYS AND GIRLS 



All progress is based on cur- 
iosity. Only to tihe inquiring 
mind does enlightenment come, 
and there can be no such thing 
as an education which is regard- 
less of those things that imme- 
diately surround us — the earth, 
the vegetables, the flowers, the 
trees, the rocks the birds the 
streams, the animals, the skies, 
and those machines through 
which the forces of nature work. 
I am conscious every day of the 
defects in my early education, 
for I should have been taught, 
first of all, not technical botany, 
but the nature of plants, the dif- 
ference between plants, and the 
nature of the layers of the earth 
and the difference between 
them, and all those other things 
that would make a walk or a 
drive a constant panorama of de- 
light. As it is, I have walked 
through the world almost blind- 
folded. Your program is to give 
new eyes to boys and girls, and 
men and women. 

FRANKLIN K. LANE. 



DIGAMMA WINS THE LAST 

GAME OF SEASON 



The Phi Eta Alpha Are Defeat- 
ed 111 a Slow Game: 
Score 13-16 



The Phi Eta Alpha lost the 
last game of the Inter-Frater- 
nity to the Digamma, and also 
their hold on second place in 
the league standing. They are 
now tied with Kappa Sigma and 
it is doubtful if the deciding 
game will ever be played. 

The game was hotly contested 
throughout and was not decided 
until the whistle blew at the 
end of the closing period. 

"Mickey" Beddoes played the 
best game for the Digamma, 
scoring three baskets from the 
field and one from the foul line. 



FRATERNITY 


LEAGUE 


STAND] 


NG 
W. 






L. P. 


Phi Pi Epsilon 


5 


1000 


Phi Eta Alpha 


3 


2 600 


Kappa Sigma 


3 


2 600 


Omega Si 


2 


3 400 


Digamma 


2 


3 400 


Barbs 





5 000 



Results of Last Weeks' Gaines: 

Mar. 12: Barbs, 9 — Digamma, 
39. 

Mar. 15: Phi Eta Alpha, 2.3— 
Omega Psi, 10. 

Mar. 17: Barbs, 9— Phi Pi, 19. 



DEATH OF MOTHERS of 

TWO OF OUR ME3IBERS 



The entire campus was shock- 
ed and grieved to learn of the 
sudden death of the mother of 
Lawrence Maplesden '21 last 
week. She had been sick and in 
the hospital since last fall, but 
it was thought that she was re- 
covering. The final news comes 
as a blow to all "Mape's" numer- 
ous friends, and there is a lot 
of heart-felt sympathy extended 
to him in his bereavement. 



THE STENTOR 



AIN'T IT THE BERRIES? 



The riper the berry, the 
sweeter the juice. 



Did you ever stop to think of 
the exceptions to the laws of 
Physics? 

Sound travels at the rate of 
400 yards per second. Excep- 
tions: 

•Lois Hall Scandal, 1,000 yards. 
Flattery, 500 yards. 
Truth, 24 yards. 
Alarm Clock, ? ? ? ? ? 



Coleman, before starting for 
the Hall: "Say Len, do I need a 
shave?" 

Holden: "It doesn't look so 
good but it feels all right." 
What's in mere looks anyway? 
Huh, Zelma. 



Troutman in Shakespeare 
class: "He had what you might 
call a typical Theta leg." 

Please explain. Bill. 



When you see a bashful Senior 
Blushing scarlet in the face, 

Everytime he pulls his watch 
out — 

There's a woman in the case. 



AnH far off the sentry answer- 
ed the challenge, "Niemand zu 
Hause." 



Some fair reader of this col- 
umn sugegsted that the title be 
changed to "The Bees Knees." 
I'm afraid that would make bus- 
iness poor. 



Welcome back Chuck. The 
Barn and the House haven't been 
the same since you left. 

Note: This is a joke. 

The Berry Twins, 

Frisco and Al. 



A Little Wreck 

Sam, Mr. Clark's man of all 
work, was delighted when his 
employer taught him to drive 
the new Ford, and one Saturday 
evening he asked to have the 
car Sunday "to go to preachin', 
a mile down de road." Mr. Clark 
consented, telling him to bring 
the car back Sunday afternoon, 
and Sam drove off proudly. Sun- 
day afternoon came, but no Sam. 
Sunday night came, and Sam and 
the car were still missing. On 
Monday morning Sam appeared 
with a very solemn face. 

"Hello!" said Mr. Clark. "What 
do you mean by this? Where 
is the car?" 

"Well, boss," said Sam, "you 
see seh, I thought I'd go over 
to Macklenburg yestiday, and I 
got in a little wreck." 

"A little — —Oh, you got in a 
wreck, did you ? Anything 
hurt?" 

"Yesseh. You knows dat big 
pane of glass you looks th'oo, up 
in front?" 

"Yes, the wind shield." 

"Well, Hat's broke all to piec- 
es." 

Mr. Clark groaned. "Any- 
thing else?" 

"Yesseh. You knows dat 
thing you po's de water in?" 

"The radiator? Yes." 

"Well, dat's a-lyin' down be- 
side de engine." 

Sam made a sweeping gesture 
toward the ground. 

"Sam!" 

"Yesseh. En you knows dem 
rubber things round de wheels?" 

"Yes, the tires. Any of them 
hurt?" 

"Dey's all busted!" 

"Sam!" 

"Yesseh. En you knows dem 
things dat sticks out over de 
wheels like dis?" Sam extended 
his arms and curved his hands 
palms down in front of him. 

"Yes, the guards. Well?" 

"Dey's a-sittin' right up like 
dis." Sam bent his elbows and 
pointed the backs of his finger 
tips toward his shoulders. 



"Sam," Mr. Clark cried, "is 
anything left of that car?" 

"Yesseh, yesseh; de cushions 
ain't hurt a mite;" 



THE INCUBATOR 



By Mrs. Henry Buff Orpington 
After the burning of much 
midnight oil and nearly three 
inches of candle, we have final- 
ly come to the end of the heart- 
felt epistles of our interested 
readers, and have decided upon 
the winners. The contest has 
been a close one and in order 
that every one is satisfied with 
the results of our decision we 
have decided to print the condi- 
tions on which we have chosen 
the winners. 

1. The appropriateness of 
their choice. 

2. The best expression of so 
heartrendering a theme. 

3. The strongest appeal. 

The winners are: 1st, Rachel 
Hecketsweiler; 2nd, Anne Mer- 
ncr, and 3rd, Laura Rossiter. 

Owing to the fact that our re- 
nowned Olympian, Professor 
Burnap, has had occasion to cele- 
brate his sixteenth plus birthday 
this month we feel duty bound 
to publish as nice a horoscope as 
possible. Now for a consultation 
with our oracle. 

Those born in March are self- 
reliant, possessing an artalytical 
mind, fond of sports and excite- 
ment and like to make hew ac- 
quaintances. They are studious, 
intellectual, loyal and fond of 
travel. They are original, cour- 
ageous, not very commynicative 
and quite politic, enjoying the 
possession of a keen sense of 
humor, which makes them popu- 
lar among their friends and ac- 
quaintances. 

