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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Lebanon Valley College 
Bulletin 



Vol. XVII (New Series) March, 1929 



No. 12 



Sixty-third Annual Catalogue 
1929-1930 




PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
ANNVILLE. PA. 



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Entered as Second-Class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley192930leba 



Lebanon Valley College 
Bulletin 



Vol. XVII (New Series) March, 1929 



No. 12 



Sixty-third Annual Catalogue 
1929-1930 




PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



CALENDAR FOR 1929-30 
1929 



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COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1929 

Feb. 2 Saturday noon First semester ends 

Feb. 2 ; .Saturday Registration of students completed 

Feb. 4 Monday, 8:00 a. m Second semester begins 

Feb. 22 Friday, 8:00 p. m Seventh Anniversary Delphian Literary So- ' 

ciety '■ 

March 27 .Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. . .Easter recess begins J J 

April 3 Wednesday, 1 :00 p. m. . . Easter recess ends * | 

April 5 Friday, 8:00 p. m Fifty-second Anniversary Kalozetean Liter- 
ary Society 

May 3 Friday, 8:00 p. m Sixty-second Anniversary Philokosmian Lit- 
erary Society 

May 4 Saturday, 2:00 p. m May Day 

May 30 Thursday Memorial Day 

June 3-8 Monday-Saturday Semester examinations 

June 9 Sunday, 10:30 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 10 Monday, 11:00 a. m. . . .Meeting of Board of Trustees 

June 10 Monday, 8:00 p. m Commencement Concert 

June 11 Tuesday Alumni Day 

June 11 Tuesday, 2 :00 p. m Class Day 

June 12 Wednesday, 10:00 a. m. .Sixtieth Commencement 

1929-1930 

Sept. 18 Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.. .Dining Hall and Residences open to enter- 
ing class 

Sept. 18 Wednesday Registration of Freshmen 

Sept. 19-21. . . .Thursday-Saturday Freshman Orientation tests and lectures 

Sept. 20 Friday, 4:00 p. m Dining Hall and Residences open to ail 

students 

Sept. 21.. Saturday Supplemental Examinations and registra- 
tion of upper class students 

Sept. 21 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Y. M. C. A., and Y. W. C. A. Reception to 

new students 

Sept. 23 Monday, 10:00 a. m Opening Exercises 

Sept. 23 Monday, 1:30 p. m Lectures begin 

Nov. 4-9 Monday-Saturday Mid-Semester Examinations 

Nov. 23 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Fifty-ninth Anniversary Clionian Literary 

Society 

Nov. 26 Tuesday, 6:00 p. m President's Reception to the Faculty 

Nov. 27 Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. . .Thanksgiving recess begins 

Dec. 2 Monday, 8:00 a. m Thanksgiving recess ends 

Dec. 11 Wednesday, 8:00 p. m. . .Junior Play 

Dec. 21 Saturday noon Christmas recess begins 

Jan. 6 Monday, 1:00 p. m Christmas recess ends 

Jan, 27-Feb. I.Monday-Saturday Semester examinations 

Jan. 29-Feb. 1 . Wednesday-Saturday. ... Registration for second semester I 

Feb. 1 Saturday noon First semester ends 

Feb. 3 Monday, 8:00 a. m Second semester begins 

Feb. 22 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Eighth Anniversary Delphian Literary So- 
ciety 

April 4 Friday, 8:00 p. m Fifty-third Anniversary Kalozetean Liter- 
ary Society 

April 16 Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. . .Easter recess begins 

April 23 Wednesday, 4:00 p. m. . .Easter recess ends 

May 2 Friday, 8:00 p. m Sixty-third Anniversary Philokosmian Lit- 
erary Society ; 

May 3 Saturday, 2:00 p. m May Day ' 

May 30 Friday Memorial Day 

June 2-7 Monday-Saturday Semester examinations 

June 8 Sunday, 10:30 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 9 Monday, 11:00 a. m. . . .Meeting of Board, of Trustees 

June 10 Tuesday Alumni Day , 

June 10 Tuesday, 2:00 p. m Class Day ; 

June 11 Wednesday, 10:00 a. m. . Sixty-first Commencement 



THE CORPORATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. B. F. Daugherty, A.B., B.D., D.D Lebanon, Pa 1929 

Rev. G. W. Hallman, A.M Hummelstown, Pa 1929 

Rev. J. O. Jones, A.M., B.D Annville, Pa 1929 

Mr. C. L. Graybill Lancaster, Pa 1929 

Mr. J. R. Engle, A.B., LL.B.,LL.D Palmyra, Pa 1930 

Mr. John E. Gipple Harrisburg, Pa 1930 

Hon. Aaron S. Kreider, LL.D Annville, Pa 1930 

Rev. H. F. Rhoad, A.M., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa 1930 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A.M., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa 1931 

Rev. P. B. Gibble, A.M., B.D Palmyra, Pa 1931 

Rev. C. A. Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D Philadelphia, Pa 1931 

Rev. D. E. Young, A.M., B.D Harrisburg, Pa 1931 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. W. M. Beattie Shiremanstown, Pa 1929 

Rev. C. E. Fultz, D.D Washington, D. C 1929 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B Hagerstown, Md 1929 

Mr. Henry Wolf, A.B Mount Wolf, Pa 1929 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, B.D., Ph.D., D.D Red Lion, Pa 1930 

Rev. William R. Glen, A.B Baltimore, Md 1930 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B Baltimore, Md 1930 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst, A.B Carlisle, Pa 1930 

Rev. L. W. Lutz, A.B., D.D York, Pa 1931 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md 1931 

Rev. J. H. Ness, A.B. , B.D., D.D York, Pa 1931 

Rev. G. L Rider, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md 1931 

Representatives from Virginia Conference 

Rev. J. N. Fries, A.M Berkley Springs, W. Va. . . 1929 

Rev. A. J. Sechrist Martinsburg, W. Va 1929 

Rev. J. H. Brunk, D.D Martinsburg, W. Va 1930 

Rev. G. W. Stover Winchester, Va 1930 

Rev. W. F. Gruver, D.D Martinsburg, W. Va 1931 

Mr. E. C. Wine, A.B Harrisonburg, Va 1931 

Alumni Trustees 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush, '03, A.M Minersville, Pa 1929 

Prof. H. H. Baish, '01, A.M Harrisburg, Pa 1930 

Mr. A. K. Mills, '04, A.M Annville, Pa 1931 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



President Hon. A. S. Kreider 

Vice President E. N. Funkhouser 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 

Executive Committee 

A. S. Kreider S. C. Enck C. E. Fultz 

W. M. McFaul J. H. Brunk 

Finance Committee 

A. S. Kreider, Chairman 
J. R. Engle J. E. GiPPLE H. H. Baish G. D. Gossard 

E. N. Funkhouser W. F. Gruver S. H. Derickson 

Auditing Committee 

E. C. Wine, Chairman 
H. E. Shaejpfer W. N. McFaul 

Nominating Committee 

J. R. Engle, Chairman 
L. W. LuTZ E. C. Wine H. H. Baish 

Faculty Committee 

S. C. Enck, Chairman 
E. N. Funkhouser J. H. Brunk A. K. Mills 

Buildings and Grounds Committee 

P. B. Gibble, Chairman 
J, O. Jones J. E. Gipple I. S. Ernst W. F. Gruver 

Library and Apparatus Committee 

H. H. Baish, Chairman 
R. "R. BuTTERWicK R. G. MowREY G. W. Stover 

Farm Committee 

J. R. Engle, Chairman 
Henry Wolf A. J. Sechrist G. D. Gossard S. H. Derickson 

Publicity Committee 

G. A. Richie, Chairman 
Andrew Bender P. B. Gibble J. H. Ness G. I. Rider 



Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D., LL.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, A.M Registrar 

MRS, MARY C. GREEN Dean of Women 

ALBERT BARNHART Agent of the Finance Committee 



FACULTY 

HIRAM H. SHENK, A.M., LL.D Professor of History 

A. B., Ursinus College, 1899; A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 1900; 
Student, University of Wisconsin, summer term; Instructor in Political 
Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1899-1900; Professor of History and 
Political Science, 1900-1916; Custodian of Public Records, Pennsylvania 
State Library, 1916 to date; Instructor in Y. AI. C. A. Summer Schools, 
Blue Ridge, N. C, 1916-1920, Silver Bay, 1918, and Lake Geneva, 1921; ■ 
Educational Secretary, Army Y. M. C. A., Camp Travis, 1917-1918; 
Professor of History, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

SAMUEL H. DERICKSON, M.S., Sc.D., , Professor of Biological 
Science 

B. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1902; graduate student, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1902-1903; M. S., Lebanon Valley College, 1903; Sc.D., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1925; Professor of Biological Science, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1903; Land Zoologist, Bahama Expedition, Baltimore 
Geographical Society, summer 1904; Director, collection of Eocene and 
Miocene Fossils for Vassar College, summer 1908; Student Marine 
Biology, Bermuda, summer 1909; Student Tropical Botanical Gardens, 
Jamaica, summer 1910; Student Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, 
summer 1911; Acting President of Lebanon Valley College, summer 
1912; Fellow American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
The Botanical Society of America, the Phytopathological Society of 
America — 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, B.Pd., A.M., Professor of Physics and 
Mathematics and Registrar 

Millersville State Normal School, 1907; B.Pd., ibid., 1910; A. B., 
Lebanon V'alley College, 1912; A. M., ibid., 1917; Columbia University, 
1914-1916; Professor of Education and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 
191S — . Registrar, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Political 
Science and Economics 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 
Alexandria, Pa., 1911-1912; Principal of High School, Linglestown, Pa., 
1912-1913; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1916; Mem- 
ber of Law Bar of Lebanon County and of Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Bar; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Lebanon Valley 
College, 1916— 



BULLETIN 7 

PAUL S. WAGNER, M.A., Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., lyebanon Valley College, 1917; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1917-18; Military Service, 1918-19; Headmaster, Franklin 
Day School, Baltimore, Md., and graduate student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1919-20; Y. M. C. A. Educational Conference, Silver Bay, 
N. Y., Summer 1920; Graduate Student, Columbia University, Summers 
1921-23; Instructor in Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 1920-23; 
Travel and study in Europe, Summer 1922; M. A., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1925; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Professor of 
Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

MRS. MARY C. GREEN Professor of French and Dean of Women 

Student, New York Conservatory of Music, 1896-97; Private Teacher 
of Piano, 1897-1900; Travel and Study: Berlin, 1900-01; Paris. 1901- 
1909; Florence, 1909-10; Johannesburg, 1910-11; Paris, 1911-14; In- 
structor in French, Lebanon Valley College, 1916-20; Study abroad, 
Ecole des Vacances, L' Alliance Francaise, Paris, 1923; Professor of 
French and Dean of Women, Lebanon Valley College, 1920 — 

ANDREW BENDER, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1906; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1914; 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Lebanon Valley College, 1907- 
1909; Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, Columbia University, 1912-1914; 
In Industrial Chemistry, 1914-1921; Chief Chemist, Aetna Explosives 
Company; Chemical Director, British American Chemical Company; 
Director of Control Laboratory, The Barrett Company; Professor oi 
Chemistry, Lebanon Valley College, 1921 — 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK, A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of 

Philosophy and Bible 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; A. M., ibid., 1904; B. D., Bone- 
brake Theological Seminary, 1905; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 1910; 
twenty-six years in the Ministry; Professor of Philosophy and Religion, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1921-1922; Professor of Philosophy and Bible, 
1922— 

HELEN ETHEL MYERS, A.B Librarian 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Drexel Institute Library School, 
1908; Assistant New York Public Library, 1908-1910; Cataloger, Univer- 
sity of Chicago Library, 1910-1911; Librarian, Public Library, Lancaster, 
Pa., 1912-1921; Member American Library Association; Lebanon Valley 
College Librarian, 1921 — 

HAROLD BENNETT, Ph.D., Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professor of 
Latin Language and Literature 

B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; military service 
■ with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915-1918; Fellow in Latin, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1919-1921; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1921; 
Professor of Latin, College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C, 1921-1922; 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Lebanon Valley College, 
1922-28; Leave of absence, 1928-1929. 

ETHEL MARY BENNETT, B.A., Professor of French Literature 

and German 
B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; in charge of 
Modern Language Department, Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby, Ont., 
1915-1919; Tutor in French and German, University of Chicago, 1920- 
1921; Graduate Student, Univ. of Chicago, Summer, 1922; Pro- 
fessor of French Literature, Lebanon Valley College, 1922-28; Leave of 
absence, 1928-1929. 



8 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

E. E. MYLIN, A.M Physical Director and Coach 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1916; A. M., ibid., 1917; Officers 
Training Camp, Ft. Niagara, Summer of 1917; twenty-nine months U. S. 
Army; Athletic Officer in charge of Athletics 79th Division, A. E. F., 
Spring 1919; Instructor in Mathematics and Coach Massanutten Military 
Academy, 1919-20; Coach Iowa State College, 1920-23; Lebanon Valley 
College, 1923— 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education and 
Psychology 
Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of schools, 1903-1913; Diploma, 
Illinois State Normal University, 1914; A.B., University of Illinois, 
1916; M.A., Columbia University, 1917; Ph.D., Columbia University, 
1927; Head of the department of Education and Psychology, College of 
Puget Sound, 1917-1920; Student L,eland Stanford University, Summer 
quarter, 1920; Professor of Psychology and Education, University of 
Rochester, 1920-1923; Student Columbia University, Summers 1921 and 
1922; Assistant in school administration, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, Summer 1924; Professor of Education and Psychology, 
Ivebanon Valley College, 1924 — 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE, Ph.D Professor of English 

B.A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; Military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1916-1918; College of Education, 
Toronto, 1918-1919; Lecturer in English, University of Alberta, 1919-1922; 
M.A., 1923, University of Toronto; Ph.D., 1925, University of Toronto; 
Instructor in English, University of Toronto, 1923-1925; Professor of 
English, Lebanon Valley College, 1925 — ■ 

G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE, A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of Bible and 
New Testament Greek 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1913; B.D., Bonebrake Seminary, 1917; 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1923; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1927; Residence requirements Ph.D. completed at U. of P., 1927; Ten 
years in Ministry; Assistant, Marble Collegiate Church, N. Y., 1913-14; 
Professor of Bible and New Testament Greek, Lebanon Valley College, 
1925— 

MILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 

B.A., University College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of 
English and History, Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; Lecturer in Finance and 
Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23; LL.B., University 
of Toronto, 1926; Lecturer in Economics Extension Dept., University 
of Toronto, 1923-26; Barrister-at-Law Degree, Osgoode Hall Law School, 
Toronto, 1926; Member of the Bar, Province of Ontario; Professor of 
Business Administration, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

MARY KATHRYN WALLACE, A.M., Associate Professor of English 

Ohio Wesleyan University, A.B., 1923; Frances E. Bennett Scholarship 
in English, University of Pennsylvania, 1923-24; University of Pennsyl- 
vinia, A.M., 1924; Instructor of English, Ohio Wesleyan University, 
1924-25; Instructor of English, Hollins College, Va., 1925-26; Associate 
Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

E. H. STEVENSON, M.A. (Oxon.) Professor of History 

A.B., Hendrix College, 1916; U. S. Navy. 1917-18; graduate student in 
University of Arkansas, 1919; Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, 1919- 
1922; student University of Grenoble, summer of 1921; instructor Wil- 
mington Friends' School, George School, Muhlenberg College, 1922-1928; 
part time student. University of Pennsylvania, 1924-28; completed course 
and residence requirements for Ph.D. degree; Professor of History, Leb- 
anon Valley College, 1928 — 



BULLETIN 9 

MARY STELLA JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor of French 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Travel and Study abroad, 
France, Germany, Italy, 1920-1923; Professor of French and Spanish, 
La Grange College, La Grange, Georgia, 1923-1924; Graduate Study, The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1924-1925; University of Grenoble, Grenoble, 
France, 1925-1926; Diplome de Hautes Etudes de Langue et de Literature 
Francaises, University of Grenoble, 1926; graduate student and Instructor 
in French, The Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1928; Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1928; Professor of French Literature and German, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1928 — 

DONALD E. FIELDS, A.M., Acting Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924; Instructor in Latin, Palmer Institute, 
Starkey Seminary, Lakemont, New York, 1924-1925; Student, Princeton 
University; 1925-1926; Instructor, Chestnut Hill Academy, Chestnut Hill, 
Pa., 1926-1927; Student, Princeton University, 1927-1928; A.M., 1928; 
Acting Professor Latin Language and Literature, Lebanon Valley College, 
1928— 

MIRIAM R. POLK, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Hygiene 

A.B., Goucher College, 1917; M.D., Johns Plopkins University, 1923; 
Resident Physician, Philadelphia General Hospital, 1923-1925; Private 
practice, Harrisburg; Staff of Harrisburg Hospital, 1925; Assistant Medi- 
cal Examiner, Harrisburg Public Schools; Associate Professor of Hygiene, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1928 — 

E. WINIFRED CHAPMAN, A.B., Director of Physical Education 
for Women 

Two-year Diploma in Physical Education, Temple University, 1923; A.B., 
Swarthmore College, 1928; Assistant Director of Physical Education, Swarth- 
more College, 1924-28; Six summers of Camp work; Three summers of 
playground work; Director of Physical Education for Women, Lebanon 
Valley College, 1928— 

V. EARL LIGHT, M.S Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1926; 
Candidate for the Ph.D. degree in the Department of Zoology at The 
Johns Hopkins University, June, 1929; Associate Professor of Biology, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1929 — - 



JOHN EVANS LEHMAN, A.M., Sc.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathe- 
matics and Astronom,y 
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy in Lebanon Valley College, 1887 
to 1923; Died, August 28, 1928. 



CONSERVATORY FACULTY 

RUTH ELIZABETH ENGLE, A.B., Director of the Conservatory of 

Music; Pianoforte, Form and Composition 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-16; 
Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, 1918; Teacher of 
Piano and Theory, Lebanon \'alley College, 1919-21; Pupil of Ernest 
Hutchinson, Francis Moore and Frank EaForge, New York City; Graduate 
courses at Columbia University in Composition, Improvisation and 
Musical Pedagogy under Frederick Schlieder, 1922-1924; Director of 
Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 1924 — 

R. PORTER CAMPBELL, Mus.B., Pianoforte, Organ, Harmony, 

Counterpoint and History of Music 

Diploma in Pianoforte, Lebanon \'alley College, Conservatory, 1915; 
Diploma in Organ and Bachelor of Music degree ibid, 1916; Teacher of 
Pianoforte, History and Theory, 1915-1917; U. S. Service, 1917-1919; 
Pianoforte and Pedagogy under Aloys Kramer and Arthur Freidheim, 
Summer Session, New York, 1921; Master Course in Organ Playing with 
Pietro A. Yon, New York, Summer of 1923 and Season of 1924; with 
Pietro A. Yon in Italy Summer of 1924; Organist St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, Lebanon, Pa.; Teacher at Lebanon Valley College Conservatory 
of Music, 1920 — 

EDITH FRANTZ MILLS Voice 

Graduate of Lebanon Valley College, Voice Department, 1908; student 
of A. Y. Cornell, New York, 1909-1911; Student of Madam Onistrom- 
Renard; Vocal Teacher, Lebanon N'alley College, 1912; Student of A. Y. 
Cornell Summer School, 1912, 1914, 1917 and 1922; Vocal Teacher, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1923 — ; Pupil of Mme. Cahier, Curtis Institute, 
1924. 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of !Musicai Art, New York City (Dr. Frank 
Damrosch, Director); teacher in the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y.; Instructor of Violin, Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 
1924— 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens, H. Sutton Goddard and Wm. Shakespeare, 
London, England. Private Studio, Denver, Colorado, 1916-23; Summer 
1919 Deems Taylor and Percy Rector Stephens; Private studio Carnegie 
Hall, N. Y. C, 1924-27; Vocal Instructor, Lebanon Valley College, 1927— 



BULLETIN 11 

SUPERVISORS OF PRACTICE TEACHING 
Annville High School 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D., Columbia University, 1927, Head 
Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College 

CHARLES G. DOTTER, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1909, Super- 
vising Principal 

ADA C. BOSSARD, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, French and Euro- 
pean History 

MARION D. HESS, A.B., Lebanon Valley College Latin 

STELLA M. HUGHES, B.S., Lebanon Valley College Science 

JEROME W. FROCK, B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College, 1925, 
Ad^cithciHCitics 

ELIZABETH I. WENRICH, B.S. in Ed., University of Pennsylvania, 
1924, English 

EMMA R. MEYERS, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1928, Social Sci- 
ence and English 



ASSISTANTS— LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

LAWRENCE B. DERICKSON, '29 Assistant in Biology 

BAYARD L. HAMMOND, '29 Assistant in Biology 

STELLA M. HUGHES, '25 Assistant in Botany 

PALMER E. POFF, '29 Assistant in Botany 

MARION E. HEAPS, '30 Assistant in Chemistry 

ROBERT W. JACKS, '30 Assistant in Chemistry 

CLARENCE I. NOLL, '30 Assistant in Chemistry 

CARL E. HEILMAN; 29 Assistant in Physics 

MAE M. HAMER, '29 Assistant in Education 

EMMELINE M. SHAFFER, '29 Assistant in Education 

NANCY M. ULRICH, '29 Assistant in Education 

CAROL E. BRINSER, '29 Assistant in English 

FRANCES T. HAMMOND, '29 Assistant in English 

DONALD D. KULP, '26 Assistant in English 

MIRIAM L. MUTH. '29 Assistant in English 

RUTH A. STRUBHAR, '29 Assistant in English 

IRENE A. SCHROPE, '29 Assistant in French 

L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 Assistant in German 

J. CALVIN KEENE, '30 Assistant in Greek 

RUSSELL E. MORGAN, '31 Assistant in Mathematics 

WILLIAM J. MYERS, '30 Assistant in Mathematics 

BAYARD L. HAMMOND, '29 Assistant in Spanish 

MARY BLANCHE COCHRAN, '30,.. Assistant in Physical Education 
for Women 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 



IN response to a very general and growing desire, frequently 
expressed by both the laity and the ministry, the East Penn- 
sylvania Annual Conference of the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ, at the session held at Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
March, 1865, passed by a large vote a resolution to establish a high- 
grade institution of learning, conveniently located within the bounds 
of the East Pennsylvania or the Pennsylvania Conference. This mat- 
ter was referred to a committee consisting of the Revs. Daniel S. 
Early, G. W. Miles Rigor, W. S. H. Keys and Messrs. John B. Steh- 
man and Abraham Sherk, with instructions to confer with a similar 
committee from the Pennsylvania Conference and to determine 
upon a location. One year later, in March, 1866, this committee 
reported to the Annual Conference session held at Columbia, Penn- 
sylvania, and recommended the following: 

First, the establishment of a school of high grade under the 
supervision of the Church; second, the acceptance for this purpose 
of the grounds and buildings then known as the Annville Academy 
(a private institution founded and conducted as such since 1834), 
which had been tendered as a gift to the Conference; third, the 
leasing of the buildings and grounds to a responsible party competent 
to take charge of the school for the following year. The following 
were elected as a Board of Trustees: Revs. D. S. Early, George A. 
Mark, G. W. Miles Rigor, J. B. Daugherty, Lewis W. Craumer, 
David Hoffman, and Messrs. John B. Stehman, John H. Kinports, 
Abraham Sherk, Rudolph Herr, H. H. Kreider and Samuel Walmer. 

