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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Lebanon Valley College 

BULLETIN 

April, 1922 

Vol. 10 {New Series) No. 1 



Fifty-Sixth 
Annual 
Catalog 
Number 



Published By 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Annville, Pa. 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at Annville, Pa„ under the act of August 24, 1912. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley192223leba 



Lebanon Valley College 


BULLETIN 


Vol. 10 (New Series) April, 1922 No. 1 


Fifty-Sixth Annual Catalog 


Number 


The First Annual Catalog was published in 


1867, making this the fifty-sixth issue and 


correcting previous errors 


PUBLISHED BY 


LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 


ANNVILLE, PA. 



Calendar 1922 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 
'5 '6 '7 8 9 10 


4 
11 


12 3 
5 '6 *7 8 9 10 


4 
11 


1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


29 30 31 


26 27 26 




26 27 28 29 30 31 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 






30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M r W T F s 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


12 


3 




1 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 




23 24 25 26 27 28 
30 31 


29 


27 28 29 30 31 . . 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 
8 9 10 11 12 13 


7 
14 


12 3 
5 '6789 10 


4 
11 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 




26 27 28 29 30 . . 




24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



Calendar 1923 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


. . 12 3 4 5 


6 


12 


3 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


28 29 30 31 . . 




25 26 27 28 . . 




25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


5 

12 


1 


2 
9 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 29 30 31 . . 




24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F 


S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 




1 
8 


.. 12 3 4 5 
7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 
13 


12 3 
'i 5 '6 7 8 9 10 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 


22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 26 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 31 . . 




25 26 27 28 29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 










30 31 . . 











COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1921-1922 

September 19-20... .Monday-Tuesday Examination and registration 

of students. 

September 21 Wednesday 9 A.M College year begins. 

September 24 Saturday 8 P.M Annual students' reception. 

November 18 Friday 8 P.M Fifty-first Anniversary Clion- 

ian Literary Society. 

November 23 Wednesday 4 P.M Thanksgiving recess begins. 

November 28 Monday 9 A.M Thanksgiving recess ends. 

December 17 Saturday 1 P.M Christmas recess begins. 

January 2 Monday 1 P.M Christmas recess ends. 

Jan. 30-Feb. 3 Monday-Friday... Mid-year examinations. 

February 6 Monday Second semester begins. 

February 22 Wednesday Washington's birthday. 

April 7 Friday 8 P.M Forty-fifth Anniversary Kalo- 

zetean Literary Society. 

April 12 Wednesday 4 P.M Easter recess begins. 

April 18 Monday 4 P.M Easter recess ends. 

May 5 Friday" 8 P.M Fifty-fifth Anniversary Phil- 

okosmian Literary Society. 

May 6 Saturday 2 P.M Annual May Day Exercises. 

June 11 Sunday 10 A.M Annual Baccalaureate Exer- 
cises. 

June 11 Sunday 8 P.M. Annual Address before the 

Christian Associations. 

June 12 Monday 11 A.M Annual meeting of the Board 

of Trustees. 

June 12 Monday 8 P.M Graduating Exercises Con- 
servatory of Music. 

June 13 Tuesday 2 P.M Annual Class Day Exercises. 

June 14 Wednesday 10 A. M... Fifty-fifth Annual Commence- 
ment. 

June 14 Wednesday 8 P.M Annual Senior Class Play. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1922-1923 

September 18-19-. Monday-Tuesday Examination and registration 

of students. 

September 20 Wednesday 9 A.M College year begins. 

September 23 Saturday 8 P.M Annual students' reception. 

November 24 Friday 8 P. M Fifty-second Anniversary Cli- 

onian Literary Society. 

November 29 Wednesday 4 P.M Thanksgiving recess begins. 

December 4 Monday 1 P.M Thanksgiving recess ends. 

December 21 Thursday 1 P.M Christmas recess begins. 

January 2 Tuesday 9 A.M Christmas recess ends. 

January 19 Friday 8 P. M Annual Junior Class Play. 

Jan. 29-Feb. 2 Moiiday-^Friday Mid-year examinations. 

February 5 Monday Second semester begins. 

February 16 Friday 8 P.M First Anniversary Delphian 

Literary Society. 

February 22 Thursday Washington's birthday. 

March 23 Friday 8 P.M Forty-sixth Anniversary Kalo- 

zetean Literary Society. 

March 28 .Wednesday 4 P.M Easter recess begins. 

April 2 Monday 4 P.M Easter recess ends. 

'May 4 Friday 8 P.M Fifty-sixth Anniversary Philo- 

kosmian Literary Society. 

May (5 Saturday 2 P.M Annual May Day exercises. 

May 30 Wednesday Decoration Day. 

June 10 Sunday 10 A.M Annual Baccalaureate Exer- 
cises. 

June 10 Sunday 8 P.M Annual Address before Y. M. 

and Y. W. C. A. 

June 11 Monday 11 A.M Annual meeting of the Board 

of Trustees. 

June 11 Monday 8 P. M Graduating Exercises Con- 
servatory of Music. 

June 12 Tuesday Alumni Day. 

June 13 Wednesday, 2 P. M. Annual Class Day Exercises. 

Wednesday 8 P. M. ...Annual Senior Class Play. 

June 14 Thursday 10 A. M. ...Fifty-Sixth Annual Com- 
mencement. 



THE CORPORATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Representative from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. J. E. Kleffman, A. B., D. D Baltimore, Md 1924 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, B. D, Ph. D Red Loin, Pa 1924 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A. B Carlisle, Pa 1924 

Rev. A. B. Statton, A. M., D. D Hagerstown, Md 1922 

Rev. P. R. Koonts, A. B ..Mechanicsburg, Pa 1922 

Rev. L. Walter Lutz, A. B., D. D Chambersburg, Pa 1922 

E. N. Funkhouser, A. B Hagerstown, Md 1923 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL. B Baltimore, Md 1923 

Rev. W. N. Beattie Greencastle, Pa 1923 

Rev. A. N. Horn, D. D Baltimore, Md 1923 

Henry Wolf, A. B Mt. Wolf, Pa 1923 

C. O. Yeatts York, Pa 1924 

Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

J. R. Engle, A. B., LL. B Palmyra, Pa 1924 

Hon. A. S. Kreider, LL., D .Annville, Pa 1924 

Rev. J. A. Lyter, A. M„ D. D Harrisburg, Pa 1924 

Rev. E. O. Burtner, A. M., D. D Palmyra, Pa 1922 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A. M., D. D Philadelphia, Pa 1922 

Rev. P. B. Gibble, A. B., B. D Baltimore, Md 1922 

Rev. I. M. Hershey, A. M, D. D Myerstown, Pa 1923 

Rev. H. E. Miller, A. M, D. D Lebanon, Pa 1923 

Rev. S. E. Rupp, D. D Harrisburg, Pa 1923 

J. R. Snvder Lebanon, Pa 1924 

C. F. Rupp Harrisburg, Pa 1924 

Representatives from Virginia Conference 

Elmer Hodges Winchester, Va 1924 

Rev. J. H. Brunk, D. D Berkley Springs, W. Va. 1924 

Rev. W. F. Gruver, D. D Martinsburg, W. Va 1923 

Rev. A. S. Hammack, D. D Davton, Va 1922 

Rev. A. J. Sechrist Churchville, Va 1923 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A. M Berkley Springs, W. Va. 1923 

Trustees at Large 

Harry Thomas Johnstown. Pa. 

A. J. Cochran Dawson, Pa. 

Jack L. Straub Lancaster, Pa. 

C. M. Coover Annville, Pa. 

J. E. Gipple Harrisburg, Pa. 

Alumni Trustees 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A. M., '01 Harrisburg, Pa 1924 

Rev. I. E. Runk, '99 Annville, Pa 1923 

A. K. Mills, A. M., '04 Annville, Pa 1922 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD 



President Hon. Aaron S. Kreidek 

Vice President E. N. Funkhouser 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 

Executive Committee 
A. S. Kreider A. B. Statton J. H. Brunk 

J. A. Lyter F. B. Plummer 

Finance Committee 

A S. Kreider G. D. Gossard E. N. Funkhouser 

T. R. Engle J. E. Gipple C. M. Coover 

Henry Wolf S. H. Derickson W. F. Gruver 

Library and Apparatus Committee 
H. E. Miller A. J. Sechrist T. B. Beatty W. M. Beattie 

Faculty Committee 
A. B. Statton S. C. Enck A. S. Hammack H. H. Baish 

Auditing Committee 
J. A. Lyter P. R. Koontz Elmer Hodges 

Grounds and Building Committee 
L. W. Lutz F. L. Stine J. N- Fries I. B. Haak S. E. Rupp 

Farm Committee 
A. N. Horn E. O. Burtner J. F. Brunk 

Publicity Committee 
H. H. Shenk I. E. Runk Elmer Hodges L. W. Lutz W- N. McFaul 

Nominating Committee 
I. E. Runk P. R. Koontz E. O. Burtner 



FACULTY 



GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 

President 

JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., Sc.D. 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy 

JAMES T. SPANGLER, A.M., B.D., D.D. 
Professor of Greek, Bible, and Religious Education 

HIRAM H. SHENK, A.M. 
Professor of History 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN DERICKSON, M.S. 
Professor of Biological Sciences 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M. 

Professor of Education and Physics 

Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B. 

Secretary of the Faculty and Professor of Political 

Science 

PAUL S. WAGNER, A.B. 
Mathematics 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

T. BAYARD BEATTY, A.M. 
Professor of English 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D. 
Professor of Philosophy and Religion 

ROSS G. FROUNICK, A.B. 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professor of Latin Language and 

Literature 

Professor of Education . 



FACULTY 



JOSEPH K. HOLLINGER, A.B. 
Physical Director and Coach 

MAY BELLE ADAMS, B.L.I. 
Professor of Oratory and Public Speaking 

EMMA R. SCHMAUK, A.B. 
Professor of French 

MRS. MARY C. GREEN 
Instructor in French and Dean of Women 

IRVIN E. RUNK, B.D, D.D. 
College Pastor 

HELEN E. MEYERS, A. B. 
Librarian 



ASSISTANTS 

MIRIAM CASSEL 
Assistant in Botany 

EFFIE M. HIBBS 
Assistant in Biology 

C. C. SMITH 
Assistant in Physics 

EARLE FAKE and PAUL NESS 
Assistants in Chemistry 

ALBERT BARNHART 
Agent of the Finance Committee 

MERTIE DAUGHERTY 

Office Stenographer 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 



Lebanon Valley College originated in the action of the East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ at its 
annual session held at Lebanon in March, 1865. Resolutions were passed 
deciding the question of establishing a higher institution of learning to 
be located within the bounds of the East Pennsylvania or of the Penn- 
sylvania Conference. One year later the committee appointed, recom- 
mended in its report: First, the establishment of a school of high grade 
under the supervision of the Church; second, to accept for this purpose 
the grounds and buildings of what was then known as the Annville 
Academy, tendered as a gift to the Conference; and, third, to lease the 
buildings and grounds to a responsible party competent to take charge of 
the school for the following year. School opened May 7, 1866, with 
forty-nine students. By the close of the collegiate year one hundred and 
fifty-one were enrolled, thus demonstrating at once the need of such an 
institution in this locality and the wisdom of the founders. 

In April, 1867, the Legislature granted a charter with full university 
privileges under which a College faculty was organized with Rev. Thom- 
as Rees Vickroy, Ph.D., as president, and Prof. E. Benjamin Bierman, 
A.M., as principal of the Normal Department. The same year the Phil- 
okosmian Literary Society was organized by the young men, additional 
land was purchased and a large brick building erected thereon with 
chapel, recitation rooms, president's office, and apartments for sixty 
boarding students. This building was not furnished and fully occupied 
till the fall of 1868. 

The first regular commencement was held June 16, 1870. About two 
years later opposition to the school manifested itself and President 
Vickroy stated in his report to the annual Conference that the attend- 
ance of students was reduced from one hundred to seventy-five, the 
cause of this diminution being persistent opposition on the part of cer- 
tain brethren. 

President Vickroy directed the affairs of the institution for five 
years, from 1866 to 1871. During his administration the charter was 
prepared and granted by the State Legislature, the laws and regulations 
for the internal workings framed and adopted, the curriculum estab- 
lished, and two classes — those of 1870 and 1871 — were graduated. In 
June, 1871, Prof. Lucian H. Hammond was elected president. During 
his term of office five classes were graduated, the Clionian Literary 
Society organized by the ladies, and the College made steady and sub- 
stantial progress, but failing health compelled him to resign in June, 
1876. 

Rev. David D. DeLong, D.D., became the third president. He found 
it necessary to reorganize the faculty and retain but two of the former 



10 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

teachers. The Kalozetean Literary Society was instituted to awaken 
interest in literary work among the young men by means of a healthy 
rivalry, and the music department was organized. In the summer of 
1883 a large two-story frame building was erected on College Avenue, 
containing an art room, music rooms, the department of natural science, 
a museum and the College library. During his presidency one hundred 
and seven students were graduated, fourteen in music and ninety-three 
in the literary department. 

After an interregnum of several months Rev. Edmund S. Lorenz, 
A.M., was elected president and took up the work with energy and 
ability. Enlargement was his motto and the friends of the College 
rallied to his support. Post graduate studies were offered. "The Col- 
lege Forum" made its appearance under the editorship of the Faculty. 
With a devotion that won the admiration of his friends, he labored 
incessantly for nearly two years to make the College the peer of any 
in the State, but under this strain his health failed and he was obliged 
to retire at the close of the collegiate year of 1889. 

The fifth president, Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, D.D., assumed the duties 
of his office at the opening of the iall term in 1889. He secured 
creditable additions to the endowment fund but because of discour- 
aging conditions declined re-election at the close of the first year. 

