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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Number"

Lebanon $allep 
College 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 18 (newser.es) FEBRUARY, 1930 



No. 11 




SUMMER SCHOOL 

19 30 

Annville - HARRISBURG 

PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE ' -i 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



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Summer School Calendar 



June 23— Registration of Students 
June 23 — Summer Session Begins 
Aug. 1 — Summer Session Ends 



Executive Committee of the Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
J. R. ENGLE, Esq. SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

R. R. BUTTERWICK CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH 

S. H. DERICKSON Secretary 



Faculty Committee of Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary S. H. DERICKSON 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

R. R. BUTTERWICK PAUL S. WAGNER 



Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D., LL.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, A.M .Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH Secretary of the Summer School 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M Education 

Millersville State Normal School, 1907; B.Pd., ibid., 1910; A. B., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1912; A. M., ibid., 1917; Columbia University, 
1914-1916; Professor of Education and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1915. Registrar, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Political 

Science and Economics 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 
Alexandria, Pa., 1911-1912; Principal of High School, Linglestown, Pa., 
1912-1913; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1916; Mem- 
ber of Law Bar of Lebanon County and of Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Bar; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1916— 

PAUL S. WAGNER, Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1917; M. A., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1925; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Lebanon Valley College, 1917-18; Military Service, 1918-19; 
Headmaster, Franklin Day School, Baltimore, Md., and graduate student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-20; Graduate Student, Columbia Univer- 
sity, Summer 1921; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1920 — Travel and study in Europe, Summer 1922; Graduate Study, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1923-1926; Professor Mathematics, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1926— 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1906; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1914; 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 1907-1909; 
Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, Columbia University, 1912-1914; In 
Industrial Chemistry, 1914-1921; Chief Chemist, Aetna Explosives Company; 
Chemical Director, British American Chemical Company; Director of Control 
Laboratory, The Barrett Company; Professor of Chemistry, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1921— 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of 
Philosophy and Bible 
A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; A. M., ibid., 1904; B. D., 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 1905; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1910; twenty-six years in the Ministry; Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion, Lebanon Valley College, 1921-1922; Professor of Philosophy and 
Bible, 1922— 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D Professor of Education and 

Psychology 

Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of Schools, 1903-1913; Diploma, 
Illinois State Normal University, 1914; A. B., University of Illinois, 
1916; M. A., Columbia University, 1917; Head of the Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology, College of Puget Sound, 1917-1920; Student 
Leland Stanford University, Summer quarter, 1920; Professor of Psychology 
and Education, University of Rochester, 1920-1923; Student Columbia 
University, Summers 1921 and 1922; Completed course and residence 
requirements for Ph.D. Degree, Columbia University, 1923-1924; Assistant 
in School Administration, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 
1924; Professor of Education and Psychology, Lebanon Valley College, 
1924— 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE. Ph.D Professor of English 

B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; Military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915-1918; Lecturer in English, 
University of Alberta, 1919-1922; M. A., 1923, Ph. D., 1925, University 
of Toronto; Instructor in English, University of Toronto, 1923-1925; 
Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1925 — 

MILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 

B.A., University College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of 
English and History, Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; Lecturer in Finance and 
Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23; LL.B., University 
of Toronto, 1926; Lecturer in Economics Extension Dept., University 
of Toronto, 1923-26; Barrister-of-Law Degree, Osgoode Hall Law 
School, Toronto, 1926; Membei of the Bar, Province of Ontario. Pro- 
fessor of Business Administration, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

E. H. STEVENSON, M.A., (Oxon.), Ph.D Professor of History 

B.A., Hendrix College, 1916; U. S. Navy, 1917-18; graduate student 
University of Arkansas, 1919; Rhodes Scholar, Oxford University, 1919-22; 
student University of Grenoble summer of 1921: instructor in Wilmington 
Friends' School. George School, Muhlenberg College, 1922-28; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1930; Professor of History, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, 1928— 

