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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Bulletin"

Lebanon Vallejr College 

BULLETIN 

Summer - Session - 1954 




lEBANOK VALLEMi 



Annville, Pennsylvania 



r 1 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

Summer Session Catalogue 

1954 

Calendar 

June 7 Registration 

June 8 Classes Convene 

August 27 Closing Date 

Students may register for the twelve weeks' Summer Session 
or for the first six weeks or the last six weeks only. 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 



VOLUME XLII APRIL, 1954 NUMBER 3 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Carl Y. Ehrhart, Editor; Dr. George G. Struble, Chairman, Publications 

Committee 

Published during the months of January, February, March, April, May, Aug., Oct., 
November, by Lebanon Valley College. Annville, Pa. Entered as second class mat- 
ter at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under the Act of Congress of August 24, 191? 



SUMMER SCHOOL B U L L E T I ^f 

Faculty 

SUMMER SESSION 

FREDERIC K. MILLER, Ph.D. 
President 

S. O. GRIMM, A.M., Sc.D. 
Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

G. A. RICHIE, A.M., B D., D.D. 
PVofessor of Religion and Greek 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D. 
Professor of Biological Science 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

ALVIN A. H. M. STONECIPHER, Ph.D. 
Chairman of Foreign Language Department, Professor of German 

MARY E. GILLEGPIE, M.A. 
Director, Conservatory of Music 

MAUD P. LAUGHLIN, M.A. 
Professor of History 

CARL Y. EHRHART, B.D. 
Professor of Philosophy and Director of Summer School 

RALPH S. SHAY, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of History 

HOWARD A. NEIDIG, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

THEODORE D. KELLER, A.M. 
Assistant Professor of English and Dean of Men 

GILBERT D. McKLVEEN, D.Ed. 
Professor of Education 

O. P. BOLLINGER, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

W. MAYNARD SPARKS, A.B., B.D., Ed.M., D,D, 
Assistant Professor of Religion 

FRANCES T. FIELDS, A.B. 

Instructor in Spanish 

CONSTANCE P. DENT, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Dean of Women 

ROBERT C. RILEY, B.S., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Economics and Business 

ALEXANDER R. AMELL, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

ROBERT O. GILMORE, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

BARNARD H. BISSINGER, Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics and Physics 

CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, D.Ed. 
Assistant Professor in Elementary Education 

FRANCIS W. WILSON, Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

—2— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



Lebanon Valley College will offer in 1954 a twelve weeks' summer session, 
designed to meet the needs of those who desire an accelerated college course, 
cultural improvement, or teacher certification. 

Courses which carry eight hours credit (such as Science or combinations of 
mathematics courses) will begin on June 7 and continue for eight v/eeks, ending 
on July 30. An additional course may be taken during the second six weeks 
period. 



REGISTRATION 

Registration by mail in advance of the opening date of the session is urged. 



CREDITS 

Credits will be issued to all students showing the courses attended, grades, 
and number of semester hours credit. Courses taken during the Summer Session 
are credited toward the college degrees. One hundred and twenty-six semester 
hours of academic credits are required for the bachelor degrees. For complete 
information concerning the requirements for degrees the candidate should refer 
to the college catalogue or write to the Registrar. 



VETERANS 

All veterans planning on entering Lebanon Valley College: who are eligible 
for educational training benefits under the Servicemen's Readjustment Act (Public 
Law 346, or Korean Bill 550, and Public Law 16), should make arrangements in 
advance of entrance date to secure a Certificate of Eligibiltiy and Entitlement from 
the local Veteran's Administration Office. 



EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1.00 is charged each student. 

The tuition fee is $15.00 per semester hour credit. 

In certain courses, incidental fees are charged. See specific course offerings 
for amounts of laboratory and other fees. 

A student teaching fee cf $40.00 will be charged for Education S40 and Mu- 
sic S40. 

The charge for private lessons in instrumental or vocal music will be at the 
rate of $35.00 per semester, or at the rate of $2.50 per half hour lesson. 

A library and activity fee of $2.00 will be charged and will be used for 
the library and for the promotion of student activities. 

The College will operate the dining room if there is sufficient demand. The 
charge for board, in that case will be $10.00 per week. Providing patronage 
warrants the opening of dormitories, the charge for rooms will be $4.00 per week. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration as a condition cf admission 
lo classes. 



—3— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers seven courses of study leading to the Bacca- 
laureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Chemistry. 

