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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

jCebanon Valley College. 



*7~ IS9S. 



Chartered 1867. 



Thirty-Second Annual Catalogue 



OF THE 



Officers and Students 



OF 



Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



FOR 



The Collegiate Year 
1897-98 



ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE JOURNAL PRINT 

1898 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Calendar. 

1898-99. 



September 5, 1898- 
September 6, 1898- 
September 6, 1898- 
November 24, 1898 

ciety. 
December 22, 1898 



-Entrance Examination, 10 o'clock A. M. 
-Registration for the Term. 
-Organization, 9 o'clock A. M. 
—Anniversary of the Clionian Literary So- 
mali Term of Sixteen Weeks ends. 
Vacation, 



January 2, 1899 — Entrance Examination, 2 o'clock P. M. 
January 3, 1899 — Winter Term begins, 9 o'clock A. M. 
January 26, 1899 — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
March 25, 1899 — Winter Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 
March 27, 1899 — Entrance Examination, 2 o'clock P. M. 
March 28, 1899 — Spring Term begins, 10 o'clock A. M. 
April 7, 1899 — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society. 
May 5, 1899 — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary 

Society. 
May 30,11899 — National^Holiday — Decoration Day. 
June 7, 1899 — Final Examination of Seniors begins. 
June 11, 1899 — Baccalaureate Sermon by President Roop. 
June 11, 1899 — Address to the Bible Normal Union Graduates. 
June 12, 1899 — Commencement of the Department of Music, 

7.30 o'clock P. M. 
June 13, 1899 — Meeting of the Board of Trustees, 9 o'clock 

A. M. 
June 13, 1899 — Public Meeting of the Alumni Association, 7.30 

o'clock P. M. 
June 14, 1899 — Annual Address before the Literary Societies. 
June 15, 1899 — Commencement. 
June 16, 1899 — Spring Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Corporation, 



Trustees, 



Term Expires 1901. 

REV. SAMUEL D. FAUST, D. D., Dayton, Ohio. 

B. F. BAKER, Esq., Keedysville, Md. 

REV. S. D. SKETON, Winchester, Va. 

REV. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D., .... Dallastown, Pa. 

S. W. CLIPPINGER, Esq., Chambersburg, Pa. 

ADAM R. FORNEY, A. M., Annville, Pa. 

ISAAC B. HAAK, ESQ., Myerstown, Pa. 

REV. CHARLES A. MUTCH, Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

REV. C. W. STINESPRING, Frederick, Md. 

Rev. WILLIAM H. WASHINGER, A. M., . . Chambersburg, Pa. 

REV. S. K. WINE, Staunton, Va. 

H. B. MILLER, ESQ., Harrisonburg, Va. 

Term Expires 1900. 

REV. DANIEL D. EBERLY, D. D Abbottstown, Pa. 

W. H. ULRICH, Esq., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Rev. JULIUS E. FOUT, Washington, D. C. 

REV. J. C. S. MYERS, Annex, Va. 

REV. J. B. CHAMBERLIN, Keedysville, Md. 

B. F. ENGLE, Esq., Harrisburg, Pa. 

VALENTINE K. FISHER, A. B., Berne, Pa. 

WILLIAM A. LUTZ, Esq., Shippensburg, Pa. 

REV. HIRAM B. DOHNER, B. D., ..... Bellegrove, Pa. 

REV. WM. H. SAMPSELL, Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

Term Expires 1899. 

Rev. E. B. KEPHART, D. D., LL. D., . . . . Annville, Pa. 

REV. J. T. SPANGLER, B.D., Annville, Pa. 

HENRY H. KREIDER, Esq., Annville, Pa. 

REV. JOHN A. KEIPER, A. M., Myerstown, Pa. 

REV. JACOB R. RIDENOUR, Middletown, Md. 

NATHANIEL B. LIGHT, Esq., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rev. SOLOMON L. SWARTZ, Middletown, Pa. 

REV. C. A. BURTNER, Ph. D., Harrisburg, Pa. 

RENO S. HARP, A. M., Frederick, Md. 

JOHN H. MAYSILLES, A. B., Savage, W. Va. 

Ex'Officio< 

President H. U. ROOP, Ph. D. 
Professor J. E. LEHMAN, A. M. 
Professor J. T. SPANGLER, A. M., B. D. 
Professor H. L. MEYER, B. S., 
Professor B. F. DAUGHERTY, A. M. 
Miss M. ETTA WOLFE, A. M. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



The Corporation, 



Officers of the Board of Trustees. 

President, WILLIAM A. LUTZ, Eso. 

Secretary, Rev. I. H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D. 

Treasurer, ISAAC B. HAAK, Esq. 

Executive Committee. 

HERVIN U. ROOP, Chairman. 

WM. H. WASHINGER, Secretary. 
ISAAC B. HAAK, RENO S. HARP, 

BENJ. F. ENGLE, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

ADAM R. FORNEY, ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT. 

Committees. 

i. Finance — H. B. Dohner, Chairman ; H. H. Kreider, S. L. Swartz, 
S. W. Clippinger, S. K. Wine, C. A. Mutch. 

2. Endowment — E. B. Kephart, Chairman ; W. H. Washinger, Daniel 
Eberly, S. F. Engle, W. H. Ulrich. 

3. Faculty — Benj. F. Engle, Chairman ; Isaac B. Haak, Samuel D. 
Faust, Isaac H. Albright, J. E. Fout. 

4. Library and Apparatus — J. T. Spangler, Chairman ; John H. May- 
silles, John A. Keiper, N. B. Light, Wm. H. Sampsell. 

5. Grounds, Buildings, and Domestic Department — C. A. Burtner, 
Chairman ; J. B. Chamberlain, J. C. S. Myers, J. R. Ridenour, V. K. 
Fisher. 

6. Auditing — Reno S. Harp, Chairman ; B. F. Baker, C. W. Stine- 
spring, A. R. Forney, H. B. Miller. 



Steward. 

SAMUEL F. DAUGHERTY. 



LEBANON VAIXEY COIXEGE. 

Faculty and Instructors, 



REV. HERVIN U. ROOP, A. M,, Ph. D„ 

PRESIDENT. 

Professor of Philosophy ; Pedagogy, and Oratory. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

REV. JAMES T. SP ANGLER, A. M„ B. D„ 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

H, LENICH MEYER, B. S„ 

Professor of Natural Science and Political Economy. 

REV. BENJAMIN F. DAUGHERTY, A. M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

M. ETTA WOLFE, A. M., 

Professor of the Modern Languages and English Literature. 

ORVILLE P. DeWITT, A. B., 
Assistant in English and History. 

OSCAR E. GOOD, A. M,, 

Assistant in Mathematics and Science. 

REV. C. E. HURLBURT, 

Instructor in the English Bible. 

CARRIE E. SMITH, 

Professor of Instrumental Music and Theory. 

ELLA NORA BLACK, B. S„ 
Assistant in Instrumental Music. 

MRS. HERVIN U. ROOP, A. M„ 

Professor of Voice Culture and Art. 



LEBANON VAIJ,EY COLLEGE. 

Faculty and Instructors. 



WILLOUGHBY S. WILDE, L. L C. M., 

Professor of Harmony and Voice Culture. 

HATTIE S. SHELLEY, M. E„ 
Teacher of Elocution and Physical Culture. 

LEAH C HARTZ, 

Teacher of Stenography and Typewriting : 

BISHOP E> B. KEPHART, D. D„ LL D„ 

Lecturer on International Law and Biblical Antiquities. 

REV. J. P. MILLER, D. D., 

Lecturer on Social Ethics. 

REV. D. S. ESHLEMAN, A. M„ B. D„ 
College Pastor. 

REV. H. B. DOHNER, B. D„ 
Field Secretary. 



JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M„ 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

REV. J. T, SPANGLER, B. D., 
Librarian. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Degrees Conferred 

at the 

Commencement, June 17, 1897, 



In Course/ 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Ira E. Albert. Norman C. Schlichter. 

Raymond P. Dougherty. Charles B. Wingerd. 

Bachelor of Science. 

Harry Boyer. George A. Ulrich. 

Howard E. Enders. Anna M. Keller. 

Adam S. Ulrich. Mary E. Richards. 

Master of Science. 

Jacob H. Reber, B. S. 

Master of Arts. 
David S. Eshleman, A. B. 
George K. Hartman, A. B. 
William H. Kreider, A. B. 

On Examination. 

Edward S. Bowman, B. S. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



STUDENTS. 



Graduate Students, 

Henry S. BealS, A. B., Illinois Wesleyan University, 

B. D., Drew Seminary , Glen Moore, Pa. 

John H. Best, C. E., Lehigh University, 

Baltimore, Md. 
Eu,a Nora Bi^ack, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1896, 

Annville, Pa. 
Edward S. Bowman, A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 

1897, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

E. S. Brownmi^ler, Missionary Institute, 1880, 

Reading, Pa. 
S. C. Enck, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1891, 

Manheim, Pa. 
Oscar E. Good, A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 1894, 

Progress, Pa. 
Joseph G. W. Heroi^d, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 

1893, West Newfield, Me. 

J. Alexander Jenkins, A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 

1896, St. Paul, Minn. 

Anna M. Keu,ER, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1897, 

Campbelltown, Pa. 

