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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog: Summer School Number"

Hefaanon Valkv 
Collese 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 21 (newser.es) APRIL, 1931 



No. 1 




SUMMER SCHOOL 

19 3 1 

Annville - Harrisburg 

PUBLISHED BY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as Second-Class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



CALENDAR 



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Summer School Calendar 



June 22 — Registration of Students 
June 22 — Summer Session Begins 
July 31 — Summer Session Ends 



Executive Committee of the Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
J. R. ENGLE, Esq. SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar 

R. R. BUTTERWICK CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, 

S. H. DERICKSON ' Secretary 



Faculty Committee of Summer School 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, Chairman 
CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH, Secretary S. H. DERICKSON 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, Registrar O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

R. R. BUTTERWICK PAUL S. WAGNER 



Officers of Administration and 
Instruction 

GEORGE DANIEL GOSSARD, B.D., D.D., LL.D President 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM. A.M Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH Secretary of the Summer School. 

HIRAM H. SHENK, A.M., LL.D Professor of History 

A. B., Ursinus College, 1S99; A. M., Lebanon Valley College, 1900; 
Student, University of Wisconsin, summer term; Instructor in Political 
Science, Lebanon Valley College, 1S99-1900; Professor of History and 
Political Science, 1900-1916; Custodian of Public Records, Pennsylvania 
State Library, 1916 to date; Instructor in Y. M. C. A. Summer Schools, 
Blue Ridge, N. C, 1916-1920; Silver Bay, 1918, and Lake Geneva, 1921; 
Educational Secretary, Army Y. M. C. A., Camp Travis, 1917-1918; 
Professor of History. Lebanon X'alley College. 1920 — 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH. A.B., LL.B.. Professor of Political 
Science and Economics 

A. B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1911; Principal of High School, 
Alexandria, Pa., 1911-1912; Principal of High School, Linglestown, Pa., 
1912-1913; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1916; Mem- 
ber of Law Bar of Lebanon County and of Pennsylvania Supreme Court 
Bar; Professor of Political Science and Economics, Le;)anon Valley 
College, 1916— 

PAUL S. WAGNER. Ph.D Professor of Mulhematics 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1917; M. A., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1925; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Lebanon Valley College, 1917-1918; Military Service, 1918-1919; 
Headmaster. Franklin Day School, Baltimore, Md., and graduate student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1919-1920; Graduate Student, Columbia LTniver- 
sity, Summer 1921; Instructor in ^Mathematics, Lebanon Valley College, 
1920 — Travel and study in Europe, Summer 1922; Graduate Study, 
Johns Hopkins University. 1923-1926; Professor Mathematics. Lebanon 
Valley College. 1926— 

ANDREW BENDER. Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1906; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1914; 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. Lebanon Valley College, 1907-1909; 
Instructor in Analytical Chemistry, Columbia University. 1912-1914; In 
Industrial Chemistry, 1914-1921; Chief Chemist. Aetna Explosives Company; 
Chemical Director. British American Chemical Company; Director of Control 
Laboratory. The Barrett Company; Professor of Chemistry, Lebanon Vallev 
College, 1921— 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK. A.M., B.D., D.D., Professor of 
Philosophy and Bible 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1901; A. M., ibid., 1904; B. D., 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 1905; D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1910; twenty-si.x years in the Ministry; Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion. Lebanon Valley College, 1921-1922; Professor of Philosophy and 
Bible, 1922— 



2 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D Professor of Education and 

Psychology 

Teacher, Principal and Superintendent of Schools, 1903-1913; Diploma, 
Illinois State Normal University, 1914; A. B., University of Illinois, 
1916; M. A., Columbia University, 1917; Head of the Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology, College of Puget Sound, 1917-1920; Student 
Leland Stanford University, Summer quarter, 1920; Professor of Psychology 
and Education, University of Rochester, 1920-1923: Student Columbia 
University, Summers 1921 and 1922; Completed course and residence 
requirements for Ph.D. Degree, Columbia University, 1923-1924; Assistant 
in School Administration, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 
1924; Professor of Education and Psychologv, Lebanon \'alley College, 
1924— 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE, Ph.D Professor of English 