School opened May 7, 1866, with forty-nine students. By the 
close of the collegiate year one hundred and fifty-one were enrolled, 
thus demonstrating at once the need of such an institution in this 
locality and the wisdom of the founders. 

In April, 1867, the Legislature granted a charter with full univer- 
sity privileges under which a College faculty was organized with 
Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D., as president, and Prof. E. Ben- 
jamin Bierman, A.M., as principal of the Normal Department. The 
same year the Philokosmian Literary Society was organized by 
the young men, additional land was purchased and a large brick 
building erected thereon with chapel, recitation rooms, president's 
office, and apartments for sixty boarding students. This building 
was not furnished and fully occupied till the fall of 1868. 



BULLETIN 13 

During the administration of President Vickroy the laws and 
regulations for the internal workings of the College were framed 
and adopted, the curriculum established, and the first regular com- 
mencement held on June 16, 1870. In 1872, through the leadership 
of the Misses Sarah Burns, Rebecca Kinports and Ellen Jane Mark, 
the Clionian Literary Society was organized. In 1877, for the pur- 
pose of stimulating wholesome rivalry among the men, another 
literary society was organized. Mr. Horace S. Kephart prepared 
the constitution and by-laws and Prof. Louis H. McFadden suggested 
the name "Kalozetean," which was adopted. 

In the summer of 1883 a large two-story frame building was 
erected on College Avenue, containing an art room, music rooms, 
the department of natural science, a museum and the College library. 

On January 1, 1888, the first number of "The College Forum" 
appeared under the editorship of the Faculty. 

Among the early friends of the College was Mrs. Mary A. Dodge, 
who gave to the College a fund of ten thousand dollars, the interest 
of which is "to be loaned without charge to such pious young people 
as the Faculty of the College may deem worthy of help." The 
Silver Anniversary of the College was observed in June, 1892. 
The money secured on this occasion was used to purchase three 
acres of land which was added to the campus. 

In 1897, the College began an era of enlargement which resulted 
in an addition to the old Administration Building, making it twice 
as large as before, the erection of the Engle Music Hall in 1899, 
the Carnegie Library and North Hall (the women's dormitory) in 
1904. The large Athletic Field at the east end of the town was 
also added to the assets of the College during this time. 

The disastrous fire on the night of December 24, 1904, when the 
Administration Building was entirely destroyed, tested the loyalty 
of the patrons and friends of the College. At a meeting held 
January 5, 1905, the friends of the College resolved, amid unusual 
enthusiasm, to rebuild at once, and with the stimulus of a gift of 
fifty thousand dollars from Andrew Carnegie (who had previously 
given $20,000 for the library building), plans were matured by which 
to raise one hundred thousand dollars for this purpose. The erection 
of three new buildings was projected — the Men's Dormitory, the 
Central Heating Plant and the new Administration Building. 

Through the untiring zeal and earnest efforts of President Law- 
rence Kiester, D.D., a gift was secured from a friend of the College 
in western Pennsylvania to equip the Tyrone Biological Laboratory. 
The Bishop J. S. Mills and the H. S. Immel Scholarships were also 
added to the funds of the College. At the death of the Rev. Daniel 



14 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Eberly, D.D., July 9, 1910, whose will bears date of September 
17, 1909, the College came into possession of property valued at 
about $52,000, the major portion for the endowment of the Josephine 
Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin Language and Literature. 

Beginning with 1912, the College entered upon its greatest era 
of enlargement and prosperity. Since that date the student body 
has increased with great rapidity, more than trebling its numbers. 
Continued progress of the College, however, demanded the securing 
of an adequate endowment. To meet this need the cooperating Con- 
ferences conducted an intensive endowment campaign, which closed 
June 26, 1918, with subscriptions amounting to nearly $400,000. 

The faculty and leading students realizing the need of an addi- 
tional women's literary society, organized the Delphian Literary 
Society in October, 1921. 

West Hall, a dormitory for young women, was purchased two years 
ago. 

Stimulated by a conditional gift of $175,000 for endowment from 
the General Education Board, New York City, which had previously 
given $24,000 for faculty salaries, the Board of Trustees of the 
College authorized the raising of a fund of $700,000 during the 
summer of 1924. By hearty cooperation and most heroic eflforts the 
goal was reached July 1, 1924. By April 1, 1930 the College will 
have property worth $600,000 and endowment of over $900,000. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The College is situated in Annville, a progressive and cultured 
town twenty-one miles east of Harrisburg in the beautiful, healthful 
and fertile Lebanon Valley. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

There are nine buildings on the campus: the Administration 
Building, the Carnegie Library, the Engle Conservatory of Music, 
the Women's Dormitory, the Men's Dormitory, South Hall, West 
Hall, the Heating Plant and the President's Residence. 

THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING contains the adminis- 
tration offices which are of fire proof construction, the recitation 
rooms of the College, the chemical and physical laboratories, and the 
Tyrone Biological Laboratory, the equipment of which was provided 
for by a gift from a friend froin western Pennsylvania, who also 
named it. 

The Alumni Gymnasium occupies the ground floor. Here are pro- 
vided over seven thousand square feet of floor space for the use of 
the department of physical culture and the promotion of athletic 
activities. The gymnasium has, in addition to the gymnasium floor, 
separate locker rooms for the teams, an apparatus room, and shower 
baths. 

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY, erected in 1904, furnishes com- 
modious quarters for the growing library of the College. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor, splendidly lighted and 
ventilated, and beautifully furnished, are provided with the leading 
magazines and daily papers. Periodicals devoted to the special work 
of each department are here, as well as magazines of general litera- 
ture. On the second floor are six seminar rooms designed to be 
equipped with the special works of reference for the various depart- 
ments. 

THE ENGLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, erected in 1899, 
contains the college chapel, a director's office and studio, practice 
rooms, and a large society hall. The building is well equipped with 
pianos and two large pipe organs. 

THE WOMEN'S DORMITORY, NORTH HALL, was erected 
in 1905, and is a building of beautiful proportions. In addition to 
rooms which will accommodate forty-five students, there are a 
society hall, a dining hall, a well-equipped kitchen, and a laundry, 

THE MEN'S DORMITORY, erected in 1905, contains single 



16 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

and double rooms and sixteen suites of two bed-rooms with a sepa- 
rate study-room. These afford accommodations for more than one 
hundred students. 

SOUTH HALL, the original building of the institution, acquired 
by gift in 1866, when the College was founded, has been remodeled 
as a women's dormitory and contains the Women's Infirmary. 

WEST HALL at the northwest corner of the campus was pur- 
chased during the summer of 1926. It was remodeled, enlarged, and 
accommodates about thirty girls. 

THE HEATING PLANT, erected in 1905, contains a low pres- 
sure heating system, and supplies the heat for the buildings on the 
campus. It is constructed with a view to the installation of a lighting 
plant. 

THE PRESIDENT'S RESIDENCE is situated on the north- 
west corner of the campus. 

THE CAMPUS of twelve acres, occupies a high point in the 
center of Annville and is within easy access of trolley and railroad 
lines. 

THE ATHLETIC FIELD of five and one-half acres is well 
located and admirably adapted to the purpose for which it is intended. 

LABORATORIES 

The entire northern half of the Administration Building is occupied 
by the Department of Science. The Department of Chemistry 
occupies the first floor; Physics, the second; and Biology, the third. 

The laboratories of each department are constructed after the most 
approved modern methods. The lecture rooms are provided with 
risers and Columbia tablet chairs. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

The College has always tried to furnish religious training, and 
encourages all means of promoting Christian influence. Each morn- 
ing a regular service is held in the College Chapel, at which the 
students are required to be present. 

A students' prayer-meeting is held once a week, and opportunities 
for Bible study and mission study are offered by the Christian Asso- 
ciations in addition to those afforded by the regular curriculum. 

All resident students of the College are expected to attend public 
worship in the churches of their choice, every Sunday. 
Christian The College has Young Men's and Young Women's 

Associations Christian Associations, which hold regular weekly 
devotional services and conduct special courses of 
Bible and mission study. They are centers of the spiritual interests 



i 



j 



BULLETIN 17 

of the students and deserve the hearty support of all connected with 
the college. Under these auspices public lectures, entertainments 
and socials are held, which contribute to the pleasure of the student 
body. 

COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 
Literary Excellent opportunities for literary improvement and 

Societies parliamentary training are afforded by the societies 
of the College. There are four of these societies — 
Philokosmian, Kalozetean, Clionian and Delphian. The last two are 
conducted by the girls of the college. These societies meet every 
Friday evening in their well-furnished halls. They are valuable 
agencies in college work, and students are advised to unite with one 
of them. 

Athletic ' The Athletic Association is composed of all the stu- 

Association dents of the College and the cooperating Alumni. 
Athletics are controlled by a Council consisting of 
representatives of the faculty and alumni. 

Student A group of students possessing ability in management 
Publication and composition is selected annually by the Faculty 
to bring out a periodical, La Vie CoUegienne, devoted 
to college and student interests. This encourages students to write 
for publication, and affords training of a highly specialized character 
to a number of those interested in editorial work. 

LITERARY AND MUSICAL ADVANTAGES 

During the college year, the student body has the privilege of 
hearing lectures and talks delivered by men of note in Church and 
literary circles. 

The department of music presents a number of programs during 
the year. Concerts and recitals by prominent musicians are given 
under the patronage of the Department of Music with the aim of 
creating in the student body an appreciation of the best in art. 

ADMINISTRATION 
Admission Candidates wishing to enter Lebanon Valley College 
by certificate must present credits from High Schools, 
Normal Schools, and Academies as soon as possible. Since it is at 
present necessary to limit the Freshman Class to one hundred and 
twenty-five (125) students, applications for admission will be con- 
sidered by the committee on admissions on the basis of compara- 
tive merit. Blanks for this purpose may be had on application. 

Vo. » 



18 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Candidates desiring to enter by examination must make applica- 
tion for the examination two weeks before the opening of the school 
year. Upon receipt of this application the time and place of the 
examination will be arranged. 

Reeistration Registration is the process of class assignment and 
is completed over the signatures of the adviser and 

the Registrar. No student will be admitted to any class without the 

proper registration card which is sent direct to the department of 

instruction from the Registrar's office. 
The registration days for the collegiate year 1929-30 are as follows: 

First semester, Sept. 18 for freshmen and Sept. 21 for other students; 

second semester, Jan. 29, 30, 31. 

To expedite the opening of the school year in Sep- 

Pre-registration ^gj^^er, all students of 1928-29 will be registered 

during the month of May for the ensuing year's work. A fee of 

one dollar will be charged when this is not attended to at the time 

appointed. Changes in registration will be made in September 

without charge. 

Students registering later than the days specified will 
be charged a fee of one dollar. Students desiring to 
register later than one week after the opening of the 

semester will be admitted only by special action of the proper 

committee. 



Late 
Registration 



Change of 
Registration 



When change of registration is advisable or neces- 
sary such changes must be made in the same way 
as the original registration, namely, over the signa- 
tures of the adviser and Registrar. Such changes will not be per- 
mitted after the close of the second week of the session. 
. J . The head of the department in which a student has 

^VuVlSCFS 

elected to major becomes the adviser for that student. 
The adviser's approval is necessary before a student may register for 
or enter upon any course of study, or discontinue any work. He is 
the medium of communication between the Faculty and the students 
majoring in his department, and, in a general way, stands to his 
students in the relation of a friendly counselor. 

p. ... . Classification will be made on the following credit 
basis: Freshman standing, 15 Carnegie units; Sopho- 
more standing, 30 semester hours; Junior standing, 60 semester 
hours; Senior standing, 90 semester hours. 

Advanced Credits for work done in other institutions, for which 
Standing advanced standing is desired, must be submitted to the 

committee on College Credits and a copy filed with the 
Registrar. 



BULLETIN 19 

. Every resident student must take at least fifteen hours 

* of work as catalogued. Any student at the close of the 

semester failing to pass sixty per cent- of the work for 

which he is registered will be required to withdraw from the 

institution. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work, above that pre- 
scribed by the curriculum, is linjited by the student's previous record, 
as follows: 

(a) Majority of A's — three hours. 

(b) Lower record than majority of A's — no extra hours. 

^, Class standing will be determined at the middle and 

Class 

_ . end of each semester for Faculty consideration. Reports 

of standing will be made to parents or guardians at the 

end of each semester, or when the Faculty deems it expedient. The 

standing is indicated generally by classification in seven groups, as 

follows : 

A (90-100%) signifies that the record of the student is distin- 
guished. 

B (80-89%) signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C (70-79%) signifies that the record is good. 

D (60-69%) signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (below 60%) imposes a condition on the student. 

F (Failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subject and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

I (Incomplete) signifies that work is incomplete, but other- 
wise satisfactory. 
Graduation A grade of C or better must be obtained in at least 

Credit half of the total number of semester hours required 

for graduation. 

If the student's record as a whole is poor, he may be required to 
repeat certain subjects, to repeat the year's work, or to withdraw. 
Conditions and Except in the case of the final examinations of 
Re-examinations seniors, no immediate re-examination will be 
given to students falling below the passing mark 
on the regular examinations. 

Students obtaining a final average below 60% but above 50% 
in not more than two subjects will be given a "Condition" in these 
courses, and such Conditions may be removed by obtaining a mark 
of 60% or more on a re-examination to be taken at the College 
during the days appointed for registration for the following year, 
or at the regular examinations of the following year. The subject 
matter of such an examination will be the whole work of either 



20 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

the first or second semester, or both, according to where the student 
failed to obtain the required 60%. 

A fee of $3.00' will be charged for each examination for the re- 
moval of a Condition. 

Conditions imposed at the end of the first year must be removed 
before the student enters the third year, and those imposed at the 
end of the second or third year must be removed before entering 
the senior year. Failure to remove a Condition within the above 
specified time converts the Condition into a Failure. 

Absences Should a student be absent once beyond twice the 
number of times a class meets each week, he will be 
required to take a special examination, for which a fee of one dollar 
will be charged. Such examination must be taken within a week of 
the excess absence; otherwise the student will lose his class standing. 
Absences immediately preceding or following vacation will be 
counted double. 

Discipline The rules of the College are as few and simple as the 
proper regulation of a community of young men and 
women will permit. The government of the dormitories is under 
the immediate control of the student councils, committees of stu- 
dents authorized by the College authorities. 

Chapel All students are required to attend the morning chapel 
service. Failure to attend will be ground for action by 
the Faculty upon recommendation of the Committee on Chapel 
Attendance. 

Limitations Students are limited to two of the following college 
activities: Quittapahilla, Glee Club, Plays, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball and Base Ball. This regulation can be set aside only 
by a special action of the Faculty. 

No games between college organizations may be engaged in dur- 
ing study hours except by permission of the Faculty. 

Degree and The Baccalaureate degree will be conferred by the 

Diploma Board of Trustees on recommendation of the Faculty, 

upon students who shall have completed a minimum 

of 126 semester hours, and have obtained, in each case, a grade of C 

or better in not less than one-half of the total number. 

Residence The A.B. and B.S. and B.S. in Economics degrees 

Requirement will, however, be conferred only upon candidates who 

have spent at least a full year in actual residence. 

The residence requirement for the degree of B.S. in Education is 

stated in detail on page 42. 



BULLETIN 21 

GRADUATE WORK LEADING TO THE MASTER'S 
DEGREE 

Graduate work leading to the master's degree will be done in a 
limited way. Candidates desiring to pursue such courses may ad- 
dress the Registrar or the President of the College for a copy of the 
regulations pertaining to this type of work. 

SUMMER, EXTENSION AND SATURDAY AND EVENING 

SCHOOLS 

In addition to the work offered as outlined in this catalog the 
college offers fully accredited work under three additional schedules 
as follows: Summer School, Extension School, Saturday and Even- 
ing School. 

Persons interested in any of these schedules should apply to the 
Registrar for special bulletin outlining the same. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

The College offers a limited number of tuition scholarships of 
seventy dollars a year. 

Students preparing for the ministry in the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ and having quarterly or annual conference license 
to preach, will be entitled to $100.00 reduction in tuition in the college 
on certain conditions. 

The Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fnnd 

This fund, established by a gift of $1,000, is available. 
The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by gifts amounting to $5,000, is available "for young 
men in college who are preparing for the ministry in the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ." 

The Eliza Bittingrer Eberly Fund 

This fund consists of the income of a farm located near East Berlin, Adams 
County, Pa. 

The Daniel Eberly Fund 

This fund is available and is to be loaned to worthy students seeking an 
education in college. 

The Bev. H. C. Fhillips Scholarship Fund 

This fund, established by a gift of $1,300 in memory of Rev. H. _C. Phillips, 
given by his wife and daughter, is available for young men preparing for the 
ministry. 

The Mary A. Dodgre Fund 

The income from this fund is loaned to worthy students. 
The Charles B. Bettew Scholarship 
This scholarship in Bonebrake Theological Seminary is limited to students 
from the East Pennsylvania Conference, who are graduates from Lebanon Valley 
College. 

The Dr. Henry B. Stehman Fund 

This fund has been provided by Dr. Henry B. Stehman to help needy minis- 
terial students. This fund is awarded by the President of the College. 

^Elizabeth A. Mower Scholarship Fond 

This fund was provided by a gift of $200 from Miss Elizabeth A. Mower, 
the income of which is to be used to help a needy student. 



22 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

SCHOLARSHIPS PLEDGED DtTRTXG THE ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN 

OF 1918 

The following is a list of Scholarship Funds which were subscribed during 
and since the endowment campaign of 1918: 

The Biological Scholarship $3,010.00 

The Medical Scholarship 825.00 

The Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The S. F. Engle Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

The Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Mary C. Bixler Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Otterbein Sunday School, Harrisburg, Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

The Henry C. and Anna S. Kaufman and Family Scholarship Fund.... 1,000.00 

The Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1 ,000.00 

The Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund (1st, 2nd and 3rd funds) 5,000.00 

The Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 3,366.00 

The G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The A. S. Kreider Scholarship Fund for Ministerial Students 10,000.00 

Penna. Conference Branch C. E. Scholarship 2,296.00 

East Penna. Conference Branch C. E. Scholarship 800.00 

SCHOLABSHIP AND TRUST FUNDS SUBSCRIBED IN THE 1924 
CAMPAIGN AND SINCE 

Allegheny Conference Christian Endeavor Scholarship Fund $1,000.00 

I<illian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial S. S. Scholarship Fund. , 3,000.00 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 500.00 

I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Class of 1928 Scholarship Fund 1,345.00 

John P. Cowling Memorial Fund 500.00 

Derickson Scholarship Fund 1,250.00 

East Pennsylvania Conference Christian Endeavor Union Scholarship Fund 2,200.00 

East Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Samuel F. Engle Scholarship Fund 4,000.00 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 900.00 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund (In Memory of his Father and Mother, 

William and Elizabeth Foos) 1,000.00 

Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship 1,000.00 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 2,000.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Church of the United Brethren in Christ Scholar- 
ship Fund 5,300.00 

J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 200.00 

Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H, Kleffman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The A. S. Kreider Ministerial Fund 5,000.00 

W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

John Evans Eehman Chair of Mathematics 45,800.00 

Max F. Eehman Memorial Fund, Established by Class of 1907 400.00 

Mrs. Savilla Loux Scholarship 1,000.00 

Lykens United Brethren Church Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Mechanicsburg U. B. Sunday School Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Elizabeth May Meyer Scholarship Fund 1,550.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Pennsylvania Branch Women's Missionary Association Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Pennsylvania (inference C. E. Union Scholarship Fund 1,500.00 

Grace U. B. Church of Penbrook, Pa., Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 1,645.00 

Harvey L,. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Henry B. Stehman Fund for Theological Students 750.00 



EXPENSES 

The rates on the following pages apply to the school year 1929-1930. 

