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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

1 ebapop Ualley Colle^ 



1893. 



Twenty-Seventh Catalogue 



OF THE 



Officers and Students 



OF 



Lebanon Valley College, 

Annville, Pa., 



FOR 



The Collegiate Year, 
i892-'93. 



LANCASTER, PA. 

THE NEW ERA BOOK PRINT. 

1893. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Calendar, 

1893=94. 



September 4, 1893 — Organization, 9 o'clock, A. M. 
September 4, 1893 — Entrance Examinations, 10 o'clock A. M. 
September 4, 1893 — Registration for the Term. 
September 5, 1893 — Instruction begins, 9 o'clock, A. M. 
November 30, 1893 — Anniversary of the Clionian Literary Society. 
December 21, 1893 — Public Exercises of the Sophomore and Freshman 

Classes. 
December 22, 1893 — Fall Term ends. 

Vacation. 

January 2, 1894 — Winter Term begins, 9 o'clock, A. M. 

January 2, 1894 — Entrance Examination. 

January 2, 1894 — Registration for the Term. 

March 23, 1894 — Winter Term ends. 

March 26, 1894 — Spring Term begins, 3 o'clock P. M. 

March 26, 1894 — Entrance Examination begins, 2 o'clock P. M. 

March 26, 1894 — Registration for the Term. 

March 27, 1894 — Instruction begins, at 9 o'clock, A. M. 

April 6, 1894 — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 

May 4, 1894 — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary Society. 

June 4, 1894— Final Examination of Seniors begins. 

June 10, 1894 — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 10, 1894 — Address to the Bible Normal Union Graduates. 

June 11, 1894 — Commencement of Department of Music, 7:30 o'clock, 

P. M. 
June 12, 1894 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9 o'clock, A. M. 
June 12, 1894 — Public Meeting of the Alumni Association, 7:30 o'clock, 

P. M. 
June 13, 1894 — Annual Address before the Literary Societies. 
June 14, 1894 — Commencement, 
June 15, 1894 — Spring Term ends. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 3 

dFounbing of the Jnstttutton* 

Lebanon Valley College came into existence to supply an ab- 
solute want. Denominational growth and an advancing civili- 
zation rendered it necessary for the Church of ' ' The United 
Brethren in Christ," throughout the States of Pennsylvania, 
Maryland and Virginia, to make special provision for the moral 
and intellectual culture of her children. After much delibera- 
tion and prayer, it was resolved that an institution of learn- 
ing be established, which would furnish the advantages of a 
thorough education alike to the young men and women, under 
the safe and inspiring influence of the Christian religion. 

To carry out this purpose, a committee of worthy gentlemen 
was chosen with authority to select a suitable place for its es- 
tablishment. 

Ube TLown of Hnmnlle, 

Located in the midst of the beautiful Lebanon Valley, was 
chosen on account of its accessibility, healthfulness and in- 
spiring scenery. 

As a further inducement to locate the College at this place, 
a suitable building and grounds were donated by public-spirited 
citizens for educational purposes. In 1866 the Institution was 
founded, and in 1867 chartered by a Special Act of the Legis- 
lature of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Ube Him 

Of the Trustees and Faculty, from the first, has been to pro- 
vide courses of study which will qualify students to be practical 
and self-reliant, as well as learned. 

The Charter plainly indicates that it was the intention of the 
founders to plant an institution which would become so ample 
in facilities and manifold in departments as to furnish instruc- 
tion in all the subjects of a general and special education, and 
toward this original purpose the Institution will advance as 
rapidly as the necessary means are secured and circumstances 
will demand. 

©fficers of tbe Corporation, 

The members composing the Board of Trustees are elected by 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

the Annual Conferences cooperating in the enterprise, one- 
third of whom are elected annually for a term of three years. 
The members of the Faculty sustain an ex-officio relation. 

;IFioelit£ to patrons. 

The members of the Faculty believe that all pupils should be 
encouraged to educate as thoroughly as their means and native 
endowment will admit, even when there is promise of only 
moderate success ; but when a student persists in a course of 
indifference and manifests no appreciation of time, money, or 
opportunities, the Institution regards itself morally bound to 
make known the facts to its patrons, but not until every worthy 
method has been employed for his reformation. 

Go*Boucation. 

The principle of co-education of the sexes was adopted from 
the first by the founders of the College ; and the entire absence 
of college barbarities and excesses, as well as the manifestation 
of a tendency to a higher standard of scholarship, from year to 
year, proves the wisdom of this natural order of things. The 
facilities of the College and the encouragement to a thorough 
education are offered alike to all. Experience has shown that 
there is no appreciable difference between the man and the 
woman, as such, as to ability in mastering the studies of a 
college course. 

1Ron=5ectarian. 

While the College is denominational in management, it is 
positively free from sectarian bias ; and the liberal patronage 
which it has enjoyed from homes representing all phases of 
Protestant faith, as well as from the homes of non-professors, 
attests the fact that colleges may inculcate the principles of 
Christian morality without traducing the religious convictions 
or personal belief of any one. 

Hggressive in Spirit. 

The Institution is not bound in theory or practice to anti- 
quated methods, but it seeks to interpret the laws of science 
and of life in keeping with the spirit of progress and the lead- 
ings of Providence. 

Guaranty. 

Fidelity to these principles in the past is the guaranty that 
the Institution offers to its patrons in the future. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



©fficers of tbe Corporation. 

trustees, 

fterm Bspfres 189 6. 

REV. C. I. B. BRANE, A. M., Washington, D. C. 

REV. WM. H. SAMPSELL, Churchville, Va. 

H. H. KREIDER, ESQ., Annville, Pa. 

REV. WILLIAM H. UHLER, Lebanon, Pa. 

REV. J. R. RIDENOUR, Dayton, Va. 

.NATHANIEL B. LIGHT, Esq., Lebanon, Pa. 

REV. SOLOMON L. SWARTZ, Middletown, Pa. 

A. H. RICE, ESQ., Chambersburg, Pa. 

RENO S. HARP, A. M., Frederick, Md. 

JOHN C. KNIPP, Esq., Baltimore, Md. 

trenn Bspires 1895. 

DAVID W. CRIDER, Esq., York, Pa. 

REV. SAMUEL D. FAUST, A. M., Dayton, Ohio. 

G. C. SNYDER, Esq., Hagerstown, Md. 

EDWARD M. BAKER, Esq., Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

REV. N. F. A. CUPP, ......: Winchester, Va. 

Rev. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D., York, Pa. 

S. W. CLIPPINGER, Esq., Chambersburg, Pa. 

ADAM R. FORNEY, A. M., Annville, Pa. 

ISAAC B. HAAK, ESQ., Myerstown, Pa. 

REV. CHARLES A. MUTCH, Williamstown, Pa. 

REV. CYRUS FRANK FLOOK, Myersville, Md. 

{Term Ejptres 1894. 

JOHN B. STEHMAN, Esq., Mountville, Pa. 

Hon. JOHN H. WEISS, A. M., Harrisburg, Pa. 

REV. DANIEL EBERLY, D. D., Abbottstown, Pa. 

Rev. D. D. KEEDY, Rohrersville, Md. 

REV. J. B. CHAM BERLIN, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

REV. J. C. S. MYER, Annex, Va. 

REV. ABRAHAM M. EVERS, Hagerstown, Md. 

REV. W. H. WAGNER, Dickinson, Pa. 

SAMUEL F. ENGLE, Esq., Palmyra, Pa. 

ALB ANUS S. RILAND, Esq., Friedensburg, Pa. 

WILLIAM H. ULRICH, Esq., Hummelstown, Pa. 

B£5©ffict0. 
President E. BENJ. BIERMAN, Ph. D. 
Prof. H. CLAY DEANER, A. M. 
Prof. JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M. 
Rev. Prof. J. A. McDERMAD, A. M. 
Prof. JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



©fKcets of tbe Corporation. 



:Boarfc of trustees. 

President, DAVID W. CRIDER, Esq. 

Recording Secretary, .... Rev. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT. 

Treasurer, HENRY H. KREIDER. 

Financial Agent, ISAAC B. HAAK. 

Executive Committee. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, Chairman. 

ISAAC B. HAAK, Secretary. 
ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, J. R. RIDENOUR, 

A. H. RICE, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

ADAM R. FORNEY, WILLIAM H. ULRICH. 



E. BENJ. BIERMAN, Ph. D., 

President of the College. 

MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 

Preceptress. 

JOHN. E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 

Librarian. 

Stewaro, 

JOHN H. MAULFAIR. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



dFacult^. 



E. BENJAMIN BIERMAN, A. M., PH. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, and Astronomy. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. 

REV. J. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 

Professor of the Greek Langicage and Literature. 

JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., Ped. B., 

Professor of Natural Science and Pedagogics. 

MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 

Professor of the Modern Languages and English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 

Professor of Instrumental Music and Voice Culture. 

ALICE K. GINGRICH, M. A., 

Professor of Harmony and Instrumental Music. 

EMMA A. DITTMAR, 

Teacher of Fine Arts. 

HARVEY D. MILLER, A. B., 

Teacher of Violin. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



IRegutremente of Hbmisston. 



Classical department. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the following subjects : 

Latin. — Grammar and Lessons; Caesar, two books; Cicero, three ora- 
tions ; Virgil, three books ; Latin Composition (Allen), thirty-six les- 
sons, or full equivalents for these subjects. 

