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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Gossard Memorial Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley186667leba 



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trJ " 1 ~~ l »j-,- , '-'-* J"~ ' i : - r - *'^rg 




GENERAL CIRCULAR 



AND 



FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Sffirm nn& Sffc&sttJs 



or 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 



K ' 



FOR THE 



A-C^VDKMIC Yeae, 



1866-67. 




COLUMBIA: 

Spy Steam Power Press Printing Office. 

1867. 








CHARTERED WITH AMPLE POWERS. 



GENERAL CIRCULAR 



AND 



FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OK THE 



iii«« unit Sfttftettis 



OF 



LE 



EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 



FOR THE 



A-OAdemic Year 

1866-67. 




COLUMBIA: 

Spy Steam Power Press Printing Office. 
1867. 




MODEL SCHOOL 



OF 



LOCATED AT 



AISTITVILLE, 



Lebanon 



j o^«n 





4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

i 


Ijtoartr of ffrstsiees. 


i 
1 
i 


Rev. Bishop J. J. GLOSSBRENNER 


..Churchville, Va. 




Rev. GEORGE A. MARK. Jr.. 


. .Annville, Pa. 




JOHN B. STEHMAN. Esq 


..Mountville. Pa. 




Hon. JOHN H. KLNPORTS 


..Annville, Pa. 




Rev. EZEK1EL LIGHT 


..Lebanon. Pa. 




Rev. L. W. CRAUMER 


.Meyerstown. Pa. 




JOSEPH HILL. Esq 


..Philadelphia, Pa. 




Rev. 1). S. EARLY, 


..Hummelstown. Pa. 




BENJAMIN RIEGEL, Esq 


. . Millersburg, Pa. 


j 


JOHN YOUNG, Esq 


..Lebanon, Pa. 


! 


RUDOLPH HERR, Esq 


..Annville. Pa. 




SAMUEL GROH Eso % 




! 


Rev. I. L. KEPHART 


.Hummelstown, Pa. 


Rev. PAUL J. RILAND 


..Halifax, Pa. 


! 


Rev. JOSEPH YOUNG, 






SAMUEL WALMER, Esq 


..Hummelstown, Pa. 




Rev. W. S. II. KEYES 


.Harrisburg, Pa. 


i 


LEVI HOOVER. Esq 


.New Holland. Pa. 


i 


Rev. DAVID HOFFMAN 


. .Allentown. Pa. 




MICHAEL B. SIEGRIST. Esq 


..Annville. Pa. 




Rev. J. B. DOUGHERTY 


..Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 




JOHN SCHULTZ, Esq 


..Llewellyn. Pa. 




Rev. D. M. KAUFFMAN 


..Philadelphia Pa 


i 


Rev. LEWIS PETERS 


..Reading, Pa. 




Rev. BENNEYILLE KREMER 


..McKees' Half Falls, P 


a. 


ABRAHAM SHERK, Es<,> 


..Lebanon, Pa. 


| 


Rev. A. STEIGERYVALT 


..Lebanon, Pa. 







C1IARTKRED WITH AMPLE 1'OWKRS. 



ifftcers of ibc jfWpontticn. 



PRESIDENT, 

GEORGE A. MARK, Jr. ; Annville, Pa. 

SECRETARY, 

T. R. VICKROY, Annville, Pa. 

TREASURER, 

H. H. KREIDER Annville. Pa. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

GEORGE A. MARK, Jr., Chairman. 
T. R. VICKROY. Secretary. 

D. S. EARLY, RUDOLPH HERR, JOHN H. KINPORTS. 

COMMITTEE ON FINANCE, 

GEO. A. MARK, Jr., RUDOLPH HERR, D. S. EARLY. 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION AND DISCIPLINE, 

E. LIGHT, JOSEPH HILL, I. L. KEPHART. 



LEBANON VALLKY COLLEGE. 



H iitnltr). 



Eev. t. r. vickroy, a. m., 

PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE; 
Professor of Philosophy and the Greek Language ami Liter at ere. 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages and Literature. 

JOHN S. K RUM BINE. 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Philosophy. 



Professor of Natural Science. 



Professor of the English Language and Literature 



E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A.M., 



Professor of the Normal Branches, and Principal <>).•• the Model 

School. 



Elocution, Primary English and Object Lessons. 

HENRY HOUCK, County Sup't, 

Theory and Practice of Teaching. 

JOHN WESLEY ETTER, 

Teacher of Penmanship and Book-Keeping. 

MRS. E. S. VICKROY. 

PRECEPTRESS. 

MISS ELLA L. WALKER. M. A., 
Music and Drawing. 

MISS LIZZIE M. HIGLKR. 

Music, Painting and Ornamental Branches. 

* To be Supplied. 



CHARTERED WITH AMl'LK TOWERS. 



Mantes of j§frtfrcnts. 



Names. Post Office. 

Brehm. Miss Sallie A Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Banks, Miss E. M Bighspire, Dauphin County, Pa, 

Carper, Miss M. A Bachmansville, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Crall, iMiss Emma L Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Craumer, Miss Clara S Myerstowa, Lcbauou County, Pa. 

Deibler. Miss Emma C Killingcv, Dauphin County. Pa. 

Peininger. Miss Lizzie M Campbellstown. Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Early, Miss Clara S Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Early, Miss Alice M ' : '• " 

Fisher, Miss Emma S Annville, Lebanon County. Pa. 

Orroh. Miss Annie Jonestown. Lebanon County, Pa. 

Uroh, Miss Maggie " '• ' ; i - 

Gruber, Miss H. C Grantvilb, Dauphin County, Pa. 

Herr. Miss Sallie A Annville. Lebanon County. Pa. 

Herr, Miss Clara L 

Imboden, Miss Emma L Annville, Lebanon County. Pa. 

Kauffman, Miss J. E Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Kinports, Miss Rebecca... " " " " 

Kreic'er. Miss Sarah J li " '• " 

Kinports, Miss B. E " '■ " ' ; 

Kuhns. Miss L. M Mount Joy. Lancaster County, Pa. 

Killinger, Miss P. C Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Light, Miss Amanda M Lebanou, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Landis, Miss Lizzie Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Names. Post Office. 

Landis, Miss Sallie Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Light, Miss Mary A Ono. Lebanon County, Pa. 

Levan, Miss Sallie E Harrisburg, Dauphin Connty, Pa. 

Mark, Miss E. J Annville. Lebanon County, Pa. 

