(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Extension, Saturday, and Evening Class Bulletin"

Lebanon Valley College 

BULLETIN 

Vol. XXIX AUGUST, 1940 No. 5 



EXTENSION, SATURDAY 
and EVENING CLASSES 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Tublished Monthly. Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under act of 

August 24, 1912. 



EXTENSION^ SATURDAY AND EVENING SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 

CLYDE A. LYNCH, Chairman 
MILTON L. STOKES. Director CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH 
SAMUEL H. DERICKSON ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE 



OFFICERS AND ADMINISTRATION 

CLYDE A. LYNCH, A.M., B.D., Ph.D., D.D., LL.D. President 

SAMUEL 0. GRIMM. A.M. Registrar 

MILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B., Ph.D. Director of Extension, Sat- 
urday and Evening Classes. 



FACULTY OF EXTENSION, SATURDAY AND EVENING 

SCHOOL 

HIRAM SHENK, A.M., LL.D Professor of History 

SAMUEL H. DERICKSON, M.S., Sc.D. Professor of Biological Science 

SAMUEL 0. GRIMM, A.M. Professor of Physics 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B. Professor of Political Science 

and Sociology. 

MARY C. GREEN Professor of French 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

PAUL A. WALLACE, Ph.D. ... Professor of English 

G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE, A.M., D.D. . Professor of Bible and New 
Testament Greek. 

MILTON L. STOKES. M.A.. LL.B., Ph.D. Professor of Business Ad- 

ministration and Economics. 

STELLA JOHNSON STEVENSON, Ph.D. Professor of French Liter- 
ature. 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biological Science 

LENA LOUISE LIETZAU, Ph.D. Professor of German 

MARY E. GILLESPIE, M.A. Director of the Conservatory of Music 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, Ph.D Associate Professor of English 

L. G. BAILEY, Ph.D Professor of Psychology 

MARGARET A. WOOD, M.A. Instructor in Economics 

AMOS BLACK, Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

PAUL O. SHETTEL, M.A., B.D., S.T.D. ..Professor of Philoso- 

phy and Religion. 

CLYDE S. STINE, A.M.. Ph.D. Professor of Education 

FREDERIC K. MILLER, A.M. Professor of History 

2 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Through extension work in Harrisburg, evening classes at the col- 
lege in Annville, and summer school, Lebanon Valley College has for 
many years enabled many students to obtain college courses and secure 
academic degrees while continuing their regular occupations. By a care- 
ful selection of courses and consultation with the heads of the depart- 
ments of the college or the director of extension and evening classes, a 
student can meet the requirements of the college for a baccalaureate 
degree while earning a livelihood. 

All extension and evening courses are taught by full time members 
of the college faculty. The courses offered in extension and evening 
class work are so alternated from year to year that a student can readily 
seen re those required for graduation. 

ACADEMIC STANDING 
Lebanon Valley College is fully accredited by the Department of 
Public Instruction of Pennsylvania, the American Association of Col- 
leges, and Secondary Schools of the Middle Atlantic States and Mary- 
land, and the American Association of University Women. It is a 
member of the American Council on Education. 

LOCATION 

The college is situated at Annville, twenty-one miles east of Harris- 
burg on the Benjamin Franklin Highway. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE 

Lebanon Valley College oilers the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 
and the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

,., • . Degrees will be conferred only upon candidates who have 

•enui >nt completed a minimum of 30 semester hours work in regu- 
q larly conducted classes on the college campus. This re- 

quirement may be met through attendance at evening and Saturday 
classes offered at the college. 

The college is easily accessible from Harrisburg. Due to the excel- 
lent highways students from Harrisburg and the vicinity may commute 
to the college in less than forty minutes time. 

Ho - Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 12G se- 

mester hours credits in academic work, and four in Physical 
Education. Extension and evening class students are not required to 
have the work in Physical Education. 

Quality Candidates for degrees must also obtain a mimimum of 130 
p j n +a quality points, computed as follows: for a grade of A, 3 

* points for each credit hour; for a grade of B, 2 points; for 

a grade of C, 1 point. No quality credit will be given for a grade of D. 
Maior ^ s par ^ °^ tn ^ s ^ ota ^ requirement, every candidate must 

and Minor present at least 24 semester hours in one department (to 
be known as his Major), and at least 1G semester hours in 
another department (to be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor 
must be selected before registration for the sophomore year, the Minor 
to be suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and ap- 
proval of the Head of the Major Department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements 
for a Major in the following departments: Bible and Religion, English, 
French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics (Arts option), 
Political Science and Sociology, Philosophy, and Psychology. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements 
for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics (Science option), Physics, Business Administration and Econom- 
ics, Education, Music Education. 

