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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Catalogue 1899-1900 



Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pa. 



Chartered 1867 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley18991900leba 



The Thirty- Fourth Annual Catalogue 



Of The 



OFFICERS and STUDENTS 



Of 



Lebanon Valley College 



For The 



Collegiate Year 

1899-1900. 



ANNVILLE, PA 



PUBWSHED BY THK COI,I,KGEI 
1900. 



IrEIBANON Vx\I.I,BY COIvLEGE. 

CALENDAR. 



1900, Fall Term, 

September 3, Monday — Examinations for Admission. 
September 4, Tuesday, 9 a. m. — Fall Term begins. 
November 29, Thursday — Clionian lyiterary Society Anni- 
versary. 
December 21, Friday — Fall Term of Sixteen Weeks ends. 

1901, Wintef Term, 

January 2, Wednesday, 9 a. m. — Winter Term begins. 
February 10, Sunday — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
February 22, Thursday — Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 
March 22, Friday — Winter Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 

Spring Term, 

March 27, Wednesday, 9 A. m. — Spring Term opens. 

April 5, Friday — Anniversary of the Kalozetean lyiterary 
Society. 

May 3, Friday — Anniversary of the Philokosmian lyiterary 
Society. 

May 30, Thursday — Decoration Day. 

June 8, Saturday — Junior Oratorical Contest. 

June 9, Sunday, 10.15 A. m. — Baccalaureate Discourse by 
President Roop. 

June 9, Sunday, 6 p. m. — Campus Praise Service. 

June 9, Sunday, 7.30 p. m. — Annual Address before the 
Christian Associations. 

June ID, Monday, 7.30 p. m. — Conservatory Concert. 

June II, Tuesday, 2 p. m, — Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

June II, Tuesday, 7.30 p. m. — Public Meeting of Alumni 
Association. 

June 12, Wednesday, 7.30 p. m. — Commencement of Depart- 
ment of Music. 

June 13, Thursday, 10 a. m. — Commencement Exercises. 

June 14, Friday — Spring Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 



I,:eBANON VALIvElY COLLEGE. 3 

Plan and Purpose of the College. 

Corporate Rights, 

The College was incorporated with full University privi- 
leges, by the I^egislature of Pennsylvania in an Act approved 
by the Executive on the 5th of April, A. D. 1867. The 
Management of the College is committed to a Board of Trus- 
tees, elected by the Annual Conferences cooperating in the 
enterprise, one-third of whom are elected annually for a term. 
of three years. The members of the Faculty sustain an 
ex-officio relation. 

The charter indicates that it was the purpose of the found- 
ers to plant an institution which would become so ample in 
facilities and manifold in departments as to furnish instruction 
in all the subjects of a general and special education. Toward 
this original purpose the College is rapidly advancing. 

Form of Bequest, 

To persons desiring to aid in increasing the efficiency of 
the College in the work of preparing young men and women 
for usefulness, the following form of bequest is recommended : 

I give and bequeath to the Lebanon Valley College, at 
Annville, Pa, , the sum of dollars, for the general pur- 
pose of said school. 

Organization, 

The College aims to provide courses of study which will 
qualify students to be practical and self-reliant, as well as 
learned. It comprises four departments : 

I. The College offers three courses of study, leading 
to degrees in Arts and Science. 

II. The Preparatory Department is designed to fit 
young people for College, either for the Classical or the Scientific 
Course. 

III. The Department of Music has full courses in 
instrumental and vocal music, and grants diplomas to those 
who complete either of the specified courses. 

IV. The Art Department provides thorough instruc- 
tion in drawing and painting, with the aim of improving and 
developing the mind and the aesthetic sense. 



I^KBANON VALLEY COLLKGE. 



The Cofpofation, 



Trustees. 

Name Residence Term Expiree 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., and Facui^Ty, Ex-Officio. 
Representatives from Pennsylvania Conference. 

Rev. EzEKiEi<B. KepharT, D.D., L,L.D., Annville. 1902 

Samuei< W. Cwppinger, Chambersburg, 1901 

Rev. Daniei. EBERiyY, D.D., Abbottstown. 1903 

John C. Knipp, Baltimore, Md. 1902 

Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, A. M., Chambersburg. 1901 

Rev. John E. KeEEFman, B. S., Duncannon. 1901 

WiElriAM A. IvUTz, Shippensburg. 1903 



Representatives from East Pennsylvania Conference. 



WiEEIAM H. UlyRICH, 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D.D., 
Benjamin H. Engle, 
Henry H. Kreider, 
Rev. Solomon L. Swartz, 
Adam R. Forney, A. M., 
Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, B. D., 



Hiiramelstown. 

Dayton, O. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Middletown. 

Annville. 

Bellegrove. 



Representatives from Eastern Conference. 

Isaac B. Haak, Myerstown. 

Samuel F. Engle, Palmyra. 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph.D., Shamokin. 

Simon P. Light, Esq., A. M., Lebanon. 

Rev. Charles Mutch, Reading. 

Valentine K. Fisher, A. B., Berne. 

Representatives frotn Maryland Conference. 

Rev. Arthur B. STatton, A. M., Hagerstown, Md. 

Reno S. Harp, Esq., A. M., Frederick, Md. 

George C. Snyder, Plagerstown, Md. 

Rev. Charles W. Stinespring, Frederick, Md. 

Rev. John B. Chamberlain, Washington, D. C. 

Edward Kern, Washington, D. C. 

Representatives from Virginia Conference. 

John H. MaysillES, A. B. , East Deerfield, Mass. 

Rev. SanEord D, Skelton, Winchester, Va. 

REV. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., Stephen City, Va. 

Henry B. Miller, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Rev. a. p. Funkhquser, B. S., Harrisonburg, Va. 

Rev. J. R. Ridenour, Middletown, Md. 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A. M., Dayton, Va. 



1900 
1901 
1900 
1902 
1902 
1901 
1900 



1901 
1900 
1902 
1902 
1901 
190a 

1902 
1901 
1903 
1901 

1903 
1902 



1902 
1 901 
1 901 
19CI 

1903 
1902 

1903 



I.EBANON VAIvtEY COLLEGE. 

The Corporation, 



Officers of The Board of Trustees. 
President— WILI/IAM H. ULRICH. 

Secretary— ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT. 

Treasurer— ISAAC B. HAAK. 

Executive Committee. 

HERVIN U. ROOP, Chairman. 

ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Secretary. 
ISAAC B. HAAK, RENO S. HARP, 

BENJAMIN H. ENGLE, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

WILLIAM H. ULRICH, HIRAM B. DOHNER. 

Committees. 



Finance- 
Hiram B. Dohner, Chairman. Henry H. Kreider, 

;Soi,OMON L. SWARTZ, SAMUEL W. Cl^IPPINGER, 

Syi,vester K. Wine, Charles A. Mutch. 

Endowment. 

;Ezekiel B. KepharT, Chairman. Wm. H. Washinger, 

Daniel Eberly, Adam R. Forney, 

Charles W. Stinespring. 

Faculty, 

William A. Lutz, Chairman. Isaac H. Albright, 

.Samuel D. Faust, Isaac B. Haak, 

Reno S. Harp. 

Library and Apparatus. 

James T. Spangler, Chairman. John R. Ridenour, 

S. P. Light, A. P. Funkhouser. 

Grounds, Buildings, and Domestic Department, 
Benjamin H. Engle, Chairman, A. P. Funkhouser, 
James B. Chamberlain, Valentine K. Fisher, 

Sanford D. Skelton. 
Auditing, 
Samuel F. Engle, Chairman. Henry B. Miller, 

John H. Maysilles, Geo. C, Snyder. 



Matron. 

ANNA MARY KELLER, B. S. 



LEBANON VAI^LEY COI.I<EGE. 

The Faculty and Other Officers, 



REV, HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP.fA, M,, Ph.D., 

PRESIDENT. 
Professor of Philosophy, Pedagogy, and Oratory. 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A, M., 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

REV, JAMES THOMAS SP ANGLER, A, M,, B, D,, 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

HENRY LENICH MEYER, M, S„ 
Professor of Natural Science. 

REV, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A, M,, 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

MAUD ETTA WOLFE, A. M„ 

Professor of the English Language and Literature,, 
and Instructor in German. 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A, M,, 

Professor of French, and Instructor in English. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A, M„ 
Prof essor - Elect of History and Political Science .^ 

CHARLES EDWARD SNOKE, A, B,, 
Instructor in Geography and History. 

REV, CHARLES E, HURLBURT, 
Instructor in The English Bible. 

WILLIAM OTTERBEIN ROOP, 
Assistant in Latin. 

HARRY L, EICHINGER, B, 0„ 
Instructor in Elocution. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Faculty and Other Officers, 



HERBERT S. OLDHAM, E S. So, (London) 

Director of the Department of Music, 

and Instrtictor iti Voice, Piano, Organ, and Theory, etc. 

MADAME VON BEEEGHY, 

Violin, Strings, Etc. 

CHARLES H, B, OLDHAM, 

Assista7it in Piano. 

MABEL E, MANBECK, 
Assistant in Piano. 

EDITH H, BALDWIN, 

Painti?ig and Drawing. 

WILLIAM C, ARNOLD, 

Instructor in Stenography and Typewriting. 

ENID DANIEL, B, S,, 
Instructor in Physical Culture for Girls. 

THOMAS W, GRAY, M, E., 

Instructor i?i Physical Culture. 

BISHOP E, B, KEPHART, D, D„ LLD„ 

Lecturer on International Law. 

DANIEL EBERLY, D, D„ 

Lecturer on Philosophy of History. 

REV. DAVID S, ESHLEMAN, B, D., 
College Pastor. 

REV, HIRAM B, DOHNER. B, D,. 

Field Secretary. 



JOHN E LEHMAN, A, M„ 
Secretary of Faculty. 

JAMES T, SPANGLER, B, D„ 

Librarian. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Degrees Conferred 

by the College, 

June 14th, 1899. 



L IN CURSU. 
Artium Baccalaureus. 
CwppiNGER, Walter G. Jones, William O. 

Hoy, Harry H. Kreider, Mary E. 

HUNTZBERGER, ISAAC W. MlI,LER, HaRRY E- 

Imboden, Harry M. Stehman, John D. 

Scientiae Baccalaureus. 

Batdorf, Emma R. Light, Alma M. 

Batdorf, John P. Light, Galen D. 

Clippinger, Clarence V. Miller, G. Mahlon 

Grabill, Edith S. Myers, Anna S. 

Hartz, Leah C. Runk, Irvin E. 

H'ERR, Susie F, Seltzer, Caroline D. 

Landis, Bessie M. Shelley, Hattie S. 
Trabert, Maud S. 

IL PER EXAMINATIONEM, 

Artium Magister. 
McGiNNES, Lemuel E. 

Graduates in Music. 
Manbeck, Mabel E. Royer, Mabel E. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Admission^ 



Classical Course. 

Engwsh. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is 
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division 
into paragraphs. 

I. Reading. — A certain number of books will be set for reading. 
The candidate will be required to present evidence of a general know- 
ledge of the subject matter, and to answer simple questions on the lives 
of the authors. The form of examination will usually be the writing of 
a paragraph or two on each of the several topics, to be chosen by the 
candidate from a considerable number — perhaps ten or fifteen — set before 
him in the examination paper. The treatment of these topics is designed 
to test the candidate's power of clear and accurate expression, and will 
•call for only a general knowledge of the substance of the books. In the 
place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an 
exercise book, properly certified by his instructor, containing composi- 
tions or other written work done in connection with the reading of 
the books. 

The books set for this part of the examination will be : 

1900: Dryden's Palamon and Arcite ; Pope's Iliad, books I., VI., 
XXI. and XXII. ; Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield ; Scott's Ivanhoe ; 
DeQuincey's The Flight of a Tartar Tribe ; Cooper's Last of the Mohi- 
cans ; Tennyson's The Princess ; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

1901 : Tennyson's The Princess ; Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice ; 
George Eliot's Silas Marner ; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers ; Cole- 
ridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner ; Pope's Translation of the Iliad, 
Books I., VI., XXII, and XXIV.; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; 
Scott's Ivanhoe ; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans. 

1902 : Tennyson's The Princess ; Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice ; 
■George Eliot's Silas Marner ; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers ; Cole- 
ridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner ; Pope's Translation of the Iliad, 
^Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield ; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans ; Scott's 
Ivanhoe. 

II. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination presup- 
poses the thorough study of each of the works named below. The 
examination will be upon subject matter, form and structure, and will 
also test the candidate's ability to express his knowledge with clearness 
and accuracy. 



lO LEIBANON VAI,I,EY COLLEGE. 

1900 : Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and' 
II.; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; Macaulay's Essays 
on Milton and Addison. 

1901 : Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America ; Shakespeare's 
Macbeth ; Milton's Minor Poems, Lj'cidas, Comus, L'Allegro and II 
Penseroso ; Macaulay's Essay on Milton ; Macaulay's Essay en Addiscn.- 

1902 : Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America ; Shakespeare's^ 
Macbeth ; Milton's Minor Poems, — L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus and^ 
Lycidas ; Macaulay's Essay on Milton ; Macaulay's Essay on Addison. 

History and Geography. — History of Greece, Rome, the United 
States and England. The following works will indicate the amount re- 
quired : Pennell's History of Greece, Leighton's Histor}' of Rome (to the 
close of the reign of Augustus), or Smith's Small History of Rome>, 
]McMaster's History of the United States. Tozer's Primer of Ancient 
Geography is recommended as covering the work required in Ancient 
Geography ; also a good knowledge of Modern Geography will be ex- 
pected. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System ; Algebra, 
through Geometric Progression ; Plane Geometry, including the solution 
of one hundred or more original exercises. 

Latin. — Grammar, including the rules of Prosody and Scanning, 
Ctesar, three books, or Book I. and Sallust's Catiline or Latin Readings ; 
Cicero, six Orations, including Pro Archia ; Vergil, six books of the 
^neid. Equivalents from other authors will be accepted in part. Latin 
Prose Composition, twelve chapters of Arnold, or their equivalent ; 
reading at sight of easy passages from Ceesar, Cicero, and Vergil. 

Greek. — Grammar (Goodwin); Anabasis, six books. Greek Prose 
Composition, twenty exercises of Jones, but exercises based on the prose 
as read from day to day is preferred. 

Latin Scientific Course. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the same studies as for the Classical Course, except that no Greek is 
required. 

Greek Scientific Course. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the same studies as for the Classical Course, except that no Latin is 
required. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. II 

Admission on Certificate, 

Students who seek credit for studies pursued iu high schools and 
academies must submit certificates stating the texts or portipn of texts 
used, and the number of hours spent in recitation thereon. 

Graduates of Pennsylvania State Normal Schools are admitted to the 
Latin Scientific Course without examination. 

Candidates for advanced standing coming from an}' other institution 
of equal grade will receive credit, without examination, for the studies 
which the faculty of such school may testify that they have passed. 

Real equivalents for studies required are received at the discretion 
of the Faculty. 

Studies pursued in high schools, academies, and other preparatory 
schools will not be accepted as equivalents of studies in the Junior and 
Senior years. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificates of 
honorable dismissal. 

Conditional Admission. 

A CANDIDATE failing to pass in one or more of the subjects required 
for admission, may, at the discretion of the Faculty, be admitted to his 
class conditionally to make up the deficiencies b}- extra study. N^o stu- 
dent will be given Junior Standing until all deficiencies are made up. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

CURRICULA, 



The Classical Course, 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term, 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Mythology, Prose Composition. 

Latin — Livy, Prose Composition, Roman Antiquities. 

Mathematics — Geometry Completed. 

German — Grammar and Exercises. 

Bible— IMq of Christ. 

English — Rhetoric and Composition. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Ctilture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term, 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Prose Composition. 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute or de Amicitia, Roman Literature. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. 

German — Grammar, Exercises, and Marchen und Erzahlungen. 

Bible— Tsx^ Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Essay on Addison, and Composition. 

Elocution — One hour pjr week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Spring Term. 

Greek — Herodotus, Prose Composition. 

Latin — Horace's Odes. 

Mathetnatics — Plane Trigonometry. 

German — "Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, or equivalent. 

Bible— Th& Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Irving's Sketch Book, and Compositions. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



i,e;banon valley college. 13 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
Fall Term, 

Gteek — Memorabilia, Greek Testament. 

Latin — Horace, Epistles, Quintilian. 

Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Political Science — Political Economy. 

(German — Wilhelm Tell, or equivalent. 
or 
French — Grammar and Exercises. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II., and Com- 
position. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Wintei* Tefm, 

Greek — Plato's Phsedo or Apology, Greek Testament. 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. 

(Gerinan — Faust, or equivalent, German Literature. 
or 
French — Grammar, and Super's French Reader. 
History — Mediseval History. 
Bible— Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books I. and VI., and Composition. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 

Greek — Demosthenes de Corona. Greek Testament. 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry (completed). 

(German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. 
Of 
French — Un Philosophe Sous les Toits, or equivalent. 
History — Modern History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books XXI. and XXIV., and Com- 
position. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 
Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



14 I.EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE.- 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. 

Greek — The CBdipus T3'rannus or Antigone of Sophocles, [3.] 
Latin — Cicero de Officiis. [2.] 
Physical Science — xldvanced Physics. 

^ -^ \ Applied Psychology. 

Eno-lish— ^ History of English Literature. 

■=' \ Trench on Words. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term. 

Greek — The Prometheus or The Seven against Thebes of ^^schylus. [2.] 
Latin — Terence, Andria et Adelphce. [3.] 
Physical Sciejice — Advanced Physics. 

English- [ ^^^""^ ""% 1^^^ rif V -t . 
^ \ History of English Literature. 

Pedagogy — Historj^ of Education. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term. 

Greek — The Clouds of Aristophanes. [2.] 

Latin — Juvenal, Selections. [3.] 

Physical Science — Advanced Physics. 

Etiglish — History of American Literature. 

Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. 

Pedagogy — Methodology. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

ThroughoiU the Year — Declamations, Themes, and Debates. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



Required Studies, 
Fall Term. 

Philosophy — Psychology. ; 

Natural Science — Chemistry. 

English — Elements of Literary Criticism, and Prose Classics. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 



LEBANON VALIvEY COLLEGE. 1 5 

Winter Term, 

tPhilosophy — Moral Philosophy. 
Natural Science — Geology, begun. 
English — Shakespeare. 
Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 
Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term. 

Philosophy — History of Philosoph}\ 

Natural Science — Geology, completed. Mineralogy. 

English — Philology, Anglo-Saxon. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises, 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect 
six hours' work from the following list : 

Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Astronomy — Young. 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Latin — Latin Hymns or Seneca's Essays. 

Greek — Pindar's Olympian and Pythian Odes. 

Science — Chemistry, Winter and Spring Terms ;' or Advanced Phys- 
ics, with Laboratory Work. 

TT- 1 j History of Civilization. 

tiistory I English Constitutional History. 

Archceology — A Course of Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic 

Archaeology, with Recitations. 
Philosophy — A Course of Lectures on Esthetics, with Recitations. 
It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at the beginning of the College year, and for 
the whole year ; and the election made must be adhered to, unless 
special permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 

The Latin Scientific Coufse, 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science, 

FRESHMAN YEAR, 

Fall Term. 

Science — Meteorology . 

Latin — Livy, Roman Antiquities. 

Mathematics — Geometry, completed. 

German — Grammar and Exercises. 

Bible— Ta.^ Life of Christ. 

English — Rhetoric and^Composition. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 



1 6 I^EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Wintcf Term, 

Science — Zoology and Histology. 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute. Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra . 

German — Grammar and Exercises, and Marchen and Erzahlungen. 

Bible— Ta^ Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Macaulay's Essay on Addison, and Composition, 

Elocution — One hour -weekly. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 

Science — Zoology and Histology. 

Latin — Horace, Odes. Prose Composition. 

Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. 

German — Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, or equivalent. 

Bible— '^h.e Life of Christ. 

English Literature — Irviug's Sketch Book, and Composition. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR- 
Fall Term, 

Science — Biology and Embryology. 

Latin — Horace, Epistles. Quintilian. 

Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry, begun. 

Political Science — Political Economy. 

(German — Wilhelm Tell, or equivalent. 
or 
French — Grammar and Exercises. 
Bible— Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Milton's Paradise Lost, Books I. and II., and Com- 
position. . 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Winter Term. 
Science — Biology and Embryology. 
Za^i« —Tacitus, Germania. Latin Composition. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. 

(German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. 
or 
French — Grammar, and Super's French Reader. 

History — Mediaeval History. 

Bible— 0\A Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books I. and VI., and Composition. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 7 

Spring Term, 

Science — Biology and Einbr5'ology. 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry, completed. 

{German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. 
ot 
French — Un Philosophe sous les Toits, or equivalent. 
History — Modern History. 
Bible — Old Testament History. 

English Literature — Pope's Iliad, Books XXII. and XXIV., and Com- 
position. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 
Throughout the Year — Declam.ations and Themes. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Tef m. 

Science — Advanced Physics. 

Philosophy — Logic . 

Pedagogy — Applied Psychology. 

F <rl '<ih { History of English Literature. 

^S ^ t Trench on Words. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 
Physical Cultttre — Field and Gymnasium Exercises. 

Winter Term, 

Science — Advanced Physics. 
P /■ T J Science of Rhetoric. 
J^ngusn I jjigtory of English Literature. 

Pedagogy — History of Education. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Ter ixs. 

Science — Advanced Physics. 

English — History of American Literature. 

Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. 

Pedagogy — Methodology. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. 

Physical Ctilture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year — Orations, Themes, and Debates. 

Ei,ECTivES : Science — Advanced Anatomy^ 

Mathematics — Calculus and Differential Equations, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

SENIOR YEAR, 



Required Studies. 
Fall Tetm, 



Philosophy — Psychology. 

Science — Chemistry. 

English — Elements of Literary Criticism, and Prose Classics. 

Bible— The New Testament Epistles. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Winter Term, 

Philosophy — Ethics. 

Science — Chemistry. Geology begun. 

English — Shakespeare. 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term, 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy. 

Science— /Chemistry. 

\ Geology completed. Mineralogy. 
English — Philology, Anglo-Saxon. 
Bible — The New Testament Epistles. 
Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 
Throughout the Year. — Orations, Debates, and Theses. 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect six 

hours' work from the following list : 

Science — Advanced Physics, with lyaboratory Work. Advanced 

Physiology. 

Astronomy — Young. 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Hi^tnrv— / History of Civilization. 
niswty I Elnglish Constitutional History. 

{Latin — Cicero de Officis. Terence and Juvenal. 
or 
Greek — The CEdipus Tyrannus of Sophocles, Prometheus and 
The Clouds of Aristophanes. 
Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Philosophy — Lectures on u^sthetics, with Recitations. 
Archcsology — Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology^ 
with Recitations. 



I^SBANON valine; Y COIvI^E^GE). 19 

It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at beginning of the College year and for the 
whole year, and the election once made must be adhered to, unless 
special permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 

Greek Scientific Course, 

The studies of the Greek Scientific Course are the same as those of 
the L,atin Scientific Course with the exception of Greek instead of I^atin. 



Departments of Instruction, 



The subjects taught in the regular College Courses, embrac- 
ing all subjects taught in the modern college, may be grouped 
under the general heads — Philosophy, Language and Litera- 
ture, Mathematics and Science. In providing this course and 
its daily prosecution, a two-fold duty is kept in view ; viz., 
The mental discipline of the student and his introduction to 
the main divisions of human knowledge. 

Philosophy, 

I. Psychology — Se?ises, Intellect and Will. — The aim of this 
course is to give a fair knowledge of descriptive and explana- 
tory psychology and its present stage of development, its ap- 
plication to education, and also a preparation for the other 
philosophical discipline of the Junior and Senior years. Reci- 
tations, lectures and discussions. Text-books, Baldwin's Ele- 
ments of Psychology ; Halleck's Psychology and Psychic Cul- 
ture, with the references for library work in the larger psy- 
chologies and psychological periodicals. Required of Juniors, 
Fall term. 



20 LEBANON VALLKY COLIvEGE. 

2. History of Education. \ These courses are plan- 

3. Science and Art of Education. ) r).^di especially for those 
who desire to prepare themselves for high grade work and 
positions in teaching. I^ectures will be given by the instructor 
with reference to the pedagogical library and the leading 
educational periodicals, and papers on special topics will be 
prepared by members of the class. Texts used as a basis are 
Compayre's History of Pedagogy, Painter's History of Edu- 
cation, Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, Tompkin's 
Philosophy of Teaching. 