Maulfaif, Miss Tacy A Water Works, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Mase, Miss Lizzie E Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Meyer, Miss Clara Ellen " ',' " " 

Meyer. Miss Mary E " " " " 

Kigler. Miss Sallie M Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

liiegert, Miss Susan E Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Rigler, Miss Emma K Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Steigerwalt, Miss S. M Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Sherk. Miss Lizzie M Grantville, Dauphin County, Pa. 

Sherk, Miss M. M Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Smith. Miss Rosa E Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Sbuey, Miss Jennie J East Hanover, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Sheuk, Miss Lizzie Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Trump, Miss Louisa C Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Ulrieh, Miss C. L Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Weiss. Miss Mary A Shaefferstown, Lebanon Co., Pa. 

Walmer, Miss Clara L Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Walmer, Miss M. E " " ' " 

Weidman, Miss L. E Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 

Yingst, Miss Sarah A Hummelstown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 

Zeller. Miss Mary E Mount iEtna, Berks County, Pa. 









CHARTERED 


WITH AMPLE POWERS. 9 
MALES. 




Xamks. 


Post Office. 






Sinking Springs, Berks Co., Pa. 






Annvillc, Lebanon County, Pa. 






Columbia, Lancaster County, Pa. 




Beckley, Isaac L 


Fredericksburg, Lebauou Co., Pa. 






Eberly's Mills, Cumberland Co., Pa. 






....Jonestown Lebanon County, Pa. 




Bohr, TCm. B 


Ono, Lebanon County, Pa. 




Bodenhbrn. W. B 


Annville, Lebauon County, Pa. 






Linglestown, Dauphin Co., Pa. 






Grantville, Dauphin County, Pa. 




Bomberger, Abraham L.... 


Annvillc, Lebanon County, Pa. 






.. t. .1 .i 






....Pinegrove, Schuylkill County, Pa. 




Bowman, Jacob W 


Campbellstown, Lebanon Co.. Pa. 










Crider, D. W 


Oakvillc, Cumberland Co., Pa. 




Clark, 8. W 


....Annvillc, Lebanon County, Pa. 




Collins, Lewis L 


Saxton, Bedford County, Pa. 




Crall, Eugene A 






Crall. Jacob C 


" 




Crautu or, Albert 














Schuylkill Haven, Schuylk'l Co.. Pa. 


j 


Earley, W. S 


West Hanover, Dauphin Co., Pa. 




Ensminsxer, II. R 


Palmyra, Lebauon County, Pa. 




Etter, J. W 


....Powell's Valley, Dauphin Co., Pa. 
















Gingrich, Ezra II 


1. It H i: 




Gipple, S. R 


— Millersburg, Dauphin County, Pa. 




*Gleim Silas W 


Shireniatistowu, CumberFd Co., I'a. 




drove, Geo. M. D 


....Columbia, Laueaster County, Pa. 






* Expelled. 













10 LEBANON 


VALLEY COLLEGE. 


Names.- 


Post Office. 




. ..Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Gingrich, John II 


...Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 




..Linglestowu, Dauphin County, Pa. 




. .Lebanon. Lebanon County, Pa. 




...New Salem, Juniata County, Pa. 


Herr. John K 


...Annville. Lebanon County. Pa. 




i: a u i . 




...Allentown. Lehigh Couuty, Pa. 




...Annville. Lebanon County, Pa. 


lion - , Frank 11 


.'. i. a i. 


Hoverter, Harvey --- k ' Sk 




..Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Henry. <\ C 


.i .. i. . . 




...Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 




..Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 




..Annville. Lebanon County, Pa. 




..Ringgold. Schuylkill County, Pa. 


Keller. Daniel M 


it a .. t . 




..McKee's Half Falls. Snyder Co.. Pa. 




..Mahantongo, Juniata Countv, Pa. 




..Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 




...West Myerstown, Lebanon Co.. Pa. 


Lesslie. 1>. II 


..Annville. Lebanon County. Pa. 


Light, Jos. II 


..Avon, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Light. Alfred 


..Lebanon. Lebanon County, Pa. 


Light. Boaz VV 


.. u .. .i 




t. .. .. u 




U 11 i. I. 


Light, Cornelius II 


..LTnion Water Works, Leba'n Co., Pa. 


Light. Nathaniel B 


..Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Meiley, 0. S 


..Lebanon. Lebanon County, Pa. 


Mohh,S. V 


. .Fritztown, Berks County, Pa. 


Mover, Israel R 


..Anuville, Lebanon County. Pa. 


Moyer, Win. B 


..Lebanon. Lebanon County, Pa. 


Marquett, Harry A 


..Philadelphia. Pa. 




..Annville, Lebanon Couuty, Pa. 


McCallum, Neal 


..Wernersville, Berks County, Pa. 



CHARTERED 


WITH AMPLE POWERS. 11 


Names. 


Post Office. 




....Lebanon, Lebauon County, Pa. 




....Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 


McAlister, J. Calvin 


....New Buffalo, Perry County. Pa. 




....Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Peters. -John H 


Annville, Lebanon County. Pa. 


Putt, Moriis 


Highspire, Dauphin County, Pa. 


Ruber, Theodore 


... Schuylkill Haven, Schuylk'lCo.,Pa. 
Grantvillc, Dauphin County, Pa. 




Rigler, A. C 


....Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Reider, A. 11 


— Elizabethtown, Lancaster Co.. Pa. 


Rank, Edward 8 


Grantville, Dauphin County, Pa 




Annville, Lebancm County, Pa. 


Rigor, Willi* C. K 


Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Shires, James E 


....Bedford, Bedford County, Pa.' 


Siegrist, U. B 


....Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 




a cc a if 




a (( .. (: 


Struppenhouer, D. G 


.... 

ft .. a K 


Sherk, John H 


a .. i. (( 


Smith, Chas. H 


a a a if 




Mountville, Lancaster County, Pa. 




Annville, Lebanon County, Pa. 




(( a a a 


Seibeit, Win. H 


Progress, Dauphin County, Pa. 


Sheesley, Samuel 


t< a a a 


Stouffer, Harry 


Union Deposit, Dauphin Co., Pa. 


Tittle, Moses L 


Hummelstown, Dauphin Co.. Pa. 


Uhrich. Lewis Y 


Palmyra, Lebanon County, Pa. 


Vickroy, Willie It 


Aunville, Lebanon County, Pa. 




a a tf a 


Van Reed, Chas. R 


.... Sinking Springs, Berks County, Pa. 


Weller, Josiah N 


...Fredericksburg, Lebanon Co., Pa. 


Yeaaley, Monroe 


Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pa. 




ft .. a a 


Zimmerman, Solomon 


Highspire, Dauphin County, Pa. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Inmtttart). 



