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Full text of "Leading manufacturers and merchants of New Hampshire : historical and descriptive review of the industrial enterprises of Portsmouth, Great Falls, Concord, Rochester, Nashua, Loconia, Dover, Manchester, Keene, and Claremont"

UCSB LIBRARY 



LEADING 



Manufacturers and Merchants 



OF 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE REVIEW OF THE INDUSTRIAL 

ENTERPRISES OF 



Portsmouth, Great Falls, Concord, 

Rochester, Nashua, Laconia, 

Dover, Manchester, Keene, 

ana Claremont. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

102 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK. 

CHICAGO AND PHILADELPHIA. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1887, by 

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



INTRODUCTORY. 



IN presenting this work to the public, and more directly to the citizens of 
New Hampshire, only a word or two is required to explain its character. 

Indeed, the work explains and vindicates itself. Devoted to the manifold 
industrial interests of the leading manufacturing centres of the State, it presents in 
an intelligent and concise manner an attractive review of the multifarious business 
activities that give it commercial importance and prosperity. 

As a record of the manufacturing and mercantile industries in the principal 
cities and towns, we confidently believe it will not only accomplish much towards 
their encouragement, but will also bring to the attention of many thousands of 
business men in other and remote parts of the Union grateful and interesting 
information respecting the manufactures and general trade that nourish here. If 
there are qualities for which these people are distinctively noted above others, they 
consist in the pluck, energy, and ingenuity they have exercised in conquering 
honorable place, name, and good fortune for themselves, commercially and socially. 
It is workers of this sort that have rolled it onward to its present position. The 
avenues opened by the inventor, the manufacturer, the merchant, have been often 
indeed beset by obstacles, but these have been obliged to give way to innumerable 
utilities of inestimable worth and value. What though personal benefit may have 
been in the vast majority of instances the incentive of their endeavor? Their 
activity, their enterprise, their persistence, their courage, have wrought the manu- 
facturing and commercial successes illustrated and described in the following 
pages. 

The data given in them have been drawn from the most authentic sources, 
have been carefully collated and intelligently revised, and the utmost care has 
been exercised in order that the information herein given may be relied upon as 
accurate. 

The reader will observe that while the largest and practically leading enter- 
prises in the general lines of business are treated at some considerable length, 
many smaller and less prominent concerns are also reviewed, for the simple reason 
that each one of the latter in its own way and in its own special department has 
contributed its share to the general prosperity and wealth of the various commu- 
nities mentioned. 

As intimated above, the circulation of this work will not be limited to those 
portions of New Hampshire of which it treats. It will reach to distant sections of 
the country, and many volumes will traverse the ocean and enter foreign manu- 
facturing and mercantile houses, imparting to their proprietors a fund of infor- 
mation that cannot but prove novel and interesting. 

The publishers of this work beg to acknowledge the essential service rendered, 
by many gentlemen in its preparation, for which they are sincerely thankful. 

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

INDEX OF TOWNS. 



PAGE 

STATE OP NEW HAMPSHIRE 21 

PORTSMOUTH 35 

DOVER 64 

ROCHESTER 88 

GREAT FALLS 100 

NASHUA Ill 

MANCHESTER 141 

CONCORD 178 

LACONIA 209 

KEENE 213 

CLAEEMONT... . 223 



GENERAL INDEX. 



PAGE 

Abbott-Downing Co., The, mfrs. coaches, etc., Concord 202 

Abbott & Webber, groceries, Rochester 98 

Adams, G. W., groceries, etc., Manchester 155 

Aldrich, Don H., drugs, etc, Concord .. 203 

Aldrich. G. H. & Son. insurance, Keene 217 

American Shearer Mfg. Co , Nashua 123 

Amory Mfg. Co., Manchester 156 

Amoskeag Mfg. Co., mfrs. tickings, etc., Manchester.. 154 

Anioskeag National Bank. Manchester 155 

Amoskeag Savings Bank, Manchester 157 

Anderson & Junkins, carpenters, etc., Portsmouth... 49 

Armstrong, 31., plumber, etc. . Keene 21? 

Atlantic Tea Co., Dover 84 

Ayers, A. R., carpetings. etc. , Concord 193 

Babbidge, W. J., boots and shoes, Rochester 

Bacon, C. E., jeweller, etc., Dover 

Baker, W. S. , tailor, Concord 

Bailey & Davis, mfrs. stove and kitchen goods, Roches- 



ter. 



Bailey, H., mfr. undershirts, etc., Claremont 

Balcom, Geo. L., mfr. woollen goods, Claremont 

Baldwin, The James, Co., mfrs, bobbins, etc., Manches- 
ter 

Baldwin, Dr.. dental rooms, Nashua 

Ballard, J. H., insurance, Concord 

Baril & Grenier, druggists, Manchester 

Barker, J. L. & Co., groceries, flour, etc., Nashua ... 

Bartlett & Doak, mfrs. shoes, Laconia 

Barr & Co. , hardware, iron, etc., Nashua 

Barry, E. C. , meats, etc., Dover 

Baty, Isaac, stoves, tinware, etc., Concord 

Bea'l, J. R. & Co., tailors, etc., Keene 

Beals, H. R., dentist, Keene 

Berry. J. S., boots, shoes, etc., Manchester 

Blaisdell & Perkins, groceries, etc., Manchester 

Blaisdell's stove store, Portsmouth 

Blanchard & Co., mfrs. corn meal, etc., Concord. . . . 

Blood, A. J. & Co., West Indian goods, etc., Nashua. . 

Blue Store, The, dry -goods, Claremont 

Bod well, L. B. & Co., coal, wood, etc., Manchester . . 

Boston Branch, The, boot and shoe store, Claremont . . 

Boston Branch Grocery, Keene 

Boston Clothing House, The, Great Falls 

Boston 99-Cent Store, S. E. Butterfleld, prop., Man- 
chester 

Boucher, A., groceries, etc., Claremont 

Boyuton, C. E., mfr. soda, mineral water, etc., Ports- 
mouth 

Bradbury, Geo. H., groceries, etc., Dover 

Bradley, W. G., boots, shoes, etc,, Rochester 

Bragdon, Oren & Son, mfrs. boots, shoes, etc., Ports- 
mouth 

Brason, J. P., mfr. fine cigars, Portsmouth 

Breacham, C. S. & Son, flour, corn, etc., Great Falls. . 

Breed Shoe Co., Rochester 

Brewster. E. V. & Co., boots, shoes, etc., Dover 

Brickett, H. W., fine groceries, Concord 

Bridgman, C. & Co., groceries, etc., Keene 

Briggs, J , glass, etc., Manchester 

Brooks, J. & Co., flour, grain, etc., Portsmouth 

Brooks, H. L., pharmacist, Claremont 

Broughton, John H , lumber, Portsmouth 

Browne & Stevens, periodicals, etc., 

Browne, W. E., watchmakers, etc., Dover 

Bryant & Stratton, business college, Manchester 

Bullard & Foster, drugs, etc., Keene 

Butler, hatter, etc., Portsmouth 



Canney, H. E., livery stable, etc., Dover 87 

Campbell, W. H., mfr. paper boxes 138 

Campbell & Williams, printing, Manchester 175 

Campbell, Z. Foster, druggist, etc., Manchester 161 

Call. T. E. & Son, lumber, etc., Portsmouth 48 

Capital Fire Assurance, Nashua 127 

Carr, Norman G., jeweller, etc., Concord 200 

Carr, J. C., boots, shoes, etc., Portsmouth 43 



Carswell & Brown, groceries, etc., Manchester 174 

Carter, A. & Son, dry -goods, carpeting, etc., 105 

Cavanaugh Brothers, wholesale dealers in horses, etc., 

Manchester 167 

Chandler. S. D., Nashua, elevator and grist-mill 129 

Chamberlain, W. P. , dry-goods, Keene 220 

Chapman, J. H., merchant tailor, Nashua 140 

Chase & Richards clothing, Keene, 219 

Cheney, P. C., Co., mfrs. paper, etc.. Manchester 157 

Cheshire House. M. J. Sherman. Keene 221 

Cheshire Provident Institution, The, Keene 219 

Chicago Meat Co., Portsmouth 63 

Churbuck, G. H., groceries, etc., Dover 69 

Clapp, Allen, N., wholesale kerosene oil, Manchester.. 161 

Clapp & Co., brass and iron founders, Concord 197 

Claremont National Bank 227 

Clark Bros. , fancy goods, Manchester 172 

Clark, Chas. W., shoes, Concord 190 

Clark, D. E., dry -goods, Concord 207 

Clark, M. V. B., groceries, etc., Keene 216 

Clark, W. D., groceries, etc., Great Falls 107 

dough, Geo. H., watches, etc., Rochester 99 

Coburn, E. R., & Co., mfrs. picture frames, etc., 

.Manchester 173 

Coleman, F. B.. druggist, etc., Portsmouth 61 

Collins, I. A., photographer, Rochester 97 

Conant's Steam Laundry, Concord 198 

Concord Manufacturing Company, The, mfrs. flan- 
nels, etc., Concord 301 



Concord Steam Laundry, J. H. Toof, prop., Concord. 192 
Conn, Wm., wholesale butter, cheese, etc., Portsmouth. 57 

Connell, Jas. R., jeweller, etc., Portsmouth 47 

Cook, O. H., photographer, Portsmouth 54 

Co-operative Store, J. H. Stillings, prop.. Great Falls. 105 
Corey, Wm., mfr. knitting-machine latch-needles, 

Manchester 175 

Cotton, C. R., & Co., groceries, etc 133 

Courser, W. M., groceries, etc., Dover 72 

Crawford & Stockbridge. bookbinders, Concord 195 

Crippen, Lawrence, & Co., Kansas mortgages, etc., 

Concord 194 

Crosby Invalid Furniture Company, The, Nashua 128 

Cummings Bros., marble and granite monuments, 

etc., Concord 201 

Currier, Edward H., apothecary, Manchester 155 

Cushing & Delany, grocers, etc., Dover 83 



Daniels, Joel & Co., painting, etc., Manchester 

Davis Bros., photographers, Portsmouth 

Davis, F. G. , groceries, etc. , Concord 

Davis, Moses, city undertaker, etc., Nashua 

Davis, Wright & Co., Cheshire Co. stove store, Keene. 

Dearborn, John C., merchant tailor. Great Falls 

De Courcy, Wm., tailor, Portsmouth 

Dickerman, Leavitt & Co., wholesale groceries, etc.. 

Dodge's Hotel, Rochester 

Dondero & Co., wholesale fruits, Dover 

Dover Beef Co 

Dover Five Cent Saving Bank 

Dover National Bank 

Dover Steam Loundry 

Dow, F. C., boots and shoes, Manchester 

Downs, A. K., flour, etc., Great Falls 

Downs, J. O., & Co., fish and meat, Portsmouth 

Dows & Wheeler, architects. Concord 

Dunbar. J. D., Livery, etc., Keene 

Dunn, Geo., brewers' agent, etc., Dover 

Dumas, J. A., dry and fancy goods, Great Falls 

Durgin, Wm. B., silversmith, Concord 

Dyke, S. A., harness, etc., Claremont 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Ellis. W. B., & Co., clothing, etc.. Claremont 232 

Emerson, Clias.. & Sous. French china, etc., Dover... 85 

Emerson & ALayuard, tailors, etc., Nashua 139 

Emery. John, mant'r. monuments, etc., Great Falls. 107 

Evans, Ira C., printing. Concord 191 

Evans, Henry, furniture, etc., Rochester 99 

Everett Knitting Works, mt'rs. cardigan jackets, etc., 
Manchester 170 

Fairbanks, H. B., auctioneer, etc., Manchester 177 

Faucher, H. I., provisions, etc., Manchester 172 

Feinemau, F., merchant tailor, Rochester 94 

Felton, S. A., & Son, mt'rs. brushes, Manchester 157 

First National Bank, Nashua 124 

First National Bank of Concord, N. H., The 190 

First National Bank, Portsmouth 45 

First National Bank, The, of Manchester 153 

Fisher, Edwin C., photographers. Claremont 230 

Fitzgerald. Rufus. mfr. leather belting, Nashua 127 

Flanders &. VVessen, beef, pork, etc., Nashua 126 

Flather & Co., machinists tools, etc., Nashua 119 

Fletcher & Tan ton, furniture, etc., Portsmouth 57 

Flyun Bros., meats, groceries, etc.. Portmouth 55 

Folsom. E. \V., jeweller, etc.. Great Falls 107 

Ford & Kimball, car wheels, Concord 195 

Forsaith. S. C., Machine Co., infrs. circular saw mills, 

etc., Manchester 160 

Foss, J. W.. & Co., musical .instruments, etc., Dover. 74 

Foster, G. W., music store, Keene 222 

Foye, M. C.. fancy goods, etc., Portsmouth 47 

French, J. T., doors, sash, etc., Portsmouth 61 

French. Geo. B.. dry -goods, etc., Portsmouth 51 

Frost, J. E., steam and shingle mill, Berwick 110 

Gay, Arthur E., steam, gas. and water fitt'g, Nashua. 131 

Gee. Austin W.. undertaker, etc., Claremont 226 

Gerrish, S. J., groceries, etc., Portsmouth 49 

Giffin & Son, coal. Keene 221 

Glendon House, East Rochester 93 

Globe Tea. Coffee, and Variety Store, The, W. B. Neal, 

prop., Rochester 93 

Goodrich, H. M.. furnaces, etc., Nashua 135 

Goodrich, Mercer, books, etc., Portsmouth 57 

Goodwin. H. C., pharmacist 81 

Granite Hosiery Mills, Laconia 211 

Granite State Fire Insurance Co., Portsmouth 42 

Granite State Trust Company, Manchester 159 

Grant's Hotel, f. Grant, prop., Great Falls 108 

Gray. F. L., funeral furnishers, Manchester 163 

Gregg & Son, mf rs. doors, sash, etc., Nashua 123 

Griffin, John, hatter, etc., Portsmouth 50 

"Grimes' '' Bread, Cake, etc., Dover. 73 

Gurnsey Bros. & Co., bakers, etc., Keene 220 

H 11. A. S., mfr. loom harness, etc.. Dover 74 

Hall. I. D., dry-goods, etc., Claremont 232 

Hall, Wm., flour, grain, etc., Nashua 135 

Hall. Wm. G., dry-goods, etc., Keene 2]6 

Ham. J. T. W., mfr. hats, etc., Dover 7? 

Hannaford, A. M., coffins, etc.. Claremont 228 

Hardy & Co.. groceries, etc., Manchester 168 

Hardy, F. C.. dry -goods, etc., Keene 216 

Harmon, Chas. H., fruits, confectionery, etc.. Great 

Falls 106 

Harmon. Mrs. C. H., millinery, etc., Great Falls 106 

"Hartigan, P. H., groceries. Rochester 99 

Hasty Bros., restaurant, etc., Dover 82 

Hastings, J., meats, Claremont 226 

Haubrick. F., & Co., clothing, etc., Claremont 231 

Hawthorne. The. A. R. Place, prop. Great Fails 82 

Hayes, A. W^jjeweller, etc., Dover 74 

Hayes, Geo. W.. harness, etc.. Dover 75 

Heath, Frank E . upholster'd furniture, etc., Concord 195 

Heath, T. A., & Co., carpets, etc.. Concord 200 

Heath & Stevens, marble and granite works, Man- 
chester 167 

Henderson, C. T., com, flour, etc., Dover 87 

Hendrick. A. P., jeweller, etc., Nashua 133 

Hersom. L. R.. & Son, wool, etc.. Great Falls 106 

Hilton & Willcomb. printers, Manchester 16G 

Hoit. J. Frank, grocers, etc.. Concord 199 

Holman. Chas , mfr. confectionery, Nashua 137 

Holt Bms.. infrs. Concord wheels. Concord 196 

Hotel Wrisley, Bnelduo & Thurston. proprs 96 

Howard & French, mfrs. furniture, Nashua 119 

Howe. I. S.. livery and sale stable, Rochester 95 

Howes & Ford, printers, etc., Dover 86 

Home, S. P., & Co . mfrs. sash, doors, etc., Berwick. 104 

Hunt. J. E., druggist. Nashua 118 

Humphrey, Dodge & Smith, hardware, etc., Concord. 206 
Huse, W. D., knitting-machines, Laconia 212 

Ilsley & Moore, insurance, Portsmouth 63 



Indian Head Mutual Fire Insurance Co., Nashua ]>:> 

Indian Head National Bank, Nashua 120 



Jackman, S. S., & Co., engineers, etc., Nashua 

Jackman & Sexton, carpets, etc 

James Bros., livery stable. Manchester 

James, E. P , stables, Manchester 

Jenness & Dowd. mfrs. marble, Portsmouth. 

Jewell, W. S., wholesale grocer, etc., Manchester 

Jones, C., & Co.. hardware, etc., Claremont 

Jones, F. R., fruits, Keene 

Jones, Frank, brewery. Portsmouth ....'..'..'. 

Jones & Gordon, millinery, etc . Rochester ! 

Jones, J. B., auctioneer, etc., Manchester 

Johnson, E. P., Co., coal, wood, etc . Manchester' 
Josselyn, L. H., & Co., infrs. furniture, Manchester.. 

Keene Cash Clothing Store 

Keene Five Cents Savings Bank 

Kelley, H. M., mfrs. stoves, etc.. Rochester 

Kelley, Park H., druggist, Manchester 

Kendall P. A., mfrs. saws, etc., Nashua 

Kennard, B. F., drugs, etc. . Dover 

Kennedy & Miller mfg. company, Portsmouth 

Killoren Bros., groceries, etc 

Killoren, M., & Co., dry -goods, etc . Dover 

Kimball & Co., dry and fancy goods, Nashua 

Kimball, C. H., piano's, etc., Manchester 

Kimball. D., & Co . apothecaries. Portsmouth 

Kimball, O. F., mfr. ladies' furnishing goods, etc., 

Dover 

Kimball. O. H., printer and engraver, Manchester 

Kimball, W. G. C.. photographer. Concord 

Knowlton & Stone, hardware, etc , Keene 



135 



164 
58 
1611 
23-> 
-'1 9 
42 
92 
164 

leg 

170 

220 
222 
98 
165 
134 
83 
56 
72 
79 
140 
176 
51 

73 
177 
203 
222 

Ladd W. D., & Co., City Bakery, Manchester 176 

Langden Manufacturing Company, fine shirtings, etc., 

Manchester. . 158 

Laue. J. G.. insurance, Manchester .. 167 

Lawrence. E Percy, tailor. Portsmouth 48 

Leighton. Geo. A., knitting machines, Manchester. . . 169 

Lindsey. C. H.. photographer, Nashua US 

Littlefleld. Frary & Co., furnaces, ranges, etc.. Dover. 77 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank, Concord 189 

Locke, H. C.. fruits, Portsmouth 60 

Locke, L. F.. surgeon, physician, and dentist. Nashua 136 

Londonderry Lithia Spring Water Co., Nashua 130 

Lord, C. 1j.. fancy goods, etc., Great Falls 108 

Lothrop, D., & Co.. clothing, etc.. Great Falls 104 

Lothrop, Farnham & Co., clothiers, etc., Dover 70 

Lovejoy, G. L., undertaker, etc , Concord 208 

Lowell, J. P., "Crockery Hall," etc 84 

Lucier & Perrault, dry-goods, etc., Nashua 125 

Manchester Beef Co., The 164 

Manning. J. K., boots, shoes, etc., Portsmouth 60 

Mansion House. The, Rochester 94 

Marden & Mygatt, stoves, etc., Nashua 137 

Marshall, H , wholesale produce, Manchester 165 

Marshall & Knowlton, pharmacists. Manchester 168 

Marston, C E , foundry and machine works. Dover.. 81 

Marston, J. N , real estate, etc.. Manchester 174 

Martin, C. H., & Co., drugs, etc.. Concord 1> 

Martin. L., livery stable, etc., Keene 217 

McCrillis, Herbert, groceries, etc.. Rochester 99 

McCuIlough & Nichols, livery, Claremont 227 

McKean, R. E., tailor. Manchester 152 

McQuesten. G. B., West India goods, etc., Nashua. .. 135 

McQuesten & Co., flour, grain, etc.. Nashua 118 

McQuesten & Chase, ice. wood, etc . Nashua 137 

Mead, Lewis K., druggist. Manchester 163 

Mead, Mason & Co.. contractors, etc.. Concord 193 

Meader, J. J., clothing. Rochester 95 

Merrimack County Savings Bank, Concord 192 

Merrimac Manufacturing Co.. confectioners. Dover. 69 

Merrill Brothers, flour, grain, etc., Manchester 155 

Merrill. M. J.. real estate. Nashua 118 

Meserve. agent for millinery goods. Dover 75 

Meserve. J. H., mfr. lumber, etc., Rochester 97 

Miller & Putnam, stoves, etc., Claremont 231 

Miville, F. C.. drugs, chemicals, etc , Manchester. 172 
Montgomery, D. H.. agent, Knabe pianos. Portsmouth 61 

Mooar, John, jeweller, Manchester 173 

Moody, Estabrook, & Andersons, mfrs. boots and 

shoes, Nashua 129 

Moodie, J. M.. merchant tailor. Great Falls 109 

Moore, Geo. H.. boots and shoes, Concord 191 

Moore. Geo., druggist, etc.. Great Falls 105 

Morrill, J. G., & Co., groceries, etc.. Rochester 96 

Morrill, \Vm. A., window-shades, etc., Dover 71 

Morrill & Danforth. insuranee, Concord 207 

Morse, Jos. P., insurance, etc., Portsmouth. 56 



GENERAL INDEX. 



PAGE 

Moses Brothers, newspapers, etc., Portsmouth 57 

Moses, F. W., pianos, organs, etc., Portsmouth 45 

Moses, J. W., tailor, etc., Portsmouth 59 

Munns & Paige, steam and gas fitters, etc., Concord. 196 
Murdick & Lord, mf rs. fine confectionery, Keene 216 

Murphy, David E., dry -goods, Concord 207 

Murray & Co., mfg. chemists, etc., Nashua 131 

Nashua Bobbin and Shuttle Co 128 

Nashua Card and Glazed Paper Co 132 

Nashua Lock Co 126 

Nashua Savings Bank 127 

Nashua Steam Press and Boiler Works, J. J. Crawford 

& Son. pro s 132 

National Rockingham House Stable, N. Jones, prop., 

Portsmouth 60 

National State Capital Bank, Concord 188 

Nealley, B., dry goods, etc.. Dover 72 

Nelson, Joseph, peanuts, fruits, etc.. Great Falls 110 

Nelson, N. C., watchmaker, etc., Concord 208 

Newell, L. V., & Co.. photographers. Portsmouth ... 53 
New Era Tea Company, Herbert & Tenney, props., 

Keene 219 

New Hampshire Banking Co., Nashua 122 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co.. Manchester 156 

New Hampshire House. M. O. Donnell. prop., Dover. 85 

New Hampshire Nat. Bank. Portsmouth 5'J 

New Hampshire Savings Bank, The. Concord 191 

New Hampshire Trust Co., The. Manchester 152 

Newman. Chas. T., apothecary, Manchester . 168 

Newton, Win. C.,& Son. ship stores, etc., Portsmouth 49 

Not-well, H. S., dry-goods, etc.. Nashua 138 

Nute, Geo. F., & Co., meats, etc., Dover 82 

Nutt, C. H., hardware, etc., Nashua 134 

Oliver, F. M., & Co., wholesale boots, shoes, etc., 

Manchester 153 

Osborn. J., mfr. confectionery, Nashua 139 

Otis, B. B., doors, sash, etc., Nashua 131 

Paare Belting Co. , Concord 200 

Palmer & Garmon, Manchester Marble and Granite 

Works 177 

Parker, A. E., fancy goods, etc.. Dover : 70 

Parker, John R.. photographer. Great Falls 107 

Parshley, A. S., insurance, etc . Rochester 96 

Partridge Bros., flour, feed. etc.. Manchester 157 

Pattee Bros., house furnishers. Dover 71 

Pender, John, insurance. Portsmouth 54 

People's Fire Insurance Co., of Manchester 159 

People's Savings Bank. The. Manchester 161 

Perkins, C. A. H.. books, etc.. Claremont 226 

Perkins, W. T., steam and gas fitters, etc , Dover. . 84 

Pettee & Adams, flour, grain, etc . Manchester 165 

Pettigrew, J., boots, shoes, etc.. Portsmouth 58 

Phelps, Geo., & Son. coal, Nashua 134 

Phjlbrick. O. F., & Co., coal and wood, Portsmouth . 56 
Philbrick, S., & Co., mfr. marble monuments, etc., 

Portsmouth 53 

Phoenix Hotel, Edson J. Hill, manager. Concord 204 

Pierce, D. C. M., meats, fish, etc., Dover 82 

Pierce, H. W., & Son, machinists, etc , Great Falls. . . 106 

Pierce, J. L..& Co., crockery, glassware, etc.. Nashua 125 

Pike & Heald, mfrs. of stoves, etc.. Manshester 159 

Piscataqua Savings Bank, Portsmouth 52 

Poore, D. M., groceries, etc., Manchester 174 

Porter, Roger W., mfrs. shuttles, etc., Nashua 140 

Portsmouth Brewing Co 52 

Portsmouth Marble Works 50 

Portsmouth Machine Co 46 

Portsmouth Shoe Co., The. Portsmouth 41 

Plummer, H. N., mfr. harness, etc., Rochester 98 

Hummer. Wm., teas, coffees, etc., Great Falls 109 

Prescott Piano and Organ Co., The, Concord 205 

Preston, J. W., M.D., druggist, Great Falls 108 

Rackley. B. F., apothecary, Dover 78 

Rand & Rire. stoves, etc., Claremont 232 

Randall, E. H.. steam heating, etc.. Concord 198 

Randall. J. D., printer, Portsmouth 59 

Rand ill. .J. L ship stores. Portsmouth 60 

Ban no, H. C.. mfr. harness, etc., Manchester 165 

Ranlet & Marsh, coal, wood. etc.. Concord 197 

Reed, Fred.. & Co., fine groceries. Concord 204 

Reed, J. Mason, mfr. boxes. Keene 220 

Ret-. 1. \Vm. H., meats, Nashua '.. 139 

Reynolds, Geo. A., boots, shoes, etc., Dover '. 

Rich. Brock & Co.. mfrs. sumac linings, etc.. Great 

Falls 110 

Rich &. Higgins, fish, meat, etc., Dover 76 

Richards, A. L., dry and fancy goods, Rochester. 92 

Richardson, G. G., 5 and 10-cent wares, Manchester 165 



PAGE 

Ricker, F. S., boots and shoes. Great Falls 108 

Rider & Cotton, iron, steel, etc.. Portsmouth 44 

Rief, Geo. W., mfr. stair-rails, etc., Manchester 154 

Roberts, S. J., Jr., meats, etc., Claremont 229 

Robinson, J. F., & Co., groceries, etc., Berwick.. 109 

Rochester Steam Laundry 99 

"Rockingham," The, Portsmouth 43 

Rollins, E. H., & Son, bankers, etc., Concord 199 

Sampson, W. J., & Co., painters, etc., Portsmouth. .. 44 

Sanborn, Chas., furniture, carpets, etc., Great Falls.. 104 

San born, J. B., publisher, etc.. Concord 197 

San born , W. C. , apothecary, Rochester 97 

Sawyer Woollen Mills, Dover 76 

Scott. Geo. F., variety store. Claremont 227 

Seavey, J. Frank, & Co., clothiers. Dover. 71 

Seavey. Woodbury, seeds, agricultural implements, 

etc.. Portsmouth, 63 

Shattuck, E. L , D. D.S., dentist, Nashua 134 

Shattuck, G. C., investment securities. Nashua 134 

Shaw, Geo. W., & Co.. drugs, Rochester 92 

Sheldon Bros., mfrs. furniture, Portsmouth 54 

Shelters, Leonard, wholesale hay, flour, etc., Man- 
chester 166 

Shepard, B. F. & S. D., real estate, etc., Manchester. 171 

Silsby, G. H. H., & Son. printers, etc.. Concord 207 

Simpson. C. E., merchant tailor, etc.. Portsmouth. .. 51 

Sinclair, W. W.. fruits, nuts, etc., Rochester 98 

Skinner, A. B. & S. W., dry-goods, etc.. Keene 218 

Slayton. E. M., wholesale butter, eggs, etc , Man- 
chester 171 

Sleeper & Hood, merchant tailors. Concord 197 

Snow, F. C., & Co.. merchant tailors, etc., Dover 81 

Smart, Eugene, rifles, guns, etc , Dover 84 

Small, D. P., real estate, etc.. Manchester 173 

Smith American Organ and Piano Co., The, Man- 
chester 170 

Smith, C. W.. wall-papers, etc 72 

Smith, J. A. V.. mfr. Smith's patent steel speeder 

flier, Manchester 158 

Smith & Walker, carriage hardware, Concord 192 

Snow, F. C.. Tailors, Dover 81 

Spofford, Chas. B., apothecary, Claremont 238 

Star Clothing House. Claremont 228 

Stearns, H., commission merchant. Nashua 128 

Stearns. J. E , & Co , meats, etc.. Manchester. 175 

Sterns. Wm . & Co., dry -goods, Dover 74 

Stewart. T. W. & J. H., merchant tailors. Concord. . . 205 

j Stowell. Geo. H., hardware, etc., Claremont 229 

: Straffnrd National Bank. Dover 81 

! Strickland. P.. sailmaker. etc., Portsmouth 59 

Stringer, S.. mfr. mineral waters, etc., Rochester 97 

Sugar River Paper Mill Company, Claremont 226 

Sullivan House. H G. Fitch & Son. props., Claremont. 227 

Sullivan & Littlefield, apothecaries, Dover 83 

Sullivan Machine Co., The, mfrs. quarrying machines, 

etc.. Claremont 229 

Sweetser, J. P., kitchen furnish 'gs, etc., Portsmouth. 48 

Tash, E. S.. & Co., groceries, etc., Dover 77 

Tayler, Chas. W., ranges, furnaces, etc , Portsmouth. 55 

Taylor. J., & Son, flour, etc., Manchester 174 

, Tebbetts, J. M., millinery, Portsmouth 55 

I Thacher. J. H., pharmacist, Portsmouth 58 

Thorne, E. N . dry and fancy goods. Rochester 95 

Thorp & Bartlett, stoves, ranges, etc., Manchester.. . 17C 

Thorpe. T. L., wool, etc., Manchester 160 

Thurston, J. B., mechanical engineer, Concord 192 

Thwing, A., Great Falls Book-store 109 

Tibbetts, E. A.. & Son, hardware, etc.. Great Falls. .. 107 

Tibbetts, R. Frank, watches, clocks, etc . Rochester.. 94 

Tilden, G. H., & Co.. booksellers, etc.. Keene 218 

Tilton. F. C.. clothing, etc.. Dover 83 

Tilton. G. H.. mfr. woollen hosiery, Laconia 211 

Tilion, J. s., mfr. saddles, harness, etc., Portsmouth. 47 
Towle. John E., & Co., packers pork, lard, etc., 

Manchester 154 

Tremont House. R. K. Sherman & Co. Nashua 120 

Trickey. C. H., & Co., coal and wood. Dover 76 

Trickey. C. P.. pianos, etc., Manchester 163 

Tuft <. ("has. A ., pharmacist, etc.. Dover 77 

Twombly, R. H., marble works, Dover 85 

Underhill Edge-tool Co., and Amoskeag Axe Co., 

Nashua 121 

Underbill. W. P. & Co., druggists. Concord 190 

Union Mortgage and Trust Co., Manchester 171 

Union Toy Turning Works, Claremont 231 

Vale Mills, mfrs. cambrics, sateens, etc., Nashua 120 

Vance, G. R. & Co., stoves, etc., Manchester 166 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Vickery, W. H., apothecary, Dover 73 

Wadieigh, G. W.. millinery, etc.. Concord 193 

Walker. J. Albert, wholesale and miners' agent for 

coal, Portsmouth 50 

Walker, J., dry-goods, etc., Rochester 98 

Walker, Win. 'P.. merchant tailor, Portsmouth 61 

Wallace. A. C.,mfr. building lumber, etc.. Manchester. 163 

Wallace, E. G. & E., mfrs. leather, etc.. Rochester 94 

Wallace, F. L. & Co., city undertakers, etc., Man- 
chester 170 

Ward, A. X., undertaker, etc., Dover 80 

Wardner, S., mfrs. fine cigars. Concord 203 

Watts, Fred., watches, etc., Manchester 160 

Way. Frank L., pharmacist, Manchester 166 

Webster House. A. H. Webster, prop., Portsmouth.. 45 
Wendell, A. P. & Co.. hardware, etc , Portsmouth... 56 

Weeks, M. S., groceries, etc . Great Falls 109 

Wells, J. H., ranges, etc.. Portsmouth 62 

Whalen, N. J.. mfr. harness, etc , Manchester 168 

Wheat, Qeo. E.. dry-goods, Nashua 132 

Wheeler, Harry B , printer. Nashua 138 

White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashua 122 

White Mountain Mills, mfr. of woollen hosiery, etc., 
Laconia 212 



PAGE 

Whitcomb, E. P., paper-hangings, etc., Keene 217 

Wiggin, J. H. & Co., wholesale grocers, etc., Man- 
chester 160 

Wiggin, Chas. AV. & Son, mfg. furniture, Dover 87 

Wijfgin, W. S.. groceries, etc.. Dover 84 

Winii, A. B., mfg. confectionery, etc., Nashua 133 

Winuipiseogee Hosiery Mills, Laconia 811 

Winslow, J. H.. boots, shoes, etc. .Dover 85 

Williams & Co., successors to Francestown soap- ' 

stone Co., Nashua 124 

Williams, J. B. & Sons, tanner? and mfrs. leather, 

Dover 80 

Wolf, S. & Co., merchant tailors, etc.. Rochester 94 

Woods, John, carpetings. etc.. Nashua ... 137 

Wood berry, R. H & H. O.. mfrs. shoes. Dover 78 

Woodward, C. W. & Co., tailors, etc., Concord 208 

Woodward, J. O., & Cory, mfrs. harness, etc., 

Nashua 125 

Worcester & Greenfield, books. Rochester 96 

Yeaton, J. R. & Co.. corn. meal, etc., Portsmouth 55 

York, Carl E., groceries, etc., Manchester 177 

Young, A. J.. D.D.S., Dover 86 

Young, J. W., sole leather, etc., Portsmouth 62 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 




EW HAMPSHIRE is the most mountainous region in the country east of the 
Rocky Mountains, and it is not inappropriately called "The Switzerland of 
'America." The State contains 9,280 square miles ; from north to south, its 
length is 168 miles, and its width, from east to west, from 90 to 20 miles, its 
form tapering towards the north ; and it is situated between 42 41' and 50 n' lati- 
tudes north, and between 70 40' and 72 28' longitudes, west from Greenwich, or 
between 4 34' and 6 22' east from Washington. On the west it is divided 




WHITE MOUNTAIN RANGE FROM MILAN. 

from Vermont by the Connecticut River, and it is bounded on the south by the State of 
Massachusetts, on the east by the State of Maine and the Atlantic Ocean. New Hampshire 
has a sea coast of but eighteen miles in length, and the shore is little otherwise than a 
sandy beach bordered in front by salt marshes, and indented by creeks and coves ; but for 
grandeur and wild magnificence of scenery that of New Hampshire is not excelled in either 
the Old or New World. From the lofty summits of its rugged mountains the eye surveys 
one of the wildest, and, at the same time, enchanting countries of the world, and is never 
drowsed by monotony ; rocks piled on rocks, clothed in gigantic forest growths and shrubs, 

21 



STA TE OF NE W HAMPSHIRE. 



placid lakes embosoming countless verdant islets ; pleasant valleys and farm lands in the 
highest state of cultivation, successively greet the eye, while the foaming cataract and leap- 
ing cascade, now rushing down the slopes and dashing through the plains, and winding 
their way to the sea, enchant the senses and cheat the mind of its cares. The State is 
alike noted for the extent and variety of its mineral resources, for its farm products, and 




FRANCONIA MOUNTAINS, FROM THORNTON. 

for its numerous manufactures. The settlement of New Hampshire dates from 1623, or 
three years after the arrival of the Puritans at Plymouth, Mass. Unlike Plymouth, however, 
which was settled by persons who were refugees from religious persecution, New Hamp- 
shire was first visited by white men in the interest of trade and profit, the region being at 
the time largely populated by various tribes of Indians. Captain John Mason, obtained in 

a 




WHITE MOIXTAIX RANGE FROM JEFFERSON. 

1621 a grant ot all the lands between the Naumkeag and Merrimack, and with Sir Frederick 
Gorges obtained a title to a territory they called Laconia, extending from Merrimack River 
to the River Sagadahock (or the Kennebeck). The territory first granted to Mason he called 
^ Mariana. Designing to establish fisheries, Gorges and Mason sent over from the mother 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



23 




MOUNT MADISON, OF GORHAM. 




WHITE MOUNTAINS, FROM THE GLEN. 



24 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



country in 1623 a colony, one division of which landed at Little Harbor, on the southern 
shore of the Piscataqua, and the other settled at Dover. 

In 1629 Mason obtained a further grant of the land between the Piscataqua (Ports- 
mouth) and Merrimack, and extending sixty miles into the country. This he called New 
Hampshire. In 1631 a house called the Great House was built at Strawberry Hill, now 
Portsmouth. Gorges, in his history of New England, declares "that he could hardly get 
any persons, for money, to reside" in the country he claimed; but the change of times 
and interest soon made it a place of refuge for persecuted religionists, and the settlements 
then advanced rapidly. In 1638 John Wheelright, the brother of the celebrated Mrs. 
Hutchinson, banished from Massachusetts for his Antinomian principles, came with a num- 
ber of adherents to Squanscott Falls, and settling there, called the place Exeter. Here 
the settlers combined as a body politic, chose rulers and swore to obey them. Similar gov- 
ernments were established by the colonies at Dover and Strawberry Hill. The territories 
granted to Gorges and Mason were but imperfectly defined, and disputes and jealousies 
consequently arose between the heirs of Gorges and Mason and the people of Massachu- 
setts ; and the strong feeling 
aroused was intensified by 
Mason using his influence 
to procure a royal order for 
a general governor to be 
appointed for all New Eng- 
land, and to supercede the 
governors of Plymouth and 
Massachusetts. His influ- 
ence, however, was ineffec- 
tual, but it was evidently 
not lightly regarded by 
Governor Winthrop, of 
Massachusetts, for the lat- 
ter, on the demise of Mason, 
made an entry in the first 
volume of his journal that 
his death was a "mercy." 
Fishing and trading being 
the sole objects of the set- 
tlers of New Hampshire, 
the settlements were slow 
in their progress for many 
years, and this was due, in 
great measure, to the per- 
ADAMS AND MADISON, FROM GLEN PATH. petual war the people had 

to keep up with the Indians, for New Hampshire was, perhaps, of all the colonies the one 
that suffered most from Indian hostilities. 

The different governments at Exeter, Dover and Strawberry Hill found themselves too 
weak to bear up against the constant inroads of the red-skinned savages and difficulties 
born of the colonization of a new territory, and they decided in 1641 to place the whole 
region under the jurisdiction and government of Massachusetts. New Hampshire, therefore, 
was part and parcel of the colony of Massachusetts until 1680, when, as the result of com- 
plaints made by the heirs of Gorges and Mason, and of a commission being given by 
Charles II to Colonel Nichols, Sir Robert Carr, and two others to investigate the state of 
the colonies, New Hampshire was decreed a separate province. John Cutt, Esq., of Ports- 
mouth, was, by royal authority, appointed president, and a council was assigned him by 
the crown, and a house of representatives was elected by the people. The first assembly, 
consisting of eleven persons, met at Portsmouth in the same year, and a number of laws 
were enacted. When James II ascended the English thronf new schemes of oppression 




STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



25 



were meditated for the colonies, and every vestige of liberty was to be erased. In 1686, 
under the presidency of Joseph Dudley, New Hampshire again became united with Massa- 
chusetts, and in that year Sir Edmond Andros arrived in Boston, commissioned as governor- 
in-chief over all New England, and authorized with his council to make such laws and 
impose such taxes as he might think proper. New Hampshire had already declared her 
will, which was offensive to the governing powers, and like her sister colonies, became a 
prey to his tyranny. The press was shackled, liberty of conscience invaded, and oppressive 
taxes imposed, and to prevent complaints being heard no person was allowed to leave the 
country without express license. This state of things continued until the English Revolution 
in 1688, when Andros was seized by the people and sent home a prisoner. In 1689 Brad- 
street was appointed governor, and three years later 
New Hampshire again became, and continued to be 
for a period of ten years, a separate province, when 
Joseph Dudley was once more appointed governor, 
and had Massachusetts also under his charge. Thus 
the two governments were again united, and so con- 
tinued from 1702 to 1741, sharing in each other's 
sympathies and in weal or woe. In the last named 
year New Hampshire again became a separate province 
with Benning Wentworth as governor. 

When the stirring times of the American Revolution 
came, and the heroes for freedom were called for, 
New Hampshire furnished her full quota of warriors 
men strong in lung and muscle, hardened by the 
laborious occupation of husbandry, reared in the hard- 
ships of Indian wars, and not a few experienced 
in those scenes of conflict between England and 
France, which ended in the reduction of Canada; 
and when the Mexican and other wars broke out, 
and especially when the tocsin of the Rebellion was 
' sounded, New Hampshire lads, both old and young, 
were among the first to offer their services in the 
interests of their common country. 

New Hampshire has been eminently 
successful and to-day ranks fourth in 
the group in point of population as 
well as in manufactures. A network 
of railways has placed her in direct 
communication with all the sea washed 
and inland States of the Union. The 
only port of entry in the State is Ports- 
mouth, but the great bulk of the com- 
mercial material of New Hampshire 
is carried to Boston by rail for ex- 
SILVER CASCADE IN THE NOTCH, portation. The general surface of the 

country becomes mountainous, principally in the north, the hills increasing in height as 
they recede from the sea, until they swell to the lofty grandeur of the White Mountains. 
The slope toward the Connecticut Valley is short and precipitous, and in this direction the 
only rivers of consequence are the Ammonoosuc and Ashuelot. The Androscoggin passes 
through the north-eastern part of the State, but in reality this is a river of Maine. The 
Piscataqua, the only considerable river that has its whole course within the State, is formed 
by the junction of Salmon Falls and Cocheco Rivers from the north, and several smaller 
streams from the west, and it is only from this junction to the sea, a distane of ten miles, 
that it bears the name of Piscataqua. At its mouth is the harbor of Portsmouth, one of 
the finest harbors in the countrv. The Merrimack rises in the White Mountains, not far 




26 



STATE OF NEW EAMPSHIEE. 




MOUNT CARTER, FROM GORHAM. 




VIEW FROM BRIDGE IN BERLIN. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



27 



distant from the head of the Saco, and running south through the centre of the State, 
passes into Massachusetts, where it turns and runs in a north-easterly direction, and falls into 
the Atlantic. None of the rivers of New Hampshire, however, are much used for navigation, 
but their banks afford the best of sites for mills and factories ; indeed, it is questionable if 
any other State in the Union can offer such facilities to manufacturers in the matter of 
water power as New Hampshire. It is estimated that 1 10,000 acres of the surface of the 
State are covered with water. Lake Winnipiseogee (called by the Indians Win-ne-pe-sok-ee) 
is the most extensive sheet of water within its limits, and well might the Indians, charmed 
by the scenery around it, call it "The Smile of the Great Spirit." It is 23 miles in length, 
and from 2 to 10 miles in breadth. Upwards of 360 islands are sprinkled over its bosom, 
and its shores are indented by numerous bays formed by gentle swells of land projecting 

into the lake and rising gracefully from its waters. It abounds 
in fish, and its waters are remarkably pure. Being on the 
route to the White Mountains, it is much visited by travelers, 
and during the Summer season steamboats are employed on 
the lake. Lake Umbagog, on the eastern State line, and 
others in the south and west are smaller, but all are highly 
picturesque and abound with the most lovely scenery. 

New Hampshire is known as the Granite State, from the 
fact that it possesses greater quantities of granite, suited to 
the purposes of architecture, than any other State. At 
various points on the very margins, or near the banks, of the 
Merrimack and Connecticut, are found immense and apparently 
exhaustless ranges of this stone. Marble is also abundant, 
as also most of the rocks attributed to the primary era. 
The mineral resources of the State are by no means insig- 
nificant. Iron exists in almost 
S?^ every county. The ore beds that 
have been chiefly worked are at 
Franconia and Lisbon, in the 
northerly part of the State, and 
these are considered as among the 
richest in "the country, the ores 
yielding from 60 to 70 per cent, 
of metal. Ores of copper are found 
also at Franconia, Eaton, Warren 
and other places. The zinc ore 
mines of Warren and a mine of tin 
ore at Jackson, near the foot of the 
White Mountains, are pronounced 
abounding and rich. The Jackson 
tin mine was the first valuable 
tin mine found in the United 
States. In Eaton are also exten- 
sive deposits of ores of zinc and 
lead, mixed in some of the shale with veins of silver, the amount of which is sufficiently 
great to allow of its being profitably separated. It is more economical to ship grain hereto 
from the rich fields of the west than to attempt to grow it here. The fields are chiefly 
given up to the pasturing and breeding of cattle, etc., and to the growth of vegetables, while 
the dairy products of New Hampshire have an enviable reputation. The natural growths of 
the country are various kinds of useful timber, as oak, pine, hemlock, ash, beech and birch ; 
and these in former times contributed the chief mercantile products of the region, and when 
formed into masts, staves, planks, boards, etc., were largely exported. The sugar maple is 
also abundant and the pitch yielding pine. Wolves, bears and other fur-bearing animals 
were formerly very numerous in the State, but a bounty paid by the government for their 





GIANT'S STAIRS, BARTLETT. 



28 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



destruction has led to their almost complete extermination. The rivers and lakes abound 
with fish, and wild fowl and game are plentiful in all parts. 

The manufactures of the state are varied and numerous, and embrace cotton and woolen, 




iPROFILE HOUSE AND-ECHO LAKE, FRANCONIA NOTCH. WHITE MOUNTAIN S N.Hf 



paper, iron and steel, machinery, engines, leather, boots and shoes, etc. ; and there are 
many grist and saw mills, carriage factories, powder mills, hardware, cutlery, etc., factories, 

etc. In the manufacture of cotton 
goods New Hampshire ranks second 
to Massachusetts. 

Manchester is the principal manu- 
facturing and most populous City in 
the State, and Concord is the capital. 
In 1880 the total population of the 
State was 346,991, of whom 685 
were colored, 14 Chinese and 63 
Indians. 

New Hampshire is divided into 
ten counties and two hundred and 
forty-three townships. Appended is 
a list of the counties, with the names 
of their capitals given in parenthesis : 
Eelknap (Gilford), Carroll (Ossipee), 
Cheshire (Keene), Coos (Lancaster), 
Grafton (Haverhill and Plymouth), 
Hillsboro' (Amherst), Merrimack 
(Concord), Rockingham (Exeter and 
Portsmouth), Strafford (Dover), and 
Sullivan (Newport). 

New Hampshire has always been 




THE FLUME. 



alive to the advantages of a thoroughly systematic plan of education, and in all her cities, 
towns and villages, ample provision is made for the education of the rising generation. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



29 



Before she founded her own highly popular Dartmouth College, at Hanover, in 1769, she 
was a liberal contributor to Harvard College. The State is ruled by a governor, executive 
council, a House of Representatives and a Senate, and the Constitution, as originally 
drawn, excluded from all public offices those who were moneyless and not of the Protestant 
faith. 

New Hampshire has completed a fine system of railroads, and most of the lines in the 
southern part of the State centre at Concord, the capital, and thence diverge in every direc- 
tion. 

To omit mention, in any reference to New Hamshire, of the White Mountains would 
be equivalent to an attempt to represent Shakespere's play of Hamlet by omitting the char- 
acter of the Prince of Denmark. The White Mountains are the pride and glory of New 
Hampshire, are known to all whoever turned over the pages of a school geography in any part of 
the civilized globe, and with the single exception of the Falls of Niagara no summer resort 




OWL'S HEAD AND MOOSILAUKE, WARREN, N. H. 

in the United States has annually so many visitors as the White Mountains. From all parts 
of the Union, from the British provinces, from the opposite shores of the restless Atlantic, 
from every part of the new and old world, the lovers of romantic scenery come to admire 
the rugged sky-piercing peaks, the cultivated and flowery valleys, the winding streams, the 
glassy lakes, and the dashing cascades of this mountainous region. The White Mountain 
range is located in Coos, Grafton and Carroll counties, covering an area of about 2,000 square 
miles, or nearly a third of the northern section of the State. This range of hills, which may 
be considered as a continuation of the Alleghenies, enters New Hampshire between the 
Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers, and of which the grand Monadnock, 3,254 feet in height, 
Sunapee, 4,636 feet, and Moosheloc, 4,636 feet, appear to be links, reaches its greatest ele- 
vation in Mount Washington, the summit of which is 6,428 feet above the level of the sea. 
The other principal peaks in this range (for as such it may be described, although it is 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 




PEABODY RIVER AND MOUNT WASHINGTON. 




8QUAM LAKE AND MOUNT CHOCORUA. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



31 



not always continuous) are: Mt. Adams, 5,960 feet; Mt. Jefferson, 5,860 feet; Mt. Mad. 
ison, 5,620 feet; Mt. Monroe, 5,510 feet; Mt. Franklin, 5,050 feet, and others little inferior 
in elevation, and the Kearsage Mountains rise to the height of 2,480 feet. These mountains 
are different from most others in being purely of a primitive origin. No organic remains of 
the transition period have ever been discovered near them, and they are probably the oldest 
mountains in the world. The mountains are composed of huge rocks of granite and gneiss. 
Under these hard ledges the most valuable ores exist, but coal and fossils are searched for 
in vain. Round the bases of these hills are forests of heavy timber, which is succeeded by 

a belt of stunted fir trees, 
from 10 to 15 feet high, above 
this a growth of thick bushes, 
and farther up the surface is 
covered with a dark pall of 
mosses and lichens. 

The first white men who 
visited the mountains were 
Messrs. Neal, Jocelyn and 
Field in 1632, and a few years 
afterward others came in 
search of minerals or game. 
The White Mountain plateau 
is approached by travelers 
from four directions from 
the east by the Grand Trunk, 
Eastern and Ogdensburg Rail- 
roads; from the south by Lake 
Winnipisogee and the Perni- 
gewassett Rivers; from the 
south-west by way of Con- 
necticut River and the White 
Mountain Railroad at Little- 
ton, and from the north by 
the Grand Trunk at Northum- 
berland. From all sides the 
approach is grand, and the 
mountain combinations are 
charmingly picturesque, pre- 
senting every variety of moun- 
tain scenery, slopes, ravines, 
precipices, towering cliffs and 
overhanging summits, and 
among the foot-hills delightful 
waterfalls and lakes. The 
whole of this mountainous 
region is now well provided 
with first-class hotels, and 
excellent accommodation is 
afforded to tourists. The summit of Mt. Washington can now be reached by railway, and 
here on this high eminence is a hotel, Summit House. Near the hotel is the observatory 
of the coast survey, the observing station of the United States Signal Service, and Tip-Top 
House, the printing and publishing office of Burt's "Among the Clouds," an enterprising 
newspaper. The climate for three quarters of the year is winter, and yet men, in the 
interests of science, live here the whole year round. The cold at times is so severe as to 
freeze the mercury in the thermometer. After Mt. Washington the White Mountain Notch 
is the great natural feature of the range. 




" OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAINS.' 



32 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 




WHITE MOUNTAIN NOTCH. 

2,000 feet above the rear of the house. In a 
of August 28th, 1826, great particles of the 
hurled to the bottom of the chasm. Samuel 
ber, left their abode, the Wil- 
ley House, to seek safety else- 
where, but they were caught 
by an avalanche and crushed 
to death, while, the house re- 
mained uninjured. The bodies 
of two sons and one daughter 
were never found, and the rest 
of the Willey family are interred 
near the mansion house of Wil- 
ley Farm at North Conway. 
The Franconia group of hills 
abound with objects of interest, 
notably the scenery of the 
Franconia Notch, "The Old 
Man of the Mountains," Profile 
Lake, Echo Lake, etc. 

The " natural wonders " pre- 
sented by the hills and valleys 
of this region are, once seen, 
never to be forgotten, and it is 
not surprising that the summer 
travel to the "Switzerland of 
America" is annually increasing. 



The Notch is a remarkable chasm, 
two miles in length, and where nar- 
rowest it is only 22 feet wide. It 
is the only pass through the great 
mountain barrier. Through the 
high, steep precipices, which form 
its walls, flows one of the head 
branches of the Saco river, and in 
its course receives the Waters of 
several cascades which leap down 
the declivities. This stream, after 
a heavy fall of rain, becomes fear- 
fully swollen, and frequently at 
such times sweeps away all oppo- 
sing obstacles, and fills the valley 
with ruin. The Willey House, 
made famous in story by Haw- 
thorne, stands upon the Notch road, 
nestling under the steep acclivity 
of Mt. Willey, which rears its head 
terrible storm of wind and rain on the night 
steep sides of the hills were loosened and 
Willey, his wife and family, eleven in num- 




TILE BOUBNfi MONUMENT. 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



THE present City of Portsmouth was for many years the financial and governmental cen- 
tre of the province the home of its chief magistrates and men of wealth and influence. It 
is noted as containing many buildings, paintings and localities of historic interest, and its 
inhabitants are justly proud of the wisdom and patriotism that laid its foundation so broad 
and deep. 

The township was included in the grant to the Mason and Gorges of August 10, 1862, 
and a settlement was made the following year at a place known as Odiorne's Point, now 
in Newcastle, by one David Thompson. A grant was made in 1631 by the council of Ply- 
mouth river and harbor, which covered what is now Portsmouth, Newcastle, Rye and por- 
tions of Greenland and Newington. A settlement was made where the city now stands, 
which went by the names of Piscataqua and Strawberry Bank, until in answer to a petition 
from the inhabitants thereof in May, 1753, to the government of Massachusetts, which had 
jurisdiction over it, it received its present name, which was deemed suitable, it being the 
river's mouth and a good harbor. Newcastle was set off in 1693; Greenland partially in 
1704 and fully in 1721. 

On the 27th of June, 1774, the inhabitants forced the reshipment of a cargo of tea and 
of another in the September following. 

In 1775, notwithstanding the personal popularity of Governor Wentworth, which prompted 
the inhabitants to pass a resolution pledging their utmost endeavors to prevent any insult 
being offered to him, yet they were as prompt to take up arms in behalf of liberty, as 
earnest in opposition to royalty, and contributed as freely of their money and their blood 
for the establishment of independence as the people of any locality in the colonies. 

The eminent men of Portsmouth in the eighteenth century were numerous, and promi- 
nent among them was John Langdon. His speech in the legislature, which was in session 
at Exeter at the the time of the fall of Ticonderoga, when public credit was exhausted and 
the patriots nearly discouraged, should go down to posterity beside that of Patrick Henry. 
Said Langdon, "I have one thousand dollars in hard money. I will pledge my plate for 
three thousand more. I have seventy hogsheads of Tobago rum \\hich will be sold for the 
most it will bring. They are at the service of the state. If we succeed in defending our 
firesides and our homes I may be remunerated, if we do not then the property will be of 
no value to me. Our friend Stark, who so nobly maintained the honor of our state at 
Bunker Hill, may safely be entrusted with the honor of the enterprise, and we will check 
the progress of Burgoyne." The result of this, as is well known, was the victory at Ben- 
nington and the subsequent surrender of Burgoyne. John Langdon held many public posi- 
tions in the state, and was the first presiding officer of the United States Senate. 

New Hampshire has long been called the Switzerland of America. Nature in a bounti- 
ful mood seems to have lavished her favors on this fair tract where agriculture, commerce 
and manufactures harmoniously exert their respective influences. Scarcely a town is to be 
found that is not supplied with ample water power. Viewed by rivers and railroads, teem- 
ing with luxuriant and varied products of the soil, gemmed with populous and beautiful 
towns, which are centres of industry and enterprise, and in rapid communication with the 
principal cities of New England and the middle states the commonwealth is well adapted 
for success in every avenue of commerce and trade. 

35 



36 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



The City of Portsmouth has long been one of the most interesting and important towns 
within the borders of the state. Beautiful for situation, the attention of the first settlers 
from the east was at a very early date directed to this locality by the favorable descrip- 
tion of the first committee sent out by the government. 

The first view of Portsmouth, with its lovely expanse of water on the one side and its 

diversified landscapes on the other ; its varied and beautiful architecture, historic buildings 

of a hundred years ago, villa-like residences of more modern times, charming drives and 

multiplied hills with verdue clad, where homes wander at will and gleam out like sweet 

^_________^_^^^__^_____ j ______^^_^__^____^ surprises, strikes the beholder as 

something almost phenomenal in 
beauty. The homes that linger in 
the valuable business portions of 
the town are in no wise crowded 
together, more or less yard and 
lawn being indulged in, and vari- 
ety of style and shape is so mark- 
ed that seldom are two houses seen 
that seem alike. In the centre of 
the city is Market Square, around 
which, on all sides, are clustered 
the leading public buildings and 
prominent business houses. The 
streets are wide and pleasant as 
a rule. Here, with all the busy 
rush of the busy nineteenth cen- 
tury pressing in on every side, you 
may step into several business 
establishments that have been in 
continuous existence for upwards 
of a hundred years, and in one or 
two instances been kept all this 
time in the same family, descend- 
ing from father to son and grand- 
son. The present proprietors of 
these business landmarks are 
among the merchant princes of 
the city, and take an honest pride 
in maintaining the prestige won 
by their ancestors in the marts of 
trade. 

The general excellence, thorough 
instruction and wide range of the 
educational advantages of Ports- 
mouth have made themselves felt 
not only in the character and 
trained ability of the native citizens who have gone forth from her institutions as representative 
men, but have also added to the attractions of the city as a place of residence. Large and 
generous action on the part of the city government has developed a superior system of free 
public schools, which includes a classical and high school, all under the best instruction and 

management. 

As in most of the towns of New England, the early settlement of Portsmouth was hardly 
begun before a meeting house, as it was called, was built, and a church society was organ- 
ized. With the growth of the city the churches have correspondingly multiplied, and they 
now embrace all sects and denominations. 

Portsmouth has also a national reputation, by reason of being the location of the most 




THE ROCKINGHAM. 



CITY OF PORISMOUTH. 



37 



eastern navy yard of our Government, and which occupies a large area of ground along the 
magnificent harbor. Many of the largest ships of the navy, have either been built, or under- 
gone repairs at this point, and it has been the scene of busy activity. The harbor affords 
unrivalled advantages, for the navy yard, the depths of water being sufficient for all pur- 
poses, and it being particularly convenient for looking after our important interests to the 
northeast. Though the yard at this time, is quiet, but, the demand for its production, would 
show the great value of this situation. 

Portsmouth, from her natural surroundings as well as her acquired facilities, is advan- 
tageously situated. It was from the first a centre that foreshadowed her present advantages 
of transfer and exchange. When the horn of the stage-coach gave place to the shrill whis- 
tle of the locomotive, then Portsmouth's capacity for growth and extension rapidly became 
manifest. Demand for her products steadily increased, and the supplies from her com- 
mercial and manufacturing enterprises were in request far and near. As a result Ports- 
mouth became better known, and greater numbers found it to be a desirable place for em- 
ployment or business enterprise a good town in which to live and thrive. Excellent public 
schools, church privileges and constant improvements have made it attractive as a place to 
rear and educate families. Its transportation facilities by water and rai 1 are especially avail- 




THE POST OFFICE. 

able to the business men, while pleasure travel finds here some of the most picturesque and 
charming scenery in the country. Its breweries have gained for Portsmouth a national 
reputation ; it boasts of the best equipped shoe factory in New England ; its machine works 
are prepared to supply everything in the line of machinery at short notice and of the finest 
workmanship ; its coal yards furnish the wholesale and retail trade for miles around, and 
its depots for lumber, grain, groceries, hardware, building material, etc., have become noted 
as important sources of supply for the retail dealers throughout all this section of the coun- 
try. As a financial centre Portsmouth is particularly worthy of notice. It has four national 



38 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



banks and three savings banks, and the city has every reason to be proud of their strength, 
stability and prosperity. Well officered and prudently managed, every legitimate accommo- 
dation is offered to their patrons. It also has a reliable and responsible home fire insur- 
ance company, and the natural competition for business in conjunction with a well-managed 
fire department and the general immunity of the city from fires has served to reduce fire 
insurance rates to the minimum. An illustration of the progressive spirit of the people 
is seen in the quickness with which they seize upon every practical improvement that is 
calculated to economize time, labor or money. No sooner had the telephone opened its 
ears and lips than it was introduced here, and its use has now become so general as a 
medium for business and social purposes, that its ramifications extend to every section of 
the city, while the adjacent towns and cities on all sides are included in the service. Elec- 
tric lighting is another salient example of this spirit of enterprise. Its prominent thorough- 
fares and public buildings are provided with electric lights, and the resources of this sys- 
tem are continually being multiplied in answer to the popular demand. The police force of 
the city are well disciplined and efficient ; robberies or burglaries are of very rare occur- 




U. S. NAVY YARD. 

rence within the corporate limits, and the cracking of banks and mercantile establishments 
is practically unknown. The exemption of the city from disastrous conflagrations is in great 
part due to a thoroughly organized and prompt fire service. 

A stranger visiting Portsmouth for the first time, will be surprised by the elegance of the 
city's new hotel. The Rockingham, which is not surpassed by any public house east ot 
New York. In its appointments, there has been displayed good taste and elegance, while 
it is apparant that no money has been spared to make it superior in every respect to hotels 
found outside of the largest cities. A view of the building is included in this sketch. 

If beauty of situation, unexcelled business opportunities, all that is wise in conservatism 
united with all that is noble in the grand, progressive movement of the present age ; if sur- 
roundings elevating in influence, institutions helpful in an honorable struggle with the vicis- 
situdes of practical life; if health, wealth and happiness are attractions in a place of resi- 
dence, then Portsmouth may win like a mother and command like a queen. Growing 
slowly and strongly, clinging wisely to her traditions, "without haste, without rest," Ports- 
mouth furnishes the truest condition of real life, more hopeful and rounded standards of life 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



39 




1. CHRISTS. 2. UNITARIAN. 3. CONGREGATIONAL. 4. MIDDLE 
STREET BAPTIST. 5. ST. JOHN'S. 

POKTSMOUTH CHURCHES. 



40 CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 

for "all classes and conditions of men." The resident of Portsmouth, be he workman with 
hands or brain, may have his own home, made attainable by the large industries which are glad 
to exchange just coin for fair service, and by low rents, with room for the garden and leave to 
own his spot of ground ; while the cheapness of the overflowing home market spilling itself in sur- 
plus into all the world, relieves him from an existence of mere animal slavery to the common 
needs of life. Thus the manufacturer and capitalist seeking a home here finds his interests 
and the safety and well-being of society resting upon a sound, secure basis of well-condi- 
tioned labor. Class distinctions are not more numerous or sharply defined than in other 
northern or eastern cities. The absolute rectitude which is the truest charity, and which, if 
practiced, would render half the so-called charities unnecessary, has noticeably been shown 
by the employers to the employed, and mutual esteem and true manliness are the outcome 
of such relations as are maintained between the so-called different classes in the City of 
Portsmouth. 

The excellent system of public schools which Portsmouth has long fostered with especial 
solicitude, the inestimable benefits of the religious privileges afforded by her many churches 
where each may find a congenial church-home, and the advantages of the most enlightened 
social circles in the United States ; all these attractions in a setting of healthful climate 
and sanitary local influences, together with the oft-quoted business prospects and opportuni- 
ties of the city, make it a residence suited to the varied requirements of the multitudinous 
types of men and women in whose lives and aspirations there is ever an undertone of 
"home, sweet home." 

Portsmouth contains a steady population of prosperous people, and, they do not take 
kindly to "booms" and sudden increase of wealth, they escape panics, and many other 
demoralizing business escapodes. The population in 1880 was 9,690, which will now reach 
probably 12,000, while the character, reliability, and influence, is that of a city of over 
twenty thousand. 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH 



The Portsmouth Shoe Co., Manufact- 
urers of Ladies' and Misses' Boots and Shoes, 
No. 105 Bedford Street, near Shoe & Leather 
Exchange, Boston, Mass. Factory. Ports- 
mouth, N. H. One of the largest and finest 
establishments devoted to this branch of in- 
dustry in the New England States, is that of 
the Portsmouth Shoe Company. Established 
at a comparatively recent date, it has taken 
front rank in its line of trade, and in facilities 
for production, excellence of equipment, and 
successful management, it challenges compar- 
ison with its oldest and most formidable com- 
petitors in any part of the country. This com- 
pany manufactures ladies' and misses' boots 
and" shoes exclusively. It was incorporated 
July 1, 1886, under the laws of the State of 
Xew Hampshire, with a cash capital of $75,- 
000, and has the following board of officers, 
viz: President, Hon. Frank Jones; vice-presi- 
dent, Charles P. Berry; treasurer, C. H. Meu- 
dum: directors: Frank Jones, C. H. Mendum, 
Charles A. Sinclair, Charles P. Berry, and Calvin 
Page. The plant of the company comprises a 
six-story brick building, 285 x 50 feet in di- 
mensions, with an engine house in connection, 
measuring 75 x 155 feet. It is equipped with 
a one hundred horse-power engine, and every 
modern facility known to the trade is at com- 
mand, including two elevators connecting the 
several floors, modern improved machinery, 
and every requisite tool and appliance for 
labor-saving purposes, and for rapid and per- 
fect production. The establishment is divided 
into numerous departments, each complete 
within itself, such as sole-cutting, crimping, 
stitching, fitting, treeing, finishing, buttoning, 
packing and shipping, besides separate depart- 
ments for the manufacture of all the wood and 
paper boxes used by the company for their 
goods, and steady employment is furnished to 
ftve hundred skilful operatives, whose weekly 
wages amount to $6,000. This factory has the 
capacity for producing one hundred cases of 
shoes, sixty pairs in each case, per day. The 
goods manufactured are machine-sewed en- 
tirely, and include both tine and medium 



grades, suitable for the Western and Southern 
trade, throughout which extensive territory 
this company has already established a large, 
first-class and steadily increasing trade, ob- 
tained purely on the merits of its output, the 
result of unremitting care and close personal 
attention on the part of the management, the 
purchase of the best raw material, the employ- 
ment of the best known methods at every 
stage of production, and sparing nothing in 
expense or labor that will raise the standard 
and enhance the value of the goods. The 
facilities of the concern for filling orders are 
absolutely unsurpassed by any rival house in 
the country and equalled by very few, if any, 
in the New England States. A nappy combi- 
nation of capital and brains has brought about 
a condition of affairs that may justly be termed 
a perfect success. The financial backing of 
Hon. Frank Jones, and the practical experi- 
ence and trained hand of Mr. Charles P. Berry 
at the helm, could not result otherwise to an 
enterprise thus favored and managed. Mr. 
Berry, the vice-president of the company, is 
the manager of the business and is eminently 
fitted for success in that position. He has 
been closely identified with the shoe trade for 
the past twenty-five years, is thoroughly in- 
formed as to all its requirements and demands, 
and, besides bringing to bear his valuable 
practical experience in the management, has 
also brought to the house a patronage that 
places it on a solid basis and assures its per- 
manent success and increasing prosperity. He 
is aided materially in the conduct of affairs by 
Col. Charles A. Sinclair, prominently known 
as a successful financier and capitalist, who 
takes a personal interest in the success of this 
as one among the many great enterprises with 
which he is identified. Pre-eminent in its 
own particular line of manufacture, and con- 
ducted with enterprise, judgment and liberal- 
ity. The Portsmouth Shoe Company may well 
be regarded as one of the foremost industrial 
institutions of the country, and as justly en- 
titled to the respect and consideration in the 
trade which it so largely enjoys. 



41 



42 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Granite State Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, National Block, Congress Street. The 
Granite State Fire Insurance Company, lo- 
cated here, was incorporated July 17, 1885, 
and commenced business on the 12th of No- 
vember in the same year. The Company 
writes insurance upon all classes of property, 
including dwellings, stores, stocks and mer- 
chandise. The affairs of the Company are 
most zealously guarded by an efficient board 
of officers, composed of the following well- 
known gentlemen, viz.: President, Frank 
Jones; vice-president, John W. Sanborn ; 
secretary, Alfred F. Howard; treasurer, John 
Laighton; assistant secretary, C. H. Wilkins. 
Conservatism rather than haste, carefulness 
rather than impulsiveness, final profit rather 
than present volume of business, are the lead- 
ing mottoes of their insurance creed, and a 
conscientious adherence to them is securing 
for these gentlemen the reputation of being 
among the successful managers of the country, 
and is winning the confidence of all who are 
brought into business relations with this cor- 
poration. The present strength of the Granite 
State is best shown by the annual statement 
made January 1, 1887, is as follows, viz: 



Cash Capital, 
Reserve for Reinsurance, 
All other Liabilities, 
Net Surplus, 



$200,000.00 

101,946.69 

. 24,553.98 

16,024.36 



Assets. 



$342,535.03 



ASSETS : 

MARKET VALUE. 

United States Registered Bonds, 4 per 

cent, 1907, .... $201,96000 

Carroll County, N. H., Bonds, 6 per cent, 

1891, 20000 

Fort Plain, N. Y. Water Co. 1st Mort. 

Bonds, 6 per cent. 1905, . . 10,50000 

New Hampshire Trust Co. Debenture 

Bonds, 6 per cent, 1906, . . . 15,000 00 

Eastern Railroad Bonds, 6 per cent, 1906, . 12,700 00 

New York & New England Railroad, 

Bonds, 7 per cent, 1905, . . . 12,500 00 

Colorado State Warrants, . . . 12,078 44 

Lake National Bank of Wolfboro, N. H., 

54 shares stock, .... 5,670 00 

Dover Gas Light Co. of Dover, N. H., 

100 shares stock, .... 3,000 00 

Worcester, Nashua & Rochester Railroad, 

1 share stock, .... 134 00 

Loan on Mortgage of Real Estate valued at 

$20,000, 9,00000 

Net Premiums in course of collection, . 26,190 17 

Interest accrued not included in market 

values, . . i , . . . 1,589 17 

Cash in Company's office, . . . 6,153 63 

Cash on deposit in New Hampshire Nat'l 

Bank of Portsmouth, . . . 25,849 62 

Total Assets, 

LIABILITIES: 

Unpaid Losses, .... 

Reserve for Reinsurance, 
Due Agents for Commissions and return pre- 
miums, ..... 

All liabilities, other than Capital stock, 
Capital stock, .... 

Net Surplus over all liabilities, . . 



$342,52503 

$ 19,504 90 
101,946 69 

5,04908 



126,500 67 

200,00000 

16,02436 



Surplus as regards Policy Holders. 



$342,525 03 
$216,024 36 



The Company occupies a fine suite of offices 
in the National Block on Congress Street, em- 
ploys a large corps of clerks, and some two 
hundred and fifty agents in different parts of 
the country, and is building up a patronage 



co-extensive with the Union. Hon. Frank 
Jones, the president, is too well known as 
merchant, manufacturer, Congressman and cap- 
italist, and too prominently identified with the 
growth and prosperity of this community, to 
need any eulogy here. His name is a tower of 
strength to this enterprise, and his coadjutors, 
Messrs. Sanborn, Howard and Laighton, are 
all eminently fitted to successfully administer 
the duties of their respective positions and are 
counted as Portsmouth's leading citizens. 

Frank Jones' Brewery. The opinion 
once prevailed among certain classes of the 
community that first class ale and porter could 
not be brewed in America. The energy and 
persevering industry of American brewers has 
entirely destroyed this senseless idea by pro- 
ducing ale and porter which, for quality and 
purity, are fully equal, if not superior, to that 
brewed by Bass or Guinness in Great Britain 
and Ireland. The best ale on this continent is 
made at the brewery of the Hon. Frank 
Jones, in Portsmouth. So say the best judges, 
and the majority of those who are lovers of 
the beverage in this country unite in proclaim- 
ing the fact. The first license granted in 
Portsmouth to brew and sell '* beare " was to 
Samuel Wentworth, in 1670, who built the 
first Wentworth House. In 1854 John Swin- 
dels, an English brewer, established a public 
brewery in Portsmouth, and continued the 
business alone until 1858, when Mr. Frank 
Jones took an interest in the brewery and 
operated ! the same for a few years c under 
the name of Swindels & Co. He soon be- 
came the sole proprietor, and quickly in- 
augurated those improvements and reforms 
in the methods and processes of manufact- 
ure that have resulted in brilliant success. 
Of the ancient structure in which Mr. Jones 
commenced in 1858 not a vestige remains. 
His present brewery, two malt houses, cooper- 
age, stores, stables and other business prem- 
ises, cover an area of over five acres. They 
are mammoth brick structures near the main 
line of the Eastern Railroad at the west end of 
the city. The brewery is capable of producing 
250,000 barrels annually, while new additions 
are in course of construction which will 
materially increase the capacity. Their total 
malting capacity is 375,000 bushels, and the 
malt houses two in number are provided with 
every modern appliance for steeping, growing 
and kiln-drying, and for storing barley and 
malt. The present brewery was built in 1871, 
and contains everything that skill and experi- 
ence has taught is useful and valuable in the 
business. From the malt mill to mash tun, 
steam kettle, underback, settling square-Ban- 
delot fermenting rooms, to racking tuns, 
everything shows the greatest cleanliness, 
strictest vigilance and constant care. The 
best malt and hops that can be purchased are 
utilized, and these are handled in such a scien- 
tific and successful manner as to result in the 
production of ale and porter that for purity, 
flavor and health-giving properties is unex- 
celled in this or any other country. An in- 
ferior grade of ale or porter is never permitted 
to pass the outer gates of this establishment, 
and the popularity of the output is steadily 
maintained and increased with retailers, fami- 
lies and general public. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



43 



The " Rockiiigliam." The " Rocking- 1 
ham" stands upon the site of the old Langdon 
House, the home of Woodbury Langdon, 
which was burned in the great tire which dev- 
astated Portsmouth in 1781. The elegance of 
the house is such as to impress the stranger at 
the first glance as a superb structure and a 
perfect hotel in all respects. The style of 
architecture is massive in its proportions, and 
imposing in its symmetry and stately grace. 
Its wide open doors reveal a princely home and 
disclose a cordial welcome. It was opened to 
the public February 3, 188(5, having been 
erected by the proprietor, Hon. Frank Jones, 
on the ruins of the hotel of the same name, 
which was burned in September, 1884, and 
which had stood for one hundred and two 
years. Had Mr. Jones done nothing else for 
the credit of Portsmouth than to erect this 
magnificent hotel, he would still have earned 
the gratitude of every citizen. The building 
is of brick and free stone, five stories high, 
with a frontage of upwards of one hundred 
feet, and has first-class accomodations for 
some two hundred guests. It has two covered 
entrances in front, each of which is guarded by 
two bronzed lions. On the first floor are vari- 
ous public rooms, including the office, ladies- 
reception parlor, gentlemen's reading room, 
and the dining room, with kitchen, pantry and 
storeroom in the ell on the same floor. The 
office is elegantly appointed, with marble 
floors, panel ceiling, solid mahogany wainscot- 
ing and marble counters. The reading room 
isslendidly furnished for the comfort of guests, 
and contains a magnificent portrait of the pro- 
prietor facing the door. This floor also con- 
tains the old banquet hall, which was preserved 
nearly intact from the ravages of the fire, and 
is a marvel of antique decoration and old-time 
splendor in its fixtures and fittings. The din- 
ing room has a seating capacity for one hun- 
dred and seven persons. The wainscoting of 
the two first floors is of solid mahogany. The 
bridal chambers on the second floor are models 
of elegance and taste, comprising two cham- 
bers capable of being transformed into one 
apartment, and which are richly furnished, 
decorated by skilled artists, and worthy of 
special remembrance by every visitor. The 
house is heated throughout by steam, lighted 
by electricity, and is provided with electric fire 
alarms in each hall. No luxury afforded in 
situation, surroundings, cuisine or modern 
conveniences in any hotel is lacking in the 
Rockingham. It is alike convenient to the 
permanent patron, the commercial tourist, and 
the transient guest. The menu of the house is 
especially worthy of commendation, being un- 
der the supervision of experienced chefs, and 
is kept up to the highest standard of excellence. 
The house is supplied with a passenger ele- 
vator, a bar, barber shop, billiard hall, bath 
rooms, laundry, and electric call-bells commu- 
nicating with the office. Every necessity of 
modern hotel life is furnished for the welfare 
and comfort of guests, and the management is 
distinguished for accuracy, precision and fore- 
thought in attending to every want. 

John H. Broughton, Wholesale and 
Retail Dealer in Lumber, Lime and Cement, 
Ground and Calcined Plaster: also Commission 
Merchant, Xo. 68 Daniel Street. A feature of 



Portsmouth's industries especially worthy of 
mention is the trade in lumber and builders' 
materials; and this is represented by many 
large and enterprising houses, chief among 
which is that of Mr. John H. Broughtou, one 
of the oldest and best known business men in 
this line in the city. This concern had its or- 
igin in 1S41. when it was founded by Samuel 
Adams & Co., of which firm Mr. John H. 
Broughton became a member in 1845. In 1881, 
this gentleman became the sole proprietor, and 
the business has continued to increase under 
his assiduous care. His business premises are 
spacious, and have a water front of 300 feet. 
The best facilities and appliances are provided 
for the economical handling of stock and the 
prompt fulfilment of all orders. A specialty is 
made of handling lumber, in cargo lots, and lime, 
cement, ground and calcined plaster, slate, etc., 
in both large and small quantities. Lumber is 
supplied rough or dressed, and in any form or 
dimensions desired. Besides filling orders for 
lumber from the stock on hand. Mr. Broughton 
makes shipments direct from the mills; and in 
all departments of the business his facilities 
are unsurpassed by those of any of his com- 
peers. An ample force of hands are employed 
and also a number of teams, and the trade is 
extensive both in the city and surrounding dis- 
tricts. Mr. Broughton also conducts a general 
commission business, and receives consign- 
ments of cargoes of all kinds of merchandise 
for sale on commission. He also takes charge 
of goods on behalf of parties shipping to this 
port, and all matters appertaining thereto are 
given prompt and careful attention. Orders for 
Bangor slate are also immediately attended to. 
Mr. Broughton is a native of Xew Hampshire, 
an enterprising, substantial business man, and 
a director of the First National Bank. 



J. C. Carr, Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. \o. 
34 Market Street. One of the old established 
business houses of Portsmouth is that so suc- 
cessfully conducted by Mr. J. C. Carr. and 
which was founded in 1820, by Elisha C. Crane, 
and who was succeeded in is:;.") by Messis. 
Hill & Carr. The junior member, Mr. James 
M. Carr, became the sole proprietor in 1>7<>. 
and conducted the business until his death in 
1885. when the present proprietor took posses 
sion. The store is spacious in size, attractive 
in all its arrangements and appointments, and 
well-stocked at all times with new and desir- 
able goods. The stock comprises a full and 
complete line of boots, shoes, rubbers and 
slippers, for ladies, gentlemen, misses, youth, 
boys and children, in all sizes and grades, 
including French and Dongola kid, straight 
and pebbled goat all in variety to suit the 
tastes and the means of all classes of buyers. 
These goods are received direct from the best 
manufacturers in the country, and are sold at 
prices which defy successful competition. 
The proprietor is also prepared to execute fine 
custom work of all kinds, employing the best 
of skilled labor, and guaranteeing prompt 
service and perfect satisfaction. He has in 
his employ Mr. James F. Hartshorn, who was 
foreman for Elisha C. Crane in this business 
fifty-two years ago, and who is still hale and 
hearty. Mr. Carr is a native of Danvers, Mass., 
and a practical shoemaker of large experience 
and established reputation. 



44 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



W. J. Sampson & Co., Painters and Paper 
Hangers, Dealers in Wall Papers, Curtains, 
Paints, and Artist's Materials, Nos. 10 and 12 
Daniel Street. This firm are extensive dealers 
in wall papers, curtains, paints and artists' 
materials, and carry one of the largest stocks 
of these goods to be found east of the city of 
Boston, while the name of the house is be- 
coming known throughout all this section of 
the country as synonymous with all that has 
been achieved in the art of interior decorations, 
which is made the leading specialty of the busi- 
ness. The warerooms embrace three floor 
25 x 40 feet each, which will be materially 
increased in size the coming season to meet 
the great and growing demands of the trade. 
The growth of the house since its estab- 
lishment, October 15, 1885, has been in keeping 
with the increasing demand for the finest 
decorative effects, and for that discriminating 
selection of the most perfect types of material 
and pattern that human skill and taste have 
been able to devise. The combination of these 
effects is most happily illustrated by that pop- 
ular production known as " Lincrusta Wal- 
ton," which is a specialty with this house. It 
is about as thick as leather, equally tough and 
durable, and has upon its surface a beautiful 
design in relief, as sharp in contour as a high- 
class carving. It is waterproof and a non-ab- 
sorbent, protecting the inmates and furniture 
of a room from damp walls and all external 
moisture. The styles represented here are so 
various that the decorator and house-owner 
can please their taste at once; they include Re- 
naissance, Egyptian, Moorish, Celtic, Floren- 
tine, Japanese, Greek, Byzantine, Eastlake, 
mediaeval and modern. Mouldings of every 
description are also furnished to match all wall 
papers. Plans and estimates for this class of de- 
coration are promptly furnished, and curtains, 
fixtures, drapery poles, paints, varnishes and 
oils are supplied, and curtains made to order. 
This firm are enjoying a large and influential 
patronage in this city and throughout the states 
of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 
They have executed orders for decorating the 
residences of Mr. Gignoux, Hon. W. H. Hack- 
ett, Chief Engineer Macomb, Hon. Frank 
Jones, Ex-Sheriff Kent, the Wentworth Man- 
sion, the Wadleigh house, the residence of 
Arthur Walker, and others in this city, which 
have been accomplished in the highest style of 
the art, and serve to recommend the firm to 
popular favor and public patronage. Twenty- 
five skilled artisans, painters and decorators 
are constantly employed, and unequalled 
facilities are possessed for the prompt and 
perfect fulfilment of all orders. The members 
of the firm are Messrs. W. J. Sampson, Her- 
man Manson and J. H. Gardiner, the senior 
partner being a native of New York City, the 
other members, of Portsmouth. Mr. Sampson 
has been a practical painter and decorator for 
many years, and has entire charge of that de- 
partment of the business. Mr. Manson attends 
to the paper hanging, and Mr. Gardiner to the 
management of the store. 

C. E. Boynton, Manufacturer of. and 
Wholesale Dealer in, Soda and Mineral Water, 
etc., No. 18 Bow Street. The manufacture of 
various kinds of aerated waters, and the bot- 
tling ol lager beer, ale and cider, has of late 



years become a large and important commer- 
cial pursuit. Portsmouth is well represented 
in this pursuit, and a few brief facts concerning 
one of the leading houses in the trade cannot 
but prove of general interest. We refer to that 
of Mr. C. E. Boynton, which is one of the old- 
est and most extensive establishments in its 
line in the city. It was founded in 1872, and 
has always commanded a very liberal and sub- 
stantial patronage. The premises occupied for 
the business consist of a building containing 
three floors and basement, and 20 x 40 feet 
in dimensions. These are equipped with all 
necessary appliances, including the latest im- 
proved generators, bottling machinery, etc., 
and employment is furnished to ten men and 
three teams in the several occupations of the 
business. The house manufactures soda and 
mineral water, tonic, strawberry, ginger and 
lemon beer, extract of nerve food for brain and 
nervous exhaustion and a good appetizer, crab 
apple and blood orange tonic, etc. Soda water 
is supplied in syphons for hotel and family use, 
and fountains are charged at short notice. Mr. 
Boynton also bottles for the trade the cele- 
brated Eldredge and Milwaukee lager beer, 
porter and refined cider. The business is en- 
tirely wholesale and the sales beyond Ports- 
mouth are chiefly in York, Rye and Hampton 
beaches, etc. The products of this house are 
in high favor with both dealers and consumers, 
and the business is consequently constantly in- 
creasing. Mr. Boynton is a gentleman of long 
practical experience in the business. He is a 
native of Temple, N. H., and an old resident in 
Portsmouth, where he is very popular. 



Rider &, Cotton, Iron and Steel, Ship 
Chandlery, Hardware, Paints, Oils, Colors, etc., 
No. 65 Market Street. A leading headquarters 
in this line in Portsmouth, is the establish- 
ment of Messrs. Rider & Cotton, at No. 65 
Market Street. This firm are M 7 ell and widely 
known as extensive dealers in iron and steel, 
ship chandlery, hardware, paints, oils, colors, 
etc. The house was founded some sixty years 
ago, and has been under the successful man- 
agement of the present proprietors since 1>7_. 
The premises occupied for trade purposes com- 
prise six floors, 40 x 130 feet each, which are in 
every way well adapted for the large and active 
business which is annually transacted. The 
ship owner, the builder, the mechanic, the 
housekeeper and the farmer are all supplied at 
this establishment with the necessities of 
every-day life, and at prices which are so fair 
and reasonable as to preclude successful com- 
petition. These goods are purchased direct 
from manufacturers of the highest repute, and 
special attention is given to the character and 
quality of the productions, the aim being not 
only to meet every want, but to offer the best 
in every case that the markets afford. Their 
trade is large, first class and influential through- 
out the city and surrounding country. The 
members of the firm are Messrs. T. H. Ryder, 
and W. W. Cotton, both of whom arc natives of 
this city. Mr. Ryder is a Justice of the Peace 
and Notary Public, and Mr. Cotton is a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education, and warden of 
South Parish Unitarian Church. They are 
gentlemen of ability, enterprise and integrity, 
with whom it is always a pleasure to deal. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



45 



First National Bank, United States De- 
pository, Pleasant Street, Market Square. 
This bank was chartered originally under the 
name of the Piscataqua Bank in 1824. In 1845 
it became known as the Piscataqua Exchange 
Bank, and was reorganized under the national 
banking laws as the Frst National Bank in 
1803, standing No. 1 on the secretary of the 
treasury's books, and as No. 19 in the comp- 
troller's department. Its new charter in 1882 
ranks as No. 2672. It has a capital stock of 
$300,000, a present surplus of $100.000, and 
is officered as follows, viz. : President, E. P. 
Kimball; cashier, C. A. Hazlett: directors: 
W. L. Dwight, E. P. Kimball, W. H. Hackett, 
E. H. Winchester, J. H. Broughton, K. C. 
Pierce, M. P. Stacy. The banking rooms of 
the institution on Pleasant Street, are spacious 
and elegantly appointed, affording ample ac- 
comodation to the public, and possessing every 
convenience for facilitating the dispatch of 
business. A general banking business is trans- 
acted, including the receiving of deposits, the 
discounting of approved commercial paper, 
the collection of drafts, and the dealing in all 
first-class securities. This is not only one of 
the oldest banks in Portsmouth but also one 
of the best managed and most liberally patro- 
nized. From the outset it has retained the 
confidence of the public in a marked degree. 
Its founders were men who had the rare fore- 
sight to recognize the possibilities of such an 
institution, and who laid the foundations 
sufficiently strong and deep to bear any super- 
structure that time, experience and wealth 
might rear. All its movements are marked by 
prudence, caution and honorable business 
methods, and.it is generally recognized as one of 
those solid, ably conducted institutions which 
reflect credit alike upon its officers and the 
community where its influence is felt. Its 
executive officers are gentlemen with whom it 
is always a pleasure to do business. Prompt, 
obliging and efficient in all their dealings with 
the public, they are naturally popular, and 
maintain the prestige of the bank with dignity, 
reliability and success. The president. Mr. 
Kimball, is amative of 4 Merrimac County, N. H., 
in the prime of life, and of high reputation and 
standing iji business and financial circles. 
The cashier, Mr. Hazlett, is a Portsmouth 
man, born and bred, and of tried ability as a 
tinancier, while the board of directors com- 
prises much of the solid business element of 
the city. 

Frank W. Moses, Dealer in Pianos, Or- 
gans. Music, Stationery, Holiday Goods, etc. 
A prominent and most popular business es- 
tablishment in this city is that conducted by 
Mr. Frank W. Moses, who is one of the. most 
enterprising and progressive of Portsmouth's 
merchants. Mr. Moses founded his business 
in May, 1886, bringing to bear in his manage- 
ment push and ability, and from the outset his 
efforts were rewarded with substantial public 
recognition. He has built up a very extensive, 
influential patronage and has a trade derived 
from various sections of Maine and this State. 
The spacious premises occupied comprise a 
salesroom having dimensions of 25 x 75 feet, 
and an adjoining room devoted to art purposes. 
The stock carried is large and comprehensive 
;and embraces pianos, organs, music, leather 



goods, blank books, fine stationery, and holi- 
day goods, a specialty being made of the latter 
in their seasons, but Mr. Moses holds the agency 
for the Hardman, Guild, Sohmer, Hazleton & 
Naersby and Evans pianos, and Dyer & Hughes 
organs, keeping on hand at all times a sample 
stock of these fine instruments, which he sells 
both for spot cash and on the instalment plan. 
He makes a specialty of offering bargains, in 
pianos and organs, and also does a considerable 
business in renting pianos to beach houses 
during the summer season. The room devoted 
to the display of art goods is filled with a su- 
perb collection of engravings, photographs, 
oil paintings, water color paintings, and photo- 
gravures, all of which are well worthy of in- 
spection. Picture frames are made to order in 
any desired style. Piano tuning is also execut- 
ed at reasonable prices. A large, constantly 
growing patronage is enjoyed, and the estab- 
lishment occupies a very popular place in the 
public favor. Mr. Moses is a native of this 
city, and has ever taken an active interest 
in its welfare. He is a member of the Ports- 
mouth Athletic Club, and is esteemed in both 
social and business circles. 



Webster House, A. H. Webster, Proprie- 
tress, Mr. Hennesey, Manager. The visitor 
who comes to Portsmouth, whether on business 
or pleasure bent, and who desires a first-class 
hostelry to put up at during his sojourn here, 
will find an excellent place with all home com- 
forts and hotel conveniences in the Webster 
House, centrally located at the corner of 
Vaughan and Congress streets. This popular 
house was first opened in May, 1882, by the 
present pi-oprietress, Mrs. A. H. Webster, a lady 
well and favorably known to the public. Her 
enterprise found immediate appreciation and 
has been a decided success from the outset. 
The building is spacious, being three stories 
in height and of ample proportions. The in- 
terior arrangements are perfect in every re- 
spect, being well lighted, ventilated, and fur- 
nished throughout in the most modern im- 
proved style. There are accommodations for 
fifty guests, the service being complete for 
the reception and care of that number. The 
sleeping apartments are comfortably fitted up, 
are airy and models of cleanliness, and are 
always kept well supplied with fresh beds and 
bedding. Among the other conveniences are 
fine bath rooms, barber shop, and a well-kept 
bar, well stocked with choice wines and liquors. 
The table is always kept plentifully furnished 
with all the luxuries of the season, every- 
thing purchased being the best the market 
affords. In short, everything that thought 
could suggest is at the command of guests at 
the Webster. The terms are but two dollars 
per day, and special rates are made for the- 
atrical companies and commercial travellers. 
The manager of the house, Mr. Hennesey, who 
was for several years in " The Rockingham, " 
is a favorite with the travelling public, and 
possesses the faculty of making permanent 
friends of all with whom he comes in contact. 
He is thoroughly conversant with the best 
methods of hotel management, conducts all 
his transactions in a systematic way, and all 
persons stopping at the Webster when in town 
will find him a most agreeable gentleman with 
whom to have dealings. 



46 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 




Portsmouth Machine Co., Hill and 
Pearl Streets. Portsmouth Machine Company 
was organized by some of the foremost citi- 
zens of Portsmouth for the purpose of supply- 
ing the requirements of manufacturers in this 
direction of trade. The company was in- 
corporated June 4, 1883, with a capital of 
$128,000, and with the following board of offi- 
cers and directors, viz. : President, Hon. Frank 
Jones; treasurer and manager, J. A. Farring- 
ton; directors: Frank Jones, C. H. Mendum. 
Wm. Ward, M. Eldredge, E. H. Winchester, E. 
8. Fay, B. F. Webster, J. A. Farrington, and 0. 
M. Gignoux. The works are very extensive 
and complete, comprising a four story brick 
building, 204 x 70 feet in dimensions, with 
two ells, 100 x 30 feet each, and are fully 
equipped with all the latest improved machin- 
ery, tools and appliances requisite for the sys- 
tematic and successful conduct of the business. 
The company are extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of machinery, shafting, pulleys, 
bolts; rivets and castings of every description, 
and are producing a class of work that is un- 
rivalled for quality, durability and finish. The 
castings of this company are unsurpassed for 
smoothness and quality of metal, and can al- 
ways be implicitly relied upon. The methods 
of manufacture that obtain with this company 
are of the most enterprising, progressive and 
trustworthy character, and the aim of the 
management is to excel at every step in the 
production of these supplies. The best possi- 
ble facilities are possessed for the procurement 
of raw material, none but skilled and expert 
workmen are employed, and every detail of 
the business is under the watchful eye and 
trained hand of the superintendent, Mr. Far- 
rington, whose large practical experience as a 
machinist and manufacturer renders him a 
complete master of every branch of the trade 



and insures accuracy and success in every stage 
of production. Under such favorable auspices 
the trade of the company is naturally increas- 
ing in both magnitude and importance, while 
the prices that are quoted are, as a rule, below 
those of other first-class houses. Manufact- 
urers and corporations requiring these supplies 
oannot do better than place their orders with 
this reliable establishment, where they will ob- 
tain advantages difficult to be secured else- 
where. Hon. Frank Jones, the president of 
this company, takes a personal interest in the 
welfare and success of this enterprise, and his 
name is a tower of strength to any undertak- 
ing. The clerk, Mr. Hackett, is another gen- 
tleman of commanding influence connected 
with .this corporation. He is clerk and commis- 
sioner of the United States circuit court, 
United States Chief Supervisor of elections in 
New Hampshire, commissioner to take testi- 
mony in the United States Court of Claims, 
and Commissioner of Deeds for other statts. 
The board of directors include many of the 
solid business men of the city, and are in them- 
sselve a sufficient guarantee of the reliability 
and future success of this industry. 

Blaisdc!l' Stove Store, Stoves, Ranges. 
and Kitchen Furnishings, of every Description. 
Tin, Japan, Britannia. Wooden and (ilass 
Ware, Farming Tools, Grass Seeds, etc., Xos. 
55 and 57 Market Street. A record of un- 
broken prosperity extending over a period of 
forty^odd years marks the history of the well 
and favorably known establishment whose 
name stands at the head of this sketch, and 
which since its inception has maintained an en- 
during hold on popular favor and confidence, 
well deserved, while the house fully sustains 
to-day its old-time 'reputation for reliable 
goods and honorable dealing; purchasers and 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



4T 



patrons being always assured of excellent 
value, first-class work and satisfactory treat- 
ment in this well-ordered emporium, which is 
one of the leading, largest and best equipped 
general house furnishing, stove and agricult- 
ural specialty stores in Portsmouth, as Avell 
as the oldest. This house was founded in 1848 
by Uriah Blaisdell (deceased), who conducted 
it up to 1883, when, owing to his death which 
occurred at this period, the business passed 
into the control of his son George Blaisdell, 
under whose capable and efficient management 
the same has since been continued with unin- 
terrupted success for the estate of the late 
proprietor and founder. The premises occu- 
pied for business purposes comprise six 20 x 
50 foot floors including store, shop and ware- 
house, and a vast and varied assortment is 
constantly carried, embracing a full and fine 
line of stoves, ranges and heaters of every de- 
scription, tin and sheet-iron ware of all kinds, 
.Japanned goods. Britannia, plated wooden 
ware, cutlery, glass ware, and household 
specialties in great variety, refrigerators, 
clothes wringers, kitchen utensils, farming 
and garden tools, grass seeds and kindred 
products. Several expert workmen are em- 
ployed and tin, sheet-iron and copper work of 
every variety is executed in the most superior 
and expeditious manner, and at very reasonable 
rates; particular attention also being given to 
repairing and general jobbing, while tin roof- 
ing, guttering etc., is a specialty, and alto- 
gather a large and flourishing business is 
carried on, the trade extending throughout 
the city and entire surrounding country. 

John S. Tilton, Manufacturer of. and 
Dealer in. Saddles, Harness, Whips, Collars, 
Bridles, Halters, Brushes, Combs, etc.. Xo. is 
Congress Street. At the well and favorably 
known establishment of John S. Tilton, manu- 
facturer of. and dealer in, saddles, harness, 
collars, bridles, etc., can always he found 
an extensive and elegant assortment of goods 
at the lowest prices consistent with ex- 
cellent values and upright dealing; while the 
custom work turned out here is A 1 in every 
feature of merit. in design, workmanship. 
linish and material, no store in this line in 
Portsmouth maintaining a higher reputation, 
as few if any receive a larger measure of pop- 
ular favor. This business was established in 
iMis. and from the inception of the enterprise 
down to the present day, Mr. Tilton has en- 
joyed a ilattering patronage, the general ex- 
cellence and reliability of the goods made and 
handled, coupled with close attention to the 
wants of customers, being the special features 
contributing to the success. The premises, 
including office, store and shop, occupy a 
20 x 100 foot floor, well ordered and equipped 
in every respect., and a competent force of ex- 
pert hands are employed, all orders receiving 
prompt and satisfactory attention. A full and 
fine stock is carried, embracing saddles and 
harness in every style and variety, collars and 
bridles, halters, whips, brushes, combs, oils, 
blankets, fly-nets, etc.. being agency also for 
the national harness oil, boot and shoe oil and 
harness and carriage top dressings, sold in 
pints, quarts and gallons, while repairing of 
every description likewise is executed in the 
most superior and expeditious manner. Mr. 



I Tilton, who is a native of this State, is a gen- 
tleman of middle age, and has served with credit 
I in the City Council, while his industry is an 
I important factor in this city's trade. 

M. C. Foye, Fancy Goods, Material for 
Art Xeedle Work, Stamping, etc., No. 23 Mar- 
ket Street. Among the mercantile establish- 
ments in Portsmouth may be mentioned that 
of M. C. Foye. dealer in material for ait needle 
work, embroidery, fancy goods and novelties 
in ladies' wear, eligibly located at No. 23 Mar- 
ket Street, and which is one of the centres of 
interest in the city for the female portion of 
the community owing to the exceedingly fine 
assortment of goods always displayed 'here. 
This store was established in 1878 and at its 
very inception may be said to have virtually 
bounded into public favor and prosperity, the 
patronage growing rapidly from the start, until 
now it is of a very substantial and influential 
character. The store, which is ample and 
compact, is tastefully fitted up and appointed 

j a superb display being made and a large 
and varied stock is constantly carried, embrac- 
ing a complete and exquisite line of material 
for art needle work, rich laces and embroidery, 
elegant dress trimmings of every description, 
novelties in neckwear, notions, small wares and 
fancy articles in great variety, and a full and 
fine assortment of ladies' furnishings; material 
for art needle work and stamping being 
specialties, while half a dozen courteous and 
efficient clerks attend to the wants of custo- 
mers, no pains being spared to render the ut- 
most satisfaction in every instance to patrons, 
and altogether an extensive and gratifying- 
trade is done, the patronage reaching all over 
the city and surrounding country. Mr. Foye 
is a native of Kye, this State, but a respected 
roident of Portsmouth many years, and a 

j gentleman of push, enterprise and business 
qualities. 



James R. Council, Watchmaker and Jew 
eller, No. 5 Congress Street. The business of 
this establishment was originally founded some 
sixty years ago by Mr. Robert Gray, and sub- 
sequently passed into the hands of various par- 
ties. In 1880 Mr. Council succeeded to the 
proprietorship, having been some ten years 
previously a member of the firm of Hutchin- 
son ct Council, bringing to bear upon the en- 
terprise a thorough practical experience as a 
fully trained jeweller, and under his expert 
management the house has reached a degree 
of popularity and prosperity greater than it 
had ever before attained to. The amply com- 
modious store occupied is tasteful in all its ap- 
pointments, and contains a fine, attractively 
displayed stock of goods, the assortment com- 
prising a superb showing in gold and silver 
American watches in all the leading makes; 
clocks of all kinds, optical goods, solid silver 
and plated ware, and jewellery of every descrip- 
tion, comprising all the newest novelties. 
Three expert assistants are employed and a 
leading specialty is made of the mechanical 
department, repairing of all kinds being exe- 
cuted in the most workmanlike manner at rea- 
sonable charges. Mr. Council is a native of 
Vermont, is highly regarded in this community 
for his mechanical skill, industry and business 
integrity. 



48 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



John P. Sweetser, Kitchen Furnishings, 
Stoves, Ranges and Furnaces. Plumbing, Gas 
Piping and Tin Roofing. No. 46 Market 
Street. Perhaps not in any branch of trade 
lias the march of progress wrought such a ver- 
itable revolution during the past quarter of a 
century in this country as in that devoted to 
the production and sale of stoves, kindred de- 
vices and house furnishing specialties. What 
with invention, improvement and the develop- 
ment of mechanical skill, a degree of excel- 
lence closely akin to perfection has been 
reached in this direction of late years, and in 
this Connection, attention is directed to the 
commodious and well equipped emporium of 
John P. Sweetser, manufacturer of, and 
dealer in, stoves, ranges and general kitchen 
furnishings, No. 46 Market Street, where is 
always displayed a large and exceedingly fine 
assortment of everything comprehended in 
this line at the lowest prices consistent with 
first-class .goods and upright dealing, pur- 
chasers and patrons being at all times assured 
of getting an excellent article, reliable work 
and satisfactory treatment in this, the stove 
and house furnishing establishment par excel- 
lence of Portsmouth; while its patronage is 
fully commensurate with the deservedly high 
reputation this well and favorably known con- 
cern maintains. The flourishing and popular 
store was established in 1844 by E. A. Stevens, 
of the Barston Stove Co., some thirty or 
so years ago who conducted it up to 1869, 
when he was succeeded by the present pro- 
prietor, who has since carried on the business 
with uniform and gratifying success. The 
premises occupied for business purposes com- 
prise five ample floors, including spacious and 
well-ordered shop, and an extensive and very 
superior stock is constantly carried on hand, 
embracing cooking and parlor stoves of every 
size, style and variety, ranges, heaters and 
furnaces, tin, sheet-iron and copper ware, 
kitchen utensils in great variety, refrigerators 
and a multifarious assortment of household 
specialties. Twelve or more expert workmen 
are employed, and tin, copper and sheet-iron 
work is executed in the most excellent and 
expeditious manner; also plumbing and gas- 
fitting in all theirjbrancb.es, while tin roofing, 
guttering and general jobbing likewise are 
promptly attended to; and, altogether, the 
trade which extends throughout the city, sur- 
rounding country and the beaches is of a most 
substantial and influential character. Mr. 
Sweetser, who is a native of this place, well 
known and highly regarded in the community, 
is a man of push, sagacity and enterprise, as 
well as strict probity in his dealings, and fully 
merits the large measure of public favor and 
prosperity he enjoys. 



E. Percy Lawrence, Fashionable Tailor, 
No. 9 Congress Street. The merchant tailoring 
art has no more able or popular exponent in 
the city of Portsmouth than Mr. E. Percy 
Lawrence, of No. 9 Congress Street. Mr. 
Lawrence is a practical cutter of thorough ex- 
perience, understands fully every detail of his 
responsible vocation, and the garments pro- 
duced at his establishment are unsurpassed 
for artistic cut, style and finish. He founded 



his business in February, 1886, and has won a 
large, first-class patronage by the superiority 
of his goods. The attractive salesroom and 
workshop are fitted up in the most approved 
manner, every facility being at hand to aid in 
the prosecution of affairs. A staff of fourteen 
skilled hands are employed in the manufacture 
of the fine custom clothing for which the 
house is noted. A full line of domestic and 
imported fabrics is constantly kept on hand, 
the assortment embracing all the latest pat- 
terns and designs in fashionable novelties. 
All orders for clothing are executed promptly 
and carefully, and entire satisfaction is guar- 
anteed with the finished article. The prices 
charged are, in every case, fair and reasonable. 
Mr. Lawrence, who is a native of Boston, is 
well and favorably known in this section, and 
is held in popular" esteem by an extensive busi- 
ness and social acquaintance. He has reared 
a fine business and an enviable reputation, and 
is thoroughly deserving of the success that has 
attended his efforts. 



Thomas E. Call & Son, Pine, Spruce, 
and Hemlock Lumber ; also, Laths, Pickets, 
Clapboards and Shingles, No. 136 Market Street. 
The rapid growth and development of the 
lumber business in the vicinity of Portsmouth 
has been largely brought about through the 
energy and enterprise of such houses as that of 
Messrs. Thomas E. Call & Son. This house 
has long been an important factor in supply- 
ing this section with all kinds of j>ine. spruce. 
and hemlock lumber from the forests of Maine 
and New Brunswick, and as such are deserving 
of honorable mention in this review. This is 
one of the oldest and largest concerns engaged 
in the lumber trade in this part of the State. 
It was established some forty years ago, by Mr. 
Thomas E. Call, and in 1870 the present firm 
was organized by the admission to partner- 
ship of Mr. Thomas E. Call, Jr. The plant of 
the firm covers some three acres of ground, 
with a dockage of over 200 feet, and compris- 
ing yards and buildings for the manipulation 
and storage of the immense stock that is con- 
stantly carried. The yards are so situated as 
to give the firm unsurpassed facilities for 
transportation both by water and rail, and sup- 
plies are constantly received by the cargo from 
Bangor, Me., St. Johns, N. B., and other avail- 
able points in the lumbering country. The 
connections of the house arc such that all 
orders are promptly filled for all kinds of pine, 
spruce, and Hemlock lumber, and also for 
laths, pickets, clapboards and shingles. The 
policy upon which the business is conducted is 
characterized by liberality and just dealings. 
Mr. Thomas E. Call, the founder of the busi- 
ness, is a native of Portsmouth, and one of its 
most influential citizens and prominent busi- 
ness men. He has served as Representative to 
the State Legislature, as an alderman and an 
assessor of taxes, and has long been closely 
identified with the material growth and pros- 
perity of the city. Mr. Thos. E. Call, Jr., the 
junior member of the firm, was born and reared 
in this city, is known as an active, energetic 
business man, and is now filling the respon- 
sible position of Treasurer of Rockingham 
County. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



49 



Anderson & .finikin*. Carpenters and 
Builders, Shop, Commercial Alley, rear of Me- 
chanics and Traders Bank. This firm consist- 
ing of Messrs. A. C. Anderson and A. R. Juii- 
kins, was organized in 1877, the senior partner, 
Mr. Anderson, having been engaged in the bus- 
ness here for five years previous to that date. 
The comprehensive and far-reaching knowl- 
edge of every detail of the business possessed 
by this firm, together with the reliable and re- 
sponsible character of their work, has long ago 
secured for them a large and influential patron- 
age and given them a valuable and important 
position in the business community. They 
have unequalled facilities for the prompt and 
perfect fulfilment of all contracts, and are 
prepared to minister to the wants of the public 
with skill, energy and satisfaction. They fur- 
nish plans and estimates for the construction 
of all kinds of buildings, and have gained 
special praise for their success in the erection 
of private residences. Among the notable 
.specimens of their work in this city are the 
line residences of Messrs. John Sise, Herman 
T. Eldredge, Charles E. Walker, D. H. Mont- 
gomery, Charles E. Laighton and C. E. Boyn- 
ton. No less than fifty of the finest residences 
in Portsmouth have been built by this firm, 
each of which is a monument to their skill, 
taste and judgment that serves to recommend 
them at once to popular favor and public pat- 
ronage. They are prepared to do jobbing, 
repairing and remodelling of all kinds with 
promptness and success, and place their terms 
for all classes of work at a fair and equitable 
figure. They receive their lumber by the car- 
load direct from the best sources of supply, 
employ from twelve to eighteen skilled work- 
men, and are in a position to guarantee perfect 
satisfaction in all their operations. Both mem- 
bers of the firm are natives of Portsmouth, 
and thoroughly practical and accomplished 
masters of their trade. Mr. Anderson has been 
an alderman of the city for three years, a coun- 
cilman two years and president of the City 
Council one year, and is a Post Grand of the 
I. O. O. F*., a member of the Royal Arch Ma- 
sons, and active and influential in social and 
business life. Mr. Junkins is Grand Warden 
of the I. O. O. F., Senior AVarden of St. John's 
Lodge, member of K. T., and captain of the 
Patriarchs Militant, and highly esteemed by 
his fellow-men in all the relations of life, and 
has been president of the Common Council, 
and is now warden of the Christian Church 
and assistant superintendent of the Sunday- 
School. 



William C. Newton & Son, Ship Stores, 
Groceries, Flour, Meats, Vegetables, etc., Nos. 
77 and 71) Market Street. This firm has long 
been known as extensive dealers in ship stores, 
groceries, flour, meats and vegetables, butter, 
cheese, sugar, molasses, teas, coffees and spices, 
confectionery, tobacco and cigars, and country 
produce. The business was founded twenty- 
five years ago by Messrs. William C. and W. B. 
Newton. In 1886 Mr. William C. Newton died, 
since which time the business has been contin- 
ued under the old firm name by Mr. W. B. 
Newton. The premises occupied by the busi- 
ness comprise a five-story building, 30 x 50 feet 
in dimensions, which is stocked to repletion at 
all times with new, fresh and desirable goods.' 



i The stock is one of the largest and most valu- 
able in this line in the city, received fresh from 
the hands of the producer and manufacturer, 
and an extensive trade is enjoyed, not only in 
this city, but throughout ew England and the 
Provinces. The aim of the proprietors has al- 
ways been to give to each and every customer 
full value for money expended, and this is at- 
tained by their large transactions, direct pur- 
chases and low prices. A large force of hands 
are employed to meet the demands of the 
trade, and the patronage is large and influen- 
tial, both at wholesale and retail. Mr. New- 
ton is a native of Portsmouth, in the early 
prime of life, and devoted to the interests of 
his patrons.. 

John O. Dowii & Co., Fish and Meat 
Dealers, No. 37 Penhallow and No. 9 Bow Streets. 
This enterprise was founded on October 14, 
1871, under the firm style of C. Sullivan & Co., 
Mr. J. O. Downs being an member of the firm. 
In 1885 Mr. Sullivan retired from the business, 
and Mr. Downs then formed a partnership with 
Mr. J. Holland under the present style of John 
O. Downs & Co. The premises occupied for 
the business comprise a building of three floors, 
and measuring 40 x 50 feet. These are thor- 
oughly equipped with all the latest improved 
appliances for the proper and systematic 
transaction of the business, including refrig- 
erators for the preservation of perishable arti- 
cles for an indefinite period, which insure to 
customers at all times freshness of meats of 
the very best quality. The stock carried is 
always full and complete, and embraces the 
choicest cuts of beef, pork, veal, mutton, 
lamb, etc., also fish of every description, and a 
full variety of salted and smoked meats of all 
kinds, vegetables in season, etc. The store is 
a model of neatness and presents at all times a 
clean, inviting appearance. The business of 
the concern is a large and growing one, and 
the services of seven assistants and three teams 
are required to attend to the wants of patrons 
both in the city and "suburban districts. 

Samuel J. Oerrish (Late with N. F. 
Mathes & Co.) Groceries. Provisions, Crock- 
ery, etc., No. 48 Market Street. In the city of 
Portsmouth, the house of Mr. Samuel J. Ger- 
rish ranks as one of the most enterprising and 
reliable in this line of trade. It was established 
in 1851, by Messrs. Mathes & Varrell, who were 
succeeded in 1802 by Mr. N. F. Mathes. In 
1800 Mr. S. J. Gerrish became a partner of Mr. 
Mathes, and succeeded to the sole proprietor- 
ship in 1881. The premises occupied for trade 
purposes comprise five floors. 22 x 00 feet each, 
giving ample accommodations for the large and 
valuable stock that is constantly carried. This 
stock comprises the finest teas, the purest cof- 
fees and spices, the leading brands of flour, 
sugars, syrups and molasses, butter, cheese and 
eggs, and a general line of goods that pertain 
to the staple grocery and provision trade; also 
a complete assortment of crockery of the latest 
styles and most desirable patterns. A compe- 
tent force of clerks and salomen are in attend- 
ance, and the trade is large and influential 
throughout the city and surrounding country. 
Mr. Gerrish is a native of Portsmouth, in the 
prime of life, and held in high esteem for his 
enterprise and reliability. 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Portsmouth Garble Works, John S. 
Treat, Proprietor, corner Deer, and Vaughan 
Street, (near E. R. II. Depot). Probably the 
oldest business landmark in the city of Ports- 
mouth is the establishment now so long and so 
successfully conducted by Hon. John S. Treat, 
at the corner of Deer and Vaughan Streets, 
and known as the Portsmouth Marble Works. 
The foundation of this business was laid here 
before the Revolutionary War about 1760, by 
Mr. Daniei Marble, w r ho was succeeded some 
years after by Mr. Xoah Smith. They both 
occupied the site of the present works, and in 
1807 Mr. Smith was succeeded by Mr. Samuel 
Treat, the grandfather of the present proprie- 
tor, who continued the business till 1840, when 
his son, Mr. Allen Treat, took possession, and 
he, in turn, gave way to his son, the present 
owner, in ISliG, who returned to his home in 
Portsmouth at this date, after having worked 
at the business in many of the large cities of 
the Union, and been in business for himself at 
Mobile, Ala. The works cover an area of 140 
x 80 feet, and comprise a large yard, work 
shops and safces rooms suitable for the manipu- 
lation and display of the large and valuable 
stock of marble and granite that is constantly 
carried. A specialty is made of monumental 
and cemetery work of all kinds, and in this 
branch the proprietor is a recognized master 
of his art. Success in this field of industry re- 
quires special qualifications, which include a 
taste for the work and the genius to design, as 
well as the skill to execute accurate and 
artistic carving, lettering and ornamentation 
which give durability and grace to both elabo- 
rate and plain work. In these essentials this 
house has long stood at the head of the trade 
in this section. Mr. Treat keeps constantly on 
hand ti full supply of Italian and Vermont 
marble, Biddef ord and Quincy granite, as well 
as importing Scotch granite, and is prepared 
to make to order, from the best foreign and 
American stone, monuments, headstones and 
tablets, and to fence cemetery lots with 
marble or granite curbs and posts. A superior 
quality of granite is supplied, free from iron, 
absolutely impervious to water, unaffected by 
frosts and remarkable for its silky texture, 
while the Vermont marble in which he deals 
admits of the highest polish and is especially 
fine for monumental purposes. An ample 
force of skilled hands is employed, and the 
trade of the house extends throughout a 
radius of twenty miles. Mr. Treat is a native 
of Portsmouth, and one of its prominent citi- 
zens and solid business men. He has served 
as Mayor of the city and as State Senator from 
this district, and is honored and esteemed by 
his fellow-men in all the relations of life. 