MARY STELLA JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor of French 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Travel and Study abroad, 
France, Germany, Italy, 1920-1923; Professor of French and Spanish, La 
Grange College, La Grange, Georgia, 1923-1924; Graduate Study, The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1924-1925; University of Grenoble, Grenoble, 
France, 1925-1926; Diplome de Hautes Etudes de Langue et de Literature 
Francaises, University of Grenoble, 1926; graduate student and Instructor 
in French, The Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1928; Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1928; Professor of French Literature and German, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1928 — 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1926; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929; Associate Professor of Biology, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1929 — 



CONSERVATORY FACULTY 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, A.B., Director of the Conservatory of 
Music; Pianoforte, Form and Composition 
A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-16; 
Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, 1918; Teacher of Piano 
and Theory, Lebanon Valley College, 1919-21; Pupil of Ernest Hutchinson, 
Francis Moore and Frank LaForge, New York City; Graduate courses at 
Columbia University in Composition, Improvisation and Musical Pedagogy 
under Frederick Schlieder, 1922-1924; Director of Lebanon Valley Conserva- 
tory of Music, 1924— 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of Musical Art, New York City (Dr. Frank 
Damrosch, Director) ; teacher in the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y.; Instructor of Violin, Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 1924 — 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens, H. Sutton Goddard and Wm. Shakespeare, 
London, England. Private studio, Denver, Colorado, 1916-23; Summer 1919, 
Deems Taylor and Percy Rector Stephens; Private studio Carnegie Hall, 
N. Y. C, 1924-27; Vocal Instructor, Lebanon Valley College, 1927 — 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE Tenth Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will be 
conducted both in Annville and in Harrisburg. Exercises in 
each subject will be held five times a week, from June 23 
to August 1 inclusive. All courses, except some in science, will be 
held in the morning. 

One Summer School will be held as usual on the campus at 
Annville, where the full college equipment will be placed at the 
disposal of summer students. 

A Summer School will also be conducted at Harrisburg for the 
convenience of teachers in this vicinity. For this purpose the Edison 
Junior High School has been made available by the kindness of the 
Harrisburg School District. 



REGISTRATION 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the open- 
ing of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registration be 
made by mail. Applications for admission and registration will be 
received by the Secretary up to and including Monday, June 23. 
Address, Annville, Pa. 

No registrations will be made and no changes in courses per- 
mitted after June 26. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses at- 
tended, grades and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken 
during the Summer Session are credited towards the college degrees. 
One hundred twenty-six semester hours are required for the bache- 
lor's degrees. For complete information concerning the requirements 
for degrees the candidate should refer to the college catalogue or 
address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 
A registration fee of $1 will be charged each student. 
The tuition fee is $6.00 per semester hour credit. 
A laboratory fee is charged for Science Courses. 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The charge for board and room is $9 per week, $54 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for 
the term is therefore $67-$91. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration, as a condition 
of admission to classes. 

NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, 
chiffonier, mattress, one chair and student table for each occupant. 
Students must furnish their own bedding, carpets, towels, napkins, 
soap and all other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, 
mattress, chair, dresser and student table. All other desired furnish- 
ings must be supplied bj^ the student. North Hall, the main dormi- 
tory for women, will be assigned to the use of women students at 
the summer term. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any 
additional lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order of appli- 
cation. No fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order 
that the most attractive room available may be reserved for you. 



COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREES 

An effort is being made by the College to offer in the Summer 
Session and the Extension Department all the General Requirements 
for the Baccalaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced 
for the present year, and the remainder will be made available at 
an early date. In courses where six semester hours are required, 
the departments will normally offer two hours in Summer School 
and four hours in a Supplementary Extension Course. 

For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full 
statement of the requirements is printed on the following pages. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 7 

ARRANGEMENTS OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to 
the Baccalaureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Economics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these 
degrees is, in each case, 126 semester hours. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 16 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be 
suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ment for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option), Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option), Physics. 

The B.S. in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than 16 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Econ. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Business and Business Administration. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



A.B. 


B.S. 


B.S. in Ed. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


Bible 14, 54. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


*French 16 or 


French 16 or 


French 16 or 


German 16. 


