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THE 

jLATjE WARi 

BETWEEN THE 

UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN, 

FROM JUNE 1812, to FEBRUARY 1315. 

WRITTEN IN THE ANCIENT HISTORICAL STYLE, 



BY GILBERT J. HUNT, 

Author of a number of anonymous Publications, id prose and verse. , 



n The good of his couttfryxuas the pride of his heart." — Decatur's victory. 
CONTAINING, ALSO, A SKETCH OF THE LATE 

ALGERIJNE WAR; 

J}nd the treaty concluded with the Dexj of Algiers 
The Commercial Treaty with Great Britain, 
and the Treaty concluded with the 
Creek A r ation of Indians, 



NEW-YORK, 
PUBLISHED AND SOLD FOR THE AUTHOR, 

BY DAVID LONGWORTH, 
11 Park. 



X. Dessoues Printer, no. 7, Murray-st. 

" 1816."" 



^ 






Southern Dittrict of Jf em-Tori, «i. 

BE it remembered, that on the twelfth day of Tuly, in tbe forty first year of the indepen- 
dence of the United States of America, 6ILBERT J. HUNT, of the said distri«<L 
fcath deposited in this office the title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as author ana 
proprietor, in the words and figures following, to wit: — u The Late War between the 
United States anJ Great Britain, from June 1812 to February 1815, written in the ancient 
historical style, by Gilbert J. Hunt, author of a number of anonymous publications in prose 
and verse. 

The good of hit country was the pride of his heart. — Decatur's Victory. 
Containing, also, a sketch of the late Algerine War and the Treaty concluded with the 
Bey of Algiers', the Commercial Treaty with Great Britain, and the Treaty concluded 
with the Creek nation of Indians." 

In conformity to the act of the congress of the Jnited Stales, entitled" An act for the 
encouragement of learning, by securing the cooies of Maps, Charts, and Books to the 
authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned ;" and also to 
an act, entitled " an act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement 
•f learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authirs and 
proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the bene- 
fits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other prints." 

THEKON RUDD. 
Slerk of the Southern District of Yew-Yoik, 



PREFACE. 



THE records of truth have been esteemed By 
men in all ages ; but when connected with his- 
tory, especially that of our own country, they 
J become doubly interesting. 

The work here presented to the public, 'is a 

?s faithful statement of the principal facts which 

took place during the Late War between the 

United States and Great Britain. It was writ- 

v ten not only for the author's amusement, but to 

*i condense, in as concise a manner as his talents 

would allow him, those prominent circumstances 

which ought to live forever in the American 

J? memory. 

He has avoided every expression or sentiment 
r that might wound the most delicate ear, and 
r endeavoured throughout to inculcate the prin- 
^ eiples of virtue, liberty and patriotism.^ 

Zealous as the author is to record whatever 
jv in his opinion redounds to the honor of his be- 
I loved country, he believes he has, in no instance 
I 




overstepped the modesty of truth, or suffered his 
passions to triumph over his prudence. He has 
had recourse, principally, to official documents ; 
and, where these failed, to private accounts, 
well authenticated. He, therefore, commits his 
work to the public candour, apologising only 
for any deject in the style, which lie hopes nill 
not he less pleasing for being an humble imita- 
tion of the oriental. 

Should this effort succeed, he intends publish- 
ing, in the same mode of writing, the History 
of England, from the time of Julius Cesar to 
the commencement of the American Revolution, 
and the History of America, including the 
Revolutionary war, from that period to the 
commencement of this work. 

G. J. HUNT, 



mz 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 







PAOS. 

CHAP. I — President's Message — Causes of the War 

— Energetic Measures ■proposed li 

CHAP. II — Report of the Committee — Declaration of 

War. 20 

CHAP. Ill-Reception of the Declaration of War in 
Great Britain — her friends in America 
— Caleb Strong — Hartford Convention. 28 

CHAP. IV-John Henry— Elijah Parish. 29 

CHAP. V — American Army — Militia — Navy — Bri- 
tish Navy — Rogers' first Cruise — capture 
of the U. S. brig Nautilus— removal of 
aliens beyond tide-water 32 

CHAP VI — Hull's expedition — he enters Canada, and 
encamps at Sandwich — issues his Procla- 
mation — retreats to Detroit. 36 

CHAP. Vll-HulVs expedition — surrender of his army 
and the whole Michigan Territory his 
trial and pardon by the President — cap- 
ture of Mkhilimackinack 4# 

A2 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page, 



GHAP. VIII— Capture of the British frigate Gver- 
riere, by the United States' frigate Con- 
stitution, captain Hull — capture of the 
Alert sloop of roar, by captain Porter, in 
the Essex. 48 

CHAP. IX — Attack on SackeWs Harbor — affair of 
Ogdensburgh — British drove from St. 
Regh, by the Troy militia under major 
Young — the brigs Adams and Caledonia 
re-captured by capt. Elliot, near fort Erie. 52 

CHAP. X — Battle of Queenslown — the British Gen. 

Brock killed. 56 

CHAP. XI — Gen. Smythe succeeds Gen. Van Rens- 
selaer — his attempt to cross the Niagara, 
and failure — causes. 61 

CHAP. XII — Capture of the sloop of war, Frolic of 
22 guns, by the United Slates' sloop of 
war Wasp of 18 guns. 64 

CHAP. XIII— Capture of the British frigate Macedo- 
nian, by Com. Decatur, in the frigate 
United States — brig Vixen captured by 
the British frigate Southampton. 67 

CHAP. XIV — Affairs in the north— skirmishes— bat- 
tle of Frenchtorvn, on the river Raisin — 
capture of Gen. Winchester's army — 
massacre of American prisoners. 72 

CHAP. XV— Capture of the British frigate Java, by 

the United State* frigate Constitution, 79 



TABLE OF CONTENTS, Tli 

Pace. 
CHAP. XVI — Com. Rogers* return from a second 
cruise — capture of the United States brig 
Viper — the General Armstrong and a 
Britishfrigate — privateering 84 

CHAP. XVII — Capture and burning of Ogdensbug'i 

by the British. 90 

CHAP. XVIII— Capture of the Peacock of IS guns by 
Ihiited States sloop of niar Hornet of IS 
gu?is — reluvn of the Chesapeake from a 
cruize. 93 

CHAP. XIX — Capture of Little York in upper Ca. 
nada — the destruction of the American 
army prevented by the precaution of Gen. 
Pike — his death. 98 

CHAP. XX — Sketches of the History of America. 108 

CHAP. XXl-Depredations in the Chesapeake — Havre- 
de-Grace burnt by the British under Ad- 
miral Cockburn — attack on Crany Island 
— Hampton taken by the British — out- 
rages. 114 

CHAP. XXII— Bayard and Galatin sail for St. Pc- 
tersburgh — the British compelled to aban- 
don the siege of fort Meigs. \22 

CHAP. XXIII — Surrender of fort George and fort 
Erie to the Americans — General Brown 
drives the British from before SackcWs 
Harbor, 7vith great Inss — Gens. Hinder 
and Chandler made prisoners at Forty 
Mile Creek. 12$ 



Vlil TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Passt:. 



CHAP. XXIV— Capture of the Chesapeake— Com. 

Decatur blockaded in New-London. 129 

CHAP. XXV— Capture nf Col. Boerstler and Major 
Chapm, with their command — treatment 
of prisoners — Major Chapm' s escape. 136 

CHAP. XXVI — Capture of Fort Schlosser and Black 
Rock — Gen. Dearborn resigns his com- 
mand to Gen. Boyd, on account nf sick- 
ness — the Six Nations declare war against 
Canada. 139 

CHAP. XXVII — Affairs on Lake Ontario, between 
the fleets of Com. Chauncey and Sir 
James Yeo. 144 

CHAP. XXVIII — Affairs on Lake Champlain — pil- 
lage of Pittsburgh by the British — bom- 
bardment of Burlington — depredations 
committed in the Chesapeake, andalmg 
the coast. 147 

CHAP. XXIX— Major Croghan defeats the British 
and Indians, under Gen. Proctor, in their 
attack on Fort Stephenson, Lower San- 
dusky. 151 

CHAP. XXX — British schooner Dominica, of 14 
guns, captured by the privateer Decatur, 
of 7 guns — U. S. brig Argus captured 
by the Pelican — capture of the Boxer by 
the U. S. brig Enterprise. I5f 

CHAP. XXXI— Ca; Jure of the British fleet on Lake 
Erie, by the American fleet under Com. 
Perry. 161 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. ix 

Page, 

CHAP. XXXII — Capture of Maiden and Detroit — the 
army of Gen. Proctor retreat towards 
the Moravian towns — Gen. Harrison pur- 
sues them. 167 

CHAP. XXXIII— Battle of the Thames— Gen. Har- 
rison captures the British army under 
Gen. Proctor — illumination on account 
of it — news of it received in England. 1 72 

CHAP. XXXIV— War with the Creek Nation of In- 
dians — massacre at Fort Mimms 

Georgia and Tennessee militia, under 
Gen. Jackson, retaliate. 179 

CHAP. XXXV— Continuation of the Creek War- 
Gen Jackson's grand victory over them — 
they sue for peace — a treaty is Concluded 
with them. 183 

CHAP. XXX VI— Plan of attack on Montreal defeated. 1 9@ 

CHAP. XXXVII— Newark burnt— Fort George eva- 
cuated — JSiagara frontier laid waste — 
Buffalo burnt. 195 

CHAP. XXXVIII— Cruise of the U.S. frigate Essex, 
D. Porter commander — her defence and 
capture, at Valparaiso. W3 

CHAP. XXXIX— Capture of the U. S.- sloop of war 
Frolic, by the British frigate Orpheus — 
capture of the British sl>op of war L'E- 
pervier, by the Peacock, Cap. Warring- 
ton — capture of the Reindeer, by the 



• 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page* 



Wasp, Capt. Blakely — the Avon captured 
and sunk — U. S. vessels Syren and Rat- 
tlesnake captured — Admiral Cochrane de- 
clares the whole American coast in a state 
of blockade. 20* 

CHAP. XL— Breaking vp of the cantonment at French 
Mills— affair at La Cole Mill— Major 
Appling captures two hundred British sea- 
men — Gen. Brown captures Fort Erie — 
battle of Chippana plains. 209 

CH AP. XLI— Battle of Bridgewaier. 21 4 

CHAP. XLII — Assault on Fort Erie, by the British, 
under Gen. Drummond — Cen. Brown re- 
sumes his command — sallies out of Fort 
Erie against the British camp — M' Ar- 
thur's expedition into Canada. 217 

CHAP. XLHI— Attack on Slonington, by the British 
ships of mar, which are defeated and 
driven off. 222 

CHAP. XLIV — Affairs in the Chesapeake — British 
army move up the Patuxent — land and 
maixh towards the city of Washington — 
prepare themselves for battle at Bladens- 
burgh. 225 

CHAP. XLV — Capture of Washington— sacking of 

Alexandria — death of Sir Peter Parker. 229 

CHAP. XLVI — British, under Gov. Prevost, go a- 
gainst Plaltsburgh — Com. M' Donough 
captures the British squadron on Lake 
Champlaih — 240 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



XI 



CHAP. XLVH— Battle of Pittsburgh— defeat of Sir 

George Ptevost. 246 

CHAP. XLVIII— ^Macfc on Baltimore, by the British 
army, under Gen. Ross, and the fleet un- 
der Admirals Cochrane and Cockburn. 250 

CHAP. XLIX — Destruction of the privateer Gen. 
Armstrong, Samuel C. Rcid, captain — 
Scorpion and Tigress captured— U. S. 
frigate Adams burnt — Castine — Fort 
Boyer attacked — destruction of the pi* 
rates at Barrataria, t.y Com. Patterson 
— Gen. Jackson captures Pensacola, and 
returns to New-Orleans. 25* 



CHAP. L — Steam boats — Fulton — torpedoes — attempt 
to blow up the Plantagemt — kidnapping 
Joshua Penny. 



266 



CHAP. LI — Affairs in and about Kern-York, the first 
commercial ci!y !n America— working on 
the fortifications of Brooklyn and Hacr- 
lem — capture of the British lender Eagle, 
by the Yankee smack. 274 

CHAP. LII — Affairs on the cc*an—priva!eer Prince 
of Neufchatel — Marquis of Tweedale de- 
feated in Upper Canada — capture of the 
President — loss of the Sylph — cnplvre of 
e tyane and the Jjevant by the Consti- 
tution — capture of the St. Lawrence — 
capture of the Penguin by ihe Hornet, 
eoptain Biddle. 282 



£11 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 






pag eg. 



CHAP. LIII — British fleet arrives near New-Orleans 
— the Am rican flotilla captured—attacks 
by the British upon the army of Gen. 

Jackson. 289 

CHAP. LI V— Grand Battle ofNtw-OrUans. 294 

CHAP. LV— Peace. 301 

Algerine War 307 

Conclusion 315 

Commercial Treaty. 319 

Treaty with Algiers. 323 

Treaty with tke Creeks. 32? 



•' 



THE 

HISTORY 

OF THE 



LATE WAR, 

Between the U. States and G. Britain. 



CHAP. I. 

Presidents Message — Causes of the War — - 
Energetic Measures proposed. 

1M OW it came to pass, in the one thousand 
eight hundred and twelfth year of the chris- 
tian era, and in the thirty and sixth year af- 
ter the people of the provinces of Columbia 
ha I declared themselves independent of all 
the kingdoms of the earth ; 

2 That in the sixth month of the same 
year, on the first day of the month, the chief 
Governor, whom the people had chosen to 
rule over the land of Columbia ; 

B 



16 

3 Even James, whose sur-name was 
Madison, delivered a written paper* to the 
Great Sanhedrim! of the people, who were 
assembled together. 

4 And the name of the city where the 
people were gathered together was called 
after the name of the chief captain of the 
land of Columbia, whose fame extendeth to 
the uttermost parts of the earth : albeit, he 
had gone to the land of his fathers. 

5 Nevertheless, the people loved him, in- 
asmuch as he wrought their deliverance 
from the yoke of tyranny in times past : so 
they called the city Washington. 

6 Now, when the written paper was re- 
ceived, the doors of the chambers of the 
Great Sanhedrim were closed, and a seal was 
put upon every man's mouth. 

7 And the counsellors of the nation, and 
the wise men thereof, ordered the written 
paper which James had delivered unto them 
to be read aloud ; and the interpretation 
thereof was in this wise : 

8 Lo! the lords and the princes of the 
Kingdom of Britain, in the fulness of their 

* President's manifesto, f Congress. 



17 

pride and power, have trampled upon the 
altar of Liberty, and violated the sanctuary 
thereof : 

9 Inasmuch as they hearkened not unto 
the voice of moderation, when the voice of 
the people of Columbia was, Peace ! peace ! 

10 Inasmuch as they permitted not the tall 
ships of Columbia to sail in peace on the 
waters of the mighty deep ; saying in their 
hearts, These spoils shall be given unto the 
king. 

11 Inasmuch as they robbed the ships of 
Columbia of the strong men that wrought 
therein, and used them for their own use, 
even as a man useth his ox or his ass. 

12 Inasmuch as they kept the men stolen 
from the ships of Columbia in bondage many 
years, and caused them to fight the battles of 
the king, even against their own brethren ! 
neither gave they unto them silver or gold, 
but many stripes. 

13 JN'ovv thfr men of Columbia were not 
like unto the slaves of Britain ; neither 
were their backs hardened unto the whip, as 
were the servants of the king; therefore 



tifti 



18 

they murmured, and their murmurings have 
been heard. 

1 4 Moreover the Council of Britain sent 
forth a Decree to all the nations of the earth, 
sealed with the signet of the Prince Regent, 
who governed the nation in the name of the 
King his father ; for, lo ! the King was pos- 
sessed of an evil spirit, and his son reigned 
in his stead. 

1 5 For the lords of the kingdom of Britain 
loved to dwell under the shadow of George 
the King, and under the shadow of George 
his son. ♦ 

16 Now this Decree of the Council of 
Britain was a grievous thing, inasmuch as it 
permitted not those who dealt in merchan- 
dize to go whithersoever they chose, and 
trade freely with all parts of the earth. 

17 And it fell hard upon the people of 
Columbia; for the king said unto them, 
Ye shall come unto me and pay tribute, 
then may ye depart to another country. 

18 Now these things pleased the pirates 
and the cruisers and all the sea-robbers of 
Britain mishtilv, inasmuch as thev could rob 



19 

with impunity the commerce of ^Columbia, 
under the cloak of British honor. 

19 Furthermore, have not the servants of 
the king leagued with the savages of the 
wilderness, and given unto them silver and 
gold, and placed the destroying engines in 
their hands ? 

20 Thereby stirring up the spirit of Satan 
within them, that they might spill the blood 
of the people of Columbia ; even the blood 
of our old men, our wives,and our little ones ! 

21 Thus hath Britain in her heart com- 
menced War against the people of Colum- 
bia, whilst they have cried aloud for peace : 
and when she smote them on the one cheek 
they have turned unto her the other also. 

22 Now, therefore, shall we the independ- 
ent people of Columbia, sit down silently, as 
slaves, and bow the neck to Britain ? 

23 Or, shall we nobly, and like our fore- 
fathers, assert our rights, and defend that 
which the Lord hath given unto us, Liberty 
and Independence ? 



b-2 



2a 



CHAP. II. 

Report of the Committee — Declaration of 
War. 

li OW, when there was an end made of 
reading the paper which James had written, 
the Sanhedrim communed one with another 
touching the matter. 

2 And they chose certain wise men from 
among them to deliberate thereon. 

3 And they commanded them to go forth 
from their presence, for that purpose, and 
return again on the third day of the same 
month. 

4 Now, when the third day arrived, at the 
"eleventh hour of the day, they came forth 

and presented themselves before the Great 
Sanhedrim of the people. 

5 And the chief of the wise men, whom 
they had chosen, opened his mouth and 
spake unto them after this manner : 

6 Behold ' day and night have we medi- 
tated upon the words which James hath de- 



21 

Jivered, and we are weary withal, for our 
hearts wished peace. 

7 But the wickedness of the kingdom of 
Great Britain, and the cruelty of the princes 
thereof, towards the peaceable inhabitants of 
the land of Columbia, may be likened un- 
to the fierce lion, when he putteth his paw 
upon the innocent lamb to devour him. 

8 Nevertheless, the lamb shall not be 
slain; for the Lord will be his deliverer. 

9 And if, peradventure, the people of 
Columbia go not out to battle against the 
king, then will the manifold wrongs commit- 
ted against them be increased ten-fold, and 
they shall be as a mock and a bye-word 
among all nations. 

10 Moreover, the righteousness of your 
cause shall lead you to glory, and the pillars 
of your liberty shall not be shaken. 

11 Therefore, say we unto you, Gird on 
your swords and go forth to battle against 
the king ; even against the strong powers of 
Britain ; and the Lord God of Hosts be with 
you. 

12 Now when the great Sanhedrim of the 
people heard those things which the wiso 



22 

men had uttered, they pondered them in 
their minds many days, and weighed them 
well. 

13 Even until the seventeenth day of the 
month pondered they in secret concerning 
.the matter. 

14 And it was so, that on the next day 
they sent forth a Decree, making WAR 
upon the kingdom of Great Britain, and up- 
on the servants and upon the slaves thereof. 

15 And the Decree was signed with the 
hand writing of James, the chief Governor 
of the land of Columbia. 

16 After these things, the doors of the 
chambers of the Sanhedrim were opened. 



wl 



23 



CHAP. III. 



Reception of the Declaration of War in Great 
Britain — her friends in America — Caleb 
Strong — Hartford Convention. 



AND it came to pass, that when the princes 
awl the lords and the counsellors of Britain 
saw the Decree, their wrath was kindled, and 
their hearts were ready to burst with indigna- 
tion. 

2 For, verily, said they, this insult hath 
overflowed the cup of our patience ; and now 
will we chastise the impudence of these 
Yankees, and the people of Columbia shall 
bow before the king. 

3v(Now the word Yankees was used by 
the people of Britain as a term of reproach.) 

4 Then will we ruic them with a rod of 
iron; and they shall be, unto us, hewers of 
wood and drawers of water. 



24 

5 For, verily, shall we suffer these cun- 
ning Yankees to beard the mighty lion, with 
half a dozen fir-built frigates, the men 
whereof are but mercenary cowards, bas- 
tards and outlaws ? 

6 Neither durst they array themselves in 
battle against the men of Britain; no! we 
will sweep their stars from the face of the 
waters, and their name shall be heard no 
more among nations. 

7 Shall the proud conquerors of Europe 
not laugh to scorn the feeble efforts of a few 
unorganized soldiers, undisciplined, and fresh 
from the plough, the hoe, and the mattock ? 

8 Yea, they shall surely fall ; for they 
were not bred to fighting as were the ser- 
vants of the king. 

9 Their large cities, their towns, and their 
villages will we burn with consuming fire. 

10 Their oil, and their wheat, and their 
rye, and their corn, and their barley, and 
their rice, and their buckwheat, and their 
oats, and their flax, and all the products of 
their country will we destroy, and scatter 
the remnants thereof to the four winds of 
heaven. 



25 

1 1 All these things, and more, Avill we do 
unto this fro ward people. 
? 12 Neither shall there be found safety for 
age or sex from the destroying swords of the 
soldiers of the king. 

13 Save in those provinces and towns 
where dwell the friends of the king ; for lo ! 
said they, the king's friends are many. 

14 These will we spare ; neither will we 
hurt a hair of their heads : nor shall the sa- 
vages of the wilderness stain the scalping 
knife or the tomahawk with the blood of the 
king's friends. 

15 Now it happened about this time that 
there were numbers of the inhabitants of the 
country of Columbia whose hearts yearned 
after the king of Britain. 

16 These men were called Tories, which 
signifieth, in the vernacular tongue, the blind 
followers of royalty. 

17 And with their false flattering words 
they led astray some of the children of Co* 
lumbian Liberty ; for their tongues were 
smoother than oil. 

18 Evil machinations entered into their 
hearts, and the poison of their breath might 
be likened unto the deadly Bohon Upas, 



26 

which rears its lofty branches in the barren 
valley of Java.* 

19 And they strove to dishearten the true 
friends of the great Sanhedrim ; but they pre- 
vailed not. 

20 Moreover, Satan entered into the heart 
of one of the governors of the east, and he 
was led astray by the wickedness thereof, 
even Caleb, the shittamite.f 

21 Now Caleb, which in the cherokee 
tongue, signifieth an ass, liked not the decree 
of the great Sanhedrim, inasmuch as he fa- 
vored the king of Britain ; and, though willing 
to become a beast of burden, yet would not 
move on account of his very great stupidity. 

22 And he said unto the captains of the 
hosts of the state over which he presided, Lo! 
it seemeth not meet unto me that ye go forth 
to battle against the king. 

23 For, lo ! are not the fighting men of 



* Of the existence of this wonderful tree there have been, 
doubts : but the reader is referred to the relation of P. N. Fo- 
ersch, who has given a satisfactory account oi it, froru his o^a 
travels in its neighborhood. 

f Shittamite, in the hebrew, is applied to a dissenter :— f»et- 
baps it may be equally applicable here, 



27 

Britain in multitude as the sand on the sea 
shore ? and shall we prevail against them ? 

24 Are not the mighty ships of the king 
spread over the whole face of the waters? is 
not Britain the " bulwark of our religion?*' 

25 Therefore, I command that ye go not 
out to battle, but every man remain in his 
own house. 

26 And all the governors of the east lis- 
tened unto the voice of Caleb, the shittamite. 

27 Moreover, the angel of the Lord whis- 
pered in the ear of Caleb, and spake unto 
him, saying, 

28 If, peradventure, thou dost refuse to 
obey the laws of the land, the thing will not 
be pleasant in the sight of the Lord ; 

29 Inasmuch as it may cause the people to 
rise up one against another, and spill the 
blood of their own children. 

30 And the time of warfare will be length- 
ened out, and the blood of thousands will be 
upon thine head. 

31 And Satan spake, and said unto Caleb, 
Fear not ; for if thou wilt forsake thy coun- 
try, and throw off the paltry subterfuge of 






28 

Columbian Liberty, and defy the councils 
of the great Sanhedrim, 

32 Then shall thy name be proclaimed 
with the sound of the trumpet throughout all 
the earth ; and thou shalt be a prince and a 
ruler over this people. 

33 Now the smooth words of Satan tickled 
Caleb mightily, and he hearkened unto the 
counsel of the wicked one : 

34 For the good counsel given unto him 
was as water thrown upon a rock. 

3.5 But when the chief governor and the 
great Sanhedrim of the people saw the wick- 
edness of Caleb, their hearts were moved 
with pity toward him and his followers : yea, 
even those who had made a convention at the 
little town of Hartford. 

36 Neither doth the scribe desire to dwell 
upon the wickedness which came into the vil- 
lage of Hartford, the signification of the 
name whereof, in the vernacular tongue, ap- 
peareth not. 

37 For the meddling therewith is as the 
green pool of unclean waters, when a man 
casteth a stone therein. 






29 

CHAP. IV. 

John Henry — Elijah Parish. 

.LET the children of Columbia beware of 
false prophets, which come in sheep's clo- 
thing ; for it is written, Ye shall know them 
by their fruits. 

2 J\ T ow it came to pass, that a certain man, 
whose sir-name was Henry, came before 
James, the chief governor, and opened his 
mouth, and spake unto him, saying, 

3 Lo ! if thou wilt give unto me two score 
and ten thousand pieces of silver, then will I 
unfold unto thee the witchcraft of Britain, 
that thereby thy nation may not be caught in 
her snares. 

4 And James said unto him, Verily, for the 
good of my country, I will do this thing. 

5 And immediately the man Henry open- 
ed his mouth, a second time, and said, 

6 Lo ! the lords' and the counsellors of 
Britain have made a covenant with me, and 



i 



30 

have promised me many pieces of gold if I 
would make a league with the provinces of 
ihe east, that they might favor the king ; and 
long and faithfully have I labored in their 
cause. 

7 But they deceived me, even as they 
would deceive the people of Columbia ; for 
their promises are as the idle wind that pass- 
eth by, which no man regardeth. 

8 And, when he had gotten the silver into 
his own hands, he departed to the land of the 
Gauls, where he remaineth even until this 
day. 

9 Nevertheless, the people profited much 
thereby ; inasmuch as it put them upon the 
watch, and they guarded themselves against 
the evil accordingly. 

10 He that longeth after the interpreta- 
tion of the deeds of Henry, let hirn go and 
make inquiry of those who acted with him, 
the ministers of the Hartford Convention. 

11 Now, there was a certain hypocrite 
whose name was Elijah, and he was a 
false prophet in the east, and led astray those 
of little understanding : moreover, he was 



31 

an hireling, and preached for the sake of fil- 
thy lucre. 

12 And he rose up and called himself a 
preacher of the gospel, and his words were 
smooth, and the people marvelled at him ; 

13 But he profaned the temple of the 
Lord, and he strove to lead his disciples into 
the wrong way. 

14 And many wise men turned their 
backs against him ; nevertheless he repented 
not of his sins unto this day. 

15 Neither did the people, as Darius the 
Mede did unto the prophet Daniel, cast him 
into the den of lions, that they might see 
whether the royal beasts would disdain to 
devour him. 

16 But they were rejoiced that power was 
not given unto him to command fire to come 
down from heaven to consume the friends of 
tjie great Sanhedrim. 



g 2 



*/ 



32 



CHAP. V. 



American A rmy — Militia — Navy — British 
Navy~~ Rogers' first Cruise — capture of the 
U. S. brig Nautilus — removal of aliens be- 
yond tide-water. 



A HE whole host of the people of Columbia, 
who had been trained to war, being number- 
ed, was about seven thousand fighting men.* 

2 Neither were they assembled together ; 
but they were extended from the north to 
the south, about three thousand miles.f 

3 But the husbandmen, who lived under 
their own fig-tre^, and lifted the arm in de- 
fence of their own homes, were more than 
seven hundred thousand, all mighty men of 
valor. 

4 Now the armies of the king of Britain, 
are they not numbered and written in the 
book of Hume, the scribe ? is not their name 
a terror to all nations ? 



* Standing army. 

) From District of Maine to Mobile bay and New-Orleans, 



* 



33 

5 Moreover, the number of the strong 
ships of the peaceable inhabitants of Colum- 
bia, that moved on the waters of the deep, 
carrying therein the destroying engines, 
which vomited their thunders, was about one 
score; besides a handful of "cock-boats;" 
with " a bit of striped bunting at their mast- 
head." 

6 But the number of the fighting vessels of 
Britain was about one thousand one score 
and one, which bore the royal cross. 

7 And the men of war of Britain were ar- 
rayed in their might against the people of the 
land of Columbia. 

8 Nevertheless, it came to pass, that about 
this time a strong ship of t^e United Slates, 
called the President, commanded by a skillful 
man whose name was Rogers,* 

9 Sailed towards the island of Britain, and 
went nigh unto it, and made captive numbers 
of the vessels of the people of Britain, in 
their own waters ; after which she return- 
ed in safety to the land of Columbia. 

10 And the people gave much praise to 

* Com. Rogers. 



34 

Kogers, for it was a cunYiing thing ; inas- 
much as he saved many ships that were rich- 
ly laden, so that they fell not into the 
hands of the people of Britain. 

1 1 Moreover, it happened about the fif- 
teenth day of the seventh month, in the same 
year in which the decree of the great San- 
hedrim was issued, that a certain vessel of 
the states of Columbia was environed round 
about by a multitude of the ships of the 
king ; 

12 And the captain thereof was strait- 
ened, and he looked around him, and strove 
to escape : 

13 But he was entrapped, and fell a prey 
to the vessels of the king ; howbeit, the cap- 
tain, whose name was Crane, tarnished not 
his honor thereby. 

14 And the name of the vessel of the 
United States was called Nautilus. 

15 Now, about this time, there was a law 
sent forth from the great Sanhedrim, com- 
manding all servants and subjects of the 
king of Britain forthwith to depart beyond 
the swellings of the waters of the great 
deep; even two score miles,. 



I 
35 

16 And they did so ; and their friends 
from whom they were compelled to flee, 
mourned for them many days. 

17 After this they could do no evil, on 
the which their hearts were bent continually. 

J 8 And when they arrived in the back 
parts of the far extended provinces of Co- 
lumbia, the husbandmen opened their 
mouths, and the dumb beasts looked at 
them with astonishment. 

19 Neither doth the scribe marvel at their 
astonishment; for were not the servants of 
the king astonished, out of measure, at the 
brave men of Columbia. 






36 



CHAP. VI. 



HulVs expedition — Tie enters Canada, and en- 
camps at Sandwich — issues his Proclama- 
tion — retreats to Detroit. 



IN OW it was known throughout the land 
of Columbia that war was declared against 
the kingdom of Britain. 

2 And to a certain chief captain called 
William, whose sur-name was Hull, was 
given in trust a band of more than two 
thousand chosen men, to go forth to battle 
in the north.* 

3 Now Hull was a man well stricken in 
years, and he had been a captain in the 
host of Columbia, in the days that tried men's 
souls; even in the days of Washington. 

4 Therefore, when he appeared in the 



* Canada. 



37 

presence of the great Sanhedrim,* they 
were pleased with his countenance, and put 
much faith in him. 

5 Moreover, he was a governor in the 
north, f and a man of great wealth. 

6 And, now when he arrived with his 
army hard by the Miami of the Lakes, he gat 
him a vessel and placed therein those things 
which were appertaining unto the preserva- 
tion of the lives of the sick and the maimed. 

7 But, in an evil hour, the vessel was en- 
snared, near unto a strong hold,J beside a ri- 
ver, called in the language of the Gauls, 
Detroit. 

8 And the army of the provinces of Co- 
lumbia suffered much thereby. 

9 {Nevertheless, on the twelfth of the se- 
venth month, about the fourth watch of the 
night, William with his whole host crossed 
the river which is called Detroit. 

10 And he eneamped his men round about 



* Gen. Hull had been to Washington and obtained an appoint- 
ment previous to the war. 

t Michigan territory, J Maldera. 






38 

the town of Sandwich in the province of the 
king. 

1 1 From this place, he sent forth a Pro- 
clamation, which the great Sanhedrim had 
prepared for him ; and the wisdom thereof 
appeareth even unto this day. 

12 But if a man's ass falleth into a ditch, 
shall the master suffer thereby ? if injury can 
be prevented, shall we not rather with our 
might endeavor to help him ? 

13 Now in the proclamation which Hull 
published abroad, he invited the people of 
the province of Canada to join themselves to 
the host of Columbia, who were come to 
drive the servants ol the king from their 
borders. 

14 And it came to pass, that a great multi- 
tude flocked to the banners of the great 
Sanhedrim. 

15 Nevertheless, they knew not that they 
were to be entrapt. 

16 However it was so, that William de- 
parted from the province of the king, and 
again passed the river. 

17 And when the husbandmen of the pro- 
vince of Canada, who had joined the standard 



39 

of Columbia, learned those things, they wept 
bitterly ; for they were left behind. 

18 After this William secured himself in 
the strong hold of Detroit ; and the eyes of 
the men and the women of Columbia were 
fixed upon him. 

19 And the expectation thereof may be 
likened unto a man who hath watered well 
his vineyard. 






i 






» 



40 



CHAP. VII. 



Hull's expedition — surrender of his army and 
the whole Michigan Territory — his trial 
and pardon by the President — capture of 
Michilimackinack. 



JN OW the host of the king were few in num- 
bers ; nevertheless, they came in battle array 
against the strong hold of William. 

2 And when he beheld them from afar, he 
was afraid; his knees smote one against ano- 
ther, and his heart sunk within him; for, 
lo! the savages of the wilderness appeared 
amongst thern. 

3 And a rumor went throughout the 
camp of Columbia, and it bore hard upon 
William. 

4 Inasmuch as they said the wickedness 
of his heart was bent on giving up the strong 
hold to the servants of the king. 

5 Howbeit he was not taxed with drinA 
ing of the strong waters of Jamaica ; whk h 
when they enter into the head of a man, de s- 



41 

troy his reason and make him appear like 
unto one who hath lost his senses. 

6 And when the charge against William 
was made known unto the soldiers of Colum- 
bia, they were grieved much, for they were 
brave men, and feared nought. 

7 So the officers communed one w T ith 
another touching the thing: but they wist 
not what to do.* 

8 And they fain would have done violence 
unto William, that they might have been en- 
abled to pour forth their thunders against 
the approaching host of Britain ; which he 
had forbidden to be done. 

9 Moreover, the names of these valiant 
men, who weie compelled to weep before 
the cowardice of William, are they not re- 
corded in the bosom of every friend of Co- 
lumbian liberty ?f 

10 And it was about the sixteenth of the 
eighth month when the servants of the king 
appeared before the strong hold of Detroit. 

11 And the name of the chief captain of 



* The officers present were not sufficiently numerous to war- 
rant any opposition to the weakness of the general. 



\ Miller, Cass, M'Aitlmr, Brush, FindJey, Sic. 



42 

the province of Canada, that came against 
the strong hold, was Brock, whose whole 
force was about seven hundred soldiers of the 
king, and as many savages. 

12 Now when the soldiers of Canada were 
distant about a furlong, moving towards the 
strong hold ; even when the destroying en- 
gines were ready to utter their thunders, 
and smite them to the earth, 

13 William, whose heart failed him, com- 
manded the valiant men of Columbia to bow 
down before the servants of the Icing ; 

14 And he ordered them to yield up the 
destructive weapons which they held in 
their hands. 

15 Neither could they appear in battle 
against the king again in many days. 

16 Moreover, the cowardice of his heart 
caused him to make a league with the slaves 
of the king, in the which he gave unto them 
the whole territory over which the people 
had entrusted him to preside ; notwithstand- 
ing it appertained not unto him. 

17 And the balls of solid iron, and the 
black dust, and the destroying engines be- 
came a prey unto the men of Britain. 

3 8 Now there had followed after Wil 



43 

liam a band of brave men from the west,* 
and the name of their captain was Brush ; 
and he had in trust the bread and the wine 
which were to support the army of Columbia. 

19 And, lest they should fall into the 
hands of the savages, a captain, whose name 
was Vanhorn, was ordered to go forth and 
meet him. 

20 And the band that went forth, was en- 
trapped at Brownstown, by the cunning sa- 
vages, that laid wait for them, and the killed 
and the wounded of Columbia were about 
two score. 

21 And again there were sent from the 
camp of William more than five hundred 
men to go to the aid of Brush 

22 And the name of the chief captain 
thereof, was Miller ;f and the captain whom 
he ordered to go before him was called 
SneUing.% 

23 Now Snelling was a valiant man, and 
strove hard against the men of Britain, and 
the savages; even until Miller the chief cap- 
tain arrived. 



Ohio. f Col. Miller. \ Col. J. Suelli»g. 

D2 



44 

24 And the place, which is called Magna- 
go, lieth about an hundred furlongs distant 
from Detroit. 

25 Now the battle waxed hot ; and the 
host of Miller pressed hard upon the savages 
and upon the men of Britain. 

26 Inasmuch as they were compelled to 
flee before the arms of Columbia : and Mil- 
ler gat great honor thereby. 

27 And there fell of the men of Britain 
that day an hundred two score and ten. 

28 Nevertheless, in the league which Wil- 
liam had made, he had included Miller, and 
all the brave captains and men of war of Co- 
lumbia that were nigh the place. 

29 Now, therefore, whether it was coward- 
ice outright, in William, or whether he be- 
came treacherous for filthy lucre's sake, ap- 
peareth not unto the scribe.* 



•* To palliate Hull's conduct it has been urged, that he sur- 
rendered his army to prevent the effusion of blood : but let us 
ask those charitable pallialors what they would have said of Gen. 
Jackson, if, when a mighty and a blood-thirsty enemy appeared 
before his battlements, in quest of beauty and booty, he had 
given up N. Orleans and ceded the Louisiana territory to him ? 
or of the gallant Croghan, when left to defend fort Stephenson 
with a handful of men and a single six pounder ? — These pallia- 



46 

30 But the effect thereof to the nation, 
was as a man having a millstone cast about 
his neck. 

31 So William and his whole army fell 
into the hands of the servants of the king. 

32 But as it is written in the book of Koi- 
omon, There is a time for all things, so it 

came to pass, afterwards, that William was 
called to account for his evil deeds. 

