(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Number"

LEBANON 
VALLEY COLLE 

SIXTEENTH ANNUAL 

Summer School 

JUNE 22 — JULY 31 

1936 



CONSERVATORY ff$/j3r*m^m DEMONSTRATION 

Br •■«' 0M " iSWlSl 

OF MUSIC WoY%r*M*jSB SCHOOL 



COLLEGE 




Residence School, Annville Pages 7-10 

Conservatory of Music, Annville Page 1 3 

(Music Education and Private Instruction) 

Demonstration School, Hershey Page 1 I 

(Practice Teaching and Directed Observation — 
Teacher-Training Courses) 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Published Monthly by the College 

VOLUME XXV APRIL, 1936 NUMBER 1 

Entered as second-class mutter at Annville, Pa., under Act of Aug. 24, 

1912 



SUMMER SCHOOL CALENDAR 

June 1 — Last day for demonstration-school registrations. 
June 22 — Registration and opening date. 
July 81 — Summer Session ends. 



FACULTY COMMITTEE OF SUMMER SCHOOL 

CLYDE A. LYNCH, Chairman 
CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 
ANDREW BENDER ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER 

EDWARD P. RUTLEDGE 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

3LYDE A. LYNCH, A.M., B.D., D.D., Ph.D ^.President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, A.M Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH ...Secretary of the Summer School 



FACULTY OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M Professor of Physics 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Social Sciences 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Associate Professor of Ed- 
ucation and Philosophy 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, M.A., Ph.D JProfessor of Education 

G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE, A.M., D.D JProfessor of Bible 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D _._ ....Associate Professor of Biology 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, Ph.D.. ..Associate Professor of English 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, Ph.D...._..„ Professor of German 

D. CLARK CARMEA::, M.A ._ Professor of Music 

J. I. BAUGHER, Ph.D Superintendent, of Hershey, Pa., Public 

Schools — Supervisor of Demonstration School and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education 

G. E. SCHWEIGERT, Ph.D _.__ ...Professor of Mathematics 

LULA M. RICHARDSON, Ph.D Professor of French IAteratur* 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Sixteenth Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will be con- 
ducted on the college campus in Annville. A demonstration school in the 
field of education will be conducted at the same time in Hershey, where the 
Board of Education has generously tendered the college the use of their 
modern school plant for this purpose. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration by mail in advance of the opening date of the session is urged. 
Applications for admission and registration will be received by the secretary up 
to and including Monday, June 22. Address, Annville, Pa. Due to preliminary 
arrangements required for the accommodation of persons desiring work in 
practice teaching, registrations for this work must be filed with the secretary, 
together with the laboratory fee of eighteen dollars ($18.00), not later than 
Jur.e 1. Enrollments in practice teaching are limited in number and applica- 
tions will be accepted in the order of their filing. Accommodations for ap- 
plicants in practice teaching after June 1 may be arranged but can not be 
guaranteed. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses attended, 
grades, and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken during the Sum- 
mer Session are credited towards the college degrees. One hundred twenty- 
six semester hours of academic credits are required for the bachelor's de- 
grees. For complete information concerning the requirements for degrees the 
candidate should refer to the college catalogue or address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1.00 is charged each student. 

The tuition fee is $7.00 per semester hour credit. 

A laboratory fee is charged for Science and Demonstration School 
Courses. 

The charge for board and room is $8,00 per week, $48.00 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for the term is 
therefore $63.00— $91.00. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration as a condition of admis- 
sion to classes. 

NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, chiffonier, 
mattress, one chair and table for each occupant. Students must furnish then- 
own bedding, carpets, towels, napkins, soap, and all other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, mattress, 
chair, dresser, and table. All other desired furnishings must be supplied by the 
student. North Hall, the main dormitory for women, will be assigned to the 
use of women students at the summer term. 

One light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any additional 
lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order oi application. 
fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order thai the mosl attrac- 
tive room available may be reserved for you. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers two courses of study leading to the Bac 
calaureate degree : 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science I B. S. 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these degrees is, 



LEBANON* VALLEY COLLEGE 



in each case, 126 semester hours of academic credits and 4 in physical educa- 
tion. 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a minimum of 130 quality points, 
computed as follows: for a grade of A, 3 points for each credit hour; for a 
grade of B, 2 points ; for a grade of C. 1 point. Xo quality credit will be 
given for a grade of D. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present at least 24 
>emester hours in one department (to be known as his Major), and at least 18 
semester hours in another department (to be known as his Minor). Majors 
in Education are required to take two minors. Both Major and Minor must 
be -elected not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be 
suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and approval of the 
Head of the Major department. 

