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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

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FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF 



Lebanon Valley College 

The Conservatory of Music 
and The Academv 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

1909 



Press or 
HiESTER Printing and Publishing Co, 

ANNVILLE, Pa. 



2 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CALENDAR. 

1908-1909. 

1908. 

September 16, Wednesday, College year began. 
December 23, Wednesday; Christmas vacation began. 

1909. 
January 6, Wednesday, Christmas vacation ended. 
January 29, Friday, First semester ended. 
February i, Monday, Second semester began. 
April 9, Friday, Anniversary of Kalozetean Literary Society. 
May 7, Friday, Anniversary of Philokosmian Literary Society. 
May 26-28, Senior final examinations. 
May 31-June 4, Final examinations. 
June 6, Sunday, 10:30 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon. 

7:30 p. m.. Address before the Christian Associations. 
June 7, Monday, i:oo p.-m.. Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

yi^&'V- ^v Exercises by Graduating Class in Music. 
June 8, Tuesday, 7:45 p. m., Junior Oratorical Contest. 

9:00 p. m.. Alumni Banquet and Re-union. 
June 9, Wednesday, 10:00 a. m.. Forty-third Annual Commencement 

1909-1910. 

1909. 

September 13 and 14, Examination and registration of students. 

September 15, Wednesday, College year begins. 

November 25, Thursday, Anniversary of Clionian Literary Society. 

November 25 and 26, Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 22, Wednesday, F'all Term ends. 

1910. 
January 5, Wednesday, Winter Term begins. 
January 24-28, Mid-year examinations. 
January 27, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
January 28, Friday, First semester ends. 
January 31, Monday, Second semester begins. 
February 13, Sunday, Day of Prayer for students. 
February 22, Tuesday, Washington's Birthday — holiday. 
March 25, Friday, Winter Term ends. 
March 28, Monday, Spring Term begins. 
June 8, Wednesday, Forty-fourth Annual Commencement. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



THE CORPORATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President Lawrence Keister, and Faculty, Ex-Officio. 

NAME RESIDENCE TERM EXPIRES 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 



Rev. DanieIv Eberly, D. D., ' 
Rev. Wm. H. Washinger, D. D., 
Rev. John E. Kleffman, A. B., 
John C. Heckert, Esq., 
George C. Snyder, Esq., 
Rev. Cyrus F. FIvOok, 
Rev. John W. Owen, A. M., 
Rev. G. D. Gossard, 
Kev. G. K. Hartman, a. B., 
Rev. a. B. Statton, A. M., 
W. O. AppenzeIvLar, Esq., 



Hanover 
Chambersburg 
Red Lion 
Dallastown 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Myersville, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Chambersburg 



19TI 
1909 
1909 
1911 
1911 
1909 
1911 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 



Hon. W. H. Ui^rich, 
Isaac B. Haak, Esq., 
John Hunsicker, Esq., 
Rev. J. A. Lyter, D. D. 
Benjamin H. Engine, Esq., 
Jonas G. Stehman, Esq., 
Rev. D. D. Lowery, D. D. 
Samuel F. Engle, Esq., 
George F. Breinig, Esq., 
D. Augustus Peters, Esq., 
M. S. Hendricks. Esq., 



Hummelstown 

Myerstown 

Lebanon 

Harrisburg 

Hummelstown 

Mountville 

Harrisburg 

Palmyra 

AUentown 

Steelton 

Shamokin 



1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1909 

lOIO 

1910 
1909 
1910 
1909 
1909 



Representatives from the Virginia Conference 



Rev. a. p. Funkhouser, D. D., 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A. M., 

J. N. Garber, Esq., 

Rev. G. W. Stover, 

Rev. S. R. Ludwig, 

Rev. a. S. Hammack, 

T. C. Harper Esq., 

W. L. Showalter, 

T. W. Mathias, 



1909 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1910 
1910 

TRUSTEEvS-AT-LARGE— Hon. Marlin E. Olmstead, LL. D., Har- 
risburg; B. Frank Keister. Esq., Scottdale; Warren B. 
Thomas, Esq., Johnstown; Ezra Gross, Esq., Greensburg. 

ALUMNAL TRUSTEES— Prof. H. H. Baish, A. M., '01, Altoona; 
Rev. E. O. Burtner, B. S., '90, Harrisburg; Rev. Alvin E. 
Shroyer, '00, Highspire, Pa, 



Harrisonburg, Va. 
Berkeley Springs, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Staunton, Va. 
Western Port, Md. 
Harrisonburg, Va, 
Dayton, Va. 
Dayton, Va. 
Mathias, W. Va. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

OFFICERS. 

President ----- Hon. Wm. H. Ulrich 
Vice President - - Rev. Daniel Eberly, D. D. 

Secretary - - - Rev. Isaac H. Albright, Ph. D. 
Treasurer - - - E. Benjamin Bierman, Ph. D. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Lawrence Keister W. O. Appenzellar 

W. H. Washinger W. H. Ulrich 

D. D. Lowery S. F. Engle 

George F. Breinig 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 
J. S. Mills B. F. Keister 

D. Eberly W. H. Washinger 

M. S. Hendricks D. D. Lowery 

C. F. Flook 

FACULTY COMMITTEE 
W. H. Washinger A. B. Statton 

D. D. Lowery J. A. Lyter 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 
J. A. Lyter E. O. Burtner 

LIBRARY AND APPARATUS COMMITTEE 
J. A. Lyter Geo. K. Hartman 

E. O. Burtner H. H. Shenk 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS COMMITTEE 

George F. Breinig J. W. Owen 

G. W. Stover 

FIELD SECRETARY— Rev. D. E. Long, A. B. 
MATRON— Mrs. Violette Freed. 



I.EBANON VALIvEY eOIvLEGE 

THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

Rev. IvAWRENCE KEISTER. S. T. B., D. D., 

President. 

JOHN EVANS IvEHMAN, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

RKV. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., D. D., 

Professor of Greek, and Instructor in Bible. 

HIRAM HERR SHE^K, A. M., Dean, 
Professor of History and Political Science. 

SAMUEI. HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M. S., Secretary, 

Professor of the Biological Sciences. 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A. M., 

Principal of the Academy. 

JOHN SMITH SHIPPEE, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and French, 

ANDREW BENDER, A. B., 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

NORMAN C. SCHUCHTER, A. M., 

Professor of English. 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M., 
Professor of German. 

HARRY DYER JACKSON, A. B., 

Director of the Department of Music. 



& LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS 



Rev. S. EDWIN RUPP, A. M., 

Professor of Sociology. 

M. VIOLETTE MOVER, 

Professor of Voice Culture. 

FLORENCE S. BOEHM, 

Instructor in Art. 

ARTHUR E. SPESSARD, B. I., 

Instructor in Elocution. 

ROV J. GUVER, A. B., 

Instructor in Academy and Librarian. 

LENA MAE HOERNER, 

Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 

ROGER E. SAVLOR, 

Laboratory Assistant in Academy. 

Miss EDNA D. VEATTS, 
Miss MARV B. MUSSER, 
WILBER E. HARNISH, 
ALBERT D. FLOOK, 

Teachers in Academy. 

Rev. henry B. SPAYD, 

College Pastor. 



LEBx\NON VALLEY COLLEGE 7 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 



Lebanon Valley College originated in the action of East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference at its annual session held at Lebanon in March, 1865. 
Resolutions were passed deciding the question of establishing a higher 
institution of learning to be located within the bounds of the East Penn- 
sylvania or of the Pennsylvania Conference. One year later the com- 
mittee appointed recommended in its report: P'irst, the establishment 
of a school of high grade under the supervision of the church; second, 
to accept for this purpose the grounds and buildings of what was then 
known as the Annville Academy, tendered as a gift to the Conference; 
and, third, to lease the buildings and grounds to a responsible party 
competent to take charge of the school for the coming year. School 
opened May 7, 1866, with fortv-nine students. By the close of the col- 
legiate year one hundred and fifty-three were enrolled, thus demonstrat- 
ing at once the need of such an institution in this locality and the wis- 
dom of the founders. 

In April, 1S67, the Legislature granted a charter with full university 
privileges under which a College faculty was organized with Rev. 
Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph. D., as president, and Prof. E. Benjamin 
Bierman, A.M., as principal of the Normal Department. The same year 
the Philokosmian Literary Society was organized by the young men, 
additional land was purchased and a large brick building erected there- 
on with chapel, recitation rooms, president's office, and apartments for 
sixty boarding students. The building was not furnished and fully oc- 
cupied till the fall of 1868. 

The first regular commencement occurred June 16, 1870, when the 
first three graduates, William 6. Bodenhorn, Albert C. Rigler, and Mary 
A. Weiss received their diplomas. 

About two years later opposition to the school manifested itself and 
President Vickroy stated in his report to the annual Conference that 
the attendance of students was reduced from one hundred to seventy- 
five, and the cause of this diminution was persistent opposition on the 
part of certain brethren. 

President Vickroy directed the affairs of the institution for five 
years, from 1866 to 1871. During his administration the charter was 
prepared and granted by the State Legislature, the laws and regulations 
for the internal workings framed and adopted, the curriculum establish- 
ed, and two classes— those of 1870 and 1871— were graduated. In June, 
187 1, Prof. Lucian H. Hammond was elected president. During his 
term of office five classes were graduated, the Clionian Literary Society 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

organized by the ladies, and the College made steady and substantial 
progress, but failing health compelled him to resign in June, 1876. 

Rev. David D. Belong, D. D., became the third president. He 
found it necessary to reconstruct the faculty and retained but two of 
the former teachers. The Kalozetean Literary Society was instituted 
to awaken interest in literary work among the young men by means of 
a healthy rivalrv, and the music department was organized. In the 
summer of 1883 a large two-story frame building was erected on College 
Avenue, containing art room, music rooms, the department of natural 
science, a museum and the College library. During his presidency 
one hundred and seven students were graduated, fourteen in music and 
ninety-three in the literary department. 

After an interregnum of several months Rev. Edmund S. Lorenz, 
A. M., was elected president and took up the work with energy and 
ability. Enlargement was his motto and the friends of the College 
rallied to his support. Post graduate studies were offered. The Col- 
lege Forum made its appearance under the editorship of the Faculty. 
With a devotion that won the admiration of his friends he labored in- 
cessantly for nearly two years to make the College the peer of any in 
the State, but under this strain his health failed and he was obliged to 
retire at the close of the collegiate year of 1889. 

The fifth president, Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, D. D., assumed the 
duties of his office at the opening of the fall term in 1889. He secured 
creditable additions to the endowment fund but because of discouraging 
conditions declined re-election at the close of the first year. 

The question of re-locating the College agitated its constituency, 
divided its friends and greatly hindered its progress. Some were al- 
most in despair, others were indifferent, while others hoped and waited 
for the best. Under these conditions the Board of Trustees met in 
special session July 28, 1890, and called Dr. E. Benjamin Bierman to the 
presidency. He was inaugurated on the evening of the sixth of Novem- 
ber following. Buildings were renovated, a large number of students 
enrolled and the Mary A. Dodge Fund of ten thousand dollars received, 
"the interest of which only is to be loaned without charge to such pious 
young people as the Faculty of the College may deem worthy of help 
as students." The Silver Anniversary of the College was celebrated 
June 15, 1892, when money was raised to purchase about three acres of 
ground to be added to the college campus. With the experience of 
twenty-five years of earnest effort to combat opposition and overcome 
error and misconceived notions of higher education and to build up an 
institution of learning creditable to the United Brethren Churoh, the 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 9 

friends of the College entered upon the second quarter of a century 
with new hope and aspiration. 

