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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Catalogue, 19014902, 



Lebanon V alley College 



ANNVILLE, PA 




Chartered 1867. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley190102leba 



The Thirty- sixth Annual Catalogue 



of the 



Lebanon Valley College 

COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

THE ACADEMY SCHOOL OF EXPRESSION 

BEPARTMENT OF PEDAGOGY SCHOOL OF ART 
SUMMER SCHOOL 

1901-1902. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



PUBLISHED BY THE COEEEGE 
19c 2 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CALENDAR. 



1902 Fall Term. 

September S, Monday — Examinations for Admission. 
September 9, Tuesday, 9 a. m. — Fall Term begins. 
November 27, Thursday — Clionian Literary Society Anni- 
versary i 
December 19, Friday — Fall Term ends. 

1903 Winter Term. 

January 6, Tuesday, 9 a. m. — Winter Term begins. 
February 10, Sunday — Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
February 22, Sunday — Washington's Birthday. 
March 27, Friday — Winter Term ends. 

Spring Term. 

April 7, Tuesday, 9 a. in. — Spring Term opens. 

April 10, Friday — Anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary 
Society. 

May 1, Friday — Anniversary of the Philokosmian Literary 
Society. 

May 29, Friday — Decoration Day. 

June 14., Sunday, 10.15 a - !>l - — Baccalaureate Discourse by 
President Roop. 

June 14, Sunday, 6 p. m. — Campus Praise Service. 

June 14, Sunday, 8 p. m. — Annual Address before the Chris- 
tian Associations. 

June 15, Monday, y.jo p. m. — Conservatory Concert. 

June 16, Tuesday, 9 a. m. — Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

June 16, Tuesday, 7.30 p. m. — Junior Oratorical Contest. 

June 17, Wednesday, j.jo p. m. — Commencement of Depart- 
ment of Music. 

June iS, Thursday , 10 a. m. — Commencement Exercises. 

June 19, Friday — Spring Term ends. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



The Corporation. 



Trustees. 

Name Residence Term Expires 

President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., and Faculty, Ex- Officio. 



Representatives from Pennsylvania Conference. 



REV. Ezekiel B. Kephart, D.D., LL.D. 

Rev. J. S. Miles, D.D., Ph.D., 

Samuel W. Clippinger, 

Rev. Daniel Eberly, D.D., 

John C. Knipp, 

Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, A. M., 

Rev. John E. Kleffman, A. B-, 

William A. Lutz, 

John C. Heckart, 

Henry Wolf, 

Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A. M., 

Reno S. Harp, Esq., A. M., 

George C. Snyder, 

Rev. Charles W. Stinespring, 

Rev. John B. Chamberlain, 



Westerville, Ohio. 


1905 


Annville. 


1905 


Chambersburg. 


1904 


Abbottstown. 


1903 


Baltimore, Md. 


I9°5 


Chambersburg. 


1904 


Duneannon. 


1904 


Shippensburg. 


1903 


Dallastown. 


I9°5 


Mount Wolf. 


1905 


Hagerstown, Md. 


1905 


Frederick, Md. 


1904 


Hagerstown, Md. 


1903 


Frederick, Md. 


1904 


Washington, D. C. 


1903 



Representatives from Eastern Pennsylvania Conference. 



William H. L'lrich, 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D.D., 

Benjamin H. Engle, 

Henry H. Kreider, 

Rev. Solomon L. Swartz, 

Adam R. Forney, A. M., 

Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, D.D., 

Jonas G. Stehman, 

Isaac B. Haak, 

Samuel F. Engle, 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph.D., 

Simon P. Light, Esq., A. M., 

Rev. Charles Mutch, 

Valentine K. Fisher, A. B., 



Hummelstown. 

Dayton, O. 

Harrisburg. 

Annville. 

Middletown. 

Annville. 

Reading. 

Mountville. 

Myerstown. 

Palmyra. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

New Holland. 

Berne. 



1903 
1904 
1903 
1902 
1902 
1904 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1903 
1902 
1902 
1904 
I9©3 



Representatives from Virginia Conference. 



John H. Maysilles, A. M., 

Rev. Sanford D. Skelton, 

Rev. Sylvester K. Wine, A. M., 

Henry B. Miller, 

Rev. A. P. Funkhouser, B. S., 

Rev. J. R. Ridenour, 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A. M., 



Munson, W. Va. 
Winchester, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Middletown, Md. 
Daj'ton, Va. 



1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1903 
1905 
J 903 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Corporation. 



Officers of The Board of Trustees. 

President— HON. WILLIAM H. ULRICH. 

Secretary— REV. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT. 

Treasurer— PRESIDENT HERVIN U. ROOP. 

Executive Committee. 

HERVIN U. ROOP, Chairman. 

ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Secretary. 
ISAAC B. HAAK, HENRY H. KREIDER, 

BENJAMIN H. ENGLE, HIRAM B. DOHNER, 

WILLIAM H. ULRICH, SIMON P. LIGHT. 

Committees. 



Finance. 
Hiram B. Dohner, Chairman. Henry H. Kreider, 

Solomon L. Swartz, Samuel W. Clippinger, 

J. C. Heckart, A. P. Funkhouser. 

Endowment. 
EzekiEE B. KepharT, Chairman. Wm. H. Washinger, 
Daniee Eberey, Adam R. Forney, 

John C. Knipp, Simon P. Light. 

Faculty. 
William A. LuTz, Chairman. Isaac H. Albright, 

Samuel D. Faust, Isaac B. Haak, 

Reno S. Harp. 

Library and Apparatus. 
Geo. C. Snyder, Chairman. John R. Ridenour, 

C. W. Stinespring, C. A. Mutch, 

S. K. Wine. 

Grounds, Buildings, and Domestic Department. 
Benjamin H. EnglE, Chairman. A. B. Statton, 
James B. Chamberlain, Valentine K. Fisher, 

Sanford D. Skelton. 

Auditing. 
Samuel F. Engle, Chairman. Henry B. Miller, 

John H. Maysilles, J. N. Fries. 



Matron. 
ANNA MARY" KELLER, B. S. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers. 



REV. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, A. M., Ph.D., 
President, and Professor of Philosophy. 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A. M., Secretary, 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

REV. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

MAUD ETTA WOLFE, A. M., Preceptress, 

Professor of the English Language and Literature, 

and Instructor in German. 

REV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A. M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, (London, Eng.), 

Director of Department of Music, and Professor of Voice, 

Piano, Organ, and Theory. 

THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A. B., Registrar, 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
Professor of French and Associate in English. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., Librarian, 
Professor of History and Political Science. 

HOWARD EDWARD ENDERS, M. S., 
Professor of the Biological Sciences. 

REV. LEWIS FRANKLIN JOHN, A. M., B. D., 

Pi of essor of English Bible, and Pedagogy, and 
Associate Professor of Philosophy. 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, 
Principal of Art Department. 

Professor of German Language and Literature. 

CHARLES H. B. OLDHAM, 

Assistant in Piano. 

BYRON W. KING, A. M., Ph. D., 

Director School of Expression. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers. 



EMMA R. BATDORF, B. S., 

Instructor in Elocution and Oratory. 

REBA F. LEHMAN, A. B., 
Instructor in French. 

THOMAS S. STEIN, A. M., 
Instructor in Latin. 

NETTIE R. DUNAHUGH, M. E., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

S. E. McCOMSEY, 
Instructor in Violin, Strings, Etc. 

WILLIAM C. ARNOLD, 
Stenography and Typewriting. 

HOFFMAN DERICKSON, 
Laboratory Assistant in Biological Sciences. 

THOMAS W. GRAY, M. E., 
Instructor in Physical Culture. 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, 

GRANT B. GERBERICH, B. S., 

ZAC. A. BOWMAN, 

G. MASON SNOKE, A. B., 

HOMER M. B. LEHN, 
Instructors in Department of Pedagogy. 

BISHOP E. B. KEPHART, D.D., LL.D., 
Lecturer on International Law. 

DANIEL EBERLY, D.D., 
Lecturer on Philosophy of History. 

BISHOP J. S. MILLS, D.D., Ph.D., 
Lecturer on Sociology. 

REV. J. T. SHAFFER, 
College Pastor. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Baccalaureate Degrees 

Conferred by the College, 

June 13, 1901. 



I. IN CURSU. 

Scientiae Baccalaureus. 

Edward M. Baesbaugh, Frank B. Emenheiser, 

William H. Burd, Emma F. Loos, 

Lewis E. Cross, William Spencer Roop, 

Harry H. Yohe. 

Artium Baccalaureus. 

Henry H. Baish, Thomas F. Mieeer, 

Morris W. Brunner, Sue S. Mover, 

Robert R. Butterwick, David M, Oyer, 

Samuee F. Daugherty, Wileiam Otterbein Roop, 

John E. Keeffman, S. Edwin Rupp, 

Karnig Kuyoomjian, A. Garfieed Smith, 
Cyrus W. Waughtee. 



II. PER EXAMINATIONEM. 
Scientiae Magister. 
Harry W. Mayer. 

Artium Magister. 

John R. Geyer, Amos B. Hess, 

Morrison Weimer. 

Divinitatis Doctor. 

Rev. Hiram B. Dohner, B. D., Reading. 

REV. F. E. Tower, A. M., B. D., New York City. 

Graduates in Music. 

LiEEiE Burkey, Kathryn M. Landis, 

Anna E. Kreider, Ruth Leslie, 

Lieeie G. Kreider, Sue S. Mover, 

Mary Zacharias. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 



PLAN AND PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE. 

Corporate Rights. — The College, established in 1866, was 
incorporated with full University privileges, by the Legisla- 
ture of Pennsylvania in an Act approved by the Executive on 
the 5th of April, A. D. 1867. The Management of the College 
is committed to a Board of Trustees, elected by the Annua! 
Conferences cooperating in the enterprise, one-third of whom 
are elected annually for a term of three years. The members 
of the Facult} 7 sustain an ex-officio relation. 

The charter indicates that it was the purpose of the found- 
ers to plant an institution which would become so ample in 
facilities and manifold in departments as to furnish instruction 
in all the subjects of a general and special education. Toward 
this original purpose the College is rapidly advancing. 

Form of Bequest. — To persons desiring to aid in increasing 
the efficiency of the College in the work of preparing young 
men and women for usefulness, the following form of bequest 
is recommended : 

I give and bequeath to the Lebanon Valley College, at 
Annville, Pa., the sum of dollars, for the general pur- 
pose of said school. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The Campus includes about ten acres in the very heart of 
the beautiful Lebanon Valley, Annville, within easy access of 
the railway station, post office, churches, and the usual busi- 
ness places. LTpon it are erected three commodious College 
buildings. 

South College, or the Ladies' Hall, is a large brick 
building, entirely separate from the other premises, and under 
the immediate care of the Preceptress. Young ladies from 
abroad are furnished a comfortable and pleasant home, where 
they have every advantage for stud} 7 and general improvement. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 9 

North College, or the Administration Building, also 
built of brick, will be, when finished, two hundred and ten 
feet in length. It is four stories high, and contains the Pres- 
ident's Office and Reception Room, the Recitation Rooms, 
and the entire department of Natural Science with its 
ph} T sical apparatus, the chemical, physical, and biological labo- 
ratories, and the museum, besides dormitory facilities for 
more than one hundred students. The building is heated 
throughout by steam. 

The Engle Music Hall, erected in 1899, a spacious and 
beautiful structure, of Hummelstown brownstone and of the 
Elizabethan order of architecture, is one of the most attractive 
and imposing of the College buildings. The cost of the build- 
ing was about twenty -five thousand dollars, and, in addition, 
over six thousand dollars have been expended in its furnish- 
ing. It supplies accommodations for the Director's Room and 
Office, the College and Society Libraries, a commodious and 
elegant Reading Room, Literary Society Halls, twelve or 
more Practice Rooms supplied with new pianos, and a large 
Auditorium with a fine pipe organ. 

RELIGIOUS TRAINING. 

Religious training is regarded as essential to a thorough 
education. The Institution being founded in the interest of 
Christ and Christian scholarship, assumes for its work the 
joint culture, by all proper means, of both intellect and heart. 
More than ninety per cent, of the students are communicant 
members of Church, and a Christian spirit underlies and 
animates the instruction in the different departments. But 
beyond this, special provision is made for more direct and 
positive Christian influence. 

1. A regular service, consisting of the reading of Scriptures, 
singing, and prayer, is held in the College Chapel every school 
morning. Students are required to be present. 

2. Weekly prayer meetings are conducted by the students 
in the College. 



IO LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

3. There are flourishing organizations of the Young Wo- 
men's and Young Men's Christian Associations in the Col- 
lege, which hold their meetings on Sunday afternoon of each 
week. These are great auxiliaries to the religious life of the 
College. 

4. All resident students of the College are required to attend 
public worship on the Sabbath in the United Brethren Church, 
except those who, on account of church membership or w r ish 
of parent or guardian, may prefer to attend church elsewhere. 

5. A Bible Normal Class, for the instruction of Sunday- 
school teachers, is conducted semi-weekly. The course of 
instruction extends over one year, and is the one provided for 
and used by the Bible Normal Union. A diploma, issued by 
the Sunday-school Board of the United Brethren Church, is 
granted to students who complete the course. 

6. Regular recitations are heard during the year in Bible 
History, in the Greek of the New Testament, and in the Eng- 
lish Bible. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 
Next to moral and religious character, the first of all things 
to be secured and cared for in the training of the young, is 
sound physical health. Accordingly, wise and liberal provi- 
sion is made to preserve and promote it by daily exercise in 
the open air. * 

LITERARY AND MUSICAL ADVANTAGES. 
An important feature of the educational w r ork at Lebanon Yal- 
ley is the course of lectures by the President and the Professors 
and by invited speakers from abroad. These are to be deliv- 
ered before the students of all departments once a month. An 
evening course of five cumbers is conducted by the Christian 
Associations of the College. Their course the past year was : 
The Almondbury Hand Bell Ringers, of England ; The 
Weeks Company ; Hon. G. A. Gearhart, of Buffalo ; Metro- 
politan Star Quintett ; and Rev. S. Parkes Cadman, of Brook- 
lyn. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE . I I 

The President of the College expects to give the Freshman 
class one hour ever) r other week during a portion of the first 
semester a series of practical lectures designed to aid in the 
formation of good intellectual habits, and to acquaint the 
incoming students with the spirit and purpose of the College. 

The presence of the Conservatory of Music, with the Elocu- 
tion and Art Departments, brings unusual facilities for aesthetic 
unfolding within the reach of students in all departments. 
The man\ T rehearsals of the Conservator}' of Music and the 
numerous concerts and recitals by prominent musicians assist 
in the cultivation of a high musical standard, and afford op- 
portunities that cannot be equaled except in our largest cities. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and par- 
liamentary training are afforded by the societies of the Col- 
lege. There are three of these societies — one sustained by the 
young ladies, the Clionian ; and two by the young men, the 
Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. Each societ)- has a well- 
furnished hall and its own library. These societies are con- 
sidered valuable agencies in College work, and students are 
advised to unite with one of them. 

LIBRARIES AND READING ROOM. 