(4) A course in Music Education leading to a degree of Bachelor of Science. 

(5) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Tech- 
nology. 

(6) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

(7) A co-operative course in Forestry leading to a Master of Forestry degree 
from Duke University. 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these degrees, is in 
each case, 126 semester hours of academic credits and 4 in physical education. 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a minimum of 130 quality points, 
computed as follows: for a grade of A, 3 points for each credit hour; for a grade of 
B, 2 points for each credit hour; for a grade of C, 1 point for each credit hour. 
No quality credit will be given for a grade of D. A grade of F shall entail a loss 
of 1 quality credit point per credit hour. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present at least 24 
semester hours in one department (to be known as his Major), and at least 18 
semester hours in another department (to be known as his Minor). Both Major 
and Minor must be selected not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the 
Minor to be suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. Majors in education must have 
two Minors. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements for a 
Major in the following departments: English, French, German, Greek, History, 
Latin, Mathematics (Arts option), Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Spanish, 
Philosophy, and Psychology. The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling 
the requirements for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics and Business, Education, Mathematics (Science option). Music Edu- 
cation, and Physics. 

Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education are re- 
quired of all students. These courses which vary slightly according to the de- 
gree sought, are as follows: 

For the A.B. and B.S. degrees, except for the B.S. with major in Music Edu- 
cation 

Semester Hours 

English 10a — 10b (Composition) 6 

Foreign Language (above beginner's level) 6 

Integrated Studies 20 (Humanities) 8 

Integrated Studies 30 (Social Studies) 8 

History 24a— 24b (United States) 6 

Hygiene (Lectures for Freshmen) (No credit) 

Mathematics (required for B.S. degree only) 9 to 15 

Orientation (Lectures for Freshmen) (No credit) 

Physical Education ^ 

Psychology 20 3 

Religion 10a— 10b or 11a— lib 4 

Religion 32, or Philosophy 31 2 or 3 

•Science (Biology 12, Chemistry 10, or Physics 20, 21) 8 

*A general education course in science is in preparation 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above some of the departments 

_4._ 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

require students majoring therein to take certain additional courses in subjects 
closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at once with 
the Head of the Department in which they intend to Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted to 
advanced standing by virtue of work done in other institutions, should lose no 
time in having their credits evaluated by the Dean of the College, in order that 
they may be informed as to what requirements they must meet for graduation. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must have 
completed a minimum of 30 semester hours work in regularly conducted classes 
on the college campus. Teachers in service may meet this requirement by attend- 
ing the Summer School and Evening classes held during the year at the college. 
Credits earned in extension classes are not residence credits. 

RECREATION 

Lebanon Valley College Summer Session offers recreation in the following: 
Archery, Badminton, Hand Ball, Organized Hikes, Tennis and Volley Ball. Swim- 
ming facilities are available within a short distance of the college, and at Hershey 
and Mt. Gretna. For those interested in Golf, Hershey has the finest public golf 
course and club house in the East. 

Various social affairs, such as picnics, teas, and trips to historical places, 
museums and industrial plants will be arranged under the auspices of the 
summer school. 

SITUATION 

Annville, the home of Lebanon Valley College, is ideally situated on the 
Benjamin Franklin Highway, twenty miles east of Harrisburg. Mt. Gretna, 
nationally famous summer resort, lies but seven miles south. Hershey, Pennsyl- 
vania's recreational center, is located seven miles west and is easily reached by 
bus, train or auto. Indiantown Gap is situated only about ten miles northwest 
of Annville. 

EXTENSION AND EVENING COURSES 

For many years Lebanon Valley College, through extension and evening 
courses, has enabled teachers, state employees, and others in active employment 
to attend college courses and secure academic degrees. Through these courses 
teachers may meet the certification requirements of the State Department in the 
secondary field. 

Extension courses are offered in the William Penn High School, 3rd and Divi- 
sion Streets, Harrisburg, evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 P. M. 

A limited number of classes will be held at the College in Annville, 
evenings from 6:30 to 8:15 P. M., and from 8:15 to 10:00 P. M. 

Registration for extension classes will be September 21, 1954. Classes begin 
September 27, 1954. Registration for second semester extension classes will take 
place February 1, 1955. Classes begin February 8, 1955. 