Those majoring in Education must take two Minors of not less than 
18 semester hours each. 

For the special requirements for those majoring in Business Admin- 
istration and Economics and for those majoring in Music Education, 
write for the college Bulletin. 

S 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education, 
are required by all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 

Bible 14 and 82 - 6 hours 

English 14 and 26 10 hours 

Foreign Language 1 

History- 6 h 

Hygiene ... 2 hours 

Mathematics- 

Philosophy 32 2 hours 

Physical Education 4 hours 

Psychology 14 4 hours 

Science 1 

Social Studies ... .. hours 

Economics 16 or 

Philosophy 23-A and 2 

Political Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 and 23 

i Fur the a.b. degree l- hours 

For the B.S. degree ti hours are required abovi th< - ...cnnc Coui les 
may bt> selected from French, German >r Latin. 

2 This may be made u]j from lh< following HI torj 13, 123, -13, 23 A, 
23-B, 46, 412, 422, 13-B. 

3 Math. 13, 23, and 4S ar. req i i « Sclent Pr< Medical 
students may substitute an elective for Math, 48. Students majoring In Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics are required <■• take Math, l • •! 1 1 .: and 123. 

4 Biology 18, Chemistry Is. and Physic 18 u indldates for tliu B.S. 
degree with a major In Si • • the three. 

For explanation of the numbers see the i letin. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain additional 
courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing by virtue of work done in other institutions, should 
lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, in order 
that they may be informed as to what requirements they mu^t meet for 
graduation. 

Bachelor of Science with a major in Education. Teachers College 
credits from recognized institutions are allowed on the following basis: 
work of a professional character will be equated on the basis of semester 
hours. Graduates who have taken the full two years' normal course 
based upon four full years of high school work usually receive approxi- 
mately 60 semester hours, though each case is evaluated individually. 
A total of 126 hours of academic credits is required. For full information 
address the Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

The Pennsylvania State Council of Education has approved the 
following regulations for the College Provisional Certificate. 

This certificate entitles the holder to teach for three years in any 
public high school of the Commonwealth the subjects indicated on its 
face, and to teach in the elementary field where the applicant is a 
holder of a certificate for teaching in this field or has completed an 
approved curriculum in preparation for teaching in such field. 

The applicant for this certificate must be a graduate of an approved 
college or university and must have successfully completed at least 
eighteen semester hours of work of college grade in education distributed 
as follows: 

4 



Introduction to Teaching ...... 3 seme: tor hours 

Educational Psychology (General Psychology is a 

prerequisite) 3 semester hours 

Practice Teaching- in the Approp I ield ...6 semester hours 

Electives in Education I from the following 

list — .... 6 semester hours 

Secondary Education icational Sociology 

Elementary Education onal Systems 

School Efficiency Hi tory of Education 

Special Methods -iples of Education 

School Hygiene Educational Psychology 

Educational Administration rechnique of Teaching 

Educational Measurerm 

The pract I" 1 met by taking I 

tion 136. 

PRE-I'ROFESSIONAE COURSES 
The coll ire-medical, p I I, ' : 'logical courses 

to prepare students for entrance to schools of Medicine, Law, and The 
ology. For studeri i h to n the field of economic in 

preparation for tin' bu the college offers a course in Bus- 

iness Administration. Sin in these fields should write 

to the Registrar for the College Bulletin. 

MUSIC 
The college has a separate department, the Conservatory o r Music, 
for those interested in Mm interested in this field should 

write either to the Director of the Conservatory of Music or the College 
Registrar for the bulletin of the Conservatory. 

CREDITS 
Credits will be issued to all students showing the courses attended, 
grades and number of < emester hours. Most of the courses offer two 
semester hours' credit. In the case of courses offering three hours 
credit per semester, extra classes are required for the additional hour 
credit. 

FEES 
A fee of one dollar will be charged for matriculation. In the case of 
students registered in both extension and evening courses only one ma- 
triculation foe is requi' e tuition charge for Extension and Sat- 
urday and Evening Courses will be $8.00 for each semester hour of 
credit. A special tuition fee of $5/0 per semester hour will be charged 
persons who desire to take any of the courses as auditor, without ex- 
amination and without credit. 