The A. B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirement for 
a Major in the following departments: Bible and Xew Testament Greek, 
English. French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics (Arts option) , 
Political and Social Science. Philosophy and Religion. The B. S. degree will 
be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements for a Major in the following 
departments: Biology. Chemistry. Mathematics (Science option), Physics, 
Business Administration, Education, and Music Education. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education, are 
required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly according to the 
decree sought, are as follows : 



A.B. 
Bible 14, 52 or S2 
English 16. 2(5 
*French It) or 

German 1(5 
History, four hours, 

exclusive of Hist. 

1(5 
Philosophy 32 
Philosophy 2(5 or 

Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 <x 23 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry IS or 

Physics IS 
Psychology 14, 23 
Physical Education 
Hygiene 



BJS 

In Physical Sciences I 

Bible 14. 52 or 82 

English 1(5, 26 

French 16 or 
German 16 

History, four hours, 
exclusive of Hist. 
16 

tMath. 13 and 23, 46 

Philosophy 32 

Philosophy 26 or 
Economics 16 or 
Pol. Science 16 or 
Sociology 13 & 23 

Biology 18 

Chemistry IS 

Physics is 

Physical Education 

1 lv^iene 



In Education 
Bible 14. 52 or 82 
English 16, 26 
French 16 or 

German 16 
History, four hours, 

exclusive o+* Hist. 

16 
Philosophy 32 
Psychology 14, 23 
Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 & 23 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry IS or 

Physics is 
Physical Education 
Hv<iiene 



* Twelve semester hours oi Foreign Language aie required of all candidates for the 
A.B. degret : six hours of this total must be from French ItS or German 16. 

$ Pre-Medical students who are majoring in either Biology or Chemistry may substi- 
tute an elective Cor Math. 16. 

For explanation of numbers ustd above see the departmental announcements. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

An effort is being made by the College to offer in the Summer Session 
and the Extension Department all the General Requirements for the Bac- 
calaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced for the present year, 
and the remainder will be made available at an early date. In courses where 
six semester hours are required, the departments will normally offer two 
hours in Summer School and four hours in a Supplementary Extension 
Course. For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full state- 
ment oi the requirements is printed above. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above some of the depart- 
ments require students majoring therein to take certain additional courses in 
subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at once with 
the Head of the Department in which they intend to major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted to ad- 
vanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, should lose no 
time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, in order that they may 
be informed as to what requirements they must meet for graduation. 

Bachelor of Science with Education Major. Teachers College credits 
from recognized institutions are allowed on the following basis: work of a 
professional character will be equated on the basis of semester hours. Grad- 
uates who have taken the full two years' normal course based upon four full 
years of high school work usually receive approximately 60 semester hours, 
though each case is evaluated individually. A total of 126 hours of academic 
credit is required. For full information address the Department of Education, 
Lebanon Valley College. 

VISUAL EDUCATION 

On October 10, 1934 the State Council of Education approved the follow- 
ing regulation with respect to the preparation of teachers; "All applicants for 
permanent teaching certificates on and after September 1, 1935, shall be re- 
quired to present evidence of having completed an approved course in visual 
and sensory techniques." 

Lebanon Valley College includes among its offerings for the 1936 summer 
session a course in Visual Education. This course has been approved by the 
State Department of Education and is open to undergraduates as well as post- 
graduate students. 

THE EXTENSION COURSES 

To accommodate the needs of teachers in service, and for the convenience 
of those who are unable to pursue the work of the college in regular course by 
residence on the campus during the winter months, an extension department 
has been established. Extension courses for 1936-1937 will be announced at the 
summer session. They rotate from year to year to enable students to complete 
the work leading to degrees by residence during the summer sessions, which 
are coordinated with the extension plan in the offering of required courses. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must have 
completed a minimum of 30 semester hours of work in regularly conducted 
classes on the college campus. Teachers in service may meet this requirement 
by attending the Summer School and Friday and Saturday classes held during 
the year at the college. Credits earned in extension classes and at the Hershey 
Demonstration School are not residence credits. 