German 16. 


German 16. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


History 46. 


tLatin 16 or 


Mathematics 13, 23, 


Latin 16 or 


Math. 13, 23. 


36. 


Math. 13, 23. 


Philosophy 23, 33, or 


Philosophy 13, 23, or 


Psychology, 13, 23. 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Economics 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Sociology 16. 


Biology 18 or 


Biology 18. 


Biology 18 or 


Chemistry 18, or 


Chemistry 18. 


Chemistry 18, or 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physics 18. 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


Physical Education 


Hygiene 


Hygiene 


Hygiene 



* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all candidates 
for the A. B. degree; six hours of this total must he from French 16 or German 16. 

t Latin is required of all students majoring in English, French, or Greek. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements 
in the regular catalogue. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above, some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain addi- 
tional courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to 
Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, 
should lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, 
in order that they may be informed as to what requirements they 
must meet for graduation. 



Bachelor of Science in Education. Lebanon Valley College grants 
the degree Bachelor of Science in Education. Normal school credits 
from recognized institutions will be allowed towards this degree on 
the following basis: work of a professional character will be equated 
on the basis of semester hours. Graduates, who have taken the 
full two years' normal course based upon four full years of high 
school work, usually receive approximately 60 semester hours, 
though each case is evaluated individually for credit towards the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Education. A total of 126 hours of 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 9 

credit is required for the degree. For full information, address the 
Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 

THE EXTENSION COURSES 

To accommodate the needs of teachers in service, and for the 
convenience of those who are unable to pursue the work of the 
college in regular course by residence on the campus during the 
winter months, an extension department has been established. The 
offerings in Extension courses are listed on another page in this 
bulletin. Extension courses rotate from year to year so as to enable 
students to complete the work leading to degrees by residence during 
the summer sessions, which are coordinated with the extension plan 
in the offering of required courses. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must 
have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours of work in regularly 
conducted classes on the college campus. Teachers in service may 
meet this requirement by attending the Summer School and Friday 
and Saturday classes held during the year at the college. Credits 
earned in extension classes and at the Harrisburg Summer School 
are not residence credits. 

SOCIAL LIFE AND RECREATION 

The college recognizes that social activities and recreation have a 
proper place in cultural development. Accordingly, a series of social 
events and informal outings of students and faculty are fitted into 
the summer program. The opening event is a reception in North 
Hall parlors on Friday evening, June 27th. 

Annville is happily situated amidst a variety of points of interest. 
Some of Pennsylvania's leading resorts are. within short motoring 
distances. Mt. Gretna, Hershey, South Mountain resorts and numer- 
ous others of less prominence offer students interesting and whole- 
some recreation. At these places bathing facilities are of the highest 
order. Afternoon parties at any of these favorite retreats afford 
splendid relaxation, since class work is confined to the morning 
hours. 

In the industrial field some of the country's leading establishments 
are within easy reach by motor. The world's leading anthracite 
coal fields are within an afternoon's ride, and an observation tour 
yields an educational return of more than ordinary value. The Arm- 
strong Linoleum Company, at Lancaster, and the Hershey Chocolate 
Company, at Hershey, are leading American firms in their re- 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

spective fields, and are always genial hosts to students from the 
college. A visit to the Cornwall mines of the Bethlehem Mines 
Corporation introduces the visitor to some of America's richest 
mineral deposits and most interesting geological formations. These 
places are all within easy access of the college and tours are organ- 
ized for the educational return derived therefrom. 

During the summer term students will have ample opportunity to 
observe Pennsylvania's National Guard in military maneuvers. The 
military camp at Mt. Gretna is regarded as one of the finest of its 
kind in the country and field maneuvers are both interesting and 
instructive to observe. 

The State Capital at Harrisburg, Valley Forge, The Cloisters at 
Ephrata, Conrad Weiser's Home at Womelsdorf, and Gettysburg 
are historical shrines within short distances of the college. 

