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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Bulletin"

College 

BULLETIN 

Vol. 8 (NEW SERIES) MARCH, 1921 No. 12 



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MtGr€tiia,Pa, 



SUMMER SCHOOL NUMBER 
19 2 1 



PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley1921812leba 



Lebanon ^^allep College 

Mt. Gretna 
Summer School 

1921 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



BULLETIN 

Published by 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pa. 



CALENDAR 



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Summer School Calendar 



June 18, 20 and 21 — Registration of Students 

June 20 — Summer Term Begins 

July 29 — Summer Term Ends 



ADDRESS ALL SUMMER SCHOOL CORRESPONDENCE TO 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

MOUNT GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



THE FACULTY 



GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 

President 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., Sc.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

HIRAM H. SHENK, A.M. 

Professor of History 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S. 

Professor of Biological Sciences 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M. 

Professor of Education and Mathematics 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Social Sciences 

MALCOLM M. HARING, A.M. 

Professor of Chemistry 

T. BAYARD BEATTY, A.M. 

Professor of English 

R. R. BUTTERWICK, A.B., D.D. 

Professor of Bible and Philosophy 

WALTER E. SEVERANCE, A.M. 

Professor of Latin and Education 

MARY C. GREEN 

Professor of French 



Committee in charge of the Summer Session 

T. BAYARD BEATTY, Director 
C. R. GINGRICH, Secretary 
SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar and Treasurer 
S. H. DERICKSON H. H. SHENK M. M. HARING 



General Information 



THE Mount Gretna Summer School Is an extension of the 
work of Lebanon Valley College, authorized and ap- 
proved by the trustees of the college and directed by the 
faculty. The sessions are held at Mount Gretna, Pennsylvania, 
in the buildings of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua Association. 
The environment, the social life of the resort, the opportunities 
for healthful recreation, as well as for quiet and effective study 
make this an ideal location for the Summer School. The 
courses are planned primarily for the following groups of men 
and women: 

I. Those who wish to complete their college entrance re- 
quirements. 

II. Those who desire to shorten the period of college resi- 
dence or to make up deficiencies. 

III. Teachers of Elementary schools, high schools, and nor- 
mal schools who seek advanced instruction with or without the 
idea of acquiring a degree. 

l\\ Collegiate graduates who desire to acquire credits 
towards their master's degree. 

V. Other persons who desire collegiate instruction. 

ADMISSION AND ATTENDANCE 

There are no formal examinations for admission to the summer 
school. Students, both men and women, will be admitted to such 
courses as the respective instructors find them qualified to pursue 
with advantage. 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the 
opening of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registra- 
tion be made by mail. Applications for admission and registra- 
tion will be received by the Registrar up to and including Satur- 
day, June 18; address, Annville, Pa. 

On Monday, June 20, and Tuesday, June 21, registration will 
be continued in the C. L. S. C. Building, Chautauqua Grounds, 
Mount Gretna. The registration hours will be from 1 P. M. to 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

4. P. M. Since the number of students will necessarily be 
limited by the accommodations available, an early communi- 
cation will insure the applicant reservation and a supply of 
necessary equipment. Classes will be open to all on June 20 and 
21, but after June 21 they will be restricted to duly registered 
students. 

Regular exercises will begin promptly on June 20. Notice of 
any proposed addition or cancellation of courses must be re- 
ported at once in person at the Office of the Registrar. Students 
will be allowed, after securing the consent of the Director, to 
make changes in their courses up to and including Tuesday, 
June 21, but after June 21 they will be permitted to make no 
changes whatever. Full credit will be given only for those courses 
for w^hich students have registered and paid not later than June 
21. Students registering June 22 to 30, inclusive, may receive 
half credit for the work done in any course; but students enter- 
ing after June 30 will receive no academic credit. A student at- 
tending any course is required to do the full work assigned to 
the class; auditors are not admitted. Absence from class exer- 
cises may be excused only in case of illness. 

PROGRAM 

Exercises will be held every day in every subject, but no stated 
exercises w411 be held on Saturdays, with the exception of the 
first week, Saturday, June 25. Each course will consist of thirty 
lectures or other exercises, or their equivalent in laboratory or 
field work. 