F. M. McLaury, A. B., Wesleyan University, 

York, Pa. 
John L. Meyer, A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 1893, 

Annville, Pa. 
Bertha Mumma, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1896, 

Fredericksburg, Pa. 
J. CAivViN Oi^dt, A. M., Central Penna. College, 1890, 

Put-in-Bay, Ohio. 
Jacob H. Reber, M. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1895, 

Huntingdon, Pa. 
John R. Waluce, B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1895, 

Norfolk, Va. 
Wilbur M. YiNGST, A. B., Dickinson College, 1896, 

Boiling Springs, Pa. 



UndeivGraduates, 

Senior Class, 

C. Classical Course. S. Scientific Course, M, Musical Course, 

NAME. RESIDENCE. ROOM. 

Aei,EN U. Baer, S. Reading, 23 N. College. 

John Q. Deibi,er, S. Steelton, 23 N. C. 

Orvii^e P. DeWiTT, C. Newport, Railroad St. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



John R. Geyer, C. 
Bessie Kinports, S. 
Edwin Kreider, S. 
Mary E. Kreider, M. 
J. Asa Light, S. 
Louise Rowse Mieeer, C. 
Steeea K. Sargent, M. 
Jay W. Yoe, S. 
Jacob Zerbe, C. 



Middletown, 

Annville, 

Annville, 

Annville, 

Lebanon, 

Harrisburg, 

Annville, 

Sbippensburg, 

Heilmandale, 



33 N. C. 
West Main St. 
East Main St. 
East Main St. 
28 N. C. 
South College. 
West Main St. 
40 N. C. 
40 N. C. 



Junior Class- 



Emma R. Batdorf, S. 
John P. Batdorf, S. 
Cearence V. Ceippinger, S. 
Waeter G. Ceippinger, C. 
Edith S. Grabiix, S. 
George M. Haines, S. 
Leah C. Hartz, S. 
Susie F. Herr, S. 
Harry H. Hoy, C. 
Isaac W. Huntzberger, C. 
Harry M. Imboden, C. 
Wm. O. Jones, C. 
Mary E. Kreider, C. 
Bessie M. Landis, S. 
Aema M. Light, S. 
Gaeen D. Light, S. 
G. Maheon Mieeer, S. 
Harry E. Mieeer, C. 
Anna S. Myers, S. 
Edwin K. Rudy, C. 
Irvin E. Runk, S. 
Carrie D. Seetzer, S. 
Hattie Spangeer Sheeeey, S. 
John D. Stehman, C. 
Maud S. Trabert, S. 



Annville, 

Annville, 

Taneytown, Md. 

McKinney. 

Lancaster. 

Avon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Killinger. 

Elizabethtown. 

Annville. 

Elkton, Va. 

Annville. 

Hummelsto wn . 

Annville. 

Jonestown. 

Harrisburg. 

Lebanon. 

Mountville. 

Union Deposit. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Hatton. 

Mountville. 

Annville. 



W. Main St. 
W. Main St. 

38 N. C. 
13 N. C. 

s. c. 

28 N. C. 
W. Main St. 
E. Main St. 

26 N. C. 

E. Main St. 
W. Main St. 
College Ave. 
E. Main St. 
Railroad St. 
W. Main St. 
16 N. C. 
32 N. C. 

27 N. C. 

s. c. 

26 N. C. 
24 N. C. 
Willow St. 
S. C. 

39 N. C. 

W. Main St. 



IO 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



NELLIE BUFFINGTON, S. 

Lewis E. Cross, S. 
Annie E. Kreider, C. 
Lizzie G. Kreider, S. 
Reba F. Lehman, C. 
Fred. W. Light, S. 
Seth A. Light, C. 
David E. Long, S. 
Flora Maysili.es, S. 
ROSS NlSSLEY, S. 
CLYDE J. Saylor, S. 
Alvin E. Shroyer, S. 
Paul E. Smith, S. 
Chas. E. Snoke, C. 
G. Mason Snoke, C. 
Paul M. Spangler, S. 
Harry E. Spessard, C. 
Edith Warmer, S. 
Adam Wier, C. 



Sophomore Class* 

Elizabeth ville, 

Rayville, Md. 

Annville, 

Annville, 

Annville, 

Lebanon, 

Avon, 

Bellegrove, 

Munson, W. Va. 

Hummelstown , 

Annville, 

Shamokin, 

Lebanon, 

Newville, 

Annville, 

Lebanon, 

Chewsville, Md., 

Harrisburg, 

Lititz, 

Freshman Class. 



Edward M. Balsbaugh, S. 
Rene D. Burtner, C. 
Madie Burtner, C. 
R. R. Butterwi;ck, C. 
Samuel F. Daugherty, C. 
Frank Douglass, S. 
Frank B. Emenheiser, S. 
Chas. C. Haines, S. 
Joseph L. Kreider, S. 
Karnig Kuyoomjian, C. 
Homer Lehn, S. 
Annie F. Loos, S. 
Emma F. Loos, S. 
Elizabeth Marshall, S. 
Thos. F. Miller, C. 



Hockersville, 

Harrisburg, 

Harrisburg, 

Shoemakersville, 

Dallastown, 

Steelton, 

Dallastown, 

Avon, 

Annville, 

Tarsus, Asia Minor, 

Bellegrove, 

Berne, 

Berne, 

Annville, 

Donnally's Mills, 



S. C. 

College Ave. 
E. Main St. 
Sheridan Ave. 
E. Main St. 
Cumb. St. 
16 N. C. 
24 N. C. 
E. Main St. 
27 N. C. 
E. Main St. 
College Ave. 
W. Main St. 
15 N. C. 
W. Main St. 
N. 9th St. 
41 N. C. 

s. c. 

15 N. C. 



30 N. C. 
32 N. C. 
S. C. 
16 N. C. 
S. C. 

32 N. C. 
College Ave. 

33 N. C. 
Sheridan Ave. 
29 N. C. 

14 N. C. 
E. Main St. 
E. Main St. 
E. Main St. 
Queen St. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. II 

Susie S. Mover, C. Derry Church, S. C. 

Ralph Reider, C. Middletown, 33 N. C. 

Wm, OTTERBEIN Roop, C. Harrisburg, 14 N. C. 

Wm. Spencer Roop, S. Highspire, College Ave. 

Cearence A. Soeeenberger.S. Harrisburg, 38 N. C. 

Charges W. WaughTEE, C. Red Lion, 36 N. C. 

Harry H. Yoe, S. Shippensburg, 40 N. C. 

Special Students. 

J. B. ArTz, Annville, Pa. 

J. W. BOMBERGER, Annville, Pa. 

Z. Bowman, Annville, Pa. 

Ada GaleaGher, Lebanon, Pa. 

G. B. Gerberich, Annville, Pa. 

John A. Hoeunger, Fontana, Pa. 

Harvey E. Hartz Palmyra, Pa. 

Harry A. Honker, Lebanon, Pa. 

R. L. Jones, Lickdale, Pa. 

U. S. G. Renn, Bphrata, Pa. 

Edith Shaak, Lickdale, Pa. 

A. L. Shannon, Mountville, Pa. 

John M. Sheleey, Steelton, Pa. 

A. W. Steinrtjck, Deodate, Pa. 

Lizzie Walters, Annville, Pa. 

Elizabeth M. Weidman, Lebanon, Pa. 

Senior Preparatory. 

Arabella Batdorf, S. Annville, W. Main St. 

M. Luther BrownmillER, C. Reading, W. Main St. 

Morris W. Brunner, C. New Bloomfield, 

Augustus Crone, C. Eastmont, 25 N. C. 

Mamie Dean, S. Annville, W. Main St. 

Hoffman Derickson, C. Newport, 24 N. C. 

Frank F. Fry, S. Reward, Lebanon. 

Jas. J. Funk, S. New Buffalo, 31 N. C. 

John W. Garland, S. Pequa, 29 N. C. 

I. Mover Hershey, C. Hockersville, 26 N. C. 

Wm. M. Knauss, C. Allentown, 30 N. C. 



12 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



A. Wesley Mieeer, C. 


Mechanicsburg, 


20 N. C. 


John W. Midler, S. 


Donnolly's Mill, 


Queen St. 


Edward Nisseey, C. 


Middletown, 


26 N. C. 


David M. Oyer, C. 


Upper Strasburg, 


28 N. C. 


Mabee Purr, S. 


Highspire, 


s. c. 


S. Edwin Rupp, C. 


Oberlin, 


31 N. C. 


Wm. J. Sanders, C. 


Sunbury, 


37 N. C. 


Harry E. Shriver, S. 


Deny Church, 


33 N. C. 


R. R. Sites, S. 


Housum, 


31 N. C. 


A. Garfieed Smith, C. 


Rohrersville, Md., 


39 N. C. 


L. Edward Smith, S. 


Lebanon, 


9th St. 


Paul P. Smith, S. 


Annville, 


R. R. St. 


Junior 


Preparatory, 




Aebert E. Arnfieed, C. 


Johnstown, 


27 N. C. 


J. Wesley Baesbaugh, C. 


Hockersville, 


30 N. C. 


Geo. E. Barto, S. 


Myerstown, 


18 N. C. 


Wm. Betz, S. 


Schaefferstown , 


White Oak St. 


Jno. C. Daugherty, C. 


Highspire, 


37 N. C. 


Urias Daugherty, C. 


Dallastown, 


College Ave. 


Mii/ton E. Donough, C. 


Myerstown, 


18 N. C. 


H. L. Eichinger, C 


New Cumberland, 


E. Main St. 


Raeph Engee, S. 