J. Albert Walker, Wholesale Dealer 
and Miner's Agent for Anthracite and Bitumi- 
nous Coal of the Best Mines. Also, Lime, Ce- 
ment and Plaster; Concord R. R. Wharf, No. 
137 Market Street. Mr. Walker is widely and 
prominently known as the proprietor of the 
Portsmouth Coal Pockets, and as a miner and 
extensive wholesale and retail dealer in anthra- 
cite and bituminous coal of the best mines; 
also, in lime, cement and plaster. He began in 
the coal business in 1868, as a member of the 
firm of C. E. Walker & Co , withdrawing in 



1880 and establishing his present enterprise. 
He has acquired a high reputation for honor- 
able and liberal dealing, is recognized as one of 
the most responsible and substantial business 
men of the city, and all his transactions are 
marked with a careful regard for the interests 
of his patrons and the maintenance of the high 
standing and prestige of his house. The coal 
business is exclusively wholesale, and the 
heavy demands upon the resources of the es- 
tablishment necessitate the carrying of an 
immense stock, to the end that no delay may 
be occasioned in the filling of orders. The 
coal handled is noted for its superiority of 
quality, every bushel disposed of being 
guaranteed as coming up to the highest 
standard of excellence. The great facilities 
possessed by the house for the procurement of 
supplies give it important advantages which 
are freely shared with customers, and business 
relations once entered into with this reputable 
concern are sure to prove both pleasant and 
lasting. The premises occupied comprise 
some three hundred feet of wharfage, and the 
storage capacity is fully eight thousand tons. 
Coal pockets are also operated in the city oi 
Boston, and the trade of the house covers a 
wide area, necessitating the employment at 
some seasons of upwards of one hundred men. 
Mr. Walker is a native of Portsmouth, and one 
of its solid, reliable and representative busi- 
ness men, prominent in commercial and 
financial circles and is recognized as one of 
those business men who build up great enter- 
prises in every avenue of trade. 



John Griffin, Hatter and Men's Furnisher, 
No. 5 Market Square. Established in April, 
1886, this establishment at once bounded into 
popularity, and the business has since been 
conducted with such energy and spirit, coupled 
with fair and equitable dealing as to merit the 
large favor bestowed. The store has an area 
of 20 x 40 feet. In its style of fittings and -fix- 
tures it is elegant and attractive, and it is 
stocked with a splendid selection of seasonable 
and stylish goods. The show-windows are ar- 
tistically dressed with the most recent novel- 
ties, and in the interior is a magnificent display 
of the most fashionable goods in hats, caps and 
men's furnishing goods. The hats are all man- 
ufactured with the greatest care from the best 
materials to be obtained, and in all the latest 
styles. In the men's goods department are to 
be found all the most recent novelties in shirts, 
cuffs, collars, underwear, neckwear, hosiery, 
gloves, etc., and these are offered at remark- 
ably low prices. The policy of the proprietor 
from the commencement has been fair and 
honorable dealing, coupled with the most en- 
ergetic and enterprising business management; 
and it lias been duly appreciated by a discern- 
ing public. In addition to the goods referred 
to, Mr. Griffin also keeps on hand a large as- 
sortment of trunks, bags, canes and walking- 
sticks, and valises, and these are offered at 
terms the most advantageous. Mr. Griffin was 
born in Utica. N. Y., in 1851. and has already 
served the interests of his fellow-citizens in 
the capacity of alderman in Portsmouth. He 
has built up a large and increasing trade among 
the very best circles of the public, and is de- 
servedly popular. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



51 



George B. French, Dry Goods and Car- 
pets, Nos. 19 and 21 Market Street. Mr. 
French has been engaged in the dry goods 
trade in this city for the past thirty years, and 
by force of energy, enterprise and close atten- 
tion to the popular want, has reached a pre- 
eminence in the trade of which he has just 
reason to be proud. He occupies the largest 
and finest salesroom in this line in the city, 
together with two floors above and a base- 
ment, for the exhibition and storage of the 
stock that is constantly carried. The entire 
premises are divided into appropriate depart- 
ments, each under competent and experienced 
management, and no facility is lacking 
whereby the convenience of patrons and the 
interests of the house may be enhanced. The 
stock is comprehensive and diversified, em- 
bracing dry and fancy goods, small wares, 
carpets, oil-cloths and mattings. In the dress 
goods department is shown a full line of 
black and colored silks, satins, rhadames, 
ottomans, also velvets, plushes, velveteens, 
cashmeres, camel's hair cloths, dress flannels 
and fancy dress goods, while all the new fab- 
rics and shades are added as soon as they 
appear in the market. The line of housekeep- 
ing goods is very complete and prices are low, 
including table linens, towels, napkins, mus- 
lins, blankets, yarns and flannels. The stock 
of carpets is the largest and finest in the city, 
comprising velvets, Brussels, tapestries, in- 
grains and other grades, in great variety of 
styles, shades and patterns, received direct 
from the best looms of Europe and America. 
The store is splendidly lighted, convenient 
in all its arrangements for inspection and sale, 
and twelve clerks and salesladies attend to the 
wants of patrons with ability and expedition. 
The patronage of the house is Jarge, first class 
and permanent throughout the city and all the 
surrounding country. Mr. French is a native 
of New Hampshire, and known as among our 
prominent* citizens whose operations in busi- 
ness have told largely in favor of the material 
development of the city. Mr. French was 
a member of the State Legislature in 1860, and 
is a member at the present writing. He has 
also been a Select Man, and is at present 
assessor of taxes, all of which positions and 
offices he has filled with credit to himself, and 
acceptance to his constituents. He is very 
popular in the community and is well versed 
in his line of trade. 



C. E. Simpson, Merchant Tailor and Dealei 
in Ready-Made Clothing and Gentlemen's 
Furnishing Goods, Rubber and Oil Clothing, 
etc.. No. 3 Bow Street. Among the largest 
business interests of the country there are few 
that represent larger capital or wield a strongei 
influence than the clothing trade. In glancing 
over the houses engaged in this business in 
Portsmouth one is naturally attracted to the 
fine store of Mr. C. E. Simpson, one of the old 
est and best known business men in the city 
This establishment is very eligibly located ai 
the corner of Market and Bow streets, and has 
a frontage of 30 feet and a depth of 50 feet 
It is splendidly lighted by fine plate glass shovt 
windows, handsomely fitted up and admirablj 
arranged. It is now' forty-seven years sinct 
this business was founded, and throughout it 
long career it has always enjoyed an extensiv 



.nd first-clnss patronage. The founder was 
dr. C. E. Myers, who started business in 1840, 
nd in 1850 took into partnership Mr. C. E. 
impson, under the firm style of C. E. Myers 
: Co. In 1887 Mr. Simpson became the sole 
roprietor of the business in which he had, for 
period of thirty-one years, been an active 
artner. He carries one of the largest and 
inest assortments of ready-made clothing and 
enllemen's furnishing goods to be found 
n the city, and these for quality, fit, style and 
lovelty are not surpassed by any competing 
louse in the city. The stock is full and com- 
ilete, embracing a full line of men's, youths' 
nd boys' ready-made clothing, cut from the 
atest imported London fashions and patterns, 
md made from the best materials and finished 
11 the finest manner; also a complete stock of 
entlemen's furnishing goods, including all the 
atest novelties in neckwear, handkerchiefs, 
hosiery, gloves, underwear, etc., and a large 
variety of the best rubber and oil clothing. 
These goods are sold at astonishingly low 
trices, and command a ready sale. A leading 
'eature of the business is the custom depart- 
ment, in which a large assortment of foreign 
and domestic fabrics is shown, and all gar- 
ments made to order are guaranteed to be per- 
:ect in fit and style. Mr. Simpson is a native 
of the city, eminently popular, and fully mer- 
its the success he enjoys. 

David Kimball & Co., Apothecaries, 
No. 36 Market Street. The house so long 
onducted under the firm name of David Kim- 
ball & Co., at No. 36 Market Street, has always 
been recognized as one of the most reliable 
drug establishments in Portsmouth. It was 
founded in 1816, and in 1824 Mr. David Kim- 
ball became the proprietor, continuing the 
business as David Kimball & Co. until 1880, 
when he was succeeded by Mr. Frank J. Phil- 
brick who entered the store as clerk in 1870, 
and who has since prosecuted the business un- 
der the old firm name. It is an elegant estab- 
lishment in every way, being spacious in size, 
handsomely appointed, and under the most ex- 
perienced and skilful management. A splen- 
did line of goods is shown in every branch of 
the business. The pure and superior assort- 
ment of drugs, medicines and pharmaceutical 
preparations are supplied from the most repu- 
table sources, and are selected with special ref- 
erence to strength and freshness. In the line 
of novelties in perfumery, toilet articles and 
fancy goods, the enterprise of the proprietor 
has placed within the reach of his patrons the 
best articles that can be purchased. The house 
is perfectly equipped for its specialty of pre- 
scriptions, and absolute accuracy is assured in 
all cases. This is also a popular resort for pur- 
chasers of fine domestic and imported cigars, 
confectionery, soda and mineral waters, and 
in the holiday season it is extensively patron- 
ized by old and young in search of useful and 
ornamental treasures for Christmas and New 
Year's gifts. Prices are placed at a veiy rea- 
sonable figure, and the house is eminently pop- 
ular with all classes. Mr. Philbrick is a native 
of Portsmouth, a practical and accomplished 
pharmacist, member of the New Hampshire 
Pharmaceutical Association, and known in this 
community as a useful citizen and honorable 
and responsible business man. 



52 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Portsmouth Brewing Company, 

Brewers of India Pale, Stock and Cream Ales. 
Hop Beer and Old Brown Stout; Brewery and 
Office, No. f>4 Bow Street. A leading exponent 
of the immense brewing interests in Ports- 
mouth is the Portsmouth Brewing Company, 
whose office is located at No. 64 Bow Street. 
This company are extensive brewers of India 
pale, stock and cream ales, hop beer and old 
brown stout. The officers and directors are as 
follows, viz. : President, Arthur Harris; Vice- 
President, G. Scott; Treasurer, Mark A. Scott; 
Directors : Arthur Harris, of New York; P. 
Harrington, of Manchester; and George Scott, 
George A. Mudge, George E. Hodgdon and 
Herman A. Tarltou, of Portsmouth. The prep- 
aration for the manufacture is complete and 
extensive, every accessory having been pro- 
vided to assume a high and perfect standard. 
The ale here brewed has already secured a wide 
and increasing popularity with dealers and con- 
sumers, its purity, flavor and health-giving 
properties being unsurpassed. Only the choic- 
est materials, carefully selected by competent 
representatives of the concern, are used, and 
in the process of production the full strength 
and virtue of each constituent is extracted and 
resolved into a union that has found unusual 
favor with connoisseurs. The greatest pains 
are taken in every detail of the work, the best 
and latest methods are employed, and such 
principles applied in the manufacture as long 
experience and research have commended and 
approved. The machinery embraces every in- 
vention and appliance known to modern brew- 
ing, and many improvements have been added 
by the management that are of great practical 
utility. Each department is under competent 
direction, and the entire bushiess is under the 
close personal supervision of Mr. Mark A. Scott, 
the manager, whose fine technical knowledge 
and large practical experience having been 
brought in the business is of the greatest value 
in securing perfect results. It is the policy of 
this company to furnish the best in quality, 
wholesomeness and general excellence, and the 
estimation in which its products is held at 
home and abroad gives conclusive proof that 
a responsive chord has been struck in the pop- 
ular heart. A customer once secured is seldom 
lost, and business relations entered into with 
the company are sure to prove pleasant, profit- 
able and lasting. 

\>u Hampshire Rational Bank, No. 

14 Pleasant Street. -The city of Portsmouth has 
in the New Hampshire National Bank a sub- 
stantial and successfully conducted institution 
which, by its sound and liberal methods, has 
largely aided the development of the various 
mercantile and manufacturing interests of this 
community. It was incorporated many years 
ago as the New Hampshire Bank, and was re- 
organized under the national banking laws in 
isi>5. It has a capital of 150,000, a present 
surplus of $30,000, and is officered as follows, 
viz. : President, E. A. Peterson ; cashier, L. S. 
Butler; directors, Frank Jones, E. A.Peterson. 
Marcellus Eldredge, Thos. A. Harris. True M. 
Ball, Daniel Marcy, and J. Albert Walker. It is 
a bank of issue, loans and deposits, handles first- 
class commercial paper, makes collections, and 
engages in all transactions that are a legitimate 
part of its character. Special and praise- 



worthy attention is given to the security of all 
loans, while a disposition is shown to accom- 
modate every worthy applicant, and to extend 
every aid consistent with safety and necessary 
precaution. The growth of the institution has 
been commensurate with the energy and pro- 
gressive spirit of its direction, and a valuable 
and increasing list of patrons is drawn to its 
counters, the ability of the management and 
the high standing of the officers and directors 
giving every guarantee of the intelligent con- 
servation of all interests committed to its care. 
The banking rooms of the institution, located 
at No. 14 Pleasant Street, are eligibly situated 
in the heart of the city, amply provided with 
improved fire and burglar-proof vaults, and so 
managed as to give the greatest possible 
security. The Board of Directors comprise an 
array of business talent and financial strength 
that commands the universal respect and con- 
fidence of the community. The president. 
Mr. Peterson, and the cashier, Mr. Butter, are 
thoroughly trained financiers, whose opinions 
have great weight in banking circles, and 
under whose management the affairs of the 
New Hampshire National may be considered 
as entrusted to safe, wise and clean hands. 

Piseataqua Savings Bank, Pleasant 
Street. One of the noteworthy and deserving 
public institutions of this city is the Piseataqua 
Savings Bank, whose office is with the First 
National Bank, o'n Pleasant Street. This bank 
was incorporated in 1877, under the laws of the 
State of New Hampshire, and from its incep- 
tion to the present time its officers and trustees 
have included many of most substantial and 
best-known citizens of this community. Its 
present board of officers are as follows, viz.: 
President, E. P. Kimball; secretary and treas- 
urer, R. C. Pierce; trustees: E. P. Kimball. W. 
L. Dwight, J. H. Broughtou, R. C. Pierce. J. W. 
F. Hobbs, E. C. Spinney, E. B. Philbrick, J. 
Albert Walker, J. H. Hutchinson, A. F. How- 
ard, H. A. Yeaton. This is purely a savings 
bank, and conducted in the interest of the 
people and recognized as an important factor 
in developing a spirit of economy and thrift in 
the community. Being conducted on sound 
business principles, and its management charac- 
terized by foresight and judicious enterprise, 
coupled with ability and integrity, its history 
from the start has been a record of steady 
progress and prosperity, and sustaining to-day 
a prominent position among the stable and re- 
liable financial institutions of the city and 
State. A flourishing business is transacted, 
giving evidence of constant and substantial in- 
crease annually, while its connections are of 
the most desirable character. Its deposits 
July 1, 1887, aggregate 461,587. Its manage- 
ment is in the hands of gentlemen of sound 
judgment and tried ability, whose names are a 
sufficient guarantee of the solvency of the in- 
stitution. The president, Mr. Kimball. is the 
president, also, of the First National Bank of 
this city, and his reputation and standing as a 
financier was long ago established beyond the 
requirements of praise. Mr. Pierce is a native 
of Portsmouth, and eminently fitted by natural 
talents and practical experience for the safe 
and judicious administration of the duties of 
his responsible position and is highly respected 
in the community. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



S. Pliilbrick & Co., Manufacturers of 
Marble and Granite Monuments. Tablets and 
Headstones, Posts and Curbing, Steps and But- 
tresses. Xo. '2 Water Street. In connection 
with our review of Portsmouth special men- 
tion ought to be given the old and widely 
known firm of S. Pliilbrick & Co., manufact- 
urers of marble and granite monuments, head- 
stones, tablets, etc., Xo. 2 Water Street, who are 
by common consent among the foremost and 
best known exponents of the art in this city or 
State ; the work leaving this reliable and well- 
ordered establishment being first-class in every 
feature of merit in design, execution, finish 
and general excellence while the patronage 
of the concern, which is very extensive, is 
fully commensurate with deservedly high rep- 
utation the firm sustains for reliability and 
skill. This flourishing enterprise was started 
some fifty odd years ago by S. Pliilbrick, who 
conducted the same under the style of S. Phil- 
brick & Co. up to 1886, when the business 
passefl into the control of his son and succes- 
sors Messrs. George P., Xewell S. and O. F. 
Pliilbrick who have since continued with un- 
interrupted success, still trading under the 
old firm name, which is regarded as something 
akin to a well-established trade-mark. The 
yard and shops are ample and commodious, 
and twelve or more expert workmen are em- 
ployed, marble and granite work of every vari- 
ety for cemetery or building purposes being 
executed in the highest style of art, while spe- 
cial attention is devoted to granite polishing. 
An extensive and A 1 assortment of rough and 
finished Italian marble (received through a 
Boston importing house) and Eockport granite 
is constantly carried on hand; also superb 
monuments, headstones, tablets, slabs, posts 
and curbing, steps and buttresses and emblem- 
atic designs in great variety, and altogether 
the trade of the firm, which extends through- 
out the entire State, is of a very substantial 
and influential character. 



Ilsley & Moore, Fire, Life and Accident 
Insurance. Agents and Brokers, Xo. 3 Pleasant 
Street. Among the leading and most responsi- 
ble firms engaged in the insurance line in this 
section of the State may be named that of 
Ilsley & Moore, general fire, life and accident 
insurance agents, and brokers, whose neat and 
well-known offics is located at Xo. 3 Pleasant 
Street, and none in the business in Portsmouth 
maintain a higher reputation for stability, 
reliability and integrity, as few if any enjoy 
a larger share of public favor and confidence"; 
while they number among their clientele many 
of the solid and wealthy citizens in the com- 
munity. This flourishing business was estab- 
lished in 1809 by Messrs. Joseph P. Morse and 
W. X. Ilsley. who conducted the same up to 
1886, when the old firm of Morse & Ilsley was 
dissolved, Mr. Morse retiring, and Mr. Ilsley 
taking into partnership W. II. Moore, thus 
constituting the pushing and popular firm 
whose name heads this sketch, and who have 
since continued it with the most gratifying 
success. They transact a general fire insur- 
ance brokerage business, and are agents for 
some of the most stable and reliable fire, life 
and accident companies in the United States, 
representing among others the following well 



and favorably known institutions : Equitable 
Life, Xew York ; Xew England Mutual Life, 
Boston; and Fidelity & Casualty Co., New 
York (being the liockingham County agents 
of the latter), and, altogether, an extensive 
and very substantial business is transacted, 
while the patronage grows steadily apace with 
years. Messrs. Ilsley and Moore, who are 
natives of this city, are both gentlemen of 
courteous manners and strict probity, as 
well as men of sound judgment, energy and 
ability, and all persons establishing business 
relations with them are likely to find the same 
become pleasant, profitable and permanent. 



L,. V. Newell & Co., Portrait and Land- 
scape Photographers, Number 1 High street. 
Of those who have acquired a high reputation 
for fine work in this line in Portsmouth special 
mention ought here to be made of L. V. Newell 
& Co., who are among the foremost exponents 
of the art in this city; the pictures leaving this 
reliable establishment being first class in every 
feature of merit. This business was estab- 
lished in October, 1883, by L. V. Newell, who 
conducted the same alone up to December, 1886, 
when he admitted into partnership E. C. Nick- 
erson, thus constituting the firm whose name 
heads this sketch. The gallery and reception 
room are neatly appointed and the operating 
department is completely equipped in every 
respect with the most improved appliances 
and general appurtenances ; no pains being 
spared to render the utmost satisfaction in 
every instance to patrons. Photography in all 
its branches is executed in oil, pastel, crayon, 
India ink, and kindred work is done in the 
most superior and expeditious manner, artistic 
portraits and landscape views being specialties, 
and altogether the patronage of the house is 
large and prosperous and affords evidence of 
constant and gratifying increase. Messrs. 
Xewell and Nickerson are both gentlemen of 
courteous manners and practical and expert 
photographers. 

J. H. Timelier, Pharmacist, No'. 12 
Market Square. This gentleman is a pharma- 
cist of first-class ability and of very extended 
experience in his important and onerous 
profession. He was born in Biddeford, Me., 
in 1826, is a pharmaceutical graduate, and a 
member of the American and New Hampshire 
Pharmaceutical Associations. For forty-one 
years he has been one of the most noted and 
popular men in Portsmouth. His premises 
are very eligibly located, fronting, as they do 
on Market Square, Daniel Street, and Market 
Sti-eet. The stock embraces a general assort- 
ment of fresh, pure drugs, chemicals, and 
also all requisites in the line of perfumery 
and toilet articles, together with all the 
leading proprietary medicines of acknowl- 
edged merit. Mr. Thacher is the manufact- 
urer and sole proprietor of Dickman's, Little- 
field's & Thacher' s Court Plaster, which is 
admitted to have no superior in the market. 
Experienced assistants are employed, and 
the strictest attention is paid to the com- 
pounding of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes, which are always prepared 
in the most accurate and prompt manner from 
the finest and purest drugs. 



54 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Sheldon Brother*, Manufacturers of, 
and Dealers in. Fashionable Parlor Suits, Sofas, 
Lounges, Rocking, Parlor and Easy Chairs, 
Centre Tables, Black Walnut Chamber Sets, 
etc.. Salesroom. Xo. 72 State Street. A stock 
of modern furniture is one of the most attrac- 
tive sights to be seen along any of our fashion- 
able thoroughfares. There is an originality 
of design, coupled with richness of materials 
and excellence of workmanship, that entitles 
each piece to be called a work of art. In the 
city of Portsmouth no house takes a higher 
position in the manufacture and sale of fine 
furniture than that of Sheldon Brothers, lo- 
cated at No. 72 State Street. This house was 
established in 1808, and has been conducted 
with marked ability and steadily increasing 
success. The premises occupied comprise 




e- 



four floors, 25 x 50 feet each, and unsurpassed 
facilities are at hand for the prosecution of 
the business upon a larger scale. The sales- 
rooms are stocked to repletion with a fine 
assortment of fashionable parlor, chamber 
and dining room suits, sofas, lounges, easy 
chairs, centre tables, black walnut chamber 
sets, chestnut and painted sets, and hall, 
library, office and kitchen furniture of every 
kind, besides innumerable special pieces in 
wood, silk, brocades, velours and plushes. A 
specialty is made of upholstering to order and 
for sale work, and the restoring of old furniture. 
The commonest meterials, when remodeled 
by this house, assume unique and attractive 
shapes, in unity with both the modern and 
the antique. Much of the ware is matchless 
for elegance and beauty, and it is the aim of 
the management to offer goods which shall 
rank superior in the trade, not only in quality 
of material but in the equally important mat- 
ters of tasteful designs and artistic workman- 
ship. Our readers may be assured that in the 
purchase of furniture, or in employing this 
house in any of its departments, their inter- 
ests will be greatly enhanced, and that in the 
matter of price nothing will be left to be 
desired. The trade is large in both city and 
country, and all orders are promptly and care- 



fully filled. Mr. Stewart A. Sheldon, the sur- 
viving partner of the original firm, is a native 
of Portsmouth, in the prime of life, and ener- 
getic, enterprising and reliable in all his busi- 
ness methods. 



O. H. Cook, Cards, Cabinets, and all 
Larger Sizes, No. 5 Congress Street, (over 
Fay's). The improvements made in the art of 
photography are best seen in Portsmouth by 
visiting the studio of Mr. O. H. Cook, who has 
the finest establishment of the kind here, and 
is recognized as the leading photographer of 
this city, being thoroughly enterprising and 
progressive in his methods, and possessing a 
natural taste and large experience as an artist. 
His parlors are spacious and well-lighted, 
handsomely furnished and fitted up for the 
reception of patrons, while on the walls are to 
be seen many fine specimens of the artist's 
skill in every branch of his work. He is pre- 
pared to execute every style of artistic work, 
both in oils, crayons, India ink, pasteh and 
water colors,, and furnishes cards, cabinets and 
larger sizes of photographs in the highest style 
of the art, and at prices which are remarkably 
low for first-class work. He is thus enabled 
to suit all tastes, and those who examine his 
work and test his skill will be delighted at the 
result of his labors. He is doing a large and 
prosperous business. He was the second 
photographer in New England to adopt the in- 
stantaneous process, and is never satisfied to 
merely keep abreast of the times, but forges his 
way ahead in his endeavor to elevate the pro- 
fession and enhance the value of his work. 
Mr. Cook is a native of Maine, in the prime of 
life, and has been established here since 1875, 
during which time he has gained a high re 
putation. 

John Fender, Insurance, National Block, 
Congress Street A leading and popular in- 
surance agency in the city of Portsmouth is 
that conducted by Mr. John Pender, whose 
office is located in National Block, on Congress 
Street. He established this agency here in 
March, 1885, and has developed a large and 
influential patronage throughout the city and 
surrounding- country. As an insurance agent 
and broker he has had wide experience, and is 
prepared to conduct all branches of his business 
under the most favorable conditions. He is 
the authorized agent in Portsmouth and 
vicinity for the following well-known com- 
panies, viz.: the Granite State Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company, of Portsmouth; the People's 
Fire Insurance Company, of Manchester; the 
Capitol Fire Association, of Nashua; the Mas- 
conia Fire Insurance Company, of Lebanon; 
the Manufacturers' and Merchants', and the 
State Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, of 
Concord; and the Employers' Liability Asso- 
ciation, of London, England. Policies are also 
secured in any of the larger companies that 
may be desired, and upon the most favorable 
terms. Mr. Pender now controls the insuring 
of the many of the choicest lines of business 
and residential property in the city and its 
vicinity. The interests of policy-holders are 
closely watched and carefully guarded by him, 
and he is a recognized and reliable authority 
upon all matters relating to fire insurance. 
Mr. Pender is a native of Massachusetts. 



LEAU1SG MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



J. M. Tebbetts, Fashionable Millinery. 
No. 14 Market Street. The millinery estab- 
lishment of Mrs. J. M. Tebbetts, at No. 14 
Market Street, is one of the most popular 
metropolitan shopping places in the city of 
Portsmouth, For nearly twenty years it 
has been under its present enterprising man- 
agement, and during that time it has been 
the chief source of' supply for artistic and 
fashionable millinery merchandise, such as 
hats, bonnets, fine French flowers, ostrich 
plumes and tips, rich ribbons and laces, straw 
and silk goods, feathers, ornaments and trim- 
mings of every description. The establish- 
ment is one of the leading attractions to 
the ladies of Portsmouth and vicinity, and 
enjoys the best trade in its special line of 
enterprise. In prices, as well as in quality 
and style of goods, Mrs. Tebbetts successfully 
competes with any house in this part of the 
country, and her large patronage, drawn from 
the elite of this city and its surrounding towns, 
is a deserved tribute to her enterprise, taste 
and judgment. A large number of competent 
assistants are regularly employed to meet the 
demands of the trade, and every facility is at 
hand for the prompt and perfect fulfilment 
of all orders. Consignments are constantly 
arriving from the most fashionable sources 
of supply, and every effort is made to secure 
the choicest and most desirable novelties in 
this line as soon as they are ready for the 
market. The assortments contain at all times 
the freshest productions of both home and 
foreign markets, and the latest and most 
correct styles. Mrs. Tebbetts has been emi- 
nently successful in catering to the. tastes of 
this community in this direction of trade, 
and is universally popular with her host of 
permanent patrons. 

.1 a im>* R. Yeaton & Co., Corn, Meal 
and Oats, Ships' Stores, etc., Corner Vaughan 
and Congress Streets. Mr. Yeaton, who is sole 
proprietor of this establishment, is one of 
Portsmouth's recognized leading merchants. 
He founded his business here in 1858, be- 
ginning with a modest capital and gradually 
increasing his facilities as his trade expanded, 
which it did steadily fi-om the outset. The 
store occupied is 20 x 80 feet in dimensions, 
and has a basement of like capacity. A 
large stock is carried, the assortment com- 
prising corn, meal, oats, butter, cheese, 
and farm and dairy produce of all kinds, 
also a full line of staple groceries, canned 
goods, and ships' stores of every variety. 
Besides selling for cash, the proprietor also 
accepts produce in exchange for other goods. 
Both a family and shipping trade is catered to, 
the volume of business transactions are of 
an extensive character, and the establishment 
lias a large list of permanent patrons. A 
branch store is situated on McDonough Street 
at which a flourishing trade is also enjoyed. 
Mr. Yeaton. who is a native of Portsmouth, is 
now in his fiftieth year, and in the enjoyment 
of an excellent constitution; he is a business 
man of push and enterprise, prompt and 
honorable in all his transactions, is also a 
thrifty and well to-do partner, and his record 
is one of uninterrupted success and mercan- 
tile probity. 



Charles W. Taylor, Wholesale and Re- 
tail Dealer in Furnaces, Ranges, etc., Nos. 42 
and 44 Market Street This gentleman is 
well and widely known as a wholesale and 
retail dealer in furnaces, ranges, and in Tay- 
lor's Patent Steam Cover, Adjustable Stove 
Pipe Shelf, and the North Star Wash Board, 
and makes a leading specialty of sanitary 
plumbing. He established his business here 
in 1883, and, by energy, industry and enter- 
prise, has built up a fine reputation and a 
large and growing trade. The premises com- 
prise a five-story building, 40 x 100 feet in 
dimensions, and unsurpassed facilities are 
possessed for the systematic and successful 
prosecution of the business in all its depart- 
ments. In the line of plumbing this house 
occupies an unquestioned position in the 
front rank of the trade from which it can 
make good its claim for accomplishing the 
best .and most thorough work to be found in 
any locality, while every convenience is at 
hand for the prompt and perfect fulfilment of 
all orders. The stock oi stoves, ranges, and 
fuinaces which is constantly carried em- 
bodies all the latest improvements made in 
cooking and heating, and is received direct 
from the best manufacturers in the country, 
a specialty being made of furnaces. A gen- 
eral jobbing business is transacted in tin, 
sheet-iron and copper work, and the trade is 
large, first class and influential in all branches 
of the business, requiring the services of from 
ten to fifteen hands, and extending throughout 
the city and all the surrounding country. 
Mr. Taylor is a native of Portsmouth, and a 
young man of experience, business ability 
and personal worth, with whom it is always a 
pleasure to deal. 

Flynn Tiro*., Meats, Groceries and Provi- 
sions, Ship Stores a Specialty, No. 31 Market 
Street. This business was inaugurated in June, 
1886, and has quickly grown to proportions now 
necessitating a three-story building and base- 
ment, each floor having 'dimensions of 20 x 00 
feet, the place throughout being thoroughly 
metropolitan in all its arrangements and ap- 
pointments. The affairs of the house are con- 
ducted with systematic regularity, and the 
great amount of business accomplished, to- 
gether with the low prices which prevail in all 
the departments, impress the visitor with the 
fact that money can be saved in purchases 
made here, while at the same time dependence 
may be placed upon securing the very best 
goods the market affords. A very large stock 
is carried, embracing every variety of foreign 
and domestic staple and fancy groceries, fresh 
and salt meats, and provisions of all kinds, 
fruits and vegetables, canned goods, ships' 
stores, and a choice assortment of foreign and 
American wines and. liquors. A specialty is 
made of supplying ships with stores, and spe- 
cial inducements in prices are offered in this 
line. Every facility is possessed for the prompt 
fulfilment of orders, and in all their transac- 
tions the firm will be found liberal and fair. 
The co-partners, Messrs. Eugene and Barthol- 
omew Flynn, are thoroughly experienced iu 
their line"of trade, hold a high position in mer- 
cantile and social circles, and are actively iden- 
tified with the best interests of this city. 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Kennedy & Miller M'f 'g Co., Manufact- 
urers of Hosiery and Gloves, Xo. 34 Union 
'Street. Although, perhaps, not so widely 
known as a manufacturing centre as some 
other cities and towns in this State of 110 
greater commercial importance, but chiefly 
devoted to one special industry that fills the 
eye, Portsmouth does contain, notwithstand- 
ing, some noteworthy and flourishing indus- 
trial enterprises, prominent among which is 
the well and favorably known establishment 
of the Kennedy & Miller M'f'g Co., Manu- 
facturers of Hosiery and Gloves, No. 34 Union 
Street, and which is in all respects an admira- 
bly conducted and well-equipped concern of 
the kind, and whose products are in steady 
and extensive demand in the trade throughout 
the entire New England. This company, of 
which Thomas Kennedy is president and 
George A. Miller, treasurer, with Messrs. 
Thomas Kennedy, George A. Miller and Her- 
man W. Oxford, directors, was duly incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State as the 
Kennedy & Miller M'f'g Co., with a capital 
stock of 15,000 in 1881, and the positive and 
permanent success that has attended the en- 
terprise from its inception abundantly attests 
thj general excellence and reliability of the 
goods manufactured, as well as the wisdom 
that inspired the venture, and the energy, 
ability and sound judgment displayed in the 
management of the business. The factory, 
which is ample and commodious, is operated 
by steam power and completely equipped in 
every respect with the newest and most im- 
proved machinery, appliances and general 
appurtenances, while a full force of expert 
hands are employed, and the trade, which ex- 
tends all over the Eastern States, is exceed- 
ingly large and continually increasing. 

Jos. P. Morse, Insurance, Real Estate 
and Money Broker and House Agent, No. 13 
Pleasant Street. The insurance and feal es- 
tate agent is an important factor in every com- 
munity, and the duties exercised by such 
agent have an influential bearing on the com- 
mercial and manufacturing resources of a 
community. Prosecuting an enterprise in this 
direction is Mr. Joseph P. Morse, who founded 
his establishment, which is located at No. 13 
Pleasant Street, twenty years ago. Mr. Morse 
is a gentleman of the highest standing, who 
has made a complete study of the law of real 
estate and of insurance questions, and can be 
engaged with implicit confidence in all mat- 
ters pertaining thereto. He gives the most 
carefully attention to the sale, exchange and 
letting of properties, collects rents, negotiates 
loans, and also effects insurance to any amount 
in leading reliable insurance companies, and 
is prompt and efficient as an insurance agent. 
He is the accredited representative of the 
following insurance companies: Home M'f'rs' 
and Traders' Mutual Fire Insurance Co., of 
Concord, IS". H. ; The Granite State, of Ports- 
mouth; The New England, of Rutland. Vt. ; 
Capital Fire Insurance Co., of Concord, N. H. ; 
Guarantee Fire Insurance Co., of Great Falls, 
N. H.; Travellers Life and Accident Insurance 
Company of Hartford, Conn. Mr. Morse was 
born sixty-eight years ago at Plymouth, N. H., 
and has been in active business in Portsmouth 
for forty-two years, and has always been an 



earnest supporter of any movement conducive 
to the general welfare and benefit of the com- 
munity. 



A. P. Wendell V Co., Dealers in Hard- 
ware and Cutlery, Paints, Oils and Varnishes, 
Oars, Rowlocks, and Boat Fittings ; Guns and 
Ammunition, No. 2 Market Square. This is one 
of the leading and most prominent commercial 
concerns of the city. The business was origi- 
nally inaugurated in 1847 by Mr. Abram Q. 
Wendell, and successfully conducted by him 
untill 1874, when the present firm succeeded 
to the entire control, and have since greatly 
increased the facilities and business operations 
of the house. The premises occupied com- 
prise a five-story building, each floor having 
an area of 25 x 60 feet. The establishment 
is well systematized throughout, every de- 
partment being complete in its appointments, 
and every facility is possessed for the satis- 
factory handling of a large volume of trade 
transactions such as the firm command. The 
stock carried has been carefully selected and 
embraces none but the most reliable goods, and 
comprises a complete assortment of staple and 
fancy hardware, cutlery, paints, oils, varnishes, 
oars, rowlocks, boat fittings, mechanics' tools 
and builders' requisites, guns and ammunition 
and sporting goods of all kinds. The house 
holds the agency for John's celebrated asbestos 
liquid paints, and plastic stove lining, keeping 
on hand a large supply at all times. A staff 
of competent clerks are employed, every 
facility is possessed for the prompt fulfilment 
of orders. The members of the firm, Messrs. 
A. P. and Henry Wendell, are natives of this 
city, and' among her most substantial and 
representative merchants and citizens. 



O. F. Philbriek & Co., Dealers in Coal and 
Wood. Office, No. 4 Water Street. Among the 
leading and most responsible forms engaged in 
this line in Portsmouth can be named that of 
O. F. Philbriek & Co., wholesale and retail deal- 
ers in coal and wood, whose well known office 
is located at No. 4 Water Street, with capacious 
and well stocked yard on the water front, -and 
than which no concern of the kind in this city 
sustains a higher reputation for reliable stock 
and upright dealing, as few receive a larger 
measure of merited recognition; customers 
being always assured of getting an excellent 
article, honest weight and measure, and satis- 
factory treatment in this popular and well 
ordered establishment. This flourishing en- 
terprise was started in June, 18S3, and from its 
reception has been conducted with uniform 
and gratifying success, the patronage of the 
firm being large and prosperous, and grows 
apace annually. The yard has a dock frontage 
of 150 feet and a depth of 450 feet and a heavy 
and carefully assorted stock is constantly car- 
ried, including best quality of anthracite coal 
of all kinds (received direct from Pennsylva- 
nia); also fire and kindling wood, sawed and 
split, and four hands are employed, while 
three teams are in steady service supplying 
customers all over the city and surrounding 
towns. The firm is composed of Messrs. 
George P., Newell S. and Otis F. Philbriek. 
brothers, and natives and residents of Ports- 
mouth, 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



57 



Fletcher & Taiiton, Furniture Dealers 
and Upholsterers, and Undertakers, No. 00 
Market Street. This house was founded some 
seventy or eighty years ago, during which 
time it has been in the hands of several pro- 
prietors. Prior to 1872 Mr. C. J. Colcord was 
proprietor for a quarter of a century, and at 
that date he was succeeded by the present firm, 
the co-partners in which are Messrs. S. S. 
Fletcher and H. G. Tanton. The former is a 
native of Kittery, and the latter of Prince 
Edward Island. The premises occupied con- 
sist of three spacious floors, and these are 
very tastefully fitted up throughout. The 
stock carried is very large and complete, com- 
prising fine and library furniture, including 
plain and upholstered sofas, chairs, lounges; 
parlor, library, dining-room and bedroom 
suites of the very latest and most fashionable 
designs. The firm are prepared at all times to 
do all kinds of upholstering and house decora- 
tion at the shortest possible notice in the very 
highest style of workmanship known to the 
trade, and at most reasonable prices. They 
make a specialty of fine custom work, and for 
this purpose employ none but the most skilled 
and proficient workmen. Repairing and re-up- 
holstering receive the most careful attention. 
The house has attained wide-spread popularity 
for the excellence of its productions and the 
honorable business methods adhered to. The 
firm are also furnishing undertakers and em- 
balmers, carry a full and complete assortment 
of funeral requisites, and furnish everything 
required in connection with burials. They 
take entire charge of funerals, give particular 
attention to embalming, are prompt and relia- 
ble in all their engagements, reasonable in their 
charges and personally popular in the com- 
munity. 



dioodrich, Books and Stationery, 
No. 1 Congress Block. The popular head- 
quarters for books, stationery and wall-paper 
in the city of Portsmouth is the establishment 
of Mr. Mercer Goodrich, at No. 1 Congress 
Block, corner of Market and Daniel streets. 
This is one of the finest business locations in 
the city, and so popular a resort has it become 
that all Portsmouth may be said to pass 
through it in a day. To the stranger, from 
its literary attractiveness, it is a place not to lie 
overlooked, while the lovers of literature in 
this community make it their chief rendezvous. 
To drop into Goodrich's for a glimpse at the 
last new novel or magazine is with them a 
daily duty. The house has been under the 
popular management of Mr. Goodrich since 
its foundation in 1877. It is spacious in size. 
and well stocked in every department Here 
are to be found all the' works of the best 
authors, in history, science, and fiction, prose 
and poetry; medical, theological and agricult- 
ural works; maps, globes and guide-books: 
sporting, yachting and out-of-door literature 
generally; books with fine bindings, illustrat- 
ed works, juvenile books, and seaside novels. 
The establishment is never without the last 
'new thing" in English. French or American 
literature. The Portsmouth circulating library 
is also kept here, which contains L'.IOO volumes 
and is liberally patronized. The assortment of 
wall-paper is very large and complete, com- 
prising all the latest designs and patterns of 



both domestic and foreign production. Six 
clerks and salesmen give prompt and courte- 
ous attention to the wants of customers. Mr. 
Goodrich is a native of Portsmouth, and one 
of its best known citizens and prominent busi- 
ness men. He has held the office of city clerk 
for the past three years, and is closely iden- 
tified with the welfare and prosperity of the 
city in the broadest sense. 



William 01111, Wholesale Dealer in 
Butter, Cheese, Lard, Beans, etc. Western 
Lard and Vermont Dairy Butter a Specialty, 
Xo. 68 State Street. An old established and 
well-known house devoted to this important 
branch of commercial activity in Portsmouth 
is the stable and reliable concern of William 
Conn, wholesale dealer in butter, cheese, lard, 
beans, etc., No. 68 State Street, whose history 
since the inception of the business, thirty odd 
years ago, marks a record of steady and sub- 
stantial progress. Being conducted on sound 
and conservative business principles, and its 
management from the start characterized by 
energy, sagacity and judicious enterprise, 
coupled with upright and honorable dealing, 
the result could hardly have been other than 
the well merited success Mr. Conn has de- 
servedly achieved. The premises occupied 
comprising office, storehouse and cellar, are 
ample and commodious and completely 
equipped in every respect with the most im- 
proved cold-storage appliances and general 
appurtenances, including capacious refrigera- 
tors, and a heavy and choice stock is con- 
stantly carried on hand to meet the require- 
ments of the steady and extensive demand; 
Western lard and Vermont dairy butter being 
the specialties handled, and the trade which is 
of a wholesale character extends all over 
the city and environing towns, Newberry- 
port, Dover, Hampton, Rye and the beaches. 
Mr. Conn is a native of Hillsboro, N. H., 
but an old and one of the best known and 
stanchest residents of Portsmouth. He is 
the present efficient and popular representa- 
tive in the State Legislature from this district. 



Brothers, Dealers in Newspapers 
and Periodicals, Fruits and Confectionery, 
etc.. No. 21 Congress Street. The business 
of this well-known firm was inaugurated in 
1872 at their present address, and bringing to 
bear an unlimited amount of energy and en- 
terprise in their management, they made a 
sun-ess from the outset. Their finely fur- 
nished store, having an area of 20 x 50 feet, 
is furnished especially for the requirements of 
their trade, and is a very attractive salesroom. 
A large, carefully selected and excellently 
varied stock is at all times found displayed 
here, the assortment comprising all the latest 
newspapers and periodicals, novels, station- 
ery, fancy goods, cutlery and toys, tobaccos, 
foreign and domestic cigars, confectionery in 
full variety, and a very superior supply of: all 
the latest fruits in season. An extensive city 
and suburban trade is catered to. demanding 
the employment of a staff of five clerks. The 
members of the firm, Messrs. F. F. and S.W. 
Moses, are gentlemen of excellent business 
ability, upright and straightforward natives 
of this city. 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



Jeimess & Dowel, Manufacturers of all 
kinds of Foreign and American Marble, No. 52 
Market Street. The growth of the industrial 
and mercantile resources of Portsmouth dur- 
ing recent years has been of the most gratify- 
ing order, new enterprises constantly coming 
into existence to aid in the general prosperity 
and development of the community. Among 
the most noticeable of recent industries estab- 
lished here is that conducted by Messrs. Jen- 
ness and Dowd. This firm inaugurated their 
business in March, 1887, and are carrying on 
general operations as manufacturers of all 
kinds of foreign and American marble and 
granite work of all kinds. The co-partners are 
practically acquainted with every department 
of their profession, having been engaged in it 
for years, and they are assisted in their opera- 
tions by a corps of skilled workmen. The 
workshop, having an area of 25 x 50 feet, has 
every facility at command to aid in the pro- 
duction. Marble and granite work of every 
description is executed to order at short no- 
tice, a specialty being made of monumental 
work, and for originality of design and elabo- 
rate finish in their output, Messrs. Jenness & 
Dowd cannot be excelled by any of their con- 
temporaries. They receive the choicest qual- 
ity of Italian marble direct through a leading 
Boston importing house, and their granite 
from the leading quarries of New England. 
They are prepared with the best conveniences 
to manufacture to order any design required, 
and to meet every demand of the trade prompt- 
ly, guaranteeing entire satisfaction in all cases. 
The members of the firm, Messrs. Lowell Jen- 
ness and John H. Dowd, are both New Eng- 
landers, the former having been born in this 
State, the latter in Maine. They have an ex- 
tensive business and social acquaintance, and 
their permanent success is fully assured. 

J. Brooks V Co., Flour, Grain and Grass 
Seeds, Steam Mills and Elevator near Concord 
R. R. Depot, Office and Store Nos. 141 and 143 
Market Street. As a striking instance of the 
extensive centre Portsmouth has become for 
all branches of trade, we may quote the busi- 
ness house of Messrs. J. Brooks & Co., of Nos. 
141 and 143 Market Street, who are widely 
known as wholesale and retail dealers in flour, 
grain and grass seeds, pork, lard, etc., and as 
proprietors of the steam mills and elevator 
near the Concord R. R. depot. The business of 
this house was originally established some 
thirty-five years ago by Mr. J. Brooks, and in 
I8ii5, the firm of J. Brooks & Co., was organized 
by the admission to partnership of Mr. H. A. 
Yeaton. In 1878 Mr. Brooks died, and the busi- 
ness lias since been conducted by Mr. Yeaton 
and the Brooks estate. The elevator was built 
in 1880, and has a capacity of 25,000 bushels. 
For trade purposes the firm occupy a fine large 
store on Market Steeet, where is carried a 
large stock of the best brands of flour, which 
is regulated by the.demands of the trade. In or 
der to fill orders promptly in all cases, arrange- 
ments are made with large shippers where- 
by the stock of flour and grain is kept full and 
complete. The goods are received direct from 
manufacturers and first hands, and are sold to 
the trade and consumers in quantities to suit, 
at the lowest market prices. The trade is 
large and active in the city and throughout the 



states of New Hampshire and Maine, requir- 
ing the employment of a large force of men 
and teams, and which is annually increasing in 
volume and importance. Mr. Yeaton is a na- 
tive of Portsmouth, well-known as a useful cit- 
izen and an upright business man. 



Oren Bragdon & Son, Manufacturers of 
and Dealers in Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, No. 
24 Market Street. Among the prominent mer- 
cantile establishments is that of Messrs. Oren 
Bragdon & Son, manufacturers of, and dealers 
in, boots, shoes and rubbers. The business was 
originally founded some forty years ago by 
Mr. Oren Bragdon, who is a native of Maine, 
but has resided in this city since 18o7. Dur- 
ing the r war he served as City Marshal, fulfil- 
ing all his onerous duties in a capable and effi- 
cient manner. As a merchant he has ever 
been noted for his horn sty, honorable methods 
and liberal policy, and he commands the re- 
spect of the entire community. His son, Mr. 
Wm. A. Bragdon, who was born in this city, 
and who spent many years in Boston in the 
wholesale boot and shoe business, was admit- 
ted a member of the firm on January 1, 1S87. 
He is a business man of thorough training, en- 
ergetic and enterprising, and is popular and 
well-liked in both mercantile and social circles. 
The business premises occupied have an area 
of 20 x 60 feet, are excellently fitted up, and 
contain a splendid assortment of fine boots, 
shoes, rubbers and slippers of every descrip- 
tion, which has been carefully selected from 
the leading manufacturers of the country and 
are unsurpassed for style, excellence of qual- 
ity, and the remarkably low prices at which 
they are offered. Special attention is given to 
custom work and repairing, all orders being 
executed faithfully at low prices. 



Joseph Pettigrew, Boots, Shoes and 
Slippers, No. 1 Congress Street, (opp. North 
Church.) Without making any insidious com- 
parisons, we should Jt>e unfaithful in the dis- 
charge of our duties as truthful historians, 
if we failed to make mention of the widely 
known boot and shoe establishment so ably 
conducted by Mr. Joseph Pettigrew of No. 1 
Congress Street. This business was founded 
in 1868, and from that time to this, has enjoyed 
a liberal patronage. The store is 20 x 40 feet 
in dimensions attractively arranged and ?con- 
tains as fine a line of goods as can be found in 
any similar establishment in this city. Polite 
and obliging attention is accorded to all visi- 
tors by Mr. Pettigrew and two assistants, and 
no misrepresentations are made in order to 
effect a sale, consequently patrons can rely on 
all goods obtained here. He carries every- 
thing in the way of foot-wear for the old 
and young of both sexes, of all sizes, styles 
and qualities, and makes a specialty of the 
celebrated A.S.T. Co. black sole leather tip 
shoes for children, the only kind that will not 
injure the feet, and of which he sells large 
numbers. He also makes boots and shoes to 
order at low prices, repairs the same promptly 
and on moderate terms. He is a native of this 
city, and is one of Portsmouth's most solid 
business men. He is a member of the Me- 
chanics' Association, I.O.O.F. and the Re- 
beccas. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



Peter Strickland, Sail Maker, and Man- 
ufacturer of Awnings, Tents, Flags, and Horse | 
Covers, Xo. '.)! Market Street. An interesting 
and important industry is that conducted in 
Portsmouth by Mr. Peter Strickland, at his es- 
tablishment, Xo. 91 Market Street. This gen- 
tleman is well known throughout the State as 
a sail maker of large experience and estab- 
lished reputation; also, as an extensive man- 
ufacturer of awnings, tents, flags, and horse 
covers. The business was originally estab- 
lished in 1885, by Messrs. Thomas S. Gay & Co., 
Mr. Strickland being a member of the firm and 
succeeding to the sole control in April, 1886. 
The premises occupied by .the business com- 
prise three floors, 30 x 70 feet each, and a com- 
petent force of skilled and expert hands are 
constantly employed. The specialty of this 
house is the manufacture of sails to order, 
while a large and growing business is tran- 
sacted in making both for the trade and to or- 
der all kinds of plain and fancy awnings, tents, 
flags, and horse covers. Many of the leading- 
ship owners along the coast are constant pa- 
trons of this house, and the many sailing craft 
that frequent' this section add largely to the 
general patronage, while the regular trade in 
canvas goods forms an important factor in the 
business. Awnings and frames for stores and 
private dwellings are made and put up at the 
shortest notice. Striped awning cloth and all 
kinds of sail cloth are kept for sale ; also, boat 
sailSj wagon covers, canvas signs, tent poles, 
pins, flag poles, etc. The proprietor is the 
agent here for water-proof duck, and the only 
manufacturer of flags in the State. The flags 
manufactured by him are of the finest material 
and design, and are for sale and to let for dec- 
orations. The awnings made by him are of 
superior quality and finish* and the goods in 
every department of the business are such as 
to commend their own merits to the inspection 
of all. Mr. Strickland is a thoroughly practical 
and experienced manufacturer, having a com- 
plete knowledge of all the details and require- 
ments of his trade. 



Butler, " Hatter," and Gent's Furnish- 
er, Xo. 13 Congress Street. A house that 
has been established for half a century must 
necessarily engage and attract more than ordi- 
inary attention from the compilers of this re- 
oiew of the commerce and industries of the city 
vf Portsmouth. Such an establishment is that 
now conducted by Mr. George W. Butler, at 
Xo. 13 Congress street. This noteworthy con- 
cern was originally founded fifty years ago by 
X. K. Walker, and has since undergone several 
changes of management, the present propri- 
etor coming into control in 1880. Under his 
energetic directorship the facilities of the 
house, as well as its trade, have been greatly 
extended, and its prosperity placed upon a 
substantial, permanent footing. The hand- 
somely furnished salesroom, 20 x 50 feet in di- 
mensions, is one of the most atti-active business 
places in the city. It is filled to its utmost ca- 
pacity with a complete stock of the choicest 
go<i ds, embracing the finest line of silk, wool, 
cloth and felt hats and caps, in all the newest 
and most fashionable styles. The variety 
shown in gentlemen's furnishings is complete 
in every respect, and includes the best grades 
in fine' underwear, neckwear, laundered and 



unlaundered shirts, scarfs, cuffs, collars, hos- 
iery, gloves, etc., and the prices are always as 
low as the lowest. A display of superior 
trunks, travelling bags and valises is also made. 
Customers have all their wants attended to 
without delay, and are guaranteed satisfaction 
in their purchases. Mr. Butler is a native of 
the State of Vermont, and is now in the prime 
of life. 



J. W. Moses, Tailor and Draper, and 
Dealer in Clothing and Furnishing Goods, 
No. 6 Market Street. The business had its 
origin in 1837, when it was founded by Mr. 
Charles Cheever. who, five years later was 
succeeded by Mr. Moses. For forty-five years 
he has beeii doing business in his present 
store, which is a veritable land-mark in the 
history of the city's industrial enterprise. 
The store is very commodious, and stocked 
with a choice selection of gentlemen's outfit- 
ting goods of every description. Of ready 
made clothing, made up from the most relia- 
ble materials, in the best style of workman- 
ship, and in the prevailing fashions, there is 
an ample display, and here men, youths and 
boys of all sizes and ages, can secure perfect 
fitting apparel at remarkably low prices. In 
gentlemen's furnishing goods all the most 
recent novelties in neckwear, underwear, 
shirts, collars, cuffs, etc., are shown. The 
house is particularly noted for the superior 
quality of the shirts dealt in. The special 
feature of the business is the custom depart- 
ment, which contains an extensive stock of 
foreign and domestic fabrics of the finest 
quality. Garments and suits are made to 
order and a perfect fit is guaranteed. Prompt 
attention is given to cleansing and repairing, 
and a large patronage is enjoyed. Mr. Moses 
is a native of this city, and one of its most pop- 
ular merchants. 



John I>. Randall, Mercantile Job 
Printer, Xo. 5 Congress Street. Mr. Randall 
established himself in 1882 and is a practical 
printer, well knowing the wants of the com- 
munity in his line. Since the inception of his 
enterprise he has always enjoyed a liberal and 
permanent patronage from all classes of the 
community. The premises occupied are very 
commodious, and are furnished with the latest 
improved presses, types and materials of all 
descriptions. In mechanical execution Mr. 
Randall's printing cannot be excelled, and he 
keeps constantly on hand the most extensive 
supply of new type, comprising all the latest 
styles, and is always making additions as new 
designs are issued. He does all kinds of job 
and commercial printing promptly and in an 
artistic manner on very moderate terms. He 
publishes " The Seashore," an eight page 
journal, of large circulation, and devoted to 
the interests of the summer visitors in the 
vicinity. It is issued on Saturday, and v ell 
filled with interesting reading matter. All or- 
ders by mail or otherwise are promptly at- 
tended to, and the work executed to the satis- 
faction of his patrons. He is a native of this 
city, and thoroughly understands every detail 
of his business in which he is prompt and re- 
liable in all his dealings and merits the 
success thus far achieved and a permanent 
continuance of the same. 



60 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



National and Rockiiighum House, 

Sale and Let Stable. Xathan Jones, Proprietor. 
No. 23 Hanover Street. Mr. Jones established 
his business here in 1SS5, and has built up a 
large patronage in all branches of his trade. 
His establishment has become a popular head- 
quarters not only in the livery business, but 
also as a famous horse mart, where horses, 
carriages, harnesses, blankets, robes, whips 
and halters could be bought, exchanged or 
hired at the lowest prices. The stable has first- 
class accommodations for thirty-two horses, 
and is provided with every modern conven- 
ience and facility requisite for the enterprise. 
A splendid stock of horses is kept for hire, as 
well as a full line of carriages, buggies, landafus, 
hacks and other vehicles, suitable for either 
business or pleasure, at moderate rates. The 
boarding branch of the enterprise is patronized 
by the best class of customers, and an ex- 
perienced force of grooms and stall-men give 
careful attention to the comfort of the stock. 
Mr. Jones is a recognized authority upon the 
good points and the treatment of horses, and 
has unsurpassed facilities for supplying those 
in quest of driving horses with the best in the 
market. Parties in need of horses, carriages 
or horse furnishing goods of any kind will do 
well to consult him as a gentleman who can 
furnish them with a reliable article to their 
entire satisfaction. His reputation for fair 
and honorable dealing has long been firmly 
established in this community. Mr. Jones is 
a native of Harrington, X. H., and came to 
this city at the age of eighteen, residing here 
ever since. His brother, Hon. Frank Jones, is 
well known as the ex-member of Congress 
from this district. 



J. K. .Tlunnintf, Boots. Shoes and Slip- 
pers, Xo. 5 Market Street. This house was 
established eight years ago and is now the 
largest in its line in the city and since its in- 
ception has enjoyed a liberal and substantial 
patronage due to the superior quality of the 
goods handled, their low prices, and the honor- 
able business methods of its proprietor. He 
occupies a fine store 15 x 80 feet in dimensions 
handsomely finished and fitted up, and ad- 
mirably arranged for the effective display of 
his stock. He carries a complete assortment 
of boots, shoes, gaiters and slippers, for men 
and boys; and for ladies, everything seasonable 
and fashionable from the dainty kid slipper to 
the strong walking shoe. The trade is large 
and steadily increasing, fine polite assistants 
aid the proprietor in attending to the wants 
of his rminy customers, and neatness, order 
and system prevail. Mr. Manning is a native 
of Xewmarket X. H. and is an active progres- 
sive business man. 



John L,. Randall, Ship Stores, Groceries, 
Flour, Tea, Coffee and Country Produce, Con- 
fectionery, Tobacco and Cigars ; No. 66 State 
Street, Corner Pleasant. Established in 1881 
by the present popular proprietor, situated in 
an eligible location for trade purposes, and 
dealing in every description of goods coming 
under the head of ship stores and family gro- 
ceries, the house of Mr. John L. Randall, at 
No. 66 State Street, corner of Pleasant, is num- 
bered among the most prosperous in its spe- 
cial line of trade in Portsmomth. The stock 



includes the best brands of flour, and the 
finest teas, the purest coffees and spices, 
canned goods in greatjrariety, sugars, syrups 
and molasses, preserves, pickles, table delica- 
cies and condiments, the products'of the farm, 
the dairy, the orchard and the garden, fresh 
from the hands of the producer, a fine line of 
confectionery, and the best brands of domes- 
tic and imported cigars and tobacco. Goods 
are delivered promptly to all parts of the city, 
and orders from the country are filled with 
the utmost dispatch. The trade is large and 
active in both city and country, and the best 
possible inducements are offered to families 
and vessels in regard to both excellence of 
goods and economy of prices. Mr. Eandall is 
known as one of the prominent and reliable 
grocers of Portsmouth. 

William DeCourcy, Fashionable Tailor, 
No. 37 Congress Street. Mr. DeCourcy has, by 
his enterprise, skill, and splendid acquirements 
in his profession, established a trade that is 
broadly distributed throughout all this section, 
and is both large, first-class and influential in 
city and country. He has teen actively en- 
gaged in business here since 1871, and deVotes 
his entire attention to fine clothing and first- 
class custom work. He occupies two floors, 20 
x 50 feet each, and exhibits one of the finest 
lines of domestic and foreign fabrics ever 
brought to this city, including overcoatings, 
suitings and trouserings that give the limit of 
manufacture in high-class goods. The gar- 
ments produced at his establishment are per- 
fect in style, fit and artistic woikmanship. and 
recommend the house at once to the confidence 
and patronage of all. A force of twenty hands, 
all skilled and experienced in the art, are reg- 
ularly employed, while all the details of the bus- 
iness are under the personal supervision of the 
proprietor, whose excellent taste and practical 
judgment serve to insure satisfaction to every 
customer. Prices aie placed at as low a figure 
as is consistent with first-class work, and the 
trade of the house is annually increasing in vol- 
ume and importance. Mr. DeCourcy is a native 
of Montpelier, Vermont, in the prime of life, 
reliable and responsible in all his dealings. and 
eminently popular and successful in catering 
to the wants of the community in this direc- 
tion of trade. 



H. C. LiOcko, Foreign and Domestic Fruits, 
etc. ; No. 14 Maiket; Street. This business 
was established i y this gentleman nine- 
teen years ago. and in all this long period 
he has enjoyed a biilstantial patronage. He 
occupies a store 15 x 50 feet in dimensions, 
neatly finished and fitted up, and admirably 
arranged for the advantageous display of his 
diversified stock. He carries a full line of 
foreign and domestic fruits, confectionery of 
all kinds, including the celebrated Whitman's 
Philadelphia chocolate drops and caramels. 
also choice teas and coffees from the "Orien- 
tal Tea Company.'' and a full line of Looks. 
magazines, New York story papers, serials. 
periodicals, etc. In another department- he 
has beer, ale and light drinks. Mr. Locke 
is a native of Concord in this state, and is 
prominently identified with the order of the 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Knights of Honor and the Ked Men. 



LEAVING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



61 



William P. Walker, Merchant Tailor, 
No. 8 Market Square. The history of promi- 
nent representatives of the tailor's art in Ports- 
mouth must give a leading position to Mr. Wil- 
liam P. Walker, of No. 8 Market Square. Not 
to know this gentleman argues one's self un- 
known. He has heen a tower of strength in 
his profession for these many years, having 
been actively engaged in the business here ever 
since 1848. He is still apparently in the prime 
of life, and has developed a reputation in his 
line of trade that places him beyond the re- 
quirements of praise. To seek his services 
once is to be his patron always. His place of 
business is the popular headquarters for those 
who appreciate an establishment where is to be 
found a line of goods that is at all times supe- 
rior, and where the general make-up, lit and 
trimming of a garment is a matter of careful 
consideration and study. His store is eligibly 
si United, and every facility is at hand for rapid, 
successful and satisfactory work. He exhibits 
a line stock of clothes and trimmings, com- 
plete in material, design and novelty, and rep- 
resenting the best sources of American and 
European production. Mi-. Walker devotes his 
time to nothing but lino custom work, and the 
garments made by him are acknowledged by 
every patron to be perfection in style, fit and 
artistic workmanship. The trade of the house 
is hiTge, first class and influential, requiring the 
constant services of a large force of skilled 
hands and his patrons embrace many of the 
officers of the.TJ. S. Navy and a goodly number 
of our best dressed citizens and solid business 
men. His prices are placed as low as is con- 
sistent with first class work, and he is known 
to be eminently fair and conscientious in all 
bis business methods. Mr. Walker is a native 
of this state, in the thirty-second degree of 
Masonry, prominent in the order of (:dd Fel- 
lows, and respected and popular in all the re- 
lations of life. 



I>. II. Montgomery. Sole Agent for the 
Knabe Pianos. Dealer in Pianos, Organs. Sheet 
Music and Musical Goods. Pictures and 
Frames, Artists' Materials, No. 6 Pleasant 
Street, opposite Post Office. Attention is here 
directed to the popular emporium of D. II. 
Montgomery, sole agent for the celebrated 
Knabe pianos, and dealer in pianos, organs, 
sheet music, general musical merchandise, 
art novelties and picture frames, eligibly lo- 
cated at No. 6 Pleasant Street, Where is always 
displayed an exceedingly fine assortment of 
everything comprehended in this line, includ- 
ing besides the excellent and elegant Knabe 
pianos, also the well and favorably known 
('bickering, Ives & Pond, Briggs and the 
Vose pianos, and the Mason & Hamlin. 
Wilcox & White and the Smith American 
organs. This store was established in isi>2 by 
D. H. Montgomery (deceased), who conducted 
it up to November 13. 1885, when owing to his 
death which occurred at this period, the busi- 
ness passed into the control of H. P. Mont- 
gomery, who as manager has since continued 
the same for the estate of the late proprietor 
and founder. The store, which is 25 x 70 feet in 
dimensions, is finely appointed and a very 
superior and complete stock is constantly 
carried on hand, embracing pianos and organs 
of the leading American manufactures, other 



musical instruments, violins, guitars, banjos, 
etc.. sheet music, music books and musical 
goods of every description, also a superb as- 
sortment of artistic picture frames, pictures, 
holiday cards and novelties in great va- 
riety, fancy articles and the exquisite Sou- 
venir album for which the house is sole 
agent here. Several expert hands are em- 
ployed, and picture framing and kinditd work 
is done to order in the most superior ;,nil ex- 
peditious manner ; also piano tuning and re- 
pairing while three courteous and efficient 
clerks attend to the wants of customers. Pianos 
and organs are sold either for cash or on easy 
payments 'by the week or month to suit pat- 
trons, and the same are also rented at very 
reasonable rates, liberal and honorable terms 
prevailing in every instance. 

F B. Colemail, Druggist and Apothe- 
cary, Corner Congress and Yanghan streets. 
Among the best known members of the phar- 
maceutical profession in Portsmouth can be 
named F. B. Coleman. who enjoys an excellent 
reputation for pure and fresh drugs and medi- 
cines, as well as for accuracy and reliability in 
preparing physicians' prescriptions. The store 
was established in 1865 by J. II. Thatcher, who 
couducted it up to 1877 when he was succeeded 
by the present proprietor. The store is finely 
fitted up, and a carefully selected and com- 
plete stock is always carried, embracing be- 
sides pure drugs, medicines and chemicals of 
all kinds, acids, extiacts, and proprietary n me- 
dics of merit (including several effective prepa- 
rations put up 1 y Mr. Coleman himself), spirits. 
alcohol, perlumery. toilet articles, sponges, 
soaps, chamois, small wares, stationery, "lluy 
ler's" candies, fine cigars, flavors, mineral wa- 
ters and kindred specialties: while an efficient 
and capable assistant is in attendance, and the 
trade, which is both wholesale and retail, is at 
once large, prosperous and permanent, extend- 
ing throughout the city, surrounding country. 
and the beaches. Mr. Coleman, who is a na- 
tive of this place, is a practical and expert 
pharmacist, with many years experience in the 
exercise of his profession, and stands high in 
the community both in social and commercial 
circles. 



Jolin T. Freneli, Dealer in Doors. Sash. 
Blinds and Mouldings ; Nos. 17 to 21 Daniel 
Street. This house was founded in 1860 by 
the present owner, who is a native of this city, 
and from the outset it has been prosperous, 
owing to the uniformly high standard of ex- 
cellence at which the goods have been main- 
tained. The building occupied has three floors, 
each 25x50 feet in dimensions, admirably 
adapted for the purposes of the business, and 
supplied with every necessary convenience. 
The stock is complete, and was personally 
selected by Mr. French from the most trust- 
worthy sources of manufacture, and comprises 
building material which is unrivalled for relia- 
bility, utility, finish and general excellence by 
any other establishment handling this class of 
goods. A large trade is enjoyed, and all orders 
are met with prompt fulfilment at the most 
favorable terms. Mr. French is a gentleman 
who looks well after the interests of his cus- 
tomers, and has ever preserved an enviable 
name for strict mercantile integrity. 



62 



CITY OF PORTSMOUTH. 



J. W. Y ouiivf. Sole Leather and Cut Stock, 
Boots and Shoes Made and Repaired, Rubber 
Repairing a Specialty; also Sole Agent for the 
celebrated Vienna Pressed Yeast, Rear of City 
Building. Mr. .1. W. Young, the proprietor of 
these popular and prosperous enterprises was 
born in this State in 1838, and has been a resi- 
dent of the city of Portsmouth for many years. 
He founded these enterprises in 1879, and now 
occupies premises in the rear of the City Build- 
ing, comprising a work-shop and salesroom 
both of which are of ample dimensions to meet 
the requirements of his trade. He deals quite 
extensively in sole leather and cut stock, shoe 
findings, etc., and in his stock will be found all 
accessories to the successful making of a boot 
or shoe of any kind of material. His stock of 
sole leather is the best to be found in the mar- 
ket, while all of his upper stock is from the 
best manufactories, while his line of ladies' and 
gentlemen's lasts are of the latest and most 
fashionable designs, and among the findings 
will be found every tool from a crimping-board 
or boot-tree down to the most diminutiVe last- 
ing tack, also forepart, shank and burnishing 
irons, wax, bristles, thread, etc. The yeast 
business which was established by him at the 
same time, although small at the beginning 
and slow to start, has now, through his great 
energy and skilful management, become a suc- 
cess and a leading branch of his business, he 
having delivered the past year more than $o()00 
worth to his customers. It has proved itself so 
good and reliable an article that it has become 
indispensable to every hotel, baker and family 
in this vicinity. He makes a specialty of mak- 
ing to order fine boots and shoes for ladies and 
gentlemen in which lie uses none but the very 
best materials. Repairing of all kinds receives 
prompt attention, and a particular specialty is 
made of repairing rubber boots and shoes. 
Mr. Young served in the United States Navy 
during the War of the Rebellion, in the United 
States steamer Kearsarge, and was present at 
the memorable naval engagement between that 
vessel and the Rebel gunboat Alabama. 

Davis Brothers, Portrait and Landscape 
Photographers, No. 15 Pleasant Street. To 
Messrs. Davis Brothers belongs the honor of 
conducting the oldest photographic studio in 
Portsmouth. It has been in great favor with 
the population of this city for over thirty 
years, and its popularity increases with the 
lapse of years. The studio was founded in 
1856, by Mr. Louis G. Davis, who, in the fol- 
lowing year took into partnership his brother 
Charles, since which date the style of the con- 
cern has been Davis Brothers. Both these gen- 
tlemen are natives of New Hampshire. The 
premises occupied comprise the second and 
third floors of the building, which is 25 x 50 
feet in dimensions. The reception-room is on 
the second floor, and is very handsomely fitted 
up and furnished. The operating-room, lo- 
cated on the third floor, is equipped with all 
the latest improved appliances and devices, the 
processes employed being such as have been 
approved and adopted by leading photogra- 
phers throughout the country. The members 
of the firm devote their attention to every 
branch of the art, photographs of every de- 
scription being produced from the carte de vis- 
ite to life size. Landscape, as well as portrait 



work, is given immediate attention, to, and the 
fullest satisfaction is given in respect of all 
orders. Portraits are enlarged and finished in 
India ink, crayon, pastel, etc., and the very 
highest results are guaranteed. The prices are 
fully as low as can be obtained in any first-class 
establishment. 



John II. Wells, Ranges and Kitchen fur- 
nishings, No. 61 Market Street. This gentle- 
man is an extensive dealer in stoves, ranges 
and kitchen furnishings of all kinds. The 
house over which he presides was founded 
some forty years ago, and has been under the 
management of various proprietors, among 
them Hon. Frank Jones, ex-member of Con- 
gress from this district, and has been in charge 
of the present proprietor since 1881. The 
premises occupied by the business comprise 
six floors, 20 x 40 feet each, giving ample ac- 
commodation for the prosecution of an active 
trade in all branches of the business. The 
stock is comprehensive, embracing a line of 
stoves and ranges embodying all the latest im- 
provements in heating and cooking; lamps and 
lamp goods, tin-ware of every description, and 
kitchen furnishings in great variety. These 
goods are ajl supplied from manufacturers di- 
rect, and are the best and most desirable in the 
trade. In tin, sheet>-iron and copper work, this 
house is thoroughly equipped for rapid, suc- 
cessful and satisfactory work, and every facil- 
ity is afforded for the prompt and perfect ful- 
filment of all orders. The trade is large and 
influential in city and country, and under en- 
terprising and progressive management is an- 
nually increasing in volume and importance. 
Mr. Wells is a native of Rockingham County, 
N. H. He and his sons are owners of a large 
first-class grocery store on the opposite side of 
the street, where can be found a "large and select 
stock of fancy and staple groceries, and every- 
thing found in a first-class grocery store. He 
has been in the grocery business since 1847. 

John P. Brason, Manufacturer of Fine 
Cigars, Nos. 51 and 27 Congress Street. This 
house is becoming widely known to the trade 
and smokers generally in the city of Ports- 
mouth and vicinity. Mr. Brason is a native of 
Massachusetts, and was formerly in the same 
line of business on Dexter Street, in Paw- 
tucket, R. I., but removed to this city and es- 
tablished this industry at Nos. 51 and 27 Con- 
gress Street, in September, 1886. His store 
arid workshop although of not very pretentious 
proportions are appropriately separated and 
fitted up with special reference to the business 
carried on. .He has always made it a special 
point to use none but the very best qualities of 
materials, and to employ none but skilful and 
proficient workmen so that 'he could offer to 
his customers an article he could conscien- 
tiously recommend in every respect. That he 
has succeeded in doing this is well attested by 
the constantly increasing popularity of his 
goods and the demand for them wherever he 
introduced. In addition to his own produc- 
tion he keeps a fine and carefully selected as- 
sorthient of cigarettes, chewing and smoking 
tobaccos of the very best brands, snuffs, pipes 
and other smokers' materials. His trade is 
large, both wholesale and retail and his prices 
are very low. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



63 



Chicago Meat Co., Dealers iu Beef, Ham, 
Veal, Fresh and Salt Pork, Sausages, Poultry 
and Vegetables; Christopher Smart, Manager, 
No. 4 Pleasant Street, next to Custom House. 
A method that has proved satisfactory iu 
supplying the demand for fresh beef is that 
adopted by the representative and widely 
known house of the Chicagb Meat Company, 
which consists of slaughtering the cattle in 
Chicago and shipping the dressed beef in re- 
frigerator cars to all points in the East, where 
it arrives as sweet and fresh as the day it was 
killed, with no perceptible loss in weight, and 
therefore can be sold at a less price to the con- 
sumer. This house was established August 1, 
183(5, at No. 4 Pleasant Street, nqxt door to the 
Custom House, under the management of Mr. 
Christopher Smart. The remarkable success 
that has rewarded the efforts of the Chicago 
Meat Company is a convincing proof of the 
wisdom shown in establishing this house. The 
premises occupied are ot ample dimensions 
which are fully equipped with all the latest 
improved refrigerators and cold storage nec- 
essary for the successful prosecution of the 
business. Here can be found a full and com- 
plete stock of the choicest beef, veal, mutton, 
lamb, pork, fresh and salt pork, hams, poultry, 
sausages, vegetables and fruit of all kinds in 
their season, and sold to customers at the most 
reasonable prices. The store is kept in the 
neatest and cleanest order, polite and courte- 
ous assistants attend to the wants of custom- 
ers, and orders are delivered by wagon at resi- 
dences throughout the city free of charge. 
Mr. Smart devotes his entire attention to the 
business and spares no efforts or pains to meet 
the wants of his patrons. He is a native of 
Portsmouth and an active and prominent mem- 



ber of the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias 
organizations. 



Woodfoury Seavey, Seeds, Agricultural 
Implements, Wheels and Wheel Stock, Wooden 
Ware, Baskets, Brooms, Fertilizers, Ground 
Plaster, etc., Nos. 62 and 64 Market Street. 
The house of Mr. Woodbury Seavey, at Nos. 62 
and 64 Market Street, from the enterprise and 
magnitude of its operations, as well as the use- 
fulness and diversity of its machinery and 
wares, is entitled to an honorable place on the 
pages of a work devoted to an impartial review 
of the commerce and industry of the city of 
Portsmouth. Mr. Seavey is well and favorably 
known throughout this community as a dealer 
in agricultural implements, seeds, wheels and 
wheel stock, wooden ware, baskets, brooms, 
fertilizers, ground plaster, etc. The business 
of this house was founded twenty-two years 
ago by Messrs. Goodwin and Sweetser, and, 
after some changes, Mr. Seavey and his son be- 
came the owners iu 1874, the son retiring in 
1880. The premises comprise two floors, 60 x 
40 feet each, and the establishment is one of 
the largest as well as oldest in this Une in the 
city. The stock of agricultural implements, 
seeds and tools for sale here comprises the 
most improved and those best adapted to the 
use of the farmer and gardener, all of which 
are fully warranted. They include ploughs, 
harrows, cultivators, lawn mowers, hoes, forks, 
shovels, spades, rakes,, and everything neces- 
sary or useful in or about the farm. The line 
of wheel stock embraces bent rims, spokes, 
hubs, etc., and the stock of fertilizers is full 
and complete, recommending its own merits to 
the wants of the agriculturist. Mr. Seavey is 
a native of New Hampshire, an experienced 
agriculturist, and a practical business man. 



CITY OF DOVER. 



THE City of Dover is situated in Rockingham County, on the Cocheco river, and is an import- 
int station of the Boston and Maine Railroad. Its projectors intended it for a manufacturing 
jentre, and their intention is being realized in the fullest measure. They builded well and 




FRANKLIN ACADEMY. 



wisely. Its birth and growth are peculiar to itself. It was not, as is usual, a place of residence 
first and of business afterwards ; but, to all practical intents and purposes, it was a business 
venture, and its excellent manufacturing resources are the palpitating centre around which its 
64 



CITY OF DOVER. 



65 



residence portion clusters and revolves. In every essential regard it is a most remarkable mu- 
nicipal example of true Yankee grit and enterprise. The enormous \vater-po\vei here running 
to waste early challenged the attention of New England capitalists, who quickly determined 
that this great waste in the land of steady habits, where the frugalities and economies of life 




HKLKNAP SCHOOL. 

were revered an- practiced as cardinal virtues, must not and should not go on. Under the 
stimulous of a rational and liberal policy, capital, brains and skill have reared a city that 
is brave, sturdy and commanding in all the material fibres and elements that predicate 




METHODIST CHURCH. 

commercial substance and success, and holds a future within its grasp. The amount of 
capital invested in manufacturing and other business enterprises here is enormous; the 
energy, practical knowledge and industrial skill exhibited in their management and opera- 
tion are of the highest order. But great as is the present outcome of the splendid resources 



66 



CITY OF DOVER. 



in hand, the development of these is still in its infancy. The growth of the city has beet 
healthy and substantial, and people who come here come for a purpose and to stay. Every 




PINE HILL SCHOOL HOUSE. 

year is addin,., .0 the aggregation of capital that here finds profitable investment, and to the 
amy of skilled artisans whose deft hands win ample wage. 

Let no one imagine, however, that the City of Dover is simply the seat of an extensive 




SCHOOL HOUSE, SAWYER MILLS. 

water-power and numerous extensive and flourishing manufactories. It is a delightful place 
in which to live. The city is self-contained, and complete in all those things that make 
life rational and worth the living. In building up the great and prosperous business interests 



CITY OF DOVER. 



G7 



that have made it famous, its people have not been oblivious to the significant, moral and 
social demands created and imposed by New England civilization. It is modern in every 
essential regard. Its streets mostly intersect at right angles, all its improvements, public 
and private, are of a substantial and permanent character, and mushroomism is conspicuous 
by its absence. Brick and stone are the prevailing building materials, and solid and sightly 
specimens of architecture adorn the principal thoroughfares. The number of beautiful pri- 
vate residences framed by cultivated lawns is a distinguishing feature, and its manifold signs 
of prosperity are matched by the countless symbols of intelligence, culture and refinement 
that rise on every hand. The average intelligence of its people is exceptionally high. The 




CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

symbols of education and culture are to be found on every hand and there is no lack of 
aestheticism ; but, fortunately, its inhabitants are utterly destitute of that overdone dilettante- 
ism that affects abhorrence of "greasy mechanics." Here lived and died Hon. John P. 
Hale, one of the greatest statesmen of thirty years ago ; here is the home of the present 
Governor of the State, who is largely identified with the manufacturing industries of Dover ; 
and just outside of the city limits reside ex-United States Senator Rollins, and Hon. Mr. 
Doe, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire. 



68 CITY OF DOVER. 



Ever since the town began to make real growth and history its people have been quick 
to encourage industrial arts and pursuits, and they have their reward in the annually aggre- 
gating wealth that flows from the manufactories that make the basis of the city's fame and 
fortune. Rents are moderate, building material cheap, water-power is abundant, the best 
skilled labor no higher here than elsewhere, while business men and capitalists are always 
ready and eager to give substantial aid and encouragement to the honest projectors of any 
and every legitimate enterprise. Time was, and not very long ago, when the general trade 
of Dover was insignificant enough as compared with its present generous proportions. It is 
now the natural receiving and distributing station for the immense amount of produce of 
all kind that is raised in the fertile agricultural country tributary to it. 

It goes without saying, of course, that the people of Dover have made large and ample 
provision for the education of their sons and daughters, and the plan here in vogue is of 
a piece with the system common to the state. The general interests of the public schools 
are carefully watched and safely guarded, and its instruction challenges the admiration of 
all. The school houses are ample in size and number, thoroughly modern and convenient 
in every essential respect, and of beautiful and substantial architecture. 

Religion and education go hand in hand, and side by side with the means that furnish 
the one are the organizations for religious work and worship. The same spirit that actuated 
the early settlers to found a church in their time has moved their descendants and follow- 
ers, and the establishment and growth of religious organizations have kept fairly in line 
with the material prosperity of the town. Many of the churches are elegant specimens of 
church architecture, of which any city in the Union might be proud. 

The city is well supplied with banking facilities, having three National and three Savings 
Banks, all well and ably managed, and offering every legitimate accommodation to their patrons. 

As a place of residence, Dover offers the advantages which only a prosperous growing , 
city of slow and legitimate growth can give. There is nothing ephemeral or false in the 
conditions attained. It has not "boomed" into sudden notice or spurious mushroom pros- 
perity. She has not "jobbed" her way to the enviable position she occupies. By agricul- 
ture and then by honest and superior labor ministering to the needs of the world in honor- 
able, pains-taking industry, she has, with the additional aid of commerce, grown naturally 
into orderly, healthful and ever-increasing prosperity. It is impossible to live in a town and 
not imbibe something of its spirit. Dover is healthy, bracing and invigorating, and in 
its influences public -spirited and elevating. There is not the feverish contagion of restless- 
ness and dissatisfaction that pervades some other cities. Beautiful homes have room, and 
sway, and individuality, with more or less of the green earth pertaining to them and room 
for "vine and fig-tree." Historic associations remind of a heroic and earnest past, such as 
men in the rush of to-day need the bracing influence of. Churches, free* schools and 
libraries are recognized as necessities, where all meet on common ground. Its climate is 
good ; its sanitary provisions superior ; its municipal protection efficient. Lighted by gas 
and electricity, provided with a street railway, and guarded by efficient police protection 
and a thorough fire department, it also combines cheap taxes and economical living rates 
to attract new residents. Building lots can be purchased by mechanics at remarkably low 
rates and on easy terms. The system of water works is excellent, and the water is both 
pure and abundant. In all those things that ordinarily classify themselves under the head 
of modern improvements, Dover is fairly abreast with the spirit of the age as represented in 
New England. The average New Englander of to-day is fond of that which it was not 
always possible for his ancestors to obtain comfort. His town may be old, but he does not 
mean that it shall lack any of those appointments and conveniences that predicate progress 
and the forms and forces of civilized life. Without the possession and enjoyment of these 
he is not comfortable either in body or soul. The people of Dover have provided them- 
selves with all these. Busy factories, productive farms, prosperous trade are not enough for 
them. Schools and churches must be counted in, and the demands of education and religion 
receive the attention which they deserve as conservators of an intelligent and stable community. 
The steady increase in population, which was 9,294 in 1870, and reached 11,687 in 1880, 
is now estimated to be close to 14, coo, with promise ot continued growth and prosperity. 



CITY OF DOVER. 



Merrimae Manufacturing Co., Confec- 
tioners, Manufacturers of Christmas and New 
Year's Novelties, Wedding Cake Ornaments, 
etc. ; Japanese Cough Drops a Specialty. Up 
to a comparatively recent period nearly all 
the finer grades of confections, candies and 
kindred toothsome products consumed in the 
United States, were imported from Europe. Of 
late years, however, thanks to native genius and 
progress, very notable and gratifying improve- 
ment has been effected in American confec- 
tionery, candy and pastry, which for flavor, 
pmity and quality are to-day unsurpassed by 
the best French productions of the kind. A 
widely and favorably known concern devoted 
to this interesting branch of industry in this 
section of the country is that of the Merrimae 
Manufacturing Co., Dover, N. II., manufactur- 
ers of confectionery, holiday novelties, wed- 
ding cake ornaments, Japanese cough drops, 
etc., and for which G. H. Biddle is agent in 
this city, and whose products maintain a de- 
servedly high reputation for general excellence 
and reliability and as a consequence are in 
steady and extensive demand. Mr. Biddle, 
who is a gentleman of thirty-eight and a native 
of Massachusetts, formerly engaged in the 
grocery trade for ten years, opened a store 
here in Dover in 1877 and at once established 
himself in public favor and prosperity, build- 
ing up in a short while a large and flourishing 
patronage. Handling and producing a very 
superior class of goods, of sterling integrity 
in his dealings, and being withal a man of 
push, sagacity and excellent business ability, 
the result could scarcely have been other than 
the unequivocal success that has attended the 
enterprise from the start. The premises oc- 
cupied for business purposes by the company, 
confectionery and bakery, are spacious and 
commodious, and are completely equipped in 
every respect with the best facilities and most 
improved appliances and appurtenances, while 
eight expert hands are employed in the baking 
department. The store is neatly kept and a. 
very inviting display is made, and a heavy and 
A 1 stock is constantly carried, comprising de- 
licious and wholesome confectionery of every 
description: caramels, chocolate creams, bon- 
bons, marsh mallows and toothsome candies of 



all kinds; plain and ornamental cakes, bread, 
pies and pastries of every variety ; Japanese 
cough drops being a specialty. A competent 
force of courteous and competent clerks attend 
to the wants of customers in the store, while 
three teams are in steady service supplying 
patrons throughout the city and environs, and 
altogether the trade, which is both wholesale 
and retail, is exceedingly large, extending over 
the greater part of the New England States. 



G. Il.Churlnick, Dealer in Choice Family 
Groceries, Teas, Coffees, Spices, Flour and 
Grain, Butter, Cheese, and Country Produce, 
Ham's Block. Prominent among the grocery 
establishments in Dover that are noted for 
selling only pure and superior goods is that of 
Mr. G. H. Churbuck, located in Ham's Block, 
on Washington Street. This gentleman has 
been well and favorably known in the grocery 
trade of this city for the past twenty years, 
and established his present store February 9, 
1884. His business premises comprise a store 
and basement, 20 x 60 feet each, and excellent 
facilities are possessed for conducting the bus- 
iness in a thoroughly systematic and success- 
ful manner. The stock is complete, fresh and 
desirable in every department, and embraces 
teas, coffees, and spices, flour, grain and 
country produce, butter, cheese and eggs, 
sugars, syrups and molasses, canned goods, 
table sauces and foreign and American delica- 
cies in great variety; green and dried fruits, 
baker's bread, fresh milk, early vegetables, 
and everything appertaining to a first-class 
grocery and provision store. All goods are 
purchased direct from manufacturers and pro- 
ducers, and are highly esteemed by the com- 
munity for their freshness, purity and low 
prices. Patrons of this establishment have 
the satisfaction of knowing that nothing infe- 
rior or adulterated will be offered them. The 
trade of the house is large and active, requir- 
ing the services of five men and three teams, 
and prompt and careful attention is given to 
every order. Mr. Churbuck is a native of 
Massachusetts, and very popular in this city 
as an enterprising merchant and a reliable 
business man. 



69 



CITY OF DOVER. 



George Dunn, Brewers' Agent and Dealer 
in Pure California Wines, Lowell's Block, P. O. 
Box 220. One of the most prominent, active, 
and substantial business men of this city is Mr. 
George Dunn, the well-known brewers' agent 
and dealer in pure California wines. This gen- 
tleman inaugurated his enterprise here in 1877, 
and has met constantly increasing success from 
the outset, building up a large, first-class line 
of patronage strictly on the merits of his goods 
and by honorable, straightforward dealing. 
The commodious premises occupied comprise 
a store and basement, each 20 x 50 feet in di- 
mensions, excellently fitted for the purposes of 
the house, and filled with a very extensive 
stock of the choicest class of goods in this line. 
The assortment comprises wines and liquors 
of every description, including the finest wines 
of California vintage, imported and domestic 
brandies, gins, whiskies Irish, Scotch, bour- 
bon, rye; rums, cordials, bitters, ales, lagers 
and porters. Mr. Dunn is agent for Frank 
Jones' celebrated ale, for Dover and vicinity, 
always keeping a full supply of this favorite 
beverage on hand. The trade carried on is ex- 
clusively wholesale and is principally with ho- 
tels and families. Every facility is possessed 
for the prompt fulfilment of orders, and two 
delivery teams are constantly employed in de- 
livering goods at their destination. A spe- 
cialty is made of supplying California wines at 
the lowest prices, and every article sold is 
guaranteed to be strictly pure and free from 
adulteration of any kind whatever. The wines 
and brandies are specially beneficial for inva- 
lids, or persons with debilitated systems, who 
need building up. A trial is sufficient to prove 
their excellence. Mr. Dunn, who is a native of 
this city, is one of our most esteemed citizens, 
and progressive merchants. He has ever taken 
an active part in promoting the best interests 
of the community, and his reputation as a mer- 
chant and business man has long since been 
established beyond the requirements of 
praise. 

Lothrop, Fariihain & Co., Clothiers, 
Hatters and Furnishers, No. 476 Central Ave- 
nue. The Messrs. Lothrop, who founded the 
business here many years ago, have long been 
prominent in every good work for the advance- 
ment of the business interests of the city, and 
justly deserve the esteem in which they are 
held in the community and the success which 
they have achieved. The present firm was or- 
ganized in 1882, and the house is a recognized 
leader in its line of trade, holding a command- 
ing position among the mercantile institutions 
of the State. As clothiers, hatters and fur- 
nishers, this firm are supplied with every fa- 
cility for catering to the tastes and ministering 
to the wants of the public with the most emi- 
nent success and satisfaction. The store is 
spacious, attractive and commodious, and one 
of the largest and finest business houses in the 
city. The firm devotes special attention to 
the sale of fine clothing for men, youth, boys 
and children, each grade being made in the 
latest style and of the best material, selected 
with care and judgment. The assortment of 
hats embraces the latest and most seasonable 
styles, and the line of furnishings includes all 
the novelties in neckwear, underwear, shirts, 
hosiery, gloves,handkerchiefs, collars and cuffs, 



and other fittings for all seasons. Five clerks 
and salesmen give prompt and careful atten- 
tion to the demands of customers, and the 
trade is brisk and lively at all times. The 
members of this firm are Messrs. James E. 
Lothrop, Daniel Lothrop, Jr., John C. Lothrop, 
Charles H. Farnham and John J. Hausen. 
Daniel Lothrop, Jr. resides in Boston, and is 
widely known under the name of D. Lothrop 
& Co. as book publishers. The other mem- 
bers are prominent citizens of Dover. Mr. 
James E. Lothrop is president of the Cocheco 
National Bank, and Mr. John J. Hausen is 
president of the Dover National Bank. Mr. 
Charles H. Farnham is a young man that has 
been connected with Messrs. Lothrop as sales- 
man and manager for the past thirteen years, 
forming the present firm by entering together 
with Mr. Hauseu in 1882, the firm up to that 
time being known as D. Lothrop & Co. Al- 
though the business done previous to 1882 was 
the largest of any in the city, it was as nothing 
when compared with the present firm's busi- 
ness. The entire management of the firm's 
affairs is given into the hands of Mr. Farnham, 
who is a man full of energy and push. Since 
his entrance into the firm he has remodelled 
the entire store, putting in an elegant front 
besides building on extensions at three differ- 
ent times. During this time he has started a 
branch house at Cocheco Block, Rochester. X. 
H., being the only American clothing house in 
the town; and in the face of extremely hard 
competition he has, with the utmost energy, 
pushed his firm to the leading place among the 
merchants of that time. He is as active in 
promoting the interest and commerce of Eoch- 
ester as of Dover. Mr. J. E. Lothrop and Mr. 
Hausen have been quite prominent in forming 
the Dover Improvement Association, a com- 
pany that has been the means of bringing a 
large number of manufacturing interests into 
this city. 



A. E. Parker, Fancy Goods, Kid Gloves, 
Corsets, Hosiery, Fringes, Buttons and Laces. 
No. 37G Central Avenue. This store was es- 
tablished by E. C. and W. N. Andrews about 
forty years ago, who were succeeded in ]S~<> 
by the present proprietor. Handling a very 
superior line of goods, of strict probity in his 
dealings, and devoting untiring attention to 
the wants of his customers, it is only in the 
nature of things that Mr. Parker should se- 
cure the firm and flattering hold on popular 
favor he has from the first deservedly enjoyrd. 
The store, which is 20 x 65 feet in dimensions. 
is neatly fitted up and a large and admirably 
selected stock is always carried on hand, in- 
cluding elegant trimmings, beautiful laces and 
embroideries, exquisite kid gloves, novelties 
in neckwear, making a specialty of kid gloves, 
corsets, hosiery, ladies' underwear, fringes, but- 
tons and fancy goods in great variety; while 
four polite and competent clerks and salesla- 
dies attend to the wants of purchasers, no pains 
being spared in this flourishing establishment 
to render the fullest satisfaction in every in- 
stance to patrons. Mr. Parker, who is a gentle- 
man in the prime of life .and a native of 
Wolfborough, N. H., is well and favorably 
known in the community alike as a business 
man and citizen. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



71 



William A. Morrill, Window Shades and 
Fixtures, Carpetings, Crockery and Glass 
Ware, Plated Ware and Fancy Goods, No. 1 
Cocheeo Block. This reputable house was 
founded in 1847 by Mr. Abel C. Smith, the 
present proprietor being a clerk in the estab- 
lishment, and he and his brother succeeded to 
the sole control in 1859 (his brother retiring in 
1871). The premises occupied by the business 
comprise three floors and a basement, 30 x 60 
feet each, divided into appropriate depart- 
ments, and each well managed and completely 
stocked with new and desirable goods. The 
stock is comprehensive and diversified, em- 
bracing in carpets a splendid assortment of 
body Brussels, tapestry, ingrains and other 
styles, including the latest designs and patterns 
in both foreign and domestic production, and 
presenting a brilliant display of the possibilities 
of production. The lines of crockery and 
glassware are complete, and every effort has 
been made to improve the quality and enhance 
the value of the stock in every essential par- 
ticular. All goods are selected with taste and 
judgment, and are offered at prices that com- 
mand the attention of the closest and most 
judicious buyers. The connections of the pro- 
prietor with manufacturers and importers en- 
able him to secure the freshest and choicest nov- 
elties so soon as they are ready for the market, 
and his enterprise in this direction is duly ap- 
preciated by the public who give him a gener- 
ous and liberal patronage. Mr. Merrill is a 
native of Massachusetts, and a resident of 
Dover since 1834. 



Pattee Brothers, General House Fur- 
nishers and Dealers in Carpets, Stoves, Cur- 
tains, Bedding, etc., No. 378 Central Avenue. 
This large establishment has become the fa- 
vorite headquarters, for general house furnish- 
ing goods, including furniture, carpets, stoves, 
curtains, bedding, etc., and although opened to 
the public as recently as December, 1886, it has 
taken rank as the foremost concern of the kind 
in this city and county. The premises occu- 
pied for trade purposes comprise six floors, 40 
x 80 feet each, the whole being arranged in the 
best manner for the rapid and economical 
handling of goods. A large stock is carried in 
each department, embracing black walnut suits, 
plush parlor suits, ash chamber suits, fancy 
lounges, hair-cloth parlor sets, fancy spring 
rockers, fancy student chairs, black walnut 
side-boards, writing desks, and other furniture 
for the parlor, chamber, dining-room, hall, li- 
brary, office and kitchen, ranging in quality 
from the plainest to the most elaborate and 
costly, and including many beautiful specimens 
of mechanical skill and excellence. The sup- 
ply is of the most complete and comprehensive 
character, and well calculated to meet the re- 
quirements of every taste and fancy. In the 
carpet department 'a line display is made, the 
goods representing the products of the most 
noted American and European manufacturers, 
and including all the latest novelties and most 
exquisite designs it is possible to obtain. The 
prices are placed at the lowest point, and a 
specialty is made of the popular instalment 
plan, by which on making easy weekly or 
monthly payments, the choicest goods are se- 
cured by those of limited means. The propri- 
etors, Messi's. W. K. and J. D. Pattee, are na- 



tives of New Hampshire, and young men of 
energy, enterprise and business ability. 

Dover National Bank. The Dover Na- 
tional Bank, which since its inception some 
twenty-three years ago has maintained an un- 
broken record of prosperity, growing in public 
favor and confidence steadily year by year 
from the first, now stands by common con- 
sent among the most stable and reliable 
financial institutions in the county, while its 
connections are of a most substantial and grat- 
ifying character. The Dover National was 
duly incorporated in 1865, and was reorganized 
in 1885, with capital stock of 100,000, and 
from the first its history has been marked by 
steady progress, judicious management and 
unswerving integrity, as its snug surplus of 
$31,000 amply attests. A general banking bus- 
iness is transacted; fiscal paper of all kinds, 
bonds, securities, etc. being negotiated ; ex- 
change bought and sold ; drafts issued on 
Great Britain and Ireland, and collections made 
on all points throughout the United States ; 
while notes are discounted and deposits re- 
ceived; in short, everything that properly per- 
tains to banking and firfance is attended to, and 
altogether a large and flourishing business 
is done. The officers of the bank are Oliver 
Wyatt, president; Eli V. Brewster, vice-pres- 
ident; and Isaac F. Abbott, cashier ; and the 
board of directors are as follows: Messrs. Ol- 
iver Wyatt. Eli V. Brewster, John J. Hausen, 
Joshua G. Hall, Henry A. Worthen, Richard N. 
Ross and Moses D. Page. They are all gentle- 
men of standing in the community, prominent 
in business, social and public life, and are 
among Dover's solid and foremost citizens.-. 



J. Frank Seayey & Co., One Price 
Men's Boys' and Children's Clothiers and Fur- 
nishers, No. 456 Central Avenue, corner of Sec- 
ond Street. This concern dates its inception 
back to May 10, 1886, and has been successful 
from the outset. The premises comprise a 
spacious store, 25 x 70 feet in dimensions. 
The stock carried is at all times kept full and 
complete in all the departments, the firm hav- 
ing a thorough knowledge of the wants of the 
trade and how to satisfactorily meet all de- 
mands made upon their resources. The assort- 
ment includes ready-made clothing for men, 
boys and children, made of the best materials in 
all the newest styles, and unsurpassed for excel- 
lent cut, finish, quality, and workmanship. A 
superior display is also made in gentlemen's 
furnishings, rubber goods, umbrellas, etc., all 
of the choicest grades. The one price system 
is rigidly adhered to, and that price is always 
placed at the lowest margin of profit, so that 
the best value for the least outlay is always ob- 
tainable here. The members of the 'firm, 
Messrs. J. Frank Seavey and A. F. Seavey are 
natives of Rochester, N. H., and have long re- 
sided in this city. Mr. J. F. Seav.ey served for 
two years as a representative to the State Leg- 
islature, and later on as state senator for two 
terms. Mr. A. F. Seavey has been a member of 
the city council, and also served for two terms 
as a representative to the Legislature of this 
State. Both gentlemen are noted for their abil- 
ity, and they command the fullest confidence, 
respect and esteem of their large social and 
business acquaintance. 



72 



cirr OF DOVER. 



Killoren Brothers, Dealers in Groceries 
and Provisions. Law's Block, No. 304 Central 
Avenue. As an essential industry the grocery 
trade stands in the front rank of our national 
enterprises, and in its operations employs the 
investment of large capital and the talents of 
many of our most enterprising business men. 
One of the most popular houses in this line of 
trade in Dover is that of Killoren Brothers, 
located at No. 304 Central Avenue. This firm 
are extensive dealers in groceries and pro- 
visions of all kinds, and have been established 
in the business here since 1873. The store is 
spacious in size, admirably arranged, and 
always well stocked with goods which are 
offered to customers at prices only obtainable 
from such houses as are enabled, by reason of 
extensive sales, to procure supplies in round 
lots from first hands. The- stock includes the 
finest teas, the purest coffees and spices, the 
best brands of family flour, canned goods in 
great variety, sugars, syrups and molasses, 
butter, cheese and eggs, preserves, pickles, 
sauces, condiments and table delicacies of the 
best character, and everything that pertains to 
the staple and fancy grocery trade. The 
equitable manner in which the business is con- 
ducted, as well as the admirable quality and 
uniform reliability of the stock, serves to com- 
mend this house to the favor and patronage of 
all. Five clerks and salesmen and two delivery 
teams are required to meet the demands of 
the large and growing trade, and every facility 
is at hand for the prompt and perfect fulfil- 
ment of all orders. Mr. M. Killoren, the sole 
surviving proprietor, is one of the best known 
business men of this city, being actively en- 
gaged also in the dry goods trade here, has 
served the city as alderman, and is highly es- 
teemed in all the relations of life. 



C. W. Smith, Wall Papers, Books, Station- 
ery and Picture Framing, Bracewell Block. 
So popular a source of supply has this house 
become for the necessities and luxuries of life 
that all Dover may with a little exaggeration 
be said to pass through it in a day. It is head 
quarters for books and stationery, pictures and 
picture frames, wall papers, toys, albums, and 
holiday goods of the most desirable kind. The 
lovers of literature and art make it their chief 
rendezvous, and it is a popular shopping place 
for the ladies as well as for the student and 
the young. The store is spacious, attractive 
and commodious, finely stocked in every depart- 
ment with the new and the beautiful, the 
unique and the useful, and one never tires of 
inspecting the novel features exhibited in gifts 
and rare art treasures. Here are all the works 
of standard authors in fine bindings or cheap, 
as you may desire; fine stationery of every kind, 
pictures and picture frames of artistic merit 
and novelty; wall paper of the latest designs 
and patterns at bottom prices. For toys, 
o-ames and holiday goods, commend us to 
Smith's. There are French toys, German toys, 
Yankee toys, and toys for girls and toys for 
boys, in immense assortment. There are pict- 
ure books and games, bric-a-brac of every de- 
j scription, ornaments, articles of vertu, ivory 

and leather goods, fans, pocket-books, brass 
igoods, sporting goods, cutlery, and an admira- 

ble collection of novelties of every description; 
artists' material of all kinds, oil, water, pastels, 



crayon-colors and artists' supplies of every , 
kind. Mr. Smith is known as one of the enter- 
prising and progressive merchants of this city, 
and an important factor in building up the 
name and fame of Dover. 



W. M. Courser, Groceries and Fresh 
Meats, No. 116 Washington Street. Of the mer- 
chants in Dover in this line of trade none 
are more equal to the demand made upon 
them than is Mr. W. M. Courser. He has been 
established in business here since 18(37, and 
has built up a reputation and a trade that 
places him in the front rank of enterprise and 
success. He. occupies a fine large store, and 
deals extensively in groceries, flour, provis- 
ions and fresh meats. His stock comprises all 
the articles named, in infinite variety, such as 
fine Japan and Oolong teas, old Government 
Java coffee, pure cream tartar, saleratus 
and spices of all kinds, broma, cocoa, choco- 
late, mustard, sage, extracts, essences, oils, 
bread preparation, mace, preserved citron, 
soaps of all kinds, caddy, pail and table lard, 
crackers by the barrel and half barrel, fresh 
and salt meats, fresh vegetables, green and 
dried fruits, confectionery and cigars, and 
everything that can be looked for in a first- 
class grocery store. Choice brands of Ohio, 
Michigan and St. Louis flour are kept con- 
stantly in stock. Mr. Courser is a native of 
Warner, N. H., and recognized as one of its 
leading merchants and representative busi- 
ness men. 



B. Frank Xealley, Dry Goods, No. 2 
Bracewell Building, No. 432 Central Avenue. 
This gentleman is an extensive dealer in foreign 
and domestic dry goods, cloakings, gloves, 
hosiery and small wares, and has been estab- 
lished in the business here since 1865. His 
store is very spacious and attractive, and has 
long been a popular source of supply for bar- 
gains in dry goods. In the dress goods de- 
partment he is showing a full line of black 
and colored silks, satins, rhadamaux, otto- 
mans, velvets, plushes, velveteens, cashmeres, 
camel's hair cloth, dress flannels and fancy 
dress goods, that are marked down to close, 
while all the new fabrics and shades are added 
as soon as they appear in the market. The 
line of house furnishing goods is complete and 
prices low, including table linens, towels, nap- 
kins, muslins, country blankets, yarns and 
flannels, at lower prices than ever. A fine as- 
sortment is shown of new hosiery for ladies 
and children, plain, striped and fancy, from 
cheap domestic to finest French goods; mous- 
quetaire, hook and button kid gloves in opera, 
black and colors; cashmere and silk gloves in 
all the new shades; fine quality lave mitts; 
gauze undervests, underwear in scarlet and 
white for ladies, misses and infants; corsets, 
bustles and hoop-skirts; and all the latest nov- 
elties in trimmings, fancy goods and small 
wears. The cloak department is filled with 
choice selections of new and novel shapes, of 
all the different makes in material, in plush, 
silk and cloth, paletots, Russian circulars, 
dolmans, stockinet jackets, etc. The trade is 
large and active, requiring the assistance of 
four clerks, and the house is universally pop- 
ular in the community. Mr. Nealley is a na- 
tive of Maine. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



73 



William II. Vickery, Apothecary, Xo. 
362 Central Avenue. The peculiar responsi- 
bility that attaches to the compounding and 
dispensing of prescriptions and kindred func- 
tions imparts to the calling of the druggist an 
interest and importance somewhat unique in 
this respect among the arts and sciences ; and 
therefore it is that accuracy and vigilance be- 
come elements closely akin to knowledge and 
skill in the laboratory. In this connection 
special mention should be made in this review 
of William II. Vickery, apothecary, this city, 
whose neat and well-known pharmacy is lo- 
cated at Xo. i)G2 Central Avenue, and who for 
nearly a quarter of a century has sustained an 
excellent reputation for reliability in preparing 
physicians' prescriptions, as well as ability in 
the general exercise of his profession; while 
he receives as a consequence an extensive and 
influential patronage. This well-ordered and 
tastefully appointed drug store was established 
in 18G4, and from its inception to the present 
day has steadily grown in public favor and 
confidence, well deserved, being in all respects 
one of the leading and best equipped establish- 
ments of the kind in the city or county. The 
store, which is 20x50 feet in dimensions, is 
handsomely fitted up and admirably kept an 
elegant soda fountain, beautiful show cases 
and attractive appointments rendering a very 
inviting display, while a large and carefully 
selected stock is constantly carried, embracing 
pure and fresh drugs, medicines and chem- 
icals, extracts, acids and proprietary remedies 
of merit, including the following specialties 
prepared by Mr. Yickery himself : Puttner's 
emulsion, corn solvent, sarsaparilla, lemon and 
vanilla flavoring extracts, healing lotions, 
tooth-powder, and beef, iron and wine and Xew 
England cough balsam. The stock also com- 
prises a full and fine line of druggists' sundries, 
surgical instruments, trusses and .supporters; 
also agent for Johnson's adaptable porous felt 
splints, soaps, sponges, chamois, medicated pa- 
per, sanitary preparations, toilet articles, per 
f umery, mineral waters, candies, confectionery, 
cigars, small wares, stationery, leather novelties 
in great variety and a multifarious assortment 
of holiday goods and fancy articles ; three ca- 
pable and efficient assistants likewise being 
in ;:t tendance, and altogether an exceedingly 
large and flourishing trade is done. Mr. Vick- 
ery. who is a native of this place and one of 
Dover's staunchest and most respected citizens, 
is a gentleman of middle age, of courteous 
manner and the highest personal integrity, as 
well as one of the foremost members of the 
pharmaceutical profession in Strafford County, 
and is a member of the school committee. 



Grime' Cream Bread, Cake and Pastry, 
Xo. 34G Central Avenue. At this establish- 
ment can always be found a large and choice 
assortment of cream bread, cake, pastry, con- 
fectionery, and kindred toothsome products ; 
also a full line of teas, coffees, delicacies, 
canned goods and general family groceries. 
This store was established in 1872 by the gen- 
tleman whose name stands at the head of the 
sketch, and from the inception of the enter- 
prise Mr. Grimes has enjoyed a large measure 
of merited recognition. Handling and produc- 
ing a first-class line of goods, and being a man 
of energy, enterprise and skill, the result could 
scarcely have been other than the unequivocal 



success that has attended his efforts from the 
start. The store is tastefully fitted up and 
compact (the bake-shop being located on 
Washington Street), and a large and A 1 stock 
is constantly carried, comprising palatable and 
excellent cream bread, wholesome and deli- 
cious cake, pies and pastry of all kinds, tooth- 
some and pure confections, candies, caramels, 
chocolate creams, bonbons, etc.; also choice 
teas and coffees, spices, condiments, table lux- 
uries, sauces, preserves and canned goods in 
great variety, prime dairy butter, lard, eggs, 
best quality family flour, oatmeal, corn and rye 
meal, rice, sugars, molasses, syrups, household 
specialties, soda, starch, soap and shelf goods; 
brown bread and beans, also, being supplied 
every Sunday morning. Several clerks attend 
to the wants of customers in the store, besides 
half a dozen or more hands employed in the 
baking department. 

O. F. Kimball, Manufacturer of, and 
Dealer in, Ladies' Furnishing Goods, Cor- 
sets, Hoop-skirts, Bustles, Dress Trimmings, 
Ladies' and Children's Cotton Underwear, 
Aprons, and Infants' Eobes; Print Wrap- 
pers a Speciality; No. 422 Central Avenue. 
In this review of the industrial, commercial 
and general business interests of Dover and 
environs a prominent place should be accorded 
the excellent raid noteworthy establishment of 
O. F. Kimball, manufacturer of, and dealer in, 
ladies' furnishing goods, corsets, undei-gar- 
ments, bustles and kindred articles of female 
wear, eligibly located at No. 422 Central 
Avenue, which becomes the centre of interest 
to the feminine portion of this community, by 
reason of its being the only concern in town 
devoted to the production of wrappers, hoop- 
skirts and specialties in underwear, as well as 
one of the finest and best ordered fancy goods 
and dress trimmings stores here; while pur- 
chasers and patrons can always rely upon get- 
ting a very superior article, upright dealing 
and satisfactory attention in this well-known 
and deservedly popular emporium. This 
flourishing enterprise was started in 1871 by 
O. W. Farrar, who conducted it up to 188(>. 
when he was succeeded Ly the present proprie- 
tor, who has since ( ontinued the business with 
unbroken success, the patronage of the house 
now being large and prosperous. Making and 
handling a first-class line of f.'oods and devot- 
ing untiring' attention to the wants of custom- 
ers, and being withal a young man of push, en- 
terprise, and thorough business qualities the 
result could hardly have leen other than the 
large measure of merited prosperity that from 
the first has attended Mr. Kimball's well-di- 
rected efforts. The store, which is 20 x 75 
feet in dimensions, is neatly fitted up and well 
ordered and an 'extensive and excellent stock 
is constantly carried, including dress trim- 
mings in great variety, corsets and undergar- 
ments of every description, infants' wardrobes, 
embracing complete outfits in every style, con- 
stantly on hand or made to order'. Novelties 
in neckwear, gloves, hosiery, notions and small 
wears, hoop-skirts and bustles, aprons, chil- 
dren's waists and infants' robes, wrappers and 
ladies' furnishing goods of all kinds, print 
wrappers being a specialty, while a competent 
force of polite and competent clerks are in at- 
tendance, besides fifteen or more expert oper- 
ators employed in the busy season. 



74 



CITY OF DOVER. 



Win. Stcru ifc Co., Dry Goods, No. 386 
Central Avenue. There is not probably among 
the various and multifarious mercantile con- 
cerns that contribute to the sum of trade and 
commerce in any town or city one to which 
more interest or importance attaches than the 
well-ordered general dry goods and ladies' 
wear emporium; and therefore it is that the 
excellent and deservedly popular corner 
store of William Sterns & Co., dealers in fine 
foreign and domestic dry goods, cloaks, trim- 
mings, notions and small wears, No. 386 Central 
Avenue. Dover, becomes the centre of attrac- 
tion to the female portion of this community, 
there being here always displayed an exceed- 
ingly line assortment of everything compre- 
hended in dry and fancy goods at the low- 
est prices consistent with first-class value and 
honorable dealing; while patrons can at all 
times rely upon getting a very superior article, 
prompt and polite attention and satisfactory 
treatment in this well and favorably known 
establishment, whose history, since its incep- 
tion some thirty-two years ago, marks a record 
of steady and substantial progress, and which 
fully sustains its hold on public favor and con- 
fidence. The neat and flourishing store was 
established in 1855 by the firm of Sterns & 
Myers, who conducted it up to 1864, when 
the style changed to William Sterns who was 
succeeded in 1883, by William Sterns & Co., 
the " Co." being his son-in-law, Moses Fry, 
and as such the business has since been con- 
tinued with uninterrupted success. They oc- 
cupy a finely appointed and tastefully arranged 
20 x 80 foot store, and a 20 x 40 second floor and 
annex 40 x 40, and carry constantly on hand 
an extensive and Al stock, embracing elegant 
dress fabrics and trimmings in great variety, 
silks, satins, and velvets, fine shawls, cloaks 
and wraps, gloves, notions and hosiery, laces 
and embroideries, fancy goods, small wares, 
corsets, and undergarments of all kinds, para- 
sols, fans, ornaments and ladies' furnishings of 
every description, ready-made garments being 
a specialty. Half a dozen or so courteous and 
competent assistants attend to the wants of 
customers, no pains being spared to render the 
utmost satisfaction in every instance to pur- 
chasers, and altogether a large and flourish- 
ing patronage is received. The copartnership 
consists of Messrs. William Sterns and Moses 
Fry. natives respectively of Germany and New 
York, but old and highly regarded residents of 
i).>\vr. prominent and respected in the com- 
munity alike as merchants and citizens. 
This firm is the oldest dry goods concern in 
this section of the State, and has outlived in 
its :2 years of successful business, all its com- 
petitors, and stands pi'e-eminently the first 
and most popular store of its line in this 
community and is the acknowledged leader 
in styles and regulators of low prices. 

A. W. Hayes, Watchmaker and Jeweller, 
No. 6 Brace well Block. Mr. Hayes became the 
proprietor of this house May 1, 1884, as the 
successor to Mr. Charles S. Kingman, and, be- 
ing a practical watchmaker and jeweller and 
knowing thoroughly all the wants and require- 
ments of the trade, he quickly built up a good 
patronage. His salesroom is spacious and at- 
tractive, and well stocked with new, beautiful 
and valuable goods. The stock embraces a 



choice selection of foreign and American 
watches, French and American clocks, bronzes, 
jewellery, diamonds, silverware and optical 
goods, all of which are noted for beauty of 
design and excellence of workmanship. The 
assortments are complete in every respect, re- 
ceived from manufacturers and importers of 
the highest repute, and are offered to custom- 
ers at prices which are low and attractive. 
The workshop in the rear of the store is fitted 
up with every appliance and facility for rapid, 
systematic and successful work, and repairing 
of all kinds is promptly and neatly executed. 
The trade of the house is drawn from the best 
classes of this city and surrounding country, 
and special attention is given to securing nov- 
elties of the greatest artistic value for wedding 
and holiday gifts. No pains or expense are 
spared to improve the quality and elihnnce the 
value of the stock in all departments. Mr. 
Hayes is a native of New Hampshire. 

