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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

The 

Lebanon Valley College 

Bulletin 



Series III. APRIL, 1906 No, 2 



Catalogue Number 
19054906 



COLLEGE FOUNDED 1866 



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.^'^' 



Lebanon Valley College 
Bulletin 



CONTAINING THE 

FORTIETH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



1905-1906 



Annville, Pa., April, 1906 

Entered at the post-office^ Annville^ Pa., as second-class matter, 

January 24, 1904, under Act of July 16, 1894. 

Published quarterly by the Colleg-e. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Calendar 



1905—1906 

1905 
September 13, Wednesday, College year began. 
November 30 and December 1, Thanksgiving recess. 
December 23, Saturday, Christmas vacation began. 

1906 
January 3, Wednesday, Instruction began. 
January 22, Monday, Mid-year examinations began. 
January 25, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
January 26, Friday, First semester ended. 
January 29, Motiday, Second semester began. 
February 11, Sunday, Day of Prayer for Students. 
February 22, Thursday, Washington's Birthday— holiday. 
March 24— April 2, Spring vacation. 
April 3, Tuesday, Instruction begins. 
April 13, Friday, Anniversary of Kalozetean Society. 
May 4, Friday, Anniversary of Philokosmian Society. 
May 28, 29, 31, Senior final examinations. 
May 30, Wednesday, Memorial Day — holiday. 
June 2, Saturday, 7:45 p^ m., Freshman contest in declamation. 
June 4-9, Final examinations. 

June 9, Satufday, 7:45 p. m., Shakespeare's "As You Like It." 
June 10, Sunday, 10:15 a. m., Baccalaureate sermon. 
6:00 p. rn., Campus praise service. 
7:00 p. m., Annual address before the Christian 
Associations. 
June 11, Monday, 7:30 p. m., Commencement of Music Department. 
June 12, Tuesday, g:oo a. m., Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
7:30 p. m.. Alumni banquet and reunion. 
June 13, Wednesday, 10:00 a. m.. Fortieth Annual Commencement. 

1906—1907 

1906 
September 10 and 11, Examination and registration of students. 
September 12, Wednesday, College year begins. 
November 29, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. Anniversary of Clio- 

nian Literary Society. 
November 29 and 30, Thanksgiving recess. 
December 22, Saturday, Christmas vacation begins. 

1907 
January 9, Wednesday, Instruction begins. 
January 28, Monday, Mid-year examinations begin. 
January 31, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
February 1, Friday, First semester ends. 
February 4, Monday, Second semester begins. 
February 10, Sunday, Day of Prayer for Students. 
February 22, Friday, Washington's Birthday — holiday. 
March 29 — April 1, inclusive, Easter recess. 
June 12, Wednesday, Forty-first Annual Commencement. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



The Corporation 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President A. P. Funkhouser, and Faculty, Ex-Officio. 

TERM 
NAME RESIDENCE EXPIRES 

Representatives from Pennsylvania Conference 



*Rev. EzekielB. Kephart, D.D., LL.D., 

Rev. J. S. Mills, D.D., LL.D., 

Rev. Daniel Eberly, D.D., 

Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, A.M., 

Rev. John E. Kleffman, A.B., 

William A. Lutz, 

John C. Heckert, 

Henry Wolf, 

Rev. Arthur B. Statton, A.M., 

George C. Snyder, 

William O. Appenzellar, 

Cyrus F. Flook, 



Annville, Pa. 
Annville 
Hanover 
Chambersburg 
Carlisle 
Shippensburg- 
Dallastown 
Mount Wolf 
Hag-erstown, Md. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Chambersburg 
Myersville, Md. 



Representatives from East Pennsylvania Conference 

William H. Ulrich, Hummelstown 

Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D.D., Dayton, Ohio 

Benjamin H. Engle, Harrisburg 

Henry H. Kreider, Annville 

Charles E. Rauch, A.B., - Lebanon 

Rev. Henry S. Gabel, Dayton, Ohio 

Maurice E. Brightbill, Annville 

Jonas G. Stehman, Mountville 

Rev. D. D. Lowery, Harrisburg 

Samuel F. Engle, Palmyra 

Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph.D., Reading 

Simon P. Light, Esq., A.M., Lebanon 

Valentine K. Fisher, A.B., Berne 

George F. Breinig, Allentown 

Representatives from Virginia Conference 

John H. Maysilles, A.M., Schenectady, N 

Rev. Silas D. Skelton, Edinburg, Va. 

Rev. a. p. Funkhouser, B. S., Harrisonburg, Va. 

Rev. J. R. Ridenour, Middletown, Md. 



1905 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1906 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1907 

1906 
1907 
1906 
1905 
1905 
1907 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1906 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1907 



Y. 1908 
1907 
1907 
1906 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A.M., BerkleySprings,W.Va.l907 

Rev. C. p. Dyche, Antioch, W. Va. 1906 

TRUSTEES-AT-LARGE— Hon. Marlin E. Olmsted, LL.D., Har- 
risburg; Mr. Frank Keister, Scottdale; Mr. Warren 
Thomas, Johnstown; Mr. Ezra Gross, Greensburg. 
ALUMNAL TRUSTEES— H. H. Baish, A.M., '01, Altoona; Rev. R. 
R. Butterwick, A.m., '01, Palmyra; Rev. E.O. Burtner, 
B.S., '90, Hummelstown. 
* Died Jan. 24, 1906. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Officers and Committees of the Board 



OFFICERS 
President . - - - Samuel P. Eng-le 

Vice-President - - - Rev. Daniel Eberly, D. D. 

Secretary - - - Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. D. 

Treasurer - - - William C. Arnold, A. M. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
A. P. Punkhouser Samuel F. Engle 

Isaac H. Albright Benjamin H. Engle 

Henry H. Kreider R. R. Butterwick 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Jonas G. Stehman Henry H. Baish 

Henry H. Kreider E. O. Burtner 

FACULTY COMMITTEE 
Daniel Eberly Simon P. Light 

Isaac H. Albright D. D. Lowery 

LIBRARY AND APPARATUS COMMITTEE 

J. S. Mills H. S. Gabel 

J. R. Ridenour R. R. Butterwick 

E. O. Burtner 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 
John H. Maysilles H. H. Baish 

E. O. Burtner 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 
Benjamin H. Engle George F. Breinig 

John H. Maysilles 

PRECEPTRESS— Miss Bessie Trovillo 

MATRON— Mrs. Violette Freed 

STEWARD— John H. Maulfair 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers 



*Eev. HERVIN ULYSSES ROOP, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., 
President and Professor of Philosophy ( iSgj ) 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., Dean, 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy ( 1887 ) 

Rev. JAMES THOMAS SP ANGLER, A.M., B.D., 

Professor of Greek Language afid Literature {i8g7^ 



Professor of English Literature {^8^7) 

Rev. benjamin FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A.M., 
Professor of Latin Language a?id Literature {i8gj) 

HERBERT OLDHAM, F.S.Sc, 

Director of the Department of 3Tusic, and Professor of 

Piano and Organ {i8g8) 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A.M., Seceetary, 
Professor of French and English {i8gg) 

THOMAS GILBERT McFADDEN, A.M., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics {1900) 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A.M., 

Professor of History and Political Science {1900) 

fHOWARD EDWARD ENDERS, M.S., 
Professor of the Biological Sciences {1900) 

EDITH H. BALDWIN, 

Principal of Art Depart-tnent {1900) 

Rev. lewis FRANKLIN JOHN, A.M., D.D., 
Professor of English Bible and Associate i?i Philosophy {1901) 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S., 

Acting Professor of the Biological Sciences ( 1903) 

♦Resigned January 1, 1906. Rev. A. P. Funkhouser elected President March 9, 1906. 
t Absent on leave. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty and Officers, Continued 



JOHN KAKL JACKSON, A.M., 

Professor of Voice and Public Speaking {1904) 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A.M., 
Principal of the Academy {1904) 

BESSIE TROVILLO, A.B., 

Professor of German Language and Literature {190^) 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, A.B., 

Principal of the Normal Departm,ent 

WILLIAM CALVIN ARNOLD, A.M., Registeae, 
Instructor in Sociology 

REBA FISHER LEHMAN, A.B., Libeaeian 

PAUL MOURY SPANGLER, 
Instructor in Phonography 

THOMAS S. STEIN, A.M., 
Assistant in Languages 

ANDREW BENDER, 

Assistant in Mathem,atics 

MILTON OSCAR BILLOW, 

Assistant in Academy 

DAVID W. McGILL, 

ALMA MAE LIGHT, M. S., 

ALVIN BINNER, M.E., 

Instructors in Normal Department 

Rev. WILLIAM J. ZUCK, D.D., 

College Pastor 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

History of the College 



Lebanon Valley College had its beginning- May 7, 1866, its organi- 
zation being the outgrowth of the action of the East Pennsylvania 
Annual Conference to establish a higher institution of learning in 
the church. An academy building in Annville was presented to 
the conference on condition that such an institution as contemplated 
be perpetually maintained, and it was in this building that the 
college was founded with an attendance of forty-nine, this number 
being increased to one hundred and fifty-three on the enrollment 
list by the close of the following year. 

In 1867 eleven additional acres of ground was purchased, and on 
August 23 of that year was laid the corner-stone of what was des- 
tined to be, until the close of 1904, the main building of the college. 
Unfortunately, the larger needs of the college of to-day were not 
anticipated, and a portion of the grounds was divided into building 
lots and sold. 

The new building contained the chapel, recitation rooms, presi- 
dent's office, and dormitory, with kitchen and dining hall in the 
basement. 

The building was furnished in time for closing exercises to be 
held in it at the close of the college year in 1868, although there 
was no regular commencement until June 16, 1870, when the first 
three graduates, William B. Bodenhorn, Albert C. Rigler, and Mary 
A. Weiss (Mrs. John R. Reitzel) received their diplomas. 

In 1883 a two-story frame building was erected on College Avenue, 
which contained library, museum, art room, accommodations for the 
science department, and several recitation rooms. This was used 
until 1900, when the addition of a large wing to the main building 
rendered it no longer necessary and it was removed. 

In 1899 was finished Engle Music Hall, the handsome gift of Mr. B. 
H. Engle. This hall is a three-story brown stone building, and con- 
tains chapel, the office and practice rooms of the music department, 
art room, and Kalozetean Literary Society hall. Here, too, the 
library and reading room found accommodations for six years. 

In 1904-1905 Mr. Andrew Carnegie presented to the college the 
beautiful library building elsewhere described, and in 1904 ground 
was broken on the Sheridan Avenue side of the campus for a new 
ladies' dormitory. 

A crisis in the history of the college came on December 24, 1904, 
when early in the evening fire broke out and swiftly swept away the 
entire main building. What a loss this was, may be realized when 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

we recall that at this time there were in this building- well-equipped 
chemical, physical, and biological laboratories ; a museum contain- 
ing many valuable specimens ; the president's office ; recitation 
rooms; Philokosmian hall, newly and beautifully furnished; dormi- 
tories for sixty students, and the heat plant for the entire institu- 
tion. A portion of the apparatus was saved, and a little of the 
recitation room furniture; but everything else, including the papers 
and records left in the office, and all of the students' property left 
in the rooms during the vacation, was totally destroyed. 

While the portion of the building containing the boiler was 
wrecked, the boilers themselves were fortunately not so badly in- 
jured but that they could in a short time be put in working order, 
and the opening of the winter term was delayed but a single week. 
There were left to the college in which to carry on its work the 
original building, for years used as a dining hall and ladies' dormi- 
tory; the music building, and the almost completed Carnegie 
library. What was left of the laboratory apparatus was transferred 
to the library basement ; seminar rooms in the library, one or two 
rooms in the ladies' hall, chapel and practice rooms in the music 
hall, were at once converted into recitation rooms; rooms in private 
homes in the village were donated to the college for dormitory 
purposes, and work was resumed at once with the loss of but a single 
student, who had gone home with the expectation of not returning. 

Meanwhile, how had the internal work proceeded? A charter was 
obtained in April, 1867, and a faculty organized with Thomas Rees 
Vickroy as president, and Prof. E. Benjamin Bierman, principal 
of a normal department for teachers. President Vickroy served 
until 1871, faithfully doing the pioneer work of establishing a 
curriculum and regulations for the college government. He was 
followed by Lucian H. Hammond, who served from 1871-1876, when 
failing health compelled him to resign. The third president was 
Rev. David D. DeLong, who served from 1876 to August, 1887. 
During his administration there was organized a musical department, 
from which the first class was graduated in 1882. 

There was an interregnum of several months after the resignation 
of President DeLong, the executive committee and faculty manag- 
ing the interests of the institution. In October, 1887, Rev. Edmund 
S. Lorenz was elected to the presidency, ably filling the position 
until the close of 1889, when his health failed and he was obliged to 
resign, his successor being Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart. President Kep- 
hart served but a year, declining a re-election. 

Certain discouraging conditions led to discussion concerning re- 
locating the college. It was at this juncture that the board of 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 9 

trustees elected Dr. E. Benjamin Bierman to the presidency. It 
was in the early part of his administration that the Mary A. Dodge 
scholarship fund for the help of worthy students was given to the 
college. President Bierman served until the spring of 1897, when 
he was succeeded by Dr. Hervin U. Roop, who held the office until 
January 1, 1906, after which time the administration of the college 
was in the hands of the executive committee and the faculty, 
until the election of the Rev. A. P. Funkhouser, March 9, 1906. 

