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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

THE 

Lebanon Valley CoDege 
BULLETIN 



Series ill. 



APRIL, 1905. 



No. 2 



Catalogue Number 
1904-1905 




COLLEGE CHARTERED ia6r 



Thirty-Ninth Annual Catalogue 



of the 



Lebanon Valley College 

I 

Collegiate Department 

. The Academy 

Special Departments for Teachers 

School of Music 

School of Expression 

School of Art 

Summer School 



1904-1905 



Annville, Pa., April, 1905. 

Entered at the post-office, Annville, Pa., as second-class matter^ 
January 24, 1904, under Act of July 16, 1894 

Published Quarterly by Lebanon Valley College 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

College Calendar. 



SORING TERM. 

April 3, Monday^ Registration, g a. m. 

April 4, Tuesday^ Instruction begins, g a. ni. 

April 14, Friday, AnmYers2iry of the Kalozeteanl^iterarySociety 

May 5, Friday, Anniversary, Philokosmian Literary Society. 

May 22, Monday , Senior Final Examinations begin. 

May 30, Ticesday, Memorial Day, a holiday. 

June 10, Freshmen Declamation Prize Contest, 7. 30 p. in. 

June II, Sunday, Baccalaureate Sermon by President Roop, 
10. 1 ^ a. m. 

June 1 1 , Sunday, Campus Praise Service, 6 p. 7n. 

June 1 1 , Sunday^ Annual Address before the Christian Asso- 
ciations, 7.30 p. m.,hy F. S. Edmunds, Esq., of Phila. 

June 12, Monday^ Commencement, Dept. of Music, 7.30 p. m. 

June 13, luesday, Meeting of Board of Trustees, g> a. in. 

June 13, Tuesday^ Junior Oratorical Prize Contest, 7.30 p. m. 

June 13, Tz/^^^oy, Annual Alumni Banquet and Reunion, p/.?/2. 

June 14, Wednesday , Thirty-Ninth Annual Commencement, 
10 a. 7n., Oration by Dr. Albert H. Smyth, Phila. 

June 14, Wednesday, Conservatory Concert. 7.30 p. m. 

June 26, Monday, Summer Session begins. 

1905 FALL TERM. 

September 11 and 12, Mo7iday and Tuesday, Examination 

and Registration of Students. 
September 13, Wednesday , Instruction begins, g a. m. 
November 30, Thursday, Clionian Literary Society Anni- 

vensary, 7 .30 p. m. 
December 2 and 9, Senior Public Orations. 
December 22, Friday, Fall Term ends, 3 p. in. 

1906 WINTER TERM. 

January 3, Wednesday, Instruction begins, p a. m. 

January 25, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

January 26, Friday, First Semester ends. 

February 22, Wednesday , Washington's Birthday, a holiday. 

March 3 and 10, Junior Public Orations. 

March 23, Friday, Winter Term Ends. 

April 3, Tuesday, Spring Term begins. 

June 13, Fortieth Annual Commencement. 

September 12, Academic Year begins. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



The Corporation. 



TRUSTEES. 

President Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., LL.D. and Faculty, Ex-Officio. 

TERM 
NAME residence EXPIRES 

Representatives from Pennsylvania Conference. 



Rev. Ezekiel B. Kephart, D.D., 


LL.D., 


Westerville, Ohio 


1905 


Rev. J. S. Mills, D.D., LL.D., 




Annville 


1905 


Rev. Daniel Eberly, D.D., 




Hanover 


1906 


Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, A.M., 




Chambersburg 


1907 


Rev. JohnE. Klkffman, A.B., 




Carlisle 


1907 


William A. Lutz, 




Sliippensbiirg 


1906 


John C. Heckert, 




Dallastown 


1905 


Henry Wolf, 




Mount Wolf 


1905 


Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A.M., 




Hagerstown, Md. 


1905 


George C. Sny^der, 




Hagerstown, Md. 


1906 


William 0. Appenzellar, 




Chambei sburg 


1906 


Cyrus F. Floor, 




Myersville, Md. 


1907 


Representatives from Eastern Pennsylvania Conference. 




William H. Ulrich, 




Hummelstown 


1906 


Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D.D., 




Dayton, Ohio 


1907 


Benjamin H. Engle, 




Harrisburg 


1906 


Henry H. Kreider, 




Annville 


1905 


Charles E. Rauch, A.B., 




Lebanon 


1905 


Rev. Henry- S. Gabel, 




Lebanon 


1907 


Maurice E. Brightbill, 




Annville 


1906 


Jonas G. Stehman, 




Mountville 


1907 


Rev. D. D. Lowery, 




Harrisburg 


1907 


Samuel F. Engle, 




I'almyra 


1906 


Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph.D., 




Reading, 


1905 


Simon P. Light, Esq,, A.M., 




Lebanon, 


1907 


Valentine K. Fisher, A.B., 




Berne, 


1906 


George F. Breinig, 


' 


Allentown, 


1907 


Representatives from Virginia Conference. 




John H. May-silles, A.M., 




Munson, W. Va. 


1908 


Rev. Sanford D. Skelton, 




Winchester, Va. 


1907 


Rev. a. p. Funkhouser, B.S., 




Harrisonburg, Va. 


1907 


Edward F. Millard, 




Martinsburg, W. Va. 


1907 


Rev. J. R. Ridenour, 




Middletown, Md. 


1908 


Rev. J. N. Fries, A.M., 




Berkley Springs, W. Va 


L 1906 


Rev. C. p. Dyche, 




Antioch, W. Va. 


1906 


TRUSTEES-AT-LARGE— Hon. Marlin E 


. Olmsted, LL.D., Harrisburg ; 


Mr. Frank Keister. 


, Scottdale ; Mr. Warren Thomas, 



Johnstown, and Mr. Ezra Gross, Greensburg. 
ALUMNAL-TRUSTEES— Prin. H. H. Baish, A.M., '01, Altoona ; Rev. 
R. R. Butter WICK, A.M., '01, Palmyra, and Rev. E. O. 
Burtner, B.S., '90, Hummelstown. 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Corporation. 
OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

PRESIDENT— Hon. William H. Ulrich 

VICE-PRESIDENT— Rev. Daniel Eberly 

SECRETARY— Rev. Isaac H. Albright 

TREASURER— Hervin U. Roop 

Executive Committee. 

HERVIN U. ROOP, Chairman 

ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Secretary 
ISAAC B. HAAK, HENRY H. KREIDER, 



BENJAMIN H. ENGLE, 



HIRAM B. DOHNER, 



SIMON P. LIGHT. 



Committees. 



Finance --Henry H. Kreider, Chairman 
Jonas G. Stehman, 
John C. Heckert, 
J. S. Mills, 



Samuel F. Engle, 
Cyrus F. Flook, 
Henry Wolf, 
Edward F. Millard 



Wm. O. Appenzellar, 
Marlin E. Olmsted, 
A. P. Funkhouser. 



Endowment — Ezekiel B. Kephart, Chairman 
William H. Washinger, 
Daniel Eberly, 
Charles E. Ranch, 

Faculty — William A. Lutz,'Chairman Isaac H. Albright, 

Samuel D. Faust, Isaac B. Haak, 

Simon P. Light, George B. Breinig. 

Library and Apparatus — George C. Snyder, Chairman. 

John R. Ridenour, Robert R. Butterwiok, 

Henry S. Gabel, C. P. Dyche, 

Edward O. Burtner. 

Grounds, Buildings, and Domestic Department- 



Benjamin H. Engle, Chairman. 
Maurice E. Brightbill, 
Sanford D. Skelton, 

Auditing —John H. Maysilles, Chairman. 
John Kleffman, 

Preceptress — Miss Edith H. Baldwin. 

Matron — Mrs. John H. Maulfair. 



A. B. Statton, 
Valentine K. Fisher, 
D. D. Lowery. 

Henry H. Baish, 
J. N. Fries. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers. 



Kev. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 

Preside7it, and Professor of Philosophy [iSg'/) 

Lebanon Valley College, Cornell University, University of Wooster, 

Clark University and University of Pennsylvania. 

Member of the National Education Association, Member of the American 

Academy of Political and Social Science, Member of the American 

Anthropological Association. 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy ( iSS"/ ) 

Lebanon Valley College, Ohio University, and Cornell University. 

Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 



Rev. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A.M., B.D., . 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature {i8gy) 

Lebanon Valley College and Union Biblical Seminary 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A.M., 

Professor of the English Language and Literature [iSgy) 
Ottefbein University, and School of Modern Languages 

Rev. benjamin FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A.M., 

Professor of the LatiJi Language and Literature [iSgy) 
Lebanon Valley College, Union Biblical Seminary, and University of Chicago 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F.S.Sc, (London, England) 

Director of tl^e Department of Music, and Professor of 

Piano and Organ {/8g8) 

Trinity College, Dublin, and London College of Music 

Fellow of the Society of Science, Letters, and Arts, London, Eng. 

Pupil of Sir R. P. Stewart, Sir John Stainer, Sir Walter Macfarren, and Joachim Raff, 

THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A.M., Registeae, 

Professor of Chemistry arid Physics {jgoo) 
Otterbein University, Johns Hopkins University, Ohio State University, 

and Harvard University 
Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A.M., Seceetaey, 

Professor of French, and Associate in English {i8gg) 

Lebanon Valley College and Harvard Univei'sity 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers, continued 



HIRAM HERR SHENK, A.M., Libeaeian, 

Professor of History and Political Science [1900) 

Ursinus College, Lebanon Valley College, and University of Wisconsin 

Member of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 

HOWARD EDWARD ENDERS, M.S., 

Professor of the Biological Sciences {igoo) 

Lebanon Valley College, University of Michigan, and Johns Hopkins University 

Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 

Rev. lewis franklin JOHN, A.M., D.D., 

Professor of English Bible, and Associate in Philosophy {1901) 

Otterbein University and Yale University 

Member of the Religious Education Association, 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, 

Drexel Institute 
Principal of Art Depart'tnent {/goo) 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S., 

Acting Professor of the Biological Sciences (igoj) 

Lebanon Valley College and Johns Hopkins University 

JOHN KARL JACKSON, A.M., 

Prof essor of Public Speaking , and Instructor in Voice {1904) 
Hedding College, Harvard University, Knox College Conservatory of Music 

BESSIE TROVILLO, A.B., 

Professor-elect of G erf nan Language and Literature ^ 
Hedding College and Knox Conservatories of Music and Wellesley College 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A.M., 

Principal of the Academy, 

and Instructor in Latin and English {igo4) 

Lebanon Valley College 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, A.B., 

Principal of the Teachers' Preparatory Department {1902) 
Lebanon Valley College 

THOMAS S. STINE, A.M., 

Instructor in German {1900) 

Franklin and Marshall College 

WILLIAM CALVIN ARNOLD, A.M., 
Registrar-elect and Instructor in Sociology 
Lebanon Valley College and Columbia University 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers, continued 

EMMA R. BATDORF, B.S., 

Instructor in Elocution {/goo) 
Lebanon Valley College and King's School of Oratory 

CHARLES H. B. OLDHAM, 

Instructor in Piano {i8g8) 
Lebanon Valley College 

S. E. McCOMSEY, 

Instructor in Violin, Strings, etc. {1901) 

Pupil of Andrew Verdier and Ewald Southun 

REBA FISHER LEHMAN, A.B., 

Associate Librarian {1904) 
Lebanon Valley College 

PAUL MOURY SPANGLER, 

Instructor in Bookkeeping 
Temple College and Lebanon Valley College. 

ANDREW BENDER, 

Laboratory Assistant in Physics 

JOHN GILLIS, 

Director of Athletics 

DAVID W. McGILL, 

Lebanon Valley College 

ALMA MAE LIGHT, M. S., 

Lebanon Valley College 

ALVIN BINNER, M.E., 

West Chester Normal School and Lebanon Valley College 
Instructors in Teachers* Preparatory Department 

Rev. WILLIAM J. ZUCK, D.D., 

College Pastor 

SPECIAL LECTURE STAFF, 1904-1905 



Bishop E. B. KEPHART, D.D., LL.D., 

Lect2irer o?i Archaeology 

DANIEL EBERLY, D.D., 

Lecturer on Philosophy of History 

Bishop J. S. MILLS, D.D., Ph.D., LL.D., 

Lecturer on Sociology 

W. H. GOTWALD, D.D., LL.D., 
Lecturer on Apologetics 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Plan and Purpose of the College. 

CORPORATE RIGHTS.— The College, establislied in 1866, was 
incorporated with full University privileges by the Legislature of Pennsyl- 
vania, in an Act approved by the Exeputive on the 5th of April, A. D. 1867. 
The Management of the College is committed to a Board of Trustees, elected 
by the Annual Conferences co-operating in the enterprise, one-third of w^hom 
are elected annually for a term of three years. The members of the Faculty 
sustain an ex -officio relation. 

The charter indicates that it was the purpose of the founders to plant an 
institution which would become so ample in facilities and manifold in 
departments as to furnish instruction in all the subjects of a general and 
special education. Toward this original purpose the College is rapidly 
advancing. 

FORM OF BEQUEST. — To persons desiring to aid in increasing the 
efficiency of the College in the work of preparing young men and women for 
usefulness, the following form of bequest is recommended : 

1 give and bequeath to the Lebanon Valley College, at Annville, Pa., 
the sum of dollars, for the general purpose of said school. 

Grounds and BulMlngs. 

The Grounds include about twenty acres in the very heart of the 
beautiful Lebanon Valley, Annville, within easy access of the railway 
station, post office, churches, and the usual business places. Upon them are 
erected nine commodious College buildings. 

SOUTH COLLEGE, or the Ladies' Hall, is a large brick building, 
entirely separate from the other premises, and under the immediate care of 
the Preceptress. Young ladies from abroad are furnished a comfortable and 
pleasant home, where they have every advantage for study and general 
improvement. Beginning with September, 1905, this building will be used 
as the home for the Academy boys. 

NORTH COLLEGE, or the Administration Building, also built of 
brick, was originally eighty-four feet in length. In 1900 its length was 
doubled. ' It was four stories high. This building was totally destroyed by 
fire December 24. Instead of this one building there will be four, to be 
known as, (a) the ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, which will contain the 
President's offices. Treasurer's office, eighteen Recitation Rooms, etc. ; (b) 
the MEN'S DORMITORIES, on the Oxford and Cambridge system, pro- 
viding single suites, double suites, single and double rooms, for more than 
one hundred students; (c) a SCIENCE HALL, modern in design, devoting 
one floor each to the Physical, Chemical and Biological laboratories ; (d) a 
CENTRAL HEATING AND LIGHTING PLANT. These buildings are to 
be ready for occupancy by September 12, 1905. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 9 

THE ENGLE MUSIC HALL, erected in 1898-1899, a spacious and 
beautiful structure, of Hummelstown brownstone and of the Corinthian order 
of architecture, is one of the most attractive and imposing of the College 
buildings. The cost of the building was about twenty-five thousand dollars, 
and, in addition, over six thousand dollars have been expended in its furnish- 
ings. It supplies accommodations for the Director's Room and Office, the 
Art Department, Literary Society Halls, twelve or more Practice Rooms 
supplied with new pianos, and a large Auditorium with a fine pipe organ, 
the gift of J. C. Heckert. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY BUILDING, erected in 1904-1905, is built 
of brick with stone trimmings, and is of Italian Renaissance style of archi- 
tecture, two stories in height with a finished basement. The structure is 
commodious and finely appointed, and is now in use. 

The WOMEN'S DORMITORY, now nearly under roof, is being built of 
brick with stone trimmings, and of the Elizabethan style of architecture. It 
will be three stories high with finished basement, and will contain a large 
refectory, kitchen, store room, parlor, two Society Halls, Matron's Room 
and Office, baths, toilets, and dormitory rooms to accommodate seventy 
girls. It will be ready for occupancy September 1, 1905. 

THE BRIGHTBILL GYMNASIUM, now in course of construction, is 
being built of limestone and will be modern in every detail. 

All the buildings are heated throughout by steam from a large central 
heat plant, and also lighted throughout by electricity". 

A NEW ATHLETIC FIELD was purchased in 1903. It is a beautiful 
field containing six acres; it is enclosed, and fitted uj) for all x)hases of 
modern athletics. 

Religious Training;, 

Religious training is regarded as essential to a thorough education. The 
Institution, being founded in the interest of Christ and Christian scholarship, 
assumes for its work the joint culture, by all proper means, of both intellect 
and heart. More than ninety per cent, of the students are communicant 
members of the church, and a Christian spirit underlies and animates the 
instruction in the different departments. But, beyond this, special provision 
is made for more direct and positive Christian influence. 

1. A regular service, consisting of the reading of Scriptures, singing 
and prayer, is held in the College Chapel every school morning. Students 
are required to be present. 

2. Weekly Prayer Meetings and Bible and Mission Study Classes are 
conducted by the students in the college. 

3. There are flourishing organizations of the Young Women's and Young 
Men's Christian Associations of the College, which hold their meetings each 
week. These are great auxiliaries to the religious life of the College. 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

4. All resident students of the College are required to attend public 
worship on the Sabbath day. 

5. A Bible Normal Class, for the instruction of Sunday school 
teachers, is conducted semi-weekly. The course of instruction extends 
over one year, and is the one provided for and used by the Bible Normal 
Union. A diploma is granted to students who complete the course. 

6. Regular recitations are heard during the year in Bible History, in 
the Greek of the New Testament, and in the English Bible. 

Health and Physical Culture. 

Next to moral and religious character, the first of all things to be secured 
and cared for in the training of the young, is sound physical health. Accord- 
ingly, wise and liberal provision is made to preserve and promote it by daily 
exercise in the open air, and by a careful course of gymnastic instruction. 

Literary and Musical Advantages. 

An important feature oi the educational work at Lebanon Valley is the 
course of lectures by the President and the Professors and by invited speakers 
from abroad. These are to be delivered before the students of all depart- 
ments once a month. An evening course of five numbers is conducted by the 
Christian Associations of the College. Their course for 1904 and 1905 was : 
Wallace Bruce Amsbury Company ; Lecture — Frank Dixon ; Lulu Tyler 
Gates Company ; Germaine — The Magician ; and Play — School for Scandal. 

The President of the College expects to give the Freshman class one hour 
every other week during a portion of the first semester a series of practical 
lectures designed to aid in the formation of good intellectual habits, and to 
acquaint the incoming students with the spirit and purpose of the College. 

