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lefaanon l^allep 
College 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 16 (new series) FEBRUARY, 1928 



No. 11 




SUMMER SCHOOL NUMBER 

19 28 

Annville - Harrisburg 

PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



CALENDAR 



June 


s 


M 


T 


w 


'r 


1 


s 
2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 



July 


s 

1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


M 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


T 

3 
10 

17 
24 
31 


w 

4 
11 
18 
25 


T 

5 
12 
19 
26 


F 

6 
13 
20 

27 


s 

7 
14 
21 

28 



Summer School Calendar 



June 25 — Registration of Students 
June 25 — Summer Session Begins 
Aug. 3 — Summer Session Ends 



Executive Committee of the Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
HON. AARON S. KREIDER S. H. DERICKSON 

J. R. ENGLE, Esq. SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

R. R. BUTTERWICK CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH 

Secretary 



Faculty Committee of Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary S. H. DERICKSON 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

R. R. BUTTERWICK 



Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D, D.D., LL.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, A.M Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH Secretary of the Summer School 

HIRAM H. SHENK, A.M Professor of History 

A. B., Ursinus College, 1899; A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 1900; 
Student, University of Wisconsin, summer term; Instructor in Political 
Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1899-1900; Professor of History and 
Political Science, 1900-1916; Custodian of Public Records, Pennsylvania 
State Library, 1916 to date; Instructor in Y. M. C. A. Summer Schools, 
Blue Ridge, N. C, 1916-1920, Silver Bay, 1918, and Lake Geneva, 1921; 
B;ducational Secretary, Army Y. M. C. A., Camp Travis, 1917-1918; 
Professor of History, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

SAAIUEL H. DERICKSON, M.S., Sc.D., Professor of Biological 
Science 

B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1902; graduate student, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1902-1903; M. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1903; Pro- 
fessor of Biological Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1903; Land Zoolo- 
gist, Bahama Expedition, Baltimore Geographical Society, summer 1904; 
Director, collection of Eocene and Miocene Fossils for Vassar College, 
summer 1908; Student, Marine Biology, Bermuda, summer 1909; Student 
Tropical Botanical Gardens, Jamaica, summer 1910; Student Brooklyn 
Institute of Arts and Sciences, summer 1911; Acting President of Leba- 
non Valley College, summer 1912; Fellovir American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Member The Botanical Society of America, 
the Phytopathological Society of America. 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M Mathematics 

Millersville State Normal School, 1907; B.Pd., ibid., 1910; A. B., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1912; A. M., ibid., 1917; Columbia University, 
1914-1916; Professor of Education and Physios, Lebanon Valley College, 
1915. Registrar, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Political 
Sdience and Economics 
A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 
Alexandria, Pa., 1911-1912; Principal of High School, Linglestown, Pa., 
1912-1913; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1916; Mem- 
ber of Law Bar of Lebanon County and of Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Bar; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1916— 

MRS. MARY C. GR^Y.^. Professor of French and Dean of Women 
Student, New York Conservatory of Music, 1896-97; Private Teacher 
of Piano, 1897-1900; Travel and Study: Berlin, 1900-01; Paris, 1901- 
1909; Florence, 1909-10; Johannesburg, 1910-11; Paris, 1911-14; Instruc- 
tor in French, Lebanon Valley College, 1916-20; summer 1923, Ecole des 
Vacances, Paris; Professor of French and Dean of Women, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1920— 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1906; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1914; Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 1907- 
1909; Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, Columbia University, 1912-1914; 
In Industrial Chemistry, 1914-1921; Chief Chemist, Aetna Explosives 
Company; Chemical Director, British American Chemical Company; 
Director of Control Laboratory, The Barrett Company; Professor of 
Chemistry, Lebanon Valley College, 1921 — 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ROBERT R. BUTTERVVICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of 
Philosophy and Bible 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; A. M., ibid., 1904; B. D., 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 190S; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1910; twenty-six years in the Ministry; Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion, Lebanon Valley College, 1921-1922; Professor of Philosophy and 
Bible, 1922— 

PAUL S. WAGNER, Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Lebanon \'alley College, 1917; M. A., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1925; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Lebanon Valley College, 1917-18; Military Service, 1918-19; 
Headmaster, Franklin Day School, Baltimore, Md., and graduate student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-20; Y. M. C. A. Educational Conference, 
Silver Bay, N. Y., Summer 1520; Graduate Student, Columbia Univer- 
sity, Summer 1921; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1920 — Travel ar.d study in Europe, Summer 1922; Graduate Study, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1923-1926; Professor Mathematics, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1926— 