MATRICULATION 

The Matriculation fee in the College is $25.00, and must be paid 
on or before September 1 to assure accommodations. This fee is not 
subject to refund, nor is there any rebate allowed for any reason. 
The greater portion of this fee is used for student activities. 

Special students who take less than half work in the regular ap- 
pointed classes, or any students who take work outside of regular 
recitation periods, are required to pay matriculation according to the 
number of hours taken. 

Matriculation for Music ranges from one dollar to twenty-five 
dollars. No additional fee is required for music from students who 
have already matriculated for College departments. 

TUITION 

For seventeen hours or less in the College the annual tuition is 
$200. Six dollars will be charged for each additional hour of work 
taken in regular classes when the total number of hours for the 
year exceed thirty-four. 

Ministers' children in the College department are entitled to a 
rebate on full tuition of $50. Scholarships do not cover the tuition 
for extra work taken. 

LABORATORY FEES 

To cover the cost of materials used in the Laboratories, the follow- 
ing fees are charged: each 

SEMESTER 

Biology 18 $8.00 

Biology 28 8.00 

Biology 38 8.00 

Biology 48 8.00 

Biology 58 8.00 

Chemistry 18 8.00 

Chemistry 28 10.00 

Chemistry 38 10.00 

Chemistry 48 12.00 

Chemistry 54 4.00 



24 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Physics 18 $5.00 

Physics 28 5.00 

Physics 34 5.00 

Psychology 13 1.00 

Psychology 23 i.UO 

Education 82 1.00 

There will be no refund of laboratory fees. 

A deposit of $2 is required of each stude t in the Biological 
laboratory as a guarantee for the return of key and apparatus. The 
amount, less any deductions for loss or breakage, is refunded when 
keys and apparatus are returned. 

Breakage Deposit for Chemistry Courses — Chemistry 18, $3; 
Chemistry 28, $4; Chemistry 38, $4; Chemistry 48, $5. All breakage 
in the Chemical Laboratory will be charged against the individual 
student and any balance of the above deposits due the student at 
the completion of his course will be returned or credited to his 
account, and any deficit beyond his deposit will be charged to his 
regular College account. 

BOARDING 

The domestic department is in charge of a skilled and competent 
chef. Plain, substantial and palatable food especially adapted to the 
needs of the student is provided. The kitchen is furnished with the 
most modern equipment and all food is prepared in the most sanitary 
manner. 

The boarding rate for the college year 1929-1930 is $200.00. Stu- 
dents who leave college during the term will be required to pay 
board at the rate of $6.50 per week during their stay in college. These 
rates do not include Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter vacations. 

All students who do not room and board at their homes are re- 
quired to room and board in the college unless special permission is 
obtained from the Executive Committee to do otherwise. Students 
refusing to comply with this regulation forfeit their privileges as 
students in the College. 

ROOM RENT 

Room rent varies from $50.00 to $98.00 except when double rooms 
are assigned to only one student, in which case the occupant will pay 
the regular rent for two. Rooms are reserved for those who forward 
the matriculation fee prior to August 1; applications received after 
that date must be accompanied by the fee to assure accommodations. 



BULLETIN 25 

Occupants of a room are held responsible for all breakage and 
loss of furniture or any loss whatever for which the students are 
responsible. A breakage fee of $10 is required of each student room- 
ing in the Men's Dormitory. All or part of this may be returned 
at the end of the year. A dormitory service fee of $6 is charged 
men in the Dormitory. A breakage fee of $5 is required for each 
student in the Women's Dormitories. After deducting the cost of 
repairing damaged walls or furniture, the balance will be returned. 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a chiffonier 
and book case, and for each occupant a cot, mattress, one chair and 
study table. Students must provide their own bedding, rugs, towels, 
soap and all other furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitories is furnished with a rug, 
bed, mattress, chair, dresser and study table. All other desired 
furnishings must be supplied by the student. 

AH students to whom rooms are assigned are strictly forbidden to 
sub-let their rooms to day-students or to others for a money or any 
other consideration. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Only 
40-watt lights are allowed. 

The College reserves the right to close all the dormitories during 
the Thanksgiving, Christmas and Easter vacations. 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

The minimum expense for men is $475 and for women $485. The 
maximum expense for a full course in Lebanon Valley College for 
one year, exclusive of laboratory fees, books and personal expenses, 

is $525 for men and $520 for women. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Sixty days prior to Commencement, candidates for degrees are 
required to pay the following fees : 

Students graduating in the College $15.00; in Music, $13.00; those 
receiving certificates in Music $8.00. 

REGULATIONS 

Matriculation fee must be paid by August 1 to secure room reser- 
vation, and in any case by September 1. 

Laboratory fees must be paid at the beginning of each Semester. 

Bills for regular College expenses, including Tuition, Boarding, 
and Room Rent, are issued at the beginning of each semester, cover- 



26 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ing the expenses for the full semester. These bills are due on the 
day they are issued and must be paid within ten days. 

When a student leaves school or the boarding hall for any other 
reason than sickness, he shall pay board at the rate of $6.50 per week, 
without any rebate or refund, except when ordered otherwise by the 
Finance Committee of the College. 

Satisfactory settlement for all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal can be granted and before grades are recorded 
or given to the student. 

Students who are candidates for Diplomas or Certificates must 
make full settlement entirely satisfactory to the Finance Committee 
before diplomas or certificates will be sealed and delivered. 

A room for men day students is provided in the Administration 
building. A deposit of $5.00 is required to cover janitor service 
and breakage. The unused portion of this fee will be returned. 

ABSENCE AND SICKNESS 

When students retain their class standing during absence from 
school because of sickness or for any other reason, no rebate or 
refund will be allowed on tuition, or room rent. 

In case of sickness which occasions loss of class standing, a 
reasonable rebate or refund will be allowed on tuition. 

When a student is absent from school more than two weeks in 
succession because of sickness, and retains his room during the time 
of absence, then a rebate of $4.00 per week will be allowed for all 
absence exceeding the two weeks. Reductions cannot be allowed for 
athletic, glee club, or banquet trips. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

Help is extended annually to a limited number of students, but 
only to those pursuing full courses in the College. This help is 
given in the form of Merit Scholarships, Ministerial Scholarships, 
Waiterships, Janitorships, Tutorships, or Library work. All of this 
help is extended or given only upon the condition that the recipient 
complies with all the rules and regulations of the College. 

A student forfeits the privilege of a scholarship or other help 
from the school when his average grade falls below passing stand- 
ards or when in any way he refuses to cooperate with the College, or 
when he disregards the regulations of the institution. 

Students rooming in Dormitories and boarding at the College Din- 
ing Hall will be given preference when work of various kinds is 
assigned. 



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REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Students may be admitted to Freshman standing in Lebanon 
Valley College on the following plans: 

I. Admission by Certificate. The following classes of candidates 
are admitted to Freshman standing on presentation of certificates 
signed by the proper authorities showing the kind and amount of 
work done: 

1. Graduates from any four-year high school course approved 
by the Pennsylvania State Department of Education. 

2. Graduates from any four-year course of a school accredited by 
the Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle 
States and Maryland, or by the State University of the state in which 
the school is located. 

Such certificates must represent a total of at least IS units of 
work and must meet the requirements outlined in the Table of 
Requirements for Admission. They must also indicate that the 
respective candidates are qualified to pursue collegiate education 
successfully. Candidates whose preparatory records are unsatisfac- 
tory to the committee on admissions will be refused admission. 

A unit represents the work of a school year of no less than thirty- 
six weeks, with five periods of at least forty-five minutes each per 
week, or four periods of one hour each per week. A unit, therefore, 
is the equivalent of one hundred and eighty recitation periods of 
forty-five minutes each, or one hundred and forty-four periods of 
one hour each. 

Blank entrance credit certificates will be furnished upon applica- 
tion to the Registrar. 

II. Admission by Examination. Candidates not presenting ap- 
proved certificates may be admitted upon examination. Examina- 
tions will be given upon the work covered by the list of secondary 
subjects approved by the Association of Colleges and Preparatory 
Schools of the Middle States and Maryland. Candidates for admis- 
sion by examination must meet the same specific requirements as 
those for admission by certificate. 



THE CURRICULUM 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to 
the Baccalaureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Eco- 
nomics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The minimum number of credits required of candidates for these 
degrees is 126 semester hours. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 16 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
before registration for the sophomore year, the Minor to be suitably 
related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and approval of 
the Head of the Major Department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option), Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option), Physics. 

The B.S, in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than 16 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Economics degree will be awarded to those fulfilling 
the requirements of the course in Business Administration as outlined 
on page 57. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 
Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



30 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



A.B. 

Bible, 14, 54. 
English 16, 26. 
*French 16 or 

German 16 or 

Spanish 16. 
History 26 or 46 
tLatin 16 or 

Math. 16. 
Philosophy 26 or 

Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 16. 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18. 
Psychology 13, 23. 
Physical Education 
Hygiene 



B.S. 

Bible 14, 54. 

English 16, 26. 

French 16 or 
German 16 or 
Spanish 16. 

History 26 or 46 

Math. 16, 46. 

Philosophy 26 or 
Economics 16 or 
Pol. Science 16 or 
Sociology 16. 

Biology 18. 

Chemistry 18. 

Physics 18. 

Physical Education 

Hygiene 



B.S. in Ed. 

Bible 14, 54. 
English 16, 26. 
French 16 or 

German 16 or 

Spanish 16. 
History 26 or 46 
Latin 16 or 

Math. 16. 
Psychology 13, 23. 
Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 16. 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18. 
Physical Education 
Hygiene 



* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all candidates 
for the A. B. degree; six hours of this total must be from French 16, German 16, 
or Spanish 16. 

t Latin is required of all students majoring in FJnglish, French, Greek or 
Latin. _ IJ , -:1k,' 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES BY YEARS 

AH the courses included in the foregoing list of General and Spe- 
cial Requirements will ordinarily be taken in fixed years of the 
college course. The normal arrangement for students seeking the 
A.B. and B.S. degree is exhibited below; for course leading to B.S. 
in Ed. see announcement under department of Education. 



First Year 



A. B. 



Hours 
per 
week 

Hygiene 2 

English 16 3 

Four of the following, of 
which one must be a Mod- 
ern Language, and one 
must be Latin or Mathe- 
matics: 

Education 124 

French 06 or 16 

German 06 or 16 

Spanish 16 

Greek 16 

History 16 

Latin 16 

Math. 16 

16 or 17 



.11 or 12 



Hours 
B. S. per 

week 

Bible 14 2 

English 16 3 

Hygiene 2 

French 06 or 16, or 

German 06 or 16, or 

Spanish 16 3 

Math. 16 3 



One of: 

Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18 4 



17 



BULLETIN 



31 



A. B. 



Bible 14 

English 26 

One of: 

Biology 18 or 
Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18 

*Elective 



Second Year 

Hours 
per 
week 

.. 2 

,. 3 



B. S. 



English 26 

Mathematics 46 . 

Remaining two of: 
Biology 18 or 
Chemistry 18 or 
Physics 18 

*Elective 



Hours 
per 
week 

. 3 
. 3 



17 



. . . 2 or 3 

16 or 17 



• This must include French 16 or Ger- 
man 16 or Spanish 16 if course 06 
was taken in the first year. 



* This must be French 16 or German 
16 or Spanish 16 if course 06 was taken 
in the first year. 



A. B. 



Third Year 

Hours 
per 
week 



Psychology 13, 23 3 

One of: 

Economics 16 or 

Political Science 16 or 

Sociology 16 or 

Philosophy 26 3 

Elective 9 



15 



B. S. 



Hours 
per 
week 



One of: 

Economics 16 or 

Political Science 16 or 

Sociology 16 or 

Philosophy 26 

Elective 



3 

12 

IS 



A. B. per 

week 

Bible 54 2 

**History 46 3 

Elective 10 



15 



Fourth Year 

Hours 



•• An elective may be substituted if 
History 26 has already been taken. 



B. S. 



Bible 54 .... 
**History 46 
Elective 



Hours 
per 
week 

2 
. 3 
. 10 

15 



N. B. — The figures in the above exhibits are for hours per week 
throughout the year, and must therefore be doubled to find the 
number of semester hours credit in each case. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Grimm 

13. General Astronomy — Three hours. First Semester. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Reports on assigned read- 
ings. Important constellations and star groups are studied. 

A fine four-and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope adds to the in- 
terest of the subject. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

BIBLE AND NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

Professors Richie and Butterwick 

Major: Bible 14, 26, 34 or 54; New Testament Greek 46, 56. 
Minor: Bible 14, 26; New Testament Greek 46 or 56. 

COURSES IN BIBLE 

14. General Introduction to the English Bible. Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

The aim of the course is to make a survey and acquire an appre- 
ciative understanding of the history and literature of the whole 
Bible. 

26. The New Testament. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the Gospels, with special emphasis upon the life and 
teachings of Christ, is made during the first semester. The second 
semester deals with the life and epistles of Paul. 

34. The Prophets. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the lives of the major and minor prophets, and an 
analysis of their contributions to the Word of God. Offered 1929-30. 

44. Rise and Development of the Hebrew Nation. Two hours. 

First Semester. 

Rise and Development of the Christian Church. Two hours. 
Second Semester. 

54. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of the 
Kingdoms. Two hours. Throughout the year. Prof. Butterwick. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish the student with a knowl- 
edge of the religious growth and practices during the time of the 
Kingdoms under the leadership of the prophets. 



BULLETIN 33 

COURSES IN NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

Professor Richie 
46. Readings from the Book of Acts and the General Epistles. 
56. The Gospel according to John and Selected Readings. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Prerequisite: Greek 16 and 26. 
These courses are given in alternate years. Course 56 will be 
offered 1929-30. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Derickson, Associate Professors Polk and Light, 
AND Assistants 

The work outlined in the following courses in Biology is intended 
to acquaint the student with those fundamental facts necessary for 
the proper interpretation of the phenomena manifested by living 
things with which they are surrounded and to lay a broad founda- 
tion for specialization in universities in professional courses in 
Biology. 

Those completing the courses will be well prepared for the work 
in medical schools, for graduate work in colleges and universities, 
for teaching the biological sciences in high schools and for assistant- 
ships in university and experiment station laboratories in the depart- 
ments of agriculture and the United States Biological Survey. 

Major: Courses 18, 28 and any additional courses of higher num- 
ber in the department amounting to eight semester hours. 

Minor: Course 18 and eight semester hours from courses of higher 
number in the department. 

14. Hygiene. Two hours. Throughout the year. Required of all 
Freshmen. 

The aim of the course is to bring to the attention of the student 
early in the college course some of the common pitfalls in the path 
of health and the methods of avoiding them themselves as well as 
to train them for leadership in community health improvement. 

The course consists of experiments, observations and inferences 
regarding health procedures. This is supplemented by the necessary 
accompaniment of instruction concerning the structure and function 
of the human body. 

18. General Biology. Four hours. Throughout the year. Three 
hours class work and three hours laboratory work each week. The 
aim of the course is to acquaint the student with the essential struc- 
tures and processes of living things. 

Plants and animals are studied in the laboratory to observe the 
structure, properties and activities of living protoplasm as illustrated 

No. 3 



34 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

by organisms composed of a single cell, simple tissues and of systems 
of organs. The principles of development, heredity:, homology, 
classification, adaptation and evolution are also considered. 

Required of Freshmen preparing for medicine or majoring in 
Biology. 

Required of Sophomores majoring in Chemistry, Mathematics 
and Physics. Elective for others. 

28. Botany. Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1930-31. 

Three class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 
The object of the course is to give the student a general knowledge 
of the plant kingdom. The form, structure and functioning of one 
or more types of each of the divisions of algae, fungae, liverworts, 
mosses, ferns and seed plants are studied. 

Special attention is given to the phylogeny and ontogeny of the 
several groups and constant comparisons are made of those struc- 
tures indicating relationships. The principles of classification are 
learned by the identification of about one hundred and fifty species 
of plants represented in the local spring flora. These studies are 
conducted in the field so that the plants are seen as dynamic forces 
adapted to their environment. 

Required of those majoring in Biology. Elective for others. 

Texts: — Holman and Robbins' Textbook of Botany; Gray's New 
Manual of Botany, seventh edition. 

38. Zoology. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods of two 
hours each, per week. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the structure, 
life history and behavior of representatives of each phylum of ani- 
mals. In the study of types, structure, function and adaptation are 
given equal emphasis. The principles of phylogeny and ontogeny 
are considered. 

The laboratory and class work is supplemented by field studies 
including observations of habits, ecological conditions and the use 
of keys for identification and classification. 

Text: — Hegner's College Zoology. 

48. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Four hours. Through- 
out the year. Offered 1930-31. Six hours laboratory work and two 
hours of conference and demonstration each week. 

The course consists of the dissection and study of a suctorial fish, 
a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, an amphibian, a reptile, a bird and 
a mammal. 

Carefully labeled drawings are required of each student as a 
record of each dissection. 



BULLETIN 35 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine or majoring in 
Biology. 

58. Vertebrate Embryology and Histology. Four hours. Through- 
out the year. Two lectures and six hours laboratory work each week. 

The course consists of the study of the principles of development 
of vertebrates. The origin of the sex cells, fertilization, the environ- 
ment of the embryo, the histogenesis of tissues and organs, and the 
significance of the transition stages in development receive attention. 
The laboratory work of the first half of the year is based on the 
chick and pig, the remainder of the year to the normal histology of 
the adult mammalian tissues. 

Each student receives individual instruction in the technic neces- 
sary for the preparation of the material used in the course. 

Elective for those preparing for medicine or majoring in Biology. 

Texts : — Patten*s The Chick and Pig ; Bremer's Textbook of Histology. 

64. Genetics. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and 
variation and their practical applications to mankind. 

74. Biological Problems. Two hours throughout the year or four 
hours either semester. An honors course. Laboratory work with 
conferences. 

This course is open to a limited number of students majoring in 
Biology who have made a distinguished record in their previous 
courses. It consists in working out problems assigned to them in- 
volving a practical application of various methods of technic, orig- 
inality of method and interpretation and the development of the 
spirit of research. A weekly conference and report on the progress 
of the work will be required and a detailed report including com- 
plete records of the work done must be presented before Senior 
examinations. 

84. Bacteriology. Four hours. First semester. Offered 1930-31. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with various forms 
of bacteria and their role in nature. It includes laboratory technique 
in cultivation, sterilization, isolation of pure cultures, and staining 
of bacteria. 

94. Physiology. Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1930-31. 

A course of instruction in general physiology dealing with the 
tissues of the body and especially their function in respiration, 
digestion, circulation, excretion and reproduction. 

104. Historical Geologfy. Four hours. Second semester. Offered 
1931-32. 4 

A general course in historical and structural geology giving atten- 



36 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

tion to the processes and dynamic agencies by which the crust of the 
earth has been formed and evolved into its present condition with 
special attention to the fossil remains of plants and animals therein 
contained. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Stokes and Gingrich 

See page 57 for general outline of the complete course in Business 
Administration. 

14. Economic Geography. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The course attempts, in a general outline, to estimate the signi- 
ficance of geographical conditions as factors in the development of 
civilization and to sketch the history and development of commerce. 

23. Mathematics of Finance. Three hours. Second semester. 

The course seeks to present the mathematical principles and 
operations used in financial work. A detailed study of compound 
interest, compound discount and annuities is undertaken. Appli- 
cation of these principles is then made to practical problems of 
amortization, sinking funds, depreciation, valuations of bonds and 
building and loan associations. 

36. Elements of Accounting. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course in accounting principles and their application in business 
to sole traders, partnerships and corporations; operating accounts 
and balance sheets; the preparation of financial statements, part- 
nership and corporation adjustments; columnar books; controlling 
accounts; elements of corporation accounting, branch house ac- 
counting; business papers. 