During the successive administrations the work has grown from 
its original small proportions to the creditable conditions indicated 
by the various courses of study outlined in the present issue of the 
Bulletin. 356 have been graduated in the literary department, 
and 88 in music. The faculty from eight members in the beginning 
has increased to its present number, 13 professors and 13 instructors. 

Three literary societies have been organized among the students, 
two for young men, the Philokosmian, organized in 1867, and the 
Kalozetean, in 1877 ; and one for young women, the Clionian, organ- 
ized in 1872. 

The regular publications of the college are the Bulletin, issued 
quarterly by the faculty ; and the College Forum, published since 
1888 by the students. 

Immediately after the fire President Roop secured from Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie, who had already presented the college with the 
library building, a gift of $50,000, on condition that a like amount be 
secured from friends of the institution. The work of rebuilding was 
at once begun, and by the opening of another year the work will no 
longer be handicapped by the external conditions existing since the 
fire ; but spacious and handsome accommodations will be furnished 
in the different buildings elsewhere described, for the various depart- 
ments of Lebanon Valley College. 

The directors of the college are a board of trustees elected from 
the Pennsylvania, Eastern Pennsylvania, and Virginia annual con- 
ferences, and from the alumni association. 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

General kiformation 



Buildings and Grounds 



There are six building-s on the campus in use, the Carnegie 
library, the Engle music hall, the women's dormitory, the men's 
dormitory, the academy building, and the heating plant. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, a building of the Gothic style of 
architecture, was erected in 1904. It contains reading rooms, stack 
rooms, and seminar rooms, together with a large assembly room, at 
present used for general lecture purposes, and later intended to be 
converted into a stack room. 

THE ENGLE MUSIC HALL, of Hummelstown brownstone, 
erected in 1899, contains the college chapel, used for all large college 
gatherings, a director's office and studio, practice rooms, a large 
society hall, and a room for the department of art. The building is 
well equipped with pianos and a large pipe organ. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY was erected in 1905, and is a 
building of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms which will 
accommodate forty-five students, there are a society hall, a dining 
hall, a well equipped kitchen, and a laundry. 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY is a modern structure of brick with 
Indiana limestone trimmings. It contains single and double rooms 
and sixteen suites of two bed rooms with a separate study room. 
These afford accommodations for eighty-five students. This building 
was also erected in 1905. 

THE ACADEMY BUILDING, the original building of the insti- 
tution, and acquired by gift in 1866 when the college was founded, is 
now used as a dormitory and recitation hall for the academy students. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, is in harmony with the 
buildings above described. It contains a low pressure heating sys- 
tem of the most perfect construction and supplies the heat for all 
the buildings on the campus. It is constructed with a view to the 
installation of a light plant. 

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, finally to be the most 
important and central of the buildings, is now in course of construct- 
ion. It is built of buff brick with terra cotta trimmings, three stories 
high. It is to contain the recitation rooms of the college and the 
laboratories of the science department. The department of art is 
also to find here commodious and modern quarters. The administra- 
tive offices of fire proof construction are on the first floor. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

To accommodate all of these buildings, the campus, originally of 
ten acres, has been recently enlarged by purchase. It occupies a 
high point in the centre of the town of Annville and is within easy 
access of all trolley and railroad lines. 

The athletic field of five and one half acres, is well located and 
admirably adapted to the purposes for which it is intended. On it 
are erected a good grand stand and bleachers. 



Religious Work 



Recognizing that most of its students come from Christian fam- 
ilies, the college has always tried to furnish religious training. It 
believes in cultivating the heart as well as the mind, and encourages 
all wholesome means of promoting Christian influence. 

Each school morning, a regular service is held in the college 
chapel, at which the students are required to be present. At this 
service there is singing, reading of scripture, and prayer. Members 
of the faculty conduct this service. 

A students' prayer meeting is held once a week, and opportunities 
for Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian asso- 
ciations in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

A Bible Normal class is conducted to train Sunday school teachers. 
The course extends over one year and a diploma is granted to all 
who complete the course. 

All resident students of the college are required to attend public 
worship in churches of their choice every Sunday. 

The religious life during the past year has been earnest and help- 
ful, and patrons may feel satisfied that high moral influences are 
being exerted constantly over their children. 



College Organizations 



Associations 



Christian '^^® college has flourishing Young Men's and 

Young Women's Christian Associations, which hold 
regular weekly devotional services and conduct 
special courses of Bible and mission study, often in charge of 
members of the faculty. 

These organizations frequently are visited by the general secre- 
taries, who infuse enthusiasm into the work. Membership is voluntary, 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

and the success of these societies is an almost certain index of the 
natural condition of the religious life at Lebanon Valley College. 

Under their auspices numerous public lectures, entertainments, 
and socials are held, so they contribute incalculably to the pleasure 
of the student body. They are the centre of the spiritual welfare of 
the students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with the 
college. 

Literarv Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and 

. . parliamentary training are afforded by the societies of 
ocie es ^^^ college. There are three of these societies — one 
sustained by the young ladies, the Clionian; and two by the young 
men, the Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. They meet every Fri- 
day evening in their well furnished halls for literary exercises con- 
sisting of orations, essays, and debates. These societies are con- 
sidered valuable agencies in college work, and students are advised 
to unite with one of them. 

Athletic "^^^ Athletic Association is composed of all 

. . students and others connected with the college, who 

pay the required athletic fee. It elects besides its 
own officers, the managers of the various athletic teams. 

The direct supervision of athletics is in the hands of the committee 
of the association, called the executive board of athletics. This 
board is made up of seven members as follows: Two members of the 
faculty of the college; the president of the association, who is ex- 
officio president of the board; the base ball, foot ball, and basket ball 
managers, and the treasurer of the association. 

Bioloeical "^^^ Biological Field Club offers to any student of 

the college an opportunity to collect, study, and 

*® " discuss objects of interest in the field of living 

nature. Frequent excursions are made to places of special interest 

to members of the club. 

Historical '^^® Historical Society of Lebanon Valley College is 

organized by the students who have elected the his- 
*^*® ^ torical-political group together with such others as 
may be especially interested in historical studies. The purpose of 
the organization is to stimulate among the students the spirit of 
historical research. Members of the society are collecting material 
for a museum, which will be arranged in proper form as soon as 
suitable provision can be made in one of the new buildings. The 
society holds stated meetings, at which papers are read and subjects 
of historic importance are discussed. The members of the society 
from time to time visit places of historic note. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

> 
Modem Lan- ^^ order to stimulate interest in the study of 

^, , the modern lang-uages, at the request of the 
sudse Club o o 7 -a 

* ^ junior and senior students of the modern lan- 

g-uage g"roup, a club has been formed under the direction of the 

adviser of the group. The club meets every third Saturday evening- 

or afternoon as occasion suggests. Student programs alternate with 

lectures by the teachers in the department. 

Library and Reading Rooms 

The beautiful new Carnegie library building furnishes commod- 
ious quarters for the growing library of the college. Each depart- 
ment has its particular books for reference in addition to the large 
number of volumes for general reading and study. An annual 
amount is appropriated by the board of trustees for the purchase 
of new books, and plans are being made for the enlargement of the 
library in order to meet the growing needs of the college. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted 
and ventilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the 
leading* magazines and daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the 
special work of each department are here, as well as magazines of 
general literature. On the second floor are six seminar rooms, 
designed to be equipped with the special works of reference for the 
various departments, where students doing the most serious work 
may study undisturbed. 

Laboratories 



Since the disastrous fire, December, 1904, the laboratories have 
been temporarily housed in the basement of the Carnegie library. 

The department of biology occupies the southeast room, and 
chemistry the remainder of the basement. 

Owing to the extremely temporary nature of the quarters, little in 
the way of permanent equipment, as lockers and extensive plumbing, 
has been put in. Two rooms on the second floor of the Carnegie 
library have been provided for laboratory work in physics, while a 
third is utilized as an apparatus room. 

Literary and Musical Advantages 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of 
hearing lectures and talks delivered by resident professors and men 
of note in church and literary circles. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The department of music together with the department of 
public speaking presents a number of programs during the year for 
the pleasure and benefit of the general student body. Concerts and 
recitals by prominent musicians are given under the patronage of 
the department of music with the aim of creating in the student an 
appreciation for the best in art. 

For the last two years a lively interest in dramatics has been 
aroused and sustained largely through the production of Shakes- 
pearean plays under the direction of the department of public 
speaking. Various college organizations have likewise presented 
plays of a high grade. These efforts in production help to broaden 
the interests of the student and to increase his powers for aesthetic 
appreciation. 

A further means of enjoyment and education is the evening course 
of five numbers including lecturers and concert performers under 
the management of the Christian associations of the college. 



Scholarships 

The college offers a limited number of one-hundred-dollar free 
tuition scholarships to honor graduates of State normal schools and 
approved high schools and academies. One scholarship is allotted to 
the first honor graduate of our own academy. 

Graduates of high schools and academies whose standard is not 
equal to that of our own academy, may enter the senior year of the 
academy and become competitors for our own academy scholarship. 

Honor graduates of preparatory schools who have conditions, may 
be allowed to make them up in the freshman year. If the first 
semester's work shows a majority of A's and nothing less than B in 
all work including conditions, a scholarship may be awarded. 

The faculty shall make all scholarship awards. 



Graduate Work 



Since all its members are fully occupied with undergraduate work, 
the faculty deems it unwise to offer any work for the degree of Master 
of Arts during the coming year. In rare cases sufficient resident 
work upon certain advanced courses given may be outlined. But as 
special action would be required in each case, no detailed announce- 
ment can be made here. All inquiries about graduate work should 
be addressed to the registrar. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Administration 



AAxii^t^ The following are the advisers for the students in 

each of the five groups in which courses of instruct- 
ion are offered: For the classical group, Professor Spangler; for the 
philosophical, Professor John; for the chemical-biological, Professor 
McFadden; for the historical-political, Professor Shenk ; for the 
modern language. Professor Schlichter ; for the freshman class, 
Professor Daugherty, and for the academy. Professor Spessard. The 
students of each group are amenable to the adviser in all matters of 
conduct, study, and discipline. He is to grant leave of absence, 
permission to go out of town, and excuses. His approval is necessary 
before a student may register for or enter upon any course of study, 
or discontinue any work. He is the medium of communication 
between the faculty and the students of his group, and in 
a general way stands to his students in the relation of friendly 
counsellor. 

It is earnestly desired that students may be in- 
Discip me iiuenced to good conduct and diligence by higher 
motives than fear of punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the 
courteous and generous feelings natural to young men and women 
engaged in literary pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators 
of conduct. It is the policy of the administration to allow in all 
things as much liberty as will not be abused, and the students are 
invited and expected to co-operate with the faculty; but good order 
and discipline will be strictly maintained and misconduct punished 
by adequate penalties. The laws of the college are as few and 
simple as the proper regulation of a community of young men and 
women will permit. The college will not place its stamp or bestow 
its honors upon anyone who is not willing to deport himself becom- 
ingly. Every unexcused absence from any college duty, every 
failure or misdemeanor of a student, is reported to the faculty, and 
a record made of the same. 

The maximum number of hours, conditioned, 
^ permitted for senior standing is four ; for 

junior standing six, for sophomore eight, and for freshman — to be 
decided for individual student by the committee on classification. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work above that pre- 
scribed by the curriculum is limited by the student's record for 
previous years as follows : 

(a) Majority of A's, nothing less than B — no limit. 

(b) Majority of B's, nothing less than C — four hours. 

(c) Lower record than (b) — no extra hours. 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The scholarship of students is determined by 

Class Manaing j-ggult of examinations and daily recitations 
combined. The grades are carefully recorded. 

Reports of standing will be made to parent or guardian at end of 
each term when desired by them, or when the faculty deems it 
expedient. The standing is indicated generally by classification in 
six groups, as follows : 

A signifies that the record of the student is distinguished. 

B signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C signifies that the record is good. 
. D signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (conditioned) imposes a condition on the student. Conditions 
incurred in January must be made up by June ; conditions incurred 
in June must be made up by September. Failing to make up a 
condition at the time appointed is equal to a record F. 

F (failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or 
repeat the subjects, and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent 
thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to 
repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year, or to withdraw. 

Deeree '^^® degree of bachelor of arts is conferred, 

by a vote of the board of trustees on recom- 
an ip oma mendation of the faculty, upon students who 
have satisfactorily completed any of the groups. 



Expenses 



COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 

Matriculation Fee, payable in advance $5.00 per year 

Tuition — Twenty hours' work or less, in college,' . . 50.00 per year 
Twenty-four hours 'work or less, in academy, 50.00 per year 
Additional hours of work will be charged for at rate of $1.50 
per each hour per semester. 

Graduation Fee, payable 30 days prior to commencement . . $10.00 

Laboratory Fees per semester : 

Biology $6 00 

Histology 5 00 

Embryology 5 00 

Comparative vertebrate anatomy 6 00 

Botany 2 00 

Physiology 2 00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

Chemistry 1 , 5 00 

Other courses in chemistry ; . . . 6 00 

Physics 1 5 00 

Elementary physics 3 00 

TABLE BOARD AND ROOM RENT 
Table Board— Regular students, $104.00 per year ; $2.80 per week. 
Five-day students, $74.00 per year ; $2.00 per week. 
Room Rent $40 to $60 per year, 

varying- as one or two students occupy one room and accord- 
ing- to location of room. 

Students rooming- alone at their own request will be required 
to pay full rent of the room. 

A reduction of one half of the reg'ular fifty dollar tuition fee will 
be made to children of ministers in the active work. 

