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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF 



Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Conservatory of Music 
The Academy 



1912 



Press of 

Hiester Printing and Publishing Co. 

Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CALENDAR 



1911-1912 

191 1 

September 13, Wednesday, College year began. 

November 30, Thursday, Anniversary of the Clionian Literary Society. 

December 21, Thursday, Fall Term ended. 

1912 
January, 3, Wednesday, Winter Term began. 
January 22-26, Mid-year examinations. 
January 25, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
January 26, Friday, First Semester ended. 
January 29, Monday, Second Semester began. 
March 29, Friday, Anniversary of Kalozetean Literary Society. 
May 3, Friday, Anniversary of Philokosmian Literary Society. 
May 28-31, Senior Final examinations. 
June 3-7, Final examinations. 
June 9, Sunday 10:30 a. m , Baccalaureate sermon. 

7:30 p. m., Address before Christian Associations. 
June io, Monday, 7:45 p. m., Exercises by Graduating Class in Music. 
June 11, Tuesday 9:00 a. m., Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

2XD p. m., Class Day exercises. 

7:45 p. m., Junior Oratorical Contest. 

9:00 p. m., Alumni Banquet and Re-union. 
June 12, Wednesday 10:00 a, m., Forty-sixth Annual Commencement. 

8:00 p. in., Annuai Play, Merchant of Venice. 

1912-1913 

1912 

September 9-10, Examination and registration of Students. 

September 11, Wednesday, College year begins. 

November 28, Thursday, Anniversary of Clionian Literary Society. 

November 28-29, Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 20, Friday, Fall Term ends. 

1913 
January 1, Wednesday, Winter Term begins. 
January 20-24, Mid-year examinations. 
January 23, Thursday, Day of Prayer for Colleges. 
January 27, Monday, Second Semester begins 
February 9, Sunday, Day of Prayer for Students. 
February 22, Saturday, Washington's Birthday. 
March 19, Wednesday, Winter Term ends. 

EASTER RECESS 
March, 26, Wednesday, Spring Term begins. 

June 11, Wednesday, 10:00 a. m., Forty-seventh Annual Commence- 
ment. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE CORPORATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

President Lawrence Keister, and Faculty, Ex-Offlcio 
Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 



RESIDENCE 



REV. Wm. H. Washinger, A.M., D.D., Chambersburg 



Rev. John E. Kleffm<_n, D. D., 
S. H. Bowers, Esq., 
George G. Snyder, Esq., 
Rev. Cyrus F. Floor, 
Rev. John W. Owen, A. M. B. D., 
REV. G. D. Gossard, A. B. D. D., 
Rev. A. B. StaTTon, A. M., B. D., 
W. O. Appenzellar, Esq., 
Rev. L- Walter Lutz, 
Rev. D. M. Oyer 



Chambersburg 
Lemoyne 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Mversville, Md. 
York 

Baltimore, Md. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Chambersburg 
Dallastown 
Boiling Springs 



TERM EXPIRES 

1912 
1912 
1914 
1 9 14 
1912 
1914 
1913 
1913 
I9I3 
1913 
1914 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 



Hon. W. H. Ulrich * 
Isa c B. Haak, Esq., 
John Hunsicker, Esq., 
Rev. J. A. Lyter, D. D. , 
Jonas G. Stehman, Esq., 
Rev. D. D. Lowery, D. 5., 
Samuel F. Engle, Esq., 
George F. Breinig, Esq., 
H. A. Sherk, Esq., 
Aaron Kreider, Esq., 
M. S. Hendricks, Esq., 



Hummelstown 

Myerstown 

Lebanon 

Harrisburg 

Mountville 

Harrisburg 

Palmyra 

Allentown 

Harrisburg 

Anuville 

Shamokin 



Representatives from the Virginia Conference 



Rev. W. F. Gruver, D. D., 
Rev. E. E. Neff, 
Rev. A. S. Hammack, 
Eugene Tutwiler 
Elmer Hodges, 
W. S. Secrist, 



Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Berkeley Springs, Va. 
Dayton, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Winchester, Va. 
Keyser, W. Va. 



1912 
1913 

1913 
1913 
1913 
1912 

J 9!3 
1912 
1912 
1912 



1913 
1912 

1913 
1912 
1912 
1913 



Trustees=at= Large — H. S. Immel, Esq , Mountville; Warren A. 
Thomas, Esq., Johnstown; A. J. Cochran, Esq., Dawson. 

Alumnal Trustees — Prof. H. H Baish, A. M., '01, Altoona; Rev. 
I. E. Runk, B.D., '03, Harrisburg; Rev. F. Berry Plummer, 
A. B., '05, Baltimore. 

* Deceased. 



4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF BOARD 

OFFICERS 

President Rev. A. B. Statton, U. D. 

Vice President A. S. Kreider 

Secretary -r Rev. F. Berry Plummer, A. B. 
Treasurer Rev. W. H. Weaver 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Lawrence Keister S. F. Engle 

Aaron Kreider John Hunsicker 

W. H. Washinger D. D. Lowery 

* Hon. Win. H. Ulrich 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Aaron Kreider G. C. Snyder 

H. A. Sherk S. F. Engle 

W. F. Gruver C. W. Brewbaker 

* W. H. Ulrich 

FACULTY COMMITTEE 
A. B. Statton J. A. Lyter 

D. D. Lowery H. H. Baish 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 
I. B. Haak B. H. Engle * 

LIBRARY AND APPARATUS COMMITTEE 
W. O. Appenzellar J. A. Lyter 

A. E. Shroyer G. D. Gossard 

GROUND AND BUILINGS COMMITTEE 

B. H. Engle * E. E. Neff 

J. G. Stehinan 

MATRON— Mrs. Violette Freed. 
* Deceased. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

REV. LAWRENCE KEISTER S. T. B., D. D. 

President 

CHARLES CLINTON PETERS, A. M. Dean, 
Professor of Philosophy and Education 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A. M. 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

HIRAM HERR SHENK, A. M. 
Professor of History and Political Science 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M. S., Secretary 
Professor of Biological Sciences 

REV. ALVIN E. SHROYER, B. D. 

Professor of Greek, and Instructor in Bible 

GEORGE ELLAS WISEWELL, A. M. 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin 

Language and Literature 

Professor of French 

HENRY E. WANNER, B. S. 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics 

LUCY S. SELTZER, A. M. 

Professor of German 

FALBA L. JOHNSON, A. M. 
Professor of English 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A. M. 
Principal of the Academy 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

E. EDWIN SHELDON, Mus. M. 
Director of the Conservatory of Music 

IDA MANEVAL SHELDON. Mus. B. 
Pianoforte, Harmony, Musical History 

MRS. EDITH FRANTZ MILLS 
Voice Culture 



HARRIET LADD MARBLE 

Voice, Harmony, Musical History 

FRED WEISS LIGHT 
Violin 

FLORENCE BOEHM 
Instructor in Art 

MAY BELLE ADAMS 

From Emerson College of Oratory 

Professor of Oratory and Physical Culture 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM 
Laboratory Assistant in Biology 

GEORGE A. WILLIAMS 
Laboratory Assistant in Physics and Chemistry 

JOSIAH E REED 

HELEN L. WEIDLER 

HARRY E. ULRICH 

CLARA KEE HORNE 

ELIZABETH AGNES LAU 

Teachers in Academy 

REV. HENRY B. SPA YD 
College Pastor 



The College 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Lebanon Valley COLLEGE originated in the action of East Penn- 
sylvania Conference at its annual session held at Lebanon in March, 1865. 
Resolutions were passed deciding the question of establishing a higher 
institution of learning to be located within the bounds of the East Penn- 
sylvania or of the Pennsylvania Conference. One year later the com- 
mittee-appointed, recommended in its report: First, the establishment 
of a school of high grade under the supervision of the church; second, 
to accept for this purpose the grounds and buildings of what was then 
known as the Annville Academy, tendered as a gift to the Conference; 
and, third, to lease the buildings and grounds to a responsible party 
competent to take charge of the school for the coming year. School 
opened May 7, 1866, with forty-nine students. By the close of the col- 
legiate year one hundred and nftj'-three were enrolled, thus demonstrat- 
ing at once the need of such an institution in this locality and the wis- 
dom of the founders. 

In April, 1867, the Legislature granted a charter with full university 
privileges under which a College faculty was organized with Rev. 
Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph. D., as president, and Prof. E. Benjamin 
Bierman, A. M., as principal of the Normal Department. The same year 
the Philokosmian Literary Society was organized by the young men, 
additional land was purchased and a large brick building erected there- 
on with chapel, recitation rooms, president's office, and apartments for 
sixty boarding students. The building was not furnished and fully oc- 
cupied till the fall of 1868. 

The first regular commencement occured June 16, 1S70. About two 
years later opposition to the school manifested itself and President Vick- 
roy stated in his report to the annual Conference that the attendance of 
students was reduced from one hundred to seventy-five, the cause of 
this diminution being persistent opposition on the part of certain 
brethren. 

President Vickroy directed the affairs of the institution for five 
years, from 1866 to 1871. During his administration the charter was 
prepared and granted by the State Legislature, the laws and regulations 
for the internal workings framed and adopted, the curriculum establish- 
ed, and two classes — those of 1870 and 1871 — were graduated. In June, 
187 1, Prof. Lucian H. Hammond was elected president. During his 
term of office five classes were graduated, the Clionian Literary Society 
organized by the ladies, and the College made steady and substantial 
progress, but failing health compelled him to resign in June, 1876. 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 9 

Rev. David D. DeLong, D. D., became the third president. He 
found it necessary to reconstruct the faculty and retained but two of 
the former teachers. The Kalozetean Literary Society was instituted 
to awaken interest in literary work among the young men by means of 
a healthy rivalry, and the music department was organized. In the 
summer of 1883 a large two-story frame building was erected on College 
Avenue, containing art room, music rooms, the department of natural 
science, a museum and the College library. During his presidency 
one-hundred and seven students were graduated, fourteen in music and 
ninety-three in the literary department. 

After an interregnum of several months Rev. Edmund S. Lorenz, 
A. M., was elected president and took up the work with energy and 
ability. Enlargement was his motto and the friends of the College 
rallied to his support. Post graduate studies were offered. The Col- 
lege Forum made its appearance under the editorship of the Faculty. 
With a devotion that won the admiration of his friends he labored in- 
cessantl}' for nearly two years to make the College the peer 'of any in 
the State, but under this strain his health failed and he was obliged to 
retire at the close of the collegiate year of 1889. 

The fifth president, Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, D. D., assumed the 
duties of his office at the opening of the fall term in 1889. He secured 
creditable additions to the endowment fund but because of discouraging 
conditions declined re-election at the close of the first year. 

The question of re-locating the College agitated its constituency, 
divided its friends and greatly hindred its progress. Some were al- 
most in despair, others were indifferent, while others hoped and waited 
for the best. Under these conditions the Board of Trustees met in 
special session July 28, 1830, and called Dr. E. Benjamin Bierman to the 
presidency. He was inaugurated on the evening of the sixth of Novem- 
ber following. Buildings were renovated, a large number of students 
enrolled and the Mary A. Dodge Fund often thousand dollars received, 
"the interest of which only is to be loaned without charge to such pious 
young people as the Faculty of the College may deem worthy of help 
as students." The Silver Anniversary of the College was celebrated 
June 15, 1892, when money was raised to purchase about three acres of 
ground to be added to the college campus. With the experience of 
twenty-five years of earnest effort to combat opposition and overcome 
errors and misconceived notions of higher education and to build up an 
institution of learning creditable to the United Brethren Church, the 
friends of the College entered upon the second quarter of a century 
with new hope and aspiration. 



io LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

President Bierman served successfully until the spring of 1891, when 
he was succeeded by Rev. Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., who held the office 
till Jan. 1, 1906, after which time the administration was in the hands 
of the Executive Committee and the Faculty until the election of Rev. 
A. P. Funkhouser, A. M., March 9, 1906. 

The presidency of Dr. Roop stands out as the period when the 
group system in the College curriculum was introduced, when the ath- 
letic field was acquired, when the disastrous fire of December 24, 1904, 
occured, sweeping away the Administration Building in a few hours, 
and when several new buildings arose on the campus — Engle Music 
Hall 1899, and the Carnegie Library and Ladies' Dormitory in 1904. The 
recuperative powers of the institution were put to the test by the 
destruction of the main building. At a meeting held January 5, 1905, 
the friends of the College, resolved, amid unusual enthusiasm to rebuild 
at once and with the stimulus of a gift of fifty thousand dollars from 
Andrew Carnegie received by the President, who had previously secured 
$ 20,000 from the same source plans were matured by which to raise one 
hundred thousand dollars for this purpose. The erection of three new 
buildings was projected — the Men's Dormitory, the Central Heating 
Plant and the new Administration Building, the latter being completed 
under the supervision of President Funkhouser, whose term of office is 
marked also by a strenuous effort to straighten out the tangled threads 
in the financial skein and to meet the debt which rose to almost or al- 
together ninety thousand dollars. Bonds were issued to the amount of 
fifty thousand dollars and the co-operative college circles organized to 
relieve the financial conditions. 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S. T. B , D. D., was elected president of the 
College, June 10, 1907, at the annual session of the Board of Trustees. 
He solicited $7,700 for the equipment of the Science Department, 
secured the Mills Scholarship $1000 and the Immel Scholarships $2000. 
The debt effort authorized by the Board, June 3, 1908, was carried for- 
ward successfully, $50,000 having been pledged, before Jan. 1, 1909, ac- 
cording to the condition of the pledge which also required the continu- 
ation of the canvass to secure another $50,000 in order to cover the 
entire debt. At the death of the Rev. Daniel Eberly, D. D., July 9, 
1910 whose will bears date of September 17, 1909, the College came into 
possession of property valued at about $45,000, the major part being 
given for the endowment of the Latin Chair. According to the Treas- 
urers books the amount of outstanding bonds April 1, 1912 was $43,000, 



GENERAL INFORMATION n 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College is situated in Annville, which is on the Harrisburg 
division of the Philadelphia and Reading Railway. Annville is also 
connected by trolley line with Lebanon and Harrisburg. 

Buildings and Grounds 

There are seven buildings on the campus, the Carnegie Library, the 
Engle Music Hall, the Women's Dormitory, the Men's Dormitory, the 
Academy Building, the Administration Building, and the Heating Plant. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, a building of the Gothic style of 
architecture, erected in 1904, furnishes commodious quarters for the 
growing library of the College. Each department has its particular 
books for reference in addition to the larger number of volumes for gen- 
eral reference and study. An annual amount is appropriated by the 
Board of Trustees for the purchase of new books, and plans are being 
made for the enlargement of the library in order to meet the growing 
needs of the College. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted and 
ventilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the leading 
magazines and daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the special work 
of each department are here, as well as magazines of general literature. 
On the second floor are six seminar rooms designed to be equipped with 
the special works of reference for the various departments, where stu- 
dents doing the most serious work may study undisturbed. 

