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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Number"

Hebanon ^allep 
College 



BULLETIN 



Vol. 17 (newser.es) FEBRUARY, 1929 



No. 11 




SUMMER SCHOOL 

1929 

Annville - Harrisburg 

PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



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Summer School Calendar 



June 24 — Registration of Students 
June 24 — Summer Session Begins 
Aug. 2 — Summer Session Ends 



Executive Committee of the Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
HON. AARON S. KREIDER S. H. DERICKSON 

J. R. ENGLE, Esq. SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

R. R. BUTTERWICK CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH 

Secretary 



Faculty Committee of Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary S. H. DERICKSON 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

R. R. BUTTERWICK PAUL S. WAGNER 



SUPPLEMENT 



The following two courses in 
CHEMISTRY 

will be offered in Annville by 
Dr. Andrew Bender 

CHEMISTRY 

S18. General Chemistry. — An introduction to the study of chem- 
istry, including a study of the elements, their classification and 
properties, and a study of the important compounds of each element. 
During the course constant reference is made to manufacturing and 
industrial processes, and interpretation of the phenomenal material 
development of the present century is made in the light of the rapid 
increase in chemical knowledge. The laboratory work of the course 
includes about 100 carefully selected experiments. Two hours lectures 
or recitations and three hours of laboratory work daily. Text, 
Holmes' General Chemistry. Laboratory Fee $16,00. Eight semester 
hours. 

S48. Organic Chemistry. — A study of the sources, classification 
and type reactions of organic materials, of foodstuffs and tlicir rela- 
tion to nutrition, dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, petroleum prod- 
ucts, coal tar intermediates, manufacturing processes and recent 
developments in this field of chemistry. The course will include a 
carefully selected series of demonstrations, the display of a large 
number of representative materials and the use of a large number of 
charts prepared especially for the course. A knowledge of the ele- 
ments of chemistry will be assumed. The laboratory work of the 
course consists of about sixty experiments covering the preparation 
and study of a wide range of representative compounds. Two hours 
of lectures and recitations and three hours of laboratory work daily. 
Laboratory Fee $24.00. Eight semester hours. 



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Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

jEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D., LL.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, A.M Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH Secretary of the Summer School 

SAMUEL H. DERICKSON, M.S., Sc.D., Professor of Biological 

Science 

B. S., Lebanon Valley Gjllege, 1902; eraduate student, Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1902-1903; M. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1903; Pro- 
fessor of Biological Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1903; Land Zoolo- 
gist, Bahama Expedition, Baltimore Geographical Society, summer 1904; 
Director, collection of Eocene and Miocene Fossils for Vassar College, 
summer 1908; Student, Marine Biology, Bermuda, summer 1909; Student 
Tropical Botanical Gardens, Jamaica, summer 1910; Student Brooklyn 
Institute of Arts and Sciences, summer 1911; Acting President of Leba- 
non Valley College, summer 1912; Fellow American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, Member The Botanical Society of America, 
the Phytopathological Society of America. 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M Mathematics 

Millersville State Normal School, 1907; B.Pd., ibid., 1910; A. B., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1912; A. M., ibid., 1917; Columbia University, 
1914-1916; Professor of Education and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1915. Registrar, Lebanon Valley College, 1920— 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Political 
Science and Economics 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 
Alexandria, Pa., 1911-1912; Principal of High School, Linglestown, Pa., 
1912-1913; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1916; Mem- 
ber of Law Bar of Lebanon County and of Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Bar; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1916— 

PAUL S. WAGNER, Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1917; M. A., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1925; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Lebanon Valley College, 1917-18; Military Service, 1918-19; 
Headmaster, Franklin Day School, Baltimore, Md., and graduate student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-20; Graduate Student, Columbia Univer- 
sity, Summer 1921; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1920 — Travel and study in Europe, Summer 1922; Graduate Study, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1923-1926; Professor Mathematics, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1926— 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of 
Philosophy and Bible 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; A. M., ibid., 1904; B. D., 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 1905; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1910; twenty-six years in the Ministry; Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion, Lebanon Valley College, 1921-1922; Professor of Philosophy and 
Bible, 1922— 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D Professor of Education and 