Required of Juniors and open to special students who are 
prepared for the course, Winter and Spring terms. 

4. Logic, Deductive and Inductive. — The theory and laws of 
thought are studied with constant application in exercises in 
the logical treatment of conceptions, the conversion of propo- 
sitions, immediate inference, S3dlogisms, and the detection of 
fallacies. Special attention is given to the principles of 
inductive reasoning and scientific method. The time allotted 
to the subject is sufiicient to make the studj' of practical 
advantage as well as a genuine discipline. Text-book, Hyslop's. 
Required of Juniors, Fall term. 

5. The subject of Christian Evidences occupies the Spring 
term of the Junior year. The external and the internal proofs 
are distinguished, and the place of each is defined. The studies 
of the previous year are found to prepare the student well for 
appreciating the place of prophec}^ miracles, and the historical 
evidences. Theories of inspiration are examined and the 
miraculous character of Christ is set forth, together with the 
adaptation of the Gospel to the nature and needs of man. 

The text-books used are Fisher's Christian Evidences, and 
Flint's Theism. 

6. Psychology is studied during the Fall term of the Senior 
year. With the aid of a text-book a general survey of the 
soul's power of knowing, feeling, and willing is made, with 
discussions of various theories ; the aim being to cultivate the 
power of abstract thought, as well as to introduce the student 
to philosophic research and discussion, therebj' to acquire a 



IvEBANON VALLKY COLLEGE. 21 

more complete master}^ of the whole science in the rich and 
varied growth that it has attained in recent years. 

7. Christian Ethics follows in the Winter term, and text- 
books and lectures are employed to acquaint the student with 
leading sj^stems of ethics and the fundamental principles of 
morality. Practical ethics is then very fully treated both 
comprehensively and in detail. 

8. History of Philosophy concludes the course in the Spring 
term. During the first part of the term, a survey of the 
philosophy of the Greeks from about 600 B. C. to the fourth 
Century A. D. is made by recitations, lectures, the reading of 
Plato's Protagoras, Gorgias, Theataetus, and parts of other 
dialogues, and reports of readings by the classes in the works 
of Zeller, Grote, and others. Attention is also given to the 
philosophy of the Romans and to the Patristic and Scholastic 
Philosophies. The remainder of the term is spent in the study of 
Modern Philosophy, with special regard to Descartes, Spinoza, 
lyOcke, Berkeley, Hume, I^eibnitz, and Kant, and more recent 
problems. Text-books : Haven's and Weber's Histories of 
Philosophy, with frequent references to the histories of Ueber- 
weg, Erdman, Schwegler, and others. 

9. Butler's Analogy. In this study the aim is by supple- 
mental lectures to adapt the study to the times, calling atten- 
tion to the latter form of unbelief, in order to place the student 
in possession of as complete a defense of the Christian faith as 
possible. Elective for Seniors. 

I o. Archaeology. — Elective for Seniors. A course of lectures 
on Prehistoric and Plistoric Archaeology, with Recitations. 

II. Esthetics. — A course of lectures on Esthetics, with 
Recitations. Elective for Seniors. 

Language and Literature, 

Greek Language and Literature, 

In the Freshman Year, Herodotus and Plomer's Iliad are 
read. During this year emphasis is placed upon the study of 
the forms of words and syntax and upon reading at sight. 



22 I^BBANON VAIvIvEjY COIvIvBGE). 

The work of tlie year includes further a study of the Greek 
historians, epic and lyric poetry, antiquities and mythology. 
One hour a week is devoted to prose composition. 

The Sophomores read the Memorabilia, the Phsedo or Apol- 
ogy, and Demosthenes on the Crown. Along with the read- 
ing there is also a study of Socrates and the Socratic Schools 
with a general study of Greek philosophy, the writings of 
Plato, Greek oratory and the Laws and Law Courts of Athens. 
Portions of the Greek Testament are read at stated times dur- 
ing the year. 

In the Junior Year, the CEdipus Tyrannus or Antigone of 
Sophocles, the Prometheus Bound or Seven against Thebes of 
jBschylus, and the Clouds of Aristophanes are read ; with a 
study of Greek tragedy, comedy, and theater. 

The Hebrew Language* 

Hebrew is an elective throughout the Senior Year, and is 
offered for the benefit particularly of students intending to 
take, a Theological Course. An elem^entary knowledge of the 
grammar of the language is acquired, and several chapters in 
Genesis are read and carefully studied. 

Lantin Language and Literature, 

The aim of the course of instruction in Latin is to teach to 
read Latin correctly and rapidly ; to translate with accuracy 
and facilitj^ into idiomatic English ; to familiarize the student 
with the styles and idioms of Latin as illustrated by the authors 
of different periods ; and to acquaint the student with the lead- 
ing facts of Roman life, history, literature, and antiquity. 
Due importance is attached to Latin as a foundation of literary 
culture and as a basis for a more perfect knowledge of the 
Knglish language. 

During the Freshman Year particular attention is given to 
iorms and constructions. Written translations and composi- 
tion are required. Antiquities will be studied in connection 
with Livy, and prosody with the Odes of Horace. The Gram- 
mar is carefully reviewed this year. 



LEBANON VAIvLEY COLIvEGE. 23 

In the Sophomore Year the Epistles of Horace, Quintilian's 
Institutions of Oratory, Book X., and the Germania and Agri- 
cola of Tacitus are studied. Composition is continued, liter- 
ary and historical topics are assigned for treatment, and col- 
lateral reading is required. Special study of the literature of 
the Silver Age. 

The Junior Class will read Cicero's De Officiis, one or two 
plays of Terence, and the Satires of Juvenal. The character- 
istics of each of these authors are carefully studied. The 
Roman drama is made a subject of study. 

Text-books used: Lord's Livy, Rockwood's De Senectute, 
or Lord's De Amicitia, Smith & Greenough's Horace, Frieze's 
Quintilian, Hopkin's Germania and Agricola, Crowell's De 
Officiis, Lindsay's Juvenal, Wilkin's Primer of Antiquities, 
Allen and Greenough's Grammar, Harper's Latin Dictionary. 
The text books catalogued will be required. 

German Language and Literature, 

The aim is to give the student a thorough knowledge of the 
use of the German language. The first year will be devoted 
to a study of the grammar and composition, with readings of 
Marchen and Brzahlungen and simpler selections from the 
German classics, foUovv^ed by Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche or 
its equivalent. The second year will include the history of 
German literature, and the reading of Schiller's William Tell 
and Maria Stuart, and Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea or 
Faust. Classes will meet five times per week. 

French Language and Literature, 

The purpose of the work in French is to enable the student 
to read the language with facility. Special attention will be 
given to a study of the grammar. Easy prose selections will 
be read first, followed by two or more of the following : Fen- 
elon, Telemaque ; Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin ; Souvestre, 
Un Philosophe Sous les Toits; Erckman-Chatrain, LeConscrit; 
Napoleon (Fortier); Lamartine, Jeanne d'Arc ; Verne, L'Ex- 
pedition de la Jeune-Hardie. Classes will meet five times per 
week. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLKGK.. 

English Language and Literatttre, 

For tlie benefit of those who wish a better foundation for 
English work, one term may be devoted to a rapid but thorough 
review of English Grammar. Three terms are given to the study 
of Elementary Rhetoric, chiefly in its relation to composition.. 
A practical text-book is used, and daily exercises, intended to 
develop the student's accuracy and ease of expression, are re- 
quired to be written, and are corrected by the teacher or be- 
fore the class. 

During the Winter term of the Junior Year, Hill's Science 
of Rhetoric is carefully studied. 

Beginning with the Middle Preparatory Year, the study of 
English Literature will be continued throughout the course. 
Until the end of the Sophomore Year the work will consist of 
a study of English classics, much of the reading being done in 
the class-room, the chief aim being to develop in the students 
a taste for the works of our best authors. Classes will meet 
twice per week. 

Throughout the Junior and Senior Years classes will meet 
daily. The history of the English language will be studied, 
and the development of literature in England and America. 
Considerable time will be spent in the critical study of prose 
classics, special attention being given to the English novel. 
One term of the Senior Year will be devoted to a study of 
Shakespeare. Anglo-Saxon will be studied during one term, 
that the student may acquire an elementary knowledge of our 
language in its oldest form. 

Mathematics and Science, 



Mathematics and Astronomy, 

In the study of mathematics the discipline of the logical 
faculties is constantly sought, the aim being that every prin- 
ciple shall receive careful demonstration, and as far as possible 
be practically applied, so that students may acquire such a 
knowledge of mathematical principles as will give them power 
to solve practical problems and make original investigations. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 25 

The required course extends through the Freshman and 
Sophomore Years, — the Freshmen studying Solid Geometry, 
Advanced Algebra, and Plane Trigonometry; the Sophomores, 
Surveying, Spherical Trigonometr}-, and Analytical Geometry. 

In the Junior Year an elective course in Differential and 
Integral Calculus, and one in Elementary Differential Equa- 
tions are offered to those who wish to do more than the work 
of the required course. 

Plane Surveying follows Plane TrigonomxCtry in the Fall 
Term of the Sophomore Year. The department is supplied 
with a complete set of instruments for this purpose, a first-class 
transit, leveling-rod, etc., and field work is required to enable 
the student to learn the use of these. 

General Astronomy is studied during the Fall Term of the 
Senior Year (elective). The department is provided with a 
four and a half inch refracting telescope, equatorialh^ mounted. 

Natural Science, 

The aim of the instruction in the preparatory department is to 
give the student a general knowledge of Physical Geography, 
Physiology, and Elementar}^ Phj'sics, and to familiarize him 
with the proper methods of investigation as a preparation for 
advanced work and original research, through experiment, 
observation, and inference. 

Botany. — A standard text-book is used as a guide to study 
the plant, its parts, and their functions. A written record is 
required of the complete analysis of seventy-five plants that are 
mounted by the student in his herbarium. Fee, three dollars, 
for which herbarium and blanks wdll be furnished. 

Zoology. — The scope of the instruction includes the general 
principles of Zoology. Special attention is given to classifica- 
tion, distribution, heredity, evolution. In the course of anat- 
omy and histology an opportunity is offered to study the tis- 
sues by microscopic sections. Fee, five dollars. 

Biology. — This course covers the entire year, and must be 
entered in the Fall Term. It includes the detailed study of 
typical forms of life. Fee, five dollars per term. 



26 i,e;banon valley college. 

Physics. — The student is directed to become familiar with 
the laws of Mechanics and Physics, by instruction, personal 
experiments, and repeated written tests. Fee, three dollars 
per term. 

Chemistry. — The course in Chemistry requires two recita- 
tion periods and five hours' laboratory practice a week during 
the Fall Term of the Senior Year for all students. In the ' 
Scientific course the work extends throughout the entire Senior 
Year and includes Analytical Chemistry. At least one hundred 
and fift}' experiments must be made in Fall Term work, and a 
record made in permanent notes. A fee of five dollars is 
charged for use of chemicals and apparatus, and all breakage 
must be paid for before grade can be given. Working table 
space is assigned as soon as fee is paid ; this will be strictly 
adhered to. 

Geology. — This subject includes the study of the forces pro- 
ducing geological changes, carefully revievving structural and 
historical geology'. The student is required to determine sev- 
enty-five minerals in the laboratory under the observation of 
the instructor. Fee, two dollars. 

All fees are to be paid in the College office. 

Labofatofies and Apparatus, 

The facilities have been increased so as to accommodate 
from thirty-five to forty students at the working tables. 

The collection of apparatus for lecture demonstrations and 
experiments by the student, has additions made thereto 
throughout each year. 

Historical and Political Science, 

In the Preparatory Department, one term is spent on each 
of the following subjects, in the order given : United States 
History, Bible History, General Historj^, Roman History, 
Grecian History, and Civics. See Preparatory Courses. 

I. Political Economy. The effort is to ground the student 
well in the principles of the science, with frequent reference to 
its social and historical bearings. Fall Term, Sophomore 
Year. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 27 

2. Ancient and Mediaeval History. The work in Ancient 
History includes a brief chronological review of the origin, 
development, and downfall of ancient nations; and in Mediaeval 
History, an account of the great forces at work during the 
Middle Ages. The student is required to use the Library and 
to prepare articles upon assigned topics. Winter Term, Soph- 
omore Year. Thatcher and Sch will's Europe in the Middle 
Age. 