The College Library, with the Libraries of the Literary 
Societies, is arranged with a view to making it specially valu- 
able as a reference library. By gift or purchase, additions are 
constantly made to the list of books in the different depart- 
ments. 

With the Library is connected a Reading Room, provided 
with the issues of the current press, and with the leading pe- 
riodicals of the day, including several of the best European 
journals, together with cyclopaedias, dictionaries, and other 
works of reference. The more valuable journals in each de- 
partment of instruction are provided, and the current numbers 
of these publications are always accessible in the Reading 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Room. The librarian is in constant attendance to guide and 
assist students in their researches. During term time the 
hours are 12.30 P. M. to 7 P. M. 

LABORATORIES AND MUSEUM. 

The Biological Laboratory on the first floor of the central 
building, is a large room, 40x18 ft., well lighted and thor- 
oughly fitted with desks, lockers, water, and gas for twenty- 
five students. The laboratory is well equipped with new 
Bausch and Lomb compound microscopes, B. and L. im- 
proved laboratory microtome, paraffine oven, constant tem- 
perature oven, incubator, dissecting microscopes, and such 
other apparatus, reagents, and stains as are needed. 

Marine material for dissection and forms not found in this 
locality are obtained from marine supply stations. 

The Chemical Laboratory. The general experimental labo- 
ratory in basement of main building contains thirty-two sepa- 
rate desks and lockers, with water, gas and sink. The labo- 
ratory is further supplied with hoods for removing noxious 
gases, blast lamps for glass working, gas collecting and 
measuring apparatus, scales, and Queen balance. Each stu- 
dent is given in addition complete individual equipment for 
performing all experiments of Remsen's College Chemistry. 

The Qualitative and Quantitative Laboratory is on the first 
floor of the central building. It is equipped with new Sar- 
torius balance with gold-plated weights, blast lamps, oven, 
aspirators, still, for continuous production of distilled water, 
batteries for electrolysis, platinum ware, and all other neces- 
sary apparatus for general quantitative analysis. 

The Physical Laboratory, connected with physical lecture 
room, on first floor, by double doorway, is a commodious, 
well lighted room, fitted with laboratory tables, gas, water, 
steam, aspirators, et cetera. While the apparatus is not exten- 
sive, all is of modern design, and with additions to be made next 
year will provide equipment for practically all experiments of 
Ames and Bliss's Manual of Physical Experiments. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 1 3 

The Museum occupies a separate room on the second floor. 
About four hundred feet of shelf room is filled with a good 
collection of specimens in geology, mineralogy, economic 
botany, and zoology. 

The Stock Room joins the general chemical laboratory in 
basement. Here are kept reserve chemicals and chemical 
apparatus. 

The gas machine, ioo light capacity, is also in this room. 
The gas pipes supplying laboratories have parallel air pipes 
from blower, so connected that gas can be made any desired 
quality as it enters the bunsen burners. 

MATRICULATION. 

Matriculation is regarded as a pledge on the part of the 
student to obey all the rules of the College, and is permitted 
only on that condition. 

A fee of five dollars each year is required of every regularly 
matriculated student in the Literary Department, and three 
dollars of each student taking full music course, on the pay- 
ment of which a certificate will be given, entitling the holder 
to all the privileges of the College. For students taking 
piano or voice or art only, the fee for the year is only one 
dollar. 

DISCIPLINE. 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced to 
good conduct and diligence by higher motives than fear of 
punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courtesy and 
generous feelings natural to young men and women engaged 
in literary pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of 
conduct. It is the policy of the administration to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students 
are invited and expected to cooperate with the Faculty ; but 
good order and discipline will be strictly maintained, and mis- 
conduct punished by adequate penalties. The Laws of the 
College, enacted by the Board of Trustees, are as few and 
simple as the proper regulation of a community of young men 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

and women will permit. These are printed, and a copy is 
placed in the hands of every student at the beginning of each 
year. These Laws must be observed, not only in their letter 
but in their spirit. The College will not place its stamp or 
bestow its honors upon any one who is not willing to deport 
himself becomingly. Every unexcused absence from any 
College duty, failure or misdemeanor of a student, is reported 
to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 

CLASS STANDING. 

The scholarship of the students is determined by result of 
examinations and daily recitations combined. The grades are 
carefully recorded. 

Reports of standing will be made to parent or guardian at 
end of each term when desired by them, or when the Faculty 
deems it expedient. The standing is indicated generally by 
classification in six groups, as follows : 

A. (passed with honor) signifies that the record of the 
student is very satisfactor}^. 

B. (passed with fair standing ) signifies that the record of 
the student is clear. 

C. (passed with low standing) does not at the time condi- 
tion the student, but warns him that his record is unsatisfac- 
tory and that improvement must be made. Unless he im- 
proves he may be required to repeat the subject. 

D. (deficient) signifies that a portion of the work required 
has not been accomplished. The satisfactory completion of 
such work will be necessary to entitle the student to a clear 
record. . 

E. (conditioned) imposes a condition on the student. Con- 
ditions incurred in January must be made up in June ; condi- 
tions incurred in June must be made up in September. Fail- 
ure to make up a condition at the time appointed is equal to 
a record of F. 

F. (failed completely ) signifies that the student must drop 
or repeat the subject, and cannot be admitted to subjects de- 
pendent thereon. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE I 5 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be re- 
quired to repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year, or to 
withdraw. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

No student may leave the College without the personal per- 
mission of the President, or, in his absence, of the Senior 
Professor. Because of the hurtful influence the absence of a 
student, for even a day, exerts on his progress, nothing but 
sickness or unavoidable accident is sufficient to excuse him 
from regular attendance at recitations. 

Any student withdrawing from the Institution during term- 
time, without giving due notice, and having permission so to 
do, will be marked upon the records as having irregularly 
withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class, must present 
to the Professor in charge of said work a satisfactory excuse 
for being absent. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMAS. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred, by a vote of 
the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Faculty, up- 
on students who have satisfactorily completed any of the 
Groups. 

The College bills and Society dues of candidates must be 
paid or secured to the satisfaction of the Treasurer, by Satur- 
day before Commencement. The graduation fee is ten dollars. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

In order to encourage the systematic prosecution of studies 
after graduation, graduate work for both resident and non- 
resident alumni of Lebanon Valley College, as well as for 
alumni of other recognized colleges, is provided. 

The courses of study have been arranged with reference to 
the needs of those who purpose passing to a master's degree, 
but they may also be pursued by those who desire only the 
culture or knowledge, without academic honors. 



I 6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

One year of resident, or three years of non-resident study, 
will, under favorable circumstances, qualify candidates for 
examination for the degree of Master of Arts, and all 
who pass satisfactorily such examination and present a 
thesis upon a topic approved by the Faculty, will be recom- 
mended for the degree. This provision for the second 
degree in no way invalidates the present privilege of attain- 
ing the degree in course by all graduates of three years' 
standing who have completed a standard course of professional 
study, and present a satisfactory thesis upon a topic approved 
by the Faculty. Examinations will be conducted in May of 
each year. A charge of twenty-five dollars will be made for, 
the examination and diploma fees. In all cases a thesis (not 
fewer than 2,000 words, typewritten,) must be submitted at 
least one month before close of College year., Accepted theses 
become the property of the College. 

Application for information respecting graduate work must 
be made, in writing, to the President of the College. 

DORMITORIES. 

The two main buildings are used for dormitory purposes. 
A Professor resides in each building. The rooms are heated 
by steam, and each building is supplied with water. Young 
men from a distance are expected to room in the dormitories. 
Should any prefer to take rooms elsewhere, they will be 
charged with the rent of the vacant rooms in the dormitories. 
No student, however, will be held responsible for the rent of 
more than one room. Bach student will be held accountable 
for any damage he may cause to the College property. Stu- 
dents will be held individually responsible for all damage 
done to their rooms, by whomsoever committed. 

Each student upon taking a room in the College is required 
to deposit two dollars with the Treasurer as a guarantee 
against loss of keys and the destruction of property. The 
amount not used will be refunded at the end of the year. 

Students are required to furnish their own towels, napkins, 
and bedding, except mattress. Every article of clothing, and 
other personal property should be distinctly marked with the 
owner's full name. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE I 7 

Expenses. 

The charge for tuition is fifty dollars a year. A student who is absent 
from College on account of sickness or for any other cause, and retains 
his place in his class, during such absence, pays the term bill in full. 

Boarding, light, heat, room rent, and tuition in the literary depart- 
ment, regular work, are as follows : 

Fall Term, $ 74 00 

Winter Term, 57 00 

Spring Term, 54 00 

Total for the year, $185 00 

Special Examinations in each Branch, not recited in College, $ 4 00 

Additional charge the Senior year to cover expense of graduation, 10 00 

The charges for room rent, heat, and furniture are made on the 
basis of two persons to each room. If a student prefers to room alone 
he will be charged fifty cents additional a week. Any student not 
boarding in the institution and occupying a room in the building will be 
charged a reasonable rent for the same. 

No bill will be made for tuition and room rent for a shorter period 
than one term ; and no deductions will be made except in the charge for 
board in case of a prolonged absence on account of sickness. 

If a student quit the Institution for any time, whether with or with- 
out permission, he cannot return afterward to the same class, except by 
paying the regular dues for the whole period of such absence. 

To a limited number of young persons otherwise unable to command 
the privileges of the College, aid is given to the extent of their tuition 
bills and sometimes their room bills also, by giving them opportunity to 
render service to the College ; by giving them a loan on approved secur- 
ity payable after graduation, without interest ; or by beneficiary support. 
Application must be made to the President. 

Any student who receives beneficiary aid from the College may be 
called upon to render services to the College as an equivalent for any 
part, or all, of the money so received. 

The tradition of the College and the public sentiment of the students 
favor economy in all expenses. 

Terms of Payment. 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before 
Commencement. 

Bills are due and must be paid, or their payment secured at the 
College office, at the opening of each term, on September 9th, January 
6th, and April 8th, b2fore the student is enrolled for class-work. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENTS. 



Lebanon Valley College comprises the following Depart- 
ments well organized : 

The College offers five Groups of Studies, leading to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. The Groups bear the names of the 
leading subjects included in them. They are : the Classical 
Group, the Philosophical Group, the Chemical-Biological 
Group, the Historical-Political Group, and the Modern Lan- 
guage Group. 

The Academy provides a four years' course, designed to fit 
young people for the Freshman Class in any college. 

The Department of Pedagogy is organized to provide a train- 
ing school for teachers. 

The Summer Session offers preparator3% and college courses 
with credit toward a degree, affording special opportunities to 
teachers. 

i 

The School of Music has full courses in instrumental and 
vocal music, and grants diplomas to those who complete either 
of the specified courses. 

The School of Art provides thorough instruction in draw- 
ing and painting, with the aim of improving and developing 
the mind and the aesthetic sense. 

The School of Expression affords opportunity for training in 
correct and effective utterance of thought. 

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE. 

There are three methods of admission to the College : 

L FROM THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. All students who have 
satisfactorily completed the work of the Academy are admitted to Fresh- 
man classes without examination. 

II, BY CERTIFICATE. Graduates from Pennsylvania State Normal 
Schools and from approved High Schools and Academies are ordinarily 
admitted to Freshman classes without examination, upon presentation 
of properly prepared certificates. Satisfactory certificates must state the 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE . 1 9 

length of time spent in any subject, text used and grade attained. Cred- 
it will be granted only for the amount of work certified. 

Grades and certificates from other colleges of good standing will be 
accepted for admission to higher college classes. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificate of 
honorable dismissal. 

III. BY EXAMINATION. Candidates for Freshman class not provided 
with certificates mentioned above will be examined in the following sub- 
jects : 

German. — (German may be substituted for Greek) Grammar; Plillern's 
Holier als die Kirche ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Maria Stuart . 
Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, and the United States. The fol- 
lowing texts will indicate the amount required : Meyers's History of 
Greece; Meyers's Rome : Its Rise and Fall, second edition, extended to> 
A. D. Soo; McMaster's History of the United States; Fiske's Civil Gov- 
ernment. 

Sconce. — Physical Geography (Davis); Physiology (Martin); Botany 
(Gray); Elementary Physics (Carhart and Chute). 

English. — Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric ; Scott and Denney's Compo- 
sition-Rhetoric. 

Candidates will also be examined on the course in reading as outlined. 
in the College Entrance Requirements in English, as follows : 

For Careful Study. — Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America - 
Macaulay's Essay on Addison ; Macaulay's Essay on Milton ; Milton's 
L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Cemus and Lycidas; Shakespeaie's Macbeth. 

For General Reading. — Carlyle's Essay on Burns ; Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner ; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans ; George Eliot's Silas Marner ; 
Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield ; Pope's Translation of the Iliad ; Shake- 
speare's Julius Caesar ; Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice ; Sir Roger de 
Coverley Papers ; Tennyson's The Princess. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic; Algebra, through Quadratics ; Plane and 
Solid Geometry. 

Latin. — Grammar, including the rules of Prosody and Scanning; Caesar, 
four books, or Book I. and Sallust's Catiline or Latin Readings; Cicero, 
six Orations, including Pro Archia; Virgil, five books of the ^Eueid. 
Equivalents from other authors will' be accepted in part. Latin Prose 
Composition, Bennett's or Allen's, or their equivalent ; reading at sight 
of easy passages from Ctesar, Cicero, and Virgil. 

Greek. — Grammar (Goodwin); Anabasis, four books. Greek Prose 
Composition, twenty exercises of Jones, or their equivalent. 



20 



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24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Philosophy. 

PRESIDENT ROOP and PROFESSOR JOHN. 

i. Logic — Three hours. First semester, Mo., Tu., Wed., at 10. 

President Roop. 

This course presents the elements of deductive and inductive logic, 
laying especial emphasis on the formal and material fallacies. Hyslop's 
Elements of Logic with Minto's Logic for Consultation on special topics. 

Required of all Sophomores. 

2. Psychology — Three hours. Second semester. 

Professor John. 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the elements of 
psychology and as a general introduction to the study of philosophy. 
Required of Sophomores. 

3. Anthropology — One hour. Fall term. Thur. , at 11. 

Lectures, with recitations. President Roop. 

Required of Juniors. 

4. Ethnology — One hour. Winter term. Thur. , at 11. 

Lectures with recitations. President Roop. 

Required of Juniors. 

5. Philosophy of History — One hour. Spring term. Thur., at 11. 

President Roop. 
Lectures with recitations. 
Required of Juniors. 

6. Psychology, Experimental and Theoretical. — Three hours. First 

semester. Professor John. 

An investigation of the mental states from the introspective and 
experimental points of view. Texts : Titchener, Baldwin, Sanford. 

Required in Philosophical Course. Elective for Juniors and Seniors 
in other courses. 

7. History of Philosophy — Two hours. Second semester. 

Professor John. 

Special attention will be given to the problems of Philosophy in their 
rise and historic development, through Ancient, Medieval and Modern 
periods. The aim will be to form the habit of philosophic thought. 

Text : Rogers's History of Philosophy. References to Get eral 
Histories of Philosophy, and Periodicals. 

Required of Juniors. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 25 

8. Ethics — Two hours. Throughout the year. Tu., Wed. 

President Roop. 