When two children are in attendance from the same family, a 
discount of 10% from the regular tuition is made. 

Two bills will be presented during- the year, one at the beginning 
of each semester. 

Payments are due in four equal installments as follows : October 
1, December 1, February 15, and April 15. 

All payments, if possible, should be made by check, draft, or 
money order, and should be made in favor of Lebanon Valley College. 

No extension of time will be granted for the payment of bills unless 
a written application 07t forms to be provided by the treasurer, is made be- 
fore the dates set for their payments. 

No reduction will be made in tuition and room rent for a semester 
except for protracted sickness. 

Table board will be charged only for actual time in attendance, 
but no reduction will be made for an absence of less than a week. 

A deposit of three dollars will be required of !each dormitory 
student upon entering- school, to cover any damage to room during 
year. Any unexpended balance will be returned to student at end 
of year. 



Departments 



Lebanon Valley College comprises the following well organized 
departments : 

THE COLLEGE offers five groups of study leading to the degree 
of bachelor of arts. The groups bear the names of the leading 
subjects included in them. The following are the names of the 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

groups : The classical, the philosophical, the chemical-biolog-ical, 
the historical-political, and the modern language. 

THE ACADEMY provides a three years' course designed to Jit 
young people for the freshman class in any college. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC offers full courses in instru- 
mental and vocal music and grants diplomas to those who com- 
plete either of the courses. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ART provides thorough instruction in 
drawing and painting, with the aim of improving and developing 
the aesthetic sense. 

THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT has been organized to provide 
a training school for teachers. 

Admission to the College 



There are three methods of admission to the college. 

I. FROM THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. All students 
who have satisfactorily completed the work of the academy are 
admitted to the freshman class without examination. 

II. BY CERTIFICATE. Graduates from Pennsylvania State 
normal schools and from approved high schools and academies are 
ordinarily admitted to freshman class without examination, upon 
presentation of properly prepared certificates. Satisfactory certifi- 
cates must state the length of time spent in any subject, text used, 
and grade attained. Credit will be granted only for the amount 
of work certified. 

Grades and certificates from other colleges of good standing will 
be accepted for admission to higher college classes. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificates 
of honorable dismissal. 

III. BY EXAMINATION. Candidates for freshman class not 
provided with certificates mentioned above will be examined in the 
following subjects : 

German — (German may be substituted for Greek) grammar, 
books under German a and German b. 

History — History of Greece, Rome, and the United States. The 
following texts will indicate the amount required: Meyer's History 
of Greece; Meyer's Rome: Its Rise and Fall, second edition, ex- 
tended to A. D. 800; McMaster's History of the United States; 
Fiske's Civil Government. 



GENERAL INFORMATION ^ 19 

Science — Physical Geography (Davis); Physiolog-y (Martin); Bot- 
any (Gray); Elementary Physics with laboratory course. 

English — Sykes's Eno-lish Composition and Hill's Foundation of 
Rhetoric are used in our own academy. 

Candidates for admission to the freshman class must have passed 
these works or their equivalent to satisfy the entrance requirements 
in rhetoric. 

Candidates will also be examined in the following- courses as 
outlined by the committee on uniform college entrance requirements: 

I. For g-eneral reading- for the years 1906, 1907, 1908: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice; 
Coleridg-e's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Scott's Lady of 
the Lake; Georg-e Eliot's Silas Marner; Irving-'s Life of Goldsmith; 
Tennyson's Idyls of the King-. 

For the years 1909, 1910, 1911: Group I. (Two to be selected.) 

Shakespeare's As You Like It, Henry V., Julius Caesar, The 
Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Nig-ht. 

Group II. (One to be selected.) 

Bacon's Essays; Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I. ; The 
Sir Roger De Coverley Papers in the Spectator; Franklin's Autobio- 
graphy. 

Group III. (One to be selected.) 

Chaucer's Prologue; Spenser's Faerie Queen, (selections); Pope's 
The Rape of the Lock; Goldsmith's The Deserted Village; Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury (First Series) Books II. and III. with especial atten- 
tion to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected.) 

Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield ; Scott's Ivanhoe ; Scott's 
Quentin Durward ; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables ; 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond ; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford ; Dickens's A 
Tale of Two Cities ; George Eliot's Silas Marner ; Blackmore's 
Lorna Doone. 

Group V. (Two to be selected.) 

Irving's Sketch Book ; Lamb's Essays of Elia ; De Quincey's 
Joan of Arc and the English Mail Coach : Carlyle's Heroes and Hero 
Worship ; Emerson's Essays (selected) , Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 

Group VI. (Two to be selected.) 

Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner; Scott's The Lady of the Lake; 
Byron's Mazeppa and The Prisoner of Chillon ; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series) Book IV. with especial attention to Words- 
worth, Keats, and Shelley ; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome ; Poe's 
Poems ; Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal ; Arnold's Sohrab and 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Rustum ; Long-fellow's The Courtship of Miles Standish ; Tenny- 
son's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of 
Arthur ; Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They 
Brought The Good News from Ghent to Aix, Evelyn Hope, Home 
Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of 
the French Camp, The Boy and the Angel, One Word More, Herv^ 
Riel, Pheidippides. 

II. Study and Practice — This part of the examination pre- 
supposes the thorough study of each of the works named below. The 
examination will be upon subject matter, form, and structure. In 
addition, the candidate may be required to answer questions 
involving the essentials of English grammar, and questions on the 
leading facts in those periods of English literary history to which 
the prescribed works belong. 

The books set for this part of the examination will be : 

For the years 1906, 1907, 1908 : 

Shakespeare's Julius Caesar ; Milton's Minor Poems, L'Allegro, 
II Penseroso, Comus, and Lycidas ; Burke's Conciliation with 
America ; Macaulay's Essay on the Life of Samuel Johnson ; Macau- 
lay's Essay on Milton. 

For the years 1909, 1910, 1911 : 

Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L'Allegro, 
and II Penseroso ; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration ; Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

Mathematics — Arithmetic; Algebra through Quadratics ; 
Plane and Solid Geometry. 

Latin — Grammar, including Prosody ; Caesar, four books, or 
two books, and an equivalent for two, Sallust, Nepos, and Viri Romae ; 
Cicero, five orations, including Pro Archia ; Virgil, five books of the 
^neid. Equivalents from other authors will be accepted in part. 
Latin prose composition, Bennett's or Allen's or their equivalent ; 
reading at sight of easy passages from Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil. 
Grammar : Allen and Greenough's, Harkness's, or Bennett's. 

Greek — Grammar (Goodwin) ; Anabasis, four books; Greek 
prose composition, twenty exercises of Jones, or their equivalent; 
Iliad, three books. 



OUTLINE OF COURLES 



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Mathematics 2 
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Bible 1 
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22 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 







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German 2 3 
French 2 3 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 1 3 
English 2 1 
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French 2 3 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 2 3 
English 2 1 
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Philosoiihy 1 3 
English 2 1 
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Philosophy 2 3 
English 2 1 
Biology 1 ; or ) . 
Chemistry 1 / 
Elective 6 




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Mathematics 3 3 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 1 3 
English 2 1 
* Elective 7 


Mathematics 3 3 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 2 3 
English 2 1 
Elective 7 


* Biology 1 or chemis- 
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Philosophy 1 3 
Latin 2 ; or \ „ 
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German 2 3 
History 1 3 
English 2 1 
Biology 1 ; or ) . 
Chemistry 1 / ^ 


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Latin 2 ; or \ „ 
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German 2 3 
History 1 3 
English 2 1 
Biology 1 ; or \ . 
Chemistry 1 ( ^ 




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Latin 2 3 
Greek 2 3 
German 4 4 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 1 3 
English 2 1 


Latin 2 3 
Greek 2 3 
German 4 4 
History 1 3 
Philosophy 2 3 
English 2 1 




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OUTLINE OF COURSES 



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German 3 2 
French 3 3 
English 3 4 
English 5 3 
Economics 1 3 
Philosophy 4 2 


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French 3 3 
English 4 4 
English 6 3 
Philosophy 4 2 
Elective 3 




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Economics 1 3 
Philosophy 4 2 
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English 3 4 
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Economics 2 3 
Philosophy 4 2 
English 4 4 
Elective 5 




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Biology;2 ; or \ . 
Chemistry 2 j 
Mathematics 4 3 
Economics 1 3 
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Chemistry 3 J 
Mathematics 5 3 
Elective 10 




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Philosophy 3 2 
Philosophy 4 2 
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English 3 4 
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English 4 4 
Economics 2 3 
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Economics 1 3 
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English 4 4 
Elective 11 


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24 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 





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English 7 2 
English 9 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 3 2 
Elective 7 


English 8 2 
English 10 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 5 2 
Elective 7 




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History 4 3 
History 5 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 3 2 
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History 6 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 5 2 
Sociology 2 
Elective 4 




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Physics 1 4 
Bible 3 2 
* Elective 10 


Physics 1 4 
Bible 5 2 
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hrs. 
Philosophy 5 2 
Philosophy 6 2 
Philosophy 7 2 
History 5 3 
Bible 3 2 
Elective 5 


Philosophy 5 2 
Philosophy 7 2 
History 6 3 
Bible 5 2 
Elective 7 




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Philosophy 5 2 
History 4 3 
Bible 3 2 
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Philosophy 5 2 
History 4 3 
Bible 5 2 
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DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 25 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Philosophy 



PROFESSOR JOHN. 

1. Logic — Three hours. First semester. 

This course presents the elements of deductive logic, laying- espec- 
ial emphasis on the formal and material fallacies. Hyslop's Elements 
of Log-ic with Minto's Logic for consultation on special topics. 

2. Psychology — Three hours. Second semester. 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the elements 
of psychology and to serve as a general introduction to the study of 
philosophy. 

.3. Psychology of Religion — Two hours. First semester. 

The aim is to find a religious meaning in the biological processes. 
A study is made of conversion as a normal event, of the conversion 
period, of* the phenomena of conversion so as to control them in 
religious education. 

Starbuck is used as a guide. James, Coe, Hall, etc., as references. 

4. History of Philosophy— ^\fQ hours. Throughout the year . 
Special attention will be given to the problems of philosophy in 

their rise and historic development, through ancient, mediaeval, and 
modern periods. The aim will be to form the habit of philosophic 
thinking. 

Text : Roger's History of Philosophy. Reference to general his- 
tories of philosophy, and periodicals. 

5. Ethics — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

[a] Metaphysical Ethics — Lectures, theses, and discussions. 

The main problems of ethics will be studied, chiefly with reference 
to their bearings on life. The more important psychological and 
sociological data will be presented. The question of the relation of 
the individual to society will be treated, and the metaphysical im- 
plications discussed. 

{b) Applied Ethics — The lectures of this course will be devoted to 
a discussion of the practical value of the ethical ideals given by 
utilitarianism, testheticism, optimism, sociology, and culture. There 
will be considered the individualistic applications of these ideals, 
and the personal virtues. The lectures will keep in view the mutual 
bearings of practical ethics and Christian civilization. 

References : Aristotle, Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Mackensie, Sidgwick, 
and others. 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

6. Esthetics — Two hours. First semester. 
Recitations, lectures, and theses. 

7. >A System of Philosophy — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
The object of this course is two-fold : (a) To acquaint the student 

with some of the great systems of philosophy ; (b) To give a sys- 
tematic drill in philosophic thinking. This includes a survey of all 
the great problems of philosophy, a thorough study of the solutions 
given by the authors used as a guide, and a comparison with the 
solutions in other systems. 

Recitations, lectures, and theses. 



Greek Lansuage and Literature 

PROFESSOR SPANGLER. 

1. Freshman Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Herodotus: Selections from several of the books are read. Review 

of the Greek historians and the Persian Wars. Greek prose com- 
position. 

Plato: Apology and Crito, Plato and his dialogues, The Athenian 
Courts. 

New Testament Greek: Readings in the Pauline epistles. 

2. Sophomore Greek— Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon: Memorabilia, or Demosthenes: De Corona. Socrates 

and the Socratic schools. The Attic orators. 

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus, or Aeschylus: Prometheus Bound. 
Development of the Greek drama. Greek tragedy, comedy, and 
theater. 

3. Junior Greek — Three hours. Second semester. 
Aristophanes: Clouds, or Euripides: Alcestis or Orations of Lysias. 



LaLin Language and Lit>erat»ure 

PROFESSOR DAUGHERTY. 

1. Freshman Latin— Four hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Livy: This course includes Book XXI. and parts of Book 
XXII. describing Hannibal's advance upon Rome to the battle of 
Cannse. The author's style and peculiarities of syntax are studied. 
Prose composition based upon the text. Special chapters of Roman 
history are assigned. Wilkin's Roman Antiquities. Grammar is 
reviewed. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 27 

(b) Cicero: De Senectute (1907,) or De Amicitia (1906) is read. 
Special studies in syntax and prose composition based upon the text. 

(c) Horace: Selections from the Odes and Epodes. A careful 
study is made of the poetical contructions, historical and illustrative 
facts, an analysis of the thought and general interpretation of each 
ode and epode read. The meters of Horace are carefully studied. 

2. Sophomore Lafm—Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Horace: Satires and Epistles. Selected satires and epistles; 

Ars Poetica. Special attention will be paid to the argument, style, 
and character portrayal, also their place in literature. Historical 
outlines of Roman literature. Bender's text and lectures. 

(b) Tacitus: Germania and iVgricola. The historical and literary 
importance of both are brought out in the study of these works. 

(c) Quintilian. Books X. and XII. This course aims to give a 
comprehensive view of the principles of rhetoric and oratory as 
taught by the Romans. This course alternates with course 2b. 