The XDresence of the Conservatory of Music, with the Elocution and Art 
Departments, brings unusual facilities for aesthetic unfolding within the reach 
of students in all departments. The many rehearsals of the Conservatory of 
Music and the numerous concerts and recitals by prominent musicians assist 
in the cultivation of a high musical standard, and afford opportunities that 
cannot be equalled except in our largest cities. 

Lit»erary Societies. 

Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and parliamentary 
training are afforded by the Societies of the College. There are three of these 
societies — one sustained by the young ladies, the Clionian ; and two by the 
young men, the Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. Each society has a well 
furnished hall and its own library. These societies are considered valuable 
agencies in College work, and students are advised to unite with one of them. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 11 

Libraries and Reading Room. 

The College Librar}^ with the libraries of the Literary Societies, is 
arranged with a view to making it especially valuable as a reference library. 
By gift and purchase, additions are constantly made to the list of books in 
the different departments. Large additions were made during the past year. 

With the libraries is connected a Reading Room , provided with the issues 
of the current press and with the leading periodicals of the day, including 
several of the best European journals, together with cyclopaedias, dictionaries, 
and other works of reference. The more valuable journals in each depart- 
ment of instruction are provided, and the current numbers of these publica- 
tions are always accessible in the Reading Room. The Librarians are 
in constant attendance to guide or assist students in their researches. 
The Library is thoroughly catalogued on the Dewey plan. During 
term time the hours are from 9 to 12 A. M., and 12:30 to 7 P. M. 

Laboratories and Museum. 

THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY, on the first floor of the central 
building, is a large, room, 40x18 feet, well lighted and thoroughly fitted with 
desks, lockers, water and gas, for twenty-five students. The laboratory is 
well equipped with new Bausch and Lomb compound microscopes, B. and L. 
improved laboratory microtone, paraffine oven, constant temperature oven, 
incubator, dissecting microscopes, and such other apparatus, reagents and 
stains as are needed. 

Marine material for dissection and forms not found in this locality are 
obtained from marine supply stations. 

A large case for models and skeletons has been added recently, contain- 
ing four Auzoux models — Man complete ; the human eye ; the human ear ; 
the human brain ; all greatly enlarged and dissectible. A series of seven 
models of vertebrate brains. Models of dissections of the sponge, starfish, 
fresh water mussels, crayfish and perch. 

Prepared skeletons of man, as well as of several of the lower mammals, 
birds, reptiles, and fishes. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. The general experimental labora- 
tory, in basement of main building, contains thirty-two separate desks and 
lockers, with water, gas and sink. The laboratory is further supplied with 
hoods for removing noxious gases, blast lamps for glass working, gas collect- 
ing and measuring apparatus, scales, and Queen balance. Each student is 
given in addition complete individual equipment for performing all experi- 
ments of Remsen's College Chemistry. 

THE QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE LABORATORY is on 
the second floor of the central building. It is equipped with new Sartorious 
balance, blast lamps, oven, aspirators, batteries for electrolysis, and all other 
necessary apparatus for general quantitative analysis. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE PHYSICAL LABOEATORY, connected with physical lecture 
room on first floor, by double doorway, is a commodious, well lighted room, 
fitted with laboratory tables, gas, water, steam, aspirators, et cetera. All 
apparatus is of modern design, and equipment for practically all experiments 
of Ames and Bliss's Manual of Physical Experiments is provided. 

THE MUSEUM occupies a separate room on the second floor. About 
four hundred feet of- shelf room is filled with a good collection of specimens 
in geology, mineralogy, economic botany and zoology. 

THE STOCK EOOM joins the general chemical laboratory in the 
basement. Here are kept reserve chemicals and chemical apparatus. 

THE GAS MACHINE, one hundred light capacity, is also in this room. 
The gas pipes supplying laboratories have parallel air pipes from blower, so 
connected that gas can be made any desired quality as it enters the bunsen 
burners. 



Matriculation is regarded as a pledge on the part of the student to obey 
all the rules of the College, and is permitted only on that condition. 

A fee of five dollars each year is required of every regularl}^ matriculated 
student in the Literary department, and three dollars of each student taking 
full Music or Art course, on the payment of which a certificate will be given 
entitling the holder to all the privileges of the College. For students taking 
piano or voice or art only, the fee for the year is only one dollar. 

Biscipllsie. 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced to good conduct 
and diligence b^^ higher motives than fear of punishment. The sense of 
duty and honor, the courteous and generous feelings natural to young men 
and women engaged in literary pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators 
of conduct. It is the policy of the administration to allow in all things as 
much liberty as will not be abused, and the students are invited and expected 
to co-operate with the Faculty ; but good order and discipline will be strictly 
maintained and misconduct punished by adequate penalties. The Laws of 
the College, enacted by the Board of Trustees, are as few and simple as the 
proper regulation of a community of young men and women will permit. 
These are printed, and a copy is placed in the hands of every student at the 
beginning of each year. These laws must be observed, not only in their 
letter, but in their spirit. The College will not place its stamp or bestow its 
honors upon any one who is not willing to deport himself becomingly. 
Every unexcused absence from any College duty, failure, or misdemeanor of 
a student, is reported to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 



LEBANON VALLEx COLLEGE 13 

Advisers. 

The following are the Advisers for the students in each of the five 
groups in which courses of instruction are offered : For the Philosophical 
group, President Roop ; for the Classical, Professor Spangler ; for the 
Chemical-Biological, Prof. McFadden ; for the Historical-Political, Prof. 
Shenk ; for the Modern Language, Prof. Schlichter ; for the Freshman Class, 
Prof. Daugherty, aud for the Academy, Prof. Spessard. The students of 
each group are amenable to the adviser in all matters of conduct, study, and 
discipline. He is to grant leave of absence, permission to go out of town, 
and excuses. His approval is necessary before a student may register for or 
enter upon any course of study, or discontinue any work. He is the 
medium of communication between the President and Faculty, and the 
students of this group, and in a general way stands to his students in the 
relation of friendly counsellor. 

Classification. 

The maximum number of hours, conditioned, permitted for Senior 
standing is four ; for Junior standing four, for Sophomore six, and for 
Freshman — to be decided for individual student by the committee on 
Classification. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work above that prescribed by 
the curriculm is limited by the student's record for previous years 
as follows : 

( a ) Majority of A's, nothing less than B — no limit. 

( b ) Majority of B's, nothing less than C — four hours. 

( c ) Lower record than ( b ) — no extra hours. 

Class Standing. 

The scholarship of students is determined by result of examinations 
and daily recitations combined. The grades are carefully recorded. 

Reports of standing will be made to parent or guardian at end of each 
term when desired by them, or when the Faculty deems it expedient. The 
standing is indicated generally by classification in six groups, as follows : 

A. signifies that the record of the student is distinguished. 

B. signifies that the record of the student is very good. 
C signifies that the record is good. 

D. signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E. ( conditioned ) imposes a condition on the student. Conditions 
incurred in January must be made up in June ; conditions incurred in June 
must be made up in September. Failing to make up a condition at the 
time appointed is equal to a record F, 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

F. ( failed completely") signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subjects, and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to repeat 
certain subjects, to repeat the year, or to withdraw. 

Leave of Absence. 

No student may leave the College without the personal permission of 
the President, or, in his absence, of his adviser. Because of the hurtful 
influence the absence of a student, for even a day, exerts on his progress, 
nothing but sickness or unavoidable accident is sufficient to excuse him from 
regular attendance at recitations. 

Any student withdrawing from the Institution during term-time, with- 
out giving due liotT^e and having permission so to do, will be marked upon 
the records as having irregularly withdrawn. 

Any student prevented from attending class, must present to the 
Professor in charge of said work a satisfactory excuse for being absent. 

Theses. 

Every member of the Senior Class must submit to the President and 
Professor of English on January tenth, a subject for a final thesis, with an 
outline of the treatment proposed. After their approval of the subject and 
the treatment, every member of the class must write a thesis on the subject 
chosen. This thesis must then be submitted by May first. 

Degree and Diplomas. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred, by a vote of the Board of 
Trustees on recommendation of the Faculty, upon students who have 
satisfactorily completed any of the Groups. 

The College bills and Society dues of candidates must be paid or secured 
to the satisfaction of the Treasurer, by Saturday before Commencement. 
The graduation fee is ten dollars. 

Gradeat»e Work. 

In order to encourage the systematic prosecution of studies after 
graduation, graduate work for both resident and non-resident alumni of 
Lebanon Valley College, as well as for alumni of other recognized colleges, 
is provided. 

The courses of study have been arranged with reference to the needs of 
those who purpose passing to a master's degree, but they may also be 
pursued by those who desire only the culture or knowledge, without 
academic honors. 

One year of resident, or three years of non-resident, study will, under 
favorable circumstances, qualify candidates for examination for the degree of 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 15 

Master of Arts, and all who pass satisfactorily such examination, and present 
a thesis upon a topic apj^roved by the Faculty, will be recommened for the 
degree. This provision for the second degree in no way invalidates the 
present privilege of attaining the degree in course by all graduates of three 
years' standing who have completed a standard course of professional study, 
•and present a satisfactory thesis upon a topic approved by the Faculty. 
Examinations will be conducted iu May of each year. A charge of twenty- 
five dollars will be made for the matriculation, examination and diploma 
fees, five dollars to be paid when the student matriculates and the remaining 
twenty upon completion of work. In all cases a thesis (not fewer than 3,000 
words, type- written) must be submitted at least one month before close of 
college year. Accepted theses become the property of the College. 

Dormit^ories. 

Three large buildings are used for dormitory purposes. A Professor 
resides in each building. The rooms are heated by steam, and each building 
is supplied with water and electric light. Young men from a distance are 
expected to room in the dormitories. Should any prefer to take rooms else- 
where, they will be charged with the rent of the vacant rooms in the 
dormitories. No student, however, will be held responsible for the rent of 
more than one room. Each student will be held accountable for any damage 
he may cause to the College property. Students will be held individually 
responsible for all damage done to their rooms, by whomsoever committed. 

Each student, upon taking a room in the College, is required to deposit 
two dollars with the Treasurer as a guarantee against loss of keys and the 
destruction of property. The amount not used will be refunded at the end 
of the year. However, the student who fails to return his key to the College 
office at close of term forfeits his deposit. 

Students are required to furnish their own towels, napkins and bedding, 
except mattress. Every article of clothing, and other personal property, 
should be distinctly marked with the ownier's full name. 

Expei^ses. 

The charge for tuition is fifty dollars a year, twenty dollars for the Fall 
term and fifteen dollars for each of the other terms. A student who is 
absent from College on account of sickness or for any other cause, and retains 
his place in his class during such absence, pays the term bill in full. 

Boarding, light, heat, room rent, and tuition in the literary department, 

regular work, are as follow : 

Fall Term, ." $80 00 

Winter Term, 63 00 

Spring Term, 57 00 

Special examination in each Branch, not recited in College 5 00 
Additional charge the Senior year to cover expense of 

graduation, 10 00 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The charges for room rent, heat, and furniture are made on the basis of 
two persons to each room. If a student prefers to room alone he will be 
charged fifty cents additional a week. Any student not boarding in the 
•institution and occupying a room in the building will be charged a 
reasonable rent for the same. 

If a student quit the institution for any time, whether with or without ' 
permission, he cannot return afterward to the same class, except by paying 
the regular dues for the whole period of such absence. 

To a limited number of young persons otherwise unable to command 
the privileges of the College, aid is given to the extent of their tuition bills 
and sometimes their room bills also, by giving them opportunity to render 
service to the College ; by giving them a loan on approved security payable 
after graduation, without interest ; or by beneficiary support. Application 
must be made to the President. 

Any student who receive beneficiary aid from the College maybe called 
upon to render service to the college as an equivalent for any part, or all, of 
the money so received 

The College offers - Fourleen One-Hundred-Dollar Free Tuition 
Scholarships to honor graduates of State Normal Schools^ recognized 
High Schools^ and Academies. 

The tradition of the College and the public sentiment o£ the students 
favor economy in all expenses. 

To Parents. — The attention of parents is called to (a) the necessity of 
paying tuition in advance ; (b) the request of the Faculty that all students- 
attend Sabbath morning church worship ; (c) the requirement that all 
students attend the daily chajDel exercise ; (d) the importance of not asking 
leave of absence for students, except for most urgent reasons. 



Terms of Payment*. 

All fees for diplomas and degrees must be paid thirty days before 
Commencement. 

Bills are due and are to be paid, or their payment secured, at the 
College office, at the opening of each term, on September 16th, January 5th, 
and April 7th, before the student is enrolled for class work. No fee is 
rebated, except boarding on account of protracted sickness. If a student 
enters upon a term's work it is understood as an agreement that he will pay 
the bill for tuition, and room rent for the whole term, even if he should not 
remain to the end of term. 



LEBANON, VALLEY COLLEGE 17 

Departments. 

Lebanon Valley College comprises the following ])epartments well 
organized: 

THE COLLEGE offers live (Jroups of Studies, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. The Ciroups bear the names of the leading 
subjects included in them. They are: The Classical group, the Philo- 
sophical group, the Chemical-Biological group, the Historical-Political 
group, and the Modern Language group. 

THE ACADEMY provides a four years' course, designed to fit 
young people for the Freshman Class in any college. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION is organized to provide a 
training school for teachers. 

THE SUMMER SESSION offers preparatory, and college courses with 
credit towards a degree, affording special opportunities to teachers. 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC has full courses in instrumental and 
vocal music, and grants diplomas to those wlio complete either of the 
special courses. 

THE SCHOOL OF ART provides thorough instruction in drawing 
and painting, with the aim of im^jroving and developing the mind and 
the aesthetic sense. 

THE SCHOOL OF EXPRESSION affords opportunity for training 
in correct and effective utterance of thought. 

Admission to the College. 

There are three methods of admission to the College. 

I. FROM THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. All students who 
have satisfactorily completed the work of the Academy are admitted to the 
Freshman Class without examination. 

II. BY CERTIFICATE. Graduates from Pennsylvania State Normal 
Schools and from approved High Schools and Academies are ordinarily 
admitted to Freshman Class without examination, upon presentation of 
properly prepared certificates. Satisfactory certificates must state the 
length of time spent in any subject, text used, and grade attained. Credit 
will be granted only for the amount of work certified. 

Grades and certificates from other colleges of good standing will be 
accepted for admission to higher college classes. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificates of 
honorable dismissal. 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

III. BY EXAMINATION. Candidates for Fiesliman Class not 
provided with certificates mentioned above ^vill be examined in the 
following subjects : 

GeemAjST. — ( German may be substituted for Greek ) Grammar; 
Hillern's Holier als die Kirche ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell and Maria Stuart ; 
Goethe's Hermann and Dorothea. 

History. — History of Greece, Eome, and the LTnited States. The 
following texts will indicate the amount required : Meyer's History of 
Greece ; Meyer's Kome : Its Rise and Fall, second edition, extended 
to A. D. 800 ; McMaster's History of the United States ; Fiske's Civil 
Government. 

Science. — Physical Geography (Davis) ; Physiology (Martin); Botany 
(Gray) ; Elementary Physics (Carhart and Chute). 

English. — Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric ; The Mother-Tongue 
Volume III. 

Candidates will also be examined on the course in reading as outlined 
in the College Entrance Requirements in English, as follows : 

For Careful Study. — 1. Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America; 
2. Macaulay's Essay on Addison ; 3. Macaulay's Life of Samuel Johnson ; 
4. Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus, and Lycidas ; 5. Shake- 
speare's Macbeth. 

For Genei^al Reading. — 6. Scott's Lady of the Lake ; 7. Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner ; 8. George Eliot's Silas Marner ; 9. Irving's Life of 
Goldsmith ; 10. Shakespeare's Julius Csesar ; 11. Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice ; 12. Sir Roger de Coverly Papers ; 13. Tennyson's Idylls of 
the King ; 14. Scott's Ivanhoe : 15. Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, Algebra through Quadratics ; Plane and 
Solid Geometry. 

Latin. — Grammar, including Prosody ; Csesar, four books, or two 
books, and an equivalent for two, Sallust, Nepos, and Viri Romse ; Cicero, 
six orations, including Pro Archia ; Virgil, five books of the Jineid. 
Equivalents from other authors will be accepted in part. Latin Prose 
Composition, Bennet's or Allen's or their equivalent ; reading at sight 
of easy passages from Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil. Grammar : Allen and 
Greenough's, Harkness's, or Bennett's. 

Geeek. — Grammar (Goodwin) ; Anabasis, four books. Greek Prose 
Composition, twenty exercises of Jones, or their equivalent. 



LE HA X( )X VALLEY COLLEGE 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 23 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



Philosophy. 



PRESIDENT EOOP AND PROFESSOR JOHN. 

1. Logic — Three hours. First semester, Mo., Tu., Wed., at 10. 

President Roop. 

This course presents the elements of deductive logic, laying especial 
emphasis on the formal and material fallacies. Hyslop's Elements of Logic 
with Minto's Logic for consultation on special topics. 

Required of all Sophomores. 

2. Psychology — Three hours. Second Semester, Mo., Tu., Wed., at 10. 

Professor John. 
This course is intended to acquaint the student with the elements of 
psychology and as a general introduction to the study of philosophy. 
Required of Sophomores. 

8. Anthropology — One hour. Fall term. Wed., at 11. 

Lectures and recitations. Required of Juniors. President Roop. 

4. Ethnology— Oxv&\\QWT. Winter term. Wed., at 11. 

Lectures and recitations. Required of Juniors. President Roop. 

5. Philosophy of History — One hour. Spring term. Wed., at 11. 
Lectures and recitations. Required of Juniors. President Roop. 
Courses 3, 4, and 5 are designed to enable the student to acquire not 

only the leading facts concerning the history of the progress of the human 
race, but to furnish him with a sound foundation for good citizenship and 
for a rational study of the problems of life. 

6. Experime?ital Psychology — Two hours. First semester. 

Professor John. 
The student will be trained in laboratory methods of Psychic research. 
Required of Juniors in Philosophical Group. Elective for others. 

7. History of Philosophy — Three hours. Second semester. ' 

Professor John. 

Special attention will be given to the problems of Philosophy in 
their rise and historic development, through Ancient, Mediaeval, and 
Modern jieriods. The aim will be to form the habit of philosophic 
thinking. 

Text : Roger's History of Philosophy. Reference to General Histor- 
ies of Philosophy, and Periodicals. 

Required of Juniors. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

8. Ethics — Two hours. Throughout the year. Tu., at 9 ; Wed., 
at 10. President Koop. 

(a) Metaphysical Ethics. — Lectures, theses, and discussions. 

The main problems of Ethics will be studied, chiefly with reference 
to their bearings on life. The more important psychological and socio- 
logical data will be presented : the question of the relation of the 
individual to society will be treated, and the metaphysical implications 
discussed. 

