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Full text of "Land of Lincoln Capitennial of Springfield, Illinois, June 30-July 6, 1957"

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Land of Lincoln 



"Cabin to Capitol" Spectacular 
Official Historical Booklet 50c 




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SPRINGFIELD BANKS 






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LINCOLN 



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LAND 



ASSOCIATION 



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SPRINGFIELD 

AND VICINITY 




W LAKE SHORE 
| — ORIVE | Lake Springfield 



WMAY ON YOUR DIAL 



Where MUSIC is The Keyword to Top Entertainment! 
Listen For Springfield's Favorite Radio Personalities! 

CAL SHRUM, "Tops in Western" DON HANLEY. "Wake Up to Music' 

5:00 to 7:00 A.M. 8:00 to 10:00 A.M. 

11:05 to 12:00 Noon 



WAYNE CODY, "Old Favorites and New" HARRY RING » WMAY Top 3(r 

1:00 to 2:00 P.M. 2:00 tQ 5:0Q RR 

9:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M. 



DICK SHAUGHNESSY, "WMAY First 5, 

and WMAY Pre- 
dictions" 

5:00 to 6:00 P.M. 



WMAY 




"The Voice of The Capital" 



THROUGH THE YEARS 

SPRINGFIELD HOTELS HAVE PLAYED AN 

IMPORTANT PART IN THE GROWTH AND 

PROGRESS OF SPRINGFIELD. 

AS WE CELEBRATE THE CAPITENNIAL 
MAY WE CONTINUE TO SERVE WITH WARM 
AND GRACIOUS HOSPITALITY ALL WHO 
ENTER OUR DOORS. 



SPRINGFIELD 
HOTEL ASSOCIATION 

Hotel Abraham Lincoln Hotel St. Nicholas Hotel Leland 

Capitol Hotel Elks Club Grand Hotel 

Illinois Hotel Library Hotel Palmer Hotel 



LAND OF LINCOLN 
CAPITENNIAL 

OF 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 
JUNE 30-JULY 6, 1957 




"We can succeed only by concert. It is not 4 can any 
of us imagine better?' but 4 can we all do better?' ' 

from Lincoln's "Annual Message to Congress," 
Dec. 1, 1862. 



LAND of LINCOLN CAPITENNIAL ASSOCIATION 



404 East Adams St. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 



SEARS' HISTORICAL HIGHLIGHTS 










Back in I88fc, sears, roebuck and Co. 

HAD A HUMBLE BEGINNING IN THE LITTLE 
TOWN OF NORTH ftEDWOOO. MlMHCSOTA. 
FOR IT WAS THERE THAT YOUTHFUL 
STATION AGENT ttlCHARD SEARS. FIRST 
STARTED SELLING WATCHES BY MAIL. 




A CLASSIFIED AD FOR A WATCHMAKER 
WHICH PtCK $CAW RAN IN THE CHICAGO 
DAILY NEWS IN 1887 ATTRACTED THE 
ATTENTION OF ALVAH ROEBUCK . 

THEIR SUBSEQUENT MEETING LED 
ULTIMATELY TO THE ESTABLISHMENT 
OF THEIR FAMOUS PARTNERSHIP. 



^EARS. ROEBUCK ANO CO- ENTERED THE 
RETAIL FIELD IN 1925. ITS EVANSVILLE, 
INDIANA STORE - OPENED IN OCTOBER OF 
THAT YEAR • WAS THE FIRST STORE TO 
BE ESTABLISHED OUTSIDE OF A 
MAIL ORDER. PLANT. 




mode 

with 



lune, 192?, (hot the fir 

Sears store, located 

parking space for its 

the managership of Mr 



South Grond 



in Springfield. The 

l at Second Street, 

rs, was opened in October, 



XI \ 




City of Springfield, Illinois 



NELSON O. HOWARTH May 28 , 1957 

MAYOR 



Mr. William Wingerter 

Chairman 

Springfield Capitennial 

Springfield, Illinois 

Dear Bill: 

I congratulate your committee for its long hours of service 
in staging Springfield's first Capitennial Celebration. I Join 
with your hope that hereafter It be an annual affair. 

Springfield is the heart of Lincoln Land. With little or no 
Invitation at least one million people presently visit Springfield 
each year to relive the traditions of Lincoln. A well publicized 
annual Capitennial can multiply that number. 

In recent years Lincoln has become known not only as a great 
American President, but also as a representative of an ideal burning 
in the hearts of people in every land. 

The phrase "of the people, by the people and for the people" 
is more than a phrase. It Is a symbol to the entire world that 
the United States is dedicated to the proposition that humanity 
will be free only when governments can guarantee equal opportunities 
for all citizens to seek success limited only by their own 
capabilities without discrimination based on religion, race 
or national origin. 

truly yours, 



Nelson 0. Howarth 
Mayor 



NOH/dh 




^ + + + + + + * 




William G.Stratton 

Governof 



ipficb o*" The Govhrnor 

Springfield 



May 24, 1957 



Mr. W, F. Winger ter, President 
Land of Lincoln Capitennial 
Springfield, Illinois 

Dear Mr. Winger ter: 

On behalf of the State of Illinois, and personally, I want 
to extend best wishes and congratulations to you and the people of 
Springfield on the occasion of the Capitennial. 

Those of us in state government who make Springfield our 
second home, am appreciative of your gracious hospitality, and of the 
beauty of this pleasant city. All of us too, with the rest of the 
world, are deeply avrare of the historical significance of Springfield. 

It is commendable that the Capitennial group has arranged 
this observance xo recall Springfield's heritage. 2ach year thousands 
of visitors from all parts of the world make a pilKri pi age to this 
city to honor its greatest citizen, Abraham Lincoln. It is good 
that all of us, through this celebration, are reminded again of the 
tremendous role Springfield has played in the history of the world. 

It is ~y hope that ycur days of celebration am successful 
and onjoynble to all. 

Sincerely, 



Afa^jrJCZ^ 



WGj : pn 



II \ PPY BIRTHDAY TO A GREAT CITY! 




DcWITT S. CROW CLEM SMITH CREEL DOUGLASS SAMUEL O. SMITH. JR. 

CIRCUIT JUDGES 
# of the & 

Seventh Judicial Circuit 
Sangamon, Greene. Macoupin, Morgan, Scott and Jersey Counties 

Building Toward A New 

Century of Progress 

For Springfield 

Your City Council 



P 





3 d 



Fronk H. Whitney 
Commissioner 



George M. Oliver 
Commissioner 



Nelson O. Howorrh 
Mayor 



George W. Doyle 
Commissioner 



Owen J. Darling 
Commissioner 













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/.<>// 7<> Hifiht: Willard Bunn. 
Jr., Treasurer; Francis H . \\ en- 
zel, Vice-President; W. F. Win- 
gerter, President; IT alter E. 
IT agner. Secretary. 



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II kite this booklet does not contain a complete his- 
tory, in- hope n perusal through its pages may help 
you understand its background, its business, its cul- 
ture, its graciousness and its hopes fur the future. 

THE SPRINGFIELD STORY 

125 YEARS AGO. APRIL 2. 1832 

Springfield was incorporated as a TOWN under "An acl to 
Incorporate the inhabitants of such towns as may wish to be 
incorporated.'' approved by the General Assembly of Illinois. 
February 12. 1831. A CITY CHARTER was granted to Spring- 
Held by act ol the General Assembly. February 3. 1840. 

THE FIRST in Springfield . . . 

— Cabin was built by John Kelly in 1819 near First and Jeffer- 

son streets. 
— Supreme Court came to Springfield in 1838. Judge Samuel D. 

Lockwood and Judge William Wilson sitting. 
— House built on North Third Street for C. A. Gehrmann on the 

site of cabin built by William Kelly, John's brother. Ground 

is now location of Gehrmann Park. 
— licensed tavern was on northeast corner of Second and Jeffer- 
son streets. It was a double log house, run by Elijah Slater 

in 1822. 

Illinois State Journal appeared November 10, 1831, as the 

"Sangamon Journal". 
— Airplane to reach Springfield was in 1901 when Walter Brook- 
ing raced an Illinois Central train from Chicago to the Fair 

Grounds winning $10,000. The airplane traveled 40 miles an 

hour. 
— Elevator in Springfield was installed in the present State Capi- 
tol building. 
— School of Music was established at the Ursuline Academy 

in 1858. 
— U. S. Post Office was maintained in a small frame building 

about 200 yards west of the present G. M. & O. depot in 1823. 
— Postmaster was Major Elijah lies. 
— Money order was issued in 1864. 
— Tavern-hotel was the "Indian Queen Hotel", located at Second 

and Jefferson, and operated by Archer G. Herndon. 
— Memorial Day was observed in 1868. 
— Train ran from Alton to Springfield in 1852. 
— Doctor was Gershom Jayne. 

—Newspaper was the "SANGAMO SPECTATOR" in 1826. 
— Term of Sangamon County Circuit Court was held in 1821. 

John Kelly was commissioned to build a log Courthouse which 

cost $42.50. An additional $20.50 was spent to make it usable 

in winter — this included a fireplace. 
— Negro physician was Dr. James E. Henderson. 
— First primary election was held under commission form of 

government, February 28, 1911, with 105 candidates on the 

ballot. 
— "Moulage" was developed in Springfield by Hettie Bunker 

Smith in 1936. 
— Pumping station located on the Sangamon River north of town, 

was put into operation in 1868. 
— Water went over the main dam at Lake Springfield in 1935 

and Springfield's water problem was solved. 
— Park in the city system was Washington for which George N. 

Black gave the land in 1901. 
— Golf course — four holes — was set up inside the race track at 

the State Fair Grounds. 
— Public course — 18 holes — was laid out in Bunn Park in 1912. 
— "Horse Railway" (street cars) was opened in 1866, running 

"nth Street west on Monroe to Lincoln Avenue. 
— Religious organization to convene regularly was the Methodist 

Society which began meeting in 1821 in the home of Charles 

R. Matheny. 
— Building erected definitely for a church was "a little brick 

shanty", located on Third Street between Washington and 

Adams Streets. It was built in 1830 by the Presbyterians for 

which $1200 had been subscribed. 
— Teacher was Andrew Orr who taught in a log building which 

was in use until 1829. 
— S. M. Gutcheon was appointed Superintendent of Schools in 

1855. 
— Negro desk sergeant in the Police Department is the present 

one, Virgil Harvell. 
— Fire Company — The Pioneers — was organized in 1857. 
— Fire plugs appeared in 1866. 
— Welfare organization was the Dorcas Society. 
— Opera house was built in 1879 by George W. Chatterton. a 

local jeweler. It was located on the southeast corner of Sixth 



and Jefferson Streets, and was modeled on the Union Sguare 
Theatre in New York. 

— Vein of coal was passed through almost unnoticed when drill- 
ing for an artesian well in 1857. 

— Automobile dealer in the city was Guy Mathis, who shared 
quarters with Coe Brothers, stationers. 

— Woman automobile driver was Mrs. Edward Sturtevant, daugh- 
ter of John H. Green, who in 1901 drove her father's one cylin- 
der Oldsmobile 3 blocks at 15 m.p.h. 

— Building and Loan Association was the German-Savings and 
Loan Association — now American Savings and Loan Associa- 
tion — and it financed the building of the present City Hall. 

— 114 South Sixth Street is still the one and only location of the 
Springfield Marine Bank, the oldest bank in Illinois. It has 
"outgrown" and worn well four other buildings at this address. 
Lincoln was a depositor here. 

— Square piano — now made into a desk — was owned by "Sweet 
Sue Cook" — the grandmother of Mrs. Henry B. House. 

— Both tub with running water was installed in 1865 in the home 
of Mrs. C. M. Smith, Mary Todd Lincoln's sister. 

— A professional theatre was recorded here in 1838 when Isher- 
wood and Mackenzie brought their company to perform in the 
American House, the leading hotel located on southeast corner 
of Sixth and Adams Streets. 

— Circus and menagerie was billed here in the summer of 1833. 

— Industry recorded was a horse mill and distillery operated by 
Thomas Cox. 

— Book bindery was established in 1837. 

— Merchant and first "modern" mill owner was Elijah lies. 

— Automobile bought here was a one cylinder "Northern Run- 
about" purchased in 1901 by Harry T. Loper. 

— School building for which funds from a tax were used for its 
cost was Palmer School. 

— Council (364) of the Knights of Columbus was organized here 
March 19, 1899, with Joseph H. Sheehan named Grand Knight. 

— Dial telephone service went into operation at midnight on Au- 
gust 19, 1939, with former Mayor John Kapp dialing the first 
call. Springfield was one of the first cities to receive dial 
service. 

— Telephone office was opened for business on September 18, 
1879, in a third floor room in a building at Sixth and Monroe 
Streets. 

— Telephone call was made by Governor Shelby M. Cullom. 

— City marshal was George Keefner, elected in 1867. 

— Telephone exchange with 25 telephones each in a wooden box 
about 4 feet long and one foot wide. 

— Open-face watch made in the United States was made at the 
Illinois Watch Factory in 1878. 

— "Mixes" were made at Pillsbury Mills in Springfield in 1945. 

— Nickelodeon opened its doors to the public in 1907. It was 
located across the street from the Leland Hotel and was called 
the Orpheum. 

— Gas lights were introduced in 1854. 

— Electric lights came in the late winter of 1878 following in- 
stallation of temporary equipment in the Ide Foundry. Fifth and 
Madison Streets, and the City Railway Park (now part of Lin- 
coln Park). 

— Locomotive arrived by steamboat and was put on the track 
in Springfield September 6, 1838. 

— Train of the Northern Cross Railroad entered Springfield Feb- 
ruary 15, 1842. 

— Train ran on the Sangamon and Morgan Road July 23, 1849. 

— Electric street car was run over the line June 12, 1890. 

— First transfers were put to use in 1893. 

— Bus was put into operation in August, 1924. The last street 
car made its final run in January, 1938. 

— Bicycle displayed in Springfield was owned by Ralph Baker. 

— Air transportation for Springfield started in August, 1926, be- 
tween St. Louis and Chicago in connection with the air mail 
service of the Robertson Aircraft Corporation with Charles 
Lindbergh one of the first three pilots. Speed was 90 miles an 
hour. 

— Commercial flying was developed in 1925 when Walter Cutter 
and Leslie Smith brought their own planes and conducted a 
miniature flying school. 

— Highway radio-telephone system opened between Chicago and 
St. Louis in 1947 with Springfield a vital point. 

— Telephone — two of them, in fact — was put into operation be- 
tween the downtown Western Telegraph Office and the branch 
office in the State House on February 29, 1878. 

— Church services and sermons to bedfast congregation members 
were sent by telephone in 1900 by the Second Presbyterian 
Church. 



BACK IN 1884 



That was a long time ago — 1884, when the Franklin Life was founded. 

Chester A. Arthur (ever hear of him?) was President. 

There were 38 stars in the American flag. (Ten of the present states were still 
territories.) 

No one had heard of Theodore Roosevelt — or the second Roosevelt, either. 
The telephone was a toy, and the Army was fighting Sitting Bull. 



* ik * 



Franklin Life has done a lot of growing since then, particularly in the years 
since 1940, when insurance in force was only $177,500,000. 

We reached One Billion in March, 1951 . . . 

Two Billion before the end of 1955. 

Today we are half way along on attainment of our Third Billion. And Frank- 
lin's goal is Three Billion in force before the end of 1958. 

With a nationwide organization, and over a thousand local people employed 
in the Home Office — we are proud to be a part of Springfield. 

We hope that Springfield is equally proud of the Franklin Life. 



THE FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Distinguished Service Since 1884 




Lorraine \. Fleck 

Creator of 
Lincoln the Lawyer 
"Official Capitennial 

Souvenir" 



LINCOLN TRAIL SOUVENIRS 

Manufacturer — Jobber — Distributor 

I ( >1() West Jefferson Street 

Springfield, Illinois Phone 3-8751 

Souvenirs - Gifts - Novelties and Small Toys 




tlSest lA/iikei from 
The Old Corner Drug Store 

BROADWELI/S 

Prescription Pharmacists 



BAUM MONUMENT & STONE CO. 

PIONEER MONUMENT COMPANY OF SPRINGFIELD 

101 YEARS OLD 

MAIN OFFICE AND PLANT, I0TH & JACKSON STS. 

MONUMENTAL DISPLAY, 
3411 SOUTH SIXTH ST. ROAD 



THE 

CREDIT BUREAU OF SPRINGFIELD, INC. 

IS PROl'D TO BE 

\\ INTEGRAL AND IMPORTANT PART 

OK 

LINCOLNLAND 

We are headquarters for credit, personnel and 
-|p<ri,il reports and collection service. We were or- 
ganized l>v the merchants and professional men of 
Springfield 33 years ago for the mutual protection 
of the public and themselves against excessive credit 



VINCENT'S BEAUTY SHOP 

305 So. 6th 

Looking for an ideal hairdo? Tliat i* definitel} a tlirill at 
an) age? Come in and lei mir technicians create an exciting 
ne« liair fashion for yon. 

fake home n gift from nur large selection of 
leu elt i and / oilelries. 



BOB'S BOTTLING CO. 

Frostie Root Beer 

V>l)itt>" ( Grange 



SPRINGFIELD PRODUCE, INC. 

Fresh Fruits and \ egetables 

LOtli St. & Capitol \\r. 

Springfield 



Greetings — 

III. Insect Control Company 

J \ m is H. Smith 
34 1 ( > So. MacArthur Springfield 



THE FIRST in Springfield . . . 

— TV station began transmitting its test pattern at 1:24 p.m. 
September 17, 1953. 

— Time in history, Springfield was seen by a nation-wide tele- 
vision audience — February 12, 1956, when a section of the 
NBC's Wide Wide World originated in Lincoln Land. 

— Illinois State Fair was telecast in 1954. 

— Girl Scouting became a part of the growing story of Spring- 
field in 1921 when the first troop was organized with 19 girls. 

— High school opened in 1855. 

— Parochial academy — Ursuline Academy — opened in 1857. 

— Manager of the Telephone Exchange was Major Robert B. 
Hoover. 

— Telegraphic message received in 1848. 

— Sale of public lands in Sangamon County took place on No- 
vember 6, 1823. 

— Mayor was Benjamin S. Clements whose term began in 1840. 

— Two-story frame house was built in 1827 by Charles R. Ma- 
theny. 

— "Open air street car" made its maiden run in 1900. 

— Soda fountain was located in Dodds Drug Store. 

— Negro policeman was Edwin Lee. 

— Experimental paving was started in 1870 and the first real pav- 
ing was put down in 1878. 

— Catholic bookstore was opened in 1884 by May Faith at 214 
South Seventh Street. 

— Librarian of the "free public library", organized in 1885, was 
Mrs. Hannah L. Kimball. 

— Board of Town Trustees were Cyrus Anderson, John Taylor, 
Elisha Tabor, Mordecai Mobley and William Carpenter. 
Charles R. Matheny was president of the town. (Lincoln served 
as a town trustee 1839-1840.) 

— Governor to reside in Springfield was Thomas Carlin. The 
Governor's house was located on the northwest corner of Sev- 
enth and Capitol Avenue from 1839. 

— Occupants of the present executive mansion was the Joel A. 
Matteson family who moved there on November 30, 1855. 

— Plat of the town was made in 1823 by James C. Stephenson, 
surveyor. 

— Librarian of the subscription library, organized in 1866, was Dr. 
Samuel Willard. 

SPRINGFIELD WAS 

— Called Newsomville and Calhoun previous to 1833. 

— One of two cities Richmond, Virginia, was the other) which 
during the depression of 1907 was reputed to have been the 
only city of considerable size whose banks, during the short 
though severe recession, continued to issue currency on . an 
unrestricted basis. 

— The site of a Lutheran College — Illinois State University — which 
was a project undertaken in 1851 by a group of citizens headed 
by John T. Stuart. Abraham Lincoln served as Trustee and 
Robert Lincoln, his son, was a student. 

— A "regular" stop on the circuit for a circus each year "when 
either Barnum & Bailey, Ringling Brothers, or Forespaugh & 
Sells (later Sells, Floto) and, or, Buffalo Bill set up their tents 
on the Comet Grounds (between Third and Fifth Streets beyond 
South Grand Avenue, or at the Circus Grounds on North Elev- 
enth Street, just south of Ridgely Avenue). 

— The home of such companies as Illinois Watch, Coats Watch, 
William Fetzer, Springfield Bridge and Iron, Ide and Son Engine, 
United Zinc and Chemical, Lourie Manufacturing, Meikle 
Watch, Armstrong Brothers' Metal Works, J. L. Owens Manu- 
facturing, Elevator Milling, Union Mill, Capitol Foundry and 
Machine, Kinsella Varnish, E. F. Lomelino Manufacturing. U. S. 
Gypsum, H. R. Ashcraft Manufacturing, Springfield Wire Screen, 
Springfield Show Case, Illinois Trunk and Manufacturing, 
Stnffler Ice Manufacturing, Wastemo Chemical, Springfield 
Harrow, Springfield Canvas Goods, Springfield Vinegar, 
Springfield Pickle, Maurer Ice, Waterman and Waterbury, 
Sterling Paper, Franz Brothers' Packing, Hartmann Brothers' 
Manufacturing Bakers, Connelly Baking. National Refining, H. O. 
McGrue Planing Mill, C. A. Power Planing Mill, Springfield 
Planing Mill, E. W. Hocker and Son, Spitznagle Candy Manu- 
facturing, Springfield Glove Manufacturing, William Foster 
Manufacturing, Springfield Brush Manufacturing, F. L. Schlier- 
back Harness Manufacturer, Frank Godley Shoddy Mill, J. W. 
Cooper Metal Works, H. B. Davidson Carriage Works, August 
Brand Carriage Manufacturer, Wabash R. R. Shops, Illinois 
Traction System, Lincoln Park Coal and Brick, Dawson Brick 
and Tile, Capital City Concrete Construction, J. L. Fortado, 
Illinois Granite and Stone Works, Springfield Brass Foundry, 
Zumbrook Screen Factory, Ball Brothers Cigar Manufacturers, 



Henning Pickle, M. Zwicky's Sons Soap Works, Springfield 
Woolen Mills, William Pierce's Broom Factory, John Cook's 
Soap and Candle Establishment, Aetna Foundry and Machine 
Shop, and Farris Furnace Company. 

SPRINGFIELD IS 

— The home office of such companies as Franklin Life Insurance, 
Illinois National Insurance, Standard Mutual Casualty, Acme 
Life Insurance. 

— 34 state and national organizations, other than farm groups, 
have headguarters here including Illinois Congress of Parents 
and Teachers Association. 

— 610 feet above sea level. 

— Capital of Illinois since 1839. 

— The location of the motherhouses of the Dominican Sisters of 
the Sacred Heart Convent, and of the Franciscan Sisters — the 
Hospital Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. 

— The Bishopric See for Episcopal and Roman Catholic dioceses. 

— The home of the Sangamo Electric Company. 

— The site of a national cemetery — Camp Butler — dedicated in 
1949 and known as the "Arlington of the West". 

— The county seat, since 1821. 

— The site of Lincoln's home and his tomb. 

— Headquarters for fen agricultural organizations. 

— Serviced by 25 major trucking firms. 

— Also serviced by 1 1 furniture and special handling concerns 
with connections all over the country. 

