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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Lebanon Valley College 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 7 (New Series) May, 1919 



No. 3 



Fifty-second Annual Catalog 
Number 



j LEB 

L_ 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

| ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter February 26, 1918, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



1 

Lebanon Valley College 


BULLETIN 


Vol. 7 (New Series) May, 1919 No. 3 


Fifty-Second Annual Catalog 


Number 


PUBLISHED BY 


LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 


ANNVILLE, PA. 



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COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1918-1919 



Sept. 16-17 Monday-Tuesday 

Sept. 19 Wednesday 9 :00 a. m. 

Nov. 22 Thursday 

Dec. 20 Friday 4 :00 p. m. 

Jan. 2 Thursday 1 :00 p. m. 

Jan. 17 Friday 

Feb. 18-21 Tuesday to Friday 

Apr. 11 Friday 

Apr. 17 Thursday 4:00 p. m. 

Apr. 22 Tuesday 4 :00 p. m. 

May 2 Friday 

May 3 Saturday 

May 30 Friday 

June 14 Saturday 8 :00 p. m. 

June IS Sunday 10:30 a. m. 

June 15 Sunday 8 :00 p. m. 

June 16 Monday 11:00 a. m. 

June 16 Monday 7 :4S p. m. 

June 17 Tuesday 2:00 p. m. 

June 17 Tuesday 7 :30 p. tn. 

June 18 Wednesday 10:00 a. m. 



Examination and registration of students. 

College year began. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas recess began. 

Christmas recess ended. 

Anniversary Clionian Literary Society. 

Mid-year examinations. 

Anniversary Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Easter recess began. 

Easter recess ended. 

Anniversary Philokosmian Literary Society. 

May-day exercises. 

Memorial Day. 

Junior Oratorical Contest. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Annual address before Christian Associa- 
tions. 

Annual meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Exercises by graduating classes in Music 
and Oratory. 

Class Day exercises. 

Alumni Re-union. 

Fifty-second annual Commencement. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1919-1920 



Sept. 15-16 


Monday-Tuesday 


Sept. 17 


Wednesday 


Nov. 11 


Tuesday 


Nov. 21 


Friday 


Nov. 27 


Thursday 


Dec. 20 


Saturday 9 :00 a. m. 


Jan. 5 


Monday 1 :00 p. m. 


Jan. 26-30 


Monday to Friday 


Feb. 2 


Monday 


Mar. 31 


Wednesday 4 :00 p. m. 


Apr. 6 


Tuesday 4:00 p. m. 


Apr. 9 


Friday 


May 7 


Friday 


May 8 


Saturday 2:00 p. m. 


June 5 


Saturday 8 :00 p. m. 


June 6 


Sunday 10:00 a. m. 


June 6 


Sunday 7 :45 p. m. 


June 7 


Monday 11:00 a. m. 


June 7 


Monday 7 :45 p. m. 


June 8 


Tuesday 2 :00 p. m. 


June 8 


Tuesday 7:30 p. m. 


June 9 


Wednesday 10:00 a. m, 



Examination and registration of students. 

College year begins. 

Victory Day. 

Anniversary Clionian Literary Society. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas recess begins. 

Christmas recess ends. 

Mid-year examinations. 

Second Semester begins. 

Easter recess begins. 

Easter recess ends. 

Anniversary Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Anniversary Philokosmian Literary Society 

May Day exercises 

Junior Oratorical Contest. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Annual address before Christian Associa- 
tions. 

Annual meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Exercises by graduating classes in Music 
and Oratory. 

Class Day exercises. 

Alumni Re-union. 

Fifty-third annual Commencement. 



THE CORPORATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 



Rev. 



Rev. A. A. Long, A.M., D.D. 
Rev. A. B. Statton, A.M., D.D. 
W. O. Appenzellar 
Rev. L. Walter Lutz, A.B., D.D. 
Elmer N. Funkhouser, A.B. 
Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B. 
W. M. Beattie 

Htimmelbaugh 

Horn, D.D. 

Klefifman, A.B., D.D. 

Ziegler, A.B., B.D. 

Fleming, B.D., Ph.D. 
Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B. 
Rev. F. L. Stine, A.B. 



Rev. 


E. 


H. 


Rev. 


A. 


N 


Rev. 


T. 


E. 


Rev. 


S. 


G. 


Rev. 


M. 


R 



York 1919 

Hagerstown, Md. 1919 

Chambersburg 1919 

Chambersburg 1919 

Hagerstown, Md. 1920 

Baltimore, Md. 1920 

Greencastle 1920 

Frederick, Md. 1920 

Baltimore, Md. 1920 

Baltimore, Md. 1921 

Hagerstown, Md. 1921 

Red Lion 1921 

Carlisle 1921 

Mt. Alto 1921 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. R. R. Butterwick, A.M., D.D. Hershey 

Rev. E. O. Burtner, A.M., D.D. Palmyra 

Rev. H. E. Miller, A.M., D.D. Lebanon 

J. G. Stehman Mountville 

G. F. Breinig Allentown 

Rev. I. M. Hershey, A.M., B.D. Myerstown 
Rev. S. F. Daugherty, A.M., B.D., D.D Annville 

J. R. Engle, A.B., LL.B. Palmyra 

I. B. Haak Myerstown 

Hon. A. S. Kreider Annville 

Rev. J. A. Lyter, A.M., D.D. Harrisburg 

Representatives from Virginia Conference 



Rev. A. S. Hammack, D.D. 
Rev. W. F. Gruver, D.D. 
Rev. A. J. Secrist 
Prof. T. N. Fries, A.M. 
Rev. J. H. Brunk, D.D. 
Elmer Hodges 



Dayton, Va. 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 
Churchville, Va. 
Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 
Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 
Winchester, Va. 



1919 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 



1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 



Trustees at Large 



Immel, H. S. 
Thomas, Warren A. 
Cochran, A. J. 
Straub, Jack L. 
Coover, C. M. 
Wolf, Henry, A. B. 
Gipple, J. E. 



Mountville, Pa. 

31 Miami Ave., Columbus, O. 

Dawson, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Mt. Wolf. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Alumni Trustees 



Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., '05 

H. H. Hoy, A.B., '99 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A.M., '01 



Carlisle, Pa. 
Millersburg, Pa. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



1919 
1920 
1921 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 

Officers 

President Hon. A. S. Kreider 

Vice-President Prof. H. H. Baish 

Secretary and Treasurer Rev. W. H. Weaver 

Executive Committee 

A. S. Kreider t r En°le A. A. Long 

A. B. Statton ■/•■_* j R Brunk 

Finance Committee 

A. S. Kreider E. N. Funkhouser Henry Wolf 

G. D. Gossard C. M. Coover J. R. Engle 

W. H. Weaver Jack L. Straub W. F. Gruver 

Library and Apparatus Committee 

J. E. Lehman E. H. Hummelbaugh 

A. J. Secrist S. E. Rupp 

Faculty Committee 
A. B. Statton A. S. Hammack 

H. E. Miller II. H. Baish 

Auditing Committee 
L. W. Lutz C. A. Mutch Elmer Hodges 

Grounds and Buildings Committee 

S. F. Daugherty J. F. Snyder C. F. Flook 

J. N. Fries G. F. Breinig 

Farm Committee 

E. O. Burtner A. A. Long J. H. Brunk 

Publicity Committee 

A. E. Shroyer I. Moyer Hershey W. M. Beattie 

F. B. Plummer S. O. Grimm 

Nominating Committee 

I. Moyer Hershey W. F. Gruver 

A. N. Horn F. B. Plummer 



FACULTY 



GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 
President 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., Sc.D. 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

JAMES T. SPANGLER, A.M., D.D. 
Professor of Philosophy and Religious Education 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S. 
Professor of Biological Sciences 

ALVIN E. SHROYER, B.D. 
Secretary of the Faculty, Registrar, and Professor of Greek and Bible 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M. 
Professor of Education and Physics 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of History and Political Science 

CHARLOTTE F. McLEAN, A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

CLARA A. HOLTZHAUSSER, A.M., Ph.D. 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professor of Latin Language 

and Literature 

PAUL S. WAGNER, A.B. 
Mathematics — on leave of absence in National Service 

MALCOLM M. HARING, A.M. 
Professor of Chemistry 

WILLIAM N. MARTIN, A.B. 
Principal of the Academy and Instructor in Mathematics 



FACULTY 



MAY BELLE ADAMS 
Professor of Oratory and Public Speaking 

EMMA R. SCHMAUK, A.B. 
Instructor in French 

MRS. MARY C. GREEN 
Instructor in French 

A. LOUISE KREIDER 
Librarian and Dean of Women 



ASSISTANTS 

EDWIN F. CASTETTER 
Assistant in Biology 

RUTH HAINES 
Laboratory Assistant in Botany 

WALTER BUNDERMAN 
Assistant in Chemical Laboratory 



ALBERT BARNHART 
Agent of the Finance Committee 

SAMUEL F. DAUGHERTY, B.D., D.D. 
College Pastor 

ANNA GARMAN FORRY 
Stenographer 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 

Lebanon Valley College originated in the action of the East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the United Brethren Church at its annual session 
held at Lebanon in March, 1865. Resolutions were passed deciding the 
question of establishing a higher institution of learning to be located 
within the bounds of the East Pennsylvania or of the Pennsylvania Con- 
ference. One year later the committee appointed recommended in its 
report: First, the establishment of a school of high grade under the su- 
pervision of the Church ; second, to accept for this purpose the grounds 
and buildings of what was then known as the Annville Academy, ten- 
dered as a gift to the Conference; and, third, to lease the buildings and 
grounds to a responsible party competent to take charge of the school 
for the coming year. School opened May 7, 1866, with forty-nine stud- 
ents. By the close of the collegiate year one-hundred and fifty-one 
were enrolled, thus demonstrating at once the need of such an institution 
in this locality and the wisdom of the founders. 

In April, 1867, the Legislature granted a charter with full university 
privileges under which a College Faculty was organized with Rev. 
Thomas Rees Vickory, Ph.D., as president, and Prof. E. Benjamin 
Bierman, A.M., as principal of the Normal Department. The same year 
the Philokosmian Literary Society was organized by the young men, 
additional land was purchased, and a large brick building erected thereon 
with chapel, recitation rooms, president's office, and apartments for 
sixty boarding students. The building was not furnished and fully 
occupied till the fall of 1868. 

The first regular commencement occurred June 16, 1870. About 
two years later opposition to the school manifested itself and President 
Vickory stated in his report to the annual conference that the attendance 
of students was reduced from one-hundred to seventy-five, the cause of 
this diminution being persistent opposition on the part of certain 
brethren. 

President Vickory directed the affairs of the institution for five years, 
from 1866 to 1871. During his administration the charter was prepared 
and granted by the State Legislature, the laws and regulations for the 
internal workings framed and adopted, the curriculum established, and 
two classes — those of 1870 and 1871 — were graduated. In June, 1871, 
Professor Lucian H. Hammond was elected president. During his term 
of office five classes were graduated, the Clionian Literary Society or- 
ganized by the ladies, and the College made steady and substantial 
progress, but failing health compelled him to resign in June, 1876. 

Rev. David D. DeLong, D.D., became the third president. He found 
it necessary to reconstruct the Faculty and retain but two of the former 
teachers. The Kalozetean Literary Society was instituted to awaken 
interest in literary work among the young men by means of a healthy 
rivalry, and the music department was organized. In the summer of 
1883 a large, two-story, frame building was erected on College Avenue, 
containing art room, music rooms, the department of natural science, a 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 9 

museum and the College library. During his presidency one hundred 
and seven students were graduated, fourteen in music and ninety-three 
in the literary department. 

After an interregnum of several months, Rev. Edmund S. Lorenz, A. 
M., was elected president and took up the work with energy and ability. 
Enlargement was his motto and the friends of the College rallied to his 
support. Post graduate studies were offered. The "College Forum" 
made its appearance under the editorship of the Faculty. With a de- 
votion that won the admiration of his friends he labored incessantly for 
nearly two years to make the College the peer of any in the State, but 
under this strain his health failed and he was obliged to retire at the 
close of the collegiate year of 1889. 

The fifth president, Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, D.D., assumed the duties 
of his office at the opening of the fall term in 1889. He secured credit- 
able additions to the endowment fund, but, because of discouraging con- 
ditions, declined re-election at the close of the first year. 

The question of re-locating the College agitated its constituency, di- 
vided its friends, and greatly hindered its progress. Some were almost 
in despair, others were indifferent, while others hoped and waited for the 
best. Under these conditions the Board of Trustees met in special ses- 
sion July 28, 1890, and called Dr. E. Benjamin Bierman to the presi- 
dency. He was inaugurated on the evening of the sixth of November 
following. Buildings were renovated, a large number of students en- 
rolled and the Mary A. Dodge Fund of ten thousand dollars received, 
"the interest of which only is to be loaned without charge to such pious 
young people as the Faculty of the College may deem worthy of help 
as students." The Silver Anniversary of the College was celebrated 
June 15, 1892, when money was raised to purchase about three acres of 
ground to be added to the college campus. With the experience of twen- 
ty-five years of earnest effort to combat opposition and overcome errors 
and misconceived notions of higher education, and to build up an insti- 
tution of learning creditable to the United Brethren Church, the friends 
of the College entered upon the second quarter of a century with new 
hope and aspiration. 

President Bierman served successfully until the spring of 1897, when 
he was succeeded by Rev. Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., who held the office 
until January 1, 1906, after which time the administration was in the 
hands of the Executive Committee and the Faculty until the election 
of Rev. A. P. Funkhouser, A.M., March 9, 1906. 

The presidency of Doctor Roop stands out as the period when the 
group system in the College curriculum was introduced, when the ath- 
letic field was acquired, when the disastrous fire of December 24, 1904, 
occurred, sweeping away the Administration Building in a few hours, 
and when several new buildings arose on the campus— Engle Music Hall 
1899, and the Carnegie Library and Women's Dormitory in 1904. The 
recuperative powers of the institution were put to the test by the de. 
struction of the main building. At a meeting held January 5, 190S, the 
friends of the College resolved, amid unusual enthusiasm, to rebuild at 
once. With the stimulus of a gift of fifty thousand dollars from An- 
drew Carnegie, received by the President, who had previously secured 
twenty thousand dollars from the same source, plans were matured by 
which to raise one hundred thousand dollars for this purpose. The 



10 BULLETIN 

erection of three new buildings was projected — the Men's Dormitory, 
the Central Heating Plant, and the new Administration Building; the 
latter being completed under the supervision of President Funkhouser, 
whose term of office is marked also by a strenuous effort to meet the 
debt which rose to almost or altogether ninety thousand dollars. Bonds 
were issued to the amount of fifty thousand dollars and the co-operative 
college circles organized to relieve the financial conditions. 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D., was elected president of the 
College, June 10, 1907, at the annual session of the Board of Trustees. 
He solicited $7,700 for the equipment of the Science Department, se- 
cured the Mills Scholarship of one thousand dollars, and the Immel 
Scholarship of two thousand dollars. The debt effort authorized by the 
Board, June 3, 1908, was carried forward successfully, $50,000 having 
been pledged before January 1, 1909, according to the condition of the 
pledge, which also required the continuation of the canvass to secure 
another fifty thousand dollars in order to cover the entire debt. At the 
death of Rev. Daniel Eberly, D.D., July 9, 1910, whose will bears date 
of September 17, 1909, the College came into possession of property 
valued at about forty-five thousand dollars, the major portion being 
given for the endowment of the Latin Chair. 

In June, 1912, President Keister presented his resignation to the 
Board of Trustees and in September the Rev. Dr. George D. Gossard, 
of Baltimore, Maryland, was elected president. He at once entered 
upon the duties of his office, to which he brings conscientious devotion 
and intelligent enthusiasm. 

Plans were immediately adopted and the wheels set in motion to in- 
crease the effectiveness and enhance the utility of the college by mate- 
rially increasing the attendance which, as a result, rose by the close of 
the 1912-1917 period to almost four hundred and fifty students. But 
the work of the college was hampered more than ever by an increasing 
shortage of funds. The co-operating conferences came to the rescue, 
but even then the new demands upon the college made it imperative 
that the educational work of the Church be given permanent financial 
aid. The outstanding feature of the present administration is the rais- 
ing of an endowment fund of $400,000 to provide this support. This 
result, unsuccessfully sought for during the last fifty years, was 
achieved through a special campaign inaugurated December 27, 1917, at 
a joint meeting of the East Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, and Virginia 
Conferences held in the Sixth Street United Brethren church, Harris- 
burg, Pa. At this meeting the goal was fixed at $350,000, and it was 
stipulated that the entire sum should be used for additional endowment. 
The month of June, 1918, was fixed as the time for the intensive cam- 
paign. The Y. M. C. A. plan of raising large funds was adopted and 
adapted to local needs. By means of an intensive organization of the 
conferences all members and other friends of the church in the co-op- 
erating territory were asked to contribute to the fund. The campaign 
closed June 26, 1918, with subscriptions amounting to almost $400,000. 
The secret of this unparalleled success is to be found in the united 
action of a large number of interested persons and credit must always 
be given to all who had a part in this undertaking. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College is situated in Annville, a progressive and cultured town 
twenty-one miles east of Harrisburg, in the beautiful, healthful, and 
fertile Lebanon Valley. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

There are eight buildings on the campus : the Administration Building, 
the Carnegie Library, the Engle Conservatory of Music, the Women's 
Dormitory, the Men's Dormitory, South Hall, the Heating Plant and 
President's House. 

