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Full text of "The Lamoille Valley cook book"

THE 

LAMOILLE VALLEY 

COOK BOOK 

Published by the Ladies of the Congregational 
Church of Johnson, Vermont 



COPYRIGHT 1904, BY THE FIRST CONGRE- 
GATIONAL SOCIETY OF JOHNSON, VERMONT 



" We may live without poetry, music and art, 

We may live without conscience, and live with- 
out heart. 

We may live without friends, we may live 
without hooks, 

But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 



LIBRARY Of CONGRfSsj 


Two Copies 


Keceived 


DEC 23 


1904 


CopyntfiK tifitry 

cuss «^ XXc. NO! 

/ O 3 5^/ 2_ 

COPY B. 



^ 



i 



A /^^ 



CONTENTS 



SOUPS 1-8 

OYSTERS AND FISH 8-13 

MEATS 13—19 

WELSH RAREBIT, ETC 19-24 

SALADS 24—31 

SAUCES 31-35 

PUDDINGS 35—47 

PIES 47-56 

DESSERTS 56-63 

CAKE 63—85 

BREAD 85-97 

BREAKFAST AND TEA 97-104 

SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES 104-113 

FRIED CAKES AND 1PR:ITTERS 113—119 

CUSTARDS AND CREAMS 119-125 

EGGS 125-130 

PICKLES AND PRESERVES 130-138 

CANDIES , 138-144 

MISCELLANEOUS 144-150 



PRINTED BY 
NORTUKOP, PRINTCR, CASTLETON. 



SOUPS. 



*' Nou\soocl digestion wait on appetite and health 
on if>ot/2."— Shakespeare. 



The basis of all good soups is the broth of meat, 
This may be made by boiling the cracked joints of 
meat, veal or mutton, and is best when it is cooked 
the day before it is' to be eaten. 



BEEF SOUP. 

Select a good soup bone of 6 pounds ; cover with 
cold water; 1 tablespoonful salt. Skim till it boils 
clear. Let it boil slowly 3 hours. Slice 3 medium 
carrots, 3 parsnips, put in the soup and boil another 
hour. Flavor with parsley and leek. M. P, 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

1 bundle of asparagus 1 quart of milk 
3 even teaspoonfuls flour 1 tablespoonful butter 
Salt and pepper to taste 
Wash the asparagus and boil in salted water 30 
minutes. Cut off tops and put in a soup tureen. Put 
the milk on to heat. Press the asparagus through the 
colander. Rub butter and flour together, add the 
milk and stir continually until it thickens. Add the 
asparagus; take it at once from the fire. Add the 
salt and pepper and pour over the tops in the tureen. 
All cream soups must be served as soon as they are 
made or they will curdle. Mrs. S. T. Rorer. 



BEAN SOUP. 

One quart beans soaked over night, 1 piece fat 
pork the size of a Baldwin apple. Cut the pork into 
little cubes like dice. Put beans over early in the 
morning in cold water; bring to a boil and drain off 
water; repeat this twice. Then add pork and boil 
steadily for five hours. Season with pepper and salt. 
If ])referred pass through a colander just before 
serving, rubbing all the thick part through with a 
wooden spoon. Water should be added while boiling. 

E. G. French. 

CORN SOUP. 

Kernels shaved from 6 large ears of corn, 1 pint 
of raw potato cut fine, 2 quarts boiling w^ater. Boil 
20 minutes. Season with salt, pepper, butter and 
cream ; just before serving add 4 crackers, cut into 
small pieces. Mrs. J. R. Hill. 

VEGETABLE STEW. 

Boil a small piece of shank bone till the meat 
comes off. Cut fine. Add, an hour before serving, a 
small beet and turnip, a few little potatoes and an 
onion cut fine. Have plentj^ of w^ater in the soup; 
serve with crackers. Mrs. T. J. Baker. 

TOMATO BISQUE. 

1 quart tomatoes V2 teaspoonful soda 

1 tablespoonful corn starch Butter size of an Qgg 
3 pints milk Salt & pepper to taste 

Stew the tomatoes and strain them. Add the 
soda to remove the acid. Put the milk in double 
boiler and when scalding hot put in the corn starch, 
wet with a little cold milk. Let cook five minutes ; 
then add butter, salt and pepper. Put all together 
and let boil up. Serve very hot with bread cut in 
dice and browned in oven. V. H. Stearns. 



OYSTER SOUP. 

1 quart water 1 teacup butter 

1 pint milk 2 teaspoonfuls salt 

4" crackers rolled fine 1 teaspoonful pepper 

Bring to a l^oiling heat as soon as possible. Add 
1 quart oysters. Let the whole boil up. M. A. T. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To 1 pint of canned tomatoes (or 4 raw ones,) 
cut fine, add 1 quart of boiling water and let them 
boil. Add 1 teaspoonful soda, when it will foam. 
Immediateh" add 1 pint of sweet milk, salt and pepper, 
generous piece of butter., When it boils add small 
crackers and serve. Susan G. Deal. ' 

TOMATO SOUP, NO. 2. 

1 can tomatoes IVo pints water 

1 tablespoonful sugar 1 teaspoonful salt 

A dash of caj^enne 1 tablespoonful flour 

1 teaspoonful butter 
Let cook till it is well done. Mrs. Fairchild. 

MACARONI SOUP. 

A knuckle of veal Small piece of lamb 

Water to cover well 

When well cooked, season \vith salt, pepper and 
herbs, if you like, and a small onion. Have ready 1/4 
pound of macaroni v^diich has been boiled tender; 
strain your soup from the ineat ; add the macaroni ; 
let it boil and serve. Cooking School. 

CABBAGE SOUP. 

Chop some cabbage leaves fine, boil until tender, 
add 1 large cup milk, butter size of an egg, salt and 
pepper to taste. Serve -with oyster crackers. 

Proctor. 



TOMATO CREAM. 

One quart tomatoes, 1 small onion chopped fine; 
cook together and strain. One quart milk boiled 
alone, 1 pint sweet cream warmed alone; stir into 
the strained tomato 1 tablespoonful butter, 2 table- 
spoonfuls flour (rubbed to a cream) and cook until it 
thickens; add a piece of soda size of a large bean. 
Just before serving pour tomatoes into boiling milk, 
then stir in cream, season with pepper and salt. 
Butter can be substituted for cream. 

Mrs. Orange Buck. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

1 pint milk ' 1 tablespoonful flour 

1 head celery 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 large sliced onion 
Boil celery in pint water 30 minutes, boil onion 
and milk together, mix flour with littlecold milk, and 
add to boiling milk, cook till thickened. Mash celery 
in water in ^vhich it was cooked and stir into boiling 
milk, add butter, salt and pepper. Strain and serve. 

Mrs. W. D. Welch. 

POTATO AND CELERY SOUP. 

6 good sized potatoes 1 stalk celery 

1 quart milk 1 onion 

Tablespoonful butter 
Pare potatoes and boil 30 minutes, turn off water 
and mash light, boil onion and celery in milk, add to 
potato the boiling milk, with butter, pepper and salt 
Rub through a strainer and serve immediatelv. 

Mrs. W. D. Welch. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One cup tomatoes, 1 pint water, boil and strain, 
add salt and pepper and butter to taste, 2 crackers 
rolled fine, 1 large spoonful flour, ^A teaspoonful soda 
the last thing. Mrs. F. W. Holmes. 



TOMATO SOUP. 

1 quart tomatoes 1 quart water 
Butter size of an egg Salt and pepper 

1 teaspoonful soda 
Add immediately after, 1 quart of boiling milk 
and % cupful rolled ci'ackers. 

Mrs. N, a. Waterman. 

SWISS WHITE SOUP. 

Stock for 6 persons Beat up 3 eggs 

2 spoonfuls flour 1 cupful milk 

Pour this slowly through a seive into the boiling 
soup, add salt and pepper. Anonymous. 

DUMPLINGS. 

1 pint flour measured be- V2 teaspoonful soda 
fore sifting 1 teaspoonful cream 

Vz teaspoonful salt tartar 

1 teaspoonful sugar 1 cupful sweet milk 

Mix the dry ingredients together and put through 
the seive, add milk and mix quickly, roll 1/2 inch thick 
and boil 10 minutes. Mrs. Ware. 




OYSTERS AND FISH, 



" Master, I marvel how the fishes live in the seas.^^ 
" Why, as men do a-land, the great ones eat up the 
little ones.'^ 



FISH BALLS, 

1 cupful salt cod 1/^ tablespoonful butter 

1 pint potatoes 1 egg 

Vs teaspoonful pepper 
Pick the codfish into small pieces, pare potatoes 
and cut into smallish pieces; boil together in w^ater 
enough to cover till the potatoes are done. Drain 
well and nijish thoroughly. Add beaten egg, melted 
butter, pepper and a little salt, if needed. Shape into 
balls, roll in flour and fry in smoking hot fat till a 
nice brown. Drain on paper. C. S. 



To fry fish without breaking, use a large quantity 
of fat and have it smoking hot. Roll the fish in corn 
meal and fry brown, turn and fry the other side 
brown. The fish will be thoroughly done and will 
not crumble. Salt to taste. Mrs. B. Rogers. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Choose large oysters for frying. Drain them on 
a cloth. First roll them in cracker dust, then dip in 
beaten egg, roll again in cracker dust and fry to a 
nice brown in hot butter, seasoned with pepper and 
salt. Three eggs will be required for 1 quart of 
oysters- M. P. 



BAKED FISH. 

1 cup crumbs 2 tablespoonfuls butter 

1 tablcspoonful grated % tablespoonful black 

onion pepper 

M teaspoonful salt A dash of cayenne 

Water to moisten 

Put dressing between layers of fish and on top 
with small bits of butter, salt and pepper. Serve 
with sliced lemon. Mrs. Nye. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

V2 pound salt pork 8 good sized potatoes 

3 pounds fresh fish, cod sliced 

or haddock 1 large onion, sliced 

1 quart milk 6 crackers, toasted 

Fry the pork brown in bottom of kettle, cut the 
fish into pieces about two inches square, being careful 
to remove all the bones. Remove the slices of pork 
and place in the kettle alternate layers of fish, pota- 
toes and onions, seasoning each layer with salt and 
pepper. Add water to just cover the last layer, cook 
slowly till the potatoes are done, having the kettle 
closely covered. Put in the milk, let it heat up and 
pour into the tureen over the toasted crackers. Salt 
codfish may be used and is preferred by some. 

M. E. C. B. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Butter an earthen dish. Put in a layer of cracker 
crumbs, wet with milk, then a layer of oysters, 
sprinkle with salt, pepper and bits of butter the size 
of a walnut, continue to do the same till your dish is 
full. The last layer should be cracker crumbs. Add 
a beaten egg to a little milk and pour over it. For a 
medium sized dish, bake about an honr. The cracker 
crumbs should be thick enough to conceal the oysters. 

M. P. Stevens. 



-10- 

OYSTERS BAKED. 

Cut some ver3^ thin slices of fat pork into pieces 
about the size of 3'our oysters; la^^ them on the bot- 
tom of a dripping pan. On each piece of the pork lay 
an oyster previously drained, dust with white pepper. 
Cover with a bit of the fat pork and bake in a hot 
oven until the pork is crisp and of a light brown 
color, the oysters will then ht sufficiently well done- 
Remove to a hot dish and serve with sliced lemon. 

CREAM vSALMON. 

One can salmon minced fine, drain off liquor; 
throw away. For the dressing, boil 1 pint milk, 2 
tablespoonfuls butter, salt and pepper to taste. 
Have ready 1 pint fine bread crumbs, place a layer in 
the bottom of the dish, then a laj-er of fish, then a 
layer of dressing, and so on, having crumbs for the 
last laver. Bake till brown, C. C. B. 







-11- 



-12- 



-13- 



^EATS. 



■" Some hae meat that canna eat, 
And some would eat that want it; 

But we hae meat and we can eat, 
So let the Lord he t hank it. ^' 



Meats to be roasted or broiled should be given 
tbe greatest amount of heat possible at first that the 
surface may be hardened and the juices retained. 



TO COOK BEEFSTEAK. 

Pound well your meat until the fibres break. Be 
sure that next you have to broil your steak, good 
coals in plenty ; not a moment leave, but turn it 
this way and then that. The lean should be quite 
rare, not so the fat. The platter now and then' the 
juice receive. Put on your butter, place on it 3^our 
meat, salt, pepper, turn it over, serve and eat. 

Mrs. H. C. Fullington. 

BEEF FRICASSEE. 

Cut steak, or other nice lean beef, into small 
pieces, and simmer slowly in water enough to cover 
until very tender. Season to taste with butter, salt 
and pepper, and add tablespoonful of flour to thicken 
the gravy. Bake a shortcake, split and butter it, 
put the meat on one half, cover with the other half, 
pour gravy over it, and serve. K. A. L. 



-14- 



VEAL LOAF. 



3 pounds raw veal chopped 8 crackers rolled fine 
fine 2 eggs well beaten 

1 tablespoonful salt and Butter size of an egg 
pepper 
Mix with milk quite soft. Bake in a loaf about 

two hours in a slow oven, Use nearly 1 pint of milk. 

M. E. F. 



VEAL LOAF. 

3^/4 pounds chopped veal 3 tablespoonfuls cream 

1 small teaspoonful pepper 2 eggs 

2 scant teaspoonfuls salt Butter size of an egg 

Stir all together; then mold into a loaf. Put 8 
tablespoonfuls powdered cracker on top. Put a little 
water on top. Bake 3 hours. 



BEEF LOAF. 

IV2 pounds round Beefsteak 2 eggs beaten 
chopped fine 2 cups milk 

Butter size of an egg. 
Bake in a tin ll^ hours. Baste often with cold 
milk. Turn on platter and use the baste for gravy, 
with flour added. Mrs. G. E. Conger. 



BEEF LOAF. 

3 pounds of beef chopped 2 eggs beaten 

fine 4 crackers rolled fine 

Salt and pepper 1 tablespoonful butter 

Sage to taste 
Mix and roll into a loaf. Put into a tin ; add 
water and bits of butter. Cover and bake in a slow- 
oven 2 houi"s. Baste often. Very nice to slice. 



15 

CHICKEN CHOP. 

1 chicken weighing 2 or 3 3 teaspoonfuls butter 
pounds 1 cup cream 

1 heaping tablespoonful A speck of black pepper 

flour A Httle salt 

2 eggs 1 pint bread crumbs 

Cut the meat of the chicken fine and season with 
the salt and pepper. Put the butter on to heat, add 
the flour and cream, and 1 w^ell beaten egg; season 
more if needed ; boil up once and add the chicken, 
then remove from the fire and add the juice of a large 
lemon. Butter a platter and spread the mixture on 
about an inch thick. Smooth off with a knife and 
put away to cool. When cold cut in oval shapes, 
carefully roll in egg and breadcrumbs, and fry brown 
in hot lard. Mrs. George Ranney. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR CHOPS. 

1 can tomatoes 8 cloves 

3 slices lemon 
Boil together 10 minutes 
^ teaspoonful salt i/4 teaspoonful pepper 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 1 tablespoonful flour 

Brown these together, but do not burn. Then 
pour into the tomatoes and boil 2 minutes more. 
Strain through seive. Mrs. G. Ranney. 

CHICKEN-PIE CRUST. 

2 quarts flour 1 pint thick sour cream 
1 pint sweet milk 4 heaping teaspoonfuls 

3 scant teaspoonfuls 'soda cream tartar 
A little salt 

Enough for sides and top of a 10-quart pan 
Mix cream and milk together. Dissolve soda in 
a little water and add next. Mix thoroughly. Put 
cream tartar into the flour and sift twice; then add to 
the cream and milk. Handle with as little flour as 
possible to roll out V2 inch thick for the sides. W. 



-16- 



BOILED FLANK TO CUT COLD. 

Take a piece of flank of beef 6 or 8 inches wide 
and as long as you can cut it. Sprinkle salt over it 
and let stand 24 hours. Then prepare stuffing the 
same as for a turke}' and spread over it. Then roll 
very tight and tie a piece of cloth all over it. Boil 6 
hours. When you take it up lay it between two 
])oards and drain till it is cold. It will then cut in 
beautiful slices. Mrs. Sarah Conant. 

HAM PATTIES. 

One pint of ham which has been previously 
cooked, 2 parts of bread crumbs wet with milk ; mix 
all together. Put the batter in gem pans. Break 
one egg over each, sprinkle the top thickly with 
cracker crumbs and bake until browned over. A nice 
breakfast dish. C. 

MEAT BALLS. 

One bowl full of fine chopped meat (cold), add 1 
cu]3 of Isread or cracker crumbs, a little chopped 
onion ; a little gravy mixed with the crumbs to 
moisten them. Season with salt, pe-pper, thyme or 
savory or sage, and fr\^ in balls. C. 

CHICKEN-PIE. 
3 cups sour cream 2 cups sour milk 

3 teaspoonfuls soda 2 teaspoonfuls salt 

Stir nearly as hard as needs to be, moulding as 
little as possilile. Line a ten quart pan with the 
paste, and bone the meat of 4 well boiled chickens and 
fill the pan, putting in pepper, salt if needed, butter 
and chicken stock for seasoning, then cover with the 
paste cutting a piece from the top crust the size of a 
biscuit and replacing after covering. Bake in slow 
oven until done. Mrs. Waite. 

" All human history attests 
That happiness for man, the hungry sinner. 
Since Eve ate apples, much depends on dinner/^ 



-17- 



-18- 



-19- 



WELSH RAREBIT, ETC 



WELSH RAREBIT. 

1 pound cheese V2 teaspoonful dry 

1 tablespoonful butter mustard 

1 cupfulsweet cream Little cayenne pepper 

1 egg beaten light 
Put the butter into the chafing dish, when nearly 
melted add cheese cut in small pieces, mustard, pep- 
per, stir all the time, add cream slowly, then lastly 
egg. Serve hot on toast. • Mrs. L. B. Cross. 

RAREBIT. 

V2 pound cheese broken in 2 eggs 

bits A dash of cayenne 

1 tablespoonful butter 1 teaspoonful mustard 

V2teaspoonful salt Vz cupful cream or milk 

Put all in double boiler, cook till cheese is melted, 

then spread on crisp toast. Serve hot. 

C. R. Farrington. 

CHEESE FONDU. 



tablespoonful melted 

butter 
cup fine fresh bread 

crumbs 



1 cup milk 
Pinch of soda 

2 cups grated cheese 
Salt 



Dash of red pepper 
Cook ten minutes in a double boiler,add 2 beaten 
eggs and cook 3 minutes stirring, constantlv. Serve 
hot on toast. M. H. B. 



20 

CHEESE FONDU. 

% cupful crackers broken 1/2 cupful grated cheese 
fine 2 eggs beaten light 

1 cupful sweet milk 1 tablespoonful butter 

Soda, pepper and salt. 
Put soda in last. Bake in a quick oven. 

MACARONI A LA L'lTALIENNE. 

Bvitter a baking dish, and sprinkle with cracker 
crumbs, put in a layer of macaroni which has been 
boiled, and then some grated cheese and enough rich 
tomato sauce to fill in, repeating until the dish is full 
enough ; strew the top with grated cheese and cracker 
dust and small pieces of butter. Bake until it is a 
rich brown and serve hot. 



TOMATO SAUCE FOR THE ABOVE DISH. 

1 quart can tomatoes 2 tablespoonfuls butter 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 2 cloves 

1/^ onion sliced . 
Cook the tomato, onion and cloves 10 minutes, 
then strain. Replace it on the stove and when it 
boils add the butter and flour, which have been rub- 
bed together; or, if you prefer, you can add the but- 
ter and then stir in the flour mixed with a little 
water, season with pepper and salt. This sauce is 
nice to serve with boiled fish or macaroni. 

Mrs. J. Chesley Hartwell. 

CHEESE RELISH. 

One-fourth pound grated cheese, put in a spider 
with 1 cupful of milk ; when boiling add Iteaspoonful 
of salt, 1 teaspoonful dry mustard, a little pepper, 
piece of butter size of an egg, then add 3 rolled 
crackers, stir briskly and turn into a warm dish. 

Mrs. J. C. Hartwell. 



21 

MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 

One-third package of macaroni broken into inch 
pieces, throw them into boihng water which has been 
well salted, boil until tender, then drain. To 2 
cupfuls of hot milk add 1 tablespoonfulof flourand 2 
of butter, cook until smooth, season to taste. Butter 
a small pudding pan, put in first a layer of macaroni, 
then a lay^er of grated cheese and a few spoonfuls of 
the thickened milk, continue in like manner until you 
have used all the macaroni; sprinkle fine cracker 
crumbs on the top and a few bits of cheese and butter 
bake about V2 hour. I use about V2 cupful of grated 
cheese, but the amount can be varied to suit the 
taste, Ida Perry. 




-22- 



-23- 



■ 24 

SALA'DS. 



Arrange lettuce, parsley or white celery leaves 
around a dish ; heap the meat or whatever the salad 
is made of, lightly in the center of the dish ; pour 
dressing over and raise gently with a fork to let the 
dressing through. It is better to make the dressing 
shortly before using. The tasteful arrangement of 
your salad and a good dressing makes it a very 
appetizing dish. 

"To wake a perfect salad there should he a spend- 
thrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a wise man for salt, 
and a madcap to stir the ingredients up and mix 
them well together.'' — Spanish Proverb. 

LETTUCE SALAD. 

Yolks of 3 hard boiled eggs, salt and mustard to 
taste ; mash fine ; add desert spoonful of melted but- 
ter ; mix thoroughly ; add gradually a tea-cupful of 
vinegar; pour over the lettuce; garnish by slicing an- 
other tgg and putting on the top. A. S. Johnson. 

POTATO SALAD (COLD). 

Chop cold boiled potatoes fine, with enough raw 
onion to season well. Make a dressing as for lettuce 
and pour over it. Mrs. G. L. Johnson. 

SALAD DRESSING NO. 1. 

1 egg Vu teaspoonful mustard 

1 tablespoonful sugar V2 teaspoonful salt 
Vs cupful sharp vinegar Va cupful sweet cream 

Beat together all the ingredients, except cream, 
and cook over steam like mustard. When cold beat 
in the cream. H. Lizzie Pearl. 



25 

SALAD DRESSING NO. 2. 

V2 tablespoonfnl mustard 4 talDlespoonfuls melted 

V2 tablespoonful salt butter 

3 egL s 3 talDlespoonfuls sugar 

1 cur ' 1 milk V2 cupful vinegar 

Mix all together well before putting in the milk. 
Cook in an outside dish of boiling water. 