NOTE: Marion Preston wishes 
me to add that diarists of the 
sentimental type are sometimes 
numbered with the March hare. 



THE 



S T E N T R 



ATHLETICS 



BASE-BALL SCHEDULE IS 
ANNOUNCED FOR 1920 



14 GAMES TO RE PLAYED 



Lake Forest AVill Open Season 

Against Armour At 

Chit'as'o on Api-il 

Seventeenth 



Coach Derby has just complet- 
ed a fourteen game schedule for 
the Red and Black. The first 
Conference game will be played 
with Northwestern College at 
Naperville on May 1, 1920. 

The opening game of the seas- 
on is only one month away and 
ill that time the Coach must se- 
lect his team and develop some 
teamwork. He cannot do this 
unless enough men turn out so 
that we may have two teams 
for practice games every day. 

If you are interested in Base- 
Ball report to the Coach or Cap- 
tain Eddy. Practice will be 
held every afternoon after 
spring vacation. 

1920 Sehednle: 
April 17 — Armour, there. 
April 24 — Valparaiso, there. 
April 30 — Armour, here. 
May 1 — Northwestern College, 

there. 
May 7 — Monmouth, here. 
May 8 — Valparaiso, here. 
May 14 — Knox, here. 
May 15— Beloit, here, 
lyiajr 21— Knox, there. 
May 22— Monmouth, there. 
May 28— Northwestern ,Co"llege 

there. 
May 29— Beloit, there. 
June 5 — St. Viator, there. 
June 7 — Wheaton, here. 



She: Poor boy, Pm so sorry 
you didn't pass your examina- 
tions. What was the reason, I 
wonder? 

He: (Also wondering) I can't 
think. 



ALL STATE HIGH SCHOOL 

HASKKT-IJALL TEAi^f 



At the close of the Illinois 
State Basket-Bali Tournament 
the coaches of the teams play- 
ing selected the following men 
on their All-Stor teams. 

First Team: 
Campbell, Canton — forward. 
M. Russell, Mt. Vernon— for- 
ward. 
St ill well, Olney — center. , 
Berry, Canton — guard. 
Wilson, Centralia — guard. 

Second Team 
Baker, Rock.ford — forward. 
Craig, Galesburg — forward. 
Valentine, Marion — center. 
Biggs, Marion — guard. 
Simon, Canton — guard. 



A Oooid Provider 

Judge: And is your husband a 
good provider? 

Mirandy: He shuah am a good 
providah. But all de time all's 
skeered he'll be caught at it. 



Sir, did you see a ring lying 
about here? 

Er — a finger ring. Madam? 

Of course! What do you think 
it was — a nose-ring? 



Do you believe those myster- 
ious wireless messages were 
from Mars? No, from Venus. 
This is leap year, you know. 



Mrs. S.: Pres. Wilson says, 
"There are blessed intervals 
when I forget I am President of 
the U. S." 

Mr. S.: I wish we people might 
have "blessed intervals" when 
we could forget it too." 



Young Son: "Mother, I wish 
you'd gimme a dime, so I could 
pay you that nickel I owe you." 



SOPHOMORE TRACK TEAM 
WINS INTERCLASS MEET 



:\L\inTN MAYEAU STARS 



Many Athletes Turn <Mit For 

First Indoor Track and 

Field Meet of 

Year 



By winning six out of ten ev- 
ents the Sophomores easily won 
the Interclass Track and Field 
Meet held last Saturday in the 
Gym. 

Martin Mayeau was the indiv-" 
idual star of the meet, winning 
one first place, two seconds and 
two thirds. J. Jowett was sec- 
ond with ten points scored in 
the shot put and standing board 
jump. 

All athletes who scored six 
points or won a first place will 
be awarded with class numerals. 

880 yd. Run — won by A. Hale; 
J. Dougherty, second; Matthews, 
third. 

20 yd. Dash — won by D. Bar- 
rick; Mayeau, second; Alano, 
third. 

440 yd. Dash — won by M. Bed- 
does; Scheurs, second; Leonard, 
third. 

20 yd. L. Hurdles — won by 
Mayeau; Schreurs, second; Hale, 
third. 

Mile Run — won by Hause; 
Dougherty, second; Abernathy, 
third. 

20 yd. H. Hurdles — won by 
Schreurs; Barrick, second; Mor- 
ley, third. 

Shot Put — won by Jowett; 
Morley, second; Mayeau, third. 

High Jump — won by Morley; 
Mathews, second; Mayeau, third. 

Standing Broad Jump — won 
by Jowett; Mayeau, second; T. 
Hale, third. 

Relay — won by Sophomores; 
Beard, Barrick, Dougherty, Hale 

Starter — Derby. 

Timer — Allee. 



THE STENTOR 



ALII3INI NOTES 



1900— 

Jonathan Jackson's home ad- 
dress is 7 Lawn Ridge, East Or- 
ange, New Jersey, where he 
finds on his return from his of- 
fice at 56 Broad St. New York, 
Mrs. (Helen Creelman, Ferry- 
Hall 1900) Jackson, John Jona- 
than, Jr., born February, 1918 
and Mary Jane, born May, 1919. 

Mrs. W. B. (Ethel McClena- 
han) Hoagland's address is 105 
Sixth St., East Hutchinson, Kan- 
sas. Mr. Hoagland is a clothing 
merchant there. 
1902— 

Andrew B. Caswell is now As- 
sistant Secretary of the North- 
ern Trust Co., Chicago. He was 
married in October, 1916 to Miss 
Katherine Maddison, and has 
one son two years old. His 
home is at 548 Aldine Ave. 

Miss Lola A. Shepard has been 
since 1918, after a year at the 
Illinois State University Library 
School, an assistant cataloger at 
the Iowa State University Li- 
brary, Iowa City. Her perma- 
nent address remains 1134 Elm- 
wood Ave., Wilmette. 
1904— 

Miss Jeannette Gait's address 
is Elkton, Maryland, R. F. D. 4, 
where she is staying at home. 

Mrs. D. G. (Alice Graves) Kid- 
der's home is now at 1511 S. 
Western Ave., Long Beach, Cal- 
ifornia. 

Albert E. Hennings resigned 
from his assistant professorship 
in Chicago University, which he 
held in 1918-19, to accept the as- 
sociate professorship of Physics 
in the University of British Col- 
umbia, Vancouver, B. C, where 
he now is. He received the de- 
gree of Ph. D. from Chicago in 
1916. 

0. S. Thompson is very agree- 
ably located as principal of the 
Union High School at Compton, 
California, with a good salary 
and "automobile up-keep." 

Since 1914 Leonard B. Trow- 
bridge has been the field repre- 



1 sentative of the Chicago Tract 
I Society, 440 S. Dearborn, trav- 
! elling annually over most of 
' eight states and to more than 
; 200 towns, giving addresses in 
' churches and elsewhere concern- 
i ing the religious needs of aliens 
j in this country. He has four 
I children between 3 and 10. 



Wife: "And why do you object 
to my studying French and 
Spanish?" 

Husband: "Why? Because I 
think one tongue is enough for 
any woman." 