Students are allowed to take one or more courses as they de- 
sire, although they are advised not to exceed six credits. All 
courses are assigned a certain number of tuition points and most 
courses have a credit value. A point is the credit gained for a 
duly matriculated student upon the completion of an hour 
weekly for one academic half year, or the equivalent thereof, un- 
less otherwise specified, and is designated a semester hour credit. 
One hour of lecture or recitation, or two hours of laboratory 
work daily during the summer session will cover the require- 
ments for two semester hours towards the bachelor's degree, and 
in some cases towards the master's degree. 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 7 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The sessions are held at Mount Gretna, Pennsylvania, in the 
buildings of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua Association, situated 
on the grounds of the Association. These buildings, especially 
designed for educational work, contain commodious and well 
equipped class rooms and are located in the heart of the resort. 
It is through the kind and generous cooperation of the Pennsyl- 
vania Chautauqua Association that the excellent facilities for edu- 
cational work of that Association are placed at the disposal of the 
summer school. Adjoining the grounds of the Pennsylvania 




CA^^IPUS VIEW 

Chautauqua Association are grounds of the Campmeeting Asso- 
ciation of the United Brethren in Christ. This resort of nearly 
five hundred cottages, scattered among the trees and shrubbery, 
accommodate a summer population of several thousand people. 
To the west of the grounds of the Chautauqua Association is the 
beautiful Lake Conewago which offers splendid facilities for 
bathing and boating. This lake is fed by pure mountain streams 
flowing from innumerable springs of the finest water to be found. 
The grounds also adjoin those of the military reservation of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, w^here encampments, attended 
by thousands of soldiers are held annually. 

Mount Gretna is situated on the Lebanon Branch of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad, eleven miles from Conewago where it 
forms a junction with the main line. At Lebanon this railroad 



8 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



joins the Philadelphia and Reading, so that Mount Gretna is 
within commuting distance of Lebanon, Lancaster and Harris- 
burg. It is, moreover, easily accessible from these points by 
automobile, being located midway between the Lincoln Highway 
and the William Penn Highway. 

BIOLOGICAL ADVANTAGES 

Mount Gretna is a paradise for the Naturalist or Biologist. 
The opportunities for the study of inland forms of life are un- 
limited. An abundant variety of plant and animal associations 
and varied ecological conditions are accessible. The topography 
consists of mountains with a wide range of forest trees and shrubs, 
deep ravines, with cold mountain streams, carrying the pure 
spring water through densely vegetated swamps out into richly 
cultivated meadowlands. Old fields, once under cultivation and 
now reserved for military purposes, supply unusual types of 
uncultivated forms of life. The lake and ponds are rich in aquatic 
forms, some of which are very rare. The flora is rich in fungae, 
mosses, ferns and flowering plants. Over thirty species of ferns 
are found in the vicinity. Over one hundred species of flowering 
plants have been identified by classes in a single day's tramp. 
An herbarium of several hundred species may be collected in a 
season. 

Birds and insects are abundant both in species and numbers 




TENNIS COURTS 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 9 

and in the summer season offer excellent opportunities for the 
study of breeding habits and life histories. 

All necessary equipment from the biological laboratories of 
the college will be transferred to a laboratory which has been 
provided in the Hall of Philosophy at Mount Gretna. 

ENTERTAINMENT AND LECTURE COURSES 

During the Summer Session a series of lectures and entertain- 
ments, under the direction and supervision of the Summer 
School faculty and the Women's Auxiliary Society of the Penn- 
sylvania Chautauqua Association, will be offered to the public. 

THE BIBLE CONFERENCE 

The United Brethren Bible Conference, directed annually by 
many of the most noted Bible teachers of the day, follows im- 
mediately after the close of the Summer School. This Confer- 
ence is held on the grounds of the Campmeeting Association. 

FEES 

A matriculation fee of five dollars ($5.00) will be charged each 
student upon registration. 

Tuition will be charged at the rate of six dollars ($6.00) per 
semester hour credit. For courses in which no college credit it 
allowed tuition will be charged at the same rate; that is, for a 
course offered one hour per day the tuition for the course will be 
twelve dollars ($12.00). Rates for special courses will be supplied 
upon application. 

Checks should be drawn for the exact amount of the bill and 
made payable to the order of the REGISTRAR,— MOUNT 
GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL. 

BOARD AND ROOM 

A limited number of rooms will be supplied by the school at 
rates ranging from two dollars ($2.00) to four dollars ($4.00) 
per week. 

Rates for rooms and board outside of the school are as follows: 

Hotel Conewago — Board and room — When two persons 
occupy the same room the rates will be $3.00 to $6.00 each per 
day or $18.00 to $36.00 each per week. 



10 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



When a room is occupied by one person the rates will be $3.50 
to $7.00 per day or $2L00 to $42.00 per week. 

