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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

ebapoi? l/alley C°H e< ?? 



"And let him that is athirst come." 



Twenty-Second Catalogue 



— OF THE — 



Officers and Students 



Lebanon Valley College, 



JLnET^riX^l^B, FJL., 



The Collegiate Year 



1887-88. 



LANCASTER, PA. 

THE NEW ERA STEAM BOOK PRINT. 

i838. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



(£aiiEN£>aR FOR 1555-'59. 



August 27, 1888 
August 27, 1888 
August 27, i88£ 
August 28, 1888 
August 28, 1888 
November 29, ii 
December 18, i! 

Classes. 
December 21, i< 



. — Organization, 3 o'clock, P. M. 

. — Entrance Examinations, 3:30 o'clock, P. M. 

>. — Registration for the Term. 

. — Instruction begins, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

.—Examinations continued, 1 o'clock, P. M. 

388. — Anniversary of Clionian Literary Society. 

388. — Public Exercises of the Sophomore and Freshman 

388.— Fall Term ends. 



January 7, 18 
January 7; 18 
January 8, 18 
January 8, 18 
March 21, 18! 
March 24, 18? 
March 24, 18' 
March 24 and 
March 25, i8i 
April 4, 1 889. 
May 2, 1889. — 
May 28, 1889.- 
June 4, 1889. — 
June 8, 1889.— 
June 9, 1889. — 
June 9, 1889.- 
June 10, 1889. 

P. M. 
June ii, 1889, 
June 12, 1889 
June 12, 1889, 



Vacation. 

\g. — Winter Term begins, 3 o'clock, P. M. 

9. — Entrance Examination. 

9. — Registration for the Term. 

9. — Instruction begins, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

9. — Winter Term ends. 

j. — Spring Term begins, 2:30 o'clock, P. M. 

9. — Entrance Examination begins, 2 o'clock, P. M. 

25, 1889. — Registration for the Term. 

9. — Instruction begins. 

-Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary Society. 

-Final Examination of Seniors begins. 

General Examination of Classes begins. 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 3 o'clock, P. M. 

Commencement of Department of Music, 7:30 o'clock, P. M. 

-Public Meeting of the Alumni Association, 7:30 o'clock, 



— Annual Address before the Literary Societies. 
— Commencement. 
— Spring Term ends. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



The Founding of the Institution. 



T EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE came into existence to 
-J-* supply an absolute want. Denominational growth and an 
advancing civilization rendered it necessary for the Church of 
" The United Brethren in Christ," throughout the States of 
Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, to make special pro- 
vision for the moral and intellectual culture of her children. 
After much deliberation and prayer, it was resolved that an in- 
stitution of learning be established, which would furnish the 
advantages of a thorough education alike to young men and 
women, under the safe and inspiring influences of the Christian 
religion. 

To carry out this purpose, a committee of worthy gentlemen 
was chosen, with authority to elect a suitable place for its es- 
tablishment. 

The Town of Annville, 

located in the midst of the beautiful Lebanon Valley, was 
chosen on account of its accessibility, healthfulness and in- 
spiring scenery. 

As a further inducement to locate the College at this place, 
a suitable building and grounds were donated by public-spirited 
citizens for educational purposes. In t866 the Institution was 
founded and in 1867 chartered by a Special Act of the Legisla- 
ture of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

The Aim 

of the Trustees and Faculty, from the first, has been to provide 
courses of study which will qualify students to be practical and 
self-reliant, as well as learned. 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Charter plainly indicates, that it was the intention of the 
founders to plant an institution which would become so ample 
in facilities and manifold in departments as to furnish in- 
struction in all the subjects of a general and special education, 
and toward this original purpose the Institution will advance as 
rapidly as the necessary means are secured and circumstances 
will demand it. 

Officers of the Corporation. 

The Board of Trustees are elected by the co-operating con- 
ferences, one-third of whom are elected annually for a term of 
three years. 

The members of the Faculty, and two persons chosen by 
the Alumni from their own number, sustain an ex-officio re- 
lation. 

Fidelity to Patrons. 

The members of the Faculty believe that all pupils should be 
encouraged to educate as thoroughly as their means and native 
endowment will admit, even when there is promise of only 
moderate success ; but when a student persists in a course of 
indifference and manifests no appreciation of time, money or 
opportunities, the Institution regards itself morally bound to 
make known the facts to its patrons, but not until every worthy 
method has been employed for his reformation. 

Co-Education. 

The principle of co-education of the sexes was adopted from 
the first by the founders of the College — and the entire absence 
of college barbarities and excesses, as well as the manifestation 
of a tendency to a higher standard of scholarship, from year to 
year, proves the wisdom of this natural order of things. The 
facilities of the College and the encouragements to a thorough 
education are offered alike to all. And experience has shown 
that there is no appreciable difference between the male and the 
female, as such, as to ability in mastering the studies of a 
college course. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 5 

Non-Sectarian. 

While the College is denominational in management, it is 
positively free from sectarian bias ; and the liberal patronage 
which it has enjoyed from homes representing all phases of 
Protestant faith, as well as from the homes of non-professors, 
attests the fact that colleges may inculcate the principles of 
christian morality without traducing the religious convictions 
or personal belief of any one. 

Aggressive in Spirit. 

The Institution is not bound in theory or practice to anti- 
quated methods, but it seeks to interpret the laws of science 
and of life in keeping with the spirit of progress and the lead- 
ings of Providence. 

Guaranty. 

Fidelity to these principles in the past is the guaranty that 
the Institution offers to its patrons in the future. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Officers of the Corporation. 



TRUSTEES. 



Term Expires 1891. 

Rev. GEO. HARMON, Petersburg, W. Va. 

Prof. J. N. FRIES, Dayton, Va. 

Rev. D. D. KEEDY Rohrersville, Md. 

J. S. DEANER, Keedysville, Md. 

JOHN THOMAS, ■■'... . Johnstown, Pa. 

Rev. M. O. LANE Annville, Pa. 

Rev. W. H. WAGNER, Dickinson, Pa. 

GIDEON LIGHT, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALB-ANUS S. RILAND, Friedensburg, Pa. 

W. S. REED, Altenwald, Pa. 

S. N. EBY, Mount Joy, Pa. 

JACOB SNEATH Columbia, Pa. 

JOHN B. STEHMAN, Mountville, Pa. 

Term Expires i8go. 

Rev. W. R. BERRY, Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

Rev. J. R. RIDENOUR, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Rev. J. MEDSGER, New Florence, Pa. 

Rev. GEORGE WAGONER, Johnstown, Pa. 

Rev. L. W. CRAUMER, Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev. J. RUNK Berrysburg, Pa. 

Rev. SOL. SWARTZ, Highspire, Pa. 

Rev. D. R. BURK HOLDER, Walnut Bottom, Pa. 

Rev. C. I. B. BRANE, Hagerstown, Md. 

Rev. A. M. EVERS, . , Keedysville, Md. 

H. H. KREIDER, Annville, Pa. 

J. B. HURSH, Newville, Pa. 

Term Expires 1889. 

Rev. C. P. DYCHE, Dayton, Va. 

Rev. G. P. HOTT, Winchester, Va. 

Mr. G. C. SNYDER, Boonsboro, Md. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Mr. E. M. BAKER, Hagerstown, Md. 

Col. J. A. STAHLE Mt. Wolf, Md. 

JOHN HURSH, Newville, Pa. 

DAVID W. CRIDER, York, Pa. 

Rev. J. YOUNG, Annville, Pa. 

Rev. L. W. STAHL, Greensburg, Pa. 

Rev. L. R. JONES, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

RUDOLPH HERR Annville, Pa. 

ISAAC B. HAAK, Myerstown, Pa. 

Rev. B. B. WEIDMAN, Sinking Springs, Pa. 

EX- OFFICIO. 

President E. S. LORENZ, 
Prof. H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Prof. GEO. W. BOWMAN, A. M., 
Prof. JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Prof. W. S. EBERSOLE, A. M., 
ALICE M. EVERS, B. S., 
ALICE K. GINGRICH, M. A., 
FLORENCE A. SHELDON., 
Rev. I. H. ALBRIGHT, A. M., 
A. L. GROFF. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

President JOHN B. STEHMAN. 

Recording Secretary Rev. L. W. STAHL. 

Treasurer HENRY H. KREIDER. 

Financial Agent Rev. M. O. LANE. 

Steward JOHN H. MYERS. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
E. S. LORENZ, Chairman. 
M. O. LANE, Secretary. 

GEO. HARMON, D. D. KEEDY, 

I. B. HAAK, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

D. R. BURKHOLDER. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 

The Rev. E. S. LORENZ, A. M., B. D., 

President, and Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature and Astronomy. 

GEORGE W. BOWMAN, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Rey. w. s. ebersole, a. m. 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

Professor of English Language and Literature. 

ALICE M. EVERS. B. S., 

Professor of Instrumental Music and French. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 



ALICE K. GINGRICH, M. A., 

Professor of Voice Culture. 

FLORENCE ADELAIDE SHELDON, 

Teacher of Fine Arts. 

JOHN W. SNOKE, 

Instructor in Normal Department. 

HENRY F. STAUFFER, 

Assistant Instructor in Normal Department. 

E. S. BOWMAN, 
Teacher of Book-Keeping and Penmanship. 

Mrs. LUCINDA BRECHBILL KEEDY, 

Preceptress. 

W. S. EBERSOLE, 

Librarian. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, 

Secretary of Faculty. 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Requirements of ^mission. 



Classical Department. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the following subjects : 
Latin. — Grammar and Lessons; Caesar, two books; Cicero, 

three orations; Virgil, three books; Latin composition, 

(Allen), thirty-six lessons; or full equivalents for these 

subjects. 
Greek. — Grammar and Lessons ; Anabasis, two books ; Greek 

Composition, (Jones), Complete. - 

Mathematics. — Higher Arithmetic, Algebra, four books of 

Geometry and Elementary Book-keeping. 
Natural Science. — Geography of the Heavens and Physical 

Geography. 
Bible. — Old and New Testament History. 
English. — English Grammar and Analysis, Higher Lessons in 

English, Prose Composition, General History, History of 

the United States, and Elements of Rhetoric. 

Scientific Department. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class, for the 
Scientific Course, are examined in the following : 

Latin Grammar and Lessons, two books of C83sar, General 
History, United States History, Arithmetic, Descriptive Geog- 
raphy, English Grammar, and Elements of Rhetoric. 

Preparatory Department. 

All Students entering the Preparatory Department, as well 
as those taking higher standing, are required to pass examina- 
tion in common English Branches. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. II 

Graduates from High Schools. 