Females, Jj.9 

Males, lOJf 

Total 153 



Instrumental Masic, ..... Jj.2 

Drawing—Penciling, . . . . .66 

Crayoning, .... 8 

Preparatory, or Model School, . . 100 
Commercial Department, . ... 17 
Normal Department, . . . § . 18 
Collegiate Department 58 



CHARTERED WITH AMPLE POWERS. 



jHotrcI %%00l department. 



-Jvfodel Solzool QoiMTSi 



PRIM ART CLASS. 
First Term. 
Object Lessons. 

Orthography. Union Primer. 

Heading Union First Header. 

Second Term 
Object Lessons. 

Orthography, Sanders' Primary Speller. 

Heading, Union First Header. 

Oral Arithmetic, Robinson's Table Book. 

Third Term. 

Object Lessons. 

Orthography Sanders' Primary Speller. 

Heading. Union Second Header. 

Arithmetic, Robinson's Primary. 

SECOND AR Y CI, A SS. 
First Term. 
Object Lessons. 

Orthography, Union Speller. 

Read ing Union Second Header. 

Arithmetic Robinson's Rudiments. 

Second Term. 

Object Lessons. 

Orthography. Union Speller. 

Reading, Union Third Reader. 

( J eography Col ton's M odcru . 

Arithmetic. Robinson's Rudiments. 

Third Term. 
Object Lessons. 

Orthography, Union Speller. 

Reading, Union Third Reader. 

Arithmetic, Robinson's Rudiments. 

Geography, Colton's Modern . 

Vocal Music, Drawing, Penmanship and Declamation throughout 
the year. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



IN TERMED I A TE ( 'LA SS. 
First Term. 

Orthography Uniou Speller. 

Written Arithmetic, Robinson's Practical. 

Oral " " Intellectual. 

G eography , Colton's Quarto. 

Composition, Quackenbos's First Lessons. 

Second Term. 

Orthography, Union Speller. 

Reading, Union Fourth Reader. 

Written Arithmetic, Robinson's Practical. 

Oral l; " Intellectual. 

Geography. Colton's Quarto. 

Composition Quackenbos's First Lessons. 

Third Term. 

Orthography, Uniou Speller. 

Reading, Union Fifth Reader. 

Written Arithmetic, Robinson's Practical. 

Oral " ' : Intellectual. 

Geography, Colton's Quarto. 

Grammar, Oral Lessons. 

Vocal Music, Declamation, Composition, Penmanship and Draw- 
ing, throughout the year. 

ELEMENT AR Y OLA SS. 
First Term. 

Written Arithmetic, Robinson's Progressive. 

Oral ' : - Intellectual. 

Etymology, McElligott's Analyzer. 

Reading Uniou Fifth Reader. 

G ram mar Forma 1 Analysis. 

Second Term. 

Algebra, Robinson's Elementary. 

Etymology, McElligott's Analyzer. 

G eography Warren's Physical. 

Grammar. 

Latin, McClin tock's First Rook. 

Third Term. 

Algebra, Robinson's Elementary. 

Grammar. 

Geography Mitchell's Classical. 

Latin McCliutock's First Book. 

Vocal Music, Declamation, Composition, Penmanship and Draw- 
ing throughout the year. 



CHARTERED WITH AMPIYE POWERS. 



15 



^oroutl wty&ttmmt. 



. — -JTcrmThcul 'JoibTse. 

/>». DIVISION. 

First Term. 

Written Arithmetic, Robinson's Practical. 

Oral " Brooks' Mental. 

< reograpby, < iolton's Quarto. 

< >rthography Union Speller. 

Reading, . . Union Fifth Reader. 

Grammar, Analysis and Parsing. 

Second Tkrm. 

Written Arithmetic, Practical (completed.) 

Algebra, Robinson's Elementary, 

i ieography, Colton's Quarto, (completed.) 

Etymology McElligott's Analyzer. 

< ! ram mar. 

Third Term. 

Algebra, Robinson's Elementary. 

Arithmetic " Higher. 

Geography, Warren's Physical. 

Etymology, McElligott's Analyzer. 

School Economy, Wiokersham. 

Vocal Music, Penmanship, Drawing, Composition and Declamation 
throughout the year. 



A. DIVISION. 
First Term. 

Mathematics Higher Arithmetic. 

English, History of United States. 

" Webb's Chronology. 

Yatural Science Wells' Natural Philosophy 

Philosophy Mental Science. 

Second Term. 

Mathematics, Algebra and Geometry. 

Knglish Composition and Rhetoric. 

Natural Science Chemistry. 

Philosophy, , < 'hristian Ethics. 

Third Term. 

Mathematics, Vlgebra and Geometry. 

Kaglish, ■ Composition and Rhetoric. 

< Constitution of United Slates, Sheppard. 

Methods of Teaching, Wiekersham. 

Composition and Declamation throughout the year. 
Written Outlines and Analyses of Studies pursued. 



| 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 


(golleqiaic department. 


PRE PARA TOR Y VLA SS. 


III.— CLASSICAL COURSE. 


IV.— BIBLICAL COURSE. 


First Term. 


First Term. 


Latin — McClintock's Second Book. 


Biblical-' Historical Geography. 


Greek — McClintock's First Book. 


Greek — McClintock's 1st Book. 


English — History of the U. S. 


English — History of the U. S. 


MaikemaM.cs — Higher Arithmetic. 


Mathematics— Higher Arithmetic. 


Second Term. 


Second Term. 


Latin — Virgil. 


Biblical — Angus' Hand Book. 


Greek— McClintock's 2d Book. 


Greek — McClintock's 2d Book. 


Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic. 


Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic. 


English — Composition it Rhetoric. 


English — Composition & Rhetoric. 


Third Term. 


Third Term. 


Latin — Virgil. 


Biblical — Angus' Hand Book. 


Greek — McClintock's 2d Book. 


Greek— McClintock's 2d Book. 


Mathema I ics — Higher Al ge bra . 


Mathematics — Higher Algebra. 


English — Composition it Rhetoric. 'English — Composition & Rhetoric. 


FRESHMAN ( LA SS. 


First Term. 


First Term. 


Latin — Livy. 


Biblical— Nast's Gospel Records. 


Prose Composition. 


Greek — Gospel by St. Matthew. 


Greek — Herodotus. 


Mathematics — Algebra it Geometry 


Mathematics — Algebra and Geom- 


Hebrew — Grammar and Chrestom- 


etry. 


athy. 


En, g lish— Language and Literature 


English — Language and Literature 


Second Term. 


Second Term. 


Latin — Cicero de Amicitia. 


Biblical — Westeott's Introduction. 


Greek — Homer. 


Greek — Gospel by St. Mark. 