B. A., Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1915; Military service 
with Canadian Expeditionary Forces, 1915-1918; Lecturer in English, 
University of Alberta, 1919-1922; M. A., 1923, Ph. D., 1925, University 
of Toronto; Instructor in English, University of Toronto, 1923-1925; 
Professor of English, Lebanon Valley College, 1925 — 

MILTON L. STOKES, M.A., LL.B, Professor of Business Admin- 
istration 
B.A., University College, University of Toronto, 1920; Professor of 
English and History, Presbyterian College, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 
1920-21; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; Lecturer in Finance and 
Government, McMaster University, Toronto, 1922-23; LL.B., University 
of Toronto, 1926; Lecturer in Economics Extension Dept., University 
of Toronto, 1923-26; Barrister-of-Law Degree, Osgoode Hall Law School, 
Toronto, 1926; Member of the Bar, Province of Ontario. Professor of 
Business Administration, Lebanon Valley College, 1926 — 

E. H. STEVENSON, M.A., (Oxon.), Ph.D Professor of History 

B.A., Hendrix College, 1916; U. S. Navy, 1917-18; graduate student 
University of Arkansas, 1919; Rhodes Scholar, Oxford University, 1919-22; 
student University of Grenoble summer of 1921; instructor in SV'ilmington 
Friends' School, George School, Muhlenberg College, 1922-28; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1930; Professor of History, Lebanon \'anev Col- 
lege, 1928— 

MARY STELLA JOHNSON, Ph.D Professor of French 

B.S., The Johns Hopkins University, 1916; Travel and Study abroad, 
France, Germany, Italy, 1920-1923; Professor of French and Spanish, La 
Grange College, La Grange, Georgia, 1923-1924; Graduate Study, The 
Johns Hopkins University, 1924-1925; University of Grenoble, Grenoble, 
France, 1925-1926; Diplome de Hautes Etudes de Langue et de Literature 
Francaises, University of Grenoble, 1926; graduate student and Instructor 
in French, The Johns Hopkins University, 1926-1928; Ph.D., The Johns 
Hopkins University, 1928; Professor of French Literature and German, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1928— 

V. EARL LIGHT, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1926; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929; Associate Professor of Biology, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1929 — 

LENA LOUISE LIETZAU, Ph.D Professor of German 

University of Michigan, 1900-1901; Michigan State College, Summer 1901; 
Teacher, Lansing, Mich., 1901-1903; Teacher and Principal Blue Island, 111., 
1903-1919; Chicago University, Graduate work in German, 1911-1914; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, summer 1913; Greek study Saloniki, Greece, 1919-1920; 
Principal, American Boarding School for Girls, Saloniki, Greece, 1920- 
1929; State Normal School, Ypsilanti, Mich., semester, 1925; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Vienna, 1928; German Summer School, Mt. Holyoke College, 
summer 1930; Member Modern Language Ass'n. of America; Professor of 
German, Lebanon Valley College, 1930 — 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



CONSERVATORY FACULTY 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER, A.B Pianoforte, Form and Composition 

A. B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-16; 
Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, 1918; Teacher of Piano 
and Theory, Lebanon Valley College, 1919-21; Pupil of Ernest Hutchinson, 
Francis Moore and Frank LaForge, Xew York City; Graduate courses at 
Columbia University' in Composition, Improvisation and ^Musical Pedagogy 
under Frederick Schlieder, 1922-1924; Director of Lebanon Valley Conserva- 
tory of Music, 1924 — 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of Music Art, New York City (Dr. Frank 
Damrosch, Director) ; teacher in the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y. ; Instructor of Violin, Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music, 1924 — 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens, H. Sutton Goddard and Wm. Shakespeare, 
London, England. Private studio, Denver, Colorado, 1916-23; Summer 1919, 
Deems Taylor and Percy Rector Stephens; Private studio Carnegie Hall, 
N. Y. C, 1924-27; Vocal Instructor, Lebanon Valley College, 1927 — • 




ENGLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

THE Eleventh Summer Session of Lebanon Valley College will 
be conducted both in Annville and in Harrisburg. Exercises in 
each subject will be held five times a week, from June 22 
to July 31 inclusive. All courses, except some in science, will be 
held in the morning. 