The question of re-locating the College agitated its constituency, 
divided its friends and greatly hindered its progress. Some were almost 
in despair, others were indifferent, while others hoped and waited for 
the best. Under these conditions the Board of Trustees met in special 
session July 28, 1890, and called Dr. E. Benjamin Bierman to the 
presidency. He was inaugurated on the evening of the sixth of Novem- 
ber following. Buildings were renovated, a large number of students 
enrolled and the Mary A. Dodge Fund of ten thousand dollars received, 
"the interest of which only is to be loaned without charge to such pious 
young people as the Faculty of the College may deem worthy of help 
as students." The Silver Anniversary of the College was celebrated 
June 15, 1892, when money was raised to purchase about three acres of 
ground to be added to the college campus. With the experience of 
twenty-five years of earnest effort to combat opposition and overcome 
errors and misconceived notions of higher education and to build up 
an institution of learning creditable to the Church of the United Breth- 
ren in Christ, the friends of the College entered upon the second quarter 
of a century with new hope and aspiration. 

President Bierman served successfully until the spring of 1897, when 
he was succeeded by Rev. Hervin U. Roop, Ph.D., who held the office 
until January 1, 1906, after which time the administration was in the 
hands of the Executive Committee and the Facultv until the election 
of Rev. A. P. Funkhouser, A.M., March 9, 1906. 

The presidency of Dr. Roop stands out as the period when the group 

"system in the College curriculum was introduced, when the athletic 

field was acquired, when the disastrous fire of December 24, 1904, 

occurred, sweeping away the Administration Building in a few hours, 



BULLETIN 11 

and when several new buildings arose on the campus — Engle Music 
Hall 1899, and the Carnegie Library and Women's Dormitory in 1904. 
The recuperative powers of the institution were put to the test by the 
destruction of the main building. At a meeting held January 5, 1905, 
the friends of the College, resolved, amid unusual enthusiasm, to rebuild 
at once and with the stimulus of a gift of fifty thousand dollars from 
Andrew Carnegie received by the President, who had previously secured 
$20,000 from the same source, plans were matured by which to raise 
one hundred thousand dollars for this purpose. The erection of three 
new buildings was projected — the Men's Dormitory, the Central Heat- 
ing Plant and the new Administration Building, the latter being com- 
pleted under the supervision of President Funkhouser, whose term of 
office is marked also by a strenuous effort to meet the debt which rose 
to ninety thousand dollars. Bonds were issued to the amount of fifty 
thousand dollars and the cooperative college circles organized to relieve 
the financial conditions. 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S. T. B., D.D., was elected president of the 
College, June 10, 1907, at the annual session of the Board of Trustees. 
He solicited $7,700 for the equipment of the Science Department, se- 
cured the Mills Scholarship of $1000 and the Immel Scholarship of 
$2,000. The debt effort authorized by the Board, June 3, 1908, was 
carried forward successfully, $50,000 having been pledged before Jan- 
uary 1, 1909, according to the condition of the pledge which also re- 
quired the continuation of the canvass to secure another $50,000 in 
order to cover the entire debt. At the death of Rev. Daniel Eberly, 
D.D., July 9, 1910, whose will bears date of September 17, 1909, the 
College came into possession of property valued at about $45,000, the 
major portion being given for the endowment of the Latin Chair. 

In June, 1912, President Keister presented his resignation to the 
Board of Trustees and in September the Rev. Dr. George D. Gossard, 
of Baltimore, Md., was elected president. He at once entered upon 
the duties of his office to which he brings conscientious devotion and 
intelligent enthusiasm. 

Plans were immediately adopted and the wheels set in motion to 
increase the effectiveness and enhance the utility of the college by ma- 
terially increasing the attendance which, as a result rose by the close 
of the 1912-1917 period to almost four hundred and fifty students. 
But the work of the college was hampered more than ever by an 
increasing shortage of funds. The cooperating conferences came to 
the rescue, but even then the new demands upon the college made it 
imperative that the educational work of the Church be given permanent 
financial aid. The outstanding feature of the present administration is 
the raising of an endowment fund of $400,000 to provide this support. 
This result, unsuccessfully sought for during the last fifty years, was 
achieved through a special campaign inaugurated December 27, 1917, 
at a joint meeting of the East Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, and Virginia 
Conferences held in the Sixth Street United Brethren church, Harris- 
burg, Pa. At this meeting the goal was fixed at $350,000, and it was 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

stipulated that the entire sum should be used for additional endow- 
ment. The month of June, 1918, was fixed as the time for the inten- 
sive campaign. The Y. M. C. A. plan of raising large funds was 
adopted and adapted to local needs. By means of an intensive organiza- 
tion of the conferences all members and other friends of the Church 
in the cooperating territory were asked to contribute to the fund. 
The campaign closed June 26, 1918, with subscriptions amounting to 
almost $400,000. 



BULLETIN 13 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The College is situated in Annville, a progressive and cultured town 
twenty-one miles east of Harrisburg in the beautiful, healthful and 
fertile Lebanon Valley. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

There are eight buildings on the campus : the Administration Build- 
ing, the Carnegie Library, the Engle Conservatory of Music, the 
Women's Dormitory, the Men's Dormitory, South Hall, the Heating 
Plant and President's Residence. 

The Administration Building contains the administration offices 
which are of fire proof construction on the first floor, the recitation 
rooms of the College, the chemical and physical laboratories, and the 
Tyrone Biological Laboratory, the equipment of which was provided 
for by a gift from a friend from western Pennsylvania. 

The Alumni Gymnasium occupies the ground floor. Here are pro- 
vided over seven thousand square feet of floor space for the use of 
the department of physical culture and the promotion of athletic activ- 
ities. The gymnasium has, in addition to the gymnasium floor, separate 
locker rooms for the teams, for the men, and for the girls, an apparatus 
room, and shower baths. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, erected in 1904, furnishes com- 
modious quarters for the growing library of the College. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted and 
ventilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the leading 
magazines and daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the special work 
of each department are here, as well as magazines of general literature. 
On the second floor are six seminar rooms designed to be equipped 
with the special works of reference for the various departments. 

THE ENGLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, erected in 1899, 
contains the college chapel, a directors' office and studio, practice 
rooms, and a large society hall. The building is well equipped with 
pianos and a large pipe organ. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY, NORTH HALL, was erected in 
1905, and is a building of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms 
which will accommodate forty-five students, there are a society hall, 
a dining hall, a well-equipped kitchen, and laundry. 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY, erected in 1905, contains single and 
double rooms and sixteen suites of two bed-rooms with a separate 
study-room. These afford accommodations for more than one hundred 
students. 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY, SOUTH HALL, the original 
building of the institution, acquired by gift in 1866, when the College 
was founded, has been re-modeled and is now used as a women's 
dormitory. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, contains a low pressure 
heating system, and supplies the heat for all the buildings on the cam- 
pus. It is constructed with a view to the installation of a lighting plant. 

THE PRESIDENT'S RESIDENCE, is situated on the northwest 
corner of the campus. 

THE CAMPUS of twelve acres, occupies a high point in the center 
of Annville and is within easy access of trolley and railroad lines. 

THE ATHLETIC FIELD of five and one-half acres is well located 
and admirably adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. 

LABORATORIES 

The entire northern half of the Administration Building is occupied 
by the Departments of Science. The Department of Chemistry occu- 
pies the first floor; Physics, the second; and Biology, the third. 

The laboratories of each department are constructed after the most 
approved modern methods. The lecture rooms are provided with risers 
and Columbia tablet chairs. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The College has always tried to furnish religious training, and en- 
courages all means of promoting Christian influence. Each morning 
a regular service is held in the College Chapel, at which the students 
are required to be present. 

A students' prayer-meeting is held once a week, and opportunities for 
Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian Associations 
in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

All resident students of the College are expected to attend public 
worship in the churches of their choice, every Sunday. 

Christian The College has Young Men's and Young Women's 

Associations Christian Associations, which hold regular weekly de- 
votional services and conduct special courses of Bible 
and mission study. They are centers of the spiritual interests of the 
students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with the college. 
Under these auspices public lectures, entertainments and socials are 
held, which contribute to the pleasure of the student body. 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

Literary Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and 

Societies parliamentary training are afforded by the societies 

of the College. There are four of these societies — 

Philokosmian, Kalozetean, Clionian, Delphian, the last two are sus- 



BULLETIN 15 

tained by the young ladies. They meet every Friday evening in their 
well-furnished halls for literary exercises. These societies are con- 
sidered valuable agencies in college work, and students are advised to 
unite with one of them. 

Athletic The Athletic Association is composed of all the stu- 

Association dents of the College and the cooperating Alumni. 
Athletics are controlled by a Council consisting of ten 
members as follows : — three faculty members appointed by the Presi- 
dent; three Alumni members appointed by the Alumni members of the 
Athletic Association ; three Undergraduates elected by the undergrad- 
uate members of the Athletic Association, and the Athletic Editor of 
"The Crucible." The Graduate Manager and the Coach are ex officio 
members of the Council without a vote. 

The Mathematical The Mathematical Round Table is an organization 
Round Table of the students of the College who are interested 

in mathematical studies. Its object is to create 
interest in and love for the "exact science." Its meetings are held on 
the last Wednesday evening of each month. Papers on mathematical 
history and biography are read and discussed. Current events in the 
mathematical world and papers on various mathematical subjects make 
the meetings very interesting and helpful. 

STUDENT PUBLICATION 

A group of students possessing ability in management and composi- 
tion are nominated by the Faculty to publish, semi-monthly, "The 
Crucible-" This student publication affords training of a highly special- 
ized character to a number of students interested in editorial work. 

LITERARY AND MUSICAL ADVANTAGES 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of hearing 
lectures and talks delivered by men of note in Church and literary circles. 

The department of music together with the department of public 
speaking presents a number of programs during the year. Concerts 
and recitals by prominent musicians are given under the patronage of 
the Department of Music with the aim of creating in the student an 
appreciation for the best in art. 

There is a lively interest in the drama. Various college organizations 
have presented Shakespearean and other plays of a high grade. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Advisers The following are the advisers for the students in each of 
the four groups in which courses of instruction are offered: 
For the Classical group, Prof. Spangler ; for the Science group, Pro- 
fessor Derickson ; for the Historical-Political, Professor Gingrich ; for 
the Modern Language, Professor Beatty ; Professor Wagner is adviser 
to all Freshmen. The adviser's approval is necessary before a student 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

may register for or enter upon any course of study, or discontinue any 
work. He is the medium of communication between the Faculty and 
the students of his group, and, in a general way, stands to his students 
in the relation of a friendly counselor. 

Discipline The rules of the College are as few and simple as the 
proper regulation of a community of young men and women 
will permit. The government of the dormitories is under the imme- 
diate control of the student councils, committees of students authorized 
by the College authorities. 

Classification Every student residing in the dormitory must take at 
least fifteen hours of work as cataloged. Any stu- 
dent failing to pass ten (10) hours of work at the close of each 
semester will be required to withdraw from the institution. 

The maximum number of hours, conditioned, permitted for senior 
standing is four; for junior standing, six; for sophomore standing, 
six ; for freshman standing, six. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work, above that prescribed 
by the curriculum, is limited by the student's previous record, as fol- 
lows : 

(a) Majority of A's — three hours. 

(b) Lower record than majority of A's — no extra hours. 

No students will be given credit for more than forty-fou A - semester 
hours in any twelve months. 

Credits for work done in other institutions, for which advanced 
standing is desired, must be submitted to the committee on College 
Credits and a copy filed with the Registrar. 

Class Standing Reports of standing will be made to parents or 
guardian at the end of each term when desired by 
them, or when the Faculty deems it expedient. The standing is indi- 
cated generally by classification in six groups, as follows : 

A (90-100%) signifies that the record of the student is distin- 
guished. 

B (80-90%) signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C (70-80%) signifies that the record is good. 

D (60-70%) signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (below 60%) imposes a condition on the student. 

Failing to make up a condition at an appointed time is equal to a 
record of F. 

F (failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subject and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to 
repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year's work, or to withdraw. 

Admission Students wishing to enter Lebanon Valley College must 
present credits from high schools, normal schools, and 
academies before the time of matriculation. Blanks for such credits 
may be had on application to the Registrar. 



BULLETIN 17 

Registration The registration days for the collegiate year 1922-1923 
are as follows : September 18, 19, 20, and Monday and 
Tuesday, February 5 and 6, of the second semester. Students registering 
later than the days specified will be charged a fee of one dollar. 

Registration is not complete until the Registrar has affixed his signa- 
ture to the matriculation card and a copy of same has been filed with 
the Registrar. 

Absences Should a student be absent once beyond the number of 
times a class meets each week, he will be required to take 
a special examination, for which a fee of one dollar will be charged. 
Such examination must be taken within a week of the excess absence; 
otherwise the student will lose his class standing. Absences immediately 
preceding or following vacation will be counted double cuts. 

Chapel All students are required to attend the morning chapel 

service. Failure to attend will be ground for action by 
the Faculty upon recommendation of the Committee on Chapel At- 
tendance. 

Limitations Students are limited to two of the following college 
activities : Quittapahilla, Glee Club, Plays, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball and Base Ball. This regulation can be set aside only by a 
special action of the faculty. 

No games between college organizations may be engaged in during 
study hours except by permission of the Faculty. 

Degree and The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 

Diploma is conferred by a vote of the Board of Trustees on 

recommendation of the Faculty, upon students who 

have satis factorily completed 138 semester hours of work in any of 

the groups. 

The Bachelor's degree will, however, be conferred only upon candi- 
dates who have spent at .least a full year in actual residence. 

GRADUATE WORK 

The College will accept candidates for the Master's degree subject 
to the following considerations : 

(1) That when an applicant seeks the Master's degree in one jot, 
the entire year be spent in residence. "00 

(2) That when an applicant prefers to do the work designated for 
the degree in non-residence, at least two years be devoted to the pursuit 
of the course, and not more than five years. 

(3) That fourteen year-hours be required for the degree — six hours 
of minor subjects and eight hours of major subjects, four of which 
shall be devoted to research work in connection with the required thesis. 

(4) That no arrangement will be made to do this work by corre- 
spondence. 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

(5) That students pursuing undergraduate courses for the Master's 
degree must maintain a grade of eighty-five percent (85%) in all such 
courses. 

(6) That the registration fee be the same as the annual matricula- 
tion fee. 

(7) That the tuition for the work done outside the regular college 
classes shall be arranged for with the teachers concerned. 

