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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Number"

fobannn 

BULLETI 



VOL. 22 [N 



EW SERIES 




February, 1934 




SUMMER SCHOOL 
1934 

ANNVILLE - HARRISBURG 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



Entered as Second-Class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24. 191 



CALENDAR 



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August 


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2526 


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27128 


29 


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76 


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-- 






1 















Summer School Calendar 



June 25 — Registration of Students 
June 25 — Summer Session Begins 
August 3 — Summer Session Ends 



Eixeeutive Committee of the Summer School 

CLYDE A. LYNCH, Chdnnan 
J. R. ENGLE, Esq. SA^IUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 



R. R. BUTTERWICK 
S. H. DER'ICKSOX 



CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, 



Secretary 



Faculty Committee of Summer School 

CLYDE A. LYNCH. Chairman 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary S. H. DERICKSON 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

R. R. BUTTERWICK PAUL S. WAGNER 



Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

OFFICERS OF ADMIXISTRATIOX AND INSTRUCTION 

CLYDE A. LYNCH. D.D.. Ph.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIAIAL A.M Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH Secretary of the Summer School 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd.. A.M., Professor of Physics and 
Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B.. LL.B., Professor of Political 
Science and Economics 

MRS. MARY C. GREEN . .Professor of French and Dean of JJ'omrn 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Associate Professor 
of Education 

PAUL A. \V. WALLACE, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of English 

E. H. STEVENSON, A.B., B.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

LENA LOUISE LIETZAU, Ph.D. Professor of German 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE. Ph.D Associate Professor of English 

L. G. BAILEY, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education and 
Psychology 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, Ph.D., Professor of Ancient Lan- 
guages 




WOMEN S DORMITORY 




MEN S DORMITORY 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE Fourteenth Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will 
be conducted both in Annville and in Harrisburg. Exercises in 
each subject will be held live times a week, from June 25 to Au- 
gust 3 inclusive. All courses, except some in science, will be held in the 
morning. 

One Summer School will be held as usual on the campus at Annville. 
where the full college equipment will be placed at the disposal of sum- 
mer students. 

A Summer School will also be conducted at Harrisburg for the con- 
venience of teachers in this vicinity. For this purpose Central Higli 
School Building has been made available by the kindness of the Har- 
risburg School District. 

REGISTRATION 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the open- 
ing of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registration be made 
by mail. Applications for admission and registration will be received 
by the Secretary up to and including Monday, June 25, Address, Ann- 
ville, Pa. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses attend 
ed, grades and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken dur- 
ing the Summer Session are credited towards the college degrees. One 
hundred twenty-six semester hours of academic credits are required for 
the bachelor's degrees. For complete information concerning the re- 
quirements for degrees the candidate should refer to the college cata- 
logue or address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1 will be charged each student. 

The tuition fee is $7.00 per semester hour credit. 

A laboratory fee is charged for Science Courses. 

The charge for board and room is $8 per week, $48 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for the 
term is therefore $63.oo-$9i.oo. 

The fees are payable at the time of registration, as a condition of ad- 
mission to classes. 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, chiffonier, 
mattress, one chair antl student tahle for eacii occu])ant. Students 
must furnisli their own hedding, carpets, towels, napkins, soap and all 
other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, mat- 
tress, chair, dresser and student table. All other desired furnishings 
must be supplied by the student. North Hall, the main dormitory for 
women, will be assigned to the use of women students at the summer 
term. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any 
additional lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order of applica- 
tion. No fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order that 
the most attractive room available may be reserved for you. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE 

An effort is being made by the College to oft'er in the Summer Session 
and the Extension Department all the General Requirements for the 
Baccalaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced for the 
present year, and the remainder will be made available at an early date. 
In courses where six semester hours are required, the departments will 
normally offer two hours in Summer School and four hours in a Sup- 
plementary Extension Course. 

For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full state- 
ment of the requirements is printed on the following pages. 

