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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Catalogue, 19004901, 



Lebanon \ alley C°Uege 



ANNVILLE, PA 




Chartered 1867. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley190001leba 




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TheuThiftyvFifth Annual Catalogue 



Of The 



OFFICERS and STUDENTS 



Of 



Lebanon Valley College, 



For The 



Collegiate Year 



19004901, 



ANNV1LLE, PA, 



PUBLISHED BY THE COI^EEGE 
I90I. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

CALENDAR, 



1901, Fall Term, 

September 3, Tuesday — Examinations for Admission. 
September 4, Wednesday , p a. m. — Fall Term begins. 
November 28, Thursday — Clionian Literary Society Anni- 
versary. 
December 20, Friday — Fall Term of Sixteen Weeks ends. 

1902, Winter Term, 

January 7, Tuesday, 9 a. m. — Winter Term begins. 
February 9, Sunday — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
February 22, Saturday — Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 
March 28, Friday — Winter Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 

Spring Term, 

April 2, Wednesday, 9 a. m. — Spring Term opens. 

April 4, Friday — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary 
Society. 

May 2, Friday — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary 
Society. 

May 30, Friday — Decoration Day. 

June 14, Saturday — Junior Oratorical Contest. 

June 15, Sunday, 10.15 a - m - — Baccalaureate Discourse by 
President Roop. 

June 15, Sunday, 6 p. m. — Campus Praise Service. 

June 15, Sunday, 8 p. m. — Annual Address before the Chris- 
tian Associations. 

June 16, Monday, 7.30 p. m. — Conservatory Concert. 

June 17, Tuesday, 2 p. m. — Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

June 17, Tuesday, 7.30 p. m. — Public Meeting of Alumni 
Association. 

June 18, Wednesday, 7.30 p. m. — Commencement of Depart- 
ment of Music. 

June 19, Thursday, 10 a. m. — Commencement Exercises.. 

June 20, Friday — Spring Term of Twelve Weeks ends. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

PLAN AND PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE. 



Corporate Rights. 

The College was incorporated with full University privi- 
leges, by the Legislature of Pennsylvania in an Act approved 
by the Executive on the 5th of April, A. D. 1867. The Man- 
agement of the College is committed to a Board of Trustees* 
elected by the Annual Conferences cooperating in the enter- 
prise, one-third of whom are elected annually for a term of 
three years. The members of the Faculty sustain an ex-officio 
relation. 

The charter indicates that it was the purpose of the found- 
ers to plant an institution which would become so ample in 
facilities and manifold in departments as to furnish instruction 
in all the subjects of a general and special education. Toward 
this original purpose the College is rapidly advancing. 
Form of Bequest. 

To persons desiring to aid in increasing the efficiency of 
the College in the work of preparing young men and women 
for usefulness, the following form of bequest is recommended: 

I give and bequeath to the Lebanon Valley College, at 
Annville, Pa., the sum of dollars, for the general pur- 
pose of said .school. 

Organization. 

The College aims to provide courses of study which will 
qualify students to be practical and self-reliant, as well as 
learned. It comprises five departments : 

L The College offers three courses of study, leading 
to degrees in Arts and Science. 

II. The Preparatory Department is designed to fit 
young people for College, either for the Classical or the Scien- 
tific Course- 
Ill. The Normal Department is designed to meet 
the wants of a large class of students who are preparing for 
public school work, and cannot see their way clear to com- 
plete a full College course. 

IV. The Department of Music has full courses in 
instrumental and vocal music, and grants diplomas to those 
who complete either of the specified courses. 

V. The Art Department provides thorough instruc- 
tion in drawing and painting, with the aim of improving and 
developing the mind and the aesthetic sense. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Corporation, 



Trustees, 

Name Residence Term Expires 

President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., and Faculty, Ex-Officio. 

Representatives from Pennsylvania Conference. 

Rev. Ezekiel B. KepharT, D.D., LL.D., Annville. 1902 

Samuel W. Ceippinger, Chambersburg. 1904 

Rev. Daniel Eberly, D.D., Abbottstown. 1903 

John C. Knipp, Baltimore, Md. 1902 

REV. Wm. H. Washinger, A. M., Chambersburg. 1904 

Rev. John E. KeEFEman, B. S., Duncannon. 1904 

Wieeiam A. LuTZ, Shippensburg. 1903 

John C. HeckarT, Dallastown. 1902 

Representatives from East Pennsylvania Conference. 

Wieeiam H. Ulrich, Hummelstown. 1903 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D.D., Dayton, O. 1901 

Benjamin H. Engle, Harrisburg. 1903 

Henry H. Kreider, Annville. 1902 

Rev. Solomon L. Swartz, Middletown. 1902 

Adam R. Forney, A. M., Annville. 1901 

Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, B. D., Bellegrove. 1903 

Representatives from Eastern Conference, 

Isaac B. Haak, Myerstown. 1901 

Samuee F. EngeE, Palmyra. 1903 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph.D., Shamokin. 1902 

Simon P. Light, Esq., A. M., Lebanon. 1902 

Rev. Charles Mutch, Pleading. 1901 

Valentine K. Fisher, A. B., Berne. 1903 

Representatives from Maryland Conference, 

Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A. M., Hagerstown, Md. 1902 

Reno S. Harp,' 'Esq., A. M., Frederick, Md. 1904 

George C Snyder, Hagerstown, Md. 1903 

Rev. Charles W. Stinespring, Frederick, Md. 1904 

Rev. John B Chamberlain, Washington, D. C. 1903 

Edward Kern, Washington, D. C. 1902 

Representatives from Virginia Conference, 

John H. Maysilles, A. M., East Deerfield, Mass. 1902 

REV. Sanford D. SkelTon, Winchester, Va. 1904 

Rev. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., Stephen City, Va. 1904 

Henry B. MILLER, Harrisonburg, Va. 1904 

REV. A. P. FunkhouSER, B. S., Flarrisonburg, Va. 1903 

Rev. J. R. Ridenour, Middletown, Md. 1902 

REV. J. N. Fries, A. M., Dayton, Va. 1903 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Corporation, 



Officers of The Board of Trustees. 

President— WILLIAM H. ULRICH. 

Secretary— ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT. 

Treasurer— HER VIN U. ROOP. 

Executive Committee. 

HBRVIN U. ROOP, Chairman. 

ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Secretary. 
ISAAC B. HAAK, RENO S. HARP, 

BENJAMIN H. ENGLE, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

WILLIAM H. ULRICH, HIRAM B. DOHNER, 

SIMON P. LIGHT, Esq. 

Committees. 



Finance, 

Hiram B. Dohner, Chairman. Henry H. KrEider, 

Solomon L. Swartz, Samuel W. Clippinger, 

J. C. Heckart, A. P. Funkhouser. 

Endowment. 

EzEKJEL B. KEPHART, Chairman. Wm, H. Washinger, 
Daniel Eberey, Adam R. Forney, 

John C. Knipp, Simon P. Light. 

Faculty. 

William A. Lutz, Chairman. Isaac H. Albright, 

Samuel D. Faust, Isaac B. Haak, 

Reno S. Harp. 

Library and Apparatus. 

Geo. C. Snyder, Chairman. John R. Ridenour, 

C. W. Stinespring, C. A. Mutch, 

S. K. Wine. 

Grounds, Buildings, and Domestic Department. 

Benjamin H. Engle, Chairman. A. B. Statton, 
James B. Chamberlain, Valentine K. Fisher, 

Sanford D. Skelton. 

Auditing. 

Samuel F. Engle, Chairman. Henry B. Miller, 

John H. Maysilles, J. N. Fries. 

Matron. 

ANNA MARY KELLER, B. S. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Faculty and Other Officers, 



REV. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, A. M., Ph.D., 

President. 

Professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy. 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A. M., SECRETARY, 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

REV. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

REV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

MAUD ETTA WOLFE, A. M., Preceptress, 

Professor of the English Language and literature, 

and Lnstructor in German. 

THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A. M., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
Professor of French and Lnstructor in English. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., Librarian, 
Professor of History and Political Science. 

HOWARD E. ENDERS, M. S., 
Professor of the Biological Sciences. 

ANNA C. R. WALTER, A. B., 
Lnstructor in Elocution, Oratory and Physical Culture. 

WILLIAM OTTERBEIN ROOP, A. B., 
Lnstructor in Latin. 

CYRUS W. WAUGHTEL, A. B., 
Lnstructor in Mathematics. 

REV. CHARLES E. HURLBUT, 
Assistant in English Bible. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The Faculty and Other Officers* 



HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, (London, Eng.), 

Director of thelDepartment of Music, and Professor of Voice, 

Piano, Organ, and Theory. 

MABEL MANBECK, 
Assistant in Piano. 

CHARLES H. B. OLDHAM, 

Assistant in Piano, 

MADAME VON BEREGHY, 

Instructor in Violin, Strings, Etc, 

EDITH BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97, 
Instructor in Painting and Drawing, 

WILLIAM C. ARNOLD, 
Stenography and Typewriting. 

THOMAS W. GRAY, M. E., 
Instructor in Physical Culture. 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, 

GRANT B. GERBERICH, B. S„ 

ZAC. A. BOWMAN, 

HARRY A. HONKER, 

Instructors in Normal Department, 

BISHOP E. B. KEPHART, D.D., LL.D., 
Lecturer on International Law. 

DANIEL EBERLY, D.D., 
Lecturer on Philosophy of History. 

REV. J. T. SHAFFER, 
College Pastor. 

REV. HIRAM B. DOHNER, B. D., 

Field Secretary. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 

Degrees Conferred by the College, 
June 14, 1900, 



I. IN CUFSU. 
Scicntiae Baccalaureus. 

Nellie Buffington, Lizzie G. Kreider, 

C. Madie Burtner, Oren G. Meyers, 
Enid Daniel, Ross Nissley, 
Grant B. Gerberich, Ralph D. Reider, 
Fred Weiss Light, Clyde J. Saylor, 
David E. Long, Alvin J. Shroyer. 

Artium Baccalaureus, 

Rene D. Burtner, J. Mark Peters, 

Anna E. Kreider, Charles E. Snoke, 

Reba F. Lehman, G. Mason Snoke, 

Galen D. Light, Nora E. Spayd, 

Seth A. Light, Harry E. Spessard, 

D. Augustus Peters, Adam K. Wier. 

II. PER EXAMINATIONEM, 

Scientiae Magister. 

Howard E. Enders, Frank F. Holsopple. 

Artium Magister. 
John S. Gruver, Norman C, Schlichter, 

John H. MaysilleS, Hiram Herr Shenk, 

Charles B. Wingerd. 

Graduates in Music. 
Arabelle Batdorf, Anna E.;Kreider, 

Edna Groff, Lizzie G. Kreider, 

Lena Owens. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Requirements for Admission, 



Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the following studies : 

Classical Course. 

English. — No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is 
notably defective in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division 
into paragraphs. 

I. Reading. — A certain number of books will be set for reading. 
The candidate will be required to present evidence of a general know- 
ledge of the subject matter, and to answer simple questions on the lives 
of the authors. The form of examination will usually be the writing of 
a paragraph or two on each of the several topics, to be chosen by the 
candidate from a considerable number — perhaps ten or fifteen — set before 
him in the examination paper. The treatment of these topics is designed 
to test the candidate's power of clear and accurate expression, and will 
call for only a general knowledge of the substance of the books. In the 
place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate may present an 
exercise book, properly certified by his instructor, containing composi- 
tions or other written work done in connection with the reading of the 
books. In every case, knowledge of the book will be regarded as less im- 
portant than the ability to write good English. 

The books set for this part of the examination will be : 

1901 to 1905 : Tennyson's The Princess ; Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Venice ; George Eliot's Silas Martier ; The Sir Roger de Coverley Pa- 
pers ; Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns ; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Scott's Ivanhoe ; Lowell's 
The Vision of Sir Launfal. 

II. Study and Practice. — This part of the examination presup- 
poses the thorough study of each of the works named below. The ex- 
amination will be upon subject matter, form and structure, and will 
also test the candidates ability to express his knowledge with clearness 
and accuracy. 