3. Modern Histor}^ A careful study of the rise and prog- 
ress of the modern nations is made, including the manners, 
customs, religion, and intellectual and political development 
of the people. Essays on assigned topics. Spring Term, 
Sophomore Year. Text-book, Sch will's Modern Europe. 

4. History of Education. Winter Term, Junior Year. See 
Pedagogy. 

5. History of Civilization. Elective for Seniors, Winter 
Term. 

6. English Constitutional History. Elective for Seniors. 

7. International Ivaw. Elective for Seniors. 

The English Bible, 

Each of the four College classes receives instruction in the 
Bible, the course being so arranged that the whole Bible is 
studied during the four years. One recitation each week 
throughout the 3^ear is required of every student. The course 
is as follows : 

Freshman Class. — The New Testament History, as set forth 
in the Gospels and the Acts. The Life of Christ is studied 
carefulb/ by periods, and the order and connection of events 
are closely observed. The development of His ministry is 
marked, and the crisis and climaxes discovered. Works of 
reference are used freely lo bring the student to realize the 
situation, ecclesiastically, politically, and socially. The Apos- 
tolic Age is taken up for the same kind of study. The stu- 
dent comes into direct contact with the Scriptures. One year, 
one hour per week. 

Sophomore Class — The Old Testainent History, as found in 



28 LEBANON VAIvI^EY COLLEGE. 

the historical books of the Old Testament, is carefullj^ studied^ 
The literary and spiritual qualities of the Bible are brought 
into view. One 5^ear, one hour per week. 

Junior Class — The Pfophets and Poets of the Old Testament, 
with lectures in introduction, outlines, and study of selected 
passages. One hour each week. 

Senior Class — The New Testament Doctrines, as they appear 
in the Epistles of St. Paul. These Epistles are studied in 
chronological order, and topically. 

These courses are under the direction of the President, and 
Instructor C. E. Hurlburt. 

Elocution and Oratory, 

The aim will be to give careful instruction in the arts of 
speech, — to teach the student to study his mental processes 
and their free, natural expression, and not mechanical rule. 
Practical drill in voice building, declamation, and kindred 
matters, will be required of the Freshman Class one hour each 
week. In the Sophomore Year, lectures on the general subject 
of Oratory and Orators will constitute a main feature of the 
instruction, while from the Junior and Senior Classes exten- 
sive original work in the making of orations, with public de- 
livery of the same, will be required. 

Rhetorical Exercises, 

To afford sufficient opportunities for exercise in composition 
and public speaking, a system of Rhetorical Exercises has 
been put in operation. Advanced classes in the College are 
required to take part in public exercises at least once a year. 

Drav/ing and Painting, 

The practice of drawing, painting, and carving teaches stu- 
dents to be more observant of their surroundings, discriminat- 
ing in regard to good form, color, and design. Thorough in- 
struction is provided by the department in drawing and paint- 
ing, aiming at the development of the sesthetic faculties and 
of the power of expression. The charge for one lesson a 
week, three hours, is fifty cents. 



LEBANON VAIvIvBY COI^IvKGE. 29 

General Information* 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS, 

The Campus includes about ten acres in the very heart of 
the beautiful Lebanon Valley, Annville, within easy access of 
the railroad station, post office, churches, and the usual busi- 
ness places. Upon it are erected four commodious College 
buildings. 

South College, or the IvAdies' Hall, is a large brick 
building, entirely separate from the other premises, and under 
the immediate care of the Preceptress. Young ladies from 
abroad are furnished a comfortable and pleasant home, where 
they have every advantage for study and general improvement. 

North College, or the Administration Building, also 
built of brick, will be, with the addition being made, two 
kundred and ten feet in length. It is four stories high, and 
contains the President's Office and Reception Room, the Reci- 
tation Rooms, Gymnasium, besides dormitory facilities for 
jmore than one hundred students. The building is heated 
throughout by steam. 

Science Hall contains the entire department of Natural 
Science with its physical apparatus, the chemical and biologi- 
cal laboratories, and the museum. 

The Music Hall, erected in 1899, a spacious and beautiful 
structure, of Hummelstown brownstone and of the Elizabethan 
order of architecture, is one of the most attractive and impos- 
ing of the College buildings. The cost of the building was 
about twenty-five thousand dollars, and, in addition, over six 
thousand dollars have been expended in its furnishing. It 
supplies accommodations for the Director's Room and Office, 
the College and Society Libraries, a commodious and elegant 
Reading Room, Literary Society Halls, twelve or more 
Practice Rooms supplied with new pianos, and a large Audi- 
torium with a fine pipe organ. 



30 IvSBANON VAIvLKY COIvLKGE. 

RELIGIOUS TRAINING, 

Religious training is regarded as essential to a thorough 
education. The Institution being founded in the interest of 
Christ and Christian scholarship, assumes for its work the 
joint culture, by all proper means, of both intellect and heart. 
More than ninety per cent, of the students are communicant 
members of the Church, and a Christian spirit underlies and 
animates the instruction in the different departments. But 
beyond this, special provision is made for more direct and pos- 
itive Christian influence. 

1. A regular service, consisting of the reading of Scriptures, 
singing, and prayer, is held in the College Chapel every school 
morning. All students are required to be present. 

2. Weekly prayer meetings are conducted by the students 
in the College. 

3. There are flourishing organizations of the Young Wo- 
men's and Young Men's Christian Associations in the Col- 
lege, which hold their meetings on Sunday afternoon of each 
week. These are great auxiliaries to the religious life of the 
College. 

4. All resident students of the College are. required to attend 
public worship on the Sabbath in the United Brethren Churchy 
except those Who, on account of church membership or wish 
of parent or guardian, may prefer to attend church elsewhere. 

5. A Bible Normal Class, for the instruction of Sunday- 
school teachers, is conducted semi-weekl3^ The course of in- 
struction extends over one year, and is the one provided for 
and used by the Bible Normal Union. A diploma, issued by 
the Sunday-school Board of the United Brethren Church, is 
granted to students who complete the course. 

6. Regular recitations are heard during the year in Bible 
History, in the Greek of the New Testament, and in the Eng- 
lish Bible. 



I.EBANON VAIvIvEY COIvLEGE. 3 1 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

Next to moral and religious character, the first of all things 
to be secured and cared for in the training of the young, is 
sound physical health. Accordingly, wise and liberal provi- 
sion is made to preserve and promote it by daily exercise in 
the open air, and by a carefully guarded course of gymnastic 
training. Class instruction in light gj^mnastics is offered at 
moderate cost, under the direction of the director of physical 
culture. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES, 

Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and par- 
liam^entary training are afforded by the societies of the Col- 
lege. There are three of these societies — one sustained by the 
young ladies, the Clionian; and two by the young men, the 
Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. Each society has a well- 
furnished hall and its own library. These societies are con- 
sidered valuable agencies in College work, and students are 
advised to unite with one of them. 

LIBRARIES AND READING ROOM. 

The College I^ibrary, with the Libraries of the Literary So- 
cieties, to which all the students have daily access, contains 
about ten thousand volumes, and is arranged with a view to 
making it specially valuable as a reference library. By gift 
or purchase, additions are constantly made to the list of books 
in the different departments. 

With the Library is connected a Reading Room, provided 
with the issues of the current press, and with the leading pe- 
riodicals of the day, including several of the best European 
journals, together with cyclopaedias, dictionaries, and other 
works of reference. The more valuable journals in each de- 
partment of instruction are provided, and the current numbers 
of these publications are always accessible in the Reading 
Room. The librarian is in constant attendance to guide and 
assist students in their researches. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

MATRICULATION. 

Matriculation is regarded as a pledge on the part of the 
student to obey all the rules of the College, and is permitted 
only on that condition. 

A fee of five dollars each year is required of every regularly 
matriculated student in the I^iterary Department, and three 
dollars of each student taking full music course, on the pay- 
ment of which a certificate will be given, entitling the holder 
to the privileges of the Library, Reading Room, and Gym- 
nasium. For students taking piano or voice only, the fee for 
the year is only one dollar. For literary students entering for 
the Spring Term only, the fee is two dollars. 

DISCIPLINE, 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced to 
good conduct and diligence by higher motives than fear of 
punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and 
generous feelings natural to young men and women engaged 
in literary pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of 
conduct. It is the policy of the administration to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students 
are invited and expected to cooperate with the Faculty ; but 
good order and discipline will be strictl}^ maintained, and mis- 
conduct punished by adequate penalties. The Laws of the 
College, enacted by the Board of Trustees, are as few and 
simple as the proper regulation of a community of j^oung men 
and women will permit. These are printed, and a copy is 
placed in the hands of ever}^ student at the beginning of each 
year. These Laws must be observed, not only in their letter, 
but in their spirit. The College will not place its stamp or 
bestow its honors upon any one who is not willing to deport 
himself becomingly. Ever}^ unexcused absence from an}" 
College duty, failure or misdemeanor of a student, is reported 
to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 

GRADING AND EXAMINATION, 

Students are graded on their work in the Recitation Room. 
One hundred per centum is the standard in perfection of 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 33 

scholarsliip. Written examinations of classes are held at the 
close of each term. These examinations are reckoned as 
equivalent to one-half of the recitation work of the term, or 
one-third of final grade, in estimating the student's standing. 
No student who omits attendance upon an examination in any 
study will receive a grade in the study, or be regarded as 
having finished it, until the examination is passed. A grade 
of less than 70 per centum will compel the student to submit 
to a second examination after further preparation, or to repeat 
the study with the next lower class. Applicants for special 
examinations will be charged an appropriate fee. 

The final examinations of the Seniors are held two weeks 
before Commencement, from which time they are subject to 
such duties only as are required for their preparation for grad- 
uation. 

At the end of each term, the class-standing of each student 
in all studies will be reported to the parent or guardian, who 
is earnestly recommended to give these reports careful atten- 
tion, and promptly to notify the President of any failure to 
receive them. 

PROMOTIOrSj. 

At the beginning of each term, the old classes are re- 
organized and new ones formed. At or near the close of each 
academic year, the names of all the members of each class 
separately come before the Faculty for promotion, and those 
of the Senior class for graduation, and no student is promoted 
to a higher class, or to graduation, except upon the unanimous 
vote of the Faculty. No student will be advanced to regular 
standing in the next class until all conditions are made up. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE, 

No student may leave the College without the personal per- 
mission of the President, or, in his absence, of the Senior 
Professor. Because of the hurtful influence the absence of a 
student, for even a day, exerts on his progress, nothing but 
sickness or unavoidable accident is suflicient to excuse him 
from regular attendance at recitations. 



34 LEBANON VAIvLEY COLIvEGE. 

Any student withdrawing from the Institution during term- 
time, without giving due notice, and having permission so to 
do, will be marked upon the records as having irregularly 
withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class, must present 
to the Professor in charge of said work a satisfactory excuse 
for being absent. 

LECTURE COURSE. 

A course of popular lectures will be delivered during the 
year by some of the most noted lecturers in the field. 

Lectures and entertainments were given by the following 
during the past year : Col. George W. Bain, Katharine Ridg- 
way Concert Company, Professor I^ivingston Barbour, Hon. 
George R. Wendling, Helen Reed String Quartette, and Pres- 
ident Byron W. King. 

In addition to these, there were lectures by members of the 
Faculty. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS, See Calendar, page 2. 

DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS, 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred, by a vote of 
the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Faculty, up- 
on students who have satisfactorily completed the Classical 
Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science, or of Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy is in like manner conferred upon students who satis- 
factorily complete the Latin Scientific or Greek Scientific 
Course. 

The College bills and Society dues of candidates must be 
paid or secured to the satisfaction of the President, by Saturday 
before Commencement. The graduation fee, and the fee for 
subsequent degrees, is five dollars. 

GRADUATE WORK, 

In order to encourage the systematic prosecution of studies 
after graduation, graduate work for both resident and non- 



I^EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 35 

resident alumni of L,ebanon Valley College, as well as for 
alumni of other recognized colleges, is provided. 