One Summer School will be held as usual on the campus at 
Annville, where the full college equipment will be placed at the 
disposal of summer students. 

A Summer School will also be conducted at Harrisburg for the 
convenience of teachers in this vicinity. For this purpose the Edison 
Junior High School has been made available by the kindness of the 
Harrisburg School District. 



REGISTRATION 

In order that the work may proceed with dispatch upon the open- 
ing of the term, it is urged that arrangements for registration be 
made by mail. Applications for admission and registration will be 
received by the Secretary up to and including Monday, June 22. 
Address, Annville, Pa. 

CREDITS 

Certificates will be issued to all students showing the courses at- 
tended, grades and number of semester hours' credit. Courses taken 
during the Summer Session are credited towards the college degrees. 
One hundred twenty-six semester hours are required for the bache- 
lor's degrees. For complete information concerning the requirements 
for degrees the candidate should refer to the college catalogue or 
address the Registrar. 

EXPENSES 

A registration fee of $1 will be charged each student. 
The tuition fee is $7.00 per semester hour credit. 
A laboratory fee is charged for Science Courses. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 5 

The charge for board and room is $9 per week, $54 per term. 

The entire charge for registration, tuition, board and room for 

the term is therefore $69.00-$97.0{). 

The fees are payable at the time of registration, as a condition 
of admission to classes. 



NOTICE TO BOARDING STUDENTS 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a cot, 
chiffonier, mattress, one chair and student table for each occupant. 
Students must furnish their own bedding, carpets, towels, napkins, 
soap and all other necessary furnishings. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitory is furnished with bed, 
mattress, chair, dresser and student table. All other desired furnish- 
ings must be supplied b}' the student. North Hall, the main dormi- 
tor}' for women, will be assigned to the use of women students at 
the summer term. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Any 
additional lights must be paid for by the student. 

The more desirable rooms will be reserved in the order of appli- 
cation. No fee is required. Address the Secretary promptly in order 
that the most attractive room available may be reserved for you. 



COURSES LEADING TO THE BACCALAUREATE 
DEGREES 

An effort is being made by the College to ofifer in the Summer 
Session and the Extension Department all the General Requirements 
for the Baccalaureate degree. Most of these courses are announced 
for the present year, and the remainder will be made available at 
an early date. In courses where six semester hours are required, 
the departments will normally ofifer two hours in Summer School 
and four hours in a Supplementary Extension Course. 

For the convenience of those working towards a degree, a full 
statement of the requirements is printed on the following pages. 



6 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ARRANGEMENTS OF COURSES OF STUDY 

Lebanon Valley College offers four courses of study leading to 
the Baccalaureate degree: 

(1) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

(2) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

(3) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation (B.S. in Ed.) 

(4) A course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Economics (B.S. in Econ.) 

The total number of credits required of candidates for these 
degrees is, in each case, 126 semester hours. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 18 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
not later than the beginning of the Junior year, the Minor to be 
suitably related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and 
approval of the Head of the Major department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ment for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option), Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option). Physics. 

The B.S. in Ed. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a Major in Education, but in this case two Minors 
of not less than 18 semester hours each must be presented. 

The B.S. in Econ. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the 
requirements for a A^ajor in Business and Business Administration. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses, embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 



A.B. B.S. ' B.S. in Ed. 

Bible 14, 54. Bible 14, 54. Bible 14, 54. 

English 12, 14, 26. English 12, 14, 26. English 12, 14, 26. 