President Bierman served successfully until the spring of 1897, when 
he was succeeded by Rev. Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., who held the office 
till Jan. I, 1906, after which time the administration was in the hands 
of the Executive Committee and the Faculty until the election of Rev. 
A. P. Funkhouser, A. M., March 9, 1906, 

The presidency of Dr. Roop stands out as the period when the 
group system in the College curriculum was introduced, when the ath- 
letic field vv^as acquired, when the disastrous fire of December 24, 1904, 
occurred, sweeping away the Administration Building in a few hours, 
and when several new buildings arose on the campus — Engle Music 
Hall 1899, and the Carnegie Library and Ladies' Dormitory in 1904. The 
recuperative powers of the institution were put to the test b}' the 
destruction of the main building. At a meeting held January 5, 1905, 
the friends of the College resolved, amid unusual enthusiasm to rebuild 
at once and with the stimulus of a gift of fifty thousand dollars from 
Andrew Carnegie received by the President, who had previously secured 
$20,000 from the same source plans were matured by which to raise one 
hundred thousand dollars for this purpose. The erection of three new 
buildings was projected — the Men's Dormitory, the Central Heating 
Plant and the new Administration Building, the latter being completed 
under the supervision of President Funkhouser, whose term of office is 
marked also by a strenuous effort to straighten out the tangled threads 
in the financial skein and to meet the debt which rose to almost or al- 
together ninety thousand dollars. Bonds were issued to the amount of 
fifty thousand dollars and the co-operative college circles organized to 
relieve the financial conditions. 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S. T. B., D.D., was elected president of the 
College, June 10, 1907, at the annual session of the Board of Trustees. 
On the 12th of June he assumed the duties of the office, bringing to the 
task an earnestness and devotion that immediately awakened a new in- 
terest among the students, the Faculty and the friends of the institution. 
During his first year he solicited the money to secure the much needed 
equipment for the Science Department. 

The debt effort authorized by the Board, June 3, 1908, was carried 
forward successfully, $50,000 having been pledged, before Jan. i, 1909, 
according to the condition of the pledge which also required the con- 
tinuation of the canvass to secure another $50,000 in order to cover the 
entire debt. The College agent is in the field and may God hasten the 
day of deliverance. 



lo LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College is situated in Annville, which is on the Harrisburg 
division of the Philadelphia and Reading Railway. Annville is also 
connected by trolley line with Lebanon and Harrisburg. 

Buildings and Grounds 

There are seven buildings on the campus, the Carnegie Library, the 
Engle Music Hall, the Women's Dormitory, the Men's Dormitory, the 
Academy Building, the Administration Building, and the Heating Plant 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, a building of the Gothic style of 
architecture, erected in 1904, furnishes commodious quarters for the 
growing library of the College. Each department has its particular 
books for reference in addition to the large number of volumes for gen- 
eral reference and study. An annual amount is appropriated by the 
Board of Trustees for the purchase of new books, and plans are being 
made for the enlargement of the library in order to meet the growing 
needs of the College. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted and 
ventilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the leading 
magazines and' daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the special work 
of each department are here, as well as magazines of general literature. 
On the second floor are six seminar rooms designed to be equipped with 
the special works of reference for the various departments, where stu- 
dents doing the most serious work may study undisturbed. 

THE ENGLE MUSIC HALL, of Hummelstown brownstone, 
erected in 1889, contains the college chapel, used for all large college 
gatherings, a director's office and studio, practice rooms, and a large 
society hall. The building is well equipped with pianos and a large 
pipe organ. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY was erected in 1905, and is a 
building of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms which will ac- 
commodate forty-five students, there are a society hall, a dining hall, a 
well equipped kitchen, and a laundry. 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY is a modern structure of brick with 
Indiana limestone trimmings. It contains single and double rooms and 
sixteen suites of two bed rooms with a separate study room. These 
afford accommodations for eighty-five students. This building was also 
erected in 1905. 



GENERAL INFORMATION ii 

THE ACADEMY BUILDING, the original building of the insti- 
tution, and acquired by gift in 1866 when the College was founded, is 
now used as a dormitory. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, is in harmony with the 
buildings above described. It contains a low pressure heating system 
of the most perfect construction and supplies the heat for all the build- 
ings on the campus. It is constructed with a view to the installation of 
a light plant. 

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING is the most important and 
central of the buildings. It is built of buff brick with terra cotta trim- 
mings, three stories high. It contains the recitation rooms of the Col- 
lege and the laboratories of the science department. The department 
of art has here commodious and modern quarters. The administration 
offices of fire proof construction are on the first floor. 

To accommodate all these buildings, the campus, originally of ten 
acres, has been recently enlarged by purchase. It occupies a high point 
in the centre of the town of Annville and is within easy access of all 
trolley and railroad lines. 

The athletic field of five and one half acres is well located and ad- 
mirably adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. On it are 
erected a grand stand and bleachers. 



Laboratories 

The entire northern half of the Administration Building is occupied 
by the department of science. The Department of Chemistry occupies 
the first floor: Physics the second, and Biology the third. 

The laboratories of each department are constructed after the most 
approved modern methods, and students find everything arranged for 
their convenience. Stock rooms and special laboratories adjoin the 
general laboratories. The lecture rooms are provided with risers and 
Columbia tablet arm chairs. 



Religious Work 

Recognizing that most of its students come f jom Christian families, 
the College has always tried to furnish religious training. It believes 
in cultivating the heart as well as the mind, and encourages all whole- 
some means of promoting Christian influence. 



12 IvEBAN©N VALLEY COLLEGE 

Each school morning, a regular service is held in the college chapel, 
at which the students are required to be present. At this service there 
is singing, reading of Scripture, and prayer. Members of the Faculty- 
conduct this service. 

A student's pra^^er meeting is held once a week, and opportunities 
for Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian Associ- 
ations in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

All resident students of the College are required to attend public 
worship in churches of their choice every Sunday. 

The religious life during the past year has been earnest and help- 
ful, and patrons may feel satisfied that high moral influences are being 
exerted constantly over their children. 



College Organizations 

Chri tfoin ^^^ College has flourishing Young Men's and 

Young Women's Christian Associations, which hold 
regular weekly devotional services and conduct 
special courses of Bible and mission study, often in charge of members 
of the Faculty. 

These organizations frequently are visited by the general secre- 
taries, who infuse enthusiasm into the work. Membership is voluntary, 
and the success of these societies is an almost certain index of the real 
condition of the religious life at Lebanon Valley College. 

Under these auspices numerous public lectures, entertainments, 
and socials are held, so that they contribute incalculably to the pleasure 
of the student body. They are the centre of the spiritual welfare of the 
students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with the 
College. 

Literarv Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and 

. . parliamentary training are afforded by the societies of 

the College. There are three of these societies — one sus- 
tained by the young ladies, the Clionian, and two by the young men, 
the Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. They meet every Friday even- 
ing in their well furnished halls for literary exercises consisting of 
orations, essays, and debates. These societies are considered valuable 
agencies in college work, and students are advised to unite with one of 
them. 



Associations 



GENERAIv INFORMATION 13 

Athletic ^^^ Athletic Association is composed of all students 

. . and others connected with the College, who pay the 

required athletic fee. It elects, besides its own officers, 
the managers of the' various athletic teams. 

The direct supervision of athletics is in the hands of the committee 
of the association, called the executive board of athletics. This board 
is made up of seven members as follows: Two members of the Faculty 
of the College; the president of the association, who is ex-officio presi- 
dent of the board; the baseball, football, and basket-ball managers, 
and the treasurer of the association. 

Biological ^^^ Biological Field Club offers to any student of the 

College an opportunity to collect, study, and discuss ob- 
jects of interest in the field of living nature. Frequent 

excursions are made to places of special interest to members of the club. 

Historical "^'^^ Historical Society of Lebanon Valley College is 

organized by the students who have elected the histor- 
^ cal-political group together with such others as may be 
especially interested in historical studies. The purpose of the organ- 
ization is to stimulate among the students the spirit of historical re- 
search. Members of the society are collecting material for a museum, 
which will be arranged in proper form as soon as suitable provision can 
be made in one of the new buildings. The society holds stated meet- 
ings, at which papers are read and subjects of historic importance are 
discussed. The members of the society from time to time visit places 
of historic note. 

Modern Lan- ^" order to stimulate interest in the study of the 

modern languages, at the request of the junior and 
guage C u senior students of the modern language group, a club 
has been formed under the direction of the adviser of the group. The 
club meets every third Saturday afternoon or evening as occasion sug- 
gests. Student programs alternate with lectures by the teachers in the 
department. 

Literary and Musical Advantages 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of hear- 
ing lectures and talks delivered by resident professors and men of note 
in church and literary circles. 

The department of music together with the department of public 
speaking presents a number of programs during the year for the pleas- 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ure and benefit of the general student body. Concerts and recitals by 
prominent musicians are given under the patronage of the departmtnt 
of music with the aim of creating in the student an appreciation for the 
best in art. 

There is a lively interest in the drama. Various college organiza- 
tions have presented Shakespearean and other plays of a high grade. 

A further means of enjoyment and education is the course of lec- 
tures and concerts under the management of the Christian associations 
of the College. 

Administration 

The following are the advisers for the students in each 
of the five groups in which courses of instruction are of- 
fered: For the classical group, Professor Spangler; for the mathemat- 
ical-physical, Professor Bender; for the chemical-biological, Professor 
Derickson; for the historical-political. Professor Shenk; for the modern 
language, Professor Shippee; for the freshman class. Professor 
Schlichter; and for the Academy, Professor Spessard. The students of 
each group are amenable to the adviser in all matters of conduct, study 
and discipline. He is to grant leave of absence, permission to go out of 
town, and excuses. His approval is necessary before a student may 
register for or enter upon any course of study, or discontinue any work. 
He is the medium of communication between the Faculty and the stu- 
dents of his group, and in a general way stands to his students in the 
relation of a friendly counsellor. 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced 
^ to good conduct and diligence by higher motives than 

fear of punishment. The sense of duty and honor, the courteous and 
general feelings natural to young men and women engaged in literary 
pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. It is the 
policy of the administration to allow in all things as much liberty as will 
not be abused, and the students are invited and expected to cooperate 
with the Faculty; but good order and discipline will be strictly main- 
tained and misconduct punished by adequate penalties. The laws of 
the College are as few and simple as the proper regulation of a commu- 
nity of young men and women will permit. The College will not place 
its stamp or bestow its honors upon anyone who is not willing to deport 
himself becomingly. No hazing of any kind will be permitted. Every 
unexcused absence from any college duty, every failure or misdemeanor 
of a student is reported to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Classification ^^^^ maximum number of hours, conditioned, per- 

mitted for senior standing is four; for junior standing, 
six, for sophomore, eight, and for freshmen, to be decided for individual 
students by the committee on classification. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work above that prescribed 
by the curriculum is limited by the student's record for previous years 
as follows; 

fa) Majority of A's, nothing less than B — no limit. 

(b) Majority of B's, nothing less than C— four hours. 

(c) IvOwer record than (b) — no extra hours. 

^, ^^ .. The scholarship of students is determined by re- 

Class Standing ,, , . ^. . . •, ., . 

^ suit of examinations and daily recitations com- 
bined. The grades are carefully recorded. 

Reports of standing will be made to parent or guardian at the end 
of each term when desired by them, or when the Faculty deems it ex- 
pedient. The standing is indicated generally by classification in six 
groups, as follows: 

A signifies that the record of the student is distinguished. 
, B signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C signifies that the record is good. 

D signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (conditioned) imposes a condition on the student. Conditions 
' incurred in January must be made up by June; conditions incurred in 
June must be made up by September. Failing to make up a condition 
at the time appointed is equal to a record F. 

F (failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subjects, and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to 
repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year, or to withdraw. 

Desree ^^^ degree of bachelor of arts is conferred, by a vote 

of the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Fac- 
.and Diploma ^^^^^^ ^^^^ students who have satisfactorily completed 
any of the groups. 

Graduate Since all its members are fully occupied with undergrad- 

uate work, the Faculty deems it unwise to offer any work 
Work ^^^ ^^^ degree of Master of Arts during the coming year. 
In rare cases sufficient resident work upon certain advanced courses 
given may be outlined. But as special action would be required in 
each case, no detailed announcement can be made here. All inquiries 
about graduate work should be addressed to the Dean. 



i6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Scholarships 

The College offers a limited number of one-hundred-dollar free 
tuition scholarships to honor graduates of State normal schools and ap- 
proved high schools and academies. One scholarship is allotted to the 
first honor graduate of our own academy. 