The courses of study have been arranged with reference to 
the needs of those who purpose passing to a master's degree, 
but they may also be pursued by those who desire only the 
culture or knowledge, without academic honors. 

One year of resident, or three years of non-resident study, 
will, under favorable circumstances, qualify candidates for 
examination for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of 
Science, and all who pass satisfactorily such examination and 
present a thesis upon a topic approved by the Faculty, will be 
recommended for the degree. This provision for the second 
degree in no way invalidates the present privilege of attaining 
the degree in course by all graduates of three years' standing 
who have completed a standard course of professional study, 
and present a satisfactory thesis upon a topic approved by the 
Faculty. Examinations will be conducted in May of each 
year. A charge of twenty-five dollars will be made for the exam- 
ination and diploma fees. In all cases a thesis (not fewer than 
2,000 words, typewritten,) must be submitted at least one 
month before close of College year. Accepted theses become 
the property of the College. 

Application for information respecting graduate work must 
be made, in writing, to the President of the College. 

DORMITORIES, 

The two main buildings are used for dormitory pur- 
poses. A Professor resides in each building. The rooms are 
heated by steam, and each building is supplied with water. 
Young men from a distance are expected to room in the dor- 
mitories. Should any prefer to take rooms elsewhere, they 
will be charged with the rent of the vacant rooms in the dor- 
mitories. No student, however, will be held responsible for 
the rent of more than one room. Each student will be held 
accountable for any damage he may cause to the College prop- 
erty. Students will be held individually responsible for all 
damage done to their rooms, by whomsoever committed. 



36 I,:^BANON VAIvLKY COI^IvEGK. 

Bach student upon taking a room in the College is required 
to deposit $2 with the President as a guarantee against loss of 
keys and the destruction of property. The amount not used 
will be refunded at the end of the j-ear. 

Students are required to furnish their own bedding, except 
mattress and bolster. Every article of clothing, and other 
personal property should be distinctly marked with the own- 
er's full name. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

This Department has a two-fold aim: First, to give thorough prepa- 
ration to those desiring to enter collegiate classes ; Second, to afford to 
those who are unable to take a complete college course opportunities 
■whereby they can gain much needed and practical mental development 
for life's work. 

COURSES OF STUDY- 

The work has been outlined with great care, and it is believed that 
the courses offered present as valuable and compact four years' of study 
as can be selected. The work of the first preparatory year is devoted to 
the study of such subjects as will probabl)' enable the student to pursue 
the work of the later course. Experienced instructors have charge of 
the teaching. 

Three distinct courses are offered, at the completion of any of which 
a certificate or diploma signed by the President of the college is granted. 

The Classical Preparatory Course. 

The Latin Scientific Preparatory Course. 

The Greek Scie7itific Preparatory Course. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMITTANCE, 

Candidates for admission should be at least twelve years of age, and 
must present from teachers or other trustworthy persons letters of intro- 
duction indicating good character and correct habits. To facilitate clas- 
sification, those who have been in attendance at other schools should 
bring certificates of honorable dismissal, with statements of studies pur- 
sued and work completed. 

Students received on certificate are classified "on trial." Failure to 
maintain standing will cause re-arrangement of course and classification. 
Thorough work is expected of all. 

PROMOTION AND GRADUATION. 

Students are required to complete any given study before passing to 
a corresponding higher one. Those who complete an}' one of the pre- 
scribed courses will be granted a diploma, but no one will be graduated 
who has not been connected with the school for at least two terms. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



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38 I^BBANON VAI,Iv:SY coi,i,i)G:e. 

Expenses. 

The charge for tuition is forty dollars a year, or one dollar per week. 
A student who is absent from College on account of sickness or for any 
other cause, and retains his place in his class, during such absence, pays 
the term bill in full. 

Boarding, washing ( 12 pieces a week), light, fuel, room rent, and 
tuition in the literary department, in any four (4) branches, or regular 
work. 

Fall Term, sixteen week, $ 74 00 

Winter Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks, , 56 00 

Total a year, |i86 00 

Special Examinations in each Branch, not recited in College, . . . $4 00 
Additional charge to cover expenses of graduation, 5 75 

The charges for room rent, heat, and furniture are made on the basis 
of two persons to each room. If a student prefers to room alone he will 
be charged fifty cents additional a week. Any student not boarding in 
the institution and occupying a room in the building will be charged a 
reasonable rent for the same. 

Bxtra washing, plain pieces, fifty cents a dozen. White dresses, 
etc., extra. 

No bill will be made for a shorter period than one term ; and no 
deductions will be made except in the charge for board in case of a pro- 
longed absence on account of sickness. 

No reduction for absence of two weeks or less at the beginning, or 
the last four weeks before the close of the term. 

If a student quit the Institution for any time, whether with or without 
permission, he cannot return afterward to the same class, except by pay- 
ing the regular dues for the whole period of such absence. 

Tefms of Payment, 

AH fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before 
Commencement. 

College dues are to be paid in advance. This rule will be enforced. 
No student will be admitted to classes until all bills are satisfactorily 
settled with the Financial Secretary. 



^__^^«*WT?S*«^-^ 



W 



^ 







NEW MUSIC HALL 



IvSBANON VALLEY COIvIvKGE. 39 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, 



FACULTY, 

REV. HBRVIN U. ROOP, A.M., Ph.D , 
President. 

HERBERT OIvDHAM, F. S. Sc (Lon., Eng. 

Director. 

Piano, Voice, Organ, Harmony, Etc. 

MABEL E. MANBECK, 
Piano. 

CHAS. H. OLDHAM, 
Piano. 

MADAME VON BEREGHY, 
Violin, Strings, Etc. 

M. ETTA WOLFE, A.M., 
English Literature, German. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A.M., 
French, English. 

EDITH BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97, 
Painting, Drawing, Etc. 



Elocution, Otatory, Etc. 
*To be supplied. 

The Conservatory, 

The new Conservatory building is now opened and will be fully 
equipped for the study of all branches of Music and Art. 

The building contains the Director's room and ofi&ce. College Li- 
brary and Reading Room, fourteen or more practice rooms, and a large 
auditorium with a pipe organ. 

From the beginning grade to the full development of artistic re- 
quirement, the faculty and the different courses of study insure a steady 
progress. The Conservatory Diploma is a suflBicient evidence of the 
standing of the possessor. 

In addition to the regular certificates and graduating diplomas, the 
Conservatory is empowered to confer the different certificates given by 
the London College of Music, of London, England, with which college 
the Conservatory is in affiliation. 

The Faculty is made up of the best instructors. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

THE DIRECTOR, 

Herbert Oldham, F, S, Sc, 

Trmity College^ Dublin; London College of Music. 

Professor Herbert Oldham, the Director, was educated in England, 
Germany, and France. He studied Piano and Harmony, Organ, and 
chorus conducting, under Sir George Macfarren ; Voice under Signer 
Rendeggar in London ; Piano and Composition under Emil Haberbier in 
Paris, and Piano under Joachim Raff in Germany. 

He came to America in 1881 as Solo Panist to the celebrated Violin- 
ist, Camilla Urso. Was called to Western College, Toledo, Iowa, in '82, 
and was Director there during four years. Professor Oldham went from 
there to Shenandoah, Iowa, and then to Lincoln, Nebraska. 

In 1883 he was made an Honorary Life Fellow and member of the 
board of examiners of the Society of Science, Letters, and Art, of Lon- 
don, England, and four years later was appointed representative for 
Iowa and local examiner of the London College of Music. He was one 
of the founders (and President in '85) of the Iowa Music Teachers' State 
Association. 

The Conservatory of Music is organized for a fourfold purpose : 
(i) To continue musical and literary studies as a broad basis for regular 
collegiate work in the college. (2) To use the art of music as a means 
of intellectual, aesthetical, and moral culture. (3) To furnish instruction 
in all branches of music to special or regular students. (4) To educate 
teachers of music. 

It is divided into the following Courses of Instruction : 

PIANOFORTE. — The regular course of study in the Piano Depart- 
ment is divided into sixteen grades, from the most rudimentar}' studies 
to the great concertos, etc. 

Send to the Director for separate catalogue of the Conservatory, con- 
taining the complete courses in all branches. 

VOICE. — The Vocal Course is divided into twelve grades. The most 
approved methods are used. Complete course in Conservatory catalogue, 

PIPE ORGAN. — The Course in Pipe Organ Music may be taken up 
by any student who proves able to enter Section A of Grade 3 of the 
Piano Course. 

In this study special attention will be given to chorus accompani- 
ment and to registration, thereby rendering the student capable of tak- 
ing a position as organist and choir director and creditably filling the 
same. 

REED ORGAN. — The Course in Reed Organ can be taken up inde- 
pendently of the Piano Course. Special attention will be given to 



I.EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 4I 

training the student so as to form a capable organist, and thoroughly to 
understand the various combinations of the different stops. 

HARMONY. — The complete Course in Harmony will occupy the 
sections indicated by B Grade 2, to C Grace 3 in connection vv'ith the 
Piano Course, but any student can enter the Harmony Class at any time. 

SIGHT READING AND CHORUS CI^ASS.— A class for this study 
will be formed at the beginning of each term. The importance of ac- 
quiring the ability to read music at sight can not be too strongly urged 
upon those who desire to lay the proper foundation for a musical educa- 
tion. All pupils in the Vocal Department should give this course spe- 
cial attention. 

A Chorus Class will also be formed. 

LECTURES. — There will be given Lectures on Musical History each 
term, and all regular students of the Conservatory will be required to 
attend them. 

GLEE CLUB.— The Conservatory has also formed a Glee Club for 
male voices, which meets once a week during the college year. 

CONCERTS. — Recitals and concerts by the students, the faculty, or 
leading artists, will be held at stated intervals throughout the year. 

GENERAL REMARKS.— Pupils will be accepted in any of the de- 
partments for which they are fitted, whether they desire to complete the 
course or not. 

Most especial care will be bestowed upon beginners in all subjects. 

Students are advanced according to their knowledge and proficiency 
in work, and not according to the number of terms or lessons taken at 
the Conservatory. 

GRADUATION. — Students will be eligible for graduation on com- 
pletion of the prescribed courses. Each graduate must give during the 
last year of study at least one recital in addition to the final performance 
at commencement concert. 

Not only must every candidate for graduation give evidence of re- 
quisite musical talent and capacity, but also complete in the course of 
literary studies, English Grammar, three terms' work; Rhetoric and 
Composition, three terms' work; Literature, French or German, each 
three terms' work. ■ 

SUMMER SCHOOL.— A Summer Music School will be held be- 
ginning July I and ending September i. 

Send for separate circular to the Director. 



42 



LEBANON VAI,I<EY COI^lvEGE. 



EXPENSES. — The following table will show the expenses in all de- 
partments of the Conservatory: 



PRIVATE LESSONS. 


4 

.2 


£■3 




Voice, Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Director, 
Voice, Piano or Organ, One per week, by Director, 
Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Assistant, 
Piano or Organ, One per week, by Assistant, 
Harmony, 


824 00 
12 00 
16 00 
10 00 
16 00 


818 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


818 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


CLASS LESSONS. 








Harmony, One lesson per week. 

Theory, One lesson per week. 

Musical History, etc., One lesson per week, 


10 00 
3 00 
2 00 


7 50 
2 00 
2 00 


7 50 
2 00 
2 00 


USE OF INSTRUMENTS. 








Piano, One iiour per day, 
Reed Organ, One hour per day. 
Pipe Organ, One hour per day, 


2 00 

1 50 

2 50 


1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


BOARD, ROOM, ETC. 








Board, Room Rent, Fuel, Light, Washing (12 pieces). 


58 00 


44 00 


44 00 



Pipe Organ Students must pay at the rate of lo cents per hour for 
organ blower. 

Fee for Graduation Diploma, $5.00. 

RUIvES AND REGULATIONS.— No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In cases of long continued illness the loss is shared equally by 
the college and the student. 

All tuition is payable strictly in advance. Students upon being as- 
signed lesson hours must present to the Director a card from the Presi- 
dent. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., the 
beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufl&cient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade 
will be issued at close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc, 

Address, 
Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc, Director, 
or Hervtn U. Roop, Ph.D., President, 

Ann\t:i,le, Pa. 



IvEBANON VAI^LEY COI^IvEGE. 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS, 



43 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

RESIDENCE 
Baltimore, Md. 