46. Accounting. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Cost accounting; Principles of cost accounting, system of control 
over elements of cost, wage systems and time records, overhead 
and its distribution, job orders and process costs, relation of cost 
records to general accounts. 

Auditing: Principles of and procedure in audits, internal and 
external; scope and kinds of audits; office organization; internal 
check, analysis and reconstruction of operating and financial state- 
ments; reports to executives; special features in different business 
and financial organizations; legal decisions. 

53. Transportation. Three hours. First semester. 

Railway accounts and rates; principles of rate making as estab- 
lished by the railways, the regulative tribunals and the courts; rail- 
way policy in the United States and the other chief countries; 
railway rate structures, organization of ocean commerce; ocean 



BULLETIN 37 

freight rates; shipping conferences and their results; relation ot 
ocean and land transportation interests; inland water transportation; 
highway transportation. Offered in 1929-30 and each alternate year. 

63. Insurance. Three hours. Second semester. 

Insurance as a factor in private and business life; a study of the 
principles and practices used in the more important forms of in- 
surance; the economic services and business uses of insurance; 
types of insurance organizations; types of life insurance policies; 
liability and compensation insurance; fire insurance; marine insur- 
ance; automobile insurance; title insurance; credit insurance; insur- 
able interest; legal problems arising in connection with insurance. 
Offered 1929-30 and each alternate year. 

73. Marketing. Three hours. First semester. 

The course deals with the methods and policies of the marketing 
of agricultural products and the merchandising of manufactured 
commodities; meaning and importance of marketing distribution; 
marketing functions; assembling; transporation; storage; trade 
channels; developing of marketing methods; direct marketing; sale 
of goods by middlemen; auctions; produce exchanges; speculation; 
unit stores; department stores; mail-order houses; chain stores; co- 
operative marketing; fair competition; price policies; trade informa- 
tion; market analysis; merchandising costs and prices; an analysis 
of the merits and defects of the existing distributive organization. 
Offered 1930-31 and each alternate year. 

83. Advertising, Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of advertising as a business force. The course covers 
the development and fundamental principles of advertising and an 
examination of the methods of representative advertisers; problems 
and the scope of advertising; functions of advertising; the appeals; 
the presentation of the appeals; mediums; the advertising agency 
and its work. Offered 1930-31 and each alternate year. 

92. Public Finance and Administration. Two hours. First se- 
mester. 

Economic functions of the state; principle and incidence of taxa- 
tion; national and local finance; public debts and their redemption; 
revenue systems of modern states; central and local administration. 
Offered 1929-30 and each alternate year. 

103. Statistics. Two hours. Second semester. 
General introduction to the use of statistics; methods of collection; 
tabulation and graphic presentation; analysis and interpretation; 



38 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

application to the study of business cycles, population and other 
problems; a survey of some of the principal sources of statistical 
information. Ofifered in 1929-30 and each alternate year. 

116. Lraw. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

An orientation course in the general field of law and procedure, 
touching the following subjects, viz: Business Associations, Real 
Property, Liens, Leases, Mortgages, Wills, Workmen's Compensa- 
tion, etc. 

123. Business Administration. Three hours. First semester. 

A study of the fundamentals of business organization and ad- 
ministration; the field of business administration; plant location; the 
administration of personnel; market problems; finance; production; 
risk-bearing; wage systems; welfare activities. 

133. History of Economic Thought. Three hours. Second semester. 

A course dealing with the evolution of economic thought through 
the principal schools from the physiocrats to the present, and giving 
special attention to the criticism of current theories of value, inter- 
est, rent and wages. Books recommended: Haney, History of Eco- 
nomic Thought; Gide and Rist, History of Economic Doctrines; 
Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations; Malthus, Essay on Population; 
Ricardo, Principles of Political Economy; J. S. Mills, Principles of 
Political Economy; Marx, Capital; Bohm-Bawerk, Capital and 
Interest; and The Positive Theory of Capital; Marshall, Principles 
of Economics. Offered in 1929-30. 

143. Corporation Finance. Three hours. First semester. 

Economic services of corporations; capitalization; detailed study of 
stock and bonds; financing of extensions and improvements; man- 
agement of incomes and reserves; dividend policy; insolvency; 
receiverships; reorganizations. Books recommended: Gerstenberg, 
Financial Organization and Management; Bonneville, Elements of 
Business Finance; Mead, Corporation Finance; Gerstenberg, Mate- 
rials of Corporation Finance; Dewing, Corporate Promotions and 
Reorganizations. Offered in 1930-31. 

153. Investments. Three hours. Second semester. 

A presentation of the underlying economic theory as it is worked 
out in actual practice of investment institutions today. The course 
deals with the development and place of investment in the field of 
business and its relation to other economic, legal and social institu- 
tions. The fundamental principles are presented along with a descrip- 
tion of investment machinery. An analysis is made of the various 
classes of investments. Books recommended: Sakolski, Principles of 



BULLETIN 39 

Investment; Lyon, Investment; Jordan, Investments; Badger, In- 
vestment Principles and Practices. Offered in 1930-31. 

Note: For other courses in Business Administration, see Econom- 
ics, listed under Political and Social Science. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Bender and Assistants 

The Department of Chemistry oflfers to students who do not 
intend entering the chemistry or engineering professions such a grasp 
of the fundamentals of the science as is needed by the modern in- 
telligent citizen. For those intending to enter chemistry as a pro- 
fession or to enter professions of which chemistry makes up a vital 
part the department aims to cover the ground and to offer the best 
training that modern methods in chemistry afford. Students com- 
pleting the work offered by the department should be able to meet 
all requirements that the industries demand of graduate chemists. 

The facilities of the department have been very much increased 
during the past few years. There have been added recently 
an Emerson Adiabatic Calorimeter, Acme motion picture projector, 
Freas constant temperative oven. Hilger Spectroscope, additional 
platinum ware and physico-chemical apparatus. 

Opportunity is given for a limited amount of research work in 
Chemistry. 
Major: Courses 18, 28, 38. 
Minor: Courses 18 and either 28 or 48. 

18. General Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. Throughout the 
year. Two demonstration lectures, one recitation and one three- 
hour laboratory period per week. 

A thorough and systematic treatment of the fundamental principles 
of the science and the appHcation of these principles. The elements, 
their classifications and compounds are studied in detail. While the 
course prepares the student for the courses that follow, the needs of 
the student who will pursue the subject no farther are kept in mind. 
Consequently a broader field is covered than that offered by the 
average text-book in general chemistry. 

Laboratory Hours: — Section A, Wednesdays, 1-4. 
Section B, Thursdays, 1-4. 
Section C, Fridays, 1-4. 

28. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Two lectures or recitations and six hours of laboratory work per 
week. The theories and principles of analytical chemistry are studied. 



40 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The course includes a study of the systematic methods of sepa- 
rating and detecting all of the ordinary metals and acid radicals. 
The laboratory work includes the analysis of about thirty solutions 
and solids varying in complexity from simple salts to complex 
insoluble artificial mixtures. 

Text -book: — Stieglitz's Qualitative Analysis, Vol. 1. 

Laboratory Manual: — Stieglitz's Qualitative Analysis, Vol. 2. 

Laboratory Hours : — Mondays and Tuesdays, 1-4. 

38. Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. Throughout the year. 
One lecture or recitation and eight hours of laboratory work per 
week. A study of the methods and principles of quantitative analysis 
and chemical calculations. 

The laboratory work includes simple introductory determinations, 
acidimetry, alkalimetry, partial analysis of copper, iron, lead, zinc 
and manganese ores, analysis of coal, alloys, limestone, cement, 
silicate rock, and steel electrolytic analysis, gas analysis, and a few 
organic analyses including fertilizers, milk, butter and oils. 

Text -books : — Mahin's Quantitative Analysis, with frequent reference 
to other works. 

Laboratory Hours: — Mondays and Tuesdays, 1-5. 

48. Organic Chemistry. Four hours. Throughout the year. Two 
hours lectures and recitations and six hours of laboratory work per 
week. 

The course includes a study of the sources, classification and 
type reactions of organic materials, of food-stuffs and their 
relation to nutrition, dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, coal 
tar intermediates, manufacturing processes and recent developments 
in this field of Chemistry. The course includes a carefully se- 
lected series of demonstrations, the display of a large number of 
representative materials, and the use of about one hundred charts 
especially prepared for this course. 

The laboratory work consists of about sixty experiments covering 
the preparation and study of a wide range of representative com- 
pounds. Prerequisite, Chemistry 18. 

Text-book: — Norris' The Principles of Organic Chemistry. 

Laboratory Manual : Fisher's Laboratory Manual of Organic Chemistry. 

Laboratory Hours: — Wednesdays and Thursdays, 1-4. 

54. Physical Chemistry. Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Lectures and conferences. Prerequisites, Chemistry 38 and 48, and 
a working knowledge of the Calculus. 

Text-book: — Getman's Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry. 



BULLETIN 41 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Reynolds, Butterwick, Grimm and Assistants 

While the primary aim of this department is to provide training 
for those who desire to enter the teaching profession, yet it is be- 
lieved that the courses offered will be useful also in connection with 
the training of children and in the social relationships of the edu- 
cated man and woman. Education is one of the most important 
concerns of society. A serious study of the problems of education 
will enable the college men and women to give society intelligent 
leadership in many of its most important undertakings. 

The courses of the department have been planned with special 
reference to the requirements of the State of Pennsylvania. Students 
who, for any reason, wish to teach in other states, should early 
consult with the head of the department in the selection of courses 
to meet the requirements of such states. 

The Pennsylvania State Council of Education has approved the 
following regulations for the College Provisional Certificate: 

"This certificate entitles the holder to teach for three years the 
subjects prescribed for a public high school of the third class or to 
teach in any public high school of the Commonwealth the subjects 
indicated on its face. 

"The applicant for this certificate must be a graduate of an ap- 
proved college or university and must have successfully completed 
at least eighteen semester hours of work of college grade in educa- 
tion distributed as follows: 

Introduction to Teaching 3 semester hours 

Educational Psychology 3 semester hours 

Practice Teaching 6 semester hours 

Electives in Education 6 semester hours 

"The holder of this certificate will be certified to teach each subject 
in which not less than twelve semester hours have been completed." 

In order to meet these requirements, students of the college 
who are candidates for the A.B. or B.S. degree are advised to do 
their major and minor work in subjects which are ordinarily taught 
in the public high schools. 

They should, furthermore, register for Education 124, 13, 23, 
Psychology 13, Psychology 23, Education 136, and 82, pre- 
ferab'iy in the order named. Wherever possible this work should be 
started in the Freshman year. 

By action of the Department of Public Instruction, in October, 
192': "The six semester hours of practice teaching may be met by 
three semester hours of actual classroom experience in observation, 
participation and practice teaching under approved supervision and 



42 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

three semester hours of methodology or administration related to this 
experience." 

To those who are preparing for work in Education as a profes- 
sion, and who desire to make a more complete preparation than the 
minimum required by the State, a major in Education leading to 
the degree of B. S. in Education is ofifered. For this, courses in 
Education or Educational Psychology totaling twenty-four semester 
hours are required, and in addition two minors, chosen from related 
fields, of eighteen semester hours each. 

The residence requirement for this degree may be met either by 
spending a full year in actual residence or by earning 32 semester 
hours in residence either during sessions of the Summer School or 
during the regular academic year. The student should consult page 
30 for the general requirements for this degree. 

APPOINTMENT BUREAU 

In order to give students the benefit of calls that are received 
for teachers and to render greater assistance in finding employment, 
the College provides for an Appointment Bureau to keep on file 
records of students with their credentials for those who desire it. 
For registration with the bureau a fee of one dollar is charged. 

The Appointment Bureau of the College cooperates with the 
Placement Service, Teacher Bureau, of the Department of Public 
Instruction, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, thus offering additional facili- 
ties for the placement of graduates of this institution. 

EDUCATION 
124. Introduction to Teaching. Two hours throughout the year. 
An introductory course for prospective teachers, intended also to 
enable students to decide whether they have an interest in profes- 
sional education, and to introduce the citizen to the problems of 
one of the most important institutions in a democracy. It does 
not necessarily presuppose an intention on the part of the student 
to enter the teaching profession. A survey of the field based on 
observation, assigned readings, and class discussions. 

33. Principles of Secondary Education. Three hours. Second 
semester. A course dealing with the high school pupils, their 
physical and mental traits, individual differences, and the ma.":e-up 
of the high school population; the secondary school as an institution, 
its history, its relation to elementary education, and to higher educa- 
tion; social principles determining secondary education; the cur- 
riculum; the place, function, and the value of the several subjects of 
the curriculum; organization and management of the high school. 



BULLETIN 43 

13. History of Education. Three hours. First semester. An 
analysis of the history of education from the time of early Greek 
education to the present day. Special attention will be given to 
the aims, content, organization and results of the educational systems 
of various countries, as well as to the great leaders of educational 
thought. 

23. History of Education in the United States. Three hours. 
Second semester. A study of education in colonial times; early at- 
tempts at organizing systems of education; the history of the ele- 
mentary school; the Latin grammar school; the academy movement; 
the history and growth of the high schools, colleges and universi- 
ties; the present public school. 

136. Practice Teaching and Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

Six hours. Both semesters. Open to seniors only, except by per- 
mission of the Head of the Department. A course dealing with 
high school teaching problems accompanied by observation and 
participation in the field of one's major. Reports of observations, 
conferences and discussions. Prerequisite, Psychology 13. 

73. Philosophy of Education. Three hours. Second semester. 
Open to seniors only. This course aims to supply a basis for con- 
structive thinking in the field of education. Various theories in 
education will be considered. 

82. Educational Measurements. Two hours. First semester. A 
critical analysis of the problems in measuring the results of teaching. 
A study of the uses and administration of representative tests and 
scales for junior and senior high school subjects. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 13. Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

92. The Junior High School. Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the principles and problems involved in the reorgani- 
zation of Secondary Education. Special attention is given to the 
need for reorganization, the aims of a junior high school, the present 
status of development, present curriculum, courses of study, signi- 
ficant features of certain junior high schools and methods of in- 
struction. Offered 1929-1930. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

13. General Psychology. Three hours. First semester. This 
course aims to acquaint the student with the psychological stand- 
point and with the fundamental psychological principles. It includes 
a study of such topics as native tendencies, acquired tendencies, emo- 
tions, imagination, memory and reasoning. Not open to Freshmen. 



44 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

23. Educational Psychology, Three hours. Second semester. 
Designed to meet the needs of students of education who are seek- 
ing from psychology the facts and principles that have a bearing 
on their problems. Special emphasis is placed on the learning process. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 13. 

33. Social Psychology. Three hours. First semester. A study 
of mental growth and action as shown in social relationships. Pre- 
requisite, Psychology 13. 

42. Psychology of Adolescence. Two hours. Second semester. 
A study of the anatomical, physiological, and psychological changes 
characterizing adolescence; the question of motives, personality, emo- 
tions, the environment and social relations will be handled. Pre- 
requisite, Psychology 13. Offered 1930-1931. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Paul A. W. Wallace and Associate Professor 
Mary K. Wallace 

All undergraduates are required to complete English 16. Students 
whose principal department is English must in addition complete 
twenty-four semester hours of work in English as specified below, 
and electives as agreed upon in conference with the Departmental 
Advisor. 

Major: Courses 26, 66, 512, 43, 53, and four additional hours of 
approved courses in literature. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, and six semester hours of elective courses 
in literature. 

Course 16 is prerequisite to all other courses in English. 

16. English Composition. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Required of all college freshmen. 

26. A Survey of English Literature. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. Required of all college sophomores. 

Snyder and Martin: A Book of English Literature. 

43. Eighteenth Century Prose. Three hours. First semester. This 
course is open only to college seniors. 

Alden: Readings in English Prose of the Eighteenth Century: 
Essays of Addison (ed. John Richard Green) ; Defoe : Robinson 
Crusoe; Swift: Gulliver's Travels; Fielding: Tom Jones; Goldsmith: 
She Stoops to Conquer; Thackeray : Henry Esmond. 



BULLETIN 45 

53. Nineteenth Century Prose. Three hours. Second semester. 
This course is open only to college seniors. 

Alden: Readings in English Prose of the Nineteenth Century; 
Dickens: David Copperfield; Scott: The Heart of Midlothian; 
Eliot : Romola; Meredith : Beauchamp's Career; Hardy : The Wood- 
landers. 

512. The Romantic Movement in English Poetry. Two hours. 

First semester. 

Page: British Poets of the Nineteenth Century (Wordsworth, Cole- 
ridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, Keats). 

524. American Literature. Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Pattee : Century Readings in American Literature. 

532, Tennyson and Browning, Two hours. Second semester. 
Page : British Poets of the Nineteenth Century. 

66. Shakespeare. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The Rolfe edition of the following plays : A Midsummer Night's 
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Twelfth 
Night, The Tempest, Romeo and Jidiet, Jtdiiis Caesar, Hamlet, Macbeth, 
Othello, King Lear, Henry IV (I and 11). 

82. The Development of the English Novel. Two hours. First 
semester. 

Cross : The Development of the English Novel. 

132. Modern Drama. Two hours. Second semester. A survey 
of English drama from 1850 to the present. 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Johnson and Green 
The aim of this department is twofold: first, to give an accurate 
and practical knowledge of the French language, which will equip 
the student for teaching French in the secondary schools; and 
second, to develop an appreciation of the French spirit, as ex- 
pressed in literature, and an understanding of the main literary 
movements of France, which will be of value in any field of literary 
activity. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46. 

Minor: Three of courses 16, 26, 36, 46. 

For entrance to French 16, the preparatory course 06, or its 



46 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

equivalent (two years of High School French) will be required. 
French 26 is a prerequisite for entrance to 36 or 46. 

06. Elementary French. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is intended for those who begin French in college. Its 
aim is to enable the student to write simple French sentences, to 
carry on a conversation in easy French, and to read French of ordi- 
nary difficulty. College credit of six semester hours will be granted 
for this course, but it cannot be counted toward a Major. 

Morrison & Gauthier, French Grammar; McGill De Lautreppe, 
"Pas a Pas"; Guerber, "Contes et Legendes." 

16. First Year College French. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 06, and includes 
further drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, 
composition and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

Barton & Sirich, French Review Grammar; Erckmann-Chatrian, 
"Le Tresor du Vieux Seigneur"; Dumas, "Les Trois Mousquetaires"; 
George Sand, "La Mare au Diable"; Maupassant, "Huit Contes 
Choisis." 

26. French Prose and Lyrics of the XVIII and XIX Centuries. 
Three hours. Throughout the year. OflFered 1929-1930. 

(a) History of the French Novel during the period indicated, with 
special study of representative works of Lesage, Mme. de Stael, 
Chateaubriand, Hugo, Balzac, and writers of the naturalistic school. 

(b) The development of lyric poetry in the late eighteenth and 
in the nineteenth century, with a study of selections from Chenier, 
Lamartine, Alfred de Vigny, Hugo, Alfred de Musset, and Leconte 
de Lisle. 

36. French Drama of the XVIII and XIX Centuries. Three hours. 
Throughout the year. Offered 1929-1930. 

The history of the drama from the eighteenth century to the 
present. Reading and discussion, in class, of: Beaumarchais, "Le 
barbier de Seville; Hugo, "Hernani"; Augier, "I^e gendre de M. 
Poirier"; Rostand, "Cyrano de Bergerac"; Brieux, "La Robe Rouge"; 
Hervieu, "La course du Flambeau." Class reports on other dramas 
of the same period. 

46. French Literature of XVII Century. Three hours. Through- 
out the year. Offered 1930-1931. 

A study of the social and literary tendencies of the time, with 
special attention to the Classic Drama. Corneille, "Le Cid," "Horace," 
"Polyeucte"; Moliere, "Les Precieuses Ridicules," "Tartuffe," "Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme"; Racine, "Andromaque," "Athalie"; Selec- 
tions from Boileau, "L'Art Poetique"; and La Fontaine's "Fables," 
and from the chief prose writers of the century. 



BULLETIN 47 

GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Johnson 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, 36 or 46. 

06. Elementary German. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Grammar; practice in speaking and writing; reading of easy prose; 
dictation. 

This course is elective for all students who do not offer German 
for entrance. College credit of six semester hours will be granted 
for the course, but it can not be counted toward a Major in German. 

16. First Year College German. Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

A continuation of the grammar studied in German 06. Prose com- 
position. Reading of texts of average difficulty, with a view to giving 
the student a good reading knowledge of German. 

Baumbach, "Waldnovellen," "Der Schwiegersohn"; Seidel, "Leb- 
erecht Hiihnchen"; Renter, "Eines Toten Wiederkehr"; Schiller, 
"Das Lied von der Glocke." 

26. Literature of the 18th Century. Three hours. Throughout the 
year. Offered 1930-1931. 

The important literary movements of the century will be studied. 
Dramas of Lessing, Schiller and Goethe will be read and discussed in 
class. 