{b) Applied Ethics. — The lectures of this course will be devoted to 
a discussion of the practical value of the ethical ideals given by Utilitar- 
ianism, ^Estheticism, Optimism, Sociology, and Culture. There will be 
considered the individualistic applications of these ideals, and the personal 
virtues. The lectures will keep in view the mutual bearings of practical 
ethics and Christian civilization. 

Eeferences : Aristotle, Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Mackensie, Sidgwick, 
and others. 

Required of all Seniors. 

9. yEsthetics — Two hours. First semester. Tu., Wed., at 11. 
Eecitations, lectures, and theses. Professor John. 
Required of Seniors in Philosophical Group. Elective for all others. 

10. Sociology — Two hours. Second semester. Tu., Wed., at 11. 
Recitations, lectures, and theses. Text : Fairbank's Introduction to 

Sociology. Professor John. 

Required of Seniors in Philosophical Group and elective for others. 

11. A System of Philosophy — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Professor John. 

The object of this course is two- fold : (a) To acquaint the ^student 
with some of the great systems of Philosophy ; (b) To give a system- 
atic drill in philosophic thinking. This includes a survey of all the great 
problems of Philosophy, a thorough study of the solutions given by the 
authors used as a guide, and a comparison with the solutions in other 
systems. Royce's The World and the Individual is the text for 1904-5. 

References to Philosophical Library. 

Recitations, lectures, and theses. Open to Seniors. Required in 
Philosophical Group. 

# 

Greek Language and Lit>erat»iire. 

PROFESSOR SPANGIvEE. 

1. Epic Poetry and History — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Homer's Iliad and Herodotus, Epic Poetry, Scanning, Ionic Dialect, 
and Syntax. Homeric Antiquities. Review of the Greek Historians and 
the Persian]!Wars. Greek Prose Composition. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 25 

Required of Freslimen in Classical Group. Elective iu the other 
"Cr roups with Latiu. 

2. Philosophy a?id Oratory — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Xenophon's Memorabilia, Plato's Apology and Crito, and Demos- 
thenes' De Corona. Greek New Testament. Socrates and the Socratic 
Schools. Plato and the Platonic Literature. The Athenian Orators and 

-'Courts. 

Required of Sophomores in Classical Group. Elective iu the Philosoph- 
ical, Historical-Political, and Modern Language Groups with Latin. 

3. Tragedy and Cotnedy — Two hours throughout the year. 
Prometheus Bound of ^Eschylus, CEdipus Tyrannus of Sophocles, and 

Olouds of Aristophanes or Orations of Lysias. Development of the Greek 

Drama. Greek Tragedy, Comedy, and Theatre. 

Kequired of Juniors in the Classical Group. Elective with Latin or 

French in the Historical-Political (^roup for those who have taken 1 
«and 2. 

4. Senior Elective — Two hours. Throughout the year. . 
Pindar's Odes, Thucydides, and Alcestis of Euripides. 
Elective for Seniors in Classical Group. 

Lat>!n Language ai\d Lat»era6ure. 



PROFESSOR DAUGHERTY. 

1. Freshman Latin — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Livy, Book I. or XXL, and part of Book XXII. , Wilkin's Koman 
Antiquities. Assigned readings in Roman history. 

b) Cicero, De Amicitia or De Senectute or Selected Letters, Special 
-Study of tlie Subjunctive Mood. 

c) Horace, Odes and Epodes. The meters of Horace are carefully 
studied. The Grammar is thoroughly reviewed this year. Miller's Prose 
Composition, based on Livy and Cicero, once a week. 

Required of Freshmen in Classical Group and elective with Greek in 
•other groups. 

2. Sophomore Latin — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Horace, Satires, Epistles, and Ars Poetica ; Quintilian, Book X., 
and .part of Book II. 

b) Tacitus, Germania. Bender's Roman Literature is studied. 
^Special topics assigned. 

c) Tacitus, Agricola. Latin Prose continued. 

Elective in the Philosophical, Historical-Political, and Modern Lau- 
.-guage Groups. 



2G LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

3. Junior Lati/i— -Two hours. Throughout the year. 
a) Cicero, De Officiis or De Natura Deorum. 

d) Juvenal, Selected Satires. Studies in History and Antiquities, 
assigned. 

c) Terence, Audria, Adelphi or Phormio ; or Plautus, Captivi Tri- 
nummus or Menaechmi. 

Required of Juniors in Classical Group. Elective in other groups for 
those who have taken 1. 

Courses 2 and 3 alternate. Course 2 was taken by Sopliomores and 
Juniors in 1904-5. Course 3 will be taken by Sojjhomores and Juniors 
in 1905-1906. 

4. Senior Elective — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Selections from Seneca, and Pliny. Latin Poets — Catullus and Lu- 
cretius. Early Latin, Lectures on Roman Life and Literature. 

Elective in Classical Group. 

German Language and Literature. 



INSTRUCTOR THOS. S. STEIN. 

1. FVeshman German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Lessing's Nathan der Weise, Fall term ; Goethe's Meisterwerke, Winter- 

and Spring terms. History of German Literature. German Composition. 
Required in Freshman year of all students except Classical. 

2. Sophomore German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

a) Scientific German — Hodges. 

b) Aus dem Staat Friedrichs des Grossen — Freytag. 

c) Ekkehard— Scheffel. 

Required in Sophomore year of all Modern Language students. 

3. Ju7iior German — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Meisterwerke des Mittelalters — Wenckebach. Faust — Gcethe. 
Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

4. Special Sophomore German — Four hours. Throughout the year.. 
This course is arranged for students who have a knowledge of both 

Latin and Greek. It includes a rapid but thorough study of grammar, and. 
the reading of selections from the German Classics. 

Required in Sophomore year of all Classical students. 

French Language and Literature. 



PROFESSOR SCHLICHTEE. 

1. First Year Course — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Grammar, composition, drills in pronunciation, reading of easy prose- 
and poetry. Text-books : Eraser and Squair's French Grammar, Guerber's> 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 27 

Contes et. Legendes, Booster and Aldrich's French Keader, Mairet's La 
Tache du Petit Pierre, Merimee's Colomba, and an additional prose work 
to be selected. 

Required of all Modern Language students who do not offer French 
for admission. 

2. Second Year Course — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Prose composition with advanced grammatical study and considerable 

reading of prose and poetry, as follows : George Sand's La Mare an Diable, 
Enault's Le Chien du Capitaine, About's Le Koi des Montagnes, Racine's 
Athalie, Moliere's L'iVvare, Beaumarchais' Le Barbier de Seville, Selected 
Stories from Guy de Maupassant, Rostand's Les Romanesques, and a select 
drama of Corneille's. 

3. Third Year Course — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The object of this course is to give the student an exact knowledge 
of the French language so that he may translate accurately and rapidly 
from French into English. Lectures will be given on each author studied, 
showing especially his relation to his time. The following books will be 
read in class : Canfield's French Lyrics (Holt & Co. ) ; Corneille, Nico- 
mede (Macmillan), Polyeucte ; Racine Les Plaideurs, Iphigenie ; Mol- 
iere Le Misanthrope, Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme ; Victor Hugo, Hernani ; 
Voltaire, Zaire. The students will read outside, also, Dumas pere, Les 
Trois Mousquetaires ; De Vigny, Cinq- Mars ; Balzac, Eugenie Grandet ; 
Chateaubriand, Atala ; Sainte-Beuve, Selected Essays (Ginu & Co.) 



English Language and Literature. 



PROFESSOR SCHLICHTER AND MRS. SCHLICHTER. 

1. The Theory and Practice of English Composition — Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes a thorough study of rhetoric and extensive 
writing of short and long themes. There will be lectures and conferences, 
and the following text-books will be studied : Scott and Denney's Para- 
graph Writing, Wendell's English Composition, Lewis's The Forms of 
Prose Discourse, and Genung's Working Principles of Rhetoric. 

Required of all Freshmen. 

2. English Composition and History of English — One hour. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes the writing and delivery of an oration each 
term, other long themes, and lectures on the history of the English 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Laugiiacre. Text-books : Arlo Bates's Talks on Writing English, 
(two volumes. ) 

Required of all Sophomores who.do not take English 2a and open only 
to those who have passed in English 1. 

2a. A7^gimientatio?i — One hour. Throughout the year. 

This course consists of brief drawing, oral and written argument, and 
a study of Baker's Principles of Argumentation and Baker's Specimens of 
Argumentation, 

This course may be taken only by Sophomores who have the special 
consent of the department. 

3. History of English Literature— Yowx hours. First semester. 

A comprehensive survey of the history of English Literature will be 
given b}^ means of lectures, reference to leading critics, and outside reading 
of representative selections or complete works of the leading English 
authors from the earliest times to the present. Text-book : Moody and 
Lovett's History of English Literature. 

Required of all students except Chemical-Biological. 

4. History of American Literature — Four hours. Second semester. 
Course 4 follows course 3, applying similar methods to the study of 

American Literature. Text-books : Trent's American Literature, 
Bronson's American Literature, and Wendell's Literary History of 
America. 

Required of all students except Chemical-Biological. 

Reading lists in courses 3 and 4 can be obtained uj^on application. 

5. History a7id Nature of English Diama — Three hours. First 
semester. 

The nature of the drama will be studied and its origin and develop- 
ment in England will be traced to the present time. Students will be 
expected to read many of the dramatic masterpieces. Text-books : Wood- 
bridge's Technique of the Drama, MattheM^'s The Drama. 

Required in Junior year of all Modern Language students. 

6. The History and Nature of Poetry — Three hours. Second 
semester. 

Poetry will be studied from the appreciative, technical, and critical 
standpoints. Text-books : Gummere's Hand-book of Poetics, Pancoast's 
Standard English Poems. References to the works of Sidney, Shelley, 
Horace, Vida, Boileau, Hunt, and Stedman. 

Required in Junior year of all Modern-Language students. 

7. Old English — Two hours. First semester. 

Students will begin with Smith's Old English Grammar and then 



LEBANON VALLEY C0LLP:(;E 29 

read all the selections in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader except The 
Phoenix. 

Required in Senior year of Modern Language students. 

8. Middle English — Two hours.* Second semester. 

Extensive reading of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Editions of Morris 
and of Skeat in the Clarendon Press Series). Students must be acquainted 
with French, and Old English is desirable for the successful ]irosecution of 
this course. Pollard's Chaucer Primer is also used. 

Required in Senior year of Modern Language students. 

0. Literary Criticism — Three hours. First semester. 

The history and nature of the novel will be studied in this course and 
an introduction to the principles of criticism will be given. Students will 
be expected to read a list of English novels in their chronological 
order. Text-books : Winchester's Priuci])les of Criticism and Perry's 
Study of Prose Fiction. 

Re(|uired of Modern Language students. 

10. Shakespeare — Three hours. Second semester. 

Critical reading of four or five of the leading plays. Rolfe's editions 
will be used. Students will also study Dowden's Shakespeare I'rimer and 
Sidney Lee's Life of Shakespeare. 

Re(iuired of Modern Language students. 

Mathematics and Astronomy. 

PROFESSOR LEH:\rAX. 

1. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. Fall term. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progres.sions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permutations 
and combinations, etc. Text-book, Wells's New Higher. 

Required of all Freshmen. 

•2. Plane Trigonometry — Four hours. Winter term. 

definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and oblicjue 
triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights. Wentworth's 
Text. Required of all Freshmen. 

:>. Spherical Trigofwmetiy — Four hours. Spring term. 

Development of trigonometric formulae, solutions of right and oblique 
spherical triangles, with applications to astronomy. Wentworth's Text. 

Required of all Freshmen. 

4. Analytic Geometry — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and hyjier- 
bola are studied and so much of higher plane curves and of the geometry of 
space as time will permit. Text, Wentworth's. 

Required of Sophomores in the Chemical-Biological group. 



30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

5. Diferential Calculus — Three hours. First semester. 
Differentiation of Algebraic and transcendental functions, Maxima 

and Minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, envel- 
opes, etc. Text, Osborne. 

Kequired of Juniors in the Chemical-Biological group. 

6. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second semester. 
Integrations, rectifications of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cubature 

of solids, etc. Text : Osborne. 

Eequired of Juniors in the Chemical-Biological group. 

7. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, 
leveling, etc. 

Elective for Juniors. 

8. Differential Equalions—ThreehovLV^. First semester... 

A course in the Elements of Differential Equations. Open to Seniors 
v^ho have taken courses 4, 5, and 7. 

9. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second semester. 
Bowser's text book will be studied. Numerous examples solved. 
Course 8 is required for this. 

Ast»ronomy, 



PEOFESSOE LEHMAN. 

1. General Astro?iomy — Four hours. First semcvster. 

Young's text is studied. The department is provided with a fine four- 
and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope equatorially mounted, of which the 
students make free use. 

Elective for Seniors. 



Chemistry ai^d Physics. 



PEOFESSOR MCFADDEN. 



Chen\ist*ry. 

1. General Ijwrga7iic Cheviistfy—YouT \\om:&. Throughout the year. 
Lectures and recitations. Mo. , Wed. , Fri. Laboratory, 4 hours a week. 

The ground covered in this course is that laid down in Remsen's 
College Chemistry, which is used as a guide both for recitations and for 
laboratory work. 

Required in' Junior year of Chemical-Biological students. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 31 

2. Qualitative Chemical Analysis — Four hours. Fall term. 

Open to students who have had Chemistry 1. Tliis course consists of 
-one lecture or (^uiz a week, and a minimum oE eight iiours of laboratory 
work. Text : H. L. Wells's Qualitative Analysis. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical-Biological students. 

3. Quantitative Chemical Analysis -Four hours. Winter and 
Spring terms. 

Open to students who have had Chemistry 2. This is a brief intro- 
duction to quantitative analysis, in which both gravimetric and volumetric 
methods are employed. Occasional lectures and recitations are given. A 
minimum of eight hours of laboratory work is required. Text : Talbot's 
'Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical-Biological students. 

4. Water Analysis — Four hours. Second semester. 

Open to students w^ho have had Chemistry 2 and are taking Chemis- 
try 3. This course includes a study of sources of water supply, methods 
of purification, and relation to health, together with practical laboratory 
work in the chemical and bacteriological examination of local water sup- 
plies. Text : Mason's Water Supply, w4th supplementary lectures. A 
minimum of eight hours of laboratory work is required. 

Elective in Senior year to Chemical-Biological students. 

Physics. 

1. General Advanced Physics — Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Lectures and recitations Tu., Th., Fri. Laboratory, three hours a week. 

This course includes experimental lectures and recitations based upon 
Ames's Theory of Physics, and laboratory exercises selected from Ames's 
and Bliss's Manual of Experiments in Physics. 

Required of all Chemical-Biological students in either the Junior or 
Senior year. 

Geology. 

1. General Geology —Four hours. Throughout the year. 

This course includes a study of the forces at w^ork within and upon 
the crust of the earth, the rock-forming materials of crust and their arrange- 
ment into strata, and the historical successions of forniations. About 
one-fourth of the time is devoted to petrology with considerable laboratory 
work. Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, and theses. The 
ground covered is approximately that laid down in Scott's Introduction 
to Geology. 

Elective in Senior year. 



32 . LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Biology. 



PROFESSOR ENDERS, AXJ) ACTIN(i PROFESSOR DERICKSOX. 

1. General Biology — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

To be preceded by Course 1 in Drawing. The course consists of 
three recitations and four laboratory periods throughout the Sophomore 
year In this course the work in the laboratory will begin with a study 
of the simpler forms of animal and plant life, and complete dissections 
will be made of several phyla of plants. Some of the animals studied 
will be amoeba, paramecia, vorticella, hydra, star tish, earth worm, lobster 
or Cray fish, mussel or clam, grasshopper or cricket, and the frog. The 
class-work will cover all the objects studied in the laboratory, together 
with additional forms. 

Students contemplating the study of medicine and surgery are advised 
to elect Courses 2 and 8, and, if possible. Course 4. 

Text-book : Parker's Elementary Biology. Laboratory Guide : 
Dodge's Elementary Practical Biology. 

Required in Sophomore year of all Chemical -Biological students. 

Note books and drawing paper are provided. 

2. Conipavaiive Verlebrate Anatomy — Four hours. Throughout 
the year. Five hours laboratory work and one lecture or quiz each week. 

This course consists of the dissection and thorough study of a number 
of vertebrates. Typical P'orms, such as the lamprey, eel, skate, and mud 
puppy, turtle, pigeon, and rabbit are dissected. Carefully made drawings 
are required of each student as a record of each dissection. Text : Parker's 
Zootomy and Martin's Hand-book of Vertebrate Dissection. 

Assigned studies in Parker and Haswell's Zoology and Wiedersheim's 
Comparative Anatomy. 

Elective in Junior year. 

8. Histology — Four hours. First semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The course 
is essentially that offered in medical schools leading to the medical degree. 
The class work will cover the normal histology of the human body, 
while the lal)oratory work will consist in the study and description of 
microscopic preparations showing cell structure and karyokinesis, the 
various kinds of epithelium, connective tissues, muscle, adenoid, vascular, 
and nerve tissues. The blood and the blood-forming organs, the in- 
testinal, the reproductory and genito-urinary organs, the skin and dermal 
appendages, the central nervous system, the special senses are then fully 
considered, and numerous microscopic preparations representing different 
methods of fixation, and staining will be carefully studied. Text-book i. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 3a 

Huber's Text-book of Histology, Bohm-Davidoff. Laboratory Guide r 
Huber's work on Histology. 

Elective in Senior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

4. Comparative Embryology of Vertebrates — Four hours. Second 
semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The labora- 
tory work will be based on the development of the chick, supplemented by 
the pig and other embryological material. Students will be required to 
stain, imbed, section, mount, and study embryos of various periods of incu- 
bation, and prepare notes and drawings of same. 

Elective in Senior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

5. Zoology — Four hours. First semester. 

Three hours and two laboratory periods weekly. This course con- 
sists in the study of the structure, classification, habits, and distribution 
of invertebrate and vertebrate animals with special reference to influence 
of environment to adaptation, and to the general principles of organic 
evolution. 

Elective in Senior year for Chemical-Biological students. 

6. Human Anatomy — Four hours. First semester. 

Four hours' laboratory work and two lectures or quizzes weekly. 
This course consists of the dissection and thorough study of the Auzoux 
model of the complete man and pre]Dared human skeletons. The gross 
anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, urino-genital, and 
nervous systems will be thoroughly studied, and records made in notes and 
drawings by each student. Text : Gray's Anatomy. 