Greek. — Grammar and Lesson; Anabasis, two books; Greek Composi- 
tion C Jones), complete. 

Mathematics — Higher Arithmetic, Algebra, three books of Geometry, 
and Elementary Bookkeeping. 

Natural Science — Geography of the Heavens and Physical Geography. 

Bible — Old and New Testament History. 

English— English Grammar and Analysis, Higher Lessons in English, 
Prose Composition, General History, History of the United States, 
and Elements of Rhetoric. 

Scientific department 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the following : 

Latin Grammar and Lessons, two books of Caesar, General 
History, United States History, Arithmetic, Descriptive Geo- 
graphy, English Grammar, and Elements of Rhetoric. 

preparatory ^Department. 

All Students entering the Preparatory Department, as 
well as those taking higher standing, are required to pass ex- 
aminations in common English branches. 

(Sraonates from Ibigfo Scbools. 

Persons having been graduated from regularly graded or 
high schools will be admitted without examination, upon the 
presentation of certificate or diploma, and will be classified, ac- 
cording to the character and amount of work done, as set forth 
in said certificate or diploma. 

Candidates coming from other institutions are required to 
furnish a certificate of regular dismission. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 9 

No one will be admitted later than the beginning of the 
Senior Year. 

Candidates for advanced standing will be examined in the 
studies of the Preparatory Course, and also in those previously 
pursued by the class which they purpose entering, or their real 
equivalents. 

/IDatriculation. 

Matriculation is regarded a pledge on the part of the student 
that he will obey all the rules of the College. 

A fee of one dollar each year is required of every one who 
enters the College, on the payment of which a certificate will 
be given, entitling the holder to the privileges of the College. 

Courses of 5tub$. 

The College offers four courses of study — the Classical, the 
Scientific, the Academical, and the Musical. 

Ube Classical Course 

Is the most thorough, and should be elected by all whose op- 
portunities will permit of their taking it, and especially by 
such as aspire to the ripest scholarship or purely literary pur- 
suits. 'Those who satisfactorily finish this course are graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Uhc Scientific Course 

Requires but one ancient language, either the Greek or the 
Latin ; otherwise it is the same as the Classical Course. 
It leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Ube Hcaoemical Course 

Extends over three Collegiate years, and is as full and sym- 
metrical as the time will admit. It is intended to furnish the 
necessary discipline and instruction for a practical education. 
A diploma will be awarded to those who complete this course. 

Ube flCmsical Course, 

In addition to the regular studies of the subject, requires a 
general knowledge of such branches as are best suited to a 
musical education. 



IO LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



Classical Course- 



ffresbman Glass, 

FALL TERM. 
Latin — Livy, Roman Antiquities and Mythology. 
Greek — Herodotus, selections (Mather). Greek History (Fyffe). 
Mathematics — Geometry — completed (Wentworth) . 
Science — Physiology. Zoology, begun (Orton). 

WINTER TERM. 
Latin— Cicero de Senectute (Allen and Greenough). Ancient Rome 

(Pennell). 
Greek — Homer's Iliad, First Book (Keep). Old Greek Life (Mahaffey). 
Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry (Wentworth). 
Science — Zoology — completed. Botany (Gray). 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Horace — Odes (Chase). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Greek — Homer's Iliad, Second and Third Books (Keep). History of 

Greek Literature (Jebb). 
Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Conic Sections (Wentworth). 
Science — Botany — completed. 



Sophomore Class, 



FALL TERM. 

Latin — Horace — Epistles (Chase). Ouintilian (Frieze). 

Greek — Memorabilia (Winan). Greek Testament (Acts). 

Mathematics — Analytical Geometry (Wentworth). 

Political Science — Political Economy (Laughlin). 

Modem Language — 'French (Otto's French Grammar and Exercises). 

[3-] 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin — Tacitus — Germania (Stuart). Latin Composition (Allen). 

Greek — Plato's Phaedo (Wagner). Greek Testament (Acts). 

Mathematics — Calculus (Peck). 

History — History of Civilization (Guizot). 

Modern Language — French — Les Aventures de Telemaque (Fenelon). 

[3]. 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Tacitus — Agricola (Stuart). Writing Latin. 

Greek — Demosthenes's de Corona (Tyler). Greek Testament (Romans). 
Mathematics — Surveying (Wentworth). 
Modern Language — French — Un Philosophe sous les Toits (Souvester). 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. II 



3unior Class. 

FALL TERM. 

Latin — Cicero de Officiis (Crowell). [2.] 

Greek — The (Edipus Tyrannus of Sophocles (White). [3.] 

Literature — English Literature (Shaw). 

Science — Mechanics (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 

Modern Language — German (Collar's Eysenbach). 

1 WINTER TERM. 

Latin — Terence — Andria et Adelphoe (Crowell). [3.] 

Greek — The Prometheus of /Eschylus (Mather). [2.] 

Science — Natural Philosophy (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 

Literature — English Literature (Shaw). 

Modern Language — German — (Brandt's Reader and Grammar). 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin— Juvenal — Selections (Chase). [3.] 
Greek — The Alcestis of Euripides (Woolsey). [2.] 
Science — Natural Philosophy (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 
Literature — Study of American Authors. 

Modern Language — German — Der Neffe als Onkel, or William Tell 
(Schiller). German Literature (Bayard Taylor). 



Senior Class. 

FALL TERM. 

Psychology — Mental Philosophy (Haven). 
Science — Astronomy (Young). Chemistry. 

Logic and Political Science — Logic (McCosh). Government Class Book 
(Young). 

WINTER TERM. 

Ethics — Moral Philosophy (Hickok). 
Science — Geology, begun (Dana). 
Rhetoric — Science of Rhetoric (Hill). 
History — Ancient and Modern. 

SPRING TERM. 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy (Haven). 

Religion — Analogy of Religion (Butler), and Natural Law in the Spiritual 

World (Drummond). 
Science — Geology, completed. Mineralogy. 
Ethics — Evidences of Christianity. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Scientific Course* 



Jreebman Class, 



FALL TERM. 



Latin — Cicero's Orations (Stuart.) Latin Composition (Allen). 
Mathematics — Algebra (Wentworth). 
Science — Geography of the Heavens. 
History — General History (Anderson). 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin— Virgil's JEneid (Chase). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Mathematics — Algebra (Wentworth) . 
English — Higher English (Reed and Kellogg). 
Science — Physical Geography. 

SPRING TERM. 

Latin — Virgil's ^Eneid (Chase.) Latin Composition (Allen). 
Mathematics — Geometry (Wentworth). 
English — Higher English (Reed and Kellogg). 
Book-Keeping — Elements of Single and Double Entry. 

Sopbomore Class. 

FALL TERM. 

Latin — Livy (Chase).- Roman Antiquities and Mythology. 
Mathematics — Geometry — -completed (Wentworth). 
Modern Language — French or German. 
Science — Physiology. Zoology — begun (Orton). 

WINTER TERM. 
Latin — Cicero de Senectute (Allen and Greenough). Ancient Rome 

(Pennell). 
Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry (Wentworth). 
Modern Language — French or German. 
Science — Zoology — completed. Botany (Gray). 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Horace — Odes (Chase). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Mathematics— Spherical Trigonometry and Conic Sections (Wentworth). 
Modem Language — French or German, with German Literature. 
Science — Botany — completed. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 3 



3untor Class. 

FALL TERM. 



Political Economy — Political Economy (Laughlin). 
Science — Mechanics (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry (Wentworth). 
Literature — English Literature (Shaw). 

WINTER TERM. 

Science — Natural Philosophy (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 

Mathematics — Calculus (Peck). 

History — History of Civilization (Guizot). 

Literature — English Literature (Shaw). 

SPRING TERM. 

Literature — American Authors. 

Science — Natural Philosophy (Snell's Olmsted — Revised Edition). 

Mathematics — Surveying (Wentworth) . 

Ethics — Evidences of Christianity. 



Senior Class. 

FALL TERM. 

Logic and Political Science — Logic (McCosh). Government Class Book 

(Young). 
Psychology — Mental Philosophy (Haven). 
Science — Astronomy (Young). Chemistry. 

WINTER TERM. 

Ethics — Moral Philosophy (Hickok). 
Rhetoric — Rhetoric (Hill). 
Science — Geology, begun (Dana). 
History — Ancient and Modern. 

SPRING TERM. 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy (Haven). 

Religion — Analogy of Religion (Butler), and Natural Law in the Spirit- 
ual World (Drummond). 
Science — Geology, completed. Mineralogy. 



H 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Hcabemical Course. 



jfirst l^ear. 

FALL TERM. ' 



German or Latin — elective. 

Algebra. 

English Grammar. 

German or Latin — elective. 
English Analysis. 

German or Latin — elective. 
Geometry. 



Orthography. (2) 

Bible History. 

Science of Government. 



French or Latin — elective. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Geometry. 



WINTER TERM. 

Physical Geography. 
Algebra. 
SPRING TERM. 

Higher English. 
Book-Keeping. 

Second Jl)ear. 

FALL TERM. 

Political Economy. 
English Literature. 



French or Latin — elective. 

Rhetoric. 

Trigonometry or Zoology — elective 



WINTER TERM. 

Botany — begun. 
English Literature. 



SPRING TERM. 
French or Latin — elective. | Study of American Authors. 