Prose Composition. 


Mathematics — Algebra it Geometry 


Mathematics — Algebra and Geom- 


English — Outlines of History. 


etry. 


Hebrew — Grammar and Chrestom- 


English — Outlines of History. 


athy. 


Third Term. 


Third Term. 


Latin — Quintilian. 


Biblical — Westeott's Introduction. 


Greek — Homer. 


Greek — Gospel by St. Luke. 


Prose Composition. 


Mathematics — Plane Geometry and 


Mathematics — Plane Geometry and 


Trigonometry. 


Trigonometry. 


English — Outlines of History. 


English — Outlines of History. 


Hebrew — Pentateuch. 



CHARTERED WITH AMPLE POWERS. 17 


SOPHOMORE CLASS. 


First Term. 


First Term. 


Latin — Horace's Odes. 


Biblical — The Doctrines of theBible 


Greek — Memorabilia. 


Greek — John and Acts. 


Greek & Roman Mythology. 


Mathematics — Spherical Geometry 


Mathematics— Spherical Geometry 


and Trigonometry. 


and Trigonometry. 


English — Elocution. 


English — Elocution. 


Hebrew — Historical Books. 


Second Term. 


Second Term. 


Latin — Horace's Epistles. 


Biblical — Morals of Christianity. 


Greek — Electra of Sophocles. 


Greek — Pauline Epistles. 


Grecian Antiquities. 


Mathematics — Conic; Sections. 


Mathematics — Conic Sections. 


Hebrew — Historical Books. 


Philosophy — Logic. 


Philosophy— Logic. 


Third Term. 


Third Term. 


.La/in— Cicero de Oratore. 


Biblical — Evidences of Christianity 


Roman Antiquities. 


Greek — Pauline Epistles. 


Greek — Prometheus of JEsehylus. 


Mathematics — Analytical Geomt'y. 


Mathematics — Analytical Geomt'y. 


Philoso2Jhy — Rhetoric. 


PhilosoiJhy — Rhetoric. 


Hebrew — Historical Books. 


JUNIOR CLASS. 


First Term. 


First Term. 


Latin — Cicero de Ofhciis. 


Germa n — Ollendorff. 


Greek — Thucydides. 


Greek— Catholic Epistles. 


Archaeology of Greek and 


Hebrew-^Ps&ims. 


Roman Literature. 


Biblical — History of Doctrine. 


Mathematics — Diff. and Integ. Cal- 


Philosophy — Mental Science. 


culus. 




Philosophy — Mental Science. 




Second Term. 


Second Term. 


Latin — Tacitus. 


German — Ollendorff and Reader. 


Greek — Theocritus. 


Biblical — Ecclesiastical History. 


Archaeology of Greek and 


Greek — Apocalypse. 


Roman Art. 


Hebrew — Major Prophets. 


Mathematics — Analytical Mech'cs. 


Natural Science — Natural Philoso- 


Natural Science — Nat. Philosophy. 


phy. 


Third Term. 


Third Term. 


Latin — Plautus. 


German — Adler's Reader. 


Greek — Demosthenes de Corona. 


Biblical — The Institutions of the 


History of Greek iV: Roman 


Church. 


Literature. 


Hebrew — Minor Prophets. 


Mathematics — Analytical Mechan- 


Natural Science — Natural Philoso- 


ics. 


phy. 


Natural Science — Nat. Philosophy. 


Biblical — History of the Church. 


Philosophy— Elements of Criticism 


Philosophy — Elements of Criticism 






18 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 
Mathematics — Astronomy. 
Natural Science — Geology. 
Philosophy — Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 



First Term. 
Hebrew— Chaldeeof Dan'l<fc Ezek'l 
Natural Science — Geology. 
Philosophy — Moral Science. 
German — Adler's Hand Book. 



Second Term. Second Term. 

Mathematics — Surveyingand Nav- \Pastoral — Church Governm't and 

igation. Discipline. 

Natural Science — Chemistry. { Natural Science — Chemistry. 

Philosojyhy — History of Philosophy i Philosophy — Hist'ry of Philosophy 
Philosophy of History I Philosophy of Hist'ry 

German— Adler's Hand Book. 



Third Term. 

Natural Science — Chemistry. 
Philosophy — Laws of Nations. 

Constitution of U. 

Butler's Analogy. 

Natural Theology, 



S. 



Thihd Term. 
Natural Science — Chemistry. 
Philosophy — Homiletics. 

Whedon on the Will. 

Butler's Analogy. 

Natural Theology. 



Collegiate Department, (Continued.) 



PRE PAR A TOR Y OLA SS. 



V.— LADIES' COURSE. 

First Term. 
Latin — McClintock's 2d Book. 
French — Fasquelle's Fr'ch Course. 
English— History of U. S. 
Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic. 



VI.— SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

First Term. 
English — Physical Geography. 

History of U. S. 
French — Fasquelle's Fr'ch Course. 
Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic. 



Second Term. Second Term. 

Latin — Virgil. English — Chronology. 

French — Fasquelle's Fr'ch Course. Composition ik, Rhetoric. 

Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic, j MaiJtem atics — Higher Arithmetic. 
Englisli— Composition it Rhetoric. Frencli — Fasquelle's Fr'ch Course. 

Third Term. Third Term. 

Latin — Virgil. English — Chronology. 

French — Fasquelle's Colloquial Composition A- Rhetoric. 

Reader. Mathematics — Higher Algebra. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. French — Fasquelle's Colloquial 
English — Composition cfc Rhetoric. : Reader. 

Instrumental Music, and Draw- Drawing throughout the year. 
ing throughout the year. 1 



CHARTERED WITH AMPLE POWERS. 



19 



JUNIOR SECTION. 



First Term. 
Latin — Livy. 

Prose Composition. 
French — Telemaque. 
Mathematics— Algebra and Geom- 
etry. 
English — Language &, Literature. 

Second Term. 
Latin — Cicero de Amicitia. 
French — Dumas' Napoleon. 
Mathematies— Algebra and Geom- 
etry. 
English— Outlines of History. 

Third Term. 
Latin — Quintilian. 
French — Dumas' Napoleon. 
Mathematics— Plane Geometry 
Trigonometry. 
English— Outlines of History. 



First Term. 
German — Ollendorff. 
French — Telemaque. 
Mathematics — Algebra and Geom- 
etry. 
English — Language <fc Literature. 

Second Term. 
German — Adler's Reader. 
French — Dumas' Napoleon. 
Mathematics— Algebra and Geom- 
etry. 
English — Outlines of History. 