3. Ju7iio7 Latin — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Cicero: De Officiis. This text is made the basis for the study of 
ethics as taught by Cicero and his predecessors. 

(b) Plautus and Terence. Selected plays are read from these 
authors. 

(c) Juvenal. This course alternates with 3b. Selected satires 
are read and are made the basis for a study of the character of the 
times. 

4. Senior Latin — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Cicero's Letters. May be arranged for semester or year as 
determined by the class at the beginning of the year. A study of 
the character and career of Cicero is made from selected letters 
and from other historical and biographical sources. 

(b) Remnants of Early Latin, (Allen and Egbert,) or Cicero De 
Oratore may be taken up as elective in senior year. 



Modem Languages 

Thejwork in these languages is very practical. The languages are 
taught as living tongues reflecting the races who use them. French 
and German are used in the class-rooms as much as possible so that 
the students may have a good conception of these languages as 
actually used, and so that they may get as much enthusiasm as 
possible for a permanent interest in these tongues. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



PROFESSOR SCHLICHTER. 

1. Elementary Course — Three hours. Throug-hout the year. 
French Grammar (Fraser and Squair) ; Contes et L^gendes (Part 

I); French reader (Aldrich and Foster); Mairet: La Tache du Petit 
Pierre M^rim^e: Colomba ; La Biche: La Grammaire; Emile 
Girardin: La Joie Fait Peur. 

2. Second Year Course — ^Three hours. Throughout the year. 
French Composition (Jeanne Bouvet); Moliere: L'Avare; Beau- 

marchais: Le Barbier de Seville; Eugene Scribe: Les Doigts de F^e; 
Edmond About: Le Rois des Montagues; Corneille: Cinna; Racine: 
Athalie; Rostand: Les Romanesques; Guy de Maupassant: Contes 
Choisies. Conversation. 

3. Third Year Course — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
M^ras: Syntaxe Pratique; Moliere: Le Misanthrope, Le Bourgeois 

Gentilhomme; Racine: Andromaque, Les Plaideurs; Corneille: Hor- 
ace, Polyeucte; Hugo: Hernani; De Vigny: Cinq-Mars; Dumas: Les 
Trois Mousquetaires; Copp^e and de Maupassant: Selected Tales 
(Cameron); or Balzac: Eugenie Grandet; Chateaubriand: Atala; 
Sainte-Beuve: Selected Essays; or. Super: Histoire de France; 
French Lyrics (Canfield's collection); Pailleron: Le Monde ou L'on 
S'Ennuie. Conversation. Lectures on each author read. 

4. Seventeenth Century Literature — 

Warren: Selections from Descartes, La Rochefoucauld, Bossuet, 
La Bruydre, Pascal; Moliere: Amphitryon, Le Malade Imaginaire, 
Le M^decin Malgr4 Lui, Tartuffe, Les Femmes Savantes; Racine: 
Brittanicus, Ph^dre, Iphig^nie, Berenice, Esther; Corneille: Le 
Menteur, Le Cid, Pomp^e; Faguet: Seventeenth Century Studies; 
La Fontaine: Fifty Fables; Madame de S^vigne: Selected Letters; 
Boileau: L'Art Po^tique; Gasquet: French Readings of the Seven- 
teenth and Eighteenth Centuries; Lanson: La Vie de Corneille; 
Monceaux: La Vie de Racine; Durand: La Vie de Moliere. (Open 
to all who have completed Course 3 with high credit.) Elective in 
senior year for students of modern language group. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



PROFESSOR TROVILLO. 

1. Freshman German— Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Reading, and class discussion, which as far as possible is carried 
on in German, of the following: Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 29 

Nathan der Weise; Heine's Harzreise and selected poems; Baum- 
bach's Der Schwiegersohn; Heyse's L'Arrabbiata; Schiller's Maria 
Stuart. 

There is more or less German composition and grammar review 
in connection with all the texts read. Special emphasis is put on 
acquiring the vocabulary of domestic German life such as is found in 
Der Schwiegersohn. 

2. Sophomore German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Reading of Scheffel's Ekkehard, Fouque's Undine, Storm's In 

St. Jiirgen and Wenckebach's Meisterwerke des Mittelalters. In 
connection with the latter lectures on early German literature up to 
the 14th century will be given. 

3. Junior Germa^i — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the life of Goethe and his relation to German literature, 
based on the reading of Dichtung und Wahrheit and lectures. Read- 
ing of Goethe's Gotz von Berlichingen, Iphigenie, Goebel's selected 
poems; general survey of Hermann und Dorothea and Faust (with 
selected readings). 

4. Special Sophomore German — Four hours. Throughout the year. 
This course is arranged for students who have a knowledge of both 

Greek and Latin. It includes a rapid but thorough study of Joynes- 
Meissner's Grammar, and the reading of the following or their 
equivalents : Wenckebach's Gliick Auf, Storm's Immensee, 
Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell, together 
with constant exercise in conversation and composition. 



English Language and Literature 

PROFESSORS N. C. AND E. W. SCHLICHTER. 

1. The Theory and Practice of English Compositiofi — Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes a thorough study of rhetoric and extensive 
writing of short and long themes. There will be lectures and con- 
ferences, and the following text-books will be studied : Scott and 
Denney's Paragraph Writing, Wendell's English Composition, 
Lewis's The Forms of Prose Discourse, and Genung's Working Prin- 
ciples of Rhetoric. 

2. English Composition and History of English — One hour. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes the writing and delivery of an oration each 
term, other long themes, and lectures on the history of the English 



30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

languag-e. Text-books : Arlo Bates's Talks on Writing- Eng-lish, 
(two volumes.) 

Required of all sophomores who do not take English 2a and open 
only to those who have had English 1. 

2a. Argumentation — One hour. Throughout the year. 

This course includes brief drawing, much oral and written argu- 
ment, and a study of Baker's Principles of Argumentation and Baker's 
Specimens of Argumentation. 

This course may be taken only by sophomores who have the spe- 
cial consent of the department. 

3. History of English Literature — Pour hours. Pirst semester. 
A comprehensive survey of the history of English literature will 

be given by means of lectures, reference to leading critics, and out- 
side reading of representative selections or complete works of the 
leading English authors from the earliest times to the present. Text- 
book : Moody and Lovett's History of English Literature. The fol- 
lowing is the reading list for 1905-1906 : 

Beowulf (selections) ; (*)Clfaucer: Prologue, Knight's Tale, Nun's 
Priest's Tale; Malory: King Arthur, Books I. and XL; (^) Spenser: 
Faerie Queen, Book I. ; Shakespeare : As You Like It, (*) Hamlet, 
Richard the Third, The Tempest; Marlowe: The Jew of Malta; 
Ben Jonson : The Alchemist; Bacon's Essays (selected); (*) Milton: 
Paradise Lost, Books I. and II., Sonnets ; Dryden : Palamon 
and Arcite, (*) Alexander's Feast ; Swift : Gulliver's Voyage to Lilli- 
put ; Pope : (*) Essay on Man ; Johnson : Milton ; Goldsmith : She 
Stoops to Conquer, The Traveller, The Deserted Village ; Gray's 
Elegy ; Burns : Cotter's Saturday Night and (*) other poems ; Lamb's 
Essays (selected) ; Carlyle : Hero as Prophet. In Page's British 
Poets of the Nineteenth Century " are studied representative poems 
of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Landor, 
Tennyson, The Brownings, Clough, Arnold, Rossetti, Morris, and 
Swinburne. Scott's Kenil worth, Dickens's Tale of Two Cities, 
Thackeray's Vanity Fair, and George Eliot's Adam Bede are 
studied with outlines furnished. Works marked (*) and the nineteenth 
century poets are read as a whole or in part in class ; other works 
read outside and merely discussed in class. 

4. History of American Literature — Four hours. Second 
semester. 

Course 4 follows course 3, applying similar methods to the study 
of American literature. Text-books : Trent's American Literature, 
Bronson's American Literature, and Wendell's Literary History of 
America. 



DEPARTMENTS OE INSTRUCTION 31 

An amount of reading- similar to that of course 3 is required. 

5. The English Drama to i6oo — Three hours. First semester. 
(Omitted in 1906-07.) 

This course combines the theory of the drama and the history of 
the Eng-lish drama to 1600. Proper perspective is secured by tracing 
in lectures dramatic development from the time of the Greeks. At 
the end of the course the main tendencies since 1600 to the present 
time are briefly outlined. Manly's two volumes of Pre-Shakespear- 
ean Specimens are studied ; Woodbridge's Technique of the Drama 
is used, and typical plays of Lyly, Peele, Nash, Greene, Marlowe, 
Jonson, and Shakespeare are read. References are also made to the 
best contemporary dramatic criticism. 

6. Poetics — Three hours. Second semester. (Omitted in 1906-07.) 
In this course the theories of Aristotle, Horace, Vida, Boileau, 

Jonson, Sidney, Dryden, Addison, Shelley, Hunt, Coleridge, Hazlitt, 
and Arnold are studied, and poetry is studied technically. Each stu- 
dent prepares his own book of extracts from the later epic on, which 
is made the basis of work in scansion. The aim above all else is to 
create a love for poetry built upon a sound mental foundation. 
Gummere's Handbook of Poetics and Saintsbury's Loci Critici. 

7. Old English — Two hours. First semester. 

This course aims to give the student an elementary knowledge of 
English in its oldest form and to fit him for advanced university work 
in English philology. Smith's Old English Grammar ; all the select- 
ions in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader except The Phoenix. 

8. Middle English — Two hours. Second semester. 
Extensive reading of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (editions of 

Morris and of Skeat in the Clarendon Press Series). Students must 
be acquainted with French, and Old English is desirable for the suc- 
cessful prosecution of this course. Pollard's Chaucer Primer and 
Emerson's Middle English Reader are also used. 

9. The Novel and Literary Criticism — Three hours. First 
semester. 

The history and nature of the novel will be studied in this course 
and an introduction to the principles of criticism will be given. 
(Students will be expected to read the following list of English novels 
in their chronological order) : Sidney's Arcadia, Bunyan's Pil- 
grim's Progress, Swift's Tale of a Tub, Defoe's Captain Single- 
ton, Richardson's Pamela, Ann Radcliffe's Mysteries of Udol- 
pho, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Scott's Ivanhoe, 
Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Thackeray's Vanity Fair, Dick- 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ens's David Coppe'rfield, Trollope's Barchester Towers, George 
Eliot's Middlemarch, Stevenson's Treasure Island. Text- 
books: Winchester's Principles of Criticism and Perry's Study of 
Prose Fiction, 

10. Shakespeare — Three hours. Second semester. Critical read- 
ing of four of the leading plays. Rolfe's editions will be used. 
Students will also study Dowden's Shakespeare Primer and Sidney 
Lee's Life of Shakespeare. 



Mathematics and Astronomy 



MATHEMATICS 



PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

1. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. First semester. 
Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the 

binomial theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, 
permutations and combinations, etc. Hawkes' Advanced Algebra. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry — Four hours. Second 
semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and 
oblique triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and 
heights. Wentworth. 

Development of trigonometric formulae, solutions of right and 
oblique spherical triangles, with applications to astronomy. Went- 
worth. 

3. Analytic Geometry — ^Three hours. Throughout the year. 
The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and 

hyperbola are studied, and so much of higher plane curves and of 
the geometry of space as time will permit. Wentworth. 

4. Differential Calculus — Three hours. First semester. 
Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 

and minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, 
envelopes, etc. Osborne. 

5. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second semester. 
Integrations, rectifications of curves, quadrature of surfaces, 

cubature of solids, etc. Osborne. 

6. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plot- 
ting, leveling, etc. Wentworth. 



. ; DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 33 

7. Differe7itial Equations — Three hours. First semester. 
A course in the elements of differential equations. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, 4, and 5. Murray. 

8. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second semester. 
Bowser. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 7. • 

ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

1. General Astro7wmy — Four hours. First semester. 

The department is provided with a fine four-and-a-half-inch 
achromatic telescope equatorially mounted, of which the students 
make free use. Young. 

History and Political Science 

PROFESSOR SHENK 

1. Medicsval and Modern History — Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

A general course prescribed in all the groups. Papers, special 
reports, and theses, based on available original sources, will be 
required of all students. Robinson : History of Western Europe ; 
Readings from European History. 

2. English Economic History — Three hours. First semester. 
The economic life and development of the English people during 

mediaeval and modern times. Special attention will be given to the 
manor system, the guilds, growth of commerce, the industrial 
revolution, the rise of trade unions, and the relation of government 
to industry. Cheyney : The Industrial and Social History of Eng- 
land ; Gibbins : Industry in England. 

3. English Constitutional History — Three hours. Second 
semester. 

The English Constitution and its historical development. A 
careful study of important documents will be made. Taswell-Lang- 
meade : Constitutional History of England. 

4. United States Constitutional History — Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A full course covering the colonial and constitutional periods. 
An extensive reading course of original and secondary sources is 
required. Channing : Students' History of the United States 
Macdonald : Select Charters; Macdonald: Select Documents. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

5. Historical and Practical Politics — Three hours. First semester. 
The development of the leading- governments of the world, and 

a comparative study of the same. Woodrow Wilson : The State. 

6. The Theory of the State — Three hours. Second semester. 

A course on the nature and end of the State. Willoughby : The 
Nature of the State. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 



PROFESSOR SHENK AND MR. ARNOLD 

1. Economics — Three hours. First semester. 

A general course in economic theory, supplemented by consid- 
eration of practical current problems. The standpoints of the 
different schools will be carefully considered. Bullock : Introduc- 
tion to the Study of Economics. 