Mrs. a. H. Buck. 

SALAD DRESSING. NO. 3. 

2 spoonfuls butter 2 spoonfuls flour 

2 spoonfuls sugar 2 spoonfuls mustard 

1 cupful vinegar 

Stir all together and let it come to a boil; then 
add 1/2 cup cream. Good for cabbage or potato. 
Mrs. Lottie McFarland. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Chop fine one cabbage. Season well with salt 
and pepper. Make a dressing as follows :- 
2 eggs beaten light 6 tablespoonfuls sugar 

6 tablespoonfuls cream 1 scant tablespoonful 
2 scant tea-cupfuls vin- mustard 

egar 
Cook in a double boiler ; pour over the cabbage. 

Mrs. Arthur Pike. 

SCALLOPED CABBAGE. 

Chop half a head of cabbage, throw into boiling 
salted water, let boil 25 minutes, drain, place on 
baking dish ; pour over it a sauce made as follows: 
Melt 2 tablespoonfuls butter, add 2 tablespoonfuls 
flour; stir till blended ; add 1 pint milk, stir until it 
boils; add 1 hard boiled egg, chopped fine, 1 tea- 
spoonful salt, a little pepper. Pour this over the 
cabbage and put bread crumbs on top, moistened in 
milk ; bake 20 minutes. Mrs. E. G. French. 



26 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 
1 tablespoonful mustard One-tenth tablespoonful 
1 tal)lespoonful sugar of cayenne 

Yolks of 3 eggs uncooked 1 teaspoonful salt 
% cup vinegar V2 lemon (juice only) 

1 cupful of whipped cream 1 pint oil or butter 

Beat the yolks and dry ingredients until they are 
very light, with a silver or wooden spoon, having 
the bowl set in a pan of ice water. Add a few drops 
of oil at a time until the dressing becomes very thick^ 
or nearly hard; then add the oil more rapidh^ beat- 
ing hard ; then iidd vinegar. When the oil and vine- 
gar are allin, it should be very thick. Now add lemon 
juice and whipped cream. Place on ice for a few 
hours. The whipped cream may be omitted. 

Mrs. 'H. C. Fullington. 

MEAT AND POTATO SALAD. 

Cut cold meat in thin slices, then cut in small 
squares. Add the same quantity of cold boiled po- 
tatoes cut in thin slices, 1 teaspoonful chopped pars- 
ley, piece of 1 onion. Mix and pour over it a salad 
dressing. Mrs. W. Welch. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 
1 cupful vinegar 3 eggs well beaten 

1 tablespoonful mustard 1 teaspoonful pepper 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar 3 tablespoonfuls melted 

butter 
Cook as a custard and when cold add one tea- 
cupful of whipped cream. To the above, stir in the 
meat of one chicken cut fine with a knife. Do not 
chop it, as chopping makes it salvy. Also cut up two 
bunches of celery. Mrs. C. Hartwell. 

TURNIP SALAD. 

Grate 1 V2 cupfuls turnip as you would horserad- 
ish, pour over it sharp vinegar, add sugar to taste 
and a little salt. Serve very cold. Choose a nice 
sweet turnip. Nellie Fisher. 



DRESSING FOR POTATO SALAD. 

Into a pint or a little more of pleasant tasting 
vinegar, put 6 tablespoonfuls sweet cream, 5 table- 
spoonfuls melted butter, 1 tablespoonful ground 
mustard, 1 teaspoonful salt, Vs teaspoonful Ijlack 
pepper. Mix well, set over the tire and let it boil a 
few minutes. Then beat to a foam 3 eggs, stir them 
into the dressing and remove immediately from the 
fire. When cold pour over the potato. 

Mrs. B. a. Hunt. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

1 large spoonful parsley 9 potatoes 

cut fine 1/2 of a small turnip 

V2 a carrot 1 small beet 

Cut potatoes in small slices, the beet, turnip and 
carrot very fine. Mix all well and add a sprinkling 
of salt. Pour over a salad dressing and put in the 
ice chest until very cold. Mrs. W. D. Welch. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

3 eggs 1 tablespoonful sugar 
1 teaspoonful salt 1 cupful milk 

V2 cupful vinegar 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 teaspoonful mustard 
Boil until it thickens before adding butter. 

Mrs. Wm. Nye. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

4 tablespoonfuls vinegar 3 tablespoonfuls melted 
1 teaspoonful salt butter 

1 teaspoonful sugar V2 teaspoonful mustard 

A little pepper 
Mix and let stand on the stove till it comes to a 
boil, then stir into it the well beaten yolk of an egg, 
add the white beaten stiff the last thing. It is nicer 
with 2 or 3 tablespoonfuls of cream added the last 
thing. Mrs. R. G. Prentiss. 



—28 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

1 large cabbage head 1 cupful sour cream 

chopped fine 1 cupful sugar 

V4, teaspoonful mustard Vinegar enough to 

moisten well 
Mix thoroughly and let stand 24 hours. 

Mrs. Wm. Patten. 



FISH SALAD. 

A fresh white fish or trout, boil, then chop it but 
not too fine, add same quantity of chopped cabbage 
or celery. Season same as chicken salad. Garnish 
with tender leaves of lettuce. Mrs. G. Albee. 



FISH SAUCE. 

Make a pint of drawn butter, add 1 tablespoon- 
ful of pepper sauce, a little salt and 6 hard boiled 
eggs chopped fine. Pour over the boiled fish and 
garnish with sliced lemon. Mrs. G. L. Johnson. 



SALMON SALAD. 

1 can salmon 2 heads lettuce 

Juice of one lemon Salt and pepper 

Break the salmon in small pieces and add salt and 
pepper and lemon juice, place in ice chest till cold. 
Wash lettuce and let it stand in ice \vatcr till cold, 
drain off all water and put in ice chest till time to 
serve. When wanted, arrange leaves in form of shell 
and arrange shells in flat dish. Mix salmon with 
salad dressing and pour lightly over lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. W. D. Welch. 



-29- 



-30- 



31 

SAUCES, 

EGG SAUCE. 

Three ounces butter beaten with 1 ounce of flour; 
stir into it 1 pint boiling water ; salt and pepper ; 
cook 15 minutes; pour sauce into a bowl having hard 
boiled eggs sliced or chopped, in it. A. E. 

CREAM DRESSING. 

One large tablespoonful sweet cream, whip it to 
a stiff froth; add 2 tablespoonfuls fine sugar, nearly 
V2 cupful vinegar ; beat and use for cabbage. 

Mrs. a. E. 

DRAWN BUTTER SAUCE. 

Beat 1 cupful butter, 2 tablespoonfuls flour to a 
cream; pour over this 1 pint boiling water. Let it 
come to the boiling point, but do not boil. Serve 
immediately. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Chop two hard boiled eggs and stir into drawn 
butter. Anon. 

MUSTARD SAUCE. 

1 cupful sugar 1 tablespoonful butter 

1 tablespoonful mus- 1 cupful vinegar 

tard 4 eggs 

Beat the eggs well, mix all together, turn into a 
new tin dish and boil in water only to a cream (not 
thick). Strain through a thin cloth, and it is ready 
for use. Mrs. Elwood. 

CELERY VINEGAR. 

Haifa pint of celery seeds in a quart of vinegar; 
bottle it and in a month it will be fit for use. It must 
be strained before it is used. Miss W. 



32 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

Slice 1 onion in a bowl, cover with good vinegar. 
After two days pour ofif vinegar, add to it a tea- 
spoonful cayenne, same of pepper, and same of salt, 
1 tablespoonful sugar, and of mustard enough to 
thicken ; mix, set on the stove and stir until it boils. 
When cold it is fit for use. S. A. Holmes. 

TABLE MUSTARD. 

Mix 2 tablespoonfuls mustard smooth with a 
little water, then add 1 even teaspoonful butter, 1 
tablespoonful sugar, a small pinch salt, a sprhikling 
of pepper and 1 tablespoonful of vinegar, boil 
enough to cook through. Nellie Wilson. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

1 quart tomatoes 2 tablespoonfuls butter 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 8 cloves 

A small piece of an onion 
Cook tomato, onion and cloves 10 minutes; beat 
butter and add flour; stir till smooth, brown and 
thick; add tomatoes; cook 2 minutes; season with 
salt and peper and strain. This is nice with fish. 

Mrs. L. Welsh. 

MUSTARD CREAM. 

Two tablespoonfuls mustard, 1 scant tablespoon- 
ful salt,%cupful sweet cream, 3 eggs, mixed together 
and cooked in double boiler ; then add % cuplul of 
hot vinegar. Mrs. H. N. Waite. 

TOMATO MUSTARD. 

1 peck ripe tomatoes 6 red peppers 

Boil until soft, strain as catsup 
1/2 pound salt 2 tablespoonfuls black 

1 ounce ginger pepper 

1 ounce allspice 
Boil 11/2 hours. When cold add 1 pint vinegar, 
V2 pound ground mustard, Mrs. W.J. Valleau. 



-33- 



35 

PUDDINGS. 



The man who doestiH love pudding won't love his 
wife.^^ 



DEW PUDDING. 

3 crackers rolled fine 1 pint milk 

Yolks of 2 eggs Piece of butter size of walnut 

A pinch of salt 
Bake V2 hour, then put on top whites of two eggs 
beaten with one cupful sugar. Flavor to taste, set 
in oven to brown. Mrs. L. C. Mills. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

1 cupful sweet milk 2 cupfuls graham flour 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful chopped raisins 

2 small teaspoonfuls of Iteaspoonful each of gin- 

soda ger, cinnamon, cloves, 

2 teaspoonfuls of preserve- and chopped citron 

ed orange peel 

Steam from 2y2 to 3 hours. Serve with whipped 
cream or any kind of pudding sauce preferred. 

Mrs. R. a. Waterbury. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

14 cupful sugar V2 cupful flour 

V4, cupful butter 1 pint milk 

5 eggs 
Heat the milk in a double boiler, add flour and 
sugar and cook until smooth, take from the fire, add 
butter and the eggs beaten separately. Bake in cups 
set in a pan of water 1^ hour. Serve as soon as taken 
from the oven. Ida Perry. 



36 

CREAMY PUDDING SAUCE. 

One-fourth cupful butter creamed, add slowly i^ 
cupful sugar, beat well, then set the bowl in a dish of 
hot water and stir until smooth. When it has cooled 
a little, add 4 tablespoonfuls of sweet cream, the 
thicker the better, and 1 tablespoonful of flavoring, 
beat until quite stiff, then put in a cold place until 
needed. This is nice for any hot pudding. 

Ida Perry. 

OLD FASHIONED INDIAN PUDDING. 

One quart old skimed milk, boiled, take from 
the stove and add 2 cups corn meal, lV2Cupfuls brown 
sugar, 1 teaspoonful ginger, 1 teaspoonful salt 1 
quart cold milk skimed, V2 cupful flour. Butter the 
pan you bake it in with butter the size of an egg, put 
into the dish and pour over the top V2 cupful sweet 
cream and stir a little ; bake slowly 3^ to 4 hours. 

Mrs. N. a. Waterman. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful molasses 

2 cupfuls suet chopped fine 2 cupfuls milk 

2 eggs 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 teaspoonfuls ginger 1 teaspoonful each cloves, 
1 cupful raisins cinnamon, and nut- 

1 cupful currants meg 

3 cupfuls flour 
Put 1 tablespoonful each of soda and salt in 
water while cooking. Steam 3 hours. To be eaten 
with a wine sauce. Mrs. H. A. Waterman. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

1 tg,g, 2 teaspoonfuls soda 

1 cupful molasses V2 teaspoonful salt 

1 cupful sweet milk 1 teaspoonful cloves 

2 cupfuls graham flour 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 
1 cupful chopped raisins 1 teaspoonful nutmeg 

Steam 3 hours. Serve with sweet sauce. 

Mrs. H. H. Cowles. 



37 

FLORENTINE PUDDING. 

5 eggs 2 tablespoonfuls corn 

4 tablespoonfuls sugar starch 

1 cupful cold milk 1 quart boiling milk 

Dissolve corn starch in cold milk. Make boiled 
custard of yolks, sugar and starch. Frost with the 
whites beaten stiff with 1 tablespoonful sugar. 

Mae L. Cheney. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

1 quart of milk 3 cupfuls fine bread 

Yolks of 4 eggs crumbs 

Juice of 4 oranges Grated rind of 1 orange 

Sugar to taste ; it needs to be quite sweet 
Bake in a pudding pan set in a pan of water, beat 
the whites of the 4 eggs to a stiff froth, add a little 
sugar and flavoring, spread over the pudding and 
brown in the oven. To be eaten cold. Ida Perry. 

SUET PLUM PUDDING. 

1 cupful suet chopped fine 1 cupful cooking molasses 

1 cupful milk 1 cupful raisins 

3V^ cupfuls flour 1 egg 

1 teaspoonful each of A little nutmeg and salt 
cloves, cinnamon, soda 
Boil 3 hours in a pudding mould set into a kettle 
of water. Mrs. Maxfield. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

1 quart milk 3 ounces grated vanilla 

3 tablespoonfuls corn chocolate 

starch 2 eggs 

V2 cupful pulverized sugar 

Boil the milk, stir in the chocolate, starch, sugar 
and beaten yolks of the eggs, and bake. When the 
pudding is cold, beat the whites of the eggs to a 
froth, stir in V2 cupful sugar, spread this on the pud- 
ding and serve. Mrs. A. H. Buck. 



38 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 cupful milk 2 eggs 

1 cupful sugar 3 tablespoonfuls melted 

2 cupfuls flour butter 

2 teaspoonfuls baking powder 

Mrs. Thomas Waterman. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

1 cupful milk 2 teaspoonfuls corn starch 

1 cupful sugar 1 egg 

Beat sugar and yolk of egg together, add corn 
starch wet with a little cold milk, stir into the heat- 
ed milk and cook 5 minutes. When done add beaten 
white of egg and lemon flavoring. Mrs. Knight. 

THANKSGIVING PUDDING. 

Take thin slices of bakers' bread, butter them 
well and place in deep pudding dish with alternate 
layers of raisins, seeded. When the dish is nearly full 
turn over all a quart of milk with 3 eggs beaten and 
1 cupful sugar. Let stand over night. In the morn- 
ing place dish in steamer and cook 4 or 5 hours. 
When done spread jelly over the top and frost with- 
whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff and 4 tablespoonfuls 
sugar; set in oven to brown. A ver3^ little cinnamon 
and nutmeg should be sprinkled between each layer. 
Serve with whipped cream sweetened and flavored 
with vanilla. Mrs. C. H. Stearns. 

CRANBERRY PUDDING. 

3 eggs 3 cupfuls flour 

V2 cupful sugar 2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 

V2 cupful butter tar 

% cupful milk 1 teaspoonful soda 

IV2 cupfuls cranberries 
Steam 2 hours or bake 1 hour. Serve with sweet 
sauce. C. R. Farrington. 



- — SO- 
PLUM PUDDING. 

1 cupful sweet milk 1 cupful currants 

1 cupful molasses 3 cupfuls flour 

1 cupful chopped suet 1 egg 

1 cupful raisins 2 teaspoonfuls baking 

Spice to taste powder 

Steam 3 hours. H. E. Fairchildv 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

1 cupful sugar White of 1 egg 

Butter size of an egg Juice of 1 orange 

Beat the egg very stifif and add last. 

H. E. Fairchild. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

1 pint sweet milk A little salt 
V2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful cream tar- 
Flour for a thin batter tar 

Steam 2 hours. 

Sauce — Butter and sugar stirred to a cream. 
One pint fresh strawberries mashed and stirred in the 

cream. I. M. Barton. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

V2 cupful butter 1 egg (white) 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful strawberries 

Beat the butter to a cream, then beat into it the 
sugar, add the white of egg well beaten and the 
strawberries thoroughly mashed. C. S. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 
1 pint fine bread crumbs 1 quart milk 
1 cupful sugar Yolks of 4 eggs thorough- 

Grated rind of 1 lemon ly beaten 

Butter size of an egg 
Mix, bake. Whip the whites of 4 eggs with one 
cupful sugar and juice of 1 lemon. Spread a layer of 
jelly on pudding after it is baked, pour beaten whites 
of eggs over this, return to oven 1 minute. 

Mrs. L. M. Fullington. 



DATE PUDDING. 

1 egg beaten light % cupful melted buttef 

Vz cupful milk V2 cupful molases 

IV2 cupfuls graham flour IV2 teaspoonfuls salt 
V2 teaspoonful soda 1 cupful dates stoned and 

cut up 
Steam 2^ hours. Serve with creamy sauce. 

Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 

One-fourth cupful butter creamed, add V2 cupful 
powdered sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls milk added drop 
by drop. Flavor with % teaspoonful vanilla and V» 
lemon. Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

1 cupful sour milk 2 cupfuls flour 

V2 cupful molasses V2 cupful chopped raisins 

V2 cupful butter A little cinnamon 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful soda 



Steam 2 hours. 



SAUCE. 



V2 cupful sugar 1 spoonful flour 

1 tablespoonful butter 1 cupful hot water 
Little nutmeg 

Mrs. C. H. Stearns. 
TIPSY PUDDING. 

1 cupful sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cupful of sour cream Lemon extract 

1 egg Flour to make batter 

When baked cut in 3 inch squares, s])lit and spread 
with jelly. Put together in a deep dish 1 pint milk 
brought to boil, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 cupful sugar beaten 
and stirred in the milk, flavor with lemon and pour 
over cake ; make frosting of the whites and pour over 
the top ; place jelly on top. Agusta A. Bailey. 



41 

■ STEAMED PUDDING. 

3 1/2 cupfuls flour 1 1/2 cupfuls sweet milk 

1 cupful molasses 1 teaspoonful soda 

1/3 cupful butter 
Steam 3 hours. Mrs. B. L. Austin, 

HONEY-COMB PUDDING. 

1 cupful sugar ^^ cupful butter 

1/2 cupful milk 1 cupful flour 

4 eggs 1 cupful raisins 

V2 tablespoonful soda Small cupful molasses 

Stir flour and sugar together, melt butter in milk 
that has been warmed, turn this on sugar and flour, 
stir in Qgg beaten very light, last add molasses and 
soda beaten together while foaming. Bake 40 min- 
utes. Mrs. L. M. Knight. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

V2 coffee-cupful molasses \i cupful butter 

1 tgg, 1/2 cupful sweet milk 

V2 teaspoonful soda 1% cupfuls graham flour 

1 small cupful raisins Spice to taste 

Mix well together, steam 3 hours. Good with 
any kind of sauce but best with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. L. M. Fullington. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

One quart of milk (reserve one cupful); scald the 
milk ; 3 tablespoonfuls of corn meal, wet in a little 
cold milk, and boil a minute or two. Add 1 cupful of 
molasses, the remainder of the milk, a good half cup- 
ful of cold water and 1 Q^g. Boil in a moderate oven 

2 Vz hours. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Soak 1 cupful cocoanut in 1 pint of milk. As soon as 
it boils add 1 pint cold milk, thickened with 1 table- 
spoonful corn starch, or 1 powdered cracker, 3 eggs, 
a little butter, salt and nutmeg ; sugar to taste. M. 



42 

RICE PUDDING. 

Take % of a cupful of rice, boil, pour over it 1 
pint of milk. Take the yolks of 3 eggs, the grated 
rind of a lemon, a little salt, and sugar to taste. Stir 
all together, bake and cool. Take the whites of the 
eggs, beaten to a froth, 1 V2 cupfuls of sugar, and the 
juice of a lemon ; pour this over the pudding and 
brown lightly. Mrs. A. H. Buck. 

SUET PUDDING. 

1 cupful sour milk 1 cupful molasses 

3 cupfuls flour 1 cupful suet chopped fine 

1 cupful raisins 1 teaspoonful salt 

2 small teaspoonfuls soda 
Steam 3 hours. Emma Holmes. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 cupful sugar Butter size of an egg 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful soda 

14 cupful sweet milk 2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 
iy2 cupfuls flour tar 

A little salt 
Steam 1 hour. Mrs. Wm. Patten. 

SAUCE. 

1 tea-cupful sugar i/^ cupful butter 

1 tablespoonful flour Juice and grated rind 1 

lemon 
Beat all together, then add 1 pint boiling water ; 
boil 3 minutes. Mrs. Wm. Patten. 

APPLE DOWDY. 

1/3 cupful sour milk % cupful cream 

Salt 1 teaspoonful soda 

Flour for a stiff" batter 

Put apples, pared and quartered, in a pudding 
dish, and pour this batter aver them; then bake 
slowly 1 hour.. M. P. Stevens. 



43 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

2 oranges peeled and cut V2 cupful sugar 

in small pieces 1 tablespoonful corn starch 

2 eggs 1 pint milk 

Put oranges in a dish, sprinkle sugar over them ; 
make a custard of the milk, yolks of eggs and corn 
starch. Pour custard over oranges ; then make a 
frostiug of the whites of eggs and set in oven to 
brown. Serve cold. Mrs. Mead. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

4 oranges cut in pieces 2 tablespoonfuls corn starch 
1 cupful sugar Yolks of 3 eggs 

1 quart boiling milk 
Sprinkle sugar on oranges, add milk corn starch 
dissolved in water, and yolks of eggs. Make frosting 
of whites and 1 cupful sugar. Place in oven to 
brown, S. C. Buck. 

PUDDING. 

3 eggs A little salt 

4 tablespoonfuls flour 1 pint boiling milk 

Beat yolks and flour together, adding enough 
milk to make a smooth batter, then the boiling milk 
last the whites. Bake 10 minutes. 

Mrs. W. B. Frink. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

V2 cupful sugar Butter size butternut 

Yolk 1 egg V2 pint boiling milk 

poured over it 
Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth. Put 
into the dish to serve the sauce in. Pour the liquid 
over it. Flavor and serve. Mrs. W. B. Frink. 



44 

BIRD'S NEST PUDDING. 

8 apples peeled and cored 3 teaspoonfuls baking 
4 eggs powder 

2 cupfuls flour 1 pint milk 

1 teaspoonful salt Sugar 

Place the apples in a deep dish and fill the open- 
ings where the cores were scooped out with sugar. 
Cover and bake slowly till the apples are done. Beat 
the yolks of the eggs light, add flour with baking 
pow^der and salt sifted in, then add the milk, and 
lastW the beaten wdiites of the eggs. Grate a little 
nutmeg over the apples, pour in the batter and bake 
1 hour. Serve with sauce. Mrs. G. L. Johnson. 