33 And he was examined before the law- 
ful tribunal of his country, and they were all 
valiant warriors and chief captains in the 
land of Columbia. 

34 Howbeit, when the council* had weigh- 
ed well the matter, they declared him#wi%, 
and ordered that he should suffer death. 

35 Nevertheless, they recommended him 
to the mercy of James, the chief governor of 
the land of Columbia. 

36 Saying, Lo ! the wickedness of the 
man appeareth unto us as the noon day ; 



tors might even have wished that tbe heroes of Erie and Cham- 
plain had felt the same qualms of conscience : — but they ought 
to know that it was such noble deeds that stopt the " effusion «f 
blood." 

. * Court-martial. 






4$ 

37 But the infirmities of his age have 
weakened his understanding, therefore let his 
gray hairs go down into the grave in silence. 

38 And when James heard the words of 
the council, his heart melted as wax before 
the fire. 

39 And he said, Lo ! ye have done that 
which seemeth right unto me. 

40 Nevertheless, as my soul hopeth for 
mercy, for this thing William shall not sure- 
ly die ; but his name shall be blotted out 
from ihe list of the brave. 

41 For it appeareth unto me that he was 
possessed of an evil spirit, and wist not what 
he did. 

42 Not withstanding this, William thanked 
him not, but added insult to cowardice.* 

43 So W T illiam was ordered to depart to 
the land which lieth in the east,f where he 
remaineth unto this day ; and his name shall 
be no more spoken of with reverence 
amongst men. 

44 Moreover, there was another evil which 
fell upon the people of the United States, 



Hull's address to the public. f Massachusetts, 



4T 

about the time the host of Columbia crossed 
the river Detroit. 

45 For, lo ! the strong hold of Michili- 
mackinack, which lieth nigh unto the Lakes 
of Michigan and Huron fell an easy prey un- 
to the men of Britain, and their red brethren ; 

46 Howbeit, their numbers were more 
than four-fold greater than the men of Co- 
lumbia, who knew not of the war. 

47 Nevertheless, the people of the United 
States, even the great Sanhedrim, were not 
disheartened ; neither were they afraid ; for 
they had counted the cost, and were pre- 
pared to meet the evil. 









48 



CHAP. VIII. 



Capture of the British frigate Guerriere, by 
the United States' frigate Constitution, cap- 
tain Hull — capture of the Alert sloop of 
war, by the Essex, captain Porter. 



IN OW it came to pass, on the nineteenth 
day of the eighth month, that one of the tall 
ships of Columbia, called the Constitution, 
commanded by Isaac whose sur-name was 
Hull, 

2 Having spread her snowy wings on the 
bosom of the mighty deep, beheld from afar 
one of the fighting ships of Britain bearing 
the royal cross. 

3 And the name of the ship was called, in 
the language of the French, Guerriere,* 
which stgnifieth a warrior, and Dacres was 
the captain thereof. 

4 Now when Dacres beheld the ship of 
Columbia his eyes sparkled with joy, for he 
had defied the vessels of Columbia. 

* The Guerriere was taken from the French bj the British*- 



43 

5 And he spake unto his officers and hiv 
men that were under him, saying, 

6 Let every man be at his post, and ere 
the glass hath passed the third part of an 
hour, her stripes shall cease to sweep the air 
of heaven. 

7 And the yawning deep shall open its 
mouth to receive the enemies of the king. 

8 And the men of Dacres shouted aloud, 
and drank of the strong waters of Jamaica, 
which make men mad ; moreover they mixed 
the black dust therewith. 

9 Now when Isaac drew nigh unto the 
king's ship the people of Columbia shouted. 

10 And Isaac bore down upon the strong 
ship of the king. 

11 About this time they put the lighted 
match to the black dust of the destroying en- 
gines, and it was like unto a clap of thunder. 

12 Moreover, the fire and smoke issued 
out of the mouths of the engines in abun- 
dance, so as to darken the air, and they were 
overshadowed by the means thereof. 

13 (Now the black dust was not known 
an ng the ancients ; even Solomon, in alibis 
wisdom, knew it not) 

hi And the battle continued with tre- 



50 

mendous roar until about the space of half 
an hour, when its noises ceased. 

15 But when the clouds of smoke had 
passed away, behold ! the mighty Guerriere 
lay a sinking wreck upon the face of the 
waters. 

16 The shadow of hope passed over her 
as a dream; and most reluctantly was she 
compelled to strike the lion's red cross to 
the eagle of Columbia. 

17 Whilst the Constitution, like Sha- 
drach in the fiery furnace, filled her white 
sails and passed along as though nothing had 
happened unto her. 

18 .Now the slain and the maimed of the 
king that day were five score and five. 

19 And the loss of the people of Colum- 
bia, was seven slain and seven wounded. 

20 After this Isaac caused a burning coal 
to be placed in the ship that she might be 
consumed, and the flames thereof mounted 
towards the heavens. 

21 And the great Sanhedrim honored 
Isaac with great honor, and the people were 
rejoiced in him, and they forgat the t 
which had hefallen them in the north. 

22 But when the lorxis and counsel! 



6i 

Britain heard those things they believed 
them not ; it was as the bitterness of gall to 
their souls ; for the pride of Britain was fixed 
upon her navy ; it was the apple of her eye. 

23 Now, as one evil followeth after ano- 
ther to the sons of men, so it happened that, 
in the same month, a certain strong ship of 
the United States, even the Essex, the name 
of the captain whereof, was Porter, sailed in 
search of the vessels of the king, on the wa- 
ters of the ocean. 

24 And in process of time, she fell upon 
one of the ships of Britain, called the Alert, 
and made spoil thereof to the people of Co- 
lumbia. 



i 



52 



CHAP. IX. 



Attack on SackeWs Harbor — affair of Og~. 
densburgh — British drove from St. Regis, 
by the Troy militia under major Young — 
the brigs Adams and Caledonia re-captured 
by capU Elliot, near fort Erie. 



JM OW the movements of the enemy were 
as the motion of a whirlwind, which passeth 
from the north to the south, and from the east 
to the west. 

2 And they sought to encorppass the 
whole land of Columbia round about. 

3 So it came to pass that a number of the 
armed vessels of the king, that sailed on the 
great lake which is called Ontario, moved 
toward Sacketl's Harbor. 

4 And they demanded certain vessels of 
the people of the United States, which they 
had taken from the king, to be given up un- 
to them, saying : 

5 Verily, if ye give them not up, then will 



53 

we lay a contribution upon you, and ye shall 
pay tribute. 

6 But Bellinger, the chief captain of the 
Harbor, refused. 

7 And when the vessels of the king were 
hard by, a certain captain whose name was 
Woolsey, set one of the engines to work. 

8 And the vessels of the king also opened 
the mouths of their engines and shot into the 
camp of Columbia. 

9 And the number of the husbandmen of 
the United States that flocked to the defence 
of the Harbor was about three thousand. 

10 And when the men of war of Britain 
saw that the people of Columbia were not 
afraid, and that they knew to use the des- 
troying engines, they fled to their strong 
hold, in the province of the king, which is 
called Kingston. 

1 1 Howbeit, some of their ships received 
much damage from the balls of heavy metal, 
that smote Ihem, from the slrons: hold. 

12 Now as the malice of the nations in- 
creased one against another, so did the evils 
increase which surrounded them. 

1 3 And it came to pass on the fourth day 
of the tenth month, there came a thousand 



• 



54 

fighting men of Britain to lay waste the vil- 
lage of Ogdensburg, which lieth hard by the 
river St. Lawrence. 

14 Howbeit, the people of Columbia per- 
mitted them not to come unto the land; but 
compelled them to depart in haste. 

] 5 Nigh unto this place is a village which 
is called St. Regis, where the soldiers of Bri- 
tain had come to fix a strong hold, on the 
borders of Columbia. 

16 But a brave captain, whose name was 
Young, with a band of men, called militia, 
went against them. 

17 And he sat the destroying engines to 
work, and the noise thereof sounded in their 
ears ; so they were discomfitted and fled in 
confusion. 

18 And the number of the servants of the 
king, made captive that day, was two score 
men, with the instruments of destruction in 
their hands. 

19 Moreover, one of the banners of the 
king, even the red-cross standard of Britain, 
fell into the hands of Young. 

20 On the eighth day of the same month, 
a captain, of Columbia, whose name was El- 
liot, a cunning man, took a chosen band, who 



55 

came from the sea-coast, and put them in 
boats. 

21 And he departed with them from Nia- 
gara towards the strong hold of Erie, even 
in the dead of the night. 

22 And he came unawares upon the two 
vessels which were covenanted to the king, 
with the army at Detroit. 

23 And the name of the vessels were the 
Adams and the Caledonia, and Elliot cap- 
tured them the same night. 

24 However, the nest day, as Elliot and 
his men were returning with their prizes, the 
men of Britain, who were upon the other 
shore, let the destroying engines loose upon 
them from their strong hold ; 

25 And a few of the people of Columbia 
were slain ; moreover, it was here the valiant 
Cuylcr fell ; a ball of heavy metal struck him 
as he was coming on a fleet horse toward the 
water's edge. 

26 Now Cuyler was a man well beloved ; 
and the officers and men of Columbia grieved 
for him many days. 



E 2 






56 



CHAR X. 



Battle of Queenstown — the British General 
Brock killed. 



AND it came to pass on the morning of the 
thirteenth day of the tenth month, 

2 That Stephen, a chief captain of Colum- 
bia, sur-named Van Rensselaer, essayed to 
cross the river which is called Niagara, with 
his whole army. 

3 Now the river lieth between the Lake 
Erie and the Lake Ontario. 

4 And the noise of the waters of the river 
is louder than the roarings of the forest; 
yea, it is like unto the rushing of mighty 
armies to battle. 

5 And the movement of the falls thereof 
bringeth the people from all parts of the 
earth to behold it.* 

6 Ho Stephen gat his soldiers into the 
boats that were prepared for them, and they 

* Niagara falls. 



■ 



I 



57 

moved upon the rough waters of the river, 
toward the strong hold of Queenslown. 

7 And when the men of Britain saw them 
approach, they opened the engines upon 
them, from Fort George, Erie, and Black 
Mock. 

8 Nevertheless, they persevered ; although 
the strength of the waters, which were un- 
governable, separated the army. 

9 However, Solomon,* a captain and a 
kinsman of Stephen, reached the shore with 
the men under his command, in all about two 
hundred. 

10 And he put the army in battle array, 
in a valley, and moved up towards the strong 
hold ; and Brock was the chief captain of the 
host of Britain. 

1 1 And from their strong hold they shot, 
with their mischievous engines, balls of lead 
in abundance ; and it was as a shower of 
hail upon the people of Columbia ; 

12 For there was no turning to the right 
hand nor to the left for safety. 

1 3 And Solomon and his men fought hard ; 
and they rushed into the hottest of the battle. 

* Col. Solomon Van Rensselaer. 



58 

14 And a captain of the United State?, 
whose name was Chrystie, followed close after 
them, with a chosen band of brave men. 

15 So they pushed forward to the strong 
hold, and drove the men of Britain before 
them, like sheep, and smote them hip and 
thigh, with great slaughter ; and Brock, their 
chief captain, was among the slain. 

16 And Chrystie, and the valiant Wool, 
and Ogilvie, and the host of Columbia gat in- 
to the hold, and the army of the king fled : 
and Chrystie was wounded in the palm of his 
hand. 

17 But Solomon was sorely wounded, so 
that his strength tailed him, and he went not 
into the hold. 

18 And that day there fell of the servants 
of the king many valiant men, even those 
who were called invincibles, and had gained 
great honor in Egypt. 

19 Nevertheless, the same day a mighty 
host of savages and soldiers of the king,* 
came forth again to battle, and rushed upon 
the people of the United States, and drove 
them from the strong hold of Queenstown. 

* Reinforcements from Fort George and Cnippawa. 






59 

20 For, lo ! Stephen, the chief captain, 
could not prevail on the host of militia, on 
the other side of the river, to cross over. 

21 So the army of Columbia moved down 
towards the river to cross over again, that 
they might escape. 

22 But when they came down to the water 
side, lo ! they were deceived, for there was 
not a boat to convey them to a place of safe- 
ty ; so they became captives to the men of 
Britain. 

23 Now the men of Britain treated the 
prisoners kindly, and showed much tender- 
ness towards them; for which the people 
blessed them. 

24 And the killed and wounded of the 
host of Columbia, were an hundred two score 
and ten. 

25 And the prisoners that fell into the 
hands of the king, were about seven hun- 
dred. 

26 Nevertheless, in a letter which Ste- 
phen sent to Henry* the chief captain of the 
army of the north, he gave great honor un- 



* Maj. Gen. Dearboxn. 



60 

to the captains who fought under him that 
day. 

27 And the names of the valiant men, who 
distinguished themselves in the battle, were 
Wadsworlh, Van Rensselaer, Scott, Chrystie, 
Fenwick, Fink, Gibson, and many other brave 
men of war. 









til 



CHAP. XL 



Gen. Smyth succeeds Gen. Van Rensselaer — 
his attempt to cross the Niagara, and failure 
— causes. 



A.FTER these things, on the same day in 
which the letter was written, Stephen resign- 
ed the command of his army to a certain 
chief captain whose name was Alexander.* 

2 Now Alexander was a man well skilled 
in the arts of warfare. 

3 And he made a proclamation to the 
young men of the state of New-York, 
wherein he invited them to go forth from 
their homes, and join the host under him. 

4 And the words thereof pleased the 
young men, so that they went in numbers 
and joined Alexander; on the shores of the 
river which is called the Niagara. 

5 Rut here the hand of the scribe trem- 

* Brig. Gen. Smvth. 



62 

bleth, his tongue faltereth, his heart sicken- 
eth, and he would fain blot from his memory 
that which truth compels him to record ; for 
he is a living witness thereof. 

6 Alas, there was an evil spirit moving in 
gecret, and in bye-places throughout the land 
of Columbia; and it was the offspring of ty- 
ranny, the cup-bearer of royalty; Toryism. 

7 And lo ! its viper-like insidiousness 
crept into the ears of the unwary husband- 
men. 

8 For the sect of the tories whispered 
unto them, saying, Lo! the laws of the land 
cannot compel you to step over the borders 
of the United States. 

9 Moreover, said they, the fierceness of 
the savages is terrible as the wild tyger, and 
their numbers as the trees of the forest. 

10 And the veteran soldiers of the king, 
who have been' bred to war, are spread in 
multitudes over the province of Canada. 

11 Therefore, if ye go orer to fight 
against them, ye will be as sheep going to 
the slaughter, and ye shall never again re- 
turn to the house of your fathers, for ye 
will be destroyed. 

12 Even as the wickedness of the war, 

4 



.«.. 



63 

which the great Sanhedrim have made, 
against the king, cannot prosper, so shall ye 
fall a prey to the folly thereof. 

13 And it came to pass when the husband- 
men heard these smooth words, many of them 
were bewildered in their minds, and knew 
not what to do. 

14 So when the young men who had 
flocked to the banners of Alexander, came 
down to the water's edge, to go into the 
boats, they thought of the words which the 
enemies of Columbia had spoken unto them; 
and they refused to cross over : 

15 Neither could the persuasions of the 
chief captain prevail on them all to go 
into the boats ; and those whose hearts were 
willing were not enough. 

16 So he was obliged to suffer them to re- 
turn to their homes ; for his expectations 
were blasted. 

17 And the army of Columbia went into 
winter quarters; for the earth was covered 
with snow, and the waters of the great lakes 
were congealed. 






64 



CHAP. XII. 



Capture of the sloop of War Frolic, of 22 
guns, by the United Stales' sloop of war 
Wasp, of IS guns. 



JN OW the strong ships of war of the king- 
dom of Britain were spread over the whole 
face of the waters of the ocean. 

2 But few, indeed, were the vessels of Co- 
lumbia, that were fighting ships and carried 
the destroying engines. 

3 Howsoever, early in the morning of the 
eighteenth day of the tenth month, about the 
sixth hour, being on the sabbath day, 

4 One of the ships of Columbia, called the 
Wasp, the name of the captain whereof was 
Jones, who was a valiant man, discovered 
afar off one of the strong ships of the 
king. 

5 Now the ship of Britain was mightier 
than the ship of Columbia, and she was call- 



**r*^ 



* % 



65 

ed the Frolic, and the captain's name was 
Whinycates. 

6 And they began to utter their thunders 
about the eleventh hour of the day, and the 
noises continued for more than the space of 
half an hour. 

7 When the Wasp, falling upon the Fro- 
lic, and getting entangled therewith, the mea 
struggled together; and the mariners of Co- 
lumbia overpowered the mariners of Bri- 
tain. 

8 So it came to pass, that the Frolic be- 
came captive to the ship of Columbia. 

9 And the slain and the wounded of the 
king's ship were about four score. 

10 And the children of Columbia lost, in 
all, about half a score : howbeit, there was 
much damage done to both vessels. 

1 1 Nevertheless, about this time, a mighty 
ship of Britain, called the Poictiers, came 
upon the vessels, which were in a defence- 
less situation, and took thern both, and com- 
manded them to go to the island of the king 
which is called Bermuda. 

12 However, the people #f Columbia 
were pleased with the noble conduct of 




66 

Jones, and for his valiant acts they gave 
him a sword of curious workmanship. 

13 Moreover, while he remained at Ber- 
muda, the inhabitants, the servants of the 
king, treated him kindly ; and showed much 
respect for him and his officers that were 
made captive. 



67 



CHAP. XIII. 



Capture of the British frigate Macedonian, by 
Com. Decatur, in the frigate United States 
— brig Vixen captured by the British fri- 
gate Southampton. 



JN OW it happened on the twenty-fifth day 
of the tenth month, in the first year of the 
war, that a certain strong ship of Britain, 
that had prepared herself to fight a ship of 
Columbia, appeared upon the waters of the 
deep. 

2 And she was commanded by a valiant 
captain whose name was Carden, and the 
name of the ship was the Macedonian. 

3 And on the same day she met one of 
the strong ships of Columbia, the name of 
the captain whereof was Decatur, and the 
vessel was called the United States. 

4 Now Decatur was a man who had ne- 
ver known fear; and the good of his country 
was the pride of his heart. 

F 2 



68 

5 And when he came towards the ves- 
sel of the king, he used no entreaty with 
his men, for they all loved him, and the 
point of his finger was as the Word of his 
month. 

6 So when the ships came nigh unto 
one another, their thunders were tremen- 
dous, and the smoke thereof was as a black 
cloud. 

7 Nevertheless, in the space of about nine- 
ty minutes, the strong ship of Britain struck 
her red flag to the simple stripes of Columbia* 

8 Now the Macedonian was a new ship, 
and she gat much damage. 

9 But the United States, like the com- 
panions of Shadrach, moved unhurt upon the 
waters ; nay, even her wings were not singed. 

10 And the slain and the wounded, of the 
ship of the king, were five score and four. 

11 And there fell of the people of Colum- 
bia five who were slain outright, and there 
were seven maimed. 

12 Moreover the ship of Britain had se- 
ven of the stolen men of Columbia therein, 
who were compelled to fight against their 
brethren ; and two of them were slain in 
battle. 



* 



69 

13 And when Carden came on board the 
ship of Columbia, he bowed his bead;, and 
offered to put his sword, of curious work- 
manship, into the hands of Decatur. 

14 Bui Decatur said unto him, Nay; thou 
hast defended thy ship like a valiant man; 
therefore, keep thy sword, but receive my 
hand. 

15 So they sat down and drank wine to- 
gether, for the spirits of brave men mingle 
even in the time of warfare. 

16 And after they had eaten and drank, 
Carden opened his mouth, for he was trou- 
bled in his mind, and spake unto Decatur, 
saying : 

17 Lo ! if this thing which hath happened 
be known unto the king, that one of the ves- 
sels of Britain hath struck her flag, and be- 
come captive to a vessel of the United 
States, what shall be done unto the captain 
thereof? for such a thing hath not been 
heard of among the nations of the earth. 

18 And Decatur answered, and spake un- 
to Carden, saying, Verily thou art deceived, 
neither will harm happen unto thee. 

19 For, lo! it came to pass, about three- 
score days ago, that one of the btrong ships 



70 

of the king, thy master, the name whereof 
was called Guerriere, fell an easy prey to 
one of the strong ships of Columbia; and 
they burnt her with fire upon the wa- 
ters. 

20 Now when Carden heard these words, 
his heart leaped with joy ; for he dreaded the 
frowns of the king, and he was glad that he 
stood not alone in the thing. 

21 After this, in the eighteen hundred and 
thirteenth year of the christian era, on the 
first day of the first month of the same year, 
and on the sixth day of the week, 

22 The ship United States and the ship 
Macedonian came into the haven of New- 
York, having passed a certain dangerous 
place called Hell-gate : and there was a heavy 
fog that day. 

23 And there were great rejoicings in the 
city, and throughout the whole land of Co- 
lumbia. 

24 Moreover, there was a sumptuous din- 
ner given to Isaac, Decatur, and Jones, in 
honor of their valiant deeds ; and the number 
of the guests were about five hundred. 

25 And the inhabitants of New- York 
made a great feast, on the ninth day of the 



71 

month, for the brave mariners that wrought 
in the ship of Columbia. 

26 And they became merry with the 
drinking of wine ; after which they depart- 
ed and went unto a house of mirth and 
gaiety.* 

27 Now, it is written in the words of So- 
lomon, whose wisdom hath not been excel- 
led, that, there is a time to weep, and a 
time to rejoice. 

28 Not many days after those things, it 
came to pass, that the hearts of the lords and 
the counsellors of Britain were rejoiced. 

29 For a certain mighty ship, called the 
Southampton, fell upon a smaller vessel of 
the United States, f and made capture there- 
of unto the king. 

30 But the storm arose, and the sea beat 
upon the vessels, and they were cast away, 
and they parted asunder, upon an island 
which lieth far to the south, and both vessels 
were lost. 



* Theatre. 

t United States' brig Vixen, 12 guns, G. W.Recd com- 
wander. 



72 



CHAP. XIV. 



Affairs in the north — skirmishes— battle of 
Jfrenchtown, on the river Raisin — capture 
of Gen. Winchester's army — massacre of 
American prisoners. 



JN OW it came to pass, that the wickedness 
of Britain had roused up the spirit of Satan 
in the savages of the forest, in the north and 
in the west. 

2 And the tomahawk and the scalping 
knife were raised against the people of Co- 
lumbia on the borders of the great lakes. 

3 So the people sought after a valiant 
man to go against the savages and the men of 
Britain. 

4 And they pitched upon a certain go- 
vernor of the west, whose name was Harri- 
son,* and the great Sanhedrim made him a 
chief captain of the army. 

* Maj. Geo., W. H. Harrison, Governor of Ohio. 



73 

b Moreover, he was beloved by the peo- 
ple, and a mighty host of husbandmen were 
ready to follow after him. 

6 And Harrison rested his army at the 
strong hold of Meigs, nigh the Miami Rapids, 
which lieth in the way journeying towards 
the strong hold of Maiden, which is in the 
province of the king ; whither he intended to 
go forth in the pleasant season of the year. 

7 And Winchester* was another chief cap- 
tain that went against the savages. 

8 Now the savages had been a sore thorn 
in the side of the people of Columbia. 

9 They had assailed the hold which is call- 
ed after a chief captain whose name was 
Dearborn, and their numbers overpowered 
it, and they used deceit, and put to death 
the men and the women and the infants that 
were found in the hold, after they had be- 
come captives, save about half a score. 

10 And their bowlings along the dark for- 
est were more terrible than the wild w 7 olf, 
and their murderous cunning more dreadful 
than the prowling tiger. 

11 And the servants of the king gave 

* Brig. Gen. Winchester. 



74 

them to drink of the strong wafers of Jamai- 
ca, well knowing that they loved it as they 
did their own souls, 

12 Yet these were the allies, the mess- 
mates, the companions of the slaves of Bri- 
tain ! hired assassins ! 

13 However, about this time there were 
many brave captains of the people of the 
United States that went against them. 

14 Even Russel, and Hopkins, and Tupper, 
and Campbell, and fVilliams, and others, who 
drove the red savages before them. 

1/5 And burnt their villages,* and laid 
waste their habitations, and slew many of 
them; for it is written in the holy scripture, 
Blood for blood ! 

16 Nevertheless, they treated the savage 
prisoners who fell into their hands kindly ; 
neither suffered they the people to buffet 
them. 

17 But it came to pass, on the twenty-se- 
cond day of the first month, a mighty horde 
of savages and servants of the king, fell up- 
on the army of Winchester the chief captain. 

18 And it was about the dawning of the 



* Towns on the Wabash. 



75 

day, when the destructive engines opened 
their fires. 

19 And the place where the battle was 
fought was called, in the vernacular tongue, 
Frenchtown, which lieth on the south side of 
the River Raisin, nigh unto Lake Erie. 

20 Now the name of the chief captain of 
the army of Britain was Proctor, and he 
proved himself a wicked man, and his name 
is despised even unto this day. 

21 Howsoever, the battle waxed hot, and 
they began to rush one upon another with 
great violence. 

22 And the small band of Columbia 
fought desperately, and the slaughter was 
dreadful ; and the pure snow of heaven was 
sprinkled and stained with the biood of 
men ! 

23 Nevertheless, the people of the United 
States were overcome, and their chief cap- 
tain made prisoner. 

94 So when Winchester found he was 
made captive, and that there was no hope 
for the rest of the men under his command, 
he made a league with Proctor, the chief cap- 
tain of the host of the king. 

25 In the which Proctor agreed to vouch- 



76 

safe protection to the captive men of Colum- 
bia, from the wrath of the savages, whom he 
had inflamed. 

26 Now the number of the men of Co- 
lumbia that fell into their hands that day, 
were about five hundred ; and the slain and 
wounded about an hundred two score and ten. 

27 And the number of the savages and the 
men of Britain who fell in battle that day 
were many. 

28 And Proctor removed the captives unto 
the strong hold of Maiden, which lieth upon 
Ihe opposite side of the river, in the province 
of the king. 

29 But, in the cruelty of his heart, he left 
the sick, the wounded, and the dying to the 
mercy of the savages of the wilderness ! 

30 Jn this thing he transgressed the word 
of a man, which is evil in the sight of the 
Lord. 

31 Oh! for a veil, to hide in utter dark- 
ness the horrid deeds of that awful day, that 
they might not be handed down to the chil- 
dren of men, in the times to come. 

32 Lo ! early in the morning of the next 
day, ere the sun had risen, the work of death 
began I 



77 

33 Behold the sullen savage, with deadly 
rage, drag forth the shivering soldier over 
the blood-stained snow, fainting, bleeding 
with his wounds, and imploring on his knees 
for mercy. 

34 Alas ! the savage understandeth not his 
words ; but giveth him a blow with the hatch- 
et of death. 

35 For have not the counsellors of Britain 
said, For this will we give unto you sil- 
ver and gold ? 

36 Thus were the poor wounded prison- 
ers of Columbia slaughtered in abundance. 

37 And Round-Head, the chief captain of 
the warriors, and the savages under him, gat 
great praise from Proctor, the chief cap- 
tain of the host of Britain.* 

38 Neither did the sick and wounded es- 
cape, who had gathered themselves toge- 
ther in the houses, that they might be 
sheltered from the piercing cold ; even 
those who were weary and unable to go 
forth. 

39 For the savages put the burning brand 



* See Proctor's accouut of tbe battle, dated Quebec, Febru» 
ary 8, 1313. 



78 

to the houses, from which thev could not 
flee, and burnt them alive therein. 

40 And the flames and the smoke arose ! 
and their cries and their groans reached the 
high chancery of heaven, 

41 Where they will stand recorded, until 
the coming of that Day for which all other 
days were made. 

42 Lo ! are those the helpmates of the 
mighty kingdom of Britain ? that noble and 
generous nation, the bulwark of religion? 

43 Tell it not in Gath ; publish it not in 
the streets of Askalon.* 



* The whole of this massacre was conducted under the eyes 
of the British officers, and sanctioned by them as well as by their 
government ; for this fact has'never been disavowed. 



MM 



79 



CHAP. XV. 



Capture of the British frigate Java, by the 
United States frigate ConstittUion. 



J.N the twelfth month of the first year of the 
decree of the great Sanhedrim, on the twen- 
ty and ninth day of the month, 

2 It came to pass, that one of the strong 
ships of the king had approached the country 
of the south, which lieth many thousand 
miles off. 

3 And the ship was called Java, after one 
of the sweet scented islands of the east ; 
where the poppy flourishes, where the heat 
of the sun is abundant, and where the Bohon •« 
Upas emits its deadly poison. 

4 Moreover, she carried about four hun- 
dred and fifty men, and a governor,* and 
many officers and soldiers of the king ; and 
she was well prepared for battle. 



* Gov, Byslop and suite, bound to Bombay, in the East Indies, 
G2 



80 

5 And Lambert commanded the ship of 
Britain, and he was a brave and valiant man. 

6 So as he passed along, nigh unto the 
coast of Brazil, where the sun casteth the 
shadow of a man to the south at noon day : 

7 (A place unknown to the children of Is-, 
rael, in the days of Moses) 

8 Lo ! one of the tall ships of Columbia, 
even the Constitution, beheld her when she 
was yet a great way off, and made signs 
unto her which she answered not. 

9 Which caused the gallant captain, whose 
sur-name was Bainbridge,* to cast a shot to- 
wards her, after which she received the 
thunder of his destroying engines. 

10 Audit was about the second hour after 
the mid-day, when the sound of the battle- 
drum was heard. 

] 1 And as they approached towards each 
other the people shouted aloud, and the 
roaring of the engines was dreadful. 

12 And the servants of the king fought 
bravely ; and they held out to the last. 

13 For they were ashamed to let the na- 
tions of the earth say unto them, 

14 Lo! ye, who are the lords and the 

* Com. Bainbridgc. 



81 

masters of the mighty deep, have suffered 
these feeble* Yankees to conquer you. 

15 Therefore, the slaughter was dreadful, 
beyond measure. 

16 And the black clouds of smoke arose, 
and obscured the rays of the sun, so that 
they fought in the shade thereof. 

17 And the winds moved the vessels 
about, and they strove to avoid the balls of 
lead, and the heavy balls of iron, that whis- 
tled about them in multitudes. 

18 (Now these balls, which were gathered 
from the bowels of the earth, were unknown 
to the Philistines ; even Sampson was a 
stranger to them.) 

19 However, the ships fought hard, for 
the space of about two hours, when their 
thunders ceased. 

20 And the ship of Britain had become a 
wreck, and the deck thereof was covered 
with blood ! 

21 Nevertheless, the servants of the king 
struck not the flag of Britain ; for they were 
loth, and hesitated : 



* Anacreon Moore, by this time, it is hoped, is sufficiently 
convinced of the effeminacy of the Americans, 



82 

22 But when Bainbridge, who saw this, 
came down upon them a second time, they 
humbled themselves, and drew down the 
British cross. 

23 And the slain and the wounded of the 
king, that day, were an hundred three score 
and ten ; 

24 And those of the people of Columbia, 
were about thirty and four. 

25 Moreover, Bainbridge, the captain of 
the vessel of the United States, was sorely 
wounded. 

26 And Lambert, the captain of the ship 
of the king was wounded, even unto death. 

27 Now, after the servants of the king 
were taken from the wreck, and meat and 
drink sat before them, that they might be re- 
freshed, they regaled themselves, and were 
thankful. 

28 And on the second day Bainbridge put 
a match to the black dust that remained in 
the ship, and she burst asunder, and rent the 
air with a loud noise. 

29 And the fragments thereof were spread 
upon the waters round about. 

30 And the fish of the sea, even the 
mighty whales, fled from the noise of tbe 
ship. 




',.' ■■■■ 



83 

31 However, the Constitution escaped not 
unhurt, for she was much wounded in her 
tackling. 

32 So, when Bainbridge came into the 
haven of St. Salvador, which lieth farther to 
the south, he gave the men of Britain, whom 
he had made captive, liberty to go home to 
the king, their master. 

33 But when the tidings thereof reached 
the palace of the king, the lords and the prin- 
ces and the rulers of Britain were con- 
founded. 

34 Their spirits sunk within them : aston- 
ishment seized the tyrants of the ocean. 

35 The smile of joy had departed from 
their countenances, and the gloom of despair 
hovered around them. 

36 The wise men and the orators were 
mute ; they gaped one upon another, and 
wist not what to say. 

37 But the people of Columbia, from the 
north to the south, were gladdened ; and be- 
stowed great honor and praise on Bainbridge 
the captain. 

38 Even the great Sanhedrim of the peo- 
ple rejoiced with great joy. 






84 



CHAP. XVI. 



Com. Rogers' return from a second cruise — 
capture of the United Stales'' brig Viper — 
the General Armstrong and a British fri- 
gate — privateering. 



IN OW it came i o pass, in the beginning of 
the one thousand eight hundred and thir- 
teenth year of the Great Founder of the 
Christian sect, 

2 That a strong ship of the United States, 
called the President, commanded by Rogers, 
returned a second time to the land of Co- 
lumbia. 

3 And while she was upon the waters of 
the great deep, she fell in with one of the 
packets of the king, called after the swift- 
flying bird* of the air, and made capture 
thereof. 

4 And in the ship Rogers found abun- 

* Swallow.' 



85 

dance of wealth; even an hundred, sixty and 
eight thousand pieces of silver. 

5 And it was carried, with many horses, 
to a place of safe-keeping,* in the town of 
Boston, which lieth to the east. 

6 Moreover, he made capture of another 
ship of the king,f laden with oil and bones 
of the great fish of the deep. 

7 Now it happened, on the seventeenth 
day of the first month of the same year, 

8 That one of the weak vessels of the 
United States,:}: became a prey to one of the 
strong ships of the king, called the Narcis- 
sus ; albeit she fought not. 

9 About this time the great waters of 
the Chesapeake, which empty into the sea* 
were guarded by the strong ships of the 
king, so that the vessels might not arrive or 
depart therefrom. 

10 But the vessels of the United States, 
and the private vessels of the men of Colum- 
bia, were doing great damage unto the com- 
merce of Britain, even in her own waters. 

1 1 And the number of the private vessels. 



* State Bank of Boston. f Snip Argo. 

t United States' brig Viper. 






86 

tabt moved swiftly over the face of the wa- 
ters, and went out to despoil the commerce 
of Britain, and make capture merchant ves- 
sels thereof, was about two hundred, two 
score and ten. 

12 And they made capture of more than 
fifteen hundred of the vessels of the people 
of Britain.* 

13 Moreover, there was a sore battle 
between one of the private armed vessels of 
the people of the United States, and a strong 
ship of the king.f 

14 The privateer was called the General 
Armstrong, and the name of the captain was 
Guy.% 

15 Now Guy was a valiant man, and fear 
was a stranger to him. 

16 And on the eleventh day of the third 
month, he espied from afar a vessel which 
appeared as a speck upon the waters. 

17 But when he bore down upon her, be- 
hold ! she was a fighting ship of Britain, 
carrying the destroying engines. 

18 And Guy was nigh being entrapped, 



* During the war; j A British frigate. 

\ Capt. Champlin. 



Wk 



87 

for he was deceived, thinking it a merchant's 
ship. 

19 Therefore he was compelled to fight, 
so he opened upon the vessel of the king 
one of his mischievous engines called, in the 
vernacular tongue, long-torn. 

20 And they fought hard, and the noise of 
the engines was very great. 

21 And the balls of lead and iron shower- 
ed around like hail-stones ; for the strong 
ship of Britain had them in abundance. 

22 Now the slaughter was dreadful on 
both sides, and Guy was nigh making cap- 
ture of the ship : but he received a wound 
and his vessel was disabled, so he made good 
his escape. 

23 And the slain and the wounded of Guy 
were twenty and three, and the vessel of the 
king lost about twice that number. 

24 Now, for this valiant act, Guy gat 
great honor, and the people gave him a 
sword of curious w r orkmanship. 

2f) Moreover, the Saratoga, the Scourge, 
the Chasseur, and many other private vessels 
of the people of the United States, were a 
grievous pi ague to the servants of the king; 

26 Inasmuch as some of them made sport 

H 






with the mighty blockade of Britain, which 
she put forth against the free people of the 
land of Columbia. 

27 For when they came nigh unto the 
coast of Britain, they made capture and 
burnt the vessels of the kins;, that carried rich 
merchandise, costly jewels, and silver and 
gold. 

28 Yea, even in their own waters, and in 
the sight of their own havens, did they do 
these things. 

29 For it happened that the cunning Yan- 
kees knew how to construct the swift-sailing 
vessels, that they out-ran the strong vessels 
of Britain. 

30 And as the ships of Britain moved but 
slowly on the waters, so they caught them not. 

31 Wherefore the artificers, the mechan- 
ics, and those who dealt in merchandise, rais- 
ed their voices to the great council of Bri- 
tain, saying, 

32 Lo ! are we not the faithful servants of 
the king, our master ? have we not given unto 
him the one half of our whole substance ? and 
shall these Yankees take from us the remain- 
der? 

33 Hath not the king a thousand ships of 



war? and wherefore should we be hemmed in? 

34 Lo ! our merchant vessels are idle ! nei- 
ther can we pass in safety even unto the land 
of Hibei nia, which lieth nigh unto us. 

35 And, behold, the captain of a private 
armed vessel of the Yankees, in derision of 
the proclamation of our lord the king, hath 
proclaimed the island of Great Britain and 
her dependencies in a state of rigorous 
blockade ; saying, Lo ! I have the power to 
hem ye in ; 

36 Therefore, let the counsellors of the 
king ponder these things, and let the strong 
ships of Britain drive the vessels of Columbia 
from our coast. 

37 Now the wise men of Britain heard 
those things with sorrow; and they spake one 
to another concerning the matter : 

38 But they wist not what to do; for the cun- 
ning of the captains of the fast sailing vessels 
of Columbia, surpassed the wisdom of the 
lords of Britain. 