Psychology 
Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of Schools, 1903-1913; Diploma, 
Illinois State Normal University, 1914; A. B., University of Illinois, 
1916; M. A., Columbia University, 1917; Head of the Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology, College of Puget Sound, 1917-1920; Student 
Leland Stanford University, Summer quarter, 1920; Professor of Psychology 
and Education, University of Rochester, 1920-1923; Student Columbia 
University, Summers 1921 and 1922; Completed course and residence 
requirements for Ph.D. Degree, Columbia University, 1923-1924; Assistant 
in School Administration, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 
1924; Professor of Education and Psychology, Lebanon Valley College, 
1924— 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE. Ph.D Professor of English 

B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; Military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915-1918; Lecturer in English, 
University of Alberta, 1919-1922; M. A., 1923, Ph. D., 1925, University 
of Toronto; Instructor in English, University of Toronto, 1923-1925; 
Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1925 — 

MILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 
B.A., University College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of 
English and History, Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; Lecturer in Finance and 
Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23; LL.B., University 
of Toronto, 1926; Lecturer in Economics Extension Dept., University 
of Toronto, 1923-26; Barrister-of-Law Degree, Osgoode Hall Law 
School, Toronto, 1926; Member of the Bar, Province of Ontario. Pro- 
fessor of Busir.ess Administration, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

MARY KATHRYN WALLACE, A.M., Associate Prof essor of English 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1923; Frances E. Bennett Scholar in 
English, University of Pennsylvania, 1923-24; re-awarded Scholarship for 
1924-25; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1924; Instructor in English, 
Ohio Wesleyan University, 1924-25; Instructor in Englisih, Hollins Col- 
lege, Hollins, Va., 1925-26; Associate Professor of English, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1926— 

E. H. STEVENSON, M.A., (Oxon.) Professor of History 

B.A., Hendrix College, 1916; U. S. Navy, 1917-18; graduate student 
University of Arkansas, 1919; Rhodes Scholar, Oxford University. 1919-22; 
student University of Grenoble summer of 1921; instructor in Wilmington 
Friends' School, George School, Muhlenberg College, 1922-28; Professor of 
History, Lebanon Valley College, 1928 — - 

MARY STELLA JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor of French 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Travel and Study abroad, 
France, Germany, Italy, 1920-1923; Professor of French and Spanish, La 
Grange College, La Grange, Georgia, 1923-1924; Graduate Study, The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1924-1925; University of Grenoble, Grenoble, 
France, 1925-1926; Diplome de Hautes Etudes de Langue et de Literature 
Francaises, University of Grenoble, 1926: graduate student and Instructor 
in French, The Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1928; Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1928; Professor of French Literature and German, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1928— 

V. EARL LIGHT, M.S Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1926; 
Candidate for the Doctor's degree in the Department of Zoology at The 
Johns Hopkins University, June, 1929; Associate Professor of Biology, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1929 — - 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE ninth Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will be 
conducted both in Annville and in Harrisburg. Exercises in 
each subject will be held five times a week, from June 24 
to August 2 inclusive. All courses, except some in science, will be 
held in the morning. 

One Summer School will be held as usual on the campus at 
Annville, where the full college equipment will be placed at the 
disposal of summer students. 

A Summer School will also be conducted at Harrisburg for the 
convenience of teachers in this vicinity who wish to complete, bj 
means of summer courses, the residence requirements towards their 
degrees. For this purpose the Edison Junior High School has been 
made available by the kindness of the Harrisburg School District. 

REGISTRATION 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the open- 
ing of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registration be 
made by mail. Applications for admission and registration will be 
received by the Secretary up to and including Monday, June 24 
Address, Annville, Pa. 

No registrations will be made and no changes in courses per- 
mitted after June 27. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses at- 
tended, grades and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken 
during the Summer Session are credited towards the college degrees 
on the same basis as courses taken during the regular college year. 
One hundred twenty-six semester hours are required for the bache- 
lor's degrees. Twenty-seven semester hours are required for the 
master's degrees. The requirement of one year's residence for a 
collegiate degree may be met by attendance upon not less than four 
Summer Sessions. For complete information concerning the re- 
quirements for degrees the candidate should refer to the college 
catalogue or address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1 will be charged each student. 
The tuition fee is $6.00 per semester hour credit. 
A laboratory fee is charged for Science Courses. 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The charge for board and room is $9 per week, $54 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for 
the term is therefore $67-$9L 

The fees are payable at the time of registration, as a condition 
of admission to classes. 

NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, 
chiflfonier, mattress, one chair and student table for each occupant. 
Students must furnish their own bedding, carpets, towels, napkins, 
soap and all other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, 
mattress, chair, dresser and student table. All other desired furnish- 
ings must be supplied by the student. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any 
additional lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order of appli- 
cation. No fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order 
that the most attractive room available may be reserved for you. 



COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREES 

An effort is being made by the College to offer in the Summer 
Session and the Extension Department all the General Requirements 
for the Baccalaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced 
for the present year, and the remainder will be made available at 
an early date. In courses where six semester hours are required, 
the departments will normally offer two hours in Summer School 
and four hours in a Supplementary Extension Course. The 
residence requirement of one year may be met by attendance at 
Summer School. In this way the Baccalaureate degree will be 
made available to those who are not able to attend the regular 
annual College sessions. 

For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full 
statement of the requirements is printed on the following pages. 



SUMAIER SCHOOL BULLETIN 7 

ARRANGEMENTS OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to 
the Baccalaureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Economics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these 
degrees is, in each case, 126 semester hours. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 16 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be 
suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ment for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option), Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option). Physics. 

The B.S. in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than 16 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Econ. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Business and Business Administration. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



A.B. 


B.S. 


B.S. in Ed. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


*French 16 or 


French 16 or 


French 16 or 


German 16. 


German 16. 


German 16. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


tLatin 16 or 


Mathematics 13, 23, 


Latin 16 or 


Math. 13, 23. 


36. 


Math. 13, 23. 


Philosophy 23, 33, or 


Philosophy 13, 23, or 


Psychology, 13, 23. 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Biology 18 or 


Biology 18. 


Biology 18 or 


Chemistry 18, or 


Chemistry 18. 


Chemistry 18, or 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


Hygiene 


Hygiene 


Hygiene 



* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all candidates 
for the A. B. degree; six hours of this total must be from French 16 or German 16. 

t Latin is required of all students majoring in English, French, Greek or 
Latin. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements 
in the regular catalogue. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above, some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain addi- 
tional courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to 
Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, 
should lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, 
in order that they may be informed as to what requirements they 
must meet for graduation. 



THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Some of the courses offered in the Extension Department may 
be taken for credit towards a Master's degree, provided arrangements 
are made in advance with the instructor. Some extra work will be 
required, such as additional reading, reports, experiments, etc. The 
complete regulations governing graduate work for the degrees of 
A.M. and M.S. may be -obtained upon application to the Registrar 
of the College. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 9 

Bachelor of Science in Education. Lebanon Valley College grants 
the degree Bachelor of Science in Education. Normal school credits 
from recognized institutions will be allowed towards this degree on 
the following basis: work of a professional character will be equated 
on the basis of semester hours. Graduates, who have taken the 
full two years' normal course based upon four full years of high 
school work, usually receive approximately 60 semester hours, 
though each case is evaluated individually for credit towards the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Education. A total of 126 hours of 
credit is required for the degree. For full information, address the 
Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 

« THE EXTENSION COURSES 

To accommodate the needs of teachers in service, and for the 
convenience of those who are unable to pursue the work of the 
college in regular course by residence on the campus during the 
winter months, an extension department has been established. The 
offerings in Extension courses are listed on another page in this 
bulletin. Extension courses rotate from year to year so as to enable 
students to complete the work leading to degrees by residence during 
the summer sessions, which are coordinated with the extension plan 
in the offering of required courses. 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

ANNVILLE 



BIOLOGY 

S18. General Biology. — A course in the general principles of 
Biology including a consideration of both plants and animals, their 
relation to their environment and to each other, the principles of 
their growth, metabolism, adaptation, reproduction, evolution and 
relation to human welfare. 

Two hours class work and four hours laboratory work per day. 
Laboratory fee $16. Eight semester hours. 