Persons having been graduated from regularly graded or high 
schools will be admitted, upon the presentation of certificate or 
diploma, without examination, and will be classified according 
to the character and amount of work done, as set forth in said 
certificate or diploma. 

Candidates coming from other institutions are required to 
furnish a certificate of regular dismission. 

No one will be admitted later than the beginning of the 
Senior Year. 

Candidates for advanced standing will be examined in the 
studies of the Preparatory Course, and also in those previously 
pursued by the class which they purpose entering, or their real 
equivalents. 

Matriculation. 

Matriculation is regarded a pledge on the part of the student 
that he will obey all of the rules of the College. 

A fee of one dollar each year is required of every one who 
enters the College, on the payment of which a certificate will 
be given, entitling the holder to the privileges of the College. 



LEBANON" VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Bourses of jBtudy. 



The College offers four courses of study — the Classical, the 
Scientific, the Academical, and the Musical. 

The Classical Course 

is the most thorough, and should be elected by those who con- 
template entering the "Learned Professions," and by such as 
aspire to the ripest scholarship or purely literary pursuits. Those 
who satisfactorily finish this course are graduated with the de- 
gree — Bachelor of Arts. 

The Scientific Course 

requires but one ancient language — either the Greek or the 
Latin ; otherwise it is the same as the Classical Course. 
It leads to the degree, Bachelor of Science. 

The Academical Course 

extends over three Collegiate years and is as full and symmetrical 
as the time will admit. It is intended to furnish the necessary 
discipline and instruction for a practical education. A diploma 
will be awarded to those who complete this course. 

The Musical Course, 

in addition to the regular studies of the subject, requires a gen- 
erous knowledge of such branches as are best suited to a mu- 
sical education. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 3 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Freshman Class. 



FALL TERM. 



Latin. — Livy, (Chase,) Roman Antiquities and Mythology. 
Greek. — Herodotus, (Mather,) Greek History, (Fyffe.) 
Mathematics . — Geometry — completed , and Trigonometry , 

(Wentworth.) 
Science. — Physiology, (Cutter.) Zoology — begun, (Orton.) 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero de Senectute, (Allen and Greenough,) 

Roman Literature. 
Greek. — Homer's Iliad, (Boise.) Old Greek Life, (Mahaffey.) 
Mathematics. — Spherical Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 
Science. — Zoology — completed. Botany, (Kellerman.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Horace — Odes, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Greek. — Homer's Iliad, (Boise.) 

History of Greek Literature, (Jebb.) 
Mathematics. — Conic Sections, (Wentworth.) 
Science. — Botany — completed. 

Sophomore Class. 

FALL TERM 

Latin. — Horace — Epistles, (Chase,) Quintilian, (Frieze.) 
Greek. — Memorabilia, (Winan,) Greek Testament, (Acts.) 
Mathematics. — Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 
Political Science. — Political Economy, (Perry. ) 
Literature. — English Literature, (Trimble.) [2.] 



•14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Tacitus — Germania, (Stuart.) Latin Composition, 

(Allen.) 
Greek. — Apology and Crito, (Dyer, ) Greek Testament, (Acts.) 
Mathematics. — Calculus, (Buckingham.) 
History. — History of Civilization, (Guizot.) 
Literature. — English Literature, (Trimble.) [3.] 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Tacitus — Agricola, (Stuart.) Writing Latin. 

Greek. — CEdipus Tyrannus, (White.) Greek Testament, 

(Romans.) 
Mathematics. — Surveying, (Wentworth.) 
Literature. — Study of American Authors. 

Junior Class. 
FALL TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero de Officiis, (Crowell.) [2.] 

Greek. — Demosthenes de Corona, (Tyler.) [3.] 

Logic and Political Science. — Logic, (McCosh.) Government 

Class Book, (Young.) 
Science. — Mechanics. 
Modern Language. — German Grammar, (Worman.) 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Terence — Andria et Adelphoe, (Crowell.) [3.] 
Greek. — Prometheus, (Mather.) [2.] 
Science. — Natural Philosophy. 
Rhetoric. — Science of Rhetoric, (Hill.) 

Modern Language. — German — Die Jungfrau von Orleans. 
(Schiller.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Juvenal — Selections, (Chase.) [3.] 

Greek. — Alcestis, (Woolsey.) [2.] 

Science. — Natural Philosophy. 

Ethics. —Evidences of Christianity, (Hopkins.) 

Modern Language. — German, Iphigenie auf Taurus. (Goethe.) 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 5 

Senior Class. 
FALL TERM. 

Psychology. — Mental Philosophy, (Haven.) 

Science. — Astronomy, (Loomis. ) Chemistry, (Avery's.; 

Modern Language. — French, (Otto's French Grammar and 

Exercises.) [3.] Hebrew, (Green.) 
History. — Ancient. [2.] 

WINTER TERM. 

Ethics. — Moral Philosophy, (Hickok.) 

Belles Lettres. — Elements of Criticism, (Kames.) 

Science. — Geology, (Dana,) begun. 

Modern Language. — French, Les Adventures de Telemaque, 

(Fenelon.) [3.] Hebrew, (Green.) 
History. — Mediaeval. [2.] 

SPRING TERM. 

Philosophy. — History of Philosophy, (Haven.) 

Religion — Analogy of Religion, (Butler.) Natural Law in 

Spiritual World, (Drummond.) 
Science. — Geology, (Dana,) completed. Mineralogy, (Dana.) 
Modern Language. — French, Literature Francaise, 

(Chapsal.) [3.] Hebrew, (Green.) 
History. — Modern . [ 2 . ] 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Freshman Class. 



FALL TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero's Orations, (Stuart,) Latin Composition, 

( Allen.) 
Mathematics. — Higher Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 
Science. — Geography of the Heavens. 
History. — General History, (Anderson.) 



1 6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Virgil's ^Eneid, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Mathematics. — Higher Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 
English. — English Analysis, (Greene.) 
Science. — Physical Geography, (Mitchell.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Virgil's iEneid, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 

Mathematics. — Algebra, (Wentworth. ) 

English. — Higher Lessons. 

Book-keeping. — Elements of Single and Double Entry, (Duff.) 

Sophomore Class. 
Latin. — Livy, (Chase,) Roman Antiquities and Mythology. 
Mathematics . — Algebra (Wentworth. ) 
Political Science. — Political Economy, (Perry.) 
Science. — Physiology, (Cutter,) Zoology — begun, (Orton. ) 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero de Senectute, (Allen and Greenough.) Roman 

Literature. 
Mathematics — Algebra, (Wentworth. ) 
History. — History of Civilization, (Guizot. ) 
Science. — Zoology — completed. Botany, (Kellerman.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Horace— Odes, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Mathematics. — Geometry, (Wentworth.) 4 books. 
Ethics. — Evidences of Christianity, (Hopkins,) 
Science.^— Botany — completed. (Kellerman. ) 

Junior Class. 
FALL TERM. 

Logic and Political Science. — Logic, (McCosh.) Government 

Class Book, (Young.) 
Science. — Mechanics. 
Mathematics. — Geometry — completed, Plane Trigonometry, 

(Wentworth.) 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 7 

Modern Language. — German or French, and Ancient History. 
Literature. — English Literature, (Trimble.) [2.] 

WINTER TERM. 

Rhetoric. — Science of Rhetoric, (Hill.) 
Science. — Natural Philosophy. 

Mathematics. — Spherical Trigonometry, (Wentworth.) 
Modern Language. — German, or French, and Mediaeval His- 
tory. 
Literature English Literature, (Trimble.) [3.] 

SPRING TERM. 

Literature. — American Authors. 

Science. — Natural Philosophy. 

Mathematics. — Conic Sections, (Wentworth.) 

Modern Language. — German, or French, and Modern History. 

Senior Class. 
FALL TERM. 

Psychology. — Mental Philosophy, (Haven.) 

Science. — Astronomy, (Loomis,) Chemistry, (Avery's.) 

Mathematics . — Analytical Geometry, (Wentworth.) 

WINTER TERM. 

Ethics. — .Moral Philosophy, (Hickok.) 
Belles-Lettres. — Elements of Criticism, (Kames.) 
Science. — Geology, (Dana,) begun. 
Mathematics. — Calculus, ( Buckingham . ) 

SPRING TERM. 

Philosophy. — History of Philosophy, (Haven.) 
Religion. — Analogy of Religion, (Butler.) 
Science. — Geology — completed. Mineralogy, (Dana.) 
Mathematics. — Surveying, (Wentworth. ) 



1 8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



ACADEMICAL COURSE. 



First Year. 



FALL TERM. 



German or Latin — Elective. I Orthography. (2.) 

Algebra. ! Bible History. 

English Grammar. (3.) ' Science of Government. 



WINTER TERM. 



German or Latin — Elective. Physical Geography. 
English Analysis. Algebra. 



SPRING TERM. 



German or Latin — Elective. Higher English. 
Geometry. Book-keeping. 



Second Year. 



FALL TERM. 



French or Latin — Elective. Political Economy. 

Physiology and Hygiene. English Literature. (2.) 

Geometry — Plane Trigonom- 
etry. 



WINTER TERM. 



French or Latin — Elective. I Botany — begun. 



Rhetoric. 

Spherical Trigonometry or Zo- 
ology — Elective. 



English Literature. (3.) 



SPRING TERM. 



French or Latin — Elective. 
Surveying or Evidences of 
Christianity — Elective. 



Study of American Authors. 
Botany — completed . 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
Third Year. 



*9 



Mental Philosophy, 
Chemistry. 



History of Civilization, 
Natural Philosophy. 



Mineralogy, 
Analogy of Religion, 



FALL TERM. 

Mechanics. 
Astronomy. 

WINTER TERM. 



Moral Philosophy, 
Geology. 



SPRING TERM- 



History of Philosophy, 
Natural Philosophy, 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



rvjusicem Bourses. 



PIANO COURSE. 



First Year, 
FALL TERM. 

Piano. — Wieck's Technical Exercises, Heller's Studies, op. 47, 

Book I. dementi's Sonatinas. 
Academical Studies, — English Grammar, German. 

WINTER TERM. 

Piano. — Wieck's Technical Exercises continued, Heller's 

studies, op. 47, Book II. Reinecke's Sonatinas. 
Academical Studies, — English Analysis, German. 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano. — Wieck's Exercises continued, Krause's Studies, op. 2, 
Czerny's Octave Studies, op. 553, Kiihlau's Sonatinas, 
Selections from standard composers. 

Academical Studies,— Higher English, German, 

Second Year. 
FALL TERM. 

Piano. — Wieck's Exercises continued, Heller's Studies, op. 46, 
Book I. Czerny's Daily Studies, Mendelssohn's "Songs 
without Words." 

Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony. 

Academical Studies. — French or Italian. 