1901 to 1905 : Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, 
L' Allegro, and II Penseroso ; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with Amer- 
ica ; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, England and the United 
States. The following works will indicate the amount required : Myers' 
History of Greece ; Myers' Rome: Its Rise and Fall ; Larned's History 
of England ; McMaster's History of the United States. ; Fiske's Civics. 

Science. — Geography (Descriptive, Political and Physical), As- 
tronomy, Botany, Elementary Physics. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, including the Metric System; Algebra, 
through Geometric Progression ; Plane Geometry, including the solu- 
tion of one hundred or more original exercises. 



IO LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Latin. — Grammar, including the rules of Prosody and Scanning, 
Caesar, four books, or Book I. and Sallust's Catiline or Latin Readings; 
Cicero, six Orations, including Pro Archia ; Vergil, five books of the 
^Eneid. Equivalents from other authors will be accepted in part. Latin 
Prose Composition, Bennett's or Allen's, or their equivalent; reading 
at sight of easy passages from Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil. 

Greek. — Grammar (Goodwin); Anabasis, four books. Greek 
Prose Composition, twenty exercises of Jones, but exercises based on the 
prose as read from day to day is preferred. 

Latin Scientific Course* 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the same studies as for the Classical Course, except that no Greek is 
required. 

Greek Scientific Course, 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class are examined in 
the same studies as for the Classical Course, except that no Latin is 
required. 

Admission on Certificate. 

Students who seek credit for studies pursued in high schools and 
academies must submit certificates stating the texts or portion of texts 
used, and the number of hours spent in recitation thereon. 

Graduates of Pennsylvania State Normal Schools are admitted to the 
Latin Scientific Course without examination. 

Candidates for advanced standing coming from any other institution 
of equal grade will receive credit, without examination, for the studies 
which the faculty of such school may testify that they have passed. 

Real equivalents for studies required are received at the discretion 
of the Faculty. 

Studies pursued in high schools, academies, and other preparatory 
schools will not be accepted as equivalents of studies in the Junior and 
Senior years. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificates of 
honorable dismissal. 

Conditional Admission, 
A candidate failing to pass in one or more of the subjects required 
for admission, may, at the discretion of the Faculty, be admitted to his 
class conditionally to make up the deficiencies by extra study. No stu- 
nent will be given Junior Standing until all deficiencies are made up. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. II 

CURRICULA. 



The Classical Course, 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 



The numerals after each subject indicate the number of hour 
recitations per week. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term, 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Mythology, Prose Composition. [5]. 

Latin — Livy, Prose Composition, Roman Antiquities. [5]. 

Mathematics — Geometry Completed. [5]. 

German — Grammar and Exercises. [4]. 

Bible— Lif e of Christ. [ 1 ] . 

English — Advanced Rhetoric. [2]. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term. 

Greek — Homer's Iliad, Prose Composition. [5]. 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute or de Amicitia, Roman Literature. [5]. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. [5] . 

German — Grammar, Exercises, and Marchen und Erzahlungen. [4]. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. [ 1 ] . 

English — Advanced Rhetoric. [2]. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Spring Term, 

Greek — Herodotus, Prose Composition. [5]. 

Latin — Horace's Odes. [5]. 

Mathetnatics — Plane Trigonometry. [5]. 

German — Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, or equivalent. [4]. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. [ 1 ] . 

English — Advanced Rhetoric. [2]. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — One hour per week. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR, 

Fall Term, 

Greek — Memorabilia, Greek Testament. [4]. 

Latin — Horace, Epistles, Ouintilian. [4]. 

Mathematics — Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying. [4]. 

History — Mediaeval History. [3]. 

(German — Wilhelm Tell, or equivalent. [3]. 
or 
French — Grammar and Guerber's Contes 6t Legendes. [4]. 
Bible— Old Testament History. [1]. 
English — Argumentation. [2]. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Winter Term. 

Greek — Plato's Phsedo or Apology, Greek Testament. [4]. 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. [4]. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. [4]. 

{German — Faust or equivalent, German Literature. [3]. 
or 
French — Whitney's French Reader. [4]. 
Histoty — Modern History. [3]. 
Bible— Old Testament History. [1]. 
English — Argumentation. [2]. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 



Spring Term. 

Greek — Demosthenes de Corona. Greek Testament. [4] . 
Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. [4]. 
Mathematics — Analytical Geometry (completed). [4]. 

{German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. [3]. 
or 
French — Modern Prose Selections. [3]. 
History — Modern History. [3]. 
Bible— Old Testament History. [1]. 
English — The Later English Drama. [2]. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 
Throughout the Year— Declamations and Themes. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 13 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term, 

Greek — The (Edipus Tyrannus or Antigone of Sophocles. [3]. 
Lathi — Cicero de Officiis. [2]. 
Science — Chemistry. [3]. 

Philosophy- { *£|g; d [ p 3 s ] ycholog y . [2] . 

Ffnrlith / History of English Literature. [5]. 
ungiisn— J j ohnson . s English Words. 

Political Science — Political Economy. [3]. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Winter Term, 

Greek — The Prometheus or The Seven against Thebes of ^Eschylus. [2]. 

Latin — Terence, Audria et Adelphoe. [3]. 

Physical Science — Chemistry. [3]. 

English — History of English Literature. [5]. 

Pedagogy — History of Education. [2]. 

Political Science — Political Economy. [2] . 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term. 

Greek — The Clouds of Aristophanes. [2]. 

Latin — Juvenal, Selections. [3]. 

Physical Science — Chemistry. [ 1] . 

English — History of American Literature. [5]. 

Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. [3]. 

Pedagogy — Methodology. [2] . 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 

Throughout the Year — Declamations, Themes, and Debates. 

SENIOR YEAR, 



Required Studies, 

Fall Term, 

Philosophy — Psychology. [4]. 

Natural Science — Advanced Physics. [4]. 

English — Elements of Literary Criticism, and the English Novel. [3]. 

Bible— The New Testament Epistles. [1]. 

Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Winter Term. 

Philosophy — Moral Philosophy. [4]. 
Natural Science — Advanced Physics. [3]. 
Bible— The New Testament Epistles. [1]. 
Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term. 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy. [4]. 
Natural Science — Advanced Physics. [3]. 
Bible— The. New Testament Epistles. [ 1] . 
Physical Culture — Prescribed Exercises. 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect 
six hours' work from the following list : 

Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Astronomy — Young . 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Latin — Latin Hymns or Seneca's Essays. 

Greek — Pindar's Olympian and Pythian Odes. 

Science — Advanced Chemistry, or Geology, with Laboratory 
Work. 

History— I Histo fy of Civilization. 

J \ American Constitutional History. 
Archceology — A Course of Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic 

Archseology, with Recitations. 
Philosophy — A Course of Lectures on ^Esthetics, with Reci- 
tations. 

***»-{£532£. 

French — Courses 2 and 3, Page 23. 
It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at the beginning of the College year, and for 
the whole year ; and the election made must be adhered to, unless 
special permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 

The Latin Scientific Course, 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fall Term, 

Science — Meteorology. [4]. 

Latin — Livy, Roman Antiquities. [5]. 

Mathematics — Geometry, completed. [5]. 

German — Grammar and Exercises. [4]. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. [1]. 

English — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition. [2]. 

Elocution — One hour per week. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 1 5 

Winter Term. 

Science — Zoology , [4] . 

Latin — Cicero de Senectute. Prose Composition. [5]. 

Mathematics — Higher Algebra. [5]. 

German — Grammar and Exercises, and Marchen andErzahlungen. [4]. 

Bible— The Life of Christ. [1]. 

English — Advanced Rhetoric. [2]. 

Elocution — One hour weekly. 

Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term, 
Science — Zoology. [4]. 

Latin — Horace, Odes. Prose Composition. [5]. 
Mathematics — Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. [5]. 
German — Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, or equivalent. [4]. 
Bible— The Life of Christ. [1]. 
English — Advanced Rhetoric. [2]. 
Elocution — One hour per week. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 
Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR, 

Fall Term. 
Science — Biology. [3]. 

Latin — Horace, Epistles. Quintilian. [4]. 

Mathematics-Spherical Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry begun [4] 
History — Mediaeval History. [3]. 

(German — Wilhelm Tell, or equivalent. [3]. 
or 
French — Grammar and Guerber's Contes et Legendes. [4]. 
Bible— Old Testament History, fi]. 
English — Argumentation . [2] . 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium. 

Winter Term, 

Science — Biology. [3]. 

Latin — Tacitus, Germania. Latin Composition. [4]. 

Mathematics — Analytical Geometry. [4]. 

(German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. [3]. 
or 
French — Whitney's French Reader. [4]. 
History — Modern History. [3]. 
Bible— Old Testament History. [1]. 
English Literatme — Argumentation. [2]. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 



1 6 LEBANON VAL^Y COLLEGE, 

Spring Term. 

Science — Biology. [3]. 

Latin — Tacitus, Agricola. Writing Latin. [4% 

Mathemztics — Analytical Geometry, completed. [4]. 

(German — Maria Stuart, or equivalent. German Literature. [3]? 
or 
French — Modern Prose Selections. [4]. 
History — Modern History. [3]. 
Bible— Old Testament History, [ 1] . 
English Literature— The Later English Drama. [2]. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 
Throughout the Year — Declamations and Themes. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Fall Term. 

Science — Chemistry. [3]. 
Philosophy — Logic. [3]. 
Pedagogy — Applied Psychology. [2]. 

Wno-lUh J Histor y of English Literature. [5]. 
angnsn 1 Johnson's English Words. 

Political Science — Political Economy. [3]. 

Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 

Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Exercises. 

Winter Term, 

Science — Chemistry. [3I. 

English — History of English Literature. [5]. 
Pedagogy — History of Education. [3]. 
Political Science — Political Economy. [2]. 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 
Physical Culture — Gymnasium Work. 

Spring Term. 
Science — Chemistry . 

English — History of American Literature. 
Philosophy — Theism and Christian Evidence. [3]. 
Pedagogy — Methodology. [3] . 
Bible — Old Testament Prophecies. [1]. 
Physical Culture — Field and Gymnasium Work. 
Taroughout the Year — Orations, Themes, and Debates. 
Electives : Science — Advanced Anatomy, or 

Mathematics — Calculus and Differential Equations. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 17 

SENIOR YEAR- 



Required Studies. 

Fall Term. 

Philosophy — Psychology. [4]. 

Science — Advanced Physics. [4] . 

English— ^Elements of Literary Criticism, and the English Novel. [4] . 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. [1]. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Winter Term. 

Philosophy — Ethics. [4] . 

^ripnrr— f Advanced Physics. [4]. 
Science L Geology . [4] . 

Bible — The New Testament Epistles. [1]. 
Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Spring Term. 

Philosophy — History of Philosophy. [4]. 

Srirnrr f Advanced Physics. [4]. 

* aence ~ \ Geology. [4]. 

Bible— The New Testament Epistles, [ij. 

Gymnasium — Prescribed Exercises. 

Throughout the Year — Orations, Debates, and Theses. 

In addition to the Required Studies, Seniors are required to elect six 
hours' work from the following list : 

Science — Advanced Chemistry, with Laboratory Work. Ad- 
vanced Physiology. 

Astronomy — Young. 

Hebrew — Grammar Exercises and Reading. 

Historv— I Histor y of Civilization. 

J \ American Constitutional History. 

{Latin— Cicero de Officiis. Terence and Juvenal. 
or 
Greek — The (Edipus Tyrannus of Sophocles, Prometheus and 
The Clouds of Aristophanes. 
Evidences — Butler's Analogy. 

Philosophy — Lectures on ^Esthetics, with Recitations. 
Archeology — Lectures on Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology, 
with Recitations. 

English— { Shakespeare. 
nngnsn ^ Anglo-Saxon. 

French — Courses 2 and 3, Page 22. 



1 8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

It should be understood that a sufficient number of students must 
elect a subject, otherwise the Professor will not be required to teach it. 
All elections must be made at beginning of the College year and for the 
whole year, and the election once made must be adhered to, unless 
special permission to change be granted by the Faculty. 