Graduates of high schools and academies whose standard is not 
equal to that of our own academy, may enter the senior year of the 
academy and he^mer competitors for our own academy scholarship. 

Hon or -graduates of preparatory schools who have conditions may 
be allowed to make them up in the freshmen year. If the first sem- 
ester's work shows a majority of A's and nothing less than B in all 
work including conditions, a scholarship may be awarded. 

The Faculty and Executive Committee shall make all scholarship 
awards. 

Expenses 

COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 

M ATRICUIvATION FEE, • $ 5 OO 

Tuition, If paid in advance 50 00 

If not paid in advance 60 00 

For twenty hours or less in the College, or, for twenty-four 
hours or less in the Academy. Each additional hour per sem- 
ester, $1.50. 
Laboratory Fees, per semester: 

Biology i-a $2 00 

Biology i-b 6 00 

Biology 2 6 00 

Biology 3 ... 5 00 

Biology 4 5 00 

Science c 3 00 

A deposit of $2.00 is required of each student who is assigned a 
locker in the biological laboratory as a guarantee of the care and return 
of the keys and apparatus. The treasurer will refund the deposit when 
a certificate from the department is presented stating that the keys have 
been returned in good condition. 

Chemistry i $ 6 00 

Chemistry 2 7 50 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



17 



Chemistry 3 . . . 7 50 

Chemistry 4 ..... . 5 00 

Chemistry 5 .... 5 00 

A deposit of $3.00 is required of each student who is assigned a 
locker in the chemical laboratory. Any part of this breakage deposit 
unused v»^ill be refunded at the end of the course. 

Physics 3 I5 00 

Elementary Physics. 3 00 

All laboratory fees and deposits for each semester must be paid in 
advance. A student will not be assigned a locker or apparatus in any 
of the laboratories without a certificate from the treasurer of the Col- 
lege stating that the fee has been paid and the deposit made. 
Graduation Fee, payable thirty days prior to commencement, |io 00 

TABLE BOARD AND ROOM RENT 
Tabi^e Board — Regular students, paid in advance $2.80 a week; $104 
a year, not in advance $3.36 a week; $124.80 a year. 
Five-day students, when paid in advance $2.00 a week; 
$74.00 a year, not in advance $2.40 a week; |88.5oayear. 
Room Rent — Paid in advance $40 to |;6o a year, according to location 
of room. When not paid in advance $48 to I72. 
These rates are fixed by a special order of the Board of Trustees. 
The rate for payment in advance may be secured by paying one- 
fifth at the opening of the Fall term; one fifth at the middle of the Fall 
term; three-tenths at the opening of the Winter term; three-tenths at 
the opening of the Spring term. The higher rate will be charged after 
ten days from the day a bill is due. 

Failure to pay one bill before a second falls due will exclude a stu- 
dent from classes. 

Requirements for Admission 

The College offers five groups of studies leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, as follows: The Classical, the Mathematical-Physical, 
the Chemical-Biological, the Historical-Political and the Modern Lan- 
guage. Students are admitted to the Freshman Class on examinations, 
on certificates of approved high and preparatory schools, and on the 
certificates of the College Entrance Board. 

Full information concerning the cost, place, etc., of this Board's 
examinations may be had upon application to the Secretary of the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board, Post-office Sub-station 84 New York. 



i8 IvEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

A candidate should have preparation according to the following 
general outline: 

For all groups, English, 4 years; Latin, 4 years, (prose composition 
each year); German, 2 years; English History and Civics, i year; Greek 
and Roman History, i year; Algebra, 2 years; Plane Geometry, i year; 
Solid Geometry, j^ year; Physics, i year; Elementary Zoology, i year. 

N. B. — For the Classical Group, Greek i year, (instead of either 
Physics or Elementary Zoology. 



Entrance Subjects in Detail 

ENGLISH. 
English A. 

The ability to vv^rite good English is the one necessary requirement. 
Candidates will be expected to answer general questions testing their 
knowledge of the following list of Classics. 

For the Years 1909, 1910, 191 1; Group L (Two to be selected.) 

Shakespeare's As you lAke It, Henry V., Julius Caesar, The Mer- 
chant of Venice, Twelfth Night. 

Group II. (One to be selected.) 

Bacon's Essays, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress Part i, The Sir Roger 
De Coverly Papers in the Spectator, Franklin's Autobiography. 

Group III. (One to be selected.) 

Chaucer's Prologue, Spenser's Faerie Queen (selections). Pope's 
The Rape of the Lock, Goldsmith's The Deserted Village, Palgrave's 
Golden Treasury (First Series) Books II. and III., with especial attention 
to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, and Burns. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected.) 

Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Scott's 
Quentin Durward; Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, 
Thackeray's Henry Esmond, Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford, Dickens's A Tale 
of Two Cities, George Eliot's Silas Marner, Blackmore's Lorna Doone. 

Group V. (Two to be selected.) 

Irving's Sketch Book, Lamb's Essays of Elia, De Quincey's Joan of 
Arc, and the English Mail Coach, Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship, 
Emerson's Essays (selected), Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 

Group VI. (Two to be selected.) 

Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Scott's The Lady of the Lake, 
Byron's Mazeppa and the Prisoner of Chillon, Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury (First Series) Book IV. with especial attention to Wordsworth, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

Keats, and Shelley, Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome, Poe's Poems, 
Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal, Arnold's Sohraband Rustum, Long- 
fellow's The Courtship of Miles Standish, Tennyson's Gareth and Ly- 
nette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur, Browning's 
Short Poems. 

English B. 

Study and Practice — This part of the examination presupposes the 
thorough study of each of the works named below. The examination 
will be upon subject matter, form and structure. In addition, the can- 
didate may be required to answer questions involving the essentials of 
English grammar, and questions on the leading facts in those periods 
of English literary historj^ to wdiich the prescribed works belong. 

The books set for this part of the examination will be: 

For the years 1909, 1910, 1911: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, L'Allegro, and 
I Penseroso; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or Wash- 
ington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration; 
Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

Latin. 

The preparation in Latin should comprise the first four books of 
Caesar, six orations of Cicero, and six books of Virgil's Aeneid. There 
should be four years of work in composition, and a study of prosody. 

German. 

Two years of work are required including easy prose composition 
and reading of at least 600 pages of moderately easy prose and poetry. 
Daily practice in writing German and careful drill in pronunciation is 
expected. 

English History. 

Walker's Essentials of English History or its equivalent. 

Greek History. 

To the fall of Corinth, and the history in brief of the more ancient 
countries. Roman History — The history of the Roman Republic and 
the Empire to the time of Constantine. Meyer's Ancient History or its 
equivalent. 

Algebra. 

As treated in the elementary text-books of Wells, Wentworth, Tan- 
ner, or equivalent. The time supposed to be devoted to the systematic 
study of this requirement is the equivalent of a course of three lessons 
a week through two school vears. 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Plane and Solid Geometry. 

As treated by Wentworth, or an equivalent. 

Physics. 

As much as is contained in Carhart and Chute's High School Phy- 
sics, or an equivalent. The laboratory work required must consist of 
at least forty exercises or experiments of the character given in the 
National Physics Course, or others similar to these in grade and method. 

Elementary Biology. 

The requirement may be fulfilled by any one of the following 
courses or the equivalent: 

(a) General Biology. — ^^A one-year course in which at least one- 
third of the time has been given to laboratory work on both plants and 
animals as mentioned in (b) and (c). 

(b) Botany. — A one-year course in which at least one-third of the 
time was devoted to laboratory work, including at least two types of 
blue-green algae, four types of green algae, one type each of the red 
and brown algae, three types of the fungi, a liverwort, a moss, and a 
fern. The structure and germination of types of monocotyledonous 
and dicotyledonous seeds. The morphology of types of buds, stems, 
roots, leaves, flowers, and fruit. At least five experiments in physiol- 
ogy. Field work either in outlined ecological studies or the collection 
of material for an herbarium representing twenty families of plants. 

A briefer course covering at least half of the work outlined above 
may be offered in connection with a half year's work in Zoology for 
the one year of elementary biology. 

(c) A one-year course in which at least one-third of the time was 
devoted to laboratory work, including a study of the cell, the tissues, 
the morphology of at least one type of each phylum, the general prin- 
ciples of development. Definite field studies in animal ecology. Ex- 
periments in ph5^siology. 

A briefer course, including laboratory work on at least half of the 
forms outlined above, may be offered in connection with a half year's 
work in botany for the one year of elementary biology. 

Laboratory notes and drawings must be presented with credentials 
before credit will be given. 

Elementary Greek. 

White's First Greek Book, or equivalent. 

Special Note — For more detailed information on entrance require- 
ments see outlines of Academy courses. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES 



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German 2 3 
French 2 3 
Chemistry i 4 
English 2 I 
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History i 3 
Philosophy 2 3 
English 2 I 
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Greek 2C 3 
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Greek iC 3 
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English 3 3 
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Economics i 3 
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Economics 2 3 
Philosophy 4 2 
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Physics I \ 
Physics 3 / 4 
Chemistry 2 4 
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Physics 2 1 
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Chemistry 3 4 
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Latin 3 2 
Philosophy 4 2 
English 3 3 
Economics i 3 
Bible I 2 
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Philosophy 4 2 
English 3 3 
Bible I 2 
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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 





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English 9 3 
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History 5 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 3 2 
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History 6 3 
Philosophy 5 2 
Bible 5 2 
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Bible 3 2 
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Bible 3 2 
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DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 25 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Philosophy 

1. Logic — Three hours. First Semester. 

The aim is to acquaint the pupil with the laws of thought as re- 
vealed in the nature of the human mind. A careful introductory sur- 
vey is made of the syllogism and of the scientific method, and a drill is 
gi%'en in the detection and correction of logical fallacies. Recitation 
and library references. Professor Shenk. 

2. Psychology — Three hours. Second Semester. 

General Psychology. — This course is planned to guide the student 
in forming the habit of observing and interpreting mental phenomena, 
and to lay a foundation for all the higher branches dealing primarily 
with mental life. Recitation, lecture, experiment, and library refer- 
ences. Professor Shenk. 

3. Psychology of Religion — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The religious nature of man is studied psychologically as manifest- 
ed in childhood, adolescence, and maturity, including the phenomena of 
conversion and Christian growth. 

Elective for Seniors in case a sufiBcient number desire to pursue it. 

4. History of Philosophy — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A general survey is made of the field of Philosophy in general with 
special emphasis upon Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and upon the systems of 
Rationalism, Empircism, and Idealism. The aim is to develop the love 
of the truth, a discriminating judgment, and independent thinking. 

Professor Shenk. 

5. Ethics. — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The course is an introduction to ethical theory and practical ethics. 
It aims to set forth fundamental moral ideas and principles in their re- 
lation to ideal living. Professor SpangIvER. 

Greek Language and Literature 

professor spangler 
I b. Elementary Greek — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon: Four books of the Anabasis. Greek Prose. 
I c. Advanced Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Homer: Three books of the Iliad, scansion, sight translation, epic 
poetry. Greek antiquities, Greek literature and Greek prose. 



26 IvKBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

1. Junior Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Herodotus: Selections from several of the books are read. Review 

of the Greek historians and the Persian Wars. 

Plato: Apology and Crito. The Athenian courts. 
New Testament. Readings in the Pauline epistles. 

2. Senior Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon: Memorabilia; or Demosthenes: De Corona. Socrates 

and the Socratic schools. The Attic oration. 

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus; or Aeschylus: Prometheus Bound. 
Development of the Greek drama. Greek tragedy, comedy and theater. 