— The headquarters of the downstate division organization, Illi- 
nois Bell Telephone Company since 1937. 

— Serving as a switching center for the microwave radio relay 
system. 

— The home of Hiram E. Jackson, Jr., an outstanding Negro artist, 
whose "Woman in White" and "Emancipator" hang in the re- 
cently dedicated Art Building at Lincoln University, Jefferson 
City, Missouri. 

SPRINGFIELD HAS 

— Three motorized post offices operating out of the Springfield 
post office to provide fast mail delivery to towns not ade- 
quately served by railroads. 

— Population of 87,500 (including census count of recently an- 
nexed areas) is the estimated population in 1957. 

— The oldest bank in Illinois — Springfield Marine Bank — organ- 
ized in 1851. 

— The Commission form of government with a city council consist- 
ing of Mayor Nelson O. Howarth and four Commissioners: 
Frank Whitney, George M. Oliver, George W. Doyle, Owen J. 
Darling. 

— 7 fire stations, 15 motor vehicles and 2 inhalators. 

— 102 firemen, and 98 policemen. 

— 15 autos, 9 motorcycles and 1 ambulance for the Police Dept. 

— 5 newspapers: 2 dailies; 1 Sunday; 2 weeklies. 

— 3 broadcasting stations. 

— 1 television station. 

— 124 churches of all faiths: 99 Protestant; 15 Catholic, and 2 
Jewish Synagogues. 

— 2 airlines with 25 flights daily. 

— Trains from 6 railroads move in and out of Springfield daily. 

— 47 inter and intra state buses leave the bus terminal daily. 

— 3 manufacturers employing more than 1,000 employees; 7 em- 
ploying more than 250; 7 employing more than 100 employees, 
and 71 employing less than 100 employees. 

— 2 seminaries: Concordia College, 1874 (Lutheran, Missouri 
Synod), Diocesan Latin School. 1948 (Roman Catholic). 

— 2 schools of nursing: Memorial Hospital School of Nursing Edu- 
cation (First and Miller Streets), St. John's School of Nursing 
Education (821 East Mason Street). 

— 2 aviation schools: one at Capitol Airport and one at Southwest 
Airport. 

— 6 high schools (Springfield, Feitshans, Lanphier, Cathedral, 
Sacred Heart Academy and Ursuline Academy). 

— In addition to the three schools of basic beauty culture, one of- 
fers advanced courses, George's School of Cosmotology. 

— An area of 10.5 square miles. 

— 960 acres of parks. 

— 6 golf courses — all have grass greens. 

— 1 little theatre — Springfield Theatre Guild. 

— Lake Springfield containing 21.4 billion gallons of water, with 
a shore line of 57 miles. 

— 45 elementary schools — public and parochial. 

— Summer union Protestant services under the direction of the 
Springfield Council of Churches, begun during World War I 
under the leadership of Elmer Kneale, founder of the Mid-Day 
Luncheon Club. 



TIIKCMMTXL 



120 YEARS AGO. FEBRUARY 28. 1837 — 

Springfield was chosen as ihe new capital of Illinois 
by the General Assembly of Illinois in accordance with 
"An act permanently to locate the seat of government 
for the State of Illinois," approved at Vandalia. Febru- 
ary 25. 1837. 
The territi i ipital of Illinois was 

ii the Second General 
i on Deo mbei 4, lK2n it passed 
an act making Yandaha the seat of government for the 




next twenty years. 

During the Tenth General Assembly (1836-1837) 
Sangamon County was ably and vigorously represented 
by the "Long Nine"— Senators Job Fletcher and Archer 
G Herndon, and seven representatives. John Dawson. 
Ninian W. Edwards. William F. Elkin. Abraham Lincoln. 
Andrew McCormick, Dan Stone and Robert L. Wilson — 
all tall and angular, their combined height exactly fifty- 
four feet, with Lincoln contributing his four inches to 
make the average six feet. 



Q 





ROBERT LANG WILSON 



ARCHER G. HERNDON 



JOB FLETCHER 



(No photo available) 




ANDREW McCORMICK 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN 



(No photo available* 



DANIEL STONE 






NINIAN W. EDWARDS 



WILLIAM F. ELKIN 



JOHN DAWSON 



As the tide of emigration moved northward it was 
conceded that the capital must be nearer the center of 
populatiun. but Vandalia and southern Illinois fought 
hard against it. Internal improvements had become 
in contagious fever, and a vast system 

lis and railroads were projected. The "Long 
Nine." with a well-planned log rolling" program moved 
They were willing to trade their 
ernal improvements for votes to support 
the removal ol ipital from Vandalia to Spring- 

field Lincoln introduced the removal bill and proved 
ii :'\ for li tit for the capital. 

was indeed a great personal tri- 
umph for Lin 
The Long Nine" staged a celebration at 

ivern to whii ; entire legislature 
was united A public d held in Springfield 

on Jul-- tural Hotel u here "some 

. upwards of forty 
zing the judicious management . . . abil- 
ity . gentlemanly deportment constant and untir- 
ing labor" of the Sangamon delegation. Lincoln toasted: 
.! friends They are too numerous to be now- 



named individually, while there is no one of them who 
is not too dear to be forgotten or neglected." 

The act provided for an appropriation of S50.000 to 
commence building the statehouse and that at least 
S50.00C should be contributed by the citizens of the place 
chosen, and not less than two acres of land were to be 
conveyed to the state as a site for the capitol. By an 
act supplemental to the act permanently locating the 
seat of government at Springfield, approved March 3, 
1837. the county commissioners were empowered to 
convej to the State the three-acre property known as the 
"public square." 

Work on the new state house was begun after the 
two story brick court house was torn down. From the 
Hill quarry a few miles south of Springfield, on Spring 
Creek, sandstone was hauled by ox teams for the erec- 
i Doric structure designed by Springfield's baker- 
architect John F. Rague. The cornerstone was dedi- 
cated on July 4. 1837. Edward D. Baker delivering an 
eloquent address. 

Governor Thomas Carhn issued a proclamation that 
all State records be removed (by wagon) to Springfield 
by July 4. 1839: however, the state government did not 




Johnson & Biggs 
Marathon Service 



s P 



ring & Edward? 



Congratulations 
To Our Home Town 

Tain tor A 

Market 

Quality Foods Over 30 Years 
Spring and Lawrence 



Congratulations Capitennial 

ILLINOIS TRANSIT LINES INC. 

326 North Sixth Street 



Interior Decorators 
Wishes 

Congratulation 5 to S^prinafieia 
101 West Monroe Street 



Forward With Springfield 

BRADLEY BUILDING 

Florence N. Bradley, Mgr. 
Real Estate Management 



"Home of 84 Nationally Advertised 
Brands" 
Established 1917 — Our 40th Year 

WOLFSON'S FURNITURE CO. 



Springfield 



Jacksonville 



Best U ishes 

Zorn Drug Store, Inc. 

THE STORE OF PERSONAL SERVICE 

LINCOLN and EDWARDS STREET 

Phone Dial 4-3434 SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Greetings 

WINCHESTERS 

WALLPAPER and PAINT STORE 

UNFINISHED FURNITURE ■ ARTIST SUPPLIES - TOYS 

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING 

408-410 EAST MONROE STREET 

PHONE 3-9211 SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



BUNN 



CAPITOL 



COMPANY 



SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Established 1840 




SERVING CENTRAL ILLINOIS 

Contract Builders Hardware 
Industrial and Contractor Supplies 



NORSIDE RESTAURANT 

Steaks - Chops - Chicken 
Short Orders - Plate Lunches 

We Feature "Turkey Dinners" 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays 

Phone 2-0698 Dave Cook 

1144 NORTH NINTH STREET 




' wwwwi^^^ 



SUPPLY COMPANY 

1010 EAST ADAMS STREET 



19 2 0-42-24 SOUTH THIRTEENTH STREET 
PHONE 3-3694 - SPRINGFIELD - ILLINOIS 




Here Lincoln served in the last session of the Twelfth General Assembly. 
Here in the Supreme Court chambers Lincoln argued more than two hundred cases. 

Here in the House of Representatives Lincoln took issue with Stephen A. Douglas on the repeal of the Mis- 
souri Compromise. October 4. 1854. 
Here in the House of Representatives Lincoln made his famous "House Divided" speech on June 16. 1858. 
Here in the Governor's Rooms Lincoln made his headquarters as President-Elect. 
Here in the House of Representatives on May .'} and 4. 1865, Lincoln's remains lay in state. 



actually function in Springfield until December 9, 1839. 
The legislature was not to convene in the new capitol 
until December 7, 1840. While construction continued 
the legislature met in the First Methodist Church (south- 
east corner, Fifth and Monroe streets) and the Second 
Presbyterian Church (west side of Fourth street); and 
the Supreme Court in St. Paul's Episcopal Church (Third 
and Adams streets). After many delays, Illinois' fifth 
capitol was completed in 1853 at a total cost of $260,000, 
double its orginal estimate. 

By the close of the Civil War it was already apparent 
that the State had outgrown its capitol. Fearful of re- 
location and removal. Representative James C. Conk- 
ling of Sangamon County introduced a bill providing 
for the erection of a new State Capitol. It was approved 
by Governor Richard J. Oglesby on February 25, 1867. 



The act provided that the public square and State- 
house be conveyed to Sangamon County and the city of 
Springfield (deed was executed October 23, 1869) in 
consideration of $200,000 to be paid to the State of Illi- 
nois and that the city and county convey to the State 
the nine-acre tract on which the Capitol now stands. 

The land was secured at a cost to the city of $70,000. 
The $200,000 paid by the county and $250,000 from the 
State Treasury was appropriated to commence the work. 
Construction "costs were limited to $3,000,000 originally, 
but $4,500,000 was expended before its completion. 
Ground was broken on March 11. 1868 and the corner- 
stone laid October 5. Still unfinished the building was 
first occupied in January, 1876; the legislature met there 
in 1877 for the first time. By 1888, Illinois' sixth and 
present Capitol was finally completed. 




By 1957 the capitol group of buildings consists of a renovated 
statehouse, the Supreme Court Building dedicated in 1908, the 
Centennial Building completed in 1923, the Archives Building 
(1938), the Armory and Office Building (1936), and the Illinois State 
Office Building (1955). 



H E II OLD. I \ M \Y IT II V O LI ALL I) \ YS 




In 1857 . . . the Right Rev. Henry Damian Juncker. D. D.. 
was the bishop of Alton, under whose paternal 
cart' was the little Catholic flock of Springfield 
who worshipped at the 60' by 30' frame church 
of St. John the Baptist on the south side of 
\dams Street between Eighth and Ninth. 

During the past century the 
Catholic faithful have advanced 
the cause of religion and 
charity in this community 
by the erection of 11 parish 
churches, a 735 bed hospital, 
a home for the aged, a maternity home, a tuberculosis sani- 
torium, a crippled children's hospital. 10 elementary schools. 
3 high schools, a trade school, 
a junior college, a pre- 
seminarv school for 
the priesthood and 
a summer camp 
for young- 
sters. 



In 1957 . . . the Most Rev. William 
A. O'Connor. D.D., 
is the bishop of 
Springfield in 
Illinois, the diocesan 
See having been transferred to 
the Capital Cit) in 1923. This month 
the Catholics of Springfield completed a 
successful fund-raising campaign of SI .950.000.00 
for the erection of a new boys' high school and for the expan- 
-ioii of the two irirls" academies. 




EVEN TO TIIL CONSLIMMATION OF THE WORLD! 



jjk 







CHURCHES 

The deep rooted strength of Spring- 
field must be resultant in a great degree 
to the faith of the law-abiding, God- 
fearing pioneers who establishd this 
city. Carrying their religious heritage 
with them along the oxen trails, these 
sober-minded folk hastened to erect 
Houses of Worship befitting their par- 
ticular faiths. Our churches, from their 
meager beginnings have grown steadily 
and harmoniously with Springfield. 






i 



ST. PAULS CATHEDRAL 

I Episcopal I 
(Second St. at Lawrence) 



LINCOLN'S PEW 

Interior, First Presbyterian Church, 
then located corner of Washington and 
Third St., showing "Lincoln Pew" — ^ 
fifth from front, draped with V. S. flag. ^ 
W hen church was moved to present edi- W 
fice, northwest corner Seventh St. at 
Capitol, this pew was removed and 
placed in the new church but placed as 
the first pew. 





CATHEDRAL OF THE 
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
I Roman Catholic I 
(800 block S. Sixth St. I 



BR1TH SHOLOM TEMPLE 
412 E. Scarritt 



ADMINISTRATION 

The office of the Council is a clearing 
house for all types of information; 
schedules the many Council ac- 
tivities; works in close relation- 
ship with the larger Agen- 
cies of the Protestant 
movement; and admin- 
isters all Council 
business. 



CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

Supervises Chaplaincy work at the Me- 
morial Hospital; cooperates with 
State Council in matters relating 
to Comity; makes study of lo- 
cal community needs, in 
fields of race relations, so- 
cial action, and so 
forth. 



UNITED 
CHURCH WOMEN 

A self-governing division 
of the Council, which 
sponsors World Day of 
Prayer, May Fellowship, 
Missions Institutes, 
UNICEF "Trick or Treat" 
program, World Commu- 
nity Day, year-round serv- 
ice to nursing homes, and 
many other important 
functions. 



SPRINGFIELD 
COUNCIL OF CHURCHES 

Thirty-six churches, from twelve denominations, 
working together — -"to manifest more fully the 
essential oneness of the Christian Churches in 
Jesus Christ as their divine Lord and Saviour, 
and to promote the spirit of fellowship, service 
and cooperation among them." The Council 
engages in those activities which can be done 
better by churches working together than by 
working separately. The work of the Council 
is carried on by its various departments. 



401 ' '2 East Capitol Ave. Springfield, Illinois 
Telephone 3-5360 



CHRISTIAN 

EDUCATION AND 

LOCAL CHURCH 

ACTIVITIES 

Sponsors annual School of 
Religion; Sunday School 
Teacher Recognition; 
plans children's worship 
services and youth rallys; 
supervises other coopera- 
tive activities in fields of 
Christian education, evan- 
gelism, etc. 



RADIO AND 

TELEVISION 

Regular programs include 
Sunday: 7:30 A.M., WMAY, 
"Morning Worship;" 9:45 A.M. 
WCVS, "Christian in Action;" 10:45 
A.M., WTAX, Church Service; 10:15 
P.M., WTAX, "The Churchmen's Forum;" 
WTAX, "Sunday School Quiz;" and spe- 
cial programs on W1CS-TV. Publicizes re- 
ligious programs sponsored by National 
Council and denominational groups. 



INTER-CHURCH SERVICE 
AND WORSHIP 

Arranges union services in- 
cluding George Washington's 
Birthday Breakfast for Men, Lent- 
en, Good Friday, Summer Union 
Services, Reformation Day, Thanks- 
giving, and others as needed. Music 
committee sponsors Hymn Festivals, 
Choir Clinics, and provides music for 
special services. 



Central Baptist 

Elliott Avenue Baptist 

Harvard Park Baptist 

Union Baptist 

Zion Baptist 

First Christian 

Stuart Street Christian 

First Church of the Brethren 

First Church of God 

First Congregational 

Plymouth Congregational 

Christ Episcopal 



COUNCIL MEMBERS 

St. Paul's Episcopal 

First Evangelical United Brethren 

Hope Evangelical United Brethren 

Faith Lutheran 

Grace Lutheran 

Luther Memorial 

St. John's Lutheran 

First Methodist 

Asbury Methodist 

Douglas Avenue Methodist 

Grace Methodist 

Jerome Methodist 



Kumler Methodist 
Laurel Methodist 
Wesley Methodist 
Woodside Methodist 
St. Paul's A.M.E. 
St. John's A.M.E. 
Free Methodist 
First Presbyterian 
Westminster Presbyterian 
Third Presbyterian 
Fourth Presbyterian 
Filth Presbyterian 



SPRINGFIELD CHURCHES WELCOME YOU TO SUNDAY SERVICES 



CENTRAL BAPTIST 



HARVABD PARR 



b Gnod and CoHce* 



Capitol and College 




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*«•«*&-_ 



FIRST METHODIST CHURCH rFi/tfi 
nnd Capitol). The first denomination to 
hold services was the Methodist in 1821, in 
the home of Charles Matheny. The Pres- 
byterians, under leadership of the Rev. 
John G. Bergen, built the first church 
building in Springfield in 1830, at Third 
and Washington; the Methodists soon fol- 
lowed with their building at Fifth and 
Monroe. 



CONGREGATIONAL 



UNITED BRETHREN 



Four Squr. C0«XI 



LUTHERAN 



fMluourl Synod l 



LUTHERAN 


THE NAZAXENE 


UNDENOMINATIONAL 


BETHANY El Wtt 


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"-—- — ^- — r>"<- 



\\ i- are proud of the part we have played 
in the development of Springfield 

ORGANIZED 1893 

SPRINGFIELD FEDERATION 
of LABOR, AFL-CIO 



Through it- \«';ir- the Federation has been de- 
voted to advancing the economic and working 
conditions in our community and also assisting 
the recreation, health and welfare agencies as 
well a> supporting legislation and community 
program- beneficial to all citizens. 

"// luit is good for the com- 
munity is good for labor 



Francis Durkhn Charles H. Midden 
President Secretary 



SPRINGFIELD JEWISH 

COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

COUNCIL AND ITS MEMBER 

ORGANIZATIONS SALUTE 

THE CAPITENNIAL 

Anti-Defamation League 
Ernes Lodge. Bnai Brith 
Bnai Brith Chapter 
Congregation Bnai Abraham 
Bnai Abraham Sisterhood 
Bnai Abraham Men's (Unit 
Hadassah 

Jewish War \ eterans 
Springfield Jewish Federation 
Temple Brith Sholom 
Brilli Sholom Sisterhood 
Brith Sholom Mens Club 




"OUR HATS OFF" 

To 
Springfield 

and the 
CapitenniaJ 
Celebration 

From 




Joseph P. Km>\ 



Alien T. Lucas 



Y U R 

CIRCUIT CLERK 

and 

S I \ T E R E P R E S E N T A T I V E 



COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY 

Springfield has a diversified background of manufacturing, retail and 
wholesale business, coal mining, rail and motor transportation. The center of 
a prosperous agricultural area devoted to general farming and stock raising. 
Hundreds of businesses, small and large, have grown, in many cases from a 
humble start, to form important institutions of the Springfield commercial 
picture. 




SANGAMO ELECTRIC COMPANY 

( Located on block between Ninth and Eleventh, Converse and 

North Grand Avenues. I 




PILLSBl RY MILLS, INC. 
1 1525 East Phillips! 



WE'VE BEEN AROUND A LONG TIME 

Hauling coal for industry is the heritage of the Midland from its ancestor, the Pawnee Railroad, 
constructed in 1892 across the south part of Sangamon County. C&IM came into being when the 
line was extended to Taylorville in 1906. The railroad came to Springfield in 1926 when it acquired 
trackage from Springfield to Peoria. 

C. & I. M. is proud to be the only railroad serving this area which has its headquarters and prin- 
cipal facilities in Springfield. We like being a part of this community and foresee a glorious future 
for it. 

J. E. DARE, President 

CHICAGO & ILLINOIS MIDLAND RAILWAY COMPANY 




Our Bail WiiLi 


SCHERF BOILER CO. 


ROBERTS FISH CO. 


Steel Fabricators & Erectors 


Your Birch Eye Distributor 


Serving Springfield & Central Illinois 




continuously since 1905 


Serving Central Illinois since 1900 


Office: 711 So. 11th St. 


Si yi \ i'ii and Washington 


SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 


A. L. Strong & Son 


Compliments of 



SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Roofs - Siding - Sheet Metal Work 

and Remodeling 



STATE CLEANERS 

since 1914 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 

PAINT HEADQUARTERS 
512 E. MONROE ST. PH. 4-9835 



TRUTTER PLATING CO. 



211 East Jefferson St. 



COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY 




^!§3. ALLIS-CHALMERS 

MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

(3000 South Sixth Street) 



HENRY 

NELCH & SON 

COMPANY 

(800 South 
Ninth Street) 




r^if 



r ■ « ■ « s s 5 . 

rlH»!i 5? jj 

til ' 9 i i'.tjj 
II II 



ILLINOIS 

FARM SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

(1500 East Linn I 




Suppose you could turn back the calendar... 



If you could put yourself into the Spring- 
field of the 19th Century, what different 
sights you would see! 

In the telephone exchange of the early 
1880's, for instance, you would have 
walked in on a scene like that above. Yet 
for all its guaintness, this soon became a 
nerve center of the state capital. 

Then as you turned the pages of the cal- 
endar forward again, you would see 
amazing changes all over town. New 
business buildings would be going up. 
Whole neighborhoods would grow before 
your eyes. The entire life and appear- 
ance of the city would be transformed. 

One of the vital forces bringing the 
change was telephone service. It brought 
people closer together . . . speeded the 
wheels of industry . . . increased the 
tempo of business. 

Today, if you were to walk into our tele- 



phone exchange, you would see the new 
and larger "nerve center" below. But in 
spite of its new look, its role in the life of 
Springfield is still the same; for the magic 
of this modern telephone service is al- 
ready shaping an even more marvelous 
future. 




ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Today Springfield, like any major city 
in the United States, is only seconds 
away from any place in the civilized 
world. 



MAIL. From the lime of the first settlement in 
Springfield until 1823 when local service was pro- 
vided there was no post office nearer than Ed- 
wardsville, 80 miles southwest. The early settlers 
received their mail from that point as best they 
could. Home delivery service — with four carriers 
— was introduced in 1873. Today there are 106 
city routes, 12 parcel post, 6 special delivery, 
and 8 rural routes traveled daily by postal em- 
ployees to deliver approximately 85 million 
pieces of mail handled annually by the Spring- 
field post office. 



TELEGRAPH service in Springfield dates back 
almost 110 years. Western Union's nation-wide 
network of high-speed carrier circuits and micro- 
wave system fogether with its modern electronic 
transmission and recording equipment is a testi- 
monial of skilled communication engineering in 
action. 




THE "LATEST" IN POST OFFICE EQUIP- 
MENT for speedy handling of mail: the (Car- 
riers' Mail Cart and the Mobile Post Office 
which provides more adequate service for 
smaller communities. 




ORIGINAL TELEGRAPH 
INSTRUMENT invented by 
Samuel F. B. Morse in 1835. 
The recorder had a suspend- 
ed pencil which marked 
hills and valleys, indicating 
dots and dashes, on a paper 
tape as it ivas drawn under 
the pencil by the works of a 
clock. Below the recorder is 
the "portrule" transmitter, 
u ith a row of metal teeth 
set up to produce the de- 
sired dots and dashes. 



HIGHSPEED MESSAGE 
CENTER where telegrams 
are on perforated tape form 
flashed automatically through 

the center and routed to 
their destination by the elec- 
tronic "bruin." 




TELEPHONE. Forward-looking citizens of Spring- 
field were quick to recognize the advantage of 
the telephone shortly after its invention. Since 
its introduction here in 1879, the expanding use 
of the telephone and the growth of Springfield 
have been closely interwoven. Through April, 
1957, there were 56,000 telephones in use in 
Springfield, and customers are using them to the 
tune of about 300,000 calls daily. 



THE ILLINOIS BELL TELEPHONE 
COMPANY. The Home of the Dial 
Central Office. (Sixth and Cook 
Streets). 