Greek Scientific Course, 

The studies of the Greek Scientific Course are the same as those of 
the Latin Scientific Course with the exception of Greek instead of Latin. 



Departments of Instruction, 



The subjects taught in the regular College Courses, embrac- 
ing all subjects taught in the modern college, may be grouped 
under the general heads — Philosophy, Language and Litera- 
ture, Mathematics and Science. In providing this course and 
its daily prosecution, a two-fold duty is kept in view, viz., 
The mental discipline of the student and his introduction to 
the main divisions of human knowledge. 

Philosophy. 

President Roop. 
i. Psychology — Se?ises, Intellect and Will. — The aim of this 
course is to give a fair knowledge of descriptive and explana- 
tory psychology and its present stage of development, its ap- 
plication to education, and also a preparation for the other 
philosophical discipline of the Junior and Senior years. Reci- 
tations, lectures and discussions. Text-books, Baldwin's Ele- 
ments of Psychology ; Roark's Psychology in Education, 
with the references for library work in the larger psychologies 
and psychological periodicals. Required of Juniors, Fall term. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. I§ 

2. History of Education. 1 These courses are plan- 

3. Science and Art of Education. ) ned especially for those 
who desire to prepare themselves for high grade work and 
positions in teaching. Lectures will be given by the instructor 
with reference to the pedagogical library and the leading 
educational periodicals, and papers on special topics will be 
prepared by members of the class. Texts used as a basis are 
Compayre's History of Pedagogy, Painter's History of Edu- 
cation, Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, Tompkins's 
Philosophy of Teaching. 

Required of Juniors and open to special students who are 
prepared for the course, Winter and Spring terms. 

4. Logic, Deductive a?zd Inductive. — The theory and laws of 
thought are studied with constant application in exercises in 
the logical treatment of conceptions, the conversion of propo- 
sitions, immediate inference, syllogisms, and the detection of 
fallacies. Special attention is given to the principles of in- 
ductive reasoning and scientific method. The time allotted to 
the subject is sufficient to make the study of practical advan- 
tage as well as a genuine discipline. Text-book, Hyslop. 
Required of Juniors, Fall term. 

5. The subject of Christian Evidences occupies the Spring 
term of the Junior year. The external and the internal proofs 
are distinguished, and the place of each is defined. The studies 
of the previous year are Found to prepare the student well for 
appreciating the place of prophecy, miracles, and the historical 
evidences. Theories of inspiration are examined and the 
miraculous character of Christ is set forth, together with the 
adaptation of the Gospel to the nature and needs of man. 

The text-books used are Fisher's Christian Evidences, and 
Flint's Theism. 

6. Psychology is studied during the Fall term of the Senior 
year. With the aid of a text-book a general survey of the 
soul's power of knowing, feeling, and willing is made, with 
discussions of various theories ; the aim being to cultivate the 
power of abstract thought, as well as to introduce the student 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

to philosophic research and discussion, thereby to acquire a 
more complete mastery of the whole science in the rich and 
varied growth that it has attained in recent years. 

7. Christian Ethics follows in the Winter term, and text- 
books and lectures are employed to acquaint the student with 
leading systems of ethics and the fundamental principles of 
morality. Practical ethics is then very fully treated both 
comprehensively and in detail. 

8. History of Philosophy concludes the course in the Spring 
term. During the first part of the term, a survey of the 
philosophy of the Greeks from about 600 B. C. to the fourth 
Century A. D. is made by recitations, lectures, the reading of 
Plato's Protagoras, Gorgias, Theataetus, and parts of other 
dialogues, and reports of readings by the classes in the works 
of Zeller, Grote, and others. Attention is also given to the 
philosophy of the Romans and to the Patristic and Scholastic 
Philosophies. The remainder of the term is spent in the study 
of Modern Philosophy, with special regard to Descartes, 
Spinoza, Eocke, Berkeley, Hume, Eeibnitz, and Kant, and 
more recent problems. Text-books : Haven's and Weber's 
Histories of Philosophy, with frequent references to the his- 
tories of Ueberweg, Erdman, Schwegler, and others. 

9. Butler's Analogy. — In this study the aim is by supple- 
mental lectures to adapt the study to the times, calling atten- 
tion to the latter form of unbelief, in order to place the stu- 
dent in possession of as complete a defense of the Christian 
faith as possible. Elective for Seniors. 

10. Archaeology. — Elective for Seniors. A course of lec- 
tures on Prehistoric and Historic Archaeology, with recitations. 

11. ^Esthetics. — A course of lectures on ^Esthetics, with 
Recitations. Elective for Seniors. 

Language and Literature, 

Greek Language and Literature, 

Professor Spangler. 
In the Freshman Year, Herodotus and Homer's Iliad are 
read. During this year emphasis is placed upon the study of 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 21 

the forms of words and syntax and upon reading at sight. 
The work of the year includes further a study of the Greek 
historians, epic and lyric poetry, antiquities and mythology. 
One hour a week is devoted to prose composition. 

The Sophomores read the Memorabilia, the Phsedo or Apol- 
ogy, and Demosthenes on the Crown. Along with the read- 
ing there is also a study of Socrates and the Socratic Schools 
with a general study of Greek Philosophy, the writings of 
Plato, Greek oratory and the Laws and Law Courts of Athens. 
Portions of the Greek Testament are read at stated times dur- 
ing the year. 

In the Junior Year, the CBdipus Tyrannus or Antigone of 
Sophocles, the Prometheus Bound or Seven against Thebes of 
iEschylus, and the Clouds of Aristophanes are read ; with a 
stud}' of Greek tragedy, comedy, and theater. 

The Hebrew Language* 

Hebrew is an elective throughout the Senior Year, and is 
offered for the benefit particularly of students intending to 
take a Theological Course. An elementary knowledge of the 
grammar of the language is acquired, and several chapters in 
Genesis are read and carefully studied. 

Latin Language and Literature, 

Professor Daugherty. 

The aim of the course of instruction in Latin is to teach to 
read Latin correctly and rapidly ; to translate with accuracy 
and facility into idiomatic English ; to familiarize the student 
with the styles and idioms of Latin as illustrated by the authors 
of different periods ; and to acquaint the student with the 
leading facts of Roman life, history, literature, and antiquity. 
Due importance is attached to Latin as a foundation of literary 
culture and as a basis for a more perfect knowledge of the 
English language. 

During the Freshman Year particular attention is given to 
forms and constructions. Written translations and composi- 
tion are required. Antiquities will be studied in connection 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

with Livy, and prosody with the Odes of Horace. The Gram- 
mar is carefully reviewed this year. 

In the Sophomore Year the Epistles of Horace, Ouintilian's 
Institutions of Oratory, Book X. , and the Germania and Agri- 
cola of Tacitus are studied. Composition is continued, liter- 
ary and historical topics are assigned for treatment, and col- 
lateral reading is required. Special study of the literature of 
the Silver Age. 

The Junior Class will read Cicero De Officiis. one or two 
plays of Terence, and the Satires of Juvenal. The character- 
istics of each of these authors are carefully studied. The 
Roman drama is made a subject of study. 

Text-books used : Lord's Livy, Rockwood's De Senectute, 
or Lord's De Amicitia, Smith & Greenough's Horace, Frieze's 
Quintilian, Hopkin's Germania and Agricola, Crowell's De 
Officiis, Lindsay's Juvenal, Wilkin's Primer of Antiquities, 
Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Harper's Latin Dictionary. 
The text-books catalogued will be required. 

German Language and Literature, 

Professor Wolfe. 
The aim is to give the student a thorough knowledge of the 
use of the German language. The first year will be devoted 
to a study of the grammar and composition, with readings of 
Marchen and Erzahlungen and simpler selections from the 
German classics, followed by Hillern's Hbher als die Kirche or 
its equivalent. The second year will include the history of 
German literature, and the reading of Schiller's William Tell 
and Maria Stuart, and Goethe's Herman and Dorothea or 
Faust. 

French Language and Literature, 

Professor Schlichter. 
i. Elementary Course. — Grammar, drills in pronunciation 
and reading of easy prose and poetry. Throughout the year. 
Texts : Guerber's Contes et Legendes, Whitney's French 
Reader, Souvestre's Un Philosophe Sous les Toits, and a se- 
lected prose work. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 23 

2. Advanced Course. — Prose composition, rapid reading of 
modern prose in Fall and Winter terms. Works of Merim6e, 
George Sand, Enault, and Daudet. In Spring term dramas 
of Beaumarchars and Moliere. Open to students who have 
completed Course 1 or equivalent. 

3. Drama, Poetry and French Literature. Selected works 
of Corneille, Racine, Moliere. Selections from French poetry 
and reading of French literature. Throughout the year. 
Open to students who have completed Course 2. 

English Language and Literature. 

Professor Wolfe and Professor Schlichter. 

The aim in the Preparatory Department is to provide the 
best possible foundation for the college English work. The 
Junior class will study English Grammar throughout the year. 
The Middle class will study Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric in 
connection with the English classics. The Senior class will 
use Scott and Denney's Composition-Rhetoric in order to get 
an understanding of Elementary Rhetoric. Written work is 
required daily and corrections are made before the class. The 
study of the English classics is also continued. — Professor 
Schlichter. 

In the College Department the following courses are offered : 

1. Advanced Rhetoric. — Narration, description, exposi- 
tion, and lectures on criticism. Weekly themes with indi- 
vidual correction. Required throughout the Freshman Year. 
Text-books : Scott and Denney's Paragraph Writing, Lewis's 
Specimens of the Forms of Prose Discourse, selections from 
Scott, Irving, L,amb. — Professor Schlichter. 

2. Argumentation. — Study of masterpieces of argumenta- 
tion, briefs, and debates. Text-book : Baker's Principles of 
Argumentation. Required in Fall and Winter terms of the 
Sophomore Year. In Spring term the class will read speci- 
mens of the later English drama. — Professor Schlichter. 

3. History of English and American Literature. — Required 
throughout the Junior Year. Classes will meet daily. In 
the Fall term Johnson's English Words is carefully studied in 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

connection with the other work. Text-books : Pancoast's 
Introduction to English Literature, Pancoast's Introduction to 
American Literature. — Professor Wolfe. 

4. Literary Criticism and Development of the English 
Novel. — Required daily of Seniors throughout the Fall term. 
Text-book : Johnson's Elements of Literary Criticism. — Pro- 
fessor Wolfe. 

5. Shakespeare. — Reading of plays and interpretative crit- 
icism. Elective for Seniors in Winter term. — Professor 
Wolfe. 

6. Anglo-Saxon. — Study of grammar and reader that the 
student may acquire an elementary knowledge of our language 
in its oldest form. Elective for Seniors in Winter term. 

7. An elective course for Seniors to run through the 
Spring term will be announced later. 



Mathematics and Science, 



Mathematics and Astronomy, 

Professor Lehman. 

In the study of mathematics the discipline of the logical 
faculties is constantly sought, the aim being that every prin- 
ciple shall receive careful demonstration , and as far as possible 
be practically applied, so that students may acquire such a 
knowledge of mathematical principles as will give them power 
to solve practical problems and make original investigations. 

The required course extends through the Freshman and 
Sophomore Years, — the Freshmen studying Solid Geometry, 
Advanced Algebra, and Plane Trigonometry ; the Sophomores, 
Surveying, Spherical Trigonometry, and Analytical Geometry. 

In the Junior Year an elective course in Differential and 
Integral Calculus, and one in Elementary Differential 
Equations are offered to those who wish to do more than the 
work of the required course. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 25 

Plane Surveying follows Plane Trigonometry in the Fall 
Term of the Sophomore Year. The department is supplied 
with a complete set of instruments for this purpose, a first- 
class transit, leveling rod, etc., and field work is required to 
enable the student to learn the use of these. 

General Astronomy is studied during the Fall Term of the 
Senior Year (elective) . The department is provided with a four 
and a half inch refracting telescope, equatorially mounted. 

Natural Science, 

Professor McFadden and Professor Enders. 

The aim of the instruction in the preparatory department is 
to give the student a general knowledge of Physical Geogra- 
phy, Physiology, and Elementary Physics, and to familiarize 
him with the proper methods of investigation as a preparation 
for advanced work, through experiment, observation, and 
inference. 