*French 16 or French 16 or French 16 or 

German 16. German 16. German 16. 

History 46. History 46. History 46. 

Latin 16 or Mathematics 16, 46. Latin 16 or 

Math. 16 or Philosophy 13, 23, or Math. 16 or 

Greek 16 Economics 16 or Greek 16. 

Philosophy 23, 33, or Pol. Science 16 or Psychology, 13. 23. 

Economics 16 or Sociology 16. Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or Biology 18. i Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 16. Chemistry 18. ' Sociology 16. 

Biology 18 or Physics 18. Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18, or Physical Education Chemistry 18, or 

Phj'sics 18 Hygiene Physics 18. 

Physical Education Physical Education 

Hygiene ^ Hygiene 

* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all candidates 
for the A. B. degree; six hours of this total must be from French 16 or German 16. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements 
in the regular catalogue. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the General Requirements listed above, some of the 
departments require students majoring therein to take certain addi- 
tional courses in subjects closely related to the Major. 

Students outlining a course for a degree should communicate at 
once with the Head of the Department in which they intend to 
Major. 

Candidates for the Baccalaureate degree who desire to be admitted 
to advanced standing, by virtue of work done in other institutions, 
should lose no time in having their credits evaluated by the Registrar, 
in order that they may be informed as to what requirements they 
must meet for graduation. 

Bachelor of Science in Education. Lebanon Valley College grants 
the degree Bachelor of Science in Education. Normal school credits 
from recognized institutions will be allowed towards this degree on 
the following basis: work of a professional character will be equated 
on the basis of semester hours. Graduates, who have taken the 
full two years' normal course based upon four full years of high 
school work, usually receive approximately 60 semester hours, 
though each case is evaluated individually for credit towards the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Education. A total of 126 hours of 



8 • LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

credit is required for the degree. For full information, address the 
Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College. 

THE EXTENSION COURSES 

To accommodate the needs of teachers in service, and for the 
convenience of those who are unable to pursue the work of the 
college in regular course by residence on the campus during the 
winter months, an extension department has been established. The 
offerings in Extension courses are listed on another page in this 
bulletin. Extension courses rotate from year to year so as to enable 
students to complete the work leading to degrees by residence during 
the summer sessions, which are coordinated with the extension plan 
in the offering of required courses. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

As a pre-requisite to the granting of all degrees the candidate must 
have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours of work in regularly 
conducted classes on the college campus. Teachers in service may 
meet this requirement by attending the Summer School and Friday 
and Saturday classes held during the year at the college. Credits 
earned in extension classes and at the Harrisburg Summer School 
are not residence credits. 

SOCIAL LIFE AND RECREATION 

The college recognizes that social activities and recreation have a 
proper place in cultural development. Accordingly, a series of social 
events and informal outings of students and faculty are fitted into 
the summer program. The opening event is a reception in North 
Hall parlors on Friday evening, June 26th. 

A.nnville is happilj^ situated amidst a varietj' of points of interest. 
Some of Pennsylvania's leading resorts are within short motoring 
distances. Mt. Gretna, Hershey, South Mountain resorts and num.er- 
ous others of less prominence offer students interesting and whole- 
some recreation. At these places bathing facilities are of the highest 
order. Afternoon parties at an^^ of these favorite retreats afford 
splendid relaxation, since class work is confined to the morning 
hours. 

In the industrial field some of the country's leading establishments 
are within easy reach by motor. The world's leading anthracite 
coal fields are within an afternoon's ride, and an observation tour 
yields an educational return of more than ordinary value. The Arm- 
strong Linoleum Company, at Lancaster, and the Hershey Chocolate 
Company, at Hershey, are leading American firms in their re- 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 9 

spective fields, and are ahvaj-s genial hosts to students from the 
college. A visit to the Cornwall mines of the Bethlehem Mines 
Corporation introduces the visitor to some of America's richest 
mineral deposits and most interesting geological formations. These 
places are all within easy access of the college and tours are organ- 
ized for the educational return derived therefrom. 