ARRANGEMENTS OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to the 
Baccalaureate degree : 

(i) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leadmg to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Eco- 
nomics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these degrees 
is, in each case, 126 semester hours of academic credits and 4 in physical 
education. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present at 
least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his Major), 
and at least 18 semester hours in another department (to be known as 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected not later than th(' 
beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be suitably related to the 
Major, and chosen with the advice and approval of the Head of the 
Major department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirement 
for a Major in the following departments : Bible and New Testament 
Greek, English, French, German, Greek. History, Latin, Mathematics 
(Arts option). Political and Social Science, Philosophy and Religion. 
The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the requirements for 
a Major in the following departments : Biology, Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics (Science option). Physics. 

The B.S. in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the re- 
quirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than i8 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Econ. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the re- 
quirements for a Alajor in Business and Business Administration. 
These detailed requirements are set out in the regular college catalogue. 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education, 
are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly accord- 
ing to the degree sought, are as follows ; 



A.B. 


B.S. 


B.S. in Ed. 


Bible 14, 52 or 82 


Bible 14, 52 or 82 


Bible 14, 52 or 82 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


English 12, 14, 26. 


*French 16 or 


French 16 or 


French 16 or 


German 16. 


German 16. 


German 16. 


History, six hours ex- 


History, six hours ex- 


History, six hours ex- 


clusive of Plist. 16. 


clusive of Hist. 16. 


clusive of Hist. 16. 


fLatin 16 or 


Mathematics 16, 46. 


Latin 16 or 


Math. 16 or 


Philosophy 32 


Math. 16 or 


Greek 16. 


Philosophy 26 or 


Greek 16. 


Philosophy 32 


Economics 16 or 


Philosophy 32 


Philosophy 26 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Psychology, 13, 23. 


Economics 16 or 


Sociology 16 


Economics 16 or 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Biology 18. 


Pol. Science 16 or 


Sociology 16. 


Chemistry 18. 


Sociology 16. 


Biology 18 or 


Physics 18. 


Biology 18 or 


Chemistry 18, or 


Physical Education 


Chemistry 18, or 


Physics 18. 


Hygiene 


Physics 18. 


Psychology 13, 23 




Physical Education 


Physical Education 




Hygiene 


Hygiene 







* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all can- 
didates for the A.B. degree ; six hours of this total must be from French 
16 or German 16. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental an- 
nouncements in the regular catalogue. 

t Latin 16 required from those majoring in French, 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above, some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain additional 
courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree . should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, 
should lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, 
in order that they may be informed as to what requirements they must 
meet for graduation. 

Bachelor of Science in Education. Lebanon Valley College grants 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education. Normal school credits 
from recognized institutions will be allowed towards this degree on the 
following basis: work of a professional character will be equated on 
the basis of semester hours. Graduates, who have taken the full two 
years' normal course based upon four full years of high school work, 
usually receive approximateh' 60 semester hours, though each case is 
evaluated individually for credit towards the degree Bachelor of 
Science in Education. A total of 126 hours of academic credit is re- 
quired for the degree. For full information, address the Department 
of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 

THE EXTENSION COURSES 

To accommodate the needs of teachers in service, and for the con- 
venience of those who are unable to pursue the work of the college in 
regular course by residence on the campus during the winter months, 
an extension department has been established. The offerings in Ex- 
tension courses are listed on another page in this bulletin. Extension 
courses rotate from year to year so as to enable students to complete 
the work leading to degrees by residence during the summer sessions 
which are coordinated with the extension plan in the offering of re- 
quired courses. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must 
have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours of work in regularly 
conducted classes on the college campus. Teachers in service may meet 
this requirement by attending the Summer School and Friday and Sat- 
urday classes held during the year at the college. Credits earned in ex- 
tension classes and at the Harrisburg Summer School are not residence 
credits. 



SUMAIER SCHOOL BULLETIN 7 

SOCIAL LIFE AND RECREATION 

The college recognizes that social activities and recreation have a 
proper place in cultural development. Accordingly, a series of social 
events and informal outings of students and faculty are fitted into the 
summer program. 

Annville is happily situated amidst a variety of points of interest. 
Some of Pennsylvania's leading resorts are within short motoring 
distances. Mt. Gretna, Hershey, South Mountain resorts and numer- 
ous others of less prominence olTer students interesting and whole- 
some recreation. At these places bathing facilities are of the highest 
order. Afternoon parties at any of these favorite retreats afford 
splendid relaxation, since class work is confined to the morning hours. 