NAME, 

.John H. Best, 

'95, Lehigh University. 
Bmma R. Batdorf, 

'99, Lebanon Valley College. 
Bdward S. Brownmiller, 

'fo, Susquehanna U^iiversity . 
Joseph Daugherty, 

'8g, Lebanon Valley College. 
Raymond P. Daugherty, 

'97, Lebanon Valley College. 
Howard Henry Enders, 

'97, Lebanon Valley College. 
I. Cai^vin Fisher, 

'90, Ur sinus College. 
John R. Geyer, 

'9<§, Lebanon Valley College. 
John S. Gruver, 

'95, Otierbein University. 
F. F. Hoi,soppi,E, 

'gi, Juniata College. 
Isaac w. Huntzberger, 

'gg, Lebanon Valley College. 
J. ALEXANDER Jenkins, 

'9(5, Lebanon Valley College. 
Anna Mary Keli^ER, 

'gj, Lebanon Valley College. 
Ai,MA M. Light, 

'gg, Lebanon Valley College. 
John H. Maysii<i,es, 

'95, Lebanon Valley College. 
Harry W. Mayer, 

'9<5, Lebanon Valley College. 
Frank M. McIvAURy, 

Wesleyan University . 
Harry F. M1LI.ER, 

'gg, Lebanan Valley College. 
James C. Oi.dt, 

'90, Central Pennsylvania College 
Edwin A. Pyi,es, 

'9j, Dickinson Seminaty. 



Annville, Pa. 
Reading, Pa. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Elkhart, Iowa. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Royalton, Pa. 
Reliance, Va. 
Parkerford, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Oberlin, Ohio. 
Campbelltown, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
East Deerfield, Mass. 
Sacramento, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Elizabethville, Pa. 
Put-in-Bay, Ohio. 
Port Royal, Pa. 



44 



IvEBANON VAI.LEY COLLEGE. 

Waynesboro, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Jacob Hassi,er Reber, 

'95, Lebanon Valley College. 
Ibvin E. Runk, 

'99, Lebanon Valley College. 
Ottaman Scheider, Pittsburg, Pa. 

'59, Western Theological Sei-ninary. 
Norman Coi,estock Schi,ichTer, Annville, Pa. 

'97, Lebanon Valley College. 
Hiram Herr Shenk, Deodate, Pa. 

^gg, Ursinus College. 
Willis G. Tobey, Reliance, Va. 

'95, Otterbein University . 
Charles B. Wingerd, Dayton, Ohio. 

''g'/, Lebanon Valley College. 
AViLLiAM A. Zehring, Reliance, Va. 

'9<§, Otterbein University. 

UNDERGRADUATES. 

C. denotes Classical Course ; Degree of A. B. 
S. denotes Scientific Course ; Degree of B. S. 
N. C. denotes North College Dormitory. 
S. C. denotes South College Dormitory. 





SENIORS, 




NAME, COURSE, 


RESIDENCE, 


ROOM. 


Nellie Buffington, 


s. 


Annville, 


S. C. 


C. Madie Burtner, 


c. 


Harrisburg, 


S. C. 


Rene d. Burtner, 


c. 


Harrisburg, 


N. C. 


Enid Daniel, 


s. 


Philadelphia, 


s. c. 


Grant B. Gerberich, 


s. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


Reba F. Lehman, 


c. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


Frederick Weiss Light, 


s. 


Lebanon, 


E. Cumb. St. 


Galen D. Light, 


c. 


Jonestown, 


N. C. 


B. 5., 'gg, Lebanon Valley College. 




Seth a. Light, 


c. 


Avon, 


N. C. 


David E. Long, 


s. 


Annville, 


W. ]\[ain St. 


Anna E. Kreider, 


c. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


Lizzie G. Kreider, 


s. 


Annville, 


Sheridan Ave, 


Oren G. Myers, 


s. 


Oakville, 


College Ave. 


Ross NlSSLEY, 


s. 


Humnielstown, 


N. C. 


D. Augustus Peters, 


c. 


Sieelton, 


Front St. 


Jacob M. Peters. 


c. 


Steelton, 


Front St. 


Ralph D. Reider, 


s. 


Middletovs'n, 


N. C. 


Clyde J. Saylor, 


s. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 



I^EBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



45 



AxviN B. Shroyer, 


S. 


Shamokin, 




College Ave. 


Chari<ES E. Snoke, 


C. 


Newville, 




N. C. 


G. Mason Snore, 


C. 


Annville, 




Sheridan Ave. 


Nora Ewzabeth Spayd, 


C. 


York, 




S. C. 


Harry E. Spessard, 


C. 


Chewsville, 


Md., 


N. C. 


Adam Wier, 


c. 


Lititz, 




N. C. 

Seniors, 24, 



JUNIORS, 

John H. Ai^leman, C. Johnsonburg, 

Ph.B., '97, Illinois Wesleyan University. 



Kerwin W. Ai<ti,and, C. 

Jacob B. Artz, S. 

Wii:,i<iAM H. BuRD, S. 

Robert R. Butterwick, C. 

Lewis E. Cross, S. 

Samuei< F. Daugherty, C. 

Frank B. Emenheiser, S. 

John Ki^efeman, C. 



Seven Valleys, 

Annville, 

New Bloomfield, 

Jonestown, 

Rayville, Md., 

Dallastown, 

Dallastown, 

Duncannon, 



B.S.^ '89, Lebanon Valley College. 



Karnig Kxjyoomjian, C. 

Emma F. Loos, S. 

Thomas F. M1L1.ER, C. 

Susie S. Moyer, C. 

David M. Oyer, S. 

WlI^WAM OTXERBEIN ROOP, C. 

WiELiAM Spencer Roop, S. 

S. Edwin Rupp, C. 

A. GARF1E1.D Smith, C. 

Cyrus W. Waughtei., C. 

Harry H. Yoke, S. 



Tarsus, Asia Minor, 

Berne, 

Donelly's Mills, 

Derry Churcli, 

Upper Strassburg, 

Harrisburg, 

Highspire, 

Oberlin, 

Rohrersville, 

Red Lion, 

Shippensburg, 



Md. 



E. Main St. 
College Ave. 
N. C. 

College Ave. 
College Ave. 
College Ave. 



N. C. 

S. C. 

Queen St. 

S. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

N. C. 

College Ave. 

N. C. 

Juniors, 20. 



George H. Albright, 
Henry H. Baish, 
Edward M. Bai^baugh, 
M. Luther Brownmii<i.er 
Morris W. Brunner, 
D0NAI.D J. Cowling, 
Hoffman Derickson, 
Claude R. Engle, 
Charles C. Haines, 



SOPHOMORES. 

S. Shamokin, 

C. Altoona, 

S. Hockersville, 

, S. Reading, 

C. New Bloomfield, 

C. Greensburg, 

S. Newport, 

S. Harrisburg, 

S. Avon, 



College Ave. 
N. C. 

College Ave. 
W. Main St. 
Queen St. 
E. Main St. 
E. Main St. 
N. C. 
N. C. 



46 



LEBANON VALI.EY COI.LEGE. 



RUDOI^PH F. HERR, 


S. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 


Joseph Lehn Kreider, 


s. 


Annville, 


Sheridan Ave. 


Thomas A. Lawson, 


s. 


Dallastown, 


College Ave. 


A. Wesley Miller, 


s. 


Mechanicsburg, 


N. C. 


J. B. Nye, 


s. 


Middletown, 


N. C."^ 


William J. Sanders, 


C. 


Sunbury. 


N. C. 


Helen I. Shank, 


s. 


New Brighton, 


S. C. 


William Sites, 


c. 


Harrisburg, 


N. C. 


Paul M. Spangler, 


s. 


Lebanon, 


N. C. 


Aaron W. Steinrtjck, 


s. 


Deodate, 


College Ave. 


Alfred C. T. Sumner, 


c. 


Bonthe, West Africa, 


, N. C. 
Sophomores, 20. 




FRESHMEN, 




J. Wesley Balsbaugh, 


c. 


Hockersville, 


N. C. 


Christian S. Bomberger. 


, c. 


Bismarck, 


N. C. 


David D. Brandt, 


s. 


Newville, 


N. C. 


David D. Buddinger, 


s. 


Annville, 


W. Main St. 


Charles W. Christman, 


c. 


St. Thomas, 


N. C. 


Urias J. Daugherty, 


c. 


Dallastown, 


College Ave^ 


John Dickson, 


s. 


Dillsburg, 


N. C. 


Milton E. Donough, 


c. 


Myerstown, 


N. C. 


Harry L. Eichinger, 


c. 


New Cumberland, 


E. Main St. 


J. Walter Esbenshade, 


c. 


Bird -in -Hand, 


N. C. 


Edw. S. FENSTERMACHER; 


, c. 


Cressona, 


N. C. 


Thomas W. Gray, 


s. 


Ickesburg, 


N. C. 


Sara Helm, 


c. 


Lebanon, 


s. c. 


I. Mover HersheY, 


c. 


Halifax, 


N. C. 


Solomon D. Kauffman, 


c. 


Dallastown, 


College Ave.- 


Walter Kohr, 


c. 


York, 


N. C. 


Homer M. B. LEhn, 


c. 


Alger, 


N. C. 


Isaac F. Loos, 


s. 


Berne, 


N. C. 


Hiram F. Rhoad, 


c. 


East Hanover, 


N. C. 


IvILLA SCHOTT, 


c. 


Lebanon, 


S. C. 


Ralph C. Shaeffer, 


c. 


Hummelstown, 


N. C. 


Paul P. Smith, 


s. 


Annville, 


Railroad St. 


C. A. SOLLENBERGER, 


s. 


Harrisburg, 


Main St. 


Edith Spangler, 


c. 


Lebanon, 


S. C. 


Harry F. Stauffer, 


c. 


Emporium, 




Elizabeth Stehman, 


s. 


Mountville, 


S. C. 


J. Walter Turnbaugh, 


s. 


Yeoho, Md. 


N. C. 


E. B. Ulrich, 


s. 


Annville, 


E. Main St. 
Freshmen, 28. 



I<:eBANON VAI^LEY COI.I<EGE. 



47 



SPECIAL STUDENTS, 

Charles A. Boyer, Cleona. 

Hei<En H. Breslin, Lebanon. 

Maria Bucher, Lebanon. 

Charles G. Dotter, East Hanover. 

William W. Gable, Hatton, Kansas. 

William Fahr, Lebanon. 

Carrie E. Fretz, Palmyra. 

Harry M. Hartz, Palmyra. 

Sannie Hartz, Palmyra. 

Frank L. Heilman, Annville. 

John A. Hershey, Lebanon. 

James PIipplE, Middletown. 

Harry A. Honker, Lebanon. 

Robert L. Jones, Lickdale. 

Sara Klick, Lebanon. 

John F. Light, Bellegrove. 

Ray G. Light, Avon. 

SalliE Loose, Upper Berne. 

Mamie B. Risser, Lawn. 

Frank B. RuTTER, Lebanon. 

Edwin M. Sando, Lebanon. 

Kathryn SchoTT, Lebanon. 

Mary Warner, Annville. 

Harry H. Weber, Middletown. 

B. H. Weidman, Sinking Spring. 

Specials, 26. 

PREPARATORY STUDENTS. 



William C. Arnold, 
Charles E. Boughter, 
David H. Ferguson, 
Charles A. Fisher, 
John H. Graybill, 
William M. Grumbein, 
Amos L. House, 
H. Edward Keiter, 
Henry C. Klinger, 
Phoebe Risser, 
Charles E. Roitdabush, 
John I. Shaud, 
John Sheesley, 





SENIORS. 




c. 


York, 


N. C. 


c. 


Lebanon, 


N. C. 


c. 


Shelburne, Ont., 


Railroad St. 


c. 


Lebanon, 


N. C. 


c. 


Annville, 


N. C. 


s. 


Annville, 


W. Main St. 


c. 


Markelville, 


Queen St. 


c. 


Oriental, 


N. C. 


c. 


Oriental, 


N. C. 


s. 


Florin, 


s. c. 


c. 


Myersville, Md. 


N. C. 


c. 


Annville, 


W. Main St 


c. 


Penbrook, 


N. C. 



48 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGi;. 



Al^BERT J. ShENK, S 


i. Annville, W. Main St. 