SAUCE FOR PUDDING. 

Beat 1 tablespoonful butter with 1 cupful sugar; 
stir with it the yolks of 2 eggs and 3 tablespoonfuls 
■cream. Cook in a double boiler until it thickens. 
Jiemove and stir in the beaten whites. Serve at once. 

Mrs, O. McFarland. 







-45- 



-46- 



47 

"PIES. 



'A good pumpkin pie — a delicious compound of 
everything hut pumpkin with just enough of that 
in it to srive it a name.^' 



PASTRY FOR PIES. 

1 pint flour V2 teaspoonful salt 

V2 cupful butter V2 cupful lard 

Chop the butter and lard into the flour wet with 
ice water with a little soda. Make a very stiff" dough, 
roll the upper crust very thin, spread over it a layer 
of lard, sprinkle with flour, wet it with ice water. 
When baked it will be very flaky. This is sufficient 
for two pies. Mrs. Mary Jordon. 

SQUASH PIE. 

4 heaping tablespoonfuls V2 cracker 

squash 4 heaping tablespoonfuls 

1 Qgg sugar 

Beat squash, sugar and egg together, add cracker 
rolled fine and milk enough for one pie, flavor with 
lemon or rose. Very nice. Mrs. M. L. Stearns. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

1 cupful cranberries 1 cupful sugar 

V2 cupful raisins stoned 2 tablespoonfuls flour 
1 cupful water 
Stir flour and sugar together and boil with ber- 
ries and raisins. Add 1 teaspoonful vanilla when 
cold. Bake with two crusts. 

Mrs. Thomas Waterman. 



-48- 



BOILED CIDER PIE. 

5 tablespoonftils sugar 4 tablespoonfuls boiled 
4 tablespoonfuls water cider 

1 egg 1 tablespoonful flour 

Bake with two crusts. Mrs. Maxfield, 

CRACKER PIE. 

3 crackers or 6 table- V2 cupful butter 

spoonfuls stale bread 1 cupful molasses 
1 cupful sugar 1 cupful boiling water 

V2 cupful boiled cider or 2 eggs 

vinegar 1 teaspoonful all kinds of 

spices 
This will make three pies. 

Mrs. B. S. Fullington. 

CREAM PIE. 

% cupful sugar 1 tablespoonful corn 

1 egg . starch 

Stir all this into one pint of boiling milk. When 
cooled, add vanilla and bake in a deep plate lined 
with rich crust ; cover the top with a meringue. 

Mrs. C. N. Farrington. 

MINCE PIE MEAT. 

1 quart chopped meat 1 quart chopped apples, 
V2 pint suet heaping 

2 quarts sweet cider 2 quarts brown sugar 
1/2 pint boiled cider V2 pint molasses 

V2 pint butter 2 tablespoonfuls allspice 

2 tablespoonfuls cloves 2 tablespoonfuls cinna- 
IV2 tablespoonfuls nutmeg mon 

Salt Raisins 

Simmer slowly four hours. 

Mrs. H. W. Stevens, 



49 

BOILED CIDER PIE. 

1 egg 1 cupful sugar 

1 tablespoon ful flour 7 tablespoonfuls boiled 

A small piece butter cider 

Bake with two crusts. Mrs. W. G.Jones, 

COCOANUT PIE. 

¥2 cupful desiccated cocoa- 2 eggs 

nut Butter size of a walnut 

1 small cupful sugar 

Soak the cocanut in I1/2 cupfuls milk. Nice with 
a meringue on top. AIrs. Maxfield. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

Boil 1 cupful cocoanut in milk for 1 pie, V2 cupful 
sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful corn starch. 
Bake a rich crust and turn in and frost and bake a 
few minutes. Mrs. G. E. Conger. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

1 tea-cupful stewed rhu- 1 cupful sugar 

barb 2 tablespoonfuls flour 

Yolk of 1 egg 
Bake with one crust ; use the white of the egg and 
3 tablespoonfuls of sugar for a frosting. Flavor w^ith 
lemon. Mrs. Heman Miller, 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful vinegar 

1 egg IV2 crackers 

1 teaspoonful butter Some raisins 

Spice to taste 
Boiling water enough to soften the crackers, 

Mrs. C. R. Farrington. 



50 

RAISIN PIE. 

Juice and rind of 1 lemon 1 egg 
2 scant cupfuls sugar 1 cupful chopped raisins 

A small piece butter 4 tablespoonfuls flour 

2 cupfuls of water 

Mrs. Heman Miller. 

MARSH CRANBERRY PIE. 

1 cupful cranberries V2 cupful raisins 

1 egg or 1 large spoonful 1 cupful sugar 

of flour 

Chop raisins and berries together. 

E. A. CODMNG. 

LEMON PIE. 

1 lemon Yolks of 3 eggs 

1 cupful sugar 1 tablespoonful flour 
% cupful milk Piece of butter size of a 

walnut 
Bake with one crust, using the whites of the eggs 
for frosting. Mrs. A. J. Gould. 

LEMON PIE. 

Grated rind and juice of 1 V2 cupful sugar 

lemon iy2 cupfuls cold water 

2 tablespoonfuls corn Beaten yolks of 2 eggs 

starch 

Cook in double boiler, stir all the time while 
cooking, add a small piece of butter. Bake a crust 
and put in the filling, frost and brown. 

Mrs. E. D. Mills. 

ORANGE PIE. 
Juice of 2 oranges 4 eggs 

4 tablespoonfuls sugar 1 tablespoonful butter 

Cream the butter and sugar together. Add the 
beaten yolks, then the grated rind and juice of the 
oranges ; lastly the w^hites beaten to a froth. Bake 
with one crust. Mrs. G. E. Conger. 



51 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

4 crackers II/2 cupfuls of sugar 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful of vinegar or 

1 cupful water boiled cider 

y2 cupful of butter 1 cupful of seeded raisins 

Two eggs beaten and stirred in the last thing. 
Spice to taste. Lettie Carpenter. 

CREAM PIE. 

Beat together 2 eggs, 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar, 

2 of flour, and a little salt, a little over V^ pint of 
cream and milk ; or if you use all milk add a large 
tablespoonful of butter. The secret of this being nice 
is in the baking. Alice G. Bradley. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful water 

1 cupful raisins 1 cupful vinegar 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful butter 

1 cupful of cracker Spice to taste 

crumbs 
Beat all together, except the crumbs. Add them 
after removing from the fire. This will make the fill- 
ing for four pies. Mrs. O. A. McFarland. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

Take 1 cupful of chopped rhubarb, 1 egg, 1 cup- 
ful sugar. Mix all well together. This makes 1 pie, 
is much like a lemon pie and is good for a change. 
Canned rhubarb can be used. 

Mrs. E. R. Wheeler. 

TART CRUST. 

One cupful of lard warmed a little ; add the white 
of 1 egg and beat together 5 minutes ; 1 tablespoon- 
ful white sugar, 3 tablespoonfuls water, salt, flour 
enough to roll. Lillian Graves. 



SOUR CAEAM PIE. 

1 cupful cream 1 tablespoonful flour 

1 cupful sugar 1 egg 

V2 cupful raisins Flavor with vanilla 

Beat the cream and sugar thoroughly together; 
then add the egg, well beaten. Bake with 2 crusts. 

Augusta Bailey. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

1 quart sifted pumpkin 1 pint sugar (wet maple 

2 quarts rich milk is best) 

1 teaspoonful nutmeg 1 teaspoonful salt 

2 teaspoonfuls ginger 2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon 

1 beaten egg 
Stir the sugar and spice into the pumpkin and 
add milk, and earaf last. 



-&& 



CREAM PIE. 

1 cupful sugar Vo cupful flour 

Yolks of 2 eggs 2 tablespoonfuls of milk 

Pinch of salt 
Stir into a pint of boiling milk. Stir until cooked. 
Flavor v^ith vanilla and pour into a crust previously 
baked. Beat the w^hites of two eggs with two table- 
spoonfuls of sugar. Spread on top and brown. 

Mrs. B. a. Hunt. 

CREAM PIE. 

3 tablespoonfuls of sugar 2 tablespoonfuls corn 

3 eggs (save the whites of starch 

2 for frosting) 1 cupful sweet cream 

Add enough boiling milk to fill the pie. Bake 

slowly. Much depends upon the baking. 

Mrs. G. Livermore. 



53 

RHUBARB PIE. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful chopped rhubarb 

V2 cupful seeded raisins 1 egg 

chopped 1 heaping tablespoonful 

of flour 

Bake with two crusts. Mrs. G. Livermore. 

LEMON PIE, 

1 cupful of sugar I/2 pint of water 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 2 eggs ( yolks ) 

Cook thisfllling with the grated rind a.nd juice of 
1 lemon. Bake the crust and put in the filling. Frost 
and set in the oven to brown. Sara K. Page. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

Scald 1 pint of milk in a double boiler, add 1 
tablespoonful corn starch ; cook 10 minutes, stir all 
the time. Add 1 cupful sugar, 2 squares of chocolate 
grated and melted. When cold flavor with vanilla. 
Fold into it 1 pint of whipped cream. Bake wifh 
onlv 1 crust, or diamond shaped pieces of pastry on 
top". ' Mrs. G. E. Conger. 

RAISIN PIE. 

1 cupful raisins 1 small cupful sugar 

1 tablespoonful flour 

Cook raisins and sugar, with water enough to 
cover, slowly 1 hour. Let cool a little, then add the 
flour. Bake with two crusts. Mrs. Mead. 

SOUR CREAM PIE. 

1 scant cupful sour creain 1 cupful new milk 
1 egg 1 tablespoonful flour 

1 cupful sugar 
Beat the cream, sugar and flour together ; then 
add the egg, well beaten ; whip thoroughly. Lastly 
add milk and flavoring. Bake with 1 crust and frost 
the top. Mrs. Bert Rogers. 



-54- 



-55- 



VESSERTS. 



" 'And please you know,' quoth the peasant, 
'The same dessert is x^ery pleasant,' " 



FRUIT TAPIOCA. 

One-half cupful tapioca, pour on a pint and a half 
of boiling water; cook 1 hour, or until clear. Add i/4 
teaspoonful salt, Vs cupful sugar and 1 tea-cupful of 
berries, or V2 cupful jelly. Mrs. A. Dodge. 

PEACH TAPIOCA. 

1 cupful pearl tapioca 1 quart water 

1/2 cupful sugar y2 teaspoonful salt 

6 canned peaches, or fresh ones in their season 

Soak tapioca in water for 2 hours ; then add the 
sugar, salt and the peaches halved or cjuartered, and 
cook in a moderate oven until the tapioca becomes- 
transparent and jelly-like and the peaches soft, which 
will require about IV^ hours, cooking slowlv. Serve 
with cream. Mrs. T. J. B. 

PRUNE WHIPS. 

1 pound prunes 4 eggs (whites) 

1 small cupful sugar Vi teaspoonful salt 

1/4 teaspoonful soda 

Soak prunes over night in just enough v^^ater to 
cover. In the morning stone them and stew in the 
water in which they were soaked until they are soft 
and will form a thick paste ; add sugar. When cool 
mix thoroughly with the whites of eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth, adding salt and soda. Turn the mixture 
into a pudding dish and bake 15 minutes, or till nicely 
browmed, in a slow oven. Serve cold with whipped 
eream. M. P. Stearns, 



57 

PEACH JELLY. 

1 can peaches 1 cupful sugar 
V2 package gelatine % cupful water 
Soak the gelatine in the water for half an hour or 

more. Drain syrup from the peaches, putting 1 V2 or 
2 cupfuls syrup into a saucepan to heat. Slice peaches 
into a fancy glass or china dish and sprinkle half of 
the sugar over them; add the rest of the sugar to the 
sja'up. When syrup is hot remove from the fire and 
add the gelatine and water, stirring till dissolved. 
Pour over peaches and set on ice to harden. Serve 
with sweetened whipped cream. F. S. Andrews. 

ORANGE FLOAT. 

1 quart water 2 lemons (juice and pulp) 

1 coffee-cupful sugar 4tablespoonfulscorn starch 
4 or five oranges sliced 3 eggs (whites) 

Cook sugar, water, lemon and corn starch to- 
gether fifteen minutes, stirring all the time. When 
cold pour over the oranges, sliced into a glass dish, 
and over the top spread the beaten whites of eggs, 
sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 

Mrs. G. L. Johnson. 

COFFEE MOSSI. 

1 pint cream whipped 1 tablespoonful gelatine dis- 
1 cupful sugar solved in a little water 

2 tablespoonfuls coffee steeped in ^2 cupful water 
Strain the coffee into the gelatine and cool until 

it is a little thick ; then mix all together and pack in 
an ordinary pail or freezer, and chill. 

Mrs. Geo. Ranny. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Rind and juice of 1 lemon l^ cupful sugar 
Butter size of a walnut 1 ^gg well beaten 
Beat the mixture well and heat till it comes to a 
boil. I. M. Barton. 



58 

APPLE SNOW. 
3 large tart apples V2 cupful powdered sugar 

3 eggs (whites) V2 cupful jelly 

Stew the apples, cored but not pared, drain and 
sift. Beat the eggs stiff, add sugar and apple and 
beat till like snow. Pile lightly on a glass dish, gar- 
nish with the jelly. Serve with boiled custard. 

Mrs. Ranger. 

APPLE SNOW 2. 

Stew some sour apples and sweeten to taste ; sift 
or strain. To each pint of apple add the white of 1 
^g,g. Heap on a glass dish and pour around it some 
whipped cream, sweetened to taste. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. L. H. Wheeler. 

FRIED BANANAS. 
Peel ripe bananas ; roll in cracker dust and in 
beaten eggs, again in cracker, and fry whole like 
doughnuts till brown and lay in a colander; serve 
with fruit sauce. Mrs. Geo. Ranny. 

FRUIT SAUCE, 
Thin with water and melt currant jelly, by placing 
the glass in a dish of hot water, and pour around the 
bananas on individual dishes. Mrs. Geo. Ranney. 

LEMON ICE. 
IV2 quarts of water 1 pound fine sugar 

Juice of 4 lemons 
To make it nice and white use the whites of 2 
eggs, whipped in before freezing. 

Mrs. H. C. Fullington. 

LEMON ICE NO. 2 

1 quart water Juice of 4 lemons 

2 cupfuls sugar 
Strain, then add beaten whites 2 eggs. Freeze 
same as ice cream. This will make 12 dishes. 

Mrs. L. M.Jones. 



59 

RASPBERRY SHERBERT. 

1 quart water 1 teaspoonful gelatine 

1 pint sugar 3 tablespoonfuls cold water 

1 pint raspberry juice 2 lemons ( juice only) 

Boil water and sugar together 10 minutes ; soak 
the gelatine in the cold water a short time, and add 
it to the boiling syrup ; strain syrup through cheese 
cloth into the freezer. When cold add the raspberry 
juice and the juice of the lemons, or instead of the 
lemon juice, half a cupful of red currant juice. Freeze. 
Cooking School Magazine. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

3 eggs 1/3 cupful flour 

1 cupful sugar I1/2 pints milk 

Beat eggs, sugar, flour and stir in the hot milk. 
Caramelize 1 cupful sugar and pour into custard 
while both are hot. Cool and add 1 pint whipped 
cream, sw^eeten and freeze. 

Miss Charlotte Wills. 

HOW TO CARMELIZE SUGAR. 

Put granulated sugar in buttered frying-pan, 
place on stove and stir constantly. Remove from 
lire as soon as dissolved. As no water is used care 
must be taken not to burn. The sugar when done 
should look about like light molasses. 

Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful flour 

2 eggs 1 pint milk 

Beat eggs, sugar and flour together and stir into 
boiling milk. Cook until custard thickens. Cara- 
melize ¥2 cupful sugar and stir it into the custard 
when done and while both are hot. When cool, add 
1 quart cream, strain into freezer and freeze. 

Mrs. L. B. Cross. 



60 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

1 pint hot milk l^ cupful sugar 

1 egg 1 tablespoonful flour 

Pour the hot milk on this and cook 20 minutes. 
Carmelize % cupful sugar ; add to custard while hot, 
add 1 quart cream, V2 teaspoonful vanilla, and freeze. 

Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 

MILK SHERBERT. 

Juice of 4 lemons 2 cupfuls of sugar 

1 quart of milk 
This should be frozen immediately after adding 
the milk. Adine M. Bell. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

1 quart raspberry juice 1 quart currant juice 

1 quart granulated sugar 
Boil 5 minutes and skim. Bottle while hot. Use 

2 tablespoonfuls to tumbler of water. A. C. W. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Heat 1 tablespoonful best butter, or 1 scant tea- 
spoonful olive oil, smoking hot. Add V2 pound of 
blanched almonds. When the almonds begin to 
brown sprinkle over them 1 scant tablespoonful of 
salt, and stir and shake until all are of a golden 
brown. Oil gives a richer glaze than butter. To 
blanch the almonds pour over them boiling v^ater 
and let them stand fifteen minutes, then rub the skins 
off with a coarse cloth. Salted peanuts are nice and 
may be prepared in the same way. Housewife. 



-61- 



-62- 



63 

Cc^KE. 



^'Aye, to the leavening, hut here^s yet in the -word 
hereafter the kneading, the making of the cake, the 
heating of the oven, and the baking. Nay, you must 
stay the cooling, too, or you may chance to burn 
vour mouth.'^ — Shakespeare. 



FRUIT CAKE. 
4 pounds sugar 4 pounds butter 

40 eggs 4 pounds flour 

4 pounds English currants 6 pounds raisins 
3 pounds citron 12 nutmegs 

8 tablespoonfuls rose 8 tablespoonfuls cinna- 

water mon 

8 tablespoonfuls mace 8 tablespoonfuls cloves 
V2 pint brandy 2 tablespoonfuls soda 

4 tablespoonfuls cream tartar 

Mrs. C. a. McFarland. 

WHITE CAKE. 

2 scant cupfuls sugar % cupful butter 

Whites of 5 eggs 3V2 cupfuls flour stirred in 

% cupful sweet milk lightly 

1/2 teaspoonful soda Iteaspoonful cream tartar 

Flavor 
Mrs. C. a. McFarland. 

CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 

3 eggs IV2 cupfuls sugar 
1/2 cupful butter V2 cupful milk 

5 tablespoonfuls grated 2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 

chocolate ing powder 

1% cupfuls flour A little salt 

Melt the chocolate in part of the milk. This is 
very nice with a vanilla frosting. 

Mrs. R. G. Prentiss. 



64 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 9 large eggs 1 heaping cupful fine gran- 
1 cupful flour sifted 5 ulated sugar 

times before measuring V^ teaspoonful each of 
1/2 teaspoonful cream tar- lemon and vanilla extract 

tar A pinch of salt 

Separate the eggs, add salt and cream tartar to 
the whites and beat till very stiff; add sugar and 
flavoring ; beat thoroughly, then carefully fold in the 
flour ; put in a moderate oven at once, bake from 40 
to 50 minutes. I invert pan to cool when cake is 
done. Mrs. Geo. Ranney 

BRIDAL FOOD. 

Whites of 6 eggs 1 V2 cupfuls flo'Ur 

V2 cupful corn starch 14 cupful butter 

1/2 cupful milk 1 cupful sugar 

3 teaspoonfuls Royal baking powder 
Rose, lemon and almond. Carrie L. Cross. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful butter 

V2 cupful sweet milk 2 cupfuls sweet milk 

% cupful blueberries Whites of 2 eggs 

1 teaspoonful cream V2 teaspoonful soda 

tartar 

Carrie L. Cross. 

MARBLE CAKE 

2 eggs 1 cupful sour cream 
1 cupful white sugar V2 teaspoonful salt 
% teaspoonful soda 2 cupfuls flour 

Then pour % of the mixture into another dish 
and add 3 tablespoonfuls molasses, 1/2 teaspoonful 
cloves, cinnamon and allspice, a little nutmeg, a 
pinch more soda, 1 tablespoonful flour. Put in the 
tin alternate light and dark. L. C. M. 



65 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 5 eg^s 1 tumblerful sugar 

1 tumblerful flour 1 teaspoonful cream tar- 

1 teaspoonful vanilla tar 

Sift the flour 4 times, add the cream tartar and 
sift again. Sift the sugar, beat the eggs to a stiff 
froth, add the sugar lightly, then the flour gently, 
then the vanilla. Bake 45 minutes in a moderate 
oven. Do not open the oven door until the cake has 
been in at least 15 minutes. Do not grease the pan ; 
turn it upside down to cool. Mrs. I. L. Pearl. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

3 eggs 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful flour 3 teaspoonfuls Royal baking pow^- 
der sifted into flour 
Beat .sugar and yolks together, then add whites 
whipped to a stiff froth; add flour. When ready for 
the tin stir in 3 tablespoonfuls boiling water and 1 
teaspoonful essence of lemon. 

Mrs. Thomas Waterman. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 11 eggs 1 cupful flour 

iy2 cupfuls sugar 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 teaspoonful vanilla 
Put cream tartar into flour, sift 5 times ; sift 
sugar, beat eggs very stiff, add sugar and mix care- 
fully ; add flour gradually, stirring all the while ; last 
the flavoring. Turn quickly into an ungreased tin. 
Bake 40 minutes in a moderate oven. 

Susan C. Nye. 

CENTENNIAL CAKE. 

1 cupful butter 2 cupfuls sugar 

3 cupfuls flour 2 eggs 

1 cupful milk 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 
Flavor with anything you like. Mrs. Austin . 



SPONGE CAKE (TWO LOAVES), 

4 eggs iy2 cupfuls sugar 

2 cupfuls flour 1 cupful milk 

Beat the whites and yolks separately, add sugar 
to yolks slowly, stir in the whites, then the flour 
which has been thoroughly mixed with 2 teaspoon- 
fuls cream tartar, 1 teaspoonful soda and a little 
salt. Add the milk boiling hot, beat until thorough- 
ly mixed. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. E. E. Holmes, 

COFFEE CAKE. 

1 cupful brown sugar 1 cupful butter 

2 eggs V2 cupful molasses 
1 cupful strong cold coffee 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 teaspoonful cloves 2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon 
5 cupfuls sifted flour 1 cupful raisins or currants 

Add the fruit last, rubbed in a little of the flour. 
Bake about 1 hour. Mrs. G. L. Johnson.. 