36. The German Novel. Three hours. Throughout the year. Offer- 
ed 1929-1930. 

Study of the development of the German novel, particularly in 
the latter half of the 19th century. Examples of various types of 
novels and representative Avorks of leading novelists will be studied 
or reported upon in class. 

46. Goethe. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Prerequisite German 26. Study of Goethe's life and works; inten- 
sive study of Goethe's prose, poetry and drama; essays in German 
required. 

GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Professors Richie, Bennett and Fields 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46 or 56. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, 36 or 46 or 56. 

16. Elementary Greek. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Study of forms and syntax, with easy prose composition. Selec- 
tions from Xenophon's Anabasis. This course is intended for stu- 
dents who enter college with no Greek. 



48 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

26. First Year Greek. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Xenophon: The Anabasis; selections previously unread. Homer: 
Selections from the Iliad ; scansion and epic poetry : Herodotus : 
Selections from several of the books. 

36. (a) Philosophy. Three hours. First semester. 

Plato: The Apology of Socrates. Xenophon: Selections from the 
Memorabilia. Lectures on Greek philosophy from Thales to Plato. 

(b) Drama. Three hours. Second semester. 

Selections will be read from the tragedies of Aeschylus and 
Sophocles. Lectures on the Greek drama and its influence. Pre- 
requisite: Greek 16 and 26. 

46 'and 55. New Testament Greek. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. Prerequisite: Greek 16 and 26. 

These courses will be given in alternate years; in 1929-30 course 
56 will be offered. 

For further description of these courses see the announcements 
of the department of Bible & New Testament Greek. 

HISTORY 

Professors Stevenson, Shenk, and Butterwick 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46. 

Minor: Courses 16, 46 and either 26 or Z6. 

16. History of Civilization. Orientation course for Freshmen, 
tracing man's progress from prehistoric times to the present. The 
aim of the course is to acquaint the student with important move- 
ments and institutions and with the methods and materials of His- 
tory and the social sciences. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Required of History 
majors. 

36. English History. Survey of the history of England and the 
British Empire. Attention will be given to social and intellectual 
movements as well as to political and constitutional questions. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Required of majors in 
English and History. 

26(a). The French Revolution and Napoleon. Political, economic, 
and intellectual conditions of the old regime; work of the Revo- 
lutionary Assemblies; Biographies of Revolutionary leaders; Na- 
poleonic Statesmanship; reorganization of Europe after the fall of 
Napoleon. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Offered 1929-30. 

26(b). Europe since 1815. Stress will be laid on the Industrial 



BULLETIN 49 

Revolution and the movements that it produced; attention will be 
given to the diplomatic background of the World War and recent 
efforts for World peace. 

Offered in 1930-1931. 

46. American History. General survey of American History. 
Particular attention will be given to foreign relations and to the 
history of the frontier. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Required of Seniors. 

64. A Study of the Economic Blackground of American History, 
including the growth of American agricultural and industrial inter- 
ests, from colonial beginnings to their present day development. 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professor Bennett; Acting Professor Fields 

The aim of this department is to offer courses affording a com- 
prehensive and sympathetic understanding of Roman life and 
thought, and their influence upon modern times. 

The Freshman course includes a thorough review of forms and 
syntax, but in this and all subsequent courses the text will be studied 
primarily as literature, and used as a basis for discussion of some 
phase of civilization. 

The course is designed not only to provide a thorough training for 
those planning to teach Latin in the secondary schools, but also 
to inculcate good literary taste, and to furnish a broad culture which 
will serve as a foundation for professional training in law, theology, 
journalism, or any field of public life. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, 36 or 46. 

16. Mythology. Selections from Ovid, Metamorphoses; study of 
classical mythology. Three hours. First semester. 

Legend and History. Selections from Livy; outline history of 
Rome to end of the Republic. Three hours. Second semester. 

This course will include a thorough review of Latin forms and 
syntax, followed by exercises in Latin prose composition. During 
the second semester special attention will be paid to the study of 
Latin derivatives in English, with a view to increasing the student's 
vocabulary and developing accuracy in the use of words. 

26. Ljrric Poetry. Selections from the Odes of Horace and lyrics 
of Catullus. Emphasis will be laid upon literary interpretation and 
correct metrical reading. Three hours. First semester. 

Drama. At least one play by Plautus and one by Terence will be 

No. 4 



50 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

read and interpreted. Special study will be made of the staging and 
acting of ancient drama. Three hours. Second semester. 

36. Satire. Selected Satires of Horace and Juvenal. Lectures 
on the history of Roman Satire, and study of social conditions at 
Rome in the time of the Empire. Three hours. First semester. 

Virgil. A course in the life and works of Virgil, specially adapted 
to the needs of students intending to teach Latin. Selections will 
be read from the Bucolics and Georgics. The Aeneid will be studied 
in relation to its sources, and by means of lectures and reports a 
careful study of Virgil's Epic Technique will be made. Three hours. 
Second semester. (Not offered 1929-30.) 

46. Philosophy. Selections from Lucretius, De Rerum Natura; 
Cicero, De Senectute and De Amicitia. Study of the Epicurean and 
Stoic systems. Three hours. First semester. 

Cicero. A study of the life and works of Cicero, specially adapted 
for those intending to teach. Selections will be read from Cicero's 
Letters, and used as a basis for the study of Roman political institu- 
tions. The Catiline conspiracy will be specially considered, Sallust's 
Catiline being read for comparison with the Ciceronian account. 
Three hours. Second semester. 

THE CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION 
16. Greek and Latin Literature. This course is intended espe- 
cially for the student of English Literature who desires an acquaint- 
ance with the Greek and Latin classics, but is unable to read them 
m the original. It is open as an elective to all students above Fresh- 
man standing. A brief survey of the history of Greek and Latin 
Literature will be followed by a study of the development of the 
separate literary fields such as Epic, Drama, Lyric, Philosophy, His- 
tory, Satire, etc., with wide reading of the important authors in the 
best English translations. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Wagner and Grimm 

Major: Courses 16, ZZ, 46, 53, 74, 84. 

Minor: Courses 16, 46, and any additional six semester hours. 

A Major in Mathematics may lead to either the B.S. or A.B. 
degree. If the B.S. is desired, the candidate must take the General 
Requirements for that degree (see p. 30), and must select as his 
Minor either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics. 

If the A.B. is desired, the candidate must take the General Re- 
quirements for that degree (see p. 30), and may take his Minor in 
any department other than those named in the preceding paragraph. 



BULLETIN 51 

16. General Mathematics. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

An introductory course designed to give to the student a knowledge 
of the fundamental principles of Plane Trigonometry, Analytic 
Geometry, and the elements of the Calculus. The first semester will 
be devoted to Plane Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry and some 
elements of Calculus. The second semester will be devoted to Ana- 
lytic Geometry and the Calculus. Required of all Freshmen not 
electing Latin 16, and is prerequisite to any of the courses which 
follow. 

23. Projective Geometry. Three hours. First semester. 

Introduction to Projective Geometry, ratios, anharmonic and 
harmonic; perspective, involution, etc. 

33. Advanced Algebra. Three hours. Second semester. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permuta- 
tions and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 

46. Differential and Integral Calculus. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

Diflferentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 
and minima, development into series, etc. Integrations, rectification 
of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cubature of solids, etc. 

53. Advanced Calculus. Three hours. First semester. 

A continuation of Mathematics 46 and is required of all candidates 
majoring in Mathematics. 

63. Plane Survesang. Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting 
and drafting, leveling, etc. 

74. Differential Equations. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A course in the elements of diflferential equations. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 46. 

84. Analytic Mechanics. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Resolution of forces, two and three force pieces, center of gravity, 
acceleration, moment of inertia, friction. 

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Professor Butterwick 

Major: Philosophy 02, 12, 26, 43, 53, Bible 26. 

Minor: Philosophy 02, 12, 26, and 43 or 53. 

02. Introduction to Philosophy. First semester. Two hours. 

This course is intended to introduce beginners to the basic prob- 
lems and theories of Philosophy and quicken them to some apprecia- 
tion of the role played by philosophy in the whole movement of 



52 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

civilization, while at the same time, giving them at least an inkling 
of the work of the greatest thinkers and arousing in them a desire 
to go to the sources. 

12. Inductive and Deductive Logic. Second semester. Two hours. 
Juniors. 

This course is intended to furnish the student with a knowledge of 
the laws of correct thinking; the purpose and place of the syl- 
logism in the processes of thinking; and the detection of fallacies in 
thinking. 

26. History of Philosophy. Throughout the year. Three hours. 
Juniors and Seniors. 

In this course the aim will be (1) to trace the development of 
Philosophy, pointing out what of permanent value each system, 
as it arose, contributed toward a final solution of the nature of being, 
and (2) to show the interaction between philosophic thought and 
the practical life of the period during which it flourished. 

43. Psychology of Religion. First semester. Three hours. 

The growth of religion in the life of the individual is subject to 
certain psychological laws. This course seeks to acquaint the stu- 
dent with such laws so as to facilitate religious growth. Offered 
1929-30. 

53. Philosophy of Religion. Second semester. Three hours. 

The purpose of this course is properly to correlate scientific and 
philosophic truths with religion. The same truths permeate all fields 
of knowledge. Conflicts of truth do not exist. Offered 1929-30. 

102. The History of Religion. Juniors and seniors. First se- 
mester. Two hours. 

This course is intended to provide the student with the facts con- 
cerning the rise and development of religion in general. The his- 
torical point of view is adhered to throughout. 1930-31. 

112, The Religion of the Hebrews. Juniors and seniors. Second 
semester. Two hours. 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a com- 
prehensive view of the rise and development of the Hebrew religion 
as set forth in the Bible and contemporaneous literature. 1930-31. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm 
Major: Physics 18, 24, 34, 44, Math. 74. 

Minor: Physics 18 and any eight additional semester hours. 
18. General Physics. Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Three hours lectures and recitation and four hours laboratory 
work per week. The course will be a thorough investigation of 



BULLETIN 53 

the fundamental principles of physical science and is especially 
intended as a preparation for Physics 2, 3, and 4, and for those 
interested in the practical applications of physical laws and principles. 

Laboratory hours: Thursday and Friday afternoons. 

24. Advanced Phjrsics — Mechanics. Four hours. One semester. 

This course will be a thorough investigation of the mechanics of 
solids, liquids, and gases and sound. 

First semester, 1929-30. 

34. Advanced Physics — Electricity and Magnetism. Four hours. 
One semester. 

This course will be a thorough consideration of the laws of the 
electric and magnetic fields and the power applications of electricity. 

Second semester, 1929-30. 

44. Advanced Physics — Heat and Light. Four hours. One 
semester. 

This course will be concerned with the nature of heat and light and 
the transmission of each through various media including reflection, 
refraction, and dispersion. 

First semester, 1930-31. 

The Calculus will be a very great aid in these courses. 

Drawing 13. Elementary Mechanical Dravring. Three hours. First 
semester. 

Use of instruments, construction of geometric figures, projection of 
simple solids, simple sections and development of surfaces, lettering, 
sketching, tracing, and blueprinting. 

The college will provide the usual drawing desks, etc., and the 
student will provide his own drawing instruments. 

Drawing 23. Descriptive Geometry. Three hours. Second 
semester. 

Problems in the projection of point, lines, planes, and solids and 
in the intersection of lines, planes, and solids. 

POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professors Gingrich and Stokes 

Major: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16, Eco- 
nomics 26. 

Minor: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16. 

The courses in this department are planned to be useful in pre- 
paring the student for service in political and social work after 
graduation. They are recommended especially to persons who in- 
tend to enter professional life. 



54 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ECONOMICS 

16. Economic Theory. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of the existing 
economic order. One hour a week in seminar groups is given to 
the discussion of economic problems. 

26. Business Law. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course dealing with the elementary principles of law generally 
related to the field of business, including Contracts, Agency, Sales, 
Bailments, Insurance and Negotiable instruments. 

34. Money, Foreign Exchange and Banking. Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

A course dealing with monetary theory, the gold standard and 
problems of foreign exchange. A study of the American system 
and a comparative study of banking systems generally; the business 
cycle; problems of reparations. Offered in 1930-1931 and each 
alternate year. 

53. Labor Problems. Three hours. Second semester. 

The course deals with: Population and land settlement, seasonal 
employment, unemployment, problems of the working day, wage 
rates, trade unionism, open and closed shops, strikes, lockouts, boy- 
cotts, arbitration and conciliation, the sweating system, child and 
woman labor, wage boards and the minimum wage, industrial acci- 
dents, profit sharing, co-partnership and co-operation. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

16. American Government and Politics. Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of 
the fundamental laws of Federal and State Government. Much 
time is given to the study of leading cases. 

24. Political Theory. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of various theories of the state and the structure and 
province of government. A considerable portion of the work of the 
second semester is given to the consideration of practical problems 
of national and international import. 

SOCIOLOGY 

16. Principles of Sociologfy. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the various 
theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the 
general field of learning. Modern social problems are discussed 
during the second semester. 



BULLETIN 55 

SPANISH 

06. Elementary Spanish. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is open as an elective to all students "who do not 
present Spanish for entrance. The work includes grammar and 
composition, easy conversation, and the reading of texts of average 
difficulty. 

Texts: — Hills & Ford, First Spanish Course; Hills & Cano, Cuentos 
y leyendos; Carolina Marcial Daroda, Espana Pintoresca; Alarcon, El 
capitdn Veneno. 

16. Intermediate Spanish. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course includes a thorough review^ of grammar and syntax, 
with practice in composition and conversation. Several stories and 
plays by modern Spanish authors will be read. 

Texts : — Seymour & Carnahan, Short Spanish Review Grammar; 
El prestamo de la difmita, (4) Benavente, Tres comedias. 

1. Baroja, Zalacain el aventurero 

2. Caraba, La Rana Viajira 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

E. E. Mylin, Physical Director 

The work in Hygiene is under the direction of Associate Professor 
Light. 

Two hours a week of regular prescribed work are required of all 
students, resident and special, in the first and second year classes, 
and are an integral part of the requirements for graduation. 

Hygiene. Two hours a week. Required of all first year men. 

Freshman Physical Education. Two hours a week. 

Sophomore Physical Education. Two hours a week. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

E. Winifred Chapman, Physical Director 

The work in Hygiene is under the direction of Dr. Polk. 
' The aim of the work in this department is to promote the general 
physical well being of the students, and to assist them to gain the 
hygienic, corrective and educative effect of rightly regulated exercise. 

In order that this object may be better attained, and to assist the 
director in gaining a definite knowledge of the strength and weak- 
ness of the individual, a careful physical examination and medical 
inspection is required, which serves as a basis for the work. 

All students must take the prescribed work in Physical Education. 
It is strongly recommended that before entering College each student 



56 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

undergo a thorough visual examination and be fitted with glasses, 
if there is a need for them. 

The Health Laws of the State of Pennsylvania require successful 
vaccination against smallpox before a person can enter private, 
parochial or public schools as a student. 

First year students are required to attend a course of lectures in 
Personal and Sex Hygiene, given twice a week for one year. 

Two hours of exercise each week are required of all resident and 
non-resident women throughout their college course. Exceptions 
to this requirement are made only for physical disability and at the 
discretion of the College physician in which case suitable work is 
prescribed. 

Students are required to provide themselves with gymnasium 
suits. Application for information regarding the regulation costume 
should be made to the Director of Physical Education for Women. 

1. Hygiene 

Two hours per week throughout the year required of all 
first year women. 

2. Hockey 

Two hours per week. Fall to Thanksgiving. 

3. Archery 

Two hours per week. Fall to Thanksgiving, Spring to June. 

4. Educational Gymnastics 

One hour per week. Thanksgiving to Spring. 

5. Folk Dancing 

One hour per week. Thanksgiving to Spring. 

6. Recreational Games 

One hour per week. Thanksgiving to Spring. 

7. Special Corrective Gymnastics 

One hour per week. Thanksgiving to Spring. Advised for 
students who need special attention because of poor car- 
riage, slight curvations of the spine, etc. Daily work on the 
part of the students is in addition to a period once a week 
with the instructor. 

8. Tennis 

Two hours per week. Fall to Thanksgiving, Spring to June. 

9. Track and Field Events 

Two hours per week. Spring to June. 
10. Volley ball 

Two hours per week. Spring to June. 

Application for information in regard to the regulation costume 
for athletics and gymnastics should be made to the Director of 
Physical Education for Women. 



BULLETIN 57 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

PLAN OF THE COURSE 

First Year per°week 

Hygiene 2 

Chemistry 18, Physics 18, or Biology 18 4 

Economic Geography 14 , 2 

College Algebra, Mathematics of Finance 3 

EngHsh 16 3 

French, German or Spanish 16 3 

~17 
Second Year 

Bible 14 2 

Economics 16 3 

Elements of Accounting 3 

English 26 3 

Political Science , 3 

Elective 2 

~16 
Third Year 

Advanced Accounting 3 

History 64 (Economic History of the U. S.) 2 

Economics 26 (Law) 3 

Transportation, Corporation Finance (1929-30) 3 

Marketing and Advertising (1930-31) 

History (English) 3 

Elective 3 

~17 
Foxirth Year 

Bible 54 2 

Public Finance, Statistics (1929-30) 2 

Economics 34 (Money and Banking 1930-31) 

Law, Partnership, Corporations, Insurance, Property, 

Leases, Mortgages, Workmen's Compensation 3 

Business Administration, History of Economic Thought 3 

History 46 (American year) 3 

Elective 3 

16 

During the Third and Fourth years a series of lectures will be 
offered by the Department in the following fields: Insurance, In- 
vestments, The Stock Exchange, Labor Problems. All students must 
take the Physical Education offered in the First and Second Years. 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSES 

The following courses of study are outlined for those desiring to 
qualify for admission to medical schools. 

The work outlined for the two-year course includes the subjects 
specified by the Bureau of Professional Education of the Pennsyl- 



58 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



vania Department of Public Instruction as the minimum require- 
ment for admission to any medical school. 

The four-year course includes all of the subjects required for 
admission to the medical schools which require a collegiate degree 
for admission and fulfills the requirements of the college for the 
Bachelor of Science degree. 

The student must maintain a standard of not less than "B" in all 
courses in order to obtain the recommendation of the college for 
admission to a medical school. 

In addition to the courses outlined the student is advised to read 
the following: 

Locy, Biology and its Makers. 

Hollman-Walker, Organic Chemistry. 

Current Biological Literature in Journals of Wistar Institute of 
Anatomy and Biology. 



Two- Year Course 



Hours 
T^. per 

First year week 

Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 18 4 

English 16 3 

French 16 or 

German 16 3 

Mathematics 16 3 



17 



Hours 
becond year week 

Biology 38 or 48 4 

Chemistry 48 4 

Psychology 13 3 

Physics 18 4 

Economics 16 3 



18 



Four-Year Course 



Hours 
_. per 

First year week 

Bible 14 2 

Chemistry 18 4 

English 16 3 

French 16 or 

German 16 3 

Mathematics 16 3 

Hygiene 2 

17 
Second year 

Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 48 4 

English 26 3 

Psychology 13 3 

Mathematics 46 3 



Hours 

Third year ^^^^ 

Biology 48 or 64 and 94 . . 4 

Economics 16 3 

Physics 18 4 

Sociology 16 3 

Elective 2 



16 

Fourth year 

Biology 38 or 58 4 

Chemistry, Qual. Anal 4 

History 46 3 

Bible 54 2 

Elective 2 



17 



15 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

np HE aim of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory is to teach 
music historically and aesthetically as an element of liberal 
culture; to offer courses that will give a thorough and practical un- 
derstanding of theory and composition; and to train artists and 
teachers. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission to the courses in the Conserva- 
tory of Music leading to a diploma are practically equivalent to those 
of the College. An applicant for admission must (1) be a graduate 
of a four year High School, and (2) possess a reasonable amount of 
musical intelligence. 

MUSIC SUPERVISORS' COURSE 
(B. S. in Music) 

Entrance Requirements 

The possession of an acceptable singing voice and of a fairly 
quick sense of tone and rhythm. 

Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair degree 
of accuracy and facility. 

Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument represent- 
ing two years study. 

A general academic education, representing a four-year high school 
course or its equivalent. 