J. W. Foss & Co., Musical Instruments, 
Strings, New and Second-hand Furniture, etc. 
American Hall Building, Franklin Square. 
This establishment was founded twenty-two 
years ago by G. W. Wendell, who was suc- 
ceeded in 1882 by the present management. 
The copartners, Messrs. James W. and John 
W. Foss, are natives of this State, and are 
thoroughgoing, progressive merchants of rare 
business tact and executive ability. The store 
is 20 x 70 feet in extent, and contains a variety 
of articles, including new and second-hand 
goods of all kinds, comprising furniture, bed- 
ding, stoves, picture moulding, frames, glass, 
musical instruments, strings, and a vast mis- 
cellany of articles too numerous for mention 
here. No misrepresentation is allowed in 
making sales, and all goods purchased here 
can be depended upon to be exactly as slated. 
the house having a high reputation which it 
is determined to maintain. 



Andrew S. If all, Manufacturer of Loom 
Harness and Heeds, No. 56 Fourth Street. This 
business was originally inaugurated in 18-42 by 
Mr. Winslow Hall, father of the present propri- 
etor, and was continued by him until December 
12, 1882, when he died and was succeeded by 
his son, Mr. Andrew S. Hall, in 1884.* The 
house bears a reputation of the highest charac- 
ter for the superiority of its productions, has 
long been an acknowledged leader in its line, 
and has developed a first-class permanent 
trade which derives its tributary area from all 
parts of New Hampshire. Massachusetts, and 
Maine, and is each year steadily growing in 
volume. The premises, 30 x 50 feet in dimen- 
sions, are thoroughly equipped and employ- 
ment is afforded ten assistants. The loom 
harnesses and reeds manufactured here have 
no superiors in this or any other country, and 
are made in the most thorough, reliable man- 
ner, of the best materials, and are regarded as 
standard everywhere. Every facility is pos- 
sessed for the meeting of all the demands of 
the trade, and orders are promptly filled at 
the most favorable rates. Mr. Hall, who is 
a native of this city, is thoroughly expe- 
rienced, in every department of his vocation. 
and carefully superintends all the operations 
of his workmen, thus securing the most grati- 
fying resxilts. 



LEAUIXG MAXUFACTl'BERS AND MEHCIIAST.S. 



I>over Fivfe Cents Sa\ imr* Bank, Xo. 

:;SL' Central Ave. In this connection special 
attention ought to be directed in this review 
of the industrial, commercial and general 
business interests of Xew Hampshire to the 
noteworthy and flourishing Dover Five Cents 
Savings Bank, of this city, and which since 
its organization in 1650 has steadily increased 
in public favor and confidence, while the very 
substantial sum of nearly 200,001) now on 
deposit amply attests the fact that it supplies 
a want in the community very largely appre- 
ciated. The Dover Five Cents .Savings Bank 
is. the first institution of the kind that has 
ever been established in Xew Hampshire. In 
its organization, it has been the design to be 
guided by the plans and experience of all 
other banks, selecting all in them good and 
avoiding all that was thought erroneous; and 
thus, to make it a model institution, fully and 
perfectly adapted to the interests .and wants 
of our community. It will receive on deposit 
any sum not less than five cents, so that chil- 
dren and those of small means may have a 
safe deposit for the little savings they may 
make, where they will draw interest and 
accumulate against the time of entering into 
business, marriage, sickness, want, or the in- 
firmities of age. " Twenty-five cents a week 
laid by and paid in as they amount to one 
dollar, and continued for ten years, may pro- 
duce as follows: In one year to S18.18; in two 
years s_!7.o:); mi three years S41.53 ; in four 
years s->d.s4; in five years 72.90; in ten years 
$lGU.on." All of the increase is for the benefit 
of the depositor. The officers and trustees 
of the bank are all gentlemen of the highest 
personal integrity, as well as men of sound 
judgment, experience and thorough business 
ability. They are as follows: president, 
John J. Hanson; vice-president. Eli V. Brew- 
ster: secretary and treasurer. Isaac F.Abbott; 
trustees, Eli V. Brewster, William A. Merrill. 
Ephraim H. Whitehouse, "William II. Vickery, 
John J. Hanson, Isaac F. Abbott, Edmund M. 
Swan, Henry A. Wortheu, James F. Seavey, 
Dennis Cash and Solomon H. Foye. 

Dover Beef Co., Commission Dealers in 
George II. Hammond's Western Dressed Beef, 
Lard. Sausages. Hams, etc., Second Street. 
In issi two separate houses were established 
in Dover for dealing at wholesale in dressed 
beef . One of these was founded by Geo. H. 
Hammond & Co., for the sale of Western 
dressed beef, and the other by Sawyer. Hollis 
iV <'<>., for the sale of Eastern dressed beef. 
In ]:; Messrs. J. H. Wheeler & Co. bought 
the business of Sawyer, Hollis & Co., and in 
the following year the two houses amal- 
gamated under the title of the Dover Beef 
Company. The proprietors are Messrs. George 
H. Hammond A Co., of Detroit, Mich., S. E. 
Hyde. J. H. Wheeler of Boston, Mass., and J. 
IL Wheeler, of Xew York. The premises 
comprise a one story building 28 x 100 feet 
in dimensions, and tins contains a refrigerator, 
measuring 40 x 20 feet. The business is of 
a commission character and entirely whole- 
sale, and the stock of dressed beef, mutton, 
lamb and pork kept constantly on hand is 
the choicest and finest in the city. The stock 
also includes salt provisions, fresh pork ribs, 
sausages, tripe, lard, salt, etc. The fresh 



meats are received direct from the slaughter 
houses of Messrs. George II . Hammond & 
Co., located in Hammond, Indiana, and South 
Omaha. Xeb., and provisions from Hammond, 
Standish & Co., Detroit, Mich. The trade of 
the house extends over all parts of the states 
of Xew Hampshire and Maine, and the volume 
of business transacted is of great magnitude. 
The business is under the management of 
Mr. "\\ . E. Pierce, who is a native of Great 
Fall. Five hands and two delivery wagons 
are employed in filling orders and the estab- 
lishment is the largest and most popular in 
its line in this section of the State. 



Oeorge W. Hayes, Harness and Horse 
Goods, Trunks, etc., Franklin Square. To be 
engaged in carrying on business in any special 
line of trade for the space of fifty years, is 
an experience that is given to but very few to 
enjoy. Yet such experience has fallen to Mr. 
George W. Hayes. Mr. Hayes was born in 
Barnstead, X. H., and though now past three- 
score and ten, being in his seventy-ninth yea?, 
is still an active business man, enterprising, 
and keeping fully abreast of the times, as his 
younger contemporaries are well aware of. 
He has lived in Dover the greater portion of 
his busy life, and founded his business here on 
January 15, 1888, a half century ago, lacking 
a few months. He is a practical harness 
maker, and was the first person to sell woollen 
horse blankets and robes of every kind in this 
city. He is, of course, a master of every 
branch of his vocation, and all harness made*, 
or goods sold by him. can be regarded as 
reliable in every respect. His salesroom con- 
tains a full stock of riding saddles and bridles, 
heavy and light harnesses, whips of all kinds. 
also horse blankets, carriage robes, linen horse 
povers, fly blankets, collars, and horse cloth- 
ing of every description. He likewise deals in 
trunks, bags and valises, the assortment being 
of a very superior character. 

jfleserve. Agent English, French and 
American Millinery Goods, Xo. 880 Central Av- 
enue. This is in all respects a model establish- 
ment of the kind and where can always be 
found an exceedingly fine assortment of the 
latest Parisian, London and Xew York novel- 
ties in millinery, hair goods, toilet articles and 
fancy small wares: while patrons may at all 
times rely upon getting correct styles, first-class 
goods and satisfactory treatment. This busi- 
ness was established about fourteen years a^o. 
and his trade from the start until now has 
been of a most substantial and gratifying 
character. The store is 20 x 75 feet in di- 
mensions, the stock carried embracing ex 
iMiisite bonnets and hats in the newest designs 
and most fashionable patterns, both trimmed 
and untrimmed, beautiful trimmings, feathers, 
flowers, silk ribbons, plushes, velvets, satins, 
beads and French. English and American mil- 
linery goods of all kinds; also a full and fine 
line of hair goods, wigs, curls, puffs, bangs and 
,;,(ft'nr<'x in every shade, style and variety, toilet 
articles, perfumery, small wares, fancy goods 
and novelties in head and neckwear. Bonnets 
and hats are trimmed and altered, and hail- 
work executed in the most satisfactory man- 
ner. Mr. Meserve is a native of Dover, and a 
gentleman of pleasing manners. 



7G 



CITY OF DOVER. 



Sawyer IVoollea Mills, Charles II. 
Sawyer, President, Jonathan Sawyer, Treas- 
urer. The manufacture of woollen fabrics is 
one of the eailiest, and at the present time one 
of the most prosperous of American industries. 
For many years, British woollen goods were 
considered unrivalled in the American market, 
but to-day, through the enterprise, skill and re- 
sources of our manufacturers, domestic fabrics 
are turned out which are quite equal to the 
iinest goods made abroad. In connection with 
these statements, special reference is made to 
the old established and famous Sawyer Woollen 
Mills, of Dover, X. H. These mills were 
founded in 1332, and the business was duly in- 
corporated under the laws of New Hampshire 
in 1373. The following gentlemen, who are 
widely known and highly esteemed in financial 
and manufacturing circles for their executive 
ability, sound business principles and integrity, 
are the officers, viz. : Chas. H. Sawyer, presi- 
dent; Jonathan Sawyer, treasurer; F. A. & J. 
Sawyer, selling agents; C. H. Sawyer, agent 
in charge; T. M. Clark, superintendent; C. H. 
I^oss, paymaster. The mills are extensive, and 
are admirably equipped with all the latest im- 
proved machinery, apparatus and appliances 
necessary for the systematic and successful pros- 
ecution of the business. Four hundred and fifty 
operatives are employed and the machinery is 
driven by steam and water power combined. 
The company manufactures annually 1,360,000 
yards of woollen goods of various descriptions, 
and consumes 2,400,000 pounds of first-class 
wool. The woollen fabrics of this responsible 
company are unrivalled for quality, durability, 
linish and general excellence by those of any 
other first-class house in the United States or 
Europe, while the prices quoted for them are 
extremely moderate. The trade of the com- 
pany extends throughout all sections of the 
United States, these woollen fabrics being 
everywhere recognized and appreciated by the 
trade and public, as standard productions. 
The Sawyers, who are the principal stock- 
owners of this popular corporation, are the 
descendants of a celebrated old New England 
family, whose members have ever been noted 
for their public spirit and patriotism. The 
present governor of Xew Hampshire is the 
Honorable C. H.. Sawyer. The prosperity of 
this company presents a forcible illustration of 
the material benefits arising from a federal 
policy, affording protection to American in- 
dustries, resulting in the development of the 
nation's wonderful resources, and in the crea- 
tion of such corporations as this one, thereby 
rendering the United States forever indepen- 
dent of foreign manufacturers, and benefiting 
our working population in every possible 
way. 

C. H. Trickey & Co., Coal and Wood, Of- 
fice, First Street. This firm are widely known 
as extensive dealers in coal and wood, and have 
been engaged in the business here since 1872. 
The house has acquired a wide reputation for 
honorable and liberal dealing, is entirely reliable 
and responsible, and all its transactions are 
marked with a careful regard for the interests 
of patrons and the maintenance of its prestige 
in the trade. The coal handled is noted for its 
uniform good quality, every bushel disposed 
of being guaranteed as coming up to the 



highest standard of excellence. The firm deal 
in both anthracite and bituminous coals, in- 
cluding the English cannel, and their house has 
long been headquarters for the best products 
of the coal mines of this country. The trade 
is exclusively at retail, and the heavy demands 
upon the resources of the establishment 
necessitate the carrying of an immense stock 
to the end fhat no delay may be experienced 
in the filling of orders. The coal yards have a 
storage capacity of four thousand tons, and 
the trade in wood is also conducted upon a 
large scale. From fifteen to twenty-five men 
and some sixteen horses are required in the 
business, which is large and active at all 
seasons. Mr. Trickey is a native of Xew 
Hampshire, thoroughly identified with the 
commercial growth and prosperity of this com- 
munity. He is also largely engaged in the 
purchase of timber, or standing growth, pur- 
chasing either the land and timber, or the 
timber alone, which is put on the market at 
figures very advantageous to buyers. This 
gentleman and his ancestors have for upward 
of fifty years attended to all the hauling of the 
Cocheco Manufacturing Co. and print works, 
and also attends to all heavy transportation of 
goods of every kind for manufacturers or mer- 
chants. 



Rich & Higgiiis, Dealers in Fish, Meat, 
Poultry and Vegetables, Fresh, Pickled, 
Smoked, Salt, Dry and Shell Fish; also Pickles. 
Canned Goods, and Fresh Fruits in their sea- 
sous; under Belknap Church, Xo. 324 Central 
Avenue. The trade in meats, fish and poul- 
try is one of great importance in the city of 
i Dover, and a leading headquarters in this line 
is that establishment so long and so success- 
fully conducted by Messrs. Rich & Higgins, 
under the Belknap Church, on Central Avenue. 
This reliable and popular house was founded 
some twenty years ago, by Mr. Bart. Rich, the 
present style of firm being adopted in L885. 
The store and market is one of the finest and 
! best appointed in this city, provided with 
| every improvement for the perfect preservation 
of perishable articles for an indefinite period, 
and spacious in size, well stocked and ably 
managed. The house deals extensively iii 
fish, meats, poultry and vegetables of ;ill 
kinds, and the stock comprises fresh, pickled, 
smoked, salt, dry and shell fish ; fresh salt, 
smoked and corned meats ; fine poultry and 
game; fresh vegetables in their season; 
pickles, preserves, sauces and canned goods 
in great variety, and fresh fruits from the 
producer and grower. The management 
is in possession of the best possible facilities 
for procuring supplies from the most reputa- 
ble sources, which enable it to offer to cus- 
tomers fresh and first-class goods at prices 
which preclude successful competition. Only 
the best stock is handled, and the greatest. 
' skill and experience is brought to bear in 
selecting the requisite goods to supply the 
; large and first-class trade. Prices are placed 
! at the lowest figure consistent with the quality 
j of the goods, and goods are promptly delivered. 
Mr. John R. Higgins, the sole surviving pro- 
prietor, is a native of Massachusetts, thor- 
oughly informed as to all the requirements 
of his trade and how best fco meet its every 
demand. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS ASD MERCHANTS. 



Lit t (Hit-Id, Frary & Co. (Successors to 
Littleiield, Hill & Co.), Dealers in Furnaces, 
Ranges, Stoves, and Kitchen Furnishings; also, 
Plumbers; No. 08 Washington Street, .No. 5 
Cocheco Mock. In the mechanical arts there 
is no branch of more importance than plumb- 
ing. Health and happiness depend in a great 
measure on the work, and too much care can- 
not be exercised in selecting a suitable and 
intelligent sanitary engineer. The represent- 
ative house engaged in this line of enterprise 
in Dover is that" of Messrs. Littlefield. Frary ct 
Co., located at No. 58 Washington Street. This 
firm are extensive dealers in furnaces, ranges, 
stoves and kitchen furnishings, and make a 
leading specialty of sanitary plumbing. The 
house was founded in Iir5(5, by Messrs. S. II. 
Fuller & Co., the present senior partner, Mr. 
H. Littlefield, being a member of the firm. Mr. 
Fred. D. Frary came into the business ten years 
ago, and the present firm was organized May 1, 
1887, by the admission to partnership of Mr. 
Geo. L. Johnson. The business premises com- 
prise three floors and a basement, :.'"> x 50 feet 
each, and employment is constantly furnished 
to from ten to fourteen hands in the different 
departments of the business. The stock carried 
is one of the largest and most valuable in this 
section, comprising wood, coal, gas, and oil 
stoves, embodying all the modern improve- 
ments for cooking and heating; furnaces and 
ranges of the best makes, tin, sheet-iron and 
copper ware of all kinds, and general furnish- 
ings for housekeeping. A full line is also 
carried of plumbers' supplies, and every facil- 
ity is afforded for the prompt and perfect ful- 
filment of all orders for sanitary engineering 
and plumbing. Patrons of this house are as- 
sured of securing the greatest satisfaction in 
the quality and price of goods. 

John T. W. Ham. Manufacturer and 
Jobber of Hats, Caps and Furs. No. 4^s Central 
Avenue, Bracewell Block. This enterprise was 
founded in 1839, by Mr. A. D. Purinton, and in 
1 <">'. i Mr. Ham became a member of the firm of 
Purinton & Ham, succeeding to the sole con- 
trol in 1877. The store as regards inferior ar- 
rangements and appointments is not surpassed 
in the city, while the stock that is constantly 
carried commends its own merits to the inspec- 
tion of all. A large and influential trade is 
transacted in hats, caps, furs and gents' fur- 
nishing goods in full variety, both at wholesale 
embracing everything in this line and retail, 
the assortment being full and complete in each 
department and embracing everything that is 
new, stylish, fashionable and seasonable. The 
fur department contains all the latest styles in 
ladies' furs, seal-skin sacks, fur-lined circulars, 
beaver, otter, and other fashionable and costly 
furs. In the general assortment are shown 
ladies' and gentlemen's gloves, scarfs and tip- 
pets; also, carriage and sleigh robes of black 
bear, wolverine, fox, badger, wolf, buffalo and 
other species. The new line of furs which are 
displayed each season is one of the largest and 
finest to be found in this section of the coun- 
try, and as the proprietor is prepared to manu- 
facture furs in all articles of wearing apparel 
he can offer them at remarkably low prices. 
The line of hats includes silk, fur, felt, cloth 
and straw hats, all of the latest fashion, and 
sold at popular prices. There is also a fine 



slock of trunks, bags and umbrellas. Four 
cleiks are employed in the store and one sales- 
man on the road, and the trade is large, first- 
class and permanent throughout the city and 
State, every facility being at hand for the 
prompt and perfect fulfilment of all orders. 
Mr. Ham is a native of Dover. 



E. S. Tasll & Co., Groceries and Shoe 
Findings; No. 49'J Central Ave. One of the en- 
terprising establishments in the grocery trade 
of Dover is that of Messrs. E. S. Tash it Co. 
The business was founded some thirty years 
ago by Messrs. A. S. and George \\". Tash. 
the present film succeeding to the control 
March 4. ISST. The store is spacious in size, 
and well adapted for the large and active 
business transacted l.y the enterprise and 
energy of the proprietors. The stock is full 
and complete in every particular, embracing 
all the articles needed by families in the staple 
grocery line, including fine teas and coffees, 
pure spices, the leading 1 rands of family flour, 
sugars, syrups and molasses. 1 utter, 'cheese 
and eggs, canned goods in great variety, green 
and dried fruits, soaps, starch and laundry 
requisites, dairy, garden and farm products 
fresh from the hands of the producer, and an 
immense variety of grocers' small wares, the 
whole constituting a well-selected and com- 
plete assortment. Goods are purchased direct 
of manufacturers and producers, in large quan- 
tities and at advantageous rates, enabling the 
fiim to supply their customers at pi-ices which 
defy successful competition. The firm is 
composed of Messrs. E. S. Tash and (;. W. 
Gray, both natives of New Hampshire, and 
residents here for many years. Mr. Tash is 
serge an t-at-arms for the governor and coun- 
cil at Concord. 



Charles A. Tufts, Pharmacist, Drugs and 
Chemicals; No. 85 Washington Street. The 
business of this reliable concern was originally 
founded in 1815 by Mr. Asa A. Tufts, a skilled 
chemist, and was successfully conducted by 
him for thirty two years, his son, the present 
proprietor, succeeding to the control in 1847. 
Mr. Tufts is a native of Dover and is one of 
our most prominent and highly respected citi- 
zens. He is a graduate of the Massachusetts 
college of pharmacy, and also of the medical 
department of Dartmouth College. He is 
thoroughly versed in tmttir'ui 'timlini, and in 
the preparation of remedial compounds of all 
kinds, and has fully illustrated his accuracy 
and perfect reliability in the years that he has 
catered to the wants of the public in this line. 
The quarteis occupied comprise a store and 
basement i'u x 00 feet in dimensions each. 
The salesroom contains a large, well-selected, 
complete stock of goods incident to the trade, 
and the laboratory is fully supplied with all 
I the requisite facilities for compounding the 
' most difficult prescriptions and medicines. 
Mr. Tufts has filled the positions of city 
school committee, city councilman and al- 
derman, state senator, for many years trustee 
of state asylum for the insane, member and 
president of the state board of pharmacy. 
He is an honorary member of the Baltimore 
and California colleges of pharmacy, and of the 
Pharmaceutical Association of Massachusetts. 
Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Iowa. 



78 



CITY OF DOVER. 



B. F. Rackley, Apothecary, No. 448 Cen- 
tral Ave., National Block. From the very earli- 
est ages the art of preparing the compounds 
that alleviate and remove pain and heal the 
sick has been regarded as among the highest 
of human functions. Nor has time in any de- 
gree taken from the importance attaching to 
the calling of the apothecary, the well-ordered 
pharmacy being one of the most indispensable 
features of progress in every community in our 
day, as it need scarcely be stated. And in this 
connection attention is directed to the spacious 
and handsome drug store of B. F. Rackley, de- 
sirably situated at Xo. 448 Central Ave., in the 
National Block, and which is in all respects 
one of the finest and best equipped establish- 
ments of the kind in or around Dover, none en- 
gaged in this line hereabouts enjoying a higher 
reputation for pure and fresh drugs and medi- 
cines and excellent proprietary remedies, or 
for accuracy and reliability in compounding 
and dispensing prescriptions than Mr. Kackley, 
who is by common consent one of the leading 
members of the pharmaceutical profession in 
this part of the State, while his patronage is 
fully commensurate with his name and stand- 
ing. This admirably conducted and flourish- 
ing store was established some twenty odd 
years ago, and from its inception to the present 
day has steadily grown in public favor and 
confidence, well deserved, the business grow- 
ing apace annually, until now it is at once 
large, prosperous and permanent; while the 
specialties put up here are in steady and exten- 
sive demand in the trade throughout the entire 
New England States, owing to their unequivo- 
cal merit. The store, which is 20 x 80 feet in 
dimensions, is elegantly fitted up and tastefully 
arranged a superb Tuft's soda fountain, fine 
show cases, and attractive appointments ren- 
dering a very inviting display, and a large and 
carefully assorted stock is constantly carried, 
including besides a complete line of pure drugs 
and medicines, chemicals, paints, oils, extracts, 
acids, alcohol, spirits, flavors, and everything 
comprehended in druggists' sundries sponges, 
soaps, chamois, medicated paper, mineral wa- 
ters, etc. ; also, fancy leather novelties, cutlery, 
stationery, toilet articles, perfumery, candies, 
confectionery, cigars and tobacco. Three ca- 
pable and efficient assistants are in attendance, 
a fine prescription trade (which is a specialty) 
being done, and among the preparations of 
which Mr. Rackley is sole proprietor, may be 
named the following well and favorably known 
remedies: .Rackley's Sarsaparilla and Electric 
Pills, for the cure of scrofula, scrofulous sores, 
and all diseases arising from scrofula in the 
blood, and for purifying and renovating the 
whole system; Rackley's Ginger Cordial, for 
diarrhoea, cholera morbus, dyspepsia, colic, 
heartburn, etc., etc. ; Rackley's Favorite Hair 
Dressing, for preserving and beautifying the 
human hair; Rackley's Ivory Dentifrice; and 
Homai's Persian Wash, etc. 



C. E. Bacon, Jeweller, Fine Watch Repair- 
ing and Engraving a Specialty, No. 388 Central 
Avenue. It is evident from a study of an- 
cient history, that the art of making jewellery 
was one of the first at which mankind arrived, 
and that the taste for personal decoration is a 
universal expression of human existence in all 
ages. By the improvements made in the man- 



ufacture, the cost of jewellery has in these mod- 
ern times been so much reduced as to make its 
use practically universal. A leading head- 
quarters in Dover tor both watches, clocks ami 
jewellery is the establishment of Mr. C. E. Ba- 
con, at No. 388 Central Avenue. This gentleman 
has been established in business here for the 
past thirty years, and has by honest endeavor 
and enterprising, legitimate methods, built up 
a reputation and a trade that places him in the 
front rank of popularity and success. His store 
is one of the prominent centres of trade on 
this busy thoroughfare, and is ably conducted 
in all its departments. In watches, clocks, jew- 
ellery, silverware and optical goods, the display 
is very attractive and the assortments are equal 
to any in the city. The goods have all been 
selected with care and judgment, exhibiting 
a wide range in value, and are calculated to 
meet the wants of the greatest possible number 
of buyers. Special attention is given to fine 
engraving by an artist of unequalled merit, 
whose work is greatly admired by the public, 
and watch repairing of all kinds is promptly 
and skilfully executed. The house is prepared 
to give the best satisfaction in all its operations, 
and the proprietor is consistent in his deter- 
mination to furnish first-class goods and satis- 
factory service at the lowest possible prices. 
Ample capital is employed in the enterprise, 
and it is recognized as an important factor in 
the mercantile development of the city. Mr. 
Bacon is still in the early prime of life, prompt, 
obliging and popular in his business dealings, 
and reliable and responsible in all the relations 
of life. 



R. H. & H, O. Woodfoerry, Manufact- 
urers of Misses', Women's and Children's 
Shoes, corner Park and Dover Streets. A very 
popular and well-known establishment in Dover 
engaged in this Jine of manufactures is the 
one named in the caption of this sketch. The 
firm "began business about a score of years ago 
at Beverly, Mass., under the style of Wood- 
berry Bros., and on Febuary 3, 188G, they 
opened as a branch concern in Dover the largo 
brick factory .located on the corner of Park 
and Dover streets, under the style of R. H. & 
H. O. Woodberry: The factory is a substantial 
five story building, fitted 'up and completely 
equipped with all the latest improved machin- 
ery required in the production of women's, 
misses' and children's shoes. Employment is 
given to two hundred hands, skilled and 1 ex- 
perienced in the business; and the products 
consist principally of shoes of the medium 
grade, all of which are made of the very bc^t 
quality of materials, fine workmanship, and 
of the latest and most fashionable styles 
adapted to the wants of first-class retailers 
and jobbers. All the operations of the factory 
are conducted under the close supervision of 
the manager, Mr. Joseph T. Woodberry. a 
shoemaker of vast experience, and the firm are 
thus enabled to ensure complete satisfaction 
to their customers in every particular. The 
trade is not confined to the New England 
States, but extends throughout all portions 
of the Union from Maine to California. The 
concern is in every respect a representative 
one, and the products of the establishment 
are everywhere appreciated for their uniform, 
excellence and their reasonable price. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



79 



HI. Killoreii & Co., Dry Goods, Fancy 
Goods, etc., No. 462 Central Avenue. The 
city of Dover has a number of first-class 
houses engaged in the dry and fancy goods 
trade, prominent among which is the estab- 
lishment of M. Killoreii & Co., located at Xo. 
462 Central Avenue. This enterprise was 
inaugurated in April, 1887, and its manage- 
ment has been characterized by such enter- 
prise and ability as to command universal 
approbation and a liberal and rapidly increas- 
ing patronage. The store is one of the most 
attractive on this popular thoroughfare, and 
is admirably arranged for the display of goods 
and the comfort and convenience of customers. 
The stock of dry goods, fancy goods and 
small wares is one of the finest in the city, 
comprising all the most desirable styles of 
dress goods in silks, satins, velvets, plushes 
and prints, white goods and domestics, hos- 
iery, gloves and underwear, corsets, bustles 
and hoop-skirts, black laces, gimps and fringes, 
embroidery and knitting silks, canvas and 
felt tidies in all colors, zephyr, saxony and 
fancy yarns, lace collars and fichus, and all 
the novelties in fancy goods and small wares. 
The house buys exclusively from manufact- 
urers and importers, thereby giving its cus- 
tomers the benefits previously acquired by 
jobbing houses. The stock is always com- 
plete in every department, is constantly being 
renewed by fresh invoices, and something 
new, beautiful and useful is to be found on 
its shelves and counters. The services of six 
clerks and salesladies are required to meet 
the demands of the trade, and patrons come 
from town and country. Popular prices pre- 
vail in every branch of the business, and 
promptness, liberality and enterprise are the 
characteristics of the house. Mr. Killoren, 
the proprietor, is a well-known business man 
of Dover, interested in various enterprises in 
this city, and is assisted in the management 
of this establishment by Mrs. Killoren, who 
presides, in his absence, with grace and popu- 
larity. 



Ebcii C. Barry, Meats and Provisions, 
X<>. 497 Central Ave. A leading source of sup- 
ply in this line in Dover is the market of Mr. 
Eben C. Barry at Xo. 497 Central Avenue. This 
gentleman is one of the prominent butchers in 
this city, and has been established in trade 
here since 1872. He keeps constantly on hand a 
large stock of fresh beef, pork, lamb, mutton, 
veal, sausages, and all kinds of fresh, smoked, 
salt and corned meats. His market is kept 
scrupulously neat and clean, and the meats are 
perfectly preserved and reliable in every re- 
spect. Only the best stock in prime condition 
are slaughtered, a fact which is well known by 
the patrons of this house, who appreciate by 
their custom the efforts made by Mr. Barry to 
furnish them with healthy and wholesome 
meats and provisions. His goods are kept 
fresh and sweet, and are delivered promptly to 
any part of the city. Competent assistants are 
employed, and customers are liberally and 
courteously treated. Mr. Barry is a native of 
Xew Hampshire, with a thorough knowledge 
of all the needs and requirements of his busi- 
ness, and eminently popular and successful in 
meeting all its demands. 



J. Doiidero & Co., Wholesale Dealers in 
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Xo. 486 Central 
Avenue, corner of Third Street. Mr. J. Don- 
dero was born in Italy, but has resided in the 
United States many years, and came to this 
city some time ago. He established himself in 
this enterprise on Xovember 7, 1886, and occu- 
pies a commodious store which is eligibly lo- 
cated at Xo. 486 Central Avenue on the corner 
of Third Street. He deals in all kinds of 
choice foreign and domestic fruits, and makes 
a specialty of bananas, keeping on ^hand both 
the Jamaica growths and those from Aspiitwall 
and Central America. His store is a busy scene 
every day, receiving and shipping fruits. He 
also deals very extensively in pine-apples, 
cocoa-nuts, oranges and lemons from the trop- 
ical climes of North and South America: also 
from the Mediterranean ports; also limes, 
Malaga grapes from Spain, and Tokios from 
Southern California, raisins, figs, etc., also all 
kinds of domestic fruits and berries. Mr. Don- 
dero's trade is both wholesale and re tail, extend- 
ing not only throughout the city, but the entire 
surrounding country. He is prepared to fill 
orders of any magnitude for any kinds of 
fruit at the shortest notice and at prices beyond 
competition. Mr. Joseph D. Jovine is the able 
and efficient partner of the firm, and has a 
large and extensive knowledge of the fruit 
business in all its branches. He was born in 
Italy in 1848. and came to America in 1873, and 
has 1 een in Dover since 1884, and has been in 
this line of business for some seven years. 

W. E. Browne, Watchmaker and Jewel- 
ler, and Bro\viie & Stevens, -Dealers in 
Books, Periodicals, Stationery, and Fancy 
Goods, No. 354 Central Avenue. The flourish- 
ing stores of W. E. Browne, watchmaker and 
jeweller, and Browne & Stevens, dealers in 
books, periodicals, fancy goods and novelties, 
both located on the same premises at No. 354 
Central Avenue, are each among the leading 
and most reliable concerns of the kind in town ; 
Mr. Browne being in all respects one of the 
forempst exponents of the watchmakers' and 
jewellers' art hereabouts, while in the other 
store can at all times be found a complete and 
first-class line of literature, magazines, news- 
papers, pictorials, artistic cards, stationery, 
toys and a multifarious assortment of novelties 
and small wares, patrons and purchasers being 
always assured of getting an excellent article, 
honorable dealing and satisfactory treatment 
in either establishment. The joint enterprise 
was started in 1886. The entire premises occu- 
py a 20 x 70 foot floor and basement, the 
store being divided into two distinct apart- 
ments, which are both neatly fitted up and 
tastefully appointed, while a full and fine stock 
is constantly carried in both. On the one side 
is displayed a very superior assortment of gold 
and silver watches, clocks of every style and 
variety, elegant jewellery of all kinds, silver 
and plated ware, spectacles, eye-glasses and 
optical goods, and on the other side, books, 
periodicals, magazines, New York and Boston 
daily papers, general stationery, leather goods, 
art novelties, cutlery, picture frames, picto- 
rials, holiday specialties, toys, dolls, and fancy 
articles. Fine watch, clock, and jewellery re- 
pairing also is executed in the most superior 
and prompt manner. 



80 



CITY OF DOVER. 




I. B. Williams & Sons, Tanners and 
Manufacturers of Oak-Tanned Leather Belting, 
Raw-Hide and Tanned Lace Leather. There 
is nothing connected with modern manufactur- 
ing that plays a more important part than 
belting. By its means, power is transmitted 
from the engine to the machinery with the 
least possible friction. At various times in- 
ventive minds have turned their attention to 
the production of belting from such substances 
as cotton, rubber, linen, etc., but in every case 
with little or no benefit. Where the first cost 
has been lessened, the use of any other than 
leather belting has always proved to be far 
more expensive in the long run. One of the 
oldest and most extensive houses engaged in 
the production of oak-tanned leather belting is 
that of Messrs. I. B. Williams & Sbns, of 
Dover. This house was founded in 1842, by 
Mr. I. B. Williams, who died in 1885, since 
which time the business has been conducted 
by his two sons, Messrs. F. B. and G. H. Wil- 
liams, who had been members of the firm for 
several years and had been trained in the art 
of manufacture from their youth up. The 
plant of the firm comprises a substantial brick 
structure, containing four floors and a base- 
ment, 80 x 100 feet in dimensions, which is 
thoroughly equipped for the systematic and 
successful prosecution of the work in hand. 
It is operated by a 60 horse-power steam en- 
gine, and furnished with all the latest im- 
proved machinery and tools known to the 
trade, employment being provided for fifty 
skilled hands. The attention of the firm is 
especially directed to the manufacture of belt- 
ing from pure oak -tanned leather, and in all 
the various shapes and sizes required by the 
trade. They also make raw-hide and tanned 
lace leather, and are known far and wide 
as tanners and manufacturers of the largest 
experience and of well-established reputation. 
Their goods are considered as the standard in 
every market of the world where they have 
been introduced and tested, and as unsur- 



passed for durability, strength and perfect 
workmanship. In every department of their 
business it would be difficult to find a concern 
either better equipped or possessing more 
comprehensive facilities for the transaction of 
a large trade and the production of a superior 
class of goods. The business in its extent and 
importance occupies a prominent place among 
the manufacturing enterprises of this State, 
and reflects the highest credit upon the man- 
agement which has made it a prosperous and 
growing enterprise. The trade of the hous.- 
extends throughout the entire United States 
and to many foreign countries, and is annually 
increasing in magnitude and importance. The 
Messrs. Williams are natives of Dover, practi- 
cal and experienced manufacturers, and young 
men of enterprise, business ability and per- 
sonal social worth. 



A. W. Ward, Undertaker and Practical 
Embalmer, Xos. 12 and 14 Third Street. In 
November, 1884, Mr. Ward started business on 
his own account, and he has been accorded a 
very liberal and substantial patronage. ITe 
occupies a neatly fitted up store, 20 x 40 !'<< t in 
dimensions, and here is carried a very fine 
stock of coffins, caskets and funeral requisites 
of every description. As a funeral director, 
Mr. A. X. Ward's services are in frequent d:-- 
mand, and he gives particular attention to the 
embalming of bodies by the latest and most 
approved process. Mr. Ward talies full charge 
of funerals, furnishing everything required in 
the best and most reliable manner, and dis- 
charges the responsible duties incident to such 
occasions to the entire satisfaction of both 
relatives and friends. He is thoroughly 
familiar with every detail of the business. Mr. 
Ward resides in the rooms above the store, and 
orders received at any hour of the day or night 
receive immediate attention. He is a native 
of Brockton, Mass.. and a gentleman of the 
highest personal and commercial integrity as 
well as of energy and business ability. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



81 



Strafford National Bank. Early in 
the first decade of the present century, or to 
be more concise, in the year 1803, the veritable 
old land-mark, whose name stands at the head 
of this sketch was organized, and from the in- 
ception of the institution down to the present 
day, its history marks a record of steady 
progress, the bank growing in public favor and 
confidence annually during the eighty-five 
years of its existence, until now its connections 
are of a most substantial and gratifying- 
character, being by common consent among 
the most staple and reliable financial institu- 
tions in this section of the country, as well as 
the oldest in Dover, and one of the oldest 
banks in the entire State. The Strafford 
National was duly incorporated' at the period 
mentioned as the Strafford Bank, and under 
this title it was conducted up to 1865, when it 
was reorganized under the national banking 
act as the Strafford National Bank, with $120,- 
000, afterwards increased to $200,000, capital. 
It has a handsome exhibit of $50,000.00 sur- 
plus and $20,000.00 undivided profits, besides 
about $75,000 in real estate, and premises to- 
day amply attest the stability and flourishing 
condition of the bank and place the institu- 
tion and its management far beyond the re- 
quirement of any need of praise these pages 
could bestow. A general banking business is 
carried on, collections being made on all 
points; exchanges bought and sold; drafts 
issued on England, Ireland and Scotland, and 
bonds, securities and fiscals of all kinds are 
negotiated; in short, everything that properly 
pertains to banking and finance, while the de- 
posits are large and increase yearly. The 
officers of -the institution are W. S. Ste*vens, 
president; E. R. Brown, cashier; and C. S. 
Cartland, assistant cashier; the board of direc- 
tor.s being composed of Messrs. W. S. Stevens, 
Jeremiah Ilorne, John McDuffee, Charles H. 
Sawyer, Jeremiah Smith, E. R. Brown and 
Samuel C. Fisher. 



C. E. TTIarstoii, Dover Foundry and Ma- 
chine Works, Manufacturer of Iron and Brass 
Castings, Machine Work, etc., No. 31 Second 
St. A representative house, engaged in the 
manufacture and sale of iron and brass cast- 
ings, machine work, etc., is that of Mr. C. E. 
Marston, Dover Foundry and Machine Works. 
This foundry was established fifty years ago, 
but the present proprietor added the machine 
works in 1876. The foundry, pattern and .ma- 
chine shops are spacious, and are supplied with 
all modern appliances, tools and machinery 
known to the trade. Thirty experienced 
moulders, mechanics, etc., are employed, and 
the machinery is driven by steam power. Mr. 
Marston manufactures largely plumbers' pipe 
and fittings, steam heating apparatus, boilers, 
lamp posts, horse hitching posts, iron columns, 
pulleys, shafting, hangers, radiators, feed 
water heaters, pumps, etc. He likewise deals 
in wrought-iron pipe, engines, gas fittings, 
steam pumps, steam fittings, gas fixtures, brass 
valves, etc., while at the same time he gives es- 
timates for piping for gas, and heating build- 
ings by steam, and for all kinds of iron work. 
Faithful attention is given to whatever may be 
required in iron and brass castings, while the 
greatest care is exercised in the selection of 
the proper qualities of metal and in the deli- 



cate processes of casting, especially where 
soundness and accuracy are required in the fin- 
ished articles. Mr. Marston is a native of Great 
Falls. 



Henry C. Goodwin, Pharmacist and 
Stationer, No. 1 Bracewell Building, Central 
Street, corner First. This house was estab- 
lished by its present proprietor in 1874, 
and is included among the finer class of phar- 
macies in this city. The store is spacious in 
size, admirably fitted up, and replete with 
everything required to constitute a first-class 
drug and prescription establishment. The ex- 
tensive and well selected stock embraces a full 
line of pure drugs, chemicals and medicines, 
toilet and nursery articles, fancy goods and 
stationery, school books, confectionery and 
cigars, soda and mineral waters, and a careful- 
ly assorted stock of such patent or proprietary 
medicines as are known to possess healing 
virtues and curative properties devoid of del- 
eterious or injurious elements. Mr. Goodwin 
also makes a line of preparations that are 
highly prized by his patrons and have a large 
sale, among which are sarsaparilla, tooth pow- 
der, all-healing ointment, anti-bilious bitters, 
kidney and liver medicine, stomach bitters, 
Lewis' cholera cordial, cough mixture, etc., 
etc. The compounding of physicians' pre- 
scriptions and family recipes receives that 
careful and intelligent professional attention 
which their important character so impera- 
tively demands, and accuracy and precision 
invariably prevail in every department of the 
business. Mr. Goodwin is a native of Milton, 
N. H., and an accomplished pharmacist and a 
reliable and trustworthy business man. 

Frank C. Snow & Co., Merchant Tai- 
lors, and Dealers in Keady-Made Clothing, No. 
446 Central Avenue. The history of prominent 
representatives of the tailor's art in Dover 
must make special mention of Messrs. Frank 
C. Snow & Co., whose popular establishment 
is located at> No. 446 Central Avenue. The 
business was originally established in 1876, by 
Mr. Frank C. Snow, and in 1880 the present 
firm was organized by the admission to parti 
nershjp of Mr. George W. Snow. The prem- 
ises occupied by the business comprise two 
floors and a basement, 20 x 80 feet each. The 
firm exhibit one of the finest stocks of cloths 
and trimmings to be found in the State. The 
very best sources of American and European 
production have contributed to its wealth, and 
\i is thoroughly complete in. material, design 
and novelty. The firm devote their special at- 
tention to fine custom work, and the garments 
produced by them are simply perfection in 
style, fit and artistic workmanship. Among 
their permanent customers are many of the 
best dressed citizens of this city, who under- 
stand the merits of a first-class tailor, and who 
have found in this establishment not only a 
line of goods that is at all times superior, but 
where the general make-up, fit and trimming 
of a garment is a matter of careful considera- 
tion and study. The house is large and em- 
ployment is furnished to twenty hands. A full 
line of ready-made clothing is also dealt in, 
and in each department popular prices prevail. 
The Messrs. Snow are natives of Dover, and 
young men of enterprise and business ability. 



82 



CITY OF DOVER. 



The Hawthorne, A. II. Place, Proprietor. 
No. 5-v> Central Avenue. A popular stopping 
place in Dover for the travelling public, and 
one which is always pleasantly remembered 
by those who have ever put up there, is the 
Hawthorne, located at No. 523 Central Avenue. 
Although not the largest hotel in the city yet 
the accommodations to be found here are of 
the best, and the table is conducted upon a 
scale of liberality but rarely equalled else- 
where. It is )>ar excellence the place for good 
liver's sojourning in this vicinity. The Haw- 
thorne was opened to the public in 1883, 
springing into popularity at the outset, and its 
patronage is of a first-class, influential charac- 
ter. The house is a two-story brick structure, 
excellently appointed throughout, provided 
with every modern convenience, and furnished 
in comfortable, home-like manner. Oil the 
first iloor arc the office, parlor, dining-room 
and bar, the latter well stocked with choice 
wines and liquors, and on the second floor are 
the airy, clean, and well-kept sleeping apart- 
ments. The terms per day are but two dol- 
lars. A first-class stable is connected with 
the house from which stylish turn-outs can 
be had at reasonable prices. The proprietor, 
Mr. A. It. Place, is a native of this State and 
lias a wide social and business acquaintance 
by whom he is held in general esteem. Dur- 
ing the late war he served in the U. S. Navy for 
three years and four months, under the com- 
mand of Admiral Farragut, and took an active 
part in many important events. 

Hasty Brothers, Jlestaurant, Ice-Cream 
Saloon, Confectionery, Cigars, etc., No. 396 
Central Avenue. These gentlemen were born 
in Great Falls, X. H., but have resided in Dover 
for some time. They founded this enterprise 
in May, 1887, and have met with success, and 
are now enjoying a trade that is seldom ac- 
corded to much older similar establishments. 
The premises comprise a salesroom, dining- 
room, ice-cream parlor and an admirably 
equipped kitchen. The other apartments are 
furnished and supplied with every convenience 
for the comfort of patrons. They carry , 
stock of fine French and American confec- 
tionery, pastries, cakes; also foreign and 
domestic fruits, and nuts; soda water with 
pure and unadulterated fruit flavoring, syrups, 
etc. The ice-cream parlor in the rear is fitted 
up in a very handsome manner, while the ice- 
cream that is served is made of the purest 
materials and entirely free from any impure 
or deleterious substances. The Messrs. Hasty 
also prepare chops, steaks, cutlets, poultry 
and game in season to oi-cler, also oysters, 
clams, crabs, lobsters, tc. They make a 
specialty of making ice-cream to order for 
balls, weddings, receptions, parties, church 
and Sunday School festivals and picnics ; also 
suppers and meals for parties served expedi- 
tion sly. They are young, wide-awake and 
energetic business men, and have established 
for themselves an excellent reputation as 
caterers and reliable men in all their deal- 
ings. 

D. C. M. Pierce, Meats, Fish, Oysters and 
Vegetables, No. 502 Central Avenue. Mr. 
Pierce has been engaged in business in this 
community for many years, and opened his 



present establishment in July, 1887. He is 
prosecuting his trade in a live, enterprising 
manner, worthy of the success which he has 
quickly acquired. His market is spacious in 
size, fitted up with all conveniences for facil- 
itating the trade and for the preservation of 
meats and perishable articles during the sum- 
mer. He carries a stock of slaughtered meats, 
including beef, pork, lamb, mutton, veal, sau- 
sage, hams, shoulders, tongues, tripe, salt, 
corned and smoked meats, all of which are 
kept fresh and pure. He butchers only the 
best cattle, in prime condition, a fact which his 
patrons thoroughly appreciate, and furnishes 
only good, healthy and reliable meats. Com- 
petent assistants are employed, and customers 
are treated with liberality and promptness. 
Mr. Pierce is a native of New Hampshire, hav- 
ing a perfect knowledge of the wants of his 
trade and the respect and confidence of tho 
general community. 



A. Reynolds, Boots, Shoes and 
Rubbers, Bracewell Block. Mr. Reynolds was 
established here in 1875, and has experienced 
a steady increase in popularity and a remarka- 
bly healthy growth. The business premises 
comprise a store and basement, 20 x 75 feet 
each, and the place is thoroughly attractive 
and well kept, arranged for convenience of 
inspection and sale, and is the centre of a large 
and active trade. Of the stock it is sufficient 
to say that it is simply complete in each and 
every particular, embracing a full lifte of boots, 
shoes, rubbers and slippers of all grades of 
size, weight and quality, and suited for the 
wear of ladies, gentlemen, misses, youth, boys 
and 'children. The laboring man can here 
supply his needs in the way of stout and dura- 
ble goods, and the dressy customer will find a 
beautiful assortment of the nobbiest and most 
stylish goods in the market, noted for artistic 
workmanship, fine finish and easy fit. The 
most celebrated manufactures of the country 
are represented in the stock, and all classes of 
people are readily suited and pleased by the 
provision here made for their varied require- 
ments. Mr. Reynolds is a native of Dover,. 
and one of its well-known citizens. 



Oeo. F. \iite &. Co., Meats and Vegeta- 
bles, Country Produce, etc.; No. 13 Third 
Street. This business has been actively prose- 
cuted for twenty years by the senior part- 
ner. The market is well fitted up with all 
conveniences for the trade, and with every 
modern improvement for the preservation of 
meats during summer, and is always kept 
neat and clean. A fine stock of meat is kept 
on hand, including beef, pork. veal, lamb 
mutton, sausage, smoked hams, shoulders, 
tongue, salt meats, etc., which are always 
fresh and desirable. This firm deal largely 
in Chicago dressed beef, and butcher their 
own lambs, calves, etc. They also keep a 
fresh stock of vegetables and farm products, 
and deal in fish on Fridays. Goods are 
promptly delivered to all parts of the city, and 
all orders are filled with care and despatch. 
The members of the firm. Messrs. George F. 
and George W. Nute, are both natives of Dover, 
reliable and responsible in all their dealings. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AX I) MERCHANTS. 



83 



Sullivan & Littlcfield, Apothecaries, No. 
89 Washington Street. This popular and well- 
patronized institution was founded in 1883 by 
Messrs. Sullivan & Harris, the firm style chang- 
ing to the present form in 1886, on the retire- 
ment of Mr. Harris and the admission of Mr. 
Littlefield as a partner. The store has an 
area of 25 x 60 feet, is superbly fitted up, and 
is one of the handsomest establishments to be 
seen in the city. It has a marble floor, (the 
only one in Dover), the electric cash carrier 
system, patented by the Meter Dispatch Co., 
of Boston, the couutei-s bear elegant plate 
glass show cases, the shelfware is of the most 
tasteful order, and, altogether, the arrange- 
ments and conveniences are such as to call forth 
the admiration of the visitor, while they re- 
flect much credit upon the taste of the manage- 
ment. A portion of the place is used as an 
office by the Western Union Telegraph Co. 
The extensive stock carried embraces a com- 
plete assortment of fresh, pure drugs and 
chemicals, family and proprietary remedies, 
toilet goods, 'fancy articles, perfumery, sta- 
tionery, surgical appliances, physicians' sup- 
plies, and druggists' sundries in general, all 
derived from the most reliable sources of pro- 
duction. The firm have a number of special 
preparations of their own manufacture which 
are of especial merit, among them being ex- 
celsior cough syrup, dentrifice, sarsaparilla, 
etc. Particular attention is devoted to the com- 
pounding of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes, the purest materials only being 
used, and every care being taken to preclude 
the possibility of error. Messrs. Sullivan c\r 
Littlefield are expert masters of every branch 
of the pharmaceutical profession, give their 
undivided attention to the interests of their 
patrons, and are gentlemen in whom the 
fullest confidence may be reposed. 



F. C. Tiltoii, Dealer in Ready-Made Cloth- 
ing, Hats, Caps and Furnishing Goods, Trunks. 
Robes, etc., No. 358 Central Avenue. An ex- 
cellent and well-equipped establishment in 
this line in Dover is that of F. C. Tilton, dealer 
in ready-made clothing, hats, caps and gener- 
al furnishing goods. No. 358 Central Avenue, 
which is in all respects one of the leading and 
most reliable stores of the kind in the city, 
purchasers being always assured of receiving a 
very superior article, satisfactory treatment 
and prompt and polite attention here; while 
the patronage is fully commensurate with the 
deservedly high reputation the house sustains. 
This well-known store is an old stand, having 
been conducted as a clothing emporium for 
many years, and came into the control of the 
present proprietor in 1SS5. who has since car- 
ried on the business with uninterrupted suc- 
cess. The store, which is 30 x 80 feet in di- 
mensions, is nicely fitted up and well ordered 
in every respect, and a heavy and excellently 
selected stock is constantly carried, comprising 
a full and fine assortment of men's, boys' and 
children's clothing-of every style and variety, 
hats and caps of all kinds, underclothing, 
shirts, neckwear, gloves, handkerchiefs, sus- 
penders, umbrellas trunks, valises, robes, 
blankets and kindred articles: while two cour- 
teous and competent clerks attend to the 
wants of customers; and the trade, which ex- 



tends all over the city and surrounding coun- 
try, is at once large, prosperous and permanent. 
Mr. Tilton is a young man of agreeable man- 
ner and strict integrity in his dealings, as well 
as push, foresight and excellent business qual- 
ities. 



11*11111$; & Delaiiv, Grocers, Butter, 
Cheese and Flour Specialties, No. 514 Central 
Avenue. This house was founded some twenty 
years ago, by Mr. George G. Lowell, succeeded 
by Col eman & Cushing in 1875, the present firm 
succeeding to the control in March, 1887. The 
premises occupied for trade purposes comprise 
a store and basement, 20 x 60 feet each, which 
are fitted up with special reference to the busi- 
ness, which includes the handling of a general 
line of groceries, both staple and fancy, such 
as teas, coffees and spices, sugars, syrups and 
molasses, canned goods in great variety, table 
delicacies, condiments, etc.; also, cigars and 
tobacco, a leading specialty being made of but- 
ter, cheese and flour. Even the most casual 
observer, on visiting this house, cannot fail to 
be impressed with the extent, system and com- 
pleteness of the establishment, and it may 
safely be asserted that, in quality, freshness 
and variety, the stock carried by this firm has 
no superior in the city. The proprietors have 
thoroughly popularized their business by en- 
terprising and legitimate methods, and are 
building up a large, thriving and permanent 
trade throughout the city and surrounding 
country. Prompt, efficient and obliging in 
their dealings with the public, they are amply 
deserving of the prosperity that has thus far 
attended their efforts, and of the esteem in 
which they are held in the community. The 
firm is composed of Messrs. C. H. Cushing and 
Walter Delany, both natives of Dover. 



B. F. Keimard, Drugs, Medicines, Toilet 
Articles, Fancy Goods, Perfumes, etc., Paints, 
Oils, Varnishes, Brushes, etc., Franklin 
Square. The .reliable pharmacy conducted by 
Mr. B. F. Kennard, on Franklin Square, has 
long been one of the leading enterprises of its 
kind in Dover. It was founded by Mr. B. F\ 
Rackley some twenty years ago, and has been 
under the control of the present proprietor 
since 1885. Mr. Kennard is a gentleman of 
rare professional skill, and his management is 
as popular as it is careful and liberal. The 
large and carefully selected stock embraces 
the purest drugs, chemicals and standard pro- 
prietary medicines, pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions of known reliability, toilet articles, per- 
fumery, stationery and fancy goods; paints, 
oils, varnishes and brushes; cigars, confection- 
ery, soda and mineral waters, and druggists' 
sundries of every description. The prescrip- 
tion department is managed with signal abil- 
ity, the work being in the hands of expert 
pharmacists, and accuracy and precision ob- 
tain in every department. Mr. Kennard man- 
ufactures a number of specialties, notably 
sarsaparilla, pills, ginger cordial, toothache 
remedy, etc., which have secured a deserved 
popularity for their remedial properties. Mr. 
Kennard is a native of Maine, of tried ability 
in his profession, and known in this city as a 
reliable, responsible and representative busi- 
ness man. 



84 



CITY OF DOVER. 



Eugene Smart, Shot guns, Rifles, Pistols, 
Ammunition and Fishing Tackle; No. 77 Main 
Street. It is twenty years since Mr. Smart 
founded his enterprise here, and during this 
period he lias commanded a patronage derived 
from a wide tributary area. He formerly man- 
ufactured guns, rifles, and other fire-arms, 
gaining an excellent name for the superiority 
of his productions. He occupies a salesroom 
and machine shop, 20 x GO feet in dimensions, 
the latter being used for the repairing of rifles, 
fowling pieces, etc. The store is excellently 
fitted up, and contains a first-class assortment 
of the leading makes : shot-guns, rifles, both 
single and double barreled, pistols of all sizes, 
ammunition, powder and shot flasks, rods, 
reels, and fishing tackle in full variety, together 
with an assortment of sportsman's goods of 
every description, all of the most reliable char- 
acter. Particular attention is paid to the re- 
pairing department, and all orders in this line 
are given prompt attention, while the charges 
are made reasonable and fair. Mr. JSmart, 
who was born in Maine, has long resided in 
this city, and is well known to all our citizens. 

John P. Lowell, Proprietor of Lowell's 
Crockery Hall, and Lowell's Wholesale and 
Retail Tea and Grocery Store. Lowell's Block, 
Xo. 44 Third Street. One of the popular 
grocery establishments in the city of Dover is 
that of Mr. John P. Lowell, located in Lowell's 
Block, on Third Street. Mr. Lowell is an ex- 
tensive dealer in staple and fancy groceries, 
crockery, china and glassware, and has been 
engaged in the business here since 1879. He 
occupies a fine large store, 20 x 75 feet in di- 
mensions, with a basement of the same size, 
and has every convenience and facility for 
conducting the business successfully and upon 
a large scale. The grocery department is 
filled with a superior stock of teas, coffees and 
spices, sugars, syrups and molasses, the best 
brands of family flour, butter, cheese and eggs, 
canned goods, fancy pickles and jellies, pre- 
served and dried fruits, green fruits and vege- 
tables in their season, and everything usually 
found in a first-class grocery store. The line 
of crockery, china and glassware is one of the 
finest in the city, embracing the latest designs 
and patterns of both domestic and foreign pro- 
duction, and are offered at prices which are 
safe from successful competition. A fine stock 
of cigars, tobacco and confectionery is also 
carried, which is liberally patronized. The 
stock, taken as a whole, is not surpassed for 
freshness, quality or general excellence in the 
city. Mr. Lowell is a native of Dover, son of 
Mayor Lowell, and a gentleman of thorough 
reliability, business experience and enter- 
prise. 

"Walter T. Perkins, Steam and Gas Fit- 
ter, Dealer in Steam Heating and Gas Lighting 
Apparatus, No. 44 Locust Street. This busi- 
ness house was founded in 1874 by the present 
proprietor, who is a thoroughly skilled expo- 
nent of his trade, and has an enviable reputation 
for the thoroughness with'which he performs 
all contracts undertaken by him. The sales- 
room and workshop, which comprise the prem- 
ises occupied, have an area of 20 x 50 feet, and 
are equipped in every department in the most 
thorough manner. The store is filled with a 



stock of steam heating and gas lighting appa- 
ratus, wrought-iron and brass pipe, valves, fit- 
tings, etc., gas fixtures, glass globes and 
shades, steam and water gauges, engineers' sup- 
plies, rubber tubing, asbestos, rubber, hemp, 
and flax packing, and piston packing, of all 
kinds. Mr. Perkins also sells the Avery pat- 
ent boiler for heating purposes, which has no 
superior fii the market for the purposes to 
which it is adapted. A corps of experienced 
workmen are employed, find all orders for 
steam or gas fitting are given prompt at- 
tention, all work being' done in a thorough, re- 
liable manner, while the charges are always 
made fair and reasonable. Mr. Perkins is a ua- 
tive of this city, is ever active in taking an 
interest in every movement that" will advance 
the best welfare of the community. 

IV. S. Wiggin, Choice Family Groceries, 
Teas, Coffees, Spices, Flour, etc., Union Block, 
opposite City Hall, Central Square. Mr. Wig" 
gin is quite a young man and a native of this 
State. The business was established many 
years ago, he having become proprietor in 18S4. 
The premises comprise a store-room and cellar 
of fair proportions and fitted up in a very neat 
manner. Enjoying unusual facilities for the 
purchase of the best class of goods in the mar- 
ket, Mr. Wiggin can offer special inducements 
to buyers in first-class new teas from China ami 
Japan ; coffees from Mocha, Java and South 
America; spices, sugars, canned goods of every 
description, foreign and domestic fruits, con- 
fectionery, tobacco and cigars; also fresh and 
pure creamery butter, cheese, fresh eggs, veg- 
etables and other products of the farm and 
dairy, and in fact everything that is usually 
found in a well regulated grocery establishment. 
Orders are delivered at residences throughout 
the city by wagon without charge. The stock 
carried is purchased direct from first hands 
and has been selected for a first-class trade, 
and inducements can be obtained at this estab- 
lishment that cannot be excelled by any others 
in the city. Mr. Wiggin devotes his personal 
attention to the business, and being familiar 
with the wants of his patrons, knows exactly 
howito supply them with the best quality of 
goods at lowest prices. 

Atlantic Tea Company, Dealers in 
Choice Teas and Coffees. This establishment 
is a branch of the firm's house in Brockton, 
and was established in the city of Dover in 
1885. There are in every centre of trade tho>e 
whose reputation for selling only superior 
goods is well known, and at the same time. 
it is a notorious fact that there are others 
of opposite characteristics. The proprietors, 
Messrs. Worthing and Mayo, carry a very large 
stock in both of their establishments, of pure 
and fresh new crop teas and coffees. Messrs. 
Worthing and Mayo also have in addition to 
their stock of teas and coffees, an assortment 
of fine crockery-ware which is likewise offered 
at very low prices. They possess ample facil- 
ities for conducting all operations under the 
most favorable auspices. Polite and courteous 
assistants give diligent attention to filling all 
orders. Mr. Herbert L. Waterman is the care- 
ful and efficient manager of the Dover branch. 
He is a young man of excellent executive abil- 
ity, and popular in business and social circles. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



J. H. Winslow, Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, 
No. 410 Central Ave. This is the oldest house 
in this line of trade, having been established 
here by Mr. Winslow some thirty-five years 
ago. Being a thoroughly practical and ex- 
perienced shoemaker, and having a foundation 
understanding of all the wants and require- 
ments of the trade, he has ever enjoyed a 
liberal and influential patronage, and steadily 
maintained a position in the front rank of 
enterprise and success. His business prem- 
ises comprise a salesroom and workshop, 
handsomely appointed and well equipped, and 
every facility is at hand for conducting the 
business in the most systematic and success- 
ful manner in all its branches. He carries, a 
full and complete stock of toots, shoes, 
rubbers and slippers for men, women, misses, 
youth, boys and children, in all the styles, 
sizes and grades suited to the tastes and the 
means, of all classes of people. A leading spe- 
cialty is made of X. Curtis & Co.'s low, con- 
gress, button and ball boots .and shoes, which 
are unsurpassed for comfort, style and dura- 
bility, and which Mr. Winslow receives direct 
from the factory and can sell at very low 
prices. He also has for ladies' wear S. New- 
comb & Co.'s boot, which has the highest repu- 
tation of any kid boot for style and fit among 
all who have worn them. These goods are all 
from select stock, and manufactured expressly 
for the trade of this house. Careful and skil- 
ful attention is also paid to fine custom work, 
and t<> repairing of all kinds. Mr. Winslow is 
a native of Dover, and one of its oldest and 
most respected merchants and substantial 
business men. 



City Hall); the work leaving this establishment 
being A 1 in every feature of merit, in design, 
execution, finish and general excellence. Mr. 
Twombly, who is a native of Dover, is a prac- 
tical workman, with many years' experience 
in the exercse of his profession, of which he 
,s a thorough master in all its branches. Be- 
ing a man of push and enterprise, as well as 
unmistakable skill, he started in business on 
his own account in 1871, and at once estab- 
lished himself in popular favor and confidence 
by the uniform satisfaction rendered to his 
patrons. Monumental work of every descrip- 
tion is executed in the highest style of art, 
in Italian and Vermont marble marble work 
exclusively f>r cemetery purposes being turned 
out and several hands are employed, while a 
large and superb assortment of finished monu- 
ments, head-stones, tablets and emblematic 
designs, is constantly carried in stock; also 
rough marble, both Italian and Vermont pro- 
ducts . 



XCAV Hampshire House, M. O'Donnell, 
Proprietor, Third Street, opposite Boston & 
Maine Depot. Prominent among the hotels of 
the State is the New Hampshire House, of 
which Mr. M. O'Donnell is the proprietor. 
This establishment, which is an old-founded 
hostelry, has been under its present energetic 
management for the past six years, and com- 
mands a first-class transient and permanent 
patronage. The premises comprise a spacious 
two-story structure, comfortably furnished 
throughout, finely appointed, and thoroughly 
equipped with the most modern appliances 
and accommodations. Its position could not 
be more desirable for travellers, as it stands 
directly opposite the Boston & Maine depot. 
The house contains superior accommodations 
for twenty-live guests, and every care is taken 
to fulfil every want of patrons. The sleeping 
apartments are well ventilated, are supplied 
with excellent beds and bedding, and are kept 
in the cleanest condition possible. The rates 
are very moderate, commercial men in partic- 
ular will find this a desirable stopping place. 
while entire satisfaction is guaranteed all 
patrons. Mr. O'Donnell is thoroughly experi- 
enced in hotel management, and is known for 
his care, attention and household principles. 



R. H. Twomfoly, Marble Works : Locust 
Street, rear of City Hall. Among those who 
have established a reputation for skill and re- 
liability in this line can be named K. H. Twom- 
bly. of this city, whose well equipped marble 
works arc located on Locust Street (rear of 



Charles Emerson & Sons, French 
China, French, Belgian and Bohemian Glass- 
ware, English and American Earthernware. 
Silver Plated Ware, Cutlery and Kerosene 
Goods, Staple and Fine Fancy Goods and Toys; 
No. 5 Bracewell's Block, Central Ave. This 
firm are extensive dealers in this line, having 
their headquarters at Haverhill, Mass., and 
established this branch here in November, 
1886. The store is 20 x 65 feet in size, 
and stocked to repletion with the new and 
the useful, the artistic and the beautful, 
embracing fine china, glassware, lamp goods, 
choice novelties and holiday specialties. The 
stock includes artistic pottery, porcelain and 
glassware brought from nearly every promi- 
nent establishment and glass factory in the 
world. Among the richly decorated goods are 
dinner , breakfast and tea sets, toilet sets, fine 
cut glassware, vases, ornamental pieces in Bo- 
hemian and Belgian glass, and the latest novel- 
ties from European manufactories, special sets 
for oyster, soup, fish, game, entree, fruit, etc.. 
artistic pottery in plaques and trays for wed- 
ding and Christmas gifts. Here are also heavy 
china, stone and earthcrnware, for hotel and 
steamboat use, and ornamental ware for family 
use, as well as cutlery, silver and plated ware, 
parian, majolica and fancy articles of every 
description; toys dolls, picture books, games, 
and holiday goods generally. The firm has its 
sources of supply in Berlin. Vh nna. Paris and 
oilier European capitals, and its plaques, 
vases and objets d 1 art are from the most 
famous masters. This firm jilso manufacture 
the Adamantine Crystal Cement, for mend- 
ing crockery, glass, etc.. and the Adaman- 
tine Cement for mending paper, cloth and 
wood. These preparations have an immense 
sale not only in this country but throughout 
all Europe. It would be impossible to name 
all the beautiful and useful goods that 
are here exhibited. The assortments are al- 
ways brilliant and complete, and the patron- 
age is large, first-class and rapidly on the in- 
crease. Mr. Charles E. Emerson, a member of 
this enterprising firm, is the manager in charge 
of this establishment, and is prepared to con- 
duct the business under the most favorable 
conditions, assuring complete satisfaction to 
customers. 



86 



CITY OF DOVER. 



E. V. Brewster & Co., Boots, Shoes 
and Rubbers, Gents' Hosiery. Gloves, Mittens, 
etc., etc.; also, Best Haxall and St. Louis 
Flour, Tea and Pure Java Coffee, No. 364 Cen- 
tral Avenue. The inception of this concern 
took place in 1846, the founders being Messrs. 
K. V. Brewster and Alpheus Rogers, the lat- 
t -r retiring the year following, and Mr. Thos. 
,1. Palmer entering the firm. The copartner- 
ship continued until 1861, when Mr. Brewster 
succeeded to the entire control, carrying on 
the business under his sole management until 
1*75, when he admitted his nephew, Mr. I. S. 
Brewster. as a copartner. The firm occupy a 
spacious store, having dimensions of 20 x 65 feet, 
neatly fitted up and well kept in every respect, 
while a heavy and carefully assorted stock is 
at all times carried. The goods dealt in com- 
prise boots, shoes and rubbers, selected 
from the leading sources of manufacture and 
unsurpassed for style, comfort, finish, and 
workmanship; also all the latest novelties in 
gentlemen's furnishing goods, hosiery, neck- 
wear, gloves, mittens, etc. These goods are 
displayed on one side of the salesroom. On 
the other is arranged and displayed a stock of 
staple and fancy groceries, in teas, coffees, 
spices, flour, sugar, dried fruits, canned goods, 
dairy produce, etc., all pure, fresh, and relia- 
ble. The Hon. E. V. Brewster, the senior 
member of the firm, has for years been one of 
the leading citizens of this State, and has 
filled, and is now filling, many important posi- 
tions. In 1863, 1864 and 1865 he served as rep- 
resentative of the New Hampshire State Leg- 
islature, and from 1868 to 1869 was mayor of 
the city of Dover, fulfilling his duties in both of- 
fices in an able, intelligent manner, to the en- 
tire acceptability and satisfaction of his consti- 
tuents. He has been the president of the Dover 
Gas Light Company for the past eighteen 
years, is vice-president of the Dover National 
Bank, and also of the Dover Five-Cent Sav- 
ings Bank, and fills the position of chairman 
of the board of trustees for St. John's M. E. 
Church. Mr. I. S. Brewster is a man of push, 
perseverance and untiring energy, thoroughly 
and practically conversant with all the require- 
ments of the trade. 



by the business and social community. He re- 
sides in St. Augustine, Fla., during the winter, 
where he has extensive business interests. In 
the year 1882 the Doctor invented and placed 
on the market a valuable patent, known as 
Young's Patent Folding Scissors, which we 
believe has met with a very large sale. 



A. J. Young, D. D. S., At Dover, No. 392 
Central Avenue, from May 1, until November 
20. Dr. Young is one of the few thoroughly 
trained and highly educated surgeon dentists 
in this section, having graduated at the Penn- 
sylvania college of dental surgery, in Phila- 
delphia, and in constant practice of his profes- 
sion since 1852. Dentistry is attended to in 
all its branches. Partial or entire sets of teeth 
are supplied, extracting and filling are skilful- 
ly and carefully done, and diseases of the teeth 
and gums receive experienced and scientific 
treatment. In preserving neglected teeth, cor- 
recting deformity, and in furnishing good and 
substantial fillings at a reasonable figure, Dr. 
Young is not excelled by any in the profes- 
sion. If your teeth are a misfit he can relieve 
you; old teeth are made over on a new plate, 
and broken sets are repaired in a durable man- 
ner, while waiting. He gives anaesthetics when 
deemed advisable, and treats his patients with 
the greatest consideration and care. Dr. 
Young is a native of D^over, the oldest dentist 
in continuous practice, and held in high esteem 



Geo. H. Bradbury, Grocer, Flour, Grain 
and Country Produce, Fine Teas and Coffees, 
No. 506 Central Avenue. In this volume the 
attention of our readers in Dover and vicinity 
is called to the reliable house of Mr.. Geo. H. 
Bradbury, at No. 506 Central Avenue. This 
gentleman is an extensive dealer in flour, 
grain and country produce, and all kinds of 
family groceries, making a leading specialty of 
fine teas and coffees, butter and cheese. He 
established his business here in 1883, and oc- 
cupies a store and basement, 20 x 50 feet each, 
and carries a stock of sufficient variety and 
magnitude to meet with ease and promptitude 
the demands of his large and growing trade. 
His stock includes the choicest products of the 
farm, the garden and the dairy, fresh from the 
hands of the producer, together with the lead- 
ing brands of flour, table delicacies of every 
description, and all articles that are pertinent 
to the family grocery trade. Mr. Bradbury 
has always made it a rule to handle none but 
the freshest, purest and most wholesome mer- 
chandise, and to sell at fair and reasonable 
prices. Mr. Bradbury is a native of Maine, 
well and favorably known in this community. 



Howes & Ford, Fine Job Printers. Com- 
mercial Work a Specialty, Hani's Block, No. 
110 Washington Street. Among the many es- 
tablishments in this city devoted to the pro- 
duction of the " art preservative of arts " and 
of the finer quality of fine job printing, 
that of Messrs. Howes & Ford, Ham's Block, 
No. 110 Washington Street, is entitled to prom- 
inent mention, and although of recent origin 
it has by the superior quality of its productions 
become the recipient of a large and influential 
patronage, such as is not often accorded to 
older houses in the same line of trade. The 
gentlemen comprising the firm are Mr. E. L. 
Howes, a native of Vermont, and Mr. H. A. 
Ford, who was born in this State. Both are 
practical printers, and thoroughly versed in all 
its details. The business was founded origi 
nally July 7, 1887, at the present location. 
Their office is of ample dimensions, neatly and 
appropriately appointed and thoroughly 
equipped with all the necessary machinery, 
presses, type, cabinets, frames, etc., belonging 
to the profession. The types and all the acces- 
sories of the establishment are of the most 
modern description, and new styles of fonts of 
letters are added to stock as they are produced 
by type founders. Steam power is used in 
driving the presses. The firm executes every 
conceivable kind of printing from a business 
card to a book, devoting especial attention to 
all kinds of commercial work, and all work is 
guaranteed to give most thorough satisfaction 
at the lowest prices consistent with a living, 
business. Messrs. Howes & Ford cheerfully 
estimate and execute contracts of any magni- 
tude for printing of any description, and all 
orders by mail receive prompt attention. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND 



87 



Charles W. Wiggiii & Soil, Manufact- 
urers of, and Dealers in Furniture and Carpet- 
ings, Chamber Sets, Willowware, Mattresses, 
Spring Beds, Tables etc., American Hall Build- 
ing, Franklin Square. This firm are extensive 
dealers in furniture, carpetings, spring beds, 
mattresses, curtains, children's carriages and 
willowware. The business was founded in 
1863, and the house has long been headquarters 
for everything new, useful and desirable in 
its special line of trade. The premises com- 
prise two floors and a basement, 50 x 50 feet, 
with storage rooms connected, 75 x 30 feet, 
giving ample accommodation for the storage 
and display of the immense stock that is con- 
stantly carried. The lines include furniture 
of every imaginable character, illustrating 
every phase of production, and ranging in 
value from the plainest article of common 
need to the most beautiful and elaborate spec- 
imens of the genius of the designer and the 
skill of the artisan. The goods are selected 
with taste and experienced judgment, secured 
direct from manufacturers of first-class repu- 
tation, and embracing parlor, chamber and 
dining-room sets, office, library, hall and 
kitchen furniture, sofas, lounges, tables, and 
a fine assortment of special pieces in wool, 
silk, brocades, velours and plushes. The carpet 
department is finely stocked with new designs 
and patterns in Wiltons, Moquettes, Axmins- 
ter, Brussels, ingrains and other carpetings 
from the best looms of Europe and America; 
also, oil cloths, linoleums, mattings, rugs, etc. 
The curtains of this firm are in all colors and 
styles, and are cut and square, so that any 
lady can make and hang them without 
trouble. Their trade is lai'ge and active in 
this city and throughout the surrounding 
country, requiring the services of a large force 
of men and teams. The members of the firm, 
Messrs. Charles W. and Harry M. Wiggin, 
are both natives of Dover. Mr. Charles W. Wig- 
gin has represented the city in the State Legisla- 
ture, has served as alderman and member of 
the city council, and is vice-president of the 
board of trade. Mr. Harry M. Wiggin is an 
ex-councilman and selectman. 



C. T. Henderson, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in Corn, Flour, Meal, Salt, Seeds, and 
Choice Family Groceries, Henderson's Block, 
corner Main and Chapel Streets. Among the 
old-established and popular grocery establish- 
ments of Dover is that so successfully con- 
ducted, by Mr. C. T. Henderson, at the corner 
of Main and Chapel streets. This house was 
originally founded about 1833, by Mr. S. H. 
Henderson, father of the present proprietor, 
who was succeeded by his son, Mr. H. M. 
Henderson, about 1858,*and in 1870 the present 
owner assumed control. The premises occu- 
pied comprise a store and basement, 20 x 80 
feet each, finely fitted up and arranged for the 
reception of customers and the display and 
storage of goods. The stock comprises the 
finest staple groceries known to the trade, 
including teas, coffees and spices; sugars, 
syrups and molasses; flour, oatmeal and Indian 
meal, canned goods, fruits, preserves, pickles 
and condiments; table delicacies of foreign 
and domestic production, and fresh produce 
of every kind, corn, meal, salt and seeds. 
These goods are received direct from manu- 



facturers and producers of the highest repute, 
and are offered at prices which preclude suc- 
cessful competition. The growth and pros- 
perity of this house is only commensurate 
with the enterprise and ability of the proprie- 
tor, who is earnestly engaged in maintaining 
the character of his goods, and by so doing is 
able to meet successfully the demands of his 
large and growing trade. Mr. Henderson is a 
native of Dover. 



H. E. Canney, Livery Stable, Locust 
Street, rear of City Hall. Mr. Canney, who is 
thoroughly conversant with all matters per- 
taining to his vocation, founded his enterprise 
here in 1884, and by energetic and reliable 
management has built up a reputation and a 
trade that place him in the front rank of suc- 
cess in this line. The stable, which is centrally 
located, is 50 x 60 feet in dimensions, and pos- 
sesses every modern convenience and facility 
for conducting the business upon the largest 
scale. They are models of cleanliness and or- 
der and well lighted, ventilated and drained. 
A splendid stock of horses is constantly kept 
for hire, together with a complete line of car- 
riages, hacks, buggies and light road wagons, 
and all orders are promptly filled at any hour 
of the day or night. Hacks are furnished for 
weddings and funerals, in charge of careful 
drivers. Special attention is given the board- 
ing of horses by the day, week, or month, the 
best of care being extended by experienced 
grooms to the equine guests. Mr. Canney is a 
native of this city, has ever taken an active in- 
terest in advancing the welfare of the commu- 
nity, and has done much by his industry to 
promote the general progress. 

Dover Steam Laundry, No. 6 Orchard 
Street. A popular and highly useful institu- 
tion to which special attention is directed in 
this article, is the excellent and admirably 
conducted Dover Steam Laundry, located 
at No. 6 Orchard Street. This business was 
founded four years ago by the present enter- 
prising and prosperous proprietor, Mr. T. G. 
Hill, and is in all respects a leading and note- 
worthy establishment of the kind, being 
among the most reliable and best equipped 
concerns in this line in the State. From its 
inception it has proved a positive success. 
The premises occupied comprise two entire 
floors, each 20 x 60 feet in dimensions, com- 
pletely fitted throughout with the most im- 
proved machinery, appliances, and appurte- 
nances, and every device pertaining to the 
business. Steam power is furnished by a four- 
teen horse-power engine, and employment is 
given to nine expert hands in the various de- 
partments. Goods are called for and delivered 
to any part of the city and its vicinity; all 
clothes are washed and done up in the most 
thorough manner. A specialty is made of 
skirts, collars and cuffs, which are washed, 
starched, ironed and polished in a very su- 
perior manner. Reasonable prices prevail and 
all work is done promptly and satisfactorily. 
Mr. Hill personally supervises all the opera- 
tions of the establishment, sees that all work 
is performed thoroughly and well, and that no 
cause for complaint is allowed to occur. He 
is a native of that important manufacturing 
centre, Biddeford, Maine, and is in every way 
worthy of public confidence and patronage. 



TOWN OF ROCHESTER. 



IT has often been remarked in the presence of the writer that Rochester is the "coming 
town of New Hampshire." A visit to it, and a careful inspection of its resources and 
advantages, discloses to the unprejudiced mind many reasons why there is absolute justice 
in this remark. The town is situated in Strafford County, and comprises the two villages 
of Rochester and East Rochester. Through the former runs the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
and through the latter the Portland and Rochester Railroad, giving the town superior trans- 
portation facilities in both directions. Excellent water power and hydraulic force is furnished 
both villages by the Salmon River, which turns the wheels of numerous manufacturing 
establishments that are giving wealth, fame and a future to the town. 




McDUFFEE'S BLOCK. 

It is an admitted fact that the true foundation of a town's prosperity are its manufacturing 
industries. A prosperity based exclusively upon a commercial business must necessarily be 
ephemeral. A community which, for instance, depends upon any one or more of the great 
agricultural staples for support and growth is liable to become paralyzed in her energies and 
interests, not only by failure in the production of such staples, but from their diversion to 
other points where eligibility gives them the advantage and preference as markets. Such, 
also, are the fluctuations in prices of articles of produce that no certainty of successful 
operations can be relied upon, and when uncertain, feverish and exciting speculation under- 
lies the business of any community, there is no guarantee of permanent or staple pros- 
perity ; whereas, where manufacturing is carried on successfully there is a steady, healthy 



TOWN OF ROCHESTER. 



89 




and substantial growth. This fact finds fitting illustration in the status of Rochester. The 
water power available for manufacturing purposes here is enormous, and sufficient for present 
need and prospective increase. 

There is nothing stagnant in the village of to-day. Everything is moving, and all the 

inhabitants are encour- 
aged at the prospects for 
the future. The streets 
are lined with grand old 
trees ; green grass is 
abundant in yard and 
lawn, and flowers are 
everywhere cultivated. 
The village is well watered, 
lighted by electric lights 
on the principal streets, 
protected from fires by an 
efficient fire department, 
guarded from malice and 
outrage by the vigilance 
of its citizens, contains no 
idle hands from necessity, 
is busy, happy and self- 
satisfied, delightfully situated in summer and in winter, and a veritable arcadia as a place of 
residence. It may justly be termed the outgrowth and climax of the civilization of New 
England ; the realization of the dreams of our ancestors who labored, struggled and fought 
to plant in this new world municipalities and republics, where equality should reign, where 
education should be universal, ._. 

where pauperism should be left 
out, where life, liberty and the 
pursuit of happiness should be 
assured to everyone, whatever 
his race, color or previous con- 
dition of servitude. The patrician 
families of New Hampshire pre- 
serve their position and command 
respect according to their deserts. 
It seems strange and arrogant to 
assume that the most advanced 
idea of civilization in the world is 
typified in such a community as 
Rochester ; yet such is the fact. 

This town, from her favorable 
location, her advantageous sur- 
roundings, her manufacturing 
facilities, both natural and ac- 
quired , her business opportuni- 
ties, her solidity, her wealth, the 




TO THE NORTH OF ROCHESTER. 



intelligence, culture and refine- 
ment of her people, her excellent 
sanitary condition, her metropolitan advantages, and the thousand and one things that tend to 
make a town a desirable place for residence or business, is beginning to attract the attention of 
people from abroad who have learned of the place. As a result, a tide of capital and business 
industry and enterprise is gradually settling in this direction, which will assist very materially in 
building up a city destined at no distant day to take a prominent place amomg the important 



90 TOWN OF ROCHESTEK. 

and populous business centres of the state. Rochester's inhabitants are composed very largely 
of those belonging to the working or industrial classes, tradesmen, mechanics, " sons of 
toil." It is essentially a busy town. There are few drones, they do not thrive. There 
are many wealthy men, and but few really poor. The importance and promise of Rochester 
as a business centre is, perhaps, not properly appreciated, except by those who have made 
their residence here, or by those who have maintained business relations with her merchants 
and manufacturers, which would afford them a fair opportunity of judging. The surround- 
ing country is peopled with a class of farmers who have, as a rule, grown independent, and 
are as valuable to the merchants of Rochester as they would be if residents of the village. 
The solidity of the town in point of healthy growth, socially, morally and intellectually, is, 
perhaps, not so fully estimated by the general public as it should be. The business of the 
community has kept steady pace with the marked increase in populations, speaking well for 
the prudence, foresight and ability of her merchants and business men. Socially and 
morally Rochester will compare favorably with any town in the state. Her citizens are 
mainly a church-going people, and as a result her villages are adorned with many hand- 
some houses of worship. All denominations and creeds are represented. The public schools 
of Rochester are of a character to cause her citizens to speak of them with pride, and as a 
natural result the people are of higher moral and intellectual standard. The arts and 
sciences are carefully fostered, and evidences are to be seen on every hand of culture and 
refinement, not only of a private character coupled with wealth, but of a public character 
as well. Her principal streets are broad, smooth and level, lined with thrifty and ornamental 
trees and flagged sidewalks, making them inviting for driving or the promenade. Many of 
the business blocks are large and attractive, and the town boasts many handsome residences. 
The mechanics and laboring men generally own houses of (their own, and houses can be 
rented at reasonable rates. Her manufacturing facilities, immense water power, and advan- 
tages as a shipping point, afford the capitalist and manufacturer a brilliant prospect, while 
her social, moral and educational status combine to render Rochester a most desirable place 
of residence. 

A well-established national bank affords all needed monetary accommodation to the mer- 
chants, manufacturers and business men generally, while two savings institutions have each 
a liberal list of depositors who are bent upon saving some part of their annual wage or 
income. A well-conducted local newspaper is generously supported. The fire and police 
departments are efficiently organized, and the sanitary arrangements of the town are such 
as to insure the healthy and comfortable conditions of its inhabitants. The industries of the 
town are varied, and some of them are operated upon an extensive scale. The principal 
manufacturing interests consist in boots and shoes, leather, cotton and woolen goods, carriages 
and wagons, and lumber. The population in 1880 was 4,683, but it is claimed that the two 
Rrchesters, which are now so closely allied in business containing about 8,000 inhabitants. 

The sketches of the business houses given in the following pages will enable the reader 
to form a generally accurate notion of the character and extent of these and other indus- 
tries, and serve to justify the flourishing condition of one of the brightest and pleasantest 
towns of the Granite State. 



LEADIXG MANUFACTURERS AXD MERCHANTS. 



91 




TOWN OF ROCHESTER. 



Geo. W. Shaw & Co., Central Square. 
The establishment so successfully conducted by 
Messrs. Geo. W. Shaw & Co. is recognized as the 
leading drug store in Rochester. It was estab- 
lished some twelve years ago by Mr. S. F. San- 
derson, who was succeeded by the present firm 
January 8, 1887. It is an elegant establishment 
in every way, and a splendid stock of goods is 
shown in every line of the business. The pure 
and superior assortment of drugs, medicines and 
pharmaceutical preparations are supplied from 
the most reputable sources and are selected with 
special reference to strength and freshness. In 
the line of novelties in perfumery, toilet articles 
and holiday goods, the enterprise of the proprie- 
tors has placed within the reach of their patrons 
the best articles that money can purchase. The 
house is perfectly equipped for its specialty of 
prescriptions, and absolute accuracy is assured in 
all cases. This is also headquarters for books 
and stationery, fine cigars, soda and mineral 
waters, and a corps of competent assistants con- 
tribute to the satisfactory operations of the 
house. Popular prices prevail. The firm is com- 
posed of Messrs. George W. Shaw and A. W. 
Pierce, both natives of Portland, Me. 

Bailey & Davis, Manufacturers of and 
Dealers in Stove and Kitchen Goods, etc. The 
business of this reliable house was inaugurated 
five years ago by Mr. Charles E. Ricker, and con- 
ducted by him until January, 1887, when the 
present firm succeeded to the ownership. The 
premises used for the requirements of the busi- 
ness consist of a building having three floors each 
20x75 feet in dimensions, admirably arranged 
throughout, and equipped with the most approved 
conveniences and accommodations. A number of 
store-houses are situated to the rear of this build- 
ing. The salesroom is well fitted up, and 
contains a large, very superior stock of reliable 
goods, the assortment embracing the finest mod- 
ern American stoves, furnaces, ranges and heaters 
of all kinds, kitchen utensils, glass, brittania, tin 
and wooden ware, watches, table cutlery and 
plated ware, also plumbing supplies of every 
description. A staff of experienced workmen are 
employed and a specialty is made of water piping, 
plumbing, tin roofing, guttering, spouting, and 
general jobbing. All work is performed promptly 
and thoroughly and satisfaction with the just 
prices charged is always guaranteed. The co- 
partners, are Mr. C. M. Bailey and Zachias 
Davis. Mr. Bailey is a resident of Pittsfield, N. 
H., and the business in this city is under the man- 
agement of Mr. Davis, who is practically ac- 
quainted with all the details of his vocation. 

Jones & Gordon, Millinery and Small 
Wares, Grange Block. The establishment o*" 

92 



Jones & Gordon is the popular metropolitan 
shopping place for the ladies of Rochester and 
vicinity. Although established at so recent a 
date as April, 1887, it has become the chief source 
of supply in this section for artistic millinery 
merchandise, including trimmed hats and bon- 
nets, all the latest styles and shapes in untrim- 
med goods, fine French flowers, ostrich plumes 
and tips, rich ribbons and laces, straw and silk 
goods, feathers, ornaments and trimmings, ruch- 
ings in nearly one hundred different styles ; also, 
Foster kid gloves, veiling, tissue, barege, and 
laces, ladies' and gents' collars and cuffs; hosiery, 
corsets, ham burgs, lace edges, yarns, worsteds, 
etc. This firm also call the attention of the 
gentlemen to " the best fifty cent shirt in the state, 
the best seventy-five cent shirt in the United 
States, and the best one dollar shirt in the world." 
This is a new store, with new goods, the latest 
styles, and under enterprising and progressive 
management. A corps of milliners whose skill 
is unsurpassed are in attendance, ready to exe- 
cute all orders in a prompt and satisfactory 
manner. In prices, as well as in quality and 
styles of goods, this firm are prepared to compete 
successfully with any of their contemporaries in 
the trade. The store is spacious, well lighted, 
completely stocked, and elegant in all its arrange- 
ments. The firm is composed of Mr. H. C. Jones 
and Miss W. E. Gordon, both experienced in this 
line of trade. 



A. L. Richards, Dry and Fancy Goods, etc., 
No. 1 Richard's Block, Main Street. The leading 
source of supply in E. Rochester for dry and 
fancy goods, jewelry, ladies' and gents' furnish- 
ing goods, etc., is the establishment of Mr. A. L. 
Richards. The business was oriuinallv estab- 
lished in 1879 by Mr. E. L. Fauuce. who was suc- 
ceeded three years after by Mrs. Fauuce, and in 
1885 the present proprietor took possession. A 
large and diversified stock is carried, embracing 
dry goods of every description, and those kindred 
articles that lend such charm and varietyMo the 
assortment. All the lines are choice, fresh and 
complete, the dress goods, silks, satins, white and 
fancy goods being particularly rich. New hosiery 
is shown for ladies and children, plain, striped 
and fancy, from cheap domestic to finest French 
goods ; hook and button kid gloves, in opera, 
black and colors, and cashmere and silk gloves in 
all the new shades ; underwear in scarlet and 
white for ladies, misses and infants ; corsets, bus- 
tles and hoop skirts; dress trimmings and all the 
latest novelties in fancy goods for ladies, and in 
genlemen's neckwear, white and colored shirts, 
jewelry of all kinds, ribbons and laces. Prices 
are low and attractive, and the trade is large and 
active is and constantly increasing. Mr. JK ichnrds 
is a native of Rochester. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



93 



Breed Shoe Company, Wakefield street. 
A very popular and well-known establishment in 
Rochester, is that of the Breed Shoe Company, 
which was founded some three years ago as a 
branch of the Francis W. Breed manufactory of 
Lynn, Mass. The factory is a three-story Irame 
building, 46x150 feet in dimensions. It is ad- 
mirably fitted up and thoroughly equipped with 
the latest improved machinery incident to the 
business, and this is operated by a 30 horse power 
steam engine. The establishment is a scene of 
busy industry, between two hundred and fifty 
or three hundred hands being permanently em- 
ployed. The products of this concern consist 
principally of cheap grades of women's and miss- 
es' button and polished shoes, machine stitched, 
all of which are made of the very best quality of 
material, in the latest and most fashionable styles, 
adapted to the wants of first-clans retailers and 
jobbers. Mr. J. L. Wetherell, formerly of Lynn, 
and who has had fifty-one year's experience in 
the shoe manufacturing business, is the superin- 
tendent of the factory. All the operations are 
conducted under his personal and immediate su- 
pervision, and the proprielors are thus enabled 
to insure complete satisfaction to their customers 
in every particular. The trade extends to all 
parts of the country, but the bulk of the products 
of the factory is shipped to the south and west. 
All orders receive prompt attention. The stand- 
ing of F. W. Breed as a shoe manufacturer in the 
boot and shoe trade of the country is exception- 
ally high, and well-known throughout the country. 



The Globe Tea, Coffee and Variety 
Store, Wilder B. Neal, Proprietor, Cocheco 
Block. This favorite concern was founded four 
years ago by the present owner. The fine, roomy 
store occupied has a capacity of 20x70 feet, is 
fitted up in the most approved modern style, hav- 
ing every convenience for the prosecution of busi- 
ness, and it is filled to its utmost extent with a 
full and complete stock of the finest china and 
Japan teas, Java, Mocha and South America 
coffees, all of the freshest, purest quality, war- 
ranted strictly unadulterated and free from all 
deleterious substances. The stock also includes 
every description of crockery, variety goods and 
holiday merchandise, etc., in toys, games, etc. 
The prices are reasonable and low in all the de- 
partments. Mr. Neal, who is a native of Farm- 
ington, Maine, has long resided in this city. 

James H. Edgerly, Undertaker, Main 
Street. Mr. James H. Edgerly has been estab- 
lished as an undertaker hero since 1840. As a 
furnishing undertaker and embalmer, Mr. Ed- 
gerly has unsurpassed facilities for rendering 
prompt, reliable and successful service. He ca- 
ters to all classes of the community, and furnishes 
everything necessary for the plainest or most 
imposing funeral ceremonies. He is prompt in 
meeting every engagement, performs his duties 
with accuracy, judgment and propriety, and can 
always be depended upon in all matters pertain- 
ing to the last sad rites of burial. He makes it a 
rule to charge only moderate prices, and keeps on 
hand the largest stock of coffins, caskets and 
other funeral supplies in the county. Mr. Ed- 
gerly is a native of New Hampshire and a resi- 
dent of Rochester for many years. 



E. G. & E. \Vallace, Manufacturers of 
Leather, Boots and Shoes. Worthy of special 
prominence in these pages is a record of the es- 
tablishment of Messrs. E. G. & E. Wallace, man- 
ufacturers of leather, boots and shoes. This con- 
cern is the most extensive and popular one in its 
line in this section of the country, and during 
the whole of its long career it has met with, as it 
has deserved, the most pronounced success. The 
firm began business here as tanners thirty-three 
years ago, and from a small beginning the tannery 
has grown until the works now cover an area of 
five acres and afford permanent employment to 
about one hundred and fifty hands. The firm 
make a specialty of upper leather of various 
kinds, and produce about the amount of one 
thousand sides per week. Twenty-five years ago 
the firm added to this enterprise the manufacture 
of boots and shoes, and in this branch their efforts 
have been attended w r ith equally remarkable suc- 
cess. The business grew year by year until now 
it is the leading one in the State, requiring the 
constant employment of five hundred operatives. 
The firm have two factories for their boot and 
shoe trade. One of these is a three-story brick 
building 36x179 feet in dimensions, with a wing 
36x65 feet. The second building is a four- story 
brick structure 50x120 feet in measurement. The 
mechanical equipments are the best that skill 
and capital can produce, and the machinery is 
operated by a steam engine of 120 horse power. 
The manufactures of the establishment consist of 
men's heavy boots and shoes, and of women's 
shoes and slippers, mostly of the cheaper grades. 
The firm cater to the western and north-western 
trade, and their goods have a high reputation in 
the market for quality, style, durability and 
cheapness. Some 4,000 pairs of shoes are turned 
out daily. The firm are always in a position to 
fill orders with the utmost promptitude, and 
their standing in the market is beyond question. 
The proprietors are brothers and are natives of 
Berwick, Me. Their large concerns, affording 
employment to seven hundred hands, are monu- 
ments to their skill ana enterprise, and to their 
energy Rochester owes much of its present pros- 
perity. 



Glendoii House. East Rochester's only 
hostelry is the Glendon House, and as the pro- 
prietor, Mr. John W. Tebbetts, k'nows how to 
make his guests comfortable, and as his customers 
have learned where good cheer and entertainment 
are to be had at the most reasonable rates, he is 
favored constantly with a large patronage. Mr. 
Tebbetts built the hotel and opened it in July. 
1878. It is a three-story frame building, and it 
is handsomely furnished, finely appointed and 
thoroughly equipped with the most improved 
modern appliances and accommodations. All the 
chambers are well ventilated, heated and lighted, 
and possess every convenience. There is accommo- 
dation for forty guests and the house is successfully 
run on the temperance plan. A splendid table is 
kept The cuisine is unrivalled, the catering for 
it being conducted on a basis of liberality, insures 
only the best of everything in the market. Mr. 
Tebbetts is a native of Dover, and has resided in 
East Rochester for thirty-seven years, and is 
widely known as a most genial and successful 
host. 



94 



TOWN OF RO CHESTER. 



S. Wolf & Co., Merchant Tailors and Deal- 
ers in Ready Made Clothing, Gents' Furnishing 
Goods, etc. A leading and noteworthy firm in 
Rochester is that of Messrs. S. Wolf & Co., mer- 
chant tailors, clothiers and outfitters. Here can 
always be found an exceedingly fine assortment 
of suitings, men's, boys' and children's clothing, 
and a complete line of gents' furnishings, head- 
wear and kindred articles at the lowest prices, 
while the custom garments made here are Al in 
every feature of merit, in cut, fit, finish and ma- 
terial. This w T ell-ordered and flourishing store 
was established about sixteen years ago by the 
pushing and popular firm whose name heads the 
sketch. The premises occupied for business pur- 
poses comprise two 40x40 feet floors, neatly fitted 
up and tastefully arranged, and an extensive and 
Al stock is constantly carried, embracing elegant 
imported and domestic fabrics, woolens and 
worsteds, cassimeres, cloths, checks, plaids. 
serges, meltons, cheviots, suitings, vestings and 
trimmings in great variety ; also, ready-made 
clothing of every size, style and pattern, fine dress 
shirts, novelties in neckwear, underclothing, hats, 
caps, trunks, valises, umbrellas, blankets, robes 
and full line of men's furnishing goods. Several 
polite and efficient clerks attend to the wants of 
customers, while some sixteen or more skilled 
and expert hands are employed. Mr. Wolf, 
who is sole proprietor, is a gentleman in the prime 
of life, and was born in Germany, but has resided 
in this country many years. He is a practical 
and expert workman himself, with long and 
thorough experience in the exercise of his art. 
Mr. Wolf is agent for the light running Domestic 
sewing machine, which is very popular in the 
home circle. He is also interested in a large store 
in Brockton, Mass., in the same line of business. 



F. Feineman, Merchant Tailor, No. 1 Mc- 
Duffee Block. The pioneer house in the clothing 
trade in Rochester is that now so successfully 
conducted by Mr. F. Feineman, at No. 1 Mc- 
Duffee Block. The business was founded in 1851, 
by Messrs. S. H. Feineman & Bro. The present 
proprietor was a member of the original firm, 
and succeeded to the sole control in 1870. He is 
a merchant tailor of large experience and high 
reputation, and also deals extensively in men's, 
boys' and children's ready-made clothing, hats, 
caps, trunks, valises and gents' furnishing goods. 
In the tailoring department is shown one of the 
best stocks of cloths and trimmings in this sec- 
tion, complete in material, design and novelty, 
and the very best sources of American and Euro- 
pean production have contributed to its wealth. 
The garments made here are simply perfect ion in 
style, fit and artistic workmanship, and to seek 
the services of this house once is to be its patron 
always. The stock of ready-made clothing is full 
and complete, and the finer grades are equal to 
the best custom work in fit, finish, elegance and 
fashion. The latest styles in hats and caps are 
always displayed, and the line of gentlemen's fur- 
nishings include all the novelties in neckswear, 
underwear, hosiery, gloves, white and colored 
shirts, handkerchiefs, collars and cuffs, known to 
the trade. Employment is furnished to twenty- 
five hands. Mr. Feineman is a gentleman whose 
reputation and standing, as a citizen and merchant, 
is established beyond the requirements of praise. 



The Mansion House, Main Street. The 
Mansion House in Rochester occupies a niche in 
the esteem and popularity of this community 
peculiarly its own. It has recently been re- 
modelled and refurnished by the present pro- 
prietor, Mr. E. T. Cotton, and has now entered 
upon a new lease of life under the most favorable 
auspices. The elegance of the house and the 
beauty of its situation impresses the stranger at 
the first glance as being a first-class hotel in all 
respects. It was first opened to the public in 
1867, by Mr. S. D. Wentworth. It is three stories in 
height, with a splendid verandah on two sides, 
and beautifully shaded by grand old trees that 
completely shut out the sun's rays in summer, 
and gives the house the appearance of a veritable 
summer resort. No luxury afforded in situation, 
surroundings, cuisine or modern conveniences in 
any hotel is lacking at the Mansion House. \i is 
situated just outside the busiest portion of the 
town, in its best residence domain, within easy 
reach of the depot, and is convenient alike to 
the permanent patron, the commercial tourist 
and the transient guest. The house is lighted in 
front by electric light, heated inside by steam 
throughout, and is provided with electric call 
bells communicating with the office. The cuisine 
of the Mansion House is especially worthy of 
mention, being under the most experienced 
management and kept up to the highest standard 
of excellence. First-class accommodations are 
furnished for fifty guests, and the terms are fixed 
at the low rate of $2. per day. Mr. Cotton is 
one of the best-known hotel men in this section, 
and his accession to the maragement of this 
house insures it renewed success and increased 
prosperity. He is also the proprietor of the Wil- 
son house at Farmington, one of the model hotels 
of New England, built by Mr. Cotton himself, 
and perfect in all its appointments and arrange- 
ments for the comfort and convenience of the 
traveling public. It is under the management of 
Mr. H. S. Cotton, son of the proprietor, and a day 
and a night at the house is a pleasant experience. 
Mr. Cotton has associated with him, in the 
management of the Mansion House, Mr. Nat. 
Ham, who is also a popular and experienced 
host, and is earnestly devoted to the promotion 
of the comfort of all who stay at this well con- 
ducted hostelry. 



K. Frank Tibbets, Watches, Clocks, Jew- 
elry, Wentworth Block. This gentleman is a 
watchmaker and jeweler of large experi- 
ence and established reputation, and has been 
engaged in the business here since 1882. His 
store is spacious in size, attractive in all its ap- 
pointments, and perfect in convenience of arrange- 
ment for inspection and sale. In watches, clocks, 
bronzes, jewelry, solid silver and plated ware, a 
line of which he has manufactured for his OWD 
trade, and which he guarantees to be superior ta 
anthingy in the market at the same price, specta- 
cles, eyeglasses and general optical goods, and m 
pocket cutlery and fine holiday goods. Mr. Tib- 
bets is agent for the Columbus watch, and carries 
every American make in all the different grades 
and prices. He pays particular attention to watch, 
clock and jewelry repairing and engraving. Mr. 
Tibl>ets is a native of Gloucester, Mass., and is rec- 
ognized as an accomplished master of his trade. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



95 



E. N. Thorne, Dry and Fancy Goods, Nos. 
3 and 4 McDuffee Block, Central Square. The 
improvements that have taken place in the dry 
goods industry have made establishments en- 
gaged that trade to become veritable bazaars, re- 
flecting the manufacturing progress of every na- 
tion. A leading headquarters in this line in 
Rochester is the establishment of Mr. E. N. 
Thorne at Nos. 3 and 4 McDuffee Block, on Main 
street. Mr. Thorne is an extensive dealer in 
foreign and domestic dry and fancy goods, and 
has been established in business here since 1883. 
The premises occupied for trade purposes com- 
prise a store and basement 40x75 feet each, giving 
an abundance of room for supplying the largest 
demands. The store is very attractive in all its 
appointments, and perfect in convenience of ar- 
rangement for inspection and sale. The stock is 
complete and carefully selected in every line, dis- 
playing all the materials that have been made 
popular by personal preference or the decrees of 
fashion, and equal attention is given to every 
assortment. In the dress goods department is 
shown a full line of black and colored silks, 
satins, Rhadamaux, ottomans, velvets, plushes, 
velveteens, cashmeres, camel's hair cloth, dress 
flannels and fancy dress goods, while all the new 
fabrics and shades are added as soon as they ap- 
pear in the market. The line of housekeeping 
goods comprises table linens, towels, napkins, 
muslins, blankets, yarns and flannels at lower 
prices than ever. In ladies furnishings is dis- 
played a fine assortment of new hosiery, plain, 
striped and fancy, from cheap domestic to finest 
French goods ; mosquetaire, hook and button 
kid gloves in opera, black and colors, also cash- 
mere and silk gloves in all the new shades; un- 
derwear in scarlet and white for ladies, misses 
and infants, and corsets, bustles and hoop skirts. 
The cloak department is filled with choice selec- 
tions of new and novel shapes, in all the different 
makes of material, guaranteed to be the finest 
fitting garments to be found anywhere, in plush, 
silk and cloth, Paletots, Russian circulars, dol- 
mans, stockinet jackets, etc. Special pains are 
taken to secure the latest novelties in trimmings 
and fancy goods, and the quality and desirability 
of the stock is ably maintained throughout. Mr. 
Thorne is a native of Maine, and accounted 
among those young, enterprising business men 
upon whom the continued development of this 
community rests. 



I. S. Howe, Livery and Sale Stable, Market 
Street. Mr. Howe founded his business here ten 
years ago, meeting with deserved success from 
the outset. The stable is spacious, properly 
lighted, thoroughly drained and ventilated, and 
free from all noxious odors. The fine horses 
kept for hire are all in excellent condition, are 
stylish in appearance, while the carriages, hacks, 
buggies, etc., are comfortable and of fashionable 
designs. The finest turnouts are furnished from 
this stable at the most reasonable charges, and 
all orders, received any hour of the day or night, 
are given immediate attention. Carriages are 
furnished for funerals, weddings, balls, or other 
occasions, and satisfactory services are guaranteed 
in every instance. Mr. Howe, who is a native of 
Rochester, devotes his entire time to the direction 
of his affairs. 



Dodge's Hotel, Central Square. One of the 
especially noteworthy landmarks in Rochester, is 
that popular hostelry, Dodge's Hotel, which has 
been in existence for over half a century. The 
place was first opened in 1834 by Mr. Jonathan 
F. Dodge, and was conducted by him with unin- 
terrupted success until 1871, when his death oc- 
curred, and Mr. J. F. Dodge Jr., succeeded to 
the control. This gentleman, who was born in 
Rochester and has always resided here, has been 
brought up in the hotel business, and under- 
stands perfectly the best methods of meeting the 
wants of the traveling public. The house is a 
substantial three-story brick structure, hand- 
somely furnished and thoroughly equipped in 
every respect with all modern improvements and 
conveniences. It contains forty well furnished, 
airy and neatly kept rooms, while the sanitary 
arrangements and general appointments are fully 
in keeping with the rest of the building. There 
is an excellent dining-room, where the choicest 
of viands, satisfactorily cooked, are served in the 
most tempting style. A bar, well stocked with 
superior wines and liquors, is also a noticeable 
feature of the establishment. The terms are but 
$2 per day. A first-class livery stable is run in 
connection with the house, from which stylish 
teams can be had at reasonable prices. Mr. 
Dodge devotes his best attention to looking after 
the interests of his patrons and is a genial host. 

J. J. Meader, Custom and Ready Made 
Clothing, and Gents' Furnishing Goods, Main 
Street, Opposite M. E. Church. This house was 
established originally in 1840, by Mr. Thos. E. 
Davis, a man of superior business ability, and 
noted for his honorable and square dealing, and 
from the date of its inception has received a very 
liberal patronage. The high reputation of the 
concern has been eminently sustained by his suc- 
cessors, the present proprietor who came into 
possession in 1869. His store is of ample dimen- 
sions, neatly and attractively fitted up and sup- 
plied with every facility for conducting his busi- 
ness. He keeps constantly on hand a very 
carefully selected assortment of foreign and 
domestic piece goods, embracing broadcloths, 
cassimeres, suitings, worsteds, plain, mottled and 
striped of the latest and most fashionable season- 
able patterns from which his patrons can select, 
and which are made up in the best and most 
artistic style to order, and though faultless in 
cut, finish and quality, will always be reasonable 
in price. Mr. Meader employs a thoroughly 
practical tailor and artistic cutter, and none but 
the most skilful and proficient workmen are em- 
ployed. He likewise carries an assortment of 
ready made clothing, which is made up from the 
best productions of domestic looms by skilled 
designers and workmen, and the goods are made 
up in every particular with the same skill, care 
and attention that are bestowed on the same class 
of garments by merchant tailors to order. His 
stock of furnishing goods is full and complete, 
comprising fine white and fancy colored dress 
shirts, neckwear of the latest and most fashion- 
able designs, underwear, hosiery, gloves, etc. 
He is also agent for Lewando's dyeing and scour- 
ing establishment of Boston, also of the city 
laundry of Lynn, Mass., and all orders left 
with him will receive prompt attention. 



96 



TO WN OF ROCHESTER. 



A. S. Parshley, Insurance, Main Street. 
The leading insurance agency in Rochester is that 
conducted by Mr. A. S. Pashley, on Main street. 
This gentleman established his business here in 
1870, and has built up a high reputation and a 
large and influential patronage throughout all 
this section. He represents all the mutual and 
stock fire insurance companies in New Hampshire, 
including the New Hampshire, the People's and 
the Fire Underwriters, of Manchester; the 
Granite State, of Portsmouth ; the Capitol, of 
Nashua ; and the Mascoma, of Lebanon. He 
does also a large brokerage business in this 
vicinity, and is prepared at all times to place the 
largest risks, distributing the same in the most 
judicious manner, quoting the lowest rates of 
premium, and guaranteeing a prompt and liberal 
adjustment of all losses. He is eminently popu- 
lar with the property owuers and business men 
of this section, and controls the insuring of many 
of the choicest lines of business and residential 
property in the community. The interests of 
policy holders are carefully watched and safely 
guarded, and his dealings with the public 
are reliable and trustworthy in all respects. Mr. 
Parhsley is a native of Stafford N. H., in the 
prime of life, and highly esteemed in social and 
business circles. He served twelve years as chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen, receiving all the 
votes cast by all parties, except forty-seven. This 
is a pleasing tiibute to the popularity and high 
esteem in which he is placed in his own town. 



Hotel Wrisley, Hanson Street ; Buelduc & 
Thurston, Proprietors. One of the most popular 
stopping places in this section of the state, and a 
particular favorite with commercial travelers, is 
the Hotel Wrisley. This well-known hostelry 
was first opened to the public in 1881, by Mrs. 
Roberts, continuing in her charge until until June, 
1884, when the present proprietors, Messrs. J. A. 
Buelduc and T. L. Thurston, succeeded tothecon- 
trol. These gentlemen, the latter of whom was 
formerly connected with the Mansion House of 
Rochester, have had long and thorough experience 
in hotel management, are perfectly conversant 
with the wants of the traveling public, and have 
satisfactorily catered to their demands. They 
have w r on an excellent, widespread reputation, 
and enjoy an extensive, first-class patronage. The 
Wrisley is a fine three-story building, having di- 
mensions of 30x80 feet, and its interior fittings and 
furnishings are complete in every particular. The 
house is lighted by gas, heated by steam through- 
out, and provided with electric call bells commu- 
nicating with the office. The dining room, 
billiard room, parlor, office and bar, the latter well 
stocked with choice wines and liquors, are all 
convenieniently located on the first floor, while the 
two upper floors are devoted to sleeping apart- 
ments, which are well lighted and ventilated, and 
are kept turnished with clean bedding. The cuisine 
is especially worthy of commendation, being under 
the most experienced management, and kept up 
to a standard of excellence. A first-class livery 
stable is run in connection with the hotel, and 
good teams are furnished at reasonable prices. 
The Wrisley's terms are commendably low, and 
all who put up here will find Messrs. Buelduc & 
Thurston estimable gentlemen to deal with, and 
most painstaking, genial hosts. 



Worcester & Greenfield, Books, Central 
Square. The popular headquarters in Rochester 
for books, stationery, periodicals and literature of 
all kinds is the establishment of Messrs. Worces- 
ter & Greenfield, on Central Square. The busi- 
ness was originally established about fifteen years 
ago by Mr. I. D. Mooney, the present proprietors 
succeeding to the control in 1881. To the stran- 
ger, from its literary attractiveness, it is a place 
not to be overlooked, while it is the chief rendez- 
vous to the literature-loving people of this com- 
munity. To drop in here for the daily paper and 
a glimpse at the last new book or magaziue is an 
every-day duty with the majority of the people 
resident here. The stock is large, choice and 
complete in every department, including the 
works of standard authors in prose and poetry, 
the latest publications of English and American 
writers, in fine bindings and pocket style ; toys, 
games, picture books, writing desks, portfolios, 
leather goods, and desirable gifts for the holidays 
in great variety and profusion. The firm also 
have a circulating library, containing six hundred 
volumes, which is very liberally patronized by 
both old and young. There is also a fine assort- 
ment of cigars, tobacco and confectionery, and the 
store is the headquarters in Rochester for the 
Boston daily and state papers. The members of 
the firm, Messrs. H. L. Worcester and Frank 
Greenfield, are young men of enterprise and pop- 
ularity 

J. G. Morrill & Co., Groceries and Grain .' 
Nos. 63 and 65 Main Street, Odd Fellows' Block. 
By a careful examination of the commercial 
facilities enjoyed by the merchants of Rochester, 
we are led to make special reference to the house 
of Messrs J. G. Morill & Co., as a representative 
one in the line of groceries and grain. Its rank 
has has been secured by enterprise, energy and 
reliable business methods. It is located at Nos. 
63 and 65 Main street, in Odd Fellows' Block, 
and was opened to the public by this firm in 1884. 
The premises occupied comprise a double store 
and basement, 60x60 feet each, with an L 15x6(J 
feet, and a store-house 22x60 feet, giving ample 
accommodations for the large stock that is con- 
stantly carried, and for the prosecution of the 
business upon an extensive scale. Even the most 
casual observer, upon visiting this house, cannot 
fail to be impressed with the extent, system and 
completeness of the establishment, and it may be 
safely asserted that in quantity, quality freshness 
and variety the stock carried here has no superior 
in this section. In the line of family groceries 
the firm deal in the finest teas, the purest coffees 
and spices, the leading brands of flour, sugars, 
syrups and molasses, canned goods in great 
variety, preserves, smices and table delicacies of 
the most desireable kind. The stock of grain is 
always large, choice and complete, received direct 
from the hands of the producer, and sold, both at 
wholesale and retail, at the lowest market prices. 
Goods are promptly delivered, and customers are 
assured complete satisfaction not only in the 
character of the goods but in manifest advantages 
in terms and prices. The firm is composed of 
Messrs. J. G. Morrill, a native of Maine. C. F. 
Caverly and J. L. Swain, both natives of Roches- 
ter, and well and favorably known in this com- 
munity for their energy and enterprise. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



97 



W. C. Sanborn, Apothecary, No. 5 McDuf- 
fee Block. A representative establishment in 
the drug and prescription trade of Rochester is 
that conducted by Mr. W. C. Sanborn, at No. 5 
McDuffee Block, on Main street. The premises 
occupied for trade purposes comprises a spacious 
store and finely equipped laboratory, all replete 
with everything required to constitute a complete 
first-class drug and prescription establishment. 
The extensive and well- selected stock embraces a 
full line of pure drugs, chemicals and medicines, 
fine perfumery, toilet articles and fancy goods, 
and a carefully assorted stock of such patent or 
proprietary medicines as are known to possess 
healing virtues and curative properties devoid of 
deleterious or injurious elements. The com- 
pounding of physicians* prescriptions and family 
recipes receive that careful and intelligent profes- 
sional attention which their important character 
so imperatively demands. A specialty is made 
of the manufacture of Sanborn's Kidney Rem- 
edy, which has a wide sale and is highly recom- 
mended for its remedial qualifications. The 
store is ably managed in all departments, and a 
force of competent assistants attend to those gen- 
eral duties that make communication with the 
establishment both pleasant and profitable. Mr. 
Sanborn is a native of New Hampshire, in the 
prime of life, and recognized as an accomplished 
pharmacist, and a reliable and responsible busi- 
ness man. 



I. A. Collins, Photographer, Hanson Street. 
Mr. I. A. Collins, photographer and expert por- 
trait artist, of Hanson street, is by common con- 
sent the leading exponent of his profession in the 
city, and the pictures produced at his admirably 
conducted and deservedly popular studio are Al 
in every respect, in fidelity to original, in design, 
execution and finish. Mr. Collins, who is a 
native of Corinth, Vermont, has for many years 
been actively identified with his present voca- 
tion, is a thorough master of all its branches, 
and since he founded his enterprise in this city 
in March, 1885, has built up a large, first-class 
patronage. The premises occupied comprise a 
salesroom and operating gallery, each 25x60 feet 
in dimensions and provided with every accommo- 
dation. The salesroom is filled with a large 
stock of picture frames, mouldings, albums, pic- 
ture stands, cord, ".etc., displayed in attractive 
order. Mr. Collins executes photographic work 
, of all kinds, including crayon, pastel, water 
colors, jlndia ink, oils, and kindred work of 
every variety, views, buildings, moving objects, 
etc., fine portraits, however, being the specialty. 

