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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE 




1943-1944 



VOLUME XXXI 



NUMBER 11 



FEBRUARY, 1943 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley194344leba 



5 H E R I D A N 



A VENUE 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CAMPUS 

KEY TO NUMBERS 

1 Administration Building 

2 Engle Conservatory 

3 North Hall 

4 Men's Dormitory 

5 Library 

6 West Hall 

7 Residence of President 

8 Heating Plant 

9 South Hall 

10 Conservatory Annex 

A United Brethren in Christ Church 

B Evangelical Lutheran Church 

C Post Office 

D Tennis Courts 



MAIN STREET 




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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE 




1943-1944 



Register for 1942-1943 
Announcement of Courses for 1943-1944 



Volume XXXI 



February, 1943 



Number 11 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Entered as Second-Class matter at Annville, Pa., under the Act of August 24, 1912 



College Calendar* 



FIRST SEMESTER— 1942 
1942 

Sept. 14-16 Monday- Wednesday Freshman Orientation; registration 

Sept. 17 Thursday, 10 :00 a.m Opening Exercises 

Nov. 7 Saturday Home-Coming Day ; Meeting of 

Board of Trustees 

Nov. 13 Friday Mid-semester reports due 

Nov. 26 Thanksgiving Day 

Dec. 12 noon-Dec. 28, 8 :00 a.m Christmas Recess 

1943 

Jan. 11-15 Monday-Friday Registration for second semester 

Jan. 22 Friday, 10 :30 a.m Midyear Commencement 

Jan. 23 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Jan. 25 Monday, 8 :00 a.m Second semester begins 

Apr. 9 Friday, 8 :00 p.m Music Festival 

Apr. 22, 5 p.m. -April 26, 5:00 p.m Easter Recess 

May 10-14 Monday-Friday Registration for 1943-1944 

May 21 Friday Meeting of Board of Trustees 

May 23 Sunday, 10 :30 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

May 24 Monday, 10 :00 a.m Seventy-fourth Commencement 



FIRST SEMESTER— 1943 
1943 

Sept. 13-15. ... Monday to Wednesday Freshman Orientation; registration 

Sept. 16 Thursday, 10 :00 a.m Opening Exercises 

Nov. 12 Friday Mid-semester reports due 

Nov. 24, 1 p.m.- Nov. 29, 8 :00 a.m Thanksgiving Recess 

Dec. 18, 1 p.m.- January 3, 8:00 a.m Christmas Recess 

1944 

Jan. 10-14 Monday-Friday Registration for second semester 

Jan. 22 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Jan. 24 Monday, 8 :00 a.m Second semester begins 

Apr. 6, 5 p.m.- April 11,5 :00 p.m Easter Recess 

Apr. 20-21 Thursday-Friday, 8 :00 p.m.. Music Festival 

May 8-12 Monday-Friday Registration for 1944-1945 

May 19 Friday Meeting of Board of Trustees 

May 21 Sunday, 10 :30 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

May 22 Monday, 10 :00 a.m Seventy-fifth Commencement 



* In view of the national emergency the college calendar is subject to change. 

4 



CALENDAR FOR 1943-1944 




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The Corporation 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A.M., B.D.. D.D 3228 N. Second St.. Harrisburg, Pa 1943 

Rev. P. B. Gibble, A.M.. B.D.. D.D 36 N. College St., Palmyra, Pa 1943 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, A.B., D.D 937 W. Walnut St., Lancaster.Pa 1943 

Rev. D. E. Young. A.M., B.D., D.D 704 N. 16th St., Harrisburg, Pa 1943 

Mr. E. W. Coble 344 N. W. End Ave., Lancaster, Pa 1944 

Rev. W. A. Wilt, D.D Annville, Pa 1944 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, A.M., D.D 3000 Herr St., Harrisburg, Pa 1944 

Mr. John Hunsicker S. Lincoln Ave., Lebanon, Pa 1944 

Mr. Roy Garber Columbia, Pa 1945 

Mr. John E. Gipple 1251 Market St.. Harrisburg, Pa 1945 

Mr. O. E. Good. A.B 340) Walnut St., Harrisburg, Pa 1945 

Rev. H. E. Miller, A.M., B.D., D.D 346 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa 1945 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A.M., LL.D 2615 N. 2d St., Harrisburg, Pa 1945 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. J. H. Ness. A.B., B.D., D.D 547 Madison Ave., York, Pa 1943 

Rev. G. I. Rider, A.B., D.D 712 Church St., Hagerstown, Md 1943 

Mr. Albert Watson 448 W. High St., Carlisle, Pa 1943 

Mr. Huber D. Strike, A.B. , M. A 1410 Mt. Rose St., York, Pa 1943 

Rev. P. E. V. Shannon, A.B., B.D., D.D. . .114 N. Newberry St., York, Pa 1944 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D 106 E. Franklin St., Hagerstown, Md. .1944 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B. , LL.D Hagerstown, Md 1944 

Mr. R. G. Mowrey, A.B Quincy. Pa 1944 

Rev. C. Guy Stambach, A.B., B.D., D.D.. .Mechanicsburg, Pa 1945 

Mr. Harold T. Lutz 1002 E. 36th St., Baltimore, Md 1945 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, B.D., Ph.D., D.D 219 S. 2nd St., Chambersburg, Pa 1945 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL. B 4023 Roland Ave., Baltimore, Md 1945 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst, A.B., B.D., D.D 2 Adams St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 1945 

Representatives from the Virginia Conference 

Rev. J. E. Oliver. A.B., B.D 200 Jefferson Ave., Petersburg, W. Va. 1943 

Mr. G. C. Ludwig Keyser, W. Va 1943 

Rev. Carl W. Hiser, A.B Martinsburg, W. Va 1944 

Rev. E. E. Miller, A.B. , D.D Harrisonburg, Va 1944 

Rev. J. Paul Gruver, A.B., B.D 704 N. Queen St., Martinsburg, W.Va.1945 

Rev. C. ,W. Tinsman Innwood, W. Va 1945 

Alumni Trustees 

Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley, A.B. ,'18. .11 Green Hill Lane.Overbrook, Philadelphia 

Pa 1943 

Mr. J. L. Appenzellar, A.B., '08 827 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa 1944 

Mr. E. D. Williams, A.B., 17 Annville, Pa 1945 

Trustees at Large 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf, Ph.D., LL.D., D.D. 1509 State St., Harrisburg, Pa 1943 

Dr. H. M. Imboden, A.B., M.D., Sc.D 850 Park Ave., New York City 1943 

Mr. Maurice R. Metzger, A.B., LL.B .... Middletown, Pa 1943 

Members of the college faculty who are heads of departments are ex officio members of 
the Board of Trustees. 

6 



Officers and Committees of the 
Board of Trustees 



President E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice President H. H. Baish 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 

Executive Committee 

C. A. Lynch, Chairman 

E. N. Funkhouser S. C. Enck W. N. McFaul 

J. H. Ness J. P. Gruver S. H. Derickson 

H. E. Miller 

Finance Committee 
L. A. Sattazahn, Chairman 
E. N. Funkhouser, C. A. Lynch, Pres. S. H. Derickson, Treas. 

Pres. Board Trustees 

H. H. Baish, 1942 G. C. Ludwig, 1943 F. B. Plummer, 1944 

J. E. Gibble, 1944 

Auditing Committee 
H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman M. R. Fleming J. E. Oliver 

Nominating Committee 

D. E. Young, Chairman C. G. Stambach G. C. Ludwig 

L. W. Yardley 

Faculty Committee 
H. H. Baish, Chairman C. A. Lynch J. H. Ness 

G. C. Ludwig M. R. Metzger 

Buildings and Grounds Committee 
P. B. Gibble, Chairman C. A. Lynch C. W. Hiser 

H. T. Lutz H. H. Shenk Mrs. Louisa W. Yardley 

Library and Apparatus Committee 
W. A. Wilt, Chairman C. A. Lynch P. E. V. Shannon 

J. E. Oliver P. A. W. Wallace 

Farm Committee 
J. E. Gipple, Chairman C. A. Lynch S. H. Derickson 

Albert Watson G. C. Ludwig 

Publicity Committee 
P. A. W. Wallace, Chairman C. A. Lynch M. L. Stokes 

H. T. Lutz Mrs. Louisa Yardley S. O. Grimm 

7 



Officers of Administration 



Clyde A. Lynch, President 

A.B., A.M., D.D., Lebanon Valley College 

B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary 

A.M., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

LL.D., Albright College 



A. H. M. Stonecipher, Ph.D Dean of the College 

Samuel O. Grimm, A.M., Sc.D Registrar 

Mary E. Gillespie, A.M Dean of Women 

Helen Ethel Myers, A.B Librarian 

J. W. Esbenshade, A.B Secretary of the Finance Committee 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Gladys M. Fencil, A.B Assistant Registrar 

Dorothy F. Grimm, A.B., B.S Assistant Librarian 

Verda M. Miles Secretary to the President 

Margaret L. Rice. . .Assistant to the Secretary of the Finance Committee 
Mrs. Esther W. Madciff, A.B. . .Secretary to Director of Conservatory 



DORMITORY PROCTORS 

Men's Dormitory Mr. and Mrs. Marino Intrieri 

North Hall Mary E. Gillespie 

South Hall Esther Henderson 

West Hall Lena L. Lietzau 



College Faculty 



Hiram H. Shenk 

A.B., Ursinus College; A.M., LL.D., Lebanon Valley College 
Professor of History 

Samuel H. Derickson 

B.S., M.S., Sc.D., Lebanon Valley College 
Professor of Biological Science 

Samuel Oliver Grimm 

B.Pd., Miller sville State Normal School; A.B., A.M., Sc.D., Lebanon Valley College 
Registrar; Professor of Physics and Mathematics 

Mrs. Mary C. Green 

Paris, 1901-1914 

Professor of French 
Andrew Bender 

A.B., A.M., Lebanon Valley College; Ph.D., Columbia University 
Professor of Chemistry 

Paul A. W. Wallace 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Professor of English 

G. A. Richie 

A.B., D.D., Lebanon Valley College; B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary; 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Bible and Greek 
Milton L. Stokes* 

B.A., M.A., LL.B., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Professor of Business Administration and Economics 

Stella Johnson Stevenson 

B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Professor of French Literature 



On leave of absence, second semester, 1942-43. 

9 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
V. Earl Light 

A.B., M.S., Lebanon Valley College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Associate Professor of Biological Science 

Lena Louise Lietzau 

Ph.D., University of Vienna 

Professor of German 
George G. Struble 

B.S. in Ed., M.S. in Ed., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Associate Professor of English 
L. G. Bailey 

A.B., Lincoln Memorial University ; M.A., University of South Carolina; 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Professor of Psychology 
Alvin H. M. Stonecipher 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Dean; Professor of Latin Language and Literature 
Jerome W. Frock 

B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College 
Director of Physical Education for Men and Coach 

Esther Henderson 

B.S. in Ed., Miami University; M.A. in Health and Physical Education, 
Columbia University 

Coach and Director of Physical Education for Women 
Amos H. Black 

A.B., Marietta College; A.M., University of West Virginia; Ph.D., Cornell University 

Professor of Mathematics 
Paul O. Shettel 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Gettysburg College; S.T.D., Westminster Theological Seminary 

Acting Professor of Philosophy and Religion 
Edward M. Balsbaugh 

B.Pd., Shippensburg State Normal School; B.S., D.Ped., Lebanon Valley College 

Assistant Professor of Education ; Director of Placement Bureau ; 
Alumni Secretary 

10 



CATALOGUE 
Clyde S. Stine 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Professor of Education and Instructor in Public Speaking 
Frederic K. Miller 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Acting Professor of History 

Marino Intrieri 

B.S., Loyola University, Baltimore 

Instructor in Physical Education for Men and Coach 
Jermain D. Porter 

A.B., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physics 
Ralph Martin McGrath 

Ph.B., M.S., University of Chicago 
Acting Professor of Business Administration and Economics 



Doris B. Magee, R.N. 
Resident Nurse 



Rev. W. A. Wilt, D.D. 
College Pastor 



11 



Conservatory Faculty 



Mary E. Gillespie, M.A. . .Director of the Conservatory of Music 

Valparaiso University, 1912-1913; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-1916; B.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1926; Dalcroze School of Music, 
New York City, Summer, 1942; Public School Music Supervisor at Scotts- 
burg, Indiana, and Braddock, Penna. ; Director of Music at Women's Col- 
lege, University of Delaware, 192S-1930; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1934; Director of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of 
Music, 1930 — ; Dean of Women, 1937 — 

Ruth Engle Bender, A.B Piano 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory, 1915-1916; Grad- 
uate of New England Conservatory of Music, 1918; Pupil of Lee Pattison, 
1916-1918; Teacher of Piano and Theory, Lebanon Valley College, 1919-1921; 
Pupil of Ernest Hutcheson and Frank LaForge, New York City, 1921-1924; 
Director of Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1924-1930; Pro- 
fessor of Piano, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1930 — 

R. Porter Campbell, Mus.B Organ 

Diploma in Pianoforte, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory, 1915; Diplo- 
ma in Organ and Bachelor of Music degree, ibid., 1916; Teacher of Piano- 
forte, History and Theory, 1915-1917; U. S. Service, 1917-1919; Pianoforte 
and Pedagogy under Aloys Kramer and Arthur Freidheim, Summer Session, 
New York, 1921; Master Course in Organ Playing with Pietro A. Yon, 
New York, Summer of 1923 and Season of 1924; with Pietro A. Yon in 
Italy, Summer of 1924; Organist St. Luke's Episcopal Church, Lebanon, Pa.; 
Professor of Organ, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1920 — 

Harold Malsh Violin 

Graduate of the Institute of Musical Art, New York City (Dr. Frank Dam- 
rosch, Director); Private study with Louis Bostelmann, New York City; 
Ottakar Cadek, New York City; David Nowinsky, Philadelphia; Ben Stad, 
Philadelphia; Teacher in the Music and Art Institute, Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; 
Professor of Violin, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1924 — 

Alexander Crawford Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens, H. Sutton Goddard, and Wm, Shakespeare, 
London, England; Private Studio, Denver, Colorado, 1916-1923; Summer 
1919, Deems Taylor; Private Studio, Carnegie Hall, N. Y. C, 1924-1927; 
Vocal Pedagogy with Douglas Stanley, New York City, 1935-1939; Pro- 
fessor of Voice, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1927 — 

Edward P. Rutledge, M.A Director of Musical Organizations 

Institute of Musical Art, New York, 1919-1921; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1925; Teacher of Instrumental Music, Public Schools, 
Neodesha, Kansas, 1925-1931; Instructor in Music Education, Summer Ses- 
sions, Columbia University, 1926-1931; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1931; Instructor in Music Education, Summer Sessions, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1937-1941; Professor of Band and Orchestra Instru- 
ments, and Director of Musical Organizations, Lebanon Valley College 
Conservatory of Music, 1931 — 

12 



CATALOGUE 
D. Clark Carmean, M.A Music Education 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1932; Supervisor of Instrumental Music, Erie County, 1927- 
1929; Teacher of Music, Cleveland City Public Schools, 1929-1931; Teacher 
of Instrumental Music, Public Schools, Neodesha, Kansas, 1931-1933; Pro- 
fessor of Band and Orchestra Instruments, Lebanon Valley College Con- 
servatory of Music, 1933 — 

W. Merl Freeland, A.B.* Piano 

Oklahoma City University, 1926-1928; B.A., Oklahoma University, 1932; 
Ten years private teaching in Oklahoma; Accompanist and Student Conduc- 
tor of Oklahoma University Men's Glee Club, 1930-1931; Conductor of Men's 
Chorus, Oklahoma City, 1930-1931; Fellowship in Juilliard Graduate School 
of Music, New York City, 1932-1936; Student of Madame Olga Samaroff- 
Stokowski, 1932 — ; Extensive concert tours throughout the United States and 
Canada with Earle Spicer and Joseph Bentonelli; Professor of Piano, Leba- 
non Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1938 — 

Virginia Darnell, M.A Harmony and Music Education 

University of California, 1926-1927; University of Southern California, 
Summer, 1931; Coe College, 1932; Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
1932-1933, 1937-1938, B.S., 1938; M.A., 1939; Season of 1937-1938, Wom- 
en's Symphony of New York City; Extensive tours throughout the United 
States with concert orchestras; Supervisor of Elementary Instrumental Mu- 
sic, Shreveport, Louisiana, 1938-1940; Private teaching in Los Angeles, 
New York City, and Shreveport; Associate Professor of Music Education, 
Lebanon Valley College, 1940 — 

Joseph Battista Piano 

Winner of D. Hendrik Ezerman Scholarship in Philadelphia, Pa., 1935; 
Student of Mme. Olga Samaroff-Stokowski, Philadelphia Conservatory of 
Music; Fellowship in Juilliard Graduate School of Music, New York City, 
1936-1939; Student of Mme. Olga Samaroff-Stokowski; Illustrated lectures 
with Mme. Olga Samaroff-Stokowski for Metropolitan Opera Guild, 1937- 
1938; Accompanist for Charles Hackett, voice instructor, Juilliard School 
of Music, 1938-1939; Winner of Youth Contest, Philadelphia, 1938, award- 
ing appearance with Philadelphia Orchestra; re-engaged in 1939 for regular 
pair of concerts in an all Richard Strauss program; Assistant to Mme. Olga 
Samaroff-Stokowski at Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, 1940; New York 
Debut, Town Hall, 1940, Town Hall recital, 1942; First winner of the 
Guiomar Novaes Award, resulting in a concert tour of Brazil, South 
America, as representative of the American pianistic youth, 1941; Professor 
of Piano, Lebanon Valley College Conservatory of Music, 1940 — 

Frederick Schweppe Voice 

Minneapolis School of Music, diploma, 1922; MacPhail School of Music, 
Mus.B., 1924; Valparaiso University, A.B., 1931; Syracuse University, 
Mus.M., 1934; Vocal Study, New York City, 1938-1942; Student of Hazel 
Dieseth, Harold Butler, Isaac Van Grove, Vittorio Trevisan, Karl Kritz 
and Cesare Sturani; Music Education, Minneapolis, Minn.; Crookston, 
Minn.; Rochester, N. Y. ; Voice and Music Education, Northland College, 
Ashland, Wis., 1925-1928; Head, Department of Music, Valparaiso Uni- 
versity, 1929-1936; Operatic debut, New York City, 1938; Member, St. 
Louis Municipal, Newark Civic, Columbia, Brooklyn, Opera Companies; 
Oratorio and Concert Work, 1938-1942; Professor of Voice, Lebanon Val- 
ley College, 1942— 



On leave of absence with the U. S. Army. 

13 



Committees, Assistants, Supervisors 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY, 1942-1943 

Admissions — Grimm, Balsbaugh, Gillespie 

Bulletin — Wallace, Gillespie, Grimm 

Chapel— Richie, Rutledge, Shettel 

Class Absences — Stokes, Balsbaugh, Light 

Commencement — Black, Bailey, Grimm 

Credits — Dean and Heads of Departments Concerned 

Curriculum — Wallace, Derickson, Miller 

Debating — Black, Stine, Stokes 

Dramatics — Struble, Carmean, Wallace 

Educational Policy — Shenk, Derickson, Stevenson 

Examinations — Stine, Bailey, Balsbaugh 

Extension — Summer School — Stokes, Balsbaugh, Stine 

Freshman Week — Stine, Bailey, Gillespie 

Honorary Degrees — Derickson, Richie, Shenk 

La Vie Collegienne — Struble, Black, Wallace 

Library — Myers, Lietzau, Porter 

May Day — Henderson, Rutledge, Stokes 

Men's Day Student Congress — Light, Shenk, Shettel 

Men's Senate — Stonecipher, Black, Miller 

N. Y. A. — Shenk, Bender, Frock 

Phi Alpha Epsilon — Stonecipher, Shenk, Stevenson 

Quittapahilla — Struble, Carmean, Stevenson 

Special Programs — Wallace, Bender, Miller 

Student-Faculty Council — Stonecipher, Gillespie, Richie 

Student Finance — Stokes and Organization Advisers 

Women's Commuters' Council — Henderson, Stevenson, Green 

W. S. G. A. — Gillespie, Lietzau, Wood 

Advisers 

Freshmen : 

A.B. — Stonecipher, Stevenson, Struble 
B.S.— Biology— Light 

Chemistry — Bender Pre-Legal — Stokes 

Economics — Stokes Pre-Medical — Derickson, Bender 

Education — Stine Pre-Theological — Richie 

Music Education — Gillespie 
"L" Club — Frock, Miller 
Life Work Recruits — Richie, Shettel, Stine 
Literary Societies: 

Philokosmian — Grimm Clionian — Myers 

Kalosetean — Derickson Delphian — Henderson 

The President and the Dean are ex officio members of all committees. 

14 



CATALOGUE 

SUPERVISORS OF PRACTICE TEACHING 
Annville High School 

E. M. Balsbaugh 

B.Pd., Shippensburg State Normal School; 
B.S., D.Ped., Lebanon Valley College 

Department of Education, Lebanon Valley College 
Charles G. Dotter 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 
Supervising Principal 

Ada C. Bossard 

A.M., Lebanon Valley College 
French and European History 

J. Gordon Starr 

B.S. in Ed., Lebanon Valley College 
History and English 

Irene Miller Disney 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

Mathematics 
Mildred E. Myers 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; A.M., Columbia University 

Latin 
Carl W. Ziegler 

A.B., Elizabethtown College 

English and German 
Henry J. Hollinger 

A.M., Columbia University 

English 
Paul Billett 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

Science 
Isabelle M. Mitchell 

B.S., Westminister College 
Science 



IS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANTS, 1942-1943 

Bible and Greek Cyril J. Little 

Biology Donald F. Bartley 

Biology John E. Hampton 

Biology Mary Ellen Johns 

Biology Marian M. Kreider 

Biology H. Dennis Sherk 

Business Administration Mary Ellen Klopp 

Chemistry Sidney M. Bashore 

Chemistry Elizabeth A. Kreiser 

Chemistry .- Stephen J. Metro 

Chemistry Harry K. Miller 

Chemistry Robert K. Ness 

Chemistry LeRoy B. Yeatts, Jr. 

Education and Psychology Katherine H. Allen 

Education and Psychology Verna P. Stonecipher 

English Mrs. Jean McKeag Billett 

English Mary Jane Fulton 

English E. Louise Keller 

English Dorothy Jean Light 

English Betty Mae Minnich 

French and Spanish Vera B. Shoop 

German Dorothy Jean Light 

History Mary E. Mehaffey 

History Katharine J. Sherk 

Mathematics Robert K. Ness 

Mathematics Jacob L. Rhodes 

Philosophy Viola E. Shettel 

Physics Frederick S. Frantz 

Dean of Women Ruth E. Haverstock 

Alumni Office Grace E. Smith 

Placement Bureau Jean L. Daugherty 



PRESIDENTS 

Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D 1866-1871 

Lucian H. Hammond, A.M 1871-1876 

Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M 1876-1887 

Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D 1887-1889 

Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M 1889-1890 

E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D 1890-1897 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S 1906-1907 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D 1907-1912 

Rev. George Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., LL.D 1912-1932 

Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D., Ph.D., LL.D 1932- 

16 



Lebanon Valley College 



HISTORY 

THE quiet growth of Lebanon Valley College, now in its sev- 
enty-seventh year, has behind it an instructive and stimulating 
history. It is the history, not of a few brilliant men, but of a 
people and an ideal. The people were the members of the eastern 
conferences of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ; the 
ideal, that of a co-educational institution of learning in which the 
highest scholarship should be fostered in a Christian atmosphere, 
and in which religion should subsist without sectarianism. To give 
form to that ideal, Lebanon Valley College was founded at Annville, 
Pa., in 1866. 

To an outside observer, the history of the College from its open- 
ing by President Thomas Rees Vickroy on May 7, 1866, in a build- 
ing donated by the old Annville Academy and with a student body 
of forty-nine, might seem to consist merely in increases in the num- 
ber of students, corresponding increases in the faculty, the purchase 
of new grounds, and the erection of new buildings. But the inner 
history was marked by a long and bitter struggle against what often 
seemed insuperable obstacles, a struggle carried on by heroic men 
and women on the faculty, among the students, and in the conferences. 
There was, to begin with, the old controversy over the wisdom 
of providing higher education for the Church's young people. In the 
first year of the College's life a fierce attack upon the educational 
policy of which it was the fruit came near to putting an end to it at 
once. But the conference stood loyally by the institution it had cre- 
ated and fought the matter through, though it meant in the end the 
dropping of valued members from the Church. 

Some twenty years later another crisis developed over the question 
of relocating the College. The debate, which lasted for some years, 
so seriously divided the friends of the College that in the uncertainty 
all progress came to a stop. In the emergency Dr. E. Benjamin 
Bierman was called to the presidency, which he assumed in 1890. 
On the wave of enthusiasm which he was able to set in motion, the 
policy of permanency and enlargement was accepted. Buildings were 
renovated, the student body increased, and when that year the College 
received the Mary A. Dodge Scholarship Fund of ten thousand dol- 
lars — by far the largest single amount that had ever come to the 
institution — Lebanon Valley College was enabled to close its first 
quarter century with a complete renewal of the confidence in which 
it had been founded. yj 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

In 1897, under the presidency of Dr. Roop and with the assistance 
of old friends and new patrons, the College entered on a fresh period 
of expansion which saw the erection of the greater part of the pres- 
ent plant. Engle Music Hall, the Carnegie Library, and North Hall 
were first built. The destruction by fire of the old Administration 
Building tested the loyalty of college supporters but did not interfere 
with the program of expansion. The friends of the College rallied to 
build a new and larger Administration Building, a residence for the 
men, and a heating plant. Dr. Roop also provided proper quarters 
and modern equipment for the science departments. His vision and 
initiative laid the foundation for the success that has since come to 
the College. 

The inauguration of the late President George Daniel Gossard 
marks the beginning of the greatest era of prosperity. During his 
term of office the student body trebled in numbers, the faculty in- 
creased not only in numbers but also in attainments, and the elimi- 
nation of all phases of secondary education raised the institution to 
true college status. During this same period two great endowment 
campaigns were completed. Through the splendid support of the 
conferences, the alumni, and other friends, the College was made 
economically sound and her permanency placed beyond question. 

As Lebanon Valley College moves forward under the energetic 
guidance of her president, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, she looks back with 
a feeling of reverence over her past. She sees there the small but 
proud history of a democratic institution, established by a pious peo- 
ple in the faith that "The truth shall make you free," and carried 
through dark days by the unswerving devotion and self-sacrifice of 
a faculty and a constituency poor in the world's goods but rich in 
faith in the ideals for which the College was founded. Lebanon 
Valley College is proud of its beginnings, and now, strengthened as 
it is in its economic sinews, with policies established and a vigorous 
administration assured, it looks forward in the spirit of its founders 
to taking rank among the leading educational institutions of the state. 

The pressure of the war has not led Lebanon Valley College to 
forget its prime function as a Liberal Arts College. The curriculum 
has undergone little change in subject matter. 

The war has, nevertheless, caused important changes in point of 
view. The emergency has set in a clearer light the essential char- 
acter and responsibilities of the institution, and it has enabled those 
in charge of certain courses, especially in the field of literature and 
the social sciences which in recent years have been confused by 
some uncertainty of aim, to find a firm center and a new orientation. 

It is, therefore, in the consciousness that she is engaged in the 
essential work of equipping young people with the knowledge, vision, 

18 



CATALOGUE 

and openness of mind without which our liberties can neither be 
understood nor maintained, that Lebanon Valley College devotes 
herself to the tasks of classroom and laboratory in the midst of a 
great war. 

A STATEMENT OF AIMS 

The motto of Lebanon Valley College, Libert as Per Veritatem, re- 
veals the educational policy of its founders, which remains essen- 
tially unchanged. While, in conformity with recent trends toward 
specialization, certain courses of an immediate and practical value 
have been added to the curriculum, the institution remains devoted 
to the purposes of a liberal education. It seeks to produce, first of 
all, cultured men and women: persons who are familiar with the 
great books and the "chief rival attitudes towards life" of all times, 
familiar with the principles that underlie all human relationships, 
and able to think for themselves on the problems around them. 

The College provides opportunities for certain types of profes- 
sional education without prejudicing its function as a liberal arts 
college. Students are prepared here for careers in commerce, teach- 
ing, and music, into which fields they may enter immediately on 
graduation. Fully accredited pre-professional courses are offered in 
medicine, law, and the ministry. Such courses, however, are not 
pursued in isolation, but are taken in connection with studies in the 
liberal arts. 

The College is in harmony with the American way of life. Appro- 
priate courses prepare students for citizenship in our democracy; 
various student activities provide training in cooperation and lead- 
ership ; and the responsibilities of campus government are shared by 
faculty and students alike. 

The College is also in harmony with the Christian way of life. 
Student organizations provide centres of religious influence. The 
faculty cooperates in fostering Christian ideals of conduct. The 
whole college meets daily in a short service of devotion. All students 
are encouraged to be faithful to the church of their choice. Through 
such means, and with the help of non-sectarian courses in Bible, 
Religion, and Philosophy, students are assisted in formulating for 
themselves a satisfying philosophy of life and in linking themselves 
with the spiritual forces necessary to their personal development and 
service to humanity. 

All these aims are the more readily attained since Lebanon Valley 
College limits its enrollment to approximately four hundred full-time 
students, and so not only enables its faculty members and administra- 
tive officers to give much individual attention to the academic, per- 
sonal, and social problems of the students, but also permits every 

19 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

student to engage in useful extra-curricular activities. The intangible 
benefits of college life are powerfully fostered in the friendly atmos- 
phere of such a restricted community. 

ACADEMIC STANDING 

Lebanon Valley College is fully accredited by the Department of 
Public Instruction of Pennsylvania and by the Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools of the Middle Atlantic States and Maryland. 
It is a member of the American Association of Colleges and of the 
American Council on Education. 

Lebanon Valley College is an Associate Member of the National 
Association of Schools of Music. The Conservatory of Music is fully 
accredited by the Department of Public Instruction of Pennsylvania. 

LOCATION 

The College is situated in Annville, twenty-one miles east of Har- 
risburg, in the heart of Lebanon Valley, midway between two ranges 
of the Allegheny system, the Blue Mountains and the South Moun- 
tains. It is on the Benjamin Franklin Highway and the Philadel- 
phia-Reading Railroad, and is quickly reached by train or bus from 
Harrisburg, Reading, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The campus, of twelve acres, occupies a high point in the centre 
of Annville. Around it are grouped twelve college buildings, includ- 
ing the Administration Building, the Carnegie Library, the Engle 
Conservatory of Music, the Men's Dormitory, and three dormitories 
for women : North Hall, South Hall, and West Hall. 

The Administration Building contains, in addition to the admin- 
istrative offices, the college lecture rooms, science laboratories, bi- 
ology and chemistry museums, and a gymnasium. 

Accommodations for study are provided on the lower floor of the 
library. These rooms are under the supervision of a librarian. The 
Y. M. C. A. lounge and the society halls are also available to mem- 
bers as study quarters. 

New quarters on Sheridan Avenue provide lounge rooms for the 
day students. 

Extramural and intramural sports are encouraged, the College 
providing equipment where needed. The following special provisions 
have been made for sports : an athletic field of five and one-half acres, 
five tennis courts, an archery range, a field for girls' hockey, a 
hand-ball court, and a gymnasium. 

A well-equipped and comfortable Infirmary has been provided, 
with a resident graduate nurse in attendance. 

20 



CATALOGUE 

THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

The present library equipment is being expanded rapidly to meet 
the growing needs of the College. 

The library already contains a good collection of the foundation 
books needed by the various college departments. It is excellently 
equipped with works of general reference, such as encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, atlases, indexes, and year books. The periodicals room 
is provided with a large and growing list of technical journals and 
magazines of general interest. 

Incoming students are instructed in the use of catalogues and ref- 
erence books, and in the best methods of working in the library. 
Books, unless specially reserved for reference work, may be taken 
out by students. Inter-library loan courtesies enable the librarian to 
provide student or faculty member with books not found on the 
college shelves. 

The library is open during these hours : 
Monday to Friday. 8 a.m. to 5 :45 p.m. ; 7 p.m. to 9 :30 p.m. 
Friday evening. ... 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 
Saturday 9 a.m. to 12 noon ; 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 

The recently acquired Heilman Library, housed in special rooms 
in the Carnegie Library, provides materials for the study of the 
history of printing in Europe and America. It is especially rich in 
Pennsylvania items, including many of the rare Saur Bibles and a 
large collection of Ephrata imprints. 



21 



Student Activities 



. . The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian 

V ns . a J! Associations hold weekly devotional services and con- 

duct special courses in Bible and Mission Study. 
They are centers of the spiritual interests of the students, and de- 
serve the hearty support of all connected with the College. 

. . Wholesome social life on the campus is promoted by 

Societies the societies of the College, of which there are four: 

the Philokosmian, Kalozetean, Clionian, and Delphian, the last 
two conducted by the girls of the College. The social life of the 
campus centers largely around these societies, which also produce 
plays and present other programs of a literary or cultural nature. 
They are valuable agencies of college life, and students are advised 
to unite with one of them. 

The Athletic Association is composed of all the stu- 
. . . . dents of the College and the cooperating Alumni. 

Athletics are controlled by a Council consisting of 
representatives of the Faculty and Alumni. 

T ..A group of students possessing ability in management 

and writing is selected annually by the Faculty to 
bring out a weekly periodical, La Vie Collegienne, devoted to col- 
lege and student interests. La Vie affords training of a highly spe- 
cialized kind to those interested in editorial work. Other opportuni- 
ties for journalistic training are afforded by The Quittapahilla, the 
annual year-book published by the Junior Class ; and by the Green 
Blotter Club, whose membership consists of a selected group of 
writers, of whom four are chosen each year from among the first 
year students. 

_ . . The College is a member of the Debating Association 

of Pennsylvania Colleges, and supports a vigorous 
Debating Club from which teams are selected to represent the Col- 
lege in intercollegiate debates with neighboring colleges and uni- 
versities, such as Franklin and Marshall, Bucknell, Elizabethtown, 
Albright, Ursinus, Western Maryland, and Susquehanna. Member- 
ship in the Debating Club is open to all students, and four teams are 
selected each year by competitive try-outs. 

_ . Those interested in dramatics, and especially pros- 

pective teachers who wish to prepare themselves for 
coaching high school plays, will find experience in the annual Junior 

22 



CATALOGUE 

Play, the anniversary plays presented by the literary societies, and 
the monthly meetings of the Wig and Buckle Club. "Cub" member- 
ship in the Wig and Buckle is open to all students who desire 
experience in any branch of dramatics — acting, directing, stage 
mechanics, etc. Regular membership is limited to those who, on 
taking part in a college production, show real proficiency. 

This honorary scholarship society gives recognition 
F 1 .. " to those who have achieved a high scholarship record 

during their college course. Those who have attained 
an average of 88 per cent during the first three and a half years of 
their college course and are of good moral character are eligible for 
membership. 

. Those who play musical instruments or who sing are eli- 
gible for membership in the musical organizations main- 
tained on the campus, such as the L. V. C. Band, Symphony Orches- 
tra, College Orchestra, Glee Club, and College Chorus. For detailed 
announcement concerning these organizations turn to page 94 of 
this catalogue. 

Many department clubs have been formed on the 
Department campus by groups of students interested in certain 

fields of investigation. At informal gatherings reports 
on current topics are presented and discussed, and visiting lecturers 
are entertained. The following is a list of such clubs : the Biology 
Club, Chemistry Club, Commerce Club, German Club, Green Blotter 
Club, International Relations Club, Wig and Buckle Club, and Life 
Work Recruits. 



PRIZES, 1942 
Max F. Lehman Memorial Mathematics Prize 
Established by the Class of 1907, in memory of a classmate. 
Awarded to that member of the freshman class who shall have at- 
tained the highest standing in mathematics. 

The prize was awarded in 1942 to Norma Viola Kiscadden. 

Sophomore Prize in English Literature 
Established by the Class of 1928. Awarded to the three best stu- 
dents in Sophomore English (English 26), taking into account 
scholarship, originality, and progress. 

The prize was awarded in 1942 to Betty Mae Minnich, Samuel 
Hower Beamesderfer, and Ruth Emily Haverstock. 

23 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Music Prizes 

Awarded to the student in the Junior Class and in the Senior 
Class rating the highest scholastically in music subjects only. 

Awarded in 1942 to Herbert Shenk Curry (Senior), and Jessie 
Custer Robertson (Junior). 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award 

Established in 1935 in memory of Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner, Class 
of 1883, by Daniel E. Burtner, Samuel J. Evers, and Evers Burtner. 

Awarded to an outstanding member of the Junior Class selected 
by the faculty on the basis of scholarship, character, social promise, 
and financial need. 

Awarded in 1942 to Grace Eleanor Smith. 



24 



Admission 

Persons desiring to enter Lebanon Valley College should make 
application on official forms which may be obtained from the Regis- 
trar. The application should be accompanied by a transcript of the 
high school record on the form provided for that purpose. 

Students coming from other institutions must present certificates 
of good standing and honorable dismissal. 

All new students are required to present a physician's certificate 
showing that they have been successfully vaccinated within a period 
of seven years before their entrance to the College. 

Graduates of standard high schools (approved by the Pennsyl- 
vania State Department of Education, by the Association of Colleges 
and Preparatory Schools of the Middle Atlantic States and Mary- 
land, or by the state university of the state in which the school is 
located) may be admitted on presentation of certificates, signed by 
the proper authorities, showing the completion of a senior high 
school course or its equivalent. 

Such certificates must show that the candidate has adequate prep- 
aration to enable him to proceed successfully with the subject matter 
which is basic in the course to which admission is sought. 

If the candidate for admission is a graduate of a four-year high 
school, 16 units must be presented; if a graduate of a three-year 
senior high school, 12 units must be presented. One unit of mathe- 
matics and one of a foreign language from the 9th grade may be 
included in determining satisfactory preparation. 

During the war emergency the College will, in conformity with 
the policy of the Pennsylvania Department of Public Instruction, 
admit properly certified high school students at the end of the first 
half of their final year at school. 

Units acceptable for admission are from the following groups of 
subjects: English, Foreign Languages (ancient or modern), Mathe- 
matics (Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry), Sciences (Biology, 
Chemistry, General Science, Physics), Social Studies (Civics, His- 
tory, etc.). Other subjects may be accepted at the discretion of the 
Committee on Admissions. 

DISTRIBUTION OF SUBJECTS 

A proper preparation for college includes credit in each of the 
above groups. To promote such distribution the college requires the 
candidate for admission from a Senior High School to present the 
following : 

25 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Minimum Requirements 

English 3 units 

Foreign Language 2 " 

Mathematics 2 " 

Science (Laboratory) 1 unit 

Social Studies 1 " 

Candidates coming from the four-year High School will be ex> 
pected to have 4 units in English. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

In addition to the above minimum requirements, candidates should 
be careful to include subjects useful or necessary as preparation for 
the subjects to be pursued in college. Attention is especially directed 
to the following recommendations. 

Foreign Languages 
If languages and literature are to be emphasized in college, 3 to 6 
units of foreign languages, including Latin, are recommended as a 
basis for more satisfactory work in these fields. 

Mathematics 

Candidates planning to go on with science should include at least 
IV2 units of Algebra and a unit of Plane Geometry. Those who plan 
to proceed with the mathematical sciences (Mathematics and Phys- 
ics) should include 2 units of Algebra, a unit of Plane Geometry, 
and, wherever possible, Solid Geometry. 

Science 

Candidates who expect to emphasize the sciences should present 
1 unit in each of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

Music 
Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Edu- 
cation must (1) be a graduate of a four-year High School, and (2) 
possess a reasonable amount of musical intelligence and accomplish- 
ment, such as : 

(a) The possession of an acceptable singing voice and of a fairly 
quick sense of tone and rhythm ; 

(b) Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair degree 
of accuracy and facility ; 

(c) Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument rep- 
resenting two years' study. 

REGISTRATION 

Registration is the process of class assignment and is completed 
over the signatures of the adviser and the Registrar. No student will 

26 



CATALOGUE 

be admitted to any class without the proper registration card, which 
is sent direct to the department of instruction from the Registrar's 
office. 

The registration days for the collegiate year 1943-1944 are as 
follows: First semester, Sept. 15 for upper-class students and Sept. 
13 for freshmen; second semester, Jan. 10-14. 

To expedite the opening of the school year in 
Pre-registration September> all stu dents of 1942-1943 will be regis- 
tered during the month of May for the ensuing year's work. A fee 
of one dollar will be charged when this is not attended to at the 
time appointed. Changes in registration will be made in September 
without charge. 

Students registering later than the days specified will 
R . , .. be charged a fee of one dollar. Students desiring to 

register later than one week after the opening of the 
semester will be admitted only by special action of the proper com- 
mittee. 

When change of registration is advisable or necessary 

ange o such changes must be made in the same way as the 

xx6£fistr3.tion 

original registration, namely, over the signatures of 

the adviser and Registrar. Such changes will not be permitted after 

the close of the second week of the session. 

_, .„ . Classification will be made on the following credit 
Classification , • -r-u ^.j- -i/r •* o t. 

basis: .Freshman standing, 16 units; Sophomore 

standing, 30 semester hours and 30 quality points; Junior standing, 
60 semester hours and 60 quality points ; Senior standing, 90 semes- 
ter hours and 90 quality points. 

. , , Credits for work done in other institutions, for which 

Standine advanced standing is desired, must be submitted to 

the Dean and a copy filed with the Registrar. 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

A few days are set apart at the beginning of the college year 
for the purpose of helping new students to become familiar with 
their academic surroundings. There are lectures, placement tests, 
hikes, and informal meetings with members of the faculty in their 
homes. New students are made acquainted with the College tradi- 
tions, and are advised concerning methods of study and the use of 
the library. 

All incoming students are required to take a thorough physical 
examination during the registration period. 

27 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ADVISERS 

The student will find little opportunity for specialization in the 
first year at College, but before registering for the second year he 
must choose a department in which to pursue work of special con- 
centration. This department shall be known as his major. The head 
of the department in which a student has elected to major becomes 
the adviser for that student. The adviser's approval is necessary 
before a student may register for or enter upon any course of study, 
or discontinue any work. He is the medium of communication be- 
tween the Faculty and the students majoring in his department, and 
stands to his students in the relation of a friendly counselor. 



Credits 



Class standing will be determined three times a year 
„ ,. for faculty consideration: nine weeks after the opening 

of College, and at the end of each semester. 
The standing in each course is indicated generally by classification 
in seven groups, as follows: 

A (90-100%) signifies that the record of the student is distin- 
guished. 

B (80-89%) signifies that the record of the student is very good. 

C (70-79%) signifies that the record is good. 

D (60-69%) signifies the lowest sustained record. 

E (below 60%) imposes a condition on the student. 

F (Failed completely) signifies that the student must drop or repeat 
the subject and cannot be admitted to subjects dependent thereon. 

I (Incomplete) signifies that work is incomplete, but otherwise 
satisfactory. 

LIMIT OF HOURS 

Every resident student must take at least fifteen hours of work as 
catalogued. Seventeen hours is the maximum permitted, except to 
students whose previous record shows a majority of A's. Such stu- 
dents are permitted a maximum of twenty hours. 



28 



Discipline 



The rules of the College are as few and simple as the proper reg- 
ulation of a community of young men and women will permit. The 
dormitories are under the immediate control of the faculty proctors 
and the student government bodies. 

Should a student be absent once beyond the number of 
A1 f ss times a class meets each week, he will be required, un- 

less he can offer satisfactory excuse for such absence, to 
pay three dollars to the College and make up the lost work by such 
means as the professor in charge shall deem advisable. For every 
succeeding unexcused cut the student will be required to pay one 
dollar. All fines for overcuts must be paid before the student so de- 
linquent may be permitted to take his final examinations. 

Absence from the classes immediately preceding or immediately 
following vacation will be counted double. 

Students in the sophomore, junior, or senior year whose record 
in the work of the preceding semester shows an average of 90%, are 
not subject to the absence rule. 

_, . Daily chapel attendance is required. Fifteen absences 

Attendance are a " owec ^ during a semester. When a student has 
reached the limit of his allowed cuts for the semester, 
he is liable to suspension from class attendance by the Dean if 
further cuts are incurred. 

. Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infringement by mem- 

bers of the other classes upon the personal rights of 
freshmen, or any discrimination against freshmen because of their 
class standing, is interpreted as hazing. 

DEFICIENT STUDENTS 
_ . . A student who has failed to pass in 60% of the semes- 

ter hours for which he is registered, or to secure 60% 
of the quality credits due on said hours, will be placed on probation. 
If at the close of the next semester such a student has still failed 
to meet this standard, he will be required to withdraw from College. 

Co d'ti c\ Students obtaining a final average below 60% 

Reixamtoations but ab .°y e 50% in an ^ sub J ect wiU be S iven a 
"Condition," and such Condition may be re- 
moved by obtaining a mark of 60% or more on a re-examination 

29 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

to be taken at the College on the days appointed for supplemental 
examinations. 

Supplemental examinations will be held twice during the year : in 
September and six weeks after the beginning of the second semester. 

A fee of $3 will be charged for each supplemental examination. 

Except in the case of the final examinations of seniors, no immedi- 
ate re-examination will be given to students falling below the passing 
mark on the regular examinations. 

Conditions must be removed during the semester following that 
in which the condition was incurred, unless the instructor in charge 
recommends that the student become an auditor of the course when 
next given; in the latter case the condition must be removed when 
the course is next repeated. Failure to meet one or the other of these 
requirements converts the Condition into a Failure. 



30 



Expenses 



The rates on the following pages apply to the college year 1943- 
1944. 

MATRICULATION 

A Matriculation Fee of five dollars must be paid by all full-time 
students who are entering the College for the first time. This fee 
should accompany the application for admission. If a student's appli- 
cation is not accepted, the fee will be returned. 

All students not enrolled in regular College or Conservatory 
Courses will be required to pay a matriculation fee of one dollar, 
once in each school year. 

TUITION AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES FEES 

An annual charge of $325, which covers not only tuition for sev- 
enteen hours per semester in the College and Conservatory, but also 
a fee for student activities, will be made for all students in regular 
courses. 

Nine dollars will be charged for each additional semester 
hour of work taken in regular classes when the total number 
of hours for the year exceeds thirty-four. This rate will also apply to 
students who enroll for fewer than twelve hours in regular courses. 

It is understood that the charge for extra hours above the regu- 
larly permitted seventeen per semester shall not be affected by the 
addition of required hours in Physical Education ; in other words, a 
student may take without extra charge the required Physical Edu- 
cation over and above his seventeen hours per semester of academic 
work. 

The payment of the annual fee entitles the student not only to class 
room instruction but to the following privileges as well : the use of 
the library, gymnasium, and athletic field; admission to athletic 
games on the home grounds or in Lebanon ; subscription to La Vie 
Cpllegienne and the College Year Book; membership in the Chris- 
tian Associations and student government associations; the use of 
the infirmary and care by the resident nurse. 

Ministers' children and the children of members of the Faculty, 
are entitled to a reduction of $50 on full tuition, in either the College 
or the Conservatory, unless they are day students, in which case they 
are entitled to a reduction of $25. Scholarships do not cover the 
tuition for extra work taken. 

31 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

LABORATORY FEES 
To cover the cost of materials used in the Laboratories, the fol- 
lowing fees are charged: each 

SEMESTER 

Methods of Teaching Biology (Education 404) $4.00 

All other Biology courses, each 8.00 

Chemistry 18 8.00 

Chemistry 24 12.00 

Chemistry 34 12.00 

Chemistry 48 12.00 

Chemistry 84 12.00 

Chemistry 94 10.00 

Chemistry 58 10.00 

Chemistry 63 8.00 

Chemistry 73 8.00 

Chemistry 102 10.00 

Physics 12, 21, 32, 42 5.00 

Psychology 14 2.00 

Education 82 1.00 

Physical Science 103 2.00 

There will be no refund of laboratory fees. 

A deposit of $2.00 is required of each student in the Biological 
Laboratory as a guarantee for the return of keys and apparatus. This 
amount, less any deductions for loss or breakage, is refunded when 
keys and apparatus are returned. 

Breakage Deposit for Chemistry Courses: Chemistry 18, $3 ; Chem- 
istry 24, $4; Chemistry 34, $4; Chemistry 48, $5; Chemistry 84, 
$4; Chemistry 94, $4; Chemistry 58, $4; Chemistry 63, $3; Chem- 
istry 73, $3; Chemistry 102, $4. All breakage in the Chemical Lab- 
oratory will be charged against the individual student. Any balance 
of the above deposits due the student at the completion of his course 
will be returned or credited to his account, and any deficit beyond 
his deposit will be charged to his regular college account. 

All deposits shall be paid at the College office. 

BOARDING 

The domestic department is in charge of a skilled and competent 
chef. Plain, substantial, and palatable food especially adapted to the 
needs of the student is provided. The kitchen is furnished with 
modern equipment, and all food is prepared in the most sanitary 
manner. 

The Boarding rate for the college year 1943-1944 is $225. The 
College reserves the right to increase this amount at any time during 
the year in case of unusual change in food prices. These rates do not 
include Christmas and Easter vacations. 

32 



CATALOGUE 

Students who leave college during the term will be required to pay 
board at the rate of $7.50 per week during their stay in college. 

All students who do not room and board at their homes are re- 
quired to room and board in the College unless special permission is 
obtained from the Executive Committee to do otherwise. Students 
refusing to comply with this regulation forfeit their privileges as 
students in the College. 

ROOM RENT 

Room rent varies from $55 to $108 except when double rooms are 
assigned to only one student, in which case the occupant will pay 
the regular rent for two. Rooms are reserved only for those who 
forward an advance payment of $25 not later than July 1 ; appli- 
cations received after that date must be accompanied by $25 to assure 
accommodations. There is no refund on room rentals. 

Occupants of a room are held responsible for all breakage and loss 
of furniture or any loss whatever for which the students are respon- 
sible. A breakage fee of $10 is required of each student rooming in 
the Men's Dormitory. All or part of this may be returned at the end 
of the year. A dormitory service fee of $6 is charged men in the 
Dormitory. A breakage fee of $5 is required for each student in the 
Women's Dormitories. After deducting the cost of repairing any 
damage to the room, estimated at the end of the college year, the 
balance will be returned or applied on account. 

Each room in the Men's Dormitory is furnished with a chiffonier 
and book case, and for each occupant a cot, a mattress, one chair, 
and a study table. Students must provide their own bedding, rugs, 
towels, soap, and all other furnishings. 

The Men's Dormitory is under the supervision of a member of the 
faculty who, with his wife, occupies a suite of rooms in the building. 

A reception room on the first floor is provided for the accommo- 
dation of parents and other visitors. 

Each room in the Women's Dormitories is furnished with a rug, 
bed, mattress, chair, dresser, book case, and study table. All other 
desired furnishings must be supplied by the student. 

All students to whom rooms are assigned are strictly forbidden to 
sub-let their rooms to day-students or to others for a money or any 
other consideration. 

One 40-watt light is furnished for each occupant of a room. 
The College reserves the right to close all the dormitories during 
the Christmas and Easter vacations. 

A day-students' room is provided for the women in South Hall. 

33 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

A fee of $5 per student, none of which is returnable, is required from 
the women, to cover janitor service and breakage. 

A fee of $5 per semester, none of which is returnable, is charged 
all male day students for their occupancy of the day-students' house 
on Sheridan Avenue. 

SCHEDULE OF ANNUAL CHARGES 

Tuition and Student Activities Fees $325.00 

Boarding 225.00 

Room Rent $55.00 to 108.00 

Service Charge, Men's Dormitory 6.00 

Matriculation Fee — payable only once, i. e., when the stu- 
dent first enters the College 5.00 

FEE FOR PRACTICE TEACHING 

A fee of $17.50 for each semester is charged to all students in the 
College and the Conservatory who do practice teaching. 

GRADUATION FEE 

Sixty days prior to Commencement, candidates for degrees are, 
required to pay the following fees: 

Students graduating in the College, $15; students graduating in 
Music, $15; students receiving certificates in Music, $8. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

An advance payment of $25 must be made by each student to pro- 
vide for registration. Students who reserve rooms in the dormitories 
are required to make this payment by July 1 to secure the reser- 
vation. After this date rooms not so secured may be assigned to other 
applicants. All other students in order to be certain of admission to 
the College must make this advance payment by September 1. Regis- 
tration is not completed and students will not be admitted to class 
until this payment is made. No refund will be made on this fee. 

Bills for regular college expenses, including tuition, laboratory 
fees, boarding, and room rent, are issued at the beginning of each 
semester, covering the expenses for the full semester. These bills are 
due on the day they are issued and are to be paid within thirty days 
from the day the semester begins. On all bills not paid within the 
specified time, interest at the rate of 6% a year will be charged for 
the period during which they remain unpaid. 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal may be granted or grades recorded. 

Students who are candidates for diplomas or certificates must make 
full settlement entirely satisfactory to the Finance Committee before 
diplomas or certificates will be sealed and delivered. 

34 



CATALOGUE 

DEFERRED PAYMENTS 

Since some parents may prefer to pay tuition and other fees in 
equal monthly installments during the academic year, we are glad 
to offer this convenience under The Tuition Plan. The cost is 4% 
greater than when payment is made in cash at the beginning of 
each semester. 

Parents who prefer to pay in equal monthly installments need 
merely notify us and we shall send them the necessary forms 
promptly. 

ABSENCE AND SICKNESS 

When students retain their class standing during absence from 
college because of sickness or for any other reason, no rebate or re- 
fund will be allowed on tuition. In case of suspension for any reason 
there will be no rebate. 

In case of sickness which occasions loss of class standing, a rea- 
sonable rebate or refund will be allowed on tuition. 

When a student is absent from school more than two weeks in 
succession because of sickness, a rebate of two-thirds of the room 
rental for the time of absence will be allowed. No other refunds will 
be allowed on room rents. 

AID TO STUDENTS 

Help is extended annually to a limited number of students, but 
only to those pursuing full courses in the College or Conservatory. 
This help is given in the form of Scholarships, Waiterships, Janitor- 
ships, Tutorships, or Library Assistantships. Such help is given on 
the explicit condition that the recipient comply with all the rules and 
regulations of the College. 

A student forfeits the privilege of a scholarship or other help from 
the College when his average grade for the semester falls below B-, 
when in any way he refuses to cooperate with the College, or when 
he disregards the regulations of the institution. 

Students rooming in dormitories and boarding at the college Din- 
ing Hall will be given preference when work of various kinds is 
assigned. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND TRUST FUNDS 

The College offers a limited number of tuition scholarships upon 
recommendation of the Scholarship Committee. It also makes some 
loans. 

Students who transfer to other institutions before completing the 

35 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

number of years designated in their application for admission shall 
be required to refund all scholarship and loan grants before their 
transcripts are sent to other institutions. 

Students preparing for the ministry in the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ and having quarterly or annual conference license 
to preach, will, if living at the College, be entitled to $100 reduction 
in tuition, provided they maintain satisfactory academic standing. 
Day students, preparing for the ministry, will be entitled to $50 re- 
duction, under the same conditions. 

No scholarship or rebate will be granted for a period shorter 
than a semester. 



36 



CATALOGUE 

PROFESSORSHIPS 

Chair of Bible and Greek Testament $15,230.00 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin Language and Literature 40,000.00 

John Evans Lehman Chair of Mathematics 36,430.04 

Rev. J. B. Weidler Fund 200.00 

STUDENT AID 

United States Senator James J. Davis Scholarship Fund $ 100.00 

Mary A. Dodge Fund. . . ,, 9,500.00 

Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 514.66 

John A. H. Keith Fund 100.00 

Henry B. Stehman Fund 853.00 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Allegheny Conference C. E. Society, Scholarship $ 1,000.00 

Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Michael H. Bachman Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial Sunday School Scholarship. . 3,000.00 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Bender Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Biological Scholarship Fund 2,517.00 

Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 12,000.00 

Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 500.00 

I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award Fund 2,000.00 

Isaiah H. Daugherty and Benjamin P. Raab Memorial Scholarship 1,500.00 

S. H. and Jennie Derickson Scholarship Fund 2,775.00 

William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 600.00 

East Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship 3,000.00 

East Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 5,000.00 

Samuel F. and Agnes B. Engle Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 3,300.00 

Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Jacob F. Greasley Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 2,120.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Sunday School Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 400.00 

H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Henry G. and Anna S. KaufFman and Family Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1,020.00 

Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. Kleffman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The A. S. Kreider Ministerial Fund 15,000.00 

W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Mrs. Savilla Loux Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lykens Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Mechanicsburg U. B. Sunday School Scholarship 2,000.00 

Medical Scholarship Fund 245.00 

Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 500.00 

Elizabeth May Meyer Musical Scholarship Fund 1,550.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000. 0u 

Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 5,000.01) 

Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 225. 0u 

Grace U. B. Church of Penbrook, Pa., Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 4.350.0U 

Philadelphia L. V. C. Alumni Scholarship Fund 264.00 

37 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund $ 1,300.00 

Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 6,380.00 

Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 300.00 

Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

BOOKS FOR LIBRARY 
Library Fund of Class of 1916 $ 1,325.00 

MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS 
Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room Fund $ 200.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Class of 1928 Prize for Proficiency in English $ 835.00 

Rev. John P. Cowling Memorial Fund 700.00 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 2,000.00 

Max F. Lehman Prize in Freshman Mathematics 400.00 



38 



Requirements for Degree 



Lebanon Valley College offers the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
(A.B.) and the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.). 

. Degrees will be conferred only upon candidates 

R . who have spent at least a full year in actual resi- 

dence. 

Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 126 se- 
mester hours credit in academic work, and in addition 4 
semester hours in Physical Education, making a total of 130 semes- 
ter hours. It is understood, however, that a student who has a 
physical disability may be excused (on recommendation from the 
college physician) from the requirement in Physical Education with- 
out being obliged to substitute other work in order to bring his total 
of semester hours from 126 to 130. 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a minimum of 
p. a ?? 130 quality points, computed as follows: for a grade of A, 

3 points for each credit hour; for a grade of B, 2 points; 
for a grade of C, 1 point. No quality credit will be given for a 
grade of D. 

._ . As part of this total requirement, every candidate 

„ J Ti/r- must present at least 24 semester hours in one de- 

and Minor v , .. "•',,. v 

partment (to be known as his Major), and at least 

16 semester hours in another department (to be known as his Minor). 
Both Major and Minor must be selected before registration for the 
sophomore year, the Minor to be suitably related to the Major, and 
chosen with the advice and approval of the Head of the Major 
Department. 

The A.B. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments : Bible and Religion, 
English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics (Arts 
option), Political Science and Sociology, Philosophy, and Psy- 
chology. 

The B.S. degree will be awarded to those fulfilling the require- 
ments for a Major in the following departments: Biology, Chemis- 
try, Mathematics (Science option), Physics, Business Administra- 
tion and Economics, Education, Music Education. 

Those majoring in Education must take two Minors of not less 
than 18 semester hours each. 

For the special requirements for those majoring in Business Ad- 

39 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ministration and Economics, see p. 79; for those majoring in Music 
Education, see p. 84; for those majoring in Chemistry, see p. 80. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Certain courses embodying the fundamentals of a liberal education, 
are required of all students. These courses, which vary slightly ac- 
cording to the degree sought, are as follows : 

Bible 14 and 82 6 hours 

English 16 and 26 12 hours 

Foreign Language 1 

History 2 6 hours 

Hygiene 1 hour 

Mathematics 3 

Orientation 1 hour 

Philosophy 32 2 hours 

Physical Education -. 4 hours 

Psychology 13 3 hours 

Science 4 

Social Studies 6 hours 

Economics 16 or 

Philosophy 23-A and 23-B or 

Political Science 16 or 

Sociology 13 and 23 

1 For the A.B. degree 12 hours of Foreign Language are required. 

For the B.S. degree 6 hours are required above the beginners' course. 
Courses may be selected, from French, German, Greek, Latin, or Spanish. 

2 This may be made up from the following courses: History 13, 123, 213, 23-A, 
23-B, 46, 412, 422, 43-B. 

3 Math. 13, 23, and 48 are required for the degree of B.S. in Science. Pre-Medical 
students may substitute an elective for Math. 48. Students majoring in Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics are required to take Math. 13 and 23 or 113 and 123. 

4 Biology 18, Chemistry 18, and Physics 18 are required of candidates for the B.S. 
degree with a major in Science. Others may elect one of the three. 



40 



Arrangement of Courses by Years 



All the courses included in the foregoing list will ordinarily be 
taken in fixed years of the college course. A maximum load of 17 
hours a week, exclusive of physical education, is permitted for the 
regular tuition. A load of 16 or 17 hours, including physical educa- 
tion, should be taken each semester to meet the total of 130 hours 
required for graduation. The normal distribution of requirements for 
students seeking the A.B. or B.S. Degree follows : 

First Year 

A.B. 

English 16 

Foreign Language (See p. 38, n. 1) 

Bible 14 

Elect from the following: 

Foreign Language, History, Mathematics, 

Science (See p. 38, n. 4) 

Hygiene 11, Orientation 11 

Physical Education 

B.S. (with Major in Science) 

English 16 

Foreign Language (See p. 38, n. 1) 

Mathematics 13, 23 or 36 

Bible 14 

Biology 18 or Chemistry 18 or Physics 18 

Hygiene 1 1 , Orientation 11 

Physical Education 

Second Year 
A.B. 

English 26 

Foreign Language (See p. 38, n. 1) 

Psychology 13 

Science, if not taken the first year (See p. 38, n. 4) 

Physical Education 

Electives 

B.S. (with Major in Science) 

English 26 

Mathematics 48 (See p. 38, n. 3) 

Psychology 13 

Science: the remaining two of Biol. 18, Chem. 

18,^ Physics 18, (See p. 38, n. 4) 

Physical Education 

41 



Hours 


a week 


1st Sem. 


2d Sem. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


6 or 7 


6 or 7 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




4 


4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


4 


3 




8 


8 


1 


1 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Third and Fourth Years 

A.B. and B.S. (with Major in Science) Hours a week 

1st Sem. 2d Sem. 

Bible 82 2 

Philosophy 32 2 

History, if not taken before (See p. 40, n. 2) . . 3 3 

One of the following : 
Economics 16, Phil. 23-A and 23-B, Pol. Sc. 16, 

Soc. 13 and 23 3 3 

Electives 

The above arrangement of courses is that followed under normal 
circumstances. 

THE ACCELERATED PROGRAM 

In conformity with the demands of war times the College has 
made it possible for students to accelerate their work and complete 
their four-years course in three calendar years or less. This can be 
accomplished by attending the twelve-weeks Summer School and 
by carrying the maximum number of hours permitted during the 
First and Second Semesters of each year. Those pursuing the Ac- 
celerated Program will take the courses outlined above, but the order 
in which they are taken will be adjusted as circumstances demand. 

Degrees will be conferred on three separate occasions each year, 
in May, August, and January. 



42 



Courses of Instruction 



The credit, in semester hours, received on the successful comple- 
tion of a course is indicated by the last digit in the course number. 
The number of hour periods the class meets each week is noted im- 
mediately after the number and name of the course. 

Students beginning the study of a language should note that no 06 
course will receive college credit unless it is followed by a second year, 
i. e., by a 16 course, in the same field. 

ASTRONOMY 

Professor Grimm 

13. General Astronomy. 

Three hours. First Semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

A course in descriptive astronomy. Reports on assigned readings. Im- 
portant constellations and star groups are studied. 

A fine four-and-a-half-inch achromatic telescope adds to the interest 
of the subject. 

BIBLE AND RELIGION 

Professors Richie and Shettel 

In times of great national crisis it is the duty and task of religion 
to develop and promote the moral and spiritual life of the college 
and nation. This department aims to increase the appreciation of 
the religious influence of ancient leaders and to evaluate the power 
and worth of Biblical customs, thoughts, and patterns in modern 
life. The general student body as well as ministerial students are 
encouraged to pursue advanced studies and apply the principles of 
Christianity to the solution of individual, national, and world prob- 
lems. 

Major: Bible 14, 82, Philosophy 52, Psychology 102, and fourteen ad- 
ditional semester hours. 

Minor: Bible 14, 22, 32, 82, and eight additional semester hours. 

14. Introduction to English Bible. Professor Richie 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Required of all college freshmen. 

An appreciative and historical survey of the literature of the Old and 
New Testaments. 

22. Life and Epistles of Paul. Professor Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. 

The life and epistles of Paul, and the practices, problems, and beliefs 
of the early church. 

43 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
32. The Prophets. Professor Richie 

Two hours. First semester. 
A study of the lives of the major and minor prophets, and an analysis 
of their contributions to the ethical and religious thought of the Old 
Testament. 

42. The Christian Church. Professor Richie 

Two hours. First semester. 

A study of the growth of Christianity beyond the primitive church, 
with special emphasis on the origin and growth of denominations. 

62. Principles of Religious Education. Professor Richie 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

A fundamental course investigating some of the theories, principles, 
and problems of Religious Education. 

72. The Church School. Professor Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

A study of the principles, problems, and methods in the organization 
and administration of the Sunday School, Church Vacation School, and 
Week Day School of Religion. 

112. Biblical Archaeology. Professor Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. 

The course reviews the findings of the explorer, excavator, and scholar 
in the field of Archaeology, and attempts to evaluate their contribution 
and illumination of Bible facts and teachings. 

Psychology of Religion. See Psychology 102. 

52. The History and Religion of the Hebrews. Professor Shettel 

Two hours. First semester. Offered yearly. 

The purpose of this course is to furnish the student with a true per- 
spective of the religious growth of the Hebrews during the period of 
the Old Testament. 

82. The Teaching of Jesus. Professor Shettel 

Two hours. First semester. Offered yearly. Required of all college seniors. 

This course attempts an intensive study of the religious concepts of 
Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. 

102. The History of Religion. Professor Shettel 

Two hours. Second semester. Open to juniors and seniors. Offered 1943—1944. 

This course is intended to provide the student with the facts concerning 
the rise and development of religion in general. The historical view is 
followed throughout. 

44 



CATALOGUE 

BIOLOGY 

Professor Derickson, Associate Professor Light, and 
Assistants 

The work outlined in the following courses in Biology is intended 
to acquaint students with those fundamental facts necessary for the 
proper interpretation of the phenomena manifested by the living 
things with which they are surrounded, and to lay a broad founda- 
tion for specialization in universities in professional courses in 
Biology. 

Those completing the courses will be well prepared for the work 
in medical schools, for graduate work in colleges and universities, 
for teaching the biological sciences in high schools, and for assist- 
antships in university and experiment station laboratories in the de- 
partments of agriculture and the United States Biological Survey. 

For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see pp. 81-83. 

Major: Biology 18 and any additional courses of higher number, in- 
cluding laboratory work, in the department, amounting to twenty-four 
semester hours. 

Minor: Biology 18 and ten semester hours from courses of higher 
number in the department. 

Those preparing to teach Biology should take Biology 18-A, 28, 38, 
and as many additional courses as their elective hours will permit. 

18-A. General Biology (Professional). Associate Professor Light 
Four hours. Throughout the year. Laboratory work Tuesday afternoon. 

Three hours class work and four hours laboratory work each week. 

Required of freshmen majoring in Biology preparing to enter medical 
schools or other lines of professional biological work. 

18-B. General Biology (Cultural). Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Laboratory work Wednesday afternoon. 

Three hours class work and three hours laboratory work each week. 
28. Botany. Professor Derickson 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1944-1945. 

Three class periods and four hours field and laboratory work each week. 

The object of the course is to give the student a general knowledge of 
the plant kingdom. One or more types of each of the classes of algae, 
fungae, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and seed plants are studied. 

Special attention is given to the phylogeny and ontogeny of the several 
groups, and constant comparisons are made of those structures indicating 
relationships. The principles of classification are learned by the identi- 
fication of about one hundred and fifty species of plants represented in the 
local spring flora. These studies are conducted in the field so that the 
plants are seen as dynamic forces adapted to their environment. 

45 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
38. Zoology. Professor Derickson 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943-1944. 

Three lectures or recitations and two laboratory periods of two hours 
each, per week. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the structure, life 
history, and behavior of representatives of each phylum of animals. In the 
study of types, structure, function, and adaptation are given equal empha- 
sis. The principles of phylogeny and ontogeny are considered. 

The laboratory and class work is supplemented by field studies includ- 
ing observations of habits, ecological conditions, and the use of keys for 
identification and classification. 

48. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Professor Derickson 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1944—1945. 

Six hours laboratory work and two hours of conference and demonstra- 
tion each week. 

The course consists of the dissection and study of amphioxus, the 
lamprey, the spiny dogfish, the haddock skull, and the cat. Carefully 
labeled drawings are required of each student as a record of each dis- 
section. 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine or majoring in Biology. 

54-A. Vertebrate Embryology. Professor Derickson 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1943—1944. 
Two class periods and six hours laboratory work each week. 
A detailed study of the development of the frog up to 10 m.m. and the 
chick up to the fifth day with comparisons with other vertebrate embryos. 

54-B. Vertebrate Histology. Professor Derickson 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1943—1944. 
Two class periods and six hours laboratory work each week. 
A study of the structure of the tissues of the vertebrate, especially of 
the mammalian body, and of various methods of technique employed. 

64. Genetics. Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1944—1945. 
Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 
This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and varia- 
tion, and their practical applications. 

74. Biological Problems. Professor Derickson 

Two hours throughout the year, or four hours either semester. 

An honors course. Laboratory work with conferences. 

This course is open to a limited number of students majoring in Biology 
who have made a distinguished record in their previous courses. It con- 
sists in working out problems assigned to them involving a practical 
application of various methods of technique, originality of method and 
interpretation, and the development of the spirit of research. A weekly 

46 



CATALOGUE 

conference and report on the progress of the work will be required, and 
a detailed report including complete records of the work done must be 
presented before semester examinations. 

84. Bacteriology. Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1943—1944. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with various forms of 
bacteria and their role in nature. It includes laboratory technique in culti- 
vation, sterilization, isolation of pure cultures, and staining of bacteria. 

94. Physiology. Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

A course of instruction in general physiology dealing with the tissues 
of the body and especially their function in respiration, digestion, circula- 
tion, excretion, and reproduction. 

Methods of Teaching in Biology (Education 404). 

Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

This course is designed to acquaint students of the sciences with meth- 
ods of obtaining, preparing, and preserving all types of scientific mate- 
rials ; the making of charts and models ; photography ; lantern slide 
making ; the fundamentals of taxidermy ; various types of tests and de- 
vices used in teaching; sources of equipment; and lists of books and 
periodicals useful to science students and teachers. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Professor Stokes 

The department aims to give students majoring in Business Ad- 
ministration and Economics a thorough training in the essential 
principles of business and economics and at the same time to offer 
sufficient electives to provide students preparing for a business career, 
the teaching profession, law schools or graduate schools, with a 
general cultural education. 

For an outline of the complete course in Business Administration 
see p. 79. 

Minor: Accounting 36 and twelve hours of electives to be selected 
from the following courses : Economic Geography, Transportation, Money 
and Banking, Marketing, Public Finance, Statistics, Corporation Finance, 
Investments, Labor Problems, Contemporary Economic Problems, Eco- 
nomic History of Europe, Business Law, History of Economic Thought. 
Economics 16 is a prerequisite. 

With the exception of Economics 16, the courses are offered in alter- 
nate years. 

47 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
14. Economic Geography. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The course deals with : the field and function of Economic Geography ; 
distribution of population ; the earth ; land forms ; influence of soils ; tem- 
perature ; winds and ocean currents ; climates of the world. Much of the 
course will deal with the more important commodities of the world's 
trade — their production, export, and import in the various countries of 
the world. Stress will be laid on the chief sources of raw materials and 
their industrial uses and the marketing and transportation problems con- 
nected therewith. Books recommended : Introductory Economic Geography 
by Klimm, Starkey, & Hall ; Economic Resources and Industries of the 
World by Lippincott ; World Resources and Industries by Zimmerman ; 
Economic Geography by Colby and Foster; Economic Geography, by 
Carter and Dodge. 

36. Principles of Accounting. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A course in accounting principles and their application in business to 
sole traders, partnerships, and corporations ; books of original entry ; 
operating accounts and balance sheets ; the preparation of financial state- 
ments ; columnar books ; controlling accounts ; elements of corporation 
accounting; branch house accounting; business papers. 

53-A. Transportation: Railroad. 

Three hours. One semester. 
Railroad services ; principles of rate making as established by the rail- 
ways, the regulative tribunals, and the courts ; Government regulation oi 
railroads ; the agencies of control ; railroad competition and its control ; 
the transportation problem. 

53-B. Transportation: Motor, Air, and Water. 

Three hours. One semester. 
Principles of motor transportation ; competition and cooperation with 
railroads; regulation of motor transportation; coordination of highway 
transportation ; air transportation ; inland water transportation and its 
relation to rail and highway transportation ; Government aid and regu- 
lation of water transportation. 

73. Marketing. 

Three hours. One semester. 

The course deals with the methods and policies of the marketing of 
agricultural products and the merchandising of manufactured commodi- 
ties ; meaning and importance of marketing distribution ; marketing func- 
tions ; trade channels ; development of marketing methods ; co-operative 
marketing ; price policies ; trade information ; market analysis ; merchan- 
dising costs and prices ; an analysis of the merits and defects of the 
existing distributive organization. 

93. Public Finance and Administration. 

Three hours. One semester. 
Economic functions of the state ; federal and state expenditures ; eco- 

48 



CATALOGUE 

nomic and social aspects of public spending ; budgetary control ; nature 
of taxation and distribution of the tax burden; the shifting and incidence 
of taxes ; the general property tax ; estate and inheritance taxation ; sales 
taxes ; personal and corporate income taxes ; the excess profits tax ; social 
security taxes ; other taxes and administrative revenues ; problems of the 
tax system; public debts and their redemption. Books recommended: 
Buehler, Public Finance; Lutz, Public Finance; Hunter and Allen, Prin- 
ciples of Public Finance; Prentice-Hall, Federal Tax Course. 

103. Statistics. 

Three hours. One semester. 

General introduction to the use of statistics ; methods of collection ; tab- 
ulation and graphic presentation ; analysis and interpretation ; application 
to the study of business cycles, population, and other problems ; a survey 
of some of the principal sources of statistical information. 

123. Industrial Organization and Management. 

Three hours. One semester. 

A study of the fundamentals of business organization and administra- 
tion ; the field of business administration ; plant location ; the administra- 
tion of personnel ; market problems ; finance ; production ; risk-bearing ; 
wage systems ; welfare activities. 

143. Corporation Finance. 

Three hours. One semester. 

Economic services of corporations ; capitalization ; detailed study of 
stocks and bonds ; financing of extensions and improvements ; manage- 
ment of incomes and reserves ; dividend policy ; insolvency ; receiverships ; 
reorganizations. Books recommended : Gerstenberg, Financial Organisa- 
tion and Management; Bonneville and Dewey, Organizing and Financing 
Business; Mead, Corporation Finance; Gerstenberg, Materials of Corpo- 
ration Finance; Dewing, Corporate Promotions and Reorganisations ; 
Buchanan, The Economics of Corporate Enterprise. 

153. Investments. 

Three hours. One semester. 

The course deals with the development and place of investment in the 
field of business and its relation to other economic, legal, and social in- 
stitutions. The fundamental principles are presented along with a descrip- 
tion of investment machinery. An analysis is made of the various classes 
of investments. Books recommended: Sakolski, Principles of Investment ; 
Lyon, Investment ; Jordan, Investments ; Badger, Investment Principles 
and Practices; Dewing, Financial Policy of Corporations. 

163. Labor Problems. 

Three hours. One semester. 
The nature of the labor problem ; the rise of industry and labor ; the 
new technology and the wage earner ; unemployment ; the problem of 
child and woman labor ; hours of labor ; industrial accidents ; unemploy- 
ment insurance ; old age pensions ; the labor movement ; economic pro- 

49 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

gram of organized labor ; industrial conflict ; agencies of industrial peace ; 
modern industrial policies ; international control of labor relations. 

ECONOMICS 

16. Economic Theory. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A course dealing with the principles of economics. Books recom- 
mended: Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations; Marshall, Principles of 
Economics and Industry and Trade; Fisher, Elementary Economics; 
Taussig, Principles of Economics; Fairchild, Furniss, and Buck, Elemen- 
tary Economics ; Bye, Principles of Economics; Gemmill and Blodgett, 
Economics, Principles and Problems; Garver and Hansen, Principles of 
Economics; Mitchell, Business Cycles. 

33. Money and Banking. 

Three hours. One semester. 

This course deals with : the nature and functions of money ; monetary 
standards and systems ; monetary development in the United States ; the 
National banking system; the structure and functions of the Federal Re- 
serve System; commercial banking; credit and its uses; credit control; 
monetary policy and the business cycle ; central banks ; investment bank- 
ing ; savings banks ; consumptive credit institutions ; agricultural credit. 

43. History of Economic Thought. 

Three hours. One semester. 

A course dealing with the evolution of economic thought through the 
principal schools from the Physiocrats to the present, giving special at- 
tention to the analysis of current theories of value, interest, rent, and 
wages. 

Books recommended : Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations; Malthus, Essay 
on Population; Ricardo, Principles of Political Economy; J. S. Mill, 
Principles of Political Economy; Marx, Capital; Bohm-Bawerk, Capital 
and Interest, and The Positive Theory of Capital; Gide and Rist, History 
of Economic Doctrines; Haney, History of Economic Thought; Homan, 
Contemporary Economic Thought; Gray, The Development of Economic 
Doctrines; Roll, A History of Economic Thought. 

This course is open to all students who have had Economics 16. 

63. Economics of Consumption. 

Three hours. One semester. 
The study of economics is approached from the consumer viewpoint. 
The course includes a study of : the role of the consumer in economic life ; 
consumers' choices ; forces back of consumer demand ; consumer educa- 
tion ; budgeting ; co-operative buying ; reasons for high costs ; producer 
aids to consumer ; standards for consumers ; government aids to consumers. 

73. Contemporary Economic Problems. 

Three hours. One semester. 

This course is for Junior and Senior students who have had the course 
in Economic Theory. The course will be conducted largely through semi- 

50 



CATALOGUE 

nar discussions, readings and papers on current economic problems. The 
course is designed to enable the student to apply the principles of Eco- 
nomic Theory toward the solution of current problems and to develop the 
power of critical analysis. 

Economic Services and Periodicals 

Students of the department are expected to make liberal use of the 
following economic services and periodicals which have been placed in 
the College Library : Barrons, The Wall Street Journal, The Finan- 
cial and Commercial Chronicle, Harvard Business Review, Review of 
Economic Statistics, Survey of Current Business, Business Week, Maga- 
zine of Wall Street, Magazine of Business, Labor Review, Social Science, 
Printer's Ink, Commerce Reports, Federal Reserve Bulletin, The Ameri- 
can Economic Review, Forbes, The Annals of The American Academy 
of Political and Social Science, Standard Statistics, United Business 
Service. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Bender and Associate Professor Porter 

The department aims to give to students majoring in chemistry 
such training in the principles and technique of chemistry as will 
enable them to find employment in the chemical industry or to pursue 
to advantage the subject further in graduate schools. Pre-medical 
students will find the courses outlined below meet the chemistry 
requirements of the best medical schools. 

For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see p. 81. 

For outline of course for those intending to enter Chemistry as a 
profession, see p. 80. 

Major: Chemistry 18, 24, 34, 48, and 58. 

Minor: Chemistry 18 and any additional twelve hours in analytical 
or organic chemistry. 

Pre-Medical students majoring in chemistry may substitute courses in 
other departments for Chemistry 58. 

18. General Inorganic Chemistry. Associate Professor Porter 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three hours of class work and three hours of laboratory work per week. 

A systematic study of fundamental principles and of the sources, prop- 
erties, and uses of the important elements and compounds. The lectures 
are illustrated by displays, demonstration experiments, and moving pic- 
tures. In the laboratory the student acquires first-hand acquaintance with 
numerous representative substances and methods. 

24. Qualitative Analysis. Professor Bender 

Four hours. First semester. 

Three hours of class work and a minimum of six hours of laboratory 
work each week. 

51 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The theory and principles of analytical chemistry are studied. The 
course includes a study of the methods for systematically separating and 
identifying all of the common metals and acid radicals. The solution of a 
number of problems involving solubility product, hydrolysis, equilibria, 
and oxidation-reduction is required. The laboratory work includes the 
analysis of about twenty solutions and solids varying in complexity from 
simple salts to complex insoluble mixtures. 

34. Quantitative Analysis. Professor Bender 

Four hours. Second semester. 

Two hours of class work and a minimum of eight hours of laboratory 
work each week. 

This course with Chemistry 24 is designed to give in one year an ade- 
quate foundation in analytical chemistry. The class room work includes 
a study of the principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis including 
solubility, equilibria, and the principles involved in electrolytic separations. 
The laboratory work includes simple introductory determinations, acidim- 
etry, alkalimetry, mixed alkalis, partial analysis of copper and iron ores 
and phosphate rock, analysis of coal, limestone, an alloy, steel, a silica 
determination and an electrolytic determination. Certain substitutions such 
as protein nitrogen determination may be made by pre-medical students. 
Becker chainomatic balances are used. 

48. Organic Chemistry. Associate Professor Porter 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three hours of class work and a minimum of five hours of laboratory 
work each week. The course includes a study of the sources, classification 
and type reactions of organic materials : foodstuffs and their relation to 
nutrition, dyes, pharmaceuticals, explosives, plastics, manufacturing pro- 
cesses. Emphasis is placed on the relation between this branch of chem- 
istry and the other sciences especially biology, and its influence on the 
progress of civilization. The laboratory work consists of about sixty 
experiments covering the preparation of a wide range of representative 
compounds. 

84. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Professor Bender 

Four hours. First semester. 

Two hours of lectures and discussions and eight hours of laboratory 
work each week. An extension of Chemistry 34. In the class room con- 
sideration is given to the application of physio-chemical principles to 
analytical procedures, the use of organic reagents in quantitative work 
and to special procedures. The laboratory work includes the complete 
analysis of a silicate rock containing alkalis, commercial products such 
as alloy steels, glass, ores, gases, and organic combustions for carbon 
and hydrogen. 

94. Organic Analysis. Professor Bender 

Four hours. Second semester. 

Two lectures and recitations and a minimum of four hours of laboratory 
work each week. The course deals with the principles of elementary 

52 



CATALOGUE 

qualitative organic analysis. The laboratory work includes the identifica- 
tion of compounds representative of all of the chief classes of organic 
materials, and the separation of mixtures with identification of constituents 
by the preparation of confirming derivatives. 

58. Physical Chemistry. Professor Bender 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1944-1945. 

Prerequisites : Chemistry 24 and 34 and prerequisite or parallel 
courses ; Chemistry 48 and Mathematics 48. 

Three lectures and one afternoon of laboratory work each week. Among 
the topics studied are : gases, liquids, solids, association and dissociation, 
thermodynamics, chemical and physical equilibrium, the relation between 
chemical activity and electro-motive force, radio-activity. The solution 
of fifteen to twenty problems weekly is an important part of the course. 
The laboratory work includes determinations of molecular weights, viscos- 
ity, surface tension, solubility, electro-motive force, conductivity, equi- 
libria, etc. 

63. Mineralogy. Professor Bender 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

A study of minerals introduced by the study of crystallography. The 
main purpose of the course is to acquaint the student with all of the im- 
portant minerals and rocks and to interpret their geological history by 
their location with reference to other minerals. The laboratory work 
consists of blow pipe work and the usual field and laboratory tests by 
which one may identify all except very rare minerals. The student is 
required to identify about one hundred minerals at sight. Individual 
collections are required. 

The Chemistry department has over five thousand labeled specimens 
of high quality representing every branch of Mineralogy. The collection 
of crystals represents every important type of crystal form, the garnets, 
felspars and spinels being especially well represented. 

73. Metallurgy — Metallography. Professor Bender 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
A study of mining methods, ore dressing, and the various metallurgical 
processes by which all of the metals are won from their ores. The labora- 
tory work consists of the grinding, polishing and etching of specimens of 
metals and ferrous and non-ferrous alloys for the study of micro structure. 
Standard equipment is provided. Visits are made to nearby steel plants 
and foundries. 

102. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Professor Bender 

A preparations course in which emphasis is placed on laboratory tech- 
nique. The number of hours of laboratory work and conferences will be 
arranged to suit individual student needs. 

ECONOMICS 

See Business Administration and Economics. 

53 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION 

Professor Stine, Assistant Professor Balsbaugh, 
Professor Bailey 

The major aim of this department is to provide professional courses 
for those who desire to teach in junior or senior high schools. And 
in view of the fact that education is one of the most important con- 
cerns of society, a minor aim of the department is to acquaint college 
men and women with the varied problems of education and thus help 
give society intellectual leadership. 

For statement of requirements for those planning to enter the 
teaching profession, see pp. 84-86. 

Major: The courses required for teacher certification in Pennsyl- 
vania; nine additional semester hours in Education; Psychology 43. 

13. History of Education. Assistant Professor Balsbaugh 

Three hours. First semester. 

An analysis of the history of education from the time of early Greek 
education to the present day. Special attention will be given to the aims, 
content, organization, and results of the educational systems of various 
countries, as well as to the great leaders of educational thought. • 

23. History of Education in the United States. Professor Stine 

Three hours. Second semester. 

The development of education in the United States in relation to social 
and economic changes from colonial times to the present, including de- 
tailed study of developments in Pennsylvania. 

33. Secondary Education. Assistant Professor Balsbaugh 

Three hours. Second semester. 

The evolution of the secondary school in the United States ; secondary 
education in other countries ; current problems and trends in secondary 
education. 

72. Philosophy of Education. Professor Stine 

Two hours. First semester. Open to juniors and seniors. 

This course aims to supply a basis for constructive thinking in the field 
of education. Various theories in education will be considered. 

82. Educational Measurements. Professor Stine 

Two hours. First semester. 

Preparation for testing by the classroom teacher is offered through 
studying principles of validity and reliability, appraising and constructing 
tests, and considering the use of results. Prerequisites : Psychology 14, 23. 
Laboratory fee of one dollar. May be taken for three semester hours 
credit. 

54 



CATALOGUE 
123. Introduction to Education. Professor Stine 

Three hours. First semester. 

An introduction to the field of education through the study of the 
American educational system, the place of the school in society, the train- 
ing and function of the teacher. 

132. Principles and Techniques of Secondary School Teaching. 

Two hours. Second semester. Professor Stine 

A study of principles, practices, and methods with their significance to 
secondary school teaching. 

May be taken for three hours credit. 

136. Student Teaching. Assistant Professor Balsbaugh 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Open to seniors only except by permission 
of the Head of the Department. 

This course is designed to meet the following Pennsylvania certification 
requirement : 

"The minimum in student teaching is based on not less than one hundred 
eighty clock hours of actual teaching under approved supervision, including 
the necessary observation, participation, and conference." 

Work in the course will be planned to meet the needs of the individual 
student. Students having an average of less than C during their first three 
years in college will not be admitted. A laboratory fee of $17.50 is charged. 

182. School Hygiene. Professor Bailey 

Two hours. Second semester. 

This course will deal with the place and scope of hygiene as it applies 
to education. Special problems relating to the development of the child, 
health defects, sanitation, hygiene of instruction, etc., will receive atten- 
tion. 

332. Special Methods. 

Two or three hours. Second semester. Open only to seniors. 

Under the direction of the appropriate subject matter departments and 
the Department of Education. 

404. Methods of Teaching in Biology. Associate Professor Light 

Four hours. Second semester. Not offered 1943—1944. 

This course is designed to acquaint students of the sciences with meth- 
ods of obtaining, preparing, and preserving all types of scientific mate- 
rials ; the making of charts and models ; photography ; lantern slide 
making; the fundamentals of taxidermy; various types of tests and 
devices used in teaching ; sources of equipment ; and lists of books and 
periodicals useful to science students and teachers. 

55 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Educational Psychology (Psychology 23). Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. 

A psychological study of the nature of the learner and the nature of 
the learning process. It includes such topics as individual differences, 
motivation, emotion, and transfer of training. Prerequisite : Psychology 14. 

202. Visual and Sensory Techniques. Professor Stine 

Two hours. Second semester. 

Psychological bases for sensory aids ; study and appraisal of various 
aids ; use of apparatus ; sources of equipment and supplies. Laboratory fee 
of three dollars. May be taken for three semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Wallace, Associate Professor Struble, 
Professor Stine 

The prime purpose of the English curriculum is to afford stu- 
dents a vital contact, through intelligent study of the greatest 
writers in English, with the foundations of our culture and civiliza- 
tion. 

We must be free or die, who speak the tongue 
That Shakespeare spake; the faith and morals hold 
Which Milton held. 

A secondary aim of the Department of English is to assist stu- 
dents to write and speak with accuracy and effectiveness. 

While the courses outlined below are designed to provide the 
essential background for high-school teaching and graduate study, 
Arnold Bennett's description of literature as "a means of life" 
indicates the main objective of this part of the college curriculum: 
to help students to a livelier awareness of the world they live in, 
and to a better understanding of its meaning. 

Major: English 16, 26, and eighteen additional semester hours, which 
shall include courses in Elizabethan and Nineteenth Century literature. 

Minor: English 16, 26, and six hours of electives. 

Those preparing to teach English should take English 16, 26, 33, 63-B, 
152, 522- A. 

English 16 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in Eng- 
lish. 

16. English Composition. Associate Professor Struble 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Required of all college freshmen. 

Students who have done particularly well in the first semester of this 
course, will be permitted, on the recommendation of the instructor, to 
take Advanced Composition as a substitute for the second semester of 
English 16. 

56 



CATALOGUE 
26. The History of English Literature. Professor Wallace 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Required of all college sophomores. 

A study of changing moods and evolving ideals from the time of 
Beowulf to that of the Second World War. 

33. Public Speaking. Professor Stine 

Three hours. First or second semester. Required of all prospective teachers. 
Not open to freshmen. 

42. Eighteenth Century Literature. Professor Wallace 

Two hours. First semester. Open to seniors. 

A rapid survey of the principal English authors between 1660 and 1800, 
accompanied by lectures on literary tendencies, with special attention to 
developing concepts of freedom. 

52. Nineteenth Century Prose. Professor Wallace 

Two hours. Second semester. Open to seniors. 

Special attention will be paid to the work of Ruskin, Carlyle, and 
Arnold, each of whom foresaw, tried to avert, and proposed a possible 
way out of, just such a catastrophe as that into which the world is now 
plunged. Supplementary readings will include examples of the romantic, 
the humanitarian, and the psychological novels of the period. 

63-A. The Development of the Drama to Shakespeare. 

Three hours. First semester. Professor Wallace 

A survey of the drama from ancient Greece to Elizabethan England ; 
a rapid reading of plays by Lyly, Marlowe, Greene, Kyd, Dekker, Jonson ; 
a study of Shakespeare's historical plays, with special attention to Richard 
II and Henry IV. 

63-B. Shakespeare. Professor Wallace 

Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the comedies and tragedies. 
132. Contemporary Drama. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
A survey of American and British drama since 1890. 
152. History qf the English Language. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. First semester. 

Historical study of English sounds, inflections, and vocabulary. Stand- 
ards of correctness ; current usage. Recommended especially for prospec- 
tive teachers of English composition. 

162. Chaucer. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944—1945. 

172. Advanced Composition. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. Second semester. 

512. Poetry of the Romantic Revolt. Professor Wallace 

Two hours. First semester. Open to juniors and seniors. 

A study of early Nineteenth Century poetry, with special attention to 

57 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

five poets who "served human liberty" : Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley, Keats. 

522- A. American Literature: From the Beginnings to the 

Civil War. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. First semester. 

An attempt, through the study of native authors, to see in perspective 
the evolving American mind; to observe how Puritanism, the Cavalier 
spirit, and the Romantic Movement have contributed to making us what 
we are; and to understand the spiritual resources of which we are the 
heirs. 

522-B. American Literature: From the Civil War to the 

Present Day. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. Second semester. 

542. Recent British and American Poetry. Professor Wallace 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

An exploration, on the one hand, of the aesthetic movements of the 
past generation, and, on the other, of the recent reawakening among poets 
to the fact that they are "the unacknowledged legislators of the world." 

552. Biography. Professor Wallace 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1943—1944. 
A study of the development of biographical writing in England and 
America. 

562. Seventeenth Century Literature. Associate Professor Struble 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
Chief intellectual currents in England from the death of Elizabeth to 
the Restoration, with passing references to the importance of Seventeenth 
Century English thought, particularly Puritanism, to the beginnings of 
American literature. Critical study of the artistic products of the period, 
with special emphasis on Milton. 
Methods of Teaching English. See Education 332. 

FRENCH 

Professors Stevenson and Green 

The aim of this department is twofold: first, to give an accurate 
and practical knowledge of the French language, which will equip 
the student for teaching French in the secondary schools ; and second, 
to develop an appreciation of the French spirit, as expressed in lit- 
erature, and an understanding of the main literary movements of 
France, which will be of value in any field of literary activity. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, 36, and 46 or 56. 

Minor: Courses 16, 26, and 6 additional hours of advanced work. 
Those preparing to teach French should take French 16, 26, and six 
additional hours of advanced work. 

58 



CATALOGUE 

For entrance to French 16, the preparatory course 06 or its equivalent 
(two years of high school French) will be required. French 26 is a pre- 
requisite for entrance to 36 or 46. 

06. Elementary French. Professor Green 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
This course is intended for those who begin French in college. Its aim 
is to enable the student to write simple French sentences, to carry on a 
conversation in easy French, and to read French of ordinary difficulty. 
College credit of six semester hours will be granted for this course if 
followed by French 16, but it cannot be counted toward a major. 

16. First Year College French. Professor Green 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 06, and includes further 
drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, 
and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

Candidates for this course are required to take the French Placement 
Test during Freshman Week, to determine the suitability of their prep- 
aration. 

26. French Literature of XVI and XVII Centuries. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Professor Stevenson 

A survey of French literary history from the Renaissance to the end 
of the period of absolute Classicism. Composition and conversation. 

36. French Literature of the XVIII and XIX Centuries. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Professor Stevenson 

A continuation of the preceding survey, beginning with the Quarrel of 
the Ancients and Moderns. Composition and conversation. Course 26 is 
prerequisite to this course. 

46. The French Novel. Professor Stevenson 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943-1944. 

A study of the development of this genre in France, special attention 
being given to the later XIX Century and contemporary novels. Compo- 
sition and conversation. Courses 26 and 36 are prerequisite to this course. 

56. French Drama. Professor Stevenson 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of the evolution of the drama in France with extensive reading 
of XVII, XVIII, and XIX Century plays. Composition and conversation. 
Courses 26 and 36 are prerequisite to this course. 

Methods of Teaching French. See Education 332. 

GERMAN 

Professor Lietzau 
The immediate aim of this department is to give a thorough prep- 
aration in German : that is, a ready and accurate reading knowledge 

59 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

of the language, as well as a satisfactory degree of proficiency in 
written and spoken German. The larger aim is to give a broader 
survey of the German language, literature, history, and civilization 
that will fully equal in cultural and informational value any course 
in English literature. 

Courses are conducted in German. 

Major: Twenty-four semester hours, exclusive of German 06. 

Minor: German 16, 26, and six additional semester hours of advanced 
work. 

Correlative : Courses in history, the literature of another language, 
political science, economics, philosophy, music, or art, furnish a back- 
ground or basis of comparison for work in German. 

Those preparing to teach German should take German 16, 26, and six 
additional hours of advanced work. 

I. Introduction 
06. Elementary German. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Intended to give students a reading knowledge of German of average 
difficulty, and to enable them to understand the spoken language and to 
express simple ideas idiomatically. 

College credit of six semester hours will be granted for this course 
only if followed by German 16. 

II. Intermediate 
16. Modern German Literature. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Reading of nineteenth and twentieth century literature combined 
with a study of geography, history, and art. Grammar and composition. 

26. Lessing and Schiller 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Introduction to the classical period of German literature. Special 
emphasis on the drama of Lessing and Schiller. 

III. Advanced 
36. The German Drama. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Theory and development of the German drama with special em- 
phasis on the nineteenth century. 

46. The German Novel and Short Story. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Theory and development of the novel and short story with special 
emphasis on the Nineteenth Century. 

56. Goethe. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A study of Goethe's life, of his lyrics, ballads, dramas, prose works. 
Prerequisite: German 26. 

60 



CATALOGUE 
76. Scientific. German. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Translation course for students specializing in science, particularly for 
students of medicine and chemistry. Not open to major students in 
German. 

Methods of Teaching German. See Education 332. 

GREEK 

Professor Richie 

The objectives of courses in classical Greek are to obtain a mastery 
of the basic elements of the language, to secure facility in reading, 
and to acquire an appreciation of the civilization of ancient Greece 
and its contribution to modern institutions. The courses in the New 
Testament and Patristics are designed to procure efficiency in the 
handling of the original sources, to acquaint the student with the 
peculiarities of Koine Greek and with the textural problems, and to 
prepare for the pursuance of further advanced studies in the seminary 
and university. 

Major: Courses 16, 26, and twelve additional hours. 
Minor: Courses 16, 26, and six additional hours. 

16. Elementary Greek. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Study of forms and syntax, with easy prose composition. Selections 
from Xenophon's Anabasis. This course is intended for students who 
enter college with no Greek. 

26. First Year Greek. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Xenophon : The Anabasis; selections previously unread. Homer : selec- 
tions from the Iliad; scansion and epic poetry. Herodotus : selections from 
several of the books, 

33-A. Philosophy. 

Three hours. First semester. 

Plato : The Apology of Socrates. Xenophon : Selections from the Mem- 
orabilia. Lectures on Greek philosophy from Thales to Plato. 

33-B. Drama. 

Three hours. Second semester. 

Selections will be read from the tragedies of Aeschylus and Sophocles. 
Lectures on the Greek drama and its influence. Prerequisite: Greek 16 
and 26. 

46. Readings from the Book of Acts and the General Epistles. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Prerequisite: Greek 16 and 26. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
56. The Gospel according to John and Selected Readings. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943—1944. 

Prerequisite : Greek 16 and 26. 
66. Patristics. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Seminar — Open to seniors. 

The Shepherd of Hermas will be read in the first semester; Justin 
Martyr during the second semester. 

HISTORY 

Professors Miller and Shenk 

The aim of the Department of History is to help the student ac- 
quire from his study of the past a truer and more comprehensive 
view of the world in which he lives. 

Major: History 13, 123, 213, 223, 23-A, 23-B, 46, and 44-C. 

Minor: History 13, 46, and nine additional hours. 

Those preparing to teach history should take History 13, 46, and nine 
additional hours, six of these to be selected from courses in European 
History and three from American History. 

13. Ancient History. Professor Shenk 

Three hours. First semester. 
The history of the Ancient Orient, Greece, and Rome. Stress will be 
placed on the cultural contributions of the Ancient World. 

123. Medieval History. Professor Shenk 

Three hours. Second semester. 

Political, social, and cultural ideas of the Middle Ages will be treated 
through a study of typical institutions such as the manor, guilds, courts, 
the church, universities, and monarchical institutions. « 

213. The Renaissance and Reformation. Professor Miller 

Three hours. First semester. 
A study of the political, economic, cultural, and religious changes that 
occurred from the Thirteenth to the Sixteenth Centuries. 

223. The French Revolution and Napoleon. Professor Miller 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A survey of the conditions in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century 
Europe which led to the outbreak of Revolution ; the events of the Revo- 
lution itself; and the effect of the Revolution upon the rest of Europe. 
Napoleon and the results of his work. 

23-A. Europe from 1815 to 1914. Professor Miller 

Three hours. First semester. 

A survey of Nineteenth Century Europe. 

62 



CATALOGUE 
23-B. Europe from 1914 to the present. Professor Miller 

Three hours. Second semester. 

A study of the World War and post-war problems. Emphasis will be 
placed upon current history. 

36. History of England and the British Empire. Professor Miller 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A survey of the History of England and the Empire from the earliest 
time to the present. 

46. Political and Social History of the United States. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Professor Shenk 

A general survey of American History with particular attention to 
social and cultural trends. 

43-B. History of the United States since the Civil War. 

Three hours, First semester. Professor Shenk 

A study of the economic, political, and diplomatic history of the 
United States from 1865 to the present time. 

403. History of Pennsylvania. Professor Shenk 

Three years. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. This course will alternate 
with History 43-B. 

A study of the political and social history of Pennsylvania with special 
emphasis on the different types of settlers and on the contribution of the 
Commonwealth to the history of the nation. 

42. American Biography. Professor Shenk 

One hour. Throughout the year. 

A study of the achievements of American men and women who typify 
important social and political trends. 

For the year 1943-1944 the selections will be made from the period from 
1800-1861. 

44-C. Source Problems in American History. Professor Miller 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Open only to History majors. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the use of source 
material and the methods of historical research. 

64. Economic History of the United States. Professor Miller 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943—1944. This course will alter- 
nate with History 164. 

A study of the economic background of American History, including 
the growth of American agricultural and industrial interests, from colonial 
beginnings to their present day development. 

164. Economic History of Europe. Professor Miller 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1944—1945. This course will alter- 
nate with History 64. 

The course deals with the economic achievements in Europe from pre- 
Jiterary times to the present; economic life in the Mediterranean Basin 

63 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

in Classical times ; the foundations of economic life in the Middle Ages ; 
the Manorial system and agrarian society ; the towns, trade, and industry 
in the Middle Ages ; the expansion of Europe and the age of discovery ; 
the Industrial Revolution and the beginnings of modern industry and 
agriculture ; Capitalism and commercial policies in the early modern peri- 
od; revolution in power, transportation and communication; economic 
imperialism and the World War; the post-war world. 

113. History of Civilization. Professor Shenk 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A general survey of the whole field of history. Particular attention will 
be given to economic, social, religious, and cultural development. Re- 
quired of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education. 

412. The American Revolution and the Period of the Con- . 

federation. Professor Miller 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

A study of the movement for Independence in the American Colonies 
and the establishment of the United States of America. 

422. The Expansion of the United States. Professor Miller 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

A study of the westward movement of the American People. 
244. History of Latin America. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943-1944. 

A survey of the political and cultural development of the Latin Amer- 
ican Republics. The period of independence, internal development, and 
relations with the United States will be emphasized. 

Methods of Teaching History. See Education 332. 



LATIN , 
Professor Stonecipher 

The purpose of the Latin Department is two-fold, professional and 
cultural. 

Professionally, its design is to give proper training to prospective 
teachers of the secondary schools and to lay the foundation for the 
higher professional training of the university. 

Culturally, it is intended to introduce the student to the field of 
Latin literature, and through it to those elements of Graeco-Roman 
culture upon which modern civilization is largely based. 

Major: Latin 16, 26, 36, 46, 64. 

Minor: Latin 16, 26, 64. 

Those preparing to teach Latin should take Latin 16, 26, 64, and two 
additional hours of advanced work. 

64 



CATALOGUE 
16. Freshman Latin. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
The reading of Sallust's Catiline, Cicero's De Senectute or De Amicitia, 
and selections from Pliny's Letters. Study of syntax from text and gram- 
mar ; Roman life and institutions ; graded exercises in prose composition. 

26. Readings from Livy, Horace, and Catullus. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Study of syntax, style, and the history of Latin literature. Latin 16 
prerequisite. 

33-A. Seneca. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1944—1945. 

Selections from the Epistulae Morales; study of style; Roman philo- 
sophic thought. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

33-B. Vergil. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1944—1945. 

Readings from Books VII-XII of the Aeneid and other works of 
Vergil. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

43-A. Cicero. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

Selections from his Letters; study of Cicero's life as reflected in his 
correspondence. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

43-B. Mediaeval Latin. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

Such readings are selected from this field .as to acquaint the student 
with the development of the Latin language and literature after the clas- 
sical period. Latin 26 prerequisite. 

64. Latin Composition. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1944-1945. 

Graded exercises in prose composition, attention also being given to 
correct pronunciation and oral expression. Required in majors and minors. 

Methods of Teaching Latin. See Education 332. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Black and Grimm 

Major: Courses 36, 48, 74, 84, 94, and Physics 18. 

Minor: Courses 36, 48, and any additional four semester hours. 

A major in Mathematics may lead to either the B.S. or A.B. degree. 
If the B.S. is desired, the candidate must take the general requirements 
for that degree (see p. 40), and must select as his minor either Biology, 
Chemistry, or Physics. 

If the A.B. is desired, the candidate must take the general require- 
ments for that degree (see p. 40), and may take his minor in any depart- 
ment other than those named in the preceding paragraph. 

65 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Those preparing to teach Mathematics should take Mathematics 36, 48, 
and four additional hours of advanced work. 

Courses 13 and 23 are not open to upper-classmen without special 
permission. 

13. Advanced Algebra. Professor Black 

Three hours. First semester. 
Covering ratio and proportion, variation, progressions, the binomial 
theorem, theorem of undetermined coefficients, logarithms, permutations, 
and combinations, theory of equations, partial fractions, etc. 

23. Plane Trigonometry. Professor Black 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Definitions of trigonometric functions, right and oblique triangles, com- 
putation of distances and heights, development of trigonometric formulae. 

25. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Professors Black and Grimm 

Five hours. Second semester. 

This course is designed for those planning to enter the armed services. 
Emphasis will be placed upon use of tables and computation. Applications 
will be made to firing problems and navigation. 

113. Introduction to the Mathematics of Finance. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. 

This course takes up the solution of the quadratic equation, logarithms, 
progressions, permutations and combinations, and the application of these 
to financial problems. 

123. Mathematics of Finance. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 

The course seeks to present the mathematical principles and operations 
used in financial work. A detailed study of compound interest, compound 
discount, and annuities is undertaken. Application of these principles is 
then made to practical problems of amortization, sinking funds, deprecia- 
tion, valuations of bonds, and building and loan associations. 

36. Analytic Geometry. Professor Black 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

The equations of the straight line, circle, ellipse, parabola, and hyper- 
bola are studied, numerous examples are solved, and as much of the 
higher plane curves and of the geometry of space is covered as time will 
permit. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 13 and 23 (or 25), or the equivalent. 
48. Differential and Integral Calculus. Professor Black 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, maxima and 
minima, rates, development into series, etc. Integrations, rectification of 
curves, quadrature of surfaces, cubature of solids, etc. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 36. 

66 



CATALOGUE 
63. Plane Surveying. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of the instruments, field work, computing areas, plotting and 
drafting, leveling, etc. 

74. Differential Equations. Professor Black 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
A course in the elements of differential equations. 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 48. 

84. Analytic Mechanics. Professor Grimm 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Resolution of force, two and three force pieces, center of gravity, ac- 
celeration, moment of inertia, friction. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 48 and Physics 18. 

94. Projective Geometry. Professor Black 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is a synthetic treatment of the elements of projective 
geometry. A knowledge of elementary analytic geometry is presupposed 
on the part of the student. 

Methods of Teaching Mathematics. See Education 332. 

MUSIC 

Professors Gillespie, Rutledge, Darnell 

Music is recognized as having a proper place in a liberal educa- 
tion. Three types of participants are necessary to create a concert : 
composer, performer, listener. The following courses, available to 
students in the liberal arts, are intended primarily to promote the 
appreciation of music and furnish the intelligent listener. 

Minor: Twenty semester hours, of which at least four hours must be 
in applied music. The selection of courses must be supervised and ap- 
proved by the Music Department adviser. 

Courses in applied music will not be credited toward any degree ex- 
cept the Bachelor of Science in Music, unless they are taken as part of 
a full minor in music. 

For courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music 
Education see pages 88, 89. 

The following courses may be taken as electives for credit toward any 
degree conferred by the college : 

112, 122, 132. Sight Reading. Professors Gillespie and Darnell 

Three hours per week each. Two hours credit each. 

Beginning with 112, singing simple melodies, simple part singing, and 
unaltered intervals, the course continues through 122 and 132, becoming 
increasingly difficult in each phase, culminating in oratorio singing. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

212. Dictation. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Dictation of intervals and melodies. 

222. Dictation. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week. Two hours credit. Second semester. 

Continued dictation of intervals and melodies, with addition of modu- 
lations and harmonic dictation. 

232. Dictation Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week. Two hours credit. First semester. 

Addition of Chromatic dictation. 
313. Harmony. Professor Darnell 

Three hours. First semester. 
Fundamentals of music notation, both tonal and rhythmic. Beginning 
written four part harmony, including simple triads. 

323. Harmony. Professor Darnell 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Inversions of simple triads, seventh chord and its inversions. Original 
work, and study of form and analysis. 

332. Harmony. Professor Darnell 

Two hours. First semester. 

Continued inversions of the seventh chord, chromatic harmony and 
modulations. Original work. 

342. Keyboard Harmony. Professor Bender 

Two hours. Second semester. 

Harmonization of melodies and transposition at the piano. 
362. Harmony. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours. Second semester. 

Original compositions in various vocal and instrumental forms. 

372. Harmony: Counterpoint. Professor Darnell 

Two hours. One semester. 

Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part and 
Three Part Counterpoint). 

553. History and Appreciation of Music. Professor Gillespie 

Three hours. First semester. 

History of music from the beginning of time to the Romantic Period. 

563. History and Appreciation. Professor Gillespie 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of music from the Romantic Period to the present day. 

61 and 62. Chorus. Professor Rutledge 

N.B. No student may receive credit for chorus work more than once. 



CATALOGUE 

ORIENTATION 

11. Freshman Orientation. 

One hour. First semester. Required of all college freshmen. 

Lectures and personal conferences designed to help students meet the 
problems, social as well as academic, that confront them on entering 
college. 

Conducted by various members of the faculty under the chairmanship 
of President Lynch. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Shettel 
Philosophy concerns itself with spiritual values and the relation 
of these values to the problems of life. The paramount function of 
courses in philosophy is to correlate spiritual values with scientific 
and all other curricular values in so far as they touch the problems 
of life. 

Major: Philosophy 02, 12, 23-A, 23-B, 32, 52, 122, 132, 142, Political 
Science 42, and Psychology 102. 
Minor: Philosophy 02, 12, 23-A, 23-B, 32, 52, 62. 

02. Introduction to Philosophy. 

Two hours. First semester. 

This course is intended to introduce beginners to the basic problems and 
theories of philosophy and quicken them to some appreciation of the role 
played by philosophy in the whole movement of civilization, while at the 
same time giving them at least an inkling of the work of the greatest 
thinkers and arousing in them a desire to go to the sources. 

12. Inductive and Deductive Logic. 

Two hours. Second semester. 

This course is intended to furnish the student with a knowledge of the 
laws of correct thinking, the purpose and place of the syllogism in the 
processes of thinking, and the detection of fallacies in thinking. 

23-A. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. 

Three hours. First semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 
In this course the aim will be (1) to trace the development of philoso- 
phy, pointing out what of permanent value each system as it arose 
contributed toward a final solution of the nature of being, and (2) to 
show the interaction between philosophic thought and the practical life 
of the period during which it flourished. 

23-B. Modem Philosophy. 

Three hours. Second semester. Open to juniors and seniors. A continuation 
of 23-A. 

32. Ethics. 

Two hours. Second semester. Open to juniors and seniors. 
The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the academic 

69 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ethical problems, and to effect an awakening and a strengthening of the 
moral sense. 

Political Theory. See Political Science 42. 

52. Philosophy of Religion. 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

The purpose of this course is to properly correlate scientific and 
philosophic truths with religion, to inquire into the validity of religious 
knowledge, and to seek a philosophical basis for an adequate religious 
viewpoint. 

62. Contemporary Philosophy. 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered yearly. 

The living philosophers of the various nations are studied. The new 
problems which have arisen for them, and the old problems in which 
they continue to be interested, will be considered, and their proffered 
solutions. 

Psychology of Religion. See Psychology 102. 
122. Aesthetics. 

Two hours. First semester. Open to juniors and seniors. Offered 1943—1944. 

A historical survey of the philosophy of the beautiful, the correlation of 
the same with the development of the fine arts, and a consideration of 
fundamental principles of criticism. 

132. Philosophy In America. 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944—1945. Open to all students. 

A critical history of ideas in the United States from the Puritans till 
today. In this country, as often elsewhere, philosophy has been integral to 
the general life of the nation. A study of both general and religious views. 

142. Epistemology. 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1944—1945. 

A consideration of our ways of knowing, and a critical study of the 
various theories of the method and grounds of knowledge. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Jerome W. Frock, Director of Physical Education for Men, 

and Coach ; Esther Henderson, Director of Physical 

Education for Women; Marino Intrieri 

The aim of the work in this department is to promote the general 
physical well being of the students, and to assist them to gain the 
hygienic, corrective, and educative effect of rightly regulated exer- 
cise. 

In order that this object may be better attained, and to assist the 
director in gaining a definite knowledge of the strength and weak- 

70 



CATALOGUE 

ness of the individual, a careful physical examination and medical 
inspection is required, which serves as a basis for the work. 

It is strongly recommended that before entering college each stu- 
dent undergo a thorough visual examination and be fitted with 
glasses, if there is a need for them. 

The Health Laws of the State of Pennsylvania require successful 
vaccination against smallpox before one may enter private, parochial, 
or public schools as a student. 

All first year students are required to attend a course of lectures 
in Personal and Sex Hygiene. 

All freshmen and sophomores are required to take two hours of 
Physical Education a week throughout the year, for which one se- 
mester hour's credit will be given each semester. 

11. Hygiene. 

One hour. Second semester. Required of all freshmen. 

The aim of the course is to bring to the attention of the student early 
in the college course some of the common pitfalls in the path of health 
and the methods of avoiding them, as well as to train him for leadership 
in community health improvement. 

The course consists of lectures, readings, and discussions relative to 
the maintenance of health. 

Courses for Women 
First semester. 

Two hours. 
Instruction and practice in such sports and games as hockey, soccer, 
tennis, table tennis, archery, handball, and in the fundamentals of basket- 
ball. 

Second semester. 

Two hours. 
Instruction and practice in such sports as basket-ball, volley-ball, bad- 
minton, baseball, paddle tennis, table tennis, archery, tennis, and quoits. 
Instruction and practice in folk, national, character, and interpretative 
dancing. Instruction and practice in games, tumbling, stunts, and natural 
gymnastics. 

Hiking — The whole year. 

Organized hikes for all women who wish to participate. 

Intramural Sports. 

Inter-class games are provided in all sports such as hockey, soccer, 
basketball, volley-ball, indoor baseball, table tennis, and tennis. 

A short seasonal schedule of games in field hockey, basketball, tennis, 
table tennis, baseball and archery is arranged to be played with other 
colleges. An honor team is chosen for these games. 

Students are required to provide themselves with gymnasium suits. Do 
not purchase suit until arrival at college. 

71 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Courses for Men 
12. For Freshmen. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Instruction and practice in such games as handball, volley-ball, basket- 
ball, soft-ball, wrestling, fencing, and archery. 

21- A. For Sophomores. 

Two hours. First semester. 

Instruction and practice in such games and sports as touch-ball, kick 
football, volley-ball, tennis ; and in the fundamentals of boxing, basket- 
ball, handball, wrestling, fencing, and archery. 

21-B. For Sophomores. 

Two hours. Second semester. 
Instruction and practice in such games and sports as basketball, boxing, 
handball, soft-ball, and tennis. 

Intramural Sports. 

Inter-class games are provided for dormitory students and day stu- 
dents. 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm and Associate Professor Porter 

Major: Physics 16-12, 33-32, 43-53, Mathematics 84, and any 
eight additional hours. 
Minor: Physics 16-12 and any ten additional semester hours. 

16. General College Physics. Associate Professor Porter 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Three hours lectures and recitations per week. This course will be a 
thorough investigation of the fundamental principles of physical science, 
and is especially intended as a preparation for Physics 2, 3, and 4, and 
for those interested in the practical applications of physical laws and 
principles. When accompanied by Physics 12, it meets the minimum re- 
quirements of those who are candidates for the bachelor's degree in sci- 
ence and for admission to the Medical Schools. 

12. General Physics Laboratory. Associate Professor Porter 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

Laboratory work associated with the subject matter of Physics 16. 
This course should accompany Physics 16. 

23. Mechanics. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

This course will be a thorough investigation of the mechanics of solids, 
liquids, gases, and sound. Prerequisite: Physics 16-12. 

21. Mechanics Laboratory. Professor Grimm 

Two hours. First semester. 
Experimental work in precise measurements. Conventional experiments 
with momentum, rotation, and physical moduli of materials. 

72 



CATALOGUE 
33. Magnetism and Electricity. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

This course will be a thorough consideration of the laws of the electric 
and magnetic fields and the power applications of electricity as direct 
and low frequency alternating currents. 

32. Electrical Measurements. Professor Grimm 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1943—1944. 
Measurements of potential, current, resistance, capacity, and inductance 
in the field of direct currents and of alternating currents at low and high 
frequencies. This course should accompany Physics 33 and 63, and may 
be divided into two parts. 

43. Light: Optics and Spectroscopy. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. 

This course will be concerned with the nature of light and its trans- 
mission through various media including reflection, refraction, and dis- 
persion. Prerequisite: Physics 16-12. 

42. Optics Laboratory. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Experimental work with reflection, refraction, and dispersion of light. 
This course should accompany Physics 43 and Physics 53. 

53. Modern Physics. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 

An investigation of the application of physical principles to molecular, 
atomic, and electronic phenomena. Recent developments in nuclear physics. 

63. High Frequency Alternating Currents — Electronics and Radio 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. Professor Grimm 

The generation of high frequency alternating currents and their appli- 
cation to radio transmission and its associated equipment. 

73. Heat and Thermodynamics. Professor Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

The theory of heat, kinetic theory of gases, and the laws of thermo- 
dynamics. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Shenk and Shettel 

The aim of the department is to prepare students for citizenship 
by acquainting them with the principles and problems of human 
associations within the several fields of specialized study. The 
courses are intended to be utilitarian as well as cultural. 

Major: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16, Political 
Science 42 and 52, and two hours of approved electives. 

73 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Minor: Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 16. 
Those preparing to teach Social Science should take Economics 16, 
Political Science 16, and Sociology 13, 23. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 
16. American Government and Politics. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
fundamental laws of Federal and State Government. 

26. Business Law. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A course dealing with the elementary principles of law generally re- 
lated to the field of business, including Contracts, Agency, Sales, Bail- 
ments, Insurance, and Negotiable Instruments. 

42. Political Theory. 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
A survey of the different philosophies and theories of government, 
ancient and modern, with special reference to political philosophy since 
the Sixteenth Century. 

52. Foreign Relations. 

Two hours. First semester. 

A study of the history and development of world politics with special 
emphasis placed upon foreign relations of the United States. 

63. Comparative Government. 

Three hours. Second semester. 

A comparative study of the most important governmental systems of 
the world, emphasizing especially the differences between federal and 
unitary government. Special attention will be given to the governments 
of the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Switzerland, and 
Russia. 

72. Political Parties in the United States. 

Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the history and origins of Political Parties, their organiza- 
tion, development, and methods of operation, leaders, machines and bosses, 
campaigns and platforms. 

82. American Constitutional Law. 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
A study of the growth and development of the constitution through the 
medium of judicial construction. Recent decisions illustrating its appli- 
cation to new conditions of the present age, and proposals for court 
modification, are given particular attention. Political Science 16 is a pre- 
requisite. 

74 



CATALOGUE 
114. Law. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

An orientation course in the general field of law and procedure, touch- 
ing the following subjects, viz. : Business Associations, Real Property, 
Liens, Leases, Mortgages, Wills, Workmen's Compensation, Insurance. 

SOCIOLOGY 

13. Principles of Sociology. 

Three hours. First semester. 
The course is intended to acquaint the student with the various theories 
of society together with the place of Sociology in the general field of 
learning. 

23. Modern Social Problems. 

Three hours. Second semester. 

This is a study in pathology: the organization and function of public 
and private welfare and social security agencies, preventive and remedial. 
Problem Children, Widowhood, Divorce, Desertion and Non-support, 
Neglected and Abused Children, Illegitimacy, Homeless Men, Old Age, 
Poverty, Unemployment, Child Labor, Industrial Accidents, Disasters, 
and Bad Health, are subjects of study and discussion. 

32. Criminology. 

Two hours. Second semester. 

A study of the causes of crime and the treatment of criminals ; criminal 
behavior; the police system and the criminal courts; treatment of juvenile 
offenders ; punishment, probation, parole, and reform. Observation and 
criticism of social agencies dealing with the crime problem is required. 

42. The Family and Its Relation to Society. 

Two hours. First semester. 

A study of the family and its social functions, its relation to social 
institutions, the rights, duties and interactions of its members, the evolu- 
tion of social thought concerning it, and its status in the future. 

Social Psychology. See Psychology 33. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Bailey and Shettel 

The courses in this department are designed to develop in the 
student an insight into the facts and principles of psychology as an 
aid in controlling their own mental life and in understanding the 
reactions and points of view of others. The department offers to the 
student who is interested in social, clinical, and other allied work 
fundamentals needed for service in these fields. To the student who 

75 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

intends to teach psychology or to carry on research in the field, it 
provides an adequate foundation for graduate work. 

Major: Psychology 13, 23, 53, 63, and eleven additional hours. 

Minor: Psychology 13, 23, and nine additional hours. 

13. General Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. First semester. Not open to freshmen. 

A beginning course in general psychology. It aims to acquaint the 
student with the fundamental psychological principles. Lectures, discus- 
sions, and laboratory demonstrations. 

23. Educational Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. 

A psychological study of the nature of the learner and the nature of 
the learning process. It includes such topics as individual differences, 
motivation, emotion, and transfer of training. Prerequisite: Psychology 13. 

33. Social Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1943—1944. 

A study of the psychic aspects of society and of problems involved in 
group behavior. The course is also concerned with the development of 
personality in the individual. Prerequisite : Psychology 13. 

43. Psychology of Adolescence. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1944—1945. 

A course designed to give an understanding of the physical, mental, 
emotional, moral, and social development of the youth. Prerequisite : Psy- 
chology 13. 

53. Applied Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

A survey of the applications of psychology to the various fields of hu- 
man relations. It includes such topics as increase of efficiency, effect of 
suggestion, improvement of personality, salesmanship, advertising, and 
the psychology of the public platform. Prerequisite : Psychology 13. 

63. Mental Hygiene. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 
A study of wholesome effective personality adjustments, including the 
causes and treatment of the more common social and emotional malad- 
justments among college students. Prerequisite: Psychology 13. 

72. Psychology of Childhood. Professor Bailey 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 

The psychological development of the child from the beginning of life 
to adolescence. Emphasis upon learning, language, comprehension, and 
emotion as these develop genetically in the individual. Prerequisite : Psy- 
chology 13. 

76 



CATALOGUE 
83. Systematic Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1943-1944. 

This course aims to acquaint the student with the different points of 
view in recent psychology. It includes structuralism, functionalism, be- 
haviorism, purposive psychology, Gestalt psychology, and psycho-analysis. 
Prerequisite: two courses in psychology. 

93. Abnormal Psychology. Professor Bailey 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1944-1945. 
An introduction to the study of abnormal behavior, including such 
topics as hysteria, multiple personality, hypnosis, analysis of nervous 
and mental maladjustments, and a study of psychological processes as 
they occur in the more marked forms of derangement. Prerequisite : Psy- 
chology 13. 

102. Psychology of Religion. Professor Shettel 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1944-1945. 
The growth of religion in the life of the individual is subject to certain 
psychological laws. This course seeks to acquaint the student with such 
laws for use in faciliating religious growth. Prerequisite : Psychology 13. 

SPANISH 
06. Elementary Spanish. Professor Stevenson 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is intended for those who begin Spanish in college. Its aim 
is to enable students to write simple Spanish sentences, to carry on a 
conversation in easy Spanish, and to read Spanish of ordinary difficulty. 
College credit of six semester hours will be granted for this course if 
followed by Spanish 16. 

16. First Year College Spanish. Professor Stevenson 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 06 and includes further 
drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, 
and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

For entrance to Spanish 16, the preparatory course 06 or its equivalent 
(two years of high-school Spanish) will be required. 

26. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Professor Stevenson 

Novels and plays will be studied and discussed in class or reported 
upon. Composition and conversation. 



77 



Summer School, Extension, and Evening 
Courses 



Through summer sessions, extension classes, and evening classes, 
Lebanon Valley College has for many years enabled teachers, state 
employees, and others in active employment to attend college courses 
and secure academic degrees. By a careful selection of courses made 
in consultation with the heads of departments in the College, a stu- 
dent can meet the course and residence requirements for a baccalau- 
reate degree. 

Students in regular attendance may, by taking summer school 
courses, meet the requirements for the bachelor's degree in three 
years. 

Courses in the following subjects will be offered in the Summer 
School of 1943, and in extension and evening classes in 1943-1944: 
Bible, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Economics, 
Education (including Visual Education), English, French, Ger- 
man, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychol- 
ogy, and Sociology. 

Extension classes are offered in the Central School Building, 
Forster Street, Harrisburg, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday evenings from 7 :00 to 9 :00 p.m. 

Evening classes are held at the College in Annville, usually on 
Friday evening between 6 :30 and 10 :00 p.m. Classes may be held on 
other evenings if desired. 

Extension and evening classes begin during the week of September 
20, 1943. 

Summer School opens June 7 and closes August 27, 1943. Students 
unable to enter on June 7 may enter July 19. 

For details, write the Director of Summer School, Extension and 
Evening Courses. 



78 



Special Plans of Study in Preparation for 
Professions 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Adviser: Dr. Stokes 

Plan of course leading to the degree of B.S. in Economics 

Hours 

First Year Credit 

Hygiene 11, Orientation 11 2 

Chemistry 18, or Physics 18, or Biology 18 8 

Economic Geography 4 

Mathematics 13 and 23, or Mathematics 113 and 123 6 

English 16 6 

French 16 or German 16 or Spanish 16 (See p. 38, n. 1) ... . 6 

Physical Education 2 

Second Year 34 

Bible 14 4 

Economics 16 6 

Principles of Accounting 6 

English 26 6 

Political Science 16 6 

Statistics 3 

Physical Education 2 

Third Year ^ 

History (See p. 38, n. 2) 6 

Political Science 26 6 

Money and Banking 3 

Marketing 3 

Economic History of the United States or Economic History 

of Europe 3 

Psychology 13 3 

Electives 8 

32 
Fourth Year 

Transportation (Rail) 3 

Corporation Finance and Investments 6 

Industrial Organization and Management 3 

Political Science 6 

Bible 82 and Ethics 4 

Electives 10 

32 

Students may elect from the following: History of Economic Thought; 
Motor, Air and Water Transportation ; Public Finance ; Labor Problems ; 
Economics of Consumption ; Contemporary Economic Problems. On con- 
sultation with the adviser electives may be selected in another field. 

79 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CHEMISTRY 

Adviser: Dr. Bender 
Plan of course leading to the degree of B.S. in Chemistry: 

Hours credit 

First Year 1st sem. 2nd sera. 

English 16 3 3 

Mathematics 13 and 23 3 3 

German 06 or 16* or 76* 3 3 

Bible 14 : 2 2 

Chemistry 18 4 4 

Hygiene 1 1, Orientation 11 1 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

Second Year 

Mathematics 36 3 3 

Biology 18 4 4 

Economics 16 3 3 

Chemistry 24 and 34 4 4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Elective 2 or 3 2 or 3 

Third Year 

Mathematics 48 4 4 

Physics 18 4 4 

Chemistry 48 4 4 

Chemistry 73 — 3 

Elective 5 2 

Fourth Year 

Psychology 13 3 — 

Chemistry 84 and 94 4 4 

Chemistry 58 4 4 

Elective 4 8 

It should be noted that Chemistry 73 and 58 are given in alternate years. 

It is recommended that a reading knowledge of French be acquired and 
that additional courses in Physics be taken. At least three hours must 
be elected outside of the sciences. 



* If German 06 is taken the first year it must be followed by German 16 or 76 
in the second year. 



80 



CATALOGUE 

REGULAR PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

Advisers: Dr. Derickson and Dr. Bender 

The following courses of study are outlined for those desiring to 
qualify for admission to medical schools. 

The work offered for a two-year course includes the subjects 
specified by the Bureau of Professional Education of the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Public Instruction as the minimum requirement 
for admission to any medical school. 

The four-year course includes all of the subjects required for ad- 
mission to the medical schools which require a collegiate degree for 
admission and fulfills the requirements of the College for the Bache- 
lor of Science degree. The student ranks as a Pre-Medical Major. 

The student should maintain a standard of not less than "B" in 
required courses in order to obtain the recommendation of the college 
for admission to a medical school. 

In addition to the courses outlined the student is advised to read 
the following: 

Locy, Biology and its Makers; Stieglitz, Chemistry in Medicine; 
Mendel, Nutrition: The Chemistry of Life; Garrison, History of 
Medicine. 

Current Biological Literature including Journals of Wistar In- 
stitute of Anatomy and Biology. 

Bio-Chemistry by such authors as Bodansky, Hawk, Gortner. 

Four-Year Course 

First Year Hours Credit Second Year Hours Credit 

Biology 18 8 Bible 14 4 

Chemistry 18 8 Chemistry 24 and 34 8 

English 16 6 English 26 6 

French 16 or Psychology 13 3 

♦German 16 (See p. 38, n. 1) 6 Physical Education 2 

Mathematics 13 and 23 . . 6 Hygiene 11, Orientation 11. 2 

Physical Education 2 Elective 10 

36 5 

Third Year Hours Credit Fourth Year Hours Credit 

Biology 48 8 Biology 54-A, 94 or 54-B . . 8 

Economics 16 or Chemistry 48 8 

Sociology 13 and 23 6 History (See p. 40, n. 2) . 6 

Physics 18 8 Bible 82, and 

Elective 10 Philosophy 32 4 



32 



Elective 4 

30 



* A few medical schools require both French and German. 

81 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ACCELERATED PRE-MEDICAL COURSE 

For the duration of the war the Council on Medical Education 
and Hospitals of the American Medical Association recommends 
that: 

1. The required pre-medical education, including satisfactory 
courses in physics, biology and chemistry, including organic chem- 
istry, shall be included within two calendar years of instruction. 

2. The first year of pre-medical education shall be considered as 
a qualifying year for a medical course. At the termination of this 
first year the student, if acceptable, should be matriculated in a 
medical school. 

3. Such a matriculated student shall be recommended for enlist- 
ment or commission in the Army or Navy to remain in an inactive 
status during the second year of his pre-medical course and until 
the completion of his medical training, subject to the maintenance 
of adequate grades. 

4. The medical schools accepting students under these conditions 
will in no way jeopardize their status with any accrediting agency. 

The Council of the American Medical Association and the Asso- 
ciation of American Medical Colleges in February, 1942, recom- 
mended the adoption of an accelerated program involving the com- 
pletion of the Medical course in three calendar years. Such a pro- 
gram is already in effect in practically all of the medical colleges 
of the country. 

Lebanon Valley College is cooperating with the medical colleges 
to enable a high school graduate to complete his medical education 
and receive his M.D. degree in five calendar years after graduation 
from high school. 

The work of each of the two calendar years is divided into three 
sessions, a summer session of twelve weeks and a first and second 
semester of seventeen weeks each. 

The courses are arranged as follows : 
First Summer Session, 12 weeks : 

General Chemistry 18 8 semester hours 

Freshman English 16 6 " " 14 

First Semester, first year, 17 weeks: 

General Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 24, Qualitative Analysis 4 

French 16 or German 16 3 

Mathematics 13 3 

Psychology 13, General Psychology 3 

Physical Education 12 1 

Orientation 11 1 " " 19 

82 



CATALOGUE 

Second Semester, first year, 17 weeks : 

General Biology 18 4 semester hours 

Chemistry 34, Quantative Analysis 4 

French 16 or German 16 3 

Mathematics 23, Plane Trigonometry 3 

Psychology 93, Abnormal Psychology 3 

Physical Education 12 1 

Hygiene 11 1 " " 19 

Second Summer Session, 12 weeks : 

Chemistry 48, Organic Chemistry 8 

Sophomore English 26 6 14 

First Semester, second year, 17 weeks: 

Biology 48, Comparative Anatomy, or 54-A, 

Embryology 4 

Physics 16, 12 4 

Elective (American History, Sociology, etc.) . . 9 " 17 

Second Semester, second year, 17 weeks : 

Biology 48 or 54-B, Histology 4 

Physics 16, 12 4 

Elective, History, Political Science, Sociology 9 " 17 



100 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Adviser : Dr. Richie 



The following schedule is designed for students planning to enter 
the Christian Ministry: 

First Year Hours Credit Third Year Hours Credit 

Bible 14 4 Bible 82 2 

English 16 6 Greek 46 6 

French 16 or German 16 . . 6 Psychology 13 and 23 6 

Greek 16 6 One of : 

Hygiene 11, Orientation 11. 2 Philosophy 23-A and 23-B 

Physical Education 2 Economics 16 or 

♦Elective 6 Political Science 16 or 

— Sociology 13 and 23 ... . 6 

32 Elective 13 

Second Year — 

Bible 22 and 32 4 33 

English 26 6 Fourth Year 

Greek 26 6 Greek 56 6 

One of: History (See p. 40, n. 2) . 6 

Biology 18 or Philosophy 32, 52 4 

Chemistry 18 or Psychology 102 2 

Physics 16, 12 8 Elective 12 

Physical Education 2 

Elective 8 30 

34 



Electives must be governed by A.B. requirements, p. 40. 

83 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Students are advised to elect such courses in Philosophy, History, Sci- 
ence, Social Science, English, Economics, and Education as will give a 
thorough, basic preparation for the advanced studies offered by the the- 
ological seminaries. % 

TEACHING 

Adviser: Dr. Stine 
Five-year Plan for Teacher Education 

While the present emergency probably precludes additional re- 
quirements for teacher certification in the secondary field, in antici- 
pation of the time when a fifth year of college work may be re- 
quired of secondary teachers, Lebanon Valley College has so ar- 
ranged sequences of courses that its students may, upon graduation, 
continue graduate courses in the Schools of Education of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania and Temple University without loss of time 
or credits in securing the master's degree. Lebanon Valley College 
will continue to offer work leading to the granting of the provisional 
certificate; and, for teachers who do not desire a master's degree, 
such work as is at present required for the college permanent cer- 
tificate. 

Certification requirements in the various states make it impera- 
tive that prospective teachers begin planning their work during the 
freshman year in college. The planning should take into considera- 
tion two factors: 

A. Requirements in professional courses. 

B. Requirements in academic subject matter. 

Requirements in Professional Courses 

The following professional courses are designed to meet the Penn- 
sylvania requirements for certification : 

A. Education 123. Three hours. This course, which is prerequisite to 
other courses in Education, should be taken in the sophomore year. 

B. Psychology 23. Three hours. Prerequisite: Psychology 13. It is sug- 
gested that Psychology 13 be taken the first semester of the sophomore 
year and Psychology 23 the second semester. 

C. Education 82. Two hours. To be taken the first semester, junior 
year. 

D. Education 32. Two hours. To be taken the second semester, junior 
year. 

E. Education 332. Two hours. Senior year. 

F. Education 136. Six hours. Prerequisites: Education 123, 82, 32, 
Psychology 23, English 33. 

84 



CATALOGUE 

In courses 32, 82, and 332 a third hour of credit may be obtained through 
additional work. 

Students wishing to major in Education or to meet requirements in 
other states should consult with Dr. Stine before beginning their profes- 
sional work. 

It should be noted that satisfactory work in English 33 (Public Speak- 
ing) is a prerequisite to the course in practice teaching. 

Requirements in Academic Subject Matter 

A. Students can be certified in the following secondary school 
subjects: English, French, German, Latin, Spanish, History, Social 
Science, Mathematics, Physical Science, and Biological Science. At 
least eighteen hours of credit in the various fields are required for 
certification to teach in those fields. College subjects other than the 
ones listed are not secondary school subjects. Hence, eighteen hours 
of credit in such fields will not help the student meet certification 
requirements. 

The student should begin planning his work in the freshman year. It is 
important that he know in which fields he wishes to meet the eighteen 
hours requirement. Major and minor fields should be selected no later 
than the end of the freshman year and the student should plan his schedule 
so as to meet certification requirements in those fields by the end of his 
junior year. In this way the senior year can be devoted to meeting major 
requirements and doing more intensive professional work. Students should 
meet certification requirements in at least three fields, i.e., one major and 
two minors. Education should not be considered a minor. Seventy-eight 
hours are required to meet this plan: sixty hours in subject matter courses 
and eighteen in Education. The student will have fifty-two additional hours 
in which to meet such requirements as have not been met in filling major 
and minor requirements, and for electives. This should be considered a 
minimum program. It can be completed without difficulty if there is careful 
and early planning. 

B. The following programs are designed to meet Pennsylvania 
requirements in the respective subject matter fields: 

1. English: 16, 26, 33, 152, 63-B, 522-A. 

2. French : 16, 26, six hours advanced work. 

3. German: 16, 26, six hours advanced work. 

4. Latin: 16, 26, 64, two hours elective. 

5. Spanish : 06, 16, 26. 

6. Mathematics : 36, 48, four hours elective. 

7. History: 13, 46, six hours of European history, and three hours of 
American history. 

8. Social Science : Economics 16, Political Science 16, Sociology 13, 23. 

9. Social Studies : Teachers certified in Social Studies can teach history 
and social science. Students will be recommended for certification in this 

85 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

field upon satisfactory completion of History 46, six hours of European 
history, Economics 16, Political Science 16 or Sociology 13, 23. 

10. Physical Sciences : Chemistry 18, Physics 18, two hours elective in 
either field. 

11. Biological Sciences: Biology 18-A, 28, 38. 

12. Science : Teachers certified in Science can teach Physical and Bi- 
ological Sciences. Students will be recommended for certification in this 
field upon satisfactory completion of Biology 18-A, Physics 18, Chemistry 
18. 

The combination fields in Science and Social Studies are concessions to 
students experiencing difficulties in meeting all requirements for certifi- 
cation in the separate fields covered by these terms. At no time should 
the student seek certification in either Social Studies or Science unless he 
is meeting all requirements in one of the divisions included in these 
fields, i.e., History or Social Science in the case of Social Studies ; Bi- 
ological or Physical Sciences in the case of Science. Furthermore, Social 
Studies or Science should be added only as a third field in which certifi- 
cation is being sought. 

Requirements for a Major in Education 

To those who are preparing for work in Education as a profession, 
and who desire to make a more complete preparation than the minimum 
required by the State, a major in Education leading to the B.S. degree 
is offered. For this, additional courses in Education and Educational Psy- 
chology are required, and in addition two minors, chosen from related 
fields, of eighteen semester hours each. 

The residence requirements for this degree may be met either by spend- 
ing a full year in actual residence or by earning 30 semester hours in 
residence either during the Summer School or during the regular academic 
year. The student should consult pages 40, 54 for the regular requirements 
for the degree. 

Scholastic Record of Prospective Teachers 

Students whose college work falls below the median grade of the Col- 
lege are strongly advised not to consider education as a profession. Such 
students are not barred from attempting to secure certification, but will 
be admitted to courses in education of senior standing with reluctance on 
the part of the head of the department and in individual cases may be 
refused recommendation. 

Placement Bureau 

In order to give students the benefit of calls that are received for 
teachers and to render greater assistance in finding employment, the Col- 
lege provides for a Placement Bureau to keep on file records of students 
with their credentials for those who desire it For registration with the 
bureau a fee of one dollar is charged. The services of the Placement 



CATALOGUE 

Bureau will be available to graduates for one year after date of graduation 
by virtue of this fee. If any graduate desires further service an additional 
fee of one dollar is charged for each year. 

The Placement Bureau of the College cooperates with the Placement 
Service, Teacher Bureau, of the Department of Public Instruction, Har- 
risburg, Pennsylvania, thus offering additional facilities for the placement 
of graduates of this institution. 



87 



The Conservatory of Music 



Professors Gillespie, Bender, Campbell, Crawford, Malsh, 

RUTLEDGE, CARMEAN, FrEELAND, DARNELL, 

Battista, Schweppe 
Lebanon Valley College is an Associate Member 
of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

THE aim of the Conservatory is to teach music historically and 
aesthetically as an element of liberal culture ; to offer courses 
that will give a thorough and practical understanding of theory and 
composition; and to train artists and teachers. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

An applicant for admission must (1) be a graduate of a four-year 
High School, and (2) possess a reasonable amount of musical intelligence 
and accomplishment, such as : 

(a) The possession of an acceptable singing voice and of a fairly quick 
sense of tone and rhythm ; 

(b) Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair degree of 
accuracy and facility; 

(c) Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument represent- 
ing two years' study. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For Training Supervisors and Teachers of Public School Music 

(B.S. in Music Education) 

This course has been approved by the State Council of Education for 
the preparation of supervisors and teachers of public school music. 
The outline of the curriculum follows : 

Clock Semester 

First Semester Hours Hours 

English, including Library Science 4 3 

Place and Purpose of Education in the Social Order, 

including School Visitation 3 2 

Harmony 313 3 3 

Solfeggio 112 (Sight Reading) 3 2 

Ear Training 212 3 2 

Private Study : Voice, Piano, Strings (Violin, Viola, 
'Cello, Bass) ; Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clari- 
net, Bassoon) ; Brasses (Trumpet, French Horn, 
Trombone, Tuba) ; and Percussion Instruments. 
Chorus, Orchestra, and Band. Work arranged 
for greatest benefit of students 9 3 

Health Education 2 1 

27 16 



CATALOGUE 

Clock Semester 

Second Semester Hours Hours 

English 3 3 

Speech 3 3 

Harmony 323 3 3 

Solfeggio 122 (Sight Reading) 3 2 

Ear Training 222 3 2 

Private Study (See First Semester) 9 3 

Health Education 2 1 

26 17 

Third Semester 

Appreciation of Art 3 2 

History of Civilization 4 4 

Harmony 332 2 2 

Solfeggio 132 (Sight Reading) 3 2 

Ear Training 232 '. 3 2 

Eurythmics 831 2 1 

Private Study (See First Semester) 9 3 

26 16 

Fourth Semester 

Principles of Sociology 2 2 

Literature 3 3 

Harmony 372 2 2 

Elements of Conducting 642 2 2 

Methods and Materials 443 4 3 

Eurythmics 841 2 1 

Private Study (See First Semester) 9 3 

24 16 

Fifth Semester 

General Psychology 3 3 

Advanced Choral Conducting 653 3 3 

Harmony 342 2 2 

History and Appreciation of Music 553 3 3 

Methods and Materials 453 4 3 

Private Study (See First Semester) 9 3 

24 17 

Sixth Semester 

Educational Psychology 3 3 

Harmony 362 2 2 

Advanced Instrumental Conducting 663 3 3 

History and Appreciation of Music 563 3 3 

Methods and Materials 463 4 3 

Private Study (See First Semester) 8 2 



23 16 



89 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Clock Semester 

Seventh Semester Hours Hours 

Physical Science 4 3 

Student Teaching and Conferences 776 8 6 

Private Study (See First Semester) 6 2 

Elective 4 4 

22 15 

Eighth Semester 

Educational Measurements 2 2 

Student Teaching and Conferences 786 7 6 

Private Study (See First Semester) 6 2 

Elective 5 5 

20 IS 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 

I. Theory of Music 

Sight Singing Courses 
Solfeggio 112. Professor Gillespie 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

Sight Singing 112 covers the work equivalent to grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 
of the public school. 

Solfeggio 122. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

Sight Singing 122 covers the work equivalent to grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 
of the public school. 

Solfeggio 132. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

A continuation with exercises and songs of increasing difficulty both 
tonal and rhythmic. Emphasis on reading from any clef. Study and ap- 
plication of additional tempo, dynamic and interpretative markings. 

Speed and accuracy are demanded. New material is constantly used, 
resulting in an extensive survey of song material. 

Dictation (Ear Training) Courses 
Ear Training 212. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 
A study of tone and rhythm integrated with Solfeggio 112 and Har- 
mony 313, including the writing of intervals, melodies, and chord pro- 
gressions as dictated from the piano. 

Ear Training 222. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 
A continuation of the study of tone, rhythm, and intervals. A consider- 
able portion of the time is devoted to the development of harmonic dic- 
tation. 

Ear Training 232. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

A study of the more difficult tonal problems and complicated rhythms. 

90 



CATALOGUE 

Designed to develop ability to recognize and write chord progressions, 
including modulation, and altered chords. 



Harmony Courses 
Harmony 313. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. 
Designed to build a foundation for further music study through a work- 
ing knowledge of the fundamentals of music notation, tonal and rhythmic, 
the major, minor, and chromatic scales, transpositions, intervals, triads, 
and musical terminology. The written work is accompanied by constant 
practice in hearing, singing, and keyboard work. 

Harmony and Melody 323. Professor Darnell 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. 
Harmonization in four voices over a given bass, the inversion of triads, 
the construction of melodies over accompaniments, the dominant seventh 
chord in fundamental position and inversion with its resolution, serial 
modulations, directly related keys, the harmonization of given melodies, 
improvisation. 

Harmony and Melody 332. Professor Darnell 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 
Study of modulation, the use of suspensions and retardations, passing 
notes of various species, embellishments, anticipation, the dominant ninth 
as applied to the harmonization of melodies and to modulations, imitation, 
modulation to indirectly related and to foreign keys. 

Harmony 342 (Keyboard). Professor Bender 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

Harmonization at the keyboard of familiar folk songs and of melodies, 
familiar and unfamiliar, of the rote song type, utilizing the various har- 
monies at the disposal of the class ; and in the reading at sight of music 
of moderate difficulty, with emphasis upon the playing of accompaniments 
and upon transposition. 

Harmony 362 (Composition and Orchestration). Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

Original composition is continued in various vocal and instrumental 
forms. 

This course offers opportunity and guidance in arranging music for 
various combinations of instruments and voice, including band, orchestra, 
and chorus. The best productions of the class will be given public per- 
formance. 

Harmony 372 (Counterpoint). Professor Darnell 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
Sixteenth Century Strict Counterpoint (Five species in Two and 
Three Part and mixed species in Three Voice). The course will touch 
on modern free counterpoint. The approach is instrumental as well as 
vocal. 

91 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

II. Materials and Methods 
Methods 443: Child Voice and Rote Songs with Materials and 

Methods for Grades 1, 2, 3. Professor Gillespie 

Four hours per week, three semester hours credit. 

A comprehensive study of the use of the child's singing voice in the 
primary grades, including the treatment of monotones, acquaintance with 
the best collections of rote songs, and practice in choosing, memorizing, 
singing, and presenting a large number of these songs ; methods of pre- 
senting rhythm through singing games and simple interpretative move- 
ments ; beginnings of directed music appreciation ; foundation studies for 
later technical developments. Comparative study of recognized Public 
School Music Series. 

Methods 453: All Materials and Methods for Grades 4, 5, 6. 

Professor Gillespie 

Four hours per week, three semester hours credit. 

A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades ; special 
attention to the formal or technical work of these grades, with an evalua- 
tion of important texts and recent approaches. Preparation of lesson plans, 
making of outlines, and observation is required. Music appreciation is 
continued. 

Methods 463 : Materials and Methods, Junior and Senior High 

School. Professors Gillespie and Rutledge 

Four hours per week, three semester hours credit. 

The junior and senior high school problems are treated separately 
through an analysis of the specific problems, year by year or in special 
groups. Attention is given to materials and methods relative to the or- 
ganization and directing of choruses, glee clubs, orchestra, band, ele- 
mentary theory, music appreciation, and class instruction in band and 
orchestral instruments ; study in the testing and care of the adolescent 
voice. 

Methods 482: Advanced Problems. Professor Carmean 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 

A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director 
of school orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general 
interest will include (1) organization and management, (2) stimulating 
and maintaining interest, (3) selection of beginners, (4) scheduling re- 
hearsals and class lessons, (5) financing and purchasing instruments, uni- 
forms, and other equipment, (6) marching bands — formations and drills, 
(7) evaluating music materials, (8) festivals, contests, and public per- 
formances. 

III. Student Teaching 
Student Teaching 776, 786 Professors Gillespie and Carmean 

Seven hours throughout the year, twelve semester hours credit. 

The Senior Class of the Music Education course teaches in the Derry 
Township Consolidated Schools at Hershey, Pa. Teaching includes vocal 
and instrumental work from kindergarten to high school. 

This work is done under the guidance of the following faculty : 

92 



CATALOGUE 

Mary E. Gillespie, MA. Columbia University, Director of the Con- 
servatory of Music, Lebanon Valley College. 

D. Clark Carmean, MA. Columbia University, Instructor in Band 
and Orchestral Instruments. 

Raymond H. Koch, MA. University of Pittsburgh, Superintendent 
of Derry Township Consolidated Schools, Hershey, Pa. 

Richard G. Neubert, M.A. New York University, Supervisor of 
Music, Derry Township Consolidated Schools, Hershey, Pa. 
A laboratory fee of $17.50 per semester is charged for student teaching. 

IV. Instrumental Courses 

Elementary Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught the 
fundamental principles underlying the playing of all band and orchestra 
instruments, learn to play melodies on instruments of each group, viz., 
string, woodwind, and brass. Problems of class procedure in public schools 
are discussed ; transposition of all instruments is taught and an extensive 
bibliography is prepared. Ensemble playing is an integral part of these 



String Class 93, 94, and 95 (Violin). Professor Carmean 

Two hours per week throughout three semesters. 

Woodwind Class 97 and 98 (Clarinet). Professor Darnell 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 

Brass Class 91 and 92 (Cornet, French horn, alto, trombone, baritone, 
or tuba). Professor Carmean 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 

Percussion 96 (Drums). Professor Rutledge 

One hour per week. One semester. 

Advanced Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Two hours per week. One semester. 

Advanced instruction in instruments is -given in unit courses. In these 
unit courses a student may study and gain practical experience in playing 
the more rare instruments of each group. 

Advanced String 903 (Viola, violoncello, and bass viol). 

Two hours per week. One semester. Professor Carmean 

Advanced Woodwind 907 (Flute, piccolo, oboe, bassoon, alto clari- 
net, and bass clarinet). Professor Darnell 
Two hours per week. One semester. 

Advanced Brass 901 (All brass instruments not studied in Brass 

91 or 92). Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week. One semester. 

Advanced Percussion 906. Professor Rutledge 

One hour per week. One semester. 

93 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

V. Musical Organizations 
College Band 910-911. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
Lebanon Valley College maintains a uniformed band, the membership 
of which is made up of college and conservatory students. The band con- 
tributes to college life by playing at football games, by appearing on 
several programs during the year, and by providing the musical accom- 
paniment for the annual May Day Fete. During the spring several con- 
certs are given in various cities of this section of the state. Membership 
in the band is determined by an applicant's ability on his instrument and 
by the needs of the band with respect to maintaining a well-balanced in- 
strumentation. 
Girls' Band 912-913. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
This organization is open to girls of the Conservatory and College 
alike. Membership in this band is determined by the applicant's ability on 
her instrument, and by the needs of the band with respect to maintaining 
a well-balanced instrumentation. The group will participate in a spring 
concert. 
Symphony Orchestra 914-915. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
The Lebanon Valley College Symphony Orchestra is a musical or- 
ganization of symphonic proportions. Open alike to advanced players from 
the college and the conservatory, the orchestra adheres to a high standard 
of performance. Throughout the school year a professional interpretation 
of a wide range of standard orchestral literature is insisted upon. 

College Orchestra 916-917. Professor Carmean 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
The College Orchestra is open to all members of the Conservatory and 
of the College who are sufficiently qualified to belong to this organization. 

Junior Orchestra 918-919. Professor Carmean 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
Students of the elementary and advanced instrumental classes are given 
an opportunity to play their instruments in the Junior Band and the 
Junior Orchestra, thus gaining a type of valuable ensemble experience 
not possible to attain in the instrumental classes. 

Glee Club 63-64. Professor Rutledge 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
The Glee Club is a mixed chorus of selected voices. The personnel of 
the organization, while open to all L. V. C. students, is limited to forty 
members. During the spring the Club appears in concerts in several 
communities throughout this section of the state. Choral literature of the 
highest type is studied intensively. 

College Chorus 61-62. Professor Rutledge 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
The mixed chorus is open to all on the campus who are interested in 
this type of musical performance and who have had some experience in 
singing. 

94 



CATALOGUE 

Instrumental Ensembles. In addition to the larger musical organi- 
zations there is additional opportunity for advanced players to try 
out for such ensembles as: 

(1) String Quartet 

(2) Violin Choir 

(3) Brass Ensemble 

(4) Woodwind Ensemble 

VI. The History of Music and Appreciation 
History of Music and Appreciation 553. Professor Gillespie 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. 
The first developments of music are treated briefly, and special em- 
phasis is laid on the work of the contrapuntal schools, the development of 
the harmonic idea in composition, and the rise of the opera and oratorio. 

History of Music and Appreciation 563. Professor Gillespie 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. 
Emphasis is placed on the growth of musical movements and forms, 
and on the lives, works, and influence of the great composers. Opportunity 
is given for hearing representative music of the different periods of music 
history and of the recognized composers. 

VII. Miscellaneous Courses 
Elements of Conducting 642. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 
Principles of conducting; study of methods of conductors, adaptation 
of methods to school situations, a study of the technique of the baton with 
daily practice, score reading, making of programs. Selection of suitable 
materials for various school groups. Readings and reports. 

Advanced Conducting 672. Professor Rutledge 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. 
A detailed and comprehensive study of the factors involved in the in- 
terpretation of choral and instrumental music. Conducting various musical 
organizations and chapel programs is an integral part of this course. 

Eurythmics 831. Professor Gillespie 

Two hours per week, one semester hour credit. 

The course offers a three-fold training : mental control through coor- 
dination ; physical poise through movements made in response to rhythm ; 
and a musical sense through the analysis of the rhythmic element in music. 

Eurythmics 841. Professor Gillespie 

Two hours per week, one semester hour credit. 

General survey of elementary and intermediate floor work, and inter- 
pretation together with a discussion of the principles underlying the 
presentation of this to children. Applied improvisation will be an integral 
part of the course. 

Care and Repair 101. Professor Carmean 

One hour per week. One semester. 

An analytical laboratory technique applied to methods of construction 

95 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

of the band and orchestra instruments. With this information as a back- 
ground, preventive measures are established to avoid undue wear and 
deterioration of the instruments, and through actual experience the stu- 
dent acquires proficiency in the operations necessary in replacements and 
repair. 

Physical Science 103. Professor Carmean 

Three hours. First semester. Open to music students only. 
Cultivation of the scientific approach to sound and tone, with emphasis 
on their application to music and musical instruments. 

VIII. Individual Instruction 
Voice, Piano, Organ, Chorus, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 

The work in the foregoing fields will be organized from the standpoint 
of the development of musicianship in the individual student. The work 
continues through eight semesters and assures a well-rounded and many- 
sided acquaintance with various musical techniques. 

Private instruction is provided in Applied Music (Piano, Voice, Organ, 
Violin, and all instruments of orchestra and band). 

Piano : Mrs. Bender, Mr. Freeland, Mr. Battista. 
Voice : Mr. Crawford, Mr. Schweppe. 
Organ : Mr. Campbell. 
Violin : Mr. Malsh. 
Brass : Mr. Rutledge. 

Viola, 'Cello, and String Bass : Mr. Carmean. 
Woodwind: Miss Darnell. 
A bulletin describing courses in Practical Music will be sent upon 
application. 

IX. Junior Department 
The Conservatory of Music sponsors a Junior Department especially 
adapted to children of elementary or high school age. 

This Junior Department offers either private or class instruction in 
piano and all instruments of the band and orchestra. A desirable number 
for class instruction is from four to six members. 

THE STUDENT RECITALS 

The student evening recitals are of inestimable value to all students in 
acquainting them with a wide range of the best musical literature, in 
developing musical taste and discrimination, in affording young musicians 
experience in appearing before an audience, and in gaining self-reliance 
as well as nerve control and stage demeanor. 

Students in all grades appear on the programs of these recitals. 

FEES 

A Matriculation Fee of five dollars must be paid by all full-time stu- 
dents who are entering the College or Conservatory for the first time. 
This fee should accompany the application for admission. If a student's 
application is not accepted, the fee will be returned. 

96 



CATALOGUE 

All students not enrolled in regular College or Conservatory Courses 
will be required to pay a matriculation fee of one dollar, once in each 
school year. 

The rates for the Music Education Teachers' and Supervisors' Course 
are $325 per year, which covers not only tuition but also a fee for student 
activities. 

The Music Education Teachers' and Supervisors' Course includes two 
private lessons per week, the use of a piano two hours daily for practice, 
and theoretical and college courses not exceeding a total of seventeen 
semester hours each semester. 

Extra hours in theoretical and college courses will be charged at the 
rate of $9.00 per semester hour. 

Private Lessons 
The rates per semester, one lesson per week, are $25.00. 
The rates per semester, one class lesson per week in the Junior Depart- 
ment, are $12.00. 

Rent of Practice Instruments 

Piano, one hour daily per semester $ 4.00 

Each additional hour daily per semester 2.00 

Organ, one hour daily, per semester 20.00 

Organ, two hours weekly, per semester 8.00 

Band and Orchestra Instruments, per semester 6.00 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Regular Conservatory students are not enrolled for a shorter period of 
time than a full semester, or the unexpired portion of a semester ; and 
no reduction is made for delay in registering when the time lost is less 
than one-fourth of the semester. 

No reduction is made for absence from recitations except in case of 
protracted illness extending beyond a period of two weeks, in which case 
the loss is shared equally by the college and student. 

Conservatory students are under the regular college discipline. 

SPECIFICATIONS OF THE FOUR-MANUAL 
MOLLER ORGAN 

GREAT ORGAN (unenclosed) 8' Rohr Flute 73 Pipes 

16' Violone 61 Pipes 8' Spitz Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Principal 61 Pipes 8' Salicional 73 Pipes 

8' Diapason 61 Pipes 8' Vox Celeste 61 Pipes 

8' Harmonic Flute ... 61 Pipes 4' Octave 73 Pipes 

8' Gemshorn 61 Pipes 4' Flute Triangulaire. . 73 Pipes 

4' Octave 61 Pipes 4' Salicet 61 Notes 

4' Flute Overte 61 Pipes 2' Fifteenth 61 Pipes 

4' Gemshorn 61 Notes 1-3/5' Tierce 61 Notes 

2-2/3' Twelfth 61 Pipes HI Rks. Mixture 183 Pipes 

2' Fifteenth 61 Pipes ] 6' Waldhorn 73 Pipes 

III Rks. Mixture 163 Pipes 8' Trumpet 73 Pipes 

Chimes (from Solo) 8 ' 0boe 73 pi Pes 

SWELL ORGAN (enclosed) 8 ' Vox Humana 61 Pipes 

16' Flute Conique 73 Pipes 4' Clarion 73 Pipes 

8' Diapason 73 Pipes Tremulant 

97 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



CHOIR ORGAN (enclosed) 

16' Dulciana 97 Pipes 

8' English Diapason . 73 Pipes 

8' Concert Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Dulciana 73 Notes 

8' Unda Maris 73 Pipes 

4' Flute d'Amour ... 73 Pipes 

4' Dulciana 73 Notes 

4' Unda Maris II . . 73 Notes 
2-2/3' Dulciana Twelfth... 61 Notes 

2-2/3' Rohr Nazard 61 Pipes 

2' Piccolo 61 Pipes 

2' Dulciana 61 Notes 

8' Clarinet 73 Pipes 

Harp 49 Bars 

Celesta 37 Notes 

Tremulant 

SOLO ORGAN (enclosed) 
III Rks. Diapason Chorus ..219 Pipes 

8' Gamba 73 Pipes 

8' Gamba Celeste .... 61 Pipes 
8' Viole Sourdine ... 73 Pipes 

8' Viole Celeste 61 Pipes 

4' Gamba 61 Notes 

4' Orchestral Flute... 73 Pipes 



8' Tromba 73 Pipes 

8' French Horn 73 Pipes 

4' Clarion 61 Notes 

Chimes 21 Tubes 

Tremulant 

PEDAL ORGAN 

16' Diapason 32 Pipes 

16' Bourdon 32 Pipes 

16' Violone 32 Notes 

16' Dulciana 32 Notes 

16' Flute Conique .... 32 Notes 

8' Octave 12 Pipes 

8' Flute Major 12 Pipes 

8' Concert Flute 32 Notes 

8' Gamba 32 Notes 

8' Dulciana 32 Notes 

4' Flute 32 Notes 

10-2/3' Quint 32 Notes 

II Rks. Mixture 64 Pipes 

16' Trombone 32 Pipes 

16' Waldhorn 32 Notes 

8' Trumpet 32 Notes 

8' Tromba 32 Notes 

4' Clarion 32 Notes 

Chimes (from Solo). 21 Notes 





COUPLERS 




Swell to Great 


Choir 4' 


Great 4' 


Swell to Great 4' 


Choir 16' 


Great Unison Off 


Swell to Great 16' 


Choir Unison Off 


Swell to Solo 


Choir to Great 


Solo to Swell 


Swell to Solo 4' 


Choir to Great 4' 


Solo to Swell 4' 


Swell to Solo 16' 


Choir to Great 16' 


Solo to Swell 16' 


Solo to Pedal 


Solo to Great 


Choir to Swell 


Solo to Pedal 4' 


Solo to Great 4' 


Choir to Swell 4' 


Swell to Pedal 


Solo to Great 16' 


Choir to Swell 16' 


Swell to Pedal 4' 


Solo to Choir 


Swell 4' 


Great to Pedal 


Solo to Choir 4' 


Swell 16' 


Great to Pedal 4' 


Solo to Choir 16' 


Swell Unison Off 


Choir to Pedal 


Swell to Choir 


Solo 4' 


Choir to Pedal 4' 


Swell to Choir 4' 


Solo 16' 


Pedal to Pedal Octave 


Swell to Choir 16' 


Solo Unison Off 





MECHANICALS 



8 Pistons affecting Swell Organ 

8 Pistons affecting Great Organ 

8 Pistons affecting Choir Organ 

8 Pistons affecting Solo Organ 

8 Pistons affecting Pedal Organ 

10 Pistons affecting Full Organ 

Crescendo Indicator — slide— four stages 

Sforzando Piston and toe stud 

All Swells to Swell Piston and toe stud 

Great to Pedal Reversible 

Swell to Pedal Reversible 

Choir to Pedal Reversible 

Solo to Pedal Reversible 

Balanced Expression Pedal — Choir Organ 
Balanced Expression Pedal — Swell Organ 



Balanced Expression Pedal — Solo Organ 
Balanced Crescendo Pedal 
5 Full organ combination Pistons dup- 
licated by toe studs 
5 Pedal combination Pistons duplicat- 
ed by toe studs 

Pedal to Swell — On and off 
Pedal to Great — On and off 
Pedal to Choir — On and off 
General Cancel Piston 
Coupler Cancel Piston 
Combination cut-out with lock 
Electric Clock 
Harp Dampers 
Chimes Dampers 



98 



Degrees 



CONFERRED JUNE 1, 1942 

Honorary Degrees 

Samuel Oliver Grimm Doctor of Science 

Walden Maynard Sparks Doctor of Divinity 



Bachelor of Arts 



Edith Electra Abary 
Irene Miriam Barber 
Ruth Clare Beam 
Earl William Boltz 
Reba Eleanor Boss 
Kathryn Elizabeth Brehm 
Mildred Louise Cross 
Martha Elizabeth Davies 
Robert Franklin Dresel 
Martha Elizabeth Foster 
Phoebe Rachel Geyer 
David Woodrow Gockley 
Georgia Betty Gravell 
Kenneth Lawrence Guthrie 
Sarah Elizabeth Hartman 



Ruth Esther Heminway 
Fredericka Laucks 
Robert Vernon Mays 
Roger Dexter Morey 
William Brandt Reed 
Elizabeth Mary Sattazahn 
Lois Jane Seavers 
Richard Franklin Seiverling 
Ralph Stanton Shay 
Marion Isabella Snavely 
Viola Arlene Snell 
Donald Stauffer Staley 
Samuel Hess Stoner 
Robert George Whisler 



Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Science 



Irvin Berman 
Mary Louise Clark 
Guy Luther Dobbs, Jr. 
Samuel Gittlen 
Donald James Glen 
Herbert Russell Greider 
Mabel Matilda Hess 
Marjorie Anne Holly 



Russel Joseph Horst 
Stephen Joseph Kubisen 
Robert Joseph Mandle 
Marie Patricia Peters 
Earl Wayne Reber 
Carl Raymond Sherk 
Christian George Wornas 
George Clinton Ziegler 



With a Major in Business Administration 

Joseph Edward Carr Edward Carroll McFerren 

Robert Daniel Hambright William Paul Mueller 



With a Major in Music Education 



Louise Adeline Boger 
Rosanna Meyer Brandt 
Margaret Alice Cox 
Herbert Shenk Curry 
Phyllis Elizabeth Deitzler 
Virginia Goodman 
Anna Mary Herr 



Mary Grace Light 
Marguerite Helen Martin 
Helen Rae Sechrist 
Betty Louise Shillott 
Irma June Sholley 
Victoria Turco 
Ruth Irene Wix 



99 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

CONFERRED AUGUST 21, 1942 

Bachelor of Arts 

Pauline Elizabeth Smee 

Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Business Administration 
Robert Elmer Heiland 

With a Major in Education 
George Vincent Kenney 

Elected to Membership 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Robert Elmer Heiland 

Graduate Cum Laude 

Robert Elmer Heiland 



ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP 
Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Honorary Scholarship Society 
Mildred Louise Cross Marjorie Anne Holly 



Martha Elizabeth Davies 
Phoebe Rachel Geyer 
Georgia Betty Gravell 
Ruth Esther Heminway 



Russel Joseph Horst 
Robert Vernon Mays 
Ralph Stanton Shay 
Carl Raymond Sherk 



Graduates Cum Laude 



Robert Vernon Mays 
Mildred Louise Cross 
Phoebe Rachel Geyer 
Ralph Stanton Shay 



Martha Elizabeth Davies 
Russel Joseph Horst 
Ruth Esther Heminway 
Carl Raymond Sherk 



100 



Addresses of Faculty and Administrative 
Officers 



Name Address Phone Number 

Bailey, L. G 403 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-5452 

Balsbaugh, E. M 108 College Ave., Annville, Pa " 7-4442 

Battista, Joseph 1103 Serrill Ave., Yeadon, Pa Madison 4247 

Bender, Andrew 532 Maple St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-4481 

Bender, Mrs. Ruth Engle 532 Maple St., Annville, Pa " 7-4481 

Billett, Mrs. Jean McKeag 343 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Black, Amos 440 Maple St., Annville, Pa " 7-4574 

Campbell, R. P 22 S. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa Leb. 775-J 

Carmean, D. Clark R. D. No. 1, Annville, Pa Ann. 7-5609 

Crawford, Alexander 561 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 7-4511 

Darnell, Virginia 230 N. Duke St., Lancaster, Pa Lane. 2-0233 

Derickson, S. H 473 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 7-5742 

Esbenshade, J. Walter 607 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa Leb. 756-J 

Fencil, Gladys M 128 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-3634 

Freeland, Merl 44 College Ave., Annville, Pa " 7-4522 

Frock, Jerome W 217 Elm Ave., Hershey, Pa Hershey 4717 

Gillespie, Mary E North Hall. L. V. C, Annville, Pa Ann. 7-5851 

Green, Mrs. Mary C 510 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 7-5481 

Grimm, Dorothy F 128 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 7-3634 

Grimm, S. 234 E. Main St., Annville, Pa " 7-4781 

Henderson, Esther South Hall, L. V. C, Annville, Pa " 7-3881 

Intrieri, Mr. and Mrs. Mariano. .Men's Dormitory, L. V. C, Annville, Pa " 7-3891 

Lietzau, Lena Louise West Hall, L. V. C, Annville, Pa " 7-3861 

Light, V. Earl R. D. No. 1, Annville, Pa *' 7-4643 

Lynch, Clyde A 26 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa " 7-3381 

Madciff, Mrs. Esther W Parkview Apts.. Hershey, Pa 

Magee, Doris South Hall, L. V. C, Annville, Pa " 7-3881 

Malsh, Harold 27 North 19th St., Harrisburg, Pa Hbg. 3-5646 

McGrath, Ralph Martin 218 Maple St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-3652 

Miller, Frederic K 763 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-3401 

Miles, Verda M 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Myers, Helen Ethel 120 College Ave., Annville, Pa Ann 7-4411 

Porter, Jermain D 625 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Rice, Margaret L 34 S. Manheim St., Annville, Pa 

Richie, G. A 466 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-3614 

Rutledge, Edward P 637 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa " 7-5761 

Schweppe, Frederick 50 W. 67th St., New York City N. Y. Su-7-4950 

Shenk, H. H 438 E. Main St., Annville, Pa Ann. 7-3301 



Shettel, Paul O 23 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Stella J 128 E. Main St , Annville, Pa 

Stine, Clyde S 43 N. Saylor St., Annville. Pa 

Stokes. M. L. 561 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Stonecipher, A. H. M 723 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa 

Struble, Geo. G 27 N. Ulrich St., Annville, Pa 

Wallace, P. A. W 504 Maple St., Annville, Pa 

Wilt, Rev. William A 50 College Ave., Annville. Pa 



7-3074 
7-3634 
7-4512 
7-4511 
7-5401 
7-5451 
7-4371 
7-4291 



101 



Register of Students 



First Semester— 1942-1943 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Rood, Merlin Floyd 29 North Tenth St Lebanon Penna. 

SENIORS 

Bamberger, John Alexander Chemistry R. D. No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Bartley, Donald Francis Pre-Medical. . . .210 Hillside Road Harrisburg Penna. 

Carter, Doris Lorraine Pre-Medical. . . .403 Georgetown Road. . Carney's Point N. J. 

Crall, Lloyd H Greek 296 West Franklin St.. .Ephrata Penna. 

Crone, Martha Louise Latin 437 West Penn St Carlisle Penna. 

Daugherty, Jean Louise History 1423 Shepherd St., 

N. W Washington D. C. 

Frantz , Frederick Strassner, Jr Mathematics 230 South 8th St Lebanon Penna 

Fritsche, Herman Alwin Bus. Admin West Norwood N. J. 

Fulton, Mrs. Mary Jane F English 829 E. Chocolate Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Gollam, William Edwin Bus. Admin 536 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Hampton, John Ellis Pre-Medical .... 617 West King St Shippensburg Penna. 

Johns, Mary Elizabeth Biology 306 South Fourth St. . . Lebanon Penna. 

Keller, Dorothy Pauline French Middletown Md. 

Keller, Emma Louise English 240 West Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Klopp, Mary Ellen Bus. Admin Route No. 3 Myerstown Penna. 

Kreider, Mrs. Jane E English 1930 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kreider, Marian Catharine German Route 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Little, Cyril James. Greek 207 South 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

March, Dorothy Louise English 41 Church St Annville Penna. 

Matala, Harry Nicholas Bus. Admin 201 Lawrence St Middletown Penna. 

Mehaffey, Mary Elizabeth History 1223 East Church St. . . Salisbury Md. 

Metro, Stephen Joseph Chemistry 309 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Moyer, Paul Sheesley Education 411 Park Avenue Hershey Penna. 

Neidig, Howard Anthony Chemistry 525 Hummel Ave Lemoyne Penna. 

Ness, Robert Kiracofe Chemistry 547 Madison Ave York Penna. 

Paine, Russel Howard Greek 426 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Patschke, Franklin Edward History 705 Guilford St Lebanon Penna. 

Rhodes, Jacob Lester, Jr Mathematics R. F. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Shaner, David Willard English Cherry Tree Penna. 

Sherk, Herman Dennis English 706 E. Mahoning St Punxsutawney Penna. 

Sherk, Katharine Jane History 3203 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Shoop, Vera Blinn. . . ; French 101 Park St Elizabethtown Penna. 

Silliman, Warren Benjamin Pre-Medical. . . .2 Maple St Poquonock Conn. 

Smith, Grace Eleanore History 453 New Street Lebanon Penna. 

Snoddy, B. Ellsworth Greek 5 North 25th St Penbrook Penna. 

Uhrich, Robert Walter Pre-Medical . . . .344 South 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

Wilkialis, George Walter Pre-Medical. . . .1723 Poquonock Ave.. .Poquonock Conn. 

Witmeyer, Eleanor Louise French 210 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Yeatts, LeRoy Brough, Jr Chemistry 207 East Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

JUNIORS 

Bacastow, Richard Ira Bus. Admin 230 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

Bachman, Theodore Brandt Pre-Medical . . . .329 West Main St Annville Penna. 

Bartels, Betty Virginia English 216 Java Ave Hershey Penna. 

Bashore, Sidney Milne j Pre-Medical. . . .110 East Oak St Palmyra Penna. 

Beamesderfer, Samuel Hower History 613 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Bouder, Norman Martin, Jr Chemistry 1 Cedar St Edgewood Md. 

Carbaugh, John Edward, Jr Bus. Admin 1025 Walnut St Lemoyne Penna. 

Carl, Shirley Chaitt Psychology 124 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Cohen, Gene Udelle Pre-Medical .... 238 Kelker St Harrisburg Penna. 

Converse, Barbara Elizabeth Mathematics 309 Barker St Ridley Park Penna. 

Curry, John Shenk Bus. Admin 403 Elm Avenue Hershey Penna. 

Dorazio, Nicola Angelo Bus. Admin 419 North St Minersville Penna. 

Edwards, George Ervin Chemistry 30 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Fox, Leland Stanford Chemistry Union Deposit Penna. 

Gerhart, Kenneth Raymond Chemistry 222 Locust St Steelton Penna. 

Graybill, Ruth Janet Chemistry 2730 Butler St Penbrook Penna. 

Grube, Mary Elizabeth History 254 Church Ave Ephrata Penna. 

102 



CATALOGUE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Harnish, Charlotte Eugenia Pre-Medical. . . .3708 Elm Avenue Baltimore Md. 

Haverstock, Ruth Emily Chemistry 2924 McKinley St., 

N. W Washington D. C. 

Hoerner, Richard James Mathematics 142 South 29th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Jiras, Edgar Joseph Chemistry 263 South Front St Steelton Penna. 

Kern, Emil Robert Pre-Medical. . . .132 South 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Marian Mark Chemistry R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Kreiser, Elizabeth Amy Chemistry Ono Penna. 

Light, Dorothy Jean English 722 Elm St Lebanon Penna. 

Mandes, Louis- David French 101 West Caracas Ave. Hershey Penna. 

Mengel, John Benjamin Chemistry 1336 Harding Ave Palmyra Penna. 

Miller, Charles Robinson, Jr Bus. Admin 200 South Second St. . . Wormleysburg Penna. 

Miller, Harry Kreiger Chemistry 201 East High St Hummelstown Penna. 

Minnich, Betty Mae English Wiconisco Penna. 

Mobley , Mark Anderson History 105 W. Lancaster St. . . . Red Lion Penna. 

Moyer, Mary Elizabeth Psychology 125 North Railroad St. . Myerstown Penna. 

Newbaker, Charles Edward, Jr History 311 South Front St.. . .Steelton Penna. 

Nichols, Joseph Edward History 810 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Pronio, Vincent Aldo Bus. Admin 303 West Caracas Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Sanders, Sterling Sylvester Chemistry 202 West Caracas Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Schwalm, Glenn Palmer Pre-Medical Valley View Penna. 

Shannon, Josephine Marie French 114 N. Newberry St York Penna. 

Souders, Bruce Chester English 132 S. Partridge St Lebanon Penna. 

Spangler, Earl Jones Bus. Admin Locust St Campbelltown Penna. 

Stein, Samuel Elmer Chemistry 2292 North 6th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Stine, George Clayton, Jr Bus. Admin 5846 Carpenter St Philadelphia Penna. 

Stonecipher, Verna Pauline Latin 723 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Trautman, Marilyn Esther English 710 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Troup, Earl Albert History Ill North Center St.. .Cleona Penna. 

Wagner, Esther May Pre-Medical .... Route 2 Lebanon Penna. 

Wasilewski, Benedict Alexander. . . .Bus. Admin 210 West Poplar St.. . .Shenandoah Penna. 

Wilt, Martha Elizabeth History 50 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Wise, John Roy Chemistry Cornwall Penna. 

Wolfe, Charles William Greek R. D. No. 2 Conestoga Penna. 

Yannaccone, Robert Pre-Medical .... 139 Sunbury St Minersville Penna. 

SOPHOMORES 

Allen, Katherine Helen French 15 Pine St Middletown Penna. 

Aurentz, Russel John Chemistry. . . . . .429 South 12th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ayers, Etta Mae Bus. Admin 1098 Willow St Lebanon Penna. 

Baker, Milton Werner History 202 38th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Beck, Robert Franklin Bus. Admin 36 Maple St Ephrata Penna. 

Blessing, Alfred Leonard Bus. Admin 404 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, Gene Gruber History 15 West Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Brandt, Alma Ruth Biology 222 North Railroad St. Palmyra Penna. 

Day, Eris June Pre-Medical. . . .Route 3 Hagerstown Md. 

Delduco, A. Alfred Chemistry 253 Middle St Minersville Penna. 

Donough, Robert John Bus. Admin 536 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Ehrengart, Betty Claire Pre-Medical. . . .34 East Henry St Linden N. J. 

Flinchbaugh, James Edward Greek R. D. No. 1 Dallastown Penna. 

Frantz, Marjorie Louise English 230 South 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Harrigar, Miles Duane Pre-Medical. . . .2nd Street Beaverdale Penna. 

Herb, Bruce Elwood Chemistry Valley View Penna. 

Hoffman, Doris Hope Chemistry 668 Washington St Cape May N. J. 

Horn, John Wesley, III Pre-Medical. . . .28 East Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Housel, Lloyd James Greek 509 N. Edgewood Ave. Somerset Penna. 

Huss, Geraldine Rider Pre-Medical. ... 150 South Hanover St. . Hummelstown Penna. 

Kauffman, Gerald Donald History Manchester Md. 

Kintzer, Brian Herbert Chemistry 905 North 16th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kiscadden, Norma Viola Mathematics 315 North 11th St Lebanon Penna. 

Klick, Johann Louise English 908 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Nancy Bomberger Pre-Tech Route No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Levitz, Blossom Rachelle Pre-Medical. . . .128 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, David L, Jr Chemistry R. F. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Elizabeth Jean Biology 1129 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, John Henry Biology Route 1 Annville Penna. 

Light, Martha Elva History R. F. D. No. 1 Lebanon Penna. 

Lipsitz, Paul Chemistry 235 Crescent St Harrisburg Penna. 

Lloyd, William John Pre-Medical. . . .428V2 Hanover Ave.. . .Allentown Penna. 

Matter, Caroline Elizabeth Biology 1223 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

MoConnell, Charles Albert Pre-Medical. . . .632 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

McGeehin, Sara Ellen English 523 Kearsarge Ave Ridgway Penna. 

103 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Miller, Mary Elizabeth Biology Box 146 Stoystown Penna. 

Raab, Yvonne Lorraine French R. D. No. 1 Dallastown Penna. 

Reed, William Marcus Bus. Admin 508 North 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Rettew, Donald Detweiler Bus. Admin 134 E. Allegheny Ave... Philadelphia Penna. 

Rumpf, William Edward Chemistry 133 West Main St Tremont Penna. 

Schnee, Edgar Franklin Chemistry 410 South Lincoln St.. .Palmyra Penna. 

Schreiber, John Walter.. Bus. Admin 1213 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Shelley, Charles Arthur Greek York Haven Penna. 

Stine, Cawley Richard Chemistry 5845 Catherine St Philadelphia Penna. 

Stonecipher, Virginia Irene History 723 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Ulmer, Marian Elenore Mathematics R. D. No. 1 Malvern Penna. 

Wallace, Anthony Francis Clarke. . .History 504 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Werner, Marie Laona History 21 E. Pottsville St Pine Grove Penna. 

Wiessman, John David Bus. Admin 2066 Pennington Rd Trenton N. J. 

Withelder, Robert Lewis Chemistry Zerbe Penna. 

Withers, Edward Donald Chemistry 46 Franklin St Dallastown Penna. 

Yeakle, Mary Martha Biology 202 E. Baltimore St Hagersto wn Md. 

Yoder, John Balthaser, Jr Bus. Admin 339 South 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

Ziegler, Eleanor Virginia English 101 High St Duncannon Penna . 

Zimmerman, Esther Marie History 3009 Walnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

FRESHMEN 

Arnold, Mark Raphael, Jr Bus. Admin 7 East High St Lebanon Penna. 

Beriont, Walter Chemistry 223 East Price St Linden N. J. 

Bittner, Joanne Barbara French 355 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Blouch, Esther Mary Biology R. D. No. 1 Palmyra Penna. 

Blyler, Donald Wellington Pre-Dental 604 North Seventh St. .Lebanon Penna. 

Bobbin, Edward Albert Bus. Admin 201 N. Broad 

Mountain Ave Frackville Penna. 

Bowman, Elizabeth Louise History 312 South 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Cassatt, Verna Catherine Biology 536 South 15th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Cassino, Joseph Francis Chemistry 911 East Henry St Linden N. J. 

Combs, Merle Raymond Biology 229 Rancocas Ave Riverside N. J. 

Cornelius, Marshall, Jr Chemistry 1038 E. Chestnut St Sunbury Penna. 

Detweiler, John Adam Pre-Medical .... 1 14 East Maple St Palmyra Penna. 

Devlin, James Francis Bus. Admin 234 Park Ave Orange N. J. 

Di Johnson, Albert Patric English 610 North 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Dinger, Leroy Wilson Pre-Theol Tower City Penna. 

Dombach, Richard Demy Chemistry 658 Walnut St Columbia Penna. 

Donan, Thomas Melton Mathematics 242 North Second St.. .Columbia Penna. 

Duke, George Melville Mathematics 231 North 14th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ebling, Richard Daniel A. B 929 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Eby , Richard Yoder Chemistry 322 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Fegan, Lloyd Victor, Jr Chemistry 428 North 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Fiorello, Joseph Michael Chemistry 10 West Paul Ave Trenton N. J. 

Fisher, Lizzette Prempert English 620 Market St Lemoyne Penna. 

Fluss, Richard Merril B. S 418 Hummel St Harrisburg Penna. 

Foltz, Leah Susan English 16 South 21st St Harrisburg Penna. 

Frank, Gabriel Bernard History 917 Maple St Lebanon Penna. 

Fravel, Mary Elizabeth History 709 South Lincoln St. . . Lebanon Penna. 

Gemberling, Marshall Luther Chemistry 112 West Main St Mount Joy Penna. 

Gibble, Phares Benard History 36 North College St. . . . Palmyra Penna. 

Gollam, Robert Allen B. S 536 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Groff, Mahlon Arthur Mathematics 322 South Grant St. . . . Palmyra Penna. 

Gruber, Carl Wilhelm Mathematics 632 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Hartz, Helen Louise History 230 Oak St Palmyra Penna. 

Heck, William Emery Pre-Medical. . . .58 Highland Ave Clifton N. J. 

Heckman, Francis Austin Chemistry 206 East Liberty St.. . .Schuylkill Haven. . .Penna. 

Himmelberger, Marion Laura Mathematics 778 Hill St Lebanon Penna. 

Hollinger, Edna Mae History Route 2, Box 91 Greencastle Penna. 

Horstick, Edwin Charles A. B 818 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Kania, Joseph Peter Bus. Admin 742 Thomas St Elizabeth N. J. 

Keeler, William Jonathon Chemistry R. D. No. 1 Pottstown Penna. 

Kemp, Gordon Blair Pre-Medical Fredericksburg Penna. 

Keperling, Ira Clay Pre-Theol R. D. No. 1 Washington Boro. . .Penna. 

Killian, Ruth Edith History 533 Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Kramer, Clyde Young A. B 335 Federal St Lebanon Penna. 

Kreiser, Edith Alma Chemistry Ono Penna. 

Kurtz, Roland Alfred Chemistry 22nd & Canal Streets. .Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Samuel Fowler, Jr Science Mt. Gretna Penna. 

Loy, Erma May A. B R. D. No. 2 Pine Grove Penna. 

104 



CATALOGUE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Mahoney, Walter Peter Bus. Admin 9 McKinley Ave West Orange N J. 

Maley, Matthew Joseph Mathematics 223 Peacock St Pottsville Penna. 

McGraw, James Joseph Bus. Admin High Road Lost Creek Penna. 

Meze, Frank Robert Chemistry 541 Church St Lebanon Penna. 

Mikionis, Leonard Bus. Admin 26 Palm St Newark N. J. 

Miller, Charles Warren Bus. Admin 202 West Main St Annville Penna. 

Miller, Sidney Stanley Pre-Medical. . . .18 East Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Miller, Viola Mabel Latin 130 Oley St Reading Penna. 

Mumma, Lorraine Christine English 220 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Orel, Irvin B. S 204 South 11th St Lebanon Penna. 

Parr, Mary Eloise A. B R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Poole, Henry Leonard Bus. Admin Valley Road Scotch Plains N. J. 

Raby, Earl Stephen History 39 East Main St Ephrata Penna. 

Rohland, Wayne Ellsworth, Jr Science 101 S. Lancaster St.. . .Annville Penna. 

Rothrock, William Alger, III Pre-Medical 2023 North Fifth St.. . .Harrisburg Penna. 

Rotzinger, Edmund George Biology 124 North Fourth St.. .Columbia Penna. 

Ruhl, Charles Stanley Bus. Admin 2700 Penbrook Ave. . . .Penbrook Penna. 

Rutt, George Peter Pre-Medical. . . .26 South Madison St.. . Allentown Penna. 

Sattazahn, Helen Louise A. B Maple Leaf Apt. No. 3 

8th and Maple Sts. . .Lebanon Penna. 

Sattazahn, Nancy Margie Pre-Medical. . . .938 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Schaeffer, Clare Cecilia English 579 Guilford St Lebanon Penna. 

Seyler, Oscar Winfield History 46 West Main St Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Shalley, John Henry A. B 25 South 11th St Lebanon Penna. 

Sherman, John Roy Pre-Medical . . . . R. D. No. 1 Sheridan Penna. 

Sherriff, William Earnest History GrantvUle Penna. 

Shettel, Paul Otterbein, Jr Chemistry 23 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Shettel, Viola Evelyn French 23 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Shupper, Frank Chemistry 568 West Scott Ave. . . .Rahway N. J. 

Smith, Jerome Bernard Pre-Medical. . . .Spruce & Guilford Sts. .Lebanon Penna. 

Snyder, Phyllis Elaine Pre-Medical Paxinos Penna. 

Staub, Mason Mathematics 522 Second St Enhaut Penna. 

Stein, Edwin Jack Bus. Admin 21 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Strickler, Edward Peter Bus. Admin R. D. No. 1 Lebanon Penna. 

Swanger, John William Chemistry R. D. No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Sykes, Evelyn Lee B. S 200 Verbeke St Harrisburg Penna. 

Tatol, Joseph Anthony Bus. Admin 302 West Chester St. . . Shenandoah Penna. 

Thompson, Andrea Mary English 371 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Thrush, Jean Corinne Biology 6 Dunbar St Chatham N. J. 

Thumma, Phyllis Cary A. B 1908 Bellevue Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Thumma, William Mentzer Bus. Admin 1908 Bellevue Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Von Stetten, Wayne Biology 26 North 8th St Columbia Penna. 

Wagner, John William Bus. Admin 27 South 18th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Weiser, Herman Joshua, Jr Chemistry 2143 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Weiss, Arthur Arnold Chemistry 2436 North 4th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wert, James Edward Chemistry 802 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Wolfe, Harvey Edward Chemistry 713 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Workman, Frances Eleanor English Reinerton Penna. 

Yeager, Catharine Salome Mathematics 126 S. Pleasant Ave.. . .Dallastown Penna. 

Zerbe, Walter Glenn Pre-Medical Valley View Penna. 

Zimmerman. Thomas Milton Mathematics Box 14 Stoystown Penna. 

SPECIALS 

Frank, Patrick Joseph Pre-Medical. . . .15 South 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

Graboski, Anthony Rudel Pre-Medical. . . .Box 233 Hershey Penna. 

Weber, Martin Raymond Pre-Medical. . . .2650 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wengert, Guy David G Pre-Medical .... 307 South 24th St Camp Hill Penna. 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 
SENIORS 

Burgner, Adelaide Sanders Music Ed 1117 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Carey, Margaretta Adelaide Music Ed 1825 Zarker St Harrisburg Penna. 

Collins, Ann B Music Ed 208 North Union St Middletown Penna. 

Deibler, Kathryn Sa villa Music Ed 201 Market St Highspire Penna. 

Detambel, Marvin Harold Music Ed 40 Front St Mohnton Penna. 

Duke, Anna Mae Boeshore Music Ed Jonestown Penna. 

Dunkle, Emma Catharine Music Ed. 3311 Brisban St. 

Paxtang Harrisburg Penna. 

Ebersole, Walter King Music Ed H. I. S. Gro-Mor Hershey Penna. 

105 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Emrich, Betty Mae Music Ed Ono Penna. 

Gruber, Jane Gingrich Music Ed 222 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Kerr, Elizabeth Krause Music Ed 505 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Klucker, Dorothy Jane Music Ed. 448 North Hanover St. Carlisle Penna. 

Kreider, Verna Laura Music Ed 128 East Lincoln Ave...Lititz Penna. 

Maurer, Harold William, Jr Music Ed 260 South 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Morrison, Albert Harold Music Ed 429 Pine St Steelton Penna. 

Morrison, Helen Alice Music Ed 210 Lewis St Minersville Penna. 

Moyer, Mrs. June Eby Music Ed 420 South Lincoln St.. .Palmyra Penna. 

Robertson, Jessie Custer Music Ed 1703-5 North Front St. Harrisburg Penna 

Schopf, Janet Marie Music Ed Mountville Penna. 

Sharman, Charles W., Jr Music Ed 1036 Green St Reading Penna. 

Smith, Doris Chittick Music Ed 226 Henry St Brooklyn N. Y. 

Stansfield, Genevieve Marie Music Ed 9 East Main St Mechanicsburg Penna- 

Talnack, John Paul Music Ed 342 Pine St Reading Penna. 

Uberseder, Hans William Music Ed 3004 Freemansburg 

Ave Easton Penna . 



JUNIORS 

Albert, Jones Ross Music Ed R. F. D. No. 1 Lebanon Penna. 

Bachman, James Smith Music Ed 249 East Main St New Holland Penna. 

Derr, Carl Leinbach Music Ed 1303 North 13th St. . . .Reading Penna. 

Fidler, Kenneth Richard Music Ed 347 West Douglass St. .Reading Penna. 

Fisher, Paul Gottshall Music Ed 2231 Spring St West Lawn Penna. 

Fornoff, Hazel Jane Music Ed R. D. No. 1 Columbia Penna. 

Garland, Jean Louise Music Ed 208 North Second St.. .Waynesboro Penna. 

Hollinger, Clayton Elias, Jr Music Ed 506 South 12th St Lebanon Penna. 

Landis, Dorothy Hope Music Ed 9 North Railroad St.. . .Myerstown Penna. 

Light, Janet Naoma Music Ed 364 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ling, Minnie Evelyn Music Ed 1506 Dauphin St Wyomissing Penna. 

Miller, Emma Catharine Music Ed 1433 West Market St... York Penna. 

Mowrey , Wayne Lytle Music Ed R. F. D. No. 1 Waynesboro Penna. 

Reed, Carroll Melvin/ Music Ed 640 George St Hagerstown Md. 

Roye, Laura Burtz Music Ed 724 Chestnut St Columbia Penna. 

Seavers, Garneta Louise Music Ed 117 South Queen St.. . . Shippensburg Penna. 

Tippery, Miriam Winifred Music Ed 1016-23rd Avenue Altoona Penna. 

Witmeyer, Clyde Richard Music Ed 210 East Main St Annville Penna. 



Adams, Anna Musi 

Bartels, Patricia Marie Mus: 

Blauch, Sarah Rosalie M 

Bomgardner, Betty June Mus 

Brown, Mary Jane Mus 

Brulatour, James Stanton Musi 

Carper, Miriam Naomi Mus 

Coover, Janet Rosaltha Mus: 

Corbalis, Berenice Louise Mus: 

Cox, Dorothy May Musi 

Fenstermacher, Wayne Clifford. . . .Musi 

Gooden, Elizabeth Anna Musi 

Hess, Elizabeth Ann Musi 

Hiester, Evelyn Catherine Musi 

Horst, Elmer Hobert Musi 

Houser, Maeredith La Verne Musi 

Jones, Miriam Lyter Musi 

Light, Vernal Earl, Jr Mus 

Miller, Ned Ellsworth Mus 

Moyer, Dorothy Elizabeth Mus: 

Moyer, Elizabeth Ann Mus: 

Porter, Sarah Skidmore Mus: 

Reinhold, Frances Rosalie Mus 

Robinson, Luther Ey ler Mus 

Smyser, Donald Edgar Mus; 

Spangler, Grace Eleanor Mus: 

Stahl, Janice Marie Mus : 

Sterner, Doris Jean Mus 

Streepy, Robert Douglas Musi 

Waller, Jeanne Arlene Musi 



SOPHOMORES 

c Ed 661 South Sixth St Steelton Penna. 

c Ed 216 Java Avenue Hershey Penna. 

c Ed 219 Maple Street Annville Penna. 

c Ed 40 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

c Ed Paradise Penna. 

c Ed Murphey School Dover Del. 

c Ed 221 Oak Street Palmyra Penna. 

c Ed 19 W. Marble Street. . . Mechanicsburg Penna. 

c Ed 1608 Perkiomen Ave. . . Reading Penna. 

c Ed 734 North 3rd St Reading. Penna. 

c Ed 1268 Penn Avenue Wyomissing Penna. 

c Ed Delaware Ave Dover Del. 

c Ed 333 S. Burrowes St State College Penna. 

c Ed 466 North 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

c Ed 1204 King St Avon Penna. 

c Ed 218 West Main St Annville Penna. 

c Ed 3605 North 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

c Ed Route 1 Annville Penna. 

c Ed Valley View Penna. 

c Ed 327 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

c Ed Route No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

c Ed 56 Madison Ave Red Bank N.J. 

c Ed 301 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

c Ed 12 Lombard St Thurmont Md. 

c Ed 366 West Louther St.. . Carlisle Penna. 

Ed R. D. No. 2 Gettysburg Penna. 

c Ed 30 W. Chocolate Ave. . . Hershey Penna . 

c Ed 3539 Oak St Laureldale Penna. 

c Ed 1837 Fairview Ave Easton Penna. 

c Ed 1805 South Wood St. . . . Allentown Penna. 



106 



CATALOGUE 



FRESHMEN 



MAJOR 



STREET NUMBER 



POST OFFICE 



STATE 



Albert, Kathryn Irene Mus 



Bardarik, Grace Vera Music Ed 124 North Mill St St. Clair Penna 



Cohen, Leonard Marlin Musi 

Cully, Grace Marie Musi 

Dietz, .Janet Marie Musi 

Dromgold, Virginia Mae Mus 

Dubs, Janet Ruth Musi 

Edelman, Asher Samuel Musi 

Frezeman, Eleanor Jean Musi 

Gingrich, Jean Marion Mus: 

Glatfelter, Ruth Romaine Mus 

Granger, Edward George Musi 

Gray bill, Dorothy Virginia Mus 

Hershey, Eleanor Louise Musi 

Karre, Ruth Lois Musi 

Koury, Sarah Evelyn Musi 

Leininger, Marion Elizabeth Musi 

Lloyd, Thomas, Jr Musi 

Manderbach, Gordon Seibert Musi 

Marquette, George Reynolds Musi 

Meily, Madeline Mary Musi 

Mohler, Charlotte Kathryn Musi 

Ramsey, Lincoln F., Jr Musi 

Reed, Clarence, Junior Musi 

Reiff, Ruth Elizabeth Musi 

Rowe, Mary Jane Musi 

Sampson, Kenneth Lovell Mus 

Schaak, Thomas James Musi 

Seabrook, Helen Mead Musi 

Shappell, Kenneth Stewart Musi 

Stauffer, Sarah Elizabeth Mus 

Strock, Mary Jean Musi 

Wagner, George Bobb Musi 

Wennerholm, Helen Adelaide Musi 

Wieland, Mary Jane Musi 

Wohlrab, Harry Allen Musi 

Zimmerman, Robert Andrew Musi 



c Ed Route 1 Lebanon Penna. 



c Ed 238 Kelker St Harrisburg Penna. 

c Ed 19 South College St. . . . Myerstown Penna. 

c Ed 31 West Coover St Mechanicsburg Penna. 

c Ed 9 Broadway Ave Duncannon Penna. 

c Ed R. D. No. 3 Lititz Penna. 

c Ed 43 Broadway Hagerstown Md. 

c Ed 1026 Mulberry St Reading Penna. 

c Ed 232 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

c Ed 1133 West Poplar St. . .York Penna. 

c Ed 504 North 11th St Lebanon Penna. 

c Ed West King St Ephrata Penna. 

c Ed 207 Aldrich Ave Altoona Penna. 

cEd 232 Oak Terrace, 

Mt. Penn Reading Penna. 

c Ed 2420-A North 5th St. . .Harrisburg Penna. 

c Ed 137 West Summit St. . . Mohnton Penna. 

c Ed 437 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

cEd 118 South 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

c Ed 110 N. College St Myerstown Penna. 

cEd 205 North 26th St Camp Hill... Penna. 

c Ed 913 Wyomissing Blvd. .Berkshire Heights. .Penna. 

e Ed 1952 Perkiomen Ave. . .Reading Penna. 

c Ed Wiconisco Penna. 

c Ed 902 Bridge St New Cumberland . .Penna. 

c Ed R. R. No. 1 Chambersburg Penna. 

c Ed 332 Tenth St New Cumberland . .Penna. 

c Ed 825 Scull St Lebanon Penna. 

c Ed 304 Laurel St Tremont Penna. 

c Ed 40 Stanton St Schuylkill Haven. . .Penna. 

c Ed 220 North 15th St Harrisburg Penna. 

c Ed R. D. No. 2 Mechanicsburg Penna. 

c Ed R. D. No. 1 Myerstown Penna. 

c Ed New York Ave Congers N. Y. 

c Ed 204 East Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

c Ed 234 Thomson Ave Paulsboro N. J. 

c Ed North Center St Fredericksburg Penna. 



SPECIALS— Part-time 

Acres, Barbara Piano 3 East High St Lebanon Penna. 

Albert, Calvin Russell Cornet R. F. D. No. 1 Lebanon Penna. 

Baker, Helen Voice 516 West Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Beamesderfer, Harold Piano 623 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Black, Barbara Piano 8th and Chestnut Sts.. .Lebanon Penna. 

Bolan, Dorothea Piano 931 Maple St Lebanon Penna. 

Bomgardner, Josephine Voice 40 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Bouder, Norman M., Jr Cornet 1 Cedar St Edgewood Md. 

Bowman, Gene Voice 15 West Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Bowman, James, Jr Piano 106 N. Lincoln St Palmyra Penna. 

Bowman, Marie Matilda Piano 110 East High St Lebanon Penna. 

Bowman, Nancy Piano 15 West Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Bratton, Lavinia Piano 16 East Poplar St Lebanon Penna. 

Brett, Janet Piano 10 East Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Bross, Fred Cornet 129 W. Sheridan Ave. . . Annville Penna. 

Buser, Sarah Ann Piano 301 First Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Butterwick, Helen Irene Voice 218 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Daugherty, Warren Piano 1031 Poplar St Lebanon Penna. 

Dellinger, Helen Violin 3rd Ave. and Mifflin St.. Lebanon Penna. 

Deraco, Catherine Voice, Piano, 

Organ 814 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Eckert, Betsey Piano 14 East Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Fetteroff, Paul Cornet Military Reservation. . . Indiantown Gap Penna. 

Folmer, Harry French Horn 360 North 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Foltz, Leah S Voice, Piano. ... 16 South 21st St Harrisburg Penna. 

Garloff, Madeline Piano R. D. No. 3 Myerstown Penna. 

Germer, Meredith Eurythmics 2207 North 4th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ginder, J. Leanna Organ 907 E. Chocolate Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Gingrich, Betty Voice 232 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Gingrich, Russel Flute 232 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

107 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Hall Anna Fae Piano 128 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Heffelfinger, Fern Voice 829 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Herr, Victor Cornet 36 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Hess, Marjorie Cornet 21 North Main St Manheim Penna. 

Johns, Mary Elizabeth Voice 306 South 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Jones, Jean Piano 422 Cumberland St. . . . Lebanon Penna. 

Kemp, Charles Voice 228 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Killian, Ruth Organ 530 Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Knoll, Robert W Voice Box 366 Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Edwin U Piano North Lancaster St.. . .Annville Penna. 

Kreider, Larry Drums 490 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Lehman, Erma Jean Piano, Violin 29 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Levitz, Adelle Piano i28 Cumberland St. ... Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Doris Piano 19 E. Sheridan Ave. . . . Annville Penna. 

Light, Mrs. Emma Hoke Piano 339 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Fanny Organ 602 Locust St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, John Henry Voice R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Light, Louise Piano Cornwall Penna. 

Long, Helen Organ, Piano.. . . 124 East Cherry St. . . .Palmyra Penna. 

Ludwig, Emily Piano 422 Weidman St Lebanon Penna. 

Maurer, Eloise Piano 1544 Oak St Lebanon Penna. 

McKool, Ernest R Piano 14 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Meyer, Nancy Piano, Cello . . . . R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Millard, Marion Piano Annville Penna. 

Miller, Mary Elizabeth Voice Stoystown Penna. 

Mobley, Mark A Piano 105 W. Lancaster St Red Lion Penna. 

Moyer, Nancy Piano, Violin R. D. No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

Nagle, Elliott Clarinet 327 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Nye, Jeanne Piano 330 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Phillippy, Howard Voice 428 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Raab, Yvonne Voice Dallastown Penna. 

Raby, Stephen E Cornet, Voice. . .39 East Main St Ephrata Penna. 

Rhine, Jay Cornet 550 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Risser, Harold Piano, Piccolo. . .R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Rohland, Henry Piano 235 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Rohland, John Piano 235 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Royer, Mary Alice Piano 317 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

Rudegeair, Clarence Voice 218 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Rutledge, Mrs. Edward P Voice 625 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Schott, Sara Piano Cornwall Penna. 

Seidle, Maylorraine Piano Myerstown Penna. 

Shaak, Robert Violin 52 N. Lancaster St Annville Penna. 

Sherk, H. Dennis Voice 706 E. Mahoning St Punxsutawney Penna. 

Shroyer, Ann Piano 83 E. Sheridan Ave.. . .Annville Penna. 

Shroyer, Frances Piano 83 E. Sheridan Ave.. . .Annville Penna. 

Snyder, Phyllis Piano Paxinos Penna. 

Souders, Bruce C Voice 132 S. Partridge St Lebanon Penna. 

Spitler, Evelyn Piano 115 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Starr, Kathleen Flute, Piano .... East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Stonecipher, Evelyn Cornet 723 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Struble, George G., Jr Cello, Piano 27 North Ulrich St Annville Penna. 

Su mm y, Helen Voice 847 Cumberland St. . . .Lebanon Penna. 

Wagner, Virginia Ann Piano 124 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Wenger, Doris Piano Fredericksburg Penna. 

White, Betty Cornet 259 S. Charlotte St Manheim Penna. 

Wildermuth, Emma Piano 432 East Market St Pottsville Penna. 

Woodley, Gurney Piano Det. Sta. Complement . Indiantown Gap Penna. 

Workman, Frances Voice Reinerton Penna. 

Zug, Esther Piano R. D. No. 2 Lebanon Penna. 

EVENING CLASSES 

Adams, Mrs. Dorothy Brubaker 322 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Arnold, Lillian G 116 North College St. . . Myerstown Penna. 

Baer, John 50 North 13th St Harrisburg Penna 

Barnhart, Henry Maurer R. D. No. 1 Hummelstown Penna. 

Bossard, Ada Catharine 127 N. Lancaster St. ... Annville Penna. 

Brandt, Mark S 1311 Elm St Lebanon Penna. 

Brown, Roland Hilbert 212 Lewis St Harrisburg Penna. 

Buchinsky, Charles J State Police Barracks. .Hershey Penna. 

Curry, Sarah M 267 West Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Daniels, June Holdeman 416 South Lincoln St.. .Palmyra Penna. 

Early, Josephine M 120 Center St Cleona Penna. 

108 



CATALOGUE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Ebling, Russell B Richland Penna. 

Enders, Gertrude D 2011 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Engesser, John A 709 North St Harrisburg Penna. 

Eslinger, Charles F 100 Oak St Progress Penna. 

Feeser, Alta R 2738 Elm St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gable, John Henry R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Gable, Mrs. John H R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Giles, Russell D 137 South Hetrick St... Palmyra Penna. 

Goodwill, Mrs. Elizabeth D Parkside Apts Hershey Penna. 

Green, Erma Isabel 325 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Grosniek, John I State Police Barracks. .Hershey Penna. 

Hertzler, Joseph Lewis 22 North 18th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Howard, Ray B 1422 Naudain St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kolle, Wilson Ray 420 Spruce St Lebanon Penna. 

Laucks, Frederieka 125 Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

Long, Mrs. Edith Burkey 248 North Railroad St. Palmyra Penna. 

Lyter, Anna M 1929 North 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Madciff, Mrs. Esther Walmer Parkview Apts Hershey Penna. 

Phillips, Eric W 17 East Granada Ave. . Hershey Penna. 

Ream, Elva Mae 630 Camp St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ritzman, Thelma Marie 50 West Maple Ave. . . . Hershey Penna. 

Ross, Helen B R. D. No. 2 Myerstown Penna. 

Sanders, Harry E 13th and Liberty Sts. . . Harrisburg Penna. 

Sheckart, Mrs. Edna Rutherford 36 Easy Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Sheckart, Theodore 36 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Shope, Dorothy M 1259 McCord Ave Oberlin Penna. 

Sieber, Herman C State Police Barracks. Hershey Penna. 

Snyder, William 241 Mifflin St Lebanon Penna. 

Spangler, Helen Bright 315 South 1st Ave Lebanon Penna. 

Taennler, Marie 2137 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Thomas, Chris East Main St Annville Penna. 

Troup, Earl A Ill North Center St. . .Cleona Penna. 

Vanaman, Richard Henry Leroy 1326 Howard St Harrisburg Penna. 

Williams, Edward R R. D. No. 1 Pine Grove Penna. 

Witmeyer, Eleanor Louise 210 East Main St Annville Penna 

Yingst, Edith E 115 South Front St. . . . Harrisburg Penna. 

EXTENSION COURSES 

Abary, Edith E 115 South Front St. .. .Harrisburg Penna. 

Bare, Mrs. Ruth DeWalt 108 North 2nd St West Fairview Penna. 

Benney, Lloyd W 3831 Brisban St Harrisburg Penna. 

Boss, Reba 702 East St Harrisburg Penna. 

Crown, Anna 78 Susquehanna St Middletown Penna. 

Cyckowski, Martha M 801 East Main St Lykens Penna. 

Duncan, Ann M., R. N Mitchell Apt. B-7 Harrisburg Penna. 

Enders, Gertrude D 2011 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Engesser, John A 709 North St Harrisburg Penna. 

Faust, Isabelle E 2612 Lexington St Harrisburg Penna. 

Flood, James E 414 N. Harrisburg St. . . Steelton Penna. 

Frund, Willette L 2153 Logan St Harrisburg Penna. 

Hartman, Dorothy 1 144 Altoona Ave Enola Penna. 

Hertzler, Joseph Lewis 22 North 18th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Howard, Ray B 1422 Naudain St Harrisburg Penna. 

Husek, Stephanie O Echo Knoll, R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Hutchinson, Nancy N R. D. No. 1 Dauphin Penna. 

Kerstetter, Evelyn Lucille 1714 State St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kitchen, Mrs. Kathryn F 210 Kelso St., Paxtang . Harrisburg Penna. 

Kruger, Helena B R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Lippitt, Barbara Ann 230 North 29th St Camp Hill Penna. 

March, Mrs. Rita N 207 Oak St Harrisburg Penna. 

Matula, Anne E P. O. Box 95 Middletown Penna. 

McNeal, Esther C 3606 Cloverfield Harrisburg Penna. 

Miller, Marie M 668 Mohn St Enhaut Penna. 

Miller, Pauline 632 Boyd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Mitchell, Isabelle 21 S. Lancaster St Annville Penna. 

Paxton, Helen P 119 North 4th St Lemoyne Penna. 

Robinson, Julia L 134 Balm St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ropeter, Charlotte 272 Briggs St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ross, Helen B R. D. No. 2 Myerstown Penna. 

Sanders, Harry E 13th and Liberty Sts. . . Harrisburg Penna. 

Schaffner, William D 3641 North Front St. . . Harrisburg Penna. 

Shaull, Elizabeth 469 State St West Fairview Penna. 

109 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Shaw, Peggy 261 Herre St Harrisburg Penna. 

Shields, Paul A Locust Lane and 

Wood St Harrisburg Penna. 

Snyder, Jane Elizabeth Duncannon Penna. 

Snyder, Margaret Irene 2004 Mulberry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Thomas, Patricia Ann 1929 Market St Harrisburg Penna. 

Thompson, Helynn M 2314 Hoffer St Penbrook Penna. 

Vanaman, Richard Henry Leroy 1326 Howard St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wagner, Janet G 1718 Forster St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wilt, Roy B 3920 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Witman, Anna Geraldine 33 South Water St Hummelstown Penna. 

Woodward, Florence C 1013 North 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1942 

Adlestein, Max Pitt 1606 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Arnold, Lillian G 116 North College St.. .Myerstown Penna. 

Arnold, Mark R., Jr 7 East High St Lebanon Penna. 

Bachman, James Smith 249 East Main St New Holland Penna. 

Baer, John 50 North 13th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Bartley, Donald Francis 210 Hillside Rd Harrisburg Penna. 

Bashore, Sidney Milne 110 East Oak St Palmyra Penna. 

Beamesderfer, Grace E 25 East Granada Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Bitner, Mrs. Tirzah L 222 Altoona Ave Enola Penna. 

Blessing, Alfred L 404 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Bomgardner, Betty June 40 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Bonner, Harold W Box 109 Scotland Penna. 

Bossard, Ada Catharine 127 N. Lancaster St Annville Penna. 

Bowman, Gene Gruber 15 West Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Brandt, Alma Ruth 222 N. Railroad St Palmyra Penna. 

Brosious, Mrs. Kathryn Stare 1309-A Market St Harrisburg Penna. 

Brulatour, James Stanton Murphy School Dover Del. 

Burgner, Mrs. Adelaide Sanders 1117 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Carl, Shirley Chaitt 124 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Carper, Miriam Naoma 221 Oak St Palmyra Penna. 

Converse, Barbara Elizabeth 309 Barker St Ridley Park Penna. 

Cox, Dorothy 734 North 3rd St Reading Penna. 

Crone, Martha Louise R. D. No. 4 Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Curry, Mrs. Sarah Muth 267 West Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Deibler, Kathryn S 201 Market St Highspire Penna. 

Dellinger, Helen 3rd Ave. and Mifflin St.. Lebanon Penna. 

Detweiler, John A 114 E. Maple St Palmyra Penna. 

Donough, Darathea Ruth 536 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Donough, Robert J 536 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Douglass, Karen J 304 South 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

Ehrlich, Ethel Francis 56 Ridge Road Lyndhurst N. J. 

Enders, Gertrude D 2011 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Englehardt, Edwin Francis 1821 Market St Harrisburg Penna. 

Feeser, Alta R 2738 Elm St., Penbrook Harrisburg Penna. 

Fox, Leland S Union Deposit Penna. 

Frantz, Frederick Strassner, Jr 230 South 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Fritsche, Herman A Van Walen Ave West Norwood N.J. 

Fulton, Mrs. Mary Jane 829 E. Chocolate Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Gable, John H R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Gerhart, Vera A 287 Duke St Ephrata Penna. 

Germer, Meredith Johnson 2207 North 4th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Giles, Russell D 137 S. Hetrick St Palmyra Penna. 

Gollam, William E 536 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Good, Robert Ray 523 Spruce St Lykens Penna. 

Gooden, Elizabeth Anna Delaware Ave Dover Del. 

Groff, Mahlon A., Jr 322 South Grant St Palmyra Penna. 

Grube, Mary Elizabeth 254 Church Ave Ephrata Penna. 

Hampton, John E 617 West King St Shippensburg Penna. 

Harris, Josephine E 229 Cocoa Ave Hershey Penna. 

Heiland, Robert E 10 East Main St Myerstown Penna. 

Hershey, Miriam A Good Samariten Hosp. . Lebanon Penna. 

Hess, Mrs. K. Isabella R. D. No. 1 Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Hite, Betty 100 Second Ave Altoona Penna. 

Hollinger, Eloise M R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Immler, Audrey J 2145 North 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Isenberger, Mrs. Eleanor Herb 563 Madison Ave York Penna. 

Jiras, Edgar Joseph 263 S. Front St Steelton Penna. 

Johns, Mary Elizabeth 306 South 4th St Lebanon Penna. 

110 



CATALOGUE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Keller, Emma Louise 240 West Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

Kenney, George V 157 North 15th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Koons, Lucille Ellen 219 E. Maple St Cleona Penna. 

Kreider, Mrs. Jane E 1930 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kreider, Marian C Route No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Kreider, Marian M Route No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Kroll, Dorothea B Chester N. Y. 

Layser, Kathryn R. D. No. 2 Myerstown Penna. 

Lentz, Anna Kathryn 708 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Dorothy Jean 722 Elm St Lebanon Penna. 

Light, V. Earl, Jr R. D. No. 1 Annville Penna. 

Lloyd, William J 428H Hanover Ave.. . .Allentown Penna. 

Lyter, Anna M 1929 North 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

March, Dorothy L 41 Church St Annville Penna. 

Marshall, Elizabeth 427 Cumberland St Lebanon Penna. 

Mathieson, D. Lloyd Campbelltown Penna. 

McConnell, Charles A 632 Canal St Lebanon Penna. 

McGeehin, Sara Ellen 523 Kearsarge Ave Ridgway Penna. 

Mehaffey, Mary Elizabeth 540 North 9th St Lebanon Penna. 

Mengel, John B 1336 Harding Ave Palmyra Penna. 

Miller, Harry Kreiger 201 East High St Hummelstown Penna. 

Miller, Marie M 668 Mohn St Enhaut Penna. 

Miller, Ned Ellsworth Main St Valley View Penna. 

Mobley, Mark Anderson 105 W. Lancaster St. . . Red Lion Penna. 

Mohler, Charlotte 913 Wyomissing Blvd. .Berkshire Heights. .Penna. 

Morrison, Albert H 429 Pine St Steelton Penna. 

Mqyer, William S Sheridan Penna. 

Neidig, Howard A 525 Hummel Ave Lemoyne Penna. 

Nichols, Joseph Edward 810 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Phillips, Eric W 17 East Granada Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Plank, Betty 412 Bosler Ave Lemoyne Penna. 

Porter, Sarah S 56 Madison Ave Red Bank N. J. 

Raby, Stephen Earl 39 East Main St Ephrata Penna. 

Reed, Carroll 604 George St Hagerstown Md. 

Reed, William Marcus 508 North 2nd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Rhodes, Jacob Lester, Jr R. D. No. 3 Lebanon Penna. 

Ritz, Garland Samuel Route No. 2 York Penna. 

Rodgers, George Washington, Jr 516 State St Johnstown Penna. 

Rutherford, Betty Anne 520 Cumberland St. . . .Lebanon Penna. 

Schnee, Edgar 410 S. Lincoln St Palmjra Penna. 

Schwalm, Glenn Palmer Valley View Penna. 

Shaner, David Willard Cherry Tree Penna. 

Shannon, Jo Marie 114 N. Newberry St York Penna. 

Sharman, Charles W., Jr 1036 Green St Reading Penna. 

Shelley, Charles A York Haven Penna. 

Shenk, Mrs. Marbelle Route No. 2 Myerstown Penna. 

Sherk, H. Dennis 706 E. Mahoning St Punxsutawney Penna. 

Sherk, Katharine Jane 3202 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Sherriff, William E Grantville Penna. 

Shettel, Paul O., Jr 23 W. Sheridan Ave. . . . Annville Penna. 

Shettel, Viola 23 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Shoop, Vera Blinn 101 East Park St Elizabethtown Penna. 

Shope, Dorothy M 1259 McCord Ave Oberlin Penna. 

Silliman, Warren B Poquonock Conn. 

Smee, Pauline Elizabeth R. D. No. 6 Carlisle Penna. 

Smith, Donald 1 49 Trinidad Ave Hershey Penna. 

Smith, Grace Eleanore 423 New St Lebanon Penna. 

Smyser, Donald Edgar 366 W. Louther St Carlisle Penna. 

Snyder, Marlin Henry R. D. No. 2 Jonestown Penna. 

Stein, Samuel Elmer 2292 North 6th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Stemler, Hettye E 1720 State St Harrisburg Penna. 

Swanger, J. William R. D. No. 5 Lebanon Penna. 

Thompson, Helynn M 2314 Hoffer St Penbrook Penna. 

Trautman, Marilyn Esther 710 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Troup, Earl Albert Ill North Center St. . .Cleona Penna. 

Uberseder, Hans 3004 Freemansburg 

Avenue Easton Penna. 

Uhrich, Robert W 344 South 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

VanHorn, George Arthur 247 Areba Ave Hershey Penna. 

Wagner, Esther M Route No. 2 Lebanon Penna. 

Wallace, Anthony Francis Clarke 504 Maple St Annville Penna. 

Weber, Martin R 213 Walnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

Weiser. Herman Joshua, Jr 2143 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Ill 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

NAME STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

Whiteside, Mrs. Esther B 1514 North 8th St Paducah Ky. 

Wilkialis, George W 1723 Poquonock Ave. . . Poquonock Conn. 

Wilt, Martha Elizabeth 50 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Wise, John Roy Cornwall Penna. 

Withelder, Robert Lewis Zerbe Penna. 

Witmeyer, Clyde Richard 210 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Yannaccone, Robert 139 Sunbury St Minersville Penna. 

Yestadt, James F 1719 Forster St Harrisburg Penna. 

Yingst, Edith E R. D. No. 1 Middletown Penna. 

Yingst, Kathryn B 1012 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Yoder, John B., Jr 339 South 2nd St Lebanon Penna. 

Yokum, George E., Jr 15 East Main St Hummelstown Penna. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Baker, Ellen Voice 215 N. College St Palmyra Penna. 

Boger, Joan R Voice 125 N. Railroad St Annville Penna. 

Dise, Treva Voice 205 Cocoa Ave Hershey Penna. 

Ehrlich, Ethel Piano 56 Ridge Road Lyndhurst N. J. 

Fetteroff, Paul Cornet Indiantown Gap Penna. 

Flinchbaugh, Harry Cornet Manheim Penna. 

Folmer, Harry French Horn 360 North 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Garloff, Madelyn Piano R. D. No. 3 Myerstown Penna. 

Ginder, Leanna Organ 907 E. Chocolate Ave. .Hershey Penna. 

Gingrich, Betty Voice 232 East Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Gingrich, Jean Organ 232 E. Main St Palmyra Penna. 

Gruber, Jane G Voice, Organ 222 College Ave Annville Penna. 

Heffelfinger, Feme Voice 829 Lehman St Lebanon Penna. 

Hess, Marjorie Cornet, Piano.. .21 N. Main St Manheim Penna. 

Hoffman, Samuel Cornet East Cherry St Palmyra Penna. 

Keene, Ruth C. A Organ 29 E. Maple St Cleona Penna. 

Landis, Dorothy Hope Violin, Voice, 

Organ 9 N. Railroad St Myerstown Penna. 

Levitz, Adelle Piano 128 Cumberland St. . . .Lebanon Penna. 

Light, Mrs. Emma Hoke Piano 339 North 8th St Lebanon Penna. 

Long, Helen Organ Palmyra Penna. 

Lorenson, Mrs. C. A Piano Cornwall Penna. 

McKool, Ernest Piano 14 North 7th St Lebanon Penna. 

Mobley, Mark A Piano Red Lion Penna. 

Moyer, Elizabeth Ann Voice, Piano. . . .Route No. 2 Hershey Penna. 

Noll, Kathryn M Piano 314 Sandhill, R. No. 3 .Lebanon Penna. 

Peterson, Elizabeth Anne Voice, Piano Cornwall Penna. 

Raby, Stephen Voice, Cornet . . . Quincy Orphanage Quincy Penna. 

Rudegaire, Clarence Voice 218 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Schaak, Robert Violin Lancaster St Annville Penna. 

Strickler, Marian Voice 203 Hathaway Park . . . Lebanon Penna. 

Struble, George G., Jr Cello 27 N. Ulrich St Annville Penna. 

Summy, Helen Voice 847 Cumberland St. . . . Lebanon Penna. 

White, Betty Cornet 259 S. Charlotte St Manheim Penna. 

Wildermuth, Emma Piano Market St Pottsville Penna. 

Zug, Esther Piano R. D. No. 2 Lebanon Penna 



112 



197 
47 
45 

537 
23 

514 



177 
691 
124 

567 



CATALOGUE 
SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR, 1942-1943 

FIRST SEMESTER 

College Men Women Total 

Post-Graduate 1 1 

Seniors 23 16 39 

Juniors 34 17 51 

Sophomores 30 25 55 

Freshmen 71 27 98 

Specials 4 . . 4 

163 85 248 
Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 7 17 24 

Juniors 9 9 18 

Sophomores 8 22 30 

Freshmen 14 23 37 

38 71 109 

Specials— Part-time 31 57 88 

69 128 

Evening and Staurday Classes 23 24 

Extension Courses (Off-Campus) 10 35 

Total in all Departments 265 272 

Names repeated 12 11 

Net enrollment 253 261 

Summer Session, 1942 

College 73 69 142 

Specials in Conservatory 10 25 35 

83 94 

Total including Summer Session 336 335 

Names repeated in summer session 67 57 

Net enrollment including Summer Session 269 298 

SUMMARY COLLEGIATE YEAR, 1941-1942 

College Men Women Total 

Post-Graduate Students 1 . . 1 

Seniors 35 18 53 

Juniors 30 19 49 

Sophomores 42 19 61 

Freshmen 55 29 84 

1 2 3 

164 87 251 
Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 3 13 16 

Juniors 11 15 26 

Sophomores 15 9 24 

Freshmen 15 25 40 

Specials 2 2 

44 64 108 

Specials— Part-time 34 76 110 

— 218 

Evening and Saturday Classes 47 66 113 

Extension Courses (Off-campus) 29 57 86 

Total in all Departments 318 350 668 

Names repeated 19 38 57 

Net Enrollment 299 312 611 

Summer Session, 1941 

College., 33 61 94 

Specials in Conservatory . . 15 15 

33 76 109 

Total including Summer Session 332 388 720 

Names repeated in summer session 14 38 52 

Net Enrollment 318 350 668 

113 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

REGISTRATIONS 

Second Semester, 1941-1942 

NAME MAJOR STREET NUMBER POST OFFICE STATE 

College: 
Juniors 

Kishpaugh, Dorothy Jess Bus. Ad Hershey Penna. 

Kreider, Mrs. Jane E English 1 930 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Sophomores 

Mobley, Mark Anderson History 105 W. Lancaster St. . .Red Lion Penna. 

Neville, William Joseph Pre-Medical .... 200 S. Railroad St Myerstown Penna. 

Freshmen 

Beriont, Walter Chemistry 223 East Price St Linden N. J. 

Sherriff, William Ernest History Grantsville Penna. 

Special 

Shettel, Paul Otterbein, Jr Chemistry 23 W. Sheridan Ave Annville Penna. 

Conservatory of Music: 

Specials— Part-time 

Cully, Grace Voice Myerstown Penna. 

Daugherty, Warren, Jr Piano 1031 Poplar St Lebanon Penna. 

Day, Eris June Piano Route No. 3 Hagerstown Md. 

Dise, Treva E Voice 205 Cocoa Ave Hershey Penna. 

Farver, Mrs. Jane R Piano 49-A East Cherry St.. .Palmyra Penna. 

Folmer, Harry Cornet 360 North 10th St Lebanon Penna. 

Heagy , John G Voice East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Kreider, Mrs. Jane E Piano 1930 North 3rd St Harrisburg Penna. 

Lorenson, Mrs. Ruth Piano Cornwall Penna. 

Mobley, Mark A Piano 105 W. Lancaster St. . .Red Lion Penna. 

Nye, Jeanne Piano 330 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Pronio, Elvira Piano 303 W. Caracas Ave. . .Hershey Penna. 

Summy, Helen Voice 847 Cumberland St. . . . Lebanon Penna. 

Wohlrab, Harry 234 Thomson Ave Paulsboro N. J. 

Woodley, Gurney M Piano M. T. S. Station Com- 
plement Indiantown Gap Penna. 

Evening and Saturday Classes 

Beamesderfer, Grace E 25 E. Granada Ave. . . .Hershey Penna. 

Boyer, Walter S 429 North 8th St Lebanon Penna 

Darkes, Mrs. Ethel Hower R. D. No. 4 Lebanon Penna. 

Derr, Carl Leinbach 1303 W. 13th St Reading Penna. 

Eslinger, Charles F 100 Oak St Progress Penna. 

Garber, Pauline M Bainbridge Penna. 

Gerhart, Vera A 287 Duke St Ephrata Penna. 

Kenney, George V 157 N. 15th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Kolle, Wilson Ray 429 Walnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Koons, Lucille Ellen 219 East Maple St Cleona Penna. 

Marstellar, J. Everett R. D. No. 2 Harrisburg Penna. 

Miller, Mrs. Marion Stover 763 East Maple St Annville Penna. 

Mosher, Rita M 1204 Chestnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

Moyer, William S Sheridan Penna. 

Och, John Thomas 1424 Swatara St Harrisburg Penna. 

Richards, Marie F 202 Chestnut St Lebanon Penna. 

Shellenberger, Jane 223 East Main St Annville Penna. 

Strickler, Mary M Schaefferstown Penna. 

Swartz, Dorothy Jane Marysville Penna. 

Swope, John Francis R. D. No. 3 Myerstown Penna. 

Taennler, Marie 2017 Derry St Harrisburg Penna. 

Weber, Martin R 213 Walnut St Harrisburg Penna. 

Wengert, Guy D 307 South 24th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Zinicola, Joseph L 1935 North 5th St Harrisburg Penna. 

Extension Courses 

Buchanan, Ida Christine 621 Riley St Harrisburg Penna. 

Douglas, Eugene R 621 Forster St Harrisburg Penna. 

Feeser, Alta R 2738 Elm St Harrisburg Penna. 

Gray, Allen R East Berlin Penna. 

Hess, Mrs. K. Isabella Sweitzer R. D. No. 1 Mechanicsburg Penna. 

Lilienffeld, Alfred 51 E. Pottsville St Pine Grove Penna. 

Reed, Albert A High Street Pine Grove Penna. 

Snow, John B 1411 Reily Road Harrisburg Penna. 

Stoner, Naomi Highspire Penna. 

Supple, Raymond Arthur 38 North 28th St Penbrook Penna. 

Thompson, Helynn M 2314 Hoffer St Penbrook Penna. 

Washington, Harriet 800 Cowden St Harrisburg Penna. 

114 



ndex 



PAGE 

Absence 29,35 

Academic Standing of College . . 20 
Academic Standing of 

Conservatory 20 

Accelerated Program 42, 82 

Administration, Officers of 8 

Admission, Requirements for ... 25 

Admission, Music Department . . 84 
Addresses, Faculty and 

Administrative Officers 101 

Advanced Standing 27 

Advisers 14,28 

Aid to Students 35 

Aims of the College 19 

Application for Admission 25 

Assistants, Administration 8 

Assistants, Student 16 

Astronomy, Courses in 43 

Athletic Association 22 

Bible and Religion, Courses in . . 43, 44 

Biology, Courses in 45-47 

Board of Trustees 6 

Board of Trustees, Committees . . 7 

Board of Trustees, Officers 7 

Boarding 32 

Breakage Deposit, Laboratories . . 32 

Breakage Deposit, Rooms 33, 34 

Buildings and Grounds 2, 20 

Business Administration, 

Courses in 47-50 

Business Administration, 

Outline of Course 79 

Calendar, College, 1942-1943 4 

Calendar, College, 1943-1944 4 

Chapel Attendance 29 

Chemistry, Courses in 51-53 

Chemistry, Outline of Course ... 80 

Class Standing 27 

Classification 27 

Clubs, Departmental 23 

Committees of Board of Trustees 7 

Committees of the Faculty 14 

Conditions, Scholastic 29 

Conducting, Courses in 95 

Conservatory of Music 88-98 

Corporation, The 6 

Corporation, Officers of the 7 

Courses of Instruction 43 

Credits 28 

Day Student Rooms 33,34 

Debating 22 

Deficient Students 29 

Degrees Awarded 1942 99, 100 

Degrees Granted 39 



Degrees, Requirements for 39, 40 

Dictation, Courses in Music 90 

Discipline 29 

Dormitory Proctors 8 

Dramatics 22 

Economics, Courses in 50, 51 

Education, Courses in 54-56 

English, Courses in 56-58 

Enrollment, Student, 1941-1942.. 113 
Enrollment, Student, First 

Semester, 1942-1943 113 

Entrance Requirements, College.. 25,26 
Entrance, Requirements, 

Conservatory 88 

Equipment 20 

Eurythmics, Course in 95 

Evening Classes 78 

Examinations, Supplemental .... 29 

Expenses, College 31-34 

Expenses, Conservatory of Music 96, 97 

Extension Courses 78 

Faculty, College 9-11 

Faculty, Conservatory of Music. 12, 13 

Fees, Graduation 34 

Fees, Laboratory 32 

Fees, Matriculation 31 

Fees, Practice Teaching 34 

Fees, Re-examinations 30 

French, Courses in 58, 59 

Freshman Week 27 

German, Courses in 59-61 

Grading System 27 

Graduation Fees 34 

Graduation Requirements 39, 40 

Greek, Courses in 61, 62 

Gymnasium 20 

Harmony, Courses in 91 

Hazing 29 

Health Service 20 

History, Courses in 62-64 

History of Music, Courses in . . . 95 

History of the College 17 

Hours, Limit of 28 

Hygiene, Courses in 71 

Infirmary 20 

Individual Instruction, Music ... 96 
Instrumental Music, Instruction 

in 93 

Journalism 22 

Junior Department, Music 96 

Laboratories 20 

Laboratory Fees 32 

Latin, Courses in 64, 65 

Library 21 

115 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PAGE 

Literary Societies 22 

Loan Funds 35 

Location 20 

Major and Minor 39 

Mathematics, Courses in 65-67 

Matriculation Fee 31 

Medicine, Plan of Study 

Preparatory for 81-83 

Methods in Music, Courses in... 92 
Music Education, Outline 

of Course 88-90 

Musical Organizations 23, 94 

Music, Junior Department 96 

Music and the A.B. Degree .... 67, 68 

Music, Minor 67 

Officers of Administration 8 

Officers of Board of Trustees ... 7 

Organ Specifications 97, 98 

Orientation, Course in 69 

Outline of Courses: 

Bachelor of Arts 41-42 

Bachelor of Science with 

Major in Science 41-42 

Major in Chemistry 80 

With Major in Business 

Administration 79 

With Major in Education . . 54, 86 
With Major in Music 

Education 88-90 

Pre-Medical 81-83 

Pre-Theological 83 

Payment of Fees 34, 35 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 23, 100 

Philosophy, Courses in 69, 70 

Physical Education 70-72 

Physical Science 96 

Physician's Certificate 25 

Physics, Courses in 72, 73 

Placement Bureau 86 

Political Science, Courses in ... 74, 75 

Practice Teaching, College 55 

Practice Teaching, Conservatory 

of Music 92 

Practice Teaching Supervisors . . 15 

Pre-Medical, Outline of Course .. 81 

Pre-Medical, Accelerated Course . 82, 83 

Presidents 16 

Pre-Theological, Outline of Course 83 



PAGE 

Prizes Awarded 1942 23 

Probation 29 

Psychology, Courses in 75-77 

Public School Music, Outline 

of Course 88-90 

Quality Points 39 

Re-examinations 29, 30 

Register of Students 102-112 

Registration 26 

Registration, Change of 27 

Registration, Late 27 

Registration, Pre- 27 

Religious Organizations 21 

Requirements for Admission, 

College 25, 26 

Requirements for Admission, 

Conservatory 25, 88 

Requirements for Degree 39, 40 

Residence Requirements for 

Degree 39 

Room Equipment 33 

Room Rent 33 

Room Reservation 33 

Saturday Classes 78 

Scholarships 35-38 

Sickness 35 

Sight Singing, Courses in 90 

Sociology, Courses in 75 

Spanish, Courses in 77 

Student Activities 22 

Student Activities and 

Tuition Fees 31 

Student Assistants 16 

Student Recitals 96 

Summary of the Enrollment .... 113 

Summer Session 78 

Teaching, Requirements for 

Certificates 84-86 

Trust Funds 35-38 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Tuition and Student Activities 

Fees 31 

Tuition Rebate, Ministers' 

Children 31 

Tuition Rebate, Faculty 

Children 31 

Y. M. and Y. W. C. A 22 



116