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING is the most important and 
central of the buildings. It is built of buff brick with terra cotta trim- 
mings, three stories high. It contains the recitation rooms of the Col- 
lege and the laboratories of the science departments. The department 
of art has here commodious and modern quarters. The administra- 
tion offices of fireproof construction are on the first floor. 

The Alumni Gymnasium occupies the ground floor. Here are provided 
over seven thousand square feet of floor space for the use of the de- 
partment of physical culture and the promotion of athletic activities. 
The gymnasium has, in addition to the gymnasium floor, separate locker 
rooms for the teams, for the men, and for the girls, an apparatus room, 
and the usual shower baths. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, a building of the Gothic style of archi- 
tecture, erected in 1904, furnishes commodious quarters for the growing 
library of the College. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted and ven- 
tilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the leading maga- 
zines and daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the special work of each 
department are here, as well as magazines of general literature. On the 
second floor are six seminar rooms designed to be equipped with the 
special works of reference for the various departments, where students 
doing the most serious work may study undisturbed. 

THE ENGLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, of Hummelstown 
brownstone, erected in 1899, contains the college chapel, used for all 
large college gatherings, a directors' office and studio, practice rooms, 
and a large society hall. The building is well equipped with pianos 
and a large pipe organ. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY, NORTH HALL, was erected in 
1905, and is a building of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms 
which will accommodate forty-five students, there are a society hall, a 
dining hall, a well-equipped kitchen, and laundry. 



12 BULLETIN 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY is a modern structure of brick with 
Indiana limestone trimmings. It contains single and double rooms and 
sixteen suites of two bed-rooms with a separate study-room. These 
afford accommodations for more than one hundred students. This 
building was also erected in 1905. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY, SOUTH HALL, the original build- 
ing of the institution, acquired by gift in 1866, when the College was 
founded, has been re-modeled and is now used as a women's dormitory. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, contains a low pressure 
heating system of the most perfect construction, and supplies the heat 
for all the buildings on the campus. It is constructed with a view to 
the installation of a lighting plant. 

THE PRESIDENT'S HOME, a commodious frame two and one- 
half story building, is situated on the northwest corner of the campus. 

The campus of twelve acres, occupies a high point in the center of 
Annville and is within easy access of all trolley and railroad lines. 

The athletic field of five and one-half acres is well located and ad- 
mirably adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. 

LABORATORIES 

The entire northern half of the Administration Building is occupied 
by the Departments of Science. The Department of Chemistry occu- 
pies the first floor; Physics, the second, and Biology, the third. 

The laboratories of each department are constructed after the most 
approved modern methods, and students find everything arranged for 
their convenience. Stock rooms and special laboratories adjoin the 
general laboratories. The lecture rooms are provided with risers and 
Columbia tablet chairs. 

RELIGIOUS WORK 

The College has always tried to furnish religious training, and en- 
courages all wholesome means of promoting Christian influence. Each 
morning a regular service is held in the College Chapel, at which the 
students are required to be present. 

A students' prayer-meeting is held once a week, and opportunities for 
Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian Associations 
in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

All resident students of the College are expected to attend public wor- 
ship in the churches of their choice, every Sunday. 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

Christian The College has flourishing Young Men's and Young 

Associations Women's Christian Associations, which hold regular 

weekly devotional services and conduct special courses 

of Bible and mission study. 

Under these auspices numerous public lectures, entertainments and 

socials are held, which contribute incalculably to the pleasure of 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 13 

the student body. They are the center of the spiritual welfare of the 
students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with the 
College. 

Literary Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and par- 
Societies liamentary training are afforded by the societies of the 
College. There are three of these societies — Philokos- 
mian, Kalozetean, and Clionian, the latter sustained by the young 
ladies. They meet every Friday evening in their well-furnished halls 
for literary exercise. These societies are considered valuable agencies 
in college work, and students are advised to unite with one of them. 

Athletic The Athletic Association is composed of all the stu- 

Association dents of the College. It elects its own officers and the 
assistant managers of the various athletic teams. The 
direct supervision of all athletics is in the hands of the graduate man- 
ager and the College Administration Office. The treasurer of the Col- 
lege is the treasurer of the Association. 

The Mathematical The Mathematical Round Table is an organization 
Round Table of the students of the College who are interested 
in mathematical studies. Its object is to create 
interest in and love for the "exact science." Its meetings are held on 
the last Wednesday evening of each month. Papers on mathematical 
history and biography are read and discussed. Current events in the 
mathematical world and papers on various mathematical subjects have 
made the meetings very interesting and helpful. 

LITERARY AND MUSICAL ADVANTAGES 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of hear- 
ing lectures and talks delivered by men of note in Church and literary 
circles. 

The department of music together with the department of public 
speaking presents a number of programs during the year. Concerts 
and recitals by prominent musicians are given under the patronage of 
the Department of Music with the aim of creating in the student an 
appreciation for the best in art. 

There is a lively interest in the drama. Various college organizations 
have presented Shakespearean and other plays of a high grade. 

A further means of enjoyment and education is the course of lectures 
and concerts under the management of the Christian Associations of 
the College. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Advisers The following are the advisers for the students in each of 
the four groups in which courses of instruction are offered : 
For the Classical group, Professor Shroyer ; for the Science group, Pro- 
fessor Derickson ; for the Historical-Political, Professor Gingrich ; for 
the Modern Language, Doctor McLean; Professor Spangler is adviser 
to all Freshmen. The adviser's approval is necessary before a student 
may register for or enter upon any course of study, or discontinue 
any work. He is the medium of communication between the Faculty 
and the students of his group, and, in a general way, stands to his stu- 
dents in the relation of a friendly counselor. 



14 BULLETIN 

Discipline The laws of the College are as few and simple as the proper 
regulation of a community of young men and women will 
permit. The government of the dormitories is under the immediate con- 
trol of the student councils, commtttees of students authorized by the 
College authorities. 

Classification Every student residing in the dormitory must take at 
least fifteen hours of work as catalogued. Any stu- 
dent failing to pass ten (10) hours of work at the close of each semester 
will be required to withdraw from the institution. 

The maximum number of hours, conditioned, permitted for senior 
standing is four; for junior standing, six; for sophomore standing, 
seven; for freshman standing, six. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work, above that prescibed 
by the curriculum, is limited by the student's previous record, as follows : 

(a) Majority of A's — four hours. 

(b) Majority of B's — two hours. 

(c) Lower record than majority of B's — no extra hours. 

No student will be given credit for more than twenty-two (22) hours 
in any twelve months. 

Credits for work done in other institutions, for which advanced stand- 
ing is desired, must be submitted to the committee on College Credits 
and a copy filed with the Registrar. 

Class Standing Reports of standing will be made to parents or guard- 
ian at the end of each term when desired by them, or 
when the Faculty deems it expedient. The standing is indicated gener- 
ally by classification in six groups, as follows : 

A signifies that the record of the student is distinguished. 

B signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C signifies that the record is good. 

D signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (conditioned) imposes a condition on the student. 

Failing to make up a condition at an appointed time is equal to a 
record of F. 

F (failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subject, and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to re- 
peat certain subjects, to repeat the year's work, or to withdraw. 

Admission Students wishing to enter Lebanon Valley College must 
present credits from high schools, normal schools, and 
academies at the time of matriculation. Blanks for such credits may 
be had on application to the Registrar. 

Registration The registration days are as follows : September 15, 16, 
17, and Thursday, January 29, and Friday, Jan- 
uary 30 preceding the opening of the second semester. Students regis- 
tering later than the days specified will be charged a fee of one dollar. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 15 

Registration is not complete until the Registrar has affixed his signa- 
ture to the matriculation card and a copy of same has been filed with 
the Registrar. 

Absences A student may be absent from class, without excuse, during 
a semester, the number of times the class meets each week. 
Should he be absent once beyond double the number of times, the class 
meets each week, he will be required to take a special examination, for 
which a fee of one dollar will be charged. Such examination must be 
taken within a week of the excess absence; otherwise the student will 
lose his class standing. Absences immediately preceding or following 
vacation will be counted double cuts. 

Chapel All students are required to attend the morning chapel service. 
Failure to attend will be ground for action by the Faculty 
upon recommendation of the Committee on Chapel Attendance. 

Limitations Students are limited to two of the following college ac- 
tivities : Quittaphilla, Glee Club, Plays, Foot Ball, Basket 
Ball and Base Ball. 

No games between college organizations may be engaged in during 
study hours except by permission of the Faculty. 

Degree and The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
Diploma is conferred by a vote of the Board of Trustees on recom- 
mendation of the Faculty, upon students who have satis- 
factorily completed sixty-nine hours of work in any of the groups. 

Graduate Since all its members are fully occupied with undergrad- 
Work uate work, the Faculty deems it unwise to ofTer any work 
for the degree of Master of Arts during the coming year. 
In rare cases sufficient resident work upon certain advanced courses 
may be outlined. But as special action would be required in each case, 
no detailed announcement can be made here. All inquiries about grad- 
uate work should be addressed to the President. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

The College offers a limited number of one hundred and forty dol- 
lar free tuition scholarships, $70 a year for two years, to honor grad- 
uates of the State Normal Schools and approved High Schools and 
Academies. One scholarship is allotted to the first honor graduate 
of our own Academy. 

The College also offers a free tuition scholarship of $70 a year for 
two years to a literary graduate of Shenandoah Collegiate Institute, 
Dayton, Va. The recipient of that scholarship will be determined by 
Lebanon Valley College. 

Graduates of High Schools and Academies whose standard is not 
equal to that of our own Academy, may enter the senior year of the 
Academy and become competitors for our own Academy scholarship. 



16 BULLETIN 

Honor graduates of preparatory schools who have conditions may be 
allowed to make them up in the freshman year. If the first semester's 
work shows a majority of A's and nothing less than B in all work in- 
cluding conditions, a scholarship may be awarded. 

The Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $1,000, is available. 

The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $2,000, is available "for young men 
in college who are preparing for the ministry in the Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ." 

The Eliza Bittinger Eberly Fund 

This fund consists of the income of a farm located near East 
Berlin, Adams County, Pa. 

The Daniel Eberly Fund 

This fund is available and is to be loaned to worthy students seeking 
an education in college. 

The Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 

This fund established by a gift of $1,300 in memory of Rev. H. C. 
Phillips, given by his wife and daughter, is available for young men 
preparing for the ministry. 

The Mary A. Dodge Fund 

The income from this fund is loaned to worthy students. 

The Charles B. Rettew Scholarship 

This scholarship in Bonebrake Theological Seminary is limited to 
students from the East Pennsylvania Conference and Lebanon Valley 
College. 

The Dr. Henry B. Stehman Fund 

This fund has been provided by Dr. Henry B. Stehman to help needy 
ministerial students. This fund is awarded by the President of the 
College. 

Elizabeth A. Mower Scholarship Fund 

This fund was provided by a gift of $200 from Miss Elizabeth A. 
Mower, the income of which is to be used to help a needy student. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 17 



SCHOLARSHIPS SECURED DURING THE RECENT 
ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN 

The following is a list of Scholarship Funds which were subscribed 
during the recent endowment campaign to raise at least $350,000. 
This will all be paid by October, 1922. At present only a part of these 
funds is available. 

The Biological Scholarship $3,010.00 

The Medical Scholarship 825.00 

The Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The William E Duff Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

The Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The S. F. Engle Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

The Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Mary C. Bixler Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

The Otterbein Sunday School, Harrisburg, Scholarship Fund.. 1,100.00 

The Henry C. and Anna S. Kaufman and Family Scholarship 

Fund 1,000.00 

The Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund.. 5,000.00 

The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund (The second fund) 2,500.00 

The Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 2,190.00 

The G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 



EXPENSES 

Matriculation 

The Matriculation fee in both College and Academy is $12.00. This 
fee is not subject to refund, nor is there any rebate allowed for any 
reason. 

Special students who take less than half work in the regularly ap- 
pointed classes, or any student who takes work outside of regular reci- 
tation periods either in the College or Academy, is required to pay 
matriculation according to the number of studies taken. 

Oratory and Art students who are not matriculated in the College 
are required to pay an enrollment fee of one dollar each. 

Matriculation for Music ranges from one dollar to eight dollars. No 
additional fee is required for music from students who have matri- 
culated full for College or Academy. 

Tuition 

For twenty hours or less in the College the annual tuition is $70.00. 
$2.06 per semester is charged for each additional hour of work taken in 
regular classes, or for each hour for which credit is allowed, of semes- 
ter work taken outside of regular college recitation periods. Credit can 
be allowed only when the work has been taken under instructors ap- 
proved by the Executive Committee. 

The tuition in the Academy is $50.00 for twenty-four or less hours 
of work taken ; for each additional hour per semester, $1.25. For all 
credit allowed for work taken outside of regular recitation periods, 
$1.25 per semester hour will be charged. 

Ministers' children in the college and academy departments are en- 
titled to a rebate on full tuition of $35.00 and $25.00 respectively. 
Scholarships do not cover the tuition for extra work taken. 

Laboratory Fees 

To cover the cost of materials used in the Laboratories, the follow- 
ing fees are charged: 

Tyrone Biological Laboratory 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Biology 1 $6.00 $6.00 

Biology 2 6.00 6.00 

Biology 3 6.00 6.00 

Biology 4 6.00 6.00 

Biology 5 6.00 6.00 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 19 

Chemical Laboratory 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Chemistry 1 $8.00 $8.00 

Chemistry 2 ... „ 8.00 8.00 

Chemistry 3 8.00 8.00 

Chemistry 4 . . .. 6.00 6.00 

Chemistry 5 12.00 12.00 

Breakage fee and key deposit, (returnable.) $3.00 per year in all 
courses. Any balance remaining, after deducting breakage charges, 
etc., will be returned. 

Physics Laboratory 

Physics 1 5.00 5.00 

Physics 2 and 3 3.50 3.50 

All breakage will be charged against the student in each department. 
There will be no refund of laboratory fees. If chemicals and laboratory 
supplies continue to advance in price there will be a corresponding in- 
crease in the laboratory fees. 

Boarding 

The Domestic Department is in charge of a skilled and competent 
chef. Plain, substantial and palatable food especially adapted to the 
needs of the student is provided. The kitchen is furnished with the 
most modern equipment and all the food is prepared in the most sani- 
tary and satisfactory manner. 

The boarding rate for the school term 1919-20 is $175.00. Students 
who stop school during the school term will be required to pay board at 
the rate of six dollars per week during their stay in school. Day stu- 
dents may obtain meal tickets at the rate of ten meals for $3.50, if paid 
in advance, and all extra meals taken by five-day students or meals 
taken by friends of students, at 35 cents each. A rebate of forty dol- 
lars is allowed for five-day students. These rates do not include 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter vacations. 

If foodstuffs continue to advance in cost, there will be a correspond- 
ing increase in boarding rates. 

All students who do not room and board at their homes are re- 
quired to room and board in the college unless special permission be 
obtained from the Executive Committee to do otherwise. Students re- 
fusing to comply with this regulation forfeit their privileges as students 
in the College. 

Room Rent 

Room rent varies from $20.00 to $60.00 except when double rooms are 
assigned to only one student, then the occupant will pay the regular 
rent for two. For Heat and Light $6.00 to $9.00 will be charged. A 
deposit fee of $5.00 is required when a room is reserved. This fee will 
be deducted from the second half year's payment. 

When five or more day students occupy one room, then the rate to 
each occupant is $22.50 and must be paid at the opening of the school 
year, and there will be no refund. 



20 BULLETIN 

One light fixture is installed permanently in every dormitory room. 
For every additional light temporarily installed, there will be an extra 
charge of $3.00 to the occupants of the room. Only 40 watt lamps are 
allowed. One lamp is furnished free at the opening of school. 

A dormitory fee of $6.00 will be charged each student in the Men's 
Dormitories. Occupants of a room are held responsible for all break- 
age and loss of furniture or any loss whatever for which the student 
is responsible. 

In the Men's Dormitories rooms will be furnished with a bed, chairs, 
and table. Students must furnish their own carpets, towels, napkins, 
soap, and all other necessary furnishings. 

Contingent Fee 

All College students are required to pay a contingent fee of $20.00 
and Academy students $10.00. 

Estimated Expenses 

The maximum expense for a full course in L. V. C. for one year, ex- 
clusive of laboratory fees, books, and personal expenses, is $352 for 
men and $346 for women. The minimum expense for men is $309 and 
for women $303. 

Graduation Fee 

Sixty days prior to Commencement, candidates for degrees are re- 
quired to pay the following fees. 

Students graduating in the College $12.00; in Music $10.00; in the 
Academy $5.00; those receiving certificates in Oratory, Art, or Music 
$5.00 each. 

REGULATIONS 

Matriculation fee must be paid at the time of enrollment. 

Laboratory fees must be paid at the beginning of each Semester. 

The regular College or Academy expenses which include Tuition, 
Room Rent, and Boarding are divided into four equal installments : 
One-fourth is due September 17; one-fourth on November 12; one- 
fourth on January 26, and one-fourth on April 1. These bills are due 
on the day they are issued and must be paid within ten days. 

When a student leaves school or the boarding hall for any other rea- 
son than sickness, he shall pay board at the rate of six dollars per 
week, without any rebate or refund, except when ordered otherwise by 
the Finance Committee of the College. 