3. Junior Elective Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
New Testament: Readings in the gospels of Mark and John and in 

the Pauline and Catholic epistles. The object of this course is exegeti- 
cal and practical. It will include a study of the synoptic gospels and a 
survey of the letters of Paul. 

Latin Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR SHIPPEE. 

1. Freshman Latin — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Livy: This course includes Book XXL, and parts of Book XXII. , 
describing Hannibal's advance upon Rome to the battle of Cannae. The 
author's style and peculiarities of syntax are studied. Special chapters 
of Roman history are assigned. Wilkin's Roman Antiquities. Gram- 
mar is reviewed. 

(b) Cicero: De Senectute and De Amicitia are read. Special 
studies in syntax based upon the text. 

2. Sophomore Latin — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Horace: Satires and Epistles. Selected satires and epistles; 
Ars Poetica. Special attention will be paid to the argument, style, and 
character portrayal, also their place in literature, historical outlines 
of Roman literature. Bender's text-book and lectures. 

(b) Tacitus: Germania and Agricola. The historical and literary 
importance of both are brought out in the study of these works. 

(c) Quintilian. Books X.-XII. This course aims to give a com- 
prehensive view of the principles of rhetoric and oratory as taught by 
the Romans. 

3. Junior Latin — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Cicero: De Officiis. This text is made the basis for the study 
of ethics as taught by Cicero and his predecessors. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 27 

(b) Plautus and Terence. Selected plays are read from these 
authors. 

(c) Juvenal. Selected satires are read and are made the basis for a 
study of the character of the times. 

4. Senior Latin — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

(a) Cicero's Letters. May be arranged for semester or year, as 
determined by the class at the beginning of the year. A study of the 
character and career of Cicero is made from selected letters and from 
other historical and biographical sources. 

(b) Remnants of Early Latin, (Allen and Egbert,) or Cicero's De 
Oratore may be taken up as elective in senior year. 

French Language and Literature 



PROFESSOR SHIPPEE 

1. Elementary Course — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
French Grammar (Fraser and Squair); Contes et Legendes; Aldrich 

and Foster's French Reader; Mairet's La Tache du Petit Pierre; Bruno's 
Le Tour de la France; L'Abbe Constantin; Le Conscrit; La Poudre aux 
Yeux; Jeanne D'Arc. 

2. Intermediate Course — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Bouvet's French Composition; Columba; Carmen and Other Stories 

(Merimee); Sand's La Petite Fadette and La Mare au Diable; Bowen's 
French Lyrics; Corneille's Le Cid; Racine's Athalie; Moliere's L'Avare; 
Maupassant's Contes Choisis; Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme 
Pauvre; Foncin's Le Pays de France; Augier's Le Gendre de Monsieur 
Poirier; About's Le Roi des Montagues. 

Other works than those mentioned will be read. This course aims 
to give the student ease in reading French prose and verse and facility 
in writing simple French prose. 

3. Nineteenth Century Literature — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

Composition will be continued throughout the year. A hasty sur- 
vey of French Literature will be made, for which Pellissier's Littera- 
ture Francaise will be the text book. Several of the great novels will 
be read; De Vigny: Cinq Mars; Victor Hugo: Les Miserables; Notre 
Dame de Paris, Balzac: Eugenie Grandet; Le Cure de Tours. Poetry, 
drama and historical prose will also be extensively read. 

4. Classical French Literature — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The greater part of the works of Moliere, Racine, and Corneille will 
be read. There will also be wide reading in the prose works of the 
classic writers, including Voltaire, Bossuet, Descartes, La Bruyere, Pas- 
cal, Madame de Sevigne, Mme de La Fayette, and Fenelon. 

This course will alternate with course 5. 

5. Composition and Conversation — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

The object of this course is to enable the student to write French 
with ease and to speak it with considerable fluency. In the latter part 
of the year some English classic will be the basis of the written work. 

This course is elective for students who have completed Course 2, 
and for those who have completed Course i, with high credit. 

German Language and Literature 

MRS. SCHI^ICHTKR 

1. Freshman German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Literature of the 19th century. Fouque's Undine; Heine's Die 

Harzreise; Miiller's Deutsche Liebe; Freitag's Die Journalisten; Schef- 
fel's Ekkehard; Deutsche Gedichte; Wenckebach's composition. 

2. Sophomore German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Literature of the i8th century, dwelling especially upon the works 

of Lessing and Schiller. Lessing: Emilia Galotti, Minna Von Barn- 
helm, and Nathan der Weise; Schiller: Maria Stuart, Die Jungfrau von 
Orleans, and Wallenstein's Tod. Besides this, Wenckebach's Meister- 
werke des Mittelalters will be assigned, chiefly for outside reading. 

3. Junior German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Life of Goethe and his influence upon German literature. Dich- 
tung und Wahrheit; Poems; Gotz von Berlichingen; Egmont; Tasso; 
Iphigenie; selections from Faust. 

N. B. Robertson's History of German Literature will be used as a 
text-book in Courses 2 and 3. 

4. Scientific German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course aims to give students specializing in technical work as 
good a scientific vocabulary as the time will permit. Students must 
have at least two years of preparatory German to take the course = 
Freshmen may take it instead of German i. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 29 

English Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR SCHLICHTER 

I Theory and Practice of English Composition— Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes a thorough study of rhetoric and extensive 
writing of short and long themes. There are recitations, lectures, and 
private conferences. Text-books: Wendell's English Composition, Fos- 
ter's Argumentation and Debating, and Brewster and Carpenter's Mod- 
ern English Prose, Arlo Bates's Talkson Writing English. 

2. American Poetry — One hour. Throughout the year. 

This course considers carefully in detail the work of nine American 
poets. There are lectures, short papers, and critical references: Text- 
books: Page's the Chief American poets, Wendell's Eiterary History of 
America, and Trent's History of American Literature. 

3. History of English Literature — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

This course deals with the work of all the leading authors from the 
earliest times to the present. There are lectures, recitations, and fre- 
quent tests on outside reading. A full list of required readings of the 
course may be had upon application. Text-books: Moody and Eovett's 
History of English Literature and Manly 's English Poetry. 

5. The English Drama — Three hours. First Semester. Given 
1909-10. 

The theory of the drama and the early history of the English drama 
are taken up in this course. Text-books: Manly's Pre-Shakspearean 
Specimens (2 vols), Woodbridge's Techinque of the Drama, Thorndike's 
Tragedy. Typical plays of Lyly, Peele, Nash, Greene, Marlowe, Jon- 
son, and Shakespeare are read. 

6. Poetics — Three hours. Second Semester. Given 1909-10. 
Leading theories of poetry from Aristotle to Arnold are studied, and 

poetry is studied technically. Each student prepares his own book of 
extracts from the later epic, on which is made the basis of work in 
scansion. The aim above all else is to create an enduring love for poetry. 
Text-books: Gummere's Handbook of Poetics and Saintsbury's Loci 
Critici. 

7 Old English — Two hours. First Semester. Given 1910-11. 

A thorough course in the earliest English. Text-books: Smith's 
Old F^nglish Grammar, Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader. (AH the selec- 
tions will be read except the Phoenix.) 



30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

8. Middle English — Two hours. Second Semester. Given 1910-11. 
Extensive reading in Chaucer as typical of the period. Students 

must be acquainted with French, and Old English is a decided aid to 
the successful prosecution of this course. Text-books: Liddell's Pro- 
logue, Knight's, and Nonnes PrestesTale, Root's The Poetry of Chaucer, 
Chaucer's Complete Works, (Globe edition.) 

9. The English Novel — Three hours. First Semester. 

Mainly the theory of fiction as exemplified by three or four master- 
pieces. A brief survey of the history of the novel is included. Consid- 
erable written analysis of short stories. Text-books: Perry's The Study 
of Prose Fiction, Walter Raleigh's The English Novel. 

10. Shakespeare — Three hours. Second Semester. 

Critical reading of four plays and general reading of ten outside of 
class. Rolfe's editions will be used for study. Also Sidney Lee's Life. 

Mathematics and Astronomy 

MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR I^EHMAN 

1. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. First Semester. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binom- 
ial theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permu- 
tations and combinations, theory of equations, etc. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry — Four hours. Second 
Semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and ob- 
lique triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights, 
development of trigonometric formulae, solution of right and oblique 
sperical triangles, applications to Astronomy. 

3. Analytic Geometry — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and hy- 
perbola are studied, numerous examples solved, and as much of the 
higher plane curves and of the geometry of space is covered as time 
will permit. 

4 Differential Calculus. — Three hours. First Semester. 

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 
and minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, en- 
velopes, etc. 

5. Integral Calculus— Three hours. Second Semester. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 31 

Integrations, rectification of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cuba- 
ture of solids, etc. 

6. Plane Surveying^Three hours. Second Semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, 
leveling, etc. 

7. Differential Equations — Three hours. First Semester. 
A course in the elements of differential equations. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, 4 and 5. Murray. 

8. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second Semester. 
Bowser. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 7. 

ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

I. General Astronomy — Four hours. First Semester. 
The department is provided with a fine four-and-a-half-inch achro- 
matic telescope equatorially mounted, of which the students make free 



History and Political Science 

PROFESSOR SHENK 

1. Mediaeval and Modern History — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

A general course prescribed in all the groups. Papers, special re- 
ports, and theses, based on available original sources, will be required 
of all students. Robinson: History of Western Europe; Readings 
from European History. 

2. English Economic History — Three hours. First Semester. 
The economic life and development of the English people during 

mediaeval and modern times. Special attention will be given to the 
manor system, the guilds, growth of commerce, the industrial revolu- 
tion, the rise of trade unions, and the relation of government to indus- 
try. Cheyney: The Industrial and Social History of England; Gibbins: 
Industry in England. 

3. English Constitutional History — Three hours. Second Semester. 

The English Constitution and its historical development. A care- 
ful study of important documents will be made. Taswell-Langmeade: 
Constitutional History of England. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

4. United States Constitutional History— Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A full course covering the colonial and constitutional periods. An 
extensive reading course of original and secondary sources is required. 
Channing: Students' History of the United States; Macdonald: Select 
Charters; Macdonald: Select Documents. 

5. Historical and Practical Politics— Three hours. First Semester. 
The development of the leading governments of the world, and a 

comparative study of the same. Woodrow Wilson: The State. 

6. International Law — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A course in the fundamental principles of International Law. Much 
time is given to the study of important cases. 

Economics and Sociology 

PROFESSORvS SHENK AND RUPP 

1. Economics — Three hours. First Semester. 

A general course in economic theory, supplemented by considera- 
tion of practical current problems. Careful consideration will be given 
the different points of view of the leading economists. Bullock: Intro- 
duction to the Study of Economics. 

2. Current Labor Problems — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A course devoted to a study of the important labor problems of the 
present day: Strikes, labor organizations, employer's association, arbi- 
tration, trade agreement, labor legislation, etc. Adams and Sumner: 
Labor Problems. 

3. Theory of Sociology — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is intended to give the student a knowlege of the vari- 
ous theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the gen- 
eral field of learning. Part of the course will be devoted to a study of 
Emigration and Immigration, and the American Negro. 

4. Practical Sociology — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the causes of Poverty, Methods of Relief, Tenement 
House Reforms, The Liquor Problems, etc. 

English Bible 

I. New Testament — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
The life of Jesus Christ. The course is based on the Gospel by 
Mark, including frequent references to the other Gospels. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 33 

2. New Testament— Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The life of Paul. The Acts of the Apostles and the Pauline epistles 
are studied with a view to Paul's life, character, and influence on the 
Christian world. 

This course may be taken in lieu of i, at the option of the teacher. 

3. Old Testament^Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Old Testament History. For the first semester the study will be 
based on the Pentateuch; for the second, on the Historical Books. 

Biology 

PROFESSOR DKRICKSON 

The courses of instruction cover four years. They are recognized 
as being as valuable in developing the powers of the mind as the other 
courses in the college curriculum, in that they develop the powers of 
observation and thought essential to the understanding of all phases of 
the phenomena of human existence. 

The courses have been outlined with a three-fold purpose in view. 