HAROLD BENNETT, Ph.D., Jospchinc Bittiugcr Ebcrly Professor of 
Latin Language and Literature. 
B.A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 191S; military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915 1918; Fellow in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1919-1921; Ph.D.. University of Chicago, 1921; 
Professor of Latin, College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C, 1921-1922; 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Lebanon N'alley College, 
1922— 

EVERETT E. MYLIN, A.M Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1916; A. M., ibid.. -1917 ; Officers 
Training Camp, Ft. Niagara, Summer of 1917; twenty-nine months U. S. 
Army; Athletic Officer in charge of Athletics 79th Division, A. E. F., 
Spring 1919; Instructor in Mathematics and Coach Massanutten Military 
Academy, 1919-20; Coach Iowa State College, 1920-23; Lebanon Valley 
College, 1923— 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D. . : . . . .J'rofcssor of Education and 
Psychology 
Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of Schools, 1903-1913; Diploma, 
Illinois State Normal LIniversity, 1914; A. B., University of Illinois, 
1916; M. A., Columbia University, 1917; Head of tbe Department of E;du- 
cation and Psychology, College of Puget Sound, 1917-1920; Student 
Leland Stanford University, Summer quarter, 1920; Professor of Psychology 
and Education, Unii^ersity of Rochester, 1920-1923; Student Columbia 
LTniversity, Summers 1921 and 1922; Completed course and residence 
requirements for Ph.D. Degree, Cokvmbia LIniversity, 1923-1924; Assistant 
in School Administration, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 
1924; Professor of Education and Psychology, Lebanon ^'^alley College, 
1924— 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE. Ph.D Professor of English 

B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; Military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 19151918: Lecturer in English, 
University of Alberta, 1919-1922: M. A., 1923, Ph, D., 1925, University 
of Toronto; Instructor in English, University of Toronto. 1923-1925; 
Professor of English, Lebanon X'allcy College, 1925 — 

AlILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 

B.A., Univer-jity College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of 
iCnglish and History, Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; Lecturer in Finance and 
Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23; LL.B., LIniversity 
cf Toro!Uo, 1926; Lecturer in Economics Extension Dept., LIniversity 
of Toronto, 1923-26; Barriser-of-Law Degree, Osgoode Hall Law 
School, Toronto, 1926; Membei of the Bar, Province of Ontario. Pro- 
fessor of Busif.ess Administration, Lebanon \'.Tlley College, 1926 — 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 5 

MARY KATHRYN WALLACE, A.M., Associate Prof essor of English 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1923; Frances E. Bennett Scholar in 
English, University of Pennsylvania, 1923-24; re-awarded Scholarship for 
1924-25; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1924; Instructor in English, 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1924-25; Instructor in English, Hollins Col- 
lege, HoUins, Va., 1925-26; Associate Professor of English, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1926— 

HELEN ETHEL MYERS, A.B Librarian 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Drexel Institute Library School, 
1908; Assistant New York Public Library, 1908-1910; Cataloger, Univer- 
sity of Chicago Library, 1910-1911; Librarian, Public Library, Lancaster, 
Pa., 1912-1921; Member American Library Association; Lebanon Valley 
College Librarian, 1921 — 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE eighth Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will be 
conducted both in Annville and in Harrisburg. Exercises in 
each subject will be held five times a week, from June 25 
to August 3, inclusive. All courses, except some in science, will be 
held in the morning. 

One Summer School will be held as usual on the campus a1 
Annville, where the full college equipment will be placed at the 
disposal of summer students. 

A Summer School will also be conducted at Harrisburg for the 
convenience of teachers in this vicinity who wish to complete, bj 
means of summer courses, the residence requirements towards their 
degrees. For this purpose the Edison Junior High School has been 
made available by the kindness of the Harrisburg School District. 

REGISTRATION 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the open- 
ing of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registration be 
made by mail. Applications for admission and registration will be 
received by the Secretary up to and including Monday, June 25, 
Address, Annville, Pa. 

No registrations will be made and no changes in courses per- 
mitted after June 28. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses at- 
tended, grades and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken 
during the Summer Session are credited towards the college degrees 
on the same basis as courses taken during the regular college year. 
One hundred twenty-six semester hours are required for the bache- 
lor's degrees. Twenty-seven semester hours are required for the 
master's degrees. The requirement of one year's residence for a 
collegiate degree may be met by attendance upon not less than four 
Summer Sessions. For complete information concerning the re- 
quirements for degrees the candidate should refer to the college 
catalogue or address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1 will be charged each student. 
The tuition fee is $6.00 per semester hour credit. 
A laboratory fee is charged for Science Courses. 