Suits Called for 
and Delivered 



J. B. Veselsky 

LADIES' AND MEN'S TAILOB 

CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Anderson BuiMUig. Photie8S6 

LAKE FOKMSr, ICL. 

TIPTON'S CAFE 

We Specialize in Home-Made 

Pies and Cakes 
STRICTLY HOME COOKING 

509 Central Ave. Highland Park 

PEARL THEATRE 

South First St. 
HIGHLAND PARK, ILL. 

Where the best of pictures are shown 
Shows: 7:00—10:35 p. m. 
Matinee Saturday, 2:30 p. m. 
Phones: 341, 342, 343. 



C. T. GUNN CO. 
'T'T^Mr^T TTO GROCERS 

A. VV. 2ENG1-/ER I The place to get good things to eat 

Agency Huyler's Candies, 

Curtice Bros. Goods. ILAKE F0RE5ST 



( leiiniiKj. Frtssiiifi. Hepairini/ 



Spring 
Woolens 
are here 



Tweeds, Worsteds, Flannels, 
Homespuns, Silks, Linens and 
White Flannels. 

That exactly right pattern 
you have in your mind we 
have in our store. 




Tailor for Young Men 

THREE STORES 

7,N. LaSaile St. 71 E. Monroe St. 

314 S Michigan Ave. 



I giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiHiioiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii 




i «l 



I Premium 



j Hams and Bacon 

I are mild, 

I sweet, tender. 

I Each piece is care- 

I fully selected and 

I cured to give it the 

I distinctive "Premium" 

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I Ask for "Premium" Products 

I Swift & Company 

I U. S. A. 

i 

iflllllHIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIUINIIIHIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIHIIillllllllllllliMIWilH^ 



THE STENTOR 



"Say dad, remember that story 
you told me about when you 
were expelled from college?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, I was just thinking Bur 
nap was right when he said 'his- 
tory repeats itself.' 

"What is a faculty?" 

"A faculty is a body of men 
surrounded by red tape." 



"Can't I take your order for 
an encyclopedia?" asked the dap- 
per agent. "No, I guess not" 
said the busy man, "I might be 
able to use it a few times, but 
my son will be home from col- 
lege in June." 



THe Best Place 
to EAT ii\ 

WAUKEGAN 



SIDNEY BURRIDGE 

21 Market Square 

CIGARS— CIGARETTES 
BILLIARDS 



Keith: "1st it possible to con- 
fide a secret to you?" 

Robby: "Certainly. I will be 
as silent as the grave." 

Keith: "Well then, I have a 
pressing need for ten bucks.'' 

Robby: "Do not worry, it is 
as if I had heard nothing." 



Telephone 14 

For Good Taxi Service C»JI 

WILLIAM BURGESS 

Garage and Auto Livery 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

Autoonobile Supplies Uuiixage TrHnsferr»4 

Seven Passenger Cars to Rent by Trip or Hour 



No Jul) Too Smai: 



None Too Larg 



Burnap, seeing Buckingham, 
who was carrying a lot of Sten- 
tors under his arm said: "Don't 
all those papers make you tired 
my boy?" 

"No Sir, said Buck, I don't 
read them," And the drinks 
were on the College Mentor. 



There are two ways of rising 
in the world: either by one's own 
industry or profiting by the fool- 
ishness of others. 



• FOR SALE • 

• • 

• Special 3A Folding Eastman • 
2 Kodak with carrying case. J 

• Price $25.00. See Mr. Tucker, • 

• at Book Store or Telephone • 
! 580-J. I 



Dr. Theo. S. Proxmire 
Office and Residence 

3 1 2 Deerpath Ave. Phone 66 

LAKE FOREST'S Only "Exclusive Dry 
Goods Store. " Market Square 

MEYER'S 

Dry Goods 

A Shop for Womens and Childrens 

Furnishings 
Offer the Services of a Competent Staff \ 
whose aid in selecting and ^vhose sug- 
gestions may be followed confidently. ' 



BLOUSES, SEPARATE 
SKIRTS, NEGLIGEES, 
SWEATER COATS, LIN 
GERIE, CORSETS, PETTI 
COATS, UNDERWEAR, 
HOSIERY, BATH ROBES, 
NECKWEAR, GLOVES 
and Many Other Lines of 
Merchandise. 



A. J. ITRICH 

Plumbing and Heating 
LAKE FOREST, ILL. 

Phones: Office 398 Residence 866 



John Griffith & Sons 

REAL ESTATE RENTING 

All Branches Insurance Written 

Phones: Office 160 Residence 226 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



Fraternity Jewelry and Novelties 

Stationery, Invitations, Danes Programs 

"BROCHON" 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

5 So. Wabash Ave. 
CHICAGO 



PHONE 881- 



Spalding Sweaters 




A STYLE IN THE 

TRUE ATHLETIC 
BUILD FOR EVERY 
OUTDOOR PUR- 
POSE 

Send for 
Catalogue 



G. SPALDING & BROS. 



LITERARY ASSISTANCE 

Scholarly service extended to 
speakers, debaters, fraternity 
men, writers. We have helped 
thousands on their special sub- 
jects and themes. Our research 
service rendered at moderate 
charge quite promptly. Write 
us your specific requirements, 
and obtain our estimate, with 
list of endorsements from our 
patrons. Authors' Research Bu- 
reau; 500 Fifth Ave., New York. 



FRANK J. WENBAN 

PHARMACIST 
Deerpath Ave. Lake Forest, 111. j 

Sodas— Cigars- -Candies I 

The Lake Forest Trust & Savings Bank j 

SOLIt^TS YOUR BUSINESS 
CONVENIENTLY I ORATED. 
SPLENDIDLY' Et^UIPI'ED. | 

Defrpath and Westt-ru Ave. i 

LAKE FOREST. ILLINOIS 



James Mitchell 

THE JEWELER 

Silverware and College 
Jewelry 

Osiear Pierson 

Furniture Repairing 



Picture Framing 



I.AKF. K«»RKST, 



II.I>, 



KASMUSSEN BROS. BOOT SHOP 

COLLEGE HEAQUARTERS FOR 
SHOES of STLYE and QUALITY 

PHONE612 MARKETSQUARE 



THE STENTOR 



CLARENCE 



Clarence is a queer duck. He 
is just out of the Army, where, 
though he was never out of the 
States, he was wounded — in tar- 
get practice. The only thing 
military about him is his uni- 
form. He has fully as much of 
the military bearing and pre- 
cision as a fat woman in a kimo- 
no. 

He happens into the office of 
Mr. Wheeler, the conventional 
millionaire business man. Here 
he is unwittingly introduced to 
all the troubles of the Wheeler 
family, to-wit: Bobby, the son 
in his first pair of long trous- 
ers, struggling to be a man with 
his father's spats and cane and 
with awkwardly handled cigar- 
ettes and dice. He has been 
fired from three schools and is 
haunted by a breach of promise 
suit occasioned by inadvertently 
kissing one of the housemaids. 
He is also inspired with a spir- 
itual passion for Violet Pinney, 
the beautiful governess of his 
pre-debutante sister, Cora. Cora 
is infatuated . with a certain 
grass-widower. The many con- 
ferences between the father and 
the governess over Cora's con- 
duct have made Mrs. Wheeler 
extremely jealous. All these 
forces clash in the office on this 
particular morning, leaving the 
three females in tears, Mr. 
Wheeler raving, and Bobby wild- 
ly excited. When Mr. Wheeler 
learns that Clarence's peculiar 
accomlishment in the Army was 
to drive mules without swear- 
ing, he takes him to his bosom 
and to the palatial home in 
Englewood, N. J., which is to 
New York as Lake Forest is to 
Chicago. 