SOCIAL LIFE AND RECREATION 

The college recognizes that social activities and recreation have a proper 
place in cultural development. Accordingly, a series of social events and in- 
formal outings of students and faculty are fitted into the summer program. 
These include week-end dances, twilight concerts, and campus song fest^. 
Students interested in dramatics are given an opportunity to participate in a 
play staged during the summer term. Tennis, swimming, hiking, picnics, and 
golf are included in the attractive recreational program. A committee ol 
students and faculty arrange a diversified program of social activities. 

Annville, the home of Lebanon Valley College is ideally situated on the 
Benjamin Franklin Highway, twenty miles east of Harrisburg. Mt. Gretna, 
nationally famous summer resort, lies but seven miles south. Hershey, Penn- 
sylvania's recreational center, is located seven miles west and is easily reached 
by bus, train or auto. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 








S3 






?l 






co 


o 

05 


71 

-- C 

50 CO r - SO 


u CO 


~. 


CI CO >, c S CO 


5 -'CO' . 


O 
30 


OS H. O t0 

"ass-gs 

u O C o e £ 


S ° « -2 
c o 53 c 




— *c 2 3 P *" 

S IE 5 H £ 


§ — 2h CO 



m CO 

CO-- 4, 

= co c 






o o 



~ c 

CO .2 



H i 



o 
oi 


CO 
CM 

CO CO 
CO CO 

c c 
.2 .2 

Cm — 

u v 

3 3 


© 

r 


H 

co 

i 

oi 

CC —i 
03 CO 

CO CO 

C C 

.2 .2 

Cm '-4_» 

3 a 
= 3 
t3 — 


o 

© 
© 

- 


CO 
01 

CO m 

cflco 
c c 
.2 .2 

efl ci 

"- V 

3 3 

-a 'a 


© 

ci 

c 
o 


< 

CO 
CO 

CO 

c 
o 

- 

3 



Q 9. =5 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BIBLE 

Dr. Richie 
S42. The Christian Church. A study of the growth of Christianity 
from the primitive church to the present day, with special emphasis on the: 
origin and growth of denominations. Two semester hours credit. 

S62. Principles of Religious Education. A fundamental course in- 
vestigating some of the theories, principles, and problems of Religious Educa- 
tion. Two semester hours credit. 

S92. Character Education. — A survey of basic principles, theories, and 
methods in character building in the held of religion and society in general. 
Two semester hours credit. 

BIOLOGY 

Dr. Light 

Biology S16. General Biology. — A course in the general principles of 
Biolog\ r including the consideration of both plants and animals, their relation 
to their environment and to each other, the principles of metabolism, growth, 
differentiation, adaptation, reproduction, evolution and human welfare. 

The summer period offers a distinct advantage for biological work in that 
much more of the work may be done in the natural habitat of the organisms 
under consideration. 

The work will require about six hours per day and will be divided between 
the field, the laboratory or the class room as best meets the requirements of 
the material being studied. Six semester hours credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

Dr. Bender 

S26. Qualitative Analysis. — Two hours lectures and a minimum of 
four hours of laboratory work daily. Theories and principles of analytical 
chemistry. A study of the systematic methods of separating and detecting all 
of the ordinary metals and acid radicals. 

The laboratory work includes the analysis of about thirty solutions and 
solids increasing in complexity from simple salts to complex insoluble artificial 
mixtures. Arrangements can be made for securing two additional credits 
through post-summer school work. Laboratory fee — $15.00. Six semester 
hours credit. 

S46. Organic Chemistry. — Two hours lectures and a minimum of four 
hours of laboratory work daily'. 

The course includes a study of the sources, classification, and type re- 
actions of organic materials, of food-stuffs and their relation to nutrition. 
dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, coal tar intermediates, manufacturing proc- 
esses, and recent developments in this field of Chemistry. The course includes 
a carefully selected series of demonstrations, the display of a large number ol 
representative materials, and the use of about one hundred charts and slides 
specially prepared for this course. 