(OMMl MCVMONS 



NEWSPAPERS 

The American newspaper is an essential instrument in the lives of the American people. Its freedom to print 
guaranteed by the Constitution. Springfield's daily newspapers have morning and evening editions. 




ILLINOIS STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER BUILDING. <313 South 
Sixth Street). The Illinois State Journal (F. S. Haynes, editor and 
publisher ami J. I'.mil Smith, publisher emeritus) and the Illinois 
Stati- Register I /■'. S. Haynes, publisher and I . Y. Dallman, editor) 
published by the Copley Press, Inc. 



RADIO 

WCVS, orginally chartered as WCBS in 1926 (name changed in 1947) is Springfield's oldest radio sta- 
tion. It was the tirst Springfield station to become part of a network — the NBC (Blue), in 1940. It is now 
affiliated v/ith the ABC radio network and the Mutual Broadcasting System. WCVS operates on 1450 
kilocycles. Since 1956 their studio has been located in their building at 3001 South Fourth Street. 

WMAY went on the air for the first time in October, 1950. Operating on 970 kilocycles, it utilizes 1he 
latest approved type RCA 1000 watt transmitter by day and 500 watt by night. It is affiliated with the 
NBC radio network. The transmitter site and studio are located eight miles northeast of Springfield. 

WTAX, serving Springfield since 1930, is licensed to operate unlimited hours on 1240 kilocycles with 
250 watt power. It is affiliated with CBS radio network. It has an FM station and today is Springfield's 
only high fidelity radio station. The WTAX studio is located on ByPass 66 and Cook. 



TELEVISION 

d's only television station, WICS, began 

telecasting on September 17, 1953, over Channel 20 

wet at 18,000 watts. The antenna for this 

ultra high UHF station is in the 3000 block on South 

Fourth Street. 




Channel 20 Channel 20 Channel 20 Channel 20 Channel 20 Channel 20 Channel 20 




A, 



LTHOUGH young in the century -and -a -quarter history 
of Springfield, WICS Channel 20 is proud to serve the com- 
munity and Central Illinois with the most potent and fastest- 
growing communications medium in the world today. 

r 

V^JHANNEL 20 is dedicated to the present and future growth of Lincolnland. 
Community service is our keynote, and we take pride in making our television fa- 
cilities available to every public service organization in Springfield and Central 
Illinois. 

c 

V_JHANNEL 20 keeps you entertained by the finest programs from NBC — the 
Nation's No. 1 network . . . and within a short time Channel 20 will increase 
its scope when it begins telecasting NBC network programs in glorious color. 



Channel 



WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS WICS 




WESTERN WATER 


£ 


PROOFING CO., INC. 


ENGINEERS — CONTRACTORS 


We Congratulate 


Phone 4-3474 — 4-3475 


SPRINGFIELD'S 125th 


2136-40 North Sixteenth Street 


CAPITENNIAL CELEBRATION 


SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 


* 


Flynn-Hippard Drug Store 


We Are Proud We Have Been a Part of 


Prescription Druggists 




401 EAST ADAMS— COR. 4TH STREET 


This Community For a Large 


SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 


Part of This Time. 


Frank Alvey & Co. 

FINEST PIPES AND TOBACCOS 
JOKES - NOVELTIES • LUNCH - BILLIARDS 


KRESGE'S 


Phone 2-0421 

514 E. MONROE ST. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 





\t Work in Springfield 

for !'..'} ^ cars the 

YMCA 



extends greetings to the 

"Old Home Town" in its big 

( Iapitennial Celebration 

YOU will find it at the "V 

\ well-rounded program with Christian 

emphasis for Boys, Men and Families 

Special Summer Rates Inquire ;>t 317 So. Seventh St. 

Telephone l-'>816 

Flic ^ M<! \ i- ;i member of 
I iiitid Coiumimih Services 



congratulations 

to tup: 

capitennial 

KNIGHTS 

of 
COLUMBUS 

Council No. 364 



GREETINGS 
From 

THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

1500 Seniors 
450 Juniors 



A Friend offers this space to the 

MARIAMA CLUB 

for expression of thanks to the Advertisers 
in Capitennial Souvenir Program for their 
cooperation. 



Best Wishes 

BUTTERNl T BREAD 

Springfield, Illinois 



Serving Springfield for 25 years! 

MEL-O-CREAM DONUTS 

Between 2nd & 3rd on Jefferson 



iMionr ::-22;;i 



W. B. BURKHARDT 

I'll MBING AND HFATING 

127 \\ esl Reynolds Street 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 




FELLOWSHIP 

Being a friendly community, Springfield 
always has boasted of a great variety of 
clubs, civic groups and organizations. 
The activities of these various groups 
have enriched the cultural and social 
life of the community. 
The following is a listing of some of the 
organizations in Springfield which are 
active today : 



Advertising Club 

Alpha Delta Kappa 

Alpha Gamma Chi 

Alpha Omega 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Alpha Phi 

Alpha Iota 

Altrusa. International 

Amateur Musiral Club 

American Association of University Women 

American P.usiness Club 

American Guild of Organists 

American Legion 

Am vets 

Anchor Boat Club 

Anti-Rust Club 

Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 

Beta Gamma Upsilon 

Beta Sigma Phi 

Beta Phi Delta 

Blue Ridge Club 

Boy Scouts of America 

Business & Professional Women's Club 

Catholic Women's Clubs 

Catholic Youth Organization 

Ceramics and Crafts Club 

Cosmopolitan Club 

Daughters of the American Revolution 

Daughters of the Nile 

Delphi International 

Delta Kappa Gamma 

Delta Theta Tau 

Epsilon Sigma Alpha 

Fraternal Order of Eagles 

Gamma Upsilon 

Girl Scouts 

Harvard Park Dad's Club 

High Twelve Club 

Illini Country Club 

International Order of Odd Fellows 

Iota Phi Lambda 

Island Bay Yacht Club 

Italian-American Social Club 

Jeptha Shrine 

Job's Daughters 

Junior Chamber of Commerce 

Kappa Rho 

King's Daughters 

Kiwania Club 

Knights of Columbu- 

Knights of Pythia- 

Knights Templar 

Lake Press Club 

Lion's Club 

Literary Researchers 

The Masonic Organization 

Mather Gun Club 

Mid-Day Luncheon Club 

National League of American Penwonien 

National Woman's Relief Corps 

Navy Club of Sangamon County 

Naw Mothers' Club of America 



Nu Phi Mu 

Oakcrest Country Club 

Optomissus Club 

Optomist Club 

Order of Amaranth 

Order of Demolay 

Order of the Eastern Star 

Order of Rainbow Girls 

Pan-Hellenic Club 

P.E.O. Chapters 

Phi Beta Psi 

Phi Tau Omega 

Philo Alumnae Society 

Phi Theta Kappa 

Pi Beta Phi 

Pi Mu National Music Sorority 

Pi Rho Zeta 

Quota Club 

Rebekah Lodges 

Rotary International 

Royal Order of Jesters 

Sangamo Club 

Sangamo Surf Club 

Sertoma 

Sigma Alpha Sigma 

Sigma Delta Pi 

Sigma Iota Chi 

Sons of the American Revolution 

Sons of Union Veterans 

Southern View Village & Community Club 

Springfield Art Association 

Springfield Association of Commerce and Industry 

Springfield Association of Insurance Women 

Springfield Chapter of Rose Croix 

Springfield Chord Organ Club 

Springfield Civic Garden Club 

Springfield Colored Woman's Club 

Springfield Consistory of S.P.R.S. 

Springfield Council of Churches 

Springfield Council of the Navy League 

Springfield Council of Women's Clubs 

Springfield Hadassah 

Springfield Junior League 

Springfield Motor Boat Club 

Springfield Municipal Band 

Springfield Municipal Choir 

Springfield Municipal Opera Association 

Springfield Nature League 

Springfield Tagathon Club 

Springfield Theatre Guild 

Springfield Verbewriter's Guild 

Temple Brith Sholom Sisterhood 

Toastmasters International 

Toastmistress Club 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 

Woman's Club of Springfield 

Young Men's Christian Association 

Young Women's Christian Association 

Zonta International 

All of the organizations mentioned deserve more than this 

brief listing, hut space does not permit extended comment. 



77'*-!^ LAKE CLUB proudly presents a brilliant Variety Show, 
produced iiinl staged especially for The Capitennial Celebration 



eif f f f 4f 



"GRANDFATHER'S FOLLIES" 

Floradora Dancing Girls! Singing Waiters! Star Acts! Comedy Blackouts! 

INCLUDE A LAKE CLUB PARTY IN YOUR CELEBRATION PLANS — PHONE 3-3423 



For the past 83 years we have been 

helping to build a 

GREATER SPRINGFIELD 

by providing funds for 

HOME OWNERSHIP 

WORKINGMENS SAVINGS 
\M) LOAN ASSOCIATION 

II I Sou tli 5th Street 



Greetings 
to Springfield 




We are proud to have been 
a part of this wonderful 
Historic Community for 
nearly a half century 



LT Jas. D. Sheehan S'g'n C»- 



804 EAST ADAMS STREET 



FELLOWSHIP 





SCOUTING IS OUTING. In 1911, a group of boys and 
a man became the first Boy Seout Troop in Springfield. 
The Abraham Lincoln Council was formed in 1919 to 
stabilize and service a rapid grmcth of this volunteer 
movement. Now 98 Cub Packs, Boy Scout Troops, and 
Explorer Posts provide programs for nearly 2900 boys in 
Sangamon County. From over 20,000 former Scouts have 
come leaders and good citizens of our community. 



THE GIRT SCOUT program has kept pace with the 
growth of the city and now has 169 troops and 2,733 
Brownies, Intermediates, and Senior Girl Scouts in the 
City of Springfield. 

The above picture shows oak trees in the note beautiful 
Lincoln Memorial Garden. These trees were planted as 
acorns, an early Girl Scout service project. 




BOYS' CLUB OF SPRINGFIELD (WOT E. JEFFER- 
SON ST.) — This group of boys interrupted their play 
at the Boys' Club to have this picture taken. The fa- 
cilities of the Club include library, game rooms, craft 
shop, gym. Club rooms are located in the area of 
greatest need, and are available to all Springfield's 
boys between the ages of 8 and 16. six days a week, 
at low cost. 




"Jaycee Saturday Night" was organized more than 
two years ago by the Springfield Junior Chamber of 
Commerce and radio station If TAX. Each Saturday 
night from 8:3(1 until 11:00 p. m., Sangamon County 
teen-agers enjoy 2 ' * hours of dancing for 5.25 admis- 
sion. Music is provided by disk-jockey- turn-tables, 
with the last hour of the dance broadcast over K TAX. 
After some difficulties, a permanent htcation was ob- 
tained for the dances by the Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce. Average attendance is 350 teens. 





■■IK 

11 -"l- 




iai 



SPRINGFIELD MUNICIPAL CHOIR, 
II NDGREN, DIRECTOR. 



HEALTH 

and 
\\ KLFARE 



MEMORIAL HOSl'l I M. 
OF SPRINGFIELD 

(First and Miller) 




^MK IJW Ift !,-■ 



ST. JOHNS HOSPITAL 
(701 East Mason St.J 




Would that those early pioneers of this great city could have experienced the comfort and attention of our 
present, magnificent institutions of health and welfare. Bolstered only by faith and fortitude these energetic 
folk suffered undeniably with the lack of adequate medical attention. Humble and inadequate as they must 
have been in those early days, societies and groups for the aid of fellow men were in existence, and today 
their successors are still active in community welfare. This spirit of helpfulness inherent in Springfield's early 
settlers is now expressed by our united community service. 



5PRNGFELD 




HOSPITAL SISTERS OF 

THE THIRD ORDER OF 

ST. FRANCIS 

Have Lightened the Pain of Suffering in 
Sickness and in Need Since 1875 

1875 — Arrival of twenty Sisters from Eu- 
rope, two to settle in Springfield and 
establish the Motherhouse. 

Caring for the sick in homes, they 
knew no English but presented a 
card that identified them and an- 
nounced that the works of charity 
demanded no pay. 



1879 — St. John's Hospital first opened its doors to an unwilling people who knew 
hospitals only as a last resort, a place where death claimed all who entered, 
a place for those who had no one to care for them. 

These wrong impressions faded away when Sisters gave themselves com- 
pletely to sooth the pain, to guiet the suffering, to calm the fears — even more, 
to study the ways of science that would make the hospital a haven of recov- 
ery and of rest. 

AND SO THROUGH THE YEARS— 

The Hospital Sisters have continued in their endeavor to keep apace in the 
march of scientific progress that brings new methods, new treatments and 
new medications to aid in caring for the sick. 



The Motherhouse of the Hospital Sisters 
of the Third Order of St. Francis is located 
at St. Francis Convent, north of Spring- 
field. 

Sisters from this community conduct St. 
John's Hospital (700 beds) and School of 
Nursing, St. John's Sanatorium (200 beds) 
and Crippled Children's Hospital (50 beds) 
and School; St. Monica's Hall and Hospi- 
tals and Mission Centers throughout Illi- 
nois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Louisiana and 
Arizona. 

They also staff a hospital and sanatorium 
in Japan. 




HEALTH 

and 
WELFARE 






ST. JOHNS CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S HOME 
\\[> HOSPITAL (Sangamon Ave. Road). 




\T THE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER (717 S. Grand 
East). I psychiatrist l>\ studying the play of an emo- 
tionally disturbed child ran unlock the secret fears that 
produce behavior problems. 




SOCIAL SERVICE 
ORGANIZATIONS 

American Cancer Society 

American Red Cross 

Catholic Charities of 
Springfield 

Child & Family Services 

The Counselor Association 

Goodwill Industries 

Illinois Commission on 
Children & Youth 

Illinois Heart Association 

Illinois Welfare Association 

Illinois Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union 

Lutheran Charities 

National Foundation for 
Infantile Paralysis 

St. Monica Hall 

Salvation Army 

Sangamon County 

Tuberculosis Association 

Service Bureau for Colored 
Children 

Springfield Jewish Federation 

Springfield Urban League 

Travelers Service 

Visiting Nurses Association 



ST. JOHN'S S \N \ TORDUM 
Sangamon Ive. Road) 



MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 




Like Springfield, Memorial Hospital has made 
significant growth since 1897 when a small group of 
religious people purchased a home from the late Dr. 
Langden at Fifth Street and North Grand Avenue 
and converted it into a 12 bed hospital. As most 
hospitals in those days, it contained little more than 
beds for the care of the sick and injured, and was 
known as the Springfield Hospital and Training 
School. In these early days, however, a need to train 
student nurses was recognized and a class of two 
young girls was started in 1897 to he graduated in 
1899. 



So great was the need for service that, within two years, a wing had to be 
built, increasing capacity to 45 beds. In 1904 enlargement was again neces- 
sary and construction of a second wing brought the number of beds up to 100. 

In 1941 the present building was constructed after the church control had 
been relinquished and a non-sectarian Board of Directors was organized. Me- 
morial Hospital in 1957, excellent as it is, is still lacking certain facilities which 
the communitv urgentlv needs. Construction is now in progress to add 104 
more beds and to provide other needed facilities. These include a new and 
larger x-ray department with equipment for Cobalt 60 — a radio-active isotope 
with an intensity equal to that of a 3,000,000 volt x-ray machine, facilities for 
the complete care of nervous and mental patients — including an electroence- 
phalograph, and facilities for the care of the chronically ill patient — including 
a new department of physical medicine. The chronically ill patient is one, 
regardless of age or specific illness, who requires a long period of convalescence 
from the physical medicine department. 



Upon the completion of 
these new services in 1958, 
Memorial Hospital will 
have grown from a 12 bed 
institution to one of 384 
beds having a nursing 
school enrollment of ap- 
proximately 120 students 
as compared to the first 
class of two students. Me- 
morial Hospital will then 
be in a much better posi- 
tion to give the Springfield 
area the full benefits of 
mid-20th century hospital 
protection. 




This space contributed by friends of MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 




lit Ma Grieme, General Manager 
Herman Grieme, Parts Manager 
I harles Grieme, Truck Salesman 
William Grieme, Sales Manager 
Leslie Grieme, Shop Foreman 
20 Other Capable Emploj 



In 1924, a small implement company had its be- 
ginning. Two brothers, Henrj ami William Grieme 
formed a partnership known as Grieme Brothers, 
under which name they arc -till operating. 

The first building 10 x 60 was outgrown due to 
their increasing business. 

In L947, a KM) ft. by 160 ft. two Btorj brick build- 
ing was erected on North Walnut Road. 

Service is the motto of this organization. It con- 
tinues to give service not merely of dollar- and cent;. 
hut friendship, genuine interest and de-ire to serve. 




CONGKATl I. M KINS TO SPRINGFIELD. 

\ WONDERFl I, CUV OK HOMES, 

CHURCHES, 15! SINESSES 

AND THE 

<.<>\ ERNMENT OF ILLINOIS 

Our lirm ha- tin- distinction of being one of the 
Charter members of the Outdoor Advertising Indus- 
try in Illinois. We purchased the original husiness of 
Poster and Painted Displays in Central Illinois from 
the W .1. Horn System, which -tailed in 1890, and 
have expanded and modernized over the years to pro- 
vide our customers the best in service and location-. 

We are proud to he growing with Springfield. 



Greeley and Sons 



I 



1703-05 PEOR] \ ROAD 

Dial S605 

\\ . I. Greeley, Sk. Mrs. Bernice J. Greelei 

William F. Greeley, Jr. Roreri W. Greelei 

Jon \\ . Gri i i m 



Continuous quality 
year after year 





Congratulations 
Springfield! 

AMRHEIN 
BAKERY 




ST. JOSEPH'S HOME FOR THE AGED 

(S. Sixth St. Road) 

ILLINOIS PRESBYTERIAN HOME ( West 

Lawrence at Old Chatham Road, former 

location Palmer Sanatorium ). "Fairhills," 

a residence for older people. 



► 



"^JBM II IK 



BOYS FARM (11 miles east of Springfield) 
was established 1952 to provide a home for 
dependent teen-age boys. Prior to its found- 
ation, many Sangamon County boys were 
committed to state correctional schools be- 
cause no other facilities were available to 
the county court. A non-profit corporation, 
with a volunteer board of directors. Boys 
Farm is licensed by the state as a "group 
care home." It has been "home" to more 
than 50 teen-agers in its short 4^/ 2 years 
history. 




CARRIE POST KINGS DAUGHTERS 
HOME FOR WOMEN (541 Black Ave.) 
Former Post Home was incorporated in 1893 

to charitably aid and provide a /ionic for de- 
serving aged women. Forty-eight circles 
having a membership of 1.557 women for 
the support and benefit of the home, note 
caring for thirty-seven aged women. 



HEALTH 

and 
WELFARE 




MARY BRYANT HOME FOR BLIND 
WOMEN OF ILLINOIS 1 107 E Lawrence 
Ave.). Established 194b, non-profit, unde- 
nominational, no entry fee, no age restric- 
tion, capacity 20 residents. 




MAR I AM A CLUB (931 A. Rutledge). Resi- 
dence for teen-age girls from broken homes 
maintained by the Mariama Club, a local 
non-profit organization, dedicated, Novem- 
ber, 1954. 




i n c o 



c a s u a 



It 



•n 



y , c o 

FIFTH AND CAPITOL 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 
TELEPHONE 4-3411 



Robert P. Butts, Jr 
President 



LINCOLN LIVED HERE! 



uarch, 1887. 



district, ^. 
»xe, Schuyler and Pev 



8M 



J. T. STUAKT AND A. L.INCOLN. 

ATTORN E VS and Counsellors at Law, will practice ,| 
conjointly, in the Courts of this Judicial Circuit. — j 
Office No. 4 Hoffman's R»w,'u,i stairs. 
Springfield, aphl 12, 18J7. 4 j 

THE partnership h« f o f — « muurig batweaav 
derstgned ' * ' **"" 



This advertisement appeared for the first 
time in the "Sangamo Journal" April 15, 
1837. 




LINCOLN HOME IN 1860. Lincoln is standing to the 
right of the doorway. 



"Springfield is many times larger than it was in Lincoln's 
time, and the passing years have made great changes in its 
appearance. Nevertheless, some of the buildings in which he 
lived and worked remain. . . . 

"When Lincoln came to Springfield in the spring of 1837 
the town was anything but prepossessing. Small store buildings 
lined the square, in the center of which stood a two-story brick 
court house. Most of the twelve or thirteen hundred inhabitants 
lived in small frame houses, with here and there an imposing 
residence, and just as often the simple cabin of an early pioneer. 
Remnants of the groves in which the town was founded furn- 
ished shade, but otherwise the streets were bare of trees. In 
summer every passing team raised clouds of dust while in 
winter the mud seemed to have no bottom, for there was not a 
foot of pavement. Hogs, cows and chickens wandered at will, 
and disputed the few board walks and footpaths with pedes- 
trians. 

"In the twenty-four years of Lincoln's residence Springfield 
grew to a city of ten thousand inhabitants. The brick court 
house was soon replaced by the stone State House. In time 
two and three story brick buildings supplanted the smaller 
stores around the square and lined the adjacent streets. Fine 
homes appeared, and the log cabins vanished. Railroads came, 
and with them, many of the conveniences and graces of life. 
But crudities remained, for except around the square the streets 
were still unpaved, hogs still wallowed in mud holes, and frogs 
croaked in undramed swamps. 

"Such, in brief, was the environment in which Lincoln, by 
the twin paths of law and politics, attained national prominence. 



"At the time of his settlement in Springfield, Lincoln was 
serving his second term as a member of the Illinois House of 
Representatives. In 1838 and again in 1840 he was re-elected. 

"After four terms in the General Assembly, Lincoln set elec- 
tion to the national House of Representatives as his goal. His 
chance came in 1846, and he was duly elected. . . . When, after 
Taylor's election in 1848, he was unable to secure appointment 
to an office which he wanted, he retired in disappointment and 
resolved to devote himself to the iaw. 

"This resolution he kept until 1854, when the passage 
of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill thoroughly aroused him. From that 
time on he threw all his energies into the fight against what he 
considered to be the growing menace of slavery. By 1856, 
when the Republican Party was organized in Illinois, he was 
generally considered its leader; two years later all were agreed 
that he was the only possible opponent of Douglas. For three 
months the two rivais traveled over the state, speaking in every 
sizable town. Douglas won, but Lincoln did not lose, for a 
national reputation was the reward of his effort. 

"This reputation served him well in 1860, when the Repub- 
lican Party gathered in national convention at Chicago. The 
most prominent leaders . . . were either too radical, or too 
conservative, or too old, or too long in public life, for strong 
factions of the party, and the prize fell to Lincoln. At the news 
cannon boomed, bonfires blazed, and Springfield went wild with 
joy — and not until Lincoln spoke his words of farewell on 
February 11, 1861, did it relapse into its customary . . . exis- 
tence." 

From "Lincoln's SpringfieUV' by Hurry E. Prnlt. 