WINTER TERM. 

Piano. — Heller's Studies, op. 46, Book II. Czerny's Daily 
Studies, Mozart's and Haydn's Sonatas. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 21 

Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony continued. 
Academical Studies -Rhetoric, French or Italian. 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano. — Loeschhorn's Trill Studies, op. 165, Kullak's Octave 
Studies, op. 48. Chopin's Waltzes, Mazurkas, Fantasies, 
and Nocturnes. (Chopin's Album.) 

Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony concluded. 

Academical Studies . — French or Italian. 

Third Year. 
FALL TERM. 

Piano.— Technical Exercises continued, Cramer's Studies, 
Book I. Selections from Weber and Chopin. Compo- 
sitions for four hands. 

Academical Studies. — English Literature. 

WINTER TERM. 

Piano.— Technical Studies continued, Cramer's Studies, Book 

I finished. Book II begun, approximating metronome 
time. Selections from Schubert, Schumann and Grieg. 
Compositions for four or eight hands. 

Academical Studies. — English Literature, 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano -Technical Studies concluded, Cramer's Studies, Book 

II completed. Selections from Bach, Beethoven's Sona- 
tas, Nos. 1, 8, 12, 21, 23, or 27. Compositions for eight 
and sixteen hands. 

Academical Studies. — American Literature. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 
COURSE IN VOICE CULTURE, 



First Year. 
FALL TERM. 

Voice. — Instruction in the Mechanism of the Voice, proper use 
of the Respiratory Organs, Development of Pure Tone — 
Concone's 30 Exercises, Concone's 50 Lessons — -begun, or 
for Contralto Voices, Liitgen's Studies, or Concone's Me- 
thod for Bass. Easy Songs and Ballads. 

Piano. — New England Conservatory Method and Loeschhorn's 
Studies, op. 65, Book I. 

Academical Studies. — English Grammar, German. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice.. — Study of the Union of the Registers, Study of the 
Vowels and Consonants — Concone's 50 Lessons, or Liit- 
gen's Studies. Easy Songs and Ballads. 

Piano. — New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's 
Studies, op. 65, Book II. 

Academical Studies. — English Analysis, German. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice. — Application of Words to Music. Concone's 50 Lessons 
or Liitgen's Studies completed — Concone's op. 10, Book I, 
begun. Songs from Abt, Curschman, Schubert, Mendels- 
sohn and Schumann. 

Piano. — New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's 
Studies op. 52, Book I, Reinicke's op. 107, and other 
pleasing pieces. 

Academical Studies. — Higher English, German. 
Second Year. 
FALL TERM. 

Voice. — Scales, Arpeggios and Velocity Exercises continued — 
Concone's op. 10, Book I, completed. Songs from Abt, 
Curschman, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Schumann, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 23 

Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony. 
Academical Studies. — French or Italian. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice. — Concone, op. 10, Book II. Bonaldi's Exercises for 

Vocalization. Songs from Standard Composers. 
Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony — continued. 
Academical Studies. — Rhetoric, French or Italian. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice. — Concone, op. 10, Book II, and Bonaldi's Exercises 
completed. Songs of a more difficult grade from standard 
composers. 

Theory. — Emery's Elements of Harmony — concluded. 

Academical Studies. — French or Italian. 

Third Year. 

FALL TERM. 

Voice. — Exercising in Phrasing, Execution and Expression — 
Concone, op. 12, Book I. Songs of more difficult char- 
acter, Duet, Trio and Quartet Singing. 

Academical Studies. — English Literature. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice. — General finishing Exercises in Phrasing, Execution 
and Expression — Concone, op. 12, Book II. More dif- 
ficult Songs from Classic Composers. 

Academical Studies. — English Literature. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice. — Vacca's Practical Method for Italian Singing, Difficult 

Songs and Arias. 
Academical Studies. — American Literature. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



pREpemaTORY Bourses. 



CLASSICAL. 



First Year. 
FALL TERM. 



Latin.— -^Grammar, (Allen and Greenough,) Lessons, (Jones.) 

Mathematics. — Higher Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 

Science. — Geography of the Heavens. 

Bible Instruction. — Bible History, (Blaikie.) 



WINTER TERM. 

Latin.— Grammar, Lessons and Caesar, (Stuart.) 
Greek. — Grammar, (Goodwin,) Lessons, (White.) 
Mathematics. — Higher Arithmetic, (Robinson.) 
Science. — Physical Geography, (Mitchell.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Caesar, (Stuart,) and Latin Composition, (Allen.) 

Greek. — Grammar, (Goodwin,) Lessons, (White.) 

Mathematics. — Algebra, ( Wentworth. ) 

History. — United States History, (Anderson.) 

Science. — Ancient Geography, (Mitchell,) Mythology, (3.) 

Second Year. 
FALL TERM. 

Latin. — Cicero'sOrations, (Stuart,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Greek. — Anabasis, (Goodwin,) Greek Composition, (Jones.) 
Mathematics. — Algebra, (Wentworth. ) 
History. — General History, (Anderson.) 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 25 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Virgil's yEneid, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Greek. — Anabasis, (Goodwin,) Greek Composition, (Jones.) 
Mathematics. — Algebra, (Wentworth. ) 
English. — Elements of Rhetoric, (Hill.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Virgil's ..Eneid, (Chase,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
Greek. — Anabasis, (Goodwin,) Greek Composition, (Jones.) 
Mathematics. — Geometry, (Wentworth.) [4 Books.] 
English. — Higher Lessons. 
Book- Keeping. — Elements of Single and Double Entry, (Duff.) 



SCIENTIFIC. 



FALL TERM. 

Latin. — Grammar, (Allen and Greenough,) Lessons, (Jones.) 
Bible Instruction. — Bible History, (Blaikie.) 
Mathematics. — -Arithmetic, (Robinson's Complete.) 
English. — Grammar, (Greene . ) 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin. — Grammar and Lessons, Csesar, (Stuart.) 

English. — Elements of Rhetoric, (Hill.) Grammar, (Greene.) 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, (Robinson's Complete.) 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin. — Caesar, (Stuart,) Latin Composition, (Allen.) 
History. — United States History, (Anderson.) 
Mathematics . — Arithmetic, (Robinson's Complete.) 
English. — Grammar, ( Greene. ) 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



ACADEMICAL COURSE. 



Preparatory Year. 
FALL TERM. 

English Grammar, (3), Descriptive Geography, (2), Arith- 
metic, Reading and Phonetic Analysis, Penmanship, (2), Or- 
thography, (3). 

WINTER TERM. 

English Grammar, (3), Descriptive Geography, {2), Arith- 
metic, Reading and Phonetics, (3), Orthography, (2), Ele- 
ments of Rhetoric. 

SPRING TERM. 

United States History, English Grammar, (3), Descriptive Ge- 
ography, (2), Arithmetic, Reading and Phonetics, (3), Orthog- 
raphy, (2). 



MUSICAL COURSE. 



Preparatory Year. 

The Preparatory year of the Musical Course contains all the 
studies of the Academical Preparatory year and adds the fol- 
lowing : 

FALL TERM. 

The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's 
Studies, op. 65, Book I. 

WINTER TERM. 

The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's 
Studies, op. 55, Book II. 

SPRING TERM. 

The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's 
Studies, op. 52, Book I, Reinicke, op. 107, Schumann's 
" Scenes from Childhood," and other pleasing pieces. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 27 

GENERAL PREPARATORY. 

During each term of the Collegiate year, two classes in Arith- 
metic are organized ; also, two classes in Green's English 
Grammar, one in Analysis, and one in Definitions and Parsing ; 
also, classes in Reading, Drawing, Penmanship, Mitchell's De- 
scriptive Geography, and a class in Book-keeping. 



NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 

It has been our custom for a number of years to provide a 
Normal Department for the instruction of teachers or of those 
who intend to teach, and our work has been appreciated. 
More recently the department has been more fully developed, 
the course enlarged, the number of instructors increased, and 
more general facilities provided. This Normal Department is 
in session only during the Spring Term. 

Course of Instruction. 

United States History, (Anderson or Swinton) ; Physical 
Geography, (Mitchell or Warren) ; Political Geography, 
(Mitchell) ; Civil Government, (Young) ; English Grammar, 
(Raub or Greene) ; Higher English, (Raub or Greene) ; Read- 
ing, (Appleton's Fifth) ; Orthography, (Raub) ; Physiology, 
(Mill); Written Arithmetic, A, (Brooks' Normal); Written 
Arithmetic, B, (Brooks r Normal) ; Mental Arithmetic, A and 
B, (Brooks') ; Algebra, (Robinson's Elementary) ; Theory of 
Teaching, (Raub or Baldwin) ; Latin Grammar, Beginning, 
(Allen & Greenough's Grammar and Jones' Lessons). 

In addition to these the regular college work, including the 
Higher Mathematics, Sciences, &c, offers opportunities for ad- 
vanced work that some may desire to improve, in so far as they 
do not conflict with their regular normal work. 

Lectures by prominent educators on various phases of the 
educational work will be freely provided, to add variety, interest, 
and inspiration. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Department of Instruction. 



MENTAL AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY. 



Mental and Moral Sciences. In the Senior year of the 
Classical and Scientific courses, students are admitted to the 
study of Psychology and Ethics. These subjects are taught by 
means of text-books and interlocutory methods, and it is ex- 
pected that those who pursue them will attain a fair knowledge 
of the history and present status of these sciences. 

Seventeen weeks are devoted to the study of Psychology, and 
eleven weeks to the study of Ethics, with five recitations in each 
per week. 

Apologetics. Analogy of Religion and Evidences of Chris- 
tianity are studied in the Senior and Junior years, twelve weeks 
being devoted to each. Written theses are required, setting 
forth, briefly, the arguments of the authors' and students' views 
concerning them. In the study of these subjects, there are ex- 
ercises in the review of authors and their criticism. 

Philosophy. This subject is taught with reference to origin 
and development of pure philosophical inquiry ; and to a com- 
parison of the various systems, both "Ancient" and "Modern." 

Social Science. Political Economy opens to the student 
the subject of individual and national well-being, and treats 
scientifically the living questions, Production, Distribution and 
Consumption. 

Seventeen weeks are devoted to this subject during the Sopho- 
more year, and it is expected that intelligent views will be 
reached as to the theories of tariff. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 2Q 



LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



In this department the design is to give thorough instruction 
in the language and literature of the Romans. The authors 
whose writings are studied are Csesar, Cicero, Virgil, Livy, 
Horace, Quintilian, Tacitus, Terence and Juvenal. In the earlier 
stages the learner's attention is especially directed to the mastery 
of inflections, to the elements of the words declined and conju- 
gated, so as to obtain a perfect familiarity with the stems, signs, 
and endings. As the study advances Syntax is taken up, and 
by constant reviews of the Grammar, the knowledge obtained 
is confirmed and enlarged. To acquire the ability to translate 
faithfully and elegantly is a leading object. Students are asked 
to show the construction of the text, explain the derivation of 
words and apply the principles of grammar, m connection 
with the reading of the poets particular attention is given to 
Prosody. 