Botany. — A standard text-book is used as a guide to study 
the plant, its parts, and their functions, A written record is 
required of the complete analysis of seventy-five plants that 
are mounted by the student in his herbarium. Fee, three 
dollars, for which herbarium and blanks will be furnished. — 
Professor Enders. 

Zoology. — The scope of the instruction includes the general 
principles of Zoology. Special attention is given to classifica- 
tion, distribution, heredity, evolution. Fee, five dollars. — 
Professor Enders. 

Biology. — This course covers the entire year, and must be 
entered in the Fall Term. It includes the detailed study of 
typical forms of life. Fee, three dollars per term. — Profess- 
or Enders. 

Chemistry. — Required of all Juniors. General Chemistry 
occupies the Fall and Winter terms. Two experimental lec- 
tures and one quiz are given each week, and a minimum of 
four hours weekly of laboratory work is required of all stu- 
dents. Each student is given private desk in laboratory and 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

is supplied with a complete outfit of apparatus for general 
chemical experiments. Remsen's Briefer Course furnishes the 
general basis for both recitation and laboratory work. Stu- 
dents who employ more than the minimum period in labora- 
tory will perform additional experiments selected from larger 
works and involving greater skill in manipulation. 

Qualitative Analysis, one recitation and six hours weekly in 
laboratory, occupies the Spring term. H. L. Wells's Qualitative 
Analysis is used as guide. Laboratory fee for Chemistry is 
five dollars a term, which includes limited breakage. — Pro- 
fessor McFadden. 

Physics, — Required of all Seniors. The year's course con- 
sists of three experimental lectures or recitations and four 
hours of laboratory work a week. Texts: Ames's Theory of 
Physics, and Ames and Bliss's Manual of Experiments in 
Physics. Laboratory fee is three dollars a term. — Professor 
McFadden. 

Geology. — Required of all Seniors in Science Course during 
Winter and Spring terms. A careful study of the entire field 
of Geology is made by lectures, recitations, and thesis work. 
About one-fourth of the time is devoted to petrology. Con- 
siderable laboratory work is required here, and the student 
must learn to identify common rocks and minerals. Texts : 
Scott or Brigham. Fee is two dollars for entire course. — 
Professor McFadden. 

Advanced Chemistry. — Elective for Seniors. A year's course 
in quantitative analysis. Considerable attention will also be 
paid to the preparation of pure salts and reagents. The 
course will consist of a minimum of eight hours weekly labo- 
ratory work with occasional lectures, and will aim to give a 
broad acquaintance with both gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis. Text : Talbot. Laboratory fee, six dollars a term. 
— Professor McFadden. 

Laboratories. 

Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics, have each sepa- 
rate modern laboratories. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 27 

The Biological laboratory, 40 x 18 feet, has accommodations 
for twenty students. 

There are two well equipped chemical laboratories and one 
large stock room. Desk room is offered for about fifty. 

Twenty-five students can work in the Physical laboratory 
without inconvenience. 

Historical and Political Science, 

Professor Shenk. 
In the Preparatory Department, one term is spent on Unit- 
ed States History ; one year on Ancient History, and one 
year on English History and Civics. See Preparatory Courses. 

1 . Political Economy. The effort is to ground the student 
well in the principles of the science, with frequent reference 
to its social and historical bearings. Fall and Winter Terms, 
Junior Year. 

2. Mediaeval History. The work in Mediaeval History 
includes an account of the great forces at work during the 
Middle Ages, with special reference to the development of 
the Papacy, the fusion of the Roman and the Teuton, Feudal- 
ism, the Crusades and the struggle between the Papacy and the 
Empire. The student is required to use the Library and to 
prepare articles upon assigned topics. Fall Term, Sophomore 
Year. Thatcher's Short History of Mediaeval Europe. 

3. Modern History. A careful study of the rise and prog- 
ress of the modern nations is made, including the manners, 
customs, religion, and intellectual and political development 
of the people. Essays on assigned topics. Winter and Spring 
Terms, Sophomore Year. Text-book : Sch will's Modern 
Europe. 

4. History of Education. Winter Term, Junior Year. See 
Pedagogy. 

5. History of Civilization. Elective for Seniors, Winter 
Term. 

6. American Constitutional History. Elective for Seniors. 

7. International Law. Elective for Seniors. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The English Bible, 

President Roop, and Professors Spangler and 
Daugherty. 

Each of the four College classes receives instruction in the 
Bible, the course being so arranged that the whole Bible is 
studied during the four years. One recitation each week 
throughout the year is required of every student. The course 
is as follows : 

Freshman Class. — The New Testament History, as set forth 
in the Gospels and the Acts. The Life of Christ is studied 
carefully by periods, and the order and connection of events 
are closely observed. The development of His ministry is 
marked, and the crisis and climaxes discovered. Works of 
reference are used freely to bring the student to realize the 
situation, ecclesiastically, politically, and socially. The Apos- 
tolic Age is taken up for the same kind of study. The stu- 
dent comes into direct contact with the Scriptures. One year, 
one hour per week. — Professor Daugherty. 

Sophomore Class. — The Old Testament History, as found in 
the historical books of the Old Testament, is carefully studied. 
The literary and spiritual qualities of the Bible are brought 
into view. One year, one hour per week. — Professor 
Spangler. 

Junior Class — The Prophets and Poets of the Old Testament,, 
with lectures in introduction, outlines, and study of selected 
passages. One hour each week. — President Roop. 

Senior Class. — The New Testament Doctrines, as they appear 
in the Epistles of St. Paul. These Epistles are studied in 
chronological order, and topically. — President Roop. 



Elocution and Oratory, 

The aim will be to give careful instruction in the arts of 
speech, — to teach the student to study his mental processes 
and their free, natural expression, and not mechanical rule. 
Practical drill in voice building, declamation, and kindred 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 29 

matters, will be required of the Freshman Class one hour each 
week. In the Sophomore Year, lectures on the general sub- 
ject of Oratory and Orators will constitute a main feature of 
the instruction, while from the Junior and Senior Classes ex- 
tensive original work in the making of orations, with public 
delivery of the same, will be required. 

Rhetorical Exercises* 

To afford sufficient opportunities for exercise in composition 
and public speaking, a system of Rhetorical Exercises has 
been put in operation. Advanced classes in the College are 
required to take pa^t in public exercises at least once a year. 

Drawing and Painting, 

The practice of drawing, painting, and carving teaches 
students to be more observant of their surroundings, discrim- 
inating in regard to good form, color, and design. Thorough 
instruction is provided by the department in drawing and paint- 
ing, aiming at the development of the aesthetic faculties and 
of the power of expression. See Department of Art. 



30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

General Information. 



GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS, 

The Campus includes about ten acres in the very heart of 
the beautiful Lebanon Valley, Annville, within easy access of 
the railroad station, post office, churches, and the usual busi- 
ness places. Upon it are erected three commodious College 
buildings. 

South College, or the Indies' Hall, is a large brick 
building, entirely separate from the other premises, and under 
the immediate care of the Preceptress. Young ladies from 
abroad are furnished a comfortable and pleasant home, where 
they have every advantage for study and general improvement. 

North College, or the Administration Building, also 
built of brick, will be, when finished, two hundred and ten 
feet in length. It is four stories high, and contains the Pres- 
ident's Office and Reception Room, the Recitation Rooms, 
Gymnasium, and the entire department of Natural Science 
with its physical apparatus, the chemical and biological labo- 
ratories, and the museum, besides dormitory facilities for 
more than one hundred students. The building is heated 
throughout by steam. 

The EnglE Music Hall, erected in 1899, a spacious and 
beautiful structure, of Hummelstown brownstone and of the 
Elizabethan order of architecture, is one of the most attractive 
and imposing of the College buildings. The cost of the build- 
ing was about twenty-five thousand dollars, and, in addition, 
over six thousand dollars have been expended in its furnish- 
ing. It supplies accommodations for the Director's Room and 
Office, the College and Society Libraries, a commodious and 
elegant Reading Room, Literary Society Halls, twelve or 
more Practice Rooms supplied with new pianos, and a large 
Auditorium with a fine pipe organ. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 3 1 

RELIGIOUS TRAINING. 

Religious training is regarded as essential to a thorough 
education. The Institution being founded in the interest of 
Christ and Christian scholarship, assumes for its work the 
joint culture, by all proper means, of both intellect and heart. 
More than ninety per cent, of the students are communicant 
members of the Church, and a Christian spirit underlies and 
animates the instruction in the different departments. But 
beyond this, special provision is made for more direct and 
positive Christian influence. 

i. A regular service, consisting of the reading of Scriptures, 
singing, and prayer, is held in the College Chapel every school 
morning. All students are required to be present. 

2. Weekly prayer meetings are conducted by the students 
in the College. 

3. There are flourishing organizations of the Young Wo- 
men's and Young Men's Christian Associations in the Col- 
lege, which hold their meetings on Sunday afternoon of each 
week. These are great auxiliaries to the religious life of the 
College. 

4. All resident students of the College are required to attend 
public worship on the Sabbath in the United Brethren Church, 
except those who, on account of church membership or wish 
of parent or guardian, may prefer to attend church elsewhere. 

5. A Bible Normal Class, for the instruction of Sunday- 
school teachers, is conducted semi-weekly. The course of 
instruction extends over one year, and is one provided for 
and used by the Bible Normal Union. A diploma, issued by 
the Sunday-school Board of the United Brethren Church, is 
granted to students who complete the course. 

6. Regular recitations are heard during the year in Bible 
History, in the Greek of the New Testament, and in the Eng- 
lish Bible. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

Next to moral and religious character, the first of all things 
to be secured and cared for in the training of the young, is 
sound physical health. Accordingly, wise and liberal provi- 
sion is made to preserve and promote it by daily exercise in 
the open air, and by a carefully guarded course of g}^mnastic 
training. Class instruction in light gymnastics is offered at 
moderate cost, under the direction cf the director of physical 
culture. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and par- 
liamentary training are afforded by the societies of the Col- 
lege. There are three of these societies — one sustained by the 
young ladies, the Clionian ; and two by the young men, the 
Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. Each society has a well- 
furnished hall and its own library. These societies are con- 
sidered valuable agencies in College work, and students are 
advised to unite with one of them. 

LIBRARIES AND READING ROOM. 

The College library, with the Libraries of the Literary So- 
cieties, to which all the students have daily access, contains 
about ten thousand volumes, and is arranged with a view to 
making it specially valuable as a reference library. By gift 
or purchase, additions are constantly made to the list of books 
in the different departments. 

With the Library is connected a Reading Room, provided 
with the issues of the current press, and with the leading pe- 
riodicals of the day, including several of the best European 
journals, together with cyclopaedias, dictionaries, and other 
works of reference. The more valuable journals in each de- 
partment of instruction are provided, and the current numbers 
of these publications are always accessible in the Reading 
Room. The librarian is in constant attendance to guide and 
assist students in their researches. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 33 

MATRICULATION- 

Matriculation is regarded as a pledge on the part of the 
student to obey all the rules of the College, and is permitted 
only on that condition. 

A fee of five dollars each year is required of every regularly 
matriculated student in the Literary Department, and three 
dollars of each student taking full music course, on the pay- 
ment of which a certificate will be given, entitling the holder 
to the privileges of the Library, Reading Room, and Gymna- 
sium. For students taking piano or voice only, the fee for 
the year is only one dollar. For literary students entering for 
the Spring Term only, the fee is two dollars. 



DISCIPLINE, 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced to 
good conduct and diligence by higher motives than fear of 
punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and 
generous feelings natural to young men and women engaged 
in literary pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of 
conduct. It is the policy of the administration to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students 
are invited and expected to cooperate with the Faculty ; but 
good order and discipline will be strictly maintained, and mis- 
conduct punished by adequate penalties. The Laws of the 
College, enacted by the Board of Trustees, are as few and 
simple as the proper regulation of a community of young men 
and women will permit. These are printed, and a copy is 
placed in the hands of every student at the beginning of each 
year. These Laws must be observed, not only in their letter, 
but in their spirit. The College will not place its stamp or 
bestow its honors upon any one who is not willing to deport 
himself becomingly. Every unexcused absence from any 
College duty, failure or misdemeanor of a student, is reported 
to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

GRADING AND EXAMINATION. 