In the industrial field some of the country's leading establishments 
are within easy reach by motor. The world's leading anthracite coal 
fields are within an afternoon's ride, and an observation tour yields an 
educational return of more than ordinary value. The Armstrong Lin- 
oleum Company, at Lancaster, and the Hershey Chocolate Company, 
at Hershey, are leading American firms in their respective fields, and 
are always genial hosts to students from the college. A visit to the 
Cornwall mines of the Bethlehem Mines Corporation introduces the 
visitor to some of America's richest mineral deposits and most interest- 
ing geological formations. These places are all within easy access of 
the college and tours are organized for the educational return derived 
therefrom. 

During the summer term students will have ample opportunity to 
observe Pennsylvania's National Guard in military maneuvers. The 
military camp at Mt. Gretna and Indiantown Gap are among the finest 
of their kind in the country and field maneuvers are both interesting and 
instructive to observe. 

The State Capitol at Harrisburg, Valley Forge, The Cloisters at 
Ephrata, Conrad Weiser's Home at Womelsdorf, and Gettysburg are 
historical shrines within short distances of the college. 

Well kept tennis courts are available for the use of summer students 
at all times. 

LANGUAGE COURSES 

For the convenience and accommodation of persons studying lan- 
guage the college has adopted the plan of offering a full year of credit 
in each language in the summer session. Students taking language 
will have three recitation periods daily and will concentrate their 
efforts in a single field. 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IX 

ANNVILLE 



BIOLOGY 

Dr. Light 



Biology Si6. General Biology. — A course in the general principles 
of Biology including the con.sideration of both plants and animals, 
their relation to their environment and to each other, the principles 
of metabolism, growth, differentiation, adaptation, reproduction, evolu- 
tion and human welfare. 

The summer period offers a distinct advantage for biological w-ork 
in that much more of the work may be done in the natural habitat of 
the organisms under consideration. 

The work will require about six hours per day and will be divided 
between the field, the laboratory or the class room as best meets the 
requirements of the material being studied. Six semester hours credit. 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Butterwick 

S32. Social Psychology. A treatment of the processes of intcr- 
social stimulation and of social attitudes and values as products. Data 
are obtained by analyzing personal experiences. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S42. Educational Sociology. The intent of this course is to arti- 
culate the school with other institutions of society, the home, the church, 
industry and the state, with the view of developing a more perfect cor- 
relation among the institutions dealing with the social welfare of man- 
kind. Two semester hours credit. 

S72. Child Pyschology. A survey of the psychology of the normal 
child. The special periods of infancy, early and middle childhood, and 
adolescence are treated in a comprehensive manner, having in view a 
unified process of the entire period of development. Two semester 
hours credit. 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Wallace 

S24. A Survey of English Literature. This course, with two ad- 
ditional hours in any field of English or American literature, will satisfy 
the college requirement for sophomore English. Four semester hours 
credit. 

S82. The Novel in English. A study of the development of the 
novel in England and America, beginning with the Eighteenth Century. 
Two semester hours credit. 

FRENCH 
Professor Green 

S36. Elementary French. This course is intended for those who 
begf 1 French in college. Its aim is to enable the student to v.'rite simple 
French sentences, to carry on a conversation in easy French, and to 
read French of ordinary diiificulty. College credit is granted for this 
course, but it cannot be counted toward a Major. Six semester hours 
credit. 

GERMAN 

Dr. Leitzau 

S16. "Kulturkunde." The making of modern Germany, its geog- 
raphy, its institutions, its social and artistic life, illustrated by maps, 
pictures, and reading from contemporary literature. This course is not 
only a preparation for the study of German literature but is intended 
also for those who wish to use German as a tool for advanced work 
in science and other fields. Six semester hours credit. 

HISTORY 

Professor Gingrich 

S62. Economic History of the United States. A survey of Am- 
erican History with special emphasis upon the growth and development 
of agricultural, industrial and commercial institutions. Two semester 
hours credit. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm 

S16. College Physics. A survev of the fundamental laws of 
Physics in the fields of mechanics, electricity and light. One hour lec- 
ture and recitation daily and four hours laboratory. Six semester hours 
credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



II 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich 

Economics 
S52. Social and Economic Aspects of the New Deal. A critical 
survey of recovery measures undertaken by the Roosevelt Administra- 
tion. The course deals with the World Crisis and the economic and 
social theories embodied in recent legislation, such as the RFC, NRA, 
AAA, PWA, CWA, etc. Two semester hours credit. 