Students interested in extension and evening class work should write to 
Director of Auxiliary Schools for information. The Director, Carl Y. Ehrhart, will 
appreciate suggestions as to what courses may be desired. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Numerous inquiries have been received concerning courses for teachers 
desirous of re-entering the profession and from teachers who wish to secure 
certification in additional fields. Most of the courses offered in the Summer Session 
will serve as refresher courses in addition to offering credit for certification. 

If there is a sufficient demand, additional courses will be offered. If the 
course in which you are interested is not listed in this Bulletin, write to the 
Director of the Summer School. 

—5— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



BIOLOGY 

SI 8a- 18b General Biology. A course in the general principles of Biology In- 
eluding the consideration of both plants and animals, their relation to their environ- 
ment and to each other, the principle of metabolism, growth, differentiation, adapta- 
tion, reproduction, evolution and human welfare. 

The summer period offers a distinct advantage for biological work in that 
much more of the work may be done in the natural habitat of the organisms 
under consideration. 

The work will require a one and a half hour lecture period each day, also 
30 two-hour laboratory periods throughout the eight weeks' summer session. 
The laboratory fee is $10.00 per semester. Eight semester hours credit. 

S28a-28b Botany. Field studies of the summer flora. Designed especially for 
Pre-veterinary and Pre-medical students and those preparing to teach Biology in 
secondary schools and others interested in the study of plant life. 

Emphasis will be given plants known to cause or cure diseases in man or 
other animals. References will be assigned on local plants from which drugs are 
derived, their preparation and use. 

Each student will need Gray's Manual 7th edition. A plant press (optional) 
if a herbarium is desired, and clothing suitable for traveling thru trackless fields 
and mountains. Laboratory fee is $10.00 per semester. Eight semester hours credit. 



CHEMISTRY 

S44a-44b Special Problems. Intensive library and laboratory study of topics 
of special interest to advanced students in the major fields of chemistry. One to 
four semester hours credit. Laboratory fee, $10 per hour. Breakage fee, $10.00. 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

S44 Corporation Finance. First six weeks. Mr. Riley 

Economics services of corporations; capitalization; detailed study of stocks and 
bonds; financing of extensions and improvements; management of income and re- 
serves; dividend policy; insolvency; receiverships; reorganizations. Prerequisite: 
Economics 23. 

S40-1 History o£ Economic Thought. First six weeks. Mr. Riley 

The evolution of economic thought through the principal schools from the Phy- 
siocrats to the present, giving special attention to the analysis of current theories of 
value, interest, rent, and wages. Required readings in the works of Adam Smith, 
Malthus, Ricardo, J. S. Mill, Karl Marx, Bohm-Bawerk, Gide, Rist, Haney, Homan, 
Gray, Roll, and others. 

S46 Economics of Transportation. Second six weeks. 

The various types of transportation systems and services; costs; regulation 
by State and Federal governments; rates and rate technique; valuation and rate of 
return; combinations; labor in the transport industries; and government ownership. 

_6— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

S34 Retailing and Sales Management. Second six weeks. 

Organization of the sales department; study of the product and the buyer; 
problems of procurement; selection, training and motivation of the sales force; 
advertising and promotion; dealer aids; displays; trade marks; slogans; packag- 
ing; copy and layout; reports; costs and control. Demonstrations and practice in 
selling techniques and formulation of advertising campaigns. 

EDUCATION 

The purpose of the Education Department is to promote the elevation of the 
profession of teaching. 

Courses offered, during the summer sessions, will meet certification require- 
ments as established by the State Department of Public Instruction. The faculty is 
adequately staffed for these offerings and the material presented is equal to that 
of the regular session. 

The summer study develops numerous advantages over the fall and spring 
term. Classes are of sufficient size to develop a friendly relationship between stu- 
dent and teacher. This enables the professor to become aware of the individual 
needs of each member of the class. The material presented is more concentrated 
and distractions from extra-activities are at a minimum. 

A unique offering at Lebanon Valley is the Summer Student Teaching Program 
through the co-operation of the Derry Twp. Public Schools at Hershey, Penna. 

The following courses are offered during the Summer Session: 

S20 Introduction to Education. An introduction to the field of education 
through the study of the American educational system, the place of the school 
in society, the training and function of the teacher. Three semester hours credit. 

S30 Educational Measurements. Preparation for testing by the classroom 
teacher is offered through studying principles of vahdity and reliability, appraising 
and constructing tests, and considering the use of results. Laboratory fee of $1.00. 
Three semester hours credit. 