SPONGE CAKE (ONE I ALWAYS USE). 

2 eggs well beaten 1 cupful sugar 
14 cupful cold w-ater in I14 cupfuls flour 

which sift V2 tea- 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

spoonful soda Flavor to taste 

Miss T. 

BERWICK SPONGE CAKE. 

3 eggs IV2 cupfuls sugar 
% cupful milk V2 teaspoonful salt 

V2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 teaspoonful vanilla or 2 cupfuls flour 

lemon 

Beat the eggs, 3^olks and whites separately, then 
with the sugar 5 minutes ; add the milk, then the 
flour sifted 3 times with the salt, cream tartar and 
soda. Bake in a large shallow tin, A. C. W, 



-67- 



FRUIT CAKE. 

V2 cupful sugar V2 cupful milk 

V2 cupful water Vs cupful butter and lard 

1 cupful fruit 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 cupfuls flour Spices of all kinds 

One Qgg to be broken in the last thing and then 
beaten 5 minutes. Miss T. 



FRUIT CAKE (TWO LOAVES). 



1 cupful sugar 
IV2 cupfuls butter 
4 cupfuls flour 
1 pound currants 
1 nutmeg 

1 teaspoonful cloves 
1 teaspoonful mace 



1 cupful molasses 
4 eggs 

1 pound raisins 
Vi pound citron 
1 teaspoonful cinnamon 
1 teaspoonful allspice 
1 teaspoonful lemon juice 
11/2 teaspoonfuls soda 

Mrs. L. B. Cross. 



NUT CAKE. 



Vi cupful butter 
IV2 cupfuls flour 
1 teaspoonful soda 
Stir vvell. 



1 cupful white sugar 
V2 cupful sweet milk 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 
1 cupful chopped walnuts 

Mrs. E. G. S. 



CHEAP FRUIT CAKE. 



V2 cupful butter 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

Beat well ; add 
2 eggs 1 cupful molasses 

1 teaspoonful soda % teaspoonful each cloves 

2 cupfuls flour and nutmeg 

1 cupful fruit 

Mrs. E. G. Smith. 



—68 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

2 eggs 1/2 cup white sugar 

1/2 cup flour V2teaspoonful cream tartar 

14 teaspoonful soda A pinch of salt 

Bake in a long tin; when baked spread with jelly 
and roll. Mrs. E. G. Smith. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

2 cupfuls sugar % cupful butter 
1 cupful milk 3 cupfuls flour 

3 eggs 1 teaspoonful cream tar- 
V2 teaspoonful soda tar 

Flavor with vanilla 
Bake half in two pans. To the remainder add 1 
cupful chopped raisins, V2 cifpful currants, a little 
citron, cinnamon and cloves, 3 tablespoonfuls molas- 
ses, a little flour. Bake this in two pans and put all 
together with jelly or iceing. H. E. Pearl. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

% cupful sugar IV2 cupfuls flour 

Yolk of 1 egsi; in a cup, fill 2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 
with milk ing powder 

Frost with the white of the egg or bake for a 
layer cake. Lillian Graves. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

3 cupfuls sugar 2 cupfuls butter 

4 cupfuls flour 1 cupful sweet milk 
2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 1 teaspoonful soda 

tar 3 pounds raisins 

2 pounds currants M pound candied citron 

y^ pound candied lemon 1 nutmeg 

2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon 1 teaspoonful cloves 



8 eggs 



Mrs. E. G. French. 



, B9— 

GOLD CAKE. 

V2 cupful butter 1 cupful sugar 

Vs cupful sweet milk Yolks of 3 eggs 

V2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful cream tar- 

tar 
Mrs. Henry Porter. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar 1/2 cupful sweet milk 

1 cupful flour 1 Qgg 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 1 teaspoonful soda 

tar Butter size of an egg 

Mrs. Arthur Pike. 



FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful butter 

3 eggs 1 cupful molasses 

1 teaspoonful cloves 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 nutmeg Vs cupful cold water 

IV^ teaspoonfuls soda 4% cupfuls flour 
1 cupful stoned raisins 14 cupful currants 
Yo cupful citron 
Beat whites and yolks of eggs separately. 

Mrs. Allen Atwood. 

FARMERS' FRUIT CAKE. 

1 egg 1 cupful sugar 

V2 cupful butter V2 cupful sour milk 

2 cupfuls flour 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 teaspoonful cloves 2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon 

2 teaspoonfuls nutmeg 1 cupful sour dried apples 

Soak apple over night, then chop fine and simmer 
2 hours in a cupful of molasses. Add the apple last. 

Mrs. H. H. Cowles. 



70 

SPONGE CAKE. 

2 eggs 1 cupful sugar 

l^ cupful sweet cream 1 cupful flour before sifting 

1/2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

A little salt Flavoring 

Mrs. Gould. 

SPICE CAKE. 

1 cupful brown sugar ^ cupful butter 

2 eggs 2V2 cupfuls flour 

V2 cupful milk 2 tablespoonfuls molasses 

1 teaspoonful cinnamon I/2 teaspoonful nutmeg 
and cloves 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cupful raisins 

Mrs. J. D. Odell. 

CREAM CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar Yolks of 2 eggs 

White of 1 egg V2 cupful sv^eet milk 

Butter size of a small egg 3 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 
IV2 cupfuls flour - ing powder 

Beat together and bake in two layers. L. C. M. 

PORK CAKE. 

1 pound salt pork 2 cupfuls black molasses 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful strong hot coffee 

2 pounds raisins 1 pound currants 

1 tablespoonful soda 1 tablespoonful of all kinds 

1 nutmeg spice 

7 cupfuls flour 

Mrs. Carrie Annis. 

HERMIT CAKE. 

2 eggs IV2 cupfuls brown sugar 
% cupful butter 1 cupful chopped raisins 
1 teaspoonful all kinds 6 teaspoonfuls milk 

spice 1 teaspoonful soda 

Flour to make a batter as thick as for griddle 
cakes. Frost the top. Mrs. Smith Hebb. 



-71- 



MARBLE CAKE. 



LIGHT PART. 



Whites of 3 eggs 
V2 cupful sugar 
2 cupfuls flour 



V2 cupful butter 
V2 cupful milk 
iy2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder 



DARK PART. 



Yolks of 3 eggs 1 cupful molasses 

1/2 cupful butter 2 cupfuls flour 

1 teaspoonful soda Va cupful milk 

Cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg 

Angie S. Titus. 

NUT CAKE. 



4 eggs 

1/2 cupful butter 
2V2 cupfuls flour 
1 cupful raisins 
1 teaspoonful lemon ex- 
tract 



1^2 cupfuls sugar 
V2 cupful milk 
2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 
ing powder 
1 cupful walnut meats 



C. R. Farrington. 



LEMON CAKE. 



3 eggs 

1/2 cupful butter 

2 cupfuls flour 

Makes three layers 



IV2 cupfuls sugar 

1 cupful milk 

2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 

ing powder 



filling for the above. 

1 egg Juice and grated peel of 1 

1 cupful sugar lemon 

1 tablespoonful flour 1 teaspoonful cold water 

Mix and bake in hot oven until thick, then cool 
and spread between the layers, 

Mrs. Thompson. 



FIG CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar 3 tablespoonfuls melted 

2 eggs butter 
1% cuptiils flour % cupful millv 

V2 teaspoonful soda Iteaspoonful cream tartar 

FILLING FOR ABOVE 

1 pound llgs Icupful sugar I/2 cupful water 

Boil 16 minutes, cool and spread between layers. 

Mrs. Thompson. 

COLD WATER SPONGE CAKE. 

1 small cupful sugar 2 eggs A little salt 

Beat 10 minutes; add 
ll^ cupfuls flour IV2 teaspoonfuls Royal 

Small V2 cupful cold water baking powder mixed 

1 teaspoonful vanilla with the flour 

Bake in a moderate oven 20 minutes. Do not 
open oven door for 15 minutes. Mrs. Sayles. 

JELLY ROLL. 

3 eggs 1 cupful of sugar 

2 tablespoonfuls sweet milk 1 cupful flour 

1 heaping teaspoonful Royal baking powder 
Beat the whites and yolks separately. Bake, 
While hot remove from the pan and lay in a cloth 
wet in cold water. Spread with jelly, roll a nd sprinkle 
with powdered sugar. Mrs. A. J. Gould. 

NUT CAKE. 

3 eggs IV2 cupfuls sugar 

14 cupful brown butter I/2 cupful sweet milk 
2V2 cupfuls flour Iteaspoonful cream tartar 

Yi teaspoonful soda 1 cupful butternut meats 

1 teaspoonful salt 

Alice G. Bradley. 



73 

DRIED APPLE CAKE. 
IV2 cupfuls dried apple 1 cupful molasses 
V2 cupful brown sugar 1 cupful sour milk 

Vs cupful butter 3 cupfuls flour 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful soda 

Spices of all kinds 
Soak the apple over night, then chop fine; simmer 
in the molasses until soft, then add the other ingred- 
ients. Mrs. Henry Porter. 

ORANGE CAKE. 
Beat yolks of 4 eggs and white of 1 egg, 1 cupful 
sugar, i/4cupful butter, V2 cupful milk, IV2 cupfuls 
flour, IV2 teaspoonfnls Royal baking powder, or % 
teaspoonful cream tartar and % teaspoonful soda 
instead. 

FILLING 

Beat white of 1 egg to a stiff froth, add 1 orange 
grated, 1 cupful sugar. Spread between layers. Use 
the whites of 2 eggs for frosting. Mrs. Thompson. 

PLAIN DARK CAKE. 
IV2 cupfuls sugar 3 tablespoonfuls molasses 

% cup butter 2 eggs 

V2 cupful sour milk 1 cupful chopped raisins 

1 teaspoonful soda 2 cupfuls flour 

A little of all kinds of spice 
Very nice. Mrs. W. H. Leslie. 

SPONGE CAKE. 
3 eggs iy2 cupfuls sugar 

2 cupfuls flour Vs cupful water or milk 

V2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

A pinch of salt Flavor -with lemon 

Beat the eggs 2 minutes, then add the sugar and 
beat 5 minutes, then 1 cupful flour with cream tartar 
beat 2 minutes, then the water or milk with soda and 
beat 1 minute, then the rest of flour with salt and 
beat 2 minutes. Bake in a quick oven 20 minutes. 

Mrs. W. Leslie, 



74 

PORK CAKE. 

1 cupful molasses 1 tea spoonful soda 

4 tablespooiifuls sugar 2 teaspoontuls cloves 

1 cupful pork 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

1 cujiful hot water 1 cupful raisins 

Chop the poi'k fine. Seed the raisins. Bake 40 
minutes in a brisk oven. Mrs. W. H. Leslie. 

WHITE CAKE (SPLENDID). 

2 even cupfuls sugar Scant V2 cupful butter 
1 cupful sweet milk 3 even cupfuls flour 

1 even teaspoonful soda 2 even teaspoonfuls cream 

tartar 
Whites of 4 eggs beaten stiff added last. Mix 
all with hand; add whites, then mix more. 

Mrs. Thompson. 

JELLY ROLL. 

2 eggs 1 cupful sugar 

6 tablespoonfuls sweet 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
milk V2 teaspoonful soda 

IV2 cupfuls flour 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Bake in a sheet which measures about 9x15 

inches, and in a quick oven ; turn out on a damp 

towel, spread with jelly and roll. 

Mrs. Arthur Pike. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One cupful hot water, V2 cupful butter; put on 
stove; when it boils stir in 1 cupful dry flour, take 
out all the lumps. When cool stir in 2 eggs well 
beaten and soda as large as a pea. Drop on tins and 
bake 20 minutes ; then look in ; bake 10 minutes 
more. When cold open the side and put in cream 
made as follows: One pint milk set in hot water until 
it boils, 2 tablespoonfuls corn starch wet in a little 
milk, 2 tablespoonfuls sugar, yolks of 2 eggs. Beat 
all and put in boiling. Add butter size of a nutmeg, 
2 teaspoonfuls lemon extract, and cool. 

Mrs. Thompson. 



75 

RAISIN LAYER CAKE. 

Yolks of 3 eggs White of 1 egg 

Ys cupful butter 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful milk 2 cupfuls flour 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

FILLING FOR ABOVE 

White of 2 eggs beaten stiff, 1 cupful chopped 
raisins. Make a syrup of % cupful sugar, 3 taljle- 
spoonfuls water, boil 5 minutes, pour over eggs slc^w- 
ly, add raisins, beat until cool. Mae L. Cheney. 

CREAM CAKE. 

4 eggs (whites and yolks 2 cupfuls sugar 

beaten separately) 1 cupful sweet cream 

2 heaping cupfuls flour 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar sifted with the flour 
Add the whites of eggs the last thing before the 
flour, and stir flour in gently without beating. 

Mrs. G. L. Johnson. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

2 Two squares of chocolate (melted), ''2 cupful 
sweet milk, yolk of 1 egg', boil until it thickens, 
stirring constantly. Then add, 1 cupful of sugar, V2 
cupful milk, 2 cupfuls of flour, 1 teaspoonful soda, 1 
teaspoonful vanilla, butter size of a walnut. Bake 
in 2 layers. 

FROSTING 

White of 1 egg, 1 cupful sugar. Boil sugar, with 
enough water to melt it, until it strings. Turn in the 
beaten white of the egg. Stir until cold. Flavor 
with vanilla. Persis L. McFarland. 

GOLD CAKE. 

3 cufuls sugar 1 cupful butter 

IV2 cupfuls sweet milk 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
V2 teaspoonful soda 5 cupfuls flour 

Yolks of 1 dozen eggs 

Mrs. Mary Jordan. 



76 

LEMON LAYER CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar Butter size of an egg 

2 eggs V2 cupful sweet milk 
l%Vupfuls flour 2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 
ing powder 

FILLING. 

Juice and grated rind 1 1 tablespoonful flour 

lemon 1 eg,g 

V2 cupful water V2 cupful sugar 

Cook in double boiler. Mrs. C. E. Ewers. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

1 cupful of sugar V2 cupful of butter 

1/4 cupful of sweet milk 2 cupfuls of flour 

1 teaspoonful of vanilla 1 V2 teaspoonfuls baking 
Whites of three eggs powder 

Make in 3 layers. 

FROSTING. 

Yolks of 3 eggs 1 cupful of sugar 

V2 teaspoonful- vanilla 
Beat 15 minutes. Put this in each layer and on 
the top. Mrs. Mary Jordan. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 9 eggs, pinch of salt, V2 teaspoonful 
cream tartar w^ith the eggs ; beat till 3'ou can turn 
your patter upside down ; add I14 cupful sugar, 1 
cupful flour sifted 5 times, 1 teaspoonful vanilla. 
Bake 50 minutes. Invert the pan when you take 
from the oven. Use a pan wnth a hole in the center. 
Frost. Mrs. Fairchild. 

WHITE CAKE. 

IV2 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful milk 

2 cupfuls flour 4 tablespoonfuls melted but- 
1 heaping teaspoonful ter 

Royal baking powder 
Whites of 3 eggs, beaten and added last. 

Mrs. Ida C. Churchill. 



77 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

1 cupful butter 2 cupfuls sugar 

1 cupful milk 4 cupfuls flour sifted with 2 

4 eggs teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

and 1 teaspoontul soda 
Take half the ingredients, put the yolks in the 
gold and the whites in the silver. Flavor diflferently, 

Mrs. J. Foster, 

COFFEE CAKE, 

1 cupful sugar % cupful melted butter 
V2 cupful strong coffee i/4 cupful molasses 

2 cupfuls flour 2 eggs 
Cinnamon and cloves 1 teaspoonful soda 

14 pound w^alnuts 1 cupful dates chopped fine 

Bake 1 hour Mrs. Ida C. Churchill. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

1 cupful corn starch 1 cupful butter 

2 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful sweet milk 
2 cupfuls flour Whites of 7 eggs 

Rub butter and sugar to a cream, mix 1 tea- 
spoonful cream tartar with the flour and corn starch, 
dissolve V2 teaspoonful soda in the milk and add to 
the sugar and butter, then add the flour and beaten 
whites of eggs. Flavor to taste. (Never fails to be 
good.) Mrs. G. L. J. 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 

1 cupful butter 3 cupfuls sugar 

1 cupful sweet milk 3 cupfuls flour 

1 cupful corn starch 2 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 

1 teaspoonful vanilla ing powder 

Whites of 12 eggs 

FILLING FOR ABOVE. 

Whites of 2 eggs, frosting sugar enough to make 
stiff, 1 cupful of English walnuts chopped ; put be- 
ween layers. Mrs. L. B. Cross. 



- — 78 

GOLD CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar % cupful butter 

1/2 cupful sweet milk I1/2 cupfuls flour 

Yolks of 8 eggs 2 heaping teaspoonfuls 

Royal baking powder 
Mrs. Fairchild. 

LOAF CAKE. 

1 cupful butter 2 cupfuls sugar 

3 cupfuls flour 3 eggs 

1 teaspoonful soda 1 cupful new milk 

1 grated nutmeg 
Beat 20 minutes. Mrs. Austin. 

CHOCOLATE GLACE CAKE. 

Beat to a cream a generous V2 cupful of butter 
and gradually work into this 1 cupful sugar. Add 1 
square of chocolate melted, also 2 unbeaten eggs. 
Beat vigorously for five minutes, then stir in 14 cupful 
milk and lastly IV2 cupfuls flour with which have 
been mixed 2 teaspoonftils baking powder. Flavor 
with vanilla. Pour into a buttered shallow cake pan 
and bake for V2 hour in a moderate oven. When cool 
spread with glace frosting. Jennie Bell. 

FRUIT JELLY CAKE. 

LIGHT PART. 

6 eggs (whites) IV2 cupfuls sugar 

1/2 cupful butter V2 cupful sweet milk 

2 cupfuls flour 1 heaping teaspoonful 

Royal baking powder 

DARK PART 

6 eggs (yolks) IV2 cupfuls dark sugar 

IV2 cupfuls flour V2 cupful butter 

V2 cupful sweet milk 1 pint stoned raisins 

1 teaspoonful cloves, nut- 1 heaping spoonful bak- 
meg and cinnamon ing powder 

Put together with jelly. Lillian Graves. 



CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE. 

Cream together 1 cupful of sugar and I/2 cupful of 
butter. Beat in % cupful milk, add V2 teaspoonful of 
soda, add 1% cupfuls flour with 1 teaspoonful cream 
tartar, 2 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately ; 
add the whites the last thing. Bake in layer tins. 

FILLING. 

Two tablespoonfuls grated chocolate, 4-Vo table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, a little milk; boil and thicken with 
flour, then spread between the layers. Put whipped 
cream on top. Mrs. Norris. 

BANBERRY TARTS. 

1 cupful chopped raisins 1 lemon 

1 beaten egg 1 cupful sugar 

1 Boston cracker 1 tablespoonful butter 

Roll cracker fine, squeeze juice and chop lemon 
fine, mix all together. Cut large circles of rich pie 
crust, put a small tablespoonful of filling in each and 
make turnover style. Lucy Baker. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful milk 

1 egg 2 cupfuls of flour 

Butter size of an egg 1 teaspoonful Royal bak- 

ing powder 
frosting. 

Four tablespoonfuls of sweet creain and confec- 
tionery sugarenough to thicken. Flavor with vanilla, 
melt chocolate and pour into the cream and sugar. 

Susan G. Deal. 

DOLLY VARDEN CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful butter beaten to 
V2 cupful sweet milk a cream 

2 cupfuls flour Whites of 3 eggs beaten to 
1 teaspoonful Royal bak- a froth 

ing powder Mrs. N. A. Waterman. 



PORK FRUIT CAKE. 

One egg, 1 cupful sugar, V2 cupful molasses, 1 
large half cupful fine chopped salt pork, 1 cupful sour 
milk, 1 teasponful each soda, cinnamon, cloves and 
allspice, 1 cupful seeded raisins, thoroughly mixed 
with 3 cupfuls flour. Mrs. S. F. Sayles. 

SNOW-BALL CAKE. 

1 cupful sugar % cupful butter 
V2 cupful milk 2 cupfuls flour 

Whites of 3 eggs beaten 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 
stiff V2 teaspoonful soda 

Mrs. S. F. S. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 

2 cupfuls white sugar 1 cupful butter 

1 cupful milk 3 eggs 

V2 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspooTifuI cream tartar 

3 cupfuls flour 

Beat butter and sugar together, add the yolks of 

eggs, then the beaten whites, dissolve the soda in the 

milk, rub the cream tartar in the flour and add last, 

Mrs. Smith Hebb. 

A GOOD FRUIT CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. 

2 cupfuls thick milk 2 cupfuls brown sugar 
14 cupful molasses V2 cupful butter 

1 cupful chopped raisins 1 teaspoonful cinnamon 

2 teaspoonfuls soda and nutmeg 
% teaspoonful cloves 4 cupfuls flour 

Bake in 2 tins. Mrs. B. S. Fullington, 

FIG FILLING. 

% pound of figs % cupful of sugar 

White of 1 Qgg^ Juice of an orange 

Soak the figs in warm water until soft, chop fine. 
Beat the egg to a stiff froth, add this the last thing. 
Very nice, Mrs. P'airchild. 



81 

WATERMELON CAKE. 

One cupful sugar, V2 cupful butter beaten to a 
cream, whites of 3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth, V2 cup- 
ful sweet milk, l^ teaspoonful soda dissolved in the 
milk, 2 cupfuls flour, 1 teaspoonful cream tartar in 
the flour, stir whites in last. Take out a little more 
than Vs of the batter and add to it red sugar enough 
to color it ; add a handful of seeded raisins. Bake in 
a round loaf with the red part in the center. 

Mrs. Norris. 

GOLDExN FROSTING. 

Yolks 3 eggs, 1 cupful sugar, beat 15 minutes or 
until stiff" enough to spread. Flavor with vanilla. 

SOFT FROSTING FOR CAKE. 

Two-thirds cupful flour and water enough to 
make a stiff" paste. Place in a double boiler and cook 
thoroughly. When cold add one cupful sugar, V2 cupful 
butter whipped to a cream, mix by adding a little at 
a time and flavor. Sprinkle over the top cocoanut 
or chocolate. Mrs. C. A. McFarland. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

Two tablespoonfuls sweet cream, 2 tablespoonfuls 
cocoa or grated chocolate. Thicken with confection- 
ers' sugar. Mrs. J. R. Hill. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

% cupful of grated choco- 1 cupful of sugar 

late 1 cupful of boiling water 

2 heaping teaspoonfuls of A small piece of butter 
corn starch A little salt 

Moisten the corn starch in a little cold water, add 

this to the boiling water, let it cook until thick, add 

a little vanilla. 