Three weeks later finds Clar- 
ence the sole confidant of each 
member of the family, beloved 
by all the womenfolk; and the 
emergency repairman alike, of 
broken plumbing and of strain- 



ed relations. Inevitably he falls 
in love with the governess and 
inevitably he is repulsed — at 
first. Then, suddenly, all real- 
ize that they have taken him 
for granted for three weeks with 
out so much as knowing even 
his last name. His statement 
to one of the maids that he for- 
merly was employed in a lab- 
oratory is misconstrued by her 
and it is communicated to the 
others that he has worked in a 
hotel wash-room. He finally ad- 
mits that he is the greatest liv- 
ing authority on Cleopatra and 
drops into the parlance of Dr. 
Allee: "He's the biggest man in 
the country on potatoe bugs. 
He's been fifteen years on pota- 
to bugs." A vacancy having 
arisen in the Cleopatra field, 
the lack of which first drove 
Clarence to job-hunting, he and 
Miss Pinney are enabled to 
make plans for the future. 
Here there is a point worthy of 
notice. He kisses her not once. 
When "Clarence" is relegated 
from the professional stage to 
amateur performances, no Dean 
of Women will object to its 
performance by her wards'. 

You'll like "Clarence." It- has 
just passed its hundredth per- 
formance at the Blackstone. 
The parts of Bobby and Cora 
are taken by Gregory Kelly and 
Ruth Gordon, who starred in 
"Seventeen " and Miss Pinney is 
Elsie Mackay, who was acclaim- 
ed the prettiest girl in Chicago 
when she played in Henry VIII 
three years ago. The play is 
clever and there are lots of 
laughs though sometimes the 
wit is rather obvious. Better 
see it — if you haven't. 



THEM'S MY SENTIMENTS 
Life's Platform 



Immediate and complete elim- 
ination of the government print- 
ing office, including the Con- 
gressional Record of bunk and 
bull. 

Immediate and complete elim- 
ination from public life of Jose- 



phus Daniels, Senator Lodge, 
Secretary Baker, Senator John- 
son and Albert Sidney Burleson. 

Incarceration for the rest of 
his natural life in a grape-juice 
factory of William Jay Bryan. 

Ban on investigating commit- 
tees for a period of at least one 
year, reduction of taxes being 
made possible through the sav- 
ing of hundreds of millions of 
dollars. 

Shooting at sunrise of all 
long-haired, wild-eyed govern- 
ment experts who (at the pub- 
lic expense) have been trailing 
all over the country telling us 
how to eat, sleep, breathe, do 
business, bring up our families, 
make love and die. 

Instant death for any politi- 
cian or statesman who rampages 
from coast to coast spilling al- 
leged oratory at every city, ham- 
let and crossroad enroute. 

Immediate anti-anti legisla- 
tion providing for the fine and 
imprisonment of anyone who 
shall seek to regulate the lives 
and morals of Americans, thru 
legislation providing fines and 
imprisonment for people who 
live their lives differently from 
the way the anti's think they 
should. 

Deportation of all profiteers, 
including already over-paid 
workers who strike for still 
higher wages, nit-wit govern- 
ment employees who aren't 
worth half what they get, and 
those individuals who make up 
the price of goods simply be- 
cause they know they can get 
it. 

Immediate reduction of in- 
come tax. 

Immediate reduction of ex- 
cess-profits tax. 

Immediate reduction of amuse 
ment tax. 

Immediate reduction of lux- 
uries tax. 

Less government, less legisla- 
tion, less talk, less playing of 
the political game, and more en- 
thusiasm for work and consider- 
ation of the American people as 
a whole. 



THE STENTOR 



Smugglers' Tricks 

The extent to which smug- 
glers of former days in England 
would go to accomplish their 
ends is indicated by the extra- 
ordinary contrivances to which 
they resorted in order to secrete 
their cargo and escape the rev- 
enue cutters. They form an in- 
teresting chapter in human in- 
genuity. Sometimes, says Mr. 
G. F. Mowbray in the Windsor 
Magazine, the masts and spars 
were made of painted tin and 
contained fine old cognac brandy. 
Hollowed-out hams were filled 
with tobacco and closed up 
again. Dummy ropes were made 
of tobacco washed with rum to 
give them a hempen appearance. 
Rafts of dozens of ankers of 
spirits were brought over and 
sunk, with a cork or a feather 
to mark their whereabouts, so 
that they could be landed as oc- 
casion served. The very floor 
planks were hollowed out to re- 
ceive lace, and smugglers car- 
ried pads of tea hidden in their 
clothing. TViere were false bulk 
heads, false keels and false bows. 
The Plough of Hastings had a 
false bow in which some fifty 
kegs could be hidden, and sim- 
ilar craft hailed from Rye and 
Bexhill. 

The following item appeared 
in a newspaper of the year 1817: 

"A curious seizure was made 
on Friday the 12th, at Stone- 
house, soon after the arrival of 
a vessel from Guernsey. A por- 
ter, carrying a bedstead from a 
shore boat, was met on the beach 
by a customhouse officer, who, 
having asked the porter to 
whom it belonged, and having 
received rather an unsatisfac- 
tory reply, thought it right to 
examine the bedstead. On do- 
ing so, he found that the posts 
were hollowed out and contain- 
ed several hundred pounds' 
worth of lilac igeniously con- 
cealed under slides." 



Photo Supplies, Developing 
Stationery and Candy 

nt 

FrencK's Drti^ Store 

M. H. Hussey & Co. 

COAL WOOD 
COKE LUMBER 
FEED AND 

Building Material 

L. H. W. SPEIDEL 
Gents' Furnishings 

Suits Made to Order 

Cleaning, Repairing, Pressing 

Tel. 644 NOTARY PUBLIC 

Lake Forest 
LAUNDRY 

F, J HELD, Prop. 

Phone 175 

WHY? 

Ask' Any Good Dresser in 
LAKE FORKST 




UNITED 
I CIGAR STORES 

OF AMERICA 

T. L. Eastwood' 

AIJENT 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Come up to WAUKEGAN and DINE at 

George's Cafe 

It is Dainty, Home-like and as Attractive 
as any Big City Restaurant. 

Try my Sunday Evening 
Dinner 

Leslie W. George 



ANDERSON BROS. 
Dry Good, Groceries and 
G e ne ra 1 Merchandise 



Telephones: 
LAKE FOREST. 



37, 38, 39, 51 
- ILLINOIS 



K ODA K 

I 

I KODAKS AND 
I SUPPLIES 

; KRAFFTS DRUG STORE 



THE TRADE-MARK 

Is on the bread, 
look' for the word 

F e: D e: ra i_ 

It's the sign of the best bread made 

The Federal System of Bakeries 

22 DEERPATH, V\AEST 



U/ie 
CALVERT FLORAL CO. 