.■-..?zx* ; ' 



^KWi 



CHAP. XVII. 



Capture and burning of Ogdensburgh by the 
British, 



IN these days the war against Columbia 
was waged with great violence. 

2 And the fur- clad savages prowled in se- 
cret places and fell upon the helpless. 

3 * They hid themselves in the wilderness ; 
they couched down as a lion ; and as a young 
lion, they watched for their prey.' 

4 The tall and leafless trees of the forest 
bent to the strong winds of the north ; and 
the sound thereof was as the roaring of 
mighty waters. 

5 Moreover, the face of the earth was 
covered with snow, and the water of the 
livers was frozen. 

6 And the borders of Columbia, nigh un- 
to the province of the king, were exposed to 
the transgressions of the enemy. 

7 And the soldiers of the king came in 



91 

abundance from the island of Britain, and 
pitched their tents in the Canadian provinces. 

8 Accordingly, it came to pass, on the 
twenty-second day of the second month, be- 
ing the birth-day of Washington, the de- 
liverer, 

9 That a mighty host came out of the pro- 
vince of the king, and went against the town 
of Ogdensburgh, and made capture thereof. 

10 And there were five slain and ten 
wounded of the people of Columbia, and 
about three score were taken by the servants 
of the king. 

1 1 Moreover, the men of Britain gat much 
spoil ; even a multitude of the black dust 
fell into their hands ; 

12 And twelve of the destroying engines, 
which the people of Columbia had taken 
from the king, about forty years before. 

13 Also, three hundred tents, and more 
than a thousand weapons of war ; but the 
vessels and the boats, they consumed with 
fire. 

14 Now Ogdensburgh was a beautiful vil- 
lage to behold; nevertheless they burned it 
with fire, and it became a heap of ruins. 

15 And the women and the children look- 

H 2 






92 

ed for their homes, but found them not ; and 
they sat down in sorrow, for the haughty 
conquerors laughed at their sufferings. 

16 After which they returned with their 
spoil to Pt£$£ott, from whence they came, 
being on the other side of the water, in the 
province of the king. 

17 And the honor that was poured out up- 
on the slaves of Britain that day was as a 
thimble full of water spilt into the sea : for 
they were like unto a giant going out against 
a bulrush. 



93 



CHAP. XVIIL 



Capture of the Peacock, of 1 8 guns, by the U. 
S. sloop of war Hornet, of 16 guns — return 
of the Chesapeake from a cruise. 



A HE deeds of the renowned warriors, the 
patriots, and the valiant men of Columbia, 
have prepared a path for the scribe, which 
he is compelled to follow. 

2 But, as the soaring eagle moves to its 
craggy nest, or the cooing dove to its tender 
mate, so is the compulsion of his heart. 

3 If the wickedness of Britain hath made 
manifest her folly ; if her sons have sat down 
in sackcloth and ashes, the scribe looketh 
down upon her with pity. 

4 It is written that, He who prideth him- 
self in his strength shall be humbled ; and the 
haughty shall be brought low. 

5 And, if the Lord hath smiled upon the 
arms of Columbia, let no man frown. 

6 Now it came to pass, in the eighteen 



94 

hundred and thirteenth year of the christian 
era, on the twenty-fourth day of the second 
month, 

7 That one of the fighting vessels of Co- 
lumbia, called the Hornet, which signifieth, 
in the vernacular tongue, a fly whose sting 
is poison, 

8 Moved upon the great waters of the 
deep, far to the south, nigh unto a place 
which is called Demarara. 

9 Moreover, the captain of the Hornet 
was a valiant man, and his name was Law- 
rence. 

10 And it was towards the setting of the 
sun, when he came nigh unto one of the 
strong ships of the king, called the Peacock, 
after the bird whose feathers are beautiful 
to behold ; 

1 1 And the captai n thereof was sur-named 
Peake. 

12 Now began the roaring noises of the 
engines of destruction, that opened their 
mouths against one another ; and dreadful 
was the slaughter of that day. 

13 Nevertheless, in the space of about the 
fourth part of an hour the vessel of the king 
captured by the people of Columbia, 



95 

14 And they found therein some of the 
mariners of the United States, who had beg- 
ged that they might go down into the hold 
of the ship, and not. raise their hands against 
the blood of their own brethren : 

15 But Peake, the commander, suffered 
them not, but compelled them to fight against 
their own kinsmen; and one of them was 
slain in battle. 

16 And the killed and maimed of the peo- 
ple of Britain, were about two score and 
two ; and Peake, the captain, was also slain : 
and the loss of Columbia was about five 
souls ! 

17 Moreover, the Peacock sunk down in- 
to the yawning deep, before they could get 
all the men of Britain out of her ; and three 
of the people of Columbia were buried with 
her, whilst in the humane act of endeavoring 
to preserve the lives of the enemy. 

18 Now this was the fifth fighting vessel 
of the king which had been humbled, since 
the decree of the great Sanhedrim, before 
the destroying engines of the people of Co- 
lumbia. 

19 And Lawrence, and the brave men that 



96 

fought under him, had honor and praise pour- 
ed out upon them abundantly. 

20 Moreover the people of New- York 
gave unto Lawrence vessels of silver, with 
curious devices ; and they made a feast for 
the men who fought in the Hornet. 

21 And all the people were exceedingly 
rejoiced at the valiant acts of Lawrence, and 
his fame extended throughout the land of 
Columbia ; the sound of his name was the 
joy of the heart. 

22 But when the news thereof reached the 
ears of the wise men of Britain, they said, 
Lo ! these men are giants ; neither are they 
like unto the warriors of the king. 

23 And their witchcraft and their cunning 
are darkness unto us ; even as when a man 
putteth a candle under a bushel. 

24 Behold! five times hath the "striped 
bunting" of Columbia, triumphed over the 
royal cross of Britain. 

25 Now the great Sanhedrim, who were 
assembled together, forgat not the valiant 
deeds of the mariners of Columbia. 

26 For they divided amongst them more 
than seventy thousand pieces oi silver. 



97 

27 And it came to pa«s, on the tenth day 
of the fourth month, in the same .year, that 
the Chesapeake, a strong vessel of the United 
States, arrived in the haven of Boston. 

28 She had sailed upon the face of the 
rough waters more than an hundred days, af- 
ter she departed from the land of Columbia, 
and passed a great way to the south : 

29 And went hard by the island of Barba- 
doeSy and those places, in the great sea, 
which encompass the world, from whence 
they bring poisoned waters, which open the 
womb of the earth to receive the unwary 
sons of men. 

30 Moreover, in returning, she came nigh 
unto the Capes of Virginia, where the sweet 
scented plant* groweth in abundance. 

31 And while she was on the ocean she 
captured a number of the vessels of the peo- 
ple of Britain, which were laden with rich 
merchandise. 

* Tobacco. 






98 



CHAP. XIX. 



Capture of Little York, in Upper Canada — 
the destruction of the whole American army 
prevented by the precaution of Gen. Pike — 
his death. 



JN OW, while these things happened in the 
south, and the evils of war destroyed the life 
of man, and the smiles of heaven strengthen- 
ed the arms, and lifted up the glory of Co- 
lumbia ; 

2 Behold, preparations of warfare were 
making on the borders of the great lakes of 
the north. 

3 And the vessels of war of Columbia 
that were upon the waters of the lake called 
Ontario, were commanded by a brave man, 
whose name was Chauncey. 

4 Now on the twenty fifth day of the fourth 
month, the army of Columbia, who were ga- 
thered on the shore of the lake, went down 
into the strong vessels of Chauncey. 



99 

5 And the number that went into the 
vessels was about two thousand. 

C And Henry* and Zebulon, whose sur- 
name was Pike,f were the chief captains of 
the host of Columbia. 

7 On the same day the sails of the vessels 
were spread to the winds of heaven, and they 
moved towards a place called Little York,% 
in the province of Canada. 

8 Howbeit, the winds were adverse and 
blew with great violence from the east. 

9 Nevertheless, on the morning of the 
twenty -seventh day of the same month, the 
army of Columbia, commanded by Pike, the 
chief captain, moved out of the strong ships 
of the United States. 

10 But Henry remained on board the ves- 
sel of Chauncey, neither came he to the wa- 
ter's edge. 

11 And the place w T here the host of Co- 
lumbia landed was to the west of the town, 
about twenty and four furlongs, and from 
the strong hold of the king about ten fur- 
longs. 



* Major General Dearborn. f Brig. Gen. Pike. 

\ Capital of U. Canada. 



100 

12 The gallant Forsyth, who led a band 
of brave men, who fought not for iilihy lu- 
cre's sake, went before the host. 

13 And their weapons of war were of cu- 
rious workmanship,* and they sent forth 
balls of lead ; such as were unknown to Pha- 
raoh when he followed the children of Israel 
down into the red sea. 

14 Now Zebulon, with a thousand chosen 
men, followed close after Forsyth, the war- 
rior. 

1 5 About this time the savages and the 
servants of the king, even a great multi- 
tude, opened their engines of destruction 
without mercy. 

16 And from the forest, and the secret 
places, their balls were showered like unto 
hail-stones, and the sound thereof was as 
sharp thunder. 

17 And a man, whose name was Sheaffe, 
was the chief captain of the host of Britain. 

18 Now the destroying engines of the 
strong hold of the king issued fire and 
smoke with a mighty noise, and shot at the 
vessels of the United States. 

* Rifles. 



101 

19 But Chauncey returned unto them 
four-fold ; and the battle waxed hot, both on 
the land and on the water. 

20 And the men of Columbia rushed for- 
ward with fierceness, and drove the men of 
Britain from their strong hold. 

21 So they fled towards the town for safe- 
ty, for they were overcome ; and the savages 
were smitten with fear, their loud yellings 
ceased, and their feet were light as the wild 
roe ; 

22 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia 
shouted aloud, and sounded their trumpets, 
their cymbals, and their noisy drums, which 
were contrived since the days of Jeroboam, 
king of Israel. 

23 And Zebulon, the valiant warrior, fol- 
lowed hard after them ; and they found no 
rest ; for they were sore pushed, and the 
phantom of their imaginations pictured out 
new evils. 

24 So when they found they were nigh 
being made captive, they departed in haste 
from the town and from the strong hold 
thereof, save about two score. 

25 Now when the army of Britain was 
overthrown ; when they were compelled to 



102 

flee from the strong bold ; the wickedness of 
Satan entered into their hearts. 

26 And they gathered together abundance 
of the black dust and fixed it into the lower- 
most part of the fort, below the walls of 
stone. 

27 After which they put a lighted match 
nigh to it, so that when the whole army of 
Columbia got into the hold, they might be 
destroyed. 

28 But the Lord, who is good, even he 
who governeth the destinies of man, permit- 
ted it not. 

29 Now when Zebulon and bis army 
came out of the thick woods, in battle array, 
to go forth against the strong hold, 

30 Lo ! they saw not the host of Britain : 
but the eye of Zebulon was as the eye of an 
eagle, his strength as the lion, and his judg- 
ment as the wise : 

- 31 So he stayed his men of war from rush- 
ing forward towards the place, lest they 
might be entrapped : and he caused them to 
move along the wood to the right and to the 
left, 

32 About this time a stripling, from the 
south, with his weapon of war in his hand. 



103 

ran up to Zebulon, and spake unto him, 
saying, 

33 Behold! a man of Britain appeareth in 
the fort ; suffer me, I pray thee, to slay 
him, for he is busied with the destroying en- 
gines : 

34 But Zebulon said, Nay ; we are yet a 
great way off. 

35 And the young man entreated him a 
second time, saying, I beseech thee, let me 
step out before the host and slay him, lest 
the engine be let loose upon us ; then Zebu- 
lon said unto him, Go. 

36 So he ran out before the army and shot 
the man, and he fell to the earth ; and it was 
about a furlong off, and the weight of the 
ball was about the weight of a shekel. 

37 But as the young man returned to 
where the army stayed, behold ! the black 
dust in the hold caught fire, and it rent the 
air with the noise of a thousand thunders: 

38 And the whole army fell down upon 
their faces* to the earth ; and the stones, 



* However strange this may appear, it is a fact that the 
concussion of the air produced that effect on nearly all who 
fronted the explosion, 

!2 



104 

and the fragments of rocks, were lifted 
high ; and the falling thereof was terrible, 
even unto death. 

39 Yea, it was dreadful as the mighty 
earthquake, which overturneth cities. 

40 And the whole face of the earth round 
about, and the army of Zebulon, were over- 
shadowed with black smoke ; so that, for a 
time, one man saw not another : 

41 But when the heavy clouds of smoke 
passed away towards the wnst, behold the 
earth was covered with the killed and the 
wounded. 

42 Alas! the sight was shocking to be- 
hold ; as the deed was ignoble. 

43 About two hundred men rose not : the 
stones had bruised them ; the sharp rocks 
bad fallen upon them: 

44 They were wedged into the earth : 
their weapons of war were bent down into 
the ground with them ; their feet were turned 
towards heaven ; their limbs were lopped off. 

45 But when those who escaped unhurt 
arose and looked around, they beheld not 
their chieftain ; he had fallen to the earth. 

46 A huge stone smote him upon the 
back, and two of his officers, (one of whom 



105 

was the gallant Fraser,*) raised him up and 
led him forth from the field of murder ; 
the one on the one side, and the other on the 
other side. 

47 And as they led him away he turned 
hi* head around to his brave warriors, and 
said unto them, Go on: I will be with you 
soon ! I am not slain. 

48 The magic of his words gave joy to 
their hearts ; for they loved him as they 
loved their own father. 

49 And with resistless force his noble 
band rushed on, at the trumpet's soilnd, over 
the heaps of slain and wounded to glory, 
and to triumph! 

50 And a swift messenger ran down unto 
Henry, with these words in his mouth, Lo ! 
the right hand of our army is slain! its pride 
is gone ! Zebulon has fallen ! 

51 Immediately Henry departed from the 
fleet, and came to the shore, and went up 
aiid led the host of Columbia to the town 
and took it. 

52 JNow the slain, the maimed and the 



* Major Fiaser, son of Donald Fraser of New-York. 



106 

captives of the host of Britain that day, were 
about a thousand fighting men : 

53 And the loss of the men of Columbia 
was about three hundred slain and wounded. 

54 And Henry, the ehief captain, gave 
great honor to the captains under him, even 
Seott, and Boyd, and Porter, and all the brave 
men that fought that day. 

55 Nevertheless, Sheaffe, the captain of 
the king, escaped with a handful of men,, 
and the swift-footed savages : leaving behind 
him the insignia of British mercy ! — a human 
scalp! 

56 But the rejoicings of the people were 
mingled with deep sorrow ; for the brave 
were slain in battle. 

57 Oh! earth, how long shall thy inhabit- 
ants delight in warfare ? when shall the old 
men cease to weep for their children ? 

58 Behold yon lonely widows ; they weep 
for their husbands and their children; but 
they shall see their faces no more! 

59 The fair daughters of Columbia sigh 
for the return of their beloved. 

60 Seest thou those little ones ? they fly 
to their disconsolate mother , they leap with 






107 

joy at the name of father ! but he shall never 
return ! 

61 Oh! that they had cast the black dust 
into the sea ! then might not the children of 
men weep and wail. 

62 Now on the next day, when the army 
of Zebulon gat the tidings that their captain 
was slain, the tears started in their eyes ; 
they were mute, their hearts failed them ; 
and they became as weak women. 

63 Moreover, the United States made 
great lamentations over him; and the re- 
membrance of his name shall live in the 
hearts of the people. 

64 The eagle of Columbia dropt a feather 
from her wing, which the angel of brightness 
caught ere it fell to the earth, ascended 
fo heaven, and recorded the name of Pike. 






10* 



CHAP. XX. 



Sketches of the History of America* 



X HE voice of many years shall drop upon 
the children of men ; and our children's chil- 
dren shall hearken unto it in the days to 
come. 

2 The country of Columbia is a wide ex- 
tended land, which reacheth from the north 
to the south, more than eight thousand 
miles ; and the breadth thereof is about three 
thousand. 

3 Moreover, the name of the country was 
called after the name of a great man, who 
was born in a place called Genoa ; being in 
Italia, on the sea-coast. 

4 His name was Christopher, sur- named 
Columbus. 

5 As the righteous man struggleth against 
wickedness, so did he against ignorance and 
stupidity. 



109 

6 Nevertheless, it came to pass, in the 
fourteen hundred and ninety-second year of 
the Christian era, that he crossed the waters 
of the mighty deep, a thing that had never 
been known among the sons of men : 

7 And the place where he landed was an 
island in the sea, nigh unto the continent of 
Columbia, called San Salvador; which, be- 
ing interpreted, signifieth a place of safety. 

8 And the place was inhabited by wild 
savages, and they were naked. 

9 Now when the people heard that Co- 
lumbus had found a new land, they were as- 
tonished beyond measure, for it was many 
thousand miles off; moreover, some of them 
strove to rob him of the honor, and he was 
treated wrongfully. 

10 But his name was lifted up above his 
enemies, and it shall not be lost. 

11 Now the land of Columbia is a most 
plentiful land, yielding gold and silver, and 
brass and iron abundantly. 

12 Likewise, all manner of creatures, and 
herbs and fruits of the earth, 

13 From the red cherry, and the rosy 
peach of the north, to the lemon, and the 
golden orange of the south. 






110 

14 From the small insect, that cheateth the 
microscopic eye, to the huge mammoth that 
once moved on the borders of the river Hud- 
son ; on the great river Ohio ; and even down 
to the country of Patagonia in the south. 
j 1 5 Now the height of a mammoth is about 
seven cubits and an half, and the length 
thereof fourteen cubits ; and the bones there- 
of being weighed were more than thirty 
thousand shekels; and the length of the 
tusks is more than six cubits. 

16 It is more wonderful than the elephant; 
and the history thereof, is it not recorded in 
the book of Jefferson, the scribe ?* 

17 The fierce tiger and the spotted leo- 
pard dwell in the dark forests ; and the swift- 
footed deer upon the mountains and high 
places. 

18 Now the number of inhabitants that 
are spread over the whole continent, is more 
than an hundred million. 

19 And the people of Columbia, who are 
independent of the tyrants of the earth, and 
who dwell between the great river which is 
called Mississippi, in the south, and the pro- 

* Jefferson's notes on Virginia. 



Ill 

vince of Canada, in the north, bein» number- 
ed, are about a thousand times ten thousand 
souls.* 

20 The men are comely and noble, and 
cowardice hath forgot to light upon them : 
neither are they a superstitious people ; they 
are peace-makers, they love the God of Is- 
rael, and worship him; and there are no 
idolaters amongst them. 

21 The women are passing beautiful; 
they are like unto fresh lilies ; their cheeks 
are like wild roses ; their lips as a thread of 
scarlet; nature hath gifted them with Roman 
virtue and patriotism ; and they have spread 
goodness with a plentiful hand. 

22 Now it had happened in times past that 
the king of Britain had made war upon the 
people of Columbia, even forty years ago. 

23 For the riches and prosperity of Co- 
lumbia had become great, and the king cov- 
eted them. 

24 And the war raged with the might of 
Britain, even in the heart of the land of Co- 
lumbia, for about the space of seven years, 



*Thr last census, in 1810, stated the amount at about 8,000,000, 
the uumberinay now probably be increased to 10,000,000. 
K 



112 

when the army of Columbia became trium- 
phant ; neither could the power of Britain 
conquer the sons of liberty. 

25 So those who remained of the armies 
of Britain returned home to the king, their 
master ; and there was peace throughout the 
United States, and a covenant made between 
the nations. 

26 But the names of the wise men of the 
great Sanhedrim, in those days, and the 
names of those who fought hard in battle, 
and spilt their blood in the cause of liberty, 
are they not written in the books of the 
chronicles of those days ? 

27 Now the fatness of the land of Colum- 
bia bringeth people from all nations to dwell 
therein. 

28 The people of Columbia use no per- 
suasion, the sacred cause of Liberty is the 
star of attraction ; and the time shall 
come when the eyes of all men shall be open- 
ed, and the earth shall rejoice. 

29 Their laws are wholesome, for the 
people are the lawgivers, even as it was in 
the days of Cesar : but they know no kings. 

30 Here the poor Briton, that flies from 



113 

the blood-suckers of his country, findeth 
plenty. 

31 The nationless Gaul fleeth here for 
safety from the wrath of a shallow king. 

32 The persecuted Hibernian stealeth 
away, like a thief in the night, to behold the 
resting place of freedom. 

33 Here the dull Germany the jealous 
Spaniard, and the royal Scot, are all received 
with the open hand of hospitality. 



U4 



CHAP. XXI. 



Pepredations in the Chesapeake — Havre-de- 
Grace burnt by the British under Adm* 
Cockburn — attack on Crany Island — - 
Hampton taken by the British — outrages. 



JNOW it came to pass, that the mighty 
fleet of Britain, which was moving round 
about the great Bay of Chesapeake, com- 
mitted much evil upon the shores thereof. 

2 And they robbed those who were de- 
fenceless, and carried away their fatted cat- 
tle, their sheep, and all those things which 
they found, and put them into the strong 
ships of the king. 

3 Moreover, they burned the dwellings 
of the helpless with fire, and they accounted 
it sport. 

4 And the old men, the little children, and 
the women, yea the fair daughters of Colum- 
bia, were compelled to fly from the wicked- 
ness of barbarians. 



115 

5 Even the small villages that rose beauti- 
fully on the river side, became a prey unto 
them, and were consumed by the mighty c<m- 
querors of Europe. 

6 They were like hungry wolves that are 
never satisfied ; destruction and devastation 
marked their footsteps. 

7 JNow the ships of the king were com- 
manded by a wicked man whose name was 
Cockburn. 

8 And it was so that on the third day of 
the fifth month, in the thirty and seventh 
year of the independence of the people of 
Columbia, 

9 Cockburn, sur-named the wicked, led 
forth a host of the savage men of Britain, 
against a pleasant village, called Havre-de- 
Grace, which lieth on the borders of the Sus- 
quehanna, a noble river ; being in the state 
of Maryland. 

10 Now there was none to defend the 
place, save one man, whose sur-name was 
O' Neil, who came from the land of Hibernia, 
and him they made captive. 

11 And they came as the barbarians of 
the wilderness ; fierceness was in their looks, 
cruelty was in their hearts. 

K 2 



116 

12 To the dwelling houses they put the 
burning brand, and plundered the poor and 
needy without pity ; such wickedness was 
not done even among the Philistines. 

13 The women and children cried aloud, 
and fell down at the feet of the chief captain 
of the king : but, alas ! his heart was like un- 
to the heart of Pharaoh ; he heard them not. 

14 However, it came to pass, the next 
dav, when the brave Cockburn had collected 
his booty, and glutted his savage disposition, 
he departed. 

15 And on the sixth day of the same 
month he went against other unprotected 
villages, which lie on the river Sassafras, 
called, Frederickstown and Georgetown, and 
burnt them also. 

16 So did he return to his wickedness as a 
dog returneth to his vomit. 

17 Now about this time the number of 
the strong ships of Britain were increased, 
and great multitudes of the soldiers of the 
king came with them to the waters of the 
Chesapeake. 

18 And it came to pass, on the twenty-se- 
cond day of the next month, that Cockburn, 
the chief captain of the ships of Britain, §lS- 



117 

sayed to go against a small island, nigh unto 
Korfolk, in the state of I irginia, called in 
the vernacular tongue Crany -Island. 

19 And the number of the men of Britain 
that went against the island was about five 
thousand ; and they began to get upon the 
shore about the dawning of the day. 

20 Near unto this place a few vessels of 
Columbia, commanded by the gallant Cas- 
sia, were hemmed in by about a score of the 
mighty ships of the king. 

21 Now the fighting vessels under Cassin 
were mostly small, and were called gun- 
boats, and they were little more than half a 
score in number. 

22 Howbeit, but a few days before they 
went against the Junon,* a strong ship of 
Britain, and compelled her to depart from 
before the mouths of the destroying en- 
gines. 

23 But the island was defenceless ; and 
there came to protect it an hundred brave 
seamen from the gun-boats, and an hundred 
and fifty valiant men from the Constellation^ 
a fighting ship of the United States. 

* British frigate Junon. 



118 

24 And they brought the destroying en- 
gines with them, and they let them loose 
upon the vessels of the king, and upon the 
men who were landing upon the shore. 

25 And the thundering noise thereof as- 
tonished the servants of the king ; for they 
knew there was but a handful of men upon 
the island. 

26 Moreover, Britain in her folly had in- 
vented a new instrument of destruction, which 
they called Congreve Rockets ; and they threw 
them in great abundance. 

27 But they were harmless as turtle doves, 
for th(-y killed not a man. 

28 Now the men of Columbia, with their 
handicraft, shot the balls of iron strait as an 
arrow from a bow, and thereby did much 
damage to the slaves of the king. 

29 Inasmuch as they slew about two hun- 
dred of the men of Britain that day ; and 
drove the host of them from the island. 

30 So the mighty army of Britain fled in 
haste to the strong ships of the king for 
safety. 

31 Now on the twenty-fifth day of the 
same month the army of Britain went against 



a village called Hampton, which lieth in the 
state of Virginia, and took it. 

32 Hovvbeit, the little band of Columbia, 
commanded by Crutchfield, fought hard 
against them. 

33 Nevertheless, they prevailed over him, 
and slew seven of his men, and wounded 
others, upon which he fled ; for the men of 
Britain were like unto a swarm of locusts. 

34 But the blood of two hundred royal 
slaves became a sacrifice to the wickedness 
of their leaders. 

35 There is a time when truth may be ut- 
tered with pleasure ; and the droppings 
thereof are like unto frankincense and 
myrrh. 

36 But, alas ! the hour hath passed away 
or it hath not yet come ; she hath gone down 
into the vale of tears ; yea, deep sorrow 
treadeth upon her heels. 

37 Oh ! Albion ! that a veil might be cast 
over the transgressions of that day : 

38 Thy wickedness shall be written with 
a pen of iron, and with the point of a dia- 
mond. 

39 It was here, even in Hampton, that 






120 

thy strength and thy majesty rose up against 
the poor the sick and the needy. 

40 Instead of protecting the tender wo- 
men, the fairest work of God ; the life of the 
world ; behold ! what hast thou done ? 

41 See ! the shrieking matron cast herself 
into the waters that she may escape thy bru- 
tal violence : but all in vain; her garments 
are torn from her ; she becomes a prey t© 
thy savage lust. 

42 Not she alone, but her daughter, and 
her fair sisters, have fallen into thy unhal- 
lowed hands, and been defiled ! 

43 Oh, Britain ! the voice of violated chas- 
tity riseth up against thee : the mark of the 
beast is printed in thy forehead : 

44 Even the old and weak men became 
victims of thy barbarity ; thy servants strip- 
ped the aged Hope, and buffeted him ; with 
the points of their swords did they torment 
him. 

45 Do the groans of the murdered Kirby 
creep into thine ears? go thou and repent of 
thine evil ; and do so no more : the Lord 
God of hosts shall be thy judge. 

46 The people of Columbia shall forgive 



12) 

thy crimes against them ; hut the remem- 
brance thereof shall live coeval with time ; 
neither shall they forget the name of Cock- 
burn. 

47 Even the sect of the tories despised 
him; the evils which he wrought caused many 
of them to turn aside and walk in the foot- 
steps of the great Sanhedrim. 

48 And thou, black Revenge! dreadful 
fiend ! sleep within the precincts of Hamp- 
ton : a strong seal is put upon thy sepulchre; 
the sons of Columbia shall not disturb thee. 

49 When they pass by this ill-fated town, 
they shall step aside and weep ; neither shall 
they enter the streets thereof, lest they awa- 
ken thee. 

50 And woe unto the royal potentate, or 
the princely ruler, that shall presume to break 
the seal, or rouse thee from thy slumbers ! 

51 Thy waking will be as the waking of 
the hungry tiger, when he riseth up to re- 
fresh himself; retribution shall be obtained ; 
and the heathen shall tremble. 



122 



CHAP. XXII. 



Mnssian mediation — Bayard and Gallatin sail 
for St. Petersburgh — the British compelled 
to abandon the siege of Fort Meigs. 



JL HE lofty eagle cutteth the air with his 
wings, and moveth rapidly along ; the fish of 
the deep glide swiftly through the waters ; 
the timid deer bounds through the thick 
forests with wonderful speed : 

2 But Imagination surpasseth them all; 
she rideth on the fleet winds ; she holdeth a 
stream of lightning in her hand. 

3 In an instant she fiieth from the frozen 
mountains of Zembla, in the regions of the 
north, to the burning sands of Africa, in the 
torrid zone. 

4 Now the sons of Columbia were peace- 
makers; neither did their footsteps follow af- 
ter warfare. 

5 (It is written in the holy scriptures, Bless- 
ed are the peace-makers, for they shall be 
called the children of God.) 



123 

6 So the great Sanhedrim of the people 
sent two of the wise men of Columbia, the 
one named Gallatin and the other Bayard, 
into a distant country : 

7 Even unto the extensive country of 
Russia, that there they might meet the wise 
men of Britain, and heal the wounds of the 
nations, and make peace with one another. 

8 But the people of Britain are a stiff- 
necked race, and they yielded not to the en- 
treaties of the great Sanhedrim ; therefore 
the war continued to rage. 

9 So it came to pass, on the fifth day of the 
fifth month, in the pleasant season of the 
year; when the trees put forth their leaves 
and the air is perfumed with the sweet scent 
of flowers, and the blue violets bespread the 
green hillocks ; 

10 That Harrison, the chief captain, from 
the west, the brave warrior, who had en- 
trenched himself in the strong hold of Meigs, 
nigh unto the river Miami, sallied forth 
against the savages and the slaves of Britain, 
that hemmed him in. 

1 1 Now there were about a thousand sol- 
diers of the king, and a thousand savages 
that had besieged the fort many days ; and 



124 

threw therein the balls of destruction, and 
strove to make captive the army of Columbia. 

12 Nevertheless Harrison, and his gallant 
little band, fought hard against them, and 
drove them from before the strong hold with 
great slaughter. 

13 Likewise, the slain of Columbia was 
about four score, besides the wounded. 

14 Moreover, the chief captain gave great 
honor to Miller and all the captains and sol- 
diers under him; even those called militia. 

15 And the names of the states called Ohio 
and Kentucky were raised high, by the valiant 
acts of their sons that day. 



125 



CHAP XXIII. 

Surrender of Fort George and Fori Erie to 
the Americans — Gen. Brown drives the Bri- 
tish from before Sacketfs Harbor, with 
great loss — Gens. Winder and Chandler 
made prisoners at Forty-mile Creek. 



JN OW, on the twenty-seventh day of the 
same month, being thirty days after Zebulon 
had gone to sleep with his fathers, 

2 Henry, whose sur-name was Dearborn, 
and Lewis* the chief captains of the army of 
Columbia, and Chauncey the commander of 
the fleet of the United States, that moved on 
the waters of the great lake Ontario, essayed 
to go against Fort George and Fort Erie, in 
the province of the king 

3 For they had previously concerted their 
plan and matured it ; and taken on board the 
ships, the army of Columbia, and a number of 
the destroying engines. 

_ ■— — — . . — , -**.*^- M «-, y . 

* Gen. Morgan Lewis. 



j26 

4 And when the vessels of Chauncey came 
nigh unto the place, they let the destroying 
engines loose upon the fort, with a roaring 
noise. 

5 In the meantime the army landed upon 
the shore, and went against the servants of 
the king. 

6 And the men of Britain were frighten- 
ed at the sound of the warring instruments 
that reached their camp, and they fled in dis- 
may towards the strong hold of Queenstown. 

7 And they destroyed their tents, and 
their store-houses, and put a match to the 
black dust of their magazines, and blew them 
up into the air ; this they did even from Chip- 
jjarva and Albino. 

8 Moreover, the slain and wounded of the 
king were two hundred two score and ten ; of 
the men of Columbia about three score were 
slain and maimed. 

9 So the forts George and Erie were cap- 
tured by the army and navy of the United 
States. 

10 And Henry, and Isaac, whose sur-name 
was Chauncey, spake well of all the captains 
and men that fought with them. 



127 

1 1 The gallant captains Scott and Forsyth 
fought bravely ; neither were they afraid. 

12 Boyd, and M'Comb, and Winder, and 
Chandler, and Porter, and a host of heroes, 
turned not aside from the heat of the battle. 

13 And here the noble spirit of the youth- 
ful Perry burst forth into view ; a man made 
to astonish the world, and shower down glory 
upon the arms of Columbia. 

14 Now it happened about the same time 
that the strong ships of Britain moved to- 
wards the other end of the lake, to the east 
thereof, and went against the place called 
SacketCs Harbor. 

15 The fleet of the king was commanded 
by a chief captain whose name was Yeo ; and 
Prevost, the governor of Canada, command- 
ed the army. 

16 And on the morning of the twenty- 
ninth day of the month, they landed more 
than a thousand men on the shores of Co- 
lumbia. 

17 Howbeit, a certain valiant man, even 
Jacob, whose sur-name was Brown, com- 
manded the host of Columbia that went 
against them : 

L 2 



128 

18 And Jacob, albeit a man of peace,* 
drove the men of Britain, and compelled 
them to flee rapidly from the shore, and get 
them into their vessels. 

19 So Prevost and Yeo returned to the 
strong hold of Kingston. 

20 And the skill of Jacob, in driving away 
the soldiers of the king, pleased the people, 
and they honored him greatly. 

21 J\ T ot many days after these things, there 
was a sore battle fought, near to a place call- 
ed Forty-mile Creek. 

22 And it was so that Winder and Chan- 
dler, two brave captains of the United States, 
and about four score men, were come upon 
unawares in the darkness of the night, and 
made captive by the servants of the king. 

23 After which they were conveyed to the 
strong hold of Montreal, which lieth in the 
province of Canada, on the river St. Lawrence. 

24 The officers and soldiers of Columbia 
fought bravely, and there were many slain 
and wounded on both sides ; 

25 Nevertheless, the army of the United 
States rested nigh unto the place. 

/ . I i » ii . i ■ * *• 

* General Biown is a Quaker. 



129 



CHAP. XXIV. 



Capture of the Chesapeake — Com. Decatur 
blockaded in New-London. 



JLN these days the pride of Britain wae 
sorely wounded ; for she had been discomfit- 
ed upon the waters of the great deep ; and 
disappointment had sharpened her anger. 

2 The people of Columbia had triumphed 
over her ships ; and her mighty armies had 
gained no honors. 

3 Notwithstanding she had made peace 
with the nations of Europe, and her whole 
strength was turned against the people of 
Columbia. 

4 The prosperity of many hundred years 
had flattered her, and she was puffed up with 
the vanity thereof ; yea 3 she had forgotten 
herself. 

5 So it came to pas's, on the first day of 
the sixth month, a certain strong ship of the 



130 

lung, called the Shannon, appeared before 
the haven of Boston, which lieth to the east. 

6 And she bid defiance to the vessels of 
Columbia; for she had prepared herself for 
the event. 

7 Now the Chesapeake, a fighting ship of 
the United States, was nigh unto the place ; 
and she was commanded by the brave Law- 
rence, who had gained much honor in the sight 
of the people ; neither was he afraid. 

8 And he went forth to battle against the 
vessel of the king, which was commanded by 
Broke, a valiant man. 

9 Moreover, the mischievous engines that 
were in the ship of Britain were more, like- 
wise the number of their men were greater 
than those of the vessel of the United States. 

10 For Broke had gotten about two hun- 
dred men, and secreted them, so that when 
the hour of danger arrived they might assist 
his men, and fall unawares upon the men of 
JLawrence. 

11 Nevertheless, towards the going down 
of the sun, the vessels drew nigh unto each 
other. 

12 And Lawrence spake unto his officers 
and his mariners, saying : 



131 

13 Now shall we set our engines at the 
work of destruction ; let the fire issue out 
of their mouths, as it were like unto fiery 
dragons. 

14 And although their numbers be great- 
er than ours, yet may we be conquerors ; for 
he who is little of spirit gainelh nothing. 

15 But if, peradventure, we should be 
overcome, even then shall not the sacred 
cause of Liberty perish, neither shall the 
people of Columbia be disheartened. 

16 Also, your names shall be recorded as 
the champions of freedom. 

17 And the nations of the earth shall 
learn with astonishment, how dearly you 
prize the inheritance of your fathers. 

18 Now when Lawrence had made an end 
of speaking, they sat the destroying engines 
to work, and rushed one upon another like 
fierce tigers. 

19 The fire and smoke were abundant, and 
tremendous was the noise that floated upon 
the waters round about, 

20 And the Chesapeake fell close upon 
the Shannon, swords clashed with swords, 
and pikes with pikes ; and dreadful was the 
conflict thereof. 



132 

21 But the men of Broke were more nu- 
merous than the men of Lawrence, and 
overpowered them, by the means of their 
numbers. 

22 Already had the valiant Lawrence 
fallen ; his life-blood flowed fast ; still he 
cried out to his brave companions, saying 
unto them, Don't give up the ship : his noble 
spirit fled, but his name shall not perish. 

23 Moreover, about this time all the offi- 
cers of the ship of the United States were 
either slain or sorely wounded ; so she was 
captured by the vessel of the king. 

24 After which the wickedness of barbari- 
ans again came forth ; to be conquerors was 
not enough : but they were vain-glorious 
and overjoyed, and so became prodigal in 
spilling the blood of their prisoners. 

25 Satan rose up in their hearts, and they 
shot the balls of death down into the hold of 
the vessel of the United States, even against 
the halt and maimed who had surrendered 
themselves. 

26 And when the tidings thereof reached 
the kingdom of Great Britain, the lords, the 
princes, the rulers, yea, all the people were 
rejoiced beyond measure. 



133 

27 And they bid their roaring engines ut- 
ter their voices, in London, their chief city, 
that had been silent many years, even those 
in the great tower,* which wasbuiit by Wil- 
liam the conqueror, more than seven hun- 
dred years ago. 