Well kept tennis courts are available for the use of summer stu- 
dents at all times. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

ANNVILLE 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER Pianoforte, Form and Composition 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

PRIVATE LESSONS 

Private lessons in Piano, Voice and Violin will be given by Mrs. 
Bender, Mr. Crawford, and Mr. Malsh, respectively. 

S02. Theory. — This course will not only give one the rudiments 
and fundamentals of music, but, by analysis, give the student a 
broader viewpoint of the same. Two semester hours credit may be 
earned. 

RATES 

Rates for private instruction, half hour periods twice weekly, 
are twenty dollars for the term of six weeks. For the course on 
theory tuition charge is twelve dollars. 

ENROLLMENT 

Candidates for instruction in music are requested to enroll for 
the course in advance of the opening of the term, by advising the 
summer school secretary of their intentions, in order that periods 
may be reserved for instruction and practice. 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

ANNVILLE 



BIOLOGY 

Dr. Light 

S36. Zoology. — The course is intended to acquaint the student 
with- the structure, life, history and behaviour of representatives 
of each phylum of animals. In the study of types, structure, function 
and adaptation are given equal emphasis. The principles of phy- 
logeny and ontogeny are considered. The laboratory and class work 
is supplemented by field studies including observations of habits, 
ecological conditions and the use of keys for identification and classi- 
fication. Arrangements may be made with Dr. Light for additional 
work to yield two additional hours credit for this course. 

Two hours class work and two hours laboratory work per day. 

Laboratory fee $16.00. 

Text: — Hegner's College Zoology. 

Six semester hours credit. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Prof. Stokes 
S12. Economic Geography. — A course giving consideration to the 
significance of geographical conditions as factors in the development 
of civilization together with a sketch of the history and development 
of commerce. A required course for candidates for the B.S. in 
Econ. degree, the same is applicable towards Standard Certificates 
and should be useful for grade and high school teachers. Two se- 
mester hours credit. 

S32. Money and Banking. — This is the regular course given to 
the students in the Department of Business Administration during 
the winter term and presupposes that the student has had a course 
in Economics. The course deals with monetary theory, the gold 
standard, inflation, international exchange, price levels and specula- 
tion. A study is made of the functions of banks, bank credit, the 
structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System: and agricul- 
tural credit. Two semester hours credit. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 13 

CHEMISTRY 

Dr. Bender 

S16. General Chemistry. — An introduction to the study of Chem- 
istry, including a study of elements, their classification and prop- 
erties, and a study of the important compounds of each element. 
During the course constant reference is made to manufacturing and 
industrial processes, and interpretation of the phenomenal material 
development of the present century is made in the light of the 
rapid increase in chemical knowledge. The laboratory work of the 
course includes about 100 carefully selected experiments. Two hours 
lectures or recitations and two hours of laboratory work daily. 
Arrangements may be made with Dr. Bender for additional work 
to yield two additional hours of credit for this course. Text: — Ken- 
dall's Smith's College Chemistry. Laboratory fee, $16.00. Six se- 
mester hours credit. 

EDUCATION 

Dr. Reynolds 

S82. Educational Measurements. — This course aims to acquaint 
students with the more frequently used standardized educational 
tests in such subjects as reading, writing, spelling, arithmetic, geog- 
raphy, history, language, algebra, foreign languages and other sub- 
jects. It will involve the mastery of the tests, the giving and use of 
the results. Textbooks, assigned readings, test materials. Laboratory 
fee of one dollar. Two semester hours credit. 

Si 12. Technique of Teaching. — This course is intended especially 
for Elementary and Junior High School teachers. The major em- 
phasis will be given to the study of special methods and devices in 
the principal elementary school subjects. Some attention will be 
given, however, to a few of the more general methods, such as super- 
vised study, socialized recitations, and the project method. Two 
semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Wallace 

S542. Recent British Poetry. — Two semester hours credit. 

S62. Shakespeare. — A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant 
of Venice, As You Like It, Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Macbeth. 
Two semester hours credit. 