82 

APPLE CREAM FILLING FOR CAKE. 

Grate 1 large sour apple, add 1 tea-cupful of 
sugar and the white of 1 egg. Beat 20 minutes 
with a fork. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

Mrs. a. H. Buck. 

ROLLED JELLY CAKE. 

Three eggs, 1 cupful sugar, 1 cupful flour. 

Mrs. J. Foster. 

LAYER JELLY CAKE. 

One cupful cream, 3 cupfuls flour, 2 cupfuls sugar, 
4 eggs. Mrs. J. Foster. 



-83- 



-84- 



85 

B%Ec4D. 



'^Here is bread which strengthens men^s hearts 
and therefore is called ' The Staff of Life.' " 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING BREAD. 

Good flour, good yeast, pure water and sweet 
milk are the first essentials to the making of "Good 
Bread." Flour should alw^ays be sifted before meas- 
uring, and if kept in a cool pantry, it should be 
warmed before using. Milk and water should also 
be warm. It has been the general custom to mix 
bread at night, but the best bread makers now agree 
that it is better to raise it more quickly. More of 
the sweet, natural flavor and strength of the flour is 
retained if the dough rises quickly, and never more 
than until double its bulk. Kneading is necessary 
when water bread is made, but not for milk bread if 
all the ingredients are mixed thoroughly and it is cut 
down often with a knife. One of the important steps, 
and one often overlooked, is that the dough be well 
covered in all its stages until it is put into the oven. 
A crust is not desirable until the loaf is in the baking 
pan. Be very careful about using any flour beyond a 
dusting of the board w^hen shaping into loaves for 
often the failure to have good bread is caused by the 
careless use of a cup of flour which was needlessh' 
worked into the dough at this stage, causing the loaf 
to rise unevenly in the oven and bulge at the side. 
Butter the top of the loat when taken from the oven. 



86 

HOP YEAST. 

'' My nature is subdued to what it works in.'" — 
Shakespeare. 



3 potatoes 1 tablespoonful of salt 

8 or 10 hops % cupful of sugar 

1 quart boiling ^water 
Put hops and salt into a bowl and pour over them 
the boiling water. Peel and grate the potatoes, strain 
the liquid over them and add sugar. Set on the stove 
a few njinutes tp thicken. When milk is warm, stir 
in one cupful of good yeast, cover and put in a warm 
place to rise. Mrs. Smith. 

WHITE BREAD. 

11 cupfuls Ceresota flour 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 
2 tablespoonfuls lard 1 tablespoonful salt 

2 cupfuls of scalded sweet 2 cupfuls of water, 

milk 1/2 cupful of water, 1/2 cake 

of compressed yeast 
dissolved in it 

Rub into the flour, the lard. Mix milk, water, 
sugar, salt, and then the dissolved 3^east. Add the 
flour, beating thoroughly. Let rise over night. This 
will make three loaves. Mrs. A. C. Whitten. 

BREAD MADE QUICKLY. 

1 cake compressed yeast 1 cupful warm water 
1 teaspoonful salt 1 cupful warm milk 

Flour as required 
Dissolve the yeast in the water, add one cupful of 
flour, mix well and let it rise in a bowl placed in a 
pan of hot water half an hour. When the sponge is 
foamy, add the milk, salt and flour enough to make a 
stiff dough, knead until smooth. Divide into 3 parts 
and shape into long rolls. Let them rise until double 
the bulk, then bake about half an hour. H. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 
1 cupful warm water i/4 cake of 3'east 

V2 cupful of molasses Vo teaspoouful of soda 

1 teaspoonful of salt 1 cupful of flour 

2 cupfuls of graham flour 
Let this rise over night. In the morning turn 
without kneading, into baking tins. Let it rise, then 
bake about one hour. Mrs. Oscar McFarland. 

SCOTCH SHORT BREAD. 
1 pound of flour V2 pound of coflee A sugar 

V2 pound of butter (before A little salt 

it is salted) 

Beat butter and sugar to a cream, add flour and 
salt, mix well and roll out about ^4 inch thick, cut in 
small squares, bake in a slow oven. These will need 
to be very stiff when rolled out or they will melt and 
not be good. They will keep for weeks and are much 
better after being kept a week. 

Mrs. E. G. French. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

1 pint milk (scalded) 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

2 tablespoonfuls butter Vi yeast cake 

A little salt 
Make a thick batter and let it rise over night. In 
the morning add a ver3^ little soda dissolved in milk. 
Knead 15 or 20 minutes, Let it rise, then roll out 
and cut with a biscuit cutter, brush over with melted 
butter and fold. Let them rise until very light, bake 
20 minutes in a brisk oven. Brush them with melted 
butter after removing from the oven. 

Mrs. Charlotte McFarland. 

GRAHAM BREAD, NO. 2. 
2 cupfuls sour milk V2 cupful of sugar 

A pinch of salt 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 cupful white flour 2 cupfuls entire wheat 

This will fill a common bread tin. 

Mrs. J. R. Hill. 



88 

SALLY LUNN. 

1/2 cupful of sugar 1 cupful of milk 

1 egg 2 teaspoonfuls butter 

3 teaspoonfuls baking Flour to make as stiff as 

powder cake 

Bake in a quick oven in a sheet. Nice for tea with 
butter. Mrs. Fairchild. 

SOUP STICKS. 

1/2 cake yeast Vi cupful warm water 

1 heaping tablespoonful 1 cupful scalded milk 

of butter 1 heaping tablespoonful 

V2 teaspoonful of salt of sugar 

White of 1 egg Flour for a stiff dough 

Add the white of the egg (beaten stiff) the last 
thing. Knead it long and vigorously. Let it rise in 
a warm place until light, then knead it down in the 
bowl. Take out pieces as large as an egg, roll first 
in a ball, then into long strips about nine inches long 
and three-fourths of an inch thick. Place them quite 
a distance apart on the baking tin as they must not 
touch Avhile rising or baking. Let them rise and bake 
slowly. They should be nearly all crust and if they 
dry thoroughly before they are baked they will be 
crisp and brittle. N. F. 

CREAM TARTAR BISCUIT. 

1 quart flour i/^ cupful butter or lard 

4 teaspoonfuls Royal and butter 

baking powder A little salt 

1 teaspoonful sugar 1 pint of milk 

Sift baking powder through the flour, rub in the 
shortening with the sugar and salt. Mix with the 
milk as soft as can be handled, roll out and cut w^ith 
biscuit cutter, lay close together in dripping pan and 
1)ake in a very hot oven about 20 minutes. 

Mrs. Mary Jordan. 



89 

EGG BISCUIT. 

Make a dough as for the cream tartar biscuit and 
add the last thing the whites of 2 eggs beaten very 
light. Your biscuits will be as light as feathers. 

N. A. Fisher. 

MUFFINS. 

2 tablespoonfuls butter 2 cupfuls of flour 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar 2 teaspoonfuls of baking 

1 cupful of milk powder, or 1 of soda 

1 egg and 2 of cream tartar 

Beat butter and sugar together, add the beaten 
egg and beat again, then add the milk and flour. 
Put in the baking powder the last thing and give a 
good beating. Bake in muflin rings or gem pans, in 
a quick oven, about 20 minutes. 

BUNS. 

14 cupful yeast ^4 cupful warm water 

1 cupful scalded milk 1 tablespoonful sugar 

V2 teaspoonful salt 2 cupfuls flour 

Mix these ingredients into a batter. Place the 
bowl in a pan of warm water to rise and when full of 
bubbles add 1 egg well beaten, V4 cupful melted but- 
ter V2 cupful currants, V4, teaspoonful cinnamon, flour 
to make a stiff" dough. Knead 20 minutes, then let 
it rise and when light shape into small balls. Place 
close together in a pan and when very light bake in a 
moderate oven. When done brush them over with 
the beaten white of an egg with a little sugar. H. 

OATMEAL BREAKFAST ROLLS. 

2 cupfuls cooked oatmeal 1 cupful scalded milk 

3 cupfuls of flour I/2 cupful of yeast or 
A little salt % yeast cake 

Mix thoroughly at night and let rise in a warm 
place. In the morning take out into roll pans. Let 
them rise. Bake 20 minutes. 



90 

BUNS. 

1/2 yeast cake V2 cupful sugar 

V2 cupful butter IV2 cupfuls milk 

Mix together at night, in the morning add sugar 
some currants and cinnainon. Mrs. Knight. 



BUNS. 

2 cupfuls bread sponge 1 cupful sweet milk 
1 cupful of sugar % cupful of raisins 

Mix quite thick and let them rise. Mould in but- 
ter, rise and bake. Mrs. Henry L. Porter. 



MUFFINS. 

1 pint of milk 2 tablespoonfuls butter 

1/^ cupful of yeast or 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

14 yeast cake 2 eggs 

V2 teaspoonful soda A little salt 

Flour to make a stiff batter 

If you want them for tea, set them to rise at 
noon. When risen, put into rings without stirring 
down. Let them rise in the rings 15 minutes before 
putting into the oven. Bake V2 hour. 

Mrs. C. a. McFarland. 



DROP CAKES. 

1 pint milk 1 egg 

A little salt VV2 pints flour 

This will make 1 dozen. If baked in the morning, 
dip the tops in cold water and put into a warm oven 
about five minutes before tea. Very good. 

Mrs. Sarah Hodges. 



91 

WHEAT DROP CAKES. 

2 cupfuls flour 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

3 teaspooonfuls baking 1 egg 

powder V2 cupful milk 

14 teaspoonful salt 1 tablespoonful melted 

butter 

Mix the dr3' ingredients and pass through a sieve. 
Beat the egg and stir it and the milk into the dry in- 
gredients, add the Ijutter last. Have ready a kettle 
of hot fat, dip a dessert spoon into the hot fat, take 
up a spoonful of the mixture and drop into the fat. 
Fry about six minutes or till done through. Drain 
on soft paper. C. S. 

POPOVERS NO. 1. 

1 pint sweet milk 1 pint ol flour 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful baking 

A little salt powder 

Bake in a hot oven. Lillian C. Gr.wes. 

POPOVERS NO. 2. 

3 cupfuls of milk 3 cupfuls flour 

3 eggs A little salt 



-tofe' 



Bake one-half hour. Mrs. W. Jones. 

POPOVERS NO. 3. 

1 cupful flour 1 cupful new milk 

1 egg A piece of butter the size 

A little salt of an egg- 

Bake in gem irons in a quick oven. 

Mrs. C. E. Ewers. 

POPOVERS NO. 4. 

1 egg (well beaten) 1 cupful of sweet milk 
1 cupful of flour A little salt 

Bake about 20 minutes in hot irons and a quick 
oven. Mrs. A. N. Dodc.k. 



92 

FEATHER MUFFINS. 

3 eggs (well beaten) V4, cupful of sugar 

V2 cupful of melted butter V2 cupful sweet milk 
2 cupfuls of flour 1 teaspoonful baking 

powder 
Mix sugar and eggs, add butter, milk, flour and 
baking powder. "Sunset Hill House." 

SPIDER CAKE. 
1% cupfuls granulated 1 cupful of sour milk 

corn meal Vs cupful wheat flour 

1 teaspoonful salt 2 eggs beaten well 

1 teaspoonful of soda 2 cupfuls sweet milk 

1 tablespoonful butter 

Mix together the meal, flour, salt, soda and but- 
ter. Add the eggs, then 1 cupful of sweet milk and 
the sour milk. Butter a spider with a piece of butter 
the size of an egg. Pour in the mixture and add, 
without stirring, the second cupfnl of sweet milk. 
Bake in quite a brisk oven. L. M. 

BISCUIT. 

1 cupful sweet milk V2 cupful sour cream 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 1 teaspoonful of soda 

tar Flour 

A little salt 

Lillian Graves. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD, NO. 1. 

4 cupfuls of corn meal 2 cupfuls of wheat flour 

1 cupful of molasses 1 quart of sweet milk 

1 teaspoonful soda 
Steam 2 hours and bake 1. Mrs. B. L. Austin. 

BROWN BREAD, NO. 2. 

2 cupfuls sweet milk 1 cupful of molasses 
1 cupful sour milk 2 cupfuls wheat flour 
1 teaspoonful soda 3 cupfuls corn meal 

A little salt 
Steam 3 hours. Mrs. H. H. Cowles 



93 

BROWN BREAD, NO. 3. 

1 cupful sour milk 3 cupfuls skimmed milk 

1 cupful of molasses or 3 cupfuls corn meal 

dark maple sugar 2 cupfuls of coarse flour 

1 teaspoonful of soda 1 teaspoonful of salt 

Steam 3 hours or bake. Mrs. C. J. Bell. 

BROWN BREAD, NO. 4. 

2 cupfuls sour milk 14 cupful of molasses 

1 teaspoonful soda V^ teaspoonful salt 

2 cupfuls of Indian meal 1 cupful of flour 

V2 cupful of sweet milk 
Steam 2 hours and bake 1. Mrs. Freeman. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

1 cupful sour milk or but- 1 cupful of flour 
termilk 1 cupful of meal 

1/2 cupful of sugar 1 egg 

1 teaspoonful of soda A little shortening 

Mrs. J. HiCKEY. 

SNOW ROLLS. 

One pint scalded milk, V2 cupful butter. When 
cool, add 1 yeast cake dissolved in V2 cupful warm 
water, 1 small half cupful sugar, 1 teaspoonful salt, 
flour enough to make very soft batter. Let rise, roll 
out, cut, spread with melted butter, fold over. Let 
rise once more and bake in quick oven. No kneading 
required. Very nice. Mrs. R. Waterbury. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

4 cofifee-cupfuls of Indian 2 cupfuls of coarse flour 
meal either wheat or rye 

1 tablespoonful of salt 1 teacupful of molasses 
Boiling water enough to make a thin batter 
When nearly cold, add one-half cupful of yeast. 

Put in a warm place until it cracks over the top, 

which should be smooth. Bake 5 or 6 hours. 

Mrs. Powers. 



94 

BROWN BREAD NO. 5. 

2 cupfuls Indian meal 2 cupfuls rye 

2 cupfuls sour inilk 1 cupful molasses 

1 cupful boiling water 2 teaspoonfuls soda 

1 teaspoonful salt 1/2 teaspoonful ginger 
Steam 3 hours. Mrs. Thompson. 

BROWN BREAD NO. 6. 

2 cupfuls meal IV2 cupfuls boiling water 

1 cupful sour milk 1 cupful of molasses 

1 cupful rye or graham 1 teaspoonful soda 
1 teaspoonful salt 
Pour the boiling water over the meal. When cool 
add the other ingredients. Steam 3 hours. 

Mrs. N. a. Waterman. 

BROWN BREAD NO. 7. 

2 bowlfuls stale bread 1 cupful Indian meal 

crumbs 1 cupful sour milk 

1 coffee-cupful maple 1 teaspoonful soda 

sugar 1 tablespoonful salt 

Soak the bread crumbs in the sour milk until soft. 
Steam 3 hours. Mrs. B. A. Hunt. 







-95- 



-96- 



97 

"BREAKFAST AND TEA. 



" You would like woman to become a houeshold 
drudge.^' " Yes, I would, only drudge doesnH sound 
well. Call her a ministering angel instead, and it will 
come to the same thing. ^^ 



BIRD'S NEST TOAST. 

Break eggs carefully, put whites in a deep dish, 
leave yolks in the shells ; beat whites very light, salt 
then heap in the shape of a nest on slices of dipped 
and buttered toast; put in the center of each nest one 
of the yolks, a little pepper and butter. Brown 
in the oven. Mrs. M. P. Stevens. 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

A quart mashed potato, a tea-cupfttl of broken 
butter, heaping teaspoonful salt stirred in while hot. 
Keep the potato covered in a hot place ; a cupful of 
cream (or rich milk) set on to w&rm, 4 eggs, whites 
and yolks beaten separately. A large, thickly but- 
tered dish is used for baking. Bake 20 minutes, or 
until nicely browned. Mrs, B. G. Fullington. 

THE BEST BAKED BEANS. 

Don't soak overnight, but pick over in the morn- 
ing and v^ash. For every quart of dry beans take a 
teaspoonful of soda and cover the beans v^ith w^ater 
and let boil until the water is green, stirring occa- 
sionally, drain off, add more water, stir and drain off, 
add more water and let come to a boil, drain off, 
put into the bean pot, add 14 cupful sugar and a 
pound of salt pork, cover with water and put in the 
oven and bake slowly all day. As fast as the water 
cooks out of them add more. The beans -will be dark 
red and juicy and whole. Mrs. B. Rogers. 



98 

POTATO PUFF. 

1 pint mashed potato V2 cupiul melted butter 

1 cupful sweet milk Salt and pepper to taste 

Add the yolks of 3 eggs and beat the whole mix- 
ture till it looks smooth, then stir in the whites of 
the eggs beaten stiff and bake in quick oven 30 
minutes. Mrs. R. G. Prentiss. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Three cupfuls finely chopped chicken, season wath 
tea-spoonful chopped parsley, piece of an onion, salt 
and pepper to taste. Scald 1 cupful milk, stir in table- 
spooniul butter and flour, When cold add to chicken. 
Shape in balls, roll in beaten egg and, bread crumbs, 
and fry. L. Welch. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

2 cupfuls chopped cold 1 tablespoonful butter 

potatoes 1 cupful milk 

2 tablespoonfuls flour 2 eggs well beaten 

Mix the whole with the cold potato until 
thoroughly light, put in a pudding dish and bake to 
a golden brown. The quality depends on the very 
thorough beating of the eggs, so the potatoes will 
be light and porous after baking. 

Mrs. H. E. Fairchild. 

BANANA SHORT-CAKE. 

1 pint flour 1 large teaspoonful Royal 

Ys cupful shortening made baking powder 

moist with milk 

Slice 3 bananas and 1 orange; grate the best of 
the yellow orange rind; mix with a cupful of sugar. 
Split the freshly made cake, butter and fill with the 
prepared fruit; 4 spoonfuls of sweet cream is a great 
addition. The -white of an egg can be beaten with it 
and sweetening and flavoring added. 

Mrs. B. L. Austin. 



99 

BEST DUTCH CHEESE. 

Scald the milk until the curd settles to the bot- 
tom of the pan; strain and press. For every pint of 
the curd add a piece of butter the size of an ei^g and 
salt to taste. Work all together with the hands until 
it creams; pack in molds. Mrs. B. Rogers. 

CINNAMON DROPS. 

1 egg 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful molasses l^ cupful butter 

1 cupful water 2 teaspoonfuls cinnamon 

1 heaping teaspoonful 5 cupfuls flour 

soda 

Bake in cups. Mr . A. Pike. 

BREAKFAST GEMS. 

1 egg 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

2 tablespoonfuls butter % cupful milk 

1 cupful flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream 

1 teaspoonful soda tartar 

Bake 15 minutes in a hot oven 

Mrs. O. Buck. 

HAM CROQUETTES. 

1 cupful cooked ham, 2 cupfuls mashed potatoes 

chopped fine 1 tal3lespoonful butter 

2 eggs Little pepper and mustard 

Beat the eggs and beat all into potato ; shape 
into balls, roll in bread crumbs, then in beaten egg 
and again in bread crumbs, and fry. Mrs. Welch. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

One cupful grated cheese mixed with 1 cupful 
flour, V2 teaspoonful salt, pinch of cayenne pepper 
and piece of butter size of an egg ; add enough cold 
water to enable one to roll the paste, then cut in 
strips 7 inches long by i/^ inch wide ; put on tins and 
bake 5 or 10 minutes. Mrs. L. M. Jones. 

LofG. 



—100 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

One can salmon. Break to pieces fine with fingefs; 
1 tablespoontul finely chopped celery, 1 teaspoonfiil 
chopped parsley, little grated onion, salt pepper and 
1 tablespoonfui lemon juice. Mix all together with 
V2 cupfiil sweet cream ; shape in croquetts, roll in 
beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry. 

Mrs, W, 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Peel and slice potatoes thin. Butter an earthen 
dish, put in a layer of potato, season with salt, pep- 
per and butter, a bit of onion chopped fine ; sprinkle 
on a little flour. Now put on smother layer of potato 
and the seasoning'. Continue in this way till the dish 
is filled. Just before putting into the oven pour a 
cupful of milk over. Bake % of an hour. 

Mrs- H. Maxfield, 

POTATO SOUFFLE. 

6 large smooth potatoes V2 cupful boiling milk 
1 tablespoonfui butter Whites of 4 eggs 
Salt and pepper to taste 
Bake 45 minutes. Take the potatoes from the 
oven and with a sharp knife cut them in two length- 
wise ; scoop out the potato with a spoon and put in 
a hot bowl ; mash light and fine ; add the seasoning, 
butter and milk and then half the whites of the eggs- 
Fill the skins Avith the mixture, cover with the re- 
maining white of the egg, and brown in the oven- 
Great care must be taken not to burn the skins. 

Mrs. H. C. Fullington. 

BREAKFAST ROLLS- 

1 crtp sweet milk V2 cup sugar 

1 egg 1 pint flour 

Butter size of an egg 2 teaspoonfuls cream tartar 

1 teaspoonful soda Bake 

This will make 12 foils- Mrs. F. W. Holmes, 



■ 101— 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 

2 cupful s milk 1 teaspoouful salt 

1 tablespoonful each of 1 salt-spoonful pepper 

butter and flour Ms cupful stale bread 

3 eggs crumbs 

2 cupfuls raw chicken 1 teaspoonful chopped 

meat chopped fine parsley 

Make a white sauce of the milk, flour, butter, salt 
and pepper. Add the bread crumbs and cook 2 min- 
utes. Add chicken and yolks of eggs well beaten, the 
parsley, and lastly the whites beaten stiff. Bake in 
buttered pudding dish 35 minutes. Serve immedi- 
ately with 

MUSHROOM SAUCE. 

Two tablespoonfuls butter melted, add 2 table- 
spoonfuls flour, iVa cupfuls chicken stock, 5 pepper- 
corns, 1 slice onion and carrot, a sprig of parsley, and 
blade of mace. Simmer 30 minutes. Add % cupfnl 
of milk. Strain. Add mushrooms cut in slices. Salt 
and pepper to taste. Cook 3 minutes. The souffle i.s 
nice without the sauce which may be omitted. Must 
be served as soon as taken from the oven as it will 
fall if allowed to stand. 
Miss Charlotte Wills, Boston Cooking School. 