6 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 7 

The charge for board and room is $9 per week, $54 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for 
the term is therefore $67-$91. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration, as a condition 
of admission to classes. 

NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, 
chiffonier, mattress, one chair and student table for each occupant. 
Students must furnish their own bedding, carpets, towels, napkins, 
soap and all other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, 
mattress, chair, dresser and student table. All other desired furnish- 
ings must be supplied by the student. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any 
additional lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order of appli- 
cation. No fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order 
that the most attractive room available may be reserved for you. 



COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREES 

An effort is being made by the College to offer in the Summer 
Session and the Extension Department all the General Requirements 
for the Baccalaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced 
for the present year, and the remainder will be made available at 
an early date. In courses where six semester hours are required, 
the departments will normally offer two hours in Summer School 
and four hours in a Supplementary Extension Course. The 
residence requirement of one year may be met by attendance at 
Summer School. In this way the Baccalaureate degree will be 
made available to those who are not able to attend the regular 
annual College sessions. 

For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full 
statement of the requirements is printed on the following pages. 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ARRANGEMENTS OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to 
the Baccalaureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Economics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these 
degrees is, in each case, 126 semester hours. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 16 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be 
suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ment for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option). Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option). Physics. 

The B.S. in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than 16 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Econ. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Business and Business Administration. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



A.B. 


B.S. 


B.S. in Ed. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


*French 16 or 


French 16 or 


French 16 or 


German 16. 


German 16. 


German 16. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


tLatin 16 or 


Mathematics 13, 23, 


Latin 16 or 


Math. 13, 23. 


ze. 


Math. 13, 23. 


Philosophy 23, 33, or 


Philosophy 13, 23, or 


Psychology, 13, 23. 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Biology 18 or 


Biology 18. 


Biology 18 or 


Chemistry 18, or 


Chemistry 18. 


Chemistry 18, or 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


11, 21. 


11, 21. 


11, 21. 



* Twelve semester hours of Foreign L,anguage are required of all candidates 
for the A. B. degree; six hours of this total must be from French 16 or German 16. 

t L,atin is required of all students majoring in English, French, Greek or 
IfBtin. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements 
in the regular catalogue. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above, some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain addi- 
tional courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to 
Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, 
should lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, 
in order that they may be informed as to what requirements they 
must meet for graduation. 



THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Some of the courses offered in the Extension Department may 
be taken for credit towards a Master's degree, provided arrangements 
are made in advance with the instructor. Some extra work will be 
required, such as additional reading, reports, experiments, etc. The 
complete regulations governing graduate work for the degrees of 
A.M. and M.S. may be obtained upon application to the Registrar 
of the College. 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Science in Education, Lebanon Valley College grants 
the degree Bachelor of Science in Education. Normal school credits 
from recognized institutions will be allowed towards this degree on 
the following basis: work of a professional character will be equated 
on the basis of semester hours. Graduates, who have taken the 
full two years' normal course based upon four full years of high 
school work, usually receive approximately 60 semester hours, 
though each case is evaluated individually for credit towards the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Education. A total of 126 hours of 
credit is required for the degree. For full information, address the 
Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 













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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

ANNVILLE 



BIBLE 

Professor Butterwick 

S52a. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of the 
Kingdoms. Two semester hours. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish the student with a knowl- 
edge of the rehgious growth and practices during the time of the 
Kingdoms under the leadership of the prophets. The course will 
be ofifered in two parts, Part one in the summer of 1928 and Part 
two in the summer of 1929. 

BIOLOGY 

Dr. Derickson 

(At Mount Gretna) 
Biology S26. Plant Ecology. — A study of the plant life in the 
vicinity of Mount Gretna with special reference to the relation of 
the plants to their environment. The major portion of the work 
will be done in the fields, woods and swamps where the plants grow. 
The work will include the identification of the plants as well as a 
study of the ecological factors of a variety of habitats including 
the lake, swamps, uncultivated fields, open woods and the mountain. 
Several texts will be reviewed in connection with the field studies. 
Six semester hours. 

Biology S22. Taxonomy of Spermatophsrtes and Pteridophytes. 