Fees for the fir ' ter are due and payable on or before Oc- 

toher 15 and f->>- the second sero iter on or before February 15. Re- 
mittances should be mad < in Lebanon Valley College and may be s^nt 
by mail to -T. W. F^benshade, Secretary of the Finance Committee. 

REGISTRATION 
Special registration evenings for the extension classes in Harris- 
burg will be held in tl < Central High School Building, on Forster Street 
from 7:00 9 : Q0 p. in. on Monday and Tuesday oyonings, September 16th 
and 17th. At that time students interested in Extension classes may 
meet and eonsult with the director, and extension class teachers rela- 
tive to their courses. Students unable to register on either of the above 
evenings may do so on the evening the class in which tbpy are inter- 
ested meets. 

Registration for the evening rlass^s at Annville wdl be held on 
Fridav evening. September 20th. 

Thp Extension and Evpning Class representative of the College in 
Harrisburg and the vicinity is Mr. Hilhert V. Lochner, of the Depart- 
ment of Public Assistance. 

5 



EXTENSION COURSES 

1940-41 

Central School, Forstcr Street, Hurrisburg, Pa. 

Classes begin the week of September 16th 

Course Time Professor 

Mental Hygiene Mondays 7:00-0:00 Dr. L. G. Bailey 

American Economic History Tuesdays 7:00-0:00 Prof. F. K. Miller 

Political Theory Tuesdays 7:00-9:00 Dr. P. O. Shettel 

Economics Wednesdays 7:00-9:00 Margaret A. Wood 

English Composition Thursdays 7:00-9:00 Dr. G. G. St ruble 

or 

American Literature Thursdays 7:00-9:00 

English Literature Thursdays 7:00-9:00 Dr. P. A. W. Wallace 

Hershey High School, Hershey, Pa. 

Registration in High School, September 19th, 7:30 p. m. 

History of Music and Appreciation — Mis3 Mary E. Gillespie 

The time of meeting of the class will be decidrd at the time of legis- 
tration. 

SATURDAY AND EVENING CLASSES 

Administration Building, Annville, Pa. 
Classes will be organized Friday, September 20th, 7:00 v. m. 

Course Room No. Professor 

Bible 14 20 Dr. G. A. Richie 

Biology 18 23 Dr. V. Earl Light 

Biology 28 22 Dr. S. H. Dcrickson 

Chemistry 18 9 Dr. Andrew Bender 

Economics 16 or 83 17 Dr. M. L. Stokes 

Education 203 27 Dr. Clyde S. Stine 

French 06 or 26 15 Dr. Stella J. Stevenson 

French 16 15 Marv C. Green 

German 16 or 26 16 Dr. Lena L. Lietzau 

History 46 5 Dr. H. H. Shenk 

Mathematics 13. 23, 36 or 48 17 Dr. Amos Black 

Philosophy 02, 32 5 Dr. P. O. Shettel 

Mathematics 113, 123 13 Professor S. O. Grimm 

Sociology 13, 23 18 Professor C. R. Gingrich 

Students taking evening class work should register for the desired 
classes in the Registrar's Office before proceeding to the designated 
rooms. 

6 



nrscRiPTioN op courses oFrrprn 

IN HARRISBURG 
ECONOMICS 

E-16. Principles of Economics. This course will deal with the fun- 
damentals of economic theory. This course is a required course for all 
students of the Social Sciences and for students in Business Administra- 
tion. Throughout the year. Three semester hours credit.* Wednesday 
evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. Margaret A. Wood 

OR 

E-83. Economics of Consumption. The study of economics is ap- 
proached from the consumer's view point. The course includes a study 
of: the rule of the consumer in economic life, consumers' choices, forces 
hack of consumer demand, consume'- (duration, budgeting, co-operative 
buying, reasons for high costs, producer aids to consumers, government 
aid to consumers. First semester. Three semester hours credit/' Wed- 
nesday evenings, r:00-9:00 p. m. Margaret A. Wood 

E-73. Contemporary Economic Problems. This course is devoted 
specifically to the study of pn . - | day economic problems. It deals with 
the problems of: unstable price levels, the business evele, the banking 
svstem, the monetary system, international trade, taxation, agriculture. 
transportation, population, labor, etc. Second semester. Three semester 
hours credit. * Wednesday evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Margaret A. Wood 

If desired, a course in Money and Bankine may be offered in place 
of the above courses. 