During the summer term students will have ample opportunity to 
observe Pennsylvania's National Guard in military maneuvers. The 
military camp at Alt. Gretna is regarded as one of the finest of its 
kind in the country and field maneuvers are both interesting and 
instructive to observe. 

The State Capital at Harrisburg, Valley Forge, The Cloisters at 
Ephrata, Conrad Weiser's Home at Womelsdorf, and Gettysburg 
are historical shrines within short distances of the college. 

Well kept tennis courts are available for the use of summer stu- 
dents at all times. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

ANNVILLE 

RUTH ENGLE BENDER Pianoforte, Form and Composition 

HAROLD MALSH Violin 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD Voice 

PRIVATE LESSONS 

Private lessons in Piano, Voice and Violin will be given by Mrs. 
Bender, Mr. Crawford, and Mr. Malsh, respectively. 

S02. Theory. — This course will not only give one the rudiments 
and fundamentals of music, but, by analysis, give the student a 
broader viewpoint of the same. Two semester hours credit may be 
earned. 

RATES 

Rates for private instruction, half hour periods twice weekly, 
are twenty dollars for the term of six weeks. For the course on 
theorj' tuition charge is twelve dollars. 

ENROLLMENT 

Candidates for instruction in music are requested to enroll for 
the course in advance of the opening of the term, by advising the 
summer school secretary of their intentions, in order that periods 
may be reserved for instruction and practice. 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

ANNVILLE 



BIBLE 

Dr. Butterwick 
S52. The Religious History of the Jews During the Time of the 
Kingdoms.^ — The purpose of this course is to furnish the student 
with a knowledge of the religious growth and practices during the 
time of the Kingdoms under the leadership of the prophets. Two 
semester hours credit. 

BIOLOGY 

Dr. Light 

S46. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. — The course consists of 
the dissection and study of suctorial fish, a cartilaginous fish, a bony 
fish, an amphibian, a reptile, a bird and a mammal. 

Two hours class work and two hours laboratory work per day. 

Laboratory fee $16.00. 

Six seinester hours credit. 

CHEMISTRY 

Dr. Bender 

S16. General Chemistry. — An introduction to the study of Chem- 
istry, including a studj- of elements, their classification and prop- 
erties, and a study of the important compounds of each element. 
During the course constant reference is made to manufacturing and 
industrial processes, and interpretation of the phenomenal material 
development of the present century is made in the light of the 
rapid increase in chemical knowledge. The laboratory work of the 
course includes about 100 carefully selected experiments. Two hours 
lectures or recitations and two hours of laboratory work dail}'. 
Text: — Kendall's Smith's College Chemistry. Laboratorj' fee, $16.00. 
Six semester hours credit. 



12 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Drs. Butterwick, Wagner axd Lietzau 

S42. Educational Sociology.- — The intent of this course is to ar- 
ticulate the school with the other institutions of society, the home, 
the church, industry and the state, with the view of developing a 
more perfect correlation among the institutions dealing with the 
social welfare of mankind. Offered by Dr. Butterwick. Two semester 
hours credit. 

S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Junior and Senior 
High School. — Offered by Dr. Wagner. Two semester hours credit. 

S32. Secondary Education. — A professional course for teachers 
and high school principals, considering the development in the United 
States, England, France and Germany, the objectives, the curri- 
culum and the quality of instruction. Two semester hours credit. 

S72. Child Psychology. — A course dealing with the characteris- 
tics of original nature; innate tendencies and instincts; general ten- 
dencies, habits and learning of children; cross-sections of child life 
at various ages; the exceptional child. Two semester hours. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Steven SOX 
S612. Pre-Shakespearean Drama. — After a brief survey of the 
drama and stage in Greece and Rome, the lectures will be devoted 
to the Medieval Stage and Drama, Miracle and Moralitj^ Plays, early 
Chronicle Plays. The course is intended as a background for the 
study of Shakespeare. Two semester hours credit. 