First, to meet the demand for a general training in biology, caused 
by the recently established conclusion among educators, that a knowl- 
edge of the principles of biology is not only a useful but an essential 
factor in any course of training in which social and moral questions are 
to be considered. 

Second, to meet the demand of the high schools for college trained 
teachers in biology. 

Third, to lay a broad foundation in the science for those who desire 
to pursue post graduate courses in universities and medical colleges. 

Students desiring to elect a single year's work in biology are ad- 
vised to elect I — b; if two years, i — a and i— b or i — b and 3 and 4, de- 
pending on the object in view. Those contemplating a career in medi- 
cine, or the profession of teaching biology or a post graduate course in 
biology, are urged to complete all the courses offered. 

Description of Courses 

Biology, i-a. Botany. Four hours. Two lectures or recitations 
and two laboratory periods of two hours each, per week. Throughout 
the year. The object of the course is to give the student a broad gen- 
eral knowledge of the plant kingdom. The form, structure and func- 
tioning, of one or more types of each of the divisions of algae, fungi, 
liverworts, mosses, ferns and flowering plants, are studied. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Special attention is given to the ontogeny and phylogeny of the 
several groups suggestive of evolution. 

Experiments are performed in the physiological laboratory to de- 
termine some of the relations of plants to v^ater, gravitation, tempera- 
ture and light. Several types of seeds are studied as to their structure, 
germination and development. The principles of classification are 
learned by the analysis and identification of representatives of at least 
twenty-five orders of spermatophytes. 

The laboratory and class room work is supplemented by frequent 
field trips. 

Each student is supplied with a compound microscope, dissecting 
instruments, note and drawing materials and portfolio. 

Required of freshmen in chemical- biological group. Elective for 
others. 

Biology i-b. General Biology. Four hours throughout the year. 

Three lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours each, per 
week. 

The principles of biology are learned by making a careful compara- 
tive study of representatives of several ph^da of animals. The amoeba, 
euglena, paramcecium, vorticella, hydra, starfish, earthworm, crayfish, 
grasshopper, mussel and frog are studied. A careful study is made of 
the embryology of the frog. The process of development is closely 
watched from the segmenting of the egg until metamorphosis takes 
place. Each student is taught the principles of technic by preparing 
and sectioning embryos at various stages of development. From these 
and other microscopic preparations the development of the internal 
organs and origin of tissues is studied. This is followed by a histologi- 
cal study of the tissues of the adult frog. 

Each student is required to keep a record of all work done in the 
laboratory in carefully prepared notes and drawings. 

For sophomores in the chemical-biological group. Elective for 

others. 

Text-books: — Parker's Zoology. 

* Biology 2. — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Four hours 
throughout the year. Six hours laboratory work and two conferences 
each week. 

The course consists of the dissection and thorough study of a suc- 
torial fish, a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, an amphibian, a reptile, a 
bird and a mammal. Carefully labeled drawings are required of each 
student as a record of each dissection. 

Text-books: — Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology, Kingsley's Text-book of 
Vertebrate Zoology. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 



35 



Biology — 3. Vertebrate Histology. Four hours. Beginuing of the 
year to the end of the first week in March. Two conferences and six 
hours laboratory work per week. 

The normal histology of the human body is made the basis of the 
class work. Each student is required to acquire a practical knowledge 
of all phases of histological technic. 

All the tissues as well as the structure of all of the organs of the 
body are studied. Each student prepares about one hundred and fifty 
slides. 

Text-book: — Ruber's Text-book of Histology, Bohm and Davidoff. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

Biology 4. — Embryology of Vertebrates. Second week in March to 
the end of the year. Two lectures and five hours laboratory work per 
week. The laboratory work is based on the development of the chick 
and comparisons made with that of the frog and mammal. A study is 
made of living embryos at various stages of development. These are 
later killed, prepared and sectioned by the student for the study of the 
development of the internal organs. Fully labeled drawings are re- 
quired. 

Text-book: — Elements of Embryology, Foster and Balfour, 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 
* Biology 2 and Biology 3 and 4 are given in alternate years. Biology 3 and 4 
will be given in 1909 and 1910. 

Education 



1. History of Education — ^Two hours. First Semester. 
Beginning with the oriental nations, a survey will be made of the 

leading systems of education, in connection with the forces which pro- 
duced them, and their influence upon culture as a whole. Monroe's 
History of Education is used as a guide. Painter's History of Educa- 
tion, Campayre's History of Pedagogy, and Quick's Educational Re- 
formers will be used as references. 

2. Psychology and Philosophy of Education — Two hours. Second 
Semester. 

Educational principles will be subjected to the test of psychology 
and philosophy. Text-books: Rosenkranz's Philosophy of Education, 
Harris's Psvchologic Foundations, Tompkin's Philosophy of Teaching, 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Chemistry 

PROFESSOR BENDER 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Throughout the 
year. 

Consisting of three hours lectures and recitations and four hours of 
laboratory work per week. Non-metals, metals, their metallurgy, com- 
pounds, theoretical chemistry, modern applications, problems and writ- 
ten exercises. 

Conversational lectures with demonstrations. The object of the 
course is to give the student a comprehensive knowledge of general 
chemistry and to lay a stable foundation for advanced work in that 
science. 

Newell's Descriptive Chemistry is used as a text-book during the 
early part of the course and is followed by Remsen's College Chemistry, 
which represents the ground covered in the class room and is taken as 
a guide for laboratory work. 

The course pre supposes no previous knowledge of chemistry. 

2. Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. First Semester. 
Pre-requisite Chemistrj^ i. This course consists of one lecture and 

eight hours of laboratory work per week. 

The object of the course is to familiarize the students with the best 
methods of separating and detecting the metals and acids. The reac- 
tions of the general qvialitative reagents on solutions of compounds of 
the elements, is first studied. The student then classifies the elements 
into groups, basing the classification on his own experimental work. 
His accuracy is tested by unknowns at every step. 

Text-books: Dennis and Whittelsey's Qualitative Analysis, Parts of 
Prescott and Johnson's Qualitative Chemical Analysis. Constant refer- 
ence is made to Fresenius and other standard works. 

3. Quantitative Analysis — Gravimetric — -Four hours. Second 
Semester. 

Pre-requisite Chemistry 2. Theory and practice of quantitative 
laboratory methods. The work of the course includes one lecture and 
a minimum of eight hours of laljoratory work per week. Accuracy is 
insisted upon as a first requisite. 

This course includes the determination of water of crystallization in 
copper sulphate, barium chloride and magnesium sulphate, preparation 
of pure salts, determination as oxides of aluminum, copper, nickel, iron, 
strontium, calcium, lead and zinc, determination of metals as oxalate. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 37 

sulphate, sulphide, phosphate, chromate and chloride, complete analyses 
of several alloys and minerals. 

Text-book: Olsen's Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 

4. Quantitative Analysis — Gravimetric and Volumetric — Four 
hours. First Semester. 

Pre-requisite, Chemistry ^. Electrolytic determination of metals, 
calibration of flasks, pipettes, bulbs and burettes, acidimetry, standard 
acids and alkalies. Methods for determination of nitrogen, titration of 
boric and carbonic acids, oxidation and reduction methods, iodometric 
methods. 

This course may be extended throughout the year, to include the 
analysis of iron, steel and coal, assay of iron ores, silicates, fertilizers. 
The flexibility of the course allows the student to do special work. 

Text-books: Olsen's Quantitative Chemical Analysis, Blair's Chem- 
ical Analysis of Iron. 

5. Organic Chemistry — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Pre-requisite, Chemistry i. One lecture and three hours of labora- 
tory work per week. A study of the principal compounds of carbon. 
This series of carefully selected experiments illustrates the methods used 
in preparing the principal classes of carbon compounds and the funda- 
mental reactions involved in their transformations. 

Text-books: Remsen's Organic Chemistry, Orndorff's Laboratory 
Manual of Organic Chemistry. 

6. Industrial Chemistry — ^Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Pre-requisite, Chemistry i. A careful study of the practical appli- 
cations of the laws of Chemistry. The course includes a study of the 
manufacture of artificial fuels, salt, soda, hydrochloric and sulphuric 
acids, the different kinds of glass, explosives, pigments, porcelain, 
earthenware, bromine, iodine, leather, sugars, alcohols, oils, gums, 
resins, varnishes, coal tar products, cement, concrete, coke, fertilizers, 
paper, textile products. Special metallurgical processes. Compari- 
sons of domestic with foreign methods. 

Text-book: Thorp's Outlines of Industrial Chemistry. 

Course 6 alternates in years with course 5. Offered 1909-10. 

Physics 

PROFESSOR BKNDKR 

I. Advanced Course — Three hours. First Semester. Mechanics 
of solids, liquids and gases. Heat. Lectures, demonstrations, recita- 
tions, written exercises, problems. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

2. Sound, Light, Magnetism, Electricity — Three hours. Second 
Semester. A continuation of Course i. 

3. Advanced Laboratory Practice — One hour. The course consists 
of four hours of laboratory work per week throughout the year. 

Measurements of precision in mechanics. Thermometry, Calor- 
imetry, Optics, Acoustics, Potentiometry, and allied subjects. 

Laboratory Guide: A combination of Ames and Bliss's Manual of 
Experiments in Physics, and Nichols's Laboratory Manual of Physics 
and Applied Electricity is used. 

It is intended that the scope and quality of work done in the above 
courses shall be such that the students, upon completing them and de- 
siring to take up technical work later, can receive credit for the course 
in general physics, usually given in the junior year, in an engineering 
course in any good technical school. 

4. Three hours. Throughout the year. This course is open only 
to those who have completed courses i, 2 and 3. Extended work in 
Mechanics, including engineering problems. Applied electricity. The 
character of the work will be arranged to meet individual needs. 



Department of Oratory and Public Speaking 

ARTHUR RAY SPKSSARD, B. I. 

The art of oratory rests upon certain laws of nature, and it is the 
purpose of the department topresent the work with this thought in view. 
The value of public speech is recognized and emphasized as a most 
powerful agency and as an avenue to usefulness, touching every phase 
of life. 

In the instruction special stress is laid upon originality, the develop- 
ment of individuality and personality. Elocution is taught as the oral 
interpretation of literature — and a high standard of work and selections 
is maintained. Psychic work as taught in the new schools of dramatic 
art and music, is emphasized. The full course consists of three years — 
including the required year in the College. Students with previous 
training may finish it in less time. 

Course of Study 

First Year. (Required — Freshman Year.) 

Elocution — Types of literary interpretation. Principles of expres- 
sion. Sight Reading, Voice Development, Development of Imagination. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 39 

Second Year. (Special work.) 

Tone production, oral exercises, physical culture, emotional de- 
velopment, analysis of standard works, reading and recitation of select- 
ions, private work. Dramatic Pantomime, Extemporaneous Speech, 
Dialect, and Monologues. 

Third Year. (Special work.) 

Philosophy of expression, history of oratory, melody and speech, 
advanced voice development, dramatic training, characterization, mon- 
ologues, cuttings from standard authors, oration work, extempore 
speaking, interpretation of Shakespeare, Browning, etc, private work; 
Art of criticism, arrangement of programs, public recital work. 

Private Lessons 

Persons who do not desire to graduate or take an entire course may 
arrange for lessons singly or by the term. In this case the work will be 
arranged to suit the individual needs of the student. 




40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE ACADEMY 

THE FACULTY 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A. M., PrincipaL 
Mathematics and English. 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A. M., 

Mathematics. 

Rev. JAMES THOMAS SPANGLER, A. M., B. D., 

Greek. 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M., 
History. 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M. S., 

Zoology. 

ANDREW BENDER, A. B., 

Physics. 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. M. 

English. 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M., 

German. 

ROY J. GUYER, A. B., 
Instructor in Latin. 

FLORENCE BOEHM, 

Drawing. 

WILBUR E. HARNISH, 

Assistant in Algebra. 

EDNA D. YEATTS, 

Assistant in English. 