Chautauqua Inn — Board and room — $16.00, $18.00 and 
$21.00 per week, $3.50 per day. 

The Kauffman House — Rates for room and board vary 
from $12.00 to $25.00 per week. All rooms have running ar- 
tesian water. Bungalows operated in connection with the hotel 
may be rented. 

Gretna Hall — Board and room, $10.00 per week. Boarding 
only, $7.50 per week. Meal tickets at special rates. 




^''f 



HOTEL CONEWAGO 



AIT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 11 



Description of Courses 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Derickson 

s-6 — Nature Study — One hour per day. Two classes may be 
conducted in nature study, one for boys and girls from the pubhc 
schools and another for adults. The aim of the course will be to 
familiarize the student with the forms of life with w^hich they are 
surrounded and to acquaint them with their habits and asso- 
ciations. Assistance will be rendered those who desire to pur- 
sue special studies in any particular group of plants or animals. 
No college credit. 

s-72 — Methods of Teaching Nature Study — One hour per 
day. This course is intended for teachers or those preparing to 
teach Nature Study or Biology, who w^ish to increase their effi- 
ciency in presenting various forms of life and the principles of 
Biology to their classes. Practical demonstrations will be given 
and opportunities for practice teaching may be had by those 
desiring college credit. Two semester hours credit may be earned. 

s-81 — Bird Study — One hour per day. About sixty species 
cf birds may be studied in the immediate vicinity of Mount 
Gretna. The class will spend an hour or more each morning in 
the identification of species both by appearance and by note. 
Special work in the study of feeding and nesting habits and dis- 
tribution will be outlined for those desiring the same. Prepared 
skins w^ill be at hand to assist in the closer study of the different 
species. A pair of opera or field glasses w^ill be found ver}^ service- 
able in the course. A limited number may be rented for the 
season from the laboratory. One semester hour credit. 

s-92 — Botany — One hour per day. This course will consist 
largely of field work supplemented by laboratory work. Structure 
of the plants and their relation to their environment will be 
studied and the plants identified with the aid of a key. Teachers 
of Botany w^ill have an opportunity of becoming familiar with 
the summer flora and of collecting and preserving much \'aluable 
material for use in their classes. A copy of Gray's Manual, 
Seventh Edition, will be needed for this course. Those desiring 
to prepare an herbarium should provide themselves w^ith plant 
presses and driers. Herbarium materials, note books, museum 
bottles and reagents for fixing and preserving materials for 
sectioning, dissection or demonstration can be purchased at the 
laboratory at cost. Two semester hours credit. 



12 ■ LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Harixg 

s-12-a — General Inorganic Chemistry^ — One hour per day. 
Text: General Chemistry for Colleges, Alex. Smith. Two se- 
mester hours credit. Offered in 192 L 

s-12-b — General Inorganic Chemistry — One hour per day. 
A continuation of s-12-a, offered in 1922. Prerequisite s-12-a. 
Text: General Chemistry for Colleges, Alex. Smith. Two semes- 
ter hours credit. 

s-22 — Theory of Analytic Chemistry — One hour per day. 
Prerequisites s-12-a and s-12-b. Text: Qualitative Chemical 
Analysis, Vol. I, Stieglitz. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52-a — Organic Chemistry— One hour per day. Pre- 
requisites s-12-a, s-12-b and s-22. Text: Introduction to Organic 
Chemistry, Stoddard. Two semester hours credit. Offered in 
1921. 

s-52-b — Organic Chemistry — One hour per day. A con- 
tinuation of s-52-a. Prerequisite s-52-a. Text: Introduction to 
Organic Chemistry, Stoddard. Two semester hours credit. 
Offered in 1922. 

s-72-a — Physical Chemistry — One hour per day. Pre- 
requisites s-12-a, s-12-b, s-22, s-52-a, and s-o2-b. Text: Outlines 
of Theoretical Chemistry, Getman. Two semester hours credit. 
Offered in 1922. 