Latin Composition is studied with care. After the text-book 
is completed there are regular exercises in writing Latin esrays. 

The Continental method of pronunciation is used. From 
the beginning pupils are taught correct accent and quantity, and 
by careful practice are trained to read the Latin text with facil- 
ity and grace. 

During the Winter Term lectures are delivered every week, 
on the History of Roman Literature, before the class studying 
that subject, in which the early stages of its growth are traced, 
and the most prominent writers, from the time of Livius An- 
dronicus up to the patriotic era, are presented. Especially are 
the illustrious authors of the Augustine age and their works 
made the subjects of treatment. It is the aim in these lectures 
to give to the students of Latin Literature a comprehensive view 
of the subject, and to infuse a desire for the study of those 
literary masterpieces which have so long maintained an honored 
place among the educated classes of all civilized lands. 



3<D LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The following books of reference are recommended : White 
and Riddle's, or Leverett's Latin Lexicon, Roby's or Zumpt's 
Latin Grammar, Doederlein's Latin Synonyms, Johnston's Clas- 
sical Atlas, Mommsen's History of Rome, Ellis' Quantative 
Pronunciation of Latin, and Corssen's Ausprache, Vocalismus, 
und Betonung der Lateinischen Sprache. 



GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



The subjects taught in this department are the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature, the History of Greece, the History of 
Greek Literature, Antiquities and Comparative Philology. 

In the Preparatory Classes the student is thoroughly drilled 
in the inflections of the language, and words are carefully ex- 
amined with reference to the application of the laws of euphonic 
change and rules of construction. 

Written and oral translations, from Greek into English and 
from English into Greek, are given throughout the first two 
years. In all of these exercises strict attention is paid to the 
grammatical principles involved, and the laws of accent are 
carefully applied. 

A greater familiarity with idioms and the spirit of the lan- 
guage is acquired by means of the "Modern Method" of teach- 
ing languages — by questions and answers in the original\ongue. 

In the higher classes, special attention is given to the style, 
spirit and subject matter of the author. With these recitations 
are connected exercises in Comparative Philology and Histori- 
cal Etymology, in derivative words, tracing the transition from 
the primary meaning to secondary and figurative meanings, and 
observing the interchange of words through the cognate tongues. 

The Greek Testament is studied throughout the Sophomore 
year, one recitation per week. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 3 1 

Books of Reference. Anthon's Classical Dictionary, An- 
trum's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, Allen-Had - 
ley's Greek Grammar, Veitch's Greek Verbs, Kuhner's Greek 
Grammar, Mahaffey's Greek Literature, Symond's Greek Poets, 
Papillion's Comparative Philology, Grote's History of Greece, 
Goodwin's Greek Moods and Tenses, Homeric Grammar, 
Grote's Plato, and introduction to the Rhythmic and Metric of 
the Classical Languages, Ginn and Co.'s Classical Atlas. 



MATHEMATICS. 



Geometry and Trigonometry. Geometry is a two-fold 
science, being demonstrative reasoning, and a system of prac- 
tical truths. In the study of this science we seek to bring out 
the meaning and practical utility of the abstract propositions, 
and seek to enable the student to feel that he deals with com- 
mon affairs, and not with abstractions of the imagination. By 
frequent application of practical problems, the principles are 
fixed in the student's mind, and thought is developed ; indeed 
practical applications are essential to a full apprehension of geo- 
metrical truths, otherwise the science becomes a mere discussion 
of abstract propositions. The work preceding the proportion- 
alities and measurement of polygons, circles, and solids is done 
in the Preparatory year. There are exercises in original inves- 
tigation and application of Algebra to Geometry. 

One-half of the Freshman year is devoted to Plane and Spher- 
ical Trigonometry. Students apply the principles to the meas- 
uring of heights and distances, and to Astronomy, as a part of 
class exercise. 

Calculus and Surveying. The study of Calculus is taught 
during the Sophomore year, and is required of all students. 

Surveying occupies the Spring term of the Sophomore year. 
Instruction is given in practical surveying, and the student is 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

taught, by use of instruments and field-practice, to be self-reliant 
and thorough. 

Books of Reference. Peck's Mathematical Dictionary, 
Gauss' Theory of Numbers, Todhunter's General Theory of 
Equations, Salmon's Modern Higher Algebra, Newcomb's or 
Wentworth's Geometry and Trigonometry, and Olney's General 
Geometry. 



NATURAL SCIENCE. 



The College does not propose to make specialists in any of 
the departments of Science ; yet, the design is to teach thor- 
oughly, and as minutely as time will permit, all the subjects 
embraced in this Department. 

Students begin the study of Science with Physical Geography 
in the first year of the Preparatory Course, and finish with 
Geology in the last term of the Senior year. 

Geography of the Heavens and Physical Geography to- 
gether cover the Fall and Winter terms of the Preparatory — 
first year ; the studies being so arranged as to give the most fa- 
vorable season for the study of the constellations and heavenly 
bodies. 

Physiology, including Anatomy and Hygiene, is studied by 
Freshmen. The study of Anatomy will be aided, as far as 
practicable, by dissection of important organs, such as heart, 
eye, etc., of ox or sheep, and by the use of the microscope. 

Zoology, embracing the Topics, Biology, Comparative Anat- 
omy, and Geographical Distribution of Animals, is begun in the 
latter part of the Fall teim of the Freshman year, and extends 
through the Winter term. 

Botany, structural and physiological, is studied by the use of 
text book and microscopic specimens; Systematic Botany, by 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. $$ 

the analysis of specimens in the class-room and in the field. It 
is a Spring term study of the Freshman year. 

Natural Philosophy is studied by the Juniors during the 
entire year, devoting the Fall term to Mechanics and Hydrosta- 
tics ; Winter and Spring terms to Pneumatics and Physics. 

Chemistry. — Instruction in Theoretical and Descriptive 
Chemistry is given during the Fall term of the Senior year. A 
considerable time will be given to lectures and laboratory work. 

Mineralogy and Geology are studied by the Seniors during 
the Winter and Spring terms. A short course in Mineralogy 
follows the study of Dynamical and Historical Geology. 

Books of Reference. 

In connection with the study of text books, students should 
read as much collateral matter as time will allow. The follow- 
ing books will be found valuable as furnishing fuller treatment 
of subjects than it is possible to give in text books : Huxley's 
Physiology or Dalton's Human Physiology ; Packard's Zoology ; 
Gray's Structural Botany ; Plantl and Vine's Botany ; Dana's 
Mechanics; Atkinson's Ganot's Physics or Deschanel's Natural 
Philosophy ; Cook's The New Chemistry ; Wurtz's The Atomic 
Theory; Dana's Manual of Geology, Le Conte's Geology; 
Nicholson's Ancient Life History of the Earth. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



In this department are taught English Grammar, Analysis, 
Higher English, Elements of Rhetoric, General History, Bible 
History, Logic, Science of Government, Science of Rhetoric, 
History of Civilization, Elements of Criticism, and English 
Literature. 

We seek to bring to view the structure and uses of the Ian- 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

guage, not only by the study of rules, but by careful study of 
the best literary models, and original composition. Higher 
Lessons in English afford opportunities to those desiring ad- 
vanced drill in the art of expression and composition. The 
Elements of Rhetoric are studied in the Preparatory Depart- 
ment in a practical way, while the Science of Rhetoric, a sub- 
ject pursued by the Juniors, supplements this drill by a much 
more systematic and scientific study of the forms of Prose, 
Poetry and Style. 

The view taken of the history of the world is, from necessity, 
somewhat cursory, but sufficient to create a taste for historical 
study. The history of our own country is studied during the 
Spring term. The Fall term of seventeen weeks is given to the 
study of Bible History, which all are required to study with 
the same care that they do the other branches of the curriculum. 

The " History of Civilization " is taught from text-books, 
but is supplemented by a series of dissertations, the subjects of 
which are assigned students at the beginni ng of the term, and 
which they are required to prepare either for oral or written 
delivery before the class. 

Logic is studied by the Juniors. Special attention is given 
the forms of correct argument and fallacy. 

The Science of Government, embracing a rapid, yet com- 
plete view of our political system , is taught with reference es- 
pecially to the duties of good citizenship. 

Elements of Criticism, as related to the beautiful in nature 
and art, and a knowledge of the principles of good taste, is 
studied in the Senior year. 

English Literature, taught by both manual and the works 
of the standard authors, is made one of the most interesting 
and important branches of this department. Our constant aim 
is to awaken new interest in the study of our own language and 
literature, and, whatever the study, the student may feel that 
his training in English is not neglected. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 35 

Books of Reference. 

The College Library is well supplied with histories and liter- 
ature bearing upon the subjects of this department, to some of 
which the student is referred almost daily, and in some instances 
required to examine for special information. The Library is 
our great ally and aid in instruction. 

For special reference, the following are recommended : 
Welsh's Development of the English Literature and Lan- 
guage; Townsend's Art of Speech, Vols. I and II; Smith's 
Old and New Testament History ; Whitney's Language and 
the Study of Language ; Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage ; Stille's Studies in Medieval History. 

Astronomy. 

Astronomy occupies seventeen weeks of Senior year. The 
instruction is both by use of text-book and lectures which em- 
brace the latest discoveries and researches. In some respects 
the instruction is mathematical, as the students are required to 
find the periodic time and mass of planets, sun's rising and 
setting and beginning, and duration of twilight, eclipses, &c. 

Students will have some practice with an Achromatic Tele- 
scope. They will be required, as a part of class work, to make 
observations of the Sun, Planets, Clusters of Stars, &c. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 



Instruction is imparted in German and French by exercises 
in translation, by conversational practice and by writing. It is 
the aim in this department so to master these languages, that 
they may become of practical value. In addition to the text- 
books named in the course, the following are recommended : 
Adler's German and English Dictionary, and Spier's and Su- 
renne's French Pronouncing Dictionary. 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 



Music Course. 



The course of instruction in either Piano or Voice will occupy 
three years. A Preparatory year is also required of those who 
expect to enter upon the regular course, and are not already 
familiar with the rudiments of music. Pupils may devote their 
entire time to music, or take it in connection with other studies. 
The stated time for completing the course may be lengthened or 
shortened, according to the advancement of the pupil. Some 
pupils will accomplish in two years what would take others three 
or four years to complete. A knowledge of the elements of 
Harmony will be required, or one year's study, in order to 
graduate in either Piano or Voice. At the close of each term a 
written exa mination is made. A graduate in Voice is also ex- 
pected to acquire a degree of proficiency on the Piano, sufficient 
to enable him to play his own accompaniments. 