J. H. Meserve, Manufacturer of Lumber, 
Mouldings, etc., also Dealer in Glazed Windows, 
Blinds, etc. The leading representative of the 
building trade is Mr. J. H. Meserve, who is well 
and widely known as a manufacturer of lumber, 
mouldings, window frames, doors, brackets, stair 
rails, etc., and also as an extensive dealer in lum- 
ber, glazed windows, blinds, sash, etc. He in- 
augurated his enterprise here in June, 1876, and 
has achieved a reputation and acquired a trade 
that places him in the front rank of enterprise 
and success in this section of the country. His 
business premises cover about one acre of ground, 
and comprise a large lumber yard and a well- 



equipped planing mill, provided with three pla- 
ners, a double surfacer and matcher, two steam 
engines, one for planing, 45 horse power, and one 
for sawing, 40 horse power, and two boilers, 
while employment is given to twenty skilled and 
expert hands. A large stock of lumber, both 
dressed and in the rough, is constantly carried, 
together with a splendid assortment of builders' 
materials, outside and inside hard-wood and fine 
finish, in regular sizes, while the facilities of the 
house are such that special sizes are promptly 
manufactured to order. From April 1st to Aug- 
ust 1st, this house received fifty-three car loads 
of lumber to supply the demands of its trade, 
which is both wholesale and retail and extend- 
ing throughout the entire state, besides a large 
local demand. Specialties are made of mouldings, 
windows, brackets and stair rails, and of glazed 
windows to order. Mr. Meserve is a native of 
Rochester. 



W. J. Babbidge, Boots and Shoes, Grange 
Block. One of the largest and most popular boot 
aud shoe establishments in Rochester is that of 
Mr. Warren J. Babbidge,in the new Grange block, 
on Market street. He owns two other stores, one in 
Springvale, Me., and the other in Portsmouth, N. 
H. This enterprise was inaugurated in March, 
1887, by Messrs. Babbidge & Foss, the present 
proprietor succeeding to the sole control in July 
following. The store is one of the most spacious 
and attractive in town, and is supplied with every 
modern convenience. The amplitude of the stock 
which is here displayed ranks the house as a 
leader in its line of trade, and commends it the 
favor and patronage of all. The assortment com- 
prises boots, shoes, rubbers and slippers for men, 
women, misses, youths, boys and children, in all 
the various styles, grades and sizes known to the 
trade. The connections of the proprietor with 
manufacturers of the highest repute enable him to 
offer his customers the rarest inducements as re- 
gards excellence of stock and economy of prices. 
Repairing is neatly and promptly executed, and 
the patronage is growing rapidly. Mr. Babbidge 
carries on a large jobbing trade throughout Maine 
and New Hampshire. 

S. Stringer, Manufacturer of Soda and Min- 
eral Waters, Belfast Ginger Ale,Tonic, etc., Hanson 
Street, Basement of Hotel Wrisley. Mr. Stringer 
founded his enterprise three years ago, and, owing 
to the superiority of his productions has built up 
a large, first-class trade, having patrons in all parts 
of the state, and being particularly heavy in the 
White mountains. The premses occupied are 
fitted up in the most approved manner having 
every appliance and modern apparatus necessary 
for the purposes of the business. Mr. Stringer 
employs a number of experienced assistants and 
manufactures in large quantities soda aud mineral 
waters of all kinds, Belfast ginger ale, tonic, ginger, 
pineapple, birch and root beers, lager, etc. Only 
the best materials are used in the production and 
the beverages made here are noted for their fineness 
of flavor, and general excellence. A heavy stock 
is constantly kept on hand and every facility is 
possessed for the prompt fulfilment of orders. 
Mr. Stringer, who is a native of Portsmouth, this 
state, is thorougly deserving of the great success 
that is attending his efforts. 



98 



TOWN OF ROCHESTER. 



Abbott & Webber, Choice Family Gro- 
ceries, No. 2 Blaisdell's Block, East Rochester. 
This business was first established in March, 
1886, by Mr. C. M. Abbott, the present firm being 
organized the following year. The firm occupy 
a large and commodious store, and carry a splen- 
did stock of goods at all times. This stock in- 
cludes the well-known and popular French pat- 
ent and Old Honesty brands of floor, the best and 
purest teas, coffees and spices, the sweetest but- 
ter, the freshest eggs, canned goods in great vari- 
ety, fancy pickets and jellies, candiments and 
table luxuries, besides a choice and complete line 
of cigars, tobacco and confectionery. The firm 
also deal in boots and shoes for men's, women's, 
misses', youths' and children's wear, suited to 
the tastes and the means of all classes of buyers, 
and received direct from the best manufacturers, 
and customers have the satisfaction of knowing 
that nothing inferior or adulterated will be 
offered them. Goods are promptly delivered, 
and the lowest prices invariably pievail. The 
firm is composed of Messrs. C. M. Abbott and A. 
D. Webber, both natives of Maine. 

W. G. Bradley, Boots, Shoes, Rubbers and 
Shoe Findings, Central Square. This gentleman 
has been engaged in business here since 1879, and 
also operates branch establishments at Newbnry- 
port aud Salem, Mass. He occupies large and 
finely-appointed quarters, and has unsurpassed 
facilities for conducting the business systematic- 
ally and successfully and upon a large scale. His 
stock is one of the largest and finest in this section, 
and comprises boots, shoes, rubbers and si ippers for 
men, women, misses, youth, boys and children, in 
all the various styles, grades and sizes, suited to 
the tastes and the means of all classes of people. 
The productions of the leading manufactories in 
New England are represented in the stock, and 
the prices which prevail are so eminently fair 
and reasonable as to add materially to the popu- 
larity of the house. Repairing of all kinds is 
promptly attended to, and a corps of competent 
clerks and salesmen contribute to the satisfactory 
operations of the house. Mr. Bradley is a native 
of Massachusetts, and a gentleman of large expe- 
rience in the shoe trade. He is a self made man ; 
he started business on his own account at eleven 
years of age, and now, in his thirty-ninth year, 
he owns three stores and real estate besides, to 
the amount of $10,000. 



"W. W. Sinclair, Fruit, Nnts and Confection- 
ery, Tobacco and Cigars, East Rochester. Mr. 
Sinclair founded his business in 1886, and has 
built np a first-class custom, his establishment 
being held in popular favor. The commodins store 
occupied, which has au area of 20x60 feet, is fitted 
up in the most approved style, contains a large, 
carefully selected stock of choice merchandise, the 
assortment comprising the finest foreign and do- 
mestic fruits and nuts, raisins, plain and fancy 
candies and confectionery, all the favorite brands 
of smoking tobaccos, and a full variety of Havana 
Key West and domestic cigars. The stock is com- 
plete in all the departments, nnd is always kept 
up to the highest standard. The proprietor is 
a native of Maine. He is untiring in his devotion 
to his patrons interests, and always strives to give 
the best goods for the least money. 



Henry M. Kelley, Manufacturer and 
Dealer in Stoves, Tinware, Hardwaie, Pumps, 
etc., Market Street. This gentleman is an exten- 
sive dealer in stoves, tinware, hardware, pumps, 
lead pipe and kitchen furnishing goods, and a 
plumber, gas and steam fitter of large experience 
and established reputation. He also attends 
promptly to job work in tin, brass, copper and 
sheet iron. His premises are spacious and well 
equipped for manufacturing and trade purposes, 
and every convenience is at hand for the prompt 
and perfect fulfilment of all orders. His stock of 
stoves comprises the best makes embodying all 
the latest improvements in both heating and 
cooking, while the several lines include all the 
implements, utensils and tools needed by the 
housekeeper, the builder, the mechanic and the 
farmer in this line of trade. Plumbers' goods of 
all kinds are also for sale, and all work in that 
line is performed skillfully and to the entire sat- 
isfaction of customers. Mr. Kelley is a native of 
New Hampshire, in the prime of life and of large 
practical experience. 

J. Walker, Dry Goods and Groceries, Flour, 
Grain, etc, East Rochester. Mr. J. Walker, 
for the past seventeen years has been 
engaged as a dealer in general merchandise. 
He has built up a large, permanent trade through 
the employment of honest representation and by 
handling none but goods which he could conscien- 
tiously commend to the public^ The fine store ' 
occupied has a capacity of 50x50 feet, is equipped 
in the most approved style for the requirements 
of the trade, and is stocked to repletion with an 
extensive assortment of dry and fancy goods of 
every description, notions, small wares, etc., 
choice staple and fancy groceries, fruits, vege- 
tables, dairy products, canned goods, grain and 
feed, etc. The finest family flour, including such 
brands as Haxall, Washburu nnd Old Honesty, is 
always kept on hand. All purchases are deliv- 
ered free of charge to any part of the c-ity nnd its 
vicinity. Mr. Walker, who is a native of Maine, 
but has long resided in this city, is a merchant 
of acknowledged talent and ability. 

H. N. Plummer, Manufacturer of Light 
and Heavy Harness, etc., Hanson Street, Opposite 
the Post Office. Attention is directed to thewell- 
kept and reliable emporium of H. N. Plumraer, 
manufacturer of light and heavy harness of all 
kinds, and dealer in horse blankets, robes, whips, 
brushes, combs, etc. Mr. Plnmmer, who is a 
native of Farnington, Me., and a practical and 
expert workman, with many years experience in 
the exercise of his arts, started this thriving 
business here in 1883 and at once established 
himself in public favor and confidence well 
deserved, building up in a short while a very 
liberal and flattering patronage. He occu- 
pies a n-.'at and compact store and shop, 
and employs three skilled hands, fine cus- 
tom work being a specialty and a complete 
and superior stock is constantly carried, in- 
cluding harness of every style and variety, 
collars, whips, blankets, lap robes, fly nets, combs, 
brushes, sponges, chamois, snaps, etc., while re- 
pairing, cleaning and oiling also are executed 
neatly and promptly, and altogether, a flourish- 
ing trade is done. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



99 



George H. Clough, Watches, Clocks and 
Jewelry, New Grange Block. A newly estab- 
lished concern is that of Mr. George H. Clough, 
who is a practical and experienced jeweler and 
established this house ia March, 1887, and 
from the date of its inception has received very 
liberal and substantial patronage, such as is not 
often accorded to much older houses. His store 
is of ample dimensions, very neatly and appropri- 
ately appointed. He carries a very well selected 
stock stock of fine watches, of American and Euro- 
pean watches from the most celebrated makers, 
and a general assortment of all kinds rich and 
beautiful jewelry, comprising finger and ear- 
rings, both plain and ornamental, brouches, brace- 
lets, b.mgles, watch chains and charms, lockets, 
necklaces, rare stones set in the latest and most 
unique styles, silver and plated ware, foreign and 
domestic clocks, eye-glases, spectacles, opera- 
glases and other ^oods. These articles have been 
selected with great care and warranted to be as 
represented in every particular and are sold at 
the most reasonable prices. Mr. Clough is a prac- 
tical jeweler and is prepared to do all kinds re- 
pairing of fine jewelry, watches and clocks. Mr. 
Clough is a resident of this state, and has resided 
in Rochester many years, while his trade is 
gradually increasing to very large proportions. 

P. H. Hartigan, Choice Family Groceries, 
Teas, Coffees, etc., Market Street. Mr. Hartigan 
established this business originally in 1872, and 
from the date of its commencement, has enjoyed 
a very large patronage. His store is spacious, 
handsomely fitted up and has every facility for 
handling large quantities of goods. The stock 
includes a well and carefully selected assortment 
of fine and staple groceries, the choicest of young 
Hyson, Oolong, Japan, English breakfast and 
other teas, fragrant Mocha, Java and South Amer- 
ican coffees, hermetically sealed goods of the best 
quality in tin and glass, spices, condiments, table 
delicacies, select brands of flour, corn-meal, choic? 
creamary butter, fresh eggs, cheese, bakers' and 
laundry supplies, sugars, syrups,fine confectionery, 
foreign and domestic fruits, popular brands of 
foreign and domestic, cigars, tobaccos, etc. Mr. 
Hartigan's long experience in business makes him 
familiar with all its details, and being a superior 
judge of a good article, has an established reputa- 
tion for dealing only in pure goods. Polite and 
courteous attention is given to the wants of cus- 
tomers and orders are delivered at residences by 
wagons free of charge. 



Henry Evans, Furniture, Crockery, Glass, 
etc., Warerooms Near the Depots. Few among 
the many excellent and noteworthy mercantile 
establishments that contribute to the general sum 
of trade and commerce in Rochester have secured 
a more enduring hold on public favor and confi- 
dent than the well-known and reliable emporium 
of Henry Evans, dealer in furniture of all kinds, 
household specialties, and kindred wares, centrally 
located, on Hanson street, near the depots, and 
which is by common consent one of the lending, 
largest and best equipped houses of the kind in 
town. This store was established in 1878, by the 
present proprietor, and from the inception of the 
business Mr. Evans has enjoyed a large and pros- 
perous trade. The premises occupied for business 



purposes comprise three 24x60 foot floors, and an. 
extensive and complete stock is constantly carried, 
embraces plain and artistic furniture of every 
description, elegant parlor and chamber suits in 
great variety, tables, chairs and dining- rcom fur- 
niture, cabinet articles, upholstered goods, mirrors 
and looking glasses, and general house furnishing 
goods, upholstering also being done and picture 
frames made to order in the most superior and sat- 
isfactory manner. Mr. Evans is a native of New 
York, and is well known and highly regarded in 
the community. 

Rochester Steam Laundry, George F. 
Willey, Jr., Proi rietor, Dodge's Building, Central 
Square. One of. the largest and most popular 
business establishments in Rochester is the steam 
laundry of which George F. Willey, Jr., is pro- 
prietor. The house was founded originally in 
1886 by Messrs. Ramsey and Willey jt the present 
location, iluder the firm title of Messrs. Ramsay 
and Willey. Mr. Ramsay retired from the firm 
January 1st, 1887 and the present proprietor 
assumed full charge and by his able management 
and enterprise has greatly increased the facilities 
and patronage of the house. He occupies two 
floors, of a floorage area of 2,400 feet, which is 
provided with all the latest and most impoved 
machinery and mechanical appliances, which are 
driven by steam power and employment is given 
to ten operatives. Mr. Willey also makes a 
specialty of hand-work. Special attention is 
paid to the laundering of hotel guests' goods, 
restaurants, also to private families and gentlemen. 
Agents are wanted for the enterprise in every 
town in the state and all orders by mail will 
receive prompt attention. The work is done in 
a manner which cannot be surpassed, and it is 
a fact worthy of particular mention that there is 
less wear to articles laundered by his piocess 
than in the ordinary manner over the old- 
fashioned wash-board. A valuable adjunct to 
this popular e-tablishruentis itspublic bath-room 
which is the only one in Rochester and is kept in 
the neatest and cleanest condition. Mr. Willey 
is a native of Rochester. 



Herbert McCrillis, Groceries, Flonr and 
Provisions, East Rochester. Mr. Herbert Mc- 
Crillis, the well-known dealer in groceries, 
flour and provisions, established his business 
here in April, 1881. He occupies a large store 
and basement, with store houses capable of 
accommodating the large stock that is constantly 
carried. This stock includes the best brands of 
family flour, the finest teas, the purest coffees 
and spices, butter, cheese, and eggs, fresh fruits 
in their season in quantities to suit, sugars, 
syrups and molasses, soap, starch and oil, canmd 
goods, condiments and table delicacies, and the 
products of the farm, the orchard and the dairy, 
f.esh from the hands of the producer. The pro- 
prietor jilao deals in choice brands of cigars and 
tobacco, confectionery of all kinds, and does a 
general barter business in country produce. He also 
carries a complete line of boots and shoes, for 
men, women, misses, youth, boys and children, 
suited to the tastes and the means of all classes 
of buyers, aud the l>est possible inducements are 
offered to purchasers. Mr. McCrillis is a native 
of Rochester, 



GREAT FALLS AND BERWICK (ME). 



GREAT FALLS is one of the most beautifully located of the manufacturing cities of New 
Hampshire. For a long period it was but sparsely populated. Being a border settlement, 
where the war-whoop of the Indians resounded through the forests and over the plains too 
frequently for the comfort of white settlers seeking peaceful and prosperous homes, only 
hunters and trappers visited the present precincts of Great Falls until after the famous King 
Philip's War and the complete subjection of the savages. Then came the white men from 
over the seas and from the settlements of Plymouth and Massachusetts, and founded here 
the present city of Great Falls, which is situated on the verge of the State of New Hamp- 
shire, and in Strafford County. The beautiful Salmon River separates it from the busy little 
town of Berwick in the State of Maine. Though perched on opposite banks of the river 
and in different states, the manufacturing and commercial interests of the twin cities are 

identical, in common sharing in pros- 
perity and suffering in adversity. The 
pioneer settlers were quick to appre- 
ciate the excellent facilities afforded 
on the banks of the Salmon River for 
the pursuit of manufacturing enter- 
prises, the large and beautiful falls 
in the river supplying a water power 
of vast value, and one which was 
even more appreciated in days pre- 
ceding the invention of the steam 
engine than now. On the adoption 
of the factory system in the produc- 
tion of cotton goods, one of the first 
mills erected in New England was 
built at Great Falls, and the city is 
to-day a noted centre of the cotton 
trade, and one of New Hampshire's 
principle manufacturing cities. The 
city is situated in a district of great 
natural beauty, near to the falls, and 
at the junction of the Great Falls 
Branch of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad, the great Falls and Con- 
way Railroad, and the York and Cum- 
berland Railroad. It is thirty-three 
miles east of Concord, and within a limited radius are grouped over twenty towns and 
villages in Eastern New Hampshire and Maine, that look to Great Falls as the centre and 
leading city of the group. The surroundings. of the city are fertile and rich in agricultural 
products, for which Great Falls has become a noted distributing point. 

The population of the city in 1880 was 8,000, and since that date it has experienced a 
large increase ; for, from her favorable location, her advantageous surroundings, her com- 

100 




THE GREAT FALLS NATIONAL BANK. 



TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 



101 



mercial facilities, her business opportunities, her advantages as a shipping and distributing 
point, her wealth, and the intelligence, refinement and culture of her people for public and 
private enterprises, her excellent sanitary condition, and the thousand and one things that 
tend to make a city a desirable place of residence, Great Falls has begun to attract the 
attention of people from abroad and from other parts of the country; and as a result a tide 
of capital and business enterprise is gradually settling in this direction, that will assist, at 
no distant day, in building up here a city destined to take a prominent place among the 
great business centres of New England. The manufacturing and mercantile resources of 
Great Falls are now undergoing great development, and the promises held out for the 
future are matters of general pride and gratification. The railway facilities, giving prompt 
and ready communication with the seaboard and principal cities of the east, are great fac- 
tors in enlarging the manufacturing and commercial interests of Great Falls, and in increas- 
ing the value of the land and of agricultural products in the vicinity. While thus favored 
in respect of location for trade and manufactures, and endowed with excellent transporta- 
tion facilities, Great Falls has been remarkably fortunate in possessing men qualified with 
both capital and energy for developing the commerce and manufactures of the city. The 

importance of Great Falls, however, 
is not, perhaps, as fully appreciated 
as a business centre as the circum- 
stances warrant, save by those who 
have made the city a residence for 
a greater or less length of time, or 
by those who have maintained busi- 
ness relations with her merchants 
and manufacturers, and thus had a 
fair opportunity afforded of judging. 
While the city itself is a busy hive 
of industry, the surrounding country 
is peopled with a class of agricul- 
turists who have grown wealthy, and 
who bring to the city a trade of no 
small importance. From the city 
good roads radiate into all parts of 
New Hampshire and Maine, and 
along these roads are continuously 
poured supplies of farm products, 
which here find ready sale at good 
prices. 

But it is chiefly as a cotton manufacturing centre that Great Falls is noted ; and the true 
secret of a town's prosperity unmistakably lies in its manufacturing industries, for where 
manufacturing is carried on successfully, there invariably is a steady, healthy and substantial 
growth. Some of the cotton and woolen factories her.e are mammoth structures, and are filled 
with machines of all kinds, and all the tools necessary to carry on the different branches of 
production. The commerce of the city has kept pace with her increasing growth as a man- 
ufacturing centre. The commercial houses are both numerous and varied, and these, as a rule, 
are conducted with rare tact and energy. The aggregate of dry goods, millinery, fancy 
goods, notions, hardware, crockery, agricultural implements, clothing, boots, shoes, stoves, tin- 
ware, house furnishing goods, etc., handled by traders here is large and is annually increasing, 
while the city is yearly becoming a leading source of supply for a large, rich agricultural 
section lyirtg along the several lines of railroads centering here. The retail trade of Great 
Falls covers a large extent of territory, thickly settled and wealthy, almost exclusively tribu- 
tary to this city in many of the most important lines of business. It is a fact, creditable 
alike to the business tact of the retail dealers and to their energy and enterprise, that the 
prices of their goods are as low as, if not lower than, those prevailing in any other city in 
the east, and this fact is due, not only to the transportation facilities enjoyed, but to the circum- 




GREAT FALLS HOTEL. 



102 TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 

stance that the expenses of conducting business, rents, taxes and cost of living, are placed 
at a low and reasonable figure. 

One of the potent agencies in building up the trade and industry of the city, and con- 
sequently, a large factor in her growth and prosperity, is the banking business, the city being 
adequately supplied with national banks and savings institutions, all of which are in a sound 
and healthy condition, and are ably and wisely managed. 

The government of the city is in the hands of a Mayor, City Council, Board of Alder- 
men and other representatives and officers, and the affairs of the municipality are wisely and 
economically administered. The city is supplied with an abundance of excellent water both 
for domestic purposes and for fire protection, to say nothing of the sufficiency for manufac- 
turing and trading purposes. The fire department is thoroughly equipped, and its prompt- 
ness and efficiency in cases of fire are a matter of pride and gratification to every citizen. 
The police force is adequate, well organized and efficiently drilled, and person and property 
are thoroughly protected. 

In the important particular of school facilities Great Falls is in no sense behind" her 
sister cities. The city has a High School and other elegant school buildings, where pupils can 
attain the highest degree of proficiency in all branches necessary to qualify them for any of 
the ordinary pursuits of life. There are also several private educational establishments, and 
a fine public library, consisting of thousands of books, pamphlets, etc., that is heartily appre- 
ciated by the people. There are, too, some finely built churches in the town, comprising 
every sect and denomination, and many of these ecclesiastical structures are models of 
architectural art. Then, the press of Great Falls has long been a power for good in the 
community, and no city of its size in the state is better supplied with ably edited newspapers ; 
its agency in building up the prosperity of the place has been marked and appreciated, and 
its liberal support and advocacy of all legitimate enterprises, public and private, its denunci- 
ation of fraud, and its championship of the right, contribute more to the happiness and well 
being of the people than any other single agency. 

From a sanitary point of view, Great Falls is a desirable place of residence. The death 
rate is as low as that of any other city in New England, and every precaution is exercised 
by the city authorities to maintain the present healthy condition. With a steadily increasing 
population and an expanding business, both wholesale and retail, and with manufacturing 
and transportation facilities unexcelled in the State, Great Falls offers a splendid field of 
enterprise for the capitalist seeking an opportunity to invest and increase his wealth. The 
rents in the city are remarkably reasonable, the cost of building small, and the expense of 
building as low as elsewhere. The inhabitants belong chiefly to the industrial classes 
mechanics, tradesmen, etc. The wealth is pretty equally distributed, and while there are 
many wealthy, there are few really indigent, and but few who do not labor in some useful 
capacity. The solidity of the city, in point of healthy growth, socially, morally, as well as 
architecturally, is commendable ; and socially and morally, Great Falls will compare favor- 
ably with any other city in the world. Her citizens, for the most part, are a church-going 
people, while the public schools of the city are of such a character as to cause her citizens 
to speak of them with pride. The arts and sciences are cultivated and fostered, and evi- 
dences are to be seen on every hand of culture and refinement, not only of a private char- 
acter coupled with wealth, but of a public character as well. 

The business portion of the city is compactly and substantially built, and many of the 
business blocks are large and attractive. The City Hall, as well as other public and private 
buildings, are a credit to the city. The city is well laid out, the streets neatly kept and well 
lighted, the thoroughfares are, for the most part, lined with shade trees, and those sections 
of the city devoted principally to residences are inviting and attractive. 

With her large and increasing population and her populous surrounding country, and 
the many other advantages here briefly pointed out, Great Falls affords a splendid field for 
the capitalist and the manufacturer in which to locate as a base of operations for every 
channel of trade, offering the most brilliant prospects for the future to the investor, and 
affording in her educational, moral, social and sanitary advantages, an eminently desirable 
place of residence. 



TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 



103 



The City of Berwick, on the opposite side of the river, is equally flourishing and pro- 
gressive, and alike representative in her mercantile and manufacturing enterprises. She has 
grown up with and by the side of Great Falls, is, to all intents and purposes, part and 
parcel of herself, though she is under separate legislative, judicial and municipal government. 
Her factories and other trade establishments are, as a rule, intelligently directed and admir- 
ably equipped. The manufacturing facilities are as complete and perfect as they can be 
made, the custom being to employ the finest machinery, the most skilful artisans, and all 
accessories calculated to improve production and economize cost. Educational facilities are 
adequately provided, and the spiritual necessities of the people are cared for, while the full- 
est protection is given to person and property by an efficient police force and fire depart 
ment. 




In the subjoined pages our readers will find described a large number of industries that 
are illustrative of the importance of Great Falls and Berwick as producing centres. From 
these descriptions of distinctive industries a better idea of Great Falls and Berwick will be 
obtained than could be gained by the perusal of a general article. Both places are making 
long strides in the direction of intellectual development and in material prosperity. Their 
success in all these fields of labor and of thought are shown in their factories, their mills, 
their public schools and local libraries. Both places are equally noted for their wealth, 
their solid business enterprises, the scrupulous honesty of their business men, rather than 
for that spirit of speculation in which, in other cities, fortunes are quickly made, and even 
more quickly lost. As long as their interests are in the hands of men like these, their 
development will be advanced upon a solid and substantial plane, their prosperity will be 
steadily increased, and their future growth and progress assured. 



GREAT FALLS AND BERWICK. 



Charles Sanborn, Furniture, Carpets and 
Feathers. The establishment of Mr. Charles 
Sanborn, the widely known dealer in furniture 
and carpets, was originally founded by D. G. 
Rollins, and was conducted under various succes- 
sive managements until 1866, when the present 
proprietor came into possession. Mr. Sanborn 
was born in Canada in 1824, and came to this 
city in 1842. His business premises are amply 
spacious and are equipped in the most approved 
style for all the purposes required. A large 
and superior stock is carried, the assortment 
embracing a splendid variety of furniture, in 
plain ' and ornamental styles, also carpets of all 
kinds, and feathers. The goods are all of the 
most reliable character, affording ample field for 
selection, while the range of prices is such as to 
meet all wants. A number of workmen are em- 
ployed, and special attention is given to the 
repairing of furniture ; all orders in this line be- 
ing executed with neatness and dispatch. Alto- 
gether the house is a first-class one with which to 
establish business relations, and we take pleasure 
in commending it to the attention of our readers. 

S. P. Home & Co., Manufacturers of and 
Dealers in Doors, Sash, Blinds, Glazed Windows, 
etc., Shop, Sullivan Square, Berwick Side. This 
flourishing enterprise was inaugurated in 1871 
by the present proprietors, who brought great 
practical experience to bear, and made a success 
of their venture from the outset, and have built 
up a wide-spread demand for their products. 
The premises occupied comprise two stores, each 
30x51; feet in dimensions, together with an annex 
20x30 feet in area. The entire place is supplied 
with the best facilities and completely equipped 
throughout with the most improved appliances 
and appurtenances known to the business, and 
steam power is supplied by a 10-horse power 
engine. A force of skilled and expert hands are 
employed, and the range of manufacture em- 
braces every description of doors, sash, bliuds 
and glazed windows, also stair work and brackets 
of all sizes. The members of the firm are 
Messrs. S. P. Home and W. L. Butterfield, the 
former a native of New Hampshire, and the lat- 
ter of Vermont, both being gentlemen of enter- 
prise and business capacity. 
104 



C. S. Beacham & Son, Dealers in all 
Kinds of Flour, Corn Meal, Grain, Feed and 
Shorts. The business of this reliable and pro- 
gressive concern was inaugurated in 1864, the 
founders being Messrs. Davis & Blood, who were 
succeeded by Messrs. Wright & Co. The latter, 
after conducting the business successfully for 
some time, disposed of the enterprise to the pres- 
ent proprietors, Messrs. C. S. Beacham & Son. 
These gentlemen, Messrs. Charles S. and C. Ar- 
thur Beacham, are both natives of New Hamp- 
shire, and were born respectively in 1833 and 
1860. They occupy a spacious store, which 
covers an area of 30x70 feet. The railroad track 
runs close to the door, thus affording every con- 
venience for the receipt of supplies and the ship- 
ment of orders. The store is well fitted up through- 
out, possesses every facility for the successful 
prosecution of the business. The stock comprises 
the finest products of the most celebrated flour- 
ing mills in the country, together with grain and 
feed of all kinds. The firm have a large patron- 
age, and their trade is yearly increasing in mag- 
nitude. 



Daniel Ix>throp & Co., Wholesale and 
Retail Dealers in Clothing, Hats, Caps and Gen- 
tlemen's Furnishing Goods, Market Square and 
Market Street. This enterprise was founded as 
far back as 1858 by Mr. John C. Lothrop, repre- 
sentative of the firm of D. Lothrop & Co., who 
carried on the business of D. Lothrop & Co. up 
to the present time. This gentleman is a native 
of Rochester, N. H., born 1828. In addition to 
their Great Falls store, the firm have other es- 
tablishments of a like character in Boston, Dover 
and Rochester ; Mr. James E. Lothrop has been 
mayor of Dover, and a member of the State 
Legislature. Their store in Great Falls has a 
capacity of 55x60 feet. Clothing of every de- 
scription and in the prevailing styles for men, 
youths, boys and children, is displayed in profu- 
sion, and an abundance of choice is afforded to 
patrons, both in quality and price. The stock 
also includes the latest novelties in hats, caps, 
beaver, felt, cloth and straw, and the finest of 
underwear, shirts, hosiery, gloves, handkerchiefs 
collars, cuffs and the latest novelties in neckwear 
are all displayed in lavish array. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



105 



George Moore, Druggist and Apothecary, 
No. 26 Market Street. It is of the utmost im- 
portance in every community to know where a 
druggist or apothecary is to be found who is 
thoroughly accurate and prompt in his business. 
Great Falls has one of that character in the per- 
son of Mr. George Moore, at No. 26 Market street. 
Mr. Moore was born in this town in 1826. After 
devoting several years of close study and experi- 
ence in this line of trade, he founded this estab- 
lishment in 1858, and has conducted it ever since 
with the most unqualified success. His store is 
of ample dimensions, very neatly and attractively 
fitted up with fine show cases, counters, etc. He 
keeps on hand, constantly, a full and complete 
assortment of fresh and pure drugs, chemicals, all 
of which are fully up to the highest standard 
demanded by the U. S. Pharmacopeia, also all pro- 
prietary medicines of well established merit and 
reputation, toilet and fancy goods, foreign and 
domestic mineral waters, perfumery, physicians' 
and surgeons' requisites, druggists' sundries, etc. 
Mr. Moore makes a particular specialty of 
compounding physicians' prescriptions and family 
recipes, and in this department of the business 
the house has gained an enviable reputation, and 
ranks among the foremost in this section of the 
state, for the purity of its drugs and the accuracy 
and care with which they are compounded. All 
modern appliances to secure proper results have 
been provided, and no one more fully appreciates 
the responsibility in performing such duties than 
the proprietor. He employs only the most relia- 
ble and competent assistants, and orders are filled 
at all hours of the day or night. Mr. Moore is 
enterprising and reliable, and enjoys the highest 
respect of all with whom he has had business 
relations. 



A. Carter & Son, Dealer in Dry Goods, 
Carpetings, Feathers, Curtains, Fixtures, Uphol- 
stery Goods, etc., No. 28 Market Street, One of 
the oldest and most popular retail dry goods 
houses in Great Falls is that of Messrs. A. Carter 
& Son. The business had its origin in 1850 and 
the founders were Messrs. Carter & Merrill. Mr. 
Merrill subsequently retired, and then the style 
of the concern was changed to Carter Bros. 
In 1883 the firm was reorganized and then be- 
came Alfred Carter & Son. The senior member 
of the firm was born in New Hampshire in 1828, 
and is now a director of the Summersworth Na- 
tional Bank. His son, Mr. Edgar I. Carter, is 
also a native of this state and was born in 1856. 
The firm occupy for the purposes of their busi- 
ness two connecting stores, each 25x56 feet in di- 
mensions. The principal salesroom, on the 
ground floor, is finely fitted up, and every mod- 
ern convenience has been provided to facilitate 
the rapid transaction of business. The immense 
stock carried embraces everything that can be 
found in any kindred establishment, including 
dry and fancy goods, notions, silks, satins, velvets 
and dress goods, millinery trimmings, ladies' and 
gentlemen's furnishings, household goods, cloaks, 
shawls, underwear, curtains and curtain materi- 
als, fixtures, upholstery goods, ladies' and chil- 
dren's outside garments, etc. On the second floor 
is a fine display of carpets, rugs, mats, etc., of 
both domestic and foreign manufacture. An 
ample staff of courteous assistants are employed. 



The Boston Clothing House, Bank 
Building, High Street. In the compilation of 
this review of the leading industrial, commercial 
and general business interests of Great Falls,it is 
the aim of the publishers to give place and 
prominence to houses and firms in a relative 
degree to the standing they maintain in their re- 
spective lines of trade, and it is in pursuance of 
this design that special mention is here made of 
the widely-known and noteworthy establishment 
known as the Boston Clothing House, whose 
headquarters are located at the Bank Building, 
High street. The business of this house was 
founded in 1881, and from the first has been 
steadily growing in volume and influence. The 
extensive premises occupied consist of two stores, 
each 40x50 feet in dimensions, admirably fitted 
up throughout for all the purposes of the busi- 
ness, and supplied with every accommodation 
for customers. The immense stock carried is the 
largest of the kind to be found in the city, and is 
complete in all the various departments. The 
assortment comprises every description of ready- 
made clothing, made from the best materials, in 
the latest styles, and unsurpassed for general 
excellence and reliability. A superior showing is 
also made in gentlemen's furnishing goods of all 
kinds, as well as a fine variety of trunks and 
traveling bags. The goods are all placed at the 
lowest prices, and all purchases made here may 
be relied upon to represent the best of value. 
The proprietors of this worthy establishment, 
Messrs. Bodwell & Reeve, are business men of a 
high order of ability, are liberal and enterprising 
in their methods, and occupy a position of high 
standing in mercantile circles. They are natives 
of Maine, have long been favorably known in 
this section, and are thoroughly identified with 
the best interests of the community. 

Co-operative Store, Odd Fellows' Block ; 
John H. Stillings, Agent. The Co-operative 
Store had its origin in 1875, and from its incep- 
tion to the present it has had accorded a most 
substantial patronage. The premises occupied 
are commodious and well-arranged, consisting of 
a salesroom with a frontage of 40 feet and a depth 
of 52 feet, and every facility and convenience are 
at hand for the storage and display of the large 
stock constantly carried. The house deals exten- 
sively at retail in groceries, provisions, fruit, veg- 
etables, dairy products, etc., and the assortment 
kept on hand is so complete as to embrace every- 
thing of a desirable nature included in those 
lines. Staple productions and table delicacies of 
every description are always to be found in this 
establishment in their choicest and most reliable 
forms, and inducements are offered in the matter 
of prices, which are not easily duplicated else- 
where. The teas and coffees obtainable here are 
of the finest brands in the market : and flour, 
butter, cheese, eggs, etc., are the best that money 
can procure. The stock also embraces a full line 
of crockery, glassware, and all the miscellaneous 
goods usually found in an extensive and well 
conducted family grocery house. The stock in 
every department is selected with great care and 
excellent judgment, and customers can always 
rely upon the fact that nothing known to \ e 
adulterated or not of first-class quality will In- 
sold to them. Mr. Stillings was born in Maine. 



100 



TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 



Li. B. Hersom & Son, Wool and Wool 
Skins, Manulacturers of All Kinds of Sheep 
Linings. In reviewing the various industries 
that have made Great Falls an important centre 
of trade and manufacture, it is with pleasure we 
note as the leader in its branch ot trade the 
widely-known house of Messrs. L. E. Hersom & 
Son, dealers in wool and wool skins, and manu- 
facturers of all kinds of sheep linings. This 
house was first founded by Mr. L. R. Hersom, 
the firm later on becoming L. R. Herson & Co., 
and in 1883 changing to L. R. Hersom & Son. 
The management has ever been characterized by 
ability and energy, and a business has been 
built up that has its ramifications throughout 
the entire United States. The premises occupied 
comprises a four and a half story building 40x138 
feet in dimensions, with an attached L, the same 
height, and 34x34 feet in area. The place is 
equipped throughout in the most approved man- 
ner, having every facility to aid in the prosecu- 
tion of the enterprise, and constant employment 
is afforded to a force of thirty competent hands. 
The sheep linings manufactured here are un- 
rivalled for uniformity of excellence, and have a 
standard reputation in the market. Ordars are 
promptly filled on the most advantageous terms, 
and goods shipped to any point without delay. 
The magnitude of this enterprise, the system and 
economy of its operations, as well as the promi- 
nence of its projectors, all combine to place it 
among the most important factors of the city's 
business wealth, and fully entitle it to the pros- 
perity and lasting success it has so honorably 
achieved. The Hon. L. R. Hersom is one of the 
best-known figures iu public life in this state. 
He has served as representative to the Maine 
Legislature, has filled every office of note in this 
city, and has ever sustained a reputation of the 
most enviable character for executive talent, in- 
flexible integrity, and the highest order of intel- 
ligence. His son, Mr. A. E. Hersom, is a busi- 
ness man of excellent ability, is influential in 
mercantile circles, and is respected as a most 
useful and honorable member of the community. 

Mrs. C. H. Harmon, Millinery and Fancy 
Goods, Sanborn'a Block, Main Street. Of the 
many and varied mercantile establishments that 
contribute to the sum of trade and business 
activity in any progressive community in these 
days, not one comes within measurable distance 
of the well-ordered millinery and ladies wear 
emporium in point of genuine interest, and there- 
fore it is that the neat and deservedly popular 
store of Mrs. C. H. Harmon, dealer in fine mil- 
linery, neckwear, trimmings and fancy goods, 
which is eligibly located in Central Block, Main 
street, becomes the centre of attraction to the 
female portion of the population of Great Falls, 
there being here always displayed the latest 
novelties and most correct styles in bonnets and 
hats, hair ornaments, silk ribbons, laces, notions 
and a multifarious assortment of articles com- 
prehended under the general head of fancy goods ; 
while patrons can at all times rely upon finding 
an excellent article, satisfactory treatment and, 
prompt and polite attention in this flourishing 
establishment. The store, which was established 
in 1876 by Mrs. Harmon, a lady of excellent 
business ability and of many years experience, is 



20x40 feet in dimensions and tastefully appointed, 
and a full and fine stock is constantly carried, 
embracing besides exquisite hats and bonnets, 
both trimmed and untrimmed, superb plumes, tips 
flowers and millinery trimmings, silks, corsets, 
plushes and beads; also laces and embroideries, 
collars and cuffs, hair and neck ornaments, dress 
trimmings, notions, toilet articles and ladies' 
furnishings in great variety, while bonnets and 
hats are trimmed and altered in the most superior 
style likewise, and altogether the patronage of 
the establishment is of a very substantial and 
influential character. 



Henry W. Pierce & Son, Machinists, 
Berwick Side. This enterprising concern was 
founded in 1886, and it has. thns far, had a most 
successful career, and one that augurs well for 
the future. The firm occupy two stores, each 
containing an area of 25x60 feet, and here they 
carry on the general business of machinists, build- 
ing machines and engines, etc., and repairing the 
same. The mechanical equipments are all of the 
most perfect and ample character. The firm 
make a specialty of steam, gas and water fitting, 
and for this work they carry an extensive stock 
of fittings. They also erect, in the neatest possi- 
ble manner, all kinds of pipe fence for graves and 
lots, and execute all kinds of mill work. The 
firm are agents for stationary engines and boilers, 
all kinds of turned and cold rolled steel shafting, 
and for the Columbia bicycles and tricycles. 
They carry a very extensive stock of mill sup- 
plies of every description, and, receiving these di- 
rect from the makers, they are in a position to 
offer in respect thereof, the most advantageous 
terms both in prices and times to both large and 
small consumers. 



Charles H. Harmon, Fruits, Confection- 
ery, Cigars, Pipes and Tobacco. The Old News 
Stand, Opposite B. and M. Depot. Mr. Harmon 
came to this town in 1847 from Maine, where he 
was born in 1843, and has been a resident here 
ever since. The business was established orig- 
inally in 1853 by John G. Hill, and after several 
changes the present proprietor came into posses- 
sion in 1887. The house has from the date of its 
commencement been the favorite resort of the 
very best classes of our citizens, and has always 
done a very large and prosperous business. The 
premises occupied are of ample dimensions and 
very neatly and attractively arranged. Mr. 
Harmon keeps constantly on hand a full and 
complete assortment of foreign and domestic 
fruits in their season and is in constant receipt of 
new invoices every day, while his stock of con- 
fectionery is unsurpassed for variety, excellence, 
freshness and absolute purity. He likewise car- 
ries a fine line of the choicest, most popular and 
favorite brands of foreign and domestic cigars, 
cigarettes, smoking and chewing tobaccos, snuffs, 
also meerschaum, clay and wood pipes, cigar and 
cigarette holders, pocket cases, pouches and other 
smokers' articles. Here can always be found a 
full supply of intellectual food in the shape of all 
the latest published works of the most famous 
writers; also periodicals, magazines and all of 
the Boston daily papers and leading weeklies 
from all parts of the United States as soon as 
published. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



107 



E. A. Tibbets & Son, Wholesale and Re- 
tail Dealers in Hardware, Tools, Paints, Oils, 
Varnishes, etc. This house stands prominently 
forward as a leader in the wholesale and retail 
hardware trade of Great Falls. The business 
was founded by Mr. Luther C. Tibbets in 1841, 
and three years later he was succeeded in the 
enterprise by Mr. I. Brooks, aud in 1847 he was 
succeeded by Tibbets & Bro. , the present firm 
assuming control in 1881. Mr. Tibbets, ST., was 
born in Maine in 1824, and for the past forty- 
three years has been conducting business at his 
present stand. For two years he was a member 
of the Legislature, and is now the oldest director 
of the Summersworth National Bank, having been 
connected with it since its incorporation in 1858. 
Some years ago he took into partnership his son, 
and the style of the house then became E. A. 
Tibbets & Son. The store is very eligibly located, 
is commodious, and well equipped with a full and 
complete stock, including everything in the wide 
range of heavy and shelf hardware, builders' and 
mechanics' and manufacturers' tools and supplies, 
pocket and table cutlery, every variety of 
carriage, wood and iron work, glass, paints, oils, 
varnishes, etc. The stock is extensive and has 
been selected with care and excellent judgment. 
Those in need of goods will find it to their ad- 
vantage to deal with this reliable house. 



John Emery, Manufacturer of Monuments, 
Tablets, Scrolls and Headstones, Berwick Side. 
The Great Falls Marble and Granite Works are 
among the oldest in this section of the state, and 
were established in 1846 by Mr. John Emery, who 
has established wide-spread reputation as an ar- 
tistic marble and granite worker. The premises 
cover a space of ground 100x150 feet, and are com- 
plete in all their appointments, being supplied 
with all the machinery and appliances requisite 
in the business. Mr. Emery is a thorough skilled 
artist, as the many beautiful specimens of his 
handiwork in marble and granite to be seen at his 
establishment will testify. He designs and exe- 
cutes monuments, tablets, headstones, scrolls, etc., 
beautiful in conception and unsurpassed in finish, 
and many of the memorials that adorn the ceme- 
teries throughout this section are the productions 
of his skill. Mr. Emery deals in soap stone, 
pumice ctoae, hones and brimstone. He is a 
native of the Stale of New Hampshire, and is one 
of the most useful of the enterprising citizens of 
Great Falls. 



E. W. Folsom, Jeweler and Optician, No. 
5 Main Street. Mr. E. W. Folsom, the well- 
known watchmaker and jeweler, has been estab- 
lished here since 1850. The business was for 
some years carried on by Mr. S. B. Cole, who was 
followed by A. F. Chandled and he by E. W. 
Folsom & Co.. and in 1879 it came under the sole 
control of Mr. Folsom. The store is neatly and 
handsomely arranged, and fitted up with plate 
glass show cases and ornamental counters, and is 
well stocked with a fine assortment of watches in 
gold and silver cases, and also clocks in great 
variety, silver and plated ware and all the lead- 
ing fashionable styles in jewelry. Mr. Folsom 
was born in Maine in 184!), and since 1874 has 
been located in Great Falls. He is a practical 
jeweler and watchmaker, and was brought up in 



the business at Manchester. He is thoroughly 
conversant with its every detail, and makes a 
specialty of repairing watches, clocks and jewelry 
in a superior manner. 



William D. Clark, Groceries and Provis- 
ions, No. 25 Market Street. This establishment 
was founded originally about the year 1812 by a 
Mr. W. Wiggins, and is one of the oldest if not 
the oldest house of its kind in the town. Mr. 
Clark succeeded to the business in 1877 and has 
carried it on ever since with uniform success. 
The store is of ample dimensions, appropriately 
fitted up and supplied with all conveniences. He 
carries a full and complete stock of groceries and 
provisions, embracing hermetically sealed goods 
in glass and tin, from the best establishments 
known to the trade; sugars, syrups, spices, condi- 
ments, table delicacies, best brands of family 
flour, provisions, grain, mill-feed, cheese, pure 
creamery butter, et?gs, vegetables, foreign and do- 
mestic fruits, brooms, wooden and' willow ware, 
etc. Mr. Clark is an expert judge of tens and 
coffees and he deals in none but the purest and 
best, aud his stock of tobacco and cigars has been 
selected with the greatest care. Popular prices 
prevail. Mr. Clark is a native of this state. 

John R. Parker, Photographer. An 
artist whose productions in the photographic art 
are sec.ond to none in this section is Mr. John B. 
Parker. This gentleman was born in Massachu- 
setts in 1862, and in his native state acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the photographic art. In 
February, 1886, he came to Great Falls and 
founded his present popular gallery. He has a 
fine large operating room, a handsome reception 
room, and all the facilities requisite for accom- 
plishing rapid and successful work. The instan- 
taneous process of photography is employed, and 
is specially adapted to taking the portraits of 
children and nervous persons. Mr. Parker de- 
votes his energies to every branch of the art, pro- 
ducing photographs and landscapes. He makes a 
specialty of coj ying and enlarging pictures in 
crayon, oil, india ink, pastel, water colors, etc., 
which are true to life and the original. Talented 
and accomplished, he never fails to make a cor- 
rect likeness and give satisfaction to his patrons. 

John C. Dearborn, Merchant Tailor, etc., 
Pray's Building, High Street. Mr. Dearborn es- 
tablished this business about twenty years ago wi th 
the avowed intention of furnishing the citizens 
with the finest and most fashionable clothing at a 
fair price, in which he has been successful. In 
the handsomely fitted up store a fine display is 
made of a choice and well selected stock of for- 
eign and domestic woolen suitings, etc , in all the 
new, beautiful, fashionable styles. These goods 
include the best efforts of the most distinguished 
manufacturers and in the assortment will be found 
everything seasonable and desirable. Mr. Dear- 
born is familiar with every detail of the merchant 
tailor's art and is conceded to be one of the most 
correct, stylish cutters in town. He fashions 
garments in strict accord with the prevailing 
styles worn in Boston and New York, and gives 
his personal supervision to the smallest details of 
trimmings. Mr. Dearborn was born in Maine iii 
1839 and has been in Great Falls since 1867. 



108 



TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 



Grant's Hotel, E. Grant, Proprietor. The 
leading hostelry in Great Falls is Grant's Hotel, 
which bears a reputation of enviable character for 
the liberality and enterprise of its management. 
This widely known house was first opened in 
1873 by the present proprietor, Mr. E. Grant, who 
has had ample experience in this line, and is 
thoroughly conversant with all the needs of the 
traveling public. The building has four stories, 
each 50x100 feet in dimensions, and an attached 
L. There are forty sleeping apartments all fitted 




J. W. Preston, M. D., Druggist. One of 
the best qualified druggists in Great Falls is Dr. 
J. W. Preston, whose pharmacy is one of the old 
landmarks of the town. Dr. Preston, who was 
born in Canada in 1826, but a resident of the 
United States for many years, is both a medical 
and pharmaceutical graduate, and practiced 
medicine in Plymouth, N. H., for seventeen 
years previous to his removal to this place in 
1884, and therefore brings to bear upon his busi- 
ness trained skill and a wide range of practical 
experience. The house was founded origi- 
nally by Messrs. M. Noble & Co., in 1831, 
who were succeeded by Mr. Stevens, follow- 
ed by Mr. Jones, then Mr. J. P. Ladd, who 
was succeeded by Mr. J. Y. Wingate, after 
him came Mr. E. M. Carlton, who was suc- 
ceeded by the present proprietor in 1884. 
The store is spacious and is completely 
stocked with an assortment of pure drugs 
and chemicals, proprietary medicines of 
well-known merit and reputation, toilet and 
fancy articles, perfumery, foreign and domes- 
tic mineral waters, dye stuffs, stationery, 
druggists' sundries, etc. The utmost dili- 
gence and care is exercised by the doctor in 
the compounding of physicians' prescrip- 
tions and family recipes, filling all orders 
with promptitude and the greatest care and 
accuracy at all hours of the day or night. 
As a physician he brings to bear a class of 
knowledge than which there is no more val- 
uable adjunct in a pharmacy. In this respect 
Dr. Preston's establishments ranks the equal 
of any in this section. 



np in the most approved style, and supplied with 
good beds and clean bedding. The sanitary arrange- 
ments of the establishment are as perfect as they 
can be made ; the house is well ventilated, lighted 
and heated throughout, and altogether no trouble 
or expense has been spared to provide for guests 
all the comforts of home. Free conveyance is 
supplied to and from the depots. The clerk, Mr. 
H. W. Niles, is a favorite with all the patrons of 
the establishment, and is untiring in his efforts 
to please. Mr. Grant personally superintends all 
the affairs of his house. 

Fred. S. Bicker, Boots and Shoes, Carter's 
New Block, Market Street. One of the most 
attractive business establishments of Great Falls 
is that of Mr. Fred. S. Ricker, who engaged in the 
boot and shoe trade, and may be said to be the 
leader of fashion in footwear. He has all the new 
styles as soon as brought out, and keeps on sale a 
general assortment of French, English and Amer- 
ican boots and shoes, made in the best manner in 
perfect accord with the fashionable ideas of the 
day. These goods have been chosen with care 
expressly for a fastidious custom and will be 
found in all sizes for ladies', gentlemen's, misses' 
and children's wear. Rubbers, slippers and all 
those goods belonging to the trade are also kept 
in stock. Mr. Ricker was born at Berwick, Me., 
opposite Great Falls. He has had quite an ex- 
tended experience in the boot and shoe trade, and 
has been established in business since 1886, and 
is in the fall enjoyment of a large first-class trade. 
In size the store is 17x50 fret, and is complete and 
perfect in all its appointments. 



A. K. Downs, Flour and Groceries, Ber- 
wick Side. One of the most popular and reliable 
general groceries stores in this town is the well- 
known and nourishing establishment of A. K. 
Downs. The business was established in 1872 by 
the present proprietor, and he has since built up a 
large and prosperous trade. The store is 30x60 
teet in dimensions and neatly kept, while an 
extensive and first-class stock is constantly carried, 
including fine teas and coffees, pure spices, sauces 
and condiments, choice dairy butter, cheese, eggs 
and lard, best brands of family flour, sugars, rice, 
molasses, oatmeal, cereal food products, canned 
goods. of all kinds, smoked and salt fish, and a 
complete assortment of staple and fancy groceries, 
no pains being spared to render the fullest satis- 
faction in every instance to customers. Mr. 
Downs is a native of Berwick, Me. 



C. Li. Lord, Fancy Goods Store, Boston and 
Maine Depot. Mr. C. L. Lord has for the past 
ten years been engaged here in business operations. 
Recently he removed to the new store in the 
Boston and Maine depot, which he has fitted up 
in the very best manner and made it attractive 
by displaying a large and varied assortment of 
fancy goods, embracing everything coming under 
that head, including boisery, gloves, furnishing 
goods, laces, ribbons, worsteds and worsted goods, 
woolens, etc., and also a general line of fancy 
and ornamental hair goods. He is also the agent 
for the Walden Dye House, and for the Universal 
Paper Patterns. Born in Maine in 1838, Mr. Lord 
came to Great Falls in 1874, and has from that 
time been conspicuous in commercial affairs. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



109 



A. Thwing-, Great Falls Book Store, No. 2 
Central Buildings. The Great Falls Book Store 
has been established some forty years, and came 
under the sole control of the present proprietor 
in 1869. The store is one of the best kuown and 
most popular in town. In size it is 25x50 feet, 
and is very tastefully and attractively fitted up 
and admirably arranged. The stock is large, 
Varied and complete in all departments, and em- 
braces books upon all subjects, history, theology, 

'travels, science, etc., and also the popular light 
literature of the day by eminent authors, and all 
the various school and text books used in the ed- 
ucational institutions throughout this part of the 
state. Blank books are an important feature of 
the business, and also commercial and school and 
fancy stationery, and a great variety of ornamen- 
tal articles that belong to their special business. 
Paper hangings in all the new, beautiful styles 

* and patterns are also displayed in profusion, to- 
gether with a general line of fancy goods and 
guitar and violin strings. Born in Massachu- 
setts 42 years ago, Mr. Thwing came to 
Great Falls in 1868. He is popular, prominent 
and influential, and for three years served his fel- 
low townsmen in the most acceptable manner as 
town clerk. 



John A. Dumas, Dry and Fancy Goods, 
Small Wares, etc., Bank Building, High Street. 
The well ordered dry goods and ladies' wear em- 
porium of J. A. Dumas, is the centre of attraction 
to the female portion of thiscommunity,there being 
here always displayed a complete and first-class as- 
sortment of every thing comprehended in this line, 
while popular prices and reliable goods are at all 
times the prevailing features here. This well and 
favorably known store was established many 
years ago by Mr. Weatherbee, and after several 
changes in the management, it passed into the 
control of the present proprietor in 1887. The 
premises occupied for business purposes are spa- 
cious and commodious and finely appointed, the 
store running through from High street to Elm 
street, and a heavy and Al stock is carried, com- 
prising elegant dress goods and trimmings, suits, 
cloaks and shawls, gloves, hosiery and notions, 
novelties in neckwear, laces and corsets, linens, 
sheetings, ginghams, cottons, calicoes and fancy 
goods in great variety ; while several competent 
and efficient clerks attend to the wants of cus- 
tomers, and the trade, which extends all over the 
town and surrounding country is exceedingly 
large. 



J. F. Robinson & Co., Groceries, Sul- 
livan Square, Berwick, Maine. Among the busi- 
ness men who are prominent in Berwick is the 
firm of J. F. Eobinson & Co., who are engaged in 
the grocery trade. The copartners, Mr. J. F. 
and Mr. Charles H. Robinson, established the 
house in 1869 which has since built up a large, 
substantial trade. In dimensions the store is 24x48 
feet and is well stocked with a choice well selected 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries of every 
description, including the very best quality teas 
and coffees, pure spices, family flour, hermetically 
sealed goods in tin and glass and provisions, etc. 
Both members of the firm were born in Maine, 
the former in 1883 and the latter in 1841. 



William Plummer, Fine Teas, Coffees and 
Choice Family Groceries. Thirty odd years of 
unbroken prosperity sums up in brief the history 
of the well and favorably known establishment of 
William Plummer, dealer in fine teas, coffees, 
spices and general family groceries, which since 
the inception of the enterprise in 1857, has 
maintained a record of steady progress. The 
store, which is ample and commodious, is 
neatly fitted up and excellently kept, and a large 
and first-class stock is constantly carried, com- 
prising fine teas and coffees, pure spices, condi- 
ments and canned goods in great variety, best 
family flour, sugar, molasses, vinegars, oils, 
smoked and salt fish, rice, oatmeal, choice dairy 
butter, cheese, lard, soda, soaps, starch, house- 
hold specialties, shelf goods and a full and fine 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries of every 
description ; while several efficient assistants at- 
tend to the wants of customers, and the trade of 
the establishment, which extends all over the city 
and environs, is very large. Mr. Plummer is a 
native of Maine, but has resided in this place 
since 1839, and was a popular and efficient select- 
man during 1869 and 1870. 

M. S. Weeks, Groceries, Meats and Provi- 
sions, etc., Hodsdon's Block, Market Street. A 
reliable and popular house in Great Falls is that 
of Mr. M. S. Weeks. Mr. Weeks came to Great 
Falls in 1877 from Maine, where he was born in 
1857. Having had a practical experience in this 
line of trade he founded this establishment in 
1886, and although of such recent origin he has 
received a patronage which is not very often ac- 
corded to much older houses. The premises 
utilized are of ample dimensions, neatly and 
tastefully fitted up with special reference to the 
business. The stock embrace* everything in the 
way of fancy and staple groceries, meats, provi- 
sions, etc., and canned goods of every description, 
sugars, syrups, bakers' and laundry supplies, 
foreign and domestic fruits, spices, table delica- 
cies, pure and unadulterated teas and cofiees, 
fresh salt, dried and smoked meats and fish, 
cheese, pure creamery butter, eggs, vegetables ; 
also confectionery, nuts, cigars, cigarettes, pipes 
smoking and chewing tobacco, in fact, everything 
found in a well conducted grocery store. 



J ohn M. Moodie, Merchant Tailor, Market 
Square. Mr. Moodie is an experienced practical 
cutter, and fashions and designs gentlemen's 
clothing upon scientific principles, and is one of 
the best and most correct in the business. In 
the neatly arranged and tastefully fitted up store, 
a large and varied assortment of fine woolens, 
suitings, cloths, tweeds, trouserings, etc., of both 
foreign and domestic production, is displayed in 
profusion. The goods are all of the highest 
standard quality and latest fashionable styles, 
and include everything seasonable, fashionable 
and desirable. Repairing and pressing receives 
his prompt attention. Born at Glasgow, Scot- 
land, in 1852, Mr. Moodie came to America in 
1859, and in 1877 became permanently located in 
Great Falls, and ten years later succeeded to the 
business that had been established and carried on 
by Mr. J. B. Clark for a quarter of a century pre- 
viously. 



110 



TOWN OF GREAT FALLS. 



Rich, Brock & Co., Manufacturers of 
Sumac Linings in All Colors, Tanned Leather, 
etc., Factory and Salesroom, School Street. This 
firm are carrying on general operations as manu- 
facturers of sumac linings in all colors, sheep, 
kid, black and white alum tanned leather, also 
pebbled sheep and tongue stock, aud have built 
up an extensive demand for their productions. 
The premises used for the business have dimen- 
sions of 30x80 feet, are fitted up in the most ap- 
proved style for the required purposes, and pos- 
sess every facility for the satisfactory piosecutioii 
of the industry. A force of twelve hands are 
employed in the production, and the goods turned 
out are unrivalled by any similar merchandise 
now in the market, the highest uniform standard 
of excellence being maintained. The firm sell 
to the trade on the most favorable terms, and 
have every facility for promptly filling orders. 
The members of the firm, Messrs. W. H. Rich, 
G. E. Brock and J. E. Lord, are all natives of 
Maine. 



Joseph Nelson, Fresh Baked Peanuts, Fruit 
and Confectionery, Front of B. and M. Depot. 
Mr. Nelson was born in Italy in 1844, having 
come to the United States in 1874 and settled 
here in 1876, at which time he founded his present 
business. The premises occupied are spacious 
and commodious, neatly and tastefully arranged, 
and contains a full and complete assortment of 
choice foreign and domestic fruits in their season, 
embracing choice Mediterranean, Florida and 



West India oranges, lemons, limes, pineapples, 
bananas, also the best and finest qualities of 
California, Malaga and domestic grapes, apples, 
pears, peaches, plums, etc. He likewise carries a 
lull and choice assortment of foreign and native 
nuts, and makes a particular specially of fresh 
baked peanuts, which has always been the favorite 
of the people. Mr. Nelson also keeps a full and 
complete line of confectionery, which is made 
from none but the purest materials by the most 
reliable manufacturers. 



J. E. Frost, Steam and Shingle Mill, Ber- 
wick Side. This business was inaugurated by 
the present proprietor in 1881, and its record is 
one of uninterrupted prosperity, and continued 
advancement. The mill, which has dimensions 
of 35x100 feet, is equipped with the most im- 
proved machinery, operated by steam power, and 
the most complete facilities for all the purposes 
required. A force of experienced workmen are 
employed, and the range of production embraces 
planing, jointing, jig sawing, turning posts, bal- 
lusters, window, screen and door frames, small 
box making, shingles, plank and boards, picks, 
rails; also all kinds of inside and outside finish, 
mill work, and general jobbing is attended to. 
Orders by express are given prompt attention, 
and satisfaction with poods or work done is guar- 
anteed in all cases. Mr. Frost offers marked ad- 
vantages in terms, and all transactions had with 
him are sure to terminate satisfactory and 
pleasantly. Mr. Frost is a native of Maine. 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



THE flourishing and progressive City of Nashua has the distinction of having been the 
first English settlement in the southern part of the State of New Hampshire. For half a 
century or more after the Puritans had arrived and established themselves at Plymouth, 
and the Bay State colony had been founded, the site of Nashua was still a wilderness, peo- 
pled and controlled by the red men; to-day it is one of the best known, most flourishing 
and most delightfully situated of the many cities within the limits of the Granite State. As 
the Indians retreated before the white men, who took possession of the lands of Massachu- 
setts, they fixed their wigwams in the fastnesses of Maine and New Hampshire, and in the 
neighborhood of Nashua the red men held their war dances, and ran amuck for the scalps 
of the white men who ventured to explore that section of country. For more than half a 
century after its settlement it was a mere border colony and the scene of frequent sanguin- 
ary fights between the abongines and the settlers for possession and domination. Nashua 
suffered severely during King Philip's war from 1675 to 1678, again in 1691, on the 
outbreak of war between England and France, soon after the accession to the English 
throne of William III., when hostilities extended to the colonies. The French from Can- 
ada, assisted by large numbers of Indians, invaded several parts of New England. The 
cruelties practiced almost exceed belief. Towns were attacked at midnight, and in mid- 
winter ; the people were often killed in their beds, and those whose lives were spared 
were torn from their homes, and obliged to endure sufferings worse than death. Dur- 
ing this war, and in the year 1691, the French and Indians visited the citizens of Nashua 
with death and desolation. 

The peace that was secured by treaty was of but short duration, for in 1702 hos- 
tilities were renewed, and this time concerning the Spanish succession, the French and 
Indians immediately invaded New England, and the war was continued for eleven years, 
during which time frequent attacks were made upon and ravages committed in Nashua. 
In one of these onslaughts the celebrated friendly Indian, Joe English, was killed. Peace 
was restored in 1713. 

The Indians, however, were still discontented, and in 1722 the tribes in Eastern and 
Northern New England again went on the war-path for a period of three years. In 
1724 they visited Nashua, and carried off two of its citizens. A party of eleven persons 
started in pursuit, but were soon waylaid by the red men, and ten of them killed. 
The only survivor was Joseph Farwell, who was the next year lieutenant in captain 
John Lovewell's expedition. Captain Lovewell raised a company of volunteers, and 
marched northward in pursuit of the Indians. In the first expedition they killed one 
Indian and took another prisoner. In a second excursion they killed ten Indians, but 
in a third expedition they fell into an ambuscade at Lovewell's Pond, in Frysburg, Me. 
Captain Lovewell, Lieutenant Farwell and Ensign Robbins, all of Nashua, were killed, 
as also the chaplain, Mr. Frye, and twelve others, and eleven wounded. In this san- 
guinary engagement the noted chief Paugus was killed. The blow fell heavily upon the 
feeble settlement, but it was a triumph for New England, for the power of the Indians 
was broken for ever, and song and romance have embalmed the memory of the heroes 
of " Lovewell's Fight." 

HI 



112 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



The Nashuites had, therefore, a long and serious lesson in border warfare, and 
when the Revolution came they were fitted by experience for battling with the trained 
soldiers of England. In the war of the Rebellion, too, Nashua contributed of her best 
blood and treasure, and the deeds of those who fell in. the struggle for the perpetua- 
tion of the Union are commemorated by an artistic monument erected by the citizens. 

Nashua is located in Hillsboro' County, on the west side of the Merrimac River, at 
the confluence of the Nashua River, 31 miles south by east of Concord. Originally the 
town embraced a large extent of territory, and bore the name of Dunstable. It was 
incorporated a town on April I, 1746, and in December, 1836, the name was changed 
to Nashua. The Nashua river ran through the heart of the town, and in 1842, in con- 
sequence of some difficulty about locating a town house, that portion of the town 
located on the north and west sides of the river petitioned to be set off and incorpor- 
ated into a town by the name of Nashville. The legislature granted them their peti- 
tion ; but, in 1853, a charter was granted and accepted, by which the original towns 
became re-united under a city government, and to-day it ranks as the second city in 
New Hampshire in point of population, manufactures and commerce. 

The city is watered by Salmon Brook (a small stream flowing from Groton, Mass., 
and emptying into the Merrimack), and by the Merrimack and Nashua Rivers. In nearly 




THE DAM BELOW MAIN STREET BRIDGE. 

the centre of the city the latter river empties itself into the Merrimack. The Nashua is a 
beautiful stream. It has a serpentine course through the southern part of Hillsboro' County, 
in this State, and its source in Worcester County, Mass. It is formed of two branches, 
called the south and north branches. The north branch is formed of two streams, one 
from Ashburnham, and the other from Wachuset Ponds. The south branch is composed of 
Still River, issuing from the east side of Wachuset Mountain, and a small stream from 
Quinepoxet Pond, in Holden. These branches are united in Lancaster, from which the 
main river proceeds, in a north-easterly course, to Harvard, Shirley, Groton, and Pepperell, 
Mass., and thence into New Hampshire, through Hollis, and to its confluence at Nashua 
with the Merrimack. The Nashua has, in a distance of two miles from its mouth, a fall of 
65 feet. The Merrimack is one of the principal rivers of New England, and is formed by 
the junction of the Pemigewasset and Winnipiseogee Rivers, which have their origin in the 
White Mountains, and which unite at Franklin ; and the confluent stream then bears the 
name of Merrimack. Originally this name was written Merremacke and Monnomoke, which, 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



113 



in the Indian language, signified a sturgeon. In width the river varies from 50 to 150 
rods ; and at its mouth it presents a beautiful sheet of water of half a mile in width. 
From Franklin the river pursues a southerly course for 78 miles to Chelmsford, Mass., 
thence an easterly course for 35 miles to the sea, at Newburyport. 

The City of Nashua is thus abundantly supplied with water power from both the Rivers 
Nashua and Merrimack, and the founders of the city were alive to the advantages here 
presented for manufacturing purposes. It is to its manufactures that Nashua owes its 
growth to the second in rank of the cities and towns of New Hampshire. The prospects are 
that Nashua will not only continue to maintain its present rank, but that it will become 
even a more important centre than now of large and varied manufacturing interests. Then, 
the true secret of a town's prosperity undoubtedly lies in its manufacturing industries. A 
prosperity based exclusively upon a commercial business must necessarily be ephemeral. A 
town which, for instance, depends upon any one or more of the great agricultural staples 
for support and growth, is liable to become paralyzed in her energies and interests, not only 
by failure in the production of such staples, but from their diversion to other points whose 
eligibility gives them the advantage and preference as markets. Such also are the fluctu- 
ations in prices of articles of produce that no certainty of successful operations can be 
relied upon, and when uncertain, feverish and exciting speculation underlies the business of 
any community, there is no guarantee of permanent and staple prosperity, while, where 
manufacturing is carried on successfully, there is a steady, healthy and substantial growth. 




MX. PLEASANT SCHOOL BUILDING. . 

Nashua owes its importance, both present and future, to its manufacturing industries. For 
variety and perfection of mechanical skill, as may be seen in her numerous and various 
manufactories, Nashua is abreast with any of her sister cities in New England. Her cotton 
mills do a large work, and have done much to increase the population of the city, but it is 
thought that her other manufactories have done more, such as artificers in wood and iron, 
in cards, paper and leather, builders of ponderous or curious machines, makers of edge 
tools, locks and shuttles, forge men, foundry men, and artisans of almost every degree and 
calling. In looking over the catalogue of the great multitude and almost endless variety of 
manufacturing establishments, it would seem as though the mechanical genius must be well 
tested at Nashua. It would be somewhat difficult to name an article that could not at 



114 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



once be furnished, if ordered ; and when the factories, mills and workshops are run to- 
their full capacity, business of all kinds is brisk, money is plentiful, and the tradesmen- 
and work-people are happy. 

The Nashua Manufacturing Company is the pioneer manufacturing concern in the 
city. This company was organized with a capital of $300,000, which was afterwards 
augmented to 51,000,000. In 1822 to 1823 the greater portion of the lands in the town 
and on the River Nashua up to the falls was purchased by the company, who com- 
menced building a dam, canal and other works for factories. The company has 
several extensive mills, and employ over a thousand hands in manufacturing shirtings 
and drills, printing cloths, jeans, sheetings, etc. The Nashua Manufacturing Co. were 
followed by the Jackson Manufacturing Co., who also operate several extensive mills- 




EPISCOPAL CHURCH, MAIN STSEET. 

and employ a large number of operatives in producing sheetings and shirtings. After 
these two flourishing companies had become fairly established, other mills and workshops 
were erected, and new industrial enterprises are constantly springing up. 

From her favorable location, her advantageous surroundings, her commercial facilities, 
her business opportunities, her extensive manufactres, her solidity, and the intelligence, 
wealth, culture and moral advancement of her people Nashua, is a desirable place of 
residence, as well as an advantageous point for business of all kinds; while in every 
item to be taken into account in the make-up of a manufacturing city comparison is 



CITY OF NASHUA. . 115 

challenged. In this progressive age, the prospects of a city for the future are largely 
due to its transportation facilities. Fortunately, Nashua has great advantages of this 
kind, in being a great railroad centre. Railways have come to the city from all quar- 
ters, and have so cultivated their fields of operation that they form the largest arm of 
the commercial service of the community, constituting a transportation system rarely 
equalled by any inland city. The railway service affords immediate and cheap com- 
munication with all the principal business centres of New England and with the sea- 
board, and a large traffic is the result. 

With a desirable location for trade and manufactures, Nashua has been remarkably fortu- 
nate in possessing men qualified with both capital and energy to build up and command 
commercial relations with all parts of the country ; and the magnitude of the manufacturing 
and mercantile interests of the city, and the prospects held out for the future, are matters of 
general pride and gratification. The manufactories and other trade establishments of Nashua 
are, as a rule, successfully and intelligently directed and admirably equipped, a fact that will 
be fully shown in the sketches of individual business houses at the end of this chapter. 
The manufacturing facilities are as complete and perfect as they can be made, the custom 
being to employ the finest machinery, the most skilful artisans, and all accessories calculated 
to improve production and economize cost. Thus it has come to pass that the goods 
made here are in wide demand, and are considered as standard in all markets. The shops 
and factories of the city give employment to a large number of skilled laborers, receiving 
good wages ; indeed, the people are, as a rule, of the better class to be found in the cities 
of New England, being composed largely of industrious artisans, while the business men 
and capitalists are enterprising and liberal-spirited in contributing to the already phenom- 
enal growth and prosperity of the city. There are many wholesale and jobbing houses 
in the numerous lines of commerce, and these enterprises are managed with energy and 
tact. There are, too, numerous retail houses engaged in dry goods, millinery, fancy goods 
and notions, hardware, crockery and glassware, agricultural implements, stoves, tinware, 
house furnishing goods, etc., and a liberal distribution of establishments concerned in the 
handling of food supplies. Indeed, Nashua has become a great centre for supplies for 
populous surrounding districts; and to the credit of dealers be it said that in almost every 
line of merchandise they sell at prices fully as low as the cheapest houses in Boston 
and in some instances lower, this desideratum being attained by the Nashua merchants 
having in their favor less rents and taxes and less living expenses than their Boston 
competitors. The leading houses in the various avenues of trade are noticed in detail in 
the subsequent pages, and the descriptions of the different business concerns will be read with 
general interest and profit. These business enterprises are noted for their solid, substan- 
tial character, and the business men for their energy, liberality, and the hearty welcome 
they give to all new enterprises, being alive to the fact that the more varied the man- 
ufactures and commerce of the city are the more permanent and steady will be the 
growth and prosperity of the whole community. 

Nashua's banking business is one of the most potent agencies in building up the 
trade and the industries of the city, and, in consequence, is a large factor in the increase 
of her commerce and wealth. There are several ably and prudently managed banks, all 
in a sound and healthy condition. 

Nashua being a New England city, it may be taken for granted that matters of edu- 
cation have long been considered as of primary importance. No expense has been spared 
in perfecting and developing a complete system of public schools, a high and several 
graded schools being given adequate support and encouragement. These educational 
advantages naturally prove an important attraction to the manufacturer having a family 
of children, to whom he desires to give a first-class education at the lowest cost, and 
retain his children under his own roof during their schooling days. The various schools 
are model institutions of their kind, and are supplied with a staff of competent teachers, 
and with all the modern appliances and facilities for imparting instruction in the higher 
as well as in the elementary branches of education. The annual reports show steady 
and increasing attendance, gratifying progress in all grades, and the most satisfactory 



116 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



condition of affairs in every way. While the public school system has been brought to a 
high state of perfection, there are several private institutions that enjoy an exceptionally 
valuable reputation. 

The press, too, is noted for its influence upon the community, and no other city of 
its size is better supplied with ably edited newspapers. Its agency in building up the 
prosperity of the place has been marked and appreciated, and its liberal support and 
advocacy of all legitimate enterprises, public and private, its denunciation of fraud, and 
its championship of the right, contribute more to the happiness and well being of the 
people than any other single agency. 

Nashua is rich in churches, many of the edifices being splendid specimens of archi- 




1. PILGRIM CONGREGATIONAL. 2. ROMAN CATHOLIC. 3. UNITARIAN 

NASHUA, CHURCHES. 

tecture. All the denominations are represented, and the uniformly large attendance 
bespeaks the high moral and religious character of the people. 

The City Hall is a spacious, splendid building, and the other public edifices of the 
city are attractive in form and ornamentation. The city government, consisting of Mayor, 
City Council and Board of Aldermen, and a staff of officials in different departments, 
has its affairs wisely and economically managed in the interests of all classes of the 
community. The police force is thoroughly effective and is under wise and experienced 
direction. The fire department is also under excellent control, and is a just source of 
pride to every citizen. Person and property are safe under the efficient local govern- 



CITY OF NASHUA. 117 



ment, the population is temperate and law abiding, and general interests are carefully 
fostered and promoted. The hotel accommodations of the city are first-class in every 
respect, and travelers will always find a hearty welcome and a generous hospitality. 

In 1853 the Gas Works went into operation, and in the following year the Pennichuck 
Water Works were constructed. The City enjoys an abundant supply of pure water, and 
the thoroughfares, which are kept neat and clean, are illuminated by gas and electric 
lights. 

The soil of Nashua has considerable variety. The land in the east part of the town, 
on Merrimack River, is level and fertile, as well as some portions of the valleys of the 
Nashua and Salmon Brook ; but a considerable portion of the city is sandy and uneven. 
The location of the city is everything that can be desired. Its climate is healthy ; its 
broad streets and wide business thoroughfares are well paved and graded, and its num- 
erous elegant private residences combine to make it an attractive place in which to live. 
The population in 1870 was 10,543 and in 1880 it had increased to 13,397. The people 
generally are occupied in some useful sphere of labor, and the homes of all classes 
have an air of comfort and respectability about them. The city is substantially built up, 
clean and pleasing in appearance, and gives every evidence of a progressive spirit that 
is surely carrying it forward to enviable future eminence. 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



McQuesten & Co., Flour, Grain, Feed, 
Salt, Grass Seeds, etc., Under Baptist Church. 
This business was originally established in 1865 
by the firm of Holt & McQuesten, and four years 
later Mr. Holt retired, and Messrs. Howard, 
Clark and Hunt became associated in the concern, 
the firm then becoming McQuesten & Co., and so 
continuing ever since, although Mr. McQuesten 
retired shortly after the formation of the new 
firm. The premises occupied consist of a com- 
modious store and basement with L, having 
altogether a total floorage area of nearly 10,000 
square feet. The trade, which is very extensive, 
is both wholesale and. retail, and extends over a 
large area of the surrounding country. A spe- 
cialty is made of fine grades of flour, with grain, 
feed, salt, grass seeds, etc. The house is also 
agent for the celebrated Stockbridge fertilizer, 
and supplies the farmers for many miles around 
about the city. Messrs. Howard and Clark are 
natives of New Hampshire, while Mr. Hunt was 
born in Luzerne Co., Pa. They all have been 
long residents of Nashua, and fully identified 
with the city and its interests, Mr. Howard hav- 
ing served his fellow citizens as councilman, 
while Mr. Hunt has been a member of both the 
board of aldermen, and the city council. Mr. 
Clark has been a member of the board of asses- 
sors, and for many years clerk of the board of 
check lists. 



Miles J. Merrill, Real Estate Bought, 
Sold or Exchanged, Boom 9, Old Post Office 
Building. Mr. Merrill is a native of Amherst, 
this state, but has been a resident of this city 
ever since 1878, afc which time he founded this 
establishment at the present location. Mr. Mer- 
rill is a gentleman who is thoroughly posted in 
all the details of the real estate business, and 
has made a complete study of the law of realty, 
and also of the relations of the landlord and ten- 
ant, and he can be engaged with implicit confi- 
dence in all matters pertaining thereto. He 
makes a specialty of buying, selling or exchang- 
ing real estate throughout the city or state, 
improved or unimproved ; also the taking charge 
of and managing real estate, for large or small 
capitalists, renting and collecting rents, attending 
to the repairs. The public seeking investment 
can always rely upon his judicious advice, and 
the benefit of his sound judgment in effecting 
purchases that will not only afford a steady in- 
come, but also almost a certainty of increased 
value in the near future. Mr. Merrill is a 
notary public, and is now a justice of the peace. 

118 



J. E. Hunt, Druggist and Pharmacist, No. 
79 Factory Street. One of the most careful and 
attentive druggists in the city of Nashua is Dr. 
J. E. Hunt, who is a native of Massachusetts, 
and is both a medical and pharmaceutical grad- 
uate. He received his diploma as a doctor of 
medicine from the University of Virginia. He 
engaged for the first time in the drug business in 
1826, and continued that with the practice of 
medicine and dentistry at intervals for many 
years. He came to this city in 1869, and founded 
a drug store, which he disposed of in 1879, and 
immediately, during the same year, opened the 
present establishment. He brings to bear upon* 
his business trained skill and a wide range of 
practical experience. His large and fine estab- 
lishment is completely stocked with an assort- 
ment of pure drugs and medicines, all proprietary 
remedies of value, foreign and, domestic mineral 
waters, toilet and fancy articles, druggists' sun- 
dries, physicians' and surgeons' requisites, etc., 
while the doctor pays especial attention to the 
compounding of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes, filling all orders with prompti- 
tude and the greatest care and accuracy. As a 
physician he brings to bear a class of knowledge 
than which there is no more valuable adjunct in 
a pharmacy, and is well qualified to diagnose 
and prescribe for every form of disease. He is 
the oldest druggist in the city. 

C. H. Lindsey, Photographer, Main Sreet. 
Mr. C. H. Lindsey, who is a leading representative 
in Nashua, has achieved an enviable reputation 
as an accomplished artist, and having a full 
knowledge of every detail of the profession gained 
from an experience extending over nineteen years 
executes the very highest class of artistic work, 
which is finished as may be desired in oil, crayon, 
water colors or pastel. The portraits made by 
Mr. Lindsey are of lifelike character and superior 
finish, in cabinet, panel or smaller sizes, and in 
no instance has he failed to give perfect satisfac- 
tion to all who have visited his establishment. 
Handsome backgrounds and all the newest and 
latest appliances have been provided, which, in 
connection with an admirable arrangement for the 
management of light and shade enable him to 
execute work in the highest style of the art. Mr. 
Lindsey was born at Manchester this state where 
he learned the art of photography, and was engaged 
in the business from 1873 to 1877. A year later 
he located in Nashua, where he has become well 
known and esteemed, and he is a member of the 
Order of Odd Fellows. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



119 



Howard & French, Manufacturers of 
Chamber Furniture, Factory No. 24 Amherst 
Street, Office and Salesroom, No. 117 Main 
Street. The firm of Howard & French conducts 
the largest and most influential establishment of 
its kind in the city, and have few if any supe- 
riors in the state. The house was originally es- 
tablished about forty years ago by Messrs. At- 
wood & Co., and their several successors have 
carefully fostered and maintained the enviable 
reputation for enterprise and progress, as well as 
liberal business methods, so successfully inaugu- 
rated by the founders of the business. Mr. How- 
ard, the present senior partner in the concern, 
became associated with Mr. E. P. Brown in 
1867, and shortly afterward the firm was changed 
to Howard & Copp, so continuing till 1876, when 
Mr. Copp retired and the firm became Howard 
& Co. Mr. French entered the firm three years 
later, but the style -was not changed to Howard 
& French till February of the present year. The 
commodious and eligibly located sales establish- 
ment of the house consists of a section of the 
new Howard Block (the property of Mr. How- 
ard), where they occupy four stories and base- 
ment, giving them altogether more than 25,000 
square feet of floorage area. The entire establish- 
ment is attractively furnished and supplied with 
every possible convenience and facility, including 
a modern passenger elevator for the accommoda- 
tion of the patrons, and a freight elevator for the 
expeditious handling of the large stock. The 
manufacturing plant of the house is situated on 
Amherst street, and consists of a main building 
40x168 feet in superficial area, with annexes for 
furnishing storage, etc., giving them for manufac- 
turing purposes about 100,000 square feet, where 
they manufacture ash, walnut, cherry and birch 
chamber furniture in large variety of designs and 
quality', for the trade, and make a specialty of 
ash, walnut and birch bedsteads. The assortment 
of goods which crowds all the floors of their ex- 
tensive sales and warerooins, embraces furniture 
of every grade and description, carpets of all the 
popular American and European producers, beside 
a large and fine line of artistic, antique and prac- 
tically useful china, crockery and glassware. 
They display at all times the latest and freshest 
patterns and designs, and the most seasonable 
novelties. The upholstering department is well 
stocked with curtains, shades, lambrequins, etc., 
furniture coverings, cords, tassels, etc. The 
preparations for the prompt and satisfactory pros- 
ecution of the business is complete in every par- 
ticular, and the inducements offered by the firm 
in the way of quality of goods, and the prices at 
which they are placed, have made the house a 
strong favorite with consumers throughout the 
state. From comparatively modest beginnings, 
rather as an adjunct to the retail department, the 
manufacturing feature of the business has so 
rapidly developed within a few years, that it is 
now a very heavy industry by itself; and so popu- 
lar have their productions become, that the trade 
extends over the entire New England States, New 
York City and State, and goods have been shipped 
from this live and wide-awake establishment 
even to the farthest southern and western section 
of the country. A specialty is made of the lower 
priced and medium grades of chamber sets, and 
saparate beds, and it is fairly estimated that this 



concern finish more of this class of goods annu- 
ally than any other house in New England, the 
sales aggregating over $200,000 per year. Dealers 
will be only consulting their own interest by 
supplying themselves from the stock of this re- 
liable house, the large volume of business done 
enabling them to quote prices impossible to their 
more unassuming competitors. The influences of 
so progressive a house are manifold, and the city 
is justly and properly proud of so representative 
a factor in the commercial welfare and prosperity 
of Nashua. 



Flather & Co., Machinists' Tools, etc., Crown 
Street. A review of the industrial interests of 
Nashua develops the existence of a class of houses 
prepared to compete in the special ties they manu- 
facture with the rival establishments of this 
or any other country, and in this connection 
special reference is directed to the progressive 
concern which forms the subject of this sketch. 
The house was originally founded by the present 
firm in 1869, and first occupied comparatively 
limited premises on Water street, afterward 
removing to what was known as the old watch 
factory, but the rapid development of the busi- 
ness resulting from the superiority of machines 
produced, soon necessitated much more commo- 
dious quarters, and in 1876 the present plant was 
built, comprising a main machine shop with 8,000 
square feet of floorage area, with annexes of boiler 
room, office, etc. The premises are thoroughly 
equipped throughout with the most modern 
machinery and labor saving devices and appli- 
ances procurable, and a large force of skilled 
artisans are employed in the various departments 
and processes of manufacture. A leading speci- 
alty is made of the manufacture of engine lathes, 
which with various meritorious and practical 
improvements, are made under letters patent. 
These lathes already hold a high position in the 
trade, being especially adapted to fine work 
where a high degree of accuracy is indispensable. 
They are furnished with any length of bed up to 
22 feet, and so thoroughly seated and confirmed 
are they in public favor that from one to two 
dozen lathes a month is the output of the com- 
pany. The field of usefulness for this favorite 
lathe is not confined to the United States, although 
hundreds are in continuous operation throughout 
the country, but they have been exported to 
numerous foreign countries, principally to Russia, 
England, Scotland, China, Norway, Sweden, etc., 
and the demand for them is ever increasing, 
testimonials from eminent firms and corporations 
bearing evidence to the high character of con- 
struction and finish and perfect accuracy of the 
products of the company. Messrs. W. and W. 
J. Flather, comprising the members of the firm, 
are both natives of England, but have been resi- 
dents of this country for the past thirty years. 
They are both skilled mechanicians, having 
devoted a lifetime to their craft, and their prac- 
tical knowledge of mechanics is fully illustrated 
by their superior productions. The standing of 
this progressive house in financial and manu- 
facturing circles is too well known to require any 
remarks at our hands, while as regards integrity 
and true enterprise they justly merit the excel- 
lent record to which they have permanently 
attained. 



120 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Vale Mills, Manufacturers of Cambrics and 
Sateens, Main Street, at Harbor. A representa- 
tive and truly progressive establishment engaged 
in the manufacture of cotton products iu the 
thriving city of Nashua is the subject of the pres- 
ent sketch. Inaugurated in 1853 under the title 
of the Harbor Manufacturing Co., it retained that 
designation till 1863, when the entire stock was 
acquired by Mr. B. Saunders, who caused the 
renovation and improvement of the entire plant, 
and the introduction of many practical and sys- 
tematic usages, at which time the name of Vale 
Mills was given to the works. The main mill is 
a commodious three-storied structure having 
nearly 15,000 square feet of floorage area, with en- 
gine room, boiler and picker room annexed ; 5,000 
spindles, all ring frames, are operated. The 
weaving shed is 34x160 feet in dimensions and 
contains one hundred 40-inch looms with slash- 
ing. The works are driven by Risden and Her- 
cules Turbine wheels, while a 100 horse power 
engine is provided for auxiliary power when re- 
quired, besides furnishing steam for a complete 
system of heating. One hundred operatives are 
employed, and the products of the works comprise 
cambrics and sateens of a superior quality, all be- 
ing 40-inch goods, the popularity of which result 
in an annual output aggregating one and a quar- 
ter million yards. With the vastly improved 
machinery and lengthening of the looms, the ca- 
picity of the mill has been doubled since the ac- 
quisition of the property by Mr. Saunders in 1868. 
The water power, which is the property of the 
company, is known as Salmon brook, and is fed 
by two reservoirs 20 and 30 miles respectively from 
the city. These reservoirs are supplied from a 
natural basin of purely spring fed water, and the 
result is one of the best water privileges in the 
country. The officers of the company are, Mr. B. 
Saunders, treasurer and manager, and Park man 
Dexter, president, these gentlemen, with Mr. E. 
S. Russell, constituting the board of directors. 
The selling agents are S. B. Dexter & Co., with 
offices at both Boston and New York, and through 
whom the out put of the mills are disposed of 
to the large jobbers of the country. 

Indian Head National Bank, of Nashua, 
N. H. With a history of more than a third of a 
century the Indian Head National Bank of 
Nashua, N. H., has always been a prominent fig- 
ure among the financial institutions of the state, 
and has afforded a strong support to all local en- 
terprises of a legitimate character, its policy 
towards commercial, manufacturing and other in- 
terests calculated to promote the material growth 
of the city, being marked with liberality. The 
bank was founded in 1851 as the Indian Head 
Bank, and was changed to a national bank in 
1863. It was re-chartered in 1883 with a capital 
of $120,000, and now has a surplus of over $50,000. 
It has correspondents of the highest responsibility 
at the principle points in the Union, and is pre- 
pared to place all matters intrusted to them upon 
the most satisfactory basis. During its long and 
honorable career the bank has gained a high po- 
sition in the confidence of business men and capi- 
talists, and enjoys the patronage of an extended 
list of depositors, including many of the most 
substantial citizens and firms in the city. The 
National Bank of the Republic is their correspon- 



dent at Boston. The president, Edward Spauld- 
ing, has held that position for the past eleven 
years, while the cashier, Frank A. McKean, 
has officiated as such for fifteen years, but has 
been connected with the bank for double that 
length of lime. He is also president of the Capi- 
tol Fire Insurance Co., of this city. The board of 
directors, in addition to the president, consists of 
Messrs. A. G. Reed, E. F. McQuiesten, D. H. 
Greeg, W. I. Jackman and W. H. Beasom, all of 
whom are prominent in commercial life and 
reliable and responsible iu all their dealings with 
the public. 

Tremont House, R. K. Sherman & Co., 
Proprietors, Corner of Main and West Pearl 
Streets. This old time hostelry has a history 
almost co-existent with the commercial record of 
the city, having been built by a syndicate of citi- 
zens about foity years ago, and conducted in 
their interest for a number of years. Aboutl875 
Mr. Gilman Scripture, the present owner, ac- 
quired the property and conducted the hotel for 
ten years, until some eighteen months since when 
the present firm of R. K. Sherman & Co., became, 
the proprietors, Mr. Sherman having managed 
the hotel for Mr. Scripture for the preceding 
three years. Mr. Sherman has been very widely 
known and appreciated for the past twenty years 
as a popular hotel manager, having conducted a 
number of hotels at summer resorts as well as in 
cities and towns. The advantages of the Tre- 
mont House are manifold, it being the most cen- 
trally located hotel in the city, has more rooms 
than any other two hotels in the city, and is by 
all odds the most convenient to the several depots 
and the leading manufacturers and most promi- 
nent business houses. The house has been en- 
tirely renovated and largely refurnished, and 
every room is supplied with electric communica- 
tion with the office, while many of the rooms are 
especially large, light and attractive. The office, 
writing room, leading room, reception room, par- 
lor, etc., are all on the first floor, as well as the 
large and cheerful dining-room, which has seating 
accommodations for a hundred guests. Mr. 
Sherman gives his personal attention to the cui- 
sine, makes all purchases himself, and will ac- 
cept of nothing but the best of everything, while 
the preparation of the food is under the watchful 
eye of Mrs. Sherman, whose long association with 
hotels gives her especial advantages for this su- 
pervision. Twelve employees are required to 
properly and expeditiously fulfill the duties of 
the various departments, while Mr. O. F. Sher- 
man, the son of the proprietor, very efficiently 
and acceptably fills the arduous and responsible 
position of clerk. Messrs. Sherman & Co., while 
not aspiring to metropolitan fastidiousness in the 
conduct of the Tremont House, concentrate their 
efforts upon making a homelike and comfortable 
house of entertainment for travelers and other 
guests, and commercial men will certainly simply 
consult their own interest in visiting Nashua by 
putting up at the Tremont, where every facility is 
offered them for the accommodation of their 
patrons. This house is also a great favorite for 
riding and sleighing parties from Lowell, Law- 
rence, Manchester and adjacent towns, and mine 
host of the Tremont always makes their visits en- 
joyable and long to be remembered. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



121 



Underbill Edge Tool Company and 
Amoskeag Axe Company (Consolidated). 
This representative and widely-known house 
was originally inaugurated more than a third of 
a century ago, and took its name from Geo. W. 
Underbill, at that time engaged in the manufac- 
ture of tools in a small u/ay, and the develop- 
ments which have been accomplished through 
the long series of years of enterpiise and ex- 
periment have placed the house far in the van 
among its contemporaries and competitors 
throughout the country. John H. Gage of Maine, 
and H. M. Goodrich of Nashua, were the original 
pyesident and secretary, respectively, and the 
wisdom and practical business methods of these 
gentlemen in laying the foundation of the enter- 
prise have been carefully fostered by their 
successors, and the enviable reputation so long 
ago established has been sedulously maintained 
and augmented. The extensive plant is most 
eligibly located aud covers an area of 20 acres of 
ground, the main building having a frontage of 
300 feet and is 50 feet in width. Various other 
buildings are utilized for different purposes, and 
the motive power is furnished by a 500 horse 
power Corliss Engine requiring three boilers, with 
an anxilliary force of two 100 horse power water 
wheels. Eighteen large grindstones are in constant 
use, an axe poll machine (one of the first in use 
in the United States) with a capacity of eight 
hundred per day, and two head hammers with a 
capacity of four hundred each per day, are in 
continuous operation, while the grand aggregate 
of output reaches the handsome figures of from 
ten to twelve thousand dozen axes per year. One 
hundred skilled artizans are employed in the 
various departments and processes of construc- 
tion, aud the company has representatives in all 
the large cities of the country, including New 
York, Boston and Chicago. A considerable export 
trade is done extending even to South Africa aud 
Australia. In 1879 the entire plant of the 
Amoskeag Axe Co. was acquired by this com- 
pany, and the two companies were consolidated, 
materially enhancing the volume of the business, 
already of such magnificent proportions. The 
present board of officers consists of Mr. Jas. L. 
Pierce, president, and Mr. W. H. Beasom, treas- 
urer and manager. The former is a native of Water- 
town, Mass., but having been a resident of Nashua 
for nearly forty years he is thorouhly identified 
with the city and its interests, and is highly es- 
teemed in financial and mercantile circles for his 
many excellent qualities, both as a citizen and a 
leading commercial representative. Mr. Beasom, 
the efficient treasurer and manager, is a native of 
Nashua, his father having been connected with 
the enterprise from its inception, holding the 
office of president from 1855 till his death oc- 
curred in 1870, and attaining special prominence 
among Nashua's noted citizens of his time. His 
son, the present treasurer and manager, has long 
been identified with the interests of the concern, 
and is most completely conversant with all the 
multifarious details of the business, and in his 
dual capacity sustains the chief load of responsi- 
bility, and it is eminently due to his executive 
ability and sound management that the establish- 
ment continues uninterruptedly on its prosperous 
career. He is also a director of the Indian Head 
National Bank. lu conclusion it may be justly 



stated that the policy upon which this house is 
conducted is one of liberality and probity, and 
the success to which it has attained has not only 
been well merited, but is such as is only accorded 
to those firms that are governed by correct and 
just principles. 



Jackmah & Sexton, Carpets, Furniture, 
House Furnishing Goods, etc., No. 131 Main 
Street, Beasom Block. In the city of Nashua no 
house takes a higher position in their line than 
the subject of the present sketch. Founded in 
1840 by the firm of Reed & Slater the history of 
the house has been one of continuous enterprise 
and progress, while the patronage has not only 
annually increased in volume but also in the 
area over which the trade of the establishment is 
distributed. After several changes in proprietor- 
ship the present copartnership was formed in 
1881, both members having followed the fortunes 
of the houee as clerks for many years previous to 
succeeding to the management. Mr. Jackman 
having been a member of the firm of Reed & 
Jackman since 1872. The commodious premises 
occupied by this reliable concern, are centrally 
located in Beasom Block, the number being 131 
Main street, where they occupy four floors 40x90 
feet in dimensions, aggregating nearly 15,000 
square feet of floorage area, constituting con- 
cededly the largest emporium in the city. The 
entire premises are handsomely and conveniently 
fitted up, and include a modern elevator for the 
facilitating of their business. From eight to a 
dozen assistants are required to properly and ex- 
peditiously serve the large line of patrons, and 
otherwise meet the demands upon the facilities 
of the house. The various departments are at 
all times replete with a carefully selected assort- 
ment of the different kinds of goods handled, 
which consist of carpets of both American and 
European production, choice designs and patterns 
of parlor and chamber furniture, crockery, glass- 
ware, wall-papers, draperies, window shades and 
every variety of house furnishing goods. Every- 
thing ia selected with the rare judgment only 
possible to those with long practical experience, 
while the prices quoted are uniformly low, the 
result of careful consideration in the purchase of 
the goods. The storage department is located in 
the rear of the establishment on Factory street, 
greatly adding to the facilities for promptly fill- 
ing large ciders. It may be most truly stated 
that this popular house is an important factor in 
the industrial advancement, as well as the com- 
mercial welfare of the city. Mr. Jackman is a 
native Newburyport, Mass., but his twenty-eight 
years of residence in Nashua has completely 
identified him with the city of his adoption, he 
having served his fellow citizens in both the 
board of aldermen and councilmen, and is at the 
present time a director in the Indian Head 
National Bank. Mr. Sexton was born at Hollis 
this state, and has been a resident here for sixteen 
years, and while not having held any city office 
is equally sincere in his efforts to promote the 
commercial advancement of Nashua. Both are 
men of energy and sound business ethics, and 
have had a predominating .share in the rearing of 
this monument to Nashua's enterprising and pro- 
gressive spirit, and the business of the house is 
conducted on a liberal basis. 



12-2 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



New Hampshire Banking Company, 

No. 52 Main Street. This reliable institution 
was chartered in 1879, and commenced business 
in the following year, having been incorporated 
as a guaranty savings bank with a guaranty fund 
of $100,000. Interests on deposits commence on 
the first business day of each month. The prem- 
ises used for banking purposes are conveniently 
and attractively fitted up, and the vaults in use 
are of the celebrated Hall Safe & Lock Co.'s, 
make, their invincible character affording the 
most perfect security to the depositors. From 
the outset this bank has gained and retained the 
confidence of the public to a marked degree. 
Money is loaned on government bonds and ap- 
proved securities at current rates of interest. 
Uuder its present wise and conservative manage- 
ment this bank is doing a large and safe business, 
its assets in August, 1887, being nearly $1,000,- 
000. Its Boston correspondent is the Maverick 
National Bank. The officers of the bank are, 
Solomon Spaulding, president, and W. A. Farley, 
treasurer, while the board of trustees consists of 
the president together with the following well- 
known gentlemen: Edward Hardy, Albert A. 
Eotch, Chas. H. Nutt, Archibald H. Dunlap, 
David O. Smith, George Phelps, Solon S. Whithed, 
Charles Holman, and Eugene F. McQuesten. The 
president is a gentleman of large experience in 
financial matters, and is a native of this state, 
seventy-six years of age, over fifty of which he 
has resided in Nashua. He was for two years 
the president of the city court, is an ex -judge, 
ex-school commissioner and has also held various 
other responsible positions of trust. The treas- 
urer, although still a young man, has been con- 
nected with the banking business for the past 
eight years, and has held his present position 
for a year past. He is thoroughly conversant 
with the manifold and responsible duties of his 
position. The board of trustees comprises much 
of the solid element of the citv. 



White Mountain Freezer Company, 

Manufacturers of Sands' Patent Triple Motion 
White Mountain Freezer. New England has al- 
ways, since the foundation of the country, car- 
ried the palm in the feature of inventive genius, 
as also in developing the results thereof, and to 
this section the entire world is now largely in- 
debted for labor-saving devices of practical util- 
ity. A prominent illustration of the justice of 
this claim is exemplified in the universal popu- 
larity of the subject of this sketch, Sands' Pat- 
ent Triple Motion Ice Cream Freezer, generally 
known in the trade as the White Mountain 
Freezer. Mr. Thomas Sands, the founder and 
proprietor of the present extensive and far-reach- 
ing business, is also the inventor of the principle 
and action of this inmitable freezer, which has 
^iven it conceded pre-eminence over all other 
makes almost throughout the length and breadth 
of the globe. Conceiving the practical ideas which 
govern his invention in 1873, Mr. Sands com- 
menced the manufacture of his freezer in a lim- 
ited way at Laconia, this state, after it had re- 
ceived the unqualified endorsement of some of 
the largest houses in the trade, and in a very few 
years the marvelous demand for this perfect 
freezer necessitated vastly more commodious 
quarters, and in 1880 the business was removed 



to this enterprising city, and the present large 
and complete plant established, with branches of 
two lines of railroads running into the works, 
thereby greatly facilitating the large and con- 
stantly increasing daily shipments, which aggre- 
gate from eight to ten thousand of the various 
sizes monthly. Some idea of the magnitude of 
the business may be conveyed by a reference to 
the following figures. The entire plant covers a 
space of 3i acres, while the numerous buildings 
devoted to the different departments of labor and 
construction, etc., are most conveniently arid ac- 
cessibly located. The main shop is a substantial 
building containing three floors 35x200 feet in di- 
mensions, the foundry is 40x170 feet in size, 
while the principal storehouse contains 6,0( 
square feet of floorage area with an extension 150 
feet in length. The lumber dry houses have a 
capaeity of 40,000 feet every five days. The 
various departments are connected by shafting, 
and require the services of a 200 horse power en- 
gine to furnish the requisite power. Various 
other annex buildings are used for different pur- 
poses, and altogether comprise by far the largest 
establishment of the kind in the, world. Every- 
thing pertaining to the construction of the freezer 
is here produced from the raw material even to 
the clearing of the native forests for the lumber, 
and the purchase of the iron in the pig, thereby 
reducing lothe minimum thecost of construction. 
The works are thoroughly equipped throughout* 
with the most modern labor-saving machinery, 
appliances and appurtenances, much of which 
was especially designed and constructed for the 
particular purpose intended, many features of 
which emanated from the prolific brain of the 
founder and proprietor. In fact, every conceiva- 
ble device and improvement that will in the 
slightest degree augment the facilities for rapid 
and perfect production are seized upon and util- 
ized as fast as conceived of. One hundred and fifty 
skilled workmen are employed in and about the 
plant, besides four office assistants and a number 
of traveling salesmen ; a complete system is ob- 
served in all the various branches and altogether 
an admirably arranged and conducted establish- 
ment is the result, all under the watchful eye 
and management of the enterprising proprietor. 
The salient features which give the White Moun- 
tain Freezer its pre-eminence are its unapproach- 
able triple movement, and the fact that no sur- 
face of zinc comes in contact with the cream 
while in operation. Block tin being used in the 
galvanizing process in place of the zinc surface so 
common in 1 be make-up of other freezers. It is 
hard for us to add anything to the reputation of 
the goods manufactured by this company, as they 
are now in constant demand all over this and 
many foreign countries, large shipments even be- 
ing made to Italy, as well as other adjacent Eur< - 
pean nations, while the anmial large increase in 
sales not only test the enormous capacity of the 
works, but speaks volumes for the precedence 
given this perfect freezer over all competition. 
The company also manufacture a specially prac- 
tical and convenient ice crusher worked by either 
hand or power. This is the result of long obser- 
vation and experiment, and is admitted to be the 
best in use for the purpose intended, while it has 
the advantage 6ver others of being complete in 
every particular. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



123 



Gregg & Son, Manufacturers of Doors, Sash, 
Blinds, etc. In reviewing a city of the import- 
ance properly ascribed to Nashua from a manu- 
facturing point of view we are frequently at a 
loss in properly grading the large interests as to 
pre-eminence in their respective fields. But in 
our researches among the number we are only 
doing justice in giving special prominence to so 
important a factor in the city's progress as the 
subject of the present sketch. The foundation of 
this house dates back to 1871 . During the long 
and steadily upward career of this enterprising 
house, the original plant has been materially in- 
creased and added to, until at the present time it 
is of commodious dimensions, the main building 
with annex, dry-room, engine-room, etc., having 
a ground floorage of some 12,000 square feet. 
The works are completely equipped with all the 
most modern machinery, and labor-saving appli- 
ances and devices known to the trade, and em- 
ployment is given to one hundred and fifty work- 
men in the various departments and processes of 
construction. The products of the house com- 
prise sash, doors, blinds, brackets, stair rail and 
balusters, mouldings, mantels and mantel shelves, 
window and door frames. Planing, sawing and 
turning is done to order, and house finish of all 
descriptions furnished at short notice. In the 
glazing department may be found a full line of 
regular sized glazed windows, irregular sizes be- 
ing made, and glazed with all the various quali- 
ties and kinds of gloss desired. Special attention 
is given to the making of solid and veneered 
hardwood doors, hardwood finish and inside 
blinds. These goods embrace all the styles and 
patterns adapted to the wants of the trade, the 
raw material being selected with a judgment born 
of long and ripe experience. No concern in the 
country is more reliable in this and all other re- 
spects, and none can more thoroughly command 
the advantages and opportunities of the market. 
A specialty is made of marbleized wood shelves 
and mantels, made from selected hardwoods, 
principally birch and maple. These goods are 
manufactured under letters patent, and they are 
fast coming into popular and steady demand, it 
being the unanimous opinion of builders and oth- 
ers who have used and tested them, that they are 
in many important respects far superior to either 
marble or slate. Among the many advantages 
possessed by the marbleized shelving is its capa- 
bilities for variety of patterns, for taking a high 
state of permanent polish, its non-liability to 
injury by breakage or its complete resistance to 
chemicals and oils, its lightness and adaptability 
to being readily fixed in position, and altogether 
its genera) durability, while the cost is no greater 
than the ordinary marble or slate fixtures. In 
addition to the marbleized mantels, the firm has 
recently introduced the manufacture of full man- 
tels, in all kinds of wood, for natural finish, such 
as whitewood, ash, cherry, black walnut, oak, 
mahogany, etc. In this department may be seen 
new patterns of unique and elegant designs, 
varving in cost to suit the requirements of the 
trade, and in all cases as low as the lowest. Spe- 
cial styles are made from architects' designs 
when so desired. It is proposed to make this 
department an important feature of their manu- 
facture, meriting the patronage of the trade. 
The large an<1 constantly increasing patronage of 



this establishment extends over the entire New 
England states, and the volume of trade is due to 
the progressive principles early inaugurated and 
carefully fostered. Both Mr. Gregg, Sr., and son, 
are natives of this state, and long residents of 
Nashua, being highly regarded locally and in the 
trade as far-sighted men of liberal business 
methods and unswerving integrity. Those who 
form business relations with this house may do 
so in the complete confidence of having their 
interests consulted in each and every transaction. 



American Shearer Manufacturing 
Company, Manufacturers of Human Head and 
Horse Clippers, No. 314 Main Street. To this 
company attaches the credit of having produced 
the first clipping machines manufactured, as also 
to its president, Mr. R. T. Smith, belongs the 
honor of having conceived of the application of 
the principle of the clipper to an instrument for 
the removal of the human and horses' hair. The 
company was founded in 1865 on Water street, 
this city, and during its career of more than 
twenty years, has made several changes in loca- 
tion for the sake of increased facilities rendered 
necessary by the steadily advancing demand for 
their goods, the natural result of theii superiority 
of workmanship and finish. The company have 
recently taken possession of their new plant lo- 
cated at the harbor at No. 314 Main street 
The premises consist of a substantial brick struc- 
ture, three stories in height, with a frontage of 
70 feet and a depth of 80 feet. The two lower 
stories are occupied by the Shearer Co., and they 
are completely equipped with the new and special 
machinery designed and constructed for thf 
purpose. A 30 horse power engine with 90 
horse power boiler, furnishes the motive power, 
and from forty to fifty skilled mechanics are em- 
ployed in the various departments and processes 
of construction. "With an authorized capital of 
$40,000, and double the capacity of their former 
works, the company are now prepared to fill all 
orders promptly and satisfactorily. Although 
the leading features of the business are clipping 
machines of every description, barbers' clippers 
and cyclometers, other specialties in their line 
are manufactured to order as required. The offi- 
cers of the company are, R. T. Smith, president, 
and J. K. Priest, treasurer and manager, both 
gentlemen being well and favorably known in 
manufacturing and mercantile circles for their in- 
tegrity and correct business methods. The direc- 
tors, Messrs. A. E. Sanderson, Howard E. Priest 
and Fred. K. Priest, are representative business 
men, whose efforts in behalf of the interests of 
the company in conjunction with the officers, 
fully merit the large measure of success which 
has been attained by this important industry 
The inventive genius of the president of the com- 
pany, Mr. R. T. Smith, has of late been applied 
to the invention and perfection of machinery for 
producing by power hamburg embroideries which 
have heretofore only been produced by hand work. 
It is the intention of the company organized for 
the purpose, to furnish the completed machinery, 
as also to enter into the manufacture of embroid- 
eries themselves at an early date. This practical 
and wonderful advance in the method of produc- 
ing these goods will naturally revolutionize the 
production of these goods. 



124 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



First National Bank, Main Street. One 
of the most important adjuncts of a successful 
business community are the fiduciary institution 
that secures a safe and quick exchange in the 
monetary affairs. In this city we specially 
refer to the above popular bank has, since its 
inception, maintained an unbroken record of 
prosperity. A general banking business is 
done. Stocks and bonds are negotiated, collec- 
tions are made on all points, drafts are issued on 
American banks, and correspondence is main- 
tained with the chief cities, the regular author- 
ized correspondents being the Commonwealth 
National Bunk, of Boston, and the Nassau Na- 
tional Bank, of New' York City. The capital is 
$100,000, while the surplus is $5,500 and the un- 
divided profits over $5,000. The connection of 
the bank are of the most desirable and gratify- 
ing character. The offices of the bank are neatly 
and attractively fitted up, and have a floorage 
area of over 1,800 square feet. Three assistants 
are employed, and a liberal share of the local 
business is permanently enjoyed. The board of 
officers consist of Geo. A. Eamsdell, president ; 
J. A. Spaldiug, cashier; and W. E. Spalding, as- 
sistant cashier, all natives of New Hampshire. 
Mr. Ramsdell has held the office of president for 
five years, while Mr. J. A. Spalding has officiated 
as cashier for nearly twenty-five years. He also 
holds the position of president of the Indian 
Head Mutual Fire Insurance Co., while his son 
has been assistant cashier for five years. The 
board of directors consists of the president and 
cashier, together with Messrs. L. A. Roby, I. D. 
Greeley, Chas. Holman, Solon S. Whithead and 
Chas. H. Burns, all gentlemen of standing in the 
Community, and among the most prominent busi- 
.less men and leading citizens of Nashua. 



Williams & Co., Successors to Francestown 
Soapstone Company. An especially noteworthy 
instance of progressive enterprise is furnished in 
the career of the house which is the subject of 
the present sketch. The Francestown Soapstone 
Co. was duly incorporated under the laws of the 
state in 1865, with a capital stock of $150,000, 
which was four years later increased to $300,000, 
and Williams & Co. are the successors thereof. 
Their office, salesroom and factory are located op- 
posite the Concord railroad station, while they are 
sole owners of both the Francestown quarry at 
Francestown, N. H., and the Hawk's Mountain 
quarry at Perkinsville, Vt., and are conceededly 
the most extensive soapstone quarriers and dealers 
in the entire world. Besides the vast quantities 
of soapstone slabs, blocks and furnace tiles sold in 
balk, per square or cubic foot or ton, they are ex- 
tensive wholesale dealers in soapstone sinks, 
water tanks, wash trays, register frames, round 
grate stones, fireplace linings, hearths, foot warm- 
ers, griddle stones, chimney caps, funnel stones, 
etc., also a large line of soapstone stoves, revolv- 
ing oven bottoms, factory dresser rolls, oyster and 
fish bars, urinals, chemical vats, sarcophagi, crude, 
siftad and bolted dust, etc. Francestown soap- 
stone is acknowledged by all dealers, architects 
and plumbers who have used it to be the best in 
the market, and is adopted as the standard by the U. 
S. Government. For strength, durability, fineness 
of texture, perfection of polish, beauty and rich- 
ness of color, it surpasses all others. It is spe- 



cially adapted for laundry tubs, kitchen sinks 
and other sanitary appliances as the most pene- 
trating oils, acids, alkalies, and strongest chem- 
ical combinations do not penetrate or effect it in 
the least. It is a wonderful fire-proof stone, and 
has been submitted to the effects of heat and 
cold without expansion or contraction. It is the 
only soapstone that is susceptible of a polish 
equal to marble or granite, and the polished goods 
are extensively used where an economical as well 
as handsome sanitary or fire-proof article is de- 
sired. The specially advantageous freighting 
facilities ol this well-known house are such that 
goods can be shipped at a very low rate, the same 
rates as from Boston to any point in the United 
States. The extensive works of this concern are 
comprised in a building having a floorage area of 
nearly 30,000 square feet,'modernly fitted up, and 
equipped with all the machinery, aparatus and 
labor-saving devices requisite to the business, and 
the motive power is furnished by a 100 horse 
power engine, and a 100 horse power boiler. A 
large force of skilled workmen are employed at 
the factory, while nearly double that force are 
required at both the quarries and the factories, 
with steam apparatus for manufacture of goods. 
Thousands of tons of soapstone is the annual out- 
put of this unrivalled establishment. Among 
the many important institutions and buildings 
throughout the country in which the products of 
this house have been largely used, special men- 
tion can most properly be made of the U. S. Ma- 
rine Hospital, at Baltimore, Md.; the U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy, at West Point ; the Government 
Buildings, at Washington, including White 
House; Palace Hotel, San Francisco, ai;d else- 
where ; the New Court House at Quincy, 111., and 
many others. It is almost superfluous to add 
that all orders receive prompt attention and care- 
ful consideration, and that those entering into 
business relations with this prosperous and en- 
terprising concern may do so with implicit confi- 
dence in their honor and integrity, and with a 
complete surety of having their best interests 
consulted in the case of each and every transac- 
tion. Gen. Chas. Williams, the president of the com- 
pany, is a man of many parts, long, well and favor- 
ably known in the financial, insurance and mer- 
cantile world, and beside being' the respected 
head of this manifold industry, he is an honored 
member of the governor's council, and a di- 
rector of the Amoskeag and People's Fire Insur- 
ance Cos., of Manchester, and of the Nashua 
Horse Railroad Co, Nashua Acton & Boston 
Railroad, Trustee Elliott Hospital fund, Man- 
chester, and York Beach Railroad. Mr. A. H. 
Williams, the efficient treasurer and manager, 
graduated at Dartmouth College, 1885, is thor- 
oughly conversant with each and every detail of 
all departments of the business, and gives close 
application and supervision to every feature and 
process. He is a director of the Capitol Fire In- 
surance Co., of Nashua, and is most fairly en- 
titled to the consideration and esteem in which 
he is held by the entire trade. Hon. Chas. H. 
Bartlett assumes the office of secretary, and has 
the interest of the company in view in all of his 
transactions in connection therewith. Not only 
the city of Nashua, but the entire state takes just 
pride in the local claim they have upon this far- 
reaching and eminently useful industry. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



125 



The Indian Head Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, With less than a year of 
business life this company is already established 
on a sound financial basis, and gives strong evi- 
dence of rapidly pushing its way to the van 
among its many more mature competitors for 
public favor. Organized in November, 1885, at 
the close of fourteen calender months of business, 
its showing as portrayed below would be an 
eminently creditable one even to corporations of 
much larger growth, and can be properly and justly 
accepted as a precursor of future progress. Assets. 
Cash in hand and in banks, $4,079.43; loans on 
mortgages, $5,950.00; premiums in course of 
collection, $1,688.40; accrued interest, $183.05; 
premium notes and obligations, $16,511.78 ; total 
assets, $28,412.66. Liabilities guaranty fund 
$5,000.00; unearned premiums, reckoned at fifty 
per cent. $4,127.94; commissions due agents on 
uncollected premiums, $219.26; surplus above 
guaranty fund, and unearned premiums, $19,- 
065.46; total, $28,412.66 ; amount at risk (first 
fourteen months business), $556,902.96; cash 
premiums thereon, $8,255.89; net surplus, $2,- 
553.68. Mr. Jno. A. Spaulding, the president of 
the company, has demonstrated his eminent fit- 
ness for this responsible position from having 
served the First National Bank of Nashua as 
cashier ever since its inception in 1863, while Mr. 
Mark R. Buxton, the secretary, has long been 
well and favorably known in both mercantile and 
financial circles, and has had eight years of ex- 
perience in active connection with insurance 
matters. The business of the company, although 
as yet largely local, 13 rapidly developing and ex- 
tending, and by a continuance of its sound 
methods, and just and equitable adjustment of 
losses will rapidly gain a leading position among 
the underwriters of the state. 