•V HKC2T :• 

:\ ,XX\X /: 
v :;^/s.\g:-' 

PILLSBURY MILLS, Inc 



MAKERS OF: 

PILLSBURYS BEST FLOUR 
BAKERY FLOURS 
BAKERY MIXES 
GROCERY MIXES 

OUR 27th YEAR 

IN SPRINGFIELD 



100 years ago 



The Immortal Abraham Lincoln 
purchased two pairs of shoes for 
his son- from the 

B. H. LUERS SHOE STORE 

This item appears in the Ledger 
on filf at the present 

. II. Iini's Sons Shoe Store 

217 South Sixth Street 
Springfield, Illinois 



— Now Two Locations — 
217 SOUTH SIXTH 1328 SOUTH MacARTHUR 



WE SALUTE 
SPRINGFIELD CAPITENNIAL 

- \\ e're in our 97th year - 
Same Local ion 

HENSON ROBINSON 
COMPANY 

114 No. Fifth St. 



VISIT THE 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN MUSEUM 




( lontractor 



Designer 



Engineers 



DIRECTLY OPPOSITE THE LINCOLN HOME 

GIFT SHOP IN LOBBY 
REFRESHMENTS 
CLEAN REST ROOMS 
AIR CONDITIONED 



LINCOLN LIVED HERE! 



Abraham Lincoln's association with these Springfield sites are com- 
memorated bv bronze markers. 



\ / 



Joshia F. Spee» Store (103 S. Fiflh Si. I. 
Above this (lore Lincoln shared a sleeping room 
with Joshua Speed when he came lo Springfield 



Home of Niman W. Edwards (northwest cor- 
ner. Centennial Building). Here Abraham Lin- 
coln and Man- Todd were married November 4. 
1812. Here Mrs. Lincoln died July 16, 1882. 
Mr,. Lilian W . Edwards was Mary's older sis- 



r. Elizabeth. 



/ \ 



\ / 



\ / 



.u v * Herndon Law Office 1105 S. Fifth 
William H. Herndon was Lincoln's third 
arlner I1814-I86.il. In 1860 and for sev- 
ears prior, the firm was located here. 



St.). Here Lincoln served in the Eleventh Gen- 
eral Assembly (1839-1840) and delivered an ad- 
dress before the Young Men's Lyceum ..I Spring- 
field, January 27, 1838. which was published in 



/ \ 



Globe Tavern (315 East Adams St. I. Mr. and 

Mrs. Lincoln made their home here following 
their marriage, and here their son, Koberl Todd 
Lincoln, was born August 1. 1843. 



/ V 



\ / 






Jot, 



Hi 



(116-118 N. 

Sixth St.). Here on May 18. 1860, Lincoln re- 
reived the news of his nomination for the piesi- 
deney. "The Journal paper was always my 
friend: and. of course, its editors the same." 



ole Lincoln in 1864. 



/ \ 



\ / 



Oak Kidce Cemetery. An inscription on 111 
public receiving vault -tales that: the hodv 
Abraham Lincoln lav in this vault from the da 
of III- funeral, .May 4, 1865, until December 21 



\ / 



ClLF. Mobile & Ohio Station, Altos I 
IThird and Washington Sis. I. Abraham 
coin's body was brought to Springfield by 



/ \ 



(.mvr WeCTEXN Station (Tenth and Monn 
SIS.). Here Lincoln spoke lo his friends fro 
the rear platform of the Great Western trai 
near Ihe present Wabash freight office, as I 
left Springfield lor v\ a-liinglon, February 1 
1861. 



/ \ 




The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Garden was planned and 
planted by the Garden Club of Illinois on land set aside for 
this purpose by the City of Springfield. This sixty-acre tract 
along the eastern shore of Lake Springfield dramatizes the 
natural beauty of the trees, shrubs and flowers which were 
a part of the early Illinois landscape. 

The idea of this living memorial to Lincoln took shape 
when Lake Springfield was being built, 1931-1935 Jens Jensen, 
internationally famous for the great beauty of his naturalistic 
plantings, was the designer. The first plantings were made 
November 14. 1936 and have continued as conditions were 
favorable for renewal and new beauty. 

On the higher elevations one may seek solitude among 
the forest trees and carpets of woodland flowers. Nearby one 
may gain inspiration from the blooming crab apples, redbud, 
dogwood, and a host of others. In the open spaces are prairie 
flowers, and along the blue waters of the Lake are the plants 
of the open meadow in festive array. There are also plantings 
designed for the feeding, shelter and protection of birds. 
Friendly gathering places— "council rings" (great circular 
stone seats around a paved area with a firepit in the center) — 
are to be found throughout. 

The Garden is maintained jointly by the City of Spring- 
field and the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Garden Foundation, 
under the capable direction of Mrs. Harriet Knudson. Perma- 
nent as stone or bronze, it is flexible beyond either, capable 
of endless change — thus unique as a living memorial. 



LINCOLN MEMORIAL GARDEN, 
Lake Springfield. 




We Ait Happy To Cooperate . . . 

With the 

LINCOLN LAND ASSOCIATION 

In Producing 

"CABIN TO CAPITOL" 

\\ 1. INVITE YOU ... to return to Springfield and bring your friends and family to 

see the 12th annual production of Robert Sherwood's 

famous Broadway play 

"ABE LINCOLN IN ILLINOIS" 

At New Salem State Park 

August 21 through August 25th and also August 29th through September 1st 

More than 300,000 people have witnessed this famous production. 
ADMISSION— Adults, $1.00 Children, 25c 

For Further Information, write: 

ABE LINCOLN PLAYERS, Inc. 



816 Myers Building 



Springfield, Illinois 




ii souvenir \ ii 



I 107 Monument Avenue 

(Just Outside Entrance to Lincoln's Tomb) 
Stop at our Bhop after your visit to Lincoln's 
Tomb and look over one of the largest and 
most complete lines of souvenirs and gifts 
in the country . 



ORR INSURANCE AGENCY 

INC. 

INSURANCE 
AUTO FINANCING 

519 EAST CAPITOL AVENUE 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Phone 8-7373 




COAL COMPANY 



NINTH & ASH STS. 
SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 



PUNCH FOR PARTIES 
FRESH PURE ORANGE JUICE 
DELICATESSEN ICECREAM 
^FRUIT JUICE HUT 



I TOO W. LAWRENCE 



PHO/HC v JU/.I 



GGAGESHOP 



Gills of Leather 

Everything lor the 

Traveler 

Phone 2-8913 

309 South Filth St. 

SPRINGFIELD. ILL. 



LINCOLN LIVED HERE! 



Abraham Lincoln's association with these Springfield sites are com- 
memorated bv bronze markers. 



C. M. 


\ 
Smith Store ( .".28 E. Adam* Si.)- tl 


i room 


■n the ihird floor of this building, Lin 


oln. in 


January. 1861. wrote his first inaugura 


ddress. 


Mr. Smilh was the husband of Mrs 


Lincoln' 


sister. Ann. The desk Lincoln used 


villi its 


many pigeon holes and sloping front 


al Libr 


I the foyer of the Illinois Slate Hislor, 



Locan & Lincoln Law Of 
it.). Stephen Trigg Logan w 
aw partner 11811-18441. 



:e 1203 S. Siyth 
Lincoln's ..-.,..,.1 



Stiabt S Lincoln Law Ofi 
St.). John Todd Stuart was I 
partner 11837-1841). Their < 
serond floor, front, and wi 
Sangamon County Circuit Cou 
11837-18401. 



1100 N. Fifth 
coin's first law 
-e was on the 
rented to the 
as a jury room 




ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

from ambrotvpe made in 

April, 1858. 




STEPHEN A. DOUGLAS 

from daguerreotype made 
in July, 1855 




We Salute 
The Greatest City in the World 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

MATTHEWS TRANSFER CO. 

"Common Freight Service Via Ten Line 

Haul Carriers to or from Anywhere, U.S.A." 



* 



Dial 7538 



DANNE'S 

Famous for 
Hot lieef Sandwiches 

& 

300 E. WASHINGTON ST. 

Across from G.M.&O. Depot 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

2-0371 — PHONE — 8-9629 

OWNER— JOHN LYNN 



SERVING SPRINGFIELD AND 

VICINITY for over 42 YEARS 

Kodaks - Fast Film Service 

Greeting Cards 

"Everything Photographic Since 1975" 

THE CAMERA %UOP 



NCORPORATED 



320-322 South Fifth Street 



Telephone 2-241 3 




Enjoy the Finest 

Old Fitzgerald 

and 

Cabin Still 

Distributed by 

VAN PICKERILL 

&SONS 

Springfield 







A. J. CARGNINO 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 
433 West Lawrence Telephone 3-9343 



ORPHEUM BOWLING & BILLIARDS 

126 North Sixth Street 
FRED METZ— Proprietor 



Compliments 
KNAAP & SMITH 

REISCH SHOE SHOP 



119 South Fifth Street 



Springfield, Illinois 



ART GIBSON GEO. L HOCKENYOS 

Dial 6312 

SENTINEL INSECT CONTROL 
LABORATORY 

"PROTECTION FROM INSECT LOSSES" 
Exterminating Contractors 213 E. Jefferson St. 



MILITARY - CIVIL DEFENSE 



Springfield has been honored by having the oldest continuous National Guard unit in the history of the Na- 
tional Guard of Illinois. National Guard units of Springfield have participated in the Winnebago War, 1827; 
Black Hawk War, 1832; Mexican War, 1846-1848; Civil War, 1861-1865; Spanish-American War, 1898; Mexi- 
can Border Service, 1916; World War I, 1917-1918; World War II, 1941-1946, and Korea, 1950-1953. 

Abraham Lincoln was a Company Commander in 1832 for thirty days, then re-enlisted as a private in Cap- 
tain Elijah lies company for twenty days, and then served for thirty days in Captain Jacob M. Early's Inde- 
pendent Sky Corps. 



Since World War II, Springfield has new units, 
talion added to its list of fine units. 



,70th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and 32nd Ordnance Bat- 




O&Mr- 





ILLINOIS NATIONAL GUARD JET FIGHTER PLANES. 





MASS-FEEDING DEMONSTRATION being conducted 
with improvised ovens and equipment, supervised by 
Gen. Clay M. Donner. director, Springfield and Sanga- 
mon Civil Defense Corps, with John E. Ogletree, Chief 
of Emergency Feeding, " elfare Section. 



CAMP LINCOLN is the oldest training cnmp in Illinois 
still in continuous use b\ the National Guard. 



Serving the Springfield Area 



1930-1957 



WTAX 

1240 K.C. 

CBS Radio Network 



News - Sports - Music - Drama - Comedy 



& AMERICAN 
AIRLINES 

Serving SPRINGFIELD 

to VACATION \KI. \S OF EAST COAST. 

\\ EST COAST, SOI THWEST 

AND MEXICO 

PIm, no 8-3161 


VACATION or BUSINESS 

TRAVEL 

Agent Representing ALL AIRLINES 
RAILROADS, STEAMSHIP COMPANIES 
CRUISES— ALL-EXPENSE TOURS 

Serving the Springfield Areo Ten Teors 

CIRCLE TOUR & TRAVEL BUREAU 

HOTEL LELAND LOBBY . . . LILLIAN S. OLIVER. Owner-Monoger 

DIAL 2-2919 . . . SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

For Tour Convenience, Heservotions Mode ond Tickets Issued 

With No Additional Chorge 


SIEBERT'S 

SHOE STORE 

324 S. SIXTH STREET 

ESTABLISHED 1902 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 


S \ N ( ; A M O N 

SAVINGS and LOAN 

ASSOCIATION 

312 South Fourth Street 
Established 1886 


TRUMAN L PLATT & SONS CO., Inc. 

BITUMINOUS 

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

2300 NORTH HTH ST. SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 


MURPHY RUG and 
FURNITURE CLEANERS 

2056 S.Mac Arthur Blvd. 



MILITARY -CIVIL DEFENSE 



CIVIL 1)1.1 EV-E-HOME PROTECTION TKMMNC 
GRADUATION CEREMONIES for volunteer* who have 
completed n tewweehs course, Held at the Sangamon 
County Farm Bureau '111 V Sinth St.). Sixteen such 
classes sponsored by the Springfield and Sangamon 
County Civil Defense Office have been completed since 
January 1957, iiitli a total enrollment of 1,000 persons 
from the Springfield area. 




A/. 




A GRANDMA'S PANTRY EXHIBIT thoum in conjunc- 
tion with National Civil Defense Week, Sept. 9-15, V)',f,. 




I S. \ W \l. \M) M\RINE CORPS RESERVE TR UN- 
[NGCENTEB 2001 Lake Shore Drive), teas completed 
Jan. /5, 1949 at a i o\t of t350ft00, and houset equipment 
valued at tSOOfiOO. tctive duty personnel con 
natal officer and 8 enlisted personnel, I marine corpi 
officer and 7 enlisted. 250 naval reserve personnel use 

the Center fur training on Monday, Tueulus anil Irtda-* 
evenings', the marine cor pi reserve unit of 100 drill on 
7 hursday ex en 



ARKS. RFCREATION AND SPORTS 




Organization and conducting a 
general recreation program for 
Springfield's citizens of all ages 
is the purpose of the Play- 
ground and Recreation Com- 
mission. The credo of the Com- 
mission may well be summar- 
ized by saying that it behooves 
every community to provide 
adequate recreational facilities 
for a healthful community. 
Springfield's many parks with 
their varied recreational activi- 
ties have made also a more 
friendly community. 



IK \l\l\<; IOR BASEBALL. 



S\\ [MMING \T SPRING- 
FIELD'S MEMOR] VL POOL 



► 





i 



PLAYGROl ND NITE, 1956. 




ALLIS-CHALMERS 

MANUFACTURING CO 



SPRINGFIELD WORKS 




The Farm Families of Sangamon County 
Are Proud to Have Had a Significant 
Part in the Early History of Sangamon 
County and Are Glad to Participate in 
The CAPITENNIAL CELEBRATION. 



O&pwftUu 




For Typing 
Perfection 

Phone 4-4861 



Henry's Typewriter Service 

Repairs for All Makes of 

TYPEWRITERS AND ADDING MACHINES 

1062 East Ash Street 

Springfield, Illinois 



Call 5515 Air Conditioned 

HARPER METHOD BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Alpha E. Jones 

Permanent Waving 

Hair Shaping - Styling - Coloring 

Manicures 

Figurama Reducing 



50] West Allen Street 



Springfield, Illinois 



l'VRKS. KKCKEATION AND SPORTS 




LAKE SPRINGFIELD 
(southeast edge of Springfield) i>rovid>>s facilities for 
hooting, swimming, fishing and other aquatic sports, 
t municipal opera season has been scheduled here in 
the summer. 




LINCOLN ACRES 



A. G. EDWARDS 
and 

SONS 

719 MYERS BUILDING 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



BEAUTY SHOP EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

// it's the finest in cosmetics, 
It's by Revlon. 

Hair Dryers, Neiv and Rebuilt 

JAEGER SUPPLY CO. 

421 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 




210 SOUTH FIFTH ST. 



My Friends: 

Here I am, in historical 
detail, fashioned by hand, 
in my suit of rusty black 
and old plaid shawl. 

I will make a fine addi- 
tion to a collection. I am 
11 inches tall. 

My good wife, Mary, is 
made ivith the same de- 
tail. She is 8 inches tall. 
Purchase us separately or 
as a pair. 

Sincerely, 
Your Abe Lincoln Doll 




Kenbeth Workshop 



Single Doll: $3.95 

Pair: $7.50, both postpaid 

No C.O.D.'s 



1547 Williams Blvd. 
Springfield, Illinois 



Compliments of 

ALVTN S. KEYS & CO. 

40 Years of Insurance Service to 
Our Community 



615 East Monroe St. 



Phone 7543 



Compliments On 
A CENTURY OF PROGRESS 

BLACK & CO. 

HARDWARE 

314 East Adams 422 East Adams 

1614 South Mac Arthur 



qA Salute to 

The Land of Lincoln 



m rf**;* 





£.0^"^™^ (i^^ 



^^v 



Today's n 

l.ilniiir to 



iWMM MnwilWrvf 



W^^SSbs; ; ^ :: ^ ~ 



^*^, / 



lodern Combine is a far cry from the cradle of Lincoln's day — From hack hreaking hand 
power and plenty — The unfolding drama of agricultural mechanization and a free people. 

MASSEY-HARRIS-FERGUSON INC. 

SPRINGFIELD BRANCH 

IN THE HEART OF LINCOLNLAND 



Weao&t Jnc. 

Est. 1923 

Wholesalers of Plumbing, Heating and Sheet Metal Supplies 

215-229 NORTH EIGHTH STREET • TELEPHONE 4-4834 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



In Peoria 
1827 South Washington St. 



Greetings Springfield 

MORRISON SAUSAGE 

3443 East Cook 



Compliments Of 

DRIVE-IN CAR WASH 

'THE BEST IN TOWN" 

A CLEAN CAR 

DRIVES BETTER LASTS LONGER 

1814 South Sixth Street Just South of Laurel 



SCHRYVER-SPROUSE & CO. 

"All Forms of Insurance" 

Dial 4-4866 

410 South Fifth Street 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



COMPLIMENTS 

CAPITOL ENGRAVING & 
ELECTROTYPE COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



W. F. Wingerter, President 
Francis W. Wenzel, Vice-President 



Mrs. Sara J. Becker 

James E. Dare 

Dr. Thome Deuel 

Comm. George W. Doyle, 

Francis M. Durkin 

Frank England 

G. William Horsley 



LINCOLN LAND ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS: 

Walter E. Wagner, Secretary 
Wiliard Bunn, Jr., Treasurer 



DIRECTORS: 

Joseph F. Jannesse 
E. Carl Lundgren 
John W. McKee 
Homer Mendenhall 
Mrs. Harold T. Merritt 
Ward Montgomery 
Albert M. Myers 



H. Francis Shuster 
Mrs. Raymond Taintor 
Dr. Ruth Walker 
Dr. D. E. Webster 
Bruce E. Wheeler 
Miss Dorothy Wolfson 
Roy E. Yung 



LAND OF LINCOLN CAPITENNIAL 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

W. F. Wingerter, General Chairman Walter E. Wagner, Secretary 

Francis W. Wenzel, Headquarters Chairman Wiliard Bunn, Jr., Treasurer 

UNDERWRITING DIVISION: Allen M. Smith, Chairman 

REVENUE DIVISION: Joseph F. Jannesse, Chairman 

Historical Souvenir Booklet: Mrs. Raymond Taintor, Chairman 

Historical Data Committee: 

Mrs. Maude Nation Lanham, Chairman 
Mrs. Helene H. Rogers Marquardt, Editor 
Mrs. C. Russell Johnston, Mrs. Marion D. Pratt 



Mrs. John G. Nevens, Chairman 

Miss Nina Adams 

Mrs. Harold Albrecht 

Mrs. Norman L. Baker 

Mrs. A. C. Cochran 

Mrs. Donald Blager 

Mrs. George Cashman 

Mrs. Herman Davis 

Mrs. Clinton Dawson, Jr. 

Mrs. Gerald Dillman 

Novelties Committee: 

Felix Maero. Chairman 



Advertising Committee (Mariama Club): 

Mrs. Frank Fee Mrs. E. D. dinger 

Mrs. John Galasse Mrs. James A. Parker 

Mrs. Henry C. Groesch Mrs. Earle Paulsel 

Mrs. Mervin E. Gustaveson Miss Ruth Saylor 

Mrs. Banks Haigood Mrs. Herman Schoening 

Miss Elsie Heustead Miss Marguerite Smith 

Mrs. Harry Johnson Mrs. LaRue Taintor 

Mrs. John Lloyd Mrs. L. T. Thornton 

Mrs. Evelyn Moore Mrs. Elizabeth Wheeler 

Mrs. Pearl Nelson Mrs. Harold E. Yager 

Concessions Committee: 

Paul Terrill, Chairman 
Silver Suarez 



Miss Lorraine Fleck, Chairman 

Mrs. A. C. Balestri 

Mrs. Marion Brown 

Mrs. Jacob Bunn, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Cashman 



CELEBRATION BALL COMMITTEE 



Mrs. Nelson O. Howarth 

Mrs. Clascenna Hinton Harvey 

Mrs. Hester I. Kerr 

Mrs. Terry J. Livingstone 

Mrs. Albert Myers 



Mr. Lee J. Muller 
Miss June Parsons 
Mr. Robert Steffan 
Mrs. A. A. Touch 
Mrs. Walter E. Wagner 



PROMOTIONAL DIVISION: 

Mrs. Gertrude Zeunges, Ladies Chairwoman John L. Satterlee, Men's Chairman 



Mrs. Robert Saner, Chairman 
Mrs. Henry C. Groesch 



Tennial Belles Committee: 

Mrs. Nelson Howarth 
Mrs. Robert Carter 



Mrs. James Walsh 



Mrs. J. Waldo Ackerman, Chairman 
Mrs. Arthur Gottschalk 



Sunbonnet Committee: 

Miss Elsie Pavletich 
Miss Linda Ennis 



Miss Bonnie Bonjean 
Mrs. Don Schnepp 



George W. Doyle, Chu 
John Winch 



Ivan Falconer, Chairman 
lames Wilkins, Co-Chairman 
Henry Bogardus 

Men's Hat Committee: 

!I-?sch. Cha;' 



Queen Contest Committee: 

Richard Roberts, Chairman 



Gary Phillips 
Linda Pearson 



Mary Gerald 
C. W. Neeld 



Promenade and Caravan Committee: 

WiIIk mi Giachetto 
Mrs. Walter Bubnis 



Bearded Brothers Committee: 
Earl Gasaway 
Edward Glenwright 
Russell Wilson 



George Dillon 
Don Zahn 
George Jefferson 



Kangaroo Court Committee: 

C. Leo Shaughnessy, Chairman 
Joey Mack 



SPECTACLE TICKET DIVISION: 

Robert F. McDonald, Chairman 

Finance: 

Eugene Redfern 

Tickets & Tabulation: 

Paul Davidsmeyer 
Clascenna Harvey 

Publicity: 

John W. Midgely 
W. F. Miller 



Sylvia Walter 
Mary Miller 



Ray Swartout 

Herbert Wiley 

Bud Dickason 
Arthur Abney 

Telephone: 

Edna Tebrugge 



G. William Horsley, Co-Chaiimun 
Thome Deuel, Chairman 



Adelaide O'Brien, Chu 
Betty Farrington 



Freda TerVeen, Co-Chairman 
Charles Weishaupp 



Helen Randolph, Co-Chairman 
James McComas, Co-Chairman 
George Flynn 
Charles Wade 
Mary Agnes Buscher 
Margaret Grandone 
Ellen Walker 



Rules & Eligibility: 

Eugene Segin 

Arrangements: 

Margaret Bruns 



Awards: 

Marybell Altman 
Jim Bohnger 



Correspondence: 

Barbara Steward 



Hube Collins 
Arabelle Flatley 



G. B. Gordon 

Thelma Daily 

Arthur Squires 
Norma Paine 
Cashiers and Gates Committee: 



Patrons Ticket Committee: 

Melba McKenzie, Co-Chairwoman Deems Maupin, Chairman 
James Bolinger, Co-Chairman 

SPECTACLE DIVISION: 

Glenn Farrington, Co-Chairman 



Scenario and Title Committee: 

Margaret A. Flint 

Cast Committee: 

Jay Slaven 
Tom Shrewsbury 

Properties Committee: 

Charles Dennis, Co-Chairman 

Stage Managers Committee: 

Mary Ellen Kennedy 

Make-Up Committee: 