28 Their joy was unbounded, for they 
had overcome one of the strong ships of Co- 
lumbia. 

29 Now the slain and the wounded on 
board the Chesapeake, were an hundred two 
score and four ; and there fell of the servants 
of the king about two hundred. 

30 Amongst the slain of Columbia were 
also Augustus, whose sur-name was Ludlow, 
and another brave officer whose name was 
While. 

31 And when the people of Columbia 
heard of a truth that Lawrence was slain, 
they mourned for him many day9. 

32 His body was conveyed to a place 
called Halifax, in the province of the king, 
where they honored his name, and buried 
him for a while. 



* On this occasion they fired their tower guns, which had not 
been done since Nelson's victory. 



134 

33 But in process of time his body was 
taken out of the earth, likewise the body of 
Ludlow, and conveyed to the city of New- 
York. 

34 And the captain's name who brought 
the bodies away from Halifax, was Crownm- 
skidd. 

35 So Lawrence w T as buried in the burial- 
place of his fathers, in his own land : and a 
great multitude of people went out to behold 
the funeial as it passed through the city. 

36 And his valiant deeds shall live in the 
remembrance of the people. 

37 About this time, on the fourth day of 
the month, the brave Decatur essayed to go 
forthwith his vessels upon the waters of the 
mighty deep, 

38 And the vessels that were with him 
were called the United States , the Hornet, and 
the Macedonian; a strong ship which he had 
captured from the king. 

39 But it was so, that some large vessels 
of Britain, carrying each of them more than 
seventy of the destroying engines, suffered 
him not to go forth. 

40 Moreover, they wished to retake the 



135 

Macedonian, that they might retrieve the 
shame of the capture thereof. 

40 So the ships of Britain blockaded De- 
catur and his ships in the haven of New- 
London, being in the latitude of blue-lights, 
which lieth in the state of Connecticut, 
nigh unto a place called Stonington, and they 
remained there many months. 






M 



136 



CHAP. XXV. 



Capture of Col. Boerstler and Major Chapin, 
with their command — treatment of prisoners 
— Major Chopin's escape. 



JN OW there was much hard fighting on the 
borders, for the nations were wroth against 
one another, and many men were slain by the 
sword. 

2 (But it is written in the book of Jere- 
miah the prophet, that, He who is slain by 
the sword, is better than he who is slain by 
famine.) 

3 Nevertheless, many of the soldiers of 
Columbia suffered by the means thereof, for 
the cruelty of Britain hath not been exceed- 
ed by any. 

4 Inasmuch, as they gave unto them who 
fell into their hands unwholesome food, and 
a scanty fare. 

5 But when the servants of the king be- 
came captives to the people of Columbia, 



13? 

they were kindly treated, and partook of 
the fat of the land. 

6 Now it came to pass, in the second year 
of the war, on the twenty-third day of the 
sixth month, 

7 That a captain of the United States., 
whose sur-name was Boerstler, was ordered 
to go forth from the slrong hold of Fort 
George, to annoy the enemy. 

8 And the name of the place where he es- 
sayed to go, was called JB caver-dams, being 
distant from the strong hold of Qiieenstown 
about seventy furlongs. 

9 And the number of the men of war of 
Columbia who followed after him was little 
more than five hundred. 

10 But when they came nigh unto the 
place, early in the morning of the next day, 
lo ! they were encompassed round about by 
the savages and soldiers of the king. 

1 1 Nevertheless, they fought bravely for 
a time, and Dearborn, the chief captain of 
Fort George, sent the valiant Chrystie to 
help him out of his snare. 

12 But Boerstler and his army had al- 
ready become captive to the men of Britain. 

13 And they made a covenant in writing, 



138 

between one another, but the men of Britain 
violated the covenant. 

14 Inasmuch as they permitted the sava- 
ges to rob the officers of their swords, and 
their apparel, yea, even the shoes from off 
their feet. 

15 After which the men of Columbia 
were commanded to go in boats, down to the 
strong hold of Kingston, in the province of 
the king. 

16 But a certain brave captain, called 
Chapin,* a cunning man withal, made his es- 
cape in a boat, and arrived at the strong hold 
of Fort George ; having, by the strength of 
his single arm, overpowered three of the 
strong men of Britain. 



* Major Chapin. 



W 1 ^ 



139 



CHAP. XXVI. 



Capture of Fort Schlosser and Black Rock — 
Gen. Dearborn resigns his command to Gen. 
Boyd, on account of sickness — star nations 
declare war against Canada. 



AND it came to pass, on the fourth day of 
the seventh month, which is the birth day of 
Columbian Liberty and Independence, 

2 In the dark and solemn hour of the 
night, when the deadly savage walketh 
abroad, and the hungry wolves howl along 
the forest, 

3 A band of the men of Britain crossed 
over the water from Chippawa to a place 
called Fort Schlosser, 

4 And there was a handful of the men of 
the United States in the place, whom they 
made captive, being twelve in number. 

5 Likewise, they carried away the bread 
and the meat, and some of the strong waters ; 
also one of the destroying engines. 

M2 



140 

6 Moreover, the engine which they 
brought away was made partly of brass, 
partly of iron, and partly of wood. 

7 And the weight of the ball that issued 
out of its mouth was about two hundred she- 
kels, after the shekel of the sanctuary. 

8 On the tenth day of the same month 
they also passed over the river Niagara, to- 
wards a place called Black Rock, and the 
small band at the place fled. 

9 And they destroyed the strong house, 
and the camp with fire, and carried away the 
flour, and the salt, and such things as they 
stood in need of. 

10 However, while they were yet carry- 
ing them away, there came a band of men of 
the United States, from the village of Buf- 
faloe, 

11 And let their instruments of war loose 
upon them ; and smote them even unto 
death ; albeit, those who were not slain es- 
caped with their plunder. 

12 And they fled hastily away, leaving 
nine of their slain behind, and more than half 
a score of captives. 

13 The soldiers of the king were com- 
manded by two men, the one called Bishop 



J41 

and the other Warren, and the men of 
Columbia were commanded by a chief 
captain, named Porter.* 

14 About this time the savages and the 
men of war of Britain assailed the guards 
and the out-posts near unto Fort George. 

1*5 Day after day and night after night 
did they annoy them ; and many were slain 
on both sides. 

J 6 And Dearborn, the chief captain of the 
fort, and of the host of Columbia round 
about Niagara, became sick and unable to 
go out to battle. 

17 So Boyd, a brave and tried warrior, 
was made chief captain in his stead, until 
Wilkinson, the chief captain, arrived : and 
the gallant Fraser was appointed one of his 
aids. 

18 Now there were some amongst the 
tribes of the savages, who had been instruct- 
ed in the ways of God, and taught to walk 
in the path of righteousness ; 

19 For the chief governor of the land of 



Gen. P. B. Porter, 



142 






Columbia, and the great Sanhedrim of the 
people, had taken them under their care, 

20 And sent good men amongst them to 
preach the gospel, and instruct them in the 
sublime doctrine of the Saviour of the world. 

21 And they hearkened unto the preach- 
ers, and were convinced, and their natures 
were softened. 

22 Amongst these tribes were those who 
were called, the Six nations of New-York 
Indians : 

23 And their eyes were opened, and 
they saw the evil and the wickedness of 
Britain. 

24 So their chiefs and their counsellors 
rose up and made war against the province 
of Canada, and fought against the hired sa- 
vages of the king of Britain. 

25 But in all their acts they suffered not 
the spirit of barbarians to rule over them. 

26 They remembered the good counsel 
given to them by their aged chief.* 



* Alluding to an eloquent speech, delivered about tbat 
time, to the Six Nations, by one of their old warriors. 



343 

27 And when the red savages and the 
men of Britain fell into their hands, they 
raised neither the tomahawk nor the scalp- 
ing knife. 

28 Nay, they treated them kindly; and 
those who were slain in battle they disturbed 
not ; and their humanity exceeded the hu- 
tyianity of the white men of Britain. 









144 



CHAP. XXVIL 

Affairs on Lake Ontario, between the fleets of 
Com. Chauncey and Sir James Yeo. 

IN those days, the great waters of the lake 
Ontario were troubled with the movements 
of the fighting ships of Columbia, as well as 
those of the king. 

2 Now the fleet of the king, which was 
commanded by Yeo, who was a skilful cap- 
tain, was greater than the fleet of Columbia, 
which was commanded by the brave Chaun- 
e,ey. 

3 And they had contrived to move to and 
fro upon the bosom of the lake Ontario many 
months, 

4 And two of the small vessels, called the 
Julia and the Growler, being parted from 
the fleet, fell into the hands of Yeo. 

5 Nevertheless, Chauncey followed after 
Yeo, and hemmed him in for a time. 

6 But a strong west wind arose and the 
fleets were again separated. 






145 

7 After this Chauncey captured a number 
of small fighting vessels, and about three 
hundred soldiers of the king. 

8 Now it was so, that when Yeo put his 
fleet in battle array, as though he would 
fight, 

9 Then Chauncey went out against him, 
to meet him, and give him battle ; but the 
heart of Yeo failed him, and he turned aside 
from the ships of Columbia. 

10 So Chauncey sailed along the borders 
of the lake, from the one end to the other ; 
even from Niagara to Sackett's Harbor, and 
Yeo followed him not. 

11 Now all the vessels of the king, and all 
the vessels of the United States, that carried 
the destroying engines, upon the lake Onta- 
rio, being numbered were about seventeen. 

12 Howsoever, they cut down the tall 
trees of the forest, and hewed them, and built 
many more strong vessels ; although they had 
no gophar-wood amongst them in these days. 

1 3 And they made stories to them, even 
to the third story, and they put windows in 
them, and they pitched them within and 
without will) pitch; after the fashion of the 
ark. 



146 

14 And, io ! some of the ships which they 
built upon the lake, carried about an hundred 
of the engines of death. 

] 5 And the weight of a ball which they 
Yomited forth was about a thousand shekels. 

16 Now the rest of the acts of Chauncey 
and Yeo. which they did, are they not writ- 
ten in the book of Palmer, the scribe ?* 



* Historical Register, an excellent publication, in 4 vols, oc- 
tavo, printed in Philadelphia, 1816 ; which contains the facts 
and the official documents of the late >var. 



5^: 



147 



CHAP. XXVIII. 

Affairs on Lake Champlain — pillage of 
Platlsburgk by the British — bombardment 
of Burlington — depredations committed in 
the Chesapeake, and along the coast. 

JN OW the fighting vessels of Britain began 
to appear npon the lake, called, by the an- 
cient Gauls, Champlain. 

2 And the vessels of war of Columbia that 
were upon the waters of the lake were not 
yet prepared for battle ; the name of the 
commander whereof was JSFDonougli, (a 
stripling). 

3 So it came to pass, on the thirty and first 
day of the seventh month, that the vessels of 
the king came forward against Plattsburgh, 
which lieth on the borders of the lake. 

4 And there were none to defend the 
place ; for the army of Hampton, a chief cap- 
tain of the United States, was encamped upon 
the opposite side of the lake, at a place call- 
ed Burlington, in the state of Vermont. 



148 

5 And the number of the soldiers of the 
king that landed at Plattsburgh was more 
than a thousand men, and the name of their 
chief captain was Murray. 

6 And a captain of the United States, 
whose name was Mooers, a man of valor, 
strode to gather together the husbandmen of 
the place, but they were not enough. 

7 So the army of the king captured the 
place ; and the men of Columbia fled before 
the men of war of Britain. 

8 Moreover, the wickedness which had 
been committed at Hampton, was noised 
abroad, even from the shores of Virginia 
to lake Champlain. 

9 Accordingly all the women and chil- 
dren, who were able, suddenly departed from 
the place, lest the same thing might, perad- 
venture, happen unto them. 

10 Neither were they deceived in judg- 
ment ; for, lo ! when the place was given up, 
and a covenant made, the servants of the 
king proved faithless. 

1 1 They abided not by the contract ; say- 
ing, Pish ! ye are but Yankees, therefore will 
we do to you as seemeth meet unto us ! 

12 So they burnt the houses, and all other 



149 



things belonging to the United States, witb 
fire. 

13 After which they fell upon the mer- 
chandise, the goods, and the chatties of all 
manner of persons ; nay, the persons of some 
of the women were abused : 

14 Meanwhile they forced others to put 
the burning brand to their own dwellings ; 
or pay them tribute. 

15 They killed the cattle, and prepared 
them food ; and after they had eaten and 
drank, they overturned the tables. 

16 So when their vengeance was comple- 
ted, they departed to other places and com- 
mitted like evils. 

17 About the same time the vessels of the 
king, that sailed on the lake, went against 
the town of Burlington ; where the army of 
Hampton was. 

18 But when the men of Columbia began 
to let the destroying engines loose upon 
them from the strong hold before the town, 
they fled in dismay. 

19 Now while these things were passing 
in the north, Ihe greedy sons of Britain were 
laying desolate the small vil lages of the south. 

20 On the waters of the Chesapeake they 



150 

captured the small vessels and made spoil 
thereof. 

21 Moreover, they gat possession of a 
Small place called Kent Island, and robbed 
the poor and needy ; for there was no mercy 
in them. 

22 Yea, it was said of a truth, and talked 
abroad, that they came in the night time, and 
disturbed the small cattle, and the fowls, and 
took them for their own use, and crawled 
away like men ashamed ; 

23 Thus committing a sin, by violating the 
eighth commandmant of God, which saith, 

THOD SHALT NOT STEAL. 

24 Even the state of North-Carolina es- 
caped them not ; they landed a thousand 
men of war at a place called Ocracocke. 

25 And again the work of destruction be- 
gan ; they spread terror and dismay whither- 
soever they went. 

26 They troubled the men of Columbia 
all along the sea coast, which is more than 
eight thousand furlongs, from north to south. 

27 Moreover, they gat much plunder; 
even much of the good things with which the 
land of Columbia aboundeth. 



151 



CHAP. XXIX. 



Major Croghan defeats the British and In- 
dians, under Gen. Proctor, in their attack 
on Fort Stephenson, Lower Sandusky. 



Nevertheless, it came to pass, that 

Harrison, the chief captain of the north west 
army, had placed a captain, a young man, in 
the hold called Fort Stephenson, to defend it. 

2 Now the fort lieth at the western end of 
the great lake Erie, at a place called San- 
dusky. 

3 And the number of the soldiers that 
were with the youth in the hold, was about 
an hundred and three score, and they had 
only one of the destroying engines. 

4 Now the name of the young man was 
George, and his sur-name was Croghan. 

5 So on the first day of the eighth month, 
about the going down of the sun, a mighty 
host from J^lalden appeared before the holdk 

IS 2 



152 

6 Even a thousand savages, and about five 
hundred men of war of Britain ; and Proctor 
was the commander thereof, 

7 Moreover, they brought the instruments 
of destruction in great plenty ; even howitzers, 
which were not known in the days of the 
children of Israel. 

8 And they had prepared themselves for 
the fight, and encompassed the place round 
about, both by land and by water. 

9 After which Proctor sent a message to 
the brave Croghan, by a captain whose name 
was Elliot, and the words thereof were in 
this sort : 

10 Lo ! now ye can neither move to the 
right nor to the left, to escape, for we have 
bemmed you in ; 

1 1 Therefore, that your blood may not 
be spilt in vain, we command that ye give up 
the strong hold into the hands of the servants 
©f the king, and become captives. 

12 We have the destroying engines in 
abundance, and we are a numerous host. 

13 Furthermore, if ye refuse then shall 
the wild savages be let loose upon you ; and 
there shall be none left among you to go 
and tell the titungs thereof. 



153 

14 But when Croghan heard the message, 
he answered and said unto Elliot, Get thee 
now to thy chief captain, and say unto 
him, I refuse ; neither will 1 hearken unto 
him : 

15 And if it be so, that he come against 
me with his whole host, even then will I 
not turn aside from the fierce battle ; though 
his numbers were as the sand on the sea 
shore. 

16 Lol David, of old, with a sling and a 
stone slew the mighty Goliah: and shall the 
people of Columbia be afraid, and bow be- 
fore the tyrants of Europe ? 

17 Then Elliot returned to the army of 
the king ; and immediately the mouths of 
their engines were opened against the fort. 

18 And the noise thereof continued a long 
time ; even until the next day ; but their bat- 
tering prevailed not. 

19 Now when Proctor saw it was of no 
avail, he divided his host into two bands, 
and appointed a captain to each band ; and 
they moved towards the fort and assailed it 
with great violence. 

20 But the men of Croghan were pre« 
pared for them ; and they let loose their 



154 

weapons of war upon them, and set their 
destroying engine to work, and smote the 
men of Britain, hip and thigh, with great 
slaughter. 

21 And the deep ditch that surrounded 
the fort was strewn with their slain and their 
wounded. 

22 So the host of Britain were dismayed 
and overthrown, and fled in confusion from 
the fort into the forest ; from whence, in the 
dead of the night, they went into their ves- 
sels, and departed from the place. 

23 Now the loss of the men of Britain was 
about an hundred two score and ten ; and of 
the men of Columbia there was one slain 
and seven wounded. 

24 But when Proctor had rested his army 
he sent a skilful physician to heal the maim- 
ed which he had fled from and left behind. 

25 But Harrison, the chief captain said 
unto him, Already have my physicians bound 
up their wounds, and given them bread and 
wine, and comforted them ; after the manner 
of our country. 

26 For we suffer not the captives that 
fall into our hands to be buffeted or mal- 
treated 5 neither want they for any thing. 



155 

27 So the physician of the king's army 
was permitted to return to his own camp. 

28 Moreover, great honor and praise were 
bestowed upon the brave Croghan, the cap- 
tain of the fort, for his valiant deeds; and hie 
name was spoken of with joy throughout the 
land of Columbia, 






156 



CHAP. XXX. 



British schooner Dominica; of 14 guns, cap' 
tured by the privateer Decatur, of 7 guns — 
XJ. 8. brig Argus captured by the Pelican — 
capture of the Boxer by the U* S. brig En- 
terprise, 



JN OW the war continued to rage without 
abatement upon the waters of the great 
deep ; 

2 And manifold were the evils that came 
upon the children of men by the means 
thereof. 

3 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim of the 
people were forced to bestir themselves ; and 
they had continued their councils day after 
day without ceasing. 

4 And it came to pass, that there was a 
dreadful battle fought between a vessel of 
the king, and a private vessel of Columbia. 

5 Now the name of the vessel that fought 
was Decatur, and the captain's name was JOir 
ron, a GauL 



J 57 

6 And it was so, that about the fourth day 
of the eighth month, the Decatur having sail- 
ed out of the haven of Charleston, being in 
the state of South Carolina, fell in with one 
of the fighting vessels of the king, called the 
Dominica. 

7 But the destroying engines of the king's 
vessel were two-fold greater in numbers 
than those of the Decatur. 

8 Nevertheless, they set them to work, 
so that they groaned beneath the fire and 
smoke ; 

9 And in about the space of an hour the 
Dominica was conquered and taken captive. 

10 For when the vessels came close to- 
gether, the men smote one another with 
their swords and weapons of war; yea, even 
the balls of iron they cast at each other, with 
their hands, and slew one another with won- 
derful slaughter. 

11 Inasmuch as there were slain and 
maimed of the king three score souls ; those 
of the Decatur were about a score : more- 
over the captain of the Dominica was slain. 

12 The fight was an unequal one ; and 
the bravery of Diron gained him a great 
name, for he overcame the enemies of free- 



158 

dona ; although their force was greater than 
his. 

13 After this, on the fourteenth day of the 
same month, there was another sore battle 
between a small vessel of the United States, 
called the Argus, and the Pelican, a ship of 
the king. 

14 Now the Pelican was somewhat strong- 
er than the Argus, and they were stubborn 
and kept the destroying engines to work, 
with great noise, about forty and five minutes. 

15 And the brave captain of the Argus, 
whose name was Allen, was wounded unto 
death, and the vessel of Columbia was cap- 
tured by the ship of Britain, the name of the 
commander whereof was Maples. 

16 Of the men of Columbia six were slain 
and seventeen wounded ; of the men of Bri- 
tain the slain and wounded were five. 

17 Now the death of Allen was spoken of 
with sorrow throughout the land of Colum- 
bia, for he had defended the vessel of the 
United States nobly : and captured some 
merchant ships of Britain. 

18 Even the enemy regarded him for his 
bravery, for they buried him with honor in 
their own country, not far from the place 



159 

where he became captive, which was in the 
waters of the king, even in St. George's 
Channel. 

19 But it came to pass, on the fifth day of 
the next month, in the same year, 

20 That a certain small vessel of Colum- 
bia, carrying the engines of destruction, com- 
manded by a gallant man, whose name was 
Burrows, fell in with another small vessel of 
the king, called the Boxer, and the captain 
thereof was a brave man, and his name was 
Blythe. 

21 In the language of the people of the 
land, the vessel of Columbia was called the 
Enterprise. 

22 Now when the vessels drew nigh un- 
to each other the men shouted with loud 
shouting. 

23 And immediately they let the mischie 
vous engines loose upon one another, with a 
noise like unto thunder. 

24 But it happened, that in about the 
space of forty minutes, the Boxer was over- 
come ; but she was taken somewhat unawares: 

25 For, lo ! the pride of the men of Bri- 
tain had made them foolish ; and, thinking of 
conquest, they nailed Britannia's red-crosp 

to the mast of the vessel. 
o 



160 

26 Whereupon, after they were over- 
come, they cried aloud for mercy, saying, 

27 Behold ! our colors are fast ; and we 
cannot quickly unloose them : neverthe- 
less, we will be prisoners unto you, there- 
fore spare us. 

28 So the brave mariners of Columbia 
spared them, and stopped the destroying en- 
gines; for their hearts were inclined to mercy. 

29 However, this was another bloody fight; 
for there fell of the men of Britain forty that 
were slain outright, and seventeen were 
wounded. 

30 And the loss of Columbia in slain and 
maimed was about fourteen. 

31 And the commanders of both vessels 
were slain ; and they buried them with honor 
in the town of Portland, which leaveth Boston 
to the west; for the battle was fought hard by. 

32 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim was 
pleased with the thing, and gave unto the 
kinsman of Burrows a medal of gold, in to- 
ken of remembrance thereof.* 



* Mathew L. Davis, of New-York, passing by and observ- 
ing the burial place of Burrows, stopt and ordered a monument 
to be erected to his memory at his own private expense. 



J61 



CHAP. XXXI. 



The capture of the British Fleet on Lake Erie, 
by the American Fleet under Com. Perry* 



JL HE Lord, in the plenitude of his wisdom 
and power, ordaineth all things which come 
to pass : and the doings are for the benefit of 
man, and for the glory of God. 

2 For where is the evil which hath not 
turned to an advantage, and been a warning, 
and swallowed up the evil that might have 
come? 

3 J\ T ow about this time the strong vessels 
of Columbia, that moved upon the face of 
the blue waters of the great lake Erie, were 
given in charge to Oliver, whose sur-name 
was Perry. 

4 And he was a prudent man, and had 
prepared himself to meet the vessels of the 
king, even forty days before hand. 

5 And the name of the captain of the fleet 
®f Britain was Barclay, a man of great valor; 



262 

but he boasted and was vain of his fleet, 
for it was more powerful than the fleet of 
Columbia. 

6 Nevertheless, it came to pass, in the one 
thousand eight hundred and thirteenth year, 
on the tenth day of the ninth month, early 
in the morning, about the rising of the sun, 

7 The valiant Perry beheld the fleet of the 
lung at a distance upon the lake ; so he un- 
moored his vessel and went out to meet them 
in battle array, fleet against fleet. 

8 And when their white sails were spread 
upon the bosom of the lake, they appeared 
like unto a squadron of passing clouds. 

9 A gentle breeze wafted the hostile ves- 
sels towards one another. 

10 It was silence upon the waters; save 
when the sound of musical instruments fell 
sweetly upon the ear. 

11 But it happened, a little before the 
mid-day, that the shouts of the men of war of 
Britain were heard, and the shouts of the 
men of Columbia. 

12 And now the destroying engines be- 
gan to utter their thunders, vomiting forth 
fire and smoke and brimstone in abundance. 

13 And suddenly the waters were in an 



163 

uproar ; and the bellowing noise sounded 
along the lake. 

14 Moreover, the chief force of the ships 
of the king was put against the vessel ia 
which Perry was ; 

15 And the vessel was called the La«/< 
rence, after a brave man, whose dying words 
waved upon her, aloft : 

16 Now, behold, a thousand balls of iron, 
skim the surface of the waters, swift as 
shooting stars. 

17 But when the battle waxed hot, and 
Perry saw that the tackling of his vessel was 
shot away, and his men were slain and 
wounded with great slaughter, and his des- 
troying engines became silent, 

1 8 He put the charge of the vessel into 
the hands of one of his officers, whose name 
was Yarnelly a trusty man : 

19 Then, with the starry banner of Co- 
lumbia in his hand, did the gallant Perry 
leap into his cock-boat, while his brave mari- 
ners quickly conveyed him to another fight- 
ing vessel of the United States, called the 
JSiiagara, commanded by a valiant man 
whose name was Elliot. 

80 After this again the vessels uttered 

02 



164 

their thunders and fought hard, and the men 
of Columbia poured out destruction upon 
the servants of the king. 

21 And it came to pass, that the skilful 
contrivance of Perry, and the bravery of 
his men, at length forced the whole fleet of 
the king to become captive, even unto the 
cock-boats of Columbia. 

22 Thus again was the mighty lion hum- 
bled before the eagle: for six strong vessels 
of Britain were overcome at one time. 

23 And the slain and wounded of the 
king that day, was an hundred thirty and 
iive ; besides there were about a thousand 
prisoners. 

24 The loss of the United States was 
twenty and seven that were killed, and four 
score and ten were wounded. 

25 Moreover, the number of the men of 
Britain made captive was more than all the 
men of Perry's squadron. 

26 Now Perry was a righteous man, and, 
like the good Samaritan, took care of the 
halt and maimed, and put skilful men to 
bind up their wounds ; and the men of Bri- 
tain blessed lam, 



16a 

27 Neither was he a man puffed up with 
vanity, even in the hour of victory : 

28 For when he had conquered the fleet of 
Britain, he wrote to Jones,* one of the 
scribes of the great Sanhedrim, with modes- 
ty, saying, 

29 To day it hath pleased the Lord that 
the people of Columbia should triumph over 
their enemies. 

30 At the same time he wrote to Harri- 
son, the chief captain of the host of Colum- 
bia, whose army was at the bay of Sandusky, 
saying, We have met the enemy, and they 
are ours ! 

31 Then did the enemies of Columbia 
weep ; and the gainsayer put on deep 
mourning. 

32 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim honor- 
ed Perry with great honor; yea, they thanked 
him, and gave him medals, with devices cu- 
riously wrought. 

33 Likewise, the people gave him much 
silver plate, with gravings thereon, men- 
tioning his deeds. 



* W. Jones, Secretary of the Navy. 



166 

34 And the bye-slander might read hit 
triumph in his country's eyes. 

35 His sons shall hear him spoken of with 
pleasure ; and his name shall be mentioned 
in the song of the virgins. 

36 Where, oh ! Albion, are now thy 
mighty admirals ? where thy Nelson ? where 
the transcendant glory they gained for thee ? 

37 Alas ! it hath expired upon the waters 
of Erie, before the destroying engines of 
Perry ! 



WW 
StKM 



i67 



CHAP. XXXII. 



Capture of Maiden and Detroit — the army of 
Gen. Proctor retreat towards the Moravian 
towns — Gen. Harrison pursues them. 



iN OW when Perry bad taken care of the 
captives, and the wounded, and set them up- 
on the shore, 

2 He began to convey the army of Har- 
rison from Fort Meigs and round about. 

3 And having gathered them together in- 
to his vessels, he brought them, and landed 
them nigh unto the strong hold of Maiden. 

4 And it came to pass, on the twenty- 
third day of the same month, in which Perry 
conquered the fleet of Britain, 

5 That Harrison, the chief captain, began 
to march the host of Columbia against the 
strong hold of Maiden, and captured a town 
called Amherstburgh, nigh thereunto. 

6 Now Proctor was tfie chief captain of 
the savages and servantsof the king. 



168 






7 And when he saw the men of Columbia 
approach, he destroyed the fort, the tents, 
and the store-houses of the king, and, with 
his whole host, fled swiftly towards Sand- 
wich. 

8 And Harrison, and the host of Colum- 
bia, followed hard after him. 

9 Now when the savages of the wilder- 
ness beheld the men of Britain flee before 
the children of Columbia, their spirits sunk, 
and they were sore amazed.* 

10 Moreover, they upbraided the ser- 
vants of the king, saying, Lo ! ye have de- 
ceived us, and led us from our hunting 
grounds, and we are an hungered: 

1 1 For, verily, ye promised us bread and 
wine,f and silver and gold ; yea, even that 
we should drink of the strong waters of Ja- 
maica, if we would go out with you and 
fight the battles of the king, against the men 
of Columbia. 

12 But, behold! now ye would run away 
and leave us to fight alone. 

* See Tecumseh's letter to Proctor. 

f At this time it will be remembered the British army irere 
abort of supplies. 



1C9 

13 Whereupon many of their tribes cast 
away their tomahawks, and refused to fight 
under the banners of the king. 

14 And when Harrison came to Sand- 
wich, Proctor and his army had departed 
from the place, and fled towards the river 
Thames, near Moravian Town. 

15 (Now the Thames emptieth its waters 
into the lake St. Clair, and the Moravian 
Towns lie upon the river, about an hundred 
miles from Maiden, towards the north in the 
province of Upper Canada.) 

16 Moreover, as they journied on, the 
brave M* Arthur crossed over with his band 
to the strong hold of Detroit, and took it. 

17 But the savages and the men of Bri- 
tain had destroyed those things which they 
could not carry away, and fled in haste. 

18 So M'Arthur, in whom the chief cap- 
tain put much faith, remained at Detroit in 
the charge thereof. 

19 And it came to pass, when Harrison 
saw that the host of Britain fled before him, 
he departed from Sandwich and went after 
them ; it being on the second day of the next 
month. 

20 And his whole army followed after 



170 

turn, in all about three thousand brave men 
from the back- woods of the state of Ken- 
tucky and the pleasant villages of Ohio. 

21 Now Harrison was a mighty man of 
valor, and no man could make him afraid ; 
and the captains and officers that were with 
him were all valiant men. 

22 And, when some of his captains said 
unto him, Lo ! there is a feast to-day ; go 
thou and partake thereof, and refresh thy- 
self, and we will watch ; 

23 He answered and said unto them, Nay, 
shall I go and riot, whilst the warriors of Co- 
lumbia lie on the frozen ground? 

24 No, their fate shall be my fate ; and 
their glory shall be my glory. 

25 So he wrapped himself in his cloak, 
and lay down in his own tent. 

26 And the husbandmen of Kentucky 
were led on by their valiant governor, whose 
name was Shelby, and he was a man well 
stricken in years ; even at the age of three- 
score did he go out against the enemies of 
Columbia ; and all the people rejoiced in 
him. 

27 And the gallant Perry staid hot be- 
hind ; but freely offered his strength, and 



171 

was one of the right hand men of Harrison, 
with whom he followed after the host of 
Britain. 

29 Nevertheless, it happened that a band 
of the savages strove to give hindrance to 
the army of Columbia. 

30 But the men of Columbia let two of 
the destroying engines loose upon them, and 
they fled into the wilderness like wild deer. 






172 



CHAR XXXIIL 



Battle of the Thames — Gen. Harrison cap* 
tures the British army under Gen. Proc- 
tor — illuminations on account of it — news of 
it received in England. 



A.ND it came to pass, on the fifth day of 
the same month, that Proctor, with the sava- 
ges and the army of the king, rested upon 
advantageous ground, on the banks of the 
river Thames, 

2 Where he drew his army up in the or- 
der of battle, after the fashion of these days, 
and prepared himself to meet the host of Co- 
lumbia. 

3 Now the army of Proctor was mighty; 
for he had a thousand horsemen : but the 
number of the savages that followed after 
him* are not known to this time ; howbeit, 
they were many. 

4 And they were under the charge of a 
chief warrior, whom they called Tecumseh, a 






173 

savage whom the king had made a chief 
captain.* 

5 And it came to pass, on the same day, 
in the latter part of the day, the army of 
Harrison drew nigh unto the place. 

6 And he called together his captains of 
fifties, and his squadrons, and encouraged 
them, and commanded them to prepare 
themselves for the fight. 

7 And he put the host of Columbia in 
battle array against the host of Britain, army 
against army. 

8 Now the sound of the trumpet, the cym- 
bal, the bugle-horn, and the noisy drum, 
echoed through the deep wilderness. 

9 And the red savages appeared in the 
field before the men of Britain, for they had 
put them, as a shield, in the front of the 
battle. 

10 And they yelled with dreadful vei- 
lings, and sounded aloud the war-whoop^ 
which was the signal of death. 

1 1 But the army of Columbia rushed up- 
on them with the fierceness of lions. 



Brig. General 



174 

12 And the weapons of war were used 
without mercy ; the foxes and the beavers 
crept into their holes, for the destroying en- 
gines frightened the wild beasts, so that they 
looked for their hiding places. 

13 The gallant Johnson* fell upon them 
with a band of chosen horsemen, and he 
drove them before him like chaff before the 
wind, and smote their chief warrior, f and 
slew him with his own hand, so that he fell 
to the earth. 

44 And the host of Columbia assailed the 
men of Britain on all sides, and overcame 
them and made them prisoners of war ; 
whereupon the engines ceased to utter their 
thunders. 

15 Howbeit, Proctor escaped, on a swift 
running horse, with a handful of his captains 
that were under him. 

16 Now the number of prisoners captured 
by the army of Harison that day were about 
six hundred. 



* Col. Johnson, of the Kentucky light-horse. 

| Tecumseh : who was at that moment in the act of shooting 
ihe colonel. 



175 

17 And the slain and wounded of the 
men of Britain were thirty and three ; and 
the same number of savages were slain. 

18 Of the army of Columbia seven were 
slain and two score and two were wounded. 

19 But the men of Kentucky and Ohio, 
whose sons and brothers and fathers had been 
inhumanly slaughtered at the River Raisin, 
slew not a single captive. 

20 But they treated them as men; thus 
doing good for evil ; according to the word 
of the Lord. 

21 Moreover, they captured six of. the 
destroying engines that were made of brass, 
and two that were made of iron; besides 
many weapons of war. 

22 Now three of the brass engines were 
those given to the men of Britain, at the cap- 
ture of Detroit, the first year of the war, and 
were the same that had been taken from the 
king in the days of Washington. 

23 Soon after the battle, Harrison return- 
ed with his army to Detroit, where many of 
the savages had assembled, to repent of their 
evils, and ask for mercy from the chief cap- 
tain. 

24 So Harrison made a covenant with 

P 2 



176 

them, and they were thankful, and gave him 
hostages. 

25 Now there were great rejoicings 
among the children of Columbia, and the 
hearts of the people of the United States 
were exceeding glad. 

26 So that when the news thereof reached 
them they drank wine ; and when the even- 
ing came they lighted their candles, and put 
them in candlesticks of silver and candle- 
sticks of gold. 

27 And there were many thousands of 
them ; and the light thereof was as though 
the stars had fallen from heaven. 

28 This did they throughout the land of 
Columbia, from the district of Maine, in the 
east, to the state of Georgia, in the south. 

29 But the sect of the tories shut their 
eyes ; neither would they go out to behold 
the glory of the light thereof. 

30 Moreover, when the Prince Regent, 
and the chief counsellors, and the wise men 
of Britain, heard the tidings, for a truth, that 
their fleet and their army were captured, they 
were astonished beyond measure. 

31 They looked at one another like men 
who had lost their wits : they were si- 



177 

lent, and their tongues clave to the roof of 
their mouths. 

32 Their knees smote one against ano- 
ther, for the strength of Britain was shaken ; 
her valiant warriors lost their honor j* and 
her glory was outshone. 

33 Now there were great honor and praise 
bestowed upon Harrison for his courage, 
and his valiant acts - r and the people remem- 
bered his name with pleasure. 

34 Moreover, he gave great praise to 
Shelby, the governor, and Perry, and John- 
son, and all the brave men that were with 
him. 

3/3 And in the same month, when the ob- 
ject of the army was fulfilled, the husband- 
men of Columbia returned every man to his 
own house. 

36 But Harrison and Perry, and the band 
of warriors of the great Sanhedrim, went in- 
to their vessels. 



* Doubly lost it : by water and by land ; by being conquered 
and by being cruel. 



178 

3? And they moved from Detroit and 
came in the ships of Perry to Buffalo, 
nigh unto the river Niagara, to meet Wil- 
kinson, who came from the south, and was 
appointed chief captain of the army of the 
centre . 



• 






179 



CHAP. XXXI V. 



War with the Creek Nation of Indians — mas- 
sacre of Fort Minims — Georgia and Ten- 
nessee militia, under General Jackson, re- 
taliate* 

m 

JN OW it came to pass, while these things 
were going on in the north, and the repent- 
ant savages laid their murderous weapons at 
the feet of Harrison, 

2 That the servants of the king were stir- 
ring up the spirit of Satan in the savages of 
the wilderness of the south ; 

3 And placing the destroying engines into 
their hands that they might drink the blood 
of the people of Columbia. 

4 Now those southern barbarians were 
called the Creek nation of Indians. 

5 Moreover, thev were a nation of savages 
that dwelt in the back-woods and the wilder- 
ness round about the states of Georgia, Ten- 
nessee, and the Mississippi Territori/. 



180 

6 So about this time they took their 
weapons of death in their hands, and went 
against the strong hold of Fort Minims, 
which lieth on a branch of the river Mobile, 
which emptieth its waters into the great Gulf 
of 31exico. 

7 And they captured the place ; and with 
the fury of demons they murdered, with 
the tomahawk, the men, the women, and the 
infants that were in and about the fort, 
sparing neither age nor sex ; and slaying the 
prisoners that begged for mercy. 

8 Ana" the number of the people of Co- 
lumbia that were massacred and burnt alive 
in their houses, that day, was about four 
hundred ; however, there were an hundred 
savages slain. 