(a) Metaphysical Ethics. — Lectures and discussions. 

The main problems of Ethics will be studied, chiefly with reference to 
their bearings on life. The more important psychological and sociolog- 
ical data will be presented ; the question of the relation of the individual 
to society will be treated, and the metaphysical implications discussed. 

(b) Applied Ethics. The lectures of this course will be devoted to 
a discussion of the practical value of the ethical ideals given by Utilitar- 
ianism, iEstheticisrn, Optimism, Sociology, and Culture. There will be 
considered the individualistic applications of these ideals, and the 
personal virtues. The lectures will keep in view the mutual bearings of 
practical ethics and Christian civilization. 

References : Aristotle, Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Mackensie, Sidgwick, 
and others. 

Required of all Seniors. 

9. ^Esthetics — Two hours. First semester. Tu., Wed., at 9. 

President Roop. 
Lectures with recitations. 
Required of Seniors of Philosophical Group. Elective for all others. 

10. Sociology — Two hours. Second semester. Professor John. 
Recitations and lectures. 

Required of Seniors in Philosophical Group and elective for others. 

11. A System of Philosophy — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Professor John. 



Greek. 

PROFESSOR SPANGI.ER. 

/. Epic Poetry and History. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Homer's Iliad and Herodotus, Epic Poetry, Scanning, Ionic Dialect 
and Syntax. Homeric Antiquities. Review of the Greek Historians and 
The Persian Wars. Greek Prose Composition. 

Required of Freshmen in Classical Group. Elective in the other 
Groups with Latin. 

2. Philosophy and Oratory. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
JJjXenophon's Memorabilia, Plato's Apology and Crito, and Demosthe- 
nes' De Corona. Greek Testament. Socrates and the Socratic Schools, 
Plato and The Platonic Literature. The Athenian Orators and Courts. 

Required of Sophomores in Classical Group. Elective in the Philo- 
sophical, Historical-Political and Modern Language Groups with Latin. 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

j. Tragedy and Comedy. —Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Prometheus Bound of iEschylus, QEdipus Tyrannus of Sophocles, and 
Clouds of Aristophanes or Orations of Lysias. Development of the Greek 
Drama. Greek Tragedy, Comedy, and Theatre. 

Required of Juniors in Classical Group. Elective with Latin or French 
in the Historical -Poiitical Group for those who have taken i and 2. 

4. Senior Elective. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Pindar's Odes, Thucydides and Alcestis of Euripides. 
Elective for Seniors in Classical Group. 

Latin. 

PROFESSOR DAUGHERTV. 

/. Freshman Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Livy, Book XXI. and part of Book XXII., Wilkins's Roman An- 
tiquities. 

b) Cicero, De Senectute or De Amicitia. 

c) Horace, Odes and Epodes. The meters of Horace are carefully 
studied. The Grammar is thoroughly reviewed this year. Latin Prote 
Composition, once a week. 

Required for Freshmen in Classical Group, and is elective with Greek 
in other Groups. 

2. Sophomore Latin. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Horace, Satires, Epistles, and Ars Poetica; Ouintilian, Book X. and 
part of Book XII. 

b) Tacitus, Germania. Bender's Roman Literature is studied. 

c) Tacitus, Agricola. Latin Prose continued. 
Required for Sophomores in Classical Group. 

3. Junior Latin. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Cicero, De Officiis, or De Natura Deorum. 

b) Terence, Andria or Adelphoe; or Plautus, Captivi or Trinummus. 
In this connection Latin Comedy will be made a subject of study. 

c) Juvenal, Selected Satires. 
Required for Juniors in Classical Group. 

4. Senior Electives. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Selections from Seneca, Pliny, Tibullus, or Lucretius. Early Latin: 

Epigraphy. Lectures on Roman Life and Literatm-e. 
Elective in Classical Group. 

German. 

1. Freshman German. Three hours. Throughout the vear. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 27 

Nathan der Weise, Fall teim ; Goethe's Meisterwerke, Winter and. 
Spring terms. History of German literature. 

Required in Freshman year of all students except classical. 

2. Sophojnore German. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
To be provided. 

Required in Sophomore year of all Modern Language students. 

3. Junior German. Two hours. Throughout the year. 
To be provided. 

Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

4. Special Sophomore German. Four hours. Throughout the year. 
This course is arranged for students who have a knowledge of both 

Latin and Greek. It includes a rapid but thorough study of grammar, 
and the reading of selections from the German Classis. 
Required in Sophomore year of all Classical students. 

French Language and Literature. 

PROFESSOR SCHEICHTER. 

/. First Year Course. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Grammar, composition, drills in pronunciation, reading of easy 
prose and poetry. Text-books: Chandenal's French Grammar, Guer- 
"ber's Contes et Legendes, Whitney's Reader, Mere Michel et Son Chat, 
Merimee's Colomba. 

Required in Sophomore year of all Modern Language students. 

2. Second Year Course. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Prose Composition with advanced grammatical study and considerable 

reading of prose and poetry, as follows : George Sand's La Mare au Dia- 
ble, Enault's Le Chien du Capitaine, de Vigny's La Canne de Jonc, 
About's Le Roi des Montaignes, Racine's Athalie, Moliere's L'Avare, 
Reaumarchais' Le Barbier de Seville, Victor Hugo's Hernani. 
Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

3. Third Year Course. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Extensive reading of the masterpieces of French prose and poetry, and 

lectures on the history of French literature 

Required in Senior year of all the Modern Language students. 

English Language and Literature. 

PROFESSOR WOEFE and PROFESSOR SCHEICHTER. 

i. Freshman English. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Scott and Denney's Paragraph Writing, Lewis's Specimens of the 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Forms of Prose, Johnson's English Words, Weekly Themes. 
Required of all students in Freshman year. 

2. Sophomore English. — One hour. Throughout the year. 
Baker's Principles of Argumentation. 

Required of all students in Sophomore year. 

3. English Literature. --Four hours. Fall and winter terms. 
Pancoast's History of English Literature. Outside reading. 
Required in Junior year of all students except Chemical-Biological. 

4. American Literature. Four hours. Spring term. 
Pancoast's History of American Literature. Outside reading. 
Required in Junior year of all students except Chemical-BiologicaL 

5. Drama. — -Three hours. First semester. 
Woodbridge's Technique of the Drama. 

Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

6. Poetics. — Three hours. Second semester. 

Gummere's Hand-book of Poetics, with Pancoast's Standard English- 
Poems. 

Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

7. Old English. — Two hours. Fall and winter terms. 
Smith's Old English Grammar, Bright'^; Anglo-Saxon Reader. 
Required in Senior year of Modern Language students. 

8. Middle English. Two hours. Spring term. 
Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. 

Required in Senior year of Modern Language students. 

9. Literary Criticism. — Three hours. First semester. 
Johnson's Literary Criticism. 

Required of Modern Language Seniors. 

jo. Shakespeare. — Three hours. Second semester. 
Critical study of Shakespeare. 
Required of Modern Language Seniors. 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 

PROFESSOR' LEHMAN. 

i. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. Fall term. 

Covering ratio, proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permutations- 
and combinations, etc. 

Required of all Freshmen. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 29 

2. Plane Trigonometry — Four hours. Winter term. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and oblique 
triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights. 
Required of all Freshmen. 

3. Spherical Trigonometry — Four hours. Spring term. 
Development of trigonometric formulae, solutions of right and oblique 

spherical triangles, with applications to astronomy. 
Required of all Freshmen. 

4. Analytic Geometry— Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of th 1 straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and hypei- 
bola are studied, and so much of higher plane curves and of the geometry 
of space as time will permit. 

Required of Sophomores in the Chemical-Biological group. 

5. Differential Calculus — Three hours. First semester. 
Differentiation of Algebraic and transcendental functions, Maxima 

and Minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, 
envelopes, etc. 

Required of Juniors in the Chemical-Biological group. 



6. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second semester. 
Integrations, rectification of curves, quadrature of surfaces, curvature 

of solids, etc. 

Required of Juniors in the Chemical-Biological group. 

7. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, 
levelling, etc. 

Elective for Juniors. 

Astronomy. 

1. General Astronomy — Four hours. First semester. 

Young's Text is studied. The department is provided with a fine four 
and a half inch achromatic telescope equatorially mounted, of which 
the students make free use. 

Elective for Seniors. 

Chemistry and Physics. 

PROFESSOR MCFADDEN. 

Chemistry. 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry . — Four hours. Throughout the year, 
lectures and recitations, Mo., We., Fr. Laboratory, three hours a week. 



30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The ground covered in this course is approximately that laid down in 
Remsen's College Chemistry, which is used as a guide both for recita- 
tions and for laboratory work. 

Required in Junior year of Chemical-Biological students. 

2. Qualitative Chemical Analysis. — Four hours. Fall term. 

Open to students who have had Chemistry i. This course consists of 
one lecture or quiz a week, and a minimum of eight hours of laboratory 
work. Text : H. L. Wells's Qualitative Analysis. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical-Biological students. 

j. Quantitative Chemical Analysis. — Four hours. Winter and spring 
terms. 

Open to students who have had Chemistry 2. This is a brief introduc- 
tion to quantitative analysis, in which both gravimetric and volumetric 
methods are employed. Occasional lectures and recitations are given. 
A minimum of eight hours of laboratory work is required. Text : Tal- 
bot's Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical -Biological students. 

4. Water Analysis — Four hours. Second semester. 

Open to students who have had Chemistry 2 and are taking Chemistry 3. 
This course includes a study of sources of water supplv, methods of puri- 
fication, and relation to health, together with practical laboratory work 
in the chemical and bacteriological examination of local water supplies. 
Text: Mason's Water Supply, with supplementary lectures. A minimum 
of eight hours of laboratory work is required. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical-Biological students. 

Physics. 

/. General Advanced Physics.— Four hours. Throughout the year^ 
Lectures and recitations Mo., We., Fr. Laboratory, three hours a week. 

This course includes experimental lectures and recitations based upon 
Ames's Theory of Physics, and laboratory exercises selected from Ames 
and Bliss's Manual of Experiments in Physics. 

Required of all Chemical-Biological students in either Junior or Senior 
year. 

Geology. 

1. General Geology. Four hours. Second semester. 

This course includes a study of the forces at work within and upon the 
crust of the earth, the rock-forming materials of crust and their arrange- 
ment into strata, and the historical succession of formations. About one- 
fourth of the time is devoted to petrology with considerable laboratory 
work. Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, and theses. The 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 3 I 

ground covered is approximately that laid down in Scott's Introduction 
to Geology. 

Elective in Senior year. 

Biology. 

PROFESSOR ENDERS. 

1. General Biology. — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

To be preceded hy Course 1 in Drawing, The course consists of three 
recitations and four laboratory periods throughout the Sophomore year. 
In this course the work in the laboratory will begin with a study of the 
simpler forms of animal and plant life, and complete dissections will be 
made of several phyla of plants. Some of the animals studied will be 
amoeba, paramecio, vorticella, hydra, star fish, earth worm, lobster or 
cray fish, mussel or clam, grasshopper or cricket, and the frog. The 
class-work will cover all objects studied in the laboratory, together with 
additional forms. 

Students contemplating the study of medicine and surgery are advised 
to elect Courses 2 and 3, and, if possible, Course 4. 

Text-book : Parker's Elementary- Biology. Laboratory Guide : Dodge's 
Elementary Practical Biology. . 

Required in Sophomore year of all Chemical-Biological studenis. 

2. Histology. — Four hours. First semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The course is 
essentially that offered in medical schools leading to the medical de- 
gree. The class work will cover the normal histology of the human 
body, while the laboratory work will consist in the study and descrip- 
tions of microscopic preparations showing cell structure and karyoki- 
nesis, the various kinds of epithelium, connective tissues, muscle, ade- 
noid, vascular, and nerve tissues. The blood and blood-forming organs, 
the intestinal, reproductory and genito-urinary organs, the skin and 
dermal appendages, the central nervous system, and special senses are 
then full}' considered, and numerous microscopic preparations represent- 
ing different methods of fixation, and staining will be carefully studied. 
Text-book : Huber's Text-book of Histology, Bohm-Davidoff. Labora- 
tory Guide : Huber's Laboratory Work in Histology. 

Elective in Junior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

3. Comparative Embryology of Vertebrates. — Four hours. Second 
semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The laboratory 
work will be based on the development of the chick, supplemented by 
pig and o'„her embryological material. Students will be required to 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

stain, imbed, section, mount, and study embryos of various periods of 
incubation, and prepare notes and drawings of same. 

Elective in Junior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

4. Mammalian Anatomy. — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Consists of two conferences and recitations and five periods of labora- 
tory work. The course deals with the complete anatomy of a mammal 
(the cat) whose structure closely resembles that of man. The course is 
intended for those who desire some knowledge of human anatomy, with 
dissecting a human body, but more especially for those who desire to 
teach physiology in the secondary schools, or who intend later to carry 
on medical work. Laboratory Guide : Reighard and Jennings's Anato- 
my of the Cat. 

Elective in Senior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

5. Zoology. — Four hours. First semester. 

Three hours and two laboratory periods weekly. This course consists 
in a study of the structure, classification, habits, and distribution of in- 
vertebrate and vertebrate animals with special reference to influence of 
environment to adaptation, and to general principles of organic evo- 
lution. 

Elective in Senior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

Laboratory Fees. 

Biology, Three Dollars per term 

Histology, ."' . Five Dollars for course 

Embryology, Five Dollars for course 

Mammalian Anatomy, Three Dollars per term 

Botany Three Dollars for course 

Chemistry 1, Five Dollars per term 

2, s P'ive Dollars for course 

3, Six Dollars per term 

4,- Five Dollars for course 

Physics 1, Three Dollars per term 

Elementary Physics, Two Dollars per term 

Geology 1 , One Dollar for course 

History and Political Science. 

PROFESSOR SHENK. 

History. 

/. Medieval and Modern History — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A general course, prescribed in all the Groups. Papers, special re- 
ports, and theses, based on available original sources, will be required of 



LEBANON VALLKY COLLEGE 33 

all students. Thatcher, Short History of Mediaeval Europe; Schwill, 
History of Modern Europe. 
Required of all Sophomores. 

2. English Economic History. — Three hours. First semester. 

The economic life of the English people during Mediaeval and Modern 
times, with special reference to government control, the use of trade 
unions, etc. Cheyney, The Industrial and Social History of England. 

Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political students. 

j. English Constitutional History. — Three hours. Second semester. 
The development of the English Constitution, in which careful study 
of^important documents will be made. Macy, The English Constitution. 
Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political students. 

y. United States Constitutional History. — Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

A full course covering the Colonial and Constitutional periods. The 
leading documents in Macdonald's Select Charters and Macdonald's 
Documents will be read and discussed. 

Required in Senior year of all Historical-Political students. 

Political Science. 

/. Economics. — Three hours. First semester. 

A course in economic theory supplemented by consideration of practi- 
cal economic problems. The standpoint of the different schools will be 
carefully considered. Bullock, Introduction to the Study of Economics. 

Required of all Juniors. 

