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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Department of Music Bulletin"

Lebanon Valley College 

BULLETIN 

Vol. 19 JULY, 1930 No. 4 



Department of 

Music 
1930- 1931 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvaljul193019leba 



Lebanon Valley 
College 

T>epartment of <i!kCusic 



mf^ 



FACULTY 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., LL.D., President 
MARY EDITH GILLESPIE, B.S., Director 



Public School Methods 
Critic, and Practice Teaching 

MARY EDITH GILLESPIE, B.S. 



Piano 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, A.B. 
R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B. 



Voice 

ALEXANDER CRA\VFORD 

Organ 
R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B. 

Violin 
HAROLD MALSH 

Harmony, Theory, Counterpoint, Composition 
and History of Music 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, A.B. 
R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B. 



'^ijpartmanX of Ml u sic 



Mary Edith Gillespie, B.S, 



IV/riSS GILLESPIE began 
her musical preparation at 
Valparaiso University. Later she 
attended Oberlin Conservatory 
and then completed the Public 
School Music course at Colum- 
bia University, graduating from 
Teachers College with a Bach- 
elor of Science degree. 

She has had much success both 
as Supervisor and Director of 
Music. With the highest recom- 
mendation she now comes to 
Lebanon Valley as Director of 
the Conservatory from the Uni- 
versity of Delaware, where for 
the last six years she has held 
the position of Director of Music. 




Ruth Engle Bender, A.B. 




IV/TRS. BENDER'S musical 
preparation has been thor- 
ough and extensive. Having com- 
pleted her academic course at 
Lebanon Valley College in 1915, 
she resumed the study of music 
in a more specialized manner. At 
the end of a year's study of piano 
and harmony at Oberlin Con- 
servatory, she entered the New 
England Conservatory in Boston, 
Massachusetts, where for two 
years, she was a pupil of Lee 
Pattison. She graduated from 
New England Conservatory and 
then accepted the position as 
teacher of piano and theory at 
Lebanon Valley Conservatory. 



Xebanon Valley (ToUe^ca ^ftulUtin 



She spent two successive summers at Chautauqua in the study of 
piano with Ernest Hutcheson, the eminent artist and teacher. While 
in Chautauqua, she did ensemble work with members of the New 
York Symphony Orchestra. 

The desire for more advanced work led Mrs. Bender to continue 
her study in New York Citj- with celebrated artists, such as Ernest 
Hutcheson, Francis Moore, and Frank LaForge. Graduate courses 
at Columbia University, Composition, Improvisation, and Musical 
Pedagogy under Frederick Schlieder, amply equip her for her present 
position. 

R. Porter Campbell, Mus.B. 



"|\/r R. CAMPBELL began his musical career at Lebanon Valley 
College Conservatory. After obtaining his diploma in Piano- 
forte in 1915, the diploma in Organ and the Bachelor of Music de- 
grees in 1916, he was retained on the Faculty for two years as 

teacher of piano and theory. At 
this point the World War inter- 
vened but in 1920 he resumed his 
teaching at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Conservatory. During the 
summer of 1921 he studied piano 
in New York City with Aloys 
Kramer and Arthur Friedheim. 
In the summer of 1923 he began 
his study of organ with Pietro 
Yon, the renowned Italian or- 
ganist. He continued his organ 
study throughout the year and 
in the summer of 1924 accom- 
panied Mr. Yon on his annual 
visit abroad, where he lived and 
studied at the Villa Yon in Italy 
for four months. For three years 
he was organist and choirmaster 
of the Seventh St. Lutheran Church, Lebanon, Pa., but in January, 
1924, accepted the position as organist of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, Lebanon. 

While on European tour, Mr. Campbell won favorable comment 




Department of Jtlusic 



from the most distinguished music critics and music authorities 
of Italy; he played at St. Peter's in the Vatican, the Pontifical 
School of Sacred Music, and the Academy of St. Cecilia in Rome 
and appeared in public recital at Milan and Settimo Vittone. Since 
his return he has appeared with great success in recitals in Lebanon 
and the Eastern part of the State. 



Alexander Crawford 



A LEXANDER CRAWFORD is a native of Glasgow, Scotland. 
Born in a musical family, he began singing at the age of fifteen 
years. His first instruction was g-iven by the elder Crawford who, 
in his day, was a singer of prominence in the Old Country. 

The family migrated to America and settled in the west where 
Mr. Crawford received his initial training. He made his first pro- 
fessional appearance at the age of nineteen. The following year 
he returned to London, England to continue his studies with Wm. 
Shakespeare; it was there, also, that he began teaching. After two 
years abroad Mr. Crawford returned to America and appeared in 
concert and oratorio throughout 
the country. Following a per- 
formance of the Messiah in Den- 
ver, Colorado in 1915, he was re- 
quested to open a studio there, 
which he did and remained there 
until 1923. In that year he was 
urged by Percy Rector Stephens, 
eminent vocal teacher, to return 
to New York. 