Elective in Junior year. 

Laboratory Fees. 

Biology Four Dollars per term • 

Histology Five Dollars for course 

Embryology Five Dollars for course 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy . . . Four Dollars per term 

Human Anatomy Four Dollars for course 

Botany Three Dollars for course 

Physiology . Two Dollars for course 

Chemistry 1 Five Dollars per term 

2 Seven Dollars per term 

3 Seven Dollars per term 

4 Seven Dollars for course 

Physics 1 Four Dollars per term 

Elementary Physics Two Dollars per term 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

History and Political Science. 



PEOFESSOR SHENK. 

History. 

1. MedicBval and Modern History — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

A general course prescribed in all the Groups. Papers, special reports, 
and theses, based on available original sources, will be required of all 
students. Thatcher, Short History of Mediseval Europe ; Schwill, History 
of Modern Europe. 

Eequired of all Sophomores. 

2. English Economic History — Three hours. First semester. 

The economic life and development of the English people during Medi- 
seval and Modern times. Special attention will be given to the manor 
system, the guilds, growth of commerce, the industrial revolution, the rise 
of trade unions, and the relation of government to industry. Cheyney, The 
Industrial and Social History of England ; Gibbins, Industry in England. 

Eequired in Junior year of all Historical-Political students. 

3. English Constitutional History — Three hours. Second semester. 
The English Constitution and its historical development. A careful 

study of important documents will be made. Taswell-Langmeade, Consti- 
tutional History of England. 

Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political students. 

4. United States Co7istitiitional History — Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

A full course covering the Colonial and Constitutional periods. An 
extensive reading course of original and secondary sources is required. 
Channing's Students' History of the United States ; Macdonald's Select 
Charters ; Macdonald's Select Documents. 

Required in Senior year of all Classical and Historical-Political students. 

Economics ai\d Political Science. 

1. Economics — Three hours. First semester. 

A general course in economic theory, supjilemented by consideration 
of practical current problems. The standpoints of the different schools 
will be carefully considered. Bullock, Introduction to the Study of 
Economics. 

Required of all Juniors. 

2. Current Labor Problem,s — Three hours. Second semester. 

A course devoted principally to the important labor problems of the 
present day : strikes, labor organizations, employers' associations, arbitra- 
tion, trade agreement, labor legislation, etc. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 35 

Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political and Philosophical 
students. Elective in other groups. This course is offered during 1904-5. 

3. Current Monopoly Problems — Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the theories of monopoly, the tendencies of capitalistic 
combinations, government ownership of natural monopolies, railway combi- 
nations, etc. 

Required in Junior year of all Historical-Political and Philosophical 
students. This course will be offered during 1905-6. 

4. Historical a?id Practical Politics — Three hours. First semester. 
The development of the leading governments of the world, and a com- 
parative study of the same. Woodrow Wilson, The State. 

Required in Senior year of all Historical-Political and Philosophical 
students. 

5. The Theory of the State — Three hours. Second semester. 

A course on the Nature and End of the State. Willoughby, The 
Nature of the State. 

Required in Senior year of all Historical-Political and Philosophical 
students. 

Educat^ion. 



PROFESSOR JOHN. 

1. History of Education- TYfo]io\jim. First semester. 
Beginning with the Oriental Nations, a survey will be made of the 

leading systems of education, in connection with the forces which xDroduced 
them, and their influence upon culture as a whole. Painter's History of 
Education, Compayre's History of Pedagogy, and Quick's Educational 
Reformers will be used as guides. 
Required of all Juniors. 

2. Psychology and Philosophy of Education — Two hours. Second 
semester. 

Educational principles will be subjected to the test of Psychology and 
Philosophy. Texts : Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, Harris's 
Psychologic Foundations, Tompkin's Philosophy of Teaching. 

Required in the Philosophical Group. Elective for Juniors and Seniors 
in other groups. 

English Bible an^d Missions. 



PROFESSOR JOHN. 

1. New Testament — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Inductive study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as contained 
in the Gospels. 

Required of Freshmen and elective for Soi3homores. 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

2. New Testatnent — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Acts and Epistles. Attention is given to the geographical and his- 
torical incidents in the life of Paul. A careful inductive study will he 
made of some of the Pauline Epistles. 

Required of Freshmen and elective for Sophomores. 

3. Old Testament — Two hours. First semester. 
Inductive study of the Old Testament Laws. [1904-1905.]. 
Required of Seniors and elective for Juniors. 

4. Old Testament Prophecy I. — Two hours. First semester, [1905-1906]. 
Required of Seniors and elective for Juniors. 

5. Old Testament Prophecy II. — Two hours. Second semester. 
[1904-1905]. 

Courses 4 and 5 will cover Old Testament Prophecies. They will be 
studied inductively in their chronological and historical setting. 
Required of Seniors and elective for Janiors. 

6. The Psalms and Old Testament Wisdom — Two hours. Second 
semester. [1905-1906]. 

Hebrew psalmody will be studied as literature and as an expression of 
the national and religious life of Israel. Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, and 
Lamentations will be taught, with a comparative study of the Apocryphal 
Books, Ecclesiasticus, and the Wisdom of Solomon. 

Required of Seniors and elective for Juniors. 

7. Bible Evidences — One hour. First semester. 

A series of lectures Avill be given on the proofs of Christianity, to 
gether with an examination of the modes of revelation and the formation 
of the canon. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Courses 1, 3, and 5 will be given in 1904-1905, and courses 2, 4, and 6 
in 1906-1907. This arrangement is for the accommodation of students 
desiring to specialize in Bible Study. 

8. The History of Missions — The missionary features of the Old 
Testament are noticed. The teachings of Christ on missions, together with 
the spirit and work of the Apostolic Age, are followed as the basis of subse- 
quent missionary history. The history since the days of the Apostles is 
covered in detail. 

This course is elective for all the college classes and is planned to 
extend through a period of four years. Each year's work is independent, 
yet the four years are connected and progressive, including as much as 
possible of the world wide mission field. The subject for 1904-1905 is Japan. 
A large number of reference works on Japan were procured for this study. 

Two hours. First semester. 

For detailed outline of full Missionary Course, send to the college. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 37 



The Academy. 



The Facult*y. 

Rev. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, Ph. D., LL. D., 

President of the College. 

HARRY E. SPESSARD, A. M., Principal, 
Mathematics and English. 

Rev. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., Greek. 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M., German. 

Rev. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A. M., Latin. 

THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A. M., Physics. 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A. M., English. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., History. 

Rev. lewis FRANKLIN JOHN, A. M., D. D., Bible History. 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, Drawing. 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DYM\(^Y^^O^,M.. ^., Physiology and Botany. 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, A. B., Common English Branches. 

EMMA R. BATDORF, B. S., Elocution. 

PAUL M. SPANGLER, Bookkeeping. 

REBA F. LEHMAN, A. B., Librarian. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Academy is an integral part of the College and has a two-fold 
aim: First, to give thorough preparation to those desiring to enter 
collegiate classes; Second, to afford to those who are unable to take a 
complete college course opportunities whereby they can gain much 
needed and practical mental development for life's work. 



Kequirements for Admittance. 

Candidates for admission should be at least twelve years of age, and 
must present from teachers or other trustworthy persons letters of intro- 
duction indicating good character and correct habits. To facilitate 
classification, those who have been in attendance at other schools should 
bring certificates of honorable dismissal, with statements of studies 
pursued and work completed. 

Students are admitted at any time to the grade to which they are 
qualified by previous study. 

Students received on certificates are classified "on trial." Failure 
to maintain standing will cause re-arrangement of course and classifica- 
tion. Thorough work is expected of all. 

For expenses see page 15. 



Courses of Study. 

The work has been outlined with great care, and it is believed that the 
courses offered present as valuable and compact a four years' course of study 
as can be selected. The work of the first year form is devoted to the 
study of such subjects as will profitably enable the student to pursue the 
work of subsequent year forms. Most students will be able to enter tha 
second year form. Experienced instructors have charge of the teaching. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



39 



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1a 




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Latin c 

Mathematics d 
English d 
Science b and d 
Greek b ; or 
German b 
Bible History 


Latin c 

Mathematics d 
English d 
Science b, c and d 
Greek b ; or 
German b 
Bible History 


Latin c 

Mathematics d 
English d 
Science c and d 
Greek b ; or 
German b 
Bible History 




a 

o 


Latin b 
Mathematics c 
English c 
History c 
Greek a ; or 
German a 


Latin b 
Mathematics c 
English c 
History c and d 
Greek a ; or 
German a 


Latin b 
Mathematics c 
English c 
History d 
Greek a ; or 
German a 


*Greek should be taken by 
students preparing for Classi- 
cal Group. German by others. 


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Latin a 
Mathematics b 
English b 
Science a 
Drawing 


Latin a 
Mathematics b 
English b 
History a 
Drawing 


Latin a 
Mathematics c 
English b 
History a and b 
Drawing 




a 

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u 


Mathematics a 
English a 
Geography 
Keading and 

Orthograijhy 


Mathematics a 
English a 
Geography 
Penmanship 


Mathematics a 
English a 
Latin — Special 

Beginning 
Bookkeeping 






'^^^1 IFd 


■mB3X43;UT^ 


'iuj3j^ Suuds 





40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION, 



Drawing. 

The purpose of this course is to give to all students of the second 
year form two hours' work each week in free-hand pencil drawing in 
outline to prepare them properly for later work in Science, Greometry, 
et cetera. 

Geography. 

This course in Descriptive Geography lays a good foundation for the 
study of Physical Geography. Special attention is given to the natural 
features of the United States. 

Reading and Orthography. 

Eeading and voice culture, including pronunciation and definition 
of words, and memorizing choice selections, and also Orthography are 
required. 

Penmanship and Bookkeeping. 

First year form students and all others found deficient in penman- 
ship are required to take daily exercises in the study of the principles 
and typical forms of letters, with practice in graded exercises. 

Book-keeping is also required in preparation for clerical and office 
work. 

For Stenography and Typewriting an extra charge is made. 

Latin. 

a. Begmning Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Bennett's Foundations of Latin is used as a text. The aim is to 

master the system of Latin inflections, to acquire a moderate vocabulary, 
and to give thorough drill in the elementary principles of Latin syntax. 
During the third term fables and Eoman history are read from Eolfe 
and Dennison's Junior Latin Book, with constant exercises in j)rose 
composition. 

Required of all students in second year form . 

b. Second Year Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Csesar, Books I.-IV., or their equivalent. Cicero, six orations, in- 
cluding Pro Archia. Grammar and Prose Composition. Texts : Csesar, 
Eolfe and Dennison; Cicero, Allen and Greenough. 

Required of all students in third year form. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 41 

c. Third Year Latin. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Virgil, Books I.-V. Prosody. Beren's Mythology. Benuett's 
Prose Composition. Text : Virgil, Greeuough and Kittredge. 
Required of all students in fourth year form. 

Special Beginni7ig Latin. — Five hours. Spring term. 
For the privilege of special drill beginner's Latin is offered to those 
who enter in the'sjiring term. 

German. 

a. Beginning German. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Grammar and Gluck Auf, fall and winter terms ; Germelshausen and 

Hoher als die Kirche, spring term. 

Required in third year form of students preparing for all Groups 
except Classical. 

b. Second Year German. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Wilhelm Tell, fall term ; Hermann and Dorothea, winter term ; Maria 

Stuart, spring term. Composition. 

Required in fourth year form of students preparing for all Groups except 
Classical. 

Greek. 

a. Beginning Greek. Five hours. Throughout the year. 
White's First Greek Book. Xeuophon's Anabasis begun. 
Required of all Classical students in third year form. 

b. Second Year Greek. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Xeuophon's Anabasis continued until end of Book IV. Greek Prose 
Composition. Greek Antiquities. Greek Literature. 

Required of all Classical Students in fourth year form. 

English. 

a. First Year English. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
English Grammar. Professor Heilmau. 

b. Second Year English. Five hours. Throughout the year. 

This year is devoted to careful reading of the English classics, 8, 9, 12, 
14, 15. 

Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Third Year English. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric, and English classics 2, 7, 10, 11, 13. 
Required of all students in third year form. 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

d. Fourth Year English. — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The Mother-Tongue (Vol. II.), and classics 1, 3, 4, 5, 6. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. Numbers after English 
classics are explained on page 17 in paragraph concerning entrance 
requirements. 

History. 

a. United States History. — Five hours, winter term. Two hours^ 
spring term. 

McMaster's History of the United States. 
Required of all students in second year form. 

b. Civil Government. — Three hours. Spring term. 
Fiske's Civil Government. 

Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Greek History. — Three hours. First semester. 
Myer's History of Greece. 

Required of all students in third year form. 

d. Roman History. — Three hours. Second semester. 
Myer's Rome : Its Rise and Fall. 

Required of all students in third year form. 

Science. 

a. Physical Geography. — Four hours. Fall term. 

Appleton's Physical Geography is used as the basis of work. There will 
be daily recitations on the text, together with discussions on observations 
made by the students on physiography, etc., in and about Annville. 
Required of all students in second year form. 

b. Physiology. — Two hours. Fall term. 

The brief course of Martin's Human Body is used as the text-book. 
Some mammal will be dissected and the relation of parts will be demon- 
strated to the class, while skeleton and charts will greatly aid in attaining a 
good knowledge of the subject. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 

c. Elementary Botany. — Two hours. Winter and spring terms. 

In the beginning of the course observations, careful drawings, and notes 
are made of the various stages in the germination of several representative 
seeds sown by the students themselves. Roots, stem, leaves, fruits, etc., are 
studied from the objects or from charts, so that the student may be prepared 
to begin systematic botany with the appearance of the early flowers. An 
herbarium of no less than seventy-five plants with full analyses will be 
required of each student, together with laboratory work in plant dissection 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 43 

and elementary work in plant histology and ecology: Several of the 
cryptogams will be studied in the laboratory. 

Two recitations and one laboratory period. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 

d. Elementary Physics. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The fundamental principles of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, and 
light will be developed and discussed by experiments and recitations as 
thoroughly as time permits. 

In addition to class work, students will spend two hours a week in 
laboratory. Accurate notes are required. 

A working knowledge of algebra is required for admission to this course. 

Texts : Carhart and Chute's Physics. Crew and Tatnall's Laboratory 
Manual of Physics. 

Required of all students in fourth year form . 

Mat^hemat^ics. 

a. Arithmetic. — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Covering factoring, greatest common divisor, least common multiple, 
common fractions, decimals, compound denominate numbers, practical 
measurements, etc. 

Required of all students in first year form. 

b. Arithmetic. — Five hours. Fall and winter terms. 

Covering percentage, profit and loss, interest and discount, stocks and 
bonds, mensuration, the metric system, etc. The more elementary course is 
open to students not prepared for this work. 

Required of all students in second year form. 

c. Algebra. — Five hours. Spring term and throughout following year. 
The work extends over four terms and is intended to give the student a 

thorough foundation in the principles and operations of Algebra through 
quadratic equations. 

Required of all stn dents in second and third year forms. 

d. Geometry. — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Plane Geometry is studied during the half year, and is followed by 
solid. In each original work and numerical exercises receive considerable 
attention. 

Required of all students in fourth year form. 

English Bible. 

1. Bible History. — One hour. Throughout the fourth year form. 

2. The " Bible Normal Coufse.^'' — Offered to all students. 

Those completing this course are entitled to certificates and seals given 
by Denominational and General Sabbath School Boards. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Depart»ment> for Teachers. 

This Department of the College was organized to provide a training 
school for teachers during the vacation months, the objects of which are : — 

{a) To prepare young men and women to become teachers. 

{d) To help teachers to prepare for their examinations and make 
reviews of necessary branches. 

{c) To help Secondary Teachers, Principals, and Superintendents to 
advance in their profession. 

It is a well-known fact that a large number of persons are obliged to 
make their way through school entirely by their own efforts. To afford 
opportunities to such persons, Lebanon Valley College has adopted two 
general courses of instruction, viz. : Tke Teachers' Preparatory Course, and 
the Teachers' College Course, designed particularly for those w^ho rely on 
the profession of teaching for their suiDport. These courses are graded all 
into years, so as to give such teachers an opportunity to take them during 
their vacation months. In order to accomplish this, the year of the Teachers' 
Courses opens annually during the first week of April and closes the fourth 
week of August. 

I. The Teachers' Preparat*ory Course. 

This Course is framed in accordance with the opinion expressed in the 
report of the Committee of Fifteen, that no one should teach in a public 
school who has not completed at least the course of a secondary school having 
a full three years' course above the common branches. 

This Course is arranged to cover a period of four years. According to 
the provisions of the laws of Pennsylvania, all persons who have successfully 
completed this course are entitled to be examined in their work and to 
receive permanent certificates in the studies in which they are found to be 
proficient. Examinations for this purpose can be taken under a County 
Committee for teachers' permanent certificates or under the direction of any 
State Normal School as per regulations published in its catalogue. The 
requirements to enter these examinations are that the applicant shall be 
twenty-one years of age, shall have taught three full terms in the public 
schools of the State, and bring satisfactory endorsements from the public 
school boards and the superintendent under whom he has taught. The three- 
year requirement can readily be fulfilled by the students pursuing this 
course, for, their work being done during vacation, they can regularly teach 
during the winter months and thus save time and money, and in addition 
secure the groundwork of an education. 



LEBANON VALLP]Y COLLEGE 



45 



Teachers' PreparaLory Course. 



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spring Term 



Latin — Beginning 

Arithmetic 

United States History 

Civil Government 

English Grammar 

School Administration 

Penmanship 



Summer Term 



Latin — Csesar 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

English Classics 

Principles of Edncation 

Drawing: 



Latin — Cicero 

German — Grammar and 

Exercises ; or 
Greek — Lessons 
Algebra 

English Classics and Rhetoric 
Ancient History 
Educational Methods 



Latin — Virgil 
German— Wilhelm Tell, 

Hermann und Dorothea ; or 
Greek — Anabasis 
Plane Geometry 
English Classics and Rhetoric 
Elementary Physics 
History of Edncation 



Latin - Beginning 

Arithmetic 

Algebra 

English Classics 

Physical Geography 

Education 



Latin — C?esar 
Algebra 

English Classics 
Rhetoric 
Physiology 

Principles of Teaching 
German - Grammar and 
Exercises 
Greek Lessons 



or 



Latin — Cicero 
German — Grammar, Com- 
position and Classics ; or 
Greek — Lessons 
Plane Geometry 
English Classics and Rhetoric 
Child-Study 
Vocal JNIusic 



Latin — Virgil 
German — JMaria Stuart 
Greek Anabasis 
Solid Geometry 
Elementary Physics 
English History 
Education 
Vocal ]Music 



or 



NOTE 1 — Students may take up the work of any year for which they 
are qualified. 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Not>e 2— Special Review Classes for Teachers and OLhers. 