2. Current Economic Problems. — Three hours. Second semester. 
An intensive stud)' of the most important economic problems of the 

present day; as, Trusts, Government Control, Banking and Currency, 
and Labor Problems. 

Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political students. 

3. Historical and Practical Politics. — Three hours. First semester. 
The development of the leading governments of the world, and a com- 
parative study of the same. Woodrow Wilson, The State. 

Required in Senior year of all Historical-Political students. 

7. The Theory of the State. — Three hours. Second semester. 
A course on the Nature and End of the State. Willoughby, The Na- 
ture of the State. 

Required in Senior year of all Historical-Political students. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Pedagogy. 

PROFESSOR JOHN. 

i. History of Education — Two hours. First semester. 

Beginning with the Oriental Nations, a survey will be made of the 
leading systems of education, in connection with the forces which pro- 
duced them and their influence upon culture as a whole. Such an 
introduction will enable the student to appreciate the educational ideals 
of his own time. Painter's History of Education, Compayre's History of 
Pedagogy, and Quick's Educational Reformers will be used as guides. 
Lectures and recitations. 

Required for Juniors. 

2. Psychology and Philosophy of Education — Two hours. Second 
semester. 

Educational principles will be subjected to the tests of psychology 
and philosophy. The aim will be to secure an intelligent appreciation 
of the importance and value of education to individual and social life. 
Special attention will be given to the educational ideals and systems in 
the United States. Texts : Rosenkranz's, Philosophy of Education, 
Harris's Psychologic Foundations, Tompkins's Philosophy of Teaching. 

Required of all students in the Philosophical Group. Elective for 
Juniors and Seniors of other groups. 

3. Methodology and School Management — Three hours. Spring term. 
For the accommodation of those who intend to teach, a course will be 

offered in the Theory and Practice of Teaching. The aim will be to 
secure an intelligent appreciation of the teacher's work, and to acquire 
a practical knowledge of the best methods of teaching. 
Elective for all. 



English Bible. 

PROFESSOR JOHN. 

i. New Testament — Two hours. First semester. 

Inductive study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as contained 
in the Gospels. 

Required of Freshmen. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 35 

2. New Testament — Two hours. Second semester. 

Acts and Epistle's of Paul. Attention is given to the geographical and 
historical incidents in the life of Paul. A careful inductive study will 
be made of some of the Pauline Epistles, and a rapid survey of others. 

Required of Freshmen. 

3. Old Testament — Two hours. First semester. 
Inductive study of the Hexateuch. [1902-1903]. 



4. Old Testament Prophecy I — Two hours. First semester. [1903-1904] 

5. Old Testament Prophecy II — Two hours. Second semester. 
[1902-1903]. 

Courses 4 and 5 will cover Old Testament Prophecies. They will be 
studied inductively in their chronological and historical setting. 

6. The Psalms and Old Testament Wisdom — Two hours Second 
semester. [1903-1904]. 

Hebrew psalmody will be studied as literature and as an expression of 
the national and religious life of Israel. Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, and 
Lamentations will be taught, with a comparative study of the Apocry- 
phal Books, Ecclesiasticus and The Wisdom of Solomon. 

7. Bible Evidences — One hour. First semester. 

A series of lectures will be given on the proofs of Christianity, together 
with an examination of the modes of revelation and the formation of 
the canon. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Courses 3 and 5 will be given in 1902-1903, and courses 4 and 6 in 
1903-1904. All Seniors are required to take the course offered, and it may 
be elected bj' Juniors. This arrangement is for the accommodation of 
students desiring to specialize in Bible study. 

The value of the systematic study of the English Bible as mental 
discipline and training for inductive inquiry is now generally recognized. 
Hence as thorough work will be required in this department as in any 
other. 

The aim will be to acquaint the student with the contents of the Bible 
as literature and as a revelation from God influencing the lives of 
individuals and nations. 



36 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 























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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 37 

The Academy. 



The Academy is an integral part of the College and has a two-fold 
-aim : First, to give thorough preparation to those desiring to enter col- 
legiate classes ; Second, to afford to those who are unable to take a com- 
plete college course opportunities whereby they can gain much needed 
-and practical mental development for life's work. 



Requirements for Admittance. 

Candidates for admission should be at least twelve years of age, and 
must present from teachers or other trustworthy persons letters of intro- 
duction indicating good character and correct habits. To facilitate clas- 
sification, those who have been in attendance at other schools should 
bring certificates of honorable dismissal, with statements of studies pur- 
sued and work completed. 

Students are admitted at any time to the grade for which they are 
qualified by previous study. 

Students received on certificate are classified "on trial." Failure to 
maintain standing will cause re-arrangement of course and classification. 
Thorough work is expected of all. 

For expenses see page 17. 



Courses of Study. 

The work has been outlined with great care, and it is believed that 
~the courses offered present as valuable and compact four years' of study 
■as can be selected. The work of the first year form is devoted to the 
study of such subjects as will probably enable the student to pursue the 
work of subsequent year forms. Most students will be able to enter the 
second year form. Experienced instructors have charge of the teaching. 



38 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 39 

Drawing. 

The purpose of this course is to give to all students of the second year 
form two hours' work each week in free-hand pencil drawing in outline 
to prepare them properly for later work in Science, Geometry, etc. 

Geography. 

This course in Descriptive Geography lays a good foundation for the 
study of Physical Geography. Special attention is given to the natural 
features of the United States. 

Reading and Orthography. 

Reading and voice culture, including pronunciation and definition of 
words, and memorizing choice selections. Orthography is also required. 

Penmanship and Bookkeeping. 

First year form students and all others found deficient in penmanship 
are required to take daily exercises in the study of the principles and 
typical forms of letters, with practice in graded exercises. 

Book-keeping is also required in preparation for clerical and office work . 

For Stenography and T} r pewtiting an extra charge is made. 

Latin. 

a. Beginning Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Bmnett's "Foundations of Latin" is used as a text. The aim is to 

master the system of Latin inflections, to acquire a moderate vocabulary, 
and to give thorough drill in the elementary principles of syntax. Easy 
reading, with constant exercises in prose composition. 
Required of all students in second year form. 

b. Second Year Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Caesar, Books I. -IV., or their equivalent. Cicero, five orations, includ- 
ing Pro Archia. Exercises in Prose Composition. 
Required of all students in third year form. 

c. Third Year Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Virgil, Books I. -IV. Prosody. Mythology. Bennett's Prose Com- 
position. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 

Special Beginning Latin. Five hours. Spring term. 
For the privilege of special drill beginner's latin is offered to those 
who enter in the spring term. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

German. 

a. Beginning German. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Grammar and exercises throughout the year ; Holier als die Kirche, 

spring term. 

Required in third year form of students preparing for all Groups 
except Classical. 

b. Second Year' German. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Wilhelm Tell, fall term ; Hermann and:Dorothea, winter term ; Maria 

Stuart, spring term. Composition. 

Required in fourth year form of students preparing for all Groups 
except Classical. 

Greek. 

a. Beginning Greek. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
White's First Greek Book. Xenophon's Anahasis begun. 
Required of all Classical students in third year form. 

b. Second Year Greek. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon's Anabasis continued to the end of Book IV. Greek Prose 

Composition. Greek Antiquities. Greek Literature. 
Required of all Classical students in fourth year form. 

English. 

a. First Year English. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Allan's Grammar. 

b. Second Year English. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
This year is devoted to a daily study of the English classics. 
Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Third Year English. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric, two hours per week; Fnglish Classics. 

one hour. 

Required of all students in third year form. 

d. Fourth Year English. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Scott and Denney's Composition-Rhetoric, one hour; Classics, two 

hours. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. For English classics 
see entrance requirements, page 19. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 4 1 



History. 



a. United States History.— Vive hours, winter term. Two hoursj 
-spring term. 

McMaster's History of the United States. 
Required of all students in second year form. 

b. Civil Government. — Three hours. Spring term. 
Fiske's Civil Government 

Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Greek History.- — Three hours. First semester. 
Myers's History of Greece. 

Required of all students in third year form. 

d. Roman History. — Three hours. Second semester. 
JVIyers's Rome : Its Rise and Fall. 

Required of all students in third year form. 



Science. 

a. Physical Geography. — Four hours. Fall term. 

Appleton's Physical Geography is used as the basis of work. There 
-will be daily recitations on the text, together with discussions on obser- 
vations made by the students on physiography, etc., in and about Ann- 
ville. 

Required of all students in second year form. 

b. Physiology. — Two hours. First semester. 

The briefer course of Martin's Human Body is used as the text-book. 
Some mammal will be dissected and the relation of parts will be demon- 
strated to the class, while skeleton and charts will greatly aid in attain- 
ing a good knowledge of the subject. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 

c. Elementary Botany. — Two hours. Second semester. 

In the beginning of the course observations, careful drawings, and 
■notes are made of the various stages in the germination of several repre- 
sentative seeds sown by the students themselves. Roots, stem, leaves, 
fruits, etc., are studied from the objects or fvotn charts so that the stu- 
dent may be prepared to begin systematic botany with the appearance 
of the early flowers. An herbarium of no less than seventy-five plants 
with full analyses will be required of each student, together with labora- 
tory work in plant dissection and elementary work in plant histology 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

and ecolog)'. Several of the cryptogams will be studied in the laboratory^ 
Two recitations and one laboratory period. 
Text : Bergen's Foundations of Botany. 
Required of all students in fourth year form. 

d. Elementary Physics. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The fundamental principles of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, and 
light, will be developed and discussed by experiments and recitation as 
thoroughly as time permits. 

In addition to class work, students will spend two hours a week in 
1 iboratory. Accurate notes are required. 

A working knowledge of algebra is required for admission to this 
course. 

Texts: Carhart and Chute's Physics. Crew and Tatnall's Laboratory- 
Manual of Physics. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 



Mathematics. 

a. Arithmetic. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Covering factoring, greatest common divisor, least common multiple,, 
common fractions, decimals, compound denominate numbers, practical 
measurements, etc. 

Required of all students in first year form. 

b. Arithmetic. — Five hours. Fall and winter terms, 

Covering percentage, profit and loss, interest and discount, stocks and 
bands, mensuration, the metric system, etc. The more elementary 
CDurse is open to students not prepared for this work. 

Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Algebra. — Five hours. Spring term, and throughout following 
year. 

The work extends over four terms and is intended to give the student 
a thorough foundation in the principles and operations of Algrebra 
through quadratic equations. 

Required of all students in second and third year forms. 

d. Geometry. — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Plane geometry is studied during half of the year, and is followed by- 
solid. In each original work and numerical exercises receive consider- 
able attention. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



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44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Department of Pedagogy. 

This Department was organized to provide a training school for teach- 
er j, the object of which is : 

a). To prepare young men and women to become teachers. 

6). To help teachers to prepare for their examinations, and make 
reviews of necessary branches. 

c). To afford teachers and others, whether intending to pursue a full 
college course or not, facilities for studying under the direction of col- 
lege professors and with college equipment. 

With a view to assisting those who feel their need of special training 
along professional lines, this department now offers courses of instruc- 
tion suited to the wants of teachers in all stages of advancement, and 
comprising all branches required by them for obtaining either Count}- or 
State Certificates, and supplemented by such auxiliary work as will help 
to a strong and symmetrical development. 

Special Review Classes. — At the opening of the Fall term classes in all 
fie common branches for teachers and others are formed. A good review 
of the various subjects is completed by the end of the winter term. In 
t \t spring term review classes are again formed in addition to a number 
of others not scheduled. Thus it will be seen that teachers and those 
preparing to teach can secure work in all the common branches at any 
time during the .year. A special circular, which may be had on applica- 
tion, explains this work more completely. 

For further work on the subject of Pedagogy, see page 34. 

The Special Spring Term will open April 7th, 1903. The privileges of 
the College and the Academy will be open to all students of this Depart- 
ment. The attention of persons intending to pursue courses in the com- 
ing Summer Session is called to the fact that by attending Lebanon 
Valle}' College during the Spring term and continuing during the Sum- 
mer Session almost a half year's work may be completed. Teachers 
will find it to their advantage to attend both the spring term and Sum- 
mer Session. 

Expenses for the spring term, — tuition, room, board, fuel, etc., fifty 
dollars. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE J 5 

The Summer School. 



Summer Courses of Study. 

June 23 — August i, 1902. 
The objects of the Summer School are : 

1. To give students of the College Department and of the Prepara- 
tory Department, who are conditioned in one or two of the studies of 
their class, an opportunity to make up their deficiencies and become 
regular ; and such students are expected, if able to do so, to avail them- 
selves of this opportunity. 

2. To assist students who desire to enter a college, or the Senior 
Preparatory Class in the following fall, but whose preparation is too 
deficient, to make the needful preparation. 

3. To give teachers an opportunity to prepare themselves more 
fully for teaching — teaching the higher branches in the public schools 
and academies. 

During the summer will be offered the following 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry. 
English — Grammar, Rhetoric, English and American Literature. 
Greek — Beginners' Class, Anabasis, and Homer. 
Latin — Beginners' Class, Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, Horace. 
German — Beginners' Class, German Prose and Translation. 
French — Beginners' Class, French Prose and Translation. 
Science — Physical Geograph}-, Physics, Astronomy, Botanj-. 
History — General, English, American, and Civics. 
Economics and Sociology — Political Economy, Sociology. 
Psychology and Pedagogics — Psychology, Methods, School Manage- 
ment, History cf Education. 

If possible, satisfactory arrangements will be made concerning any 
stud}* desired that is not mentioned in the courses. Credit toward a 
degree will be given upon completion of any course. 

Instruction in Music, Art, Elocution, Physical Culture, and Business 
will be given during the session. Fine opportunities in these subjects 
are offered. 

Recitations six days in the week, making in reality a seven weeks' 
term with the expense of six. 

The term will open on Monday, June 23rd, and close on Friday, 
August 1st. The fees are : Matriculation two dollars ; fee for instruc- 
tion, ten dollars for each course, for two courses, fifteen dollars. 

Room and board can be had for three dollars per week. 

Write to the President for special circulars and any other informa- 
tion. 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



Faculty. 



REV. HERVIN U. ROOP, A.M., Ph.D., 

President. 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, (Eon., Eng.) 

Director. 

Piano, ] r oice, Organ, Harmony, Etc. 

CHAS. H. OLDHAM, 
Piano. 

S. E. MACCOMSEY, 
Violin, Strings, Etc. 

M. ETTA WOLFE, A. M., 
English Literature, German. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
French, English. 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, Drexel Institute, '97, 
Painting, Drawing, Etc. 

EMMA R. BATDORF, B. S., 
Elocution, Oratory, Etc. 



The Conservatory. 

The new Conservatory building is fully equipped for the study of all 
branches of Music and Art. 

The building contains the Director's room and office, College Li- 
brary and Reading Room, fourteen or more practice rooms, and a large 
auditorium with a pipe organ. 

From the beginning grade to the full development of artistic re- 
quirement, the faculty and the different courses of study insure a steady 
progress. The Conservatory Diploma is a sufficient evidence of the 
standing of the possessor. 

In addition to the regular certificates and graduating diplomas, the 
Conservatory is empowered to confer the different certificates given by 
the London College of Music, of London, England, with which college 
the Conservatory is in affiliation. 