S512. Early Nineteenth Century Poetry. — Wordsworth, Cole- 
ridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, Keats. Two semester hours credit. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

HISTORY 

Profs. Stokes and Gingrich 
S22(b). Modern Europe, 1815-1878.— A study of the national 
movements of the 19th century and their effect upon international 
relations. Special attention will be paid to: the revolutions of 1848, 
the age of Napoleon III and the foundation of the Third French 
Republic; the work of Cavour and Garibaldi in Italy and Bismarck 
in Germany; the growth of German imperialism. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S32. British History, 1689-1815.— The relations of England, Scot- 
land and Ireland; the evolution of cabinet government and of the 
Whig and Tory parties, with special reference to the work of Wal- 
pole, Chatham and the younger Pitt; British foreign and colonial 
policy; the struggle with France; the loss of the American Colonies; 
society before and during the Industrial Revolution; the effects of 
the French Revolution on English thought and life. Two semester 
hours credit. 

S62. Economic History of the United States. — A study of the 
economic background of American history covering the agricultural, 
industrial, and commercial fields. The history of local economic 
institutions is given careful consideration. Two semester hours credil. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Dr. Johnson 
S14. French. — First year of College French. A continuation and 
extension of course E06. Drills in grammar, practice in conversa- 
tion, composition and dictation, and more extensive reading. Open 
to all candidates for first year College French. Double periods daily 
Four semester hours credit. 

S12. Latin. — First year of College Latin. The work of the sum- 
mer will consist of a review of forms and syntax, exercises in prose 
composition, and the reading of selections from Ovid. The summer 
course will be followed by extension courses that will permit stu- 
dents taking this course to complete Latin 16. Two semester hours 
credit. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Reynolds 
S42. Psychology of Adolescence. — A study of the physical and 
mental changes which characterize adolescence. The questions of 
rate and variation in learning, motive, personality, disturbances and 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



15 



control of behavior will be handled. This course has been approved 
by the State Department of Education for professional credit. Two 
semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Prof. Gingrich 
S22. World Politics. — A study of the growth and development of 
International Diplomacy since 1815. Modern movements in the in- 
terest of world peace are studied and discussed. Credit may be used 
either towards history or social science requirements. Two semester 
hours credit. 

S22(a). United States and Latin America. — A study of the his- 
tory of the Latin America Republics and their relations to the 
United States. Credit may be applied either towards history or 
social science requirements. Two semester hours credit. 




WOMEN S DORMITORY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

HARRISBURG 

BIBLE 

Dr. Butterwick 
S52. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of the 
Kingdoms. — The purpose of this course is to furnish the student 
with a knowledge of the religious growth and practices during the 
time of the Kingdoms under the leadership of the prophets. This 
is a continuation of the course offered in Harrisburg during the 
summer of 1929, and is open to new students as well as to those 
who have taken the previous course. Two semester hours credit. 

EDUCATION 

Dr. Butterwick, Dr. Wagner and Prof. Grimm 

S42. Educational Sociology. — The intent of this course is to ar- 
ticulate the school with the other institutions of society, the home, 
the church, industry and the state, with the view of developing a 
more perfect correlation among the institutions dealing with the 
social welfare of mankind. Offered by Dr. Butterwick. Two semester 
hours credit. 

S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Junior and Senior 
High School. — Offered by Dr. Wagner. Two semester hours credit. 

SI 12. Principles and Technique of Teaching. — This course is in- 
tended especially for elementary and junior high school teachers. 
The major emphasis will be given to the study of special methods 
and devices in the principal elementary school subjects. Some atten- 
tion will be given, however, to a few of the more recent general 
methods, such as supervised study, socialized recitations, and the 
project method. Offered by Professor Grimm. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S122. Introduction to Teaching. — An introductory course for pros- 
pective teachers, intended to enable students to decide whether they 
have an interest in professional education, and to introduce the 
citizen to the problem of one of the most important institutions in 
a democracy. Some of the topics considered are: Teaching as an 
Occupation; The Materials of Education; Nature's Provisions for 
Learning; The Outcomes of Teaching and Learning. Offered by 
Professor Grimm. Two semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Stevenson 
S612. Pre-Shakespearean Drama. — After a brief survey of the 
drama and stage in Greece and Rome, the lectures will be devoted 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 17 

to the Medieval Stage and Drama, Miracle and Morality Plays, early 
Chronicle Plays. The course is intended as a background for the 
study of Shakespeare. Two semester hours credit. 