O. TRIEBWASSER, Prop. 
Phone 17 LAKE FOREST, ILL. 



If it's B;ikert :it HUNTOON'S If* Hftked Risht 

W^. G. HUNTOON 

Headquarters for High Class 

Bakerv Goods and Ice Cream 

Phone 306 LAKE FOREST. ILL. 



Telephone 582 



Telephone 584 



"It is much easier to be crit- 
ical than correct. (Disraeli.) 



RAPP BROS. 

MARKET 

FRESH SALT AND SMOKED MEATS 

Poultry and Eggs All Kinds Fish 

GAME IN SEASON 



THOMAS H. HORAN 

Manager 

Modern Laundry Company 

Chicago-Lake Forest Commutation 

Tickets 

32 OEERPATII. ^VBSX 



THE STENTOR 



I 

I 
I 

I 

V 

t 

V 

t 

V 

I 

1 

I 



,«. ,*, .*. -♦. .*. ,*. ,\ ,*. ,*, ,*, ^t .*--*W -*, A a*—^ »V*'*iM*a«*« »*>*'*'im'****« 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Lake Forest, Illinois. 

THE college year 1919-1920 opens with a larger enrollment than ever before. Some 
of the features of the new year are (1) a new Professor of Eoonomics, severa 
of whose courses will give the fundamentals of business training, (2) full reor- 
ganization of athletics, with competent directors for both nieri and women, (3) 
positive interest and co-operation of the alumni in the welfare of the students and the 
college, (4) special interest in the Glee Club and the Garriok (dramatic) Olub. 

The situation of Lake Forest is convenient to Chicago and the environment, 
beautiful. The student body comes from an unusually wide territory. All students 
are fully provided with both room and board on the campus at moderate rates. Ex- 
pense, $325 to $400 for men; |350 to |150 for women. Both men and women have an 
active share, through student council, in maintaining the morale of the college life. 
Under the same government as the college, but with separate plants and faculties, ai* 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY— a preparatory school for boys; opened in 1868. 
FERRY HALL— a preparatory school for girls. 
THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC— offering superior advantages. 

For information about any department, address 

PRESIDENT'S OKhlCE 
LAKE FOREST COLLEGE, Lake Forest, Illinois 






Deluxe Theatre 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 

MEANS GOOD SHOWS 
EVERY EVENING 



DE. C. W. YOUNG DR. R.' 0. SMITH 

Dentists 
200 Westminister East Telephone 110 

Office Hours: 

9:00 a. m. to 12;00 m. 1:00 p. m. to 5 p. m 

LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
STATE BANK of LAKE FOREST 

"MARKET SQUARE" 
Combined Capital and Surplus $140,000.00 



USE g 



ownaN' 



SAFE MILK 



Perfectly pasteurized milk, bottled 
in the country. Safeguarded from 
Cow to Consumer. : : : 



BOWMAN DAIRY COMPANY 

Telephones: Glencoe 70 Highland Park 9 571-579 Vine Ave. 



Lake Forest Conlertioneni 

Home-Made 

Candies and Ice Cream 

CALL, AT 

O'Neill's Hardware Store 

WHBiJ IN NEED OP 

NEW RECORDS 

FOR YOUR VICTROLA 



Clofliing and 

1^11 Pllt sill II gs 

Cleaning and Tailoring a Specialty 

Jensen & Sundmark 
SHOES 

UH OO REPAIRING 

Phone 709, Western Ave., Lake Forest 



/ 



The Stentor 

OF LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



VOLUME XXXIV 



LAKH POKKST. ILI,I\'OIS, APRIL 10 192U 



NUMBRii 22 



iMISS (iOCKER, AFRICAN 

MISSIONARY, VISITS HERE 



Thursday evening the girls of 
Lois Durand Hall had the op- 
portunity of hearing Miss Marie 
Gocker tell something of the 
need for Christian workers in 
Africa. She was fresh from the 
field having returned in 1919 af- 
ter five year's work in Cam- 
eroun Africa. We girls of Am- 
erica can have no conception of 
the hardships which girls of oth- 
er lands have to endure, nor of 
the discomforts Christian mis- 
sionaries undergo n order to 
help them. Miss Cocker's talk 
made us not only feel more 
grateful for the blessings which 
God has heaped upon us, but 
made us feel ashamed of the lit- 
tle we do to share our joys and 
blessings with others. She 
made us want to help spread 
the happiness which Christian- 
ity alone can bring. 

Miss Gocker was born in Al- 
sace, and came to America for 
her education, because she felt 
that to her at least Ameria was 
the land of promise and of op- 
portunity. She made good use 
of the opportunities of the Unit- 
ed States offered, as it made evi- 
dent by her degrees; Master of 
Philosophy, Doctor of Theology, 
and Doctor of Medicine. A mis- 
sionary to Africa as well as to 
any other land needs indeed all 
three. She was sent over in 
1914 by the Board of the North- 
west, and spent five years in 
Cameroun. She was specifically 
intrusted with teaching the na- 
tive French and it was during 
her stay there that the province 
was changed from German to 
French hands. 

Miss Gocker had a school for 
girls and one for boys. She 



F(>RESTER NOW OFF 

TO THE PRINTERS 



This week-end sees the copy 
for the 1921 issue of the For- 
ester off to the printers, and the 
Forester Board relieved of a 
rather gruesome and thankless 
task. In the course of the next 
month the college annual will 
be completed and held in readi- 
ness for distribution to the stu- 
dent body. Doubtless there will 
be considerable comment, pro 
and con, over the various char- 
acteristics of the book — and any 
number of criticisms on the de- 
fects of it. Nevertheless much 
credit is due the members of 
the board as well as those con- 
tributors who helped make it a 
possibility, and they are hoping 
that the student body and fac- 
ulty will not be overcritical of 
their best efforts. In view of 
the fact that there has not been 
an annual here for three years, 
as well as the fact that any 
number of other difficulties 
arose in the attempt to get out 
an annual this year; let us give 
credit where credit is due — and 
above all, extend our thanks to 
the Junior class for their initia- 
tive and splendid school spirit 
in this matter. 



brought with her some composi- 
tions written in French by sav- 
ages, which show the possi- 
bilities that lie latent in them 
awaiting proper developement, 
which a Christian education can 
give. 

We cannot all give of our- 
selves, our lives, our very soul, 
as Miss Gocker has done, but we 
can all give our prayers and our 
thoughts for her and others in 
that work. 