Surveying or Evidences of Chris- J Botany — completed. 



tianity — elective. 



Mental Philosophy. 
Chemistry. 

History of Civilization. 
Natural Philosophy. 

Mineralogy. 
Analogy of Religion. 



XTbirfc l^ear. 



FALL TERM. 

I Mechanics. 
I Astronomy. 

WINTER TERM. 

Moral Philosophy. 
Geology. 

SPRING TERM. 

I History of Philosophy. 
I Natural Philosophy. 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 5 



flfcusfcal Courses* 



piano Course, 
first l^ear. 

FALL TERM. 

Piano — Wieck's Technical Exercises, Heller's Studies, op. 47, Book I. 

Clementi's Sonatinas. 
Academical Studies — English Grammar, German. 

WINTER TERM. 

Piano — Wieck's Technical Exercises continued, Heller's Studies, op. 47, 

Book II, Reinecke's Sonatinas. 
Academical Studies — English Analysis, German. 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano — Wieck's Exercises continued, Krause's Studies, op. 2, Czerny's 
Octave Studies, op. 553, Kuhlau's Sonatinas, Selections from standard 
composers. 

Academical Studies — Higher English, German. 

Second l^ear. 

FALL TERM. 

Piano — Wieck's Exercises continued, Heller's Studies, op. 46, Book I. 

Czerny T s Daily Studies, Mendelssohn's " Songs without Words." 
Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony. 
Academical Studies — French or Italian. 

WINTER TERM. 

Piano — Heller's Studies, op. 46, Book II. Czerny's Daily Studies, Mo- 
zart's and Haydn's Sonatas. 
Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony, continued. 
Academical Studies — Rhetoric, French or Italian. 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano — Loeschhorn's Trill Studies, op. 165, Kullak's Octave Studies, op. 

48, Chopin's Waltzes, Mazurkas, Fantasies and Nocturnes. (Chopin's 

Album). 
Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony concluded. 
Academical Studies — French or Italian. 



l6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Ubirfc |)ear. 

I FALL TERM. 

Piano— Technical Exercises continued. Cramer's Studies, Book I. Se- 
lections from Weber and Chopin. Compositions for four hands. 
Academical Studies — English Literature. 

•WINTER TERM. 

Piano— Technical Studies continued. Cramer's Studies, Book I. finished. 
Book II. begun, approximating metronome time. Selections from 
Schubert, Schumann and Grieg. Compositions for four or eiglu 
hands. 

Academical Studies — English Literature. 

SPRING TERM. 

Piano — Technical Studies concluded, Cramer's Studies, Book II. com- 
pleted. Selections from Bach, Beethoven's Sonatas, Nos. i, 8, 12, 21, 
23, or 27. Composition for eight and sixteen hands. 

Academical Studies — American Literature. 



Course in IDoice Culture, 
jfirst 32ear* 

FALL TERM. 
Voice — Instructions in the Mechanism of the Voice, proper use of the Re- 
spiratory Organs, Development of Pure Tone — Concone's 30 Exer- 
cises, Concone's 50 Lessons — begun, or for Contralto Voices, Liitgen's 
Studies, or Concone's Method for Bass. Easy Songs and Ballads. 
Piano — New England Conservatory Method and Loeschhorn's Studies, 

op. 65. Book I. 
Academical Studies — English Grammar, German. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice — Study of the Union of the Register, Study of the Vowels and Con- 
sonants — Concone's 50 Lessons, or Liitgen's Studies. Easy Songs 
and Ballads. 

Piano — New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's, op. 65, Book 
II. 

Academical Studies — English Analysis, German. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice — Application of Words to Music. Concone's 50 Lessons or Lutgen's 
Studies completed — Concone's op. 10, Book I, begun. Songs from 
Abt, Curschman, Schubert, Mendelssohn and Schumann. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 7 

Piano — New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's Studies, op. 

52, Book I, Reinicke's op. 107, and other leading pieces. 
Academical Studies — Higher English, German. 



Seconfc Iflear. 

FALL TERM. 

Voice — Scales, Arpeggios and Velocity Exercises continued — Concone's 
op. 10, Book I, completed. Songs from Abt, Curschman, Schubert, 
Mendelssohn and Schumann. 

Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony. 

Academical Studies — French or Italian. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice — Concone, op. 10, Book II. Bonaldi's Exercises for Vocalization. 

Songs from Standard Composers. 
Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony — continued. 
Academical Studies — Rhetoric, French or Italian. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice — Concone, op. 10, Book II, and Bonaldi's Exercises completed. 

Songs of a more difficult grade from standard composers. 
Theory — Emery's Elements of Harmony — concluded. 
Academical Studies — French, or Italian. 



Ubirfc Iflear. 

FALL TERM. 

Voice — Exercising in Phrasing, Execution and Expression — Concone, op. 

12, Book I. Songs of more difficult character, Duet, Trio and Quartet 

Singing. 
Academical Studies — English Literature. 

WINTER TERM. 

Voice — General Finishing Exercises in Phrasing, Execution and Expres- 
sion — Concone, op. 12, Book II. More difficult Songs from Classic 
Composers. 

Academical Studies — English Literature. 

SPRING TERM. 

Voice — Vacca's Practical Method for Italian Singing, Difficult Songs and 

Arias. 
Aacdemical Studies — American Literature. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



preparatory Courses. 



Classical, 
tfivst 3£ear. 

FALL TERM. 
Latin — Grammar and Lessons (Collar and Daniell). 
Mathematics — Arithmetic (Went worth). 
Science — Geography of the Heavens. 
Bible Instruction — Bible History (Blaikie). 

WINTER TERM. 
Lathi— Grammar and Lessons, and Cseser (Stuart). 
Greek — Grammar (Goodwin), Lessons (Boise). 
Mathematics — Arithmetic (Wentworth). 
Science — Physical Geography. 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Caesar (Allen and Greenough). Latin Composition (Allen). 

Grammar, Revised (Allen and Greenough). 
Greek — Grammar (Goodwin), Lessons (Boise). 
Mathematics — Algebra (Wentworth) . 
History— United States History (Eggleston or Barnes,). 
Science — Ancient Geography (Mitchell). Mythology. 

Second H)ear. 

FALL TERM. 

Latin — Cicero's Orations (Stuart). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Greek — Anabasis (Kelsey). Greek Composition (Jones). 
Mathematics — Algebra (Wentworth). 
History — General History (Anderson). 

WINTER TERM. 
Latin — Virgil's iEneid (Chase). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Greek — Anabasis (Kelsey). Greek Composition (Jones). 
Mathematics — Algebra (Wentworth). 
English — Elements of Rhetoric (Hill). 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Virgil's ^Eneid (Chase). Latin Composition (Allen). 

Greek- Anabasis (Kelsey). Greek Composition (Jones). 

Mathematics — Geometry, Three Books (Wentworth). 
English — Higher English (Reed and Kellogg). 
Book-Keeping — Elements of Single and Double Entry. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 9 

Scientific. 

FALL TERM. 

Latin — Grammar and Lessons (Collar and Daniell). 
Bible Instruction — Bible History (Blaikie). 
Mathematics — Arithmetic (Wentworth). 
English — Grammar (Reed and Kellogg). 

WINTER TERM. 

Latin — Grammar and Lessons, Caesar. 

English — Elements of Rhetoric (Hill). Grammar. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic (Wentworth) . 

SPRING TERM. 
Latin — Caesar (Allen and Greenough). Latin Composition (Allen). 
Histoty — United States History (Eggleston or Barnes). 
Mathematcis — Algebra (Wentworth) . 
English — Grammar (Reed and Kellogg). 



Hcafcemical Course, 
preparatory 32ear. 

FALL TERM. 

English Grammar. Descriptive Geography. Arithmetic. Reading 
and Phonetic Analysis. Orthography. 

WINTER TERM. 

English Grammar. Descriptive Geography. Arithmetic. Reading and 
Phonetics. Orthography. Elements of Rhetoric. 

SPRING TERM. 

United States History. English Grammar. Descriptive Geography. 
Algebra, Reading and Phonetics. Orthography. 

flHmsical Course, 
preparatory ^ear. 

The Preparatory Year of the Musical Course contains all the studies of 
the Academical Preparatory Year and adds the following : 

FALL TERM. 

The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's Studies, op. 65, 
Book I. 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

WINTER TERM. 
The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's Studies, op. 65 
Book II. 

SPRING TERM. 

The New England Conservatory Method, Loeschhorn's Studies op. 52, 
Book I, Reinicke, op. 107, Schumann's "Scenes from Childhood," and 
other pleasing pieces. 

(Seneral preparatory 

During each term of the Collegiate year, two classes in Arith- 
metic are organized ; also, one in Elementary Algebra, two 
classes in English Grammar — one in Analysis, and one in De- 
finitions and Parsing ; also, classes in Reading, Drawing, Pen- 
manship, Descriptive Geography, and a Class in Book-Keeping. 

IRormal department. 

It has been our custom for a number of years to provide a 
Normal Department for the instruction of teachers, or of those 
who intend to teach Recently the department has been more 
fully organized, the course enlarged, the number of instructors 
increased, and the facilities improved. This department is 
open during the Spring Term only. 

Course ot "(Instruction. 