ALBERT DANIEL FLOOK, 
Assistant in Arithmetic. 

MARY B. MUSSER, 
Assistant in Latin. 

ARTHUR RAY SPESSARD, B. I., 

Public Speaking. 

WALTER V. SPESSARD 

Assistant in Civics. 



THE ACADEMY 41 

Lebanon Valley Academy 

The Academy was established in 1866. For forty-two years it has 
cherished the ideals of full and accurate scholarship, and the develop- 
ment of character that fits one for the largest service to society. From 
its inception college preparation has been its main purpose. But its 
curriculum has been well adapted to the needs of those who have en- 
tered immediately on practical life or professional study. 

The Academy is an integral part of the College and profits by the 
proximity of students engaged in higher studies; by the ready access to 
the library, athletic field, literary societies, dormitory and laboratory 
privileges and by the opportunity to combine courses of study in the 
Academy with others in the College and Conservatory. 



Admission 

The applicant should be at least twelve years of age. It is desirable 
that he shall have completed the ordinary common school branches. 
Classes however are sometimes formed in language, arithmetic, history, 
and geography when deemed necessary. In general it is to the stu- 
dent's advantage to enter in September, or less preferably at the second 
half year. However the applicant usually finds enough work if he 
should enter at any time. 

Each student for admission shall bring with him a certified state- 
ment of work done in the school last attended. Credit will be given for 
work thus certified. Should an applicant fail to present this certificate, 
he shall take an informal examination in the common school branches. 
He will then be assigned work at the discretion of the Principal. No 
student will be admitted until his registration is completed. 



Examinations 

Examinations are held at the close of each half year. At this time 
reports are sent to parents or guardians. More frequent reports are 
sent when requested by parents. In the Academy records, A signifies 
excellent; B, very good; C, fair; D, low but passing; E, conditioned; 
F, failing; R, repeat in class. An "E" record may be removed by a 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

test on any part of the course in which the record is poor; an "F" 
record may be removed by an extended examination on the payment of 
a special fee of two dollars. 



Abs 



ences 



If, in any semester, a student have two absences in any subject he 
shall either take a test on the subject matter passed over in his absence 
or by doing specially assigned work satisfy the professor in charge that 
he has a creditable knowledge of the work passed over. If the two 
absences in question are unexcused the student shall take the test and 
pay a fee of one dollar. For detailed information, see the absence rules 
of the College. 



Courses Offered 

In the first semester classes are formed in 

English Grammar, Classics, and Rhetoric. 

Algebra, Elementary and Intermediate. 

Geometry, Plane. 

Advanced Algebra. 

History of Greece. Given in 1909. 

English History. Givein 1910. 

Latin — First year, Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil. 

Greek — First year. 

German — First and second years. 

Physics. 

Zoology. 

Freehand drawing. 

In the second semester new classes are formed in 
Roman History. Given in 1910. 
Civics. Given in 191 1. 
Englisli Classics. 



THE ACADEMY 
Outline of Courses 



43 



CLASSICAL 



SCIENTIFIC 



JUNIOR 

Latin a 

English a 

Mathematics . .ai 

Mathematics. a2 

Physical Geography . 

LOWER MIDDLE 

Drawing 

Latin b 

English .b 

History d | 

History c j 

Mathematics b 

German a 

UPPER MIDDLE 

Latin c 

English . .c 

Mathematics , c 

German a 

Declamation 

History b 

SENIOR 

Latin. d 

English Classics.. d 

Greek .a or b 

German b 

Mathematics . . d 

Science d 



JUNIOR 

Latin .a 

English.. a 

Mathematics. ............. .ai 

Mathematics a2 

Physical Geography ....... 

LOWER MIDDLE 

Drawing 

Latin ....,.., .b 

English b 

History . . . .d | 

History .c j 

Mathematics b 

History b 

UPPER MIDDLE 

Latin c 

English .c 

Mathematics c 

German. ..... a 

Declamation. 

Science. c 

SENIOR 

Latin .d 

English Classics., .d 

German . b 

Mathematics .e 

Science d 



NOTE — Any substitution or change in these courses must be ap- 
proved by the faculty. Higher Algebra, Trigonometry, and Chemistry 
may be elected, but can not be substituted for work required in the de- 
tailed outline of courses. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

English 

A. Junior English — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Vision of Sir Launfal, A Tale of Two Cities, Deserted Village, Ir- 
ving's Sketch Book, and Last of the Mohicans. Oral and written themes 
based on the student's experience. Capitalization and punctuation. 
Unit}^ and coherence in the sentence and composition. 

B. Lower Middle English — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Silas Marner, Ivanhoe, The Ancient Mariner, Pilgrim's Progress, 

DeCoverly Papers. Grammar — the verb, phrases, clauses and connect- 
ions. Short themes in Narration. 

English (a) and (b) one and one-half units. 

C. Upper Middle English — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
The Merchant of Venice, House of Seven Gables, Gareth and 

Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, The Passing of Arthur, Macaulay's Es- 
say on Addison, Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, and other classics. In- 
finitives and participles, composition and rhetoric. (Spalding.) Themes 
emphasizing diction and description. 

D. Senior English — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
English classics required for careful study by the College Entrance 

Board. 

English (c) and (d) one and one-half units. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



Latin 



A. Junior Latin — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Finst year Latin, Moore and Schlichter. 

Fabulae Faciles. One unit. 

B. Lower Middle Latin — Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Caesar, Books I.-IV. Composition based on the text. 

One unit. 

C. Upper Middle Latin — Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Cicero, six orations. D'Oge's Composition based upon the text. 
Une unit. 

D. Senior Latin — Four hours. Throughout. 
Virgil's Aeneid. Prosody, sight translation. One unit. 



THE ACADEMY 45 

German 



A. Beginning German— Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Bacon's German Grammar and easy reading texts, 150 to 200 pages. 

Translations of simple English sentences into German. One unit. 

B. Second Year German — Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Joynes-Meissner Grammar. Daily practice in writing German. 

Reading of about 400 pages of moderately easy texts, both prose and 
poetry. One unit. 



Greek 

A. Greek — Four hours. Throughout the year. White's First 
Greek Book. 

In as much as onl}^ one year of Greek is now offered in the Acad- 
emy, classical students are expected to have at least German (a) and (b.) 



Mathematics 

A.I Arithmetic — Four hours. Throughout the year. A special 
drill in fractions, percentage, and the metric system. Junior year. 
One-half unit. 

A. 2 Algebra— Four hours. Throughout the year. The equivalent 
of Slaught and Lennis' High School Algebra, elementary course. 

B. Algebra — Three hours. Throughout the year. Slaught and 
Ivcnnis High School Algebra, advanced courses, is completed. Lower 
middle year. One-half unit. 

C. Plane Geometry Four hours. Throughout the year. Wells' 
New Plane and Solid Geometry is the text-book used. Much time is 
given to original problems. Upper middle year. One unit. 

D. Solid Geometry — Four hours. First semester. Text-book, 
Wells. One-half unit. 

E. Advanced Arithmetic — Four hours. Second semester. Up-to- 
date methods and short cuts that every person should know. Required 
of all senior Academy students. 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Science 

The course embraces the work in elementary biology outlined by 
the committee on college entrance requirements. 

Text-boofk: Elementar}' Zoology, Kellogg. One unit. 

ELEMENTARY PHYSICS (Science d) 

1. Four hours. Throughout the year. Mechanics of solids, 
liquids and gases, heat, light, magnetism, electricity. Conversational 
lectures, illustrated by experiments and the lantern. Recitations. 
Weekly written exercises, corrected in detail. Problems illustrating 
the laws and principles of physics. 

The aim of the course is to acquaint the student with the phe- 
nomena and laws of the phj'sical world ; to cultivate a love for physical 
science, and to prepare for more advanced work in Physics. 

No previous knowledge of Physics is required for admission to the 
course. 

Text-book : Carhart and Chute's High School Physics. One unit. 

2. Elementary Laboratory Practice — Two hours laboratory work 
per week throughout the year. The student acquires skill in the manip- 
ulation of physical apparatus and in making measurements of physical 
quantities. Careful work is insisted upon, and the student's work must 
be approved before leaving the laboratory. Accurate and neatly written 
notes must be handed in at regular times. About sixty-five standard 
experiments are required, with an additional optional number. The 
National Physics course is followed. 

History and Civics 

B. English and Civics — Three hours. Throughout the year. One 
unit. 

C. Grecian — Three hours. First semester. 

Myer's Ancient History. Lower middle year. One-half unit. 

D. Roman — Three hours. Second semester. 

Myer's Ancient History. Lower middle year. One-half unit. 

Free-Hand Drawing 

The work consists of drawing from simple objects, and then from 
groups of objects. 



THE ACADEMY 47 

Eigbt and shade are subsequently taken up. The subject receives 
a quarter-unit of credit. The class meets once a week. 

Elocution 

One hour a week is devoted to declamations and the rudiments of 
vocal expression and intrepretation of the best English classics. 
One-fourth unit. 

Election of Studies 

While there are two definitely prescribed courses in the Academv- 
there is considerable room for election of courses that have special value 
to students intending to specialize. 

The Principal advises students what subjects are fundamental to 
professional and engineering courses. 

Graduation 

The required credit for graduation, as outlined in the Classical and 
Scientific Courses, is sixteen units, provided that the student shall 
have completed at least the three units in Mathematics, the three units 
in English, three units of Latin, two units of German, one laboratory 
science, and one unit of history. 

In general the pursuance of a four or five-hour subject per week 
per year constitutes a unit. Corresponding credits are given for reci- 
tations reciting fewer times per week. However, all credits are based 
upon the report of the committee of the Association of Teachers of 
Secondary Schools. In short, the completion of seventy-two hours of 
work as above outlined entitles the student to a diploma of graduation. 
If said student desires to enter Lebanon Valley College he shall arrange 
his work so as to meet the entrance requirements for the several 
courses. 

Sub-Preparatory Course 

Sometimes students of mature age come to us not fully prepared to 
enter the Academy. They have for various reasons attended school but 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

a short time and find it embarassing to enter the public schools with 
scholars so much younger than themselves. For these we make pro- 
vision. However, at least sixteen hours of regular Academy work is re- 
quired for classification. 

Facts to be Considered 

A one hundred dollar scholarship is awarded each year to the Acad- 
emy graduate who has, according to the vote of the Faculty, made the 
best class record and deported himself in accordance with regulations. 

Academy students are admitted to all social privileges of the Col- 
lege. Excellent opportunities are offered for self improvement in the 
Literary societies and Christian associations. 

The Normal Department 

The object of the Normal Department is to give special instruction 
to young men and women who desire to teach in our public schools. 

All the fundamental branches in which teachers are required to be 
examined are systematically and thoroughly reviewed and daily in- 
struction is given in the principles of teaching and the art of school 
management. 

The work in this department is continued throughout the year. 
During the spring term, which begins about the time public schools 
close, special teachers are employed to accommodate the increasing 
numbers. These teachers are the best public school teachers obtainable 
who know just what points to emphasize in preparation. 




DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 49 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Faculty 

HARRY DYER JACKSON, Director 

Piano, Organ, Etc. 

VIOLETTE M. MOYER, 

Voice 

ETTA WOLFE SCHLICHTER, A. M. 

German 

JOHN SMITH SHIPPEE, A. M., 

French 

NORMAN C. SCHLICHTER, A. M., 

EiKjlish 

ARTHUR SPESSARD, B. I., 

Klucntion 

FLORENCE S. BOEHM, 
Paint iny , Draunntj 

Location and Equipment 

The Engle Music Hau, is a handsome three-story stone struc- 
ture. It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe organ, director's 
room, and. nine practice rooms, waiting and writing room for student's 
use, large society rooms, lavatories, etc. The whole building is lighted 
bv electricity and heated by steam, -and designed and furnished with a 
view to having it complete in every respect for the study of music in all 
its branches. A complete musical education from the very first steps 
to the highest artistic excellence may be secured. The director will 
use every effort to obtain positions for those students who have finished 
the courses, and who may wish to teach or perform in public. 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Object 

The department has for its object, the foundation and diffusion of 
a high and thorough musical education. The methods used are those 
followed by the leading European conservatories. The courses are 
broad, systematic, progressive, and as rapid as possible, and the con- 
servatory offers the means for a complete education in musical art at a 
moderate cost. 