The Faculty is made up of the best instructors. 



y 







NEW ENGLE MUSIC HALL. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 47 

The Director. 

Herbert Oldham, F. S., Sc. 
Trinity College, Dub/in ; London College of Music. 



Professor Herbert Oldham, the Director, was educated in England, 
Germany, and France. He studied Piano and Harmony, Organ and 
chorus conducting, under Sir George Macfarren ; Voice under Signor 
Rendeggar in London; Piano and Composition under Emil Haberbier in 
Paris, and Piano under Joachim Raff in Germany. 

The Conservatory of Music is organized for a fourfold purpose : 
( t ) To continue musical and literary studies as a broad basis for regular 
collegiate work in the college. (2) To use the art of music as a means 
of intellectual, cesthetical, and moral culture. (3) To furnish instruc- 
tion in all branches of music to special or regular students. (4) To 
educate teachers of music. 

It is divided into the following Courses of Instruction : 

PIANOFORTE. — The regular course of study in the Piano Depart- 
ment is divided into sixteen grades, from the most rudimentary studies 
to the great concertos, etc. 

Send to the Director for separate catalogue of the Conservatory, con- 
taining the complete courses in all branches. 

VOICE. — The Vocal Course is divided into twelve grades. The most 
approved methods are used. Complete course in Conservatory catalogue. 

PIPE ORGAN. — The course in Pipe Organ Music may be taken up 
by any student who proves able to enter Section A of Grade 3 of the 
Piano Course. 

In this study special attention will be given to chorus accompaniment 
and to registration, thereby rendering the student capable of taking a 
position as organist and choir director and creditably filling the same. 

REED ORGAN — The Course in Reed Organ can be taken up inde- 
pendently of the Piano Course. Special attention will be given to 
training the student so as to form a capable organist, and thoroughly 
to understand the various combinations of the different stops. 



48 LEBANON :, VALLEY COLLEGE 

HARMONY — The complete Course in Harmony will occupy the- 
sections indicated by B Grade 2, to C Grade 3, in connection with the= 
Piano Course, but any student can enter the Harmony Class at any time_. 

SIGHT READING and CHORUS CLASS.— A class for this study will 
be formed at the beginning cf each tern. The importance of acquiring 
the ability to read music at sight ^can not jbe too strongly urged upon 
those who desire to lay the proper foundation fcr a musical education- 
All pupils in the Vocal Department should_ give this course special at — 
tention. 

A Chorus Class will also be formed. 

LECTURES. — There Avill be given Lectures on Musical History each 
term, and all regular students of the^Ccnservatciy Mill be required tc 
attend them. 



CONCERTS. — Recitals and concerts by the students, the facult}-, or 
leading artists, Avill be held at stated intervals throughout the vear. 



GENERAL REMARKS.— Pupils will be^ accepted in any of the de- 
partments for which they are fitted, whether the}' desire to finish the 
course or not. 

Most special care will be bestowed upon beginners in all subjects. 

Students are advanced according lo their knowledge and proficiencv 
in work, and not according to the number_of terms and lessons taken at- 
the Conservatory. 



GRADUATION. — Students will Ineligible for graduation on comple- 
tion of the prescribed courses, Each graduate must give during the last 
year of study at least one recital in addition to the final performance aL 
commencement concert. 

Not 011I3- must every candidate for graduation give evidence of requi- 
site musical talent and capacity, but also complete in the course cf liter- 
ary studies, English Grammar, threef terms' work ; Rhetoric and Com- 
position, three terms' work ; Literature, French or German, each three 
lerms' work. Free tuition in anyone of the literary studies. 

SUMMER SCHOOL.— A Summer Music School will be held begin- 
ning July 1 and ending September 1. 

Send for separate circular tj the Director. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



EXPENSES.— The following table will show the expenses in all 
departments of the Conservatory : 



PRIVATE LESSONS. 


a 

Eh 

Eh 


a 

5 

Eh 
<U 


a 

Fh 

O) 

Eh 

bo 

p, 
go 


Voice, Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Director. 
Voice, Piano or Organ, One per week, by Director. 
Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Assistant, 
Piano or Organ, One per week, by Assistant, 
Harmony, 


$24 00 
12 00 
16 00 
10 00 
16 00 


$18 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


$18 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


CLASS LESSONS. 




$7 50 
2 00 
2 00 




Harmony, One lesson per week, 

Theory, One lesson per week, 

Musical History, etc., One lesson per week, 


$10 00 
3 00 
2 00 


$7 50 
2 00 
2 00 


USE OF INSTRUMENTS. 








Piano, One hour per day, 
Reed Organ, One hour per day, 
Pipe Organ, One hour per day, 


$2 00 

1 50 

2 50 


$1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


$1 50 

1 00 

2 00 


BOARD, ROOM, ETC. 






Board, Room Rent, Heat, Light, 


$.54 00 


$42 00 


$40 00 



Pipe Organ students must pay at the rate of io cents per hour for 
organ blower. 

Fee for Graduation Diploma, $5.75. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS.— No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In cases of long continued illness the loss is shared equally 
by the college and the student. 

All tuition is payable in advance. Students upon being assigned 
lesson hours must present to the Director a card from the President. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., 
the beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade 
will be issued at close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., 

Address, 
Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc, Director, 
or Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., President, 

AnnvillE, Pa. 



5<D LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Department of Art. 

MISS EDITH h. Baldwin, Drexel Institute, instructor. 

"A talent for any art is rare ; but it is given to nearly ever}- one to 
cultivate a taste for Art ; only it must be cultivated with earnestness ; 
the more things thou learnest to know and enjoy, the more complete 
and full will be for thee the delight of living." — Plato. 
The aim of this Department is : 

1. To Study Art for Art's sake. 

2. To combine Art and Literature as a broad basis for regular 
college work. 

3. To use Art as a means of intellectual, artistic, and moral cultui e 

4. To give instruction in all lines of Art. 

5. To instruct students for teachers. 

Courses of Study. 

A— The Technical Course. 

Technical instruction is given in the following classes : 

Class 1 — Drawing in black and white, from life, nature, flowers, 

casts, etc. 
Class 2 — Still-life class. Drawing and painting in water colors. 
Class 3 — Painting in oil and water colors. 

Class 4— Portrait class. Drawing and painting from the drajtd 
Class 5— China painting. [life model. 

B— History and Criticism of Art. 

Course 1 — Theory of Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. This 

course has special reference to the Principles of Art Criticism. 
Course 2 — History of Art. (a) Ancient Art. (b) Christian Art 
through the period of the Renaissance, (c) Modern Art. 

Diplomas. 

Students who complete one or more of the classes of the Technical 
Course will receive certificates signed by the Instructor. Diplomas are 
given by the College to those who have finished full course. 

General Information. 

Students of this Department giving their principal attention to Art 
may take any one of the literary studies without charge. No reduction 
is made for absence from class or private lessons ; if, however, absent on 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 5T 

account of sickness, the lesson may be made up by the student. 

Credit will be given such as have done work in Art elsewhere. There 
will be given one exhibition of the students' work during the year. All 
work done during the College year is expected to be shown at the an- 
nual exhibition in June. 

Lectures on Art will be given during the year. 

TUITION — As the Second year form class is required to take 
drawing, the tuition for this class is three dollars for the year ; to others 
the terms are as follows : 

Fall Winter Spring 
Drawing — Charcoal, Pencil, etc., Term Term Term 

Two lessons a week, $10.00 $8.00 $8.00 

Painting — Oil, Water Colors, 
China, etc. ; 

Two lessons a week, $15.00 $10.00 $10. co 

Single Lessons, 75c. 
Children's Saturday Class, $2,50 $2.00 $2.00. 



Elocution. 

This department is open to all members of the College. Its aim is the 
correct and effective utterance of thought. Special attention is given to 
/oice Culture, Articulation, including Pronunciation and Expression. 
Bible reading and the study of Shakespeare have places in the course. 
For course of study and other information, address the President of the 
College. 



52 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Catalogue of Students. 



Graduate Students. 

NAME 

Arabelle Batdorf, 

igoi Mus., Lebanon Valley College 
Emma R. Batdorf, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 
Ella Nora Black, 

1896, Lebanon Valley College 
John H. Best, 

1895, Lehigh University 
Robert R. Butterwick, 

1 90 1, Lebanon Valley College 
Joseph Daugherty, 

1889, Lebanon Valley College 
Raymond P. Daugherty, 

1897, Lebanon Valley College 
Enid Daniel, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Grant B. Gerberich, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Edna M. Groff, 

190 1 Mus., Lebanon Valley College 
Frank F. Holsopple, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Isaac W. Hunfczberger, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 
J. Alex Jenkins, 

1896, Lebanon Valley College 
Anna Mary Keller, 

1897, Lebanon Valley College 
Annie E. Kreider, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Lillie G. Kreider, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Mary E. Kreider, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 
Reba F. Lehman, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Ruth M. Leslie, 

1901 Mus,, Lebanon Valley College 
Alma M. Light, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 



RESIDENCE 
Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Toledo, Iowa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Huntingdon, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Oberlin, Ohio. 

Annville, *Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



53 



Lewis Walter Lutz, 

1897, Otlerbein University 
Harry E. Miller, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 
Fukuji Nishida, 

Graduated, Chenezei-Gakkan 
Jacob Mark Peters, M. D., 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
D. Augustus Peters, Ph. G., 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Edwin A. Pyles, 

1S93, Dick in so n Seminary 
Jacob Hassler Reber, 

1895, Lebanon Valley College 
Irvin E. Runk, 

1899, Lebanon Valley College 
D. H. Scanlon, 

1890, Union Theological Seminary 
Ottarnan Scheider, 

1889, Western Theological Seminary 
G. Mason Snoke, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Harry E. Spessard, 

1900, Lebanon Valley College 
Morrison Weimer, 

1887, Lebanon Valley College 
William A. Zehring, 

1898, Otlerbein University 



West Fairview, Pa. 
Dayton, Ohio. 
Negaski, Japan. 
Steelton, Pa. 
Steelton, Pa. 
York, Pa. 
Waynesboro, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Berrysville, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Huntsville, Wash. 
Rogers, Arkansas. 
Front Royal, Va. 



Undergraduate Students. 



George H. Albright, 
John H. Alleman, 

Ph. £., '97, Illinois 
David D. Buddinger, 
Donald J. Cowling, 
Hoffman Derickson, 
Claude R. Engle, 
Thomas W. Gray, 
Clinton Cleveland Gohn, 
Joseph Lehn Kreider, 
Thomas A. Lawson, 



Seniors. 

Scientific, 
Classical, 
Wesleyan Universi 
Scientific, 
Classical, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 
Scientific, 



Lebanon. 
Johnsonburg. 
ly. 
Annville. 
Scottdale. 
Newport. 
Brownstone. 
Ickesburg. 
York Haven. 
Annville. 
Dallastown. 



54 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Artie Wesley Miller, Scientific, 

William J. Sanders, Classical, 

William A. Sites, Classical, 

Alfred Charles Tennyson Sumner, Classical, 



William C. Arnold, 
Kerwin W. Altland, 
Unas J. Daugherty, 
J. Walter Esbenshade, 
Sara E. Helm, 
Wesley M. Heilman, 
Isaac Moyer Hershey, 
Solomon D. Kauffman, 
Luther B. Nye, 
Hiram F. Rhoad, 
Emmet C. Roop, 
Edwin K. Rudy, 
Lillian M. Schott, 
Ralph C. Schaeffer, 
Paul P. Smith, • 
Edith E. vSpangler, 
Harry F. Stauffer, 



William Ralph Appanzellar, 
David Dickson Brandt, 
Augustus C. Crone, 
M. Edna Engle, 
Elizabeth I. Etter, 
Charles Alien Fisher, 
Charles H. Fisher, 
John H. Graybill, 
William M. Grumbine, 
Charles C. Haines, 
Frank S. Heinaman, 
J. Arthur Knupp, 
Mary N. Light, 
Ira D. Lowery, 
Margaretta C. Miller, 
Alfred Keister Mills, 
Nell C. Reed, 
William E. Riedel, 
Charles E. Roudabush, 



Juniors. 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, ! 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Sophomores. 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 



Mechanicsburg. 
Sunbury. 
Harrisburg. 
Bonthe, Africa. 



York. 

York. 

Dallastown. 

Bird-in.Hand. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Dallastown. 

Middletown. 

East Hanover. 

Harrisburg. 

Union Deposit. 

Lebanon. 

Hummelstown. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Millville, N. J. 



Chambersburg. 

Newville. 

Eastmont. 

Brownstone 

Harrisburg. 

Lebanon. 

York. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Bellegrove. 

Columbia. 

Penbrook. 

Lebanon. 

Harrisburg. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Annville. 

Shamokin. 

Dallastown. 

Shenandoah, Va. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



55 



Frank L. Scott, 
John I. Shaud, 
Albert J. Shenk, 
Monroe W. Smeltzer, 
Mabel M. Spayd, 
Aaron W. Steinruck, 
John J. Unger, 



Victor A. Arndt, 
Thomas Bayard Beatty, 
Charles E. Boughter, 
Arthur R. Clippinger, 
Lula M. Clippinger, 
Clarence K. Dickson, 
Charles E. Dotter, 
Nettie R. Dunahugh, 
J. Raymond Engle, 
Ralph L. Engle, 
Elmer E. Erb, 
Park F. Esbenshade, 
Charles A. Fry, 
Robert B. Graybeille, 
Rush M. Hendricks, 
May B. Hershey, 
Nancy R. Kauffman, 
Wiufield S. Knauss, 
Titus H. Kreider, 
Homer M. B. Lehn, 
Isaac F. Loos, 
Jacob n. Martin, 
Pearl E. Mathias, 
Ellen W. Mills, 
George D. Owen, 
Charles C. Peters, 
Gordon I. Rider, 
John R. Robb, 
Benjamin D. Rojahn, 
Cyrus E. Shenk, 
Emanuel E. Snyder, 
Max O. Snyder, 
Elizabeth Stehman, 
Elmer B. Ulrich, 
Harry Yiengt, 



Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 



Freshmen. 



Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Classical, 

Classical, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 

Scientific, 



Rayville, Md. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Penbrook. 

York. 

Deodate. 

Vineland, N. 1 



Mount Carmel. 

Ouincy. 

Intercourse. 

Mowersville. 

Chambersburg. 

Dillsburg. 

East Hanover. 

State Line. 

Palmyra. 

Palmyra. 

Hockersville. 

Bird-in-Haud. 

Bellegrove. 

Annville. 

Hummelstown. 

Deny Church. 

Dallastown. 

York. 

Annville. 

Alger. 

Berne. 

Vian. 

Highspire. 

Annville. 

New Bloomfield. 

Altenwald. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Lebanon. 

Dallastown. 

Deodate. 

Yoe. 

Liverpool. 

Mountville. 

Annville. 

Mt. Zion. 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

George Ard ...... New Columbia. 

Titus A. Alspach Lebanon. 

J. Susan K. Becker Lebanon. 

Cecilia Bohr Lebanon. 

Helen H. Bressler Lebanon. 

John H. Baker Union Deposit. 

Rosa Cohen .Lebanon. 

John I. Clay East Hanover. 