TEA OR BREAKFAST GEMvS. 

1 cupful sweet milk 1 egg 

1 pint flour 1 tablespootifiil shorten- 

1 tablespoonful sugar ing 

1 tablspoonful baking 1 teaspoonful salt 

powder 

Bake in tin or iron gem pans. 

Belle L. Butler, New York CitjN 



-102- 



-103- 



- — 104— 

SMALL CAKES & COOKIES 



*' Variety's the spice of life/' 



GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful butter V2 cupful sour milk 

1 tablespoonful vinegar 1 teaspoonful soda 

1 teaspoonful ginger Flour to roll 

Mrs. Thompson, 

COOKIES. 

1 V2 cupfuls sugar % cupful butter 

2 eggs 2 tablespoonfuls sweet 
1 heaping teaspoonful milk 

baking powder V2 teaspoonful salt 

Sprinkle a little sugar on Flour to roll 
top 

Mrs. Thompson. 

SPONGE DROPS. 

3 eggs 1 cupful sugar 

1 teaspoonful cream tar- V2 teaspoonful soda 
tar IV2 cupfuls flour 

Salt 
Beat eggs and sugar till very light. Sift cream 
tartar and soda with flour 3 times. Beat all till light, 
place 3 inches apart in spoonfuls and bake in quick 
oven. Eaten with ice cream. Mrs. G. E. Conger, 

COOKIES. 

1 cupful white sugar 1 cupful sour cream 

1 teaspoonful soda Little salt 

Flour to roll Mrs. Foster. 



-105- 



COOKIES NO. 2. 

1 cupful sugar 2 eggs 

2 tablespoonfuls water V2 teaspoonful soda 
Flavor lemon. Flour to roll 

Mrs. J. F. 
GINGER SNAPS. 

Vo Cupful butter 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful molasses 1 teaspoonful ginger 

2 teaspoonfuls baking Flour enough to roll 

powder 

Mrs. Goul,d. 
LEMON COOKIES. 

1^ cupfuls sugar 1 egg 

% cupful butter ^ V2 cupful Cream 

V2 cupful sour milk Salt 

1 teaspoonful soda Juice and rind 1 lemon 

Flour to roll 

S. C. Buck. 

CREAM TARTS. 

Fill tart shell with whipped cream, then drop a 
teaspoonful of jully on top of each. P. D. B. 

SMALL CAKES. 

1 cupful sour creanl Vs cupful butter 

IVs cupfuls sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 

Salt, and flour to roll 

Angie TlTtJS. 
GINGER CAKES. 

Boil 1 cupful molasses, add 1 tablespoonful gin- 
g^er, 1 teaspoonful soda, 2 of cream tartar, butter 
Bize of an egg^ flour till stiff. Mrs. Thompson. 



\ 

- — lot)— 

HERMITS. 

2 eggs 11/2 cupfuls sugar 

1 cupful butter 1 cupful currants 

1 teaspoonful soda dis- 1 teaspoonful each of 

solved in a little milk cloves, cinnamon and 

nutmeg 
Roll quite thin, sprinkle with sugar before baking, 

Mrs. E, E. Holmes. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful lard 

1 egg 1 cupful molasses 

1 teaspoonful ginger 1 teaspoonful soda 
Mix very hard, roll cjuite thin. 

Mrs. E. E, Holmes. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 

2 eggs V2 cupful butter 

3 teaspoonfuls Royal bak- 3 cupfuls flour 

ing powder 1 cupful milk 

2 tablespoonfuls sugar 1 cupful raisins seeded and 

chopped 
Steam in small cups 30 minutes. If left too long 
they will be heavy. Eaten with wine sauce. 

Mrs. F. W. Holmes. 

CREAM COOKIES. 

1^4 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful sour cream 

1 egg 1 teaspoonful lemon 

1 teaspoonful soda Flour to roll 

M. P. S. 

MOTHER^S COOKIES. 

2 eggs 2 cupfuls sugar 
1 cupful cream 1 cupful butter 
1 large teaspoonful soda Flour to roll 

Mrs. Ware. 



—107— 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful molasses 2 tablespoontuls white 
4 tablespoonfuls butter sugar 

4 tablespoonfuls boiling 1 teaspoonful soda 
water Ginger to taste 

Put soda in a cup, add the boiling water, then fill 
the cup with molasses, add the butter, sugar and gin- 
ger and flour to roll out very thin. Mrs. Leslie. 

GINGERBREAD. 

2 cupfuls flour 1/2 cupful sugar 

V2 cupful molasses Butter size of an €:^g 

1 teaspoonful ginger 1 teaspoonful soda 

% cupful l)oiling water 

Mrs. N. a. Waterman. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful sugar 

1 even tablespoonfulsoda 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar 

1 tablespoonful ginger 
Boil the molasses and stir the soda into it. Have 
the egg, beaten with the sugar and ginger and stir in- 
to the molasses and bake quickh^ 

Lillian C. Graves. 

HERMITS. 

2 eggs 1 cupful butter 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful raisins (stoned) 

A little soda Spices of all kinds {Vo tea- 

spoonful of each) 
Flour to roll and cut, then bake. 

Mrs. J. HiCKEY. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful lard or butter 1 cupful molasses 
1 tablespoonful ginger 1 heaping teaspoonful soda 
Flour enough to make a stiff dough, roll thin. 
Bake quick. Mrs. H. C. Fullington. 



—108 

GINGERBREAD. 

2V3 cupfuls flour 1% teaspootifuls soda 

2 teaspoonfuls ginger 1 cupful molasses 

V2 teaspoonful salt 1 cupful sour milk 

l^ cupful melted shortening 
Put all the dry ingredients together and pass them 
through a seive several times that they may become 
thoroughh^ mixed, then add the molasses, sour milk 
and shortening and beat vigorously. Pour into 
shallow buttered pan and bake half an hour in mod- 
erate oven. C. S. 

SPICED COOKIES. 

IV2 cupfuls brown sugar 1 cupful butter 
2 eggs . 1 cupful currants 

2 large spoonfuls sweet 1 small teaspoonful soda 
milk All kinds of spices 

Flour to roll 

Mrs. W. G. Jones. 

LADY FINGERS. 

1 cupful sugar 1 egg 

V2 cupful butter (beaten Vi cupful milk 

together) V2 teaspoonful soda 

1 teaspoonful cream tar- 1 pint flour 

tar l^A teaspoonfuls vanilla 

Cut in strips, roll in sugar, bake in quick oven. 

Mary L. Fullington. 

HERMITS. 

2 eggs 11/2 cupfuls white sugar 

V2 cupful butter 1 cupful currants or chop- 

1 teaspoonful cloves ped raisins 

1 teaspoonful nutmeg 1 teaspoonful of allspice 
1 teaspoonful of soda dissolved in 2 tablespoonfulsof 
sweet milk 

Mrs. Mary JoRDEN. 



109 

HERMIT COOKIES. 

1 egg 1 large cupful sugar 

% cupful butter 1 teaspoonful of soda in 

V2 teaspoonful of cloves hot water 

1 cupful of raisins stoned H teaspoonful nutmeg 
and chopped Flour to roll out like 

cookies 
Mrs. H. M. Stratton. 

HERMITS. 

iy2 cupfuls sugar 2 eggs 

1 cupful butter 1 teaspoonful soda 

Vs cupful sweet milk 1 teaspoonful cloves 

1 teaspoonful cinnamon 1 cupful nice raisins, seed- 
ed and chopped fine 
Sprinkle with sugar, bake in a quick oven. 

Alice G. Bradley, 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful granulated sugar 
V2 cupful butter V2 cupful lard 

2 teaspoonfuls soda IV^ teaspoonfuls ginger 

1 tablespoonful vinegar % cupful strong coffee 

Pinch of salt 
Flour to make stiff, roll thin and bake in hot 
oven, Mrs. J. F. Wilson. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One-half cupful butter, 1 cupful cold w^ater boiled 
together, add 1 cupful flour, simmer a short time. 
When partly cold add 3 eggs, 1 at a time, without 
beating. Drop on a pan in dessert spoonfuls, bake 
thoroughly in a very hot oven. When cold fill with 
cream made of 2 cupfuls milk, 1 cupful sugar, 2 eggs, 

2 small tablespoonfuls flour. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. J. D. Odell. 



..^110 , 

FINGERS. 

^ eggs beaten light 1 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 cupful sugar l^ teaspoonful soda 

Flour to roll C[uite thin 
Cut in strips about 6 inches long and 1 inch wide 

Emma R. Holmes, 

SUGAR GINGERBREAD. 

1 cupful sugar V2 cupful butter 

2 small eggs or 1 egg and 1 teaspoonful ginger 

yolk l^ teaspoonful soda 

Flour to make stiff and roll thin 

Carrie L. Cross. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

1 egg 1 cupful sugar 

1 cupful molasses 1 teaspoonful ginger 

1 teaspoonful soda 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar 

A pinch of salt Flour to roll stiff 

Bake in a hot oven, Mrs. J. R. Hill, 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

1 cupful cold boiled oat- 1 cupful sugar 

meal 1 cupful flour 

Butter size of an egg Pinch of salt 

1 teaspoonful soda 2 teaspoonfuls cream 

tar 
Roll thin and bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. J. R. Hill. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

1 egg 1/2 cupful sugar, scant 

V4, cupful shortening Vo cupful molasses 

V2 cupful boiling v^ater V2 teaspoonful ginger 
1 teaspoonful soda IV2 cupfuls flour 

Pinch salt 
Bake in shallov^r tins. Mrs. L. M. FullingTon. 



— Ill— 

OAT FLAKE COOKIES. 

2 cupfuls flour 2 cupfuls oat flake 

1 small cupful sugar 1 small cupful butter 

¥2 teaspoonful soda V4, cupful hot water 

Pinch of salt and flour to roll thin 

Mrs. J. F. Wilson. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

V2 cupful lard 1/2 cupful butter 

V2 cupful sugar 1 cupful molasses 

1 egg 1 tal3lespoonful ginger 

1 teaspoonful soda Flour to roll 

Mrs. H. L. Porter. 

CREAM ROLLS. 

One cupful sugar, 1 egg, 3 tablespoonfuls old 
sweet milk (a small piece soda in it) ; fill the cup with 
sweet milk ; iy2 cupfuls flour, sifted with 1 heaping 
teaspoonful Royal baking pow^der, a little nutmeg, a 
little salt, 14 cupful English currants or cut raisins, 
A hot oven. Mrs. W. B. Frink. 

SOUR CREAM GINGERBREAD. 

1 cupful sour cream 1 cupful molasses 
Pinch of salt 1 teaspoonful soda 

2 teaspoonfuls each of cinnamon, ginger and allspice. 

Flour to make a batter that will fall readily from 
the spoon. Mrs. E. R. W. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful molasses 

1 cupful butter and lard V2 cupful boiling water 

(mixed) 1 teaspoonful ginger 

1 teaspoonful soda dis- 1 teaspoonful salt 

solved in the water Flour to roll 

Mrs. O. a. McFarland. 



BOW KNOTS. 

Cut thin puff paste into half inch strips and stiapef 
them on the baking tin into the form of a double 
bow knot- When baked put jelly on each loop of the 
bow, ' Mary. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

1 egg' 1 cupful molasses 

Vs cupful melted butter" V2 cupful milk 
1 teaspoonful soda 1 teaspoonful ginger 

2^2 cupfuls flour A little salt 

Mrs. E, R. Wheeler. 

PLAIN COOKIES. 

1 cupful sugar ' V2 cupful lard or butter 

14 cupful sour milk V2 teaspoonful soda 

Flour to roll soft 
A little grated orange peel is very delicate flavoi'-' 
ing for these. Grace Wheeler, St. Cloudy Minn.^ 




113 

FRIED CAKES & FRITTERS 



" Men's faiths are wafer-cakes. '^ 



CORN FRITTERS. 

1 cupful grated corn 1 egg 

Small piece butter 2 tablespoonfuls sweet milk 

2 tablespoonfuls flour Pinch of salt 

A little pepper 
Drop from spoon into melted butter in frying 
pan and fry until brown. Add more flour if necesssary 
to make the batter of proper consistency. 

Mrs. J. F. Wilson. 

AUNT ROXANA'S RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

One quart milk, 1 cake of yeast, made in a sponge 
and raised over night; in the morning add 1 cupful 
melted butter and lard (mixed), 2 cupfuls sugar, 1 
cupful warm milk, 1 small teaspoonful soda, 1 of 
salt, 2 eggs and nutmeg; mix well but not too stiff; 
keep warm and raise very light; roll, cut in squares 
(but never twist), lay upon warm board, cover with 
cloth and let them stand until puffy and light ; then 
fry. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

1 cupful milk 1 eg^g 

2 teaspoonfuls baking Pinch of salt 

powder 2 large tart apples 

Flour to make stiff' 
Slice the apples very thin and stir lightly into the 
batter. Drop iDy spoonfuls into hot lard and fry to a 
nice brown. Nice with maple syrup. 

Mary P. Stearns. 



114 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 egg % cupful sugar 

2 teaspoonfuls butter 1 teaspoonful salt 
A little nutmeg 1 cupful milk 

3V2 cupfuls flour 2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 

1 teaspoonful soda tar 

A. C. W. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 cupful sugar 2 eggs 

1 tablespoonful of melted 1 cupful sweet milk 

shortening 1 teaspooonful salt 

2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 1 teaspoonful soda in the 

tar in the flour and milk 

nutmeg Flour to roll 

Mrs. W. G.Jones. 

CRULLERS. 

1 tumbler sugar 3 eggs 

3 tablespoonfuls butter 
Very stiff. Fry in hot lard. Mrs. Ewers. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 cupful sugar 1 egg 

1 teaspoonful soda 2 teaspoonfuls cream tar- 

1 cupful sweet milk tar 

Butter half the size of an Flour enough to stiffen 
egg 

Mrs. Sarah Hodges. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

1 cupful sugar 2 eggs 

2 cupfuls sour milk 2 large spoonfuls butter 
1 teaspoonful soda A little salt 

Flour to roll 

Mrs, J. Foster. 



—115—- 

FRIED CORN. 

Cut and scrape from the cob green corn enough 
for a pint, to this add 1 egg well beaten, 1 cupful 
flour, % cupful cream or buttermilk, salt and pepper 
to taste. Fry in butter. Mrs. Thomas Waterman. 

CRULLERS. 

1 egg 1 mixing spoonful of but- 

2 mixing spoonfuls sugar ter 

2 mixing spoonfuls sweet 1 teaspoonful cream tar- 

milk tar 

1/2 teaspoonful of soda 
Mold rather hard and fry in smoking hot fat. 

Mrs. Henry Porter. 

CRULLERS. 

3 eggs 3 tablespoonfuls melted 
6 tablespoonfuls sugar butter 

4 tablespoonfuls sweet % teaspoonful soda 

milk Nutmeg 

A little salt Flour to roll 

Cut and fry. Mrs. J. Hickey. 

JOLLY BOYS. 

Sift thoroughly 2V2 tablespoonfuls of corn meal, 2 
heaping tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 tablespoonful of 
sugar, 1 salt spoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful Royal bak- 
ing powder. Beat 1 egg and add to this dry mixture 
with enough milk to make a drop batter, beat well 
and drop by spoonfuls into smoking hot lard. 

Mrs. H. W. Stevens. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One cupful sugar, 1 egg, 1 cupful sour milk with a 
small heaping teaspoonful soda stirred into it ituntil 
it foams, butter size of a butternut, level teaspoonful 
ginger, flour to roll. Mrs. W. B. F'rink. 



—116 

GOOD FRITTERS. 

One pint good buttermilk, add a little salt and a 
teaspoonful soda, stir in flour enough to make a thick 
batter and fry in hot lard. Mrs. Freeman. 

PLAIN DOUGHNUTS. 

14 cupful butter 2 cupfuls fresh sour milk 

1 teaspoonful soda Salt 

Flour to roll 

Mrs. R. G. PrEntiss. 

PLAIN DOUGHNUTS. 

1 egg 2 cupfuls sour milk 

4 tablespoonfuls sugar 1 teaspoonful soda 
4 tablespoonfuls butter 1 teaspoonful salt 
Cream, butter and sugar Flour to mold lightly and 

roll out 
Beat in the egg, add milk with the soda dissolved 
in it, then flour. Let it rise 10 minutes, then fry. 

Mrs. H. W. S. 

GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 

1 pint sweet corn 1 pint sweet milk 

3 well beaten eggs 

Stir all together, beating hard. Season with salt, 
pepper and 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter, stirring it 
well and adding a little flour to make the ingredients 
adhere together. Fry on griddle, or bake in oven if 
preferred. Nellie Wilson. 



-117- 



-118- 



119 

CUSTARDS AND CREAMS, 



*'One sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits 
in delight beyond the bliss of dreams.^' 



CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

1 quart milk 4 tablspoonfuls sugar 

4 eggs 3 tablespoonfuls browned 

sugar 
To the boiling milk add the browmed sugar while 
it is hot, then add the eggs, sugar and cook as other 
custards. Mrs. J. R. Hill. 

ROYAL CREAM. 

1 pint milk 2 tablespoonfuls sugar 

2 tablespoonfuls Cox's 2 eggs 

gelatine Flavor with vanilla 

Soak gelatine in milk for V2 an hour, beat yolks 
of eggs with sugar and stir into milk. Set into hot 
water till the mixture thickens. Beat the whites to a 
stiff froth and stir in quickly the moment it is taken 
from the fire. Turn into moulds and set in a cool 
place to harden. Serve with wdiipped cream. 

H. E. Pearl. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

1 pint sweet cream 1 can of pineapple 

1 small cupful sugar V2 box gelatine 

Chop the pineapple fine, add the juice and sugar, 
w^hip the cream, dissolve the gelatine in V2 cupful 
water. Mix all together and set on ice to harden, 
stirring occasionly till it begins " to set. Turn out 
onto a glass dish and serve w^ith lady fingers or 
macaroons. Mrs. H. Wilson. 



120 

COFFEE JELLY. 

V2 box gelatine 1 cupful sugar 

IV2 pints water Scant half cupful dry coffee 

Let it boil up once and strain, add to the rest. 
Eat with whipped cream Susan Deal. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE CREAM. 

1 pint thick sweet cream 1 cupful powdered sugar 

2 eggs (whites) 1 teaspoonful vanilla 

Whip the cream till stiff and add the "whites 
beaten to a stifl froth and the sugar and flavor. 

C. S. 

CUSTARD SOUFFLE. 

3 tablespoonfuls butter i/i cupful flour 
1 cupful milk 4 eggs 

1/4 cupful sugar 
Cream the butter, then beat into it the flour and 
pour on gradually the milk boiling hot. Cook about 
five minutes in double boiler, stirring often. Beat the 
yolks of eggs till thick, add the sugar and stir care 
fully into the cooking mixture. Remove from the fire 
and set away to cool. About 30 minutes before serv- 
ing, fold into the mixture the stifiiy -beaten whites of 
the eggs. Bake in a buttered pudding dish about V2 
an hour and serve at once with creamy sauce. 

Boston Cooking school. 

CREAMY SAUCE. 

1 cupful sugar 1 Qgg (white onl\^) 

'V2 cupful water 
Boil sugar and water 10 or 15 minutes or till a 
thick syrup is formed. Pour the syrup in a fine 
stream onto the white of the egg beaten till frothy 
])ut not dry. Set into a dish of ice water and beat 
till cold, then fold in a cupful of whipped cream. 
Flavor to taste. Cooking School. 



121 

ROCK CREAM. 
One cup rice, boil in new milk till soft, Sweeten 
with white sugar, and when done pile it high on a dish. 
When cold lay on it in places, square lumps of jelly or 
preserved fruit. Beat the whites of three eggs to a 
stiff froth, sweeten, and flavor with vanilla. Add to 
this 1 tablespoonful rich cream. Drop frosting in 
spoonfuls over the rice, giving the form of a rock of 
snow. Agusta A. Bailey. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 
Soak 2/3 cupful tapioca in 1 cupful milk over night. 
Take the rest of a quart of milk and scald, add yolks 
of 3 eggs, tapioca and 1 cupful sugar. Boil until it 
thickens. When done, whites of eggs well beaten and 
flavor. Sara K. Page. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

2 tablespoonfuls pearl Vo teaspoonful salt 

tapioca 1 pint milk , 

Whites of 2 eggs Yolks of 2 eggs 

V^ teaspoonful vanilla Vs cupful of sugar 

Soak the tapioca in enough hot water to cover it 
in a bouble boiler. When the w^ater is absorbed, add 
milk and cook until soft. Beat eggs, sugar and salt; 
add and cook 2 or 3 minutes. Remove from the fire 
and add the beaten whites. When cool, flavor. 

Mrs. W. E. Ranger. 

PEACH CREAM. 

1 cupful peaches 1 cupful sugar 

Vs cupful gelatine 1 tablespoonful lemon 

Whites of 2 eggs juice 

Stew the peaches and sugar until the peaches can 
be mashed smooth, add the lemon juice and gelatine 
(previously dissolved) and beat until nearl3^ cold. 
Add the well frothed whites of the eggs and beat 
thoroughly. Pour into a mould and set on ice for 2 
hours. Serve with cream. Apples can be substituted 
for peaches. H. Lizzie Pearl. 



TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Three tablespoonfuls tapioca, soak in w^ater ovef 
night; 1 quart milk, 3 eggs, 1 cupful sugar, flavor 
with lemon. Bring the milk to a boil, stir in the 
tapioca first, then the eggs, well beaten, with 1 
tablespoonful corn starch, saving whites of 2 eggs for 
frosting. Add flavoring last. To be eaten cold. 

Mrs< J. D. Odell- 



FLOATING ISLAND. 

1 pint milk 3 eggs 

4 heaping teaspoonfuls corn starch 

Heat the milk, beat the yolks of 2 eggs and the 
other with the sugar and starch, add a pinch ot salt 
and a little cold milk, add to the boiling milk and 
cook well, stirrdng till done. Pour out in 6 or 8 flat 
bottomed wet cups to cool. To serve, turn each out 
into a saucer, beat the 2 whites stiff", sweeten and 
flavor to taste, and pile on them, then pour around 
them raspberry or strawberrv sauce. 