9 For it was a sore fight ; and Beasley, who 
commanded the fort, fought hard against 
them ; howbeit, he was slain. 

10 But it came to pass, in the same year, 
that the people of Columbia were revenged 
of the evil : 

1 L Andrew, whose sur-name was Jackson, 
a man of courage and valor, was chief cap- 
tain in the south, 

12 And he sent out one of his brave cap- 



181 

tains, whose name was Coffee, with a strong 
band; even nine hundred mighty horsemen: 

13 Now these were the valiant husband- 
men of Georgia and the back-woods of Ten- 
nessee ; their horses were fleet as the roe- 
buck ; their weapons of war were certain 
death. 

14 So they went forth against a town of 
the savages called Tallushatches, on the se- 
cond day of the eleventh month. 

15 And on the next day they encompassed 
the town round abont ; and the savages pre- 
pared themselves for battle. 

16 About the rising of the sun they sound- 
«d their drums, and began their horrible yel- 
lings. 

17 But they frightened not the hearts of 
the brave men of Tennessee. 

18 So when Coffee had stationed his cap- 
tains and his men of war about the town, in 
the order of battle, the whole army shouted 
aloud j 

19 And the instruments of destruction 
were let loose upon them on all sides ; and 
they fought with all their might. 

20 But the men of Columbia rushed 
upon them, and subdued them, and made 



182 

about four score women and children cap- 
tive. 

21 And slew about two hundred of their 
warriors ; leaving not a man to tell the ti- 
dings. 

22 For, lo ! when the savages of the wil- 
derness commit great evils and transgres- 
sions against the people of Columbia, 

23 The great Sanhedrim of the people 
send out mighty armies against them, that 
are able to overthrow them, and make their 
towns a desolation, and lay waste their habi- 
tations. 

24 Now the loss of the army of Columbia 
that day, was five slain and about forty 
wounded. 

25 And Jackson, the chief captain, gave 
great praise to Coffee, and all the valiant 
men that fought that day. 

26 On the next day after the battle, the 
army of Columbia returned to their camp, at 
a place called the I en-Islands. 






J83 



€HAP. XXXV. 



Continuation of the War with the Creeks — Gen, 
Jackson's grand victory over them — they sue 
for peace — a treaty is concluded with them. 



Notwithstanding their discomfi- 
ture, the nation of the Creeks were still bent 
on warring against the people of Columbia. 

2 And they committed many outrages up- 
on the inhabitants of the states round about. 

3 But it came to pass, on the seventh day 
of the same month, that a messenger came to 
Jackson, the chief captain, and spake unto 
him, saying : 

4 Lo ! even now, more than a thousand 
savages have pitched their tents at Talledo- 
ga, near the strong hold of Lashley, with in- 
tent to assail it. 

5 Immediately Jackson took two thousand 
hardy men, who were called volunteers, be- 
cause they fought freely for their country? 
and led them against the savages, 

a 



184 

6 Now the men of war that followed after 
him were mostly from the state of Tennes- 
see, and men of dauntless courage. 

7 So, early in the morning of the next 
day, the army of Jackson drew nigh the 
pJace, in battle array. 

8 And the savages came out towards the 
army of Columbia, with shouting and yell- 
ings : and again the engines of destruction 
were used plentifully. 

9 And the leaden balls whizzed about 
their ears like unto a nest of hornets. 

10 But the horsemen, and the whole army 
of Jackson, rushed upon the savages, and 
slew them with great slaughter, and over- 
came them. 

11 And the number of savages slain that 
day was about three hundred ; and a red- 
cross banner of the Spanish nation was found 
amongst them and taken. 

12 Seventeen of the men of Columbia 
were slain, and about four score wounded. 

13 So, when the battle was over, Jackson 
returned to his own camp. 

14 After these things had come to pass, 
on the twelfth day of the month, a certain 
captain, whose sur-name was White, was sent 



185 

against another place called the Hillabee- 
Towns. 

15 And, on the eighteenth day of the 
same month, he took the towns, and destroy- 
ed them, and slew three score of the savages, 
and made about two hundred two score and 
ten prisoners. 

16 About eleven days afterwards, a val- 
iant captain, whose name was Floyd, with his 
brave men, went against the towns of Autos* 
see and Tallisee, which lie on the banks of the 
river Tallapoosie. 

17 And Floyd went against them with 
boldness, and triumphed over them, and kill- 
ed about two hundred of them, and burned 
their towns with fire, and slew the king of 
Autossee, and the king of Tallisee, who were 
the kings of two tribes. 

18 Moreover, on the thirteenth day of the 
next month, Claiborne, a governor, and a 
man of valor, went against the savages that 
dwelt on the river Alabama ; 

19 And he marched with his army through 
the wilderness more than an hundred miles, 
to a town built upon a place called by the 
savages the Holy-ground, where three of the 
Indian prophets dwelt. 



186 

20 Now there were lying prophets among 
the savages, even as there were in the days 
of old ; and they prophesied according to 
their own wishes ; 

21 And those of shallow understanding 
believed them, and were led into a snare, 
whereby their whole tribe was nigh being 
destroyed. 

22 And Wether ford, the chief warrior of 
the Creek nation, was there also with his 
band. 

23 And he fought hard against Claiborne ; 
but he was overthrown, and fled, and the 
town was burnt, even two hundred houses. 

24 After all these tribulations, the depre- 
dations of the savages of the south were not 
stayed. 

25 So Jackson, the chief captain, went out 
against them with his army, and attacked 
them at their strong hold on the waters of 
the Tallapoosie, where they were entrench- 
ed, having more than a thousand warriors. 

26 'Now this was on the twenty and se- 
venth day of the third month, in the one 
thousand eight hundred and fourteenth year 
of the age of Christianity. 

27 And Jackson set his destroying engines 



J 87 

to work, and fought desperately against 
them, for about the space of five hours; 
when he overcame them, so that only about 
a score escaped. 

28 Seven hundred and fifty of the savage 
warriors were found slain in battle ; and two 
hundred two score and ten women and chil- 
dren became captives to the army of Co- 
lumbia. 

29 Manahoee, their chief prophet, was 
smitten in the mouth, and slain, and two other 
false prophets were slain with him. 

30 Moreover, about the first day of the 
sixth month, a brave man, whose name was 
Pearson, with the husbandmen of the states 
of Aorlh and South Carolina, went against 
them along the borders of the Alabama, and 
captured about six hundred of them. 

31 Thus did the men of Columbia triumph 
over them, and conquer them, even to the 
seventh time. 

32 And so the judgment of the Lord fell 
upon them for their unrighteousness, and for 
their wicked and murderous deeds. 

33 After which they repented of their 
evil, having, through their own folly, lost 

many thousand warriors. 

a 2 



J 88 

34 And the chief warriors gave up their 
instruments of destruction, and laid them at 
the feet of Jackson, the chief captain. 

35 Even Wetherford, the chief warrior, 
gave himself up to Jackson, saying, I fought 
with my might ; but I have brought evil upon 
my nation ; and thou hast slain my warriors; 
and I am overcome. 

36 Now the savages are easily inflamed 
and roused to works of sin and death ; and 
of their weakness the servants of the king 
are not ashamed to take advantage ; even 
to the ruin of the poor and ignorant bar- 
barians. 

37 So the warriors and the whole nation 
of the Creeks, being tired of a destructive 
war, entreated the men of Columbia for 
peace, saying unto Jackson, 

38 Lo ! now are our eyes opened to our 
own profit ; now will we make peace with 
you. 

39 And if ye will no more suffer the fire, 
and the sword, and the destroying engines to 
jgpread desolation amongst us, 

40 Then will we* make a covenant with 
you, and give you for an inheritance a great 



189 

part of the land which our fathers inherited 
before us. 

41 And the length and the breadth there- 
of shall be about as large as the whole island 
of Britain, whose men of war have led us 
into this snare. 

42 For although the king, who calleth 
himself our father, across the great waters, 
did put the instruments of death into our 
hands, and give us the black dust in abun- 
dance ; nevertheless he deceived us ; and in 
the hour of danger his servants left us to take 
care of ourselves. 

*^>^43 So Jackson made a covenant with them , 
ano*rfrw«^signed by the chiefs of their natio«. 
44 And after it had been examined by the 
wise men and the great Sanhedrim of the 
people, it was signed with the hand-writing 
of James, the chief governor of the land of 
Columbia. 



190 

CHAP. XXXVI. 

Plan of attack on Montreal defeated. 

1 HE frailty of man speaketh volumes : one 
man accuseth another ; but where is he who 
is perfect? 

2 Man deviseth mighty plans in his own 
mind, but he accomplisheth them not. 

3 He is wise in his own conceit, but his 
wisdom faileth him : he seeth folly in others,, 
but perceiveth not his own ; he is as a reed 
shaken with the wind. 

4 Now the country of Columbia was assail- 
ed on every side by the enemies of freedom: 

5 And in the hope that the war might 
speedily cease, and an end be made of the 
shedding of blood, the great Sanhedrim of 
the people wished to push their armies into 
the heart of the proyinces of the king, even 
to Montreal. 

6 So they pitched upon certain chief cap- 
tains, who were well skilled in the arts of 



191 

warfare ; and Wilkinson and Hampton were 
the names of the captains ; 

7 And Brown, and Boyd, and Covington, 
and Swift, and Coles, and Purdy, and !?«/>- 
&y, and Swarttvout, and Fraser, and many 
others, were valiant captains under them. 

8 Not many days after Harrison returned 
from his triumph over Proctor's army ; and 
in the same year, it came to pass that Wil- 
kinson conveyed his army from Fort George 
and the country of Niagara, to Sackett's 
Harbor, at the east end of lake Ontario ; 
leaving Harrison and M'Clure behind, at 
the strong hold of Fort George. 

9 From Sackett's Harbor Wilkinson 
moved to a place called Grenadier Island ; 
and in the first week of the eleventh month 
he arrived at Ogdensbnrgh, in order to go 
against the strong hold of Montreal. 

10 Now the army of Hampton rested 
nigh unto lake Champlain ; and about the 
same time he moved towards the borders of 
the king. 

11 And Wilkinson sent a messenger to 
him and entreated him to come and meet 
him, and join the two armies together at the 
village of St. Regis. 



192 

12 The same night Wilkinson with his 
army crossed the great river St. Lawrence, 
near by the strong hold of Prescot, which li- 
eth in the dominions of the king. 

13 And he moved down with about six 
thousand men towards the hold of Montreal, 
until he came to a place called Crysthr's 
Farms, near unto Williamsburgh. 

14 Now at this place, on the eleventh day 
of the eleventh month, a strong band of the 
men of war of Britain, from Kingston and 
round about, fell upon his army in the rear, 
and annoyed them greatly. 

15 At length, on the same day, a part of 
the army of Columbia turned about, and 
fought against them and drove them back ; 
however it was a sore fight. 

16 Wilkinson, the chief captain who went 
before the host of Columbia, had been sick 
many days, and was unable to go forth 
against them himself. 

17 So he sent some of his brave cap- 
tains, even Boyd, and Swartwout, and Cov- 
ington ; and the engines of destruction were 
set to work with great noise and fury ; and 
the valiant Covington was wounded unto 
death. 



193 

18 Moreover, the loss of the men of Co- 
lumbia that day was an hundred slain, and 
two hundred two score and ten wounded, 
and the loss of the king was about an hun- 
dred four score and one. 

19 After this battle the army of Wilkin- 
son moved along down the St. Lawrence un- 
til they came to Barnhearts, near Cornwall, 
where they met the valiant Brown. 

20 Now this place lieth on the north side 
of the river, and on the other side lieth St. 
Regis, where Wilkinson, the chief captain, 
expected to be joined by the army of Hamp- 
ton from Champlain. 

21 But in this he was disappointed ; for, 
lo ! Hampton sent one of his captains, whose 
name was Atkinson, to Wilkinson, with the 
tidings that he had declined to meet him, 
and was returning to his camp on the lake. 

22 Now when the army of Wilkinson 
heard those things, they were discouraged ; 
and all the plans that were well devised by 
Armstrong,* the chief captain, and scribe of 
the great Sanhedrim, were of no avail. 

23 So the army of Wilkinson crossed the 
river again and came into the land of Co- 

* Gen. Armstrong, Secretary at War. 



194 

lumbia, at French Mills, near St. Regis; 
where they went into winter quarters. 

24 And the men of Columbia, even the 
great Sanhedrim, were disappointed in their 
expectations. v 

25 Moreover, Hampton received much 
blame in the thing ; and he was even taxed 
with the crime of drinking too freely of the 
^strong waters. 

26 But the imaginary evils which the 
children of men commit are oftentimes gra- 
ven in brass, whilst their actual good deeds 
are written in sand. 

27 Neither shall it be forgotten here, that 
when the shivering soldiers of Columbia were 
suffering with cold in the north, 

28 The lovely and patriotic daughters of 
Columbia, blest with tenderness, remember- 
ed them, and sent them coverings for their 
hands and for their feet, 

29 Even from the fleece : of their fathers* 
flocks, they wrought them with their own 
hands, and distributed them with a good heart. 

30 And, for their kindness and humanity, 
the poor soldier blessed them, and their vir- 
tues were extolled by the men of Columbia 
throughout the land. 



195 



CHAP. XXXVII. 

Newark burnt — Fort George evacuated — Ni- 
agar a frontier laid waste — Buffalo burnt, 

AN the meantime, however, the strong ves- 
sels of Chauncey went out and brought Har- 
rison, and the remnant of his army, from 
Fort George to Sackett's Harbor, to protect 
the place. 

2 But they left M'Clure behind, with the 
men under him ; being for the most part hus- 
bandmen, called militia, and volunteers. 

3 And they were eager to be led onto the 
battle ; but the term for which their services 
were engaged expired, and they returned 
every man to his own house. 

4 So M'Clure, the chief captain of the 
fort, called a council of his officers, and they 
agreed to depart to the strong hold of Ni- 
agara. 

5 And they took their destroying engines 
and the black dust, and the bread and meat 

B 



196 

of the army, and carried them across the 
river. 

6 Likewise they put a lighted match to 
the black dust, in the fort, and it was rent 
asunder with a great noise, as it were of 
thunder and an earthquake. 

7 Moreover, they burnt the town of New- 
ark, before they departed, which happened 
on the tenth day of the twelfth month. 

8 Howbeit, they gave the inhabitants time 
to flee before they put the burning torch to 
their dwellings ; nevertheless, it was an evil 
thing, and pleased not the people of Co- 
lumbia. 

9 The men of Columbia were not cruel, 
and they put none of the inhabitants of the 
town to the sword. 

10 After this, it canae to pass on the nine- 
teenth day of the same month, early in the 
morning before the dawning of the day, 
about fifteen hundred of the savages and sol- 
diers of the king crossed the river and went 
against Niagara, 

11 And they fell upon them unawares, 
while they were yet asleep in their tents ; 
and overcame them, and took the fort, and 
put the garrison to the sword ; even the wo- 



197 

men and children suffered under the savage 
tomahawk. 

12 Now the people of Columbia, who 
were massacred that day, were about two 
hundred two score and ten. 

13 But the captain of the hold, whose 
name was Leonard, was charged with the 
evil ; for he had left the fort, and neglected 
that duty which should ever be the pride of 
a soldier. 

14 Nevertheless, when they had commit- 
ted all this horrid slaughter, the barbarians 
were not fully glutted with murder ; 

1 5 So they went against the little villages 
of Lewistown, Manchester, Youngstonm, and 
Tuscarora, and burnt them with fire, and 
slew the poor and helpless that dwelt round 
about the place. 

16 After which, at the close of the year, 
they went against the beautiful village of 
Buffalo, and burnt it also ; and made it a 
ruin and a desolation. 






1% 



CHAP. XXXVIII. 

Cruise of the V. S. frigate Essex , _D. Porter 
commander — her defence and capture? at 
Valparaiso. 

JN OW while the great lakes and rivers were 
bound in fetters of ice, and the armies of Co- 
lumbia slumbered in the winter camps of the 
north ; 

2 And whilst the conquering sword of 
Jackson spread ruin and desolation among 
the misguided savages of the south ; 

3 Lo ! new scenes of warfare appeared up- 
on the waters of the great deep. 

4 In the first year of the war David, whose 
sur-name was Porter, sailed from the shores 
of Columbia towards the south, that he might 
capture the vessels of the men of Britain. 

5 And the ship which he commanded was 
one of the strong vessels of Columbia, called 
the Essex. 

6 Now David was a valiant man, and he 
had contrived a plan to annoy the commerce 



199 

of Britain in the waters of the great Pacific 
Ocean, 

7 So, in process of time, he passed around 
the furthermost part of the land of Columbia, 
which is called Cape Horn, and lieth far to 
the south ; near the country of Palagonia, 
which is inhabited by the barbarians, and 
sailed towards the haven of Valparaiso. 

8 From whence, leaving Chili to the south, 
he moved along the coast of Peru, till he 
came to Lima, where it never rains : 

9 A country where gold and silver are 
found in abundance, and where therfj is one 
continual summer, and the trees blossom 
throughout the year. 

.10 Again, he prepared his vessels, and 
sailed from Lima towards the north, until he 
fell upon the islands of Gallapagos ; called 
the enchanted islands. 

11 Now these islands lie upon the west 
side of the great continent of Columbia, un- 
der a meridian sun, beneath the girdle of the 
world. 

12 Hereabouts he captured a multitude of 
the merchant ships of Britain, laden with 
rich merchandize, and silver and gold. 

1 3 And he fixed a score of the destroying 

B2 



200 

engines into one of the ships he had taken ; 
and made her a fighting vessel, and called 
her name Essex Junior, and a man, whose 
name was Downs, he made captain thereof, 

14 And he fell upon the fishermen of Bri- 
tain, and captured those who went out to 
catch the mighty whales, which afford oil to 
give us light in the night time, and the bones 
thereof shade our daughters from the scorch- 
ing sun of the noon-day. 

15 Moreover, David went to an island 
where there dwelt wild savages, and estab- 
lished himself so that he could go out and re- 
turn whensoever he chose. 

16 And when he departed from the island, 
which he called after the chief governor of 
the land of Columbia in those days,* he left 
some of his men, with the weapons of war, 
to defend the place. 

17 Now David was a grievous thorn in the 
side of Britain, and he almost destroyed her 
commerce in the South Seas : 

18 Inasmuch as he put the wise men of the 
king to their wits end ; for they were unable 
to out-sail him and take him captive. 

19 So they sent their strong ships in search 

* Madison Island, 



201 

of him, by two's, over the whole face of the 
waters of the Southern Ocean ; and the ex- 
pense thereof would hare made more than 
two feasts for the Prince Regent, who govern- 
ed England in the name of his father. 

20 However, it came to pass, that David 
returned again in his ship to the haven of 
Valparaiso; and the vessel, called the Essex 
Junior, accompanied him. 

21 Now Downs, who commanded her, had 
been to the place before, and conducted the 
prizes of David there, and brought him the 
tidings that he was likely to be ensnared up- 
on the waters. 

22 So whilst David was there, on the 
twenty-eighth day of the third month, in the 
eighteen hundred and fourteenth year of the 
Christian era, 

23 He looked around, and behold ! he saw 
two of the strong ships of Britain approach- 
ing, for the purpose of hemming him in ; the 
one called the Phoebe, and the other the 
Cherub. 

24 But his heart sank not within him, for 
be knew no cowardice ; but, with the wis- 
dom of a brave man, he strove to escape, as 
the vessels were too powerful for him> 



202 

25 But the winds were adverse, and blew 
bard, and prevented the tacklings of his ship 
from taking effect : 

26 Nevertheless, David said unto the cap- 
tains of the king, Come singly, and not like 
cowards, upon me ; then shall ye receive the 
thunders of the freemen of Columbia abun- 
dantly ; 

27 And her liberty shall not suffer, al- 
though in the contest ye may destroy my ves- 
sel upon the face of the waters. 

28 But Hillyar, the captain of the king's 
ship called the Phoebe* was afraid lest he 
should be overcome. 

29 Now, when David found he was unable 
to make good his escape, he drew nigh the 
land, that be might be protected by the great 
law of nations ; for it was a place friendly to 
both parties. 

30 But in this he was deceived ; for the 
authorities of Spain trembled at the nod of 
the servants of Britain, in whom there was no 
faith. 

31 So both vessels came upon him, like 
ravenous wolves, in the very haven of Valpa- 
jaiso ; thus transgressing the law of nations, 



203 

and committing an outrage which hath few 
examples under the sum 

32 And they set their engines to work up- 
on the Essex with all their might. 

33 Nevertheless, David fought against 
them with desperation, for there was no hope 
left for him to escape ; neither did he expect 
mercy. 

34 And he held out for more than the 
space of two hours, when he became over- 
powered ; having his ship a sinking wreck, 
covered with blood, and on fire ; with about 
an hundred and fifty of his men slain and 
maimed. 

35 So after David had fought hard, he be- 
came captive to the ships of the king ; who 
had also some of their men slain, and some 
wounded. 

36 Moreover, Hillyar gave him praise 
and called him a man of courage ; for he 
fought against two strong ships of Britain. 

37 And David made a covenant with Hill- 
yar, in which the Essex Junior was given 
unto him and his men, that they might re- 
turn in her again to their own country. 

38 And it came to pass, in the seventh 
month of the same year of the battle, David 



204 

arrived in the city of New-York; having 
been absent about two year3. 

39 Now when the people of Columbia be- 
held the valiant Porter, they were rejoiced 
with exceeding great joy ; inasmuch as they 
untackled the horses from before his chariot, 
and drew him through the city. 

40 And they made a sumptuous feast for 
him, and invited a multitude of guests ; and 
spent the day in gladness and mirth. 






205 



CHAP. XXXIX. 

Capture of the U. & sloop of war Frolic, by 
the British frigate Orpheus — capture of 
the British sloop of war JU Epervier, by the 
Peacock, Capt. Warrington — capture of the 
Reindeer, by the Wasp, Capt. Blakely — the 
Avon captured and sunk — U. S. vessels Sy- 
ren and Rattlesnake captured — Admiral 
Cochrane declares the whole American coast 
in a state of blockade. 



JN OW it happened, on the twenty-first day 
of the fourth month of the eighteen hundred 
and fourteenth year, that one of the strong 
ships of the king, called the Orpheus; 

2 Being upon the waters of the great 
deep, fell in with a small vessel of the Uni- 
ted States, called the Frolic, and made cap- 
ture thereof. 

3 However, in the same month, not many 
days afterwards, a fighting vessel of Colum- 



206 

bia, called the Peacock, commanded by the 
brave Warrington, met one of the vessels of 
the king. 

4 Now they were about equal in force; 
and the name of the vessel of Britain wag 
called UEpervier, and the captain's name 
was Wales. 

5 And they sat the engines of destruction 
to work, and fought with great fury for the 
space of forty minutes; 

6 When the mariners of Columbia over- 
came the servants of the king, and the vessel 
of Britain struck her red-cross to the ship of 
Warrington. 

7 And there were slain and wounded of 
the servants of the king about twenty and 
three ; but there were none slain of the peo- 
ple of Columbia. 

8 Moreover, Warrington gat about an 
hundred and twenty thousand pieces of sil- 
ver, that were in the vessel. 

9 And he received great praise through- 
out the land for this gallant exploit. 

10 And the great Sanhedrim thanked him 
and gave him a medal of gold. 

11 Likewise, the people of Savannah, a 
chief town in the state of Georgia, being a 



207 

thousand miles to the south of New-YoVk s 
honored him greatly. 

12 For he had brought both vessels into 
their port ; and there were much rejoicings ; 
and a rich feast was prepared for him by the 
people. 

13 Moreover, it came to pass, on the 
twenty-eighth day of the sixth month, that 
one of the righting ships of Columbia, called 
the JVasp, met a vessel of the king upon the 
ocean, called the Reindeer ; after one of the 
swift running animals of Columbia. 

14 Now the Wasp was commanded by a 
man of courage ; whose name was Blakeley. 

15 And a dreadful battle began ; and the 
mischievous weapons of destruction shower- 
ed around with tremendous noise. 

16 Nevertheless, Blakeley ran down upon 
the Reindeer, and in about twenty minutes 
made her a captive unto the ship of Columbia. 

17 But her captain was slain, and she was 
as it were a wreck upon the waters ; so 
Blakeley destroyed her. 

18 The loss of the king, in killed and 
wounded that day, was about seventy and 
five ; and five of the children of Columbia 

were slain, and about a score maimed, 

s 



268 

19 And the friends of the great Sanhe* 
drim were pleased with the valiant acts of 
Blakeley. 

20 Moreover, on the twenty-seventh day 
of the eighth month, the Wasp captured an- 
other ship of the king, called the Avon, anc 
sunk her to the bottom of the briny deep. 

21 And the slain and the wounded of the 
Avon, was two score and two. 

22 Howbeit, about the same time, the Sy- 
ren and the Rattlesnake* fell into the hands 
of the king. 

23 About this time the whole land of Co- 
Jumbia was ordered to be hemmed in by Coch- 
rane, a servant of the king, and a chief cap- 
tain of the navy of Britain. 

24 But all their blockades were of no 
avail ; for the men of Columbia escaped and 
outwitted them. 

* U. S. schooner and brig, about 14 guns each. 

mw 



J20» 



CHAP. XL, 

ireaking up of the cantonment at French 
Mills— affair at La Cole Mill— Major Ap- 
pling captures two hundred British seamen 
— Gen. Brown captures Fort Erie — battle 
of Chippawa plains. 



J\ OW it came to pass, in the second month 
of the same year in which David gat home 
to the United States, 

2 That the armies of the north began to 
be in motion, and departed from the place 
called French Mills, where they were en- 
camped. 

3 And a part thereof moved towards 
Plattsburgh, on lake Champlain ; and was 
commanded by a brave man, whose name 
was Macomb, and Wilkinson, the chief cap- 
tain, followed after them. 

4 But the other part of the host, command- 
ed by Jacob, whose sur-name was Bronm\ 



210 

went to Sachetfs Harbor; and from thence 
against the strong hold of Niagara. 

5 And it was so, that when Wilkinson 
heard that Jacob had gone against Niagara ; 
he marshalled out his force, and went against 
a place in the province of the king, called 
La-Cole-Mill, to take it. 

6 Nevertheless, he failed, and lost many 
men, after which the command of the army 
was given to a chief captain, whose name 
was Izard, 

7 In the meanwhile many of the evils of 
warfare were committed on and about the 
waters of Ontario and the great lake Erie. 

8 And a gallant captain, whose name was 
Appling* took about two hundred of the ma- 
riners of the royal navy of Britain, at a place 
called Sandy Creek, by the waters of lake 
Ontario : being in the same month that the 
strong hold of Osivego was taken by the men 
of Britain. 

9 Now on the third day of the seventh 
month, it came to pass, that Jacob, the chief 
captain of the host of Columbia, on the bor- 
ders of the river Niagara, 

* Major Appling, 



211 

10 Having prepared his men beforehand, 
crossed the river and captured fort Erie, and 
an hundred thirty and seven of the soldiers 
of the king, and some of the destroying en- 
gines ; 

11 And the next day, being the anniversa- 
ry of the independence of Columbia, after 
having left some of the men of war to defend 
the place, 

12 He moved with his host towards the 
plains of Chippawa, where they rested for 
the night. 

13 On the next day Jacob assembled his 
captains of fifties, and his captains of hun- 
dreds, and spake unto them, saying, 

14 Lo! the army of the king are mighty 
men of valor, and their numbers are great, 
even those who have fought under the ban- 
ners of Wellington.* the chief warrior of Bri- 
tain ; and Riall, the chief captain of the host, 
is a man of great experience : 

15 Nevertheless, be not disheartened ; but 
let us beware that we be not ensnared. 

16 So he prepared his army to go against 



;: LordWelliogton, 

S2 



212 

the host of Britain, in battle array ; and the 
soldiers of Columbia shouted for the battle. 

17 Now the army of Britain rested upon 
the plains of Chippawa, and were ready to 
meet the army of Columbia; they shouted 
aloud, and inflamed their blood with the strong 
waters of Jamaica. 

18 And they put fire to the black dust of 
the destroying engines ; and a great noise is- 
sued from the mouths thereof. 

1 9 Moreover, they vomited fire and smoke 
and brimstone wonderfully, and with the 
movements of the armies the dust of the earth 
arose and overshadowed the field of slaughter. 

20 And the heavy balls of iron whistled 
about them in abundance* 

21 However, the skill of Jacob, and his 
brave captains, became manifest, and they 
drove the slaves of Britain before them, 

22 And compelled them to flee to their 
strong entrenchments at Fort George and 
jFort Niagara. 

23 And the field of battle was covered 
with the slain and the maimed ; even eight 
hundred men. 

24 And the slain and wounded of the ser- 
vants of the king were about five hundred. 



213 

25 So Jacob and his army gat great praise, 
and all the warriors of Columbia that fought 
that day ; 

26 Amongst whom were the volunteers of 
the states of New-York and Pennsylvania^ 
who were led on by the gallant Porter.* 

27 And Ripley was there, and the brave 
Scott, who went out and fought in the heat of 
the battle. 



* Gens. Porter, Ripley, and Scott.-, 






214 

CHAP. XLL 

Battle of Bridgewater. 



jS OW about this time there was peace 
among the strong powers of Europe ; and the 
strength of Britain was free to be employed 
against the people of Columbia. 

2 So she increased her navy on the shores 
of Columbia, and strengthened her armies in 
Canada ; and sent skilful men to conduct them 
and to fight her battles : 

3 And, in her spite, she emptied out the vi- 
als of her vengeance upon the United States. 

4 Notwithstanding, it came to pass, on the 
twenty-fifth day of the same month, 

5 That another bloody battle was fought 
hard by, at a place called Bridgewater, from 
whence ye might behold the stupendous wa- 
ter-falls of Niagara. 

6 There the army of Britain came out 
against Jacob, with a host of five thousand 
chosen men. 

7 Now the numbers of the host of Colura- 



215 

bia were less than the host of the king, who 
were commanded by two chief captains, the 
one named Drummond, and the other JRiattj 

8 Nevertheless, Jacob went out against 
them and gave them battle : and the army of 
Columbia shouted aloud ; and the battle wax- 
ed hot beyond measure. 

9 And it lasted for the space of seven 
hours \ even until the midnight. 

10 The huge engines of destruction roar- 
ed as the loud thunder, and the blaze thereof 
was like unto flashes of lightning. 

1 1 But it came to pass, that the army of 
Columbia drove the invincibles of Wellington 
from the field. 

12 The valiant Miller, with his band, rush- 
ed upon the soldiers of the king, with the 
sharp points of his weapons of war, that faint- 
ly glittered in the light of the moon, and 
overcame them.* 

13 Moreover, Drummond, the chief cap- 
tain of the king, was wounded, and nigh be- 
ing made captive; and Riall, the chief cap- 



* Miller's brilliant charge on theenemv, 



216 

tain, was taken and fell into the hands of the 
brave Jessup.* 

14 And Jacob, the chief captain of the 
host of Columbia, was sorely wounded ; and 
the brave Scott was wounded to a certain de- 
gree. 

15 However, this was a dreadful battle, 
fought army against army, and blood and 
slaughter covered the green fields. 

16 The loss of the king, was about a thou- 
sand and two hundred fighting men, who 
came to the land of Columbia to lose the 
honor they won in Europe. 

17 The loss of the men of Columbia was 
also very great ; being an hundred three 
score and ten slain, and more than five hun- 
dred maimed. 

18 Now as Jacob, the chief captain of the 
host of Columbia was wounded, the charge 
was given to the valiant Kipley, and the 
army returned to the strong hold of Fort 
Erie. 

19 And Jacob and his brave men gained 
great praise throughout the land of Columbia. 



Major Jessup, of the 25th Reg. 



2J7 



CHAP. XLII. 



Assault on Fort Erie, by the British, under 
Gen. Drummond — Gen. Brown resumes his 
command — sallies out of Fort Erie against 
the British camp — M l Arthur's expedition 
into Canada. 



AND it came to pass, on the fourth day of 
the next month, being the same day that the 
gallant Morgan, with two hundred and two 
score men, drove a thousand soldiers of the 
king from before Black Rock, 

2 A chief captain of Columbia, whose 
name was Gaines,* arrived from Sackett's 
Harbor at Fort George ; and took the com- 
mand thereof. 

3 And it was so, that on the following day 
the army of the king approached towards 
the fort, and encamped themselves. 

4 Moreover, they threw up breast-works 



* Gen, Gaines. 



218 

and prepared their battering-rams, with in- 
tent to destroy the place, and make captives 
of the men of Columbia. 

5 For as the invincible soldiers of Bri- 
tain had lost a great deal of honor > they long- 
ed to gain some favor in the sight of the king, 
their master ; so they sat their bombs and 
their engines at the work of destruction. 

6 And on the fifteenth day of the month, 
after they had prepared themselves, they 
rushed forth with all their might against the 
strong hold of Columbia. 

7 And as their deeds were evil, they began 
in the dead of the night, when the howlings 
of the wild-wolf are heard from afar, and the 
steady roar of distant waterfalls, catches the 
ear of the drowsy centinel. 

8 Lo ! it was a night dark and gloomy ; 
and the very clouds of heaven wept for the 
folly of man.* 

9 Quickly did the weapons of murder dis- 
turb and trouble the general silence. 

10 Their thunders roared around the bat- 
tlements; and the sudden blaze, from the en- 
gines, was as a thousand flashes of lightning. 

* It was a rainy night. 



219 

11 But the men of Columbia were not a- 
sleep ; for they met them at the onset : thrice 
the men of Britain came , and thrice were 
they driven back. 

12 About this time, a man of Columbia, 
who was sorely wounded, begged of an offi- 
cer of the king that his life might be spared ; 

13 But the captain, whose name was 
Dtummond,* to whom he spake, refused him 
quarters ; and, taking an oath, he swore and 
cursed the men of Columbia, saying* Even as 
f slay thee, so shall it be with ye all* 

14 Thus violating the commandment of 
God, which sayeth, Thou shalt do no 

MURDER. 

15 But the hand of the Lord was stretch- 
ed out against him ; for while he was yet 
speaking, in the wickedness of his heart, he 
was smitten dead to the earth. 

16 Now, although the men of Britain did 
some injury to the fort, they were quickly 
compelled to depart. 

17 And the slain and wounded of the king 
that night, were about seven hundred, besides 
two hundred captives. 



♦ Col. Drunamond. 



220 

18 The loss of the United States was about, 
an hundred men. 

19 Now it came to pass, on the seven- 
teenth day of the next month, when Jacob 
was recovered of his wounds, and had re- 
sumed his command, he sallied out of Fort 
Erie with his men, and went against the camp 
of the servants of the king. 

20 And by his bravery and skill, and that 
of the valiant captains under him, he took 
and destroyed their strong holds, and slew 
many of them, so that their loss was about a 
thousand fighting men. 

21 And the slain and wounded of Jacob's 
army were two hundred ninety and nine. 

22 Now the valiant deeds of Jacob, and his 
brave men, are they not written in all the 
books of the chronicles of the land of Colum- 
bia of that day ? 

23 After this, on the twenty-first day of 
the same month, Drummond and the host of 
Britain, being tired of the noise of the des- 
troying engines of the men of Columbia, 
went away from the place and rested their 
army at Q,ueenstown. 

24 About this time Izard, the chief cap- 
tain, arrived at Fort Erie, from Pittsburgh, 



221 

and, as he was the oldest captain, he took the 
charge of the army of the north. 

25 During these circumstances, it happen- 
ed that the brave M f Arthur, who had remain- 
ed at the strong hold of Detroit, to defend it, 

26 Moved his army towards Burlington 
Heights, and went more than an hundred 
miles into the province of Canada. 

27 And the men of Columbia that went 
with him were valiant men from tbe state of 
Kentucky and Ohio ; in number about eight 
hundred. 

28 Victory perched upon their arms, and 
they slew some of the servants of the king, 
and made many prisoners, and returned again 
with the loss of one man. 

29 In the meanwhile, the army of Izard 
crossed the river and returned from Erie to 
the borders of Columbia, in tbe latter part 
of the year, and went into their winter 
camps at Buffalo. 






WmWm 



322 



C3HAP. XLIII. 



Attaek on Stonington, by the British ships of 
war, which are defeated and driven off. 



IN these days the strong powers of Britain 
strove hard to quench the fire of Columbian 
Liberty. 

2 But it was lighted up by the hand of 
heaven, and not to be extinguished by the 
insignificant and self-created gods of the 
earth. 

3 Now it came to pass, on the ninth day of 
the eighth month of the same year, 

4 That the mighty ships of Britain came 
and opened their thundering engines upon 
the little town of Stonington, which lieth in 
the state of Connecticut, in the east. 

5 But the inhabitants of the place were 
bold and valiant men, and they scorned to 
make a covenant with the servants of the 
king. 



223 

6 Although Hardy,* the chief captain of 
the king's ships, had threatened to destroy 
the place ; saying, Remove from the town 
your women and your children, who are in- 
nocent and fight not. 

7 Thus showing more righteousness than 
any of the king's captains ; albeit, he gave 
them only the space of one hour to depart- 

8 So the men of Columbia let the destroy- 
ing engines loose upon the vessels, and shot 
the yankee-balls amongst them plentifully., 
and compelled them to depart : 

9 Notwithstanding, they had but two of 
the destroying engines in the place. 

10 However, on the eleventh day of the 
same month, they were again forced to put 
them in motion. 

11 For, in the mean time, Hardy had sent 
a messenger to the inhabitants, saying, 

12 If ye will not prove wicked, and will 
refrain from sending your evil torpedoes 
amongst our vessels, then will we spare your 
town. 

13 Now Hardy was mightily afraid of 



* Com. Hardy, a captain under Lord Nelson, at the batUeof 

Trafalgar, 

T 2 



224 

these torpedoes, (the history whereof is writ- 
ten in the fiftieth book of these chronicles) 
and he trembled at the sound of the name 
thereof. 

14 Nevertheless, the people of Stonington 
refused his request. 

15 So the ships of Britain came again and 
they brought another strong ship of the king 
to help them to take the place. 

16 But once more the valiant sons of Con- 
necticut made them fly for safety : and they 
came not again. 

17 And the gallant conduct of the people 
of Stonington gained them much praise, even 
from the great Sanhedrim of the people. 