John A. Detweiler Palmyra. 

D. Miller Early .... Coheva. 

Mary Gruber Bachmansville. 

Abram R. Geyer, Royalton. 

H. B. Garver Middletown. 

Edward S. Fenstermacher Cressona. 

J. F. Ferguson Newport. 

Sannie Hartz Palmyra. 

John A. Hershey Lebanon. 

Clara Euston Lebanon. 

Sara A. Klick Lebanon. 

Clayton E. Lerch Grantville. 

John F. Light Bellegrove. 

Harry W. Light Bellegrove. 

Ray G. Light Avon. 

Winfred G. Light Reading. 

John H. McLaughlin Carsonville. 

Calvin T. PeifTer Avon. 

William S. Poorman Palmyra. 

Mamie B. Risser Lawn. 

Rebecca J. Slonaker Lebanon. 

Sara Snavely Lebanon. 

Mary Warner Annville. 

Lizzie Walter Annville. 

ACADEMY STUDENTS. 

Virgie M. Bachman Annville. 

Ella Bacon ... Williamstown. 

Harry Barnhart Annville. 

Harvey Barnhart Annville. 

Archie S. Beatty Quincy. 

Edward F. Beckmeyer York. 

Andrew Bender Dillsburg. 

Lizzie Boeshore Lickdale. 

Gertrude May Bowman Dayton, Ohio. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 57 

Ruth Braselmann Annville. 

Walter H. Brubaker Lebanon. 

Raymond K. Buffington Elizabethville. 

Lillie S. Burkey Lebanon. 

Michael Clemens Lebanon. 

Lloyd Cross Philadelphia. 

Nettie Diem Intercourse. 

Joseph L. Dougherty Lititz. 

Nellie Davis New Cumberland. 

Mary E. Dean Annville. 

Oscar, J. Deitzler Hummelstown. 

Frank R. Dodds Shellbourne, Ont., Ca. 

Clara Eisenbacb Red Lion. 

Bessie A. Englar Gratis, Ohio. 

Neta B. Englar Gratis, Ohio. 

M. Alma Engle Harrisburg. 

Eli A. Faus Mount Joy. 

Harry|Fahr Lebanon. 

Grace Fisher Palmyra. 

Elias M. Gehr Cedar Lane. 

Charles Gerbart Annville. 

Frank Gray Blain. 

Margaret Gray Ickesburg. 

Harry M. Haak Myerstown. 

John B. Hambright Florin. 

Adam G. Heilman Greble. 

Valeria G. Heilman Greble. 

Laura Helms Lebanon. 

Lizzie Henry Palmyra. 

Albert Herr Annville. 

Clarence Herr Annville. 

Denver Herr Annville. 

John F. Herr Annville. 

William E. Herr Annville. 

Ruth M. Hershey . . Derry Church. 

Harry F. Hinkle Annville. 

Eugene E. Hite Royalton. 

Pharis M. Ho'ldeman Mt. ^Etna. 

Mary Horstick Palmyra. 

J. Warren Kaufman Mt. Carmel. 

John F. Kelley Armbrust. 

Ammon H. Kreider Annville. 

Harper Kreiser Reading. 

Mame Keller Schuylkill Haven. 



58 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Kathryn M. Landis Union Deposit. 

John Lehman Annville. 

Max Lehman Annville. 

Jennie Leslie Annville. 

Ruth M. Leslie Palmyra. 

John A. Light West Lebanon. 

Nancy J. Light Avon. 

Norman L. Linebaugh . York. 

Nettie M. Lockeman York. 

John G. Loose Palmyra. 

Harry E. McLaughlin Carsonville. 

A. Lucile Mills Annville. 

Arthur S. Miller Annville. 

Rufus E. Morgan Valley View. 

Harry Moyer Palmyra. 

Harry M. Moyer Derry Church. 

Mamie K. Moyer Eairland. 

Edith J. Myers Mount Joy. 

Rosa Reddick Walkersville, Md. 

George E. Reiter Myerstown. 

George Richards ■ Annville. 

Maine B. Risser Lawn. 

Harry S. Rittle Lawn. 

John R. Robb Lebanon. 

John E. Rooks Rochester Mills. 

Lucy M. Sherk Harrisburg. 

Ira R. Shoop Mt. Holly Springs. 

Charles L. Shuler Montgomery's Ferry. 

William J. Smith Oliveburg. 

John H. Sprecher Lebanon. 

Frank L. Stine , Rohrersville, Md. 

Mary Stover Hummelstown. 

Walter Strayer . Flinton. 

Jennie Updegrave Sacramento. 

George B. B. Ulvich Myerstown. 

George M. Ulsh Lykens. 

Jennie Vallerchamp Millersburg. 

Raymond Wagner Suedburg. 

Charles A. Weaver Steelton. 

George E. Wharton Philadelphia. 

Edith Weisenborn Highspire. 

John Yiengst Mt. Zion. 

Khaleal Kara Yosuf Antioch, Syria, Turkey 

Mary Zacharias Sinking Spring. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



59 



Mary E. Zimmerman Annville. 

The above list include? the names of all who were connected with 
the Academy between April, 1901, and April, 1902. 



STUDENTS IN MUSIC. 



P. — Piano; V. — Voice; O. — Pipe Organ; H. — Harmony; T. — Theory; 
Hi. — History; C. — Chorus. 



Senior Class. 



Margaret Attwood, P. H. T. Hi., 
Gertrude Bowman, P. H. T. Hi. C, 
Neta Englar, P. H. T. Hi. C, 
Alma Engle, P. V. H. T. Hi. C, 
Nettie Lockenian, P. V. H. T. Hi. C, 
Isaac F. Loos. P. H. T. Hi. C, 
Elizabeth Stehman, P. H. T. Hi. C, 
Mary Zimmerman, P. H. T. Hi. C, 
Emma Batdorf, V. H. T. Hi., 
Arabelle Batdorf, O., 



Lebanon. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Gratis, Ohio. 

Hummelstown. 

Vork. 

Hamburg. 

Mountville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 



Maud Ard, V., 

W. C. Arnold, C. 

Albert Barnhart, P., 

Pearl Bodenhorn, P., 

Virgie Bachman, P. H. Hi. C, 

Lillie Burkey, O. C, 

Emnn Bomberger, P., 

Jessie Brane, P., 

Bayard Beatty, C, 

Ed. F. Beckmeye'r, C, 

David Brandt, C, 

Annie Capp, P., 

D. J. Cowling, C, 

Nettie Diem, P. Hi. C, 

Paul Daugherty, P., 

S. H. Derickson, C, 

Clara Eisenbaugh, P. V. Hi. T. C, 

Raymond Engle, P., 

Miller Early, P. V., 

Forney Eby, P., 

Claude Engle, C, 

Mabel Foltz, P., 



Woodward. 

Vork. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Ouincy. 

Vork. 

Newville. 

Jonestown. 

Scottdale. 

Intercourse. 

Lebanon. 

Newport. 

Red Lion. 

Palmyra. 

Coheva. 

Lebanon. 

Hummelstown. 

Campbelltown, 



6o 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Grace Fisher, P. V. H. Hi. T. C, 

Charles Fisher, P. C, 

Margaret Gray, P. V.|H. Hi. T. C. 

Thomas Gray, C, 

Ray Graeff, O., 

Amy Gabel, P., 

Edith Gingrich, P., 

Martha Henry, P., 

Mabel Herr, P., 

Carrie Himmelberger, P., 

Eva Hershey, P., 

Valeria Heilman, P. V. C, 

Adam Heilman, P. V. C, 

Sannie Hartz, P., 

Moses^Hagey, V,, 

Olive Hess, V., 

Sadie Herr, P. C. Hi., 

Ruth Hershey, P. Hi., 

Anna Hayes, P. V. Hi., 

Lawrence Herr, P., 

Mary Horstick, P. H., 

Rush Hendricks, C, 

Frank Heinaman, C, 

Anna Kreider, V. C, 

Lillie Kreider, V. C, 

Mamie Keller, P. V. Hi. T. C, 

Harper Kreiser, P. V. C, 

Harry Kreider, P. , 

Louise Kreider, P., 

Sol. D. Kauffman, C, 

J. L. Kreider, C, 

Jennie Leslie, P. V. H. Hi. T. C, 

Ruth Leslie, P. O. C, 

Edith Lehman, P., 

Alma Light, C, 

Edith Myers, P., 

Artie W. Miller, V. C, 

May Meyer, P., 

Paul Meyers, P., 

Lizzie Moyer, O., 

Ellen Mills, V. C, 

Lucile Mills, P. C, 

Rufus Morgan, O., 

Grace Nissley, P., 



Palmyra. 

York . 

Ickesburg. 

Ickesburg. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Greble. 

Greble. 

Palmyra. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Harrisburg. 

Hummelstown. 

Elton. 

Annville. 

Palmyra. 

Hummelstown . 

Columbia. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Schuylkill Haven. 

Reading. 

Heilmandale. 

Annville. 

Dallastown. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Palmyra. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Mount Joy. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Annville. 

Lebanon. 

Campbelltown. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Valley View. 

Hummelstown. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



61 



George D. Owens, C, 
Susie Reiter, P. V., 
George Reiter, V. C, 
Daisy Royer, P., 
George Richards, C, 
Emmet Roop, C, 
Mary Rutherford, P., 
Miriam Savior, P., 
Bertha Shenk, P., 
Gertrude Schaeffer, P., 
Cora Stoever, O., 
Alfred C. T. Sumner, C. 
W. J. Sanders, C, 
Anna Umbenhen, O., 
Katie Ulrich, P. V. T., 
Jennie Vallerchamp, P. 
Fannie Weiss, P., 
Mabel Witman, P., 
Mabel Walmer, P., 
Blanch Wolfe, P., 



New Bloomfield. 

Myerstown. 

Myerstown. 

Lebanon. 

Annville. 

Harrisburg. 

Royal ton. 

Annville. 

Annville. 

Hummelstown. 

Lebanon. 

Bonthe, Africa. 

Sunbury. 

Myerstown. 

Hummelstown. 

Millersburg. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 

Lebanon. 



ART STUDENTS. 

Florence Boehm Annville. 

Cecilia Bohr Lebanon. 

Helen Brightbill Annville. 

Edward F. Beckmeyer York. 

Elsie Conner Annville. 

Neta Englar Gratis, Ohio. 

M. Alma Engle Brownstone. 

M. Edna Engle Brownstone. 

Charles Gerhart Annville. 

Emma Gingrich Annville. 

Martha Henry Annville. 

Katherine Hauffman Lebanon. 

Dwight John Annville. 

Minnie Kalbach Lebanon. 

Mary Kellar Annville. 

Anna Kreider Annville. 

Mary Kreider Annville. 

Sallie Kreider Annville. 

Riba F. Lehman Annville. 

Alma Light Annville. 

Jessie Light Annville. 



62 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Emily Loose Palmyra. 

Kathryn Landis Union Deposit. 

Edith J. Myers . Mount Joy. 

Margaret Rigler . Annville. 

Bessie Seltzer Lebanon. 

Mary Shenk . . . . : Annville. 

Mrs. Lydia Schwenk Dillsburg. 

Olive Walters . Annville. 

Nettie Dunahugh State Line. 

Elsie Henry • Palmyra. 

Mabel Stauffer Palmyra. 

Winifred Stover Annville. 

Naomi Witman Lebanon. 

Clare Wood Annville. 



STUDENTS IN PEDAGOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Titus Alspach Lebanon. 

John J. Artz Ono. 

Ira Bacastow Palmyra 

Samuel Beamesderfer Kleinfeltersville. 

A. S. Beatty Quincy. 

Miles Becker Myerstown. 

Irene Bicksler Palmyra. 

Lizzie Boeshore Lickdale. 

Annie Bowman Annville. 

Raymond Boger Annville. 

Nellie Boltz Annville. 

Harry Bomberger Lebanon. 

Lizzie Bomgardner Fredericksburg. 

Lizzie Books Cleona. 

Laura Bowman Bismarck. 

Ervin Boyer Mt. Zion. 

Harry A. Brandt Lebanon. 

Clayton L. Brandt Fontana. 

James Brightbill Myerstown. 

Walter Brubaker Lebanon. 

A. H. Burkholder Campbelltown. 

Lizzie Clouser Bellegrove. 

Samuel Deininger Alger. 

D. M. Early Coheva. 

John S. Early Coheva. 

Harry Eberly Kleinfeltersville. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Cora G. Ebersole Annville. 

Mabel Ebersole Cleona. 

John A. Eckert Iona. 

C} 7 rus Ellenberger Annville. 

Joseph Ellenberger Annville. 

M. B. Farling Palmyra. 

H. S. Fegan Cleona. 

Emma K. Fisher Myerstown. 

J. B. Funk Cleona. 

J. H. Garman Mt. Zion. 

H. G. Gerber • . . . Mt. Zion. 

Philip Gelz East Hanover. 

Kate Glick Mt. Zion. 

W. G. Goodman West Hanover. 

Harry Gruber . Annville 

L,illie E. Gundrum . Mt. Zion. 

Harry M. Haak ' Myerstown. 

C. C. Hains Bellegrove. 

Calvin Heilman Cleona. 

Edith Heilman Cleona. 

Clara Heilman Cleona. 

Frank Heilman Annville. 

Mary Heilman Cleona. 

Lemuel Heisey Palmyra. 

John H. Herr Hummelstown. 

Denver Herr Annville. 

Carrie Hess Annville. 

Lizzie HofFner Centre View. 

Ammon Horst Schaefferstown. 

Allen G. Horst Schaefferstown. 

Mary D. Horstick Palmyra. 

Arthur Hostetter Annville. 

Paul Krall Iona. 

Oscar Leese Annville. 

Nancy Light Avon. 

Harry Light Alger. 

Oscar S. Light Annville. 

Naomi R. Light Avon. 

Iva Maulfair Annville. 

John McCurdy Lebanon. 

Lizzie McLaughlin Myerstown. 

Harry E. McLaughlin Carsonville. 

George Merkle East Hanover. 

W. E. Miller Mt. Zion. 



6+ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Harvey Moyer Palmyra. 

Morris Moyer Palmyra. 

Harry Moyer Palmyra. 

Henry Nowlen Annville. 

Edward Olewine Mt. Zion. 

Kate Philips Lickdale. 

William E. Rank East Hanover. 

John R. Robb Lebanon. 

Rhoda Riegel Lebanon. 

John Royer Annville. 

Mary A. Seabold Annville. 

Raymond F. Shaak Lebanon. 

Samuel Shanaman Annville. 

Walter Schock Mt. Zion. 

John H. Sherk Annville. 

Earnest Shirk* Annville. 

Beckie Smith Reistville. 

Harry A. Smith Fontana. 

Sarah Snavely Lebanon. 

John I. Snavely Ono. 

G. M. Snoke . . • ■ Annville. 

Mabel Snyder Rexmont. 

Harvey Snyder ; . . . Cleona. 

Alice Spangler Bellegrove. 

John H. Sprecher Lebanon. 

Annie Steiner Myerstown. 

Cora E. Stoever Lebanon. 

Harry Swanger Avon. 

Sadie A. Swanger Avon. 