United States History (Anderson or Swinton) ; Physical 
Geography (Butler or Guyot) ; Political Geography (Butler) ; 
Civil Government (Young) ; English Grammar (Raub or 
Green) ; Higher English (Raub or Green) ; Reading (Apple- 
ton's Fifth); Orthography (Raub) ; Physiology (Mill) ; Written 
Arithmetic, A (Brooks' Normal) ; Written Arithmetic, B 
(Brooks Normal) ; Mental Arithmetic, A and B (Brooks) ; Al- 
gebra (Robinson's Elementary) ; Theoryof Teaching (Raub or 
Baldwin) ; Beginner's Latin Book (Collar and Daniel). 

In addition to these the regular college classes, including the 
Higher Mathematics, Sciences, etc. , offer opportunities for ad- 
vanced work. 

Lectures by prominent educators on various phases of the 
educational work will be provided^ to add variety, interest and 
inspiration. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 21 

Department of flfcusic, 

/TCmsic Course. 

The course of instruction in either Piano or Voice will occupy 
three years. A Preparatory year is also required of those who 
expect to enter upon the regular course, and are not already 
familiar with the rudiments of music. Pupils may devote their 
entire time to music or take it in connection with other studies- 
The stated time for completing the course may be lengthened 
or shortened, according to the advancement of the pupil. Some 
pupils will accomplish in two years what, in case of others, 
will require three or four. A knowledge of the elements of 
Harmony will be required, or one year's study, in order to 
graduate in either Piano or Voice. At the close of each term 
a written examination is required. A graduate in Voice is 
also expected to acquire a degree of proficiency on the Piano, 
sufficient to enable him to play his own accompaniments. 

private ano Class Xessons, 

Private lessons will be given at extra cost, but the class 
system is strongly recommended. It is practiced in the best 
conservatories of this country and Europe. Mendelssohn says : 
' ' It has advantages over private instruction ; it produces in- 
dustry, spurs on to emulation and preserves against one-sided- 
ness of education and taste." " The student of music will as 
surely fail of a complete musical education, by taking private 
instruction alone, as would the student of science without the 
advantage of the College or University." 

Students in Piano are arranged in classes of two. Pupils in 
Voice culture in classes of two or four. Harmony students in 
classes of four or six. 

Elements of music, sight-singing and part-singing classes 
free to all music pupils. Public recitals are given by the music 
pupils every two months. 

Pupils will take practice in ensemble playing. 

IRecitations. 

Classes in cultivation of the voice, piano-forte, organ, har- 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

mony and chorus practice receive two lessons a week. Students 
may enter at any time, but it is very desirable that they should 
begin with the term on account of grading, time of lessons, etc. 
A careful examination is made by the teacher in charge, re- 
garding the proficiency of all new pupils, that they may be 
properly classified in the course. 

Sheet music, books, etc. , can be obtained at reduced rates. 

Those who complete the required course of study in either 
Piano or Voice are awarded a diploma. Diplomas will be con- 
ferred only at the Annual Commencement. 

< 

Brt department. 

This department is well supplied with studies from the best 
artists, additions being made from time to time. Ample op- 
portunities are afforded for obtaining instruction in Free-hand 
Drawing, both from casts and the flat, Modeling in Clay, 
Painting from Copy or Still Life in Oil or Water Colors, and 
China Decoration. It is intended to impart essential principles 
while training the eye and hand to accurate and successful 
practice. 

Special advantages in this department are offered by a sys- 
tem of daily lessons, which is not customary in schools not 
especially devoted to Art. 

Students will find works of interest and assistance in the 
College Library. 

. postgraduate Courses. 

Lebanon Valley College offers to its own graduates and 
those of other Colleges, five courses for non-resident study, 
leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy : 

i. Course in Philosophy. 

2. Course in Ethics. 

3. Course in Christian Evidences. 

4. Course in Political Science. 

5. Course in Pedagogics. 

The courses are organized and students are pursuing the 
studies. 

For further information that may be desired regarding these 
courses and the terms attached, address the President of the 
College. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 23 



General Jnformatioru 



Lebanon Valley College is located at Annville. This village 
is noted for its healthfulness and freedom from those tempta- 
tions to vice so common to cities and large towns. It is acces- 
sible from all points, being located on the direct route of rail- 
road travel from Harrisburg, via Reading, to Philadelphia or 
New York. Trains stopping at Annville leave Harrisburg and 
Reading nine times a day, Sunday excepted. 

Buxlfcings auk Grounds. 

The Buildings, three in number, are situated on a fine cam- 
pus of about ten acres, within easy access of the railroad, post- 
office, churches, etc. 

The main building is a large brick structure containing 
Chapel, Recitation Rooms, Society Halls, Reading Room and 
Gymnasium, besides a number of dormitories for students. 
These rooms are arranged for two students each, are well 
ventilated and provided with wardrobes. The building is 
heated throughout by steam. 

A second building contains the Library, Art Room, two 
Music Rooms, and the entire department of Natural Science 
with Laboratory and Museum. 

The Ladies' Hall is entirely separate from the other prem- 
ises, and is under the immediate care of the Preceptress. Young 
ladies from abroad are furnished a comfortable and pleasant 
home, where they have every advantage for study and general 
improvement. Non-resident students board in the Institution, 
where they are under the continual care of the President and 
Professors. 

jfurnisbtna ant> ©utfit. 

Students are required to furnish their own bedding, except 
the mattress, bolster and pillows. They should have their 
blankets, sheets, pillow cases and clothing indelibly marked 
with full name. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Spending /IDone^. 

Patrons are kindly but tirgently reminded that students need 
very little pocket money. 

It should be remembered that luxurious habits and good 
scholarship seldom go together, and that the principles and 
practice of economy are essential to a good education. 

ffor Bll. 

It is desired that the facilities of the College be kept within 
the reach of all, and it is therefore urged that jewelry be left 
at home, and that in dress there be no vain display. 

All that is beyond a becoming neatness should be discarded 
by the student. 

^Discipline. 

The object of the Institution is to afford a home, where par- 
ents or guardians may place their sons, daughters and wards, 
with safety and profit, and where young men and }^oung 
women may be fitted for usefulness under influences calcu- 
lated to refine their tastes, ennoble their aspirations, discipline 
their intellectual powers, and develop a high Christian charac- 
ter. The Government of the College is strict but parental, 
making its appeal to the student's own sense of honor, and no 
one habitually guilty of immoral practices, or who is persist- 
entty disorderly, will be tolerated in the Institution. Every 
unexcused absence, failure, or misdemeanor of a student is re- 
ported to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 

The first three demerit marks will subject the student to pri- 
vate reproof; the first six to reproof before the Faculty ; the 
first nine to reproof in public, with notice to parent or guard- 
ian ; and the first twelve to dismissal from the College. 

The Faculty may, on evidence of reformation, restore a dis- 
missed student. 

Studies and IRecitations. 

Students are required to pursue the studies of the classes to 
which they are assigned, unless exempted for special reasons. 
No student is permitted to take a study to which he has not 
been assigned, nor to discontinue a study without permission 
obtained from the Faculty. 



LEBANON VAUvEY COLLEGE. 25 

OtaMng. 

Students are graded on their work in the Recitation Room. 
The standard in perfection of Scholarship is 100 per centum. 
The student's standing is determined by the average of his 
term and examination grades. A grade of less than 65 per 
centum will compel the student to submit to a second examina- 
tion, or to repeat the study. 

Parents having children in the College classes, and desiring 
their report and grades, may obtain them by applying to the 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

Examinations. 

Regular examinations are held at the close of each term. 
The examinations are intended to be thorough, and serve to 
determine the standing of the student. 

In all cases when from any cause a student has failed to be 
present at the regular examination, he shall undergo an exam- 
ination before being permitted again to recite in the classes of 
the College. 

The final examinations of the Seniors are held two weeks 
before Commencement, from which time they are subject to 
such duties only as are required for their preparation for gradu- 
ation. 

Candidates for class standing other than those who have 
regularly pursued their studies at the College, or who bring 
certificates of class standing in other institutions, are required 
to pass special examinations, either at the beginning or end ot 
a term. 

promotion. 

At the beginning of each term, the old classes are re-organ- 
ized and new ones formed. At or near the close of each aca- 
demic year, the names of all the members of each class, 
separately, come before the Faculty for promotion, and those 
of the Senior Class for graduation, and no student is promoted 
to a higher class, or to graduation, except upon the unanimous 
vote of the Faculty. 

IRbetorical Exercises. 

All students upon entering the institution are assigned to 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

rhetorical classes, which are met on Wednesday of each week 
by members of the Faculty for literary drill. These Rhetori- 
cals, together with the L,iterary Societies, afford sufficient 
opportunities for exercise in Composition and Oratory. Ad- 
vanced classes in the College are required to take part in 
public exercises two or three times a year. 

Xeave of Hbsence. 

No student is allowed to be absent during the term without 
special permission. The absence of a student, for even a day, 
during his term-time, exerts on his progress a hurtful influence, 
which is seldom fully appreciated by parents and guardians ; 
hence no apology, but that of sickness or unavoidable accident, 
is sufficient to excuse a student from regular attendance at 
recitations. 

No student, during the term, is expected to quit the Institu- 
tion without the consent of the President and Faculty. 

Any one withdrawing from the Institution during the term- 
time without giving due notice and having permission to do so, 
will be marked upon the records as having irregularly with- 
drawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class must present to 
the Professor in charge a written excuse for being absent. 