Grayce Vinegori 
Ruth Payson 
Reta McComas 
Ruth Gehner 
Dolores Leinweber 
Maxine Rawhngs 
Margie Trower 



Clyde Walton 



Gordon Casper 
Carl I. Richardson 



Judy Horsley 
Loe Burk 



Peggy Runkel 
Gordon Matthews 
Virginia Koontz 
Carol Laughlin 
Edward Wedeking 
Bernice Van Meter 
Florence Calvert 



Roberta Richardson, Chairman 
Bill Lockhart 
Charlotte Lockhart 
Mrs. Mariann Stearman 



Costume Committee: 

Mrs. Isabel Smurr Arabelle Flatley Pearl Danley 

Mrs. Bonnie Stevens Mary Jean Luce Cynthia McKenzie 

Roger Johnson Joan O'Neill Myrtle McKenzie 

Jean Johnson 



Mel Kampe 



Paul Konen, Chairman 



James Armstrong 
Mary Meyer 



C. W. Neeld 



Ralph Zeunges 
A. R. Schoenrock 



Billie Cox 

Henry Kloppenburg 



John W. Chapman, Co-Chairman 



PUBLICITY DIVISION: 
Press: 



Dick O'Neil 
Beulah Gordon 



Radio and TV: 

Bill Miller 



Distributive: 

William Greeley 
William Richards 

Speakers: 

Clifton Thornton 
Jack Fisherkeller 



Sarah Feuer 
Wayne Allen 



G. B. Gordon 



Anthony Jirik 



Ted Grippo 
Richard Hobson 



HOSPITALITY DIVISION 

William E. McElroy, Co-Chairman 



Housing and Official Entertaining Committee: 

James Bolinger, Chairman 



Forrest D. Norris, Co-Chairman 
Alec E. MacPherson, Co-Chairman 



William E. McElroy, Chairman 
Joel D. Eastham 
R. L. Thompson 
Elmer R. Knight 
P. C. Yocum 



Pioneer Recognition Committee: 

William Schnirring, Jr. 
William Stout 

Boy Scout Pilgrimage Committee: 

S. R. Ryerson 
A. R. Booth 
Carl Carter 
Owen R. Marsh 
Bruce Wheeler 



George Kennedy 
Frank Darneille 



Howard H. Peck 
John Satterlee 
Dr. Richard Graebel 
W. R. C. White 



SPECIAL EVENTS DIVISION 



John W. McKee, Chairman 

Merchants Promotion Committee: 

Albert Myers, Chairman 



Phil Bisch, Chairman 
W. R. C. White 
Ramona McGlennon 



Robert Mountz, Chairman 



Historical Windows Committee: 

Allen M. Smith, Chairman 



Parades Committee: 

H. Francis Schuster 
Charles King 
Roger Meredith 

Music Committee: 



Don Pope 
Earl Gasaway 
Meredith Rhule 



Religious Heritage Day: 
G. B. Gordon, Chairman 
Robert E. Cook, Co-Chairman 
Rev. Joseph A. Murray 
Rev. Harry Kriebel 
Rabbi Lewis Satlow 
E. Carl Lundgren 
Beulah Gordon 



SPECIAL DAY 

W. Guthrie Piersel 
Sara Feuer 
Thomas McDermand 
Charles McElroy 
Alice Helmle 
Jack Edgecomb 
John W. McKee 
Gerald Hogan 



COMMITTEES: 

Ralph DiSanto 
Franklin Perkins 
James Cummins 
Donald Jones 
Raymond F. May 
Rev. E. E. Laughlin 
Rev. Raymond B. Knudsen 
Clifton Norell 



Rev. W. W. Roth 
K. Y. Plank 
Rev. Chester Carlson 
Carl Richardson 
Rev. Richard Hewitt 
Rev. D. K. Montgomery 
Rev. Beryl Kinser 
Prof. Otto F. Stahlke 



Mayor Nelson Howarth, Chi i 



Neighbors Day: 

Maero 



Queen's Day: 

■ e Fleck, Chairman Mrs. James Tebrugge Mrs. Mary Miller 

Mrs. Mark Brown Miss Norma Paine Miss Arabelle Flatley 

Youth Day: 
H. Francis Shusler, Chairman Charles King Lee Carey 

Maurine Evans Mrs. Maude Lanham Mrs. Robert Furry 

Mrs. Stanley Thomas Woodrow Russell Richard Waughop 

Merle Perry 



Mrs. Jack F. Minnis 
Mrs. Marie Kahn 



Chick McRoberts 

Norma Trede 

Mrs. Esther Schmidt 



Phil Bisch, Co-Chairman 



Gertrude Zeunges, Chairman 
Mrs. Louis Noll 
Grace Murphy 
Velma Spitler 
Emma Mae Hale 
<Mrs. Alice Ford 
Miss Janet Irwin 
Elizabeth Charlton 
Peggy McKenzie 
Mrs. Helen Merritt 
Mrs. James M. Batterton 
Joan Coady 



Independence Day: 

W. R. C. White, Co-Chairman 



Ladies' 

Mary Alice Smith 
Sally Holliday 
Helen Kimball 
Pauline Denison 
Mrs. Lester Park 
Mrs. Oliver A. Johnston 
Mrs. Richard Roberts 
Mrs. Walter Bubnis 
Mrs. Jane McDonald 
Jean Bolt 

Frances Shidiauski 
Betty Senters 



Day: 

Pat Sheley 
Mrs. Jo JvIcLain 
Mrs. Richard Quay 
Ethel Stewart 
Florence Vidor 
Nora Stuches 
Denysia Bastas 
Yuanita Evans 
Eleanor Keefner 
Ruby Robinson 
Bonnie Pillischafske 
Frances Jarvis 



Mary Theobald 
Sherilyn Puschel 
Nancy Gaffigan 
Marlene Morris 
Barbara Marlow 
Delores Earl 
Yuanita Lanham 
Mabel Brees 
Nellie Rice 
Mrs. Lucille Lindley 
Mrs. Edith Phillips 
Mrs. Alta Pierson 



Forrest D. Norris, Co-Chairman 
Alec E. MacPherson, Co-Chairman 



Homecoming Day: 

William Schnirring, Jr. 
William Stout 



George Kennedy 
Frank Darneille 



The Lincoln Land Association gratefully acknowledges the unselfish help and contributions of the following 

persons, groups and business firms: 



Furnishings For Capitennial 
Headquarters: 



Board of Education 

Capital Cily Paper Company 

Central Office Equipment Company 

Jefferson Stationers, Inc. 

Machine's Tavern 

Modern Business Machines Company 

Pepsi-Cola Company 

Sprinqfield Rural Urban Clinic 

Wiley Office Equipment Company 

Historical Souvenir Booklet: 

Miss Hellie Bunker Smith 
J. Walter Marquardt 

State Historical Library 
Illinois State Journal 
Illinois State Reqister 
Mrs. Marqaret Loud 
Miss Anne Curfman 
Miss Edna Allen 
Manama Club 

Queen Contest Prizes: 

Sasco United Television Company 
Maytaq Corp i 

Sikking Company 

iry Studios 
Tim McAllister — Utah Woolen Mills 
Packinq Company 
Hotel 



Lincoln Museum: 

Michael O. Garvey 

Lincoln National Life Insurance Co. 

James T. Hickey 

Lincoln Colleqe 

Norman Broadwell 

Judqe Creel Douqlas 

Sanqamon County Officials 



Volunteer Help in Capitennial 
Office: 

Girl Scouts: Terry Phillips, Sandra Wilson, 

Susan Stackman. Janet Way. Lucy Cole. 

Nancy Moon, Mary Ann Baum. Susan 

Marsha Bishop, Marian Schultz. 



Queen Contest Flowers: 

Bud & Helen's Flowc- 
Flowers By Mary Lou 
Truman Cole Flower Shop 
Winch Floral Shop 



Pageant Spectacle: 

State of Illinois Officials— use of facilities 

Sunley- conf: 
Scherf Boiler Co.— Metal workers 
Vredenburqh Lumber Co. — lumber for 

slaqes 
Claren> ■ ng stock 

Boy Scouts 



Cotillion Ball: 

Miss Marqarel E. Baker 

Mrs. Norman Jones 

Mrs. William D. McCarty 

Mrs. Charles R. Hooqland 
• eld Arl Association 
[field Cralts & Ceramics Club 
(field Civic Garden Club 

4lh Deqree Kniqhts ol Columbus 

William H. Kewley. Potentate 

Ansar Shrine Band 

A Mid Bunn, Jr. 
.: Life Insurance Co. 

Illini Counliy Club 

Sprinqfield Marine Bank 

S. J. Can, 

Arqyle Stables, Ml. Carroll. 111. 

Janet Pape 
S. Phil Hutrh 
Mrs. Don Blanchard 
Georqe Pike 
Bernard Neuman 
Paul Anderson 
Georqe Kichinko 
Tom Mi 



Bearded Brothers Stockades: 

• : mery Ward & Co. 
Sears, Roel ■ • 5 



CABIN TO CAPITOL — SYNOPSIS OF SCENES 



THE LINCOLN LAND ASSOCIATION 

Proudly Presents 
"CABIN TO CAPITOL — THE SPRINGFIELD STORY" 



Illinois Stale Fairgrounds 
July 2nd through July 6th, 1957 

A John B. Rodgers Production 
Mrs. Rea Warg, Producer-Director 
Max R. Scudder, Associate Director 



THE QUEEN'S INTRODUCTION 

Horsemen ride in formation as a tribute to her Royal Highness. Through an avenue of flags proudly borne 
by our Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, 4-H, pass the representatives from all the states, cadets, sailorettes. The Royal 
Princesses of Her Majesty's Court will arrive to complete the colorful scene. A blare of trumpets heralds 
the arrival of her Most Royal Highness, Queen of Springfield Capitennial. 



Queen of Celebration 
Pages for Queen 
Attendants for Queen 

Karen Camp 
Barbara Valent 
Kathy Gedney 
Jean Nicol 
Harriet King 
Susan Heimlich 
Penny Heimlich 
Terry Johnson 
Kathy Ryan 
Sharon Crouse 
Jane Cully 
Carol Egizi 
Mary Louise Hasara 
Judy Buckholdt 
Violet Seebach 
Susan Hodde 
Jinny Saries 



48 States Sailorettes 

Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts Trumpeteers 

Trail Riders 



Jinny Bachmann 
Betsy Clark 
Sally Carson 
Sandra Carson 
Nancy Hawkins 
Joyce Mulcahy 
Sharon K. Redding 
Pam Nance 
Joan Hiler 
Margie Besling 
Joan McElhanon 
Sharon Eggleston 
Connie Thoman 
Sandra Capella 
Jo Elaine Sager 
Dorothea Edson 
Judith Sager 



Jeanne Bogardus 
Georgia Estock 
Sue McMullen 
Hazel Ingraham 
Dinah Sangster 
Sara Cohn 
Sue Browne 
Kathy Lenz 
Barbara Knox 
Koran Churchman 
Peggy Madden 
Roberta Sager 
Judy Reinning 
Linda Williamson 
Nancy Stowers 
Kathy Stoeckel 
Julaine Bonansinga 
Janette Davis 



Trail Riders: 

George Bryant 
Charles Bryant 
Sam Albright 
Alice Albright 
Gene Albright 
O. P. Davis 
Gary Spence 
Jack Carter 
Al Burris 
Joe DeRosa 
Charles Waters 
Fred Painter 
Paul Grosball 
Audrey Brashear 
Melvin Theobald 
Ben Spence 



SCENE 1— IN THE BEGINNING 

Our civilization didn't all begin a century nor two centuries ago. The roots hark back into many nations and 
many peoples. The old Indian Legends tell of the creation of America. 



Auoka — Marcia Pehlman 



Manitou —Julian Baggerly 



Hiawatha — John Risse 



Dancers: 
Bettie Dillon 
R. J. Marshall 
Mike Beier 
Janette Davis 



Sharon Crouse Rusty Evans Maurine Downey 

Tom Hayes Gary Nix Mary Jo Releford 

M. M. Keafer Paul Passerini Margie Belwig 

Fred Rice Ceil Yoggerst Diane Grizzell 

/3>'ll Coons 

SCENE 2— UNDER TWO FLAGS 

The lands of the Indian tribes of the Illinois Confederacy lay first under the banner of the Fleur De Lis, second 
under the flag of the British, and third under the Stars and Stripes. 

Father Marquette — Floyd Bollinger French Soldiers Priests 

Joliet — Jerry Joe Clark American Soldiers Indiana 

Soldiers (British) 

Larry Barrett Don Barrett Margie Besling Joan Hiler 

SCENE 3— TREATY OF EDWARDSVILLE 

The Preemption Act of 1813 gave the settler first right to buy the land upon which he had made improve- 
ment, but fhe red men were reluctant to give up their lands. Finally, the Kickapoos agreed to meet in Ed- 
wardsville, and here they signed an agreement to leave their land and go to the new lands on the Osage 
River. 

August£Ch#teau — Jerry Joe Clark Benjamin Stevenson — Jim Bollinger 

Indian braves and children from Boy Scout and Explorer Troops, Girl Scouts, Order of Arrow, and Gary Nix 
Group. 



SCENE 4— FIRST SETTLEMENT 

The coming of the Kelley's and their founding of homes in Springfield. . . . The meeting of the County Com- 
missioners to name Springfield as Temporary County Seat. . . . and the kindness of the settlers to other 
wagon trains making their weary way to new homes and new lands. 



Elisha Kelly — Charles Bryant 
Charles R. Matheny — Sam Albright 
Zachariah Peter - Ellis Albright 
William Drennan — Charles Dunmire 
James Latham — James Williams 
Rivers Cormack — George May 
John Spillers — Delbert Phares 
John Linsey — Duane Theobald 
Stephen Stillman — 
John Robinson — 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Coffinbargar 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Dixon 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy L. Shuman 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Jabusch 
Charles and Helen Botterbusch 
John and Betty Devocelle 
Wayne and Betty Leinicke 
Frank and Onie Koehne 
Mrs. Bernice Spence 
Wayne Crawford 
Barbara Painter 



Elijah lies — 

John Taylor — 

James Simms — 

Gersham Jayne 

Wagon Master- Gary Spence 

Riders- -Charles Waters, Al Burris, Sam Albright, Ellis Albright 

Team Drivers 

Little Boy 

Father and Mother — Virgil and Kathryn Cutright 

Children in Wagon — Sandra Robbins, Judy Lanterman 



Gene Klemme 
Bea and Albert Burris 
Elizabeth Klemme 
Mulvey and Vera Hankins 
Charles and Lucy Waters 
Bob and Dorothy Eggleston 
Ron and Maxine Flesher 
Margaret Goodall 
Philip Hank 
Norma Dunmire 



Georgann Albright 

Joyce Bryant 

Verna Albright 

Mrs. James Williams 

Mrs. Duane Theobald 

Mrs. George May 

Mrs. Delbert Phares 

Russell and Gertrude Meyers 

Lee and Eula Muller 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Smith 



SCENE 5— CORNERSTONE OF LEARNING 

Our early settlers realized that in order to build a foundation for a new life for the future generations to come, 
their children must learn to read and write. To fully appreciate the great strides education has made, we look 
in on one of the early schools. It seems, however, that the teacher had some of the same troubles then as now. 



School Teacher — 

Arlene Waters 
Karen Metzroth 



Nancy Holzaepfel 
Sharon Rutledge 



School Children: 



Paula Canum 
Beverly Smith 



Joyce Smith 
Linda Schmidt 



Diane Schmidt 
Joyce Veseling 



SCENE 6— CALL TO WORSHIP 

History of the circuit riders and the building of our churches. 

Minister — Floyd Ballinger Men Women 



Helen M. Chambers 
Estella Watts 
Ruth Constant 



Doris Dasher 
Katherine Loughmiller 
Janice Bottersch 



Nola Wilmarth 
Anna Mae Summers 
Ann Oehler 



Children 

Margie McCammon 
Betty Robson 
James Leinicke 



SCENE 7— CAPITOL CITY 

In April, 1832, Springfield was incorporated as a town. Settlers crowded into the Sangamo country. The 
mails came by stagecoach, and each letter cost 25 cents, which was paid by the recipient. If you were a 
wise Scotsman, you might think up a system in order not to pay the fee. The Capitol in 1837 was moved to 
Springfield and the people celebrate. Lincoln comes to live here as a permanent resident. 



John Williams — William McElroy 
Stage Coach Driver — George Bryant 
Mr. McNab— Mr. Wilbur Gibbs 



Lincoln — G. W. Horsley 
Josh Speed — Norman Bullard 



E. P. Baker — Harry Clayton 
Elijah lies — D. L. Deere 



Towns people 

Hayes M. Lauterbach 
Walter Gross 
Harold Higgins 
Forrest D. Norris 
Rose Marie Moser 
Mrs. Eugene Thompson 
Sadie Miller 
P. J. Adams 



Military Men 

Judy Gallant 

Mrs. Robert Waring 

Mrs. John Painter 

Mrs. Ralph Ward 

Mrs. Lawrence Camp 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Miller 

Richard Miller 

William Miller 



Dignitaries 



Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pike 
Earl Paulsel 
Keith Richards 
James Sorensen 
Allen Thomas 
Mrs. Lawrence Camp 
Margie McCammon 
Doris Dasher 



Carol Redding 

Bernadine Grady 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert DeWan 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 

Mr. Bolinger 

Ron Jackson 

Mrs. Jane Horton 



SCENE 8— PRICE OF POLITICS 

While battles were won and lost on the Legislative Floor, much of the groundwork was laid in strange ses- 
sions held in meetings in the lobby of the State House. Groups met here to discuss and plan. They came 
to be known as "The Lobby". However, the political pot began to boil bitterly and fiercely. . . . Hot political 
feelings of the era led not only to beatings but to murder. 



A. W. Calvary 
Pope — Wilbur Gibbs 

Hayes M. Lauterbach 
Harry Clayton 
D. L. Deere 



Green 

Rev. J. N. Early- 



Walter Gross 
Harold Higgins 



-Horace W. Bivin 

Forrest D. Norris 
Earl Paulsel 



Truett — James Sorenson 



Keith Richards 
Allen Thomas 



SCENE 9— CAPITOL WHIRL 

When Springfield captured the seat of the government, sessions of the court and of the Legislature drew po- 
litical leaders from all over the state. The wives of the lawmakers declined to be left to the boredom of 
routine in their own communities, so they joined their husbands in the Capitol. The beginning of a gala so- 
cial period set in mad cotillions became the fashion. Lincoln, Douglas, and Mary Todd attended one of these. 



Mrs. Ninan Edwards 

Mary Todd — Betty Farrington 

Mr. Lincoln — G. W. Horsley 

S. A. Douglas — S. Phil Hutchison 



Dancers 

Dignitaries 

Waiters 



SCENE 10— THE IRON HORSE 

The auction of the Old Northern Cross railroad, 
arrival of the new railroad. 



The start of the Donner and Reed party to California and the 



Auctioneer 

Col. P. C. Johnson — Carl Richardson 

Reed 

Dancers: Bill Klingler (Caller) 

Norma Dunmire 

Josephine Klingler 

Verna Albright 

LeRoy and Pauline Coffinbarger 

Guy and Bea Shuman 

Charles and Helen Botterbusch 

Frank and Onie Koehne 

Gary Spence 

Russell and Cecelia DeCastongrene 

Barbara Painter 

Albert and Bea Burris 



Barber 

Nicholas Ridgely 

George and Mary May 

Jim and Marie Williams 

Robert and Dorothy Eggleston 

Margaret Goodall 

Russell and Gertrude Meyers 

Lee and Eula Muller 

Sam Albright 

Georganne and Ellis Albright 

Charles Dunmire 

Charles and Joyce Bryant 

Frank and Florence Dixon 

Ralph and Dorothy Jabusch 



Farmer on Wagon 
Donner — Gary Spence 



John and Betty Devocelle 

Wayne and Betty Leinicke 

Mrs. Bernice Spence 

Wayne Crawford 

Gene and Elizabeth Klemme 

Duane and Mary Theobald 

Delbert and Margaret Phares 

Charles and Lucy Waters 

Ronald and Maxine Flesher 

Phillip Hauck 

Mulvey and Vera Hankins 



Donner Party: 
Helen M. Chambers 
Estella Watts 
Ruth Constant 



Doris Dasher 
Katherine Loughmiller 
Janice Bottersch 



Nola Willmarth 
Anna Mae Summers 
Ann Oehler 



Margie McCammon 
Betty Robson 
James Leinicke 



SCENE 11— ELECTION OF A PRESIDENT 

Lincoln becomes President of the United States 

Lincoln, the boy — Charles Mertz 

Lincoln, the surveyor 

Lincoln, the lawyer — Nicholas V. Baltusevich 



Dignitaries 

Townspeople: 

Mrs. Lawrence Camp 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Miller 

Richard Miller 

William Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pike 

P. J. Adams 



Judy Gallant 
Rita A. Ralph 
Pat Lavin 
Mary Ann Foster 
Shirley Davidson 
Ann Sutton 
Wilma Mellinger 
Allen Mellinger 



Lincoln, the debater — G W. Horsely 
Messenger Boy — Robert Carl Richardson 
Mary Todd — Betty Farrington 



Janet Mellinger 

Robert F. Midden 

Shirley Vetter 

Mrs. Robert Waring 

Mrs. John Painter 

Mrs. Ralph Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert DeWan 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 



Mr. Bolinger 
Glenanne Farrington 
Robert Carl Richardson 
Veta Donner Coomer 
Mary Frances Lavin 



SCENE 12— AFFECTIONATE FAREWELL 

Mr. Lincoln G. W. Horsely 

Townspeople: 

Mrs. Lawrence Camp 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Miller 

Richard Miller 

William Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pike 

P. I. Adams 

ludy Gallant 

Robert Carl Richardson 



Mrs. Lincoln — Betty Farrington 



Rita A. Ralph 
Mary Ann Foster 
Mary Frances Lavin 
Robert F. Midden 
Shirley Vetter 
Mrs. Robert Waring 
Mrs. John Painter 



Mrs. Ralph Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert DeWan 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton 

Mr. Bolinger 

Glenanne Farrington 

Veta Donner Coomer 

Pat Lavin 



SCENE 13— TO PRESERVE THE UNION 

Illinois' answer to Lincoln's call for troops. The opening of Camp Butler. Douglas' speech before the Spring- 
field Legislature. The war and the end of war. 



Lincoln — G. W. Horsely 

Stephen Douglas — S. Phil Hutchison 

Trail Riders: 

George Bryant Al Burris 

Charles Bryant Charles Waters 

Gene Albright Paul Grosball 

Gary Spence Melvin Theobald 



Grant — Jerry Pollack 
Cook — Carl Richardson 

Sam Albright 
Alice Albright 
O. P. Davis 
Jack Carter 



Joe DeRosa 
Fred Painter 
Audrey Brashear 
Ben Spence 



SCENE 14— MR. LINCOLN RETURNS HOME 

SCENE 15— STATE FAIR 

There you were with your hair slicked down, all ready to take your best girl to the State Fair. There you 
would see the bathing beauties, the CanCan girls, see the races — Ah, the Gay Nineties. What a wonderful 



Photographer 
Judge 

Dr. Stephen G. Gard 
Bernice Gard 



Barker 
Strong man 

Lee J. Muller 
Henry F. Boyle 



Little boy 
Medicine man 



Balloon man 
Policeman 



Jerry Boyle 
Ann Pope 



Race Horses from Mr. V. Stoven, Stoven Stables 



Bathing Beauties: 
Suffragettes 
Bike Riders 
CanCan Dancers 
Dorothy Dietrich 



Susan Sponsler 
Erika Rehm 
Sharon Stillwell 
Sharon Gibson 
Jane Harrison 



Kathleen Burke 
Bathing Beauties: 
Margie Besling 
Mary Jo Releford 
Jo Ann Gobel 



LaRue Pope 
Bernice Koch 



Ceil Yoggerst 
Marilyn DeGraff 
Donna Schoknecht 
Margaret Forth 
Judy Perrine 



Eula Muller 



Duane Grezzell 
Jane Grebler 
Judy Lanterman 
Sandra Robins 
Bernie Koch 



SCENE 16— WORLD WAR I 

In 1917, once again America answered the call. 