The outline of the curriculum follows: 

First Semester 

Elementary Theory 3 3 

Sight Reading (1) S iVn 

Dictation (1) (Ear Training) 5 2j4 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Biology 3 3 

English (1) 3 3 

Physical Education (1) 3 1 

26 17 



60 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Second Semester 

Harmony and Melody (1) 3 3 

Sight Reading (2) 3 1^ 

Dictation (2) (Ear Training) 3 1J4 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Introduction to Teaching 3 3 

English (2) 3 3 

Physical Education (2) 3 1 

Oral Expression 2 2 

24 17 

Third Semester 

Harmony and Melody (3) 3 3 

Sight Reading (3) 3 1J4 

Dictation (3) 3 1^ 

Violin Class (1) 2 2 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Psychology and Child Study 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

Physical Education (3) 3 1 

24 17 

Fourth Semester 

Harmony and Melody (3) 3 3 

Sight Reading (4) 3 1J4 

Dictation (3) (Harmonic) 3 1^ 

Violin Class (2) 2 2 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Psychology 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

Physical Education (4) 3 1 

24 17 

Fifth Semester 

History of Music and Appreciation (1) 3 3 

Child Voice and Rote Songs with materials and 

methods for grades 1, 2, 3 3 3 

Harmony (4) (Keyboard) 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

History of Education 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

19 17 



BULLETIN 61 



Sixth Semester 



History of Music and Appreciation (2) 3 3 

Materials and Methods, Grades 4, 5, 6 3 3 

Harmony (5) (Musical Form and Analysis) 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Educational Sociology 3 3 

Elective 3 3 



19 17 



Seventh Semester 



Harmony (6) (Composition) 3 3 

Games, Pageantry and Folk Dancing 3 3 

Orchestral and Choral Conducting 3 3 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 4 2 

Principles of Education 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

19 17 



Eighth Semester 

Materials and Methods, Junior and Senior High 

School 3 3 

Community Music 1 1 

Voice, Piano, Organ, Violin, Chorus, Orchestral 
and Band Instruments — Arrange work for 

greatest benefit of students 2 1 

Student Teaching , 13 10 

Technique of Teaching 2 2 

21 17 

N. B. — The fifteen hours of elective work must be chosen from 
one field. 



OUTLINE OF COURSE LEADING TO A DIPLOMA 
First Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing 4 

Sight Playing 1 

Elementary Harmony and Composition 2 

Appreciation of Music 2 

English 16 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Dictation 4 



62 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Second Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing 3 

Sight Playing 1 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

History of Music 2 

English 26 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Harmonic Dictation 3 

Third Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Sight Singing and Chord Dictation 2 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

Psychology of Music 1 

Musical Form 2 

French or German 3 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Choral Works 1 

Fourth Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice or Violin 2 

Harmony, Composition and Counterpoint 2 

Harmonic Analysis 2 

Science and Theory of Music , . 2 

Ensemble Playing 1 

Four hours daily practice 10 

Choral Works 1 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

(a) Theoretical 

Elementary Harmony. Three hours throughout the year. 

Study of intervals, triads, inversions, and chords of the seventh. 
Harmonization of simple melodies and basses. Original work, hymn 
tunes and keyboard harmony. 

Prerequisite: a study of the rudiments of Music including nota- 
tion, formation of scales, major and minor. 

Advanced Harmony. Three hours throughout the year. 

Secondary Seventh chords, dominant ninths, modulation, suspen- 
sions and ornamented tones. 

Sight Singing and Ear Training. Five hours first semester. Three 
hours second semester. 

Rhythmic notation, singing of intervals, chords and melodies. 
Melody writing. Transposition. 

Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training. Three hours through- 
out the year. 

Dictation of Seventh Chords in Four part Harmony. Modulation 
and Melody Writing. 



BULLETIN 63 

Elementary Dictation. Dictation of intervals and melodies. Trans- 
position. 

Harmonic Dictation. Dictation of intervals, melodies and chords 
in four part harmony, Transposition. 

Counterpoint. Two hours throughout the year. 

Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part 
Counterpoint). 

Form and Composition, Two hours throughout the year. 

The construction of simple binary, and terniary forms, and the 
analysis of musical works of diflferent periods. Free Composition: 
improvisation of simple terniary and contrapuntal forms, such as 
"The Pin Head Fugue." 

History of Music. Three hours throughout the year. 

Development of Music in its various forms from the beginning of 
the Christian Era to the present, with an introduction on ancient and 
primitive music. Text, lectures, and collateral reading. Lectures are 
illustrated by examples of the particular art forms or from the works 
of the particular composer under discussion. 

Pedagog^y. 

The aim of this course is to give Juniors and Seniors practical 
teaching experience under the instruction and supervision of members 
of the Faculty. After a course of lectures and demonstration by 
the Supervisor, the student gains actual experience in teaching pupils 
both in class and private lessons. 

Lectures will be given on all phases of piano playing. The instruc- 
tion will be based on the most modern pedagogical and psychological 
principles. All presentation of material will be first made through 
the ear, the most spiritual sense, then the eye and touch. 

(b) Practical 

Private instruction is provided in Applied Music (Piano, Voice, 
Organ and Violin). 

Piano: Miss Engle, Mr. Campbell. 

Voice: Mrs. Mills, Mr. Crawford. 

Organ: Mr. Campbell. 

Violin: Mr. Malsh. 

A bulletin describing courses in Practical Music will be sent upon 
application. 

THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

A candidate for this degree must have received a Diploma from 
Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, or other institution 
offering an equally advanced course of study, and in addition thereto 
must complete one year's work in canon, fugue, composition and 



64 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

orchestration; and must compose a cantata for solos arid mixed 
voices, with an accompaniment for symphony orchestra, requiring at 
least thirty minutes for performance, or a concerto for a solo instru- 
ment and orchestra, or a symphony in three or four movements 
for orchestra, of similar length. 

The graduation fee for the degree is $13.00. 

THE DIPLOMA 

The diploma is granted only to candidates who have completed the 
four year course of study in one branch of applied music, as a major 
study, and at least three years (Freshman, Sophomore and Junior) 
study in a second branch, as a minor study, and the complete sub- 
joined theoretical studies for the four year course in the major, and 
the three-year course in the minor study. 

The major and minor studies may be coupled as follows: 

Major: Pianoforte, Pianoforte, Pianoforte, Violin, Voice, Organ. 

Minor: Organ, Violin, Voice, Pianoforte, Pianoforte, Pianoforte. 

The graduation fee is $13.00. 

Note — A combination of other branches may be effected under 
special conditions which may be presented to the Director. 

THE CERTIFICATE 

Certificates are issued to those who are not able to complete the 
four year course, but who are able to complete the first three years of 
the course leading to a diploma. Students desiring a certificate 
must add to the Junior year the course of lessons in Piano Methods. 

The fee for a certificate is $8.00. 

MUSIC AND THE A.B. DEGREE 

Music study may be credited toward the A.B. Degree to a total of 
twenty semester hours (five semester hours per year). For such 
credit, the requirements are as follows: Two half-hour recitations 
per week in Applied Music, two hours per day in practice, two hour 
recitations per week in harmony. 

A student desiring credit for this course of study is expected to 
continue the same until graduation. Credit will not ordinarily be 
granted for a single year of study. Only under exceptional conditions 
such credit may be granted by the faculty upon recommendation of 
the Director of the Conservatory. 

THE STUDENTS' RECITALS 

The students' Tuesday evening recital is of inestimable value to all 
students in acquainting them with a wide range of the best musical 
literature, in developing musical taste and discrimination, in afford- 



BULLETIN 65 

ing young musicians experience in appearing before an audience, and 
in gaining self-reliance, as well as nerve control and stage demeanor. 
These recitals also enable all students and others who are interested 
in music to gain a much wider acquaintance with musical literature 
than would otherwise be possible. Students in all grades appear on 
the programs of these recitals. Each senior is required to present 
one special graduation recital. 

FEES 

Matriculation for Music ranges from one dollar to twenty-five dol- 
lars. No additional fee is required for music from students who have 
already matriculated for College departments. 

Semester bills are payable strictly in advance of recitations. Stu- 
dents are registered at the office of the College Registrar over the 
signature of the Director of the Conservatory. 

The Rates for the Public School Music Supervisors' Course will 
be $220 per year. This will include all theoretical classes, two private 
lessons weekly, and two hours daily practice. 

Private Lessons 

Rates are determined by the classification of the pupil and the fees 
charged by the different professors. 

The rates per semester, two hours per week, range from $34.00 
to $50,00, and for one lesson per week from $17.00 to $25.00. 

Class Lessons 
The rate for all Theoretical courses given as class work is $18.00 
per semester for each course. 

Rent of Practice Instruments 

Piano, one hour daily per semester $4.00 

Each additional hour daily per semester 2.00 

Organ, one hour daily, per semester 20.00 

Organ, two hours weekly, per semester 10.00 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Students are not enrolled for a shorter period of time than a full 
semester, or the unexpired portion of a semester; and no reduction 
is made for delay in registering when the time lost is less than one- 
fourth of the semester. 

No reduction is made for absence from recitations except in case of 
protracted illness extending beyond a period of two weeks, in which 
case the loss is shared equally by the college and the student. 

Conservatory students are under the regular college discipline. 

The Men's Glee Club and the Eurydice Choral Society are 
organized under the direction of the Department of Music, 

No. 5 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Behney, John Bruce 434 Park Ave Freeland Luzerne Penua. 

Bodenhorn, EUwood S 720 Penn Ave West Reading Berks Penna. 

Bossard, Ada Catharine 127 N. Lancaster St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Grube, Ray Young 254 Church Ave Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Hughes, Stella Minerva Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Kulp, Donald Dual Jr. College, University of 

Tennessee Martin Weakley Tenn. 

Liebegott, Charles E 334 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Stern, Paul Hertzler 144 E. High St Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Wagner, James Edgar 1833 North St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Wilson, Charles T 117 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

SENIORS 

Apgar, Anna Boyer 928 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon; Penna. 

Aungst, Henry Reuben 176th St & 114th Ave. . St. Albans, L. I. ..Queens N. Y. 

Bailey, Hazel Irene 30 S. Market St Winchester Frederick Va. 

Beattie, John Wesley 125 E. Main St Shiremanstown. . . . Cumberland Penna. 

Becktel, Russell Gordon Tower City Schuylkill Penna. 

Bender, Mary AmeUa 441 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Blatt, William Carl 515 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bomberger, Eh Monroe 124 Pershing Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bork, Kathryn Virginia 322 W. Orange St Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Brinser, Carol Emma 600 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Calabrese, Dominic 182 Westervelt Place.. . .Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Christman, William F Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Clymer, Mary Elizabeth 316 E. Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Deitrich, Viola Rebecca 221 N. Railroad St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Derickson, Lawrence Buck 528 Forrest St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Detweiler, Enos August 310 Chestnut St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Disney, Aiba David 108 N. Harrison St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Donmoyer, Earl Hostetter 423 S. 12th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Eberly, Carl Donald .39 E. Howard St Dallastown York Penna. 

Emenheiser, WiUiam Otterbein York Haven York Penna. 

Essick, Ruth Darlington R. F. D. No. 2 Downingtown Chester Penna. 

Fearnow, Sarah Jane Berkeley Springs . . Morgan W. Va. 

Gelbert, Charles Magnus 618 N. Spring Garden. . . Ambler Montgomery Penna. 

Gorski, Edna Teresa 60 Plauderville Ave Garfield Bergen N. J. 

Hamer, Mae Matilda 1553 Logan Ave Tyrone Blair Penna. 

Hammond, Bayard Louis 223 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Peima. 

Hammond, Frances Twaddle 223 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Harpel, Leah Eleanor 517 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Heilman, Carl Ernest R. F. D. No. 8 Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hershey, Miriam Jeanette 815 Madison Ave York York Penna. 

Hoffman, Marion Elizabeth 602 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hook, Clara H 237 Maclay St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hovis, Harry LeRoy EmigsviUe York Penna. 

Hunter, Paul Wesley 1228 Silliman St Erie Erie Penna. 

Kauffman, Esther Pauline Wernersville Berks Penna. 

Kiehner, Miles Stanley River St Cressona Schuylkill Penna. 

Kleinfelter, Dorothy Evelyn 417 E. Main St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Klinger, Allen Edwin Sacramento Schuylkill Penna. 

Kunkle, OrviUe 123 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Lane, Mildred Harriet 218 Main St Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Lang, Edna Elizabeth 116 S. Calverton St Baltimore Baltimore Md. 

Laurie, Andrew Louis 101 Sayre St Elizabeth Union N. J. 

Light, Edith Catherine 128 S. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Ruth Ellen 503 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Lutz, Jennie Barnett 133 Herr St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lutz, Lewis Archie 217 Harding Court York York Penna. 

Lutz, Robert Walter Expedit Cambria Penna. 

Matter, Ira Henry Halifax Dauphin Penna. 

Matthes, Elizabeth Johanna Berkshire Country Club. Reading Berks Penua. 

Mentzer, Clarence Lau.ston Valley View Schuylkill Penna. 

Miller, Florence Maurine 558 W. Market St York York Penna. 

Miller, Forrest William 1 17 N. Lancaster St Annville Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 67 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Miller, Frederic Keiper 346 N. Qth St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Irene Margie 304 W. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Janet May 930 E. Market St York York Penna. 

Muth, Miriam Lydia 267 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Oyer, Russell ConweU 244 E. Garfield St Shippensburg Cumberland Penna. 

Piela, Stanley Anton 139 Union St Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Poff, Palmer Edward 15 N. Pleasant Ave Dallastown York Penna. 

Reigel, Ruth Elizabeth 303 W. High St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Rider, Harold Calvin 712 W. Church St Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Schrope, Irene Agnes Valley View Schuylkill Penna. 

Shaffer, Emmeline May 9th St New Cumberland. . Cumberland Penna. 

Silber, Fannie 251 Walnut St Newark Essex N. J. 

Snyder, George Russel Wingate Center Penna. 

Snyder, Richard Herr 116 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Sparrow, Wajme Gross 15 S. 2nd St Wormleysburg . . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Strubhar Ruth Anna 764 Charlotte St Pottstown Montgomery Penna. 

Thomas, Martin Henry 2214 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Thomas, Mary Book 706 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Troutman, Charles Robert 756 Hill St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ulrich, Nancy Miller 232 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ulrich, Parke Hershey Main St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Umholtz, Mildred Clarissa Sacramento Schuylkill Penna. 

Wengert, Kathryn June R. D. No. 2 Jonestown Lebanon Penna. 

Wentz, Howard Andrew 1003 Bridge St New Cumberland. . Cumberland Penna. 

Wilson, Maynard Pahner Verona Oneida N. Y. 

Wolfe, Florence Mabel R. F. D. No. 3 Bernville Berks Penna. 

JUNIORS 

Albright, Roy Bishop 9 Park Ave Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Allwein, Homer John 10 N. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Allwein, Joseph Witmer 521 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Angstadt, Esther 1424 Muhlenberg St ... . Reading Berks Penna. 

Ax, Mary Elizabeth 423 Canal St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bachman, Gladys Fae W. Main St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Barnhart, Alfred Charles 1130 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Barnhart, Clarence Paul 897 W. Washington St. .Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Bendigo, Glenn Emanuel Orwin Schuylkill Penna. 

Black, EUzabeth Margaret 363 N. 2nd St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Boughter, Louise Hoffer 119 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bovino, Dominic Anthony 141 24th St Brooklyn Kings N. Y. 

Boyd, David Hammond 19 S. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Boyer, Dorothy Marion Arendtsville Adams Penna. 

Burtner, Warren Edward 233 S. 2nd St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Cochran, Mary Blanche Gap Lancaster Penna. 

Cooper, Ruth Grace 401 S. Main St Jamestown Chautauqua Penna. 

Copenhaver, Helen Elizabeth 2415 N. 4th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Cunjak, Rudy Joseph 746 S. 2nd St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Dyne, Corinne Margaret 52 Carlisle Ave York York Penna. 

Fink, Charles Monroe 25 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

FioreUo, Joseph Russell 15 Dexter St Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Gable, Dorothy Isabella 57 S. 5th Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Gaciofano, Frank 276 Farnham Ave Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Gingrich, Harold Lee Lawn Lebanon Penna. 

Gordon, Anne 602 Stuyvesant Ave Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Gregory, Dolores Valinda R. F. D. No. 4 Martinsburg Berkeley W. Va. 

Groman, Edv/ard 190 Corabella Ave Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Hackman, Mildred May R. F. D. No. 4 Myerstown Lebanon Penna. 

Hagner, Kathryn Harriet 1126 Mulberry St Reading Berks Penna. 

Hain, Helen Rettew Penn Avenue WernersviUe Berks Penna. 

Hand, Helen Mae R. F. D. No. 2 Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Hazelton, James Charles Wibaux Wibaux Mon. 

Heaps, Marion Elizabeth 213 West Main St Palmyra Lebanon Peima. 

Hershey, Anna Marquette 169 S. Railroad St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Hertzler, George Edgar 131 E. Clay St Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Hiester, Dorothy Elizabeth 466 N. 4th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hoy, Anna Elizabeth Market Street Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hyland, Elizabeth Dorothie E. Chocolate Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Jacks, Robert Wright 142 E. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Kauffman, Lester Millard Dover York Penna. 

Keene, James Calvin 17 E. Pottsville St Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

No. 6 



68 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Keener, Grace Elizabeth Schaefferstown .... Lebanon Penna 

Knaub, Gladys Marjorie Fourth St Mount Wolf York Penna. 

Light, Wayne Augustus 625 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

March, Ruth Evelyn 3787 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Meyers, Elwood William 344 E. Main St Dallastown York Penna. 

Miller, Leah Anna Germansville Lehigh Penna. 

Morrow, Olive Miriam 230 High St Duncannon Perry Penna. 

Myers, Mildred Elizabeth 321 W. Main St -Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Myers, William Jacob R.' F. D. No. 1 Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Noll, Clarence Irwin 605 N. Railroad St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Parnell, Ruth Elizabeth 127 Oak St Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Peter, Irene Bachman 1012 Turner St Allentown Lehigh Penna. 

Rank, Mary Elizabeth 21 W. Main St ."^nnville Lebanon Penna. 

Renninger, Louis Robert N. Robeson St Robesonia Berks Penna. 

Rhoads, George Frederick 201 Market St Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Riegel, Elva Mae 374 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rife, Madeline Anna 1223 Scotland Ave Chambersburg .... Franklin Penna. 

Schaeffer, Pauline Lehman 460 Moore St Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Showers, Mary Elizabeth 339 Maple St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Shroyer, Al vin Edgar, Jr 83 Sheridan Ave Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Sitlinger, Albert LeRoy 501 S. 2nd St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Slenker, Palmer Millard Yoe York Penna. 

Smyser, Margaret A R. F. D. No. 10 York York Penna. 

Snyder, John William Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Snyder, Mary Leah Avon Lebanon Penna. 

Stambaugh, Oscar Frank Markelsville Perry Penna. 

Strebig, Bernita Sheekard 132 Greenwich St Reading Berks Penna. 

Stuckey , Russell Rodger 30 Caracas Avenue Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Taranto, Michael 702 Summit St Linden Union N. J. 

Ulrich, Foster Grosh 15 S. Chestnut St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Vanderwall, Norman 624 Cleveland Ave Linden Union N. J. 

Weber, Lloyd Martin Blue Ball Lancaster Penna. 

Witmer, Mary Ellen Mountville Lancaster Penna. 

Wood, Raymond Earl 1108 Frankhn St Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Yake, Harriet Josephine 332 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Zappia, Samuel Thomas Central Ave Brocton Chautauqua N. Y. 

Zechman, Harry William Sacramento Schuylkill Penna. 

SOPHOMORES 

Auman, Sara Eva Pahnyra Lebanon Penna. 

Becker, George John 572 Palisade Ave Weehawken Hudson N. J. 

Berkov, Henry David 25 S. 4th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Binner, Alma Mary Rexmont Lebanon Penna. 

Bleichert, Martin Fisher 723 Guilford St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bollman, Rose Elizabeth 439 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Daub, Lloyd Alvin Muir Schuylkill Penna. 

Early, Edna Mae 501 W. Chestnut St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Ehrgott, Marie Marguerite 430 Locu.st St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ensminger, Sara Louise 240 N. Main St Red Lion York Penna. 

Etter, Russel Emerich 279 W. Main St Hummelstown. .... Dauphin Penna. 

Evancoe, Paul John 426 Pennsylvania Ave. . . South Renova Clinton Penna. 

Fisher, Caroline Sarge 11 Columbine Road Worcester Worcester Mass. 

Focht, Theodore Murray 505 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Grant, Alexander Douglass 135 Hooper Ave Toms River Ocean N. J. 

Greiner, Norman Shirk 624 Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Haas, Jacob Charles R. D. No. 1 Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hafer, Dorothy Blanche 109 Rosemore Ave Glenside Montgomery Penna. 

Hower, Ethel May R. F. D. No. 2 Lebanon Lebanon Penna 

Hoy, Harry Howard, Jr Market St Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hutchison, Joseph Brandt 315 Bridge St New Cumberland. . Cumberland Penna. 

Kelly, Leo Joseph 506 Woodland St Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Kralick, Peter Harry 143 N. Chestnut St Mount Carmel Northumberland. .. Penna. 

Lebo, Warren Ellsworth Market St Halifax Dauphin Penna, 

LeVan, Effie Ruth R. D. No. 4 Catawissa Columbia Penna. 

Liller, Ruth Irene 30 Areba Ave Hershey Dauphin. Penna. 

McClure, Meredith Rice E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, John Franklin 213 S. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Morgan, Russell Evan 344 Pine St Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Nye, Quebe Eryle 22 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Persons, Grant Emerson 127 S. 4th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Patriaio, George Bruno 728 8th St Oakmont Allegheny Penna. 



BULLETIN 69 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Rank, John Herr 21 W. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Rearick, Luther Malcohn MifBintown Juniata Penna. 