THE ENGLE MUSIC HALL, of Hummelstown brownstone, 
erected in 1899, contains the college chapel, used for all large college 
gatherings, a director's office and studio, practice rooms, and a large 
society hall. The building is well equipped with pianos and a large 
pipe organ. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY was erected in 1905, and is a 
building of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms which will ac- 
commodate forty-five students, there are a society hall, a dining hall, a 
well equipped kitchen, and a laundry. 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY is a modern structure of brick with 
Indiana limestone trimmings. It contains single and double rooms and 
sixteen suites of two bed rooms with a separate study room. These 
afford accommodations for eighty-five students. This building was also 
erected in 1905. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE ACADEMY BUILDING, the original building of the insti- 
tution, and acquired by gift in 1866 when the College was founded, is 
now used as a dormitory. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, is in harmony with the 
buildings above described. It contains a low pressure heating system 
of the most perfect construction and supplies the heat for all the build- 
ings on the campus. It is constructed with a view to the installation of 
a light plant. 

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING is the most important and 
central of the buildings. It is built of buff brick with terra cotta trim- 
mings, three stories high. It contains the recitation rooms of the Col- 
lege and the laboratories of the science department. The department 
of art has here commodious and modern quarters. The administration 
offices of fire proof construction are on the first floor. 

To accommodate all these buildings, the campus, originally of ten 
acres, has been recently enlarged by purchase. It occupies a high point 
in the centre of the town of Annville and is within easy access of all 
trolley and railroad lines. 

The athletic field of five and one-half acres is well located and ad- 
mirably adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. On it are 
erected a grand stand and bleachers. 

Laboratories 

The entire northern half of the Administration Building is occupied 
by the department of science. The Department of Chemistry occupies 
the first floor; Physics the second, and Biology the third. 

The laboratories of each department are constructed after the most 
approved modern methods, and students find everything arranged for 
their convenience. Stock rooms and special laboratories adjoin the 
general laboratories. The lecture rooms are provided with risers and 
Columbia tablet arm chairs. 

Religious Work 

Recognizing that most of its students come from Christian families, 
the College has always tried to furnish religious training. It believes 
in cultivating the heart as well as the mind, and encourages all whole- 
some means of promoting Christian influence. 

Each school morning, a regular service is held in the college chapel, 



GKNERAIv INFORMATION 13 

at which the students are required to be present. At this service there 
is singing, reading of Scripture, and prayer. Members of the Faculty 
conduct this service. 

A student's prayer meeting is held once a week, and opportunities 
for Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian Associa- 
tions in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

All resident students of the College are required to attend public 
worship in churches of their choice every Sunday. 

The religious life during the past year has been earnest and helpful, 
and patrons may feel satisfied that high moral influences are being ex- 
erted constantly over their children. 

College Organizations 

Christian ^ e College has flourishing Young Men's and 

Young Women's Christian Associations, which hold 

regular weekly devotional services and conduct 

special courses of Bible and mission study, often in charge of members 

of the Faculty. 

Under these auspices numerous public lectures, entertainments, 
and socials are held, so that they contribute incalculably to the pleasure 
of the student body. They are the centre of the spiritual welfare of the 
students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with the Col- 
lege. 
I iterarv Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and 

parliamentary training are afforded by the societies of 
Societies 

the College. There are three of these societies— one sus- 
tained by the 3'oung ladies, the Clionian, and two by the young men, 
the Kalozetean and the Philokosmian. They meet every Friday even- 
ing in their well furnished halls for literary exercises consisting of 
orations, essays and debates. These societies are considered valuable 
agencies in college work, and students are advised to unite with one of 
them. 

p. ... The Biological Field Club offers to any student of the 

College an opportunity to collect, study, and discuss ob- 
jects of interest in the field of living nature. Frequent 
excursions are made to places of special interest to members of the club. 

Athletic ^ e Athletic Association is composed of all students 

. . and others connected with the College, who pay the 
required athletic fee. It elects, besides its own officers, 
the managers of the various athletic teams. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The direct supervision of athletics is in the hands of the committee 
of the association, called the executive board of athletics. This board 
is made up of seven members as follows: Two members of the Faculty 
of the College; the president of the association, who is ex-officio presi- 
dent of the board; the baseball, football, and basket-ball managers, and 
the treasurer of the association. 

The Mathmatical The Mathematical Round Table is an organi- 

zation of the students of the College who are 
Round Table interested in Mathematical Studies. It has been 
in successful operation for over a year. Its object is to create interest 
in and love for the "exact science." Its meetings are held on the last 
Wednesday evening of each month. Papers on mathematical history 
and biography are read and discussed. Current events in the mathe- 
matical world and papers on various mathematical subjects have made 
the meetings very interesting and helpful. 

Modern I an- * n or( ^ er * stimulate interest in the study of the 

modern languages, at the request of the junior and 
** ** senior students of the modern language group, a club 

has been formed under the direction of the adviser of the group. The 
club meets every third Saturday afternoon or evening as occasion sug- 
gests. Student programs alternate with lectures by the teachers in the 
department. 



Literary and Musical Advantages 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of hear- 
ing lectures and talks delivered by resident professors and men of note 
in church and literary circles. 

The department of music together with the department of public 
speaking presents a number of programs during the year for the pleas- 
ure and benefit of the general student body. Concerts and recitals by 
prominent musicians are given under the patronage of the department 
of music with the aim of creating in the student an appreciation for the 
best in art. 

There is a lively interest in the drama. Various college organiza- 
tions' have presented Shakespearean and other plays of a high grade. 

A further means of enjoyment and education is the course of lec- 
tures and concerts under the management of the Christian associations 
of the College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Administration 

The following are the advisers for the students in each of 
Advisers 

of the five groups in which courses of instruction are of- 
fered: For the classical group, Professor Shroyer; for the mathematic- 
cal-physical, Professor Lehman; for the chemical-biological, Professor 
Derickson; for the historical-political. Professor Peters; for the modern 
language, Professor Wisewell; for the freshman class, Professor Shenk 
and for the Academy, Professor Spessard. The students of each group 
are amenable to the adviser in all matters of conduct, study and discip- 
line. He is to grant leave of "absence, permission to go out of town, and 
excuses. His approval is necessary before a student may register for or 
enter upon any course of study, or discontinue any work. He is the 
medium of communication between the Facult}' and the students of his 
group, and in a general way stands to his students in the relation of a 
friendly counsellor. 

It is earnestly desired that students may be influenced 
P to good conduct and diligence by higher motives than 

fear of punishment. The Wfise of duty and honor, the courteous and 
general feelings natural to young men and women engaged in literary 
pursuits, are appealed to as the best regulators of conduct. It is the 
policy of the adminisl ration to allow in all things as much liberty as will 
not be abused, and the students are invited and expected to cooperate 
with the Faculty; but good order and discipline will be strictly main- 
tained and misconduct punished by adequate penalties. The laws of 
the College are as few and simple as the proper regulation of a commu- 
nity of young men and women will permit. The College will not place 
its stamp or bestow its honors upon anyone who is not willing to deport 
himself becomingly. No hazing of any kind will be permitted. Every 
unexcused absence from any college duty, every failure or misdemeanor 
of a student is reported to the Faculty, and a record made of the same. 

The maximum number of hours, conditioned, per- 
mitted for senior standing is four; for junior standing, 
six; for sophomore, eight and for freshmen, to be decided for individ- 
ual students by the committee on classisification. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work above that prescribed 
by the curriculum is limited by the student's record for previous years 
as follows: 

(a) Majority of A's, nothing less than B — no limit. 

(b) Majority of B's, nothing less than C— fourhours. 
; (c) Lower record than (b) — no extra hours. 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The scholarship of students is determined by result 
** of examinations and daily recitations combined. The 
grades are carefully recorded. 

Reports of standing will be made to parent or guardian at the end 
of each term when desired by them, or when the Faculty deems it ex- 
pedient. The standing is indicated generally by classification in six 
groups, as follows: 

A signifies that the record of the student is distinguished. 

B signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C signifies that the record is good. 

D signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (conditioned) imposes a condition on the student. Conditions 
incurred in January must be made up by June; conditions incurred in 
June must be made up by September. Failing to make up a condition 
at the time appointed is equal to a record F. 

F (failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subjects, and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to 
repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year, or to withdraw. 
p. The degree of bachelor of arts is conferred, by a vote 

of the Board of Trustees on recommendation of the 
an P Faculty, upon students who have satisfactorily com- 

pleted any of the groups. 

„ . . Since all its members are fully occupied with under- 

graduate work, the Faculty deems it unwise to offer any 
work for the degree of Master of Arts during the coming 
year. In rare cases sufficient resident work upon certain advanced 
courses may be outlined. But a special action would be required in 
each case, no detailed announcement can be made here. All inquiries 
about graduate work should be addressed tc the Dean. 

Scholarships 

The College offers a limited number of one-hundred-dollar free 
tuition scholarships to honor graduates of State normal Schools and ap- 
proved high schools and academies. One scholarship is allotted to the 
first honor graduate of our own academy. 

Graduates of high schools and academies whose standard is not 
equal to that of our own academy, may enter the senior year of the 
academy and become competitors for our own academy scholarship. 

Honor graduates of preparatory schools who have conditions may 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

be allowed to make them up in the freshmen year. If the first sem- 
ester's work shows a majority of A's and nothing less than B in all work 
including conditions, a scholarship may be awarded. 

The Bishop J. S. Mills' scholarship established by a gift of $1000 
is available. 

The H. S. Immel Scholarships being a gift of $2000, will be avail- 
able ''for young men in the college who are preparing for the ministry 
in the church of the United Brethren in Christ." 

The proceeds of the Eberly farm became available for "indigent 
students" in 1911-12. 

The Charles B. Rettew Scholarship in Bonebrake Seminary is limit- 
ed to students from East Pennsylvania Conference and Lebanon Valley 
College. 

The Faculty and Executive Committee shall make all scholarship 
awards. 

Expenses 

COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 

Matriculation Fee $ 5 00 

Physical Culture and Athletics 5 00 

Tuition, College or Academy 50 00 

For twenty hours or less in the College, or for twenty-four hours or 
less in the Academy, the tuition is $50.00. Each additional hour, for 
semester or half- year, $1.50. 

Deduct $25.00 from the regular tuition for minister's children. 

The tuition of fifty dollars in the Preparatory and College depart- 
ment does not apply to the Art, Oratory and Musical departments. The 
tuition of these departments will be found elsewhere in this catalogue. 

All regular music students are required to pay a matriculation fee 
of three dollars and three dollars for Athletics and Physical Culture. 

All special students are required to pay a matriculation fee of one 
dollar and one dollar for Athletics and Physical Culture. 

All art students and all oratory students, not otherwise matricu- 
lated, shall pay one dollar matriculation fee annually, before privilege 
or privileges of the College are granted to them. 
Laboratory Fees, per semester: 

Biology i-a $ 2 00 

Biology i-b 6 00 

Biology 2 6 00 



i8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Biology 3 5 oo 

Biology 4 5 oo 

A deposit of $2.00 is required of each student who is assigned a 
locker in the biological laboratory as a guarantee of the care and return 
of the keys and apparatus. The treasurer will refund the deposit when 
a certificate from the department is presented stating that the keys have 
been returned in good condition. 

Elementary Chemistry $ 4 00 

Chemistry 1 6 00 

Chemistry 2 7 00 

Chemistry 3 6 00 

Chemistry 4 5 00 

Chemistry 5 10 00 

A deposit of $300 is required of each student who is assigned a 
locker in the chemical laboratory. Any part of this breakage deposit 
unused will be refunded at the end of the course. 

Physics 3 $5 00 

Elementary Physics 3 00 

All laboratory fees and deposits for each semester must be paid in 
advance. A student will not be assigned a locker or apparatus in any 
of the laboratories without a certificate from the Treasurer of the Col- 
lege slating that the fee has been paid and the deposit made. 
Graduation FEE, payable thirty days prior to commencement, $10.00. 

TABLE BOARD 

Table Board — Regular students, paid in advance, $3.75 per week; 
$140 a year. 

Five-day Students, (fifteen meals), $2.70 per week; $100 per year. 

Meal tickets are furnished to day students at the rate of twenty- 
five cents per meal. 

ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES 

COLLEGE AND ACADEMY 

The item sundries in the following table include such expenses as, 
Laboratory Fees, Society Fees, Deposit Fees, Christian Association 
Fees, Club Fees, Star Course Fees, Books, Stationary, Banquet Fees 
and Laundry, which aggregate approximately from twenty-four to one 
hundred and twenty-four dollars, annually, according to the means and 
habits of the individual student. 



GENERAL INFORMATION i 9 

A student can without injury to himself or herself reduce the an- 
nual expense below two hundred and seventy dollars, the lowest esti- 
mate, in the following table. 

A more liberal expenditure would approximate three hundred and 
ninety- six dollars for a college year of thirty-eight weeks. 

Thus the expenditure of a student while passing through Lebanon 
Valley College, ranges from thirty to forty-four dollars per month, not 
including clothing, car-fare and luxuries. In going over the list of 
sundry expenses, it may be observed that some of these items are op- 
tional. 

The following table exhibits six scales of annual expenditures, 



Matriculation 


$ 


5 °o 


$ 5 00 


$ 5 00 


$ 5 00 


$ 5 00 


$ 5 00 


Physical Culture 




5 °o 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


Tuition 




50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


Room Rent 






40 00 


45 00 


50 00 


55 00 


60 00 


Boarding 






140 00 


140 00 


140 CO 


140 00 


140 00 


Light and Heat 






6 00 


6 00 


7 00 


9 00 


12 00 




60 00 


246 00 


251 00 


257 00 


267 00 


272 00 


Sundries, (appro 


<dmately) 


24 00 


37 °o 


49 00 


60 00 


124 00 



270 00 288 00 306 00 324 00 396 00 

APPORTIONMENT OF EXPENSES 

Matriculation Fee of $5.00 in advance. 





Year 


One- 


One- 


Three- 


Three- 








Fifth 


Fifth 


Tenths 


Tenths 








Sept. 20 


Nov. 1 


Jan. 4 


Mar. 27 


Boarding, Regular 


$140 


00 


$28 00 


$28 


00 


$42 00 


$42 OO 


Boarding, 5-day 


100 


00 


20 00 


20 


00 


30 00 


30 OO 


Tuition 


50 


00 


10 00 


IO 


00 


15 00 


15 OO 


Room Rent 


40 


00 


8 00 


8 


00 


12 OO 


12 OO 


Room Rent 


45 


00 


9 00 


9 


00 


14 OO 


13 OO 


Room Rent 


50 


00 


10 00 


10 


00 


15 OO 


15 OO 


Room Rent 


55 


00 


11 00 


11 


00 


17 OO 


16 OO 


Room Rent 


60 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


18 OO 


18 OO 


Light and Heat 


6 


00 


1 00 


1 


00 


2 OO 


2 OO 


Light and Heat 


7 


00 


1 00 


1 


00 


3 °° 


2 OO 


Light and Heat 


9 


00 


2 00 


2 


00 


3 °° 


2 OO 


Light and Heat 


12 


00 


3 00 


3 


00 


3 °° 


3 00 


Phys. Culture and Athletics 5 


00 


1 00 


2 


00 


I OO 


I OO 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

These rates are fixed by special act of the Board of Trustees. Fail- 
ure to pay a bill before another falls due will exclude a student from 
classes and the privileges of the College. 