Bugler 



Drill Team 



SCENE 17— THE ROARING 20's 

The old time movies — the short hair — the Charleston. 



Theda Bara — Carol Miller 

Rudolph Valentino Julian Baggerly 



Lieutenant Dabney — Comley Evans 



Dancers: Betty Dillon 

Buddy Roberts 



SCENE 18 — LFVING MEMORIAL -Once again the darkness of war clouds swept our nation and from that 
turmoil came a symbol that shall long represent the valor of our men. Marines 



SCENE 19— THE BURNING QUESTION 

With each of us rests the decision . . . What shall we do with this new giant? 

General Groves Scientists 



Bill Henry 



John Cameron Swaze 




Greetings to 
4 Wonderful 
City 



AUTO RECONDITIONERS 
918 E. Capitol 

QUALITY work by 
Expert craftsman for 

*jp " years 

Auto Wreck Work — Simonizine 




From The Land of Lincoln 

Doll Portraits in Bisque 18" and 23" 

Authentic Originals by Maggie Head Collectors Items 

DORIS GRANT, Distributor in Springfield 

105' 2 East So. Grand Phone 8-1264 

On display at R. F. Herndon Co. 



HARDWARE MUTUALS 
AUTO INSURANCE 

PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE 



"Photography is Fun" Phone 3-8181 

p/tctc -Craft £kcp 

Fifth at Laurel — Springfield, Illinois 

CAMERAS • SUPPLIES • PHOTO FINISHING 

Plenty of Parking Space 

(Don) D. E. SUESEN (Andy) O. W. ANDERSON 



ENJOY 

HARDWARE 

MUTUALS 

DIVIDEND 

SAVINGS 



• Fast, friendly, coast-to-coast 
service. 

• Cpuality protection at low net 

cosl. 

Hardware Mutuals have returned 
more than $150,000,000 in divi- 
dends to policyholders since 
organization. 



Sally 

Ward 



"Where the Lowest 

Budget Can Afford 

the Best" 

Telephone 8-4313 
Launderers ' ' 6 East Jefferson Street 
Dry Cleaners 327 North Sixth Street 



J. HUTCHINSON R. MORGAN 

Branch Office 
630 EAST ADAMS 8-2543 

insurance for your AUTO . . HOME . . BUSINESS 



B & Z PASTRY SHOP 

420 E. Adams St. 

Springfield, Illinois 

R. E. Tietze — Owners — Irene R. Tietze 



JACK II ARM AN 

So. Grand & MacArthur 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Jl* 



PW r 





BALESTRFS GRILL 

Laurel and MacArthur — Routes 36-54-4 



Our presenl restauranl started in 1948 with a counter and 21 stools. All 
cooking was done behind this counter with Leitner Stainless Steel Equipment 
This made a nice counter establishment, but soon was inadequate to take care 
{ our manj customers. 5 tables added soon did not Bll our need for space. 

In 1950 the grocen store adjoining was bought and the space added to the 
resuurant. Our capacity was now sufficienl for 122 patrons. The kitchen m 



pieces of necessary equipment 
A complete dinner menu was 



the rear took on a new broiler and main oth 
to take care of the steadilj increasing busines 
introduced. 

In 1955 another remodeling project was necessary to enable us to better 
serve the public. Ml cooking equipment was taken to the kitchen, the counter 
cut down, more tables added extending the dining room into the grill. 

WE ARE INDEED GRATEFUL FOR THE PATRONAGE WHICH HAS 
MADE FOR CONTINUED PROGRESS. TO SHOW 01 R APPRECIATION 
\\l HAVE MADE BALESTRI'S ONE OF THE FINEST RESTAURANTS 
IN I ill SPRINGFIELD VREA. 



II A W MOTOR SALES. Inc. 

NINTH and CARPENTER 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Robert V. Hanson 



Lewis A. Wood 



HOLLAND 




Dial 5933 



218 S. Sixth Street 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



ILLINI RADIO & TV. Inc. 

RCA Television 
318 SO. 4TH ST. SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Phone 2-3211 
SALES & SERVICE 

WM. MILNER EVAN RICHIE 

FORMERLY HOBBS ELECTRIC SHOP, INC. 

LEE WERNER OIL CO. 

305 WEST JEFFERSON 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

PHONE 3-3823 




J£atitia-> Hoffman^ 

Director of 



SPRINGFrELD COLLEGE 



Springfield College of Music & Allied Arts invites 
you to visit the college during the Capitennial Cele- 
bration. A leader in the field of Music and Dance 
since its inception in 1916, the Springfield College of 
Music & Allied Arts is an institution with which are 
associated the finest of standards and cultural attain- 
ments. 

Beginning and Advanced Courses in Dance, Piano, 

Voice, Violin, Drama, Baton, Band and 

Ballroom Dancing 

308 y 2 South Fourth Street Dial 2-8611 

Fall Season Starting September 3rd 



LUCKY BOY 
GOOD BREAD 



Greetings - - - 

MATHEIS HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware - Paints 

Sheet Metal Work 

Phone 3-3533 601 So. 11th St. 



MODERNISTIC SCHOOL OF 
BEAUTY CULTURE 

300-302 East Monroe Street 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



The New 



zMOR TON'S 

216-218 South Fifth Street 

SRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Springfield's Smartest Styles 



UNSBEE NURSING 
HI 




Phone 3-5955 

NURSE ON DUTY 24 HOURS 

HOSPITAL BEDS FOR BED PATIENTS 

1417 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Owned and Operated By 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Unsbee 



PKRSONAUTIKS 



"Let us hope, rather, thai l>y the besl cultivation of tlie physical world, beneath 
.mil around us; and tin- intellectual ami moral world within us, we shall secure 

an imli\ iilual. social, ami political prosperity ami happiness, whose course shall 
be iiiim ard and upv\ ard, and v, hich. « hile the earth endures, shall not pass away." 



The backbone of every great city and every important civilization has been the leaders, 
the pioneers and the average people who strive for ideals commensurate with their tal- 
ents and ambitions. Springfield has been fortunate throughout the years in being 
favored with pioneer stock of great courage and vision — with contemporary individ- 
uals of aggressive, optimistic faith in the future of this city. 




in,,,, 

now State Historical Library; execu 
live secretary, tbraham Lincoln Isso 
ciation, author of many authoritativi 
ttndies on I no oln <md Illinois history 



0?»i- /f&J 



M Mil TODD LINCOLN. 
wife »/ Abraham Lincoln, mother of 
Holo-rt Todd (1843-1926), Edward 
linker (1846-1850), William Wallace 
(1850-1862) and Thomas "Tad" (1853- 
IHTI). Mrs. Lincoln dud in Spring- 
field in /K«:'. 




JOHN TODD STUART, 
prominent lender in cultural and 
business enterprises. He had encour- 
aged Lincoln to studs law, having 
known him in the Muck Hawk War 
and in the state legislature. He was 
Lincoln's first law partner (Stuart <£ 
Lincoln). HU7-1H41). 





For 42 years Stout's Jewelers has met 
the demands of Springfield and Central 
Illinois residents who have demanded out- 
standing quality in jewelry, silver, china and 
true precision timepieces. 

It is little wonder that we number among 
our customers second and third generations 
who have come to us for both purchase and re- 
pair — for the finest and most unusual 
in custom-made jewelry. 

Because through the years we have refused to 

compromise in quality or service, Stout's 

has joined the ranks of Springfield's 

most respected home-owned business firms. 



c5tou*i' 



JEWELERS 




315 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 





GEORGE OTTO 


Forty five years of Service 


BOILER COMPANY 




Commercial and Residential 


^ 


Heating 


"Everything in Paper" 


Call ns for free Estimate on 
Any Heating Problem 


* 


Phone 4-2777 - Springfield, Illinois 


CAPITAL CITY 
PAPER CO., INC. 


Congratulations Springfield 

7he Slack rfhauJ 
£teak HwAt 




2242 South Sixth Springfield, Illinois 


Phone 2-5511 


Phone 5622 




Bo Keeley Gene Petrella 



18S7- 195*3 



1933 - 1957 



\\ t are proud i" -ay thai THE MILL has been a part 
nl Springfield for almosl twenty-five years, and that 
Louis and Herman Cohen have been in business al 
the -.mic location for the past fortv years, 

\\ e salute the Springfield Capitennial anil the finest 
city in the world — 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

and hope that we may have the privilege of serving 
you in the future as we have in the past. 

Herman, Louis, and Richard S. Cohen 

for your dining pleasure . . . 




mill 



906 North Fifteenth Street 




Illinois it I ■ «|iii|»iii«*ni € <>. 



ILLINOIS NATIONAL 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

133 South Fourth Street 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Automobile, Casualty, Workman's 
Compensation, Burglary and Fire 

See One of Our Many Local Agents 




RSONAL CARE OUR SPECIALTY" 



MS-Ka Kennel 



DIAL 4-1025 



Compliments Of 

GENERAL TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 

OF ILLINOIS 

1130 South Sixth Street 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



PERSONALITIES 






JAMES M. GRAHAM, 

lawyer, congressman, and Knight of 

St. Gregory. 



DR. GERSHOM JAYNE, 
prominent early physician. 



GEN. JOHN A. LOGAN, 

G.A.R. commander, founder of 

Memorial Day, U.S. representative 

and senator. 





MOTHER MARY JOSEPH 

WOULFE, 

foundress of Springfield Ursuline 

Convent, 1857. 




WILLIAM H. HERNDON, 

Lincoln's law partner 1 1 84 1-1865). 

He was elected mayor of Springfield 

in 1854. 




WILLIAM DODD CHENERY 
FAMILY. 

Mr. C.henery was proprietor of the 
Chenery House where the Lincoln! 

stayed before their departure for 
Washington, D.C. in February, 1861. 



GEORGE W. HELMLE. 
architect. 



PERSONALITIES 






SHE! Bl M CI I l.OM. 
governor {1877-1885), US. representa- 
tive "'ii/ senator. 



ROBERT C. LANPHIER, SR.. 
founder aj Sangamo Electric 

Company. 





SUSAN B. WILCOX. 
head of English Department, Spring- 
field High School, whose ft/e was 
dedicated '" tfce i 'JU ouragement of all 
her students. The High School Room 
hi I incoln Library is named for her. 



RICH \RI> YATES, 

Civil " or governor and 

I S senator. 



ELIJAH ILES. 

one of the founding fathers »/ 

Springfield. 



Q 



JACOB BUNN, 
wholesale grocer, banker and manu- 
facturer. He and his lirother John 
were intimate friends of the I incoUU 
who were welcome guests at the Buna 
home (Sixth at Jackson). Public- 
spirited and philanthropic, they 
served their community uell. 






THE RE\ . CH \RI ES DRESSER, 

Episcopalian clergyman who married 

Vary Todd and Abraham Lincoln, 

and built the home purchased 

fn Lincoln. 



JESSE K. DUBOIS, 

first Republican Slate Auditor 

18S7-1864). 



OZIAS M. HATCH. 
first Republican Secretary of State 
(1857-1865). Lincoln attended his wed- 
ding to Julia Enos. 



Best Wishes 
from 

TRI-COUNTY 
BEER DISTRIBUTORS 



Greetings 

Dine in the New and Distinctive 
Atmosphere of 

THE CLIFFS GOURMET 
1577 Wabash Ave. 




In Springfield 

Enjoy the Friendly 

Congenial Atmosphere 

of 



I 

J J 



Enroute to New Salem 

State Park 

1 Mile West of 

Springfield on the 

Historical 

Lincoln's Trail 

Routes 97 - 125 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



BUILDING MATERIALS 

AND 

READY MIXED CONCRETE 

HENRY NELCH & SON CO 

ESTABLISHED IN 1896 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 




TITLE 

HISTORIANS 



Doing Business in Springfield 

from 1997 to 1957 



flu 1 sum COUNTY MI 

[ 



409 EAST ADAMS STREET 

Springfield, Illinois 



Nationally Known Brands 

Furniture, Rugs and Appliances 

At Discount Prices 

TISCKOS FURNITURE & 
APPLIANCES 

522 North Fourth St. 



j;vewley'S 

<J.WillJlH. f JSpJ-idMfcB» 

lSt?««>COOK \U»/ / PHONE 2-8915 

»' ~ SPR INGFIELD.ILL. 



DELLERT'S 

624 East Adams Street 

Wallpaper Paints 

Pictures Picture Framing 



In the Land of Lincoln 
It's 

SPRINGFIELD MOTORS Inc. 

Your Lincoln and Mercury Dealer 
West Jeeferson at Rutledge 



MIDWAY LIQUOR'S 

Largest Liquor Store in the State 

724 South Grand Ave., East 

Phone 8-1014 — 8-2281 



Hammond Organs — Pianos 
TV — Appliances 

The Bruce Company 

Serving the Public Since 1899 



BOB REED'S 

TELEVISION SERVICE COMPANY 

2-7211 or 2-5568 
2948 South MacArthur Blvd. 



Phone 8-2557 

DAVIS FINANCE CO. 

B. B. DAVIS, President 
Loans $50.00 to $500.00 



101 East Monroe Streel 



Springfield, Qlinoi 



"Springfield's Only Health Food Store" 

THE HOUSE OF NATURAL LIVING 
FOODS FOR SPECIAL DIETS 

613 South Fifth Street Phone 3-2882 

Mrs. Marie Riecks Elledce, Proprietor 



K^olonlal III! I ol vl 

2900 SOUTH MAC ARTHUR BLVD. 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS . DIAL 4-1704 



LESTER PLUMBING & 
HEATING 

217 EAST JEFFERSON STREET 
Office Number 2-9832 



PERSONALITIES 






J. OTIS HUMPHREY. 
lawyer and judge, first president of 
Lincoln Centennial Association (since 
1929, Abraham Lincoln Association). 



THE RIGHT REV. 
TIMOTHY HICKEY, 

Chancellor of Alton Diocese, pastor 
of Immaculate Conception Church. 



CLARK M. SMITH, 

merchant and brother-in-law of the 
Lincolns. 






NINIAN W. EDWARDS. 
son of Gov. Ninian Edwards and Lin- 
coln's brother-in-law. He ivas first 
Superintendent of Public Instruction. 



BENJAMIN P. THOMAS. 
author, executive secretary, Abraham 
Lincoln Association. His "Abraham 
Lincoln" is one of the best one-vol- 
ume biographies of Springfield's 



MRS. ALICE W. BROOKS, 

principal of the Bettie Stuart Institute. 






EDWARD L. BAKER. 

ditor, "Illinois State Journal" and 

L .S. consul to Buenos Aires. 



MRS. JESSIE PALMER WEBER, 

daughter of Gov. John M. Palmer, 

and first permanent librarian, Illinois 

State Historical Library. 



CHRISTOPHER C. BROWN, 

lawyer and son-in-law of John Todd 

Stuart. His second wife was Mrs. 

Caroline Owsley Farnsworth. 



EXCELLO 




REEL MOWERS ROTARY MOWERS 

RIDER MOWERS 
Manufactured By 

HEINEKE & COMPANY 

Springfield, Illinois 



ijw: 



y) th YEAR 



SERVING SPRINGFIELD AND VICINITY WITH 

QUALITS MATERIALS AND WORKMANSHIP 

FOB YOUR HOME VND BUSINESS 

ROOFING: Barrett Bonded Tar and Gravel As- 
phalt built-up roofs, Vsphall shingles ami slate. 

SHEET METAL \\nl!k: \ complete shop to serve 
Mini entire needs for gutters, downspouts, duct- 
\\ ink. skylights, etc 

II RNACES: Vmerican Standard, Conco ami York 
gas furnaces. \. < •. Smith arid Conco gas conver- 
sion burners. 

\IK CONDITIONING: York, Conco ami American 
Standard. I \ size and model for every borne or 
business, i 

SCHMIDT BROS. inc. 

12K) E. LAI REL ST. Phone 2-7719 



Greetings Springfield 

SOUTHERN VIEW MOTEL 
and DINING ROOM 

TJ. S. 66 — South of Springfield 
Air Conditioning and TV 



advertising ^Art at its 'BesL 



advertising 




PHONES 7554 



Congratulations and Best W ishes 

FR1SINA AMUSEMENT CO. 

Row State 

Esquire Springfield Drive-In 



design house 

exclusive interiors 

815 w. Washington street Springfield, Illinois 

dial 8-9693 



PERSONALITIES 





JOHN M. PALMER, 

Civil War general, governor (18b n - 

1873), grandfather of Dr. (George 

Palmer, founder of the Palmer 

Sanatorium. 



SIMEON FRANCIS, 

editor and publisher of the "Sangamo 

Journal" (now the "Illinois State 

Journal"). 





GEORGE N. BLACK, 
merchant and one of the founders of 
the Illinois Stale Historical Society. 
He gave the ground for Washington 

Park, the first city park. 



lav 



JAMES C. CONKLING, 
r, civic leader, of whom Lincoln 



wrote: "He has ample business quali- 
fications, is entirely trustworthy: and 
withal is my personal friend of long 
standing" 




EDWARD D. BAKER. 
lawyer and congressman, who deliv- 
ered the oration at the laying of the 
cornerstone of the Illinois State Capi- 
tol, July 4, 1837. Intimate friend of the 
Lincolns, their third son was named 
after him. 



LOGAN HAY. 
lawyer, state senator, and president, 
Abraham Lincoln Association 1 1°20- 
1942). He was the son of Milton Hay 
lib,: had studied law in Lincoln's low 
office, and grandson of Stephen T. 
Logan. Lincoln's second law partner. 




JOHN WILLIAMS, 

early merchant and founder of the 

First JSational Bank organized in 

1863. 




HELEN VAN CLEAVE 
BLANKMEYER. 

author and civic leader, long-time 

member Library Board, receiving 

Trustees' Award from the Illinois 

Library Association. 




MRS. ALICE EDWARDS FERGU- 
SON. MR. B. H. FERGUSON, AND 
MRS. BENJAMIN S. EDWARDS. 
Mr. Ferguson tens the owner of the 
China Store located on the southwest 
corner of Sixth and Monroe. After 
her mother's death, Mrs. Ferguson 
gave the Edwards home to the Spring- 
field Art Association (700 N. Fourth 
St.). 



fim: 
photography 

SINCE 
11571 





Bearded Brother 



Tennial Bell 

ANDERSON 
STUDIO 

42 l l / 2 South Fifth St. 

ROXY THEATRE BLDG. 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

PHONE 2-6215 



Compliments of 

WINCH FLORAL SHOP 

323 East Monroe Street 
SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 

Phone 2-3375 



BEST WISHES SPRINGFIELD 



Central Heating S flir Conditioning Co. 



EXCLUSIVE WILLIAMSON HEATING 
AND AIR CONDITIONING DEALER 




Congratulations Springfield 

SAPUTO TWINS 

FAMOUS PIZZA HOUSE 
FINE ITALIAN FOODS 

Rain or Shine, We Deliver to Your Door 
Phones 2-0105 or 4-2523 

Eighth and Monroe Street 




tf<CHJ< 



&un 



CI STOM-FITTED COSMETICS 

Mrs. Arthur Kmcaid 

1431 South College ffWaattjd by- 

Telephone 3-7738 



PHONE 21403 

RUG and CARPET CLEANERS 
Oriental and Domestic 

THE ELITE CLEANERS 

RUGS AND FURNITURE 

2804 SO. TWELFTH ST. SPRINGFIELD. fLL. 



_yv Statute to S^prinafietd 




World's Most Complete Line of Trucks 

INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER CO 

101 West Washington Street 
SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 



CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES 



GEORGE P. COUTRAKON 

Your State Representative 

of 48th District 




GEORGE E. DRACH 

Your State Senator 
45th Senatorial District 



* 




G. WILLIAM HORSLEY 

Your State Representative 
of 48th District 




With pride in the (City's history 

And confidence in a bright future . . . 

ILLINOIS FARM SUPPLY 

CONGRATULATES SPRINGFIELD ON HER 125th BIRTHDAY 



A. H. Harris & Associates 

1119 South Sixth Street 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

"A Fine Neiv Home for a Fine Old Service" 




Visit us soon and inquire 
about our nationally adver- 
tised "Circle Security" plan to 
help you pay loss of time, hos- 
pital and surgical expense. It 
will pay you to investigate 
this famous plan. 



MUTUAL OF OMAHA 
Mutual Benefit Health & Accident Association 



Th^ 


Frye Printing Company 


SUPPER CLUB 


* 


2641 South Sixth Street 


723 EAST ADAMS STREET 


For Private Parties or 


Telephone 2-9616 


Reservations . . . 


ti 


^r 




Telephone 2-0867 


W. C. Reddick R. E. Miller, Jr. 




"Surrey with the fringe on top" 
Seeing the sights on a Sunday afternoon 




Mrs. Myrtle Unsbee, descendant of the 

Hunks family, wearing her Grandmother's 

dress (1834). 




Linda Ennis, descendant of Todd Family, wearing gown 
owned by Mary Todd Lincoln. 



FRANK UiNETTES 

Enjoying the American way of tiling 



BARKER -LUBIN COMPANY 

300 No. 9th STREET 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

The Builders Department Store 
Devoted to building and creating a greater Springfield. 

PHONE 2-8881 




The Light Refreshment 



GEORGIAN RESTAURANT 

FAMOUS FOR STEAKS & GOOD FOOD 
9th and South Grand Phone 2-0561 



TRY OUR FAMOUS 
TENDERLOIN STEAK PLATE 



$1.25 



Pies and Food Prepared To Take Out 
Open 24 Hours Daily . . . Except Tuesday 



Succc:<:or<; 

DAVIS & ROSE 




Owners 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



SPRINGFIELD'S CITY HALL 

since 1893 (Capitol at Seventh). 





SANGAMON COUNTY COURT- 
HOUSE since 1876 when partially com- 
pleted new State Capitol uas first occu- 
pied. W hen more space ivas needed the 
building was enlarged in 1899 by raising 
it with jacks and adding another floor 
at the ground level, a new roof and 
dome. John F. Rague ivas the architect 
of the original building, and S. J. Hanes 
the architect who conceived the manner 
of providing more space without chang- 
ing the lines of the building. 




in 



FEDERAL BUILDING 
(Monroe between Sixth and Seventh >. 







m 

gag 

mmmm 




EXECUTIVE MANSION, official home of Illi- 
nois governors since November, 1855 is located 
three blocks <'Ost of the Capitol group on a 
beautifully landscaped knoll on Jackson be- 
tween Fourth anil Fifth streets. 