Students are graded on their work in the Recitation Room. 
One hundred per centum is the standard in perfection of 
scholarship. Written examinations of classes are held at the 
close of each term. These examinations are reckoned as 
equivalent to one-half of the recitation work of the term, or 
one-third of final grade, in estimating the student's standing. 
No student who omits attendance upon an examination in any 
study will receive a grade in the study, or be regarded as 
having finished it, until the examination is passed. A grade 
of less than 70 per centum will compel the student to submit 
to a second examination after further preparation, or to repeat 
the study with the next lower class. Applicants for special 
examinations will be charged an appropriate fee. 

The final examinations of the Seniors are held two weeks 
before Commencement, from which time they are subject to 
such duties only as are required for their preparation for grad- 
uation. 

At the end of each term, the class-standing of each student 
in all studies will be reported to the parent or guardian, who 
is earnestly recommended to give these reports careful atten- 
tion, and promptly to notify the President of any failure to 
receive them. 



PROMOTION. 

At the beginning of each term, the old classes are reorgan- 
ized and new ones formed. At or near the close of each 
academic year, the names of all the members of each class 
separately come before the Faculty for promotion, and those 
of the Senior class for graduation, and no student is promoted 
to a higher class, or to graduation, except upon the unanimous 
vote of the Faculty. No student will be advanced to regular 
standing in the next class until all conditions are made up. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 35 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

No student may leave the College without the personal per- 
mission of the President, or, in his absence, of the Senior 
Professor. Because of the hurtful influence the absence of a 
student, for even a day, exerts on his progress, nothing but 
sickness or unavoidable accident is sufficient to excuse him 
from regular attendance at recitations. 

Any student withdrawing from the Institution during term- 
time, without giving due notice, and having permission so to 
do, will be marked upon the records as having irregularly 
withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class, must present 
to the Professor in charge of said work a satisfactory excuse 
for being absent. 



LECTURE COURSE. 

A course of popular lectures will be delivered during the 
year by some of the most noted lecturers in the field. 

In addition to these, there will be lectures by members of 
the Faculty. 



TERMS AND VACATIONS, See Calendar, page 2. 



DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred, by a vote of 
the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Faculty, up- 
on students who have satisfactorily completed the Classical 
Course. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science, or of Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy is in like manner conferred upon students who satis- 
factorily complete the Latin Scientific or Greek Scientific 
Course. 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

The College bills and Society dues of candidates must be 
paid or secured to the satisfaction of the President, by Saturday 
before Commencement. The graduation fee, and the fee for 
subsequent degrees, is five dollars and seventy-five cents. 



GRADUATE WORK. 



In order to encourage the systematic prosecution of studies 
after graduation, graduate work for both resident and non- 
resident alumni of Lebanon Valley College, as well as for 
alumni of other recognized colleges, is provided. 

The courses of study have been arranged with reference to 
the needs of those who purpose passing to a master's degree, 
but they may also be pursued by those who desire only the 
culture or knowledge, without academic honors. 

One year of resident, or three years of non-resident study, 
will, under favorable circumstances, qualify candidates for 
examination for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of 
Science, and all who pass satisfactorily such examination and 
present a thesis upon a topic approved by the Faculty, will be 
recommended for the degree. This provision for the second 
degree in no way invalidates the present privilege of attaining 
the degree in course by all graduates of three years' standing 
who have completed a standard course of professional study, 
and present a satisfactory thesis upon a topic approved by the 
Faculty. Examinations will] be conducted in May of each 
year. A charge of twenty-five dollars will be made for the 
examination and diploma fees. In all cases a thesis (not few- 
er than 2,000 words, typewritten,) must be submitted at least 
one month before close of College year. Accepted theses be- 
come the property of the College. 

Application for information respecting graduate work must 
be made, in writing, to the President of the College. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 37 

DORMITORIES. 

The two main buildings are used for dormitory purposes. 
A Professor resides in each building. The rooms are heated 
by steam, and each building is supplied with water. Young 
men from a distance are expected to room in the dormitories. 
Should any prefer to take rooms elsewhere, they will be 
charged with the rent of the vacant rooms in the dormitories. 
No student, however, will be held responsible for the rent of 
more than one room. Bach student will be held accountable 
for any damage he may cause to the College property. Stu- 
dents will be held individually responsible for all damage 
done to their rooms, by whomsoever committed. 

Bach student upon taking a room in the College is required 
to deposit $2 with the President as a guarantee against loss of 
keys and the destruction of property. The amount not used 
will be refunded at the end of the year. 

Students are required to furnish their own bedding, except 
mattress. Bvery article of clothing, and other personal prop- 
erty should be distinctly marked with the owner's full name. 



38 



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40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, 

This Department has a two-fold aim : First, to give thorough prepa- 
ration to those desiring to enter collegiate classes ; Second, to afford to 
those who are unable to take a complete college course opportunities 
whereby they can gain much needed and practical mental development 
for life's work. 

COURSES OF STUDY, 

The work has been outlined with great care, and it is believed that 
the courses offered present as valuable and compact four years' of study 
as can be selected. The work of the first preparatory year is devoted to 
the study of such subjects as will probably enable the student to pursue 
the work of the later course. Experienced instructors have charge of 
the teaching. 

Three distinct courses are offered, upon the completion of any of 
which a certificate or diploma signed by the President of the college is 
granted. 

The Classical Preparatory Course. 

The Latin Scientific Preparatory Course. 

The Greek Scientific Preparatory Course. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMITTANCE, 

Candidates for admission should be at least twelve years of age, and 
must present from teachers or other trustworthy persons letters of intro- 
duction indicating good character and correct habits. To facilitate clas- 
sification, those who have been in attendance at other schools should 
bring certificates of honorable dismissal, with statements of studies pur- 
sued and work completed. 

Students received on certificate are classified "on trial." Failure to 
maintain standing will cause re-arrangement of course and classification. 
Thorough work is expected of all. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION, 

Students are required to complete any given study before passing to 
a corresponding higher one. Those who complete any one of the pre- 
scribed courses will be granted a diploma, but no one will be graduated 
who has not been connected with the school for at least one term. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 4 1 



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42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

NORMAL DEPARTMENT, 

The Normal Department is designed to furnish for teachers who 
desire to equip themselves better for their work, and who yet may not 
wish to complete a college course, a short and practical course. 

The Department offers a course of three years, upon completion of 
which a certificate will be awarded. The course affords an opportunity 
for the student to select largely the studies to which he wishes to devote 
his time. It includes a thorough study of Elementary Psychology, and 
its application to teaching. The studies run parallel with the studies in 
the departments of the College. Time spent here, where the work is 
thoroughly done, and where the field covered is within the student's 
grasp, will yield far more satisfactory results than the same time spent 
in trying to cover a larger territory in a short and hurried course. 

The Annville Normal is connected with the College in the Spring 
term, — the aim being to make a thorough review of all the common 
branches. Many students avail themselves of this opportunity. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

First Year, 

Fai,i, Term — Advanced Arithmetic, English Grammar, Physical Geog- 
raphy, Drawing. 

Winter Term — Rhetoric and Literature, Algebra, Astronomy, Drawing. 

Spring Term — Rhetoric and Literature, Algebra, Physiology, Civil 
Government. 

Second Year. 

Fai,i, Term — Latin, Algebra, Two Electives. 
Winter Term — Latin, Geometry, Two Electives. 
Spring Term — Latin, Geometry, Two Electives. 

For the Electives the student may elect any studies in the College 
courses, not beyond the Freshman Year, for which he is prepared. 

Third Year. 

Fall Term— Latin, Elementary Physics, Two Electives. 
Winter and Spring Terms — Latin, Elementary Physics, Botany, Two 
Electives each term. 
The Electives may be any studies in the College courses, not be- 
yond the Junior Year, for which the student is prepared. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 43 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL, 



SUMMER COURSES OF STUDY- 



June 24— August 2, 1901, 

The objects of the Summer School are : 

1. To give students of Freshman Class and of the Preparatory De- 
partment, who are conditioned in one or two of the studies of their class, 
an opportunity to make up their deficiences and become regular ; and 
such students are expected, if able to do so, to avail themselves of this 
opportunity. 

2. To assist students who desire to enter a college, or the Senior 
Preparatory Class in the following fall, but whose preparation is too de- 
ficient, to make the needful preparation. 

3. To give teachers an opportunity to prepare themselves more 
fully for teaching — teaching the higher branches in the public schools 
and academies. 

During this summer will be offered the following 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
Mathematics — Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry. 
English — Grammar, Rhetoric, English and American Literature. 
■GREEK — Beginners' Class, Anabasis, and Homer. 
Latin — Beginners' Class, Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, Horace. 
German — Beginners' Class, German Prose and Translation. 
French — Beginners' Class. French Prose and Translation. 
Science — Physical Geography, Physics, Astronomy, Botany. 
History — General, English, American, and Civics. 
Economics and Sociology — Political Economy, Sociology. 
Psychology and Pedagogics — Psychology, Methods, School Manage- 
ment, History of Education.. 

If possible, satisfactory arrangements will be made concerning any 
study desired that is not mentioned in the courses. Credit toward a de- 
gree will be given upon completion of any course. 

Instruction in Music, Art, Elocution, Physical Culture, and Busi- 
ness will be given during the session. Fine opportunities in these sub- 
jects are offered. 

Recitations six days in the week, making in reality a seven weeks' 
term with the expenses of six. 

The term will open on Monday, June 24th, and close on Friday, 
August 2d. The tuition in the literary department is ten dollars. 
Jidom and board can be had for three dollars per week. 

Write to the President for special circulars and any other information. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Expenses. 

The charge for tuition is forty dollars a year, or one dollar per 
week. A student who is absent from College on account of sickness or 
for any other cause, and retains his place in his class, during such ab- 
sence, pays the term bill in full. 

Boarding, washing (12 pieces a week), light, fuel, room rent, and 
tuition in the literary department, in any four (4) branches, or regular 
work. 

Fall Term, sixteen weeks, $ 74 00 

Winter Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Spring Term, twelve weeks, 56 00 

Total for the year of 40 weeks, $186 00 

Special Examinations in each Branch, not recited in College, . . . $4 00 
Additional charge to cover expenses of graduation, 5 75 

The charges for room rent, heat, and furniture are made on the 
basis of two persons to each room. If a student prefers to room alone 
he will be charged fifty cents additional a week. Any student not 
boarding in the institution and occupying a room in the building will be 
charged a reasonable rent for the same. 

Extra washing, plain pieces, fifty cents a dozen. White dresses,, 
etc., extra. 

No bill will be made for a shorter period than one term; and no de- 
ductions will be made except in the charge for board in case of a pro- 
longed absence on account of sickness. 

No reduction for absence of two weeks or less at the beginning, or 
the last four weeks before the close of the term. 

If a student quit the Institution for any time, whether with or with- 
out permission, he cannot return afterward to the same class, except by 
paying the regular dues for the whole period of such absence. 



Terms of Payment, 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirtj' days before 
Commencement. 

College dues are to be paid in advance. This rule will be enforced. 
No student will be admitted to classes until all bills are satisfactorily- 
settled with the Financial Secretary. 




NEW ENGLE MUSIC HALL. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 45 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, 



FACULTY, 



REV. HERVIN U. ROOP, A.M., Ph.D., 
President. 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, (Lon., Eng.) 

Director. 

Piano, Voice, Organ, Harmony, Etc. 

MABEL E. MANBECK, 
Piano. 

CHAS. H. OLDHAM, 
Piano. 

MADAME VON BEREGHY, 
Violin, Strings, Etc. 

M. ETTA WOLFE, A. M., 
English Literature, German. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. II., 
French, English. 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97, 
Painting, Drawing, Etc. 

ANNA C. R. WALTER, A. B., 
Elocution, Oratory, Etc. 

The Conservatory, 

The new Conservatory building is now opened and is fully equipped 
for the study of all branches of Music and Art. 