Satisfactory settlement for all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal can be granted and before grades are recorded or 
given to the student. 

Students who are candidates for Diplomas or Certificates must make 
full settlement entirely satisfactory to the Executive Committee before 
diplomas or certificates will be sealed and delivered. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 21 

ABSENCE AND SICKNESS 

When students retain their class standing during absence from school 
because of sickness or for any other reasons, no rebate or refund will be 
allowed on tuition, or room rent. 

In case of sickness which occasions loss of class standing, a reason- 
able rebate or refund will be allowed on tuition. 

When a student is absent from school more than two weeks in suc- 
cession because of sickness, and retains his room during the time of 
absence, then a rebate of $4.00 per week will be allowed for all absence 
exceeding the two weeks. Reductions cannot be allowed for athletic, 
glee club, or banquet trips. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

Help is extended annually to a limited number of students, but only 
to those pursuing full courses in the College or in the Academy. This 
help is given in the form of Merit Scholarships, Ministerial Scholar- 
ships, Waiterships, Janitorships, Tutorships, or Library work. All of 
this help is extended or given only upon the condition that the recipient 
proves loyal to the school and complies with all the rules and regula- 
tions of the College. 

A student forfeits the privilege of a scholarship or other help from 
the school when his average grade falls below passing standards or 
when in any way he refuses to co-operate with the College, or when 
he disregards the regulations of the institution. 

Students rooming in Dormitories and boarding at the College Dining 
Hall will be given preference when work of various kinds is assigned. 



22 



BULLETIN 



Outline of Requirements for Admission to Groups Leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The following is an outline of the requirements for admission to the Fresh- 
man class of Lebanon Valley College. A detailed description of the courses indi- 
cated in this outline appears on pages 24-31 of this catalogue. Of these eleven 
and one-half units are required as specified and three units may be elected. 

A unit represents the work of a school year of no less than thirty-six weeks, 
with five periods of at least forty-five minutes each week, or four periods of one 
hour each per week. A unit, therefore, is the equivalent of one hundred and 
eighty recitation periods of forty-five minutes each, or one hundred and forty-four 
periods of one hour each. 



GROUP I 
English 



English 



Three units 
required 



GROUP II 

Mathematics 



GROUP III 
Foreign 
Languages 



Elementary Algebra 1 unit 

Intermediate Algebra Y* unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Solid Geometry Y* unit 

Plane Trigonometry ^ unit 



Two and one- 
half units re- 
quired, one of 
which must be 
Plane Geom. 



Latin 

German 

French 

Greek 

Spanish 

Italian 



4 units 
2 units 
2 units 
2 units 
1 unit 
1 unit 



Five units re- 
quired, three 
of which must 
be Latin. 



GROUP IV 
Physical 
Sciences 



GROUP V 
Biological 
Sciences 



GROUP VI 
History, Etc. 



GROUP VII 



Physical Geography 

Physics 

Chemistry 



Yi or 1 unit 

1 unit 

Yz or 1 unit 



Physics requir- 
ed. Chemistry 
required only 
for students in- 
tending to take 
Science Group. 



Botany 

Zoology 

Physiology 



1 unit 
1 unit 
1 unit 



Elective 



Greek and Roman 1 unit 

Medieval and Modern 1 unit 

English 1 unit 

Civics Y2 unit 

Economics Yt unit 



One unit re- 
quired. 



One unit of credit may be given for 
subjects not mentioned in the above 
groups at the discretion of the Col 
lege Committee on credits. 



In case the requirements of a given Group are not fully met by the fourteen 
and one-half units elected, the studies necessary for such requirements must be 
taken in place of an elective in the regular college course. For example, if a 
student presents three units of Latin and two of German for admission to a Group 
requiring four units of Latin, he must include in his college course the equivalent 
of the fourth unit of Latin. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



23 



Outline of Requirements of Admission to Groups Leading to the 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

The following is an outline of the requirements for admission to the Freshman 
class of Lebanon Valley College. A detailed description of the- courses indicated 
in this outline appears on pages 24-31 of this catalogue. An aggregate of fourteen 
and one-half units must be offered by the candidate for admission. Of these twelve 
units are required as specified and two and one-half units may be elected. 

A unit represents the work of a school year of no less than thirty-six weeks, 
with five periods of at least forty-five minutes each per week, or four periods of 
one hour each per week. A unit, therefore, is the equivalent of one hundred and 
eighty recitation periods of forty-five minutes each, or one hundred and forty-four 
periods of one hour each. 



GROUP 1 


English 




3 units 


Three units 


English 








required 


GROUP II 


Elementary Algebra 




1 unit 


Three units 


Mathematics 


Intermediate Algebra 




Yz unit 


required, one- 




Plane Geometry 




1 unit 


half unit of 




Solid Geometry 




Yz unit 


which must be 




Plane Trigonometry 




Y2 unit 


Solid Geom- 
etry. 


GROUP III 


Latin 




4 units 


Two units re- 


Foreign 


French 




3 units 


quired. 


Languages 


German 
Greek 
Spanish 
Italian 




3 units 

3 units 

1 unit 

1 unit 




GROUP IV 


Physics 




1 unit 


Two units re- 


Physical 


Chemistry 




1 unit 


quired. 


Sciences 










GROUP V 


Botany 




1 unit 


One unit re- 


Biological 


Zoology 




1 unit 


qured. 


Sciences 










GROUP VI 


Greek and Roman 




1 unit 


One unit re- 


History, Etc. 


Medieval and Modern 

English 

Civics 

Economics 




1 unit 

1 unit 

Y2. unit 

Yi unit 


quired. 


GROUP VII 


One unit of credit 


may 


be given 






for subjects not mentioned in the 






above groups at the 


discretion of 






the College Committee 


on 


credits. 





In case the requirements of a given Group are not fully met by the fourteen 
and one-half units elected, the studies necessary for such requirements must be 
taken in place of an elective in the regular college course. For example, if a 
student presents three units of Latin and two of German for admission to a Group 
requiring four units of Latin, he must include in his college course the equivalent 
of the fourth unit of Latin. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Candidates for admission should note carefully the following descrip- 
tion of courses. 

ENGLISH 

Three Units Required 

A thorough course in Advanced English Grammar, and systematic 
course in English Composition and in the essentials of Rhetoric is re- 
quired of all students. In addition to this and following the recom- 
mendations of the Conference on Uniform Entrance Requirements in 
English, books are prescribed for reading and practice, and for study 
and practice, as follows : 

a. Reading and Practice — 1916. Two units. 

Group I. (Two to be selected.) The Old Testament, comprising at 
least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings and Daniel, together with the. books of Ruth and Esther ; 
the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III, IV, V, 
XV, XVI, XVII ; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, of Books, XI, 
XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Virgil's Aeneid. The Odyssey, Iliad, 
and Aeneid should be read in English translations of recognized literary 
excellence. For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may 
be substituted. 

Group II. (Two to be selected.) Shakespeare's The Merchant of 
Venice, Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, 
Henry the Fifth, lulius Caesar. 

Group III. (Two to be selected.) Defoe's Robinson Crusoe — Part 
I ; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, either Scott's Ivanhoe or Quentin 
Durzvard, Hawthorne's The House of Seven Gables, either Dickens' 
David Copperfield or A Tale of Tzvo Cities, Thackery's Henry Es- 
mond, Mrs. Gaskill's Cranford, George Eliot's Silas Marner, Steven- 
son's Treasure Island. 

Group IV. (Two to be selected.) Bunyon's Pilgrim's Progress, Part 
I., the Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in the "Spectator," Franklin's 
Autobiography (condensed), Irving's Sketch Book, Macaulay's Essays 
on Lord Clive and Warren Hastings, Thackery's English Humorists, 
Selections from Lincoln, including at least two inaugurals, the speeches 
in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public Address and 
Letter to Horace Greeley, along with a brief memoir or estimate, Park- 
man's Oregon Trail, either Thoreau's Walden or Huxley's Autobiog- 
raphy and selections from Lay Sermons including the address on Im- 
proving Natural Knowledge , A Liberal Education, and A Piece of 
Chalk, Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels With a Donkey. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 25 

Group V. (Two to be selected.) Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First 
Series Books II and III, with special attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, 
Cowper and Burns), Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard and Gold- 
smith's Deserted Village, Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Lowell's The 
Vision of Sir Launfal, Scott's The Lady of the Lake, Byron's Childe 
Harold, Canto IV, and The Prisoner of Chillon, Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series, Book IV, with special attention to Words- 
worth, Keats, and Shelley), Poe's The Raven, Longfellow's The Court- 
ship of Miles Standish, and Whittier's Snow Bound, Macaulay's Lays 
Of Ancient Rome, and Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, Tennyson's 
Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur, 
Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the 
Good News from Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home 
Thoughts from the Sea, Incidents of the French Camp, Herve Riel, 
Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down in the City. 

b. Study and Practice — (One unit) Shakespeare's Macbeth, Mil- 
ton's L 'Allegro, II Penseroso and Comus, Burke's Speech on Concilia- 
tion with America, or Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's 
First Bunker Hill Oration, Macaulay's Life of Johnson or Carlyle's 
Essay on Burns. 

MATHEMATICS 

a. Elementary Algebra, Algebra to Quadratics — One unit. 

1. The four fundamental operations. 

2. Factoring, determination of highest common factor and lowest 
common multiple by factoring. 

3. Linear equations, both numerical and literal, containing one, two, 
and three unknowns. 

4. Problems depending on linear equations. 

5. Radicals and the extraction of the square root of polynomials. 

6. Fractional and negative exponents. 

b. Quadratics and Beyond — One-half unit. 

1. Quadratic equations, both numerical and literal. 

2. Problems depending on quadratic equations. 

3. The binomial theorem for positive integral exponents. 

4. The formulas for the nth term and the sum of the terms of arith- 
metical and geometrical progressions. 

5. Numerous problems chosen from mensuration, from physics, and 
from commercial life. 

The equivalent of Hawke's and others. 
High School Algebra complete. 

c. Plane Geometry — One unit. 

1. The usual theorems and constructions. 

2. The solution of numerous exercises, including problems of Loci. 

3. The equivalent of Durell's Plane Geometry. 



i 



26 BULLETIN 

d. Solid Geometry — One-half unit. 

1. The usual theorems, the properties and measurements of prisms, 
pyramids, cylinders, and cones, the sphere and spherical triangle. 

2. Applications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

e. Trigonometry — One-half unit. 

1. Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric functions as 
ratios, circular measurements of angles. 

2. Proofs of the principal formulae and the transformation of trig- 
onometric expressions by means of these formulae. 

3. Solution of trigonometric equations. 

4. The theory and use of logarithms. 

5. The solution of right, oblique, and spherical triangles with appli- 
cations. 

LATIN 

Latin a — Three units. 

A systematic course of five lessons a week extending over a period 
of three years is required. 

The real test of the candidate's fitness is based upon his ability to 
read simple Latin prose, to explain constructions and idioms, and to 
turn simple Latin sentences into prose. 

He should have studied grammar, elementary prose composition, 90 
to 120 pages of Nepos (Lives) and Caesar (Gallic and Civil wars) ; 
also about 40 pages of Cicero and the first four books of Virgil or its 
equivalent in Latin poetry. 

Latin b — One unit (optional). 

Virgil and Ovid, 6,000 to 10,000 verses or other equivalents not read 
in Latin A. 

GREEK 

Greek 1 — One unit. 

The equivalent of White's First Greek Book. Five recitations a week 
for at least thirty weeks. The candidates shall have read the equiva- 
lent of about eight chapters of Anabasis and show a knowledge of ordi- 
nary forms. 

Greek 2 — One unit. 

At least the first four books of the Anabasis together with the ability 
to turn short sentences into Greek. 

Greek 3 — One unit. 

The translation at sight of Attic prose and of Homer, including con- 
structions, idioms, and prosody ; and the ability to translate a short 
passage of connected English narrative is required. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 27 

GERMAN 

a. Elementary German — Two units. 

During the first year the work should comprise : 

1. Careful drill on pronunciation. 

2. Drill on the rudiments of grammar. 

3. Abundant easy exercises in reproduction and memory work. 

4. The reading of 75 to 100 pages of graduated texts from a reader. 

During the second year the work should comprise : 

1. The reading of ISO to 200 pages of literature in the form of easy 
stories and plays. 

2. Reproduction practice as before, both oral and written. 

3. Continued drill on the rudiments of grammar. 

Suitable stories and plays are as follows : 

Wilhelmi's Einer muss heiraten, Bacon's Im Vaterland, Anderson's 
Maerchen, Leander's Traeumereien, Heyse's L'Arrabbiata, Hillern's 
Hoher als die Kirche, Storm's Immensee, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene 
Krug, Stokel's Unter dem Christbaum, Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn. 

b. Intermediate German — One unit. 

The work should comprise, in addition to the elementary course, the 
reading of about 400 pages of moderately difficult prose and poetry to- 
gether with constant drill in reproduction and grammatical drill, with 
special reference to the infinitive and the subjunctive. 
Suitable reading matter can be selected from the following: 
Freytag's Die Journalisten, Fouque's Undine, Goethe's Hermann und 
Dorothea, Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm, Schiller's Der Neffe als 
Onkel, William Tell, Die Jungfrau von Orleans and others prescribed 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

FRENCH 

a. Elementary French — Two units. 

The applicant should be able to pronounce French accurately, to turn 
simple English sentences into French and to answer questions on the 
rudiments of grammar. 

The first year's work should comprise the rudiments of grammar, the 
reproduction of natural forms of expression and the reading of 100 
to 175 duodecimo pages of graduated texts. 

During the second year the work should comprise : 

1. Constant practice in translating into French easy variations upon 
the texts read. 

2. Frequent oral abstracts. 

3. The mastery of the use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of 
all but the rare, irregular verb forms and the simpler uses of the 
conditional and the subjunctive. 



28 BULLETIN 

4. The reading of 400 to 500 pages of easy, modern prose in the form 
of series, plays, or historical or biographical sketches. 

Suitable texts for the second year are : 

About j Le roi des Montagnes, Bruno's Le tour de la France, Mairet's 
Lr.tache du petit Pierre, Merimee's Colomba, Legouve and Labiche's 
La cigale chez les fourmis, Le Bedolliere's La Mere Michel et son chat. 

b. Intermediate French — One unit. 

1. Constant practice in French paraphrasing. 

2. Grammar in modern completeness. 

3. Writing from dictation. 

4. The reading of from 400 to 600 pages from suitable texts such as 
the following : 

Corneille's Le Cid, Sandeau's Le gendre de M. Poirier, Daudet's La 
Bellc-Nivernaise , Racine's Athalie, Andromaque and Esther, George 
Sand's plays and stories, Sandeau's Mademoiselle de la Siegliere, and 
others. 

PHYSICS 

Elementary Physics — One unit. 

1. The study of a standard text-book as Carhart and Chute's High 
School Physics, or Millikan and Gale's A First Course in Physics. 

2. Lectures and table demonstrations. 

3. Individual laboratory work consisting of at least 30 experiments as 
required by the College Entrance Examination Board. 

4. The course should include the following fundamental topics : 

a. Introduction, metric system, volume, density, weight, and states 

of matter. 

b. Mechanics, fluids, and solids. 

c. Heat. 

d. Sound. 

e. Light. 

f. Magnetism. 

g. Static Electricity, 
h. Current Electricity. 

The applicant must also present an approved laboratory note book 
of experiments performed, together with a certificate from the teacher 
of Physics stating the exact character and amount of work done under 
his supervision. 

BOTANY 

Elementary Botany — One unit. 

PART I. The General Principles of (a) Anatomy and Morphology, 
(b) Physiology, and (c) Ecology. 

a. Anatomy and Morphology. 

The seed, the shoot, specialized and metamorphosed shoots, the root, 
specialized and metamorphosed roots, the flower, the comparative and 
morphological study of four or more types, the fruit and the cell. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 29 



b. Physiology. 



Roll of water in the plant, photosynthesis, respiration, digestion ir- 
ritability, growth, and fertilization. 

c. Ecology. 

Modifications, dissemination, cross-pollination, light relations of 
green tissue and special habitats. 

PART II. The natural history of the plant groups and classifica- 
tion. A comprehensive study of the great natural group of plants. 
Selections may be made from the following: 

a Algae. Pleurococcus, Sphaerella, Spirogyra, Vaucheria, Fucus, 
Nemalion. 

b. Fungi. Bacteria, Rhizopus, or Mucor, Yeast, Puccinia, Corn 
smut, Mushroom. 

c. Lichens. Physcia (or Parmelia or Usnea). 

d. Bryophytes. In Hepaticae, Radula and in Musci, Mnium. 

e. Pteridophytes. In Filicineae, Aspidium, or equivalent, including 
the prothallus. In Equesetinae, Equisetum. In Lycopodinae, Lyco- 
podium and Selaginella. 

f. Gymnosperms. Pinus or equivalent. 

g. Angiosperms. A monocotyledon and dicotyledon. 

The applicant shall present a certified note-book of individual labor- 
atory work of at least double the amount of time given to recitation. 
Special stress should be laid upon accurate drawings and precise de- 
scriptions. 

ZOOLOGY 

Elementary Zoology — One unit. 

1. The general natural history — including general external structure 
in relation to adaptations, life histories, geographical range, relations 
to other plants and animals, and economic relations — of common verte- 
brates. 

Suggested types are a mammal, bird, lizard, snake, turtle, newt, frog, 
dogfish or shark, bony fish, clam, snail, starfish, earthworm, hydra, sea 
anemone, paramoecium. 