The fololwing is an extract 
(Continued on page ten) 



STORY TELLERS AND 

FOLK DANCERS WANTED 



The regular Y. W. C. A. meet- 
ing was held Thursday evening. 
Mrs. Pfanstiehl of Highland 
Park, a former president of the 
Y. W. C. A. of the University of 
Chicago, opened the devotional 
service by reading the thir- 
teenth chapter of Corinthians, 
and telling us of the need for 
Christian service, all of which 
must be backed by charity, and 
love in its noblest form. Miss 
Swinbell then told us about the 
needs of Highwood our neigh- 
bor, and the great opportunity 
for a real service right there. 
Before Uncle Sam cleaned up 
Highwood to make it safe for 
his men, who frequented the 
place on leave from Fort Sheri- 
dan, it was absolutely hopeless, 
and beyond the possible reach 
oT social service workers. In 
those olden times scarcely a 
week passed without some crime 
to further darken its name. We 
college people little thought 
that Highwood was unlike the 
other north shore towns so not- 
ed for beauty in every way. 
Miss Swindell received several 
willing offers for help with her 
girls, and Lake Forest College 
may from now on be counted 
upon for a weekly delegation of 
workers to Highwood. Anyone 
who can help with folk dancing 
story telling, or by .I'ust going 
to be "friends" with the young 
women of the Patriotic League 
of highwood, please inform Hel- 
en Sanders, the social service 
chairman of the Y. W. C. A. who 
in turn will arrange with Miss 
Swinball, the Highwood secre- 
tary. 



Miss Coan spent her vacation 
in Winnetka and Highland Park. 



THE STENTOR 



DISCISSION CLIB 



At their last meeting the 
members of the Discussion Club 
adopted a new constitution. 
They are starting the work of 
the spring term with renewed 
zeal and interest. Tuesday ev- 
ening Elaine Kellogg lead the 
basis of socialistic beliefs and 
■at the next meeting the Bolshe- 
vism or the socialistic problem 
will be taken up. Due to the 
fact that Lois Hallers now have 
an extension of evening permis- 
sion to eight o'clock the meet- 
ing hour has been set for Tues- 
day evening of every other week 
from five to six o'clock. This 
isn't much time to give — thmk 
of it only two hours per month 
to current events. Surely every 
girl in Lois Hall can do that. 
She owes it to herself and to her 
college. Come on girls! We are 
expecting every one of you 
down in the Big Room for tlie 
next meeting of the Discussion 
Club. 



THE BIBLE CLASS 



OUTDOOR SPORTS FOR OIRLS 



With the coming of Spring, 
the girls of- the campus will be- 
gin outdoor sports. Tennis 
seems to be the favorite when 
almost every girl has signed up 
for it. A number of the girls 
are going to continue their 
swimming at Ferry Hall while 
only two or three signed for 
baseball. Some of the students 
were very much disappointed to 
find that so few desired baseball 
because they were very desirous 
of having a girl's baseball team. 
Few seem to realize how much 
fun there is to this popular Am- 
erican game. 

It will not be long now before 
the tennis courts will be dotted 
with bright colored sweaters I 
worn by girls playing in the 
open air. We certainly are glad 
to give up work in the gym for 
there is indeed much more en- 
joyment to be gained from out- 
door sports. 



The Class is meeting every 
Monday evening at 7:30 in Mr. 
Roberts' home, 15 Sheridan 
Road. The meetings have be- 
come increasingly interesting, 
and as a natural sequence, the 
attendance has doubled. 

The fundamentals of religion 
and the Christian religion m 
particular are generally the dis- 
cussion topics. At present the 
class is considering the Bible. 
We have a broad minded teach- 
er with a very practical, modern 
and uplifting philosophy. Those 
who are attending the class find 
it hard to stay away. 
o 

Once more we wish to pass a 
gentle hint to the gentlemen on 
the campus who have not as yet 
paid their Stentor bills. Two 
dollars isn't very much, but the 
longer you put it off the harder 
it is going to be for you to pay 
that bill. Spring is here or al- 
most here and there will be so 
many places for your money to 
fly to. Please think of this and 
remember that it is your duty 
to pay this litle debt of honor. 
Please don't forget! 



Considerable interest is show- 
ing itself among the men over 
the choice of candidates for 
president in both parties, es- 
pecially among the young Re- 
publicans on the campus; who 
feel a keen interest in the re- 
sults which will come from the 
National Convention in Chicago 
next June. A number have ex- 
pressed their desire to attend 
the convention and see the 
workings of the powers that be 
in the Republican party, and at 
least two of our students have 
applied for positions in the very 
machinery of the convention. 
All this signifies that the men 
of the college are not all dead- 
ends are they all benumbed to 
the live issues of the day! 



Hard Luck 

Ain't no us/e, as I can see, 
In sittin' underneath a tree 
An' growlin' that your luck is 

bad, 
An' that your life is extra sad; 
Your life ain't sadder than your 

neighbor's 
Nor any harder are your labors; 
It rains on him the same as you, 
An' he has work he hates to do; 
An' he gets tired an' he gits 

cross. 
An' he has trouble with the boss; 
You take his whole life through 

and through, 
Why he's no better off than you. 

If whinin' brushed the clouds 

away, 
I wouldn't have a word to say; 
If it made good friends out o' 

foes, 
I'd whine a bit, too, I suppose; 
But when I look around an' see 
A lot o' men resemblin' me. 
An', see 'em sad, an' see 'em gay. 
With work t' do 'most every day, 
Some full o' fun, some bent with 

care. 
Some havin' troubles hard to 

bear, 
I reckon, as I count my woes, 
They're 'bout what everybody 

knows. 

The day I find a man who'll say' 
He's never known a rainy day 
Who'll raise his hat right up an' 

swear 
In forty years he's had no care. 
Has never had a single blow, 
An' never known one touch o' 

woe, 
Has never wept or heaved a 

sigh. 
Has never had a plan go wrong, 
But alius laughed his way along; 
Then I'll sit down and start to 

whine. 

That all the hard luck here is 
mine. 

Edgar A. Guest. 
o 

PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 



THE STENTOR 



Burlesque Ou Witches, Scene 
From McBeth 

Act LXI 



Scene i — A deep cavern that 
has been most luxuriously fitted 
out as a kitchen. In the middle 
a cauldron that would be boil- 
ing if there were any fire under 
it. Clatter of tinware and noise 
of broken glass. Enter three 
cooks on roller skates, velocipede 
and hobby horse. 

First Cook (mournfully): 
"Thrice the wood pussy hath 
mewed." 

Second Cook (with glee): 
"Thrice and once the squirrel 
screamed." 

Third Cook (silently): "Old chef 
cries, 'tis time, 'tis time." 

First Cook: 
"Round about the cauldron 
In the old potatoes throw. 
Meat that in refrigerator, 
After cat had often ate 'er; 
Ornelly gravy, somehow got. 
Boil trou first i' the great stew 

pot." 

All (aesthetically): 
"Thig-a-ma-jig, and old what 

not; 
Throw 'em all in the great stew 

pot." 

Second Cook: 
"Fish from out Community Lake 
In the cauldron boil and bake; 
Eye of spud that's hard as rocks. 
Lots of salt, and tongue of ox. 
Spinach greens and carrot top. 
Turnip's end and beet of cop 
For a hash a powerful trouble. 
Like a Hell broth boil to bub- 
ble." 

All (mockingly). 