S40 Student Teaching. This course is designed to meet the minimum stu- 
dent teaching requirements for Pennsylvania certification in public school teach- 
ing on the secondary level. In addition to the regular summer school tuition, o 
laboratory fee of $40.00 is charged. This course will be given in Hershey, Pa. 

Mr. Raymond Koch, Supt. of Derry Township School is the Director in charge 
of the Hershey program and is directly responsible to Lebanon Valley College. 
Mr. Lange, the High School principal, and a selected corps of instructors from 
the same system act as Master Teachers. Six semester hours credit. 

S45 Visual and Sensory Techniques. Psychological bases for sensory aids: 
use of apparatus; sources of equipment and supplies. Laboratory fee of $4.00. 
Three semester hours credit. 

S49 Workshop in English. 

Methods and techniques in teaching English. Laboratory work in the use of 
special devices. Three semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

S 10a- 10b English Composition. Mr. Keller, Ml. Strubl? 

Three hours. First and second six weeks. 

S21a American Literature: From the Beginnings to the Civil War. 

Three hours. First six weeks. Mr. Struble 

An attempt, through the study of native authors, to see in perspective the 
evolving American mind; to observe how Puritanism, the Cavalier spirit, and the 
Romantic Movement have contributed to making us what we are; and to under- 
stand the spiritual resources of which we are the heirs. 

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SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

S21b American Literature: From the Civil War to the Present Day. 

Three hours. Second six weeks. Mr. Struble 

S30a Shakespeare. Mr. Struble 

Three hours. First six weeks. 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings to the time of Shakespeare, a 
study of the life and times of Shakespeare, and an analysis of Shakespearean 
comedy. 

S30b Shakespeare. Mr. Struble 

Three hours. Second six weeks. 
A study of the Elizabethan stage and an analysis of Shakespearean tragedy. 

S31 History of the English Language. Mr. Struble 

Three hours. Second six weeks. 

Historical study of English sounds, inflections, and vocabulary. Standards of 
correctness; current usage. Required of all prospective teachers of English composi- 
tion. 

S35 Poetry of the Romantic Movement. Mr. Keller 

Three hours. First six weeks. 
An intensive study of the principal poets of the early nineteenth century: 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Methods of Teaching English. See Education S49. 



GERMAN 

SIO Intermediate German. 

This course includes readings selected from nineteenth and twentieth 
century literature plus some study of the social and historical background. Theae 
readings form the basis for grammatical study, written compositions, and conversa- 
tional practice. Six semester hours credit. 

SIO Intermediate Spanish. 

This is a continuation and extension of course SI and includes further drill in 
the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, and dictation, and 
more extensive reading. For entrance to Spanish 10, the preparatory course 1, or 
its equivalent (two years of high school Spanish) will be required. Six semester 
hours credit. 



HISTORY 

SIO The History of Western Civilization. Mrs. Laughlin 

It is the purpose of this course to introduce the student to the principal de- 
velopments of mankind from early historical times to the present. Emphasis will 
be placed upon the history of Western civilization in its political, social, and 
cultural achievements. Some attention is also given to proper forms of note taking, 
the preparation of reports, and the elements of research. Three semester hours 
credit. 

S21 The Renaissance and Reformation. First six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 

A study of the political, economic, cultural, and religious changes that oc- 
curred from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries. Special attention is given to 
the artistic developments of the Renaissance. Three semester hours credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

S22 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Europe. Second six weeks. 

Mrs. Laughlii! 

This course includes a study of the Wars of ReUgion, the Age of Louis XIV, 
the Old Regime in France, the French Revolution, Napoleon, and the Congress of 
Vienna. Three semester hours credit. 

S24a — b Political and Social History of the United States and Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Laughlin 

Continues throughout the summer session. 

A general survey of American history from Colonial times to the present. A 

study of the importance of Pennsylvania's contribution to the development of the 

nation v/ill be stressed. This course is designed to fulfill the state requirements 

for United States and Pennsylvania history. Six semester hours credit. 

531 Europe from 1815 to 1914. First six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 
Nineteenth Century Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak of 

World War I. Three semester hours credit. 