(8) That the tuition fee for work done in the regular undergraduate 
classes shall be four dollars ($4) per semester hour; the Registrar's 
fee for work done outside the regular college classes shall be two and 
one half dollars ($2.50) per hour; the additional fee for work done 
outside the regular college classes to be arranged for with the teachers 
concerned. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

The College offers a limited number of one hundred and forty dollar 
free tuition scholarships, $70 a year for two years, to honor graduates 
of the State Normal Schools and approved High Schools and Acad- 
emies. 

The College also offers a free tuition scholarship of $70 a year for 
two years to a literary graduate of Shenandoah Collegiate Institute, 
Dayton, Va. The recipient of that scholarship will be determined by 
Lebanon Valley College. 

Honor graduates of preparatory schools who have conditions may 
be allowed to make them up in the freshman year. If the first 
semester's work shows a majority of A's and nothing less than B in 
all work including conditions, a scholarship may be awarded. 

Students preparing for the ministry in the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ and having quarterly or annual conference license 
to preach, will be entitled to $100.00 tuition in the college on certain 
conditions. 

The Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $1,000, is available. 

The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $3,000, is available "for young 
men in college who are preparing for the ministry in the Church of 
the United Brethren in Christ." 

The Eliza Bittinger Eberly Fund 

This fund consists of the income of a farm located near East Berlin, 
Adams County, Pa. 

The Daniel Eberly Fund 

This fund is available and is to be loaned to worthy students seeking 
an education in college. 



BULLETIN 19 

The Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $1,300 in memory of Rev. H. C 
Phillips, given by his wife and daughter, is available for young men 
preparing for the ministry. 

The Mary A. Dodge Fund 

The income from this fund is loaned to worthy students. 

The Charles B. Rettew Scholarship 

This scholarship in Bonebrake Theological Seminary is limited to 
students from the East Pennsylvania Conference, who are graduates 
from Lebanon Valley College. 

The Dr. Henry B. Stehman Fund 

This fund has been provided by Dr. Henry B. Stehman to help 
needy ministerial students. This fund is awarded by the President of 
the College. 

Elizabeth A. Mower Scholarship Fund 

This fund was provided by a gift of $200 from Miss Elizabeth A. 
Mower, the income of which is to be used to help a needy student. 

SCHOLARSHIPS SECURED DURING THE RECENT 
ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN 

The following is a list of Scholarship Funds which were subscribed 
during the endowment campaign to raise at least $350,000 and the 
recent Interchurch drive. This will all be paid by October, 1922. At 
present only a part of these funds is available. 

The Biological Scholarship $3,010.00 

The Medical Scholarship 825.00 

The Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The S. F. Engle Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Mary C. Bixler Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

The Otterbein Sunday School, Harrisburg, Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

The Henry C. and Anna S. Kaufman and Family Scholarship 

Fund „ 1,000.00 

The Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund (1st, 2nd, and 3rd funds).... 6,500.00 

The Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 3,366.00 

The G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



EXPENSES 

Matriculation 

The Matriculation fee in the College is $12.00. This fee is not sub- 
ject to refund, nor is there any rebate allowed for any reason. 

Special students who take less than half work in the regularly ap- 
pointed classes, or any student who takes work outside of regular 
recitation periods, is required to pay matriculation according to the 
number of studies taken. 

Oratory students who are not matriculated in the College are re- 
quired to pay an enrollment fee of one dollar. 

Matriculation for Music ranges from one dollar to eight dollars. No 
additional fee is required for music from students who have already 
matriculated for College departments. 

Tuition 

For twenty hours or less in the College the annual tuition is $125.00. 
$3.25 per semester is charged for each additional hour of work taken 
in regular classes, or for each semester hour of work for which credit 
is allowed, taken outside of regular college recitation periods. Credit 
can be allowed only when the work has been taken under instructors 
approved by the Executive Committee. 

Ministers' children in the College department are entitled to a rebate 
on full tuition of $50.00 respectively. Scholarships do not cover the 
tuition for extra work taken. 

\ 
Laboratory Fees 

To cover the cost of materials used in the Laboratories, the follow- 
ing fees are charged. 

Tyrone Biological Laboratory 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Biologv 1 $6.00 $6.00 

Biology 2 6.00 6.00 

Biology 3 6.00 6.00 

Biology 4 6.00 6.00 

Biology 5 6.00 6.00 

Chemical Laboratory 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

Chemistry 1 $ 8.00 $ 8.00 

Chemistry 2 8.00 8.00 

Chemistry 3 8.00 8.00 

Chemistry 4 6.00 6.00 

Chemistry 5 12.00 12.00 

Chemistry 7 4.00 4.00 

Chemistry 8 2.00 2.00 



BULLETIN 21 

Breakage Fees Deposit in Chemistry 1922-1923 — Chemistry 1, $3; 
Chemistry 2, $4; Chemistry 3, $4; Chemistry 4, $4; Chemistry 5. $5. 

All breakage in the Chemical laboratory will be charged against the 
individual student and any balance of the above deposits due the student 
at the completion of his course will be returned or credited to his 
account and any debit beyond his deposit will be charged to his regular 
college account. 

Physics Laboratory 

First Second, 
Semester Semester 

Physics 1 $5.00 $5.00 

Physics 2 and 3 5.00 5.00 

All breakage will be charged against the student in each department. 
There will be no refund of laboratory fees. 

If chemicals and laboratory supplies advance in price, there will be 
a corresponding increase in the laboratory fees. 

Boarding 

The domestic department is in charge of a skilled and competent 
chef. Plain, substantial and palatable food especially adapted to the 
needs of the student is provided. The kitchen is furnished with the 
most modern equipment and all the food is prepared in the most 
sanitary manner. 

The boarding rate for the school term 1922-1923 is $200.00. Stu- 
dents who stop school during the school term will be required to pay 
board at the rate of $6.50 per week during their stay in school. A 
rebate of forty dollars is allowed for five-day students. These rates 
do not include Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter vacations. 

If foodstuffs advance in cost, there will be a corresponding increase 
in boarding rates. 

All students who do not room and board at their homes are required 
to room and board in the college unless special permission be obtained 
from the Executive Committee to do otherwise. Students refusing to 
comply with this regulation forfeit their privileges as students in the 
College. 

Room Rent 

Room rent varies from $32.00 to $75.00 except when double rooms 
are assigned to only one student, then the occupant will pay the regular 
rent for two. A deposit fee of $5.00 is required when a room is re- 
served. This fee will be deducted from the second half year's payment. 

When five or more day students occupy one room, then the rate to 
each occupant is $22.50 and must be paid at the opening of the school 
year, and there will be no refund. 

For every additional light temporarily installed in any dormitory 
room there will be an extra charge of $3.00 to the occupants of the 
room. Only 40 watt lamps are allowed. One lamp is furnished free 
at the opening of school. 

Occupants of a room are held responsible for all breakage and loss 
of furniture or any loss whatever for which the student is responsible. 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

In the Men's Dormitories rooms will be furnished with a bed, chairs, 
and one table for each occupant. Students must furnish their own 
carpets, towels, napkins, soap, and all other necessary furnishings. 

Estimated Expenses 

The minimum expense for men is $369 and for women $363. The 
maximum expense for a full course in L. V. C. for one year, exclusive 
of laboratory fees, books and personal expenses, is $412 for men and 
$406 for women. 

Graduation Fee 

Sixty days prior to Commencement, candidates for degrees are re- 
quired to pay the following fees : 

Students graduating in the College $15.00; in Music $13.00; those 
receiving certificates in Music $8.00. 

REGULATIONS 

Matriculation fee must be paid at the time of enrollment. 

Laboratory fees must be paid at the beginning of each Semester. 

The regular College expenses which include Tuition, Room Rent, 
and Boarding are divided into four equal installments : One-fourth is 
due September 20, one-fourth on November 20, one-fourth on February 
5; and one-fourth on April 11. These bills are due on the day they 
are issued and must be paid within ten days. 

When a student leaves school or the boarding hall for any other 
reason than sickness, he shall pay board at the rate of $6.50 per week, 
without any rebate or refund, except when ordered otherwise by the 
Finance Committee of the College. 

Satisfactory settlement for all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal can be granted and before grades are recorded or 
given to the student. 

Students who are candidates for Diplomas or Certificates must make 
full settlement entirely satisfactory to the Finance Committee before 
diplomas or certificates will be sealed and delivered. 

ABSENCE AND SICKNESS 

When students retain their class standing during absence from school 
because of sickness or for any other reason, no rebate or refund will 
be allowed on tuition, or room rent. 

In case of sickness which occasions loss of class standing, a reason- 
able rebate or refund will be allowed on tuition. 

When a student is absent from school more than two weeks in suc- 
cession because of sickness, and retains his room during the time of 
absence, then a rebate of $4.00 per week will be allowed for all absence 
exceeding the two weeks. Reductions cannot be allowed for athletic, 
glee club, or banquet trips. 



BULLETIN 23 

AID TO STUDENTS 

Help is extended annually to a limited number of students, but only 
to those pursuing full courses in the College. This help is given in 
the form of Merit Scholarships, Ministerial Scholarships, Waiterships, 
Janitorships, Tutorships, or Library work. All of this help is extended 
or given only upon the condition that the recipient proves loyal to the 
school and complies with all the rules and regulations of the College. 

A student forfeits the privilege of a scholarship or other help from 
the school when his average grade falls below passing standards or 
when in any way he refuses to cooperate with the College, or when 
he disregards the regulations of the institution. 

Students rooming in Dormitories and boarding at the College Dining 
Hall will be given preference when work of various kinds is assigned. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted to Freshman standing in Lebanon Valley 
College on the following plans : 

I Admission by Certificate. The following classes of candidates 
are admitted to Freshman standing on presentation of certificates 
signed by the proper authorities showing the kind and amount of work 
done : 

1. Graduates from any four-year high school course approved by 
the Pennsylvania State Department of Education. 

2. Graduates from any four-year course of a school accredited by 
the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle 
States and Maryland, or by the State University of the state in which 
the school is located. 

Such certificates must represent a total of at least \A l / 2 units of work 
and must meet the requirements outlined on pages 26 and 27 of this 
catalog. 

A unit represents the work of a school year of no less than thirty-six 
weeks, with five periods of at least forty-five minutes each per week, 
or four periods of one hour each per week. A unit, therefore, is the 
equivalent of one hundred and eighty recitation periods of forty-five 
minutes each, or one hundred and forty-four periods of one hour each. 

Blank entrance credit certificates will be furnished upon application 
to the Registrar. 

II Admission by Examination. Candidates not presenting ap- 
proved certificates may be admitted upon examination. Examinations 
will be given upon the work covered by the list of secondary subjects 
approved by the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of 
the Middle States and Maryland. Candidates for admission by examina- 
tion must meet the same specific requirements as those for admission 
by certificate. 



24 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Outline of Requirements for Admission to Groups Leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree 

The following is an outline of the requirements for admission to the Fresh- 
man class of Lebanon Valley College. Of these eleven and one-half units are 
required as specified and three units may be elected. 



GROUP I 
English 


English 


Three units required 


GROUP II 
Mathematics 


Elementary Algebra 1 unit 
Intermediate Algebra Yz unit 
Plane Geometry 1 unit 
Solid Geometry Yz unit 
Plane Trigonometry Y* unit 


Two and one-half 
units required, one of 
which must be Plane 
Geometry. 


GROUP III 
Foreign 
Languages 


Latin 4 units 
German 2 units 
French 2 units 
Greek 2 units 
Spanish 1 unit 
Italian 1 unit 


Fi\e units required. 


GROUP IV 
Physical 
Sciences 


Physical Geogr. Yi or 1 unit 
Physics 1 unit 
Chemistry / 2 or 1 unit 


Physics required. 
Chemistry required 
only for students in- 
tending to take 
Science Group. 


GROUP V 
Biological 
Sciences 


Botany 1 unit 
Zoology 1 unit 
Physiology 1 unit 


Elective. 


GROUP VI 
History, Etc. 


Greek and Roman 1 unit 
Medieval and Modern 1 unit 
English 1 unit 
Civic? Yz unit 
Economics Yi unit 


One unit required. 


GROUP VII 


One unit of credit may be 
given for subjects not men- 
tioned in the above groups at 
the discretion of the College 
Committee on credits. 





In case the requirements of a given Group are not fully met by the fourteen 
and one-half units elected, the studies necessary for such requirements must be 
taken in place of an elective in the regular college course. For example, if a 
student presents three units of Latin and two of German for admission to a 
Group requiring four units of Latin, he must include in his college course the 
equivalent of the fourth unit of Latin. 



BULLETIN 



25 



Outline of Requirements for Admission to Groups Leading to the 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

The following is an outline of the requirements for admission to the Fresh- 
man class of Lebanon Valley College. An aggregate of fourteen and one-half 
units must be offered by the candidate or admission. Of these twelve units are 
required as specified and two and one-half units may be elected. 



Group I 
English 


English 


3 units 


Three units required 


GROUP II 


Elementary Algebra 


1 unit 


Three units required 


Mathematics 


Intermediate Algebra 


y 2 unit 


one- 


lalf unit of 




Plane Geometry 


1 unit 


whic 


h must be Solid 




Solid Geometry 


Yz unit 


Geometry. 




Plane Trigonometry 


y 2 unit 






GROUP III 


Latin 


4 untis 


Two 


units required. 


Foreign 


French 


3 units 






Languages 


German 
Greek 
Spanish 
Italian 


3 units 

3 units 

1 unit 

1 unit 






GROUP IV 


Physics 


1 unit 


Two 


units required. 


Physical 


Chemistry 


1 unit 






Sciences 










GROUP V 


Botany 


1 unit 


One 


unit required. 


Biological 


Zoology 


1 unit 






Sciences 










GROUP VI 


Greek and Roman 


1 unit 


One 


unit required. 


History, Etc. 


Medieval and Modern 1 unit 








English 


1 unit 








Civics 


Yz unit 








Economics 


i/2 unit 






GROUP VII 


One unit of credit 


may be 








given for subjects not men- 








tioned in the above groups at 








the discretion of the 


College 








Committee on credits. 