S54a. Vertebrate Embryology. — The course consists of a study 
•of the origin and development of the individual. Beginning with the 
origin of the germ cells, the processes of cleavage, origin and differ- 
entiation of tissues and organs will be traced to the establishment 
of family characteristics. 

The Frog and Chick will be made the basis of the laboratory study. 
One hour class work and three hours laboratory work each day. 
Laboratory fee $8. Four semester hours credit. This course will be 
given at Mount Gretna and will be credited either toward a Bache- 
lor's or Master's degree. 

S54b. Methods of Histological Technic, — This course is designed 
especially for teachers of Biological Sciences in High Schools. It 
consists of training and practice in making microscopic slides for the 
study or demonstration of the structure of the tissues of plants and 
animals. Opportunity will be given to prepare slides for use in 
courses in General Science, Biology, Botany, Zoology and Physi- 
ology. As much time will be devoted to the study of the preparations 
made as time' will permit. One hour of instruction and three or 
more hours of laboratory work each day. Laboratory fee $8. Four 
semester hours. 

This course will be given at Mount Gretna and will be credited 
either toward a Bachelor's or a Master's degree. 

Students intending to register for this or the preceding course 
and desiring boarding and room at Mount Gretna may write Pro- 
fessor Derickson for information. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 
S82. Educational Measurements. — This course aims to acquaint 
students with the more frequently used standardized educational 
tests in such subjects as, reading, writing, spelHng, arithmetic, 
geography, history, language, algebra, foreign languages and other 
subjects. It will involve the mastery of the tests, the giving and 
use of the results. Textbooks, assigned readings, test materials. 
Laboratory fee of one dollar. Two semester hours. 

S112. Principles and Technique of Teaching. — This course is in- 
tended especially for elementary and junior high school teachers. 
The major emphasis will be given to the study of special methods 
and devices in the principal elementary school subjects. Some atten- 
tion will be given, however, to a few of the more recent general 
methods, such as supervised study, socialized recitations, and the 
project method. Two semester hours. 

S152. Educational Psychology. — Emphasis on the topics of gen- 
eral psychology which form the basis for a study of the problems 
of education. Special emphasis will be given to innate tendencies; 
individual differences; their measurement; their significance; and 
the learning process. Two semester hours. 

ENGLISH 
S22. From Beowulf to Shakespeare. — This is the introductory 
part of the year's survey of English Literature, required of all 
college sophomores. The course will be continued in extension 
during the winter. Readings : Snyder and Martin : A Book of Eng- 
lish Literature. Charles Reade : The Cloister and the Hearth. Sir 
Walter Scott :^ Kenilworth. Two semester hours. 

S42. Eighteenth Century Prose. — Two semester hours. 

Alden : Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century, 
Addison: Essays (Ed. John Richard Green). 
Defoe : Robinson Crusoe. 
Swift : Gidlizrer's Tra/uels. 
Fielding : Tom Jones. 
Goldsmith : She Stoops to Conquer. 
Thackeray : Henry Esmond. 
S532. Tennyson and Browning. — Two semester hours. 
Page : British Poets of the Nineteenth Century. 

FRENCH 

Sl4, First Year College French. — This is a continuation and 
extension of course E6, and includes further drill in the principles 



I 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 13 

of grammar, practice in conversation, composition and dictation, 
and more extensive reading. Readings in the French short story. 
Four semester hours. 

GERMAN 

S02. Elementary German. — Grammar; practice in reading and 
v\friting; reading of easy prose; dictation. Tw^o semester hours. 

HISTORY 

S12. Medieval Institutions. — Feudalism, the Manor, the Organi- 
zation of the Church, Monastic Movements, Development of Mon- 
archy, Law^ Courts, Guilds, and other typical institutions of the 
Middle Ages. 

Lectures, Reports, Class Discussion. Two semester hours. 

S42. American History to 1789. — European Background of Amer- 
ican History, Voyages of Discovery, Colonization, Organs of British 
Imperial Administration, Social and Political Institutions of the 
Colonies, Revolution, Critical Period, Making of the Constitution. 

Lectures, Reports, Class Discussion. Two semester hours. 