GERMAN 

Dr. Lietzau 
S04. Elementary German. — A beginners course intended to give 
students a reading knowledge of German of average difficulty, and to 
enable them to understand the spoken language and to express simple 
ideas idiomatically. Conversation, Grammar and composition. Two 
hours daily. A continuation of this course will be offered in extension 
1931-1932. Four semester hours credit. 

HISTORY 

Dr. Stevenson 
S22. Outlines of European History, 800-1789. — A rapid survey of 
the organization of Medieval Society and the transition to modern 
times. Political, Economic and Intellectual Movements will be given 
attention. Two semester hours credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 13 

S62. Economic History of Europe, 1760-1930. — A study of the 
changes in the economic and social organization of society resuhing 
from the Industrial Revohition, and the proposed sohitions of current 
Economic problems. Tavo semester hours credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

Dr. Wagner 

S12. College Algebra. — Covering ratio and proportion, variation, 
progressions, the binomial theorem, theorem of imdetermined coeffi- 
cients, logarithms, permutations and combinations, theory of equa- 
tions, partial fractions, etc. Two semester hours credit. 

S42. Differential and Integral Calculus. — Differentiation of Alge- 
braic and transcendental functions, maxima and minima, development 
into series, etc. Integrations, rectifications of ctirves, quadrature of 
surfaces, cubature of solids, etc. Two semester hours credit. 

(Dr. Wagner may add an additional course m Mathematics if the 
demand is sufficient. Those interested in Mathematics courses not 
published should communicate with him in advance of the opening 
of the Summer Session). 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Prof. Gingrich 

SOCIOLOGY 

S12. Sociology. — A course in social problems taught by the case 
method. Pathological conditions of society are studied as to cause and 
effect and agencies for correction are carefully analyzed. The aim of 
the course is to prepare the student for more efficient social service in 
a realistic rather than an idealistic world. Two semester hours credit. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
S12. American Government and Politics. — A course designed to 
give the student a working knowledge of Federal and State Govern- 
ment. Much time is given to the study of leading cases. The course 
will be concluded by an extension course offered in Lebanon during 
the winter of 1931-32. Two semester hours credit. 

ECONOMICS 

S32. Money and Banking. — This course deals with monetary the- 
ory, the gold standard, inflation, international exchange, business cy- 
cles, price levels and speculation. A study is made of the functions of 
banks, bank credit, the function and structure of the Federal Reserve 
System, and agricultural credit. Two semester hours credit. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

OFFERED IN 

HARRISBURG 



EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Dr. Reynolds 

S32. Principles of Education. — The high school pupils, their 
physical and mental traits, individual differences, and the make-up 
of the high school population; the secondary school as an 
institution, its history, its relation to elementary education, and to 
higher education; social principles determining secondary education; 
aims and functions of secondary education; the curriculum; the 
place, function, and value of the several subjects of the curriculum; 
organization and management of the high school. Two semester 
hours credit. 

Si 12. Technique of Teaching. — This course is intended especially 
for Elementary and Junior High School teachers. The major em- 
phasis will be given to the study of special methods and devices in 
the principal elementary school subjects. Some attention will be 
given, however, to a few of the more general methods, such as super- 
vised study, socialized recitations, and the project method. Two 
semester hours credit. 

S152. Educational Psychology.^ — Emphasis on the topics of gen- 
eral psychology which form the basis for a study of the problems 
of education. Special emphasis will be given to innate tendencies; 
individual dififerences; their measurement; their significance; and 
the learning process. Two semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Dr. Wallace 

S42. Eighteenth Century Prose. — A study of literary tendencies 
in the Eighteenth Century, with special attention to the work of 
Addison, Steele, Defoe, Swift, Johnson and Goldsmith. Two semester 
hours credit. 

S512. The Romantic Movement in English Poetry. — Readings in 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey, Byron, Shelley, Keats, with special 
attention to poetry of the mountains. Illustrated with lantern slides. 
Two semester hours credit. 