An extensive study of the representatives of these two groups of 
plants and the preparation of a classified herbarium of the same. 
Two semester hours. 

CHEMISTRY 
Dr. Bender 
S18. General Chemistry. — An introduction to the study of chem- 
istry, including a study of the elements, their classification and 
properties, and a study of the important compounds of each element. 

12 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN ' 13 

During the course constant reference is made to manufacturing and 
industrial processes, and interpretation of the phenomenal material 
development of the present century is made in the light of the rapid 
increase in chemical knowledge. The laboratory work of the course 
includes about 100 carefully selected experiments. Two hours lectures 
or recitations and three hours of laboratory work daily. Text, 
Holmes' General Chemistry. Laboratory Fee $16.00. Eight semester 
hours. 

S48. Organic Chemistry. — A study of the sources, classification 
and type reactions of organic materials, of foodstuffs and their rela- 
tion to nutrition, dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, petroleum prod- 
ucts, coal tar intermediates, manufacturing processes and recent 
developments in this field of chemistry. The course will include a 
carefully selected series of demonstrations, the display of a large 
number of representative materials and the use of a large number of 
charts prepared especially for the course. A knowledge of the ele- 
ments of chemistry will be assumed. The laboratory work of the 
course consists of about sixty experiments covering the preparation 
and study of a wide range of representative compounds. Two hours 
of lectures and recitations and three hours of laboratory work daily. 
Laboratory Fee $24.00. Eight semester hours. 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Butterwick 

S12. History of Education. — An analysis of the history of edu- 
cation from the time of early Greek Education to the present day. 
Special attention will be given to the aims, content, organization 
and results of the educational systems of various countries, as well 
as to the great leaders of educational thought. Two semester hours. 

S22. History of Education in the United States. — A study of 
education in the colonial times, early attempts at organization of 
systems of education, the history of the elementary school; the 
Latin grammar school; the Academy; the history and growth of the 
American High School; and the present school system. Two 
semester hours. Summer of 1929. 

S72. Child Psychology. — A course dealing with the characteris- 
tics of original nature; innate tendencies and instincts; general ten- 
dencies, habits and learning of children; cross-sections of child life 
at various ages; the exceptional child. Two semester hours. 

S92. Philosophy of Education. — This course aims to orientate 
the teacher and to supply a basis for constructive thinking in the 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

field of education. It will include a discussion of the aims and 
methods of public education from the modern point of view. Various 
theories in education will be considered. The class will consider 
the changes that have been brought about in educational conceptions 
as they have been influenced by modern industrial, social and scien- 
tific development. Two semester hours. 

ENGLISH 

Associate Professor M. K. Wallace 

S12. Composition and Literature. — A brief study of the essay 
and of the writing of description and narration. Part of the course 
(.English 16) required of all college freshmen. Two semester hours. 

S52. American Literature. — A brief survey of the growth and 
development of the literature of this country. Two semester hours. 

S82. The History of the Novel. — Two semester hours. 

FRENCH 

Professor Green 
S02. Elementary French. — This course is intended for those who 
begin French in College. Its aim is to enable the student to write 
simple French sentences, to carry on a conversation in easy French, 
and to read French of ordinary difiticulty. College credit of two 
semester hours will be granted for this course, but it cannot be 
counted toward a Major. Aldrich-Foster-Roule, French Grammar; 
Daudet, Contes choisis. 

S12. First year French. — Grammar, composition, dictation, and 
the reading of texts of intermediate difficult}\ Two semester hours. 

S52. Advanced Conversation & Prose Composition. — This course 
is intended to promote fluency in conversation, and will include the 
writing of short essays in French. Two semester hours. 

Advanced courses in French Literature, for undergraduate or 
graduate credit, will be arranged if there is sufficient demand. 

Note. — French conversation at table in the Dining Hall will be 
arranged if desired. 

HISTORY 

Professors Mylin and Stokes 

S12. Europe, 1648 to 1815. — A study of European History from the 
Peace of Westphalia to the Battle of Waterloo. Lectures, readings, 
reports and discussion. Two semester hours. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 15 

S32. 19th Century English History. — One hour per day. The poHti- 
cal history of England during the 19th century, together with a con- 
sideration of the constitutional, economic and social development, 
forms the basis of the course. Particular attention will be given 
to a study of Britain's foreign policy during the period. Two 
semester hours. 