J. O. Woodward & Cory, Manufacturers 
and Dealers of Fine Harnesses, Saddles, Whips, 
etc., Eailroad Block, Railroad Square. The busi- 
ness has been established fully fifty years, and is 
concededly the oldest as well as the representa- 
tive house in their line in the city. The prem- 
ises occupied consist of a store and workroom 
20x70 feet in dimensions, conveniently fitted up 
and admirably equipped. The house carries 
everything in the line of horse furnishing goods, 
while repairing in all their branches is attended 
to at short notice, and in the best possible man- 
ner. Trunks and traveling bags of every size, 
style and quality are kept in stock, and the 
trade of the house is large and continually 
increasing, and extends over the city and sur- 
rounding country. Mr. J. O. Woodward suc- 
ceeded to the business in 1874, and three years 
afterward Mr. Cory was associated with him, 
and since then the firm name has been J. O. 
Woodward & Cory. Mr. Woodward is a native 
of New Hampshire, and having been a resident 
of Nashua for twenty years past, is thoroughly 
identified with the commercial interests of the 
city. He is an active member of the I. O. O. F., 
and is esteemed and respected by his fellow citi- 
zens for his integrity and correct business meth- 
ods. Mr. Cory is a nalive of Vermont, and has 
resided in the city since 1870. He is also a mem- 
ber of the I. O. O. F., and is considered both a 
useful as well as a popular citizen. 



J. Li. Pierce & Co., Crockery, Glassware, 
Paper Hangings, etc., Main Street. This reliable 
concern, which consists of Mr. J. L. Pierce and 
his son, Geo. R. Pierce, was originally established 
more than a third of a century ago by the firm 
of Coggin & Pierce. Ten years afterwards Mr. 
Pierce succeeded to the proprietorship, and con- 
ducted the business in his own name till 1878, 
when his sons were admitted into the firm, since 
which time it has been known as J. L. Pierce & 
Co. The premises occupied by this popular house 
comprise a commodious store and basement, cen- 
trally located on Main street, and having an ag- 
gregate floorage area of nearly 5,000 square feet. 
The store is tastefully and conveniently fitted up 
throughout, and the stock, which is at all times 
large and complete in assortment, consists of 
paper hangings and window shades, china, crock- 
ery, glassware, etc., while a specialty is made of 
fine silver plated ware. The stock is being con- 
stantly replenished with newly imported and do- 
mestic goods of novel designs and standard quali- 
ties. Three assistants are employed, and the leg- 
itimate field for the distribution of their goods 
extends over a considerable area of the surround- 
ing country. J. L. Pierce & Co. are the agents 
for the celebrated wall covering so widely known 
as Lincrusta Walton, also for the best quality of 
mica papers. Mr. Pierce, Sr., is a native of Wa- 
tertown, Mass., but having resided in Nashua 
since 1849, he has become thoroughly identified 
with the city and its interests. He holds the 
position of president of the Underhill Edge Tool 
Co., and has served his city as a member of the 
board of aldermen. Mr. Pierce, Jr. , is a native of 
Nashua, and gives his entire time and attention 
to the details of the business. 



LiUCier & Perrault, Dry Gooda, Millinery, 
etc., Howard Block, Opposite City Hall. This 
enterprising and popular concern was established 
in 1877, and for the ten years of its history has 
been continuously augmenting its facilities for 
expeditiously serving its rapidly increasing trade, 
and constantly adding to the variety and assort- 
ment of goods carried. The premises occupied 
as salesrooms and office, etc. , consist of a commo- 
dious and well appointed store and basement, 
aggregating nearly 6,000 square feet of floorage 
area. Ten assistants are required in the various 
departments, and the stock is always kept up to 
the Al mark in every particular. Full and 
complete lines of dry goods, both domestic and 
imported, millinery, silks and dress goods, suits 
and cloaks, hosiery and underwear, embroideries 
and laces, trimmings and buttons, gloves, parasols 
and umbrellas, domestics, and notions are at all 
times carried, and a specialty is made of fine 
watches and jewelry, etc., in fact, everything 
requisite to a first-class establishment. Arrange- 
ments have been long ago perfected for securing 
the freshest goods and leading novelties as soon 
as they are ready for the trade. Both Messrs. Lucier 
& Perrault are Canadians by birth, owning Quebec 
as the place of nativity, but having resided in this 
country for the greater portion of a score of years, 
they have become fully identified with the land 
of their adoption. They have displayed much 
energy and perseverance in pushing their enter- 
prise to the forefront, and justly merit their large 
measure of popularity. 



126 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Nashua Lock Company, Manufacturers 
of Builders' Hardware; Fine Castings in Brass and 
Iron. Among the considerable number that have 
gained a more than national reputation for the 
superiority of their wares, special prominence 
should unhesitatingly be given to the well-known 
and reliable Nashua Lock Co. This house has 
a history dating back more than half a cen- 
tury, having been originally established in 1833 
by the firm of J. D. Orteron & Co. After a suc- 
cessful career of about thirty years the present 
company was duly incorporated in 1862. About 
twenty years since the rapid growth of patronage 
rendered necessary the establishment of the pres- 
ent plant, which has been added to and improved 
upon from time to time as such annexes became 
indispensable, until, at the present writing, 
twelve large two-storied buildings, aggregating 
350,000 square feet of ground space are utilized 
in the various departments and processes of man- 
ufacture. The premises are completely equipped 
with all the latest improved appliances, tools and 
automatic machinery, operated by a powerful 
steam engine. Two hundred and fifty skilled 
operatives are employed, and the output of the 
house aggregates the handsome amount of 
$200,000 annually. A specialty is made of fine 
grade and first quality builders' hardware, made 
from carefully selected stock, being unrivalled 
for quality, finish, utility, reliability and general 
excellence. The company publish a large illus- 
trated and handsomely bound catalogue of its 
specialties, which is furnished to the trade upon 
application. With an authorized capital of a 
quarter of a million, the company have a paid up 
capital of nearly $130,000, while the sales 
throughout this and foreign countries are annually 
largely augmented. The Boston office is at No. 
36 Pearl street, while for the convenience of its 
many western patrons, an office and salesroom 
have been established at No. 148 Lake street, Chi- 
cago. The officers are, A. C. Barstow, president ; 
H. G. Bixby, treasurer, and Emery Parker, super- 
intendent. 



J. TLJ. Barker & Co., Choice Groceries, 
Flour, Pure Teas, Coffees and Spices, No. 43 Main 
Street. This business has been established for 
more than ten years, and for three years was car- 
ried on by Mr. F. E. Burns, who was succeeded 
by Messrs. J. L. Barker & Co. in 1887. The 
store is commodious and admirably adapted to 
business purposes, and well stocked with a choice 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries of all 
kinds, including the finest teas and coffees, pure 
spices, family flour, hermetically sealed goods in 
tin and glass, provisions, table delicacies and con- 
diments, etc. A large, substantial business is 
carried on, and Mr. Barker, who conducts the 
business upon sound, liberal principles, is enjoy- 
ing a well merited success. He is a thorough- 
going business man, his experience in the trade 
extending over thirty years. He is a native of 
Vermont, and was born at Thetford. In 1865 he 
entered upon his business career as proprietor of 
a store at Caudia, N. H., and about 1882 he 
moved to Nashua, and for several years was a 
member of the firm of Barker Bros. Mr. Barker 
is a member of high degree in the Masonic Order, 
and also of the Order of Odd Fellows, and is a 
gentleman of sterling worth. 



Henry Stearns, Commission Merchant and 
Dealer in Flour and Grain, Railroad Square, Op- 
posite N. L. Freight Depot. Founded more than 
a third of a century ago, or to be exact in 1853, 
by Solomon Spaulding, this house has continued 
to cultivate and maintain the enviable reputation 
originally inaugurated at the inception of the 
business, and the result has been a prosperous 
and successful record. In 1856 the firm was 
changed to Spaulding & Foster, and again in 1857 
to Spaulding & Stearns, and finally, in 1873, Mr. 
Stearns assumed the entire proprietorship, and 
has since continued the management of the busi- 
ness, having received his earlier education in the 
details by his service as clerk in the employ of 
the founder from 1853 to 1857. The premises 
consist of a substantial and commodious building 
with three stories and basement, and 60x125 feet 
in dimensions, with an annex warehouse on the 
B. & L. railroad track with two stories 30x100 
feet, and one story 25x40 feet in superficial area. 
Four assistants and three trucks are required to 
properly and expeditionsly handle the vast quan- 
tities of flour and grain passing through the 
establishment. The trade is principally whole- 
sale, and with the superior facilities enjoyed for 
the transaction of a large business, a thorough 
knowledge of the requirements, and the most de- 
sirable connections with producers and packers, 
Mr. Stearns is enabled to offer inducements to 
the trade which are equal, if not superior, to 
those obtainable from any other quarter. Mr. 
Stearns is a native of Lexington, Mass. , but hav- 
ing resided here for the past thirty-four years he 
has become completely identified with the inter- 
ests of the city. 

Flanders & Wesson, Dealers in Beef, 
Pork, Veal, Mutton, Lamb and Poultry, Frnit, 
Vegetables, Canned Goods, etc. The individual 
members of this firm are Edwin D. Flanders, who 
was born in Alton, N. H., in 1859, and a resident 
of this city since 1883, with an experience of over 
six years in the business ; and L. Fred Wesson, 
a native of this state and of the same age as his 
partner, but was reared in Nashua, and has been 
in this line of trade since 1873. The house was 
founded originally by Mr. C. H. Kittredge in 
1872 and the present firm succeeded in April, 
1886. The store is of spacious dimensions, cen- 
trally and conveniently located, handsomely 
fitted up and arranged with special reference to 
the trade, which involves the daily receipt and 
handling of large quantities of fresh beef, pork, 
veal, mutton, lamb, poultry, game in season, for- 
eign and domestic fruits, berries, canned goods, 
vegetables, fine creamery butter, egcs and other 
products of the farm and dairy. The best im- 
proved refrigerators for furnishing cold storage 
for the preservation of perishable articles are in 
operation, and these insure at all times pure and 
wholesome food during hot weather at the lowest 
prices. All orders are filled promptly, neatness 
and cleanliness is observable on every hand, and 
the proprietors devote their personal attention to 
every detail of the business. Messrs. Flanders 
and Wesson are wide-awake, energetic and 
square-dealing young men, and are very popular 
with all who know them. Mr. Flanders is an 
active and prominent member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



127 



Capital Fire Assurance, Office, Howard 
Block, Main Street. This company was in- 
corporated in February, 1886, and during 
its comparatively short life its progress has been 
marked by a management of sound executive and 
financial ability, resulting in the display to the 
public at the end of the first ten months of busi- 
ness of the following statement, which speaks 
for itself in the strongest terms, and forms a con- 
vincing proof and argument to insurers : Assets, 
cash on hand, and in bank, $5,223.69 ; loans on 
mortgages and colateral, $28,075.00; demand 
notes, 11,000.00; bonds and stocks, $21,385.00- 
gross premiums in course of collection, $2,508.90 ; 
accrued interest $1,283.46 , office furniture, sup- 
plies, etc., $500.00 ; total, $69,976.05. Liabilities : 
cash capital, $50,000.00 ; reserve for re-insurance 
50 per cent., $13,924.58; commissions due agents 
on uncollected premiums, $350.50; net surplus, 
$5,700.97 ; surplus to policy holders, $55,700.97. 
In comparison with many older companies The 
Capitol presents an unusually enviable state- 
ment, and its progress since the issuing of the 
same has been even more marked and satisfac- 
tory. In addition to their own large and sub- 
stantial business this company acts as agenta for 
the following well-known and responsible com- 
panies : The Amoskeag Fire, of Manchester ; the 
Mascome Fire, of Lebanon ; the Guaranty Fire, of 
Great Falls ; the Concord Fire, of Concord ; the 
Cheshire Mutual, of Cheshire ; and the Indian 
Head Mutual, of Nashua, all of New Hampshire. 
The officers of the company are. Frank A. Mc- 
Kean, president, and Mark R. Buxton, secretary. 
The former is a native of Nashua, and has been 
connected with the Indian Head National Bank 
for thirty years, one-half of which he has held the 
responsible position of cashier ; while Mr. Buxton, 
the secretary, although a native of Vermont, hav- 
ing resided in Nashua for thirty years, is com- 
pletely identified with the interests and welfare of 
the city. 

Nashua Savings Bank, of Nashua, N. H. 
This bank is recognized as one of the oldest and 
soundest financial institutions in the state, hav- 
ing been originally incorporated under the laws 
of the state of New Hampshire as long ago as 
1854. Its career has been one of unbroken pros- 
perity, while under its present wise and conser- 
vative management it is- favored with a large line 
of deposits, all of its movements being worked by 
prudence caution, and honorable business 
methods. Prompt, obliging and efficient in their 
dealings with the public, the officers are natur- 
ally popular, and maintain the credit of the bank 
in all the amenities of social life, as well as in the 
discharge of the responsibilities incumbent upon 
them as officials. The following statement of the 
condition of the bank on July 1st, 1887, speaks 
volumes for its management, and is a prophetic 
precursor of its future honorable and progressive 
career, under equally favorable auspices as its past 
history has been fortunately favored with. " To 
the bank commissioners of the state of New 
Hampshire. Condition of the Nashua Savings 
Bank of Nashua, in the county of Hillsborough, 
on the first day of July, 1887. Statement. Lia- 
bilities. Due depositors, $2,805,241.76 ; surplus. 
$105,304.23; guaranty fund, $130,000.00 : premium 
at market value, $221,580.21 ; total, $3,262,126.20. 



Resources. Market value. Loans on real estate, 
$1,132,163.83; loans on personal security, $45,- 
000.00; loans on collateral security, $35,507.00; 
bonds, miscellaneous, $368,500.00 ; county, city, 
town and district bonds, $303,212.50 ; bank stock, 
$397,380.00; railroad stock, $284,350.00 ; railroad 
bonds, 316,050.00 ; other investments, $327,666.- 
23 ; balance on deposit in Indian Head Banks, 
$29,281.89; International Trust Co., $6,396.67; 
cash, $16,618.08 ; total, $3,262,126.20. Resources. 
Par value. Loans on real estate, $1,132,163.83; 
loans on personal security, $45,000.00 ; loans on 
colateral security, $35,507.00; bonds, miscellane- 
ous, $368,500.00 ; county, city, town and district 
bonds, $293,418.89; bank stock, $305,790.00; rail- 
road stock, $281,600.00; railroad bonds, $297,000.- 
00 ; other investments, $238,286.23 ; balance on de- 
posit in Indian Head Bank, $29,281.89; Interna- 
tional Trust Co., $6,396.67; cash, $16,618.08; 
total, $3,049,562.59. Resources. Value on books. 
Loans on real estate, $1,132,163.83 ; loans on per- 
sonal security, $45,000.00 ; loans on collateral 
security, $35,507.00 ; bonds, miscellaneous, $366,- 
525.00; county, city, town and district bonds, 
$294,712.50 ; bank stock, $306,450.00 ; R.R. stock, 
$273,804.79; railroad bonds, $297,000.00; other 
investments, $237,086,23 ; balance on deposit in 
Indian Head Bank, $29,281.89; International 
Trust Co., $6,396.67 ; cash, $16, 618. 08 ; total, $3,- 
040,545.99. Nashua, N. H., August 3, 1887. We, 
the undersigned, committee of the trustees of the 
Nashua Savings Bank, do severally solemnly 
swear that we have made a thorough examina- 
tion of its aifairs and that the foregoing statement 
by us made is true, according to our best knowl- 
edge and belief. So help us God. Augustus G. 
Reed, G. C. Shattuck, committee of the trustees. 
Personally appearing, the above named Augustus 
G. Reed and G. C. Shattuck made oath to the 
foregoing statements, before me, Geo. F. Andrews, 
Justice of the Peace." The officers of the bank 
are, Wm. W. Bailey, president, and Virgil C. Gil. 
man, treasurer, who together with Messrs. Ed. 
Spaulding, Aug. G. Reed, Perley,Dodge, Chas. H. 
Campbell, Jos. L. Pierce and G. A. Shattuck, 
form the board of trustees, all of whom are prom- 
inent in financial, manufacturing and mercantile 
circles. 



Rnfiis Fitzgerald, Manufacturer of 
Leather Belting, etc., Corner of Main and Park 
Streets. For seventeen years this enterprising 
house has conducted the above business at the 
present location, and during these long series of 
years, the patronage has been on the continuous 
increase, owing to the uniform excellence of qual- 
ity of the goods produced. The works comprise 
a spacious floor 25x70 feet in dimensions, appro- 
priately and conveniently fitted up for facilitating 
operations, and a fine and complete stock is at all 
times carried, comprising thewell-known stretched 
leather belting, railroad bell cord , loom strapping, 
sewing machine belting, etc. They have also 
constantly on hand the very best quality of belt 
and lace leather, belt hooks, belt rivets, etc. Re- 
pairing of all kinds is promptly attended to. 
Having been a resident of Nashua for the past 
twenty -seven years, Mr. Fitzgerald is closely iden- 
tified with the interests of the city. He is a 
member of both the F. and A. M. and K. of P., 
and is held in high esteem. 



128 



CITY OF NASHUA. 




The Crosby Invalid Furniture Com- 
pany, Nos. 46 and 48 Lowell Street. It is more 
than twenty years since Dr. Josiah Crosby con- 
ferred a great blessing upon suffering humanity 
by the invention of his now well-known and 
widely popular invalid bed. After it had received 
the unanimous endorsement of the medical fra- 
ternity as to principle of construction, various im- 
provements were added, and four distinct patents 
were secured from June, 1876, to September, 1884. 
The first company was formed under the name of 
The Sargent Invalid Furniture Co. in 1884 and 
was succeeded in 1886 by the present company, at 
which time it was duly incorporated under the 
laws of the state, with a capital of $20,000. The 
present premises consists of a substantial build- 
ing, four stories in height, with a floorage area of 
nearly 10,000 square feet, completely equipped 
with the most modern machinery and appliances, 
the motive power being supplied by a 20 horse 
power engine. Twenty employees are required 
. in meeting the continuous and rapidly increasing 
demand upon the facilities of the works. The 
Crosby invalid bed is the best constructed and 
the most convenient invalid bed on the market, 
and is offered at less than half the price of any 
other. It affords easy access to the body in all 
cases of fractures, amputations, acute rheumatism, 
consumption, etc., and permits the clothing to be 
changed and the bed made up without mov- 
ing the patient, thus securing perfect cleanliness 
and ventilation without fatigue or annoyance to 
the invalid. Hundreds of them are in use, and it 
has been adopted by the U. S. Government and 
other large hospitals throughout the country. 
They are unquallifiedly endorsed by the medical 
profession, and wherever used have invarably 
given the fullest satisfaction. It can be operated 
by a child ten years old when necessary, changing 
the position of the invalid with the utmost ease 
and without inconvenience. That it was the 
only patent bed used by the late President Gar- 
field during his long and tedious suffering, having 
been selected by his surgeons from the large num- 
ber offered, speaks volumes for its practicability 
and popularity. A fully equipped machiue 
works is combined with the factory, where in ad- 
dition to the iron work of the bed the company 
also manufacture cotton mill specialties, includ- 
ing Saunder's top grinder, machinery clocks, etc., 
and Ladd's patent card grinder; manufacturing 



of patented articles, and repairing of machinery 
of all kinds is promptly and intelligently 
attended to. The above cut will give the 
reader an idea of this excellent bed, and from 
it a better idea can be secured than by a more 
extended review. The present board of officers 
consists of H. H. Eeed, president, and G. W. 
Whittemore, manager and treasurer. These 
gentlemen are untiring in their efforts to further 
the interests of the company, and command the 
respect and consideration of the trade and com- 
munity by their integrity, probity and honorable 
business dealings. 

Nashua Bobbin and Shuttle Company, 

Bobbins, Spools and Shuttles. A house with a 
history of over half a century, although not posi- 
tively an anomoly in this the older section of the 
country, is at least exceptional, and carries with 
it substantial proof of the stability of the busi- 
ness, and superior character of the goods pro- 
duced. Such a record has the subject of the pres- 
ent sketch. Co-existent with the town itself, 
having been founded in a small way by Josephus 
Baldwin in 1835, when the city was a village, it 
has grown with the growth of the city, which 
later it has had a large influence in securing, and 
the Nashua Bobbin and Shuttle Co. is now not 
only the very largest concern in its line in the 
country, but concededly the plant of the greatest 
dimensions in the world, covering as it does in 
its various departments and ramifications fully 
three acres of ground space. From 1862 till 1885 
the firm was Eaton & Ayer, in which latter year 
on the retirement of Mr. Eaton the present com- 
pany was organized. About two hundred skilled 
workmen are employed, and the tools and ma- 
chines incident to the business are manufactured 
on the premises, blacksmiths and machine shops 
being provided for the purpose. The productions 
consist of bobbins, spools and shuttles for the use 
of all kind of textile manufacturers, and the 
house has long supplied a very large proportion 
of the most important works in the country. 
New Hampshire woods are chiefly used, birch and 
maple being the principle stock handled. The 
present officers. F. H. Ayer, treasurer; G. H. 
Hatch, secretary, and Ira Cross, superintendent, 
have long been associated with the enterprise, and 
are highly regarded in financial and manufactur- 
ing circles. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



129 



Moody, Estabrook & Andersons, 

Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers in Boots 
and Shoes. There are some houses in every 
manufacturing center whose steadily successful 
career, heavy and extensive transactions, and 
otherwise solid qualities, make them landmarks 
in the history of the place, and prime factors in 
the commerce and prosperity of the future aggran- 
dizement. Of such the house of Moody, Esta- 
brook & Andersons is a prominent representa- 
tive. The business here was founded in 1879 by 
the firm of Estabrook & Andersons Bros., and 
eighteen months later Mr. Moody assumed the 
senior partnership of the concern. The original 
premises occupied by this house were commodi- 
ous in proportions, the building being 34x80 feet 
in height, afterwards increased to 34x160, but the 
continuous and unprecendented augumentation of 
their patronage rendered a very considerable 
increase in their facilities imperatively necessary 
after five years of experience of their supposedly 
ample accommodation. In 1885 the present ex- 
tensive plant was erected, having been especially 
designed and constructed with a view to the most 
convenient and successful prosecution of their 
now enormous business, constituting as now com- 
pleted and occupied by all odds eoncededly the 
largest and finest structure in the country devoted 
solely to the manufacture of boots and shoes, be- 
ing entirely of brick with a frontage of 172 feet, 
and a depth of 194 feet, with four stories and 
basement, having the enormous floorage area of 
over 60,000 square feet. They give constant 
employment to nearly five hundred operatives, 
and find use in their various departments, and 
processes of manufacture for one hundred and 
twenty-five stitching machines, four Mackay 
sewing machines and two Wardwell machines, 
eight standard screw machines, two Giant leveling 
machines, five Buzzell trimming machines, six 
Dodge edge setting machines, four Buzzell 
heel trimming machines, three Tapley heel 
burnishing machines and five sole cutting 
machines, together with all the most modern 
machinery, appliances and labor-saving devices 
known to the trade. A 100 horse power Eollins 
engine furnishes the motive power, and a 
Thompson & Houston electric light plant on the 
premises provides the entire works with three 
hundred and fifty incandescent lights. The 
capacity of this vast establishment is 5,000 pairs 
per day, to which point the works will soon attain, 
making as they are at the present writing within 
a very few hundred pairs of this maximum num- 
ber. The house makes a specialty of medium 
grade goods, and in the selection of raw material 
as well as in the many processes through which 
the shoe passes previous to completion, a most 
thorough system of inspection and supervision is 
employed, resulting in the high standard of 
stock, workmanship and superiority of finish so 
much and practically appreciated throughout the 
large area over which the trade of the house is 
distributed. No concern in the country is more 
reliable in this respect, and none can more thor- 
oughly command the advantages and opportuni- 
ties of the market in the matter of purchase of 
stock. The large and still increasing patronage 
of the establishment is due not only to the un- 
qualifiedly high character of the goods produced, 
but fully as much to the honorable spirit of 



equity and fair dealing that pervades the man- 
agement, and which is an earnest that the house 
will continue to prosper and be a potent instru- 
mentality in the growth and welfare of the city 
and state. All of the partners have been con- 
nected with the manufacturing of boots and shoes 
during their entire business career, and are in 
consequence specially qualified for furthering the 
interests of their large establishment. They are 
also all natives of New Hampshire, excepting Mr. 
Estabrook, who was born in Grofton, Mass. Mr. 
Moody has a stock farm at Claremont. The Bos- 
ton office and salesrooms are located at Nos. 45 
and 47 Lincoln street. Mr. Estabrook makes 
his residence at Nashua, and divides his time be- 
tween the factory and Boston office. He is also 
treasurer of the Nashua Electric Light Co., and 
director of the Second National Bank. The 
Messrs. Geo. E. and Frank E. Andersons, the 
junior members of the firm, also reside at Nashua 
and have the supervision of the factory. The 
names of the members of the firm carry respect, 
and the confidence in which they are held, and 
the active interest they take in local affairs for 
the general benefit of the city, makes further 
personal mention entirely unnecessary. They are 
all members of the New England Boot and Shoe 
Association, and active in its councils and man- 
agement. 

S. D. Chandler, Proprietor, Nashua Elevator 
and Grist Mill, Main Street, Near Worcester 
Depot. This house enjoys a great advantage from 
the fact of its owning and controlling the only 
elevator and grist mill in the city, and from the 
nature of things both being of large capacity, the 
elevator accommodating 40,000 bushels, and the 
mill grinding 1,000 bushels daily. The mill and 
elevator building is a substantial three-story 
structure 34x160 feet in dimensions, conveniently 
and admirably fitted up with all the modern 
machinery, appliances and labor-saving and per- 
fecting devices known to the trade, and operated 
by a 60 horse power engine. Flour, grain, lime 
and cement are the staple features. This business 
was established in 1866, and in 1869 an adjunct 
to the business was founded in the shape of a 
manufactory of hydraulic cement sewer pipe, and 
being the only enterprise of a like character in 
the city or vicinity, a large field has been secured 
for the distribution of the output. The combi- 
nation of the two features are specially appropri- 
ate as the same class of dealers and consumers 
handle and require both classes of productions. 
Mr. Chandler started in business originally in 
Hingham as long ago as 1851, and two years later 
he opened a bakery in Nashua, which he con- 
ducted for about seven years and then retired 
from the business, and for six years subsequently 
he was in Boston and New York City, returning 
here in 1866 to inaugurate his present flourishing 
enterprise. During his twenty-one years of resi- 
dence in Nashua Mr. Chandler has become closely 
identified with the city's development and pro- 
gress, and has filled many positions of honor and 
trust, including those of councilman, alderman 
and mayor, and he is at present a director in the 
Second National Bank. It would be superfluous 
to treat in this article of the high estimation he 
is held in by his fellow citizens, as their appre- 
ciation has been practically demonstrated. 



130 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Londonderry Liitliia Spring 
Water Company. Among the 
innumerable spring waters with which 
this and other sections of the country 
teems, it might seem invidious to 
particularize a special water as sur- 
passing all others in remedial virtues 
and curative properties in the case of 
the diseases for which it is claimed to 
be a panacea, but it is not partiality 
to give to the Londonderry Lithia 
Spriug Water its just dues. The 
spring from which this wonderful 
nature's specific is obtained is located 
in the old town of Londonderry, about 
six miles from Nashua, and has been 
known as a healing spring for a hun- 
dred years past, and tradition has it 
that the Indians used formerly to 
dance and go through their incanta- 
tions around this spring, to appease 
the healing spirit supposed to dwell 
therein, and it is a fact easy of dem- 
onstration that the present generation 
living in the vicinity look upon the 
water as a universal panacea. So 
much evidence finally accumulated 
that the physicians of Nashua became 
interested and caused an analysis of 
the water to be made. The discovery 
of lithium and other medicinal agents 
possessed by no other water in the 
world, led them to form a stock com- 
pany to place the water within their 
each of the millions, and the result is 
that the Lithia Spring Co. are doing 
business to-day on an immense scale, 
bottling and barreling more water than any 
other spring company in America. The salts 
of Lithia, which were first prominently brought 
under the notice of the medical profession 
by Dr. Garrod, who recommended it in cases of 
uric acid diathesis, connected with gravel, and 
also in chronic gout and rheumatism. This 
recommendation was based upon the fact that 
lithia possesses great affinity for uric acid, ren- 
dering it soluble, and hence when mixed with car- 
bonate of soda, it decomposes the latter and unites 
with the uric acid, forming a soluble urate of 
lithia, and leaves the soda free. 

For thirty years, as is proven by abundant of 
testimonials from reliable persons, the salts 
of lithia have proved a curative agent of the 
highest order in the treatment of gout or rheu- 
matism, diseases of the kidneys and bladder 
and the removal of all morbid phenomena, the 
result of the uric acid in the blood. In its nat- 
ural state lithia is so intimately united with 
other minerals that it requires powerful chemicals 
to free it, and it is believed to lose much of its 
usefulness by this process, and as a result physi- 
cians have come to look to nature's alchemist for 
relief, hence the great advantage of partaking of 
the lithia in its natural state as it comes from the 
spring. It has cured hundreds of cases of rheu- 
matism, gout, neuralgia, dyspepsia and malarial 
poisoning, and is the only lithia water containing 
enough lithia to make it worthy of the name. 
In fact, it contains more lithia than all other 
known springs combined. It is concededly the 
only water which antidotes the bad effects of 




liquor, and is the finest blender with liquors in 
the market, beside actually curing the headaches 
and bad stomachs of the over-indulgent. A glass 
of lithia in the morning rehabilitating the man 
at once. It has the endorsement not only of the 
medical fraternity generally, but of the very 
highest authorities in the profession. 

The New York office of the company is 
centrally located at No. 335 Broadway; the 
Philadelphia office, at No. 112 N. 9th street; 
the Baltimore office, at Nos. 221 and 223 Charles 
street, and the Washington office is at No. 
1010 F street, N. W., while it is found on sale 
at all druggists and first-class grocers throughout 
the country. The office and works of the com- 
pany are located at Nashua, where the premises 
have been especially prepared for the preparation, 
bottling, etc., of the water. Two springs of dif- 
ferent degrees of strength are utilized, the com- 
bination of which gives the highly beneficial 
properties so widely appreciated. The capacity 
of the works is seventy-five barrels daily, which 
large amount is exhausted by the continuous de- 
mand upon the facilities of the company. This 
popular company have now in contemplation the 
addition of a branch at Chicago and have about 
completed arrangements with a large wholesale 
drug house to act as their western agents. This 
more will be much appreciated by their large line 
of western buyers as it will enable them to ship 
direct from their western depot, and thus largely 
facilitate and expedite their business with the 
western states, which now forms a very important 
part of the company's demand. 



LEADING MANUFACTUEEKS AND MERCHANTS. 



131 



Murray & Co., Manufacturing Chemists 
and Wholesale Druggists. This house has the 
distinctive feature of being the only exclusively 
wholesale drug house in the entire state. 
Founded in 1883 as the J. A. Hoitt Company the 
business was conducted under that title until the 
present year, when Mr. Hoitt retired and the firm 
name was changed by the remaining partners to 
Murray & Co. The premises occupied by this 
well-known concern are located in a substantial 
building on Main street, at the business center of 
the city, 3,500 feet of floorage area is utilized in 
their several departments and altogether a very 
large business is done. The specialties of their 
own manufacture, which are so much in favor 
throughout their trade, comprise extracts, essen- 
ces, etc., including Hoitt & Co's. Best, and Grocer's 
Favorite; Neutraliue, a Deodorizer and Detergent, 
the only remedy of the kind in the world ; Clement 
liquid plaster; J. A. Hoitt Co's. new cologne with 
sprinkler tops; J. A. Hoitt Co's Happy New 
cologne and tripple extracts in bulk, coucededly 
the finest handkerchief perfumes on the market, 
and equal to the best imported. A miscellaneous 
line of specialties are also manufactured, consist- 
ing of bay rum, hair oils and tonics, tooth 
powder, Parisian Rose Cream, glycerine, tonic 
bitters, cholera cure, colored inks, camphor ice 
and cosmoline, cosmetique, moustache wax, 
carbolic ac-id crystals, etc., and a full stock of 
barber's supplies, besides a full line of Lorillard's, 
Buchamon and Lyall'sand the Drummond tobacco 
Co's. goods, and Mayo's Plug and J. Wright & 
Co's. tobaccos. The firm call especial attention 
to their private brands of plug tobacco, to which 
they have given the names of 4-11-44 and Our 
Best, and they make the claim for this that it is 
as good a piece of tobacco for the price as has 
ever been introduced into New Eagland. It is 
made of long stock, has a splendid flavor, and is 
a general favorite wherever introduced. Their 
stock of imported and domestic cigars and cigar- 
ettes is the largest in the state, and range in 
prices from the lowest to the highest procurable 
in this country or Havana. They also make in 
their laboratoiy a fine line of soda and mineral 
water syrups, for which they issue a special price 
list which is sent by mail on request. Their stock 
of pure selected drugs and popular patent and 
proprietary medicines is kept well assorted at all 
times, so that they are prepared to supply dealers 
with any required quantity on demand. They 
guarantee the quality of their goods, give care- 
ful attention to details and invaribly make 
prompt shipments. Those entering into business 
relations with this house will find their interests 
considered ami subserved. The members of the 
firm of Murray & Co., father and son, have been 
connected with the enterprise from the first, and 
it is, therefore, superfluous to say that they are 
thoroughly acquainted with every detail and 
feature of the business, and to their vigilance 
and progress! veness is largely due the great 
measure of success to which this important 
industry has attained, as a factor in the commer- 
cial development of Nashua. 



Benjamin B.Otis, Doors, Sash and Blinds, 
etc., Railroad Square. A noteworthy Nashua 
concern that has flourished and progressed ever 
fcince its original foundation more than a quarter 



of a century ago, is that of Benjamin B. Otis, 
wholesale and retail dealer in doors, sash, blinds, 
etc. The business was inaugurated in 1852 by 
Paul Otis, who conducted it for almost twenty 
years, when in 1871 he admitted his son into 
partnership, and the firm was known as Paul 
Otis & Son till 1883, when the present proprietor 
succeeded to the business. The premises occu- 
pied comprise a substantial three-story and base- 
ment building 25x70 feet in dimensions, and a 
heavy and Al stock is at all times carried, con- 
sisting of doors, sash, and blinds, glazed sash, 
and painted blinds, window frames, etc., together 
with paints, oils, varnishes, and a full line of 
painters' supplies, and the trade, which is both 
wholesale and retail, extends over a large area of 
country, and annually foots up an exceedingly 
handsome figure. Builders and others forming bus- 
iness connections with this house may be sure of 
having their interests consulted and subserved in 
the case of each and every transaction. Mr. Otis, 
the present enterprising proprietor, has been a 
resident of Nashua since his infancy. He is a 
member in excellent standing of the I. O. O. F., 
and also of the A. O. U. W. Indian Head Asso- 
ciation, the largestand strongest in the city. He 
has recently completed a three-si ory 40x70 
building for occupancy about January 1st, of 
next year, which will largely increase the 
facilities for carrying and handling the extensive 
stock. 



Arthur E. Gay, Steam, Gas and Water Fit- 
ter, etc., No. 44 Main Street. This house is cou- 
cededly the representative establishment in its 
line in the city, and since its inception, fifteen 
years ago, the record of the concern has been one 
of continuous progress. Mr. Gay is a gentleman 
of twenty years of practical experience in his 
craft, and gives his personal attention to all the 
details of the business to the end that every item 
of the same shall be satisfactory in all cases. 
His premises consist of a commodious and well 
appointed store and workshop aggregating 1,400 
square feet of floorage area, and he carries in 
stock a large and complete assortment of all 
goods coming under the head of gas, water and 
steam supplies, including wrought iron steam, 
gas and water pipe and fittings, brass and iron 
valves, steam coils, radiators, etc., pumps and in- 
jectors, boiler fittings, steam and hot water heat- 
ing apparatus. Heating of public buildings and 
private resiliences is made a special feature, and 
reference is given to many of the more substan- 
tial and conspicuous structures of the city and 
vicinity furnished by this popular house. Buck- 
eye force pumps and wind engines are for sale 
here, as well as a well-selected and choice line of 
gas stoves and gas fixtures. Mr. Gay is prepared 
to furnish estimates for the fittings for lighting, 
heating, ventilation or drainage of public build- 
ings, factories, stores or private dwellings. He 
employs none but the best of skilled labor, places 
his prices and charges at uniformly low figures, 
and guarantees satisfactory work in every in- 
stance. Mr. Gay is a native of Nashua, and is 
therefore completely identified with the commer- 
cial interests and general welfare of the city. He 
is a member of the F. and A. M., and is recog- 
nized as a business man of enterprise and pro- 
gressiveness. 



132 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Nashua Card and Glazed Paper Com- 
pany, Manufacturers of Cardboard, Glazed Pa- 
per, etc., No. 12 Pearson Street. Thirty-eight 
years existence marks the history of the 
widely-known and flourishing house which is the 
subject of the present sketch, whose career since 
its inception has been a record of steady progress, 
and one that has become a concedediy leading 
and representative house in its line. Founded in 
a comparatively small way in 1849 by the firm 
of Gill & Co., various changes occurred in the 
designation of the firm during the subsequent 
twenty years, until in 1869 the present company 
was organized, a charter for that purpose having 
been obtained three years previously. The pres- 
ent plant was built one year after organization, 
but has been added to from time to time as the 
continuously increasing demands upon the facili- 
ties necessitated. The premises at the present 
writing comprise a main building of substantial 
character three stories in height, with a floorage 
area of 30,000 square feet, with three-storied wing 
32x65 feet in dimensions. The works are fully 
equipped with all the modern tools and appli- 
ances and automatic labor-saving machinery. An 
average of one hundred skilled operatives are 
employed in the various departments, and the 
output reaches the extremely large aggregate of 
from six to eight tons per day. The products of 
the house consist of cardboard of all kinds, and 
glazed, plated, enameled and embossed papers of 
every description. The raw material for stock is 
carefully selected, and every process of manufac- 
ture is carefully watched and followed through 
to completion, resulting in the high grade of 
goods which have become so popular wherever 
introduced. The trade of the house extends to 
all the principal cities of the Union, and is mostly 
confined to the leading jobbers in their line. Mr. 
H. W. Gilman holds the dual office of president 
and treasurer, and gives his undivided attention 
and the benefit of his many years of practical ex- 
perience to the furthering of the interests of this 
important and far-reaching industry. The board 
of directors consists of Messrs. J. W. White, Chas. 
H. Hill, W. V. Gilman, and the president, mem- 
ber de facto. The names of all of these gentle- 
men are synonymous with probity and integrity, 
and they are highly regarded in mercantile and 
manufacturing circles for their honorable busi- 
ness methods. 



Nashua Steam Press and Boiler 
Works, J. J. Crawford & Son, Proprietors. 
Among the many important manufactories which 
the thriving city of Nashua can properly and 
justly boast of, an establishment which has a dis- 
tinctive individuality to a large degree is that 
forming the subject of the present sketch. This 
enterprise was originally inaugurated in 1867 by 
the firm of Dobbins & Crawford, at Lowell, Mass., 
and Mr. Crawford in assuming the entire control 
and management of the business in 1873, at the 
same time removed the plant to this city, and in 
1885 associated his son with him in the business, 
since which time the designation of the firm has 
been J. J. Crawford & Son, and the works are 
widely known as the Nashua Steam Press and 
Boiler Works. The premises occupied consist of 
a commodious and substantial structure with 
nearly 8,000 square feet of floorage area, com- 



pletely equipped with all modern machinery, 
appliances and apparatus, the motive power being 
steam. Twenty-five skilled workmen are em- 
ployed, and every facility furnished for the con- 
venient construction of their popular productions, 
which consist of hydraulic and patented pcwer 
presses, with patented hollow steam press plates 
and connections, also steam boilers, rotary bleach- 
ers, water and oil tanks, and plate iron work of 
all kinds, rotary boilers, cupolas, iron doors, 
shutters, penstocks, quarter turns, etc., for water 
wheel work, etc., etc. A leading specialty is 
made of their improved patented power screw 
press, for manufacturers of woolen and worsted 
goods, shawls, cloths, hosiery, and all kinds of 
goods which require to be hot pressed, also baling 
presses for cotton or any other kind of goods for 
which a powerful press is desirable. J. J. Craw- 
ford & Son own all the patents ever granted in 
this country on these presses, plates and connec- 
tions (seven in number), and have specially su- 
perior facilities for furnishing the very best steam, 
plate press or baling press in the market at uni- 
formly low prices. For those preferring hy- 
draulic presses the company is prepared to fur- 
nish a very superior press, with cast steel, 
wrought iron, or gun iron cylinders, with pumps 
of unexceptionable construction. Hundreds of 
these presses are in use by the large manufactur- 
ers throughout the country, and their unanimous 
eulogy of their practicability and utility speaks* 
volumes for their popularity. Those entering 
into business relations with this reliable and rep- 
resentative house, may do so with implicit confi- 
dence in their integrity and honorable dealings, 
as also with the assurance that their interests 
will be fully and entirely considered in the case 
of each and every transaction. 

George E. Wheat, Foreign and Domestic 
Dry Goods, etc., No. 2 Noyes Block. This store 
has a floorage area of over 5.0CO square feet, and 
has exceptionally advantageous connections with 
the leading importers and manufacturers of the 
large business centres, and secure their goods on 
the most favorable terms. A staff of six assist- 
ants are employed in the various departments, 
and all customers are waited upon promptly and 
politely, all operations of the house being con- 
ducted upon the most systematic plan. All the 
most desirable dry goods, including blankets, 
flannels, table linens, prints, cotton cloths, gloves, 
ginghams, hosiery, underwear, corsets, etc. ; a^o 
ladies' and children's cloaks, of which they make 
a leading feature, dress find cloak buttons, luces, 
neckwear, ribbons, handkerchiefs, yarns and a 
splendid line of Berlin zephyr, worsteds, German- 
town yarn, Scotch yarn, knitting silks, flcsses, 
arrasene chenille, felting. Orders for stamping 
and pinking are promptly executed, while a 
complete assortment of Harper's Bazaar patterns 
are kept constantly on hand. A millinery de- 
partment is a feature with the house, and a fine 
line of goods of every desciption pertaining to 
ladies' hats and bonnets, and children's headwear 
is kept constantly on hand. Mr. Wheat has been 
established here for eight years. He is a member 
of the Pilgrim Fathers, and Golden Cross, and 
was born in this county, he is an enterprising, 
wide-awake merchant, and a citizen of integrity 
and probity. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



133 



A. P. Hendrick, Jeweler and Engraver, 
Dealer in Gold and Silver Watches, Clocks, Solid 
Silver and Silver Plated Ware, Finest Quality of 
Spectacles and Eye Glasses. Goods sold, Engraved 
Free at Short Notice. Special Attention given to 
the Repairing of Fine Watches and French 
Clocks, No. 35 Main Street. One of the lead- 
ing representative engravers and jewelers 
of Nashua is Mr. A. P. Hendrick, who has 
been established in the business since 1871. The 
store, which is 20x70 feet in area, is neatly fitted 
up with plate glass show cases, and ornamental 
counters, and contains a general line of new style 
fashionable jewelry of every description, also 
gold and silver watches, clocks, solid silver and 
silver plated ware in new, beautiful designs. Mr. 
Hendrick is a practical jeweler, watchmaker and 
engraver, with an experience of thirty-six years, 
and repairs and regulates clocks and watches and 
repairs jewelry, and executes engraving in the 
highest style of the art. All goods purchased of 
him are engraved with full name or monogram 
free of charge. A full assortment of the finest 
spectacles, eye glasses and optical goods is always 
kept on sale, and a special business is made of 
properly adjusting glasses to suit the eye. Mr. 
Hendrick, who was born at Keene, in this 
state, has had thirty-six years experience in the 
watch and jewelry business. Mr. Hendrick be- 
longs to a class of our estimable citizens to whom 
the coming generation will do well to immitate. 
In other words, he is a self-made man, starting 
in the Avorld at an early age, without the advant- 
ages of the present day, but by close and earnest 
application to his occupation has placed himself 
in the front rank as a merchant in his line. Mr. 
Hendrick has been a member of the K. W. Lodge 
of I. O. O. F. for a period of twenty-two years, 
holding the position of R. W. D. Grand Master 
of the above lodge, which he resigned by letter 
in 1879, but still holds a membership in good 
standing. 



A. B. Winil, Manufacturer of and Dealer in 
Confectionery, Cake and Ice Cream. Mr. Winn 
was born in Massachusetts, but has been a resi- 
dent of this city since 1871, and being a practical 
and experienced confectioner, he founded this 
establishment in 1876. The premises are of 
ample dimensions and consist of a well-fitted up 
store and ice cream parlor and candy factory, em- 
ployment being furnished to a number of hands. 
The stock in the store presents a singularly 
agreeable array of things, wholesome, flavorsome, 
delicate and aromatic. Purity is one of the main 
essentials with these goods, and in this establish- 
ment nothing is used but the purest and best, 
and no deleterious article of any kind is allowed 
for coloring, flavoring or ingredient. The can- 
dies are at all times fresh, as are the pastries and 
ice cream, specialties being made in candies such 
as fine box goods, marrons glacies, bon-bons, car- 
amels, chocolates, etc., while he is prepared to 
furnish the public with the choicest pastries, 
wedding, fruit, pound, sponge and other varieties 
of cake, and the ice creams are flavored with all 
the standard fruits, etc. He makes a specialty 
of furnishing balls, parties, weddings, receptions, 
church fairs and festivals, picnics, excursions, 
and also has a very large family trade derived 
principally from among our wealthiest citizens. 



Barr & Co., Hardware, Iron, Steel, etc., No. 
70 Main Street. This old and reliable hardware 
house was originally established in 1845, and 
continued under the same management for a 
quarter, of a century, when Matthew Barr, the 
founder, was succeeded by the three gentlemen 
who form the present copartnership, and who 
have continued the old designation, on account 
of the enviable reputation and prestige so long 
ago inaugurated by the original proprietor. This 
establishment enjoys the distinction and advan- 
tage of being the oldest as well as the leading 
house in its line in the city, and is most centrally 
located at No. 70 Main street, where the premises 
occupied consist of a store and basement, each 
40x80 feet in dimensions, and having an aggregate 
floorage area of nearly 7,000 square feet. The 
stock consists of a lull and complete line of 
hardware of every description, cutlery, fishing 
tackle, sporting goods, etc., iron and steel agri- 
cultural implements, paints, oils, etc. The supplies 
in all departments are purchased in large quanti- 
ties direct from the producers and heavy dealers, 
and especial advantages are in consequence given 
to their patrons in the way of prices, which are 
always uniformly low, while the high quality on 
which their wide popularity is based is sedulously 
maintained. Messrs. Barnard, Kittredge and 
Barr are natives of New Hampshire, and having 
served as clerks in the employ of the founder for 
many years, were eminently qualified to prosecute 
the business, and to continue its record for fair 
and honorable dealing. The house employs four 
assistants, and its trade extends to a considerable 
area of the surrounding country. An Al stock is 
always carried, and customers are invariably 
guaranteed complete satisfaction in the case of 
each and every purchase. 



C. R. Cotton & Co., Wholesale and Retail 
Grocers, Corner of Main and Water Streets. The 
house of C. R. Cotton & Co. is one of the most 
substantial mercantile concerns in the state, and 
is a leading representative in this city of the great 
growing industry of the country. The business 
was founded in 1875 by Cotton & Thomas, and 
nine years afterward the present firm succeeded 
to the business. The house has been managed 
with a practical ability and judicious enterprise 
that has made it a continuous success, the sales 
annually reaching a very handsome figure. The 
firm deals extensively in imported and fancy 
groceries of every description, and the stock carried 
embraces everything known to the grocery trade, 
including teas, coffees, flours, sugars, spices and 
foreign and domestic table luxuries, such as pre- 
serves, pickles, catsups, mincemeats, etc. The 
premises occupied consist of a commodious store 
and basement, each having a floorage area of 
about 1,800 square feet. And beside their large 
city patronage, an extensive trade is enjoyed 
extending over a large section of the surrounding 
country, their business being of both a wholesale 
and retail character. Mr. Cotton is a native of 
this state, while Mr. Allton was born in Maine. 
The house is a prominent factor in the commer- 
cial prosperity of the city, while the members of 
the firm are widely known as gentlemen of pro- 
gressive spirit whose every representation is 
entitled to the utmost consideration and confi- 
dence. 



134 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



C. H. Nutt, Hardware, Iron, Steel, etc., Nos. 
1 and 2 Nutt's Building. This house is one of 
the old reliable landmarks of the city, having 
been founded in 1824 by the Nashua Manufactur- 
ing Co., who sold out to Isaac Spaulding in 1826, 
who was succeeded in 1837 by Kendall & Gould, 
who in turn were succeeded by the firm of Mon- 
roe & Saylor in 1840, and Mr. C. H. Nutt, the 
present proprietor, acquired the business in 1852. 
The premises occupied by this house consist of 
two floors and basement having a total ground 
room of nearly 16,000 square feet. The stock car- 
ried is at all times large and complete in variety, 
and comprises hardware, cutlery, fishing tackle, 
sporting goods, iron, steel, paints, glass, saws, 
belting, agricultural implements, etc., and the 
trade extends over a considerable area of the sur- 
rounding country. It is both wholesale and re- 
tail in its character, and the prices quoted for 
standard goods are uniformly low, the result of 
the large and direct purchases from the producers 
and heaviest dealers. Mr. Nutt is a native of 
Tingsborough, Mass., but, having been a resident 
of Nashua for a half a century, he is most com- 
pletely identified with the city and its interests. 
He was a member of the first city council, and 
has filled the office of town clerk before the city 
was incorporated. He is a director in both the 
Nashua Water and Gas Works, and is a trustee 
of the City Savings Bank and the N. H. Banking 
Co. It is needless to add that he has always de- 
served and retained the respect and confidence of 
his fellow citizens by his correct principles and 
sound integrity, and he is fairly and fully en- 
titled to the large measure of success which he 
has attained to in the enterprise he has so long 
had the management and control of. 



E. Li. Shattuck, I>. D. S., Dentist, Bea- 
sorn Block. Dr. Shattuck was born in Andover, 
Mass., and graduated with very distinguished 
honors at the Harvard Dental College, and came 
to this city and established himself in the prac- 
tice of his profession in 1887, and although not so 
long in the profession as many others, by his ex- 
perience and thorough knowledge of every detail 
of dentistry, he has acquired a reputation for skill 
and reliability not often accorded to much older 
persons in the business. His reception and oper- 
ating rooms are very handsomely and appropri- 
ately fitted up. The different preparations of 
cocoaine and vapors for the alleviation of pain in 
sensitive teeth, previous to tilling with gold, pla- 
tina, composition, etc., or extraction, have proved 
of great success in his hands. He also devotes es- 
pecial attention to the making of artificial teeth 
on gold, silver, rubber or any of the plates now in 
use and in this branch cannot be surpassed, and 
his charges are extremely moderate. Dr. Shat- 
tuck is an active and valued member of the Free 
and Accepted Masons, also of the order of Odd 
Fellows. 



George Phelps & Son, Coal, Hollis Street 
Coal Yard ; Office in S. D. Chandler's Grain Store, 
Corner of Main and Hollis Streets. Supplying 
the citizens of Nashua and the adjacent sections of 
country with requisite articles of fuel is quite an 
important business, and is carried on extensively 
by Messrs. George Phelps & Son, whose coal 
yard is situated on Hollis street on the line of the 



Boston and Maine railroad and Worcester and 
Nashua division, with which it is connected by a 
side track. It is well fitted up and provided with 
conveniences for business purposes, and has a ca- 
pacily for the storage of 1,500 tons of coal. The 
best qualities of coal only is supplied by the firm 
who receive it direct from the mines and supply 
a large wholesale and retail demand at the very 
lowest market quotations. Mr. George Phelps, 
who established the business in 1870, was born in 
Massachusetts, but has resided in the state of 
New Hampshire since the above date. His son 
and copartner, Mr. Arthur W. Phelps, was born 
in Worcester, Mass., and has been associated in 
business with his father about a year. He holds 
the position of city weigher, and is one of the 
most enterprising among our popular young busi- 
ness men. 



G. C. Shattuck, Dealer in Investment Se- 
curities, Rooms Nos. 7 and 8 Howard Block. 
The subject of this sketch was for many years en- 
gaged in the flour and grain trade, having only 
within a year past inaugurated his present enter- 
prise, but, as a result of the enviable local repu- 
tation he has established and maintained in the 
community, he has already acquired a large and 
influential patronage, including among his cus- 
tomers many of the leading capitalists and inves- 
tors of the city and state. He is the authorized 
agent for Ihe well-known and reliable banking^ 
house of Cordley, Young & Fuller, of No. 121 
Devonshire street, Boston, and through this firm 
orders are executed in the Boston and New York 
markets. The offices are located in Howard's 
Block, the appointments being of an attractive 
and convenient character, and the services of three 
assistants are required to properly and expedi- 
tiously meet the demands upon the facilities for 
investment offered. Mr. Shattuck is a native of 
Nashua, and is firmly identified with the best in- 
terests and the commercial prosperity of the city. 
He is a trustee of the Nashua Savings Bank, and 
has been called by his fellow citizens on various 
occasions to fill the responsible positions of select- 
man, councilman, alderman, member of the school 
committee, etc. 

P. A. Kendall, Manufacturer of and Dealer 
in all Kinds of Saws, Railroad Avenue. A promi- 
nent manufacturer and dealer in all kinds of 
saws in the city of Nashua is Mr. P. A. Kendall. 
Mr. Kendall was born in Londonderry, N. H., 
and became a resident of this city in 1875. The 
business now conducted by him was established 
originally by Mr. L. D. Boynton in 1880, who 
was succeeded by the present proprietor in 1882. 
His factory and storeroom are of ample dimen- 
sions and thoroughly equipped with all the best 
and latest improved machinery required in the 
business, and he is prepared to fill orders for any 
number of saws of any description at. shortest 
notice and lowest prices. Saw riling of every de- 
scription is done to order in the best workman- 
like manner, also cross-cut and circular saws are 
re-toothed and gummed, and special attention is 
yiven to truing all kinds of circular saws. Mr. 
Kendall keeps constantly on hand a superb line 
of hand, wood and cross-cut saws which are un- 
surpassed in this section of the country, and 
which have a wide sale. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



135 



G. B. McQuesteii, West India Goods and 
Groceries, No. 29 Bridge Street. A truly repre- 
sentative house, and beyond all question or argu- 
ment the largest and finest grocery establishment 
in the city, is that of G. B. McQuesten, located at 
No. 29 Bridge street. The premises consist of a 
fine large store and basement 50x100 feet in 
dimensions, and containing altogether fully 10,000 
square feet of floorage area. All of this extensive 
space is fully and completely stocked from floor 
to ceiling with a choice and critically selected 
stock of West India goods. Groceries, both staple 
and fancy, meats, provisions, flour, grain, crockery, 
etc., and all quoted at uniformly low prices. 
This important and far reaching supply mart 
was originally established thirty years ago by Mr. 
J. B. McQuesten, who founded the enterprise on 
just and equitable business principles, and it has 
been the study and practice of his son and succes- 
sor to maintain the enviable reputation he labored 
so sedulously to inaugurate. Seven active and 
competent assistants in connection with three 
delivery wagons are required to meet the local 
demand upon the retail department, while the 
drafts upon the large and completely assorted 
stock in bulk by the smaller retail trade in the 
vicinity, make a large item in the aggregate sales. 
Mr. McQuesten, having been so long associated 
with his father, is completely educated in every 
detail of the business, and gives each feature the 
benefit of his practiced judgment and supervision. 
He is still a comparatively young man, and always 
solicitious for the highest welfare of his native 
city of Nashua, and in the best interests of the 
state. 



S. S. Jackman & Co., Engineers and Con- 
tractors, No. 85 West Pearl Street. This enter- 
prising and popular house was originally estab- 
lished in 1866 by Mr. S. S. Jackman, the present 
enior partner, and ten years later Mr. F. O. Ray 
was admitted to partnership, and the business has 
since been conducted under the firm name of S. 
S. Jackraan & Co. The premises occupied consist 
of a roomy and conveniently arranged store and 
workroom, with a floorage area of 1,400 square 
feet. The business is that of engineers and con- 
tractors for high and low pressure, steam and hot 
water heating. They are also manufacturers of deal- 
ers in gas fixtures, steam, gas and water pipe of all 
kinds, brass and iron, steam and water fittings, 
plumbers' stock, rubber hose and pumps of every 
description. A specialty is made of house heating 
and the house refers with confidence to very many 
of the residents of the city and vicinity. Steam, 
gas fitting and plumbing are promptly executed, 
while expert workmen are employed for all 
branches of their business. All work is warranted, 
and complete satisfaction guaranteed in each and 
every piece of work undertaken. An Al stock is 
carried in every line, and the trade is by no 
meansconfined to the limits of the city, extending 
as it does over a large area of the surrounding 
country. Mr. Jackman is a native of New 
Hampshire, while Mr. Ray was born in Maine, 
both have had large practical experience in their 
craft, Mr. Jackman having been in the same line 
for thirty-five years. He is a member in good 
standing of the I. O. O. F., while Mr. Ray is a 
member of the same organization as well as of the 
F. and A. M. 



H. M. Goodrich, Furnaces, Stoves, Tin- 
ware, Pumps, etc., No. 2 Goodrich Block, Main 
Street. This house is pre-eminently a landmark 
among the old time business concerns of Nashua, 
and has a history dating back for two-thirds of 
a century. The house was originally founded in 
1822 by Reuben Goodrich, and conducted success- 
fully by him for nearly forty years, his son, the 
present proprietor, succeeding to the business in 
1860, since which time he has been the sole pro- 
prietor. The house is the oldest, and concededly 
the leading one in its line in the city, and acquires 
its large patronage not only from a liberal pro- 
portion of the residents of the city, but also 
from a large area of the surrounding country. 
The premises occupied consist of a commodious 
store and basement, the latter being used as a tin 
and sheet iron manufactory and stove warehouse, 
having an aggregate floorage area of nearly 5,000 
square feet. The stock carried is at all times 
large and complete in the various lines which 
comprise furnaces, ranges, stoves, tin-ware, pumps, 
refrigerators, etc., also lead pipe, sheet lead, sheet 
iron, brass, japanned, britannia, copper, wooden, 
glass and plated ware. A full line ot kitchen 
furnishing goods, toys and fireworks is also 
carried. Plumbers' material, ana plumbing done 
to order, while a specialty is made of slate and tin 
roofing. A staff of skilled workmen are em- 
ployed, and repairing of all kinds pertaining to 
their line is effected promptly and satisfactorily, 
while the prices charged are uniformly low. 
Mr. Goodrich has a thoroughly practical knowl- 
edge in his several handicrafts, having had forty- 
two years of active experience. Having been a 
resident of Nashua for a long term of years, he 
is fully identified with the best interests of the 
city. He was formerly president of the Under- 
bill Edge Tool Co., a director of the Promicoek 
Bank, and justice of the peace for the state, also 
served on the Governor's staff from 1872 to 1874 
inclusive, and auditor of the books of the N. & L 
K. R. Co. for several years. 



"William Hall, Flour, Grain, Hay, Straw, 
Lime, etc., Railroad Buildings, R. R. Square. 
This house was originally established in 1840 by 
Gilman Shattuck, and passed down from father to 
son, the former having died in 1860. Mr. Shat- 
tuck, Jr., formed a copartnership in 1876 with 
Mr. Hall, and ten years later Mr. Hall succeeded 
to the proprietorship. The premises consists of a 
substantial three-storied building 50x100 feet in 
dimensions, having altogether some 15,000 square 
feet of floorage room, and the stock, which is at 
all times large, consists ot flour, grain, hay, straw, 
lime, plaster, cement, salt, calcined plaster, plas- 
tering hair, etc. The trade is principally whole- 
sale, and a very large country patronage is en- 
joyed. Five assistants are required to properly 
and expeditiously meet the demands upon the 
facilities of the house, while all mail orders are 
promptly and accurately filled. Mr. Hall is a 
native of Mason, N. H., but came to this city in 
1857, and was associated with other lines of trade 
before connecting himself with his present enter- 
prise. He is justly entitled to the high position 
he holds in the esteem and confidence of his fel- 
low citizens, and is properly considered an import- 
ant factor in the development of the city's re- 
sources. 



136 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



LOCKE'S EXPANDING ELASTIC ARBOR, 

FOR. ZDEKTTISTS' TJSE. 




MANUFACTURED BY G. S. LOCKE & CO., NASHUA, N.H. 



PATENTED NOV. 23, 1875. 



I*. F. Locke, Surgeon, Physician and Den- 
tist, Main Street. The city of Nashua is to be 
congratulated upon having in their midst such 
an enterprising and liberal a citizen, of so ingen- 
ious and fertile a brain, as has been developed in 




the case of Dr. L. F. Locke, A. M., M. D., fellow 
of the American Scientific Association ; also mem- 
ber of several medical societies. At the rooms of 
this popular physician, surgeon and dentist on 
Main street can be seen several practical speci- 



So great is the improvement of this instrument 
over the usual process that when the nominal 
cost of a complete set of eight different sizes, only 
$2.00, is considered, no dentist can consistently be 
without its convenient assistance, even for the 
construction of a single set of teeth. The arbor 
is of six and eight different sizes, easily fitted to 
any lathe. So popular has this arbor become 
with the profession that it finds a ready sale at 
all of the dental depots of the country. A price 
list of the different sizes and portions of sets will 
be sent on application and all orders accompanied 
with the amount of price will be promptly filled. 
Another useful device is a splint for use in the 
case of fractured jaw, which is the result of tak- 
ing a wax impression of the injured section and 
making a- foira which holds the jaw in position 
without inconvenience to the patient. To Dr. 
Locke's credit may also be charged the invention 
and introduction of an extremely convenient as 
well as valuable adjunct to the farmer's success 
in the shape of an artificial nurse or foster mother 
for young pigs, lambs, calves, etc. An effective 
means of saving the young pigs is illustrated on 
this page, which is a very simple affair, consisting 
of a tin pail having several small spouts near the 
bottom and upon each spout an india rubber nip- 
ple. It is equally servicable in the rearing of 
young dogs, lambs or even calves under like cir- 
cumstances. Dr. Locke is also the inventor of a 




mens of his inventive genius. Pre-eminent among 
the number is his Expanding Elastic Arbor, 
which entirely supersedes the file and scraper, 
and completely obviates the annoyance of soiled 
or sore fingers in the roughing down, smoothing 
up and polishing of rubber and celuloid work. 
Its simplicity of construction is a salient feature. 



specially convenient portable generator of laugh- 
ing gas (as it is called), which young dentists will 
find a valuable aid to them in the practice of their 
profession, a cut of which is also displayed here- 
with. Being a finished and thoroughly educated 
physician and surgeon as well as dentist his val- 
uable time is completely occupied. He is ready 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



137 



to receive propositions from parties with capital 
desirous of availing themselves of the opportunity 
here presenting itself for introducing and placing 
his inventions with the trade or customers. All 
communications should be addressed to G. S. 
Locke & Co., P. O. Box 494, Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire. To Dr. Locke the city of Nashua is largely 
indehted for a number of progressive improve- 
ments which have done much toward the devel- 
opment of the growth of the city, such as the 
building of houses in various locations and dis- 
posing of land at reduced prices to manufacturers 
as an incentive to these locating in Nashua, etc. 
The doctor, during the late Civil War. after offer- 
ing his valuable services, was appointed by the 
State Board as an. examiner of state troops, and 
to him is credited the first correct and authentic 
report of the first battle of Bull Run, in addition 
to which he is the author of the " Roll of Honor," 
a complete list in book form with notes of the 
soldiers who went from New Hampshire into the 
service of their country during the Civil War. 



McQuesten & Chase, Taruic Pond Ice, 
Wood, Lumber, etc., No. 25 Railroad Square. 
This house was originally established at Letchfield, 
N. H., 1883 and removed to this city two years 
later, locating at their present central site. The 
premises, including yard, stables, steam wood yard, 
etc.,havean aggreggate areaofover 6,000 square feet. 
A 10 horse power engine is employed, and a suffi- 
cient corpsof workmen to properly audexpeditious- 
ly serve the largeand constantly increasing number 
of patrons. Five thousand tons of the popular 
Tarnic pond ice is handled annually, besides large 
quantities of wood and lumber, pressed bay and 
straw. The facilities for promptly filling orders 
are unsurpassed, while the stock is purchased in 
such large quantities that most advantageous 
terms are secured, thus enabling the house to 
offer inducements to customers that smaller 
dealers cannot afford to duplicate. Both mem- 
bers of the firm are natives of Letchfield, but are 
well known in Nashua and vicinity, and theyare 
generally regarded as substantial as well as rep- 
resentative business men. 



John Woods, Carpetings, Paper Hangings, 
Window Shades, Books, Stationery etc., No. 5 
Noyes Block. This house was originallv estab- 
lished by the firm of Jaquith & Co. in 1872, Mr. 
Woods, the present proprietor, having been the 
junior partner. After a career of fourteen years 
Mr. Jaquith retired from the firm and Mr. Woods 
assumed the proprietorship, and has since con- 
ducted the business in his own name. The 
promises occupied consist of a fine and attractive 
store containing an aggregate of about 1,800 
square feet of floorage area. The salesrooms are 
filled with an assortment of carpets of all grades 
and styles of manufacture in favorite designs and 
patterns, oil-cloths of all kinds, window curtains 
and shades, and a fine line of books and stationary, 
etc. This house enjoys a large and constantly 
increasing patronage, which lias been secured 
mainly by the standard quality of the goods, and 
correct business methods as well asequitanle deal- 
ings with each and every customer. Mr. Woods 
is a native of New Hampshire, and has resided 
for many years in Nashua, where he has become 
completely identified with growth and prosperity. 



Charles Holmaii, Manufacturing Confec- 
tioner, Nos. 245 and 247 Main Street. This sub- 
stantial and widely-known house has, from its 
foundation, more than twenty year^ ago, main- 
tained a career of unbroken prosperity. From an 
annual trade of small proportions, its transactions 
have increased and expanded until its sales uow 
aggregate over a quarter of a million dollars. 
The operations of the house extend from Maine 
to the Mississippi river. The premises occupied 
comprise a substantial three-storied building, 
with a floorage area of 18,000 square feet, em- 
ploying seventy to eighty bands. The produc- 
tions are both machine and hand-made, consisting 
of fine American and French confectionery. The 
goods being absolutely pure, standard in quality, 
and in great favor throughout the area over which 
the trade of the house is distributed. Cocoanut 
cakes and bon-bons, gum work, chocolate cream 
drops and goods are a specialty and the firm are also 
manufacturers of choice Havana cigars, the 
superiority of quality and grade of which gives 
them a ready sale wherever intioduced. A fea- 
ture is also made of fine druggists' lozenges. The 
house is a thoroughly representative one in every 
sense of the term, and a factor in the commercial 
development and present status of Nashua. Mr. 
Holman is a native of Massachusetts, but having 
resided in Nashua for a quarter of a century, he 
is most completely identified with the interests 
of the city, and has held the office of alderman, 
councilman and mayor. He is a direclor of the 
First National Bank of the city, as well as of the 
Worcester and Nashua railroad. 



Marden & Mygatt, Stoves and Stove Fur- 
niture, etc., No. 163 Main Street. For the past 
fifteen years this house has been a favorite resort 
for the residents of Nashua and vicinity requiring 
articles of comfort or necessity in their line. The 
business was originally established in 1868 by the 
firm of L. E. Gould & Co., Mr. Marden, of the 
present firm, having been the junior partner in 
the firm from 1878. After eleven years of suc- 
cessful experience Mr. Gould retired, and the firm 
in 1883 became Marden & Mygatt. The premises 
occupied are located at No. 163 Main and Nos. 5 
and 7 High streets, and consist of a conveniently 
fitted up and arranged store and workroom and 
tin shop, the foimer having a floorage area of 
about 1,750 square feet and the latter 2,500 square 
feet. Five assistants are required to properly 
and expeditiously meet the demands upon their 
facilities. A specialty is made of the popular 
makes of stoves, ranges and furnaces for both 
heating and cooking, together with a complete 
assortment of stove furniture; also tin, sheet 
iron, brass and copper ware, iron and copper 
pumps, lead pipe, etc. Mr. Mygatt is a tin smith 
by trade, while Mr. Marden has devoted many 
years of his life to the details of his business. 
All kinds of repairing are promptly attended to, 
and a specialty is made of tin roofing, furnace 
work and general roofing and plumbing, while 
their prices are uniformly low. The house is pre- 
pared to contract for any work in their line at 
very reasonable figures. Both gentlemen are 
long residents of Nashua, are members of the 
I. O. O. F., and intimately connected with the 
licst interests of the city, and are highly respected 
citizens. 



138 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



A. J. Blood & Co., Dealers in West India 
Goods, Groceries, Country Produce, Flour, etc., 
No. 102 Pearl Street, Corner of Elm Street. This 
old and reliable grocery house was founded origi- 
nally in 1857 by Mr. Caleb Emery, who was sub- 
sequently succeeded by Mr. G. W. Green, who 
conducted the business very successfully until 
his death in 1881, when Messrs. A. J, Blood & 
Co. succeeded, and under whose able manage- 
ment and liberal dealing the trade has greatly 
increased. The individual members of this firm 
are Mr. A. J. Blood and Mr. F. M. Eayrs, both of 
whom are natives of New Hampshire and resi- 
dents of Nashua many years. The store occupied 
is of spacious dimensions, having a frontage of 
25 feet with a depth of almost three times that 
distance. It is eligibly located at No. 102 Pearl 
street on the corner of Elm. and iasupplied with 
all necessary conveniences for the comfort of cus- 
tomers; and the varied stock of goods, which 
comprises everything in the line of fancy and 
staple groceries, including West India goods, such 
as tine unadulterated sugars, syrups, choice Ha- 
vana cigars, oranges, lemons, bananas, limes, 
pineapples, etc. ; also fresh new crop teas from 
China and Japan, fragrant coffees from Mocha, 
Java and South America, canned goods of every 
description, spices, condiments, pure creamery 
butter, eggs, cheese, domestic fruits and other 
products of the farm and dairy, provisions, in 
fact, everything that is usually found in all well- 
regulated grocery houses. Mr. Blood, before go- 
ing into business for himself, had a practical ex- 
perience as grocery clerk of twenty years, and is 
thoroughly versed in all its details, and being a 
superior judge of a fine article this house has an 
established reputation for dealing in pure goods 
only. Polite attention is given to the wants of 
customers by the proprietors and their assistants, 
and the store is kept in the very neatest and 
cleanest condition, while prices are at bed-rock. 
Both proprietors are popular in the community, 
and are wide-awake and honorable business men. 
Mr. Blood is an active and prominent member 
of the Knights of Honor, while his partner takes 
a great interest in the welfare and prosperity of 
the Odd Fellows' Order, and in the affairs of the 
Knights of Honor. 



Harry B. Wheeler, Plain and Ornamental 
Steam Job Printer, Noye's Block, Main Street. 
Au old established and popular concern repre- 
senting this interest in Nashua is that forming the 
subject of the present sketch. For nearly a quar- 
ter of a century Mr. Wheeler has been located in 
Nashua. He occupies a large portion of an entire 
floor in Noye's Block, with a superficial area of 
1,500 square feet. The premises are admirably 
and conveniently fitted up for the purposes of 
the business, and besides the always complete as- 
sortment of type including the latest styles, they 
have three steam presses run by a 3 horse power 
engine. Employment is given to three assistants, 
and the house is prepared to execute with prompt- 
ness all classes of mercantile and legal printing; 
also catalogues, pamphlets, circulars, price lists, 
cards, invitations, etc. Mr. Wheeler gives his 
personal attention to every detail of the business. 
Mr. Wheeler was born at Amherst, this state, but 
his long residence here has completely identified 
him with Nashua. 



W. H. Campbell, Manufacturer of Paper 
Boxes. For the past twenty years this house has 
been engaged in the production of paper boxes, 
the industry having been inaugurated by Mr. S. 
S. Davis in 1867, who conducted tlie business 
with marked ability and steadily increasing suc- 
cess until about a year since, when lie was suc- 
ceeded by the present proprietor, who for the 
previous seventeen years had been engaged in the 
fancy goods and toy business in New York City. 
The premises occupied by this progressive house 
are located in the new electric light building on 
Water street, and comprise two floors aggregat- 
ing a total floorage area of over 7,000 square feet. 
The works are thoroughly equipped with all the 
latest improved box making machinery, includ- 
ing cutters, presses, etc., and furnishes employ- 
ment to from twenty to forty hands, the motive 
power being steam, supplied by the Electric 
Light Co., who have also equipped the entire 
works with incandescent lights. The produc- 
tions consist of paper boxes of every description, 
new styles of which are constantly being intro- 
duced, and every variety is made to order at the 
shortest notice. A specialty is made of boot and 
shoe, confectionery, knitting cotton, hosiery and 
glove boxes, many large manufacturers being sup- 
plied from this reliable house. Wedding cake 
and ice cream boxes are constantly on hard, and 
fancy ornamental boxes are made as required. 
The goods made by this house can compete in all 
points, including style, quality and price, with ' 
those of any similar establishments in the coun- 
try. Mr. Frank E. Davis, the efficient foreman, 
has had long experience in the trade and is fully 
acquainted with all the details, supervising all 
the processes of manufacture, resulting in the 
class of goods so popular throughout the area 
over which the trade of the house is distributed. 



H. S. Norwell, Dry Goods, Notions, Hos- 
iery, etc., No. 19 Main Street. Mr. Norwell, 
the popular proprietor, first established him- 
self in business in Nashua in 1865, and two 
years afterward he sold out and went to Chicago, 
where he opened a dry goods store four years 
after, was burned out in the great fire of 1871 and 
reopened as soon afterward as possible, occupying 
five different sites in all. In 1878 he returned to 
Nashua and re-established himself at his present 
location, where he occupies a large and attrac- 
tively fitted up and arranged store 25x80 feet in 
dimensions. He requires about twenty-two as- 
sistants to properly and expeditiously serve the 
many customers who favor him with their pat- 
ronage. The stock carried is at all times large 
and varied, and includes both imported and do- 
mestic dry goods, silks, domestics, cloaks, fancy 
goods and notions, glover, underwear, etc. Mr. 
Norwell has made such connections as enables 
him to obtain his goods direct from the largest 
importers and popular American manufacturers, 
so that he always has the most desirable novel- 
ties as soon as they appear in the market. From 
his long practical experience Mr. Norwell is nat- 
urally fully acquainted with all the details of the 
business and the requirements of the trade and 
the desires of his customers, whoe interests are 
invariably considered. He is a native of Scot- 
land, but has resided in this country since 1861, 
and lor a number of years in this city. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



139 



John Osborn, Manufacturing Confectioner ; 
Also Dealer in Foreign and Domestic Cigars, To- 
baccos, Stationery and Toys, No. 15 Factory 
Street. Few persons in this region have had as 
lengthy a connection with the confectionery 
trade as Mr. John Osborn, of No. 15 Factory 
street, Nashua. Mr. Osborn is a native of Quincy, 
Mass., and came to this city in 1824, and estab- 
lished this business in 1846. The premises occu- 
pied by Mr. Osborn comprise a store and factory, 
and a number of hands are employed in the man- 
ufacture of plain and fine confectionery and 
candies. In the store will be found a full and 
complete assortment of these toothsome goods, at 
all times fresh. Purity is one of the main essen- 
tials with these articles, and to-day the difficulty 
of obtaining candies and confections devoid of 
adulteration and deleterious substances is so 
great, that the advantages of dealing with a house 
like that of Mr. Osborn, whose reputation is es- 
tablished for making none but the purest and best 
goods, are at once manifest. Being a practical 
and experienced confectioner, Mr. Osborn devotes 
his entire attention to all the details of his estab- 
lishment, which enables him to guarantee all 
goods of his manufacture. He also keeps in his 
store a full line of domestic cigars and cigarettes 
of all the popular brands, chewing and smoking 
tobaccos, smokers' materials, stationery of all 
kinds, and toys. His trade is both wholesale and 
retail, extending throughout the city and sur- 
rounding country, a wagon being kept on the 
road, receiving and delivering orders. 



Emerson & Maynard, Custom Tailors, 
Merchants' Exchange. This house was originally 
established in 1852 by Mr. Robert Emerson, the 
present senior partner in the concern, who after 
an individual career of over twenty-five years, 
admitted Mr. Maynard into partnership, he hav- 
ing been in the employ of Mr. Emerson for the 
seven previous years. The premises consist of 
an entire floor with about 1,750 square feet of 
floorage area. Nearly a dozen skilled workmen 
are constantly employed by the concern, and the 
best fitting garments trimmed and made in the 
most desirable manner, and accurate in cut and 
fit, are furnished at short notice. A fine stock 
of domestic and imported fabrics, including wool- 
ens, cassimeres, suitings, diagonals, broadcloths, 
doeskins, beavers and vestings in all the different 
varieties of plain goods, stripes, plaids, checks 
and other patterns is carried at all times, while 
the prices charged are always uniformly low in 
proportion to the quality of goods and superiority 
of workmanship. Both gentlemen are natives of 
New Hampshire and both have had long experi- 
ence in their profession, Mr. Maynard sixteen 
years, while Mr. Emerson has been in the busi- 
ness over fifty years. It is therefore needless to 
refer to their qualifications for their calling. 

Moses Davis, City Undertaker, Manufac- 
turer and Dealer in Marble and Granite Monu- 
ments, Tablets, Head Stones, Granite Work, etc., 
Railroad Hquare, Nos. 12 and 14 Main street. 
One among our most prominent old residents is 
Mr. Moses Davis, who is engaged in business as a 
marble and granite worker and as an undertaker. 
Mr. Davis, who was born at Hudson, in this state, 
seventy-one years ago, came to Nashua in 1841 



and established himself in business as a marble 
worker, and in 1848 as an undertaker and eleven 
years later added that of working in granite. 
Mr. Davis executes the very best class of work 
in marble and granite for cemetery and building 
purposes, and originates many beautiful designs 
for monuments, tablets, head stones, etc., and 
erected many of the beautiful memorials to be 
seen in the cemeteries in and about this section of 
the state, and also furnished the cut and dressed 
granite for the Goodrich Block, the engine houses 
and many of the business houses and private res- 
idences of our city. As an undertaker he has 
always enjoyed a wide reputation as being one of 
the most careful and considerate gentlemen in 
the vocation. He attends to the preservation of 
the corpse and furnishes caskets, coffins, robes 
and all the requisites for a funeral. In the dif- 
ferent branches of his business Mr. Davis employs 
fifteen hands and occupies premises used as mar- 
ble and granite yard about an acre in extent on 
the line of the Worcester Railroad. He is the 
leading marble and granite worker and also un- 
dertaker in the city. 



Wm. H. Reed, Beef, Pork, Lard, Hams, 
Mutton, Veal, Laton's Building. This store is 
conveniently arranged and is conducted in the 
most systematic manner. In size it is 25x70 feet 
with an annex of 50x40 feet in area. It is kept 
scrupulously clean and provided with every facil- 
ity for filling orders, and made attractive and in- 
viting by the excellent manner everything in the 
line of choice cuts of fresh beef, veal, lamb, mut- 
ton, pork, etc., and also smoked and salt meats 
and poultry and fruitsand vegetables is displayed. 
Poultry and game is a specialty, Mr. Reed always 
having the finest and best that can be obtained. 
He has had many years experience as a purveyor 
of articles for the table, and as a caterer to the 
wants of the public is not surpassed by any 
others. He was born and brought up in Nashua, 
and was formerly a member of the Board of Al- 
dermen, and is very popular as an esteemed citi- 
zen and business man. Mr. Reed has been sup- 
plying the citizens with articles for the table 
since 1865, and for fourteen years was a member 
of the firm of Ackerman & Reed. Since 1879 he 
has continued the business on his own a'ccount, 
and has become widely known as one of the 
leading representative dealers in meats, fruits, 
vegetables and country produce in the city. 

Dr. Baldwin, Dental Rooms, Over First 
National Bank. Dr. H. Baldwin has been in this 
profession longer than any others in the city, and 
dates his experience from 1850. In the finer 
artistical surgical departments there are few 
equally skilled as Dr. Baldwin. The doctor makes 
a specialty of preserving the natural teeth, and 
also filling and of making artificial teeth in sets 
or singly to order on gold, silver or other plates, 
executing the work with skill and always giving 
satisfaction. Dr. Baldwin, who was born in the 
state of New York, learned his profession at 
Troy. In 1855 he located at Louisville, Ky., 
where he remained until the war broke out, when 
he came to Nashua, and afterwards spent some 
years traveling. In 1884 he returned to the city 
and became permanently located. He is a mem- 
ber of the New England Dental Association. 



140 



CITY OF NASHUA. 



Kimball & Co., Dry and Fancy Goods, 
Noyes .Block, Main Street. This honse was first 
opened as far back as 1851 by A. & F. F. Kimball 
and continued until 1868, the time of the decease 
of Mr. A. Kimball. In that year the present firm 
was formed, Mr. F. F. Kimball, the head of the 
house, having full control of its general manage- 
ment. The store in Noyes Block, Main street, in 
area is 21x90 feet. It is one of the largest in the city 
and is appropriately fitted up and every conve- 
nience is provided for the display of the stock and 
for benefit of the patrons and the public. The 
lines of goods carried in stock embrace every- 
thing in dry and fancy goods of both foreign and 
home productions, and includes besides all the 
various dress fabrics, silks woolens, hosiery, white 
goods, laces,embroderies, gloves, notions,domestics, 
and all those articles that belong to the trade. 
Mr. Kimball is an active, energetic business man 
possessing all those characteristics which go to 
make the thrifty enterprising New England 
merchant. He is a public spirited gentleman and 
influential citizen, and takes pleasure in fostering 
and promoting every enterprise that is for the 
general public good. In the store a new improved 
automatic cash system and electric lights have 
been introduced. Mr. Kimball, who was born at 
Lime, in this state, has resided and been iden- 
tified with the business affairs of Nashua since 
1844. 



John H. Chapman (Agent), Merchant 
Tailor, No. 96 Main Street. The oldest as well 
as the leading merchant tailoring establishment 
in Nashua is conducted by Mr. John H. Chn-pman. 
The business was originally founded in 1847 by 
Mr. John B. Chapman, and passed through several 
changes in proprietorship during the time between 
that date and 1877, when the present proprietor 
assumed the management. The premises, consist- 
ing of showroom, workroom, etc., are conve- 
niently and attractively fitted up for the purposes 
of the business. The stock carried comprises a 



fine line of domestic and imported suitings, etc., 
from the most popular looms of Europe and 
America, and includes most desirable patterns in 
the popular fabrics. Mr. Chapman has had large 
experience in his business, gives his personal 
attention to every feature and process of produc- 
tion, and employs only those who are experienced 
and practically proficient. A large custom is de- 
rived from the merchants and best class of the 
residents of the city and vicinity, and the patronage 
is constantly on the increase Owing to the superi- 
ority of work turned out, both as to quality and 
fit, while Mr. Chapman's prices are always uni- 
formly low, the class of workmanship considered. 
Mr. Chapman is a native of Nashua, and is there- 
fore completely identified with the welfare of the 
city 



Roger W. Porter, Manufacturer of Shuttles 
Bobbins and Spools. The subject of this sketch 
for many years superintended the works of the 
largest house in the line in the world, the Nashua 
Bobbin and Shuttle Co., before establishing him- 
self in his present venture, some five years since. 
The premises occupied by this rising house consist 
of a substantial building, with 4,000 square feet 
of floorage area, completely equipped with all the 
modern machinery, appliances and labor saving 
devices necessary to the successful prosecution of 
the business, the motive power being supplied by 
a 12 horse power engine ; a force of competent 
and experienced workmen are employed, and 
everything pertaining, to the line of trade is pro- 
duced, consisting of all sizes and styles of shuttles, 
bobbins, spools, etc., the capacity of the works 
being three hundred shuttles per day. The repu- 
tation ofthis house is already firmly established,and 
the trade extends over a large area of the country, 
besides being constantly on the increase. Mr. 
Porter gives his personal supervision to each and 
every detail of the business, and the various pro- 
cesses of manufacture and finish, and the result 
is a superior article in each and every instance. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



OF the district now comprised within the City of Manchester and its environs, the Amoskeag 
tribe of Indians were, like Robinson Crusoe, " lords of all they surveyed," prior to the advent of 
the white man, who, Puritan and God-fearing as he was, hunting for a place where he could 
practice his peculiar religious ordinances in peace and at his own " sweet will," found he had to 
fight ere he could persuade the Indians that the lands they and their forefathers had occupied for 
ages, didn't exactly belong to them, but that such territory as he just felt like " prospecting," he 
was entitled to claim as his. The whole country-side, hereabouts, possessed a rich soil, with 
undulating surface, and this was drained by Massabesick Pond and numerous small streams 
which had their confluence with the River Merrimack, whose waters had for centuries rolled and 
tumbled over what are now known as Amoskeag Falls, on their way to the sea. Amoskeag 
was so named on account of these falls, the appellation signifying " the place of much fish." 
The Indians who resided here gained an easy living by catching fish at the falls, and when the 
first white settlers presented themselves, the former endeavored to make an impression upon the 
minds of the latter that the territory could only be peopled by one race, and that the red skins. 
The first settlers to arrive and to locate within the present boundaries of the City came in 1722 from 
the Massachusetts Colony, and these were, John Goffe, Jr., Edward Lingfieldjand Benjamin Kidder, 
who built homes for themselves and families on Cohas Brook, Goffe' s house being nearly oppo- 
site the falls that now bear his name. Other settlers followed, and eleven years afterwards, 
Archibald Stark, John McNeil and John Riddell, who came with their families from Nutfield, 
now Londonderry, took up their abodes near the Amoskeag Falls. The Indians fought with 
them, then entered into struggles of extermination with neighboring hostile tribes, and weakened 
themselves to a degree that they could fight but little ; still, those who had escaped the toma- 
hawk, by prowling around when least expected, kept the white men active and continually under 
arms. In their last and final efforts to expel the invaders, the Indians, in what is known as 
King Philip's War, were killed or compelled to seek habitation elsewhere, and peace was assured 
as against the savages. To reside in the neighborhood of Amoskeag Falls in those days was to 
realize all the dangers of "border life ; " and the settlers who took prominent parts, under Col. 
Goffe, Capt. Rogers and Gen. Stark, in the various wars of the last century, knew little of 
peace, and had but little chance to develop the settlement by building highways and introducing 
other evidences of civilization, until the last gun in the Revolutionary War had been fired. The 
first effort to establish manufactures, for which Manchester has since become famous, grew out 
of a public reward for engaging in battles with Indians. Major Ephraim Hildreth and several 
other Massachusetts men were given a tract of land three miles wide on the east bank of the 
Merrimack, from Suncook to Litchfield. This grant was named Tyngstown, in honor of Capt. 
William Tyng. On Cohas Brook Major Hildreth built a saw mill. The first settlers of London- 
derry, we are told, supposed that that portion of Manchester on the east side of the Merrimack 
was included in their grant, but through a mistake in making the survey, a strip of land eight 
miles long, and a mile wide, on the east bank of the river, was cut off and left outside their jur- 
isdiction. This tract, which included what is now the most densely populated part of Man- 
chester, was called Harrytown. 

For a long period there was a dispute between the authorities of Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire as to the boundary line between the two States, and this involved the question as 

141 



142 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



to which State Tyngstown belonged. In 1740 a settlement of the dispute was arrived at, and 
Tyngstown was decided to belong to New Hampshire. On Sept. 3, 1751, in response to a peti- 
tion the governor and council of New Hampshire granted a Town's Charter for atown to be 
called Derryfield, whose limits contained an area of thirty-five square miles. At the Hall 
Tavern, Manchester Centre, the first town's meeting was held on Sept. 9, 1751, and for 
early a century afterwards this continued to be the location of the " seat of government." 




NEW GOVERNMENT BUILDING. 

The little town was progressive ; it had within it natural and acquired resources for the upbuild- 
ing of a large and prosperous manufacturing centre ; and there were not wanting those who 
"staked their all" in laudable efforts to make the utmost use of these facilities in establishing 
around the Amoskeag Falls the nucleus of the present flourishing and prosperous city of Man- 
chester. Foremost among these was the Hon. Samuel Blodgett, who recognized that here 
would arise a manufacturing city like unto that of Manchester in England, and he did his 
utmost to make it so. He was a shrewd, far-sighted man, and enterprising and when he took 
up his residence on the east bank of the Merrimack, near Amoskeag Falls, he was possessed 
of a large fortune. He has left a record on the pages of the history of his State as " the pionec r 
of internal improvements in New Hampshire." He had been a sutler during the Colonial and 
Revolutionary Wars, a judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and a merchant with extensive 
business connections. He set about the construction of the canal which now runs around the 
falls, so that through it might be carried to market the vast quantities of lumber that grew on 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



143 




HANOVEK HOUSE. 



the banks of the Merrimack. This work was begun in May, 1794, and it exhausted not only 
Judge Blodgett's private fortune, but all the money he could raise by lottery. The work, how- 
ever, was completed in May, 1807, but only four months before Judge Blodgett breathed his 
last. Had he lived three years longer he would have had the gratification of seeing the realiza- 
tion of his prophecy that Derryfield would 
become "The Manchester of America," for, on 
May 13, 1 8 10, when the population of the town 
had increased to 615, and when the first cotton 
mill upon the river at Amoskeag had just 
been completed, the town empowered Thomas 
Stickney, John G. Moor and Amos Weston as a 
committee to petition the Legislature to change 
the name of the town from Derryfield to Man- 
chester. This was no doubt done out of com- 
pliment to the memory of Judge Blodgett. In 
the following June session the Legislature 
granted the prayer of the petitioners, and since 
then Manchester has become the leading and 
most prosperous of New Hampshire's cities, and 
has made a reputation for itself, through its 
manufactures, as wide as the world is broad. 

In 1846 Manchester was raised from the rank 
of a town to the dignity of a city. The first 
election took place on August 19, in that year, 
at which the usual officers were elected with the 
exception of mayor, there being four candidates 
and no choice. On the first day of September, 
a second election for mayor was held, resulting in the return of Mr. Hiram Brown, the Whig 
candidate, by 24 majority, in a vote of 1,154. The city government was organized Sept. 8, 1846 
in the Town House, in the presence of a large concourse of people. The population at this time 
was 10,125. The city extends up and down both sides of the Merrimack River, is eighteen miles 
south from Concord, eighteen miles north from Nashua, forty-one west from Portsmouth, 
twenty-six north-west from Lawrence, and fifty-four north-west from Boston. It contains twenty- 
one thousand seven hundred acres, more" than one-quarter of which is improved land. 

The city owes its origin and prosperity to its manufacturing enterprises, and it is to-day 
one of the principal cotton and woollen manufacturing centres in the country. The 
pioneer concern was the Amoskeag Cotton and Woollen Manufacturing Co. In 1810, and 
just before the town changed its name from Derryfield to Manchester, a factory was built on 
the west bank of the river, by Benjamin Prichard, and Ephraim, David and Robert Stevens, who 
were the nucleus of a stock company which held its first meeting January 31, 1810, as " The 
Proprietors of the Amoskeag Cotton and Wool Factory," and was incorporated in June of the 
same year as "The Amoskeag Cotton and Woollen Manufacturing Company." Its mill was 
forty feet square and two stories high. There was then no picker, and the cotton was ginned in 
the neighborhood at four cents a pound. The machinery consisted only of spindles, and the 
yarns, at once the company's dividends, the officers' salaries, and the operatives' wages, were 
either sold as they were spun, or woven for the company by the housewives of the town. After 
several changes in ownership, and some increase of facilities, the mill property and privileges 
came into the possession of the " Amoskeag Manufacturing Company," which was incorporated 
in 1831, and which purchased large tracts of land on both sides of the river, and acquired con- 
trol of the immense water-power which has made Manchester what it is to-day. Soon after, this 
corporation began to erect mills and boarding-houses on the east side of the river, and to 
develop its immense purchase by selling land and water-powers to other corporations, which were 
induced by its liberal policy to organize and locate here. One of these, the Stark, was organized 
in 1838, the Manchester in 1839, the Namaske Mill in 1856, the Langdon in 1860, the Deny 
Mills in 1865, and the Amory in 1879. On October 24, 1838, the Amoskeag Company made its 



144 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



first public sale of lands to men who were builders of the coming city. A few streets had already 
been laid out and graded, and this sale gave increased vigor to the growth of the town, several 
blocks and public buildings being erected soon after. The second sale occurred in October of 
the following year. The land then sold was bounded by Elm, Hanover, Union and Merrimack 
streets, which brought higher prices than the lots offered at the first sale, owing to the rapid 
growth of the town. The new village thus established on the river's bank soon eclipsed the old 




FRANKLIN STREET CHURCH. 



town at the Centre, from which it was then separated by a dense wood, and mutual jealousy and 
ill feeling naturally arose to such a height, that at the annual meeting of 1840, thirty constables 
had to be chosen before the business could be proceeded with. There were two sets of candi- 
dates, representing the interests of the old and new towns, and the latter carried the day, and 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



145 




146 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



thereafter held the reins of government. In 1841, the first town meeting was held in the new 
village, in a hall on Amherst street. During this year the town bought from the Amoskeag 
Company for $2,400 the lot on the corner of Elm and Market streets, where the City Hall now 
stands. On Sept. 26, 1844, the Amoskeag Company had the third land sale, and that sold com- 
prised the tract bounded by Elm, Merrimack, Union and Park streets. Higher prices were 
obtained than at the previous sales. In 1845, on the 3Oth of September, the fourth and last 
extensive land sale of the Amoskeag Company, embracing the tract between Elm, Lowell, 
Union and Orange streets, took place. 

The history of the manufacturing interests of Manchester is almost coeval with that of the 
city itself. These interests are the source of its vitality, having raised it from the level of a mere 
fishing resort to its present position of commercial importance and thriving activity. From a 
small beginning, on the west side of the river, where yarn was spun, the cotton having been 
previously cleansed by hand in the neighboring families, the business has progressed until the 
corporations of the city employ over ten thousand persons, and have a monthly pay-roll of over 
four hundred thousand dollars. The daily product of the mills is about 200 miles of cloth. 
Closely identified with the interests of the city have been the growth and prosperity of the Amos- 
keag Manufacturing Com'pany. .This company was organized in July, 1831, and absorbed sev- 
eral lesser companies that had begun the manufacture of cotton cloth, and, as already shown, 
purchased 1,500 acres of land on the east side of the river, built a new dam, constructed canals, 
erected mills, leased and sold water privileges and mill sites to other corporations, and laid out 
the site of the town, building tenements and boarding houses for their own operatives, and sell- 
ing large tracts of land to new settlers. This liberal policy was an inducement to other manu- 
facturers to locate here, and to-day we have in our midst vast mills engaged in the manufacture 

of cotton and woollen goods, paper, hosiery, loco- ' 
motives and steam fire engines, b uilders' hardware, 
knitting machine needles and button fasteners, bob- 
bins, spools, shuttles, blinds, sashes, brackets, pack- 
ing boxes, chairs, roll skins, iron and wood-working 
machinery, knitting machines, carriages, card, 
clothing, pottery, etc. The city has many exten- 
sive commercial houses that control a large vol- 
ume of trade throughout New England, and these 
are managed with ability and success. 

In this progressive age, the prospects of a city 
for the future are largely due to its transportation 
facilities. Fortunately, Manchester has many advantages of this kind. Railroads come 
to the city from all quarters, and freight and passenger rates are fair and equitable. The various 
railroad companies possessing running powers into Manchester are, Concord Railroad, incorpo- 
rated in 1835 ; Concord and Portsmouth Railroad, incorporated in 1855, extending from Manches- 
ter to Portsmouth, and run by the Concord and Manchester and Lawrence Railroad Companies; 
Manchester and Lawrence Railroad, incorporated in 1847 ; and Manchester and North Weare 
Railroad, from Manchester to North Weare, run by the Concord and Manchester and Lawrence 
Railroad Companies. The main streets of the city are supplied with traveling facilities by the 
Manchester Horse Railroad, incorporated in 1876. 

Manchester is well provided with what are so highly valued by densely populafed cities, 
and often difficult to obtain, namely, "breathing places." In the heart of the city are five 
public commons, gifts from the Amoskeag Company, in addition to the private squares which 
surround its own blocks and those of other corporations. The commons are known as Merri- 
mack, Concord, Tremont, Hanover and Park Squares. The largest of these commons is the 
Merrimack, containing 5^ acres, bounded by Elm, Merrimack, Chestnut and Central streets. It 
is enclosed by a substantial iron fence, and has, on its northern side, a large pond, supplied by a 
culvert leading to it from Hanover Square. Near the centre is located the soldier's monument. 
Concord Square is bounded by Concord, Vine, Amherst and Pine streets, is intersected by 
Chestnut street, and contains 4^ acres. It is surrounded by stone edging, has numerous shade 
trees, and an attractive fountain near its centre. Hanover Square is bounded by Union, 



iiiimiiiii 
iiiiiiiiuiii 
iiiiiiiiiiiii 




SMYTHS BLOCK. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 147 

Amherst, Beech, and Hanover streets, and contains four acres. It has a large pond, supplied by 
the waters of Mile Brook, and is well supplied with shade trees. Tremont Square is situated 
between Pine, Bridge, Union and High streets, and contains 2^ acres. Some of the original 
forest trees yet remain upon it. Park Square, situated between Chestnut, Park, Pine and Cedar 
streets, contains 3^ acres, is very level, without water and partially shaded. 

About half-way from the northern and southern limits is the principal business centre of 
the city, and here, too, the population is the most dense. On the east bank of the Merrimack are 
located the great manufactories, their canals running parallel with the river, and bordered by 
the track of the Concord Railway and a street of 60 feet in width, which belongs to the corpora- 
tions. Forty or fifty rods to the east of this and parallel with it, at an elevation of 90 feet from 
the surface of the river, extends the city's main thoroughfare. This is Elm street, which is two 
and one half miles in length, paved partially with granite blocks, bordered with brick or concrete 
sidewalks, and shaded with trees. It was hud out as a public highway by the selectmen of the 
town on May 5, 1840, and is 100 feet wide, with 12 feet on each side for footwalks, and 10 feet 
in the centre for ornamental trees. The streets are laid out to cross each other at right angles, 
running nearly north and south and east and west. 

The government of the city is vest- 
ed in a mayor, eight aldermen, one 
from each ward, and twenty-four mem- 
bers of the common council, three 
from each ward, all elected biennially 
by the people in November. The 
mayor is chairman of the board of 
mayor and aldermen, and the city 
clerk is the clerk of the board. The 
common council chooses a presiding 
officer from its members, and appoints 
a clerk. Assessors are elected, one 

from each ward, who together consti- 
OPEKA HOUSE BLOCK. , , ~ , 

tute a board. Each ward also elects 

one .nspector of check-lists and one overseer of the poor, and one moderator, one ward clerk, 
and three selectmen, for the transaction of ward business. The city councils in convention 
elect the city clerk, city treasurer, city solicitor, city physician, city messenger, superin- 
tendent of the city farm and keeper of House of Correction, superintendents of highways, and 
several minor officers. The board of mayor and aldermen appoints a collector of taxes, and 
the mayor appoints three health officers. The present mayor is Mr. John Hosley. 

The fires which frequently occurred in the early history of the city satisfied the citizens 
that a system of Water Works was essential, but no practical step was taken to secure it until 
1871, when the city council took the matter in hand, and appointed Colonel J. T. Fanning 
to perfect a system for securing an adequate supply from Massabesic Lake. A substantial 
dam was built across the outlet of the lake at Cohas Brook, a suitable canal and penstock 
constructed, leading the water to. the pumping-station, where it turns the wheels and 
feeds the pumps which drive it through the forcemain, seven thousand feet long and 
twenty inches in diameter, to the reservoir at Manchester Centre. This basin has a 
capacity of sixteen million gallons, is one hundred and fifty-two feet above Elm street 
at the City Hall, one hundred and eighty-eight feet above the level of Canal street at 
the passenger station, and one hundred and thirteen feet above the level of the pumps 
which supply it. The pumps are worked by two turbine wheels, and deliver one thou- 
sand nine hundred and eighty gallons a minute, or two million eight hundred and fifty-one thou- 
sand two hundred gallons in twenty-four hours. 

The cemeteries of the city are kept in excellent condition and are the pride of the 
people. The city owns three cemeteries, Valley, Pine Grove and Amoskeag cemeteries. 
The Valley is 79 7-10, Pine Grove 54 and Amoskeag 434" acres in extent. There are 
several private burial grounds. About two miles from the City Hall, on Milford street, 
near the town of Bedford, is located a Catholic burying-ground called St. Joseph's 




148 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



cemetery. Nearly two-thirds of its twenty acres have been improved. Four acres of 
land, situated west of the intersection of Beech street and Manchester and Lawrence 
railroad, were purchased December 10, 1878, and now constitute the St. Augustine 
cemetery. Mount Calvary cemetery, which belongs to the St. Marie society, contains 
about thirty acres of land, situated in Amoskeag, on the elevated ground lying north of 
the Goffstown road. Several acres have been laid out in lots and avenues. There are 
also the old burying-ground at the Centre ; one at Goffe's Falls ; one in West Man- 
chester ; one near the school-house at Harvey's mills, called the " Merrill cemetery ;" one 
in the eastern part of the City, known as "Stowell's ground;" the "Ray cemetery," on 
the River road, near Amoskeag Falls ; the " Forest cemetery," on the old Weston farm 
in the south-eastern part of the city ; and a small yard in the north part of the city. 
Some of the above are private and most of them but little used. 

In 1839, the town voted to buy a fire-engine and necessary apparatus. To this single engine 
others were added from time to time, until eight or ten engine and hose companies were under 
the city's control, when the first steam fire-engine was bought in 1879. This was also the first 
one made by the Amoskeag Company, whose engines have since gained a world-wide celebrity. 
This invention wrought a revolution in the fire department, and as more steamers were added 
the hand-machines were withdrawn and the membership diminished, until the department 
acquired its present proportions. During the past year, a new engine house was built at West 
Manchester, at a cost of $10,000. A new second-class steam fire-engine was purchased, at an 
expense of $4,000, to replace the old steamer Fire King. A chemical engine was bought for 
$2,250 ; also a new hook-and-ladder truck, at a cost of 1,800, a hose-wagon costing $350, and 
seven horses. A lot of land on Webster street was purchased for a site for a new engine house 

in that quarter, and contracts 
were awarded for the erection 
of a building. The fire alarm 
telegraph system has been en- 
tirely remodeled by putting up 
new copper wire, and nine new 
boxes have been added, the 
whole cost being $6,000. The 
present organization of the de- 
partment includes one hundred 
and eighteen members, as fol- 
lows : I Chief Engineer ; 4 As- 
sistant Engineers ; 3 Steam Fire 
engine Companies, 14 men each; 
I Horse Hose Company, 20 
jnen; 2 Horse Hose Companies, 
12 men each ; I Chemical En- 
gine Company, 4 men ; I Hook-and-Ladder Company, 25 men. In 1872 the fire alarm tele- 
graph was adopted, and it comprises over twenty-seven miles of wire and forty-five alarm boxes 
and seven tower strikers. 

The police service is an efficient and well equipped force. The court sits daily for 
trial of criminal cases. The regular term return day, first Wednesday of each month. 
In addition to the ordinary day and night staffs there is a strong force of "special 
police." 

While Manchester was known as Derryfield, but little attention was given to the sub- 
ject of education, and such school facilities as were provided were maintained by voluntary 
subscriptions. Up to 1781 private dwellings were used for schools, but in that year a public 
school was built, and two years later the selectmen, by making four divisions of the town 
for school purposes, originated the school-district system, which continued eighty-five years. 
The city assumed control of the schools in 1868. The first teacher, as shown by the records, 
was Jonathan Rand. Most of the present twenty-five school buildings were built under the 
district system. The school property now owned by the city is valued at $325,225. 




MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BLOCK. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



149 



The city has an efficient training school for teachers, founded in 1869, and this has 
fitted 107 regular teachers for the public schools. There are evening schools in Spring street 
and Lowell street on the East Side, and one in School street on the West Side, and these 
are rendering excellent service. 

The Roman Catholics of the city had supported private schools in district No. 2 prior 
to 1 86 1, but in that year the district voted them the use of the Park street building, and 
schools were superintended there by Rev. Wm. McDonald, and supported by the Catholics 
until 1863, when the School Board decided to take charge of the schools. The Board, how- 
ever, established others, so that in 1868 there were about half a dozen Catholic schools, 
whose teachers were elected upon nomination by Fr. McDonald, and the teachers wore in 
the school the dress peculiar to sisters of Roman Catholic convents. These schools were 
maintained at the city's expense, and were discontinued in 1868. The Catholics are still 
allowed the use of the building given them in 1861, and most of the teachers in their schools 
are taught by sisters from Mt. St. Mary's Convent. 

The Manchester Athenaeum, founded in 1844, was the origin of the present City Free 
Library. The Athenaeum, in 1846 and 1847, received in gifts from the manufacturing cor- 
porations $2,000, and in 1854 the property it had accumulated was transferred to the City, 




PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDING. 

and the library was made free. February 5, 1856, it was nearly destroyed by fire, but the 
shelves were speedily replenished, and in July, 1871, it was located in a brick building 
erected for its use on Franklin street, at a cost of $30,000, the lot being the gift of the 
Amoskeag Company. During the year 1882, an annex to the library was built, at a cost 
of $9,500. The library contains 27,491 volumes, in every department of literature, besides 
some 2,000 pamphlets, maps, etc., and has been the recipient of liberal donations, the prin- 
cipal of which are those from Dr. Oliver Dean, Hon. Gardner Brewer, and Hon. Moody 
Currier. Books are delivered from 9 to 12 A. M., and 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 P M., Sundays, 
Wednesday evenings, and holidays excepted. A well furnished reading-room in connection 
with the above is kept open to the public during the same hours. 

If there was one thing more than another for which the first settlers of the country were 
noted it was their fervid piety. They tried religion in combination with bullets upon the red 
savages who took fish from the waters at Amoskeag Falls ; and when the Indians had cleared 



150 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



out, the white men who stepped into their places, mixed fishing with preaching among them- 
selves. The Rev. Mr. Seccomb, of Kingston, came here to fish in 1743, ar >d on Sundays deliv- 
ered exhortations to the residents, who in 1758 founded a meeting house. The founders, 
however, had too much of the "Old Adam" in them, for they quarrelled, and their meeting 
house went to decay. The Baptists organized a church in 1812, but, after flourishing a few 
years, this was dissolved, and preaching in the settlement became fitful and spasmodic, until 
Deember 2, 1828, when the Congregationalists organized at Amoskeag Village the first perma- 
nent church. A Presbyterian church had been organized at Manchester Centre a few months 
before, and these two churches amalgamated August 15, 1839, and a building was erected on 
Hanover street. Rev. Cyrus Wallace was ordained as its pastor January 8, 1840, and he was 
the first minister ever settled and ordained in the town. Since then religious efforts have been 
earnest, energetic and ample in the city, and the several handsome church edifices attest the 
7eal, taste and wealth of the various sects of religionists. 

The Franklin Street (Congregational) church has a chime of nine bells in its tower. The 
First Baptist church, on the corner of Concord and Union streets, was erected at a cost of 
$60,000. Merrimack Street Baptist church was founded in 1845, and the present building cost 
$7,000. The Pine Street Freewill Baptist church dates its organization from 1842, and an 
offshoot of this is the Merrimack Street Freewill Baptist church, founded in 1860. The Meth- 
odist Episcopalians were among the first to preach the Gospel in Manchester, and they estab- 
lished their first church September 21, 1829. The St. Paul's Methodist society, now worshipping 
on the corner of Union and Amherst streets, where the church was built in 1883 at a cost of 

$36,000, was organized December 16, 1839. The Grace 
Episcopal church, on the corner of Lowell and Pine 
streets, was organized in July, 1841. The Unitarians 
organized their society in 1841; the Universalists founded 
their church in 1839, and the Christian church, worship- 
ping in Mirror Hall, was founded September 21, 1870. 
The St. James' M. E. Mission church, on Penacook 
street, was organized June 2, 1881. The Second Advent 
Society, existing since 1843, built their church on Pearl 
and Arlington streets in 1881. The City Missionary 
Society began in 18, and in 1850 built the church on 
the corner of Merrimack and Beech streets. The West 
Manchester Union Congregational church was organized 
September 10, 1883, and worship in a building on Main 
street, built by Presbyterians in 1820. The Spiritualist 
Society, founded in 1880, worship in Music Hall. The 
German church of the New Jerusalem, No. 25 Mast 
Road, West Manchester, was organized September 4, 

1 88 1. The Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church, hold- 
ing services in Mission chapel, was organized in June, 

1882. The First German Presbyterians organized July, 
26, 1882, and worship Sunday mornings in Young Men's 
Christian Association room, and Sunday evenings in 

Main Street church, West Manchester. In July, 1844, the Rev. Wm. McDonald came to 
Manchester. There were then no Catholic churches. Under his influence St. Anne's, on the 
corner of Merrimack and Union streets, was built, and he is still the pastor. There are three 
other Catholic churches in the city. These are St. Jcseph's, built in 1869, on the corner of 
Lowell and Pine streets ; St. Augustine (French), corner of Beech and Spruce streets, built 
1874 ; and St. Marie (French), Beaufort street, West Manhester, erected in 1881. 

The City of Manchester is in no sense lacking of benevolent organizations, charitable asso- 
ciations, and trade, literary, military, agricultural, political, social, boating and amusement 
societies, all of which are well supported and in a flourishing condition. 

The City has eleven newspapers. The Daily Mirror and American and The Weekly 
Mirror and Farmer, are published by Mr. John B. Clarke. The Union Democrat (weekly) and 




WEEKS' BLOCK. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 151 



Manchester Union (morning and evening), are issued by Mr. J. C. Moore. American Young 
Folks, consolidated with the Boys and Girls of New Hampshire, is published monthly by the 
American Young Folks Co. Echo Des Canadiens (weekly) is issued by C. L. Fitzpatrick and 
L. Bondreau ; Le Rateau (weekly), P. C. Chatel, proprietor ; Manchester Weekly Budget, 
Kendall & Ladd, publishers; Semi-Weekly Record, Frank H. Challis, proprietor; Notes and 
Queries (monthly magazine), issued by S. C. and L. M. Gould. 

Manchester had its Town House before its City Hall. A hall on Amherst street at first 
served the purposes of the Town House. In 1841, the town bought the site of the present City 
Hall for $2,400, and erected on it at a cost of $17,000, the Town House, and in 1842 the first 
meeting was held in it. On August 12, 1844, the building was destroyed by fire, and on the 
same spot the City Hall was built at a cost of 35,000, and opened in October, 1845. 