ENGLISH 

E-16. English Composition. — This course is required of all stud- 
ents proceeding to a college decree. Throughout the year. Three semes- 
ter hours credit." Thursday evenings, 7:00-9:00 i>. m. 

Dr. George G. Struble 
OR 

E-526. American Literature. This course will deal with American 
Literature from the beginnings to the present day. Throughout the year. 
Three 1 semester hours credit/ Thursday evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Dr. George G. Struble 

E-26. Survey of English Literature. This course is required of all 
students proceeding to a college degree. Throughout the year. Three 
semester hours credit.'" Thursday evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Dr. P. A. W. Wallace 
HISTORY 

E-163. Economic History of Europe. This course deals with the 
economic achievements in Europe from pre-literary times to the present; 
economic life in the Mediterranean Basin in Classical times; the founda- 
tions of economic life in the Middle Ages; the manorial system and agra- 
rian society: the towns, trade and industry in the Middle Ages; the 
expansion of Eui*ope and the age of discovery; the Industrial Revolution 
and the beginnings of modern industry and agriculture: capitalism and 
cetmmercial policies in the early modern period ; revolution in power, 
transportation and communication ; economic imperialism and the World 
War; the post-war world. First semester. Three semester hours credit/ 
Timsdav evenings. 7:00-9:00 p. m. Professor F. K. Miller 

E-63. Economic History of the United States. A study of the 
background of American History including the growth of American agri- 
cultural and industrial interests from colonial beginnings to their pres^ 
ent dav development. Second semester. Three semester hours credit/ 
Tuesday evenings. 7:00-9:00 p. m. Professor F. K. Miller 



* Additional classes are required for courses offering three semester 
hours credit. 

7 



PHILOSOPHY 

E-43. Political Theory. A survey of the different philosophies and 
theories of government, ancient and modern, with special reference to 
political philosophy since the sixteenth century. First semester. Three 
semester hours credit.* Monday evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Dr. Paul 0. Shcttel 

E-03. Introduction to Philosophy. This course IS intended to in- 
troduce beginners to the basic problems and theories of Philosophy. Sec- 
ond semester. Three semester hours credit. 1 Monday evenings, 7:00- 
9:00 p. m. Dr. Paul O. Shettel 

PSYCHOLOGY 

E-63. Menial Hygiene. A study of wholesome effective personailty 
adjustments, including the causes and treatment of the more common 
social and emotional maladjustments among individuals. First semester. 
Three semester hours credit. Monday evenings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Dr. L. G. Bailov 

E-53. Applied Psychology. A survey of the applications of Pay 
chology to the various fields " ! human relations. It includes such topic.-, 
as: increase of efficiency, effect of suggestion, improvement of personal- 
ity, advertising, and the psychology of the public platform. Second se- 
mester. Three semester hours credit.* Monday ev< nings, 7:00-9:00 p. m. 

Dr. L. C. Bailev 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSE OFFERED 

IN HERSHEY 
E-553. Music History and Appreciation. In this course the devel- 
opments of music arc treated briefly, with emphasis placed on the growth 
of musical movements, on the lives, works and influence of the great com- 
posers. An integral part of the course will be listening to representative 
music of the different periods of musical history, and of the important 
composers. First semester. Three semester hours credit. 

Mary K. Gillespie 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OFFERED 

IN ANNVILLE 

The following courses will be offered by the college at Annville dur- 
ing the college year 1940-41. The Science courses offer four semester 
hours credit — two hours credit for the lecture work and two hours credit 
for the laboratory work per semester. The lecture work and the labora- 
tory work are offered on different evenings. If the classes so desire the 
laboratory work may be offered Saturday mornings. The language courses 
offer three semester hours credit. The amount of credit for each course 
is indicated after the description of the course. Residence credit is given 
for all courses taken at the college. 

The time for the weekly meetings of each class will be arranged 
at the time classes are organized. Organization of classes will take place 
Friday, September 20th. at 7:00 p. ro. 

Most of the courses are offered Friday evenings, and are offered at 
such times as to enable students to take two courses. Should a class so 
desire a course may be offered on Saturday morning3. 

BIBLE 

14. Introduction to English Bible.— An appreciative and historical 
survey of the literature of the Old and New Testaments. This is a re- 
quired course for all students proceeding to a degree. Throughout the 
year. Two semester hours credit. Dr. G. A. Richie 

* Additional classes are required for courses offering three semester 
hours credit. 