2. Current Labor Problems — Three hours. Second semester. 

A course devoted principally to the important labor problems of 
the present day: strikes, labor organizations, employers' associa- 
tions, arbitration, trade agreement, labor legislation, etc. 

3. Current Monopoly Problems — Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the theories of monopoly, the tendencies of capital- 
istic combinations, government ownership of natural monopolies, 
railway combinations, etc. Courses 2 and 3 will alternate. 

4. Sociology — Two hours. Second semester. 

This course is intended to give the student a knowledge of the 
various theories of society together with the place of sociology in 
the general field of learning. 

English Bible and Missions 

BIBLE 

PROFESSOR JOHN 

1. New Testament — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Inductive study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as 

contained in the Gospels [1906-7] . 

2. New Testament— T^Ro hours. Throughout the year. 

The Acts and Epistles. Attention is given to the geographical 
and historical incidents in the life of Paul. A careful inductive 
study will be made of some of the Pauline Epistles [1907-8] . 

3. Old Testament — Two hours. First semester. 
Inductive study of the Old Testament laws [1906-7] . 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 35 

4. Old Testament Prophecy I. — Two hours. First semester 
[1905-6]. 

5. Old Testament Prophecy II. — Two hours. Second semester 
[1906-7] . 

Courses 4 and 5 will cover Old Testament prophecies. They will 
be studied inductively in their chronolog-ical and historical setting-. 

6. The Psalms and Old Testament Wisdom — Two hours. Second 
semester [1907-8] . 

Hebrew psalmody will be studied as literature and as an expres- 
sion of the national and religious life of Israel. Proverbs, Job, 
Ecclesiastes, and Lamentations will be taug-ht, with a comparative 
study of the Apocryphal books, Ecclesiasticus and the Wisdom of 
Solomon. 

MISSIONS 

PROFESSOR JOHN 

1. History of Missions — Two hours. First semester. 

The aim will be to give an outline of the history of Christian 
missions from the earliest days to the present time. 

2. Study of Mission Fields — Two hours. Second semester. 
Africa was the subject for 1905-6, Japan for 1904-5. 

3. Home Missions — Two hours. Second semester. 

This will include the problems of the city, of immigration, of 
organized forms of evil opposed to the church, etc. 

4. Religious Psychology and Pedagogy — Two hours. First 
semester. 

This will embrace the study of man as a religious being, special 
attention being given to the child. A critical examination of 
present methods of religiooas education as used in the Sunday school, 
and of the Sunday school curriculum in the light of pedagogical 
psychology. 

Courses 1 and 2 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores ; 
courses 3 and 4, for juniors and seniors. 



Biology 



PROFESSOR ENDERS AND ACTING PROFESSOR DERICKSON 

1. General Biology — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

To be preceded by Course 1 in drawing. The course consists of 
three recitations and four laboratory periods throughout the sopho- 
more year. In this course the work in the laboratory will begin with 



,36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

a study of the simpler forms of animal and plant life, and complete 
dissections will be made of several phyla of plants. Some of the ani- 
mals studied will be amoeba, paramecia, vorticella, hydra, star fish, 
earth worm, lobster or cray fish, mussel or clam, grasshopper or 
cricket, and the frog". The class- work will cover all the objects 
studied in the laboratory, together with additional forms. 

Students contemplating the study of medicine and surgery are 
advised to elect Courses 2 and 3, and, if possible, Course 4. 

Parker's Elementary Biology. Laboratory Guide: Dodge's Ele- 
mentary Practical Biology. 

Note books and drawing paper are jDrovided. 

2. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — Four hours. Throughout 
the year. Five hours' laboratory work and one lecture or quiz each 
week. 

This course consists of the dissection and thorough study of a 
number of vertebrates. Typical forms, such as the laniprey, eel, 
skate, mud puppy, turtle, pigeon, and rabbit are dissected. 
Carefully made drawings are required of each student as a record of 
each dissection. Text : Parker's Zootomy and Martin's Hand-book 
of Vertebrate Dissection. 

Assigned studies in Parker and Has well's Zoology and Wieders- 
heim's Comparative Anatomy. 

3. Histology — Four hours. First semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The 
course is essentially that offered in medical schools leading to the 
medical degree. The class work will cover the normal histology of 
the human body, while the laboratory work will consist of the study 
and description of microscopic preparations showing cell structure 
and karyokinesis, the various kinds of epithelium, connective tissues, 
muscle, adenoid, vascular, and nerve tissues. The blood and the 
blood-forming organs, the intestinal, the reproductory and genito- 
urinary org'ans, the skin and dermal appendages, the central nervous 
system, the special senses are then fully considered, and numerous 
microscopic preparations representing different methods of fixation 
and staining will be carefully studied. Text-book : Huber's Text- 
book of Histology, Bohm-Davidoff. Laboratory Guide : Huber's work 
on Histology. 

4. Comparative Embryology of Vertebrates — Four hours. Second 
semester. 

Three recitations and four laboratory periods weekly. The lab- 
oratory work will be based on the development of the chick, supple- 
mented by the pig and other embryological material. Students will 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 37 

be required to stain, imbed, section, mount, and study embryos of 
various periods of incubation, and prepare notes and drawings of 
same. 

5. Zoology — -Four hours. First semester. 

Three hours and two laboratory jDeriods weekly. This course 
'consists in the study of the structure, classification, habits, and dis- 
tribution of invertebrate and vertebrate animals with special refer- 
ence to influence of environment, and adaptation, and to the general 
principles of organic evolution. 

GEOLOGY 

1. Gener-al Geology — Four hours. Second semester. 

This course includes a study of the forces at work within and 
upon the crust of the earth, the rock-forming materials of crust and 
their arrangement into strata, and the historical successions of forma- 
tions. Instruction is given by lectures and recitations. The ground 
covered is approximately that laid down in Scott's Introduction to 
Geology. 

Chemistry 



PROFESSOR MCFADDEN 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Throughout the 
year. 

This course consists of two lectures, one quiz, and four hours of 
laboratory work a week. Its object is to give the student a compre- 
hensive and accurate knowledge of general chemistry and to lay a 
stable foundation for advanced work in that science. 

The ground covered is that laid down in Remsen's College Chem- 
istry which is used as the text for recitations and the guide for labo- 
ratory work. 

2. Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. First semester. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 1. This course consists of one lecture 

and a minimum of eight laboratory hours a week. The object of the 
course is to familiarize the student with the best methods of separa- 
ting and detecting- the common metals and acids, and give him a 
broad view of the underlying principles of separation based upon the 
electrolytic theory. 

The student's accuracy is tested by unknowns at each step ; the 
analysis of an extended series of complicated mixtures, alloys, and 
minerals completes the course. 

H. L. Wells' Qualitative Analysis is used as a laboratory guide, 
but constant reference ismade toFresenius and other standard works. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

3. Quantitative Analysis— Yomv hours. Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 2. The work of this course includes 

one lecture or quiz and a minimum of eight hours of laboratory work 
a week. Its object is to give an introduction to quantitative analysis. 
Accuracy is insisted upon as a first requisite. 

The course includes the determination of chlorine, iron, sulphur, 
and phosphorous, the analysis of limestone, calibration of volumetric 
apparatus, and preparation of standard solutions. 

Text: Morse's Exercises in Quantitative Analysis. 

4. Quantitative Analysis — Four hours. First semester. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. This is a continuation of course 3. 

The work is entirely individual, and while quite flexible, ordinarily 
includes the preparation of pure salts, assay of iron ores, electrolytic 
separations, carbon di-oxide, silicates, and fertilizers. 

This course may be extended throughout the year. 

Text: Morse's Exercises in Quantitative Analysis, with constant 
reference to Fresenius, Blair, Lord, and others. 

5. Water Analysis — Four hours. First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. This includes a study of sources of 

water supply, methods of purification, and relation to health, tog'ether 
with practical laboratory work in the chemical and bacteriological 
examination of local water supplies. 

Text: Mason's Water Supply, with supplementary lectures. 

Laboratory work requires a minimum of eight hours a week. 

6. Organic Chemistry — Four hours. First or second semester. 
Three lectures and four laboratory hours a week. 

Text: Remsen's Organic Chemistry. 
Not offered 1906-7. 

Physics 

PROFESSOR MCFADDEN 

1. General College Physics — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

The course includes two lectures, one quiz, and four laboratory 
hours a week. 

Texts: Ames's Text Book of General Physics, and Ames and 
Bliss's Manual of Experiments in Physics. 

Education 

PROFESSOR JOHN 
1. History of Education — Two hours. First semester. 
Beginning with the oriental nations, a survey will be made of the 
leading systems of education, in connection with the forces which 
produced them, and their influence upon culture as a whole. Mon- 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 39 

roe's History of Education is used as a guide. Painter's History of 
Education, Compayre's History of Pedagog-y, and Quick's Educa- 
tional Reformers will be used as references. 

2. Psychology and Philosophy of Education — Two hours. Second 
semester. 

Educational principles will be subjected to the test of psychology 
and philosophy. Texts: Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, 
Harris's Psychologic Foundations, Tompkin's Philosophy of Teaching. 

Department of Oratory and Public Speaking 

PROFESSOR JACKSON 

The art of oratory rests upon certain laws of nature, and it is the 
purpose of the department to present the work with this aim in view. 
The value of public speech iis recognized and emphasized as a most 
powerful agency and as an avenue to usefulness. 

In the instruction special stress is laid upon originality and the 
development of individuality. Elocution is taught as the oral inter- 
pretation of literature — and a high standard of selections is main- 
tained. The full course consists of three years — including the re- 
quired year in the college. Students with previous training may fin- 
ish it in less time. 

Course of Study 

I si Year. {Required — Fresh^nan Year.) 

Elocution. — Types of literary interpretation. Principles of ex- 
pression. Modulation, emphasis, pitch, tone, quality, gesture, simple 
calisthenics, breathing, readings, extempore speaking. 

Interpretation and analysis of classics : Longfellow's Miles 
Standish, Dickens's Christmas Carols, Orations of Washington 
and Lincoln, Tennyson's Enoch Arden, Goldsmith's She Stoops 
to Conquer, Shakespeare's As You Like It. No text book. 

2d Year. {Special work.) 

Tone production, oral exercises, physical culture, emotional de- 
velopment, vocal psychology, gesture and pantomime, analysis of 
standard works, reading and recitation of selections , private work. 
Text: Southwick's Elocution and Action. 

^d Year. {Special work.) 

Philosophy of expression, history of oratory, melody and speech, 
advanced voice development, dramatic training, characterization , 
monologues, cuttings from standard authors, oration work, extem- 
pore speaking, interpretation of Shakespeare, Browning, etc., pri- 
vate work. Text : Raymond's Orator's Manual. 
Private Lessons 

Persons who do not desire to graduate or take an entire course 
may arrange for lessons singly or by the term. In this case the work 
will be arranged to suit the individual needs of the student. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Academy 



THE FACULTY 



HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A. M., Principal, 
Mathematics and English ^ 



Rev. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., 
G^^eek. 



ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
German. 



Rev. benjamin FRANKLIN DAUGHERTY, A. M., 
Latin. 



Physics. 

NORMAN COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, A. M., 

English. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., 

History. 



Rev. lewis FRANKLIN JOHN, A. M., D. D., 

Bible. 



EDITH H. BALDWIN, 
Drawing. 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M. S. 

Physiology and Botany. 

MILTON OSCAR BILLOW, 

Instructor in English. 



THE ACADEMY 41 



Plan and Purpose 



The academy is a distinct department of the college. The in- 
structoKS are all college trained men with years of experience. The 
purpose of the present instruction is to prepare young- men and women 
for our own and other colleges, and for technical schools. Mathe- 
matics, three years' Eng-lish, English grammar, theme writing and 
business forms, the ancient classics, history, and commercial geo- 
graphy are required. 

At least a year's course in book-keeping is now required of 
every student. 

Hereafter graduating exercises will be held and diplomas will be 
presented to such as satisfactorily complete the regular academy 



Entrance Requirements 

Scholars from the public schools should have completed the eighth 
or grammar grade. No examination will be required in the common 
branches unless the candidate shall have neglected to present his 
grades from the school previously attended. A list of passing grades 
should be signed by the principal in charge. In case no grades are 
presented, an oral examination is given by the principal in arithmetic, 
English grammar, history, geography, physiology, etc. The candi- 
date will then be entered on trial. 



Class Stranding 



Examinations are held at the end of each semester. Daily 
grades are recorded and frequent tests are given. Soon after the 
semester examinations reports are sent to the parents or guardians 
of all academy students. Any irregularities or violations of the regu- 
lations of the academy will be indicated in the deportment grade. 

A, is distinguished ; B, is very good ; C, is good : D, is passing 
grade ; E, is conditioned ; F, is failure. 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Out>line of Courses 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Arithmetic — Advanced drill in fractions; short cuts and 
percentage. 

Algebra — Wentworth's New School Algebra begun. 

Longmaft's English Grammar, and the careful study of five Eng- 
lish classics. 

Commercial Geography. 

United States History — Completed in first semester. 

English History — Begun in second semester. 

Beginner's Latin and Ccesdr. (One book). 

Academic Physiology — Laboratory work required. 

Book-keeping — Business practice with actual notes, checks, drafts, 
and vouchers according to best double entry system. 

Beginner's Greek — Second semester. (Optional). 

Students intending to enter the classical course in college may 
take Greek in the second semester, discontinuing book-keeping and 
omitting commercial geography. 