NOTE. — No laboratory work in Chemistry will be offered- 
Where courses listed carry laboratory w^ork, full credit for the 
course will be given when such work has been successfully com- 
pleted in a college laborator}^ 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Gin'grich 

s-12 — Economic Theory — One hour per day. A course in 
Economic theory covering the work of one semester. Two se- 
mester hours credit. Offered in alternate years beginning in 1921. 

s-22 — Economic Problems — One hour per day. A study of 
practical economic problems continuing the work of Economics 
s-12, which is a prerequisite. Offered in alternate years beginning 
in 1922. Two semester hours credit. 

s-32 — Business Associations — One hour per day. A study 
of the several types of business associations, the liability of indi- 
viduals and associations engaged in business and a practical 



MT. GRETXA SUMMER SCHOOL 



13 




LIBRARY BUILDING 



consideration of modern business methods. Much time is given 
to the study of corporations. Offered in alternate years beginning 
in 1921. Economics s-12 and s-22 prerequisites. Two semester 
hours credit. 

s-42 — Uniform Business Law — One hour per day. This 
course offers a general survey of the practical phases of business 
law, emphasizing those subjects covered by uniform statutes. 
Offered in alternate years beginning in 1922. Economics s-12 
and s-22 prerequisites. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52 — Money and Banking — One hour per day. The pur- 
pose of this course is to familiarize the student with the monetary 
history of the United States, the history of banks and banking, 
the methods of banks and clearing houses, and the laws relating 
to this subject. Economics s-12 and s-22 prerequisites. Two 
semester hours credit. This course w^ill be offered only provided 
a sufficient number of students elect the same by arrangement 
with the instructor in advance of registration. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Grimm and Severance 

s-12 — History of Education— One hour per day. This 
course will be an analysis of the History of Education from the 
days of primitive man to the present day with especial emphasis 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

upon the work of Rousseau, PestalozzI, Herbart, and Froebel as 
the forerunners of modern educational theories and practices. 
Two semester hours credit. ,. 

s-32 — Principles of Secondary Education — One hour per 
day. This course will begin with an intensive study of the history 
of public education in the United States to determine the institu- 
tional origin of the American High School. The subsequent work 
will concern itself with the educational principles that energize 
our present secondary school work. Tw^o semester hours credit. 

s-62 — High School Administration — One hour per day 
The course will deal with the best ways of guiding the work of 
teachers and of pupils, so that boys and girls, on leaving school, 
may be as well fitted as possible to live their lives with the great- 
est satisfaction to themselves and to society. 

Attention will be given to the special problems of directing 
high schools in Pennsylvania. 

The work will be carried on by means of lectures, discussions, 
readings, reports and examinations. Two semester hours credit. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Beatty 

s-12 — Public Speaking — One hour per day. This is a course 
in the fundamentals of effective speaking, the structure of the 
speech, training in delivery and the presentation of selections. 
One semester hour credit. 

s-13 — Dramatic Interpretation — One hour per day. This 
is a course in the vocal interpretation of several of Shakespeare's 
plays and of several modern dramas or one act plays. If there are 
enough registrants for this course a modern play will be presented 
at the close of the session. One semester hour credit. 

s-52-a — American Literature — One hour per day. This is a 
course in the history of American Literature with special em- 
phasis on Emerson, Hawthorne and Whitman. Lectures, dis- 
cussions and assigned readings. Two semester hours credit. 

s-52-b — Revolutionary Literature — r7S9-LS25. One hour 
per day. This course covers the period of the Revolutionary and 
Romantic Writers with special emphasis on Godwin, Southey, 
Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron and Keats. Lectures and 
illustrative readings. Two semester hours credit. 

S-62 — Shakespeare — One hour per day. This is a course in 
the life and art of Shakespeare. Lectures, discussions and re- 
quired reading. Two semester hours credit. 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 15 

s-72 — The Short Story — One hour per day. This course in- 
cludes a brief history of the short story together with its charac- 
teristics as an art form. Exercises, theses and stories with dis- 
cussion and conferences. Two semester hours credit. 

s-202 — College Entrance English — One hour per day. This 
course is designed to prepare for College English. This course 
emphasizes composition and the reading of assigned classics. 
Lectures, discussion, themes and conferences. One-half unit 
credit. 

NOTE. — Other courses will be given if there is a demand for 
them. Only those courses will be given in which there are at 
least six re2:istrants. 



FRENCH 

Professor Greex 

s-a — Children's Course in Conversational French — One 

hour per day. The aim of this course is to enable children to 
understand to some extent the language when spoken, to form 
simple sentences, to memorize nursery rhymes and to play French 
games. No college credit. 

s-b — Practical Course in French Conversation and Com- 
position — One hour per day. The aim of this course is to give 
increased facility in speaking the language by means of the 
direct method. It is intended to aid those desiring to speak 
French without an intensive study of grammar. No college credit. 

s-12-a — First Year French---One hour per day. This course 
includes a drill in French pronunciation and grammar with ex- 
ercises in dictation and composition. Text: Thieme and Effinger's 
French Grammar. Course offered in 192L Two semester hours 
credit. 

s-12-b — First Year French — One hour per day. A con- 
tinuation of French s-12-a and the reading of the following: 
La Belle France and La Poudre aux yeux. Course offered in 
1922. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22-a — Second Year French — One hour per day. Ad- 
vanced Composition, dictation and the reading and interpreta- 
tion of the following classics: Madame Therese and Lectures 
Historiques. Course offered in 1921. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22-b — Second Year French — One hour per day. Con- 
tinuation of French s-22-a and the reading of the following 
classics: Standard French Authors and La Mare au diable. 
Course offered in 1922. Two semester hours credit. 