Roudabush, Robert Lee 320 Fifth St Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Ruasell, Kenneth Lyman 125 HigUand St YoungsvUle Warren Penna. 

Salada, Charles Dean 465 Main St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Saylor, Mildred Harrison 622 W. King St York York Penna. 

Sehaak, Robert Franklin 520 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Schanbacker, Rading Vinton 318 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Schell, Josephine Mae Mt. Aetna Berks Penna. 

Sheddy, Madeline Helen 222 N. Main St YoungsviUe Warren Penna. 

Shenk, Cyrus Alfred 430 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Snavely, Charles Joseph 30 Summit St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Suavely, Harry Theodore Ono Lebanon, Penna. 

Spangler, William Gilbert 1913 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Stager, Mary Elizabeth 8th and Church Sts Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Stuckey, Kenneth Charles 30 Caracas Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Trezise, Willard 252 North St Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Watkins, Harold Edward Good Spring Schuylkill Penna. 

Welker, Herbert Mark Morgan. . . 457 Main St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Wise, Charles Henry 239 N. 2nd St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Wolf, Earl Emerson 712 N. Plum St Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Wolfe, Mabel Anna 713 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Wood, Joseph Edgar 509 Monmouth St Trenton Mercer N. J. 

FRESHMEN 

Abraham, Joseph William 339 Washington St Freeland Luzerne Peima. 

Agen, Ruth Muriel 725 N. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Albert, Karl Richard 43 Main St Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Allen, Clinton Johnson New Park York Penna. 

Armacost, Goldeth Ruth 645 Orpington Road .... Baltimore Baltimore Md. 

Baird, Ahce Eleanor 505 56th St Altoona Blair Penna. 

Balsbaugh, Marlin Elijah Swatara Dauphin Penna. 

Bamford, Charles Joseph Westover St Morrisville Bucks Penna. 

Barnes, Philip 60 W. Scott Place Elizabeth Union N. J. 

Bartolet, Charles Elsworth 3215 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bauder, Harry Augustus 27 W. Main St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Bauder, John Fleck 27 W. Main St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Beck, Daniel Frederick Henry.. . .201 S. Railroad St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Behm, Oliver Amos 121 Cocoa Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Bender, Lenora Mary R. F. D. No. 1 Duncannon Perry Penna. 

Benzing. CjTithia Ellen 304 Park Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bixler, Mary Elizabeth 318 Sixth St New Cumberland. . Cumberland Penna. 

Bomgardner, Earl Wesley 24 N. Locust St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Bowers, Katharine Viola 625 Chestnut St York York Penna. 

Bowman, Donald Leslie 543 N. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman. Paul Nelson Ill Edgar St York York Penna. 

Brown, Jesse Jefferson Markelsville Perry Penna. 

Buckley, Hilda Dutton 952 Tilghman St AUentown Lehigh Penna. 

Buffington, Mary Malinda Main St Ehzabethville Dauphin Penna. 

Burgner, Newton Milton 1016 Mifflin St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Camille, James Daniel 2001 .Jackson Ave Windber Somerset Penna. 

Carls, Russell William 33 E. Centre St Shenandoah Schuylkill Penna. 

Christiansen, Mildred Wilhelmina.69 E. High St Avon Norfolk Mass. 

Christman, Samuel Fred Williamson Franklin Penna. 

Clark, Forrest Roosevelt 304 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Coleman, Ralph Eugene 615 Spruce St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Conrad, Roy Garman Jonestown Lebanon Penna. 

Daley, Martha May 136 S. Washington St. . .Greencastle Franklin Penna. ' 

Dennis, Russel Eugene N. 3rd St West Milton Union Penna. 

DePolo. Philip 2008 Graham Ave Windber Somerset Penna. 

Dibiase, Celia _. 137 Carbon St Minersville Schuylkill Penna. 

Dissinger, Leon Benjamin 21 Centre St Lititz Lancaster Penna. 

Draper, Doris Evelyn 235 E. Baltimore St Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Earley, Morton Jay Emeigh Cambria Penna. 

Engle, Mary Elizabeth Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Eppley, Mary Jane R. F. D. No. 6 Mechanicsburg Cumberland Penna. 

Esbenshade, Ann Augusta 607 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Flook, Elizabeth Eby Grey Gables Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Fonnan, Alice Anna Pottsville St Wiconisco Dauphin Penna. 

Prevola, James Domenic 208 21st St Brooklyn Kings N. Y. 

Frey, Earl Baohman 438 N. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



70 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Garber, Anna Lucinda Main St Florin Lancaster Penna . 

Garber, Dorothy Elizabeth 828 Walnut St Columbia Lancaster Penna 

Gelwicks. Helen Marie Box 22 Mechanicsburg. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Gibble, Alfred Tennyson 622 N. Lincoln St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Girton, Arthur Darell 243 N. Pine St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Glassmoyer, Franklin Frederick. .443 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Graybill. Mae LaVene R. F. D. No. 2 Hummelstown Dauphin. Penna. 

Green, Donald Sloan 721 Greenwood Ave Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Greiner, Marcella Mary 427 S. 12th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Groh, Helen Josephine 541 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna 

Hall, William Moore 125 Second St California Washington Penna. 

Hartman, Paul Francis 34 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Heller, Calvin Reese 368 Myers St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Hershey, Gladys June 4655 N. Camac St Philadelphia Philadelphia Penna. 

Holstein, Richard Wagner 365 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Houck, Elinor Margaret 199 Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hughes, John David R. F. D. No. 3 Catawissa Columbia Penna. 

Keene, Paul Kershner 17 E. Pottsville St Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Kiehl, Anna Mary 247 S. 8th St Columbia Lancaster Penna. 

Kinney, Alvin Edgar 51 Clinton Ave Farmingdale Nassau N. Y. 

Kleinfelter, Paul Ira 342 E. Main St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Klopp, Lawrence Franklin Chestnut St Robesonia Berks Penna. 

Kohler, Preston Scott Wormleysburg . . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Krebs, Katherine Louise R. F. D. No. 1 Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Kuhnert, Alfred Ewalt Oberlin Dauphin Penna. , 

Latimer, Guy Main St High Bridge Hunterdon N. J. 

Leathem, James Hain 428 N. 8th St Lebanon -^Xebanbn Penna. 

Lechthaler, Roy Melvin, Jr 721 3rd St New Cumberland. ^Cumberland Penna. 

Lee, Charles Alvin Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Lefever, Elizabeth Dabler 142 Fairview Ave Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Lehman, William Wert 1508 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Leibig, RusseU LeRoy 21 S. 20th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna 

Lick, Artz Samuel 722 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Giles Aaron 461 E. Main St AnnviUe Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Jacob Warren 4th Ave & Lehman St. . .Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Margaret Ethel 421 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Loftus, Carl Charles 417 W. Market St Scranton Lackawanna Penna. 

Long, Violet Miller R. F. D. No. 3 Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Maloney, Paul Robert 311 Berry St West Pittston Luzerne Penna. 

March, Pearl Savoy Scotland Franklin Penna. 

Mark, Gordon Gish 305 E. Main St Pabnyra Lebanon Penna. 

McCusker, Robert John 63 Mary St Bordentown Burlington N. J. 

Mease, Frank Risser Jonestown Lebanon Penna. 

Meiser, Edgar William 611 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Mentzer, Russell Jay 448 E. Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Meyer, Almeda Kathrjoi R. F. D. No. 2 Annville Lebanon Penna. 

MiUer, Grant Nathaniel Orwin Schuylkill Penna. 

Miller, Lester Amos 117 N. Lancaster St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Marlin LeRoy 118 W. Main St Pabnyra Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Titus Carl Sacramento Schuylkill Penna. 

Milovich, Elias 663 S. 4th St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Monteith, James Roderick Emeigh Cambria Penna. 

Morris, John Hutchison 214 Columbus Ave Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Morton, Eulalie Naomi 1404 Second Ave Elmwood, York . . . York Penna. 

Morton, Violet May 1404 Second Ave Ehnwood, York. . .York Penna. 

Mummert, Lolita Elizabeth . .R. F. D. No. 2 Williamsport Washington Md. 

Mund, Frederick William 1915 Hollins St Baltimore Baltimore Md. 

Murphy, Donald Elhot 616 Church St South Fork Cambria Penna. 

Nye, Frank Hoffman 430 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Nye, George Robert 123 S. Hanover St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Orsino, Olianus Julius 522 Euclid Ave Canonsburg Washington Penna. 

Paris, Margaret Signe 1515 Ehn St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Peck, Eva Leona 106 W. Market St Marietta Lancaster Penna. 

Peterson, Helen Myra 234 Congress St Bradford McKean Penna. 

Pickel, Ray Wagner 13 S. Locust St Marietta Lancaster Penna. 

Pleiss, William Edward 301 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Pratt, Richard Francis 48 Grant Ave Farmingdale Nassau N. Y. 

Rank, James Donald. 21 W. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Rawhouser, Robert 652 Madison Ave York York Penna. 

Rugh, Chauncey Warren 413 Grant St South Fork Cambria Penna. 

RhPP, Mary Anne R, D. No. 1 Harrisburg Dauphin Penna? 

Salek, Charles John 346 Lanza Ave Garfield Bergen N. J. 



BULLETIN 71 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Schell, Marvin Kepley 527 Spruce St Lebanon Lebanon Peima. 

Sellnow, Raymond Albert 2114 Genesee St Trenton Mercer N. J. 

Shaffer, Richard Earl 108 E. Cherry St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Shiffler, Dorothy Fern 36 Chestnut St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Shively, Naomi Helen R. F. D. No. 1 Chambersburg . . . .Franklin Penna. 

Shortlidge, Allen Stone 133 S. 8th St Columbia Lancaster Penna. 

Shroyer, Ruth Emma 927 N. Shamokin St ... . Shamokin Northumberland. . . Penna. 

Sipe, WiUiam John 604 Salem Ave York York Penna. 

Slater, Dorothy Evelyn Main St Terre Hill Lancaster Penna. 

Smiley, Williard Loy 418 Market St Lemoyne Cumberland Penna. 

Smith, Kathryn Frances Expedit Cambria Penna. 

Snavely, Adam Levi Ono Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Charles Daniel 267 S. 12th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Dorothy Nancy Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Blarl Gilbert 116 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Stewart, Robert Henry 135 W. Jackson St York York Penna. 

Stine, John Houck 197 Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Strausser, William Penn Shoemakersville. . .Berks Penna. 

Taylor, Jacob Kermit Main St Yoe York Penna. 

Thompson, Arthur William Grande Avenue Tower City Schuylkill Penna. 

Thompson, Dorothy Caroline. . . .E. Main St Southboro Worcester Mass. 

Thrush, Bernard Elwood 157 S. 4th St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Trone, Phyllis Romaine 1621 Virginia Ave Hagerstown Washington Md. 

Ulrich, Barbara Elizabeth 643 S. 29th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Umberger, Luella Myrle R. F. D. No. 5 Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Wagner, Henrietta .\ugusta 10 Phelps Ave Bergenfield Bergen N. J. 

Walborn, R. Arthur R. F. D. No. 3 Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Warner, Roscoe Solomon R. F. D. No. 2 Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Weimer, Edgar Arthur, Jr 352 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Williard, Darwin Randolph 245 W. Main St Lykens Dauphin Penna. 

Wittle, Eugene Leroy 910 EUzabeth St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Wogan, William Wolf, Jr 133 N. Duke St York York Penna. 

Yingst, Kathryn Minerva BE. Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Yost, Emma Mae 31 E. Main St Schuylkill Haven. .Schuylkill Penna. 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Baxnhart, Thomas Jefferson Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Barr, Francis Brotherlin 2818 Beale Ave Altoona Blair Penna. 

Carvin, Walter 21 E. Pershing Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Feldaer, Oscar B 1100 Herr St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Gruman, Jennie Arnopolsky 40 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Harris, Henry Ray S. Lancaster St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

McCurdy, Mary Emerson 3025 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 
Juniors 

Hess, Hilda Irene 1541 Ridge Ave Waynesboro Frankhn Penna. 

Kissinger, Eleanor Mae R. D. No. 2 Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Slichter, Mary Alcesta 239 E. New St Lancaster Lancaster .^^^^ .... Penna. 

Weigel, Olive Marie 536 Vine St Johnstown Cambria Penna, 

Sophomore 

Young, Margaret Helen 429 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Freshmen 

Bowman, Marian Elizabeth 1113 Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Carpenter, Harry Wesley 1031 Poplar St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Dotter, Ernest Shuey Ono Lebanon Penna. 

Evans, Christine Minerva 703 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna, 

Goshert, Mary Katharine 26 N. Penn St Shippensburg Cumberland Penna. 

Haldeman, Dorothy Beulah Lawn Lebanon Penna: 

Seeley, Marye Lorraine Audree. . . 400 Grant Ave New Brunswick . . . Middlesex N.J. 

Thompson, Iris Hester 31 Henrietta St Red Lion. York Penna, 

Updegrave, Ruth Amelia Sacramento Schuylkill Penna. 



72 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Special Students 

NAME STUDY STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Achenbach, Amy Piano 532 Maple St Lebanon Penna. 

Allen, Clinton Johnson Violin New Park Penna. 

Beattie, John Wesley Voice 125 E. Main St Shiremanstown. . . . Penna. 

Bender, Elizabeth Teall Piano 216 Maple St AnnviUe Penna. 

Benzing, Cynthia Ellen Voice 304 Park Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Bixler, Ralph Edward Voice 217 W. Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Boger, Mrs. Pauline H Voice 341 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, EQlda E Violin Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Bowman, Lillian May Violin Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Boyer, Dorothy Marion Voice ArnedtsviUe Penna. 

Burgner, Newton MUton Organ 1016 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Butterwick, Anna Elizabeth Piano 218 E. Maple St AnnviUe Penna. 

Butterwick, Helen Irene Violin 218 E. Maple St AnnviUe Penna. 

Carls, RusseU WUliam Organ 33 E. Centre St Shenandoah Penna. 

CasBel, Violette Irene Piano R. D. No. 3 AnnviUe Penna. 

Clark, Forrest Roosevelt Voice 304 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Deibler, John Q Voice Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Dyne, Corinne Margaret Organ 52 CarUsle Ave York Penna. 

Eddy, Helen Louise Voice R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Eesick, Ruth DarUngton Organ R. D. No. 2 Downingtown Penna 

Flook, Elizabeth Eby Voice Grey Sables Hagerstown Md. 

Flory, HUda Jane Piano Lawn Penna 

Funk, Lena Mae Violin R. D. No. 1 AnnvUle Penna. 

Gingrich, June Violin CoUege Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Gordon, Ann Piano 602 Stuyvesant Ave Trenton N. J. 

Gossard, Mary EUzabeth Piano and Voice.. .Sherdan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Grimm, Henry Violin E. Maple St AnnviUe Penna. 

Groh, Helen Josephine Piano 541 Cumberland St Lebaaon Penna. 

Grumbine, May S Voice 149 W. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Hafer, Dorothy Blanche Voice 109 Rosemore Ave Glenside Penna. 

Hain, Helen Rettew Organ Penn Ave WernersviUe Penna. 

Harkins, Geraldine Piano CornwaU Penna. 

Hatz, RusseU C Violin 248 Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna 

Hertzler, George Edgar Voice 131 E. Clay St Lancaster Penna. 

Hostetter, Ruth Piano Lincoln St Palmyra Penna. 

Kettering, Ruth Margaret Piano 515 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Knoll, Robert W Voice R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Koch, Dorothy Piano 313 E. Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

Kreamer, John WiUiam Violin 326 W. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Kreider, Catherine Louise VioUn and Piano . . 73 Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Kreider, Helen Violin and Piano. . . 73 Sberidan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Kunkle, Orville Organ 123 N. 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Latimer, Guy Violin High Bridge N. J. 

Lebo, Warren E Piano and Harmony. Market St Halifax Penna. 

LeVan, Effie Ruth Piano and Organ. . .R. F. D. No. 4 Catawissa Penna. 

Light, Elizabeth Voice Myerstown Penna. 

Lockart, Mrs. Edna Voice Myerstown Penna. 

March, Ruth Evelyn Piano 3787 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Mentzer, Clarence Lanston Organ VaUey View Penna. 

MiUer, Florence Maurine Organ 558 W. Market St York Penna. 

MiUer, Forrest WilUam Voice 117 N. Lancaster St AnnvUle Penna. 

MUler, Leah Anna Voice and Piano Germansville Penna. 

MiUs, Catherine LucUe VioUn 444 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Mills, Mary Grace Piano 444 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Moyer, Anne Voice 402 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Mumma, Anna Piano 428 N. Raib-oad St Palmyra Penna. 

Murr, Myrtle Mae Piano and Organ. .HuU St Sinking Spring Penna. 

Myers, Mildred E Organ 321 W. Main St AnnvUle Penna. 

Oyer, RusseU C Voice 244 E. Garfield St Shippensburg Penna. 

Peter, Irene Bachman Piano and Voice. . . 1012 Turner St AUentown Penna. 

Rearick, Alice P Voice AnnviUe Penna. 

Rearick, Luther Malcolm Voice Mifflintown Penna. 

Richie, Alice Mary Piano 466 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Rife, Madeline Anna Voice 1223 Scotland Ave Chambersburg . . . .Penna. 

Shaak, Mrs. Mabel Voice Lebanon Penna. 

Shenk, Beatrice Voice 314 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Shroyer, Alvin Edgar Voice 83 Sheridan Ave AnnvUle Penna. 

Smith, Catharine A Voice The Heights Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Dorothy Nancy Piano Cleona Penna. 

Strebig, Bernita Sheckard Organ 132 Greenwich St Reading Penna. 

Strubhar, Ruth Anna Organ 764 Charlotte St Pottstown Penna. 

Taylor, Jacob Kermit Voice Main St Yoe Penna. 

Troutman, Mrs. Mary Snoke Voice 710 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Yake, Harriet Josephine Voice 332 Chestnut St Lebanon, Penna. 



BULLETIN 73 

SUMMER SCHOOL, 1928 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Alleman, Margaret E 2045 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Angstadt, Esther 1424 Muhlenberg St.. . .Reading Berks Penna. 

Apgar, Anna Boyer 928 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Arbegast, Harriet S 419 W. Keller St Meohanicsburg. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Bair, Naomi P 2003 Swatara St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Barnhart, Thomas J Cleona Lebanon Pennsi. 

Bechdolt, Mary Hessen 1933 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Billow, Florence M 1621 Briggs St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Black, Mary A Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Black, Robert Alexander 201 S. 17th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bleistein, Rita Ehzabeth 529 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bodenhorn, Ellwood Saylor 720 Penn Ave West Reading Berks Penna. 

Boger, Erma May 121 Railroad St Annvil'e Lebanon Penna. 

Boltz, Susan M R. D. No. 5 Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bomberger, Eli Monroe 124 Pershing Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

BoBsard, Ada C 127 N. Lancaster St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, Roscoe 2010 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bowman, Sara Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Brooks, Lulu Virginia 251 Adams St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Brown, Clara J 916 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Brubaker, Claribel 227 S. York St Mechanicsburg — Cumberland Penna. 

Brubaker, Mrs. Sara Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Burkholder, Mary E 722 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Carl, Paul Revere Oak & Edgewood Aves. .Audubon Camden N. J. 

Christman, William F Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Daniel, A. Miriam Linglestown Dauphin Penna. 

Dearwechter, Sarah Rebecca Fredericksburg. . . . Lebanon Perma. 

Deitrich, Viola Rebecca Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Demmy, Naomi M Bainbridge Lancaster Penna. 

Denison, Mary J Dauphin Dauphin Penna. 

Dibler, Jane 2327 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Dissinger, Sara G 251 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Dodd, Mrs. Margaret Hunter. . . .407 Reading St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Dohner, Abraham Shenk 411 W. Main St Annville Lebanon Peima. 

Donough, Ethel M 1138 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Perma. 

Dougherty, Margaretta 567 S. 19th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Dugan, Cora E 1843 Regina St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

EUenberger, Paul S R. D. No. 2 Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Freeman, Carl 1623 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Garraty, Edna 363 Spruce St Steelton Dauphin Peima. 

Gingrich, Harold Lee Lawn Lebanon Penna. 

Gingrich, Henry M. Mountville Lancaster Penna. 

Gingrich, John A Fredericksburg. . . .Lebanon Penna. 

Graybill, Susan B 109 Railroad St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Greiner, Norman S 624 Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Griffith, Isabella G 504 Donaldson Apts .... Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Groman, Edward 190 Corabella Ave Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Grosh, Myra S 2015 E. 115th St Cleveland Cuyahoga Ohio 

Grube, Ray Young 254 Church Ave Ephrata Lancaster Penna. 

Hammond, Bayard Louis Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Harclercde, Carroll B 162 N. 2nd St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Hartman, J. Ernest Dillsburg York Penna. 

Hartman, Mary G 205 Kelker St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Heagy, S. Loraine 1803^ Market St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Henne, Dorothy 1146 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hill, Ada M 220 Pine St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Hoffman, Gertrude M 1616 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hoffman, Katharine A 538 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hoffsommer, Mabel 322 S. 17th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Holland, lona G 428 N. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Holstein, Effie G Richland Lebanon Penna. 