In case the requirements of a given Group are not fully met by the fourteen 
and one-half units elected, the studies necessary for such requirements must be 
taken in place of an elective in the regular college course. For example, if a 
student presents three units of Latin and two of German for admission to a 
Group requiring four units of Latin, he must include in his college course the 
equivalent of the fourth unit of Latin. 



26 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



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30 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Lehman 

13. General Astronomy — Three hours. First Semester. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Reports on assigned readings. 
Important constellations and star groups are studied. 

A fine four-and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope adds to the interest 
of the subject. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

BIBLE 

Professor Spangler 

14. Bible History. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the main facts 
of Bible history. The historical books of the Bible are studied, together 
with such collateral material as is necessary to make the historical fea- 
tures clear and defined. 

24. Institutions and Ideals of the Bible. Two hours. Thruout 
the year. 

This course is complementary to course 1, which furnishes the his- 
torical background for the survey of the Bible from the institutional 
and ideal viewpoints. The book of Genesis is viewed as foundational ; 
and the Hebrew commonwealth and the Christian church are treated 
as the supreme institutions, in subordination to which the several social 
institutions and ideals are set forth. 

34. Prophecy and Doctrines. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

An elective course for Juniors and Seniors. This is a devotional 
study of prophecy, including the historical setting and the predictive 
elements of several of the prophetic books and certain prophecies, to- 
gether with their doctrinal implications. 

The textbook for all the courses is the American Standard version 
of the Bible, Topical Helps Edition. 

42. Bible Psychology and Education. Two hours. First Semes- 
ter. 

52. Religious Education. Two hours. Second Semester. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Derickson 
18. General Biology — Four hours. Thruout the year. 
Three lectures or recitations and one laboratory period of two hours 
each week. 



BULLETIN 31 

The object of the course is to acquaint the student with the essential 
structures and processes of living things. 

Types of plants and animals are studied in the laboratory to illustrate 
the structure, properties, and activities of living protoplasm as mani- 
fested in individuals composed of a simple cell, of tissues, and of sys- 
tems of organs. The principles of development, homology, classifica- 
tion, adaptation, evolution and heredity are considered. 

The course is fundamental and it or its equivalent is required for 
admission to all other courses in Biology. 

Required of Sophomores in all courses. Elective for others. 

28. *Botany — Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods of two 
hours each, per week. The object of the course is to give to the 
student a broad, general knowledge of the plant kingdom. The form, 
structure, and functioning of one or more types of each of the divi- 
sions of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and flowering plants 
are studied. Special attention is given to the ontogeny and phylogeny 
of the several groups suggestive of evolution. 

Experiments are performed in the laboratory to determine some of 
the relations of plants to water, gravitation, temperature, and light. 
Several types of seeds are studied as to their structure, germination, 
and development. The principles of classification are learned by the 
analysis and identification of representatives of at least twenty-five 
orders of spermatophytes. 

The Laboratory and class-room work is supplemented by frequent 
field trips. 

Each student is supplied with a compound microscope, dissecting in- 
struments, note, and drawing materials. 

38. *Zoology. Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three lectures and two laboratory periods of two hours each, per 
week. 

The principles of biology are learned by making a careful comparative 
study of representatives of several phyla of animals. The amoeba, 
euglena, Paramecium, vorticella, sponge, hydra, starfish, earthworm, 
crayfish, grasshopper, mussel, amphioxus, and frog are studied. A 
careful study is made of the embryology of the frog. The process of 
development is closely watched from the segmenting of the egg until 
metamorphosis takes place. Each student is taught the principles of 
technic by preparing and sectioning embryos at various stages of de- 
velopment. From these and other microscopic preparations the de- 
velopment of the internal organ and origin of tissues are studied. This 
is followed by an histological study of the tissues of the adult frog. 

Each student is required to keep a record of all work done in the 
laboratory in carefully prepared notes and drawings. 

Texts : — Hegner's College Zoology, Holm's The Frog. 



*Biology 2 and Biology 3 are given in alternate years. Biology 2 will be 
given in 1922-1923. 



32 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

48. fComparative Vertebrate Anatomy — Four hours. Thruout 
the year. Six hours laboratory work and two conferences each week. 

The course consists of the disfcection and thorn study of a 
suctorial fish, a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, an amphibian, a reptile, 
a bird, and a mammal. Carefully labeled drawings are required of 
each student as a record of each dissection. 

Text-books : — Pratt's Vertebrate Zoology, Kingsley's Text-book of 
Vertebrate Zoology. 

58. fVertebrate Histology and Embryology — Four hours. 

Histology — Two conferences and six hours of laboratory work per 
week. The normal histology of the mammalian body is made the basis 
of the class work. Each student is required to acquire a practical 
knowledge of all phases of histological technic. 

All the tissues as well as the structure of all of the organs of the 
body are studied. Each student prepares about one hundred and fifty 
slides. 

Text-book : — A Manual of Histology and Organography, Hill. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

Embryology — Second week in March to the end of the year. Two 
lectures and six hours of laboratory work per week. The laboratory 
work is based on the development of the chick and comparisons made 
with that of the frog and mammal. A study is made of living embryos 
at various stages of development. These are later killed, prepared, and 
sectioned by the student for the study of the development of the in- 
ternal organs. Fully labeled drawings are required. 

Text-book: — Chordate Development, Kellicott. 

Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Bender and Assistants 

The Department of Chemistry offers to such students as do not 
intend entering the chemistry or engineering professions such a grasp 
of the fundamentals of the science as is needed by the modern intelli- 
gent citizen. For those intending to enter chemistry as a profession 
or to enter professions of which chemistry makes up a vital part the 
department aims to cover the ground and to offer the best training 
that modern methods in chemistry afford. Students completing the 
work offered by the department should be able to meet all require- 
ments that the industries demand of undergraduate chemists. 

18. General Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours thruout the year. 
Two demonstration lectures, one recitation and one three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. 

A thoro and systematic treatment of the fundamental principles 
of the science and their application. The elements, their classifications 
and compounds are studied in detail. While the course prepares the 
student for the courses that follow, the needs of the student who will 

t Biology 4 and Biology 5 are given in alternate years. Biology 5 will be 
given in 1922-1 023. 





s- 

81 

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■: ■ ■■ ■'. - . ■,'.,'.. 




BULLETIN 33 

pursue the subject no farther are kept in mind. Consequently a broader 
field is covered than that offered by the average text-book in general 
chemistry. 

Text-book: — Smith's General Chemistry for Colleges, New Edition. 

Laboratory Manual : — Smith's Laboratory Outline of College Chem- 
istry. 

28. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours. Thruout the year. Two 
lectures or recitations and six hours of laboratory work per week. The 
theories and principles of analytical chemistry are studied. 

The course includes a study of the systematic methods of separating 
and detecting all of the ordinary metals and acid radicles. The labora- 
tory work includes the analysis .of about thirty solutions and 
solids varying in complexity from simple salts to complex insoluble 
artificial mixtures. 

Text-book: — Stieglitz's Qualitative Chemical Analysis. 

Laboratory Manual : — A. A. Noyes' Qualitative Chemical Analysis. 

38. Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. Thruout the year. One 
lecture or recitation and nine hours of laboratory work per week. A 
study of the methods and principles of quantitative analysis and chem- 
ical calculations. 

The laboratory work includes simple introductory determinations, 
acidimetry, alkalimetry, partial analysis of copper, iron, lead, zinc, and 
manganese ores, analysis of coal, alloys, limestone, cement and silicate 
rock, electrolytic analysis, gas analysis, and a few organic analyses 
including fertilizers, milk and butter. 

Text-books : — Mahin's Quantitative Analysis with frequent reference 
to other works. Whitely's Chemical Calculations. 

48. Organic Chemistry. Four hours. Thruout the year. Two 
hours lectures and recitations and six hours of laboratory work per 
week. 

Classification and type reactions are emphasized rather than the 
consideration of specific compounds. The sources of organic materials 
are considered as well as the prominence of organic chemistry in modern 
industry. Dyes, medicinals, disinfectants, explosives as well as the 
chemistry of foods and their relations to nutrition are considered as 
thoroughly as time permits. The laboratory work consists of about 
sixty experiments covering the preparation and study of a wide range 
of representative compounds. Prerequsite, Chemistry 18. 

Text-book : — Stoddard's Introduction to Organic Chemistry. 

Laboratory Manual : — Fisher's Laboratory Manual of Organic Chem- 
istry. 

54. Physical Chemistry. Two hours. Thruout the year. Lec- 
tures and conferences. Prerequisite courses — Chemistry 18, 28, 38 and 
48 and Mathematic 43 and 53. 

Text-book : — Washburn's Principles of Physical Chemistry. 
63. Industrial Chemistry. Two hours. Thruout the year. Not 
offered in 1922-23. 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Gingrich 

13 and 23. General Economics. Three hours. Thruout the year. 

An introductory course including a careful study of the fundamental 
principles of the existing economic order; an outline of the develop- 
ment of economic thought; and a consideration of modern economic 
problems. 

Carver : — Principles of National Economy. 

33. Business Finance. Three hours. First semester. 

A study of the several types of business associations; the law gov- 
erning company promotion and finance ; the liability of individuals and 
combinations engaged in business; securities; budgets; and the manage- 
ment and exploitation of corporations. 

Lough : — Business Finance. 

43. Money and Banking. Three hours. Second semester. 

A course dealing with the nature and functions of money; banking 
and monetary systems; credit; domestic and foreign exchange; gov- 
ernment paper money; and a brief history of banking at home and 
abroad. 

Holdsworth : — Money and Banking. 

56. Uniform Business Law. Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The course is a general survey of the field of business law, em- 
phasizing subjects covered by uniform statutes. 

Bush: — Uniform Business Lazv. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Grimm and Butterwick 

14. History of Education — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

A study of the pedagogical theories and practices, from the early days 
of China to the present. Especial attention given to the educational 
work of Pestalozzi, Herbart, and Froebel. 

Text-book : — Monroe's Text-book in the History of Education. 

22. School Management and School Law — Two hours. Second 
semester. 

A consideration of the problems involved in a class management and 
in school supervision. Investigation of the development of the public 
schools of the State of Pennsylvania, and a careful study of the present 
legal provision for the control and support of education in this com- 
monwealth. 

34. Secondary Education — Two hours. Thruout the year. 
This course deals primarily with the American High School of today — 

its relation to the earlier Academies and English Grammar schools and 
its growth since the Civil War. Some attention will be given to the 
history of secondary schools in Europe. 

The course will consist of two parts: (1) The general problem of 
the high school, and (2) the high school curriculum. 



BULLETIN 33 

Surveys of at least one ungraded and one graded school must be 
made and reported by each member of the class. 

Text-books : — Cubberley's A History of Public Education in the United 
States; Inglis' Principles of Secondary Education. 

42. Philosophy of Education. Two hours. Second semester. 

In this course attention is given to the entire field of educational 
truth with a view of unifying into a consistent whole the several aspects 
of education. 

Offered 1921, 1923. 

52. Psychology of Education. Two hours Second semester. 

This course' aims to lay scientific foundations for the art of teaching, 
so far as those foundations have to do with psychology. 

Offered 1922, 1924. 

62. Child Psychology. Two hours. First semester. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Beatty, Misses Adams and Meyers 

14. Theory and Practice of English Composition. Two hours. 
Thruout the year. Required of all college freshmen. 

The aim of this course is to improve the student's ability to convey 
information, to present ideas consecutively, and to be persuasive. The 
first semester is devoted to the composition of ideas; the second semes- 
ter emphasizes the composition of images. 

Texts: — Baldwin's College Composition; Lomer and Ashman's Study 
and Practice of Writing English. 

12. Public Speaking. One hour. Thruout the year. Required 
of all college freshmen. This course is in conjunction with 14. 

This course aims to give the student practice in the fundamentals of 
oral expression, and drill in the interpretation and delivery of orations 
and other forms of literature. 

26. History of English Literature. Three hours. Thruout the 
year. Required of all college sophomores. 

This course is a survey course covering the period of English Litera- 
ture from the Anglo-Saxon to the present. 

Texts : — Fletcher's History of English Literature; Century Selections 
of Readings in English Literature. 

32. Advanced Public Speaking. One hour. Thruout the year. 
Open to those who have completed 14 and 12. This course is in con- 
junction with 34. 

This course is a further study of the principles of oral expression, 
with special emphasis on extemporaneous speaking from assigned sub- 
jects, the preparation and delivery of occasional speeches and original 
orations. 

34. Advanced Composition. Two hours. Thruout the year. 
Open to those who have completed English 12 and English 14. 

This course aims to familiarize the student with the types of exposi- 
tory writing and the special feature article. 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Texts : — Curl's Expository Writing; Bleyer's How to Write Special 
feature Articles. 

42. Social Ideals of the late Seventeenth and Eighteenth Cen- 
turies. Two hours. First Semester. Required of all Historical- 
Political Group students. 

This course aims to give a somewhat intensive study of the Litera- 
ture, from the Restoration to the Revolutionary Period (1789-1832). 

Text: — Gosse's History of English Literature (18th Cen.) 

512. Revolutionary Literature, 1798-1832. Two hours. Second 
Semester. Required of all Historical-Political students. 

This covers the period from Burke to Scott with special emphasis 
on the poets, Southey, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron and Keats. 

Text: — Saintsbury's History of English Literature (19th Cen.) 

522. American Literature. Two hours. Second semester. Re- 
quired of all Historical-Political Group students. 

This course alternates with the Revolutionary Literature course and 
therefore will be offered during 1922-23. 

66. Shakespeare and the Drama. Three hours. Thruout the 
year. Required of all students in the Modern Language Group. 

By lectures the development of the drama is traced from the begin- 
ning to the closing of the theatres in 1642. The development of 
Shakespeare as a dramatic artist is traced by a study of each play 
with a careful reading of at least ten plays. Various tendencies are 
traced through the Restoration Drama to the present. 

Texts: — Neilson's The Chief Elizabethan Dramatists; Tupper's Rep- 
resentative English Dramas from Dryden to Sheridan. 

72. The Short Story. Two hours. First semester. Required 
in the Modern Language Group. 

This course covers the history of the short story and makes an 
analysis of the same. Students taking this work are required to write 
examples illustrating types studied. 