Third Term. 
German — Adler's Reader. 
French — Dumas' Napoleon. 
Mathematics — Plane Geometry & 

Trigonometry. 
English— Outlines of History. 



MIDDLE SECTION. 



First Term. First Term. 

Latin — Horace's Odes. (German — Adler's Hand Book. 

French — Chefs d'Oeuvre de Racine \ French — Chefs d'Oeuvre de Racine 
Mathematics— Spherical Geometry \ Mathematics— Spherical Geometry 
& Trigonometry. & Trigonometry. 

English — Elocution and Roman ' English— Elocution and Roman 
History. History. 



Second Term. 
Latin — Horace's Epistles. 
French — Moliere. 
Mathematics — Conic Sections. 
English— History of Greece. 
Philosophj' — Logic. 

Third Term. 
Latin — Cicei-o de Oratore. 

Roman Antiquities. 
French — Corneille. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geome- 
try. 
Philosophy— Rhetoric. 



Second Term. 
German — Adler's Hand Book. 
French — Moliere. 
Mathematics — Conic Sections. 
! English — History of Greece. 
| Philosophy — Logic. 

Third Term. 
| German. 

French — Corneille. 
Mathematics—Analytical Geome- 
try. 
Philosophy — Rhetoric. 
English — Lord's Modern History. 



20 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



SENIOR SECTION. 



First Term. 

Mathematics — Astronomy. 

Natural Science — Anatomy, Phys- 
iology <fe Hygiene. 
Geology. 

Philosophy — Mental Science. 

Second Term. 
Natural Science — Botany. 

Nat'l Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 
Philosophy — Moral Science. 



First Term. 
Mathematics — Diff. and Integral 
Calculus. 
Astronomy. 
Natural Science — Geology. 
Philosophy — Mental Science. 

Second Term. 
Mathematics — Analyt'l Mechanics 
Nat. Science — Natural Philosophy. 

Chemistry. 
Philosophy — Moral Science. 
Math. — Surveying <fc Navigation. 



Third Term. Third Term. 

Nat. Science— Natural Philosophy. Nat. Science— Natural Philosophy 

Chemistry. Chemistry. 

Philosophy — Elements of Criticism Philosophy — Elements of Critic'm 



Natural Science— Botany. 



Political Economy. 
Political Philosophy. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



21 



cucral wittnlut. 



I.— Courses of Instruction. 



Thorough Instruction will be afforded in the follow- 
ing Courses of Study : 

1. A Model School or Preparatory Course, which will 
embrace instruction in Orthography, Reading, Geography, Penman- 
ship, Oral and Written Arithmetic, Drawing, Vocal Music, Classical 
and Physical Geography, Elementary Algebra and the Elements 
of Latin. 

In this department, the rudimentary facts of Physical Science 
will be taught by Object Lessons or the Development System, 
which embraces " such a course of training for the young that all 
the faculties shall receive exercise of such an amount, kind, and 
quality as shall best conduce to the harmonious and complete de- 
velopment of the whole individual." 

2. A Normal Course, which includes instruction in all the 
branches required by law to be taught in the Common Schools of 
the State, with a few other studies suited to develop those powers 
of mind essential to make efficiant teachers. Besides, the Normal 
Class will have an opportunity of observing the operation of the 
Model School, and the Senior Division will have the privilege of 
attending some of the Lectures of the Professors of the College. 

3. The College Courses, which embrace all the branches of a 
liberal education and are adapted to suit special cases. 

CI. The Classical Course is similar to that pursued in other Col- 
leges, and is that which experience has proved to be best adapted 
to develop the mental powers and cultivate and refine the taste. A 
student's grade and advancement will be determined more by the 
quality than by the quantity of his performances. 

h- The Biblical Course presents what we think will supply a 
long-felt want. It is, what its name implies, a course in which the 



22 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Word of God will be specifically and thoroughly studied. Believing 
as we do, that a knowledge of revealed truth is of great importance 
to man in every relation in life, and that the design of a classical 
education can be accomplished nearly as well by the study of the 
Scriptures in the languages in which they were written as by the 
study of classic Greek or Latin ; we have substituted for the classics 
and some of the higher mathematics, the Original Scriptures and 
sach other studies as will enable students to comprehend fully and 
clearly the solemn truths contained in the Word of God. For en- 
trance upon this course no special qualifications are required, and 
graduating in it will confer no special right upon any one, as the 
road to the Christian Ministry lies through the Class and the Quar- 
terly and Annual Conferences. While " God sends by whom he 
will send," and the weak things of God are often chosen to con- 
found the wisdom of man, yet a thorough biblical training enabled 
Paul to defend the truth before kings and princes and to raise the 
Gospel standard amid such centers of refinement and learning as 
Athens, Corinth, Ephesus and Rome. Without attempting the 
specific education of the Theological Seminary, by the Divine bless- 
ing, we hope to educate hundreds, whom God will call and send 
forth to preach " the unsearchable riches of Christ." 

C. The Ladies' Course is thorough, and embraces a wide range 
of study, including music, drawing, painting, &c. 

cl. The Scientific Course is intended to afford a general culture 
to such as do not desire to pursue the Classics and prefer to study 
the French and German Languages and Literature. It includes 
all the Mathematics, Philosophy, &c, of the Classical Course, with 
two or three additional studies. For graduation in this course, an 
equivalent amount of Latin or Greek will be accepted in lieu of 
German or French. 

CorciiTiercial Course. 

4. For such students as have completed their curriculum of study, 
or such as wish to obtain a knowledge of the rules and forms of 
business while pursuing other branches, a thorough Commercial 
Course is provided at a moderate cost. In this Course, Classes 
will be formed at the beginning of each term, which will be 
thoroughly drilled by daily recitations from test books, oral in- 
structions, and practice in writing up books. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION, ETC. 



23 



II.-- Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission into the Model School or Normal De- 
partment will be examined and will be classified according to their 
qualifications. 

All candidates for admission to any course must be of suitable 
age, and must present satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 

Candidates for advanced standing must pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination upon the studies pursued by the class which they pro- 
pose entering, or in their equivalents. 

The qualifications necessary for admission to any of the College 
Classes, is a satisfactory knowledge of the branches taught in the 
Model School, except that a knowledge of Latin Grammar will not 
be required for entrance upon the Biblical or Scientific Course. 

Entering Lebanon Valley College as a student will be regarded 
as a pledge to observe all its Laws and Regulations. 

Candidates properly prepared in some studies for admission to a 
higher class, but deficient in others, will be required to make up 
their requisitions by regular recitations in the lower classes. We 
deem this requirement essential to the success of students in the 
higher departments of study. 