BIOLOGV 

18. General Biology. — -This course fulfills the science require- 
ments of students proceeding toward a degree excepting those majoring 
in science in which case additional scienc are required. In addi- 

tion to two hours of lectures per week, lour hours work per week in the 
laboratory is required. The lectures will be held on Tuesday evenings 
and the laboratory work will be held on Wednesda.s evening . Credit 
will be granted to those students who wish onl.\ the lecture .'.oil. and 
not the laboratory work. ThruuKhout the year. Four semester hours 
credit. Dr. V. Earl Light 

28. Botany. The object of th the student 

eral knowledge of the plant kingdom. One or mo of each of the 

classes of Algae, Fungae, liverworts, mosses, ferns and seed plants are 
studied. Special attention is given to the phylogeny ami ontogeny of the 
several groups and constant comparisons are made of those structures 
indicating relationships. The principles of classification are learned by 
the identification of about out: hundred ami lilt species of plants r< pre 
sented in the local spring flora. These studie: ducted in th.- field 

so that the plants are seen as dynamic forces adapted to their environ- 
ment. The time for lectures and laboratorj vork will be arranged s\hen 
the class is organized. Throughout tin- year. I erne: ter hours credit. 

lir. S. II. Derickson 
CHEMISTRY 

18. General Inorganic Chemistry. A systematic study of the fun- 
damentals of Chemistry. The rapid increase in kno of the material 
world in which we live and particularly the new knowledge of the con- 
stitution and structure of matter demands a popular approach to Chem- 
istry. While this procedure is followed in tin- cou] , the aim is to lay a 
firm foundation for those who will pursue tin' subject matter further. 
The time for lectures ami for the laboratory work will Ik- arranged when 
the class is organized. Throughout the year. Four semester hours credit. 

1 >r. Andrew Bender 
ECONOMICS 

16. Principles of Economics. This course will deal with the fun- 
damentals of economic theory. This course is a required curse for all 
students of the Social Sen nees and for students in Br administra- 

tion. Throughout the year. Three semester hours credit. 

Dr. M. B. Stokes 
OR 

83. Economics of Consumption. The study of economics is ap- 
proached from th.- consumer's view point. The course includes a study 
of: the role of the consumer in economic life, consumers' choices, forces 
back of consumer demand, consumer education, budgeting, co-operative 
buying, reasons for high costs, producer aids to consumers, government 
aid to consumers. First semester. Three semester hours credit. 

Dr. M. L. Stokes 

73. Contemporary Economic Problems. This course is devoted spe- 
cifically to the study of present day economic problems. It deals with 
the problems of; unstable price levels, the business cycle, the banking- 
system, the monetary system, international trade, taxation, agriculture, 
transportation, population, labor, etc. Second semester. Three semester 
hours credit. Dr. M. L. Stokes 

EDUCATION 

202 or 203. Visual Education. — The psychology of visual and sen- 
sory aids to learning and their administration will be studied. Special 
attention will be given to the sources and types of visual aids which 
are within the means of the ordinary school system and classroom 
teacher. Lectures, readings, reports, demonstrations and individual pro- 
jects. The State course will be followed. Baboratory fee $2.00. First 
semester. Two or three semester hours credit. Dr. Clyde S, Stine 



82. Educational Measurements. — A critical analysis of the problems 
in measuring the results of teaching. A study of the uses and adminis- 
tration of representative tests and scales for junior and senior high 
school subjects. Second semester. Two semester hours credit. 

Dr. Clyde S. Stine 
OR 

33. Principles of Secondary Education. A course dealing with 

high school pupils, their physical and mental traits, individual diffei 
ences, and the make-up of the high school population; the secondary 
school as an institution, its history, its relation to elementary education 
and to higher education; social principles determining secondary educa- 
tion; the curriculum; the place, function, and value of the several sub- 
jects t>f the curriculum; organization and management of the high school. 
Second semester. Three semester hours credit. Dr. Clyde S. Stine 

FRENCH 

06. Elementary French. — This course is intended for those who 
begin French in College. Its aim is to enable the student to write simple 
French sentences, to carry on a conversation in easy French, and to 
read French of ordinary difficulty. College credit of six semester hours 
will be granted for this course, if followed by French 10, but it cannot 
be counted toward a major. The course is given throughout the year. 