Text: — Albright's Short Story. 

82. History of the Novel. Two hours. Second semester. Re- 
quired in the Modern Language Group. 

By means of lectures and assigned readings the development of the 
novel is traced from the Gesta Romanorum to Robert Louis Stevenson. 

Text: — Hamilton's Manual of the Art of Fiction. 

92. Early English. Two hours. First semester. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors. 

Early English grammar and sounds are studied; portions of Beowulf 
are read with due attention to Anglo-Saxon meter. 

Text: — Bright's Anglo Saxon Reader. 

102. Middle English and Chaucer. Two hours. Second semes- 
ter. Open to Juniors and Seniors; English 92 a pre-requisite. 

Texts : — MacCracken's College Chaucer; McLean's Old and Middle 
English Reader. 



BULLETIN 37 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Schmauk and Mrs. Green 

16. First Year French — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

This course includes a drill in French pronunciation and grammar 
with exercises in dictation and composition (Thieme and Ef finger's 
French Grammar) ; and the reading of the following texts or their 
equivalents; Daudet, Contes choisis; Dumas, L'Evasion due Buc Beau- 
fort; Labiche Martin Le Voyage de M. Perrichon. 

26. Second Year French — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Grammar, composition, dictation and the reading and interpretation 
of such texts as the following: Erckmann-Chatrian, Le Conscrit de 
1813; Ca et La en France; Standard French Authors, Guerlac; Lec- 
tures Historiques, Moffett; La (Mare) au Diable, George Sand; Le 
Monde on F on s'ennuie. 

36. French Literature of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Cen- 
turies — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Study of classic drama. Reading and reports on works of Corneille, 
Moliere, Racine, and other representative writers. 

46. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century — Three hours. 
Thruout the year. 

Study of eminent modern authors. Reports on works assigned for 
private readings. 

52. Practical Course in French Conversation and Composition- 
One hour. Thruout the year. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Frounich and Schmauk 

16. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Literature of the 19th century. Fouque's Undine, Heine's Die Harz- 
reise, Freytag's Die Journalisten. Scheffel's Ekkehard, Mueller's 
Deutsche Liebe; Deutsche Gedichte, Wenkebach's Composition. 

The college will offer the following courses if the demand is suf- 
ficient. 

26. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Literature of the 18th century. Representative works of Lessing, 
Schiller and Goethe will be read, discussed and compared. 

36. Elective German — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Pre-requisite German 2. General view of German Literature. Rapid 
reading of representative authors of each period; reading of selections 
from German History, Freytag's Ausdem Jahrhundert des Grossen 
Krieges. Reports in German on assigned work. This course alternates 
with German 66. 

66. Elective Goethe — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Pre-requisite German 2. Study of Goethe's life and works ; inten- 
sive study of Goethe's prose, poetry and drama; essays in German re- 
quired. This course alternates with German 36. 

76. Elective course in scientific German for students in science. 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Spangler 

16. Elementary Greek — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Xenophon : The Anabasis completed. Greek Prose. 

Homer : The Iliad. Scansion and epic poetry. 

Herodotus : Selections from several of the books, Review of the 
Greek historians and the Persian War. 

26. Plato and Xenophon. Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Plato : The Apology and Crito. The Athenian courts. 

Xenophon : The Memorabilia. Socrates and the Socratic schools. 

34. Greek Drama. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Selections from the tragedies of Sophocles and Aeschylus, and the 
development of the drama and theater. 

45. New Testament Greek. Three hours. Thruout the year. 
The object of this course is exegetical and practical, and comprises 

a study of the Gospels and the letters of Paul. 

Courses 16 and 26 are required for graduation from the Classical 
Group. 

HISTORY 

Professors Shenk and Butterwick 

12. Medieval History. First semester. Two hours. 

A study of the life and institutions of the Middle Ages. 

22. Early Modern Europe. Second semester. Two hours. 

The Renaissance, Reformation and French Revolution. 

24. European History from the accession of Louis XIV to the 
present time. Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Robinson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, Volumes 
I and II, Robinson's Readings. 

34. History of England — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

A brief review of the Anglo-Saxon period; a more thorough study 
of the period following the Norman Conquest, and an intensive study 
of the Tudor period and the Revolution. 

Terry: — History of England; Cheyney; Introduction to the Social 
and Industrial History of England, Cheyney; Readings in English 
History. 

46. History of the United States — Three hours. Thruout the 
year. 

52. History of Christianity. Second semester. Two hours. 

This course is intended to study Christianity as a historic force — the 
mightiest force operative in the human race. Particular attention is 
given to the story of its origin, progress and development of the Chris- 
tian religion, and of its influence upon the world. 



BULLETIN 39 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Frounick 

As many courses will be offered in the Latin Department as may 
be required to satisfy the demand for instruction in Latin. Course 16 
is intended for students who have had three or four years of Latin in 
the secondary school. The remaining courses will alternate from year 
to year. In general, they are open to all students who have had Latin 16. 

16. Freshman Latin — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Cicero: — De Senectute and De Amicitia; Livy : Selections; or selec- 
tions from the Roman Historians. Latin Grammar and Composition. 
First semester. 

Ovid: — Selections; Catullus: Selections; Terence: Phormio; or se- 
lections from Latin Verse. Latin Grammar and Composition. Second 
semester. 

23. Pliny: Selected Letters— Three hours. First semester. 

This course embraces the reading of several of Pliny's letters; a 
methodical study of syntax; and the study of life and manners in 
Rome during the Early Empire. 

33. Horace: Odes and Epodes — Three hours. Second semes- 
ter. 

Attention will be directed chiefly to the literary side of the poet's 
work. Constant practice in metrical reading. 

43. Tacitus: Agricola and Germania — Three hours. First semes- 
ter. 

In its aim and method of instruction this course will be similar to 
course 23. 

53. Plautus and Terence — Three hours. Second semester. 

Detailed study of selected plays. Special attention will be paid to 
the characteristics of early Latin forms, syntax, and versification. 

63. Cicero: Selected Letters — Three hours. First semester. 

Several letters will be read showing Cicero's character, tastes, and 
relations to his personal and literary friends. Study of Roman polit- 
ical institutions in connection with Cicero's public career. 

73. Virgil: Aeneid. Books VII-XII — Three hours. Second 
semester. 

This course consists of the reading of the Aeneid, Books VII-XII, 
with special emphasis on correct and literary form. 

86. Roman Satire — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Selections will be read from the Satires of Juvenal and Horace, and 
from the Epigrams of Martial. A study of Roman society under the 
Empire will be made in connection with the course. 

92. Roman Private Life — One hour. Thruout the year. 

A systematic treatment of ti.° life of the Romans with reference to 
the remains of ancient art, inscriptions, and the testimonial of classical 
authors. 

102. Topography of Rome — One hour. Thruout the year. 

This course will consider the situation, growth, development, and 
existing remains of ancient Rome. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

112. Latin Composition — One hour. Thruout the year. 
Thoro review of Latin grammar in connection with the translation 
of English into Latin. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Lehman and Wagner 

13. Advanced Algebra — Three hours. First Semester. 
Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 

theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permuta- 
tions and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 

23. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry — Three hours. Second 
semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and 
oblique triangles, measuring angles to compute distances and heights, 
development of trigonometric formulae, solution of right and oblique 
spherical triangles, applications to Astronomy. 

36. Analytic Geometry — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, parabola, and hyperbola are 
studied, numerous examples solved, and as much of the higher plane 
curves and of the geometry of space is covered as time will permit. 

43. Differential Calculus — Three hours. First semester. 

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 
and minima, development into series, tangents, normals, evolutes, en- 
velopes, etc. 

53. Integral Calculus — Three hours. Second semester. 

Integrations, rectification of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cuba- 
ture of solids, etc. 

63. Plane Surveying — Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting, 
leveling, etc. 

73. Differential Equations — -Three hours. First semester. 

A course in the elements of different equations. Murray. 

Pre-requisite, Mathematics 43 and 53. 

83. Analytic Mechanics — Three hours. Second semester. 

Bowser. Pre-requisite, Mathematics 73. 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Professor Butterwick 

14. (A) Psychology — Two hours. Thruou't the year. 

Special emphasis will be placed upon (1) the application of psycho- 
logical laws to practical life, and (2) the philosophical bearing of cer- 
tain psychological principles. 

Text-book: — Human Psychology, Warren. 

(B) Logic — From six to ten weeks will be devoted to the con- 
sideration of the essentials of logic. 

Text-book: — The Essentials of Logic, Sellars. 



BULLETIN 41 

22. Introduction to Philosophy — Two hours. First semester. 

Text-book : — Introduction to Philosophy, Fullerton. 

32. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy — Two hours. 
First semester. 

42. History of Modern Philosophy — Two hours. Second semes- 
ter. 

In these courses the aim will be (1) to trace the development of 
Philosophy, pointing out what of permanent value of each system, as 
it arose, contributed toward a final solution of the nature of being, 
and (2) to show the interaction between philosophic thought and the 
practical life of the period during which it flourished. 

Text-book : — History of Philosophy, Cushman. 

53. Ethics — First semester. Three hours. 

This course will be primarily constructive and critical and historical 
only in so far as its constructive purpose demands. Much attention 
will be given to the practical bearing of the doctrine set forth on the 
pressing problems of today — such as individualism, the integrity of our 
social institutions, the problems which grew out of progress, etc. 

Text-book : — Problems of Conduct, Drake. 

63. Social Psychology — Second semester. Three hours. 

A study of mental growth and action as shown in social relationships. 

Text-book : — Human Traits, Edman. 

72. Present Philosophical Tendencies — First semester. Two 
hours. 

The typical tendencies of the day, including materialism, idealism, 
realism, pragmatism and pluralism, are surveyed, and an attempt is 
made at a constructive treatment of the fundamental problems of 
reality. 

Text: — Present Philosophical Tendencies, Perry; A Realistic Uni- 
verse, Boodin. 

83. The Philosophy of Religion. — Three hours. First semester. 

93. The Philosophy of the Christian Religion — Second semester. 
Three hours. 

Text-book: — The Philosophy of the Christian Religion, Fairbairn. 

Offered 1923-1925. 

103. The Psychology of Religion — Second semester. Three hours. 
1922, 1924. 

203. — Metaphysics — Second semester. Two hours. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm 

Physics 18. General Physics — Four hours. Thruout the year. 

Three hours lectures and recitation and four hours laboratory work 
per week. The course will be a thoro investigation of the fundamental 
principles of physical science and is especially intended as a preparation 
for Physics 2, 3, and 4, and for those interested in the practical appli- 
cations of physical laws and principles. 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Laboratory hours Thursday and Friday afternoons and Saturday 
morning. 

24. Advanced Physics — Mechanics — Four hours. One semester. 

This course will be a thoro investigation of the mechanics of solids,, 
liquids, and gases and sound. 

First semester, 1922-1923. 

34. Advanced Physics — Electricity and Magnetism — Four hours. 
One semester. 

This course will be a thoro consideration of the laws of the electric 
and magnetic fields and the power applications of electricity. 

Second semester, 1922-23. 

44. Advanced Physics — Heat and Light — Four hours. One semes- 
ter. 

This course will be concerned with the nature of heat and light and 
the transmission of each through various media including reflection,, 
refraction, and dispersion. 

Second semester, 1922-23. 

Textbooks : — Kimball's College Physics, and a special text for each 
of courses 2, 3, and 4. 

The Calculus will be a very great aid in these courses. 

Drawing 13. Elementary Mechanical Drawing — Three hours 
first semester. 

Use of instruments, construction of geometric figures, projection of 
simple solids, simple sections and development of surfaces, lettering,, 
sketching, tracing, and blueprinting. 

The college will provide the usual drawing desks, etc., and the 
students will provide his own drawing instruments. This course will 
be given 1922-23. 

Drawing 23. Descriptive Geometry — Three hours second semester 

Problems in the projection of point, lines, planes, and solids and in 
the intersection of lines, planes, and solids. 

This course will be given second semester 1922-23. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE 

The work consists of gymnastic classes two days a week. Two 
years work in college is required for graduation. This work is re- 
quired of all Resident and Special students. 

The work consists of marching, calisthenic drills, elementary work 
on the heavy apparatus, folk dancing, and group games. 

The aim of the course will be to keep the students in good physical 
condition and to prepare them to handle similar work in grade or high 
schools. 

11. Freshman Physical Culture — One half hour. Two hours per 
week. 

21. Sophomore Physical Culture — One half hour. Two hours per 
week. 



BULLETIN 43 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich 

16. American Government and Politics — Three hours. Thruout 
the year. 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
fundamental laws of Federal and State Government. The course is 
devoted chiefly to the study of leading cases. 

Textbook: Young's The New American Government and Its Work, 
and lectures. 

26. Political Science — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

A study of various theories of the state and the structure and prov- 
ince of government. A considerable portion of the work of the second 
semester is given to the consideration of practical political problems 
of national and international import. 

Textbook: — Haines' Principles and Problems of Government. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Gingrich 

14. Principles of Sociology — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the various 
theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the general 
field of learning. Modern social problems are discussed during the 
second semester. 

Textbook : — Ross' Principles of Sociology. 

SPANISH 

16. Elementary Spanish — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

The elements of grammar ; practice in composition and conversation 
and the reading of simple stories and plays. 

26. Intermediate Spanish — Three hours. Thruout the year. 

Reading of several stories and plays by modern Spanish authors. 
Thoro review of grammatical principles, and practice in composition 
and conversation. 

ORATORY AND PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Professor Adams 

The work of this department is primarily personal culture, the high- 
est development of the personality of the student. "The development 
of the art of oratory is the development of the orator himself." 

The course requires two years of study of prescribed work. Upon 
the completion of the studies a certificate is awarded. 

Students entering the regular course must have had a high-school 
course or its equivalent. 

A recital is given at least once a term for which the students are 
carefully prepared. These afford the students public platform prac- 
tice by which they gain confidence and experience. 

Each Senior is required to adopt and arrange a program for a public 
recital, from some piece of literature approved by the instructor. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ORATORY AND LITERARY INTERPRETATION 

1. Evolution of Expression — Two hours. Thruout the year. 

Study of selections from great orators, essayists, poets and dram- 
atists. Practical drill work before class for developing power of 
student thru application of principles to his individual needs. Personal 
criticism and guidance to bring out originality of student. Dramatic 
work. 