Private and Class Lessons. 

Private lessons will be given at extra cost, but the class system 
is strongly recommended. It is practiced in the best conserva- 
tories of this country and Europe. Mendelssohn says : "It has 
a dvantages over private instruction ; it produces industry, spurs 
on to emulation and preserves against one-sidedness of educa- 
tion and taste." " The student of music will as surely fail of 
a complete musical education, by taking private instruction 
alone, as would the student of science without the advantage of 
the College or University." 

Students in Piano are arranged in classes of two. Voice cul- 
ture pupils in classes of two or four. Harmony students in 
classes of four or six. 

Elements of music, sight-singing and part-singing classes free 
to all music pupils. Public recitals are given by the music 
pupils every two months. 

Pupils will take practice in ensemble playing. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 37 

Recitations. 

Classes in cultivation of the voice, piano-forte, organ, har- 
mony, and chorus practice receive two lessons a week. Stu- 
dents may enter at any time, but it is very desirable that they 
should begin with the term on account of grading, time of 
lessons, &c. A careful examination is made by the teacher in 
charge, regarding the proficiency of all new pupils, that they 
may be properly classified in the course. 

Sheet music, books, &c, can be obtained at reduced rates. 

Those who complete the required course of study in either 
Piano or Voice are awarded a diploma. Diplomas will be con- 
ferred only at the Annual Commencement. 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



This department is well supplied with studies from the best 
artists, new additions being made from time to time. Ample 
opportunities are afforded for obtaining instruction in Free-hand 
Drawing, both from casts and the flat, Modelling in Clay, 
Painting in Oil, China and Water Colors. It is intended to 
impart essential principles while training the eye and hand to 
accurate aud successful practice. 

Special advantages in this department are afforded by a sys- 
tem of giving daily lessons, which is not customary in schools 
not especially devoted to Art. 

Students will find works of interest and assistance in the Col- 
lege Library. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



(Jenerbl Information 



T EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE is located at Annville. 
i-V This village is noted for its healthfulness and freedom 
from those temptations to vice so common to cities and large 
towns. It is accessible from all points, being located on the 
direct route of railroad travel from Harrisburg, via Reading, to 
Philadelphia or New York. Trains stopping at Annville leave 
Harrisburg and Reading seven times a day, Sunday excepted. 

Buildings and Grounds. 

There are two large brick buildings, capable of accommoda- 
ting a large number of students. The rooms are arranged for 
two students each, are well ventilated, contain clothes-presses 
and other conveniences. 

There has recently been erected a third building, containing 
the Library, a large and well-lighted Art-Room, two Music 
Rooms, the entire Department of Natural Science, with its 
Laboratory and Museum. There is also a fine campus of about 
six acres. - 

The Ladies' Hall is entirely separate from the other 
premises, and is under the immediate care of the Preceptress. 
Young ladies from abroad are furnished a comfortable and pleas- 
ant home, where they have every advantage for study and 
general improvement. Non-resident students board in the In- 
stitution, where they are under the continual care of the Presi- 
dent and Professors. 

Furnishing and Outfit. 

Students are required to furnish their own bedding, except 
the mattress, bolster and pillows. They should have their blan- 
kets, sheets, pillow-cases and clothing indelibly marked with 
their full name. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 39 

Spending Money. 

Patrons are kindly but urgently reminded that students need 
very little pocket money. 

It should be remembered that luxurious habits and good 
scholarship seldom go together, and that the principles and 
practice of economy are essential to a good education. 

For All. 

It is desired that the facilities of the College be kept within 
the reach of all, and it is therefore urged that jewelry be left at 
home, and that in dress there be no vain display of wealth. 

All that is beyond a becoming neatness should be discarded 

by the student.* 

Discipline. 

The object of the Institution is to afford a home, where pa- 
rents or guardians may place their sons, daughters, and wards, 
with safety and profit, and where young men and young women 
may be fitted for usefulness under influences calculated to refine 
their tastes, ennoble their aspirations, discipline their intellectual 
powers, and develop a high Christian character. The Govern- 
ment of the College is strict but parental, making its appeal 
to the student's own sense of honor, but no one habitually 
guilty of immoral practices, or who is persistently disorderly, 
can be tolerated in the institution. Every unexcused absence, 
failure, or misdemeanor of a student is reported to the Faculty, 
and a record made of the same. 

The first three demerit marks will subject the student to pri- 
vate reproof; the first six to reproof before the Faculty; the first 
nine to reproof in public, with notice to parent or guardian ; 
and the first twelve to dismission from the College. 

The Faculty may, on evidence of reformation, restore a dis- 
missed student. 

Studies and Recitation. 

Students are required to pursue the studies of the classes to 
which they are assigned, unless exempted for special reasons. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

No student is permitted to take a study to which he has not 
been assigned, nor to discontinue a study without permission 
obtained from the Faculty. 

Grading. 

Students are graded on their work in the Recitation Room. 
The standard of perfection in scholarship is ioo. The stu- 
dent's standing is determined by the average of his term and 
examination grades. A grade of less than 65 per centum will 
compel the student to submit to a second examination, or to re- 
peat the study with the next lower class. 

Parents having children in the College classes, and desiring 
their report and grades, may obtain them by applying to the 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

Examinations. 

Regular examinations are held at the close of each term. 
The examinations are intended to be thorough, and have an in- 
fluence in determining the standing of the student. 

In all cases, when from any cause a student has failed to be 
present at the regular examination, he shall undergo an exam- 
ination before being permitted again to recite in the classes of 
the College. 

The final examinations of the Seniors are held two weeks 
before Commencement, from which time they are subject only 
to such duties as are required for their preparation for gradua - 
tion. 

Candidates for class standing other than those who have reg- 
ularly pursued their studies at the College, or who bring certifi- 
cates of class standing in other institutions, are required to pass 
special examinations, either at the beginning or end of a term. 

Promotion. 

At the beginning of each term, the old classes are re-organ- 
ized and new ones formed. At or near the close of each 
academic year, the names of all the members of each class, sep- 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 4 1 

arately, come before the Faculty for promotion, and those of 
the Senior Class for graduation, and no student is promoted to 
a higher class, or to graduation, except upon the unanimous 
vote of the Faculty. 

Rhetorical Exercise. 

All students upon entering the Institution are assigned to 
rhetorical classes, which are met on Wednesday of each week by 
members of the Faculty for literary drill. These Rhetoricals, 
together with the Literary Societies, afford sufficient opportuni- 
ties for exercise in Composition and Oratory. Advanced classes 
in the College are required to take part in public exercises two 
or three times a year. 

Leave of Absence. 

No student is allowed to be absent during the term without 
special permission. The absence of a student, for even a day, 
during his term-time, exerts on his progress an evil influence, 
which is seldom fully appreciated by parents and guardians ; 
hence no apology, but that of sickness or unavoidable accident, 
is sufficient to excuse a student from regular attendance at 
recitation. 

No student, during the term, is expected to quit the Institu- 
tion without the consent of the President and Faculty. 

Any one withdrawing from the Institution during term-time 
without giving due notice and having permission to do so, will 
be marked upon the records as having irregularly withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class must present to 
the Professor in charge a written excuse for being absent. 

Religious Exercises. 

Religious service is held in the College Chapel on the morn- 
ing of each day, and all students are required to attend. 

Students from abroad, who are residents of the College, are 
also required to attend public worship on the Sabbath in the 
United Brethren Church, unless otherwise directed by the 
Faculty, except those who on account of church membership, 



. 2 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

or wish of parent or guardian, may prefer to attend church 
elsewhere. 

A students' prayer meeting, to which all are invited, is held 
on each Tuesday evening. 

Y. M. C. A. 

There is a thrifty organization of the Young Men's Christian 
Association in the College which holds its meetings on Satur- 
day night of each week. The moral influence of this organi- 
zation is very salutary in the Institution. 

Literary Societies. 

There are connected with the College three literary societies 
— the Clionian, the Philokosmian, and the Kalozetean. The 
first is the Ladies' society. Each has its proper hall and its own 
library. These societies are regarded as valuable aids to college 
work, and students are advised to join one of them. 
Physical Culture. 

A well equipped gymnasium is in operation in the main Col- 
lege building, to which all students have access at stated times by 
the payment of a small fee. A careful "Director" has over- 
sight of these exercises to guard against accidents and immod- 
eration. 

In addition to the physical discipline of the gymnasium, the 
students are required to take regular exercise in the open air 
when the weather will admit of it, and every precaution is taken 
to foster health. 

Help for Indigent Students. 

The College has methods of assisting a limited number of 
worthy young men who have not the means of defraying their 
own expenses, and yet scores apply from year to year, both of 
ladies and gentlemen, whom we have not the means to help. 
May not the statement ot this fact be a sufficient appeal to lead 
many to endow scholarships, the income of which will be suf- 
ficient to help to an education those who could not otherwise 
obtain it? 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 43 

Libraries and Cabinets. 

The College Library, to which all the students have daily 
access without charge, contains twenty-six hundred volumes. 
The libraries of the literary societies also comprise a respectable 
number of well-selected and standard volumes. The libraries 
are constantly increasing by donations from friends and from 
the proceeds of a constantly accruing fund. 

The cabinet contains a collection of specimens in Miner- 
alogy, Geology and Natural History. 

Reading Room. 

There is in the College a well-stocked Reading Room which 
is daily accessible to the students, and in connection with it a 
Natural History Club which operates in conjunction with the 
corresponding department of the institution. 

A small fee is charged for reading room privileges. 

Degrees. 

Bachelor of Arts. — This degree is conferred in course upon 
any student of the College who completes the studies of the 
Classical Course, and passes a satisfactory examination upon the 
same. 

Bachelor of Science. — This degree is conferred in course 
upon any student who completes the studies of the Scientific 
Course and passes a satisfactory examination upon the same. 

Master of Arts. — This degree is, on application, conferred 
upon any Bachelor of Arts, who has, for at least three years 
after his graduation, devoted himself to literary or professional 
pursuits, and has, during the same time, sustained a good moral 
character. Fee, five dollars. 

Inquiries Concerning Departments. 

Persons wishing more detailed information than is given in 
this catalogue, as to courses of study, methods of instruction, 
examinations, etc., may address the President or the Professor 
in charge of the department concerned. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Schedule. 

At the end of each term a Schedule of the College Exercises 
for the ensuing terra is issued. Every student must take the 
equivalent of at least fifteen periods of recitation each week, 
unless excused by special action of the Faculty. 