Mrs. T.J. Baker, 



RUSSIA CREAM. 

4 eggs 1 cupful sugar 

1 quart milk V2 box gelatine 

Dissolve the gelatine in V2 pint warm watet^ 
Beat yolks of eggs and sugar together and cook 
with the milk like custard. Remove from the stove } 
add the beaten whites, stirring rapidly ; then add 
gelatine and a teaspoonful lemon. PoUr into a 
mould, turn out when hard and cut in blocks like ice 
cream. Make the day before 3'ou wish to use it. 

Susan G. Deal. 



123 

VELVET CREAM. 

Two-thirds box gelatine soaked in milk and pre- 
pared with 3 half pints of scalded cream, V2 cupful 
sugar stirred into the cream over the fire ; after the 
gelatine is dissolved take from the fire and beat very 
light, adding as the cream cools 1 teaspoonful of 
flavoring extract, or 3 tablespoonfuls of rose water, 
dropped in very gradually w^hile beating. Beat the 
whites of 3 eggs very light; beat into the cream until 
of an even froth ; turn into moulds. 

Mrs. H. C. Fullington. 



^^^ 




-124- 



125 

EGGS. 



'^Oh, egg within thy oval shell 
What palate tickling joys do chvell.''^ 



OMELET. 

6 eggs beaten very light 1 small cupful milk 

Pepper and salt to taste 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth and the yolks to 
a smooth, thick batter. Add the milk to the yolks, 
also the salt and pepper ; lastly stir in lightly the 
whites. Have ready in a spider a lump of butter the 
size of a walnut. When it is hissing hot pour in the 
Qgg and cook over a clear fire. Do not stir it, but 
contrive as the Qgg sets, to slip abroad knife under to 
prevent burning. It should cook in 10 minutes at 
most. Fold over and turn out on a hot platter. 
Serve at once. Bread crumbs, grated cheese or chop- 
ped ham may be added to the omlet if liked. 

Mrs. C. H. Stearns. 

OMELET. 

1 cupful milk 1 tablespoonful flour 

3 eggs A pinch of salt 

Beat yolks, add flour and milk, mix thoroughly, 
add beaten whites. Pour in a buttered spider and 
cover. Cook slowly ; when done to a nice brown, 
double half over and slide upon a warm platter. 

Mrs. John Hill. 

OMELET. 

Three eggs, beat well ; 3 tablespoonfuls sweet 
milk, a little salt. Pour into a hot frying pan well 
buttered ; when partly done, fold over. 

Mrs. W. J. White. 



126 

HASH WITH DROPPED EGGS. 

Make a fine hash of potatoes, beef and bread 
crumbs. Drop on a buttered griddle and fry both 
sides brown. Place on a platter and cover each with 
a dropped egg that that has been cooked. 

Mrs. Cyrus Davis. 

EGGS AND HAM, BAKED, 

Take some very fine minced ham, mixed to a paste 
with a little boiling water, let it cool. Line small egg 
cups with the ham, break an egg into each cup, cover 
with bread crumbs. Bake 10 minutes. Josephine. 

OMELET. 

4 eggs 1 cupful milk 

1 tablespoonful flour Pinch of salt 
Beat the yolks, milk, and flour and last add the 
whites beaten till you can turn the dish over. Put a 
good sized piece of butter in the spider and cook 
quick. Mrs. H. E. Fairchild. 

RICE OMELET. 

1 cupful cold cooked rice 2 beaten eggs 
V4 cupful milk A litte flour 

Have frying pan hot, butter generously and pour 
the omelet in. When a light brown on the under side 
place in oven a moment, then dish like egg omelet. 

Mrs. C. C. Rogers. 

SCALLOPED EGGS. 

Boil 6 eggs hard, peel and cut into small pieces. 
Into a baking dish put a layer of bread crumbs, then 
a layer of egg, season with butter, pepper and salt, 
cover with bread crumbs, then another layer of egg; 
have the top layer bread crumbs ; cover the top with 
pieces of butter, and lastly pour over it rich milk 
enough to moisten well. Bake V2 hour in a brisk 
oven. Nice for tea. N. A. Fisher. 



—127— 

CORN OMELET. 

V2 cupful corn Yolk of 1 egg 

2 tablespoonfuls of milk Pepper and salt 

or cream 

Beat well and add the last thing the beaten white 
of 1 egg. Have a hot griddle, when browned, turn. 

Mrs. a. E. Elwood. 

OMELETS. 

For 3 pefsons. Three eggs, yolks and whites sep- 
arated, whites beaten stiff. To the yolks add Stable- 
spoonfuls of milk, salt and a dash of pepper, then 
carefully stir in the whites. Pour the mixture into a 
hot buttered frying pan, do not leave. When brown, 
fold and set in the oven a minute ; turn on a hot 
plate. Emma R. Holmes. 




-128- 



-129- 



130 

SICKLES AND "PRESERVES 



"Peter Piper picked a pecli of pickled peppers.''' 



SWEET PICKLES. 

7 pounds fruit 3 pounds sugar 

1 quart vinegar An ounce of all kinds spice 

Mrs. T. Waterman. 

RIPE CUClfMBER PICKLES. 

Take large yellow cucumbers, pare and scrape 
out the seeds, soak in salt water two days, take out 
of the brine, pour over them boiling water, let them 
stand over night, pour off this water and they are 
readv for the pickle, which prepare as follows ; One 
quart sharp vinegar, 1 pint of hot water, 2 large 
cupfuls sugar, 1 tablespoonful cinnamon, cloves, all- 
spice, black pepper, nutmeg, add a handful of raisins or 
ripe grapes, scald all together and boil until the cu- 
cuml^ers are easily penetrated with a fork; use as 
little of the vinegar to boil them in as possible and 
pour the rest over them when done. 

Mrs. Alice Elwood. 

SPICED PICKLE. 

One dozen large cucumbers, wash and slice them 
without peeling, sprinkle with salt and drain 3 hours. 
Take 1 quart vinegar, % cupful best salad oil, V2 cup- 
ful white mustard seed, V2cupful black mustard seed, 
1 tablespoonful celery seed, y2 dozen small white 
onions sliced very thin. To this dressing add the cu- 
cumbers, mix w^ell. Ready for use in 3 weeks. 

Mrs. Ellen B. Leach. 



- — 131 

RIPE TOMATO PICKLE. 

Take good ripe tomatoes and peel and cut in 
chunks, and for every 5 pounds of tomatoes take 2V'j 
pounds sugar and 1 pint vinegar, 1 teaspoonful of 
all kinds of spices and boil 2 hours. 

Mrs. B. Rogers. 

CUCUMBER SWEET PICKLE. 

1 peck ripe cucumbers 3 pounds brown sugar 

1 gallon vinegar 1 ounce mixed spices 

Pare the cucumbers and remove the seeds. Cut 
into smallish pieces, sook over night in v^eak salt and 
water. Make a syi'up of the sugar and vinegar with 
spice tied in a bag and boil 20 minutes. Drain the 
cucumbers and dry with a cloth. Boil them in the 
syrup till soft and transparent. Skim out, drain and 
place in stone jar. Boil the syrup till thick as molas- 
ses. V. H. Stearns. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

1 peck ripe tomatoes 10 green peppers 
10 good sized onions 5 cupfuls vinegar 
3 cupfuls brown sugar 5 tablespoonfuls salt 
Boil 2 hours and can while hot. 

Mrs. M. L. Stearns, 

CHILI SAUCE. 

25 ripe tomatoes 6 onions 

2 green peppers 1 large bunch celery 

Chop fine and add 

3 quarts vinegar IV2 cupfuls sugar 

1 teaspoonful allspice 1 teaspoonful cloves 

1 teaspoonful cinnamon 1 teaspoonful mace 
2 teaspoonfuls salt 
Boil fast for an hour and a half, and then let 
simmer for an hour and a half or two hours more. 
If whole mixed spice is used, tie it in 4 small bags. 

Mrs. E. G. French. 



132 

TOMATO KETCHUP. 

8 quarts strained toma- 4 tablespoonfuls mustard 
toes 6 tablespoonfuls black 

6 tablespoonfuls salt pepper 

1 tablespoonful yellow 1 tablespoonful ground 
ginger cloves 

V2 cupful brown sugar 1 quart vinegar 

Boil slowly. Put into bottles. 

Mrs. J. R. Hill. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

1 onion 18 ripe tomatoes 

1 cupful sugar 3 green peppers, chopped 

2 14 cupfuls vinegar fine 

1 teaspoonfulall kinds of 2 teaspoonfuls salt 

spice Bottle for use 

Mrs. C. M. McF. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

7 pounds fruit 6 pounds white sugar 

2 pounds raisins 2 oranges 

Cook until thick enough to keep good. 

E. A. Codding. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

5 pounds currants 4 pounds browai sugar 

2 tablespoonfuls cloves 2 of cinnamon 

1 pint vinegar 
Boil until thick. Persis L. McFarland. 

JERSEY PICKLES. 

5 lbs. ripe tomatoes 3 lbs. sugar 

1 pint vinegar I/2 oz. cinnamon 

V2 oz. cloves 
Boil tomatoes and sugar till quite thick, then put 
spices in a bag and cook. 



133 

GREEN TOMATO SOY. 

T-wo gallons green tomatoes sliced without peel- 
ing, 12 good sized onions sliced, 2 quarts vinegar, 1 
quart sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls salt, 2 tablespoon fuls 
ground mustard, 2 tablespoonfuls black pepper, 1 
tablespoonful allspice, 1 tablespoonfnl cloves, inix all 
together and stew until tender, stirring often lest 
thej' should scorch. Put in small glass jars. 

Mrs. Ellen B. Leach. 

CANNING FRUIT WITHOUT COOKING. 

2 drams salicylic acid 1 pound granulated sugar 

3 quarts soft water 
Bring it to a boiling heat and use as you want. 
Put raw fruit in cans and pour it over hot. No cook- 
ing the fruit. Mrs. J. Davis. 

PICKLE LILLY. 

5 quarts green tomatoes 6 green peppers chopped 

chopped Sprinkle with V2 pint salt 

Let stand over night. Drain off the brine, cover 
with good vinegar and cook slowly 1 hour. Then 
drain and put in a jar. One pound sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful each cinnamon and cloves, 14 tablespoonful 
allspice, Vs cupful each whole mustard and horse- 
radish, grated, 1 pint vinegar. When boiling hot 
pour over pickle in jar and cover tight. 

RHUBARB SAUCE. 

6 pounds rhubarb 1 large cupful raisins 
5 pounds sugar 2 lemons 

Cut the rhubarb into inch pieces, put with the 
sugar and let stand overnight. In the morning drain 
off the juice and boil 20 minutes good, then add the 
rhubarb, the raisins, stoned, lemon (juice and rind), 
and cook slowly for 1 hour. A little preserved ginger 
added just before taking up is an improvement. 

Mrs. M. L. Stearns. 



ORANGE CURRANT MARMALADE, 

t pounds currants 6 pounds sugar 

1 pound raisins 2 oranges chopped 

Boil until it jellies. Very good. S- Holmes, 

CURRANT JAM. 

7 pounds currants 6 pounds sugar 

2 pounds raisins (stoned) 2 oranges 

Squeeze the oranges on the currants and cook V^ 
hour, then put the raisins and orange peel (chopped) 
with sugar into currants and cook until quite thick. 

Mrs. G. E. Conger. 

CATSUP. 

Cook ripe tomatoes until soft, then ptit through a 
seive to remove skin and seeds. To 4quarts of toma- 
to after sifting add 3 large spoonfuls each of pepper, 
salt and mustard, 1 pint vinegar; cinnamon and 
cloves can be added if liked. Boil till thick. 

Mrs. W. D. Welsh. 

GREEN CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

t'ick small green cucumbers, wash and fill into 
glass cans, packing closely. Add 1 teaspoonful salt to 
each quart cart, V2 teaspoonful mustard seed, 1 small 
red pepper. Fill can with good cold vinegar and close 
tightly. Let stand two months before using. These 
will be found equal to those made bj' a much more 
laborious process. Mrs. C. C Rogers. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

i/2 peck green tomatoes 2 bunches celery 

1 large cabbage 6 medium sized onions 

Chop all together and let stand in weak brine 
over night, drain in colander and pack lightly in jar 
or fruit cans (cans preferred ). To each quaft of vin- 
egar add 1 cupful sugar and all kinds of spice to taste. 
When boiling pour over pickles till covered. S. F. S. 



135 

CIDER JELLY. 

Half package gelatine, 14 pint cold water, let 
stand till dissolved, add V2 pint boiling water, 1 pint 
cider, IV2 cupfuls sugar, the grated rind and juice of a 
lemon, let it stand on the stovetill sugaris dissolved, 
strain into moulds. Mrs. M. E. F. 

UNCOOKED CURRANT JELLY. 

Mash currants thoroughly, put in bag to drain 
but do not squeeze. To each cupful juice add 1 cup- 
ful sugar, stir until sugar is dissolved. Pour into 
tumblers. Keep in dark cupboard. Mrs. Nye. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Place cucumbers in a jar and between each layer 
sprinkle salt. When all are in, turn on scalding water 
to cover; when this cools turn off and bring to scald- 
ing point again, pour over again and when cool turn 
off. Scald once more, then when cool turn off and 
prepare a weak vinegar by bringing it to a scalding 
heat and turning off when cool ; repeat this until it 
has been used six times, then throw away. Now 
spice good vinegar and scald and turn on pickles, 
and as soon as cool begin to use. 

Mrs. L. H. Wheeler. 

TOMATO PICKLES. 

Select small ripe tomatoes. Prick each with a 
darning-needle; put down a laj^er of the tomatoes 
sprinkle liberally with salt ; then put in a layer of 
sliced onions, salt as before ; fill up the jar or tub 
with alternate layers ; let them remain so three days, 
then wipe off the salt and prepare a hot pickle of 
vinegar spiced to taste with cinnamon stick, whole 
cloves, etc.; pour when boiling over the tomatoes 
and onions ; put in a weight to keep them in the vin- 
egar and set dow^n cellar ; will keep without sealing 
in stone jars. Belle L. Butler, New York City. 



-136- 



-137- 



138 

CANDIES. 

'^Sweets to the sweet." 



MOLASSES CANDY. 

2 cupfuls sugar V2 cupful water 

1 cupful molasses Small piece of butter 

When it begins to boil add V4. teaspoonful cream 
tartar. Do not stir while cooking. Do not butter 
the hands before pulling. Theda Jones. 

CREAM CANDY. 

1 quart sugar V2 teaspoonful cream tartar 

1 cupful hot water 
Cook without stirring until waxy. When cool 
stir to a cream. Bell Hill. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

1 quart molasses V2 teaspoonful cream tartar 

IV2 pints white sugar Small piece of butter 
i/'2 pint water 
Boil sugar and water, when it boils add cream 
tartar and butter, and boil until it cracks in water. 
It is then ready to pull. May H. Baker. 

SOFT CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

1^'2 pounds granulated Vi pound grated chocolate 
sugar 1/4 pound butter 

1/4 pint sweet cream 
Melt together and boil 25 minutes, stirring occa- 
sionly. When done add 1 teaspoonful vanilla, and 
pour in buttered pans until 14 inch thick ; when cold 
mark in squares. Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 



139 

CHOCOLATE CREAM DROPS. 

FOR THE CREAM 

Take 1 pound granulated sugar, add water 
enough to dissolve the sugar, add Vs teaspoonful of 
cream tartar, add V2 teaspoonful vanilla. Don't stir 
after the sugar is dissolved ; boil quick ; cook until 
waxy ; w^hen cool stir to a cream ; let the cream stand 
long enough to become hard enough to make into 
shapes; let the shapes stand an hour or more to 
harden before dipping into the chocolate. 

CHOCOLATE FOR THE CREAM. 

Melt V2 pound of confectioner's sweet chocolate; 
when ready drop the creams into the melted choc- 
olate 2 or 3 at a time and lift them on 2 forks, placing 
them on buttered paper to dry. M. Belle Hill. 

CHILDREN'S GLASS CAxNDY. 

Take a sheet of letter paper and fold it down, 
then lap the corners and pin them to form a sort of 
box. Take one cupful white sugar and water enough 
to make the sugar quite w^et; put the sugar and 
water in the box and place immediately upon the 
stove. Let the mixture boil rapidly until brittle 
when tested by dropping a little in water. F^lavor 
with vanilla, slip off into a pan of cold water to 
cool, when cold remove the pins and the paper 
will slip off, Mrs. J. R. mLL. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

Two cupfuls sugar-house molasses, 1 cupful gr^m- 
ulated sugar. Boil together until a little dropped in 
cold water will break. Just as 3^ou remove candy 
from stove add 1 teaspoonful soda and pour into 
buttered pans. Cool and pull as long as possible. 
One-half cupful of anj^ variety of nuts broken small 
and spread in pans before cand}^ is poured in will 
make another variety', and is very nice. 

Mabel Rogers. 



140 

VASSAR FUDGES. 

2 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful milk 

V4 cake chocolate Small piece butter 

Cook until it will form a soft ball in water. Stir 
until it partly thickens, pour in buttered tins. When 
nearly cool cut in sinall squares. May H. Baker. 

PEA-NUT CANDY. 

2 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful rolled pea-nuts 

Small piece butter 
Melt butter in frying-pan, add sugar and stir 
constantly. As soon as dissolved stir in nuts and 
pour quickly on to a warm buttered tin. Mark in 
squares when partly cool. Mrs. W. G. Andrews. 

CARAMELS. 

1 cupful sugar 1 cupful milk 

1 cupful molasses 1 cupful grated chocolate 

Butter size of an egg 
Boil molasses and sugar, mix chocolate with milk 
and add when molasses boils, add the butter just be- 
fore taking off, pour onto shallow tins and mark in 
squares when nearly cool. Theda Jones. 

CREAM CANDY. 

2 cupfuls granulated sugar 1 tablespoonful vinegar 
V2 teaspoonful cream tartar V2 cupful water 

Boil till it hardens by dropping into cold water. 
After taking off the stove, flavor with 1 teaspoonful 
lemon extract. Cool in a buttered pan, then pull and 
cut into pieces. A. C. Written. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

2 cupfuls molasses Butter size of walnut 

1 cupful sugar 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar 

Boil until brittle when dropped into cold water. 
Remove from fire and stir in rapidly 1 pinch soda. 
Pour into buttered tins and when cool pull. 

LuELLA Leslie. 



141 

PEPPERMINTS, 

2 cupfuls granulated 1 or 2 teaspoonfuls pepper- 

sugar mint essence 

V2 cupful water 
Boil sugar and water together about 5 minutes, 
or till it will just hold together when dropped in cold 
water. Remove from fire and begin stirring. When 
slightly cool add the peppermint, and when it begins 
to look creamy, drop on buttered paper. 

Arthur Stearns. 

TAFFY CANDY. 

3 cupfuls granulated IH cupfuls water 

sugar 2 tablespoonfuls vinegar 

A little flavoring extract 1 tablespoonful butter 

Boil without stirring until it "cracks" when drop- 
ped in water. Pour out in buttered tins until cool 
enough to handle, pull until white. 

Grace Kysar, St. Cloud, Minn. 




-142- 



■143- 



144 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



COLOGNE. 



10 drops of oil of lavender 20 drops of rosemary 
30 drops of lemon 30 drops of bergamot 

3 drops of cinnamon 40 drops of neroli 

2 grains of musk 6 drops of ottar of roses 

1 pint of alcohol 

C. A. McFarland, 

HOME MADE KOUMISS. 

Fill a glass quart can with new milk, add 3 tea- 
spoonfuls sugar and shake well, then add % cake 
yeast. Seal can and place w^here it will be subject to 
about 70° Fahrenheit. Shake well once an hour. If 
made in the morning let it remain until night, w^hen 
it may be placed on ice or in a cool place. The next 
morning it will be ready for use. In opening the can 
it had better be done over a pan as the kourmiss fre- 
quently comes out in a hurry. Mrs. T. J, Baker. 

BRESLAU OF BEEF. 

Chop until quite fine the broken pieces of a roast. 
Season with salt, butter and a little pepper and stir 
in 1 beaten Qgg. Put the mixture into a wet bowl. 
When moulded turn out and brush it over with Qg,g, 
sprinkle with fine bread crumbs or cracker crumbs, 
brown in the oven and serve either hot or cold. The 
same proportion of meat may be moulded in custard 
cups and set point upward in a buttered dish, brushed 
over with beaten egg, sprinkled with cracker crumbs 
and nicely browned. A sauce or gravy maybe pour- 
ed around if desired. Mrs. Cyrus Davis. 



145 

A GOOD DRINK. 

Lay this by for summer. One-fourth teaspoonful 
cream tartar, 1 teaspoonful sugar, a few drops ex- 
tract of lemon, a glass of cold water. Stir well and 
you have as nice a glass of lemonade as you could 
wish. Mrs. E. Wheeler. 

GRUEL FOR INVALIDS. 

1 cupful milk 3 cupfuls water 

1 spoonful flour 
Boil 10 minutes, add a little salt and serve with 
crackers. Mrs. L. M. Jones. 

HOME-MADE HONEY. 

Five pounds w^hite sugar, 1 quart water. Let the 
sugar and water boil until the sugar is dissolved, let 
it cool, then stir in 1 pound of bees' honey and 3 
drops of peppermint essence. Mrs. J. Hickey. 

CANNING CORN. 

With a knife score the kernels by cutting through 
the center of every row ; then cut from the cob and 
with the back of the knife scrape all the milk off the 
cob. Put a tea-cupftl into a quart jar and pound it 
down with a wooden maul (made like a potato 
masher) ; keep adding corn and pounding it down 
until the jar is filled to within half an inch of the top ; 
there must be no air spaces and the milk must fill 
every space ; put the rubber on and the cover about 
half way; set the jar into a kettle of cold water, 
having placed a piece of board between bottom of 
jar and kettle ; let it boil 3 hours, then screw the 
cover on as tightly as possible, then boil 1 hour 
longer; as soon as the jar is cold wrap in brown 
paper and put on its side in the coolest part of the 
cellar. By using a wash boiler several jars may be 
canned at a time. Mrs. Hodges. 



146 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

Five quarts berries, mash them and cover them 
witli cider vinegar, let stand in sun 12 hours, keep at 
night in cool place, stir several times through the 
day, strain and put 5 quarts fresh berries at p. m., 
strained raspberry vinegar over them, mash and let 
stand 24 hours and to each quart allow 1 pint water 
and 3 pounds sugar, stir steadily until sugar is dis- 
solved, skim when it comes to a boil, remove from 
the lire and bottle while it is Vk'arm. 