.IReligious Bjercises. 

Religious service is held in the College Chapel on the morn- 
ing of each day, and all students are required to attend. 

Students from- abroad, who are residents of the College, are 
also required to attend public worship on the Sabbath in the 
United Brethren Church, unless otherwise directed b}' the 
Faculty, except those who on account of church membership, 
or wish of parent or guardian, niay prefer to attend church 
elsewhere. 

A students' prayer meeting, to which all are invited, is held 
on each Tuesday evening. 

Cbristian Hssociations. 

There are thrifty organizations of the Young Women's and 
the Young Men's Christian Associations in the College, which 



LEBANON VAEEEY COLLEGE. 27 

hold their meetings on Saturday night of each week. The 
moral influence of these organizations is very salutary in the 
Institution. 

Xiterars Societies. 

There are connected with the College three Literary Societies 
— the Cuonian, the Kaeozetean, and the Phieokosmian. 
The first is the ladies' society. Each has its proper hall and 
its own library. These societies are regarded as valuable aids 
to college work, and students are advised to join one of them. 

pbpsical Culture. 

A well equipped gymnasium is in operation in the main Col- 
lege building, to which all students have access at stated times 
by the payment of a small fee. A careful Director has 
oversight of these exercises to guard against accidents and 
immoderation. 

In addition to the physical discipline of the gymnasium, the 
students are required to take regular exercise in the open air 
when the weather will admit of it, and every precaution is 
taken to foster health. 

1belp for fiiMgent Stuoeuts. , 

The College has methods of assisting a limited number of 
worthy young men who have not the means of defraying their 
own expenses," and yet scores apply from year to year, both of 
ladies and gentlemen, whom we have not the means to help. 
May not the statement of this fact be a sufficient appeal to lead 
many to endow scholarships, the income of which will be suf- 
ficient to help to an education those who could not otherwise 
obtain it. 

libraries auo Gabiuet. 

The College Library, to which all the students have daily 
access, contains nearly four thousand volumes. The Libraries 
of the Literary Societies also contain seventeen hundred vol- 
umes of well-selected and standard books. The libraries are 
constantly increasing by donations from friends and from the 
proceeds of a constantly accruing fund. 

The cabinet contains a collection of specimens in Mineralogy, 
Geology, Zoology, and Natural History. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 

IReaoing IRoom. 

There is in the College a well-stocked Reading Room which 
is daily accessible to the students, and in connection with it a 
Natural History Club which operates in conjunction with the 
corresponding department of the institution. 

A small fee is charged for reading room privileges. 

degrees. 

Bachelor of Arts. — This degree is conferred in course upon 
any student of the College who completes the studies of the 
Classical Course, and passes a satisfactory examination upon 
the same. 

Bachelor of Science — This degree is conferred in course upon 
any student who completes the studies of the Scientific Course 
and passes a satisfactory examination upon the same. 

Master of Arts — This degree is, on application, conferred upon 
any Bachelor of Arts, who has, for at least three years after 
his graduation, devoted himself to literary or professional pur- 
suits, and has, during the same time, sustained a good moral 
character. Fee, five dollars. 

Inquiries Concerning Departments. 

Persons wishing more detailed information than is given in 
this catalogue, as to courses of study, methods of instruction, 
examination, etc., may address the President, or the Professor 
in charge of the department concerned. 

Scbeonle. 

At the end of each term a Schedule of the College Exercises 
for the ensuing term is issued. Every student must take the 
equivalent of at least fifteen periods of recitations each week, 
unless excused by special action of the Faculty. 

Ube Bible IRormal "anion. 

A Normal Class for the instruction of Sunday-School 
Teachers is conducted on each Sabbath by one of the Profes- 
sors. The course of instruction extends over one year, and is 
the one provided for and used by the Bible Normal Union. A 
diploma, issued by the Sunday-School Board of the United 
Brethren Church, is granted to students who complete the 
course. 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 29 

Xecture Course, 

A course of popular lectures will be delivered during the Fall 
and Winter Terms by some of the most noted lecturers in the 
field. 

Lectures and entertainments were given by the following 
during the past year : The Boston Star Quartet ; Hon. James 
M. Beck, Rev. Charles H. Caton, Edward P. Elliott and the 
English Hand Bell Ringers. 

In addition to these lectures, there were lectures by mem- 
bers of the Faculty. 

Hnnouncement anb Suggestions/ 

From time to time additions are being made of apparatus for 
philosophical and laboratory purposes as well as of specimens 
of scientific and historic interest. Many of these additions are 
the gifts of friends to whom the College makes grateful ac- 
knowledgment. 

The Institution is prepared to suitably preserve and exhibit 
all specimens of any value, and in all cases the wishes of 
donors will be respected. 

Specimens in Geology, Mineralogy, Botany and Zoology are 
especially solicited. 

Contributions to the College Library will also be highl}*- 
appreciated, especially of old and rare books and manuscripts, 
which are liable to be lost if they are not deposited in the 
library of a permanent institution. 

Books, specimens and antique relics should be addressed to 
the librarian or Professor of the Natural Science Department, 
with the donor's name legibly signed. 

Uerms anb Vacations, 

The Collegiate Year is divided into three terms. 

The Fall Term will begin Monday, September 4, 1893, and 
will end on Friday, December 22, 1893. 

The Winter Term will begin on Monday, January 2, 1894, 
and will close on Friday, March 23, 1894. 

The Spring Term will begin Monday, March 26, 1894, an d 
will close on Thursday, June 14, 1894. 

Students should enter, if possible, on the first day of the term. 



30 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



Expenses* 



Boarding, washing (12 plain pieces a week), light, fuel, room rent, and 
tuition in Literary Department in any four (4) branches, or regular work 
a term : 

Fall Term, sixteen weeks, $74 00 

Winter Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Total a year, , $186 00 



SPRING 
TERM. 



Tuition a term in Literary Department, any 
Four Higher Branches, 

Any Two Higher Branches and Two Common 
Branches, 

Any One Higher Branch and Three Common 
Branches, . 

Any Four Common Branches, 

Any Additional Higher Branch, 

Any Additional Common Branch, ..... 

Normal Department, . 

Ornamental Penmanship, a term, 

Book-Keeping, 

Special Laborato^ Practice 3 rec't'ns a week 



FAIvI, 


WINTER 


TERM. 


TERM. 


$l6 OO 


$12 OO 


15 OO 


II OO 


14 OO 


IO OO 


12 OO 


9 OO 


4 OO 


3 00 


3 °o 


2 25 


1 50 


1 00 


3 00 


2 00 


5 00 


3 5o 



10 00 
9 00 



00 

25 
00 
00 
00 

50 



Laboratory Expenses. — Students in the Laboratory pay a small 
charge for their outfit; also, for apparatus destroyed and material con- 
sumed. 

Special Examinations in each Higher Branch, not recited in College, $4 00 
Special Examinations in each Common Branch, not recited in College, 3 00 
Diplomas and Degrees, 5 00 

Full Course in Common English Branches : Elocution, Orthography, 
English Grammar, Descriptive Geography, Arithmetic, and U. S. History. 

Any student who takes and pays for any four Higher Branches, at regu- 
lar rates, may study any one of the above Common English Branches free. 



j£ytra Cbarges* 
ZlDusical department. 



Lessons on Piano or Organ, 2 lessons a week, 

Voice Culture, 2 lessons a week, 

Harmony (Classes 4 or 6), 

Chorus Class, or part singing to those not tak- 
ing any other study in the department, . . 
Use of the Piano for one period each day, . . 
Use of the Organ for one period each day, . . 



EALL 


WINTER 


TERM. 


TERM. 


$16 OO 


$12 OO 


12 OO 


9 OO 


IO OO 


7 50 


3 00 


2 00 


2 OO 


1 5o 


I 50 


1 00 



SPRING 
TERM. 

$12 OO 
9 OO 

7 50 

2 00 
* 50 
1 00 



Ten per cent, deduction will be made on each additional period. 
Musical Historyand Biography a term, $2 00 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



31 



Hrt department. 





FALI, 


WINTER 


SPRING 




TERM. 


TERM. 


TERM. 


China Painting, one lesson a day, 


$18 OO 
18 OO 
18 OO 


$14 OO 
14 OO 
14 OO 


f 14 OO 
14 OO 
14 OO 


Modelling in Clay, one lesson a day, . . 


13 00 

8 00 


9 00 
6 00 


9 00 
6 00 


Drawing from the Antique, one lesson a day, . 
Drawing from the Flat, one lesson a day, 


8 00 
6 00 


6 00 
4 50 


6 00 
4 50 



The charges for room rent, heat, and furniture are made on the basis 
of two persons to each room. In case where a student rooms alone he 
will be charged 50 cents additional a week. Any student not boarding 
in the institution and occupying a room in the building will be charged 
a reasonable rent for the same. 

Extra washing, plain pieces, 50 cents a dozen. White dresses, etc., 
extra. 

Each student will be held accountable for any damage he may cause 
to the college property. Students will be held individually responsible 
for all damage done to their rooms, by whomsoever committed. 

Tuition and room rent are counted from the time of entering to the end 
of the term, and tuition from the first of the term for entrance second or 
third week. 

We urge a comparison of these charges with those of other schools, 
believing that such a comparison will establish the fact that our rates are 
more moderate for the advantages afforded than can be found elsewhere. 