S. S. Normal Class. 

A Normal Class for the instruction of Sunday School Teach- 
ers is conducted on each Sabbath by one of the Professors, 
The course of instruction extends over one year, and is the 
one provided for and used by the Bible Normal Union. A 
diploma issued by the Sunday School Board of the United 
Brethren Church is granted to students who complete the course, 

Lecture Course. 

A course of Popular Lectures will be delivered during the 
Fall and Winter Terms by some of the most noted lecturers in 
the field. 

During the past year the following lecturers were engaged : 

Prof. Henry Houck, Deputy State Supt. ; Prof. R. M. Mc- 
Neal, Prof. Jas. M. Coughlin, Prof. S. O. Goho, Rev. M. P. 
Doyle, D. D., Rev. Jahu De Witt Miller, Corporal Tanner, 
and others. 

In addition to these lectures, there was a lecture each week 
by a member of the Faculty. 

Announcement and Suggestions. 

From time to time additions are being made of apparatus for 
philosophical and laboratory purposes as "well as of specimens 
of scientific and historic interest. Many of these additions are 
the gifts of friends to whom the College makes grateful ac- 
knowledgment. 

The institution is prepared to suitably preserve and exhibit 
all specimens of any value, and in all cases the wishes of donors 
will be respected. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 45 

Specimens in Geology, Mineralogy, Botany and Zoology are 
especially solicited. 

Contributions to the College Library will also be highly ap- 
preciated, especially of old and rare books and manuscripts, 
which are liable to be lost if they are not deposited in the li- 
brary of a permanent institution. 

Books, specimens and antique relics should be addressed to 
the librarian or Professor of the Natural Science Department, 
with the donor's name legibly signed. 

Terms and Vacations. 

The Collegiate Year is divided into three terms. 

The Fall Term will begin Monday, August 27th, 18S8, and 
will end on Friday, December 21st, 1888. 

The Winter Term will begin on Monday, January 7th, 1889, 
and will close on Friday, March 21st, 1889. 

The Spring Term will begin Monday, March 24th, 1889, and 
will close on Thursday, June 12th, 1889. 

Students should enter } if possible^ on the first day of the 
term. 



4 6 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Expenses. 



Boarding, washing (12 plain pieces per week), light, fuel, room rent and 
tuition in Literary Department in any four (4) branches, or regular work 
per term : 

Fall Term, seventeen weeks, $78 00 

Winter Term, eleven weeks, 52 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Total per year, $ 1 86 00 



FALL 


WINTER 


SPRING 


TERM. 


TERM. 


TERM. 


5l7 OO 


#H 


00 


#12 OO 


x 5 5° 


IO 


00 


II OO 


14 00 


9 


00 


10 00 


12 00 


8 


00 


9 00 


4 25 


2 


75 


3 °° 


3 °° 


2 


00 


2 25 
9 OO 


1 so 


1 


00 


I OO 


2 75 


2 


00 


2 OO 


5 00 


3 25 


3 5° 



Tuition, per term in Literary Department, any Four 
Higher Branches, 

Any Two Higher Branches and Two Common 
Branches, 

Any One Higher Branch and Three Common 
Branches, 

Any Four Common Branches, 

Any Additional Higher Branch, 

Any Additional Common Branch, 

Normal Department, 

Ornamental Penmanship, per term, 

Book-Keeping, 

Special Laboratory Practice, 3 recitations per week, 



Laboratory Expenses. — Students in the Laboratory pay a small charge 
for their outfit; also, for apparatus destroyed and material consumed. 
Special examination in each Higher Branch, not recited in College, $4 00 
Special examination in each Common Branch, not recited in College, 3 00 
Diplomas and Degrees, 5 00 

Full Course in Common English Branches : Elocution, Orthography, 
English Grammar, Descriptive Geography, Arithmetic and U. S. History. 

Any student who takes and pays for any four Higher Branches, at regu- 
lar rates, may study any one of the above Common English Branches free. 

Extra Charges. 

MUSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Lessons on Piano or Organ, two lessons per week 

Voice Culture, two lessons per week, 12 00 8 00 8 75 

Harmony (Classes 4 or 6), 10 00 6 50 7 25 

Chorus Class, or part singing to those not taking any 

other study in the department, 300 200 200 

Use of the Piano for one period each day, .... 2 00 1 25 1 25 

Use of the Organ for one period each day, . . . 1 c;o 1 00 1 00 



FALL 


WINTER 


TERM. 


TERM. 


#17 OO 


#11 OO 


12 OO 


8 00 


IO OO 


6 50 


3 °° 


2 00 


2 00 


1 2 5 


1 5° 


1 00 



SPRING 
TERM. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 47 

Ten per cent, reduction will be made on each additional period. 

Musical History and Biography per term, $2 oo 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



FALL 
TERM. 



WINTER 
TERM. 



Painting in Oil, one lesson per day, .... 
China Painting, one lesson per day, . . 
Water Colors, one lesson per day, .... 
Modelling in Clay, one lesson per day, . . . 
Drawing from the Antique, one lesson per day, 
Drawing from the Flat, one lesson per day, . 



SPRING 

TERM. 



$18 00313 00J314 00 

18 ooj 13 00 14 00 

14 00 8 00 9 00 

8 00 5 50 6 00 

8 00 5 50 6 00 

6 ool 3 75 4 00 



The charges for room rent, heat and furniture is made on the basis of 
two persons to each room. In case where a student rooms alone he will 
be charged 50 cents additional per week. Any student not boarding in 
the institution and occupying a room in the building will be charged a 
reasonable rent for the same. 

Extra washing, plain pieces, 50 cents per dozen. White dresses, etc., 
extra. 

Each student will Le held accountable for any damage he or she may 
cause to the college property. Students will be held individually respon- 
sible for all damage done to their rccms, ly whomsoever committed. 

Tuition and room rent are counted from the time of entering to the end 
of the term, and luilicn fiim the first oi the teim for entrance second or 
third week. 

We urge a comparison of these charges with those of other schools, be- 
lieving that such a comparison will establish the fact that our rates are more 
moderate for the advantages afforded than can be found elsewhere. 

Terms of Payment. 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before Com- 
mencement. 

One-half of all other bills in advance. Balance in the middle of the 
term. This rule will be firmly adhered to. No student can be admitted 
to classes until all L ills are satisfactorily settled with the Financial Secretary. 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



(Commencement Week. 



1888. 

Sunday, June 10th, 10 o'clock, A. M., Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon by the President. 

Sunday, June 10th, 7:30 o'clock, P. M., Annual Sermon, 
by the Pastor, Rev. J. R. Meredith. 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Monday, June 6, 7, 
8 and 11, Examination of Classes. 

Monday, June nth, 3 o'clock, P. M., Annual Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Monday, June nth, 7:30 o'clock, P. M., Graduating Ex- 
ercises of Department of Music. 

Tuesday, June 12th, 7:30 o'clock, P. M., Public Meeting 
of the Alumni Association. 

Wednesday, June 13th, 7:30 o'clock, P. M., Annual Ad- 
dress before the Literary Societies. 

Thursday, June 14th, 9 o'clock A. M., Commencement 
Exercises. 



LEBANON VALLEV COLLEGE. 49 



Degrees Conferred in Course 

AT 

COMMENCEMENT, 1887. 



A. M. 

Jacob Z. Hoffman, Glossbrenner W. Hanger, 

Gideon R. Kreider, J. Henry Muller. 

A. B. 

Harry Thomas Denlinger, Joseph P. Jordan, 

Lillie Catharine Mark, George R. Schenk, 

Morrison Weimer. 

B. S. 

Clayton Hershey Backenstoe, Anselm Vinet Heister, 
William Dick Shupe. 



Honorary degrees. 

D. D. 

Rev. B. F. Booth, Rev. M. P. Doyle, 

Rev. G. W. McLaughlin, Rev. J. P. Miller. 



5° 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



{STUDENTS. 





Senior Class. 




Albert Henry Gerberich, 


Union Deposit, Pa., 


Scientific. 


William McCIellan Hain, 


Progress, Pa., 


Scientific. 


Horace Brightbill Keedy, 


Rohrersville, Md., 


Scientific. 


Alice Lydia Kutz, 


Newville, Pa., 


Musical. 


Sallie Adaline Mark, 


Annville, Pa., 


Musical. 


Sidney Moyer, 


Lebanon, Pa., 


Musical. 


Anna Rebecca Reed, 


Altenwald, Pa., 


Scientific. 


Nettie May Swartz, 


New Oxford, Pa., 


Musical. 


Joseph Kurtz Wagner, 


Dickinson, Pa., 
Junior Class. 


Scientific. 


Benjamin Franklin Daugherty, Dallastown, Pa., 


Classical. 


Joseph Daugherty, 


Dallastown, Pa., 


Scientific. 


Samuel D. Faust, 


Roxbury, Pa., 


Classical. 


Reno Shaeffer Harp, 


Myersville, Md., 


Classical. 


John Lincoln Keedy, 


Rohrersville, Md., 


Classical. 


Edward Everett Keedy, 


Rohrersville, Md., 


Classical. 


John Edward Kleffman, 


York, Pa., 


Scientific. 


Aaron Albion Long, 


Walnut Bottom, Pa., 


Classical. 


Mary Annie Zug, 


Lebanon, Pa., 
Sophomore Class. 


Scientific. 


Edward Stauffer Bowman, 


Boonsboro, Md., 


Scientific. 


Cyrus Franklin Flook, 


Myersville, Md., 


Scientific. 


Lorena S. Funk, 


Church ville, Va., 


Scientific. 


William Robert Keller, 


Heilmandale, Pa., 


Scientific. 


William Haines Kindt, 


Annville, Pa., 


Classical. 


Ellwood Thomas Schlosser, 


, Boonsboro, Md., 


Scientific. 


James Thomas Spangler, 


Shanksville, Pa., 


Classical. 


Allen Fishburn Ward, 


Annville, Pa., 
Freshman Class. 


Scientific. 


Edward Otterbein Burtner, 


West Fairview, Pa., 


Classical. 


Samuel John Evers, 


Keedysville, Md., 


Classical. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



51 



Simon Fleischer Earnest, 
Upton W. Harshman, 
Jacob M. Herr, 
Ferdinand Hesse, 
Jacob Adam Lesher, 
Ella Nora Saylor, 
Grant Lincoln Shaeffer, 
Mary Magdalena Shenk, 
Henry Feandt Stauffer, 
Isaac Benjamin Sivartz, 
William Henry Washinger, 



Annville, Pa., Scientific. 

Wolfsville, Md., Classical. 

Fredericksburg, Pa., Scientific. 