Hook, Clara H 237 Maclay St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hostetter, D. Ralph Harrisonbm-g Rockingham Va. 

Houck, Mary Willett. 42 N. 28th St Penbrook Dauphin Penna. 

Hoy, Ruth M 478 Moore St Millersburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hughes, Stella M Pine Grove Schuylkill Penna. 

Hunt«r, Paul Wesley Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Irvine, Naomi Arnold 40 E. Main St Mechanicsburg. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Kauffman, Helen E Box 104 Fayetteville Franklin Penna. 

Keener, Artyaneas G 255 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna* 



74 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Keener, Seth Elverson 2549 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Kelchner, Albert H Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Keiper, Edward D 706 S. 26th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Kistler, Adessa F Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Hemm, Gertrude Ehzabeth 1414 State St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna 

Kulp, Donald Dual Y. M. C. A Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Eunkle, Orville 123 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Lehman, Luella Campbell 913 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lehman, Mary H 31 S. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Liebegott, Charles E 334 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Claude Felix Fannettsburg Franklin Penna. 

Light, Edith C 128 S. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Grace E Avon Lebanon Peima. 

Light, Margaret E 421 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon.. , Penna. 

Light, Ruth Ellen 503 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Sadie E Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Logan. Reba E Boiling Springs. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Longenbach, Gertrude M 101 1 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Lutz, Jennie B 133 Herr St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lutz, Robert Walter Expedit Cambria Penna. 

MaoDonald, E. Myrrhyna 1200 N. 15th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Mann, Mrs. Edna F 239 Briggs St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Martin, William Norman RouzerviUe Franklin Penna. 

Martz, Margaret 1 2311 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Peima. 

Matter, Ira H Halifax Dauphin Penna. 

Maurer, Marguerite E 260 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon.. Penna. 

McCaully, Margaret E 525 Locust St Lebanon Lebanon Peima. 

McClure, Meredith Rice 223 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Meehan, Mary 2121 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Miller, Frederic K 346 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Morrow, Pearle A Duncannon Perry Penna. 

Mountz, R. Mae 1809 Regina St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Moser, K. Ernestine 213 Market St Highspire Dauphin Peima. 

Myers, Carrie E 62 N. 18th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Piela, Stanley A 139 Union St Lodi Bergen N. J. 

Rearick, Luther Malcolm Mifflintown Juniata Penna. 

Reider, Mae E PalmjTa Lebanon Penna. 

Rickabaugh , Margaret Anna 14 S. 20th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Rickabaugh, Mary Kathryn Newville Cumberland Penna. 

Rissinger, Marvin Zwingli Fredericksburg. . . . Lebanon Penna. 

Rothermel. Anna M 16 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rugh, C. Warren 413 Grant St South Fork Cambria Penna. 

Schamber, Emma R. D. No. 1 Jonestown Lebanon Penna. 

Scott, Mary M R. D. No. 7 Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Sheetz, Byron W Halifax Dauphin Penna'. 

Shuster, Mrs. Grace W 36 18th St Camp Hill Cumberland Penna. 

Sites, Emily Elizabeth 1007 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Slenker, Palmer Millard Yoe York Penna. 

Suavely, Mrs. Harry Lickdale Lebanon Penna. 

Suavely, Harry T Ono Lebanon Penna. 

Suavely, Lottie J Ono Lebanon Penna. 

Snavely, Marion I Ono Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Emily Harriet 611 Guilford St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Richard Herr Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Spancake, Robert E Donaldson Schuylkill Penna. 

Spangler, Nora Lavina Camp Hill Cumberland Penna. 

Sparrow, William L 1607 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Sponsler, Melvin G R. D. No. 2 Hahfax Dauphin Penna. 

Steigleman, Sylva M Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Stern, Paul H Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Stoner, Anna Mary 2615 Butler St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Strayer, Marion Edessa Red Lion York Penna. 

Swanger, Carrie A 624 Canal St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Swanger, Murray L Hyndman Bedford Penna. 

Thomas, Martin Henry 2214 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Thomas, Mary Book 706 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Tittle, Elmer E City View Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Tschudy, Earl H 613 Canal St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Uhich, Parke H 15 S. Chestnut St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Wagner, James Edgar 1918 North St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Walton, Mrs. Grace 2454 Jefferson St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Weaver, Nellie R 219 S. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 



BULLETIN 75 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Weirich, Iva G 803 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Wengert, Anna EUzabeth 433 S. 13th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna 

Wengert, Kathryn June R. D. No. 2 Jonestown Lebanon Penna. 

Wenrich, Amelia L Cressona SehuylMIl Penna. 

Williams, Olive Janice 132 Linden St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Witmer, Arthur R Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Wolf, Earl Emerson 712 N. Plum St Lancaster Lancaster Penna. 

Wolfe, Porte Arlington 835 Willow St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Yake, H. Josephine 332 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Zerbe, Ellen M Zerbe Schuylkill Penna. 

Zerbe, Lena M Zerbe SohuylkUl Penna. 

Zerbe, Sylvia A 1949 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT, 1928-1929 

Alleman, Catherine 1032 Rolleston St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Alleman, Mrs. Elsie B 1440 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Allen, Jean Gray R. D. No. 2 Dancannon Perry Penna. 

Asper, Elda Mae 1616 Swatara St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Aughinbaugh, M. Louise 1931 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bacastow, Simon P 268 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Bair, Naomi P 2003 Swatara St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bechdolt, Mary Hessen 1933 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Belt, Mrs. Florence R 3039 Green St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Bender, Anna Mae 1561 Walnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Berger, Grace K 116 S. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Black, Mary A Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Boltz, Esther L 438 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Boltz, Susan M 440 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, Mabel M 214 S. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Brown, Clara J 916 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Brubaker, Sara B Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Burkholder, Mary E 722 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Capp, Minnie 121 S. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Christman, William F 158 Second St Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Cobaugh. Harry B 2633 Reel St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Conrad, Frank, Jr 1208 Walnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Crane, Mary Evelyn 634 Muench St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Crozier, Helen F 1523 Swatara St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Curry, Conrad Kreider Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Demmy, Josephine M 20 Raihoad St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Donchick, Mickey J 129 Evergreen St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Dougherty, Margaretta 567 S. 19th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Driver, Agnes J 711 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Dugan, Cora E 1843 Regina St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Eck, Lee Richland Lebanon Penna. 

EUenberger, Armeda V Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

EUenberger, Joseph Vernal R. D. No. 2 Annville. Lebanon .Penna. 

Fahnestock. Elizabeth Bellevue Park Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Fasnacht, Hilda 425 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Feaser, George W 234 E. High St Middletown Dauphin Penna. 

Fenical, Catharine R 1618 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Fields, Clarence L 808 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Fink, Lyall J 1800 Walnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Fisher, Caroline Derr 113 S. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Frazier, Mrs. Gertrude M 119 S. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Frock, Jerome W Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Garber, Mrs. Stuart Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Garman, Laura E 1606 Penn St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Garman, Ruth S Dauphin Dauphin Penna. 

Garraty, Edna 363 Spruce St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Geisel, Horace G 3005 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Gemmi, Lillian 256 S. 6th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

German, Mrs Helen 1 249 Emerald St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Gray, Cordelia B Ickesburg Perry Penna. 

Grayb'll, Susan B 109 Railroad St Annville Lebanon, Penna. 

Green, Jane K 205 Swatara St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Griffith, Isabella G 504 Donaldson Apt Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Grimm, Stella M 414 S. 14th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Grunden, Mabel Kelso St Paxtang Dauphin Penna. 

Gmnpert, Harry, Jr 1105 Penn St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 



76 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



STREET NUMBER 



POST OFFICE 



Hall, Marjorie A 41 N. 20th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Harclerode, Carroll E 162 N. 2nd St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Harm, Bertha C 206 E. Granada Ave. . . .Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Harris, Mabel Froelich 2354 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hartman, Mary G 205 Kelker St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Heagy, S. Loraine 1803^ Market St Harrisbiu'g Dauphin Penna. 

Heefner, Catharine 1244 Kittatinny St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hill, Ada M 220 Pine St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Hill, Dorothy E 344 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hiller, J. Edward 2316 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hinnenkamp, Agnes 58 N. 13th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hooker, Peter Lewis 2522 Lexington St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hoffman, Gertrude M 1616 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hoffman, Katharine A 538 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Hoffsommer, Mabel 322 S. 17th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Holland, lona G 428 N. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Holmes, Marguerite R. 3104 Hillside St Penbrook Dauphin Peima. 

Hook, Clara J 237 Maclay St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hoover, Mary C 3011 Derry St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Horting, Margaret A 3217 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Hughes, Hudson 225 S. 2nd St Steelton Dauphin Penna. 

Irvine, Naomi Arnold 40 E. Main St Meehanicsburg. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Isele, Blanche Elizabeth 432 S. 14th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Karch, Nancy M 119 N. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Keener, Artyaneas G 2551 Sixth St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Keener, S. Elverson 2549 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Keiper, Edward D 706 S. 26th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Keller, Evelyn J 301 S. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kinports, Anna E 203 Cocoa Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Kliek, Charlotte 40 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kline, Mildred A 132! Howard St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Knoll, Isaac B 51 Sheridan Ave Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Krause, Katharine B 123 S. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Dorothy E 542 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Edna C Ill E. Cumberland St... Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Mary Catherine 510 E. Main St Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Kulp, Myra W 905 W. Main St Pahnyra Lebanon Penna. 

Lady, Carrie M 229 Cocoa Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 

Laucks, Helen M 1730 State St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lebo, Gertrude E Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Lehman, Mary H 31 S. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Lentz, Dorothy Ethel 204 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Lewis, Mary A 1501 Swatara St HarristDurg Dauphin Penna. 

Liebegott, Charles Edgar 334 N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Emma L 330 N. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Grace E Avon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Naomi R 610 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Sadie E Cleona Lebanon Penna. 

Little, A. W. S 1731 Green St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Logan, Reba E Boiling Springs. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Lutz, Jennie Barnett 133 Herr St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

MacDonald, E. Myrrhyna 1200 N. 15th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Mann, Mrs. Edna F 239 Briggs St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Martz, Calvin S 3406 Montow St Paxtang Dauphin Penna. 

Martz, Margaret 1 2311 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Maurer, Marguerite E 260 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Maurer, Ralph Alan 358 N. 4th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

McCoy, Anna L 501 j Cumberland St. . . .Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

McCreary, Samuel W Dillsburg York Penna. 

McGann, Albert Forrest 202 Harris St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Meehan, Mary 2121 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Mell, Faith A West Fairview. . . .Cumberland Penna. 

Metzgar, Mahlon M 107 E. Cherry St PahmjTa Lebanon Penna. 

Moser, Thomas E Muir Schuylkill Penna. 

Moyer, Katherine C 23 Hoke Ave Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Muench, Millie Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

MuBser, Sarah E 11 S. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Myers, Carrie W 62 N. 18th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Neidlinger, Robert Tower City Schuylkill Penna. 

Nitrauer, Harvey L Y. M. C. A Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Nonn, Rosa B 2237 Penn St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Parmer, Mary G 229 Cocoa Ave Hershey Dauphin Penna. 



BULLETIN n 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE COUNTY STATE 

Peiffw, Edna M 457 E. Maple St Annville Lebanon. Penna. 

Peters, Ruth H 9 B. Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Hiillips, Mildred 518 Pershing Ave Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Poup, William Henry 2510 N. 6th St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Price, Dorothy Louise Annville ,. Lebanon Penna. 

Quickel, Gilbert H 2126Bellevue Rd Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Ramer, Pearl S 827 Lehman St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ranch, Mabel 1 925 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rearick, Alice P Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Rees, Lillie M 124 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Reidel, Etta M 442J N. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rioe, Frank 1714 Regina St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Rice, Lenore G 228 Peffer St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Richwine, George H 305 N. 17th St Camp Hill Cumberland Penna. 

Rickabaugh, Margaret Anna 14 S. 20th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Riegel, Rhoda N 119 S. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rishel, Helen Rosena. 5 Maple St Pahnyra Lebanon Penna. 

Rockwell, Katherine 246 Emerald St Harrisburg Dauplun. Penna. 

Rothermel, Anna M 16 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Rothermel, M. Helen 16 S. 8th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Ryan, Alice 1601 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Sanders, Mrs. Elizabeth 1117 Chestnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Sands, Anna M 219 S. 13th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Schlayer, Anna C 2037 Green St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Schott, Katherine V 311 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Schropp, J. Gladys 39 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Scott, S. Agnes 431 Willow St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Seltzer, Christine A 512 Cumberland St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Seltzer, Edna E 15 S. 4th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Shaughnessy, F. H Manheim Lancaster Penna. 

ShumaJcer, Guy R R. D. No. 1 Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Shuster, Mrs. Grace W 36 18th St Camp Hill Cumberiand Penna. 

Siegrist, Lottie Y 114 S. 7th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, Ella Minerva 16 E. Walnut St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, Evelyn Mildred 12 N. 10th St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Snowden, Viola E 3001 Market St Camp Hill Cumberiand Penna. 

Spayd, Catharine E 117 S. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna. 

Spayd, M. Elizabeth 117 S. 11th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna, 

Spencer, Frieda M 1855 Market St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Steigleman, Sylva M Highspire Dauphin Penna. 

Stengle, Faber E 12 Main St Oberiin Dauphin Penna. 

Stern, Paul H Elizabethtown Lancaster Penna. 

Stevens, Mrs. Anne Cole 1917 Market St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna, 

Stoner, Anna Mary 2615 Butler St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Strickler, Mary M Schaefferstown Lebanon. Penna. 

Sullivan, Mary M 2510 N. 5th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna, 

Tack, Sara A 3215 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Thomas, Martin Henry. 2214 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Thomas, Mary Book 706 N. 3rd St Harrisburg. Dauphin Penna. 

Ulrich, Parke Hershey Main St Palmyra Lebanon Penna. 

Undercuffler, Edwin T 52 N. 17th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Wagner, Esther R 2449 Reel St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Wall, Martha E 909 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Walter. Ada M 315 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin Penna. 

Walter, E. Marion 315 W. Main St Hummelstown Dauphin. Penna. 

Walter, Violet Annville Lebanon Penna. 

Weaver, Nellie R 219 S. 9th St Lebanon Lebanon Penna. 

Weigle, Ervin Arburtus 211 S. 2nd St Wormleysburg Cumberland. Penna. 

Weirick, Iva C 803 N. 16th St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Westenberger, Blanche B Cornwall Lebanon. Penna. 

Wilson, Helen L 2115 Penn St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Witmer, Arthur R 119 E. Maple St Palmyra. Lebanon. Penna. 

Wolfe, Florence M 464 N. 5th St Lebanon Lebanon. Penna, 

Wood, Sarah E 249 Emerald St Harrisburg Dauphin. Penna. 

Yingling, Mildred E 551 Woodbine St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 

Zerbe, Sylvia A 1949 Chestnut St Harrisburg Dauphin Penna. 



78 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR 1928-1929 

Graduate Students 10 

Seniors 78 

Juniors 79 

Sophomores 55 

Freshmen 152 

Unclassified 7 

Total in CoUege 381 

Conservatory of Music 88 

Summer School 154 

Extension^Department 194 

Total enrollment in all departments ' 817 

Names rei)eated in Conservatory, Summer School and Extension 121 

Net Enrollment 696 



BULLETIN 



79 



Degrees Conferred June 13, 1928 

Doctor of Laws 

Hiram Herr Shenk 

Doctor of Divinity 

Alexander R. Ayres N. Howard MacAllister 

Oliver Tillman Ehrhart Hiram F. Rhoad 

Clayton C. Gohn Warren S. Wilson 

Arthur Lee Maiden 



Bachelor of Arts 



Harry Darkes Albright 
Louise Fredricka Baker 
John Bruce Behney 
Alabel Catherine Brewbaker 
Henry Yost Brubaker 
Benetta Eleanor Burrier 
Catherine Christian Craven 
Marian Bowman Dorsheimer 
Kathryn Anna Flinchbaugh 
Olga Sara Freeman 
Mary Margaret Geyer 
Olivette Lydia Haas 
Mabel Grace Hafer 
Gladys Sarah LeVan Happel 
Bernice Ames Hoover 
Jacob Mays Horst 
Elmer Adam Keiser 
Alice Jennie Kindt 
Charles Milford Knisley 



Raymond Heisey Koch 
Raymond Earl Kuhnert 
Frances H. Long 
Lloyd Henry Lux 
Anna Catharine Mark 
Emma Rebecca Meyer 
Samuel Meyer 
Millard Joseph Miller 
Harvey Leroy Nitrauer 
Beryl Deborah Orth 
Helen Elizabeth Paine 
Walter Daniel Pugh 
Elsie Margaret Reider 
Sarah Lou Rose 
Ruby Ann See 
Eleanor Rebecca Snoke 
Mary Nelda Spatz 
Walter Edgar Waggoner 
Viola Mae Wolf 



Charles Ray Bell, Jr. 
Oran Pass Bollinger 
Myrl Lincoln Brown 
Joseph Charles Bruno 
Ralph Alfred Daubert 
Abraham Shenk Dohner 
John Paul Dohner 
Adam Irvin Dundore 
Roy Ivan Flinchbaugh 



Bachelor of Science 

Roy Seibert Flook 
Edna Catherine Graham 
Henry Allison Kohler 
Uhl Rondo Kuhn 
Monroe Harnish Martin 
Edward J. C. Orbock 
David Herr Rank 
Homer Castle Schwalm 
Arnold Hurst Zwally 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

Luella Mae Burkholder John Fritchey Kob 

Paul Alexander Elberti Irene June Schell 

Earl Wilson Fornwalt George Clifford Singley 

Laura Edith Garman James Dewey Wallace' 

Bachelor of Science in Economics 

Paul Benner Piersol Norman Francis Wheeler 



80 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Degrees Cum Laude 

Edna Catherine Graham David Herr Rank 

Roy Ivan Flinchbaugh Monroe Harnish Martin 

Harry Darkes Albright Louise Fredricka Baker 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Diploma 

Grace Elizabeth Daniel, Piano 

DEGREES CONFERRED SEPTEMBER 15, 1928 
Bachelor of Arts 

Byron Wilbur Sheetz 
Floyd Balsbaugh Whisler 

Bachelor of Science in Ediication 

Paul Revere Carl 

Isabella Gertrude Griffith 

Edna Floyd Mann 



BLANK FORMS FOR WILL BEQUESTS 

I give and bequeath to the "Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, 
in the County of Lebanon, in the Township of Annville," incorporated 

under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the sum of 

dollars; and the receipt of the Treasurer thereof 

shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for the same. 

In devises of real estate observe the following: 

I give and devise to "The Trustees of Lebanon Valley College, in 
the County of Lebanon, in the Township of Annville," incorporated 
under the laws of the State of Pennsylvania, the following land and 

premises, that is to say to have 

and to hold the same, with the appurtenances, to the said Board, its 
successors and assigns, forever. 

Persons making bequests and devises to the Board of Trustees, 
or knowing that they have been made, are requested to notify the 
President of the College, George Daniel Gossard, Annville, Pa., 
and, if practicable, to enclose a copy of the clause in the will, that 
the wishes of the testators may be fully known and recorded. 

Persons making bequests who may desire to have the bequests 
devoted to some particular purpose, such as general endowment, or 
the endowment of a chair, or for a building, or for the endowment 
of a scholarship, are requested to make specific mention of the same 
in the will provision. 



INDEX 

Absences 20, 26 

Admission 17 

Advisers 18 

Aid to Students 26 

Astronomy 32 

Bible 32 

Biology 33 

Board of Trustees, Officers and Committees of the 5 

Buildings and Grounds 15 

Business Administration, Course in 36, 57 

Calendar 3 

Carnegie Library 15 

Chapel 20 

Chemistry 39 

Classification 18 

Class Standing, Reports 19 

Classic in Translation 50 

College Organizations 17 

Conditions and Re-examinations 19 

Corporation 4 

Courses, College 29 

Outline of 30 

Description of 32 

Degrees Conferred 79 

Degree and Diploma 20, 63 

Economics 54 

Education 42 

English 44 

Expenses, College 23 

Department of Music 65 

Faculty, College 6-9 

Department of Music 10 

French Language and Literature 46 

General Information 15 

German Language and Literature 47 

Graduate Work 21 

Greek Language and Literature 47 

History 48 

History of the College 12 

Laboratories 16 

Latin Language and Literature 49 

Limitations 20 

Mathematics 50 

Music Department 59 

Courses 59 

New Testament Greek 33, 48 

Philosophy and Religion 51 

Physics 52 

Physical Education 55 

Political Science 54 

Practice Teaching 43 

Pre-Medical Courses 57 

Psychology 43 

Religious Work 16 

Register of Students 66 

Registration 18 

Residence Requirements for Graduation 20 

Requirements for Admission, College 27, 28 

Scholarships 21 

Sociology 54 

Spanish 55 



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