Pupils should be familiar with orders of insects or with crustaceans, 
spiders, and myriapods. 



30 BULLETIN 

Actual examination of common animals with the above should be 
supplemented by reading giving natural history information. 

Laboratory work required. 

Certified note-books should be presented. 

In general, the work as outlined by the College Entrance Examination 
Board will be accepted. 

CHEMISTRY 

Elementary Chemistry — One unit. 

The candidate's preparation should include : 

1. Individual laboratory work, comprising at least forty exercises 
from a list of sixty or more as outlined by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. 

2. Instruction by lecture-table demonstrations, to be used mainly as 
a basis for questioning upon the general principles involved in the 
pupil's laboratory investigations. 

3. The study of at least one standard text-book, to the end that the 
pupil may gain a comprehensive and connected view of the most im- 
portant facts and laws of Elementary Chemistry, Brownlee's Principles 
in Chemistry, or its equivalent is required. 

HISTORY 

History a — One unit. 

Ancient History, with special reference to Greek and Roman history, 
including also a brief study of the ancient civilization and bringing the 
study down to the death of Charlemagne. 

History b — One unit 

Medieval and Modern History, from the death of Charlemagne to 
the present time. 

History c — One unit. 
English History. 

History d — One unit 
American History and Civics. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Physicial Geography — One unit. 

a. The Earth as a Globe. 

b. The Ocean. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 31 

c. The Atmosphere — including weather instruments and the United 
States Weather Map. 

d. The land. 

e. Volcanoes. 

f. Rivers. 

g. Glaciers. 

h. Relation of man, plants, and animals to climate, land forms, and 
oceanic areas. 

A note-book certified to by the teacher in charge is required in all 
cases for one unit. Otherwise one-half unit only may be offered. 

DRAWING 
Free-hand Drawing — One unit. 

1. The applicant must be able to sketch with fairly steady and clean 
lines any figures or combinations of figures, polygons, spirals, or the 
like. 

2. He shall be able to sketch common objects such as furniture and 
utensils with reasonable accuracy and correctness of proportion. 

3. Also to sketch from copy, enlarging or reducing dimensions, any 
simple object, such as a valve or title pattern. 

A note-book with drawings approved and certified to by the teacher 
must be presented in order to receive credit. 



32 



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36 BULLETIN 

PHILOSOPHY AND EDUCATION 

PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR SPANGLER 

1. Psychology — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Special emphasis will be upon (1) the application of psychological 
laws to practical life, and (2) the philosophical bearing of certain 
psychological principles. Six weeks will be devoted to a consideration 
of the essentials of Logic. 

2. Introduction to Philosophy — Two hours. First Semester. 

3. History of Philosophy — Two hours. Second Semester. 

In this course, the aim will be (1) to trace the development of phil- 
osophy, pointing out what of permanent value each system, as it arose, 
contributed toward a final solution of the problem of the nature of 
being, and (2) to show the interaction between philosophic thought 
and the practical life of the period during which it flourished. 

4. The Philosophy of Religion — Two hours. Second Semester. 

5. Ethics — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

This course will be primarily constructive and only insofar critical 
and historical as its constructive purpose demands. Much attention 
will be given to the practical bearing of the doctrine set forth on the 
pressing problems of to-day — such as individualism, the integrity of our 
social institutions, the problems which grow out of progress, etc. 

6. Theism — Two hours. First Semester. 

A course in the grounds of theistic belief. Elective for Seniors. 

7. Child Psychology — Two hours. First Semester. 

8. Bible Psychology and Education — Two hours. Second Semester. 

9. Religious Education — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

EDUCATION 

PROFESSOR GRIMM. 

1. History of Education — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

A study of pedagogical theories and practices, from the early days of 
China to the present. Especial attention given to the educational work 
of Pestalozzi, Herbart, and Froebel. 

2. School Management and School Law — Two hours. Second 
Semester. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 37 

A consideration of the practical problems involved in class manage- 
ment and in school supervision. Investigation of the development of 
the public schools of the State of Pennsylvania, and a careful study 
of the present legal provision for the control and support of education 
in this commonwealth. 

3. Secondary Education — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

This course deals primarily with the American High School of to- 
day — its relation to the earlier Academies and English Grammar 
schools and its growth since the Civil War. Some attention will be 
given to the history of secondary schools. in Europe. 

The course will consist of two parts: (1) The general problems of 
the high school, and (2) The high school curriculum. 

Surveys of at least one ungraded and one graded school must be 
made and reported by each member of the class. 



MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

1. Advanced Algebra — Four hours. First Semester. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permuta- 
tions and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry — Four hours. Second 
Semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, geniometry, right and oblique 
triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights, develop- 
ment of trigonometric formulae, solution of right and oblique spherical 
triangles, applications to Astronomy. 

3. Analytic Geometry — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, parabola, and hyperbola are 
studied, numerous examples solved, and as much of the higher plane 
curves and of the geometry of space is covered as time will permit. 

4. Differential Calculus — Three hours. First Semester. 

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 
and minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, en- 
velopes, etc. 

5. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second Semester. 

Integrations, rectification of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cuba- 
ture of solids, etc. 

6. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, lev- 
eling, etc. 



I 



38 BULLETIN / 

7. Differential Equations — Three hours. First Semester. 
A course in the elements of different equations. Murray. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics, 3, 4, and 5. 

8. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second Semester. Bowser. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics, 7. 

ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR LEHMAN 

1. General Astronomy — Three hours. First Semester. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Reports on assigned readings. 
Important constellations and star groups are studied. 

A fine four-and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope adds to the interest 
of the subject. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR TO BE APPOINTED 

1. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Literature of the 19th century. Fouque's Undine, Heine's Die Harz- 
reise, Freytag's Die Journalist en, Scheffel's Ekkehard, Mueller's Deut- 
sche Liebe ; Deutsche Gedichte, Wenkebach's Composition. 

The college will offer the following courses if the demand is suffi- 
cint. German 2 course a prerequisite to the following : 

2. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 
Literature of the ISth century. Representative works of Lessing, 

Schiller, and Goethe will be read, discussed, and compared. 

3. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 
Pre-requisite German 2. General view of German Literature. Rapid 

reading of representative authors of each period ; reading of selections 
from German History, Freytag's Ausdem Jahrundert des Grossen 
Kreiges. Reports in German on assigned work. This course alter- 
nates with German 6. 

6. Elective Goethe — Three hours. Thruout the year. 
Pre-requisite German 2 Study of Goethe's life and works; intensive 

study of Goethe's prose, poetry and drama ; essays in German required. 
This course alternates with German 3. 

7. Elective-Practical German — One hour. Thruout the year. 
Pre-requisite German 3 or 6. This course aims to meet the needs of 

those who intend to teach German. Hour will be arranged to suit the 
convenience of the class. 

8. Elective course in scientific German for students in science. 

Courses in Old High German and Middle High German may he arranged for 
students in Philology. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 39 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

PROFESSORS MCLEAN AND ADAMS 

1. Theory and Practice of English Composition — Two hours. 
Thruout the year. 

This course includes a thorough study of (1) the technique and devel- 
opment of the sentence and the paragraph and (2) the forms of com- 
position, weekly themes, recitations, and lectures. 

Texts : Genung's Working Principles of Rhetoric and Lomer and 
Ashmun's Study and Practice of Writing English. 

2. Public Speaking — One hour. Thruout the year. 

This course aims to give the students practice in the fundamentals of 
oral expression. Study of the lives and methods of great orators. Drill 
in interpreting and delivering orations and other forms of literature. 
Extemporaneous speaking, arguments, occasional speeches, and original 
orations, impersonation, characterization, dramatic, study and presenta- 
tion of scenes from some of Shakespeare's plays. 

3. History of English Literature — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

This course deals with the work of all the leading authors from the 
earliest time to the present. 

Texts : Saintsbury's A Short History of English Literature and Cen- 
tury Selections of Readings in English Literature. 

English I pre-requisite. 

4a — Two hours. First Semester. English 3 pre-supposed. 

Eighteenth Century Prose Writers. 

This course is conducted by means of lectures, reports by members of 
the class, and recitations, which concern themselves, in the main, with 
Swift, Steele, Addison, Berkeley as a man of letters and Burke. 

Text: E. Goose, History of English Literature in the Eighteenth 
Century. 

4b — Two hours. Second Semester. 

Nineteenth Century Poets. Method as in 4 above. 

The work of this semester is devoted principally to Tennyson and 
Robert Browning with preliminary consideration of Coleridge, Keats, 
Shelley, Byron, and Scott. 

Text: G. Saintbury's History of Nineteenth Century Literature. 

5. Shakespeare — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The development of the drama is traced from its beginning to the end 
of the Elizabethan period. Shakespeare's plays are then critically 
studied. 

Texts : Neilson's Chief Elizabethan Dramatists ; Boas' Shakespeare 
and His Predecessors; Rolfe's Edition of Shakespeare. English 3 pre- 
supposed. 



/ 



40 BULLETIN 

6a. Advanced Composition — Two hours. First Semester. 

A course dealing with the principles of criticism and the analysis of 
the short story. 

Texts : Gayley and Scott, Introduction to the Methods and Material 
of Literary Criticism and Albright's Short Story. 

6b. Argumentation — Two hours. Second Semester. 

Specimens of literary, forensic and scientific argumentation are 
analyzed and criticized in class. Students are required to write several 
argumentative essays during the semester. 

Text : Baker's Principles of Argumentation. 

6b. in connection with English 6a constitutes a year of advanced 
composition. English I pre-supposed. 

7a. Early English — Two hours. First Semester. 

This course, together with English 7b constitutes a year of English 
philology. Early English grammar and sounds are studied. Portions 
of Beowulf are read with due attention to Anglo-Saxon Metres. 

Text : Smith's Old English Grammar and Exercise Book. 

7a. Middle English including Chaucer. Two hours. Second 
Semester. 

Texts : MacCracken's College Chaucer, MacLean's Old and Middle 
English Reader. 

English 7a a pre-requisite. 

8a. Course in Theme Writing — One hour. Thruout the year. 



GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR SHROYER 

1. Elementary Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 
Xenophon : Four Books of the Anabasis. Greek Prose. 

2. Sophomore Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Homer : Three books of the Iliad, scansion, sight translation, epic 
poetry. Greek antiquities, Greek literature, and Greek Prose. 

3. Junior Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Herodotus : Selections from several of the books are read. Review 
of the Greek historians and the Persian Wars. 
Plato : Apology and Crito. The Athenian courts. 
New Testament. Reading in the Pauline epistles. 

4. Senior Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Xenophon Memorabilia, or Demosthenes, De Corona. Socrates and 
the Socratic schools. The Attic oration. 

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus, or Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound. De- 
velopment of the Greek Drama. Greek tragedy, comedy, and theatre. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 41 

5. Elective Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

New Testament : Readings in the gospels of Mark and John and in 
the Pauline and Catholic epistles. The object of this course is exeget- 
ical and practical. It will include a study of the synoptic gospels and 
a survey of the letters of Paul. 



BIBLE 

PROFESSOR SHROYER 

1. Teacher Training Lessons — Hurlbut. 

2. Bible Doctrines— Sell. 

3. Introduction* to New Testament History— Rail. 

4. Introduction to Old Testament History — Painter. 

5. Scientific Confirmations of Old Testament History — Wright. 

6. Social Institutions and Ideals of the Bible — Soares. 

Each course two hours. One Semester. 
Four courses required. 
Two courses elective. 

DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 

PROFESSOR SCHMAUK AND MRS. GREEN 

1. First Year French — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

This course includes a drill in French pronunciation and grammar 
with exercises in dictation and composition (Thieme and Effinger's 
French Grammar) ; and the reading of the following texts or their 
equivalents ; Daudet, Contes choisis; Dumas, L'Evasion du Due Beau- 
fort; Labiche-Martin Le Voyage de M. Perrichon. 

2. Second Year French — Three hours. Thruout the year. 
Grammar composition, dictation and the reading and interpretation 

of such texts as the following: Erckmann-Chatrian, Le Consent de 
1813; Ca et L'd en France; Standard French Authors, Guerlac; Lec- 
tures Historiques, Moffett; La (Mare) au Diable, George Sand; Le 
Monde ou I' on s'ennuie. 

3. French Literature of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Cen- 
turies — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Study of the classic drama. Reading and reports on works of Cor- 
neille, Moliere, Racine, and other representative writers. 

4. French. Literature of the Nineteenth Century — Three hours. 
Thruout the year. 

Study of eminent modern authors. Reports on works assigned for 
private readings. 

5. Practical Course in French Conversation and Composition — 

One hour. Thruout the year. 



42 BULLETIN' 

DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

PROFESSOR HOLTZHAUSSER 

1. Livy; Cicero: De Senectute — Selections. Three hours. First 
Semester. 

2. Ovid — Selections. Three hours. Second Semester. 

3. Horace: Odes and Epodes — Pre-requisites, Latin 1 and 2. Three 

hours. First Semester. 

5. Plautus and Terence: Selected Comedies — Pre-requisites, Latin 
3 and 4. Three hours. One Semester. 

6. Pliny: Letters. Giving a picture of the historical, political, and 
private life of Rome in the first century A. D. Pre-requisites, Latin 3 
and 4. Three hours. One Semester. 

Cicero: Letters. Giving a picture of the historical, political, and 
private life of Rome in the first century B. C. Pre-requisites, Latin 3 
and 4 — Three hours. One Semester. 

8. Tacitus and Suetonius — Selections. Pre-requisites, Latin 3 and 
4. Three hours. One Semester. 

9. Latin Prose Composition — Open only to students who are taking 
or have taken Latin 3 and 4. One hour. Thruout the year. 

10. Rapid Reading Course in Latin Prose Writers — Two hours. 
Thruout the j'ear. 

11. Topography of Rome. Picturing the situation, growth and de- 
velopment of the city, its monuments, etc., beginning from the earliest 
stages of its existence. Pre-requisite. Latin 1 and 2. One hour. 
Thruout the year. 

SPANISH 

1. Elementary Spanish. Three hours. Thruout the year. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

HISTORY 

PROFESSOR SPANGLER 

1. Medieval and Early Modern History — Two hours. Thruout 
the year. A study of the life and institutions of the Middle Ages; the 
Renaissance and the Reformation. 

Thatcher and Schwill's Europe in the Middle Ages, Schwill's Modern 
Europe, Robinson's Readings. 

2. European History from the accession of Louis XIV to the pres- 
ent time. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Robinson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, Volumes I 
and II, Robinson's Readings. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 43 

3. History of England — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

A brief review of the Anglo-Saxon period ; a more thorough study of 
the period following the Norman Conquest, and an intensive study of 
the Tudor period and the Revolution. 

Terry: History of England; Cheyney; Introduction to the Social and 
Industrial History of England, Cheyney; Readings in English History. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR GINGRICH 

4. Constitutional Law — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
fundamental laws of Federal and State Government. The course is 
devoted chiefly to the study of leading cases. 

Young's "The Nezv American Government and Its Work" and lec- 
tures. 

5. Political Science — Three hours. First Semester. 

A study of various theories of the state and of the structure and 
province of government. 

Garner: Elements of Political Science. 

6. United States Political and Constitutional History — Three 
hours. Thruout the year. 

A course devoted to the careful study of American political history, 
emphasizing especially matters relating to the adoption and interpreta- 
tion of the Federal Constitution. 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR GINGRICH 

1. Economics — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The work of the first semester deals with economic theory. During 
the second semester practical current problems are considered. 
Fetter : Economic Principles. Volumes 1 and 2. 

2. Money and Banking — Three hours. First Semester. 

The course is intended to familiarize the student with the monetary 
history of the United States, the history of banks and banking, the 
methods of banks and clearing houses, and with the laws relating to 
this subject. 

3. Business Finance — Three hours. Second Semester. 

A study of business laws, the several types of business associations, 
the liability of individuals and associations engaged in business and a 
practical consideration of modern business methods. Much time is 
given to the study of corporations. 

Lough : Business Finance. 



I 



44 BULLETIN 

4. Theory of Sociology — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

The course is intended to give the student an understanding of the 
various theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the 
general field of learning. Modern social problems are considered at 
length. 

Blackmar and Gillin : Outlines of Sociology. 

Ross : Social Psychology. 



BIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR DERICKSON, MR. CASTETTER, AND MISS HAINES 

1. General Biology — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Three lectures or recitation and one laboratory period of two hours 
each week. 

The object of the course is to acquaint the student with the essential 
structures and processes of living things. 

Types of plants and animals are studied in the laboratory to illus- 
trate the structure, properties, and activities of living protoplasm as 
manifested in individuals composed of a simple cell, of tissues, and of 
systems of organs. The principles of development, homology, classifi. 
cation, adaptation, evolution, and heredity are considered. 

The course is fundamental and it or its equivalent is required for 
admission to all other courses in Biology. 

Required of Sophomores in all courses. Elective for others. 

2. *Botany — Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods of two hours 
each, per week. The object of the course is to give to the student a 
broad, general knowledge of the plant kingdom. The form, structure, 
and functioning of one or more types of each of the divisions of algae, 
fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and flowering plants are studied. 
Special attention is given to the ontogeny and phylogeny of the several 
groups suggestive of evolution 

Experiments are performed in the laboratory to determine some of 
the relations of plants to water, gravitation, temperature, and light. 
Several types of seeds are studied as to their structure, germination, 
and development. The principles of classification are learned by the 
analysis and identification of representatives of at least twenty-five 
orders of spermatophytes. 