Palmyra, 


20 N. C. 


Raymond Engee, S- 


Palmyra, 


20 N. C. 


Aeice Ferree, S. 


Harcisburg, 


S. C. 


Sadie Foreman, S. 


Hockersville, 


S. C. 


Eeeis H. Free, C. 


New Cumberland, 


White Oak St. 


D. H. FURGESON, C. 


Shelburne, Out., 


R. R. St. 


Lorenza D. Gass, S. 


Shamokin, 


37 N. C. 


JAC. R. GEYER, C. 


Middletown, 


33 N. C. 


Lottie F. Herr, S. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


John F. Herr, S. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


Amos L. House, C. 


Markelville, 


Queen St. 


Edith Hunsicker, S. 


Annville, 


Sheridan Ave. 


Soeomon D. Kauffman, C. 


Dallastown, 


College Ave. 


Herbert keedy, C. 


Hagerstown, Md., 


College Ave. 


H. C. KXinger, C. 


Oriental, 


30 N. C. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



13 



Harper Kreiser, C. 


Reading, 




25 N. C. 


Wm. O. Lovell, S. 


Garfield, Md., 




31 N. C. 


Max F. Lehman, S. 


Annville, 




E. Main St. 


Amos F. Martin, C. 


Millersville, 




24 N. C. 


Frances McAllister, C. 


Harrisburg, 




S. C. 


Wm. H. Mover, S. 


Boiling Springs, 




25 N. C. 


J. Nissley Mumma, S. 


Enders, 




W. Main St. 


Walter L. Ream, S. 


Harrisburg, 




17 N. C. 


Hiram F. Rhoad, C. 


East Hanover, 




Sheridan Ave. 


Herman G. Ruhl, C. 


Manheim, 




14 N. C. 


Frank M. Shadel, C. 


Williamstown, 




30 N. C. 


Monroe W. Smeltzer, C. 


Penbrook, 




Sheridan Ave, 


Irene Smith, S. 


Red Lion, 




S. C. 


Chas. A. Snavely, C. 


Vian, 




41 N. C. 


Anna M. Snyder, S. 


Yoe, 




s. c. 


Frank F. Snyder, C. 


Palmyra, 




33 N. C. 


Oscar A. Stauffer, S. 


Palmyra, 




18 N. C. 


Harvey Steckbeck, S. 


Schaeff ersto wn , 






Jerome Tennis, S. 


Middletown, 




20 N. C. 


M. M. Weber, C. 


Enders, 




R. R: St. 


Department of Music, 








Piano* 




Ella Nora Black, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Nellie Buffington, 


Elizabeth ville 


, Pa. 


Fannie Bomberger, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Mrs. M. Ella DaugherTy, Dallastown, Pa. 


Mamie E. Dean, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Alice Ferree, 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Grace Fisher, 


Palmyra, 


Pa. 




Leah C. Hartz, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Mamie K. Haverstick, 


Neffsville 


, Pa. 




Lottie F. Herr, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Susie F. Herr, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




John F. Here, 


Annville, 


Pa. 




Will E. Herr, 


Annville, 


Pa. 





H 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Annie E. Kreider, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Reba F. Lehman, 
Max F. Lehman, 
Emma Loos, 
Patrick Meyer, 
Annie S. Myers, 
Susie S. Moyer, 
Flora Maysilles, 
Iva Mauleair, 
Elizabeth Marshall, 
Ruth Leslie, 
Harry E. Miller, 
Edith Hunsicker, 
Grace Nissley, 
Mabel Putt, 
Susie Reiter, 
Stella Sargent, 
Nellie Sharp, 
Elizabeth Shirk, 
Elizabeth Shope, 
Bertha Smith, 
Irene Smith, 
Anna Snyder, 
William Spessard, 
John Stehman, 
Mary Zimmerman, 

Alice Ferree, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Ruth Leslie, 



Theory. 



Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Berne, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Mountville, Pa. 
Derry Church, Pa. 
Munson, W.Va. 
Annville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Highspire, Pa. 
Myerstowu, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Steelton, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Red Lion, Pa. 
Yoe, Pa. 
Chewsville, Md. 
Mountville, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 

Susie S. Moyer, 
Elizabeth Shirk. 
Elizabeth Shope. 



J. Irene Smith. 
Harmony — Stella k. Sargent. 

Musical History, 

Ella Nora Black, Susie S. Moyer, 

Mrs. M. Ella Daugherty, Anna S. Myers, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



15 



ALICE FERREE, 
Annie E. Kreider, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Ruth Leslie, 

Anna Snyder. 

Voice Culture. 

Fannie Bomberger, 
Maurice H. Brightbill, 
Wellington Brunner, 
Mrs. Della F. Daugherty, 
Samuel F. Daugherty, 
Edith S. Grabill, 
Leah C. Hartz, 
Lottie F. Herr, 
William O. Herr, 
Annie E. Kreider, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Mary E. Kreider, 
Harper Kreiser, 
Mary KreigER, 

Elizabeth Walters. 



Elizabeth Shope, 
Stella Sargent, 
Elizabeth Shirk, 
Irene Smith, 



Reba F. Lehman, 
David E. Long, 
Louise R. Miller, 
Bertha Mumma, 
Anna S. Myers, 
William S. Roop, 
Sara A. Roop, 
Stella Sargent, 
Nellie Sharp, 
Elizabeth H. Shope, 
Hattie S. Shelley, 
Irene Smith, 
W. N. Spessard, 
John Stehman, 



China Painting. 

Mrs. Della F. Daugherty, Alice Ferree, 

Mame K. Haverstick. 

Stenography, Typewriting, and Penmanship. 

John C. Daugherty, Harper Kreiser, 

Frank R. Douglass, Ruth Leslie, 

Lorenzo D. Gass, Frank M. Shadel, 

Amos L. House, Jerome Tennis. 



1 6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

SUMMARY. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Graduate Students, 17 

Total, 17 

UNDERGRADUATES. 

Seniors, 12 

Juniors, 25 

Sophomores, 19 

Freshmen, 22 

Partial Course, 16 

Total, 94 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Senior Class, 23 

Junior Class, 43 

Total, 66 

MISCELLANEOUS, 

Students in Music, 69 

Students in Stenography, Typewriting, and Penmanship, .... S 

Students in China Painting, 3 80 

Total, 257 

Deduct names counted more than once, 53 

Total, . . , 204 

BY CONFERENCES. 

East Pennsylvania, 115 

Eastern, 42 

Pennsylvania, 35 

Maryland, 7 

Virginia, 3 

Allegheny, 1 

Ontario, 1 

Total, 204 

Students belonging to other churches, classified by conferences, 52 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 7 

ADMISSION, 



The College offers the following courses of study : The 
Classical, the L,atin Scientific Course, and the Greek 
Scientific Course. 

Classical Course. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the following studies : 

English— Grammar, Analysis, English and American Literature, and 
Rhetoric. 
An essay of about five hundred words, correct in spelling, punctuation, 
and grammar, must be written by the candidate, in the presence of the 
examiners, upon some subject drawn from one of the following works : 

For 189S— Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Burke's Speech on Conciliation 
with America ; DeOuincey's The Flight of a Tartar Tribe ; Carlyle's Es- 
say on Burns ; Tennyson's The Princess. 

Greek — Grammar, Anabasis (four books), Iliad (three books), Composi- 
tion. 

Latin — Grammar, Caesar (four books), Cicero (four orations), Virgil 
(four books), Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic, Elementary Algebra complete, Plane Geom- 
etry. 

Science — Geography (Descriptive, Political, and Physical), Astronomy, 
Botany, Natural Philosophy. 

History — United States History, English History, Grecian History, Ro- 
man History, Bible History, Civil Government. 

Latin Scientific Course, 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the same studies as for the Classical Course, except 
Greek. 

Greek Scientific Course, 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are ex- 
amined in the same studies as for the Classical Course, except 
no Latin. 



1 8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Admission on Certificate, 

Students who seek credit for studies pursued in high 
schools and academies must submit certificates stating the 
texts or portions of texts used, and the number of hours spent 
in recitation thereon. 

Graduates of Pennsylvania State Normal Schools are ad- 
mitted to the L,atin Scientific Course without examination. 

Candidates for advanced standing coming from any other 
institution of equal grade will receive credit, without exami- 
nation, for the studies which the faculty of such school may 
testify that they have passed. 

Real equivalents for studies required are received at the dis- 
cretion of the Faculty. 

Studies pursued in high schools, academies, and other pre- 
paratory schools will not be accepted as equivalents of studies 
in the Junior and Senior years. 

Students coming from other institutions must present cer- 
tificates of honorable dismissal. 

Conditional Admission, 

A candidate failing to pass in one or more of the subjects 
required for admission, may, at the discretion of the Faculty, 
be admitted to his class conditionally to make up his deficien- 
cies by extra study. No student will be given Junior standing 
until all deficiencies are made up. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 9 

CURRICULA, 



The Classical Course, 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 
Fall Term, 

Greek — Herodotus, Mythology, Prose Composition. 

Latin — Livy, Prose Composition, Roman Antiquities. 

Mathematics — Geometry Completed. 

German — Grammar and Exercises. 

Bible — Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Scott's Ivanhoe. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Prose Composition. 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute or de Amicitia, Roman Literature. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. 

German — Grammar, Exercises, and Marchen und Erzahlungen. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Macaulay's History of England, Chap. I. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Spring Term. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Prose Composition. 