MIDDLE YEAR 

Algebra — New School Algebra completed during the first 
semester. 

Geometry — Wentworth's, second semester. 
English Composition — Sykes's Five Classics. 
History — Myers's Greek and Roman. 
Latin — Csesar and Cicero. 
Greek, German, or Frefich. 
Civics and Drawing. 



SENIOR YEAR 

Geometry — Plane and solid completed. 

Efiglish — Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric, five classics, and com- 
position exercises. 

Physics — Laboratory work required. 
Botany — Field and laboratory work. 
Latin — Virgil. 
Greek — (Homer), German, or French. 



THE ACADEMY 



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English c 3 
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Science c 2 
Latin c 5 
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44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



English 

(a) Junior English — Three hours. Throug-hout the year. Long- 
man's Eng-lish g-rammar and five English classics. 

{b) Middle Year English — Three hours. Throug-hout the year. 

The year is devoted to the careful study of The Merchant of 
Venice, Julius Csesar, Macaulay's Life of Addison. Idyls of the King-, 
and The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner. 

Sykes's Elementary Eng-lish Composition is used in connection 
with theme work. 

(r) Sejiior English — Three hours. Throug-hout the year. 

Hill's Foundations of Rhetoric and composition exercises. 

Carlyle's Essay on Burns, Burke's Speech on Conciliation, 
Shakespeare's Macbeth, Macaulay's Essay on Milton, Milton's Comus, 
Lycidas, L'Alleg-ro, and II Penseroso. 

German 

{a) Beginning German — Five hours. Throug-hout the year. 

Grammar and Gliick Auf, first semester ; Hoher als die Kirche, 
Germelshausen, and composition, second semester. 

Required in second year of all students preparing- for all groups 
except classical. 

{b) Second Year German — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

The following books or their equivalents will be read : Leander's 
Traumereien (sight) ; Storm's In St. Jiirgen ; Meyer's Der Schuss 
von der Kanzel and Das Amulett ; Schiller's Wilhelm Tell ; Goethe's 
Hermann und Dorothea. Composition. Required in third year 
of students preparing- for all groups except classical. 



French 



{a) Beginner's Course — Eraser and Squair's French Grammar 
(Part I.), Snow and Le Bon's Easy French, Aldrich and Foster's 
French Reader. Easy exercises in turning English into French. 
Elements of pronunciation. 

{b) Secondary Course — Eraser and Squair's French Grammar 
(irregular verbs), Bruno's Tour de la France, About's La Mere de la 
Marquise, with additional reading according to circumstances. More 
advanced composition work. Thorough attention to pronunciation. 



THE ACADEMY 45 

Latin 

{a) Junior Year Latin — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Collar and Daniell's first year Latin is completed and one book 
of Caesar's Gallic War is read. The aim is to give a thorough drill 
on Latin inflections, to master the meaning and forms of a limited 
number of words, and to translate easy sentences into good idiomatic 
English. Composition. 

{b) Middle Year Latin — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Caesar, books ,11. -IV., or ^their equivalent. Cicero, five orations, 
including Pro Archia. Grammar and prose composition. Texts : 
Caesar, Allen and Greenough ; Cicero, Allen and Greenough. 

[c] Senior Year Latin — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Virgil, books I.-V., prosody, Beren's Mythology, Bennett's prose 
composition. Text : Virgil, Greenough and Kittredge. 



Greek 

{a) Beginning Greek — Five hours. Throughout the second 
semester. 

White's First Greek Book. 

[b] Second Year Greek — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Xenophon, four books of the Anabasis. Greek prose composition. 

{c) Third Year Greek — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Homer, three books of the Iliad, epic poetry, mythology, Greek 
antiquities, Greek literature, and Greek prose composition. 



History 



{a) United States History — Three hours. First semester. Pri- 
marily a review. 

McMaster's History of the United States. 

{b) English History — Three hours. Second semester. 

Parker's Essentials of English History is the text. 

[c] Greek History — Three hours. First semester. 

Myers's History of Greece. 

{d) Roman History — Three hours. Second semester. 

Myer's Rome : Its Rise and Fall. 

{e) Civics — One hour. Throughout the year. 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Mathematics 



(a) Arithmetic— ThvQQ hours. Throug-hout the year. Mental 
and commercial, advanced, fractions, short cuts, decimals, [and per- 
centag-e. This course is not elementary in any particular. 

[b) Algebra — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A careful drill f or beg-inners. Wentworth's New School Algebra, 
to simultaneous quadratic equations. 

{c) Algebra and Geometry — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

New School Algebra is completed at the end of the first semes- 
ter. Wentworth's Plane Geometry, books I. II., during second 
semester. 

{d) Geometry — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Wentworth's Plane and Solid Geometry is completed. Open 
only to students who have completed Mathematics c or its full 
equivalent. 

Science 



{a) Academic Physiology — Two hours. First semester. 

Martin's Human Body is the text. 

Some mammal will be dissected and the relation of the parts will 
be demonstrated to the class, while skeleton and charts will greatly 
aid in attaining a good knowledge of the subject. 
' {b) Commercial Geography — Two hours. Second semester. 

This course is of practical benefit to every young person. 

{c) Elementary Botany—Two hours. Throughout the year. 

In the beginning' of the course observations, careful drawings, 
and notes are made of the various stages in the germination of seve- 
ral representative seeds sown by the students themselves. Roots, 
stems, leaves, fruits, etc., are studied from the objects or from charts, 
so that the student may be prepared to begin systematic botany 
with the appearance of the early flowers. An herbarium of no less 
than seventy-five plants with full analyses will be required of each 
student, together with laboratory work in plant dissection and ele- 
mentary work injDlant histology and ecology. Several of the crypt- 
ogams will be studied in the laboratory. 

Two recitations and one laboratory period a week. 

{d) Elementary Physics — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The'fundamental principles of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, 
and light will be developed and discussed by experiments and reci- 
tations as thoroughly as time permits. 



THE ACADEMY 47 

In addition to class work, students will spend two hours a week 
in laboratory. Accurate notes are required. 

A working knowledge of algebra is required for admission to 
this course. 

Texts : Wentworth and Hill's Physics, Crew and Fatnall's 
Laboratory Manual of Physics. 

Drawing 

The purpose of this course is to give to all students of the middle 
year one hour each week in free hand pencil drawing in outline to 
prepare them properly for later work in science, geometry, etc. 

Under Courses 

Sometimes students of mature age come to us not fully prepared 
to enter the academy. They have for various reasons attended school 
but a short time and find it embarrassing- to enter the public schools 
with scholars so much younger than themselves. For these we fur- 
nish tutors from college classes. However, at least sixteen hours of 
regular academy work is required for academy classification. 

Facts To Be Considered 

A one hundred dollar scholarship is awarded each year to the 
academy graduate who has, according to the vote of the faculty, 
made the best class record and deported himself in accordance with 
the regulations of the academy. 

Academy students are admitted to all social privileges of the col- 
lege. Excellent opportunities are ofi'ered for self improvement in 
the literary societies and Christian associations. 

The Normal Department 

WESLEY M. HEILMAN, PRINCIPAL. 

The object of the Normal Department is to give special instruc- 
tion to young men and women who desire to teach in the public 
schools of the county and state. 

All the fundamental branches in which teachers are required to 
be examined are systematically and thoroughly reviewed and daily 
instruction is given in the principles of teaching and the art of 
school management. 

The work in the department is continued throughout the year. 
During the spring term, which begins about the time public schools 
close, special teachers are employed to accommodate the increasing 
numbers. These teachers are the best public school teachers obtain- 
able who know just what points to emphasize in preparation. 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



Faculty 

Herbert Oldham, F. S. Sc, Director, London, 
Piano, Organ, etc. 

J. Karl Japkson, A. M., 
Voice and Elocution. 

Etta Wolfe Schlichter, A. M., 
German. 

Norman C. Schlichter, A. M., 
French, Efiglish. 

Edith Baldwin, 
Painting, Di'azaing, 



Locat>ion and Equipments 

The Engle Music Hall is a handsome three-story stone structure. 
It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe organ, director's room, 
and nine practice rooms, waiting and writing room for student's use, 
large society rooms, lavatories, etc. Each class room is supplied 
with the necessary pianos, etc. The whole building is lighted by 
electricity and heated by steam, and designed and furnished with a 
view to having it complete in every respect for the study of music in 
all its branches. A complete musical education from the very first 
steps to the highest artistic excellence may be secured. The director 
will use every effort to obtain positions for those students who have 
finished the courses, and who may wish to teach or perform in public. 



Object 



The department has for its object, the foundation and diffusion 
of a high and thorough musical education. The methods used are 
those followed by the'leading European conservatories. The courses 
are broad, systematic, progressive, and as rapid as possible,! and the 
conservatory offers the means for a complete education in musical 
art at moderate cost. 

Herbert Oldham, Director 

Director Oldham was born near London and educated there. He 
was choir boy in Christ Church Cathedral from the age of six years 
to that of seventeen. Studied the pianoforte, harmony, pipe organ. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 49 

and voice, under Sir R. P. Stewart. After completing the academic 
course in Trinity Colleg-e, Dublin, he studied pipe organ and com- 
position with Sir John Stainer, organist of St. Paul's, London, the 
pianoforte with Sir Walter McFarren, of Cambridge University, and 
voice training with Signor Randegger, London. Later he went to 
Frankfort where he studied under Joachin Raff ; from there to Paris, 
studying under Emil Haberbier. In 1883 Professor Oldham toured 
through the United States as solo pianist to Camilla Urso, playing 
in two hundred and ninety-seven cities and towns. He then 
located in Toledo, Iowa, as director of the conservatory of Western 
College. Later he lived in Lincoln, Nebraska, and left Le Mars, 
Iowa, to take the direction of Lebanon Valley College Department 
of Music. 

Prof. John Karl Jackson 

Professor Jackson is exceptionally well fitted for the position of 
instructor in voice and elocution. He is an academic graduate of Red- 
ding College (Illinois), also of Harvard University. He studied music 
for two years in Knox Conservatory of Music (Illinois), and several 
years in Boston under the best private teachers, such as J. Gilbert, 
M. Von Below, and others. He studied history and theory of music 
with J. K. Paine (Harvard), chorus training under W. A. Locke 
(Boston), and was prominent in musical organizations at Harvard, 
was soloist of the glee club, soloist several years in some of the 
principal churches in Boston, and has appeared frequently as 
concert singer both in the east and west. 

Pianoforte 



The course is divided into sixteen grades, equalling four grades 
per annum for four years, work. A comprehensive study of the stan- 
dard literature of instructive piano work is absolutely necessary to 
the piano student and these are studied through the various grades. 
The new school of studies edited by Carl Thumer and published in 
sixteen grades, along with Koehler's and Plaidy's Technical Exercises 
are the basis for the technical and etude work through all the grades. 

Voice 



It is the aim of this department to build up the voice, beginning 
with the simplest forms of pure tone production and proceeding sys- 
tematically to advanced vocalization. Perfect breath control, relax- 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ation, and correct tone placing are the cardinal points in voice cul- 
ture, and these are carefully and rig-idly insisted upon. Phrasing, 
enunciation, and resonance are also given important consideration in 
the course. Special attention is paid to the needs of individual 
voices, and the studies are varied accordingly. 

Organ 

The director has had twenty-five years' experience as concert and 
church organist, and has studied and played in Great Britain, Ger- 
many, and the United States. 

The student must be advanced to at least the sixth grade in the 
pianoforte course before taking up the study of the organ. 

The course prepared is based on the best methods of England, 
France, and Germany, and with a view to educating the student in the 
most thorough manner. Special attention is given to the proper 
modes of service playing, organ accompaniments, etc., as well as con- 
cert or recital playing. 

Harmony Course 

Is based on Brockhoven's Harmony and occupies four terms' 
work. It is taught in classes, but backward students can arrange for 
private lessons. 

Theory Course 

Is based on Elson's Theory and occupies three terms' class work. 

History Course 



Is based on Reimann's History of Music and Filmore's Lessons 
in Musical History, and occupies three terms of class work. 

Send to the director for separate catalogue of the Department 
of Music containing the complete"courses in all branches. 

LECTURES. — There will be lectures on musical history each 
term, and all regular students of the department will be required to 
attend them. 

CONCERTS. — Recitals and concerts by the students, the faculty, 
or leading artists, will be held at stated intervals throughout the 
year. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 51 

Certificates 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATES. 
Complete course in pianoforte or in any of the other subjects, 
viz., voice, organ, violin, harmony, theory, or history. 
Fee for certificate, $2.50. 

Diplomas 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DIPLOMAS. 

Complete selected course, viz., piano, organ, violin or voice. 

In case of piano or organ student, three terms voice. In case of 
voice student, three terms piano. Complete courses in harmony, 
history, and theory. Three terms each in chorus class, English 
grammar, rhetoric and composition, literature, French, or German. 

Free tuition in any one of the literary studies. Each candidate 
to give a public recital during last term. 

Fee for diploma, $5.75. 

Degree 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE. (Mus. B.) 

Candidates must already have taken a diploma. 

Must have freshman standing in any of the college courses. 

Two years, fugue, harmony, counterpoint, and composition. 

Must write a composition for four solo voices and chorus, to occupy 
about twenty minutes, and must train, rehearse, and conduct the 
same for public performance. 

Fee for degree, $10.00. 

Summer School 

A summer music school will be held beginning June 15, and end- 
ing September 1. 

Send for separate circular to the director. 