2. Philosophy of Expression and Laws of Art — Two hours. 
Thruout the year. 

Expressive study of different forms of literature with particular 
attention to the laws of art which logically follow the steps of the 
Evolution. Dramatic work. 

(Two hours credit in college is given for each of the above courses. 
1 and 2 when taken with one private lesson a week.) 

3. Poetic Interpretation. One hour. Thruout the year. 
Special interpretation and critical study of the great poets, with 

presentation and criticism before class, to acquaint student with mas- 
tery of literary art, to develop appreciation of the music and sugges- 
tiveness of poetry, and imaginative and poetic elements in work. Study 
of poetic forms from the ballad to lyric and dramatic poetry. 

4. Normal Training and Methods — One hour. Thruout the year. 
Practice in teaching and class management. Under the direction and 

criticism of the instructor, the Seniors conduct class work, lecture 
upon principles, and discuss their application. 

5. Dramatic and Platform Art — One hour. Thruout the year. 
Interpretation and dramatic study of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, 

Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, and As You Like It. Presentation 
of prepared scenes for criticism. Practical work in stage business, 
deportment, and grouping. 

Platform deportment, correct bearing, and presentation before audi- 
ence. Platform methods and traditions. Pantomime, study of emo- 
tions. Freedom and responsiveness in bodily expression. 

Sketches and plays are given from time to time during the year, 
which, with the annual Junior and college plays provide special dramatic 
training for many. 

Private lessons, with attention to the special needs of the students, 
either in overcoming habits, or in personal development and repertoire, 
are given thruout the course to supplement the class work. 

Attention is given to the choice, adaptation and abridgment of selec- 
tions for public reading, arrangement of programs, writing introduc- 
tions, etc. One hour per week. 

6. Voice Training. 

Exercises for breath control, for freeing of voice by proper placing 
and direction of tone, purity, flexibility, radiation, resonance, and 
power; pitch, volume, and inflection in emphasis. Tone color and 
form, ideal and imaginative qualities in tone. Diction. 

Given daily thruout the course. 



BULLETIN 45 

7. Physical Training. 

Exercises for securing poise, bearing, freedom and ease in movement; 
to gain control over body and render it responsive to thought. Re- 
sponse in bearing and dramatic attitudes. Fundamental principles of 
gesture and drill. Given daily thruout course. 

8. English Literature. 
English Literature (English 26) 
Composition and Rhetoric (English 16) 

9. Psychology. (Philosophy 14). 

10. Public Speaking. 
English 12. Public Speaking. 

English 32. Advanced Public Speaking. For description of courses 
see English. 



Lebanon Valley Academy 



PREPARATORY SCHOOL OF LEBANON VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

Discontinued at the close of the academic year of 1922 

For information concerning the Academy, see the catalog of 1920-1921. 



ADMINISTRATION 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D. 

President of the College 

P. S. WAGNER 

Principal, Mathematics, Physics 



FOUNDED 1866 



Conservatory of Music 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

URBAN H. HERSHEY, Mus.D. 
Pianoforte, Organ, Counterpoint, Composition 



R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B. 
Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony, History of Music 



LETITIA WITHROW 

Voice, Sight Singing 



RUTH ELIZABETH ENGLE, A.B. 
Pianoforte, Theory, Sight Playing 



MIRIAM R. OYER 
Public School Music 



BULLETIN 49 

LOCATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The Engle Conservator}- of Music is a handsome, three-story, stone 
structure. It contains a fine auditorium with large pipe organ, direc- 
tor's room, studios, practice rooms, waiting, and writing room for 
students' use, large society rooms, lavatories, etc. The whole building 
is lighted by electricity, and heated by steam, and designed and furnished 
with a view to having it complete in every respect for the study of 
music in all its branches. A complete musical education, from the 
very first steps to the highest artistic excellence, may be secured. The 
director will use every effort to secure positions for those students 
who have finished courses, and who may wish to teach or perform 
in public. 

OBJECT 

The department has for its object the foundation and diffusion of 
a high and thoro musical education. The methods used are those 
followed by the leading European conservatories. The courses are 
comprehensive, systemaitc, progressive, and as rapid as possible. The 
conservatory offers the means for a complete education in musical art 
at a moderate cost. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

I 
Pianoforte 

The course in Pianoforte is divided into five divisions : Sub-Fresh- 
man, Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior. 

The course marked out must, however, necessarily be varied accord- 
ing to the ability and temperament of the pupils. Many works must 
be studied by all, but there is much that may be essential for one 
student and not at all necessary for another. Individual instruction 
only is given. 

A system of technics is used that is in line with the most approved 
methods. Special attention is paid to the development of a true legato 
touch and clear, smooth technique. The use of the pedal, so much 
neglected, is emphasized. At the same time expression and interpreta- 
tion are not neglected. Technical and theoretical ability is worthless, 
except as it enables the performer to bring out the beauties and mean- 
ing of the composer. 

By a recent act of the Executive Board arrangements were made for 
a teacher to give instruction to children and others in the elementary 
grades of the pianoforte course at a cost within the reach of all. This 
work is carried on according to the methods in use in the leading 
Conservatories. 

For such instruction, the rate of tuition will be fifty cents per lesson. 
This enrollment as a regular student of the Conservatory will entitle 
the student to all privileges of the institution. * The advantages to be 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

derived from appearing in recital classes, receiving instruction in stage 
deportment, as well as opportunities for hearing and associating with 
•other music students, are certain to act as incentives to better, more 
conscientious work. 

Memorizing music is required of all students. It is a great acquisi- 
tion to be able to perform a number of selections from memory. 

Sight Reading — This, although to a certain extent a natural gift, 
can be greatly improved by systematic work. One who can read well 
has all music at his command, while a poor reader has but a few 
pieces which may have been learned. 

Practice — Special effort is made to teach pupils how to practice. 
Difficult places are pointed out and the students are taught how to 
learn them in the quickest and most thorough manner. Quality is of 
more value than quantity in practice. 

Ensemble Playing — It is impossible to overestimate the value of 
thoro training in duet, trio, and quartet playing. Students are 
given drill in these as well as in accompaniment playing. 

II 
The Voice 

Students contemplating work in this department should bear in mind 
two important facts ; first, that the natural ability to sing varies with 
every student, and secondly, that while the producion of tone from 
any musical instrument is by artificial means, the elements that go to 
make up the human voice are composed of flesh and blood, subject to 
the most delicate nervous impulses. 

Hence the course in the Study of Voice must be varied according 
to the needs of the individual, and the success of the pupil depends 
largely upon the sympathetic insight of the teacher and the sincere 
cooperation in mind as well as body on the part of the student. 

The old Italian method as shown in Marchesi's "Art of Singing" 
will be used, and exercises from other standard texts will be given to 
suit the needs of the individual student. 

Ill 
The Pipe Organ 

The Pipe Organ — commonly called "The King of Instruments" — 
"has made rapid strides in development during the last fifty years, and 
today is no longer regarded as an instrument solely for accompaniments 
■and church use, but has taken is place among solo instruments and 
gained a distinct recognition from the music-loving people. A large 
field, therefore, is open to the student of the organ. 

A new Three-Manual Moller Pipe Organ with detached console, mod- 
ern in every respect, has recently been installed in the college chapel. 

The increased demand for organ instruction the past year has made 
■necessary the addition of a Two-Manual Reed Organ with pedals for 
practice purpose. Both organs are connected with kinetic organ blowers 



BULLETIN 51 

which insure most satisfactory wind pressure with its steady, even 
tone as a result. 

The course outlined for this department is planned to provide the 
student with a repertoire for recital purposes and to satisfactorily meet 
the requirements of the organist in church. 

IV 
The Violin 

Among the stringed instruments, the Violin stands as one of the 
■oldest and has always been admired for its beautiful and thrilling 
strains. 

The musical possibilities within the compass of the violin are mar- 
velous and unexcelled by any other instrument. The best artists of 
the olden and modern times were skilled on the violin and it appeals 
to those of the finest musical taste today. 

Nowhere in English literaure do we find a nobler or more glowing 
tribute to the violin than is the little poem penned by our own immortal 
"Autocrat" where he places the violin among the highest order of 
■musical instruments. 

V 

Theoretical Music 

Theoretical studies are essential to rapid and comprehensive sight 
reading and to excellence in the higher grades of music. Good pedal- 
ing depends on a knowledge of harmony, and memorizing is greatly 
faciliated by it. 

An intelligent insight into the foundation, upon which rests the art 
of music, gives interest to the pupils in their playing and singing and 
makes them musicians, as well as performers. 

VI 

Soloist's and Teacher's Courses 

Two courses leading to the granting of diplomas are offered. Both 
follow the same general course outlined on page 69. 

The Soloist's Course requires a satisfactory appearance in the 
annual recital by the Junior Class and an individual recital during the 
Senior year. 

The Teacher's Course is offered to those who wish to specialize 
for the teaching profession. Such pupils will be excused from the 
Junior and Senior recitals, but required to teach in the Normal depart- 
ment one hour per week for two years under the direction of a teacher 
of the Conservatory faculty in charge of such work. A Weekly 
Methods Class conducted by the teacher directing this department will 
b>ring to the attention of these student-teachers points where their 
teaching may be improved, and essential principles underlying the 
work of the successful teacher. 

Teaching in the Normal will begin in October and end on, or about 
^lay 1st. 



52 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

VII 

Public School Music 

Realizing the demand for trained teachers of Public School Music,, 
the Conservatory offers a course for such work which requires two 
years for completion. 

The text used in the Methods class is that of Hollis Dann, Super- 
visor of Music of the Public Schools of Pennsylvania. However, other 
texts are studied and compared so that the graduates should be able to 
handle any course in Public School Music in use at the present time. 

Aside from this, students have the advantage of doing teaching under 
supervision in the Annville Public Schools, thereby putting into practice 
the theoretical knowledge gained in the Methods class. 

Special attention is paid to the care of the child voice in singing 
which is such an essential feature of Public School Music. Candidates 
for this course must have completed a four-year High School course 
or its equivalent. Positions are not guaranteed to graduates. 

VIII 
A Four Year Course in the Theory of Music 
The Conservatory diploma will be given for the satisfactory comple- 
tion, with no grade below 85 percent in the following subjects : Har- 
mony — 3 semesters; Musical History — 2 semesters; Sight Singing — 4 
semetsers; Theory — 1 semester; Musical Form — 1 semester; Psychol- 
ogy of Music — 1 semester; Harmonic Analysis — 1 semester; Simple 
Counterpoint — 1 semester ; Double Counterpoint — 1 semester ; Canon 
and Fugue — 2 semesters. The candidate for graduation in the above 
course must have completed the Sophomore year in pianoforte to the 
satisfaction of the Conservatory faculty. 

College Credit 

Credit will be given in the college department for the completion of 
courses in Harmony, Musical History, and Counterpoint. 

The Second "Solo Subject" 

Candidates for graduation by diploma or certificate in Piano shall 
have taken at least one year in voice, violin, or organ. For graduation 
in Voice, Violin, or Organ the student shall have at least Sophomore 
standing in piano. 



BULLETIN 



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BULLETIN 55 

HOW TO BECOME "A FULL COURSE STUDENT" 
IN THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

To be a "full course student" in the Conservatory you will be required 
to carry one solo subject (piano, voice, or organ) and two theoretical 
branches, such as Harmony and Musical History. Two lessons, each 
one-half hour in length are given each week in the solo subject. Classes 
in Harmony recite two hours per week. Classes in Musical History 
meet on alternate days for three hour-lessons per week. The course 
in Harmony requires three semesters, while the course in Musical 
History may be completed in one year. 

The "full course student" engages four practice hours daily through- 
out the year. 

One subject, such as German, French, or English, may be taken in 
the College by a "full course student" without additional charge. 

The "full course student" will find the tuition as follows : 
FIRST SEMESTER — Two lessons per week, as stated above 

Piano or voice $34.00 

Harmony 18.00 

Musical History 18.00 

Piano Practice, 4 hours daily 10.00 

Matriculation Fee 8.00 

Sight Singing and Dictation 15.00 

$103.00 
Voice or Piano added, 2 lessons per week $34.00 additional 

Organ, one lesson per week 17.00 additional 

Organ practice, one hour daily.... $10.00 or 20.00 additional 
SECOND SEMESTER— Rates and courses the same as first semester. 

CERTIFICATE 

Candidates for graduation by Certificate in pianoforte, pipe organ, 
or violin, must have satisfactorily completed the full course in har- 
mony, musical history and sight playing. 

Candidates for graduation by certificate in voice must have satis- 
factorily completed the full course in harmony, musical history, sight 
singing and dictation. 

Graduation Fee for Certificate, $8.00. 

DIPLOMA 

Candidates for graduation with Diploma must have satisfactorily 
completed the requirements as outlined on page 53. 
Graduation Fee for Diploma, $13.00. 

DEGREE 

Requirements for Mus. B. Degree : 

Candidate must hold a diploma covering the course as outlined on 
page 70. 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

In addition to the above, one year's work in Canon and Fugue, 
2 lessons per week, Orchestration, 2 lessons per week, and one year's 
work in Original Composition, 2 lessons per week, will be required. 

Fee for Degree, $13.00. 

RECITALS AND MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Students' Evening Recitals. Each term recitals are given in which 
students, who have been prepared under the supervision of the in- 
structors, take part. These recitals furnish incentives to study and 
experience in public performance. 

Students' Recital Class. Students who are not sufficiently advanced 
to appear in the Evening Recitals are given experience in public per- 
formance in the Students' Recital Class. These classes are not open 
to the public. Rules governing Concert Deportment are brought to 
the attention of the students and each performer shown what is ex- 
pected of him or her when before an audience. The result is a 
smoother and more satisfactory appearance in the Evening Recitals 
when assigned to such work. 

THE EURYDICE CHORAL CLUB 

This club for young women was organized four years ago, having 
for its object the study of standard choruses and choral works, pro- 
ducing the same at a Spring concert. 