Political Science 

S12. American Government and Politics, A study of the Am- 
erican Government at work. Leading cases on American Constitutional 
Law are studied at length. Two semester hours credit. 




CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

HARRISBURG 



EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Bailey 

S22. Educational Psycholog}^ Designed to meet the needs of 
students of education who are seeking from psychology the facts and 
principles that have a bearing on their problems. Special emphasis is 
placed on the learning process. Prerequisite, Psychology 13. Two 
semester hours credit. 

S82. Educational Measurements. A critical analysis of the prob- 
lems in measuring the results of teaching. A study of the uses and 
administration of representative tests and scales for junior and senior 
high school subjects. Prerequisite, Psychology 13. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S182. School Hygiene. This course will deal with the place and 
scope of hygiene as it applies to education. Special problems relating 
to the development of the child, health defects, sanitation, hygiene of 
instruction, etc., will receive attention. Two semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Dk. Struble 

S12, Freshman English. Limited in enro!lment, the course pro- 
vides individual instruction for individual needs. May be taken to sat- 
isfy the requirements for either first or second semester of freshman 
composition. Two semester hours credit. 

S132. Contemporary Drama. A survey of American and European 
drama since 1890. Intensive study of a dozen representative plays. 
Discussion of problems involved in amateur play-production, and criti- 
cal survey of books useful in school dramatics. Two semester hours 
credit. 

S162. Chaucer and His Age. A general introduction to mediaeval 
literature with particular emphasis on Chaucer, Two semester hours 
credit. 



SUAIAIER SCHOOL BULLETIN 13 

HISTORY 

Dr. Stevenson 

S34. England in the 19th Century. Politcal, social and economic 
movements in England from 1789 to 1914. The Indnstrial Revolution, 
the Evolution of Democracy. Development of Imperial Policies, studies 
of typical statesmen and their policies. Two semester hours credit. 

S122. Social Life in the Middle Ages. An introductory survey of 
institutions and ideas in western Europe in the middle ages, with par- 
ticular attention to the 13th and 14th centuries. The course will deal 
with such topics as : Farming ; Trade and Travel ; Chivalry and War- 
fare ; the Clergy; Language and Literature; Law and Politics; Phi- 
losophy and Science ; the Transition to Modern Times. Two semester 
hours credit. 

LATIN 

Dr. Stonecipher 

S16. Freshman Latin. The reading of Sallust's Catiline, Cicero's 
Dc Scncctutc or Dc Aiiiicitia, and selections from Pliny's Letters. 
Study of sjmtax from text and grammar; Roman life and institutions; 
graded exercises in prose composition. 

Latin 16 is required of French majors. Six semester hours credit. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Dr. Stevenson 

Economics 
S52. Social and Economic Aspects cf the New7 Deal. A critical 
survey of recovery measures undertaken by the Roosevelt Administra- 
tion. The course deals with the World Crisis and the economic and 
social theories embodied in recent legislation, such as the RFC, NRA, 
AAA, PWA, CWA, etc. Two semester hours credit. 



14 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



.«^ 



'^^^ 








SUMMARY OF COURSES 



IN ANNVILLE 

Biology Si6. General Biology. 

Economics S52 — The New Deal. 

Education S32. Social Psychology. 

Education S42. Educational Sociolog>'. 

Education S72. Child Psychology. 

English S24. English Literature. 

English S82. English Novel. 

French S06. Elementary French. 

German S16. Freshman German. 

History S62. American Economic History. 

Physics S16. College Physics. 

Political Science S12. American Government. 



IN HARRISBURG 

Economics S52. Economics of the New Deal. 
Education S22. Educational Psychology. 
Education S82. Educational Measurements. 
Education S182. School Hygiene. 
English S12. Freshman English. 
English S132. Contemporary Drama. 
English 162. Chaucer and His Age. 
History S34. England in the 19th Century. 
History S122. Social Life in the Middle Ages. 
Latin S16. Freshman Latin.