The original privately owned Illi- 
nois State University, popularly called 
"The Coffee Mill' taken dnu>.i in 1933, 
replaced by Wessel Hall. 

CONCORDIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 





mfflflfl' 

muni! mm I 



Founded in Fort Wayne, Ind., 

1846 

On Springfield Campus 

Since 1875 



Maintained by 

The Lutheran Church-Missouri 

Synod 

For the Training of Its 

Ministry 







• 






- - - 








■ 




ff'essel Hall — class room building, 
dedicated 1955. 



Van Horn Hall — dormitory, 
dedicated 1954. 



In 1875 Concordia Seminary was moved to Springfield and established 
on its present campus which had been occupied by the privately owned Illinois 
State University. 

The university had been erected in 1854 on land donated by the Enos 
family of Springfield. Abraham Lincoln was one of its trustees and his son, 
Robert, one of its graduates. 

Since the founding of Concordia Seminary, 2500 men have been graduated 
for the Lutheran ministry, of whom more than 1200 are active today as pastors 
and missionaries in all parts of the world. 




Martin Luther Statue 
unveiled May 26, 1957. 



SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, LIBRARIES 



The first school built of logs is a contrast with schools built of brick, stone and metals. The little log school 
was built in Springfield in a clearing on the north side of what is now Washington Street between Pasfield and 
Lewis, in 1821 soon after the first settlers came. It was heated bv a fireplace and pupils sat on backless 
benches made of log slabs with sticks for legs. The teacher had no desk, a pail of water with a gourd for a 
cup was used by all. One reader, owned by the teacher, was used by the pupils. 

Today's pictures of the Springfield system of schools and colleges carry an increased tempo which with over 
30,000 students is a far cry from the little group which gathered in the log cabin 130 years ago. 

Specialized classes are held daily in Stuart and Douglas schools, and the Cerebral Palsy Development School. 
Although the Springfield schools have made steady progress, they are still insufficient for our needs. 




. -Wh. 



^^ta^silPCSSSaaL-*^ 



PALMER SCHOOL (Thirteenth and Mason), 

first Springfield school built with public jutuls 

opened April 14, 1856, and was then called 

First W ard School. 



In the Years of our Lord 

1857-1957 

For one hundred \ ears-proudly a part of Springfield 




1857— Marked the founding of the Ursuline Order in this city by Mother 
Mary Joseph Woulfe who had come to this area with other re- 
ligious led by Right Rev. Henry Damian Juneker, Bishop of 
Alton (now Springfield). Illinois. 

From this memorable date the Ursulines have loved Springfield 
and have ever been deeply interested in any civic or educational 
movement that enhanced our City's progress. 

The years from poor beginnings in a humble school to today's 
Academy for girls, their Monastery. Chapel, Conservatory of 
Music and Junior College are wonderful testimony to a dedica- 
tion to high standards of education, calls to the religious voca- 
tion, and championing of higher education facilities for the 
community. 

Not only high school for girls in their academy but the complete 
ro>tcr of Junior College subjects such as Pre-Medical, Pre-Legal. 
Liberal Arts cv Sciences, Teacher Training. Commerce. Engi- 
neering and Music are offered on a co-educational basis as well 
as a fidl adult education program. 

1957 — At present the Ursulines of Springfield have well over 3,700 
enrollees in their parochial schools, their Academy and their 
Junior College of Springfield, Illinois. 



Truly a hundred years with God's grace are but the threshold to 

greater things in the future for both 

Springfield and the Ursulines. 



SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, LIBRARIES 





1. SPRINGFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
(101 S. Lewis) 

2. FEITSHANS HIGH SCHOOL 
(1121 S. Fifteenth St.) 

3. LANPHIER HIGH SCHOOL 
(1300 N. Eleventh St.) 

4. URSULLNE ACADEMY 

(1400 N. Fifth St.) 

5. CARVER TRADE SCHOOL— 
FOR BOYS (1117 E. Washing- 
ton St.) 

6. ST. JAMES TRADE SCHOOL— 
FOR BOYS (Sangamon Ave. 
Road) 






THE FINE HARNESS CLASS — A popular event at any horse show for over 
one hundred years, is a feature at the annual MIDWEST CHARITY HORSE 
SHOW held each year at the State Fairgrounds. 



Serving Springfield Since 1932 

THE SO-HO 

STEAK HOUSE 

139 N. 4th St. 



Walking Distance from all Hotel 



MS 



Laura & Felix 



ICY ROOT BEER STANDS, INC 

You are never far from the 
Icy Root Beer Stands. Your 
favorite Drive-In, famous for 
Hamburgers, Sandwiches and 
Fountain Drinks. 

We wish to thank Springfield 
and Surrounding Communi- 
ties for their wonderful pa- 
tronage for the past twenty 
years. Customers like you 
have contributed much to our 
growth. 

TWO (2) CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 



Soi'TH SlDE 

5th & So. Grand 
Tel. 4-1831 



North Side 

Rvtledc.e & No. Grand 

Tei.. 4-1832 



Have You Tried Our King-Burgers, or Our 
Carry-Out Service? 






i 



L I f." ^"~^r JT— 






_ • _ W w A 



::iv.A_ 5a\ \:$ .^: _:av a>5; _ 





Serving Springfield in the fields of 

Thrift and Home Ownership 

for over Fifty Years 



SECURITY FEDERAL 

SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

518 East Monroe Street 
Savings up to $10,000 insured f>y the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation 



Sacred Heart tcademy extendi congratulations 
to Capitennial 




Sacred Heart Academy is a fully accredited high 
school for resident and day students con- 
ducted by Dominican Sisters 



H.inlh I, .i.l ih.- Dominican Sisters, now of Sacred Heart 
Convent, Springfield, Illinois, then a small community of six, 
■el fool mi Dlinoia toil in the year 1H73 when thai Land o' 
Lincoln beckoned them to Springfield. At the invitation of 
President I lyases S. Gram in October, in;t. thej were to have 
the honor of unveiling the recentl) completed Lincoln nioiui- 
ni.nl. \^.iin twentj yean later, the year 1893. when th. v estab- 
lished their permanent residence, it h- on tht- DuRois prop- 

ertj in weal Springfield redolent with memories of Lincoln. 
The close friendship between Jesse K. DnBois and Abraham 
Lincoln, began when they were both members of the State 
Legislature, bronghl Lincoln a> a frequent guest to the inter- 
esting old man-ion of the Civil War period, which was the 
original building on the property and -till serves a- the music 
conservatory of the Academy. To this building were added 
others as the community and the school grew: the Sacred 
Heart Convent building, 1893; the Sacred Heart Chapel, 1901; 
the Academic building, 1909; Siena Hall and the Chaplain's 
residence, 1949; and the Regina Coeli Infirmary, 1957. 

The small community of six has grown to a community of 
o\er five hundred members, who. in addition to Sacred Heart 
Academy, staff many other schools and hospitals. The Acade- 
my, now enrolling four hundred students, grants diplomas 
yearly to a class of eighty in contrast to a class of eight, the 
number comprising its first graduating class, 1897. The Acade- 
my is a fully accredited high school whose course of study has 
been expanded to meet the needs of the changing times, but 
the purpose of the school as stated in an early prospectus, "to 
provide young ladies with a solid education to train them to 
the refinements of good society, and to leach them their duty 
as promoters of peace and order ill the Christian home." 1 has 
never been lost sight of. 



W e are proud of our City's past. We have faith 


BACHMANN-KUMLE 


in our City's future. 


Prescriptions 


ILLINOIS 


Across from the Leland Hotel 


PLUMBING AND HEATING 




SUPPLY COMPANY 


S. W. Cor. 6th & Capitol 


W. G. Davis, \ i< roR Hribal, 




President Treasurer 

II. <). Kllis, J. \Y. Grkknwood, 
/ ii<- President Secretary 


INSTITUTE OF 
BUSINESS TECHNIQUES 


825 EAST M UMSON ST. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 


522 East Monroe Street — Eighth Floor 


Telephone 8-7345 


SPECIALISTS IN BUSINESS TRAINING 


Wholesale Plumbing and Heating 


Day and Evening Classes 




Telephone 8-3311 



SCHOOLS, COLLEGES. LIBRARIES 





CENTENNIAL BUILDING, location of 
the Illinois State Library, Illinois State 
Historical Library and Illinois State Mu- 
seum. The Homer-Lincoln Room in the 
Historical Library has one of the best and 
largest collections of books and pamphlets 
on Lincoln; the Library also has the larg- 
est number of Lincoln original documents, 
other than the National Archives and the 
Library of Congress; and perpetuates the 
story of Illinois in its holdings. 




DIOCESAN LATIN SCHOOL 
(Lake Springfield) 

' ' P Jm 

■ 

■• "Tr. 3BE39BT'- 





t; 




LINCOLN LIBRARY— Doorway to the 

Wonderful World of Books (326 S. Sev- 
enth St.). It has the largest public library 
circulation in Illinois outside Chicago and 
the third largest in the United States for 
cities of comparable population size. Or- 
ganized in 1866 as the Springfield Library- 
Association, a joint stock company, the li- 
brary ivas transferred to the city in 1886 
on condition it be maintained as a free 
public library. The present building, com- 
pleted in 1904, was made possible by funds 
contributed by Andrew Carnegie. 




SACRED HEART ACADEMY 

(1200 W. Washington St.) 




TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 

(515 S. MacArthur Blvd.) 



SPRINGFIELD JUNIOR COLLEGE 
(1500 N. Fifth St.) 



TR \\SIM>RT\TI<>\ 



Capitol Airport (Walnut St. 

Road) 




The huge caravans of modern, 
high-speed trucks that leave 
and enter Springfield today- 
would certainly be an unbeliev- 
able apparition to the pioneers 
and early travelers in Illinois 
and of this city who struggled 
to this area through forests, al- 
most impassable muddy roads 
and streets. The tortures of our 
first citizens in moving in the 
simplest manner and the short- 
est distances seem improbable 
when we view the great trans- 
portation systems that sustain 
Springfield today. 




One of Springfield's long-dis- 

tarit<> motor truck freight line 

terminals. 




i TYPICAL II 1C 11 If IV IN- 
TERSECTION designed to fa- 
cilitate movement of automo- 
tive traffic, i I . S. 66 at signal- 
ized interchange of ('it\ I . S. 
tui anil Bypass 66, south edge of 
Springfield.) 



Abraham Lincoln Streamliner 
arriving in Springfield. 



We/come to Springfield — and the Capitennial celebration! Whether you're in the 
market for a new or used car, you'll get a BETTER deal from a member of the 
Springfield Auto Dealers Association. 



BATES CHEVROLET COMPANY 
CAPITOL PONTIAC COMPANY 
GIUFFRE BUICK COMPANY 
ILLINI MOTOR COMPANY 
KERST AUTO SALES 
LANGENFELD MOTOR SALES 
SPRINGFIELD MOTORS 



Springfield Auto Dealers Association 

"Organized for 37 years to promote and improve the 
automotive industry in Springfield" 



RENTAL & SALES 

• HOSPITAL BEDS • WALKERS 

• WHEEL CHAIRS • CRUTCHES 

• PATIENT LIFTERS • MEDICAL OXYGEN 

American Ambulance 

CALL . CALL 

7563 Service 7563 

1316 SO. 15th at SO. GRAND 


Compliments 

Banks Haigood 

Plumbing and Heating 

P P 


Comp//menfs of 

PRODUCERS DAIRY CO. 

Ninth & Jefferson St. 


Nichol's Drive-In Laundry 

1936 So. MacArthur 

JACK W. CARNCROSS, Operator 


CHARLES B. SEAY 

Personalized Shoe Fitting 

212 South Fourth Street 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Phone 8-6922 


Phone 3-7411 

Rcifs furniture^ oJlCtirLj 

THE STORE OF 
LOVELY THINGS FOR THE HOME 

MacArthur Blvd. at Outer Drive 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



CITY WATER LIGHT & POWER 



"The bounties of nature and the bless- 
ings of science are brought to the people 
at lowest cost." 



"Health requires pure water, civic 
health requires faithful public service." 

Willis J. Spaulding, 
Commissioner, 1911-1943 



"A monument to the ability of the peo- 
ple to serve themselves and build for pos- 
terity." 

George F. Johnson 




LOWEST DOMESTIC ELECTRIC RATES IN SPRINGFIELD AND ILLINOIS 



Happy Birthday to a Great City 



MONTGOMERY 

ROOFING AND INSULATING 
COMPANY 



700 SOUTH TWELFTH STREET 



Phone 2-6816 



SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 



1 
\ 
J 

John F. Jacobs 

Phone 8-1796 Phone 2-0795 

1567 WABASH AVENUE 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

MINIATURE GOLF 
The Family Game Fun For All 

BATTING RANGE 

Practice Your Batting on Automatic Pitching 

Machines 

ARCHERY 

Moving Targets — Exclusive In Central Illinois 

Free Instruction 

ALSO DART BOARDS 
Open 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 P.M. 




UTILITIES 



FIRST ELECTRIC ARC 
LIGHTS /artist's conception ) 
as demonstrated in City Rail- 
way Park, summer 1879. The 
generator was driven by trac- 
tion engine. 



A GAS BILL 
dated June 2, 1858 




GAS 

The first listed public utility in Springfield (except for the town pump 
and the watering trough in 1839) was the Springfield Gaslight Company, 
formed by John Todd Stuart, Stephen T. Logan. Ninian W. Edwards and 
other prominent citizens. The company started service in 1855 by fur- 
nishing the street lights for the City of Springfield. Soon after service 
was extended to stores, offices and homes al the rate of $3.25 per thou- 
sand cubic feet of gas. 



LOCAL TRANSPORTATION 

John Todd Stuart was also the first president of Springfield's initial 
local transportation system, the Springfield City Railway Company which 
was incorporated February 1, 1361. Due to the Civil War it was not con- 
structed until five years later. 



Serving Springfield 



• with dependable natural gas since 18 5 4 



• with low cost electricity since 1882 




Q 



• 



Growing With Springfield 



DAVIS 



\ \ \Mi; TO TRl ST FOR 



Dry Cleaning & Laundry 



2222 Small Sixth Street 



Phone 2-4488 



Stores All Over Central Illinois 




The Spikre Shoppe 

CORSETS : LINGERIE 
HOSIERY 

511 East Monroe Street 
Phone 3-4052 



Compliments of 

JANES BEAUTY SHOP 

629 South Fifth Street 
Prop., Jane Cochran Phone 3-0423 



Compliments and Best Wishes 

BISCH & SON 

Memorial Home 

Since 1896 

Springfield, Illinois 



"Boivl W here the Stars Bowl'' 

THE BOWL 

Second and Adams 

Air Conditioned Parking Lot 

Complete Food and Bar Service 



UTILITIES 




CITY LIGHT AND POWER 
PLANT AND ITS WATER 
FILTRATION PLANT, Lake 
Springfield. It is the largest 
municipally owned power plant 
in Illinois. 



WATER 

The cily entered the utility field with the election of Water Com- 
missioners who on April 15, 1861, issued bonds for $3,000 for the con- 
struction of a water system. In 1866, bonds were issued for $197,000, and 
in 1867. bonds for $250,000. The original water works was completed 
July 1, 1868, and was planned to serve a city of 50,000 inhabitants. The 
waterworks consisted of a leservoir at Reservoir Park (now known as Lan- 
phier Park) and an engine at the river plant. At this time the city had 
approximately 15 miles of water main and 51 fire pumps. The largest 
water main was the 15" line from the water works. 



ELECTRICITY 

Springfield's first view of electric lights came in the late winter of 
1878-79, after A. L. Ide, President, Ide Engine Works, had visited Thomas 
A. Edison in New Jersey and had two arc lights shipped from the East. 
The electric generator was connected to a traction engine and the new 
system of illumination was displayed at Fifth and Madison Streets where 
the Ide Engine works was located. 

On March 7, 1881. Mi. Ide and others formed the Springlield Steam 
Supply and Electric Company. They purchased the Baptist Church at the 
southwest corner of Adams and Seventh streets and converted it into a 
generating station. Service from this station was started on a limited 
scale in 1382. Even as late as 1884 doubt as to the efficiency of electric 
service for street lighting was indicated when the city extended its con- 
tract for gas street lights for another ten years. 

In 1894. Frank W. Tracy and others formed the Capitol Electric Com- 
pany with the provision that the company, under certain circumstances, 
was later to be turned ovsr lo the City of Springlield. In 1906, the city 
took possession of the plant at Tenth and Reynolds Streets and started 
lighting the streets and city buildings. 





WILLIS .1. SPAULDING, City 

Commissioner. Department of 
Public I'roperty. who first con- 
ceived the idea of Lake Spring- 
field. 



MeadowGold Dairy Products 

"7 'he Finest Sold Is Meadow Gold" 

it 
DOING BUSINESS SINCE 1895 

OLDEST DAIRY IN 
SPRINGFIELD 

330 North Fourth Dial 2-4417 



CONGRATULATIONS 
SPRINGFIELD! 

WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE 
SERVED OUR COMMUNITY 
FOR TEN YEARS! 



it 



WE, TOO, ARE GROWING! 



it 



McDERMAND WOODWORKS 

L839 South Eleventh Street 




Excellent Charter Service . . Reasonarle 

Rates for Group Trips To All 

Parts of the State 

For Information, Call 2-5531 or 2-5532 

Enjoy Shopping ... Go By Bus 

Springfield Transportation Co. 

610 EAST ASH STREET 
SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

TELEPHONE 2-5531 and 2-5532 



NATIONAL WINDOW 

CLEANING COMPANY 

Inc. 

Established 1910 

Walls Cleaned Floors Waxed 

Complete Janitor Service 

MYTAR 

Rug and Furniture Cleaners 

Specialists in Wall-to-Wall 
Carpet Cleaning 



Phone 3-6311 



206 S. Eleventh St. 



II IDE YESTERYEARS 




If EST ON MO\RUE ST. Intersection it at Fifth St. Dodds Drug Store is on opposite corner 
from Brown's Drug Store with statue of lion hanging above aiming. Telephone service office 
teas located on second floor of present Senate Theater Building. 

In passing, may we suggest the pleasure that must be experienced by those among us who have seen, felt and lived 
the experience we cherish as history — history of a wonderful city for a lot of nice people since 1832 — in fact, from the 
beginning in 1819. Today we are aware of the great gift given us by the toils of our predecessors. The growth we 
see — the happiness we feel — the prosperity we enjoy — are enhanced by reminders oi yesteryears. 



ill 




HENSON ROBINSON COMPANY 

1112-114 N. Fifth St.). 



Tilt HOME KOK THE FRIENOLES 

(northeast corner. Seienth nnd 
South Grand) founded in 1863. 



Compliments Of 


S. DRENDEL 




6k 


R. B. EVANS 


COMPANY 


CONSTRUCTION CO. 


1016 WEST LAWRENCE AVE. 


ft 


Plumbing - Heating - Air Conditioning 


Sales - Service - Installations 


Since 1921 


Serving the Springfield Area 
Over 40 Years 


441 North Walnut Street 


Phone Phone 
3-4715 2-5495 







SMITH FUNERAL CHAPEL 

Established 1848 

Julian S. Boardman 

Robert L. Boardman 

620 East Edwards Street 



DRACHS 

PIOnftR RESTflURflni 




42S-427 E WASHINGTON 
SPRINGFIELD . ILL. 



M UESTIC SHOPPE 

121 South Fifth St. Phone 3-2341 

"H here society's best dressed men rent 
their formal near." 

Elizabeth Polk. Mgr. 
Established L91] 



GALVA CREAMERY 



OticeybuW 




youll/UuwsW 



GALVA, ILLINOIS 




CITY HAY MARKET 

l Seventh and Jefferson I about 1875. 




TELEPHONE CABLE 
INSTALLERS, 1880 





STREET CAR BARNS 

(Fourth anil Monroe I about 1875. 

The horses were housed in the 

basement. 



OPEN AIR STREET CAR 
at Fifth and Capitol. 







CHICAGO & ILLINOIS MIDLAND 

RAILROAD 

which ran between Springfield and 

Chatham. 




LELAND HOTEL IN THE 
NINETIES 

(northwest corner. Sixth and Capitol). 

The main entrance ivas on Sixth 

Street; tlie door on Capitol was called 

"The Ladies Entrance." 






ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL 
(southeast corner. Fourth and Jeffer- 
son) in the nineties. Note the station 
wagon at the main entrance and sev- 
eral carriages waiting in line. They 
had traffic problems! 




Baldwin I'iwos and Organs 
( i iNN BAND INS'l'Kl MENTS 
SHEET Ml SIC - RECORDS - HI II 
I I-:. MONROE ST. SPRINGFIELD. 



COLLINS & C( )MPANY, Jewelers 

Dl LMOND Ml l(< ll INTS S (il'TH I\\s 

OFFICIAL RAILROAD TIME INSPECTORS 

Elmer I. Collins 

Established in 1891 210 South Sixth Street 

Sixty-six ) fears <»/ Faithful Service to Springfield 



HR5T Federal savings and loan association 



i/m 3P/tc/<iata/t/iu 



M. PHOTOG ^ m ^ t€l€Cc&- 

CONVENTIONS • BANQUETS • PUBLICITY 



Phone 4-9615 



224 ',7 South Fifth 
SPRINGFIELD 



COMMERCIAL CONVENTION GROUPS - MEETINGS 
SUES ROOM SET-UPS ■■ OISPUTS ■■ WEDDINGS 
STEREO ■■ COLOR - PHOTO MURALS - COPSES 

MOTION PICTURES - SOUND • 16-35 MM 
SOUND PROJECTOR RENTALS 



SWINNEY'S STANDARD SERVICE 

8th & So. Grand Ave. Phone 2-9113 

"Leave your car worries with us." 



One-Dav Cleaners & Hatters 

816 North Ninth Street (Rear) 

Deluxe Dry Cleaning 

EXTRA SPECIAL SERVICE TO VISITORS 



\KC1T WILSON INC. 

Menswear 
408 South Fifth Strekt 



ILL.-MO. WELDING PRODUCTS CO. 

(Serving Central Illinois Since 1913) 

Decatur - Springfield • Quincy 

(Home Office) Jacksonville 



American Republic Ins. ( !<>. 



Compliments Of 

PIXIE PANTRY 





Sprints field's Biggest Little Restaurant 


530 South Sixth Street 


Serving Home-like Food 




300 West Edwards Street Dial 3-8121 


( )ld Fashion Bargain Days! 




The BOOTERY 


AFRIEND 


Home of Hard-to-Find Sizes 




Fifth .mil Monroe Springfield. Illinois 


. 




THE PIONEER WOMAN 
Maude Nation Lunham ("Marian"), de- 
scendant of Ann Rutledge, proudly wears 
a dress of the Rutledge family. 





"That's a mighty fine beard, boys" 




1909 car, mined fry Robert Little Smith, Springfield, passes safety check. 



( !ompliments of the 



ROY A. BOOKER 

ClectHc £e?i)ice 



2028 South MacArthur Blvd. 



SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Greetings to 




THE GARDEN CENTER 


Springfield 




OF SPRINGFIELD 

Featuring: 

Garden Products of Proven Quality 






ASGROW Seed & Garden Supplies 




NIAGARA Garden Chemicals 


v ; 




YIGORO & VERTAGREEN Fertilizer* 
VAUGHAN'S & ORTHO Products 
GARDEX Garden Tools 
Quality Farm Products 


V V 




PURINA Chows & Sanitation Products 


WILLIS MEYERS CORP. 