* * * 

Third Cook: 
"Piece of onion, apple peel, 
Orange rind, and slippery eel 
That through the sea did slily 

steal; 
Flavor that was never real; 
Garlic of ditch digging wop. 
Straw of broom and stringy mop 
That had cleaned the kitchen 

floor 
From the cupboard to the door. 
Take the physics from the lab, 
Make the gruel thick and slab, 



PERSONALS 
Helen Barnthouse has not re- 
turned on account of the illness 
of her mother. 



Elizabeth Torreyson spent her 
spring vacation at the home of 
Margaret Griffith. 



Margaret Mills has been de- 
tained at home because of ill- 
ness. 



Sara Fisher has not returned 
to the Hall as her mother is very 
ill. 



The Farwells, Irene and Zel- 
ma, spent the spring vacation at 
Lois Hall. 



Rebecca Armstrong spent the 
spring vacation in Oak Park. 



Miss Hamilton and Miss Hos- 
pes did not return promptly af- 
ter the spring vacation but we 
expect them soon. 



OFFENHISER-WISE 



Paul Bergen is just recovering 
from an operation on his jaw 
which was caused by a severe 
kick during a football game 
while he was still attending the 
Academy. He has just left the 
AugTistana Hospital in Chicago 
for his home in Joliet and sends 
word that he didn't "want to 
get well" as the nurses are pret- 
ty nice looking there. 

Garnette Highbee wishes to 
announce that it isn't safe to 
sit near a window in the Chem- 
istry lecture room as one is 
liable to be tied up considerably 
without being asked. 



Into it some string beans toss 
For the ingredients of our 

sauce." 

All (passing out): 
"Thig-a-ma-jig. and old what 

not 
Throw 'em all in the great stew 

pot 
Cool it with some gravy brown 
And make it harder to go down.' 
Die, then all exeunt. 



The campus was -greeted with 
quite a pleasant surprise a few 
days ago upon learning of the 
marriage of Miss Editli C. Wise, 
of Freeport, 111., to Mr. Paul L. 
Off'enhiser of Oberlin, Ohio, 
which took place in Chicago on' 
Thursday, March 2.5, 1920. 

Both were former students of 
Lake Forest College, Miss Wise 
being a popular Freshman 
young lady in the class here last 
year and a member of the Theta 
Psi sorority, while Mr. Offenhis- 
er was a sophomore here last 
year and a prominent member 
of the Digamma fraternity. The 
marriage grew out of a betroth- 
al while both were in college 
here last year, but came quite 
unexpectedly and as a rather 
clever surprise to their many 
friends in Lake Forest College. 
Mr. Offenhiser completes his 
college course at Oberlin this 
year and will return to Free- 
port where Mr. and Mrs. Offen- 
hiser will be at home to their 
many friends. The sincere best 
wishes of all Lake Foresters go 
with them, t-ogether with the 
congratulations of the Theta 
Psi sorority and the Digamma 
fraternity. 

— 

Marsh and McColley were the 
star performers for Phi Pi. 
Leon McFerran, Lake Forest '18, 
played for the Evanston team 
against his fraternity brothers, 
and showed that in his old age, 
he hasn't lost any of his old- 
time' form and speed. 

The score: 

Phi Pi Epsilon— 36. 

Emerson Street — 33. 


Mothers .4rt 

It was in the drawing class 
at the studio. 

"Sargent was a great artist," 
said Miss Evans, "With one 
stroke he could change a smiling 
face into a sorrowful one." 

"That's nothing," piped up 
Mickey "My mother used to do 
that to me lots of times." 



THE STENTOR 



THE STENTOR 

Published weekly during the col- 
legiate year by the students of Lake 
Forest College. 

Raymond Moore, '20. 
Board of Editors: 
Leonard Holden, '20. 
Ralph Stewart, '20. 
Elaine Kellogg, '22. 
Beth Thayer, '22. 
Don Hause, '23, athletics. 

Business Management: 

Ruth Kennedy, '22. 

Reporters: 

Myron Thayer, '20. 
Glenn Herreke, '20, 
James Leonard, '21. 
Eugene Tucker, '21. 
Marion Preston, '21. 
W. G. McColley, '21. 
Henry Kunz, '22. 
Margaret Mills, '22. 
Ruth Bahlert '22. 



THAT UNFINISHED WORK 



There is an old saying, that 
we all know, which runs some- 
wihat to the effect that one 
should "never put off till to- 
morrow what he can do to-day." 
This saying, old as it may be 
holds yet and pertains in an es- 
pecial way to college life and col 
lege work. Few of us really 
cofljplete the work that we set 
out to do before launching heart 
and soul into some new adven- 
ture. How much better it 
would be for all concerned if we 
could only learn the little les- 
son which is so well pointed out 
in the od proverb. 

In college our work is our 
scholastic work and it is this 
that we put off from day to day. 
We pay for this negligence when 
we come to the finals and are 
forced to stay up all night in 
order to cram some knowledge 
into our poor feverish brains. 
While we are in college our 
work is almost play compared to 
the real work that we will have 
to face when we are forced to 
make our -way in the world. If 
we form the habit of letting our 
work slide while we are in col- 
lege, we will find it very hard 
to break that habit and it will 



be twice as hard for us to ac- 
custom ourselves to the new 
routine. Habits are easily form- 
ed and they are hard to break 
after they have become ingrain- 
ed in th« nervous system. 

Don't put off that work, or 
that play either for it is in its 
way just as necessary as is the' 
work, because you will suddenly 
find a huge mountain blocking 
your progress, and mountains 
are hard to move. Work tliat 
is done bit by bit is a pleasure 
and brings with it a certain sat- 
isfaction that can be gained in 
no other way. If you wish to 
know what this satisfaction is, 
try doirijg your work every day 
as it comes and not waiting to 
force all your effort toward it at 
one time. The result of unfin- 
ished work is a long string of 
begun tasks which, leave the 
character weak and the will un- 
trained for the work is to come. 
Do you wish to be ready for the 
world when you go out to meet 
it? 



A CAMPUS FROLIC 



Let's call off chapel and the 
two periods following, either 
Tuesday or Thursday of next 
week and all get together to 
gather up the stray bits of pa- 
per and other rubbish strewn 
about the campus. A rake run 
over the greensward to give the 
tender blades of grass more 
room for expansion would be 
quite beneficial at this time. 
One hundred and fifty men and 
women each doing their bit can 
wonderfully improve our even 
now beautiful campus. It's 
worth while — two more months 
of school — talk it up. 

Clean-Up day is an annual 
event in many colleges. Of 
course there are always a few 
fastidious and dainty who will 
not condescend to spend a few 
hours working, especially when 
there is no financial reward. 
However, that doesn't handcuff 
the ninety-nine per cent of will- 
ing workers. Action is the thing 



wanted. Throw away the ham- 
mer, grab a rake, and do your 
bit. 

The experience you will gain 
in pushing a broom and in pull- 
ing a rakfe* may come in handy 
in the near future. Of course, 
we all expect now that our ser- 
vants] 'wi|l take care of such 
menial tasks — distance lends en- 
chantment — who knows. It's all 
a parjt of a well rounded col- 
lege education — eventually. Why 
not now? 