Manchester's sons have, throughout her history, been noted for their valor, and they have 
had their full share of fighting in the various wars in which America has had to engage. When 
the Civil War broke out the "boys " were ready for the conflict that should determine the con- 
tinuance or the severance of the Union. Many of the " boys," however, never returned to tell 
their story of their battles by road and field, but their fellow citizens held their memory in rever- 
ence, and practical proof of this is to be found in the handsome monument that stands on Merri- 
mack Square, and which was unveiled September n, 1879. In style, modern Gothic; in 
materials, New Hampshire granite and bronze ; the monument, in its design, is historical and 
military, besides being a useful fountain. The base, which is cruciform, includes a basin, thirty 
feet in width, inclosed in a parapet of ornamental character. In the center of each of the four 
projecting arms of the basin is a pedestal, on a line with the parapet, supporting each a bronze 
statue of heroic size, representing the principal divisions of service in the arrfty and navy ; 
namely, the infantry soldier, the cavalryman, artilleryman and sailor. Alternating in pairs 
between these figures are eight bronze posts for gas-lights, surmounted by our national emblem. 
The column, fifty feet in height, rising from the center of the basin, is supported on a circula- 
pedestal four feet in diameter, and is crowned with a capital richly carved with appropriate 
Gothic ornament ; upon this is placed a colossal statue, in granite, eight feet in height, repre- 
senting Victory with her mural crown, a shield lying at her feet, and holding a wreath and 
recumbent sword emblematic of triumph and peace. This figure, irrespective of the sentiment 
which it admirably conveys, is a fine work of art in its attitude, features and drapery. At the 
base of the column is placed a shield with the arms of the city ; while above are displayed flags 
and weapons, the trophies of war. Surrounding the circular pedestal is a bronze bas-relief, four 
feet in height, representing such incidents of recruiting, arming, parting from friends and march- 
ing, as tell in a simple and effective manner, the meaning of the memorial. Above the bas- 
relief are twelve gargoyles, attached to the cornice of the circular pedestal, and issuing from them 
are jets of water falling into the basin below. The monument, which cost $22,000 in its erec- 
tion, bears the inscription " In honor of the men of Manchester, who gave their services in the 
War which preserved the Union of the States and secured equal rights to all under the Constitu- 
tion, this monument is built by a grateful City." 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



The New Hampshire Trust Company, 

No. 908 Elm Street; Ex-Governor James A. 
Weston, President ; Leonard P. Foster, Secre- 
tary ; Hiram D. Upton, Treasurer. Special at- 
tention is directed in this commercial review to 
the substantial and responsible New Hampshire 
Trust Co., whose offices in Manchester, N. H., are 
eligibly located at No. 908 Elm street. The com- 
pany has likewise offices in the Sears' Building, 
Boston, and western offices in Minneapolis, Minn.; 
Fargo, Dakota ; Topeka, Kansas. This company 
was duly incorporated by special charter of the 
Legislature ot New Hampshire in 1885, with a 
paid up capital of $200,000, and is under the su- 
pervision of the Bank Commissioners of the State. 
The following gentlemen are the officers and 
directors, viz : Ex-Gov. James A. Weston, presi- 
dent ; Hon. Charles H. Bartlett, Foster R. Clem- 
eat, vice-presidents ; Hiram D. Upton, treasurer ; 
Leonard P. Foster, secretary ; Foster R. Clement, 
western manager. Directors : Ex-Gov. James A. 
Weston, Manchester, N. H.,pres. Merchants' Nat. 
Bank, and pres. N. H. Fire Ins. Co. ; Ex-Gov. P. 
C. Cheney, Manchester, N. H., U. S. Senator, 
pres. Peoples' Savings Bank; Hon. James F. 
Briggs, (ex-M. C.), Manchester, N. H., pres. First 
Nat. Bank of Hillsborough ; Hon. Claries H. 
Bartlett, Manchester, N. H., formerly clerk U. S. 
District Court; John C. French, Manchester, N. 
H., sec'y N. H. Fire Ins. Co.; Alonzo Elliott, 
Manchester, N. H., of Elliott & Ryder, bankers ; 
Hon. William P. Chamberlain, Keene, N. H.; 
Seth M. Richards, Newport., N. H. T of Dexter 
Richards & Son ; Hon. Hiram A. Tuttle, Pitts- 
fie-ld, N. H.; S. B. Pearmain, No. 51 State street, 
Boston, Mass., of Pearmain & Brooks, note and 
stock brokers ; Henry Allison, Fitchburg, Mass., 
pres. Safety Fund Nat. Bank ; Hon. Benjamin F. 
Cutter, No. SO Chauncy street, Boston, Mass.; 
Henry K. French, Peterborough, N. H.; Hon. 
John M. Parker, (Soffstown, N. H., pres. Guaranty 
Savings Bank of Manchester; Hon. Benjamin A. 
Kimb.ill, Concord, N. H., managing director Con- 
cord R. R.; Hon. William M. Chase, Concord, N. 
H., formerly pres. First Nat. Bank of Concord ; 
F. D. Hutchins, Lancaster, N. H., cashier Lan- 
caster Nat. Bank ; Hon. John Sise, Portsmouth, 
N. H., pres. Nat. Mechanics' and Traders' Bank ; 
Hon. Charles H. Sawyer, Dover, N. H., of Sawyer 
Woollen Mills ; Hiram D. Upton, Manchester, N. 
H., formerly cashier Monadnock Nat. Bank of 
East Jaffrey, and pres. North-western Trust Co.; 
Foster R. Clement, Minneapolis, Minn., formerly 
manager North-western Trust Co.; Leonard P. 
Foster, Manchester, N. H. ; Geo. S. Dowley. pres. 
Vermont Nat. Bank, Brattleboro ; Geo. C. Fiske, 
pres. Wason Car Co, Springfield, Mass. The 



company makes a specialty of western farm 
mortgages, and likewise acts as fiscal agent for 
individuals, estates, municipalities and corpora- 
tions, and as trustee in corporation mortgages. 
The company likewise collects checks, drafts and 
notes, and all similar items in all sections of the 
United States and Canada. It also buys and 
sells stocks, bonds and notes at market rates, and 
pays interest on time deposits. The company has 
always choice six and seven per cent, loans in all 
sizes on hand ready for immediate delivery, and 
other desirable investments in county, city and 
water company bonds, paying from five to six per 
cent. The following statement "shows the affairs 
of the conipany on. the 30th day of June, 1887. 
The liabilities, including capital of $200,000 and 
surplus and profits of $29,742.82 are $941,610.42. 
The assets are, loans on real estate, $796,091.04; 
loans on personal security, $36,207.47 ; loans on 
collateral security, $54,000 ; county, city, town 
and district bonds, $22,682.57 ; other items, $32,- 
629.34, making a total of $941,610.42. Sums 
from $200 up can be more satisfactorily invested 
in this way and with less trouble and anxiety to 
the owner than any other security now available 
in the American money market. 

R. E. McKean, Fashionable Tailor, Cham- 
bers, Opera House Block, Hanover Street. This 
house is one of the foremost exponents of the tailor- 
ing art in the city ; the garments leaving this re- 
liable and popular establishment being first-class 
in every feature of merit, in cut, fit, finish and 
material ; while the patronage of the house is 
exceedingly large. This flourishing establish- 
ment was first opened in 1881 by the firm of 
Williams & McKean, who conducted it up to 
1884, when Mr. McKean became sole proprietor, 
who has since carried on the business alone with 
uninterrupted success. The premises occupied, 
which are spacious and commodious, are taste- 
fully fitted up and appointed, and an exceed- 
ingly fine assortment of imported and domestic 
fabrics in the newest styles, designs and patterns, 
elegant cassimeres, cloths, plaids, stripes, meltons, 
serges, checks, tweeds, cheviots ana fashionable 
suitings of all kinds is constantly carried on 
hand, while from fifteen to twenty-five expert 
workmen are employed in the shop, and the trade, 
which extends throughout the city and environs, 
is of a most influential aod flourishing character, 
and grows apace. Mr. McKean is a native of this 
state, wi(h fifteen years practical experience 
in the exercise of his trade, and fully merits the 
large measure of popular favor and patronage he 
receives, as he always guarantees complete satis- 
faction. 



152 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



153 



The First National Bank, of Manches- 
ter, N. H. The history of The First National 
Bank of Manchester is closely identified with 
that of the progress of the city. It was incor- 
porated as a state bank. The bank has printed 
its history based upon the records in its keeping, 
and we are told the institution was originally in- 
corporated under the name of the Merrimack 
River Bank, July 14, 1855, Ralph Metcalf being 
Governor of the state. The charter was granted 
for the term of twenty years from July 15, and 
was accepted August 1st by the following board 
of grantees (those whose names are marked with 
an asterisk [*] are now dead) : *\Villiam Whit- 
tle, William G. Means, *John H. Moore, *Peter 
P. Woodbury, Frederick Smyth, William P. 
Newell, *Timothy W. Little, *William Patten, 
*Isaac Torapkins, Isaac W. Smith. *Frederick G. 
Stark, *John Ordway, *Geo. W. Converse, Josiah 
C. Eastman, *\Villiam Shepherd, *D. J. Daniels, 
*C. W. Baldwin, *Jacob G. Cilley, *Alonzo 
Smith, David Cross, *Phineh;s Adams. Francis 
H. Lyfoid, B. F. Martin, *William Richardson, 
Waterman Smith, *Frank A. Brown, Alphens 
Gay, Jr., Joseph B. Clark, John M. Parker, 
*Heury T. Mowatt, *Geo. W. Bailey, William 
Perkins, and their associates. The first meeting 
of the grantees took place at the office of Fred- 
erick Smyth, No. 4 Smyth's Block. Suitable 
by-laws were adopted, the capital stock, 150,000, 
divided into 1.500 shares, and the requisite ma- 
chinery for the successful working of the new 
institution was provided. The following were 
chosen directors: William G. Means, Waterman 
Smith, William P. Newell, John H. Moore, Wil- 
liam Whittle, B. F. Martin, David Cross; presi- 
dent, William G. Means ; cashier, Frederick 
Smyth; clerk, John D. Irving. The Bank of 
Commerce, in Boston, was selected as a place of 
deposit. The discount of notes was authorized 
Nov. 1, 1855, and the first loan was make to the 
agent of the Manchester Mills. By Nov. 7, the 
capital stock had all been subscribed and paid in. 
In 1856, the board of directors was re-elected, 
and in November of that year William Whittle 
resigned and Phinehas Adams was chosen in bis 
place, and there was no further change until 
1859, when Mr. Means resigned as president, and 
was succeeded by B. F. Martin, who served one 
year, and was succeeded by Waterman Smith. 
The various elections of directors have been as 
follows: 1859, B F. Martin, Waterman Smith, 
David Cross, John H. Moore, William P. Newell, 
Phinehas Adams and Joseph B. Clark ; 1860 4, 
Waterman Smith, Aretas Blood, David Cross, 
Natt Head, Joseph B. Clark, William W. Brown 
and R. N. Batchelder ; 1866-7, no change ; 1868-9, 
Waterman Smith, David Cross, Natt Head, W. 
W. Brown, Joseph B. Clark, R. N. Batchelder 
and Thomas Wheat; 1870-4, Waterman Smith, 
David Cross, W. W. Brown, Thomas Wheat, Natt 
Head, Frederick Smyth and Joseph B. Clark; 
1875-6, Waterman Smith, Joseph B. Clark, Fred- 
erick Smyth, Thomas Wheat. David Cross and 
Natt Head; 1877, Waterman Smith, David Cross, 
Frederick Smyth, Joseph B. Clark, F. B. Eaton 
and Thomas Wheat ; 1878-83, Waterman Smith, 
Joseph B. Clark, Frederick Smyth, F. B. Euton, 
David Cross, Thomas Wheat and Natt Head ; 
1884, officers : president, Frederick Smyth ; 
vice-president, David Cross; cashier, Chas. 



F. Morrill ; clerk, John P. Goggin ; direc- 
tors, David Cross, Frederick Smyth, Joseph 
B. Clark, F. B. Eaton, Thomas Wheat, Frank 
Dowst and Joseph F. Kennard ; 1887, Frederick 
Smyth, David Cross, Thomas Wheat, F. B. Eaton, 
Joseph F. Kennard, Frank Dowst and Freeman 
Higgins. On the 22nd of March, 1865, the stock- 
holders voted to reorganize under the United 
States Bank Act as the First National Bank of 
Manchester. This institution has never missed 
paying a dividend to its stockholders semi-annu- 
ally, and has never paid less than six per cent. ; 
indeed more often eight or ten per cent, than oth- 
erwise. On the first of August, 1887, the bank 
was shown to have a capital stock paid in of 
$150,000, a surplus fund of $30.000 and undi- 
vided profits amounting to $1,110. The institu- 
tion transacts a general banking business in 
loans, discounts, deposits, and makes collections 
through correspondents at home and abroad. The 
Bon-ton correspondent is the Commonwealth Na- 
tional Bank, the U. S. depository. The president 
is Mr. Frederick Smyth, who is a native of New 
Hampshire. From '1864 to 1883 he was the 
cashier of the bank, and in the latter year was 
elected president. He is also president and treas- 
urer of the Merrimack River Savings Bank. Mr. 
Charles F. Morrill, who is a native of New Hamp- 
shire and was formerly a clerk in the bank, has 
been cashier since 1883. He is also a trustee of 
the Merrimack River Savings Bank. Few banks 
in the New England States present so favorable 
a showing as does that of which this article 
treats. 

F. M. Oliver & Co., Wholesale Dealers in 
Boots and Shoes, Rubbers and Shoe Findings, No. 
89 Hanover Street. A prominent and reliable 
house engaged exclusively in the wholesale trade 
in boots, shoes, rubbers and shoe findings is that 
of Messrs. F. M. Oliver & Co., of No. 89 Hanover 
street. This enterprising and flourishing busi- 
ness house was originally established in April, 
1886, by Messrs. J. P. Thomas & Co. In Febru- 
ary, 1887, Messrs. F. M. Oliver & Co. succeeded 
to the business, and by able management together 
with energy and honorable business methods have 
brought the business to its present state of pros- 
perity, Mr. Oliver bringing to bear the experi- 
ence of some years ; for twenty years he was 
traveling talesman in this line, making him 
eminently fitted for this business, and a con- 
stantly increasing business is being developed 
throughout the New England States. The house 
is represented by three traveling salesman. This 
is the only house of its kind in theity of Man- 
chester. The premises occupied by the firm are 
located at No. 89 Hanover slreet, nearly opposite 
the post-office, and consist of first floor and base- 
ment 25x80 feet. They have on hand and carry a 
full line of boots, shoes, rubbers, slippers and 
shoe findings, of desirable manufacturers. The 
house receive the goods direct from well-known 
manufacturers, and are in a position to make 
advantageous offers to the retail houses throughout 
the New England States, at as low prices as is 
consistent for good articles of footwear. Mr. 
F. M. Oliver is a native of this state and is a 
gentleman possessing excellent business qualities, 
and fully merits the success attending the results 
of this business enterprise. 



154 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Amoskeag Manufacturing Company, 

Manufacturers of Tickings, Denims, Canton Flan- 
nels, Grain Bags, Ginghams, Shirtings, Stripes, 
Dress Goods, etc. Manchester can boast of having 
the largest cotton mills in the country, and these 
belong to the Amoskeag Manufacturing Co. This 
company was formed in 1831 by five Manchester 
men, who bought 1,500 acres of land. They sold 
some, and then built dams, canals, tenement 
houses for help, cotton mill, etc., and during the 
Civil War the machine shop of the mill was used 
for making arms. The mills have kept increasing 
in number to meet the enlarged trade of the com- 
pany, and these are now fourteen in number, and 
range from four to six stories high. They have a 
frontage of 1,500 feet and a depth of 300 feet, 
and occupy twenty acres of land. Here, too, is 
one of the largest mill chimneys in the country. 
It has a base of 45 feet and a height of 265 feet. 
The mills contain 21l ,000 spindles and 7,000 
looms, and the driving force for these is furnished 
by 21 turbine wheels, aggregating 6,000 horse 
power. An auxiliary force is contributed by four 
steam engines of 4,500 hoise power. The boiler 
house has a capacity for 60 boilers and contains 
48 boilers. There are 4,000 females and 3,000 
males employed, and the products of the 
establishment consist of tickings, denims, Can- 
ton flannels, grain bags, ginghams, shirtings, 
stripes, dress goods, and a variety of fancy cotton 
fabrics. Weekly, 1,500,000 yards of cloth, weigh- 
ing 450,000 pounds are produced, and 600,000 
pounds of cotton are consumed. In a year 17,500 
tons of coal, 16,000 gallons of oil, 250 tons of 
starch and $225,000 worth of drugs are consumed. 
The goods produced here have no superiors in 
the market, and they are supplied to dealers 
throughout the country by the company's selling 
agents, Messrs. J. L. Bremer & Co., of Boston and 
New York. The treasurer is Mr. T. Jefferson 
Coolidge, whose office is at Boston. The agent at 
the mills is Mr. H. F. Straw, who has been 
employed in the mills since 1872. He is a son of 
Ex-Gov. Straw, who was agent for the mills for 
many years. The present agent assumed control 
of the mills four years ago as successor to Mr. 
Livermore. Mr. Chas. H. Manning is the general 
superintendent; Mr. Harry E. Parker, manufac- 
turing superintendent; Mr. Charles L. Richard- 
son, paymaster ; Mr. Edwin H. Hobbs, engineer. 

John E. Towle & Co., Packers and 
Wholesale Dealers in Pork, Lard, Dressed Hogs, 
Sausages, Hams, etc., Drake and Carpenter's 
Block, Granite Street. It is interesting to con- 
template the magnitude which the provision 
trade has attained in the United States when 
compared to the limit to which it was circum- 
scribed a quarter of a century ago. Probably no 
business has had a more rapid growth, and this 
remarkable increase must be largely ascribed to 
the enterprise and industry of those connected 
with the trade who have made its extension a 
life study. One of the most widely known and 
representative houses in this line in Manchester 
is that of Messrs. John E. Towle & Co., pork 
packers, lard refiners, and wholesale dealers in 
dressed hogs, sausages, tripe, hams, pigs' feet, 
dried beef, etc., Drake and Carpenter's Block, 
Granite street. This business was originally 
established by Messrs. Clough & Towle in 1875, 



and on the dissolution of the partnership in 1882, 
the business passed into the hands of Mr. John 
E. Towle, who has since conducted the enterprise 
under the style of John E. Towle & Co. The 
salesroom has an area of 25x75 feet, sud, in addi- 
tion to this, the proprietor occupies the basunent 
which is 75x75 feet in measurement. The prem- 
ises are fully equipped with all the latest im- 
proved appliances and apparatus known to Ihe 
trade. Mr. Towle also does some slaughtering 
of country fed hogs, and the curing and packing 
departments are under his close personal super- 
vision. The goods cf this bouse are unsurpassed 
by those of any other similar establishment, and 
are everywhere recognized and appreciattd by 
the trade as standard productions. Five hands 
are employed, a large stock is carried, the busi- 
ness is entirely wholesale, and the house ranks Al 
in the market. 



George W. Rief, Manufacturer of Stair 
Rails, Brackets, Mantel Shelves and Piazza Bal- 
usters, Scroll Sawing, etc., Forsaith's Building, 
Corner Franklin and Auburn Streets. The busi- 
ness controlled by Mr. Geo. W. Rief was origi- 
nally founded some fifteen years ago by W. G. 
Westover. In June, 1884, Mr. K. W. Morse 
became the proprietor, and in July 7, 1884, the 
latter was succeeded, by Mr. Rief, who was born 
in Canada thirty-two years ago. He has had ten 
years experience in his line of trade, and his 
workshop comprises one floor of Forsaith's Build- 
ing, on the corner of Franklin and Auburn streets. 
This is fully equipped with all necessary machin- 
ery and tools, and the machinery is operated by 
steam power. Constant employment is furnished 
to a force of experienced workmen in the several 
departments of sawing, planing, turning and 
and mouldings. The operations of the house 
consist of the manufacture of brackets, stair rails, 
posts, etc., mantel shelves and piazza balusters, 
and in scroll sawing, turning and general job 
work. In all the products of the house the 
determination of the firm is to produce goods that 
shall rank superior in the trade, both in quality 
of material and careful workmanship. 



Baril & Grenier, Druggists, No. 1104 Elm 
Street. Although the business of this house was 
founded not longer ago than December, 1886, a 
large, first-class patronage has already been ac- 
quired. The copartners, Messrs. J. B. Baril 
and A. G. Grenier are well known to 
the public. Mr. Baril, who was born 
in Canada, has resided in the United States 
for the past twenty years, the greater portion of 
the time in this cily. He has had years of expe- 
rience as a druggist and chemist, and is a pharma- 
cist of acknowledged skill and ability. Mr. 
Grenier is also a native of Canada and has lived 
in Manchester for the past fourteen years. He 
established himself in the grocery business in 
1881. The store occupied is handsomely fitted 
up, is admirable in all its appointments, and con- 
tains a large, superior assortment of drugs and 
chemicals, all fresh and of undoubted purity, also 
reliable proprietary remedies, toilet and fancy 
goods, surgical appliances, perfumery, physicians' 
supplies, etc. Particular attention is devoted to 
the compounding of prescriptions, which are pre- 
pared with the finest drugs. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



155 



Amoskeag National Bank, No. 867 

Elm iStreet. This- is not only one of the oldest 
and most popular banks in the city and state, but 
also one of the best managed. It was staited in 
1852 as a state bank under the style of The Amos- 
keag Bank. In 18G4 it was reorganized, and was 
one of the first banks to be chartered under the 
National Bank Act. Its career has been one of 
marked success, and from first to last has had the 
fullest confidence of the public accorded it. The 
bank has a capital of $'200.000, and the surplus 
of $60,000, which in itself is sufficient evidence of 
the care and prudence exercised in the manage- 
ment of the affairs of the institution. The presi- 
dent, ex-Gov. Moody Currier, has held office since 
1864. He is a native of New Hampshire, and is 
also president and trustee of the Amoskeag Sav- 
ings Bank and trustee of the People's Savings 
Bank. The cashier is Mr. George B Chandler, 
who has been connected with the bank since 1864. 
He is also treasurer and 'trustee of the People's 
Savings Bank. The directors are Messrs. Moody 
Currier, Edson Hill, Henry Chandler, B. C. Dean, 
D. B. Varney, John B. Varick, Lucien B. Clough, 
R. P. Silver and George W. Riddle. The bank 
has a fine suite of offices at No. 867 Elm street, 
and a general banking business, including the re- 
ceiving of deposits, the discounting of approved 
commercial paper, the collection of drafts, and 
the dealing in first-clasa securities, is transacted. 
Under its present wise and conservative manage- 
ment, this bank is doing a large and safe busi- 
ness, all of its movements being marked by pru- 
dence, caution and honorable business methods. 
while it is generally recognized as H solid institu- 
tion, reflecting credit alike upon its officers and 
the community where its influence is so credita 
bly felt. 

Merrill Brothers, Flour, Grain, Shorts, 
etc., No. 758 Elm Street. Among the young, 
rising and energetic business houses in the city of 
Manchester, is the flour, grain and feed establish- 
ment of Messrs. Merrill Bros., and may be 
noted as one that is rapidly taking a prominent 
position. The individual members of the firm 
are B. F. and C. R. Merrill, both natives of Nor- 
way, Maine. The former has been a resident of 
this city since 1875 and the latter came here four 
years later. They established this enterprise in 
1883 at the present address. The premises occu- 
pied comprise a commodious store and basement, 
each 25x90 feet in dimensions, and are thoroughly 
equipped with all necessary conveniencies. The 
stock comprises the most select brands of spring 
and winter wheat flour from the most celebrated 
new process mills in the United States; also fine 
and coarse grains and seeds, mill-feed, such as 
shorts, bran, chopped corn and oats, buckwheat 
flour, graham flour, oat and white and yellow, 
bolted and unbolted cornmeal, etc. They give 
particular attention to baled hay and straw, 
selecting none but the sweetest, purest and 
brightest to be found in the market. They have 
a very large trade which is both wholesale and 
retail, extending throughout the city and sur- 
rounding country. They sell for some of the 
most important mills in the country. Mr. C. R. 
Merrill is an active and prominent member of the 
Order of I. O. O. F.; also in the councils of the 
Order of Red Men. 



G. W. Adams, Groceries. Meats and Provi- 
sions, Brown's Block, Hanover Street. This busi- 
ness was founded in the fall of 1847 under the 
firm name of Aaron Felton & Co., afterwards in 
1850 it became Adams & Co., then was changed 
to Adams & Andrews, from that title to Adams 
& Son, who were succeeded by Adams & Lamprey, 
and in 1883 Mr. G. W. Adams became sole pro- 
prietor and has conducted it with great success 
ever since. The store utilized is spacious and 
commodious, centrally located and fitted up in a 
very attractive and appropriate manner, and con- 
tains a full and carefully selected assortment of 
fancy and staple groceries, meats and provisions, 
such as fresh, new crop teas from Japan and 
China, fragrant coffees from Java, Mocha and South 
America, hermetically sealed goods in glass and 
tin from the most celebrated establishments in 
Europe and America, spic s, condiments, table 
delicacies, the most select brands of flour, pure 
and fresh creamery butter, eggs, cheese, and other 
farm and dairy products direct from the pro- 
ducers, also fresh and salt meats, provisions, etc. 
The premises contain all the latest ?nd best 
improved refrigerators to supply cold storage for 
the preservation of perishable articles, such as 
fresh meats, poultry, vegetables, etc., for an indefi- 
nite length of time. The goods of this concern 
are highly esteemed throughout the city and 
vicinity for their freshness, absolute purity and 
low prices, while the services of five courteous 
and polite assistants are in constant demand. 
This house is one of if not the oldest in its line 
in this city. Mr. Adams is a native of Sutton, 
N. H., but has been a resident here since 1847. 



Edward H. Currier, Apothecary, Elm 
Street, Corner Menimack. Prominent among the 
leading members of the pharmaceutical profession 
in Manchester, is Dr. Edward H. Currier, who 
stands in the forefront in his line in this city, 
sustaining a deservedly high reputation for relia- 
bility and skill in preparing physicians' prescrip- 
tions and in all branches, being a capable and 
experienced M. D., as well as an expert druggist. 
Dr. Currier, who is a native of Hopkinton, N. H., 
but has lived in this city since early boyhood, is 
a graduate of Dartmouth Medical College. He 
assumed control of this well and favorably known 
drug store in 1871, which has been in prosperous 
existence as such for upward of forty years. The 
store, which is 25x70 feet in dimensions, is hand- 
somely fitted up and attractively appointed, two 
brilliant electric lights, art-tiled flooring, and 
splendid show cases rendering a very fine display, 
and a large and carefully selected stock is al- 
ways carried, including besides a complete line of 
fresh and pure medicines, drugs and chemicals, 
standard proprietary remedies, druggists' sundries 
and pharmaceutical specialties in great variely, 
acids, extracts, medical liquors, spirits and alcohol ; 
also mineral waters and flavors, toilet articles, 
scented soaps, perfumery, sponges, small wares, 
stationery and cigars, while two efficient regis- 
tered pharmacist assistants are employed. Dr. 
Currier is a prominent member and one of the 
commissioners of the State Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, and the New Hampshire Medical Society, 
while he also enjoys the respect and confidence of 
his associate members in the I. O. O. F. and 
Masonic Order. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



New Hampshire Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Manchester. The New Hampshire Fire 
Insurance Co., of Manchester, was incorporated 
under the laws of New Hampshire in 1870, and 
immediately entered upon a career of usefulness 
which has been continued until to-day with 
increasing prosperity ; indeed, this is the leading 
stock insurance of the state, and has the highest 
ratio of assets to liabilities. The chief executive 
officers are : president, J. A. Weston, ex-governor 
of the state, ex-Mayor of Manchester, president 
of the Merchants' National Bank, treasurer of the 
Guaranty Savings Bank, and civil engineer; Hon. 
S. N. Bell, ex-member of Congress; treasurer, 
Geo. B. Chandler, secretary of the Amoskeag 
National Bank and ex-member of the State Sen- 
ate; secretary, John C. French; assistant secre- 




t:iry, W. H. Berry. With the exception of the 
two last named, who have been in office for five 
years, these gentlemen have held their positions 
since the organization of the company. These 
officers are assisted by a board of directors, con- 
sisting of the following gentlemen, who are all 
residents in New Hampshire: James A. Weston, 
Samuel N. Bell, Moody Currier, Geo. B. Chandler, 
Alfred Quimby, Bush rod W. Hill, W. H. Berry, 
N. P. Hunt, Benj. C. Dean, N. W. Cumner, Geo. W. 



Riddle, John C. French, Dexter Richards, John 
M. Hopkins, John D. Chandler, W. D. Cadwell, 
Frank A. McKean, H. K. French, F. A. Faulkner, 

A. G. Folsom, W. D. Knapp, Frank Jones, John 

B. Varick and Andrew Bunton. The affairs of 
the company are most zealously guarded by its 
officers, who have made a record which has gained 
the confidence of all with whom they have had 
business relations. Conservatism rather than 
haste, carefulness rather than inpulsiveness. final 
profit rather than present volume of business, 
have been the leading mottoes of this company's 
insurance creed. Small risks are well scattered, 
the securities are undoubted, the directors are 
men of acknowledged ability and integrity, and 
the company, who enjoy a prosperous business, 
offer by policies the very best indemnity against 
loss or damage by fire. The financial status of 
the company on July 1, 1887, cash capital, $500,- 
000; reserve for re-insurance, $401,940; reserve 
for unpaid losses and other liabilities, $74,920.94 ; 
net surplus, $248,754.09; total assets, $1,225, 615.- 
03. Since 1870 the company has increased the 
capital from $100,000 to $500,000 and every honest 
claim has been met when due. The company is 
as solid as the granite hills and offers insurance 
at the lowest rates. It is represented by agents 
in all the leading cities in the east, north and 
west. 



Amory Manufacturing Company. fc 

The Amory Manufacturing Co.'s concern is one 
of the most distinguished, and its products, which 
have a standard value in the market, are to be 
found on sale in all the principal cities of the 
Union. Phis company was incorporated in 1879 
under the laws of New Hampshire, with a capital 
of $900,000 in 900 shares. The premises occupied 
for manufacturing purposes consist of a very 
extensive mill, having a frontage of 580 feet and 
a depth of 90 feet, containing four floors and 
basement. The mill is admirably equipped with 
all the latest improved machinery and appliances. 
The machinery, which includes 57,000 spindles 
and 1,520 looms, is driven by four turbine water 
wheels, a Corliss engine of 450 horse power and 
five boilers of 700 hoise power in all. The man- 
ufactures of the concern consist of fine and 
medium sheetings, shirtings and jeans, which are 
unrivalled for quality and general excellence. In 
the production of these goods 800 operatives are 
employed, and the average pay roll per month is 
$2i ,000. Weekly 85,000 pounds of cotton are 
used, and yearly 10,000 tons of coal, 5,000 gallons 
of oil, and 100,000 pounds of starch are used. Of 
cloth, 250,000 yards, weighing 75,000 pounds are 
produced weekly. The treasurer of this pros- 
perous company is Mr. C. W. Amory, who is a 
native of Massachusetts, and whose office is 
located at No. 50 State street, Boston. Since 
July, 1887, Mr. Wm. E. Winsor has been the 
agent in charge. He has had twenty-seven years 
experience in the business, and was formerly con- 
nected with the Franklin Manufacturing Co., of 
Rhode Island; of the Rockfort Mills, Rookfort, 
Mass, etc. Mr. Sebastian Christophe is the pay- 
master. The selling agents are Messrs. John L. 
Bremer & Co., Boston and New York. All these 
gentlemen, except Mr. Christophe, hold similar 
positions in connection with the mills of the 
Langdon Manufacturing Co., of this city. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



157 



Amoskeag Savings Bank, No. 867 Elm 

Street. This deservedly popular and excellent 
institution was incorporated in 1852, and its 
history from the start has been a record of steady 
progress and prosperity. A flourishing business 
is transacted, the same giving evidence of con- 
stant and substantial increase annually, and the 
connections of the bank are of the most desirable 
character. There is a guaranty fund of $190,000, 
the deposits amount to $3,600,000 and the assets 
to over $4,000,000. The bank has a fine suite of 
offices, and these are handsomely fitted up and 
have an inviting appearance. Since 1868 Mr. 
Moody Currier has filled the office of president. 
He has also been president of the Amoskeag Na- 
tional Bank since 1863, and is a trustee of the 
Peoples' Savings Bank. Since 1883 the office of 
treasurer has been ably filled by Mr. Henry 
Chandler, who is also a director of the Amoskeag 
National Bank. Mr. J. E. Currier has been the 
teller for nine years. The trustees are, Messrs. 
Moody Currier, L. B. Clough,H. C. Merrill, Otis 
Barton, Henry Chandler, George W. Kiddle, J. E. 
Bennett and L. French. These gentlemen are all 
resident in the city, widely known as men of 
sound judgment and excellent buisnesa ability. 

P. C. Cheney Company, Manufacturers 
of Paper and Dealers in Paper, Paper Stock and 
Wiping Waste; Office, Amoskeag Mills; P. C. 
Cheney, Treasurer. The paper industry is one of 
the earliest, and at the present time, one of the 
most prosperous of American manufactures, its 
history embodying many features incident to 
the rise and development of other industrial pur- 
suits. During the last forty years, through the 
energy and ability of our manufacturers, Ameri- 
can paper has driven the foreign article almost 
entirely away, and now occupies the post of 
honor. A leading representative of a promi- 
nent branch of this trade is the P. C. Cheney 
Co., of this city, whose manufactories are lo- 
cated as follows : Paper and Waste Mills, Man- 
chester, N. H. ; Uncanoonook Pulp Mills, Goffs- 
town Centre, N. H. ; Great Bay Pulp Mills, East 
Tilton, N. H. ; Cherry Valley Mills, Washington, 
N. H. The firm of P. C Cheney Co. originally con- 
sisted of P. C. Cheney, Ira Cross and E. M. Tubbs. 
This firm first manufactured paper at Goffstown 
Centre. Their establishment was burned out in 
1871, and they resumed business at the Amoskeag 
Paper and Waste Mills, Manchester, and here 
were located the headquarters of the firm. The 
burned mill at Goffstown Centre was restored, 
and the manufacture of pulp was commenced at 
this mill. The Monaduock Pulp Mills at Peter- 
borough, operating under a franchise granted the 
Peterborough Co. in 1835, were along with the 
charter, purchased by P. C. Cheney & Co., in 
1878, and then came into existence the P. C. 
Cheney Co. of to-day, with a capital of $100,000, 
P. C. Cheney owning almost the entire stock. 
The mills at Goffstown Centre and Peterborough 
manufactured pulp exclusively for the paper 
mills at Manchester, where a specialty was made 
of card middles and white and buff card and 
glazed papers in rolls for card and glazed paper 
manufacturers. The pulp mills at Petersborough 
having been recently sold, the Goffstowu Mill con- 
tinuing. The mills have a capacity for producing 
eight tons of paper per day. Two hundred hands, 



all told, are employed, and the pay roll amounts 
to about $5,000 per month. Five steam engines 
and seven boilers, representing in all 500 horse 
power, and four water wheels, constitute the 
driving force, and the buildings, two and three 
stories high, cover an area of fully two acres. 
The company also deal in paper and paper stock, 
and in wiping waste for railroads and machinists' 
use. The business extends to all parts of the 
country. The treasurer, Mr. P. C. Cheney, is too 
well known to need comment. He has served in 
the highest public offices in the city and state. 
He has filled the office of Mayor of the City, Gov- 
ernor of the State, and was United States Senator 
during the 2nd session of the 49th Congress. He 
is at the present time president of the Peoples' 
Savings Bank, and is a trustee of the Guaranty 
Trust Co. Mr. W. S. Holt is the agent, and 
Mr. P. C. Laselle is the clerk of the company. 

S. A. Felton & Son, Manufacturers of 
Brushes, Corner of Franklin and Auburn Streets. 
One of the most noted brush manufacturing 
concerns in the city and state is that of Messrs. 
S. A. Felton & Son. This business dates its be- 
ginning back to 1852, when it was founded by 
Mr. H. G. Weil son. Later the style of the con- 
cern was changed to Eoby Brush Works ; in 1877 
to S. A. Felton & Co., and in 1884 toS. A. Fel- 
ton & Son. Mr. S. A. Felton was born in Marl- 
borough, Mass., and his son, Mr. D. D. Felton, in 
Minnesota, and both have resided in Manchester 
since 1867. Their factory is 60x70 feet in di- 
mensions, and it is equipped with the most 
modern tools and machinery, the latter being 
operated by steam power. The concern occupies 
a front rank in this line of industry, possesses 
the best appliances for the successful carrying on 
of the business, and employs a number of skilled 
and experienced operatives in Ihe manufacture of 
shoe manufacturers', cotton mills, woollen mills, 
loom and machinists', paint, horse, dandruff, shoe, 
stove, scrub and harness brushes. The business 
extends throughout the New England States and 
is yearly growing in volume, and the firm have 
built up an enviable reputation for the superiority 
of their manufactures, and their fair and equita- 
ble business policy. 

Partridge Brothers, Flour, Feed and 
Grain, Baled Hay and Straw, No. 1258 Elm 
Street.- Messrs Partridge Bros, (successors to W. 
A. H. Colby) dealers in flour mill-feed, oats, hay, 
etc., has maintained an enduring hold on public 
favor for thirty odd years, and fully sustains 
to-day its old-time reputation for reliable goods 
and straightforward dealing. This stable and re- 
liable house was founded in 1857 or thereabout, 
and came into the control of W. A. H. Colby in 
1884, who conducted it up to 1886, when he was 
succeeded by the pushing and popular firm whose 
name heads this sketch. They occupy for busi- 
ness purposes a 30x100 foot frame structure, with 
neat office, and carry constantly on hand a heavy 
and first-class stock, comprising the best brands 
of family flour, mill-feed of all kinds, meal, bran, 
corn, oats, barley, rye, straw and hay, four in 
help being employed, while two delivery wagons 
are in regular service supplying customers all 
over the city and suburbs. Messrs. A. L. and 
C. S. Partridge are natives of Vermont. 



158 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Blaisdell & Perkins, Groceries, Meats 
etc., No. 1217 Elm Street. Among the foremost 
concerns in Manchester may be named the well 
ordered and reliable establishment of Blaisdell & 
Perkins, dealers in fine teas, groceries, meats and 
provisions, fruits and country produce, and which 
since its inception some five years ago, has main- 
tained a record of steady progress. This popular 
and prosperous store was established about 1883, 
by B. F. Blaisdell, \vho admitted into partnership 
his son-in-law. E W. Perkins, thus constituting 
the pushing and popular firm whose name heads 
this sketch. The store and basement, which are 
20x7d feet in dimensions, are neatly fitted up and 
well kept; also a store house 30x70 feet, corner of 
Myrtle and Chestnut streets, and a heavy and 
first-class stock is constantly carried, comprising 
pure teas, coffees and spices, condiments, delica- 
cies, canned goods, fruits and vegetables, fresh and 
salt meats of all kinds, prime bacon, hams and 
lard, choice dairy butter, cheese, provisions, 
flour, oatmeal, sugar, beans, rice, peas, molasses, 
syrups, vinegar, oils, soda, soap, starch, household 
specialties, and staple and fancy groceries of every 
variety, etc., and in connection is a meat market 
for the supply of fresh beef, mutton, pork, etc., 
which enjoys a large trade. Mr. Blaisdell is a 
native of Farmingtou ; established the well known 
Massachusetts Market in Boston, corner of Endi- 
cott and Cross streets, in 1847, conducting it for a 
period of eleven years ; removed in 1858 to 
Farmington and conducted a grocery and provis- 
ion business, there about fifteen years; removed 
to Wolf boro, in business there about four years, 
and came to Manchester and opened a grocery 
and provision store in 1877. In 1880 he bought 
out Henry Morse, successor to Morse & Bartlett, 
and took his son-in-law, Mr. E. W. Perkins, into 
partnership. Since 1884 Mr. B. has retired from 
the active interest, leaving it to the management 
of Mr. Perkins, who is a native of York, Maine, 
and a graduate of the New Hampton College, New 
Hampshire. He taught school in York and Kit- 
tery, Me., about four years, then removing to 
Manchester and entering into partnership with 
Mr. B. and has, by able management, increased 
the business to its present prosperous condition. 
Three competent and polite assistants attend to 
the wants of purchasers, while two delivery 
wagons are in steady service. 

Langdon Manufacturing Company, 

Fine Shirtings and Sheetings, Canal Street. 
The extensive and flourishing concern, whose 
name is made the caption of this review, repre- 
sents one of the greatest industries of Manchester, 
and, indeed, one of the most extensive of the Uni- 
ted States. The Langdon Manufacturing Co. was 
incorporated in 1859, with a capital of $200,000, 
and this has since been increased to $500,000, in 
500 shares. Two mills are operated. One of 
these is a five-story building, 72x220 feet in di- 
mensions, and the other a four-story building, 
measuring 67x284 feet. In. addition to these 
there are about a dozen smaller buildings used 
for various purposes in connection with the busi- 
ness. The machinery includes 37,504 spindles 
and 820 looms, and the driving power is fur- 
nished by a 250 horse power Corliss steam en- 
gine, three 100 horse poVer steam boilers and 
two water wheels. Permanent employment is 



afforded to 380 females and 120 males, and 120,- 
000 yards of cloth, weighing 37,000 pounds, are 
produced weekly, in the manufacture of whiih 
42,000 pounds of cotton week, and 1,200 tons of 
coal, 3,000 gallons of oil, and 79,000 pounds of 
starch are consumt d yearly. The pay roll amounts 
to about $12.000 monthly. The president is Mr. 
John L. Bremer, of Boston, and the treasurer is 
Mr. C. W. Amory. He is also the treasurer of 
the Amory Manufacturing Co., of this city, and 
his office is at No. 50 State street, Boston. The 
agent at the mills is Mr. William E. Winsor, 
who is a native of Rhode Island, and he is also 
the agent of the Amory Manufacturing Co. He 
has held his present position since July, 1887, 
and for 27 years was connected with the Franklin 
Manufacturing Co., the Hock fort Mills and other 
cotton concerns in Massachusetts. Since 1866 
Mr. Walter S. Kelley, who is a native of Rhode 
Island, has been the pay master. The company 
manufacture principally fine shirtings and sheet- 
ings, which are unexcelled by anything in the 
market, foreign or domestic, and have a standard 
reputation in the trade. The selling agents are 
Messrs. John L. Bremer & Co., Boston and New 
York. 



J. A. V. Smith, Manufacturer of Smith's 
Patent Steel Speeder Flier, with Centrifugal or 
Spring Pressure, Corner of Brook and Canal 
Streets. In examining into the industries which ' 
centre in Manchester, we are impressed with the 
necessity of taking cognizance of many enter- 
prises contingent upon leading the manufactures 
that are the foundation of the city's prosperity 
and growth. Prominent in this direction the 
concern of Mr. J. A. V. Smith is entitled to more 
than passing mention. This enterprise was 
founded in 1868, and has been at its present 
location, on the corner of Canal aud Brook 
streets, for the past year by the present proprie- 
tor, who has established a reputation and a trade 
unexcelled by those of any other manufacturer in 
his line in the city or in the New England stntes. 
He is the patentee and manufacturer of Smith's 
Patent Steel Speeder Flier, with Centrifugal or 
Spring Pressure, as sole proprietor and manufac- 
turer of improvements, patented April 20, 1866, 
Oct. 18, 1886, Jan. 11, and Jan. 18, 1887; he is 
able to offer tp manufacturers a flier which has no 
equal. Fly frames aud speeder fliers are repaired, 
and pre c sers and springs furnished to order 
promptly and satisfactorily. A specialty is made 
of all kinds of flier work. The premises occupied 
consist of one floor 60x120 fret in dimensions, 
and this is amply furnished with first-class mod- 
ern tools and machinery, which is operated by 
steam power. Constant employment is fnrni.shcd 
to thirty to forty skilled and experienced hands, 
whose operations are conducted under the close 
personal supervision of Mr. Smith, who is an ex- 
pert in the business, and who has been connected 
with the trade since 1848. He controls a large 
business and his trade relations extend to all 
parts of the Union. His establishment is finely 
fitted up, and is provided with electric lights, etc. 
Prompt attention is given to all communications, 
and the business is conducted upon the strict 
lines of integrity and liberality. Mr. Smith was 
born 64 years ago in New Boston, N. H., and per- 
sonally is very popular in business circles. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



159 



Peoples' Fire Insurance Company, of 

Manchester, No. 839 Elm Street (Merchants Ex- 
change). A company which has quickly taken a 
leading position among the principal insurance 
corporations of the country is the Peoples' Fire 
Insurance Co., of Manchester. The company was 
chartered in August, 1885. and the following dis- 
interested declaration is sufficienntly explanatory 
of the financial status of the corporation and of 
the progress made in sixteen months : " Insurance 
Commissioner's Office, Concord, N. H., Jan. 12, 
1887. To whom this may concern, it may certify, 
That I have personally verified the Annual State- 
ment of the Peoples' Fire Insurance Co., of Man- 
chester, this state, rendered Dec. 31st, 1886, at 
the home office, examining and comparing the 
securities, assets and liabilities as set forth in said 
statement, item by item, with the records of the 
company, and find as follows: total amount of 
assets, $405,860.38; total amount of liabilities, 
except capital, $136,521.97; capital stock paid up 
in cash, $250,000.00 ; surplus above capital and 
all liabilities, $19,338.41. And I further certify 
that said company has fully complied with the 
laws of this state, and that statute provision is 
made in this state for the admission of similar 
companies of other states into this state. Oliver 
Pillsbury, Insurance Commissioner of New Hamp- 
shire." The company is doing a brisk and satis- 
factory business throughout the New England 
States, the north-west, west as far as California 
and south to Kentucky and Maryland, and agen- 
cies are established in all the principal cities. 
The company have a fine suite of offices and five 
clerks are employed, and insurance is written 
upon dwellings, furniture, barns, farm property, 
stores, factories, etc., at the lowest rates, not only 
against fire, but against damage by lightning. 
Policies are issued at low rates and all claims are 
promptly and honorably met. The officers are 
well-known business men, in whose hands the 
company's affairs are certain to be prudently 
managed. The president is Dr. Joseph C. Moore, 
physician, editor of the Manchester Union, direc- 
tor ot the Union Banking Co., and director of the 
Union Mortgage & Trust Co. The vice-president 
is Mr. G. W. Week, a prominent and well-known 
citizen. The treasurer is Mr. C. F. Morrill, who 
is cashier of the First National Bank, a director 
of the Union Banking Co. and a director of the 
Union Mortgage & Trust Co. The secretary is 
Mr. S. B. Stearns, who is also a director of the 
Union Banking Co. The executive committee 
consists of Messrs. Joseph C. Moore, Geo. W. 
Weeks, Noah S. Clark, W. M. Parker and David 
Cross. 



Granite State Trust Company, Elm 

Street. This company was incorporated under 
the laws of New Hampshire in the present year, 
and as it is under the direction of able and ex- 
perienced financiers of high reputation its success 
is a foregone conclusion. The company has a 
capital of $50,000. and the president is Hon. 
James F. Briggs, who is also president of the 
National Bank of Hillsborough, N. H. The vice- 
president is Mr. Edward S. 1'aiue, who was con- 
nected with the Manchester National Bank for 
the past twenty years, having succeeded the late 
Col. Chas. E. Baleh as cashier, and now president 
of the Cass Co. Bank, Castleton, Dakota. The 



treasurer is Mr. Alonzo Elliott, who has had sev- 
eral years experience in trust companies' affairs. 
He has been agent of the Concord Railroad for 
eighteen years past, and among other institutions 
he is connected as director with the Peoples' 
Insurance Co., New Hampshire Trust Co., Guar- 
antee Savings Bank, Peoples' Gas Light Co. and 
Manchester Electric Light Co., and the secretary 
is Mr. P. S. Soper. The directors are, Messrs. 
George A. Laton, Oliver B. Green, Allen N. 
Clapp, Geo. E. Morrill, Geo. S. Holmes, Hiram 
Hill, W. H. Scott, James F. Briggs, Horace Mar- 
shall, Edward H. Paine, Ex-Mayor Alphus Gay 
and Alonzo Elliott. The company occupy on Elm 
street a fine suite of offices, admirably fitted up for 
the business. Thecompany isauthorized to receive 
and hold money and property in trust and on deposit 
from courts of law or equity, executors or admin- 
istrators, assignees, guardians, trustees, corpora- 
tions and individuals, and may be appointed by 
probate courts trustee under any will upon such 
terms and conditions as may be agreed upon. 
Deposits may be made at any time and interest is 
allowed. The company is entitled to act as agent 
or attorney for the care and management of in- 
vested property and for the collection of dividends 
and interests. The company offers the best of 
security to its patrons, and its affairs are in the 
hands of prudent and conservative citizens and 
financiers. 



Pike & Heald, Manufacturers of and Deal- 
ers in Stoves, Furnaces and Ranges, 972 Elm 
Street. One of the oldest and most reliable estab- 
lishments in Manchester is the popular concern of 
Pike & Heald, manufacturers of and dealers in 
stoves, fuinaces, ranges, tinware, etc., which for 
upwards of forty years has maintained a firm hold 
on public favor, and which fully sustains to-day its 
old-time reputation. This well and favorably 
known house was originally established by Messrs. 
Hartshorn & Tufts, about the year 1843, and 
after passing through several changes in the firm, 
came into the control of Messrs. Hartshorn & 
Pike, in 1858, who conducted the business up to 
1870, when they were succeeded by Messrs. Pike 
& Heald, the present firm, who have since that 
time continued the business. The premises occu- 
pied for business purposes comprise a 25x80 foot 
store and basement, and an extensive and Al 
stock is constantly carried, including stoves, 
ranges, heaters and furnaces of all kinds, tin and 
sheet-iron ware of every description, kitchen 
utensils and housekeeping articles ; the firm be- 
ing agents also for Hie Magee & Crawford coal 
ranges, the Franconia wood range, and the Flor- 
ence, Diamond and Golden Star oil stoves. Steam 
and gas fitting, plumbing and water piping like- 
wise are executed in the most superior and expe- 
ditious manner, while tin roofing, to which they 
are prepared to give prompt attention ; also 
special attention is given to orders for galvanized 
and copper cornices, general jobbing, sheet-iron, 
copper and kindred work also are done; from twenty 
to thirty expert hands being employed. Messrs. 
Pike and Heald are paying special attention to 
steam. gasand water piping,also plumbing. Messrs. 
R. H. Pike .and C. N. Heald, who are natives of this 
state, are both men of energy and enterprise, as 
well as skill, and fully merit the extensive pat- 
ronage they receive. 



IfiO 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



S. C. Forsaith Machine Company, 

Manufacturers or' Circular Saw Mills, Saw Mill 
Machinery of all Kinds, Bolt Forging Machines, 
Power Spring Hammers, Hand Fire Engines, etc., 
South of Passenger Station. The works of the 
S. C. Forsaith Machine Co., of this city, have 
grown from a very small beginning to be the 
largest of their kind in the state of New Hamp- 
shire. In 1860 the business was started under 
the style of S. C. Forsaith & Co. .by the late Mr. 
Forsaith, who had, in the course of his business 
career different partners until, in 1884, the busi- 
ness passed into the hands of the present S. C. 
Forsaith Machine Co. which was incorporated 
under the laws of New Hampshire, with a paid 
up capital of $275,000. Until his death, in 1885, 
Mr. Forsaith was the treasurer of the company, 
and he was succeeded by Mr. David B. Varney, 
who is a director of the Amoskeag National Bank. 
The president is Mr. George B. Chandler, who is 
also a director of the New Hampshire Fire Insur- 
ance Co., treasurer of the People's Savings Bank 
since 1874, and cashier of the Amoskeag National 
Savings Bank since 1863. Mr. William E. Drew 
is the agent of the company, has the entire man- 
agement of the works, and is a prominent citizen. 
He learned his trade as a practical machinist in 
the works and is thoroughly versed in all the de- 
tails of the business, with which he has been iden- 
tified since boyhood. The company have a fine 
suite of offices, which are connected by the West- 
ern Union telegraph and telephone wires. The 
company manufacture circular saw mills, with 
patent lever sets, lath and shingle machines, saw 
mill and wood-working machinery, all kinds ; 
shafting, boxes, hangers, pulleys, couplings, 
flanges, gearing, bolts, etc., Abbe's Patent Bolt 
Forging Machines, power spring hammers and 
hand fire engines ; portage engines and circular 
saws are specialties of the company. The com- 
pany have circular saws from four to sixty inches, 
and leather belting of every description constantly 
on hand. They also carry in stock a large num- 
ber of second-hand steam engines of various sizes. 
The works cover about three acres, and they con- 
sist of eight buildings. These include machine 
shop, planing mill and box factory, boiler and 
engine houses, etc. The mechanical equipments 
throughout are of the most complete and ample 
character. The box factory turns out some three 
hundred boxes daily, and these are supplied to mills 
and shoe factories. From seventy-five to one 
hundred hands are employed, and the works, 
which are located south of the passenger station, 
are kept constantly busy. 

J. H. Wigfgin &Co., Wholesale Grocers 
and Receivers of Flour, Proprietors of the Man- 
chester Tea Company and Manufacturers of Con- 
fections, Nos. 923 and 925 Elm Street. This re- 
liable and representative house was founded in 
1874, and it has had an honorable and successful 
career. The premises occupied consist of the first 
floor and basement 25x100 feet in dimensions, 
and an L measuring 20x70 feet. These are fully 
equipped with every appliance and facility for the 
handling and preservation of the choice and valu- 
able stock. Here will be found an unusually 
large and first-class assortment of foreign and 
domestic fancy and staple groceries, including 
French, German and English delicacies, such as 



prepared mustards, sauces, relishes, salad dress- 
ings and condiments of all kinds, potted meats, 
etc., as well as goods of American growth and 
preparation, canned meats, syrups, vegetables, 
fruits, choice family and bakers' flour, farinaceous 
articles, and everything usually found in a first- 
class establishment. The great specialties of this 
responsible house, however, are the best brands 
of teas and coffees, which are highly appreciated 
for their superior qualities. In fact, the goods of 
this reliable establishment are renowned for their 
quality, purity and freshness and moderate prices. 
The firm are the largest retailers of standard 
groceries and fancy table supplies in New Hamp- 
shire, and are manufacturers of rich and rare con- 
lections. They do more business than any other 
three houses in the city and their sales average 
$250,000 a year. The firm have also a flourishing 
establishment at Laconia, N. H., and the trade is 
both wholesale and retail in its character. From 
twenty to twenty-five hands and five delivery 
wagons are employed, and the trade extends 
throughout the New England States. Mr. J. H. 
Wiggin, who is a native of New Hampshire, is 
the sole proprietor. 



T. L,. Thorpe, Wool, Wool Waste and Paper 
Stock, No. 21 Depot Street. This establishment 
was founded twenty years ago by the present pro- 
prietor, and he has enjoyed an extensive, steady 
patronage of first-class character. The spacious 
premises occupied consist of a building 30x50 
feet in dimensions, having three floors and base- 
ment, the entire place being excellently equipped 
and provided with the best modern conveniences 
peculiar to the business. The large stock con- 
stantly carried is complete in all the various 
departments, and comprises wool, wool waste, 
wrapping and paper stock of all kinds. Every 
facility is possessed for the fulfillment of orders 
of any magnitude, and the lowest prices are 
always quoted. Mr. Thorpe is a native of New 
York, has resided in this city for many years, and 
is a member of the Board of Aldermen. 



Fred Watts, Gold and Silver Watches, 
Jewelry, etc., No. 1101 Elm Street. Mr. Watts 
embarked in this business three years ago. and 
the results experienced have met with his most 
sanguine expectations. He occupies a large, 
commodious store, which is very handsomely 
fitted up, attractively arranged, and complete in 
its appointments. A very valuable and carefully 
selected stock is carried, embracing a choice as- 
sortment of gold and silver watches for ladies and 
gentlemen, jewelry of all kinds, comprising brace- 
lets, bangles, earrings, brooches, diamonds and 
other precious stones set in the latest designs, 
plain and fancy rings, watch chains and charms, 
French, Swiss and American clocks, solid silver 
and plated ware, optical goods, etc. A specialty 
is made of fine American watches, the leading 
makes being offered at the most reasonable prices. 
Two expert assistants are employed in the me- 
chanical department, and particular attention is 
devoted to the repairing of watches, clocks and 
jewelry, all work being executed thoroughly, and 
under a guarantee. Mr. Watts, though a native 
of England, has resided in Manchester since his 
r%ildhood. He is a member of the Masonic and 
Odd Fellows' Orders. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



161 



Allen N. Clapp, Wholesale Dealer in Stand- 
ard Refined Kerosene Oil, Nos. 354 Granite and 6 to 
22 Main Streets. This concern was founded nearly 
one-half century ago by Mr. Ira Ban. About the 
year 1856 Mr. Allen N. Clapp, who is a native of 
Marlborough, N. H.,carae to Manchester, being 
then nineteen years of age, and entered the em- 
ploy of Mr. Ban as clerk, with whom he remained 
in that position until 1860, when being admitted 
into partnership the firm name was changed to 
Bun & Clapp, and was continued under that 
title until 1881. Mr. Clapp then purchased Mr. 
Ban's interest and has since conducted the busi- 
ness as sole proprietor with large success. Mr. 
Clapp carries on his business in the large and at- 
tractive brick block located at the junction of 
Granite and Main streets, which was completed 
in January, 1871, and is now owned by him of 
which he occupies the stores No. 354 Granite and 
from No. 6 to 22 Main Street, having a frontage 
of 150 feet and a depth of 75 feet. The stock 
carried is both large and varied, having wholesale 
and retail departments, embracing a general line 
of goods for all necessary requirements of its 
patrons and the community at large, comprising 
provisions of all kinds, staple and fancy groceries, 
best brands of flour, a large assortment of canned 
goods, salt fish, tobaccos and cigars, an excellent 
stock of staple dry goods, hardware and all 
modern improved agricultural implements. A 
large city and surrounding country trade is 
enjoyed. Mr. Clapp employs a large force of clerks 
and assistants, together with several wagons and 
trucks for the receipt and delivery of goods. In 
addition to the above line Mr. Clapp is the sole 
agent in the state of New Hampshire for the 
Standard Oil Co.. of Cleveland, Ohio, and his sales 
are extensive, receiving his supply direct from 
the company's yards at Nashua, where it is 
brought in large tanks by railroad. Mr. Clapp is 
able to supply the oil in any quantity desired at 
lowest market prices with promptness and dis- 
patch. From a small beginning this branch of 
his business has increased in volume until he is 
now delivering upon orders about one hundred 
barrels of oil per day and is extending his trade 
into Northern N. H. and the state of Vermont. 
In all respects Mr. Clapp is to be commended for 
his spirited business policy and fair and equitable 
dealing with those who have business connections 
with him. Mr. Clapp is one of the best-known 
men in the city of Manchester, and his fellow 
citizens have testified their confidence in him by 
electing him to represent them in the State Legis- 
lature and as a member of the board of Alder- 
men of Manchester. He is a live and energetic 
business man, always at the post of duty and 
ready to assist in the promotion of the interests 
and welfare of this thriving business city of 
Manchester. 



Z. Foster Campbell, Druggist and Chem- 
ist, Corner of Elm and Aniherst Streets. Z. Foster 
Campbell, druggist and chemist for upwards of 
of twenty-five years, has sustained an excellent 
reputation for accuracy and reliability in com- 
pounding and dispensing prescriptions and in the 
general exercise of his profession, of which he is one 
of the leading and most popular members in Man- 
chester, and enjoys the favor of many of the fore- 
most physicians in town. Mr. Campbell, whois 



a gentleman of middle age and a native of this 
state, is a registered druggist and a skilful and 
expert pharmacist and chemist of thirty odd 
years experience, established himself in business 
at the present location in 1882, building up in a 
short time a large and flourishing trade. The 
store is 2Cx70 feet in dimensions and neatly fitted 
up and appointed, and a carefully selected and Al 
stock is constantly carried, embracing pure and 
fresh drugs and medicines of every description, 
chemicals, extracts, acids and pharmaceutical 
specialties in great variety, standard proprietary 
remedies and patent medicines of all kinds, spirits, 
alcohol and medicinal liquors, mineral waters, 
flavors, perfumery, toilet articles and druggists' 
sundries ; also fancy goods, small wares, stationery, 
candies and cigars. A handsome soda fountain, 
attractive show cases and tasteful surroundings 
render the place very inviting, while three 
capable and reliable assistants are in attendance. 



The Peoples' Saving's Bank, No. 867 

Elm Street. The Peoples' Savings Bank is one of 
the strongest, most useful and prosperous insti- 
tutions in Manchester. The bank was incorpor- 
ated in 1874, and by the energy and faithfulness 
to the interests of the depositors, and the sound 
and judicious principles governing its manage- 
ment has achieved wide popularity. It is plainly 
a savings bank, free from the varied and com- 
plex transactions appertaining to the character of 
other financial concerns. Deposits are received 
in sums from $1.00 to $1,000, and a liberal rate of 
interest is guaranteed and paid yearly. There is 
a guaranty fund of $100,000, and theamounfcof 
deposits received up to date is $750,000. Ex- 
Gov. P. C. Cheney, who is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, has held the office of president from the 
beginning. Mr. G. B. Chandler has been the 
treasurer from the start and he is also cashier of 
the Amoskeag National Bank, and a native of 
New Hampshire. Since 1875 Mr. E. M. Brooks 
has held the office of teller. The board of direc- 
tors consists of Messrs. P. C. Cheney, A. W. 
Quint, Edson Hill, Moody Currier, Charles H. 
Bartlett, E. M. Topliff, H. M, Putney, G. B. 
Chandler, A. P. Olzemau and Geo. W. Riddle. 
The bank chambers are handsomely fitted *up, 
and a staff of competent clerks are in attendance. 



A. E. Eaton & Co., Wholesale Manufac- 
turers of Chestnut and Pine Dining Tables, 
Forsaith Building, Corner of Franklin and 
Auburn Streets. The house of Messrs. A. E. 
Eaton & Co. is entirely devoted to the manufac- 
ture of chestnut and vine dining tables, in the 
production of which it has no superior in the 
trade. This establishment was founded in 1882, 
since which time a very extensive trade has been 
developed. The premises occupied comprise one 
floor in Forsaith's building, on the corner of 
Franklin and Auburn streets, and this is 50x70 
feet in dimensions, thoroughly equipped with all 
necessary tools and machinery, which is opeiated 
by steam power. Five hands are employed and a 
very extensive stock of tables is kept constantly on 
hand. Sales are made only to dealers, and the 
trade extends throughout the New England States. 
Mr. A. E. Eaton is a young, energetic business 
man, and a native of Vermont. He has resided in 
Manchester since 1874. 



162 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 




Bryant & Stratton Business College, 

Corner of Elm and Manchester Streets, Wm. 
Heron, Jr., Principal and Proprietor. "If a 
father wishes to give his son a legacy," said 
Horace Mann, "that will endurewhile life exists, 
let him send him to an institution where he can 
obtain a general business education." and the 
business colleges now scattered over the country 
are accomplishing more real practical work than 
any of the great universities. Manchester has 
its efficient Bryant & Stratton Business College, 
and 'this is under the personal direction of Mr. 
Wm. Heron, Jr., principal and proprietor. This 
institution, now in its twenty-third year, was 
established to prepare young people for business. 
Since its foundation more than 4,500 students 
have attended, and many can trace their success 
in life to the thorough training here received. 
The college was founded by Bryant & Stratton in 
1865, and in 1879 Mr. William Heron, Jr., who is 
a graduate of the Troy Business College, and a 
teacher of ten years experience, became the pro- 
prietor. The premises occupied comprise one 
floor 50x80 feet in dimensions, and this is finely 
fitted up. Day and evening sessions are held, 
and there is accommodation for one hundred 
pupils. The subjects taught are bookkeeping, 
business arithmetic, penmanship, business forms, 
correspondence, commercial lavr, etc., and the 
whole are capped by actual business practice. 
Competent teachers are employed, and diplomas 
are granted to proficient pupils. Students who 
have successfully passed through a course of train- 
ing in this college have found no difficulty in 
securing profitable situations. 



James Brothers, Livery, Hack and Boara 
ing Stable, No. 44 Manchester Street. The livery 
stable conducted by the Messrs. James Bros, has 
a reputation of the highest character. The busi- 
ness was originally founded by Mr. Stephen 
James, on Amherst street, in 1839. and in 1844 
removed to the present location and took S. D. 
Sherburn as partner, when the firm became 
known as James & Sherburn, which was after- 
wards changed to James & Coffin ; then Coffin & 
Johnsen, and in 1855 to S. James & Son, and in 
3870 to James Bros., the present firm. Their 
father, the founder of the industry, died in 1871, 
his demise being generally regretted by a lar^e 
circle of friends. The stable, which consists of a 
three-story building 60x100 feet in dimensions, 
is well lighted, drained and ventilated, and 
every care and attention is given to the welfare 
and comfort of horses entrusted to the proprie- 
tors, by efficient and experienced stallmen. In 
the livery department they keep constantly on 
hand an excellent stock of horses, and also have 
a complete line of carriages, barouches, hacks 
and light wagons ready at short notice for all oc- 
casions, and orders may be left at the Hotel 
Windsor or at the stable, while the charges are 
always reasonable. A hack service is run to and 
from all trains for the benefit of the public, trans- 
fers being made at popular prices. The firm em- 
ploy only sober, reliable drivers, and give the 
best of attention to their customers' wants. The 
Messrs. James, who are natives of this state 
have lived in Manchester since 1839, and are 
thoroughly interested in the city's welfare and 
futmre prosperity. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AXD 



Eagre r & Bandy Wholesale and RetailGrocers, 
No. "it Elm Street. Some thirty odd years of 
uninterrupted prosperity marks the history of the 
well and favorably known concern of Eager & 
Kand, wholesale and retail dealers in staple and 
fancy groceries, flour and provisions. The house 
was founded in !<>-< by J. (). A. Eager, in connec- 
tion with the late J. Rowley, who conducted it alone 
up to 1375, when he took into partnership Mark 
Kand. thus forming the pushing and prosperous 
firm wliose name heads this sketch. The busi- 
ness premises, which are spacious and commo- 
dious, are admirably kept in ever} 7 respect, and 
an exceedingly fine stock is constantly carried, 
comprising pure teas, coffees and spicesof all kinds, 
delicacies, condiments and canned goods of every 
description, choice dairy butter, cheese and lard, 
prime smoked meats and provisions, best brands 
of family flour, oatmeal, corumeal and cereal food 
products in great variety, sugars, syrups, molasses, 
smoked and salt fish, soda, soap, starch, house- 
hold specialties, shelf goods and general staple 
and fancy groceries. Some half a dozen or so effi- 
cient and polite assistants are employed, while 
two delivery wagons are in steady service supply- 
ing customers all over the city and suburbs. and al- 
together the trade of the firm, which is of both a 
wholesale and retail nature, is large. Messrs. 
Eager & Kand. who are respectively natives of 
Laconia and Warner, this state, stand high in 
the community alike as merchants and citizens, 
Mr. Eager being one of the trustees of the Merri- 
mak River Savings Bank. 

F. Li. Gray, Funeral Furnishings of All 
Kinds, No. 1088 Elm Street. This admirably 
conducted and well equipped establishment was 
originally opened about 1878 by Melindy and H. 
J. Poore, who were succeeded in 1884 by the firm 
of Poore & Gray, who carried on the business up 
to 1885, when Mr. Gray retired and subsequently, 
in February, 1887, became sole proprietor. The 
warerooms occupy a 20x75 foot floor and are 
neatly fitted up and well ordered in every respect, 
while a complete and very superior assortment 
of coffins and caskets of every size, style and 
variety is constantly carried on hand ; also grave 
clothes of all kinds, shrouds, trimmings and 
everything comprehended in funeral requisites. 
Remains are prepared for burial, funerals directed 
and interments procured in any of the city or 
suburban cemeteries in the most superior and 
satisfactory manner at reasonable rates, while a 
full and fine line of funeral furnishings of every 
description can always be found here at the low- 
est prices consistent with first-class articles and 
honorable dealing, and altogether a large and 
flourishing business is carried on. Mr. Gray is a 
native of Hancock, N. II.. and was formerly en- 
gaged in the soda and mineral water business, 
and has served two years in the city council and 
was a member of the State Legislature during 
the sessions of 1887 and 1888. Mr. Gray also 
bears a very creditable war record, sharing the 
fortunes of the 6th N. H. Vols. from 1861 to 1864, 
attached to the 9th Army Corps under Gen. Burn- 
side, and was severely wounded at the battle of 
Spottsylvania. He is a popular and esteemed 
member of the G. A. R. Louis Bell Post Xo. 3. 
and is likewise a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of 
H. and Royal Arcanum. 



Lewis K. Mead, Druggist, No. 87!) Elm 
Street. Mr. Mead was boiu in Bartlett, N. H.. 
but has been a resident ot Manchester for many 
years. He established himself in business at this 
corner in 1875, the premises having been used as 
a drug store for over a quarter of a century, but 
w;is lu-ver so successfully conducted as since the 
present proprietor assumed its control. The ele- 
gant arraiigenien t of the store isobserved by all who 
enter it, being handsomely fitted up with marble 
counters, French plate glass show windows and 
cases, tiled floor, and the surroundings are in 
harmonious keeping with all these accessories. 
The stock embraces a large and carefully selected 
assortment of fresh and pure drugs and chemicals, 
fully up to the highest standard demanded by 
the United States Pharmcopceia, proprietary medi- 
cines and remedies of well-known merit and estab- 
lished reputation, toilet and fancy articles, per- 
fumery, druggists' sundries, natural mineral 
waters from Europe and at home, physicians' and 
surgeons' requisites, and in fact everything usually 
found in a first-class pharmacy can be obtained at 
this house. The high character of the manage- 
ment of this establishment render mistakes in the 
compounding of physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes absolutely impossible, as all" mod- 
ern appliances to secure accuracy have been pro- 
vided, and no one more fully appreciates the re- 
sponsibility in performing those duties than Mr. 
Mead. He employs none but the most reliable 
and competent assistants, and prescriptions are 
prepared at all hours of the day and night. He 
is greatly respected and was chosen to represent 
his fellow citizens in the legislative halls in 1886, 
which he did with great credit to himself and 
satisfaction of his constituents. Mr. Mead is a 
member of the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
Red Men, and a Free and Accepted Mason. As a 
business man and citizen, Mr. Mead occupies a 
prominent position in the metropolis of the 
state. 



C. P. Trickey, Pianos and Organs, etc., No. 
1085 Elm Street. Undoubtedly one of the best 
appointed and most attractive music establish- 
ments in this section is that of Mr. C. P. Triekey. 
The enterprise was founded in 1879 at the present 
address, and under the energetic management of 
Mr. Trickey its success became assured from the 
outset. The store occupied has an area of 20x70 
feet, is fitted up in the most tasteful, approved 
style. The stock embraces the finest pianos and 
organs, sheet music, music books. and musical mer- 
chandise of all kinds, also books.stationery and pic- 
ture frame moulding. Mr. Trickey is agent for the 
celebrated pianos made by Win. Bourne, of Boston. 
and always keeps a full supply on hand of these 
line instruments. Receiving his pianos and organs 
direct from the manufactories, and buying ex- 
clusively for cash, giving purchasers the benefits, 
Mr. Trickey is prepared to sell them at the very 
lowest prices for cash, and makes a specialty of 
delivering an instrument upon easy methods of 
payment, by the week or month. Two assistants 
find employment in the salesroom, and an excel- 
lent business is constantly enjoyed. Particular 
attention is devoted to the making of picture 
frames, any desired style being furnished to order 
at short notice. Mr. Trickey is a native of this 
state. 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



The Manchester Beef Company, Re- 
ceivers ami Commission Merchants in Swift's 
Chicago Dressed Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal and 
Hogs. Within a comparatively brief period 
Messrs. G. F. & E. C. Swift have built up a trade 
and a name for themselves that extend not only 
from shore to shore of the American continent 
but to the nations of Europe; and to-day they 
take the lead of all other concerns engaged in 
handling dressed beef. This firm slaughter cat- 
tle in Chicago and ship the dressed beef in re- 
frigerator cars to all the principal cities, notably 
in the east, where it arrives as sweet and fresh as 
on the day it was killed, with no perceptible loss 
in weight, and can, therefore, be sold at a less 
price to the consumer than when sent on the 
hoof. The firm began business in 1876 in Chi- 
cago, and in 1877 they established a branch in 
Manchester, which has been conducted under the 
style of the Manchester Beef Co. For the past 
three years the business here has been under the 
able and popular management of Mr. H. W. 
Heath, who is a native of Groton, Vermont, and 
has had great practical experience in the whole- 
sale meat trade. The premises now occupied 
were erected specially for the business in the 
present year, and they consist of a substantial 
building, containing four floors and basement 
containing 30,000 square feet of floorage area. 
They are fitted up with all necessary conveniences 
and appliances, and are models of neatness and 
cleanliness, including four refrigerators, each 
20x40 feet in dimensions, and these have a total 
capacity for storing two hundred and forty head 
of cattle and two hundred and fifty tons of'ice. 
I\ is the largest establishment of its kind in the 
state, and dealers can always rely upon securing 
here the freshest and choicest beef, mutton, lamb, 
veal and hogs at bed rock prices. There has 
recently been added a department fitted up in 
the most complete manner for the exclusive sale 
of pork products, such as hams, shoulder, ribs, 
sausages, lard, etc., under the management of 
Mr. Jno. W. Pope, who is a native of Danbury, 
Ct., and has devoted some twenty or more years 
in this line. 



A. C. Wallace, Manufacturer of and Dealer 
in Building Lumber, Boards, Clapboards. Shin- 
gles, Packing Boxes, etc.; also WickoflPs Patent 
Water Pipes and Tubings, Piscataquog Mills, 
Main Street. Prominent among the houses en- 
gaged in the lumber trade is that of Mr. A. C. 
Wallace. The business now controlled by him 
was founded by him as far back as 1853, and 
to-day it is the oldest as well as the largest con- 
cern in its line in Manchester. The premises 
occupied are located on Main street, and consist 
of a yard about an acre in extent and a steam 
planing mill 50x200 feet in dimensions. Mr. 
Wallace carries on hand an immense stock of 
building lumber of all kinds, boards, clapboards, 
shingles, laths, fence pickets, trunk wood, pack- 
ing boxes, etc. The planing mill is equipped 
with the latest improved wood-working machin- 
ery, which is operated by a steam engine of 60 
horse power, and about thirty hands are em- 
ployed in the business. Some 600,000 feet of 
lumber are consumed annually in the manufac- 
ture of timber and boards and about 1,000,000 
feet in the manufacture of packing boxes, which 



form a leading feature of the business. Mr. Wai. 
lace also carries a very extensive stock of Wick- 
offs Patent Water Pi^es and Tubing?. The trade 
of the concern extends to all parts of the New 
England States, and Mr. Wallace is one of the 
best-known business men and prominent citizens 
of Manchester. He is a native of New Hamp- 
shire, and sixty-seven years of age. He has 
served the interests of his fellow eilizens in the 
office of assessor and other public positions, as 
water commissioner since organization of board, 
member of Board of Engineers about ton years 
and a member of Fire Department thirty years. 
For four terms he was a member of the State 
Legislature, and for two terms was a member of 
the Board of Aldermen. 



E. T. James, Hack, Livery and Boarding 
Stable, No. 145 Hanover Street. The livery and 
boarding stable of Mr. E. T. James has been in 
continuous and successful operation since 1861, 
when it was founded by Messrs. Hill & James. 
In 1869 the firm became Fogg & James, and in 
1880 Mr. James assumed entire control, and has 
developed a very flourishing business. The sta- 
ble is a two-story frame building, with a frontage 
of 50 feet on Hanover street. In the rear it 
widens out to 100 feet and runs to a depth of 
100 feet. It is splendidly lighted, thoroughly 
ventilated and drained, and is fitted up in the 
most thorough and modern manner with every 
requisite convenience. The boarding branch of* 
the enterprise is under careful and experienced 
supervision. There are ample accommodations 
for thirty-five horses and an equal number of car- 
riages, and the rates are placed at a most moder- 
ate figure. Hacks, carriages, coupes, buggies, 
etc., are at the disposal of the public for all occa- 
sions, such as funerals, balls, entertainments, 
weddings, the theatre, shopping, etc. From ten 
to twelve hands are employed. Born in Deer- 
field, N. H., Mr. James has resided in Manches- 
ter for thirty years. He is an ex-water com- 
missioner. 



J". B.- Jones, Auctioneer and Commission 
Merchant, No. 983 Elm Street. This admirably 
conducted and flourishing concern was established 
in 1865, and from its inception to the present day 
Mr. Jones, who has been at the head of the busi- 
ness from the start, has grown in public favor and 
confidence well deserved, until now his patronage 
is at once large and permanent. He occupies a 
well-kept 25x100 foot store, three stories and 
basement, and carries constantly on hand an ex- 
tensive and excellent stock, including new and 
second-hand furniture of every description, stoves, 
ranges, tinware, cutlery, crockery, glassware, 
kitchen utensils, refrigerators and house furnish- 
ing goods of all kinds, while several capable and 
efficient assistants are in attendance. Mr. Jones 
attends to auction sales in any part of the state, 
second-hand furniture and household specialties 
being bought and sold, and altogether a very tine 
business is carried on. Mr. Jones, who is a na- 
tive of Romway, N. H., but has been a resident 
of this city since 1850, has been sheriff of the 
county during 1875 and 1876, and refers by permis- 
sion to ex-Gov. Frederick Smyth, Hon. ex-Gov. 
O. A. Weston, Hon. G. W. Morrison, Hon. B. P. 
Cilley and Hon. John Hosley. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



165 



Pettee & Adams, Dealers in Flour, Grain, 
Shorts, Lime, Cement, etc., No. 754 Elm Street. 
This firm are millers and dealers in flour, grain, 
shorts, lime, cement, etc., and in their grist mill 
they have in use all the latest improved mechan- 
ical appliances for securing the best results at low 
cost. The concern is an old established one. It 
had its origin in 1845, when it was founded by 
Messrs. .T. Abbott & Co. In 1861 the firm was 
changed to H & H. E. Pettee, Messrs. Horace and 
Holmes R. Pettee forming the partnership, and 
in 1876 the firm was reorganized, the partners 
being H. R. Pettee and J. W. Whittle. In 1882 
Mr. Whittle retired, and he was succeeded as Mr. 
Pettee's partner by Mr. H. P. Adams. Mr. 
Pettee was born at Francestown, N. H., and came 
to reside in Manchester in 1856. He is a promi- 
nent business man, citizen and politician. He 
has served his fellow citizens in the city council, 
in the school board and in the Legislature. Mr. 
Adams was born in New Boston, N. H., and from 
1861 to 1863 he was a member of the 13th Mass- 
achusetts Volunteers, connected with the Army 
of the Potomac, and served under Generals Grant, 
Hooker, Banks and Polk. The firm's grist mill is 
located on Main strpet, on the West Side. This 
is a frame building 50x70 feet in dimensions, and 
was built thirty-five years ago. though the present 
proprietors. have owned it only five years. It 
contains three sets of rollers and one cracker, 
which are operated by a steam engine of 35 horse 
power and boiler of 70 horse power. Five hands 
are employed and the grinding capacity of the 
mill is from 500 to 600 bushels per day. The 
firm's store is at No. 754 Elm street, and consists 
of salesroom and basement, each 25x100 feet in 
dimensions, and here a very heavy stock of flour, 
grain, shorts, lime, cement, hay and straw, salt 
of all kinds, etc., is carried, and a large wholesale 
and retail trade is done, five hands and two 
delivery wagons being employed in the conduct 
of the business. 



Horace Marshall, Wholesale Merchant and 
Commission Dealer in Produce, No. V20 Elm 
Street. One oM the oldest and most stable and 
reliable produce commission houses in this city 
is the well and favorably known house of Horace 
Marshall, successor to Marshall Bros., wholesale 
merchant and commission dealer in country pro- 
duce, which is by common consent among the 
leading, largest and best equipped establishments 
of the kind hereabout. The house was founded 
in 1869 by Marshall Bros., who conducted it up to 
1880, when the business passed into the sole con- 
trol of the present proprietor. Handling a very 
superior class of goods, upright and honorable in 
his dealings, he has been enabled to bnild up 
the lanre and flourishing patronage he now 
deservedly enjoys. He occupies for business pur- 
poses a 25x80 foot store and basement, and carries 
constantly on hand a heavy and first-class stock, 
comprising butter, cheese, eggs, lard, beans, peas, 
potatoes, onions, apples and country produce 
generally, several in help being employed, while 
two delivery wagons are in steady service also 
supplying customers all over the city and 
environs, and the trade, which is principally 
wholesalers very extensive. Mr. Marshall, who 
is a native of Windham, N. H. , is an old and 
respected resident of Manchester. 



Henry C. Ranno, Manufacturer of and 
Dealer in Harnesses, Horse Clothing, Trunks, 
Bags, etc., No. 24 South Main Street. Special 
mention should here be made of Henry C Ranno, 
manufacturer of and dealer in fine harnesses, 
horse clothing, trunks, traveling bags, and kind- 
red articles, who is by common consent one of 
the leading exponents of the art in Manchester, 
the goods leaving this popular and well-known 
concern being first-class in every feature of merit, 
in design, workmanship, material and finish. 
Mr. Rauuo, who is a gentleman of middle age and 
a native of this state, is a practical and expert 
workman himself, with many years experience in 
the exercise of his art. He started in business on 
his own account in this city in 1874, moving to his 
present commodious quarters about oneyear later. 
He occupies a neat 25x75 foot etore, with well- 
equipped shop attached, and carries constantly on 
hand an extensive and Al assortment of light and 
heavy harnesses, collars, horse blankets, whips, 
nets, combs, brushes, sponges, chamois, harness 
oils, trunks, valises, etc., while four skilled hands 
are employed, fine custom work and repairing also 
being done in the most superior and satisfactory 
mancer. Mr. Ranno making a specialty of cus- 
tom work. 



Park H. Kelley, Druggist, Corner of Elm 
and Pearl Streets. An exceptionally fine and 
well-ordered drug establishment is that of Mr. 
Park H. Kelley. This favorite pharmacy was 
first opened to the public in 1879 by Messrs. Jas. 
S. Heath & Co. Messrs. Miville & Gage suc- 
ceeded to the control later on, Messrs. Gage & 
Kelley in 1883, and in 1886 Mr. Kelley became 
the sole proprietor. The store is desirably 
located, is 20x70 feet in dimensions, attractive in 
all its appointments and fixtures, and amply pro- 
vided with every facility and convenience. The 
stock comprises pure, fresh drugs and chemicals, 
toilet and fancy articles, pharmaceutical prepar- 
ations, proprietary medicines, physicians' sup- 
plies, surgical appliances, etc., every department 
being complete in its variety. Two experienced 
assistants are employed, and in the well-equipped 
laboratory of the establishment physicians' pre- 
scriptions and family recipes are compounded 
from pure drugs with promptness, accuracy and 
care at any hour of the day or night. Mr Kelley, 
who is a native of this state, is a member of the 
State Pharmaceutical Association. 



G. G. Richardson, Five and Ten Cent 
Wares, No. 930 Elm Street. This extensively 
patronized establishment was opened in January, 
1886, by the present proprietor. The spacious 
store occupied has an area of 25x80 feet, is fitted 
up in the most attractive style, and is stocked to 
its utmost Jimits with a widely varied stock of 
excellent goods in the line of crockery, glass, tin, 
majolica, light iron and china ware, housekeeping 
articles of every variety, notions, fancy goods, 
toys, and small wares of every description are 
here exhibited. A specialty is made of five and 
ten cent goods. Three clerks are kept busy giv- 
ing polite attention to customers. Mr. Richard - 
son. who is a native of Hillsboro, N. H., has for 
twelve years occupied a responsible position in 
the mail service, on the railroad running between 
Manchester and Peterboro, N H. 



1(56 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



G. R. Vance & Co., Stoves, Kanges, Fur- 
nishing Goods, etc., No. 706 Elm Street. 
Among the many dealers in labor-saving and 
useful house furnishing goods in the city of 
Manchester is the firm of Messrs, G. R. Vance & 
Co. The individual members of this enterpris- 
ing house are Mr. G. R. Vance, a native of 
Vermont, but a resident here since 1854, and Mr. 
J. L. Woodman, who was born in this city. This 
concern was inaugurated in 1867 by Mr. Vance, 
and from the start has been the centre of a first- 
class trade unsurpassed by any similar concern in 
the city. In 1872 Mr. Woodman was admitted 
into the business as partner, since which date the 
business has been conducted under the present 
firm title. The premises occupied for the busi- 
ness comprise a fine store and basement, each 
having a frontage of 20 feet, with a depth 
of over three times that distance. The store 
is very attractively and neatly appointed, and 
supplied with all convenieucies for the com- 
fort of customers and display of the large and 
varied assortment of goods. The stock embraces 
the latest improved and newest patterns and de- 
signs of parlor, office and cooking stoves, ranges, 
heaters, etc.; also gas and oil stoves of the most 
recent invention, refrigerators, dishes, glassware, 
lamps and their fittings, pots, pans, kettles, laun- 
dry goods and culinary utensils of the very best 
quality and superior finish. They also do quite an 
extensive manufacturing and repairing business 
in all kinds of copper, tin and sheet metal ware, 
having every facility in the way of tools, appara- 
tus and workmen in this department of their 
trade. Especial attention is also given to all 
kinds of job work pertaining to the business, and 
orders are delivered by wagon to all parts of the 
city free of charge. Mr. Vance is a prominent 
and valued member of theOdd Fellows' fraternity, 
and takes great interest in future welfare. 



A. M. Eastman, Groceries and Meats, No. 
850 Elm Street. A noteworthy and excellent 
establishment is the admirably conducted and 
well-known store of A. M. Eastman, dealer in 
fine groceries, choice fruits, confections, meats 
and provisions, which has maintained a firm 
hold on popular favor and confidence for upward 
of twenty-six years. This well ordered and de- 
servedly popular store was established in 1861 by 
Wm. E. Eastman & Sou, who conducted the same 
until 1870, when, owing to the death of the senior 
member, which occurred at this period, the busi- 
ness passed into the sole control of his son and 
successor, the gentleman whose name heads this 
sketch. The premises occupied for business pur- 
poses embrace a 25x100 foot floor and basement, 
neatly fitted up and excellently kept, and a heavy 
and Al stock is constantly carried, comprising 
pure and fresh teas and coffees, spices, canned 
goods in great variety, choice fruits, delicious im- 
ported and fresh-made confectionery, and a mul- 
tifarious assortment of shelf goods, and every thing 
comprehended in staple and fancy groceries. Ten 
or more efficient and courteous assistants are em- 
ployed, all orders receiving prompt and satisfac- 
tory attention, while three delivery wagons are 
in steady service. The trade is both wholesale 
and retail, and is exceedingly large. Mr. Ivist- 
man is a native of Canaan. X. If., but has been 
a respected resident of this city since H.~>(). 



Leonard Shelters, Wholesale Dealer in 
Hay, Flour and Country Produce, Granite Street, 
Near Depot. This reliable house was founded by 
the present proprietor in 1877, and the business 
has since been conducted with uninterrupted suc- 
cess. The premises occupied consist of salesroom 
25x80 feet in dimensions, and of a basement of 
equal size. They are admirably fitted up and 
arranged for the purposes to which they are de- 
voted. The house does a large commission busi- 
ness, and is engaged in receiving daily large con- 
signments of flour, hay and country produce of all 
kinds from the most noted producing regions of 
the country. Speedy sales are effected, and con- 
signors can always rely upon prompt and satisfac- 
tory returns. The business is exclusively of a 
wholesale character, and dealers and large con- 
sumers are offered the fine class of goods in the 
market at bed rock prices. A heavy stock is car- 
ried and orders are promptly attended to. Before 
entering into this business Mr. Shelters was 
for twelve years overseer in the Manchester Mills. 
He is a native of Clinton Co., New York, an 
ex -member of the city council, and very popular. 

Frank Li. Way, Pharmacist, No. 134 School 
Street. One of the most popular among our 
young skilled practical pharmacists is Mr. Frank 
L. Way. The store is neatly and attractively 
fitted up with plate glass show cases, a soda 
fountain of beautiful design and ornamental ' 
shelf ware and counters. In size it is 20x50 feet 
and contains a valuable stock of pure, fresh drugs 
and medicines of the highest standard quality; 
also all the various pharmaceutical preparations 
and proprietary remedies, toilet articles and per- 
fumes, and all the requisites used by physicians 
in their practice. Mr. Way has been engaged 
compounding and dispensing medicines for the 
past ten years and is familiar with the business 
in all its details. Physicians' prescriptions and 
family recipes receive special care and are com- 
pounded with accuracy, rare skill and judgment. 
Mr. Way, who was born at Bedford, in this state, 
was brought up in the drug business in this city 
and in Boston. He has been established in busi- 
ness since 1885, and is highly endorsed and recom- 
mended as one of the best pharmacists in this 
section. He is a popular member of the Order of 
Odd Fellows, the Red Men and others. 



Hilton & Willcomb, Printers, Corner Elm 
and Amherst Streets. The foundation of this 
business dates from 1884 when it was established 
by Dillon & Flood, who continued it for one year 
when they were succeeded by Hilton & Hodge, 
and in April, 1886, by Hilton & Morgan, and in July 
of the present year they in turn were followed by 
Hilton & Willcomb, who are both practical printers 
of many years experience, and make a specialty of 
fine job work and all kinds of commercial print- 
ing, executing the work with rare skill in the 
very best manner. Commodious premises are 
occupied which are fitted up with the latest im- 
proved presses, new style type and provided \\ith 
every facility for meeting the demands of their 
patrons. Mr. C. W. Hilton, the head ol the firm, 
is a native of Saratoga Co., N. V. 1I( \\-.\x 
been in Manchester daring th past three yean 
and is very popular. Mr. O. C. Willcomb, his 
copartner, was born at Ipswich, Mass. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



167 



Cavaimugh Brothers, Wholesale and Re- 
tail Dealers in Horses, Carriages, etc., and Manu- 
facturers of Hand-Made Harnesses ; Factory and 
Store, No. 1082 Elm Street. Among the most 
enterprising establishments located in this city is 
that of the Messrs. Cavanaugh Bros., wholesale and 
retail dealers in horses, carriages, horse clothing, 
and manufacturers of hand-made harness. Their 
excellently equipped stable, a two-story struc- 
ture, at which they carry on a sale business, is 
located on Merrimack street, and has ample 
accommodations for one hundred and fifty horses. 
The factory and salesrooms are situated at No. 
1082 Elm street, and are comprised in a spacious 
three-story building and basement, each floor 
having an area of 50x81' feet. The establishment 
is the largest and most important of the kind in 
this section of the state. The business was first 
inaugurated in 1867 by Edwin Branch, who was 
succeeded in 1880 by E. W. Kimball, the latter 




selling his interests in December, 1885, to the 
present proprietors, and they have acquired a 
patronage derived from all parts of the New Eng- 
land States. Ten hands are employed. The har- 
ness works are equipped with the most improved 
.appliances, and the goods turned out are unsur- 
passed for excellence of material, workmanship 
and finish. The salesroom contains a large, su- 
perior stock of the firm's splendid productions, 
from which all tastes and means can be satisfac- 
torily suited. The Messrs. Cavanaugh give spe- 
cial attention to the buying and selling of horses 
on commission. They are in frequent receipt of 
business, gentlemen's, family and draft horses, 
from Vermont, Canada and the west, and on 
every Saturday morning at ten o'clock, hold auc- 
tion sales of the same, at which fine investments 
are available. The copartners, Messrs. M. A. 
and J. F. Cavanaugh are natives of Taunton, 
Mass., and have resided in this city for the past 
eight years. 



James Briggs, Britannia, Glass, Wooden 
and Willow Ware, etc. Stove Mart, No. 714 Elm 
Street, Brown's Building. Mr. Briggs estab- 
lished this business in 1871 at the present address, 
and from its inception to the present day has enjoy- 
ed a continuous and unbroken career of prosperity. 
The premises utilized comprise a finely and at- 
tractively fitted up store room and basement, each 
25x80 feet in dimensions, both of which 
are required to store the large stock of 
varied and useful goods which the necessities of 
the establishment require. Here will be found at 
all times a full and general assortment of Britan- 
nia, glass, wooden and willow wear, hollow ware, 
sinks, zinc, tin and sheet iron ware, in fact all the 
many culinary utensils and dining-room articles 
which are so necessary in every well-regulated 
household, while his stock of parlor, office and 
cook stoves, ranges and heaters is among the most 
varied and larges-t in the city. In this depart- 
ment of his business, Mr. Briggs has every facility 
for repairing and furnishing all broken or worn- 
out parts of stoves, etc., and his reputation as a 
judge of the capabilities of these articles is such 
that he has a very extensive patronage. He does 
a very extensive business in the manufacture of 
copper, tin and sheet-iron work, and ail sorts of 
hollow ware made from these materials, while es- 
pecial attention is given to job work of all kinds 
that pertains to his line of trade. Mr. Briggs is a 
native of England, but came to the United States 
in 1863. He is a prominent and valued member 
of the Order of Foresters. 



John G. Laue, General Insurance Agent 
and Adjuster, Post-Office Building. Among the 
leading and most responsible insurance men in 
this city can be mentioned the name of John G. 
Laue, general insurance agent and adjuster. Mr. 
Laue. who is a native of this state, and an old 
and respected resident of Manchester established 
himself in business at the present location in 
1865, and during the twenty-two years since has 
received a large and flattering patronage. He 
transacts a general insurance business and adjusts 
claims and losses, in short, attends to everything 
that properly pertains to risks, while he repre- 
sents some of the most stable and reliable 
companies in New Hampshire, among others 
the Exeter Mutual, of Exeter, and the 
Phrenix Mutual, of Concord, and doing a broker- 
age business for all the leading stock companies 
in the county, and altogether a flourishing busi- 
ness is transacted; also represents the Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., of New York, for which he has 
built up a large business. 

Heath & Stevens, Marble and Granite 
Works, Corner of Central and Franklin Streets. 
The works, which possess an area of 46x100 feet, 
are equipped in the most complete manner for the 
prosecution of the industry, a large stock is car- 
ried, and employment is given a force of skilled 
artisans. The members of the firm, Messrs. 
Frank A. Heath and Reuben P. Stevens, are 
thorough practical exponents of their vocation. 
They manufacture monuments of all kinds in for- 
eign and domestic granite and marble, tablets, 
headstones, markers, etc.. also curbing and ceme- 
tery work of every variety. Orders are executed 
promptly, and the charges reasonable. 



168 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Hardy & Co., Wholesale and Eetail Deal- 
ers in < roceries, Flour, Provisions, etc., 
Cilley Block, No. 1035 Elm and No. 14 
Concord Streets. At the spacious and well 
stocked concern of Hardy & Co., wholesale 
and retail dealers in general groceries, flour and 
provisions, is one of the leading, most reliable and 
best equipped houses of the kind in Manchester, 
and where can at all times be found an extensive 
and Al stock of everything comprehended in 
staple and fancy groceries. This enterprising 
and popular firm was established in 1882, and at 
its very inception may be said to have bounded 
into public favor and prosperity. The 
premises occupied for busines purposes 
comprise a 25x100 foot store and base- 
ment, and a heavy and first-class stock is con- 
stantly carried, embracing pure and fresh teas, 
coffees and spices, sauces, preserves and canned 
goods in great variety, choice dairy butter, prime 
smoked meats and provisions, best brands of fam- 
ily flour (including the Entire Wheat flour, and 
Wheatlet for which the firm are mill agents), 
oatmeal, cereal food products, rice, lard, sugars, 
molasses, syrups, vinegar, oils, soda, starch, soap, 
shelf goods and general groceries, fine goods being 
a specialty, while three efficient and capable 
assistants are employed. Mr. Orison Hardy, who 
is sole proprietor, is a native of this state and a 
respected resident of Manchester since 1848, and 
prior to establishing this flourishing business 
had been a successful .traveler for a quarter of a 
century for some of 'the leading Boston wholesale 
grocers, and is a popular and esteemed member of 
the I. O. O. F and Red Men, and also a deacon in 
the First Baptist Church. 



Marshall & Knowlton, Pharmacists, No. 
744 Elm Street. At the well-equipped and ele- 
gant drug store of Marshall & Knowlton, phar- 
macists, can always be found an exceedingly 
fine line of pure and fresh drugs, medicines 
and chemicals, standard proprietary remedies, 
acids, extracts and pharmaceutical specialties in 
great variety ; mineral waters, flavors, perfumery, 
toilet articles, soaps, sponges, chamois, sanitary 
preparations, etc., while prescriptions are com- 
pounded in the most accurate and reliable man- 
ner, the firm being among the most skilful and 
popular members of the profession in town. This 
neat and well-ordered store was established in 
1877 by Messrs. Marshall & Knowlton. The 
store, which is spacious and commodious, is finely 
fitted up and tastefully appointed art-tiled floor, 
handsome show cases. An attractive soda foun- 
tain and fixtures, imparting to the place a very 
inviting appearance, and a carefully selected and 
complete stock is constantly carried. Messrs. 
John H. Marshall and Geo. H. Knowlton, com- 
posing the firm, are both natives of Sutton, N. 
H., but have resided in this city several years. 

Chas. T. Newman, Apothecary, West 
Side. Among the leading members of the phar- 
maceutical profession in Manchester may be 
mentioned the name of Chas. T. Newman, apoth- 
ecary, who enjoys an excellent reputation for 
accuracy and reliability in compounding and 
dispensing physicians' prescriptions and in the 
general exercise of his calling, as well as for pure 
and fresh medicines, drugs and chemicals. Mr. 



Newman, who is a native of Portsmouth, N. H., 
but raised in Haverhill, Mass., is a registered 
drugist and a popular and esteemed member of 
the state Pharmaceutical Association. He estab- 
lished himself in business here in 1877, and readily 
won his way to public favor. The store, which is 
spacious and commodious, is nicely fitted up and 
tastefully kept, and a large and carefully selected 
stock is constantly carried, embracing besides 
fresh and pure drugs, medicines and chemicals of 
every variety, extracts, acids, druggists' special- 
ties of all kinds, proprietary remedies of merit, 
including Newman's Carbolic Ointment, Bright's 
Kidney Remedy, Dr. B. Haselton's Indian Lini- 
ment and Newman's Cough Curative : also min- 
eral waters, flavors, spirits, alcohol and medicinal 
liquors, toilet articles, fancy goods, small wares, 
perfumery, scented soaps, sponges, chamois, sani- 
tary preparations, stationery and cigars, while a 
handsome soda fountain imparts an inviting ap- 
pearance to the place. 

N. J. Whalen, Manufacturer of and Dealer 
in Harnesses, Trunks, Bags, Horse Clothing, 
Cynthiannia Horse Boots, Nos. 99 and 101 Merri- 
mack Street. This gentleman, who is an ac- 
knowledged expert leader in his responsible voca- 
tion, having had many years valuable experience 
therein, founded his business here in 1880, bring- 
ing energy and progressive ideas to bear in his 
management, the result being that a large, flour-' 
ishing trade was soon acquired. The premises 
forming the headquarters of the enterprise consist 
of a commodious two-story building, excellently 
fitted up throughout and supplied with every 
appliance requisite. The salesroom is filled with 
a large, valuable stock which embraces harness, 
horse and stable equipage, horse blankets, lap 
robes, whips, etc.; also a splendid line of trunks 
and bags. A specialty of the house is the manu- 
facture of harness and saddles. Five expert 
hands are employed, only the best stock is used, 
and the production is noted for its elegance, style 
and finish, while the prices are always uniformly 
reasonable. Mr. Whalen is a native of this state. 



E. P. Johnson Company, Hard and 
Smith Coal, Wood, etc., Office, No. 668 Elm Street. 
The business of this concern was originally 
inaugurated in 1854 by Johnson & Smith, contin- 
uing thus until 1867, when the firm style became 
E. P. Johnson & Co., the present firm name being 
adopted in 1886. The individual members of the 
firm are, Mr. E. P. Johnson, one of the original 
founders, the Hon. William Perkins, who has 
served for three terms as representative to the 
State Legislature, and Messrs. C. E. Wason and 
J. S. Levering. With such a combination of 
executive talent it is but natural that this com- 
pany should occupy such a commanding position 
in this community. The coal yards and Imsimss 
premises are situated at the corner of Elm an d 
Valley streets and on Franklin street, having an 
area in full of 40,000 square feet, and possessing 
every necessary equipment for the prosecution of 
a large wholesale and retail trade, while employ- 
ment is afforded a corps of experienced driver;- . 
clerks, etc. The firm are general dealers in, and 
handle immense quantities of hard and soft coal. 
wood, pressed hay and straw, and secure their 
supplies from the leading sources of production. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



1C9 



George A. Leightoii, Power Circular 
Knitting Machines for Cardigan Jackets, Leg- 
gings, etc. ; also Shirt and Hosiery Machinery, 
Corner of Franklin and Auburn Streets. Among 
the most popular and successful knitting ma- 
chines in the country is the Patent Automatic 
Circular Ribbed Fashioning Knitting Machines, 
manufactured by Mr. George A. Leighton. These 
works were founded in 1873 by Mr. R. G. Annan, 
who. in 1882, was succeeded in the proprietorship 
by Mr. Leighton, who is the owner of the patent 
rights of the Automatic Circular Ribbed Fashion- 
ing Knitting Machines for Cardigan jackets, leg- 
gings, etc., and also of shirt and hosiery machin- 
ery. He is also the president of the Everett 
Knitting Works of this city, these machines 
being of his invention. The premises occupied 
consist of one floor 50x125 feet, and this is fur- 




nished with one planer, two punches, two up- 
right drills, three millers, twenty lathes and 
other machinery, which is operated by steam 
power. From fifteen to twenty-five hands are 
employed, and a brisk business is done, the ma- 
chines being shipped to all parts of the country. 
The Patent Automatic Circular Ribbed Fashion- 
ing Knitting Machine is a novelty in the c'ass 
termed Circular Knitting Machines, in that it 
is automatic: in producing the various patterns of 
wool, such as fancy and plain blocks, checks, vor- 
tical and circular stripes, in any desirable com- 
bination or any one pattern entire, also in widen- 
ing and narrowing the garment or article at any 
point or points. The following are but a f'e\v of 
the articles which can be manufactured by this 
machine, it being adapted (according to size) to 
any work that can be produced on Circular Knit- 



ting Machines : First Hosiery, in any pattern 
or combination of patterns, using the widening 
and narrowing mechanism to fashion the work, 
or make in the hose the garter above and below 
the knee, which has never before been attempted. 
Second Leggings, and various other articles of 
apparel too numerous to mention, including 
wristers. Silk can also be employed with 
equally as good results. It will be readily un- 
derstood by those acquainted with this class of 
knitting, that a machine which will make from 
eight to ten dozen pair of hose per day (fash- 
ioned), and that one person can attend to at least 
six machines, must certainly be very economical 
in comparison with all other machines, and there- 
fore very valuable. The heels and toes of hosiery 
are made on another machine, this being used 
for legs only. 

W. S. Jewell, Wholesale Grocer and Flour 
Dealer, Tobaccos and Cigars a Specialty, Old 
Depot Store. In this review of the commercial, 
industrial and general business interests of Man- 
chester, a prominent place should be given to the 
well and favorably known establishment of W. S. 
Jewell, wholesale grocer and flour dealer, the sta- 
ble and reliable Old Depot Store, which since 
the inception of the business upward of twenty- 
eight years ago, has maintained a record of steady 
and substantial progress, and which fully sus- 
tains to-day its hold on public favor and confi- 
dence, being by common consent the leading, 
largest and best equipped concern of the kind in 
this city, as well as one of the oldest, while its 
connections, which are of a most extensive and 
gratifying character, grow apace annually. The 
house was founded in 1859 by J. S. Kidder & 
Co., who were succeeded by the firm of C. H. 
Hill & Co., who conducted it up to 1885, when 
the business passed into the control of Krudell & 
Jewell, by whom it was carried until January, 
1887, when Mr. Jewell became sole proprietor, 
and has since continued the business alone with 
uninterrupted success. The premises occupied 
comprise an entiie Iwo-story 40x120 foot build- 
ing, well ordered and equipped throughout, and 
a vast ami varied stock is constantly carried to 
meet the requirements of the trade, embracing 
everything comprehended in staple and fancy 
groceries, line ttas and coffees of every descrip- 
tion, pure spices, condiments, entrements, sauces 
and table luxuries, canned goods in great variety, 
tobaccos and cigars of every variety (imported 
and domestic), best brands of family flour, oat- 
meal, cornmeal, rice and cereal /ood products of 
every description, smoked and salt fish, vinegar, 
oils, soda, starch, .soap, household specialties and 
a multifarious assortment of shelf goods and 
grocers' sundries, tobaccos and cigars being a 
specialty, while Mr. Jewell is agent also for 
Wash burn's Superlative Flour. Half a dozen 
or more in help are employed, while three wag- 
ons are in steady service, and the trade of the 
house, which is of a wholesale character exclu- 
sively, extends all over the entire state, with a 
fine local patronage, and is exceedingly large. 
Mr. Jewell, who is a native of New Hampshire. 
and a resident of Manchester since early boyhood, 
is a young man of sterling qualities, full of push 
ml enterprise, and maintains an Al commercial 
standing, 



170 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



The Smith American Organ and 
Piano Company, Manufacturers of Organs 
anil Pianos, No. 531 Treniont Street, Boston; 
Branch House. No. 864 Elm Street, Manchester ; 
R. B. Quay, Manager. The Smith American 
Organ and Piano Co.. of Boston, opened a branch 
house in Manchester for the sale of their cele- 
brated pianos and organs in 1887, and the venture 
has been attended by the most satisfactory re- 
sults. The salesroom is 20x70 feet in dimensions, 
is finely fitted up, and it contains a very attrac- 
tive selection of pianos and organs of the com- 
pany's manufacture. This company began busi- 
ness in 1852, and by its pianos and organs it has 
made its name famous on both sides of the 
Atlantic. The company's factories and princi- 
pal offices are located at No. 531 Tremont street. 
The factories are equipped with the best labor- 
saving machinery that skill and capital can com- 
mand, and the company's facilities are such as to 
enable it to offer to the public and to the trade, 
pianos and organs the equal, if not the superior, 
of any in the market, on terms the most advan- 
tageous. The organs of this company are pro- 
duced in a variety of styles and combinations, 
ranging in price from $50.00 to $1,000, and adapted 
for use in the school, church, parlor and conserva- 
tory ; in fact for any use for which an organ is 
intended. The organs made by this company 
now number over one hundred and twenty thous- 
and. The Smith American Piano is not only sold 
at a fair price but has not a superior in the 
market. It is substantially built of the best 
materials obtainable and it has a most elegant 
and attractive exterior. The interior is a triumph 
of skill from an artistic and scientific point of 
view. Siuce'the company opened their establish- 
ment in Manchester it has been under the man- 
agement of Mr. R. B. Quay, who is a native of 
Ohio, and has been in the company's service for 
the past eight years. He is a gentleman who has 
devoted his time to this branch of business and 
has by his energy added largely to the increasejd 
demands of this company. 



Li. H. Josselyn & Co., Manufacturers of 
Furniture. Franklin Street, Corner of Auburn 
Street. Prominent among the leading notable 
lirms in the city engaged in the manufacture of 
furniture is that of Messrs. L. H. Josselyn & Co., 
who have built up a trade of considerable propor- 
tions. The business was started in 1874 by 
Messrs. Josselyn & Marston, but on the dissolu- 
tion of this partnership in 1876, Mr. L. H. Josse- 
lyn took sole charge of the affairs of the establish- 
ment under the style of L. H. Josselyn & Co. 
Mr. Josselyn is a native of Portland, Me., and has 
had vast experience in the furniture industry. 
The premises occupied consist of a substantial 
building, measuring 100x100 feet, and containing 
two floors and basement. The most modern and 
efficient tools and wood-working machinery, 
operated by steam power, are in use, and some 
twenty hands are employed in fitting together 
parts of furniture and in finishing them for the 
trade. The firm have a mill at Wet Campton, 
N. H., started in 1884, for the preparation of stock, 
and here a considerable number of workmen are 
employed. The stock prepared here is sent on to 
receive the finishing touches in the Manchester 
house. The manufactures consist of ash and 



painted chamber suites, bedsteads, bureaus, sinks, 
washstands, chestnut and pine dining table, and 
all kinds of chairs in the wood and finished. A 
large stock is kept on hand, and* the trade is 
wholesale in its character, ana is widespread. A 
mill at Goffstown will shortly be erected with a 
capacity for seventy-five men with dry house, 
store house, etc., making a spcialty of chamber 
sets, chairs, tables, etc., with railroad track to 
shop, etc. 

Everett Knitting Works, Manufacturers 
of Cardigan Jackets, Leggings and Fancy Knit 
Goods. This concern was incorporated only dur- 
ing the present year, and it has met with such 
great success thus far as to indicate the attain- 
ment of great prosperity in the future. The 
company was incorporated under the laws of 
New Hampshire with a capital of $20.000. The 
president is Mr. George A. Leighton, machinist 
and builder of knitting machines, in this city, 
and the treasurer is Mr. Edward Dorsey. Both 
these gentlemen are natives of'New Hampshire. 
The premises occupied have a floorage area of 
14,000 square feet, and here twenty- five knitting 
machines, operated by steam' power are kept at 
work in manufacturing Cardigan jackets, leggings 
and fancy knit goods. The machines in use are 
the Patent Automatic Circular Ribbed Fashioning 
Knitting Machines, by which are produced any 
number of patterns or designs that are only lim-* 
ited by the conception of the manufacturer or 
operator. Seventy-five hands are employed, and 
the products of the concern have won great favor 
in the market, and are shipped to all sections of 
the country through Messrs. Rogers, Lamson & 
Co., of New York, who are the selling agents of 
the company. A large stock of goods, plain and 
fancy, are constantly kept on hand, and from 
which any order can be promptly filled. 

F. Li. "Wallace & Co., City Undertakers 
and Practical Embalmers. The well-known and 
deservedly popular firm of F. L. Wallace & Co., 
city undertakers and practical embalmers, are in 
all respects the leading members of the profession 
in Manchester. This old and favorably known 
establishment was originally stajted in 1857 by 
Straw & Prince, who were succeeded in 1863 by 
John Prince, who was in turn succeeded six years 
subsequently by C. S. Fisher, who conducted the 
business up to 1874, when it passed into the hands 
of Pearson & Wallace. In 1876 the firm was 
changed to Fairbanks & Pearson in 1881, then the 
style of the firm was Pearson, Wai lace & Co. .contin- 
ued until the death of Mr. Pearson Oct. 9th, 1886, 
when it passed into the control of Messrs. F. L. 
Wallace & Co., the present concern. The ware- 
rooms are finely fitted up and appointed, and \\ 
complete and first-class assortment of coffins, 
caskets, grave clothes, shrouds, trimmings, and 
everything comprehended under the general head 
of funeral requisites is constantly carried < n hand, 
cloth, velvet, plush and silk covered caskets being 
a specialty. Handsome hearses and carriages also 
are furnished at short notice and at reasonable 
terms, while remains are prepared for burial and 
bodies embalmed in the most expert and satisfac- 
tory manner; funerals are directed and inter- 
ments procured in any of the city and suburban 
cemeteries 



LEADING MANUFACTUKEltS AND MERCHANTS. 



171 



Union Mortgage and Trust Company, 

Merchants' Exchange Building. The Union 
Mortgage and Trust Co. was incorporated in 1887 
under the laws of the state of Kansas, with a 
capital of $100,000, and has its western office at 
Marion, Kansas. This, company offers lirst mort- 
gages of real estate, both of farms and city prop- 
erty, paying six and seven per cent. The prompt 
payment of both principal and interest guaran- 
teed at the former rate, and at the latter prompt 
payment of interest and collection of principal 
without expense to holder guaranteed. The 
marvelous development of the west has led to a 
large and legitimate demand from borrowers, for 
money to improve their property, the value of 
which is steadily appreciating. Central Kansas 
affords unexcelled securities of this kind. More 
lines of railway were constructed in Central 
Kansas during the year 1886 than in any state 
in the Union. From the most reliable sources it 
is estimated that fivo hundred thousand persons 
will be added to thu population of Kansas before 
the close of tho present year. The comparative 
cheapness of tho land, tho fertility of the soil and 
the ease with which it can be cultivated, enables 
the borrower to successfully pay higher interest 
rates than could be safely obtainable in the east. 
The methods of placing western mortgage loans 
adhered to by this company are worthy of careful 
consideration, and are such as to secure a full in- 
vestigation of the character of the security offered 
for loan, the credit and reliability of the bor- 
rower, and insuro a close supervision of the loan 
during its continuance. This company guaran- 
tees promptness and due dilligence in the transac- 
tion of all business ou the part of the officers, 
agents or employes of the company ; a perfect 
title to all property on. which loans are made ; 
the truth of all material facts set forth in the 
application and report; that all papers are made 
in due form and in accordance with the laws of 
the state of Kansas, and the prompt payment of 
all interest and watch overall loans made, and 
that no loss shall occur by reason of the non-pay- 
ment or taxes or other liens, and that payments 
of principal and interest will be made without 
expense to the holder. The officers of the com- 
pany are as follows, viz Joseph L. Hosmer, 
president; Hon. George H. Stearns, treasurer; 
Edwin M. Donaldson, secretary; Chas. C. Hayes, 
vice-president ; R. O. Nelson, second vice-presi- 
dent ; W. A. Stanford, special agent; E. R. 
Trenner, examiner of titles. Directors : W. H. 
Dudley, cashier of First National Bank, Marion, 
Kan.; Levi Billings, president Cottonwood Val- 
ley B:mk ; Hon. E. E. Truesdell, Suncook, N. H. 
State Senator and Superintendent of Pembroke, 
Webster and China Corporation; Roswell O. Nel- 
son, Marion, Kansas, treasurer of Marion Co., 
Kansas; Col. I>. L. Jewell, Suncook, N. H., agent 
of Pembroke, Webster & China Corporation ; W. 
A. Stanford Marion, Kansas, of Stanford & Son, 
merchants; Chas. C. Hayes, Esq., Manchester, N. 
H.; John Dovvst, Esq.. Manchester, N. H., with 
Head & Dowst; E. R. Trenner, Marion, Kansas, 
attornev-at-law ; John T. Whitehouse, Lamed, 
Kan., of Wilson ct Whitehouse; Hon. J. B. 
Haselton, Suncook, N. H. ; Fred L. Frazer, 
Marion, Kansas, register of deeds of Marion 
Co., Kansas; Hon. George H. Stearns, ex- 
inaydr of the city of Manchester. N. H.; Joseph 



L. Hosmer, Suncook, N. H., of the firm of Don- 
aldson, Hosmer & Co., Marion, Kansas ; Edwin 
M. Donaldson, Marion, Kansas, of the firm of 
Donaldson, Hosmer & Co., Marion, Kansas. The 
president, treasurer and other officers and direc- 
tors are too well known in business and financial 
circles to require any eulogy at our hands. 

E. M. Slayton, Receiver of and Wholesale 
Dealer in Butter, Cheese, Lard, Pork, Eggs and 
All Kinds of Country Produce, Granite Street. 
This enterprising and flourishing houso was 
founded in 1865 by the present proprietor's 
father, Mr. H. K. Slayton, who is a native of 
Vermont and has resided in Manchester for the 
past thirty-four years. He was a member of the 
State Houso of Representatives in 1871-2, of the 
city Council in 1875 and of the State- Senate in 
1877-8, and he is now a trustee of the Guaranty 
Savings Bank. In 187:: he retired from business 
in favor of his son. Mr. E. M. Slaytou, present 
proprietor. Mr. E. M. Slaylon, who was born in 
Vermont thirty- five years ago, came to reside in 
Manchester when eleven years old, and in 1885-6 
he represented his fellow citizens in the Legisla- 
ture. As a commission merchant he receives 
heavy consignments of butter, cheese, lard, pork, 
beans, eggs, potatoes, evaporated apples and all 
kinds of coui.try produce, and -he possesses ample 
facilities and influential connections for conduct- 
ing all transactions under the most favorable 
auspices. The pi emises arc very convenient and 
spacious, and consist of a building measuring 
30x80 feet, and containing two stories and base- 
ment. They are admirably fitted up and an 
excellent stock is carried. Ten hands and three 
delivery wagons are employed, and also one 
traveling salesman. The business is exclusively 
of a wholesale character and extends throughout 
the New England states. 