Walter M. Swope Avon. 

Pierce E. Swope Hamlin. 

George B. Ulrich Myerstown. 

Clarence Ulrich Annville. 

J. S. Ulrich Annville. 

Raymond Wagner Suedburg. 

Sadie J. Wagner Mt. Zion. 

Allen G. Walmer East Hanover. 

Anna M. Walter "'.... Annville. 

Harry Witmoyer Bellegrove. 

Jonathan Yiengst Mt. Zion. 

John Yiengst Mt. Zion. 

Harry L. Zartman Mt. Zion. 

George Zimmerman Alger. 

Mary R. Zinn Myerstown. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



65 



The above list includes the names of all who were connected with 
this department between April, tcjoi, and April, 1902. 

SUMMARY. 

Students in College Department, 15S 

Students in Academic Department, 101 

Students in Pedagogical Department, 114 

Students in Music, Painting, Elocution, 131 

Total for 1901-1902, deducting names repeated, 45 1 



GRADUATES. 



The Alumni Association. 



Officers for 1901-1902. 
PRESIDENT— Prof. H. E. Enders, M. S., '97, Annville, Pa. 
V. PRES.,— Miss Nora E. Spa yd, A. B., '00, York, Pa. 
REC. SECRETARY— Miss Ella Nora Black, B S., '96, Annville, Pa. 
COR. SECRETARY— Miss Mary E. Kreider, A. B., '99, Annville, Pa. 
TREASURER— REV. I. H. Albright, Ph.D., '76, Lebanon, Pa. 

'70— Wm. B. Bodeuhorn, a.m., Died at Annville, Pa., March 4, 1889. 

Albert C. Rigler, Teller National Bank, Annville, Pa. 

Mary A. Weiss (Reitzel) Chicago, 111. 

'71— Clemmie L. Ulrich, Died at Annville, Pa., Feb. 18, 1880. 

'72 — J- Wesley Etter, a.m., d.d., Died at Dayton, Ohio, Mar. 28, 1895. 



John K. Fisher, a.m., 

Ezra H. Gingrich, a.m., 

John H. Graybill, A.M., 

John H. Kinports, a.m., 

Jennie E. Kauffman (Crouse) a.m. 

Adam R. Forney, 

'73 — H. B. Stehman, A.M., M.D., 

Sarah Burns (LaRosh) a.m., 

Charles S. Daniel, 

George A. Loose, 

'74 — Adam R. Forney, a.m., 

John E. Lehman, a.m., 

Zaranius S. G. Light, a.m., 

Jos. W. Osborn, a.m., ph d., 

Robert Steinmetz, a.m., 

Hiram E. Steinmetz, a.m., 

Rebecca Kinports (Kendig) a.m., 

Ella Jane Mark (Sneath), 



Died at Lebanon, Pa., June 18, 1890. 

Druggist, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Minister, St. Mary's, Pa* 

Druggist, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Danville, N. J. 

Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

Supt. Pres Hospital, Chicago, 111. 

Pekin, 111. 

Minister, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Farmer, Birdsboro, Pa. 

Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

Prof. Mat., Ast., L.V.C., Annville, Pa. 

Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

Died at Swansea, Mass., Jan. 4, 1889. 

F'armer, Annville, Pa. 

Merchant, Lititz, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Franklin, Mass. 



66 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



'75 — Samuel H. Clair, a.m., 

Sarah E. Collier (Etter) ma., 

'76 — IsaacH. Albright, am.,ph.d. 

J. Geo. Johnson, a.m., ph.d., 

John R. Wright, a.m., 

Aaron G. Herr, 

'77 — Geo. W. Hursh, a.m., m.d., 

Abram H. Shank, a.m., 

Alice M. Rauch (Hagey), M.A., 

Ella J. Rigler (Deaner), M.A., 

Monroe P. Sanders, 

Gerret G. Shellenberger, 

'78 — Geo. F. Bierman, a.m., PH.D. 

Cornelius A. Burtner, a.m., PH.D., 

Virginia G. Burtner (Pitman) M.A., 

A. Belle Howe (Oberst), M.A., 

Hiram B. Dohner, b.d., 

Daniel D. Keedy, 

Harvey E. Thomas, 

'79 — Charles D. Baker, a.m., m.d. 
H. Clay Deaner, a.m., 
Horace S. Kephart, a.m., 
John C. Yocum, a.m., 
Clara S. Craumer (Leavens), A.B., 
Mary E. Groff (Jaquith), m.a., 
Emma L. Landis, m.a., 
J. Lon Whitmoyer, B.S., 

A. Lefevre Groff, 

Fannie C. Killinger (Yocum), 

Lizzie E. Weidman (Groff), 

Henry Wolf, 

'80— V. Kline Fisher, a.b., 

George W. Gensemer, a.b., 

S. Oliver Goho, a.m., 

Cyrus D. Harp, a.m., b.d., 

Simon P. Light, a.m., 

Rosa M. Meredith (Porter), m.a., 

Fannie M. Deaner (Keedy), m.a., 

Alice K. Gingrich (Cowell), m.a., 

Sallie A. Herr (Geyer), m.a., 

Alice J. Light (Beam), M.A., 

B. Frank Baker, 
Elmer C. Thomas, 



Prin. High School, Ashland, Pa. 

Died at Ithaca, N. Y. 
Minister, Lebanon, Pa. 

Minister, Port Richmond, N. Y. 

Minister, Washington, N. J. 

Clerk, Annville, Pa. 

Physician, Columbia, S. C. 

Minister, Kittaning, Pa. 

Steelton, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Died at Marietta, Pa., May io, 1892. 
Farmer, Wichita, Kan. 

.Minister, Clay, Pa. 

Died at Harrisburg, Pa., March, 1900. 
557 vScott Street, Toledo, Ohio. 

Teacher, North Platte, Neb. 

Minister, Reading, Pa. 

Merchant, Keedysvilie, Md. 

Farmer, Boonsboro, Md. 

Physician. Rohrersville, Md. 

Business, Annville, Pa. 

Lib. Mer. Library, St. Louis, Mo. 

Attorney-at-Law, Kansas City, Mo. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Died at Des Moines, la., May 12, 1891. 

Teach, of Art, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Salesman, Los. Angeles, Cal. 

Bookkeeper, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Merchant, Mount Wolf, Pa. 

Farmer, Berne, Pa. 

Merchant Tanner, Pinegrove, Pa. 

Gen. Agt. Am. Bk.Co., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Minister, Providence, R. I. 

Attorney-at-Law, Lebanon, Pa. 

York, Pa. 

Keedysvilie, Md. 

Yreka, Cal. 

Catawissa, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Farmer, Keedysvilie, Md. 

Farmer, Boonsboro, Md, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



6 7 



'81— Ella J. Mark (Sneath), A.M., 

Charles E. Rauch, a.b., 

Elias H. Sneath, a.m., ph.d., 

Isaiah H. Sneath, A.M.. PH.D., 

Sylvester K. Wine, a.m., 

Cyruf L- Benson, b.s., 

Elmer H. Garvev, B.s., 

Henry A. Sechrist, b.s., 

Ella M. Smith (Light), B.s., 

Arabella Stauffer, B.S., 

Millie Weidman (Brightbill ), b.s., 

George A. Wolf, b.s., 

Mary A. VanMeter (Funderburk) 

John B. Ziegler, b.s., m.d., 

James M. VanMetre, Jr., 

'82 — William O. Fries, A.M., 

Christian E. Geyer, a.b., 

Charles B. Gruber, a.m., 

Mary E. Knepper (Meed), M.A., 

J. Goodwin Steiner, a.m., 

Mary S. Culy (Kennedy), 

Clinton J. Barr, b.s., 

Laertes T. Conrad, M.S., 

John H. Oliver, b.s., 

George W. VanMetre, 

'83 -Elmer E. Craumer, a.b., 

Jacob Z. Hoffman, A.M., m.d., 

Gideon R. Kreider, a.m., 

Solomon G. Merrick, a.b., 

Alice M. Evers (Burtner), b.s., 

Althea C. Fink (Merrick), B.s., 

Lizzie J. Kinports, B.s., 

J. Foster Milliken, b.s., 

'84— W. J. Baltzell, a.b., b.mus., 

G. W. Hanger, a.m., ph.d., 

J. Henderson Kurtz, a.b., 

Joseph E. S. Medsger, a.b., 

J. Henry Muller, a.m., b.d., 

J. Oliver Thrush, a.b., b.d., 

M. Angel Fry, B.S., 

C. Eugenia Hauck, b.s., 

H. Lincoln Musser, B.s., 

Anna May Saylor, B.S., 

'85— Markwood M. Burtner, a.m. 



Franklin, Mass. 
Merchant, Lebanon, Pa. 

Prof. Phil. Yale U., New Haven, Conn. 
Minister, Franklin, Mass. 

Minister, Stephen City, Va. 

Clerk, Lebanon, Pa. 

Died at Hastings, Neb., Feb. 23, 1895. 
Minister, Eaton, Ohio. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Teacher of Music, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Merchant, Mt. Wolf, Pa. 

, m.a., Columbia, S. C. 

Physician, Penbrook, Pa. 

Merchant, Columbia, S. C. 

Minister, Fostoria, Ohio. 

Attorney-at-Law, Catawissa, Pa. 

Business, ■ Baltimore, Md. 

Arkansas City, Kan. 
Business, Knoxdale, Pa. 

Georgetown, Ont. 
Business, Lebanon, Pa. 

Minister, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Prof. Unv. Pacific, Pacific Grove, Cal. 
Surveyor, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Attorney-at-Law, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Physician, Wichita, Kan. 

Merchant Miller, Annville, Pa. 

Minister, Duxbury, Mass. 

Swamp Scott, Mass. 
Duxbury, Mass. 

Annville, Pa. 
Attorney-at-Law, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Editor The Etude, Philadelphia, Pa 
Dept. of Labor, Washington, D.C. 
Clerk P. R. R. Co., Altoona, Pa. 

Jeweler, New Florence, Pa. 

Minister, Bloomington, 111. 

Minister. Pottsville, Iowa. 

Postal Clerk, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Lebanon, Pa. 

Merchant, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Teacher, Annville, Pa. 

, Minister, Wasco, Oregon. 



68 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



William S. Ebersole, a.m., 
Joseph Allen Lyter, a.m., 
'86 — Daniel E. Burtner, a.m.,b d. 
'87 — Clayton H. Backenstoe, B.S., 
Harry Thomas Denlinger, a.b., 
Anselm Vinet Hiester, B.S., 
Joseph Patterson Jordan, a.b., 
Lillie Catharine Mark (Ball), a.b. 
George Rigler Shenk, a.m., m.d., 
William Dick Shupe, B.S., 
Sallie Jane Waite, 
Morrison Weimer, a.m., b.d., 
'88— Albert H. Gerberich, b.s., 
Wm. McClellan Hain, B.S., 
Anna R. Reed (Weimer), B.S., 
Joseph Kurtz Wagner, B.S., 
'89 — Benj. F. Daugherty, a.m.. 
Joseph Daugherty, B.S., 
Samuel D. Faust, a.m., d.d., 
Reno Shaffer Harp, a.m., 
John Lincoln Keedy, a.b., b.d., 
Edward Everett Keedy, a.b., b.d., 
John Edward Kleffman, b.s., 
Aaron Albion Long, a.m., 
Ellwood Thomas Schlosser, 
'90 — Edward S. Bowman, a.m., 
Edward O. Burtner, B.s., b.d.. 
Lorena S. Funk (Bowman), b.s., 
William Robert Keller, b.s., 
William Haines Kindt, a.m., 
James T. Spangler, a m., b.d., 
Allen Fishburn Ward, b.s., 
'91 --Schuyler Colfax Enck, a.m., 
Samuel J. Evers, a.b., b.d., 
John Wilson Owen, b.s., 
Lillian M. Ouigley, b.s., 
Ella Nora Saylor (Sheffey), b.s., 
Grant L. Shaeffer, a.m., b.d., 
Mary Magdalena Shenk, b.s , 
Wm. Henry Washinger, a.m., 
'92 — AnnaE. Brightbill(Harp)B.S. 
Anna R. Forney (Kreider), a.b., 
Elmer Loose Haak, B.s., 



Prof. G'k, Cornell Col., Mt. Vernon, la. 
Minister, Harrisburg, Pa. 

.Minister, Swamp Scott, Mass. 

Attorney-at-Law, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Minister, Lancaster, Pa. 

Prof. Pol. Sci. F. & M., Lancaster, Pa. 
Minister, . McDonald, Pa. 

, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Physician, Reading, Pa. 

Died at Johnstown, Pa., March I3,'94. 
Teacher, Bellefonte, Pa. 

Prin. Rogers Acad., Rogers, Arkansas. 
Prin. Pub. Schools, Royersford, Pa. 
Attorney-at-Law, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rogers, Arkansas. 
Theological Student, Oberlin, Ohio. 
Prof. Latin L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Minister, Carlisle, Pa. 

Prof. C'h His. U. B. Sem., Dayton, O. 
Attorney-at-Law, Frederick City, Md. 
Minister, Walpole, Mass. 

Minister, Hadley, Mass. 

Minister, Duncannon, Pa. 

Minister, Shamokin, Pa. 

Farmer, Boonsboro, Md. 

Minister, Harrisburg, Pa, 

Minister, Hummelstown, Pa, 

Minister, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pension Agency, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Minister, Brownstown, Pa. 

Prof. Greek L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Tailor, Lebanon, Pa. 

Minister, Columbia, Pa. 

Minister, Glenbrook, Conn. 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Minister, New Oxford. Conn. 

Art Student L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Minister, Chambersburg, Pa. 

,Died at Annville, Pa., March 15, '96. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Bookkeeper, Myerstown, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



6 9 



Jacob M. Hen, B.S., 

Seba C. Huber, b.s., 

Josephine Kreider (Henry), B.s,, 

Andrew Raymond Kreider, B.S., 

David Albert Kreider, a.b., ph.d., 

Laura E. Reider (Muth), b.s., 

Lillie T. E. Rice (Gohn), b.s., 

John Dickson Rice, a.b., 

Harry Backenstoe Roop, B.S., M.D., 

Hervin Ulysses Roop, a.m., ph.d., 

'93 — Simon Peter Bacastow, B.S., 

Horace W. Crider, b.s., 

Joseph G. W. Herold, b.s., ph.d., 

Samuel Thomas Meyer, a.m., 

John L. Meyer, a.m., 

Harry H. Sloat, 

Elvire C. Stehman (Pennypacker), 

Minnie E. Weinman ( Lyt'e), b s., 

'94 — David S. Eshleman, a.m., b. 