S82. Recent United States History. — A study of the Social and 
Political History of the United States since the Civil War. The 
growing importance of the United States in international aflfairs 
will receive special emphasis. Two semester hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Grimm 
Sl2. College Algebra. — The usual topics will be covered, with 
special attention given to Theory of Equations. Two semester hours. 

S22. Plane Trigonometry. — Study of the relations between the 
trigonometric functions; solution of right and oblique triangles; prac- 
tical applications of trigonometry to the determination of heights 
and distances. Two semester hours. 

S32. Analytic Geometry. — A study of the equations of the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola. Two semester hours. 

S42. Elementary Differential Calculus. — Differentiation of alge- 
braic and transcendental functions, with applications in determination 
of tangents and normals, solution of problems in maxima and 
minima, etc. Two semester hours. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Stokes 
S-12. Economic Theory. — One hour per day. A course in Eco- 
nomic Theory covering the work of one semester during the summer 
of 1928. The course is a continuation of the course offered during 
the summer of 1927. The course consists partly of lectures and 
partly of assignments and seminar discussions of economic problems. 
Students who have not had work in economics but who wish to 
take the course may do so. Two semester hours. 

S12. American Government and Politics. — One hour per day. A 
study of the federal government of the United States with an exami- 
nation of leading constitutional cases forms the basis of the work 
for the summer of 1928. A course in state government was offered 
in the summer of 1927. Two semester hours. 





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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

HARRISBURG 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Reynolds 
S32. Principles of Secondary Education. — The High School as 
an institution, its history, its relation to elementary and higher edu- 
cation; the physical and psychological nature of the High School 
pupil; the program of studies; the place, function and value of the 
several subjects offered. Two semester hours. 

S82. Educational Measurements. — This course aims to acquaint 
students with the more frequently used standardized educational 
tests in such subjects as, reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, 
geography, history, language, algebra, foreign languages and other 
subjects. It will involve the mastery of the tests, the giving and 
«se of the results. Textbooks, assigned readings, test materials. 
Laboratory fee of one dollar. Two semester hours. 

S152. Educational Psychology. — Emphasis on the topics of gen- 
eral psychology which form the basis for a study of the problems 
of education. Special emphasis will be given to innate tendencies; 
individual differences; their measurement; their significance; and 
the learning process. Two semester hours. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Wallace 
S22. A Survey of English Literature. — The first part of English 
26, required of all college sophomores. The remainder of the course 
will be offered in Harrisburg during 1928-29. Two semester hours. 

S532, Tennyson and Browning. — Two semester hours. 

S62, Shakespeare's Tragedies. — One hour per day. Julius Caesar, 
Macbeth, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra and King Lear. Two 
semester hours. 

FRENCH AND GERMAN 

Drs. Bennett and Wagner 
S02. Elementary French. — This continues a course for beginners, 
which has been carried on in the Extension classes of 1927-28. It 
completes the preparation for French 16, which will be offered in 

17 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

the Extension classes of 1928-29 and the following summer. Frencli 
16 meets the modern language required for the baccalaureate degree. 
Candidates who have had some French and are planning to enter 
French 16 next fall, will find it to their advantage to use this summer 
course as a means of "brushing up." Two semester hours. 

S12. First Year College German. — Grammar, composition, a'd 
the reading and interpretation of texts of average difficulty. Open 
only to those who have had at least one year's previous study of 
German. This course is part of German 16, which meets the 
modern language requirement for the baccalaureate degree. Two 
semester hours. 



HISTORY 

Professor Shenk and Dr. Bennett 

S122. Europe, 1815 to 1920. — A study of political movements 
in Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the Treaty of Versailles. 
Lectures, readings, reports and discussions. Two semester hours. 

Sl2. Europe, 1648-1815. — A study of European History from 
the Peace of Westphalia to the Battle of Waterloo. Lectures* read- 
ings, reports and discussion. Two semester hours. 

S32. History of England. — Two semester hours. 

S112. Ancient Historic gnraphy. — The history of Greece and Rome 
will be studied by readings from the ancient writers of history. 
Selected passages will be read from the best translations of such 
famous historians as Herodotus, "the prince of story-tellers"; Thu- 
cydides, "the father of philosophic history"; Livy, "the master of 
the pictured page"; Caesar, "the laconic apologist"; and a number of 
biographies from Plutarch's Lives. The aim of the course will be 
as much literary as historical. Two semester hours. 