The regular College expenses are divided into four installments, 
and students are required to pay each installment in advance. The first 
installment is due at the opening of the School Year; the second, No- 
vember ist; the third, January 4th and the fourth, March 27th. 

Students who are candidates for degrees must make satisfactory 
settlement for all dues and bills before degrees are voted. 

No reduction will be made for tuition and room-rent, for a semes- 
ter, except for protracted sickness. In case of long continued illness, 
the loss is shared equally by the College and the student. 

No reduction will be made for table board, for an absence of less 
than one week, and then only in case of sickness, or important duties 
that compel the student to be absent from his College work. Reduc- 
tions cannot be allowed for banquet trips, or Club trips, or Athletic 
trips. 

Students are required to furnish their own towels, napkins, soap, 
and all bed furnishings, except mattresses. 

Any student who receives beneficiary aid from the college, may be 
called upon to render services to the College for all or part of the aid so 
received. 

Opportunity for self-help is extended to a limited number of stu- 
dents. One hundred and twenty Dollars ($120) is allowed to those who 
are given waiterships. Sixty-six dollars and fifty cents ($66.50) to the 
librarians. Fifty-seven dollars ($57.00) to the janitor of the Library. 
Forty-seven dollars and fifty cents ($47.50) to the janitors in the Men's 
Dormitory and in the Administration Building. Thirty-eight dollars 
($38.00) to the janitors in the Music Hall. In each case the term of ser- 
vice is thirty-eight weeks, and a close application is required to the 
work assigned. A neglect of duty is sufficient cause for a removal of 
the student from the position. 

Requirements for Admission 

The following are the reguirements for admission to a course lead- 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



A diagram from which fifteen units may be selected for Freshman 
standing. 



GROUP I 


English 


3 units 


Required 


English 








GROUP II 


Elementary Algebra 


i unit 


Two and a half units 


Mathematics 


Intermediate Algebra % unit 


including Plane 




Plane Geometry 


i unit 


Geometry are re- 




Solid Geometry 


y z unit 


quired. 




Plane Trigonometry 


y 2 unit 




GROUP III 


Latin 


4 units 


Five units are re- 


Foreign 


German 


3 units 


quired, three of which 


Languages 


French 


3 units 


must be Latin. 




Greek 


3 units 




GROUP IV 


Physical Geog. } 2 


or i unit 


Physics required. Al- 


Physical 
Sciences 


Physics 

Chemistry y 2 


I unit 
or i unit 


so Chemistry, i 
unit, by students 
intending to take 
Chem-Bio. course. 


GROUP V 


Botany 


i unit 


One unit only may 


Biological 


Zoology 


i unit 


be chosen. 


Sciences 


Physiology 


i unit 




GROUP VI 


Greek and Roman 


i unit 


One unit only may 




Mediaeval and Mode 


rn i unit 


be chosen. 


History, Etc. 


English 


I unit 






Civics 


y 2 unit 






Economics 


y 2 unit 




GROUP VII 


Drawing y 


or i unit 


One unit only may 




Domestic Science 


y 2 unit 


be chosen. 




Agriculture 


l / 2 unit 






Book-keeping 


y 2 unit 






Commercial Law 


y 2 unit 






Commercial Geog. 


y 2 unit 






Psychology 


>2 unit 






Methods of Teaching ]/ 2 unit 





Of the above courses as outlined eleven and one-half units are re- 
quired; the remaining three and one-half units may be chosen from the 
seven groups in whatever manner desired. 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Candidates for admission should note carefully the following de- 
scription of courses in order to measure up to the standard set. 

ENGLISH 
Requirement for 1012. 

1. A thorough course in advanced English Grammar. 

2. A systematic course in Composition, and the essentials of 
Rhetoric. 

3. At least ten of the books outlined in groups I-VI. 
a. Reading and Practice — Two units. 

Group I. (Two to be selected.) 

Shakespeare's As you Like It, Henry V, Julius Caesar, The Merchant 
of Venice, Twelfth Night. 

Group II. (One to be selected.) 

Bacon's Essays, Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress Part I, The Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers in the Spectator, Franklin's Autobiography. 

Group III. (One to be selected.) 

Chaucer's Prologue, Spenser's Faerie Queen (Book I,) Pope's The 
Rape of the Lock, Goldsmith's The Deserted Village, Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series) Books II and III, with especial attention to Dry- 
den, Collins, Gray, Cowper and Burns. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected) 

Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Scott's Ouen- 
tin Durward, Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, Thackerav's 
Henry Esmond, Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford, Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities, 
George Eliot's Silas Marner, Blackmore's Lorna Doone. 

Group V. (One to be selected.) 

Irving's Sketch Book, Lamb's Essays of Elia, De Ouiucey's Joan of 
Arc and The English Mail Coach, Carlyle's The Hero as Poet, The Hero 
as Man of Letters, and the Hero as King; Emerson's Essays (selected,) 
Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies. 

Group VI. (Two to be selected.) 

Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Scott's The Lady of the Lake, 
Byron's Mazeppa and The Prisoner of Chillon, Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury (First Series) Book IV, with especial attention to Wordsworth, 
Keats and Shelley; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome, Poe's Poems; Lo- 
well's The Vision of Sir Launfal, Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, Long- 
fellow's The Courtship of Miles Standish, Tennyson's The Princess, 
Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the 
Good News from Ghent to Aix, Evelyn Hope, Home Thoughts from 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, 
The Boy and the Angel, One Word More, Herve Riel, Pheidippides. 

b. Study and Practice — One unit. 

This part of the requirements presupposes the thorough study of 
each of the following works: 

Shakespeare's Macbeth, Milton's Comus, L'Allegro, and 11 Pense- 
roso, or Tennyson's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The 
Passing of Arthur; Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill Ora- 
tion; Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

MATHEMATICS 

a. Elementary Algebra, Algebra to quadratics — One unit. 
1 The four fundamental operations. 

2. Factoring, determination of highest common factor and lowest 
common multiple by factoring. 

3. Linear equations, both numerical and literal, containing one, 
two and three unknowns. 

4. Problems depending on linear equations. 

5. Radicals and the extraction of the square root of polynomials. 

6. Fractional and negative exponents. 

b. Quadratics and Beyond — One-half unit. 

1. Quadratic equations, both numerical and literal. 

2. Problems depending on quadratic equations. 

3. The binomial theorem for positive integral exponents. 

4. The formulas for the nth term and the sum of the terms of 
arithmetical and geometrical progressions. 

5. Numerous problems chosen from mensuration, from physics and 
from commercial life. 

The equivalent of Hawke's and others, 
High School Algebra complete. 

c. Plane Geometry — One unit. 

1. The usual theorems and constructions. 

2. The solution of numerous exercises, including problems of 
Loci. 

3. The equivalent of Durell's Plane Geometry. 

d. Solid Geometry — One-half unit. 

1. The usual theorems, the properties and measurement of prisms, 
pyramids, cylinders and cones, the sphere and spherical triangle. 

2. Applications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

e. Trigonometry — One-half unit. 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

i. Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric functions as 
ratios, circular rneasurment of angles. 

2. Proofs of the principal formulas, and the transformation of tri- 
gonometric expressions by means of these formulas. 

3. Solution of trigonometric equations. 

4. The theory and use of logarithms. 

5. The solution of right, oblique and spherical triangles with ap- 
plications. 

LATIN 

Latin A — Three units. 

A systematic course of five lessons a week extending over a period 
of three years is required. 

The real test of the candidates fitness is based upon his ability to 
read simple Latin prose, to explain constructions and idioms, and to 
turn simple latin sentences into prose. 

He should have studied Grammar, Elementary prose composition, 
90 to 120 pages of Nepos (Lives) and Csesar (Gallic and Civil wars;) also 
about 40 pages of Cicero and the first four books of Virgil or its equiva- 
ent. 

Latin B — One unit (optional.) 

Virgil and Ovid, 6,ooo to 10,000 verses or other equivalents not read 
in Latin A. 

GREEK 
1, 2 or 3 units 

1. The equivalent of White's First Greek Book. Five recitations 
a week for at least thirty weeks. The candidates shall have read the 
equivalent of about eight chapters of Anobasis and show a knowledge of 
ordinary forms. One unit. 

2. At least the first four books of the anabasis together with the 
ability to turn short sentences into Greek. One unit. 

3 The translation at sight of Attic prose and of Homer, construc- 
tions, idioms and prosody and the ability to translate a short passage of 
connected English narrative is required. One unit. 

GERMAN 
a. Elementary German — Two units. 
During the first year the work should comprise: 

1. Careful drill on pronunciation. 

2. Drill on the rudiments of grammar. 

3. Abundant easy exercises in reproduction and memory work. 




I till 




:jl if I 









GENERAL INFORMATION • 25 

4. The reading of 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a reader. 
During the second year the work should comprise: 

1. The reading of 150 to 200 pages of literature in the form of easy 
stories and plays. 

2. Reproduction practice as before, both oral and written. 

3. Continued drill on the rudiments of grammar. 
Suitable stories and plays are as follows: 
Wilhelmmi'sEiner Muss Heiraten, Im Vaterland, Andersen's Mar- 

chen, Deander's Traumereien, Heyse's L'Arabbiata, Hillrn's Hoher als 
die Kirche, Storm's Immensee, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug, 
Stokl's Unter dem Christbaum, Baumbach's, Der Scwiegersohn. 

b. Intermediate German — One unit. 

The work should comprise, in addition to the elementary course, 
the readiug of about 400 pages of moderately difficult prose and poetry 
together with constant drill in reproduction and grammatical drill, with 
special reference to the infinitive and the subjunctive. 

Suitable reading matter can be selected from the following. 

Freytag's Die Journalisten, Fouque's Undine, Goethe's Hermann 
and Dorothea, Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, Schiller's Der Neffe als 
Onkel, Wilhelm Tell, Die Jungfrau von Orleans and others prescribed 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

FRENCH 

a. Elementary French — Two units. 

The applicant should be able to pronounce French accurately, to 
turn simple English sentences into French and to answer questions on 
the rudiments of grammar. 

The first year's work should comprise the rudiments of grammar, 
rhe reproduction of natural forms of expression and the reading of 100 
to 175 duodecimo pages of graduated texts. 

During the second year the work should comprise: 

1. Constant practice in translating into French easy variations 
upon the texts read. 

2. Frequent oral abstracts. 

3. The mastery of the use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of 
all but the rare irregular verb forms and the simpler uses of the condi- 
tional and the subjunctive. 

4.* The reading of 400 to 500 pages of easy modern prose in the 
form of stories, plays, or historical or biological sketches. 

Suitable texts for the second year are: 

About's "Le roi des montagues;" Bruno's "L,e tour de la France;" 
Mairet's"L,a tache dupe tit Pierre;" MerimeVs "Colomba;" Legonoeand 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Labiche's "La cigale chez les fourinis;" Le Bedolliere's "La Mere 
Michel et son chat." 

b. Intermediate French — One unit. 

i. Constant practice in French paraphrasing. 

2. Grammar in modern completeness. 

3. Writing from dictation. 

4. The reading of from 400 to 600 pages from suitable texts such 
as the following: 

Corneille's "Le Cid;" Sandeau's "Le gendre de M. Poirier;" Dau- 
det's "La Bell-Nivernaise;" Racine's "Athalie," "Andromaque" and 
"Esther;" George Sand's plays and stories; Sandeau's, "Mademoiselle 
de la Siegliere," and others. 

PHYSICS 

One unit. 

1. The study of a standard text book as Carharte and Chute's 
High School Ph} 7 sics, or Milikan and Gale's A First Course in Physics. 

2. Lecture and table demonstrations. 

3. Individual laboratory work consisting of at least 30 experiments 
as required by the College Entrance Examination Board." 

4. The course should include the following fundamental topics: 

a. Introduction: Metric system, volume, density, weight and states 
of matter. 

b. Mechanics: Fluids and solids. 

c. Heat. 

d. Sound. 

e. Light. 

f. Magnetism. 

g. Static Electricity, 
h. Current Electricity. 

The applicant must also present an approved laborator)' note book 
of experiments performed, together with a certificate from the teacher 
of Physics stating the exact character and amount of work done under 
his supervision. 

BOTANY 

One unit. 
PART I. The General Principles of (A) Anatomy and Morpho- 
logy, (B) Physiology, and (C) Ecology. 
a. Anatomy and Morphology. 
The seed, the shoot, specialized and metamorphosed shoots, the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 27 

root, specialized and metamorphosed roots, the flower, the comparative 
and morphological study of four or more types, the fruit and the cell. 

b. Physiology. 

Role of water in the plant, photosynthesis, respiration, digestion 
irritability, growth and fertilization. 

c. Ecology. 

Modifications, dissemination, crosspollination, light relations of 
green tissue and special habitats. 

PART II. The Natural History of the Plant Groups and classifi- 
cation. 

A comprensive study of the great natural groups of plants. Selec- 
tions may be made from the following: 

a. Algae. Pleurocoecus, Sphaerella, Spirogyra, Vancheria, Fucus, 
Nemalion. 

b. Fungi. Bacteria, Rhizopus or Mucor, Yeast, Puccinia, Corn 
Smut, Mushroom. 

c. Lichens. Physcia (or Parmelia or Usnea.) 

b. Bryophytes. In Hepaticae, Radula and In Musci, Mnium. 

e. Pteridopbytes. In Filicineae, Aspidium or equivalant including 
the prothallus. In Equesetinae, Equisetum. In Lycopodineae, Ly- 
copodium and Selaginella. 

f. Gymnosperms. Pinus or equivalent. 

g. Angiosperms A monocotyledon and a dicotyledon. 

The applicant shall present a certified note-book of individual labo- 
oratory work of at least double the amount of time given to recitation. 
Special stress should be laid on accurate drawings and precise descrip- 
tions. 

Zoology 
One Unit. 

1. The general natural history — including general external struc- 
ture in relation to adaptations, life histories, geographical range, rela- 
tions to other plants and animals, and economic relations — of common 
vertebrates. 

Suggested types are a mammal, bird, lizard, snake, turtle, newt 
frog, dogfish or shark, bony fish, clam snail, starfish, earthworm, hydra 
seaanemone, paramoecium. 

Pupils should be familiar with orders of insects or with crustaceans, 
spiders and myriapods. 

Actual examination of common animals with the above should be 
supplemented by reading giving natural history information. 

Laboratory work required. 



28 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Certified note-books should be presented. 

In general, the work as outlined by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board will be accepted. 

CHEMISTRY 
One Unit. 
The candidate's preparation should include: 

i. Individual laboratory work, comprising at least forty exercises 
from a list of sixty or more as outlined by the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board. 