Beginning April third and continuing for ten weeks there will be con- 
ducted, as in previous years, a review of the so-called common branches 
under the principalship of Professor Wesley M. Heilman, A. B., who will be 
assisted by three or four very capable public school teachers. 

Among the special advantages are : (a) That a thorough and systematic 
review and drill are given in all the branches taught in the public school ; 
(b) That instruction is given daily in the principles and methods of 
teaching ; (c) That teachers and others, whether intending to pursue a 
full college course or not, are given facilities for study under the direction 
of college professors and with college equipment ; (d) That the department 
is organized and conducted in the interest of the students. The system of 
classification enables the student to be advanced as rapidly as his progress 
permits. None are held back to accommodate the dull and indifferent. 

The expense for tuition for the term is ten dollars ; for tuition, board, 
room rent, light, etc., is forty-five dollars. 



II. Four Year College Course for Secondary 
Teachers, Principals, and Superintendents. 

This is a four-year course of equal rank with the other courses offered at 
the Lebanon Valley College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
The work for the degree is largely elective, especially in the Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior years. The standard of instruction maintained and of 
work required is that of the best colleges of the Middle States. 

It is everywhere recognized that Secondary Teachers, Principals, and 
Superintendents should have college training for general culture and especial 
training in the subjects in which they desire to specialize. 

No young teachers who desire to make teaching their profession should 
be satisfied with educational attainments less than a college course, or its 
equivalent. Indeed the needs of the public schools of Pennsylvania as well 
as the teachers' own welfare demand that they should take advantage of 
such courses of study. A College course will pay in the way of commanding 
a larger income, greater influence, and higher usefulness. 

It should also be noted that a college diploma such as is obtained for the 
work of the Teachers' College Course, with three years' successful experience, 
entitles the teacher to the highest State certificate granted. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Teachers' College Course. 



47 



FRBSHIVLAN GRADB. 



First Term — Spring. 



Latin — Livy ; or 

Greek — Iliad 

German — Nathan der 

Weise ; or 
French — Bejjinning 
Advanced Algebra 
Theory and Practice of 

English Composition 
Educational Studies 
Bible 



Second Term-Summer Third Term — Spring, 



De Senectute ; or 
Greek — Iliad 
German — Goethe's 

Meisterwerke ; or 
French — Begi nning 
Plane Trigonometry 
Theory and Practice of 

English Composition 
Educational Studies 
Bible 



Latin — Horace ; or 
Greek — Herodotus 
German — Goethe's 

Meisterwerke ; or 
French — Beginning 
Spherical Trigonometry 
Theor}' and Practice of 

English Composition 
Educational Studies 
Bible 



BOPHOIVLORE: ORADK. 



First Term — Summer. 



Logic 

History — Mediaeval and 

Modern 
Advanced Eng. Comp. 
"^Elective g hrs. 



Second Term — Spring. 



Psychology 

History — Mediaeval and 

Modern 
Advanced Eng. Comp. 
Elective g hrs. 



Third Term — Summer 



Psychology of Educat'n 
History — Mediaeval and 

Modern 
Advanced Eng. Comp. 
Elective g hrs. 



JUNIOR GRADK;. 



First Term — Spring. Second Term-Summer 



English Literature 
Economics 
Anthropology 
Elective 7 hrs. 



Third Term — Spring, 



English Literature American Literature 

History of Philosophy Philosophy of Educat'n 
Ethnology {Philosophy of History 

Elective 7 hrs. \Elcctive 7 his 



SKNIOR GRADK. 

This year is to be taken in the usual College terms. 



Ethics 

Bible 

Elective 12 hrs. 



Ethics 

Bible 

Elective 12 hrs. 



Ethics 

Bible 

Elective 12 hrs. 



■^Chemistry 1, or Biology 1, or Physics 1, 

must be elected here or in Junior Grade. 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Electives. 

These Electives may be taked in the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
Grades : 

/^z'^^c/z^jj/— Esthetics, Sociology, System of Philosophy. 

Greek — Memorabilia, Plato's Apology and Crito, De Corona. 

Latin — Horace, Satires and Epistles ; Tacitus, Germania and Agricola ; 
Quintilian. 

French —Advanced course. 

English— Ym^\^\\ Drama, Poetics, Old English, Middle English, 
Literary Criticism, Shakespeare. 

Mathematics — Analytic Geometry, Calculus. • 

Chemistry — General Chemistry ; Qualitative Chemical Analysis ; Quan- 
titative Chemical Analysis. 

Biology — General Biology ; Mammalian Anatomy , Histology ; Embry- 
ology. 

Physics — General Advanced Physics. 

///^•^rj/— English Constitutional ; U. S. ConstitutionaL 



Ot>her Department's. 

During the Summer Term, in addition to the work presented in the 
Teachers' Course, a summer school is conducted, offering work in the Con- 
servatory of Music, School of Expression, and School of Art. 

Positions for Students. 

We help students in all departments to secure positions. The demand 
for qualified teachers is much greater than the supply. The lowest salary 
for teaching is $35 per month, but there is a pressing call for teachers at 
higher salaries who possess a greater degree of preparation than the mini- 
mum which the law requires. College graduates with experience easily 
command $80 per month and upwards. 

Sat>urday Courses for Teachers and Others. 

In the year 1899 the College announced special courses for teachers, in 
the belief that there were many teachers within the reach of the College who, 
having had a normal or high school training or the equivalent of such 
training, would avail themselves of such courses of study as would better fit 
them for practical and progressive work in teaching, provided such courses 
were offered at times that would not conflict with the duties of the class- 
room. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 49 

The courses at present embrace a wide range of subjects in all depart- 
ments of the College, and aim to give a student who is possessed of a good 
High School or Normal School education or its equivalent the opportunity of 
•carrying on systematic Avork in one study, or group of studies. 

The satisfactory completion of any course entitles the student to a 
certificate of study, and will count toward a degree. 

All candidates for admission are required to fill out the registration 
blank presented by the College for all matriculating students. This may be 
done in the office of the President of the College. 

Session and Expenses. 

The session of 1904-1905 opened on Saturday, September 25, and will 
close on Saturday, March 25. Instruction is given ou Saturdays between 9 
A. M. and 12 M., unless the class and instructor agree upon some more 
convenient time. 

The matriculation fee is two dollars. The tuition fee is six dollars for 
the first course of one hour per week, five dollars for the second course, and 
four dollars for the third course, making a total of fifteen dollars for the 
three courses of one hour per week for the entire season. 



Department) of Orat^ory and Public Speaking. 



The Art of Oratory rests upon certain laws of nature, and it is the 
purpose of the Department to present the work with this aim in view. The 
value of public speech is recognized and emphasized — as a most powerful 
agency, and as an avenue to usefulness. 

In the instruction special stress is laid upon originality and the develop- 
ment of individuality. Elocution is taught as the oral interpretation of 
Literature — and a high standard of selections is maintained. The full course 
consists of three years — including the required year in the College. Students 
with previous training may finish it in less time. 

Course of Study. 

ist Year. {Required — Freshman Year.) 

Elocution. — Types of Literary Interpretation. Principles of Expression. 
Modulation, Emj)hasis, Pitch, Tone Quality, Gesture, Simple Calisthenics, 
Breathing. Readings. Extempore Speaking. 

Intepretation and Analysis of Classics : Longfellow's " Miles Staudish," 
Dickens's " Christmas Carols," Orations of Washington and Lincoln, Tenny- 
son's " Enoch Arden," Goldsmith's " She Stoops to Conquer, " Shakespeare's 
"As You Like It." (No Text Book.) 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

2d Year. [Special Work.) 

Tone Production ; Oral Exercises ; Physical Culture ; Emotional Devel- 
opment ; Vocal Psychology ; Gesture and Pantomime. Analysis of Standard 
Works, Keading and Eecitation of Selections, Private Work. (Text-- 
South wick's " Elocution and Action.") 

jd Year. [Special Work.) 

Philosophy of Expression ; History of Oratory ; Melody and Speech ; 
Advanced Voice Development ; Dramatic Training, Characterization ; 
Monologues ; Cuttings from Standard Authors ; Oration Work : Extempore 
Speaking. Interpretation of Shakespeare, Browning, etc. Private Work. 
(Text — Raymond's " Orator's Manual.") 

Private Lessons. 

Persons who do not desire to graduate or take an entire course may 
arrange for lessons singly or by the term. In this case the work will be 
arranged to suit the individual needs of the student. 

Tultlori m Bepartmei^t of Oratory.' 

FOR SPECIAL WORK (Two Hours). 

Fall Term $18.00 

Winter and Spring Terms ( each ) 16.00 

FOR PRIVATE LESSONS (One Hour) 
(One per week.) 

Fall Term $16.00 

Winter and Spring Terms (each) 12.00 

FOR PRIVATE LESSONS (Singly). 

One hour % 1.00 

Forty-five minutes 75 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 51 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



Facult»y. 

Rev. HERVIN U. ROOF, Ph. D., LL. D., 

Pi'esident. 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, (Lon.,EDg.,) 
Dii'edor. 

Piano ^ Organ, Harmony, etc. 

JOHN KARL JACKSON, A. M., 

Voice. 

CHAS. H. OLDHAM, 
Piano. 

S. E. MACCOMSEY, 

Violin, Strings, etc. 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
English Literature, Geinnan. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. M., 

French, English. 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, 

Painting, Draivi^ig, etc. 

EMMA R. BATDORF, B. S., 

Elocution, etc. 

The Conservatory. 

The new Conservatory building is fully equipped for the study of all 
branches of Music and Art. 

The Building contains the Director's room and office, fourteen or more 
practice rooms, and a^iarge Auditorium with a pipe organ. 

From the beginning grade to the full development of artistic require- 
ment, the Faculty and the different courses of study insure a steady pro- 
gress. The Conservatory Diploma is a sufficient evidence of the standing 
of the possessor. 

In addition to the regular certificates and graduating diplomas, the 
Conservatory is empowered to confer the different certificates given by 
the London College'^ of Music, of London, England, with which college the 
Conservatory is in affiliation. 

The Faculty is made up of the best instructors. 



52 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

.. The Director. 



HERBERT OLDHAM, F. S. Sc, 

Trinity College, Dublin ; London College of Music. 

Professor Herbert Oldham, the Director, was educated in England, 
Germany, and France. He studied Piano and Harmony, Organ and chorus 
conducting, under Sir George Mcfarren ; Voice under Signer Rendeggar 
in London ; Piano and Composition under Emil Haberbier in Paris, and' 
Piano under Joachim Raff in Germany. 



The Conservatory is organized for a fourfold purpose : 
( 1 ) To combine musical and literary studies as a broad basis for 
regular collegiate work in the College. (2) To use the art of music as 
a means of intellectual, fcsthetical, and moral culture. (3) To furnish 
instruction in all branches of music to special or regular students. (4) To 
educate teachers of music. 

It is divided into the following Courses of Instruction : 

PIANO-FORTE. — The regular course of study in the Piano Depart- 
ment is divided into sixteen grades, from the most rudimentary studies to 
the great concertos, etc. 

Send to the Director for separate catalogue of the Conservatory, con- 
taining the complete courses in all branches. 

VOICE- — The Vocal Course is divided into twelve grades. The 
most approved methods are used. Complete course is found in the Con- 
servatory catalogue. 

PIPE ORGAN. — The course in Pipe Organ Music may be taken up 
by any student who proves able to enter Section A of Grade 3 of the 
Piano Course. 

In this study special attention will be given to chorus accompani- 
ment and to registration, thereby rendering the student capable of taking 
a position as organist and choir director and creditably filling the same. 

REED ORGAN. — The Course in Reed Organ can be taken up inde- 
pendently of the Piano Course. Special attention will be given to training 
the student so as to form a capable organist, and thoroughly to understand 
the various combinations of the different stops. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 53 

HARMONY. — The complete Course in Harmony will occupy the 
sections indicated by B Grade 2, to C Grade 3, in connection with the Piano 
Course, but any student can enter the Harmony class at any time. 

SIGHT READING and CHORUS CLASS.— A class for this study 
will be formed at the beginning of each term. The importance of acquiring 
the ability to read music at sight cannot be too strongly urged upon those 
who desire to lay the proper foundation for a musical education. All pupils 
in the Vocal department should give this course special attention. 

A Chorus Class will also be formed. 

LECTURES. — There will be given Lectures on Musical History each 
term, and all regular students of the Conservatory will be required to 
attend them. 

CONCERTS. — Recitals and concerts by the students, the Faculty, or 
leading artists, will be held at stated intervals throughout the year. 

GENERAL REMARKS.— Pupils will be accepted in any of the de- 
partments for which they are fitted, whether they desire to finish the course 
or not. 

Most Special care will be bestowed upon beginners in all subjects. 

Students are advanced according to their knowledge and proficiency in 
work, and not according to the number of terms and lessons taken at the 
Conservatory. 

GRADUATION. — Students will be eligible for graduation on comple- 
tion of the prescribed courses. Each graduate must • give during the last 
year of study at least one recital in addition to the final performance at 
commencement concert. 

Not only must every candidate for graduation give evidence of requi- 
site musical talent and capacity, but also complete in the course of literary 
studies, English Grammar, three terms' work ; Rhetoric and Composition, 
three terms' work ; English Classics, French or German, each three terms' 
work. Free tuition in any one of the literary studies. 

SUMMER SCHOOL.— A Summer Music School will be held beginning 
July 1 and ending September 1. 

Send for separate circular to the Director. 

EXPENSES. — The following table will show the expenses in all 
Departments of the Conservatory : 



54 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PRIVATE LESSONS. 






a 

0) 

t 

02 


Voice, Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Director. 
Voice, Piano or Organ, One per week, by Director. 
Piano or Organ, Two per week, by Assistant, 
Piano or Organ, One per week, by Assistant, 
Harmony, 


$22 50 
11 25 
15 00 
10 00 
15 00 


$18 00 
9 00 

12 00 
7 50 

12 00 


$16 50 

8 25 
11 25 

7 50 
11 00 


CLASS LESSONS. 




$5 00 
3 00 
3 00 




Harmony, One lesson per week, 

Theory, One lesson per week. 

Musical History, etc., One lesson per week, 


$7 50 
3 00 
3 00 


$5 00 
3 00 
3 00 


USE OF INSTRUMENTS. 








Piano, One hour per day. 
Reed Organ, One hour per day, 
Pipe Organ, One liour per day, 


$2 50 

2 00 

3 00 


$2 00 

1 50 

2 50 


$2 00 

1 50 

2 50 


BOARD, ROOM, ETC. 








Board, Room Rent, Heat, Light, 


$60 00 


$48 00 


$42 00 



Pipe Orgau students must pay at the rate of 10 cents per hour for organ 
blower. 

Fee for Graduation Diploma, $5.75. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS.— No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In case of long continued illness the loss is shared equally by the 
College and the student. 

All tuition is payable in advance. Students upon being assigned lesson 
hours must present to the Director a card from the President. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc. , the 
beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice and improvement in grade will be 
issued at the close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combination 
of courses, rooms, boarding, etc. , address 

Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc, Director, 
or Hervin U. Roop, LL. D., President, 

Annville, Pa, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 55 

Art> Departments. 



MISS EDITH BALDWIN, PRINCIPAL. 

The aim of the Department is to give thorough instruction in the 
knowledge of form and color upon which all art work is based, and without 
which no education is complete. The importance of such knowledge is being 
realized more and more, not only for the appreciation of the beautiful and 
good in Art, but for help in selecting and arranging of dress, houses, furni- 
ture, and various surroundings. The course of study is planned to train and 
develop the student's artistic perceptions and to lay the foundation for further 
study in Academies and Art Schools for those who wish to become artists. 

Course of Study. 

First Year. — Drawing in pencil and charcoal from geometric solids and 
casts. Free hand iDcrspective. 

Second Year. — Drawing from casts of heads. Painting in wator colors 
and pastels from still life and nature. — History of Art (Old Masters). 

Third Year. — Sketching from life (draped model). Paintings in oils 
from still life and nature — Composition. History of Art (Modern Artists). 

Classes of Pyrography, or burnt wood or leather, and China Decorating. 
The china is fired at the school. 

Certificate. 

students who complete the full course of study will receive a certificate 
signed by the President of the College and the Principal. 

General Information. 

students of this Department giving their principal attention to Art may 
take any one of the literary studies without charge. No reduction is made 
for absence from class or private lessons ; if, however, the absence is on 
account of sickness, the lesson may be made up by the student. 

Credit will be given such as have done work in Art elsewhere. There 
will be given one exhibition of the students' work during the year. All 
work done during the College year is expected to be shown at the annual 
exhibition in June. 

Lectures on Art will be given during the year. 

TUITION. — As the Second year form class is required to take drawing, 
the tuition for this class is three dollars for the year ; to others the terms are 
as follows : Fall Winter Spring 

Term Term Term 

Two lessons per week i|15 00 $12 00 $12 00 

One lesson per week 9 00 8 00 8 00 

Single lesson, 75 cents. 

Children's Saturday Class 2 50 2 00 2 00 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

REGISTER. OF STUDENTS. 



I. THE COLLEGE. 



Graduate Students. 

NAME RESIDENCE 

George Barber Newburgh, N. Y. 

David D. Buddinger Bellegrove 

Clarence V. Clippinger Mechanicsburg 

Walter G. Clippinger Dayton, Ohio 

Urias J. Dauglierty Dallastown 

Grant B. Gerberich Jobnsonburg 

Clinton C. Gohn Wormleysburg 

William O. Jones Greensburg 

Anna Mary Keller Philadelphia 

David E. Long Millersburg 

Lewis Walter Lutz Dallastown 

Harry E. Miller Lebanon 

Jacob Mark Peters , Steelton 

D. Augustus Peters Steelton 

Jacob Hassler Reber .• • • Waynesboro 

David H. Scanlon Berrysville, Va. 

Ottoman Schieder Pittsburg 

Edith E. Spangler Lebanon 

Alfred C. T. Sumner . ' Bonthe, Africa 

Raymond F. Swisher Port Clinton, Ohio 

Adam S. Ulrich . Annville 

George A. Ulrich Philadelphia 

William M. Yiengst Lykens 

Undergraduate Students. 
Seniors. 