B. F. & S. D. Shepard, Real Estate, Em- 
ployment and General Business Brokers, Room 
No. 2, Patten's Block, No. Ji24 Elm Street. 
Among the leading firms in Manchester can bo 
named B. F. & S. D. Shepard, real estate, employ- 
ment and general business brokers, and none in 
this business in this city sustain a higher reputa- 
tion for integrity, sound judgment and, reliability, 
as none enjoy a larger measure of public favor, 
numbering among their extensive clientele many 
of the solid and wealthy citizens in tho commu- 
nity. They transact a general real estate busi- 
ness, buying, selling and exchanging houses, lots, 
farms, etc., on commission ; attend to the collec- 
tion of house and ground rents and the manage- 
ment of estates (the purchase and sale of farms 
being a specialty), while loans are. negotiated on 
bond and mortgage, while they are accounted 
among the best judges of the present and prospec- 
tive values of both improved and unimproved 
property hereabout. They also effect employment 
for all classes of male and female help, and, in 
short, attend to business brokerage in all its 
features, and altogether a large, and flourishing 
business is transacted. Messrs. B. F. and S. D. 
Shepard (father and son respectively) are natives 
of Ellenburg, X. Y. state, but have been respected 
residents of Manchester .-everal years, the younger 
being an efficient and popular justice of the peace 
here. 



172 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



Clark Brothers, Fancy Goods, No. 941 
Elm Street. Among the flourishing and note- 
worthy mercantile establishments in this city 
may be mentioned the excellent emporium of 
Clark Bros , the deservedly popular Bee Hive, 
where is always displayed an exceedingly fine 
assortment of fancy goods, small wares, laces, em- 
broideries, gloves, hosiery, novelties in ladies' 
wear and female furnishings in great variety. 
This neat and well-known store was established 
in 1876 by J. B. Estey, who conducted it up to 
1884, when he was succeeded by the enterprising 
and popular firm whose name stands at the head 
of this sketch. The store, which is 25x80 feet in 
dimensions, is finely fitted up and attractively ar- 
ranged, a very tasteful display being made, and 
an extensive and elegant stock is carried, embrac- 
ing exquisite dress trimmings, silk ribbons, laces, 
embroideries and neckwear novelties, corsets and 
undergarments in great variety, gloves, hosiery, 
worsteds, yarns, braids, beads, buttons and 
small wares, jewelry, ornaments, notions, picture 
frames, art novelties, toilet articles and a multi- 
farious assortment of fancy goods. The firm 
make a specialty of stamping and embroidering, 
and keep on hand a full assortment of notions, 
while five competent and courteous clerks attend 
to the wants of purchasers, and the trade of 
the establishment, which extends all over the city 
and suburbs is of a most liberal and gratifying 
character. Messrs. Frank N., Geo. M. andChas. 
C. Clark, composing the firm, are natives of 
Chester, N. H., but residents of Manchester 
several years, and prior to embarking in this 
flourishing enterprise had all been employed 
in this city. 

F. C. Miville, Wholesale Retail Dealer 
in Drugs, Chemicals, etc., No. 1028 
Elm Street, Mercantile Block. The busi- 
ness of this reliable house was originally founded 
in 1843 by Dr. H. G. Connor, in whose employ 
Mr. Miville became engaged, in 1872, in the 
capacity of clerk. In 1876 he was admitted a 
partner in the firm, and in 1881 succeeded to the 
entire control. The premises are finely fitted up 
with every necessary requisite for pharmaceutical 
operations, and comprise a salesroom 20x70 feet 
in dimensions. The attractive shelf ware, hand- 
some show cases and soda fountain, combine to 
give the place a most tasteful and inviting ap- 
pearance. A large, very superior stock is carried, 
embracing all the supplies usually found in a 
first-class metropolitan drug store, including 
pure fresh drugs and chemicals, patent medicines, 
dye stuffs, fine toilet soaps, hair and tooth 
brushes, perfumery, fancy toilet articles, station- 
ery, trusses and shoulder braces, pure wines and 
liquors for medicinal purposes, etc. Two skilled 
pharmacists are employed and a specialty is made 
of the compounding of physicians' prescriptions, 
the finest materials entering into the composition, 
and accuracy being guaranteed. Mr. Miville is a 
native of Canada, and came to this city in 1871. 
He is a graduate of St. Ann's College of Quebec, 
Canada, and was the first to pass an examination 
before the State Board at Concord, N. H. He is a 
popular member of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association, St. John the Baptist and St. Augus- 
tine Societies, and is a welcome figure in every 
circle that he enters. 



H. I. Faucher, Dealer in Provisions, Beef, 
Pork. Lard, Hams, Fruits, Vegetables, Country 
Produce, Teas. Coffees, Spices, etc. Agent for the 
Central Vermont Railroad, No. 1105 Elm Street. 
This gentleman originally founded his business 
here in 1871, continuing it until 1882, when he 
retired and went to his native country, Canada, 
where he remained until 1886, when he returned 
to this city and established his present trade. 
The premises occupied comprise a store 25x75 
feet, an addition in rear 20x25 two stories in di- 
mensions, excellently fitted up throughout and 
filled with a large, exceptionally fine stock of 
goods. The assortment embraces the choicest 
provisions, beef, pork, lard, hams, fruits, vege- 
tables, country produce, teas, coffees, spices and 
general groceries, every article being of the high- 
est standard of excellence and purity. The prices 
are made uniformly low. From ten to twelve 
salesmen are employed. Among the numerous 
patrons of the establishment are many of the best 
people of this city and suburbs. Mr. Faucher is 
agent for the Kile of tickets for all parts of Canada 
and the West, via. the Central Vermont R. R. 

J. S. Berry,; Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, No. 
1083 Elm Street. At the popular establishment of 
J. S. Berry, may at all times be found a large and 
excellent assortment of every thing comprehended 
in the footwear line at the lowest prices con- 
sistent with reliable goods and upright dealing* 
while no pains are spared to render the fullest 
satisfaction in every instance to customers. This 
thriving and prosperous business was established 
in July, 1886, and from the start Mr. Berry has 
enjoyed a liberal and gratifying patronage. The 
store is neat and commodious, and a large and 
very superior stock is constantly carried, compris- 
ing ladies', gent's, misses', youths' and children's 
boots and shoes of every size, style and variety, 
both in finest and medium grades ; also rubbers 
and slippers of all kinds, and the the trade of the 
store extends all over the town and vicinity. Mr. 
Berry, is a native of Maine, but has resided 
in Manchester since 1869, and before starting 
this business had been for seventeen years em- 
ployed as overseer of the cording and spinning 
department of the Amoskeag Mills. 

L,. B. Bod well & Co., Dealer in Coal, 
Wood and Ice, No. 640 Elm Street, Forth* past 
nineteen years Messrs, L. B. Bodwell & Co., have 
been supplying the citizens of Manchester and 
vicinity with a superior quality of coal, wood and 
ice, having ample facilities for handling these nec- 
crssary articles, and a full supply is at all seasons 
at hand for meeting the wants of their patrons, 
embracing both hard and soft eoal, wood for fuel 
and kindling purposes, employing fifteen teams 
for delivering and storing the goods, also they 
supply a pure quality of ice in any quantity 
desired at low rates to consumers. Their ice 
house is located at Natts Pond, and is capable of 
storing about 10,000 tons of an excellent quality 
of pure ice. Some thirty hands are employed, 
the firm handling annually about 10,000 tons. 
This business was established in 1868 by Messr>. 
L. B. & A. Bodwell. The members of the firm 
consist of Messrs. L. B. Bodwell and A. Bod well, 
father and son respectively, both are natives 01' 
this state. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



173 



E>. P. Small, Real Estate Exchange and 
Banking Rooms, No. 9 Smyth's Block. One of 
the most active and popular representatives of 
the real estate business in this section is Mr. D. 
P. Small, whose headquarters are located in 
Smyth's Block, and whose branch offices are 
situated at Redford, Derry, Warner, Caudia, 
Franklin Falls and Nashua. Mr. Small estab- 
lished his enterprise in 1880, and now numbers 
among his permanent patrons many of our lead- 
ing capitalists and business men. He is ex- 
pert in the values of property, improved or unim- 
pioved, is thoroughly acquainted with all the 
available openings for investment in this county 
and elsewhere, and has upon his lists descriptions 
of many splendid properties of the most desirable 
character, and which are well worthy the atten- 



Joel Daniels & Co., House and Sign 
Painting, etc., No. 1094 Elm Street. Prominent 
mention ought to be made in this review of the well 
and favorably known firm of Joel Daniels & Co., 
house and sign painters, jobbers and dealers in 
paints, oils, glass, paper-hangings, etc. Mr. 
Daniels, who is sole proprietor, and is a native of 
Maine, but a resident of this city since 1866, is a 
practical and expert painter himself, with many 
years experience in the exercise of his art. He 
started in business on his own account here in 
1869, and at once established himself in popular 
favor owing to the superiority of the work ex- 
ecuted and the general excellence of the goods 
handled, coupled with upright and honorable 
dealing. The store is ample and commodious and 
a heavy and first-class stock is constantly carried, 




tion of the capitalist. Mr. Small carries on a 
general business in buying and selling property 
of all kinds, collecting rents, securing tenants 
and taking entire charge of estates, negotiating 
loans on bond and mortgage, loaning money on 
personal property, discounting notes, and making 
advances on earned wages till pay-day, charging 
the most reasonable commissions in all his trans- 
actions. He is a Justice of the Peace for this 
state, and performs all the offices which that 
position allows him. He is in direct communi- 
cation with all the great financial centres, afford- 
ing every facility for keeping posted as to the 
condition of the market. Photographs are shown 
of the most desirable properties, and a quarterly 
Real Estate eight page Bulletin is issued, which 
will be mailed free on application, those interested 
in investments of this section of the state will 
find Mr. Small well informed. 



John Mooar, Jeweler, No. 940 Elm Street, 
A record of uninterrupted prosperity, extending 
over a period of some forty-one years, marks the 
history of the well and favorably known. jewelry 
establishment of John Mooar. Mr. Mooar is a 
practical and expert workman, and the oldest ex- 
ponent of the trade in Manchester, with forty-five 
years experience in the exercise of his calling. He 
established business in this city in 1846. The 
store is 20x60 feet in dimensions and neatly fitted 
up, and a large and very superior stock is con- 
stantly carried, including fine gold and silver 
watches, elegant jewelry of all kinds, superb dia- 
monds, clocks of every style and variety, silver 
and plated ware, spectacles, eye-glasses and opti- 
cal goods, the Keystone watch case being a spe- 
cialty, and repairing of every description also is 
executed in the most excellent and satisfactory 
manner. 



including paints, oils, colors, glass, putty, brushes, 
wall-paper, window shades, artists' materials and 
general painters' supplies, while house and sign 
painting, decorating, paper hanging and kindred 
work of every description is done in the highest 
style of the art; from three to six skilled hands 
being regularly employed. Mr. Daniels, who is 
one of Manchester's staunchest citizens, was an 
efficient member of the city council 1875 and 1876, 
and also served with credit as president of the 
same body during this period, and is likewise a 
popular and prominent member of the I. O. O. F. 
and the F. & A. M. 



E. B. Coburii & Co., Manufacturers of 
Picture Frames and Dealers in Artists' Materials, 
Second-Hand School and Miscellaneous Books, 
No. 740 Elm Street. Mr. Coburn has been doing 
business in this city for the past twenty-seven 
years, and has been located in his present store, 
which is 25x70 feet in dimensions, for the past 
eleven years. Mr. Coburn is an extensive manu- 
facturer of gold, gilt, antique, bronze and other 
kin. Is of picture frames, and he deals largely in 
paintings, engravings, etc., and in artists' mate- 
rials and supplies of every description. In this 
line he has won a high reputation for the superior 
excellence of the work produced, and the uniform 
satisfaction rendered to those having business re- 
lations with his establishment. He is prepared to 
design, manufacture and gild picture frames of 
every description, making a leading specialty of 
fine gold work and of re-gilding, and gives con- 
stant employment to several skilled and experi- 
enced workmen. Mr. Coburn also carries a very 
extensive stock of second-hand school and miscel- 
laneous books. In all departments the prices are 
placed at the lowest figure. Mr. Coburn is a na- 
tive of New Hampshire. 



174 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



The James liuldvnii Company, Manu- 
facturers of Bobbins. Spools and Shuttles for 
Cotton, Woollen, Silk and Linen Mills. A promi- 
nent industry is the manufacture of bobbins, 
spools and shuttles for cotton, woollen, silk and 
linen mills, and in this useful field of enterprise 
the most successful, reliable and oldest establish- 
ment in Manchester, is that of the James Bald- 
win Co. This prosperous concern had its origin 
in 1858, when it was founded by Mr. James 
Baldwin, and in January, 1887, it passed into 
the hands of the James Baldwin Co., incorpor- 
ated under the laws of New Hampshire with a 
capital of $75,000. The founder of the enter- 
prise, Mr. James Baldwin, is president. The 
offices of secretary and treasurer are respectively 
filled by his sons, J. F. and L. C. Baldwin, who 
are natives of Nashua, N. H. The father was 
born at Westford, N. H. The works are exten- 
sive, and comprise two main and several smaller 
buildings, the whole covering an area of two 
acres. One of the main buildings was only 
recently completed. This measures 45x128 feet, 
and contains three stories and basement. The 
other principal building is a two-story structure, 
measuring 60x110 feet. The mechanical equip- 
ments are not excelled anywhere, and the 
machinery is operated by two water wheels of 
of 110 horse power, and a steam engine of 75 
horse power. The concern is the only one of its 
kind in the city and is the largest in the state. 
One hundred and fifty hands are employed and the 
pay roll amounts to $3,800 to $4,000 per month. 
The output amounts to 200 dozen shuttles and 
250,000 bobbins and spools per month, and the 
sales annually reach from $100,000 to $125,000. 
The trade of the concern extends to all parts of 
the country, and the volume of business is under- 
going steady increase. The concern deserves the 
patronage accorded and the confidence of the 
trade. 



Garswell & Brown, Groceries, Meats and 
Provisions, No. 928 Elm Street. The history of 
this house since the inception of the business 
some thirty odd yeaj-s ago marks a record of 
unbroken prosperity, and fully sustains to-day 
its old-time reputation for reliable goods and 
upright dealing. This well and favorably known 
stand was established in 1857 by H. C. Merrill, 
who was succeeded about 1877 by Thos. Hubbard, 
who continued it about two years until 1879, 
when he was succeeded by W. E. Stevens, who 
conducted it up to 1887, when he was succeeded 
by the pushing and popular firm whose name 
heads this sketch. The premises occupied for 
business purposes comprise a 25x125 foot store 
and basement, and a heavy and first-class stock 
is constantly carried, embracing pure teas and 
coffees, spices, condiments, canned goods and 
delicacies, choice dairy butter, prime smoked 
meats and provisions, smoked and salt fish, best 
brands of family flour (which is a specialty), 
sugars, molasses, syrups, rice, lard, beans, peas, 
meal, cereal food products, shelf goods, soda, 
starch, soap, household specialties and general 
staple and fancy groceries, while several compe- 
tent and polite clerks attend to the wants of cus- 
tomers, and the trade, which extends all over the 
city and suburbs, is large, prosperous and perma- 
nent. Mr. W. L. Carswell is a native of Man- 



chester, and has resided here all his life with the 
exception of about four years spent in Boston en- 
gaged in the grocery business, and Mr. E. E. Brown 
is a native of Canada, three years in the grocery 
business in Boston before coming to Manchester. 



J. Taylor & Son, All Grades of Flour. AY. 
I. Goods, Choice Family Groceries, etc., No. 99Q 
Elm Street. This reliable house was first opened 
for business in 1882, and it was not long before an 
excellent patronage began to be acquired, the 
trade to expand and grow, until now the con- 
cern is one of the most substantial and popular 
of the kind in the city. The firm occupy a spa- 
cious and commodious store 20x80 feet in size r 
excellently appointed and amply provided with 
all modern appliances. Neatness, order and sys- 
tem prevail, courteous attention is paid to all 
customers by the proprietors and their five effi- 
cient assistants, all orders are promptly filled, 
the goods carefully packed, and delivered free of 
charge to any part of the city. The stock com- 
prises fresh, pure, staple and fancy groceries of 
all kinds, all grades of family flour. West India 
goods, meats and provisions, fruits and vege- 
tables, and choice dairy and creamery products, 
which are offered at very low prices. The 
copartners, Mr. J. Taylor, and his son, Mr. Fred. 
A. Taylor, are natives of this state. 

Darwin M. Poore, Dealer in Groceries^ 
Meats, etc., No. 1139 Elm Street. Born in this 
state, Mr. Poore came to Manchester in 1865 and 
founded his enterprise here in 1867, meeting with 
excellent success from the outset. The extensive 
premises used comprise a store 20x75 feet in di- 
mensions, with an L 20x40 feet, the latter used 
for the keeping and sale of meats, fish and 
oysters. The main store is excellent in its 
arrangement and conveniences, and is filled toit& 
utmost capacity with a very superior stock of 
staple and fancy groceries, both foreign and 
domestic, specialties being made of teas, coffees, 
spices, family flour and dairy produce. Six active- 
clerks are afforded employment. Popular prices- 
rule in all the departments, and customers have 
their purchases delivered to any part of the city 
free of charge. Mr. Poore has been a member of the 
City Council, and is earnestly interested in the 
welfare and advancement of the community. 



J". N. Marstoii, Real Estateand Employment 
Agency, No. 788 Elm Street, Room 3 One among 
our old,popular,esteemed citizens is Mr. J. N. Mars- 
ton, the well-known justice of the peace and real 
estate agent. Squire Marston is an able, upright 
judge and is held in high estimation in the com- 
munity, enjoying the confidence of all by the 
upright, honorable manner he dispenses justice and 
the impartial manner he renders decisions. Jus- 
tice Marston gives particular attention to real 
estate transactions and buys and sells property of 
all kinds on commission, and makes collections 
and secures or rents tenements, and is prompt in 
his attention to all branches of the business. He 
also conducts an employment agency and supplies 
first-class farm hands and help generally. Jus- 
tice Marston, who was born in Vermont, has lived 
in the state of New Hampshire over a quarter of 
a century, and has been permanently located in 
Manchester seventeen years. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANT*. 



175 



Frederick C. Dow, Boots and Shoes. At 
the well-ordered and handsome emporium of 
Frederick C. Dow, dealer in fine boots and 
shoes, can always be found an exceedingly fine 
assortment of everything in this line, from the 
most excellent and durable boot and most attrac- 
tive and neat-fitting shoe to the most exquisite 
and dainty lady's slipper; popular prices and 
reliable goods being at all times prevailing feat- 
ures in this the footwear house par excellence of 
Manchester. This admirably-conducted and de- 
servedly-popular store was established in 1870 by 
the present proprietor, building up in a short 
time a large and flattering patronage. The prem- 
ises occupied for business purposes, which are 
commodious and ample, are neatly fitted up and 




tastefully appointed, and a heavy and Al stock is 
constantly cairied, embracing ladies', gentle- 
men's, misses', youths' and children's boots and 
shoes of every style, variety and quality, both in 
the finest and medium grades, including also 
Kimball's famous walking boots (with cork soles 
running through and rendering them thoroughly 
waterproof), the celebrated gossamer boot (the 
easiest-fitting boot known), handsome low-cut 
French kid opera slippers, side-lace boots. Dow's 
nobby style calf shoe, etc., while five capable and 
polite assistants are employed. Mr. Dow, who is 
a native of Pembrook, N. H., but a resident of 
this city since 1867, is a popular and efficient 
trustee of the Manchester Savings Bank. 



Campbell & Williams, All Kinds of Mer- 
cantile Printing, Globe Block, No. 21 Hanover 
Street. This business was inaugurated by F. H. 
Challis, and in 1881 A. S. Campbell became asso- 
ciated with him under the firm name of Challis 
& Campbell, who were succeeded in 1883 by 
Campbell & Williams. The firm has made many 



improvements and increased the facilities and 
built up a large, substantial business. The prem- 
ises are thoroughly equipped and provided with 
every facility lor doing all kinds of commercial 
and general job printing, which is executed with 
skill in the highest style of the art. The firm 
have four fast presses which are driven by steam 
power: also a Porter press and new fonts of 
modern stales of type. Besides counting house 
and general mercantile printing, posters, dodgers, 
flyers, etc., are executed at short notice, and the 
prices will compare favorably with those of any 
other well-conducted printing establishment in 
this section of the New England states. Mr. A. 
S. Campbell, who is a native of Litchfield, in this 
state, has had ten years experience as a printer, 
and his partner, Mr. J. A. "Williams, who is also 
a native of Wilmot, New Hampshire, has been 
engaged in the business for thirteen years. The 
former gentleman is a member of the I. O. O. F. 
and the A. O. U. W., while the latter is a promi- 
nent member of the Grangers and also of the A. 
O. U. W. 



William Corey, Manufacturer of Knitting 
Machine Latch Needles. Mr. William Corey has 
won high reputation as a manufacturer of knit- 
ting machine latch needles. In 1866 the business 
which he now controls was established under the 
firm style of William Corey & Co., and in 1876 
he became the sole proprietor. His premises con- 
sist of a three-story brick and wood building 
30x75 feet in dimensions, and these are fitted up 
with the latest improved machinery, which is 
operated by a steam engine of 15 horse power. 
From eighty to one hundred hands are employed, 
and the concern is the only one of its kind in the 
city, and in combination with his other branch 
works makes it the largest in the world. In ad- 
dition to manufacturing knitting machine latch 
needles, of which 130,000 are produced weekly, 
Mr. Corey is a maker of patent shoe button fas- 
teners, and in this line does a large trade, his 
products being shipped to all parts of the 
country. Mr. Corey has also a similar establish- 
ment at Upper Bedford, Quebec, where a large 
and brisk business is done. Mr. Corey was born 
of American parents in Canada. 

J. E. Stearns & Co., Meats, Fish, Oysters, 
Vegetables, Poultry, etc., No. 1313 Elm Street. 
One of the neatest and best kept establishments 
devoted to the sale of meats, sea food and garden 
products in this quarter of the city is the well- 
known and reliable market of J. E. Stearns & 
Co. This thriving and popular business was es- 
tablished in 1872 by Robinson & Stearns, who 
conducted it up to 1883, when the copartnership 
became dissolved, and three years subsequently 
the pushing and prosperous firm whose name- 
heads this sketch was formed. The store is. 
20x75 feet in dimensions, and a large and fine 
stock is constantly carried, comprising prime 
fresh beef, mutton, lamb, veal and pork, salt ami 
smoked meats, fresh fish of every variety, oysters 
and shell fish of all kinds, poultry, vegetables 
and fruits ; two efficient assistants also being in 
attendance, while a delivery wagon is in constant 
service. The firm is composed of J. E. and G. 
L. Stearns, father and son respectively, both na- 
tives of the city. 



170 



CITY OF MANCHESTER. 



AY. D. Ladd & Co., City Bakery, No. 1208 
and 1210 Elm Street. One of the neatest and 
foremost concerns in this line in Manchester is 
the well ordered and excellent City Bakery, \V. 
D. Ladd & Co., proprietors, wholesale and retail 
dealers in fancy crackers, cakes, bread, etc., which 
is among the most reliable and popular stores of 
the kind in the city. This well and favorably 
known stand was originally established as a 
bakery some fifteen years ago, and after a number 
of changes in proprietorship, in 1884 came into the 
control of the prosperous firm whose name heads 
this sketch. The premises occupied comprise a 
25x75 foot floor, and basement of equal dimen- 
sions, and the former, which is tbe store, is taste- 
fully fitted up and inviting, while the latter, 
which is used as the bake-house, is supplied with 
the best facilities and completely equipped in 
every respect, and several expert bakers are em- 
ployed. A large and very superior stock is 
carried fresh daily, including wholesome and deli- 
cious bread, fancy crackers in great variety, plain 
and ornamental cake of all kinds, pies, pasteries 
and choice confections, orders for wedding cake, 
plain, frosted or made in artistic designs, being 
promptly and satisfactorily filled at short notice, 
while three wagons are in steady service supply- 
ing customers all over the city and surrounding 
country. The individual membersof the firm are 
Messrs. W. D. Ladd and W. F. Elliott. 



Thorp & Bartlett, Stoves, Ranges, Furn- 
aces, and Kitchen Furnishing Goods, No. 1051 
Elm Street. A leading firm engaged in this line 
in Manchester is that of Thorp & Bartlett, deal- 
ers in stoves, ranges, tinware and kindred articles, 
whose spacious and handsome store is one of the 
finest and foremost establishments devoted to 
this branch of mercantile activity in the city. 
This flourishing enterprise wns started in 1874 by 
F. D. Thorp, who conducted it alone up to 1884, 
when he admitted into partnership O. F. Bartlett, 
thus constituting the pushing and popular firm 
whose name heads this sketch. The premises 
occupied for business purposes comprise a 40x60 
foot floor and basement finely fitted up and well 
ordered in every respect, and an extensive and 
admirably selected stock is constantly carried, 
embracing elegant stoves, ranges, furnaces and 
heaters of every size, style and variety, tin and 
sheet-iron ware of all kinds, stove castings and 
repairs, kitchen specialties and house furnishing 
goods in great variety, while the firm are sole 
agents also for the Adams & Westlake oil, gas 
and gasoline stoves. Tin sheet-iron and copper 
work in all its branches is executed in the most 
superior and expedtious manner, and repairing and 
general jobbing likewise is promptly attended 
to, four or more expert workmen being employed. 
Messrs. Thorp & Bartlett in addition take orders 
for steam, gas and water pipes and plumbing in 
all its branches. 



W. H. Elliott, Jeweler, Optician, and Dealer 
in Pianos, Organs and Musical Goods, No. 915 
Elm Street. A pioneer of the earlier business 
interests here, covering a period of forty-six years 
of active, busy life, during which time he has 
materially added to the growth and attractiveness 
of the city, in building two of the finest private 
residences, namely, one corner of Myrtle and 



Maple streets, another corner of Walnut and Con- 
cord streets, also a large tenement consisting of 
twenty houses in one block located corner of 
Pearl and Chestnut streets, besides several others. 
Mr. Elliott established his business here in the 
year 1841 on the block now bounded by Man- 
chester and Hanover streets, and after several 
changes locating at the present site, No. 915 Elm 
street between Hanover and Amhurst streets. 
The premises have a frontage on Elm street of 20 
feet and a depth of 100 feet. It has a choice and 
well selected stock of silverware, watches of home 
and foreign production, plain and ornamental 
clocks, fine jewelry, spectacles and eye glasses, of 
which last two mentioned articles he pays special 
attention, and as a scientific optician he is widely 
known as an expert in fitting glasses 1o suit the 
eye in difficult and abnormal cases. Mr. Elliott 
is also extensively engaged as a dealer in pianos, 
organs, musical instruments and musical mer- 
chandise. Mr. Elliott is a native of Derry, in this 
state, but has resided in Manchester since 1841, 
and was a member of the Board of Selectmen 
previous to the time Manchester was incorporated, 
and for more than one-third of a century has 
been a member of the Masonic Order and a 
Knight Templar. 

C. H. Kimball, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in Pianos and Organs, etc., No. 73 
Hanover Street. This now flourishing business 
was started in a comparatively small way by the " 
present proprietor about ten years ago, but by 
untiring energy, upright and liberal dealing and 
close attention to the wants of customers, Mr. 
Kimball rapidly pushed his way to prominence 
and public favor, building up in a short time a 
very fine trade. He occupies a neat and well 
kept 25x80 foot store and basement, and carries 
constantly on hand an extensive and Al stock, 
including the Knabe and Behr Bros, pianos, the 
Wilcox & White organs, the Wheelock pianos, 
musical instruments of ail kinds, violin strings, 
music books, sheet music, fancy cards, art novel- 
ties, sewing machines and attachments, while 
three competent and polite assistants are in at- 
tendance, and altogether the patronage is of a 
very substantial and gratifying character. Mr. 
Kimball. who is a native of this state and raised 
in the city, is a popular and esteemed member of 
the I. O. O. F., Red Men, and Royal Arcanum. 



Boston 99 Cent Store, No. 1014 Elm 
Street, Stark Block ; S. E. Butterfield, proprietress. 
At the " Boston 99 Cent Store," of which Miss 
S. E. Butterfield is the enterprising and prosper- 
ous proprietress, can always be found a multifari- 
ous assortment of useful and ornamental articles, 
household specialties, novelties and small wares for 
5, 10 and 99 cents, which cannot be duplicated 
elsewhere in Manchester at 50 per cent, advance 
in the prices. This thriving and prosperous store 
was established in 1879. The store, which is 
25x50 feet in dimensions, is finely fitted up and 
tastefully arranged, and an extensive and varied 
stock is constantly carried, comprising fancy 
goods, toys, notions, novelties, games, stationery, 
small wares, household specialties, tinware, cut- 
lery, kitchen utensils and miscellaneous articles, 
while no pains are spared to render the utmost 
satisfaction in every instance. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



177 



Palmer & Garnion, Manchester Marble 
and Granite Works, No. b'04 Elm Street, Corner 
of Granite Stieet. The establishment of Messrs. 
Palmer & Garmon is the oldest and leading con- 
cern of its kind in the city. The business was 
first started in Manchester in 1842 by J. H. 
Wiuslow, who continued it about eight years. 
He sold to J. B. Campbell, who in 1854 sold to 
Cyrus Chase, and Mr. I. D. Palmer became a 
member of the firm the same year. At this time 
there was but very little done at the business. 
In 1856 Mr. Chase Fold his interest to John U. 
Farnham, and the business was conducted by J'al- 
mer & Farnham for eleven years. In 1867 Mr. 
Palmer bought out his partner and was sole pro- 
prietor until 1871, when Mr. Win. G. Gannon 
was admitted a memher of the firm. In 1874 
Mr. Clarence D. Palmer, son of I. D., was ad- 
mitted a member of the firm. Mr. I. D. Palmer 
was born in Deering, N. H. He has been con- 
nected with the firm thirty-three ye^rs, and great 
credit is due to him for the high standard it has 
attained. Mr. Garmou was born in New London, 
this state. He came to this city in 1857 and 
entered the employ of Palmer & Faruham, was 
foreman for Mr. Palmer several years and re- 
mained with the establishment up to the time he 
became a member of it. Mr. C. D. Palmer was 
born in Grafton, Mass., and is a graduate of Dart- 
mouth College. All of the members of the firm 
are practicable workmen and give their personal 
attention to the business. The establishment is 
located at the corner of Elm and Granite streets 
and covers an area of 5,000 feet, and from twelve 
to fifteen workmen are employed on marble and 
granite. They keep constantly on hand a choice 
and excellent assortment of plain and highly 
ornamental monuments, and richly carved tablets 
in murhle, Scotch and American granite; also 
statua.y of the highest order and cemetery work 
of every description. They have on hand an ele 
gant assortment of designs of every kind and are 
always prepared to draft original and artistic 
designs and fashion them in marble and granite. 
They have a large and increasing patronage. 
Some of the finest and most costly monuments to 
be found in New England may be seen in our 
cemeteries in this city, and were designed and 
wrought at this establishment. Their trade is 
not confined to this city alone but extends into a 
large number of towns in this state and even into 
Massachusetts. 



Ormond H. Kimball, Printer and En- 
graver, No. 10 Market Street. This enterprise 
was started in 1856 by C. F. Livingston who con- 
ducted it alone up to 1877, when he was suc- 
ceec'ed by Livingston & Kimball, who carried 
on the business up to 1884, when owing to the 
retiiem at of the founder Mr. Kimball became 
sole proprietor. The premises occupied for busi- 
ness purposes comprise a 25x70 foot floor and 
basement supplied with ample steam power, and 
completely equipped in every respect with the 
most improved machinery and general appurte- 
nances, including five presses, wnile from ten to 
fifteen expert hands are employed. Printing 
and engraving of everv description are executed 
in the most superior and expeditious manner, fine 
commercial work being a specialty, and alto- 
gether the trade of the concern, which extends 



throughout the city and surrounding country, is 
exceedingly large. Mr. Kimball is a popular and 
respected member of the I. O. O. F., Red Men, 
and the G. A. R. Louis Bell Post No. 3., and 
bears a creditable war record, enlisting in the 5th 
Cav. Reg. Army in 1860, and served in i he same 
up to 1863, when he was discharged as disabled 
from wounds received at the battle of Gaine's 
Mills. When restored to health soon after, he re- 
enlistedin the 1st N. H. Artillery, and shared the 
fortunes of this regiment until mustered out in 
1864. 

Carl E. York, Wholesale nnd Retail Dealer 
in Groceries, Meats, Fresh Fish, Wild Game, 
Vegetables, Fruits, etc., No. 119 Hanover Street, 
Corner of Chestnut Street. In 1877 Mr. York 
opened his store, and from that date has by excel- 
lent management and untiring energy, brought 
the business up to the present state of prosperity, 
his trade extending as it does throughout the city 
and its immediate vicinity. It hasalways been 
a special feature of this house to supply only the 
best quality of food products and staple groceries. 
Customers can at all times feel assured of obtain- 
ing excellent goods and courteous treatme-nt. 
The stock carried at all times is large and varied, 
embracing staple and fancy groceries, consisting 
of the best brands of flour, sugars, teas, coffees, 
spices, soap, table salt, etc., canned goods in great 
variety, finest creamery and dairy butter,- eggs, 
cheese, and in fact everything to be found in a 
well ordered grocery store. There is also in 
connection with the store an excellent market 
supplied with all modern conveniences to pre- 
serve and handle prime fresh beef, mutton, lamb, 
veal, pork, fowl and game, kept in fine condition 
and of the best quality. The premises occupied 
by him are a first floor and basement 25x75 feet 
in dimensions, the market being in the rear of 
the store. Mr. York is a native of Vermont but 
has resided in Manchester since 1861 ; he is a mem- 
ber in good standing of the I. O. O. F. and Order 
of Red Men. 

H. B. Fairbanks, Auctioneer, Commission 
Merchant and Appraiser, No. 882 Elm Street. 
This business wos originally founded in 1862 by 
Mr. G. F. Bosher, Mr. Fairbanks becoming a 
member of the firm in 1875, and succeeding to 
the entire proprietorship in 1885. The spacious 
business premises comprise a building 25x100 
feet in dimensions, having three stories and base- 
ment. An extensive stock is carried, comprising 
parlor sets, crockery, glassware, ranges, chamber 
sets, mattresses, spring beds, housekeeping goods, 
etc., which are offered at the lowest cash prices, 
or are sold on e;isy payments, installment plan. 
Mr. Fairbanks carries on a general business as 
auctioneer, commission merchant and appraiser, 
pays special attention to the sale of real estate 
and personal property, and makes liberal advances 
on consignments. Auction sales are held every 
Thursday and Saturday, and prompt returns of 
the proceeds are made to consignors in every in- 
stance. Mr. Fairbanks, who is a native of this 
city, wns a member of the City Council in 1885 
and 1886. and has fully proved his value as a 
citizen. He is also a prominent and active mem- 
ber of the Order of I. O O. F., of over fifteen 
years standing. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The City of Concord is the capital of Merrimack County and also the capital of the State 
of New Hampshire. It is 75 miles distant from Boston and 474 miles north-east of Washington. 
The city lies on the route of travel and commerce between Boston and Montreal, and Boston 
and the Far West, and hence has become a principal centre of the New England system of rail- 
roads. It has also a railroad connection with Portsmouth. The railroads entering here are 
the Concord Railroad, extending to Nashua and Boston ; the Boston, Concord and Montreal Rail- 
road, extending to Haverhill on the Connecticut, and to Montreal ; the Concord and Claremont 
Railroad ; the Portsmouth and Concord Railroad ; the Northern New Hampshire Railroad, 
extending to West Lebanon, on the Connecticut, and continued by the Vermont, New York 
and Canada Railroads to Rouse's Point, Montreal, Ogdensburg, Kingston, etc. 

In telling the story of the past and present of Concord, Mr. John N. McClintock, A. M.. 
editor and publisher of "the Granite Monthly, a New Hampshire magazine devoted to literature 
history and State progress," says that to-day Concord is one of the most charming cities 
in the world, and he knows pretty well what he is talking about, for he is a gentleman of 
close observance and extensive travel. In the Granite Monthly he has pictured the antique 
and the modern in and about Concord, and has entered so much into descriptive detail that his, 
account of the settlement and progress of the city is deserving of the student's close atten^ 
tion. The compiler of these lines acknowledges indebtedness to him for many interesting items 
which will be found crowded on these pages. " Within New England," he says, " Concord has 
few rivals, and no superiors in variety and extent of attractions and beauties. Within the city 
limits there is no quarter assigned to squalor and poverty. There are many cottages, but none 
so poor that attempts at beautifying are not made, flowers in the windows or in the garden, ivy or 
grape vines, bushes and shade trees, neat fences and paths, paint, whitewash and cleanliness, 
indicate the ambition of the occupants. A stranger looks in vain for the abode of wretchedness. 
Of course there is poverty, but it is covered by the mantle of charity. The church edifices of 
every denomination in the city are creditable to the zeal and piety of the members, several build- 
ings are elegant specimens of architecture, and compare favorably with any in the State. Its 
situation is far enough inland to escape the east wind of the coast ; its elevation is enough to 
render the air dry, bracing and salubrious. The Merrimack River flows through the city, and 
is joined in its course by the important tributaries, the Contoocook, Soucook and Turkey River, 
and many small brooks. The Merrimack is boi'dered by broad intervales, bounded by older 
river-terraces, on one of which is located the village, the precinct, or the city. This beautiful 
river is restless in its flow to the sea, and is constantly wearing new channels. Great changes 
have occurred within the memory of men now living. Near the centre of the city's area cf 
sixty-four square miles, there is a miniature mountain known as Rattle Snake Hill, rising 
several hundred feet above the plain of the river, and composed of one mass of granite of 
excellent quality. From the lofty summit, almost the whole city is in view. At one's feet, 
like a broad blue ribbon, glides the Merrimack ; beyond is the steep bank which limits the Dark 
Plains ; while still farther away is Oak Hill and the Broken Ground and the Break of Day. 
Directly to the east is the village of East Concord, with its church, school-hoi:se, ward-house, and 

179 



180 CITY OF CONCORD. 



many private residences, which lose nothing in attractiveness by a close inspection. At the base 
of the hill, in the same direction, is a pile of buildings where the convicts of the State are 
employed in forwarding an important industry. Humanitarian ideas were carried out in the con- 
struction of the new State prison ; physical inconvenience and torture were not deemed an essen- 
tial part of a prisoner's punishment, and the health of the inmates was taken into consideration 
in accepting the plans. It is a model institution. A little farther to the south is Blossom-Hill 
Cemetery, a peaceful resting-place for the dead. The surface is undulating, and affords an 
opportunity for tasteful and artistic improvement ; and winding avenues, foot-paths, a little lake, 
and wide-spreading trees beautify the place. The forefathers of the town were buried in the 
old cemetery in the village, while the Catholics have consecrated ground to the north of Blos- 
som Hill. As one gazes toward the city, one after the other three trains of cars appear gliding 
towards the north : the one crosses the river to East Concord, passes the site of the Old Fort, 
and follows up the line of the canal by the ruined buttresses of the dam at Sewall's Falls, the 
other follows up the valley of the Merrimack, and crosses Sewall's Island, the station at Penacook, 
and that little island at the mouth of the Contoocook River, where stands a granite statue to 
commemorate the heroism of Hannah Dustin ; the third, after passing the village of West Con- 
cord, deflects to the west and south, passes the Mast Yard, and follows the valley of the Con- 
toocook. Nestling at the base of Rattlesnake, to the west, is a beautiful sheet of water, sur- 
rounded by high hills and quiet rural scenery, known from the days of yore as Long Pond, 
but lately dignified by the name of Penacook Lake. Three miles long, but narrow, its pure 
crystal water fed by springs beneath its surface, a hundred feet above the level of Main street, 
is the reservoir, which, by an elaborate system of water-works, supplies the city. Its overflow 
furnishes the power which has built up the flourishing village of West Concord, a hive of 
industry directed by one active brain. Here is a granite church, very attractive within and 
without ; numerous pleasant homes ; and, in the middle of the street, a horse-car station. If 
one but wait long enough, he can board an open car, and be propelled over the public highway, 
behind a steam-motor, to the northern limits of the city, to the village of Penacook on the banks 
of the Contoocook. The village overflows into the neighboring town of Boscawen, but the 
political division is only recognized on town-meeting days. Here are located factories, 
foundries, and mills, churches, school-houses, business blocks, and private residences, of a 
character to indicate the thrift and industry of the village ; yet it is nearly all the growth of the 
past two score years. On one's return to the city, he passes, at the base of Rattlesnake, numer- 
ous establishments where busy workmen fashion the granite quarried from the neighboring hill- 
side. To return to the summit, the view on every side is pleasing. Throughout the city are 
fine old farm-houses, shaded by overhanging elms, the growth of a hundred years or more, sur- 
rounded by orchards and fertile fields and pastures. The roads wind up and down the hills, 
and through shady glades where the sun is screened at mid-day. Large barns indicate great 
crops, and testify that the owners are " well-to-do." 

Beyond the limits of the city, on every hand, are the hills and mountains for which 
New Hampshire is celebrated. All around the horizon they loom up, and by the aid of a 
map can be easily distinguished. Here, sometime in the future, will be built a grand hotel. 
The Intervale Lands of the Merrimack are very fertile. Soon after entering Concord the Mer- 
rimack passes over Sewall's Falls, and thence has no natural obstruction until it reaches the 
Falls at the south-east extremity of the city, where is a vast water power. Locks are here con- 
structed, and boat navigation secured. The river here is about 100 yards wide, but during 
freshets the water rises twenty feet above the ordinary level, presenting to the eye a body of 
water a mile wide. There are handsome bridges spanning the river. Long before the white 
man with his "civilizing influences," penetrated this region, the place bore the name of Pena- 
cook, and it was the happy hunting ground of the Penacook Indians, who built over the river, at 
Sugar Ball, a fort, to protect themselves against their enemies, the Mohawks. Here the Pena- 
cooks and Mohawks had a fierce and sanguinary struggle, and then those who survived the con- 
flict were attacked by a plague which was more destructive than the tomahawk. 

For nearly a century the district of Concord was claimed to be within the jurisdiction of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony ; and within a few years after the first coast settlements were made, 
it was granted to enterprising citizens of Salem. As the conditions were not fulfilled, it reverted 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



181 



to the colony. New Hampshire disputed the right of the Bay State Colony to Penacook, and 
both States granted the township one under the name of Penacook, and the other under the 
appellation of Bow to settlers. The sons of settlers from Andover and other towns in Massa- 
chusetts were the first to arrive on the ground. They, however, found some Scotch-Irish Pres- 
byterians in possession, who, on being warned to depart, departed. Being a frontier post, the 
new settlers, who called the place Rumford, had a lively time with the Indians, against whom 
they had to build garrison houses. Some of the buildings put up by these settlers, who took 
possession on January 17, 1725, are still standing. They were God-fearing but brave men, and 
they were headed by a fighting parson, who had the best gun in the parish. His gun he took 




THE COURT HOUSE. 

with him into the pulpit, while he prayed for his enemies, and his congregation were at all times 
armed to the teeth. If men went to work in the fields they were protected by armed escorts, 
for the Indians had once pounced upon five of the settlers when at work and scalped them. 
When the dispute as to the boundary line between Massachusetts and New Hampshire had been 
terminated by the decision of the King of England, Rumford, in 1765, changed its name to 
Concord. 

In the French wars and in the Revolutionary struggle, and notably in the engagements at 
Bunker Hill and Bennington, the Concord men were equal to the emergency. During the Rev- 
olution the seat of the government for the State of New Hampshire was at Exeter, but at its 



132 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



close Concord became the favorite meeting place for the legislators, and for many years the old 
North Church was the Capitol of the State. 

The State House is on Main street, in the heart of the city, is a fine, attractive building 
of hewn granite. The body of the building is of dark surface granite, and was erected in 




CONCORD DEPOT. 

1816 to 1819, at a cost of #8o,oco. It is 126 feet in length, 49 feet in width, and with a projec- 
tion in the centre of 4 feet on each front. Since the war of the Rebellion the elegant Doric 
facade has been built of the finest granite from the Rattlesnake quarries. Within, the rotunda 
is embellished by the tattered flags of New Hampshire regiments, borne on a hundred Southern 
battle-fields ; the council chamber has on its walls the portraits of all the governors since the 
organization of the State ; the State library has a collection of portraits of the chief-justices, an 
excellent law-library for reference, and a large miscellaneous collection of books ; the represen- 
tatives' hall has life sized portraits of Washington, Webster, Pierce, and John P. Hale ; the sen- 
ate chamber has the portraits of the presiding officers of that body ; while throughout the build- 
ing are hung portraits of scholars, soldiers and statesmen who have honored their native State. 
The State-house Square, or "yard," is adorned by many noble trees one on the north side 
planted to commemorate the visit of Lafayette and is traversed by paths for the accommoda- 
tion of the public. It is surrounded by an iron fence, and has a fountain within it. An appro- 
priate statue of Daniel Webster, the gift to his native State of Benjamin S. Cheney, a generous 
citizen of Massachusetts, stands immediately in front of the main entrance to the building. 
The land occupied by the State House originally belonged to Peter Green. In 1803 a 
society of Friends was gathered, who built a meeting-house on the site of the State House. 
It was moved, to make room for the Capitol, to a lot north of the old cemetery, where it still 
stands, now a dwelling-house. The yard had originally a wall of cut stone on the north and 
south sides, and an iron fence in front and rear. 

The original settlers laid out this wide and beautiful thoroughfare substantially as it is to-day. 
The street was originally ten rods wide ; but in the course of time the abutting owners were 
allowed to encroach two rods on each side, reducing the width to six rods. Pedestrians claimed 
the middle of the street, and forced teams to take the outside. Sidewalks were then unknown. 
The streets were not named until 1834. Through this thoroughfare passed the traffic of the 
whole north country ; and from here radiated a system of turnpikes, commanding commerce in 
erery direction. In those early days, six and eight horse teams were numerous, and on each 



CITY OF CONCORD. 183 



side of the street were taverns for the accommodation of man and beast. Then a system of 
canals was devised. The old Middlesex Canal connected Charles River with the Merrimack 
above Pautucket Falls ; thence, by a series of locks, by the rapids and falls, canal boats were 
propelled to the lower landing at the south end of Main street. Concord was at the head of 




THE STATE HOUSE. 

navigation; but the railroad spoiled the business of the steamboat, the canal boat, the stage 
coach, and the eight horse teams. 

The first white settlers of Concord formed a sort of close corporation, for their charter "for- 
bade the disposal of lots in the town to strangers, more especially to a parcel of Irish people ;" 
and " to be respectable a man was expected to own a horse, and his interest was graduated by 
the amount of his real estate." The settlers were mostly of the orthodox faith, and what few 
dissenters there were, were "mild Quakers." For more than half a century Rev. Timothy 
Walker ministered to the spiritual wants of the community. The people, however, were a very 
hospitable class, and the prohibition affecting "a parcel of Irish people," and all peoples, became 
a dead letter, and open-handed welcome was extended to all new settlers. 

" Hither from Woburn came handsome young Thompson to teach school. He was a favor- 
ite in society, and won the regard of the Provincial Governor, a high rank in the military, the 
love of the minister's beautiful daughter, the widow Rolfe, and the envy and jealousy of the vil- 
lage swains. In after years he became distinguished in European politics, and when raised to 
the ranks of the nobility commemorated in his title the old name of the town, and was known as 



1S4 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Count Rumford. Count Rumford in scientific attainments became very distinguished ; and he 
will rank for all time as a benefactor of the human race. A bronze monument should be erected 
in the city, to perpetuate his memory. To the town in after years returned his only daughter, 
the countess, to avoid the pomps of foreign courts, and to pass her declining years amidst the 
familiar scenes of her childhood." 

One of the most attractive of the public buildings in the city is the Asylum for the Insane, a 
massive pile, standing majestically on an elevation, bordered by elms and oaks, in a park of 




NATIONAL STATE CAPITAL BANK BUILDING. 

great natural beauty. Both private benefactors and the State have been generous to this insti- 
tution, which is under the superintendence of Dr. Jesse P. Bancroft. The institution is as perfect 
as possible, and every care is exercised over the unfortunate inmates. 

Near the asylum grounds is the old Dodge mansion, now the Centennial Home for the 
aged. 

The old State prison, built of imperishable granite, is a monument of the past its interior 
converted into a voluntary boarding house ; its workshops utilized by artisans and machinists ; 
its high wall removed, and forming the underpinning of recently built houses. 



CITY OF CONCORD 



185 



At the foot cf Rattlesnake Hill is the new State prison a model institution where physical 
inconvenience and torture have been abolished. 

The city and county own together the City Hall and Court House, a building of pretentious 
architectural claims, which awaits the artist who can relieve its painful ugliness. It occupies a 
noble site, and some time it will reflect credit on the city and county. 

Near the State House, already described, is the Government Building, a fine, massive, four- 




story structure, facing on State street. It contains U. S. post-office, court house and pension 
office. 

The Board of Trade Building, the home of the Public Library, is a handsome four-story 
building mounted by a clock and bell tower. On the hill is the county jail the home of the 
high-sheriff of the county. Near the new cemetery is the enclosure of the Concord baseball 
club. On the plains on the east side are the Fair Grounds, lately leased to the State as a field 
for the annual muster of the State militia. Up towards Prospect Hill is the lot being converted 



186 CITY OF CONCORD. 



into a public park, by a generous lady of the city, Mrs. Nathaniel White. Out on the Hop- 
kinton road, by the grand lot chosen by President Pierce as the site for a mansion, which he 
never built, by the Bradley Monument which commemorates the Indian massacre in colonial 
days, is St. Paul School, an institution which renders Concord celebrated throughout the 
country. 

The first library association in Concord was formed in 1798. The library is located in the 
Board of Trade Building. Last year's circulation was 35,000 volumes. The librarian is Daniel 
F. Secornb, and the trustees are Messrs. Wm. L. Foster, Charles R. Corning, Abial Rolfe, 
Joseph T. Clough, Paul R. Holden, James S. Norris and William W. Flint. 

The city's first meeting-house was of logs, forty feet long, and twenty-five feet wide, situ- 
ated on the site of the store of William P. Ford & Co. In the course of twenty years this was 
replaced by a frame structure at the north end. After a ministry of fifty-two years, Rev. 
Timothy Walker was succeeded by Rev. Israel Evans, who remained eight years with the 
church at Concord ; his successor being Rev. Dr. Asa McFarland, whose ordination was cele- 
brated by a ball at Stickney's Tavern, which stood on the vacant lot, north of the City Hall. 
The latter was followed by Rev. Dr. Nathaniel Bouton. Before and during Mr. McFarland's 
ministry, the town constituted the parish ; the salary was assessed, and collected as part of 
the town expenses under the name of the " pulpit tax." Under Mr. Walker's ministry, only 
two families are known to have separated from the parish. According to a new law of the 
State, the First Congregational Society was formed July 29, 1824; and Rev. Dr. Bouton was 
ordained the following year. In 1833 the West Congregational Church was formed ; in 1837, 
the South ; in 1842, the East all having been separated from the parent church. During the 
latter year the First Church built a new meeting-house on the present site, which was burned in 
1873. The next year, 1874, the corner-stone of their present edifice was laid. Rev. F. D* 
Ayer, the fifth minister, was settled in 1867. In early days the Orthodox meeting-house, which 
stood on the site of the Walker school-house, was evidently the centre. Within it were held 
several sessions of the Legislature, the Constitutional Convention of 1791, and numerous 
forensic contests celebrated in the annals of the State. St. John's Roman Catholic Church, 
built at a cost of $75,000, is a splendid building erected under the care and pastorale of Very 
Rev. J. E. Barry, Vicar General. The other religious sects in the town have also their respec- 
tive places of worship, and these for the most part are fine, imposing edifices. 

There are adequate educational facilities in the city. The buildings are substantial, appro- 
priate, and of pleasing architecture ; and the teachers are carefully selected, well paid, and 
retained as long as efficient, unless tempted away by superior inducements. 

The fire department is thoroughly equipped and drilled, and from the Central Station 
responds promptly to the telegraphic alarm from every section of the precinct. 

There is a regular police and night watch, and in addition there is a large force of special 
police who are each paid $2.00 per day for actual service. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and until 
1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected for two years at 
each biennial election in November. Hon. Joseph Low, 1853 to 1854; Hon. Rufus Clement 
(died in office), 1855 ; Hon. John Abbott, 1855 to 1858 ; Hon. Moses T. Willard, 1859 to 1860; 
Hon. Moses Humphrey, 1861 to 1862 ; Hon. Benjamin F. Gale, 1863 to 1864 ; Hon. Moses 
Humphrey, 1865 ; Hon. John Abbott, 1866 to 1867 ; Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, 1868 to 1869 ; 
Hon. Abraham G. Jones, 1870 10*1871 ; Hon. John Kimball, 1872 to 1875; Hon. George A. 
Pillsbury, 1876 to 1877; Hon. Horace A. Brown, 1878 to 1880; Hon. George A. Cummings, 
1880 to 1882 ; Hon. Edgar H. Woodman, 1883 to 1886; Hon. John E. Robertson, 1887 to 1889. 

The population of the city at the census of 1880 was 13,845 ; the present valuation of the city 
is $9,703,458.00; Gross tax assessed for the year, $167,525.52 ; Rebate to town school-districts, 
$8,530.69; Net tax, $158,994.83 ; Rate of taxation, $12 per 1,000 ; $1.50 per $1,000 additional 
for Union School- District ; $3.30 per $1,000 additional for Precinct Tax. 

The source of the water supply is Long Pond, a natural body of water containing 265 acres, 
situated about three miles and a half from the State House, and about 125 feet higher than Main 
street in front of the State House. Mode of supply, gravity. The works, which are owned by 
the city, were constructed in 1872, but additions have since been made. No separate construe- 



CITY OF CONCORD. 187 



tion account has been kept. The works have cost about $425,000. Of this sum $393,000 was 
raised from the sale of bonds of the city : $350,000 of these bonds bear six per cent, interest, 
and the balance four per cent. The remainder of the cost of the works has been paid in part 
from the income, and in part by taxation. The demand for the water increases each year. New 
consumers in 1886 increased the revenues of the works some $1,600. It is evident that the time 
is not far distant when it will be necessary for the city to own all the water rights pertaining to 
the pond. The ownership of all those rights will add very materially to the usefulness of the 
works. The water can then be controlled so as best to supply the necessities of our citizens. 
The introduction of Long Pond water has undoubtedly been an important stimulus of the pros- 
perity and growth of the city. 

The number of births in the city in 1886 was 273, and the deaths numbered 221, or 15-78 
per 1,000 of the population. 

Concord is noted for its manufactures of carriages, harness, axles, leather hose, the Blanch- 
ard churn, the Clapp traps, axe handles, birch-bark pictures, bricks, bedsteads, brooms, brushes, 
carriage-springs, cigars, crackers, confectionery, excelsior, flour, furniture, lumber, mackerel- 
kits, meal, ploughs, salve, saws, shoes, soap, stoves, toys, water-wheels, etc. The wholesale 
trade of Concord merchants includes books, stationery, flour, grain, groceries, aside from the 
manufactured articles, and extends all through central, western and northern New Hampshire 
and Vermont. The retail stores command a large business from neighboring towns, and large 
stocks in the various lines are carried. The most important is the home trade, however, for' 
thirteen thousand people consume much food, and wear many garments. There. are three well- 
patronized book-stores in town, several printing offices, two daily and five weekly newspapers, 
The Granite Monthly, and other publications. There are three national banks, three savings 
banks, and one private banking institution. Of the leading business establishments in the city. 
interesting details will be found in the following pages. 



188 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



National State Capital Hank, The 

leading hanking institution of Concord is the 
National State Capital Bank, chartered as a state 
bank in 1853, and re-organized under the national 
hanking laws in 1865. It has a capital of $200,- 
000, a surplus of $75,000, and is officered as fol- 
lows, viz : President, L. Downing, Jr.; cashier, 
J. E. Fernald ; directors, L. Downing, Jr., James 
S. Norris, Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Hon. J. Ev- 



retained the confidence of the public in a marked 
degree. Its safety deposit vaults connected with 
the bank are ample and are not excelled by any 
in the state. Under its present wise and con- 
servative management this bank is doing a large 
and safe business, all of its movements being 
marked by prudence, caution and honorable bus- 
iness methods, while it is generally recognized 
as one of those solid, ably conducted institutions 




NATIONAL STATE CAPITAL BANK BUILDING. 



erett Sargent, John H. Pearson, John F. Jones, 
Henry J. Crippen. The banking rooms of the 
institution are spacious and elegant, affording 
ample accommodation to the public and possess- 
ing every convenience for facilitating the business 
in hand. A general banking business is trans- 
acted, including the receiving of deposits, the 
discounting of approved commercial paper, the 
collection of drafts, and the dealing in all first- 
class securities. From the outset this bank has 



which reflect credit alike upon its officers and 
the community where its influence is felt. It is 
ever ready to lend aid and encouragement to 
every deserving enterprise for the promotion of 
the public good, and treats its depositors and 
patrons with the utmost liberality and consider- 
ation. Its executive officers are gentlemen with 
whom it is always a pleasure to do business. 
Prompt, obliging and efficient in all their deal- 
ings with the public, they are naturally popular, 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



189 



and maintain the credit of the bank in both 
social, business and financial life. The president, 
Mr. Downing, is widely known as the honored 
head of the famous Abbott-Downing Co., of this 
city, and has long been foremost in every good 
work for the welfare and prospeiity of the com- 
munity. He is a native of New Hampshire, a 
trustee of the Loan and Trust Savings Bank of 
this city, and actively identified with other im- 
portant enterprises. The cashier, Mr. Fernald, 
is one of the most experienced financiers in the 
state, trained in the banking business from his 
youth up, and, although still a young man, his 
opinions are of weight in monetary circles. 
The board of directors comprises much of the 
solid business element of the city. 



Loan and Trust Savings Bank. With 
such diverse and important interests represented 
within her borders it may be inferred that ample 
banking facilities are not lacking in the old city 
of Concord. Oue of the fully tried, substantial 
and trusted fiscal institutions in the city is the 
Loan and Trust .Savings Bank. No better in- 
dorsement can be possessed by an institution of 
this kiud than a long and honorable record, 
while, as will be shown, it possesses even stronger 
claims upon popular favor. This bank was in- 
corporated under the la\v-of New Hampshire in 
1872, and from first to last it has had a most suc- 
cessful career. The officers of the bank are: J. 
E. Sargent, president; J. S. Norris, vice-presi- 
dent; John F. Jones, treasurer, and Fred. N. 
L id i, teller. The trustees are: Messrs J. E. 
Sirgeut, L. D nvning, Jr., J. S. Norris, John F. 
Jones, Silas Curtis, John H. Barron, Howard A. 
DoMge, L. W. Cogswell, Paul R. Holden, Howard 
L. Porter and John M. Mitchell. The investment 
committee consists of Messrs. J. E. Sargent, J. S. 
Norris, L. Downing, Jr., Howard A. Dodge and 
Howard L. Porter. The condition of the bank 
at the close of business on the 28th day of May, 
1837. was: Inabilities due depositors, $1,869,- 
314.67; surplus, $105,94066; guaranty fund, 
$'JO.OOO.OO; total, $2,035/255.33. The resources 
of the bauk, including loans on real estate, per- 
sonal and collateral security, bonds, st-icks, cash 
in other banks, etc., stood as follows: Market 
value, 2,074,354.05; par value, $1,994.424.05; 
value on books, $2,035,255.33. The banking 
room-* are very eligibly situated in the fine archi- 
tectural structure, the National State Capital 
Bank Building, and are elegantly appointed and 
handsomely furnished throughout, every accom- 
modation being afforded f >r the reception of pa- 
trons. A general banking business in deposits 
and loans is conducted. The officials of the bank 
are noted for their courtesy and promptness in 
the dispatch of business, accommodating to their 
patrons and very popular with all who are 
brought into business relations with them. 

William B. Durgin, Silversmith, No. 
11 School Street. The establishment of Mr. 
William B. Durgin, the well known silver- 
smith of this city, represents one of the most 
prominent institutions of the kind in the New 
England states. Its prominence has been 
ecured entirely by the indomitable energy 
and perseverance of the proprietor. The busi- 
ness was established by him in 1854, and has 



been conducted with marked ability and steadily 
increasing success. In 1884 Mr. Durgin took in 
as partner his only son, Geo. F. Durgin, who has 
been associated with him since in the business. 
The field now covered is an important one. The 
premises occupied comprise a three-story building, 
40x75 feet in dimensions, and the facilities of the 
house for meeting every demand of the trade in- 
clude all the machinery and appliances known 10 
the art of the silversmith. Mr. Durgin has with 
characteristic enterprise availed himself of every 
late and meritorious device for perfecting the 
operations of his house. The arrangements and 
conveniences are ample for the prosecution of a 
very extensive bu.-iness, and the reputation of the 
concern for the execution of work of a very high 
order of merit is excelled by no similar institu- 
tion in the country. A force of from sixty to 
seventy skilled hands are constantly employed, 
and only work of the best character is allowed to 
leave the place. One hundred and fifty thousand 
ounces of metal are used every year, and only 
solid goods are manufactured. A very heavy and 
valuable stock is constantly carried, and tie trade 
of the house extends to all parts of the United 
States. The display made in the handsome 
salesrooms of the house is worthy of the inspec- 
tion of connoisseur sin this line, as it is unequalled 
in this section of the country for beauty and 
originality of design and artistic workmanship. 
The goods are recognized as standard in all mar- 
kets of the country, and are supplied to the trade 
at fair and equitable prices. Mr. Dnrgin is a na- 
tive of Campton, N. H., trained in the art from 
his youth, and recognized as its accomplished ex- 
ponent and the leader in his line of enterprise. 

F. G. Davis, Groceries, Flour, Grain, Teas, 
Coffees, etc., No. 12 Pleasant Street. One of the 
most popular and best stocked grocery establish- 
ments in the city of Concord is that of Mr. F. G. 
Davis. Mr. Davis was born in this state in 1861, 
and after a long and active practical experience 
in this line of trade established himself in busi- 
ness, in partnership with Mr. Bartlett in 1885, 
under the fiim title of Bartletf & Davis. Mr. B. 
withdrew from the firm in 1886 and Mr. Davis 
became sole proprietor, since which date the busi- 
ness has been conducted under the present style. 
The premises occupied are spacious and con- 
venient, comprising a store room and basement, 
each 20x70 feet in dimensions, and are appropri- 
ately fitted up with every convenience lor the 
display of goods and transaction of business, and 
contain a full and choice assortment of staple and 
fancy groceries of every description, including 
new crop Oolong, Japan, English breakfast, 
young Hyson and other teas ; also coffees frrm 
Rio, Mocha and Java, tropical and domestic 
fruits, spices, condiments, a carefully selected 
stock of hermetically sealed goods in tin and 
glass, provisions, pure and sweet creamery butler, 
cheese and other products of the farm and dam ; 
also select brands of flour, buckwheat and rye 
flour, yellow and white bolted and unbolted corn 
meal, oatmeal, hay, straw, mill feed, such as 
bran, shorts, etc., in phort everything almost in 
the line of food products for man or beast. Po- 
lite and courteous assistants serve customers 
promptly, and orders are delivered at residences 
throughout the city by wagon free of charge. 



190 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



The First National Bank, of Concord, N. 
II. The First National Bank of Concord 13 one 
of the strongest and most prosperous fiduciary 
institutions iu New England, and from its incep- 
tion has had uninterrupted success, and passed 
unshaken through all seasons of financial de- 
pression. It has ever afforded a strong support 
to all local enterprises of a legitimate character, 
its policy being marked with liberality toward 
commercial, manufacturing, and other interests 
calculated to promote the material growth of the 
city. The bank was organized in March, 1864, 
and from the outset has retained the confidence 
of the public in a marked manner. Its condition 
has been one of constant development, and its 
affairs are now in a gratifyingly prosperous state, 
its capital being $150,000, and its surplus the 
same amount. Following is its report up to 
August 1, 1887: Resources: loans and discounts, 
$538,635.57; overdrafts, $503.59; United States 
bonds, 201,000 ; other stocks and bonds, $191,- 
547.50: due from reserve agents and other "Na- 
tional banks, $163,567.12; premiums paid, $9,- 
820.52; banking-house, $10,000; legal tender 
notes, specie, and cash items, $78,200.88; five 
per cent, fund with U. S. treasurer, $2,250 ; total 
$1,195,525.18. Liabilities: capital stock, $150,- 
000 ; surplus fund, $150,000 ; undivided profits, 
$57.198.81; dividends unpaid, $1,752; national 
bank notes outstanding, $45,000; deposits, $791,- 
574.37; total, $1,195,525.18. A general banking 
business is transacted, including the receiving of 
deposits, negotiation of loans and discounts, mak- 
ing collections, dealing in local and government 
securities, issuing circular and commercial letters 
of credit, and dealing in foreign exchange and all 
first-class securities. The bank has excellent cor- 
respondents, the principal ones being, the Ninth 
Nitioual bank of New York, and the Revere Na- 
tional, Maverick National and First National 
banks of Boston. The officers of the bank are: presi- 
dent, \Vm. F. Thayer ; cashier, C. G. Remick ; 
assistant cashier, Wm. A. Stone, Jr. Mr. Thayer, 
who is a native of Kingston, N. H., has resided 
in Concord since his seventeenth year, since 
which period he has become most prominently 
identified with the best interests of the place. 
He entered the First National bank of Concord as 
a clerk and by superior ability soon won prompt 
promotion. In 1873 he was appointed assistant 
cashier,* in the following year was made cashier, 
a position he retained until January, 1885, when 
he was elected to the presidency, and it is due 
much to his executive powers that the bank has 
advanced so rapidly to its present substantial and 
influential condition. Mr. Thayer is clerk and 
' director in the Contoocook Valley Paper Com- 
pany ; director, clerk, and treasurer of the Con- 
cord Cattle Co.; director iu the Lombard 
Investment Co. ; director in the Johnson 
Loan and Trust Co. ; treasurer of the city of 
Concord since 1879 ; treasurer of the Concord 
Hospital Association; and is interested in other 
corporations and associations. The cashier. Mr. 
Remick, who has been connected with the insti- 
tution since 1874,. was born in Pittsfield, N. H., 
and has been a resident of Concord since 1863. 
He possesses sound judgment and ability of a 
high order, is a gentleman of sterling worth of 
character. The assistant cashier, Mr. Stone, a 
native of Massachusetts, has been connected with 



the First National for the past ten years, has ever 
performed his duties with creditable efficiency, 
and is a highly popular member of the commun- 
ity- 

W. P. Underbill & Co., Druggists, No. 
132 North Main Street. This establishment was 
originally founded in 1840 by Messrs. E. H. Rol- 
lins, who, in 1870, was succeeded by Messrs. 
Cone & Everett. In 1874 the style of the house 
became W. P. Underbill & Co., Mr. Underbill's 
partners then being Messrs. George F. Underbill 
and Perry Kittredge. In 1884 these two gentle- 
men retired, and Mr. W. P. Underbill then 
formed a partnership with Mr. L. H. Piper, a 
partnership that has ever since existed. Mr. 
Underbill, who has been twenty years in the 
business, was born at Milville, Mass., and was 
raised in New Hampshire. Mr. Piper is a native 
of Concord, and has been connected with the drug 
trade for ten yeais. Both gentlemen are regis- 
tered druggists and members of the New Hamp- 
shire Pharmaceutical Association. They have a 
handsome store, 25x75 feet in dimensions. It is 
elegant in its fittings and appointments, which 
embrace the finest soda water fountain in the 
state, which was made to order for the firm by 
Tuft of Boston. It is ten feet high and has 
twenty-two syrup, two soda and five mineral fau- 
cets. The stock consists of a large and carefully 
selected assortment of the purest and freshest 
drugs and chemicals, proprietary medicines* 1 of 
merit, fancy toilet articles, perfumery, soaps, 
mineral waters of foreign and domestic produc- 
tion, druggists' sundries, etc. Prompt and care- 
ful attention is given to the compounding of pre- 
scriptions and family recipes, and the firm man- 
ufacture Cone's Cordial, Cone's Cough Syrup, 
Cone's Condition Powders, Mardin's Bitters, and 
pure extracts for the jobbing trade. Four assist- 
ants are employed. He also keeps a fine assort- 
ment of holiday goods, such as toilet sets, dress- 
ing cases, manicure sets, smoker's sets, cigar 
cases, collar and cuff boxes, whist broom cases, 
English, French and Japanese goods of every 
description. Also agents for the genuine Cuban 
cigars, manufactured by S. Schendel & Co. They 
also have hot soda, hot beef tea, chocolate and 
coffee, all winter. 



( 'lias. W. Clarke Fine Shoes, Woodward 
Building. Mr. Charles W. Clarke has been estab- 
lished in the city of Concord since 1867, and now 
occupies a store that has an area of 25x75 feet. 
It is tastefully fitted up and provided with 
every convenience for business purposes. Mr. 
Clarke, who is one of the oldest boot jind shoe 
dealers in the citv, is a thorough business 
man, and always has on sale a choice, well 
selected stock of fine and medium grade go ds 
which he has selected expressly for a fastidious 
custom. In the assortment will be found all the 
new beautiful styles made in accord with the fash- 
ionable ideas of the day for ladies', gentlemen's 
misses' and children's wear, and so large is the 
stock and so carefully is it selected that no one 
need haveany trouble finding just what they want, 
either in boots, shoes, rubbers or slippers. Mr. 
Clarke came to Concord from Townshend, Vt., his 
native place, in 1857. He is a prominent member 
of the Masonic fraternity. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



191 



The New Hampshire Savings Bank, 

The oldest and leading institution of the kind ill 
Concord is the New Hampshire Savings Bank, 
which has been in successful operation since its 
incorporation in 18'iO. The officers, who are 
among Concord's stauuchest citizens, well known 
and esteemed in commercial, social and financial 
circles, are Samuel S. Kimball, president; Win. 
P. Fiske, treasurer; with the following trustees, 
viz : Joseph B. Walker, Enoch Gerrish, Jesse 
P. Bancroft, John H. Stewart, Samuel S. Kim- 
ball, Oliver Pillsbury, Sylvester Dana, M. H. 
Bradley, George H Marston, P. B. Cogswell, 
Mark R. Holt, William G. Carter, Charles T. 
Page, John C. Thorue, John H. George, Samuel 
C. Eastman, Henry McFarland, John C. Ordway. 
Being conducted on fixed business principles, and 
its management being characterized by sound 
judgment, ability and integrity, coupled with 
jndicious investments and vigilance, it has from 
the first steadily increased its hold on popular 
favor and public confidence, while its excellent 
condition, as shown below, places this flourishing 
institution and its officers and managers far be- 
yond the requirements of any need of praise 
which these pages can bestow. From the state- 
ment of its condition made July 16, 1887, we ex- 
tract the following figures, viz : Due depositors, 
$2,871,736.37 ; surplus, $166,037.84 ; guaranty 
fund, $150, UUO ; premium on stocks and bonds, 
$217,282. In 1885 the bank began the erection 
of anew building, which was completed in 1887, 
and is the finest business structure in the city. 
It is built of brick, contains four floors and a 
basement, and is 47x85 feet in dimensions. The 
banking rooms are elegantly fitted up, and are 
provided with the Datuon Safe and Lock Go's, 
vaults and safes. The president, Mr. Kimball, is 
a native of Concord, and has filled his present po- 
sition with honor to himself and entire satisfac- 
tion to the patrons of the bank since 1874. The 
treasurer, Mr. Fiske, was born in Concord Dec. 
3, 1853, educated in the public schools <f the 
city, and passed one year at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass. He entered the bank as a clerk 
in October, 1872, and was promoted to the treas- 
urership in 1875. 



Isaac Baty, Stoves, Tinware, House Furnish- 
ing Goods, etc., Penuacook. Mr. Isaac Baty, 
has had almost a life time's experience as a prac- 
tical tin and sheet-iron worker, and he founded 
this enterprise in 18G6 at his present address, and 
from the date of its commencement has been the 
recipient of a very liberal patronage. His store 
is large and commodious, with workshop 
attached, which is thoroughly equipped with all 
the necessary tools and appliances required in 
the trade, while the store is very neatly and 
systematically arranged, for the display of his 
varied stock, which comprises a full line of 
parlor, office and cook stoves, ranges, heaters and 
furnaces, also gas and oil stoves. His stock of 
tin and sheet-iron ware is made of the very best 
materials and finished in the best workmanlike 
manner known to the trade. Mr. Baty also 
carries a full and complete line of household 
furnishing goods, such as cooking and laundry 
utensils, lamps and their fittings, flat-irons, 
wooden and willow ware, etc. All orders for 
general jobbing work and for outside metal work 



such as roofing, spouting and guttering, receive 
the careful and prompt attention whether in town 
or country, also stove and general repairing is 
executed in the best possible manner, while his 
prices are extremely reasonable. Mr. Baty is a 
native of St. Albans but has been a resident here 
for over a score of years. At the outbreak of the 
late Civil War Mr. Baty enlisted in the 7th 
Veteran Vermont Infantry Volunteers, and served 
in the Army of the Gulf Department, and was a 
participant in every battle from 1862 to 1865. 
He is an active and prominent member of the 
William I. Brown Post, G. A. 11., Department of 
N. H., also a member of the Sons of Temperance. 



Ira C. Evans, Fine Book and Job Printing 
of Every Description, White's Block, No. 13 Cap- 
itol Street. This enterprising concern was organ- 
ized in 1881 under the firm style of Evans & 
Sleeper, and in 1884 the firm became Evans, 
Sleeper & Woodbury. In the same year, too, 
Mr. Evans purchased the interests of his partners 
and has since conducted the business alone. He 
is a native of Hill, N. H., but has resided in 
Concord since 1846. 'He has bad twenty-three 
years experience and is thoroughly versed in all 
pertaining to the printing trade, and during the 
time he has been in business on his own account 
he has through his skill and equitable dealing 
acquired a popularity in the trade. His printing 
office is 25x75 feet with a composing room 20x35 
feet in dimensions, and is very finely fitted up 
with a full and complete assortment of types and 
other paraphernalia for the execution of the finest 
class of liook and job printing. Mr. Evans is also 
publisher of the Veteran Advocate, which has a 
large circulation and is devoted to the interests 
of the G. A. E. auxiliary organizations. The 
mechanical appliances include three job and two 
cylinder presses, operated by steam power. From 
eight to fifteen hands are employed, and all 
orders are promptly and satisfactorily executed 
at the lowest possible prices. Mr. Evans was a 
fighting man during the Civil War. From 1862 
to 1865 he was, as a member of the 12th New 
Hampshire Volunteers, with the Army of the 
Potomac, and took a hand in the engagements at 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, etc. 
He is now a member of the Sturtevant Post, No. 
2. of the G. A. R.; also of the Odd Fellows, Free 
Masons and Knights of Pythias. 



Geo. H. Moore, Boots and Shoe?, No. 75 
North Main Street. One of the oldest among our 
well-known hoot and shoe dealers is Mr. George 
H. Moore. Mr. Moore, who is a native of this 
state, established himself in business in this city 
in 1857. Three years later he fold out and 
moved to Bristol, and engaged in the dry goods 
and millinery business which he relinquished in 
1877 and returned to Concord, where he has since 
remained and has met with an unbounded success. 
He fully understands the wants of the public and 
can alwnys meet them with the best class of new 
style fashionable boots at the very lowest prices. 
In the assortment will be found everything desir- 
able for ladies, misses, gentlemen, youths, boys 
and children, made in the best manner and per- 
fect in fit and excellent in finish. Mr. Moore is 
upright and honorable in all his dealings and is 
a popular member of the Order of Odd Fellows. 



192 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



J. B. Tlmrston, Mechanical Engineer and 
Patent Attorney, National State Capital Bank 
Building. Mr J. B. Thurston, the patent attor- 
ney and mechanical engineer, confines his practice 
exclusively to patent cases, and having had quite 
an extended experience is familiar with all the 
details connected therewith. He is also a me- 
chanical expert and has devoted ten years to the 
designing and constructing new machinery, as- 
sisting inventors towards the perfection of their 
inventions. Mr. Thurston has acted as counsel 
and is still retained as attorney by many corpora- 
tions, manufacturers and inventors. He secuies 
patents in this and foreign countries, and m.ty at 
all times be consulted relative to infringements 
and the value and scope of patents. Re-issues 
receive his attention and caveats are filed, and re- 
jected applications are revised and again pre- 
sented to the Patent Office at Washington, and 
labels, trade marks, etc., are properly registered, 
and specifications and drawings are carefully pre- 
pared. Mr. Thurston, who was born in New 
York, was for some time in the practice of his pro- 
fession in that city previous to locating in Con- 
cord in 1882. His references are, Hon. A. B. 
Thompson, Secretory of State ; Hon. Samuel C. 
Eastman, Speaker House of Representatives ; 
Hon. E. H. Woodman, mayor ; Messrs. Foss & 
Merrill, civil engineers ; Messrs. Bingham & 
Mitchell, attorneys at law ; Messrs. Chase & 
Htreeter, attorneys at law; The First National 
Bank ; National State Capital Bank, all of Con- 
cord ; and Hon. Francis A. Cushinan, of Ply- 
mouth, N. H. 



Concord Steam Laundry, Foster's 
Block. No. 22 Warren Street ; J. H. Toof, Proprie- 
tor. The story of the origin and growth of the 
Concord Steam Laundry is brief, but, short as it 
is, it affords another of those examples one occas- 
ionally meets with of pluck, determination and 
integrity overcoming obstacles and wining suc- 
cess, with only brains and a strong pair of arms 
as capital, against strong competition. Mr. J. H. 
Toof, who is a native of Canada, and was at one 
time in the carpenter business, started the laun- 
dry business in the basement of Foster's Block, 
No. 21 Warren stm t, where he now has his office, 
in 1877. He, with two others constituted the 
entire working force of the establishment; but 
business began to increase, and this necessitated 
the employment of help, and as the patronage 
continued to grow in volume, more spacious 
premises became indispensable. The original 
wash house was made into an office, and a two- 
story building 30x70 feet in dimensions, and 
forming a part of the Old State Prison, was 
rented for the laundry. This is now equipped 
with every requisite, modern machinery, including 
three strain washing machines, three collar and 
cuff steam ironers, a shirt steam ironer, etc., all 
operated by steam power. Thirty-five hands are 
necessary to execute the Vnsiness of the establish- 
ment, and Mr. Toof has branch offices in all the 
towns in the state north of Concord, from all of 
whom he draws trade. The concern is now the 
largest of its kind in the state, and it is in a 
position to execute laundry work in a manner 
and at a price that cannot be excelled. Mr. Toof 
has earned his claim to recognition as an enter- 
prising and successful business man. 



Merrimack County Savings Bank The 

Merrimack County Savings Bank is an organiza- 
tion especially founded for the purpose of actively 
promoting thrift and frugality among the wage 
earning classes of Concord, and for affording 
profitable investment .f their savings. It was 
organized and chartered under the laws of the 
state of New Hampshire in 1870, and the inj-titu- 
tion has always pursued a careeer of usefulness 
and prosperity; indeed the interests of the bank 
have always been and are most intimately allied 
to the progress and prosperity of this community, 
and its policy throughout has been such as to 
promote, so far as it is consistent with its own 
solvency, the general thrift and well being 
of Merrimack Co. Mr. Lyman D. Stevens, 
attorney-at-law and a native of Piermont, N. H., 
has been the prei-ident since the incorporation of 
the bank. Mr. William M. Chase, attorney-nt- 
law, and a native of New Hampshire, has been 
vice-president for the past ten years. The office 
of treasurer and secretary has been filled since its 
organization by Hon. John Kimball, who is a 
native of New Hampshire. The trustees are 
Messrs. John M. Hill, Isaac A. Hill, Woodbridjie 
Odlin, Leland A. Smith, George A. Cummings, 
L. H. Carroll, B. A. Kimball. H. W. Stearns, C. 
H. Ausden, Geo. W. Crockett. James L. Mason 
and Dnniel Holden. The deposits amount to 
1959,428.51 and the bank has a surplus of 
$82,106.40. These figures sufficiently demon-,, 
strate that the bank is accorded the fullest con- 
fidence of the community and that the confi- 
dence is merited. The banking rooms are com- 
modious and handsomely fitted up and furnished, 
and every convenience is provided for patrons. 

Smith & "Walker, Manufacturers and 
Dealers in Carriage and Saddlery Hardware, etc., 
DI pot Street. This house is an old established 
one, dating its inception from 1843 when it was 
founded by Blackmer & Chandler. A year later 
Mr. N. B. Walker succeeded Mr. Chandler to the 
business and carried it on until 1854, when the 
firm was J. Blackmer & Co. In 1855 the present 
firm of Smith & Walker was formed, and have 
enlarged the facilities and extended the trade 
which reaches to all parts of the state and por- 
tions of Vermont and Massachusetts, in which a 
large local business is done. The premises, con- 
sisting of store and basement, are 25x80 feel in 
area, nnd n work shop 20x20 feet in size. Messrs. 
Smith & Walker are among the laigest manufac- 
turers and dealers in carriage 8ind saddleiy hard- 
ware, harness and patent leather enamelled and 
rubber cloth, etc., in thestate, and also make a spe- 
cial business of silver and brass plating, which is 
done in the best manner at the shortest notice. 
The copartners, Mr. L. A. Smith and Mr. N. B. 
Walker, are straightforward New England mer- 
chants,and always have a full and comprehensive 
stock of goods on hand to supply the large whole- 
sale an>l retail trade they are conducting. Mr. 
Smith, who was born at Cornish, in this state, 
came to Concord in 1817. He is a popular, 
prominent, useful, efficient member of the Board 
of Aldermen. Mr. Walker is from Massachusetts 
and has been a resident of Concord since 1844. 
He is an ex -mem her of the City Council. Both 
these gentlemen stand high as cit'zens, and are 
widely known and esteemed. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



193 



Mead, Mason & Co., Contractors, Build- 
ers and Manufacturers, Builders' Supplies, etc. 
One of the principal industrial establishments of 
this place is that of Messrs. Mead, Mason & Co., 
contractors and builders, and proprietors of the 
Union Steam Mills, etc., and who have long been 
most prominently identified with the growth and 
development of the best interests of the com- 
munity, and have contributed most valuable aid 
in advancing the general prosperity. The busi- 
ness was originally founded in 1847 by Messrs. C. 
E. Mead and W. G. M'ison, and conducted under 
their joint control until 1857, when N. J. Mead en- 
tered the firm and under the same name they pros- 
ecuted the business till 1884, when ill health com- 
pelled the withdrawal of N. J. Mead, and E. C. 
Mead and W. M. Mason were admitted to partner- 
ship. From the inception of the enterprise it was 
attended by marked success, the superiority of 
the products of the establishment and the artistic 
character of all work performed rapidly spreading 
its reputation and serving 1o quickly increase the 
volume of business transactions. Thus has intelli- 
gent application and honorable effort been re- 
warded. Theplantofthefirmin this city comprises 
a three-story building 80x100 feet in dimensions, 
furnished with the most improved machinery, 
operated by a 100 horse power engine, and sup- 
plied with the most improved equipments for the 
satisfactory prosecution of the industry. The 
range of production embraces dressed lumber, 
builders' supplies, pulpits, pews, house furniture, 
church and public building specialties, which are 
turned out in immense quantities, and a very ex- 
tensive stock is at all times kept on hand to meet 
the demand. The firm's factory for the manufac- 
ture of house trim, furniture, doors, sash and 
blinds, located at Lebanon, N. H., was destroyed 
by fire the present year, the loss being $100,000, 
while the insurance amounted 1o but $10,000. 
This factory was the largest of its kind in New 
Eugl md, employing at the time of the fire 225 
men. After the fire they immediately made con- 
tracts for fifty car loads of furniture with which 
to meet the fall trade; they opened a finishing 
shop at Lowell, making this a distributing point ; 
their salesman continued on the road without a 
break, and the jobbing trade, after a short delay, 
knew no difference in having its wants filled. 
They have leased a factory in Burlington (Win- 
ooski), having a capacity of 250 men, with which 
to fill their contracts for interior decoration. 
They now have contracts on hand for $80.000 
worth of work for the New York market. This 
is, we think, the only concern of any magnitude 
who confine themselves to hard wood veneered 
doors, hard wood trim, side boards, mantle*, etc., 
for the New York market. A very large force of 
workmen is employed, the number averaging over 
five hundred, and their operations are guided 
with intelligence and system by the experi- 
enced heads of the house. Messrs. Mead , Mason & 
Co., make a leading specialty of church and pub- 
lic building specialties, in which field they occupy 
a foremost position in this country, and have 
performed much notable work in this line. They 
have doubtless put more seatings in New England 
churches than all other manufacturers com- 
bined. Prominent exemplications of their 
ability are to be found in the Central Park flat 
huilding, Valencia, located at 59th street and 7th 



avenue, New York, and which is one of the most 
elegant structures in the United States, and the 
largest apartment house in the world, having 
2,000 rooms under one roof, They have also ex- 
ecuted splendid work in the State House, this 
city, the new Government building, the Congre- 
gational churches at Manchester, N. H.; Newton, 
Mass.; Arlington, Mass.; Somerville, Mass.; theM. 
E. church at Manchester, N. H.; the Boylston 
Street church, Boston, and scores of others too 
numerous for mention here. The trade of the 
house extends to all parts of New England, New 
York and adjoining states, and is of a most influ- 
ential character. Branches are located at Man- 
chester. N. H., No. 10 Canal street, Boston, and 
No. 320 Madison avenue, New York. The Messrs. 
Mead & Mason are liberal in all their business 
methods, are prompt and honorable in meeting 
engagements, and all contracts entered into with 
them are sure to result profitably and satisfactor- 
ily to all concerned. 

G. W. Wadleigh, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in Millinery and Hair Goods, Also Manu- 
facturer of Human Hair Switches, No. 140 North 
Main Street, Opposite the Post-office. Mr. G. W. 
Wadleigh, wholesale and retail dealer in millinery 
and hair goods, is one of the oldest business men 
in the city, and has been engaged in this line 
since 1842 and has established a large trade and 
to-day he is recognized as the largest dealer in 
this special business in New England outside of 
Boston. The elegantly appointed store is 25x75 
feet in dimensions, and contains a lariie assort- 
ment of fine fashionable millinery made and 
trimmed in perfect accord with the prevailing 
styles of the day. Mr. Wadleigh is also doing a 
large business as a manufacturer of hair goods, 
and always has on sale and makes to order human 
hair, switches, wigs, ventilated seams, puffs, 
curls, coquettes, perfections, water waves, frizzes, 
weft, etc. The workmanship is not excelled and 
satisfaction is always guaranteed. He also by a 
new process makes hair combings into switches 
(roots all one way) for fifty cents per ounce, which 
he warrants to be fully equal to those made from 
cut hair. Hair goods are also cleaned, repaired, 
re-dressed and made to look like new. He also 
pays the highest cash value for human hair. Air. 
Wadleigh was born in this state. 

Augustine R. Ayers,Carpetings and Crock- 
ery, etc., No. 91 North Main Street. This busi- 
ness was founded by him in 1872, and fVom its 
inception at that date has always ei joyed a lib- 
eral and substantial patronage. The premises 
occupied comprise a store of two floors and base- 
ment each 25x100 feet in dimensions, handsomely 
finished and fitted up, and provided with all the 
modern appliances, and five polite and obliging 
assistants are employed. He carries a very heavy 
stock embracing body Brussels, Wilton, velvet 
and ingrain carpets, rugs, crockery of all descrip- 
tions, china, glass and silver plated ware, paper 
hangings, window shades, table cutlery, etc. 
These goods are all Al, designed to meet the re- 
quirements of a first-class irade. Mr. Ayers is a 
native of Canterbury, in this state, and has resided 
here since 1867. He is prominently identified 
with the Order of Odd Fellows and the Capital 
Grangers. 



194 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Crippen, Lawrence & Co., Kansas Mort- 
gages. National State Capital Bank Building, 37 
North Main. No securities, except government 
bonds, have been attended with so small a percent- 
age of loss, and no securities in the financial world 
paying the same rate of interest have yet been 
found to give as much satisfaction as a well placed 
western farm mortgage, negotiated and guaranteed 
by a reliable firm. Of the sixty-seven saving banks 
in New Hampshire, with deposits amounting to 
$42,091,596, over $10,000,000 of this entire amount 
is now invested in western farm mortgages. In. 
1884 the state commissioners in their annual 
report said that they had been unable to discover 
in all these loans, any loss thus far to the several 
banks, either on account of payment of principal 
or interest. The rate now averages 6| per cent., 
and is promptly paid when due. Since 1873, 
Messrs. Crippen, Lawrence & Co. have been 
engaged in dealing in Kansas mortgages and 
other investments and have built up an immense 
business. 

The founders of the firm were Messrs. H. J. 
Crippen, J. J. Crippen and George E. Lawrence. 
The latter died in 1881, and the Messrs. Crippen 
have since continued the business under the 
original style of the firm. Mr. J. J. Crippen 
is in charge of the firm's office in Salina, Kan., 
while Mr. H. J. Crippeu manages the eastern 
office, which is located in the National State 
Capital Bank Building, in this city. The follow- 
ing interesting account of the life this gentleman 
is taken from a local publication, and will be 
read with interest : Henry J. Crippen, the son of 
Henry and Elizabeth (Stockwell) Crippen, was 
born in Canterbury, England, from which place 
the family migrated to this country when he was 
five years old. His ancestry on the father's side 
were of French descent, and on the mother's of 
the old Anglo-Saxon stock. After a brief resi- 
dence in Maine, the family removed to Boston, 
and remained in that city and vicinity for about 
seven years, then moved to Grafton, Mass., where 
the parents now reside. Henry's early education 
was received at the public schools of Boston, 
which, by permission of the committe, he con- 
tinned to attend for several years while residing 
outside the limits of the city. At the time of his 
removal to Grafton the town had no high school, 
and finding himself in advance of the district 
school he decided to go to work. Grafton was a 
shoe manufacturing town, and at the age of 
thirteen he learned the shoemaker's trade, and 
worked on the bench for three years. Having 
saved the greater part of his earnings he resolved 
to obtain a liberal education, and with that end 
in view became a student in the New London 
(N. H.) academy. He graduated from that insti- 
tution in 1857, and was the valedictorian of his 
class. In the same year he entered the freshman 
class of Dartmouth college. Here he took the 
regular academic course, and graduated in 1861, 
and was class poet. He paid his expenses at 
New London and in college by teaching during 
the winters, and one spring and two fall terms ; 
but, notwithstanding these interruptions, he 
graduated among the first scholars in his class. 
He taught his first school in Hopkinton, N. H., 
when sixteen years old. After graduating from 
college he taught for two terms at Upton, Mass., 
and in March, 1862, came to Concord, and com- 



menced the study of law with Henry P. Rolte r 
and later studied with Auson S. Marshall. In 
September, 1862, he entered a competitive exam- 
ination for the position of assistant teacher in the 
high school, and was the successful candidate. 
At that time the principal of the high school was 
also superintendent of schools, so that a large 
part of the work devolved on the assistant. The 
following year that arrangement was discon- 
tinued, and Mr. Crippen was elected as principal 
of the Merrimack grammar school, which place 
he resigned in March, 1865, to accept a position 
in the office of the state treasurer, an office then 
filled by Hon. Peter feanborn. In 1869 he re- 
ceived the appointment of clerk of the joint com- 
mittee of the U. S. house of representatives and 
senate on retrenchment, and the following year 
was appointed clerk of the senate committee on the 
District of Columbia, which office he resigned in 
1872, when he was chosen cashier of the National 
State Capital Bank, of Concord. About this time 
he commenced investing for personal friends in 
Western mortgages, but so satisfactory and suc- 
cessful were those investments that what was 
commenced as a matter of accommodation soon 
grew into a large business, and the firm of Crip- 
pen, Lawrence & Co. was formed, having offices 
at Concord, N. H., and Salina, Kansas. In 1881 
Mr. George E. Lawrence, who had charge of the 
Concord office died, and Mr. Crippen resigned his 
position as cashier in order to give his whole tim 
to the business of the firm. Under his manage- 
ment the business has grown to large proportions, 
and the investments of the firm are held by 
nearly all of the savings banks of the state, and 
by private investors throughout New England, 
and even as far off as California and Florida. The 
firm has recently extended its business to Eng- 
land, and has received some large orders from that 
country. They have also an office in the city 
of Denver, Colorado, and, from this point the 
firm transacted a very important business. Mr. 
Crippen is thoroughly reliable, safe, and con- 
servative, possessing excellent business qualities, 
good judgment, and sound common sense. He 
is an earnest thinker, and has made the sub- 
ject of finance a constant study. In business 
matters he takes broad, comprehensive views, 
while his practical acquaintance with bank- 
ing and his thorough knowledge of details are 
of great assistance in determining the method 
of carrying out of his plans. Mr. Crippen is 
popular, not only with business men, but with 
educators also. He has never lost his interest in 
educational matters, and has served continuously 
on the board of education since 1870, and is now 
its president. He favors practical rather than 
ornamental education, as very many improve- 
ments and advancements can be attributed to 
him. He has never been a candidate for political 
office, but is largely interested in the business, 
educational, and charitable organizations of the 
city. He is a ready, concise, and effective 
speaker and writer. He has definite views and 
decided opinions, which he expresses clearly 
and forcible. In politics he is a Republican ; 
he is not a member of any church, but attends 
the Unitarian. He was married September 30, 
1868, to Susan J., daughter of Col. Peter San- 
born. Their union has been blessed by two- 
daughters. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



195 



Ford & Kimball, Car Wheels, Brass and 
Iron Founders. Among the various interests 
which diversify the industries of Concord, none 
deserves more prominent notice in this review 
than the manufacture of car wheels as carried on 
by Messrs. Ford & Kimball, the well-known brass 
and ircn founders of this city. The members of 
this firm are Messrs. T. H. Ford and B. A. Kim- 
ball. Mr. Ford waa born in Sanbonton, N. H., 
sixty-seven years ago. He learned the forging 
trade in 1839, and was for five years in the em- 
ploy of the U. S. Navy at Boston. In 1846 he 
came to this city, and for the past forty years has 
been actively and prominently engaged in his 
present business. Mr. Kimball is a native of this 
state, fifty-four years of age, and was eight years 
master mechanic of the Concord railroad. He 
has been engaged in his present business for the 
past twenty- one years, seven of which as a mem- 
ber of the present firm. The plant of this firm 
covers an area of 300x400 feet, situated on the 
line of the railroad, and comprises a foundry 
measuring 65x225 feet; two pattern shops 2f x50 
feet, two stories each ; a brass shop 25x40 feet, 
and a general cleaning shop 30x175 feet. The 
cupola of the foundry has a capacity of ten tons, 
and twenty car wheels are cast, on the average, 
per day. The motive power is furnished by a 50 
horse power engine and boiler, and employment 
is given to from fifty to sixty skilled hands. The 
car wheels produced by this responsible house 
are made from the firm's own patterns and de- 
signs, and are considered as standard the country 
over, being unsurpassed for strength, durability 
and reliable workmanship by those of any rival 
concern in this or any other country. Plans, spe- 
cifications and estimates are promptly furnished 
for general brass and iron foundry work, and no 
pains or skill is spared to fulfill the expectations 
of patrons. 



C. H. Martin & Co., Wholesale and Re- 
tail Dealers in Drugs, Medicines, Paints, Oils, etc., 
Nos. 11 and 13 North Main Street, Near Pleasant 
Street. For forty-five years this has been one of 
the most noted store houses for drugs, medicines, 
paints, oils, etc., in Concord, and its popularity 
and trade have increased with the lapse of years. 
The founders of the enterprise were Messrs. 
Allison & Brown, who began business in 1840 at 
the present stand. Later the firm style was 
changed to Brown & Morgan, and in 1867 Messrs. 
C. H. Martin & Co. became the proprietors. The 
copartners then were Mr. C. H. Martin and Mr. 
R. T. Crowell, and in 1877 Mr. George L. Brown, 
who hud been a clerk in the house for some years, 
became a partner. All the members of the firm 
are natives of New Hampshire, experienced and 
registered druggists and members of the New 
Hampshire Pharmaceutical Society. Their store, 
which is finely fitted up with every necessary 
requisite for pharmaceutical operations, both in 
the wholesale and retail lines, in both of which 
a valuable trade is carried on, has a frontage of 
30 feet and a depth of 80 feet. A very large 
stock is carried, embracing all the supplies 
usually found in a first-class and extensive drug 
store, pure, fresh drugs and chemicals, patent 
medicines and remedies of every kind, surgical 
and medical appliances, and a fine assortment of 
staple and fancy toilet articles and choice per- 



fumery, and also a large department devoted to 
the trade in paints, oils, etc. The special feature 
of the business is that of compounding physi- 
cians' prescriptions and family recipes, and in 
this department the utmost care and accuracy 
are exercised, and the freshest and purest drugs 
only employed. 



Frank E. Heath, Upholstered Furniture 
and Draperies, No. 109 North Main Street. A 
very recent and important addition to the mer- 
cantile industries of Concord, is the enterprise 
established by Mr. Frank E. Heath, and centrally 
located in the Opera House Block, No. 109 N. 
Main street. Mr. Heath brings long experience 
to bear in the business, he having been a clerk 
for eight years in a furniture establishment, and 
for two years was bookkeeper for the well-known 
house of Young Bros. He occupies a fine store 
25x75 feet in dimensions, handsomely finished 
and admirably arranged for the advantageous dis- 
play of his fine stock. Neatness, order and sys- 
tem are noticeable features of the establishment. 
Two polite and efficient assistants aid the pro- 
prietor in attending to his many customers, and 
popular prices prevail. He carries a heavy and 
full line of furniture, embracing elegantly uphol- 
stered parlor suits, bed-room and dining-room 
sets, sofas, lounges, wardrobes, chairs, rockers, 
rockers, desks, in short everything in this line 
from the common kitchen table to the most elab- 
orate piece of drawing room furniture, together 
with a full line of draperies. He makes a spe- 
cialty of manufacturing hair mattresses to order, 
he also repairs furniture neatly, promptly and on 
moderate terms. We would commend this house 
to any of our readers contemplating the purchase 
of furniture to call and inspect this stock before 
purchasing elsewhere. Mr. Heath is a native of 
Somerville, Mass., but came to this city thirty 
years ago, when six years of age. He is an en- 
terprising and progressive business man, prompt 
and reliable in all his dealings, and highly re- 
spected and esteemed by all with whom he has 
business or social relations. He is a member of 
the Concord Fire Department. 

Crawford & Stockbridge, Book Binders, 
Papers Rulers, and Blank Book Manufacturers. 
The leading book binders in this city is that of 
Messrs. Crawford & Stockbridge. An inspection 
of the work produced by these gentlemen reveals 
the fact that in beauty and design, and excel- 
lence of finish, it will compare favorably with 
that of any similar establishment in the United 
States. Both gentlemen bring long practical ex- 
perience to bear, Mr. Crawford of fifty and Mr. 
Stockbridge of forty years, and as they employ 
none but skilled assistants, and use nothing but 
the finest of material, and personally superintend 
every detail of the work, the result is a product 
as near perfect as can be. They occupy a floor 
20x70 feet in dimensions, finely fitted up, well 
lighted, and provided with all the latest and most 
approved appliances pertaining to book binding, 
jiaper ruling and blank book manufacturing ; 
they give constant employment to eight skilled 
assistants. The individual members of the firm 
are Mr. F. S. Crawford, a native of New York 
City, but raised in this city, and Mr. E. A. Stock- 
bridge, born in Yarmouth, Maine. 



CITY OF CONCOBD. 



Holt Brothers, Manufacturer of Concord 
Wheels. A careful review of the business inter- 
ests of Concord develops the existence of a class 
of houses in every respect prepared to compete, in 
the several lines they represent, with the rival 
establishments of any city, and also some special 
enterprises which are unrivalled in their particular 
fields of industry. Belonging to the latter class 
is the hou-e of the Messrs. Holt Bros., manu- 
facturers of Concord wheels, plain wood hub, 
band hub and Sarven patent, also wheel stock and 
wagon wood work of every description. Their 
complete facilities, ample resources, and high 
commercial standing, and remarkable enterprise, 
are matters of which the city basevery reason to 
be proud. It is to such houses that the substantial 
growth of Concord during the past quarter 
of a century has been largely due. This is the 
largest concern of the kind in New England, has a 
reputation of the most enviable character, and a 
trade that extends to all parts of the United 
States. The business was founded in 1870 by 
the present firm, who brought thorough practical 
experience to bear in their operations, coupled 
with intelligent and executive ability of a high 
order, and their success has been the deserved 
reward of honorable ambition, and well-directed 
effort. The factory isa superior three-story brick 
building 55x150 feet in dimensions, fully equipped 
with all modern tools, machinery and appliances 
necessary for the required purposes. The machi- 
nery is operated by an 80 horse power steam engine 
and employment is given from thirty to forty 
experienced workmen. A two story frame build- 
ing 30x100 feet in area is used as a storage ware- 
house, and is filled with a large stock of the val- 
uable goods turned out from the factory. The 
Concord wheels and other specialties manufac- 
tured here are made from the best seasoned woods 
and reliable materials, are unsurpassed for qual- 
ity, strength.durability and general excellence,and 
are unsurpassed by any similar goods now in the 
market. All orders meet with prompt fulfilment, 
while satisfaction as to value of goods is guaran- 
teed in every instance. The members of the firm 
are, Messrs. Charles H., Benjamin and A. F. 
Holt, the former of whom is a native of Stockton, 
Cal., and the latter of San Francisco. Their 
specialty is the manufacturing horse cars and 
harvesting machine wheels and they carry a stock 
of these specialties. Their headquarters are at San 
Francisco, where they have a large wholesale 
house, and are universally respected for their 
sound business principles and sterling probity. 
They are representative business men in every 
respect, and are held in the highest regard as most 
valuable members of the community. 



Munns & Paige, Practical Steam and Gas 
Fitters; Also, Dealers in Plain, Galvanized and 
Brass Pipe, etc., Old Post-Office, School Street. 
In these later days, especially in crowded com- 
munities, the plumber has become in the highest 
degree essential to our health and comfort; there- 
fore, it may not be out of place if we refer our 
readers to one of the leading houses of this kind 
in Concord. We refer to that of Messrs. Munns 
& Paige, whose store and office is located in the 
old post-office on School street. This a very old 
stand, having been originally established in 1864 
by Mr. John Eaves, the present firm succeeding 



in 1880. They occupy a fine store 20x75 feet in 
dimensions, neatly finished and fitted up, and 
stocked with as fine an assorlment of plumbers' 
and gas fitters' supplies as will be found anywhere 
in this city. They carry at all times plain, gal- 
vanized and brass pipe and fittings of all descrip- 
tions, gas fixtures of all kinds, sheet lead and lead 
pipe, water-closets, wash bowls and urinals, cop- 
per baths and sinks, brass works, plated faucets, 
in short,everything that a plumber, gas or steam 
fitter could possibly need in the prosecution of 
his business. They are also agents for Gold's 
Low Pressure Self Eegulating Steam Apparatus, 
which can be fitted for hotels, schools and dwell- 
ing houses in the best manner and at moderate 
prices. Besides the above they are agents for the 
Imperial Gas Machine. They are prepared at all 
times to make estimates and enter into contracts 
for furnishing buildings of any kind with their 
water, gas, steam or sewerage connections, and 
have the facilities for executing the same promptly, 
however large they may be. In sanitaiy plumb- 
ing, the specialty of the house, on the proper per- 
formance of which so much of the health and 
comfort of the community depends, an experience 
of almost a life time should certainly be an ele- 
ment to inspire confidence. Such an experience 
have these gentlemen, both of them having been 
brought up in the business, and thoroughly un- 
derstanding it in its every branch. The trade is 
large, extending throughout the city and countyj 
requiring the cervices of six experienced mechan- 
ics to meet its demands, and at times many more. 
The individual members of the firm are, Mr. 
James Munns, a native of England, whence he 
came to this city in 1871, and Mr. E. F. Paige, 
who was born in Concord. They are active and 
enterprising business men, thorough mechanics, 
untiring in their efforts to please their patrons, 
and are justly entitled to the success that has 
thus far attended their well-directed efforts. 



J. H. Ballard, Insurance Agent, Nearly 
Opposite the Post-Office. Among the leading in- 
surance agents of Concord is Mr. J. H. Ballard, a 
gentleman who has spent twelve years of his life 
in this important department of our business in- 
terests. His thorough knowledge of fire insur- 
ance has made him an authority on the subject, 
and he is considered as one of the best informed 
and most able underwriters in this portion of the 
state. Mr. Ballard is a native of this state, and 
has been a resident of this city all his life. He 
inaugurated this enterprise on his own account 
at the present address in 1875. His office is 
located almost opposite the post-office, which is 
very neatly appointed. Among the many relia- 
ble fire insurance companies represented by Mr. 
Ballard, are 1he Capital Fire Insurance Co., of 
Concord ; the New Hampshire Fire Underwriters' 
Association of Concord, and the Manufacturers' 
and Merchants' Mutual Fire Insurance Co., of 
Concord. The sound financial standing and re- 
liability of these companies are too well known 
to require any words of commendation. Mr. 
Ballard is prepared also to plnce risks in any 
other sound and reliable New Hampshire com- 
pany to any amount on all insurable property 
and at the lowest possible rates. Mr. Ballard is 
one of our oldest residents and business men, and 
awake to the best interests of the city. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



197 



Clapp & Co., Brass and Iron Founders, No. 
8 Chandler Street. This is one of the principal 
concerns of (he kind in New England, and has 
been brought to its present high status and mag- 
nitude through the push and ability of the man- 
agement. The business was inaugurated in 1882, 
and its record from its inception has been one of 
steady progress. The works are comprised in a 
building having dimensions of 60x130 feet, also a 
pattern room of modern improvement 40x60 feet, 
three stories high. These buildings are equipped 
with the most improved machinery and appli- 
ances, operated by steam power, and every con- 
venience, appurtenance, and facility are possessed 
to aid in the prosecution of affairs. Enlargements 
of the present structure are in contemplation ow- 
ing to the increase of business. Employment is 
afforded a force of thirty experienced workmen. 
The range of production embraces foundry work 
of all kinds, railroad castings, etc. A specialty 
is made of the manufacture of sewer caps from 
the firm's own patent, also of street fountains. 
The trade is large, influential and constantly 
growing, and reaches to all parts of the United 
States. Prompt attention is given to orders re- 
ceived by mail or express, and correspondence is 
solicited. The members of the firm are, Messrs. 
Henry W. Clapp, H. W. Ranlett and Samuel S. 
Prescott. The practical man is Mr. Henry W. 
Clapp, who has had vast and valuable experience 
as an iron founder. Born in Eastern Massachu- 
setts July 4th, 1830, he, at the age of seventeen 
years entered upon the trade which he has since 
followed so successfully. He has lived in New 
Hampshire for the past forty years, has served as 
a member of the Board of Aldermen of this city, 
and in 1885 was elected a representative to the 
State Legislature. In every position held by him 
he has proved his fitness and ability. 

Sleeper & Hood, Merchant Tailors, No. 90 
North Main Street. An old established and note- 
worthy firm engaged in this line in Concord is 
that of Sleeper & Hood, merchant tailors and 
outfitters, which for twenty-eight years has main- 
tained an enduring hold on public favor. This 
flourishing business was established in 1859 by 
Crichett & Sleeper, who conducted it up to 1886, 
when J. T. Sleeper became sole proprietor and as 
such continued until 1877, when he admitted 
into partnership William E. Hood, thus forming 
the pushing and prosperous firm whose name 
heads this sketch, and by whom the business has 
since been carried on with uninterrupted success. 
They occupy a neat and well ordered 25x80 foot 
store with shop attached down-stairs, and carry 
constantly on hand an exceedingly fine assort- 
ment of imported and domestic suitings, elegant 
woolen and worsted fabrics in the newest styles 
and most fashionable designs and patterns, cassi- 
mera, checks, cloths, meltons, cheviots, stripes, 
vestings, etc., also fine dress shirts, novelties in 
men's neckwear, under clothing, gloves, umbrel- 
las, and a complete line of gent's furnishing goods. 
From twenty to thirty skilled workmen are 
employed, including expert cutters, the whole 
number being necessary to meet the demands 
of their growing and important trade. Messrs. 
Sleeper & Hood both fully merit the lame meas- 
ure of popular favor and prosperity which they 
enjoy. 



J. B. Sanborn, Publisher, Bookseller and 
Stationer, Corner of North Main and Capitol 
Streets. Mr. Sanborn is one of the oldest resi- 
dents of this city and a native of this state. The 
business he now conducts was established about 
the year 1809, and after several changes the firm 
of B. W. Sanboru & Co. became proprie- 
tors in 1852, Mr. J. B. Sail born being the part- 
ner. The business was conducted with uninter- 
rupted success under that firm title until 1874 
when Mr. B. W. Sanborn died. The present 
proprietor succeeded to his interest and has con- 
ducted the concern under the present name. The 
store is very spacious and commodious, having a 
frontage of twenty-five feet, with a depth of over 
three times that distance. The proprietor does a 
very extensive business as a publisher, and also 
keeps constantly on hand as complete a stock of 
books as can be found in the city or state, com- 
prising the leading standard legal works, revit-ed 
statutes of the state, also, history biography, sci- 
ence, theology, medical, prose and poetry, works of 
fiction by the most popular and standard authors, 
also all the latest publications from the most 
reliable publishing houses in Europe or America 
are to be found here as soon as placed upon the 
market. He also keeps a full line of educational 
and scriptural works, prayer and hymn books. 
His stock of stationery is most thorough and em- 
braces allvarieties of legal and commercial complete 
blanks, fine paper and envelopes, cards, inkn, 
pens, pencils and every article pertaining to the 
stationery trade, while his fancy goods are of the 
very latest and most popular productions. This 
house is in constant receipt of orders from all 
portions of the state. Mr. Sanborn is a well 
read and thoroughly educated gentleman with a 
perfect knowledge of the business. 

Kaiilet & Marsh, Coal, Wood and Ice, No. 
4 Freight Street. Among the leading and best 
known firms engaged in this line in Concord is 
that of Ranlet & Marsh (successors to Ranlet & 
Prescott), dealers in coal, wood and ice, and no 
concern of the kind in town maintains a higher 
reputation, as few if any at all receive a larger 
measure of popular favor. This flourishing en- 
terprise started some forty odd years ago, and in 
1856 came into the control of H.W. Ranlet & Co., 
who conducted the same up to 1874, when the 
style changed to Ranlet & Prescott, who carried 
on the business until 1882, when they were suc- 
ceeded by the pushing and prosperous firm whose 
name heads this sketch, by whom it has since 
been continued with uninterrupted success. The 
yard, which is ample and capacious, is connected 
by side track with the C. R. R. and well ordered in 
every respect, while M heavy and very superior stock 
is constantly carried on hand, including carefully 
screened and cleaned coal of the best quality and 
of every size and variety : also fire and kindling 
wood of all kinds in cord, sawed and split, and 
Horse Shoe pond ice; upwards of 3.000 tons of 
ice, G,000 tons of coal and 1.500 cords of wood 
being handled annually. Over twenty in help 
are employed, while eight coal carts and four ice- 
wagons are in regular service, supplying custom- 
ers all over the city and environs. The firm is 
composed of Messrs. H. W. Ranlet and H. O. 
Marsh, both natives of this state and residents of 
the city many years. 



198 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Dickermaii, Leavitt & Co., Wholesale 
Grocers and Dealers in Flour, Grain, Feed, Pro- 
visions, Lime, Cement, etc., Bridge Street. In 
these modern days almost every conceivable 
article ot food is sold by the grocer, and upon 
the character of our grocery houses, therefore, 
depends to a great extent the value and purity of 
the Ibod supply of the whole country. It is ac- 
cordingly a pleasure to notice in our review of 
the business interests of Concord, the uprising of 
.such mercantile houses as that of Messrs. Dicker- 
man, Leavitt & Co., which has been established 
for the purpose of handling only the finest and 
purest food products, and these on terms to 
ensure the patronage and support of retail dealers 
generally. The firm was established during the 
present year only, and the progress it has made 
thus far has been of the most satisfactory and 
encouraging character. The individual members 
of the firm are Massrs. G. O. Dickerman, E. P. 
Leavitt and S. H. Dow. All these gentlemen are 
natives of New Hampshire and were reared in 
Concord. Mr. Dickerman wa3 for seventeen years 
traveling salesman for Briggs& Statheck, whole- 
sale grocers of Boston, and Mr. Leavitt was for 
ten years the road man for Moseby & Co., 
Hour dealers, of Concord. Mr. Dow is an ex- 
lumber merchant and capitalist. The firm 
occupy on Bridge street a four story building 
75x125 feet in dimensions, and this is very neatly 
and appropriately fitted up for the business. The 
stock is a most extensive and varied one, and 
embraces everything classed in these modern days 
under the comprehensive term of staple and fancy 
groceries, flour otf the finest brands, grain, feed 
and all kinds of provisions, lime, cement, etc. 
Eight assistants are employed in the store and 
two traveling salesmen represent the firm among 
the retail grocery houses in all parts of New 
Hampshire and Vermont. The firm have every 
facility at hand for supplying their patrons 
promptly and satisfactorily and they have a 
bright and prosperous future, before them. 

Conant's Steam Laundry, No. 11 Depot 
Street. Not many years ago the public washing 
was all done by the laborious process of hand 
rubbing, the only agencies employed besides 
being a tub and washboard. All this is changed, 
and by labor-saving process, so that now nearly 
all work of the kind is sent out to be executed 
at some one of the many steam laundries in ex- 
istence. The representative laundry of Concord 
is the well-known Couant's Steam Laundry, of 
which Mr. H. E. Conant is the proprietor. This 
gentleman, who has had ten years practical ex- 
perience in the laundry business, founded his 
present enterprise in 1884, and since then he has 
built up a large and influential patronage. The 
business is carried on at No. 11 Depot street, and 
the first floor and basement are occupied. A 
floor in the building on the opposite side of the 
street, and which is connected by a bridge wilh 
the other premises spoken of, is also utilized. 
The works are equipped with all necessary appli- 
ances, which include two washing machines, one 
collar ironer, a shirt ironer and other machinery, 
all of which are operated by steam power. 
Employment is given to thirty -five hands, and a 
first-class business is being done. Delivery 
wagons are kept busy in calling for and deliver- 



ing goods at the residences of patrons, and the 
charges in all instances are fair and equitable. 
Mr. Conant is a native of Massachusetts and a 
War Veteran. From 1861 to 1865 he served as a 
member of the 21st Massachusetts Volunteers, 
with the 9th Army Corps under General Burnside, 
and was at Eoanoke Island to the finish of the 
campaign. He is now a member of the Sturte- 
vant Post No. 2, of the G. A. R., also of the 
Masonic Order and of the Odd Fellows (Society. 
He is widely known and very popular. 