The laboratory and class-room work is supplemented by frequent 
field trips. 

Each student is supplied with a compound microscope, dissecting in- 
struments, note, and drawing materials. 

3. *Zoology — Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours each, per 
week. 



*P>io1oery 2 and Biology 3 are given in alternate years. Biology 3 will be given 
in 1919-1920. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 45 

The principles of biology are learned by making a careful compara- 
tive study of representatives of several phyla of animals. The amoeba, 
euglena, Paramecium, vorticella, sponge, hydra, starfish, earthworm, 
crayfish, grasshopper, mussel, amphioxus, and frog are studied. A 
careful study is made of the embryology of the frog. The process of 
development is closely watched from the segmenting of the egg until 
metamorphosis takes place. Each student is taught the principles of 
technic by preparing and sectioning embryos at various stages of de- 
velopment. From these and other microscopic preparations the develop- 
ment of the internal organs and origin of tissues is studied. This is 
followed by a histological study of the tissues of the adult frog. 

Each student is required to keep a record of all work done in the 
laboratory in carefully prepared notes and drawings. 

Texts : Hegner's College Zoology, Holms' The Frog. 

4. "("Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — Four hours. Thruout the 
year. Six hours laboratory work and two conferences each week. 

The course consists of the dissection and thorough study of a suc- 
torial fish, a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, an amphibian, a reptile, a 
bird, and a mammal. Carefully labeled drawings are required of each 
student as a record of each dissection. 

Text-books : Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology, Kingsley's Text-book of 
Vertebrate Zoology. 

5. f Vertebrate Histology and Embryology — Four hours. 
Histology — Two conferences and six hours of laboratory work per 

week. The normal histology of the mammalian body is made the basis 
of the class work. Each student is required to acquire a practical 
knowledge of all phases of histological technic. 

All the tissues as well as the structure of all of the organs of the 
body are studied. Each student prepares about one hundred and fifty 
slides. 

Text-book: A Manual of History and Organography, Hill. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Embryology — Second week in March to the end of the year. Two 
lectures and six hours of laboratory work per week. The laboratory 
work is based on the development of the chick and comparisons made 
with that of the frog and mammal. A study is made of living embryos 
at various stages of development. These are later killed, prepared, and 
sectioned by the student for the study of the development of the in- 
ternal organs. Fully labeled drawings are required. 

Text-books : Chordate Development, Kellicott. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR HARING AND MR. BUNDERMAN 

The Department of Chemistry offers to a student in the Science 
group, who desires to specialize in Chemistry, the possibility of a four- 
years' course in the subject, together with certain electives. Such stu- 



tBiology 4 and Biology 5 are given in alternate years. Biology 5 will be given 
1919-1920 



in 1919-1920. 



46 BULLETIN 

dents are required to take Chemistry 1, 2, 3, and 5. Special courses 
may be arranged by consultation with the professor in charge. 

The courses are so planned as to give students specializing in the 
subject a thoro grounding in the principles and theory involved, and 
also in laboratory manipulation. Upon graduation such students should 
be in a position to enter commercial work, or to specialize in some 
particular branch of Chemistry, or to meet medical school require- 
ments. 

1. General Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. Thruout the year. 
One experimental lecture, two recitations, and one laboratory period 
of 3 hours each week. The fundamental chemical laws and theories, 
the elements and their compounds are considered in detail. Pre-re- 
quisite to all later courses in Chemistry and to Geology. 

Text-book: General Chemistry for Colleges, Alexander Smith. 
Laboratory Manual : Laboratory Outline of College Chemistry, Alex, 
ander Smith. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours. Thruout the year. One lec- 
ture or recitation and nine hours laboratory work. The theory and 
practice involved in the detection of the elements. Solutions, and 
natural and artificial products are analyzed. Pre-requisite, Chemistry 1. 

Text-book: Qualitative Chemical Analysis, Vol. 1, Stieglitz. 
Laboratory Manual: Qualitative Chemical Analysis, A. A. Noyes. 

3. Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. Thruout the year. One 
lecture or recitation and nine hours laboratory work. The theory and 
practice of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, and chemical calcu- 
lations. The course includes the analysis of ores, mineral?, alloys, and 
simple salts. Pre-requisite, Chemistry 2. 

Text-book : Chemical calculations, Whiteley. 
Laboratory Manual : Qualitative Chemical Analysis, Talbot. 
This is supplemented with the methods of those who are specialists 
on particular determinations. 

4. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Three hours. Thruout the 
year. A minimum of nine hours laboratory work a week will be re- 
quired. The course includes the analysis of natural and artificial pro- 
ducts, such as foods, fertilizers, paints, oils, etc. Pre-requisite, Chem- 
istry 3. Senior elective. 

Laboratory Manuals : Bulletins No. 107 and 109 of the Bureau of 
Chemistry. 

These are also supplemented with special methods. 

5. Organic Chemistry. Four hours. Thruout the year. Two hours 
lectures and recitations and six hours laboratory work. A careful study 
is made of the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds. In 
the laboratory, some typical compounds of each class are prepared and 
purified. Pre-requisite, Chemistry 2, Senior course. 

Text-book : Theoretical Organic Chemistry, Cohen. 
Laboratory Manual: Practical Organic Chemistry, Cohen. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 47 

6. Industrial Chemistry. Two hours. First Semester. Lectures 
and recitations. The practical applications of Chemistry are considered. 
Trips may be taken to various plants in the vicinity. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 3. Elective for those Seniors who are specializing in 
Chemistry^ 

Text-book: Outlines of Industrial Chemistry, Thorp. 

7. Physical Chemistry. Two hours. Thruout the year. Lectures 
and conferences. The course serves to correlate the work of the previ- 
ous years. A study will be made of the fundamental chemical laws 
and theories. Subjects considered are, the atomic and kinetic molecu. 
lar theories, liquids and solutions, thermo chemistry, equilibrium, the 
law of mass action and the phase rule, velocity of reaction and cataly- 
sis, electrical conductivity and electromotive force, hydrolysis, colloidal 
solutions and adsorption. Pre-requisite courses, Chemistry 1, 2, 3, and 
5. Open only to Seniors. 

Text-book : Outlines of Physical Chemistry, Senter. 



GEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HARING 

1. General Geology. Three hours. Second Semester. An intro. 
ductory course. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work, consisting 
of map reading, study of rock types, etc. Also some field work. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 1. Senior elective. 

Text-book : Introductory Geology, Chamberlin & Salisbury. 

Laboratory Manuals : Interpretation of Topographic Maps. Histori- 
cal and Structural Geology. Salisbury & Trowbridge. 



PHYSICS 

PROFESSOR GRIMM 

Physics 1. General Physics — Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three hours lectures and recitation and four hours laboratory work 
per week. The course will be a thoro investigation of the fundamental 
principles of physical science and is especially intended as a prepara- 
tion for Physics 2, 3, and 4, and for those interested in the practical 
applications of physical laws and principles. This course may be taken 
by those who have had no High School Physics. 

Text-book: Millikan and Gale's A First Course in Physics and Car- 
hart's College Physics and Ames and Bliss's Laboratory Manual. 

Laboratory hours Thursday and Friday afternoons and Saturday 
morning. 

2. Advanced Physics — Mechanics — Four hours. One Semester. 
This course will be a thoro investigation of the mechanics of solids, 
liquids, and gases and sound. 
First Semester 1919-1920. 



48 BULLETIN 

3. Advanced Physics — Electricity and Magnetism — Four hours. 
One Semester. 

This course will be a thoro consideration of the laws of the electric 
and magnetic fields and the power applications of electricity. 
Second Semester, 1919-1920. 

4. Advanced Physics — Heat and Light — Four hours. One Semester. 
This course will be concerned with the nature of heat and light and 

the transmission of each through various media including reflection, 
refraction, and dispersion. 

First Semester, 1920-1921. 

Text-books : Kimball's College Physics, and a special text for each 
of courses 2, 3, and 4. 

The Calculus will be a very great aid in these courses. 



ORATORY AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

PROFESSOR ADAMS 

The work of this department is primarily personal culture, the high, 
est development of the personality of the student. "The development 
of the art of oratory is the development of the orator himself." 

The course requires two years of study of prescribed work. Upon 
the completion of the studies a certificate is awarded. 

Students entering the regular course must have had a high-school 
course or its equivalent. 

A recital is given at least once a term for which the students are 
carefully prepared. These afford the students public platform practice 
by which they gain confidence and experience. 

Each Senior is required to adapt and arrange a program for a public 
recital, from some piece of literature approved by the instructor. 

Description of Courses 

1. Public Speaking. (English 2) One hour. Thruout the year. 
Required of Sophomores. Open to others at discretion of instructor. 
This aims to give the student practice in the fundamentals of oral 

expression. Physical and voice exercises for securing poise, freedom, 
and unity, breathing and articulation, placing and radiation of tones. 

Study of the lives and methods of great orators. Drill in interpreting 
and delivering orations and other forms of literature. 

Extemporaneous speaking, arguments, occasional speeches and orig- 
inal orations, impersonation, characterization, dramatic study and pre- 
sentation of scenes from some of Shakespeare's plays. 

2. Voice Training. Exercises for breath control, for freeing of 
voice by proper placing and direction of tone, purity, flexibility, radia. 
tion, resonance, and power; pitch, volume and inflection in emphasis. 
Tone color and form, ideal and imaginative qualities in tone. Diction. 

Given daily thruout course. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 49 

3. Literary Interpretation. Development of the principles of Public 
Address. 

a. Evolution of Expression. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Study of selections from great orators, essayists, poets, and drama- 
tists. Practical drill work before class for developing power of student 
through application of principles to his individual needs. Personal 
criticism and guidance to bring out originality of student. 

b. Perfective Laws of Art. Two hours. Thruout the year. Ex- 
pressive study of different forms of literature with particular atten- 
tion to the laws of art which logically follow the sixteen steps of the 
Evolution. Dramatic work. 

(Two hours credit in college is given for each of the above courses, 
a and b, when taken with one private lesson a week). 

c. Poetic Interpretation. One hour. Thruout the year. Special in- 
terpretation and critical study of the great poets, with presentation 
and criticism before class, to acquaint student with masters of literary 
art, to develop appreciation of the music and suggestiveness of poetry, 
and imaginative and poetic elements in work. Study of poetic forms. 

Attention is given to the choice, adaptation, and abridgment of selec- 
tions for public reading. 

4. Dramatic and Platform Art — One hour. Thruout the year. 

Interpretation and dramatic study of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Mer- 
chant of Venice, Julius Caesar, and As You Like It. Presentation of 
prepared scenes for criticism. Practical work in stage business, deport- 
ment and grouping. 

Platform deportment, correct bearing and presentation before au- 
dience. Platform methods and traditions. Pantomime, study of emo- 
tions. Freedom and responsiveness in bodily expression. 

Sketches and plays are given from time to time during the year, 
which with the annual college play, provide special dramatic training for 
many. 

Private lessons, with attention to special needs of the students, either 
in overcoming habits, or in personal development and repertoire, are 
given throughout the course to supplement the class work. More time 
is given to selections, arrangement of programs, writing introductions, 
etc. One hour a week. 

5. Physical Training. Exercises for securing poise, bearing, free- 
dom and ease in movement ; to gain control over body and render it re- 
sponsive to thought. Response in bearing and dramatic attitudes. Ges. 
ture drill for definite expressions through different realms. 

Given daily throughout course. 

6. English Literature. 

English Literature (English 3). 
Composition and Rhetoric (English 1). 

7. Psychology. (Philosophy 1). 

8. Normal Training and Methods — One hour. Thruout the year. 
Practice in teaching and class management. Under the direction and 
criticism of the instructor the Seniors conduct class work, lecture upori 
principles, and discuss their application. 



50 



TUITION 



Matriculation and Physical Culture, $6.00. Non-resident students 
may be exempted from physical culture. 

All tuition is payable in advance. No reduction allowed for absence 
for the first or second week of the terms, nor for lessons missed during 
the terms except in case of protracted illness. 

Regular Course, $80 per year, payable quarterly in advance. 

Special courses in Literary Interpretation, with one private lesson 
a week, giving 2 hours credit, $40 per year, payable quarterly in ad- 
vance. 

Private lessons, $1.00. 

Other classes will be formed when there is a call for any special line 
of work. 

Fee for certificate, $5.00. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

The work consists of gymnastic classes two days a week. Two 
years' work in college is required for graduation. This work is re- 
quired of all Resident, Special, and Resident Preparatory students. 

The work consists of marching, calisthenic drills, elementary work on 
the heavy apparatus, folk dancing, and group games. 

The aim of the course will be to keep the students in good physical 
condition and to prepare them to handle similar work in grade or high 
schools. 

1. Freshman Physical Culture — One-half hour. Two hours per 
week. 

2. Sophomore Physical Culture — One-half hour. Two hours per 
week. 



LEBANON VALLEY ACADEMY 



Preparatory School 

of 
Lebanon Valley College 



FOUNDED 1866 



FACULTY 

W. N. MARTIN, A.B. 
Principal, Mathematics, Physics 

ELENA SECRIST 
First Year Mathematics 

ELIZABETH FENCIL 
Second Year Mathematics 

EDNA WEIDLER 
Third Year Mathematics 

RUFUS SNYDER 
Solid Geometry 

RUTH HUGHES 
First Year English 

GRACE SNYDER 

Second Year English 

ESTHER FINK 
Third Year English 

MIRIAM LENHART 
Fourth Year English 

SUSAN BACHMAN 
First Year Latin 

MARY LUTZ 
Caesar 

LUCIA JONES 
Cicero 

FRANKIE KLINE 
American History and Civics 

MABEL MOORE 
English History 

LUELLA DARCAS 
First Year German 

MAE HOHL 
Physical Geography 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 53 

HISTORICAL 

Lebanon Valley Academy was established in 1866. For fifty-three 
years it has cherished the ideals of full and accurate scholarship, and 
the development of character that fits one for the largest service to 
society. From its inception, college preparatory work has been its main 
purpose, but its curriculum has been well adapted to the needs of those 
who have entered immediately into practical life or professional study. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations are held at the close of each half year. Other examin- 
ations will be held whenever the completion of a subject warrants such 
examination. At this time reports are sent to parents and guardians. 
More frequent reports are sent when requested by parents. In the Ac- 
ademy records, A signifies excellent; B, very good; C, fair; D, low but 
passing; E, conditioned; F, repeat in class. An "E" record may be 
removed by a test on any part of the course in which the record is 
poor. For such test a fee of one dollar is charged. An "F" may not 
be removed by a special examination. ■ 

For special tests, given on work not completed because of absence or 
otherwise, a fee of one dollar is charged. For special examinations a 
fee of two dollars is charged. 

ADMISSION 

The applicant should be at least twelve years of age. While no en. 
trance examination is required, it is expected that the applicant shall 
have completed the ordinary common school branches. 

Each student shall bring with him a certified statement of work done 
in the school last attended. Blanks for such certification will be pro- 
vided by the school. Tentative credit will be given for work thus certi- 
fied, and the student will be permitted to take up his work as near as 
possible where he left off, but any previous work found to be unsatis- 
factory will have to be repeated. 

Students will be received at any time, but in general it is to the stu- 
dent's advantage to enter in September, or less preferably, at the be- 
ginning of the second Semester. 

GRADUATION 

Any student who has completed 14^ units of work as outlined in the 
courses of study, provided that he has completed three and one-half 
units of Mathematics, three units of English, three units of Latin, one 
unit of Science, and one unit of History, shall be entitled to the school 
diploma. If the candidate desires to enter Lebanon Valley College he 
shall arrange his work to meet the entrance requirements for the sev- 
eral courses. 



54 BULLETIN 

Students having completed only a partial course will be given certi- 
ficates for such work upon request. 

ACADEMY EXPENSES 

Matriculation $ 12.00 

Tuition 50.00 

Boarding 175.00 

Room Rent 20.00 

Heat and Light 6.00 

Dormitory Fee 6.00 

Contingent Fund 10.00 

The expenses for the year excluding laboratory fees and personal 
expenses are $279.00 to $322.00. Further details concerning expenses 
and regulations are found on page 18 of this catalogue. 



LABORATORY FEES 

Elementary Physics, per Semester $3.00 

Elementary Chemistry, per Semester 4.00 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

A unit represents a year's study in any subject and is reckoned to be 
a quarter of the entire amount of work required of each student. How- 
ever, the four years of English aggregate but three units. 

For graduation fourteen and one-half units are required. The follow- 
ing courses are required of all applicants : 

Latin a, b, and c 3 units 

English a, b, c, and d 3 units 

Mathematics a, a-2, b, and c Z l / 2 units 

History 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 

Foreign Language 2 units 

Total Uy 2 units 

The remaining 1 unit may be chosen from the following list. 
Physical Culture is required of all students for which one-half unit 
credit may be given. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 

First Year 

Latin a Beginners' Latin 5 hours 

English a English Grammar and Classics 4 hours 

Mathematics a Advanced Arithmetic 4 hours 

Mathematics a-2 First Year Algebra 4 hours 

tScience a Physical Geography 4 hours 

tDrawing 4 hours 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE SS 

Second Year 

Latin b Caesar and Composition 4 hours 

English b Rhetoric and Classics 4 hours 

Mathematics c Plane Geometry 4 hours 

tHsXgd} ; Ancient History 4 hours 

tGeometrical Drawing 4 hours 

Third Year 

Latin c Cicero and Composition 4 hours 

English c American Literature and Classics 4 hours 

German a Beginner's German 4 hours 

Science c \ * / Biology f 4 . 