18 Thus would the children of Columbia 
have done, in many other places, but for the 
false words and wickedness of traitorous meir. 



225 



CHAP. XLIV\ 



Affairs in the Chesapeake — British army 
move up the Paluxent — land and march to- 
wards the city of Washington — prepare 
themselves for battle at Bladensburgh. 



-WOW the mighty fleet of Britain, that 
troubled the waters of the great Bay of Che- 
sapeake, commanded by Cockburnthe wick- 
ed, continued their depredations. 

2 The number of their fighting ships were 
increased, and the soldiers of the king had 
come thither in multitudes from the island of 
Britain. 

3 For the war which she had waged against 
the mighty ruler of France* was at an end ; 
and all their men of war were idle ; so they 
sent them against the men of Columbia, who 
slew them with terrible slaughter. 

4 Now the numbers of the servants and 
soldiers of the king, in and about the Chesa- 
peake, were little fewer than ten thousand. 

* Buonaparte, 



226 

5 And they moved up the great river, 
which is called the Potorvmac, and the river 
Patuxent, which lieth to the east thereof. 

6 So, as they passed along, they did much 
damage ; and destroyed abundance of the 
sweet-scented plant of Virginia, burning it 
with fire. 

7 Now this weed is a native of the land of 
Columbia, and groweth not on the island of 
Britain : 

8 Therefore, the nostrils of the slaves of 
Britain were regaled with the scent thereof, 
for the king had put a silver bar* against its 
plentiful use, throughout his whole do- 
minions. 

9 However, it came to pass* about thq; 
twentieth day of the same month, that the 
whole army of Britain gat out of their ves- 
sels and their boats, at a place called Bene- 
dict, being towards the head of the river Pa- 
tuxent. 

10 And a man of great experience in mat- 
ters of warfare, surnamed Poss, was chief 
captain of the host of Britain. 

1 1 So they marched on towards Washing" 

* Tax on tobacco, manufactured in Englaad, is very heavy. 



22f 

ton, which lieth on the waters of the Potow- 
mac, and is called the chief city of the land 
of Columbia ; where the great Sanhedrim as- 
semble themselves together. 

12 And they journied on until they came 
to a place called Bladensburgh, which lieth to 
the east of the city, not far off. 

13 And Cockburn staid not behind, for his 
heart thirsted after blood and murder. 

14 Now this was on the twenty-fourth day 
of the eighth month, in the one thousand 
eight hundred and fourteenth year of the 
Christian era. 

15 And the army of Columbia that went 
out to meet the host of Britain, was com- 
manded by a brave man, whose name was 
Winder. 

16 But it was in the heat of summer, and 
the husbandmen of Columbia, that went out 
to defend the place, were weary, for they 
had travelled many miles from the house of 
their fathers. 

17 Moreover, their numbers were few at 
the onset ; for those that were journeying on 
their way came not in time. 

18 Nevertheless, they who came prepared 
themselves for the fight, in the hope that they 



226 

aaight not be overcome by the servants of 
the king. 

19 And it was so, that when Ross, the 
chief captain of the host of Britain, drew nigh 
the place, and saw that the men of Columbia 
were bent on giving him hindrance, 

20 He addressed the officers and the men 
of his army, and encouraged them, saying, 

21 Lo ! we are stronger than the host of 
Columbia ; therefore, let us go with all our 
might against their chief city, and make cap?- 
ture thereof, 

22 And burn it with fire, and take their 
chief governor, and bind him hand and foot* 
and bring him before the king. 

23 Moreover, let us surround the temple 
of the great Sanhedrim of the nation, and en- 
deavor lo catch them, even as the huntsman 
catcheth foxes. 

24 Then shall we strike terror throughout 
the land of Columbia, and the arms of the 
king, our master, shall be encircled with glory. 

25 The spirit of the people will be bro- 
ken ; they will bow down to the servants of 
the king : and all the nations will behold tfce 
valiant deeds of Britain* 



229 



CHAR XLV. 



Capture of Washington — sacking of Alexan- 
dria — death of Sir Peter Parker. 



JM OW, when Ross, the chief captain, had 
done speaking, they sent forth their fire- 
brands, and sat their destroying engines to 
work, and cast balls of destruction and death. 

2 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia were 
not dismayed, but poured out their thunders 
upon them in abundance. 

3 And Joshua, sur-named Barney, who 
commanded the vessels of Columbia nigh the 
place, with his brave men, went out upon the 
land, and fought against them with despera- 
tion. 

4 For he had ordered his little fleet to be 
burnt with fire, that the men of Britain might 
not profit thereby, and it blew up in the air 
with a loud noise. 

5 Now Joshua was in the heat of the bat- 
tle i and his destroying engines slew the men 



230 

of Britain on all sides: however, he was 
wounded and made captive. 

6 But the servants of the king treated 
Joshua well, and honored him for his bravery. 

7 Now James, the chief governor, and the 
counsellors, and the scribes of the great San- 
hedrim, went out to see the battle, and to con- 
trive for the safety of the city. 

8 And Monroe* the chief scribe of the 
great Sanhedrim, was there; and Armstrong^ 
and many other friends of the land of Colum- 
bia. I 

9 Nevertheless, the wisdom of all their 
plans failed them ; and they were sorely 
grieved to behold the husbandmen and the 
army of Winder, the chief captain, flee be- 
fore the host of Britain. 

10 But they were misled in their calcula- 
tions ; and they were now unable to prevent 
the evil. 

1 1 Neither did the men of war they count- 
ed upon arrive in time to catch the army of 
the king. 

12 Therefore, the host of Columbia fled, 



* Hon. James Monroe, Sec'ry of State, 
t Gen. Armstrong. 



231 

and went beyond the city, and passing 
through Georgetown, rested at a place called 
Montgomery Court-houst. 

13 And the slain and maimed of the king, 
were about four hundred : those of the men 
of Columbia about two score. 

14 Now it was about the going down of 
the sun, when the host of the king polluted 
the Citadel of Freedom, and with their un- 
hallowed footsteps violated the Temple of 
Liberty. 

15 And Cockbure and Ross led the sav- 
age band of Britain into the midst of the city. 

16 And the men of Columbia gnashed 
their teeth, and bit their lips with vexation ; 
for the thing might have been prevented.* 



* Whatever may be individual sentiment, it has been, and 
still is the general opinion of the best informed, that there was 
sufficient time to have had the place entrenched and fortified, if 
necessary, with an hundred pieces of cannon ; and at least to 
have kept the enemy at bay uutii a sufficient force were assem- 
bled to have cut off his retreat. But to expect raw militia to 
meet and repulse, in an open plain, solid columns of regular 
troops, superior in numbers as well as discipline, must be prepos 
terous. Who is to blame in the business we presume not to say - 
but hope the evil may be remedied against a future day. Had 
the same energy and industry been exercised there, that were 
displayed by the patriotic citizens of New- York, in erectipf. 

U 



232 

17 Nevertheless, it proved a blessing, for 
it united the people of Columbia as one man, 
against the tyrants of the earth. 

18 Now the place that had been pitched 
upon to build the chief city, was in a fine 
country, and a beautiful spot, in the District 
of Columbia. 

19 But the inhabitants round about the 
City of Washington were few ; for they had, 
as it were, just begun to build it. 

20 There was much ground laid out for 
the city, even six thousand four hundred 
square furlongs ; but the buildings -therein 
were not many ; neither was it fortified. 

21 So when the servants of the king came 
to the place, they looked around, in surprise, 
and cried out with astonishment, saying, 

22 Lo ! the city hath fled with the people, 
for there are but an handful of houses in the 
place. 

23 However, the next day they began the 
work of destruction, like unto the barbari- 
ans of ancient times ; for their wickedness 



fortifications for the defence of their capital, we might have 
been spared the mortification that followed the capture of th6 
seat of government. 



233 

followed after them as the shadow followeth 
after the substance. 

24 And they destroyed the beautiful edi- 
fices with fire, even the palace of the great 
Sanhedrim. 

25 Now Cockburn hated that his wicked 
deeds should be handed down to future gen- 
erations, so he went and destroyed, with his 
own hands, the chief printing-office* of the 
city, and scattered the types abroad. 

26 Thus did he, even Cockburn, like an 
ignorant savage, stamp his own name with 
infamy, and make it to become a reproach 
amongst all mankind, 

27 Science and learning blushed at the 
champions of England, who had been repre- 
sented as the bulwark of religion ; but who 
were, in reality, the supporters of idolatry ; 
the staff of Juggernaut, the false god of India. 

23 Now the art of printing was not known 
among the ancients ; for it was invented in 
these latter days , even in the fourteen hun- 
dred and fortieth year of the Christian era. 

29 It was the helpmate of Freedom, and 
when the light which it spread burst forth 

• Office of the National Intelligences 



234 

upon the world, it began to open the eyes of 
man, and to destroy the poisonous weeds that 
choaked the growth of Liberty. 

30 Moreover, to complete the vandalism 
of Cockburn and Ross, they fell upon the 
printed books of the great Sanhedrim. 

31 Even those that had been gathered to- 
gether for instruction ; the toil of many years, 
containing the learning and wisdom of ages. 

32 And they consumed them with fire ; 
ihus striving to turn man back to the ages of 
ignorance and darkness. 

33 Now, Thomas, whose sur-name was 
Jefferson, who had been a scribe in the days 
of Washington, and a chief governor of the 
land of Columbia, in times past ; a man whom 
the people esteemed for his virtue, 

34 When he heard of their wickedness ; 
how, savage-like, they had burnt the books 
which had been written by the wise men of 
the earth, and preserved from the beginning 
to that day ; 

35 In the goodness of his heart, he wrote 
unto the great Sanhedrim, when they were 
assembled together, saying : 

36 Since, like the barbarians of old, whose 
ignorance might plead for them, the servants 



235 

of the kingdom of Great Britain have laid 
waste your chief city, and made it a deso- 
lation, 

37 And have trampled upon science, mu- 
tilated the monuments of art and industry, 
destroyed the archives of your nation, and 
burnt your books with fire ; 

38 For your benefit, and for the benefit 
of my country, I will give unto you my 
whole Library, which I have selected with 
care, from my youth upwards, and whatever 
in your judgment shall be the value thereof, 
that will I accept.* 

39 I am well stricken in years, and must 
shortly sleep with my fathers ; but the last 
wish of my heart shall be the welfare of 

MY COUNTRY. 

40 Now Thomas was a philosopher, and a 
man of great learning, and he had abundance 
of books of all nations, and in all languages, 
even ten thousand volumes. 

41 So the great Sanhedrim accepted the 
offer of Thomas, and they retain the books 
to this day. 



* Mr. Jefferson left it to Congress to make him what compen . 
sation they thought proper for his Library. 
U 2 






236 



42 Now it came to pass, in the evening of 
the same day, on which the vandals of Britain 
set fire to the city, that the army of the king 
fled from the place ; for the air of Liberty 
was poison to the followers of tyrants. 

43 Moreover, they left some of their slain 
and wounded behind, for they were afraid of 
being caught in a snare by the husbandmen 
of Columbia. 

44 So they went down to the river and gat 
into their vessels from whence they came. 

45 In the meantime, the inhabitants of 
Alexandria, a town which lieth to the south 
€>f the chief city, on the river Potomac, in the 
state of Virginia, 

46 Being smitten with fear, sent to Cock- 
burn and Ross, entreating mercy, that they 
might be spared, if, peradventure, they made 
a covenant in good faith with them, and sur- 
rendered themselves. 

47 And the chief captains of Britain 
agreed to the capitulation of the town, and to 
vouchsafe it protection. 

48 But the people suffered for their foolish 
confidence ; and no one pitied them ; for it 
was of their own seeking. 

49 So it happened, after they had trusted 



237 

to the faith of the servants of the king ; Gor- 
don, a captain of the ships in the river Po- 
tomac, came up against them before the 
town ; 

50 And took their merchant ships; and 
compelled the people to open their store- 
houses, and put into the vessels their flour, 
even sixteen thousand barrels, and their wine, 
and their cotton, and a thousand hogsheads 
of the sweet-scented plant. 

51 So the robbers of the king took them 
away, sacked the town, and laughed at the 
people thereof, for trusting to the faith of 
British honor. 

52 However, as they passed along down 
the river, with their ill-gotten treasure, lo I 
the ships of Britain were assailed, and nigh 
being destroyed : 

53 For Rogers, and Perry, and Porter t 
three valiant captains of the navy of Colum- 
bia, gave them hindrance and annoyed them 
greatly : 

54 Perry and Porter raised fortifications 
upon the borders of the river, and put there- 
in the destroying engines, which, when the 
vessels came nigh by, they let loose upon 



238 

them abundantly, and wounded them in their 
tackling, and slew numbers of their men. 

55 Moreover, the balls which the engines 
vomited forth, were red and hot from the 
mouth of the fiery furnace. 

56 Meanwhile, Rogers sent his fire-ships 
among them to destroy them as they fled ; 
nevertheless they escaped. 

51 Now about this time, being the thirtieth 
day of the same month, Peter, whose sur- 
name was Parker, who commanded a strong 
ship of the king, was committing many de- 
predations along the shores of the Chesa- 
peake ; 

58 So Peter essayed to go in the night- 
time against some husbandmen of Columbia, 
commanded by the gallant Held,* about the 
borders of the state of Maryland; 

59 And when he had landed his men of 
war, he went out after the husbandmen, and 
the plunder ; but they were upon the watch, 
and fell upon him, and killed and maimed 
about two score, and was nigh making cap- 
tives of them all ; and Peto»r was amongst the 
slain. 

* Col. Rei(L 



V 



239 

60 Now when the news of the taking of 
the chief city of Columbia, and the sacking 
of Alexandria was received in Britain, at 
first the people rejoiced, saying, Now, for- 
sooth, have we conquered these cunning 
Yankees ! 

61 But afterwards they became, for once, 
ashamed, and hid their faces ; for they had 
heard the judgment of the surrounding na- 
tions, by whom their vandalism was con- 
demned. 






24?) 



CHAP. XLVI. 



British, under Gov. Prevost, go against 
Plattsburgh — Com. Macdonough captures 
the British squadron on Lake Champlain. 



Nevertheless, if difficulties and dis- 
asters befel the people of Columbia in the 
south, lo ! there was a wreath of laurels weav- 
ing for them in the north. 

2 Behold ! a mighty army of the king bad 
assembled together at the village of Cham- 
plain, between Plattsburg and Montreal ; nigh 
unto the place where Forsyth the warrior, the 
second Sumter,* was slain : 

3 For the Prince Regent had commanded 
his servants to go forth into the heart of the 
land of Columbia, and separate the states of 
the east from the rest of the country. 

4 So it came to pass, about the fifth day of 
the ninth month, that the host of Britain ap- 

* Sumter, a brave officer in the American Revolution* 



241 

peared before the village of Plattsburgh ; 
which lieth about three hundred miles from 
New-York towards the north. 

5 Now Prevost, the governor of Canada, 
was the commander of the army ; and the 
number of his men of war was about fifteen 
thousand. 

6 And they began to prepare their batter- 
ing rams, their bombs and their rockets, and 
alt kinds of instruments of destruction ; and 
they entrenched themselves round about. 

7 Now the strong hold of Plattsburgh was 
hard by ; and the brave Macomb was the chief 
captain of the hold ; and the number of his 
men was about fifteen hundred ; being in the 
proportion of one Yankee to ten Invincibles. 

3 Howsoever, the valiant husbandmen of 
the states of Vermont and New-York, called 
militia, commanded by Mooers, a man of 
great courage, assembled together, to assist 
in the defence of the place, on the borders of 
the river Saranac, which emptieth its waters 
into lake Champlain. 

9 In the meantime, Downie, the chief cap- 
tain of the fleet of Britain upon the lake, had 
prepared himself to assist Prevost on a cer- 
tain day appointed. 



242 

10 When he was to come out against the 
fleet of Columbia, which was commanded by 
the gallant Macdonough. 

1 1 Accordingly, it came to pass, on the ap- 
pointed day, being the eleventh of the ninth 
month, in the one thousand eight hundred and 
fourteenth year of the Christian era, 

12 And three hundred and sixty-five days 
after Oliver had captured the king's fleet on 
the waters of Erie, 

13 That the strong vessels of Britain ap- 
peared, with their sails spread, moving upon 
the bosom of lake Champlain, coming against 
the fleet of Columbia. 

14 Now it was in the morning, about the 
ninth hour, when Macdonough beheld the 
fleet of Britain sailing boldly towards him. 

15 And it was so, that the vessels of Co- 
lumbia were safely moored in the bay of 
Plattsburgh, where they waited the approach 
of the enemy ; who were the strongest in num- 
bers and in their engines of death. 

16 However, when they were about a fur- 
long off, they cast their anchors, and set them- 
selves in battle array ; squadron against 
squadron. 



243 

17 Now the sound of the battle-drum was 
heard along the lake, and the brave mariners 
shouted aloud for the fight. 

1 8 Then began their destroying engines to 
utter their voices, and it was like unto the 
voice of mighty thunders. 

)9 And the same hour, the armies on the 
shore began the dreadful battle with their 
roaring engines. 

20 So that on the land and on the waters 
the fire and smoke were abundant, and the 
noise thereof was tremendous beyond mea- 
sure. 

21 And the battle waxed hot, and the ves- 
sels of Downie fought bravely against the 
vessels of Macdonovigh ; 

22 Nevertheless, the Lord of hosts favor- 
ed the men of Columbia, and they overcame 
the servants of the king. 

23 For in about the space of three hours, 
the valiant Macdonough and his brave men, 
made capture of the whole fleet of Britain, 
save a few gun-boats, that made good their 
escape. 

24 Now the killed and wounded of the 

king's fleet, were an hundred ninety and four ; 
w 



244 

and Downie, the chief captain, was among 
the slain. 

25 Moreover, the number of the captives 
of the men of Britain was about four hun- 
dred. 

26 Now Macdonough was a good man, 
neither was he full of boasting and vain-glo- 
ry : he arrogated to himself no praise on ac- 
count of his success, but ascribed the victory 
to the pleasure of the Almighty. 

27 And as it is written, in the word of the 
Lord, Do unto all men as ye would they 
should do unto you, so he took care of the 
prisoners, and employed skilful physicians 
to bind up the wounds of the maimed. 

28 Now were the children of Columbia 
exceedingly rejoiced ; yea, their hearts were 
made glad ; and they praised Macdonough 
for his noble deeds. 

29 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim honor- 
ed him ; and a piece of land, which over- 
looked the lake, was given unto him, for an 
inheritance ; 

30 That, in his old age, and when he was 
well stricken in years, he might behold with 
Joy the strength of his youth ; and smile up- 



245 

on the spot where, fleet to fleet, he triumphed 
over the enemies of freedom. 

31 And where his children's children 
might point, and say, It was there the guar- 
dian angel of Columbia permitted our father 
to humble the pride of Britain. 



246- 



CHAP. XLVir. 



Battle of Plattsburgh— defeat of Sir George 
Prevost. 

1M0W while Macdonough was capturing 
the royal fleet of Britain, upon the lake, the 
gallant Macomb scattered destruction amidst 
the army of Prevost. 

2 And the battle raged with great violence, 
and the men of Britain strove hard to pass 
over the river called Saranac; 

3 But the men of war of Columbia, who 
were upon the opposite side of the water, op- 
posed them, and slew them with great 
slaughter. 

4 And the brave Grosvcnor, and Hamilton, 
and Riley, and the gallant Cronk, drove them 
back from crossing the bridges. 

5 Likewise, many were slain in the river, 
so that the waters of the Saranac were dyed 
with the blood of the servants of the king. 

6 But Macomb kept the engines at work 3 






247 

and Brooks, and Richards, and Smith, who 
were in the forts, displayed much valor, and 
caused the engines to vomit fire and smoke, 
and balls of heavy metal. 

7 Howsoever, when Prevost saw that the 
king's fleet was captured, he began to be dis- 
heartened, and his whole army was amazed. 

8 Notwithstanding this, they continued to 
cast their balls, and their rockets, and their 
bomb-shells, and then* sharpnells, with all 
their might. 

9 Now these sharpnells were unknown 
even to the children of Columbia, for they 
were lately invented by the wise men of Bri- 
tain. 

10 However, the people of Columbia 
trusted in the strength of their arms, more 
than in the strength of these shells, so they 
used them not. 

11 Nevertheless, the army of the king 
fought hard with their battering-rams against 
the strong hold of Columbia, until the setting 
of the sun, when their noises were silenced 
by the brave band of Columbia. 

12 So the same night, Prevost, and the in- 

vincibles of the king, fled towards the strong 

hold of Montreal; leaving their sick and 
w 2 



243 

wounded behind to the mercy of the men of 
Columbia ; destroying their provisions, which 
in their haste they could not carry away. 

13 And the men of Columbia followed 
them a little way, and slew some and made 
many captives. 

14 Thus were the men of war of Britain 
conquered in the north, army against army, 
fleet against fleet, and squadron against 
squadron. 

15 And the killed and wounded of the ar- 
my of the king that day, were about a thou- 
sand men; and about three hundred, who 
were tired of their bondage, left the service 
of the king,* and joined the banners of the 
great Sanhedrim. 

16 Now Macomb received much praise 
for his bravery ; and his name shall be re- 
membered by ages yet unborn. 

17 Moreover, he spake well of all the offi- 
cers and men who fought with him. 

18 And Mooers, who commanded the 
brave husbandmen of New- York and Ver- 
mont, and Strong, the valiant chief captain 



* Deserters. 



249 

of the men called volunteers, had great 
honor for their noble deeds. 

19 Likewise, Appling, and Wool, and 
Leonard, and Sproul, distinguished them- 
selves among the brave. 

20 But when the news of the capture of the 
fleet, and the defeat of their mighty army, 
reached the lords of Britain, they put their 
fingers in their ears, that they might not 
hear it : 

21 Neither would they believe it ; but 
when they found it was so of a truth, they 
were enraged out of measure. 

22 And their wise men and their counsel- 
lors said, Lo ! we have only been trifling 
with these Yankees ; now let us send forth a 
mighty fleet and an army to overwhelm them. 






250 



CHAP. XLVIII. 



Attack on Baltimore, by the British army, un- 
der Gen. Ross, and the fleet under Admi- 
rals Cochrane and Cockburn. 



JN OW when Ross and Cockburn returned 
from their burning and pillaging, and all the 
barbarities they committed at Washington, 
the chief city, and the neighborhood thereof; 

2 Emboldened by the success of their un- 
righteous deeds, they gathered together their 
army and their navy, and essayed to go 
against the city of Baltimore, which lieth in 
the state of Maryland ; 

3 That they might commit the like wick- 
edness, in which they had taken so much 
pleasure at Hampton, Havre-de-Grace, and 
Washington. 

4 But they had a mightier place than 
Washington to go against ; for Baltimore is 
a great city, containing therein about fifty 
thousand souls, and the people had entrench- 
ed it round about, and made it a strong place. 



251 

5 So it came to pass, the next day after 
Macdonough had captured the fleet of Bri- 
tain, on lake Champlain, being the twelfth 
day of the ninth month, 

6 That their vessels and transports came 
to a place called North Pointy which lieth at 
the entrance of the river Petapsco, about an 
hundred furlongs from the city, and began 
to put their men of war upon the shore. 

7 And the number of their chosen fighting 
men, w r ho were landed, were about eight 
thousand. 

8 And when they were all moved out of 
the boats, Ross, the chief captain, conducted 
them on towards the city. 

9 As they moved along their instruments 
of war glittered in the beams of the sun ; and 
the waving of their squadrons was like the 
troubled waters of the ocean. 

10 However, when they came to a place 
called Bear Creek, lo ! the army of Columbia 
met them in battle array. 

1 1 For, when the gallant young men of 
Baltimore heard the rumor, that the slaves of 
Britain were coming upon them ; 

3 2 With the spirit of freemen, they grasp- 
ed their weapons of war in their hands, and 



252 

went out to meet them without fear ; resolv- 
ed to conquer or to die.* 

13 For well they knew, that life would be 
a burthen to them, when their habitations 
were consumed with fire ; their parents 
slaughtered ; and the innocence of their 
wives and their sisters violated. 

14 Now the name of the chief captain of 
the army of Columbia was Samuel, whose sur- 
name was Smith :f a valiant man, who had 
fought in the days of Washington, and gain- 
ed much honor. 

15 Moreover, Samuel was a man well- 
stricken in years, and he had many brave 
captains under him ; even Strieker, and Starts- 
hury, and Winder were with him. 

16 Now it was somewhat after the mid- 
day when the engines of destruction began 
their roaring noises : 

17 And the fire and smoke were vomited 
forth out of their mouths, so that the light of 
the sun was hidden by the means of the black 
clouds that filled the air. 



* Although it may be said the British were not conquered ; 
yet they were defeated, 
f Gen. Smith. 



253 

18 And their rockets, and all their inslrti< 
ments of death, which the sons of men have 
employed their understandings to invent, 
were used abundantly. 

19 Now the battle waxed hot, and the gal- 
lant Strieker, and his brave men, fought 
hard ; and it was a dreadful fight, 

20 Inasmuch as the slain and wounded of 
the king that day, were about four hundred ; 
and the loss of the men of Columbia was two 
hundred. 

21 Moreover, Ross, the chief captain of 
the host of Britain, was amongst the slain ; a 
boy, who had accompanied his father to bat- 
tle, had taken dreadful aim at Ross, with his 
rifle, and killed him ; and the people of Co- 
lumbia grieved only because it was not 
Cockburn the wicked, who had fallen ; for a 
man, whose name was O' Boyle, had offered 
live hundred pieces of silver for each of his 
ears. 

22 Nevertheless, the men of Columbia 
were not powerful enough to overcome the 
servants of the king ; so they drew back into 
their entrenchments, and strong holds ; that 
were upon the high places round about the 
city. 



254 

23 And Rogers, and Findley, and Harris, 
and Stiles were among the captains of the 
strong holds ; and were all faithful men. 

24 But it came to pass, the next day, when 
the men of Britain saw that the children of 
Columbia were well prepared for battle, that 
they were afraid to go against the strong 
holds. 

25 So in the middle of the night, which 
was dark and rainy, they departed from the 
place, and returned to their vessels, that they 
might escape the evil that was preparing for 
them. 

26 Moreover, they took the dead body of 
Ross, their chief captain, with them, and cast 
it into a vessel, filled with the strong waters 
of Jamaica; 

27 That the instrument of their wicked- 
ness might be preserved, and conveyed to the 
king, their master, and be buried in his own 
country ; for which honor the people envied 
them not. 

28 Now it came to pass, in the meantime, 
that Cochrane, and Cockburn the wicked, the 
chief captains of the mariners of the king, 
sailed up the river Petapsco, towards the 
strong hold of Fort M'Henry, to assail it 



255 

29 Now the strong hold of M'Henry lieth 
about fifteen furlongs from the city ; and the 
name of the chief captain thereof was Armis- 
teady a man of courage. 

30 And when the strong vessels of the 
king drew nigh urrto the fort, they cast their 
rockets and their bomb-shells into it plenti- 
fully, and strove hard to drive the men of 
Columbia away. 

31 But the gallant Armistead let the des- 
troying engines loose upon them, without 
mercy ; and they cast out their thunders, 
winged with death, among the servants of the 
king. 

32 The loud groans of their wounded 
floated upon the waters, with an awful horror 
that shocked the ear of humanity. 

33 And it was so, that when Cockburn 
found he could not prevail against the 
strong hold, he also departed from the 
river, neither came they against the place 
any more. 

34 Now when the men of Columbia heard 
that Ross, the chief captain of the king, was 
slain, and the host of Britain was compelled 
to flee from before the city, they were ex- 
ceedingly rejoiced. 

x 



256 

35 And the brave defenders of Baltimore 
had great praise and honor given them 
throughout the land. 

36 And the names of those who fell in the 
contest, are they not written on the monu- 
ment which the gratitude of the people of 
Baltimore erected to the memory of its 
defenders ? 






25'7 



CHAP. XLIX. 

Destruction of the privateer Gen. Armstrongs 
Samuel C. Re id, captain — Scorpion and Ti- 
gress captured — U. S. frigate Adams burnt 
— Castine — Fort Boyer attacked — destruc- 
tion of the pirates at Barrataria, by Com, 
Patterson — Gen. Jackson captures Pensaco- 
la, and returns to New-Orleans. 



JN OW the loud and frightful noise of war 
sounded upon the bosom of the great deep j 
and the shores of Columbia knew no peace. 

2 The dreadful clangor of arms rung up- 
on the land, and echoed from the mountains ; 
and the groans of suffering victims floated in 
the air of heaven. 

3 But the Lord favored the people of Co- 
lumbia, and their armies and their navy gain- 
ed strength, and prosperity was showered up- 
on them ; the voice of war became familiar to 
those who were strangers to it in times past. 



258 

4 Now on the twenty-sixth day of the ninth 
month, being in the thirty and ninth year of 
Columbian Independence, 

5 It came to pass, that a certain private 
armed vessel of the people of Columbia, call- 
ed the General Armstrong, commanded by 
Samuel, whose sur-name was Heid, 

6 Had cast her anchors in the haven of 
Fayal, an island in the sea, which lieth to- 
wards the rising sun, about two thousand 
miles from the land of Columbia ; 

7 A place where, two score and ten years 
ago, there was a mighty earthquake ; and 
where poisonous reptiles never dwell. 

8 And it was about the dusk of the even- 
ing when Samuel saw a number of the strong 
vessels of Britain hemming him in: so he 
drew nigh to the shore for safety, for the 
place was friendly to both powers. 

9 Nevertheless, the boats from the vessels 
of the -king went against Samuel to take his 
vessel ; but with his weapons of war he drove 
them off and slew numbers of them, so that 
they were glad to return to their strong 
ships. 

10 However, they quickly returned with 
a greater number of boats, and about four 



259 

hundred men ; and Samuel saw them, and 
prepared to meet them. 

11 The silver beams of the moon danced 
upon the gently rolling waves of the mighty 
deep, and the sound of the oar again broke 
the sweet silence of night. 

12 But, when they came nigh the vessel of 
Samuel, the men of Columbia poured out 
destruction upon them with a plentiful hand; 

13 Inasmuch as they were again compel- 
led to depart to their strong vessels, with 
dreadful loss. 

14 However, about the dawning of the day, 
one of the strong vessels, called the Carna- 
tion, came against the vessel of Columbia, 
and let her destroying engines loose with 
great fury. 

15 Now Lloyd, who commanded the Plan 
tagenet, was the chief captain of the squadron 
of the king, in the place ; and he violated the 
law of nations. 

16 So when Samuel saw that the whole 
fleet of Britain were bent on destroying his 
vessel, in defiance of the plighted honor of 
nations, he ordered her to be sunk. 

17 After which he and his brave mariners 

deserted her, and went upon the shore ; and 
x 2 



i 



260 

the servants of the king came and burnt her 
with fire in the neutral port of Fayal. 

18 Nevertheless, they received the reward 
of their unrighteousness, for much damage 
was done to their vessels, and their slain and 
wounded were two hundred two score and 
ten. 

19 Of the people of Columbia two only 
were slain and seven maimed ! ! 

20 And the valiant deeds of Samuel gain- 
ed him a name amongst the brave men of Co- 
lumbia. 

21 Now, in the same month, the Scorpion 
and the Tigress, two righting vessels of Co- 
lumbia, on lake Huron, were captured by the 
men of Britain. 

22 Likewise, about this time, there were 
numerous other evils that befel the sons of 
Columbia ; 

23 Inasmuch as a brave captain, whose 
sur-name was Morris, was obliged to con- 
sume his ship with fire, lest she should fall in- 
to the hands of the enemy ; and she was call- 
ed the Adams.* 



U.S. frigate Adams. 



261 

24 Now this was at a place called Castine 9 
which was forcibly occupied by the strong 
ships of Britain, and lieth to the east, in the 
District of Maine : moreover, it became a 
watering place for the servants of the king. 

25 But when James, the chief governor, 
and the great Sanhedrim, knew thereof, they 
sent word to the governor, and offered him 
soldiers to drive them from the borders of 
Columbia ; 

26 But, lo! the governor, even Caleb the 
shittamite, refused his aid, for he was afraid 
of the wrath of the king of Britain.* 

27 (Now Caleb, in the hebrew tongue, sig- 
nifieth a dog ; but, verily, this dog was 
faithless.) 

28 Moreover, it came to pass, about the 
same time, that the strong hold oiFort Boyer, 
being at a place called Mobile-point, was at- 
tacked by the strong ships of Britain. 

29 Now Mobile had lately been the head 
quarters and the resting-place of the army of 
Jackson the brave ; 

30 But the enemies of Columbia had be- 



* See the letter of Sec. Monroe, and Strong's answer. 



* 



262 

some tumultuous at a place called, by the 
Spaniards, Pensacola, whither he had depart- 
ed to quell them ; 

31 So that the fort was defended by only a 
handful of men, commanded by the gallant 
Lawrence. 

32 And the names of the vessels of the 
king, that assailed the fort, were the Hermes, 
the Charon, and the Sophie, besides other 
fighting vessels ; which opened their fires up- 
on the strong hold. 

33 Nevertheless, Lawrence was not dis- 
mayed, although Woodbine,* the white sav- 
age, came in his rear, with one of the des- 
troying engines and a howitzer, an instru- 
ment of Satan, and about two hundred sav- 
ages. 

34 So when Lawrence let his engines of 
death loose upon them, and had showered the 
whizzing balls amongst them for about the 
space of three hours, they fled. 

35 And the slaughter on board the ships 
was dreadful ; and about three hundred of the 
men of Britain were slain, and the Hermes 

* The celebrated Cspt. Woodbine, of the British navy. 



^63 

was blown out of the water into the air with 
an awful noise. 

36 The loss of the people of Columbia 
that day, was four slain and five maimed. 

37 About this time a band of sea-robbers 
and pirates, who had established themselves 
upon the island of Barrator la, were commit- 
ting great wickedness and depredations; and 
were ready to assist the men of Britain. 

38 But a valiant man, called Daniel, sur- 
named Patterson, went against them with his 
small fighting vessels,* and scattered them 
abroad, and took their vessels, and destroyed 
their petty establishment of sea-robbery. 

39 Now it came to pass, when Jackson 
heard that Pensacola, the capital of West- 
Florida, had become a resting-place for the 
enemies of Columbia ; and that the men of 
Britain occupied the place, and had built 
them a strong hold therein ; 

40 From whence they sent forth the 
weapons of war and the black dust among 
the savages, to destroy the people of Co- 



* Gun-boats. 



264 

lumbia ; and that the servants of the king of 
Spain were afraid to prevent the wickedness 
thereof; 

41 Behold! he, even Jackson, went ou 
against the place with a band of five thousanc 
righting men, the brave sons of Tennessee 
and other parts of Columbia. 

42 And it was early in the morning of the 
seventh day of the eleventh month, when 
the host of Columbia appeared before the 
walls of Pensacola. 

43 And immediately Jackson sat the en- 
gines of destruction to work ; and the smoke 
thereof obscured the weapons of war. 

44 Now when the governor of the place 
heard the noise of the engines of death 
and the clashing of arms, he was smitten 
with fear ; 

45 Insomuch that Jackson, the chief cap- 
tain, who with his army had encompassed the 
place, quickly compelled him to surrender 
the town, and beg for mercy ; which was 
granted unto him and his people, even the 
Spaniards. 

46 Now when the men of Britain saw this, 
they put the match to the black dust in 



265 

their strong hold, and it rent the air with tre- 
mendous noise. 

47 After which they fled from the land in- 
to their strong ships, that were in the haven 
of Pensacola. 

48 And Jackson, having accomplished his 
wishes, by intimidating the tools of British 
villany and murder, returned with his army 
in triumph to the city of New-Orleans, on 
the second day of the twelfth month. 



2££2*£ 



266 



CHAP. L. 

Steam-boats — Fulton — torpedoes — attempt to 
blow up the Plantagenet — kidnapping 

Joshua Penny. 

% 

JM OW it happened that, in the land of Co- 
lumbia, there arose up wise and learned 
men, whose cunning had contrived and in- 
vented many useful things. 

2 Among these there appeared one whose 
ingenuity was exceedingly great, inasmuch 
as it astonished all the inhabitants of the 
earth : 

3 Now the name of this man was Robert, 
sur-named Fulton ; (but the cold hand of 
death fell upon him, and he slept with his fa- 
thers, on the twenty and third day of the se- 
cond month of the eighteen hundred and fif- 
teenth year of the Christian era.) 

4 However, the things which he brought 
into practice in his life time will be record- 
ed, and his name spoken of by generations 
Vet unborn. 






267 

5 Although, like other men of genius, in 
these days, he was spoken of but slightly at 
first ; for the people said, Lo ! the man is be- 
side himself^ and they laughed at him ; ne- 
vertheless, he exceeded their expectations. 

6 For it came to pass, that (assisted by Li- 
vingston, a man of wealth, and a lover of arts 
and learning) he was enabled to construct 
certain curious vessels, called in the vernacu*- 
iar tongue, steam-boats. 

7 Now these steam-boats were cunningly 
contrived, and had abundance of curious 
workmanship therein, such as surpassed the 
comprehension of all the wise men of the 
east, from the beginning to this day ; 

8 Howbeit, they were fashioned some- 
what like unto the first vessel that floated up- 
on the waters, which was the ark of Noab, 
the ninth descendant from Adam ; 

9 And, that they might heat the water 
which produced the steam, there was a fiery 
furnace placed in the midst of the vessels s 
and the smoke issued from the tops thereof. 

10 Moreover, they had, as it were, wheels 
within wheels ; and they moved fast upon the 
waters, even against the wind and the tide. 

11 Ajad they first began to move upon the 

Y 



268 

great river Hudson, passing to and fro, from 
New- York to Albany, in the north, convey- 
ing the people hither and thither in safety. 