Victor Arthur Arndt Lickdale 

Thomas Bayard Beatty Quiney 

Helen Barbara Bressler Lebanon 

Arthur Rush Clippinger Shippensburg 

Alice L. Crowell York 

Emma Frances Engle Hummelstown 

Ralph Landis Engle Palmyra 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 57 

Elmer Ellsworth Erb Hockersville 

May B. Hershey Derry Church 

Jesse M. Hostetter Phoenixville 

Rachael Nancy Kaufman Dallastown 

Titus Heilman Kreider Cleoua 

Pearl Eugene Mathias Highspire 

Ellen Weinland Mills Annville 

George Dickson Owen Laurel, New Jersey 

Charles C. Peters Altenwald 

Frederick Berry Plummer . . , Bissell, Maryland 

Oordon I. Rider Mechanicsburg 

Benjamin D. Rojahn Dallastown 

Albert J. Shenk Annville 

Juniors. 

Andrew Bender Dillsburg 

Charles A. Fry Bellegrove 

Robert B. Grraybill Annville 

John B. Hambright Florin 

Ora M. Harnish Mechanicsburg 

Ruth M. Hershey Derry Church 

Elmer V. Hodges Winchester, Ya. 

Merle M. Hoover Chambersburg 

J. Warren Kaufmann Mount Carmel 

Winfield Scott Knauss York 

Ray G. Light Avon 

Ida M, Martin Annville 

Isaac Rissmiller Pennsgrove, N. J. 

John C. Rupp Liverpool 

Irvin S. Seitz Baltimore, Md. 

Cyrus E. Shenk Deodate 

Emanuel E. Snyder Yoe 

Max O. Snyder Liverpool 

Paul M. Spangler Lebanon 

Harry Franklin Stauffer Millville, N. J. 

John Curvin Strayer Red Lion 

J. J. linger Yineland, N. J. 

Sophomores. 

C. Ray Bender Halifax 

Park F, Esbenshade Bird-in-Hand 

H. E. Gehman Ephrata 

Elias M. Gehr Cedar Lane 



58 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

William Eby Herr Annville 

Amos Wallick Herman Red Lion 

Edward E. Knauss York 

Max Fisher Lehman Annville 

Homer M. B. Lehn Alger 

Maurice B. Metzgar Middletown 

John Fred. Miller Dayton, Ohio 

A. Lncile Mills Annville 

Helen Ethel Myers Mount Joy 

Calvin T. Peiffer Avon 

Mary Elizabeth Peiffer Lebanon 

Effie Evelyn Shroyer , Shamokin 

Harry Garfield Snavely Enhaut 

John H. Sprecher Lebanon 

John Balmer Showers Bradford 

Arthur Keller Waltz Chewsville, Md. 

Samuel Harrison Waughtel Red Lion 

Elmer B. Ulrich Jeddo 

Freshmen. 

Joseph Little Appenzellar Chambersburg 

Clayton W. Bachman Palmyra 

Milton Oscar Billow Shermansdale 

Margaret Davis Berlin Tyrone 

Alvin Binner Schaeilerstown 

Lewis Buffington Elizabethville 

Laura Alice Enders Elizabethville 

Eli A. Fans Manheim 

H. B. Garver Middletown 

Anna Louise Garlock Hagerstown, Md» 

Abram R. Geyer Middletown 

Roy J. Guyer Shippensburg 

D. A. Hamacker Highspire 

Roger S. B. Hartz Palmyra 

Katherine Heilman Lebanon 

Thomas J. Hunsickcr Lebanon 

Neda Adele Knaub New Cumberland 

Arthur Jones Williamstown 

Sallie Wengert Kreider Lebanon 

Samuel Burnam Long Hays Grove 

Ivan J. McKenrick Ebensburg 

David W. McGill Cleona 

Rufus E, Morgan Valley View 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 59 

Harry M. Moyer Derry Church 

Norman Lester Linebaugh York 

Joseph Newgard Lebanon 

Stanley R. Oldham Annville 

Edith Vivian Powers Dayton, Ohio 

Ceorge W. Richter Halifax 

Erma Shupe Dayton, Ohio 

Vinton D. Singer Dayton, Ohio 

Frank L. Stine Annville 

Arthur Ray Spessard Chewsville, Md. 

Ray Sheesley . Halifax 

Mida Nancy Wentzel Lebanon 

Reuben P. Wolfersberger Bismarck 

Alice INIartha Zuck • • . . . Annville 

Special Students. 

Arthur S. Beckley Lebanon 

Allen Beckley Prescott 

Thomas E. Beddow Nanticoke 

Arthur Edwin Bucke Duncannon 

Harry K. Bomberger Lebanon 

Clayton L. Brandt Lebanon 

John I. Clay East Hanover 

John A. Detweiler Palmyra 

Jacob L. Graybill Palmyra 

W. G. Goodman West Hanover 

Mervin Jacob Hocker Highspire 

Lemuel S. Heisey Palmyra 

John A. Hershey Lebanon 

Frank Krimmel Pinegrove 

Beulah Lebo Lebanon 

John F. Light Bellegrove 

Harry W. Light Bellegrove 

Eber E. Ludwick Reading- 
Lawrence Maxwell Christopher 

Morris Moyer Palmyra 

Harry B. Moyer Palmyra 

I. Clarence Moyer Bismarck 

Simon Pauxtis Wilkesbarre 

William S. Rehrer Annville 

Raymond F. Schaak Lebanon 

William Shanor . Bethlehem 

David D, Sheetz Lebanon 



60 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Frances M. Shively Chambersburg 

Sara A. Snavely Lebanon 

Joseph Stanton Chinchilla, N. Y. 

Franklin Dyson Sweger Newport 

Walter M. Swope Lebanon 

David S. Sheetz Lebanon 

Stanley A. Snyder Liverpool 

Morris Umberger Palmyra 

Frank P. Weaver Killinger 

II. THE ACADEMY. 



Bertha Adams , 
Mark A. Albert, 
Minnie Aungst. 
Chalice C. Baker, 
Harry Barnhart, 
Irene Bicksler, 
Lizzie Boeshore, 
Florence Boehm, 
Lizzie Bomgardner, 
Albert Sipe Breneman, 
Samuel Roy Breneman, 
Annie M. Bowman, 
Abraham B. Brackbill, 
W. A. Brunner, 
Sherman C. Ditzler, 
Oscar J. Ditzler, 
Elizabeth Engle, 
Eichard B. Earnest, • 
Joseph EUenberger, 
William Otterbein Ellis, 
Matt English, 
Clyde S. Erb, 
Anna B. C. Ehrhorn, 
Max M. Evans, 
Estella M. Fasnacht, 
Irene Fasnacht, 
Harry Fegan, 
Charlotte May Fisher, 
Alvin E. Foltz, 
Catharine May Gensemer, 
Dorothy B. Goss, 
Margaret Gray, 



Ottis B. Gohn, 
Vernon Grubb, 
John Gillis, 
Erwin M. Hatz, 
Valeria Sue Heilman, 
Adam L. Haesler, 
Eoy L. Harkins, 
Clara Heilman, 
Lizzie Henry, 
Lawrence DeWitt Herr, 
Denver Herr, 
John F. Herr, 
Mabel S. Herr, 
Minnie A. Hicks, 
James Hippie, 
George Nissley Hoffer, 
Phares M. Holdeman, 
Mark Holtzman, 
Leroy Otterbein Holler, 
Allen G. Horst, 
Rex Kephart John, 
Dwight Trefts John, 
Carroll F. James, 
Ammon H. Kreider, 
Rhoda Viola Kelley, 
Gideon Richie Kreider, 
Edith R. King, 
Isaiah M. Klopp, 
Clayton G. Lehman, 
John Lehman, 
Edward W. Leech, 
Mary Lehman, 
John F. Leininger, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



61 



Boaz Light, 
E. Victor Light, 
Grace Ellen Light, 
Horace Light, 
Johu A. Light, 
Nancy J. Light, 
Sara E. Light, 
Oscar Light, 
Henry Matz," 
Iva Bernice Manlfair, 
Laura F. McCormick, 
Oliver INIease, 
Barbara Miller, 
Thomas C. Miller, 
Amos B. Moyer, 
Harry B. Moyer, 
Harry Moyer, 
Minnie Olive Moyer, 
Mame K. Moyer, 
Lizzie Moyer, 
Constance W. Oldham, 
Cecilia Louise Oldham, 
Robert Owen, 
James ^L Price, 
William Peiffer, 
John A. Saylor, 
Grace Belle Schaffner, 
Mary Seabold, 
Elizabeth V. Shaud, 
Daniel O. Shelley, 

III. TEACHERS' 

William J. Bean, 
Chas C. Bensing, 
Irwin Boeshore, 
Lizzie E. Bomgardner, 
Ervin E. Boyer, 
Aug N. Brubaker, 
Harry B. Brubacher, 
Elizabeth Clauser, 
John I. Clay, 
Julia E. Deniler, 
Noarth F. Ditzler, 



Ruth A. Schropp, 
John H. Sherk, 
George W. Strine, 
Annie H. Shenk, 
Floyd Elmer Shaffer, 
Herbert Soule, 
Russell B, Stoner, 
Robert A. Snyder, 
Harvey D. Smith, 
Eva R. Spangler, 
John H. Triest, 
Ethel Henrietta Ulrich, 
Kathrine Ulrich, 
Jennie Vallerchamp, 
Raymond Wagner, 
Ruth E. AVeaber, 
John H. Vogt, 
Frank C. W^itmer, 
Mark Wert, 
Anna Mae Wolf, 
Elizabeth Willis, 
Hold en Warlow, 
Blanche Wolf, 
Florence Henrietta Wolf, 
Mary Julia Wolf, 
William K. Wolf, 
Elsie F. Yeager, 
Johu Yingst, 
Helen Zerfoss. 



PREPARTORY DEPARTMENT. 

Willis A, Dundore, 
Cora G. Ebersole, 
Joseph M. Ellenberger, 
Genevieve EsheLnan, 
Edward D. Fake, 
Edna Felty, 
Irene Felty, 
Stella Felty, 
Frank R. Fasnacht, 
J. B. Funk, 
Philip Getz, 
Dorothy B. Gross, 



62 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Ida Groli, 
Samuel B. Groli, 
Mamie L. Hauer, 
Clara S. Heilmau, 
Edith E. Heilman, 
Katie E. Henry, 
Minerva Adeline Hicks, 
Irvin S. Hoffer, 
John Hollinger, 
Mark G. Holtzman, 
Allen G. Horst, 
Sarah Catharine Kaley-, 
Ehoda Kelly, 
Clayton G. Lehman, 
Boaz G. Light, 
Grace E. Light, 
Harvey K. Light, 
Harry W. Light, 
Naomi E. Light, 
Oscar S. Light, 
I. Mabel Long, 
Henry H. Matz, 
A. A. Maulfair, 
Harry Mease, 
Mabel Mease, 
Amanda Meily, 
A. Mary Meily, 
L^vin C. Meyer, 
May L. Miller, 
Samuel W. Miller, 



Wm. E. Miller, 
Mabel Elizabeth Moyer, 
Morris M. Moyer, 
Carrie E. Nye, 
Katie G. Phillips, 
A. Kathryu Rank, 
Mary A. Seabold, 
Harry R. Seltzer, 
William Seyfert, 
Elizabeth V. Shaud, 
Daniel O. Shelly, 
Annie H. Shenkj 
John H. Shenk, 
John E. Shirk, 
Sara Alys Snavely, 
Abner G. Spangler, 
Grant B. Steckbeck, 
Cora E. Stoever, 
Harry Swanger, 
Pierce E. Swope, 
Morris M. Umberger, 
Katye A. Walmer, 
Raymond Wagner, 
Sara J. Wagner, 
Harry W. Walters, 
Mark Wert, 
Anna Mae Wolf, 
Harvey Wolf, 
Clande Augustus Yoder, 
John Balthaser Yoder. 



iV. DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION. 



Nellie Boltz, 
Clara Eisenbaugh, 
Edna Engle, 
Alva Fasnacht, 
Elizabeth Gallatin, 
Elsie Henry, 
Valeria Heilman, 
Nancy Kauffman, 



Neda Knaub, 
Edith Lehman, 
Sara Light, 
Viola Moyer, 
Francis Shively, 
Mary Stover, 
Clare Wood, 
Naomi Whitman, 
T. Bayard Beatty. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

V. DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 



63 



P.— Piano ; V.— Voice ; O.— Pipe Organ ; H. — Harmony; T. — Theory; 
Hi. — History ; A. — Analysis ; Vi. — Violin. 



Adams, Ann, 
x\rnold, Elsie, V. 
Albert, Mark, P. 
Adams, Bertha, P. 
Bixler, Irene, V. 
Bnrkey, Lillie, O. 
Beckley, Mrs., O. 
Bachman, Vergie, O. 
Beatty, T. B., G.C. 
Berlin, Margaret, P. 
Boniberger, Emma, P. H. 
Crawford, Herbert, O. 
Copi:)enhaver, Florence, P. 
Engle, Frances, P. 
Enders, Laura, P. 
Eisenbaugh, Clara, P. V. 
Evans, Mark, P. V. H. G.C. 
Engle, Ealph, G.C. 
Fisher, Charlotte, P. V. H. 
Fasnacht, Irene, P. T. 
Fans, Eli, P. V. T. Hi. 
Gray, Margaret, P. V. 
Garlock, Anna, P. 
Gehr, E. M., G.C. 
Gabel, Amy, P. V. H. Hi. T. 
Gingrich, Edith, P. 
Gensemer, Catharine, V. 
Heilman, Valeria, P. V. 
Himmelberger, Carrie, P. 
Haas, George, P. 
Heckert, Sadie, P. 
Hiester, Lizzie, O. 
Hatz, Ervin, P. V. 
Hershey, Ruth, V. 
Hambright, J. B., G.C. 
Herr, Naomi, P. 
Herr, Mabel, P. T. 



Heinaman, Frank, V. 
Harnish, Ora, P. 
Herr, DeWitt, O. H. 
Hodges, Elmer, O. P. V. G.C. 
Herr, William, P. 
Johnson, Emily, P. V. Hi. 
John, Rex, P. 
John, Dwight, P. 
Keller, Mame, V. P. H. 
Kauilman, Kathryn, P. V. 
Knanss, Edward, P. 
Kreider, Anna, V. 
King, Edith, P. V. H. 
Kreider, Louise, P. 
Klopp, Isaiah, P. H. 
Lehman, Max, G.C. 
Ludwig, Eber, G.C. 
Lichty, Arthur, P. V. H. G.C. 
Leslie, Ruth, O. 
Light, Sara, P. 
Lehman, Mary, P. 
Leslie, Jennie, P. V. H. Hi. 
Moyer, Harry, P. 
Moyer, Lizzie, P. V. T. 
Mathias, Pearl, G.C. 
Meyers, May, P. 
Maulfair, Iva, P. V. 
Mills, Ellen, V. 
McCormick, Laura, P. H. 
Mills, Lucile, V. 
McKenrick, Ivan, O. G.C. 
Nissley, Bernice, P. 
Nye, Florence, P. 
Owen, G. D., G.C. 
Oldham, Constance, P. V. H. 
Oldham, Celia, V. 
Oldham, Stanley, P. 



64 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Plummer, Berry, G.C. 
Patschke, Caroliue, P. H. 
Reiter, Susie, P. V. H. Hi. ' 
Reigert, Charlotte, O. 
Risser, Annie, P. 
Rojahn, B. D., G.C. 
Spangler, Ruth, P. 
Shively, Frances, V. O. 
Schaeffer, Gertrude, P. Hi. 
Stains, Bessie, P. 
Shenk, Annin, P. 
Stauiier, Laura, P. H. Hi. 
Singer, Vinton, P. 
Snell, H. R., O. 
Schnader, Mrs., P. 
Spessard, Harry E., P. G.C. 
Snell, Lillian, P. H. T. 
Shaud, Elizabeth, P. 
Smith, Lottie, P. 
Showers, J. Balmer, G.C. 
Shanor, W. W., G.C. 



Spessard, Arthur, G.C. V. 

Smith, Ella, P. 

Steiner, Bredella, V. 

Schaffner, Grace, V. P. 

Seibert, Florence, P. 

Spangler, Eva, P. V. 

Schropp, Ruth, P. V. 

Smith, Catharine, V. H. Hi. 

Stanton, R. G., V. P. G.C. 

Suavely, Sara, P. 

Ulrich, Kathryn, P. V. Hi. 

Vallerchamp, .Jennie, P. 

Willis, Elizabeth, P. 

Walter, Mabel, P. 

Walbron, Mrs. John, V. 

Witman, Mabel, P. 

Wolf, Florence, P. T. 

Wolf, Mary, P. V. 

Weaber, Ruth, V. ^ 

Wolfe, Blanche, JP. V. H. Hi-^T. 



Wolf, W.tK.IG.C. 
Yeager, Elsie, P. H. 



VI. DEPARTMENT OF ART. 



Annie Aungst, 
Rosa Bachman, 
Emma R. Batdorf, 
Mary C. Batdorf, 
Irene Bickler, 
Florence S. Boehm, 
Mattie Bomberger, 
Helen Brightbill, 
Elizabeth Brotherline, 
M. A. Blazier, 
Elsie Condron, 
M. Edna Engle, 
Frances Engle, 
Elizabeth Engle, 
Laura E. Enders, 
Charlotte Euston, 
Lillian Feese, 
Emma Gettel, 
Alice Gruber, 



Sara Elizabeth Helm, . 

Caroline Mae Hamaker, 

Martha B. Henry, 

John "Hunsicker, 

Annie E. Kreider, 

Ida Kreider, 

Sallie Kreider, 

Mary Keller, 

Ruth M. Leslie, 

Mattie Lesher, 

Alma Mae Light, 

Iva Light, 

Jessie Light, 

Emily E. Loose, 

Emma Loos, 

Mrs. Mark, 

Allan Meyer, 

May Meyer, 

Sarah E. Musser, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



67 



Mary E. Groff (Jaqnith) a.m., 
Emma L. Landis, a.m, 
J. Lon Whitmoyer, U.S., 

A. Lefevre Groff, 

Fannie C. Killinger (Yocum) 
Lizzie E. Weidman (Groff) 
Henry Wolf, 

'80— V. Kline Fisher, a.b., 
George W. Gensemer, a.b., 
S. Oliver Goho, a.m., 
Cyrus D. Harp, a.m., b.d., 
Simon P. Light, a.m., 
Rosa M. Meredith (Porter) a.m., 
Fannie M. Deaner (Keedy) a.m., 
Alice K. Gingrich (Cowell) a.m., 
Sallie A. Herr (Geyer) a.m., 
Alice J. Light (Beam) a.m., 

B. Frank Baker, 
Elmer C. Thomas, 

'81— Ella J. Mark (Sneath) a.m. 