III.— The Best Mode of Preparation. 

The success of a student in the higher classes depends much 
upon the thoroughness of his preparation. Many young men, of 
limited means, attempt to prepare themselves for the higher classes 
by private study. Although praiseworthy, this is a radical mis- 
take, as thorough instruction is more needed in the elementary 
than in the higher studies, and the facilities provided here will 
enable students to accomplish more with an ultimate economy of 
time and money. The drill of the first two or three years of the 
Course is all-important, and students should, by all means, spend 
these years in College. Such, however, as find it convenient to 
prepare themselves for higher Classes, we would advise to follow 
closely the plan of study laid down iu this Catalogue, and not anti- 
cipate studies which may be pursued with more advantage at 
College. 



24 PULLER EXPLANATION OF THE STUDIES. 



IV.— Fuller Explanation of the Studies. 

1. — Mathematics. 

Model School. — Mental and Practical Arithmetic and Elementary 

Algebra. 
Preparatory Class. — Higher Arithmetic and Higher Algebra 

through Quadratics. 
Freshmen Class. — Higher Algebra and Plane Geometry and Trig- 
onometry. 
Sophomore Class. — Spherical Geometry and Trigonometry, Conic 

Sections and Analytical Geometry. 
Junior Class. — Differential and Integral Calculus and Analytical 

Mechanics. 
Senior Class. — Astronomy. Surveying and Navigation. 

^©"Calculus, Analytical Mechanics, Surveying and Navigation 
are not required for graduation in the Biblical or Ladies' Course. 

2. — History and English Literature and Language. 

Model School. — Orthography, Etymology, Elementary Composition 

and English Grammar. 
Preparatory Class. — History of the United States, and Composi- 
tion and Rhetoric. 
Freshmen Class. — English Language and Literature, and Outlines 

of General History. 
Sophomore Class. — Elocution and Vocal Culture. 
Junior Class. — Original Essays. (Lectures.) 
Senior Class. — Original Orations. (Lectures.) 

JSOT'The Middle Section study Grecian, Roman and Modern His- 
tory. Students are required to make outlines and write analyses 
of the various books pursued. In the Classical Department, the 
great models of antiquity are critically studied. 

3. — Latin Language and Literature. 

Model School. — Latin Grammar and Composition. 

Preparatory Class. — Extracts from Caesar, Latin Syntax and Pros- 
ody, and Virgil. 

Freshmen Class. — Livy, Cicero de Amicitia, Quintilian (Xth 
Rook;) Latin Prose Composition. 

Sophomore Class. — Horace, (Odes, Satires and Epistles ;) Cicero 
de Oratore ; Mythology and Archaeology. 



FULLER EXPLANATION OF THE STUDIES. 25 

Junior Class. — 'Cicero de Officiis; Tacitus; Plautus' Captives; 
Archeology and History of Roman Art and 
Literature. 
These authors are not only translated, but thoroughly studied. 

4. — The Greek Language and Literature. 
Preparatory Class. — Grammar and Reader. 

Freshman Class. — Homer ; Herodotus ; Greek Prose Composition . 
Sophomore Class. — Memorabilia of Socrates ; Greek Tragedies of 
Sophocles aud Euripides ; Greek Mythology 
and Antiquities. 
Junior Class. — Thucydides and Demosthenes de Corona; Archae- 
ology and History of Grecian Art and Literature. 

5. — Modern Languages and Literature. 
Preparatory Class. — Pasquelle's French Course and Colloquial 

Reader. 
Junior Section. — Telemaque ; Dumas' Napoleon. 
Middle Section. — Chefs d'Oeuvre de Racine ; Moliere, Corneille. 

The Junior Class in the Biblical Course, and the Middle Class 
in the Scientific Course, commence the study of German — Adler's 
Ollendorff, Adler's Reader, and Adler's Hand Book of German 
Literature. Lectures on Comparative Philology and Modern Lit- 
erature will be delivered in this department. 

6. — Natural Science. 
Junior Class. — Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, 
Acoustics, Electricity, Magnetism. 
Senior ('lass — Geology and Chemistry, Anatomy, Physiology 
and Hygiene and Botany are pursued by the Senior Section. 

Lectures on suitable topics connected with Physical Science 
will be delivered. 

7. — Philosophy. 

Sophomore Class. — Logic and Rhetoric. 

Junior Class. — Mental Science and Elements of Criticism. 

Senior Class. — Moral Science, Political Economy, General and 
Constitutional Law, the Evidences of Natural 
and Revealed Religion, and the History of Phi- 
losophy and the Philosophy of History. Lectures. 



26 MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



8. — Biblical Literature and Exegesis. 
Preparatory Class. — The History, Geography and Archaeology of 
the Bible, with a thorough and critical 
study of the English version of the Scrip- 
tures. 
Freshman Class. — The Gospel Records and Westcott's Introduction 
to the study of the Gospels, with a critical 
study of the Synoptic Gospels in Greek, and 
the Pentateuch in Hebrew. 
Sophomore Class. — The Doctrines, Morals and Evidences of 
Christianity. John. Acts and the Pauline 
Epistles in Greek. The Historical Books 
in Hebrew. 
Junior Class. — History of Doctrines, and Ecclesiastical and Church 
History. The Catholic Epistles, and the Apoc- 
alypse in Greek. The Psalms and Phophets in 
Hebrew. 
Senior Class. — Church Government and Discipline, the Doctrine 
of the Will, and Sacred Rhetoric. The Chaldee 
of Daniel and Ezekiel. 

9. — Music and Ornamental Branches. 

The Course in this department is extended and thorough. It 
embraces Vocal and Instrumental Music ; Pencil, Linear, Crayon 
and Perspective Drawing; Antique, Pastel, Water and Oil Paint- 
ing; Worsted Flowers, Wax Flowers and Fruit, &c, &c. 

10. — Lectures. 
Lectures on Art, Science and Literature will be delivered by the 
Professors of the different departments. 



T '.—Miscellaneous Information. 

1. — Sessions and Vacations. 
The Collegiate year is divided into a Fall Term, a Winter Term, 
and a Spring Term. The Fall Term of eighteen weeks commences 
on the Third Monday of August, and closes on the Thursday be- 
fore Christmas. The Winter Term of twelve weeks commences 
on the First Monday of January, and closes on the last Thursday 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



27 



of March. The Spring Term of twelve weeks commences on the 
First Monday of April, and closes on the last Thursday of June. 
The vacations are seven weeks during July and August; two 
weeks at the Christmas Holidays, and one week at the beginning 
of April. 