Dr. Stella J. Stevenson 

16. First Year College French. — This is a continuation and exten- 
sion of course 06, and includes further drill in the principles of grammar, 
practice in conversation, composition, and dictation, and more extensive 
reading. This course is given throughout the year. Three hours credit 
per semester. Mary C. Green 

26. French Literature of XVI and XVII Centuries. — A survey of 
French literary history from the Renaissance to the end of the period of 
absolute Classicism. Composition and conversation. The course is given 
throughout the year. Three hours credit per semester. 

Dr. Stella J. Stevenson 
GERMAN 

16. "Kulturkunde." — The making of Modern Germany, its geog - 
raphy, its institutions, its social and artistic life, illustrated by map . 
pictures and readings from contemporary literature. This course is not 
only a preparation for the study of German literature but is intended 
also for those who wish to use German as a tool for advanced work in 
science and other fields. Throughout the year. Three semester hours 
credit. Dr. Lena Lietzau 

OR 

26. Introduction to German Literature. Outline of the history of 
German literature. Reading of selected dramas and poems of Lessing, 
Schiller, Goethe, etc. Grammar and composition. Throughout the year. 
Three semester hours credit. Dr. Lena L. Lietzau 

HISTORY 

46. Political and Social History of the United States. A general 
survey of American History with particular attention to social and cul- 
tural trends. Throughout the year. Three semester hours credit. 

Dr. II . II . Shenk 
MATHEMATICS 

13. Advanced Algebra.— Covering ratio and proportion, variation, 
progressions, binominal theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, 
logarithms, permutations and combinations, theory of equations, partial 
fractions, etc. First semester. Three semester hours credit. 

Dr. Amos H. Black 
10 



23. Piano Trigonometry. Definitions of trigonometric functions, 
right and oblique triangles, computation of distances and heights, devel- 
opment of trigonometric formulae. Second semester. Three semester 
hours credit. Dr. Amos H. Black 

OR 

36. Analytic Geometry. -The equations of the straight line, circle, 
ellipse, parabola and hyperbola are studied. Numerous examples are 
solved, and as much of the higher plane curves and of the geometry of 
space is covered as time will permit. Throughout the year. Three semes- 
ter hours credit. Dr. Amos H. Black 

OR 

43. Differential and Integral Calculus. Differentiation of alge- 
braic and transcendental functions, maxima and minima, development in- 
to series, etc. Integrations, rectificaton of curves, quadrature of sur- 
faces, cubature of solids, etc. Throughout the year. Three semest< i 
hours credit. Dr. Amos II. Black 

113. Introduction to the Mathematics of Finance. — This course 
takes up the solution of the quadratic equation, logarithms, progres- 
sions, permutations and combinations, and the application of these to 
financial problems. First semester. Three semester hours credit. 

Professor S. O. Grimm 

123. Mathematics of Finance. — The course seeks to present the 
mathematical principles and operations used in financial work. A de- 
tailed study of compound interest, compound discount, and annuities 
is undertaken. Application of these principles is then made to practical 
problems of amortization, sinking funds, depreciation, valuation of 
bonds, and building and loan associations. Second semester. Three se- 
mester hours credit. Professor S. O. Grimm 

PHILOSOPHY 

02. Introduction to Philosophy. — The course is intended to intro- 
duce beginners to the basic problems and theories of philosophy and 
quicken them to appreciation of the role played by philosophy in the 
whole movement of civilization, while at the same time giving them 
at least an inkling of the work of the greatest thinkers and arousing in 
them a desire to go to the sources. First .semester. Two semester hours 
credit. Dr. Paul 0. Shettel 

32. Ethics. — The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with 
the academic ethical problems, and to effect an awakening and a 
strengthening of the moral sense. This is a required course for all 
students proceeding to a degree. Second semester. Two semester hours 
credit. Dr. Paul 0. Shettel 

SOCIOLOGY 

13. Principles of Sociology. The course is intended to acquaint 

the student with the various theories of society together with the place 
of sociology in the general field of learning. First semester. Three se- 
mester hours credit, Professor C. R. Gingrich 

23. Modern Social Problems. Second semester. Three semester 
hours credit. Professor C. R. Gingrich 



11 



.. — 4 



Lebanon Valley College 



TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL 
SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



June 23 to August 2, 1941 



Bulletin Available 

April 1, 1941 



For Further Details Write 
The Director of Summer School 

•j.. « « ■• " "■ »» »- .. = B— ._ , „,_, ,„_. „ „ , t>