Uerms of payment. 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before 
Commencement. 

One-half of all other bills in advance. Balance at the middle of the 
term. This rule will be invariably enforced. No student will be admitted 
to classes until all bills are satisfactorily settled with the Financial 
Secretary. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Commencement Meek* 



1893. 

Sunday, June nth, 10 o'clock A. M., Baccalaureate Sermon 
by Rev. Bishop J. Weaver, D. D., of Dayton, Ohio. 

Sunday, June nth, 2 o'clock P. M., Graduating Exercises 
of the Bible Normal Union. Short Addresses by members of 
the Class. 

Sunday, June nth, 7:30 o'clock P. M., Annual Sermon by 
the Rev. Maurice B. Spayd. 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, June 7, 8 and 9, 
Examination of Classes. 

Monday, June 12th, 7:30 o'clock P. M., Graduating Exer- 
cises of Department of Music. 

Tuesday, June 13th, 9 o'clock A. M., Annual Meeting of 
the Board of Trustees. 

Tuesday, June 13th, 7:30 o'clock P. M, Public Meeting of 
the Alumni Association. 

Wednesday, June 14th, 7:30 o'clock P. M., Annual Ad- 
dress before the Literary Societies by Gen. D. H. Hastings, of 
Bellefonte, Pa. 

Thursday, June 15th, 9 o'clock A. M., Commencement 
Exercises. Conferring of Degrees, etc. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 33 

Degrees Couferreb 

at 

Commencement 1892- 

1In Course. 

A. B. 

Anna Ruth Forney, John Dickson Rice, 

David Albert Kreider, Hervin Ulysses Roop. 

b. s. 

Annie E. Brightbill, Josephine Kreider, 

Elmer Loose Haak, Andrew Raymond Kreider, 

Jacob M. Herr, Laura E. Reider, 

Seba C. Huber, Dillie J. E. Rice, 

Harry Backenstoe Roop. 

A. M. 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, A. B., Class of 1889. 
Rev. A. A. Dong, A. B., Class of 1889. 
Rev. B. F. Daugherty, A. B., Class of 1889. 
Reno S. Harp. A. B., Class of 1889. 

PH. D. 

Rev. Cornelius A. Burtner, A. M., Class of 1878. 

Ibonorar^ Degree. 

D. D. 

Rev. Aaron E. Gobble, A. M., 
President of Central Pennsylvania College. 



34 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Stubents- 

IPostXBrafcuates. 



Isaac H. Albright, A. B., Lebanon Valley, 1876; A. M., 

idem, 1879, York, Pa. 

Benjamin F. Fritz, U. B., Seminary, 1884, Greenwich, Ohio. 

George E. HoetzappeE, M. D., Belleview Medical 

College, N. Y., 1S84, Seven Valleys, Pa. 

Wieeiam H. LEWARS, Dickinson Seminary, Lutheran 

Theological Seminary of the General Sj'nod, 1880, Annville, Pa. 



Simon Peter Bacastow, 
Horace W. Crider, 
Joseph G. W. Heroed, 
Samuee Thomas Meyer, 
John L. Meyer, 
Harry H. Sloat, 
Eevire C. Stehman, 
Minnie E. Weinman, 
Mary C. Batdorf, 
Katie P. Mumma, 
Anna E. Wilson, 



David S. Esheeman, 
Oscar E. Good, 
George K. Hartman, 
Samuee F. Huber, 
George A. L. Kindt, 
Wieeiam H. Kreider, 
h. lenich Meyer, 
Maggie Strickeer, 
Anna E. Wieson, 



Harry W. Mayer, 
John H. Maysieees, * 
Chas. B. Pennypacker, 
Chas. H. Seeichter, 
John R. Waeeace, 



Senior Class. 

Sand Beach, Scientific. 

York, Scientific. 

Ephrata, Scientific. 

Annville, Classical. 

Annville, Classical. 

Manchester, Academical. 

Mountville, Scientific. 

Wilkinsburg, Scientific. 

Annville, Musical. 

Hummelstown, Musical. 

Beaver Creek, Md., Musical. 

junior Class. 

Berlin, Ont., Classical. 

Progress, Classical. 

Shiremanstcwn, Classical. 

Chambersburg, Classical. 

Annville, Classical. 

Annville, Classical. 

Annville, Scientific. 

Lebanon, Classical. 

Beaver Creek, Md., Scientific. 

Sopbomore Class. 

Sacramento, Scientific. 

Frederick, Md., Scientific. 

Mountville, Classical. 

Scotland, Scientific. 

Norfolk, Va., Academic. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



35 



Ella N. Black, 
M. Kathryn Euston, 
Sheridan Garman, 
I. Grant Hoerner, 
Stella Kephart, 
Emily E. Loose, 
Charles T. Payne, 
Edith W. Sherrick, 
Estella Stehman, 



3Fresbman Class. 

Annville, 

Lebanon, 

Shermansdale, 

Progress, 

Lebanon, 

Palmyra, 

Harrisburg, 

Everson, 

Mountville, 

lpreparatot£ Class. 



Scientific. 

Scientific. 

Scientific. 

Classical. 

Scientific. 

Scientific. 

Classical. 

Classical. 

Scientific. 



Classical. 

Adam S. Bomberger, 
George W. Bowman, 
H. Gurney Fretz, 
William C. Gable, 
Blanche Kephart, 
Edwin Kreider, 
Edwin K. Rudy, 
Norman C. Schlichter, 
George H. Stein, 
Charles B. Wingerd, 

Scientific. 

John S. Dotter, 
Daniel Z. Erb, 
Wm. W. Freidinger, 
Eelix M. Gingrich, 
Rudolph F. Herr, 
Mary E. Kreider, 
Harold S. Lewars, 
Ralph P. Lewars, 
SallieK. Meyer, 
Ella Pennypacker, 
Benjamin Peters, 
Clara F. Reist, 
Mary E. Richard, 
Bertha M. Schertzer, 
S all ie E. Walter, 



Bismarck. 

Palmyra. 

Palmyra. 

Mountville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Swatara. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Chambersburg. 

Lickdale. 
Manheim. 
Manchester, Md. 
Annville. 



Mountville. 

Derry Church. 

Manheim. 

Annville. 

Grantville. 

Annville. 



IRormal Class. 



Byron Gingrich, 
Jennie M. Hetrick, 
Arthur J. Hoverter, 



Annville. 

Grantville. 

Annville. 



36 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



John M. Leese, 
Evan J. Meese, 
Charlotte Riegert, 
Bertha M. Schertzer, 
Percy E. Spancake, 
David E. Shope, 



IHnclassiffeo. 



Joseph W. Bomberger, 
Fannie Bomberger, 
Annie K. Bomberger, 
Agnes K. Bomberger, 
Solomon R. Huber, 
Etta Kaueeman, 
Elias B. Kline, 
William H. Thomas, 



Grantville. 
Deer Park, 
Annville. 
Grantville. 



Md. 



Manada Hill. 

Annville. 
(< 

Palmyra. 

a 

Chambersburg. 
Annville. 
Syner. 
Harrisburs:. 



Department of flTmsic, 

1Post=<5raouates. 

Annie E. Brightbill, ■ Annville. 

Anna R. Eorney, " 

Josephine Kreider, " 



piano or ©rgan. 



Simon P. Bacastow, 
Mary C. Batdore, 
Lizzie M. Biever, 
Ella N. Black, 
Fannie Bomberger, 
Agnes K. Bomberger, 
Annie K. Bomberger, 
Carrie B. Freed, 
Clara E. Freidinger, 
Annie J. Fry, 
William C. Gable, 
Howard G. Henry, 
Rudolph F. Herr, 
Lottie F. Herr, 
Susie F Herr, 
Ella Kauffman, 
Sallie Kreider, 
Annie E. Kreider, 



Sand Beach. 
Annville. 
Lebanon. 
Annville. 

a 

Palmyra. 

Arendtsville. 
Manchester, Md. 
Bellegrove. 
Mountville. 
Annville. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



37 



Mary E. Kreider, 
Reba F. Lehman, 
Max F. Lehman, 
Emily F. Loose, 
John H. Maysilles, 
Sallie k. Meyer, 
Steeea Mieeer, 
Naomi F. Mohn, 
ella pennyp acker, - 
Charlotte Riegert, 
Stella Sargent, 
Mabel Saylor, 
Sallie Saylor, 
Albert J. Shenk, 
Lizzie Shope, 
Nora F. Spayd, 
Elvire C. Stehman, 
Estella Stehman, 
George H. Stein, 
Anna E. Wilson, 
Chas. B. Wingerd, 
Mary E. Zimmerman, 



Annville. 



Palmyra. 
Frederick, Md. 
Annville. 

Reading. 

Mountville. 
Annville. 



Mountville. 

Annville. 

Beaver Creek, Md. 

Chambersburg. 

Annville. 



Ibarmon^. 



Mary C. Batdorf, 
Sallie Kreider, 



Ella Pennypacker, 
Anna E. Wilson. 



Voice Culture. 



Mary C. Batdorf, 
Emma R. Batdorf, 
Lizzie M. Biever, 
Horace W. Crider, 
M. Kathryn Euston, 
Emily E. Loose, 



Sallie k. Meyer, 
Naomi E. Mohn, 
Katie P. Mumma, 
Chas. H. Sleichter, 
Estella Stehman, 
Anna E. Wilson. 