Science e J \ Elementary Chemistry \ 

tHistory b English History 4 hours 

Senior Year 

Latin d *) ( Virgil and Composition 4 hours 

German b > ** < Second Year German 4 hours 

Greek a ) (.First Year Greek 5 hours 

Science d Elementary Physics 4 hours 

English d College Entrance Requirements 4 hours 

Mathematics d Solid Geometry 4 hours 

Mathematics b Second Year Algebra 4 hours 

History a American History and Civics 4 hours 



t Elective. 

* Required for graduates in Scientific Course. 

** Choose one. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



ENGLISH 

a-1 — English Grammar — Advanced. First Semester. Four hours. 

This course is required of all pupils who have not had high-school 
grammar. Weekly themes are required. Reading: Irving's Sketch 
Book and Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans. 

a-2 — Composition and Rhetoric — Second Semester. Four hours. 

Brooks' Composition and Rhetoric. Book I. 

Theme work based on experience and assignments for reading. Read- 
ing: Scott's Ivanhoe, Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Shakespeare's 
The Merchant of Venice, Scott's Marmion. 

b — Composition and Rhetoric — Thruout the year. One hour. 
Brooks' Composition and Rhetoric. Book I. 

Reading and Practice — Thruout the year. Three hours. 

George Eliot's Silas Marner, Shakespeare's As You Like It, Addison 
and Steele's The De Coverley Papers, Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities, 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield. 

c — American Literature — Thruout the year. One hour. 
Newcomer's American Literature; rhetoric continued. 

Reading and Practice — Thruout the year. Two hours. 

Oral reading and careful study of Franklin's Autobiography, Haw- 
thorne's The House of Seven Gables, Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales, 
Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Longfel- 
low's Narrative Poems, Poe's Poems and Tales, Whittier's Snowbound. 

Composition — Thruout the year. One hour. 

Weekly themes required. 

d — Composition and Rhetoric — Thruout the year. One hour. 
Brooks' Composition and Rhetoric, Book Two, concluded. Weekly 
themes required. 

English Literature — Thruout the year. One hour. 
Newcomer's English Literature. 

Reading and Practice — Critical study of the English classics pre. 
scribed for college entrance. 

Shakespeare's Macbeth, Milton's Minor Poems, Tennyson's The Prin- 
cess, Washington's Farewell Address, Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 57 



LATIN 



The following Latin courses are arranged in accordance with the Col- 
lege Entrance Requirements. 

Latin a — Beginners' Latin. Thruout the year. Five hours. One unit. 

Smith's Latin Lessons is completed. Special emphasis is placed on 
the memorizing and classification of grammatical forms. Constant 
practice in turning short sentences illustrating the fundamental rules 
of syntax into Latin is required. 

Latin b — Caesar. Thruout the year. Four hours. One unit. 

Caesar's Gallic Wars, Books I-IV. Thirty-six lessons in composition 
based on the text with as much sight reading as possible is required. Al- 
len and Greenough's Latin Grammar. 

Latin c — Cicero. Throughout the year. Four hours. One unit. 
Cicero's Manilian Law, Cataline I-IV, and Pro Archais, D'Oge's 
Latin Composition, Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar. 

Latin d — Virgil. Thruout the year. Four hours. One unit. 

Virgil's Aeneid I — VI, Bennet's Composition, Allen rmd Greenough's 
Latin Grammar. 

Latin a, b, c, and d are required for admission to the Classical and 
Modern Language Courses of Lebanon Valley College. 

HISTORY 
History a — Thruout the year. Four hours. One unit. 

American History and Civics. Detailed Study of American History 
with special attention to the History of the United States. The latter 
part of the year will be devoted to a consideration of national, state 
and county government. 

This course is required of all candidates for graduation. 

History b — Thruout the year. Four hours. One unit. 
Walker's Essentials of English History. Offered 1918-1919. 

History c and d — Thruout the year. Four hours. One unit. 

Ancient History with special reference to Greek and Roman History 
and including a short introductory study of the more ancient nations and 
the chief events of the early middle ages, down to the death of Charle- 
magne. Offered 1919-1920. 

GERMAN 

a — Beginning German — Four hours. Thruout the year. One unit. 

Bacon's German Grammar, and the reading of 75 to 100 pages of 
graduated texts. Frequent reproduction from memory of sentences pre- 
viously read. 

b — Second Year German — Four hours. Thruout the year. One unit. 
Oral and written reproduction of the matter read in easy variations. 



58 BULLETIN 

From 150 to 200 pages of literature are selected from the following 
list: Heyse's L' Arra'obtata ; Hillern's Hoecher als die K'.rche; Storm's 
Immensee, Leander's Traeumerein, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug; 
Wilhelm's Einer muss keiraten; Baumbach's Der Schwiegersohn. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics a — Arithmetic. Half-year. Four hours. One-half 
unit- 
Rapid but thorough review of all the fundamental processes. Special 
drill in fractions, mensuration, percentage, the metric system, and mod- 
ern business forms. 
Hamilton's Arithmetic. 

Mathematics a-2 — Thruout the year. Five hours. One unit. 
Beginner's Algebra to quadratics. Williams and Kempthorne's 
Algebra. 

Mathematics b — Intermediate Algebra. Thruout the year. One 
unit. 

Second Year Algebra. This course must be offered for graduation 
by all candidates. 

Mathematics c— Plane Geometry. Four hours. One unit. 
Durell's New Plane and Solid Geometry. Taught largely from the 
standpoint of the original problems. 
This course is required for graduation. 

Mathematics d — Solid Geometry. Half-year. One-half unit. 
Durell's Solid Geontetry. 



SCIENCE 

Science a — Physical Geography. Half-year. Four hours. One-half 
unit. 

Dryer's Physical Geography. The earth as a globe, the ocean, the 
atmosphere, the land, plains, plateaus, mountains, volcanoes, rivers, 
glaciers, geological formations and ages. 

A summary of the relation of man, plants, and animals to climate, 
land forms and oceanic areas. 

Science d — Elementary Physics. Thruout the year. One unit. 

Three hours recitation and four hours laboratory work per week. 
Mechanics of solids, liquids, gases, heat, magnetism, electricity, sound 
and light 

No previous knowledge of Physics is required for admission to this 
course. 

Reed and Henderson's High School Physics. Forty experiments as 
outlined in the National Physics Note Book Sheets are required in the 
laboratory. 

Science e — Elementary Chemistry. Thruout the year. One-half 
unit. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 59 

Two hours recitation and four hours laboratory work. 

The aim of the course is to present Chemistry to the beginner in such 
a way as to enable him to grasp the fundamental principles and to help 
him to secure a working knowledge of the Science in the laboratory. 

First Principles of Chemistry by Brownlee and others, and laboratory 
exercises accompanying same. 

DRAWING 
Free Hand Drawing — Half-year. Four hours. One-half unit. 

Geometrical Drawing — Half-year. Four hours. One-half unit. 

Drawing of geometrical figures, reconstruction of figures to a given 
scale, construction of scales to any given unit, projection of plane and 
solid figures, etc. 

Morris' Geometrical Drawing. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

Academy Physical Culture. Two hours per week. Required of 
all preparatory students. 

SUB-PREPARATORY COURSE 

Sometimes students of mature age come to us not fully prepared to 
enter the Academy. They have for various reasons attended school 
for but a short time and find it embarrassing to enter the public schools 
with scholars so much younger than themselves. For these we make 
special provision whenever occasion demands. However, at least six- 
teen hours of regular Academy work is required. 

ELECTION OF STUDIES 

There is considerable room for election of courses that have a special 
value to students intending to specialize. 

The principal advises students what subjects are fundamental to pro- 
fessional and engineering courses. 

FACTS TO BE CONSIDERED 

Although Academy students enjoy a number of the same features 
as college students, such as the use of an extended library, laboratories, 
the same social privileges, literary exercises, debates, Christian Associ- 
ations, etc., they are in many respects an entirely separate student body. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

A one-hundred and forty dollar scholarship is awarded each year to 
the Academy graduate who has, according to the vote of the Faculty, 
attained the best class record and deported himself in accordance with 
the regulations. 



CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



FACULTY 



E. EDWIN SHELDON, Mus. M. 
Pianoforte, Pipe Organ, Counterpoint, Composition 

IDA MANEVAL-SHELDON, Mus B. 
Harmony, History of Music 

MABEL AMELIA MILLER 
Voice, Public School Music Methods, Sight Singing 

RUTH ELIZABETH ENGLE, A.B. 
Pianoforte, Theory, Sight Playing 

ELIZABETH JOHNSON 
Violin, Orchestral Class Training 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 63 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The Engle Conservatory of Music is a handsome, three-story, stone 
structure. It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe-organ, direc- 
tor's room, studios, practice rooms, waiting, and writing room for stu- 
dents' use, large society rooms, lavatories, etc. The whole building is 
lighted by electricity, and heated by steam, and designed and furnished 
with a view to having it complete in every respect for the study of 
music in all its branches. A complete musical education, from the very 
first steps to the highest artistic excellence, may be secured. The direc- 
tor will use every effort to obtain positions for those students who have 
finished courses, and who may wish to teach or perform in public. 

OBJECT 

The department has for its object the foundation and diffusion of a 
high and thorough musical education. The methods used are those fol- 
lowed by the leading European conservatories. The courses are broad, 
systematic, progressive, and as rapid as possible. The conservatory of- 
fers the means for a complete education in musical art at a moderate 
cost. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
I. 

Pianoforte 

The course in Pianoforte is divided into five divisions : Sub-Fresh- 
man, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior. 

The course marked out must, however, necessarily be varied accord- 
ing to the ability and temperament of the pupils. Many works must be 
studied by all, but there is much that may be essential for one student 
and not at all necessary for another. Individual instruction only is 
given. 

A system of technics is used that is in line with the most approved 
methods. Special attention is paid to the development of a true legato 
touch and a clear, smooth technique. The use of the pedal, so much 
neglected, is emphasized. At the same time expression and interpre- 
tation are not neglected. Technical and theoretical ability is worthless, 
except as it enables the performer to bring out the beauties and mean- 
ing of the composer. 

By a recent act of the Executive Board arrangements were made for 
a teacher to give instruction to children and others in the elementary 
grades of the pianoforte course at a cost within the reach of all. This 
work is carried on according to the methods in use in the leading Con- 
servatories. 

For such instruction, the rate of tuition will be thirty cents per les- 
son. This enrollment as a regular student of the Conservatory will 
entitle the student to all privileges of the institution. The advantages 
to be derived from appearing in recital classes, receiving instruction in 
stage deportment, as well as opportunities for hearing and associating 
with other music students, are certain to act as incentives to better, more 
conscientious work. 



64 BULLETIN 

Memorizing music is required of all students. It is a great acquisi- 
tion to be able to perform a number of selections from memory. 

Sight Reading — This, although to a certain extent a natural gift, 
can be greatly improved by systematic work. One who can read well 
has all music at his command, while a poor reader has but a few pieces 
which may have been learned. 

Practice — Special effort is made to teach pupils how to practice. 
Difficult places are pointed out and the students are taught how to learn 
them in the quickest and most thorough manner. Quality is of more 
value than quantity in practice. 

Ensemble Playing — It is impossible to overestimate the value of 
thorough training in duet, trio, and quartet playing. Students are given 
drill in these as well as in accompaniment playing. 



II. 
The Voice 

Students contemplating work in this department should bear in mind 
two important facts ; first, that the natural ability to sing varies with 
every student, and secondly, that while the production of tone from any 
musical instrument is produced by artificial means, the elements that go 
to make up the human voice are composed of flesh and blood, subject 
to the most delicate nervous impulses. 

Hence the course in the Study of Voice must be varied according to 
the needs of the individual, and the success of the pupil depends largely 
upon the sympathetic insight of the teacher and the sincere co.operation 
in mind as well as body on the part of the student. 

The old Italian method as shown in Marchesi's "Art of Singing" will 
be used, and exercises from other standard texts will be given to suit 
the needs of the individual student. 



III. 

The Pipe Organ. 

The Pipe Organ — commonly called "The King of Instruments" — has 
made rapid strides in development during the last fifty years, and to- 
day is no longer regarded as an instrument solely for accompaniments 
and church use, but has taken its place among solo instruments and 
gained a distinct recognition from the music-loving public. A large 
field, therefore, is open to the student of the organ. 

A new Three-Manual Moller Pipe Organ with detached console, 
modern in every respect, has recently been installed in the college 
chapel. 

The increased demand for organ instruction the past year has made 
necessary the addition of a Two-Manual Reed Organ with pedals for 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



65 



practice purposes. Both organs are connected with kinetic organ blow- 
ers which insure most satisfactory wind pressure with its steady, even 
tone as a result. 

The course outlined for this department is planned to provide the 
student with a repertoire for recital purposes and to satisfactorily meet 
the requirements of the organist in church. 



IV. 
The Violin 

Among the stringed instruments, the Violin stands as one of the old. 
est and has always been admired for its beautiful and thrilling strains. 

The musical possibilities within the compass of the violin are marvel- 
ous and unexcelled by any other instrument. The best artists of the 
olden and modern times were skilled on the violin and it appeals to 
those of the finest musical taste to-day. 

Nowhere in English literature do we find a nobler or more glowing 
tribute to the violin than is the little poem penned by our own immortal 
"Autocrat" where he places the violin among the highest order of 
musical instruments. 



V. 

Theoretical Music 

Theoretical studies are essential to rapid and comprehensive sight 
reading and to excellence in the higher grades of music. Good pedal- 
ing depends on a knowledge of harmony, and memorizing is greatly fa- 
cilitated by it. 

An intelligent insight into the foundation, upon which rests the art 
of music, gives interest to the pupils in their playing and singing and 
makes them musicians, as well as performers. 



VI. 

SOLOIST'S AND TEACHER'S COURSES 

Two courses leading to the granting of diplomas are offered. Both 
follow the same general course outlined on page 67. 

The Soloist's Course requires a satisfactory appearance in the an- 
nual recital by the Junior Class and an individual recital during the 
Senior year. 

The Teacher's Course is offered to those who wish to specialize for 
the teaching profession. Such pupils will be excused from the Junior 
and Senior recitals, but required to teach in the Normal department 
one hour per week for two years under the direction of a teacher of the 
Conservatory faculty in charge of such work. A Weekly Methods 



66 BULLETIN 

Class conducted by the teacher directing this department will bring to 
the attention of these student-teachers points where their teaching may 
be improved, and essential principles underlying the work of the sue. 
cessful teacher. 

Teaching in the Normal will begin in October and end on, or about 
May 1st. 

VII. 
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Realizing the demand for trained teachers of Public School Music, 
the Conservatory offers a course for such work which requires two 
years for completion. 

The text used in^the Methods class is that of Hollis Dann, Principal 
of Public School Music at Cornell University. However, other texts are 
studied and compared so that the graduates should be able to handle 
any course in Public School Music in use at the present time. 

Aside from this, students have the advantage of doing teaching under 
supervision in the Annville Public Schools, thereby putting into prac- 
tice the theoretical knowledge gained in the Methods class. 

Special attention is paid to the care of the child voice in singing 
which is such an essential feature of Public School Music. Candidates 
for this course must have completed a four-year High School course or 
its equivalent. Positions are not guaranteed to graduates. 



VIII. 

A FOUR YEAR COURSE IN THE THEORY OF MUSIC 

The Conservatory diploma will be given for the satisfactory comple- 
tion, with no grade below 85 per cent, of the following subjects: Har- 
mony — 3 semesters ; Musical History — 2 semesters ; Sight Singing — 
4 semesters ;Theory — 1 semester; Musical Form — 1 semester; Psy- 
chology of Music — 1 semester ; Harmonic Analysis — 1 semester ; Simple 
Counterpoint — 1 semester ; Double Counterpoint — 1 semester ; Canon 

and Fugue 2 semesters. The candidate for graduation in the above 

course must have completed the Sophomore year in pianoforte to the 
satisfaction of the Conservatory faculty. 

COLLEGE CREDIT 

Credit will be given in the college department for the completion of 
courses in Harmony, Musical History, and Counterpoint. 

THE SECOND "SOLO SUBJECT" 

Candidates for graduation by diploma or certificate in Piano shall 
have taken at least one year in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation 
in Voice, Violin, or Organ the student shall have at least Sophomore 
standing in piano. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



67 



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HOW TO BECOME 

"A FULL COURSE STUDENT" IN THE 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

To be a "full course student" in the Conservatory you will be re- 
quired to carry one solo subject (piano, voice, or organ) and two theo- 
retical branches, such as Harmony and Musical History. Two lessons, 
each one-half hour in length are given each week in the solo subject. 
Classes in Harmony recite two hours per week. Classes in Musical 
History meet on alternate days for three hour-lessons per week. The 
course in Harmony requires three semesters, while the course in Musi, 
cal History may be completed in one year. 

The "full course student" engages four practice hours daily through- 
out the year. 

One subject, such as German, French, or English, may be taken in the 
College or Academy by a "full course student" without additional 
charge. 