HARRY DYER JACKSON 



TKACHER OF PIANOFORTE, HARMONY AND THEORY 

The musical talent of Prof. Jackson manifested itself in childhood 
and he began the study of music at the age of eight. He was a student 
in the Conservatory of Music, Jacksonville, 111., 1883-84; New England 
Conservatory of Music, 1889, under the instruction of Otto Bendix, piano, 
and H. M. Dunham, organ. He graduated from Boston (Mass.) Con- 
servatory of Music under Herman P. Chelius, 1892. He then became 
director of Genesee (111.) Conservatory of Music where he remained five 
years. He graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music 
under Charles Porter, piano, H. M. Dunham, organ, and post graduate 
the following year. After two years as director of the Conservatory of 
Music of the Alabama Conference Female College, he took post gradu- 
ate work in Paris, Berlin, and Boston, Mass. He became director of 
the Qnincy Conservatory of Music in 1902, where his success was phe- 
nomenal. His election as director of Engle Conservatory occurred 
June 2, 1908. 



Pianoforte 



The course is divided into sixteen grades, equalling four grades per 
annum for four years work. A comprehensive study of the standard 
literature of instructive piano work is absolutely necessary to the piano 
student and these are studied through the various grades. The new 
school of studies edited by CarlThumer and published in sixteen grades, 
along with Koeler's and Plaidy's Technical Exercises are the basis for 
the technical and etude work through all the grades. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 51 

Voice 

It is the aim of this department to build up the voice, beginning 
with the simplest forms of pure tone production and proceeding sys- 
tematically to advanced vocalization. Perfect breath control, relaxa- 
tion and correct tone placing are the cardinal points in voice culture, 
and these are careful and rigidly insisted upon. Phrasing, enunciation, 
and reasonance are also given important consideration in the course. 
Special attention is paid to the needs of individual voices, and the 



Organ 

The student must be advanced to at least the sixth grade in the 
pianoforte course before taking up the study of the organ. 

The course prepared is based on the best methods of England, 
France, and Germany, and with a view to educating the student in the 
most thorough manner. Special attention is given to the proper modes 
of service playing, organ accompaniments, etc., as well as concert or 
recital playing. 



Harmony Course 

Is based on Brockhoven's Harmony and occupies four terms' work. 
It is taught in classes, but backward students can arrange for private 
lessons. 

Theory Course 

Is based on Elson's Theory and occupies three terms, class work. 

History Course 

Is based on Reimann's History of Music and Filmore's Lessons in 
Musical History, and occupies three terms of class work. 



52 LEBANON VALIvEY COLLEGE 

Send to the Director for separate catalogue of the Department of 
Music containing the complete courses in all branches. 

LECTURES. — There will be lectures on musical history each term, 
and all regular students of the departments will be required to attend 
them. 

CONCERTS.— Recitals and concerts by the students, the Faculty, 
or leading artists, will be held at stated intervals throughout the year. 

Certificates 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATES 
Complete course in pianoforte or in any of the other subjects, viz: 
voice, violin, harmony, theory, or history. 
Fee for certificate, $2.50. 

Diplomas 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DIPLOMAS 

Complete selected course, viz: piano, organ, violin or voice. 

In case of piano or organ student, three terms voice. In case of 
voice student, three terms piano. Complete courses in harmony, his- 
tory and theor)^ Three terms each in chorus class, English, grammar, 
rhetoric and composition, literature, French or German. 

Free tuition in any one of the literary studies. Each candidate to 
give a public recital during last term. 

Fee for diploma, 16. 00. 

Degree 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE (Mus. B) 

Candidates must already have taken a diploma. 

Must have freshman standing in any of the College courses. 

Two years, fugue, harmony, counterpoint and composition. 

Must write a composition for four solo voices and chorus, to occupy 
about twenty minutes, and must train, rehearse and conduct the same 
for public performance. 

Fee for degree, |io.oo. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 53 

Examinations 

All students taking any of the regular music courses, will be com- 
pelled to take the various examinations the second week of April. 
These examinations are for entrance in the various classes (sophomore, 
junior, and senior) the following September. All senior students must 
take their final examinations at the same time. 

These will be held in the College chapel, and are for performance, 
not theory. A list of the various studies, selections, etc., can be ob- 
tained at any time from the Director. 

Tuition 

PIANO OR VOICE. 

Fall term 30 lessons $22 50 

Fall term 15 lessons 11 25 

Winter term 24 lessons 18 00 

Winter term 12 lessons . 900 

Spring term 24 lessons 18 00 

Spring term 12 lessons 9 00 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Fall term . 30 lessons 30 00 

Fall term 15 lessons 15 00 

Winter term 24 lessons 24 00 

Winter term . 12 lessons 12 00 

Spring term 24 lessons 24 00 

Spring term . 12 lessons 12 00 

PIPE ORGAN. 

Fall term 30 lessons 30 00 

Fall term 15 lessons 15 00 

Winter term 24 lessons 24 00 

Winter term 12 lessons 12 00 

Spring term 24 lessons 24 00 

Spring term 12 lessons 12 00 

HARMONY IN CLASS. 

Fall term 7 00 

Winter or vSpring term 5 00 

Private Lessons, each 75 



54 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

HISTORY IN CLASS. 

Fall term 5 00 

Winter or Spring term 4 00 

Additional charge for single lesson. 

Students taking a full music course are charged a matriculation fee 
of $3.00 for the year, payable in advance. This fee entitles student to 
all privileges of the College. 

Students taking piano, organ, or voice only are charged a matric- 
ulation fee of $1.00 payable in advance. 

Pipe organ students must pay at the rate of 10 cents an hour for 
organ blower. 

Fee for graduation diploma, $6.00. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS —No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In case of long continued illness the loss is shared equally by 
the College and the student 

All tuition is payable in advance. 

Pupils may enter any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., 
the beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufi&cient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade, 
will be issued at the close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., address 

DIRECTOR OF THE CONSERVATORY, 

Lkbanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 




DEPARTMENT OF ART 55 

DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Florence S. Boehm, Instructor 
Course of Study for Certificate 

First Year — Drawing, Sketching in pencil of various familiar sub- 
jects, and drawing from geometric solids, good examples of proportion 
and perspective, and the principles of light and shade. 

Painting — Flowers, fruit and leaves, models, casts and familiar 
objects. Elementary original composition. 

Modeling — Fruit, vegetable forms and leaves from casts and na- 
ture; animals from the cast and prints. Elementary original compo- 
sition. 

Second Year — Charcoal drawing from casts of heads. Painting in 
water colors and pastels from groups of still life, interiors, decorative 
subjects, flowers, draperies, and out- of door sketching. 

Third Year — Sketching from life. Painting in oils from still life 
and nature. Wash drawings in ink, water color, historic ornament. 
Studies in color harmony. 

Teacher's Class — Principles and methods of drawing, modeling, 
blackboard drawing, lettering, brush work, sketching from life and 
water color. 

Saturday work is offered for teachera and children who cannot take 
work during the week. 

Keramics — Classes in china painting are instructed by the latest 
methods in conventional and naturalistic treatment. The china is fired 
in the institution, giving students an opportunity for learning how to 
fire their own china. 

Miniature — Miniature painting on ivory. 

Students who do not desire the certificate course may take special 
work along any line preferred. 

Art Exhibit 

During commencement week an exhibit of some of the work done in 
the department is held in the studio, to which all visitors are welcomed 
and entertained by members of the department. 

Expenses 

TUITION— One lesson a week 

Two lessons a week .... 

Children's beginning class 

Children's advance class 

Special lessons . 75 cents each. 



FAI.I. 


WINTER 


SPRING 


TERM 


TERM 


TERM 


fio 00 


1 8 GO 


$ 8 GG 


. 16 00 


12 GO 


12 00 


2 50 


2 GO 


2 GO 


4 00 


3 00 


3 00 


Matriculat 


ion Fee 


$1 00 



56 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



The College 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Lehman, Max F Annville 

Mills, Alfred Keister Annville 

Waughtel, Samuel H. . . . . . . Red Lion 

Wiegand, J. A Lebanon 



SENIORS 



Dotter, Charles G. 
Flook, Albert Daniel 
Hoffer, George Nissley 
Lowery, Grace Burtner 
Moyer, Amos B. 
Richter, George M. 
Spessard, Walter V. . 
Stehman,J. Warren 
Weidler, Deleth Eber 
Yeatts, Edna D. 



Annville 

Myersville, Md. 

Hummelstcwn 

Harrisburg 

Sunbury 

Halifax 

Annville 

Mountville 

Royalton 

York 



Bair, Grover Cleveland 
Fleming, Mervin R. 
Freed, Edith Nissley 
Garrett, E. Myrtle . 



JUNIORS 

Belleville 

York 

Annville 

Hummelstown 

Harnish, Wilbur E Mechanicsburg 

Hoerner, Lena Mae Mechanicsburg 

Jacoby, John Edward ...... York 

Kohler, Fillmore T Yoe 

Musser, Mary B. Mountville 

Plumnier, Charles W Hagerstown 



Plummer, Wilbur Clayton 
Renn, Earl E. 
Rutherford, F. Allen 
Seltzer, Lucy S. 
Shaffer, Floyd E. 



Hagerstown, 

Middletown 

Royalton 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 



Md. 
Md. 



Strock, J. Clyde Mechanicsburg 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



57 



Weidler, Victor O. . 
Yoder, Jesse T. . 



SOPHOMORES 



Beckley, Arthur S. . 
Bomberger, Harry K. 
Brunner, William Albert 
Ehrhart. Oliver T. 
Ellis, William O. . 
Frost, Fred T. 
Herr, Harvey Elmer 
Herr, Mabel S. . 
Holdeman, Phares M. 
Kauffman, Artus O. 
Koontz, Paul R. 
Lehman, John Karl 
Marshall, Edward. 
Schell, Esther N. 
Saylor, Roger B. 
Shoop, William Cars©n 
Spessard, Earl A. . 
Spessard, Lester 
Strickler, Alfred Desch . 
Ziegler, Samuel G. 



Royalton 
Belleville 



Mont Clare 

Lebanon 

New Bloomfield 

Millersville 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Annville 

Bellegrove 

Dallastown 

West Fairview 

Annville 

Annville 

M^'erstown 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Hanover 



FRESHMEN 



Blecker, Amnion J. 
Butterwick, Oliver 
Carmany, Earl H. 
Flook, Dawson Y. . 
Guyer, George W. 
Harnish, Clair F. 
Hensel, Forrest S. 
Hershey, Catharine 
Kennedy, Francis R. 
Kiracofe, Myra G. 
Kreider, A. Louise 
Keister, Donald C. . 
Kreider, Aaron S. 
King, Carrie E. 
Lau, Lizzie A. 



. Myerstown 

Lebanon 
. Annville 

Myersville, Md. 
. Shippensburg 

Mechanicsburg 
. Lykens 

Hershey 
. Kingston, Jamaica 

Hagerstown 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Mechanicsburg 
. York 



58 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Leopold, J. B. . Lebanon 

Leibold, Titus J. Reading 

Light, Carrie S. . . ... . . . Jonestown 

Myers, Cora V Ephrata 

Reed, Josiah F. Lebanon 

Rettew, Chester E Columbia 

Rosato, Saverio Scranton 

Shenk, Robert D Columbia 

Smith, Charles C. Red Lion 

Snyder, Verda A. ...... . Hagerstown 

Seltzer, Nellie ....... Lebanon 

Shoap, Loyd B Shippensburg 

Wingerd, Guy Chambersburg 

Wingerd, Max ........ Chambersburg 

Wert, Mark H Millersburg 

Weidler, Helen L Royalton 

SPECIAL 

Light, Jessie G Annville 

Rigler, Margaret Annville 

Loos, Anna Annville 

Detter, D. F. Williamstown 

Frantz, Edith Lebanon 

Savastio, Leonard Middletown 

Moyer, Harry M. Palmyra 

Lindsay, A. M. Steelton 



ACADEMY 



Arndt, Charles Homer 
Bachman, Ora B. 
Balthaser, James S. 
Biever, Walter 
Black, Mary 
Brightbill, Helen E. 
Brown, J. E. 
Christeson, Florence E. 
Condran, John H. 
Cresson, Nellie 
Deitzler, Jonathan C. 
Detweiler, Ruth C. 
Eby, Ervin E. 