The building contains the Director's room and office, College Li- 
brary and Reading Room, fourteen or more practice rooms, and a large 
auditorium with a pipe organ. 

From the beginning grade to the full development of artistic re- 
quirement, the faculty and the different courses of study insure a steady 
progress. The Conservatory Diploma is a sufficient evidence of the 
standing of the possessor. 

In addition to the regular certificates and graduating diplomas, the 
Conservatory is empowered to confer the different certificates given by 
the London College of Music, of London, England, with which college 
the Conservatory is in affiliation. 

The Faculty is made up of the best instructors. 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

THE DIRECTOR. 
Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc, 

Trinity College, Dublin; London College of Music. 

Professor Herbert Oldham, the Director, was educated in England,. 
Germany, and France. He studied Piano and Harmony, Organ, and. 
chorus conducting, under Sir George Macfarren; Voice under Signor 
Rendeggar in London; Piano and Composition under Emil Haberbier in 
Paris, and Piano under Joachim Raff in Germany. 

He came to America in 1SS1 as Solo Pianist to the celebrated Violin- 
ist, Cammilla Urso. Was called to Western College, Toledo, Iowa, in 
'82, and was Director there during four years. Professor Oldham went 
from there to Shenandoah, Iowa, and then to Lincoln, Nebraska. 

In 1883 he was made an Honorary Life Fellow and member of the 
board of Examiners of the Society of Science, Letters, and Art, of Lon- 
don, England, and four years later was appointed representative for 
Iowa and local examiner of the London College of Music. He was one 
of the founders (and President in '85) of the Iowa Music Teachers* 
State Association. 

The Conservatory of Music is organized for a fourfold purpose: 
(1) To continue musical and literary studies as a broad basis for regular 
collegiate work in the college. (2) To use the art of music as a means 
of intellectual, aesthetical, and moral cultnre. (3) To furnish instruc- 
tion in all branches of music to special or regular students. (4) To edu- 
cate teachers of music. 

It is divided into the following Courses of Instruction : 

PIANOFORTE. — The regular course of study in the Piano Depart- 
ment is divided into sixteen grades, from the most rudimentary studies 
to the great concertos, etc. 

Send to the Director for separate catalogue of the Conservatory, con- 
taining the complete courses in all branches. 

VOICE. — The Vocal Course is divided into twelve grades. The 
most approved methods are used. Complete course in Conservatory 
catalogue. 

PIPE ORGAN.— The Course in Pipe Organ Music may be taken ur> 
by any student who proves able to enter Section A of Grade 3 of the 
Piano Course. 

In this study special attention will be given to chorus accompani- 
ment and to registration, thereby rendering the student capable of tak- 
ing a position as organist and choir director and creditably filling the 
same. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 47 

REED ORGAN. — The Course in Reed Organ can be taken up inde- 
pendently of the Piano Course. Special attention will be given to 
training the student so as to form a capable organist, and thoroughly to 
understand the various combinations of the different stops. 

HARMONY. — The complete Course in Harmony will occupy the 
sections indicated by B Grade 2, to C Grade 3 in connection with the 
Piano Course, but any student can enter the Harmony Class at any time. 

SIGHT READING AND CHORUS CLASS.— A class for this study 
will be formed at the beginning of each term. The importance of ac- 
quiring the ability to read music at sight can not be too strongly urged 
upon those who desire to lay the proper foundation for a musical edu- 
cation. All pupils in the Vocal Department should give this course spe- 
cial attention. 

A Chorus Class will also be formed. 

LECTURES.— There will be given Lectures on Musical History 
each term, and all regular students of the Conservatory will be required 
to attend them. 

GLEE CLUB.— The Conservatory has also formed a Glee Club for 
male voices, which meets once a week during the college year. 

CONCERTS. — Recitals and concerts by the students, the faculty, or 
leading artists, will be held at stated intervals throughout the year. 

GENERAL REMARKS.— Pupils will be accepted in any of the de- 
partments for which they are fitted, whether they desire to complete the 
course or not. 

Most especial care will be bestowed upon beginners in all subjects. 

Students are advanced according to their knowledge and profi- 
ciency in work, and not according to the number of terms and lessons 
taken at the Conservatory. 

GRADUATION. — Students will be eligible for graduation on com- 
pletion of the prescribed courses. Each graduate must give during the 
last year of study at least one recital in addition to the final performance 
at commencement concert. 

Not only must every candidate for graduation give evidence of re- 
quisite musical talent and capacity, but also complete in the course of 
literary studies, English Grammar, three terms' work; Rhetoric and 
Composition, three terms' work; Literature, French or German, each 
three term's work. Free tuition in any one of the literary studies. 

SUMMER SCHOOL.— A Summer Music School will be held be- 
ginning July 1 and ending September 1. 

Send for separate circular to the Director. 



4 8 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



EXPENSES. — The following table will show the expenses in all 
departments of the Conservatory : 



PRIVATE LESSONS. 


J2 

a <d 

58 


a! 
II 

H 


bo 1/ 
B > 


Voice, Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Director. 
Voice, Piano or Organ, One per week, by Director. 
Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Assistant, 
Piano or Organ, One per week, by Assistant, 
Harmony, 


824 00 
12 00 
16 00 
10 00 
16 00 


$18 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


$18 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


CLASS LESSONS. 








Harmony, One lesson per week, 

Theory, One lesson per week, 

Musical History, Etc., One lesson per week, 


$10 00 
3 00 
2 00 


$7 50 
2 00 
2 00 


$7 50 
2 00 
2 00 


USE OP INSTRUMENTS. 








Piano, One hour per day, 
Reed Organ, One hour per day, 
Pipe Organ, One hour per day. 


$2 00 

1 50 

2 50 


$1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


$1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


BOARD, ROOM, ETC. 




$44 00 




Board, Room Rent, Fuel, Light, Washing (12 pieces). 


$58 00 


$44 00 



Pipe Organ Students must pay at the rate of io cents per hour for 
organ blower. 

Fee for Graduation Diploma, $5.00. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS.— No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In cases of long continued illness the loss is shared equally 
by the college and the student. 

All tuition is payable strictly in advance. Students upon being as- 
signed lesson hours must present to the Director a card from the Presi- 
dent. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., 
the beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade 
will be issued at close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., 

Address, 
Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc. , Director, 
or Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., President, 

AnnvilLE, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 49 

DEPARTMENT OF ART, 



MISS EDITH H. BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97, INSTRUCTOR. 



" A talent for any art is rare ; but it is given to nearly every one to 
cultivate a taste for Art ; only it must be cultivated with earnestness ; 
"the more things thou learnest to know and enjoy, the more complete 
and full will be for thee the delight of living." — Plato." 

The aim of this Department is : 

1. To Study Art for Art's Sake. 

2. To combine Art and Literature as a broad basis for regular 
college work. 

3. To use Art as a means of intellectual, artistic, and moral culture. 

4. To give instruction in all lines of Art. 

5. To instruct students for teachers. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
A — The Technical Course. 

Technical instruction is given in the following classes : 

Class 1 — Drawing in black and white, from life, nature, flowers, 
casts, etc. 
gjjjg* Class 2 — Still-life class. Drawing and painting in water colors. 

Class 3 — Painting in oil and water colors. 
r Class 4 — Portrait class. Drawing and painting from the draped 

Class 5 — China painting. [life model. 

B — History and Criticism of Art. 

Course 1 — Theory of Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. This 
course has special reference to the Principles of Art Criticism. 
Course 2 — History of Art. (a) Ancient Art. (b) Christian Art 
through the period of the Renaissance, (c) Modern Art. 

DIPLOMAS. 

Students who complete one or more of the classes of the Technical 
Course will receive certificates signed by the Instructor. Diplomas are 
given^by the College to those who have finished full course. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 
Students of this Department giving their principal attention to Art 
may take any one of the literary studies without charge. No reduction 
is made for absence from class or private lessons ; if however absent on 
account of sickness, the lesson may be made up by the student. 

Credit will be given such as have done work in Art elsewhere. 
There will be given one exhibition of the student's work during the 
year. All work done during the College Year is expected to be shown 
at the annual exhibition in June. 

Lectures on Art will be given during the year. 

TUITION — As the Junior Year Preparatory Class is required to take 
drawing, the tuition for this class is three dollars for the year ; to others 
the terms are as follows : 

Fall Winter Spring 
Drawing — Charcoal, Pencil, etc. Term Term Term 

Two lessons a week, $10.00 $8.00 $8.00 

Painting — Oil, Water Colors, 

China, etc. ; Two lessons a week, $15.00 $10.00 $10.00 
Single Lessons, 75c. 
Children's Saturday Class, . $2.50 $2.00 $2.00 



50 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS, 



NAME. 

Arabelle E. Batdorf, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College. 
Emma R. Batdorf, 

'P9, Lebanon Valley College. 
Ella Nora Black, 

'96, Lebanon Valley College. 
John H. Best, 

'95, Lehigh University. 
Joseph Daugherty, 

'89, Lebanon Valley College. 
Raymond P. Dougherty, 

'97, Lebanon Valley College. 
Enid Daniel, 

/poo, Lebanon Valley College. 
I. Calvin Fisher, 

'go, Ursinus College. 
Grant B. Gerberich, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College. 
John R. Geyer, 

'98, Lebanon Valley College. 
A. B. Hess, 

'95, Ohio University. 
Frank F. Holsopple, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College. 
Isaac W. Huntzberger, 

'99, Lebanon Valley College. 
J. Alex. Jenkins, 

'96, Lebanon Valley College. 
Anna Mary Keller, 

'97, Lebanon Valley College. 
Annie E. Kreider, 

7900, Lebanon Valley College. 
Lillie G. Kreider, 

/900, Lebanon Valley\College. 
Mary E. Kreider, 

'99, Lebanon Valley College. 
Reba F. Lehman, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College. 
Alma M. Light, 

y 99, Lebanon Valley College. 



RESIDENCE. 
Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Toledo, Iowa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Royalton, Pa. 

Collegeville, Pa. 

Parkerford, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Oberlin, Ohio. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



51 



Lewis Walter Lutz, 

'g8, Otterbein University. 
Harry W. Mayer, 

'g6, Lebanon Valley College. 
Harry E. Miller, 

'99, Lebanon Valley College. 
James C. Oldt, 

'go, Central Penna. College. 
Edwin A. Pyles, 

'97, Dickinson Seminary. 
Jacob Hassler Reber, 

'95, Lebanon Valley College. 
Irvin E. Runk, 

'gg, Lebanon Valley College. 
D. H. Scanlon, 

'go, Union Theological Seminary. 
Ottaman Scbeider, 

'89, Western Theological Seminary, 
G. Mason Snoke, 

igoo, Lebanon Valley College. 
Willis G. Tobey, 

'g8, Otterbein University. 
William A. Zehring, 

'g8, Otterbein University . 



Hawkinstown, Va. 
Sacramento, Pa. 
Dayton, Ohio. 
Put-in-Bay, Ohio. 
York, Pa. 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Berrysville, Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Front Royal, Va. 
Front Royal, Va. 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS, 



Henry H. Baish, 
Edward M. Balsbaugh, 
Morris W. Brunner, 
William H. Burd, 
Robert R. Butterwick, 
Lewis E. Cross, 
Samuel F. Daugherty, 
Frank B. Emenheiser, 
John E. Kleffman, 

B. S., '8g, Lebanon Valley College. 
Karnig Kuyoomjian, Classical, 

Emma F. Loos, Scientific, 

Thomas F. Miller, Classical, 

Susie S. Moyer, Classical, 

David M. Oyer, Classical, 

William Otterbein Roop, Classical, 



SENIORS, 

Classical, 
Scientific, 
Classical, 
Scientific, 
Classical, 
Scientific, 
Classical, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 



Altoona. 
Hockersville. 
New Bloomfield. 
New Bloomfield. 
Jonestown. 
Rayville, Md. 
Dallastown. 
Dallastown. 
Duncannon. 

Tarsus, Asia Minor. 
Berne. 

Donally's Mills. 
Derry Church. 
Upper Strassburg. 
Harrisburg. 