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MT. GRETXA SUMMER SCHOOL 17 

HISTORY 

Professor Shenk 

s-12 — Pennsylvania in the Federal Union — One hour per 
da>\ A course In the History of the United States, with special 
reference to the part taken by Pennsylvania in the affairs of the 
Federal Government from 1789 to the Civil War. The course is 
especlalh' adapted to meet the needs of teachers in the public 
schools of Pennsyhanla. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22 — History of Modern Europe — One hour per day. A 
study of modern European History since the French Revolution. 
Turner's Europe r7S9 to LS20 will be used as a text. Two se- 
mester hours credit. 

Other Courses in History will be offered in case a sufficient 
number of students apply. 

LATIN 

Professor Severance 

s-12 — Livy and Terence — One hour per day. 

The most important passages of Livy's Book I will be read 
rather rapidly for the story content. Matters of style will be 
lightly touched upon, and only the points of grammar necessary 
to elucidate the meaning of the text. 

The Phormio of Terence will occupy the last half of the course. 
Some attention will be given to noteworthy points in the language 
and meter of the play. Two semester hours credit. 

S-22 — Virgil — One hour per day. 

Selections from the works not usually read in secondary 
schools, chiefly from the last six books of the Aeneid. Two 
■semester hours credit. 

s-32 — Latin Composition. — One hour per day. 

Graded exercises in connected prose. A knowledge of forms 
and of syntax and some practice in turning English into Latin Is 
presupposed. Two semester hours credit. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professors Lehman and Grimm 

s-1 — Elementary and Intermediate Algebra — One hour 
per day. The course Is arranged to meet college entrance re- 
quirements. No college credit. 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

s-22 — Plane Trigonometry — One hour per day. Covers 
trigonometric functions as ratios. Proofs of the principal for- 
mulae and transformation of trigonometric expressions by means 
of these formulae. Solution of trigonometric equations, theory 
and use of logarithms and the solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles. Two semester hours credit. 

s-32 — Analytical Geometry — One hour per day. This 
course will be an intensive consideration of the graphic repre- 
sentation of algebraic expressions and will have a somewhat 
technical bent to relate itself as closely as possible to the needs 
of the technical student. Two semester hours credit. 

s-42 — Differential Calculus — One hour per day. This 
course will be an intensive study of that basic process, differen- 
tiation, and will endeavor to lay a firm foundation for a 
subsequent study of Integration. It will, therefore, be valuable 
for the student intending to pursue technical study. Two 
semester hours credit. , 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Butterwick 

s-12 — Psychology — One hour per day. Special emphasis 
will be placed upon the application of psychological laws to 
practical life and the implications of the same laws to school 
room procedure. Two semester hours credit. 

S-22 — Introduction to Philosophy — One hour per day. A 
study of representative philosophical writings. Two semester 
hours credit. 

s-52 — Ethics — One hour per day. This course will be pri- 
marily constructive and critical, and historical only in so far as 
its constructive purpose demands. Two semester hours credit. 

s-72 — Child Psychology — One hour per day. This course 
will be a presentation of the history of Child Psychology, the 
attending theories as to the nature of the Child Mind, and the 
development of these theories into the modern principles of 
Child Psychology. Two semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich 

s-12 — Constitutional Law — One hour per day. A course 
designed to give the student a working knowledge of the funda- 
mental laws of Federal and State Government. The course is 



MT. GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 19 

devoted largely to the study of leading cases. Offered in alter- 
nate years beginning in 1921. Two semester hours credit. 

s-22 — Political Science — One hour per day. A study of 
various theories of the state and the structure and province of 
government. Offered In alternate years beginning in 1922. Two 
semester hours credit. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Gingrich 

s-12 — Sociology — One hour per day. The course Is intended 
to give the student an understanding of the various theories of 
society together with the place of Sociology in the general field 
of learning. Modern social problems are considered at length. 
Two semester hours credit.