Latin — -Horace's Odes. 

Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry. 

German — Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, or equivalent. 

Bible— -The Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Irving's Sketch Book. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR, 
Fall Term, 

Greek — Memorabilia, Greek Testament. 

Latin — Horace, Epistles, Quintilian. 

Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Political Science — Political Economy. 

{German — Wilhelm Tell, or Hermann and Dorothea. 
or 
French — Grammar and Exercises. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Winter Term, 

Greek — Plato's Phsedo or Apology, Greek Testament. 
Latin — -Tacitus, Germania, Latin Composition. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. 

{German — -Maria Stuart, or equivalent, German Literature. 
or 
French — Grammar, and Super's French Reader. 
History — Mediaeval History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 
English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books I. and VI. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 

Greek — Demosthenes de Corona. Greek Testament. 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry (completed). 

{German — Gcethe's Faust, or equivalent. German Literature. 
or 
French — Un Philosophe Sous les Toits, or equivalent. 
History — Modern History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books XXII. and XXIV. 
Physical Culture— -Field and Gymnasium. 
Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 21 

JUNIOR YEAR, 

Fall Term, 

Greek — The GBdipus Tyrannus or Antigone of Sophocles. [3.] 
Latin — Cicero de Officiis. [2.] 
Physical Science — Advanced Physics. 

Philosophy-^ ^ ed Psychology- 

7-. , • , J Trench on Words. 
tLngusn— J History of English Language. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term. 

Greek — The Prometheus or The Seven against Thebes of ^schylus. [2.] 

Latin — Terence — Andria et Adelphoe. [3.] 

Physical Science — Advanced Physics. 

Z7 t- z. f Science of Rhetoric. 
Enghsh-^ English Literature . 

Pedagogy — History of Education. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 
Physical Culture — Gymnsium Work. 

Spring Term. 

Greek — The Clouds of Aristophanes. [2.] 

Latin — Juvenal Selections. 

Physical Science — Advanced Physics. 

English — American Literature. 

Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. 

Pedagogy — Methodology. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year. — Declamations, Themes, and Debates. 

SENIOR YEAR, 



Required Studies, 
Fall Term, 



Philosophy. — Psy chology . 

Natural Science — Chemistry. 

English — Prose Classics. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Winter Term, 

Philosophy — Moral Philosophy. 
Natural Science— Geology, begun. 
English — Shakespeare. 
Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 
Physical Culhire — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term. 

Philosophy — Histoiy of Philosophy. 

Natural Science— Geology, completed. Mineralogy. 

English — Philology, Anglo-Saxon. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect 
eight hours' work from the following list : 

Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Astronomy — Young . 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Latin — Latin Hymns or Seneca's Essays. 

Greek — Pindar's Olympian and Pythian Odes. 

Science — Chemistry, Winter and Spring Terms ; or Advanced Phy- 
sics, with Laboratory Work. 

History — I Histoi 7 of Civilization. 

■* \ English Constitutional History. 

Archceology — A course of Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic 

Archeology, with Recitations, 
Philosophy — A Course of Lectures on ^Esthetics, with Recitations. 
It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at the beginning of the College year, and for 
the whole year ; and the election made must be adhered to unless special 
permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Latin Scientific. 
Fall Term, 

Science — Meteorology. 

Latin — Livy, Roman Antiquities. 

Mathematics — Geometry, completed. 

Gertnan — Grammar and Exercises. 

Bible— -The Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Scott's Ivanhoe. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 23 

Winter Term, 

Science — Zoology and Histology. 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute. Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. 

German — Grammar Exercises, and Marchen und Erzahlungen. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Macaulay's History of England, Chap. I. 

Elocution — One hour weekly. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 

Science — Zoology and Histology. 

Latin — Horace — Odes. Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. 

German — Hillern's "Hoher als die Kirche," or equivalent. 

Bible— the Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Irving's Sketch Book. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR, 
Fall Term, 

Science — Biology and Embryology. 

Latin — Horace — Epistles. Quintilian. 

Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry begun. 

Political Science — Political Economy. 

German — Wilhelm Tell, or Hermann and Dorothea. 
or 

French — Grammar and Exercises. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I and II. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Winter Term, 

Scienee — Biology and Embryology. 

Latin — Tacitus — Germania. Latin Composition. 

Mathematics — Analytical Geometry completed. 

{German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. 
or 
French — Grammar, and Super's French Reader. 
History — Mediaeval History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 
English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books I and VI. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Spring Term, 

Science — Biology and Embryology. 

Latin — Tacitus — Agricola. Writing Latin. 

Mathematics — Calculus. 

(German — Faust, or equivalent. German Literature. 
or 
French — Un Philosophes sous les Toits, or equivalent. 
History — Modern History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books XXII and XXIV. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Exercise. 
Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term, 

Science — Advanced Physics. 

Philosophy — Logic. 

Pedagogy — Applied Psychology. 

7- , ■ r f Trench on Words. 

nngitsn j History of English Language. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Exercise. 

Winter Term, 

Science — Advanced Physics. 

j-. j- 7 f Science of Rhetoric. 
English- | Bnglish literature. 

Pedagogy — History of Education. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 

Science — Advanced Physics. 

English — American Literature. 

Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. 

Pedagogy — Methodology. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year — Orations, Themes and Debates. 

EivECTivES : Science — Advanced Anatomy. 

Mathematics — Calculus and Differential Equations. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 25 

SENIOR YEAR. 



Required Studies, 
Fall Term, 



Philosophy — Psychology. 

Science — Chemistry. 

English — Prose Classics. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Winter Term, 

Philosophy — Ethics. 

Science — Chemistry. Geology begun. 

English — Shakespeare. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term. 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy. 

Science— i Chemistr y- 

science y Q eo \ ogy completed. Mineralogy. 

English — Philology, Anglo-Saxon. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Throughout the Year — Orations, Debates and Theses. 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect six 

hours' work from the following list : 

Science — Advanced Physics, with Laboratory Work. Advanced 
Physiology. 

Astronomy — Young. 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Histnrv— \ Histoi 7 of Civilization. 
History | English Constitutional History. 

(Latin — Cicero de Officiis. Terence and Juvenal. 
or 
Greek — The CEdipus Tyrannus of Sophocle, Prometheus and 
Medea. 
Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Philosophy — Lectures on ^Esthetics, wi}h Recitations. 
Archceology — Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology, 
with Recitations. 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at beginning of the College year and for the 
whole year, and the election once made must be adhered to unless special 
permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 



Greek Scientific Course, 

The studies of the Greek Scientific Course are the same as those of 
the Latin Scientific Course with the exception of Greek instead of Latin. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



The Preparatory Department offers the following Courses 
of Study: 

The Classical Preparatory Course. 
The Latin Scientific Preparatory Course. 
The Greek Scientific Preparatory Course. 
Candidates for admission to the Junior Year will be required 
to have a fair knowledge of the common school branches. 

Students desiring advanced standing must submit certifi- 
cates, stating the texts or portions of texts used, and the num- 
ber of hours spent thereon. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
Junior Year, 

In the Junior Year the studies are the same for the Classical 
Course, the L,atin Scientific Course and the Greek Scientific 
Course. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 27 

JUNIOR YEAR, 
Fall Term, 



Latin — Grammar and Lessons. 
Mathematics — Advanced Arithmetic. 
Natural Science — Descriptive Geography. 
English — Grammar and Composition. 

Winter Term. 

Latin — Grammar and Lessons. 
Mathematics — Advanced Arithmetic. 
Natural Science — Descriptive Geography. 
English — Rhetoric and Composition. 

Spring Term. 

Lathi — Grammar and Readings. 
Mathematics — Advanced Arithmetic. 
History — United States History. 
English — Rhetoric and Composition. 

Rhetorical Exercises throughout the year. 



MIDDLE YEAR.— CLASSICAL. 

Fall Term, 

Latin — Csesar. 

Greek — Grammar and Lessons. 

Natural Science — Physical Geography. 

History — Bible History. 

English Literature — Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield. 

Winter Term. 

Latin — Csesar and Cicero. 

Greek — Grammar and Lessons. 

Mathematics — Algebra. 

Natural Science — Elementary Astronomy. 

History — General History. 

English Literature — Sir Roger de Coverly Papers in the Spectator. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Spring Term. 

Latin — Cicero, Prose Composition. 

Greek — Anabasis. 

Mathematics — Algebra. 

Natural Science — Physiology. 

History — Roman History. 

English Literature — Coleridge's Ancient Mariner. 

Rhetorical Work throughout the year. 

SENIOR YEAR, 

Fall Term. 

Latin — Virgil, Mythology. 

Greek — Anabasis, Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Algebra. 

Natural Science — Elementary Physics. 

History — Grecian History. 

English Literature — Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

Winter Term* 

Latin — Virgil, Prose Composition. 

Greek — Anabasis, Old Greek Life, Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Algebra. 

Natural Science — Botany. 

History — History of England. 

English Literature — Hawthorne's House of Seven Gables. 

Spring Term. 

Latin — Virgil, Prose Composition. 

Greek — Anabasis, Greek Literature, Prose Composition. 

Mathematics—^ Geometry. 

Natural Science — Botany. 

History — Civics. 

English Literature — Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Rhetorical Work throughout the year. 

Latin Scientific Course. 

The studies of the Latin Scientific Course are the same as those of 
the Classical Course, except no Greek. 

Greek Scientific Course. 