RussEL S. Showers, C 


;. Sheffield, Ont., N. C. 


Monroe W. Smei^tzer, C 


:. Penbrook, N. C. 


Harry 0. Wagner, C 


'. Union Deposit, N. C. 


Arabei,i<e Batdorf, 


Annville. 


Ruth Braselmann, 


Annville. 


OUINNIE BRIEH.I.Y, 


Annville. 


Ray Buffington, 


Elizabethville. 


Eva Bretz, 


Halifax, 


James Burke, 


Walkersville, Md. 


M. CI.EMENS, 


Lebanon. 


MiCHAEi< Cassei,, 


Palmyra. 


Arthur R. Clippinger, 


Movpersville. 


LUI.U Cwppinger, 


Cbambersburg. 


Joseph I,. Daugherty, 


Sboemakersville. 


Mary E. Dean, 


Annville. 


Oscar J. Deitzi^er, 


Hummelstown. 


Carson E. Enders, 


Enders. 


Alma Engle, 


Harrisburg. 


Ralph Engle, 


Palmyra. 


Raymond Engle, 


Palmyra. 


Irvin H. Fisher, 


Cressona. 


Charles A. Fry, 


Bellegrove. 


LUTIE FUNKHOUSER, 


Fawcett's Gap, Va. 


Benj. F. Ginder, 


Campbelltown. 


Sybille Gingrich, 


Lebanon. 


Robert B. Graybill, 


Annville. 


Clarence Herr, " 


Annville. 


John F. Herr, 


Annville. 


May Hershey, 


Derry Church. 


Merd D. Hollenbach, 


New Bloomfield. 


Mazie M. Horst, 


Palmyra. 


Mary Horstick, 


Palmyra. 


Titus H. Kreider, 


Palmyra. 


Kathryn Landis, 


Union Deposit. 


Max F. IvEhman, 


Annville. 


Jennie Leslie, 


Annville. 


Ruth M. Leslie, 


Palmyra. 


Nettie M. Lockeman, 


York. 


John G. Loose, 


Palmyra. 


Edgar L. Martin, 


Harrisburg. 


Harry M. Moyer, 


Derry Church. 


Edith J. Myers, 


Mt. Joy. 



Li^BANON VAIvLBY COlvIvEG:^. 



49 



Martin L. Nissi^ey, 
lyENA Owens, 
Harry M. Raab, 
Samuel A. Rauch, 
Wai^ter S. Roudenbush, 
Rosa Reddick, 
Herbert H. Risser, 
Charx<es Schaffner, 
WlI,I,IAM R. Seibert, 
Chari^es Sheffer, 
Cyrus E. Shenk, 
Martin Snavei.y, 
Ida E. Stai,i.er, 
Mary Stover, 
Bert Strayer, 
Walter Strayer, 
Clara Vallerchamp, 
Jennie Vallerchamp, 
Ievin S. Winey, 
Tekoa I. Winey, 
George L. Winters, 
Mary Zimmerman, 



Derry Church. 

El Reno, Oklahoma. 

Dallastown. 

lyebanon. 

Ivcbanon. 

Walkersville, Md. 

Campbelltown. 

Palmyra. 

Sinking Spring. 

Harrisburg. 

Deodate. 

Lebanon. 

Freedensburg. 

Hummelstown . 

Flinton. 

Flinton. 

Millersburg. 

Millersburg. 

Richfield. 

Richfield. 

New Providence. 

Annville. 



Preparatory students, 78 



STUDENTS IN MUSIC AND ART. 

SENIOR CLASS. 



ArabellE Bardorf, Piano, 
Edna Groff, Piano, 
Annie E. Kreider, Piano, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, Voice, 
Lena Owens, Piano, 



Atkins, John 
AuLT, Ella 
Bachman, Virgie 
Barnhart, Albert 
Batdorf, Arabelle 
Batdorf, Emma 
Batdorf, Mary 
Biever, Hermann 
BoDENHORN, Pearl 
Booth, Alta 



Annville. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

El Reno, Oklahoma. 

Lebanon. 
Annville. 
Annville. 
Annville. 
Annville. 
Annville. 
Annville. 
Lebanon. 
Annville. 
Lebanon. 



so 



LEBANON VAI,I,BY COLI^KGE. 



Brasei,mann, Ruth 
Bretz, Eva 
Brightbii,!., Maurice 

BURKBY, IyII,I,IE 

CoTTREi^L, Mary B. 
Cross, h. E. 
Daugherty, S. F. 
Dean, Mamie 
Derickson, S. H. 
Eari,y, D. Mii,i,er 
ElSENBEIS, J. 
EnGLE, AI.MA 

Engine, Ci^aude 
Fisher, Grace 
Foi,Tz, Mabei. 
Fox, Frank 
Fretz, Carrie 

FUNKHOUSER, IvUTIE 

Gantz, Katharyn 
Gantz, Mamie 
Gingrich, Emma 
Gingrich, Mabei. 
Gingrich, Rosa 
Gray, Margaret 
Gray, Thomas 
Groff, Ada 
Groff, Edna 
Gruber, Mii,dred 
Henry, Ewzabeth 
Henry, Martha 
Herr, W. R. 
Herr, W. O. 
HoFFER, Betty 
Hoffman, Katharine 
Hoi,i,enbaugh, M. D. 
HORST, Mazie 
Horstick, Mary 
hostetter, cora 
KovALESKi, Mrs. 
Kreider, Anna 

KREIDER, IvII,I.IE 

Kreider, Louise 
Kreider, Mary 
Kreider, Mary E. 



Annville. 

Halifax. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Rayville, Md. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Newport. 

Coheva. 

Lebanon. 

Harrisburg. 

Harrisburg. 

Palmyra. 

Campbelltown. 

Lebanon. 

Palmyra. 

Fawcett's Gap, Va. 

Lebanon. 
Grantville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Lawn. 

Ickesburg. 

Ickesburg. 

Lebanon. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

New Bloomfield. 

Palmyra. 

Palmyra. 

Bellegrove. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 



IvEBANON VALLBY COLI^EJGB. 



51 



Kreider, Sallie 

IvANDIS, KATHRYN 

Lehman, Max 
Lehman, Reba 
Leswe, Jennie 
Leslie, Ruth 
Light, Alma 
Light, Fred 
Light, Galen 
LocKEMAN, Nettie 
Loose, Emily 
Loose, Isaac 
Loser, Lena 
Manbeck, Mabel 
McAdams, Mrs. 
Miller, a. w. 
Miller, Mrs. G. 
Miller, Rena 
Moore, Mabel 
MoYER, Clara 
MoYER, Susie 
Myers, Edith 
Myers, O. G. 
Oberholzer, EllBn 
Owens, Lena 
Raab, Harry 
Reddick, Rosa 
Reiter, Susie 
Reiter, Mamie 
Risser, Anna Mary 
RiSSER, Mamie B. 
Roop, W. S. 
RUNK, I. E. 

Sanders, W. J. 
Saylor, Mamie 
Saylor, Mrs. Charles F. 
schenk, c. e. 
Seabold, Mrs. 
Shank, Helen I. 
Sheffer, Charles 
Shenk, Mary E. 
Shope, Elizabeth 
Shroyer, a. E. 
Smith, Catharine 



Annville. 

Union Deposit. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Palmyra. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

York. 

Palmyra. 

Berne. 

Campbelltown. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Mechanicsburg, 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Derry Churcli. 

Derry Church. 

Mount Joy. 

Oakville. 

Fredericksburg. 

El Reno, Oklahoma. 

Dallastown. 

Walkersville, Md. 

Myerstown. 

Myerstown. 

Lawn. 

Lawn. 

Highspire. 

Lebanon, 

Sunbury. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Deodate. 

Lebanon. 

New Brighton. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Shamokin. 

Lebanon. 



52 



I^KBANON VAI^IvEY COLI.EGE. 



Smith, Ei^izabeth 
Snave;i.y, Nora 
Spessard, Harry E. 
Stali^er, Ida 
Stehman, Ewzabeth 
Stein, Mabei, 
Stover, Mary 
Sumner, A. C. T. 
Vai,i,erchamp, Jennie 

VaI<I,KRCHAMP, CI.ARA 

Wai^mer, Mabei. 

WiNEY, TEKOA 

Winter, George 
Zacharias, Mary 
Zimmerman, Mary 



Ivebanon. 
L,ebanon. 
Chewsville, Md. 
Freedensburg. 
Mountville. 
L,ebanon. 
Hummelstown. 
Bonthe, W. Africa. 
IVLillersburg. 
Millersburg. 
Ivebanon. 
Richfield. 
New Providence. 
Sinking Spring. 
Annville. 
Music and Art Students, iiJ 



SUMMARY. 

Students in College Department, 146 

Students in Preparatory Department, 78 

Students in Mvisic, Painting, etc., iiS 

Deduct names repeated, 

Total for 1899-1900 



342 
52 

290 



Summary of Attendance for Last Decade, 

























aj 




m 







































03 








^ 




a 






tn 






bD 






< 


-d 


Year. 


1 


2 






0) 



i 


d 

a 


to 

'3 


i 

■3 


_o 

u 
ci 
ft 


S 


s 




< 
"3 































53 







u 


ft 
















^ 


w 


"^ 


m 


E^ 


02 


t-i 


Ph 


12; 


rp 


^ 


1890-1 


4 


8 


12 


13 


17 




54 


20 


10 


75 


110 


1891-2 


4 


13 


8 


14 


3 




42 


15 


10 


76 


121 


1892-3 


4 


7 


9 


4 


9 




33 


27 


17 


64 


112 


1893-4 


6 


10 


3 


8 


7 




34 


51 


15 


40 


116 


1894-5 


9 


4 


7 


8 


19 




47 


48 


9 


44 


117 


1895-6 


5 


7 


10 


11 


18 




51 


48 


7 


48 


140 


1896-7 


11 


10 


9 


17 


11 




58 


33 


6 


48 


124 


1897-8 


17 


12 


25 


19 


22 


16 


111 


66 




72 


204 


1898-9 


17 


23 


21 


22 


21 


21 


125 


76 




105 


251 


1899-1900 


28 


24 


20 


20 


28 


26 


146 


78 




118 


290 



Total Collegiate Alumni, 234 ; Musical Alumni, 48. 



IvEBANON VAIvLEY COIvLEGE. 



53 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF LITERARY ALUMNI. 



Name. 


Class. 


Name. 


Class. 


Albert, I. E. 


1897 


Graybill. J. H. 


1872 


Albert, Mary Richards 


1897 


Grabill, Edith 


1899 


Albright, I. H. 


1876 


GroS, A. L. 


1879 


Backenstoe, S. P. 


1893 


Gruber, C. B. 


1882 


Backenstoe, C. H. 


1887 


Haak, E. L. ' 


1892 


Baer, A. U. 


1898 


Hain, W. M. 


1888 


Baker, C. D. 


1879 


Hagey, Alice Ranch 


1877 


Baker, B. F. 


1880 


Hanger, G. W. 


1884 


Ball, Lillie Mark 


1887 


Harp, C. D. 


1880 


Baltzell, W. J. 


1884 


Harp, R. S. 


1889 


Barr, C. J. 


1882 


*Harp, Annie Brightbill 


1892 


Batdorf, Emma 


1899 


Hartz, Leah C. 


1899 


Batdorf, J. P. 


1899 


Hauck, C. E. 


1884 


Beam, Alice Light 


1880 


Hartman, G. K. 


1894 


Bierman, G. F. 


1878 


Heberly, H. H. 


1896 


Black, Ella N. 


1896 


Henry, Josephine Kreider 


1892 


*Bodenhorn, W. B. 


1870 


Herold, J. G. W. 


1893 


Bowman, E. S. 


1890 


Herr, J. M. 


1892 


Bowman, Lulu Funk 


1890 


Herr. A. G. 


1876 


Borer. H. 


1897 


Herr, Susie F. 


1899 


Bi'ightbill, Millie Weidman 


1881 


Hiester. A. V. 


1887 


Burns. Sarah 


1873 


Hoffman, J. Z. 


1883 


*Burtner, C. A. 


1878 


Hoy, H. H. 


1899 


Burtner, D. E. 


1886 


Huber, S. C. 


1892 


Burtuer, Alice Evers 


1883 


Huber, S. F. 


1894 


:^urtner, M. M. 