The laboratorv work consists of about sixty experiments covering the 
preparation and studv of a wide range of representative compounds. Ar- 
rangements can be made for securing two additional credits through posl 
summer school work. Laboratorv fee— $15.00. Six semester hours credit. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Reynolds and Dr. Butterwick 
EDUCATION 

S42. Educational Sociology. — The intent of this course is to articulate 
the school with the other institutions of society, the home, the church, in- 
dustry and the state, with the view of developing a more perfect correlation 
among the institutions dealing with the social welfare of mankind. Two 
semester hours credit. 

SI 12. Technique of Teaching. — This course is intended especially for 
Elementary and Junior High School teachers. The major emphasis will be 
given to the study of special methods and devices in the principal elementary 
school subjects. Some attention will be given, however, to a few of the more 
general methods, such as supervised study, socialized recitations, and the 
project method. Two semester hours credit. 

S131-B, or S132-B, or S133-B. Directed Observation.— (For course 
description see Demonstration School, Page II. 

S136. Observation and Student-Teaching. — (For course description 
see Demonstration School. Page II. 

S202. Visual Education. — The psychology of visual and sensory aids 
to learning and their administration will be studied. Special attention will be 
given to the sources and types of visual aids which are within the means of 
the ordinary school system and classroom teacher. Lectures, readings, re- 
ports, demonstrations and individual projects. The State course will be 
followed. Laboratory fee $2.00. Two semester hours credit. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

S42. Psychology of Adolescence. — A study of the physical and mental 
changes which characterize adolescence. The questions of rate and variation 
in learning, motive, personality, disturbances and control of behaviour will be 
handled. This course has been approved by the State Department of Educa- 
tion for professional credit. Two semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Struble 

Si 2. Essay Writing. — Analytical study of English and American essays 
l>y types. Individual instruction in the composition of essays. This is funda- 
mentally a composition course, and will be accepted as a substitute for one 
semester of freshman composition. Two semester hours credit. 

S152. History of the English Language. — Historical study of English 
sounds, inflections, and vocabulary. Standards of correctness; current usage. 
Recommended especially for prospective teachers of English composition. Two 
semester hours credit. 

S522. American Prose. — Historical survey of the leading American 
prose writer^ from Franklin to the present day. Two semester hours credit. 

FRENCH 

Dr. Richardson 
S06. Elementary French. — This course is intended for those who begin 
French in college. lis aim is to enable the student to write simple French sen- 
tences, to carry on a conversation in easy French, and to read French of or- 
dinary difficulty. College credit will be granted for this course but it cannot be 
counted toward a Major. Three hours of class work daily. Six semester 
hours credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

GERMAN 

Dr. Stonecipher 
S16. "Kulturkunde." — The making of modern Germany, its geography, 
its institutions, its social and artistic life, illustrated by maps, pictures, and 
readings from contemporary literature. This course is not only a preparation 
for the study of German literature but is intended also fo those who wish to 
use German as a tool for advanced work in science and other fields. Six 
semester hours credit. 

Note: For the convenience and accommodation of persons studying lan- 
guage the college has adopted the plan of offering a full year of credit in each 
language in the summer session. Students taking language have three recita- 
tion periods daily and concentrate their efforts in a single field. 

MATHEMATICS 

Dr. Schweigert 
S13. Advanced Algebra. — Covering ratio and proportion, variation, 
progressions, the binomial theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithm*, 
permutations and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 
Three semester hours credit. 

S23. Plane Trigonometry. — Definitions of trigonometric functions, 
goniometry, right and oblique triangles, computation of distances and heights, 
development of trigonometric formulae. Three semester hours credit. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Dr. Butterwick 
S22. History of Philosophy. — In this course the aim will be (i) to 
trace the development of Philosophy, pointing out what of permanent value 
each system as it arose contributed toward a final solution of the nature of 
being, and (2) to show the interaction between philosophic thought and the 
practical life of the period during which it flourished. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S32. Ethics. — The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
academic ethical problems, and to effect an awakening and a strengthening oi 
the moral sense. Two semester hours credit. 



PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm 
S16. College Physics. — A survey of the fundamental laws of Physics 
in the fields of mechanics, electricity and light. One hour lecture and recita- 
tion daily and four hours laboratory. Six semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 
Professor GlNGRK h 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 
S52. Foreign Relations.— A study of the history and development <-i 
world politics as a background to modern political movements particularly ;i 
they affect American foreign policies. Two semester hours credit. 