The studies of the Greek Scientific Course are the same as those of 
the Classical Course, except no Latin. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 29 

Departments of Instruction. 



The subjects taught in the regular College Courses, embrac- 
ing all subjects taught in the modern college may be grouped 
under the general heads — Philosophy, Language and Literature, 
Mathematics and Science. In providing this course and its 
daily prosecution a two-fold purpose is kept in view, viz : 
The mental discipline of the student and his introduction to 
the main divisions of human knowledge. 

Philosophy. 

1. Psychology — Senses, Intellect and Will. — The aim of this 
course is to give a fair knowledge of descriptive and explanatory 
psychology and its present stage of development, its applica- 
tions in education, and also a preparation for the other 
philosophical discipline of the Junior and Senior years. The 
study of the practical application of mental laws to the culti- 
vation of the mental powers is an important feature of the work. 
Recitations, lectures and discussions. Text-books, Baldwin's 
Elements of Psychology ; Halleck's Psychology and Psychic 
Culture, and Roark's Psychology in Education, with the 
references for library work in the larger psychologies and 
psychological periodicals. Required of Juniors, Fall term — 
daily recitations. 

2. History of Education. ) These courses are plan- 
2. Science and Art of Education, j ned especially for those 

who desire to prepare themselves for high grade work and 
positions in teaching. Lectures will be given by the instructor 
with reference to the pedagogical library and the leading 
educational periodicals, and papers on special topics will be 
prepared by members of the class. Texts used are Compayre's 
History of Pedagogy, Quick's Educational Reformers, Painter's 
History of Education, Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, 
White's School Management, Tompkin's Philosophy of 
Teaching. 

Required of Juniors and open to special students who are 
prepared for the course, Winter and Spring terms — (daily) 
recitations. 



30 LEBANON VA1XEY COLLEGE. 

4. Logic, Deductive and Indtictive. — The theory and laws of 
thought are studied with constant application in exercises in 
the logical treatment of conceptions, the conversion of propo- 
sitions, immediate inference, syllogisms, and the detection of 
fallacies. Special attention is given to the principles of 
inductive reasoning and scientific method. The time allotted 
to the subject is sufficient to make the study of practical 
advantage as well as a genuine discipline. Text-books, 
Hyslop's, Jevons-Hill's, McCosh's, etc. Required of Juniors, 
Fall term. 

5. The subject of Christian Evidences occupies the Spring 
term of the Junior year. The external and the internal proofs are 
distinguished and the place of each is defined. The studies of 
the previous years are found to prepare the student well for 
appreciating the place of prophecy, miracles and the historical 
evidences. Theories of inspiration are examined and the 
miraculous character of Christ is set forth, together with the 
adaptation of the Gospel to the nature and needs of man. 

The text-books used are Fisher's Christian Evidences, and 
Flint's Theism. 

6. Psychology is studied during the Fall term of the Senior 
year. With the aid of a text-book a general survey of the 
Soul's power of knowing, feeling and willing is made, with 
discussions of various theories ; the aim being to cultivate the 
power of abstract thought, as well as to introduce the student 
to philosophic research and discussion, thereby to acquire a 
more complete mastery of the whole science in the rich and 
varied growth that it has attained in recent years. 

7. Christian Ethics follows in the Winter term, and text- 
books and lectures are employed to acquaint the student with 
leading systems of ethics and the fundamental principles of 
morality. Practical ethics is then very fully treated both 
comprehensively and in detail. 

8. History of Philosophy concludes the course in the Spring 
term. During the first part of the term, a survey of the 
philosophy of the Greeks from about 600 B. C. to the fourth 
Century A. D. is made by recitations, lectures, the reading of 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 3 1 

Plato's Protogoras, Gorgias, Theataetus, and parts of other 
dialogues, and reports of readings by the classes in the works 
of Zeller, Grote, and others. Attention is also given to the 
philosophy of the Romans and to the Patristic and Scholastic 
Philosophies. The remainder of term is spent in the study of 
Modern Philosophy, with special regard to Descartes, Spinoza, 
IyOcke, Berkeley, Hume, Leibnitz, and Kant, and more recent 
problems. Text books : Haven's and Weber's Histories of 
Philosophy, with frequent references to the histories of 
Ueberweg, Krdman, Schwegler, and others. 

9. Butler's Analogy. In this study, the aim is by supple- 
mental lectures to adapt the study to the times, calling attention 
to the later forms of unbelief, in order to place the student in 
possession of as complete a defense of the Christian faith as 
possible. Elective for Seniors. 

10. Archaeology — Elective for Seniors. A course of lectures 
on Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology, with Recitations. 

11. ^Esthetics — A course of lectures on ^Esthetics, with 
Recitations. Elective for Seniors. 



Language and Literature, 

Greek Language and Literature, 

In the Freshman Year, Herodotus and Homer's Iliad are 
read. During this year emphasis is placed upon the study of 
the forms of words and syntax and upon reading at sight. 
The work of the year includes further a study of the Greek 
historians, Epic and Lyric poetry, antiquities and Mythology. 
One hour a week is devoted to prose composition. 

The Sophomores read the Memorabilia, the Phaedo or Apol- 
ogy, and Demosthenes on the Crown. Along with the read- 
ing there is also a study of Socrates and the Socratic Schools, 
with a general survey of Greek philosophy, the writings of 
Plato, Greek oratory and the Laws and Law Courts of Athens. 
Portions of the Greek Testament are read at stated times dur- 
ing the year. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

In the Junior Year, the CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone of 
Sophocles, the Prometheus Bound or Seven against Thebes of 
iEschylus and the Clouds of Aristophanes are read, with a 
study of Greek tragedy, comedy and theater. 

The course also includes the writing of theses upon assigned 
themes, requiring original investigation on the part of the stu- 
dent, critical reviews of writings and lectures bearing upon the 
studies pursued by the several classes. 



The Hebrew Language. 

Hebrew is an elective throughout the Senior Year, and is 
offered for the benefit particularly of students intending to 
take a Theological Course. An elementary knowledge of the 
grammar of the language is acquired, and several chapters in 
Genesis are read and carefully studied. 



Latin Language and Literature, 

The aim of the course of instruction in Latin is to teach to 
read Latin correctly and rapidly; to translate with accuracy 
and facility into idiomatic English; to familiarize the student 
with the styles and idioms of Latin as illustrated by the authors 
of different periods; and to acquaint the student with the lead- 
ing facts of Roman life, history, literature and antiquity. Due 
importance is attached to Latin as a foundation of literary cul- 
ture and as a basis for a more perfect knowledge of the English 
language. 

During the Freshman Year particular attention is given to 
forms and constructions. Written translations and composi- 
tion are required. Antiquities will be studied in connection 
with Livy and prosody with the Odes of Horace. Some sight 
reading is done in Senectute. The Grammar is carefully re- 
viewed this year. 

In the Sophomore Year the Epistles of Horace, Quintilian's 
Institutions of Oratory, Book X, and the Germania and Agri- 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 33 

cola of Tacitus are studied. Composition is continued, literary 
and historical topics are assigned for treatment, and collateral 
reading is required. Special study of the literature of the 
silver age. 

The Junior Class will read Cicero's De Officiis, one or two 
plays of Terence and the Satires of Juvenal. The characteris- 
tics of each of these authors are carefully studied. The Roman 
drama is made a subject of study. Part of Terence is read at 
sight. 

Textbooks used: Lord's Livy, Rockwood's De Senectute, 
Smith's Odes and Epodes of Horace, Kirkland's Satires and 
Epistles of Horace, Frieze's Quintilian, Hopkin's Germania and 
Agricola, Crowell's De Officiis, Lindsay's Juvenal, Wilkin's 
Primer of Antiquities, Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Har- 
per's Latin Dictionary. 

German Language and Literature, 

The aim is to give the student a thorough knowledge of the 
use of the German language. The first year will be devoted 
to a study of the grammar and composition, with readings of 
Marchen and Erzahlungen and simpler selections from the 
German classics, followed by Hillern's Holier als die Kirche or 
its equivalent. The second year will include the history of 
German literature, and the reading of Schiller's William Tell 
and Maria Stuart, and Gee the 's Hermann and Dorothea and 
Faust. Classes will meet five times per week. 

French Language and Literature, 

The purpose of the work in French is to enable the student 
to read the language with facility. Special attention will be 
given to a study of the grammar. Easy prose selections will 
be read first, followed by two or more of the following: Fen- 
elon, Telemaque; Halevy, L/Abbe Constantin; Souvestre, Un 
Philosophe sous les Toits; Erckman-Chatrian, lye Conscrit; 
Napoleon (Fortier); L,amartine, Jeanne d'Arc; Verne, L/Ex- 
pedition de la Jeune-Hardie. Classes will meet five times per 
week. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

English Language and Literature. 

For the benefit of those who wish a better foundation for 
English work, one term is devoted to a rapid but thorough 
study of English Grammar. Two terms are given to the study 
of Elementary Rhetoric, chiefly in its relation to composition. 
A practical text-book is used, and daily exercises, intended to 
develop the student's accuracy and ease of expression, are re- 
quired to be written, and are corrected by the teacher or before 
the class. 

During the Winter Term of the Junior Year, Hill's Science 
of Rhetoric is carefully studied. 

Beginning with the Junior Preparatory Year, the study of 
English Literature will be continued throughout the course. 
Until the end of the Sophomore Year the work will consist of 
a study of English classics, much of the reading being done in 
the class-room, the chief aim being to develop in the students 
a taste for the works of our best authors. Classes will meet 
twice per week. 