Dear Bob: 

Yer know son, I was a drivin' 
by Mr. Lanes' gals school the 
other day and I happened to no- 
tice that purty elm tree that 
them gals planted last May day. 
It's just a startin' to bud now, 
and I couldn't help but think 
how that was a righ purty cus- 
tom to plant a tree every May 
day. You know, Bob, your old 
Paw is getting old and he's kind 
o' sentimental, yes, kind o' sen- 
timental about trees and flowers, 
and he was a wonderin' if in 
Lake Forest you boys and girls 
ever observed May day. Now 
Bob, don't you reckon it would 
be nice for your senior class to 
plant a tree this May day and 
next year the following senior 
class. Just think how nice it 
would be when you're old like 
me boy, to show your lad a big 
stately tree and tell him how 
you helped plant that when you 
were a college boy. Yet, I was 
a thinkin' that Lake Forest has 
many trees now. Perhaps you 
might start the custom of chain- 
ing a tree with a class plate, 
that is, your class might adopt 
a present tree and chain it with 
your class emblem. Sentimen- 
tal, that's me, boy. May day 
with sentiment. Start the slo- 
gan, "Plant a tree or chain one 
this May Day." 

Your Paw. 



BOOST 

THE 

FORESTER 



THE STENTOR 



AVouian — Lovely Woman — Oh, 
Why Dost Thou Use Rogue J 



With a certain per cent of the 
population of the United States, 
the vital thing today is not the 
League of Nations or the High 
Cost of Living, but it it the 
Use of Rogue — and for a cer- 
tain per cent of this said certain 
per cent of the population, the 
question is already settled. 

Women who a few years ago 
frowned at the mere mention of 
rouge, now consider it a neces- 
sity of life. Girls had a vague 
idea that it was something aw- 
ful — something to be read about 
only. But the majority of these 
have been converted through 
the rouge epidemic which has of 
late swept the country. 

Strong indeed is she who can 
resist the dainty bloom which a 
bit of rouge couUl put upon her 
pale cheek. But, alas, for the 
dainty bloom — ere long it de- 
velops into a mass of such rosy 
hue that Mother Nature herself 
must blush with shame. 

I think girls must use rouge 
for two reasons: It seems to add 
to their beauty and secondly; 
all the other girls use it. Most 
of us, no doubt will admit that 
it seems to improve a girl's 
looks — but why, oh why, must 
its use be so abused? If it were 
only used more sparingly, I am 
sure there would be many more 
rouge advocates. The girl who 
attracts the reluctant attention 
of all whom she meets by her 
lavish use of rouge, is in my 
eyes, the strongest appeal 
against its use, to the girl who 
has not yet reached a decision. 

The fact that rogue is used by 
all the other girls is to me a 
strong point against it. It has 
become so common of late, al- 
most every sort of girl uses it, 
that I venture to say it will 
very soon lose the charm for the 
better class of girls. There are 
girls whom everyone of us 
would resent being classed with 
— let us be careful lest we all 
be branded alike — as rough- 
users. 



I believe that rouge used cau- 
tiously and sparingly is quite 
proper, provided it is not so no- 
ticeable as to attract even the 
slightest attention. Does this 
seem absurd? I do not think 
so. 1 believe it is entirely pos- 
sible. But the minute one feels 
a desire to put on more than has 
been said above, I beg of you 
put the rogue away from you 
and be contented with the com- 
plexion which is your own. 

The girl who uses rouge will 
very soon find herself tempted 
in many ways by the things 
which go with rouge as the lip- 
stick, eye-brow pencil and other 
articles of vanity. Rouge is bad 
enough, girls, but these last 
are ten times worse. Leave 
them in the stores — they are 
not for i»s. 

Then to rogue or not to rouge 
— that iu the question. A ques- 
tion which every girl must de- 
cide for herself — let her own 
judgment guide her — The Vi- 
dette. 



Dr. Thomas: "Jones, dont you 
ever attend a place of worship?" 

Jones: "Yes sir, I'm on my 
way to see her now." 



I 



"Oh for the life of the care- 
free college boys!" In Tues- 
day's Herald — evidently a typo- 
graphical error. 



The students at Northwestern 
University this week kidnapped 
the President of the Freshman 
class. Kemper Hall evidently 
isn't the only place where the 
students become reckless. 


Somebody please explain: One 
of the music school girls thinks 
that the strong man act was 
one of the bestest ever, but she 
can't see yet why George was 
tied to such a horrid looking 
rope. She would have liked it 
much better if he had simply 
been suspended in mid-air in 
that sheet of music — "The High- 
er the Fewer." 



PETE'S COLYUM 



Smile Blank You Smile 

Oh! thou aching heart be still, 
Tis true he does not love you, 
Just a little pleasant be 
Tlien purchance who knows but 

he 
May learn; to love you. 

Your frowning face does all but 

please 
Those ruddy lips should upward 

turn, 
To win the love for which you 

yearn. 
Look up and smile you must but 

learn 
To win the love of he. 

Dan Cupid loves the smiling 

face, 
And laughing eyes so full of 

grace. 
So smile sweet maid, oh smile 

and then 
He'll love you as you now love 

him. 
For smiles his love may win. 

"Pete" 
■ 

ETening And Peace 



Oh! the peacefulness of the ev- 
ening time, 

The quietness of it all. 

As I sit on my little cottage 
steps 

And hear the doves sweet call. 

I gaze up in the heayens above. 
The stars look twinkling down, 
And the mellow moon his rays 

has thrown. 
O'er all the roofs in town. 

Peace, peace, heavenly peace. 
Breathes with this evening air 
The rays of the moon and the 

fragrance about. 
Drive away all care. 

And my head I lift in prayer. 
While the moonbeams round me 

play, 
Thanking the Lord on high, 
For this peace at the end of 

day. 

"Pete." 




THE STENTOR 










' ^ i 






'7|;;i^^Ei^H|«nw«>> 




A casting for one of the 
huge water-wheel driven 
generators installed in the 
Mississippi River Power 
Company's plant at Keo- 
kuk. This installation will 
ultimately consist of thirty 
of these machines, griving 
a total capacity of 216.000 
kilowatts (300,000 horse- 
power). It is the largest 
hydro-electric development 
in the world. The General 
Electric Company builds 
generator for water-wheel 
drive in sizes ranging from 
374 to 32,500 kilowatts and 
the aggregate capacity of 
G-E units now in successful 
operation is in excess of 
four million horse-power. 



u ^ m wi ^w^tiT 




Mississi)^5pi Hiver Sower 
Company, Keokuk, Iowa 



-3 t-9 






'■^»-j'^*^^'-^-:^fS-^^t.^-^ . 



<m^ 



Utilizing Nature's Power 

LECTRICAL energy generated by water 
power has grown to be one of our greatest 
natciral resources — and we have only begun to 
reaclT, its possibilities. It mines and refines our 
ores, Liirn3 the wheels of industry, drives our 
stteat cars and lights our cities and towns. The 
pov/er obtained from Nature saves many million 
tons of coal every year. 

At first the field of its utilizaaon was limited by the dis- 
tance electricity could be transported. But soon research 
and engineering skill pointed the way to larger and better 
electrical apparatus necessary for high-voltage trans- 
mission. Then ingenious devices were invented to insure 
protection a