LATIN 

Dr. Bennett 
S12. First Year College Latin. — Reading of selections from the 
Metarhorphoses of Ovid. Review of Latin forms and syntax, with 
exercises in Latin prose composition. This course gives two points 
credit towards the six points required of those presenting Latin to 
meet the requirement for the A.B. or B. S. in Ed. degree. . Two 
semester hours. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN • 19 

MATHEMATICS 

Dr. Wagner 
S52. Elementary Integfral Calculus. — Two semester hours. 
S72. Elementary Differential Equations. — Two semester hours. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich 

Sl2. American Government and Politics. — One hour per day. 
This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge 
of the fundamental law and organization of federal and state gov- 
ernments. The history of the federal constitution and numerous 
decisions of the United States Supreme Court are given careful 
consideration. Part two, state government, in 1928. Two semester 
hours. Complete course offered in Harrisburg, Extension class, 
winter of 1928-29. 

S42. World Politics. — One hour per day. A study of the de- 
velopment of international relations from the simple structure of 
their origin to the complex mechanism of the present day. Prob- 
lems of the Near East, Far East and the League of Nations are 
discussed at length. Two semester hours. 

S52. Jurisprudence. — One hour per day. An outline course cov- 
ering many of the points in the general field of law that are of in- 
terest to laymen. Elementary principles of the law of contracts, 
agency, negotiable instruments, bailments, etc., will be considered. 
Two semester hours. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Mylin 
Football— B asketball— Baseball 
Athletic Coaching. Si. — One hour per day. A course for those 
who are coaching or who intend to coach athletics, covering funda- 
mentals. Different systems of offense and defense, generalship and 
strategy, training, conditioning and players' equipment are considered 
both in theory and practice. Two semester hours. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 

IN ANNVILLE 

Athletics SI. Athletic Coaching. 
Bible S52a. Religious History. 
Chemistry S18. General Chemistry, 
Organic Chemistry. 
History of Education. 

History of Education in the United States. 
Philosophy of Education. 
Child Psychology. 
Composition and Literature. 
American Literature. 
The History of the Novel. 
Elementary French. 
First Year French. 

Advanced Conversation and Prose Composition. 
19th Century English History. 
Europe 1648-1815. 
Recent United States History. 
College Algebra. 
Plane Trigonometry. 



Chemistrj"- S48. 
Education S12a 
Education S22. 
Education S92. 
Education S72. 
English S12. 
English S52. 
English S82. 
French 502. 
French SI 2. 
French S52. 
History S32. 
History S12. 
History S82. 
Mathematics S12 
Mathematics S22 



Mathematics 532. Analytic Geometry. 

Mathematics 542. Elementary Differential Calculus. 

Economics 512. Economic Theory. 

Political Science 512. American Government and Politics. 

IN HARRISBURG 

Education S32. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Education 582. Educational Measurements. 

Education 5152. Educational Psychology. 

English 522. A Survey of" English Literature. 

English 5532. Tennyson and Browning. 

English 562. Shakespeare's Tragedies. 

French 502. Elementary French. 

German 512. First Year College German. 

History 5122. Europe 1815 to 1920. 

History 512. Europe 1648 to 1815. 

History 532. History of England. 

History 5112. Ancient Historiography. 

Latin 512. First Year College Latin. 

Mathematics 552. Elementary Integral Calculus. 

Mathematics 572. Elementary Differential Equations. 

Political Science 512. American Government and Politics. 

Political Science 542. World Politics. 

Social Science 552. Jurisprudence. 

20 



Information Blank 



If you are interested in, or expect to attend tlic Summer Session 
of Lebanon Valley College, the Secretary of the Summer Session will 
esteem it a favor if you will fill out and return to him, as early as 
possible, the form below. In so doing you will not obligate yourself, 
but will help the School in making proper arrangements for its 
work. 

Christian R. Gingrich, Secretary, 
Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Dear Sir: 

(I am interested in) (I expect to attend) the Summer Session 
of Lebanon Valley College. Please give me the following informa- 
tion: 



My purpose in attending the Summer Session is: 



I desire to study the following subjects: At Annville 

At Harrisburg 



Please (reserve) (do not reserve) a place for me in the College dor- 
mitories, — thie most desirable room available at the time my reserva- 
tion is received. 

I am gfiving, on the back of this blank, a statement of my training 
and experience. 



Remarks : 



I have the following credits: 
Name of School Name of Course No. of Sem. Hrs. 



My experience is as follows: 

Place Grade Years 



Yours very truly, 
Name m tuU 



Present address- 
Home address -