52 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



William Spencer Roop, 
Samuel Edwin Rupp, 
A. Garfield Smith, 
Cyrus W. Waughtel, 
Harry H. Yohe, 

George H. Albright, 
John H. Alleman, 



Scientific, 
Classical, 
Classical, 
Classical, 
Scientific, 

JUNIORS, 

Scientific, 
Classical, 



Highspire. 
Oberlin. 

Rohrersville, Md. 
Red Lion. 
Shippensburg. 



Ph. B., '97, Illinois Wesleyan University 



Shamokin. 
Johnsonburg. 



Kerwin W. Altland, 

* Jacob B. Artz, 
David D. Buddinger, 
Donald J. Cowling, 
Hoffman Derrickson, 
Claude R. Engle, 
Clinton Cleveland Gohn, 
Joseph Lehn Kreider, 
Thomas A. Lawson, 
Artie Wesley Miller, 
Luther B. Nye, 

Edwin K. Rudy, 

William J. Sanders, 

William A. Sites, 

Alfred Charles Tennyson Sumner, 

* Deceased. 



Philosophical, Seven Valleys. 

Scientific, Annville. 

Scientific, Sinking Spring. 

Classical, Scott dale. 

Scientific, Newport. 

Scientific, Harrisburg. 

Scientific, York Haven. 

Scientific, Annville. 

Scientific, Dallastown. 

Scientific, Mechanicsburg. 

Scientific, Middletown. 

Classical, Union Deposit. 

Classical, Sunbury. 

Classical, Harrisburg. 

Classical, Bonthe, Africa. 



William C. Arnold, 
Charles W. Christman, 
Urias J. Daugherty, 
Milton E. Donough, 
J. Walter Esbenshade, 
Thomas W. Gray, 
Charles C. Haines, 
Sara Helm, 
Harry A. Honker, 
Isaac Moyer Hershey, 
Walter D. Kohr, 
Hiram F. Rhoad, 
Emmet C. Roop, 
Lillian Schott, 
Ralph C. Schaeffer, 
Paul P. Smith, 
Clinton A. Sollenberger, 
Paul M. Spangler, 



SOPHOMORES, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 



York. 

St. Thomas. 

Dallastown. 

Myerstown. 

Bird-in-Hand. 

Ickesburg. 

Bellegrove. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Manheim. 

York. 

East Hanover. 

Harrisburg. 

Lebanon. 

Hummelstown. 

Annville. 

Harrisburg. 

Lebanon. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



53 



Edith Spangler, Classical, Lebanon. 

Aaron W. Steinruck, Scientific, Deodate. 

FRESHMEN, 

William R. Appenzeller, Classical, Charnbersburg. 

J. Wesley Balsbaugh, Classical, Hockersville. 

Christian S. Bomberger, Classical, Bismarck, 

David Dickson Brandt, Scientific, Newville. 

Charles E. Boughter, Scientific, Lebanon. 

Charles G Dotter, Scientific, East Hanover. 

Harry L. Eichinger, Scientific, Union Deposit. 

Edna Engle, Classical, Harrisburg. 

Edward S. Fenstermacher, Scientific, Cressona. 

Charles A. Fisher, Classical, Lebanon. 

Charles H. Fisher, Classical, York. 

John H. Gray bill, Classical, Annville. 

William M. Grumbine, Scientific, Annville. 

Frank S. Heinaman, Classical, Columbia. 

Amos L. House, Scientific, Markleville. 

Charles M. Keath, Scientific, Rexmont. 

J. Arthur Knupp, Scientific, Penbrook. 

Homer M. B. Lehn, Classical, Alger. 

David E. Lesher, Scientific, Kleinfeltersville. 

Mary N. Light, Classical, Lebanon. 

Isaac F. Loos, Scientific, Berne. 

William E. Riedel, Classical, Dallastown. 

Charles E. Roudabush, Scientific, Myersville, Md. 

Frank L. Scott, Classical, Rayville, Md. 

John S. Shaud, Classical, Annville. 

John M. Sheesley, Scientific, Penbrook. 

Albert T- Shenk, Scientific, Annville. 

Russell S. Showers, Classical, Sheffield, Ontario. 

Monroe W. Smeltzer, Classical, Penbrook. 

Elizabeth Stehman, Scientific, Mountville. 

Clyde Thompson, Scientific, Clearfield. 

Elmer B. Ulrich, Scientific, Annville. 

Benjamin H. Weidman, Scientific, Sinking Spring. 

Harry Yiengst, Scientific, Mt. Zion. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Titus A. Alspach, Lebanon. 

Charles A Boyer, Cleona. 

Helen H. Bresler, Lebanon. 

John H. Baker, Union Deposit. 

David Fritz, Annville. 



54 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Sannie Hartz, Palmyra. 

Frank L. Heilman, Annville. 

John A. Hershey Lebanon. 

Clara Euston, Lebanon. 

Robert L. Jones, Lickdale. 

Laura Kreider, Cleona. 

Fannie Kreider, Cleona. 

Sara A. Klick, Lebanon. 

D. W. Light, Bellegrove. 

John F. Light, Bellegrove. 

Harry W. Light, Bellegrove. 

Ray G. Light, Avon. 

John H. McLaughlin, Carsonville. 

Calvin T. Peiffer, Avon. 

Mamie B. Risser, Lawn. 

Edwin M. Sando, Lebanon. 

Clark T. Shirk, Avon. 

Mary Warner, Annville. 

PREPARATORY. 

Virgie M. Bachman, Annville. 

Harvey Barnhart, Annville. 

Archie S. Beatty, Quincy. 

Thomas B. Beatty, Quincy. 

Edward F. Beckmeyer York. 

William W. Berry, Philadelphia. 

Lizzie Boeshore, Lickdale. 

Gertrude May Bowman, Dayton, Ohio. 

Ruth Braselmann, Annville. 

Raymond K. Buffington, Elizabethville. 

Lillie S. Burkey, Lebanon. 

William H. Chrisemer, Middletown. 

Michael Clemens, Lebanon. 

Arthur R. Clippinger, Mowersville. 

Lulu M. Clippinger Chambersburg. 

Joseph L. Dougherty, Shoemakersville. 

Nellie Davis, New Cumberland. 

Mary E. Dean, Annville. 

Oscar J. Deitzler Hummelstown. 

Carrie Dunkle, Boyertown. 

Clara Eisenbach, Red Lion. 

Bessie A. Englar Gratis, Ohio. 

Neta B. Englar, Gratis, Ohio. 

Alma Engle, Harrisburg, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 55 

Ralph Engle, Palmyra. 

Raymond Engle, Palmyra. 

Park F. Esbenshade, Bird-in-Hand. 

Elmer E. Erb Hockersville. 

Frank B. Erb, Shiremanstown. 

Harry Fahr, Lebanon. 

Grace Fisher, Palmyra. 

Irvin H. Fisher, Cressona. 

Charles A. Fry, Bellegrove. 

Elias M. Gehr, Cedar Lane, 

Frank Gray, Blain. 

Margaret Gray, Ickesburg. 

Robert B. Graybill, . . ■. Annville. 

Harry M. Haak, Myerstown. 

John B. Hambright, , Florin. 

Adam G. Heilman, Greble. 

Valeria G. Heilman, Greble. 

Laura Helms, Lebanon. 

Rush M. Hendricks, Hummelstown. 

Lizzie Henry, | Palmyra. 

Albert Herr, Annville. 

Clarence Herr, Annville. 

John F. Herr, Annville. 

May B. Hershey, Deny Church. 

Ruth M. Hershey, Derry Church. 

Harry F. Hinkle, Annville. 

Eugene E. Hite, Royalton. 

Mazie M. Horst, , Palmyra. 

Mary Horstick, Palmyra. 

Titus H. Kreider, Annville. 

Kathryn M. Landis, Union Deposit. 

John Lehman, Annville. 

Max F. Lehman, Annville. 

Jean S. Leininger, Myerstown. 

Jennie Leslie, Annville. 

Ruth M. Leslie, Palmyra. 

John A. Light West Lebanon. 

Nettie M. Lockeman, York. 

John G. Loose, Palmyra. 

Harry E. McLaughlin, Carsonville. 

Arthur S. Miller, ' Annville. 

Byron W. Miller, Upper Berne. 

Harry M. Moyer, Derry Church. 

Martha Manbeck, Lebanon. 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Edith J. Myers, Mt. Joy. 

* Ellen L. Oberholtzer, Fredericksburg. 

George Dickson Owen, New Bloomfield. 

Charles C. Peters, Altenwald. 

Samuel A. Rauch, Lebanon. 

Rosa Reddick, Walkersville, Md. 

George E. Reiter, Myerstown. 

Mame B. Risser, Lawn. 

Harry S. Rittle, Lawn. 

John R. Robb, Lebanon. 

John E. Rooks, Rochester Mills. 

Charles Schaffner, Palmyra. 

Weidman R. Seibert, Sinking Spring. 

Cyrus E. Shenk, Deodate. 

Lucy M. Sherk, Harrisburg. 

Ira R. Shoop Mt. Holly Springs. 

Charles L. Shuler, Montgomery's Ferry. 

William J. Smith, Oliveburg. 

Emanuel Snyder, Yoe. 

Max O. Snyder, Liverpool. 

Mary Stover, Hummelstown. 

Walter Strayer, Flinton. 

Jennie Updegrave, Sacramento. 

George B. B. Ulrich, Myerstown. 

Jennie Vallerchamp, Millersburg. 

Raymond Wagner, Suedburg. 

Charles A. Weaver Steelton. 

Edith Weisenborn, Highspire. 

John Yiengst, Mt. Zion. 

Mary Zacharias, Sinking Spring. 

Mary E. Zimmerman, Annville. 

* DCCC&S6(1. 

STUDENTS IN MUSIC AND ART, 
SENIOR CLASS, 

Lillie Burkey, Piano, Lebanon, Pa. 

Anna E. Kreider, Voice, Annville, Pa. 

Lizzie G. Kreider, Piano, Annville, Pa. 

Kathryn Landis, Piano, Union Deposit, Pa. 

Ruth Leslie, Piano, Palmyra, Pa. 

Sue Moyer, Piano, Derry Church, Pa. 

Mary Zacharias, Piano, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Ella Ault, Annville. 

Virgie Bachman, Annville. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



57 



Arabelle Batdorf, 
Emma R. Batdorf, 
Edw. F. Beckmeyer, 
Ella N. Black, 
Pearl Bodenhorn, 
Walter Boltz, 
Alta R. Booth, 
Ella Bomberger. 
Florence Bowman, 
Gertrude Bowman, 
Ruth Braselman, 
Lillie Burkey, 
Annie Capp, 
Rosa Cohn, 
Mary C. Cottrell, 
Nellie Davis, 
Mamie Dean, 
Carrie Dunkle, 
Clara Eisenbach, 
Elizabeth Englar, 
Neta Englar, 
Alma Engle, 
Claude Engle, 
Raymond Engle, 
Grace Fisher, 
Mabel Foltz, 
Amy I. Gable, 
Mamie Gantz, 
Lillian Gebhart, 
Edith Gingrich, 
Rosa Gingrich, 
Margaret Gray, 
Thomas W. Gray, 
Robert Graybill, 
Ada Groff , 
Edna Groff, 
John B. Hambright, 
Sannie Ilartz, 
Laura Helms, 
Lizzie Henry, 
Martha B. Henry, 
Valeria Heilman, 
Lawerence DeW. Herr, 
Mabel Herr, 



Annville. 

Annville. 

York. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

New Cumberland. 

Annville. 

Boyertown. 

Red Lion. 

Gratis, Ohio. 

Gratis, Ohio. 

Harrisburg. 

Harrisburg. 

Palmyra. 

Palmyra. 

Campbelltown. 

Lebanon. 

Grantville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Lawn. 

Ickesburg. 

Ickesburg. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Harrisburg. 

Florin. 

Palmyra. 

Lebanon. 

Palmyra. 

Annville. 

Greble. 

Annville. 

Annville. 