Among the artists who have recently appeared with the Eurydice 
Choral Club are Miss Elsie Baker of the Victor Concert Company, 
Miss Vera Curtis of the Metropolitan Opera Company, and Mrs- 
Bertyne Ne Collins, soprano, of New York. 

Last season the club enlarged the scope of its musical activities and 
.aside from giving the usual concert, presented Miss Sue Harvard, 
soprano, of New York City, in song recital. Club members are ad- 
mitted without charge to these recitals, and it is proposed to bring 
artists before the students from time to time for the furtherance of 
musical appreciation. 

THE MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The opportunity for a "try out" for membership in this organization 
is given every young man of the institution who possesses a singing 
voice. .Rehearsals are conducted throughout the Fall months prepara- 
tory to filling a series of scheduled dates booked by a student manager. 
Membership in this Club furnishes a musical training as well as social 
experience that is invaluable to the college man. 

TUITION 

SENIOR YEAR 
PIANO, VOICE, VIOLIN OR ORGAN 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $51.00 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 25.50 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 51.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 25.50 



BULLETIN 57~ 

JUNIOR AND SOPHOMORE YEARS 

Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ and Freshman Organ 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $34.00 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 17.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 34.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 17.00 

SUB-FRESHMAN AND FRESHMAN YEARS IN PIANO 

First Semester 2 lessons per week $17.00 

First Semester 1 lesson per week 8.50 

Second Semester 2 lessons per week 17.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson per week 8.50 

KEYBOARD, HARMONY, RUDIMENTS, THEORY, HARMONIC 

ANALYSIS, MUSICAL FORM, PSYCHOLOGY OF 

MUSIC, PUBLIC SCHOOL METHODS, 

OR SIGHT SINGING 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.. ..$15. 00 

Second Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.... 15.00 

HARMONY. MUSICAL HISTORY AND CURRENT EVENTS, 
COUNTERPOINT, CANON, FUGUE, OR COMPOSITION 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.. ..$18.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.... 18.00 

SIGHT PLAYING 
Junior and Senior Years 

First Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.. ..$10.00 

Second Semester 2 lessons (class) per week.... 10.00 

A charge of seventy-five cents each semester will be made for use 
of the Sight Playing Library. 

PIANO NORMAL METHODS CLASS 

First Semester 1 lesson (class) per week $5.00 

Second Semester 1 lesson (class) per week 5.00 

(October to April) 
In addition to the above outline of subjects in the regular courses 
leading to a diploma or certificate, private lessons in Harmony, Coun- 
terpoint, Orchestration, and Composition may be had from Dr. Hershey 
by any one desiring advanced work in these subjects at the following, 
rates : 

2 Half hour lessons weekly, per semester $ 68.00 

1 Half hour lesson weekly, per semester 34.00 

2 Hour lessons weekly, per semester 136.00 

1 Hour lesson weekly, per semester 68.00 



58 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

RATES FOR PRACTICE PERIODS 

Piano, 1 hour daily, per semester $ 4.00 

Each additional hour, per semester 2.00 

Pipe Organ (College Chapel) 1 hour daily, per semester 20.00 

Pipe Organ (College Chapel) 2 hrs. per week, per semester 10.00 

Two Manual Organ, 1 hour daily, per semester 10.00 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No reduction is made for absence during first two weeks of the 
term, nor for a subsequent individual absence. In case of long con- 
tinued illness the loss is shared equally by the College and the student. 

Pupils may enter at any time, but for convenience of grading the 
beginning of each semester is the most desirable time. 

In the case of holidays declared by the faculty, no lessons will be 
given or money refunded. 

All sheet music must be paid for when taken. 

Students are expected to consult the Director before arranging 
to take part in any public musical exercise outside of the regular work. 

No pupil is allowed to omit lessons without a sufficient cause. 

Reports showing attendance, practice, and improvement in grade 
will be issued at the close of each semester. 

For all further information as to any particular course, or combina- 
tion of courses, rooms, boarding, etc., address 

DIRECTOR OF THE CONSERVATORY, 

Lebanon Valley College. 



BULLETIN 50 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Brunner, William A., 

A.B., A.M., Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Faust, Paul B., B.S., Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Martin, William N., 

A.B Freetown Sierra Leone.. ..W. Africa 

Savior, Robert J., 

BS., C.E Progress Dauphin Penna. 

Williams, Reuben W., -igj* ] *l-.$f 'If-;' 

A.B Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

SENIORS 

Arnold, Jay H East Mauch Chunk Carbon Penna. 

Bender, Harold B Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bortz, Alta B Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, J. Russell Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Burbeck, Meta C Reading Lebanon Penna. 

Cassel, Miriam Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Daugherty, J. Dwight Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Fake, Warren H Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Gingrich, Earl S Lebanon .Lebanon Penna. 

Gingrich, Gertrude Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Gingrich, James L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Glenn, Maryland L Red Lion York Penna. 

Hartz, Ethel I Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Heckman, Oliver S Lemaster Franklin Penna. 

Heffleman, Marion V New Cumberland Cumberland Penna. 

Herr, S. Meyer \nnville Lebanon Penna. 

Hershey, Josephine L Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Hess, Verna L Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Hibbs, Effie M Morrisville Bucks Penna. 

Hiester, Ruth V Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Homan, Ralph Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, P. Rodney Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Lehman, Ethel M Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Lerew, Erdean M Dillsburg York Penna. 

Miller, Adam D \nnville Lebanon Penna. 

Ness, Paul Yoe York Penna. 

Rhoad, Edwin M Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Shadel, Russell O Williamstown Dauphin - Penna. 

Snider, John W Chambersburg Franklin Penna. 

Stabley, R. Rhodes Dallastown York Penna. 

Stern, Anna E Elizabethtown I ancaster Penna. 



60 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Stine, Josephine B Mont Alto Franklin Penna. 

Swank, Reuel E Linville Depot Rockingham Va. 

VandenBosche, E. Gas- 
ton California Washington Penna. 

JUNIORS 

Boyer, Ralph E York York Penna. 

Brunner, Esther S New Bloomfield Perry Penna. 

Durbin, Frances Ramey Clearfield Penna. 

Ensminger, Paul S- Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Fake, Earl E Reading Berks Penna. 

Faust, Guy Deckert Collingdale Delaware Penna. 

Fencil, Dorothy H Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Gingrich, Martha E Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Herr, Delia M Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Hiester, Mary F Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Hiser, Carl W Petersburg Grant W.Va. 

Hohl, George O Pitman Schuylkill Penna. 

Hughes, Helen M York York Penna. 

Hutchison, Raymond Paradise Lancaster Penna. 

Kratzert, Kathryn E Littlestown Adams Penna. 

Kreider, Warren B Lebanon Lebanon Penna.. 

Long, Anna E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Long, Kathryn M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

MacDonald, Joseph R Swatara Station Dauphin Penna. 

Merchitis, Agnes F Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Miller, Esse E Windsor Burke N. C. 

Miller, H. Lloyd Tunkhannock Wyoming Penna. 

Morrow, H. Mae Duncannon Perry Penna. 

Mutch, Heber R Reading Berks Penna. 

Reeves, C. Mae Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Ruth, Ira M Sinking Springs Berks Penna. 

Sheaffer, Eleanor F Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Shenk, S. Lucille Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, Elizabeth M Robesonia Berks Penna. 

Smith, Richard H Tremont Schuylkill Penna. 

Weaver, S. Paul -Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Wenner, William F Wilkes Barre Luzerne Penna. 

Williard, Lester R Shamokin Northumberland ..Penna. 

SOPHOMORES 

Bachman, Carl M Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Baker, Edna R Strasburg Warren Va. 

Balsbaugh, Edward U Swatara Station Dauphin Penna. 

Balsbaugh, Kathrin S Swatara Station Dauphin Penna. 

Beck, Ferdinand L Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Behman, Russell Steelton Dauphin ..Penna. 

Biecher, George R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 61 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Billet, Dora M Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

JBomgar drier, Simon P Quentin Lebanon Penna. 

Cohen, Reuben Hartford Hartford Conn. 

Dowhower, Leroy B Swatara Station Dauphin Penna. 

Drummond, Cynthia Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Edris, Regina A Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Evans, S. Donald Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Pegan, Mary E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Pencil, Calvin F Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Fields, Donald E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Greiner, Sara H Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Harpel, Ruth C Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Heindel, Rachel N Red Lion York Penna. 

Hershey, Mary B Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Hovis, John E Rouzerville Franklin Penna. 

Xreider, Mildred R Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lauster, Frederick Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Leber, Charles C Red Lion York Penna. 

Mader, David E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Martin, Ralph E Rouzerville Franklin Penna. 

Matuszak, Maryan P Hyde Park Westmoreland Penna. 

Mealey, Helen L New Market Frederick Md. 

Miller, Armand J Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Noll, Anna C Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Oyer, Ruth H Shippensburg Cumberland Penna. 

Rice, Mabel Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Riedel, Charles Emory.. ..Dallastown York Penna. 

Rupp, Claude E Harrisburg Dauphin Penna'. 

Seifried, Florence M Columbia Lancaster Penna 

Singer, Esther Anna Ephrata Lancaster Penna! 

Smith, Benton P Royalton Dauphin Penna. 

Smith, Charles C Windsor York Penna. 

Stabley, Elwood C Red Lion York Penna. 

Stauffer, Richard E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Steiss, Marie E Bradford McKean Penna 

S f wanger, Murray L Mowersville Franklin Penna. 

Underkoffler, Vincent K.Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Weisman, Lena A Emlenton .Venango Penna. 

Whistler, Edgar M Altoona Blair Penna. 

Whitman, Florence M Flizabethville Dauphin Penna. 

Witmer, Robert Leon Lemoyne jTumberland Penna. 

Wolfe, Porte H Lefbanon Lebanon Penna. 

Wolf, Walter F Hartford Hartford Conn. 

Yake, Edna Mae \nnville Lebanon Penna. 

Yake, Robert C Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Yinger, Mary Columbia Lancaster Penna. 

Ziegler, Rosa Ellen Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ziegler, Susan B Red Lion York Penna. 



62 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

FRESHMEN 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Achenbach, Alfred L Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Adams, Edward H Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Aungst, Frank C Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Behney, William H Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Blyler, Elizabeth Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, S. Matilda Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bressler, Elias Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Brown, Elsie G Martinsburg Berkley W. Va. 

Burtner, Howard J Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Carpenter, Frank Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Clark, Elsie M Downingtown Chester Penna. 

Clarkin, William M Hartford Hartford Conn. 

Cooley, Gladstone P Reliance .Warren Va. 

Dando, Charles Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Dearwechter, Sarah R Fredericksburg Lebanon Penna. 

Desenberg, Lola C Red Lion York Penna. 

Donough, Ethel L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Dunnick, Dana York ... York Penna. 

Earley, Israel B Palmyra. Lebanon Penna. 

Ellenberger, Armeda V. ..Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Fay, John L Hartford Hartford Conn. 

Finn, Raymond J Hartiord Hartford Conn. 

Francis, Edgar R Connelsville Fayette Penna. 

Frank, John J Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Geyer, Edith : Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Gingrich, J. Russell Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Gohn, Jacob A Indianapolis Marion Ind. 

Groff, Flossie M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Grubb, Estella E Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Grumbein, George L Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Hair, Mary Ellen New Bloomfield Perry Penna. 

Hartz, John Ernest... Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Heilman, John Frederick Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Heilman, Leroy N Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Heisey, George H Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Herb, Ray C Tremont Schuylkill Penna. 

Hess, Marion D Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Hoke, Samuel E Meyersdale Somerset Penna. 

Homan, Henry L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hopple, Elizabeth Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hostetter, Helen Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Hostetter, Meyer M Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Hoy. Ruth M Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hughes, Esther Eleanor. Lilly ! Cambria Penna. 

Hughes, Stella M Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Kantz, Robert J Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 63 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Keller, Ellen S New Bloomfield Perry Penna. 

Kennedy, Ruth L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kessler, Joseph M Meriden New Haven Conn. 

Kiehl, Harry R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kimmel, Kehler E Lebanon Leoanon Penna. 

Kreider, Theodore J Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Landgraf, Esther K Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Leach, Lester M. Brushy Run Pendleton W. Va. 

Leech, Mildred I Baltimore Baltimore Md. 

Light, Lloyd L Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Longenecker, Dorothy N. Mount Joy Lancaster Penna. 

Mengel, Miriam L Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Mumma, Joseph B Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Musser, Cleon M Columbia Lancaster Penna. 

Nevling, William Stacy.... Beccaria Clearfield Penna. 

Nisley, Kathryn H Progress Dauphin Penna. 

Nitrauer, W. Ellsworth.... Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Nye, Edith A Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Oswald, Girard Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Peiffer, Raymond Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Pell, Lewis H Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Perry, Wilfred E Hartford Hartford Conn. 

Quaid, William H Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Rebok, Kenneth V Chambersburg Franklin Penna. 

Reider, Mae E Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Reigle, Robert R Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Reiter, Madelyn Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Rhinehart, Paul E Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Rhoad, William O Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Rhoads, John G Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Rutt, Stanley G Denver Lancaster Penna. 

Schack, Martha Tremont Schuylkill Penna. 

Schell, Henry H Mt. Aetna Berks Penna. 

Schwalm, Esther E Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Seitzinger, Verna I Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Sheffey, Edwin G Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Sherk, John K Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Shoop, Madie E Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Silver, Mabel I Baltimore Baltimore Penna. 

Smith, Isabelle R Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Smith, Olga M Reading Berks Penna. 

Stambach, Jerome S York York Penna. 

Stauffer, Grace E Union Deposit Dauphin Penna. 

Stine, Alfred C Mont Alto Franklin Penna. 

Stoner, Grace E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Strayer, Marion E Red Lion York Penna. 

Trout, Ida E Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Umberger, Helene S Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



64 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Weik, Luther A Wyomissing Berks Penna. 

Weiser, Wilbur R Red Lion York Penna. 

White, Harry Lloyd Lebanon Xebanon Penna. 

Wolfe, Maude M Progress Dauphin Penna. 

Wolfe, William E Lebanon ..Lebanon Penna. 

Wueschinski, William A. Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Ziegler, Martha L Red Lion York Penna. 

Ziegler, Roy R Annville Lebanon Penna. 

SPECIALS 

Allen, Robert E Kulpmont Northumberland ..Penna. 