Examinations 



All students taking any of the regular music courses, will be com- 
pelled to take the various examinations held the second week of May. 
These examinations are for entrance into the various classes (sopho- 
more, junior, and senior) the following September. All senior 
students must take their final examinations at the same time. 

These will be held in the college chapel and are for perform- 
ance, not theory. A list of the various studies, selections, etc., can 
be obtained at any time from the director. 



52 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Expenses 



PRIVATE LESSONS. 


a 

i 

1 


a 
! 


bo 

1 


Voice, Piano, or Reed Organ, Two per week, by Director. 

Voice, Piano, or Reed Organ, One per week, by Director. 

Piano, Two per week, by Assistant, 

Piano, One per week, by Assistant, 

Harmony, 

Pipe Organ, Two per week, 

Pipe Organ, One per week. 


$22 50 
11 25 
15 00 
10 00 
15 00 
30 00 
15 00 


$18 00 
9 00 
12 00 
7 50 
12 00 
24 00 
12 00 


$16 50 

8 25 

11 25 

7 50 
11 00 
22 00 
11 00 


CLASS LESSONS. 




$5 00 
3 00 
3 00 




Harmony, One lesson per week. 

Theory, One lesson per week. 

Musical History, etc.. One lesson per week, 


$7 60 

3 00 
300 


$5 00 
3 00 
3 00 


USE OF INSTRUMENTS. 








Piano. One hour per day, 
Reed Organ, One hour per day. 
Pipe Organ, One hour per day, 


$2 50 

2 00 

3 00 


$2 00 

1 60 

2 50 


$2 00 

1 50 

2 50 



For cost of table board and room rent see page 17. 

Students taking- a full music course are charged a matriculation 
fee of $3.00 for the year, payable in advance. This fee entitles stu- 
dent to all privileges of the college. 

Students taking piano, organ, or voice only are charged a matric- 
ulation fee of $1.00, payable in advance. 

Pipe organ students must pay at the rate of 10 cents per hour for 
organ blower. 

Fee for graduation diploma, $5.75. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS.— No reduction is made for ab- 
sence from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent in- 
dividual absence. In case of long continued illness the loss is shared 
equally by the college and the student. 

All tuition is payable in advance. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., 
the beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade, 
will be issued at the close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combi- 
nation of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., address 

THE PRESIDENT, 
Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 53 

Departments of Art> 



Edith Herr Baldwin, Principal. 

Course of Study for Certificate 

First K?ar.— Drawing- in pencil and charcoal, from g-eometric 
solids and casts. Free-hand perspective. 

Second Year. — Drawing- from casts of heads. Painting in water 
colors and pastels from still-life and nature. Principles of desig-n. 
Pen and ink sketching-. 

Third K^^tzn— Sketching from life (draped model). Painting in 
oils from still-life and nature. Composition. History of art. 

The aim of the course is to develop a love for the beautiful, a 
knowledge of the good in art, and to lay a foundation for further 
study in academies and schools of art. 

Students who do not desire the certificate course may take 
special work along any line preferred. 

Classes in china-painting are instructed by the latest methods in 
conventional or naturalistic treatment. The china is fired in the 
studio, giving students an opportunity for learning how to fire their 
own china. 

Saturday work is offered for teachers and children who cannot 
take work during the week. 



Art> Exhibit, 



During commencement week an exhibit of some of the work done 
in the department is held in the studio, at which time all visitors are 
welcomed and entertained by members of the department. 

Expenses 

Matriculation Fee— to be paid in advance by all students 

except children in Saturday beginners' class, $1.00 

Painting in different mediums, one lesson per week, ..... 24.00 

two lessons per week 40.00 

Certificate Course, 40.00 

Drawing, one lesson per week, 12.00 

Teachers' Class in Drawing, 10.00 

Children's Beginning Class, 6.00 

Children's Advanced Class, 10.00 

Special Lessons, 75 



54 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
The College 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Buddinger, David D., 
Daug-herty, Urias J., 
Engle, Emma Frances, 
Lutz, Lewis Walter, 
Peters, Jacob Mark, 
Peters, D. Augustus, 
Sumner, Alfred C. T., 
Ulrich, Adam S., 
Ulrich, George A., 



SENIORS 



Bender, Andrew, 
Fry, Charles Adam, 
Gray bill, Robert B., 
Hambright, John Breneman, 
Harnish, Ora Mabel, 
Hershey, Ruth Mary, 
Hoover, Merle Montgomery, 
Kaufmann, J. Warren, 
Light, Ray Garfield, 
Martin, Ida May, 
Rissmiller, Isaac, 
Rupp, John Christian, 
Shenk, Cyrus E., 
Snyder, Emanuel E., 
Snyder, Max O., 
Spangler, PaulM., 
Strayer, John Curvin, 
linger, J. J., 



JUNIORS 



Bender, C. Ray, 
Esbenshade, Park F., 
Gehr, Elias M., 
Herr, William Eby, 
Herrman, Amos Wallick, 
Knauss, Edward Emanuel, 
Lehman, Max Fisher, 



Bellegrove 

Dallastown 

Hummelstown 

Dallastown 

Steelton 

Steelton 

Bonthe, West A 

Annville 

Philadelphia 

Dillsburg 

Annville 

Annville 

Florin 

Mechanicsburg 

Derry Church 

Chambersburg 

Mt. Carmel 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Pennsgrove, N. 

Liverpool 

Annville 

Yoe 

Liverpool 

Lebanon 

Winterstown 

Vineland, N. J. 

Halifax 
Bird in Hand 
Cedar Lane 
Annville 
Red Lion 
York 
Annville 



REGISTER OP STUDENTS 



55 



Lehn, Homer M. B., 
Metzg-er, Maurice Rutt, 
Miller, John Fred, 
Myers, Helen Ethel, 
Peiffer, Mary Elizabeth, 
Seitz, Irvin S., 
Shroyer, Effie Evelyn, 
Sprecher, John H., 
Waltz, Arthur Keller, 
Wauo-htel, Samuel H., 



Annville 
Middletown 
Dayton, Ohio 
Mt. Joy 
Lebanon 
Baltimore, Md. 
Shamokin 
Lebanon 
Chewsville, Md. 
Red Lion 



SOPHOMORES 



Appenzellar, Joseph Lester, 

Billow, Milton Oscar, 

Paus, Elias Arndt, 

Garlock, Anna Louise, 

Guyer, Roy Jones, 

Hartz, Roger Sherman Blaine, 

Knaub, Neda A., 

Kreider, Sallie Wenger, 

Linebaug'h, Norman Lester, 

Mills, A. Lucile, 

Morgan, Rufus E., 

Showers, John Balmer, 

Shupe, Erma, 

Stehman, Elizabeth Lucretia, 

Zuck, Alice M., 



Chambersburg' 

Shermansdale 

Manheim 

Hagerstown 

Shippensburg 

Palmyra 

New Cumberland 

Lebanon 

Derry Church 

Annville 

Valley View 

Annville 

Dayton, Ohio 

Mountville 

Annville 



FRESHMEN 



Black, Matthew B., 
Buffington, Lewis C, 
Daugherty, George C, 
Enders, Laura Alice, 
Pisher, Lawrence Machem( 
Plook, Albert Daniel, 
Hamilton, William Emory, 
Hoerner, Lena May, 
Hoffer, George Nissley, 
Kreider, Gideon Richie, Jr 
Long, Samuel Burman, 
Oldham, Stanley Reginald, 
Pickard, David P., 
Rechard, Elizabeth Hay, . 
Richter, George M., 



Avon 

Elizabethville 

Dallastown 

Elizabethville 

Bern 

Myersville, Md. 

Steelton 

Mechanicsburg 

Hummelstown 

Annville 

Hays Grove 

Annville 

Scottdale 

York 

Halifax 



56 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Saylor, John Adam, 
Shoop, Charles Wilson, 
Spessard, Roy Neff, 
Stehman, Jonas Warren, 
Steng-le, Verna I., 
Weidler, Deleth Eber, 
Yeatts, Edna Delilah, 



Annville 

Harrisburg- 

Chewsville, Md. 

Mountville 

Oberlin 

Hershey 

York 



UNCLASSIFIED 



Berlin, Margaret Davis, 
Bohr, Celia K., 
Bomberger, Harry K., 
Carnes, Patrick Joseph, 
Farley, Milford Garrett, 
Hodg-es, Elmer V., 
Lig-ht, E. Victor, 
Ludwick, Eber Esdras, 
Maxwell, Lawrence F., 
Moyer, Harry B., 
Newg-ard, Joseph M., 
Oldham, Constance, 
Ulrich, Elmer B., 
Wilder, Henry L., 



Tyrone 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Hingham, Mass. 

Asbury Park, N. 

Winchester, Va. 

Annville 

Reading 

Plymouth 

Palmyra 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Jeddo 

Hingham, Mass. 



The Academy 



SENIOR YEAR 



Brackbill, Harry G., 
Earnest, Richard B., 
Emery, Clyde Lewis, 
Erb, Clyde S., 
Freed, Edith Nissley, 
Hall, Bovey, 
Herr, Denver U., 
Herr, Lawrence DeWitt, 
Holler, LeRoy Otterbein, 
James, Carroll Frank, 
John, Rex Kephart, 
Kreider, D. Robert, 
Leininger, John F., 
Maulfair, Iva Berniece, 
Mease, Oliver, 
Mutch, J. Ralph, 



Kinzer 

Hummelstown 

North Clymer, N. Y. 

Hockersville 

Derry Church 

Westerville, Ohio 

Annville 

Annville 

Hummelstown 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Annville 

Annville 

Chambersburg 

Annville 

Onset 

New Holland 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



57 



Oldham, Cecelia Louise, Annville 

Pauxtis, Simon F., Edwardsville 

Rhoads, Kathryn C, Mt. Carmel 

Shaffer, Floyd E., Lebanon 

Stoner, Edwin Porter, Scottdale 

Stoner, Russell B., Hummelstown 

MIDDLE YEAR 

Andrew, Harry W., Strasburg" 

Bomberger, Amos Spayd, Palmyra 

Brenneman, Albert Sipe, Balfour 

Brenneman, Samuel Roy, Balfour 

Clippinger, Charles F., Shippensburg- 

Ellenberg-er, Joseph, Annville 
Ellis, William Otterbein, .. Annville 

Garrett, E. Myrtle, Hummelstown 

Herr, Mabel S. , Annville 
John, Dwig-ht Trefts, , Annville 

Lehman, John Carl, Annville 

Marshall, Jessie Read, Annville 

Shoop, William Carson, Wiconisco 

Showers, Nettie Mae, Claysville 

Singer, Bigler Miller, Elizabethtown 

Snyder, Duke Calvin, Liverpool 

Spessard, Earl Augustus, Annville 

Witman, Virginia May, Swatara Station 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



Beckley, Arthur S., 
Collins, Jeremiah Joseph, 
Daniel, Warren G., 
Dempwolf, William R., 
Engle, Ada Elizabeth, 
Fidler, Charles, 
Fishel, John H., 
Greensmith, Frederick Henry, 
Hall, Luther Columbus, 
Hawthorne, Paris F., 
Heilman, Jacob Ream, 
Jones, Thomas, 
Kelley, Rhoda, 
Landis, Frank Hiram, 
Light, Naomi R., 
McCurdy, Charles Emmett, 



Lebanon 

Hingham, Mass. 

Elizabethville 

York 

Hummelstown 

Shamokin 

Middletown 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

Westerville, Ohio 

Marietta 

Lebanon 

Shamokin 

Wilmore 

Falling Waters, W. Va. 

Lebanon 

Chambersburg 



58 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Major, Ralph Marshall, 
Miller, Charles W., 
Moyer, Morris M., 
Neary, John Joseph, 
Shenk, Samuel, 
Shenk, William, 
Smith, Harvey D., 
Smith, Herbert Alvin, 
Snyder, Verda Allena, 
Spessard, Lester Lewis, 
Wells, Mahlon Elias, 
Wert, Mark, 
Witman, Clayton C, 

Normal 

Bender, Harry, 
Black, Huo-h E., 
Dundore, Willis A., 
Heilman, Katherine, 
Himmelberg-er, Abraham M. 
Holzapfel, Cora Grace, 
Hostetter, Cyrus Grant, 
Kreider, Sarah, 
Lehman, Clayton G., 
Light, Boaz G., 
Lig-ht, Katie M., 
Light, Martin Good, 
Light, Milo, 

Reifsnyder, Nathan Kreider, 
Snavely, George J., 
Yoder, Claude A., 

Spring 

Artz, Mary, 
Aungst, Minnie, 
Behney, Jacob E., 
Bensing, Charles C, 
Bicksler, Anna, 
Bicksler, Virginia, 
Bohn, James, 
Bomgardner, Lizzie E., 
Bowman, Mabel M., 
Brandt, Clayton L., 
Ditzler, Noarth, 
Demler, Julia, 



Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Shamokin 

Annville 

Annville 

Jonestown 

Annville 

Keedysville, Md. 