Throughout the Junior and Senior Years classes will meet 
daily. The history of the English language will be studied, 
and the development of literature in England and America. 
Considerable time will be spent in the critical study of prose 
classics, special attention being given to the English novel. 
One term of the Senior Year will be devoted to a study of 
Shakespeare. Anglo-Saxon will be studied during one term, 
that the student may acquire an elementary knowledge of our 
language in its oldest form. 

Department of Mathematics, 

Mathematics and Astronomy, 

In the study of mathematics the discipline of the logical 
faculties is constantly sought, the aim being that every prin- 
ciple shall receive careful demonstration, and as far as possible 
be practically applied so that students may acquire such a 
knowledge of mathematical principles as will give them power 
to solve practical problems and make original investigations. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 35 

The required course extends through the Freshman and 
Sophomore Years, — the Freshmen studying Solid Geometry, 
Advanced Algebra, and Plane Trigonometry; the Sophomores, 
Surveying, Spherical Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry. 

In the Junior Year an elective course in Differential and 
Integral Calculus and one in Elementary Differential Equa- 
tions are offered to those who wish to do more than the work 
of the required course. 

Plane Surveying follows Plane Trigonometry in the Fall 
Term of the Sophomore Year. The department is supplied 
with a complete set of instruments for this purpose, a first-class 
transit, leveling-rod, etc. , and field work is required to enable 
the student to learn the use of these. 

General Astronomy is studied during the Fall Term of the 
Senior Year (elective). 

Natural Science. 

The aim of this department is to give the student a general 
knowledge of Physical Geography, Physiology and Elementary 
Physics, and to familiarize him with the proper methods of 
investigation as a preparation for advanced work and original 
research, through experiment, observation and inference. 

Botany. — A standard text-book is used as a guide to study 
the plant, its parts and their functions. A written record is 
required of the complete analysis of 60 to 75 plants that are 
mounted by the student in his herbarium. 

Zoology. — The scope of the instruction includes the general 
principles of Zoology. Special attention is given to classifica- 
tion, distribution, heredity, evolution. In the course of anat- 
omy and histology an opportunity is offered to study the tis- 
sues by microscopic sections. 

Biology. — This course covers the entire year and must be 
entered in the Fall Term. It includes the detailed study of 
typical forms of life. 

Physics. — The student is directed to become familiar with 
the laws of Mechanics and Physics, by instruction, personal 
experiments and repeated written tests. 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Chemistry. — The course in Chemistry requires two recita- 
tion periods and five hours' laboratory practice a week during 
the Fall Term of the Senior Year for all students. In the 
Scientific Course the work extends throughout entire Senior 
Year and includes Analytical Chemistry. At least 150 experi- 
ments must be made in Fall Term work and a record made in 
permanent notes. A fee of five dollars is charged for use of 
chemicals and apparatus, and all breakage must be paid before 
grade can be given. Working table space is assigned as soon 
as fee is paid; this will be strictly adhered to. 

Geology. — This subject includes the study of the forces pro- 
ducing geological changes, carefully reviewing structural and 
historical geology. The student is required to determine from 
60 to 75 minerals in the laboratory under the observation of 
the instructor. 

Laboratories and Apparatus. 

Arrangements are being made to enlarge the working facili- 
ties so as to accommodate from 35 to 40 students at the work- 
ing tables. 

The collection of apparatus for lecture demonstrations and 
experiments by the student, has additions made thereto 
throughout each year. 

Historical and Political Science, 

In the Preparatory Department, one term is spent on each 
of the following subjects, in the order given: United States 
History, Bible History, General History, Roman History, 
Grecian History, and Civics. See Preparatory Courses. 

1. Political Economy. The effort is to ground the student 
well in the principles of the science, with frequent reference to 
its social and historical bearings. Fall Term — Sophomore 
Year. 

2. Ancient and Mediaeval History. The work in Ancient 
History includes a brief chronological review of the origin, 
development and downfall of ancient nations; and in Mediaeval 
History, an account of the great forces at work during the 
Middle Ages. The student is required to use the Library and 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 37 

to prepare articles upon assigned topics. Winter Term — Soph- 
omore. 

3. Modern History. A careful study of the rise and pro- 
gress of the modern nations is made, including the manners, 
customs, religion, and intellectual and political development of 
the people. Essays on assigned topics. Spring Term — Soph- 
omore. 

4. History of English Language. The origin of language, 
its growth, its dialectic changes, phonetic decay, classification 
of languages, etc., are subjects treated in this course. Fall 
Term — Junior Year. 

5. History of Education. Winter Term — Junior. See Ped- 
agogy. 

6. History of Civilization. Elective for Seniors — Winter 
Term. 

7. History of Philosophy. Required of Seniors — Spring 
Term. See Philosophy. 

8. English Constitutional History. Elective for Seniors. 

9. International Law. Elective for Seniors. 

The English Bible. 

Each of the four College classes receives instruction in the 
Bible, the course being so arranged that the whole Bible is 
studied during the four years. One recitation each week 
throughout the year is required of every student. The course 
is as follows: 

Freshman Class. — The New\ Testament History, as set forth 
in the Gospels and the Acts. The Life of Christ is studied 
carefully by periods, and the order and connection of events 
are closely observed. The development of His ministry is 
marked, and the crises and climaxes discovered. Works of ref- 
erence are used freely to bring the student to realize the situa- 
tion, ecclesiastically, politically and socially. The Apostolic 
Age is taken up for the same kind of study. The student 
comes into direct contact with the Scriptures. One year, one 
hour per week. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Sophomore Class. — The Old Testame?it History, as found in 
the historical books of the Old Testament, is carefully studied. 
The literary and spiritual qualities of the Bible are brought 
into view. One year, one hour per week. 

Junior Class. — The Prophets and Poets of the Old Testament, 
with lectures in introduction, outlines, and study of selected 
passages. One hour each week. 

Senior Class. — The New Testament Doctrines, as they appear 
in the Epistles of St. Paul. These Epistles are studied in 
chronological order, and studied topically. 

These courses are under the direction of the President and 
Instructor C. E. Hurlburt. 

Elocution and Oratory, 

The aim will be to give careful instruction in the arts of 
speech, — to teach the student to study his mental processes 
and their free, natural expression, and not mechanical rule. 
Practical drill in voice building, declamation, and kindred 
matters, will be required of the Freshman Class one hour each 
week. In the Sophomore Year, lectures on the general subject 
of Oratory and Orators will constitute a main feature of the in- 
struction, while from the Junior and Senior Classes extensive 
original work in the making of orations, with public delivery 
of the same, will be required. 

Rhetorical Exercises, 

To afford sufficient opportunities for exercise in composition 
and public speaking, a system of Rhetorical Exercises has been 
put in operation. Advanced classes in the College are required 
to take part in public exercises twice a year. 

Drawing and Painting, 

The practice of drawing, painting and carving teaches stu- 
dents to be more observing of their surroundings, discriminat- 
ing in regard to good form, color and design. Thorough in- 
struction is provided by the department in drawing and paint- 
ing, aiming at a development of the aesthetic faculties and of 
the power of expression. The charge for one lesson a week, 
three hours, is fifty cents. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 39 



General Information, 



Lebanon Valley College, 

The vigorous growth of the Church of ' ' The United Brethren 
in Christ ' ' throughout Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, 
and her desire to keep abreast of the times in the moral and 
intellectual culture of her sons and daughters, made Lebanon 
Valley College a necessity. Accordingly in 1866 this Institu- 
tion was founded, and in 1867 chartered by a special act of the 
Legislature of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Vhe Xocation. Annville > located in the heart of 

the beautiful Lebanon Valley, was 
chosen on account of its accessibility, healthfulness and 
inspiring scenery, and because of the liberality of public- 
spirited citizens. It is accessible from all points, being located 
on the direct route of railroad travel from Harrisburg, via 
Reading, to Philadelphia or New York. Trains stopping at 
Annville leave Harrisburg and Reading each eight times a day, 
Sunday excepted. There is a trolley line between Annville 
and Lebanon. 

Tj/ie ^Purpose. Itistne P ur P oseof Lebanon Valley 
' * College to give such liberal culture 

as will qualify young men and women to be practical and 
self-reliant as well as learned. The purpose of the founders, 
as set forth in the charter, was to plant an institution which 
would become so ample in facilities and manifold in depart- 
ments as to furnish instruction in all the subjects of a general 
and special education. Towards this original purpose the 
institution is rapidly advancing. 

The advantages of a thorough education are offered alike to 
young men and women, under the safe and inspiring influence 
of the Christian religion. The College is denominational in 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

management, but positively free from sectarian bias. The 
Trustees are elected by the five eastern annual conferences of 
the Church, one-third being elected annually for a term of 
three years. The members of the Faculty sustain an ex- 
officio relation. 

Sbuildinas and Srounds. . The ^in gs , three 

•^ m number, are situated 

on a fine campus of about ten acres, within easy access of the 
railroad station, postoffice, churches, and the usual business 
houses. 

The main building is a large brick structure, containing 
Chapel, Recitation Rooms, Society Halls, Reading Room, 
Library and Gymnasium, besides a number of dormitories for 
students. These rooms are arranged for two students each, 
are well ventilated and provided with wardrobes. The build- 
ing is heated throughout by steam. 