2. Instruction by lecture, table demonstrations, to be used mainly 
as a basis for questioning upon the general principles involved in the 
pupils laboratory investigutions. 

3. The study of at least one standard text book, to the end that the 
pupil may gain a comprensive and connected view of the most impor- 
tant facts and laws of elementary Chemistry. Brownlee and others 
Principles of Chemistry or its equivalent is required. 

PHYSICIAL GEOGRAPHY 

One unit. 

a. The Earth as a Globe. 

b. The Ocean. 

c. The Atmosphere — including weather instruments and the U. S. 
Weather Map. 

d. The Land. 

e. Volcanoes. 

f. Rivers. 

g. Glaciers. 

h. Relation of man, plants and animals to climate, land forms, 
and oceanic areas. 

A note-book certified to by the teacher in charge in all cases is re- 
quired for the one unit. Otherwise y 2 unit only may be offiered. 

DRAWING 

One unit. 

1. The applicant must be able to sketch with fairly stead)' and 
clean lines any figures or combinations of figures, polygons, spirals or 
the like. 

2. He shall be able to sketch common objects such as furniture 
and utensils with reasonable accuracy and correctness of proportion. 

3. Also, to sketch from copy, enlarging or reducing dimensions 
any simple object, such as a valve or title pattern. 

A notebook with drawings both approved and certified to by the 
teacher must be presented in order to receive credit. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES 



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DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 33 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Philosophy 

PROFESSOR PETERS 

As there is no such thing as final authority in Philosophy every 
student in this department is urged to react upon both the text books 
to which he is referred and to the opinions submitted by the instructor. 
It is the primary purpose of the department to stimulate vigorous, in- 
dependent thinking upon questions pertaining to Philosophy. 

1. Psychology — Three hours. First Semester. 

k Special emphasis will be placed upon (1) the application of psycho- 
logical laws to practical life, and (2) the philosophical bearing of cer- 
tain psychological principles. Thus, without departing from the mode 
of treatment appropriate to a natural science, this course will be made 
to serve as a general introduction to philosophy. Text book James's 
Psychology (Briefer course.) 
2. Logic — Three hours. Second Semester. 

The intimate relation between Logic and Psychology will be em- 
phasized throughout this course. From this point of view the tradi- 
tional subject matter of elementary logic will be carefully discussed and 
the detection and classification of fallacies drilled upon. The bearings 
of Logic upon the problems of Philosophy will then be taken up. Text- 
book Creighton's "An Introductory Logic." 

3. ' History of Ancient Philosophy — Three hours. First Semester. 
In this course, and in its sequel, Philosophy 4, the aim will be (1) to 
trace the development of philosophy, pointing out what of permanent 
value each system, as it arose, contributed toward a final solution of the 
problem of the nature of being, and (2) to show the interaction between 
philosophic thought and the practical life of the period during which it 
flourished. Text-book Cushman's "A Beginner's History of Philoso- 
phy." Vol. I. 

4. History of Modern Philosophy — Three Hours. Second Semes- 
ter. 

The work of this course will be critical as well as expositor}', and 
an effort will be made at reconstruction on the basis of the great sys- 
tems of philosophy worked out from Decartes to Spencer. Text-book 
Cushman's "Beginner's History of Philosophy." Vol. II and Royce's 
"The Spirit of Modern Philosophy." 

3. Types of Modern Philosophy — Three Hours. First Semester. 
A critical discussion of Skepticism, Realism, Mysticism, Pragma- 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

tism Modern Science, the Philosophy of Evolution, Psycho-physical 
Parallelism, the New Realism, and Kantian, Fichtean, and Hegelian 
Idealism. This course is intended as an approach to Philosophy 6. 

6. Metaphysics. Three hours. Second Semester. 

This course will deal constructively with the fundamental problems 
of reality. Text-book Royce's "The World and the Individual," refer- 
ences to Taylor, Bradley and Ward. 

7. Psychology of Religion — Two hours. First Semester. 

The religious nature of man will be studied psychologically as 
manifested in childhood, adolescence, and maturity, including the phe- 
nomena of conversion and Christian growth. 

8. The Philosophy of Right— Two hours. Second Semester. 

This course will consist of lectures, library references, and dis- 
cussions. The aim will be to sketch a Philosophy of Life in as untech- 
nical language as possible and to emphasize its bearing on the concrete 
problems of daily life. The more theoretical aspects of Ethics will be, 
for the most part, avoided. The discussion will center about two topics 
(1) The inherence of change, and the consequent necessity for continual 
re-adjustment, in a developing universe; and (2) the Spirit of Loyalty 
as a criterion of conduct amid these shifting relationships. The course 
will be open to all students in the college and to those students in the 
adjunct departments who get permission from the instructor. 

9. Ethics — (Theoretical) — Two hours. First Semester. 
An investigation of the nature and the bases of morality. 

10. Ethics — (applied)— Two hours. Second Semester. 

This course is a continuation of Philosophy 9. From the stand- 
point of the theory worked out in the preceding part of the course there 
will be taken up such subjects as, the ethical significance of contem- 
porary social and moral institutions and present day social tendencies, 
a critical investigation of recent forms of individualism, a discussion of 
the problems which grow out of progress, some studies in casuistry, 
etc. Text-books Mackenzie's and Muirhead's, Library References and 
Supplementary lectures. 

11. Seminar in Philosophy — Fortnightly 7:30-9:30 p. m. Throuoh- 
out the year. 

This course is for graduate students and advanced under-graduates. 
The subjects investigated will vary from year to year, and will be de- 
termined largely by the interests of those who register for the course. 
Some member of the seminar will have charge at each meeting, and 
will read and defend a paper in which some topic, appropriate to the 
general subject of the year, is intensively treated. At least three papers 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 35 

and a thesis will be required of each member. These papers will or- 
dinarily contain from five to eight thousand words and the theses will 
be of a somewhat greater degree of elaboration. 

Persons who wish to take this course, but who can not be present at 
the meetings, may arrange to send in their papers. Of such members, 
however, somewhat more work will be required than of those who regu- 
larly attend the meetings. 

Note — Courses 1, 2 and n will be offered every year. The other 
courses will alternate as follows: 3 with 5, 4 with 6, 7 with 9, and 8 with 
10. The latter of each group will be offered in 1913-14 and the former 
in 1912-13. 

SPECIAL COURSES IN PHILOSOPHY 

PRESIDENT KEISTER 

B. Metaphysics — One hour and a half throughout the year. 

Our fundamental conceptions are considered beginning with the 
notion of being. By a process of criticism contradictions are eliminated 
and a clear and consistent view of the world is set forth. The conclu- 
sions are valid for reason and show the value of personality human and 
divine. 

The text-book used is Bowne's Metaphysics. 

Given in 1910-11. 

C. The Gospel of John — One hour and a half throughout the year. 
This course is given by lecture in connection with the course in 

Metaphysics. It is a study of the doctrine of the Gospel of John in 
order to obtain a clearer view of the Person of Christ who is the center 
of a religious system that is consistent in itself, vital in its influence 
and final for faith and reason. 
Given in 1910-11. 

D. Theory of Thought and Knowledge — By Prof. Borden P. Bowne, 
a study of thought as process, a subjective activity having its forms and 
laws and then also as product having objective validity and leading to 
knowledge. 

Given in 1911-12. 

E. The Philosophy of Christianity — By Dr. James E. Latimer, 
which deals with fundamental problems of the Christian system of doc- 
trine, being constructive in aim and orthodox in spirit. Each one hour 
and a half throughout the year. 

List of books for reference reading: A History of Philosophy, 
Ueberweg; The World a Spiritual System, Snowden; The Christian 
Faith, Curtis; The Person of Christ, Schaff; Addresses on the Gospel of 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

John, St. John Conference. The Teaching of the Gospel of John, 
Smith; The Gospel for an Age of Donbt, Van Dyke; The Philosophy of 
the Christian Religion, Fairbairn; The Universal Elements of the Chris- 
tian Religion, Hall; The Gospel of the Divine Sacrifice, Hall; Person- 
ality, Human and Divine, Illingworth; Personalism, Bowne. 

These courses are offered for post graduate work and in exceptional 
cases to students who have not received the A. B. degree. 

Education 

PROFESSOR PETERS 

1. History of Education — Three hours. First Semester. 

A history of educational practices and theories based on Monroe's 
"Text Book in the History of Education." 

2. Educational Classics — Three hours. Second Semester. 

This course will include the reading, and critical discussion in 
class, of such educational classics as the following: Milton's Tractate, 
Locke's Thoughts on Education, Rousseau's Emile, Pestalozzi's Leo- 
nard and Gertrude, Spencer's Essays on Education, etc. 

3. Froebel's Philosophy of Education — Three hours. First Se- 
mester. 

This course will include (1) a discussion of the place of Froebel in 
the history of Edudatipn; (2) a careful study of his Philosophy of Edu- 
cation as set forth in ' -The Education of Man;" and (3) a criticism of 
Froebel's doctrines in the light of the present philosophical and scienti- 
fic situation. 

4. Pestalozzi, Herbart and their followers — Three hours. Second 
Semester. 

The course is based mostly on Pestalozzi's "How Gertrude Teaches 
Her Children" and Herbart's "Outlines of Educational Doctrines." 

5. Principles of Education — Three hours. First Semester. 

A general discussion of the biological, sociological and philosophi- 
cal meaning of education, and a study of its processes and agencies. 
Henderson's "Text-book in the Principles of Education." 

6. School Management — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A consideration of the practical problems involved in class room 
management and in school supervision. 

7. Psychology of Education — Three hours. First Semester. 

A study of those aspects of psychology which have a bearing upon 
educational practice. 

8. Secondary Education — Three hours. Second Semester. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 37 

A study of the developement and present status of. the American 
secondary school system, a comparison of this system with those of 
Germany, France, and England, and a consideration of the main prob- 
lems in such schools. 

9. Methods of Teaching — Two hours. Second Semester. 

A discussion, in the light of the principles worked out in the other 
courses in the department; of 'methods of instruction in the several 
branches. The work of the course will include visits to schools in the 
neighborhood. The American Teachers Series of books on methods 
edited by James E. Russell and published by Longman's Green and Co., 
will be used as texts. Methods in the Langusges and History will be 
taken up in 1913 and in Mathematics and the Sciences in 1914. 

10. Seminar in Education — Fortnightly 7:30-9:30. Throughout 
the year. 

This seminar will be conducted in a manner analagous to that des- 
cribed under Philosophy 11. 

Note — Course i.will alternate with 3, 2 with 4, 5 with 7, and 6 with 
8, the former of each group being given in 1913-14 and the latter in 
1912-13- 

Greek Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR SHROYER 

ib. Elementary Greek — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon: Four books of the Anabasis. Greek Prose. 
2C. Advanced Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
. Homer: Three books of the Iliad, scansion, sight translation, epic 
poetry. Greek antiquities, Greek literature and Greek prose. 

1. Junior Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Herodotus: Selections from several of the books are read. Review 

of the Greek historians and the Persion Wars. 

Plato: Apology and Crito. The Athenian courts. 
New Testament. Readings in the Pauline epistles. 

2. Senior Greek — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Xenophon; Memorabilia; or Demosthenes: De Corona. Socrates 

and the Socratic schools. The Attic oration. 

Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus; or Aeschylus: Prometheus Bound. 
Development of the Greek drama. Greek tragedy, comedy and theater. 

3. Junior Elective Greek — Three hours- Throughout the year. 
New Testament: Readings in the gospels of Mark and John and in 

the Pauline and Catholic epistles. The object of this course is exegeti- 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

cal and practical. It will include a study of the synoptic gospels and a 
survey of the letters of Paul. 

Latin 

PROFESSOR WISEWEIX 

i. Freshman Latin — Three hours throughout the year. 

(a) Cicero: De Senectute or De Amicitia. Special work in syntax 
based upon the text. 

(b) Livy: Book XXI and part of Book XXII. The author's style 
and peculiarities of syntax are studied. Roman History during the 
period of the Punic Wars is reviewed, Roman political procedure and 
religious ceremonial are carefully considered. Syntactial work. 

(c) Terence: Adelphoe or Phormio. Manners and customs of the 
Romans. Lectures and assigned readings. 

2. Latin Prose — One hour throughout the year. 

Exercises in Latin prose composition based on the authors read in 
Latin i. Open to students who have taken or are taking Latin i. 

3. Sophmore Latin — Three hours throughout the year. 

(a) Horace: Ars Poetica and selections from the Odes, Epodes, 
Satires and Epistles. The Horatian use of metres will be carefully stud 
ied, as well as the place of Horace in Roman literature. 

(b) Tacitus: Germania and Agricola. The peculiarities of Taci- 
tus' style will be analyzed and his importance as an historian considered. 

Open to students who have satisfactorily completed Latin 1. 

4. Lattin Letter Writers — Two hours throughout the year. 
Selections from the letters of Cicero and Pliny. The peculiarities 

of the epistolary style will be studied. The social and political environ- 
ment in which each man wrote will also receive emphasis. Open to 
students who have satisfactorily completed Latin 3. 

Romance Languages 

PROFESSOR WISEWEIX 

i. Elementary Course — Three hours throughout the year. 

French grammar and composition. 'Aldrich and Foster, French 
Reader; Erckmann-Chatrian, Madame TheVese; Labiche, La Gramruaire; 
Feuillet, Le Roman d' un jeune homme pauvre or their equivalents will 
be read. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 39 

2. Intermediate Course — Three hours throughout the year. 

Grammar and composition; Kastner and Atkins, Short History of 
French Literature. Koren, Exercises in French Composition. Augier, 
Le Gendre de M. Poirier; George Sand, La Mare au Diable; Dumas, Les 
Trois Monsquetaires; Balzac, Cinq Scenes de la Comedie Humaine; 
Corneille, Le Cid; Racine, Andromaque; Moliere, Le Bourgeois Gentil- 
homme or their equivalents will be read. 

Open to students who have satisfactorily completed French 1. 

3a French Literature of the Seventh teenth Century— Three hours 
throughout the year. 

The history of seventeenth century French literature will be 
studied. Comfort, Exercises in French Prose Composition. Corneille, 
Cinna; Racine, Athalie; Moliere, Les Femmes Savantes; Warren, 
French Prose of the Seventeenth Century or their equivalents will be 
read. 

Open to students who have satisfactorily completed French 2. 

4a. Old French Literature. Phonology and Morphology. Three 
hours throughout the year. 

The literary history of France through the fifteenth century will be 
studied. Selections will be read from the Chanson de Roland, Aucassin 
et Nicolette, Le Roman de Renard, Le Roman de la Rose, Le Jen de 
Robin et Marion, Villehardouim, Joinville, Froissart, Villon, Charles 
d' Orleans. Old French sounds and inflections will be studied with ref- 
erence to their historical connection with Folk-Latin and with Modern 
French. The material and methods embodied in this study will be ap- 
plied to the texts read. 

Open to students who have satisfactorily completed French 3a. 

Students desiring to register for French 4a, are requested to arrange 
with the instructor before the close of the college year, that text-books 
may be in readiness for class use at the beginning of the autumn term. 
A deposit of ten dollars toward the purchase of books will be required 
of each student registering for this course. 

Italian r. Three hours throughout the year. 

Grandgent, Italian Grammar and composition. Marinoni, Italian 
Reader; Manzoni, I Prommessi Sposi or their equivalents will be read. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

Spanish 1. Three hours throughout the year. 

Hills and Ford, Spanish. Grammar. Prose composition; Alarcon, 
El Capitan Veneno; Palacio Vaides, Jos6; Perez Goldos, Dona Perfecta 
or their equivalents will be read. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. ♦ 

To alternate with Italian 1. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

German Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR SELTZER 

i. Freshman German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Literature of the 19th century. Fouque's Undine; Heine's Die 
Harzreise; Frej tag's Lie Journalisten; Scheffel's Ekkehard; Miiller's 
Deutsche Liebe; Deutsche Gedichte; Wenkebach's Composition. 

2. Sophomore German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Literature of the 18th century. Representative works of Lessing, 

Schiller and Goethe will be read, discussed and compared. 

3. Junior German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

General view of German Literature. Rapid reading of representa- 
tive authors of each period; reading of selections from German History, 
Freytag's Aus dem Jahrhundert des grossen Krieges. Reports on as- 
signed work. 

4. Middle High German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Wright's Middle High German Primer; Ein Mittlehochdeutsches 

Lesebuch: Nibelungen Lied; Gundrun; Wolfram Von Eschenbach, etc. 

5. Scientific German — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Dippold's Scientific German Reader; Uber Baterien — Cohn. 

Kuraer Abriss der Geschichte der Chemie will be read. 

English Language and Literature 

PROFESSOR JOHNSON 

i. Theory and Practice of English Composition — Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

This course includes a thorough study of technique and extensive 
writing of short and long themes. There are recitations, lectures and 
private conferences. 

ib. Critical Exposition — Long and short Themes. One hour. 
Throughout the year. 

First Semester; Principles of criticism; analysis of prose essay 
style. Second Semester: Argumentation, translation and the analysis 
of the short story. 

2. See Oratory I — Public Speaking. 

3. History of English Literature— Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

This course deals with the work of all the leading authors from the 
earliest times to the present. Text-books: Moody and Lovett's History 
of English Literature and Manly 's English Poetry. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 41 

4. History of American Literature— Three hours. First Semester. 

This course deals with the development of American Literature and 
its relation to English Literature. A careful study is made of repre- 
sentative authors. 

5a. English Literature of the Seventeenth Century — First Semester. 

The object of this course is to give the student a fairly complete 
knowledge of the literature produced in England under Charles I, the 
Commonwealth, and the later Stuarts. Particular attention is paid to 
the poetry of Dryden and Milton. 

5b. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century— Second Se- 
mester. 

The object of this course is to treat in a manner as exhaustive as 
possible the typical writers of the Eighteenth Century. Parallel read- 
ing and essays are required. 

7a. The Poetry of Chaucer — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Attention will be paid to the sources from which the poet drew his 
material and to the language, pronunciation and versification which he 
employes. 

8. Prose Fiction — Three hours. Second Semester. 

The history and technique of the novel are outlined and discussed. 
Masterpieces from each period of development are studied and analyzed. 

9. Shakespeare as a Playwright— Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

The development of the drama from the miracle plays to Shakes- 
peare's time is traced. Shakespeare's plays are then taken up chrono- 
logically and studied from the standpoint of theatrical effectiveness. 

10. Advanced Composition — Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Given whenever a class of six applies for it. 9 is a prerequisite for 

the short-story hour. One haur is devoted to essay-writing, argument 
and debating; the other to short story writing. Private conferences are 
required. 



Mathematics and Astronomy 

MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

i. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. First Semester. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binom- 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ial theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permu- 
tations and combinations, theory of equations, etc. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry — Four hours. Second Se- 
mester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functfons, goniometry, right and ob- 
lique triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights, 
development of trigonometric formulae solution of right and oblique 
spherical triangles, applications to Astronomy. 

3. Analytic Geometry — Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and hy- 
perbola are studied, numerous examples solved, and as much of the 
higher plane curves and of the geometry of space is covered as time 
will permit. 

4. Differential Calculus — Three hours. First Semester. 
Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 

and minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, en- 
velopes, etc. 

5. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second Semester. 
Integrations, rectification of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cuba- 

ture of solids, etc. 

6. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, 
leveling, etc. 

7. Differential Equations— Three hours. First Semester. 
A course in the elements of differential equations. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, 4 and 5. Murray. 

8. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second Semester. 
Bowser. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 7. 

ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR LEHM/ N 

i. General Astronomy — Four hours. First Semester. 

The department is provided with a fine four-and-a-half-inch achro- 
matic telescope equatorially mounted, of which the students make free 
use. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 43 

History and Political Science 

PROFES OR SHENK 

i. Mediaeval and Modern History — Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

A general course prescribed in all the groups. Papers, special re- 
ports, and theses, based on available original sources, will be required 
of all students. Robinson: History of Western Europe; Readings 
from European History. 

2. English Economic History — Three hours. First Semester. 
The economic life and development of the English people during 

mediaeval and modern times. Special attention will be given to the 
manor system, the guilds, growth of commerce, the industrial revolu- 
tion, the rise of trade unions, and the relation of government to indus- 
try. Cheney: The Industrial and Social History of England; Gibbins: 
Industry in England. 

3. English Constitutional History— Three hours. Second Semester. 

The English Constitution and its historical development. A care- 
ful study of important documents will be made. Taswell-Langmeade: 
Constitutional History of England. 

4. United States Constitutional History — Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A full course covering the colonial and constitutional periods. An 
extensive reading course of original and secondary sources is required. 
Channing: Students' History of the United States; Elson: History of 
the United States. 

5. Political Science — Three hours. First Semester. 

A study of the Theory of the State and of the structure and pro- 
vince of Government. Leaeock: Elements of Political Science. 

6. International Law— Three hours. Second Semester. 

A course in the fundamental principles of International Law. Much 
time is given to the study of important cases. 

Economics and Sociology 

PROFESSOR SHENK 

I. Economics — Three hours. First Semester. 

A general course in economic theory, supplemented by considera- 
tion of practical current problems. Careful consideration will be given 
the different points of view of the leading economists. Johnson: Intro- 
duction to Economics. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

* 

2. Current Labor Problems — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A course devoted to a study of the important labor problems of the 
present day: Strikes, labor organizations, employer's associations arbi- 
tration, trade agreement, labor legislation, etc. 

3. Theory of Sociology — Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is intended to give the student a knowledge of the vari- 
ous theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the gen- 
eral field of learning. Part of the course will be devoted to a study of 
Emigration and Immigration, and the American Negro. 



English Bible 

PROFESSOR SHROYER 

1. Teacher Training. Two hours. First Semester. Hurlbut. 
Bible Study by Doctrines. Two hours. Second Semester. Sell. 

2. Life of Christ. Mark as guide with references to the other 
gospels. Two hours. First Semester. 

Life of Paul. Acts and Pauline Epistles. Two hours. Second 
Semester. 

(This course may be taken instead of 1 at the option of the teacher.) 

3. Old Testament. Introduction to Bible Study. Painter. Two 
hours. First Semester. 

Scientific Confirmation of Old Testament History. Wright. Two 
hours. Second Semester. 

Introduction to the Study of Comparative Religion. Jevons. Two 
hours. This course may be taken instead of either one of the above at 
the discretion of the teacher. 



Biology 

PROFESSOR DERICKSON 

The courses of instruction cover four years. They are recognized 
as being as valuable in developing the powers of the mind as the other 
courses in the college curriculum, in that they develop the power of 
observation and thought essential to the understanding of all phases of 
the phenomena of human existence. 

The courses have been outlined with a three-fold purpose in view. 

First, to meet the demand for a general training in biology, caused 
by the reecntly established conclusion among educators, that a knowl- 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 45 

edge of the principles of biology is not only a useful but an essential 
factor in any course of training in which, social and moral questious are 
to be considered. 

Second, to meet the demand of the high schools for college trained 
teachers in biology. 

Third, to lay a broad foundation in the science for those who desire 
to pursue post graduate courses in universities and medical colleges. 

Students desiring to elect a single year's work in biology are ad- 
vised to elect 1 — b; if two years, 1 — a and 1 — b or 1 — band 3 and 4, de- 
pending on the object in view. Those contemplating a career in medi- 
cine, or the profession of teaching biology or a post graduate course in 
biology, are urged to complete all the courses offered. 

Description of Courses 

i-a. Plant Biology — Four hours. Three lectures or recitations and 
two laboratory periods of two hours each, per week. Throughout the 
year. The object of the course is to give the student a broad general 
knowledge of the plant kingdom. The form, structure and functioning 
of one or more types of each of the divisions of algae, fungi, liverworts, 
mosses, ferns and flowering plants, are studied. 

Special attention is given to the ontogeny and phylogeny of the 
several groups suggestive of evolution. 

Experiments are performed in the physiological laboratory to de- 
termine some of the relations of plants to water, gravitation, tempera- 
ture and light. Several types of seeds are studied as to their structure, 
germination and development. The principles of classification are 
learned by the analysis and identification of representatives of at least 
twenty-five orders of spermatophytes. 

The laboratory and class room work is supplemented by frequent 
field trips. 

Each student is supplied with a compound microscope, dissecting 
instruments, note and drawing materials and portfolio. 

Required of freshmen in chemical-biological group. Elective for 
others. 

Text-books: Text-book of Botany, Coulter, Barnes and Cowles; 
Principles of Botany, Bergen and Davis; Nature and Development of 
Plants, Curtis. Gray's new manual of Botany. 

i-b. Animal Biology — Four hours throughout the year. 

Three lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours each, per 
week. 

The principles of biology are learned by making a careful compara- 
tive study of representatives of several phyla of animals. The amoeba, 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

euglena, Paramecium, vorticella, sponge, hydra, starfish, earthworm, 
crayfish, grasshopper, mussel, amphioxus and frog are studied. A care- 
ful study is made of the embryology of the frog. The process of de- 
velopment is closely watched from the segmenting of the egg until 
metamorphosis takes place. Each student is taught the principles of 
technic by preparing and sectioning embryos at various stages of devel- 
opment. From these and other microscopic preparations the develop- 
ment of the internal organs and origin of tissues is studied. This is fol- 
lowed by a histological study of the tissues of the adult frog. 

Each student is required to keep a record of all work done in the 
laboratory in carefully prepared notes and drawings. 

For sophomores in the chemical-biological group. Elective for 
others. 

Text-books: Parker's Zoology, Sedgwick and Wilson's General Bi- 
ology, Holms, The Frog. 

2. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — Four hours. Throughout 
the year. Six hours laboratory work and two conferences each week. 

The course consists of the dissection and thorough study of a suc- 
torial fish, a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, an amphibian, a reptile, a 
bird and a mammal. Carefully lebeled drawings are required of each 
student as a record of each dissection. 

Text-books: Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology, Kingsley's Text-book of 
Vertebrate Zoology. 

3. ^Vertebrate Histology — Four hours (with Biology 4.) Beginning 
of the year to the end of the first week in March. Two conferences and 
six hours laboratory work per week. 

The normal histology of the human body is made the basis of the 
class work. Each student is required to acquire a practical knowledge 
of all phases of histological technic. 

All the tissues as well as the structure of all of the organs of the 
body are studied. Each student prepares about one hundred and fifty 
slides. 

Text-book: Huber's Text-book of Histology, Bohm and Davidoff. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

4. Embryology of Vertebrates— (a continuation of Biology 3.) 
Second week in March to the end of the year. Two lectures and six 
hours laboratory work per week. The laboratory work is based on the 
development of the chick and comparisons made with that of the frog 
and mammal. A study is made of living embryos at various stages of 
development. These are later killed, prepared and sectioned by the 
student for the study of the development of the internal organs. Fully 
labeled drawings are required. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 47 

Text-book: Introduction to Vertebrate Embryology. Reese. 

Elective for juniors and seniors. 

5. Morphology and Histology of Plants— Four hours throughout 
the year. Six hours laboratory work and two hours seminar per week. 
The details of the structure and development of the organs appearing 
in all stages of the life history of typical thalophytes, bryophytes pteri- 
dophytes, gymnosperms and anglosperms will be studied. 

Only those students will be admitted th this work who have shown 
by their interest in the work and knowledge of botany that they are 
capable of pursuing the work outlined with a certain degree of inde- 
pendence. 

Prerequisite, Biology 1 — a or equivalent. 

Text-books: Chamberlain's Plant Histology, Goebel's Organo- 
graphy of Plants. 

* Biology 2 and Biology 3 and 4 are given in alternate years. Biology 2 will be 
given in 1912-1913. 

Geology 

PROFESSOR WANNER 

General Geology- Four hours. Second Semester. 
The course includes dynamical, structural and historical geology, 
also some practical work in the field. 

Text-book: Scott's Introduction to Geology. 

Chemistry 

PROFESSOR WANNER 

i. General Inorganic Chemistry — Four hours. Throughout the 
year. 

Three hours lectures and recitations and four hours laboratory work. 

Non metals, metals, theoretical chemistry, a study of the funda- 
mental principles and the technical applications of the science. 

The laboratory work comprises about two hundred and fifty experi- 
ments in general chemistry, followed by some qualitative analysis. 

Text-book: Remsen's College Chemistry is used in the class room 
and laboratory. 

While the course presupposes no previous knowlege of Chemistry, 
it is advisable to have completed (Science E) or its equivalent. 

2. Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. First Semester. One hour 
lecture and a minimum of eight hours laboratory work. 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Pre-requisite Chemistry i. Methods of separating and detecting 
the bases and acids. 

The laboratory work comprises first, a study of the reactions of the 
general qualitative reagents on solutions of the metals. Followed by 
the separation and detection of the acids and bases. 

The student is required to analize a number of unknowns both in 
solid and liguid form. 

Text-books: Dennis and Whittelsey's Qualitative Analysis. Parts 
of Prescott and Johnson's Qualitative Analysis. 

3. Quantitative Analysis — Gravimetric and Volumetric. Four 
hours. Second Semester. One hour lecture and a minimum of eight 
hours laboratory work. 

Pre-requisite Chemistry 2. 

The laboratory work consists of a few simple gravimetric and vol- 
umetric determinations and a study of the chemistry of the operations 
involved. The determinations of the more important elements. The 
analyses of limestone and a few ores and alloys. 

Text-book: Talbot's Quantitative Analysis. 

4. Quantitative Analysis — Gravimetric and Volumetric — Four 
hours. First Semester. 

Pre-requisite Chemistry 3. A continuation of Chemistry 3. 
Text-book: Olsen's Quantitative Analysis. 

5. Organic Chemistry — Four hours. Throughout the year. Two 
hours lectures and recitations and a minimum of eight hours laboratory 
work. 

Pre-requisite Chemistry 1. A study of the principal compounds of 
carbon. The laboratory work comprises the preparation and purifica- 
tion of a number of organic compounds. 

Text-books: Remsen's Organic Chemistry and Cohen's Laboratory 
manual. 

6. Industrial Chemistry — Two hours. Throughout the year. Two 
hours lecture and recitation. 

A study of the practical applications of Chemistry. The manufac- 
ture of artificial fuels, salt, explosives, pigments, paper, etc. 

. The course is supplemented by frequent trips to industrial plants in 
the immediate vicinity, on which the student is required to hand in a 
report. 

Text-book: Thorpe's Outline's of Industrial Chemistry. 

Course 6 alternates with course 5. Offered 1913-1914. 



DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION 49 

Physics 

PROFESSOR WANNER 

1. General Physics — Four hours. Throughout the year.. Three 
hours lectures and recitations and four hours laboratory work. 

First Semester — Mechanics of solids, liquids and gases. Sound. 

Second Semester — Heat, light, magnetism, and electricity. 

The aim of the course is to give the student a good knowledge of 
college physics. 

Text-books: Crew's General Physics is used in the class room and 
Ames and Bliss's Manuel of Experiments in Physics, also parts of 
Nichol's Laboratory Manual of Physics and applied Electricity in the 
laboratory. 

2. Advanced Physics — Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Pre-requisite Physics 1. Extended work in mechanics, applied 

electricity, etc. The character of the work will be arranged to meet 
individual needs. 



The Academy 



52 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The Faculty 

HARRY EDGAR SPESSARD, A. M., Princi] 

Mathematics 



MAY BELLE ADAMS 
English 

ALVIN E. SHROYER, B. D. 
Greek 

HENRY E. WANNER, B. S. 
Physics and Chemistry 

GEORGE ELLAS WISEWELL, A. M. 
Latin 



LUCY S. SELTZER, A. M. 
German 

FLORENCE BOEHM 
Drawing 

JOSIAH F. REED 

HELEN L. WEIDLER 

HARRY E. ULRICH 

CLARA KEE HORNE 

Assistants 

GEORGE A. WILLIAMS 
Instructor in Physics 



THE ACADEMY 53 

Lebanon Valley Academy 

The Academy was established in 1866. For forty-six years it has 
cherished the ideals of full and accurate scholarship, and the develop- 
ment of character that fits one for the largest service to society. From 
its inception, college preparation has been its main purpose. But its 
curriculum has been well adapted to the needs of those who have en- 
tered immediately on practical life or professional study. 

The Academy is an intregal part of the College and profits by the 
proximity of students engaged in higher studies and by the ready ac- 
cess to the library, athletic field, literary societies, dormitory and lab- 
oratory privileges and by the opportunity to combine courses of study 
in the Academy with others in the College and Conservatory. 

Admission 

The applicant should be at least twelve years of age. It is desirable 
that he shall have completed the ordinary common school branches. 
In genera] it is to the student's advantage to enter in September, or less 
preferably at the second half year. However the applicant usually finds 
enough work if he should enter at any time. (See college calendar, 
page 2.) 

Each student for admission shall bring with him a certified state- 
ment of work done in the school last attended. Credit will be given for 
work thus certified. Should an applicant fail to present this certificate, 
he shall take an informal examination in the common school branches. 
He will then be assigned work at the discretion of the Principal. No 
student will be admitted until his registration is completed 

Examinations 

Examinations are held at the close of each half year. At this time 
reports are sent to parents or guardians. More frequent reports are 
sent when requested by parents. In the Academy records, A, signifies 
excellent; B, very good; C, fair; D, low but passing; E, conditioned; 
F, repeat in class. An "E" record may be removed by a test on any 
part of the course iu which the record is poor. 

For this test a fee of one dollar is charged. An "F" may not be 
removed by a special examination. 



54 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

General Information 

For special tests, given on work not completed because of absences 
or otherwise, a fee of one dollar is charged. For special examinations 
a fee of two dollars is charged. Monthlyreports are sent to parents or 

guardians which state the student's record to date and his total number 
of absences. 

Outline of Courses 

JUNIOR 

*Latin a — Beginner's Latin 5 hours 

*English a-i — English Grammar and Classics 4 hours 

^Mathematics a — Advanced Arithmetic 4 hours 

^Mathematics a- 2 — First year Algebra 5 hours 

History a\ f Civics ) , 

Science a / \ Physical Geography / 4 nours 

LOWER MIDDLE 

*Latin b — Caesar and Composition 4 hours 

*English b — Rhetoric anc Classics 4 hours 

^Mathematics c — Plane Geometry 5 hours 

History d } Ancient History, 1913-1914 4 hours 

UPPER MIDDLE 

*Latin c — Cicero and Composition 4 hours 

*English c — American Literature and Classics 4 hours 

*German a — Beginner's German 4 hours 

Dra^nV } -Chemistry . 4 hours 

History b — English History, 1912-1913 4 hours 

SENIOR 

*Latin d, or ^ ( Virgil and Composition \ 

German b, or > — -j Grammar, Classics and Composition > 4 hours 

Greek a J ( First year Greek ) 

Science d — Phj'sics 4 hours 

*English d — College requirements 4 hours 

Mathematics d — Solid Geometry \ . 

^Mathematics b — Intermediate Algebra / 4 

fi€£P" , Courses marked (*) are required of all graduates. See descrip- 
of courses. 



THE ACADEMY 55 

Description of Courses 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject and is reckoned to 
be a quarter of the entire amount of work required of each student. 
However, the four years of English aggregate but three units. 

For graduation fifteen units are required. The following courses 
are required of all applicants. 

Latin a, b and c 3 units 

English a, b, c and d 3 units 

Mathematics a-i, a-2, c and b or d. . . .2 l / 2 units 

History 1 unit 

Science •. 1 unit 

Eoreign Language 2 units 

Total 12^2 units 

The remaining 2^ units may be chosen from the following list. 

English A 

JUNIOR ENGLISH 

I English Grammar — Advanced. First Semester — Four hours. 
Required of all pupils who have not had High Gchool Grummar. 

Theme work is required weekly. Reading: Irving's The Sketch Book; 
Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans. 

II Composition and Rhetoric. Second Semester — Four hours. 
Theme work based on experience and assignments for reading. 

Reading: Scott's Ivanhoe; Colridge's The Ancient Mariner; Shakes- 
peare's The Merchant of Venice; Scott's Marmion. 

Text: Herrick and Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric. 

English B 

LOWER MIDDLE ENGLISH 

I Composition and Rhetoric. Throughout the year — One hour. 

Text: Herrick and Damon. 

Reading and Practice. Throughout the year — Three hours. , 

George Eliot's Silas Marner; Shakespeare's As You Like It; Ad- 
dison and Steele's The Decoverly Papers; Dickens' A Tale of Two 
Cities; Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress; Goldsmith's The Deserted Village; 
Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield. 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

English C 

UPPER MIDDLE ENGLISH 

I American Literature. Throughout the year— One hour. 
Text: Newcomer's American Literature. Rhetoric continued. 

II Reading and Practice. Three hours. Franklin's The Autobi- 
ography; Irving's Oliver Goldsmith; Hawthorne's The House of Seven 
Gables; Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales; Longfellow's Narrative Poems; 
Poe's Poems and Tales; Whittier's Snow Bound. 

Themes on assigned topics are required weekly. 
English a, b and c, one unit. 

English D 

SENIOR ENGLISH— One Unit 

I Composition and Rhetoric. Throughout the year — One hour. 
Herrick and Damon's New Composition and Rhetoric concluded. 

English Literature. 

II Reading and Study — Three hours. 

Shakespeare*s Julius Ceasar; Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's 
Minor Poems; Tennyson's The Princess; Washington's Farewell Ad- 
dress; Webster's Bunkerhill; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Tennyson's 
Idylls of the King. 

Latin 

Tha following Latin courses are in accordance with the recommend- 
ations made by the Commission on College Entrance Requirements in 
Latin, October 1909. 

Latin a — Throughout the year. Five hours. One unit. 

Pearson's Fssentials of Latin, is completed. Special emphasis on 
the memorizing and classification of grammatical forms is required. 
Constant practice in turning short sentences into Latin illustrating the 
fundamental rules of syntax is required. 

Latin b — Throughout the year. Four hours. One unit. 

Selections frpm Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War and Nepos 
(Lives.) Thirty-six lessons in composition based upon the text together 
with as much sight reading as possible is required. Allen and Green- 
ough's Grammar 

Latin c— Throughout the year. Four hours. One unit. 



THE ACADEMY 57 

Cicero's Maiiilian Law, Catiline I-IV, and Pro Archais. Text, Al- 
len and Greenough Six Orations, D'Oge's Latin Composition. 
Latin d — Throughout the year. Four hours. 

1. Virgil's Aeneid I, II, IV, VI, Boucolics, Georgics and Ovid's 
Metamorphoses, Fasti and Tristia. 

2. Arnold's Latin Prose Composition. One unit. 

Each student is required to have a copy of Allen and Greenough 's 
New Latin Grommar at hand for ready reference in both Latin c and 
Latin d. 

When not offered for.graduationin theAcademy this course may re- 
ceive college credit. 



History 

History a — First semester. Four hours. Civics. 

Text: Maltby's American Citizen. One-half unit. 

History b — Throughout the year. Four hours. English History. 

Walker's Essentials of English History. One unit. Offered in 
1912-1913. 

History c and d — Throughout the year. Four hours. 

Ancient history with special reference to Greek and Roman history 
and including a short introductory study of the more ancient nations 
and the chief events of the early middle ages, down to the death of 
Charlemagne. One unit. Offered in 1913-1914. 



German 

A Beginning German — Four hours. Throughout the year. One 
unit. 

Bacon's German Grammar, and the reading of 75 to 100 pages of 
graduated texts. Frequent reproduction from memory sentences pre- 
viously read. 

B Second Year German — Four hours. Throughout the year. One 
unit. 

Oral and written reproduction of the matter read in easy variations. 

From 150 to 200 pages of literature are selected from the following 
list: Heyse's L'Arrabbiata; Hellern's Hoher als die Kirche; Storm's 
Immensea; Leander's Traumerien; Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug; 
Wilhelmi's'Einer muss heiraten; Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn. 



58 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Mathematics 

A-i Arithmetic — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

A special drill in fractions, percentage, the metric system and 
modern business forms. Junior year. 

A-2 Algebra — Five hours. Throughout the year. 
Hawkes, Luby and Touton's First Course in Algebra. 

B Intermediate Algebra — Second semester. Four hours. 

This course must be offered for graduation by all candidates who 
do not offer Solid Geometry. 

C Plane Geometry — Five hours. Throughout the year. 

Durell's New Plane and Solid Geometry is the text-book used. 
Much time is spent on original problems. This course is required of 
all candidates for graduation. Lower middle year. One unit. 

D Solid Geometry — Four hours. First semester. One-half unit. 

Durell. 

The above courses can aggregate three and one-half units only. 
Courses a-i, a-2, c and either b or d are required for graduation. 

Greek 

A Beginner's Greek— Four hours. Throughout the year. 
White's First Greek Book. 

Science 

A Physical Geography— Four hours. Second semester. One- 
half-unit. 

The Earth as a Globe, The Ocean, The Atmosphere, The Land, 
plains, plateaus, mountains, volcanos, rivers, and glaciers. 

A summary of the relation of man, plants and animals to climate, 
land forms and oceanic areas. 

D Elementary Physics — Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three hours lectures and recitations and two hours laboratory 
work. 

Mechanics of solids, liquids and gases, heat, magnetism, electricity. 

No previous knowledge of Physics is required for admission to this 
course. 

Text-book: Cahart and Chute's High School Physics, Sixty ex- 
periments as outlined in the National Physics Note Book Sheets are re- 
quired in the laboratory. One unit. 



THE ACADEMY 59 

E Elementary Chemistry— Four hours. First semester. Two 
hours lectures and recitation and four hours laboratory work. 

The aim of the course is to present Chemistry to the beginner in 
such a way as to enable him to grasp the fundamental principles and to 
help him to secure a working knowledge of the science in the labora- 
tory. 

Text:book: First Principles of Chemistry by Brownlee and others, 
also Laboratory Exercises to accompany same. 

Geometrical Drawing 

Four hours. First semester. 

Morris' Geometrical Drawing. Geometrical figures, reconstruction 
of figures* to a given scale, construction of scales to any given unit, pro- 
jective representation of plane and solid figures, etc. 

The course counts one-half unit. 

Election of Studies 

There is considerable room for election of courses that have a 
special value to students intending to specialize. 

The Principal advises students what subjects are fundamental to 
professional and engineering courses. 

Graduation 

The required credit for graduation, as outlined in the foregoing 
courses, is fiteen units, provided that the student shall, have completed 
at least the three units of Mathematics, the three units of English, three 
units of Latin, two units of German, one unit of Science, and one unit 
of History. If the candidate desires to enter Lebanon Valley College 
he shall arrange his work so as to meet the entrance requirements for 
the several courses. 

Sub-Preparatory Course 

Sometimes students of mature age come to us not fully prepared to 
enter the Academy. They have for various reasons attended school but 



60 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

a short time and find it embarrassing to enter the public schools with 
scholars so much } 7 ounger than themselves. For these we make pro- 
vision. However, at least sixteen hours of regular Academy work is 
required. 

Facts to be Considered 

A one hundred dollar scholarship is awarded each year to the Acad- 
emy graduate who has, according to the vote of the Faculty, made the 
best class record and deported himself in accordance with the regula- 
tions. 

Academy students are admitted to all social privileges of the Col- 
lege. Excellent opportunities are offered for self improvement in the 
Literary societies and Christian associations. 



Conservatory 
oi Music 



62 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Faculty 

EDWIN E. SHELDON, Mus. M. 
Professor of Pianoforte, Organ, Counterpoint, Fugue 

IDA MANEVAL SHELDON, Mus. B. 
Pianoforte, Harmony, Ear Training 

HARRIET LADD MARBLE 
Voice, Harmony, Musical History 

EDITH FRANTZ MILLS 
Voice 

PHILO A. STATTON 
FREDERICK W. LIGHT 

Violin 

LUCY S. SELTZER, A B. 
German 

GEORGE ELLAS WISEWELL, A. M. 
French 

FALBA L. JOHNSON, A. M. 

English 

MAY BELLE ADAMS 
Oratory 

FLORENCE S. BOEIIM 
Painting, Drawing 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 63 

Location and Equipment 

The Engle Music Hall is a handsome three-story stone structure. 
It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe organ, director's room, 
studios, practice rooms, waiting and writing room for students' use, 
large society rooms, lavatories, etc. The whole building is lighted by 
electricity, and heated by steam, and designed and furnished with a 
view to having it complete in every respect for the study of music in all 
its branches. A complete musical education from the very first steps to 
the highest artistic excellence may be secured. The director will use 
every effort to obtain positions for those students who have finished the 
courses, and who may wish to teach or perform in public. 

Object 

The department has for its object, the foundation and diffusion of 
a high and thorough musical education. The methods used are those 
followed by the leading European conservatories. The courses are 
broad, systematic, progressive, and as rapid as possible, and the conser- 
vatory offers the means for a complete education in musical art at a 
moderate cost. 

Description of Courses 

I. PIANOFORTE 

The course in Pianoforte is divided into five divisions; Sub-Fresh- 
man, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and Senior. 

The course marked out, must, however, necessarily be varied ac- 
cording to the ability and temperament of the pupil. Many works must 
be studied by all, but there is much that may be essential for one stu- 
dent and not at all necessary for another. Individual instruction only 
is given. 

A system of technics is used that is in line with the most approved 
methods. Special attention is paid to the development of a true legato 
touch and a clear, smooth technique. The use of the pedal so much 
neglected is emphasized. At the same time expression and interpre- 
tion are not neglected. Technical and theoretical ability are worthless, 
except as it enables the performer to bring out the beauties and mean- 
ing of the composer. 

The Virgil Practice Claver, which is now generally recognized by 



64 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

the leading teachers and artists of the day as an important aid in the de- 
velopment of technique, has been introduced. 

Memorizing music is required of all students. It is a great acqui- 
sition to be able to perform a number of selections from memory. 

Sight Reading — This, although to a certain extent a natural gift, 
can be greatly improved by systematic work. One who can read well 
has all music at his command, while a poor reader has but the few 
pieces which may have been learned. 

Practice — Special effort is made to teach pupils how to practice. 
Difficult places are pointed out and the students are taught how to learn 
them in the quickest and most thorough manner. Quality is of more 
value than quantity in practice. 

Ensemble Playing — It is impossible to overestimate the value of 
thorough training in duet, trio and quartette playing. Students are 
given drill in these as well as in accompaniment playing. 

II.— VOCAL MUSIC 

The basis of all music studies should be vocal music. Singing de- 
velopes the musical ear and leads to a discernment of tone color without 
which the fundamental principles of technique and touch on the piano- 
forte cannot be obtained. 

The method used is largely that of the Italian schools, but no one 
method is employed exclusively. The development of a pure tone and 
an easy and natural control of the voice in singing is the end which is 
sought. Correct breathing, intonation, attack, legato, accent, phrasing 
and pronunciation are features of. technical drill. At the same time 
naturalness and an artistic style of singing are constantly urged upon 
the student. 

III.— THE ORGAN 

The churches of our country are making an increasing demand for 
well trained organists. The organ is no longer looked upon as an in- 
strument solely for accompaniments and church use, but has taken its 
place among solo instruments and gained a distinct recognition from 
the music-loving public. 

A large field, therefore, is open to the student of the Organ. The 
work as outlined aims to provide a thorough training in all that per- 
tains to a mastery of the organ for church or concert use. A two-man- 
ual Moller pipe organ is used in the Conservatory. 

IV.— THE VIOLIN 

Among the stringed instruments, the Violin stands as one of the 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 65 

oldest and has always been admired for its beautiful and thrilling strains. 

The musical possibilities within the compass of the violin are mar- 
velous and unexcelled by any other instrument. The best artists of the 
olden and modern times were skillful on the violin, and it appeals to 
those of the finest musical taste today. 

Nowhere in English literature do we find a nobler or more glowing 
tribute to the violin than is the little poem penned by our own immor- 
tal "Autocrat," where he places the violin among the highest order of 
musical instruments. 

V.— THEORETICAL MUSIC 

Theoretical studies are essential to rapid and comprehensive sight 
reading and to excellence in the higher grades of music. Good pedal- 
ing depends on a knowledge of harmony, and memorizing is greatly 
facilitated by it. 

An intelligent insight into the foundation, upon which rests the art 
of music, gives interest to the pupils in their playing and singing and 
makes them musicians, as well as performers. 

Recitals 

Students' Thursday Evening Recitals — At least twice each term a 
recital is given in which students, who have been prepared under the 
supervision of the instructors, take part. These recitals furnish incen- 
tives to study and experience in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class — Students who are not sufficiently advanced 
to appear in the Thursday Evening Recitals are given experience in 
public performance in the Students' Recital Class. These classes are 
not open to the public. Rules governing Concert Deportment are 
brought to the attention of the students and each performer shown what 
is expected of him or her when before an audience. The result is a 
smoother and more satisfactory appearance in the Evening Recitals 
when assigned to such work. 

Artist Recitals — Not less important than the daily class room work 
is the opportunity afforded students of hearing the representative works 
of the great masters performed by artists of recognized ability of this 
and foreign countries. These recitals have met with much favor and 
enthusiasm among the students and citizens. 

Senior Recitals — Each candidate for graduation shall give a public 
recital during the last year. 



66 



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DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 67 

Conservatory students rooming in the dormitories are required to 
take not less than 15 hours work per week, one hour practice on piano 
or organ counting as one-half hour credit. 

Candidates for graduation in piano shall have taken at least three 
terms in voice or organ. For graduation in voice or violin the student 
shall have at least three terms in piano. For organ the Sophomore 
year is required. 

Certificates 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATES 
Complete course in pianoforte or in any of the other subjects, viz: 
voice, violin, harmony, theory, or history. 
Fee for certificate, $2.50. 

Decree 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE (Mus. B.) 
Candidates must already have taken a diploma including theoretical 

course outlined on page 66. 

Must have satisfactorially completed one year's work in Canon, 

Fugue and original composition. 
Fee for degree, $10.00. 

Tuition 

PIANO OR VOICE 

Fall term 2 lessons per week $22 50 

Fall term 1 lesson per week 11 25 

Winter term 2 lessons per week 17 25 

Winter term 1 lesson per week 9 00 

Spring term 2 lessons per week 15 00 

Spring term 1 lesson per week 7 50 

SENIOR AND JUNIOR YEARS 

Fall term 2 lessons per week 30 00 

Fall term 1 lesson per week 15 00 

Winter term 2 lessons per week 23 00 

Winter term 1 lesson per week, 12 00 

Spring term 2 lessons per week 20 00 

Spring term 1 lesson per week 10 00 

PIPE ORGAN 

Fall term 2 lessons per week 30 00 

Fall term 1 lesson per week 15 00 



68 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Winter term 2 lessons per week 23 00 

Winter term 1 lesson per week 12 00 

Spring term 2 lessons per week 20 00 

Spring term 1 lesson per week 10 00 

HARMONY, MUSICAL HISTORY, EAR TRAINING, THEORY OR 
PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC 

Fall term 2 lessons per week 10 00 

Winter or Spring term .... 2 lessons per week 8 00 

Private Lessons each 75 

COUNTERPOINT, CANON OR FUGUE 

Fall term 2 lessons per week 12 00 

Winter or Spring term ... .2 lessons per week 10 00 

SIGHT PLAYING OR SIGHT SINGING 

Fall term 1 lesson per week 5 00 

Winter or Spring term . . . . 1 lesson per week 4 00 

A charge of seventy-five cents for Fall term and fifty cents for 
Winter or Spring term will be made for use of Sight Playing Musical 
Library. 

WINTER OR 
FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

For use of instruments: Piano, one hour 

per day 1 $3 00 $2 50 

Each additional hour 1 50 1 25 

Pipe Organ, one hour per day 10 00 9 00 

Students taking a full music course are charged a matriculation fee 
of $3.00 for the year, payable in advance. This fee entitles student to 
all privileges of the College. 

Students taking piano, organ, or voice only are charged a matricu- 
lation fee of $1.00 payable in advance. 

Pipe organ students must pay at the rate of 20 cents an hour for 
organ blower when motor is not in use. 

Fee for graduation diploma, $6.00. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS— No reduction is made for absence 
from the first two lessons of the term, nor for a subsequent individual 
absence. In case of long continued illness the loss is shared equally by 
the College and the student. 

All tuition is payable in advance. 

Pupils may enter at any time, but for convenience of grading, etc., 
the beginning of each term is the most desirable time. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 69 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 
Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade, 
will be issued at the close of each term. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., address 

DIRECTOR OF THE CONSERVATORY, 
Lebanon Valley College, 

Annville, Pa. 



School of Oratory 



72 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Oratory and Public Speaking 

PROFESSOR ADAMS 

The work of this department is primarily personal culture, the high- 
est development of the personality of the student. "The development 
of the art of oratory is the development of the orator himself." 

The course in Oratory affords opportunity for those who wish to 
develop their powers of expression either as interpreters or creative 
thinkers, through the interpretative study of the finest in literature. 
As the interpretation and adequate expression of the literature demands 
a high degree of mental activity at the moment of speech, and the stu- 
dent must think and feel with the author, his mental and spiritual pow- 
ers are quickened with every step, and his progress tested by his ability 
to move his audience, the class. 

The course requires two years of study of prescribed work. Upon 
the completion of the studies a certificate is awarded. 

Students entering the regular course must have had a high school 
course or its equivalent. 

General Outline 

i. Public Speaking. 

Orations, Debate, Extemporaneous Speaking, Impersonations. 

2. Voice Training. 

Vocal Technique, Placing, Tone Color. 

3. Literary Interpretation. 

Evolution of Fxpression; Laws of Art; Poetic Interpretation. 

4. Dramatic and Platform Art. 

Shakespeare, Dramatic Training, Deportment, Private Lessons. 

5. Physical Training. 

Expressive Physical Culture, Gesture, Response. 

6. English and Literature. 

Rhetoric, Composition, History of English Literature. 

7. Pedagogy. 

Psychology, Normal Training, Methods. 

Description of Courses 

1. Public Speaking. (English 2.) 1 hour. 

Required of Sophomores. Open to others at discretion of instructor. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORATORY 73 

This aims to give the student practice in the fundamentals of oral 
expression. Physical and voice exercises for securing poise, freedom 
and unity, breathing and articulation, placing and radiation of tones. 

Study of the lives and methods of great orators. Drill in interpret- 
ing and delivering orations and other forms of literature. 

Extemporaneous speaking, arguments, occasional speeches and ori- 
ginal orations. Impersonation, characterization, dramatic study and 
presentation of scenes from some of Shakespeare's plays. 

2. Voice Training. Exercises for breath control, for freeing of 
voice by proper placing and direction of tone, purity, flexibility, radia- 
tion, resonance, and power; pitch, volume and inflection in emphasis. 
Tone color and form, ideal and imaginative qualities in tone. Diction. 

Given daily throughout course. 

3. Literary Interpretation. Development of the principles of Pub- 
lic Address. 

a. Evolution of Expression. Two hours. Study of selections 
from great orators, essayists, poets and dramatists. Practical drill 
work before class for developing power of student through application 
of principles to his individual needs. Personal criticism and guidance 
to bring out originality of student. 

b. Perfective Laws of Art. Two hours. Expressive study of dif- 
ferent forms of literature with particular attention to the laws of art 
which logically follow the sixteen steps of the Evolution. Dramatic 
work. 

(Two hours credit in college is given for each of above courses, a 
and b, when taken with 1 private lesson a week.) 

c. Poetic Interpretation. One hour. Special interpretative and 
critical study of the great poets, with presentation and criticism before 
class, to acquaint student with masters of literary art, to develop appre- 
ciation of the music and suggestiveness of poetry, and imaginative and 
poetic elements in work. 

Attention is given to the choice, adaptation, and abridgement of 
selections for public reading. 

4. Dramatic and Platform Art. One hour. Interpretation and 
dramatic study of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Merchant of Venice, Julius 
Caesar and As You Like It." Presentation of prepared scenes for criti- 
cism. Practical work in stage business, deportment and grouping. 

Platform deportment, correct bearing and presentation before audi- 
ence. Platform methods and traditions. Pantomine, study of emotions, 
freedom and responsiveness in bodily expression. 

Sketches and plays are given from time to time during the year, 



74 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

which with the annual college play provide special dramatic training 
for many. 

Private lessons, with attention to the special needs of the students, 
either in overcoming habits, or in personal development and repertoire, 
are given throughout the course to supplement the claFS work. More 
time is given to selections, arrangement of programs, writing intro- 
ductions, etc. One hour a week. 

5. Physical Training. Exercises for securing poise, bearing, free- 
dom and ease in movement; to gain control over body and render it re- 
sponsive to thought. Response in bearing and dramatic attitudes. 
Gesture drill for definite expressions through different realms. 

Given daily throughout course. 

6. English and Literature. 
Composition and Rhetoric, (English I.) 
English i-b, and English Literature (English 3.) 

7. Psychology. Philosophy 1. 

Normal Training and Methods. One hour. Practice in teaching 
and class management. Under the direction and criticism of the in- 
structor the Seniors conduct class work, lecture upon principles, and 
discuss their application. 

Recitals. A recital is given at least once a term for which the stu- 
dents are carefully prepared. These afford the students public platform 
practice by which they gain confidence and experience. 

Each Senior is required to adapt and arrange a program for a public 
recital, from some piece of literature approved by the instructor. 

Tuition 

All tuition is payable in advance. No reduction is allowed for ab- 
sence for the first or second week of the terms, nor for lessons missed 
during the term except in case of protracted illness. 

Regular course, Fall term $30, Winter and Spring terms each $25. 

Special courses in Literary Interpretation a and b, with 1 private 
lesson a week. Fall term, $1$, Winter and Spring terms, each $12.50. 

Private lessons, $1.00. 

Class work in Physical Culture, per term $3.50. 

Other classes will be formed when there is a call for any special 
line of work. 

Fee for certificate, $2.50. 



School of Art 



76 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FLORENCE S. BOEHM. INSTRUCTOR 

Course of Study for Certificate 

First Year —Drawing, sketching in pencil of various familiar sub- 
jects, and drawing from geometric solids, good examples of proportion 
and perspective, and the principles of light and shade. 

Painting — Flowers, fruit and leaves, models, casts and familiar ob- 
jects. Elementary original composition. 

MoeelinG — Fruit, vegetable forms and leaves from casts and na- 
ture; animals from the cast and prints. Elementary original composi- 
tion. 

Second Year — Charcoal drawing from casts of heads. Painting in 
water colors and pastels from groups of still life, interiors, decorative 
subjects, flowers, draperies, and out-of-door sketching. 

Yhird Year — Sketching from life. Painting in oils from still life 
and nature. Wash drawings in ink, water color, historic ornament. 
Studies iu color harmony. 

Teacher's Class — Principles and methods of drawing, modeling, 
blackboard drawing, lettering, brush work, sketching from life and 
water color. 

Saturday work is offered for teachers and children who cannot take 
work during the week. 

Keramics — Classes in china painting are instructed by the latest 
methods in conventional and naturalistic treatment. The china is fired 
in the institution, giving students an opportunity of learning how to 
fire their own china. 

Miniature — Miniature painting on ivory. 

Students who do not desire the certificate course may take special 
work along any line preferred. 

Art Exhibit 

During commencement week an exhibit of some of the work done 
in the department is held in the studio, to which all visitors are wel- 
comed and entertained by members of the department. 

Expenses 



FATjL, winter spring 

term term term 



TUITION — One lesson a week $ 10 oo $800 $800 

Two lessons a week 16 00 12 00 12 00 

Children 's beginning class 2 50 2 00 2 00 

Children's advance class 4 00 3 00 3 00 

Special lessons 75 cents each. Matriculation Fee $1 00 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 77 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



College 

POST GRADUATE 

Bnddinger, David D. , A. B Lebanon 

Burtner, Edwin O., B. S Palmyra 

Daugherty , S. F Myers;own 

Hershey, I. Mover, A. B., B. D Lancaster 

Miller, Harry E, A. B., B. D Lebanon 

Road, Hiram F., A. B Highspire 



SENIORS 

Beckley, Arthur S Annville 

Butterwick, Oliver Lebanon 

Carmany, Earle H Annville 

Grimm, Samuel O Red Lion 

Harnish, Claire F Mechanicsburg 

Hensel, Forest Stanley Lykens 

Ischy, John W Lebanon 

Keister, Donald C Annville 

Kilmer, Edna Ruth : Reading 

Lau , Lizzie Agnes York 

Leibold, Titus J Reading 

Light, Carrie S Jonestown 

Lowery, Ira D Harrisburg 

Miller, Virginia Lebanon 

Piummer, Samuel Baechtel Hagerstown, Md. 

Reed, Josiah F Lebanon 

. Rettew, Chester E Columbia 

Schell, Esther Naomi Myerstown 

Seltzer, Nellie Lebanon 

Smith, Charles C Red Liob 

Thomas, Norman B. S Hagerstown, Md. 

Vogt, Paul M Prescott 

Weidler, Helen Lura Royalton 

White, Charles G Annville 

Wingerd, Guy Chambersburg 



7 8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

JUMORS 

Boughter, Ezekiel Kephart Oberlin 

Christeson, Florence E. Annville 

Clippinger, Florence E > Shippensburg 

Heffelfinger, Victor M Annville 

Home, Clara Kee Red Lion 

Klinger, Landis R Williamstown 

Lehman, Edith Marie Annville 

Leininger, John F Chambersbnrg 

Light, Boaz G Avon 

Mulhollen, Victor D Wilmore 

Myers, Cora Virginia Ephrata 

Potter, Ivan K Long Island City, 

Ressler, Ivan K Shamokin [N. Y. 

Richie, Gustavus Adolphus Shamokin 

Roberts, Palmer F Annville 

Spessard, Lottie Mae Annville 

Sherk, John E Jonestown 

Uhrich, Clarence H Hersbey 

Ulrich, Charles Y Manheim 

Ulrich, Harry Edgar Harrisburg 

Wert, Mark H Annville 

Williams, George Albert Annville 

Yarkers, Edna E Mc Alisterville 

Zimmerman, Sara Esther Shamokin 

SOPHOMORES 

Arndt, Charles H Allentown 

Bachman, Catharine B Annville 

Charleton, Harry Hayward Lowell, Mass. 

Gruber, David Augustus Annville 

Harnish, Leray Bowers Carlisle 

Hayes, Warren H Everson 

Kreider, Henry Horst Annville 

Landis, Edgar M Myerstown 

Lyter, John Bowman Harrssburg 

Meyer, Elizabeth May Annville 

Mutch, C. Edward Millersburg 

Reddick, D. Leonard Walkersville, Md. 

Risser, Blanche Campbelltown 

Rodes, Lester A Wormleysburg 

Schmidt, Carl Frederic Lebanon 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 79 

Shearer, Frank Harrisburg 

Smith, Edward H A nnville 

Snavely, Henry E " Lebanon 

Strickler, Paul L Lebanon 

Stager, William S Lebanon 

Urich, Mary Josephine Annville 

Walter, John Allen Lebanon 

Weidler, Russell Merwy n Royaltdn 

Young, David Edward Manheim 

Zimmerman, David Ellis Annville 

FRESHMAN 

Bender, Harry M Annville 

Boltz, Ammon Light Lebanon 

Bowman, Paul J Middletown 

Brightbill, Hellen E Annville 

Carl, William C. . Tower City 

Eby, Ira Clyde Lebanon 

Engle, Ruth V Hummelstown 

Engle, Ruth E Palmyra 

Engle, LaRene Hummelstown 

Groh, Samuel B >. Lickdale 

Groh, Sara M Lebanon 

Houser, Ethel Louise Baltimore 

Irwin, Mary Louella Harrisburg 

Jamison , Verling W Annville 

Jones, John O Shamokin 

Kaufman, Leroy Tower City 

Lerew, John William * Dillsburg' 

Light, Raymond A nnville 

Light, Earl O Annville 

Ligan, R. Franklin Steelton 

Lyter, Thomas B Harrisburg 

McNelly , Willis W Pottsto.wn 

Mentz, Florence C York„ 

Miller, Luther Lebanon 

Morrison, John E Steelton 

Ole weiler, Harold L York 

Peters, Howard L Steelton 

Shepley, Charles Lawrence Harrisburg 

Smith, Grace N Shoemakersville 

Snavely, Carl G Danville 



8o LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Station, Philo A . . .Hagerstown, Md. 

Stengle, Faber E Oberlin 

Stickell, Ralph Walter Waynesboro 

Weaver, Alvin L Annville 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Becker, William Harvey Annville 

Boger, Anna E .... Lebanon 

Brenneman , Curvin E Windsor 

Deitzler, Jonathan C Fredricksburg 

Garver, H . B Middletown 

Gibble, Phares B Annville 

Goss, Myra Hutnmelstown 

Hallman, Blanche Lebanon 

Harnish, Abraham H Lancaster 

Leister, J. Morris Cocolrmus 

Miller C. Wallace Lebanon 

Shoop, Virginia C Halifax 

Shoop, Caroline C Halifax 

Spangler, Abner C Annville 

Turby, Myrle Esther Palmyra 

Walcott, Ira S Tremont 

ACADEMY 

Arndt, Raymond H ...Columbia 

Blouch, Gideon L Annville 

Brooks, Oliver R Lancaster 

Bashore, David Hummelstown 

Deitzler, Jonathan C Fredericksburg 

Denlinger, Harry A , Intercourse 

Dubble, Anna I Myerstown 

Dunham, J. H Lebanon 

Ellis, Miriam R Jonestown 

Engle, Allen B Palmyra 

Ernst, Ira Sankey Remaster 

Fake, Norman I Annville 

Fake, A. D Jonestown 

Fernsler, Esther E Palmyra 

Gibble, Phares B Annville 

Gruber, E. Viola Campbelltown 

Hartz, Robert E Palmyra 

Haverstock, George M New Cumberland 

Herr, Nathan Annville 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 81 

Hetrick, Herman E Union Deposit 

Hoff er, Russell E Hummelstown 

Kreider, Irwin Victor Palmyra 

Kreider, I.J Lebanon 

Krenz, Oscar E Dillsburg 

Leister, J. Maurice Cocolamus 

Leister, Lahman I Cocolamus 

Light, Ralph B Fontana 

Light, Robert R Lebanon 

Light, Mark Y Lebanon 

Long, Harry Shupe Wilmore 

Long, David Mason Annville 

Longenecker, C. R Palmyra 

Lynch. Clyde A Harrisburg 

McClure, Robert P Boiling Springs 

McConel, William Portage 

Mathias, Josepbine S Highspire 

Medsger, Abner D Pittsbuag 

Medsger, Chalmer .Pittsburg 

Meyer, Allen B Annville 

Myers, Vera F Longsdorf 

Miller, C. Wallace , Lebanon 

Mills, Mary C West Decatur 

Mowery, John D ■> Chambersburg 

Rine, Sedic S Hoffer 

Risser, Harold Campbelltown 

Schwalm, Clarence W Lebanon 

Schaeffer, Harry E Lebanon 

Shannon , J. S Jonestown 

Shoop, Virginia C Halifax 

Shoop, Caroline C Halifax 

Snyd&r, Mabel E Lebanon 

Weaver, Elta Marie Annville 

Wrightstone, Harold K Mechanicsburg 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

SENIORS 

Diehm , Meda May Penryn 

Fry, Anna Alma Palmyra 

Gingrich, Katharine May Palmyra 

Light, Sara Marion Lebanon 

Spayd, Mary Alice Annville 

Strickler, Sara Kathryn Lebanon 



S2 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

JUNIORS 

Bachman, Ora B. (Organ) Annville 

Behney, Myrl Lebanon 

Ellis, Miriam Ruth Jonestown 

Heiudel, Velma Lucretia Red Lion 

SOPHOMORES 

Botts, George Frederick Elizabethville 

Light, Mary Lydia Annville 

Myers, Vera Fishburne Longsdorf 

Painter, Mary Elizabeth Hershey 

Shanatnan, Mabel Ada Richland 

FRESHMAN AND SPECIALS 

Albright, Ruth Lebanon 

Arnold, John Frederick Lickdale 

Berger, Grace Catherine Lebanon- 

Bomberger, Alice May Palmyra 

Bittner, Mrs. O. R Grantville 

Bangser, Bertha Lebanon 

Bowman, Harry Annville 

Bachman, Harry Annville 

Bachman, Paul Annville 

Bodenhorn, Elwood Annville 

Bomberger, Mattie Annville 

Brightbill, Helen Annville 

Daugherty, Ethel Margaret Elizabethtown 

Detweiler, Ruth Palmyra 

Denlinger, Ethel May Intercourse 

Davidson, Margaret Ethel Bellwood 

Deibler, John Q Annville 

Ely, Naomi Ruth Hagerstown, Md. 

Engle, Ruth Elizabeth Palmyra 

Frantz, Suzanne Gutelius Lebanon 

Grimm, Mrs. S. O Red Liorr" 

Gingrich, Edith A Annville 

Hammond, Nora Frances Hagerstown, Md. 

Horn, John Annville 

Horn, William Annville 

Johnson, Falba Love New York City 

Kreider, Elizabeth May Palmyra 

Kershner, Maude Eva Shoemakersville 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 83 

Kuntz, Ernestina Lebanon 

Leitheiser, Margaret Hershey 

Landis, Edna Grace Hershey 

Louser, Marie Lebanon 

Maulfair, Mary Elizabeth Hershey 

Miller, Helen Elizabeth Annville 

Miller, M. Luther Lebanon 

Moffatt. Albert Annville 

Mozer, Katherine Highspire 

Rohland, Harry Annville 

Ressler, Ivan Shamokin 

Risser, Blanche Campbelltown 

Stengle, Faber E Oberlin 

Shell, Susan Myerstown 

Sholly, Edith May « Myerstown 

Stauffer, Velma Mabel Palmyra 

Silberman , Dora Dorothy Lebanon 

Smith, Grace Shoemakersville 

Shenk, Elmer Fontana 

Spessard, Bertha Annville 

Turby, Myrle E. Palmyra 

Weidman, Evelyn East Earl 

Wolfersberger, Rebecca Campbelltown 

ORATORY 

SENIORS 

Brightbill, Helen E Annville 

Smith, Grace N Shoemakersville 

Yarkers, Edna E McAlisterville 

JUNIORS 

Berger , Grace Lebanon 

Daugherty, Ethel Elizabethville 

UNCLASSIFIED 

Butter wick, Oliver Lebanon 

Dubble, Anna Myerstown 

Herr, Mabel Annville 

Hockenbury, Nona D Lebanon 

Ischy , John W Lebanon 

Jamison, Verling Annville 



84 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Kilmer, Edna Reading 

Krentz, O. E Dillsburg 

Kreider, Elizabeth Annville 

Lau, Elizabeth York , 

Lehman, Edith Annville 

Leithiser, Margaret Hershey 

Light, Carrie Jonestown 

McConel, William Portage 

Mulhollen, Victor D ' Wilmore 

Seltzer, Nellie Lebanon 

Snyder, Verda A Keedysville, Md. 

Urich, Josephine Annville 

Weaver, Elta Annville 

Weidler, Helen Coatesville 

Wingard, Guy Chambersburg 

ART 

Batdorf, Emma Annville 

Bomberger, Mattie Annville 

Brunner, Cora Annville 

Christeson, Florence Annville 

Christeson, Mary Annville 

Fink, Esther Annville 

Galletin, Elizabeth Annville 

f 
Hae^ter , Anna Lebanon 

Kreider, Clement Annville 

Kreider, Howard Annville 

Kreider, Nancy Annville 

Landis, Harold Palmyra 

Leithiser, Margaret Hershey 

Light, Alma Annville 

Longenecker, Paul Palmyra 

Maulfair, Mary Annville 

Myers, Vera Carlisle 

Reigle, Rhoda Lebanon 

Shanaman, Mabel Richland 

Shoop, Caroline Halifax 

Seigrist, Mrs. E Lebanon 

Smith, Grace N Shoemakersville 

Spangler, Roy Annville 

Stein, Mary Annville 

Wolf, Anna Annville 

Zimmerman, May Lebanon 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 85 

SUMMARY 

Graduate Students 6 

Seniors 25 

Juniors 24 

Sophomores 25 

Freshmen 34 

Special Students 16 



Total in College 130 

Academy 52 

Conservatory 66 

Oratory 26 

Art 26 



301 
Deduct names repeated 49 



Total 252 



Decrees Conferred June 7, 1911 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Brunner, W. Albert Lehman John K. 

Ehrhart, Oliver T. Lindsay, Alexander M. 

Ellis, William Otterbein Marshall, John Edward 

Frost, Fred. L- . Saylor, Rodger Behm 

Holdeman, Phares M. Shoop, William Carson 

Kauffman, Artus Orestus Spessard, Earle Agustus 

Kennedy, Francis R. Spessard, Lester Lewis 

Koontz, Paul Rodes Ziegler, Samuel George 

GRADUATES IN MUSIC 

Bachman, Ora B. Gingrich, Edith A. 

Detweiler, Ruth Christina Meyer, Elizabeth May 

GRADUATES IN ORATORY 

Hockenbury, Nona Downey Ischy, John W. 

Snyder, Verda A. 



INDEX 

Academy 52-60 

Admission 53 

Description of Courses 55 

Examinations 53 

Outline of Courses 54 

Advisers •■• 15 

Art Department 76 

Astronomy 42 

Bible 44 

Biology 44 

Board of Trustees 3 

Buildings and Grounds 11 

Calendar : 2 

Chemistry : 47 

Class Standing 16 

College Organizations ■ 13 

Corporation 3 

Courses, Outline of, (College) 29-32 

Degrees Conferred 85 

Degree and Diploma 16 

Discipline 15 

Economics 43 

Education 36 

English Language and Literature 40 

Expenses, College and Academy 17 

Department of Art 76 

Department of Music 67 

Faculty and Officers 5 

French Language and Literature 38 

General Information 11 

German Language and Literature 40 

Graduate Work 16 

Greek Language and Literature 37 

Geology 47 

History 43 

History of the College 8 

Laboratories. 12 



Latin Language and Literature 38 

Library and Reading Room n 

Mathematics 41 

Music Department 62 

Oratory and Public Speaking 72 

Philosophy 33 

Physics 49 

Political Science 41 

Religious Work 12 

Register of Students 77 

Requirements for Admission 

Academy 55 

College 20 

Scholarships 16 

Sociology 43