9 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SOCIOLOGY 



S32. Criminology. — A study of the causes of crime and its effects upon 
society, punitive legislation, courts and their functions, prison systems, parole, 
and the crime problem generally. Two semester hours credit. 

( Educational Sociology. See Education S42). 



ECONOMICS 

S22. Business Law. — An introduction to the study of business law 
covering the subjects of contracts, agency and bailments. Two semester hours 
credit. 




10 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

THE DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

Lebanon Valley College is pleased to announce the continuation of the 
training school in grades 7 to 12, conducted as part of the 1936 summer 
session. 1 hrough the generous co-operation of the Board of Education of 
Hershey, Pennsylvania, these training courses will be conducted in the 
splendid public-school buildings of that town. Because of the high standard 
of the Hershey schools and their equipment, and by reason of the advantages 
offered by the community for project work beyond the school room, an 
opportunity for training of the highest order is afforded students preparing to 
enter the teaching profession. Hershey children will be in attendance. The 
college has engaged the services of master teachers of the highest qualifica- 
tions and proved experience. Practice teachers and observers will be under 
their guidance and the supervision of Dr. J. I. Baugher, Superintendent of 
Hershey Public Schools. 

The purposes of the school are three-fold: First, to provide a superior 
type of secondary school during the summer session for observation and 
student-teaching; second, to demonstrate modern methods of teaching; third, 
to provide sufficient observation, participation, and student-teaching to meet 
the certification requirements of Pennsylvania and other states for teachers 
on the Junior-Senior High School level. 

Students may be in residence in Annville while attending the demonstra- 
tion school at Hershey. The distance between Hershey and Annville is seven 
miles and transportation accommodations will be arranged. 

Because the number of students that can be accommodated is limited, and 
arrangements must be made according to the number of enrollments in the 
school, registrations for demonstration school work must be filed with the 
secretary of the summer school on or before June 1st. Students enrolling 
later cannot be guaranteed accommodations and should communicate per- 
sonally with the secretary to avoid disappointment. 

Fees for demonstration school work are $7.00 per credit. An additional 
laboratory fee of $18.00, payable at the time of registration, is required of 
persons taking practice teaching. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

S131-B, or S132-B, or S133-B. Directed Observation.— This course 
may be taken independently or in connection with Education S136-A at Her- 
shey or in addition to any other course given in the Lebanon Valley College 
Summer Session. Five hours per week for six weeks together with live writ- 
ten reports are required for one semester hour credit. Arrangements may l><' 
made to take either one, two or three semester hour credits. 

S136. Observation and Student-Teaching. — This course is given in 
the Public Junior-Senior High School at Hershey, Pennsylvania, and consists 
of observation, participation, ar.d actual teaching in the Demonstration. 
School. Individual and group conferences are held with the Director oi 
Student-Teaching and the critic teachers. Prerequisites: Introduction to tin- 
Study of Education and Educational Psychology. Six semester It mis credit. 

S133-A. General Methods of Teaching in the Junior and Senior 
High School. — This course deals with such problems as aims and purposes 
of a modern high school, methods of teaching on the high-school level, 
discipline, and tests and integrating of high school courses with the interests 
of the community. Offered at Hershey by Dr. J. I. Baugher. Three semester 
hours credit. 

11 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




Conservatory of Music 



L2 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Mary E. Gillespie, M.A Director 

R uth E xgi.e Be nder, A.B p ; a lt 

R. Porter Campbell, Mus.B Pianoforte, Organ 

Harold Malsh Violin 

Alexander Crawford Voice 

Edward P. Rutledge, M.A. Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Ella R. Mover. B.S., M.A Theory 

I). Clark Carjleax, M.A Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Xella Miller, B.S Piano 

Hubert Lixscott, B.A Voice 

Beula Duffey Piano 

Mf.s. Leox Reissixo.er, B.S Piano 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory is to teach music his- 
torically and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture; to offer courses 
that will give a thorough and practical understanding of theory and composi- 
tion ; and to train artists and teachers. 

The Conservatory of the college is one of a limited number of institutions 
offering courses in Public-School Music for teachers and supervisors ap- 
proved for certification by the Pennsylvania State Council of Education. 