Charles E. Ranch, A.B., 

Elias H. Sneath, a.m., PH.D., ll.d 

Isaiah W. Sneath, a.m., PH.D., 

Sylvester K. Wine, a.m., 

Cyrus L. Benson, b.s., 

Elmer H. Garver, B.s., 

Henry A. Sechrist, B.s., 

Ella M. Smith (Light) b.s., 

Arabelle Stauffer, b.s., 

Millie Weidman (Brightbill) b.s., 

George A. Wolf, b.s., 

Mary A. VanMeter (Funderburk) 

John B. Zeigler, B.s., M.D., 

James M. VanMeter, Jr., 

'82— William O. Fries, a.m., d.d 
Christian E. Geyer, a.b., 
Charles B. Gruber, a.m., 
Mary E. Knepper (Meed) a.m., 
J. Goodwin Steiner, a.m., m.d., 
Mary S. Gulp (Kennedy), 
Clinton J. Barr, b.s., 
Laertes T. Conrad, M.S., 



Died at Des Moines, La. , May 12, 1891 
Teacher of Art, Hummelstown 

Salesman, 

Business, Harrisburg 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Harrisburg 

Merchant, Mount Wolf 

Farmer, Berne 

Merchant Tanner, Pinegrove 

Gen. Agt. Brownstone Co., Harrisburg 
Minister, Providence, R. I. 

Attorney -at- Law, Lebanon 

York 

Keedysville, Md. 

Yreka, Cal. 

Catawissa 

Lebanon 

Farmer, Keedysville, Md. 

Farmer, Boonsboro, Md. 

New Haven, Conn. 
Merchant, Lebanon 

., Prof. Education, Yale University, Conn. 
Minister, New Haven, Conn. 

Minister, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Clerk, Lebanon 

Died at Hastings, Neb., Feb. 23, 1895 
Minister, Dean, Ohio 

Lebanon 
Teacher of Music, Mt. Pleasant 

Annville 



Merchant, 

A.M., 
Physician, 
Merchant, 

,, Minister, 
Attorney-at-Law^, 
Business, 

Physician, 

Business, 
Minister, 



Mount Wolf 

Columbia, S. C. 

Penbrook 

Columbia, S. C. 

Fostoria, Ohio 

Catawissa 

Baltimore, Md. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Knoxville 

Georgetown, Ont. 

Lebanon 



68 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



John H. Oliver, b.s., 
George W. VanMetre, 

'83 — Elmer E. Craumer, a.b., 
Jacob Z. Hoffman, a.m., m.d., 
Gideon R. Kreider, a.m., 
Solomon G. Merrick, a.b., 
Alice M. Evers (Burtner), b.s., 
Althea C. Fink, (Merrick), B.s., 
Lizzie J. Kinports, B.s., 
J. Foster Milliken, b.s., 

'84— W. J. Baltzell, A.B., b.mus., 

G. W. Hanger, a.m., ph.d., 

J. Henderson Kurtz, a.b, 

Joseph E. S. Medsger, a.b., 

J. Henry Muller, a.m., b.d., 

J. Oliver Thrush, A.B., b.d., 

M. Angel Fry, b.s , 

C. Eugenia Hauck, b.s., 

H. Lincoln Musser, b.s., 

Anna May Saylor, b.s., 

'85 — Markwood M. Burtner, a.m., 
William S. Ebersole, a.m., lit.d., 
Joseph Allen Lyter, a.m., 

'86 — Daniel E. Burtner, a.m., b.d., 

'87 — Clayton H. Backenstoe, b.s., 
Harry Thomas Denlinger, a.b., 
Anselm Vinet Hiester, B.s., 
Joseph Patterson Jordan, a.b., 
Lillie Catharine Mark (Ball), b.a., 
George Rigler Shenk, a.m., m.d., 
William Dick Shupe, b.s., 
Sarah J. Waite, 
Morrison Weimer, a.m., b.d , 

'88 — Albert H. Gerberich, b.s., 
Wm. McClellan Hain, B.s., 
Anna R. Reed (Weimer), b.s,, 
Joseph Kurtz Wagner, B.s., 

'89 — Beuj. F. Daugherty, a.m., 
Joseph Daugherty, B.S., 
Samuel D. Faust, a.m., d.d., 



Prof. Unv. Pacific, Pacific Grove, Cal, 
Surveyor, Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Attorney-at-Law, Pittsburg 

Physician, Wichita, Kan. 

Business, Annville 

Minister, Duxburj^ Mass. 

Williamsport 

Duxbuiy, Mass. 

Annville 

Attorney-at-Law, Pittsburg 

Editor, The Etude, Philadelphia 

Dept. of Labor, Washington, D. C. 

Clerk, P. R. R. Co., Bellwood 

Jeweler, New Florence 

Minister, Bloomington, 111. 

Minister, Webster City, Iowa 

Postal Clerk, Harrisburg 

Teacher of Music, Lebanon 

Merchant, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Teacher, Annville 

Minister, Wasco, Oregon 

Prof. G'k, Cornell Col., Mt. Vernon, la. 
Minister, 



Minister, 

Attorney-at-Law, 

Minister, 

Prof. Sci., F. & M., 

Minister, 



Harrisburg 

Williamsport 

Harrisburg 
Lancaster 
Lancaster 
McDonald 
Newton Higlilands, Mass. 
Physician, Reading 

Died at Johnstown, March 13, '94 

Teacher, Bellefonte 

Priu. Rogers Acad., Rogers, Arkansas 

Prin. Public Schools, Royersford 

A ttorney-at-Law, Harrisbu rg 

Rogers, Arkansas 



Prof. Latin, L. V. C, Annville 

Minister, York 

Prof. C'h His., U. B. Sem., Dayton, O. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 65 



Mary Manlfair, 
Alice ]\[ovver, 
Elizabeth Rel)stock, 
Mrs. C. P. Saylor, 
Bertha Schools, 
Katharine Schools, 
Mrs. Schwenk, 
Kachel Sheuk, 



Sara Suavely, 
Mary Stine, 
Dyson Sweger, 
Josephine Urich, 
Elizabeth Van de Sande, 
Florence Wolf, 
Olive Walters, 
Elizabeth Yordy. 

The above lists include the names of all who were connected with 
all departments between April, 1904, and April, 1905 

Summary. 

students in College Department 160 

Students in Academic Department 124 

Students in Teachers' Preparatory Department 83 

Students in Department of Elocution 17 

Students in Department of Music 117 

Students in Department of Art 57 

■"558 

Deduct names repeated 88 

Total 470 



REGISTER OF GRADUATES. 



It is desired to make this list complete and accurate. Please forward 
corrections to President H. IT. Eoop. 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 



Officers for 1904-1905. 

PRESIDENT— Prof. Harry E. Spessard, A. M., '00, Annville 
\\ PRES.— Rev. Alvin E. Shroyer, B. S., '00, Highspire 
REC. SECRETARY— Miss Ella Nora Black, B. S., '96, Annville 
COR. SECY— Mrs. Mary Kreider Stehman, A. B., '99, Benninj>ton, Vt. 
TREASURER— Prof. S. Hoffman Derickson, M. S., '02, Annville 
'70— Wm. Bodenhorn, a. m. Died at Annville, March 4, 1889 

Albert C. Rigler, Died at Annville, Feb. 26, 1904 

Mary A. Weiss (Reitzel) Chicago, 111. 

'71— Clemmie L. Ulrich, Died at Annville, February 18, 1880 

V2— J- Wesley Etter, A. m., d. d.. Died at Dayton, Ohio, March 28, 1895 
John K. Fisher, A. M., Died at Lebanon, June 18, 1890 



66 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Ezra Gingrich, A. m., 

John H. Gray bill, A. M., 

John H. Kinports, A. m., 

Jennie E. Kauffman (Grouse) A. M. 

Adam R. Forney, 

'73 — H. B. Stehman, a.m., m.d., 
Sarah Burns (Larosh) a.m., 
Charles S. Daniel, 
George A. Loose, 

'74 — Adam E. Forney, a.m , 
John E. Lehman, a.m., 
Zaranius S. G. Light, A.m., 
Jos. W. Osborn, A.M., PH.D., 
Robert Steinmetz, a.m., 
Hiram E. Steinmetz, a.m., 
Rebecca Kinports (Kendig) a.m., 
Ella Jane Mark (Sneath), 

'75 — Samuel H. Clair, a.m., 
Sarah E. Collier (Etter) a.m., 

'76 — ^ Isaac H. Albright, a.m., ph.d. 
J. George Johnson, a.m., ph.d., 
John R. Wright, A.M., D.D., 
Aaron G. Herr, 

'77— Greo. W. Hursh, a.m., m.d., 

Abram H. Shenk, a.m., 

Alice M. Ranch (Hagey), a.m., 

Ella J. Rigler (Deaner) a.m., 

Monroe P. Sanders, 

Garret G. Shellenberger, 

'78 — Ceo. F. Bierman, a.m., ph.d., 
Cornelius A. Burtner, a.m., ph.d., 
Virginia G. Burtner (Pitman) A.M., 
A. Belle Howe (Oberst) a.m., 
Hiram B. Dohner, d.d., 
Daniel D. Keedy, 
Harvey E. Thomas, 

'79 — Charles D. Baker, a.m., m.d., 

H. Clay Deaner, a.m., 

Horace S. Kephart, a.m., 

John C. Yocum, a.m., 

Clara S. Craumer (Leavens) A.B., 



Druggist, 
Minister, 
Druggist, 

Merchant, 
Physician, 

Minister, 
Farmer, 



Philadelphia 

St. Mary's 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Danville, N. J. 

Annville 

Pasedena, Cal. 

Pekin, 111. 

Philadelphia 

Birdsboro 



Business, Annville 

Prof. Math., Ast., L. V. C, Annville 
Merchant, Annville 

Died at Swansea, Mass., Jan. 4, 1889 
Farmer, Annville 

Merchant, Lititz 

Lancaster 
New Haven, Conn. 

Prin. High School, Ashland 

Died at Ithaca, N. Y. 

Minister, Reading 

Minister, 

Minister, Jersey City, N. J. 

Clerk, Annville 

Physician, Columbia, S. C. 

Minister, 

Steelton 
Annville 

Died at Marietta, May 10, 1892 

Teacher, Birdsboro 

Died at Harrisburg, March, 1900 
557 Scott Street, Toledo, Ohio 

Teacher, North Platte, Neb. 

Minister, Landingville 

Merchant, Keedysville, Md. 

Farmer, Boonsboro, Md. 

Physician, Rohersville, Md. 

Business, Annville 

Dayton, Ohio 
Lawyer, Died at Kansas City, Mo, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



71 



'99— Emma R. Batdorf, B.s., 

John P. Batdorf, b.s., 

Clarence V. Clippin^er, b.s., 

Walter G. Clippin<»;er, A.B., B.D., 

Edith S. Graybill, B.s., 

Leah C. Hartz (Wingerd) B.s., 

Susie F. Herr, B s., 

Harry H. Hoy, A.B., 

I. W. Huntzberger, A.M., 

Harry M. Lnboden, A.B , m.d., 

William O. Jones, a.b.. b.d., 

Mary E. Kreider (Stehman) A.B., 

Bessie M. Landis (Omwake) B.s., 

Alma M. Light, M.S., 

Galen D. Light, b.s., 

G. Mahlon Miller, B.s., b.d., 

Harry E. Miller, a.b., b d , 

Anna S. Myers, B.s., 

Irvin E. Eunk, b.s., b.d , 

Caroline D. Seltzer, B.s., 

HattieS. Shelley, B.s., 

John D. Stehman, a.b , 

Maud S Trabert, B.S., 

Henry S. Beales, a.m., 

Lemuel E. McGinnes, A.M., 



Instr. Elocution, L. V. C, Annville 
Merchant, Annville 

Teacher High School, - Mechanicsburg 
Mgr. U. B. Book Rooms, Dayton, O. 

Lancaster 

Shippensburg 

Annville 

Business, Philadelphia 

Ins. High School, Washington, D. C. 

Physician, Lebanon 

Minister, Youngwood 

Bennington, Vermont 



Died at CoUegeville, 

Teacher, 

Y. M. C. A. Sec'y, 

Minister, 

Minister, 

Teacher of Music, 

Minister, 

Teacher, 

Inst'r High School, 

Y. M. C. A. Sec'y, 

Minister, 

Supt. Public Schools, 



Jan. 1904 

Lebanon 

Boston, Mass. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Lebanon 

Steelton 

Mt. Joy 

Lebanon 

Boiling Springs 

Bennington, Vt. 

Lebanon 

Died at Glenbrook 

Steelton 



1900— Nellie Buffington, B.i 

C. Madie Burtner, b s., 
Rene D. Burtner, A.B , 
Enid Daniel, A. m.. 
Grant B. Gerberich, b.s., 
Fred Weiss Light, b.s , 
Galen D. Light, A.B., 
David E. Long, b.s., 
Annie E. Kreider, A.B., 
Lizzie G. Kreider (Shroyer), 
Reba F. Lehman, a.b., 
Seth A. Light, A B., m.d , 
Oren G. Myers, b.s., 

Ross Nissley, b.s., 

D. Aug. Peters, A.B., ph.g., 
J. Mark Peters, a.b., m.d., 
Ralph D. Reider, B.s., 



5, Teacher, Elizabeth vi lie 

Student Phys. Culture, Boston, Mass. 

Physical Dir. Y. M. C. A., Salt Lake City, Utah 

Critic Tr. State Normal, Warrensburg, Mo. 

Prin. Public Schools, Johnsonburg 

Clerk Valley Nat. Bank, • Lebanon 

Assis't Y. M. C. A. Sec'y, Boston, Mass. 



B.s. 



Minister, 

Art Student, L. V. C, 



Librarian, L. V. C, 
Physician, 

Business, 

Postmaster, 

Druggist, 

Physician, 

Business, 



Millersburg 

Annville 

Highspire 

Annville 

Philadelphia 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Hummel stown 

Steelton 

Steelton 

Hummelstown 



72 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Clyde J. Saylor, b.r., m.d., 
Alvin E. Sh rover, b.s., e d., 
Charles E. Rnoke, a.b , b.d., 
G. Mapoii Snoke, A.B., 
Nora R. Spayd (Parker), a.b., 
Harry E. Spessard, A.B., 
Adam K. Weir, a.b., 
Frank F. Holsopple, M.S., 
John S. Gruver, A m., 
Hiram H. Shenk, a.m., 

'Ot — Henry H. Baish, A.B., 
Edward M. Balsbaugh, b.s., 
Morris W. Bmnner, a.b., d.o., 
William H. Bnrd, B.s., 
Robert E. Bntterwick, a.b., b.d.^ 
Lewis E. Cross, b.s., 
Samuel F. Danjyherty, A.B., 
Frank B. Emenheiser, B.s., 
John E. Kleffman, a.b., 
Karnig Kuyoomjian, A.B., 
Emma F. Loos, b.s., 
Thomas F. Miller, a.b, 
Susie S Moy er ( Enders) , A b. , 
David M Oyer, a.b., 
William O. Roop, A B., 
William S. Roop, b s., 
S. Edwin Rupp, A.B., 
A. Garfield Smith, a.b., 
Cyrus W. Waughtel, A.B., 
Harry H. Yohe, B.s., 
A. B. Hess, A.M , 

'02— George H. Albright, B.s., 
John H. Alleman, a.b., 
David D. Buddinger, b.s., 
Donald J. Cowling, a.b., 
Hoffman Derickson, M.S., 
Claude JR. Engle, b.s., 
Thomas W. Gray, B.s. 
Clinton Cleveland Gohn, b.s., 
Joseph Lehn Kreider, b.s., 
Thomas A. Lawson, b.s., 
Artie Wesley Miller, b.s., 



Physician, Womelsdorf 

Minister, Highspire 

Theological Student Yale Div. School 
Teacher Public Schools, Annville 

West Acton, Mass. 
Prin. L. V. C. Academy, Annville 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio 

Prof. Eng., Juniata Col., Huntingdon 
Pres. E't'n N'm'l Col., Front Royal, Va 
Prof. His. Pol. Sci.,. L. V. C, Annville 

Ward Prin. Public Schools, Altoona 
Instructor in High School, Lebanon 
Physician, Lebanon 

Ward Prin. Public Schools, Altoona 
Minister, Palmyra 

Teacher Public Schools, Rayville, Md. 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio 

Minister, Loyville, Md. 

Minister, Carlisle 

Theological Student, Yale University 
Teacher, . Annville 

Business, . New York City 

Baltimore, Md. 
Minister, Newburg 

Medical Student, Baltimore, Md. 

Business, Stockton Ave., Allegheny 
Minister, Philadelphia 

Business, Baltimore, Md. 

Teacher, Cutler, Georgia 

Minister, - Vaudalia, Ohio 

Prin. Public Schools, Mechanicsburg 

Business, Reading 

Principal Public Schools, Dubois 

Minister, Bellegrove 

Grad Student in Phil. , Yale University 
Acting Professor Biology, L. V. C. 

Business, Harrisburg 

Business, Marysville 

Minister, Wormleysburg 

Grad. Stud, in Chemistry, Yale Univ. 
Medical Student, Philadelphia 

Business, Chicago, 111. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



69 



Minister, 
Minister, 
Minister, 
Minister, 
Farmer, 

Minister, 
Minister, 



Pension Agency, 
Minister, 

Prof. Greek, L. V. C, 
Business, 
Minister, 
Minister, 
Minister, 



Minister, 

Art Student, L. V 

Minister, P. E., 



Reno 'Shaffer Harp, a.m., 
John Lincoln Keedy, A.i?., n.i) , 
Edward Everett Keedy, A B., n.l). 
John Edward Klefltman, IVR., 
Aaron Albion Long, a.m., 
Ellwood Thomas Schlosser, 

'90 — Edward S. Bowman, A.M., 
Edward (). Burtuer, b.s., b.d., 
Lorena S. Funk (Bowman), b.s., 
Wiljiam Robert Keller, B.8., 
William Haines Kindt, A.M., 
Jumes T. Sx)angler, a.m., b.p. 
Allen Fish burn Ward, B.s., 

'91— Schuyler Colfax Enck, a.m., 
Samuel J. Evers, A.B.. B.l)., 
John Wilson Owen, B.s., b.d., 
Lillian M. Quigley, B.s., 
Ella Nora Saylor (Sheffey), b.s., 
Grant L. Shaeffer, a.m., b.d., 
Mary Magdalena Shenk. b.s., 
Wm. Henry Washinger, a.m., 

'92— Anna E. Brightbili( Harp), B.s., 

Anna R. Forney (Kreider), A.B., 

Elmer Loose Haak, b.s., 

Jacob M. Herr, b.s., 

Seba C. Huber, b.s., 

Josephine Kreider (Henry), b.s., 

Andrew Raymond Kreider, b.s., 

David Albert Kreider, a.b., ph.T) 

Laura E. Reider (Muth), b.s., 

Lillie J. E. Rice (Gohu), b.s., 

John Dickson Rice, a.b., Attorney-at-Law, 

Harry Backenstoe Roop, B.s., M.n., Physician, 

Hervin U. Rooi^ a.m., rii.i)., ll.d , President L. V. C, 

'93 — Simon Peter Bae^stow, b.s., Merchant Miller, 

Horace W Crider, b.s., 

Joseph G. W. Herold, b.s., PH.D., 

Samuel Thomas Meyer, a.m. ll.b., Attorney-at-Law, 

John L. Meyer, A.]\r., Teacher, 

Harry H, Sloat, Teacher, 

Elvire C. Stehman (Pennypacker), P>.s., 

Minnie E. Weinman (Lytic), b.s., 



Vttorney-at-Law, Frederick City, Md. 