12 But when the scoffers, the enemies of 
Fulton, and the gainsayers, saw that the 
boats moved pleasantly upon the river, they 
began to be ashamed of their own ignorance 
and stupidity, and were fain to get into the 
boats themselves ; after which, instead of 
laughing, they gaped at the inventor with as- 
tonishment. 

13 And it came to pass, that the great 
Sanhedrim were pleased with the thing, inas- 
much as they directed a fighting vessel of 
Columbia to be built after this manner. 

14 So a vessel was built, to carry the des- 
troying engines, even a steam-frigate, and 
they called her name Fulton the First : 

15 And the length thereof was about an 
hundred cubits, and the breadth thereof thir- 
ty cubits : 

16 Moreover, as they had no gophar- 
vvood, they built the vessel partly of the lo- 
cust-tree, and partly of the majestic oak that 
flourishes in the extensive forests of Co- 
lumbia. 

17 But it came to pass, when the wise men 



269 

and the people of Britain heard of this steam- 
frigate, they were seized with astonishment 
and fright ; inasmuch as it became a monster 
in their imaginations. 

18 And they spake concerning it, saying, 
Lo ! tiie length of this wonder of the world,, 
which hath been invented by these cunning 
Yankees, is about two hundred cubits, and 
the breadth thereof an hundred thirty and 
five cubits : 

19 The number of her destroying engines 
are very great ; and the weight of a ball which 
she vomiteth forth, is about a thousand five 
hundred two score and ten shekels : 

20 Moreover, said they, she is prepared to 
cast forth scalding water in showers upon the 
servants of the king, which will deform their 
countenances and spoil their beauty : 

21 Likewise, they have prepared her with 
two-edged swords, which, by means of the 
steam of the vessel, issue like lightning out 
of her sides. 

22 And now, also, the cunning and witch- 
craft of these Yankees, these sons of Belial, 
these children of Beelzebub, have invented 
another instrument of destruction, more sub- 
tle than all the rest : 



270 

23 Yea, these are mighty evil things, and 
they are called torpedoes, which may be said 
to signify sleeping devils ; which come, as a 
thief in the night, to destroy the servants of 
the king ; and were contrived by that arch 
iiend whose name was Fulton. 

24 Now these wonderful torpedoes were 
made partly of brass and partly of iron, 
and were cunningly contrived with curious 
works, like unto a clock ; and as it were a 
large ball. 

25 And, after they were prepared, and a 
great quantity of the black dust put therein, 
they were let down into the water, nigh un- 
to the strong ships, with intent to destroy 
them i 

26 And it was so, that when they struck 
against the bottom of the ship, the black dust 
in the torpedo would catch fire, and burst 
forth with tremendous roar, casting the ves- 
sel out of the waters and bursting her in 
twain. 

27 Now these torpedoes were brought in- 
to practice during the war, although the war 
ceased before they did that destruction to 
the enemies of Columbia, for which they 
were intended. 



271 

28 However, a certain man of courage 
and enterprize, whose name was Mix, pre- 
pared one of the torpedoes, and put it into 
the waters of the great deep, at a place called 
Lyn-Haven Bay, at the mouth of the great 
bay of Chesapeake, nigh unto the town of 
Norfolk, in the state of Virginia; 

29 And it moved towards a strong ship of 
Britain, called the Plantagenet, after one of 
the former princes of England ; but an acci- 
dent happened a little before it reached the 
vessel, and it burst asunder in the waters 
with a tremendous noise ; 

30 And spouted the water up into the air, 
as doth the mighty whale, and the sound 
thereof was, as it were, the voice of thunder, 

31 And the servants of the king were 
frightened horribly by the means thereof; 
after which they trembled at the name of 
torpedo ! — and were obliged to guard their 
vessels in the night, and put a double watch 
upon them ; 

32 Moreover, they condemned this mode 
of warfare, saying : Verily, this is a foul fa- 
shion of fighting ; inasmuch as by your cun- 
ing ye Yankees take the advantage of us ; 
and the thing is new unto us. 

Y 2 



272 

33 But they had willfully forgotten, that, 
in the life time of Fulton, they had offered 
him forty thousand pieces of gold, if he 
would bring these torpedoes into practice in 
their own country, that they might use them 
against the Gauls,* (with whom they warred 
continually for more than twenty years) : 
Howbeit they proved faithless to Fulton, and 
so he did it not for them. 

34 Moreover it came to pass that a cer- 
tain man, a pilot, even Joshua, sur-named 
Penny, became a victim of their spite, be- 
cause he attempted to go against them with 
the torpedoes to drive them out of the wa- 
ters of Columbia. 

35 Now Joshua lived at a place called 
East Hampton, being at the east end of Long 
Island, near Gardner's Island, opposite New 
London. 

36 And the men of Britain came to his 
house in the night, and stole him away, even 
out of his bed, and carried him on board a 
vessel of the king, called the Ramilies, from 
whence he was conveyed to Halifax in the 
province of Nova Scotia. 

* This was about the time of the Boalogoe flotilla. 



273 

37 Now while Joshua remained in the 
dungeons of the king he was treated with the 
inhospitaJity of barbarians ; moreover, they 
strove to lead him astray : but he proved 
faithful to his God and to his country ; for he 
had known the wickedness of Britain in times 
past.* 

38 However, they kept him in bondage 
many months, after which they suffered him 
to go to his own country. 

39 For the chief governor of the land of 
Columbia, and the Great Sanhedrim in their 
wisdom had ordered two of the servants of 
the king to be taken and held as hostages for 
his safe return ; and, but for this thing, they 
would have hanged him, even as a man hang- 
cth a dog. 

* Joshua Penny had been, previous to the war, impressed 
in the British service, and kept in it a number of years. 



274 
CHAP. LI. 



Affairs in and about New- York, the first com- 
mercial city in America — working on the 
fortifications of Brooklyn and Haerlem — 
capture of the British tender Eagle, by the 
Yankee smack. 



JN OW, as good sometimes cometh out of 
evil, so the people of New- York, a great 
city, which lieth at the mouth of the river 
Hudson, nigh the sea coast, and containeth 
more than an hundred thousand souls, 

2 When they beheld the wickedness that 
was committed by the servants of the king, 
to the south and round about, began to bestir 
themselves, and prepare for the dangers with 
which they were likely to be encompassed : 

3 So it came to pass that the husbandmen 
from the v surrounding country gathered to- 
gether, and pitched their tents hard by the 
city. 

4 And the number that came to the de- 
fence of the place was about thirty thousand 



27J 

valiant men ; moreover there were about five 
thousand husbandmen from the state of Nerv- 
Jersey,* 

5 Now these men were called Jersey Blues, 
and they were encamped partly at Paulus 
Hook, and partly at a place called the Nar- 
rows, which lieth to the south of the city a- 
bout an hundred furlongs, where the des- 
troying engines were placed in multitudes. 

6 And when the term of the engagement 
of these men of Jersey expired, they griev- 
ed only that their time was spent for nought ; 
for they were ready and well prepared to 
meet the servants of the king. 

7 Nevertheless, it was so that (he freemen 
who came to the defence of the city, built 
strong holds and forts, and raised up fortifi- 
cations in abundance, inasmuch as the whole 
place was as it were one camp. 

8 Moreover, on the tenth day of the eighth 
month, in the eighteen hundred and four- 
teenth year, the inhabitants assembled toge- 
ther in the midst of the city, even in a place 
called the Park, where the Federal Hall, a su- 
perb edifice, rears its majestic front ; within 
the walls of which the wise men, the expoun- 

* The exertions of Daniel D. Tompkins, governor of the state 
of N.York, at this time, will long be remembered by the people. 



276 

ders of the law, preside, and deliberate for 
the benefit of the people. 

9 Now it was about the twelfth hour of 
the day when the people began to gather 
themselves together ; and, from the porch of 
the hall, the aged Willet, with the star-span- 
gled banner of Columbia waving over his 
silvery head, addressed the surrounding mul- 
titude. 

10 And the people shouted with a loud 
voice, for the words of his mouth were plea- 
sant to the sons of Liberty, and were in this 
wise : 

11 Lo ! three score and fourteen years 
have brought with them their bodily infirmi- 
ties ; but were my strength as unimpaired 
as my love for my country, and that soul 
which still animates me, ye would not have 
found me in the rostrum, but in the midst of 
the battle ! fighting against the enemies of 
freedom. 

12 Thus did he encourage the people to 
prepare themselves for the protection of the 
city. 

13 And certain wise men were appointed, 
by* the people ; to bring these things into 
operation. 



277 

14 So the people began to fortify them- 
selves and entrench the high places round a- 
bout the city. 

15 And when they went out in its de- 
fence, to build their strong holds and to raise 
up their battlements ; lo! the steam-boats of 
Fulton conveyed them thither, about a thou- 
sand at a time, even towards the heights of 
Brooklyn in the east, and the heights of 
Haerltm in the north. 

16 The young and the old, the rich and 
the poor, went out together ; and took with 
them their bread and their wine ; and cast up 
the dirt for the defence of the place, freely, 
and without cost to the state.* 

17 And when they went into the boats to 
cross over the river, there was loud shouting 
in the boats and on the shore. 

18 Moreover, as they passed along up the 
Hudson, towards the haights of Haerlem, 
the fair daughters of Columbia, with hearts 
glowing with patriotism, waved their lily 
hands in token of applause. 

19 Likewise, bands of men came from the 
neighbourhood round about ; even from New- 

* The services rendered on this occasion, by that respect- 
able class of citizens, the Firemen of J\'erv- York, were parties 
cularly conspicuous. 



278 

ttrlc, and Patterson, and Paulus Hook, which 
lie in the stale of New- Jersey, 

20 They had also captains appointed over 
their bands ; and Abraham and David were 
two among the captains.* 

21 Now Abraham, with his band, came a 
great way, even from the town of Patterson, 
where the wonderful waterfalls pour head- 
long over the rocky mountains, reflecting in 
Ihe sun a thousand brilliant rainbows, 

22 Thus for an hundred days did the peo- 
ple of New- York prepare themselves for 
danger, and cast up entrenchments for many 
furlongs round about the city ; so that the 
people of Britain were afraid to go against 
It.f 

* Majoi Goodwin and Major Hunt. 

f So great was the enthusiasm of the people in contributing 
their persona! services to the erection of fortifications on the 
heights of Haerlem and Brooklyn, that scarcely could an indi- 
vidual be found in the populous city of New- York, from hoary 
age to tender youth, capable of using a mattock or a spade, 
who did not volunteer his services in this work of patriotism. 
Even the Ladies were conspicuous in aiding and cheering the 
labours of their Fathers, their Husbands, their Brothers, and 
their Children. Amongst others, the numerous societies of 
Freemasons joined in a body, and headed by their Grand- 
liastet, who was also Mayor of the city, proceeded to Brook 



279 

23 Nevertheless the strong ships of war of 
Britain moved upon the waters of the ocean 
around the place in numbers, but they were 
afraid to approach the city ; for when they 
came nigh, the men of Columbia let the de- 
stroying engines loose upon them, even those 
that vomited forth whizzing balls, like shoot- 
ing stars, red from the fiery furnace. 



lyn, and assisted very spiritedly in its defence. On this occa- 
sion an elderly gentleman, one of the order, who had two sons 
(his only children) in the service of his country, one of them 
highly distinguished during the war for his wounds and his bra- 
very, sung the following stanzas, in his own character of Mason 
and Father, whilst the Lodges were at refreshment : 

I. 

Hail, Children of Light ! whom the Charities send 

Where the bloodhounds of Britain are shortly expected ; 
Who, your country, your wives, your ti. esi^es to defend, 
Ou the summit of Urooklyn have ramparts erected : 
Firm and true to the trade, 
Continue your aid, 
Till the top-stone with shouting triumphant is laid : 
The free and accepted will never despair, 
Led on by their worthy Grand Master and Mayor. 

II. 

For me, whose dismissal must shortly arrive, 

To Heav'n I prefer this my fervent petition : 
■• May I never America's freedom survive, 
" Nor behoM her disgrae'd by a shameful submission : 
" And, though righteously steel'd, 
" If at last she must yield, 
" May my sons do their duty, and die in the field : " 
But the free and accepted will never despair, 
Led on by their wcrthy Grand Master and Mayor. 

z 



280 

24 Notwithstanding, the haughty captains 
of the ships of Britain would send in their 
boats to rob the market-men and the fisher- 
men: howbeit, they were sometimes en- 
trapped. 

25 For it came to pass, upon a certain day, 
that the Poictiers, a mighty ship of the king, 
lying at a place called Sandy-Hook, sent out 
one of her tenders, even the Eagle, in search 
of this kind of plunder : 

26 Whereupon, a fishing boat of Colum- 
bia, called the Yankee, under the direction 
of a chief captain called Lewis,* prepare* 
kerself with a number of men to entrap the 
Eagle. 

27 So they took a fatted calf, a bleating 
Iamb, and a noisy goose, and placed them 
upon the deck of the boat ; and when the ser 
rants of the king came nigh the Yankee, 
thinking they were about to be treated hand- 
somely with the good things of the land of 
Columbia, their hearts were rejoiced ; 

28 They commanded the vessel called the 
Yankee to follow after them, towards the 



* Commodore Lewis, commander of the flotilla io the harbor 
of New-York. 



, 281 

ship of the king their master ; but at this moe 
ment the men of Columbia arose up from 
their hiding-places in the hold of the boat, 
and shot into the vessel of Britain. 

29 At the sound of which they were so 
astonished, that they forgot to put the match 
to the black dust of the huge howitzer, a de- 
structive engine made of brass, which they 
had prepared to destroy the men of Columbia. 

30 So they were confused, and surrender- 
ed the Eagle up to the Yankee. 

31 And as they came up to the city, be- 
fore the Battery, which is a beautiful place 
to the south thereof, the thousands who were 
assembled there, to celebrate the Columbian 
Jubilee,* rent the air with loud shouts of joy, 
whilst the roaring engines echoed to the 
skies. 

32 Thus was the lamb preserved, and the 
proud and cunning men of Britain outwitted 
w r ith a fatted calf and a Yankee goose. 

* American Independence. 

Stf'ttf 






282 



CHAP. LII. 

Affairs on the ocean — privateer Prince of 
Neufchatel — Marquis of Tiveedale defeated 
in Upper Canada — capture of the President 
— loss of the Sylph — capture of the Cyane 
and the Levant by the Constitution — capture 
of the St. Lawrence — capture of the Penguin 
by the Hornet, captain Biddle. 



oTILL there was no peace, and the evils of 
war continued on the face of the deep, and 
the waters thereof were encrimsoned with 
the blood of man. 

2 And it came to pass, on the eleventh day 
of the tenth month, in the eighteen hundred 
and fourteenth year, that there was a sore 
battle fought between five barges from the 
Endymion, a strong ship of the king, and a 
privateer, called the Prince of Neufchatel, 
commanded by the valiant Ordonneaux, a 
man of Gaul. 

3 Moreover, the number of the men of Bri- 
tain were threefold greater than the people 
of Columbia ; and the fight happened nigh a 



283 

place called Nantucket, in the east, journey- 
ing towards Boston. 

4 Now they sat their engines to work with 
dreadful violence ; but in about the third 
part of an hour the barges of the king's ship 
were overcome ; and more than three score 
and ten of the men of Britain were slain and 
maimed : the loss in the privateer was six 
slain, and about a score wounded. 

5 Now this battle happened in the same 
month in which more than a thousand men of 
the warriors of Britain, commanded by the 
Marquis of Tweedale, were defeated at Black 
Creek, in Upper Canada, and driven to their 
strong holds by the men of Columbia, under 
the gallant Bissel.* 

6 Ten days after which the steam frigate, 
Fulton the First, was launched forth into the 
waters at New- York. 

7 And it came to pass, on the fifteenth day 
of the first month of the next year, that one 
of the tall ships of Columbia fell into the 
hands of the servants of the king ; 

8 And she was called the President, after 

the title of the chief magistrate of the land 

. - - — — .._ . , ■-.■■ » » . — 

* General Bissel. 
Z2 



284 

of Columbia; moreover, she was command- 
ed by the gallant Decatur, 

9 Who, but for an accident that befel his 
ship the day before,* whilst he was moving 
out of the harbor of New-York, would have 
outsailed the fleet of Britain, and escaped, as 
did the brave and persevering Hull, of the 
Constitution, in the first year of the war.f 

10 Nevertheless, it was so, that Decatur 
was, as it were, surrounded by the ships of the 
king, even five of them; so one of the ves- 
sels, called the Endymiun, fell upon him, and 
Decatur fought hard against her, and would 
have taken her; 

1 1 But the rest of the strong ships came 
down upon him, and opened their thundering 
engines, and compelled him to surrender his 
ship to the fleet of Britain. 

12 However it was a bloody fight; and 
there fell of the men of Columbia that day 
twenty and four that were slain outright, and 
about two score and ten were maimed, afte r 
having kept the destroying engines to work 
about the space of three hours: howbeit, 
Decatur lost no honor thereby. 

* She was injured by grounding off the Hook, 
f Commodore Hull, in this affair, gained much applause, fcr 
his manoeuvres iu escaping from the British fleet* 



285 

J 3 Two days after this, a strong vessel of 
the king, called the Sylph, was cast away, in 
a dreadful storm, at a place called Southamp- 
ton, being on Long Island, where more than 
an hundred men of Britain perished, in the 
dead of the night; and the vessel parted 
asunder and was lost. 

14 Moreover, there were six of the men 
of Britain who survived their brethren, and 
were preserved on pieces of the vessel, until 
the next day, when the neighbouring people 
took them into their houses and nourished 
them ; 

15 And, when they were sufficiently reco- 
vered, that misfortune might not bear too 
heavy upon them, they were clad, and silver 
given to them, and they were sent to their 
own country, at the expense of the people of 
Columbia. 

16 (Blessed are the merciful, for they shall 
obtain mercy, saith the scripture.) 

17 Now it came to pass, in these days, 
whilst the fleets of Britain captured the ves- 
sels of Columbia, when they caught them sin- 
gly upon the ocean, that the single ships of 
Columbia began to capture the ships of Bri- 
tain by pairs : 



286 

18 Inasmuch as it happened on the twen- 
tieth day of the second month of the same 
year, that a certain strong vessel called the 
Constitution, commanded by the brave Slew- 
art, fell in with two of the strong ships of the 
king, and compelled them both, in the space 
of forty minutes, to strike the red cross of Bri- 
tain to the stars of Columbia. 

19 And the slain and wounded of the king's 
ships were seventy and seven ; of the men 
of Columbia three were slain and twelve 
maimed ; and the names of the vessels of Bri- 
tain were the Cyane and the Levant; but 
the Levant was retaken in a neutral port,* by 
two strong ships of the king.f 

20 Now the valiant Stewart and his brave 
men gat great praise for their deeds, even the 
great Sanhedrim of the people honored them, 
and gave them twenty thousand pieces of 
silver. 

21 In the same month the gallant Boyle, 
commanding the privateer Chasseur, captur- 
ed the St. Lawrence, a fighting vessel of the 
king, in the fourth part of an hour. 

22 And the killed and wounded of the St. 

*. Porto Prava. f Acasta and Newcastle. 



287 

Lawrence were thirty and eight; and the 
Chasseur had five slain and eight maimed. 

23 Moreover, it came to pass, on the twen- 
ty-third day of the next month, that another 
fighting vessel of the king, called the Pen- 
guin, was taken by the Hornet, a strong ves- 
sel of Columbia, commanded by a man of va- 
lor and coinage, whose surname was Biddle. 

24 However, the battle was a bloody one, 
and the vessels kept their engines of destruc- 
tion fiercely in motion, for about the space 
of half an hour before the flag of Britain was 
lowered to the stripes of Columbia. 

25 And the slaughter was great ; for there 
fell of the men of Britain two score and one; 
but the slain of Columbia were only one, and 
the maimed eleven. 

26 And Biddle was honored greatly for 
his courage : 

27 However, this was the last sea-fight of 
importance, being near the close of the war. 

28 .Now about this time the navy of Co- 
lumbia had increased more than fourfold, and 
the fame thereof had extended to all nations. 

29 For, though Columbia was young, even 
as it were in the gristle of her youth ; yet 
she now began to resume the appearance, 
and display the vigor of manhood. 



288 



CHAP. LIII. 

British fled arrives near New-Orleans — the 
American flotilla captured — attacks by the 
British upon the army of Gen. Jackson. 



PS OW, when the lords and the counsellors, 
and the wise men of Britain, heard of all the 
tribulations that befel them in the land of Co- 
lumbia, they were troubled in their minds. 

2 And as they had made what they called 
a demonstration at Baltimore, they bethought 
themselves of making another demonstration 
in the south. 

3 (Now the true signification, in the ver- 
nacular tongue, of this mighty word demon- 
stration, had always been familiar to the chil- 
dren of Columbia; but the new interpreta- 
tion, although it wounded the pride of Bri- 
tain, tickled the sons of Columbia; for, as 
the world must think to this day, so they 
could only construe it, an ocular demonstra- 
tion of British folly.) 



289 4 

4 So it came to pass, that they gathered 
together their army and their navy, even two 
score and ten fighting vessels, carrying there- 
in about twenty thousand men of war; and 
the name of the chief captain of the navy- 
was Cochrane; and the chief captains of the 
army were Pakenham, Gibbs, and Keane. 

5 And they essayed to go against the city 
of New-Orleans, which lieth to the south, on 
the borders of the great river Mississippi, in 
the state of Louisiana, which was covenant- 
ed, in good faith, to the United States in the 
days when Jefferson presided as chief gover- 
nor of the land of Columbia. 

6 But it came to pass, that Jackson, when 
he had returned from the capture of Pensa- 
cola, where he corked up the bottles of ini- 
quity that were ready to be emptied out 
upon the men of Columbia, 

7 Had arrived with his army at New-Or- 
leans, he began to fortify the place, for he 
had heard it noised abroad that the king was 
bent upon taking the city. 

8 About this time, Jackson communed 
with Claiborne the governor, touching the 
matter ; and as his men of war were but few, 
the valiant husbandmen of Louisiana, Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, and the Mississippi Terri- 



r 



290 

lory, were informed of the evil, and accord- 
ingly they flocked in multitudes to the ban- 
ners of Jackson. 

9 Now, as Jackson and Claiborne had 
counted upon the arrival of the strong ships 
of Britain, so it happened, in the latter part 
of the eighteen hundred and fourteenth year, 
that they made their appearance, even in the 
twelfth month of the year. 

10 And it was so, that when they had come 
as nigh as they could unto the city with their 
heavy ships, some of which carried an hun- 
dred of the destroying engines, they cast an- 
chor: 

1 1 And lo, after having passed a certain 
dangerous place called Pass Christian, they 
prepared their boats, containing more than a 
thousand men, and sent them in great num- 
bers against the boats of Columbia that were 
upon the waters of the lakes about the city.* 

12 Now these small vessels of Columbia 
were commanded by Thomas, a brave man, 
whose surname was Jones, and he gave them 
hindrance. 

1 3 Nevertheless, in the space of about two 
hours, the boats of Columbia were captured 

* Lakes Borgae and Poucbartrain. 



291 

by the vessels of Britain, one after another, 
until they were all taken : however, the mar- 
iners of Columbia fought well, and gained 
great praise; and the loss of the king was 
about three hundred. 

14 Now the capture of the gun-boats of 
the United States upon these waters encou- 
raged the servants of the king, so they began 
to land their mighty army upon the shores 
of Columbia in great multitudes from their 
boats: 

1 5 And they pitched their tents, and cast 
up fortification?, and prepared to assail the 
strong hold of Jackson, the chief captain. 

16 But, that the host of Britain might be 
discomfited at the onset, Jackson went out 
with his army against them ; but the men of 
war of tbe king were twofold greater than 
the men of Columbia, so Jackson was unable 
to drive them away. 

17 However, he fought bravely against 
them, and slew numbers of them; albeit, the 
slain and maimed of Columbia were about 
two hundred , so Jackson drew back to his 
entrenchments, and strengthened himself 
there. 

18 Now this happened on the twenty and 

Aa 



292 

third day of the twelfth month, in the eigh- 
teen hundred and fourteenth year. 

19 And it came to pass, on the twenty-se- 
venth day of the same month, that a fighting 
vessel of the United States, called the Caro- 
line, commanded by Daniel, was set fire to, 
and blown up, by the heated balls of the 
king's fiery furnace. 

20 On the next day, the whole host of Bri- 
tain gathered themselves together, and with 
their might went against the strong hold of 
Jackson. 

21 But Jackson let the destroying engines 
loose upon the slaves of Britain, and compel- 
led them to return to their encampments 
with great loss, even an hundred and two 
score. 

22 Nevertheless, on the first day of the first 
month, of the eighteen hundred and fifteenth 
year, the men of war of Britain came again, 
and strove to dislodge the army of Jackson; 
but again they were deceived, and lost about 
an hundred men. 

23 At this time there arrived to the aid of 
Jackson about two thousand five hundred va- 
liant men, from the back-woods of Kentucky. 

24 Disappointed in their expectations, and 
failing in their attempts to discomfit the armv 



293 

of Columbia, the captains and the host of 
Britain arrayed themselves in their might to 
go against the hold of Jackson with their 
whole force. 

25 And the morning of the eighth day of 
the month was pitched upon, by the men of 
Britain, for conquering the host of Columbia, 
and settling themselves in the land of liberty. 

26 So they prepared themselves with their 
fascines and their scaling ladders, and their 
bombs and their rockets, and all the wea- 
pons of destruction that the ingenuity of Bri- 
tain could invent. 

27 After which Pakenham, the chief cap- 
tain of the host of the king, spake to the 
officers and the men of war that were under 
him, saying, 

28 Be ye prepared; for, lo! to-morrow, 
at the dawning of the day, our mighty squad- 
rons shall rush upon these Yankees, and de- 
stroy them. 

29 Here will we establish ourselves upon 
the borders of Columbia; and ye shall be 
officers, tythe-men, and tax-gatherers, under 
the king, your master: 

30 Moreover, a day and a night shall ye 
plunder and riot ; and your watch-word shall 
be, BEAUTY AND BOOTY ! 



294 

CHAP. LIV. 

Grand Battle of Neiv-Orleans. 



JN OW Pakenham, the chief captain of the 
host of Britain, made an end of addressing 
the officers and the soldiers of the king: 

2 And it came to pass, in the one thou- 
sand eight hundred and fifteenth year of the 
Christian era, in the first month of the year, 
and on the eighth day of the month, 

3 Being on the Sabbath day, (which, as it 
is written in the holy scriptures, Thou shalt 

REMEMBER AND KEEP HOLY,) 

4 That the mighty army of the king, which 
had moyed out of the strong ships of Britain, 
came, in their strength, to make conquest 
of the territory of Columbia, which lieth to 
the south ; 

5 And to place therein a princely ruler t 
and all manner of officers, the servants of the 
king, even unto a tax-gatherer. 

6 So, early in the morning, they appeared 
before the camp of the men of Columbia, even 



295 

the strong hold which Jackson, the chief cap- 
tain, had fortified. 

7 Their polished steels, of fine workman- 
ship, glittered in the sun, and the movement 
of their squadrons was as the waving of a 
wheat-field, when the south wind passeth 
gently over it. 

8 The fierceness of their coming was as 
the coming of a thousand untamed lions, 
which move majestically over the sandy de- 
serts of Arabia. 

9 And the army rested upon the plains of 
Mac Prardies, nigh unto the cypress swamp, 
being distant from the city about forty and 
eight furlongs. 

10 And it was about the rising of the sun,, 
when the battering-rams of the king began to 
utter their noises; and the sound thereof was 
terrible as the roaring of lions, or the voice 
of many thunders. 

1 1 Moreover, they cast forth bombs, and 
Congreve rockets, weapons of destruction, 
which were not known in the days of Jeho- 
shaphat. 

12 Nevertheless, the soul of Jackson fail- 
ed him not, neither was he dismayed, for he 
was entrenched round about ; and when he 

Aa2 



296 

raised his hand, he held every man's heart 
therein. 

13 And Jackson spake, and said unto his 
captains of fifties, and his captains of hun- 
dreds, Fear not; we defend our lives and 
our liberty, and in that thing the Lord will 
not forsake us : 

14 Therefore, let every man be upon his 
watch; and let the destroying engines now 
utter forth their thunders in abundance : 

15 And ye cunning back-woodsmen, who 
have known only to hunt the squirrel, the 
wolf, and the deer, now pour forth your 
strength upon the mighty lion, that we may 
not be overcome. 

16 And as the black dust cast upon a burn- 
ing coal instantly mounteth into a flame, so 
was the spirit of the husbandmen of the back- 
woods of Columbia. 

17 Now the brave men from Tennessee 
and Kentucky set their shining rifles to work, 
and the destroying engines began to vomit 
their thunders upon the servants of the king. 

18 Twice did the host of Britain, in solid 
columns, come against the entrenchments of 
Jackson, and twice he drove them back. 

19 Moreover, Daniel the brave, who had 



297 

raised up defences upon the banks of the ri- 
yer, likewise let his engines loose upon them, 
and shot into the camp of the king. 

20 And the men of Britain strove to scale 
the ramparts, and get into the stiong hold of 
Jackson ; but the husbandmen drove them 
back with great slaughter. 

21 The fire and the smoke, and the deaf- 
ning noise that sounded along the battle- 
ments, were tremendous for more than the 
space of two hours, when the dreadful roar- 
ings ceased, for the warriors of the king fled 
in confusion. 

22 But when the sulphureous vapors arose, 
behold the battle-ground was covered with 
the slain and groaning officers and soldiers 
of the kingdom of Great Britain! 

23 Humanity shuddered at the awful scene, 
whilst the green fields blushed. 

24 Seven hundred of the servants of the 
king were slain ; and their whole loss that day 
was two thousand six hundred valiant men, 
who had fought under Wellington, the cham- 
pion of England. 

25 And Pakenham,the chief captain of the 
host of Britain, was amongst the slain; and 
they served his body as they had served the 



298 

body of Ross, their chief captain at the Balti- 
more demonstration, preserving it, in like 
manner, with the strong waters of Jamaica. 

26 Moreover, one of their chief captains, 
whose surname was Gibbs, was also slain, 
and Keane was sorely wounded ; so that the 
charge of the host of Britain that remained 
from the slaughter, fell to a certain man whose 
name was Lambert. 

27 The loss of the army of Jackson was 
only seven slain and seven maimed, a circum- 
stance unparalleled in the annals of history : 
howbeit, there were about two score slain and 
wounded upon the other side of the river. 

28 Now the whole loss of the king's army, 
from the time they came against the country 
of Louisiana until their departure, was about 
five thousand. 

29 After this they were discouraged, for 
there was but a faint hope left for them ; so 
they departed, and went into the strong ships 
of the king, with their chief captain in high 
spirits. 

30 It is written in the book of Solomon, 
that a fool laugheth at his own folly : now the 
men of Britain were not inclined to laugh, 
for they were sorely grieved; and but for 



299 

the fear of the laughter of others, would have 
wept outright. 

31 And Jackson, the thief captain of the 
host of Columbia, gave great praise to the 
gallant Coffee and Carrol, and Daniel, whose 
surname was Patterson, and all the valiant 
men who fought on that glorious day. 

32 Moreover, Jackson was honored with 
great honor by the people throughout the 
land of Columbia ; even the great Sanhedrim 
were pleased with him, and exalted his name. 

33 And the inhabitants of New-Orleans 
were greatly rejoiced, and carried him 
through the streets of the city above the rest ; 
and the virgins of Columbia strewed his path 
with roses : 

34 For, io ! he had defended them from 
the violence of savages, who came in search 
of beauty and booty ! 

35 And when the wounded of the host of 
Britain were brought into the city, the fair 
daughters of Columbia took their fine linen 
and bound up the wounds of the poor faint- 
ing officers and soldiers of the king, and sat 
bread and wine before them, to cheer their 
drooping spirits. 

36 Now again were the servants of the king 
disappointed ; for, as they were sent upon an 



300 

evil, as well as a foolish errand, they expect- 
ed not mercy : 

37 And when they saw the goodness that 
was showered upon them, they said, Surely 
ye are angels sent down from heaven to heal 
the wounds inflicted by the folly of nations ! 

38 And should we again be led on to bat- 
tle against your country, with propositions 
to violate your happiness, our swords, as by 
magic, shall be stayed, and drop harmless at 
the feet of virtue and beauty ! 






301 

CHAP. LV. 

Peace. 



JN OW after the fleet of Britain had depart- 
ed from New-Orleans in dismay, they com- 
mitted many other depredations of a petty 
nature. 

2 In the mean time, Cockburn, the wicked, 
was busily employed in what his heart de- 
lighted in ; inasmuch as he carried the men 
of Britain against the borders of South Caro- 
lina and Georgia, and continued his system 
of robbery. 

3 And here, with the strong ships of Bri- 
tain, he captured a town called St. Marys, in 
the state of Georgia ; and, among other evils, 
he stole away the sable sons of Ethiopia, 

4 And conveyed them to the island of Ber- 
muda, of which the king had made him chief 
governor, and sold them, after promising them 
liberty and freedom. 

5 However, it came to pass, about this 
time, that the news of a peace being made 
between the nations arrived in the land of 
Columbia : 



302 

6 For it had happened that the great San- 
hedrim, in their wisdom, had sent out Henry, 
surnamed Clay, and Russell, two wise men, 
called, in the vernacular tongue, commission- 
ers, to join themselves with Bayard and Gal- 
latin, who were sent before them, to try and 
make peace : 

7 For the voice of the people of Colum- 
bia had spoken peace from the beginning ; 
they wished war might cease, and that the 
breach between the nations might be healed. 

8 In the mean time the king sent some of 
his wise men to meet the wise men of Colum- 
bia, at a place called Ghent, a town a great 
way off, in the country of Flanders : 

9 For it came to pass, that the generous 
mediation offered by the emperor of Russia 
was refused by the council of Britain, who 
had not yielded to the voice of accommoda- 
tion. 

10 So, when the ministers of the two na- 
tions were met, they communed a long time 
with one another, touching the matter ; 

11 But the ministers of Britain raised up 
difficulties, and demanded certain foolish 
terms, which, in the Latin tongue, were writ- 
ten sine qua non, and which being translated 



31)3 

into the Yankee tongue, might be said to 
mean neck or nothing. 

12 Nevertheless, in process of time, the 
wise men of Britain waved their demands, 
and agreed to the sine qua non given to them 
by the commissioners of Columbia. 

13 So a treaty oi peace was made and 
signed by the commissioners of both parties, 
on the twenty and fourth day of the twelfth 
month, of the one thousand eight hundred 
and fourteenth year of the Christian era. 

14 And the treaty was sent to England, 
and confirmed by the Prince Regent, on the 
twenty-eighth day of the same month ; for he 
was tired of the war, and saw no hope of con- 
quering the sons of liberty. 

15 After which it was sent from Britain, 
across the mighty deep, about three thousand 
miles, to receive the sanction of the free peo- 
ple of Columbia. 

16 And the great Sanhedrim of the peo- 
ple examined the treaty, and it was accepted 
and confirmed by them on the seventeenth 
day of the second month, in the eighteen 
hundred and fifteenth year. 

17 After which it was signed with the 

hand-writing of James, the chief governor of 

Bb 



304 

the land of Columbia, and published to the 
world. 

18 Thus was a stop put to the shedding of 
the blood of man, the noblest work of God ; 
and the noise of the destroying engines sunk 
down into silence, and every man returned 
to his own home in peace* 

19 Now when it was known for a certainty 
that peace was made between the nations, the 
people throughout the land were rejoiced 
beyond measure, 

20 (Except the wicked men, who had met 
at Hartford, and in their folly sent three of 
their scribes to the chief city, to endeavour 
to disturb the councils of the great Sanhe- 
drim ; which three men, arriving there about 
this time, were sorely grieved that they and 
their employers should be held up for a 
laughing stock to the world ; so they sneak- 
ed away like men ashamed of their own stu- 
pidity.) 

21 And it came to pass, when the news of 
peace was spread abroad, that the temples of 
the Lord were opened, and the people of 
Columbia praised God for his goodness ; yea, 
they thanked him that he had strengthened 
their arms, and delivered them from the lion's 
paw 



w 

305 

22 Thus did the children of Columbia praise 
the Lord in the strength of their youth, and 
in the days of their prosperity ; not waiting 
till the cold and palsied hand of age had made 
them feeble, and robbed their prayers of half 
their virtue. 

23 Henceforth may the nations of the earth 
learn wisdom: then shall peace become tri- 
umphant, and the children of Columbia be at 
rest; 

24 And, as it is written, their swords may 
be beaten into ploughshares, and their spears 
turned into pruning-hooks. 

25 But, nevertheless, if this war, like all 
other wars, brought evil upon the sons of 
men, it demonstrated to the world, that the 
people of Columbia were able to defend them- 
selves, single-handed, against one of the 
strongest powers of Europe. 

26 And the mighty kings and potentates 
of the earth shall learn, from this example of 
Republican patriotism, that the PEOPLE are 
the only " legitimate sovereigns" of the land 
of Columbia. 

27 Now the gladness of the hearts of the 
people of Columbia, at the sound of peace, 
was extravagant ; inasmuch as it caused them 



30t> 

10 let loose their destroying engines, that 
were now become harmless, and set in mo- 
tion their loud pealing bells, that sounded 
along the splendid arch of heaven. 

28 Moreover, they made great fires and 
illuminations in the night time, and light was 
spread over the face of the land ; 

29 And the beauty thereof was as if, from 
the blue and spangled vault of heaven, it-had 
showered diamonds ; 

30 And all the nations of the earth beheld 
ihe glory of Columbia. 



END OP THE HISTORY OF THE LATE WAR 



"AZ'JM 



31:1 

est fighting ships of these barbarians, called 
the Misodciy and he followed after her, and 
in less than the space of half an hour after 
letting his destroying engines loose upon her, 
he took her captive, with five hundred men 
that were in her. 

21 And thirty of the barbarians were slain, 
among whom was their chief captain, whose 
name was Mais Hammida, besides many were 
wounded, and about four hundred prisoners 
w T ere taken ; but Decatur had not a man 
killed. 