In response to a demand for summer courses that will enable students in 
music to earn credits to meet deficiencies, shorten attendance required in the 
regular winter terms and acquire extra training in addition to that otherwise 
obtainable in the longer terms, the Conservatory has joined with the academic 
lepartments of the college in offering work during the summer term. 

Summer students will enjoy the advantages of a wide variety of offerings 
:n one of the most modern and complete institutions of its kind. The en- 
vironment is in perfect harmony with the artistic nature of the instruction. 
Dormitory accommodations are provided for resident students. 

Requirements for admission to the Conservatory are set forth in detail in 
the regular catalogue of the college, where the course requirements also 
appear. Those desiring full information on this subject should address Mary 
E. Gillespie, Director, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory, Annville, Pa. 

During the summer of 1936 class-room instruction will be offered by 
Professor Carmean in the following courses: 

Brass I. — This course provides elementary class instruction in learning 
to play any one of the following instruments: trumpet, cornet, alto, French 
horn, trombone, baritone or tuba. One semester hour credit. 

Brass II. — Continuation of Brass I. A student may continue the stud;, 
of the instrument started in Brass I or may choose another instrument. Brass 
I and Brass II may not be taken concurrently. One semester hour credit. 

Violin I. — Elementary class instruction in violin is presented in this 
course. Tuning, playing scales and melodies as well as participating in en- 
semble work comprise the work of this class. Two semester hours credit. 

Woodwind I. — Elementary class instruction in clarinet. Both Boehm 
and Albert systems are taught. One semester hour credit. 

Woodwind II.— Continuation of Woodwind I. A student may continue 
the study of the instrument started in Woodwind 1. Woodwind I and II may 
not be taken concurrently. One semester hour credit. 

Orchestration. — This course provides guidance in arranging melodies for 
trios, and quartets and other ensembles. Scoring for small orchestra and small 
band will also be included. Only advanced students with experience and 
training satisfactory with the instructor are eligible to enter tins course. 
Two semester hours credit. 

13 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Professors Bender, Crawford, Malsh, and Campbell will be available dur- 
ing the summer term for private instruction in their respective fields. Persons 
interested in private instruction should address them individually and com- 
plete arrangements in advance of the opening date. 

Professor Carmean will be available for private instruction in viola, 
cello, and string bass. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 

IN ANNVILLE 

Bible S42 — The Christian Church. 

Bible S62 — Principles of Religious Education. 

Bible S92 — Character Education. 

Biology S16 — General Biology. 

Chemistry S26 — Qualitative Analysis. 

Chemistry S46 — Organic Chemistry. 

Economics S22 — Business Law. 

Education S42 — Educational Sociology. 

Education Si 12 — Technique of Teaching. 

Education S202 — Visual Education. 

English S12 — Essay Writing. 

English S152 — History of the English Language. 

English S522 — American Prose. 

French S06 — Elementary French. 

German S16 — Intermediate German. 

Mathematics S13 — College Algebra. 

Mathematics S23 — Plane Trigonometry. 

Philosophy S22 — History of Philosophy. 

Physics S16 — College Physics. 

Philosophy S32— Ethics. 

Political Science S52 — Foreign Relations. 

Psychology S42 — Psychology of Adolescence. 

Sociology S32 — Criminology. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Brass I — Beginning Brass. 

Brass II — Continuation of Brass I. 

Orchestration — Guidance in arranging Musical Ensembles. 

Violin I — -Elementary Class Instruction in Violin. 

Woodwind 1 — Elementary Class Instruction in Clarinet. 

Woodwind II — Continuation of Woodwind I. 



IN HERSHEY 

Education S131-B, or S132-B, or S133-B — Directed Observation. 
Education S136 — Observation and Student-Teaching. 

Education S133-A — General Methods of Teaching in the Junior and Senior 
High School. 



n 



Lebanon Valley College 

OFFERS 

EXTENSION COURSES 

HARRISBURG - LEBANON - ANNVILLE 

SATURDAY MORNING CLASSES 
IN ANNVILLE 

1936-1937 

Bulletin — August 1st 
Address: M. L. Stokes, Sec'y., Annville, Pa. 




Henhey Demonstration School