Mrs. C. a. McFarland. 

APPLE GINGER. 

Five pounds sour apples cut in small pieces, 2 
ounces of ginger root, 5 pounds sugar, 2 or 3 sliced 
lemons. Make sprup of sugar, pour over the apple, 
Boil all together until a clear rich yellow color. 

WASHING FLUID (GOOD) 

1 pound potash (concen- 1 ounce salts of tartar 
trated lye) 1 ounce liquid ammonia 

Dissolve the potash and salts of tartar in 1 gallon 
of hot water; when cold add the ammonia. Put in 
bottles and cork tightly. Soak the clothes over night. 
In the morning wring, and rub if you choose, put 1 
tea-cupful of fluid in the boiler of water, add soap 
and boil 10 minutes. Take cloths out, rub lightly, 
rinse, blue and hang out. M. P. S. 

EGG BROTH FOR INVALIDS. 

Beat 1 egg until frothy. Stir in 1 pint boiling 
meat broth free from fat, season with a saltspoonful 
salt. Eat hot with thin slices of dry toast. 

Mrs. Freeman. 

EGG TEA. 

Beat the yolk of an egg in a cupful of tea and 
drink it hot. The yolk is more easily digested than 
the white and has a better flavor. Mrs. F. 



14-7 

FOR WHOOPING COUGH. 

Cochineal 20 grains, salts of tartar 10 grains, 
loaf sugar Vo pound. Dissolve the whole in 1 pint 
-water. Dose for a child 3 to 5 years old, 1 teaspoon- 
ful 3 or 4 times a day. This medicine has been used 
with good results for many years. 

Holmes & Cowles, Druggists. 

PICKLE FOR CORNED BEEF. 

1 gallon of water 1 pint of rock salt 

1 tablespoonful saltpetre 1 tablespoonful soda 
2 cupluls of maple sugar 
Boil, skim and cool before using. This will make 
enough to cover 12 pounds. It can be used for corn- 
ed beef, beef for drying or tongue. 

Mrs. Alice Ell wood. 

PICKLE FOR BEEF. 

100 pounds ineat 6 pounds Turk Island salt 

2V2 pounds sugar 4 ounces saltpetre 

2 gallons water 
Scald all and let it cool and pour over the meat. 

Mrs. J. Davis. 

SAUSAGE. 

For each pound meat add 1 heaping teaspoonful 
sage, same of salt and a little extra, V2 teaspoonful 
summer savor^^ (or if you do not use summer savory 
use a little more sage), l^ teaspoonful pepper, and to 
each 15 pounds of meat V2 tea-cupful of ginger; mix 
well and put in bags. Mrs. E. R. Wheeler. 

SAUSAGE, NO. 2. 

50 pounds meat 11/2 pounds salt 

1 pound sage 5 ounces allspice 

3 ounces cloves 5 ounces pepper 

Mrs. Sarah Coxant. 



148 

FOR SWOLLEN JOLNTS. 

Tincture iodine 1 ounce Iodine scales V2 drachm 
Sulphate morphine 4 grains 
Mix and apply with brush every other night. 

Mrs. C. p. Jones. 

PERSIAN CREAM. 

Soft water 1 pint Cologne 2 ounces 

Alcohol 1 ounce Glycerine 2 ounces 

Gum tragacanth % ounce 
Dissolve the gum tragacanth in the water, add 
the other ingredients and afterward the juice of 1 
lemon. Apply after washing. Mrs. C. P. Jones. 

ENGLISH ANNIHITATOR. 

1 pint alcohol 1 1 ounce tincture lobelia 4 

1 ounce camphor gum 2 1 ounce tincture arnica 5 
1 ounce oil organum 3 1 ounce tincture iodine 6 

Put together in the order indicated by the figures 
at the right. This isexcellent for chilblains, lameness, 
sprains, bruises, etc. B. L. Butler, New York City. 

CLEANING FLUID. 

1 ounce aqua ammonia V2 ounce sulphuric ether 
V2 ounce alcohol Vs ounce glycerine 

1/8 ounce Castile soap % ounce borax 

(powdered) 1 pint soft water 

Use with either brush or sponge to clean woolen 
goods, rinse out with clean water and it will not in- 
jure color or fabric ; may be used with equally good 
effect on cotton and mixed goods. 

Belle L. Butler, New York City. 

TIME FOR COOKING SUMMER VEGETABLES. 

Greens, dandelions — iy2 hours. 
Greens, spinach — 1 hour. 
String-beans — 2 hours. 
Green peas — 20 minutes. 
Beets — 1 to 3 hours. 



149 

Turnips — 1 hour. 
Squash— 1 hour. 
Potatoes — V2 hour. 
Corn— V^ hour. 
Asparagus — V3 hour. 
This appUes to young and fresh vegetables. 

TIME FOR COOKING .WINTER VEGETABLES. 

Squash — 1 hour. 
Potatoes, white — V2 hour. 
Potatoes, baked— 1 hour. 
Sweet potatoes — % hour. 
Sweet potatoes, baked— 1 hour. 
Turnips— 1 to 2 hours. 
Beets— 3y2 hours. 
Parsnips — 1 hour. 
Carrots — IV2 hours. 
Cabbage— 3 hours. 

TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS. 

A speck makes Vi salt-spoonful. 

Four salt-spoonfuls make 1 teaspoonful. 

Three teaspoonfuls make 1 tablespoonfvtl. 

Two gills make 1 cupful. 

One cup contains 8 ounces of liquid. 

One tablespoonful butter makes 1 ounce. 

One tablespoonful granulated sugar makes 1 
ounce. 

One heaped tablespoonful powdered sugar makes 
1 ounce. 

One tablespoonful flour makes V2 ounce. 

Two tablespoonfuls ground spice make 1 ounce. 

Five nutmegs make 1 ounce. 

One quart sifted pastry flour makes 1 pound. 

One scant pint granulated sugar makes 1 pound. 

One pint butter makes 1 pound. 

One pint rice makes 1 pound. 

One cupful corn meal makes 6 ounces. 

One cupful stemmed raisins makes 6 ounces. 

One cupful cleaned currants makes 6 ounces. 



cA ^Jfeceipt for Cooking Husbands 

So as to make them tender and good. 
A good many husbands are spoiled by misman- 
agement. Some w^omen go about as if their husbands 
were bladders and blow them up. Others keep them 
constantly in hot water, others let them freeze by 
their carelessness and indifference. Some keep them 
in a stew by irritating waysand words; others roast 
them. Some keep them in a pickle all their lives. It 
cannot be supposed that an\^ husband will be tender 
and good managed in this way, but they are really 
delicious when properly treated. In selecting your 
husband, you should not be guided by the silvery 
appearance as in buying mackerel, nor by the golden 
tint as if you wanted salmon. Be sure to sel^c^ for 
yourself, as tastes differ. Do not go to market for 
him, as the best are ahvays brought to your door. 
It is far better to have none, unless you will patiently 
learn how to cook for him. A preserving kettle of the 
finest porcelain is best, but if you have nothing but 
an earthenware nappy, it will do with care. See 
that the linen in which you wrap him is nicely washed 
and mended with the required number of buttons and 
strings nicely sewed on. Tie him in the kettle by a 
strong silk cord called comfort, as the one called duty 
is apt to be weak. They are apt to fly out of the 
kettle, and be burned and crusty on the edges, since 
like crabs and lobsters, you have to cook them alive. 
Make a steady fire out of love, neatness and cheerful- 
ness. Keep him as near this as seems to agree with 
him. If he sputters and fizzes do not be anxious, 
some husbands do this until they are quite done. 
Add a little sugar in the form of what confectioners 
call kisses, but no pepper or vinegar on any account. 
A little spice improves them, but it must be used with 
iudgement. Do not stick any sharp instrument into 
him to see if he is becoming tender. Stir him gently, 
watch the while lest he lie to flat and close to the ket- 
tle, and so become useless. You cannot fail of know- 
ing when he is done. If thus treated you will find 
him very digestible, agreeing nicel\' with you and the 
children, and he will keep as long as you want, unless 
\'ou become careless and set him in too cool a place. 



THE McFARLAND CO,, 

Headqaarters for the Latest Novelties and Staple Dry 
Goods and Notions, Fresh Groceries, Boots, Shoes, Rub- 
ber Goods, and Gents' Clothing: ,^ ^ ,^ ^ ^ 

W. H. STEARNS. 

DEALER IN ELOUR, GRAIN AND EEED 

The best cooks use our PILLSBURY'S BEST, BEN HUR, 
TOWN TALK, ADRIAN, FLOUR, which take the lead. 

JOHNSON ~ . ~ VT. 

H c P.PK.B. ^mi^ & STEARNS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN LUMBER 
Red Birch and Rock IMaple Kiln Dried Flooring a Specialty. 

Saw Mills at No. Hyde Park, Greenfield, Eden and Johnson, Vt. 
Hard Wood Dressing Mill at Hyde Park, Vt., formerly the J. S, 

Scofleld Mill. 
Telephone Connection. Office, JOHNSON, VT. 

ARTHUR B. SOULE, I). D. S. 

COLLINS BLOCK, 88 MiALST ST. 

Special attention given to Crown and Brigde Work, and Artificial 
Teeth. Oflice closed Saturday Afternoons. 

OFFICE HOURS: 8 to 12, a.m., i to 5, p. m. 

Buy your bread at the 

DOMESTIC BAKERY,. 

Pearl St., JOHNSON, VT. 

We Knead the Dough. 

J. S. BANISTER, 

Groceries, Provisions, Fruits 

Centennial Block, MORRISVILLE, VT. 




Any Reliable 
Physician 

Will tell you that 
among the remedies 
used for PILES, a 
simple Ointment is 
indispensable. 
f«'^''^ '^^'"' - Such is 

Li^DY POOR'S oint:vie]sit 

A healing preparation, useful in Iiealing Cuts, Burns, Cliapped 

Hands and Lips, Eczema, Salt Rheum, Chilhlaius, Ulcers, 

Chating, Pimples, anil all Eruptions of the Skin. 

Price, 35 Cents at all dealers in j^edlum. or by Mall from 

lEe James W. Foster Co., Manufacturers, 
BATH, - - NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

BUY THE RELIABLE MADE UPON 

lOARDMAN "ONO'^ FOR 
&GRAY^ ~ 

PIANOS 




New, 
Up-to-Date' 



ESTABLISHED 1837 Attractive Styles 

HAVE NO SUPERIOR. SEND FOR NEW CATALOGUE. 

Factory and Warerooms 

i 543 to 549 Broadway, Albany, N. Y. 

(Opposite Depot.) 



PALO ALTO PINK 



'Perfume is of exquisite cha.ra.cter; the finest odor 
< e<ver produced; of ivonderful permanency and 

brilliancy. The odor is positively beyond comp- 



Other New Odors are 

Golden Gate Violet* Pasadena Rose 

Mariposa Lily 
Crabapple Special California Clover 

The entire line is Most Satisfac- 
tory to Dealer and Customer. 



Manufactured by .. 



Paul Rieger & Co., 

PERFUMERS 
161 First St. 5an Francisco, Cal. 



Trade supplied by E. N. Northrop, Castleton, Vt,. ) 



George Conger^ 



Dealer in 



FRESH & SALT MEATS, 

Fish, Canned Goods, Etc. 

JOHNSON, VT. 

Waterbury & Wolcott, 

Sroceries, 

3)ry 9oods, 

Moots and Shoes a Specialty. 

Tred Ul. Ecslle. 

. . Dealer in . . 

lUood and Tee. 

General Trucking. 

Citiztn's Cekpbone. 

SHOES 

For the whole family at 

SOULE & COLLINS, 

ST. ALBANS, VT. 

Next to Citt Hall,, 



Drugs, Stationery, 

Perfumes and ToileC 

Articles 

At 

SLAYTORS k SANDERS, 

Morris ville, Vermont. 



ALEXIS R. CAMPBELL, 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN, 



MORRISVILLE, 



Vt. 



A. A. MINOTT, 

Dentists. 

MORRISVILLE, VERMONT. 

Woodbury Block, Portland Street. 



Ask for 

"C. C. C." 

(Trade Mark.) 

Confections 

Crystal Conf. Co., 

Burlington, Vermont. 



ICE CREAH FREEZERS 

Buy your Food Choppers, Bread Makers, Kitchen Knives, Apple 
Parers, Meat Saws, Shears and Scissors where you can get 

Honest Goods at Living Prices 
E. E, HOLHES & CO., Jolinson, Vt. 



IVLAXKIELD & KARRELL, 

Furniture, Wall Raper, F»aints and Oils, 
Doors and Windoxvs, House Finish of all 
Kinds, Ftirn.iture Repairing, Picture F* rang- 
ing and Glazing 



The proof of the pudding is in the eating; the proof of 
painting is in using good Paint 

Try The SHERWIN WILLIAMS PAINT 

A. E, PARTLOW Paints, Oils, Etc. 

"B, S. AUSTIN, 
Furniture, Undertaker's Supplies, and Embalmer 

Nice Line of Bedroom Suits, Morris Chairs, Couches, in 
fact. Everything found in a first-class Furniture Store. 
JOHNSON - - - - VT. 

SENSIBLE WOMEN 

Are the women who know when they are getting full 
value for their money. If fifty cents will save dollars' 
worth of time and annoyance, and, on top of that, bring to 
your table dishes cooked in a way that carries joy to the 
heart oi the most exacting husband, isn't it a good invest- 
ment? This is just what our 

NOTABLE KITCHEN SPECIALTIES 

w^ill do for 3'ou. Let us show you some of them next time 
you are near our store. It will do yov: good to kno\v 
about them. 

RIDDLE BROS, Johnson, Vt. 



MERCHANT TAILOR. 
GBINTS' rilNB rURINISHirSGS. 

Also Gleaning and Repairing Done. Give me a call. 

14 Portland St., MORRISVIbLE, VT. 

Absolutely Pure Vermont 
Maple Sugar and Syrup 

An Extensive Producer, and Dealer in the Best Grades made in 

the State. When Reliable Goods are wanted the orders 

of the most critical are sent with the assurance 

of getting the Genuine Article. 

T. A. WATERMAN, 

JOHNSON, - - - VERMONT. 

IDontpelkr Crackers 

Have always borne the reputation of being 

J'Ae SBest in the "World. Why? 

Because — The old firm of C. H. Cross and C. H. Cross & Son 
have made them for (30 years. 

Because — The same workmen have baked them in the fac- 
tory for 30 years. 

Then again — The best of all is, they are baked in ovens with 
soap-stone bottoms, which keeps them moist, crisp and tender a 
great while longer than if baked in ovens with iron bottoms. As 
good crackers cannot be baked on iron as on soapstone. Be sure 
to call for MONTPELIER CRACKERS, and you get the finest 
that are made. 



C M. Cross & Son, SfCanufacturers, 

Sflontpelier, - 'Vermont. 



HALL & CHENEY, 

PHARMACISTS, 

Dealers in Th-ugs, Patent Medicines, Toilet Articles, Stationery, 

Kodaks a.nd all kinds of Amateur Photographic Supplies. Also 

Agents for the Famous Rejcall Remedies, •which are Guaranteed, 

SMORRISVILLE. - - - VERMONT. 

C. P. JOISTES, 

DRUGGIST. JE\VKLKR AND OPTICIAIV, 

Johnson, - - - Vermont. 

We aim to give good value in return for every dollar paid at our store. 

AN INVITATION 

Scarcely a day passes without a customer saying in our store 
''I had no idea you sold these things." Neither is it an unusual 
thing for purchasers to express surprise at finding in our stock 
articles quite unlike anything they have seen before, and which 
are not obtainable elsewhere. These and other instances prove 
that a better acquaintance with our store w^ould frequently save 
our customars time and money. It is difficult to induce visitors 
merely to look, as so many people hesitate to enter a store unless 
actually wanting something. While this is a natural thing to do, 
it is a mistaken consideration toward an establishment like ours, 
which is always filled with novelties. In this announcement, 
therefore, we are pressing our invitation to call as many times as 
convenient. Inspection can be made leisurely without your being 
importuned to buy, Every successive visit will discover some- 
thing not seen before. 

nONEY BACK IF YOU SAY 50 

GEO. P. DROWNE & CO., 

nORRISVILLE = = = VERMONT 

When in town call in and you will always 
find a most complete line of 

UP-TO-DATE FOOTWEAR 

. . . . AT ... . 

BLAIR'S CONSOLIDATED SHOE STORE, 

22 PORTLAND STREET. - MORRISVILLE, VERMONT. 



GMCAP GROGDRIES 

Are Dear at Any Price 

THIINK IT OVER 



T. B. ELLIS, 

GROCER, 

MORRISVIIvLB - ' " VERMONT 

When in Morrisville call at 

It1un$cn'$ Department Store 

For Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings^ Staple and Fancy 
Dry Goods^ BootSt Shoes and Rubbers^ Trunks, Bags 
and Grips, Crockery, Tin and Glassware, Groceries and 
Provisions, Butter, Eggs and Maple Sugar, Flour and 
Feed, Nails, Barbed and Woven Wire. Farm Imple- 
ments of all kinds. 
Or write us for prices, 

H. P. MUNSON, 
Morrisville, - - - Vermont. 

MOTEL JOMINSOIN, 

5. E. WELLS. Manager. 

First-cl&ss in all Appointments. Headquarters for Commercial Trat>- 
elers. Good Li'very in Connection, 

JOHNSON, ■ - - - VERMONT, 



DOCTOR YOUR OWN 

HORSE 

(Si, 
CATTLE 

WITH 

DR, A, a DANIELS' 

WARRANTED 

VETERINARY MEDICINES 




iTore widely and favorably known, 
wttli larger sales than any other 
Veterinary iTedicine in the world. 



NO. 1 STAMFORD ST. 

BOSTON = = MASS 



f 7 -5i.- -i' 




forf/ieTeefh, 

AND FIND Nothing injurious 

OR ODJECTIONABLE IN ITS COfVlPO- 




Have You Good Teeth ? Do You Wish to Preserve Them ? 

Sozodont passed through its experimental stage 50 years aao. It has ever since been the 

recognized standard dentif rice. 
It is a Tooth Health, It is a Breath Purifier. 
It is a Comfort to Genteel Men and Women, 

HALL & EUCKEL, Props., New York Citt. ._ 



'^E GlLT EDGE BUTTER COLOR " 




If you can't '* STOF» " v^rrite to 

CARROXXINK IVIKG. CO., 

CASTLETON, * * VT, 



^^■< '^ '^' •^' •^' ■'^ ••*p' •^', •-<' 'S^i'f '^.- '^.•'^- "^^ ^^^ ^^^«^ 



ALIENS FOOT=EASE 



SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOE^i 

Allen's Foot— Ease, a powder for ttic 
feef. It cures paintui, ewolifn, sniartiiitr 
nervous tet-t, and inhtantly takes the stiiiH 
out of corns and bunions. It's tlu' ftri'al- 
est coinl'ort discovery of tlie a^e. 
Makes tight-fitting or new shoes feel easy. 
It is % certain cure for introwiig nails, 
su'pating.c illous anil hot, tired, aching feet. 
We have over 30,11(10 testimonials. TKV 
IT TO-I>A V. Sold h.va 1 Druggists and 
Sh e Stores, '2.IC. Do not accept an imi- 
tation. Sent by mail for 25c. i .stamps. 

cdce: tkiai- package 

I r^CiEi sent by mail. 

IIOTHER OKAY'S SWEET 
POVVDEIJS, the best medicine f,ir Fe- 
verish, Sickly fihildi-en. Solo ly Druggists 
everywhere. Trial Package FREE. .Ad- 
dress, ALLEN S. OLMSTED, Le Toy, N.Y. 



' MeuM jh i.his njat;aii'ne ' 







THE SUN PA5TE 

STOVE POLISH 



aii^ 



^ TRADE MARK REGISTERED ■* 



MstM^-^sbor 



►est in quality. Largest in quantity. 

Polish with a cloth. Makes no dust 
Does its work quickly, easily and 
Effectively 



THE RISING SUN 

STOVE POLISH 

Hade perfect by forty years' experience, 

its shine is brightest, comes quickest 

lasts longest, never cakes 

FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS 



DEC 23 1904 



CUSTIIID 



CONTAINS NO CORN STARCH, requires no egg«, no 
cookincr. Prepared in a moment by simply adding one 
quart of boiling milk ACCORDINQ TO DIRECTIONS. 
Will produce ten cups of delicious Custard or two quarts 
of rich Ice Cream that cannot be surpassed. The ingre> 
dients are all pure and healthful. Will make the finest 
CUSTARD and ICE CREAM ever tasted. Dainty, 
nutritious and strengthening. Very acceptable t« 
children and invalids. 



E. S. BURNHAM CO., 

HANUFACTURERS 
53-61 Ganesvort St., New York. 






I I 

I Ihe Lamoille Valley | 

I COOK BOOK I 

I ^#^ I 

I t 

I i 

i i 

^ PUBLISHED BY THE LADIES ^^ 

gq OF THE CONGREGATIONAL ^^ 

6^ CHURCH OF JOHNSON, VT. &3 

I I 



/ 



y 




OU[\HAMe' Uf 



AS doing the largest 
Mail Order business of 
any Printing Office in the 
State. We have gained 
this enviable reputation 
bv fair, honest business 
methods, always giving 
our customers just what <jl 
the3^ want, at prices that '' 
are right. We never yet 
have failed to satisfy a customer. Our work is 
alw^avs out when promised, and is done in an 
up-to-date, w^orkman-like manner. Our Rail 
Road and Telephone connections are of the best, 
making it possible for you to make your wants 
known, and for us to serve 3^ou, with the least 
possible delay. For Two Dollars, ($2.(30) we 
will send you 1,000 of any of the following, 
printed in any way and from any copy a'OU 
send us : 

Note Heads, Statements, No, 6 "Bill Heads 

^et Ledgers, Envelopes, Business 

Cards, 6x9 Dodgers 

We will deliver all orders amounting to $5.00 or 
more, cash accompaning order, to your nearest Post 
Office or R. R. Station. Just drop us a card and let 
us svd)mit vovi proofs or samples. Remember \vc 
i^iinrantee satisfaction. 

nortbrop, Printer, Castkton, 



CASTLEWN - - 



VERMONT. 



G. P. 0. Mar.. 'OS.