CANTERBURY Hybrid Seed Corn 
SWIFT'S Fertilizers 


909-11 E. U)A\1S 




RUHM'S Roek Phosphate 


SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

I'iium 7">2K 




£u>eet Lr Canterbury 


Furniture Manufacturing 1 pholstering 


Goods, 


406 N. Fifth St. Phone 2-8814 


<..!>•• Goods and Institutional Furnishin 


gs 


Seed and Fertilizer for Farm Garden and Lawn 


Complete Decorating Service 




SEED COMPANY SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



v'A FOUhlDRY^MAC[M 



^r^ 




.m ti • i -• ■■■■> m "JJlILtt niitn'i li II m 

■•■\'iu-S--.iJl r i CTE lull' 







AETNA FOl NDRY \NT) 

MACHINE COMPANY 

(Second and Adams) 

in the early nineties. 



ILLINOIS WATCH FACTORY 
Main entrance, facing Ninth St. (block 
bounded by Ninth, Converse, Elev- 
enth and N. Grand). Established in 
1870 it was one of the largest tvatch 
manufacturers in the world. John T. 
Stuart urns the first president ; Jacob 
Bunn served until 1897 and his son 
Jacob succeeded him. 





TELEPHONE SWITCHBOARD. 1880. 



CLAUS JEWELRY STORE 

(210 S. Sixth St.) 




CIRCUS PARADE. 1903. 





CARNIVAL SHOW 
during State Fair Week, Publit 

S(,uare (south side), 1901. 



DOME It I ILDING, 

STATE FAIR GROUNDS, 1900. 

The dome itself was 2110 feet by 

200 feet. 





GEHRM \N\ (. \RI)EN 

1021 V. Third StJ. 

The trees and shrubs were imported 

from all parts oj the world. 





FIRST SPRINGFIELD BIGH 
SCHOOL (Fourth ;ii Madison). 







W> 



PROF. LOUS LEHMANN 

AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

in the 1880's. He also directed the 

Illinois W (itch factory Band ivhose 

members wore on their caps the open 

face natch manufactured hy the 

torn party. 



ILLINOIS NATIONAL GUARD 

ENCAMPMENT 

State Fair Grounds, 1898. 





C \MI" Bl TI.ER 
(east <>/ Springfield), 1862, was n train- 
ing camp for Illinois troops and 
served as a prison camp for 
Confederate troops. 



SI Mi U I'M Mi 
in nearby grove, lames II. Mathenj 

}r.,Jan\er. right of tree./ 




IN RESERVOIR PARK 
(now Lanphier Park), 1900. 



It's Springfield's Capitennial year — Our 74th year . . . We are proud 

to have had a small part in the Growth and 

Progress of Our Fabulous City 



Buy a 



It's not only beautiful, but RUGGED . . . Comfortable, too! 




Manufactured by 



THE SPRINGFIELD MATTRESS CO. 



74 Years Making Quality Bedding 



EDWARD'S 

PLUMBING & HEATING COMPANY 

1006 West Edwards St. - Telephone 3-3211 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



The 



"MANSION VIEW LODGE" 

Springfield's New Downtown Motor Hotel 

CONGRATULATES The 
CAPITENNIAL COMMITTEES! 
WELL DONE, SPRINGFIELD! 

P. S.: We'll be open in the early fall. 



SIMMONS 
OFFICE SUPPLY & EQUIPMENT CO. 

224 SOUTH FIFTH STREET 
SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 

ESTABLISHED 1873 



Table Queen 

BAKERY COMPANY 

2200 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 

"Fresh to your door" 



£trcH#J Cafeteria* JJhc. 

513 EAST MONROE STREET 

SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS 

Serving Good Food Since 1897 




Phone 
5474 



SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 




FANCi TURN OUT CLASS— A young felloiv and his favorite girl of the Gay 
Nineties on their way to a social event. This class is one of the outstanding 
events of the MIDWEST CHARITY HORSE SHOW held each spring at the 

State Fairgrounds. 



Best Wishes to all of Springfield 
in the Capital Year 

B. CONSTANTINO 

& 

SONS CO. 

Springfield's largest inspected 



heel" slaughters 



Here's to You Springfield on Your Capitennial 
Celebration 

A. J. BARTLETT, 
General Contractor 



903 Princeton 



Dial 3-6330 — 8-6488 



Homo Building 
Commercial Building 
Remodeling of any tvpe 
Roofing — Insulating — Garages 

Free estimates on any j<>l> in home or com- 
mercial, however large or small. 

Full) Insured — All Work Guaranteed 

Financing Vrranged F.H.A. or otherwise 




WALK-INN 

508 East Monroe St. 



DRIVE-INN 

Seventh and South Grand Ave. 



Welcome Capitennial Visitors 

Serving Springfield Its Finest Ice Cream 
For Over 50 Years 

MIAD>®W GOLD 
OCi CREAM DIVISION, 

BEATRICE F©©PS CO. 



312 S. Third St. 



Springfield, 111. 



Automotive Electric Service — Ignition — Carburetors 
Tune Up 

CHAPIN SERVICE CO. 

Dial 2-9634 
712-714 East Adams St. Springfield, Illinois 



Listed By Duncan HlNES in "Adventures in Good Eating" 

MALDANER'S 

Good Things To Eat Established 1884 

222 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

Walter J. Tabor, Proprietor 



Montgomery Realty Company 

Real Estate 

524 1^ East Capitol Ave. Springfield, Illinois 

Res.: 5355 Off.: 3-3649 



Compliments 
A Friend 



1933 ; wi 




i B LINCOLN CAB 

24 YEARS OF PROGRESS 
with SPRINGFIELD 

1957 TAXI 3 B 4 J 4 J 





617 East Vdams Street 



* 



Compliments Of 



CAPITOL PLUMBING 

AND HEATING 

SUPPLY CO. 

315 North First Street Dial 8-3493 




THE LINDSAY HOME 
(603 S. Fifth St.). 




THE SANGAMO CLUB 
< located at ea.st end of race track at 
Fair Grounds), 1896. The club was 
chartered in 1890 by prominent busi- 
ness and professional men. The club 
building in town was originally lo- 
cated at 523 S. Sixth St. 




THE PARLORS AT THE 

GOVERNOR'S MANSION, 1890. 

(Do you like to dust?) 




ST. AGATHA'S SCHOOL 

A boarding school under the direction 

of the Episcopalian Church. It ivas 

the former Ninian W . Edwards home 

i HI S. Second St.). 




KB 

CHARLES R. MATHENY HOME 

(First and W ashington) urns the first 
two-story house built in Springfield. 




GEORGE M. BRINKERHOKF 

RESIDENCE 
leys Ave., between Fifth and Sixth). 



CHATTERTON OPERA HOUSE 
IS.E. Corner, Sixth and Jefferson i 



MID-STATE 

WHOLESALE GROCERY CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS OF 



XMif j 



i o o 

FAMOUS 
FOODS 



"( )ur beautiful chapel is one of 

Sj> lino field's newest" 

M U RICK O'DONNELL COY E. LYNCH 

1227 South Seventh Street 



Compliments 
of 

THE NICCOLLS STONE & 
CONTRACTING CO. 

ROSCOE A. NICCOLLS 
and Employees 

Harry Niccolls Albert Drury 



Edward Niccolls 
George Errett 
Bishop Billups 



Gerald Errett 
Emile Vil 
Lawrence Bosaw 



32 Years of Business in Springfield. 



Compliments of 

FRANCIS W. WENZEL, 
Vice-President 

Lincoln Land Association 



LUKE J. GAULE 

Auctioneer — Over 1/3 Century 
Phone: Res. 3-1033 Sale Rain 3-4011 



Compliments Of 

W. R. CURTIS 

Jeweler 
515 East Capitol Ave. Springfield, 111. 



FARNEY TIRE CO. 

TRACTION • TREADING 
REPAIRING • VULCANIZING 

1512 East Jefferson St. Springfield, Illinois 

Dial 8-2312 



Compliments of 

FLOY I) S 

212-14 South Fifth Street 
Springfield, Illinois 



Compliments Of 

MO COFFEE SHOP 

312 South Fifth Street 
Specialty — Steaks — Chops 
Rreakfast — Lunch — Dinner 



rfitdy Jjf 



CANDIES 

FRESH ROASTED NUT MEATS 

403 East Monroe Springfield, Illinois 



Dwight O'Keefe & Co. 

INSURANCE 

815 Ridgelv Rid-. Phone 2-8877 



Congratulations Springfield Capitennial 

JOHN B. CROSBY & SON 

Realtor Builder 

First National Bank Building 



THINGS TO COME 







YMCA BUILDING (southwest 
corner, Fourth and Cook). M. D. 
Turley, architect. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, Blessed Sacrament 

Parish (Old Chatham Road, south of 

Fox Meadows). Hadley & 

Worthington, architect. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON JUNIOR 

HIGH SCHOOL (3001 Allis Ave.). 

L. Philip Trutter, architect. The 

George Washington Junior High 

School (2300 E. Jackson St.) 

will be the same design. 



THE TOWN HOUSE (700 block 

S. Seventh St.) will be one of 

the finest apartment buildings 

in the Middle West. Erected 

by the Franklin Life Insurance, this 

ultra-modern 14-story building 

will contain 98 apartment units. 



BUILDINGS UNDER CONTRACT OR 
CONSTRUCTION 

Matching the progress characterizing Springfield's 
125 years of official existence, here are some of the 
plans for the future which promise to add addi- 
tional assets to a community whose record of civic 
accomplishment has long been established. 




THINGS TO COME 



GRIFFIN UK. II SCHOOL (north- 
west corner, Washington and 
imos i. I.. Philip Trutter, 
architect. 



► 





FIRST CONGREGATIONAL 
CHl'RCH (southeast corner, 
Cherry Road and Hales Ave.), 
Hadley & Worthington archi- 
tect. 





FELLOWSHIP RUILDING. 
Fifth Presbyterian Church 
(Twenty- first at East Capitol). 
(Uias. Macklin, architect. 



MANSION VIEW LODGE 

(Fourth St., across from Gover- 
nor's Mansion ). Hadley & 
Worthington, architect. 



SALV \Tlo\ \H\IY CITADEL 

(southeast corner, Sixth and 

Carpenter). Hadley & If orthington, 

architect. 



r 




ON 

THE 

BUILDING 

OF 

SPRINGFIELD 



The Juture^ 



(Title taken from the poem — 

of the same title — 

uritten by Vaehel Lindsay.) 




NICHOLAS VACHEL LINDSAY, 
ARTIST AND POET 



ON THE BUILDING OF 5PRINGF1ELD. 



LET not ova town at lwxoe atMErnBERtnc 

LITTLE. ftTMtNS VlftS TUt r*U4lS' HOfiE . 0^ 



O-rcHO C\ULtt» THE Hk.Pi 



OF LOrtPOH STILL, " - ^^» " 
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FOR THE GUIWOSOH OF fOUfc SOr* 
f«OT ButLDtO l« Pi 0*1 . 
t TOWH CfcnnOT COMPLETE HER SOUL 



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«H*G *-* US IC* THPT GOOO 0«M - * 
VontS wt UMl W»ft»TTl(1 --SLOOO V«iTHin THE RHTI-\t 

OrifTiNo, »v> **em olo enCLftno still v«fts GAfso , 

THE PoftPLCmcn *LllftBCTH.«N Tl«£. 

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SW.VS Wi Pi\OfHE<.>, TOO Ff»R WOFM? 

1 OWL-4 WOW, OWLtSb HI* f**TH BE HtCH, , 

THE SOUL 0* TWS, OU* HinMCH IS OOOHEO, -Jfe 

QVH L\TTLE BftftlLOn V*ILL SUHELT OlE . 



SOME CIT^ 0« THE BBEftST Of ILLtflOi^ 

WO VJtSEH hf*0 (VI BETTK* M TWE STftRT 

By *=WTH Stt^LL «lSt ftCOEEMEO, B^ FfMTH SH^LL RISE 

6£M»U*0 TME weSTEl>J4 <XOa>< in Mt« MEfVBT: — 



THE CEM.Ub O* THE M/*>LE , ELt-i ft«0 OftH^ 
THE SECRET WOPE.l IHEWt-t. C«*in OF LOftn - - 
THE CA.01M TWT TWE PRniBlt ftHCELS Si«& 
ftT mC«T viHf ft 50«S OF LIFE ftf*0 LOVE f*Ht BORM - - 



B5W< BUT TO ^TWOOClE, S^UMIO FW10 hi o»t 

fjBOntr* HtiO VlWDfcRtNG ir* THiUft E.nRL-, XEf^S, 

VtHVi WILL THf* Mftiur 0»M OttSTT STBfciTS T«UV GOftL, 

**VTH1N OOft MTltS MiO£ THllft S^C^ED T£ft*S? 

WAttl yiiv-l. TMIt JTAAT OOA. vut.OKA. KLOOO ftTAHILL 
■WITH Livino i.rnwjivot. . W0«Oi THAT SET Ui FREE? 
yiHEK V.IUL T«EV «•«£ A PM» Cf 6EAUT1. Ct-EAR 
BtTWEtN OUA AMHCS ArtO OUA LVftfeATt ? 



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*t MOST M^^t M Ant LtrttOLN. HEARTED MH -- 

A EITt IS tlOT BUILDCO In A 0A1 

ANO Trltl MOST DC THEIR WORH, AHO EOrst AAD Co 
WHILE CouftTLESS CEtltrATlonS PASS AWnvt . 




UNITY 



PROGRESS PROSPERITY 

THESE ARE OUR ETERNAL GOALS 



PEACE 



SPRINGFIELD BUILDING AND 
CONSTRUCTION TRADES COUNCIL 

AFL-CIO 
AND AFFILIATED LOCAL UNIONS 



Inevitably linked with the past and any future gruwth and expansion of Springfield, the various 
local unions affiliated with the Building and Construction Trades stand ready to participate in 
plans f<»r the betterment of this area. 



Asbestos Workers Local No. 1 

Boilermakers Local No. 8f 

Boilermakers Local No. 363 

Bricklayers Local No. 1 

Carpenters Local No. 16 

Cement Finishers Local No. 539 

Electrical Workers Local No. 193 

Elevator Constructors Local No. 92 

Hod Carriers. Building and Common 
Lahorers Local No. 177 

Hod Carriers, Building and Common 
Laborers Local No. 11 1.1 (Girard) 

Glaziers Local No. 1168 

Terrazzo. Tile & Marble 



Hoisting Engineers Local No. 965 

Bridge. Structural & Ornamental 
Iron Workers Local No. 46 

Wood, Wire & Metal Lathers 
Local No. 20 

Painters, Decorators & Paperhangers 
Local No. 90 

Plasterers Local No. 59 

Plumbers & Steamfitters, Refrigeration 

Employees Local No. 137 

Roofers Local No. 112 

Sheet Metal Workers Local No. 84 

Sign Painters Local No. 730 

Teamsters & Chauffeurs Local No. 916 

Workers Helpers Local No. 109 



\\ m. E. Stuemke, President 



Boss LOUCHMILLER, Vice-President 



Kit »\k .1. SCADUTO, Secretary- Treasurer 



BEST WISHES FOR A SUCCESSFUL CAPITENNIAL 
SANGAMON COUNTY REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE 



ROBERT A. EMMINGS R. GARRETT PHILLIPS WARREN PAGE 
Chairman Vice-Chairman Secretary 

FRANKLIN W. WASHBURN 

Treasurer 



SANGAMON COUNTY REPUBLICAN OFFICIALS 



L. W. HLNTON 
Supt. of Schools 



CREEL DOUGLASS 

Probate Judge 



STANLEY THOMAS 
County Judge 



JAMES W. DUNBAR 
Probate Clerk 



M. B. OVERAKER 

County Clerk 



ARTHUR A. GROSS 
Sheriff 



RONALD GIBBS 

Recorder of Deeds 



J. WALDO ACKERMAN 

State's Attorney 



EARL 0. RAMEY 
Treasurer 



WILLIAM TELFORD 

Coroner 



SARA J. BECKER 
Auditor 



HOMER MENDENHALL 

Chairman, 

Board of Supervisors 



HERE'S SHOWERS OF FLOWERS TO A WONDERFUL CITY 



51 






30? .... ^H 


Bifflff 



SPRINGFIELD 
The home of the 




PflCKinG CO. 



912 STRAIGHT STREET • SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 

PHONE 3-8271 



REMEMBER PEGWILL'S THE LABEL 
THAT SETS A FINER TABLE 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Day-by-day Activities of Abraham Lincoln: (Abraham Lincoln 
Association) 

1809-1839 by Harry E. Pratt 1941 

1840- 1846 by Harry E. Pratt 1939 

1847-1853 by Benjamin P. Thomas 1936 

1854-1861 by Paul M. Angle 1933 

A Look at Springfield, Illinois, issued by Association of 

Commerce and Industry 1955 

Here I Have Lived: a history of Lincoln's Springfield. 

Paul M. Angle 1935 

Historical Encyclopedia oi Illinois . . and History of Sanga- 
mon County. Newton Bateman and Paul Selby. 
3 vol 1912 

The Sangamon Country. Helen Van Cleave Blankmeyer 1935 

Capitol Guide, issued by Secretary of State 1956 

Portrait and Biographical Album of Sangamon County. 

Chapman Brothers 1891 

The Illinois Capitol. Illinois State Register 1898 

History of Sangamon County, Illinois. Interstate Pub. Co 1881 

History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County. 

John Carroll Power 1876 

Lincoln's Springfield. Harry E. Pratt 1955 

History of Illinois and Her People. George W. Smith. 

2 vol 1927 

Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon 

County. Joseph Wallace. 2 vol 1904 

and other souvenir booklets issued on anniversaries of churches, 
schools and other institutions and special editions of newspapers. 



You can benefit 

from oui 

COMPLETE 

SERVICE 

om distinctive copy 

writing through eye 

etching layout and 

finished art 

to sUi I led printing 

and thorough 

mailing. . . 

We are prepared 

to serve all your 

Direct Moil 

Advertising needs 



LETTERS 
PROGRAMS 
BOOKLETS 
RULED FORMS 
ART AND LAYOUT 
COPY WRITING 
SALES PROMOTION 



HtV*l 



D** S 



Hi*** 

mont 






Marshall MUchell Arf and Letter Service 

920 SO- SIXTH ST . SPRINGFIELD. ILL 



HARRY B. LUERS, president 

ROMAN P. DORR, vice president 

MINOR L SMITH, secy.-treas. 

Williamson^ 

'Press, Inc. 

(ompletcj Offset—' 

letterpress and 

'Bindery Service^ 

' TELEPHONE 

.2-7744 . 

901 North MocArthur Boulevard 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



Tloe Editor Speaks 



W e are prone to human error 
so we promise to rectify and 
acknowledge all errors, omis- 
sions, typographical mis- 
takes and other oversights of 
this booklet in the next Capi- 
tal nial publication pub- 
lished in ?. Please notify the 
committee at that time! 



The INDEPENDENT Status „f our members is tbe 
key to superior insurance coverage and claim serv- 
ice for you. Being independent, our members are 
free to select the insurance company best suited to 
provide their customers with fire, casualty, marine 
and other lines of insurance coverage. 



THEY SERVE YOU FIRST. BUY WITH CONFI- 
DENCE WHERE THIS SYMBOL IS DISPLAYED. 

SPRINGFIELD ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE AGENTS 




\ll Mill US 

Appleyard Insurance Vgency 
Frank \\ . Vurelius 
Bernard Investment Company 
I ril Bieneman Insurance Vgenc) 
Booth X ( '< >n 1 1 >a n \ 
Brown. Collins & Brow n 
Alex R. Connoll) 
l)i\on Insurance ^genc) 
Fa) arl & Son 

Don Forsyth Insurance Vgenc) 
Chas. C. Hatfield 
Head Insurance Vgenc) 
Heffernan Insurance Agency, Inc. 
Hi llli.ikc Insurance Vgenc) 
Jones-Mclntire < lompany 
\ l\ in S. Kej > & ( lompan) 
I ..i ii | >li i.-r X ( lompan) 
Kenneth \\ . Lee 
Dwighl II. O'Keefe & Company 
< hi- Insurance Vgenc) . Inc. 
Joseph I'. I'.ol., & Co. 
Ki I ■ ly-Farmers Safe Deposit Co. 
Boliiii-.in-W anless, I nc. 
John G. Ruckel 
Schryver-Sprouse X Conipanj 
Stover Insurance ^genc) 
R. \\ . Troxell & < lompan) 
Weller & Campbell 
\\ il-oii Bros. 
\\ ilson & Eck Vgenc) 
Clarke \\ . Woodruff. 



ADDRESS PHONE NO. 

.23114 South 6th Street 5055 

613 East Adams Streel .2-4723 

306 East Monroe Streel 5775 

.318% South 6th Street 3-1517 

Reisch Building 2-4814 

.Reisch Building 2-4449 

.104% North 6th Street 3-1547 

.217% South 6th Streel ...2-9753 

406 East Adams Street 8-9669 

425% Easl Washington Street 8-8481 

Reisch Building .4-9233 

Reisch Building 2-6121 

101 North 6th Street ...3-1700 

.312 South 4th Streel 7914 

Securit) Building 4-4635 

.615 East Monroe Street .....7543 

Ferguson Building 2-5516 

United Mine Workers Building 8-5679 



Ridgely Building 

519 East Capitol Wenue 

Myers Building 

Ridgely Building 

First National Bank Building 

Myers Building 

H0% South 5th Street 

Ferguson Building 

til South 5th Streel 

First National Bank Building 

221 East Capitol \ venue 

Myers Building 

601 East Capitol Avenue 



2-8877 
2-9221 
6000 
4-9851 
4-3497 
2-7887 
4-4866 
8-5671 
2-4411 
2-9629 
8-3 153 
2-5710 
2-6331 







TODAY 



It's a far cry from John Kelly's cabin — first 
white man's habitation in what became Springfield 
— to the mushrooming city of today, a city rapidly 
approaching the 100,000 population mark: far- 
flung, prosperous, progressive. It's a far cry, too, 
from the single room in a small building — on the 
grounds of the Illinois Watch Company — which 
was Sangamo in 1899, to the Sangamo of today. 



With its home plant in Springfield grown from 
hat single room and its few people to a factory 
nth close to 510,000 feet of floor space and more 
ban three thousand employees, Sangamo now in- 
ludes plants in Pickens, South Carolina, and Ma- 
ion, Illinois, and associated manufacturing units 
ri Canada, England and Scotland. Its products 
re internationally accepted for their high quality 
nd dependability. 

Since 1899, Springfield and Sangamo have 
;rown and progressed together. And in their rec- 
>rds of the past, one reads the promise of the fu- 
ure: even greater progress! 




Sangamo Electric Company 



\ 



"Sfcp 









J 



- 






■■ 



\\ e must have main Lincoln-hearted men. 

A cit) i> not builded in a day. 

And the) must <!<> their work and conic and go 

\\ hile countless generations 

pa>> away. 




'On The Building Of Springfield" 
VACHELLINDS IV 



UNIVERSITY Of ILLINOIS URBANA 

817 7356L229L C001 

LAND OF LINCOLN CAPITENNIAL OF SPRINGFIE 



3 0112 025341337