A second building contains the Art Room, Music Rooms, 
and the entire department of Natural Science with Laboratory 
and Museum. 

The Ladies' Hall is entirely separate from the other prem- 
ises, and is under the immediate care of the Preceptress. 
Young ladies from abroad are furnished a comfortable and 
pleasant home, where they have every advantage for study and 
general improvement. Non-resident students board in the 
Institution, where they are under the continual care of the 
President and other members of the Faculty. 

furnishing and Outfit. f^T 6 lequ !"f 

<* to furnish their own bed- 

ding, except the mattress, bolster and pillows. Every article 
of clothing and other personal property should be distinctly 
marked with the owner's full name. 

Religious Vraining. *ff>*>* **** * re 

•^ ** garded as essential to a thor- 

ough education. The Institution being founded in the inter- 
est of Christ and Christian Scholarship, assumes for its work 
the joint culture, by all proper means, of both intellect and 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 4 1 

heart. More than 90 per cent, of the students are communi- 
cant members of the Church, and a Christian spirit underlies 
and animates the instruction in the different departments. 
But beyond this, special provision is made for more direct and 
positive Christian influence. 

1. A regular service, consisting of the reading of Scriptures, 
singing and prayer, is held in the College Chapel every school 
morning. All students are required to be present. 

2. Weekly prayermeetings are conducted by the students in 
the College. 

3. There are flourishing organizations of the Young Wo- 
men's and Young Men's Christian Associations in the Col- 
lege, which hold their meetings on Saturday evening of each 
week. These are great auxiliaries to the religious life of the 
College. 

4. All resident students of the College are required to attend 
public worship on the Sabbath in the United Brethren Church, 
except those who, on account of church membership or wish 
of parent or guardian, may prefer to attend church elsewhere. 

5. A Bible Normal Class for the instruction of Sunday- 
school teachers is conducted semi-weekly. The course of in- 
struction extends over one year, and is the one provided for 
and used by the Bible Normal Union. A diploma, issued by 
the Sunday-school Board of the United Brethren Church, is 
granted to students who complete the course. 

6. Regular recitations are heard during the year in Bible 
History, in the Greek of the New Testament, and in the Eng- 
lish Bible. 

Jtealth and Physical Culture. N ^ to 

•* moral and re- 

ligious character, the first of all things to be secured and cared 
for in the training of the young, is sound physical health. 
Accordingly, wise and liberal provision is made to preserve and 
promote it by daily exercise in the open air, and by a carefully 
guarded course of gymnastic training. Class instruction in 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

light gymnastics is offered at moderate cost, under the direction 
of the director of physical culture. 

Xiterary Soc/et/es. vt n7LCeUent opportunity for 

** literary improvement and par- 

liamentary training is afforded by the societies of the College. 
There are three of these societies — one sustained by the young 
ladies, the Clionian; and two by the young men, the Kaloze- 
tean and the Philokosmian. Each society has a well-furnished 
hall and its own library. These societies are considered valu- 
able agencies in College work, and students are advised to 
unite with one of them. 

Xihraries and Cabinet. ^ 5°"T T f7Z' 

to which all the students 
have daily access, contains five thousand volumes. The Libra- 
ries of the Literary Societies also contain about two thousand 
volumes of well-selected and standard books. The Libraries 
are constantly increasing by donations from friends and from 
the proceeds of a constantly accruing fund. 

The Cabinet contains a collection of specimens in Mineralogy, 
Geology, Zoology and Natural History. 

WaMculation. Matriculation is regarded as a 
' pledge on the part of the student to 

obey all the rules of the College, and is admitted only on that 
condition. 

A fee of one dollar each year is required of every one who 
enters the College, on the payment of which a certificate will 
be given, entitling the holder to the privileges of the Library. 

*7)/vr* /n/tttm ^ * s earnes tly desired that students may 
' ' ' be influenced to good conduct and dili- 

gence by higher motives than fear of punishment. The sense 
of duty and honor, the courtesy and generous feelings natural 
to young men and women engaged in literary pursuits, are 
appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. It is the policy 
of the administration to allow in all things as much liberty as 
will not be abused, and the students are invited and expected 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 43 

to co-operate with the Faculty; but good order and discipline 
will be strictly maintained, and misconduct punished by ade- 
quate penalties. The Laws of the College, enacted by the 
Board of Trustees, are as few and simple as the proper regula- 
tion of a community of young men and women will permit. 
These are printed, and a copy is placed in the hands of every 
student at the beginning of each year. These L,aws must be 
observed, not only in their letter, but in their spirit. The Col- 
lege will not place its stamp or bestow its honors upon any one 
who is not willing to deport himself becomingly. Every un- 
excused absence from any College duty, failure or misdemeanor 
of a student, is reported to the Faculty, and a record made of 
the same. 

The first three demerit marks will subject the student to 
private reproof; the first six to reproof before the Faculty; the 
first nine to reproof in public, with notice to parent or guard- 
ian; and the first twelve to dismissal from College. 

The Faculty may, on evidence of reformation, restore a dis- 
missed student. 

Sradina and Gxamination. Students ^ 

** graded on their 

work in the Recitation Room. One hundred per centum is the 
standard in perfection of scholarship. Written examinations 
of classes are held at the close of each term. These examina- 
tions are reckoned as equivalent to one-half of the recitation 
work of the term, or one-third of final grade, in estimating the 
student's standing. No student who omits attendance upon 
an examination in any study will receive a grade in the stud)^, 
or be regarded as having finished it, until the examination is 
passed. A grade of less than 70 per centum will compel the 
student to submit to a second examination after further prepa- 
ration, or will repeat the study with the next lower class. All 
students, however, whose daily average in any study is go or 
more, are exempt from examination. Applicants for special 
examinations will be charged an appropriate fee. 

The final examinations of the Seniors are held two weeks 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

before Commencement, from which time they are subject to 
such duties only as are required for their preparation for grad- 
uation. 

At the end of each term, the class-standing of each student 
in all studies will be reported to the parent or guardian, who 
is earnestly recommended to give these reports careful atten- 
tion and promptly to notify the President of any failure to 
receive them. 

^Promotion. At the be s innin g of each term > the old 

classes are re-organized and new ones 
formed. At or near the close of each academic year, the names 
of all the members of each class, separately come before the 
Faculty for promotion, and those of the Senior Class for grad- 
uation, and no student is promoted to a higher class, or to 
graduation, except upon the unanimous vote of the Faculty. 
No student will be advanced to regular standing in the next 
class until all conditions are made up. 

P~~„* *f !^c/,« rt « No student may leave the 

Jueave or Jfiosence* _ „ - " 

College without the personal 
permission of the President, or, in his absence, of the Senior 
Professor. Because of the hurtful influence, the absence of a 
student for even a day, exerts on his progress, nothing but 
sickness or unavoidable accident is sufficient to excuse him 
from regular attendance at recitations. . 

Any student withdrawing from the Institution during term- 
time, without giving due notice and having permission so to 
do, will be marked upon the records as having irregularly 
withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending Class, must present to 
the President and the Professor in charge of said work a satis- 
factory excuse for being absent. 

P~~j.*.~~ /°^-.,».„~ A course of popular lectures will 
be delivered during the year by 
some of the most noted lecturers in the field. 

Lectures and entertainments were given by the following 
during the past year: The Imperial Quartette, of Boston; the 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 45 

Rev. J. R. Reitzel, of Chicago; the Ransom Entertainers, of 
New York City; S. M. Spedon, of New York City; and the 
Rev. J. J. I^ewis, of Chicago. 

In addition to these, there were lectures by members of the 
Faculty. 

VermS and Vacations. See Calendar, page 2. 

'Decrees and 'Diplomas. , TI ?\ d ? ree of Bache- 

•* ' lor of Arts is conferred, 

by a vote of the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the 
Faculty, upon students who have satisfactorily completed the 
Classical Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is in like manner confer- 
red upon students who satisfactorily complete the L,atin Scien- 
tific or the Greek Scientific Course. 

The College bills and Society dues of candidates must be paid 
or secured to the satisfaction of the President, by Saturday 
before Commencement. The graduation fee, and the fee for 
subsequent degrees, is five dollars. 

Sraduate Work. In order to encoura s e the ^ 

tematic prosecution of studies after 
graduation, graduate work for both resident and non-resident 
alumni of Lebanon Valley College, as well as for alumni of 
other colleges, is provided. 

The courses of study have been arranged with reference to 
the needs of those who purpose passing to an advanced degree, 
but they may also be pursued by those who desire only the 
culture or knowledge, without academic honors. 

One year of resident, or two years of non-resident study, 
will, under favorable' circumstances, qualify candidates for ex- 
amination for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science, 
and all who pass satisfactorily such examination and present a 
thesis upon a topic approved by the Faculty, will be recom- 
mended for the degree. This provision for the second degree 
in no way invalidates the present privilege of attaining the 
degree in course by all graduates of three years' standing who 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

have completed a standard course of professional study and 
present a satisfactory thesis upon a topic approved by the Fac- 
ulty. No longer will the Master's degree nor the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy be conferred honorary. It is designed 
that these degrees shall represent real and solid attainments in 
scholarship. In all cases a thesis (not to exceed 2,500 words, 
typewritten, ) must be submitted at least one month before close 
of College year. Accepted theses become the property of the 
College. 