S22. The French Revolution and Napoleon. — The Social and In- 
tellectual background of the French Revolution, Revolutionary Lead- 
ers, Work of National and Legislative Assemblies, Convention, 
Reign of Terror, Napoleonic Statesmanship, Reorganization of Eu- 
rope after the Fall of Napoleon. 

Lectures, Reports, Class Discussion. Two semester hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

S12. College Algebra. — The usual topics will be covered, with 
special attention given to Theory of Equations. Two semester hours. 

S22. Plane Trigonometry. — Study of the relations between the 
trigonometric functions; solution of right and oblique triangles; prac- 
tical applications of trigonometry to the determination of heights 
and distances. Two semester hours. 

S32. Analytic Geometry. — A study of the equations of the straight 
line, circle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola. Two semester hours. 

S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Junior and Senior 
High School. — Two semester hours. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

S12. Economics. — This course is a continuation of the courses in 
Economics offered during the summer of 1928. The course consists 
partly of lectures, partly of assignments and seminar discussions of 
economic problems. Two semester hours. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

S32. Comparative Government. — A comparative study of the most 
important governmental systems of the world, emphasizing especially 
the dififerences between federal and unitary government. Special 
attention will be given to the governments of the United 
States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, South Africa, Irish 
Free State, France, Germany, Switzerland and Russia. Two 
semester hours. 

S42. Problems of Democracy. — This is an orientation course 
in the field of Social Science. As an introduction to 
social science it is recommended to those just entering the field 
as well as to teachers who are presenting this subject in the High 
Schools. Two semester hours. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

HARRISBURG 

BIBLE 

S52. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of the 
Kingdoms. — The purpose of this course is to furnish the student 
with a knowledge of the religious growth and practices during the 
time of the Kingdoms under the leadership of the prophets. Two 
semester hours. 

EDUCATION 

S32. Principles of Secondary Education. — The high school pupils, 
their physical and mental traits, individual dififerences, and the 
make-up of the high school population; the secondary school as an 
institution, its history, its relation to elementary education, and to 
higher education; social principles determining secondary education; 
aims and functions of secondary education; the curriculum; the 
place, function, and value of the several subjects of the curriculum; 
organization and management of the high school. Two semester 
hours. 

S92. Philosophy of Education. — This course aims to orientate 
the teacher and to supply a basis for constructive thinking in the 
field of education. It will include a discussion of the aims and 
methods of public education from the modern point of view. Various 
theories in education will be considered. The class will consider 
the changes that have been brought about in educational conceptions 
as they have been influenced by modern industrial, social and scien- 
tific development. Two semester hours. 

S162. Teaching of Science. — A presentation of the historic growth 
of science, the underlying philosophy accompanying the movement 
and general methods in the several fields. Two semester hours. 

Si 72. Methods of Teaching Modern Langfuages. — The relative 
merits of the so-called grammatical and direct methods will be con- 
sidered and an efifort made to evaluate results obtained by the more 
modern practices in the teaching of foreign languages. The primary 
aim of this course will be a practical one, namely, to determine upon 
methods which will most effectively and quickly prepare the student 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

to think and express himself in the foreign language and to read it 
intelligently. Two semester hours. 

ENGLISH 

S522. American Literature. — A survey of American writing from 
the Colonial times to the present, with especial emphasis on those 
men who contributed most toi the upbuilding of a national literature 
of permanent significance. Two semester hours. 

S82. The History of the Novel. — A course tracing in outline the 
development of English fiction from the Arthurian romance of the 
Middle Ages to the novels of contemporary publication. Two 
semester hours. 

S612. Restoration Drama. — The purpose of this course is to trace 
the development of the English Drama from the opening of the 
theatres by Charles II in 1660 to 1880 — to connect the Golden 
Age of the Drama with Contemporary Drama. Two semester hours. 

FRENCH 

S12. French. — A continuation of course E14. Reading, com- 
position and conversation. About's Le Roi des Montagnes (Heath) ; 
Barton & Sirich's French Reznczv Grammar and Composition (F. S. 
Crofts & Co.) Two semester hours. 