Martinsburg W. Va., Scientific. 

Virginsville, Pa., Scientific. 

Annville, Pa., Scientific. 

Lebanon, Pa., Classical. 

Annville, Pa., Scientific. 

Annville, Pa., Scientific. 

Middletown, Pa., Scientific. 

Orrstown, Pa., Classical. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



Classical. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Abraham Howry Espenshade, 
Annie Ruth Forney, 
William James Gardner, 
Elmer Loose Haak, 
David Albert Kreider, 
Ulysses Grant Renn, 
John Adam Home Shoemaker, 
James Rauch Stein, 



FIRST YEAR. 



Maurice Bowman, 
Anna Brightbill 
William Rankin Burkholder, 
Schuyler Colfax Enck, 
James Allen Harrison, 
Josephine Kreider, 
Samuel Thomas Meyer, 
Henry Milton Miller, 
Hervey Ulysses Roop, 
Henry Backenstoe Roop, 
Daniel Newton Scott, 
Absalom Lincoln Shannon, 
Isaiah Gustavus Workman, 



Gordonville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Adamsburgh, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Mile Run, Pa. 
Dick, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Newburgh, Pa. 
Clay, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Clay, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Seymoursville, W. Va. 
Shippensburgh, Pa. 
Fisherville, Pa. 



52 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Scientific. 



Charles Francis Courtney, 
Lena Erb, 

Ulysses Stanton Flick, 
Sadie May Flick, 
Robert Bruce Hursh, 
Hedwig Lucian Kinports, 
David Graybill Kreider, 
Andrew Raymond Kreider, 
Ivanora Light, 
*Edgar Mumma Major, 
Lillie Irene Meyers, 
John Wilson Owen, 
Charles Brady Pennypacker, 
Robert Taggart, 



Landisville, Pa. 
Clay, Pa. 
Utahville, Pa. 
Utahville, Pa. 
Newville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Shippensburgh, Pa. 
Mountville, Pa. 
Gordonville, Pa. 



General Preparatory. 



Sadie Elizabeth Backenstoe, 

J. William Baxtresser, 

W. O. Bomberger, 

Bertram Bowman, 

Naomi Behm Hershey, 

Anna Mary Keedy, 

Amy H. Keiser, 

George Abraham Lincoln Kindt, 

Hattie M. Lane, 

J. Frank Lane, 

Jacob M. Lentz, 

Charles John Meister, 

John Milton Mumma, 

Edward Mumma, 

Percy B. Putt, 

Mattie Richardson, 

Irvin Samuel Ricker, 

Mary B. Snavely, 



Elective Students. 



John Henry Alleman, 
Jacob Snavely Balsbaugh, 
Howard Bowman, 



Union Deposit, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Prescott, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Deny Church, Pa. 
Rohrersville, Md. 
Grantville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Huntingdon, Pa. 
Huntingdon, Pa. 
Prescott, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Heilmandale, Pa. 
Swatara Station, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 



♦Dismissed. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



53 



David Henry Burtner, 
Samuel Cottrell, Jr., 
Cecil Lafayette Dawson, 
Lizzie Jane Faust, 
Edwin Henry Fisher, 
Byron Henry Gingrich, 
Delia Goheen, 
Jennie Kreider, 
Sallie Kreider, 
Charles E. Laudermilch, 
David J. Leopold, 
James Morris Lesher, 
Carrie Adora Letterman, 
Hattie Frances Mady, 
Harry Ellsworth Maulfair, 
Katie S. Reed, 
Morris S. Reider, 
Alvin H. Royer, 
John Miles Stoner, 
Joshua William Swartz, 
Charles Wagner, 
Harry Albert Walmer, 
Naomi Huber Witman, 



Breathedsville, Md. 
Annville, Pa. 
Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 
Roxbury, Pa. 
Grantville, Pa. 
Fontana, Pa. 
North Point, Pa. 
Denver, Col. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
East Hanover, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Altenwald, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Grantville, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wormleysburg, Pa. 



Normal Department. 



Iva J. Allen, 
Stephen Bachman, 
Simon Peter Backenstoe, 
Simon D. Baeshore, 
John W. Betz, 
John Henry Blecker, 
Grant Bollinger, 
Peter R. Boltz, 
Benjamin M. Breneman, 
Mary G. Bucher, 
Louise Christison, 
John Clay Clauser, 
Mary B. Dohner, 
Robert S. Early, 
David W. Ensminger, 
Edwin Augustus Evans, 
George Brinton Evans, 



Highspire, Pa. 
Fontana, Pa. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Sinking Springs, Pa. 
Cornwall, Pa. 
Bunker Hill, Pa. 
Mount Joy, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Union Deposit, Pa. 
West Hanover, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Campbellstown, Pa. 
Campbellstown, Pa. 



54 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



William Henry Fasnacht, 
Enos Gerberich, 
Martin H. Gingrich, 
Minnie Hartz, 
Hannibal Hamlin Hartz, 
Samuel Hartz, 
Frank E. Hartz, 
William Elmer Heilman, 
Richard F. Heisey, 
Abraham Snyder Herr, 
Amos E. Hess, 
J. M. Hummelburger, 
Samuel Heilman Imboden, 
Ethel Kauffman, 
Calvin H. Kauffman, 
Harvey Koons, 
John H. Kreider, 
Clinton Krumbein, 
George L. Landis, 
Irving Lenker, 
Elias S. Lentz, 
Agnes E. Light, 
Andrew C. Light, 

Alice S. Light, 

Ida S. Light, 

Irvin S. Light, 

Ira J. Light, 

Ella Long, 

David E. Long, 

Wellington Mason, 

Thomas Henry Matterness, 

Daniel D. Miller, 

John L. Meyer, 

Emma Mower, 

Levi B. Nye, 

John Groh Philips, 

Milton W. Phillips, 

Clara Poorman, 

Monroe R. Rank, 

Harry Maulfair Reider, 

Morris Bowman Royer, 
Harvey Royer, 



Swatara Station, Pa. 
Syner, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Derry Church. Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
East Hanover, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Progress, Pa. 
Jonestown, Pa. 
Cornwall, Pa. 

Union Deposit, Pa. 

Hickory Corner, Pa. 

Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Bunker Hill, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Iona, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Bell Grove, Pa. 

Williamstown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

West Hanover, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Progress, Pa. 

Jonestown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Jonestown, Pa. 

Derry Church, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Schaefferstown, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



55 



John B. Saylor, 
William Edward Schaak, 
A. E. Schwartzbach, 
David Nathan Shanaman, 
Beckie F. Shearer, 
Robert E. Sherk, 
Jerome Ulrich Snavely, 
George Alonzo Sparks, 
Sallie E. Steckback, 
Samuel H. Stein, 
Frank Tobias, 
Sallie Troxel, 
Emma Turby, 
Lizzie M. Walters, 
Lizzie Minerva Witmer, 
Reuben Philip Wolfersberger, 
Frederick F. Yoder, 



Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Codorus, Pa. 
Annville, Pa- 
Spring Run, Pa. 
Grantville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Black Rock, Md. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Campbellstown, Pa. 
Centreport, Pa. 



MUSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Post-Graduate Studies. 



Katie Rauch, 



Alice Lydia Kutz, 
Sallie Adaline Mark, 
Sidney Moyer, 
Nettie May Swartz, 



Senior Class. 



Piano and Organ. 



Sadie Elizabeth Backenstoe, 
Mary C. Batdorf, 
Bertie B. Baxtresser, 
Howard Bowman, 
Ida L. Bowman, 
Maurice Bowman, 
Annie Brightbill, 
Louise Christison, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Newville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
New Oxford, Pa. 



Union Deposit, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Middletown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



^6 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Benjamin Franklin Daugherty., 
Lena Erb, 
Mary Erisman, 
Lizzie Jane Faust, 
Annie Ruth Forney, 
Lorena Sarah Funk, 
Delia Goheen, 
Robert Bruce Hursh, 
Calvin H. Kauffman, 
Anna Mary Keedy, 
Edward Everett Keedy„ 
John Lincoln Keedy, 
Sallie Kehler, 
Amy H. Keiser, 
Hedwig L. Kinports,, 

Annie Kreider, 

Edwin Kreider, 

Jennie Kreider, 

Mary E. Kreider, 

Sallie Kreider, 

Willie H. Kreiden. 

Alice Lydia Kulz, 

Hattie M. Lane, 

Reba F. Lehman, 

Carrie Adora LettermaiK, 

Hattie. Francis Mady J( 

Sallie Adaline Mark, 

Sidney Moyer, 

Lillie Irene Meyers*. 

Katie Rauch, 

Katie S. Reed, 

Mattie Richardsonv 

Emma Saylor, 

Lizzie S. Seltzer, 
Mary A. Seltzer, 
Minerva E. Shank,. 
Mary B. Snavely, 
Nettie May Swartz, 
Harry Albert Walmen, 
Naomi Huber Witman, 
Emma L. Wolf* 



Dallastown, Pa. 
Clay, Pa. 
Mount Joy, Fa. 
Roxbury, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Churchville, Va. 
North Point, Pa. 
Newville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Rohrersville, Md. 
Rohrersville, Md. 
Rohrersville, Md. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Grantville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Denver, Col. 
Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Newville, Pa. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Derry Church Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Annville, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Altenwald, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

New Oxford, Pa. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



57 



Theory Class. 



Lizzie Jane Faust, 
Alice Lydia Kutz, 
Emma Saylor, 
Sallie Adaline Mark, 
Nettie May Swartz, 



Sadie E. Backenstoe, 
Mary Erisman, 
Delia Goheen, " 
Amy H. Keiser, 
Alice L. Kutz, 



Lizzie J. Faust, 
Lorena S. Funk, 
Edward E. Keedy, 



Voice Culture. 



Naomi H. Witman. 



Harmony Class. 



Chorus Class. 



William R. Burkholder, 
Anna R. Forney, 
Cyrus F. Flook, 
Lorena S. Funk, 
Anna M. Keedy, 



Roxbury, Pa. 
Newville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
New Oxford, Pa. 



Hattie M. Lane, 
Hattie F. Mady, 
Katie Rauch, 
Katie S. Reed, 
Harry A. Walmer, 



John L. Keedy, 
Sallie A. Mark, 
Nettie M. Swartz. 



Alice L. Kutz, 
Aaron A. Long, 
Lillie I. Meyers, 
Katie S. Reed, 
Emma Saylor. 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



Mary C. Batdorf, 
Ida L. Bowman, 
Maurice Bowman, 
Ella R. Deaner, 
Lena Erb, 
Carrie G. Eby, 
J. Warren Henry, 



Class in Oil Painting. 