The "full course student" will find the tuition as follows : 

FIRST SEMESTER — Two lessons per week, as stated above 

Piano or voice $25.50 

Harmony 13.00 

Musical History 13.00 

Piano Practice, 4 hours daily 10.00 

Matriculation Fee 8.00 



$69.50 



Voice or Piano added, 2 lessons per week $25.50 additional 

Organ, one lesson per week 17.00 additional 

Organ practice, one hour daily $10 or $20 additional 

SECOND SEMESTER — Rates and courses the same as first semester. 

CERTIFICATE 

Candidates for graduation by Certificate in pianoforte, pipe organ, 
or violin, must have satisfactorily completed the full course in harmony, 
musical history and sight playing. 

Graduation Fee for Certificate, $5.00. 

DIPLOMA 

Candidates for graduation with Diploma must have satisfactorily 
completed the requirements as outlined on page 67. 
Graduation Fee for Diploma, $10,00. 



70 



DEGREE 



Requirements for Mus. B. Degree : 

Candidate must hold a diploma covering the course as outlined on 
page 67. 

In addition to the above, one year's work in Canon and Fugue, 2 
lessons per week, and one year's work in Original Composition, 2 les- 
sons per week, will be required. 

Fee for Degree, $10.00. 



RECITALS AND MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Students' Evening Recitals. Each term recitals are given in which 
students, who have been prepared under the supervision of the instruc- 
tors, take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study and experi- 
ence in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class. Students who are not sufficiently advanced 
to appear in the Evening Recitals are given experience in public per. 
formance in the Students' Recital Class. These classes are not open 
to the public. Rules governing Concert Deportment are brought to the 
attention of the students and each performer shown what is expected 
of him or her when before an audience. The result is a smoother and 
more satisfactory appearance in the Evening Recitals when assigned to 
such work. 

THE EURYDICE CHORAL CLUB 

This club for young women was organized four years ago, having for 
its object the study of standard choruses and choral works, producing 
the same at a Spring concert. 

Among the artists who have recently appeared with the Eurydice 
Choral Club are Miss Elsie Baker of the Victor Concert Company, 
Miss Vera Curtis of the Metropolitan Opera Company, and Mrs. 
Bertyne Ne Collins, soprano, of New York. 

Last season the club enlarged the scope of its musical activities 
and aside from giving the usual concert, presented Miss Sue Harvard, 
soprano, of New York City, in song recital. Club members are admitted 
without charge to these recitals, and it is proposed to bring artists be- 
fore the students from time to time for the furtherance of musical ap- 
preciation. 

THE MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The opportunity for a "try out" for membership in this organization 
is given every young man of the institution who possesses a singing 
voice. Rehearsals are conducted throughout the Fall months prepara- 
tory to filling a series of scheduled dates booked by a student manager. 
Membership in this Club furnishes a musical training as well as social 
experience that is invaluable to the college man. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 71 

TUITION 

PIANO, VOICE, OR VIOLIN 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $25.50 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 12.75 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 25.50 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 12.75 

SENIOR AND JUNIOR YEARS 
Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $34.00 

First Semester 1 lesson per week. . . ^ 17.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 34.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 17.00 

SUB-FRESHMAN AND FRESHMAN YEARS IN PIANO 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $10.20 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 5.10 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 10.20 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 5.10 

PIPE ORGAN 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $34.00 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 17.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 34.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 17.00 

HARMONY, MUSICAL HISTORY, EAR TRAINING, THEORY, 

HARMONIC ANALYSIS, MUSICAL FORM, PSYCHOLOGY 

OF MUSIC, PUBLIC SCHOOL METHODS, AND 

SIGHT SINGING 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week $13.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons (class) per week 13.00 

COUNTERPOINT, CANON, FUGUE, OR COMPOSITION 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week $16.00 

Second Semester. -.,, 2 lessons (class) per week 16.00 



72 BULLETIN 

SIGHT PLAYING 

Junior and Senior Years 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week $10.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons (class) per week 10.00 

A charge of seventy-five cents each semester will be made for use 
of the Sight Playing Library. 

PIANO NORMAL METHODS CLASS 

First Semester 1 lesson (class) per week $5.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson (class) per week 5.00 

(October to April) 

RATES FOR PRACTICE PERIODS 

Piano, 1 hour daily, per semester $ 4.00 

Each additional hour, per semester 2.00 

Pipe Organ (College Chapel) 1 hour daily, per semester 20.00 

Pipe Organ (College Chapel) 2 hours per week, per semester 10.00 

Two Manual Practice Organ, 1 hour daily, per semester 10.00 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence from first two weeks of the term, 
nor for a subsequent individual absence. In case of long continued ill- 
ness the loss is shared equally by the College and the student. 

Pupils may enter at any time, but for convenience of grading the 
beginning of each semester is the most desirable time. 

In the case of holidays declared by the faculty, no lessons will be 
given or money refunded. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

Students are expected to consult the Director before arranging to 
take part in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade 
will be issued at the close of each semester. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., address 

DIRECTOR OF THE CONSERVATORY, 
Lebanon Valley College. 



ART DEPARTMENT 



COURSE OF STUDY FOR CERTIFICATE 

First Year — Sketching in pencil geometric solids and various objects. 

Memory and quick action drawing. 

Principles of Perspective. 

Pencil rendering. 

Brush drawing in ink. 

Elementary Design. 

Wash drawing including original composition of landscapes, marine 
scenes, etc. Also sketching flowers, vegetable forms, and leaves with 
relation to values, tones, etc. 

Second Year — Charcoal drawing from casts. 

Painting in water colors from groups of still life interiors, decorative 
subjects, flowers, draperies, and out-of-door sketching. 
Theory and Harmony of Color Lettering. 

Third Year — Costume Sketch class — pose drawing. 

Painting in oils from still life and nature. 

Water color. 

Historic Ornament. 

Study of the Masterpieces of Painting and Sculpture. 

Teachers' Class — Principles and methods of drawing, lettering, 
brush work, water color, design, and perspective. 

Saturday work is offered for teachers and children who cannot take 
work during the week. 

China Painting — Instructions are given in the latest methods of ap- 
plying designs, which are original. The china is fired in the institution, 
giving students an opportunity of learning how to fire their own China. 



THE CRAFTS 

Jewelry — Design and construction of the same. Leather Tooling. 
Students desiring to graduate must complete two years of College 
English and History. 



74 BULLETIN 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

Seniors 

Bachman, Susan C Lebanon, Pa. 

Batdor f , Lottie M Lebanon, Pa. 

Bossard, Ada C Annville, Pa. 

Bouder, Norman M Lebanon, Pa. 

Boughter, Isaac P Pine Grove, Pa. 

Boyer, Emma I Reading, Pa. 

Bunderman, Walter L .Lebanon, Pa. 

Castetter, Edward F Shamokin, Pa. 

Darcas, Luella M Lebanon, Pa. 

Dundore, Samuel T Mt. Aetna, Pa. 

Early, Martha E Palmyra, Pa. 

Evans, Ruth V Lebanon, Pa. 

Evans, William T Lykens, Pa. 

Fasnacht, Anna B Palmyra, Pa. 

Fencil, Elizabeth K Annville, Pa. 

Geyer, Harvey K Florin, Pa. 

Gingrich, Kathryn S Lickdale, Pa. 

Haines, Ruth L Philadelphia, Pa. 

Heberlig, Raymond S Highspire, Pa. 

Hilbert, Paul E Allentown, Pa. 

Hughes, Ruth M York, Pa. 

Imboden, J. Nissley Hershey, Pa. 

Jones, Lucia M Lebanon, Pa. 

Kline, Frankie A Tower City, Pa. 

Lenhart, Miriam S New Cumberland, Pa. 

Lutz, Mary S Chambersburg, Pa. 

Moore, Mabel E Lancaster, Pa. 

Miller, Carolyn A Waynesboro, Pa. 

Oliver, J. E Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Peck, D. Wilbert Chambersburg, Pa. 

Rhoads, Russell H Lykens, Pa. 

Rupp, J. Paul Harrisburg, Pa. 

Schmidt, Martha V Lebanon, Pa. 

Secrist, Elena E Churchville, Va. 

Sloat, Ralph L Rockport, Pa. 

Snavely, Francis B Ramey, Pa. 

Snyder, Grace E Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Snyder, Rufus H Manheim, Pa. 

Tschudy, Earl H Lebanon, Pa. 

Weidler, Edna M Cherry Creek, N. Y. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 75 

Wingerd, Ray D Chambersburg, Pa. 

Yetter, Harry S Stevens, Pa. 

Zeigler, Jesse O Elizabethville, Pa. 

Juniors 

Batdorf , Charles R Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Behney, Bessie B Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Crim, Harry A Gerrardstown, W. Va. 

Durburow, Harry A Highspire, Pa. 

Ehrhart, Russell R Highspire, Pa. 

Fink, Esther M Annville, Pa. 

Fishburn, Harvey W Ephrata, Pa. 

Gingrich, Earl S Lebanon, Pa. 

Hagy, Solomon L Schoeneck, Pa. 

Haines, Henry L Red Lion, Pa. 

Hartman, Charles C Rouzerville, Pa. 

Hoffman, Ruth V Lebanon, Pa. 

Hohl, Mae S ' Pitman, Pa. 

Houser, Sadie M Annville, Pa. 

Kiebler, Reno E Annville, Pa. 

Lefever, Myrtle M York, Pa. 

Light, Sara M Lebanon, Pa. 

Maulfair, R. Helena Lebanon, Pa. 

McCauley, Ruby M Annville, Pa. 

Morrow, Robert B Duncannon, Pa. 

Mutch, Verna A Ephrata, Pa. 

Ressler, Barton C Allentown, Pa. 

Ruppenthal, Harry P Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

Saylor, Myrl V Annville, Pa. 

Sebastian, Jennie S Reading, Pa. 

Smith, E. Virginia Reading, Pa. 

Snyder, Myrtle E Robesonia, Pa. 

Stine, C. H Ft. Hunter, Pa. 

Strine, Huber D Manchester, Pa. 

Zeitlin, Dora Lehighton, Pa. 

Sophomores 

Angus, Ethel J Conemaugh, Pa. 

Bachman, Earl S Middletown, Pa. 

Bechtold, Caleb J Avon, Pa. 

Beamesderf er, James A Lebanon, Pa. 

Bomberger, Ida M Lebanon, Pa. 

Bortner, Mary E York, Pa. 



76 BULLETIN 

Darling, Olive E Chandlers Valley, Pa. 

Daugherty, Carroll Lebanon, Pa. 

Duncan, Raymond L Highspire, Pa. 

Emenheiser, Benj. F Fayetteville, Pa. 

Farrell, Orin J Phillipsburg, Pa. 

Fencil, Gladys M Annville, Pa. 

Grant, Frederick T Sunbury, Pa. 

Garver, Sara E Lebanon, Pa. 

Haas, Amnion F Annville,, Pa. 

Happel, Christine Lebanon, Pa. 

Hess, Harold G Middletown, Pa. 

Heiss, Elwood D York Haven, Pa. 

McLaughlin, Robert J Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miller, Mabel V Reading, Pa. 

Miller, Esther E Lebanon, Pa. 

Moore, Guy W Lebanon, Pa. 

Nitrauer, Grant W Highspire, Pa. 

Ness, Paul Yoe, Pa. 

Plummer, Wright P Conemaugh, Pa. 

Reber, Mark Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Schwalm, Clarence W Valley View, Pa. 

Shettel, Mary E. York, Pa. 

Sherk, Cyrus B Annville, Pa. 

Strickler, Edward C Lebanon, Pa. 

Schneider, J. Howard Palmyra, Pa. 

Stiffler, Ralph L Altoona, Pa. 

Stager, Edith V Lebanon, Pa. 

Uhler, Russell Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolfersberger, Jacob J Annville, Pa. 

Wier, Margaret M Philadelphia, Pa. 

Zellers, Arthur D Lebanon, Pa. 

Freshmen 

Bender, Harold Annville, Pa. 

Bixler, Ambrose B Annville, Pa. 

Boeshore, Charles S Lebanon, Pa. 

Bomgardner, Harry R Annville, Pa. 

Bonitz, Josephine B Steelton, Pa. 

Bowman, George A Middletown, Pa. 

Bowman, J. Russell Lebanon, Pa. 

Brown, Chester O Brogueville, Pa. 

Burgess, Paul C Philadelphia, Pa. 

Burbeck, Meta C Reading, Pa. 

Cassel, Miriam C Hummelstown, Pa. 

Cocklin, Foster W Harrisburg, Pa. 

Compton, Walter H Harrisburg, Pa. 

Conklin, Wm. S Middletown, Pa. 

Daugherty, J. Dwight Steelton, Pa. 

Daugherty, Helen J Annville, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 77 

Daugherty, Pauline E Annville, Pa. 

Darling, Francis E Chandlers Valley, Pa. 

Detweiler, Walter B Middletown, Pa. 

Dundore, Ellen Avon, Pa. 

Eldridge, Arthur C '. Myersville, Md. 

Engle, Dorothy Harrisburg, Pa. 

Engle, Harold Palmyra, Pa. 

Fencit Calvin F Annville, Pa. 

Fix, Chas. H Dallastown, Pa. 

Franklin, Palmer N Shippensburg, Pa. 

Gainor, Maris L Marietta, Pa. 

Gehr, Harvey W Waynesboro, Pa. 

Giles, Arthur H Orient, 111. 

Gingrich, James L Lebanon, Pa. 

Gingrich, Mary M Palmyra, Pa. 

Gingrich, Gertrude Lebanon, Pa. 

Glenn, Maryland L Red Lion, Pa. 

Gleim, Charles F Lebanon, Pa. 

Harvey, Albert G Hazleton, Pa. 

Hess, Verna L Middletown, Pa. 

Heffelman, Marian V New Cumberland, Pa. 

Hershey, Ray E Palymra, Pa. 

Hershey, Josephine L Myerstown, Pa. 

Heckman, Oliver S Lemaster, Pa. 

Herr, S. Meyer Annville, Pa. 

Holler, Leroy O Hummelstown, Pa. 

Houser, John F Middletown, Pa. 

Hower, Gladys K Lebanon, Pa. 

Huffer, Alfred C Boonsboro, Md. 

Hummer, Aaron D Manheim, Pa. 

Hutchison, Hugh J Norwich, Conn. 

Heister, Ruth V Annville, Pa. 

Hibbs, Effie M Morrisville, Pa. 

Jones, Howard Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kauf fman, Marlin E Lebanon, Pa. 

Kelbaugh, Lee J Thurmont, Md. 

Kreiger, Rodney P Annville, Pa. 

Kohler, John H Yoe, Pa. 

Kupp, Lester V Middletown, Pa. 

Lehr, John D Lebanon, Pa. 

Lehman, Ethel M Hummelstown, Pa. 

Lerew, Erdean M Dillsburg, Pa. 

Light, Roy H Annville, Pa. 

Light, Pearl Lebanon, Pa. 

Martin, Charles W Shippensburg, Pa. 

Martin, Wm. W Hagerstown, Md. 

Maurer, Geo. W '. Minersville, Pa. 

Miller, Adam D Annville, Pa. 

Miller, Arthur E Steelton, Pa. 



78 BULLETIN 

Miller, Harry K Hummelstown, Pa. 

Mochel, Paul B Reading, Pa. 

McCune, Joseph B Hagerstown, Md. 

Nef f , Paul R Barnesboro, Pa. 

Rudy, Earl C Middletown, Pa. 

Ruppenthal, Virgil H Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

Sanders, Harry E. Annville, Pa. 

Seeley, Arthur L Hazelton, Pa. 

Schmidt, Jos. L Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shaak, Lee S Avon, Pa. 

Shadle, Ralph E Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shadel, Russel O Williamstown, Pa. 

Smythe, Stewart Philadelphia, Pa. 

Snavely, Stewart Middletown, Pa. 

Snider, John W Chambersburg, Pa. 

Snoke, Walter L Shippensburg, Pa. 

Spangler, Paul D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sponsler, Melvin G. Halifax, Pa. 

Stine, Josephine B Mt. Alto, Pa. 

Stern, Anna E Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Stinner, Fred C Williamstown, Pa. 

Swindell, David L Baltimore, Md. 

Strickler, Lawrence J Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Treichler, Harold J Middletown, Pa. 

Tschudy, Paul D Lebanon, Pa. 

Wagner, Lester H Annville, Pa. 

Wagner, Russell E Kilmer, Pa. 

Warfel, Howard R Williamstown, Pa. 

Welsch, Harold C Waynesboro, Pa. 

Werner, Harry C Lykens, Pa. 

Whitman, John D Middletown, Pa. 

Williard, Lester R Shamokin, Pa. 

Wilson, Wm. R Shamokin, Pa. 

Wirt, Prosper D Lebanon, Pa. 

Witmer, Frank C Lebanon, Pa. 

Zinn, Geo. E Shippensburg, Pa. 

Specials 

Alwine, Florence Hummelstown, Pa. 

Boltz, Susan Jonestown, Pa. 

Bortz, Alta B Lebanon, Pa. 

Bohr, Matilda Lebanon, Pa. 

Budd, Harold J Williamstown, Pa. 

Bretz, Glenn L Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Ehrhart, O. T Lebanon, Pa. 

Fulf ord Nan Clearfield, Pa. 

Gabseivics, John P Berwick, Pa. 

Hallman, George Lebanon, Pa. 

Hartman, Jennings B Dallastown, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 79 

Horst, Edna C Hagerstown, Md. 