Ensminger, Harvey 
Fegan, Lloyd V. 
Gerberich, Clyde E. 
Gingrich, Katie 
Goodman, W. G. 
Groh, Samuel B. 
Heffelfinger, Victor M. 
Himmelberger, A. M. 
HoUzman, Mark G. 
Hummel, Russel P. 
Keath, Grace V. 
Klinger, Landis R. 
Kreider, Edward L. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



59 



Kreider, Paul M. 
Lehman, Edith M. 
Leister, J. Maurice 
Lesher, Paul E. 
]vight, Boaz G. 
Light, Milo 
Light, Raymond H. 
Light, V. Earl 
Long, Dora 
Loser, Earl G. 
Loser, Paul 
Maberry, Laura A. 
McCurdy, C. E. 
Meckley, Elizabeth L. 
Meyer, Irvin C. 
Meyer, E. May 
Mulhollen, Victor D. 
Nissley, Mary B. 



Peiffer, W. H. 
Ranch, Margaret 
Reilly, Edith 
Risser, Blanche M. 
Savastio, Leonard B. 
Sherk, John E. 
Suavely, Henry E. 
Spayd, Mary A. 
Spessard, Bertha S. 
Spessard, Lottie M. 
Ulrich, Charles Y. 
Walters, John Allen 
Weigel, Amos H. 
Williams, George Albert 
Winter, William C. 
Yarkers, Edna E. 
Zullinger, George 



NORMAL CLASS 



Artz, Stella K. , 
Beckley, SalHe A. . 
Bender, Harry M. 
Bixler, Anna . 
Bohr, Matilda M. 
Bomgardner, Lizzie . 
Daniels, Emma H. 
Donmoyer, Thomas F. 
Dundore, Willis A. 
Early, Henry H. 
Fry, H. Gertrude 
Groh, Ida 
Hartman, Clara R. 
Hartz, Ira G. 
Heagy, Roy F. . 
Heilman, George E. 
Hetrich, Mary R. 
Knoll, Harry W. 
Koons, Miles B. . 
Krall, Jerome H. 



Lickdale 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Palmyra 

Cornwall 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Avon 

Palmyra 

Palmyra 

Heilmandale 

Lebanon 

Palmyra 

Palmyra 

Cleona 

Grantville 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 



6o 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Lehman, Clayton 
Light, Hattie A. 
Light, Alice L. . 
Light, Boaz G. 
Light, Katia M. 
Light, Harrison B. 
Light, Grace E. 
Light, Bertha G. 
Mease, Harry 
Meyer, Jennie L. 
Meyer, Sarah S. 
Nye, Carrie E. 
Nye, Jennie M. . 
Olewine, Sallie M. 
Rabuck, Katie M. 
Rank, Edna L. 
Rank, A. Kathryn 
Reist, Edmund H. 
Reist, Sallie 
Reiter, Mayme F. 
Schropp, Lynian E. 
Seabold, Emma F. 
Shaak, Alice M. 
Shelley, Daniel O. 
Sherk, Robert E. 
Shetter, Joseph S. 
Snyder, Lester E. 
Swanger, Harry 
Wenger, Katie M. 
Youtz, Ella . 



Campbelltown 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Avon 

Annville 

Annville 

Avon 

Lebanon 

Onset 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Annville 

Palmyra 

Myerstown 

East Hanover 

Palmyra 

Palmyra 

Lebanon 

Heilmandale 

Myerstown 

Pinegrove 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Cleona 

Palmyra 

Campbelltown 

Greencastle 

Avon 

Rexmont 

Colebrook 



CONSERVATORY STUDENTS 



Albert, Mark A. 
Albert, Maud 
Anderson, Scott 
Bachman, Ora B. 
Balthaser, James S. 
Beckley, Carrie M. 
Bender, Harry M. 
Black, Mary S. 



. Annville 

Lebanon 
. Chambersburg 

Annville 
. Hamburg 

Lebanon 
. Annville 

Columbia 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



6i 



Blecker, AmmonJ. 
Boehm, Lydie 
Bowman, Luella 
Brane, Jessie M. 
Brightbill, Helen E. 
Burkey, Lillian S. 
Christeson, Mary L. 
Condran, Elsie 
Cresson, Nellie . 
Deck, Vernon 
Detweiler, Ruth C. 
Embich, Edna 
Ensniinger, Henry 
Ensminger, Mary 
Erb, Pearl 
Evans, David 
Fasnacht, Irene . 
Fegan, Lloyd V. 
Flook, Dawson Y. 
Frantz, Edith C. 
Freed, Edith N. 
Gantz, Lillian 
Gates, Blanche M. 
Gingrich, Katie M. 
Gingrich, Edith . 
Gleim, Edith 
Hauer, Lillian 
Hensel, Forrest S. 
Herr, Mabel S. . 
Herr, Harvey E. 
Hershey, Catharine E. 
Keath, Grace V. 
Kiracofe, Myra G. 
Kreider, A. Louise 
Lehman, Max F. 
Lehman, Edith M. 
Light, Jessie G. . 
Light, Katie M. 
Light, Ralph 
Light, Milo . 
Lowery, Grace B. 
Maberry, Laura A, 



. Myerstown 

Annville 
. Lebanon 

Reading 
. Annville 

Lebanon 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Fredericksburg 
. Palmyra 

Lebanon 
. Mt. Aetna 

Mt. Aetna 
, Hockersville 

Wiconisco 
. Annville 

Cleona 
. Myersville, Md. 

Lebanon 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Lebanon 

Palmyra 
. Annville 

Lebanon 
. Lebanon 

Lykens 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Hershey 

Penryn 
. Hagerstown, Md. 

Annville 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Harrisburg 

Schuylkill Haven 



62 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Maulfair, Iva B. 
Maulfair, Ralph 
Maulfair, Mary . 
McFerran, Lulu 
Mayer, Maud I. 
Meyer, E. Mae 
Meyer, Allen 
Mills, Alfred K. 
Mills, Lucile 
Mills, Charles W. 
Mulhollen, Victor D 
Musser, Mary B. 
Nissley, Mary B. 
Nye, Florence L 
Patchke, Luther 
Prout, Violet W. 
Ranch, Margaret V. 
Reilley, Edith . 
Richter, George M. 
Rigler, Margaret 
Ristenbatt, Beulah 
Savastio, Leonard 
Shenk, Rachel . 
Spangler, Ruth F. 
Spayd, Mary A. . 
Smith, Fred. S. 
Spessard, Bertha 
Spessard, Lottie 
Spessard, Earl 
Spessard, Arthur R. 
Strock, J. Clyde 
Strickler, Alfred D. 
Walters, Olive J. 
Wood, Claire I. 
Zullinger, George 



. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Lebanon 
. Sacramento 

Annville 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Ouincy, 111. 
. Wilmore 

Mountville 
. Middletown 

Annville 
. Lebanon 

Wiconisco 
. Grantville 

New Haven, Conn. 
. Halifax 

Annville 
, Lebanon 

Middletown 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Chambersburg 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Mechanicsburg 

Lebanon 
. Annville 

Annville 
. Chambersburg 



ELOCUTION 



Brane, Jessie M. 
Brightbill, Helen E. 
Brunner, Albert 



Christeson, Mary L. 
Gingrich, Katie 
Holdeman. Phares M. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



63 



Koontz, Paul R. 
Kohler, Filmore T. 
Plumnier, Charles W. 
Renn, Earle E. 



Shoop, W. C. 
Snyder, Verda A. 
Ziegler, vSamuel M. 



ART STUDENTS 



Boltz, Kathryn .... 


. Annville 


Brightbill, Helen E. 


Annville 


Elliott. Bertha .... 


. Annville 


Ellis, William O. . 


Annville 


Keister, I^a Verne 


. Annville 


Keath, Grace V. . . 


Penryn 


Kreider, Clement H. . 


. Annville 


Kreider, Howard H. 


Annville 


Maulfair, Mary E. , . . 


. Annville 


Meyers, Mae E. . 


Annville 


Nissley, Mary B. . . . 


. Middletown 


Snyder, Verda A. . 


Keedysville, Md. 


Spangler, W. Roy 


. Annville 


Stein, Mary .... 


Annville 


SUMMARY 


Graduate Students 


. 4 


Undergraduate Students 


87 


Seniors 


10 


Juniors .... 


18 


Sophomores . 


20 


Freshmen 


31 


Special 


8 


Academy .... 


61 


Normal Department 


50 


Department of Music 


85 


Dfepartment of Elocution 


13 


Department of Art 


14 




314 


Names repeated 


54 


TOTAI. .... 


. 260 



64 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Degrees Conferred, June 3, 1908 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Appenzellar, J. Lester Lehn, Homer M. B. 

Linebaugh, Norman L. 



Billow, Milton Oscar 
Courson, Delia 
Fisher, Byrt W. 
Guyer, Roy J. 
Hartz, R. S. B. 
Knaub, Neda A. 
Kreider, Sallie Wenger 



Long, Samuel B. 
Mease, Oliver 
Oldham, Stanley R. 
Shoop, Charles Wilson 
Zuck. Alice M. 



GraybilL Robert B. 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Rupp, Rev. S. Edwin 



DIPLOMAS IN MUSIC 



Altenderfer, Mrs. W. 
Fasnacht, Irene 
Frantz, Edith 
Gallagher, Nellie 
Gamber, Lydia 
Gantz, Mary 
Hardman, Frank 
Hatz, Ervin 
Kreider, A. Louise 



Light, Jessie G. 
Lutz, Alice K. 
Musser, Mary B. 
Oldham, Celia 
Oldham, Constance 
Shaud, Elizabeth 
Smith, Fred 
Ulrich, Gertrude 



DOCTOR OF LAWS 

Hon. George Kunkel, A. M., Harrisburg, Pa. 



INDEX 



Academy 40-48 

Absences 42 

Admission ........... 41 

Courses Offered ......... 42 

Description of Courses 44 

Examinations ......... 41 

Outline of Courses ......... 43 

Advisers ............ 14 

Art Department 55 

Astronomy ........... 31 

Bible 32 

Biology 33 

Board of Trustees 3 

Buildings and Grounds 10 

Calendar .... ........ 2 

Chemistry 36 

Class Standing 15 

College Organizations ......... 12 

Corporation ............ 3 

Courses, Outline of, (College) '. 21-24 

Degrees Conferred .......... 64 

Degree and Diploma 15 

Discipline 14 

Economics ........... 32 

Education 35 

English Language and Literature 29 

Expenses, College and Academy ....... 16 

Department of Art 55 

Department of Music 53 

Faculty and Officers 5 

French Language and Literature ....... 27 

General Information 10 

German Language and Literature 28 

Graduate Work 15 

Greek Language and Literature ....... 25 

History ...... 31 ' 



History of the College 7 

Laboratories ii 

Latin Language and Literature 26 

Library and Reading Rooms 10 

Mathematics . . . 30 

Music Department .......... 49 

Normal Department .......... 48 

Philosophy 25 

Physics ............ 37 

Political Science • . . 31 

Public Speaking . . . 38 

Religious Work .......... ii 

Register of Students . . . . . . . . . -56 

Requirements for Admission : 

Academy 41 

College ' 17 

Scholarships 16 

Sociology 32