Mr. Crawford has been a suc- 
cessful vocal teacher for thirteen 
years. His pupils are engaged 
as singers and teachers through- 
out the country, and his work is 
recognized by such men as 
Percy Rector Stephens, Vocal 
Teacher, Fulgenzio Guerrieri, 
conductor of the Philadelphia Opera Company, Max Schmit, 
formerly with the Boston National Opera Company, and New York 
Stadium Concerts, 




10 



Xcbanon ValUr College ^ftullclin 



Harold Malsh 



IV/rR. HAROLD MALSH, a 
graduate of the Institute 
of Musical Art, New York City, 
of which Dr. Frank Damrosch is 
director, has been engaged as 
teacher in the Violin Depart- 
ment since 1924. Besides his 
studies in New York City, 
Mr. Malsh taught at the Music 
and Art Institute, Mount Ver- 
non, N. Y., for two years, and 
also gave private instruction in 
the metropolis. He is well known 
in Harrisburg musical circles, 
having appeared to advantage on 
many concert programs. His 
playing is marked for its beauty 
of tone, fine musical perception 
and superb technic. (Besides his regular teaching at the Studios, 
Mr. Malsh will also be in charge of the violin ensemble class which 
will be open to all violin students.) 




12 Xebanon Vallej (Tollcgc 2^ulUlin 



' I ''HE aim of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory is to teach 
music historically and aesthetically as an element of liberal cul- 
ture; to offer courses that will give a thorough and practical un- 
derstanding of theory and composition; and to train artists and 
teachers. 

The conservatory offers complete courses of instruction in Piano, 
Voice, Violin, Organ, and theoretical subjects. 

Certificates, Diplomas and Degrees are granted by the Trustees 
of Lebanon Valley College to students who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted their course of study. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission to the courses in the Conserva- 
tory of Music leading to a diploma are practically equivalent to those 
of the College. An applicant for admission must (1) be a graduate 
of a four year High School, and (2) possess a reasonable amount of 
musical intelligence. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC COURSE 
(B. S. in Music) 

Entrance Requirements 

The possession of an acceptable singing voice and of a fairly 
quick sense of tone and rhythm. 

Ability to sing at sight hvmn and folk tunes with a fair degree 
of accuracy and facility. 

Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument represent- 
ing two years study. 

A general academic education, representing a four-year high school 
course or its equivalent. 

The outline of the curriculum follows: 

First Semester 

Elementary Theory 3 3 

Sight Reading (1) 3 l^A 

Dictation (1) (Ear Training) 5 2J.^ 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Biology 3 3 

English (1) 3 3 

Physical Education (1) 3 1 

26 17 



Department of Jttusic 13 



Second Semester 

Harmony and Melody (1) 3 3 

Sight Reading (2) 3 1^4 

Dictation (2) (Ear Training) 3 lj4 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Introduction Teaching 3 3 

EngHsh (2) 3 3 

Physical Education (2) 3 1 

Oral Expression 2 2 

24 17 
Third Semester 

Harmony and Melody (3) 3 3 

Sight Reading (3) 3 l^^ 

Dictation (3) 3 m 

Violin Class (1) 2 2 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Psychology and Child Study 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

Physical Education (3) 3 1 

24 17 
Fourth Semester 

Harmony and Melody (3) 3 3 

Sight Reading (4) 3 1^^ 

Dictation (3) (Harmonic) 3 1^-2 

Violin Class (2) 2 2 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Psychology 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

Physical Education (4) 3 1 

24 17 
Fifth Semester 

History of Music and Appreciation (1) 3 3 

Child Voice and Rote Songs with materials and 

methods for grades 1, 2, 3 3 3 

Harmony (4) (Keyboard) 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

History of Education 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

19 17 




o 



^eparlmcnl of 5tlu$ic 15 



Sixth Semester 

History of Music and Appreciation (2) 3 3 

Materials and Methods, Grades 4, 5, 6 3 3 

Harmony (5) (Musical Form and Analysis) 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Sociology 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

19 17 

Seventh Semester 

Harmony (6) (Composition) 3 3 

Games, Pageantry and Folk Dancing 3 3 

Orchestral and Choral Conducting 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 4 2 

Principles of Education 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

19 17 

Eighth Semester 

Materials and Methods, Junior and Senior High 

School 3 3 

Community Music 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for great- 
est benefit of students 2 1 

Student Teaching 13 10 

Technique of Teaching 2 2 

21 17 

N. B. — The fifteen hours of elective work must be chosen from one 
field. 

The Rates for the Public School Music Supervisors' Course will 
be $220 per year. This will include all theoretical classes, two private 
lessons weekly, and two hours daily practice. 