GERMAN 

S22. German. — Literature of the 18th century. The life and liter- 
ary activities of Lessing will be studied. Texts : Lessing's Minna von 
Barnhelm, (Heath) ; Lessing's Emilia Galotti (Heath). Two semester 
hours. 

HISTORY 

S32. The History of England. — (a) First part, English History 
from the beginning of the Tudor period to the accession of George 
III; The Tudor and Stuart Monarchies; England's Commercial Ex- 
pansion; The Puritan Revolution; The Revolution of 1688; The 
Intercolonial Wars. Two semester hours. 

S62. Economic History of the United States. — A study of the 
economic background of American History, including the growth of 
American agricultural, commercial and industrial interests, from 
colonial beginnings to their present development. Two semester 
hours. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 17 

S22. The French Revolution and Napoleon. — The social and in- 
tellectual background of the French Revolution, Revolutionary lead- 
ers, Work of National and Legislative Assemblies, Convention, 
Reign of Terror, Napoleonic Statesmanship, Reorganization of Eu- 
rope after the Fall of Napoleon. Lectures, reports, class discussion. 
Two semester hours. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

S22. Political Theory. — A study of various theories of the state 
and the structure and province of government. This course will be 
followed by extension courses in World Politics and United States 
and Latin America offered in Harrisburg during the winter of 
1929-1930. Current problems in international politics are considered 
and discussed at length. Two semester hours. 

S12. Principles of Sociologry. — A study of the development of 
society and of social principles and theories. Modern social problems 
are discussed. Lectures, readings and discussions. Two semester 
hours. 

SUMMARY OF COURSES 

IN ANNVILLE 

Biology S18. General Biology. 

Biology S54a. Vertebrate Embryology (Mt. Gretna). 

Biology SS4b. Methods of Histological Technic (Mt. Gretna). 

Education S82. Educational Measurements. 

Education SI 12. Principles and Technique of Teaching. 

Education SI 52. Educational Psychology. 

English S22. From Beowulf to Shakespeare. 

English S42. Eighteenth Century Prose. 

English S532. Tennyson and Browning. 

French S14. First Year French. 

German S02. Elementary German. 

History S12. Medieval Institutions. 

History S42. American History to 1789. 

History S22. The French Revolution and Napoleon. 

Mathematics S12. College Algebra. 

Mathematics S22. Plane Trigonometry. 

Mathematics S32 Analytic Geometry. 

Mathematics S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Junior 

and Senior High School. 
Economics S12. Economic Problems. 
Political Science S32. Comparative Government. 
Political Science S42. Problems of Democracy. 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

IN HARRISBURG 

Bible S52. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of 

the Kingdoms. 
Education S32. Principles of Secondary Education. 
Education S92. Philosophy of Education. 
Education S162. Teaching of Science. 

Education S172. Methods of Teaching Modern Languages. 
English S522. American Literature. 
English S82. The History of the Novel. 
English S612. Restoration Drama. 
French S12. First Year French. 
German S22. Second Year German. 
History S32. The History of England. 
History S62. Economic History of the United States. 
History S22. The French Revolution and Napeoleon. 
Political Science S22. Political Theory. 
Sociology S12. Principles of Sociology. 



Hetianon ¥^aUep College 



Extension Courses 

1929-1930 
Harrisburg 

Modern Language M. Stella Johnson, Ph.D. 

Social Science. C. R. Gingrich, A.B., LL.B. 

Bible G. A. Richie, B.D., A.M., D.D. 

History H. H. Shenk, A.M., LL.D. 

Education O. E. Reynolds, Ph.D. 

Mathematics P. S. Wagner, Ph.D. 

English Mary K. Wallace, A.M. 

Chemistry A. Bender, Ph.D. 

Lebanon 

English Literature P. A. W. Wallace,Ph.D. 

Sociology M. L. Stokes, M.A., LL.B. 

Pine Grove 

Education R. R. Butterwick, B.D., A.M., D.D. 

History E. H. Stevenson, M.A. (Oxon.) 

Annville 

General Zoology. — Lecture work in this course giv- 
en on Friday evening and laboratory work on Satur- 
day morning. 

For further information apply to 
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA.