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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Lebanon Valley College 

BULLETIN 

Vol. XXVI February, 1938 No. 11 

Catalogue 

1938 




REGISTER FOR 1937-1938 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES FOR 1938-1939 

Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley193839leba 



S H E R I D A N 



L 



A VENUE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CAMPUS 

KEY TO NUMBERS 

1 Administration Building 

2 Engle Conservatory 

3 North Hall 

4 Men's Dormitory 

5 Library 

6 West Hall 

7 Residence of President 

8 Heatini? Plant 

9 South Hall 

10 Conservatory Annex 

A United Brethren in Christ Church 

B Evangelical Lutheran Church 

C Post Office 

D Tennis Courts 



^ta •*** 



MAIN STREET 




I 



Lebanon Valley College 
BULLETIN 



Vol. XXVI February, 1938 



No. 11 



Catalogue 

1938 




REGISTER FOR 1937-1938 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF COURSES FOR 1938-1939 

Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Entered as Second-Class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



College Calendar for 1937-1938 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1937 
Sept. 15 Wednesday, 9:00 a. m. . .Dining Hall and Residences open to enter- 
ing class 

Sept. 15 Wednesday Registration of Freshmen 

Sept. 15-17... .Wednesday-Friday Freshman Orientation tests and lectures 

Sept. 17 Friday, 4:00 p. m Dining Hall and Residences open to all 

students 
Sept. 17-18. . . .Friday-Saturday noon.. .Re-examinations and registration of upper- 
class students 

Sept. 18 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Reception to 

new students 

Sept. 20 Monday, 9:00 a. m Opening Exercises 

Sept. 20 Monday, 1 1 :00 a. m . . . . Lectures begin 

Oct. 30 Saturday Home-Coming Day 

Nov. 12 Friday Mid-semester reports due 

Nov. 23 Tuesday, 6:00 p. m President's Reception to the Faculty 

Nov. 24 Wednesday, 1:00 p. m. . .Thanksgiving recess begins 

Nov. 28 Sunday, 5:00 p. m Thanksgiving recess ends 

Dec. 4 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Sixty-sixth Anniversary Clionian Literary 

Society 

Dec. 8 Wednesday, 8:00 p. m. . .Junior Play 

Dec. 18 Saturday noon Christmas recess begins 

1938 

Jan. 2 Sunday, 5:00 p. m Christmas recess ends 

Jan. 17-19. . . . Monday-Wednesday. . . . Registration for second semester 

Jan. 19-28. . . .Wednesday-Friday Semester examinations 

Jan. 29 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 

1938 

Jan. 31 Monday, 8:00 a. m Second semester begins 

Feb. 26 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Sixteenth Anniversary Delphian Literary 

Society 

Mar. 25 Friday Music Festival 

April 9 Saturday, 1:00 p. m Easter recess begins 

April 18 Monday, 1 :30 p. m Easter recess ends 

April 22 Friday, 8:00 p. m Sixty-first Anniversary Kalozetean Literary 

Society 
May 6 Friday, 8:00 p. m Seventy-first Anniversary Philokosmian 

Literary Society 

May 7 Saturday, 8:00 a. m Scholarship Entrance Examinations 

May 7 Saturday, 2:00 p. m May Day Exercises 

May 16-18. . . . Monday- Wednesday Registration for 1938-1939 

May 24-June 2 Tuesday-Thursday noon Semester examinations 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day 

June 3 Friday, 11:00 a. m Meeting of Board of Trustees 

June 4 Saturday Alumni Day 

June 5 Sunday, 10:30 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 6 Monday, 10:00 a. m . . . .Sixty-ninth Commencement 

4 



College Calendar for 193 8-1939 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1938 
Sept. 14 Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.. .Dining Hall and Residences open to enter- 
ing class 

Sept. 14 Wednesday Matriculation of Freshmen 

Sept. 15-17. . . .Thursday-Saturday Freshman Orientation tests and lectures 

Sept. 17 Saturday, 4:00 p. m. . . . Dining Hall and Residences open to all 

students 
Sept. 17, 19.. . .Saturday, Monday Re-examinations and registration of upper- 
class students 

Sept. 17 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Reception to 

New Students 

Sept. 19 Monday, 8:00 a. m Freshman registration begins 

Sept. 19 Monday, 10:30 a. m. . . .Opening Exercises 

Sept. 20 Tuesday, 8:00 a. m Lectures begin 

Oct. 22 Saturday Home-Coming Day 

Nov. 11 Friday Mid-semester reports due 

Nov. 22 Tuesday, 6:00 p. m President's Reception to the Faculty 

Nov. 23 Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.. .Thanksgiving recess begins 

Nov. 27 Sunday, 5:00 p. m Thanksgiving recess ends 

Dec. 3 Saturday, 8:00 p. m Sixty- seventh Anniversary Clionian 

Literary Society 

Dec. 7 Wednesday, 8:00 p. m. . .Junior Play 

Dec. 17 Saturday noon Christmas recess begins 

1939 

Jan. 1 Sunday, 5:00 p. m Christmas recess ends 

Jan. 9-13 Monday-Friday Registration for second semester 

Jan. 18-27 Wednesday-Friday Semester examinations 

Jan. 28 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 

1939 

Jan. 30 Monday, 8:00 a. m Second semester begins 

Feb. 17 Friday, 8:00 p. m Seventeenth Anniversary Delphian Literary 

Society 

Mar. 17 Friday, 8:00 p. m Si.xty-second Anniversary Kalozetean Lit- 
erary Society 

Mar. 24 Friday Music Festival 

April 1 Saturday, 1 :00 p. m Easter recess begins 

April 10 Monday, 1 :30 p. m Easter recess ends 

May 5 Friday, 8:00 p. m Seventy-second Anniversary Philokosmian 

Literary Society 

May 6 Saturday, 8.00 a. m Scholarship Entrance Examinations 

May 6 Saturday, 2:00 p. m May Day Exercises 

May 15-19 Monday-Friday Registration for 1939-1940 

May 22-June 1 Monday-Thursday noon. Semester examinations 

May 30 Tuesday Memorial Day 

June 2 Friday, 11:00 a. m Meetmg of Board of Trustees 

June 3 Saturday Alumni Day 

June 4 Sunday, 10:30 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon 

June 5 Monday, 10:00 a. m . . . . Seventieth Commencement 



CALENDAR FOR 1938-1939 




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l| 



The Corporation 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. W. a. Wilt, D.D Annville, Pa 1938 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, A.M., B.D Penbrook, Pa 1938 

Rev. J. O. Jones. A.M., B.D., D.D Elizabethville, Pa 1938 

Mr. John Hunsicker S. Lincoln Ave., Lebanon, Pa 1938 

Mr. J. R. Engle, A.B., LL.B.. LL.D Palmyra, Pa 1939 

Mr. John E. Gipple 1251 Market St.. Harrisburg. Pa 1939 

Mr. M. H. Bachman Middletown, Pa 1939 

Rev. H. E. Miller, A.M., B.D.. D.D. ... 346 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa 1939 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A.M., LL.D 2615 N. 2d St., Harrisburg, Pa 1939 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A.M., B.D., D.D 704 N. 16th St., Harrisburg, Pa 1940 

Rev. p. B. Gibble, A.M., B.D., D.D 20 N. College St., Palmyra, Pa 1940 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, A.B., D.D 344 W. Orange St., Lancaster, Pa 1940 

Rev. D. E. Young, A.M.. B.D., D.D. . . .2337 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, Pa 1940 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. p. E. V. Shannon, A.B., B.D., D.D.. .114 N. Newberry St., York, Pa 1938 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D 106 E. Franklin St., Hagerstown, Md . . . 1938 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B Hagerstown, Md 1938 

Mr. R. G. Mowrey, A.B Quincy, Pa 1938 

Rev. C. Guy Stambach, A.B., B.D Mechanlcsburg, Pa 1939 

Rev. Paul O. Shettel, A.B., B.D 1005 Beechfield Ave., Baltimore, Md. . . . 1939 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, B.D., Ph.D, D.D. .Red Lion, Pa 19.39 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B. 4023 Roland Ave., Baltimore, Md 1939 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst, A.B., B.D., D.D 45 S. West St., Carlisle, Pa 1939 

Rev. J. H. Ness, A.B., B.D., D.D 839 Maryland Ave., York, Pa 1940 

Rev. G. L Rider. A.B., D.D 712 Church St., Hagerstown, Md 1940 

Mr. Albert Watson 448 W. High St., Carlisle. Pa 1940 

Mr. O. W. Reachard Dallastown. Pa 1940 

Representatives from the Virginia Conference 

Rev. E. E. Miller, A.B Martinsburg, W. Va 1938 

Rev. W. H. Smith. A.B.. B.D Elkton. Va 1938 

Rev. J. H. Brunk. D.D Martinsburg, W. Va 1939 

Rev. G. W. Stover Winchester. Va 1939 

Rev. J. E. Oliver, A.B., B.D Keyser, W. Va 1940 

Mr. G. C. Ludwig Keyser, W. Va 1940 

Alumni Trustees 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush, '03, A.M., D.Ped. . Minersville. Pa 1938 

Mr. a. K. Mills. '04. A.B Annville, Pa 1939 

Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley. "18, A.B. 905 N. b4th St., Philadelphia, Pa 1940 

Trustees at Large 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf, Ph.D., D.D.. LL.D. 1509 State St., Harrisburg, Pa 1938 

Dr. H. M. Imboden, A.B., M.D., Sc.D BOW. 59th St., New York City 1938 

Members of the college faculty who are heads of departments are 
ex officio members of the Board of Trustees. 



officers and Committees of the 
Board of Trustees 



President J. R. Engle 

Vice President E. N. Fuxkhouser 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 

Financial Secretary J. R. Engle 

Executive Committee 

C. A. Lynch, Chairman 

J. R. Engle S. C. Enck W. N. McFaul 

J. H. Ness C. G. Ludwig S. H. Derickson 

Finance Committee 
J. R. Engle, Chairman 

C. A. Lynch, Pres. H. H. Baish, 1939 S. H. Derickson, Treas. 
J. E. GippLE, 1938 E. N. Fuxkhouser, 1939 M. H. Bachman, 1940 

F. B. Plummer, 1938 G. C. Ludwig, 1940 

Auditing Committee 
H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman P. O. Shettel E. E. Miller 

Nominating Committee 

D. E. Young, Chairman C. G. Stambach G. C. Ludwig 

Mrs. Louisa Yardley 

Faculty Committee 

H. H. Baish, Chairman C. A. Lynch J. H. Ness 

G. C. Ludwig C. E. Roudabush 

Buildinys and Grounds Committee 

F. B. Plummer, Chairman C. A. Lynch A. H. M. Stonecipher 
H. H. Shenk D. T. Ehrhart W. H. Smith 

Library and Apparatus Committee 

R. R. Butterwick, Chairman C. A. Lynch F. B. Plummer 

G. C. Ludwig P. B. Gibble 

Farm Committee 

I. S. Ernst, Chairman C. A. Lynch S. H. Derickson 

J. E. GipPLE G. C. Ludwig 

Publicity Committee 

P. A. W. Wallace, Chairman C. A. Lynch P. E. V. Shannon 

G. A. Richie Mrs. Louisa Yardley A. K. Mills 

8 



officers of Administration 



Clyde A. Lynch 

A.B., A.M., D.D., Lebanon Valley College; B.D.. Bonebrake 
Theological Seminary; K.^i.,^\\.T)., University of Pennsylvania; 
LL.D., Albright College 

President 



A. H. M. Stonecipher, Ph.D Dean of the College 

Samuel O. Grimm, A.M Registrar 

Mary E. Gillespie Dean of Women 

Helen Ethel Myers, A.B Librarian 

J. W. Esbenshade, A.B.. .Secretary of the Finance Committee 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

L. Percy Clements, A.B Director of Public Relations 

Gladys M. Pencil, A.B Assistant Registrar 

Sarah M. Lupton, B.S Assistant Librarian 

Verda M. Miles Secretary to the President 

Margaret L. Rice. .Assistant to the Secretary of the Finance Committee 



DORMITORY PROCTORS 

Men's Dormitory Mr. and Mrs. Clark Carmean 

North Hall Mary E. Gillespie 

South Hall Margaret A. Wood 

West Hall Lena L. Lietzau 



College Faculty 



Hiram H. Shenk 

A.B., Ursinus College; A.M., LL.D., Lebanon Valley College 

Professor of History 
Samuel H. Derickson 

B.S., M.S., Sc.D., Lebanon Valley College 
Professor of Biological Science 

Samuel O. Grimm 

B.Pd., Millcrsville State Normal School; A.B., A.M., Lebanon Valley College 

Registrar ; Professor of Physics and Mathematics 
Christian R. Gingrich 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; LL.B., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Political Science and Economics 
Paul S. Wagner 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Professor of Mathematics 
Mary C. Green 

Paris, 1901-1914 

Professor of French 
Andrew Bender 

A.B,, a.m., Lebanon Valley College; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of Chemistry 

« 
Robert R. Butterwick 

A.B.. A.M., D.D., Lebanon Valley College; B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary 
Professor of Philosophy and Religion 

O. Edgar Reynolds 

A.B., University of Illinois; A.M., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of Education and Psychology 
Paul A. W. Wallace 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Professor of English 

10 



CATALOGUE 
G. A. Richie 

A.B., D.D., Lebanon Valley College; B.D., Boncbrake Theological Seminary ; 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Bible and Greek 



Milton L. Stokes 

;.A., M.A., LL.B., University of Toronto; Ph.D., Uiiivcrsity of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Business Administration 
E. H. Stevenson 

A.B., Hendrix College; B.A., Oxford; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of History 
Stella Johnson Stevenson 

B.S.. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Professor of French Literature 



V. Earl Light 

A.B., M.S., Lebanon Valley College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Associate Professor of Biological Science 

Lena Louise Lietzau 

Ph.D., University of Vienna 
Professor of German 

George G. Struble 

B.S. in Ed., M.S. in Ed., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Associate Professor of English 



L. G. Bailey 

\iversity; M.A., Un 
University of Wis 

Associate Professor of Education and Psychology 



A.B., Lincoln Memorial University ; M.A., University of South Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



Alvin H. M. Stonecipher 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Dean ; Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

Margaret A. Wood 

B.S. in Ed., Temple University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Instructor in Hygiene and Political Science 

n 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Jerome W. Frock 

B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College 

Director of Physical Education for Men and Coach 
Emerson Metoxen 

B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College 
Assistant Director of Physical Education for Men and Assistant Coach 

Esther Henderson 

B.S. in Ed., Miami University; M.A. in Health and Physical Education, 
Columbia University 

Coach and Director of Physical Education for Women 
Amos H. Black 

A..B., Marietta College; A.M., University of West Virginia; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 



Rev. W. a. Wilt, D.D. 
College Pastor 



12 



Conservatory Faculty 



Mary E. Gillespie, M. A. ,,, Director of the Conservatory of Music 

Valparaiso University, 1912-1913; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-1916; B.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1926; Public School Music Super- 
visor at Scottsburg, Indiana, and Braddock, Penna.; Director of Music at 
Women's College, University of Delaware, 1925-1930; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1934; Director of Lebanon Valley College 
Conservatory of Music, 1930 — ; Dean of Women, 1937 — 

Ruth Engle Bender, A.B. Piano 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-1916; 
Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music, 1918; Teacher of Piano 
and Theory, Lebanon Valley College, 1919-1921; Pupil of Ernest Hutche- 
son. Francis !Moore, and Frank LaForge, New York City; Graduate courses 
at Columbia Laiiversity in Composition, Improvisation, and Musical Peda- 
gogy under Frederick Schlieder, 1922-1924; Director of Lebanon Valley 
Conservatory of Music, 1924-1930; Instructor of Piano, Lebanon Valley 
College Conservatory of Music, 1930 — 

R. Porter Campbell, Mus.B. Organ 

Diploma in Pianoforte, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory, 1915; 
Diploma in Organ and Bachelor of Music degree ibid., 1916; Teacher of 
Pianoforte, History and Theory, 1915-1917; U. S. Service, 1917-1919; 
Pianoforte and Pedagogy under Aloys Kramer and Arthur Freidheim, 
Summer Session, New York, 1921; Master Course in Organ Playing with 
Pietro A. Yon, New York, Summer of 1923 and Season of 1924; with 
Pietro A. Yon in Italy, Summer of 1924; Organist St. Luke's Episcopal 
Church, Lebanon, Pa. ; Instructor of Organ, Lebanon Valley College Con- 
servatory of Music, 1920 — 



Harold Malsh Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of Musical Art, New York City (Dr. Frank 
Damrosch, Director) ; Teacher in the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, 
N. Y.; Instructor of Violin, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 
1924— 



Alexander Crawford Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens, H. Sutton Goddard, and Wm. Shakespeare, 
London, England; Private Studio, Denver, Colorado, 1916-1923; Summer 

1919, Deems Taylor; Private Studio Carnegie Hall, N, Y. C, 1924-1927; 
Vocal Instructor, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1927 — 



Edward P. Rutledge, M.A. Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Institute of Musical Art, New York, 1919-1921; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925; Teacher of Instrumental Music, Public Schools, 
Neodesha, Kansas, 1925-1931; Instructor in Music Education, Summer 
Sessions, Columbia University, 1926-1931; M.A., Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, 1931; Instructor in Band and Orchestra Instruments, 
Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1931 — 

13 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Ella R. Mover, B.S., M.A. Theory 

Graduate Sternberg School of Music, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; Graduate 
of Institute of Musical Art, New York City, 1920; Graduate of Fontaine- 
bleau School of Music, Fontainebleau, France, 1922; B.S., New York 
University, 1927; M.A., ibid., 1932; Head of Theory Department, West- 
minster College, New Wilmington, Pa., 1920-1923; Head of Theory De- 
partment, Chatham School, Chatham, Va., 1923-1924; Instructor in New 
York University, Summers 1926, 1927; State Teachers College, California, 
Pa., 1927-1931; Instructor in Theory, Lebanon Valley College Conserva- 
tory of Music, 1931 — 



D. Clark Carmean, M.A. Band and Orchestra Instruments 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1932; Supervisor of Instrumental Music, Erie County, 1927- 
1929; Teacher of Music, Cleveland City Public Schools, 1929-1931; Teacher 
of Instrumental Music, Public Schools, Neodesha, Kansas, 1931-1933; In- 
structor in Band and Orchestra Instruments, Lebanon Valley College Con- 
servatory of Music, 1933 — 



Nella Miller, B.S., M.A. Piano 

Winner of National Contest, Women's Federation of Music Clubs, 1923; 
Fellowship in Juilliard School of Music, New York City, 1926-1933; Student 
of Carl Friedberg, 1926; Olga Samaroff, 1927-1933; New York Debut, 
Town Hall, 1930; New York Concert, Town Hall, 1931; Extensive Con- 
cert Work Throughout the United States; Instructor in Piano, Juilliard 
Graduate School of Music, 1931-1934; Private Teaching in New York 
City, 1931-1934; Member of Faculty, Laymans Music Course Organized 
by Olga Samaroff, Philadelphia, Penna., 1934; B.S. Degree in Music Edu- 
cation, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1934; M.A. in Music Edu- 
cation, Columbia University, 1935; Eight New York Concerts in Complete 
Cycles of Brahms Chamber Music, 1933; Instructor of Piano, Lebanon Val- 
ley College Conservatory of Music, 1933 — 

Benjamin Owen Piano 

Graduate Bohlmann School of Music, Memphis, Tennessee, 1931; Private 
study with Josef and Rosina Lh^vinne, New York City, 1931-1932, summer 
1934; Fellowship at Juilliard Graduate School, New York City, 1932, gradu- 
ating 1936; Private Piano Study with Alexander Siloti, 193S; Theoretical 
subjects under Bernard Wagenarr; Recitals in South and West, U. S., 
1928-1935; Soloist with Orchestra of Juilliard Graduate School, May 9, 
1936; Broadcasts over Stations KFI and KFAC, Los Angeles, summers 
1935-1936; Instructor of Piano, Juilliard Graduate School, 1935-; Instructor 
of Piano, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1936 — 

JuDSON House Voice 

Honorary degree, M.M., Valparaiso University, 1924; pupil of Dr. Max 
Reinhardt, Frank LaForge, and Adelaide Gescheidt; principal tenor, Phila- 
delphia Civic Opera Company, 1929-1933; teacher of voice. New York 
studio, 1927-1937; concert and oratorio appearances with leading festival 
and symphony orchestras of the L^nited States and Canada; principal tenor 
of the National Broadcasting Company, 1927-1936; Summer Opera Director, 
Chautauqua, N. Y., 1929-1930; Vocal Master classes, Brenau College, 
Gainesville, Ga., Lander College, Greenville, S. C. 1930-1936; Vocal 
Instructor, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1937 — 



14 



Committees, Assistants, Supervisors 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY— 1937-1938 

Activities — Stonecipher, Gillespie, Henderson, Richie, Rutledge 
Admissions — Grimm, Derickson, Gillespie, Shenk, Stonecipher 
Athletics — Butterwick, Frock, Gingrich, Henderson, Metoxen, Stevenson 
Bulletin — Wallace, Gillespie, Grimm, Myers 
Chapel — Butterwick, Black, Richie 
Class Absences — Stokes, Grimm, Light 
Commencement — Gingrich, Mrs. Bender, Grimm, Struble 
Credits — Grimm, Gillespie, Reynolds, Stonecipher, Stokes 
Curriculum — Stonecipher, Derickson, Gillespie, Wallace 
Debating — Stevenson, Black, Shenk, Stokes 

Educational Policy — Stonecipher, Butterwick, Derickson, Grimm, Stev- 
enson, Wallace 
Examinations — Reynolds, Bender, Gillespie, Light 
Extension — Summer School — Stokes, Derickson, Gingrich, Reynolds, 

Wallace 
Faculty — Student — (Men) Carmean, Black, Shenk 
Faculty — Student — (Women) Gillespie, Lietzau, Wood 
Freshman Week — Reynolds, Bailey, Gillespie, Stonecipher 
Flower — Light, Green, Moyer 

Honorary Degrees — Derickson, Bender, Butterwick, Richie 
La Vie Collegienne — Struble, Stokes, Wallace 
Library — Myers, Bender, Butterwick, Lietzau, Wallace 
Men's Senate — Stevenson, Black, Stonecipher 
Personnel — Stonecipher, Bailey, Grimm, Wood 
N.Y.A. — Shenk, Stevenson, Stokes 
Physical Education for Women — Henderson, Lietzau, Mrs. Stevenson, 

Wood 
Quittapahilla — Struble, Gingrich, Stokes 

Registration — Grimm, Advisers, and Agent of Finance Committee 
Schedule — Grimm, Gillespie, Henderson, Stonecipher 
Student Finance — Stokes and Organization Advisers 
Student Honorary Society — Stonecipher, Shenk, Mrs. Stevenson 
W.S.G.A. — Gillespie, Lietzau, Wood 
Freshman Advisers — A.B. : Stonecipher, Mrs. Stevenson 
B.S. : Biology— Light 

Chemistry — Bender 

Economics — Stokes 

Education — Reynolds 

Music Education — Gillespie 

Pre-Legal — Gingrich 

Pre-Medical — Derickson, Bender 

Pre-Theological — Richie 
Y.M.CA. Advisers — Butterwick, Richie, Stonecipher 
Y.W.CA. Advisers — Green, Henderson, Myers 

The President and Dean are ex officio members of all committees. 

15 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1937-1938 

ESTHER SHENK, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, '26 English 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS, 1937-1938 

THOMAS GUINIVAN, '39 Bible and Greek 

ELWOOD BRUBAKER, '40 Biology 

ESTHER FLOM, '38 Biology 

GEORGE LAZORJACK, '41 Biology 

CLARENCE LEHMAN, '39 Biology 

BURRITT LUPTON, '2>7 Biology 

JOHN MARBARGER, '38 Biology 

C. BOYD SHAFFER, '38 Biology 

DOROTHY A. WENTLING, '39 Biology 

BEATRICE ZAMOJSKI, '38 Biology 

CURVIN DELLINGER, '38 Business Administration 

MERLE BACASTOW, '39 Chemistry 

HOWARD N. BAIER, '39 Chemistry 

ROBERT TSCHOP, '38 Chemistry 

BARBARA BOWMAN, '40 Education and Psychology 

ROBERT S. GRIMM, '40 Education and Psychology 

LILLIAN LEISEY, '40 Education and Psychology 

DOROTHY NULL, '39 Education and Psychology 

THERESA STEFAN, '38 Education and Psychology 

ELIZABETH T. BENDER, '38 English 

ETHEL M. HOUTZ, '38 English 

WANDA L. PRICE, '38 English 

HAZEL M. HEMINWAY, '38 French 

VIOLETTE HOERNER, '38 French 

ROBERT LONG, '39 German 

JEAN E. McKEAG, '38 History 

CALVIN D. SPITLER, '38 History 

CARL W. DEMPSEY, '39 Mathematics 

ROGER SAYLOR, '38 Mathematics 

JACOB UMBERGER, '39 Mathematics 

HENRY SCHOTT, '38 Physics 



16 



CATALOGUE 



SUPERVISORS OF PRACTICE TEACHING 
Annville High School 

O. EDGAR REYNOLDS, Ph.D., Columbia University, 1927, Head 
of the Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College 

CHARLES G. DOTTER, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1909, Super- 
vising Principal 

ADA C. BOSSARD, A.M., Lebanon Valley College, 1929, French and 
European History 

STELLA M. HUGHES, M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1930, Science 

J. GORDON STARR, B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College, 1927, 
History and English 

IRENE M. MILLER, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929, Mathematics 

MILDRED E. AIYERS, A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1930, Latin 

CARL W. ZIEGLER, A.B., Elizabethtown College, 1931, English and 
German 

HENRY J. HOLLINGER, A.M., Columbia University, 1929, English. 



17 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PRESIDENTS 

Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D 1866-1871 

Lucian H. Hammond, A.M 1871-1876 

Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M 1876-1887 

Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D 1887-1889 

Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M 1889-1890 

E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D 1890-1897 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S 1906-1907 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D 1907-1912 

Rev. George Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., LL.D 1912-1932 

Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D., Ph.D., LL.D... 1932- 



18 



Lebanon Valley College 



HISTORY 

THE quiet growth of Lebanon Valley College, now in its 
seventy-second year, has behind it an instructive and stimulating 
history. It is the history, not of a few brilliant men, but of a 
people and an ideal. The people were the members of the eastern 
conferences of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ; the ideal, 
that of a co-educational institution of learning in which the highest 
scholarship should be fostered in a Christian atmosphere, and in 
which religion should subsist without sectarianism. To establish 
that ideal, Lebanon Valley College was founded at Annville, Pa., 
in 1866. 

To an outside observer, the history of the College from its opening 
by President Thomas Rees Vickroy on May 7, 1866, in a building 
donated by the old Annville Academy and with a student body of 
forty-nine, might seem to consist merely in increases in the number 
of students, corresponding increases in the faculty, the purchase of 
new grounds, and the erection of new buildings. But the inner history 
was marked by a long and bitter struggle against what often seemed 
insuperable obstacles, a struggle carried on by heroic men and women 
on the faculty, among the students, and in the conferences. 

There was, to begin with, the old controversy over the wisdom 
of providing higher education for the Church's young people. In the 
first year of the College's life a fierce attack upon the educational 
policy of which it was the fruit came near to putting an end to it at 
once. But the conference stood loyally by the institution it had 
created and fought the matter through, though it meant in the end 
the dropping of valued members from the Church. 

Some twenty years later another crisis developed over the question 
of relocating the College. The debate, which lasted for some years, 
so seriously divided the friends of the College that in the uncertainty 
all progress came to a stop. In the emergency Dr. E. Benjamin 
Bierman was called to the presidency, which he assumed in 1890. 
On the wave of enthusiasm which he was able to set in motion, the 
poHcy of permanency and enlargement was accepted. Buildings were 
renovated, the student body increased, and when that year the 
College received the Mary A. Dodge Scholarship Fund of ten 
thousand dollars — by far the largest single amount that had ever 
come to the institution — Lebanon Valley College was enabled to 

19 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

close its first quarter century with a complete renewal of the con- 
fidence in which it had been founded. 

In 1897, under the presidency of Dr. Roop and with the assistance 
of old friends and new patrons, the College entered on a fresh 
period of expansion which saw the erection of the greater part of 
the present plant. Engle Music Hall, the Carnegie Library, and 
North Hall were first built. The destruction by fire of the old 
Administration Building tested the loyalty of college supporters but 
did not interfere with the program of expansion. The friends of 
the College rallied to build a new and larger Administration Building, 
a residence for the men, and a heating plant. Dr. Roop also provided 
proper quarters and modern equipment for the science departments. 
His vision and initiative laid the foundation for the success that has 
since come to the College. 

The inauguration of the late President George Daniel Gossard 
marks the beginning of the greatest era of prosperity. During his 
term of office the student body trebled in numbers, the faculty in- 
creased not only in numbers but also in attainments, and the elimina- 
tion of all phases of secondary education raised the institution to 
true college status. During this same period two great endowment 
campaigns were completed. Through the splendid support of the 
conferences, the alumni, and other friends, the College was made 
economically sound and her permanency placed beyond question. 

As Lebanon Valley College moves forward under the energetic 
guidance of her president, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, she looks back 
with a feeling of reverence over her past. She sees there the 
small but proud history of a democratic institution, established by 
a pious people in the faith that "The truth shall make you free," 
and carried through dark days by the unswerving devotion and self- 
sacrifice of a faculty and a constituency poor in the world's goods 
but rich in faith in the ideals for which the College was founded. 
Lebanon Valley College is proud of its beginnings, and now, 
strengthened as it is in its economic sinews, with policies established 
and a vigorous administration assured, it looks forward in the spirit 
of its founders to taking rank among the leading educational institu- 
tions of the state. 

A STATEMENT OF AIMS 

The motto of Lebanon Valley College, Libertas Per Veritatem, 
is indicative of the purpose of the College as conceived by its found- 
ers and early supporters. Changing conditions but accentuate the 
value of this fundamental purpose. Education is a liberating force. 
Individual emancipation and social freedom are achieved by means 

20 



CATALOGUE 

of truth. This ideal of freedom is consonant with our modern demo- 
cratic ideals and social progress. It is opposed to stagnation on the 
one hand, and to anarchy on the other. 

In harmony with the general purpose of the College the following 
aims are presented: 

1. Educational Efficiency. This is promoted by a scholarly fac- 
ulty, excellent courses of study, well-equipped laboratories and 
library. The small college can deal with students in smaller groups 
and take cognizance of individual dififerences. True to the ideals 
of the Liberal Arts College, a broad cultural education is made to 
minister to the total personality of the student. 

2. Elementary Preparation for Certain Vocations. Without sacri- 
ficing the ideals of a liberal arts education, fully accredited courses 
are ofifered preparatory to the highly specialized training provided 
by graduate and professional schools. Such courses are given in the 
fields of religion, medicine, and law. Complete courses are ofifered in 
preparation for teaching and business administration. 

3. Loyalty to Christian Ideals. Faculty members are expected to 
combine excellence of scholarship with Christian character. A Chris- 
tian philosophy of life is presented and Christian ideals of character 
and conduct encouraged. Daily chapel services, good courses in 
Bible and Religion, various religious organizations on the campus, 
and the college church provide for the religious development and 
training of the students. 

4. Christian Service. The College was founded and is main- 
tained by several eastern conferences of the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ. Realizing its special obligation to its denomina- 
tional constituency, this institution makes special financial concessions 
to our own ministerial students and to the children of all ministers. 
The college is continuously supplying the Church with future leaders, 
both ministerial and lay. All of this is done without sectarian dis- 
crimination against students with other religious afifiliations. 

5. Training for Citizenship. The college campus is a miniature 
society. Situations not unlike those that obtain in the larger world 
of aflFairs necessitate the proper conditioning of the student in his 
reactions to the group. Discipline is maintained by student-govern- 
ment organizations. Physical education and various social activities 
supplement the training of the intellect. Inter-collegiate and intra- 
mural athletics, in addition to their physical values, foster the devel- 
opment of desirable social attitudes. 

ACADEMIC STANDING 

Lebanon Valley College is fully accredited by the Department of 
Public Instruction of Pennsylvania, the American Association of 
Colleges, the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the 
Middle Atlantic States and Maryland, and the American Association 
of University Women. It is a member of the American Council on 
Education. 

LOCATION 

The College is situated in Annville, twenty-one miles east of Har- 
risburg, in the heart of Lebanon Valley, midway between two ranges 

21 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

of the Allegheny system, the Blue Ridge Mountains and the South 
Mountains. It is on the Benjamin Franklin Highway and the Phila- 
delphia-Reading Railroad, and is quickly reached by train or bus 
from Harrisburg, Reading, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The campus, of twelve acres, occupies a high point in the centre 
of Annville. Around it are grouped the ten college buildings, includ- 
ing the Administration Building, the Carnegie Library, the Engle 
Conservatory of Music, the Men's Dormitory, and three dormitories 
for women: North Hall, South Hall, and West Hall. 

The Administration Building contains, in addition to the admin- 
istrative offices, the college lecture rooms, science laboratories, biology 
and chemistry museums, and a gymnasium. 

Lounge rooms are provided for the day students. 

Extramural and intramural sports are encouraged, the College 
providing equipment where needed. The following special provisions 
have been made for sports: an athletic field of five and one-half acres, 
five tennis courts, an archery range, a field for girls' hockey, a 
hand-ball court, and a gymnasium. 

A well-equipped and comfortable Infirmary has been provided, 
with a resident graduate nurse in attendance. 

THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

The present library equipment is being expanded rapidly to meet 
the growing needs of the College. 

The library already contains a fair collection of the foundation 
books needed by the various college departments. It is excellently 
equipped with works of general reference, such as encyclopedias, dic- 
tionaries, atlases, indexes, and year books. The periodicals room 
is provided with a large and growing list of technical journals and 
magazines of general interest. 

Incoming students are instructed in the use of catalogues and refer- 
ence books, and in the best methods of working in the library. 
Books, unless specially reserved for reference work, may be taken 
out by students. Inter-library loan courtesies enable the librarian 
to provide student or faculty member with books not found on the 
College shelves. 
The library is open during these hours: 

Monday to Friday 8 a. m. to 5:45 p. m.; 

7 p. m. to 9:30 p. m. 

Saturday 9 a. m. to 12 noon; 

2 p. m. to 4 p. m. 

22 



Student Activities 



The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian 
Associations hold weekly devotional services and 
conduct special courses in Bible and Mission Study. 
They are centres of the spiritual interests of the students, and 
deserve the hearty support of all connected with the College. 



Christian 
Associations 



_ . . Wholesome social life on the campus is promoted by 

the societies of the College, of which there are four: 
the Philokosmian, Kalozetian, Clionian, and Delphian. The last two 
are conducted by the girls of the College. The social life of the 
campus centers largely around these societies, which also produce 
plays and present other programs of a literary or cultural nature. 
They are valuable agencies of college life, and students are advised 
to unite with one of them. 

^ , , . The Athletic Association is composed of all the 

Athletic 
. . . students of the College and the cooperating Alumni. 

Athletics are controlled by a Council consisting of 

representatives of the Faculty and Alumni. 

A group of students possessing ability in management 
Journalism and writing is selected annually by the Faculty to 

bring out a weekly periodical. La Vie Collegienne, 
devoted to college and student interests. La Vie aflFords training of 
a highly specialized kind to those interested in editorial work. Other 
opportunities for journalistic training are afforded by The QuittapahiHa, 
the annual year-book published by the Junior Class; and by the 
Green Blotter Club, whose membership consists of a selected group 
of writers, of whom four are chosen each year from among the first 
year students. 

_. , . The College is a member of the Debating Association 

of Pennsylvania Colleges, and supports a vigorous 
Debating Club from which teams are selected to represent the Col- 
lege in intercollegiate debates with neighboring colleges and univer- 
sities, such as Franklin and Marshall, Bucknell, Elizabethtown, 
Albright, Ursinus, Western Maryland, and Susquehanna. Member- 
ship in the Debating Club is open to all students, and four teams are 
selected each year by competitive try-outs. 

T^ ^ Those interested in dramatics, and especially pros- 

Dramatics , , . , ; , r 

pective teachers who wish to prepare themselves for 

coaching high school plays, will find experience in the annual Junior 

23 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Play, the anniversary plays presented by the literary societies, and 
the monthly meetings of the Wig and Buckle Club. "Cub" member- 
ship in the Wig and Buckle is open to all students who desire ex- 
perience in any branch of dramatics — acting, directing, stage 
mechanics, etc. Regular membership is limited to those who, on 
taking part in a college production, show real proficiency. 

. . . , This honorary scholarship society gives recognition to 
p, .. those who have achieved a high scholarship record 

during their college course. Those who have attained 
an average of 88 per cent during the first three and a half years of 
their college course and are of good moral character are eligible for 
membership. 

Those who play musical instruments or who sing are 
"^'^ eligible for membership in the musical organizations main- 

tained on the campus, such as the L. V. C. Band, Symphony Orches- 
tra, College Orchestra, Glee Club, and College Chorus. For detailed 
announcement concerning these organizations turn to page 86 of 
this catalogue. 

Many department clubs have been formed on the 
Uepartment campus by groups of students interested in certain 

fields of investigation. At informal gatherings reports 
on current topics are presented and discussed, and visiting lecturers 
are entertained. The following is a list of such clubs: the Chemistry 
Club, Commerce Club, German Club, Green Blotter Club, Inter- 
national Relations Club, and Life Work Recruits. 



PRIZES, 1937 
Max F. Lehman Memorial Mathematics Prize 

Established by the Class of 1907, in memory of a classmate. 
Awarded to that member of the freshman class who shall have 
attained the highest standing in mathematics. 

The prize was awarded in 1937 to Lela W. Lopez. 

Sophomore Prize in English Literature 

Established by the Class of 1928. Awarded to the three students 
in Sophomore English (English 26) who shall have done the best 
work, taking into account scholarship, originality, and progress. 

The prize was awarded in 1937 to Sarah K. MacEwen, Robert P. 
Tschop, Edith M. Metzger. 

24 



CATALOGUE 

Music Prizes 

Awarded to the student in the Junior Class and in the Senior 
Class rating the highest scholastically in music subjects only. 

Awarded in 1937 to Emily Elizabeth Kindt (Junior) and Earl Clay- 
ton Unger (Senior). 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award 

Established in 1935 in memory of Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner, Class 
of 1883, by Daniel E. Burtner, Samuel J. Evers and Evers Burtner. 

Awarded to an outstanding member of the Junior Class selected 
by the faculty on the basis of scholarship, character, social promise, 
and financial need. 

Awarded in 1937 to Theresa Kathryn Stefan. 



25 



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Admission 



Persons desiring to enter Lebanon Valley College should make 
application on official forms which may be obtained from the Reg- 
istrar. The application should be accompanied by a transcript of 
the high school record on the form provided for that purpose. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certifi- 
cates of good standing and honorable dismissal. 

Graduates of standard high schools (approved by the Pennsyl- 
vania State Department of Education, by the Association of Colleges 
and Preparatory Schools of the Middle Atlantic States and Mary- 
land, or by the state university of the state in which the school is 
located) may be admitted on presentation of certificates, signed by 
the proper authorities, showing the completion of a four-year high 
school course or its equivalent. 

Such certificates must represent a total of at least 16 units of 
work and must meet the requirements outlined in the Table of Re- 
quirements for Admission. They must also indicate that the respec- 
tive candidates are qualified to pursue collegiate education success- 
fully. Candidates whose preparatory records are unsatisfactory to 
the Committee on Admissions will be refused admission. 

A unit represents the work of a school year of no less than thirty- 
six weeks, with five periods of at least forty-five minutes each per 
week, or four periods of one hour each per week. A unit, therefore, 
is the equivalent of one hundred and eighty recitation periods of 
forty-five minutes each, or one hundred and forty-four periods of 
one hour each. 

Blank entrance credit certificates will be furnished upon application 
to the Registrar. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration is the process of class assignment and is completed 
over the signatures of the adviser and the Registrar. No student 
will be admitted to any class without the proper registration card, 
which is sent direct to the department of instruction from the Reg- 
istrar's office. 

The registration days for the collegiate year 1938-1939 are as 
follows: First semester, Sept. 19 for freshmen and Sept. 17 and 19 for 
other students; second semester, Jan. 9-13. 

p . . To expedite the opening of the school year in 

September, all students of 1937-1938 will be regis- 
tered during the month of May for the ensuing year's work. A fee of 

27 



Registration 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

one dollar will be charged when this is not attended to at the time 
appointed. Changes in registration will be made in September 
without charge. 

•J. Students registering later than the days specified will 

be charged a fee of one dollar. Students desiring to 
register later than one week after the opening of the 
semester will be admitted only by special action of the proper 
committee. 

Chanee of When change of registration is advisable or neces- 
Reeistration ^^^^ ^^^^ changes must be made in the same way 
as the original registration, namely, over the signa- 
tures of the adviser and Registrar. Such changes will not be per- 
mitted after the close of the second week of the session. 

. Classification will be made on the following credit 
basis: Freshman standing, 16 units; Sophomore stand- 
ing, 30 semester hours; Junior standing, 60 semester hours; Senior 
standing, 90 semester hours. 

. , Credits for work done in other institutions, for which 

„ J. advanced standing is desired, must be submitted to 

the Dean and a copy filed with the Registrar. 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

A few days are set apart at the beginning of the College year 
for the purpose of helping new students to become familiar with 
their academic surroundings. There are lectures, placement tests, 
hikes, and informal meetings with members of the faculty in their 
homes. New students are made acquainted with the College tradi- 
tions, and are advised concerning methods of study and the use of 
the library. 

All incoming students are required to take a thorough physical 
examination during the registration period. 

ADVISERS 

The student will find little opportunity for specialization in the 
first year at College, but before registering for the second year he 
must choose a department in which to pursue work of special con- 
centration. This department shall be known as his major. The head 
of the department in which a student has elected to major becomes 
the adviser for that student. The adviser's approval is necessary 
before a student may register for or enter upon any course of study, 
or discontinue any work. He is the medium of communication be- 
tween the Faculty and the students majoring in his department, and 
stands to his students in the relation of a friendly counselor. 

28 



Credits 

_. Class standing will be determined three times a year 

_ ,. for Faculty consideration: nine weeks after the opening 

of College, and at the end of each semester. 

The standing in each course is indicated generally by classification 
in seven groups, as follows: 

A (90-100%) signifies that the record of the student is distin- 
guished. 

B (80-89%) signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C (70-79%) signifies that the record is good. 

D (60-69%) signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (below 60%) imposes a condition on the student. 

F (Failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subject and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

I (Incomplete) signifies that work is incomplete, but otherwise 
satisfactory. 

LIMIT OF HOURS 

Every resident student must take at least fifteen hours of work 
as catalogued. 

The permitted number of extra hours of work, above seventeen, 
is limited by the student's previous record, as follows: 

(a) Majority of A's — three hours. 

(b) Lower record than majority of A's — no extra hours. 



29 



Discipline 



The rules of the College are as few and simple as the proper regu- 
lation of a community of young men and women will permit. The 
government of the dormitories is under the immediate control of 
the student councils, committees of students authorized by the col- 
lege authorities. 

All students are required to attend the morning chapel service. 

., Should a student be absent once beyond the number 

A.DS6nC6S 

of times a class meets each week, he will be required, 
unless he can offer satisfactory excuse for such absence, to pay 
three dollars to the College and make up the lost work by such 
means as the professor in charge shall deem advisable. For every 
succeeding unexcused cut the student will be required to pay one 
dollar. All fines for overcuts must be paid before the student so de- 
linquent may be permitted to take his final examinations. 

The number of chapel absences permitted a student during a 
semester shall be fifteen. For each unexcused absence above that 
number, one-quarter semester hour shall be added to the number of 
hours required for graduation. 

Absence from the classes immediately preceding or immediate- 
ly following vacation will be counted double. 

Students in the sophomore, junior, or senior year whose record 
in the work of the preceding semester shows an average of 90%, are 
not subject to the absence rule. 

„ , Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infringement by mem- 

bers of the other classes upon the personal rights of 
freshmen, or any discrimination against freshmen because of their 
class standing, is interpreted as hazing. 

DEFICIENT STUDENTS 

_, , . A student who has failed to pass in 60% of the semester 

Probation , ^ , . , , . ,•,,,,. 

hours for which he is registered, will be placed on pro- 
bation. If, at the next semester examinations, such a student has still 
failed to pass in 60% of his courses, he will be required to withdraw 
from the institution. 

p ,. . J Students obtaining a final average below 60% 

T5 . ^. but above 50% in any subject will be given a 

Re-examinations „„ ... „ , i ^ .• • , 

Condition, and such Condition may be re- 
moved by obtaining a mark of 60% or more on a re-examination 

30 



CATALOGUE 

to be taken at the College on the days appointed for supplemental 
examinations. 

Supplemental examinations will be held twice during the year: in 
September and six weeks after the beginning of the second semester. 

A fee of $3 will be charged for each supplemental examination. 

Except in the case of the final examinations of seniors, no immedi- 
ate re-examination will be given to students falling below the passing 
mark on the regular examinations. 

Conditions must be removed during the semester following that 
in which the condition was incurred, unless the instructor in charge 
recommends that the student become an auditor of the course when 
next given; in the latter case the condition must be removed when 
the course is next repeated. Failure to meet one or the other of these 
requirements converts the Condition into a Failure. 



31 



Expenses 



The rates on the following pages apply to the college year 1938-1939. 

MATRICULATION 

A Matriculation Fee of five dollars must be paid by all full-time 
students who are entering the College for the first time. This fee 
should accompany the application for admission. If a student's appli- 
cation is not accepted, the fee will be returned. 

All students not enrolled in regular College or Conservatory 
Courses will be required to pay a matriculation fee of one dollar, 
once in each school year. 



TUITION AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEES 

An annual charge of $300, which covers not only tuition for sev- 
enteen hours per semester in the College and Conservatory, but also 
a fee for student activities, will be made for all students in regular 
courses. 

Eight and one-half dollars will be charged for each additional sem- 
ester hour of work taken in regular classes when the total number 
of hours for the year exceeds thirty-four. This rate will also apply to 
students who enroll for not more than twelve hours in regular 
courses. 

It is understood that the charge for extra hours above the regularly 
permitted seventeen per semester shall not be affected by the addition 
of required hours in Physical Education; in other words, a student 
may take without extra charge the required Physical Education over 
and above his seventeen hours per semester of academic work. 

The payment of the annual fee entitles the student not only to class 
room instruction but to the following privileges as well: the use of 
the library, gymnasium and athletic field; admission to athletic games 
on the home grounds or in Lebanon; subscription to La ]'ie Collegicnne 
and the College Year Book; membership in the Christian Associa- 
tions and student government associations; the use of the infirmary 
and care by the resident nurse. 

Ministers' children in either the College or Conservatory are en- 
titled to a reduction of $50 on full tuition, unless they are day 
students, in which case they are entitled to a reduction of $25. Schol- 
arships do not cover the tuition for extra work taken. 

32 



CATALOGUE 

LABORATORY FEES 

To cover the cost of materials used in the Laboratories, the fol- 
lowing fees are charged: 

EACH 

SEMESTER 

Biology 13 $6.00 

Methods of Teaching Biology (Education 402) .... 4.00 

All other Biology courses, each 8.00 

Chemistry 18 8.00 

Chemistry 28 and 38, each 10.00 

Chemistry 48 12.00 

Chemistry 54 4.00 

Chemistry 64 (Mineralogy) 8.00 

Physics 18, 28, and 34, each 5.00 

Psychology 14 2.00 

Education 82 1.00 

Geology 14 8.00 

There will be no refund of laboratory fees. 

A deposit of $2 is required of each student in the Biological 
Laboratory as a guarantee for the return of keys and apparatus. This 
amount, less any deductions for loss or breakage, is refunded when 
keys and apparatus are returned. 

Breakage deposit for Chemistry Courses: Chemistry 18, $3; Chem- 
istry 28, $4; Chemistry 38, $4; Chemistry 48, $5. All breakage in 
the Chemical Laboratory will be charged against the individual stu- 
dent and any balance of the above deposits due the student at the 
completion of his course will be returned or credited to his account, 
and any deficit beyond his deposit will be charged to his regular 
college account. 

All deposits shall be paid at the College office. 

BOARDING 

The domestic department is in charge of a skilled and competent 
chef and a trained dietitian. Plain, substantial, and palatable food 
especially adapted to the needs of the student is provided. The 
kitchen is furnished with modern equipment, and all food is prepared 
in the most sanitary manner. 

The Boarding rate for the college year 1938-1939 is $200. The 
College reserves the right to increase this amount at any time during 
the year in case of unusual change in food prices. These rates do 
not include Christmas and Easter vacations. 

Students who leave college during the term will be required to pay 
board at the rate of $6.50 per week during their stay in college. 

33 

2 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

All students who do not room and board at their homes are re- 
quired to room and board in the College unless special permission is 
obtained from the Executive Committee to do otherwise. Students 
refusing to comply with this regulation forfeit their privileges as 
students in the College. 

ROOM RENT 

Room rent varies from $55 to $108 except when double rooms 
are assigned to only one student, in which case the occupant will pay 
the regular rent for two. Rooms are reserved only for those who 
forward an advance payment of $25 not later than August 1; applica- 
tions received after that date must be accompanied by $25 to assure 
accommodations. 

Occupants of a room are held responsible for all breakage and 
loss of furniture or any loss whatever for which the students are 
responsible. A breakage fee of $10 is required of each student room- 
ing in the Men's Dormitory. All or part of this may be returned 
at the end of the year. A dormitory service fee of $6 is charged men 
in the Dormitory. A breakage fee of $5 is required for each student 
in the Women's Dormitories. After deducting the cost of repairing 
any damage to the room, estimated at the end of the college year, the 
balance will be returned, or applied on account. 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a chiffonier 
and book case, and for each occupant a cot, a mattress, one chair, 
and a study table. Students must provide their own bedding, rugs, 
towels, soap, and all other furnishings. 

The Men's Dormitory is under the supervision of a member of 
the faculty who, with his wife, occupies a suite of rooms in the 
building. 

A reception room on the first floor is provided for the accom- 
modation of parents and other visitors. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitories is furnished with a rug, 
bed, mattress, chair, dresser, book case, and study table. All other 
desired furnishings must be supplied by the student. 

All students to whom rooms are assigned are strictly forbidden to 
sub-let their rooms to day-students or to others for a money or any 
other consideration. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. Only 
40-watt lights are allowed. 

The College reserves the right to close all the dormitories during 
the Christmas and Easter vacations. 

A day-students' room is provided for the men in the Administra- 
tion Building, and for the women in South Hall. A deposit of $5 

34 



CATALOGUE 

per student is required from the men, and $3 per student from the 
women, to cover janitor service and breakage. The unused portion 
of this fee will be returned at the end of the year. 

SCHEDULE OF CHARGES 

Tuition and Student Activities Fee $300.00 

Boarding 200.00 

Room Rent $55.00 to 108.00 

Service Charge, Men's Dormitory 6.00 

Matriculation Fee — payable only once, i. e., when the student 

first enters the College 5.00 

FEE FOR PRACTICE TEACHING 

A fee of $17.50 for each semester is charged to all students in 
the College and the Conservatory who do practice teaching. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Sixty days prior to Commencement, candidates for degrees are 
required to pay the following fees: 

Students graduating in the College, $15; students graduating in 
Music, $15; students receiving certificates in Music, $8. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

An advance payment of $25 must be made by each student to 
provide for registration. Students who reserve rooms in the dormi- 
tories are required to make this payment by August 1 to secure the 
reservation. After this date rooms not so secured may be assigned 
to other applicants. All other students in order to be certain of 
admission to the College must make this advance payment by Sep- 
tember 1. Registration is not completed and students will not be 
admitted to class until this payment is made. No refund will be made 
on this fee. 

Bills for regular college expenses, including tuition, laboratory 
fees, boarding, and room rent, are issued at the beginning of each 
semester, covering the expenses for the full semester. These bills 
are due on the day they are issued and are to be paid within thirty 
days from the day the semester begins. On all bills not paid within 
the specified time interest at the rate of 6% a year will be charged for 
the period during which they remain unpaid. 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal may be granted or grades recorded. 

Students who are candidates for diplomas or certificates must 
make full settlement entirely satisfactory to the Finance Committee 
before diplomas or certificates will be sealed and delivered. 

35 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ABSENCE AND SICKNESS 

When students retain their class standing during absence from 
college because of sickness or for any other reason, no rebate or 
refund will be allowed on tuition. In case of suspension for any 
reason there will be no rebate. 

In case of sickness which occasions loss of class standing, a rea- 
sonable rebate or refund will be allowed on tuition. 

When a student is absent from school more than two weeks in 
succession because of sickness, a rebate of two-thirds of the room 
rental for the time of absence will be allowed. No other refunds will 
be allowed on room rents. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

Help is extended annually to a limited number of students, but 
only to those pursuing full courses in the College. This help is 
given in the form of Scholarships, Waiterships, Janitorships, Tutor- 
ships, or Library Assistantships. Such help is given on the explicit con- 
dition that the recipient comply with all the rules and regulations of 
the College. 

A student forfeits the privilege of a scholarship or other help from 
the College when his average grade for the semester falls below C, 
when in any way he refuses to cooperate with the College, or when 
he disregards the regulations of the institution. 

Students rooming in dormitories and boarding at the college Din- 
ing Hall will be given preference when work of various kinds is 
assigned. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND TRUST FUNDS 

The College offers a limited number of tuition scholarships upon 
recommendation of the Scholarship Committee. It also makes some 
loans. 

In the spring competitive scholarship examinations for entering 
students are held, particulars concerning which may be had on appli- 
cation to the president. 

Students who transfer to other institutions before completing the 
number of years designated in their application for admission shall 
be required to refund all scholarship and loan grants before their 
transcripts are sent to other institutions. 

Students preparing for the ministry in the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ and having quarterly or annual conference license 
to preach, will, if living at the College, be entitled to $100 reduc- 
tion in tuition, provided they maintain an average of C in semester 
grades. Day students, preparing for the ministry, will be entitled to 
$50 reduction, under the same conditions. 

36 



CATALOGUE 

PROFESSORSHIPS 

Chair of Bible and Greek Testament $15,230.00 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin Language and Literature 40,000.00 

John Evans Lehman Chair of Mathematics 36,430.04 

Rev. J. B. Weidler Fund 200.00 

STUDENT AID 

United States Senator James J. Davis Scholarship Fund $ 100.00 

Mary A. Dodge Fund 9,500.00 

Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 514.66 

John A. H. Keith Fund 100.00 

Henry B. Stehman Fund 1,903.00 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Allegheny Conference C. E. Society, Scholarship $1,000.00 

Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund. 1,000.00 

Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial Sunday School Scholarship. 3,000.00 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Biological Scholarship Fund 2,517.00 

Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 12,000.00 

Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 500.00 

I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award Fund 2,000.00 

Derickson Scholarship Fund 2,750.00 

William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 600.00 

East Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship 3,000.00 

East Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 5,000.00 

Samuel F. Engle Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund. 1,000.00 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 3,300.00 

Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Jacob F. Greasley Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 2,120.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Sunday School Scholarship 1,100.00 

J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 400.00 

H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Henry G. and Anna S. Kauffman and Family Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund . 1,020.00 

Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. Kleffman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The A. S. Kreider Ministerial Fund 15,000.00 

W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Mrs. Savilla Loux Scholarship Fund I,ff00.00 

Lykens Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Mechanicsburg U. B. Sunday School Scholarship 2,000.00 

Medical Scholarship Fund 245.00 

Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 500.00 

Elizabeth May Meyer Musical Scholarship Fund 1,550.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship 5,000.00 

Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 225.00 

Grace U. B. Church of Penbrook. Pa., Scholarship 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 4.350.00 

Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 1,300.00 

Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 6,380.00 

Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 1.000.00 

Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 300.00 

Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Z7 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

BOOKS FOR LIBRARY 
Library Fund of Class of 1916 $1,325.00 

MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS 
Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room Fund 200.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Class of 1928 Prize for Proficiency in English 835.00 

Rev. John P. Cowling Memorial Fund 400.00 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 2,000.00 

Max F. Lehman Prize in Freshman Mathematics 400.00 



38 



Courses of Study 



Lebanon Valley College offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts 

(AB.) and the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.)- 

-, ., Degrees will be conferred only upon candidates 

Kesidence , , , ^ ,, . ^ , 

_, . , who have spent at least a full year in actual 

Requirement . , 

residence. 

Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 126 semester 
hours' credit in academic work, and in addition 4 semester hours in 
Physical Education, making a total of 130 semester hours. It is 
understood, however, that a student who has a physical disability 
may be excused (on recommendation from the college physician) 
from the requirement in Physical Education without being obliged 
to substitute other work in order to bring his total of semester hours 
from 126 to 130. 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a minimum of 130 qual- 
ity points, computed as follows: for a grade of A, 3 points for each 
credit hour; for a grade of B, 2 points; for a grade of C, 1 point. 
No quality credit will be given for a grade of D. 

As part of this total requirement, every candidate must present 
at least 24 semester hours in one department (to be known as his 
Major), and at least 16 semester hours in another department (to 
be known as his Minor). Both Major and Minor must be selected 
before registration for the sophomore year, the Minor to be suitably 
related to the Major, and chosen with the advice and approval of 
the Head of the Major Department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Bible and New 
Testament Greek, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, 
Mathematics (Arts option). Political and Social Science, Philosophy 
and Religion. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chem- 
istry, Mathematics (Science option), Physics, Business Administra- 
tion, Education, Music Education. 

Those majoring in Education must take two Minors of not less 
than 18 semester hours each. 

For the special requirements for those majoring in Business 
Administration, see p. 73; for those majoring in Music Education, 
see p. 79. 

39 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal educa- 
tion, are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly 
according to the degree sought, are as follows: 



A.B. 

Bible 14, 52 or 82 
English 16, 26 
♦French 16 or 

German 16 
History, six hours, 

exclusive of Hist. 

16 
Philosophy 32 
Philosophy 26 or 

Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 & 23 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18 
Psychology 14, 23 
Physical Education 
Hygiene 



B.S. 



In Physical Sciences 

Bible, 14, 52 or 82 

English 16, 26 

French 16 or 
German 16 

History, six hours, 
exclusive of Hist. 
16 

tMath. 13 and 23, 46 

Philosophy 32 

Philosophy 26 or 
Economics 16 or 
Pol. Science 16 or 
Sociology 13 & 23 

Biology 18 

Chemistry 18 

Physics 18 

Physical Education 

Hygiene 



In Education 



Bible, 14, 52 or 82 
English 16, 26 
French 16 or 

German 16 
History, six hours, 

exclusive of Hist. 

16 
Philosophy 32 
Psychology 14, 23 
Economics 16 or 

Pol. Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 & 23 
Biology 18 or 

Chemistry 18 or 

Physics 18 
Physical Education 
Hygiene 



* Twelve semester hours of Foreign Language are required of all candidates 
for the A.B. degree; six hours of this total must be from French 16 or German 16. 

t Pre-Medical students who are majoring in either Biology or Chemistry may 
substitute an elective for Math. 46. 

For explanation of numbers used above see the departmental announcements. 
The lequirenients for the courses of study leading to the degree of B.S. in Business 
Administration and in Music Education, are found on pages 73 and 79 respectively. 



ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES BY YEARS 

All the courses included in the foregoing list will ordinarily be 
taken in fixed years of the college course. A maximum load of 17 
hours a week, exclusive of physical education, is permitted for the 
regular tuition. A load of 16 or 17 hours, including physical educa- 
tion, should be taken each semester to meet the total of 130 hours 
required for graduation. The normal distribution of requirements for 
students seeking the A.B. or B.S. degree follows: 



40 



CATALOGUE 
A R First Year , H°"" ^^^"'^ 

A. a. 1st Sera. 2d Sem. 

English 16 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Bible 14 2 2 

Elect from the following: Education 124, For- 
eign Language, History 16, Math., Science 6 or 7 6 or 7 

Hygiene 12 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

B.S. 

English 16 3 3 

French or German 3 3 

Math. 13 and 23 3 3 

Bible 14 2 2 

Hygiene 12 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Biology 18, or Chemistry 18, or Physics 18.. 4 4 

A.B. Second Year 

English 26 3 3 

♦French or German 3 3 

Psychology 14, 23 4 3 

**Biology 18, or Chem. 18, or Physics 18 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Electives . 

B.S. 

English 26 3 3 

Mathematics 46 3 3 

The remaining two of: 

Biology 18, or Chem. 18, Physics 18 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

***Electives 

AB. Third and Fourth Years 

Bible 52 or 82 2 

Philosophy 32 2 

History 46 3 3 

One of the following: 

Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 

13, 23, or Philosophy 26 3 3 

Electives 

B.S. 

Bible 52 or 82 2 

Philosophy 32 2 

History 46 3 3 

One of the following: 
Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 

13 and 23, or Philosophy 26 3 3 

Electives 

* If French 16 or German 16 and Greek or Latin were taken the first year, an 
elective may be substituted. 

** If one of these sciences was elected in the first year, an elective may be 
substituted. 

*** This must include French 16 or German 16 if course 06 was taken the first 
year. 

For special curricula in Education, Business Administration, Musiq 
Education, and pre-professional curricula, see pages 73-78. 

41 



Courses of Instruction 



The credit, in semester hours, received on the successful comple- 
tion of a course is indicated by the last digit in the course number. 
The number of hour periods the class meets each week is noted 
immediately after the number and name of the course. 

Students beginning the study of a language should note that 
no 06 course will receive college credit unless it is followed by a 
second year, i. e., by a 16 course, in the same field. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Grimm 

13. General Astronomy. Three hours. First semester. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Reports on assigned readings. 
Important constellations and star groups are studied. 

A fine four-and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope adds to the in- 
terest of the subject. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

BIBLE AND GREEK 

Professors Richie and Butterwick 

The denominational college justifies its existence by the presenta- 
tion of a varied and thorough study of Bible literature. The Bible 
department, therefore, aims to consider the literary value of the 
books of the Bible, appreciate the religious influence of ancient 
leaders, estimate the power and value of these contributions to modern 
institutions, life, and thought, and make a positive impact upon the 
social and spiritual contacts of the student body. The ministerial 
students are prepared for the pursuit of advanced studies and for the 
active application of the principles of Christianity to the problems 
of the parish. 

Major: Bible 14, 26, 32, 62, 12, 52 or 82; Greek 46 or 56. 

Minor: Bible 14, 52, 62, and ten additional semester hours. 

BIBLE 

14. Introduction to English Bible. Two hours. Throughout the 
year. 

An appreciative and historical survey of the literature of the Old 
and New Testaments. 

26. New Testament. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A comparative and interpretative study of the life of Jesus as re- 
corded in the Gospels is made during the first semester. The second 

42 



CATALOGUE 

semester deals with the life and epistles of Paul, and the practices, 
problems, and beliefs of the early church. 
Oflfered 1938-1939. 

32. The Prophets. Two hours. First semester. 

A study of the lives of the major and minor prophets, and an 
analysis of their contributions to the ethical and religious thought 
of the Old Testament. 

42. The Christian Church. Two hours. Second semester. 
A study of the growth of Christianity beyond the primitive church, 
with special emphasis on the origin and growth of denominations. 

52. The Religion and History of the Hebrews. Two hours. First 
semester. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish the student with a true 
perspective of the religious growth of the Hebrews during the period 
of the Old Testament. 

Offered 1939-1940. Dr. Butterwick 

62, Principles of Religious Education. Two hours. First semester. 
A fundamental course investigating some of the theories, principles, 
and problems of Religious Education. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

72. The Church School. Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the principles, problems and methods in the organization 
and administration of the Sunday School, Church Vacation School, 
and Week Day School of Religion. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

82. The Teaching of Jesus. Two hours. First semester. 
This course attempts an intensive study of the religious concept 
of Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. 

Offered 1938-1939. Dr. Butterwick 

For courses in Greek, see p. 58. 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Derickson, Associate Professor Light, and Assistants 

The work outlined in the following courses in Biology is intended 
to acquaint students with those fundamental facts necessary for 
the proper interpretation of the phenomena manifested by the living 
things with which they are surrounded, and to lay a broad founda- 
tion for specialization in universities in professional courses in 
Biology. 

Those completing the courses will be well prepared for the work 
in medical schools, for graduate work in colleges and universities, 
for teaching the biological sciences in high schools, and for assistant- 

43 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ships in university and experiment station laboratories in the depart- 
ments of agriculture and the United States Biological Survey. 
For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see pp. 74-75. 

Major: Course 18 and any additional courses of higher number, 
including laboratory work, in the department, amounting to twenty- 
four semester hours. 

Minor: Course 18 and ten semester hours from courses of higher 
number in the department. 

13. Educational Biology. Three hours. First semester. 

Two hours class work and two hours laboratory work each week. 
Required of students in Public School Music. 

The course includes a study of the fundamental facts, principles, 
and laws of biology that every teacher should know, particularly 
of those that have a bearing on courses in education, psychology, 
and sociology, as well as on certain schoolroom problems. Emphasis 
is placed on the consideration of the laws of grow^th and develop- 
ment, causes of variation, principles of inheritance, adjustment to 
environment, and the origin, evolution, structure, and physiology 
of the nervous system. 

18-A. General Biology (Professional). Four hours. Throughout 
the year. 

Three hours class work and four hours laboratory work each week. 

Required of freshmen majoring in Biology preparing to enter 
medical schools or other lines of professional biological work. 

Laboratory work Tuesday afternoon. 

18-B. General Biology (Cultural). Four hours. Throughout the 
year. 
Three hours class work and three hours laboratory work each week. 
Section A: Laboratory work Wednesday afternoon. 
Section B; Laboratory work Thursday afternoon. 

28. Botany. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

The object of the '-ourse is to give the student a general knowledge 
of the plant kingdom. The form, structure and functioning of one 
or more tj'pcs of each of the divisions of algae, fungae, liverworts, 
mosses, ferns, and seed plants are studied. 

Special attention is given to the phylogeny and ontogeny of the 
several groups, and constant comparisons are made of those struc- 
tures indicating relationships. The principles of classification are 
learned by the identification of about one hundred and fifty species 
of plants represented in the local spring flora. These studies are 
conducted in the field so that the plants are seen as dynamic forces 
adapted to their environment. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

44 



CATALOGUE 

38. Zoology. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods of two 
hours each, per week. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the structure, 
life history, and behavior of representatives of each phylum of ani- 
mals. In the study of types, structure, function, and adaptation are 
given equal emphasis. The principles of phylogeny and ontogeny 
are considered. 

The laboratory and class work is supplemented by field studies 
including observations of habits, ecological conditions, and the use 
of keys for identification and classification. 

Oflfered 1939-1940. 

48. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Four hours. Through- 
out the year. 

Six hours laboratory work and two hours of conference and demon- 
stration each w^eek. 

The course consists of the dissection and study of a suctorial fish, 
a cartilaginous fish, a bony fish, a reptile, a bird, and a mammal. 
Carefully labeled drawings are required of each student as a record 
of each dissection. 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine or majoring in 
Biology. 

Oflfered 1938-1939. 

54-A. Vertebrate Embryology. Four hours. First semester. 
Two class periods and six hours laboratory work each week. 
A detailed study of the development of the chick up to the fifth 
day with comparisons with other vertebrate embryos. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

54-B. Vertebrate Histology. Four hours. Second semester. 

Two class periods and six hours laboratory work each week. 

A study of the structure of the tissues of the vertebrate, especially 
of the mammalian body, and of various methods of technique em- 
ployed. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

64. Genetics. Four hours. First semester. 
Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 
This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and 
variation, and their practical applications. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

74. Biological Problems. Two hours throughout the year or four 
hours either semester. 

An honors course. Laboratory work with conferences. 

This course is open to a limited number of students majoring in 
Biology who have made a distinguished record in their previous 
courses. It consists in working out problems assigned to them in- 
volving a practical application of various methods of technique, orig- 
inality of method and interpretation, and the development of the 

45 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

spirit of research. A weekly conference and report on the progress 
of the work will be required, and a detailed report including com- 
plete records of the work done must be presented before senior 
examinations. 

84. Bacteriology. Four hours. First semester. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

This course i.s designed to acquaint the student with various forms 
of bacteria and their role in nature. It includes laboratory technique 
in cultivation, sterilization, isolation of pure cultures, and staining 
of bacteria. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

94. Physiology. Four hours. Second semester. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

A course of instruction in general physiology dealing with the 
tissues of the body and especially their function in respiration, diges- 
tion, circulation, excretion, and reproduction. 

OflFered 1939-1940. 

Methods of Teaching in Biology (Education 404). Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

This course is designed to acquaint students of the sciences with 
methods of obtaining, preparing, and preserving all types of scien- 
tific materials; the making of charts and models; photography; 
lantern slide making; the fundamentals of taxidermy; various types 
of tests and devices used in teaching; sources of equipment; and lists 
of books and periodicals useful to science students and teachers. 

Offered 1938-1939 as a Saturday course from 8 to 12 a. m., or as 
an evening course. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Stokes and Gingrich 

The purpose of the College in offering a course in Business Ad- 
ministration is to give the student who is preparing for a business 
career a training which embodies not only the essential principles 
of business but also offers a general cultural education. The course 
oflFers a preparation for entrance into the Law Schools. 

For an outline of the complete course in Business Administration 
see p. li. 

Minor: Accounting 36 and twelve hours of electives to be se- 
lected from the following courses: Economic Geography, Transporta- 
tion, Money and Banking, Insurance, Marketing. Public Finance, 
Statistics, Corporation Finance, Investments, Labor Problems, Con- 
temporary Economic Problems, Economic History of Europe, Busi- 
ness Law, History of Economic Thought, Psychology. Economics 
16 is a prerequisite. 

46 



CATALOGUE 

14. Economic Geography. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The course deals with: the field and function of Economic Geogra- 
phy; distribution of population; the earth; land forms; influence of 
soils; temperature; winds and ocean currents; climates of the world. 
Much of the course will deal with the more important commodities 
of the world's trade — their production, export, and import in the 
various countries of the world. Stress will be laid on the chief sources 
of raw materials and their industrial uses and the marketing and 
transportation problems connected therewith. Books recommended: 
Introductory Economic Geography by Klimm, Starkey, & Hall ; Economic 
Resources and Industries of the World by Lippincott ; World Resources 
and Industries by Zimmerman. 

Economics 16. See page 69. 

Economics 73. See page 70. 

36. Principles of Accounting. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course in accounting principles and their application in business 
to sole traders, partnerships, and corporations; books of original en- 
try; operating accounts and balance sheets; the preparation of finan- 
cial statements; columnar books; controlling accounts; elements of 
corporation accounting; branch house accounting; business papers. 

46. Advanced Accounting. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The principle of balance sheet valuation; profits, their determina- 
tion and distribution; instalment sales; insolvency and bankruptcy; 
accounting for domestic and foreign branches and for holding com- 
panies; consolidated balance sheets; a more intensive analysis and 
interpretation of financial statements. 

S3-A. Transportation: Railroad. Three hours. One semester. 

Railroad services; principles of rate making as established by the 
railways, the regulative tribunals, and the courts; railway policy in 
the United States and other countries; railway rate structures. 

53-B. Transportation: Water, Motor and Air. Three hours. One 
semester. 

Ocean and inland water transportation. Ocean carriers; routes 
and terminals; freight, passenger, mail, and express services; rates; 
marine insurance; inland waterways and their relation to railroads; 
government aid and regulation of water transportation; principles 
of motor transportation; competition and cooperation with railroads; 
regulation of motor transportation; coordination of highway trans- 
portation; air transportation. 

Money and Banking. See Economics 33, page 69. 

Business Law. See Economics 26, page 69. 

63. Insurance. Three hours. One semester. 

Insurance as a factor in private and business life; a study of the 
principles and practices used in the more important forms of in- 

47 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

surance; the economic services and business uses of insurance; 
types of insurance organizations; types of life insurance policies; 
legal problems arising in connection with insurance; reinsurance and 
investments of insurance companies. 

73. Marketing. Three hours. One semester. 

The course deals with the methods and policies of the marketing 
of agricultural products and the merchandising of manufactured 
commodities; meaning and importance of marketing distribution; 
marketing functions; trade channels; development of marketing 
methods; co-operative marketing; price policies; trade information; 
market analysis; merchandising costs and prices; an analysis of 
the merits and defects of the existing distributive organization. 

93. Public Finance and Administration. Three hours. One se- 
mester. 

Economic functions of the state; principles and incidence of taxa- 
tion; national and local finance; public debts and their redemption; 
revenue systems of modern states; central and local administration. 

103. Statistics. Three hours. One semester. 

General introduction to the use of statistics; methods of collection; 
tabulation and graphic presentation; analysis and interpretation; 
application to the study of business cycles, population, and other 
problems; a survey of some of the principal sources of statistical 
information. 

123. Business Administration. Three hours. One semester. 

A study of the fundamentals of business organization and ad- 
ministration; the field of business administration; plant location; the 
administration of personnel; market problems; finance; production; 
risk-bearing; wage systems; welfare activities. Books recommended: 
Marshall, Business Administration; Jones, Administration of Industrial 
Enterprises ; Balderson, Management of an Enterprise. 

143. Corporation Finance. Three hours. One semester. 

Economic services of corporations; capitalization; detailed study of 
stocks and bonds; financing of extensions and improvements; 
management of incomes and reserves ; dividend policy ; insolvency ; 
receiverships; reorganizations. Books recommended: Gerstenberg, 
Financial Organisation and Management; Bonneville and Dewey, Or- 
ganising and Financing Business; Mead, Corporation Finance; Gersten- 
berg, Materials of Corporation Finance; Dewing, Corporate Promotions 
and Reorganisations. 

153. Investments. Three hours. One semester. 

The course deals with the development and place of investment in 
the field of business and its relation to other economic, legal, and 
social institutions. The fundamental principles are presented along 
with a description of investment machinery. An analysis is made of 
the various classes of investments. Books recommended: Sakolski, 
Principles of Investment; Lyon, Investment ; Jordan, Investments: 

48 



CATALOGUE 

Badger, Investment Principles and Practices; Dewing, Financial Policy 
of Corporations. 

163. Labor Problems. Three hours. One semester. 

The nature of the labor problem; the rise of industry and labor; 
the new technology and the wage earner; unemployment; the prob- 
lem of child and woman labor; hours of labor; industrial accidents; 
unemployment insurance; old age pensions; the labor movement; 
economic program of organized labor; industrial conflict; agencies 
of industrial peace; modern industrial policies; international control 
of labor relations. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Bender and Assistants 

The department aims to give students majoring in chemistry such 
training in the principles and technique of chemistry as will enable 
them to find employment in the chemical industry. Pre-medical stu- 
dents will find that the courses outlined below meet the chemistry 
requirements of the best medical schools. 

For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see pp. 74-75. 

Major: Courses 18, 28, 38, and 48. 
Minor: Courses 18 and either 28 or 48. 

18. General Inorganic Chemistry. Four hours. Throughout the 
year. 

Three hours of class work and three hours of laboratory work 
per week. 

A systematic study of the fundamental principles of Chemistry. 
The rapid increase in knowledge of the material world we live in and 
particularly the new knowledge of the constitution and structure of 
matter demands a popular approach to Chemistry. While this 
procedure is followed in this course, the aim is to lay a firm foun- 
dation for those who will pursue the subject further. 

Laboratory hours: — Section A: Wednesdays, 1-4; Section B: 
Thursdays, 1-4; Section C: Fridays, 1-4. 

28. Qualitative Analysis. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Two lectures or recitations and six hours of laboratory work per 
week. The theories and principles of analytical chemistry are studied. 

The course includes a study of the systematic methods of sepa- 
rating and detecting all of the ordinary metals and acid radicals. 
The laboratory work includes the analysis of about thirty solutions 
and solids varying in complexity from simple salts to complex 
insoluble artificial mixtures. 

The last sixth of the year is spent chiefly in a study of analysis 
for the rare elements, their separations being demonstrated in the 
lecture room. 

Laboratory hours: Mondays and Tuesdays, 1-4. 

49 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

38. Quantitative Analysis. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

One lecture or recitation and eight hours of laboratory work per 
week. A study of the methods and principles of quantitative analysis 
including chemical calculations. 

The laboratory work includes simple introductory determinations, 
acidimetry, alkalimetry, partial analysis of copper, iron, lead, zinc, 
and manganese ores, analysis of coal, alloys, limestone, cement, 
silicate rock, and steel, electrolytic analysis, gas analysis, calorimetry, 
and a few organic analyses including wheat flour, milk, butter, and oils. 
Becker chainomatic balances are used. 

Laboratory hours: Mondays and Tuesdays, 1-5. 

48. Organic Chemistry. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Two hours lectures and recitations and six hours of laboratory 
work per week. 

The course includes a study of the sources, classification, and 
type reactions of organic materials, of food-stuffs and their 
relation to nutrition, dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, coal 
tar intermediates, manufacturing processes, and recent developments 
in this field of Chemistry. The course includes a carefully selected 
series of demonstrations, the display of a large number of represen- 
tative materials, and the use of about one hundred charts and slides 
especially prepared for this course. 

The laboratory work consists of about sixty experiments covering 
the preparation and study of a wide range of representative com- 
pounds. Prerequisite, Chemistry 18. 

Laboratory hours: Wednesdays and Thursdays, 1-4. 

54. Physical Chemistry. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 28 and 38 and a working knowledge of 
the Calculus. Among the topics studied are: gases; liquids; solids; 
association and dissociation; thermodynamics; chemical and physical 
equilibrium; the relation between chemical activity and electro- 
motive force; atomic structure; radio-activity. The solution of fifteen 
to twenty problems weekly is an important part of the course. 

Offered 1938-1939 and thereafter in alternate years. 

64. Mineralogy. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of minerals introduced by the study of crystallography. 
The main purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with all 
of the important ores and rocks, and to interpret their geological 
history by their location with reference to other minerals. 

The laboratory work consists of the making by each student 
of a few representative crystal models, blow pipe W'ork, and the 
usual field tests by Avhich one may identify all except very rare 
minerals. The student is required to identify over one hundred dif- 
ferent minerals at sight. Much of the work of the course is in the 
field. 

The Chemistry Department has over two thousand labeled 
specimens all of high qualitj' representing every branch of Miner- 

50 



CATALOGUE 

alogy. The large collection of crystals illustrates every important 
type of crystal form, the garnets, felspars and spinels being especially 
well represented. These specimens offer unusual opportunity for 
study. 

Offered 1939-1940 and thereafter in alternate years. 

Methods of Teaching Chemistry (Education 412). Two hours. 
Second semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for Chemistry 
majors who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

ECONOMICS 
See Political and Social Science 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Reynolds, Associate Professor Bailey, Professor 
butterwick, and assistants 

The major aim of this department is to provide professional 
courses for those who desire to teach in junior or senior high schools. 
And in view of the fact that education is one of the most important 
concerns of society, a minor aim of the department is to acquaint 
college men and women with the varied problems of education and 
thus help give society intellectual leadership. 

For statement of requirements for those planning to enter the 
teaching profession, see pp. 77-78. 

A major in Education includes Education 124, 13, 33, 73, 82, 136-A, 
136-B, and Psychology 14, 23. 

EDUCATION 

124. Introduction to Teaching. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

An introductory course for prospective teachers, intended also to 
enable students to decide whether they have an interest in profes- 
sional education, and to introduce the citizen to the problems of 
one of the most important institutions in a democracy. It does not 
necessarily presuppose an intention on the part of the student to 
enter the teaching profession. A survey of the field based on obser- 
vation, assigned readings, and class discussions. Open to freshmen 
and sophomores only. 

123. Introduction to Teaching. Three hours. First semester. 

This course is similar to Education 124. It is an introductory 
course for students in the department of music. Juniors and seniors 
who may register for this course, will be required to do more work 
than freshmen or sophomores. 

13. History of Education. Three hours. First semester. 

An analysis of the history of education from the time of early 
Greek education to the present day. Special attention will be given to 
the aims, content, organization, and results of the educational systems 

51 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

of various countries, as well as to the great leaders of educational 
thought. 

33. Principles of Secondary Education. Three hours. Second 
semester. 

A course dealing with the high school pupils, their physical and 
mental traits, individual differences, and the make-up of the high 
school population; the secondary school as an institution, its history, 
its relation to elementary education and to higher education; social 
principles determining secondary education; the curriculum; the 
place, function, and value of the several subjects of the curriculum; 
organization and management of the high school. 

73. Philosophy of Education. Three hours. Second semester. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

This course aims to supply a basis for constructive thinking in 
the field of education. Various theories in education will be considered. 

82. Educational Measurements. Two hours. First semester. 
A critical analysis of the problems in measuring the results of teach- 
ing. A study of the uses and administration of representative tests 
and scales for junior and senior high school subjects. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 14. Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

136-A. General Methods of Teaching in High Schools. Three 
hours. May be taken in either semester. Open to seniors only, ex- 
cept by permission of the Head of the Department. 

A course dealing with high school teaching problems. Pre- 
requisites, Psychology 14 and 23. 

136-B. Practice Teaching. Three hours. May be taken in either 
semester. 

This course consists of observation, participation and teaching in 
a public high school. Assigned readings, observation reports, lesson 
plans, group and individual conferences. The work is supervised by the 
head of the department. Prerequisites: (a) Senior standing; (b) 
Education 136-A; (c) An average scholastic ranking of C or better 
for all work done in the college. A laboratory fee of $17.50 per 
semester is charged for this course. 

182. School Hygfiene. Two hours. Second semester. 

This course will deal with the place and scope of hygiene as it 
applies to education. Special problems relating to the development of 
the child, health defects, sanitation, hygiene of instruction, etc., will 
receive attention. 

RELATED COURSES IN HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS 

The following courses given by other departments may be pre- 
sented as meeting in part the requirements for a major in Education, 
or the 18 hours in Education for a State Provisional College Cer- 

52 



CATALOGUE 

tificate; and as meeting the requirements of some of the State De- 
partments of Education in the issuance of a certificate to teach: 

Note. — See the respective departments under Courses of Instruction. 

404. Methods of Teaching in Biology 

412. Methods of Teaching Chemistry 

422. Methods of Teaching English 

432. Methods of Teaching French 

442. Methods of Teaching Science 

452. Methods of Teaching German 

462. Methods of Teaching History 

472. Methods of Teaching Latin 

482. Methods of Teaching Mathematics 

PSYCHOLOGY 

03. Child and Adolescent Psychology. Three hours. Second 
semester. 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the elementary prin- 
ciples of Child and Adolescent Psychology. It emphasizes those 
phases of child life which have to do with learning and other ac- 
quired tendencies. It is an elementary course designed for students 
in the Department of Music. Lectures and discussions. 

14. General Psychology. Four hours. First semester. 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the psychological 
standpoint and with the fundamental psychological principles. It in- 
cludes a study of such topics as native tendencies, acquired tendencies, 
emotions, imagination, memory, and reasoning. Lectures, discussions, 
and laboratory work. Not open to freshmen. 

23. Educational Psychology. Three hours. Second semester. 

Designed to meet the needs of students of education who are seek- 
ing from psychology the facts and principles that have a bearing 
on their problems. Special emphasis is placed on the learning process. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 14. 

33. Social Psychology. Three hours. First semester. 
A study of mental growth and action as shown in social relation- 
ships. Prerequisite: Psychology 14. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

42. Psychology of Adolescence. Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the anatomical, physiological, and psychological changes 
characterizing adolescence; the question of motives, personality, emo- 
tions, the environment and social relations will be handled. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 14. 

52. Applied Psychology. Two hours. First semester. 

A study of the application of the psychological principles to prac- 
tical problems in the professions, in business and industry, in voca- 
tional selection and guidance, in personal efficiency. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 14 and 23. 

53 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ENGLISH 

Professor Wallace, Associate Professor Struble 
The department of English aims, first, to assist the student to write 
and speak with accuracy and effectiveness; second, to introduce him 
to the main Hterary movements in England and America, and to afford 
him a close acquaintance with a few great authors. While the 
courses outlined below are designed to provide the necessary back- 
ground for high school teaching or graduate study, their prime 
object is to direct currents of intellectual interest and to encourage 
a love of good reading. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 66, 512, 42, 52, and four additional hours 
of approved courses in literature or the history of the language. 

Those majoring in English are required to take also History 34 
(English History). 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, and six hours of electives in literature or 
the history of the language. Course 16 is prerequisite to all other 
courses in English. 

16. English Composition. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Required of all college freshmen. 

26. A Survey of English Literature. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

Required of all college sophomores. 

32. Public Speaking. One hour. Throughout the year. 

42. Eighteenth Century Prose. Two hours. First semester. 

This course is open only to college seniors. 

Lectures on literary tendencies between 1660 and 1800, with special 
attention to English life and manners of the time as reflected in 
literature. 

52. Nineteenth Century Prose. Two hours. Second semester. 
This course is open only to college seniors. 

An introduction to Nineteenth Century thought, Avith special 
attention to Carlyle, Ruskin, and Arnold. 

66. Shakespeare and Elizabethan Drama. Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A rapid survey of the drama before Shakespeare, and a closer 
study of Shakespeare's principal plays. 

113. English Activities. Three hours. 

The course is for students in the Conservatory of Music. Credits 
may not be applied to meet the requirements for a major or minor 
in English except by students in Music Education. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

132. Contemporary Drama. Two hours. Second semester. 
A survev of American and European drama since 1890. 
Offered 1939-1940. 

54 



CATALOGUE 

152. History of the English Language. Two hours. First semester. 

Historical study of English sounds, inflections, and vocabulary. 
Standards of correctness; current usage. Recommended especially 
for prospective teachers of English composition. 

162. Chaucer. Two hours. Second semester. 
Ofifered 1938-1939. 

512. Poetry of the Romantic Revolt. Two hours. First semester. 
A study of early Nineteenth Century poetry, with special attention 
to five poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats. 

524. American Literature. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

542. Recent British and American Poetry, Two hours. Second 
semester. 

Methods of Teaching English (Education 422). Two hours. Sec- 
ond semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for English majors 
who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

FRENCH 

Professors Stevenson and Green 

The aim of this department is twofold: first, to give an accurate 
and practical knowledge of the French language, which will equip 
the student for teaching French in the secondary schools; and 
second, to develop an appreciation of the French spirit, as ex- 
pressed in literature, and an understanding of the main literary 
movements of France, which will be of value in any field of literary 
activity. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, and 46 or 56. 

Latin is required of all students majoring in French. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, and 6 additional hours of advanced work. 

For entrance to French 16, the preparatory course 06 or its 
equivalent (two years of high school French) will be required. 
French 26 is a prerequisite for entrance to 36 or 46. 

06. Elementary French. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is intended for those who begin French in college. Its 
aim is to enable the student to write simple French sentences, to 
carry on a conversation in easy French, and to read French of ordi- 
nary difficulty. College credit of six semester hours will be granted 
for this course, if followed by French 16, but it cannot be counted 
toward a major. 

16. First Year College French. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 06, and includes 
further drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, 
composition, and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

55 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Candidates for this course are required to take the French Place- 
ment Test during Freshman Week, to determine the suitability of 
their preparation. 

26. French Literature of XVI and XVII Centuries. Three hours. 
Throughout the year. 

A survey of French literary history from the Renaissance to the 
end of the period of absolute Classicism. Composition and conver- 
sation. 

36. French Literature of the XVIII and XIX Centuries. Three 
hours. Throughout the year. 

A continuation of the preceding survey, beginning with the Quarrel 
of the Ancients and Moderns. Composition and conversation. Course 
26 is prerequisite to this course. 

46. The French Novel, Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the development of this genre in France, special atten- 
tion being given to the later XIX Century and contemporary novels. 
Composition and conversation. Courses 26 and 36 are prerequisite 
to this course. Offered 1939-1940. 

56. French Drama. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the evolution of the drama in France v^^ith extensive 
reading of XVII, XVIII, and XIX Century plays. Composition and 
conversation. 

Courses 26 and 36 are prerequisite to this course. Offered 1938-1939. 

Methods of Teaching French (Education 432). Two hours. Second 
semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for French 
majors who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Light 

14. Historical Geology. Four hours. Second semester. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

A general course in historical and structural geology giving atten- 
tion to the processes and dynamic agencies by which the crust of 
the earth has been formed and evolved into its present condition, 
with special attention to the fossil remains of plants and animals 
therein contained. The course includes lectures and discussions and 
laboratory and field studies of material. 

Laboratory fee eight dollars. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

GERMAN 

Professor Lietzau 

The immediate aim of this department is to give a thorough 
preparation in German; that is, a ready and accurate reading knowl- 

56 



CATALOGUE 

edge of the language, as well as a satisfactory degree of proficiency 
in written and spoken German. The larger aim is to give a broader 
survey of the German language, literature, history, and civilization 
that will fully equal in cultural and informational value any course 
in English literature. 

Courses are conducted in German, 

Major: 24 semester hours, exclusive of German 06. 

Minor: 18 semester hours. 

Correlative: Courses in history, the literature of another language, 
political science, economics, philosophy, music, or art, furnish a back- 
ground or basis of comparison for work in German. 

I. Introduction 

06. Elementary German. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Intended to give students a reading knowledge of German of 
average difficulty, and to enable them to understand the spoken 
language and to express simple ideas idiomatically. 

College credit of six semester hours will be granted for this course 
only if followed by German 16. 

II. Intermediate 

16-A. "Kulturkunde." Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The making of modern Germany, its geography, its institutions, 
its social and artistic life, illustrated by maps, pictures, and readings 
from contemporary literature. This course is not only a preparation 
for the study of German literature but is intended also for those 
who wish to use German as a tool for advanced work in science 
and other fields. 

16-B. Scientific German. Translation course for students special- 
izing in science, particularly for students of medicine and chemistry. 

26. Introduction to German Literature. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

Outline of the history of German literature. Reading of selected 
dramas and poems of Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, etc. Grammar and 
composition. 

III. Advanced 

36. Nineteenth Century Drama. Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

Special study of Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, Keller, Ibsen, Haupt- 
mann; their relation to classic and romantic art, and to the social 
and philosophical problems of the century. Alternate years. 

Offered 1937-1938. 

46. The German Novel and Short Story. Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

57 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Theory and development of the novel and short story with special 
emphasis on the Nineteenth Century. Alternate years. 

56. Goethe. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A study of Goethe's life, of his lyrics, ballads, dramas, prose works. 
Prerequisite: German 26. Offered 1938-1939. 

Methods of Teaching German (Education 452). Two hours. Second 
semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for German 
majors who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

GREEK 

Professor Richie 

The objectives of courses in classical Greek are to obtain a mastery 
of the basic elements of the language, to secure facility in reading, 
and to acquire an appreciation of the civilization of ancient Greece 
and its contribution to modern institutions. The courses in the New 
Testament and Patristics are designed to procure efficiency in the 
handling of the original sources, to acquaint the student with the 
peculiarities of Koine Greek and with the textual problems, and to 
prepare for the pursuance of further advanced studies in the seminary 
and university. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, 36, or 46 or 56. 

16. Elementary Greek. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Study of forms and syntax, with easy prose composition. Selec- 
tions from Xenophon's Anabasis. This course is intended for stu- 
dents who enter college with no Greek. 

26. First Year Greek. Three hours. Througliout the year. 

Xenophon: The Anabasis; selections previously unread. Homer: 
selections from the Iliad; scansion and epic poetry. Herodotus: 
selections from several of the books. 

33-A. Philosophy. Three hours. First semester. 
Plato: The Apology of Socrates. Xenophon: Selections from the 
Memorabilia. Lectures on Greek philosophy from Thales to Plato. 

33-B. Drama. Three hours. Second semester. 

Selections will be read from the tragedies of Aeschylus and 
Sophocles. Lectures on the Greek drama and its influence. Pre- 
requisite: Greek 16 and 26. 

46. Readings from the Book of Acts and the General Epistles. 
Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Prerequisite: Greek 16 and 26. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

56. The Gospel according to John and Selected Readings. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Prerequisite: Greek 16 and 26. 

58 



CATALOGUE 

66. Patristics. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Seminar — Open to seniors. 

The Shepherd of Hermas will be read in the first semester; Justin 
Martyr during the second semester. 

HISTORY 

Professors Stevenson, Shenk, Butterwick, and Gingrich 

The aim of the Department of History is that the student shall 
acquire from his study of the past a truer and more comprehensive 
view^ of the world in which he lives. 

Major: Courses 16, 46, and additional courses amounting to 12 
semester hours. 

Minor: Courses 26 or 46 and additional courses amounting to 12 
semester hours. 

16. Ancient History. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The first semester will be devoted to the history of the Ancient 
Orient and Greece, the second semester to the history of Rome. 
Stress will be placed on the cultural contributions of the Ancient 
World. 

Not offered 1938-1939. 

146. European History Survey. Three hours. Throughout the 
year. 

This course deals broadly with the development of European So- 
ciety and Culture from the fall of the Roman Empire to the pres- 
ent. It is designed to serve as a background for later specialized 
courses in European History for students majoring in History or 
as a cultural background for students majoring in other subjects. 

126. Medieval Institutions. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Political, social, and cultural ideas of the late Middle Ages will 
be treated through a study of typical institutions such as the manor, 
guilds, courts, monarchical institutions, the church, and the univer- 
sities. In the second semester the rise of modern institutions in 
the period of the Renaissance and Reformation will be studied. 

26-A. European History from the Reformation to 1815. Three 
hours. Throughout the year. 

The first semester of the course will deal with the transition from 
medieval to modern times in the field of economic and political or- 
ganization, and the social and intellectual developments which form 
the background to the study of the French Revolution. 

The second semester will be devoted to the period of the French 
Revolution and Napoleon with attention primarily to the internal 
history of France in the period 1789-1815. 

Dr. Stevenson 

59 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

26-B. European History from 1815, to the Present. Three hours. 
Throughout the year. 

The first semester will be devoted to the study of political and 
economic developments in Europe from 1815 to 1914. 

The second semester will deal with the period of the World War 
and post-war European and World Problems. 

Throughout the year considerable attention will be given to Cur- 
rent History. 

Dr. Stevenson 

36-A. English History. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Political and Social History of England from the earliest time 
to the present. 

Dr. Stevenson 

34-B. Historical Source Problems. Two hours. Throughout the 
year. 

The period of the French Revolution will be studied. The course 
is designed as an introduction to the methods of historical research. 

42. American Biography. One hour. Throughout the year. 

A study of the achievements of American men and women who 
typify important social and political trends. 

For the year 1938-1939 the selections will be made from the period 
from 1800-1861. 

Dr. Shenk 

46-A. Political and Social History of the United States. Three 
hours. Throughout the year. 

A general survey of American History with particular attention 
to social and cultural trends. 

Dr. Butterwick 

46-B. History of the United States from the Civil War. Three 
hours. Throughout the year. 

History of the United States since the Civil War. A study of the 
economical, political, and diplomatic history of the United States 
from 1865 to the present time. 

Dr. Shenk 

44-C. Source Problems in American History. Two hours. 
Throughout the year. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the use of source 
material and the methods of historical research. 

For 1938-1939, the topics for investigation will be taken from the 
period between 1815 and 1865. 

Dr. Sbenk 

64. Economic History of the United States. Two hours. Through- 
out the year. 

60 



CATALOGUE 

A study of the economic background of American History includ- 
ing the growth of American agricuhural and industrial interests, 
from colonial beginnings to their present day development. 

Professor Gingrich 

113. History of Civilization. Three hours. Second semester. 

A general survey of the whole field of history. Particular attention 
will be given to economic, social, religious, and cultural development. 
Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Music Education. 

Dr. Shenk 

Methods of Teaching History (Education 462). Two hours. Second 
semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for History 
majors who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

LATIN 

Professor Stonecipher 

The purpose of the Latin department is two-fold, professional and 
cultural. 

Professionally, its design is to give proper training to prospective 
teachers of the secondary schools and to lay the foundation for the 
higher professional training of the university. 

Culturally, it is intended to introduce the student to the field of 
Latin literature, and through it to those elements of Graeco-Roman 
culture upon which modern civilization is largely based. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, 46, 64. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, 64. 

16. Freshman Latin. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The reading of Sallust's Catiline, Cicero's De Senectuie or De Amicitia, 
and selections from Pliny's Letters. Study of syntax from text and 
grammar; Roman life and institutions; graded exercises in prose 
composition. 

Latin 16 is required of French majors. 

26. Readings from Livy, Horace, and Catullus. Three hours. 
Throughout the year. 

Study of syntax, style, and the history of Latin literature. Latin 
16 prerequisite. 

33-A. Seneca. Three hours, First semester. 

Selections from the Epistulae Morales; study of style; Roman philo- 
sophic thought. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

Oflfered 1938-1939 and thereafter in alternate years. 

33-B. Vergil. Three hours. Second semester. 
Readings from Books VII-XII of the Aeneid and other works of 
Vergil. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

Offered 1938-1939 and thereafter in alternate years. 

61 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

43-A. Cicero. Three hours. First semester. 

Selections from his Letters; study of Cicero's h'fe as reflected in 
his correspondence. Latin 26 prerequisite. OflFered in alternate years. 
Offered 1939-1940 and thereafter in alternate years. 

43-B. Mediaeval Latin. Three hours. Second semester. 

Such readings are selected from this field as to acquaint the student 
with the development of the Latin language and literature after the 
classical period. Latin 26 prerequisite. Offered in alternate years. 

Offered 1939-1940 and thereafter in alternate years. 

64. Latin Composition. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Graded exercises in prose composition, attention also being given 
to correct pronunciation and oral expression. Required in majors 
and minors. 

Offered 1939-1940 and thereafter in alternate years. 

Methods of Teaching Latin (Education 472). Two hours. First 
semester. 

An elective course in Education designed primarily for Latin 
majors who are preparing to teach in secondary schools. 

Offered 1938-1939 and thereafter in alternate years. 



MATHEMATICS 

Professors Wagner, Black, and Grimm 
Major: Courses 13, 23 or 24, 36, 46, 56, 74, and 84. 

Minor: Courses 13, 23 or 24, 36, and any additional six semester 
hours. 

A major in Mathematics may lead to either the B.S. or A.B. 
degree. If the B.S. is desired, the candidate must take the General 
Requirements for that degree (see page 40), and must select as his 
minor either Biology, Chemistry, or Physics. 

If the A.B. is desired, the candidate must take the General Re- 
quirements for that degree (see p. 40), and may take his minor in 
any department other than those named in the preceding paragraph. 

Courses 13 and 23 are not open to upper-classmen without special 
permission. 

13. Advanced Algebra. Three hours. First semester. 

Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permuta- 
tions and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 

23. Plane Trigonometry. Three hours. Second semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, goniometry, right and 
oblique triangles, computation of distances and heights, development 
of trigonometric formulae. , , 

62 



CATALOGUE 

24. Spherical Trigonometry. Four hours. Second semester. 

Definitions of trigonometric functions, right and oblique triangles, 
measuring angles to compute distances and heights, development of 
trigonometric formulae, solution of right and oblique spherical tri- 
angles, applications to Astronomy. 

113. Introduction to the Mathematics of Finance. Three hours. 
First semester. 

This course takes up the solution of the quadratic equation, 
logarithms, progressions, permutations and combinations, and the 
application of these to financial problems. 

123. Mathematics of Finance. Three hours. Second semester. 

The course seeks to present the mathematical principles and 
operations used in financial work. A detailed studj'^ of compound 
interest, compound discount, and annuities is undertaken. Appli- 
cation of these principles is then made to practical problems of 
amortization, sinking funds, depreciation, valuations of bonds, and 
building and loan associations. 

36. Analytic Geometry. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and 
hyperbola are studied, numerous examples solved, and as much of 
the higher plane curves and of the geometry of space is covered as 
time will permit. 

46. Differential and Integral Calculus. Three hours. Throughout 
the year. 

Diflferentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima 
and minima, development into series, etc. Integrations, rectification 
of curves, quadrature of surfaces, cubature of solids, etc. 

56. Advanced Calculus. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A continuation of Mathematics 46, this course is required of all 
candidates majoring in Mathematics. 

63. Plane Surveying. Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting 
and drafting, leveling, etc. 

74. Differential Equations. Two hours. Throughout the year. 
A course in the elements of differential equations. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 46. 

84. Analytic Mechanics. Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Resolution of forces, two and three force pieces, center of gravity, 
acceleration, moment of inertia, friction. 

94. Projective Geometry. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is a synthetic treatment of the elements of projective 
geometry. A knowledge of elementary analytic geometry is pre- 
supposed on the part of the student. 

63 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

MUSIC 

Miss Gillespie, Miss Mover, AIr. Rutledge 

Minor: Twenty semester hours, of which at least four hours must 
be in applied music. The selection of courses must be supervised and 
approved by the Music Department adviser. 

Courses in applied music will not be credited toward any degree 
except the Bachelor of Science in Music, unless they are taken as 
part of a full minor in music. 

For courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education and Bachelor of Alusic see pages 79, 82. 

The following courses may be taken as electives for credit toward 
any degree conferred by the college: 

11, 12, 13. Sight Reading. Three hours per week each. One and 
one-half hours credit each. 

Beginning with 11, singing simple melodies, simple part singing, 
and unaltered intervals, the course continues through 12 and 13, be- 
coming increasingly difficult in each phase, culminating in oratorio 
singing. 

21. Dictation. Three hours per week. One and one-half hours 
credit. 

Dictation of intervals and melodies. 

22. Dictation. Three hours per week. One and one-half hours 
credit. 

Continued dictation of intervals and melodies, with addition of 
modulations and harmonic dictation. 

23. Dictation. Three hours per week. One and one-half hours 
credit. 

Addition of Chromatic dictation. 

313. Harmony. Three hours. 

Fundamentals of music notation, both tonal and rhythmic. Be- 
ginning written four part harmony, including simple triads. 

323. Harmony. Three hours. 

Inversions of simple triads, seventh chord and its inversions. 
Original work. 

333. Harmony. Three hours. 

Continued inversions of the seventh chord, chromatic harmony 
and modulations. Original work. 

342. Keyboard Harmony. Two hours. 

Harmonization of melodies and transposition at the piano. 

352. Harmony: Musical Form and Analysis. Two hours. 

64 



CATALOGUE 

Study of the form of music from the figure and motive to the 
sonata form. Includes constant analysis of standard music. 

363. Harmony. Three hours. 

Original compositions in various vocal and instrumental forms. 

372. Harmony: Counterpoint. Tw^o hours. 

Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part 
Counterpoint.) 

553. History of Music. Three hours. 

History of music from the beginning of time to the Romantic 
Period. 

563. History of Music. Three hours. 

A study of music from the Romantic Period to the present day. 

61 and 62. Chorus. 

N. B. No student may receive credit for chorus work more than 
once. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Professor Butterwick 

Philosophy concerns itself with spiritual values and the relation 
of these values to the problems of life. The paramount function of 
courses in philosophy is to correlate spiritual values with scientific 
and all other curricular values in so far as they touch the problems 
of life. 

Major: Philosophy 02, 12. 26, 43, 53, 112, Bible 26. 

Minor: Philosophy 02, 12, 26, 43, 53, 112. 

02. Introduction to Philosophy. Two hours. First semester. 

This course is intended to introduce beginners to the basic prob- 
lems and theories of Philosophy and quicken them to some apprecia- 
tion of the role played by philosophy in the whole movement of 
civilization, while at the same time giving them at least an inkling 
of the work of the greatest thinkers and arousing in them a desire 
to go to the sources. 

12. Inductive and Deductive Logic. Two hours. Second semester. 

Open to juniors. 

This course is intended to furnish the student with a knowledge of 
the laws of correct thinking, the purpose and place of the syl- 
logism in the processes of thinking, and the detection of fallacies in 
thinking. 

26. History of Philosophy. Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

In this course the aim will be (1) to trace the development of 
Philosophy, pointing out what of permanent value each system as 

65 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

it arose contributed toward a final solution of the nature of being, 
and (2) to show the interaction between philosophic thought and 
the practical life of the period during which it flourished. 

32. Ethics. Second semester. Two hours. 

Open to juniors and seniors. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the academic 
ethical problems, and to effect an awakening and a strengthening 
of the moral sense. 

43. Psychology of Religion. Three hours. First semester. 

The growth of religion in the life of the individual is subject to 
certain psychological laws. This course seeks to acquaint the stu- 
dent with such laws so as to facilitate religious growth. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

53. Philosophy of Religfion. Three hours. Second semester. 

The purpose of this course is to properly correlate scientific and 
philosophic truths with religion. The same truths permeate all fields 
of knowledge. Conflicts of truth do not exist. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

102. The History of Religion. Two hours. First semester. 

Open to juniors and seniors. 

This course is intended to provide the student with the facts con- 
cerning the rise and development of religion in general. The his- 
torical point of view is adhered to throughout. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

112. The Religfion of the Hebrews. Two hours. Second semester. 

Open to juniors and seniors. 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a com- 
prehensive view of the rise and development of the Hebrew religion 
as set forth in the Bible and contemporaneous literature. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jerome W. Frock, Director of Physical Education for Men, and 
Coach ; Emerson Metoxen, Assistant Director of Physical 
Education for Men, and Assistant Coach ; Esther Hender- 
son, Director of Physical Education for Women; 
Miss Wood 

The aim of the work in this department is to promote the general 
physical well being of the students, and to assist them to gain the 
hygienic, corrective, and educative effect of rightly regulated exercise. 

In order that this object may be better attained, and to assist the 
director in gaining a definite knowledge of the strength and weak- 
ness of the individual, a careful physical examination and medical 
inspection is required, which serves as a basis for the work. 

66 



CATALOGUE 

It is strongly recommended that before entering college each 
student undergo a thorough visual examination and be fitted with 
glasses, if there is a need for them. 

The Health Laws of the State of Pennsylvania require successful 
vaccination against smallpox before one may enter private, parochial, 
or public schools as a student. 

All first year students are required to attend a course of lectures in 
Personal and Sex Hygiene, given once a w^eek for one year. 

All freshmen and sophomores are required to take tw^o hours of 
Physical Education a week throughout the year, for which one 
semester hour's credit will be given each semester. 

12. Hygfiene. One hour. Throughout the year. 

Required of all freshmen. 

The aim of the course is to bring to the attention of the student 
early in the college course some of the common pitfalls in the path 
of health and the methods of avoiding them, as well as to train him 
for leadership in community health improvement. 

The course consists of lectures, readings, and discussions relative 
to the maintenance of health. 



Courses for Men 
12. For Freshmen. Two hours per week. Throughout the year. 
Instruction and practice in such games as hand-ball, volley-ball, 
tumbling, and gymnastics. 

21-A. For Sophomores. Two hours per week. First semester. 

Instruction and practice in such games and sports as touch-ball, 
soccer, volley-ball, speed-ball, tennis; and in the fundamentals of 
boxing, basket-ball, hand-ball, tumbling, and gymnastics. 

21-B. For Sophomores. Two hours per week. Second semester. 
Instruction and practice in such games and sports as basket-ball, 
boxing, hand-ball, soft-ball, and tennis. 

Intramural Sports. 

Inter-class games are provided for dormitory students and day 
students. 

Courses for Women 

First semester. Two hours. 

Instruction and practice in such sports and games as hockey, 
soccer, tennis, archery, handball, and in the fundamentals of basket 
ball. 

Second semester. Two hours. 

Instruction and practice in such sports as basket ball, volley ball, 
badminton, baseball, track, archery, tennis, and quoits. Instruction and 

67 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

practice in folk, national, character, and interpretative dancing. 
Instruction and practice in games, tumbling, stunts, and natural 
gymnastics. 

Hiking — The whole year. 

Organized hikes for all women who wish to participate. 

Intramural Sports. 

Inter-class games are provided in all sports such as hockey, soccer, 
basket ball, volley ball, and indoor baseball. 

A short seasonal schedule of games in field hockey and basket ball 
is arranged to be played with other colleges. An honor team is 
chosen for these games. 

Students are required to provide themselves with gymnasium 
suits. Do not purchase suit until arrival at college. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm 
Major: Physics 18, 24, 34, 44, 54, Mathematics 84. 
Minor: Physics 18 and any eight additional semester hours. 

18. General Physics. Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three hours lectures and recitations, and four hours laboratory 
work per week. 

The course will be a thorough investigation of the fundamental 
principles of physical science, and is especially intended as a prepa- 
ration for Physics 2, 3, and 4, and for those interested in the practical 
applications of physical laws and principles. 

Laboratory hours: Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. 

24. Advanced Physics — Mechanics. Four hours. First semester. 
This course will be a thorough investigation of the mechanics of 
solids, liquids, gases, and sound. 
Offered 1939-1940. 

34. Advanced Physics — Electricity and Magnetism. Four hours 
Second semester. 

This course will be a thorough consideration of the laws of the 
electric and maLrnetic fields and the power applications of electricity. 

OflFered 1939-1940. 

44. Advanced Physics — Heat and Light. Four hours. First 
semester. 

This course will be concerned with the nature of heat and light and 
the transmission of each through various media including reflection, 
refraction, and dispersion. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

68 



CATALOGUE 

54. Molecular Physics. Four hours. Second semester. 
An investigation of the application of physical principles to molecu- 
lar, atomic, and electronic phenomena. 

The Calcukis will be a very great aid in these courses. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

Drawing 13. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. Three hours. First 
semester. 

Use of instruments, construction of geometric figures, projection 
of simple solids, simple sections and development of surfaces, letter- 
ing, sketching, tracing, blue printing. 

The college will provide the usual drawing tables, etc., and 
the student will provide his own drawing instruments. 

POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Gingrich, Professor Stokes, Miss Wood 

The aim of the department is to prepare students for citizenship 
by acquainting them with the principles and problems of human 
associations within the several fields of specialized study. The 
courses are intended to be utilitarian as well as cultural. 

Major: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16, Political 
Science 42 and 52, and 2 hours of approved electives. 

Minor: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16. 



ECONOMICS 

16. Economic Theory. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course dealing with the fundamental principles of economics. 
One hour a week in seminar groups is given to the discussion of 
Economic problems. Books recommended : Adam Smith, IVealth of 
Nations; Marshall, Principles of Economics and Industry and Trade; 
Fisher, Elementary Economics ; Taussig, Principles of Economics; Edie, 
Principles and Problems; Fairchild, Furniss, and Buck, Elementary 
Economics ; Bye, Principles of Econoviics ; Gemmill and Blodgett, 
Economics, Principles and Problems; Mitchell, Busi)iess Cycles. 

26. Business Law. Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course dealing with the elementary principles of law generally 
related to the field of business, including Contracts, Agency, Sales, 
Bailments, Insurance, and Negotiable Instruments. 

33. Money and Banking. Three hours. One semester. 

This course deals with: the nature and functions of money, mone- 
tary standards and systems, monetary development in the United 
States, the National banking system, the structure and functions of 
the Federal Reserve System, commercial banking, credit and its 
uses, credit control, monetary policy and the business cycle, cen- 

69 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

tral banks, investment banking, savings banks, consumptive credit 
institutions, agricultural credit. 

43. Advanced Economic Theory. Three hours. One semester. 

A course dealing with the evolution of economic thought through 
the principal schools from the Physiocrats to the present, giving 
special attention to the analysis of current theories of value, interest, 
rent, and wages. 

Books recommended: Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations; Malthus, Essay 
on Population : Ricardo, Principles of Political Economy; J. S. Mill, 
Principles of Political Economy; Marx, Capital; Bohm Bawerk, Capital 
and Interest, and The Positive Theory of Capital ; Gide and Rist, History 
(if Economic Doctrines ; Haney, History of Economic Thought; Homan, 
Contemporary Economic Thought; Gray, The Development of Econoynic 
Doctrines. 

This course is open to all students who have had Economics 16. 

73. Contemporary Economic Problems. Three hours. One 
semester. 

This course is for Junior and Senior students who have had the 
course in Economic Theory. The course will be conducted largely 
through seminar discussions, readings and papers on current eco- 
nomic problems. The course is designed to enable the student to 
apply the principles of Economic Theory toward the solution of 
current problems and to develop the power of critical analysis. 

136. Economic History of Europe. Three hours. One semester. 

The course deals with the economic achievements in Europe from 
pre-literary times to the present; Economic life in the Mediterranean 
Basin in Classical times; the foundations of economic life in the 
Middle Ages; the Manorial system and agrarian society; the towns, 
trade, and industry in the Middle Ages; the expansion of Europe 
and the age of discovery; the Industrial Revolution and the begin- 
nings of modern industry and agriculture; Capitalism and commer- 
cial policies in the early modern period; revolution in power, trans- 
portation and communication; Economic imperialism and the World 
War; The Post- War World. 

Economic Services and Periodicals 

Students of the department are expected to make liberal use of 
the following economic services and periodicals which have been 
placed in the College Library: The Annalist, The JVall .Street Journal, 
The Financial and Commercial Chronicle. Harz'ard Business Rcviczv. 
Reviczv of Economic Statistics. Suri'cy of Current Business, Business 
Week, Magazine of Wall Street, Magazine of Business, Labor Reviez<.', 
Printer's Ink, Commerce Reports, Federal Reserve Bulletin, The Ameri- 
can Economic Reviezv, Forbes, The Annals of The American Academy 
of Political and Social Science, Poor's Economic Service, Alexander 
Federal Tax .Service. 

70 



CATALOGUE 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

13. American Government. Three hours. Second semester. 

An elective course for the accommodation of students who are 
unable to complete the more extensive course in American Govern- 
ment and Politics. A required course for Conservatory students en- 
rolled in the Music Education course. 

16. American Government and Politics. Three hours. Through- 
out the year. 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of 
the fundamental laws of Federal and State Government. Much 
time is given to the study of leading cases. 

42. Political Theory. Two hours. Second semester. 

A survey of the different theories and philosophies of government, 
ancient and modern, with particular reference to those discussed 
currently in the United States. 

Offered 1939-1940. 

52. Foreign Relations. Two hours. First semester. 
A study of the history and development of world politics with 
special emphasis placed upon foreign relations of the United States. 
Offered 1938-1939. 

63. Comparative Government. Three hours. One semester. 

A comparative study of the most important governmental systems 
of the world, emphasizing especially the differences between federal 
and unitary government. Special attention will be given to the gov- 
ernments of the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, 
South Africa, the Irish Free State, France, Germany, Switzerland, 
and Russia. 

72. The United States and Latin America. Two hours. First 
semester. 

A survey of the diplomatic and commercial relations between the 
United States and Latin American countries. 
Offered 1939-1940. 

114. Law. Two hours. Throughout the year. 

An orientation course in the general field of law and procedure, 
touching the following subjects, viz.: Business Associations, Real 
Property, Liens, Leases, Mortgages, Wills, Workmen's Compensa- 
tion, Insurance. 

SOCIOLOGY 
13. Principles of Sociology. Three hours. First semester. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the various 
theories of society together with the place of Sociology in the 
general field of learning. 

71 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
23. Modem Social Problems. Three hours. Second semester. 

32. Criminology. Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the causes of crime and the treatment of criminals; 
criminal behavior; the police system and the criminal courts; treat- 
ment of juvenile offenders; punishment, probation, parole, and re- 
form. Observation and criticism of social agencies dealing with the 
crime problem is required. 

Offered 1938-1939. 

PSYCHOLOGY 
See Education and Psychology 



SUMMER, EXTENSION, AND SATURDAY AND EVENING 

SCHOOLS 

In addition to the work offered during the regular class periods, the 
college offers fully accredited work under three additional schedules 
as follows: Summer School, Extension School, Saturday and Even- 
ing School. 

Persons interested in any of these schedules should apply to the 
Registrar for the special bulletin pertaining thereto. 



72 



special Plans of Study in Preparation for 
Professions 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Adviser: Professor Stokes 

Plan of course leading to the degree of B. S. in Bus. Ad. 
. Hours 

First Year Credit 

Hygiene 12 2 

Chemistry 18, or Physics 18, or Biology 18 8 

Economic Geography 4 

*Mathematics 13 and 23, or Mathematics 113 and 123 6 

English 16 6 

French 16, or German 16 6 

32 
Second Year 

Bible 14 4 

Economics 16 6 

Principles of Accounting 6 

English 26 6 

Political Science 16 6 

Statistics 3 

Electives 2 

Third Year 

History 36 6 

Economics 26 (Business Law) 6 

Money and Banking 3 

Marketing 3 

History 64 (Economic History of the United States) 4 

Political Science 43 3 

Electives § 

33 
Students may elect from the following: Advanced Accounting; 

Public Finance; Labor Problems; Psychology; Political Science 63; 

Economic History of Europe; Contemporary Economic Problems. 

Fourth Year 

Transportation (Rail) 3 

Corporation Finance and Investments o 

Business Administration 3 

Political Science 6 

Bible 52 or 82 and Ethics 4 

Electives L^ 

32 

Students may elect from the following: Water and Motor Trans- 
portation; History of Economic Thought; Insurance; any elective 
not taken in third year. 

• All women students registered in the department are required to take Mathe- 
matics 13 and 23. 

All students are required to take Physical Education the first two years. 

73 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

PRE-MEDICAL 

Advisers : Dr. Derickson and Dr. Bender 

The following courses of study are outlined for those desiring to 
qualify for admission to medical schools. 

The work outlined for the two-year course includes the subjects 
specified by the Bureau of Professional Education of the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Public Instruction as the minimum require- 
ment for admission to any medical school. 

The four-year course includes all of the subjects required for 
admission to the medical schools which require a collegiate degree 
for admission and fulfills the requirements of the College for the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The student ranks as a Pre-Medical 
Major. 

The student should maintain a standard of not less than "B" in all 
required courses in order to obtain the recommendation of the col- 
lege for admission to a medical school. 

In addition to the courses outlined the student is advised to read 
the following: 

Locy, Biology and its Makers; Stieglitz, Chemistry in Medicine; 
Mendel, Nutrition: The Chemistry of Life; Garrison, History of 

Medicine. 

Current Biological Literature including Journals of Wistar Insti- 
tute of Anatomy and Biology. 

Bio-Chemistry by such authors as Bodansky, Hawk, Gortner. 

Four-Year Course 

First Year Hours per week Second Year Hours per week 

Bible 14 2 Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 18 4 Chemistry 28 4 

English 16 3 English 26 3 

French 16 or Psychology 14 4 

♦German 16 3 Physical Education 1 

Mathematics 13 and 23 . . 3 Elective 2 

Hygiene 1 ,0 

Physical Education 1 

17 

Third Year Hours per week Fourth Year Hours per week 

Biology 48 4 Biology S4-A, 94 or 54-B ... 4 

Economics 16 or Chemistry 48 4 

Sociology 13 and 23 3 History 46 3 

Physics 18 4 Bible 52 or 82, and 

Elective 5 Philosophy 32 2 

■ Elective 2 

15 



16 



A few medical schools require both French and German. 

74 



CATALOGUE 



First Year Hours per week 

Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 18 4 



Two-Year Course 

Second Year 
Biology 48 or 54-A and 94. 



English 16 
French 16 or 

German 16 

Mathematics 13 and 23 



3 

3 
3 

17 



Chemistry 41 
Psychology 
Physics 18. 



14 



Hours per week 

4 

4 
4 
4 



16 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Adznser: Dr. Richie 

The following course is designed for students planning to enter 
the Christian Ministry: 
First Year Hours Credit 

Bible 14 4 

English 16 6 

French 16 or German 16.. 6 

Greek 16 6 

Hygiene 12 2 

Physical Education 2 

♦Elective 8 



34 

Second Year 

Bible 26 6 

English 26 6 



Greek 26 

One of: 

Biology 18 or 
Chemistry 18 or 
Physics 18 

Physical Education 

Elective 



Third Year 


Hours 


Credit 


Bible 32 & 42 






. 4 


Greek 46 or 56. . . . 






. 6 


Psychology 14 & ; 


33 




7 


One of: 








Philosophy 26 or 








Economics 16 or 








Political Science 


16 


or 




Sociology 13 & 


23 




. 6 


Elective 










2 
6 

34 



32 
Fourth Year 

Bible 52 or 82 2 

Bible 62 & 72 4 

History 46 or 26 or 36 . . 6 

Philosophy 32 2 

Elective 16 



30 



Students are advised to elect such courses in Philosophy, History, 
Science, Social Science, English, Economics, and Education as will 
give a thorough, basic preparation for the advanced studies offered 
by the theological seminaries. 



Electives must be rfovcrncd by A.T>. rcquircmcnl - 

75 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SOCIAL SERVICE 

Adviser: Miss Wood 

The following is a suggested curriculum for students planning to 
enter social service work. 

Hours a week 
1st Sem. 2d Sera. 



Freshman Year 

English 16 

French 06 or 16; or German 06 or 

From the following 8 or 9 hours: 

Bible 14 

Biology 18 

Chemistry 18 

Education 124 

Greek 16 

History 16 

Latin 16 

Mathematics 13 and 23 

Hygiene 12 

Physical Education 

Sophomore Year 

English 26 

Psychology 14 

Sociology 13 and 23 

Public Speaking (Eng. 32) 

*Biology 18 

*French 16 or German 16 . . 

♦Bible 14 

Physical Education 

Electives (see below) 

Junior Year 

Political Science 16 

Economics 16 

Psychology 33 

Electives (see below) 

Senior Year 

Bible 52 or 82 

Philosophy 32 

History 46 

Bus. Administration 163 . . 
Electives (see below) 



16. 



Electives 



Bible 32 

Bible 62 

Bible 72 

Biology 64 

Bus. Administration 63 

Bus. Administration 103 

Economics 26 

Education 13 

Education 82 



Sociology 32 



English 132 
History 26 
History 64 
History 113 
Philosophy 102 
Political Science 52 
Psychology 23 
Psychology 42 
Psychology 52 



If not taken in Freshman year. 



8 or 9 8 or 9 



76 



CATALOGUE 

TEACHING 

Adviser: Dr. Reynolds 

The courses of the department of Education and Psychology have 
been planned with special reference to the requirements of the State 
of Pennsylvania. Students who for any reason wish to teach in 
other states, should early consult with the head of the department 
in the selection of courses to meet the requirements of such states. 
The Pennsylvania State Council of Education has approved the 
following regulations for the College Provisional Certificate: 

This certificate entitles the holder to teach for three years in any 
public high school of the Commonwealth the subjects indicated on 
its face, and to teach in the elementary field where the applicant is 
a holder of a certificate for teaching in this field or has completed 
an approved curriculum in preparation for teaching in such field. 

The applicant for this certificate must be a graduate of an ap- 
proved college or university and must have successfully completed 
at least eighteen semester hours of work of college grade in educa- 
tion distributed as follows: 

Introduction to Teaching 3 semester hours 

Educational Psychology (General 

Psychology is a prerequisite) 3 semester hours 

Practice Teaching in the Appropriate 

Field 6 semester hours 

Electives in Education selected from 

the following list 6 semester hours 

Secondary Education Educational Sociology 

Elementary Education Educational Systems 

School Efficiency History of Education 

Special Methods Principles of Education 

School Hygiene Educational Psychology 

Educational Administration Technique of Teaching 
Educational Measurements 

The practice teaching requirement may be met by taking Educa- 
tion 136-A and Education 136-B. 

Three years of successful teaching experience in the field in which 
certification is sought, together with a teaching rating of "middle" 
or better, may be accepted as the equivalent of the practice teaching 
requirement. 

The holder of the State Provisional College Certificate is certi- 
fied to teach subjects in which not fewer than eighteen semester hours 
have been completed. 

In order to meet these requirements, students of the college who 
are candidates for the A.B. or B.S. degree are advised to do their 
major and minor work in subjects which are ordinarily taught in 
the public schools. They should, furthermore, register for Educa- 

n 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

tion 124 or 123, Psychology 14, Psychology 23, Education 13, Edu- 
cation 33, Education 136A, Education 136B, and a course in methods 
of teaching their major subject. The last named course should pre- 
cede Education 136B or parallel it. 

Those students desiring a major in Education should, in addition 
to the above courses, register for Education 82 and 73. In addition 
to the above it is highly desirable that students preparing to teach 
in our secondary schools should register for Psychology 42 (the 
Psychology of Adolescence). Wherever possible, the work in edu- 
cation should be started in the freshman year. 

By action of the Department of Public Instruction, in October, 
1923: "The six semester hours of practice teaching may be met by 
three semester hours of actual classroom experience in observation, 
participation and practice teaching under approved supervision and 
three semester hours of methodology or administration related to 
this experience." 

To those who are preparing for work in Education as a profes- 
sion, and who desire to make a more complete preparation than the 
minimum required by the State, a major in Education leading to 
the B.S. degree is offered. For this, courses in Education or Educa- 
tional Psychology totaling twenty-four semester hours are required, 
and in addition two minors, chosen from related fields, of eighteen 
semester hours each. 

The residence requirements for this degree may be met either by 
spending a full year in actual residence or by earning 30 semester 
hours in residence either during the Summer School or during the 
regular academic year. The student should consult pages 40, 51 for 
the regular requirements for the degree. 

Students whose college work falls below the median grade of 
the college are strongly advised not to consider education as a pro- 
fession. Such students are not barred from attempting to secure 
certification, but will be admitted to courses in education of senior 
standing with reluctance on the part of the head of the department 
and in individual cases may be refused recommendation. 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

In order to give students the benefit of calls that are received 
for teachers and to render greater assistance in finding employment, 
the College provides for a Placement Bureau to keep on file rec- 
ords of students with their credentials for those who desire it. For 
registration with the bureau a fee of one dollar is charged. 

The Placement Bureau of the College cooperates with the Place- 
ment Service, Teacher Bureau, of the Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, thus offering additional facilities for 
the placement of graduates of this institution. 



78 



The Conservatory of Music 

Miss Gillespie, Mrs. Bender, Mr. Campbell, Mr. Crawford, 

Mr. Malsh, Miss Mover, Mr. Rutledge, Miss Miller, 

Mr. Carmean, Mr. Owen, Mr. House 

T^HE aim of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory is to teach mu- 
-*■ sic historically and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture; 
to offer courses that will give a thorough and practical understand- 
ing of theory and composition; and to train artists and teachers. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission must (1) be a graduate of a four-year 
High School, and (2) possess a reasonable amount of musical in- 
telligence and accomplishment, such as: 

(a) The possession of an acceptable singing voice and of a 
fairly quick sense of tone and rhythm; 

(b) Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair 
degree of accuracy and facility; 

(c) Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument rep- 
resenting two years' study. 

MUSIC EDUCATION COURSE 

For Training Supervisors and Teachers of Public School Music 

(B. S. in Music Education) 

This course has been approved by the State Council of Educa- 
tion for the preparation of supervisors and teachers of public school 
music. 

The outline of the curriculum follows: 

Class Semester 

First Semester Hours Hrs. Credit 

*Introduction to Teaching 3 3 

(Includes social guidance on the campus) 

*English 16 3 3 

Harmony 313 3 3 

Sight Reading 11 3 1^ 

Dictation 21 3 1J4 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings (Vio- 
lin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds (Flute, 
Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses (Trumpet, 
French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and Percus- 
sion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra and Band. 
Work arranged for greatest benefit of stu- 
dents 9 3 

*Physical Education I _3 ^ 

Second Semester 

^English 16 3 3 

*English Activities 3 3 

(Includes library work, public speaking, and 

dramatics) 
Harmony 323 3 3 

79 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Class Semester 

Hours Hrs. Credit 

Sight Reading 12 3 V/> 

Dictation 22 3 VA 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 9 3 

♦Physical Education II 3 1 

Third Semester 27 16 

♦Science I — Biology 4 3 

(Includes the physiology of the nervous system 

as a basis of psychology) 

♦History of Civilization 3 3 

Harmony 333 3 3 

Sight Reading 13 3 1^ 

Dictation 23 3 V/z 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodvi^inds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 9 3 

Eurythmics 831 3 1 

Fourth Semester 28 16 

♦Psychology I 3 3 

♦Literature I or Literature II 3 3 

Harmony 342 2 2 

Elements of Conducting 642 2 2 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 9 3 

Materials 443 _3 _3 

Fifth Semester 22 16 

♦Educational Sociology 3 3 

Harmony 352 2 2 

History of Music 553 3 3 

Materials 453 3 3 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 12 4 

Eurythmics 861 _3 _1 

26 16 

80 



CATALOGUE 

n' j.1^ c< J. Class Semester 

blXth bemester Hours Hrs. Credit 

*American Government 3 3 

Harmony 363 3 3 

History of Music 563 3 3 

Materials 463 3 3 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 12 4 

(Includes instrumental class methods) 24 16 

Seventh Semester 

*Student Teaching and Conferences 777 10^ 7 

*Technique of Teaching 1 1 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 6 2 

Elective (§Music Appreciation or Elective) 3 3 

Elective (§Advanced Problems in Conducting or 

Elective) _3 _3 

23;^ 16 

Eighth Semester 
*History and Philosophy of Education 4 4 

(Includes History of Education in Pennsylvania 

and School Law) 

*Student Teaching and Conferences 787 IQYz 7 

*Technique of Teaching 1 1 

Private Study — Voice, Piano, Organ; Strings 

(Violin, Viola, 'Cello, Bass), Woodwinds 

(Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Bassoon), Brasses 

(Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Tuba), and 

Percussion Instruments. Chorus, Orchestra, and 

Band. Work arranged for greatest benefit of 

students 3 1 

Elective (§Organizing and Rehearsing of School 

Orchestras and Bands, or Elective) _3 _3 

21^ 16 

Core 36 semester hours 

Student Tecli. 16 

Theory ii 

Practical 34 

Elective 9 

128 



* — Core Subjects. § — Elective for Teachers and Supervisors of Music. 

81 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

OUTLINE OF COURSES LEADING TO BACHELOR OF 
MUSIC DEGREE 

First Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin or Orchestra Instruments 4 

Sight Singing 1 1 and 12 4 

Sight Playing 1 

Harmony 313 and 323 6 

English 16 : 6 

Dictation 21 and 22 4 

Elective 6 

Physical Education 2 

33 

Second Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin or Orchestral Instruments 4 

Sight Singing 13 3 

Sight Playing 1 

Harmony 333 and 342 6 

Elective 6 

Harmonic Dictation 23 3 

History and Appreciation of Music 553 and 563 6 

Physical Education 2 

31 

Third Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin or Orchestral Instruments 4 

Musical Form and Analysis 352 6 

Elective 6 

Elective 6 

Conducting 642 4 

Junior Recital 2 

Eurythmics 831 and 861 2 

30 

Fourth Year 

Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin or Orchestral Instruments 4 

Composition 363 3 

Ensemble Playing 1 

Counterpoint 372 3 

Elective 6 

Elective 6 

Senior Recital 4 

27 
Above Electives may be selected from the college department. 
Students may also elect other courses listed under the Music Edu- 
cation course including orchestras, bands, glee club, and instrumental 
ensembles. 

82 



CATALOGUE 

I. Theory of Music 
Sight Singing Courses 
Sight Singing 11. Three hours per week, IJ/2 semester hours credit. 
Sight singing 11 covers the work equivalent to grades 1. 2, 3, and 4 
of the pubHc school. 

Sight Singing 12. Three hours per week, lYz semester hours credit. 
Sight Singing 12 covers the work equivalent to grades 5, 6, 7, and 
8 of the public school. 

Sight Singing 13. Three hours per week, 1^2 semester hours credit. 

A continuation with exercises and songs of increasing difficulty 
both tonal and rhythmic. Emphasis on reading from any clef. Study 
and application of additional tempo, dynamic and interpretative 
markings. 

Speed and accuracy are demanded. New material is constantly 
used, resulting in an extensive survey of song material. 

Dictation (Ear Training) Courses 

Dictation 21 (Ear Training). Three hours per week, 1>< semester 
hours credit. 

A study of tone and rhythm planned so that the student gains 
power to recognize, visualize, sing, and write melodic phrases and 
intervals in all keys. 

Dictation 22 (Ear Training). Three hours per week, V/z semester 
hours credit. 

A continuation of the study of tone, rhythm, and intervals. A con- 
siderable portion of the time is devoted to the development of har- 
monic dictation. 

Dictation 23 (Ear Training). Three hours per week, 1^ semester 
hours credit. 

A study of the more difficult tonal problems and complicated 
rhythms. 

Designed to develop ability to recognize and write chord progres- 
sions, including modulation, and altered chords. 

Harmony Courses 

Harmony 313. Three hours per week, 3 semester hours credit. 

Designed to build a foundation for further music study through 
a working knowledge of the fundamentals of music notation, tonal 
and rhythmic, the major, minor, and chromatic scales, transpositions, 
intervals, triads, and musical terminology. The written work is ac- 
companied by constant practice in hearing, singing, and keyboard 
work. 

Harmony and Melody 323. Three hours per week, 3 semester hours 
credit. 

Harmonization in four voices over a given bass, the inversion 
of triads, the construction of melodies over accompaniments, the 

83 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

dominant seventh chord in fundamental position and inversion with 
its resolution, serial modulations, directly related keys, the har- 
monization of given melodies, improvisation. 

Harmony and Melody 333. Three hours per week, 3 semester hours 
credit. 

Study of modulation, the use of suspensions and retardations, 
passing notes of various species, embellishments, anticipation, the 
dominant ninth as applied to the harmonization of melodies and to 
modulations, imitation, modulation to indirectlj^ related and to for- 
eign keys. 

Harmony 342 (Keyboard). Two hours per week, 2 semester hours 
credit. 

Harmonization at the keyboard of familiar folk songs and of 
melodies, familiar and unfamiliar, of the rote song type, utilizing 
the various harmonies at the disposal of the class; and in the 
reading at sight of music of moderate difficulty, with emphasis upon 
the playing of accompaniments and upon transposition. 

Harmony 352 (Musical Form and Analysis). Two hours per 
week, 2 semester hours credit. 

Study of the figure and the motive, the phrase, cadences, period 
forms, two part and three part song forms, rondo forms, the so- 
nata form, the sonata allegro form. The work is accompanied by 
constant analysis and by original composition in the smaller forms. 

Harmony 363 (Composition and Orchestration). Three hours per 
week, 3 semester hours credit. 

Original composition is continued in various vocal and instru- 
mental forms. 

This course offers opportunity and guidance in arranging music 
for various combinations of instruments and voice, including band, 
orchestra, and chorus. The best productions of the class will be given 
public performance. 

Harmony 372 (Counterpoint). Two hours throughout the j^ear. 
Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part 
Counterpoint). 

II. Materials and Methods 

Methods 443: Child Voice and Rote Songs with Materials and 
Methods for Grades 1, 2, 3. Three hours per week, 3 semester hours 
credit. 

A comprehensive study of the use of the child's singing voice in 
the primary grades, including the treatment of monotones, acquaint- 
ance with the best collections of rote songs, and practice in choos- 
ing, memorizing, singing, and presenting a large number of these 
songs; methods of presenting rhythm through singing games and 
simple interpretative movements; beginnings of directed music ap- 



CATALOGUE 

preciation; foundation studies for later technical developments. Com- 
parative study of recognized Public School Music Series. 

Methods 453: All Materials and Methods for Grades 4, 5, 6. Three 
hours per w^eek, 3 semester hours credit. 

A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades; 
special attention to the formal or technical work of these grades, 
with an evaluation of important texts and recent approaches. Prepa- 
ration of lesson plans, making of outlines, and observation is re- 
quired. Music appreciation is continued. 

Methods 463: Materials and Methods, Junior and Senior High 
School. Three hours per week, 3 semester hours credit. 

The junior and senior high school problems are treated sepa- 
rately through an analysis of the specific problems, year by year 
or in special groups. Attention is given to materials and methods 
relative to the organization and directing of choruses, glee clubs, or- 
chestra, band, elementary theory, music appreciation, and class in- 
struction in band and orchestral instruments; study in the testing 
and care of the adolescent voice. 

III. Student Teaching 

Student Teaching 777 — 787. Twenty-one hours throughout the 
year, 14 semester hours credit. 

The Senior Class of the Music Education course teaches in the 
Hershey Public Schools at Hershey, Pa. Teaching includes vocal 
and instrumental work from kindergarten to high school. 

This work is done under the guidance of the following faculty: 
Mary E. Gillespie, A. M. Columbia University, Director of the 

Conservatory of Music, Lebanon Valley College. 
Edward P. Rutledge, A.M. Columbia LIniversity, Instructor in 

Band and Orchestra Instruments. 
J. I. Baugher, Ph.D. Columbia LIniversity, Superintendent of 

Hershey Public Schools, Hershey, Pa. 
Esther Bigham, B.S.M. Oberlin Conservatory, Supervisor of 

Music, Hershey Public Schools, Hershey, Pa. 
A laboratory fee of $17.50 per semester is charged for student 

teaching. 

IV. Instrumental Courses 
Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught 
the fundamental principles underlying the pla3'ing of all band and 
orchestra instruments, learn to play melodies on instruments of 
each group, viz., string, woodwind, and brass. Problems of class 
procedure in public schools are discussed; transposition of all in- 
struments is taught and an extensive bibliography is prepared. En- 
semble playing is an integral part of these courses. 

85 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

String Class 93, 94, and 95 (Violin). Two hours per week through- 
out three semesters. 

Woodwind Class 97 and 98 (Clarinet). Two hours per week 
throughout the year. 

Brass Class 91 and 92 (Cornet, alto, trombone, baritone, or tuba). 
Two hours per week throughout the j^ear. 

Percussion 96 (Drums). One hour per week. 

Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Advanced instruction in instruments is given in unit courses. In 
these unit courses a student may study and gain practical experience 
in playing the more rare instruments of each group. Two hours per 
week. 

Advanced String 903 (Viola, violoncello, and bass viol). Two 
hours per week. 

Advanced Woodwind 907 (Flute, piccolo, oboe, and bassoon). Two 
hours per week. 

Advanced Brass 901 (All brass instruments not studied in Brass 
Class 1 or 2). Two hours per week. 

Advanced Percussion 906. One hour per week. 

V. Musical Organizations 

College Band 910-11. Two hours per week throughout the year. 

Lebanon Valley College maintains a uniformed band, the mem- 
bership of which is made up of college and conservatory students. 
The band contributes to college life by playing at football games, 
by appearing on several programs during the year, and by provid- 
ing the musical accompaniment for the annual May Day Fete. Dur- 
ing the spring several concerts are given in various cities of this 
section of the state. Membership in the band is determined by an 
applicant's ability on his instrument and by the needs of the band 
with respect to maintaining a well-balanced instrumentation. 

Girls' Band 912 — 913. Two hours per week throughout the year. 

This organization is open to girls of the Conservatory and Col- 
lege alike. Membership in this band is determined by the applicant's 
ability on her instrument, and by the needs of the band with respect 
to maintaining a well-balanced instrumentation. The group will par- 
ticipate in a Spring concert. 

Symphony Orchestra 914 — 915. Two hours per week throughout 
the year. 

The Lebanon Valley College Symphony Orchestra is a musical 
organization of symphonic proportions. Open alike to advanced 
players from the college and the conservatory, the orchestra adheres 
to a high standard of performance. Throughout the school year a 
professional interpretation of a wide range of standard orchestral 
literature is insisted upon. 

86 



CATALOGUE 

College Orchestra 916 — 917. Two hours per week throughout the 
year. 

The College Orchestra is open to all members of the Conservatory 
and of the College who are sufficiently qualified to belong to this 
organization. 

Junior Orchestra 918 — 919. One hour per week throughout the 
year. 

Students of the elementary and advanced instrumental classes are 
given an opportunitj' to play their instruments in the Junior Band 
and the Junior Orchestra, thus gaining a type of valuable ensemble 
experience not possible to attain in the instrumental classes. 

Glee Club 63 — 64. One hour per week throughout the year. 

The Glee Club is a mixed chorus of selected voices. The person- 
nel of the organization, while open to all L. V. C. students, is limited 
to forty members. During the Spring the Club appears in concerts in 
several communities throughout this section of the state. Choral lit- 
erature of the highest type is studied intensively. 

College Chorus 61 — 62. One hour per week throughout the year. 

The mixed chorus is open to all on the campus who are interested 
in this type of musical performance and who have had some experi- 
ence in singing. 

Instrumental Ensembles. In addition to the larger musical organi- 
zations there is additional opportunity for advanced plaj'ers to try 
out for such ensembles as: 

(1) String Quartet 

(2) Violin Choir 

(3) Brass Ensemble 

(4) Woodwind Ensemble 

VI. The History of Music and Appreciation 

History of Music and Appreciation 553. Three iiours per week, 3 
semester hours credit. 

The first developments of music are treated briefly, and special 
emphasis is laid on the work of the contrapuntal schools, the de- 
velopment of the harmonic idea in composition, and the rise of the 
opera and oratorio. 

History of Music and Appreciation 563. Three hours per week, 3 
semester hours credit. 

Emphasis is placed on the growth of musical movements and 
forms, and on the lives, works, and influence of the great composers. 
Opportunity is given for hearing representative music of the dif- 
ferent periods of music history and of the recognized composers. 

87 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

VII. Miscellaneous Courses 

Elements of Conducting 642. Two hours per week, 2 semester 
hours credit. 

Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors, adapta- 
tion of methods to school situations, a study of the technique of the 
baton with daily practice, score reading, making of programs. Selec- 
tion of suitable materials for various school groups. Readings and 
reports. 

Eurythmics 831. Three hours per week, 1 semester hour credit. 

The course offers a three-fold training; mental control through 
coordination; physical poise through movements made in response 
to rhythm; and a musical sense through the analysis of the rhythmic 
element in music. 

Eurythmics 861. Three hours per week, 1 semester hour credit. 

General survey of elementary and intermediate floor work, and 
interpretation together with a discussion of the principles underlying 
the presentation of this to children. Applied improvisation will be 
an integral part of the course. 



VIII. Individual Instruction 
Voice, Piano, Organ, Chorus, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 

The work in the foregoing fields will be organized from the stand- 
point of the development of musicianship in the individual student. 
The work continues through eight semesters and assures a well- 
rounded and many-sided acquaintance with various musical 
techniques. 

Private instruction is provided in Applied Music (Piano, Voice, 
Organ, Violin, and all instruments of orchestra and band). 

Piano: Mrs. Bender, Miss Miller, Mr. Owen. 

Voice: Mr. Crawford, Mr. House. 

Organ: Mr. Campbell. 

Violin: Mr. Malsh. 

Brass and Woodwind: Mr. Rutledge. 

Viola, 'Cello, and String Bass: Mr. Carmean. 

A bulletin describing courses in Practical Music will be sent upon 
application. 

IX. Junior Department 

The Conservatory of Music sponsors a Junior Department espec- 
ially adapted to children of elementary or high school age. 

This Junior Department offers either private or class instruction 
in piano and all instruments of the band and orchestra. A desirable 
number for class instruction is from four to six members. 



CATALOGUE 

THE STUDENTS' RECITALS 

The students' Tuesday evening recital is of inestimable value to all 
students in acquainting them with a wide range of the best musical 
literature, in developing musical taste and discrimination, in afford- 
ing young musicians experience in appearing before an audience, and 
in gaining self-reliance as well as nerve control and stage demeanor. 

Students in all grades appear on the programs of these recitals. 
Each senior is required to appear in one special graduation recital. 

FEES 

A Matriculation Fee of five dollars must be paid by all full-time 
students who are entering the College or Conservatory for the first 
time. This fee should accompany the application for admission. If 
a student's application is not accepted, the fee will be returned. 

All students not enrolled in regular College or Conservatory 
Courses will be required to pay a matriculation fee of one dollar, 
once in each school year. 

The rates for the Public School Music Supervisors' Course are 
$300 per year, which covers not only tuition but also a fee for stu- 
dent activities. 

The Public School Music Supervisors' Course includes two private 
lessons per week, the use of a piano two hours daily for practice, and 
theoretical and college courses not exceeding a total of seventeen 
semester hours each semester. 

Extra hours in theoretical and college courses will be charged at 
the rate of $8.50 per semester hour. 

Private Lessons 

The rates per semester, one lesson per week, are $25.00. 
The rates per semester, one class lesson per week in the Junior 
Department, are $12.00. 

Rent of Practice Instruments 

Piano, one hour daily per semester $4.00 

Each additional hour daily per semester 2.00 

Organ, one hour daily, per semester 20.00 

Organ, two hours weekly, per semester 10.00 

Band and Orchestra Instruments, per semester 6.00 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Regular Conservatory students are not enrolled for a shorter period 
of time than a full semester, or the unexpired portion of a semester; 
and no reduction is made for delay in registering when the time lost 
is less than one-fourth of the semester. 

No reduction is made for absence from recitations except in case of 
protracted illness extending beyond a period of two weeks, in which 
case the loss is shared equally by the college and student. 

Conservatory students are under the regular college discipline. 

89 



Addresses of Faculty and Administrative Officers 



Name Addrest Phone Number 

Bailey, L. G 403 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 17-R 

Bender, Andrew 550 Maple St., Annville, Pa " 140-J 

Bender, Mrs. Ruth E 550 Maple St., Annville, Pa " 140-J 

Black, Amos 484 Maple St., Annville, Pa " 154-M 

Butterwick, R. R 218 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa " 20-R 

Campbell, R. P 22 S. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa Leb. 2037-J 

Cannean, D. Clark Men's Dormitory, L. V. C, Annville, Pa Ann. 137 

Clements, L. Percy 221 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 32-R 

Crawford, Alexander 38 W. Main St., .AnnviUe, Pa Ann. 66-J 

Derickson, S. H 473 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 126-W 

Engle, J. R 622 N. Lincoln St., Palmyra, Pa Pal. 19-R 

Esbenshade, J. Walter 607 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa Leb. 756-J 

Fencil, Gladys M 128 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 16-W-2 

Frock, Jerome W 335 W. Main St., Hummelstown, Pa Hum. 7-J 

GiUespie. Mary E North Hall, L. V. C. Annville, Pa Ann. 21-R 

Gingrich, C. R 36 CoUege Ave., AnnviUe, Pa " 151-J 

Green, Mrs. Mary C 510 E. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 206-J 

Grimm, S. 234 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 3-M 

Henderson. Esther 330 E. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 142-J 

House, Judson 235 East 22nd St., New York City Granunercy 3-4499 

Lietzau, Lena Louise West Hall, L. V. C, AnnviUe, Pa " 9183 

Light, V. Earl R. D. No. 1, AnnvUle, Pa " 73-R-13 

Lynch, Clyde A 26 E. Sheridan Ave., AnnviUe, Pa " 27 

Malsh, Harold West Fairview, Pa Hbg. 3-5646 

Metoxen Emerson 43 W. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa 

MiUer, NeUa 44 CoUege Ave., Annville, Pa Ann. 208 

Miles, Verda M 43 E. Mam St., AnnvUle, Pa Ann. 10-M 

Moyer, EUa R 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 10-M 

Myers, Helen Ethel 120 College Ave., Annville, Pa " 163-M 

Owen, Benjamin 309 West 109th Street, New York City 

Reynolds, 0. E 430 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 118 

Rice, Margaret L 34 S. Manheim St., AnnviUe, Pa 

Richie, G. A 466 E. Main St., AnnvUle, Pa Ann. 2-W 

Rutledge, Edward P 216 Maple St., AnnviUe, Pa " 124-J 

Shenk, Esther 438 E. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 41 

Shenk, H. H 438 E. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 41 

Stevenson, E. H 38 W. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 60-J 

Stevenson, Mrs. SteUa 243 E. Main St., AnnviUe, Pa " 123-W 

Stokes, M. L 38 W. Main St., Annville, Pa " 66-J 

Stonecipher, A. H. M 471 E. Main St., AnnvUle, Pa " 207-J 

Struble, Geo. G R. D. No. 4, Lebanon, Pa. (Cleona) Leb. 2254-J 

Wagner, Paul S 124 CoUege Ave., AnnviUe, Pa Ann. 72 

WaUace, P. A. W Maple and Ziegler Sts., AnnviUe, Pa " 101 

Wood, Margaret A South HaU, L. V. C, AnnviUe, Pa " 9180 



90 



Register of Students 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Grimm, Dorothy Fear Education 1105 S. 19th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Lupton, Burritt Keeler Lawlin . . . Biology Frankhn Ave Wyckoff N.J. 

LuptoD, Sarah Margaret German 625 S. Stewart St Winchester Va. 

SENIORS 

Aungst, Clarence Christian Bus. Ad 228 W. Main St New Holland Penna. 

Barnhart, Jefferson Chfford French 64 W. Chocolate Ave Hershey Penna. 

Bender, Ehzabeth Teall English 532 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Berger, Lloyd Daniel EngUsh Reinerton Peima. 

Billett, Ralph Edwin Biology 438 Peffer St Harrisburg Penna. 

Black, Robert Stanley Bus. Ad 20 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

Bowers, Marhn Walter History 517 Seneca St Harrisbiu^g Penna. 

Capka, Adolph James Bus. Ad Jednota Middletown Penna. 

Cunkle, Paul Vincent Bible and Greek. .459 State St West Fairview Penna. 

Da vies, Gordon Education 51 S. Landon St Kingston Penna. 

Deaven, Harry Walter Bible and Greek. .R. D. No. 2 Jonestown Penna. 

Delhnger, Curvin Nelson, Jr Bus. Ad 100 S. Main St Red Lion Penna. 

Ellenberger, Herman Albert Chemistry R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Flom, Esther Anna Biology 2200 N. Fifth St Harrisburg Penna. 

Frey, Marshall Rosette Education 268 S. 6th St Chambersburg Penna. 

Fridinger, Walter Perce Bus. Ad 122 W. King St Shippensburg Penna. 

Gasteiger, Dean Wellington. Bus. Ad 2137 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gibble, Grant Wilbur Bus. Ad 20 N. College St Palmyra Penna. 

Gongloff, Jonn Rupp Bus. Ad R. D. No. 1 Harrisburg Penna. 

Groff, John Yeagley Chemistry 128 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Harclerode, Sylva Ruth Enghsh 2307 Harvard Ave Camp Hill Penna. 

Hawtnorne, Lucille Katheryn. . . .Social Science. . . . 1612 Forster St Harrisburg Penna. 

Heminway, Hazel Margaret Enghsh 122 Chestnut Ave Woodlynne N. J. 

Hoerner, Violette Bertha Latin 269 W. High St Hummelstown Penna. 

Houtz, Ethel Mae English Selinsgrove Penna. 

Jagnesak, Ernestine Mary Social Science. . . .390 Broad St Emaus Penna. 

Kreamer, Dorothy Ellen History 472 E. Maple St Annville Penna. 

Kreamer, John Wilham Bus. Ad 523 E. Maple St Annville Penna. 

Lazorjack, George Wilson Chemistry 227 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Marbarger, John Porter Biology 102 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Mason, Ella Tamszon Enghsh 55 Ehzabeth St Bordentown N. J. 

McKeag, Jean Ellen History Elmhurst Apt. A-1 

Bellevue Ave Trenton N. J. 

Mills, Catherine Lucile English 444 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Morris, Agnes Leonina English 7048 Woodland Ave . . . .Philadelphia Penna. 

Netherwood, Helen Arbella Latin 908 E. Grand Ave Tower City Penna. 

Pollard, Mrs. Aura Stiers Biology 3008 North Fifth St . . . .Harrisburg Penna. 

Price, Wanda Langden English 131 Fifth St Carney's Point N. J. 

Raab, Charles Henry Chemistry 284 S. Walnut St Dallastown Penna. 

Risser, Lena Evelyn Enghsh 115N. Cedar St Lititz Penna. 

Roberts, Mary Carolyn Social Service. . . . 1432 North 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Rogers, Vernon Enghsh 707 Virginia Ave Martinsburg W. Va. 

Saylor, Roger Behm Mathematics 43 Park End Place East Orange N. J. 

Schott, Henry Orth Chemistry R. D. No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Schuler, Alan Edward Bus. Ad 23 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Shaffer, Charles Boyd Biology 39 N. 17th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Shearer, Daniel LeRoy German Spring Grove Penna. 

Shenk, D. Eugene, Jr Bus. Ad 120 N. Grant St Palmyra Penna. 

Sloane, Helen Barbara Social Science. , . . 1006 N. 16th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Slonaker, Paul Jeremiah Education Ganotown W. Va. 

Spangler, Gail Maxine. Enghsh 9 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Spitler, Calvin Dubbs History Route No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Stefan, Theresa Kathryn Latin 607 S. 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

Stoner, Mary Louise Enghsh 607 Kirtland St Pittsburgh Penna. 

Swartz, Chauncey Royalton Bible and Greek ..117 Raih-oad St Annville Penna. 

Thompson, Curvin Livingston.. . .Bible and Greek. .724 Roosevelt Ave York Penna. 

Uh-ich, Paul Theodore Mathematics 437 N. 11th St Lebanon Penna. 

Walmer, John David Biology Main St Jonestown Penna. 

Wilt, Ethel Vir^nia English 50 College Ave Annville Penna. 



91 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

KAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Wert, Russell Hopkins Education 837 Willow St Lebanon Penna. 

Zamojski, Beatrice Estelle Biology 276 New York Ave Newark N. J. 

Zartman, Mary Elizabeth English 450 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

JUNIORS 

Bacastow, Merle Stoner Chemistry 230 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

Baier, Howard Nelson Chemistry 608 N. Raihoad St Palmyra Penna 

Bartlett, Helen Marjorie History 502 E. 41st St Baltimore Md. 

Bowers, Herbert Harvey History 517 Seneca St Harrisburg Penna. 

Brown, Charles Willard McGaw . . French Hershey Industrial Sch. . Hershey Penna. 

Bulota, Stanley Biology New Ringgold Penna. 

Byerly, David Allen Bus. Ad 3001 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gathers, Walter Edgar, Jr English Summitt Ave North Wales Penna. 

Clark, WiUiam Ford French R. D. No. 2 Media Penna. 

Conrad, Louis Johnson Chemistry 2923 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Dempsey, Carl Wilson Mathematics 1131 Hepburn St Williamsport Penna. 

Derr, Elwood LeRoy Chemistry 1605 Chestnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

Engle, John Warren Bus. Ad Main and Railroad Sts . . Hummelstown Penna. 

Evelev, Arthur Sherman Biology 619 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Fox, Audrie Eleanora Education 285 Union St York Penna. 

Frey, Raymond Theodore Education 438 N. 5th St Lebanon Penna. 

Garzella, Michael Frank Bus. Ad 192 Parsonage St Pittston Penna. 

Goodman, Benjamine Moury Mathematics 139 E. Dewart St Shamokin Penna. 

Graby, Cora Ehzabeth Latin 710 E. Maple St Annville Penna. 

Guinivan, Thomas WilUam Greek 2216 47th St Camden N. J. 

Haas, Mildred Ehzabeth English 9. E. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Hamm, Leander Herbert Bus. Ad 68 N. 17th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Hocker, Kenneth Leverne Biology 356 Pine St Steelton Penna. 

Houck, Jean Ewing History 199 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Johnson, Julia Ida EngUsh 145 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Kinney, HarUn Shroyer Chemistry 51 Chnton Ave Farmingdale, L. I.. .N. Y. 

Kitzmiller, John Kunkel Biology 13254 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Lehman, Clarence Long Biology R. D. No. 2 Palmyra Penna. 

Leininger, Pauline Lilhan History 925 Cumberland St Lebanon Peima. 

Light, Anna Louise English 314 S. 12th St Lebanon Penna. 

Long, Robert Winfield German 23 S. Walnut St Hummelstown Penna. 

Lopes, Olga Weaber English Schaefferstown Penna. 

Metzger. Edith Maude English 37 N. Union St Middletown Penna. 

Monteitn, Amy Martha Social Service. . . . 1018 Philadelphia Ave.. .Barnesboro Penna. 

Morrison, Nellie Colclough French 210 Lewis St Minersville Penna. 

Moyer, John Henry Chemistry R. D. No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

Mulhollen, Eleanor Mae Mathematics 549 Park Ave Johnstown Penna. 

Null, Dorothy Louise English 403 S. 12tb St Lebanon Penna. 

Richie, Alice Mary History 466 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Rohrer, Ruth Romaine Latin Port Trevorton Penna. 

Rozman, Frank Albert Bus. Ad 620 S. Second St Steelton Penna. 

Rutter, Samuel Peiffer History 7 E. High bt Lebanon Penna. 

Silvers, Damon Lee Bus Ad 116 Lee Ave Trenton N. J. 

Smith, Donald George Education 825 Water St Lebanon Penna. 

Smith, Raymond Richard Bus. Ad 708 W. Broadway Red Lion Penna. 

Strickler, Evalyn May Bus. Ad 324 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Strickler, Warren Leo History 146 S. 5th St Lebanon Penna. 

Tschop, Robert Paul Chemistry 433 S. Main St Red Lion Penna. 

Umberger, Jacob Quentin Chemistry 54 Harvard Ave Mt. Gretna Penna. 

Vaughan, Samuel Ellsworth Bus. Ad 920 Fawcett St McKeesport Penna. 

Weidman, Roy Andrew Biology Akron Penna. 

Weirick, Ernest Carl Bus. Ad 144 Altoona Ave Enola Penna. 

Wentling, Dorothy Anna Biology 506 S. Lincoln St Palmyra Penna. 

Whister, Catherine EngUsh 37 Ehzabeth St Bordentown N. J. 

Whitesell, Janet Frances English 11 Washington Terrace. . East Orange N.J. 

Zeihe, Grover Franklin Biology Valley View Penna. 

ZubrofF, LilUan English 114 S. 3rd. St Minersville Penna. 

SOPHOMORES 

Artz, Robert Raymond Bus. Ad 260 S. 6th St Lebanon Penna. 

Aungst, Dean Moyer Biology 175-47 114th Ave St. Albans, L. I N. Y. 

Beamesderfer, Lloyd Bible and Greek Tower City Penna. 

Belmer Charles Miller Bus. Ad 8 Grant Ave Glens Falls N. Y. 

Bemesderfer, John Leroy Mathematics.. . . .618 Hanover St. Lebanon Penna. 

Bender, William Lloyd Bus. Ad 532 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Black, Adele Louise.. Social Service 1941 Mulberry St Harrisburg Penna. 

92 



CATALOGUE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Boran, Robert Paul Biology 518 Sunbury St Minersville Penna. 

Bowman, Barbara Beamer French Dauphin Penna. 

Bowman, Thomas Bear Bus. Ad 1113 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Brensinger, William Josiah Biology 563 Ridge St Emaus Penna. 

Brown, Robert Gayle Bus. Ad 719 Hummel Ave Lemoyne Penna. 

Brubaker, Elwood Richard Biology Route No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Deck, John Stanley Social Science. . . . 121 N. 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Dinsmore, Robert Edward Bus. Ad R. D. No. 1 Brogueville Penna. 

Eby, Jane Virginia Latin 604 N. 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ehrhart, Carl Yarkers History 344 W. Orange St Lancaster Perma. 

Evans, Anna Margaret History 703 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Evans, Evelyn Rosser History 670 W. Walnut St Lancaster Penna. 

Fox, Thomas G., Jr Chemistry Union Deposit Penna. 

Galloppi, Carmella Profeta English 250 Line St Camden N. J. 

Grimm, Robert Shircy Physics 234 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Heiland, Dwight Mast Mathematics 10 E. Main Ave Myerstown Penna. 

Hemperly, Cecil Willis Bus. Ad 1924 Bellevue Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Herman. August Carl Mathematics 420 Church St Minersville Penna. 

Horn, Paul Edward History 127 S. Hartley St York Penna. 

Huber, W. Frederick Chemistry 309 W.ilnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Kauffman, Richard Delhnger. . . .Chemistry 81 W. Main St Dallastown Penna. 

Kleiser, Sterling Haaga Biology 232 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Kress, Edward Ken History 11 Fifth St Minersville Penna. 

Leisey , LilUan Mae Latin 306 S. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Lind, Anna May Chemistry West Hampton Beach, 

L. I N. Y. 

Lloyd, Ralph Roy Bus. Ad 115 E. Caracas Ave Hershey Penna. 

Long, Dorothy EUzabeth Soc. Science 54 Woodland Ave. East Orange N. J. 

Lopes, Leia Weaber Mathematics Schaefferstown Penna. 

Maury, Gustav Thurwald Biology 8 E. Ruddle St Coaldale Penna. 

Meyer, .Jean Patricia Bus. Ad 21 Roosevelt Ave East Orange N. J. 

Miller, Evelyn Loretta Latin 268 Church St Millersburg Penna. 

Miller, Herbert Levere Biology 18 E. Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

MoUer, John Vincent Bus. Ad 35 Maple Place Chfton N. J. 

Moody. Richard Elwood Chemistry 342 N. Partridge St Lebanon Penna. 

Morrow, Paul Kenneth Mathematics Loysville Penna. 

Murzin, Louis Leo Biology R. D. No. 1 Lawnton Penna. 

Myers, Paul Erb Bible and Greek. . 1424 Green St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ness, John Herbert History 839 Maryland Ave York. Penna. 

Norton, Ruth V History 110 Barbara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Oiler, Lucille Grace Biology R. D. No. 4 Waynesboro Penna. 

Parks, Mary Rebecca Biology 40 West Ave Woodstown N. J. 

Rice, Freeman Daniel Chemistry 34 Manheim St Annville Penna. 

Saylor, Herbert Alfred Chemistry 465 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Saylor, Louise Bus. Ad 43 Park End Place East Orange N. J. 

Schoen, Irwin Donald Bus. Ad 709 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Seylar, Evelyn Maye Mathematics R. D. No. 2 Hahfax Penna. 

Shapiro, Stewart Bennet Biology 134 S. 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Smee, George Harry Chemistry 617 Oxford St Harrisburg Penna. 

SmejTie, Azer Leon Biology 15 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Sponaugle, Coda Welford Bus. Ad 404 W. Chocolate Ave. . , Hershey Penna. 

Strayer, Robert Curvin Chemistry 103 Moccasin Ave Buchanan Mich. 

Sumner, Doyle Leonard Education 112 Victoria Road, 

Bon the Sherbro Sierra Leone W.Africa 

Thomas, .Joseph Bowker History 38 Ehzabeth St Bordentown N. J. 

Touchstone, Mary Alice Enghsh Fredericksburg Penna. 

Vavrous, Lillian Mae Soc. Science 141 Guilford St Lebanon Penna. 

Walk, Christian Bitner, .Jr History Washington Boro.. .Penna. 

Weagley, Richard Pershing Biology Greencastle Penna. 

Weimer, Margaret Sellew English 228 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Wert, Robert Browning Mathematics 837 Willow St Lebanon Penna. 

White, Odell William Biology Box 52 Sheridan Penna. 

Whitman, James Richard Bus. .-Vd 439 New St Lebanon Penna. 

Witmer, Aimee Frances English 366 E. Chocolate Ave. . .Hershey Penna. 

Yingst, John Allen Mathematics Cornwall Penna. 

Yocum, Martin Dale Biology. 501 N. 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Zwally , Kathryn Matilda Social Service .... Broad St New Holland. Penna. 

FRESHMEN 

Acker, William Jr B. S Cornwall Penna. 

Arnold, John Adam B. S 433 N. 6th St Lebanon Penna. 

Bamhart., George Rees Bus. Ad 124 N. 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

93 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



MAJOR 



STREET NUMBER 



POST OFFICE 



Beitlel, Charles Rouse B. S. . . . 

Bell, Richard Clarence B. S 

Bentzel, Bernard Charles Education 

Black, James Egbert Biology.. 

Blecher, Eleanor Howard A. B. . . . 

Bomberger, Anna Mae A. B. . . . 

Bordwell, Margaret June B. S 

Bosnyak, Fred Edward Bus. Ad. 

Brandt, Frederick Otto B. S 

Breen, Frederick Tunis, Jr Bus. Ad. 

Breen, Robert Edward B. S. . 

Caulker, Solomon Brooks. 



. . .2001 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

. . .R. D. No. 2 Harrisburg Penna. 

.121 Jefferson Ave York Penna. 

. 211 Cocoa Ave Hershey Penna. 

. Route No. 1 Annville Penna. 

.124 E. Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

.311 Frederick Rd Hagerstown Md. 

.R. D. No. 2 Middletown Penna. 

... 220 N. Raih-oad St Palmyra Penna. 

.318 S. First Ave Lebanon Penna. 

.10 E. High St Lebanon Penna. 

.Bible and Greek Mambo-Shenge, 

Sierra Leone W.Africa 

Conley, Ralph Lorain Education 503 S. 3rd St Lemoyne Penna. 

Conrad, Joe Elvin B. S Valley View Penna. 

Corl, Chester WiUiam A. B Schaefferstown Penna. 

Curry, Conrad Kreider Bus. Ad R. D. No. 1 Hummelstown Penna. 

DeHuff, Ruth Louise. B. 8 748 Ohio Ave Midland Penna. 

Derick, Samuel Willis Bible and Greek.. . 1742 A N. 6th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Donough, Dorothea Ruth. A. B 536 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Dressier, John Henry Bus. Ad State St Millersburg Penna. 

Early. Josephine May A. B 120 Center Ave Cleona Penna. 

Ehrhart, Jane Yarkers A. B 344 W. Orange St Lancaster Penna. 

Erdman, Henry Light B. S 59 E. Derry Rd Hershey Penna. 

Ernst, Josephine Louise B. S 45 S. West St Carlisle Penna. 

Esbenshade, Mary Lucille A. B Bird-in-Hand Penna. 

Espenshade, Marhn Alwice A. B 701 E. Main St Middletown Penna. 

Feinstein. Leo B. S 779 Hill St Lebanon Penna. 

Fisher, Ethel Mae History 517 Cedar St., N. W. . . .Washington D. C. 

Flook, Max Kenneth B. S Myersville Md. 

Garland, WilUam Amos Bus. Ad 114 Broad St Hollidaysburg Penna. 

Gingrich, Wilmer Jay B. S Route 1 Annville Penna. 

Gittlen, Joseph B. S 2522 N. Second St Harrisburg. Penna. 

Gollam, Lucille Margaret Social Service. . . .20 S. Second St Lebanon Penna. 

Grabusky, Bernard Joseph Bus. Ad 508 Pine Hill St Minersville Penna. 



Grimm, Samuel OUver, Jr . 

Gutstein, Gert Martin 

Habbyshaw, William Richard. 

Haverstick, Donald 

Hess, Raymond Charles 

Hoffman, Martin Abraham . . . 
Holhnger, Eloise Mae. 



B. S 234 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

.B. S Berlin Germany 

.B. S 29 N. Railroad St Hummelstown Penna. 

.B. S 19 N. Lafayette Ave. . . .Atlantic City N. J. 

. B. S Jonestown Penna, 

A. B 24 E. Weidman St Lebanon Penna. 

.A. B 355 N. Tenth St Lebanon Penna. 

Homan, Mary Ellen History 423 Pershing Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Ealbach, Lillian Jeannette Social Service Southampton Penna. 

Kantor, Nathan Isidore B. S 2439 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Katchmer, George Andrew History 27 Black St Emeigh Penna. 

Kaufman, Earle Wilbur Bus. Ad 40 W. Grand Ave Tower City Penna. 

Keener, Harold Henry Bus. Ad Schaefferstown Penna. 

Etzmiller, Lynn Hoffman B. S R. D. No. 1 Halifax Penna. 

Knesel, Charles Ferrol B. S 618 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

Kohler, Fillmore Thurman A. B 2518 Francis St Baltimore Md. 

Koontz, Martha Jane B. S 1000 W. 38th St Baltimore Md. 

Kroll, Dorothea Betty A. B Chester N. Y. 

Kuhn, Frank Anthony Education 110 N. 2l8t St Camp HiU Penna. 

Lazin, Charles B. S 225 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Lenker, David Franklin Bus. Ad R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

Lenkei, Jesse Sanford Bus. Ad R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

Lennon, Frank Robert Education 174 6th Ave Clifton N. J. 

Lentz, Arthur Stanley B. S R. D. No. 1 Richland Penna. 

Long, Bradford Wilbur Bible and Greek . 823 Church St Lebanon Penna. 

Long, Robert Kohr B. S 120 MifSin St Lebanon Penna. 

Lyncd, John Howard Biology Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

McKnight, William Henry B. S 531 Haddon Ave CoUingswood N. J. 

Miller, Charles Richard Bible and Greek. .17 W. Main St Windsor Penna. 

Miller, Mabel Jane B A. B 313 E. Main St Mount Joy Penna. 

Moody, Harold LeRoy B. S 342 N. Partridge St Lebanon Penna. 

Munday, George Gerald Bus. Ad 930 Ogden Ave New York City N. Y. 

Nagle, Jonn Robert, Jr B. S R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

Nagle, Vincent Paul Bus. Ad R. D. No. 2 PottsviUe Penna. 

Nichols, Robert Alexander, 3rd.. B. S 810 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Peffley, Howard Northamer Philosophy 2541 N. 6th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Poet, Elizabeth Feme A. B 116 S. Main St Red Lion Penna. 

Prutzman, Frances Eleanor A. B 1196 Maple Ave Lancaster Penna. 

94 



CATALOGUE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Rakow, Alexander Boris Bus. Ad 427 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Rapp, Ralph Robert Chemistry 407 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Reber, Charles WiUiam Bus. Ad R. D. No. 3 Shippenaburg Penna. 

Reeser, Harry Merlow B. S 58 N. 10th St Lemoyne Penna. 

Reiff, Marian Louise A. B 902 Bridge &t New Cumberland.. .Penna. 

Reiff, Robert Heffelman B. S 902 Bridge St New Cumberland.. .Penna. 

Rex, John Lee B. S 118 Hoerner St Harrisburg Penna. 

Roemig, Irvin John Bus. Ad 640 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Rogow, Howard Alan A. B 2140 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Rosen, David Bus. Ad 18 S. Paxtang Ave Paxtang Penna. 

Rozman, Anthony John Bus. Ad 620 S. 2nd St Steelton Penna. 

Ruppersberger, Ellen Elizabeth . . A. B 4413 Belvieu Ave Baltimore Md. 

Rutherford, Betty Anne A. B 520 Cumberland St .... Lebanon Penna. 

Rutherford, Edna Carpenter Educaaon R D. No. 1 Bainbridge Penna. 

Schaeffer, John Ambrose Bus. Ad 579 Guilford St Lebanon Penna. 

Scherfel, William History R. D. No. 1 Pottstown Penna. 

Schindel, Louella Martin A. B 23 E. Irvin Ave Hagerstown Md. 

Sechrist, Warren Doyle Chemistry 78 E. Main St Dallastown Penna. 

Seiders, Irene Marie A. B R. D. No. 2 Hahfax Penna. 

Seiverhng, Daniel Snayder History 161 Church St Ephrata Penna. 

Shadle, Fred Ellsworth B. S Valley View Penna. 

Shatto, Isabel Virginia A. B State St Millersburg Penna. 

Shenk, Frank Landis. B. S 120 N. Grant St Palmyra Penna. 

Sickel, Charles Herbert Bus. Ad Green Terrace Annville Penna. 

Shder, Howard Benjamin B. S .500 Second St Minersville Penna. 

Smee, Frederick Wilson Bus. Ad 617 Oxford St Harrisbuig Penna. 

Smith, Stauffer Lloyd B. S 45 S. King St Annville Penna. 

Snyder, Harvey Bowman B. S 104 N. Lincoln St Cleona Penna. 

Spangler, Robert Gleim Bus. Ad 258 S. 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Stouffer, Paul Wilbur, Jr A. B 301 16th St New Cumberland. Penna. 

Streeter, Gordon Silas Education 15 Mission St Glens Falls N. Y. 

Trout, Floda Ellen A. B 313 Market St Lykens Penna. 

Tryanowski, William Walter B. S 102 Norwood Ave Lodi N. J. 

Ware, Evelyn Leona History 2034 BeUevue Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Weikert, Sara Ann A. B 1815 Boas St Harrisburg Penna. 

Witmer, Bernice Elizabeth Enghsh 3024 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Witmeyer, Carl John Bus. Ad 38 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Yingst, Eugene Raymond Bus. Ad 540 Spruce St Lebanon Penna. 

Zimmerman, Clinton Dewitt Bible and Greek. .3009 Walnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

Specials 

Kofroth, Arthur Hornberger B. S R. D. No. 1 Bareville Penna. 

Peiffer, Harold Bible and Greek. .350 Park St Ehzabethtown Penna. 

SATURDAY AND EVENING CLASSES 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Alleman, Mrs. Elsie B 1440 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Arnold, Dorothy Marie 3506 Jonestown Rd Progress Penna. 

Asper, Elda Mae 1616 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Baer, John 50 N. 13th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Beam, Ruth Hershey Penna. 

Beameaderfer, John W Schaefferstown Penna. 

Boss, Reba 702 East St Harrisburg Penna. 

Brooks, Aldridge 27 S. 16th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Burgner, Newton Milton 1016 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Curry, Mrs. Sarah Muth Hummelstown Penna. 

Esch, A. Glynn Box 75 Hershey Penna. 

Eager, Viola M 1217 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Galloppi, Carmella 250 Line St Camden N. J. 

Hemperly, Norman Albert 312 S. Lincoln St Lebanon Penna. 

Kenney, George Vincent 136 Hoerner St HarrLsburg Penna. 

Kessler, Elias Alvin R. D. No. 2 Annville Penna. 

King Anna Geib 209 S. Harrison St Palmyra Penna. 

King, Eleanor G 209 S. Harrison St Palmyra Penna. 

King, Ehzabeth Marguerite Richland Penna. 

Lamke, Cynthia M 230 Jefferson St Steelton Penna. 

Light, John C Front and Maple Sts. . . . Lebanon Penna. 

Lindsay, Harry L., Jr 1320 Green St Harrisburg Penna. 

O'Neal, Mary Ellen Palmyra Penna. 

Reigert, Marion 134 S. 5th Ave Lebanon Penna. 

95 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



STREET NUMBER 



POST OFFICE 



Rice, Lenore 228 Peffer St Harrisburg Penna. 

Spitler, Mrs. May Wike Schaefferstown Penna. 

Stemler, Hettye E 1714 State St Harrisburg Penna. 

Strickler, Mary M Schaefferstown Penna. 

Swanger, Harry J 821 Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Thomas, Mrs. Elizabeth D 23 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Wolfe, Mrs. Violet Eckert 212 S. 8th St Lebanon Penna. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Seniors 



Bryan, Frank Albert Pub. Sch. Music 

Butterwick, Helen Irene Pub. Sch. Music 

Cox, Isobel Louise Pub. Sch. Music 

Fink, Beatrice Lucille Pub. Sch. Music 

FrankUn, Nora Mae Pub. Sch. Music 

Hasbrouok, Gerald Laubach Pub. Sch. Music 

Heiland, Greta Annabelle Pub. Sch. Music 

Heller, Russell Kratzer Pub. Sch. Music. 

Johns, Robert March Pub. Sch. Music. 

Kindt, Emily Elizabeth Pub. Sch. Music. 

KnoU, Kathryn May Pub. Sch. Music. 

Maberry, Lucile Smoll Pub. Sch. Music. 

Miller, John Rodger Pub. Sch. Music. 

Mosher, Rita Marie Pub. Sch. Music. 

Oyler, Cecil Charles Pub. Sch. Music. 

Ralston, James Henry Pub. Sch. Music. 

Smith, Cyrus Good Pub. Sch. Music. 

YoQer, Christine Dorothy Pub. Sch. Music. 



STREET NUMBER 

1107 Second Ave 

218 Maple St 

23 W. Main St 

23 E. Locust St 

319 Cumberland St., 

146 Clymer St 

23 Henrietta St. ... 

42 N. 5th St 

306 S. 4th St 

132 Church St 



122 Paison Ave.. 

Box 117 

Simpson Road 

141 Juniper St. . . 
607 N. 4th St. . . . 

1224 Oak St 

Pa. Mihtary Reservation 



POST OFFICE STATE 

Asbury Park N. J. 

Annville Penna. 

Ephrata Penna. 

Lebanon Penna. 

Lebanon Penna. 

Reading Penna. 

Red Lion Penna. 

Emaus Penna. 

Lebanon Penna. 

Mohnton Penna. 

Wernersville Penna. 

Schuylkill Haven. . .Penna. 

Rebersburg Penna. 

Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Harrisburg Penna. 

Bellwood Penna. 

Lebanon Penna. 

Colebrook Penna. 



J 

Clippinger, Robert Smith Pub. Sch. Musi 

Fridinger, Evelyn Gertrude Pub. Sen. Musi 

Grangwer, Mildred White Pub. Sch. Mus: 

Geyer, Grace Eleanor Pub Sch. Musi 

Himmelberger, Helen Irene Pub Sch. Musi 

Hoffman, Arlene Ehzabeth Pub. Sch. Musi 

Immler, Luther Henri Pub. Sch. Musi 

Keene, Ruth Catherine AdeUne. Pub. Sch. Musi 

Koenig, William Ferdinand Pub. Sch. Musi 

Krum, June Harriett Pub. Sch. Musi 

Marbarger, Jean Isabel Pub. Sch. Musi 

Meinhardt, Amy Mae Pub. Sch. Musi 

Niessner, Virginia Helen Pub. Sch. Musi 

Patschke, Anita Eleanore Pub. Sch. Musi 

Ranck, Ida Irene Pub. Sch. Musi 

Say lor, Eugene Clyde Pub. Sch. Musi 

Shope, Donald Reigh Pub. Sch. Mus: 

Smith, Robert William Pub. Sch. Musi 

Treo, Marianna Jeanette Pub. Sch. Musi 

Yeakel, Dorothy Adelaide Pub. Sch. Musi 

Yingst, Kathryn Blossie Pub. Sch. Musi 

Yokmn, George Eugene, Jr Pub. Sch. Musi 

Zeiters, Dorothy Louise Pub. Sch. Musi 

Zettlemoyer, Elviu John Pub. Sch. Musi 



uniors 

124 W. Third St Waynesboro Penna. 

232 S. Second St Steelton Penna. 

20 East Second Ave Lititz Penna. 

c. .53 Brown St Middletown Penna. 

2319 Herr St Harrisburg Penna. 

38 W. Main St Ephrata Penna. 

R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

29 E. Maple St Cleona Penna. 

914 Spring St Reading Penna. 

c 112 W. Park Ave Myerstown Penna. 

c 102 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

c 315 Market St Lykens Penna. 

c 819 Bedford St Johnstown Penna. 

c 335 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

c Bareville Penna. 

c. .418 Reynolds Ave Lancaster Penna. 

c. .R. D. No. 2 Harrisburg Penna. 

c. .669 S. 27th St Harrisburg Penna. 

c. .516 Second St New Cumberland. . Penna. 

c. . 1948 Howard Ave Pottsville Penna. 

c. . 1012 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

c. . 1627 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

c. . 124 S. Hanover St Hummelstown Penna. 

c. .5410 Hadfield St West Philadelphia. .Penna. 



Sophomores 

Albert Mary Elizabeth Pub. Sch. Music. .134 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

Boyer, Geraldine Elizabeth Pub. Sch. Music . . 1951 Zarker St Harrisburg Penna. 

Callen, Matthew, Jr Pub. Sch. Music. 1713 N. 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Cook, Lucie Helen Irene Pub. Sch. Music. .R. D. No. 1 Dauphin Penna. 

Cotroneo, Mary Ann Pub. Sch. Music. .336 Cypress Ave Johnstown Penna. 

Druck, Margaret Elizabeth Pub. Sch. Music. 140 S. Franklin St Red Lion Penna. 

Geesey, Claude Dennis Pub. Sch. Music. 17 E. 3fd St Boyertown Penna. 

Hershey, Ruth Evelyn Pub. Sch. Music. .224 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

96 



CATALOGUE 



NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Hoffman, Henry Franklin Pub. Soh. Music. ,929 Pear St Pleading Penna. 

Hopp, Orval Woodrow Pub. Sch. Music. .R. D. No. 3 Myerstown Penna. 

Kreider, Christine Evelyn Pub. Sch. Music. .241 S. 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Lester, Philip Howard Pub. Sch. Music Wilhamstown Penna. 

Morrison, Anna Ehzabeth Ihib. Sch. Music. .534 Pine St Steelton Penna. 

Rider, Clayton Merle Pub. Sch. Music. . 226 W. Water St Middletown Penna. 

Schlosser, Verna Mae Pub. Sch. Music. .R. D. No. 2 Myerstown Penna. 

Schock, Jeanne Ehsabeth Pub. Sch. Music. .33 Frank St Mount Joy Penna, 

Strohman, H. Herbert Pub. Sch. Music. .403 N. 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Wise, Esther Naomi Pub. Sch. Music. .Broad St EhzabethviUe Penna. 

Yeagley, Harold George Pub. Sch. Music. .2114 Moore St Harrisburg Penna. 

Freshmen 

Bamberger, Lucille Henrietta, . . .Phib. Sch. Music. . 19 Hoke Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Bixler, Russell Jacob Pub. Sch. Music. .224 Ranasey Ave Chambersburg Penna. 

BUven, Jeanne Lois Pub. Sch. Music Sugar Loaf N. Y. 

Boyd, Margaret Ehzabeth Phib. Sch. Music. .118 E. High St Manheim Penna. 

Brown, Gladys Mae PHib. Sch. Music. .106 E. Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

Caton, Earl Thomas, Jr Pub. Sch. Music. .218 Hamilton St Harrisburg Penna. 

Coleman, Catherine Ruth Pub. Sch. Music, .304 Strauss Ave Johnstown Penna. 

Cox, Joan Elizabeth Pub. Soh. Music. .23 W. Main St Ephrata Penna. 

Creeger, Edwin Claude Pub. Sch. Music Thurmont Md. 

Dietrich, Ahcc Catherine Pub. Sch. Music West Hamburg . . . .Penna. 

Dreas, Laurene Ethel Pub. Sch. Music. .1428 Palm St Reading Penna. 

Drendall, Harry Iven Pub. Sch. Music Mountain Top Penna. 

Dyson, Frances Reese Pub. Sch. Music Nine Points Penna. 

Egh, Eleanor Pub. Sch. Music. .700 Hill St Lebanon Penna. 

Fauber, Joseph Wilmer Pub. Sch. Music. .613 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Gardner, Mildred Ehzabeth Pub. Sch. Music. .2.5 N. 19th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Hackman, Robert Gonder Pub. Sch. Music. .231 Spruce St Lititz Penna. 

Hains, Luke Elwood Pub. Sch. Music. L500 King St Avon Penna. 

Heilman, Alfred Henry Pub. Sch. Music .512 W. Main St Palmyra Penna 

Immler, Audrey Jane Pub. Sch. Music. .R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

Jordan, Arthur Cleveland Pub. Soh. Music. .8366 Charlecote Ridge. .Jamaica N, Y. 

Koons, Lucille Ellen PHib. Sch. Music. .219 E. Maple St Cleona Penna. 

Leff, Elaine Helen Pub. Sch. Music. .65 1st Ave Atlantic Highlands .N. J. 

Leff, Myrtle Gloria Pub. Sch. Music. .65 1st Ave Atlantic Highlands .N. J. 

Reed, Wilham Brandt Pub, Sch. Music. . 41 Mifflin St Pine Grove Penna. 

Rittle, Mildred Louise Pub. Sch. Music. .R. D. No. 2 Lebanon Penna. 

Shank, Katharine Pub. Sch. Music. .1109 Greenwood Ave Wilmette ILL 

Spangler, Mary Elizabeth Pub. Sch. Music. .239 S. 1st Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Strickhouser, Jean Luella Pub. Sch. Music York New Salem. . .Penna. 

Trupe, Thelma Leona Pub. Sch. Music. . 115 S. 9th St Akron Penna. 

Specials 

Full-Time 

BoUinger, Dorothy Pub. Sch. Music. .341 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Seitzinger, ftowell Mack Music 239 Elm Ave Hershey Peima. 

Zerbe, Harry William Viohn 47 N. Main St Pine Grove Penna. 

Part-Time 

Acker, Wilham Voice Cornwall Penna. 

Arnold, Lucille Piano R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Aungst, Randall Piano Class 315 Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Baker, Melvin Cornet 261 W. High St Hummelstown Peima. 

Bender, Elizabeth TeaU Voice, History.. . .532 Maple St AnnviUe Penna. 

Boltz, Joseph W Voice 315 Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Bomberger, Anna Mae Piano 124 E. Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

Bordwell, Margaret Voice 311 Frederick Rd Hagerstown Md. 

Boyer, Jean. Piano 5 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Brown, Charles WiUard McGaw. . Harmony, Piano.. Hershey Inds. School.. . .Hershey Penna. 

Brunner, Phylhs Piano AnnviUe Peima. 

Christ, Ruth Organ 136 E. Caracas Ave Hershey Penna. 

Clauser, W. Ray Voice CampbeUtown Penna. 

Coble, Ruth E Organ 344 N. W. End Ave Lancaster Penna. 

Cressman, Mrs. Catherine D Organ Centre Square Penna. 

Dietrich, Oleta Violin 221 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Donough, Mary J Cello 536 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Early, Josephine May CeUo 120 Center Ave Cleona Penna. 

Fasnacht, Harold Violin AnnviUe Penma. 

Fink, John Violin 22 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 



97 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Fisher, Ethel Mae Violin, Harmony. 517 Cedar St., N. W. . . .Washington D. C. 

Flom, Esther Voice 2200 N. 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Galloppi, Carmella Profeta Piano 250 Line St Camden N. J. 

Garrett, Mrs. Pauline Voice 1529 Elm St Lebanon Penna. 

Goodman, Virginia Organ East Main St Annville Penna. 

Gruber, Jane Piano 222 College Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Hauer, Marlin L Piano 306 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Heilman, EUzabeth Piano 551 Weidman St Lebanon Penna. 

Heisey, Ralph R Voice 427 N. 7th Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Houser, Maeredith Organ, Piano 218 W. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Keller, Ethel Kano 240 W. Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Keller, Louise Voice 240 W. Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Kemp, Regina Piano Fredericksburg Penna. 

Kerr, EUzabeth Piano 812 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Knoll, Robert Voice 734 HiU St Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Edwin U Piano Class 141 N. Lancaster St AnnviUe Penna. 

KroU, Dorothea Betty Piano Chester N. Y. 

Lehr, Evelyn Jean Piano 164 N. 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Leno, Carl Voice 114 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Light, Anna Louise Voice 314 S. 12th St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Doris E Piano Class 19 Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Light, Louise Rano Class CornwaU Penna. 

Longenecker, Mary Grace Cornet Maple St Annville Penna. 

McClure, Jeanne Piano Class 223 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Marbarger, John Porter Voice 102 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

March, Dorothy Rano Class 41 Church St Annville Penna. 

MarshaU, EUzabeth TSno 427 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Means, Harriet Pit..io 4 S. Fourth St Lebanon Penna. 

Metzger, Edith Maude Voice 37 N. Union St Middletown Penna. 

Meyer, Thomas Voice Columbia St SchuylkiU Haven. . .Penna. 

Millard, Marion Piano Class Annville Penna. 

MiUer, Mrs. Glen Voice 5 N. 6th St Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Jack E Voice Hershey Inn Hershey Penna. 

Miller, Marlin L Piano 118 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Mills, Catherine Lucile Hist. Music 444 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Moyer, Betty Piano R. D. No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

Nagle, Violet Mae Piano 327 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Parker, Mrs. M. M Voice 204 E. Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Payne, W. PurneU Organ Community Club Hershey Penna. 

Phillippy, Howard B Voice 420 N. Raihoad St Palmyra Penna. 

Reiff, Marian Louise Piano, Harmony. . 902 Bridge St New Cumberland. . . Penna. 

Rice, Elizabeth Piano Class 34 Manheim St AnnviUe Penna. 

Rohland, Dorothy Louise Piano 101 S. Lancaster St Annville Penna. 

Roliland, Wayne Ellsworth Trombone 101 S. Lancaster St AnnviUe Penna. 

Ruppersberger, Ellen EUzabeth . Voice, Harmony. .4413 Belvieu Ave Baltimore Md. 

Ryan, Doris Voice 30 N. 7th St. Lebanon Penna. 

Seylar, Evelyn Voice R. D. No. 2 Halifax Penna. 

Shadle, Fred Ellsworth Trombone VaUey View Penna. 

Shroyer, Ann Elizabeth Piano Class 83 E. Sheridan Ave. . . . AnnviUe Penna. 

Smith, Mildred E Voice 612 S. Railroad St Myerstown Penna. 

Snyder, Harvey Bowman Voice 104 N. Lincoln St Cleona Penna. 

Snyder, PauUne Piano, Organ, Harmony Denver Peima. 

Sprague, Patricia Piano Class 113 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Sprague, Susan Piano Class 113 E. Main St AnnviUe Penna. 

Stonecipher, Mrs. Blanche Voice 471 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Stonecipher, Vir^nia Piano Class 471 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Stoner, M. Louise Voice 562 S. 3rd St Lemoyne Penna. 

Strickler, Hugh Cello 203 Hathaway Park Lebanon Penna. 

Swope, Daniel August, Jr" Voice R. D. No. 1 Myerstown Penna. 

Thomas, Doris Piano Class 22 E. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Thomas, Robert Piano Class 22 E. Sheridan Ave AnnviUe Penna. 

Umberger, Molly Elizabeth Voice, Hano Schaefferstown Penna. 

Walter, Norman Bass VioUn 1800 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Williams, Harry Piano Class Annville Penna. 

WilUams, Jack Lyter Piano Class AnnviUe Penna. 

Wilt, Martha Piano Class 50 CoUege Ave Annville Penna. 

Witmeyer, Eleanor Piano Class CoUege Ave AnnviUe Penna. 



98 



CATALOGUE 
EXTENSION COURSES 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Barber, Myrtle B 55 N. 9th St Lemoyne Penna. 

Beck, Clara F 513 Spring St Middletown Penna. 

Bickel, Daisy M 1251 Market St Harrisburg Penna. 

Bitting, Ernest Jones 1601 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Bressler, Dorothy 527 W. 16th St New Cumberland . .Penna. 

Brooks, Aldridge 27 S. 16th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Bucher, K. Ezra 308 S. Market St Mechaniosburg Penna. 

Evans, Beth 744 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Galloppi, Carmella 250 Line St Camden N. J. 

Garner, Ruth L 2603 Boas St Harrisburg Penna. 

Garver, Elma Dorothy 211 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gibbel, Hilda 1 254 Crescent St Harrisburg Penna. 

Goodall, Ulna Fassette 216 S. 19th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Hess, Mabel M Harrisburg Hospital Harrisburg Penna. 

Hubler, Erma M 2030 N. 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Johnson, Eva Miles 826 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kenney, George Vincent 136 Hoerner St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kessler, EUas A R. D. No. 2 Annville Penna. 

King, Elizabeth Marguerite Richland Penna. 

Lamke, Cynthia M 230 Jefferson St Steelton Penna. 

Lee, M. Louise 229 Pine St Middletown Penna. 

Lochner, Ccciha S R. D Dillsburg Penna. 

Lochner, Hilbert V Mountainside Colony . . . Dillsburg Penna. 

Mackley, Eugene F 1926 N. 4th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Miller, David E R. D. No. 1..' Middletown Penna. 

Oliver, Mrs. Luella Davis 3301 Jonestown Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Rebuck, L. Jane 259 Union St Middletown Penna. 

Rice, Lenore G 228 Peffer St Harrisburg Penna. 

Schell, Rachel Marie 2031 Green St Harrisburg Penna. 

Seitz, Marlin H R. D. No. 1 Camp Hill Penna. 

Showers, Jane Ehzabeth 229 Pine St Middletown Penna. 

Sollenberger, John M 2324 Hoffer St Harrisburg Penna. 

Stephenson, Iris 1 1925 Kensington St Harrisburg Penna. 

Strayer, Mabel 2212 Penn St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wentz, Myrtle 58 Main St Middletown Penna. 

Williams, Mrs. Grace W R. D. No. 1 Linglestown Penna. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1937 

Albert, Mary Ehzabeth 134 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

Alexander, Mabel Seltzer btevens House Lancaster Penna. 

Asper, Elda Mae 1616 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Aungst, Clarence C New Holland Penna. 

Barnhart, George R 124 N. 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Barthold, Homer M 1425 Elm St Lebanon Penna. 

Beck, Carl R 347 Pine St Steelton Penna. 

Bender, Ehzabeth Teall 532 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Bollinger, Dorothy 341 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Bollman, John A 439 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Brace, William Shannon 519 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Brubaker, Sara Louise 120 E. Penn Avenue. . . .Cleona Penna. 

Byerly, David A 3001 N. 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Doboy, Joseph G Central City Penna. 

Donmoycr, Homer Elwood 423 S. 12th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ellenbcrger, Herman A R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Enck, Paul S 704 N. 16th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Engle, Eleanor C 622 N. Lincob St Palmyra Penna. 

Esch, A. Glynn Fhnton Penna. 

Flom, Esther Anna 2200 N. 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Frank, F. Kathleen 1927 N. 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gallagher, Lillian B 124 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

Garzella, Michael 192 Parsonage St Pittston Penna. 

Greene, Leona Maw-Kee-Tavern Seville Ohio 

Greiner, Mary R 1225 Colebrook Rd Lebanon Penna. 

Groff, Raymond M R. D. No. 1 Bareville Penna. 

Groninger, Gerald Mexico Penna. 

Hartman, Elbridge B 948 S. 18th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Hershey, E. Frantz Hershey Penna. 

99 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Hertzler, G. Edgar R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Hess, Mabel Matilda Hamsburg Hospital Harrisburg Penna. 

Hoerner, Violette Bertha 269 W. High St Hummelstown Penna. 

Hoover, Elizabeth Rebecca 17 N. 24th St Penbrook Penna. 

Horst, Cora M R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Houtz, Ethel Mae Elizabethville Penna. 

Humphreys, Dorothy Mae 1115 N. 17th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kaufman, Earl Wilbur 40 W. Grand Ave Tower City Penna. 

Kipp, John M R. D. No. 1 Newport Penna. 

Kreamer, Dorothy EUen 472 E. Maple St Annville Penna. 

Kreider, Christine E 241 S. 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Lamke, Cynthia M 230 Jefferson St Steelton Penna. 

Lester, Philip WiUiamstown Penna. 

Light, L. Lloyd Seaford Del. 

Linn. Emily E 106 W. Main St Tremont Penna. 

Marbarger, Jean Isabel 102 W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Maurer, Marguerite E 1544 Oak St Lebanon Penna. 

McNeal, Esther C 2140 N. Fifth St Harrisburg Penna. 

Miller, Paul Alfred 346 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Mills, Catherine Lucile 444 E. Main St Annville Penna. 

Meyer, John R. D. No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

Moyer, Joseph L R. D. No. 3 Harrisburg Penna. 

Moyer, Warren Franklin 16 Mifflin St Hue Grove Penna. 

Musser, J. Charles 2 Center Square Ehzabethtown Penna. 

Newman, Harold Ehzabethtown Penna. 

Norton, Ruth V 110 Barbara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Oiler, A. Kathryn 105 Garfield St Waynesboro Penna. 

Patrick, Melvin E 708 N. Raihoad St. . . .Pabnyra Penna. 

Patschke, Anita E 335 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

Pollard, Aura Stiers 3008 N. 6th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Price, Wanda L 131 Fifth St Carney's Point . . . .N. J. 

Raab, Charles Henry 284 S. Walnut St Dallastown Penna. 

Rakow, WiUiam Walter 427 N. 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Rice, Lenore Gertrude 228 Peffer St Harrisburg Penna. 

Seiders, Lloyd 131 Washington St. ... Ehzabethtown. . . . Penna. 

Spitler, Mrs. May Wike Schaefferstown Penna. 

Stoner, Edward W 734 S. Wood St Middletown Penna. 

Strouse, Hetty Virginia 3724 Fifth Ave Altoona Penna. 

Thomas, Joseph B 38 Ehzabeth St Bordentown N. J. 

Treo, Marianne 516 Second St New Cumberland.. . Penna. 

Umberger, Grant Jay R. D. No. 5 Lititz Penna. 

Wealand, Pauhne Joan 703 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Weaver, George N 211 Fifth St Huntingdon Penna. 

Webb, Mary G 149 E. Middle St Gettysburg Penna. 

Weimer, Margaret 228 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Wert, Russell H 837 Willow St Lebanon Penna. 

Weyland, Charlotta K Hathaway Park Lebanon Penna. 

Witter, John E Newmanstown Peima. 

Zartman, Mary 450 N. 9th St Lebanon .Penna. 

Zechman, Harry W 17 E. Pottsville St Kne Grove Penna. 

Conservatory of Music 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Barthold, Homer M Voice 1425 Ehn St Lebanon Penna. 

Bixler, Roy Voice St. Clair Penna. 

Boltz, Joseph W Voice W. Sheridan Ave Aimville Penna. 

Brechenmaker Voice Hiimmelstown. . . .Penna. 

Brubaker, Sara Louise Voice Cleona Penna. 

Buck, Ruth L Voice 552 Radnor St Harrisburg Penna. 

Deraco, Teresa Voice 814 N. 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ferguson, Mabel Voice W. Main St Hummelstown. . . .Penna. 

Fink, Beatrice Voice 23 E. Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Hershey, Ruth Organ Hershey Penna. 

Houser, Maeredith Organ Annville Penna. 

Johns, Robert Voice 306 S. 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Knoll, Robert Voice 734 Hill St Lebanon Penna. 

Leno, Carl Voice W. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Marbarger, Jean Voice Palmyra Peima. 

Metzger, Edith Organ, Voice Middletown Penna. 

Meyer, Thomas Voice 505 W. Columbia St SchuyMl Haven . . Penna. 

100 



CATALOGUE 



MAJOR 



STREET NUMBER 



Mills, Mary Grace Organ 444 E. Main St. ... 

Morrison, Anna Voice 534 Pine St 

Patschke, Anite E Organ 335 Canal St .... 

PMllippi. Harry Voice 420 N. Railroad St. 

Rvan, Doris Voice N. 7th St 

Schreffler, A Voice 32 Trinidad Ave.. . . 

Snyder, Pauline Organ 

Sii mm y, Helen Hummer Voice 

Yordy, Alma Voice 33 E. Penn Ave 

Zeiters, Margaret Voice 124 S. Hanover St . 



POST OFFICE STATE 

. Annville Penna. 

. Steelton Penna. 

. Lebanon Penna. 

. Palmyra Penna. 

. Lebanon Penna. 

. Hershey Penna. 

. Denver Penna. 

. Mt. Gretna Penna. 

. Cleona Penna. 

.Hummelstown. ...Penna. 



SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR, 1937-1938 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Men 



College 

Graduate Students 1 

Seniors 36 

Juniors 36 

Sophomores 50 

Freshmen 84 

Specials 2 

Saturday and Evening Classes 11 

220 
Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 8 

Juniors 8 

Sophomores 8 

Freshmen 10 

Specials — Full-time 2 

Specials — Part-time 28 

64 

Extension Department 10 

Summer Session, 1937 

CoUege 39 

Conservatory of Music 10 

49 

Total in all Departments 343 

Names repeated 26 

Net enrollment in all Departments 317 



Women 



Total 



2 


3 




25 


61 




21 


57 




22 


72 




30 


114 

2 




20 


31 




120 




340 


10 


18 




16 


24 




11 


19 




20 


30 




1 


3 




59 


87 




117 




181 


26 




36 


40 


79 




17 


27 




57 




106 


320 




663 


52 




78 



268 



585 



101 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR, 1936-1937 



College Men 

Graduate Studenta 2 

Seniors 40 

Juniors 41 

Sophomores 43 

Freshmen 88 

Saturday and Evening Classes 13 

227 
Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 8 

Juniors 8 

Sophomores 10 

Freshmen 14 

Specials — Full-time 1 

Specials — Part-time 27 

68 

Extension Department 14 

Summer Session, 1936 20 

Total in all Departments 319 

Names repeated in Conservatory, Extension and Summer 

Session 22 

Net total in all Departments 307 



Women 



Total 



1 


3 




20 


60 




26 


67 




23 


66 




29 


117 




31 


44 




130 


357 




8 


16 




10 


18 




18 


28 




14 


28 




3 


4 




58 


85 




111 


179 




33 


47 




22 


42 




296 




625 


25 




47 


271 




578 



REGISTRATIONS 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1936-1937 
College: Sophomore 

Beamesderfer, Lloyd Bible and Greek. .1014 N. 10th St Reading Penna. 

Freshmen 

Boran, Robert Paul Biology 518 Sunbury St Minersville Penna. 

Wert, Robert Browning Mathematics 837 Willow St Lebanon Penna. 

Witmer, Bernice EngUsh 3024 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

(transferred from Conservatory) 
Evening Classes 

Burgner, Newton M 1016 Miffin St Lebanon Penna. 

Evans, Beth 744 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Vogelsong, Charles A., Jr R. D. No. 1 Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Conservatory of Music: Freshman (Transferred from College Department) 

Foreman, David A Pub. Sch. Music. .515 W. Main St Waynesboro Penna. 

Specials — Part-time 

Bolhnger, Harold Voice R. D. No. 1 Sheridan Penna. 

Haldeman, Dorothy Piano Lawn Penna. 

Meyer, Thomas Voice Schuylkill Haven . . . Penna. 

Millard, Marian Piano Class Annville Penna. 

Ryan, Doris Voice 30 N. 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Saylor, Gardner T Piano College Ave Annville Penna. 

Seylar, Evelyn Voice R. D. No. 2 Halifax Penna. 

Extension Courses 

Blumenthal, Babette 641 Schuylkill St Harrisburg Penna. 

Curry, Sarah 336 W. Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Fox, Margaret 235 Walnut St Steelton Penna. 

Goldberger, Sidney 2544 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kitzmiller, Dorothy 41 Penn Ave Steelton Penna. 

Kurzenknabe, Susan 247 Emerald St Harrisburg Penna. 

Place, Susan 611 Benton St Harrisburg Penna. 

Tack. Ruth 3215 N. 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Stauffer, Charlotte 1823 Briggs St Harrisburg Penna. 

Willst«in, Mary 1217 Green St Harrisburg Penna. 

102 



Degrees 



Conferred June 7, 1937 

Honorary Degrees 

Charles A. Mutch Doctor of Divinity 

Paul E. V. Shannon Doctor of Divinity 

S. Paul Weaver Doctor of Divinity 

C. Valentine Kirby Doctor of Fine Arts 

Bachelor of Arts 



Claire Elizabeth Adams 
Harold Ebling Beamesderfer 
Gerald Eckels Bittinger 
Ruth Loretta Buck 
Thelma Beatrice Denlinger 
Maxine Larue Earley 
John Kenneth Eastland 
Martha Clippinger Faust 
William George Grosz 
Lois Marie Harbold 
Mary Jean Harnish 
Harold Chester Hollingsworth 
Charles Bamburgh Kinney, Jr. 
William Arthur Leech 



Rose Eleanor Lynch 
Sara Katherine Meckley 
Harry Edgar Messersmith 
Vera Belle Mulhollen 
Ellwood Edward Needy 
Anna Herr Orth 
Ruth Virginia Phenicie 
Harold Phillips 
Marjorie Helen Smith 
Delores Romaine Stiles 
Louis Ernest Straub 
Flora Mae Strayer 
Duey Ellsworth Unger 
Pauline Kathryn Yeager 



Bachelor of Science 



With a Maj 
Richard Albert Baus 
Paul Cyrus Billett 
John Marlin Brosious 
Karl R. Flocken 
Norman Lazin 

Burritt Keeler Lawlin Lupton 
Francis William MacMullen 
James Henry Miller 
Joseph Wilbur Prowell 
Howard Franklin Reber 



or in Science 

Frank Allen Rutherford, Jr. 
Jack Edward Schmidt, Jr. 
Donald Emerson Shay 
Richard Thomas Smith 
Clair Albert Snell 
John Louis Speg 
Edwin Homer Tallman 
John Wilson Trego 
Paul Kenneth Waltz 
John Zimmerman 



With a Major in Business Administration 

Edward Robert Bachman Robert Eugene Kell 

William Henry Earnest Grace Marie Naugle 

Arthur Richard Heisch George Light Smeltzer 

With a Major in Education 

Charles Elsworth Bartolet* Gladys K. Withelder 
Theodore Mandon Loose 



* Deferred from June 8, 1936. 



103 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Bachelor of Science 

Music Education 



With a Major in 
EHzabeth Bingaman 
Edna Annabelle Binkley 
WilHam Edward Black 
Dorothy EHzabeth Ely* 
Ruth Estelle Goyne 
Russell Condran Hatz 
Robert Clinger Heath* 
Theodore Kenneth Karhan 
Esther Leotta Koppenhaver 



Sara Elizabeth Light 
Gayle Elizabeth Mountz 
Marlin Ray O'Neal 
Cordelia Rebecca Sheaffer 
Richard Sillik Slaybaugh 
Henry Cyrus Steiner 
Chester Arthur Stineman, Jr. 
Earl Clayton Unger 



CONFERRED AUGUST 2, 1937 
Bachelor of Arts 

Paul Alfred Miller Mary Gilbert Webb 

Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Business Administration 
John Adam Bollman Homer Elwood Donmoyer 

With a Major in Education 
Eleanor Carolyn Engle Emily E. Linn 

With a Major in Music Education 
Homer Merkel Barthold Rose Stuart Tschopp 

Graduates Cum Laude 
Richard Albert Baus Rose Eleanor Lynch 

William Harry Earnest Francis William MacMullen 

Burritt Keeler Lawlin Lupton Grace Marie Naugle 



ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP 
Phi Alpha Epsilon 

Honorary Scholarship Society 



Richard Albert Baus 
William Harry Earnest 
Karl R. Flocken 
Charles Bamburgh Kinney. Jr. 
Burritt Keeler Lawlin Lupton 

* Deferred from June 4, 1934. 



Rose Eleanor Lynch 
Francis William MacMullen 
Grace Marie Naugle 
John Zimmerman 



104 



Index 



PAGE 

Absence 30, 36 

Academic Standing of College 21 

Administration, Officers of 9 

Admission, General Requirements 27 

Admission, Specific Requirements 26 

Admission, Music Department 79 

Addresses, Faculty and Administrative Officers 90 

Advanced Standing 28 

Advisers 28 

Aid to Students 36 

Aims of the College 20 

Application for Admission 27 

Assistants, Administration 9 

Assistants, Graduate 16 

Assistants, Student 16 

Astronomy, Courses in 42 

Athletic Association 23 

Bible, Courses in 42 

Biology, Courses in 43-46 

Board of Trustees 7 

Board of Trustees, Committees 8 

Board of Trustees, Officers 8 

Boarding 33 

Breakage Deposit, Laboratories 33 

Breakage Deposit, Rooms 34 

Buildings and Grounds 2, 22 

Business Administration, Courses in 46-49 

Business Administration, Outline of Course 73 

Calendar, College 4, 5 

Chemistry, Courses in 49-51 

Class Standing 29 

Classification 28 

Clubs, Departmental 24 

Committees of Board of Trustees 8 

Committees of the Faculty 15 

Conditions, Scholastic 30 

Conservatory of Music 79-89 

Corporation, The 7 

Corporation, Officers of the 8 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Credits 29 

Day Student Rooms 34 

Debating 23 

Deficient Students 30 

Degrees Awarded 1937 103, 104 

105 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

PACB 

Degrees Granted 39 

Degrees, Requirements for 39, 40 

Dictation, Courses in Music 64, 83 

Discipline 30 

Dormitory Proctors 9 

Dramatics 23 

Drawing, Mechanical, Course in 69 

Economics, Courses in 69, 70 

Education, Courses in 51-53 

English, Courses in 54-55 

Enrollment, Student, 1936-1937 102 

Enrollment, Student, First Semester, 1937-1938 101 

Entrance Requirements, College 26, 27 

Entrance Requirements, Conservatory 79 

Equipment 22 

Eurythmics, Course in 88 

Examinations, Supplemental 31 

Expenses, College 32-35 

Expenses, Conservatory of Music 89 

Extension Courses 72 

Faculty, College 10-12 

Faculty, Conservatory of Music 13, 14 

Fees, Graduation 35 

Fees, Laboratory 33 

Fees, Matriculation 32 

Fees, Practice Teaching 35 

Fees, Re-examinations 31 

French, Courses in 55-57 

Freshman Week 28 

Geology, Courses in 56 

German, Courses in 56, 58 

Grading System 29 

Graduation Fees 35 

Greek, Courses in 58 

Gymnasium 22 

Harmony, Courses in 64, 83 

Hazing 30 

History, Courses in 59-61 

History of Music, Courses in 65, 87 

History of the College 19 

Hours, Limit of 29 

Hygiene, Courses in 67 

Infirmary 22 

Individual Instruction, Music 88 

Instrumental Music, Instruction in 85, 86 

Journalism 23 

Junior Department, Music 88 

Laboratories 22 

Laboratory Fees 33 

106 



CATALOGUE 

PAGE 

Latin, Courses in 61, 62 

Library 22 

Literary Societies 23 

Loan Funds 37 

Location 21 

Mathematics, Courses in 62, 63 

Matriculation Fee 32 

Medicine, Plan of Study Preparatory for 74, 75 

Methods in Music, Courses in 84, 85 

Music Education, Outline of Course .79-81 

Musical Organizations 24, 86 

Music, Department of 64 

Music, Junior Department 88 

Music and the A. B. Degree 86, 87 

Music, Minor 64 

Officers of Administration 9 

Officers of Board of Trustees 8 

Outline of Courses 

Bachelor of Arts 41 

Bachelor of Science with Major in Science 41 

With Major in Business Administration 73 

With Major in Education 77, 78 

With Major in Music Education 79-81 

Pre-Medical 74, 75 

Pre-Theological 75 

Social Service 76 

Payment of Fees 35 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 24 

Philosophy, Courses in 65, 66 

Physical Education 66-68 

Physics, Courses in 68, 69 

Placement Bureau 78 

Political Science, Courses in 70 

Practice Teaching, College 52 

Practice Teaching, Conservatory of Music 85 

Practice Teaching Supervisors. 17 

Pre-Medical, Outline of Course 74, 75 

Pre-Theological, Outline of Course 75 

Presidents, College 18 

Prizes Awarded 1937 24 

Probation 30 

Psychology, Courses in 53, 54 

Public School Music, Outline of Course 79-89 

Quality Points 39 

Re-examinations 30 

Register of Students 91-101 

Registration 27 

Registration, Change of 28 

Registration, Late 28 

107 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

PAGE 

Registration, Pre- 27 

Religious Organizations 23 

Requirements for Admissions, College 26, 27 

Requirements for Admission, Conservatory 27, 79 

Requirements for Graduation 39, 40 

Residence Requirements for Graduation 39 

Room Equipment 34 

Room Rent 34 

Room Reservation 34 

Saturday Classes 72 

Scholarships 36-38 

Sickness 36 

Sight Singing, Courses in 64, 83 

Social Service, Outline of Course 76 

Sociology, Courses in 71, 72 

Student Activities 23 

Student Activities and Tuition Fees 32 

Student Assistants 16 

Student Recitals 89 

Summary of the Enrollment 101, 102 

Summer Session 72 

Teaching, Requirements for Certificates 77 

Trust Funds 36-38 

Trustees, Board of 7 

Tuition and Student Activities Fees 32 

Tuition Rebate, Ministers' Children 32 

y. M. and Y. W. C. A 23 



108