Kreider, Violet Mark Annville, Pa. 

Keller, Ray J. A Union Deposit, Pa. 

Klopp, Lewis Richland, Pa. 

Light, Joel L Allentown, Pa. 

Longenecker, C. R Palmyra, Pa. 

Mest, Girard S Allentown, Pa. 

Owens, Thomas Nanticoke, Pa. 

Rhoad, Edwin Grantville, Pa. 

Rarick, Harold R Shamokin, Pa. 

Reeser, Paul E Reading, Pa. 

Schooley, Sherman R Trucksville, Pa. 

Singer, Samuel Middletown, Pa. 

Shank, Walter L Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Schaeffer, H. E Avon, Pa. 

Stager, W. S Avon, Pa. 

Yeager, Orin C .' York, Pa. 

Student's Army Training Corps of Lebanon Valley College 

Bachman, Earl Stanton Middletown, Pa. 

Batdorf, Charles Ralph Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Beamesderfer, James Albert Lebanon, Pa. 

Bixler, Ambrose Boger , Lebanon, Pa. 

Boeshore, Charles Stover Lebanon, Pa. 

Bomgardner, Harry Roscoe Annville, Pa. 

Bouder, Norman Martin Lebanon, Pa. 

Bowman, John Russell Lebanon, Pa. 

Brown, Chester Oram Brogueville, Pa. 

Bunderman, Walter Quinter Lebanon, Pa. 

Burgess, Paul Corwin Philadelphia, Pa. 

Cocklin, Foster William Harrisburg, Pa. 

Compton, Walter Hobart Harrisburg, Pa. 

Conklin, William Swiler Middletown, Pa. 

Darling, Francis Earle Chandlers Valley, Pa. 

Daugherty, Joseph Dwight Steelton, Pa. 

Detweiler, Walter Booser Middletown, Pa. 

Duncan, Raymond Leroy Highspire, Pa. 

Ehrhart, Russell Ray Highspire, Pa. 

Eldridge, Arthur Clement Myersville, Md. 

Emenheiser, Benjamin Franklin Fa3fetteville, Pa. 

Farrell, Orin James Phillipsburg, Pa. 

Fasnacht, Clarence Earl Palmyra, Pa. 

Fishburn, Harvey Walter Ephrata, Pa. 

Franklin, Palmer Neff Shippensburg, Pa. 

Gainor, Maris Lloyd Marietta, Pa. 

Gehr, Harvey Wayne Waynesboro, Pa. 

Giles, Arthur Harold Orient, 111. 

Gingrich, James Lot Lebanon, Pa. 



80 BULLETIN 

Gleim, Charles Frederick Lebanon, Pa. 

Grant, Frederick T Sunbury, Pa. 

Haas, Ammon Franklin Annville, Pa. 

Hartman, Charles Curtis Rouzerville, Pa. 

Harvey, Albert Gartrell Hazelton, Pa. 

Heiss, Elwood David York Haven, Pa. 

Herr, Samuel Meyer Annville, Pa. 

Hess, Harold Glenn Ono, Pa. 

Holler, LeRoy Otterbein Hummelstown, Pa. 

Houser, John Forney Middletown, Pa. 

Hummer, Aaron David Manheim, Pa. 

Hutchison, Hugh J Norwich, Conn. 

Imboden, Jay Nissley Hershey, Pa. 

Jones, Howard Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kauffman, Marlin Ellis Lebanon, Pa. 

Kelbaugh, Lee Jennings Thurmont, Md. 

Kohler, John Henry Yoe, Pa. 

Lehr, John David Lebanon, Pa. 

Light, Roy Heilman Annville, Pa. 

Martin, Charles William Shippensburg, Pa. 

Martin, William Walter Hagerstown, Md. 

Maurer, George William Minersville, Pa. 

McCune, Joseph Brewer Hagerstown, Md. 

McLaughlin, Robert John Philadelphia, Pa. 

Miller, Adam David Annville, Pa. 

Miller, Arthur Edwin Steelton, Pa. 

Miller, Harry Kreiger Hummelstown, Pa. 

Mochel, Paul Burkhart Reading, Pa. 

Moore, Guy William Lebanon, Pa. 

Neflf, Paul Roland -. Barnesboro, Pa. 

Reber, Mark Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Ressler, Barton Clarion Allentown, Pa. 

Rudy, Earl Charles Middletown, Pa. 

Ruppenthal, Virgil Harold Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

Sanders, Henry Ellsworth Annville, Pa. 

Schmidt, Joseph Lidden Harrisburg, Pa. 

Schneider, Jacob Howard Palmyra, Pa. 

Seeley, Arthur L Hazelton, Pa. 

Shaak, Lee Stohler Avon, Pa. 

Shadel, Russel Otterbein Williamstown, Pa. 

Shadel, Ralph Emerson Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sloat, Ralph Leon Rockport, Pa. 

Smythe, Stewart Philadelphia, Pa. 

Snavely, Stewart Middletown, Pa. 

Snider, John Wagner Chambersburg, Pa. 

Snoke, Walter Leon Shippensburg, Pa. 

Snyder, Rufus Hummer Manheim, Pa. 

Spangler, Paul Daniel Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sponsler, Melvin Guy Halifax, Pa. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 81 

Stiffler, Ralph Leroy Altoona, Pa. 

Stinner, Fred Charles Williamstown, Pa. 

Strickler, Edward Casper Lebanon, Pa. 

Strickler, Lawrence Jacob Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Strine, Huber Dale Manchester, Pa. 

Swindell, David Lawson Baltimore, Md. 

Treichler, Harold Joseph Middletown, Pa. 

Tschudy, Paul Daniel Lebanon, Pa. 

Uhler, Russel William Lebanon, Pa. 

Wagner, Lester Harry , Annville, Pa. 

Wagner, Russel Elwood Kilmer, Pa. 

Warfel, Howard Raymond Williamstown, Pa. 

Welsch, Harold Croft Waynesboro, Pa. 

Werner, Harry Calvin Lykens, Pa. 

Whitman, John David Middletown, Pa. 

Williard, Lester Raymond Shamokin, Pa. 

Wilson, William Reynold Shamokin, Pa. 

Wingerd, Ray Deaner Chambersburg, Pa. 

Wirt, Prosper Daniel Lebanon, Pa. 

Witmer, Frank Calvin Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolfersberger, Jacob Joseph Annville, Pa. 

Yetter, Harry Stanley Stevens, Pa. 

Zellers, Arthur Daniel Lebanon, Pa. 

Zinn, George Elmer Shippensburg, Pa. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

SENIORS 

Bordner, Esther R (Piano) Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Kennedy, Hattie Mae (Public School Mus.) Palmyra, Pa. 

Landgraf, Helen E (Public School Mus.) Lebanon, Pa. 

Witmeyer, Emma M ( Pipe Organ) Annville, Pa. 

JUNIORS 

Herring, William I (Piano) Annville, Pa. 

Saylor, Myrle V (Voice) Annville, Pa. 

Walborn, Carrie M ( Piano) Lebanon, Pa. 

SOPHOMORES 

Harrison, Madeline (Voice) Lebanon, Pa. 

Herr, Delia (Piano) Annville, Pa. 

Kettering, Abigail (Piano) Annville, Pa. 

Moeckel, Sara ( Piano) Lebanon, Pa. 

Rodda, Charlotte ( Piano) Baltimore, Md. 

*Reber, Mark (Piano) Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Swartzbaugh Beulah ( Piano, Organ) Hanover, Pa. 

Strohm, Ethel ( Piano) Palmyra, Pa. 

Witmeyer, Emma (Piano) Annville, P4. 

^Taking work in other departments. 



82 BULLETIN 

FRESHMEN 

Ahalt, Earl Middletown, Md. 

Bender, Ralph Annville, Pa. 

*Burbeck, Meta Reading, Pa. 

Bomgardner, John Hershey, Pa. 

Cowan, Mrs. Grace Palmyra, Pa. 

Dunham, Ada Avon, Pa. 

Durborow, Frank Highspire, Pa. 

Farnsler, Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

Frantz, Ruth Lebanon, Pa. 

Herr, Harold Annville, Pa. 

Hisey, Ada Palmyra, Pa. 

Kemp, Madeline Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Kreider, Grace Annville, Pa. 

Kepley, Florence Lebanon, Pa. 

Kettering, Josephine Annville, Pa. 

Kettering, Esther Annville, Pa. 

Kettering, Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

*Ricker, Dorothy Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Rice, Pearl Annville, Pa. 

Saylor, Gardner Annville, Pa. 

*Stern, Anna Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Sholly, Dorothy Annville, Pa. 

Shehk, Lucile Annville, Pa. 

Shenk, Alfred Annville, Pa. 

*Secrist, Elena Churchville, Va. 

Snyder, Elsie Annville, Pa. 

Trautman, Pauline Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Umberger, Mollie Schaef f erstown, Pa. 

Woomer, Elizabeth Lebanon, Pa. 

SPECIALS 

Engelhardt, Catharine Lebanon, Pa. 

*Emenheiser, Benjamin Fayetteville, Pa. 

*Geyer, Harvey K Florin, Pa. 

Henry, Louise Annville, Pa. 

*Hilbert, Paul Engene Allentown, Pa. 

Oyer, Miriam R Shippensburg, Pa. 

*Renn, Roland Harrisburg, Pa. 

Richards, Florence Lebanon, Pa. 

Total registration in private lessons 52 

Receiving instruction, but not registered for private lessons 39 

Total 91 

"Taking work in other departments. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 83 

ACADEMY STUDENTS 

Angell, Lena Taneytown, Md. 

Burgis, Paul Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bedsworth, Lula Baltimore, Md. 

Bressler, Elias Lebanon, Pa. 

Canoles, Wm. X Parkton, Md. 

Carrillo, Manuel Yucatan, Mexico 

Cole, Clifton Lebanon, Pa. 

Fake, Warren 

Fix, Leroy Reading, Pa. 

Fortna, Raymond Lebanon, Pa. 

Grant, Fred Philadelphia, Pa. 

Guerro, Libio Yucatan, Mexico 

Hoke, Hugh Shamokin, Pa. 

Hummer," C. L Linglestown, Pa. 

Hartz, Ethel Hummelstown, Pa. 

Kohler, Wm. F Annville, Pa. 

MacDonald, J. B Swatara, Pa. 

Peters, Curwin W Dover, Pa. 

Ricker, Dorothy Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Swanger, M. L Annville, Pa. 

Spangler, Roy Annville, Pa. 

Stouff er, Robert Allentown, Pa. 

Trout, Ida Lancaster, Pa. 

VonNordeck, Maud Baltimore, Md. 

Wrightstone, E. B Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Zeigler, Roy R Annville, Pa. 

Students regularly matriculated in the Academy 26 

Students from other departments receiving instruction in Academy.. 10 

Total enrollment in Academy 36 

ORATORY 

SENIOR 

*Kreider, Violet Mark Annville, Pa. 

JUNIOR 

*Fulford, Nan Clearfield, Pa. 

Lefever, Myrtle York, Pa. 

Maulf air, Helena Lebanon, Pa. 

SPECIAL 

Bechtold, Caleb Avon, Pa. 

*Boltz, Susan Jonestown, Pa. 

Bonitz, Josephine Steelton, Pa. 

Boyer, Emma Reading, Pa. 

Dundore, Samuel Mt. Aetna, Pa. 

Early, Martha Palmyra, Pa. 

*Students taking Oratory only. 



84 BULLETIN 

Fink, Esther Annville, Pa. 

Geyer, Harvey Florin, Pa. 

Heberlig, Raymond Highspire, Pa. 

Hilbert, Paul E Allentown, Pa. 

Hoffman, Ruth V Lebanon, Pa. 

Miller, Mabel V Reading, Pa. 

Ricker, Dorothy Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Snyder, Grace Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Stager, Edith Lebanon, Pa. 

Wingerd, Ray Chambersburg, Pa. 

Zeitlin, Dora Lehighton, Pa. 

Regular students in oratory 3 

Students matriculated in other departments 18 

Total receiving instruction in oratory 21 



DEGREES CONFERRED MAY 22, 1918 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Atticks, Robert M Steelton, Pa. 

Beidler, Ada May Lehighton, Pa. 

Bender, E. E Annville, Pa. 

Bender, Ruth Dillsburg, Pa. 

Bortz, Emma Lebanon, Pa. 

Bucher, Norman B Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Detrich, LeRoy S Palmyra, Pa. 

Dunkle, Mildred Lucknow, Pa. 

Engle, Marguerite Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gallatin, M. Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

Gamble, Merab Jersey Shore, Pa. 

Garber, Dale Florin, Pa. 

Grube, Ray Y Lititz, Pa. 

Gemmill, Edgil York, Pa. 

Gemmill, Charles W Windsor, Pa. 

Hoover, Helen Chambersburg, Pa. 

Hostetter, Herman Cleona, Pa. 

Isaacs, William Hugh Forty Fort, Pa. 

Keating, William Rome, N. Y. 

Kennedy, Coleman . . Palmyra, Pa. 

Lorenz, Dorothy Roaring Springs, Pa. 

Loser, Ruth K Progress, Pa. 

Lynch, Clyde A Harrisburg, Pa. 

Martin, W. N Rouzerville, Pa. 

McCauley, Reno Annville, Pa. 

Morrison, S. F. Steelton, Pa. 

Nissley, Raymond Mt. Joy, Pa. 

Potter, Norman Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Ruth, Kathryn O Sinking Springs, Pa. 

Shaak, Helen Lebanon, Pa. 

Shannon, Carl Millersburg, Pa. 

'Students taking Oratory only. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 85 

Shannon, Paul Millersburg, Pa. 

Shettel, Paul York, Pa. 

Simon, Adam Schaeff erstown, Pa. 

Smith, E. Mae Annville, Pa. 

Smith, Florence Dallastown, Pa. 

Spitler, H. D. Lebanon, Pa. 

Walter, Daniel Lebanon, Pa. 

Walters, Leroy Sunbury, Pa. 

Williams, Louisa York, Pa. 

Wingerd, Mark Chambersburg, Pa. 

Wrightstone, Harold Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Yingst, W. Paul Lebanon, Pa. 

CONSERVATORY DIPLOMAS PRESENTED MAY 20, 1918 

Batdorf, Arabelle Annville, Pa. 

Greer, G. M York, Pa. 

Lindsay, Jane Newville, Pa. 

Oyer, Miriam R Shippensburg, Pa. 

Richards, Florence Lebanon, Pa. 

Richwine, Marie B Ephrata, Pa. 

Rhoads, Irma Chambersburg, Pa. 

Wengert, Sara Lebanon, Pa. 

ACADEMY DIPLOMAS PRESENTED MAY 22, 1918 

Burtner, Robert R Palmyra, Pa. 

Cretzinger, J. I v Duncannon, Pa. 

Engle, Harold '. Palmyra, Pa. 

Fencil, Calvin F Annville, Pa. 

Rhoad, Edwin Grantville, Pa. 

Simondette, A. C. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wagner, M. A . , Lebanon, Pa. 

SUMMARY 

Seniors 43 

Juniors 30 

Sophomores 37 

Freshmen 101 

Specials 28 

Total in College 239 

Academy 36 

Music 91 

Oratory 21 

Total enrollment in all departments 387 

Names repeated in Music, Oratory, and Academy. . . 76 

Net enrollment. , , 311 



INDEX 



Absences 21 

Academy 51 

Admission 53 

Courses 56 

Examinations 53 

Expenses 54 

Faculty 52 

Students in 83 

Advisers 13 

Art Department 73 

Astronomy 38 

Bible 41 

Biology 44 

Board of Trustees 4 

Buildings and Grounds 11 

Calendar 3 

Carnegie Library 11 

Chapel 15 

Chemistry 45 

College Organizations 12 

Corporation 4 

Courses, College 

Outline of 32 

Description of 24 

Degrees Conferred 84 

Degree and Diploma 15 

Discipline 14 

Economics 43 

Education 36 

English Language and Literature 39 

Expenses, College 18 

Academy 54 

Department of Music 69 

Department of Art 73 



Faculty, College 6 

Academy 52 

Department of Music 61 

French Language and Literature 41 

General Information 11 

German Language and Literature 38 

Graduate Work 15 

Greek Language and Literature 40 

Geology 47 

History 42 

History of the College 8 

Laboratories 12 

Latin Language and Literature 42 

Limitation 15 

Mathematics 37 

Music Department 61 

Courses 63 

Oratory and Public Speaking 48 

Philosophy 36 

Physics 47 

Physical Culture 50 

Political Science 43 

Religious Work 12 

Register of Students, College 74 

Academy 83 

Department of Music 81 

Department of Oratory 83 

Specials 82 

Students' Army Training Corps 79 

Registration 14 

Requirements for Admission, College 22 

Academy 53 

Schedule of Lecture and Recitation Hours. 32 

Scholarships 16 

Sociology 43 

Spanish 42 



BULLETIN 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, in 
the County of Lebanon, in the township of Annville," incorporated 

under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars ; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof 

shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, in 
the County of Lebanon, in the township of Annville," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and 

premises, that is to say , to have 

and to hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its 
successors and assigns, forever. 

Persons make bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, or 
knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the Presi- 
dent of the College, George Daniel Gossard, Annville, Pa., and, if prac- 
ticable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will that the wishes of 
the testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests de. 
voted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or the 
endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endowment of a 
scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of the same in the 
will provision. 



The Otterbeln Press, 
Dayton, Ohio.