Anderson, Claude S Lebanon .Lebanon Penna. 

Evans, Guy W Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Hower, Robert E Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Kratzer, Ernest P Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Sholly, Harold W Annville Lebanon Penna. 

MOUNT GRETNA SUMMER SCHOOL 

Arnold, Jay H East Mauch Chunk Carbon Penna. 

Baltzell, Ruth C New York City N. Y. 

Baughman, Mrs. Hattie.-Camphill Cumberland Penan. 

Beatty, Bayard, Jr Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bender, Harold B Annville Lebanon Penan. 

Bowers, Ethel Philadelphia Delaware Penna. 

Breeze, Mayflower Reading Berks Penna. 

Brenner, B. Leon Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Brunner, Dorothy Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Burbeck, Meta C Reading Berks Penna. 

Beyerle, Marie L Reading Berks Penna. 

Collins, C. S Baltimore Batlimore Md. 

Daigneau, Pauline Mt. Gretna = Lebanon Penna. 

Davis, Martha Reading : Berks Penna. 

Dietz, Grace Marie Mount Joy Xancaster Penna. 

Durborow, Harry A Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Esbenshade, Anna A Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Frame, Grace M Reading Berks Penna. 

Gingrich, Earle S Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Gingrich, James L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Green, Yvonne Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Glenn, Maryland Red Lion York Penna. 

Hagy, Lottie Reading Berks Penna. 

Haines, Ruth L Philadelphia Delaware Penna. 

Hamilton, Frances Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Happel, Christine G Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hartz, Ethel I Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Heckman, Oliver S Lemaster Franklin Penna. 

Hef fleman, Marion V New Cumberland Cumberland Penna. 

Heffelman, Helen Ruth. .Annville Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 65 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Hess, Verna L Middletown ..Dauphin Penna. 

Hiser, Carl W ■. Petersburg Grant W.Va. 

Kreider, Edna C Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Lerew, Erdean M Dillsburg York Penna. 

Mader, David E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Mason, Bessie M Reading Berks Penna. 

Messinger, William F Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Miller, Esse E Windsor Burke N. C. 

Miller, Mabel V Reading Berks Penna. 

Muth, Sara C Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Sample, Anna C York York Penna. 

Shaak, Carrie R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Schaak, Helen M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Shenk, Esther Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, Esther Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, E. Virginia Reading Berks Penna. 

Stern, Anna E Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Stine, Josephine B Mont Alto Franklin Penna. 

Urich, Margaret S Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

VandenBosche, E. Gas- 
ton California Washington Penna. 

Wanner, Anna Reading Berks Penna. 

Yount, Clara M York York Penna. 

Youtz, Rosa M Colebrook Lebanon Penna. 

EXTENSION SCHOOL 

Altenderfer, Carrie E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Beard, Mary Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Boltz, Esther L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Brotherline, Elizabeth ....Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Capp, Minnie Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Culp, Charlotte M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Evans, Ruth M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Gassert, Sarah M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Heilman, Emerson H Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hoffman, Katherine Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hottenstein, Harriet Lebanon ..., Lebanon Penna. 

Hughes, Anna R Scranton Lackawanna Penna. 

Uiff, Roberta Newton Sussex N. J. 

Johnson, Kathryn E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Edna C. Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Ida Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kuntzleman, Henry D Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Emma L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Naomi R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Loos, Annie Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Moyer, Katherine C Schaef ferstown Lebanon Penna. 

Peiffer, Mary E Bethel Berks Penna. 



66 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Ramer, Pearl S Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rebstock, Elizabeth Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Reineehl, Emma L Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ross, Martha H Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rothermel, Anna Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rothermel, M. Helen Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ruf, Paul Lebanon. Lebanon Penna. 

Sanders, Mrs. Elizabeth.. Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Schools, K. Helen Lebanon Lebanon - Penna. 

Schropp, Arbelin M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Shaak, Carrie R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Siegrist, Lottie Y Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Strickler, Bernetha A Schaef ferstown Lebanon Penna. 

Strickler, Mary M Schaef ferstown Lebanon Penna. 

Wike, E. May Schaefferstown Lebanon Penna. 

Wolfe, Florence M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Yeagley, Katherine E Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Yordy, M. Elizabeth Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Zerbe, Ellen M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Zerbe, Lena M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Zweier, Hilda M Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Englehart, Catharine (Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Moeckel, Sara L (Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

SENIORS 

Gingrich, Mrs. C. R (Pub. Sch. Music) Annville Penna. 

Raab, Minerva ...(Piano and Pub. Sch. 

Music) Dallastown Penna. 

Seitz, Pearl (Voice and Pub. Sch 

Music) Red Lion Penna. 

Stark, Florence (Piano) Glen Rock Penna. 

Tittle, Edna (Pub. Sch. Music) Lebanon Penna. 

JUNIORS 

Hopple, Kathryn (Pub. Sch. Music) Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Marion (Pub. Sch. Music) Lebanon Penna. 

Pell, Verna (Piano Normal) Lykens Penna. 

Sholly, Dorothy (Pub. Sch. Music) Annville Penna. 

SOPHOMORES 

Baker. Ruth C (Piano) Hazleton Penna. 

Gilbert, Esther A (Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Thomas, Mrs. F. W (Piano Normal) Middletown Penna. 



BULLETIN 



NAME 

Balsbaugh, Kathrin S 

Beatty, G. Lucille 

Bingham, Alta C 

Bouterse, Pauline 

Bowman, Kathryn 

Butterwick, Anna 

Derickson, George 

Derickson, Mary 

Dissinger, Jeanette 

Fields, Donald E 

Fields, Josephine 

Fields, Margaret 

Favinger, Ronald 

Gingrich, June 

Geller, Anna 

Gossard, Mary Elizabeth- 
Grimm, Henry 

Hall, Eleanor 

Hostetter, Helen 

Hartz, Mary 

Heilman, Harry 

Heilman, Paul 

Heilman, Lester 

Hershey, Mary 

Hollinger, Margaret 

Hoffer, Carrie 

Imboden, Eva 

Kreider, Mildred R 

Kreider, Grace 

Kettering, Elizabeth 

Kettering, Esther 

Kettering, Claire 

Kettering, Michael 

Kettering, Ruth 

Light, Emma 

Longenecker, Dorothy .... 

Long, Kathryn 

Mealey, Helen 

Mader, David E 

Meyer, Emma 

Manbeck, Marion 

Ruth, Ira 

Rapp, Kathryn 

Roemig, Madie 

Reifsnyder, Alton 

Savior, Gardner 



SPECIALS 

POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

(Voice) Swatara Station.... Penna. 

(Piano) Annville Penna. 

Annville Lebanon ' Penna. 

(Voice) Lebanon Penna, 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano and Organ). ...Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano and Voice) Elizabethtown Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Voice) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Voice) Myerstown Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Palmyra Penna. 

Piano) Hershey Penna. 

Voice) Harrisburg Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Mt. Joy Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Voice) New Market Md. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Organ) Lebanon Penna. 

Organ) Sinking Springs. ...Penna. 

Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 

Piano) Lancaster Penna. 

Piano) Annville Penna. 



68 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Stehman, Anna Mae (Voice) Manheim Penna. 

Seitzinger, Verna (Piano) Annville Penna. 

Slesser, Beatrice (Piano) Palmyra Penna. 

Shadel, Russell (Piano) .Williamstown Penna. 

Shenk, Esther (Voice) Annville Penna. 

Swanger, Kathryn (Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

Walters, Violet (Piano) Annville Penna. 

Werner, Sara G (Organ) Lebanon Penna. 

Whiskeyman, Ruth (Organ) Annville Penna. 

Yinger, Mary (Voice) Columbia Penna. 

Ziegler, Rosa (Voice) Lebanon Penna. 

Zerbe, Ellen (Piano) Lebanon Penna. 

ACADEMY STUDENTS 

Andrews, Elmer Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Bartholomew, Edward P. Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bingham, Alta C Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bingham, James Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Blatt, William C Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Brenneman, Ida E Blue Ball Lancaster Penna. 

Buch, Paul S Bareville Lancaster Penna. 

Carroll, Edward S Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Danker, Joseph Hazelton Luzerne Penna. 

Eaton, Charles A Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Fortna, Ira R Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hoffman, Charles R Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Krause, Walter Darby Delaware Penna. 

Leber, Paul A Red Lion York Penna. 

Leffler, Earl Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Lengle, Blanche C Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Metoxen, Emerson Carlisle Cumberland Penna. 

Miller, Russel A Valley View Schuylkill Penna. 

Ortiz, Carlos Chiclayo Lamboyeque Peru 

Ortiz, Juan Chiclayo Lamboyeque Peru 

Ortiz. Victor Chiclayo Lamboyeque Peru 

Raudenbush, May 

Esther! Reading Berks Penna. 

Reifsnyder, Alton Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Ressler, Q. Merrill Allentown Lehigh Penna. 

Sauer, William A Annville Lebanon , Penna. 

Schwalm, Samuel K Valley View Lancaster Penna. 

Shoemaker, A. D. J Landingville Schuylkill Penna. 

Smuck, Hilliard Y Red Lion York Penna. 

Stehman, Anna Mae Manheim Lancaster Penna. 

Swanger, S. Edna Mowersville Franklin Penna. 

Walters, Margaret F Shermansdale Perry Penna. 

Zug, Mabel Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 69 

STUDENTS IN ORATORY 
JUNIORS 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Kratzert, Kathryn Littlestown Adams Penna. 

Morrow, Mae : Duncannon Perry Penna. 

Reeves, C. Mae Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Shenk, S. Lucile Annville Lebanon Penna. 

SPECIALS 

Baker, Edna Strasburg Warren Va. 

Barnhart, Mrs. Elizabeth.. Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bingham, James .Annville .Lebanon Penna. 

Greiner, Sara H Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Herr, Delia M Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Herr, S. Meyer Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Hershey, Josephine L. ....Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Hiester, Mary F Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Hiester, Ruth V Annville Lebanon .....Penna. 

Hostetter, Helen Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Hughes, Helen M York York , Penna. 

Lehman, Ethel Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Merchitis, Agnes Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Rosenberg, Goldie Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Singer, Esther Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Stehman, Anna Mae Manheim Lancaster Penna. 

Weisman, Lena Emlenton Venango Penna. 

Yake, Edna .Annville Lebanon Penna. 



SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR 1921-1922 

Graduate Students 5 

Seniors 34 

Juniors 33 

Sophomores 55 

Freshmen 102 

Specials 6 

Total in the College 235 

Extension School 43 

Summer School _ 54 

Academy 32 

Conservatory of Music 72 

Oratory 22 

Total Enrollment in all Departments 458 

Names Repeated in Summer School, Academy, Music and Oratory.... 58 

Net Enrollment 400 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Degrees Conferred June 16, 1921 

Doctor of Laws 

Judge William M. Hargest 

Judge Charles V. Henry 

Doctor of Literature 
Norman Colestock Schlichter, A.M. 

Doctor of Divinity 

Frederick Berry Plummer, A.B. 

Walter Arnold Knapp, A.B. 

Master of Arts 

George Washington Hallman, A.B. 

Harry Elias Schaeffer, A.B. 

Edward Emanuel Knauss, A.B. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Ethel Jane Angus Christine E. Happel 

Ida M. Bomberger Edgar C. Hastings 

John I. Cretzinger Ellwood D. Heiss 

Olive E. Darling Harold G. Hess 

Carrol R. Daugherty Esther E. Miller 

Grace Marie Dietz Mabel V. Miller 

Raymond L. Duncan Guy W. Moore 

Benjamin F. Emenheiser Grant W. Nitrauer 

Orin J. Farrell Cyrus B. Sherk 

Gladys Mae Fencil Mary E. Shettel 

Sara E. Garver Orville T. Spessard 

Ammon F. Haas Edith V. Stager 
Jacob J. Wolfersberger 

Bachelor of Science 
Harry W. Blauch 
Mary E. Bortner 
Russel W. Uhler 

Conservatory Diplomas Presented June 16, 192 1 

Catherine R. Englehart, Pianoforte 

Sara L. Moeckel, Pianoforte 

Beulah Swartzbaugh, Organ and Public School Music 

Emma M. Witmeyer, Public School Music 



BULLETIN 71 

Certificates in Oratory Presented June 16, 1921 

Katherine M. Hummelbaugh 

Mabel V. Miller 

Edith V. Stager 

Academy Diplomas Presented June 16, 1^21 

Elias D. Bressler 

Raymond J. Finn 

Ida E. Trout 

Roy O. Zeigler 



72 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



INDEX 

Absences 22 

Academy — Students in 66 

Advisers _ 15 

Astronomy 30 

Bible 30 

Biology 30 

Board of Trustees 6 

Buildings and Grounds 13 

Calendar , 2 

Carnegie Library 13 

Chapel 17 

Chemistry ». 32 

College Organizations 14 

Corporation 5 

Courses, College 24 

Outline of 26 

Description of 30 

Degrees Conferred 59 

Degree and Diploma 17 

Discipline _ 16 

Economics 34 

Education _ 34 

English 35 

Expenses, College 20 

Department of Music 55 

Faculty, College 7 

Department of Music _ 48 

French Language and Literature 37 

General Information 13 

German Language and Literature 37 

Graduate Work 17 

Greek Language and Literature _ 38 

History 38 

History of the College 9 

Laboratories _ 14 

Latin Language and Literature 39 

Limitations _ 17 

Mathematics 40 



BULLETIN 73 

Music Department 47 

Courses - - 49 

Oratory and Public Speaking 43 

Philosophy - 40 

Physics 41 

Physical Culture - 42 

Political Science _ 43 

Religious Work 14 

Register of Students, College 59 

Academy 68 

Department of Music 66 

Department of Oratory _ 69 

Graduate 59 

Specials 67' 

Registration IT 

Requirements for Admission, College 23' 

Scholarships - 18: 

Sociology 43 

Spanish _ 43' 

Summer School _ 77/ 



74 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, 
in the County of Lebanon, in the Township of Annville," incorporated 

under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof 

shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, in 
the County of Lebanon, in the Township of Annville," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and 

premises, that is to say to have 

and to hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its 
successors and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, or 
knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the President 
of the College, George Daniel Gossard, Annville, Pa-, and, if practicable, 
to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that the wishes of the 
testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or 
the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endowment 
of a scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of the same 
in the will provision.