Annville 

Philipsburg 

Millersburg 

Mt. Joy 

Department 

Annville 

Avon 

Avon 

Lebanon 

Heilmandale 

Cleona 

Annville 

Cleona 

Campbelltown 

Avon 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Brickerville 

Cleona 

Lebanon 



Term 1905 



Annville 

PinegTove 

Fredericksburg 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Fredericksburg 

Onset 

Lebanon 

Bismarck 

Lebanon 

Greenspoint 

Lebanon 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



59 



Eng-le, Elizabeth, 
Eng-lish, Matthew, 
Eshelman, Genevieve, 
Felty, Edna, 
Focht, Fannie, 
Gantz, Albert, 
Gemmi, Lillian W., 
Getz, Philip, 
Gingrich, Jacob, 
Gockley, Mary L., 
Goss, Dorothy B., 
Groh, Ida, 
Hartz, Ira G., 
Hauer, Mamie L., 
Heilman, Clara S., 
Heilman, Edith, 
Heilman, Georg-e E., 
Heilman, Harry, 
Heilman, William J., 
Hoffer, Irvin S., 
Holling-er, John, 
Lig'ht, Bertha G., 
Light, E. Victor, 
Lig-ht, Grace E., 
Light, Harry W., 
Light, Harrison D., 
Light, Oscar S., 
Long, Mabelle, 
Maulfair, Arthur, 
Mease, Harry, 
Mease, Mabel, 
Meily, Amanda, 
Meily, Mary, 
Meyer, Irvin C., 
Meyer, John K., 
Miller, Barbara, 
Miller, May E., 
Mock, Mabel, 
Moyer, Harry C., 
Neary, John Joseph, 
Nye, Carrie E., 
Philips, Katie G., 
Rank, Kathrvn, 



Hummelstown 

Philadelphia 

Jonestown 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Bismarck 

Annville 

Lickdale 

Richland 

Middletowm 

Heilmandale 

Palmyra 

East Hanover 

Cleona 

Cleona 

Cleona 

Annville 

Cleona 

Palmyra 

Schaefferstown 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Avon 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Jonestown 

Lebanon 

Onset 

Onset 

Jonestown 

Heilmandale 

Annville 

Schaefferstown 

Lebanon 

Bismarck 

Schaefferstown 

Newmanstown 

Shamokin 

Annville 

Onset 

East Hanover 



60 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Reist, Allen E., 
Seabold, Mary, 
Schropp, John, 
Seibert, William, 
Seltzer, Harry, 
Shaak, Alice M., 
Shelley, Daniel O., 
Sherk, John E., 
Sherk, John H., 
Smith, H. D., 
Snavely, Julia, 
Spang-ler, Abner C, 
Stag-er, Bertha M., 
Steckbeck, Grant, 
Stopfel, Jennie I., 
Struphar, Graybill, 
Umberger, Morris, 
Walters, Harry, 
Walters, Olive Iren 
Weng-er, Annie U., 
Zerbe, Mabelle, 



Lebanon 

Annville 

Pineg"rove 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Avon 

Cleona 

Fredericksburg 

Annville 

Jonestown 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Avon 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Annville 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Royalton 

Schaefferstown 



Department of Music 



p. — Piano ; V. — Voice ; O. — Pipe Organ. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 



Kreider, Annie E., V. 




Annville 


Smith, Catherine A., V. 




Lebanon 


SENIORS 




Arnold, Elsie, V. 




Campbelltown 


Berger, Mae, P. V. 




Lebanon 


Berlin, Margaret Davis, P. 




Tyrone 


Herr, Lawrence DeWitt, P. O. 


V. 


Annville 


Hiester, Lizzie, O. 




Annville 


King, Edith Rebecca, V. 




Mt. Pleasant 


Maulfair, Iva Berniece, P. V. 




Annville 


Mills, A. Lucile, V. 




Annville 


Moyer, Lizzie, P. O. 




Campbelltown 


Roberts, Irene, P. V. 




Lebanon 


Snell, Lillian Mabel, P. V. 




Lebanon 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



61 



UNDERGRADUATE 

Adams, Ano Dolores, P. 
Albert, Alberta Adelia, P. V. 
Albert, Mark A., P. 
Aung-st, Minnie, P. 
Bachman, Pearl, P. 
Beam, Ruth E., P. V. 
Berg-er, Grace, V. 
Boltz, W. H., 
Bomberg-er, Emma, P. 
Bomberger, Ida, V. 
Bookman, Bertha, O. 
Brack bill, Harry, V. 
Brane, Jessie, V. 
Clipping-er, Charles F., V. 
Coppenhaver, Florence, P. 
Cunkle, Elva Pearl, P. V. 
Daug-herty, Paul C, P. 
Dempwolf, Wm. R., P. 
Ebrig-ht, Lida, P. 
Eng-le, Emma Frances, P. 
Ensming-er, Henry, P. 
Evans, Mark, P. V. 
Fasnacht, Irene, P. 
Faus, Elias Arndt, P. O. 
Frantz, Edith C, V. 
Gambler, Lydia, V. 
Gantz, Mary, P. 
Gettel, Mary, V. 
Gingrich, Edith, P. 
Hamilton, William Emory, V. 
Hartman, Frank F., P. V. 
Hatz, Ervin, P. V. 
Hay, M. Alberta, P. 
Herr, Mabel S., P. 
Herr, Susan Naomi, P. 
Herr, William Eby, V. 
Hodg-es, Elmer V., P. O. V. 
Holzapfel, Cora Grace, P. 
Keg^erreis, Aldus, P. 
Kimmel, Charles, V. 
Klopp, Florence, P. 
Klopp, Isaiah Meyer, P. 



STUDENTS 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Pine Grove 

Campbelltown 

Intercourse 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Columbia 

Kinzer 

Lebanon 

Shippensburg 

Lebanon 

Harrisburg- 

Lebanon 

York 

Reading- 

Hummelstown 

Mt. Aetna 

Campbelltown 

Annville 

Manheim 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Steelton 

Mohrsville 

Royalton 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Winchester, Va. 

Cleona 

Derry Church 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Burg-oon, Ohio 



62 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Kreider, A. Louise, P. Annville 

Kreider, Elizabeth, P. Annville 

Kutz, M. Luther, P. O. Mahanoy City 

Lehman, Max Fisher, V. Annville 

Lutz, Alice Katherine, P. V. Shippensburg- 

Maulfair, Elsie, P. V. Granville, 111. 

Maulfair, Mary, P. Annville 

Maulfair, Ralph, P. Annville 

Meyer, Mae, P. Annville 

Mills, Alfred Keister, V. Annville 

Mills, Ellen Weinland, V. Annville 

Mock, Mabel, P. Schaefferstown 

Moeckel, Edith^Teressa, P. Lebanon 

Morgan, Helen, V. Lebanon 

Moser, Emma, O. Steelton 

Moyer, Harry, P. Campbelltown 

Nye, Florence, P. Annville 

Oberdick, Louise Anna, P. V. York 

Oldham, Cecelia Louise, V. Annville 

Oldham, Constance, P. V. Annville 
Reifsnyder, Nathan Kreider, P. V. Brickerville 

Reiter, Sue J., O. Myerstown 

Rutter, Effie T., P. V. Intercourse 

Schaffner, Grace B., P. V. Hummelstown 

Schropp, Ruth Eva, P. Lebanon 

Shaud, Elizabeth, P. Annville 

Shenk, Rachael, P. Annville 

Sherk, Henry^oss, P. O. Harrisburg- 

Smith, Ella Minerva, V. Lebanon 

Snell, H. R., V. Lebanon 

Snyder, Verda Allena, V. KeedysviJle, Md. 

Spang'ler, Eva Ruth, P. V. Lebanon 

Spang-ler, Ira R., V. Lebanon 

Spessard, Arthur Roy, P. V. Annville 

Spessard, Earl Augustus, V. Annville 

Spessard, Harry Edgar, V. Annville 

Stengle, Verna I., P. Oberlin 

Stoner, Edwin Porter, V. Scottdale 

Uhrich, Ida, O. Fairlands 

Ulrich, Ethel Henrietta, V. Annville 

Walborn, Mary, V. Lebanon 

Wallace, Edwin, V. Lebanon 

Walmer, Gertrude M., P. Lebanon 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



63 



Weaber, Ruth Elizabeth, P. V. 
Weidman, Alta Sabina, P. V. 
Witman, Mabel, P. 
Wolf, Florence H., P. 
Wolf, Mary J., P. V. 
Wolfe, Blanche, P. 
Yeag-er, Elsie, P. V. 



Lebanon 
Cedar Lane 
Lebanon 
Mt. Wolf 
Mt. Wolf 
Lebanon 
Ephrata 



Department of Public Speaking 



Adams, Ano Dolores, 
Billow, Milton Oscar, 
Gebhart, Katie, 
Haulman, Mary, 
Knaub, Neda, 
Long", Samuel Burnam, 
Lutz, Alice Katherine, 
Moyer, Viola, 



Lebanon 

Shermansdale 

Annville 

Annville 

New Cumberland 

Hays Grove 

Shippensburg" 

Derry Church 



Department of Art 

Batdorf, Mary, Annville 

Clouser, Elizabeth, Annville 

Eng-le, Ada Elizabeth, Hummelstown 

Engle, Emma Frances, Hummelstown 

Euston, Charlotte E., Lebanon 

Feese, Lillian, Lebanon 

Hauer, Emma E., Lebanon 

Henry, Martha, ■ Annville 

Hofifman, Katharine, Lebanon 

Kreider, Sallie, Annville 

Lehman, Reba Fisher, Annville 

Lesher, Mattie, Campbelltown 

Leslie, RuthL. M., Palmyra 

Loos, Anna, Bern 

Loos, Emma F., Bern 

Mills, Ellen Weinland, Annville 

Moyer, Bessie, Derry Church 

Saylor, Mary I., Annville 

Schools, Bertha, Lebanon 

Shenk, Mary, Annville 

Shupe, Erma, Dayton, Ohio 

Wolf, Florence Henrietta, Mt. Wolf 



64 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Children's Saturday Class 

Bomberg-er, Mattie, Annville 

Brig-htbill, Helen, Annville 

Kelchner, Jennie, Swatara Station 

Kreider, A. Louise, Annville 

Maulfair, Mary, Annville 

Meyer, Mae, Annville 

Rigler, Maro-aret, Annville 



Summary 

Graduate Students, 9 

Undergraduate Students 86 

Seniors 18 

Juniors 17 

Sophomores 15 

Freshmen 22 

Unclassified 14 

Academy 69 

Normal Department 92 

Department of Music 105 

Department of Art 29 

Department of Public Speaking- 8 

398 

Names repeated 41 

Total for the year 357 



The above summary of students is based upon the matriculation 
from x\pril 1, 1905 to April 1, 1906. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 65 

Degrees Conferred June 14, 1905 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Victor Arthur Arndt Rachael Nancy Kaufman 

Thomas Bayard Beatty Titus Heilman Kreider 

Helen Barbara Bressler Pearl Eugene Mathias 

David D. Budding-er Ellen Weinland Mills 

Arthur Rush Clippinger George Dickson Owen 

Alice L. Crowell Charles C. Peters 

Emma Frances Engle Frederick Berry Plummer 

Ralph Landis Engle Gordon I. Rider 

Elmer Ellsworth Erb Benjamin D. Rojahn 

May B. Hershey Albert J. Shenk 
Jesse M. Hostetter 

DIPLOMAS IN MUSIC 

Herbert Crawford Ivan McKenrick 

Charlotte Fisher Catharine Smith 

Amy Gabel Kathryn Ulrich 

Emily Johnson Blanche Wolfe 
Laura McCormick 

The Alumni Association 



This Association has been organized to keep the graduates of the 
college in touch with their alma mater and with each other. The 
membership and interest are growing with each year. An annual 
banquet and reunion is held on Tuesday evening of commencement 
week and every member should plan to be present. 
OFFICERS FOR 1905-06. 
President, Rev. H. E. Miller, B. D., '99, Lebanon. 
Vice-President and Recording Sec'y? Miss Ella Black, B. S., '96, 

Annville. 
Corresponding Sec'y and Treasurer, Professor Hoffman Derick- 
son, M. S., '02, Annville. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 1905-06. 

Professor H. E. Spessard, '00, Chairman. 

Professor E. M. Balsbaugh, '01, Professor H. H. Shenk, Miss 
Emma Loos, '01, and Miss Mary Shenk, '91. 

The college proposes to publish soon a list of the graduates in a 
separate bulletin, giving full details about their doings since leaving 
the institution. 

All those who hold diplomas from the College, or from the De- 
partment of music are eligible to membership. The annual fee is 
one dollar payable upon receipt of notice from the treasurer of the 
association. 

The association otters two annual oratorical prizes, one of $25 
and one of $10, to members of the junior class. Last year Mr. Merle 
Hoover won the first prize and Mr. Warren Kauft'man, the second. 



66 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Index 

PAGE 

Academy , . .■ . 40 

Courses of Instruction 44 

Entrance Requirements 41 

Outline of Years 42 

Admission to College 18 

Advisers 15 

Alumni Association 65 

Art Department 53 

Board of Trustees 3 

Buildings and Grounds 10 

Calendar .• . . 2 

Courses, Outline of 21 

Bible : . . 34 

Biology 35 

Chemistry 37 

Economics and Sociology -: 34 

Education . 38 

English 29 

French . . : . 28 

German 28 

Greek . 2a 

History and Political Science 33 

Latin 26 

Mathematics 32 

Missions 35 

Oratory and Public Speaking 39 

Philosophy , . . . 25 

Physics 38 

Degrees Conferred, 1905 65 

Departments 17 

Discipline 15 

Expenses - 16-52-53 

Faculty 5 

Graduate Work 14 

Grades of Scholarship 16 

History of the College 7 

Laboratories 13 

Library and Reading Rooms 13 

Music Department 48 

Normal Department . 47 

Officers and Committees of the Bofird ........... 4 

Organizations of the College II 

Register of Students . 54 

Religious Work 11 

Scholarships 14 

Summary of Attendance • > 64 



%