Uiolin. 



Simon P. Bacastow, 
H. Gurney Fretz, 



Harry W. Mayer, 
John R. Wallace. 



art Department. 



©tl ipaiuting. 



Mary C. Batdorf, 
Mrs. H. C. Deaner, 



Mrs. J. E. Lehman, 
Sallie K. Meyer, 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Stella Kephart, Mary M. Shenk, 

Josephine Kreider, Elvire C. Stehman, 

Cbina Ipainting. 

Anna E. Brightbill, Nora Snavely, 

Anna R. Forney, Maggie Strickler, 

Crayoning. 

Agnes K. Bomberger, Alma M. Light, 

Horace W. Crider, Emily E. Loose, 

M. Kathryn Euston, Lillie I. Myers, 

Blanche Kephart, Stella Sargent, 

Elias B. Kline, Nora Snavely, 

Annie E. Kreider, Lizzie Snavely, 

Mary E. Kreider, Nora E. Spayd, 

Reba F. Lehman, Anna E. Wilson. 

Mater Color. 

MARY M. SHENK. 

Drawing. 

Lizzie M. Biever, William E. Herr, 

Agnes K. Bomberger, Elias B. Kline, 

Emma R. Witmer. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



39 



Summary 



fl>ost>(Sraouate. 

Post-Graduates, . 4 

Total, — 4 

Classical Course. 

Seniors, 2 

Juniors, 7 

Sophomores, i 

Freshmen, 3 

Preparatory, io 

Total, 23 

Scientific Course. 

Seniors, . 5 

Juniors, 2 

Sophomores, , 3 

Freshmen, 6 

Preparatory, 15 

Total, 31 

BcaDemical Course. 

Seniors, 1 

Sophomores, 1 

Total, 2 

/Iftustcal Course. 

Seniors, 3 

Total, 3 

Unclassified, 8 

Normal, 9 

Music and Art, 64 

Music and Art only, 32 

ToTai,, 112 



4-0 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Hlumni Hssociatton. 

PRESIDENT : 
REV. B. F. DAUGHERTY, A. M., Class of 1889. 

VICE PRESIDENT : 
SAMUEL J. EVERS, A. B., Class of 1891. 

SECRETARY : 

ANNA R. FORNEY, A. B., Class of 1892. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY : 

PROE. H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., Class of 1S79. 

TREASURER : 
REV. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D., Class of 1S76. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 
Prof. H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., Class of 1879. 
Prof. JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., Class of 1874. 
Prof. H. U. ROOP, A. B., Class of 1892. 
MARYM. SHENK, B. S., Class of 1891. 
EMMA L. LANDIS, M. A., Class of 1S79. 

appointments tor June, 1S92. 

POET : 
REV. JOHN L. KEEDY, A, B., Class of 1SS9. 

ADDRESSES : 

REV. W. H. WASHINGER, A. B., '91. 
REV. I. H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D., '76. 
Mrs. ALICE HAGEY, M. A., '77. 
Prof. JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., '74. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 4 1 



(Srabuates, 

CLASS OF 1870. 

William B. Bodenhorn, A. M., Died March 4, 1889, Annville, Pa. 
Albert C. Rigler, Teller Nat. Bank, Annville, Pa. 

Mary A. Weiss (Reitzel), Owosso, Mich. 

CLASS OF 1871. 

Clemmie L. Ulrich, Died Feb. 18, 1880, Annville, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1872. 

John Wesley Etter, A.M., D. D., Editor of Sunday- 
School Literature, U. B. Church, Dayton, Ohio. 
John K. Fisher, A. M.,' Died June 18, 1890, Shippensburg, Pa. 
Ezra H. Gingrich, A. M., Druggist, Philadelphia, Pa. 
John H. Graybill, A. M., Minister, Pittsburg, Pa. 
John H. Kinports, A. M., Druggist, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Jennie E. Kauffman (Crouse), M. A., Phcenixville, Pa. 
Adam R. Forney, Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

CLASS OF 187-3 

Henry B. Stehman, A. M., M. D., Supt. of Presby- 
terian Hospital, Chicago, 111 
Sarah Burns, M. A., Teacher, Englewood, 111. 
Charles S. Daniel, Minister, Philadelphia, Pa. 
George A. Loose, Salesman, Reading, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1874. 
Adam R. Forney, A. M., Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

John E. Lehman, A. M., Professor in Lebanon Val- 
ley College, Annville, Pa. 
Zaranius S. G. Light, A. M., Postmaster, Annville, Pa. 
Joseph W. Osborn, A.M., Ph.D., Died Jan. 4, 1889, Swansea, Mass. 
Robert Steinmetz, A. M., Farmer, Annville, Pa. 
Hiram E. Steinmetz, A. M., Merchant, Clay, Pa. 
Rebecca Kinports (Kendig), M. A., Lancaster, Pa. 
Ella Jane Mark (Sneath), M. A., Cambridgeport, Mass. 

CLASS OF 1875. 
Samuel H. Clair, A. M., Principal of Public High School, Ashland, Pa. 
Sarah E. Collier (Etter), M. A., Dayton, Ohio. 

CLASS OF 1876. 
Isaac H. Albright, A. M., Ph. D., P. E. of Pennsyl- 
vania Conference and Ed. "True Believer," York, Pa. 



42 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



J. George Johnson, A. M., Ph. D., Minister, 
John R. Wright, A. B., Minister, 

Aaron G. Herr, Merchant, 

CLASS OF 1877. 

George W. Hursh, A. M., M. D., Physician, 

Abraham H. Shank, A. M., Minister, 

Alice M. Rauch (Hagey), M. A.. 

Ella J. Rigler (Deaner), M. A., 

Monroe P. Sanders, Died May, 1892, 

Gerret G. Shellenberger, 



Port Richmond, N. Y. 
Newton, N. J. 
Caldwell, Kan. 



Chicago, 111. 
Chambersburg, Pa. 
Steelton, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Halifax, Pa. 
Wichita, Kan. 



CLASS OB" 1878. 
George F. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., Minister, Penbrook, Pa. 

Cornelius, A. Burtner, A. M., Ph. D., Minister, York, Pa. 
Virginia G. Burtner (Pittman), M. A., 537 Scott St., Toledo, Ohio. 
A. Belle Howe (Widmeyer), M. A., North Platte, Neb. 

Hiram B. Dohner, B. D., P. E. of East Penna. Con- 
ference, Bellegrove, Pa. 
Daniel D. Keedy, Merchant, Keedysville, Md. 
Harvey E. Thomas, Farmer, Boonsboro, Md. 

CLASS OF 1879. 
Charles D. Baker, A. M., M. D., Physician, Rohrersville, Md. 

H. Clay Deaner, A. M., Prof, in Lebanon Valley 

College, Annville, Pa. 

Horace S. Kephart, A. M., Librarian City Library, St. Louis, Mo. 
John C. Yocum, A. M., Attorney-at-Law, Kansas City, Mo. 

Clara S. Craumer (Leavens), A. B., Kansas City, Mo. 

Mary E. Groff (Jaquith), M. A., Died May 12, '91, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Emma L- Landis, M. A., Hummelstown, Pa. 

J. Lon Whitmoyer, B. S., Telegraph Operator, Fort Hamilton, N. Y. 
A. LeFevre Groff, Bookkeeper, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Fannie C. Killinger (Yocum), Kansas City, Mo. 

Lizzie E. Weidman (Groff),' Harrisburg, Pa. 

Henry Wolf, Merchant, Mount Wolf, Pa. 

CLASS OF I88O. 
V. Kline Fisher, A. B., Farmer, Berne, Pa. 

George W. Gensemer, A. B., Tanner, Pinegrove, Pa. 

S. Oliver Goho, A. M., Principal of Schools, Milton, Pa. 
Cyrus D. Harp, A. M., B. D., Minister, Roxbury, Mass. 

Simon P. Light, A. M., Attorney-at-Law, Lebanon, Pa. 

Rosa M. Meredith (Porter), M. A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fannie M. Deaner (Keedy), M. A., Keedysville, Md. 

Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., Prof, of Music, Lebanon 

Valley College, Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



43 



Sallie A. Herr (Geyer), M. A., 




Catawissa, Pa. 


Alice J. Light (Beam), M. A., 




Lebanon, Pa. 


B. Frank Baker, 


Farmer, 


Keedysville, Md. 


Elmer C. Thomas, 


Farmer, 


Boonsboro, Md. 



CLASS OF 1881. 

Ella J. Mark (Sneath), M. A., 

Charles E. Rauch, A. B., Merchant, 

Elias H. Sneath, A. M., Ph. D., Assistant Professo 

of Philosophy in Yale University, 
Isaiah W. Sneath, A. M., B. D., Minister, 
Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., Principal of Fostoria 

Academy, 
Cyrus L. Benson, B. S., 
Elmer H. Garver, B.. S.,' 
Henry A. Sechrist, B. S., Minister, 

Ella M. Smith (Light), B. S., 

Arabella Stauffer, B. S., Teacher of Music, 

Millie Weidman (Brightbill), B. S., 
George A. Wolf, B. S., Merchant, 

Mary A. VanMetre (Funderburk), M. A., 
John B. Ziegler, B. S., Physician, 

James M. VanMetre, Jr., Merchant, 



Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

r 

New Haven, Conn. 

Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Fostoria, Ohio. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Hastings, Neb. 
Sulphur Grove, Ohio. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Mt. Wolf, Pa. 
Columbia, S. C. 
East Harrisburg, Pa. 
Columbia, S. C. 



CLA 
William O. Fries, A. M., 
Christian E. Geyer, A. B., 
Charles B. Gruber, A. M., 
Mary E. Knepper, M. A., 
J. Goodwin Steiner, A. M., 
Mary S. Culp (Kennedy), 
Clinton J. Barr, B. S., 
Laertes T. Conrad, M. S., 
John H. Oliver, B. S., 

University of the Pacific, 
George W. VanMetre, 



SS OF 1882. 
Minister, 
Attorn ev-at-Law, 



Fostoria, Ohio. 

Catawissa, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Teacher of Music, Palmyra, Mo. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Georgetown, Ont. 
Clerk, Lebanon, Pa. 

Minister. Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Professor in the 

Pacific Grove, Cal. 

Martinsburg, W. Va. 



Alice K. Gingrich, 

Lebanon Valley College, 
Mary E. Knepper, M. A., 
Ella M. Smith (Light), B. S„ 
Ada M. Underwood (Ayers), 



Surveyor, 

IN MUSIC. 

Professor in Music, 

Annville, Pa. 
Teacher of Music, Palmyra, Mo. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
109 Hudson St., Hartford, Conn. 



CLASS OF 1 1S83. 
Elmer E. Craumer, A. B., Attorney-at-Law, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Jacob Z. Hoffman, A. M., M. D., Medical Lecturer, Wichita, Kan. 



44 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE- 



Miller, 


Annville, Pa. 


Minister, 


Gains, N. Y. 




Cambridge, Mass 




Gains, N. Y. 




Annville, Pa. 


Attorney-at-Law, 


Pittsburg, Pa. 



Gideon R. Kreider, A. M., 
Solomon G. Merrick, A. B., 
Alice M. Evers (Burtner), B. S., 
Althea C. Fink (Merrick), B. S., 
Lizzie J. Kinports, B. S., 
J. Foster Milliken, B. S., 

IN MUSIC. 

Alice M. Evers (Burtner), B. S., Cambridge, Mass. 

Ida M. Zent, Teacher of Music, Roanoke, Ind. 

CLASS OF 1884. 

Winton J. Baltzell, A. B., Professor of Music, Reading, Pa. 

Glosbrenner W. Hanger, A. M., Department of the 

Interior, Washington, D. C. 

J. Henderson Kurtz, A. B., Clerk in Ticket Receiv- 



er's Office, 
Joseph E. S. Medsger, A. B., 
J. Henry Miiller, A. M., B. D., 
J. Oliver Thrush, A. B., B. D., 
M. Angel Fry, B. S., 
C. Eugenia Hauck, B. S., 
H. Lincoln Musser, B. S., 
A. May Saylor, B. S., 



Jeweler, 
Minister, 
Minister, 
Postal Clerk, 



Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Florence, Pa. 
Sheffield, Mass. 
Postville, la. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Teacher of Music, Winchester, Va. 
Postal Clerk, Marietta, Pa. 

Teacher, Annville, Pa. 



C. Eugenia Hauck, 



IN MUSIC. 

Teacher of Music, Winchester, Va. 
CLASS OB" 1SS5. 



Markwood M. Burtner, A. M., Minister, Littlestown, Pa. 

William S. Ebersole, A. M., Professor of Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature in Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa. 
Joseph Allen Lyter, A. M., Minister, Philadelphia, Pa. 

IN MUSIC. 

Sevilla K. Gensemer (Bowman), Teacher of Music, Lafayette, Oregon. 
Minnie E. Speck, Carlisle, Pa. 

Ida M. Speck, Carlisle, Pa. 

CLASS OF 1S86. 
Daniel Emory Burtner, A. M., B. D., Minister, Cambridge, Mass. 

IN MUSIC. 

M. Ella Moyer, Teacher of Music, Lebanon, Pa. 

CLASS OK 18S7. 
Clayton Hershey Backenstoe, B. S., Attorney-at- 



Law, 



Harrisburg-, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



45 



Harry Thomas Denlinger, A. B., Minister, 
Anselm Vinet Hiester, B. S., Prof, of Mathematics, 

Franklin and Marshall College, 
Joseph Patterson Jordan, A. B., Minister, 
Lillie Catharine Mark, A. B., 
George Rigler Shenk, A. M., M. D., Physician, 
William Dick Shupe, B. S., Attorn ey-at-Law, 

Sallie Jane Waite, Teacher, 

Morrison Weimer, A. B., B. D., Minister, 



So. Williamsport, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Carrick, Pa. 
Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Reading, Pa. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Sedgwick, Kan. 
Sedgwick, Kan. 



L. Augusta Doyle, 
Carrie Gertrude Eby, 
Katie B. Rauch, 



IN MUSIC. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 
Teacher of Music, Newport, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



CLASS OF 1SSS. 

Albert Henry Gerberich, B. S., Principal of Pub- 
lic Schools, Williamstown, Pa. 
William McClellan Hain, B. S., Attorney-at-Law, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Anna Rebecca Reed (Weimer), B. S., Sedgwick, Kan. 
Joseph Kurtz Wagner, B. S., Minister, Blue Rock, Pa. 



IN MUSIC. 



Alice Lydia Kutz, 
Sadie Adaline Mark, 
Sidney Moyer, 
Nettie May Swartz, 



Teacher of Music, Freeburg, Pa. 

Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
New Oxford, Pa. 



CLASS OK- 188©. 

Benjamin Franklin Daugherty, A. M., Minister, 
Joseph Daugherty, B. S., Minister, 

Samuel D. Faust, A. M., Professor of Church His 

tory, Union Biblical Seminary, 
Reno Schaeffer Harp, A. M., Editor, 
John Lincoln Keedy, A. B., Minister, 

Edward Everett Keedy, A. B., Editor, 
John Edward Kleffman, B. S., Minister, 
Aaron Albion Long, A. M., Minister, 

Ellwood Thomas Schlosser, Farmer, 



Baltimore, Md. 
New Cumberland, Pa. 

Dayton, Ohio. 
Frederick City, Md. 
Watertown, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Hanover, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Boonsboro, Md. 



CLASS OF" 1890. 

Edward Stauffer Bowman, B. S., Minister, Greencastle, Pa. 

Edward Otterbein Burtner, B. S., Teacher, Delaware, Ohio. 

Lorena S. Funk (Bowman), B. S., Greencastle, Pa. 

William Robert Keller, B. S., Teacher, Johnstown, Pa. 



46 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



William Haines Kindt, A. M., Prin. of Schools, Youngsville, Pa. 
James Thomas Spangler, A. B., Student and Tutor 

in Union Biblical Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. 

Allen Fishburn Ward, B. S., Tailor, Lebanon, Pa. 



IN MUSIC. 



LorenaS Funk (Bowman), B. S., Greencastle, Pa. 

Anna Ruth Forney, Student in Art, Annville, Pa. 



CLASS OB" 1891. 



Schuyler Colfax Enck, B. S. 



Minister, 



New Holland, Pa. 
Samuel J. Evers, A. B., Student in Union Biblical 

Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. 

John Wilson Owen, B. S., Teacher, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Lillian M. Ouigley, B. S., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Ella Nora Saylor, B. S., Student in New 

England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. 

Mary Magdalena Shenk, B. S., Student in Art, Annville, Pa. 
William Henry Washinger, A. B., Minister, Harrisburg, Pa. 



IN MUSIC. 



Minnie M. Burtner, Teacher, West Fairview, Pa. 

Carrie E. Smith, Student in New 

England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. 



CLASS OF" 1892. 



Annie E. Brightbill, B. S., 
Anna Ruth Forney, A. B., 

and Music, 
Elmer Loose Haa'k, B. S., 
Jacob M. Herr, B. S., 
Seba C. Huber, B. S., 
Josephine Kreider, B. S., 
Andrew Raymond Kreider, B 

in Cornell University, 
David Albert Kreider, A. B., 

Yale University, 
Laura E. Reider, B. S., 
LillieJ. E. Rice, B. S., 
John Dickson Rice, A. B., 
Harry Backenstoe Roop, B. S. 
Hervin Ulysses Roop, A. B., 

Literature, State Normal 



Student in Art, 
Student in Art, 



Annville, Pa. 



Annville, Pa. 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Lulu, Michigan. 



Bookkeeper, 
Teacher, 
Principal of Schools, Tama, Iowa. 
Student in Art, Annville, Pa. 
S., Electrical Course 

Ithaca, N. Y. 
Assistant in Chemistry, 

New Haven, Conn. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Law Student, Chambersburg, Pa. 
, Student of Medicine, Highspire, Pa. 
Professor of English 
School, Shippensburg, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 47 

IN MUSIC. 

Lulu M. Baker, Student in Otterbein University, Westerville, Ohio. 
Annie E. Brightbill, Student in Art, Annville, Pa. 

Florence R. Brindle, Shamokin, Pa. 

Katie P. Mumma, Student in Music, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Delia F. Roop, Teacher of Music, Highspire, Pa. 

Flla N. Saylor, Student New England Conserva- 
tory of Music, Boston, Mass. 
Elvire C. Stehman, Student in L,. V. C, Mountville, Pa. 
Samuel H. Stein, Student Franklin and Marshall 

College, Annville, Pa