22 Moreover, on the second day after- 
wards, the fleet of Columbia captured ano- 
ther fighting vessel of the Algerines : 

23 And the slain that were found onboard 
being numbered, were twenty and three, and 
the prisoners were four score : howbeit, there 
were none of the people of Columbia even 
maimed. Thus was the navy of Columbia 
triumphant in the east, as it had been in the 
west. 

24 Now these things happened nigh unto 
a place called Carlhagcna, on the borders of 
Spain; and when the Spaniards beheld the 
skill and prowess of the people of Columbia, 
they were amazed. 






312 

25 Immediately after this, Decatur depart- 
ed, and went with his fleet to the port of Al- 
giers, the chief city of the barbarians, lying 
on the borders of Africa. 

26 But when their ruler beheld the star- 
spangled banners of Columbia, he trembled 
as the aspen-leaf; he had heard that his strong 
vessels were taken by the ships of Columbia, 
and his admiral slain, and he was ready to 
bow down. 

27 And Decatur demanded the men of Co- 
lumbia, without ransom, who were held in 
bondage ; and ten thousand pieces of silver, 
for the evils they had committed against the 
people of Columbia : and the Dey had three 
hours to answer him yea, or nay. 

28 However, he quickly agreed to the 
propositions of Decatur; and he paid the 
money, and signed the treaty which Decatur 
had prepared for him, and delivered up all 
the men of Columbia whom he held as slaves. 

29 And the treaty was confirmed at Wash- 
ington, the chief city, and signed by James, 
the chief governor, on the twenty and sixth 
day of the twelfth month, in the same year : 
and Decatur generously made a present of 
the ship Misoda to the Dey. 



313 

30 Now it came to pass, after Decatur had 
settled the peace with the Dey of Algiers, 
according to his wishes, that he sailed against 
another town of the barbarians, called Tunis. 

31 For the governor of this place, who is 
called the Bey, had permitted great evils to 
be committed against the people of Colum- 
bia, by the ships of Britain, during the late 
war; inasmuch as they let them come into 
Iheir waters, and take away the vessels of Co- 
lumbia that were prizes. 

32 So, for these depredations, the gallant 
Decatur demanded forty thousand pieces of 
silver, which, after a short deliberation, the 
Bey was fain to grant, lest, peradventure, his 
city might, from the force of the destroying 
engines, begin to tumble about his ears. 

33 From the port of Tunis, Decatur de- 
parted and went to a place called Tripoli, 
which lieth to the south thereof, where the 
brave Eaton* fought, and erected the ban- 
ners of Columbia upon the walls of Derne. 

34 Now the chief governor of the Tripo- 
litans, whom they called the Bashaw, had 
suffered like evils to be done by the British 

* Gen. Eaton, a hero oi*the American war with Tripoli some 
years ago. 



314 

m his dominions which had been permitted 
by the Bey of Tunis. 

35 So likewise, for these evils Decatur de- 
manded thirty thousand pieces of silver, but 
at first the Bashaw refused to pay it. 

36 However, when he saw the strong ships 
of Columbia were about to destroy the town, 
he paid the money, save a little, which he was 
unable to get, and for which Decatur com- 
pelled him to release ten of the captives of 
other nations, whom he held in bondage. 

37 Thus did Decatur, and his brave men, 
in the same year, compel the powers of Bar- 
bary to respect the banners of Columbia. 

38 Now, having accomplished the object 
of his expedition, he returned, encircled w r ith 
glory, to the land of Columbia : 

39 And all the people were rejoiced with 
great joy, and they made feasts for him, and 
extolled his name. 

40 Moreover, the great Sanhedrim of the 
people honored him for his gallant exploits 5 
and gave unto him and his brave officers and 
mariners, an hundred thousand pieces of 
silver. 



315 



CONCLUSION. 

Commodore Bainbridge Lord JExmouth's 

Expedition against Algiers* 

I.N the mean time, it had come to pass, that 
lest the fleet of Decatur should not be suffi- 
cient, the great Sanhedrim sent out after him 
another strong fleet, commanded by the val- 
iant Bainbridge. 

2 But, lo' when his fleet arrived there, 
the peace had been made, and an end put to 
the war by the fleet of Decatur: so, after 
sailing round about the coast, Bainbridge re- 
turned home again with the fleet of Co- 
lumbia. 

3 Now it came to pass, after Decatur had 
returned in triumph to the land of Columbia, 
that the lords and the counsellors of Britain 
became jealous of the fame of Columbia, 
which she had gained in the east, in releasing 
her people from slavery, as well as those of 
other nations. 

4 Moreover, the barbarians committed de- 
predations against the people of Britain, nei- 
ther did they regard their royal cross, as they 
<lid the stars of Columbia. 

Cc 



316 

5 So the king fitted out a mighty fleet to 
go against them ; and the name of the chief 
captain thereof was PellerVyto whom the vain 
people of Britain had given a new name, and 
had called him lord Exmouth. 

6 Accordingly, as their movements were 
slow, in the fourth month of the one thousand 
eight hundred and sixteenth year of the Chris- 
tian era, the mighty fleet of Britain weighed 
anchor, and shortly arrived before the city of 
Algiers, as the fleet of Columbia had done 
many months before them. 

7 And it was so, that the chief captain of 
Britain, in the name of the king his master, 
demanded of the Dey the men of Britain, 
whom he had held as slaves, and also those of 
other nations. 

8 But the Dey refused, saying, Ye shall 
pay unto me five hundred pieces of silver for 
every slave ithen will I release them, and they 
shall be free. 

9 And Exmouth, the lord of Britain, yield- 
ed to the propositions of the barbarians, and 
accordingly gave unto them the money, even 
more than twenty horses could draw ; 

10 For the number of Christian slaves 
w 7 hich Exmouth bought of the barbarians, 
was about five hundred. 



317 

1 1 Therefore, the fleet of Britain succeed- 
ed not, as did the fleet of Decatur; and the 
doings of Exmouth might be likened unto a 
certain mischievous monkey, that, in endea- 
vouring to imitate the shaving of his master's 
beard, cut his own throat.* 

1 2 Thus, in this thing, did the lords of Bri- 
tain strive to snatch the laurel from the brow 
of Columbia : 

13 But her valiant sons had entwined the 
wreath of glory; and the scribes of this day 
shall record it, in ever-living characters, on 
the pyramid of fame. 

FINIS. 



Note. — For humanity's sake, it is to be hoped, that in future, 
some, if not all Christian nations joined together, will put an end 
to the piratical system of these inhuman barharians. 

Note. — The result of the late war has had the effect of com- 
manding respect from all nations ; of which the treatmeut of 
the United States frigate Macedonian, captain Warrington, by 
the Spaniards at Carthagena, (S. A.) from whence she lately 
arrived, is an instance ; for they released the prisoners de- 
manded without hesitation. 



* Lord Exmouth narrowly escaped being assassinated while, 
on shore at Algiers. 



COMMERCIAL TREATY". 



Whereas a convention between the United States of Amer- 
ica and his Britannic Majesty, to regulate the commerce be- 
tween the territories of the United States and of his Britannic 
Majesty, was signed, at London on the third day of July, in the 
year one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, by plenipoten- 
tiaries respectively appointed for that purpose, which conven- 
tion is in the words following, to wit : 

A CONVENTION, 

To regulate tht Commerce between the territories of the United 
States and of his Britannic Majesty. 

The United States of America and his Britannic Majesty, 
being desirous, by a convention, to regulate the commerce 
and navigation between their respective countries, territories, 
and people, in such a manner as to render the same recipro- 
cally beneficial and satisfactory, have respectively named ple- 
nipotentiaries and given them full powers to treat of and con- 
clude such convention — that is to say: the President of the 
United States, by and with the advice and consent of th« Se- 
nate thereof, hath appointed for their plenipotentiaries John 
Quincy Adams, Henry Clay and Albert Gallatin, citizens of the 
United States ; and his Royal highness the Prince Regent, 
acting in the name and on behalf of his majesty, has named 
for his plenipotentiaries the right hon. Frederick John Robin- 
son, vice-president of the committee of privy council for trade 
and plantations, joint paymaster of his majesty's ibrccs, and 
a member of the Imperial Parliament, Henry Goulburn, esq. 
a member of the Imperial Parliament, and under secretary of 
state, and William Adams, esq. doctor of civil laws ; and the 
said plenipotentiaries having mutually produced and shown 
their said full powers, aud exchanged copies of the same, have 
agreed on aud concluded the following articles, videlicet : 

art i. There shall be between the Territories of the United 
States of America and all the Territories of His Britannic Ma- 
jesty in Europe a reciprocal liberty of Commerce. The in- 
habitants of the two countries respectively shall have liberty 
freely and securely to come with their ships and cargoes to ajl 
such places, ports aud rivers in the Territories aforesaid to 
which other foreigners are permitted to come, to enter into tht) 
Ce2 

X 



320 

same, and to remain and reside in any parts of the said Terri- 
tories respectively, also to hire and occupy houses and ware- 
houses for the purposes of their commerce ; and generally the 
merchants and traders of each nation respectively shall enjoy 
the most complete protection and security for their commerce, 
but subject always to the Laws and Statues of the two countries 
respectively. 

art. ii. No higher or other duties shall be imposed on the 
importation into the United States of any articles, the growth, 
produce or manufacture of His Britannic Majesty's Territories 
in Europe, and no higher or other duties shall be imposed on 
the importation into the Territories of His Britannic Majesty 
in Europe of any articles the growth, produce or manufacture 
of the United States, than are or shall be payable on the like 
articles being the growth, produce, or manufacture of any other 
foreign country, nor shall any higher or other duties or charges 
be imposed in either of the two countries, on the exportation 
of anj articles to the United States or to His Britannic Ma- 
jesty's Territories in Europe, respectively, than such as are 
payable on the exportation of the like articles to any other 
foreign country, nor shall any prohibition be imposed ou the 
importation of any articles, the growth, produce, or manufac- 
ture of the United States, or of His Britannic. Majesty's Ter- 
ritories in Europe, to or from the said territories of his Britan- 
nic Majesty in Europe, or to or from the said United States, 
which shall not equally extend to all other nations. 

No higher or other duties or charges shall be imposed in any 
of the ports of the United States on British vessels, than those 
payable in the same ports by vessels of the United States ; nor 
in the ports of any of His Britannic Majesty's Territories in 
Europe on the vessels of the United States, than shall be pay- 
able in the same ports on British vessels. 

The same duties shall be paid on the importation into the 
United States of any articles the growth, produce or manufac- 
ture of His Britanic Majesty's Territories in Europe, whether 
such importation shall be in vessels of the United States or in 
British vessels, and the same duties shall be paid on the impor- 
tation into the ports of any of his Britannic Majesty's Terri- 
tories in Europe of any article the growth, produce or manu- 
facture of the United States, whether such importation shall be 
in British vessels or in vessels of the United States. 

The same duties shall be paid and the same bounties allowed 
on the exportation of any articles, the growth, produce or ma- 
nufacture of his Britannic Majesty's territories in Eupore t&the 



321 

United States, whether such exportation shall be iu vessels of 
the United States or in British vessels; and the same duties 
shall be paid and the same bounties allowed, on the exporta- 
tion of any articles, the growth, produce or manufacture of 
the United States to his Britannic Majesty's territories in Eu- 
rope, whether such exportation shall be in Birtish vessels or in 
vessels of the United States. 

It is further agreed, that in all cases where drawbacks are or 
may be allowed upon the re-exportation of any goods, the growth, 
produce or manufacture of either country, respectively, the 
amount of the said drawbacks shall be the same, whether the 
said goods shall have been originally imported in a British or 
American vessel ; but when such re-exportation shall take 
place from the United States in a British vessel, or from the 
territories of his Britannic Majesty in Europe in an American 
vessel, to any other foreign nation, the two contracting parties 
reserve to themselves, respectively, the right of regulating or 
diminishing, in such case, the amount of the said drawback. 

The intercourse between the United Slates and his Britan- 
nic Majesty's possessions in the West Indies, and on the con- 
tinent of North America, shall not be affected by any of the 
provisions of this article, but each party shall remain in the 
complete possession of its rights, with respect to such an in* 
tercourse. 

art. in. His Britannic Majesty agrees that the vessels of the 
United States of America shall be admitted, and hospitably re- 
ceived, at the principal settlements of the British dominions in 
the East-Indies, vide-Iicet, Calcutta, Madras, Bombay, and 
Prince of Wales' Island, and that the citizens of the said 
United States may freely carry on trade between the said prin- 
cipal settlements and the said U. States in all articles of which 
the importation and exportation, respectively, to aiul from the 
said territories, shall not be entirely prohibited : provided, only, 
that it shall not be lawful for them in any time of war, Between 
the British government and any state or power whatever, to ex- 
port from the said territories, without the special permission of 
the British government, any military stores, or naval stores, or 
rice. The citizens of the U. States shall pay for their vessels* 
when admitted, no higher or other duty or charge than shall be 
payable on the vessels of the most favoured European nations, 
and they shall pay no higher or other duties or charges on the 
importation or exportation of the cargoes of the said vessels* 
than shall he payable on the same articles when imported or 
exported in the vessels of the most favoured European nations* 



322 

But it is expressly agreed, that the vessels of the United 
States shall not cany any articles from the said principal settle- 
ments to any port or place, except to some port or place in 
the United States of America, where the same shall be unladen. 

It is also understood, that the permission granted by this 
article, is not to extend to allow the vessels of the United 
States to carry on auy part of the coasting trade of the said 
British territories, but the vessels of the United States having, 
in the first instance, proceeded to one of the said principal 
settlements of the British dominions in the East-Indies, and 
then going with their original cargoes, or part thereof, from one 
of the said principal settlements to another, shall not be con- 
sidered as carrying on the coasting trade. The vessels of the 
United States may also touch for refreshment, but not for 
commerce, in the course of their voyage to or from the British 
territories in India, or to or from the dominions of the Emperor 
of China, at the Gape of Good Hope, the Island of St. Helena, 
or such other places as may be in the possession of Great Bri- 
tain, in the African or Indian seas, it being well understood that 
in all that regards this article, the citizens of the Uuited States 
shall be subject, in all respects, to the iaws and regulations of 
the British government, from time to time established. 

art. iv. It shall be free, for each of the two contracting par- 
tics, respectively, to appoint Consuls, for the protection of trade, 
to reside in the dominions and territories of the other party, but 
before any consul shall act as such, he shall in the usual form 
be approved and admitted by the government to which he is 
sent, and it is hereby declared, that in case of illegal or im- 
proper conduct towards the laws or government of the country 
to which he is sent, such consul may either be punished accord- 
ing to law, if the laws will reach the case, or be sent back, the 
offended government assigning to the other the reasons for the 
same. 

It is hereby declared that either of the contracting parties, 
may except from the resideuee of consuls such particular places 
as such party shall judge fit to be so excepted. 

art. v. This convention, when the same shall have been 
duly ratified by the President of the United States, by and with 
the advice and consent of their Senate, and by his Britannic 
Majesty, and the respective ratifications mutually exchanged, 
shall be binding and obligatory on the said United States and 
his Majesty for four years from the date of its signature, and 
the ratifications shall be exchanged in six months from this time, 
or sooner if possible. 



323 

Done at London this third day of July, in the year of out- 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen. 
JOHN Q. ADAMS. 
H. CLAY. 

ALBERT GALLATIN. 
FRED. J. ROBINSON. 
HENRY GOULBURN. 
WILLIAM ADAMS. 

Now, therefore, be it known, that I, James Madison, Presi- 
dent of the United States of America, having seen and consi- 
dered the forgoing convention, have, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate, accepted, ratified and confirmed the 
same, and every clause and article thereof, subject to the ex- 
ception contained in a declaration made by the authority of his 
Britannic Majesty on the 24th day of November last. 
In testimony whereof I have caused the seal of the United 
States to be hereunto affixed, and have signed the same 
with my hand. Done at the city of Washington, this 
twenty-second day of December, A D. one thousand 
eight hundred and fifteen, and of the independence of 
the United States the fortieth. 

JAMES MADISON. 
By the President. 

JAMES MONROE, 

Secretary of State. 



DECATUR'S TREATY 
WITH THE DEY OF ALGIERS. 

JAMES MADISON, 

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 

To all and singular to whom these presents shall come, greeting : 

Whereas a Treaty of Peace aud Amity between the United 
States of America, and His Highness Omar Bashaw, Dey of 
Algiers, was concluded at Algiers on the thirtieth day of June 
last, by Stephen Decatur and William Shaler, citizens of the 
United States, on the part of the United States, and the said 
Omar Basbaw, Dey of Algiers, and was duly signed and sealed 



324 

by tlie said parties, which treaty is in the words following, 

to wit : 

Treaty of peace and amity concluded between the United States 

of America and His Highness Omar Bashaw, Dey of 

Algiers. 

Article 1 . There shall be, from the conclusion of this treaty, 
a firm, inviolable and universal peace and friendship between 
the President and the Citizens of the United States of America, 
on the one part, and the Dey and subjects of the Regency of 
Algiers in Barbary on the other, made by the free consent of 
both parties, on the terms of the most favoured nations : and if 
either party shall hereafter grant to any other nation any par- 
ticular favor or privilege in navigation or commerce, it shall 
immediately become common to the other party, freely when 
it is freely granted to such other nations ; but when the grant 
is conditional, it shall be at the option of the coutracing parties 
to accept, alter, or reject such condition, in such manner as 
shall be most conducive, to their respective interests. 

Article 2. It is distinctly understood between the contract- 
ing parties, that no tribute, either as biennial presents, or un- 
der any other form or name whatever, shall ever be required 
by the Dey and Regency of Algiers from the United States of 
America on any pretext whatever. 

Article 3. The Dey of Algiers shall cause to be immedia- 
tely delivered up to the American squadron, now off Algiers, 
all the American citizens now in his possession, amounting to 
ten, more or less ; and a!! the subjects of the Dey of Algiers 
now in possession of the United States, amounting to five hun- 
dred, more or less, shall be delivered up to him, the United 
States, according to the usages of civilized nations, requiring no 
ransom for the excess of prisoners in their favor. 

Article 4. A just and full compensation shall be made by 
the Dey of Algiers, to such citizens of the United States, as 
have been captured and detained by Algerine cruisers, or who 
have been forced to abandon their property in Algiers in viola- 
tion of the twenty-second article of the treaty of peace and 
amity, concluded between the United States and the Dey of 
Algiers on the 5th of September 1795. 

Audit is agreed between the contracting parties, that in lieu 
of the above, the Dey of Algiers, shall cause to be delivered 
forthwith into the bands of the American Consul, residing at 
Algiers, the whole of a quantity of bales of cotton, left by the 
late consul general of the United States, in the public Maga- 
zines in Algiers, and that he shall pay unto the hands of the 
said Consul the sum of tea thousand Spauish dollars* 



325 

Article 5. If any goods belonging to any nation with tvliicli 
*ither of the parties are at war, should be loaded on board 
vessels belonging to the other party, they shall pass free and 
unmolested, and no attempts shall be made to take or detain 
them. 

Article 6. If any citizens or subjects with their effects be- 
longing to either party shall be found on board a prize vessel 
taken from an enemy by the other party, such citizens or sub- 
jects shall be liberated immediately, and in no case, on any 
other pretence whatever shall any American citizen be kept 
in capacity or confinement, or the property of any American 
citizens found on board of any vessel belonging to any other 
nation, with which Algiers may be at war, be detained from its 
lawful owners after the exhibition of sufficient proofs of Ame- 
rican citizenship and of American property by the consid of 
the United States, residing at Algiers. 

Article 7. Proper passports shall immediately be given to 
the vessels of both the contracting parties, on condition that 
the vessels of war, belonging to the regency of Algiers, on meet- 
ing with merchant vessels belonging to the citizens of the 
United States of America, shall not be permitted to visit them 
with more than two persous besides the rowers ; these only 
shall be permitted to go on board without first obtaining leave 
from the commander of said vessel, who shall compare the pass- 
port, and immediately permit said vessel to proceed on her 
voyage ; and should any of the subjects of Algiers insult or mo- 
lest the commander of any other person on board a vessel so 
visited, or plunder any of the property contained in her, on 
complaint being made by the consul of the United States re- 
siding in Algiers, and on his producing sufficient proof to sub- 
stantiate the fact, the commander or Kais of said Algerine ship 
or vessel of war, as well as the offenders shall be punished in 
the most exemplary manner. 

All vessel of war, belonging to the United States of America, 
on meeting a cruiser belonging to the regency of Algiers, on 
having seen her passports and certificates from the consul of 
the United States, residing in Algiers, shal! permit her to pro- 
ceed ou her cruize unmolested, and without detention. No 
passports shall be granted by cither party to any vessels, but 
such as are absolutely the property of citizens or subjects of 
the said contracting parties, on any pretence whatever. 

Article 8. A citizen or subject of either of the contracting 
parties, having bought a prize vessel condemned by the other 
party, or by any other nation, the certificates of condemnation 



326 

ud bill of sale shall be a sufficient passport for such vessel for 
six months, which, considering the distance between the two 
countries, is no more than a reasonable time for her to procure 
proper passports. 

Article 9. Vessels of either of the contracting parties put- 
ting into the ports of the other, and having need of provisious 
or other supplies, shall be furnished at the market price ; and 
if any such vessel should so put in from a distance at sea, and 
have occasion to repair, she shall be at liberty to land, and re- 
embark her cargo, without paying any customs or duties what- 
ever ; but in no case shall she be compelled to land her cargo. 

Article 10. Should a vessel of either of the contracting par- 
ties be cast on shore within the territories of the other, all pro- 
per assistance shall be given to her crew ; no pillage shall be 
allowed. The property shall remain at the disposal of the own- 
ers, and if re-shipped on board of any vessel for exportation, 
no customs or duties whatever shall be required to be paid 
thereon, and the crew shall be protected and succoured, until 
they can be sent to their own country. 

Article 11. If a vessel of either of the contracting parties 
shall be attacked by an enemy within cannon shot of the forts 
of the other, she shall be protected as much as is possible. If 
she be in port, she shall not be seized, or attacked, when it is 
in the power of the other party to protect her ; and, when she 
proceeds to sea, no enemy shall be permitted to pursue her 
from the same port, within twenty-four hours after her depar- 
ture. 

Article 12. The commerce between the United States of 
America and the Regency of Algiers, the protections to be 
given to merchants, masters of vessels and seamen, the reci- 
procal rights of establishing consuls in each country, and the 
privileges, immunities and jurisdictions to be enjoyed by such 
consuls, are declared to be on the same footing in every respect 
with the most favored nations respectively. 

Article 13. The consul of the United States of America 
shall not be responsible lor the debts contracted by citizens of 
his own nation, unless he previously gives written obligations so 
to do. 

Article 14. On a vessel or vessels of war, belonging" to the 
United States, anchoring before the city of Algiers, the consul 
is to inform the Dey of her arrival, when she shall receive the 
salutes which are by treaty or custom given to the ships of war 
of the most favored nations, on similar occasions, and which 
shall be returned gun for gun ; and if, after such arrival, so an- 
nounced, any Christians whatsoever, captives in Algiers, make 



327 

their escape, and take refuge on board any of the ships of war, 
they shall not be required back again, nor shall the consul of the 
United States, or commanders of said ships, be required to pay 
any thing lor the said Christians. 

Article 15. As the government of the United States of 
America has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, 
religion or tranquillity of any nation ; and as the said states 
have never entered into any voluntary war or act of hostility, 
except in defence of their just rights on the high seas, it is de- 
clared by the contracting parties, thai no pretext arising from 
religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the har- 
mony existing between the two nations; and the consuls and 
agents of both nations shall have liberty to celebrate the rites 
of their respective religions in their own houses. 

The consuls respectively shall have liberty and personal se- 
curity given them to travel within the territories of each other, 
both by land and sea, and shall not be prevented from goiug on 
board any vessels they may think proper to visit; they shall 
likewise have the liberty to appoint their own drogoman and 
broker. 

Article 16. In case of any dispute arising from the violation 
of any of the articles of this treaty, no appeal shall be made to 
arms, nor shall war be declared on any pretext whatever ; but 
if the consul residing at the place where the dispute shall hap- 
pen, shall not be able to settl* the same, the government of 
that country shall state their grievance in writing, and transmit 
the same to the government of the other, and the period of 
three mouths shall be allowed for answers to be returned, 
during which time no act of hostility shall be permitted by ei- 
ther party ; and in case the grievances are not redressed, and 
a war should be the event, the consuls, and citizens and sub- 
jects of both parties respectively, shall be permitted to era- 
bark with their eflccts unmolested, oh board of what vessel or 
vessels they shall think proper, reasonable time being allowed 
for that purpose. 

Article 17. If, in the course of events, a war should break 
out between the two nations, the prisoners captured by either 
party shall not be made slaves, they shall not be forced to. hard 
labour, or other confinement than such as may be necessary to 
secure their safe keeping, and shall be exchanged rank tor rank; 
and it is agreed, that prisoners shall be exchanged in twelve 
months after their capture, and the exchange may be effected 
by any private individual legally authorised by either of the 
parties. 

Article 18. If any of the Barbary states, or other powers af 
Dd 



328 

war with the United States, shall capture any American res- 
sel, and send into any port of the Regency of Algiers, they 
shall not be permitted to sell her, but shall be forced to depart 
the port, on procuring the requisite supplies of provisions ; 
but the vessels of war of the United States, with any prizes they 
may capture from their enemies, shall have liberty to frequent 
the port of Algiers, for refreshments of any kind, and to sell 
such prizes in the said ports, without any other customs or du- 
ties than such as are customary on ordinary commercial impor- 
tations. 

Article 19. If any of the citizens of the United States, or 
any persons under their protection, shall have any disputes 
with each other, the consul shall decide between the parties , 
and whenever the consul shall require any aid or assistance from 
the government of Algiers to enforce his decisions, it shall be 
immediately granted to him ; and if any disputes shall arise be- 
tween any citizens of the United States and the citizens or 
subjects of any other nation having a consul or agent in Algiers, 
such disputes shall be settled by the consuls or agents of the 
respective nations ; and any disputes or suits at law that may 
take place between any citizens of the United States and the 
subjects of the Regency of Algiers, shall be decided by the 
Dey in person, and no other. 

^Article 20. If a citizen of the United States should kill, 
wound, or strike a subject of Algiers, or on the contrary, a sub- 
ject of Algiers should kill, wound, or strike a citizen of the 
United States, the law of the country shall take place, and equal 
justice shall be rendered, the consul assisting at the trial ; but 
the sentence of punishment again.-. t an American citizen shall 
not be greater, or more severe, than it would be against a Turk 
in the same predicament ; and if any delinquent should make 
bis escape, the consul shall not be responsible for him in any 
manner whatever. / 

Article 21 . The consul of the United States of America 
shall not be required to pay any customs or duties whatever on 
any thing he imports from a foreign country for the use of his 
house and family. 

Article 22. Should any of the citizens of the United States 
of America die within the limits of the Regency of Algiers, the 
Dey and his subjects shall not interfere with the property of the 
deceased, but it shall be under the immediate direction of the 
consul, unless otherwise disposed of by will. Should there be 
no consul, the effects shall be deposited in the hands of some 
person worthy of trust, until the party shall appear who has a 
rigbt_ to demand them, when they shall render an account of 



329 

the property ; neither shall the Dey or his subjects give hin- 
drance in the execution of any will that may appear. 

Now therefore be it known, That I, JAMES MADISON, 
President of the United States of America, having seen and con- 
sidered the said Treaty, have, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate, accepted, ratified and confirmed the same, 
and every clause and article thereof. 

In testimony whereof, I have caused the seal of the Uni- 
ted States to be hereunto affixed, and have signed the 
\l. s.) same with my hand. Done at the city of Washington- 
this twenty-sixth day of December, A. D. one thou- 
sand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the IndepeH* 
dence of the United States the fortieth. 

JAMES MADISON. 
By the Presideut, 

JAMES MONROE, Secretary of State. 



ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT. 

Between (he United States of America and the Creek 
Nation. 

JAMES MADISON, 

President op the United States op America. 

To all and singular to whom these presents shall come, Greeting : 

WHEREAS certain articles of agreement and capitulation 
were made and concluded on the ninth day of August, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, be- 
tween Major General Andrew Jackson, in the name of the 
President of the United States of America, for and in behalf of 
the said United States, and the chiefs, deputies, and warriors, 
of the Creek Nation ; and whereas the President having seen 
and considered the same, and, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate of the United States, duly ratified and con- 
firmed the said articles of agreement and capitulation, which 
are in the words following to wit •• 



330 

Articles of agreement and capitulation, made and concluded this 
ninth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, 
between major general Andrew Jackson, on behalf of the Pre* 
sident of the United States of America, and the chiefs, deputies, 
and warriors of the Creek Nation. 

WHEREAS an unprovoked, inhuman, and sanguinary war, 
waged by the hostile Creeks against the United States, hath 
been repelled, prosecuted and determined, successfully, on the 
part of the said States, in conformity with principles of na- 
tional justice and honorable warfare — And whereas conside- 
ration is due to the rectitude of proceeding dictated by ins- 
tructions relating to the re-establishment of peace : Be it re- 
membered, that prior to the conquest of that part of the Creek 
nation hostile to the United States, numberless aggressions 
had been committed against the peace, the property, and the 
lives of citizens of the United States, and those of the Creek 
nation in amity with her, at the month of Duck river, Fort 
Mimms, and elsewhere, contrary to national faith, and the 
regard due to au article of the treaty concluded at New- York, 
in the year seventeen hundred ninety, between the two na- 
tions : That the United States, previously to the perpetration 
of such outrages, did, in order to ensure future amity and con- 
cord between the Creek nation and the said states, in confor- 
mity with the stipulations of former treaties, fulfil, with punc- 
tuality and good faith, her engagements to the said nation : 
that more than two-thirds of the whole number of chiefs and 
warriors of the Creek nation, disregarding the genuine spirit of 
existing treaties, suffered themselves to be instigated to viola- 
tions of their national honor, and the respect due to a part of 
their own nation faithful to the United States and the prin- 
ciples of humanity, by impostors denominating themselves Pro- 
phets, and by the duplicity and misrepresentation of foreign 
emissaries, whose governments are at war, open or understood, 
with the United States. Wherefore, 

First — The Uuited States demand an equivalent for all ex- 
penses incurred in prosecuting the war to its termination, by 
a cession of all the territory belonging to the Creek nation with- 
in the territories of the United States, lying west, south, and 
south-eastwardly, of a line to be run and described by persons 
duly authorised and appointed by the President of the United 
States — Beginning at a point on the eastern bank of the Coosa 
river, where the south boundary line of the Cherokee natior 



331 

crosses the same ; running from thence down the said Coosa 
river with its eastern bank according to its various meanders 
to a poiut one mile above the mouth of Cedar creek, at Fort 
Williams, thence east two miles, thence south two miles, theuce 
west to the eastern bank of the said Coosa river, thence down 
the eastern bank thereof according to its various meanders to 
a point opposite the upper end of the great falls, (called by the 
natives Woetumka) thence east from a true meridian Hue to a 
point due north of the mouth of Ofucshee, thence south by a 
like meridian line to the month of Ofucshee on the south side 
of the Tallapoosa river, thence up the same, according to its 
various meanders, to a point where a direct course will cross 
the same at the distance often miles from the month thereof, 
theuce a direct line to the mouth of Summochico creek, which 
empties into the Chatahouchie river on the east side therof be- 
low the Eufaulau town, thence east from a true meridian line 
to a point which shall intersect the line now dividing the lands 
claimed by the said Creek nation from those claimed and own- 
ed by the state of Georgia: Provided, nevertheless, that where 
and possession of any chief or warrior of the Creek nation, who 
shall have been friendly to the Unitad States during the war, 
and taken an active part therein, shall he within the territory 
ceded by these articles to the United States, every such person 
shall be entitled to a reservation of land within the said terri- 
tory of one mile square, to include his improvements as near 
the centre thereof as may be, which shall insure to the said 
chief or warrior, and his descendants, so long as he or they 
shall continue to occupy the same, who shall be protected by 
and subject to the laws of the United States ; but upon the vo- 
luntary abandonment thereof, by such possessor or his descen- 
dants, the right of occupancy or possession of said lands shall 
devolve to the United Mates, and be identified with the right of 
property ceded hereby. 

Second -The United States will guarantee- to the Creek 
nation, the integrity of all their territory eastwardly and north- 
wardly of the said line to be run and described as mentioned in 
the first article. 

Third— The United States demand, that the Creek natiou 
abandon all communciation, aud cease to hold any intercourse 
with any British or Spanish post, garrison, or towns ; and that 
they shall not admit among them, any ag;>nt or trader, who 
ghall not derive authority to hold commercial, or other inter, 
course with them, by license from the Presideut or authoris- 
ed agent of the United States. 



332 

Fourth — The United States demand an acknowledgment 
of the right to establish military posts and trading houses, and 
to open roads within the territory, guarranteed to the Creek 
nation by the second article, and a right to the free navigation 
of all its waters. 

Fifth — The United States demand, that a surrender be im- 
mediately made, of all the persons and property, taken from 
the citizens of the United States, the friendly part oi the Creek 
nation, the Cherokee, Chickesaw, and Choctaw nations, to the 
respective owners : and the United States will cause to be im- 
mediately restored to the formerly hostile Creeks, all the pro* 
perty taken from them since their submission, either by the 
United States, or by any Indian nation in amify with tne Uni- 
ted States, together with all the prisoners taken from them 
during the war. 

Sixth — The United States demand the caption and surren- 
der of all the prophets and instigators of the war, whether for- 
eigners or natives, who have not submitted to the arms of th 
United States, and become parties to these articles of capitula- 
tion, if ever they shall be found within the territory guaranteed 
to the Creek nation by the second article. 

Seventh — The Creek nation being reduced to extreme waiits 
and not at present having the means of subsistence, the United 
States, from motives of humanity, will continue to furnish gra- 
tuitously the necessaries of life, until the crops of corn can be 
considered competent to yield the nation a supply, and will 
establish trading bouses in the nation, at the discretion of the 
President of the United States, and at such places as be shall 
direct, to enable the nation, by industry and economy, to pro- 
cure clothing. 

Eighth — A permanent peace shall ensue from the date of 
these presents forever, between the Creek nation and the Uni- 
ted States, and between the Creek natiou and the Cherokee, 
Chickesaw, and Choctaw nations. 

Ninth — If in running east from the mouth of Summochico 
creek, it shall so happen that the settlement of the Kennards, 
fall within the lines of the territory hereby ceded, then, and in 
that case, the line shall be run east in a true meridian to Kit- 
^hofoonee creek, thence down the middle of said creek to its 
junction with Flint River, immediately below the Oakraulgee 
town, thence up the middle of Flint river to a point due east of 
that at which the above line struck the Kitchofoonee creek, 
thence east to the old line herein before mentioned, to wit : the 
line dividing the lands claimed by the Creek nation, from those 
claimed and owned by the state of Georgia. 



333 

The parties to these presents, after due consideration for 
themselves and their constituents, agree, to ratify and confirm 
tile preceding articles, and constitute thein the basis of a per- 
n;anet peace between the two nations ; and they do hereby 
solemnly bind themselves, and all the parties concerned and 
interested, to a faithful performance of every stipulation con- 
tained therein, (n testimony whereof, they have hereunto in- 
terchangeably set their hands and affixed their seals, the day 
and date above written. 

ANDREW JACKSON, 
Maj. Gen. Commanding llh Military District . 
Done at Fort Jackson, in presence of 
CHARLES CASSEDY, Acting Secretary. 
BENJ. HAWKINS. Agent for Indian Affairs. 
RETURN J. MEIGS, A. C. Nation. 
ROBERT BUTLER, Adjutant Gen. United States' Army. 
J. C. WARREN, Assistant Agent for Indian Affairs. 
Tustunnuggee X Thlucco, Speaker of the Upper Creeks l. s. 
Tustunnngge X .Hoppoiee, Speaker of the Lower Creeks L.s. 

(Signed by thirty-four other chiefs, omitted here.) 
GEO. MAY FIELD.) 

ALEX. CORNELS, } Public Interpreters. 
GEO. LOVETT, > 

Now, therefore, to the end that the said articles of agree- 
ment and capitulation may be observed and performed with 
good faith on the part of the United States, I, James Madison, 
President of the United States of America aforesaid, have caus- 
ed the premises to be made public, and do hereby enjoin and 
require all persons bearing office, civil or military, within the 
said United States, and all others, citizens or inhabitants 
thereof, or being within the same ; faithfully to observe and 
fulfil the said articles of agreement and capitulation, and eve- 
ry clause and provision thereof. 

In testimony whejieof, I have caused the seal of the 
/ > United States to be affixed to these presents, and sign- 
^ ' ed the same with rrry hand. 

Done at the city of Washington, the sixteenth day 
of February, in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the sove- 
reignty and independence of the United States 
the thirty ninth. 

JAMES MADISON. 
By the President, 

JAMES MONROE, 

Acting Secretary of 9\jtfe, 



331 



EIUTA. 



Page 94. terse 13, 'read " the vessel of the king was captured." 

Page )0G. verse 54 should read thus : " And Henry, the iliief 

captain, gave great honor to the captains under him, even 

Ripley, Forsyih and Euslis, and all the brave men that 

fought that day." 

Page 273. — For " Major Goodwin" read " Colonel Godwin." 



LITERARY AND COMMERCIAL. 

D. Longworth is about re-publishing from a superb London 
edition, Trace's in Russia and Poland, by Robert Johnston, to 
be comprisrd in one octavo vol. The generous offer of the 
Emperor of Russia to become a mediator, between the V nited 
States and Great Britain, not only exhibits in striking colors his 
humanity, but as Great Britain refused the offer, must naturally 
interest the American people in his behalf. There is no doubt 
but a moie intimate acquaintance with Russia and its resources, 
would be an object worthy the attention of commercial men in 
America. And the information contained in this work will be 
found particularly important to the commercial interest of the 
United States. — To the scholar, the historian, and the philoso- 
pher it will he a delicate repast. If this were not believed to 
be the fact, this paragragh should uot hare iutruded itself here. 



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