E. H. Randall, Steam Heating, etc., 
Stickney Block, Main Street. No business re- 
quires a more thorough knowledge of details 
than that which relates to heating of buildings 
and dwellings by means of steam. Of late years 
much attention has been given to it by scientific 
men, and in our city Mr. Edward H. Randall, 
who has made the subject a study, and has had 
a longpractical experience, makes it a special busi- 
ness, and has achieved a well-earned reputation. 
He furnishes plans and specifications and esti- 
mates for heating dwellings, buildings, factories, 
stores, green-houses, etc., by low or high pressure, 
steam or hot water, supplies all the requisite 
pipes, boilers, etc., always guaranteeing to do the 
work in the most satisfactory mauner at a fair 
and reasonable price. Engines, boilers, steam 
pumps, are also furnished, set up and connected, 
and put up in operation by Mr. Eandall, who is 
also prompt in attending to repairing and jobbing. 
He also introduces water and gas into buildings 
and dwellings, and gives his personal attention to 
all work entrusted to him, and refers by permis- 
sion to the New Hampshire Bank Building, the 
Chase Block and many others in the city and 
vicinity. Mr. Randall was born in Rhode Island. 
He has had twenty-five years experience as a 
steam heating engineer and sanitary plumber and 
gas fitter, and has been located in Concord since 
1878. Mr. Randall is very popular in the com- 
munity, and is a member of high standing in the 
Masonic fraternity. 

W. S. Baker, Fine Tailoring, No. 93 Main 
Street. A leading and representative house in the 
fine merchant tailoring line is that conducted by 
Mr. W. S. Baker. He established himself in busi- 
ness in 1875 with Mr. Woodward. This firm was 
dissolved in 1883, since which time he has con- 
ducted the business alone. Mr. Baker is a thorough 
artist in his profession, and has had seventeen 
years practical experience. He occupies a fine 
store 25x75 feet in dimensions, handsomely fin- 
ished and fitted up, and admirably arranged. His 
business is large and steadily increasing, requir- 
ing the services of thirty skilled hands to meet 
its demands. He carries a full line of cloths, cas- 
simeres, vestings and suitings of the latest and 
most desirable patterns, and some special patterns 
not to be found elsewhere. These goods are all 
the finest productions of French, English aud 
American looms. His trade is principally drawn 
from the best classes of society, who patronize 
him on account of the perfect manner in which 
all the garments turned out at this establishment 
are cut and finished, and for the moderate prices 
for which they may be had. Mr. Baker is a 
native of Wellsfleet, Mass., aud came to this city 
in 1874. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



199 



Blaiicliard & Co., Manufacturers of Corn 
Meal and Wholesale Dealers in Flour, Grain and 
Feed. One of the most enterprising and ener- 
getic houses in the Concord flour trade is that of 
Messrs. Blanchard & Co. The business had its 
origin in 1885, and has already become more ex- 
tensive than that of any mercantile firm of one 
member in Concord, and to-day the concern is 
one of the most noted in its line in the state. 
The proprietor is Mr. John S. Blanchard, who is 
a native of Canterbury, N. H., and for a consider- 
able period was connected with the dry goods 
trade. He has bad much exv>erience in the flour 
and grain business, having been connected with 
another firm for six years previous to 1885, when 
he established his present business, and he has a 
thorough knowledge of all its details. This firm 
has a corn mill on the Ammonoosuc river at Lis- 
bon, with a capacity of 1,500 bushels per day. 




The corn which is shipped by Grand Trunk route 
is billed to points where the meal is to go, and 
ground in transit, then forwarded on the same 
"bills of lading. A large portion of the flour sold 
by this firm is shipped direct from the mills in 
carloads to their customers, and Blanchard's 
Ammonoosuc, Security and Haxall are brands of 
superior quality, and when once used, are invari- 
bly wanted again. Their office and salesroom is 
at No. 9 South Main St., where they also have a 
retail store, and have recently added groceries, 
making a specialty of teas and coffees. Messrs. 
Blanchard & Co., determined at the stnrt to han- 
dle the best goods thp markets afford, and to sell 
at the lowest possible prices for such goods, and 
this policy has resulted in building up their pres- 
ent extensive business. Mr. Blanchard is widely 
known as strictly honorable in all his dealings, 
while his house has become a permanent and 
prosperous institution in the city. 



E. H. Rollins & Son, Bankers and Bro- 
kers, Dealers in Investment Securities, etc. The 



well and favorably known firm of E. H. Rollins 
& Son, bankers and brokers, dealers in invest- 
ment securities, stocks, bonds, etc., is one of the 
leading and most stable and reliable financial 
concerns in the city or county, numbering among 
its clientele many of the solid and wealthy citizens 
in the community. This admirably conducted 
and flourishing business was established in 1882 
by F. W. Rollins, the present junior partner, who 
carried oil the same alone up to 1885, when the 
style changed to E. H. Eollins & Son, the de- 
servedly popular and prosperous firm whose name 
stands at the head of this sketch. They occupy 
finely appointed and commodious offices, employ- 
ing two capable and efficient clerks, and transact 
a general banking and brokerage business, buying 
and selling stocks, bonds, warrants, governmen t 
securities and financial paper of all kinds, and 
negotiate loans on bond and mortgage. Invest- 
ments are placed in choice western farm lands 
and city property throughout Colorado, Nebraska, 
Dakota and Kansas, Colorado securities and 
Kansas mortgages being a specialty ; in short, 
everything properly pertaining to financial in- 
vestments and fiscal transactions is attended to, 
the Chemical National Bank of New York, and 
Kidder, Peabody & Co., of Boston, being corres- 
pondents, and altogether an exceedingly fine 
business is carried on. Mr. Rollins the elder is 
a native of this state, and one of Concord's fore- 
most and staunchest citizens, prominent in pub- 
lic, social and commercial life, being an Ex-mem- 
ber of the U. S. Senate and also of the House of 
Representatives, and is at present a director of 
the Mechanics National Savings Bank and the 
Granite State Insurance Co., of Portsmouth ; while 
Mr. Frank West Rollins (the son), who was born in 
this city, is a capable and excellent member of 
the legal profession, having studied law in the 
office of Hon. J. Y. Mugridge, is u graduate of 
Harvard, and is the popular and vigilant treasurer 
of the Manufacturers' Merchants' Mutual Insur- 
ance Co., of Concord. They also have an office in 
Boston and Denver, Col., and Grand Forks, Dak. 



J. Frank Hoit, Grocer and Dealer in West 
India Goods, Masonic Temple, Corner Main and 
Pleasant Streets. This business was founded in 
1852 by Kimball &Hoit and afterwards continued 
by Webster & Hoit from 1857 to 1860, and from 
1860 to 1864 by Hardy & Hoit. Mr. J. Frank 
Hoit from 1864 to 1866 conducted it alone and 
afterwards formed the firm of J. F. Hoit & Co., 
and under that name it was carried on until 1872, 
when Mr. Hoit assumed sole control and has since 
conducted the house with vigor, increasing the 
facilities and extending the trade. Mr. Hoit's 
long experience in the grocery trade has given 
him a wide reputation and made his establish- 
ment very popular, and to meet the demands of 
the patrons and the public, he em ploys five clerks 
and owns two wagons for delivering goods. The 
premises consisting of store and basement are 30 
x80 feet in extent, and a large stock of all the 
various lines of staple and fancy groceries and 
West India goods are always to be found on sale 
in great profusion, together with the finest brands 
of family flour, and also prime butter, provisions 
and country produce, giass seed, corn meal, etc. 
He was formerly a member of the directorate of 
the Concord Savings Bank. 



200 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Page Belting Company, There is nothing 
connected with modern manufacturing that plays 
a more important part than belting. By means 
of belting, power is transmitted from the engine 
to the machinery with the least possible loss by 
friction. At various times inventive minds have 
turned their attention to the production of belting 
from various substances other than leather, such 
as cotton, rubber and linen, but in every case 
with little or no practical benefit. Where the 
first cost has been lessened, the use of any other 
than leather belting has always proved to be 
more expensive in the long run. 

" The tanner, much wiser than all put together, 
Cried. ' Say what you will, there's nothing like 
leather.'" 

The largest house engaged in the manufacture 
of belting and lacing in New Hampshire is <hat 
of the Page Belting Co., of Concord This 
company was incorporated in 1872, under the laws 
of this state, with a present capital of $250,000, 
and is officered as follows, viz : president, Geo. F. 
Page; treasurer, Chas. T. Page; superintendent, 
Frank L. Sanders. The premises occupied for 
manufacturing purposes are very extensive, com- 
prising a tannery 60x245 feet, two stories high, 
with an addition 50x70 feet, and a belting and 
lacing factory, two stories high, 40x250 feet, the 
entire works and grounds covering an area of ten 
acres. The machinery is of the finest known to 
the trade, including six drums, one stretcher of 
fifty tons pressure, the only one in the country, 
and other modern appliances, operated by a 75 
horse power engine, three boilers of 150 horse 
power, and furnishing employment to from one 
hundred and twenty to one hundred and fifty 
hands. One thousand hides are used per week, 
and the product is one of great magnitude. The 
output is considered as the standard in the 
markets of the country, being unsupassed for 
durability, strength and general excellence. In 
every respect it would be difficult to find a con- 
cern in this or any other country either better 
equipped or with more comprehensive facilities 
for the transaction of a large trade and the pro- 
duction of a superior class of goods. The Her- 
cules Lacing, manufactured by this company, was 
patented June 12, 1883, and has a wide popu- 
larity. The trade of the houso extends through- 
out the United States, to numerous foreign coun- 
tries, and is especially heavy in the eastern states. 
Branches are operated in Boston, New York, St. 
Louis, Chicago and Kansas City. The president 
and treasurer, Messrs. Geo. F. and Chas. T. Page, 
are brothers, born in Massachusetts, and are young 
men of large experience and marked ability as 
manufacturers and business men. The superin- 
tendent, Mr. Sanders, has been connected with 
the company since its incorporation, and is emin- 
ently fitted for the responsibilities of his position. 
This business in its extent and importance oc- 
cupies a prominent place among the manufactur- 
ing interests or this city, and reflects great credit 
upon its managers, who have made it a prosperous 
and growing enterprise. 

Norman G. Carr, Watch Maker and Jew- 
eler, etc., One Door South of Phenix Block, Sign 
of Big Spectacles. The name of Carr has been 
very intimately associated with the watch mak- 



ing and jewelry trade of the city of Concoid for 
almost one-third of a century. Mr. Norman G. 
Carr was born in Bradford, this state, but has 
been a resident of this city since J844. Having 
learned the trade of watch making and jeweler 
he established this enterprise in 1856 and has 
conducted the business ever since with unvarying 
success. He occupies a very neatly arranged and 
commodious store, which is one door south of the 
Phenix Block, at the sign of the Big Spectacles. 
The appointments and fixtures are very hand- 
some and attractive, while the stock displayed is 
full and complete, embracing fine gold and silver 
watches of American and European manufacture, 
also jewelry of all kinds, such as plain and fancy 
rings, bracelets, bangles, brooches, necklaces, 
watch chains and charms, diamonds and other 
precious stones set in the latest and most unique 
styles, cuff, collar and sleeve buttons, shawl, lace 
and scarf pins, etc. ; also solid silver and plated 
ware, fancy articles, French, Swiss and American 
clocks, statuary, eye glasses, spectacles, opera 
glasses and other optical goods, thermometers, 
etc. These goods have all been selected with the 
greatest care to meet the requirements of a first- 
class trade and are offered to the public at the 
most reasonable prices, and every article is war- 
ranted to be as represented. Mr. Carr is the old- 
est practical jeweler in the city and devotes 
special attention to the repairing of fine watches, 
clocks, jewelry, etc., which is executed promptly" 
and the best style of workmanship, and satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. He is also a very prominent 
and active member of the Free and Accepted 
Masons, having passed through the different de- 
grees until he is now a Knight Templar. 

True A. Heath & Co., Dealers in 'Car- 
pets, Crockery, Glass and China Ware, Draperies, 
Window Shades, Paper Hangings, etc., Centennial 
Block, Opposite Phenix Hotel. This is a live 
wide-awake business house, and one which has, 
within a brief period, established a very large 
and flourishing business. The location of the 
establishment is in every respect a very central 
one, being located in the Centennial Block, oppo- 
site the Phenix Hotel. The business was founded 
three years ago, and from its inception to the 
present has been accorded a very liberal and sub- 
stantial patronage. The premises occupied com- 
prise a salesroom 25x75 feet in dimensions and a 
basement of equal measurement. The salesroom 
is very handsomely fitted up, and is admirably 
arranged for the effective display of goods and the 
accommodation of customers. The stock is a 
large and comprehensive one and embraces the 
newest designs and patterns in carpets from the 
looms of'Europe and America, crockery, china, 
glassware, lamps, etc., in endless variety, 
draperies, of all kinds, window shadesand paper 
hangings in the newest patterns, etc. These 
goods have been selected with the greatest care 
for a critical trade, nnd it is one meriting the 
closest examination on the part of customers. 
The house has always aimed at keeping the 
finest quality of goods, and in offering these at 
the lowest possible prices. The result is a large 
and substantial patronage. Mr. True A. Heath, 
who is the sole proprietor, is a native of Hamp- 
ton, N. H., and is a young man of spirited busi- 
ness enterprise. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



201 



The Concord Manufacturing: Com- 
pany, FJannel Manufacturers and Dyers, West 
Concord. There are some houses in this city, 
whose long and steady career, heavy and exten- 
sive transactions and solid business qualities 
make them landmarks in the history of the past, 
and prime factors in the commerce of the present. 
Of such the establishment of the Concord Man- 
ufacturing Co., at West Concord, is a prominent 
representative. This company is wideiy known 
as flannel manufacturers and dyers, and their 
mills are the oldest and largest of the kind in 
the city. The history of the concern is a record 
of thrift, enterprise, honesty and success. In 
1843 Mr. B. F. Holden came from his native state 
of Massachusetts to this city, and purchased a 
small flour mill and cloth mill, and founded the 
enterprise now so successfully conducted by the 
Concord Manufacturing Co. He started the busi- 
ness with one set of cards, and in 18471ns brother 
Mr. Daniel Holden. was admitted under the firm 
name of B. F. & D. Holden. These gentlemen 
continued to steadily extend their premises and 
increase their facilities for production, and in 1874 
the present company was incorporated, with a 
capital of $100,CLO, and with B. F. Holden as 
president, and Daniel Holden as treasurer. In 
1875 Mr. B. F. Holden died, and since that date 
Mr. Daniel Holden has filled the position of 
treasurer. The premises occupied for manufac- 
turing purposes now comprise two factories on 
opposite sides 01 the street. The old factory has 
four floors measuring 50x150 feet, and the new 
building has three stories and a basement 40xl;>6 
feet. They are thoroughly equipped with nu-d- 
ern machinery and appliances, the motive power 
beingsupplied by two engines, one of 50 and one of 
60 horse power, and three boilers of 150 horse 
power. The equipment comprises eight sets of 
cards, 48 looms and 3,620 spindles. Employment 
is furnished to from one hundred to one hundred 
and twenty-five hands; six thousand pounds of 
scoured wool are used per week, and the weekly 
product averages nine hundred yards of cloth, 
four ounces to the yard. The goods manufactured 
by this company are celebrated for their superior 
quality, durability and fine finish, and are in con- 
stant and permanent demand in all parts of the 
United States. Messrs. Parker, Wilder & Co. are 
the selling agents in New York and Boston. Mr. 
Holden, the treasurer of this extensive enterprise, 
was born in Massachusetts in 1809, and has been 
actively identified with the growth of the busi- 
ness for upwards of forty years. Although nearly 
four-score years of age, he still gives it the benefit 
of his experience and practical knowledge, and is 
highly esteemed by his fellow men as a useful 
citizen and an honorable business man. The 
company is one of the most reliable in the New 
England Slates. 



Cummiiigs Brothers, Marble and Granite 
Monuments, Cummings' New Block, Near Elm 
House. Among the most noteworthy and suc- 
cessful marble and granite workers in the state 
are Messrs. Cnmmings Bros., of Concord. The 
business of this concern had its origin in l"-f>:> at 
Franklin, New Hampshire, the founders being 
Messrs. O. and G. A. Cnmmings. In March, 1861, 
O. and G. A. Cummings established themselves at 
Concord and made Concord their headquarters, 



the Franklin house being continued as a branch. 
In 1863 Oscar Cummings died, leaving Geo. A., 
who carried on the business aloue until 1868 when 
he took in a partner M. Cummings. In 1884 
another branch was opened at Pittsfield, N. H. 
Subsequently E. G. and (!. A. Cummings erected 
for the firm's business in Concord a handsome and 
substantial building, the fourth south of the Elm 
House. The lower story or basement is used as a 
manufactory, while the first floor is occupied ex- 
clusively as a salesroom for finished monuments 
and tablets, and it is one of the largest and best 
appointed establishments of its kind in New 
England. The salesroom, which is 30x75 feet in 
dimensions, is always deserving of inspection, be- 
ing stored with richly moulded and highly pol- 
ished monuments, varying in price from $100 to- 
$1,000, with hundreds of beautifully executed tab- 
lets, from the plainest outline up to elaborately 
chiseled architectural memorials finished in the 
highest style of sculptural art, thus affording 
an opportunity for the gratification of taste aud a 
love of the beautiful. The firm are the sole 
agents for Merrimack Co., Manchester, and nearly 
all of the important towns of the state for the 
Columbian marble, from the manufactory of the 
Columbian Marble Co., of Rutland,' Vt. The 
Columbian is the most perfect and enduring mar- 
ble yet discovered, being much better adapted to 
our climate than any other American production, 
far surpassing in reliability, the best grades of 
foreign marble ever imported to this country. 
This marble is deposited in layers of widely dif- 
fering color, thus affording the most pleasing 
contrasts The dark variegated is possessed of 
shades innumerable, and susceptible of an inex- 
pensive but most beautiful and attractive orna- 
mentation, while the light medium cloud rivals 
in purity and brilliancy the finest qualities of 
Italian marble, thus possessing in quality and 
color every requisite for memorial purposes. 
The fiim keep in stock one of the largest and 
most varied collections of monumental work in 
New England. Monuments and tablets are set 
up anywhere within 20 miles without extra 
charge, or a liberal discount is made on work 
delivered at the manufactory. The firm have an 
endless variety of their own drawings of memori- 
als, in every size and pattern, and hundreds of 
card photographs, obtained at no slight cost, 
from the most attractive cemeteries in the 
United States, together with an extensive line of 
tinted and finely executed prints from for- 
eign manulacturers, with the polished specimens 
of English, Scotch, Irish and German granites, 
from which they can furnish work at manufac- 
turers' prices. Columns worked by patent ma- 
chinery, and shafts up to 25 feet in length, aud 
dies up to 15 tons are furnished promptly from 
the foreign quarries, where the firm are constantly 
having orders filled by arrangerm nTs directly with 
the manufacturers. In the line of domestic gran- 
ites they make a specialty of furnishing large 
family monuments aud tombs, also enclosures or 
borders for cemetery lots, either delivered at the 
firm's yard or set upin the cemeteries. The firm 
employ about fifteen hands and kee'p large stocks 
at their branch stores. The members of the firm 
are natives of Ackworth, N. H., and Mr. Geo. A. 
Cummings is an ex- Alderman of Concord and was 
Mayor in 1881 and 1882. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 




The Abbot-Downing Co., Manufac- 
turers of Coaches, Wagons and Carriages. It 
would be practically impossible, outside the limits 
of n special volume of its own, to do anything 
like real justice to the Abbot-Downing Co., which 
is one of the largest and most complete establish- 
ments of the kind in the United States. Neither 
would any account of the varied industries of 
Concord be- complete without containing at least 
some allusion to this enterprise, and for this 
reason the following brief statement of a few 
facts concerning the company's history and pre- 
sent facilities may be taken in place of what we 
should prefer to make a complete description and 
review of the business. The limited scale on 
which these works were originally established is 
matter for astonishment in view of the present 
magnitude of the establishment. The foundation 
of the business was laid in 1813, by Mr. Lewis 
Downing. The first year he employed one or two 
bands at different times, and his business was 
very small, as shown by the entries in the original 
book, now preserved by his son. In 1828 the 
firm of Downing & Abbot was organized, who 
continued the business until 1847, when they dis- 
solved partnership and established two separate 
houses, viz : Lewis Downing & Sons, and J. S. & 
E. A. Abbot. The junior partner of the first- 
named firm was Lewis Downing, Jr., who had 
been connected with the business since 1837, and 
who is now tha honored president of the Abbot- 
Downing Co.' In 1865 the firm of Abbot, Down- 
ing & Co. was organized, consisting of Messrs. 
Lewis Downing, Jr., J. S. Abbot, E. A. Abbot, 
Aloozo Downing, and Mr. J. H. Abbot. The 
Abbot-Downing Co. was incorporated in 1873, 
with a capital of $400,000. and is officered as 
follows : president, Lewis Downing, Jr. ; vice- 
president, Joseph H. Abbot ; treasurer, Edward 
A. Abbot ; secretary, Francis L. Abbol ; superin- 
tendent, R. M. Morgan. The works of the com- 
pany comprise some twenty buildings, thirteen of 



which are used for manufacturing, and cover an. 
area of 258,096 square feet. The buildings com- 
prise all of the most approved appointments cal- 
culated to facilitate economical manufacture, and 
the machinery requires the use of a 90-horse 
power Corliss engine and three boilers of 150-horse 
power to effect the necessary action. This com- 
pany is the oldest carriage company in the United 
States, and are the originators of the Concord 
wagons, Concord coaches, Concord wheels and 
Concord axles. As manufacturers of coaches, 
wagons, carriages and trucks they are known the 
world over. Heavy goods are made a specialty, 
and in this department of manufacture they stand 
without a successful rival. As all parts of the 
vehicle, including axles, springs end wheels, are 
made within the works, they are enabled to fur- 
nish their customers with an article that they 
know to be reliable, and of the best quality 
obtainable. Their express wagons and trucks are 
the perfection of durability and fine workman- 
ship, and a/e unequalled for strength, lightness 
and general excellence by those of any other first- 
class house in the world. The first stage-coach 
was built at these works in 1825. In 1865 they 
built thirty-fi'iir stages for Wells, Fargo & Co., 
to be used by them in mountain work while 
building the Union Pacific Railroad. Some of the 
freight wagons turned out by this company weigh 
6,500 pounds. They also engage in the building 
of horse-cars to some extent. They use 4,000 
tons of iron and steel, and 500,000 feet of lumber 
per year, and manufacture annually from 1,800 
to 2,000 wagons. Their pay-roll is $12,000 per 
month, constituting a powerful element in pro- 
moting the industrial thrift of this community. 
They employ two hundred and fifty hands in Con- 
cord. Forty at their repair shop in New York 
City, and fifteen in the lumber regions of Ver- 
mont. Their principal branches are at No. 52 
Oliver street, Boston ; No. 140 Prince street, New 
York ; and at Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. 



LEADING NANUFAC'l UREliti AXD MERCHANTS. 



203 



Their trade is co-extensive with the globe. 
Wagons of various styles, and trucks, are kept in 
stock at all times, and orders are filled with 
promptness and care. This company is undoubt- 
edly the institution which, more than any other, 
makes Concord famous the world over. Its 
officers are known as among the most patriotic, 
philanthropic and public-spirited citizens of the 
city and state, and their names are familiar in 
every quarter. The president, Mr. Lewis Down- 
ing, Jr., was born and reared on the very grounds 
where the works of the company have stood for 
the past seventy-two years. On the completion 
of fifty years of continuous service in this indus- 
try. May 4, 1887, he presented the employes of 
the company with a beautifully printed and 
engraved souvenir, accompanied by a photograph 
of himself, extending his congratulations and best 
wishes, and referring, among other things, to the 
fact that thirteen of the employees had an aver- 
age service of forty-two years the longest fifty- 
one and the shortest thirty seven, years a won- 
derful record, which he justly considers unparal- 
leled. Mr. Downing is the president of the 
National State Capital Bank, a director in the 
Stark Mills at Manchester, and takes an active 
interest in everything that is likely to prove 
advantageous to the city, county and state. The 
vice-president, Mr. Joseph H. Abbot, is also a 
native of the city, as is the treasurer, Mr. Edward 
A. Abbot, and the secretary, Mr. Francis L. 
Abbot, all are earnestly engaged in maintaining 
the prestige of. the establishment, and thereby 
meeting every demand of their immense trade. 



^y. G. C. Kimball, Photographer, No. T> N. 
Main Street. Although it is but little more than 
half a century since Daguerre introduced the pro- 
cess of making pictures through chemical action on 
sensitive plates, marvelous progress has been made 
in all branches pertaining to photography. What 
with invention, improvement, discovery and the 
notable development of skill in this direction, a 
degree ofexcellenceclosely akin to perfection itself 
has been reached in the art of late years. In this 
connection special mention ought here be made of 
W. G. C. Kimball, photographer, this city, who is 
by common consent a leading exponent of the art, 
and whose ad mirably conducted and well equipped 
studio is in all respects the finest establishment of 
the kind in the state, as well as the oldest ; the 
pictures leaving this elegant and well-ordered 
gallery being Al in every feature of merit in 
fidelity to original or copy, in execution, design 
and finish while his patronage is of a most 
extensive and flattering character and grows apace 
with years. This widely and favorably known 
studio was established away back in 1848, by W. 
H. Kimball (father of the present proprietor), who 
conducted it tip to 186.1. when the business passed 
into the control of his son and successor, the 
gentleman whose name leads this sketch. The 
premises occupied, which embrace two 25x80 foot 
floors, are handsomely fitted up and very taste- 
fully appointed, and are completely equipped in 
every particular with the most improved appli- 
ances, devices and general appurtenances, w T hile 
half a dozen or more courteous and efficient assist- 
ants are in attendance, including expert artists. 
Photography in all its branches is executed in the 
highest style of the art; only the most superior 



class of work being done crayon, India ink, 
pastel, etc., while a specialty is made of fine por- 
traits, and altogether the patronage of the estab- 
lishment is exceedingly large. Mr. Kimball, who 
is a gentleman of furty-four, of pleasing manner 
and the highest personal integrity, is a practical 
and expert photographer himself, with some 
twenty-eight years experience in the exercise of 
his profession, and stands high in the community 
alike in his business relations and in social life. 
He also bears a creditable war record, having 
shared the fortunes of the 18th New Hampshire 
volunteers at the front during 1864 and 1865, and 
is a popular and esteemed member of the G. A. 
R. Sturtevant Post No. 2. He enlisted as a 
private, and served in the Army of the Potomac 
at Petersburg, and was mustered out a lieutenant- 
colonel at the close of the war. 



S. \Vardner, Manufacturer of Fine Cigars, 
No. 146 Nor In Main Street. A prominent house 
engaged in the manufacture of fine cigars is that 
of Mr. S. Wardner. Mr. "Wardner is a native of 
Vermont, but a resident of Concord since 1864, 
and founded Ibis establishment at the present 
location in 1869, and since its inception at that 
date has built up a very prosperous trade, both 
wholesale and retail, extending throughout the 
city and surrounding country. The aim of the 
proprietor is to make an honest cigar, worthy of 
the good opinion of smokers, and to scrupulously 
maintain the superiority of his brands. The 
premises occupied consist of a commodious store 
with factory in the rear, in every way well adapt- 
ed for the work in hand, employment being given 
to several skilled and experienced cigar makers. 
Mr. Wardner is a practical cigar maker, at his 
store will be found a retail department where can 
be found at all times his favorite and special 
brands, such as the Eighty-thi ee, H;ippy Thought, 
C4ranite State and Top of the Heap, also cigar- 
ettes, smoking and chewing tobaccos and smokers' 
articles in general, which are offered to the public 
at very low prices. Every box of cigars made in 
this house bears the union label. The proprietor 
is agent for J. Wright & Go's., tobacco ot Rich- 
mond. Va., also of Liggett & Meyer's of St. Louis, 
Mo. He is an active and prominent member of 
the Order of Free and Accepted Masons, and 
always keeps his eyes well placed upon the lights. 

Don. H. Aldrich, Drugs, Medicines and 
Chemicals, etc.. No. 16 North Main Street. Prom- 
inent among the well known drug establishments 
in Concord is that of Mr. Don. H. Aldrich, which 
was first opened by him to the public in 1882, 
and since then has been under the sole control of 
Mr. Aldrich. The store is neatly and handsomely 
arranged and has an area of 20x70 feet. Plate 
glass show cases and ornamental counters and a 
soda fountain of rich design are among the feat- 
ures of the establishment, which is well supplied 
with pure, fresh drugs of the highest standard 
quality, and proprietary medicines and com- 
pounds of the most reliable character, a fine dis- 
play also being made of toilet and fancy articles. 
In the prescription department every care is ex- 
ercised in their preparation by Mr. Aldrich, who 
is a thorough pharmacist of many years experi- 
ence, asd a prominent member of the New Hamp- 
shire State Pharmaceutical Association. 



204 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Phenix Hotel, Edson J. Hill, Manager. 
The Phenix Hotel in Concord fills a niche in the 
esteem and popularity of the people of this state 
peculiarly its own. The elegance of the bouse 
needs only to be seen to impress the stranger 
favorably as a first-class hotel in all respects, 
while its wide-open door reveals a cordial wel- 
come and all the tasteful comforts of a home. It 
is i he hotel par excellence of the Granite State, 
and good management has made it so. It was 
erected in 1856, and, after being in the hands of 
several proprietors, it was purchased in 1865, by 
Mr. Tames R. Hill, who had been well and widely 



office. A fine bar, billiard hall and barber shop 
are among the other necessities of modern hotel 
life that are supplied for the use of guests. The 
dining-room is located on the first floor, and has 
a seating capacity for one hundred and twenty 
people. The cuisine is worthy of special commen- 
dation, being under the most experienced man- 
agement, and kept up to the highest standard of 
excellence. The proprietor, and his corps of 
assistants, are all justly popular with the travel- 
ing public, and the praises of the Phenix are sung 
by all who have experienced its hospitality the 
world over. 




known as a harness manufacturer in this city for 
many years. He leased the house to other par- 
ties until 1880, when he newly furnished and 
re-fitted it throughout and opened it under his 
wn management. At his lamented decease in 
November, 1884, his son, Mr. Edson J. Hill, 
assumed control, and has since presided as its 
host, sole owner and proprietor, to the delight of 
all who have patronized his house down to the 
present day. The hotel contains five stories and 
a basement, is 80x140 feet in dimensions, arid pro- 
vides first-class accommodations to from one 
hundred and fifty to two hundred guests, at from 
$2.50 to $3.50 per day. No luxury afforded in 
situation, surroundings, cuisine or modern con- 
veniences in any hotel is lacking at the Phenix. 
It is situated within easy reach of the depot", the 
State Capitol and the business centres of the city, 
and is convenient alike to the permanent patron, 
the commercial tourist and the transient guest. 
It is the prominent and popular headquarters for 
Senators and Representatives during the sessions 
of the Legislature, and is the favored resort for 
people from all parts of the world. The house is 
lighted by numerous electric lights on the first 
floor, heated by steam throughout, and provided 
with electric call bells communicating with the 



Fred Reed & Co., Fine, Staple and 
Fancy Groceries, North Main Street. One among 
the oldest business houses in the city is that now 
carried on by the firm of Fred Reed & Co. The 
business has been established more than forty 
years, and from 1881 to 1885 was conducted by 
Whietemore & Reed and -during the past two 
years by the present firm. The premises utilized 
for business purposes consists of a commodious 
store and basement 25x80 feet in dimensions. A 
large valuable stock of choice staple and fancy 
groceries is always kept on sale, embracing the 
finest teas and coffees that are brought into the 
country, hermetically sealed goods in tin and 
glass, table delicacies, condiments, family flour, 
provisions, etc. The stock has been carefully 
selected by Mr. Reed expressly for a first-class 
trade, and has been brought direct from the lead- 
ing manufactures and importers upon the most, 
advantageous terms and is being offered at the 
very lowest prices, and is one of the most desirable 
and inviting grocery houses in Concord. Mr. 
Reed was born in Maine and has resided in this 
city many years, and is one of the most active 
among the young and energetic merchants, who 
take great interest in the city's prosperity and 
welfare. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



205 



The Prescott Piano and Organ Com- 
pany, No. 71 South Main Street. The founda- 
tion of this extensive business now conducted by 
this company was laid in 1836, by Mr. Abram 
Prescott, at a time when pianos and organs were 
luxuries enjoyed only by the opulent, and when 
their manufacture was pursued under many diffi- 
culties. In 1845, Mr. Prescott took his son, 
Abram J., into partnership, and in 1850 the firm 
became Prescott Bros., consisting of Messrs. A. J., 
J. W. and J. B. Prescott. In 1854 Mr. J. \V. 
Prescott retired, and in 1858 Mr. J. B. Prescott 
died, the latter's place being taken by Mr. George 
D. B. Prescott, the firm name being Prescott & 
Bro., until 1871, when it was changed to Prescott 
Organ Co. Under that name it was incorporated 
in 1880, with a capital stock of $16,000, and in 
one year was increased to $30, 000 continuing with 



great brilliancy and power are obtained. 
Year by year this company has gone steadily Ibr- 
waid, adding one improvement after another un- 
til their organs are to-day renowned over the 
entire civilized world. The Messrs. Prescott are 
both natives of this city, and trained to their 
business from their youth. The reputation they 
have acquired as musicians, manufacturers and en- 
terprising, honorable business men, places them 
beyond the requirements of praise at our hands. 



T. W. & J. H. Stewart, Merchant Tailors, 
No. 82 Main Street This is one of the oldest 
concerns in its line in the city. The brothers 
Stewart were born at Danbnry, N. H. , and in 
1842 came to reside in Concord. Mr. T. W. 
Stewart, who has been connected with the 
tailoring trade for the past forty years, is an ex- 




steadily increasing success in the manufacture of 
organs until 1886, when the company embarked 
in the manufacture of upright pianos, and, to 
meet the necessary expansion of the business inci- 
dent thereto, the present company was incorpor- 
ated, with the following officers and directors, 
viz : president, A. J. Prescott ; treasurer, Geo. 
D. B. Prescott; clerk. Frank P.Andrews; direc- 
tors, A. J. Prescot, J. K. Foster, Geo. D. B. Pres- 
cott, H. J. Crippen and F. P.Andrews. The new 
factory, built in 1881, is four stories in height, 
36x90 feet in dimensions, provided with ample 
and modern facilitips for production, and giving 
employment to thirty five skilled and experienced 
hands. Among the many improvements now to 
be found in the Prescott Organ are the new solo 
stops Vox Celeste, Gamba, Clarinet, Vox Angelic, 
each being an independent set of reeds, peculiarly 
voiced ; the new manual sub bass ; the improved 
valve Tremolo, the Vox Humana Tremolo and 
the Parker Octavo Coupler, by the use of which 



member of the city council and a member of the 
Odd Fellows Society. He founded the business 
in 1849, and two years afterwards he admitted 
his brother, Mr. J. H. Stewart, into partnership. 
The latter has had thirty-eight years experience 
in the trade and is a member of the Masonic body. 
The firm occupy an elegantly fitted up store, 
25x80 feet in dimensions, and there is always in 
stock the latest novelties in foreign and domestic 
fabrics, and these are selected with great cire for 
a first-class trade. Measures are taken for 
gentlemen's attire, and in every instance a stylish 
and perfect fit is guaranteed. Fine custom work 
is the specialty of the house, and from fifteen to 
twenty-five hands are employed. All work is 
executed under the surveillance of the proprie- 
tors, whose skill is a sufficient guarantee that no 
garment leaves the establishment which will 
not bear the most critical examination. Mr. 
Chas. H. Stewart is associated with this firm and 
is a young man possessing all modern tastes, etc. 



U06 



CITY OF CONCORD. 




Humphrey, Dodge & Smith, Jobbers 
and Ketailers iu Hardware, Iron and Steel, etc., 
Nos. 100 and 102 N. Main Street. Among the ener- 
getic and old established business men in this city 
there are none who enjoy a better reputation than 
Messrs. Humphrey, Dodge and Smith, the hard ware 
and iron and steel merchants. This concern is not 
only one of the largest but one of the oldest in the 
New England States. The business was started 
in 1828 under the firm style of Porter, Roff 
& Brown, Later the proprietors were Ward 
& Walker, and then D. A. Ward, in 1856, 
formed a partnership with Mr. Stillman Hum- 
phrey, the principal of the present firm. Another 
change made the style of the firm Ward, Hum- 
phrey & Co.; then it became Ward, Humphrey & 
Dodge, and in 1876 the present firm of Humphrey, 
Dodge & Smith was organized. The several 
members of the firm are Messrs. Stillman Hum- 
phrey, Howard A. Dodge and Converse J. Smith, 
all of whom are natives of New Hampshire. Mr. 
Dodge is a trustee of the Loan and Trust Savings 
Bank. The premises occupied for the business are 
very spacious and in every way admirably 
adapted. They comprise a building containing 
five floors and basement, the whole standing upon 
an area of 50x100 feet. In the rear of this build- 
ing the firm have a warehouse with a frontage of 
100 feet and a depth of 90 feet ; and near the 
bridge, they have another warehouse 60x100 feet 
in dimensions, and three stories high. The store 
is suitably fitted up, and the firm carry a full 
line of every kind of goods classed as builders' and 
general hardware, tools, cutlery, housefurnishing 
goods, etc. They also carry an immense stock of 
iron and. eteel of foreign and domestic manufac- 
ture. The stock in every department has been 
very carefully selected and purchased principally 
direct from the manufacturers. From twelve to 
fifteen hands are employed and the business of the 
concern extends to ail parts of the New England 
States. It is conducted on the just principles of 
equity and the firm rank first-class in the trade. 



Dows & Wheeler, Architects, No. 72 
Main Street. Perhaps in no branch of science, 
art or industry has there been made more steady , 
and notable progress in the United States during 
the past thirty or forty years than in that which 
pertains to the functions of the architect, the 
advance made in this direction within a decade 
or two being especially marked and gratifying, 
while the magnificent structures, public build- 
ings, church edifices, dwellings and high-class 
architecture that greet the eye on every hand 
throughout the land to-day amply attest Amer- 
ican genius and skill in this interesting and im- 
portant sphere of activity. In this connection 
special mention ought here be made of the widely 
and favorably known firm of Dows & Wheeler, 
architects, No. 72 Main street, this city, who are 
by common consent the leading, most reliable 
and best equipped members of the profession in 
the entire state, sustaining a deservedly high 
reputation for sound judgment, skill and ability 
in all branches of the art, and who enjoy as a 
consequence an extensive and flattering patron- 
age, both gentlemen having had a practical expe- 
rience in the exercise of their profession extend- 
ing over thirty odd years and upward. Mr. E. 
Dows, who is a native of Vermont and one of the 
oldest architects in New Hampshire, established 
himself in business in Concord in 1857, and con- 
tinued alone up to 1870, when he associated with 
him in partnership Mr. G. Wheeler, a native of 
this state. They occupy well ordered and hand- 
some offices, and attend to all branches of the busi- 
ness, plans, designs and estimates on buildings 
and constructions of every description, being 
promptly furnished upon application. Among 
the noteworthy buildings erected on their 
plans and constructed vmder their supervision 
hereabouts may be mentioned the Opera Block, 
Post-Office Block, a portion of Abbott-Downing 
Co. Factories, Board of Trade Block and in fat t 
most of the principal structures in this section of 
the country. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



207 



G. H. H. Silsby & Son, Printers and Book- 
binders, etc., No. 23 North Main Street. A leading 
and noteworthy firm is that of G. H. H. Silsby & 
Sou, printers and bookbinders, and dealers in sta- 
tionery and blank books, and which is one of the 
foremost, largest and best equipped concerns of 
the kind in this city, as well as the oldest, having 
for upward of forty-seven years been conducted 
with unbroken prosperity. This stable and reli- 
able house was established in 1840, by Morrill & 
Silsby, who conducted the same up to 1880, when 
Mr. Morrill died, and the business has been carried 
on since under the present firm name of G. H. H. 
Silsby & Son, the pushing and popular firm 
whose name heads this sketch. They occupy for 
business purposes an entire three-story and base- 
ment 21x23 structure, supplied with ample and 
excellent facilities, and completely equipped 
throughout with the most improved machinery, 
appliances and appurtenances, including five 
capacious presses, paper cutters, ruling devices, 
etc., while an efficient staff of expert hands are in 
regular service. General job printing in the 
most superior and expeditious manner, fine com- 
mercial work being a specialty, and book-binding 
of every description likewise is promptly and 
satisfactorily attended to. The office and sales- 
room too are neatly fitted up and appointed, and 
a heavy and first-class assortment of mercantile 
stationery, ledgers, blank books of all kinds, 
cards, wrapping paper, twine, etc , is constantly 
carried on hand ; all orders receiving prompt at- 
tention, and altogether the trade of the firm, 
which extends throughout the city and state, is at 
once large and flourishing. 

D. E. Clark, Dry Goods, State Block. Mr. 
D. E. Clarke, the popular dry gooda merchant, 
occupies a fine, large, handsome store having 
dimensions of 20x75 feet in the State Block, in 
which is displayed an extensive assortment of 
dry goods, small wares, etc., embracing silks, 
dress goods in all the desirable fabrics, and all 
kinds of staple and fancy, foreign and domestic 
goods belonging to the trade, besides a general 
assortment of notions, trimmings, hosiery, white 
goods and ladies' furnishings, etc. Mr. Clarke, 
who was born in Vermont sixty years ago, located 
in Concord in 1846, and six years later he estab- 
lished the business he is now conducting with so 
much success. He is a gentleman of fine business 
qualifications, and as one of our old merchants 
and citizens is highly esteemed and popular with 
all who do their trading with him. 



Mr. Danforth is treasurer of the same organiza- 
tions. In addition to representing these compan- 
ies, Messrs. Morrill & Danforth are also agents for 
the Granite State Fire Insurance Co., of Ports- 
mouth; the Capital Fire Insurance Co., of Nashua; 
the Amoskeag Fire Insurance Co., of Manchester; 
and the Indian Head Fire Insurance Co., of 
Nashua. By energy, prudence in the selection of 
risks, and liberal and honorable treatment of 
those who commit their interests to their care, 
the firm have obtained a very valuable list of 
customers, numbering some of the city's best 
known merchants, manufacturers and real estate 



Morrill & Danforth, General Insurance 
Agents, No. 77 North Main Street. The leading 
insurance agency in Concord is that conducted by 
Messrs. Morrill & Dauforth. The business of this 
responsible house was originally founded in 1864 
by Messrs. Webster & Smith, and passed through 
minor changes of management until 1872 when 
the present proprietors succeeded to the control. 
The copartners, Messrs. Obadiah Morrill and 
Charles C. Danforth, are natives of this state, and 
are accounted among the most capable and 
thoroughly trained insurance men in thecountry. 
Mr. Morrill is secretary of tho following well- 
known companies of this city : State Mutual, 
Home Manufacturers and Trades Mutual . Mtna 
Mutual, and American Manufacturers Mutual. 



H. W. Brickett, Fine Groceries, Flour, 
Grain, etc., No. 158 North Main Street. A prom- 
inent and reliable concern of this kind in Concord 
is that of Mr. H. W. Brickett. Mr. Brickett is a 
native of this state and a resident of this city 
since 1881. He established himself on his own 
account originally in Lowell, Mass., in 1876, but 
removed to this city six years subsequently and 
began operations the same year. The premises 
utilized are large and commodious and comprise 
a finely appointed store, with basement, each 
25x75 feet in dimensions. The large variety of 
articles embraced in the stock is such as relates 
to the general wants of the community, and in- 
cludes everything in the line of staple and fancy 
groceries. The freshest new crop teas from China 
and Japan, fragrant coffees from Java, Mocha and 
Brazil, spices, condiments, table delicacies, fresh 
creamery butter, cheese, eggs, canned goods, select 
brands of flour will be found constantly pure and 
fresh iu stock ; also bakers' and laundry supplies, 
vegetables, etc. He also deals very extensively 
in corn, oats, hay, straw, white and yellow 
bolted and unbolted corn and oat meal; also 
buckwheat flour, mill feed such as bran, shorts, 
etc. These goods are all of the very best quality. 
The store is kept in the cleanest and neatest 
condition. When desired orders are delivered 
free at residences throughout the city by wagon. 

David E. Murphy, American, British, 
French and German Dry Goods, No. 80 North 
Main Street. Of those engaged in the dry goods 
business in our city there are none more justly 
entitled to consideration than Mr. David E. 
Murphy. His store has a double front and covers 
a space of 25x75 feet, and is fitted up and provided 
with every facility for business purposes. In the 
stock will be found a full and complete assort- 
ment of staple and fancy dry goods of both Ameri- 
can, British. French and German production, em- 
bracing a wide range in the varied department, of 
textile fabrics, including everything new, fashion- 
able and stylish in dress goods, silks, etc., also 
domestics and cloths, flannels, etc., and a general 
line of linens, white goods, laces, trimmings, hos- 
iery, ribbons, gloves, underwear and fancy goods of 
every description. Shawls and cloaks form a 
special department, in which is displayed the lat- 
est and most fashionable desirable seasonable 
styles. Mr. Murphy was born and brought up in 
this city and has had fifteen years experience in 
the dry goods trade, and was formerly with F. B. 
Underhill & Co., and also with Hammond & 
Thurston. He established bjmself in business in 
1885 and has since enjoyed a prosperous career. 



208 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



C. W. Woodward. & Co., Tailors and Im- 
porters, Woodward Building, Main Street. The 
inception of this business dates back to 1852, 
when it was founded by Messrs. E. W. Wood- 
ward & Co., and continued by them with the 
best of success until 1878, when the firm became 
Woodward, Baker & Co., changing, two years 
later, to E. W. Woodward & Son. In 1886 Mr. 
E. W. Woodward retired, after a most useful and 
busy commercial career, and his son, Mr. C. W. 
Woodward and Mr. E. L. Peacock have continued 
the business under the present firm name and 
style. The copartners, both of whom are natives 
of this city, have each had seventeen years ex- 
perience at their profession, and are acknowledged 
experts in every department connected therewith. 
The fine store occupied, which has an area of 
25x80 feet, is fitted up in the most tasteful, at- 
tractive style, is provided with the most approved 
modern accommodations and conveniences, and 
contains a superb assortment of fine fabrics from 
the leading manufacturers of Earope and this 
country, embracing all the newest and most fash- 
ionable designs. A force of from twenty-five to 
thirty experienced hands are employed, and the 
garments produced is unrivalled for fine cut, 
finish, style, durability and general excellence. 

G. Li. Liovejoy, Furnishing Undertaker and 
Funeral Director, No. 14 Pleasant Street. One 
of the best known undertakers in the city is Mr. 
G. L. Lovejoy. The business was first established 
by Mr. Joseph Brown as far back as 1845, and 
continued by that gentleman until 1870 when he 
was followed by Mr. Charles Crow, who was suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Lovejoy in 1883. Mr. Lovejoy 
has had quite an extended experience in this 
calling and for ten years was with Mr. Crow. 
He has a wide reputation of being one of the best, 
most careful and considerate in his attention to 
the duties of the vocation in the city. Mr. 
Lovejoy furnishes all the requirements for funerl 
als, caskets, coffins, robes, etc., and takes ful- 
charge of affairs from the house to the cemetery, 
and so well are these duties discharged that his 
services are always sought after by bereaved 
families and friends. Mr. Lovejoy is a native of 
Lancaster, in this state. He has resided in Con- 
cord for more than thirty years and is a gentle- 
man of the highest business capacity. He served 
during the war in the 3rd New Hampshire Volun- 
teers from 1861 to 1 883. He is a member of Sturte- 
van< Post No. 2, and also a member of the Mason- 
ic fraternity and the Order of Odd Fellows. 



Eagle Hotel, Opposite the Depot. There is 
nothing which ndds so much to the prestige of a 
city as first class hotel accommodations, and in 
this respect Concord has gained a deservedly high 
reputation. One of the most popular and best 
patronized hotels in this city is the Eagle, located 
opposite the State Capitol. It was first opened 



to the public in 1856, and has been under the 
management of Col. J. A. White, since 1871. 
The hotel contains five floors and abasement, has 
a frontage of 100 feet and a depth of 200 feet, and 
provides first-class accommodations for one hun- 
dred and fifty guests. The furniture has been 
selected with great taste, and the utmost care lias 
been taken with regard to the sanitary arrange- 
ments of the building. In the management of the 
Eagle everything has been reduced to a complete 
s-ystem, and all modern conveniences and im- 
provements are provided /'or the benefit of patrons, 
including a telegraph office, billiard room and 
barber shop ; the entire house is heated by steam, 
lighted by electric lights on the ground floor, and 
every room is supplied with electric call bells 
communicating with the office. The cuisine of 
the house leaves nothing to be desired, and every- 
thing of the best that the markets afford is to be 
found in the menu. The dining-room is situated 
on the ground floor, and has a seating capacity of 
one hundred and eighty people. A stay under 
its roof is always a pleasant experience. Its 
terms are placed at the rate of $2.50 to $3 50 per 
day. The Messrs. White, the proprietors, are 
brothers, and natives of this city, eminently 
popular and successful in catering to the wants of 
the traveling public, and earnestly devoted to 
furthering the interests of their patrons. Mr. J. 
A. White is also closely identified with the manu- 
facturing interests of the community as the 
enterprising head of the Concord Machine Works, 
one of the prominent industries of the city. 



!N". C. Nelson, Watchmaker, Jeweler and 
Euirraver, No. 11 School Street (Durgin's Block). 
Mr. N. C. Nelson is a native of Exeter, N. H., 
and in 1851 he migrated to Concord, where he 
has ever since had his habitation. For thirty 
years he has been identifiad with the trade of 
watchmaker, and in 1865 started business on his 
own account, having previously been connected 
with the American Watch Co. in the premises 
now occupied by him on the second floor of 
Durgin's Block, No. 11 School street. This floor 
has an area of 20x60 feet. It is very handsomely 
and attractively fitted up and contains a first-class 
stock of watches, clocks, jewelry, etc., of both 
foreign and domestic manufacture. All the 
latest and most popular novelties in these lines of 
goods are fully represented, and there is, in addi- 
tion, a fine display of solid silver bronzes and 
plated table ware, and fancy goods manufactured 
from the precious metals. The watchmaking 
and repairing department is under experienced 
management. Mr. Nelson is at all times pre- 
pared to renovate, clean and regulate time- 
pieces of every description, to get and reset dia- 
monds and other precious stones, and rej air all 
kinds of jewelry. A specialty is made of engrav- 
ing, and orders are promptly and satisfactorily 
carried out. 



LACONIA. 



ONE of the most beautiful and picturesque towns of which New England can boast is that 
of Laconia, N. H. Situated on the banks of the Winnipiseogee River, whose waters turn the 
wheels of so many factories, it is nestled in an amphitheatre of hills and its borders are washed by 
Winnesquam Lake and Round Bay, which forms a portion of the chain of lakes of which the 
famous Winnipiseogee is the largest. Its access to the lake and its proximity to the White Moun- 
tains makes it a most desirable summer resort, and brings yearly to the town a large number of 




LEWIS F. BUSIEL HOSIERY MILL. 

summer visitors, for which every convenience and luxury has been provided in the way of fine 
hotels located in the midst of the most charming lake and mountain scenery and pine groves. 
Driving, riding or boating can be had at a moments notice and trps are easily made to the 
mountains, which are within a few hours ride and over well kept roads. In skirting the shores 
of Round Bay a glimpse is caught of Mount Washington, and Belknap Range is seen upon the 
right. Within its borders and but a few miles from the Main Street is one of the most famous 
watering places of Lake Winnipiseogee, whose large and costly hotels are thronged with thou- 

209 



210 



CITY OF LACONIA. 



sands during the summer season. The town is the shire town of Belknap County, and is situ- 
ated twenty-seven miles from Concord and one hundred and two miles from Boston. There are 
extensive manufacturing establishments here, including car shops and machine shops and hosiery 
and hosiery yarn mills, which are fine buildings built of brick. The public schools are all that 




could be desired. A good public library is open to all and several churches of all denomina- 
tions, which are handsome edifices, add to -the beauty of the town, which is more like a small city 
than any other town of its size in the State. Nature has lavished her gifts profusely on this 
favored spot, hills, mountains, lakes and rivers, brooks and woodland constituting a charming 
scene which makes it one of the most delightful and attractive places of sojourn. 



CITY OF LACONIA. 



Granite Hosiery Mills, Mill street. The 
old established and representative Granite Hos- 
iery Mills enjoy the distinction of being the 
founders of the power knit hosiery producing 
business in Laconia. Mr. Jno. W. Busiel, the 
original proprietor, having commenced to knit 
hosiery by power in 1857, using in the operation 
some of the first machines ever manufactured in 
this country. Mr. Jno. W. Busiel, the founder 
of this business, was earlier a manufac- 
turer of woollen yarns, supplying many of the 
makers of hand knit goods throughout the coun- 
try, and the establishment has always continued 
this department. In 1874 Mr. Busiel died, and 
the business has since been continued by his three 
sons Jno. T., Chas. A. and Frank E. , under the firm 
name of Jno. W. Busiel & Co. During the pres- 
regirne many improvements have been inaugu- 
rated and large additions made to the facilities. 
Among their many productions they have ac- 
quired an enviable reputation for their perfect 
foot stocking (controlling as they do, the patents 
on the same), which is considered one of the best 
stockings in the market, and is a great favorite 
with the trade generally. The premises occupied 
by this popular concern comprise six commodious 
buildings consisting of main mill 37x100 with 
annexes of dry house, office and seanring room, 
finishing mill, picker house and store room. 
The works are known as a seven sett mill and are 
supplied with all the modern machinery, tools 
and appliances known to the trade, the motive 
power being supplied by two powerful turbine 
wheels, altogether constituting one of the largest 
establishments of its kind in the state. Three 
hundred operatives are employed with an average 
monthly pay roll of from $6,000 to $7,000. while 
the daily output is five hundred dozen pairs. A 
special feature is made of woollen hosiery for 
ladies, gents, misses and children, including bicy- 
cle hose and other fancy requirements, in fact 
nearly every feature in stockings called for by the 
trade. The selling agents of the company are 
Messrs Hhreve & Adams, of New York, through 
whom the goods are distributed in all the prom- 
inent cities in the Union. The members of the 
firm are natives of this state and long residents 
of Laconia, where they are highly respected 
and popular in both social and business circles. 
Messrs. Jno. and Chas. Busiel are ex-members 
of the State Legislature, while the latter is also 
president of the Lake Shore Railroad. 



\Vinnipiseogee Hosiery Mills, Frank 
P. Holt, Proprietor. This popular and progres- 
sive concern was founded originally by the firm 
of Minchin & Holt, and in 1879 Mr. Holt acquired 
the entire business, since which time the house 
has largely increased its popularity in the trade 
under the style and title of the Winnipisseogee 
Hosiery Mills. The plant comprises five substantial 
buildings, including the main mill comprising 
three stories, basement, and attic, 45x84 feet in di- 
mensions, with annexes of dye house, picker room, 
wheel house,and boiler house. The works are known 
as a six sett mill, and the motive power is furnished 
by two large turbine wheels. About two hundred 
operatives are employed, with a monthly pay roll 
amounting to from $5,000 to $6,000. The pro- 
ducts comprise an unusually extensive variety of 
ladies', gents', misses' and children's woollen and 
merino hosiery, from the lowest to the highest 
grades, and including every variety called for by 
the trade. The facilities of this reliable house are 
unrivalled. The selling agents are Messrs. W. H. 
! Tailer & Co., of New York, with branch offices at 
I Philadelphia and Chicago. The proprietor, Mr. 
; Frank P. Holt, is a native of Chelmsford, Mass.,- 
| but has resided in Laconia for the past fifteen 
years. 

4 G. H. Tilton, Manufacturer of Woollen 
Hosiery. With the advantage of a life time of 
practical experience the subject of the present 
sketch, Mr. G. H. Tilton, founded his present 
enterprise in 1885, and has reared and secured a- 
distinct popularity, as well as a large and perma- 
nent patronage. His plant having a capacity of 
a two sett mill is 24x100 feet in dimensions, with 
annex of boarding, pressing and drying room, 
28x50 feet in dimensions. Seventy-five opera-' 
tives are employed and the productions 
of the works comprise ladies', men's, misses' 
and children's woollen hosiery of a variety 

| of grades, the capacity being one hundred and 
fifty dozen daily. Mr. Tilton's father was long 
associated as partner with Mr. J. W. Busiel, the 
pioneer manufacturer or hosiery in Laconia, and 
in whose service Mr. G. H. Tilton received much 
of his earlier education in the trade. The selling 
agents of the house are Messrs. W. H. Tailer & 
Co., of New York, with branch houses at Phila- 
delphia and Chicago, and by whom the popular 
output is distributed through all the important 
business centres of the country. 

211 



CITY OF LACONIA. 



White Mountain Mills, Manufacturers of 
Woollen and Merino Hosiery and Underwear ; 
Lewis F. Busiel, Proprietor. As a factor among 
the industrial enterprises of Laconia which have 
been so largely instrumental in developing the 
commercial resources of the town, the White 
Mountain Mill, of which Mr. Lewis F. Bnsiel is the 
enterprising proprietor, stands well in the fore- 
front, having not only been one of the oldest 
manufacturers in the town, but also enjoying the 
indisputable honor of having been the pioneer 
producer of machine made hosiery not only in 
Laconia but in this country, and consequently in 
the entire world, his enterprise in this direction 
having been the forerunner of a complete revo- 
lutionization of the method of producing woollen 
fabrics. After having acquired a thorough prac- 
tical experience in the business Mr. Busiel estab- 
lished his original works in 1853, and commenced 
the manufacture of woollen yarn of a variety of 
grades, these goods at this time being in large 
domand for the making of hand-knit fabrics. 
Two years later he introduced, and commenced 
the operation of the first practical power 
machines ever constructed, and so placed on the 
market the original power made hosiery. In 1873 
Mr. Busiel added machinery for making woollen 
and merino underwear, and has since that date 
made these goods an important feature in his 
productions. In 1878 he introduced the latest 
improved Aikea Machines for the purpose of 
making hosiery, contrasting favorably with the 
finest imported goods, and his success in this 
direction has resulted in his largely superceding 
foreign productions in tbis country. He built his 
present mill in 1855 and at that time it was 
looked upon as a model establishment, and he 
has since introduced many improvements and 
inaugurated many changes. The plant is com- 
pletely equipped at the present time with all the 
most modern labor-saving machinery, tools and 
appliances known to the trade, and operated by a 
powerful improved turbine wheel. .Seventy-five 
skilled operatives find constant employment with 
a monthly pay roll of from $1,000 to $1,500. The 
capacity of the works is from twenty-five to 
fifty dozen shirts and drawers, and from seventy- 
five to one hundred dozen hosiery daily. He 
gives his personal supervision to each and every 
process of consi ruction, and this careful attention 
and oversight is amply repaid in the wide popu- 
larity accorded his productions. Messrs. Porter 
Bros., of New York and Boston, are the selling 
agents of the concern by whom the output of this 
progressive house is distributed among the large 
jobbers of the country. Mr. Busiel is a native 
of this town, and having resided in Laconia for 
the past forty years he is completely identified 
wjth the rise and best interests of the town, and 
to his energy, foresight and ambition, as well as 
to his correct and practical business methods may, 
be properly attributed the large measure of suc- 
cess which has attended his unremitting efforts. 



Bartlett & Doak, Manufacturers of Chil- 
dren's and Misses' Shoes. This well-known and 
progressive house is one of the oldest of the Lynn 
manufacturers of shoes, having been founded in 
that city ai>out the year 1850. The business was 
removed to this town in 1884, and was at first 
located in the old Belnap Mill, but about a year 



since removed to their new works, the same having 
been built specially for them by the Laconia Car 
Co. This substantial and modernly constructed 
building comprises three stories and basement, 
each 40x135 feet in dimensions and to which 50 
additional feet in length has recently been added, 
necessitated by the requirements for increased 
facilities, consequent upon the large augmenta- 
tion in volume of patronage. The works are 
completely equipped with all the latest improved 
labor saving machinery, tools and appliances 
known to the trade, while the power supplied and 
required to run the works equals 30 horse power 
in capacity. About three hundred skilled 
operatives are employed, with a monthly pay roll 
aggregating $6,000. Only children's and misses' 
shoes are produced, while a leading specialty is 
made of school and fine kid shoes. The capacity 
of the hoxise reaches the large figure of nearly 
2,000 pairs daily. The patronage of the concern 
is confined to large jobbers exclusively, and 
through them their reliable goods are distributed 
over the entire United States. Messrs. Bartlett 
& Doak are both gentlemen widely known in 
financial as well as commercial circles, but being 
in mature years the conduct of their manufactory 
is left entirely in the handsof their able manager, 
Mr. E. A. Chandler, who has had supreme control 
of this department for the past ten years. Har- 
ing devoted his entire business life to the practi- 
cal details of this craft, he has proved himself as. 
most eminently adapted to the supervision of so 
extensive a manufactory. A branch of the works 
is located at Plymouth, this state, which is under 
1he management of the firm of Austin & Chan- 
dler. 



Warren D. Hnse, Circular Eibhed Knit- 
ting Machines, etc. This business was founded in 
1879 by the present proprietor, who commenced 
in a comparatively small way but by the adoption 
of improved devices and modern machinery, and 
the exercise of progressive ideas realized, the busi- 
ness has gradually but steadily increased until at 
the present writing it has assumed proportions of 
which the enterprising proprietor may justly take 
large credit for. The plant comprises the main 
building of two stories 30x70 feet in dimensions, 
with annexes of pipe shop, blacksmith shop, and 
pattern shop. A 10 horse power engine furnishes 
fhe requisite motive power, and the works are 
fully equipped with all the necessary adjuncts toa 
first-class machine shop. From twenty to thirty 
experienced workmen are em ployed, and the aggre- 
gate monthly pay roll reaches the sum of $1,200. 
The specialty of the house is the manufacture of 
circular ribbed knitting machines of all kinds, 
although any required style of machine can be 
equally well and promptly produced. A depart- 
ment is devoted to gas and steam fitting, while 
general repairing and piping is a feature of the 
establishment. Lathfs and yacht engines are 
made to order, and altogether a large business is 
done, the trade extending to all parts of the 
United States, and constantly increasing in vol- 
ume. Mr. Huse, although a native of Vermont, 
has resided in New Hampshire a greater portion 
of his life, and in Laconia for many years past. 
He is prominently identified with the commercial 
prosperity of the town, and foremost in all meas- 
ure for this end. 



CITY OF KEENE. 



THE present City of Keene was one of the original Massachusetts grants, made in accordance 
with a vote of the general court of that province in July, 1733. Some settlements were made, 
and a fort built soon after, but the town was abandoned in 1746, in consequence of the atrocities 
of Canadian Indians, and not again occupied until 1750. The settlement of the province line 
determined the township to be within the limits of New Hampshire ; and a petition, dated Feb- 
ruary 2, 1753, was addressed to the governor asking to have the grant confirmed, and the town- 
ship chartered. Their request was granted, the town being incorporated April II, 1753, and 
named by the governor in honor of Sir Benjamin Keene, an English baronet. 

The main street was originally laid out but four rods wide, and the city owes a debt of grati- 
tude to the proprietors, who, at a meeting held September 30, 1736, voted to widen it, giving the 
proprietors of the lots on the west side four rods wide on the rear of their lots, they surrendering 
four rods in front, thus making a beautiful street eight rods in width, which has always been the 

admiration of visitors. Ample grounds have been 
kept around many of the residences, which avoids 
that crowded and irregular appearance that mars so 
many of our New England cities. 

The north-east corner of the town was set off Sep- 
tember 27, 1787, united with portions of Gilsum, 
Stoddard and Parkersfield, and incorporated into 
the town of Sullivan. Another portion was set off 
from the east side December 9, 1812, united with 
portions of Parkersfield and Marlborough, and 
incorporated into the town of Roxbury. 

Col. Isaac Wyman, of Keene, was Lieutenant- 
Colonel in the first regiment under Gen. Stark, in 
1775, unt ^ appointed Colonel in July, 1776. Among 
other prominent Revolutionary men were Samuel 
Wetherbee, Davis Harlett, and William Timothy 
and Benjamin Ellis, all of whom held commissions 
and did good service in the field. 
The township had a steady and a healthy growth, and, to keep pace with the growing ten- 
dency of the times, was in June, 1874, chartered as a city, its territory embracing the entire 
limits of the town, an area of about six miles square. 

The city is situated in the centre of a broad and fertile valley, once the bottom of a primeval 
lake. The valley is surrounded on all sides by lofty ranges of timber, covered hills, affording 
natural barriers, which serve to shield this charming valley from the chilling blasts of winter, as 
well as to temper the heats of summer. The varied scenery of this valley, afforded by hill, dale, 
mountain, ravine and forest, when clothed in the verdure of summer, together with numerous 
well-built roads, neat farm-houses, elegant mansions, beautiful groves and meandering brooks, 
renders this locality most delightful. 

Keene has been noted for many years as a prominent manufacturing point, its railroad facil- 
ities and excellent water-power being such as to invite all classes of manufacturing to the town. 

213 




CHESHIRE PROVIDENT INSTITUTION. 



214 CITY OF KEENE. 



In its social aspects, its educational advantages, its healthy climate, beauty of location, and all 
that tends to make up an attractive place of residence, either for summer guests or for a perma- 
nent home, few towns can compare with it. 

Its railroad facilities are of the very best and most desirable character, communication 
being had with the outside world by three different railway lines. The Cheshire Railroad is one 
of the principal thoroughfares leading north, and west from Boston. The road operated by this 
company is sixty-four miles in length, and runs from Fitchburg, Mass. , to Bellows Falls, Vt. At 
the former place it connects with the Fitchburg Railroad for Boston, and at the latter with the 
Central Vermont for the interior of the state, Canada and with the steamers plying on the great 
lakes. At the same place connection is also made with the Rutland Railroad, and subsequently 
with the Delaware and Hudson Railroad line to Troy, Albany and the West. From Keene to 
Boston the Cheshire line is one hour quicker than any other route, the running time being but 
three hours. From Worcester and Providence to all Canadian points this line offers twenty-eight 
miles less travel and faster trains. The principal offices of the road are located in the depot 
building at Keene. 

The Ashuelot Railroad forms a junction with the Cheshire at this point, furnishing a route 
through the Ashuelot valley, and making connections with roads leading into central Massachu- 
setts and the West. The Manchester and Keene Railroad intersects with the Lowell and Nashua 
at Greenfield, and furnishes a direct line from Keene to Nashua, and from thence by way of 
Lowell to Boston. It also intersects with the Peterboro and Hillsboro Railroad at Hancock 
Junction, and furnishes a direct route from Keene to Concord. 

Keene is distant by rail from Boston 92 miles ; 
from Burlington 142 miles ; from Springfield 74 
miles ; from Fitchburg 42 miles ; from Worces- 
ter 60 miles, and from New York 210 miles. 

The city has a population of about 8,000 
inhabitants. It is finely and substantially built 
and its five principal streets Main, Roxbury, 
Washington, Court and West entering Central 
Square, divide the city into as many wards. 
Central Square contains about one and one- 
half acres, and is surrounded on all sides by 

fine business blocks. In the centre of the 

CHESHIRE HOUSE. .-,-,, , , , , , , 

square is a beautifully shaded park, in which 

stands a handsome soldiers' monument, erected in 1872 at a cost of $7,000. Its design is a 
granite base surmounted by the bronze figure of a soldier with arms at rest. Among the 
imposing buildings situated on the square are the Court House, City Hall, one of the High 
School buildings, several church edifices, the Cheshire House, and most of the banks and 
largest stores. 

The manufacturing interests of Keene are of special importance to its growth and future 
prosperity, and have given the city an extended reputation. The waters of the Ashuelot are 
utilized in turning the wheels of numerous industrial establishments, the products of which 
include furniture, water-wheels, wood-working machinery, flannels, boots and shoes and various 
patented articles. 

As a commercial point Keene possesses great advantages, being the natural distributing 
point for all the surrounding country. Its numerous stores are in the main large and attractive, 
keeping full and complete assortments of dry goods, groceries, meats and provisions, boots and 
shoes, watches and jewelry, drugs and medicines, with other necessaries, and its merchants are 
reliable and responsible, many of them doing a fine jobbing trade in addition to a large retail 
business. 

There are seven monetary institutions in Keene, four National and three Savings Banks. 
All are in a sound condition, conservative in policy, and prominently identified with the material 
welfare and future progress of the community. 

The public schools of the city are naturally a source of pride to every citizen, being under 




CITY OF KEENE. 215 



the most competent management and standing among the first in the State. The High Schoo 1 
building on Winter street, near Central Square, was erected in 1876, at a cost of $50,000, and is 
one of the finest and most imposing structures in the city. It is buHt of brick, with brown stone 
trimmings, 52x92 feet, five stories high, including basement, and is surmounted by a tower over 
the main entrance 127 feet high. It contains a fine hall 52x58 feet, capable of seating 500 
people. The interior is furnished with ash and walnut, in the best manner, and provided with 
gas and aqueduct water on every floor. It is well ventilated, heated by steam, and will seat 300 
pupils. In addition to the High School proper, there are four grammar schools of the first, 
second and third grades, kept in the building. A thorough classical and English course is 
afforded to all pupils. Union district, which comprises the city proper, is divided into eight 
primary, six secondary, seven grammar and one high school. The schools not belonging to the 
Union district are ten in number. 

Like all New England towns Keene is well provided with churches. These are as follows : 
First Congregational Church, Central Square ; Second Congregational, Court street ; Baptist, 
Court street ; St. James Episcopal, West street ; Methodist, Court street ; Roman Catholic, 
Mulboro street ; Unitarian, Main street. The First Congregational Church is the oldest in the 
city, its history dating back to 1784. 

The system of Water Works in Keene is equal to that of any city in the country. The 
sources of supply are granite Lake and Beech Hill Reservoir, making together a reserve of 
62,000,0x30 gallons. Its force is sufficient to throw water over any dwelling in the city, and it is 
used for propelling machinery for light manufacturing. 

The city is provided with a Public Library, containing over 5,000 volumes ; an Invalid's Home, 
free to the destitute and worthy ; a battalion of militia ; a post of the G. A. R ; two Masonic 
lodges, a chapter, council andcommandery ; a lodge and an encampment of Odd Fellows ; a lodge 
of the United Order of the Golden Cross ; lodges of the Royal Arcanum, Good Templars, etc. 
The residence as well as business portion of the town is very attractive, and on every hand one 
meets unmistakable signs of enterprise, culture and refinement. 



CITY OF KEENE. 



F. C. Hardy, Dry and Fancy Goods, No. 2 
Bank Block. A leading and most successful 
exponent of the dry and fancy goods trade in 
Keene is Mr. F. C. Hardy, of No. 2 Bank Block. 
Mr. Hardy founded his business about twelve 
years ago, and from the first made it his aim to 
keep none but the best and most reliable goods, 
in consequence of which he has met with a most 
grati flying response from an appreciative public. 
The business, which is both wholesale and retail, 
is extensive and influential, and each year brings 
a steady and healthy growth, the result of the 
able and enterprising manner in which the affairs 
of the concern are managed. The spacious sales- 
room occupied has an area of 20x60 feet, is fitted 
up in the most attractive style, and every conve- 
nience and facility is present for the prompt 
handling of business, and accommodation of 
customers. The proprietor deals in every descrip- 
tion of foreign and domestic dry goods, fancy 
goods and notions. Three competent clerks are 
employed. Mr. Hardy is untiring in his efforts 
to please those who favor him with their patron- 
age, and places at their disposal all the freshest 
and choicest novelties in each line, and quotes 
prices which are thoroughly metropolitan in their 
moderation. He is a native of New Hampshire, 
is a gentleman of strict integrity and sterling 
personal worth. 

Boston Branch Grocery, Wholesale and 
Retail Grocers, Warreu's Block, Washington 
Street. This enterprise was inaugurated in 1878 
by the present proprietor, Mr. F. Beal, and from 
the outset acquiiing increased popularity and 
custom with each incoming year. The ppacions 
premises occupied consist of a store and basement, 
each 25x80 feet in dimensions, and' two commo- 
dions store houses, the latter located near the rail- 
road. The salesroom is handsomely fitted up, 
provided with all necessary conveniences, and a 
most attractive and inviting air pervades the en- 
tire premises. Mr. Beal carries an extensive 
stock, and transacts a thriving business in every- 
thing pertaining to the staple and fancy grocery 
trade, including the finest brands of teas and 
coffees, which are made a specialty of, also spices, 
sugars, cereals, canned goods, table delicacies, 
jellies, pickles, etc., and Taylor's best flour, for 
which the house holds the agency. A staff of 
four experienced clerks are employed. The low- 
est prices prevail, and the best of value is guar- 
anteed. Mr. Beal is a native of Rockland, Mas- 
sachusetts, and was formerly connected with the 
Union Co., acting for a number of years as buyer. 

"Wm. G. Hall, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, 
White Goods, etc. This admirably conducted 
216 



and reliable store was established in September, 
1880, and from the inception of the business Mr. 
Hall has enjoyed a large and prosperous patronage, 
the general excellence of the goods handled and 
the close attention paid to the wants of customers 
being the special features contributing to his suc- 
cess. The premises occupied for business pur- 
poses comprise a fine 20x80 foot store and base- 
ment, and an extensive and well selected stock is 
constantly carried, embracing elegant dress fabrics 
and trimmings in great variety, beautiful shawls 
and suits, novelties in neckwear, corsets and lace 
goods, gloves, hosiery, notions and small wares, 
white goods, linens, sheetings, towelings, ging- 
hams, cottons and calicos, while some half a dozen 
competent and polite clerks attend to the wants 
of patrons, and the trade of the house, which 
extends all over the city and environs, is exceed- 
ingly large. 

Murdick & Lord, Manufacturers of Fine 
Confectioneries and Ice Cream, No. 23 Roxbury 
Street. This is a young house, the business 
having been inaugurated on March 23, 1887. 
The members of the firm bring an extended 
experience to bear upon their operations, and by 
liberal business methods have already acquired 
an influential first-class patronage. Employing 
four experienced assistants the firm manufacture 
ice cream and confectionery of every description, 
using only the best materials in the production, 
and the goods turned out by them are noted for 
their purity, superior flavors, wholesomeness, and 
general excellence. The premises occupied com- 
prise a manufacturing department, salesroom and 
ice cream parlor, the latter being fitted up in the 
most tasteful, attractive style. The members of 
the firm, Messrs. O. P. Murdick and E. H. Lord, 
are both from Autland, Vt. 

M. V. B. Clark, Fancy and Staple Grocer- 
ies, Roxbury Street, Opposite Post-OfBce. This 
business was originated in 1880 by the present 
proprietor, and conducted by him with unabated 
energy and success up to the present time. The 
salesroom occupied has an area of 25x60 feet, is 
commodious, attractively fitted up, provided with 
every available facility, and arranged with special 
view to the prosecution of a large and flourishing 
trade. This excellent salesroom is filled to its 
utmost capacity with an extensive stock of fancy 
and staple groceries of every description, embrac- 
ing the choicest teas, coffees, spices, family flour, 
canned goods, dairy produce, fruits and vege- 
tables, etc. The goods are all selected by Mr. 
Clark from the leading sources of manufacture 
and production. Mr. Clark is a native of Ludlow. 
Vermont, but has long lived in Keene 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



217 



G. H. Aldrich & Sou, Insurance, No. 6 
Bridj-mairs Block. Few features of progress 
introduced within a century have rendered more 
service to society than the beneficent element 
insurance, while as a factor in the development of 
industry, commerce and trade its influence for good 
is virtually incalculable. A leading and responsible 
firm engaged in this line in Keene is that of G. 
W. Aldrich & Son, general insurance agents, 
whose spacious and elegant office is situated in 
Bridgmau's Block, and than whom none the 
business hereabout maintain a higher standing as 
none enjoy a larger share of public favor and con- 
fidence, numbering among their clientele many of 
the solid citizens in the community, while their 
patronage is very extensive and affords evidence 
of constant increase. This well known and 
prospt-rous firm was established in 1877, and from 
the first they have enjoyed a very substantial and 
flattering measure of popular favor. They trans- 
act a general insurance business, representing 
some of the foremost companies iu the world, 
among others the following stable and reliable 
institutions ; New Hampshire Insurance Co. stock, 
Manchester ; Granite State Insurance Co. stock ; 
Portsmouth; Guaranty Insurance Co. stock, 
Great Falls; Mascoma Insurance Co. stock, 
Lebanon; Manufacturers and Merchants Mutual 
Insurance Co., of N. H., Concord ; Home Manufac- 
turers and Traders Mutual Insurance Co., Con- 
cord ; State Mutual Insurance Co., Concord ; Con- 
cord Mutual Insurance Co., Concord ; ^Etna Mutual 
Insurance Co., Concord ; Dover Mutual Insurance 
Co., Dover ; Exeter Mutual Insurance Co., Exeter; 
Brlkuap County Mutual Insurance Co., Til ton ; 
American Manufacturers Mutual, Concord. N. 
H.; Life and Accident: Travelers Insurance Co.. 
Hartford, Conn.; Steam Boiler Insurance; while 
they also negotiate loans on bond and mortgage, 
insurance on dwellings and household furniture 
being a specialty, and altogether a large and 
flourishing business is transacted. Messrs. G. H. 
and H. C. Aldrich, father and son respectively, 
who are both natives of this city, are gentlemen 
of sterling integrity as well as men of energy, 
sagacity and excellent business qualities, and 
stand high in the community. 



M. Armstrong, Plumber and Dealer in 
Stoves, lianges, Gas Fixtures, etc., Opposite Post- 
Office. There is not perhaps within the entire 
range of the mechanical arts any branch in which 
such steady and marked progress has been made 
of late years as in plumbing and kindred 
branches, the advance made in this line, notably 
in all that pertains to sanitary work, being among 
the features of the times. One of the leading 
exponents of the art in this town is M. Arm- 
strong, plumber and dealer in stoves, ranges and 
housekeeeping goods, whose well known and 
popular emporium is desirably located just oppo- 
site tne po^t -office, and who enjoys an excellent 
reputation for skill and reliability in his line, as 
well as for first-class goods and upright dealing, 
while purchaser and patron may at all times 
rely upon getting a very superior article, first- 
class work and satisfactory treatment in this well 
ordered and thriving establishment. Mr. Arm- 
strong, who is a native of Montpelier, Vt., but a 
resident of Keene 'many years, is a practical and 
expert workman himself, with long and thorough 



experience in the exercise of his art. Being a 
man of push and enterprise as well as skill, he 
started in business on his own account here in 
April, 1873, and soon established himself in 
popular favor. The premises occupied for busi- 
ness purposes comprise two 25x60 foot floors and 
1 asement, with commodious storehouse attached, 
and a heavy and fine stock is carried, including 
stoves and ranges of all kinds, tin and sheet-iron 
ware, kitchen utensils, household specialties, 
hollow ware, library lamps, gas fixtures, 
plumbers' materials and kindred articles. 
Twelve skilled and reliable hands are employed 
while two teams are in regular service, plumbing, 
gas fitting, roofing and jobbing being executed in 
the most expeditious manner, and making a speci- 
alty of Crawford Ranges and Walker Parlor 
Stoves, and altogether a large and flourishing 
business is done. 



Laton Martin, Livery Stable, Office and 
Stable Next Door to City Hotel. A veritable old 
land mark in its line in this city is tbe well 
known and admirably conducted livery stable of 
Latin Martin, eligably located next to the City 
Hotel, which for nearly thirty-five years has 
maintained an enduring hold on popular favor, 
and fully eustains to-day its old-time repu- 
tation for excellent service and liberal and 
honorable dealing ; being in all respects one of 
the leading, largest and best equipped establish- 
ments of the kind in the state, as well as the 
oldest, while its patronage is at once large, 
prosperous and permanent. Mr. Martin, who is 
a gentleman well past the meridian of life, but 
active, vigorous and devoted to his business, was 
born at Richmond, N. H., but has resided in 
Keene since early boyhood, and is one of the 
staunchest and most respected citizens in the 
community. He established this flourishing 
enterprise iu 1853, having prior to this period 
from 1833 to 1848 been engaged in running 
freight teams to Boston, and from the inception 
of the venture to the present day the business 
has been continued with uninterrupted success. 
The stable is a commodious building, with neat 
office, and is well ordered, cleanly and excellently 
kept. From sixteen to twenty-five reliable 
horses and a corresponding number of elegant 
carriages, buggies and light wagons of every 
variety are in regular service, while several com- 
petent drivers and stable hands are employed, 
hearses and hacks likewise being promptly 
furnished for funerals. 



E. P. Wliitcomb, Paper Hangings, etc., 
Cheshire House Block. Mr. E. P. Whitcomb 
for the past ten years has been engaged in the sale 
of paper hangings. He bus a general line of all 
the various kinds of wall papers, dados, centre 
pieces, etc , and in doing quite a large trade. In 
the assortment is displayed all the new designs 
in beautiful figure and flower patterns iu the 
latest styles, from the plainest to the most elab- 
orate in beautiful tints and combinations of colors 
and gold. Mr. Whitcomb gives particular attm- 
to interior decorations, and as a paper hanger is 
highly endorsed and recommended for the skill and 
good taste he displays in his work. He was 
born in the state ot New Hampshire and has re- 
sided in Keene for more than thirty years. 



CITY OF K, JUNE. 



Ac B. & S. W. Skinner, Dealers in Dry 
Goods, Carpets. Window Shades, Crockery, 
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Pictures, etc., the 
New Museum, Opposite Court House. The house 
whose name appears at the head of this review 
occupies a position among the leading concerns in 
the city, and its history is a story of the triumph 
of experience, business talent and intelligent en- 
terprise. It has been a potent factor in the pro- 
motion of the interests of its special line of trade, 
and is contributing in no small degree to the 
mercantile importance of the city. The business 
was founded originally in 1819 by Mr. S. A. 
Gerould, and several changes in the proprietor- 
ship were subsequently made. The founder took 
into partnership his son, under the firm style of 
S. A. Gerould & Sou. Then the firm was changed 
toS. A. Gerould & Co., afterwards Richardson & 
Skinner, then to Richard, Skinner & Day, next 
Skinner, Day & Co., and anally A. B. & S. W. 
Skinner. Mr. A. B. Skinner joined the estab- 
lishment in 1867, and the business was then 
located in Gerould's Block, on the west side of 
Central Square. In 1877 he formed a partnership 
with his brother, Mr. S. W. Skinner, who is 
engaged in manufacturing underwear at Ilion, 
N. Y. From the time the present partnership 
was organized, the business, which is under the 
direction of Mr. A. B. Skinner, increased rapidly, 
and the Museum became the great purchasing 
centre in this section. More commodious prem- 
ises became a necessity, and in December, 1885, 
the firm removed to their present location in the 
First Congregational Church Block, on Court 
street, where they occupy the first floor and base- 
ment. The ground floor is divided into two 
apartments, the main store being 35x70 feet in 
dimensions, a broad archway giving a connection 
with another apartment 20x70 feet. The base- 
ment under both apartments is used for storage 
purposes, and thus a floor space of 7,700 square 
feet is occupied in connection with the business. 
The Museum deals in everything pertaining to 
the dry and fancy goods trade, in carpets, oil 
cloths, mats, rugs, shawls, cloaks, ladies' and 
gentlemen's furnishing goods, upholstery goods, 
curtains and decorations, watches, clocks, jewelry, 
crockery, china and glass, lamps, fancy goods, art 
goods, toys, etc. The stock in each line is bewil- 
dering, and embraces all grades. The Museum 
is the best lighted store in Keene, having win- 
dows at both front and rear, while the interior is 
handsomely finished and lends an additional 
charm to the fine goods displayed. The counters 
and shelving are of white wood and mahogany, 
and the floors are of birch and maple laid in 
alternate strips. In each of the many depart- 
ments of the Museum there will be found as large 
a stock as is shown in stores making a special 
feature of one line only, while prices will be 
found way down. A glance through these de- 
partments will reveal to the inquirer a thor- 
oughly well-ordered business that is the direct 
result of a strict adherence to every representa- 
tion made, as well as a libeial policy which 
recognizes and promotes the interests of others 
as far as justice will permit. Ten courteous 
assistants are employed, and undoubted quality 
of goods, low prices, prompt service and thorrugh 
system are the characteristics of the establish- 
ment at all times 



Davis, Wright & Co., Cheshire County 
Stove Store, First Door North of Railroad Depot. 
There is no more active and representative 
business concern in Keene than that of the Ches- 
hire County Stove Store, a most flourishing enter- 
prise, which has t long held a foremost position 
among the leading mercantile interests of the 
city. The business dates its inception back to 
1849, when it was founded by Tobias New, who 
was succeeded in 1857 by O. H. Gillett. In 1865 
Wells & Davis became the proprietors ; in 1869 
a change was made to Davis & Lyman, and in 
1871 to Davis & Wright, the copartners being 
Messrs. Wm. L. Davis and V. A. Wright. These 
gentlemen continued the enterprise until 1881, 
when they admitted to partnership Messrs. Frank 
M. Davis and Murry V. Wright. All four mem- 
bers of the firm are natives of Cheshire Co., 
are business men of ability and experience, and 
are noted for their integrity, and interest in ad- 
vancing the best welfare of the community. The 
spacious premises occupied consist of a building 
having three floors, each 40x60 feet in dimen- 
sions, and equipped in the most approved man- 
ner throughout for the purposes of the business. 
The salesroom is attractive in its appointments 
and contains an extensive stock of superior goods, 
the assortment comprising every variety of cook- 
ing and heating stoves, the Magee Co.'s ranges, 
gas and oil stoves, tin, iron and copper ware, 
iron, copper and wood pumps, etc. Employing 
a force of ten experienced artisans the firm pay 
especial attention to the execution of all orders 
given them for tin roofing, guttering and spout- 
ing, plumbing, and general repairing, performing 
all contracts in the most workmanlike manner, 
while the charges are made reasonable. Messrs. 
Davis, Wright & Co. are prompt in all their 
engagements and honorable in their treatment 
of patrons, and thoroughly deserve the prosperity 
they have so well earned. 

G. H. Tilden & Co., Booksellers, Station- 
ers, etc. One of the especially noteworthy busi- 
ness landmarks of Keene is the commodious and 
well known house of G. H. Tilden & Co., book- 
sellers, stationers and blank book manufacturers, 
which since it was founded by George Tilden 
away back in 1830 has been conducted down to 
the present day with uninterrupted success, and 
is one of the leading and best known concerns 
in this line in the entire state. The premises 
occupied for business purposes comprise two 
20x80 foot floors, well ordered and completely 
equipped in every respect with binding appli- 
ances, paper cutter, ruling machine and kindred 
devices, while several expert hands are employed 
in the bindery. A vast and varied stock is con- 
stantly carried, embracing miscellaneous books, 
works of art, science and literature, fiction, his- 
tortcal works, and poetry, blank books and office 
ledgers of every size, style and variety, school 
and text books, novels,' periodicals and maga- 
zines, novelties in cards, pictorials, juvenile books, 
small wares, fancy articles and a complete and 
Al assortment of general stationery, while two 
efficient and polite clerks attend to the wants of 
customers. The copartnership consists of Messrs. 
G. H. Tilden and J. W. Sturtevant, both natives 
of Keene, and among the city's representative 
citizens. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



219 



The Cheshire Provident Institution, 

Central Square. One of the most substantial 
and reliable financial institutions of Keeneis the 
Cheshire Provident Institution, which was incor- 
porated in 1833. Its officers for 1887 are as follows, 
viz: A. T. Batchelder, president; W. S. Briggs 
and R. H. Porter, vice-presidents ; O. G. Nims, 
secretary and treasurer. Trustees: John Henry 
Elliot, Geo. A. Wheelock, Henry C. Piper, Edward 
Farrar, F. C. Faulkner, J. R. Beal, Geo. W. 
Stearns, C. J. Amidon, Barrett Ripley, J. G. 
Bellows, Geo. H. Tilden, Silas Hardy, Reuben 
Stewart. F. H. Kingsbury, Frederic A. Faulkner. 
Board of Investment : A. T. Batchelder, Barrett 
Ripley, R. H. Porter, J. R. Beal, and Reuben 
Stewart. Auditors : J. R. Beal, Wm. S. Briggs, 
Geo. H. Tilden, F. C. Faulkner, and Silas Hardy. 
From the statement of the condition of the insti- 
tution made January 1, 1887, it is shown that 
the deposits amounted to $2,176,100. 52; surplus, 
$31,473.47 ; guaranty fund, $110,000. The policy 
of the institution toward commercial and manu- 
facturing enterprises is, and always has been, 
liberal and encouraging. Under its present man- 
agement it is doing a large business, all of its 
movements being markjed by prudence, caution 
and honorable business methods. Its executive 
officers are gentlemen with whom it is always a 
pleasure to deal. The president, Mr. Batchelder, 
is a well-known and honored member of the legal 
fraternity of this city, and also closely identified 
with numerous important enterprises in this 
community. Mr. W. S. Briggs, first vice-presi- 
dent, is one of the best known men in the city, 
born here in 1817. His reminiscences of early 
days in Keene and of its steady growth and 
progress are of special interest at the present day. 
Mr. Porter, the second vice-president, is one of the 
foremost citizens of the city. Mr. Nims, the 
efficient secretary and treasurer, is a gentleman 
of large business capacity and high reputation, 
while the board of trustees comprise much of the 
solid business element of the city 



Chase & Richards, Clothing, Gents' Fur- 
nishings, etc., Buffum's Block, Opposite Cheshire 
House. This firm are widely and favorably 
known as clothing dealers and merchant tailors. 
The business was first established here some 
thirty-five years ago by Messrs. C. T. & G. B. 
Buffum, and in 1876 were purchased by Messrs. 
Amidon & Chase, who was succeeded by the pre- 
sent firm in 1879. The premises occupied comprise 
two floors, each 25x80 feet in dimensions. On 
the ground floor is shown a full and complete 
line of ready-made clothing, hats, caps and gents' 
furnishing goods, fur caps and coats. The stock 
of clothing includes all kinds for men, youth and 
boys, the finer grades being equal in every 
respect to the best custom work, in fit, finish, 
elegance and fashion. The line of hats and caps 
comprises always the latest and nobbiest styles, 
and the assortment of furnishing goods includes 
all the novelties in neckwear, underwear, white 
and colored shirts, hosiery, gloves, handkerchiefs, 
collars and cuffs, and other out-fittings, all at 
fair and reasonable prices. On the second floor 
is the tailoring department, where is constantly 
employed a force of fifteen skilled and experienced 
hands. Here is exhibited one of the fineststocks 
of cloths and trimmings ever brought to this city. 



The garments imde to order by Messrs. Chase & 
Richards are simply perfection in style, fit and 
artistic workmanship. To be found among their 
permanent customers are many of the best-dressed 
citizens of the city and county. The members of 
this enterprising firm, Messrs. F. W. Chase and L. 
M. Richards, are both natives of this city. 

New Era Tea Co., Herbert & Tenney, 
Proprietors, Roxbury Street. ^There are no 
articles that can be mentioned which are so diffi- 
cult to obtain of purity than teas and coffees. 
Those who make a specialty of dealing in those 
staple commodities alone, therefore, are best 
fitted by experience to select the choicest goods 
than the general grocer, whose attention must 
necessarily be given to a large number of depart- 
ments. In this connection we wish to give 
editorial mention of a house in Keene which is 
filling a representative position in this line. This 
is the New Era Tea Co., whose quarters are located 
on Roxbury street. This valuable business was 
inaugurated in 1885 by the present proprietors, 
Messrs. F. F. Herbert and O. S. Tenney, under 
whose able and popular management a most &ub- 
stantial and gratifying success has been achieved. 
The fine store occupied has dimensions of 25x60 
feet, is fitted up in attractive style, and contains 
a well-arranged stock of goods. The stock em- 
braces all the different grades of teas and coffees, 
none but goods that can be fully guaranteed are 
carried, many superior inducements both in prices 
and quality of merchandise are offered to custo- 
mers, and affairs are conducted on the strictest 
principles of integrity. Messrs. Herbert & 
Tenney have been identified with the business 
interests of Keene for several years, and have 
acquired deserved popularity and the highest of 
standing in the community. 



Frank R. Jones, Foreign and Domestic 
Fruits, etc., Opposite Post-Office. The retail trade 
in fruits, nuts, cigars and confectionery forms a 
factor of considerable importance in every com- 
munity, and a leading house engaged therein in 
Keene is that conducted by Mr. Frank R. Jones, 
whose establishment is eligibly located opposite 
the post-office. Mr. Jones started this business 
on October 1, 1886, and bringing an unlimited 
store of enterprise, energy and ability to bear 
upon his operations has acquired a success as 
gratifying as it is pronounced. He has developed 
a trade of permanent and influential character, 
and won a reputation of the highest character as 
a fair dealing and honorable merchant. The 
premises occupied consist of a store and basement 
each 25x50 feet in dimensions, well adapted in 
every respect for the purposes of the proprietor. 
The salesroom is fitted up in a tasteful, attractive 
style, and contains a very superior assortment of 
foreign and domestic fruits, nuts, confectionery 
and cigars. Mr. Jones also deals in oysters in 
their season, and also deals out steamed clams to 
his appreciative customers. Back of the sales- 
room is an ice cream parlor which is well patron- 
ized during the summer months. An active, 
steadily increasing trade is enjoyed and the future 
of this creditable enterprise is one assured of 
prosperity. Mr. Jones is a native of Montpelier, 
Vermont, is well and popularly known here and 
thoroughly deserves his success. 



220 



CITY OF KEENE. 



J. Ma-son Reetl, Manufacturer of Boxes, 
Beaver Mills. lu reviewing the business interests 
of Keene, N. H., we should not fail to mention 
the manufacturing establishment of Mr. J. Mason 
Reed. This gentleman is engaged in the very 
extensive manufacture of locked-corner boxes 
which find an exceptionally good market 
throughout the United States, among druggists, 
chemists, confectioners, hardware and. toy manu- 
facturers. The manner in which these boxes are 
p.it together, their strength and neatness and 
other desirable features eleci much appreciation 
from consumers. A special feature is made of the 
manufacture of printed boxes for particular trade 
uses, and in fact Mr. Reed is in a position to fill 
orders for any kind of boxes whatsoever. After 
an experience of some twenty years in this busi- 
ness it is not to be wondered at that Mr. Reed's 
trade has arisen to its present large proportions. 
Whenever Mr. Reed makes a customer he seems 
to take such special pains to adapt himself to 
requirements as that the goods themselves will 
eventually lead to duplicating orders. Originally 
the business was commenced at Westport, N. H., 
and was removed to Keene, N. H., in 1881 
These are probably the largest works of their 
class in the United States and readers of this 
work should not fail to get figures of this house 
before ordering elsewhere; in fact, Mr. Reed 
believes hecannot be undersold. Mr. Reed, who is a 
native of New Hampshire, is a thoroughly practi- 
cal man in tha business, and is well known and 
much respected in the community wherein he 
resides. 



W. P. Chamberlain, Foreign and Domestic 
Dry Goods. This house enjoys a reputation in 
the highest degree enviable for the energy and 
enterprise which have ever characterized its 
management. The salesroom occupied is spacious 
and commodious, has an area of 20x80 feet, and 
is admirably arranged for the convenience of cus- 
tomers and for facilitating the transaction of a 
large and activ.e business. The stock of goods 
carried is large and complete in every department, 
embracing all kinds of dress goods, in silks, sat- 
ins, velvets, prints, cloths, etc , hosiery, gloves, 
corsets, ribbons, laces, housekeeping goods, such 
as flannels, cotton cloth, napkins, towelings, 
ladies' goods, ladies' and gentlemen's furnishings, 
fancy goods, small wares and notions, and, in 
short, everything looked for in a representative 
dry goods store. Employment is afforded to five, 
efficient clerks, and all customers are waited upon 
promptly and courteously. Mr. Chamberlain 
watches the market closely for novelties, pur- 
chases his supplies from the leading sources of 
production on the most favorable terms, and is 
thus enabled to sell to appreciative customers at 
the lowest market prices. Mr. Chamberlain is 
a native of this state. 



J. R. Beal & Co., Tailors and Clothiers, 
No. 35 Main Street. This house was founded in 
185(5 by Mr. J. R. Beal, and ever since its incep- 
tion it has been the centre of a first-class trade. 
Mr. Beal is the cashier of the Keene National 
Bank, and has served the interests of his fellow 
citizens in the capacity of councilman and 
aldt-rman. His partners are Mr. J \V. Russell 
and Mr. W. H. H. Beal. The latter is a native of 



Nelson, in this state, and the former was born at 
Alt. Auburn, Mass. The premises occupied com- 
prise two floors, each 24x70 i'eet in dimensions. 
The upper floor is used as a woikroom. The 
lower floor is the salesroom, and this is very 
neatly and attractively fitted up. The gcods in 
this establishment have all been carefully 
selected, and consist of a full and complete line 
of fashionable and seasonable ready-made cloth- 
ing, suitable for gentlemen's, youths' and boys' 
wear, which is made from the finest productions 
of foreign and domestic looms, by skilful design- 
ers and workmen, and they are made up in every 
particular with the same skill, care and attention 
as are devoted to custom made goods. A fine 
display is made of gentlemen's furnishing goods 
of every description, and all the latest novelties 
lu hats and caps. A specialty is made of custom 
tailoring, and in this department is carried a 
complete line of cloths, cassimeres, and piece 
goods of every description of both home and for- 
eign production. All garments are guaranteed 
to be perfect in fit, style, material and workman- 
ship, and the prices are such that they cannot be 
surpassed in the trade. 

Gurnsey Bros. & Co. Bakers and Whole- 
sale Dealers in Cigars. The establishment of 
Messrs. Gurnsey Bros. & Co., the well known 
bakers and wholesale dealers in cigars, was orig- 
inally founded by Messrs, f. B. & G. O. Hay-- 
ward, Mr. G. O. Hayward afterward succceeding 
to the entire control, the present owners coming 
into the proprietorship in 1885. The members of 
the firm, Messrs. N. G., E. J. and F. N. Gurnsey, 
are natives of New Hampshire, and have lived in 
Keene for the past thirty years. The premises 
used for the purposes of the firm comprise a store 
and basement 25x50 feet in area, and excellently 
equipped throughout with the most improved 
appliances and conveniences. The range of manu- 
facture comprises bread, cake, pastry And com- 
mon and fancy crackers, a specialty being made 
of Keene crackers, and the productions of the 
establishment are distinguished for their purity 
and quality. Seven hands and two delivery 
teams are employed, and both a wholesale and 
retail trade is carried on. 



Keene Cash Clothing- Store, Cheshire 
House Block, Corner Roxbury Street s F. K. Hunt, 
Manager. This noteworthy concern was founded 
in 1884 and from the date of its inception 
has been the recipient of a liberal and substantial 
patronage. The fine store occupied has an area 
of 25x50 feet, is furnished in the most tasteful 
and appropriate style, and possesses the most 
improved conveniences for the prosecution of the 
business. A large stock is at all times carried, 
the assortment comprising every variety of ready- 
made clothing for men, youths, boys and children, 
made from the best materials, in the latest 
styles, by skilled workmen, and unsurpassed for 
fit, reliability and wearing qualities. A full 
assortment is also kept of gentlemen's furnishing 
goods, hats, caps, rubber goods, umbrellas, etc., 
all of which represent the best of the kind manu- 
factured. Prices are placed at the lowest figure. 
The manager of the concern, Mr. F. K. Hunt, is a 
native of Keene, and is a business manager of 
much experience. 



LEADING MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANTS. 



221 



IJullard & Foster, Pure Drugs, Chemicals, 
Patent Medicines, etc., on the Corner, West Side 
Central Square. Among the leading members of 
the pharmaceutical profession in Keene can be 
named the well and favorably known firm of 
Bullard & Foster, whose old and deservedly popu- 
lar drug store is eligibly situated on the corner, 
west side of Central Square, and who sustain an 
excellent reputation for accuracy and vigilance in 
preparing physicians' prescriptions as well as for 
pure and fresh medicines, drugs and kindred pro- 
ducts, while their patronage is at once large, 
prosperous and permanent. This old and well 
ordered pharmacy was established in 1840 by Dr. 
John Bixby, who conducted it for many years, 
and came into the control of the present proprie- 
tors in 1886 (Mr. Bull:ird having been identified 
with the business since 1875), who have since 
continued the business with uninterrupted suc- 
cess. The store, which is compact and ample, is 
neatly fitted up and excellently kept in every 
respect, aud a large and carefully selected stock is 
constantly carried, including pure drugs, medi- 
cines and chemicals, standard proprietory reme- 
dies and patent medicines in great variety, acids, 
extracts, herbs, toilet articles, perfumery and 
pharmaceutical specialties, also choice con- 
fectionery, soda, mineral waters, flavors and fine 
cigars, while four competent and experienced 
clerks are in attendance, and altogether the trade 
of the firm is of a very substantial and gratifying 
character. Messrs. E. M. Bullard and G. C. 
Shedd are both gentlemen of courteous manners 
aud strict integrity, as well as capable druggists, 
and stand high in the community alike in their 
professional relations and in local life. 

C. Bridgman & Co., Wholesale and Retail 
Groceries, Also Dealers in Flour, Grain an'l Mill 
Feed, Bridgman's Block. In this review of the 
commercial and industrial interests of Keene, 
prominent mention should be made of the old 
and well known house of C. Bridgman & Co, 
wholesale and retail dealers in groceries, flour, 
grain and mill feed, whose capacious and well 
stocked establishment is located in Bridgman's 
Block, and which, since the inception of the busi- 
ness nearly forty-two years auo, has been con- 
ducted with unbroken success, while the firm 
fully sustains to-day its old time reputation for 
reliable goods and honorable dealing. The house 
was founded in 1846 bv the firm whose name 
stands at the head of this sketch, and its history 
from that period to the present day marks a 
record of steady progress, the trade of the concern 
growing and extending annually until now it is 
of a most substantial and gratifying character. 
In 18G6 he erected his four-story brick block at a 
cost of more than $20,000, a part of which he 
now occupies. It has a space of 21x75 feet with 
basement. Also three commodious store houses 
for storing flour, grain and mill feed. A vast and 
varied stock is constantly carried embracing sta- 
ple and fancy groceries, in their variety, making 
pure teas and coffees a specialty, spices, condi- 
mentsand canned goods in great variety,best brands 
of family flour, oatmeal and cereal food products, 
sugars, molasses, a general line of fancy groceries 
and shelf goods. Six competent and efficient clerks 
are employed, while three teams are in steady ser- 
vice supplying the customers, and patronage of the 



firm, which extends all over the city and vicin- 
ity, is exceedingly large. Mr. Bridgman, the 
head of the house is a gentleman well past 
the meridian of life, was born in Massachusetts, 
but has lived in Keene for more than forty 
years. He is a man of sterling integrity, well 
known and highly regarded throughout the com- 
munity both as a merchant and a citizen, and 
his popularity among the people is shown by the 
tact that he has b> en twice elected to the state 
Legislature and has also been a member of the City 
Council. 



Cheshire House, Central Square. The 
Cheshire House was erected by a stock company 
at a cost of some $25.000. and was opened to the 
public in 1838 by Mr. Hanson O. Lovell. Nu- 
merous additions have since been made to the 
property, materially enhancing its value and 
rendering more desirable for hotel purposes. It 
is valued at the present time at $100,000. It has 
been under the management of several different 
proprietors, until twenty years ago the present 
proprietor, Mr. M. J. Kherman, assumed control, 
and has continued the management to the pres- 
ent time. The structure is of red brick, contain- 
ing three stories and an. attic, with one hundred 
feet front on Central Square, and provides first- 
class accommodations for one hundred guests. It 
is within a minute's walk from the depot, in the 
business centre of the city, and is convenient 
alike to the permanent patron, the commercial 
tourist and the transient guest. The first floor 
is lighted by electric lights, steam heat is pro- 
vided throughout the house, and electric call 
bells in each room communicate with the office. 
A fine bar, billiard room and barber shop are 
also among the necessities of modern hotel life 
that are here supplied for the useof guests. The 
cuisine of the Cheshire is worthy of special 
praise, being under the most experienced manage- 
ment. The dining-room is located on the ground 
floor, and has a seating capacity for one hundred 
people. There is also a spacious dancing hall in 
the house. The hotel is patroniz;d by people 
from all parts of the world. Terms are placed at 
the low rate of $2.00 per day. The proprietor, Mr. 
Sherman, while being an excellent and popular 
host, is also one of the substantial citizens of 
Keene, nnd a representative New England busi- 
ness man. He is ably assisted in the management 
of the hotel by his son, Mr. George Sherman, and 
a competent corps of cleiks. 

Giffiil & Soil, Leliigh, Lackawanna, Frank- 
lin, Cumberland sind Other Coals, Office, Spauld- 
ing's Shoe Store. The business of this Jiouse was 
inaugurated in 1879 by Mr. Henry Giffin, and 
was continued by him with uninterrupted suctess 
until the present year, when he admitted his son, 
Mr George H. Giffin, as a partner, the firm style 
changing to its prest-nt form on the change being 
effected. The Messrs. Giffin are general whole- 
sale and retail dealers in Lehigh, Lackawanna, 
Franklin, Cumberland, and other celebrated coals, 
and have the best facilities for meeting all de- 
mands. Five assistants and four teams find occu- 
pation in the transaction of the business, and all 
orders received are filled with promptness and 
dispatch. The Messrs. Giffin are natives of this 
state. 



222 



CITY OF KEENE. 



Knowltoii & Stone, Hardware, Iron and 
Steel, Agricultural Tools, Belting, Lime, Cement, 
Paints, Oils aud Glass. An establishment which 
occupies the leading position in the hardware 
trade in Keene, and which is a thoroughly repre- 
sentative concern in every respect, is that of 
Messrs. Knowlton & Stone. The business of this 
admirably conducted house was originally 
founded some thirty years ago by Mr. J. B. 
Knowlton, who was succeeded by the present firm 
in 1867. The premises occupied for trade pur- 
poses comprise a brick building, owned by the 
firm, and which is a brick structure, with two 
floors, each 30x60 feet in dimensions, all of which 
space is utilized in the display of the immense 
stock of goods that is constantly carried, while 
ample storage room is found in four warehouses, 
conveniently located. The several departments 
are filled to repletion with an elaborate and 
diversified stock, embracing builders' hardware, 
shelf goods, cabinet hardware, mechanics' tools, 
agricultural implements, belting, lime, cement, 
paint, oils, glass, manufacturers' supplies, car- 
penters' and machinists' tools, locksmiths' 
butchers' and plumbers' supplies, American and 
foreign iron and steel, table and pocket cutlery 
from the most famous manufacturers, chains, files, 
and a vast variety of articles too numerous to 
mention here. The members of the firm, Messrs. 
Wm. H. Knowlton and Charles H. Stone, are 
natives of the Granite State, are prominent in 
public and business circles, and the former has 
been an active member of the City Council. 



Keene Five Cents Savings Bank, 

No. 27 Main Street. The Keene Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank was incorporated in 1868, and from 
its inception to the present time its officers 
and trustees have included many of the ablest 
financiers and most substantial business men 
of this community. Its officers for 1887 are 
President, C. T. Buffum ; vice-presidents, 
Edward Joslin, Elijah Boyden ; secretary and 
treasurer, G. A. Litchfield; trustees, F. A. Perry, 
Geo. W. Ball, H. O. Coolidge, Clark F. Rowell, 
John Humphrey, Don H. Woodward, N. O Hay- 
ward, John Q. Jones, John B. Fisk. Obadiah 
Sprague, Elbridge Clark, F. E. Keyes, Hiram 
Blake, Joseph B. Abbott, Geo. C. Hubbard, ; 
board of investment, C. T. Buffum, Edward Jos- 
lin, F. A. Perry, H. O. Coolidge, Hiram Blake 
This is purely a savings bank, conducted wholly 
in the interest of the people who, with small means, 
desire to secure a safe investment and interest 
on their savings. The methods in vogue are 
practically the same as those that govern the 
great savings banks of the country. The amount of 
deposits September 1, 1887, was $2,337,198. 
It has a guaranty fund of $100,000, and undivided 
earnings amounting to $30,000. The market 
value of its securities exceeds the value on books 
by $35.550. which added to the guaranty fund 
and undivided earnings make a total surplus of 
$165,771.62. The president, Mr. Buffum, is a 
native of Keene, and has been for many years one 
of its sound substantial and foremost business men. 
The vice-presidents are also well known as promi- 
nent in business circles. Mr. Litchfield is a gen- 
tleman of marked ability as a financier, while 
the board of trustees comprises much of the solid 
business element of the city and county. 



G. W. Foster, Music Store, Opposite Post- 
Office. For more than a quarter of a century this 
has been Keene's noted music store, and it has 
been conducted with an enterprise and integrity 
that have brought the proprietor both honor and 
practical reward in the shape of an influential and 
substantial patronage. Mr. Foster, who is a 
native of Sullivan, is a musician of fine ability, 
and a teacher of vast experience. His business 
is both wholesale and retail in its character, and 
the establishment contains everything in the line of 
musical instruments and musical merchandise. 
The store is eligibly located in front of the general 
post-office, and has a capacity of 25x60 feet. Mr. 
Foster is the general agent for New Hampshire 
for the Wilcox & White organ, and he keeps 
constantly on hand pianos and organs made to his 
order, and also the most famous pianos of Chick- 
ering & Son, William Knabe & Co., Decker & 
Bro., Hallet & Davis, Behr Bros. , Wheelock & Co., 
Aug. Bans & Co., Ivers & Pond,E. Gabler&Bro., 
Woodward & Brown, and Steinway & Sons. 
Every facility is offered purchaseis for obtaining 
first-class instruments at reasonable prices, which 
may be rented at most reasonable terms, or pur- 
chased on the instalment system. The house is 
distinguished, not only for its grand, square and 
upright pianos, and for concert, parlor and vestry 
organs, but also for choice musical merchandise 
of every description. Pianos and organs are tuned 
and repaired satisfactorily. Mr. Foster is the 
possessor of a rare, genuine W. Nicolas, aine, 
violin, of the oldest pattern, and this is on view 
in his store. He has also branch agencies in 
Manchester, Nashua and Bellows Fall, Vt., and 
has a large patronage throughout New Hamp- 
shire and Massachusetts. 



J. D. Duubar, Livery and Sale Stable, 
rear of Cheshire House. Mr. J. D. Dunbar is the 
energetic and responsible ownerof a very fine and 
well stocked livery stable at Keene. The busi- 
ness is an old and established one and is well 
known to all the citizens of this community. 
The present proprietor, however, is only in posses- 
sion since 1882, since which time the patronage 
has largely increased. Here we find as many as 
twenty-five horses taken care of. Twenty-five 
vehicles of the most varied and latest improved 
styles are here found constantly on hand, and 
twenty sleighs. This stable is located in the 
rear of the Cheshire House and enjoys the largest 
trade here. Mr. Dunbar also does an extensive 
trade in dealing in horses, and has been a resident 
of this city for some years. 

H. B. Beals, Dentist, Over Cheshire Na- 
tional Bank. Mr. H. R. Beals enjoys an excel- 
lent reputation for reliability and skill in his art, 
while he receives as a consequence a very liberal 
and flattering patronage. Dr. Beals, who is a 
native of Greenfield, Mass., is an expert and 
painstaking dentist, and is a graduate of the 
Philadelphia Dental College. He began practice 
in Keene on October 7, 1886, and at once estab- 
lished himself in public favor and confidence. 
He attends to dentistry in its every phase and 
feature, teeth being extracted, filled, adjusted and 
mounted in the most superior and reliable man- 
ner, while artificial work of every description 
also is executed in the highest style of the art. 



CITY OF CLAREMONT. 



THE first settlement in Claremont was made in 1765. A large proportion of its early 
pioneers came from Connecticut, and selected lands bordering on or near the Connecticut River. 
In 1767 the then proprietors met at the house of Colonel Josiah Willard, and appointed a com- 
mittee, consisting of Captain Enos Atwaler, Captain Benjamin Brooks, Colonel Josiah Willard, 
Jotham Hitchcock and Asa Lent, to " lott out ye remaining part of said town in such manner as 
they shall judge proper, and return a plan thereof to the proprietors." It was also " voted and 
agreed that Benjamin Tyler have two acres of land for a mill yard and convenience for building 
mills in the most convenient place on Sugar River, in Claremont, with ye privilege of s'd stream, 
on condition the said Tyler doth build a mill or mills, and keep the same in repair for ye space of 
ten years." In the same year Mr. Tyler erected a saw mill and grist mill in what was then 
" the most convenient place on the Sugar River in Claremont." 

The mills and dam were built on the same spot where similar works have since been main* 
tained in West Claremont. This enterprise was a very important one, and gave new vigor and 
a decided impetus to the progress of the settlement. As yet there were but few inhabitants and 
these lived in rude cabins scattered along Sugar River and about " Jarvis Hill." These habita- 
tions, however, quickly gave place to more convenient and inviting ones. On the 8th of March, 
1768, was held the first town meeting in Claremont, at the house of Captain Benjamin Brooks, 
in the vicinity of Jarvis Hill. Ten voters were present, and a proper town organization was 
effected. One of the first acts of a public nature was the laying out of a highway to Newport, 
and Captain Benjamin Brooks and Benjamin Sumner were chosen a committee for that purpose. 
They began about half a mile south of the middle point of the west line of the town, and pro- 
ceeded easterly in a straight line to Sugar River. The width of the highway was uniformly ten 
rods, and the road passed through what is now the south part of the village, near the Stevens 
High School Building. It was the custom to reserve strips of land ten rods in width between 
adjacent tiers or divisions of lots, with the intention that whenever lands might be taken for actual 
highways, the owners of land so appropriated could be compensated from the " reservations." 
Hence it is found that the one hundred acre lots generally contain one hundred and five acres 
each. The first appropriation made by the town for the support of schools was in 1773. It 
was then "voted to raise a vote of twenty pounds, lawful money" for that purpose, which 
would be about $66.66 in our currency. At this time there were two school-houses in town, viz : 
the South School House and another near Union Church, at West Parish. At this same meet- 
ing it was voted " that swine may go at large yockt and ringd as the law directs." From an 
early period of the settlement of the town a portion of the inhabitants had formed themselves 
into an ecclesiastical body, and observed religious services regularly on the Sabbath. Samuel 
Cole, Esq., who came here in 1767, was appointed their reader, and to some degree supplied the 
lack of a settled minister. The first minister, Mr. George Wheaton, was ordained February 19, 
1772, and died June 24, 1793, aged twenty-two years. The Rev. Augustine Hibbard was 
settled in his place in January, 1774. In the fall of 1773 Rev. Ranna Cossitt commenced his 
labors as rector of the Episcopal Church in the West Parish. 

In accordance with an order of the Provincial Congress, the census of New Hampshire was 
taken in 1775. The following is the verbatim return of Claremont : Males under 1 6 years of 
age, 148 ; males from 16 to 50, not in the army, 125 ; all males above 50 years of age, 18 ; 

223 



CITY OF CLARE MONT. 



persons gone in the army, I ; all females, 231 ; negroes and slaves for life, o ; total, 523. The 
records are very meagre in relation to the movements which now agitated the country. It 
appears that Oliver Ashley, of Claremont, was a member of the First Provincial Congress, 
which assembled at Exeter, May 17, 1775.