S62. Shakespeare. — A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant 
of Venice, As You Like It, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, King Lear. Two 
semester hours credit. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BULLETIN 15 

FRENCH 

Dr. Johnsox 

S12. First Year College French. — This is a continuation of 
French E14 and will consist of a further study of grammar, com- 
position exercises and readings. Two semester hours credit. 

S24. Second Year College French. — A study of the development 
of the French novel with extensive reading of 18th and 19th century 
novels. Double period daily. Four semester hours credit. 

HISTORY 

Dr. Shexk and Professor Stokes 

S32. 19th Century English History. — The political history of Eng- 
land during the 19th century together with a consideration of the 
constitutional, economic and social development, forms the basis of 
the course. Particular attention will be given to the leading states- 
men of the period: Castlereagh. Canning, Peel, Palmerston, Disraeli 
and Gladstone. A study will be made of affairs both foreign and 
imperial. Two semester hours credit. 

S42. Recent History of the United States. — A brief summary of 
the period of reconstruction followed by a more intense study of the 
economic and political forces in the country from the beginning of 
the administration of Hayes to the present time. Much attention will 
be given to our foreign relations growing out of the Spanish Amer- 
ican War and the World War. Text: Paxon — Recent History of the 
United States. Two semester hours credit. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Prof. Stokes 
Political Science 
S32. Political Science — Comparative Government. — A comparative 
study of the most important governmental systems of the world, 
emphasizing especially the differences between federal and unitary 
government. Special attention will be given to the governments of 
the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, South Africa, 
the Irish Free State, France, Germany, Switzerland and Russia. 
Two semester hours credit. 

Economics 
S32. Economics — Money and Banking. — This course deals with 
monetary theory, the gold standard, inflation, international exchange, 
business cycles, price levels and speculation. A study is made of the 
functions of banks; bank credit, the structure and function of the 
Federal Reserve System, agricultural credit. Two semester hours 
credit. 



SUMMARY OF COURSES 

IN ANNVILLE 

Bible S52. Religious History of the Jews. 

Biology S46. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 

Chemistry S16. General Chemistry. 

Economics S32. Money and Banking. 

Education S42. Educational Sociology. 

Education S32. Secondary Education. 

Education S72. Child Psychology. 

Education S92. Methods of Teaching Mathematics. 

EngHsh S612. Pre-Shakespearean Drama. 

German S04. Elementary German. 

History S22. Outlines of European History. 

History S62. Economic History of Europe. 

Mathematics S12. College Algebra. 

Mathematics S42. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Political Science S12. American Government and Politics. 

Sociology S12. Social Problems. 



IN HARRISBURG 

liking. 
lucation. 



Economics S32. Money and Banking. 

Education S32. Principles of Education. 

Education S112. Technique of Teaching. 

Education SI 52. Educational Psychology. 

English S42. Eighteenth Century Prose. 

English S512. The Romantic Movement in English Poetry. 

English S62. Shakespeare. 

French S12. First Year College French. 

French S24. Second Year College French. 

History S32. Nineteenth Century English History. 

History S42. Recent History of the United .States. 

Political Science S32. Comparative Government. 



Lebanon ^allep College 

Extension Courses 

1931-1932 
Harrisburg 

Modern Language Dr. Mary Stella Johnson 

American History Dr. H. H. Shtnk 

Bible iJr. R. R. Butterwick 

College Algebra Dr. P. S. Wagner 

Lebanon 

English Biographies Dr. E. H. Stevenson 

American Government Prof. C. R. Gingrich 

English Dr. P. A. AV. AVallace 

Tremont 

German Dr. L. L. Lictzau 

Social Science Prof. M. L. Stokes 

Reinerton 

Technique of Teaching Dr. O. E. Reynolds 

Annville 

(Saturday Morning) 

Geology Dr. \\ E. Light 

Organic Chemistry Dr. Andrew Bender 

Education 

For further information apply to 
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 




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