Carrie A. Letterman, 
Hattie F. Mady, 
Lillie I. Meyers, 
Mattie Richardson, 
Ella M. Smith, 
Mary M. Shank, 
Nettie M. Swartz, 



58 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Emma S. Kreider, 
Sallie Kreider, 
Willie H. Kreider, 
Ivanura Light, 

Ida L. Bowman, 
Anna M. Keedy, 
Edwin Kreider, 
Hattie M. Lane, 



Bertram Bowman, 



Ella R. Deaner, 



Drawing. 



Modeling in Clay. 



China Painting. 



Beckie F. Shearer. 
James R. Stein, 
Naomi H. Wit man, 
Emma L. Wolf. 

Katie S. Reed, 
Beckie F. Shearer, 
Samuel H. Stein, 
George H. Stein. 



Beckie F. Shearer. 



Naomi H. Witman. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 59 

{BUMMaRY. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Junior 6 

Sophomores 2 

Freshmen 5 

Preparatory , . 21 

Total " 34 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Seniors 5 

Juniors 3 

Sophomores 6 

Freshmen 8 

Preparatory 14 

Total 36 

MUSICAL COURSE. 

Seniors 4 

Total ~ 4 

Elective 26 

General Preparatory 18 

Normal only 76 

Music and Art only 22 

Total Number of Students 216 

CHURCH RELATIONS. 

UNITED BRETHREN. 

East Pennsylvania Conference 55 

East German " . \ 30 

Pennsylvania " 20 

Maryland " 10 

Allegheny " 9 

Virginia " 4 

Total United Brethren 128 

Other Churches 63 

No Church Relations 25 

Total 216 



6o LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



^LUMNI ^SSOCIHTION. 



PRESIDENT. 

Rev. M. P. Sanders, Class of 1877. 

VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Mrs. Lizzie W. Groff, Class of 1879. 

SECRETARY. 

M. Ella Moyer, Class of 1886. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY. 

Prof. H. Clay Deaner, A. M., Class of 1879. 

TREASURER. 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, A. M., Class of 1876. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

A. L. Groff, Class of 1879. 

Z. S. G. Light, A. M., Class of 1874. 

Rev. I. W. Sneath, A. M., B. D., Class of 188 1. 

Mrs. Sarah Collier Etter, A. M., Class of 1875. 

Emma L. Landis, M. A., Class of 1879. 

APPOINTMENTS FOR JUNE 12, 1888. 

ESSAYIST. 

Mrs. Sarah Collier Etter, A. M., Class of 1875. 

HISTORIAN. 

Rev. C. D. Harp, A. M., B. D., Class of 1880. 

ORATOR. 

Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M., Class of 1874. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 6 1 



ENDOWMENT. 



There are Christian men and women who could not devote themselves 
to the pursuits of knowledge for want of means ; throughout their life they 
have felt that they might have been more useful and happy, had the oppor- 
tunities of securing an education been afforded them. Will not these men 
and women become the benefactors of those worthy young people, many 
of whom now are thirsting for an education, but who are so circumstanced 
that they cannot obtain it ? 

Those wishing to consecrate some of their means to such an end, are 
solicited to endow limited scholarships in Lebanon Valley College, to assist 
those who are deserving of help. These may vary in amount from $500 
to $2,000. They may also help to bring the opportunities of an education 
within the reach of those in limited circumstances by contributing to the 
endowment of the College. 

Form of Scholarship Bequest. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay 

over the same in months after my decease, to the person who, 

when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, founded at Annville, Pennsylvania, in the year one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, as a scholarship fund, the interest of which only is 
to be loaned without charge to such pious young people as the Faculty of 
the College may deem worthy of help as students, the principal of the 
scholarship to be under the direction and management of the Trustees of 
the College. 

Form of Bequest to the Endowment Fund. 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay 

over the same in months, after my decease, to the person who, 

when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, founded in Annville, Pennsylvania, in the year one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, the same to be sacred as an endowment fund in 
said College, the interest only to be used for the payment of instructors in 

the department; the principal of said bequest to be under the 

direction and management of the Trustees of the College. 



62 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Index. 

Calendar , 2 

Historic Sketch and Purpose 3-5 

Officers of the Corporation : 

Trustees 6 

Executive Committee 7 

Faculty 8, 9 

Admission of Students 10,11 

Courses of Study: I2 

Classical 13 

Scientific 15 

Academical 1 8 

Musical 20-23 

Preparatory Courses : 

Classical 24 

Scientific '. 25 

Academical 26 

Musical 26 

General Preparatory 27 

Normal 27 

Departments of Study: 

Philosophy — Mental and Moral 28 

Latin Language and Literature 29 

Greek Language and Literature 30 

Mathematics 31 

Natural Sciences 32 

English Language and Literature 33—35 

Modern Languages 35 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal 36, 37 

Art 37 

General Information : 

How to Reach the College. Buildings and Grounds. Fur- 
nishing and Outfit. Discipline. Matriculation. Studies 
and Recitation. Grading. Examinations. Promotion. 
Rhetorical Exercises. Leave of Absence. Religious Exer- 
cises. Y. M. C. A. Literary Societies. Physical Culture. 
Higher Education of Women. Help for Indigent Students. 
Libraries and Cabinet. Reading Room. Degrees. Inqtiiries 
Concerning Departments. Schedule. Normal S. S. Class. 
Lecture Course. Announcement and Suggestions. Terms 

and Vacations 38-45 

Expenses 46, 47 

Commencement Week Bulletin 48 

Degrees Conferred in Course — Honorary 49 

Register of Students $°S% 

General Summary 59 

Alumni Association 60 

Forms for Bequests 61 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 63 

Eastern U. B. Book and Pub. House 

Is conducted in the interest of the United Brethren Church in 



the East. 



We supply all of our Church and Sunday School Litera- 



ture at the lowest rates. 



Hymnals and Sunday School Singing Books, Teacher's 



Bibles, Family Bibles, Theological, Religious, and any Mis- 



cellaneous Books in the Market. 



The Weekly Itinerant, 

$1.00 Per Annum in Advance. 

The Job Printing Department 

Does all kinds of work in best style and at lowest rates. 

Sunday School Libraries, and Normal S. S. Union Books 
a specialty. 

Ad dress all orders and correspondence to 

Rev. J. L. GRIMM, Superintendent, 

4:12 Market Street, Harrisbury, Pa. 



64 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

J. B. Stehman, J. B. Hursh, H. H. Kreider, 

President. Secretary. Treasurer. 



THE U. B. 
MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



Principal Office, - Lebanon, F*a. 



This old and well-known society has an assessment basis of $10,375, 
000.00, and-has invested assets amounting to $158,781.90. It has paid to 
the beneficiaries of deceased members, up to January 1st, 1888, the sum of 
$5,365,961.64, of which amount the heirs of 43 ministers received $74,- 
2 [5.00 at a cost of $19,317.76. Among these deceased ministers were 
Bishop Edwards and Bishop Glossbrenner. Rev. Samuel A. Young, who 
died since January 1st, 1S88, became a member at the age of forty-one 
years, in 187 1, and paid to the Society $340.16, and his family received 
$1,000.00. The same amount of insurance in the cheapest old-line com- 
pany would have cost him $418.03. 

On the first day of January, 1884, the Society opened a new Div. E, 
in which only preferred male risks, between the ages of 20 and 56, are 
admitted. The experience of four years shows that the actual cost of a 
member 42 years of age at entrance, has been $10.05 per year. 

The Board of Directors, at their last semi-annual meeting, added a 
new feature, by which the expenses and benefits of insurance are equalized 
by the formation of reciprocal circles. From five to ten members may 
form a circle upon the following conditions, viz. : one-half of the insurance 
of each member shall be paid at his or her death, to the party or parties 
designated in the assignment of the certificate, and the other half, afler de- 
ducting five per cent, thereof and the unpaid annual and assessments for 
the use of said Society, to the surviving members of the Circle in equal 
shares. But, at the death of the last surviving member, the full umount of 
the insurance, less 5 per cent, thereof and unpaid annuals and assessments, shall 
be paid to the party or parties designated in the assignment of the certificate. 
For particulars, address, 

J. B. HURSH, Secretary, 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. (^, 

MILLER ORGAN CO., 

Manufacturers of 

PARI.OR ORQANS 

And Builders of 

Pipe Organs of All Sizes. 




:r==~ ™ =« as- as 



Miller Organ Co., 



Write for Estimates for Pipe Organs. 



LEBANON, PENN'A. 



66 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



jcycles awD Trickles. 




A large stock of new 
and second-hand Ma- 
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LOW PRICES. 

You cannot afford to pur- 
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eight years of practical 
experience in the Bicycle 
business, and I give all 
my patrons the benefit of 
this experience. 

Send for Catalogues 
and Price Lists to 

MARTIN RUDY, 

LANCASTER, PA. 




SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 



-a 

-a ® 

"o E 5 



HL w. iitiri 



„ « Ch:e:jl:p Book Store, 

S 5 LJ 



AISTINJVILLE, F>A. 



No. 19 West Main St., Light's Hall. 





CD 




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CD 


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On our shelves you will find the largest variety of New, Second-Hand 
and Shelf-Worn School and College Text Books, together with an attrac- 
tive assortment of Miscellaneous Books, Pocket Books, Albums, Novelties, 
Fancy Articles, Sunday-School and Commercial Supplies and the finest 
collection of Scratch Books, Pads, Blotters, Ink and Pencil Tablets. 

It will be to your interest whether you want to Buy, Sell or Exchange, 
to visit Light's Book Store for anything you may need in the Book and 
Stationery department. 

3E3C. ■\7*7'. IjIGKEET, 

ocxkseller and. Stationer, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



6 7 



Tfte JVsw iEra 

t^rtttttncj House* 




No. 3 SOUTH QUEEN STREET, LA NCASTER, PA. 

Anything Yea May Want 

IN THE LINE OF PRINTING, PLAIN OR ORNAMENTAL, FROM 

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Having a Complete Assortment of 



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We are prepared to do All Kinds of 

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Books, Newspapers, Catalogues, Price-Lists, Leaflets, 
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Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Orders by Mail Promptly Attended to. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



Andrew H. Hershey, 

Supt. Job Department. 



Warfel & Geist, 



Printers and Publishers 



68 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Have You a Copy of President Lorenz's 

Gospel Workers' Treasury? 

An Excellent Help for the Minister, Sunday-School Superin- 
tendent and Teacher, and most interesting for general reading. 

PRICE, $1.50, POST-PAID. 

Address W. J. SHUEY, Dayton, Ohio. 

HAR DW ARE. 

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My Goods are New and First-Class and Sold at Bottom Prices. 

EAST MAIN STREET, ANNVILIjE, PA.