Graduates who have received the Master's degree, in either 
of the ways above stated, may be admitted to courses of study 
as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, upon the 
recommendation of the respective Professors and favorable 
action by the Faculty. 

Application for information respecting Graduate Work must 
be made, in writing, to the President of the College. 



LEBANON VAIXEY COI^EGE. 47 



Expenses, 



Boarding, washing (12 pieces a week), light, fuel, room rent, and 
tuition in the literary department in any four (4) branches, or regular 
work, a term. 

Fall Term, sixteen weeks, $ 74 00 

Winter Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Total a year, $186 00 

Special Examinations in each Branch, not recited in College, . . . $4 00 
Diplomas and Degrees, 5 00 

The charges for room rent, heat and furniture are made on the basis 
of two persons to each room. In case where a student rooms alone he 
will be charged 50 cents additional a week. Any student not boarding 
in the institution and occupying a room in the building will be charged 
a reasonable rent for the same. 

Extra washing, plain pieces, 50 cents a dozen. White dresses, etc. , extra. 

Each student will be held accountable for any damage he may cause 
to the College property. Students will be held individually responsible 
for all damage done to their rooms, by whomsover committed. 

Tuition and room rent are counted from the time of entering to the 
end of the term, and tuition from the first of the term for entrance 
second or third week. 

We urge a comparison of these charges with those of other schools, 
believing that such a comparison will establish the fact that our rates are 
more moderate for the advantages afforded than can be found elsewhere. 

Terms of Payment, 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before 
Commencement. 

One-half of all other bills in advance. Balance at the middle of the 
term. This rule will be invariably enforced. No student will be 
admitted to classes until all bills are satisfactorily settled with the 
Financial Secretary. 



48 Lebanon valley College. 



Music Department, 



Faculty. 

REV. HERVIN U. ROOP, A.M., Ph.D., 
President. 

CARRIE E. SMITH, 

Professor of Instrumental Music and Theory. 

ELLA. NORA BLACK, B. S., 
Assistant in Instrumental Music. 

MRS. HERVIN U. ROOP, A.M.. 

Professor of Voice Culture and Art. 

WILLOUGHBY S. WILDE, L. L. C. M., 
Professor of Musical History and Voice Culture. 

The courses of instruction in the Music Department, which 
are fully outlined on the following pages, have been arranged 
with a view to thoroughness and pleasurable progress, whereby 
the student is carried forward more rapidly than in many 
other educational institutions, and to a surer exercise of his 
own best powers. The most striking illustration of the success 
of this Department is found in the increase of the number of 
students from year to year. For all those intending profes- 
sional careers special courses are arranged supplementary to 
those taken by less advanced pupils. 

Pupils may devote their entire time to music or take it in 
connection with other studies. Public recitals are given by 
the music pupils every month. Pupils will take practice 
in ensemble playing. Students may enter at any time, but it 
is very desirable that they should begin with the term on 
account of grading, time of lessons, etc. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 49 

Course in Voice Culture. 

To render the teaching in this Department as uniform as possible the 
method founded on Garcia, Behnke and Lamperti is adopted. It is also 
strongly advised that Voice pupils take a course in instrumental music 
to enable them to play accompaniments, etc. The course in voice 
culture is divided into three grades, and as the time necessary for attain- 
ing the requisite proficiency depends entirely upon the previous 
acquirements of the pupil and upon his talent and health promotion from 
one grade to the next will be made only after a satisfactory examination. 

Preparatory Grade. 

Placing of the voice ; breathing exercises ; Behnke exercises accord- 
ing to the voice. 

Elements of Rhetoric. 

Second Grade. 

Behnke studies according to student's voice, study of and selections 
from Schubert Schumann and others ; also sacred songs in English 
and Latin. 

English and American literature, one year. 

Third Grade. 

Operatic selections in English and Italian, and study of oratories. 

To secure Teachers' Certificate students must be able to play accom- 
paniments on the Piano, to read Vocal Music at sight and have studied 
Harmony one year, and pass a satisfactory examination. 

French or German, one year. 

Students to graduate must be able to read Vocal Music at sight, have 
studied Harmony and Theory, and pass a satisfactory examination. 

Course in Piano and Harmony. 

The aim in this department will be to give thorough instruction both 
in the technique and the aesthetics of the art ; and to this end only 
standard text-books and studies will be used. Students are received into 
any grade which, upon examination, they are found qualified to enter. 

Students are advanced according to their ability and proficiency and 
not according to the number of terms they spend at the College 

The course for Instrumental music is divided into five grades, and as 
the time necessary for attaining the requisite proficiency depends 
entirely upon the previous acquirements of the student and upon his 
talent, promotion from one grade to the next will be made only after a 
satisfactory examination. 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Preparatory Grade. 
Hand Culture. 

Arm, Hand, Finger Gymnastics. 
Foundation Exercises by Mason, Virgil, Faei/ten 
Popular melodies and pieces suitable to this Grade. 
Thirty-five easy Etudes by Faei/TEN. 

Second Grade. 
Technique continued. 
L. KohlER, op. 50. 
CzERNY, op. 139, Book I. 
Loeschhorn, op. 65, Book II. 
BURGMUIXER, op. 100, Books I. and II. 
Hei,i,ER, op. 47, Books I. and II. 
Sonatinas by Diabeuj, Kuhi,an, ClemenTi. 
Theory of Music, El£ON. 
Higher English. 

Third Grade, 
Technique continued. 
BerTini, op. 29. 
CzERNY, op. 299. 
HELLER, op. 46, Book I. 
HEU.ER, Etudes of Expression, op. 125. 
Bach's Little Preludes and Two-part Studies. 
Mozart, Sonatas, the easier ones. 
Haydn, Sonatas. 
Harmony. 
The Elements of Rhetoric. 

Fourth Grade, 
Technical exercises continued. 
Loeschhorn, op. 66. 

Cramer-Bulow studies of the easier numbers. 
Czerny, op. 740. 
Bach's studies continued. 
CiyEMENTi, Beethoven Sonatas. 
History of Music — Fillmore. 
Biography. 
English and American Literature. 

Fifth Grade. 
Technical exercises continued. 
Czerny, op. 740. 
Bach — Preludes and Fugues. 
Ci^EMENTi — Gradus ad Parnassum. 
Tausig edition. 
The French or German Language, one year. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



51 



In connection with this course, selections from the Modern and Classic 
works suitable to each grade are taught. 

Pianoforte pupils will be expected to practice the following number of 
hours a day in the different grades, namely : 1st Grade, 1% hours; 2d 
Grade, 2 hours ; 3d Grade, 3 hours ; 4th and 5th Grades, 4 hours each. 

Those who complete the required course of study in either Voice or 
Piano are awarded a diploma. 

Certificates and Diplomas of the London College of Music, England, 
with which this College is in union, may be obtained, on examination, 
in both departments, if desired. 

The degree of Bachelor of Music (B. M.) will be conferred on any stu- 
dent completing the Teacher's Course. 

Expenses- 

Boarding, washing ( 12 pieces a week), light, fuel, and room rent, for 

Fall Term, sixteen weeks $58 00 

Winter Term, twelve weeks 44 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks 44 00 

SPRING 

TERM 

Piano or Organ, two lessons a week $16 00 $12 00 $12 00 

Voice Culture, one lesson a week 12 00 9 00 9 00 

Harmony (Classes 4 or 6) 10 00 7 50 7 50 

Theory 3 00 200 200 

Chorus Class of not less than ten or part singing 
to those not taking any other study in the de- 
partment 300 200 200 

Use of the Piano for one period each day ... 2 00 1 50 1 50 

Use of the Organ for one period each day ... 1 .so 1 00 1 00 

Musical History and Biography, a term $2 00 

For further particulars apply to the President of the College. 



FALIv 


WINTER 


TERM 


TERM 


$16 CO 


$12 OO 


12 OO 


9 OO 


IO OO 


7 5o 


3 00 


2 OO 


3 o° 


2 CO 


2 00 


I 50 


1 50 


I OO 



52 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Appeal 



The encouraging record for the current year given in the 
preceding pages, indicates that the work and present facilities 
are appreciated. But increased endowments are necessary to 
enable the Church to accomplish through this instrumentality 
the great work undertaken, which is now more urgent than 
ever. Properly to represent the ideal of our Church in educa- 
tion, the new work and impetus secured this year must be 
maintained and further progress and development provided for 
each succeeding year. Some methods of aiding the progress 
of the College are here suggested: 

i . Funds for the purchase of additional apparatus for Chem- 
istry, Physics, Biology, Experimental Psychology and Astron- 
omy, and for the enlargement of Library and Museum are most 
earnestly solicited. 

2. The Erection of Buildings. A new Science Building and 
a new Gymnasium Building are very greatly needed. 

3. The establishment of Professorships — $20,000 each — the 
income of which may permanently sustain Professors. A chair 
of instruction may bear a name assigned by the donor and thus 
become a useful and lasting memorial. 

4. A larger general endowment fund for the benefit of the 
College, and special endowments of scholarships for the benefit 
of those unable to educate themselves. 

5. Good, earnest young men and women as students. All 
are welcome, and will here find a home, church and school, to 
aid them in their preparation for life's work. 

6. Moral support and the sympathy and prayers of all friends 
of the cause, and the forbearance of others. 

Form of Bequest. 

Item: I hereby give and devise to Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. , the sum of dollars. 

Those desiring Catalogues or information, will please address, 
with letter postage stamp enclosed, 

The President of the College, Annville, Pa.