532 Europe from 1914 to the Present. Second six weeks. Mrs. Laughlin 
A study of the World War I and World War II. Emphasis will be placed up- 
on current history. Three semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

S32 Contemporary World Affairs. Mrs. Laughlin 

The purpose of this one-semester course is to acquaint students with current 
developments in the field of public affairs, literature, science, religion, music, 
drama, art. Students are instructed in procedures useful in evaluation of material 
received through various media of communication, such as publications, motion 
pictures, radio. Instructors from the departments concerned cooperate in teaching 
the course. No prerequisite required. Three semester hours credit. First six weeks. 

MATHEMATICS 
SlOa College Algebra. 

Minimum contents: Factorinq, fractions, exponents and radicals, loqarithms, 
linear equations and systems of simultaneous linear equations, quadratic equa- 
tions and systems of simultaneous quadratic equations, variation, the binomial 
theorem, inequalities, beginning of theory of equations. Three semester hours 
credit. First six weeks. 

SI Ob Plane Trigonometry. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, identities, functions of anqles in any 
■quadrant, radians, functions of several anqles, riqht and oblique triangles, devel- 
opment of more trigonometric formulas, use of logarithms in trigomometry, De- 
Moivre's theorem, trigonometric representation of complex numbers. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. Pre-requisite: Colleqe Alqebra. First six weeks. 

SI la Analytical Geometry and Differential Calculus. 

Concepts of sequence, one-to-one correspondence, limit of a sequence, limit of 
•a function, derivative, differentiation of alqebraic and transcendental functions, 
indeterminate forms and I'Hospital's rule, maxima and minima, points of inflection, 
partial differentiation. Four semester hours credit. Pre-requisite: Plane Trigonom- 
etry. First six weeks. 

SI lb Integral Calculus. 

Formal integration rules, constant of integration, the definite integral with cr- 
plications to areas and volumes, multiple integrals, application to work and cen- 
troid. Four semester hours credit. Pre-requisite: Calculus of Differentiation. Second 
-Six weeks. 

—9— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

PHYSICS 

S20 General College Physics. The Conventional Course in General College- 
Physics will be offered during the summer session. There will be at least nine 
hours of lectures and recitations together with a minimum of eight hours of lab- 
oratory work per week. Credit 8 semester hours. Laboratory fee $20.00. Eight 
weeks. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

520 General Psychology. Restricted to sophomores and upper classmen 
except by consent of the departmental adviser. A beginning course in general 
psychology, designed to acquaint the student with the fundamental psychological 
principles and their application in daily life. Three semester hours credit. Firsi 
six weeks. 

521 Psychology of Childhood. A study of the psychological development o' 
the child from the beginning of life to adolescence. Throughout the course emphasis 
is placed upon practical problems of child care and training. Topics considered 
include the development of proper physical and health habits, children's questions, 
religious and sex instruction, emotional and personality problems, problems of 
family life and relationships, behavior problems and discipline and problems of 
school life and relationships. Laboratory fee of one dollar. Three semester hours 
credit. Pre-requisite: Psychology 20. First six weeks. 

522 Mental Hygiene. A study of wholesome and effective personality adjust- 
ments, including the causes and treatment of the more common social and emo- 
tional maladjustments. Pre-requisite: Psychology 20. Three semester hours credit. 
First six weeks. 

523 Educational Psychology. A psychological study of the nature of thv^■ 
learner and of the learnmg process. The course includes such topics as individual 
differences, motivation, emotion, and transfer of training. Pre-requistie: Psychology 
20. Three semester hours credit. First six weeks. 



RELIGION 

SlOa-SlOb Introduction to English Bible. An appreciative and historical sur- 
vey of the literature of the Old and New Testaments. This is a required course 
for all students proceeding to a degree. Three or Six semester hours credit. Either 
six weeks or both. 

Slla-Sllb Introduction to Religion. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the place and signi- 
ficance of religion — what it is and does. Included are studies in the nature of 
God, the worth of man, science and religion, personal religious living, the Judaec- 
Christian tradition as found in the Old and New Testaments, the place of the 
Church in our modern life, and contemporary problems in the field of religion. 
This is a required course for all students proceeding to a degree. Three or SiX 
semester hours credit. Either six weeks or both. 

S32 The Teaching of Jesus. This course attempts an intensive study of the 
religious concepts of Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. This course or Philosophy 
31 required of all proceeding to a college degree at Lebanon Valley College. 
Three or six semester hours credit. Either six weeks. 