2. — Time op Entrance. 
The pi'oper time of entrance is at the beginning of a term, 
especially of the Fall Term. Regular Students may enter at any 
time, but no students will be received for a less time than a term, 
except by special agreement. 

3. — Outfit. 

Each Student should provide himself (or herself) with a pair of 
blankets, table and toilet napkins ai:d slippers. Each piece of 
clothing or bedding should be indelibly marked with the owner's 
full name. Ladies should provide themselves with napkin ring 
and silver spoon and fork. 

4. — Accommodations. 

The accommodations at this Institution are not excelled by those 
of aDy other in the State. The Rooms are well ventilated, are 
heated by furnaces, and are furnished with nearly everything 
necessary to make students perfectly comfortable. In the new 
building, two students will occupy a room, which, if they prefer, 
they may carpet; each room requiring three pieces four and a half 
yards long. All non-resident students board in the Institution, 
and are, therefore, under the care of the Faculty. 

5. — Expenses. 
Boarding, Washing, Light, Fuel, Tuition and Room Rent, 

For Fall Term of eighteen weeks $88.50 

" Winter " " twelve " 59.00 

" Spring " " " " 59.00 

Tuition for Day Scholars from 83.00 to $5.00 per month. 

6. — Extras. 

I Fall, iWint'r Spuing 



Instrumental Music, two lessons per week, 

and daily practice 

Painting, (Antique, Pastel, Water and Oil,) 
Double Entry Book-Keeping, (in classes,) 



Term. Term. 



§18.00 
15.00 
15.00 

Business Penmanship, (iu classes,) 12.00 

Ornamental Penmanship, (in classes,) 12.00 



$12.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.00 

8.00 



Term. 



$12.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.00 

8.00 



a 


" 


Science 


Mistress 


u 


Arts. 


Bachelor 


(I 


a 



28 MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 

Card Writing, $5.00. Wax Flowers and Fruit, Worsted Flowers, 
and other Ornamental Branches, at usual rates. No extra charge 
is made for Modern Languages, 'Vocal Music, or Drawing. 

The wash of each student is limited to twelve pieces per week. 
Fifty cents per dozen will be charged for all beyond that number. 

7. — Terms. 
One-half of the Boarding, Tuition, &c, for the term, is to be 
paid on entrance, and the balance at the middle of the Session. 

8.— Text Books. 
All necessary Text Books and Stationery will be furnished at 
city retail prices. 

0. — Degrees and Dii>lomas. 
The following degrees will be conferred, viz : 
On Completing the Normal Course, Bachelor of Elements. 
•' " " Scientific ' 

" " " Ladies' 

" " " Classical ' 

" " ' ; Biblical " " " Biblical Science. 

Alumni of the College will receive the Master's degree in three 
years after graduation, provided they sustain a good moral charac- 
ter, and engage in literary or professional pursuits. The fee for 
each Diploma will be 85.00. 

10. — Literary Societies. 
The Noukosmian and Philokosmian Literary Societies 
will afford students a fine opportunity for literary improvement. 

11. — Library. 
The Bcehm Library, consisting of well-selected books, is ac- 
cessible to all the students. Donations in books or money are 
earnestly solicited for this Library. 

12. — Religious Services. 
The religious exercises of the School are as follows, viz : 
(I. The opening and closing exercises, consisting of singing, 
reading of the Scriptures, and prayer. ', 

I). Bible Class on Sabbath afternoon. 
C% Prayer meeting on Friday eveuing. 

ll. Religious services on Sabbath forenoon. On Sabbath even- 
iug, students attend church with the Faculty. 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



29 



VI.— General Remarks. 



1. — Lebanon Valley College. 

This Institution is the property of the East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, and is 
under their patronage and supervision. It was opened on the 7th 
of May, 1866, and chartered with ample powers in April, 1867. 

The last Conference authorized the purchase of additional 
grounds, and the erection of new buildings. The site is secured, 
and the buildings are now in course of erection, a part of which, 
it is hoped, will be ready for occupancy at some time during the 
Fall Term. 

2. — Location. 

The seat of the College is at Annville, a beautiful rural village 
of over one thousand inhabitants, situate in the rich and fertile 
Lebanon Valley, twenty-one miles east of Harrisburg, aud thirty- 
three miles west of Heading, on the Lebanon Valley Railroad, by 
which connection is made six times daily with New York. Phila- 
delphia, Pittsburg and Baltimore. The village is noted for its 
healthfulness and the beauty of its scenery, and is free from the 
temptations to vice so common in large towns and cities. 

3. — Instruction. 
We hold that education, to be effective, must be thorough and 
practical. Hence we shall teach principles rather than rules, 
and ideas rather than words. To do this effectively, it will be 
necessary to commence with the elements of literature and science. 
While it might be more pleasant to teach the higher branches only, 
such a course would not meet a great public want. Most, if not 
all, the students who usually atteud an institution of this kind, are 
imperfect in the common branches, and as no proper progress 
can be made in higher studies without a knowledge of those 
more elemental, we shall give all our students a most thorough 
drill in common English. We aim to educate the whole man ; to 
develop his physical, moral aud intellectual powers. Educatiou 
should commence with the perceptive faculties. " All human 
knowledge begins in experience. Except phenomena are given in 
the sense, aud the intellect quickened into activity in perception, 
it can exert neither the faculty of the understanding nor the 
reason, but the human mind remains a void, and no cognition is 



30 



GENERAL REMARKS. 



possible. We must begin our intellectual action in sensation." 
Heuce the necessity for accurate training and abundant illustration 
and exercise, for the neglect of these is the bane of all sound 
learning. Upon such a beginning as a foundation, we propose 
erecting an educational structure symmetrical in its proportions, 
and towering to the regions of pure thought and holy aspiration. 

4. — The Essentials of Education. 

Among the faculties distinguishing man from the animal crea- 
tion, arc speecli, reason, taste, imagination and conscience, and just 
in proportion as these are developed and cultivated, does he rise 
in the scale of being. A high culture can be secured only by a 
proper training in the branches which constitute a liberal education. 



5. — The Necessity for General Education. 

Some think that the few only need to be well educated. This is 
an error. Men of education are wanted in the counting-room, in 
the workshop and at the plow, as well as in the pulpit ; on the ros- 
trum and at the bar. In a country like ours, where the very 
existence of the" government depends upon the general intelligence 
and virtuous principles of the masses, and where every man is 
eligible to the highest position, how necessary that all should be 
educated, especially since the chances of success are in favor of 
him who has the best qualifications ! 

The men most successful as preachers, lawvers, or legislators, are 
not the profound thinkers, but those who are able to speak well. 
Hence the necessity for 

6. — A Good Elocution. 