1885 


Huntzberger, I. W. 


1899 


Burtner, E. 0. 


1890 


Hursh, G. W. 


1877 


Clair, S. H. 


J 875 


Imboden, H. M. 


1899 


Clippinger, C. V. 


1899 


*Jacquith, Mary Groff 


1879 


Clippinger, W. G. 


1899 


Jenkins, J. A. 


1896 


Coiirad, L. T. 


1882 


Johnson, J. W. 


1876 


Cowell, Alice Gingrich 


1880 


Jones, H. 0. 


1899 


Craumer, E. E. 


1883 


Jordan, J. G. 


1887 


Grouse, Jennie Kaufman 


1872 


Keedy, D. D. 


1878 


Crider, H. W. 


1893 


Keedy, Fannie Deaner 


1880 


<;rist, Bertha Mumma 


1896 


Keedy, J. L. 


1889 


Daniel, C. S. 


1873 


Keedy, E. E. 


1889 


Daugherty, B. F. 


1889 


Keller, Anna M. 


1897 


Daugherty, Jos. 


1889 


Keller, W. R. 


1890 


Deaner, H. C. 


1879 


Kendig, Rebecca Kinports 


1874 


Deaner, Ella Rigler 


1877 


Kennedy, Mary Culp 


1882 


Dei bier, J. Q. 


1898 


Kephart. H. S. 


1879 


Denlinger. H. T. 


1887 


Kindt, W. H. 


1890 


De Witt, 0. P. 


1898 


Kindt, G. A. L. 


1894 


Dohner, H. B. 


-3878 


Kinports, Lizzie J. 


1883 


Dougherty, R. P. 


1897 


Kinports, J. H. 


1872 


Ebersole, W. S. 


1885 


Kinports, Bessie 


1B98 


Enek. S. C. 


1891 


Klefiman, J. E. 


1889 


Enders, H. E. 


1897 


Kreider, Mary E. 


1899 


Eshleman, D. S. 


1891 


Kreider, G. R. 


1883 


*Etter. J. W. 


1872 


Kreider. D. A. 


1892 


Etter, Sarah Collier 


1875 


Kreider, Anna Forney 


1892 


Evers, S. J. 


1891 


Kreider, A. R. 


1892 


Faust, S. D. 


1889 


Kreider. W. H. 


1894 


*Fisher, J. K. 


1S72 


Kreider. Edwin 


1898 


Forney, A. R. 


1874 


Kurtz, J. H. 


1884 


Fisher, V. K. 


ISSO 


Landis, Bessie 


1899 


Fries. W. 0. 


1S82 


Landis, Emma L. 


1879 


Fry, M. A. 


1884 


Leavens, Clara Craumer 


1879 


Funkerburk, Mary Van Meter 


1881 


Lehman. J. E. 


1874 


Garman, S. E. 


1896 


Light, Galen D. 


1899 


*Garver, E. H. 


1881 


Light, Alma M. 


1899 


Gensemer, G. W. 


1880 


Light, Z. S. G. 


1874 


Gerberich, A. H. 


1888 


Light, S. P. 


1880 


Geyer, C. E. 


1882 


Light, Ella Smith 


1881 


Geyer, Sallie Herr 


1880 


Light, J. A. 


1898 


Geyer, J. R. 


1898 


Long, A. A. 


1889 


Gingrich, E. H. 


1872 


Loose, G. A. 


1873 


Goho, S. 0. 


1880 


Lyter, J. A. 


1885 


Good, 0. E. 


1894 


Lytle, Minnie Weinman 


1893 



54 



I.BBANON YALilMY COLLlRGE. 



Name. 


aass. 


Name. 


Class. 


Mayer, H. W. 


1895 


Shenk, Marv Magdalene 


1891 


Maysilles, J. H. 


1895 


Shupe, W. D. 


1887 


Medsger, J. E. S. 


1884 


Sloat, H. H. 


isg? 


Meed, Mary Knepper 


1882 


Sneath, Ella Mark 


1881 


Merrick. Mrs. Althea Flink 


1883 


Sneath, E. H. 


1881 


Merrick, S. G. 


1883 


Sneath, 1. W. 


1881 


Meyer, H. Lenieh 


1894 


Spangler, J. T. 


1890 


Meyer, J. L. 


1893 


Stauffer, Arabella 


1881 


Meyer, S. T. 


1893 


Stehman, Estella 


1896 


Milliken, J. F. 


1883 


Stehman, H. B. 


1873 


Miller, G. M. 


1899 


Stehman, S. D. 


1899 


Miller, H. E. 


1899 


Steiner, J. G. 


1882 


Miller, Louise R. 


1898 


Steinmetz, H. E. 


1874 


Miller, J. H. 


1884 


Steinmetz, Robert 


1874 


Musser, H. L. 


1884 


Strickler, Maggie 


1894 


Muth. Laura Reider 


1892 


Thomas, E. C. 


1880 


Myers, Anna S. 


1899 


Thomas, H. E. 


1878 


Oberst, A. Belle Howe 


1878 


Thrush, J. 0. 


1884 


Oliver, J. H. 


1882 


Trabert, Maud S. 


1899 


*Osbom, J. W. 


1874 


Ulrich, A. S. 


1897 


Owen, J. W. 


1891 


*Ulrich, Clemmie L. 


1871 


Pennypacker. Elvire Stehman 


1893 


Ulrich, G. A. 


1897 


Pitman, Virginia Burtner 


1878 


Van Metre, G. W. 


1882 


Porter, Rosa Meredith 


1880 


Van Metre, J. M. 


1881 


Quigley. Lillian M. 


1891 


Wagner, J. K. 


1888 


Rauch, C. E. 


1881 


Waite, Sallie Jane 


1887 


Reber, J. H. 


1895 


Wallace, J. R. 


1895 


Reitzel, Mary Weiss 


1870 


Ward, A. F. 


189a 


Rice, J. D. 


1892 


Washinger, W. H. 


1891 


Rice, Lillie J. E. 


1892 


Weimer, Annie Reed 


1888 


Rigler, Albert C. 


1870 


Weimer, Morrison 


1887 


Roop, H. B. 


1892 


Whitmoyer, J. S. 


1879 


Roop, H. U. 


1892 


Wilson, Anna E. 


1894 


Runk, I. E. 


1899 


Wine, S. K. 


1881 


*Sanders, M. P. 


1877 


Wingerd, C. B. 


1897 


Savior, Anna May 


1884 


Woli, G A. 


1881 


Schiichter, N. C. 


1897 


Wolf, Henry 


1879 


Sehlosser, E. T. 


1889 


Wright, John R. 


1876 


Pecrist H. A. 


1881 


Yocum. Fannie Killinger 


1879 


Seltzer, Caroline E. 


1899 


Yocum, J. C. 


1879 


Shaeffer, G. L. 


1891 


Yoe, J. W. 


1897 


Shank, A. H. 


1877 


Zerbe, Jacob 


189S 


Sheffey, Ella Nora Say lor 


1891 


Ziegler, J. B. 


1881 


Shellenberger, G. G. 


1877 


Zug, J. F. 


1894 


Shelley, Hattie S. 


1899 






Shenk, G. R. 


1887 


*Dead. 




ALPHABHl'lCAL LIST ( 


DF MUSICAL ALUMNL 




Name. 


Class. 


Name. 


Class. 


Ayers, Ada Underwood ' 


1882 


Light, Ella Smith 


1889 


Baer, Bertha Mayer 


1896 


Loose, Emily E. 


1894 


Baker, Lulu M. 


1892 


Manbeck, Mabel 


1899 


Batdorf, Mary C. 


1893 


Mark, Sallie A. 


1888 


Black, Ella N. 


1896 


Meed, Mary Knepper 


1882 


Bowman. Lulu Funk 


1890 


Miller. Katie Rauch 


1887 


Bowman, Mellie Fortenbaugh 


1894 


Moyer, M. Ella 


188S 


Bowman, Ida L. 


1894 


Mover, Sydney 


1888 


Bowman, Sevilla Gensemer 


1885 


Mamma, E. Ruth 


1896 


Burtner, Alice Evers 


1883 


Mumma, Katie R. 


1892 


Burtner, Minnie M. 


1891 


Pennypacker, Elvire Stehman 


1892 


Cowell, Alice Gingrich 


1882 


Richards, Ida Zent 


1883 


Daugherty, Delia Roop 


1892 


Royer, Mabel 


1899 


Doyle, L. Augusta 


1887 


Sargent, Stella K. 


1898 


Gable, Florence Brindle 


1892 


Saylor, Mabel M. 


1894 


*Harp, Annie Brightbill 


1892 


Sheffey, Ella Nora Saylor 


1892 


Hauck, C. Eugenia 


1884 


Smith, Carrie E. 


1891 


Henrv, H. G. 


1896 


Speck, Ida M. 


1885 


Hershey, U. H. 


1895 


*Speck, Minnie E. 


1885 


Hoover, Ella Pennypacker 


1894 


Stehman, Estelle, 


1891 


Jeffries. Carrie Eby 


1887 


Stein, S. H. 


1892 


Kutz, Alice L. 


1883 


Swartz, Nettie May 


1888 


Kreider, Anna Forney 


1890 


Wilson, Annie E. 


1893 


Kreider, Mary E. 


1896 


*Dead. 





IvKBANON VALIvEY COIvIvEGE. 55 

The Alumni Association, 



Officers iot 18994900, 

President — JohnH. MaysiIvLES, A.B. , '95, EastDeerfield, Mass. 
Secretary — Miss Ella Nora Black, B.S., '96, Annville, Pa. 
Treasurer — Rev. I. H. Albright, Ph.D., '76, Shamokin, Pa. 



Program for Commencement Week. 

1900. 

Saturday, June 9th, 8.00 P. M., Junior Oratorical Prize 
Contest. 

Sunday, June loth, 10 o'clock A. M., Baccalaureate Discourse 
by President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D. 

Sunday, June loth, 7.30 P. M., Address before the Christian 
Associations by Dr. T. C. Carter, Roanoke, Va. 

Monday, June nth, 7.45 P. M., Graduating Exercises of the 
Department of Music. 

Tuesday, June 12th, 9 o'clock A. M., Annual Meeting of 
Board of Trustees. 

Tuesday, June 12th, 7.30 P. M., Public Alumni Meeting. 

Wednesday, June 13th, 2 o'clock P. M., Class Day Exercises. 

Wednesday, June 13th, 7.30 P. M., Conservatory Concert. 

Thursday, June 14th, 10 o'clock A. M., Graduating Exercises 
of Class of 1900. Commencement Address by Dr. 
Elias Hershey Sneath, Professor of Philosophy, Yale 
University. Conferring of Degrees and Announce- 
ments, by President Roop. 

Thursday, June 14th, 7.30 P. M., Reception by the Senior 

Class. 



•56 I.SBANON VAI.LEY COI.I<EGE. 

CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Plan and Purpose of the College 3 

Corporate Rights 3 

Form of Bequest 3 

Organization 3 

Board of Trustees 4 

Officers and Committees of the Board 5 

The Faculty and Other Officers 6 

Degress Conferred, June 15, 1899 8 

Admission 9 

To Freshman Standing 9 

On Certificate 11 

Conditional Admission 11 

Courses of Study 12 

The Classical Course 12 

The Latin Scientific Course 15 

The Greek Scientific Course 19 

Departments of Instruction 19 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Logic, etc 19 

The Greek Language and Literature 21 

The Hebrew Language and Literature 22 

The Latin Language and Literature 22 

The German Language and Literature 23 

The French Language and Literature 23 

The Fnglish Language and Literature 24 

Mathematics and Astronomy 24 

Natural Science 25 

Historical and Political Science 26 

The English Bible 27 

Elocution and Oratory 28 

Drawing and Painting 28 

General Information 29 

The Location 29 

Buildings and Grounds 29 

Religious Training 30 

Health and Physical Culture 31 

Literary Societies 31 

Libraries and Reading Room 31 

Matriculation 32 

Discipline 32 

Grading and Examination 32 

Promotion 33 

Leave of Absence 33 

Degrees and Diplomas 34 

Graduate Work 34 

Dormitories 35 

Preparatory Department 36 

Outline of Study 37 

Expenses 38 

Conservatory of Music 39 

Students 43 

Alumni 53 

Program for Commencement Week 55