—10— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

MARY E. GILLESPIE, M. A Director 

EDWARD F. RUTLEDGE, M. A Musical Organizations 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, M.A Music Education 

FRANK STACHOW, M.A Music Education, Theory and Woodwinds 

R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B Organ 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

REYNALDO ROVERS Voice 

RUTH E. BENDER, A.B Theory, Piano 

WILLIAM FAIRLAMB Piano 

SHIRLEY STAGG Piano 

ROBERT W. SMITH, M.A Music Education 

SUZANNE LECARPENTIER, M.A Theoiy, 'cello 

SYLVIA MUEHLING Piano 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory is to teach music historically 
and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture; to offer courses that will give 
a thorough and practical understanding of theory and composition; and to train 
artists and teachers. 

The Conservatory of the college is one of a limited number of institutions 
offering courses in Public-School Music for teachers and supervisors approved for 
certification by the Pennsylvania State Council of Education. 

Professors Crawford, Malsh and Campbell will be available during the sum- 
mer term for private instruction in their respective fields. Persons interested in 
private instruction should address them individually and complete arrangements 
in advance of the opening date. 

The charge for private lessons in vocal or instrumental music is at the rate of 
$35.00 per semester, or at the rate of $2.50 per half hour lesson. 



STUDENT TEACHING 40 

Six semester hours credit. 
Students requiring student teaching in Instrumental Music may make arrange- 
ments to do their practice teaching in the Demonstration School in Annville. Stud- 
ent teaching fee is $40.00. 

SIGHT-SINGING 20 Miss Gillespie 

Two semester hours credit. 

A continuation with exercises and songs of increasing difficulty both tonal 
and rhythmic. Emphasis on reading from any clef. Study and application of 
additional tempo, dynamic and interpretive markings. 

Speed and accuracy are demanded. New material is constantly used, 
resulting in an extensive survey of song material. 

MUSIC LITERATURE 32 Miss Gillespie 

Three semester hours credit. 

Study of instrumental music literature for use of teaching all phases of appre- 
ciation in public schools. 

—11— 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

Class instruction is offered for beginners, on: 

BRASS 1 — (Trumpet, Cornet, Alto, French Horn, Trombone, Baritone, or 
Tuba) — 1 hour credit. 

ADVANCED BRASS— 1 hour credit. 

PERCUSSION (Drums)— 1 hour credit. 

PERCUSSION (Advanced)— I hour credit. 

METHODS 20: Child Voice and Rote Songs with Materials and Methods for 

Grades 1, 2, 3 Miss Gillespie 

Three semester hours credit. 

A comprehensive study of the use of child's singing voice in the primary 
grades, including the treatment of monotones, acquaintance with the best collec- 
tions of rote songs, and practice in choosing, memorizing, singing, and presenting 
a large number of these songs; methods of presenting rhythm through singing 
games and simple interpretive movements; beginnings of directed music apprecia- 
tion; foundation studies for later technical developments. Comparative study of 
recognized Public School Music Series. 

METHODS 30: Materials and Methods for Grades 4, 5. 6. Miss Gillespie 

Three semester hours credit. 

A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades; special 
attention to the formal or technical work of these grades, with an evaluation of 
important texts and recent approaches. Preparation of lesson plans, making of 
outlines, and observation is required. Music appreciation is continued. 

METHODS 31: Materials and Methods, Junior and Senior High School 

Miss Gillespie 

Three semester hours credit. 

The junior and senior high school problems are treated separately through 
an analysis of the specific problems, year by year or in special groups. Attention 
is given to materials and methods relative to the organization and directing of 
choruses, glee clubs, orchestra, band, elementary theory, music appreciation, and 
class instruction in band and orchestral instruments; study in the testing and care 
of the adolescent voice. 

METHODS 40: Advanced Problems. 

Three semester hours credit. 

A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director of 
school orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general interest 
will include (1) organization and management, (2) stimulating and maintaining 
interest, (3) selection of beginners, (4) scheduling rehearsals and class lessons, 
(5) financing and purchasing instruments, uniforms, and other equipment, (6) 
marching bands — formations and drills, (7) evaluating music materials, (8) festivals, 
contests, and public performances. 

HARMONY 31: (Composition and Orchestration). 

Three semester hours credit. 

Original composition is continued in various vocal and instrumental forms 
This course offers opportunity and guidance in arranging music for various com- 
binations of instruments and voice, including band, orchestra, and chorus. The- 
best productions of the class will be given public performance. 

—12— 



J