58 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



John S. Hershey, 
Harry Hinkle, 
Bettie Hoffer, 
Mazie M. Horst, 
Harry Ilgenfritz, 
Ella Kauffman, 
Walter R. Kohr, 
Mrs. Kovaleski, 
Anna Kreider, 
Lillian Kreider, 
Louise Kreider, 
Mary E. Kreider, 
Mary Elizabeth Kreider, 
Kathryn Landis, 
Jean Leininger, 
Reba Lehman, 
Jennie Leslie, 
Ruth Leslie, 
David Lesher, 
Ray Light, 
Nettie Lockeman, 
Isaac F. Loos, 
A. W. Miller, 
Byron Miller, 
Charlotte Miller, 
Susie Moyer, 
Edith Meyers, 
Elizabeth Meyers, 
Pauline Meyer, 
* Ellen Oberholtzer, 
Rosa Reddick, 
Mamie Reiter, 
Susie Reiter, 
Anna Mary Risser, 
Mamie Risser, 
Harry S. Rittle, 
Miriam Saylor, 
Gertrude Shaeffer, 
Bessie Seltzer, 
John Sheesley, 
Lucy Sherk, 
Mrs. H. H. Shenk, 
Howard Shive, 
Elizabeth Shope, 



Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Palmyra. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

York. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Union Deposit. 

Myerstown. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Palmyra. 

Kleinfeltersville. 

Avon. 

York. 

Berne. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Berne. 

Lebanon. 

Derry Church. 

Mt. Joy. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Fredericksburg. 

Walkersville, Md. 

Myerstown. 

Myerstown. 

Lawn. 

Lawn. 

Ono. 

Annville. 

Hummelstown. 

Lebanon. 

Penbrook. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Myerstown. 

Annville. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



59 



Chas. L. Shuler, Donally's Mills. 

Elizabeth Smith, Lebanon. 

Elizabeth Stehman, Mountville. 

Mary Stover, Hummelstown. 

Kathryn Ulrich, Hummelstown. 

Anna Umbenhen, Myerstown. 

Jennie Updegrave, Sacramento, Pa. 

Jennie Vallerchamp, Millersburg. 

Mabel Walmer, Lebanon. 

Mary Zacharias, Sinking Springs. 

Mary Zimmermaan, Annville. 
* Deceased. 

CHORUS CLASS, 

R. W. Appenzellar. Anna Kreider. 

W. C. Arnold. Lillie G. Kreider. 

Vergie Bachman. Nettie Lockeman. 

Arabelle Batdorf. Jennie Leslie. 

Emma Batdorf. Ruth Leslie. 

Lillie Burkey. Kathryn Landis. 

C. W. Christman. Alma Light. 

Lewis Cross. Edith Myers, 

Nellie Davis. A. W. Miller. 

Carrie Dunkle. Susie Moyer. 

S. H. Derrickson. W. S. Roop. 

Claude Engle. A. C. T. Sumner. 

Bessie Englar. F. B. Scott. 

Raymond Engle. Lucy Sherk. 

Alma Engle. W. J. Sanders. 

Grace Fisher, Jennie Vallerchamp. 

Thomas W. Gray. H. H. Yohe. 

Rudy Herr. Mary Zimmerman. 

Valeria Heilman. Mary Zacharias. 

NORMAL STUDENTS. 

Titus Alspach, Lebanon. 

John J. Artz, Ono. 

Ira Bacastow, Palmyra. 

Samuel Beamesderfer, Kleinfeltersville. 

A. S. Beatty, Quincy. 

Miles Becker, Myerstown. 

Irene Bicksler, Palmyra. 

Lizzie Boeshore, Lickdale. 

Annie Bowman, Annville. 

Raymond Boger, Annville. 



60 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Nellie Boltz, Annville. 

Harry Bomberger, Lebanon. 

Lizzie Bomgardner, Fredericksburg.. 

Lizzie Books, Cleona. 

Laura Bowman, Bismarck. 

Ervin Boyer, Mt. Zion. 

Harry A. Brandt, Lebanon. 

Clayton L- Brandt, Fontana. 

James Brightbill, Myerstown. 

Walter Brubaker, Lebanon. 

A. H. Burkbolder, Campbelltown. 

Lizzie Clouser, Bellegrove. 

Samuel Deininger, Alger. 

D. Miller Early, Coheva. 

John S. Early, Coheva. 

Harry Eberly, Kleinfeltersville. 

Cora G. Ebersole, Annville. 

Mabel Ebersole, Cleona. 

John A. Eckert, Iona. 

Cyrus Ellenberger, Annville. 

Joseph Ellenberger, Annville. 

M. B. Farling, Palmyra. 

H. S. Fegan Cleona. 

Emma K. Fisher Myerstown. 

J. B. Funk Cleona. 

J. H. Garman, Mt. Zion. 

H. G. Gerber, Mt. Zion. 

Philip Getz, East Hanover. 

Kate Glick, Mt. Zion. 

W. G. Goodman, West Hanover. 

Harry Gruber, Annville. 

LilHe E. Gundrum Mt. Zion. 

Harry M. Haak Myerstown. 

C. C. Hains, Bellegrove. 

Calvin Heilman, Cleona. 

Edith Heilman, Cleona. 

Clara Heilman Cleona. 

Frank Heilman, Annville. 

Mary Heilman, Cleona. 

Lemuel Heisey, Palmyra. 

John H. Herr, Hummelstown.. 

Denver Herr, Annville. 

Carrie Hess, Annville. 

Lizzie Hoffner, Centre View. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 6 1 

Ammon Horst Schaefferstown. 

Allen G. Horst, Schaefferstown. 

Mary D. Horstick, Palmyra. 

Arthur Hostetter, Annville. 

Paul Krall, Iona. 

Oscar Leese, Annville. 

Nancy Light, Avon. 

Harry Light, Alger. 

Oscar S. Light, Annville. 

Naomi R. Light, Avon. 

Iva Maulfair, Annville. 

John McCurdy, Lebanon. 

Lizzie McLaughlin, Myerstown. 

Harry E. McLaughlin, Carsonville. 

George Merkle, East Hanover* 

W. E. Miller, Mt. Zion. 

Harvey Moyer, Palmyra. 

Morris Moyer, Palmyra. 

Harry Moyer, Palmyra. 

Henry Nowlen, Annville. 

Edward Olewine, Mt. Zion. 

Katie Philips, Lickdale. 

William E. Rank, East Hanover. 

John R. Robb Lebanon. 

Rhoda Riegel, Lebanon. 

John Royer, Lebanon. 

Mary A. Seabold, Annville. 

Raymond F. Schaak, Lebanon. 

Samuel Shanaman, Annville. 

Walter Schock, Mt. Zion. 

John H. Sherk, Annville. 

Earnest Shirk, Annville. 

Beckie Smith, Reistville. 

Harry A. Smith, Fontana. 

Sarah Snavely, Lebanon. 

John I. Snavely, Ono. 

G. M. Snoke, Annville. 

Mabel Snyder, Rexmont. 

Harvey Snyder, Cleona. 

Alice Spangler, Bellegrove. 

John H. Sprecher, Lebanon. 

Annie Steiner, Myerstown. 

Cora E. Stoever, Lebanon. 

Harry Swanger, Avon. 



62 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Sadie A. Swanger, Avon. 

Walter M. Swope, Avon. 

Pierce E. Swope, Hamlin. 

George B. Uhrich, Myerstown. 

Clarence Ulrich^ Annville. 

J. S. Ulrich, Annville. 

Raymond Wagner, Suedburg. 

Sadie J. Wagner, Mt. Zion. 

Allen G. Walmer, East Hanover. 

Anna M. Walter, Annville. 

Harry Witmoyer, Bellegrove. 

Jonathan Yiengst, Mt. Zion. 

John Yiengst, Mt. Zion. 

Harry L. Zartman, Mt. Zion. 

George Zimmerman, Alger. 

Mary R. Zinn, Myerstown. 

SUMMARY, 

Students in College Department, 146 

Students in Preparatory Department, 101 

Students in Normal Department, 114 

Students in Music, Painting, etc., 112 

Total for 1900-1901, deducting names repeated, 433 

Summary of Attendance for Last Decade- 





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42 


15 


10 


76 


121 


1892-3 " 


4 


7 


9 


4 


9 




33 


27 


17 


64 


112 


1893-4 


6 


10 


3 


8 


7 




34 


51 


15 


40 


116 


1894-5 


9 


4 


7 


8 


19 




47 


48 


9 


44 


117 


1895-6 


5 


7 


10 


11 


18 




51 


48 


7 


48 


140 


1896-7 


11 


10 


9 


17 


11 




58 


33 


6 


48 


124 


1897-8 


17 


12 


25 


19 


22 


16 


111 


66 




72 


204 


1898-9 


17 


23 


21 


22 


21 


21 


125 


76 




105 


251 


1899-1900 


28 


24 


20 


20 


28 


26 


146 


78 




118 


290 


1900-01 


31 


20 


17 


21 


34 


23 


146 


101 


114 


112 


433 



Total Collegiate Alumni, 260 ; 



Musical Alumni, 53. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 63 

The Alumni Association, 



Officers for 19004901, 

President — Rev. Joseph Daugherty, B.S., '89, Carlisle, Pa. 
Secretary — Miss Ella Nora Black, B.S., '96, Annville, Pa. 
Treasurer — Rev. I. H. Albright, Ph.D., '76, Shamokin, Pa. 



Program for Commencement Week, 
1901, 

Sunday, June 9th, 10. 15 o'clock A. M. , Baccalaureate Discourse 
by President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D. 

Sunday, June 9th, 8.00 P. M., Address before the Christian 
Associations by John Sparhawk, Jr., Esq., Philadelphia. 

Monday, June 10th, 7.45 P. M., Graduating Exercises of the 
Department of Music. 

Tuesday, June nth, 9 o'clock A. M., Annual Meeting of 
Board of Trustees. 

Tuesday, June nth, 2 P. M., Dedicatory Exercises of Music 
Hall. 

Tuesday, June nth, 7.30 P. M., Public Alumni Meeting. 

Wednesday, June 12th, 2 o'clock P. M., Class Day Exercises. 

Wednesday, June 12th, 7.30 P. M., Conservatory Concert. 

Thursday, June 13th, 10 o'clock A. M., Graduating Exercises 
of Class of 1 90 1. Commencement Address by Dr. 
Newell Dwight Hillis, Brooklyn, N. Y. Conferring of 
Degrees and Announcements, by President Roop. 

Thursday, June 13th, 7.30 P. M., Reception by the Senior 
Class. 



64 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

CONTENTS, page 

Plans and Purpose of the College 3 

Corporate Rights 3 

Form of Bequest 3 

Organization 3 

Board of Trustees 4 

Officers and Committees of the Board 5 

The Faculty and Other Officers . 6 

Degrees Conferred, June 14, 1900 8 

Admission 9 

To Freshman Standing 9 

On Certificate 10 

Conditional Admission . . 10 

Courses of Study ZI 

The Classical Course 11 

The Latin Scientific Course 14 

The Greek Scientific Course 18 

Departments of Instruction 18 

Mental and Moral Philosophy, Logic, etc 19 

The Greek Language and Literature 20 

The Hebrew Language and Literature 21 

The Latin Language and Literature 21 

The German Language and Literature 22 

The French Language and Literature 22 

The English Language and Literature 23 

Mathematics and Astronomy 24 

Natural Science 25 

Historical and Political Science 27 

The English Bible 28 

Elocution and Oratory 28 

Drawing and Painting 29 

General Information 30 

The Location 30 

Building and Grounds 30 

Religious Training 31 

Health and Physical Culture 32 

Literary Societies 32 

Libraries and Reading Room 32 

Matriculation and Discipline 33 

Grading and Examination, and Promotion 34 

Leave of Absence 35 

Degrees and Diplomas 35 

Graduate Work 36 

Dormitories 37 

Schedule of Recitations 38 

Preparatory Department 40 

Outline of Study 41 

Normal Department 4 2 

Summer School 43 

Expenses 44 

Conservatory of Music 45"48 

Department of Art 49 

Students 5° 

Alumni Officers Commencement Program 63