Oscar E. Good, a.m., 

George K. Hartman, a.m., 

Samuel F. Huber, a.m., ix.b., 

George A. L. Kindt, a.b., ph.b., 

William H. Kreider, a.m., ll.b., 

H. Lenich Meyer, M.S., 

Maggie Strickler, a.b., 

Anna E. Wilson, b.s., 

James F. Zug, a.b., 

'95 — Harry \V. Mayer, MS, 

John H. Maysilles, a.m., 

Jacob H. Reber, M.S., PH.D., 

John R. Wallace, B.S., 

'96— Ella Nora Black, B.S., 

Sheridan Garman, B.s., b.d., 

Harry H. Heberly, B.S., 

J. Alexander Jenkins, a.m., 

Bertha Mumma (Crist), b.s., 

Chas H. Sleichter, B s., 

Estelle Stehman, b.s., 

'97 — Ira E. Albert, a.b., 

Harry Boyer, B.S., 

Raymond P. Dougherty, a.b., 

Howard E. Enders, M.S., 

Anna M. Keller, b.s., 



Teacher, Samaria, Mich. 

Attorney-at-Law, Tama, Iowa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Business, Annville, Pa. 

Ins. Phy. Yale Un., New Haven, Conn. 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Da}-ton, Ohio. 

Attorney-at-Law, Chambersburg, Pa. 

Physician, Columbia, Pa. 

President L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 

Merchant Miller, Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Business, York, Pa. 

Minister, North Lynn, Mass. 

Law Student, New Haven, Conn. 

Teacher, Coytesville, N. J. 

Teacher, Rockport, Pa. 

B S., York, Pa. 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

D., Minister, Mountville, Pa. 

Teacher, Penbrook, Pa. 

Minister, Carlisle, Pa. 

Attorney-at-Law, Chambersburg, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Attorney-at-Law, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Prin. Schools, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Beaver Creek, Md. 
Clerk, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Teacher, Sacramento, Pa. 

Engin. Stu. Purdue Univ., Illinois. 
Prin. High School, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Teacher, Norfolk, Va. 

Teacher of Music, Annville, Pa. 

Minister, Richland Center, Wis. 

Clerk, York, Pa. 

Minister, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hummelstown, Pa. 
Business, Scotland, Pa. 

Mountville, Pa. 
Missionary, Shenghai, Africa. 

Minister, Hellam, Pa. 

Inst. Gr'k West'n Col., Toledo, Iowa. 
Prof. Biology L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Matron L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 



7o 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Mary E. Richards (Albert), B.S., 

Norman C. Schlichter, a.m., 

Adam S. Ulrich, b.s., ix.b., 

George A. Ulrich, b.s., m.d., 

Charles B. Wingerd, a.m., b.d., 

'98-— Allen U. Baer, B.S., 

John Q. Deibler, b.s., 

Orville P. DeWitt, A.B., 

John R. Geyer, a m., 

Bessie Kinports, b.s., 

Edwin Kreider, B.s., 

J. Asa Light, b.s., 

Louise Rowse Miller, a.b., 

Jay W. Yoe, B.s., 

Jacob Zerbe, a.b., 

'99— Emma R. Batdorf, b.s., 

John P. Batdorf, b.s., 

Clarence V. Clippinger, b.s., 

Walter G. Clippinger, a.b., 

Edith S. Grabill, b.s., 

Leah C. Hartz (Wingerd), b.s., 

Susie F. Herr. b.s., 

Harry H. Hoy, A.B., 

I. W. Huntzberger, a.b., 

Harry M. Imboden, a.b,, 

William 0. Jones, a.b., 

Mary E. Kreider, a.b., 

Bessie M. Landis, b.s., 

Alma M. Light, b.s., 

Galen D. Light, b.s., 

G. Mahlon Miller, b.s., 

Harry E. Miller, a.b., 

Anna S. Myers, b.s., 

Irvin E. Runk, b.s., 

Caroline D. Seltzer, b.s., 

Hattie S. Shelley, b.s., 

John D. Stehman, a.b., 

Maud S. Trabert, B.S., 

Henry S. Beales, a.m , 

Lemuel E. McGinnes, a.m., 

1900— Nellie Buffington, b.s., 

C. Madie Burtner, B.s., 

Rene D. Burtner, a b., 

Enid Daniel, b.s., 



Missionary, Shenghai, Africa. 

Grad. Stu. French & Eng. Harvard Un. 
Attorney-at-Law, St. Marys, Pa. 

Physician, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Minister, Shippensburg, Pa. 

Minister, Wyomissing, Pa. 

Farmer, Curtin, Pa. 

Prin. Schools, Gloucester City, N. J. 
Prin. High School, Royalton, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Business, Annville, Pa. 

Teacher, Lebanon, Pa. 

Pr'f R'der U. B. Pub. H'se, Dayton, O. 
Minister, Altenwald, Pa. 

Hospital, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Ins. Elocution L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Merchant, Annville, Pa. 

Teacher, Taneytown, Md. 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Shippensburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Business, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ins. Math. High School, Lebanon, Pa. 
Medical Student, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Art Student L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Teacher, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Teacher, Lebanon, Pa. 

Asst. Y. M. C. A. Sec, Boston, Mass. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Teacher of Music, Steelton, Pa. 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Teacher of Music, Lebanon, Pa. 

Ins. High School, Hammonton, N. J. 
Asst. Y. M. C. A. Sec, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Annville, Pa. 
Minister, Died at Glenbrook, Pa. 

Supt. Pub. Schools, Steelton, Pa. 

Elizabethville, Pa. 
Pr'f R'der U. B. Pub. H'se, Dayton, O. 
Asst. Phy. Dir. Y. M. C. A., Dayton, O. 
Grad. Stu. in Phil., Yale University. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



71 



Grant B. Gerberich, B.S., 
Fred Weiss Light, B.S., 
Galea D. Light, a.b., 
David E. Long, B.S., 
Anna E. Kreider, a.b., 
Lizzie G. Kreider, B.S., 
Reba F. Lehman, a.b., 
Seth A. Light, a.b., 
Oren G. Myers, B.S., 
Ross Nissley, B.S., 
D. Aug. Peters, a.b., 
J. Mark Peters, a.b., m.d., 
Ralph D. Reider, B.S., 
Clyde J. Saylor, b.s., 
Alvin E. Shroyer, B.S., 
Charles E. Snoke, a.b., 
G. Mason Snoke, a.b., 
Nora E. Spayd, a.b., 
Harry E. Spessard, A.B., 
Adam K. Wier, a.b., 
Frank F. Holsopple, M.S., 
John S. Gruver, a.m., 
Hiram H. Shenk, a.m., 

'01 — Henry H. Baish, a.b., 
Edward M. Balsbaugh, b.s., 
Morris W. Brunner, a.b., 
William H. Burd, B.S., 
Robert R. Butterwick, a.b., 
Lewis E. Cross, b.s., 
Samuel F. Daugherty, a.b., 
Frank B. Emenheiser, b.s., 
John E. Kleffman, a.b., 
Karnig Kuyoomjian, a.b., 
Emma F. Loos, 
Thomas F. Miller, a.b., 
Susie S. Moyer (Enders), a.b. 
David M. Oyer, a.b., 
William O. Roop, a.b., 
William S. Roop, b.s., 
S. Edwin Rupp, a.b., 
A. Garfield Smith, a.b., 
Cyrus W. Waughtel, a.b., 
Harry H. Yohe, B.s , 
A, B. Hess, a.m., 



Prin. Pub. Schools, South Annville. 
Clerk Valley Nat. Bank, Lebanon, Pa. 
Asst. Y. M. C. A. Sec, Boston, Mass. 
Minister, Cressona, Pa. 

Art Student, L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Ins. in Music Col. Inst., Danville, O. 
Ins. in French L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Medical Student, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Business, San Francisco, Cal. 

Law Student, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Druggist, Steelton, Pa. 

Physician, Steelton, Pa. 

Cl'k Farmers' N.B'k, Hummelst'n,Pa. 
Medical Student, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Teacher Public Schools, Bismarck, Pa. 
Teacher, York, Pa. 

Prin. Seminary, Huntsville, Wash. 
Minister, Gordonville, Pa. 

Prof. Eng. Juniata Col., Huntingdon. 
Pres. E't'n N'm'l Col., Front Royal, Va 
Prof. His. Pol.Sci. L.V.C., Annville, Pa 

Ward Prin. Pub. Schools, Altoona, Pa. 
Sup. Prin. Pub. Schools, Lansford, Pa. 
Business, New York Citv. 

V. Prin. Pub. Schools, Patten, Pa. 
Minister, Palmyra, Pa. 

Vice Prin. Seminary, Sugar Grove, Pa. 



Minister, 

Minister, 

Minister, 

Theological Student 

Teacher, 

Business, 



Highspire, Pa. 
Dover, Pa. 
Duncannon, Pa. 
Dayton, Ohio. 
Berne, Pa. 
New York City. 
Annville, Pa. 
Minister, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Prin. Pub. Schools, Riddlesburg, Pa. 
Real Estate Agent, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Minister, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Teacher, Hampden, Pa. 

Prin. Col. Inst., Danville, Ohio. 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio. 
Prin, Pub. Schools, Collegeville, Pa. 



72 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



IN MUSIC. 



'82— Alice K. Gingrich (Cowell), 

Mary E. Knepper, (Meed), M.A., 

Ella M. Smith (Light), b.s., 

Ada M. Underwood (Ayers), 

'83 — Alice M. Evers (Burtner), b.s., 

Ida M. Zent (Richards), 



Yreka, Cal. 
Arkansas City, Kan. 
Lebanon, Pa- 
Baltimore, Md. 
Swamp Scott, Mass. 
Roanoke, Indo 



'84 — C. Eugenia Hauck, Teacher of Music, Lebanon, Pa. 

'85 — Sevilla K. Gensemer ( Bowman ), Died at Pinegrove, Pa., Apr. 25/97 



Minnie E. Speck, 

Ida M. Speck, 

'86 --M. Ella Moyer, 

'87 — L. Augusta Doyle, 

Carrie Gertrude Eby (Jeffries), 

Katie E. Rauch (Miller), 

'88— Alice Lydia Kutz, 

Sallie Adaline Mark, 

Sidney Moyer, 

Nettie May Swartz, 

'90 — Lorena S. Funk (Bowman) 

Anna Ruth Forney (Kreider), 

'91 — Minnie M. Burtner, 

Carrie E. Smith, 

'92— Lulu M. Baker, 

Annie E. Brightbill (Harp), 

Florence R. Brindle (Gable), 

Katie P. Mumma, 

Delia F. Roop (Daugherty), 

EllaN. Saylor (Sheffey), 

Elvire C. Stehman ( Pennypacker), 

Samuel H. Stein, Minister, 

'93— Mary C. Batdorf, 

Anna E. Wilson, 

'94-— Ida L- Bowman (Richards), 

Mellie Fortenbaugh (Bowman), 

Emily E. Loose, 

Ella Pennypacker (Hoover), 

Mabel M. Saylor (Bender), 

'95— Urban H. Hershey, 

'96— Ella Nora Black, 

Howard Gobin Henry, 



Died at Braddock', Pa., Jan. 15/95 

Scottdale, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Lebanon, -Pa. 

' Huntingdon, Pa. 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Freeburg, Pa. 

Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

New Oxford, Pa. 

b.s., Harrisburg, Pa. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Teacher of Music, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Camp Hill, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Montrose, Col. 

Died at Annville, Pa., March 15,' 96. 

Shamokin, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Ephrata, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

York, Pa. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Beaver Creek, Md. 

Royersford, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Art Student L. V. C, Palmyra, Pa. 

Mountville, Pa. 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Teacher of Music, Manheim, Pa. 

Teacher of Music, Annville, Pa. 

Student Pharmacy, Philadelphia, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



73 



Mary E. Kreider, 

Bertha Mayer (Baer), 

E. Ruth Mumma, 

Estelle Stehman, 

'97— Mary E. Kreider, 

Stella K. Sargent (Sollenberger), 

'99 — Mabel E. Manbeck, 

Mabel Royer, 

'00 — Lillie Burkey, 
Anna E. Kreider, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Kathryn Landis, 
Ruth Leslie, 
Sue Moyer (Enders), 
Mary Zacharias, 
'01 — Arabelle Batdorf, 
Edna Groff, 
Anna E. Kreider, 
Lizzie G. Kreider, 
Lena Owens, 



Art Student L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Wyomissing, Pa. 



Teacher of Music, 



Art Student L. V. C. 



Lancaster, Pa. 
Mountville, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 



Teacher of Music, 
Teacher of Music, 
Teacher, 

Art Student L. V. C. 
Ins. in Music Col. Inst., Danville, O. 
Teacher of Music, Union Deposit, Pa. 
Teacher of Music, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Annville, Pa. 
Teacher of Music, Sinking Spring, Pa. 
Stu. in Mus. L. V. C, Annville, Pa. 
Teach, of Music, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Art Student L. V. C , Annville, Pa. 
Ins. Mus. Col. Inst., Danville, O. 

Guthrie, Oklahoma 



Program for Commencement Week. 

1902 . 

Sunday, June 15th, 10.15 o'clock A. M., Baccalaureate 

Discourse by President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D. 
Sunday, June 15th, 8.00 P. M., Address before the Christian 

Associations, by Hon. S. J. M. McCarrell, Harrisburg. 
Monday, June 16th, 7.45 P. M., Graduating Exercises of the 

Department of Music. 
Tuesday, June 17th, 9 o'clock A. M., Annual Meeting of 

Board of Trustees. 

Tuesday, June 17th, 7.30 P.M., Junior Oratorical Prize Contest. 

Wednesday, June 18th, 2 o'clock P. M., Class Day Exercises. 

Wednesday, June 18th, 7.30 P. M., Conservatory Concert. 

Thursday, June 19th, 10 o'clock A. M., Graduating Exercises 
of Class of 1902. Commencement Address by Hon. 
James M. Beck, Washington, D. C. Conferring of 
Degrees and Announcements by President Roop. 

Thursday, June 19th, 7.30 P.M., Reception by the Senior Class. 



74 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



INDEX. page 

Calendar 2 

The Corporation — Board of Trustees 3 

Officers and Committees of the Board 3 

The Faculty and Officers 5-6 

Degrees Confereed, June 13, 1901 r . 7 

Plan and Purpose of the College 8 

Corporate Rights, and Form of Bequest 8 

Grounds and Buildings 8 

Religious Training 9 

Health and Physical Culture 10 

Literary and Musical Advantages 10 

Library and Reading Room 11 

Laboratories and Museum 12 

Matriculation and Discipline 13 

Class Standing 14 

Leave of Absence, Degrees, and Diplomas .... 15 

Graduate Work 15 

Dormitories, 16 

Expenses, Terms of Payment 17 

Departments : — 18 

Admission to the College, Three Methods 18 

Outlines of Courses 20-23 

Philosophy 24-25 

Greek Language and Literature 25-26 

Latin Language and Literature 26 

German Language and Literature 27 

French Language and Literature 27 

English Language and Literature 28 

Mathematics and Astronomy 2S 

Chemistry and Physics 29-30 

Biology 31-32 

History and Political Science 33 

Pedagogy 34 

English Bible 35 

Schedule of College Recitations 36 

The Academy, Requirements for Admittance 37 

Courses of Study 37~4 2 

Schedule of Recitations 43 

Department of Pedagogy 44 

The Summer School 45 

Conservatory of Music 46-4S 

Expenses 49 

Department of Art 50 

Elocution 51 

Catalogue of Students 52-64 

Summary 65 

Alumni and Alumni Officers 65-73 

Program for Commencement Week 73 

Index 74 



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