As language is one of man's highest endowments, and is both 
spoken and written, to give true utterance to each word, and master 
all the complex forms of speech, is a matter of fundamental im- 
portance. To attain this great end, our course in Orthography, 
Reading, Elocutiou, Grammar, Composition, Rhetoric, Literature 
and Criticism is very complete. We commence with the lowest 
class in reading to teach a correct expression, and by a thorough 
drill in the elementary sounds, in vocal culture and systematic elo- 
cution, with private and public declamation, we hope to make fine 
readers and eloquent speakers. 



ECLECTIC STUDIE; 



-LESSEE-. 



31 



7. — Ability to Compose Well 

Is a great desideratum. Correct orthography and elegant diction 
can only be acquired by close study and long practice. Daily ex- 
ercise in writing words correctly, and in combining them into 
sentences after elegaDt models, with an analysis of all the forms of 
language, will lay the foundation for a chaste and beautiful style, 
while the study of the modern and the classical languages and 
literature will enrich the student's vocabulary, and enable him to 
appreciate the beauties of Composition. 

8. — Accuracy of Thought and Correctness of Reasoning. 

Accuracy of thought and correctness of reasoning is of as much 
importauce as fine elocution and elegant diction. The main object 
of education is to develop and discipline the mental powers. To 
think with facility and reason logically, is the end to be secured by 
a proper drill in mathematics, philosophy and dialectics. Error 
would soon infold society, and sap the foundations of truth, were 
there not men competent to sift each specious theory, and expose 
its fallacies. Close thinkers alone can do this. They are the con- 
servators of truth, and the allies of progress. How necessary. 
then, is a thorough drill in this particular. 



T 'II.— Eclectic Studies. 

The Laws of the College provide that students of any Course 
may elect to pursue an equivalent study in any other course, with 
the consent of the Faculty. 



- <>V 



L e s s e e s 



Key. G. W. MILES RIGOR, Leranun. Pa. 

Rev. T. R. VICEROY. A. If Annyille. Pa. 






DISCIPLINE. 



discipline. 



The government of the College is strict, but parental. It is 
based on the ideas of right and wrong, and will be administered 
impartially. 

The object of the Institution is to afford a home, where parents 
or guardians may place their children aud wards with safety and 
profit, and where young men and young ladies may be fitted for 
usefulness in life, under influences calculated to refine their tastes, 
ennoble their aspirations, and develop a high Christian character. 
By a kind but firm administration of wholesome regulations, by the 
requirement of strict attention to the exercises of the school, and 
by constant and careful training, the moral and intellectual powers 
are developed, and students fitted for high and responsible positions. 

In the Collegiate department students are required to attend 
twenty recitations and lectures per week, and for every unexcused 
absence or failure, they receive a demerit mark. 

All roughness, obscenity or vulgarity iu language or action is 
strictly forbidden, aud every species of conduct, immoral or vicious 
in its tendency, is contrary to the letter and spirit of the laws of 
the Institution. . (J-anibling, quarreling, the drinking of intoxi- 
cating liquors, prof'auity, dishonesty, the using of tobacco about 
the grounds and buildiugs, idleness, carelessness and incorrigibility, 
will meet with condign punishment. 

JVo vicious, idle, or disobedient student will he retained in the 
Institution, nor loill such be hnowincjly received. 

Students are required — 

(a.) To attend prayers every morning and every evening except on 
Saturday and Sabbath. 

(b.) To attend public worship twice on the Sabbath day, at such place 
as their parents or guardians may designate. 

(c.) To attend promptly all appointed exercises, and diligently to pre- 
pare the same. 

(d.) To observe the regulations with regard to study, recitations, &c. 

(e.) And, generally, to conduct themselves in an orderty and becom- 
ing manner. 

Every unexcused absence, failure or misdemeanor is reported to 
the faculty, and a record made of the same. 

Five demerit marks will subject a student to private reproof; 
ten, to public reproof with notice to parent or guardian, and fifteen, 
to dismission. 

The Faculty may, on evidence of reformation, restore a dismiss- 
ed student. 

For graver offences, the punishments are reproof, loss of priv- 
ilege, confinement, dismission and expulsion. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT. 



33 



ommercral department. 



For the benefit of those young men who wish to qualify 
themselves for business, and who wish to pursue an exclusively 
Commercial Course, we will afford special facilities. 

The Method of Instruction combines theory and practice, and is 
adapted to make practical business Men. 

Course of Instruction and Expense. 

Life Scholarship for full Course, including all departments 
of Book-Keeping, Lectures, Commercial Arithmetic, 
Commercial Correspondence, Commercial Law, and 

Partnership Settlements, $35 00 

Business Penmanship, (3 months,) 10 00 

Ornamental Penmanship, (3 months.) 10 00 

Card Writing, 5 00 

Phonography, 15 00 

Boarding, Washing, Light, Fuel and Furnished Room, 

per week, 4 00 

Books and Stationery. 

Books and Stationery will be furnished at city retail prices. 

Diplomas. 

Students completing the Course, will receive the Diploma or 
Certificate of the Institution, and will be assisted in obtaining 
situations. 



Time for Entrance. 

Students should enter at the beginning of a term, as recitation 
with a class, combined with individual instruction, is preferable. 



34 



CALENDAR FOR 1867. 



Oaicsidar for 1867, 



Sunday. June 23d. — Sermon to the students. 

Monday, June 24th. — (8-12 and 2-5.) — Examination of Classes 
of the Model School. 

Tuesday, June 25th. — (8-12. — Examination of the [Preparatory 

Class. 

Tuesday Evening. June 25th — 7} o'clock. — Anniversary of the 
Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Wednesday. June 26th. — (8-12.) — Examination qf Freshman 
Class. 

Wednesday Evening, June 26th — 7j o'clock. — Exhibition by the 
Model School. 

Thurselay, June 27th — 9jj o'clock A. M. — Examination of candi- 
dates for admission to the College Classes. 

Thursday, June- 27th. — (2-5 P. 31.) — Commencement Exercises. 

Vacation— Seven 7T eeks. 

Monday, August 19. — Fall Term commences. 

Monday and Tuesday, August 10th and 20th. — Examination of 
candidates for admission. 

Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 16th and 17th. — Examination of the 
classes in the Modal School. 

Wednesrlay ami Thursday. Dec. 18th and 19th. — Examination of 
the College Classes. 

Thursday Evening, Dec. 10th. — Oratorical Contest. 

Vacation,--. Two Weeks. 

Monday. January 6th. 1868. — Winter Term begins.