North Andover, Mass. 

Cumberland Mills, Maine 

Carlisle 

Shamokin 

Boonsboro, Md. 

Harrisburg 

Hummelstown 

Harrisburg 

Philadelphia 

Wilkes- Barre 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Columbia 

Glenbrook, Conn. 

Mechanicsburg 

Harrisburg 

Harrisburg 

Bridgeport, Conn . 

C, Annville 

Chambersburg 

Died at Annville, March 15, '96 

New Haven, Conn. 

Business, Myerstown 

Teacher, Samaria, Mich. 

Attorney-at-Law, Tama, Iowa 

Annville 
Business, Annville 

Asst. Prof. Physics, Yale Univ., Conn, 

Hummelstown 

Dayton, Ohio 

Chambersburg 

Columbia 

Annville 

Boiling Springs 

Homestead 

North Lynn, Mass. 

Lebanon 

New Egypt, N. J. 

Rockport 

York 

Wilkinsburg 



Business, 
Minister, 



70 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



'94- — David S. Eshelman, a.m.,b. 
Oscar E. Good, a.m., 
George K. Hartman, A. m., 
Samuel F. Huber, A b., ll,b., 
George A. L. Kindt, a.b., ph.b., 
Wm. H. Kreider, a.m., ll b., 
H. Lenich Meyer, M.S., 
Maggie Strickler, A.B., 
Anna E. Wilson, B s., 
James F. Zug, a.b., 

'95 — Harry W. Mayer, M.S., 
John H. Maysilles, a.m.. With 
Jacob H. Reber, M.S., PH.D., 
John R. Wallace, b.s., 

'96— Ella Nora Black, b.s., 
Sheridan Garman, b.s., b.d., 
Harry H. Heberly, b.s., 
J. Alex. Jenkins, a.m., ph.d., 
Bertha Mnmma (Christ) b.s., 
Chas. H, Schleichter, B.s., 
Estelle Stehman, B.s., 

'97 — Iva E. Albert, a.b., 
Harry Boyer, b.s., 
Raymond P. Dougherty, A.M., 
Howard E. Endera, M.S., 
Anna M. Keller, B.s., 
Mary E. Richards (Albert) b.s., 
Norman C. Schlichter, a.m., 
Adam S. Ulrich, b.s., ll.b., 
George A. Ulrich, b.s., m.d., 
Charles B. Wingerd, A.M., B.D., 



E., Minister, 
Teacher, 
Minister, 
A ttorn ey -at-La w . 



Middletown 

Pennbrook 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Chambersburg 



Died in Colorado, December, 1904 
Attorney-at-Law, Philadelphia 

Prin. Schools, Hummelstown 

Instr. High School, Lebanon 

Beaver Creek, Md. 
Business, Marshalltown, Iowa 

Teacher, Sacramento 

Amr. Locomotive Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Prin. High School, Waynesboro 

Died at Norfolk, Va. 



Teacher of Music, 
Minister, 

Theological Student, 
Minister, 

Teacher, 



Annville 

Van Orin, HI. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hummelstown 

East Pittston 

Mountville 



Missionary, Died atShenghai, Africa, 1902 
Minister, Hellam 

Missionary, Freetown, W. Africa 

Grad. Stu. Johns Hopkins Uni., Baltimore 
Art Student, L. V. C, Campl)el]town 
Missionary, Annville 

Prof. Eng. & French, L. V. C, Annville 
Attorney-at-Law, Lebanon 

Physician, Philadelphia 

Minister, Shippensburg 



'98 — Allen U. Bear, b.s., 
John Q, Diebler, b.s., 
Orville P. DeWitt, a.b., 
John R. Geyer, a.m., 
Bessie Kinports, b.s., 
Edwin Kieider, B.s., 
J. Asa Light, b.s.. 
Louise Rouse Miller, A.B., 
Jay W. Yoe, B.s., 
Jacob Zerbe, A.B., 



Minister, 
Farmer, 

Principal Schools, 
Attorney-at-Law, 



Eleroy, 111. 

Curtin 

New Jersey 

Middletown 

Annville 

Business, Annville 

Teacher, Lebanon 

Pr'f Reader Western Pub. House, Dayton, O. 

Minister, Altenwald 

Harrisburg 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



73 



William J. Sanders, A.B., 

William A. Sites, A.B., 

Alf. Chas. Tennyson Sumner, a.b , 

'03— William C. Arnold, a.m., 
Urias J. Daugherty, A.B., 
J. Walter Esbensliade, a.b , 
Charles Allen Fisher, A b , 
Sarah Elizabeth Helm, a.b., 
Wesley M. Heilman, A B , 
Isaac Moyer Hershey, A.B., 
Solomon D. Kaufman, A b , 
Levi B. Nye, A B., 
John W. Owen, A. b., 
Hiram F. Ehoad, a.b , 
Emmett C. Eoop, A.B., 
Chailes E. Roudabush, A.B., 
Irvin E. Runk, A.B., 
Lillian M. Schott, A.B., 
Ralph C. Schaeffer, a.b., 
Paul P. Smith, a.b., 
Edith E. Spangler, A.B., 
George A. Ulrich, a.b,, 
'04 — W. Ralph Appenzellar, A.B., 
Kerwin W. Altland, a.b., 
David D. Brandt, A.B., 
Augustus Crone, A.B., 
Maud Edna Engle, A.B., 
Charles H. Fisher, a.b , 
John H. Graybill, a.b., 
William M. Grumbine. a.b , 
Frank Heinaman, A.B., 
Anna Mary Kellar, A.B., 
Walter R. Kohr, a.b., 
Mary Naomi Light, A.B , 
Margaretta Catharine Miller, a.b , 
Alfred Keister Mills, a.b , 
Nelle C. Reed, A b., 
William E. Riedel, a.b., 
John T. Shaud, A.B., 
Mabel M. Spayd, A b., 



Instructor in Academy, Chambersburg 
Minister, Clarington 

Missionary, Bonthe, Africa 

Grad. Stu. Economics, Col. U., N. Y. 
Inst. Science, High School, Dallastov^n 
Buvsiness, Lebanon 

Theo. Stu., Princeton Seminary, N J. 
Teacher, Public Schools, Lebanon 

Prin. Teachers' Dept , L. V. C, Annville 
Theo. Stu U. B Sem., Dayton, Ohio 
Business, Dallastown 

Principal Public Schools, Middletown 
Minister, Mechauicsburg 

Minister, Killiuger 

Business, Columbus, Ohio 

Business, Waynesburg 

Minister, Mount Joy 

Teacher High School, Paoli 

Medical Student, Univ. of Mich. 

Business, Lebanon 

Grad. Student L. V. C, Annville 

Physician, Philadelphia 

Ins. High Scliool, Chambersburg 

Attorney-at-Law, York 

Theological Student, Dayton, Ohu) 

Minister, Greason 

Teacher Public Schools, Derry Church 
Theological Student, New York City 
Theological Student, Dayton, Ohio 

Instructor Business School. Lebanon 
Principal High School, Derry Church 
Business, Philadelphia 

Ins. Military School, St. Charles, Mo. 
Instructor High School, Parkesburg 

U. B. Publishing House, Dayton, Ohio 
Student Yale Uni , New Haven, Conn. 
Ins. Roger's Academy, Rogers, Ark 
Sec'y Y. M. C. A., York 

Theological Student, Philadelphia 

Teacher Pa))]ic School, Mt Joy 



74 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Music. 



'82— Alice K. Gingrich (Cowell), 
Mary E Knepper (Meed), A.M., 
Ella M. Smith (Light), B.S., 
Ada M. Underwood (Ayers), 



Yreka, Cal. 

Columbus, Ohio 

Lebanon 

Baltimore, Md. 



'83 — Alice M. Evers (Burtner), b.s., Williamsport 

Ida M. Zent (Richards), Roanoke, Ind. 

'84 — C. Eugenia Hauck, Teacher of Music, Lebanon 

'85 — Sevilla K, Gensemer (Bowman), Died at Pine Grove, Apr. 25, '97 

Minnie E. Speck, Died at Braddock, June 15, '95 

Ida M. Speck, Scottdale 

'86— M. Ella Moyer, Teacher of Music, 



'87 — L- Augusta Doyle 
Carrie Gertrude Eby (Jeffries), 
Katie E Ranch (Miller), 

'88 — Alice Lydia Kutz, 

Sallie Adaline Mark (Weineshenk), 

Sidney Moyer, 

Nettie May Swartz, 

'90 — Lorena S. Funk (Bowman), B.s., 



Teacher of Music, 



Lebanon 

Huntingdon 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

Lebanon 

Freeburg 

Atlantic, Mass. 

Lebanon 

New Oxford 

Harrisburg 
New Haven, Conn. 



'91— Minne M. Burtner, 
Carrie E Smith, 



Anna Ruth Forney (Bowman), b.s.. 

Teacher of Music, Harrisburg 

Teacher of Music, Camp Hill 

'92 — Lulu M. Baker, Ins. in Music, Otterbein Univ., Westerville, Ohio 
Annie E. Brightbill (Harp), Died at Annville> March 15, '96 

Florence R. Brindle (Gabel ) Shamokin 

Katie P. Mumma, Teacher of Music, "Schuylkill Haven 

Delia F. Roop (Daugherty) Annville 

Ella N. Say lor (Sheffey) Harrisburg 

Elvire C. Stehman ( I'ennypacker) York 

Samuel H. Stein, Minister, Lock Haven 

'93— Mary E. Batdorf, Annville 

Anna E. Wilson, Beaver Creek, Md . 



'94- — Ida L. Bowman (Richards' 
Mellie Fortenbaugh (Bowman), 
Emily E Loose, 
Ella Pennypacker (Hoover), 
Mabel M. Say lor (Bender), 



Art Student L. V C, 



Royersford 
Philadelphia 
Palmyra 
Mountville 

Jersey City, N. J. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



'95— Urban H. Hershey, 

'96 -Ella Nora Black, 

Howard Gobin Henry, 

Marj^ E. Kreider (Stehman), 

Bertha Mayer (Baer), 

E. Kuth Mumma, 

Estelle Stehman, 

'97— Mary E. Kreider (Stehman), 

Stella K. Sargent (Sollenberger), 

' 9 9- Mabel E. Manbeck, 
Mabel Eoyer, 

1900— Arabelle Batdorf , 

Edna Groff, 

Anna E. Kreider, 

Lizzie G. Kreider (Shroyer), 

Lena Owens, 

'01— Lillie Burkey, 

Anna E. Kreider, 

Lizzie G. Kreider (Shroyer), 

Kathryn Landis (Clippinger), 

Rnth Leslie, 

Sue Moyer (Enders), 

Mary Zacharias (Runk), 

'02 — Margaret Attwood (Donley), 

Gertrude Bowman (Wright), 

Neta Englar. 

Alma Engle (Yohe), 

Nettie Lockeman, 

Isaac F. Loos, 

Elizabeth Stehman, 

Mary Zimmerman, 

Arabelle Batdorf, 

Emma Batdorf, 

'03 — Virgie Bachman, 
Ella Nora Black, 
Grace Nissley, 
Mabel Walmer, 
Mary Horstick, 

'04— Lillie Burkey, 
Clara Eiseiibaugh, 
Margaret Gray, 



Teacher of Music, Manheim 

Teaclier of Music, Annville 

Student of Pharmacy, Philadelphia 

Bennington, Vt. 
Eleroy, 111 
Teacher of Music, Lancaster 

Mountville 

Bennington, Vt. 
Harrisburg 

Di . Conservatory of Music , Sugar Grove 
Teacher of Music, Lebanon 

Stu. in Music L. V. C. Annville 

Teacher of Music, Harrisburg 

Art Student L. V. C, Annville 

Highspire 

Guthrie, Oklahoma 

Teacher, Lebanon 

Art Student L. Y. C, Annville 

Highspire 

Mechanicsburg 

Teacher of Music, Harrisburg 

Baltimore, Md. 

Mount Joy 

Lebanon 

Dayton, Ohio 

Teacher of Music, Gratis, Ohio 

Vandalia, Ohio 
Teacher of Music, York 

Teacher of Music, Reading 

Mountville 

Annville 

Teacher of Music, Annville 

Teacher in Elocution, L.V.C., Annville 

Teacher of Music, Annville 

Teacher of Music, Annville 

Teacher of Music, Hummelstown 

Teacher of Music, Lebanon 

Teacher of Music, Glen Mills 

Teacher of Music Lebanon 

Teacher of Music, Red Lion 

Shippensburg 



76 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Mame Keller, 
Susie Reiter, 
Jennie Yallerchamp, 
Ruth Leslie, 



'03— Edith Myers, 
'04- — Florence Boehm, 



Teacher of Music, 
Teacher of Music, 
Teacher of Music, 
Teacher of Music, 

CERTIFICATE IN AR.T 



Schuylkill Haven 
Myerstown 
Millersburji 
Harrisburjj; 



Mount Joy 
Student Drexel Institute, Philadelphia 



Total College Alumni 331 

Total Music Alumni . 83 



College Associations. 



The Alumni Association. 

The object of this Association is to perpetuate fraternal regard among 
the graduates of the College, and to promote in every way the interests of 
their Alma Mater. Graduates from the College and the Conservatory of 
Music, and all persons admitted to a degree higher than the first in the 
Institution, are considered members. 



Officers for 1904-1905. 

Professoe Harry E. Spessard, A.M., '00, Annville 
. . . Rev. Alvin E. Shroyer, B.S., '00, Highspire 
.... Miss Ella Nora Black, B.S., '96, Annville 

Cor. Sec'y., Mrs. Mary Kreider Stehman, A.B., '99, Bennington, Vt. 

Treasurer . . . Professor Hoffman Derickson, M.S., '02, Annville 



President . . . 
Vice President 
Rec. Secretary 



The Eastern Pennsylvania Conference Associat>ion. 

President Rev. Schuyler Enck, A.M., '91, Columbia 

Secretary Rev. David S. Eshklman, A.M., '94, Middletown 

Treasurer Rev. Alvin E. Shroyer, B.S., '00, Highspire 



The Pennsylvania Conference AssociaLion. 

President Samuel F. Huber, A.M., '94, Chambersburg 

Secretary •••...... Rev. Augustus Crone, A.B., '04, Greason 

Treasurer Rev. David M. Oykr, A.B., '01, NeAvbun-- 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 77 

Some Ways in Which You Can Help Lebanon 

Valley College, 

1. Pray for it. 

2. Talk for it. 

3. Give a part of the Lord's tenth to it each year. 

4. Send your sons and daughters to Lebanon Valley. 

5. Visit the College and know its work. 

6. Send books to its Library. 

7. Remember Lebanon Valley College in your Will. 

8. Interest your friends in building its much needed buildings. 

9. Have your church make Lebanon Valley College one of the bene- 
ficiaries of its benevolence. 

10. See to it that the best men in every respect are elected to the 
College's Board of Trustees. 



What Money Can Do at Lebanon Valley College, 

$25 per year will give the College the interest of an Endowment of $500. 
$50 per year will give the College the interest of an Endowment of $1,000. 
$100 per year will give the College the interest of an Endowment of $2,000. 
$500 per year will give the College the interest of an Endowment of $10,000. 
$1,000 will establish a perpetual scholarship in the name of the donor.* 
$5,000 will establish a perpetual teaching fellowship. 
$15,000 will establish an instructorship. 
$25,000 will endow a professorship. 
$35,000 will build one of the most needed buildings. 

Will you not do something toward the ])ermanent work of Lebanon 
Valley College? 



'Harry B. Roop, B.S.,M.D., Columbia, Pa., has established such a scholarship. 



78 LFBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

INDEX. 

PAGE 

Calendar 2 

The Corporation — Board of Trustees 3 

Officers and Committees of the Board 4 

The Faculty and Officers 5-7 

Plan and Purpose of the College 8 

Corporate Rights, and Form of Bequest . 8 

Grounds and Buildings 8 

Religious Training 9 

Health and Physical Culture 10 

Literary and Musical Advantages . 10 

Library and Reading Room 11 

Matriculation, Discipline, Advisers, and Class Standing 12-13 

Leave of Absence, Theses, Degrees, and Diplomas 14 

Graduate Work 14 

Dormitories 15 

Expenses, Terms of Payment 15-16 

Departments : 17 

Admission to the College, Three Methods 17-18 

Outlines of Courses 19-22 

Philosophy 23-24 

Greek Language and Literature 24-25 

Latin Language and Literature 26-26 

German Language and Literature 26 

French Language and Literature 27 

English Language and Literature 27-28 

Mathematics and Astronomy 29-30 

Chemistry and Physics 30-31 

Biology 32-33 

History and Political Science 34 

Education and English Bible and Missions 35-36 

The Academy, Requirements for Admittance • . . . . 37-38 

Courses of Study 38-42 

Teachers' Preparatory and College Courses 44-48 

Saturday Courses for Teachers and Others 48 

Department of Oratory and Public Speaking 49-50 

Conservatory of Music 51-53 

Expenses 54 

Department of Art 55 

Register of Students ..... . 56-64 

Summary of Students 65 

Register of Alumni and Alumni Officers 65-76 

Some Ways in Which You Can Help Lebanon Valley College .... 77 

What Money Can Do at Lebanon Valley College 77 

Journal Print, Annville, Pa.