OUTLINE OF COURSE LEADING TO A DIPLOMA 

First Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing and Melodic Dictation 5 

Sight Playing 1 

Elementary Harmony and Composition 2 

Appreciation of Music 2 

English 16 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 



16 Xebanon Valley (Tollcgc 26ulUlm 



Second Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing and Interval Dictation 3 

Sight Playing 1 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

History of Music 2 

English 26 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Third Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing and Chord Dictation 2 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

Psychology of Music 1 

Musical Form 2 

French or German 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Choral Works 1 

Fourth Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

Harmonic Analysis ■. 2 

Science and Theory of Music 2 

Ensemble Playing 1 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Choral Works 1 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Elementary Harmony. Three hours throughout the year. 

Prerequisite: a study of the rudiments of Music including nota- 
tion, formation of scales, major and minor. Study of intervals, triads, 
inversions, and chords of the seventh. Harmonization of simple 
melodies and basses. Original work, hymn tunes and keyboard har- 
mony. 

Advanced Harmony. Three hours throughout the year. 

Secondary Seventh chords, dominant ninths, modulation, suspen- 
sions and ornamented tones. 

Sight Singing and Ear Training. Four hours throughout the 
year. 

Rhythmic notation, singing and dictation of intervals, chords and 
melodies. Melody writing. Transposition. 

Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. Three hours through- 
out the year. 

Dictation of Seventh Chords in Four part Harmony. Modulation 
and Melody Writing. 




w 



18 Xcbanon Valley (toUcge rSuUetin 

Methods. Three hours throughout the year. 

(1.) Child Voice and Rote Songs — with materials and methods 
for grades 1, 2 and 3. First Semester. 

(2.) Materials and methods. Grades 4, 5, and 6. Second Semester. 

Counterpoint. Two hours throughout the year. 

Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part 
Counterpoint). 

Form of Composition. Two hours throughout the year. 

The construction of simple binary, and terniary forms, and the 
analysis of musical works of different periods. Free Composition: 
improvisation of simple terniary and contrapuntal forms, such as 
"The Pin Head Fugue." 

History of Music and Appreciation. Three hours throughout the 
year. 

Development of Music in its various forms from the beginning of 
the Christian Era to the present, with an introduction on ancient and 
primitive music. Text, lectures, and collateral reading. Lectures are 
illustrated by examples of the particular art forms or from the works 
of the particular composer under discussion. 

MUSICAL PEDAGOGY 

The value of music as an educational subject is clearly shown 
(1) by the increasing number of college students who elect music 
as their major subject, (2) by the growing tendency for high schools 
to grant credits for study to those who are pursuing music either in 
special music schools, or with private teachers. Because of this 
granting of credits, a higher degree of preparation, skill, and efficiency 
is demanded of the private teacher. 

The aim of this course is to give Juniors and Seniors practical 
teaching experience under the instruction and supervision of mem- 
bers of the Faculty. After a course of lectures and demonstrations 
by the Supervisor, the student gains actual experience in teaching 
pupils both in class and private lessons. 

Lectures will be given on all phases of piano playing. The 
instruction will be based on the most modern pedagogical and 
psychological principles. All presentation of material will be first 
made through the ear, the most spiritual sense, then the eye and 
touch. 

The chief duty of the teacher is to develop within the child a 
consciousness of music as the universal language and to lead him to 
a proper unfoldment of the impulse for self-expression. 



department of 5tlusic 19 

NORMAL CLASSES 

These classes are formed of children who possess musical ability. 
A large number of young people thus acquire, at a nominal expense, 
the rudiments of a musical education, sufficient to fit them later 
to enter the regular courses of the Conservatory. 

TUITION 

Tuition fees are payable in advance unless otherwise provided. 
Rates for private lessons are determined by the classification of the 
pupil and the rates charged by the different professors. 

The rates per semester, two lessons per week, range from $34.00 
to $50.00, and one lesson per week, from $17.00 to $25.00. 

The rate for all theoretical courses given as class work is $18.00 
per semester per course. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

A student is not permitted to enroll for a shorter period than one 
full semester, or the unexpired portion thereof, thus the instructor's 
time is engaged by each student for that period. 

No reduction is made for absence from recitations except in case 
of illness extending beyond a period of two weeks, in which case 
the loss is shared equally by the College and student. No reduction 
is made for late registration unless at least one-fourth of the semester 
has elapsed. 

RECITALS 

Faculty and Student Recitals will be given at stated times 
througliout the year. The recitals are of great value to the student 
in acquainting him with repertoire, in developing musical taste, and 
in giving young musicians poise and experience in appearing before 
an audience. Music students are required to attend these recitals. 

Conservatory students' are under the regular college discipline. 

The Men's Glee Club and Eurydice Choral Club are organized 
under the direction of the Department of Music. 




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