FRENCH 

Dr. Stevenson 

S02. First Year French. — The course will cover the work of the 
last half of the first year of French. It consists of the study of 
French grammar and verb forms and the translation of simple French 
prose. Two semester hours credit.. 

GERMAN 
Dr. Wagner 
S02. Elementary German. — The course begins with the funda- 
mentals of the language, and includes a study of elementary gram- 
. mar, simple translations and some conversation. Two semester 
hours credit. 

HISTORY 
Dr. Butterwick, Prof. Grimm and Dr. Stevenson 

S32. The History of England, (b) Second part, English History 
from the Restoration of Charles II; The Foundations of the Empire; 
American and French Revolutions; The Agricultural and Industrial 
Revolutions; Political and Social Reform; Growth of Liberalism, to 
the present time. Offered by Dr. Butterwick. Two semeser hours 
credit. 

S22(b). Modern Europe, 1815-1878. — A study of the national 
movements of the 19th century and their effect upon international 
relations. Special attention will be paid to: the revolutions of 1848, 
the age of Napoleon III and the foundations of the Third French 
Republic; the work of Cavour and Garibaldi in Italy and Bismarck 
in Germany; the growth of German imperialism. Offered by Pro- 
fessor Grimm. Two semester hours credit. 

S122. Intellectual and Social History of the Middle Ages. — A 
study of intellectual movements; Heresy and its Repression; the 
Universities; Social Life in Town and Country. Some attention will 
be given to the development of Medieval Institutions. Offered by 
Dr. Stevenson. Two semester hours credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

Dr. Wagner 
S42. Introduction and Elements of Calculus. Two semester hours 
credit. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 

IN ANNVILLE 

Biology S36. Zoology. 

Business Administration S12. Economic Geography. 

Business Administration S32. Money and Banking. 

Chemistry S16. General Chemistry. 

Education SS2. Educational Measurements. 

Education SI 12. Technique of Teaching. 

English S542. Recent British Poetry. 

English S62. Shakespeare. 

English S512. Early Nineteenth Century Poetry. 

History S22(h). Modern Europe 

History S32. British History. 

History S62. Economic History of the United States. 

Language S14. First Year French. 

Language S12. First Year Latin. 

Psychology S42. Psychology of Adolescence. 

Political Science S22. World Politics. 

Political Science S22(a). United States and Latin America. 

Music S02. Theory. 

IN HARRISBURG 

Bible S52. Religious History of the Jews. 

Education S42. Educational Sociology. 

Education S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. 

Education SI 12. Principles and Technique of Teaching. 

Education S122. Introduction to Teaching. 

English S612. Pre-Shakespearean Drama. 

French S02. First Year French. 

German S02. Elementary German. 

History S32. English History. 

History S22(b). Modern Europe, 1815-1878. 

History S122. Intellectual and Social History of the Middle Ages. 

Mathematics S42. Calculus. 



Lebanon ^allep College 

Extension Courses 

1930-1931 
Harrisburg 

Modern Language M. Stella Johnson, Ph.D. 

History H. H. Shenk, A.M., LL.D. 

Education O. E. Reynolds, Ph.D. 

English P. A. W. Wallace, Ph.D. 

Philosophy R. R. Butterwick, A. M., D.D. 

Lebanon 

History E. H. Stevenson, Ph.D. 

Social Science C. R. Gingrich, A.B., LL.B. 

Latin Head of Latin Department 

Tremont 

History M. L. Stokes, M.A., LL.B. 

German P. S. Wagner, Ph.D. 

Annville 

Friday Evening and Saturday Morning Classes 

Botany S. H. Derickson, Sc.D. 

Chemistry Andrew Bender, Ph.D. 

Education 

For further information apply to 
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 




CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC