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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Gossard Memorial Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley195657leba 





LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



CATALOG ISSUE • FEBRUARY 1956 



1956 \ 1957 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

To facilitate prompt attention, inquiries should be addressed 
as indicated below: 

Admissions Director of Admissions 

Alumni Interests Alumni Secretary 

Business Matters, Expenses Business Manager 

Education Program Dean of the College 

Employment of Seniors, Alumni Director of Placement 

Evening, Extension, and Summer Schools 

Director of Auxiliary Schools 

Publications and Publicity Director of Public Relations 

Religious Activities Chaplain 

Scholarship and Self Help . Chairman, Scholarship Committee 

Student Interests Dean of Men or Dean of Women 

Teacher Placement Director of Teacher Placement 

Transcripts, Academic Reports Registrar 

College office hours are from 8:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. Monday 
through Friday. Members of the staff are available for inter- 
views at other times if appointments are made in advance. 

Please use index for additional references. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

BULLETI N 



CATALOGUE 



1956 




1957 



Register for 7955-7956 
Announcement of Courses for 7956-7957 



Volume XLIV 



February, 1956 



Number 2 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 

James W. Parsons, Editor 

Publication Committee : George G. Struble, Clark Carmean, Gladys M. Fencil, Theo- 
dore Keller, James Parsons (Executive Secretary), Thomas Lanese, Adora Rabiger. 
Published during the months of January, February, March, April, May, June, Septem- 
ber, October, November and December by Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pa. 
Entered as second class matter at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., under the Act of 
Congress of August 24, 1912. 



- V 



Calendar for 1956-1957 

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Contents 

PAGE 

College Calendar 4 

Introduction to Lebanon Valley College 6 

History and General Information 7 

Student Activities 11 

Admission 15 

Expenses 18 

Financial Aid to Students 23 

Academic Procedures 27 

Summer School, Extension, and Evening Courses 30 

Administrative Regulations 31 

Requirements for Degrees 33 

Special Plans of Study in Preparation for Professions .... 36 

Integrated Studies 54 

Courses of Study by Divisions 56 

Courses of Study by Departments 57 

Conservatory of Music 101 

The Corporation 116 

Administrative Staff and Faculty 118 

Degrees and Awards, 1955 128 

Register of Students 132 

Index 151 



\o%%io 



College Calendar 

1955-1956 



FIRST SEMESTER— 1955 
1955 

Sept. 12 Monday Board of Trustees Retreat 

13 Tuesday Faculty Retreat 

14 Wednesday to Saturday .... Freshman Orientation; Registration 
19 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Oct. 22 Saturday Homecoming Day; meeting of the 

Trustees 

25 Tuesday Religion and Life Lecture 

Nov. 1 1 Friday Midsemester grade reports due 

12 Saturday Parents' Day 

23 Wednesday, 1:00 p.m., to Thanksgiving Recess 
Monday, Nov. 28, 8:00 a.m. 
Dec. 7-14 Wednesday to Wednesday . . Pre-registration for second semester 
16 Friday, 5:00 p.m., to Christmas vacation 

Tuesday, Jan. 2, 8:00 a.m. 

1956 

Jan. 16-27 Monday to Friday Semester Examinations 

28 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER— 1956 
1956 

Jan. 30 Monday Registration 

31 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Mar. 5- 8 Monday to Thursday Religious Emphasis Week 

23 Friday, 5:00 p.m., to Easter Recess 

Tuesday, April 3, 8:00 a.m. 

April 17 Tuesday Religion and Life Lecture 

19-20 Thursday and Friday Spring Music Festival 

May 5 Saturday May Day 

2- 9 Wednesday to Wednesday . . Pre-registration for 1956-1957 

21-31 Monday to Thursday Semester Examinations 

June 1 Friday Meeting of Board of Trustees 

2 Saturday Alumni Day 

3 Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

4 Monday Eighty-seventh Annual Commence- 

ment 



College Calendar 

1956-1957 



FIRST SEMESTER— 1956 
1956 

Sept. 10 Monday Faculty Retreat 

1 1 Tuesday Board of Trustees Retreat 

12-15 Wednesday to Saturday .... Freshmen Orientation; Registration 

17 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Nov. 9 Friday Midsemester grade reports due 

10 Saturday Homecoming and Parents' Day 

13 Tuesday Religion and Life Lecture 

21 Wednesday, 10:00 p.m., to Thanksgiving Recess 

Monday, Nov. 26, 8:00 a.m. 

Dec. 4-11 Tuesday to Tuesday Pre-registration for second semester 

14 Friday, 5:00 p.m., to Christmas vacation 

Tuesday, Jan. 2, 8:00 a.m. 

1957 

Jan. 14-25 Monday to Friday Semester examinations 

26 Saturday noon First semester ends 

SECOND SEMESTER— 1957 
1957 

Jan. 28 Monday Registration for second semester 

29 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Mar. 4- 7 Monday to Thursday Religious Emphasis Week 

April 2 Tuesday Religion and Life Lecture 

4- 6 Thursday to Saturday Spring Music Festival 

12 Friday, 5:00 p.m., to Easter recess 

Tuesday, Apr. 23, 8:00 a.m. 

May 4 Saturday May Day 

1- 8 Wednesday to Wednesday . . Pre-registration for 1957-1958 

20-29 Monday to Wednesday Semester examinations 

31 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

June 1 Saturday Alumni Day 

2 Sunday Baccalaureate Service 

2 Sunday 88th Annual Commencement 

10 Monday Summer School begins 



Introduction to 
Lebanon Valley College 



Lebanon Valley College is a church related college of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. It enjoys the distinction and 
prestige resulting from 90 years of service to American 
youth and to Christian higher education. It is classified as 
a small college and takes pride in its reputation for having 
a friendly and courteous student body. It places strong 
emphasis on the personal contact between faculty members 
and students and the amount of individual attention de- 
voted to each student. It strives to provide an opportunity 
for each student to develop his intellectual capacities to the 
maximum and to develop his whole personality. Its cur- 
riculum is designed to provide a basic foundation of liberal 
education, and also to make available professional special- 
ization in areas in which staff and facilities are available. 

The college grants the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Bachelor of Science 
in Medical Technology. Lebanon Valley offers pre-profes- 
sional courses in medicine, law, dentistry, medical technol- 
ogy, engineering, forestry, and theology. 

Prospective students and parents are invited to write 
to the Director of Admissions regarding interviews, campus 
visits, or admissions application forms. 



History and General Information 



HISTORY 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE was founded in Annville, 
Pennsylvania, in 1866 by members of the Eastern Conference 
of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ. From the be- 
ginning it has been a coeducational institution which has fostered 
high standards of scholarship in a Christian atmosphere. 

With a student body of forty-nine, the college opened on May 7, 
1866, in a building donated by the old Annville Academy. Dr. 
Thomas Rees Vickroy served as its president during the first five 
years of its existence. Under succeeding administrations the institu- 
tion grew in numbers and facilities. In 1890, the college received the 
Mary A. Dodge Scholarship of $10,000, which enabled it to close its 
first quarter century with increased confidence in its future. 

In 1897, under the presidency of Dr. Hervin U. Roop and with 
the assistance of old friends and new patrons, the college entered 
on a fresh period of expansion which saw the erection of the greater 
part of the present plant. Engle Hall, the Carnegie Library, and 
North Hall were built. The destruction by fire of the old Adminis- 
tration Building tested the loyalty of college supporters but did not 
interfere with the program of expansion. The friends of the college 
rallied to build a new and larger Administration Building, a resi- 
dence for the men, and a heating plant. Dr. Roop also provided 
proper quarters and modern equipment for the science departments. 
His vision and initiative laid the foundation for the success that has 
since come to the college. 

The inauguration of President George Daniel Gossard in 1912, 
marked the beginning of an era of prosperity for Lebanon Valley. 
During his term of office the student body tripled in numbers, the 
faculty increased not only in numbers but also in attainments, and 
the elimination of all phases of secondary education raised the in- 
stitution to true college status. During this same period two great 
endowment campaigns were completed. 

Dr. Gossard was succeeded by President Clyde A. Lynch, who built 
soundly upon the foundations previously laid. Under his administra- 
tion the bonds of affection between the college and the church were 
strengthened, the active support of the alumni was vastly stimu- 
lated, academic standards were raised, the services of the college 
were extended over a wider area, and as a visible symbol of his 
energetic administration, a half-million-dollar gymnasium was added 
to the physical plant. 

After Dr. Lynch's death in 1950, the Trustees elected to the presi- 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

dency one of the younger members of the faculty, Dr. Frederic K. 
Miller. This decision was greeted with warmest enthusiasm by both 
faculty and constituents. Under his leadership the curriculum has 
been expanded, the administrative staff reorganized, and relation- 
ships with the local community and alumni strengthened. 

The present progressive and efficient administration is assured of 
increasing institutional support through the merger in 1946, of the 
Church of the United Brethren in Christ and the Evangelical 
Church. The current three-million dollar Development Program will 
provide for additional expansion of the college's physical plant and 
instructional facilities, and will better enable Lebanon Valley to 
continue its proud task of educating American youth in the Chris- 
tian liberal tradition for which it is noted. 

PRESIDENTS 

Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D 1866-1871 

Lucian H. Hammond, A.M 1871-1876 

Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M 1876-1887 

Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D 1887-1889 

Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M 1889-1890 

E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D 1890-1897 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S 1906-1907 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D 1907-1912 

Rev. George Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., LL.D 1912-1932 

Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D., Ph.D., LL.D. . . 1932-1950 

Frederic K. Miller, A.M., Ph.D, Litt.D. . . Acting President 1950-1951 

President 1951- 

OBJECTIVES 

The educational objectives of Lebanon Valley College are as 
follows: 

1. To provide an opportunity for qualified young people to pro- 
cure a liberal education and to develop their total personalities 
under Christian influences. 

2. To help provide the Church with capable and enlightened 
leaders, both clerical and lay. 

3. To foster Christian ideals of conduct and to encourage faith- 
fulness to the Church of the student's choice. 

4. To help train well-informed, intelligent, and responsible citi- 
zens, qualified for leadership in community, state and nation. 

5. To provide pre-professional students with the broad prelimi- 
nary training recommended by professional schools and professional 
associations. 

6. To provide, in an atmosphere of liberal culture, partial or 
complete training for certain professions and vocations. 

• 8 • 



CATALOGUE 

ACCREDITATION 

Lebanon Valley College is accredited by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the Department of 
Public Instruction of Pennsylvania. It is a member of the Associa- 
tion of American Colleges and of the American Council on Educa- 
tion, and is on the approved list of the Regents of the University 
of the State of New York and the American Association of Univer- 
sity Women. 

The Conservatory of Music, an integral part of Lebanon Valley 
College, is a member of, and accredited by, the National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Music. 

LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 

Lebanon Valley College is located in Annville, Lebanon County, 
Pennsylvania, 20 miles east of Harrisburg, and five miles west of 
Lebanon. The campus faces on State Highway 422 and State High- 
way 934. It can be reached by the Reading Railroad and by bus 
from Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, D. C, and 
New York. It can also be reached by the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 
using the Lancaster-Lebanon Interchange. 

Annville is a residential community of about 3,500 population, 
situated in the agricultural country of the Pennsylvania Germans. 
In addition to the cultural facilities available at the college, the 
neighboring communities of Harrisburg, Hershey, and Lebanon 
offer concerts, lectures, plays, etc., throughout the year. There are 
nine churches of different denominations in the community, and 
churches of every denomination are available within a five mile 
radius of the college. 

SUPPORT AND CONTROL 

Lebanon Valley College receives support from the General Con- 
ference and three local conferences — East Pennsylvania (U.B.), Penn- 
sylvania, and Virginia — of the Evangelical United Brethren Church. 
The institution receives no financial support from taxation. 

Total assets of Lebanon Valley College exceed $3,000,000. Among 
its assets are endowment funds in excess of $1,000,000. Aside from 
general endowment income available for unrestricted purposes, there 
are a number of special funds designated for specific uses such as 
professorships, scholarships, and the library. 

At Lebanon Valley College, as with most institutions of higher 
learning, the tuition and other annual charges paid by the student 
do not cover the total cost of his education. The College uses in- 
come received from the General Church, the supporting Confer- 
ences, the Alumni Association, and endowment to supplement the 
student fees and charges. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Control is vested in a Board of Trustees composed of 45 members, 
32 of whom represent the three supporting conferences; three trus- 
tees represent the alumni of the institution and 10 are elected at 
large. Members of the College faculty who are department chairmen 
are ex-officio members of the Board of Trustees. 

CAMPUS, BUILDINGS, AND EQUIPMENT 

The campus of 35 acres, is situated in the center of Annville. The 
college plant consists of seventeen buildings including: 

The Administration Building — The administrative offices are lo- 
cated on the main floor. The remainder of the building is devoted 
to classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices. 

The Library — The library of nearly sixty thousand volumes con- 
tains an excellent collection of the customary aids for reference work. 
In addition to a rapidly growing number of books used by the 
various departments, a diversified collection of periodicals is housed 
in a special room. 

Incoming students are instructed in the use of catalogues and ref- 
erence publications and in accepted methods of working in libraries. 

The Hiram Herr Shenk Collection (which includes the Heilman 
Library) and the C. B. Montgomery Memorial contain many valu- 
able works dealing with the history and customs of the Pennsylvania 
Germans. These collections are housed in special rooms and are 
open for reference use under staff supervision. 

Dormitories — There are five dormitories for women and two for 
men. 

The Lynch Memorial Physical Education Building — A modern 
physical education plant equipped with the most up-to-date re- 
sources for physical education and recreation. 

Infirmary — A well-equipped and comfortable infirmary is avail- 
able and is staffed by resident nurses under the supervision of the 
college physician. 

Engle Hall — Engle Hall houses the Department of Music Educa- 
tion and includes an auditorium, classrooms, studios, offices, and 
private practice rooms. 

Athletic Fields — The athletic fields provide space for football, bas- 
ketball, hockey, track, baseball, volleyball, and other sports. 



10 



Student Activities 



Extra-curricular activities constitute a vital part of college life at 
Lebanon Valley. Activities outside the classroom range from the vari- 
ous clubs and musical organizations to student government groups 
and numerous religious activities. The student has a wide variety 
from which to choose. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Lebanon Valley College was founded as a Christian college and 
continues to be dedicated to this objective. All students are invited 
and urged to participate in some phase of religious activity. 

Chapel 

The College Chapel service is held weekly in the College Church. 
Students are required to attend. Faculty, students, local clergymen 
from the various denominations, as well as other outside speakers, 
participate in this service. 

Sunday Services 

The College Church and the other churches of the community 
extend a warm welcome to all college students who wish to attend 
Sunday worship. A Sunday School class especially for college students 
is conducted in the College Church each week during the school 
year. 

The Student Christian Association 

The Student Christian Association conducts weekly devotional 
services, campus-wide Bible studies, special seasonal services, and 
intercollegiate exchange religious programs. In addition to numer- 
ous other activities, the Student Christian Association sponsors social 
events throughout the year and arranges for the Big Sister-Little 
Sister and the Big Brother-Little Brother program for incoming fresh- 
men. 

All students are urged to participate actively in the student- 
centered religious programs. 

Religious Emphasis Week 

This is one of the outstanding religious events of the school year. 
Notable speakers are invited to share their experiences with the stu- 
dent body through classroom lectures, seminars, convocations, and 
personal interviews. 

• 11 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Religion and Life Lectureships 

The purpose of the Religion and Life Lectureship is to deepen 
the student's understanding of some of the problems of life and the 
religious resources that are available to meet such problems. Each 
semester a Christian leader of national or international reputation 
is invited to spend a day on campus in order to confer with the 
faculty members and students, to conduct seminars, and to address 
the entire college community. 

Christian Vocation Week 

During this period special emphasis is given to the Christian way 
of life as the basis for all vocations and professions. Opportunity is 
provided for students interested in full-time church vocations to 
confer with visiting teams of advisors and counselors. 

Delta Tau Chi 

Many students in this campus religious organization have defi- 
nitely decided to devote full-time service to church vocations. The 
group holds regularly scheduled meetings, conducts programs at 
various hospitals and county homes, and enters into other community 
projects. 

FACULTY-STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The ultimate responsibility for the happenings on the college 
campus rests with the faculty and administration. However, the fac- 
ulty and administration have delegated considerable powers to the 
student governing bodies so that, to a large extent, students govern 
themselves. The college encourages initiative and self-government 
as a part of the democratic training students receive in college. 

Faculty-Student Council 

The coordination of student affairs is the responsibility of the 
Faculty-Student Council. The Council is composed of three faculty 
members and a representative from each of the recognized organiza- 
tions on the campus. The purpose of this organization, in addition 
to coordinating student activities, is to consider matters pertaining 
to student welfare, to seek improvement of the social life of the 
campus, to serve as liaison between students and faculty, and to 
suggest and initiate programs for the over-all improvement of the 
college. 

Governing Bodies 

Four student governing bodies function on the campus. The 
Senate is the governing body for students living in the men's dormi- 
tories; the Men's Day Student Congress is the governing body for 

• 12 • 



CATALOGUE 

commuting men students; the Resident Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association is the governing body for dormitory women; and 
the Women's Commuter Council is the governing body for day 
student women. These four organizations, with the approval of the 
faculty, make and administer the rules which govern certain aspects 
of student life. Students residing in Annville, with other than their 
immediate families, are under the jurisdiction of the appropriate 
governing bodies. 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

Social Organizations 

Phi Lambda Sigma Kappa Lambda Nu 

Kappa Lambda Sigma Delta Lambda Sigma 

Knights of the Valley The Legionnaires 

These six societies endeavor to enrich the social program of the 
college by service to the campus and community, and by broaden- 
ing the experience of its members through group action. 

Recognition Groups 

Phi Alpha Epsilon Pi Gamma Mu 

Beta Beta Beta 
Students who have achieved scholastic distinction in their aca- 
demic work as a whole, or in certain areas, are given recognition by 
membership in these societies. 

Forensics and Dramatics 

Wig and Buckle Club College Band 

Symphony Orchestra Glee Club 

College Chorus 
These organizations offer to the students of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege an opportunity to develop their dramatic and musical talents 
under qualified leadership. 

Publications 

The Quittapahilla La Vie Collegienne 

Students interested in management, writing, and editorial work 
can gain practical experience in these fields through membership 
on the staff of the Quittapahilla (college yearbook) and La Vie Col- 
legienne (campus newspaper). 

Departmental Clubs 

Chemistry:American Chemical Society Affiliate 
Elementary Education: Childhood Education Group 
Modern Languages: French Club 

. 13 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

English: Green Blotter 

Education: Future Teachers of America 

History and Political Science: Political Science Club 

Psychology: Psychology Club 

Many departmental clubs have been formed on the campus by 
groups of students interested in certain fields of investigation. At 
regular meetings, reports on current topics are presented and dis- 
cussed. Other activities sponsored by the departmental clubs include 
lectures by specialists in the club's particular field of interest, educa- 
tional films, and field trips. 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

Lebanon Valley College maintains a full program of intramural 
and intercollegiate athletic activities. Intramural leagues and tourna- 
ments are held in the various sports for men while the women 
acquire points toward individual awards for participation in the 
women's intramural program. 

The College participates in four intercollegiate sports for men 
(baseball, basketball, football, track) and two for women (basket- 
ball and hockey). There are two athletic organizations on the cam- 
pus, the "L" Club for men and the Women's Athletic Association. 

Lebanon Valley is a member of the following national and re- 
gional athletic associations: National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, Middle At- 
lantic States Collegiate Athletic Conference, and Eastern College 
Athletic Conference. 



14 



Admission 



Students are admitted to Lebanon Valley College on the basis of 
scholarly achievement, character, personality, and general ability to 
make profitable use of the college experience. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

1. All communications concerning admission should be addressed 
to the Director of Admissions, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, 
Pennsylvania. 

2. Applications should be submitted as early as possible in the 
latter part of the junior or the beginning of the senior year of high 
school or preparatory school. 

3. Applications should be filed on forms furnished by the Office 
of Admissions. 

4. Each application must be accompanied by an application fee 
of $5.00 which is not refundable. 

5. A transcript of the high school record, on a form provided by 
the College for that purpose, must be sent by the principal directly 
to the Director of Admissions. 

6. A student transferring from another institution must present an 
official transcript of his scholastic record including evidence of hon- 
orable dismissal. 

7. All new students are required to present at the time of registra- 
tion a physician's certificate showing that they have been successfully 
vaccinated within a period of seven years before entrance to college. 

Admission is based on total information submitted by the appli- 
cant or in his behalf. Final decision, therefore, cannot be reached 
until the total information has been supplied by the applicant. 

FACTORS DETERMINING ADMISSION 

Each candidate for admission will be considered individually and 
the decision of the Admissions Committee with respect to admission 
will be based on the following factors: 

1. The transcript of the applicant's secondary school record. 

2. Recommendation by the principal, teachers, and other respon- 
sible persons as to the applicant's special abilities, integrity, sense of 
responsibility, seriousness of purpose, initiative, self-reliance, and 
concern for others. 

3. A personal interview, whenever possible, with the Director of 
Admissions or his designate. 

• 15 . 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

4. The results of examinations which may be required by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions. 

a. It is recommended that applicants take the College En- 
trance Board examinations. 

Conservatory of Music 

An applicant for admission to the Conservatory must be a high 
school graduate and must present four units of English. In addition, 
the applicant must meet the following requirements judged by an 
audition on the campus before members of the Conservatory faculty: 

a. An acceptable singing voice and a fairly quick sense of 
tone and rhythm; 

b. Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair 
degree of accuracy and facility; 

c. Ability to play the piano or some orchestral instrument 
at a level representing two years study. 

RECOMMENDED UNITS FOR ADMISSION 

It is recommended that all candidates offer sixteen units of 
entrance credit acquired by graduation from an accredited secondary 
school or by an equivalancy certificate acquired through examination. 

Ten of the 16 units offered for admission must be from the fol- 
lowing subjects: English, foreign language, mathematics, science, 
social studies. 

An applicant for admission whose preparatory courses do not 
coincide with the college's requirements (see below) may be consid- 
ered by the Committee on Admissions if his academic record is of 
high quality and if, in the opinion of the Committee, he appears 
to be qualified to do satisfactory college work. All entrance de- 
ficiencies must be removed before sophomore status will be granted. 

Applicants for the music education course must give evidence by 
their audition that they possess a reasonable amount of musical intel- 
ligence and accomplishment. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

English 4 units 

*Foreign Language (in one language) 2 

Mathematics 2 

Science (laboratory) 1 

Social Studies 1 

Electives 6 

Total required 16 



* If an applicant (Conservatory excepted) cannot present the two units of for- 
eign language, he will be required to take a minimum of two years of some one 
language in college. His credits for this work will be counted toward graduation 
requirements. 

. 16 • 



CATALOGUE 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

A candidate who applies for advanced standing through credits 
earned at another institution must submit an official transcript of his 
record for evaluation. This transcript should be sent directly to the 
Director of Admissions, Lebanon Valley College, by the Registrar 
of the previous institution, upon the request of the candidate. 

Credits earned at an approved institution will be honored, pro- 
vided they carry a grade of "C" or better and that the work parallels 
courses listed in the college catalogue or can be substituted for 
courses or electives. 

Subject to the conditions listed in the preceding paragraph, Leba- 
non Valley College will recognize for transfer credit a total of 17 
hours of USAFI course work, provided such credit is recommended 
by the American Council of Education's "A Guide to the Evaluation 
of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services." 



17 



Expenses 



Lebanon Valley College is a non-profit institution. The tuition, 
fees, and other expenses paid by the students cover less than seventy- 
five percent of the College's instructional and operating costs. The 
remaining twenty-five per cent is provided by income from the Col- 
lege's endowment and by gifts from the Evangelical United Brethren 
Church, alumni, industry, and friends. The cost to the student is 
kept at the lowest possible minimum consistent with high quality in- 
struction and adequate facilities. 

Tuition, fees, and other charges for the college year 1956-1957 are 
listed below. (For a description of fees, see page 19.) 

ALL STUDENTS 

Application fee $ 5.00 

Tuition 300.00 per semester 

Student Activities fee 25.00 per semester 

Insurance (see Description of Fees, p. 19) . . . 20.00 per year 
I 

RESIDENT STUDENTS ONLY 

Board 187.50 per semester 

Room 77.50 to 85.00 per semester 

Cleaning service charge, men only 5.00 per semester 

Dormitory key fee, men only 1.00 per year 

SPECIAL FEES 

Graduation fee (seniors only) 20.00 

Registration fee for special students 1.00 per semester 

Fee for part-time students (less than 12 hours 

per semester) 20.00 per hour 

*Fee for credit hours in excess of 17 hours per 

semester 15.00 per hour 

Grade Transcript fee (see page 31) 1.00 

The College reserves the right to revise its fees and other charges 
as it may deem necessary. 

PENALTY FEES 

A fee of $5.00 is charged each student who does not register for 
classes during the prescribed registration period. A late pre-registra- 
tion fee in the amount of $10.00 is charged each student who does 
not pre-register during the established time. 



Fractional hours of credit are charged proportionately. 

. 18 • 



CATALOGUE 

MUSIC FEES 

Private music instruction (one-half hour 

per week) $40.00 per semester 

Music instruction, preparatory department 

(one class lesson per week) 20.00 per semester 

Practice rooms, one hour daily 

(for non-music majors) 5.00 per semester 

Practice rooms, each additional hour daily 

(non-music majors) 5.00 per semester 

Organ, one hour daily 35.00 per semester 

Organ, two hours weekly 15.00 per semester 

Band and orchestra instrument rental 7.50 per semester 

DESCRIPTION OF FEES 

An application fee of five dollars must be paid by all students 
entering the College. This fee covers the administrative expense of 
processing the application. It must accompany the application for 
admission and is not refundable. 

Tuition, charged at the rate of $300 per semester, entitles the 
student to 17 semester hours of instruction per semester. 

Payment of the student activities fee of $25 per semester entitles 
a student to the following privileges: use of physical education facili- 
ties and intramural athletic equipment; subscription to the College 
newspaper and yearbook; membership in the Student Christian As- 
sociation and student government associations; admission to home 
intercollegiate athletic contests; and use of College health facilities. 

All students attending the College on a full-time basis are required 
to participate in the Student Sickness and Accident Insurance Plan, 
or to sign a waiver releasing the College from any liability arising 
from accidental injuries sustained by the student on the College 
premises or in any activities in which the College is involved. The 
Insurance Plan costs $20 per year. 

The dormitory key fee is used to defray the annual expense of 
changing locks on the doors of all rooms in the Men's Dormitory. 

A graduation fee of $20 is charged all seniors to cover the cost of 
the diploma and the expenses involved in the commencement exer- 
cises. This fee does not apply to the rental costs of cap and gown. 

LABORATORY FEES 

Biology 49 $ 4.00 per semester 

Biology, all other courses 10.00 per semester 

Chemistry 12, 20, 21, 30, 31, 40, 41 12.00 per semester 

Chemistry 35, 44 16.00 per semester 

Geology 20 5.00 per semester 

Physics 21, 31, 33, 44 10.00 per semester 

Education 30, 41 1.00 per course 

• 19 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Education 40, Elementary Education 40 

(Student Teaching) 40.00 per course 

Music Education 40, 41 (Student Tchng) 20.00 per semester 

Education 45 4.00 per course 

Elementary Education 24, 32 1.50 per course 

Psychology 21, 22, 24 1.00 per course 

Psychology 30 2.00 per course 

Psychology 35, 42 5.00 per course 

Sociology 31 2.00 per course 

Laboratory fees are charged to cover the cost of materials used in 
the laboratories and are not refundable. 

DEPOSITS 

Admission deposit (required of all new 

students $50.00 

Room damage deposit (required of all dormitory 

students) 10.00 per year 

Dormitory room reservation (not required of 

new students) 50.00 per year 

Laboratory breakage deposits: 

Biology, all courses 2.00 per course 

Chemistry 12, 20, 21, 30, 31, 40, 43 5.00 per course 

Chemistry 22, 35, 41, 44 10.00 per course 

The admission deposit of $50 is required of all new students ad- 
mitted to the College, including transfers, and is payable ten days 
after the student has been notified of his admission. Payment of this 
deposit reserves a place for the student in the entering class. The 
admission deposit must be paid by June 1, and is not refundable. 

A room damage deposit in the amount of $10 per year is required 
of all students residing in a dormitory. This deposit is refunded in 
total at the end of the year, provided the occupant of the room has 
not damaged it in any way. If it is determined that a student has 
damaged a room or the furniture in it, only that portion of his 
deposit not used to restore the loss will be returned. 

Dormitory rooms are reserved only for those students who make 
an advance room reservation deposit of $50. This deposit must be 
paid by June 1, and is credited to the student's semester account. It 
is not returned except in case of emergency. This deposit is not 
required of new students whose admission deposit serves the same 
purpose. 

All breakage in the chemical and biological laboratories will be 
charged against the responsible student. Any balance of a laboratory 
breakage deposit due the student at the completion of a particular 
course will be returned to him or credited to his account; any deficit 
beyond the deposit will be charged to his regular college account. 

• 20 • 



CATALOGUE 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

Charges for tuition, board, room, other regular fees, and insurance 
will be issued at the beginning of each semester for the full semester. 
These charges are due and payable on or before the day of registra- 
tion. Bills for all other fees, breakage deposits, and books will be 
issued within thirty days after the beginning of each semester and 
are payable ten days after they are issued. 

Satisfactory settlement of all bills and fees is required before an 
honorable dismissal will be granted or grades released. 

Candidates for degrees must make full settlement of all accounts 
before diplomas will be awarded. 

DEFERRED PAYMENTS 

Parents who prefer to pay tuition and other fees in equal monthly 
installments during the academic year may make such arrangements 
through the Business Office. The cost is slightly higher than when 
payment is made in full at the beginning of each semester. 

REFUND POLICY 

No refund will be allowed on dormitory room rent. 

The unused portion of the cost for board will be refunded begin- 
ning seven days after honorable withdrawal from the College. A stu- 
dent who leaves the College unofficially, that is, without permission 
from the Dean of the College and from the Treasurer, forfeits all 
right to a refund. 

When a student retains his class standing during absence from 
college because of illness or for any other reason, no refund will be 
allowed on tuition or board. In a case of suspension or expulsion 
there will be no refund. 

In the event of absence because of illness which occasions loss of 
class standing, a reasonable refund will be allowed on tuition and 
board. The college refund policy is listed below: 

Period of student's attendance in college % of tuition 

dated from beginning of semester refunded 

One week or less 80% 

Between one and two weeks 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 0% 

DORMITORY ROOMS 

The rent for dormitory rooms varies from $77.50 to $85.00 per 
semester, depending on the type of room selected by the student. 
Occupants of a dormitory room are held responsible for all break- 

• 21 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

age and loss of furniture, or any damage whatever for which the 
students are responsible. 

Each room in the men's dormitory is furnished with a bureau 
and book case, and for each occupant there is a cot, mattress, chair, 
and study table. Students must provide their own bedding, rugs, 
towels, soap, and all other furnishings. 

The men's dormitory is under the supervision of a member of the 
College staff who occupies a suite of rooms in the building. 

A reception room is provided on the first floor of each dormitory 
for the accommodation of parents and other visitors. 

Each room in the women's dormitories is furnished with a bed, 
mattress, chair, dresser, book case, and study table. All other desired 
furnishings must be supplied by the student. 

All students to whom rooms are assigned are strictly forbidden to 
sublet their rooms to commuting students or to others for a money or 
any other consideration. 

Should vacancies develop in any of the dormitories, the College 
reserves the right to require students previously rooming in Annville 
to move into a dormitory. 

The College reserves the right to close all the dormitories during 
vacations. 

Lounges are provided by the College for commuting students. 



22 



Financial Aid 



Lebanon Valley College gives financial assistance to deserving 
students in so far as its scholarship and aid funds permit. In the 
assignment of scholarships and grants-in-aid, and in the granting of 
loans and other forms of assistance the scholarship record, personal 
character, general cooperation, and need of the individual are 
considered. 

Scholarships do not apply to accounts for tuition for extra hours 
taken. In general, scholarships are not applicable to summer school. 
No scholarship or rebate will be granted for less than a semester. 

Application — Students in need of financial assistance may apply 
for such aid after they have been notified of their admission to the 
College. Application for aid should be made to the Chairman of 
the Scholarship Committe on forms provided by the College. 

Eligibility — Scholarships may be granted for periods of from one 
to four academic years. Grants-in-aid and loans are made for the 
period of one academic year or less, but students may reapply for 
subsequent years. Financial aid for returning students is dependent 
upon satisfactory scholarship for the preceding semester. 

Payment — All scholarships and grants-in-aid awarded for a specific 
school year are payable in two equal installments, one in each semes- 
ter. Work aids are paid upon certification that the work is completed. 

COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Competitive scholarship examinations are conducted at the College 
each year. Any high school senior, in the upper third of his respec- 
tive class, who meets the College's admission requirements is eligible 
to participate. Information may be procured by writing to the 
Director of Admissions. 

Recipients of competitive scholarships are required to complete 
their undergraduate work at Lebanon Valley College or refund the 
used portion of the grant to the College before they can transfer 
credits to another undergraduate school. 

Scholarships won in the Competitive Examinations, or granted 
for high scholastic standing, can be retained only if the student main- 
tains an average grade of "B" or higher. 

THE KIFT-MULLEN MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Kift-Mullen Memorial Foundation Scholarships are available 
to college students and seniors who are graduates of Allentown High 

• 23 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

School preparing to become teachers in the public and parochial 
schools. Awards in the amount of $200.00 are made by July 1 of 
each school year. 

TUITION REBATES 

Students preparing for the ministry of the Evangelical United 
Brethren Church and who live in a college dormitory will be 
entitled to an annual reduction of $220.00 in tuition. Commuting 
students preparing for the ministry will be entitled to an annual 
reduction of $120.00 under the same conditions. 

Ministers' children are entitled to an annual reduction of $90.00 
on full-tuition unless they are commuting students, in which case 
they are entitled to a reduction of $45.00. 

GRANTS-IN-AID 

Grants-in-aid are defined as credit on tuition allowed students and 
come directly from college operating income instead of from special 
gifts or restricted endowment funds. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF-SUPPORT 

Financial assistance is available in the form of waiterships, janitor- 
ships, laboratory aids, clerical aids, work in the library and other 
forms of work assignments. These are granted to deserving students 
on the basis of the college's needs. 

LOANS 

Income from endowment established as loan funds is available as 
loans to deserving students. A student may borrow a maximum of 
$200.00 in any one year and a total of $600.00 during his college 
career. Loans are interest free during the period while the student 
is in college. Interest at a nominal rate is charged following gradua- 
tion or withdrawal fom college. Student loan funds are listed below: 

Mary A. Dodge Fund $11,361.36 

Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 514.66 

Evangelical United Brethren Church Loan Fund 5,144.33 

Henry B. Stehman Fund 2,108.71 

Alumni Giving Fund 4,867.96 

Charles E. Merrill Fund 554.10 

Paul S. Wagner Fund 223.02 

OTHER ENDOWMENT ADDS 

In addition to the student loan funds there are a number of other 
endowment aids established at the College. They are as follows: 

• 24 • 



CATALOGUE 

Professorships 

Chair of Bible and Greek Testament $15,230.00 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin Lan- 
guage and Literature 25,000.00 

John Evans Lehman Chair of Mathematics 36,430.00 

Rev. J. B. Weidler Fund 200.00 

Scholarships 

Allegheny Conference C. E. Society, Scholarship $ 1,000.00 

Alumni Scholarship Fund 6,760.00 

Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 1 ,000.00 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial Sunday 

School Scholarship 3,000.00 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Bender Scholarship Fund 1,800.00 

The Andrew Bender Chemistry Scholarship Fund 1 ,500.00 

Biological Scholarship Fund 2,517.00 

Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 8,476.65 

Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 500.00 

I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award Fund 2,000.00 

The Collegiate Scholarship Fund of the Evangelical 

United Brethren Church 4,000.00 

Isaiah H. Daugherty and Benjamin P. Raab Memorial 

Scholarship 1,500.00 

United States Senator James J. Davies Scholarship Fund 100.00 

S. H. and Jennie Derickson Scholarship Fund 6,847.22 

William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 600.00 

East Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship 3,000.00 

East Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 5,000.00 

Samuel F. and Agnes B. Engle Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 3,300.00 

Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Jacob F. Greasley Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 2,120.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Sunday School Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 400.00 

H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Henry G. and Anna S. Kauffman and Family Scholar- 
ship Fund 1,000.00 

John A. H. Keith Fund 100.00 

Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1,020.00 

Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. Kleffman Scholar- 
ship Fund 1,000.00 

. 25 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The A. S. Kreider Ministerial Fund 15,000.00 

W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Lebanon Steel Foundry Foundation Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

The Lorenz Benevolent Fund 7,500.00 

Mrs. Savilla Loux Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lykens Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Mechanicsburg U. B. Sunday School Scholarship 2,000.00 

Medical Scholarship Fund 245.00 

Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 500.00 

Elizabeth May Meyer Musical Scholarship Fund 1,550.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

The Harry E. Miller Scholarship Fund 250.00 

Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 5,500.00 

The Ministerial Student Aid Gift Fund of the E. U. B. 

Church 1,396.81 

Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 225.00 

Neidig Memorial Church Ministerial Scholarship Fund 350.00 

Grace U. B. Church of Penbrook, Pa., Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania Branch W. M. A. Scholarship Fund .... 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship 4,465.00 

Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 1,300.00 

Philadelphia Alumni Scholarship Fund 611.22 

Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 6,380.00 

Quincy E. U. B. Orphanage and Home Scholarship 

Fund 5,000.00 

Ezra G. Rank and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 300.00 

Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

The Rev. and Mrs. Cawley H. Stine Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 
Washington, D. C, Memorial E.U.B. Ministerial 

Fund 1,573.65 

Books for Library 

Library Fund of Class of 1916 $ 1,350.00 

Maintenance of Buildings 

Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room Fund $ 200.00 

Other Funds 

Class of 1928 Prize for Proficiency in English $ 835.00 

Rev. John P. Cowling Memorial Fund 1,000.00 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 2,000.00 

Max F. Lehman Prize in Freshman Mathematics 400.00 

Henry H. Baish Memorial Fund for Annual History 

Prize 1,000.00 

Dr. Warren H. Fake and Mabel A. Fake Science Me- 
morial Fund 10,000.00 

Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial Award in Music .... 479.56 



26 



Academic Procedures 



REGISTRATION 

All students are expected to register for classes on official registra- 
tion days of each semester and at designated pre-registration times. 
Information concerning official registration days is listed in the col- 
lege calendar, pages 4-5. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Students registering later than the days specified will be charged 
a fee of five dollars. Students desiring to register later than one 
week after the opening of the semester will be admitted only by 
special permission of the Dean of the College. A fee of $10.00 for late 
pre-registration will be charged students who do not pre-register dur- 
ing the designated time. 

CHANGE OF REGISTRATION 

Change of registration, when necessary, must be made over the 
signature of the adviser. Registration for a course will not be per- 
mitted after the close of the second week of the session. Students may 
withdraw from courses any time within the first six weeks of a 
semester without prejudice. 

FRESHMEN ORIENTATION 

Several days are set apart at the beginning of the college year for 
the purpose of helping new students to become familiar with their 
academic surroundings. This period is devoted to lectures, place- 
ment tests, social activities, and informal meetings with members of 
the faculty. New students are acquainted with the college traditions 
and are advised concerning methods of study and the use of the 
library. 

During the first semester, freshmen are required to attend a series 
of lectures and discussions on campus activities. 

ENROLLMENT AND CREDITS 

The college reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any 
course for which an insufficient number of students have registered. 

CONCURRENT COURSES 

A student enrolled for a degree at Lebanon Valley College may 
not carry courses concurrently at any other institution without the 
consent of his major adviser. Neither may a regular student carry 

• 27 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

courses concurrently in the Evening or Extension Division of the 
College without the permission of the major adviser. 

A student registered at Lebanon Valley College may not obtain 
credit for courses taken in other colleges during the summer unless 
such courses have prior approval of the major adviser. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Each student is assigned to a faculty adviser who serves in the 
capacity of friendly counselor. 

The student, before registering for the second year, or the third 
year, at the latest, must choose a department in which to pursue 
work of special concentration. This department shall be known as 
his major. The head of the department in which a student has elected 
to major becomes the adviser for that student. The adviser's approval 
is necessary before a student may register for or enter upon any 
course of study, or discontinue any work. 

ARRANGEMENT OF SCHEDULES 

Each student arranges his course of study in consultation with, and 
approval of, his faculty adviser. Students already in attendance do 
this during pre-registration periods. For information concerning fac- 
ulty advisers, new students will consult lists posted by the Registrar 
on registration days at the beginning of each semester. 

LIMIT OF HOURS 

To be qualified as a full-time student at least 12 semester hours of 
work must be taken. Seventeen semester hours of work is the maxi- 
mum permitted without special permission of the Dean of the Col- 
lege. The privilege of carrying extra hours will be granted only for 
compelling reasons and only when a satisfactory grade level has 
been maintained for the previous semester. An extra charge will be 
made for all hours above seventeen. 

ACADEMIC CLASSIFICATION 

Classification of students is made at the end of each semester. 
Membership in the sophomore, junior, or senior classes is granted to 
students who have obtained the normal number of semester hours 
and quality points of the class to which admission is sought, or who, 
if lacking in credit, do not fall short of the regular amount by more 
than six semester hours and twelve quality points. For enrollment in 
the sophomore class a student must have earned 30 semester hours 
and 60 quality points (new system); in the junior class, 60 semester 
hours and 120 quality points; in the senior class, 90 semester hours 
and 180 quality points. 

• 28 • 



CATALOGUE 

COUNSELING AND PLACEMENT 

Lebanon Valley College recognizes as part of its responsibility to 
its students the need for providing sound educational, vocational, 
and personal counseling. These services are under the supervision of 
trained psychologists. Measures of interest, ability, aptitude and per- 
onality, in addition to other counseling techniques, are utilized in 
an effort to help each student come to a fuller realization of his total 
personality. An important part of the counseling program consists of 
a series of lectures and discussions conducted as a non-credit course 
for freshmen. 

In addition to administering tests during freshmen week, Lebanon 
Valley College is an approved center for nationally administered 
tests such as the Graduate Record Examination, and the National 
Sophomore Testing Program. 

The college maintains a placement bureau which aids students in 
procuring part-time employment while in college, and in obtaining 
positions upon graduation. A current file is maintained which con- 
tains information about positions in various companies and institu- 
tions, Civil Service opportunities and examinations, entrance to pro- 
fessional schools, and assistantships. Representatives of various busi- 
nesses and industries visit the campus annually to interview seniors 
for prospective employment. 



29 



Summer School, Extension, and 
Evening Courses 



Through summer sessions, extension classes, and evening classes, 
Lebanon Valley College has for many years enabled teachers, state 
employees, and others in active employment to attend college courses 
and secure academic degrees. By a careful selection of courses made 
in consultation with the heads of departments in the College, a stu- 
dent can meet the course and residence requirements for a bacca- 
laureate degree. 

Students in regular attendance may, by taking summer school 
courses, meet the requirements for the bachelor's degree in three 
years. 

Courses in the following subjects will be offered in the Summer 
School of 1956, and in extension and evening classes in 1956-1957; 
Biology, Economics and Business Administration, Chemistry, Educa- 
tion, Elementary Education, Engineering, English, Forestry, French, 
German, History, Mathematics, Medical Technology, Music Educa- 
tion, Nursing, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, 
Sociology, and Spanish. 

Extension classes are offered in the William Penn High School, 
Third and Division Streets, Harrisburg, on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 P.M. Exten- 
sion classes are also offered at the Harrisburg General Hospital. 
Lebanon Valley's extension program in Harrisburg is carried on in 
conjunction with Elizabethtown College and Temple University. 

Extension and evening classes will begin during the week of 
September 17, 1956. 

For details pertaining to Summer School, Extension and Evening 
Courses, write to Dr. Carl Y. Ehrhart, Director of Auxiliary Schools. 

In 1956 Summer School will begin on June 11 and will consist of 
two sessions, of six weeks each. 

A course in Student Teaching, S-40, will be offered in the 1956 
Summer Session at Hershey, Pennsylvania. This course is designed 
to meet the minimum requirements for Pennsylvania certification 
in secondary public school teaching. 



30 



Administrative Regulations 



The rules of the College are designed to provide for proper regula- 
tion of the academic community. It is expected that the conduct of 
all campus citizens will conform to accepted standards. The posses- 
sion of an alcoholic beverage on the campus will be construed as a 
major offense and will be dealt with accordingly. It is likewise a 
major offense for any student to appear on the campus while under 
the influence of liquor. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Each student is expected to attend every session of the courses for 
which he is registered. 

If the student shall absent himself without cause he shall be re- 
ported to the Registrar's Office. If he continues to absent himself 
without cause, the instructor shall notify the student's faculty adviser 
and the Dean of the College. The adviser will counsel with the 
student regarding his work. If the absence is repeated the instructor 
will discuss this matter with the Dean of the College. The Dean of 
the College will confer with the student and notify the parents. If 
the absence is continued the instructor may drop the student from his 
roll with the consent of the Dean of the College. 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 

Chapel service is conducted once a week. Attendance is required 
of all full-time students. Three absences are allowed during a 
semester. For each additional unexcused absence one hour will be 
added to the required hours for graduation. 

HAZING 

Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infringement by members of 
other classes upon the personal rights of freshmen as individuals is 
interpreted as hazing. 

STUDENT PARKING 

All cars owned or operated by Lebanon Valley College students 
shall be registered with the Senate Parking Committee. Violations of 
parking regulations established by the Senate Parking Committee 
may result in fines. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Each student, former student, or graduate is entitled to one tran- 
script of his college record without charge. For each copy after the 
first, a fee of one dollar is charged. 

. 31 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

REGULATIONS REGARDING STUDENTS ON 
ACADEMIC PROBATION 

1. A student who does not pass, with a C average, at least 60% of 
his academic load per semester may be placed on probation. 

2. A student may be placed on academic probation whenever the 
character of his work is such as to indicate that the student is in 
danger of failing to complete the work necessary for graduation. 

3. A student placed on probation, who fails to pass all of his work 
and who does not have a C average for the semester, may be subject 
to suspension from the college for the semester following, or subject 
to dismissal. In case of suspension he may be permitted to apply 
for readmission. 

4. A student placed on academic probation will be notified of 
such status by the Dean of the College and informed of the college 
regulations governing probationers. Thereafter, infraction of these 
regulations renders the student liable to dismissal. 

5. When a student is put on probation, faculty and parents will 
be notified by the Dean of the College. The Dean of the College 
may terminate the period of probation of any student. Uusually 
this occurs at the end of a final marking period. 

6. Students on probation are required to regulate their work and 
their time so as to make a most determined effort to bring their 
work up to the required standard. 

7. The conduct of the probationer is governed by the following 
rules: 

a. No unexcused class absences will be permitted. 

b. Any office or activity in any college organization that in- 
volves such expenditure of time as to jeopardize the suc- 
cessful prosecution of academic work must be given up. 



32 




Administration Building 




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Requirements for Degrees 



Lebanon Valley College confers five bachelors degrees. They are: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chem- 
istry, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon students 
who complete the requirements for graduation in the following 
areas, and who are recommended by the Faculty and approved by 
the Board of Trustees: English, French, German, Greek, History, 
Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, 
Sociology, or Spanish. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon students 
who complete the requirements in the following areas, and who are 
recommended by the Faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees: 
Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Economics and Business 
Administration, Music Education, Arts-Engineering, Arts-Forestry, 
and Elementary Education. 

The professional degrees of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor of Science in Medical 
Technology will be conferred upon students who complete the re- 
quirements in the respective professional areas and who are recom- 
mended by the Faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees. 

For detailed information see pages 36-53. 

SEMESTER HOURS 

The requirements for degrees are stated in "semester hours credit" 
which are based upon the satisfactory completion of courses of in- 
struction. Generally, one semester hour credit is given for each class 
hour a week through a semester. In courses requiring laboratory 
work, not less than two hours of laboratory work a week through a 
semester will be required for a semester hour credit. A semester is a 
term of approximately seventeen weeks. 

Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 126 semester 
hours credit in academic work, and in addition 4 semester hours in 
physical education, making a total of 130 semester hours. It is under- 
stood, however, that a student who has a physical disability may be 
excused (on recommendation from the college physician) from the 
requirement in physical education without being obliged to substi- 
tute other work in order to bring his total of semester hours from 
126 to 130. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

MAJOR AND MINOR 

As a part of the total requirement of 130 semester hours every 
candidate must present at least 24 semester hours in one department 
(to be known as his Major), and at least 18 semester hours of course 
work in one department (to be known as his Minor).* Both Major 
and Minor may be selected before registration for the sophomore 
year and must be selected before beginning the junior year. The 
minor must be chosen with the advice and approval of the chairman 
of the major department. A student who is accepted as a major in 
any department has a right to remain in that department as long as 
he is in college. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

Degrees will be conferred only upon candidates who have earned 
at least 30 semester hours in residence. Credits earned in evening 
classes and summer school work are residence credit. 

QUALITY POINTS 

Candidates for degrees also must obtain a minimum of 130 quality 
points computed in accordance with the grading system indicated 
below. Beginning with the graduates of the Class of 1958 all can- 
didates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 260 quality points 
computed in accordance with the revised grading system indicated 
below. 

SYSTEM OF GRADING AND QUALITY POINTS 

The work of a student in each subject is graded A, B, C, D, or F. 
These grades have the following meanings: A, distinguished; B, good; 
C, average; D, passing; F, failing, student must drop or repeat the 
subject. When a grade of F has been received, the student may not 
proceed with any part of the course dependent upon the part in 
which the grade of F has been received. If a student fails twice in a 
subject, he may not register for it a third time. For each semester 
hour credit in a course in which a student is graded A he receives 3 
quality points; B, 2; and C, 1. D carries credit but no quality points. 
A grade of F shall entail a loss of 1 quality point per credit hour. 
(Effective 1954-55 for all new students, the following quality point 
grading system will be used: for each semester hour credit in a course 
in which a student is graded A he receives 4 quality points; B, 3; C, 
2; and D, 1; F carries no credit and no quality points.) In addition 
to the above grades the symbols "I", "W", "WP", and "WF" are 



* Students enrolled in professional curricula, such as Music Education, Economics 
and Business Administration, Industrial Chemistry, Elementary Education and cer- 
tain other pre-professional curricula are not required to take a Minor. 

• 34 . 



CATALOGUE 

used on grade reports and in die College records. "I" indicates that 
the work is incomplete (that the student has postponed with the 
consent of the instructor, certain required work), but otherwise 
satisfactory. This work must be completed within the semester fol- 
lowing, or the "I" will be converted to an F. 

W indicates withdrawal from a course any time within the first 
six weeks of a semester without prejudice to the student's standing. 
In case of withdrawal from a course, the symbol WP will be entered 
if the student's work is satisfactory, and WF if his work is unsatis- 
factory. The mark WP will be considered as without prejudice to the 
student's standing, but the mark WF will be counted as a grade of 
50 in averaging the grades. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students transferring from other institutions must secure an 
average grade of C or better (a quality point of at least 2.0) in work 
taken at Lebanon Valley College. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS* 

Dept.&No. Course Title Sem. Hours 

English 10 Composition 6 

Foreign Language 10 French, German, Spanish 6 

Integrated Studies 20 Humanities 8 

Integrated Studies 30 Social Studies 8 

History 24 U. S. and Penna. History 6 
Phys. Education 10 and 

Phys. Education 20 Health and Physical Education 4 

Psychology 20 General Psychology 3 
Religion 10 or 

Religion 11 Introduction to Religion 4 

Religion 32 Teachings of Jesus 2 

or or or 

Philosophy 31 Philosophy of Religion 3 

Science General Biology, Chemistry, or 

Physics 8 

Candidates for a B.S. degree with a major in Science must take 
the basic course in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics. 
For requirements in special curricula see pages 36-53. 



* These requirements do not apply to the students registered for the Bachelor of 
Science degree with a Major in Music Education. 



35 



Special Plans of Study in Preparation 
for Professions 1 



CHEMISTRY 

Adviser: Dr. Neidig 

Curriculum Leading to the Degree of B.S. in Chemistry 

This program meets all of the requirements of the American 

Chemical Society for the training of chemists for industry and for 
advanced study. 

. Hours Credit 

First Year lst Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Chemistry 12 4 4 

English lOa-lOb 3 3 

Language 10 3 3 

Mathematics 10 3 3 

Orientation 11, Health Education 11 

Physical Education 10 1 1 

Religion 10 or 11 2 2 

Second Year 

Chemistry 20 and 21 4 4 

Humanities 20 4 4 

Mathematics 11 4 4 

Physical Education 20 1 1 

Psychology 20 3 — 

Religion 32 — 2 

Third Year 

Chemistry 22 4 4 

Integrated Studies 30 4 4 

Mathematics 3 3 

Physics 20 4 4 

Electives 2 2 

Fourth Year 

Chemistry 40 4 4 

Chemistry 44 2 2 

History 24a-24b 3 3 

Electives 6 6 

Nine additional hours of Chemistry should be elected from Chemistry 

30, 31, 34, 41 or 43. Students who plan to take graduate work should ac- 
quire a reading knowledge of French and German. 



1 For the special course in Music, see page 101. 

• 36 . 



CATALOGUE 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Adviser: Associate Professor Riley 

Suggested program for majors in Economics and Business 
Administration 



First Year 



_,. „ Hours 

First Semester Credit 

Orientation 

Economics 10 3 

Mathematics 19 3 

English 10a 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Chemistry 12 or Biology 12 4 

Physical Education 10 .... 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Hours 
Credit 



Economics 11 3 

Mathematics 12 3 

English 10b 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Chemistry 12 or Biology 12 4 

Physical Education 10 ... . 1 

17 



Second Year 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

Religion 10a or 11a 2 

Humanities 20 4 

Economics 20 3 

Economics 23 4 

Physical Education 20 ... . 1 
History 24a 3 



17 



, _ Hours 

Second Semester Credit 

Religion 10b or lib 2 

Humanities 20 4 

Economics 20 3 

Economics 23 4 

Physical Education 20 ... . 1 

History 24b 3 

17 



Third Year 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 



Economics 32 3 

Economics 36 3 

Social Studies 30 4 

Psychology 20 3 

Political Science 10a 3 

16 



Hours 

Second Semester Credit 

Economics 32 3 

Economics 37 3 

Social Studies 30 4 

Philosophy 31 3 or 2 

or Religion 32 

Electives 3 or 4 



16 



Fourth Year 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

Economics 48 3 

Economics 34 or 44 3 

Economics 40-1 or 46 3 

Electives 6 



Hours 

Second Semester Credit 

Economics 49 3 

Economics 35 or 45 3 

Economics 38 or 40-2 3 

Electives 6 



15 



15 



37 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Advisor: Mr. Ebersole 

Suggested program for majors in Elementary Education. 



First Year 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

English 10a — Composition . 3 

Language 10 3 

Religion 10a — Intro. Engl. 

Bible 2 

Biology 12a — General 4 

Health & Phys. Ed. 10.... 1 

Education 20— -Intro, to Ed. 3 

16 



Second Semester 



Hours 
Credit 
English 10b — Composition . 3 

Language 10 3 

Religion 10b — Intro. Engl. 

Bible 2 

Biology 12b — General 4 

Health & Phys. Ed. 10 1 

El. Ed. 12 — Orientation and 

Curriculum 3 

16 



Second Year 



First Semester 

Humanities 20 

History 24a — U.S. and Penna. 

Psychology 20 — General . . . 

El. Ed. 21 — Intro, to Music 

El. Td. 23— Teach, of Nat. 
Science 

Phys. Ed. 22— Games & Ac- 
tivities for Elementary 
Grades 



Hours 
Credit 

4 
3 
3 
3 



17 



Second Semester Credit 

Humanities 20 4 

History 24b— U.S. and Penna. 3 

Psychology 23 — Educational 3 

El. Ed. 22— Teach, of Music 3 

El. Ed. 24 — Exploring Art. . 3 
Phys. Ed. 23 — Exhibitions 
and Demonstrations for 

Elem. Grades 1 



17 



Third Year 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

Social Studies 30 4 

Pol. Sci. 10a — American 

Gov't 3 

El. Ed. 31— Teach, of Arith. 3 

El. Ed. 32— Teaching of Art 3 

Geography 10 3 

16 



Second Semester Credit 

Social Studies 30 4 

Pol. Sci. 10b — American 

Gov't 3 

El. Ed. 33— Teach, of Soc. 

Studies 3 

English 22 — Public Speaking 2 

Geography 10 3 

Relig. 32 — Teachings of 

Jesus 2 

16 



38 



CATALOGUE 

Fourth Year 
_. Hours . Hours 

First Semester Credit second Semester Credit 

El. Ed. 41— Teach, of Read- El. Ed. 40— Student Teach. 9 

ing and Language Arts.. 4 El. Ed. 43 — Health and 

Child Psychology 3 Safety Education 3 

El. Ed. 30 — Ed. Measure- Electives 5 

ments for Elementary — 

Teaching 3 17 

Education 45 — Audio Visual 
Aids 3 

Elective 4 

17 



39 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Advisor: Mr. Gilmore 

Lebanon Valley College offers a cooperative program in Engineer- 
ing whereby a student may achieve a liberal arts degree from Leba- 
non Valley College and also an engineering degree from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

A student electing to pursue this curriculum spends the first three 
years in residence at Lebanon Valley College. At the end of these 
three years he will, if recommended, go to the University of Penn- 
sylvania for two additional years of work in engineering. At the 
successful completion of the five years of study, the student will 
receive two degrees: one from Lebanon Valley College (the Bachelor 
of Science degree) and an engineering degree from the University 
of Pennsylvania. 



Recommended curriculum for 3-2 Cooperative Plan in Engineering 

First Year 



_. _, Hours 

First Semester Credit 

English 10a — Composition . 3 
Chemistry 10 — Inorganic 

and Qual. Analysis 5 

Math. 10 — Mathematical 

Analysis 3 

Language 10 3 

Religion 11a — Intro, to 

Religion 2 

Health and Phys. Ed. 10... 1 



17 



Second Semester Credit 

English 10b — Composition . 3 
Chemistry 10 — Inorganic 

and Qual. Analysis 5 

Math. 10 — Mathematics 

Analysis 3 

Language 10 3 

Religion 11a — Intro, to 

Religion 2 

Health and Phys. Ed. 10. . . 1 



17 



Second Year 



_. _ Hours 

First Semester Credit 

Math. 11 Analyt. Geom. 

& Calculus 4 

Physics 20, 21— General ... 4 
Gen. Ed. 20— The Hu- 
manities 4 

Physical Education 20 ... . 1 

Psychology 20 — General ... 3 
Religion 32 — Teachings of 

Jesus 2 



18 



Hours 
Credit 



Second Semester 
Math. 11 — Anal. Geom. & 

Calculus 4 

Physics 20, 21— General ... 4 
Gen. Ed. 20— The Hu- 
manities 4 

Physical Education 20 1 

Engineering Drawing 3 



16 



40 



CATALOGUE 



Third Year 



r . r> Hours 

First Semester Credit 

Gen. Ed. 30— The Social 

Studies 4 

Physics 33 — Electrical Meas- 
urements 1 

Physics 32 — Magnetism 8c 

Electricity 3 

Mathematics 22 — Adv. 

Calculus 3 

History 24a— U.S. and Penna. 3 
Electives 3 



Second Semester Credit 

Gen. Ed. 30— The Social 

Studies 4 

Physics 33 — Electrical Meas- 
urements 1 

*Physics 45 — Modern Physics 3 
Mathematics 23 — Ordinary 

Diff . Equations 3 

History 24b— U.S. and Pa. 3 

Electives 3 



17 



17 



Chemical Engineers add courses as follows: 



Hours 
Credit 
Chem. 21 — Quantitative 

Analysis 2 

Physics 40 — Analytical 

Mechanics 3 



Hours 
Credit 

Chem. 21 — Quantitative 

Analysis 2 

Elective 2 



Metallurgical Engineers add courses as follows: 



Hours 
Credit 
Chem. 21 — Quantitative 

Analysis 2 

Physics 40 — Analytical 

Mechanics 3 



Hours 
Credit 

Chem. 21 — Quantitative 

Analysis , . . 2 

Elective 2 



Electrical Engineers add courses as follows: 



Hours 
Credit 
Physics 40 — Analytical 

Mechanics 3 

Elective 2 



Elective 



Hours 
Credit 
. 4 



Civil Engineers add courses as follows: 

Hours 
Credit 

Physics 40 — Analytical 

Mechanics 3 

Elective 2 



Physics 40 — Analytical 
Mechanics 



Hours 
Credit 



Mechanical Engineers add courses as follows: 



Hours 
Credit 

Physics 40 — Analytical 

Mechanics 3 

Elective 2 



Physics 40 — Analytical 
Mechanics 



Hours 
Credit 



Not required for Civil Engineers. 



41 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

COOPERATIVE FORESTRY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Mr. Bollinger 

Lebanon Valley College offers a program in forestry in coopera- 
tion with the School of Forestry of Duke University. Upon successful 
completion of a five-year coordinated course of study, a student will 
have earned the Bachelor of Science degree from Lebanon Valley 
College and the professional degree of Master of Forestry from the 
Duke School of Forestry. 

A student electing to pursue this curriculum spends the first three 
years in residence at Lebanon Valley College. Here he obtains a 
sound education in the humanities and other liberal arts in addition 
to the sciences basic to forestry. Such an education does more than 
prepare a student for his later professional training; it offers him 
an opportunity to develop friendships with students in many fields, 
expand his interests, broaden his perspective, and fully develop his 
potentialities. 

The student devotes the last two years of his program to the pro- 
fessional forestry curriculum of his choice at the Duke School of For- 
estry. Since Duke offers forestry courses only to senior and graduate 
students, the student from Lebanon Valley finds himself associating 
with a mature student body. He is well prepared for further per- 
sonal and professional development. 

Candidates for the forestry program should indicate to the Direc- 
tor of Admissions of Lebanon Valley College that they wish to apply 
for the Liberal Arts-Forestry Curriculum. Admission to the Col- 
lege is granted under the same conditions as for other curricula. At 
the end of the first semester of the third year the College will rec- 
ommend qualified students for admission to the Duke School of 
Forestry. Each recommendation will be accompanied by the stu- 
dent's application for admission and a transcript of his academic 
record at Lebanon Valley College. No application need be made 
to the School of Forestry prior to this time. 

The following course of study indicates the nature of work to be 
taken under this program. Each student selects one of the curricula 
indicated for the fifth year. 

Curriculum for Lebanon Valley College 

First Year Hours Credit 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

English lOa-lOb 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

General Biology 18a-18b 4 4 

Religion 10a-l Ob or 11 a-1 lb 2 2 

Mathematics 10a, 10b or 11 3-4 3-4 

Physical Education 1 1 

Orientation 

16-17 16-17 

. 42 • 



CATALOGUE 



Second Year 



Foreign Language (or elective) 

Chemistry 10 

Humanities 20 

History 24a-24b 

Physical Education 

Geology 20a-20b 



Hours 


Credit 


1st Sem. 


2nd Sem. 


3 


3 


5 


5 


4 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 



Third Year 



Social Studies 30 

Physics 20, 21 

Economics 20 

Psychology 20 

Religion 32 or Philosophy 31 
Electives 



Hours 


Credit 


1st Sem. 


2nd Sem. 


4 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 






2 or 3 


3 


4-3 



17 



17 



Suggested subjects for electives 

Biology 28a-28b (Botany) 
Organic Chemistry 20 
Economics 23 
English 22, 23 



Philosophy 21 
Biology 22 (Genetics) 
Biology 34 (Plant Physiology) 
Biology 33 (Introduction to 
Forestry) 



Professional Forestry Curricula at the Duke School of Forestry 

Summer Forestry Field Work (Prerequisite to fourth year courses) 

Plane Surveying 4 

Forest Surveying 5 

Forest Mensuration 4 

13 



Fourth Year 



Dendrology; Forest Pathology 

Anatomy of Wood; Sampling Methods 

Forest Soils: Silvics 

Economics of Forestry 

Harvesting and Processing Forest Products 
Electives 



Hours Credit 
1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 



15 



3 
3 
3 

4 
2 

15 



43 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Fifth Year 
General Forestry Curriculum 

Hours Credit 
1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Forest Entomology 3 

Silviculture 3 

Applied Silviculture 1 

Forest Protection 2 

Forest Management 3 

Thesis research and electives 3 9 

Soils and Silviculture Spring Trip 1 

Forest Valuation 3 

Management Plans 2 



15 



15 



Forest Products Curriculum 



Seasoning and Preservation . 

Silviculture 

Forest Management 

Advanced Forest Utilization 
Thesis research and electives 
Forest Products Entomology 

Properties of Wood 

Industrial Engineering 



Hours 


Credit 


1st Sem. 


2nd Sem. 


3 




3 




3 




3 




3 


6 




3 




3 




3 


15 


15 



44 



CATALOGUE 



PRELAW CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Professor Laughlin 
The following curriculum is recommended for students intending 

to enter a law school. 

First Year 

First Semester ^ 0U J S 

Credit 
Biology 12 or Chemistry 12 4 



Second Semester 



English 10a 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Orientation 

Physical Education 10 ... . 1 

Political Science 10a 3 

Religion 10a or 11a 2 



Hours 
Credit 
Biology 12 or Chemistry 12 4 

English 10b 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 10 1 

Political Science 10b 3 

Religion 10b or lib 2 



16 
Second Year 



16 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

Economics 20 3 

Humanities 20 4 

•Foreign Language 3 

Physical Education 20 1 

Political Science 20 3 

Psychology 20 3 



Second Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

Economics 20 3 

Humanities 20 4 

•Foreign Language 3 

Philosophy 11 3 

Physical Education 20 1 

Political Science 21 3 



17 

Third Year 



17 



First Semester *? ou " 

Credit 
Econ. 32 — Business Law . . 3 

History 24a 3 

Political Science 30 3 

Sociology 20 3 

Integrated Studies 30 4 



Second Semester 



Hours 
Credit 
Econ. 32 — Business Law . . 3 

History 24b 3 

Political Science 31 3 

Sociology 21 3 

Integrated Studies 30 4 



16 
Fourth Year 



16 



First Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

History 31 3 

Political Science 32 2 

Political Science 40 3 

Religion 32 or 

Philosophy 31 2 or 3 

Sociology 33 3 

Electives 3 



Second Semester 



Hours 
Credit 

History 32 3 

Political Science 41 3 

Sociology 30 3 

Electives 6 

15 



16 or 17 



Major — Political Science 



Note: Math. 10 (Math. Analysis) and 19 (Math, of Finance) are recommended as 
valuable in connection with the statistical and accounting problems of legal practice; 
also Econ. 23 (Accounting). 

* See catalogue statement on page 35 regarding foreign language requirements. 



45 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Dr. Wilson 

The following course of study is outlined for those desiring to 
qualify for admission to medical schools. 

The pre-medical course includes all of the subjects required for 
admission to medical schools which require a collegiate degree for 
admission, and fulfills the requirements of the College for the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The student is enrolled in the pre- 
medical curriculum. 

The student should maintain a standard of not less than "B" in 
required courses and a grade point average of not less than 1.50 in 
all subjects in order to obtain the scholastic recommendation of the 
College for admission to a medical school. 



Four-Year Course 



First Year 



Hours 
Credit 
Religion 10a- 10b or 

lla-llb 4 

Chemistry 10 or 12 10 

English lOa-lOb 6 

French 10 or German 10 1 . . 6 
Mathematics 10a, 10b, or 11 6 
Health and Phys. Ed. 10 . . 2 
Orientation 11 



Second Year 



Hours 
Credit 

Biology 18 8 

Humanities 20 8 

Psychology 20 3 

Chemistry 22 8 

Physical Education 20 ... . 2 
Electives 5 

34 



Third Year 



34 

Hours 
Credit 

Chemistry 20 and 21 8 

Social Studies 8 

Physics 20 and 21 8 

Electives 10 

34 



Fourth Year 



Hours 
Credit 

Biology 31, 32 or 45 8 

History 24a-24b 6 

Biology 48a-48b 8 

Rel. 32 or Phil. 31 . . 2 or 3 
Electives 10 or 9 



34 



1 A few medical schools require both French and German. 



46 



CATALOGUE 

PRE-DENTAL CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Dr. Wilson 

The course of study for Pre-Dental students meets the require- 
ments for admission to all Dental Schools and fulfills the require- 
ments of the college for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

The course of study for four-year Pre-Dental students is the same 
as that for Pre-Medical students outlined on page 46. 

For those students wishing to apply for admission to a dental 
school upon completion of two years of undergraduate study, a 
special course of study is available. This two-year curriculum meets 
the minimum requirements of most dental schools. 



Two Year Pre-Dental Curriculum 
1st Year 

1st Semester 

Biology 18 4 

Chemistry 12 4 

English 10 3 

French or German 10 3 

Mathematics 10 3 

Phys. Ed. 10 1 

18 

2nd Year 

1st Semester 

Chemistry 22 4 

Physics 20, 21 4 

Humanities 20 4 

Psychology 20 3 

Religion 10 2 

Phys. Ed. 20 1 

Elective — 



2nd Semester 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 

18 



2nd Semester 
4 
4 
4 

2 
1 



18 



18 



PRE-VETERINARY CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Dr. Wilson 

The need of each applicant is considered individually. The course 
will include the subjects prescribed or recommended by the profes- 
sional school which the candidate expects to enter. The course of 
study for pre-veterinary students is the same as that for pre-medical 
students outlined on page 46. One of the elective courses of the 
third year should be Biology 38. 



47 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Dr. Francis H. Wilson 

Admissions 

Applicants for admission to the curriculum must meet the ad- 
mission requirements of Lebanon Valley College as stated on pages 
15 and 16 of the current catalogue. At the same time they shall 
secure approval by the School for Medical Technologists for 
the status of pre-registered students, to be admitted on the success- 
ful completion of the academic part of the curriculum at the Col- 
lege. The School for Medical Technologists shall be the final judge 
of a student's qualifications to pursue its curriculum. 

Curriculum 

The first three years will be spent at Lebanon Valley College in 
pursuit of the following courses of study which include all the gen- 
eral requirements for graduation and certain courses especially 
suitable as preparation for the study of medical technology: 

First Year Hours Credit 

Courses 1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

English lOa-lOb (Eng. Comp.) 3 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Biology 18 (General) 4 4 

Mathematics 10a, 10b 3 3 

Religion 1 la-1 lb (Introduction) 2 2 

Health and Physical Education 1 1 

Orientation 

16 16 

Second Year 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Humanities 20 4 4 

Chemistry 12 (Gen. Inorg.) 4 4 

Biology 21 (Microbiology) 4 

Biology 32 (Animal Physiology) 4 

Foreign Language or, if this requirement has been 

satisfied, an elective 3 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

16 16 

Third Year 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

Social Studies 30 4 4 

History 24a-24b (U.S. and Penna.) 3 3 

Psychology 20 (General) 3 

Philosophy 31 (Philos. of Rel.) 3 or 2 

Chemistry 22 (Organic) 4 4 

Elective 2 or 3 2 or 3 

16 or 17 16 or 17 



CATALOGUE 

Following the completion of this curriculum the student will spend 
twelve (12) months at the Harrisburg Hospital School for Medical Tech- 
nologists in pursuit of its regular curriculum as prescribed by The Amer- 
ican Society of Clinical Pathologists. On the successful completion of both 
phases of the curriculum the student will be awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology by Lebanon Valley College. 

NURSING 

Adviser: Dr. Francis H. Wilson 

The five-year Nursing Plan offers to young women intending to 
enter the field of nursing an opportunity to obtain a liberal arts 
education in connection with their nurse's education. 

Lebanon Valley College has entered into an affiliation with the 
Harrisburg Hospital School of Nursing, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 
in order to establish a five-year curriculum in nursing. 

Curriculum 

The first two years will be spent at Lebanon Valley College in 
pursuit of the following courses of study: 

!-.• >. xr Hours Credit Sornnd Voir Hours Credit 

Fust Year lst Sem 2nd Sem _ Second Year lst Sera 2nd Sem 

English lOa-lOb ... 3 3 Humanities 20 4 4 

Foreign Language . . 3 3 History 24a-24b ... 3 3 

Biology 18 4 4 Chemistry 12 4 4 

Sociology 20-21 .... 3 3 Religion lla-llb .. 2 2 

Psychology 20 3 — Foreign Language or 

Music Appreciation elective 3 3 

31 3 Physical Education . 1 1 

Health and Phy. Ed. 11 — — 

Orientation — — 17 17 

17 17 

The next three years will be spent at the Harrisburg Hospital School 
of Nursing in pursuit of the regular curriculum. At the end of these five 
years the student who has successfully completed both phases of the 
curriculum will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
by Lebanon Valley College and the diploma in nursing by the Harris- 
burg Hospital School of Nursing. 

NURSING EDUCATION 

Lebanon Valley College and Wilkes College have entered into a 
cooperative program whereby nurses working in the vicinity of 
Annville and Lebanon may earn a degree in Nursing Education 
from Wilkes College by taking their academic credits on the campus 
at Lebanon Valley College and their professional credits at Wilkes 
College, either in extension at the Hospital or in residence at 
Wilkes-Barre. 

. 49 . 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

The usual residence requirements for a degree in Nursing Edu- 
cation may be satisfied by taking one-half the work on the campus 
at Lebanon Valley College and the other one-half at Wilkes College. 

TEACHING 

Advisers: Professor McKlveen; Assistant Professor Ebersole 

The main purpose of the instruction in the Education Depart- 
ment of Lebanon Valley College is to train future teachers to become 
efficient, conscientious, capable members of a growing and respon- 
sible profession. 

Course requirements are established to meet state certification. The 
offerings selected have been chosen to cover a sufficient area to de- 
velop a well rounded curriculum for teacher training without undue 
over-lapping of materials presented. 

Certification Requirements 

Certification requirements in the various states make it imperative that 
prospective teachers begin planning their work during the freshman year 
in college. The planning should take into consideration two factors: 

A. Requirements in academic subject matter. 

1. Public Speaking (English 22) is a college requirement for all students 
entering the teaching field. 

2. For all Provisional College Certificates, a basic course in the History 
of the United States and Pennsylvania is now required. 

3. The Provisional College Certificate entitles the holder to teach for 
three years in any public secondary school of the Commonwealth the 
subjects indicated on its face. The subjects placed on the certificate 
will be those in which a student has earned twenty-four or eighteen 
college credits. This is, of course, work completed in the academic 
field beyond the educational requirements. 

4. Students can be certified in the following secondary school subjects: 
English, French, German, Latin, Spanish, History, Social Science, 
Mathematics, Physical Science, and Biological Science. At least eighteen 
hours of credit in the various fields are required for certification to 
teach in those fields. 

5. The following programs are designed to meet Pennsylvania require- 
ments in the respective subject matter fields: 

a. English: lOa-lOb, 30a or 30b, 21a, Humanities 20. 

b. French: 10, 20, six hours advanced work. 

c. German: 10, 20, six hours advanced work. 

d. Latin: 11, 20, 42, two hours elective. 

e. Spanish: 10, 20, six hours advanced work. 

f. Mathematics: 10a, 10b, 11, six hours elective. 

g. History: 10, 24a-24b, six hours of electives. 

h. Social Studies: Teachers certified in Social Studies can teach history 
and social science. Students will be recommended for certification in 
this field upon satisfactory completion of History 24a-24b, six hours 

. 50 • 



CATALOGUE 

of European history, Economics 20, Political Science lOa-lOb, and 
Social Studies 30. 

i. Physical Sciences: Chemistry 10, Physics 20 and 21. 

j. Biological Sciences: Biology 18, 28a-28b, 38a-38b. 

k. Science: Teachers certified in science can teach physical and biologi- 
cal sciences. Students will be recommended for certification in this 
field upon satisfactory completion of Biology 18, Physics 20 and 21. 
Chemistry 10. 

The combination fields in sciences and social studies are concessions to 
students experiencing difficulties in meeting all requirements for certifica- 
tion in the separate fields covered by these terms. At no time should the 
student seek certification in either social studies or sciences unless he is 
meeting all requirements in one of the divisions included in these fields, 
i.e., history or social science in the case of social studies, and biological or 
physical sciences in the case of science. Furthermore, social studies or 
science should be added only as a third field in which certification is 
being sought. 

B. Requirements in Professional Courses. 

1. Professional Courses designed to meet Elementary Certification require- 
ments. 

The provisional college certificate may be issued to an applicant who 
has completed an approved four-year college curriculum in the ele- 
mentary field including courses in education distributed as follows: 

a. Introduction to Teaching 

b. Educational Psychology 

c. Thirty semester hours of approved courses in the field of elementary 
education including 6 to 12 semester hours of elementary student 
teaching. 

2. Professional Courses designed to meet Secondary Certification require- 
ments. 

a. Education 20. Introduction to Education 3 semester hours 

b. Psychology 23. Educational Psychology 3 semester hours 

(prerequisite: General Psychology) 

c. Education 40. Student Teaching 6 semester hours 

The minimum requirement of six semester hours of student teach- 
ing is based upon not less than 180 hours of actual teaching includ- 
ing the necessary observation, participation and conferences under 
approved supervision in a laboratory or cooperative school. 

d. Electives in education courses 6 semester hours 

The electives may be selected from the following courses: 
Education 30. Educational Measurements 

Education 31. History and Philosophy of Education 

Education 41. Guidance for the Secondary School 

Education 45. Visual and Sensory Techniques 

Education 47. Principles and Techniques of Secondary School 

Teaching 

Education 49. Special Methods 

. 51 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Any student desiring information concerning the requirements to teach 
in other states should contact the head of the Dept. of Education. 

Scholastic Record of Prospective Teachers 

Students whose college work falls below the median grade of the College 
are strongly advised not to consider education as a profession. The Col- 
lege reserves the right to refuse such persons admission into education 
courses. 

Placement Bureau 

In order to give students the benefit of calls that are received for 
teachers and to render greater assistance in finding employment, the 
College provides for a Placement Bureau to keep on file records of stu- 
dents with their credentials for those who desire it. For registration with 
the bureau a fee of four dollars is charged payable in the Treasurer's 
Office. The services of the Placement Bureau will be available to gradu- 
ates for two years after date of graduation by virtue of this fee. If any 
graduate desires further services beyond the two years following gradua- 
tion, an additional fee of two dollars is charged for each year. 

Future Teachers of America 

As an integral part of the Education Department, the George D. Gossard 
Chapter of the Lebanon Valley College Future Teachers of America holds 
monthly meetings throughout the year. 

The purpose of this organization is to enrich the offerings of the Edu- 
cation Department and to acquaint students with the practical problems 
of teaching. 

The college chapter is affiliated with the National Education Association 
and the Pennsylvania State Educational Association. 

Any student on the college campus interested in the teaching profession 
is eligible to join. 



52 



CATALOGUE 

PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Advisers: Dr. Richie and Dr. Sparks 

The following schedule is suggested for students planning to 
enter the Christian ministry: 



First Year 



Hours 
Credit 
Religion lOa-lOb or lla-llb 4 

English lOa-lOb 6 

Greek 1 6 

Choice of: 
Biology 12 

Chemistry 12 8 

Orientation 11 

Philosophy 10-11 6 

Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 10 2 

32 
Third Year *?ours 

Credit 

English 22 2 

Philosophy 35a-35b 6 

Religion 31 and 32 4 

History 24a-24b 6 

Greek 30 6 

Social Studies 30 8 

Electives 2 



Second Year 



Hours 
Credit 
Religion lOa-lOb or lla-llb 4 

Humanities 20 8 

Greek 10 6 

Philosophy 20a-20b 6 

Psychology 20 3 

Physical Education 20 ... . 2 
Electives 5 

34 



Fourth Year ** ou " 

Credit 

Religion 42 2 

Philosophy 30 3 

Philosophy 31 3 

Greek 40 6 

Electives 16 



30 



34 



Students are advised to elect such courses in philosophy, history, science, 
political science, sociology, English, economics, and education as will give 
a thorough, basic preparation for the advanced studies offered by the the- 
ological seminaries. 

Students who plan to enter United Theological Seminary must have 
twelve or more hours credit in college Greek if they wish to elect Greek 
in the Seminary. 



53 



Integrated Studies 



1. Statement of Aims 

In harmony with a widespread trend among colleges, Lebanon 
Valley College is currently engaged in revising its program of 
studies. The key word for an understanding of this trend is inte- 
gration — the subject matter of education so organized and so 
presented that the student is constantly aware of the interrelatedness 
of all knowledge. The ideal of integrated studies would be to con- 
struct for the student a broad highway over which he might travel 
in his pilgrimage toward his goal — a single avenue rather than the 
many little parallel paths over which he has formerly traveled under 
the departmentalized system of education. For obvious practical 
and administrative reasons, however, that ideal has not yet been 
attained in any college. Lebanon Valley College is neither ready, on 
the one hand, to abolish departments, nor, on the other hand to 
offer a single course that will embrace all knowledge. But we have 
attempted to organize the fundamental knowledge of a college ed- 
ucation into three main courses: one embracing the sciences, one 
arts and letters, and a third the social studies. Plans to interrelate 
these three in terms of teaching techniques are still in the process 
of formulation. 

The program of integrated studies, as offered at Lebanon Valley 
College, is designed to give the student an adequate conception of the 
nature of the physical universe in which he lives, a knowledge of the 
workings of physical laws, and some grasp of what is meant by the 
scientific method. It should awake in the student an intelligent inter- 
est in personal, family, social, and civic problems. It will not indeed 
provide ready-made answers to these problems, but it will give the 
student a better understanding of the problems, and an increased 
awareness of the historical backgrounds that brought these problems 
into being. It will present in an orderly fashion various rival views 
of life in the belief that the student, once aware of their differences, 
may intelligently shape his own attitudes. In addition to all this, it 
will provide the student with an enhanced appreciation of the 
highest reaches of the human spirit as found in literature, art, and 
music. Behind our plan of integrated studies is the fundamental 
premise that our students will go into the world not only to follow 
chosen professions, but also to be men and women: human beings 
confronted daily with the wide variety of choices in thinking and 
action which modern living entails. It is to prepare the student to 
live with himself and with others that we present these courses. 

. 54 • 



CATALOGUE 

We wish to make it explicit at this point that we do not oppose 
specialization. For the student who has chosen his profession, inte- 
grated courses will provide the background on which later specializa- 
tion may be built. In addition, by showing how his chosen subject 
fits into the pattern of the larger whole, it will make his specializa- 
tion more meaningful and therefore more effective. For the student 
who is uncertain about his plans for the future, integrated studies 
will provide opportunity to explore wide areas of knowledge and 
experience, and will aid him in discovering his own aptitudes and 
interests. It will equip all students better to assume their responsi- 
bilities as members of their local communities and citizens of a 
democracy. 

To achieve this we propose three fundamental courses to be re- 
quired of all students: 

The Sciences — a course which will acquaint the student with the nature 
of the physical universe. In preparation; not given 1956-195J. 

The Humanities — a course which will familiarize him, intellectually 
and emotionally, with his cultural heritage. 

The Social Studies — a course which will provide him with the proper 
orientation with reference to the human relationships of the world in 
which he lives. 

2. Divisional Organization 

In order to provide these courses of integrated studies, cutting as 
they do across departmental lines, and in order to attain greater 
efficiency in administration, divisional organization has been initi- 
ated. Departments of study which fall within related areas of learn- 
ing are organized into Divisions, each with a Director in charge. 
Two Divisions have been thus organized, and further extension of 
the system is contemplated. 

The Humanities Division comprises the Departments of English, 
French, Spanish, German, Russian, Greek, Latin, Philosophy, 
and (as a Department in the College) Music. — Professor Struble, 
Director. 
The Social Studies Division comprises the Departments of History, 
Political Science, and Sociology. — Professor Laughlin, Director. 

Each course in integrated studies is administered by the appropriate 
Division and differs from departmental courses in that it is not con- 
fined to one branch of knowledge, but incorporates subject matter 
from various Departments within the Division. By this means the 
student is enabled to coordinate his knowledge, one branch with 
another, the various branches with his chosen specialty, and with 
the problems of living in a complex environment. 



55 



Courses of Study by Divisions 



INTEGRATED STUDIES 

20. Humanities. Man's Quest for Values as Recorded in the Litera- 
ture of the Western World. 

Mr. Struble, Mr. Stonecipher, and Mr. Ehrhart 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Required of all sophomores. 
A detailed study will be made of significant material from the ancient 
and modern literatures of continental Europe, and from English and 
American literature. The aim will be to trace the developing mind of man 
and the growth of his sense of aesthetic and ethical values. Attempts will 
be made, throughout the course, to show how developments in literature 
are paralleled by similar developments in art and music. To this end free 
use will be made of picture exhibits, slides, motion pictures, and phono- 
graph records. One aim of the course will be to provide the student with 
genuinely aesthetic experiences. 

30. Social Studies. Mrs. Laughlin, Miss Brumbaugh, Mr. Shay 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Required of all juniors. 
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding 
of the origins and operation of contemporary society. It will offer train- 
ing helpful in making thoughtful appraisals of social situations, and it 
will integrate subject matter from the fields of history, economics, political 
science, and sociology by a study of the historical development and current 
functioning of institutions in these areas. Materials used will include 
library references, visual aids, and field trips. 

32. Contemporary World Affairs. Mr. Fehr 

Two hours. First, or second semester. 
The purpose of this one-semester course is to acquaint students with 
current developments in the field of public affairs, literature, science, re- 
ligion, music, drama, art. Students are instructed in procedures useful in 
evaluation of material received through various media of communication, 
such as newspapers, radio, TV, filmstrips, recordings, and specialized 
publications. Special attention is given to broad domestic and international 
problems facing the United States. No prerequisite is required. 



56 



Courses of Study by Departments 



Note: If no year is indicated after a course, it is understood that 
the course is offered every year. In regard to courses that run 
throughout the year, there are two types of listings. If either semester 
may be taken as a separate unit, without the other semester, the 
course will be listed as a and b. For example, a student may take 
English 21b even though he has not had English 21a and does not 
expect to take it. But if no letter is indicated with the course num- 
ber, the entire year's work must be taken if credit is expected, and 
a student may not enter the course at midyear. 

BIOLOGY 

Professors Light and Wilson 
Assistant Professor Bollinger and Assistants 

The work outlined in the following courses in biology is intended 
to develop an appreciation of man's relation to his universe, 
to acquaint students with those fundamental facts necessary for the 
proper interpretation of the phenomena manifested by the living 
things with which they are surrounded, and to lay a broad founda- 
tion for specialization in universities in professional courses in 
biology. 

Those completing the courses will be well prepared for the work 
in medical schools, schools for medical technologists, hospital schools 
for training of nurses, for graduate work in colleges and universities, 
for teaching the biological sciences in high schools, and for assist- 
antships in university and experiment station laboratories in the de- 
partments of agriculture and the United States Biological Survey. 

For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see page 46. 

Major: Biology 18 and any additional courses of higher number, 
including laboratory work, in the department, amounting to twenty- 
four semester hours. 

Minor: Biology 18 and ten semester hours from courses of higher 
number in the department. 

Those preparing to teach biology should take Biology 18, 28a, 28b, 
38a, 38b, and as many additional courses as their elective hours will 
permit. 

12a-12b. General Biology (Cultural). Mr. Light and Mr. Bollinger 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Three class periods and two hours laboratory work each week. 
This course is designed primarily for those students who do not intend 

• 57 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

to major in the sciences. The cultural value of all the sciences is stressed, 
with the greater emphasis on the biological sciences. Laboratory fee $10.00 
per semester. 

18a- 18b. General Biology (Professional). Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Two hours class work and two, two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Required of all science students who are preparing to enter medical 
schools or other lines of professional biological work. In this course repre- 
sentative forms of plant life are studied the first semester and representa- 
tive forms of animal life the second semester. Structure, and biological 
laws and principles are stressed. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

21. Microbiology. Mr. Light 

Four hours. First semester. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

This course deals with the biology of bacteria, molds, yeasts, richettsias, 
and viruses, including laboratory technique in sterilization and in methods 
of cultivating, isolating, and staining bacteria. 

Required of those preparing for medical technology. Laboratory fee 
$10.00 per semester. 

22. Genetics. Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
Three class periods and two hours laboratory work each week. 
This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and varia- 
tion, and their practical applications. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

23. Entomology. Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1956—1957. 

Two class periods and two, two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the various orders 
of insects, their characteristics and life histories, and includes a study of 
their economic importance. Field trips and a carefully prepared collection 
of insects are supplementary to the classroom work. Laboratory fee $10.00 
per semester. 

28a-28b. Botany. Mr. Bollinger 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 

Two class periods and four hours field and laboratory work each week. 

The object of the course is to give the student a general knowledge of 
the plant kingdom. One or more types of each of the classes of algae, 
fungae, liverworts, mosses, ferns, and seed plants are studied. 

Special attention is given to the phylogeny and ontogeny of the several 
groups, and constant comparisons are made of those structures indicating 
relationships. The principles of classification are learned by the identi- 
fication of about one hundred and fifty species of plants represented in 
the local fall and spring flora. These studies are conducted in the field so 
that the plants are seen as dynamic forces adapted to their environment. 
Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

. 58 • 



CATALOGUE 

31. Vertebrate Embryology. Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

Two class periods and two, two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

This course consists of a survey of the principles of development, with 
laboratory work on the frog, chick, and pig. 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine, medical technology, 
and nursing and for biology majors. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

32. Animal Physiology. Mr. Light 

Four hours. Second semester. 

Two class periods and four hours laboratory work each week. 

This course presents the basic concepts of physiology, with special 
reference to man. 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine. Laboratory fee $10.00 
per semester. 

33. Introduction to Forestry. Mr. Bollinger 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

Two class periods and four hours of laboratory work each week. 

In this course the student is taught to identify the common trees and 
shrubs. Special attention is given to their ecological importance also the 
importance of forest products such as fruits, wood, paper, resins as well 
as the distribution of trees in the United States. A collection of seeds and 
leaves when possible will be required of the various species studied. Lab 
oratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

34. Plant Physiology. Mr. Bollinger 

Four hours. Second semester. Offered 1957—1958. 

Two class periods and four hours of laboratory work each week. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the various functions 
of parts of plants. It includes lectures and experimental work on the 
processes of photosynthesis, nutrition, respiration, growth, the role of 
hormones, digestion, absorption, etc. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

38a-38b. Zoology. Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 

Two lectures or recitations and two, two-hour periods each week of 
laboratory or field work. 

The course is intended to acquaint the student with the structure, life 
history, and behavior of representatives of each phylum of animals. In the 
study of types, structure, function, and adaptation are given equal empha 
sis. The principles of phylogeny and ontogeny are considered. 

The laboratory and class work is supplemented by field studies includ- 
ing observations of habits, ecological conditions, and the use of keys for 
identification and classification. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

42. Parasitology. Mr. Wilson 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957 . 
Two class periods and one two-hour laboratory period each week. Hu- 

♦ 59 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

man and animal parasites will be studied to illustrate the phenomenon 
of parasites and its importance in the understanding of many of the prob- 
lems of human populations, conservation and animal disease. 

Recommended for students preparing for medicine arid for biology 
majors. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

44. Biological Problems. Staff 

Credit hours and time adjusted to the problem assigned. 

Laboratory work with conferences. 

This course is open to a limited number of students majoring in biology 
who have made a distinguished record in their previous courses. It con- 
sists in working out problems assigned to them involving a practical appli- 
cation of various methods of technique, originality of method and inter- 
pretation, and the development of the spirit of research. A weekly confer- 
ence and report on the progress of the work will be required, and a 
detailed report including complete records of the work done must be 
presented before semester examinations. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

45. Vertebrate Histology and Microtechnique. Mr. Wilson 

Four hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

Two class periods and two, two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

This course deals with the cells, tissues, and organ systems of the 
vertebrate body, with special reference to the mammal, together with 
modern microtechnical procedures. 

Recommended to those preparing for medicine and medical technology 
and to biology majors. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

48. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Mr. Wilson 

Five hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
Three class periods and two, two-hour laboratory periods each week. 
The anatomy of the chordates will be studied from a comparative view- 
point emphasizing the changes leading toward mammalian structure. The 
laboratory work will consist mainly of the dissection of the dogfish and 
cat, but pertinent demonstrations from bony fish, amphibians, reptiles, 
and birds will be used to illustrate important variations in structure. 

49a-49b. Materials and Techniques for the Biology Teacher. 

Mr. Light 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 

Two class or laboratory periods each week. 

In the first semester this course is designed to acquaint students of the 
sciences with methods of obtaining, preparing, and preserving all kinds 
of biological materials, various types of tests and devices used in teaching, 
sources of equipment, lists of books and periodicals useful to science 
students and teachers, and the making of charts and models. 

In the second semester will be studied the fundamentals of taxidermy, 
the preparation of skeletons, photography and lantern-slide making. Lab- 
oratory fee $4.00 per semester. 

• 60 « 



CATALOGUE 

CHEMISTRY 

Associate Professor Neidig, 
Assistant Professors Kline and Neithamer 

The department of chemistry provides the students of liberal arts, 
who study chemistry as an elective subject, with an appreciation of 
the methods and techniques employed by the chemist. In addition, 
the impact of physical science upon modern civilization is em- 
phasized in an attempt to show the student how chemistry fits into 
the mechanism of everyday life. 

Students majoring in chemistry are rigorously schooled in the 
techniques and principles of modern chemistry. Coupled with a 
liberal arts education, such training prepares the student for a suc- 
cessful life both as a citizen and a scientist. Pre-medical and pre- 
dental students majoring in chemistry follow a curriculum especially 
designed to meet the requirements of the best medical and dental 
schools. The department provides students interested in the teaching 
profession an opportunity to engage in a program which includes not 
only the study of chemistry but also various techniques of teaching 
chemistry. In addition adequate training is provided for those stu- 
dents who are interested either in industrial work or advanced study 
in chemistry. 

Junior and senior chemistry majors are eligible to participate in 
the departmental honors program if they have demonstrated high 
scholastic attainment and a high degree of proficiency in both ex- 
perimental and theoretical chemistry. In order to graduate with 
departmental honors, a student is required to (1) prepare and sub- 
mit a thesis based on an extensive laboratory investigation of an 
original problem; (2) take a comprehensive examination and the 
graduate record examination; and (3) appear before an examining 
committee comprised of the staff of the department, a faculty mem- 
ber from the department in which the student has obtained a minor, 
and at least two academically qualified individuals from outside of 
the institution. Upon the successful completion of these require- 
ments, the chairman of the department will recommend the student 
for graduation with departmental honors. 

For outline of complete Pre-Medical Course, see page 46. 

For outline of course leading to the degree of B.S. in Chemistry, 
see page 36. 

Requirements for Major: Chemistry 12, 20, 21, 22 and six addi- 
tional hours. 

Requirements for Minor: Chemistry 12 and 10 additional hours 
with the consent of the Chairman of the Department of Chemistry. 

Requirements for B.S. in Chemistry: Chemistry 12, 20, 21, 22, 40, 
44, and 9 additional hours in chemistry. 

. 61 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
12. General Inorganic Chemistry. Mr. Neidig 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 
Three class hours and four hours laboratory per week. 
A systematic study of fundamental principles and of the sources, prop- 
erties, and uses of the important elements and compounds. 
Laboratory Fee: $12.00 per semester. Breakage Deposit: $5.00. 

20. Qualitative Inorganic Analysis. Mr. Kline 

Four hours. First semester. 

Two class hours and four hours laboratory per week. 

The course includes a study of the methods for systematically separating 
and identifying all of the common metals and acid radicals. The theory 
of separation will be emphasized in lecture. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 12. Laboratory Fee: $12.00 per semester. Break- 
age Deposit: $5.00. 

21. Quantitative Inorganic Analysis. Mr. Kline 

Four hours. Second semester. 

Two class hours and eight hours laboratory per week. A coverage of 
the fundamentals of gravimetric, volumetric and colorimetric analysis. 
The presentation of the theory of quantitative analytical procedures. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 10 or 12 8c 20. Laboratory Fee: $12.00. Breakage 
Deposit: $5.00. 

22. Organic Chemistry. Mr. Neidig 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three class hours and four hours laboratory per week. A study of the 
preparation, chemical behavior and industrial use of aliphatic and aro- 
matic compounds. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 12. Laboratory Fee: $12.00 per semester. Break- 
age Deposit: $10.00. 

30. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Mr. Neithamer 

Three hours. First semester. 

One class hour and 8 (eight) hours laboratory per week. The study of 
the methods employed for the sampling and analysis of industrially im- 
portant materials. The use of modern analytical instruments is illustrated 
in this course. The techniques involved include polarography, chromatog- 
raphy, spectrophotometry, polarimetry, spectrography, and potientiometry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21. Laboratory Fee: $12.00. Breakage De- 
posit: $5.00. 

31. Qualitative Organic Analysis. Mr. Neidig 

Three hours. First semester. 

One class hour and eight hours laboratory per week. This course is con- 
cerned with the principles and methods of organic analysis. The labora- 
tory work includes the identification of organic compounds, the separa- 
tion of mixtures and the interpretation of laboratory data. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Laboratory Fee: $12.00. Breakage Fee: $5.00. 

. 62 • 



CATALOGUE 
34. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

Three hours. Second semester. 

Three class hours per week. A study of the elements based upon the 
periodic table including a presentation of modern concepts of atomic and 
molecular structure. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21. 

35a-35b. Laboratory Techniques. Staff 

One or two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 

A course designed to introduce the student to advanced laboratory 
methods by the preparation and analysis of inorganic and organic com- 
pounds. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 and 22. Laboratory Fee: $16.00 per semester. 
Breakage Fee: $10.00. 

40. Physical Chemistry. Mr. Neithamer 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

Three class hours and four hours laboratory per week. This course is 
concerned primarily with the rigorous approach to chemical principles. 
The use of physico-chemical methods is emphasized in the laboratory. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 21 and 22, Physics 20 and Mathematics 11. 
Laboratory Fee: $12.00 per semester. Breakage Fee: $5.00. 

41. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Mr. Neidig 

Three hours. Second semester. 

Two class hours and four hours laboratory per week. A study of the 
preparation and reactions of multi-functional, heterocylic and alicylic 
compounds including a fundamental approach to reaction mechanisms. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. Laboratory Fee: $12.00. Breakage Fee: $10.00. 

43a-43b. Physical Bio-Chemistry. Mr. Neidig 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

Three class hours per week. A course designed especially for pre-medical, 
biology and biochemistry students to present the physical chemistry of 
living systems. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 22. 

44a-44b. Special Problems. Staff 

One or two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 

Intensive library and laboratory study of topics of special interest to 
advanced students in the major fields of chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 and 22. Laboratory Fee: $16.00 per semester. 
Breakage Fee: $10.00. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Associate Professor Riley, Assistant Professors Tom, Egli 

The department aims to give students majoring in Economics and 
Business Administration a thorough training in the essential prin- 
ciples and fundamentals of business and economics and at the same 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

time to offer sufficient electives to provide students preparing for a 
business career, government civil service, the teaching profession, 
law schools or graduate schools, with a general cultural education. 

For an outline of the complete course in Economics and Business 
Administration see page 47. 

Major: Economics 20 and 23 and 18 additional hours in eco- 
nomics as approved by the adviser. (These additional hours should 
include Economics 35, 36, 40-2, 48.) Economics 20 is a prerequisite 
for all courses in Economics of a higher number except 23 and 32. 
Graduate Record Advanced Economics Examination. 

Minor: Economics 20 and 12 additional hours in economics with 
the consent of the chairman of the Department of Economics and 
Business Administration. 

ECONOMICS 

10. Economic Geography. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. First semester. 
Problems to be studied in Economic Geography include: (a) the geo- 
graphical distribution of economic resources, (b) the significance of eco- 
nomic resources, (c) the consequences of uneven distribution and produc- 
tion of economic resources, and (d) some solutions to the surplus and 
deficit problem of economic resources. Adequate attention will be given 
to the political, social, and cultural aspects of world geography, but the 
emphasis will be placed upon the economic aspect of the problem. The 
meaning of economic resources; interrelationships between climate, soil, 
rainfall, and vegetable resources; geographical location and economic prob- 
lems of leading vegetable, animal, and mineral resources — will be dis- 
cussed. 

11. Introduction to American Business and Industry. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The purposes of this course are: (a) to survey the development of the 
American economic system as a whole, (b) to discuss the nature of the 
various leading industries — agricultural and nonagricultural, consumer 
goods and producer goods, and (c) to study the relation between these 
industries and the broader aspects of our national economic life. 

20. Principles of Economics. Mr. Riley and Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

An introductory course in Economics designed to explain the following 
fundamental economic principles: economics of consumption, economics 
of production, banking and monetary theories and policies, governmental 
activities and fiscal policies, price system and allocation of resources, price 
levels and business fluctuation, theory of employment and income, and 
international economics. 

Prerequisite for courses of a higher number within the department, ex- 
cept 23 and 32. 

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CATALOGUE 
23. Principles of Accounting. Mr. Riley 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 
A course in accounting principles and their application in business to 
single proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Books of original 
entry; accounts; financial statements; columnar books; controlling accounts; 
departmental accounting; the voucher system; elements of cost and manu- 
facturing accounting; agencies and branches; consolidations and mergers. 

30. Intermediate Accounting. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 

Continued study of the general principles and practices of accounting 
combined with application of these principles to institutional, govern- 
mental, and managerial accounting. Problems of system installations and 
accounting for taxation and the preparation and interpretation of state- 
ments and reports are also studied. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 23. 

31. Advanced Accounting. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. Second semester in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 

Accounting for joint ventures; installment sales; consignments; agency 
and branch accounts; consolidated statements, including corporate com- 
binations; receiverships; estates and trusts; actuarial science and applica- 
tions. 

Prerequisite: Accounting 30. 

32. Business Law. Mr. Egli 

Three hours. Throughout the year in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 
A course dealing with the elementary principles of law generally related 
to the field of business, including contracts, agency, sales, bailments, in- 
surance, and negotiable instruments. 

34. Retailing and Sales Management. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 
Organization of the sales department; study of the product and the 
buyer; problems of procurement; selection and training and motivation 
of the sales force; advertising and sales promotion; media; dealer aids; 
displays; trade marks; slogans; packaging; copy and layout; reports; costs 
and control. Demonstrations and practice in selling techniques and form- 
ulation of advertising campaigns. 

35. Marketing. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 
Methods and policies of the marketing of agricultural products and the 
merchandising of manufactured commodities; meaning and importance of 
marketing distribution; marketing functions; trade channels; development 
of marketing methods; co-operative marketing; price policies; trade infor- 
mation; market analysis; merchandising costs and prices; an analysis of 
the merits and defects of the existing distributive organization. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

36. Money and Banking. Mr. Riley and Mr. Tom 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 
Nature and functions of money and credit; credit instruments and the 
money market; development and role of commercial banking and central 
banking; structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System. Monetary 
and banking theory, policy, and practice. Influence on prices, level of 
income and employment, and economic stability and progress. 

37. Public Finance. Mr. Riley and Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 
Revenues and expenditures and economic functioning of the Federal, 
State, and Local governments; principles of taxation — shifting, incidence, 
and burden; influence on incentives, income distribution, and resource 
allocation; economic and social aspects of public spending; budgetary con- 
trol and debt management; fiscal policy and economic stability. 

38. International Economics. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 
This course includes the study of international trade; foreign exchange; 
protectionism; and the economic interdependence of nations. Current in- 
ternational economic problems will be studied. 

40-1. History of Economic Thought. Mr. Riley and Mr. Tom 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957—1958. 
The evolution of economic thought through the principal schools from 
Mercantilism to the present. Special attention will be given to (a) the 
analysis of the various theories of value, wages, interest, rent, profit, price 
level, business cycles, and employment, and (b) the influences of earlier 
economic ideas upon current thinking and policy-making. 

40-2. Contemporary Economic Problems. Mr. Riley and Mr. Tom 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956—1957. 
The basic economic problem in Western societies is the problem of 
optimum allocation and full employment of relatively scarce resources for 
maximum human satisfaction among competing ends. This course deals 
with the nature of different economic theories and the application of 
these theories to the analysis and solutions of economic problems. Special 
attention will be given to the study of micro-economics and macro- 
economics in a closed economy. 

42. Income Tax Accounting. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1955-1956. 

An analysis of the Federal Income Tax Law and its applications to 
individuals, partnerships, fiduciaries, and corporations; case problems; 
preparation of returns. 

Prerequisite, Accounting 23, or consent of instructor. 

43. Cost Accounting. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1955-1956. 
A study of industrial accounting from the viewpoint of material, labor, 

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CATALOGUE 

and overhead costs; the analysis of actual costs for control purposes and 
for determination of unit product costs; assembling and presentation of 
cost data; selected problems. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

44. Corporation Finance. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 
Organizing a business, financing permanent and working capital needs, 
managing income and surplus, expanding through internal growth and 
combination, recapitalization and reorganization. Study of forms of busi- 
ness organization; charter and by-laws; directors, officers, and stockholders; 
stocks and bonds; dividend policy; concentration and anti-trust legislation; 
insolvency, bankruptcy, and liquidation or reorganization. 

45. Investments. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 

Development and role of investment and its relation to other economic, 
legal, and social institutions. The fundamental principles are presented 
along with a description of investment media and machinery. Analysis is 
made of the various classes of investments. Investment policy and manage- 
ment are discussed. 

Prerequisite: Economics 44. 

46. Economics of Transportation. Mr. Tom 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1956-1957. 
The various types of transportation systems and services; costs; regula- 
tion by State and Federal governments; rates and rate technique; valuation 
and rate of return; combinations; labor in the transport industries; public 
aids to the transport industries; and government ownership. 

48. Labor Problems. Mr. Riley 

Three hours. First semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957—1958. 
Analysis of the American labor movement; theories, history, structure, 
and functions of unionism; individual and collective bargaining policies 
and practices; labor legislation; economic aspects of some major labor 
problems — wages, hours, working conditions, security, accidents, discrimi- 
nation, child labor, superannuation, unemployment, strikes, boycotts, 
picketing, etc.; grievances; arbitration. 

49. Personnel Administration and Industrial Management. 

Mr. Riley 

Three hours. Second semester, in alternate years. Offered 1957-1958. 

Scientific management applied to the problems of business administra- 
tion — planning, organizing, staffing, directing and coordinating, and con- 
trolling. Personnel policies and practices — recruitment, selection, testing, 
placement, training, merit rating, job evaluation, wage and salary adminis- 
tration, health and safety, personal and group relations, employee benefits 
and services, time and motion study, work simplification, labor turnover 
and morale, efficiency records and incentives, standards, and personnel 
research. 

Prerequisite: Economics 48 or consent of instructor. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EDUCATION 

Professor McKlveen, Assistant Professor Ebersole, 
Assistant Professor Bowman, and Mr. Batchelor 

The major aim of the Education Department is to develop teachers 
that have learned to appreciate the value of the teaching profession. 
Students are made aware of the responsibilities of the profession and 
are encouraged to accept those obligations. 

The department endeavors to present, by its instruction, better 
techniques of teaching as well as prevailing principles of education. 

Courses are provided to comply with state certification in the 
elementary field as well as the secondary level of public school 
teaching. 

For a statement of requirements for those planning to enter the 
teaching profession, see pages 50-52. 

A. BASIC EDUCATION COURSES 

The following will be offered to meet certification in all areas: 

20. Introduction to Education (Required for elementary and 

secondary) Mr. McKlveen 

Three hours. First semester. Freshman or sophomore year. 
An introduction to the field of education through the study of the 
American educational system, the place of the school in society, the train- 
ing and function of the teacher. 

Educational Psychology (Required for elementary and secondary) 
See page 95. 

30. Educational Measurements. (Recommended elective in elemen- 
tary and secondary) Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. First semester. 
In this course the student studies principles of validity and reliability, 
appraises and constructs test items and considers the uses of test results. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

45. Visual and Sensory Techniques. (Recommended elective in 
elementary and secondary) Mr. McKlveen 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Psychological bases for sensory aids; study and appraisal of various aids; 
use of apparatus; sources of equipment and supplies. Laboratory fee of 
four dollars. 

B. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

12. Professional Orientation and the Elementary School Curriculum. 

Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of curriculum development in elementary education in relation 

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CATALOGUE 

to aims, content, school organization, controversial issues, and trends 
throughout the history of education. It includes constitutional and statu- 
tory aspects of school law and the legal status of the teacher. 

21. Introduction to Music. Miss Gillespie 

Three hours. First semester. 
A course planned for teachers expected to teach music in the elementary 
grades. Content of the course will include; fundamentals of music for 
purpose of reading music, movement to music, study of child voice, study 
of what to include in teaching on the different grade levels, the methods 
of teaching it, and a survey of the literature used in the public schools for 
this purpose. 

22. Teaching of Music. Miss Gillespie 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The second semester will continue with the content of first semester 
course No. 21 on more advanced level, with an added emphasis on the 
teaching of music in elementary grades. 

23. Teaching of Natural Science. Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. First semester. 
A course combining the methods of teaching science in the elementary 
school with a survey of the science content material and its use. It presents 
an interpretation of children's science experiences and guides the develop- 
ment of their scientific concepts. 

24. Exploring Art. Mr. Batchelor 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A course designed to help the prospective teacher acquire the funda- 
mental principles and techniques of art and to apply them to the needs 
of children in the elementary grades. It is intended to give experience in 
working with various media such as paper, metal, cardboard, wood, clay, 
tempera, water colors, and oils. It includes drawing, the elementary prin- 
ciples of design, lettering, composition, and color harmony, and their 
application to home, school, and community interests. It involves discus- 
sion of classroom problems with workshop experience in the efficient han- 
dling of materials. It aims to develop appreciation of art and to give the 
student a practical application of art for the classroom. Laboratory 
fee $1.50. 

25. Games and Activities for Elementary Grades. Miss Bowman 

Three hours per week; one semester hour credit. First semester. 
A study of the physical development of the child and the games and 
activities appropriate for the various elementary grade levels. Preparation 
of lesson plans, outlines, and other teaching aids for use in classroom, 
gymnasium, and playground. 

26. Exhibitions and Demonstrations for Elementary Grades. 

Miss Bowman 

Two hours per week; one semester hour credit. Second semester. 
Instruction in planning elementary demonstrations, exhibitions, drcuseg, 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

festivals, water shows, variety shows, field days, May Days, holiday pro- 
grams, sports carnivals, and pageants. 

31. Teaching of Arithmetic. Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. First semester. 
This course presents the historical development of mathematics, the 
results of educational research in the field, and methods of teaching. It 
acquaints the student with the use of child psychology in the develop- 
ment of functional arithmetic, diagnostic methods, and remedial in- 
struction. 

32. Teaching of Art. Mr. Batchelor 

Three hours. First semester. 
This course will help the student gain an understanding of the child's 
approach to art, and his changing needs for artistic expression. It parallels 
growth in creative and mental development. It includes methods used for 
different age levels and classroom situations, and the development of 
work units integrating art with other subject-matter areas. It acquaints 
students with the sources of art materials, their selection and evaluation. 
Lesson plans are arranged in accordance with the natural development of 
the child. Laboratory fee $1.50. 

33. Teaching of Social Studies. Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of the principles underlying the use of social studies in the 
elementary school, and desirable methods of teaching. 

40. Student Teaching. Mr. Ebersole 

Nine hours. Second semester. Open to seniors only. 

Students taking this course are required to arrange their schedules in 
order that they have the entire forenoon free from other classes every day. 

Each student must spend a minimum of 270 clock hours of actual teach- 
ing under approved supervision, including the necessary observation. 

A laboratory fee of $40.00 is charged. 

41. Teaching of Reading and Language Arts. Mr. Ebersole 

Four hours. First semester. 
This course deals with the principles, problems, materials, and tech- 
niques involved in teaching reading, speaking, listening, and writing in 
the elementary schools. 

43. Health and Safety Education. Miss Bowman 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Instruction in basic health facts, safety procedures in everyday life, and 
evaluation of commercialized materials as visual aids. The course also 
familiarizes the student with teaching methods and materials. 



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CATALOGUE 

C. SECONDARY EDUCATION 

31. History and Philosophy of Education. Mr. McKlveen 

Three hours. First semester. 

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the three 
major philosophies, idealism, realism, and pragmatism and to interpret 
those philosophies as they apply to the student, the teacher, and the 
administrator. 

The aims and theories of educational leaders will be analyzed as well 
as the contents, and organization of educational systems and practices. 

Recommended as an elective in Education. 

40. Student Teaching. Mr. McKlveen 

Six hours. First or second semester. Open to seniors only except by per- 
mission of the Head of the Department. 

This course is designed to meet the following Pennsylvania certification 
requirement. 

The minimum in student teaching is based on not less than one hun- 
dred eighty clock hours of actual teaching under approved supervision, 
including the necessary observation, participation and conference. 

The Lebanon Valley College Student Teaching Program consists of 
twelve weeks of teaching and observing in the public schools. Seniors will 
please arrange their schedules in order that they might have three consec- 
utive hours free every day. 

Seven conference hours held on campus are also part of the program. 
Students having an average less than C during their first three years in 
college will not be admitted. A laboratory fee of $40.00 is charged. 

Summer Student Teaching Program 

Six hours. Six weeks of student teaching in the Derry Township Public 
Schools of Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

For information concerning the Summer Student Teaching Program see 
the head of the Education Department or Director of Admissions. 

41. Principles of Guidance Organization and Administration. 

Mr. Ebersole 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental principles underlying the administration of guidance programs. 
Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

47. Principles and Techniques of Secondary School Teaching. 

Mr. McKlveen 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of principles, practices and methods with their significance to 
secondary school teaching. 

49. Special Methods Mr. McKlveen 

Three hours. Second semester. Open only to seniors. 
The course covers the various approaches that may be employed in 

• 71 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

teaching. Emphasis is primarily placed on methods. Techniques of teach- 
ing are demonstrated, classroom observations are made in the public 
schools and successful high school teachers are invited to the class to 
share their methods of teaching. 

DRAWING 

10. Engineering Drawing. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, sketching, orthographic 
projection, perspective drawing, working drawings, tracing and blue 
printing. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Struble, Assistant Professors Keller, Faber, 
Bowman, and Bradley 

The purpose of the Department of English is to afford students 
a vital contact with the literature of our language, and to assist them 
to write and speak effectively. 

Major: Beyond the required course in freshman English (10a- 
10b) and the required Humanities 20, English majors will take 21a, 
30a-30b, 31, 32, 35, 49, and two hours of electives. 

Minor: Beyond the required course in freshman English (10a- 
10b) and the required Humanities 20, English minors will take 21a 
and 31. 

01. Remedial English. Miss Turner 

Two hours. No credit. First and second semesters. 
An intense review carried out by group discussion and individual con- 
ference of the fundamentals of English grammar, punctuation and basic 
sentence structure. Advance permission for enrollment must be had from 
both the appropriate Dean and the instructor in charge of the course. 

10a- 10b. English Composition. Mr. Keller, Mrs. Faber, 

Mrs. Bowman, and Mr. Bradley 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Required of all students. 
The purpose of this course shall be the cultivation in the student of 
those principles of grammar, logic, rhetoric, and mechanics which enable 
men to communicate effectively with each other in the English language. 
The goal will be sought through a combination of structural analysis of 
pattern as well as constant practice in the various media of composition. 

lla-llb. Word Study. Mr. Struble 

One hour. Throughout the year. 
This course will have a two-fold purpose: (1) to give the student some 
insight into linguistic processes, particularly as pertains to the growth 

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CATALOGUE 

of the English vocabulary, and (2) to increase the range of the student's 
vocabulary, in order that he may have greater mastery over his own na- 
tive tongue. Attention to problems of pronunciation and spelling will go 
hand in hand with vocabulary building. 

Integrated Studies 20. The Humanities: Man's Quest for Values as 
Recorded in the Literature of the Western World. 

See page 56. 

Mr. Struble, Mr. Ehrhart, Mrs. Faber, and Mr. Bradley 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 

21a. American Literature: From the Beginnings to the Civil War. 

Three hours. First semester. Mr. Bradlev 

An attempt, through the study of native authors, to see in perspective 
the evolving American mind; to observe how Puritanism, the Cavalier 
spirit, and the Romantic Movement have contributed to making us what 
we are; and to understand the spiritual resources of which we are the 
heirs. 

21b. American Literature: From the Civil War to the Present Day. 

Three hours. Second semester. Mr. Bradley 

22. Public Speaking. Mr. Bradley 

Two hours. Each semester. 
Study and application of the basic principles of public speaking. Com- 
position and delivery of prepared speeches for a variety of speech situa- 
tions; analysis of the special problems involved. Special emphasis on prin- 
ciples and technique of composing and projecting; audience psychology; 
and practical training in diction and platform presence. Required of all 
prospective teachers. 

23. Advanced Composition. Mr. Struble 

Two hours. First semester. 
Principles and techniques of the short story, drama, and novel for stu- 
dents interested in creative writing. Extensive practice in the field of the 
student's special interest. 

24. Contemporary American Literature. Mrs. Bowman 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1956—1957. 
A study of American thought as it is expressed in the literature pro- 
duced in America since World War I. 

30a. Shakespeare. Mrs. Faber 

Three hours. First semester. 
A survey of English drama from its beginnings to the time of Shakes- 
peare; a study of Shakespeare's history plays and their place in the 
Elizabethan world; and an analysis of Shakespearean comedy. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
30b. Shakespeare. Mrs. Faber 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of Shakespeare's tragedies, problem comedies, and romantic 
comedies. 

31. History of the English Language. Mr. Struble 

Three hours. First semester. 

Historical study of English sounds, inflections, and vocabulary. Stand- 
ards of correctness; current usage. Required of all prospective teachers of 
English composition. 

32. Chaucer. Mr. Struble 

Two hours. Second semester. 
This course has a three-fold purpose: 1) to give the student a reasonable 
familiarity with the works of one of England's greatest poets; 2) to pro- 
vide a detailed picture of mediaeval life, culture, and thought; and 3) to 
develop skill in the reading of earlier English. 

33. Literature of the Victorian Period. Mrs. Faber 

Two hour's. Second semester. Offered 1956—1957. 
An intensive survey of the major English poets and prose writers from 
1830 to 1900. 

35. Poetry of the Romantic Movement. Mr. Keller 

Two hours. First semester. 
An intensive study of the principal poets of the early nineteenth cen- 
tury: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

37. Contemporary Drama. Mrs. Faber 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A survey of Continental, British, and American drama since 1890. 

38. The Novel. Mr. Keller 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of the development of the novel in England from Richardson 
to Joyce. 

40. Eighteenth Century Literature. Mr. Keller 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A rapid survey of the principal English authors from Dryden to Blake 
in an effort to indicate the way in which the work and thought of these 
writers have influenced modern life and literary traditions. 

49. Seminar in the History of English Literature. Mr. Keller 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Required of all English majors in their senior year; elective for English 
minors. Intensive review of the student's earlier work in English; systematic 
coverage of the gaps in the student's knowledge of the field. 

Methods of Teaching English. See Education 49. 

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CATALOGUE 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Professors Stonecipher and Richie, Assistant 
Professor Butler, Mrs. Fields 

The immediate aim of this department is to assist the student 
to acquire a working knowledge of the language or languages which 
he chooses to study, such as will enable him to proceed to more 
advanced study or to make practical use of it in other fields. The 
ultimate aim is to foster a broader and more sympathetic culture 
through the study of foreign literatures and contact with the life 
and thought of other peoples. 

Major: The student may elect a major in some one language, as 
indicated below, or a departmental major. The departmental major 
shall consist of at least eighteen hours, above the beginner's level, 
in some one language and at least twelve hours in a second language. 

Minor: See listings under the separate languages below. 

FRENCH 

Major: Courses 10, 20, 30 and 40 or 41. 

Minor: Courses 10, 20, and six additional hours of advanced work. 

Those preparing to teach French should take French 10, 20, and six 

additional hours of advanced work. 

1. Elementary French. Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
This course is intended for those who begin French in college. Its aim 
is to enable the student to write simple French sentences, to carry on a 
conversation in easy French, and to read French of ordinary difficulty. 

10. Intermediate French. Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 1, and includes further 
drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, 
and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

Prerequisite: Course 1 or 2 years of high school French. 

20. French Literature of the XVI and XVII Centuries. 

Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
A survey of French literary history from the Renaissance to the end 
of the period of absolute Classicism. Composition and conversation. 

30. French Literature of the XVIII and XIX Centuries. 

Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
A continuation of the preceding survey, beginning with the Quarrel of 
the Ancients and Moderns. Composition and conversation, 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

40. The French Novel. Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 
A study of the development of this genre in France, special attention 
being given to the later XIX Century and contemporary novels. Compo- 
sition and conversation. Courses 20 or 30 are prerequisite to this course. 

41. French Drama. Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957—1958. 
A study of the evolution of the drama in France with extensive reading 
of XVII, XVIII, and XIX Century plays. Composition and conversation. 
Courses 20 or 30 are prerequisite to this course. 

GERMAN 

Major: Course 10 and eighteen additional hours. 
Minor: Course 10 and twelve additional hours. 

I. Elementary German. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
For students with no previous knowledge of German. A study of the 
forms, syntax, and vocabulary of the language, accompanied by reading 
of simple German and exercises in pronunciation and conversation. 

10. Intermediate German. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This course is a further study of the language through selected read- 
ings, especially of the short story, accompanied by additional study of 
grammar and written and oral composition. Attention is also given to the 
historical and cultural background of the German people. 

Prerequisite: Course 1 or two years of high school German. 

II. Scientific German. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Second semester. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the style and 
vocabulary of German scientific writing. Selected articles dealing with 
the various sciences are read for the purpose of gaining facility in read- 
ing and accuracy of interpretation. 

May be taken in lieu of second semester of Course 10. 

22. Lessing and Schiller. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957—1958. 
Introduction to the classical period of German Literature. 

30. The German Drama. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
Theory and development of the German drama with special emphasis 
on the nineteenth century. 

40. The German Novel and Short Story. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
Theory and development of the novel and short story with special em- 
phasis on the nineteenth century. 

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CATALOGUE 
41. Goethe. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of Goethe's life, of his lyrics, ballads, prose works. 

GREEK 

Major: Courses 1, 10 and twelve additional hours. 
Minor: Courses 1, 10 and six additional hours. 

I. Elementary Greek. Mr. Richie 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Study of forms and syntax, with easy prose composition. Selections from 
Xenophon's Anabasis. This course is intended for students who enter 
college with no Greek. 

10. Intermediate Greek. Mr. Richie 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 
Xenophon: Selections previously unread. Selected Readings from the 
Gospel According to John. 
Prerequisite: Greek I. 

30. The Gospel According to Luke and Selected Readings. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. Mr. Richie 

Prerequisite: Greek 1 and 10. 

40. Readings from the Book of Acts and the General Epistles. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. Mr. Richie 

Prerequisite: Greek 1 and 10. 

LATIN 

Note: Courses listed below will be given when there is sufficient demand. 
10. Subfreshman Latin. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
For those who have had two years of preparation. Reading of high 
school grade, syntax, and composition. 

II. Freshman Latin. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
The reading of Sallust's Catiline, Cicero's De Senectute or De Amicitia, 
and selections from Pliny's Letters. Study of syntax from text and gram- 
mar; Roman life and institutions; graded exercises in prose composition. 

20. Readings from Livy, Horace, and Catullus. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Study of syntax, style, and the history of Latin literature. Latin 11 
prerequisite. 

• 77 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
31. Vergil. Mr. Stonecipher 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Readings from Books VII-XII of the Aeneid and other works of Vergil. 
Latin 20 prerequisite. 

SPANISH 

Major: Courses 10, 20, 30, and 40. 

Minor: Courses 10, 20, and six additional hours of advanced work. 

1. Elementary Spanish. Miss Butler 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
This course is intended for those who begin Spanish in college. Its aim 
is to enable students to write simple Spanish sentences, to carry on a 
conversation in easy Spanish, and to read Spanish of ordinary difficulty. 

10. Intermediate Spanish. Mrs. Fields 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

This is a continuation and extension of course 1 and includes further 
drill in the principles of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, 
and dictation, and more extensive reading. 

Prerequisite: Course 1 or two years of high school Spanish. 

20. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Mrs. Fields 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
Survey of Spanish literature from the Middle ages to the present with 
emphasis upon the nineteenth century. Composition and conversation. 

30. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries. Mrs. Fields 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
A continuation of Course 20. Composition and conversation. 

40. Spanish Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Centuries. Mrs. Fields 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 
Reading of outstanding authors of seventeenth and eighteenth cen- 
turies, with emphasis upon Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderon. Com- 
position and conversation. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Professor Laughlin 
10a- 10b. World Geography. Mrs. Laughlin 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 
The purpose of this basic course in geography is to develop a knowledge 
and an appreciation of the worldwide physical factors in man's environ- 
ment and of his adjustment to them. The course will include a study of 
the motions of the earth, land forms, bodies of water, soil, climate, vege- 
tation, with special emphasis on man's political, economic, and social 
responses to them. 

• 78 • 



CATALOGUE 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Light 
20a-20b. Structural and Historical Geology. Mr. Light 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 

Two class or laboratory periods each week. 

First semester — structural geology. A course designed to acquaint the 
student with the forces and dynamic agencies by which the earth has 
been formed and evolved into its present condition. 

Second semester — historical geology. This course deals with the prob- 
able location of land and sea areas of each of the various geologic periods, 
and the development of the plants and animals which lived during these 
periods as identified by their fossil remains. Laboratory fee $5.00 per 
semester. 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

See Integrated Studies, page 54. 

GERMAN 

See Foreign Languages, page 76. 

GREEK 

See Foreign Languages, page 77. 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The aim of this department is to develop the student's physical 
capacity and to maintain his health by encouraging his participation 
in an all-round program. 

In order that the student may gain the fullest benefit from the 
department's program, a physical and medical examination, includ- 
ing postural and tuberculin tests, under competent physicians, will 
be required of all entering students. 

It is strongly recommended that all entering students undergo a 
thorough visual examination. The health laws of Pennsylvania re- 
quire successful vaccination against smallpox. 

All freshmen and sophomores are required to take two hours of 
Physical Education a week throughout the year, for which one 
semester hour's credit will be given each semester. All sophomore 
men must successfully pass skill and knowledge tests in two team 
sports and four individual sports before the physical education 
requirement is complete. 

In the field of physical education and health, emphasis will be 
placed on theory, through the professional courses, and practice, 
through the activity courses. 

• 79 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

REQUIRED PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 
Assistant Professor Marquette 

10. Health, Physical Education and Hygiene for Men. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The health aims of this course are to give the student adequate knowl- 
edge of hygiene and to encourage proper attitudes towards his personal 
health. 

The physical education activities in the first semester are: touch foot- 
ball, soccer, volleyball, handball, squash, badminton, and basketball. 

The physical education activities in the second semester are: basket- 
ball, handball, squash, badminton, softball, trampoline, and weight-lifting. 

20. Physical Education for Men. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

First Semester: Advanced instruction, practice and testing in touch foot- 
ball, soccer, volleyball, handball, squash, badminton, and basketball. 

Second Semester: Advanced instruction, practice and testing in basket- 
ball, handball, squash, badminton, softball, tennis, track and field, tram- 
poline, and archery. 

11. Corrective and Adaptive Physical Education for Men. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Special activities for those students who have a physical handicap or 
deficiency. (Not open to students qualified for Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 10.) 

21. Corrective and Adaptive Physical Education for Men. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Special activities for those students who have a physical handicap or 
deficiency. (Not open to students qualified for Physical Education 20.) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 
Assistant Professor Bowman 

Students are required to wear the regulation gymnasium outfit 
which can be purchased at the college bookstore. 

10. Health, Physical Education and Hygiene for Freshmen Women. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

First Semester: Fundamental skills and practice in field hockey, soccer, 
archery, volleyball, stunts and tumbling; corrective postural exercises. 

Health: This course aims to give the student adequate knowledge of 
hygiene and to encourage proper attitudes towards her personal health. 

Second Semester: Fundamental skills and practice in basketball, soft- 
ball, tennis, and Folk and American square dancing. 

• 80 • 



CATALOGUE 

20. Physical Education for Sophomore Women. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

First Semester: Advanced skills and practice in field hockey; fundamen- 
tal skills and practice in golf, archery, volleyball; conditioning exercises. 

Second Semester: Advanced skills and practice in basketball and soft- 
ball. Funadmental skills and practice in individual sport activities: tennis, 
riding, shufneboard, badminton, bowling, handball, squash, ping pong, 
quoits, and interpretive dancing. 

11. Corrective and Adaptive Activity Class for Freshmen Women. 

(Not open to students registered in 10 and 20.) 

21. Corrective and Adaptive Activity Class for Sophomore Women. 

(Not open to students registered in 10 and 20.) 
A corrective and adaptive activity class will be offered for those students 
who are unable to participate in active exercise. This class will include 
relaxing recreational activity. Therefore, all students will be required to 
participate in some phase of the physical education program. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Laughlin, Assistant Professor Shay, Mr. Fehr 

The aim of the Department of History and Political Science is to 
aid the student in acquiring such knowledge in the field of social 
studies as will serve as a background for an unemotional and un- 
biased study of mankind's activities. It is hoped that such study will 
assist the student to arrive at opinions only after examining and 
evaluating evidence. It is believed that such training will help to 
promote good citizenship. 

The Department also provides broad training for those who plan 
to teach in the public schools or who seek government positions. 
Provision is also made for those who intend to pursue graduate work 
in the area either of history or of political science. 

Majors are offered in (1) history, (2) political science. 

HISTORY 

Major: Integrated Studies 30, Advanced Test — Graduate Record 
examination, departmental comprehensive examination, History 10, 
24a-24b, 31, 32, eight additional semester hours of history. 

Minor: Integrated Studies 30, History 10, 24a-24b, four additional 
hours of history. 

10. The History of Western Civilization. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
It is the purpose of this course to introduce the student to the principal 
developments of mankind from early historical times to the present. Em- 

. 81 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

phasis will be placed upon the history of Western Civilization in its po- 
litical, social, and cultural achievements. Some attention will also be given 
to proper forms of note taking, the preparation of reports, and the ele- 
ments of research. 

20. Europe from the Renaissance to the Congress of Vienna. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. ' / 

This course deals with the political, economic, cultural, and religious 
changes that occurred in the Western World from the thirteenth to the 
early nineteenth century. Special attention is given to the artistic develop- 
ments of the Renaissance, to the Wars of Religion, to the French Revolu- 
tion, and to the Napoleonic era. 

23. Political and Social History of the United States 

and Pennsylvania. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. First semester. 
A general course in American and Pennsylvania History from Inde 
pendence to the present time. Emphasis will be placed on the role of 
Pennsylvania in national, political, and cultural developments. This course 
is open only to students in the Conservatory of Music. 

24a-24b. Political and Social History of the United States 

and Pennsylvania. Mrs. Laughlin 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A survey of American History from the earliest settlements to the 
present. Special attention is given to the history of the colony and state 
of Pennsylvania. This course is designed to fulfill the state requirements 
for United States and Pennsylvania history. 

27. Diplomatic History of the United States. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A survey of the foreign relations of the United States since its inception 
as a nation. Emphasis is placed on the development of notable foreign 
policies and their effect on American life, the relation of the nation with 
specific areas, the influence of personalities in the field of diplomacy, the 
effect of domestic conditions upon foreign relations, and the current in- 
ternational position of the United States. 

29a-29b. Economic History of the United States. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957—1958. 
A study of the economic background of American History, including 
the growth of American agriculture and industrial interests, from colonial 
beginnings to their present day development. 

31. Europe from 1815 to 1914. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. First semester. 
Nineteenth century Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the out- 
break of World War I. Special emphasis is placed on diplomatic relations, 
revolutionary and liberal movements, the new colonialism, and the social 
changes of the latter part of the 19th Century. 

• 82 • 



CATALOGUE 

32. Europe from 1914 to the Present. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. Second semester. 
A study of World Wars I and II. Special emphasis is given to the causes 
of the world wars, the efforts to maintain the peace, the rise of dictator- 
ships, and the tension in international relations. Attention is given to the 
problems involved in the post-war periods. 

33. History of the Far East. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A study designed to acquaint the student with the social, political, eco- 
nomic, and cultural institutions of the Far East prior to 1500 and the 
subsequent changes growing out of contact with the Western World since 
that time. Special emphasis will be placed upon the trends since 1500; 
and particular attention will be devoted to the emergence of Japan from 
isolation and her development as a world power; the reformation and 
revolution in China, and her struggle for unity; and the rise of national- 
ism in Southeastern Asia and developments since the end of World War II. 

34. History of Russia. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957 . 
A study of the history of Russia from ancient times to the present. 
Special attention will be given to the late seventeenth, eighteenth, and 
nineteenth centuries; to the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917; and to the 
period of communist control. 

36. History of England and the British Empire. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957-1958. 
A survey of the history of England and the Empire from earliest times 
to the present. The student will study all aspects of English life. 

37. The History of the Middle East. 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1957—1958. 
A study of the development of the countries of the Middle East with 
emphasis on events of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the 
significance of such happenings in world affairs. Attention is paid to the 
relations between Europe, the Americas, and the Middle East during the 
rise and decline of the Ottoman power, western imperialism in the Middle 
East, and the strategic and economic importance of the area in inter- 
national affairs. 

38. History of Latin America. Mr. Shay 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 
A survey of the political and cultural development of the Latin Amer- 
ican Republics. The period of independence, internal development, and 
relations with the United States will be emphasized. 

42a-42b. American Biography. Mr. Shay 

One hour. Throughout the year. 
A study of the achievements of American men and women who typify 
important social and political trends. For the year 1956-1957 the selections 

• 83 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

in the first semester will be made from the period since the end of the 
Civil War; in the second semester they will be taken from our colonial 
and national history to 1865. 

43. History of Pennsylvania. Mr. Shay 

Three hours. First semester. 
A study of the political and social history of Pennsylvania with special 
emphasis on the different types of settlers and on the contribution of the 
Commonwealth to the history of the nation. 

44. Source Problems in American History. Mrs. Laughlin 

Two hours. Throughout the year. Open only to History majors, except by 
special permission. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the use of source ma- 
terial and methods of historical research. 

Geography lOa-lOb. See page 78. 

Methods of Teaching History. See Education 49. 

Integrated Studies 30. See page 56. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major: Integrated Studies 30, Advanced Test — Graduate Record 
examination, departmental comprehensive examination, Political 
Science lOa-lOb, 20, 21, 30, 31, 32, 40, 41. 

Minor: Political Science lOa-lOb, 20, 21, 32, three additional 
hours. Integrated Studies 30. 

lOa-lOb. — American Government and Politics. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956—1957. 
An introduction to the study of government in the United States. A 
study of the structure and functions of the various branches of the federal 
government and their relationships to each other; a consideration of the 
Constitution, of federalism and its problems, civil rights, political parties 
and pressure groups, elections, and the increasing powers of the federal 
government. Special attention is given to a wide range of problems facing 
our government and to current world affairs. 

20. Comparative Government. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A comparative study of the important governmental systems of the 
world, both democratic and authoritarian. Comparison and contrasts are 
made between unitary and federal forms. Special study is made of the 
governmental system in force in the Soviet Union. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

♦ 84 • 



CATALOGUE 

21. Foreign Relations. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A study of the development, structure, and functions of the United 
States diplomatic and consular service. Consideration will be given to 
recruitment, training, and promotions in the Foreign Service. Special 
emphasis will be given to the problems faced by American diplomatic 
officials as revealed in contemporary international relations. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

22. State and County Government. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

This course deals with the structure and functions of state and county 
government. Emphasis is placed on federal-state-local relationships, on 
administrative organization and services, on the courts, and on legislative 
representation. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite or a corequisite. 

23. City Government. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

This course deals with the rise of urbanization and with the accom- 
panying growth of municipal functions. Special attention will be paid to 
metropolitan areas, to the legal process and status of cities, to municipal 
relations with state and national government, to urban politics, and to 
the various forms of city government. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite or a corequisite. 

30. Political Parties in the United States. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A study of the history and origins of political parties, their organiza- 
tion, development, and methods of operation, leaders, machines and 
bosses, campaigns and platforms. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

31. American Constitutional Government. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A study of the growth and development of the Constitution through 
the medium of judicial construction. Recent decisions illustrating its ap- 
plication to new conditions of the present age, and proposals for court 
modification, are given particular attention. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

32. Contemporary World Affairs. Mr. Fehr 

Two hours. First or second semester. Offered 1956-1957 . 
The purpose of this one-semester course is to acquaint students with 
current developments in the field of public affairs, literature, science, 
religion, music, drama, and art. Students are instructed in the use and 
evaluation of various communications media — the daily newspaper, the 
weekly news magazine, radio and TV, filmstrips, recordings, and specialized 
publications. Special attention is given to broad domestic and international 
problems facing the United States. No prerequisite is required. 

. 85 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
33. Public Opinion. Mr. Fehr 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

An analysis of the nature and sources of contemporary public opinion, 
with special attention to types of censorship and to modern propaganda 
devices. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite or a corequisite. 

40. Political Theory. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

A survey of the different philosophies and theories of government, 
ancient and modern, with special reference to political philosophy since 
the sixteenth century. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

41. International Politics. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

This course is designed to acquaint students with the origin, forms, 
dynamics, prospects of the international political pattern. Special emphasis 
is placed on current developments and changing concepts in world politics. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

Geography lOa-lOb. See page 78. 
Integrated Studies 30. See page 56. 

HUMANITIES 

See Integrated Studies, page 56. 

LANGUAGES 

See Foreign Languages, page 75. 

LATIN 

See Foreign Languages, page 77. 



MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor Bissinger and Assistant Professor Gilmore 

The Department of Mathematics has three major aims: 

1. To attempt to make all students aware of the part mathematics 
plays in the modern world, to feel and to enjoy the beauty of in- 
tellectual honesty thru its symbolism and "language" so that they 
can intelligently consider the quantitative aspects of many fields 
of work as well as their own field of concentration; 

2. to assist students, in the sciences and other fields, to acquire a 
mathematical technique — a tool — which they can apply therein; 

• 86 . 



CATALOGUE 

3. to prepare those students who want to specialize in Mathematics, 
statistics, and actuarial work so that they can use this training 
in such fields as economics, physics, biology, chemistry, or 
teaching. 

Many students will want to further their preparation and go on 
to graduate school. The Department will attempt to place the grad- 
uating senior in a school where such study can be pursued and, in 
case of financial need, will attempt to obtain for the student part- 
time teaching at such institution. 

A student who plans to teach in secondary school should consult 
the requirements for certification in teaching under the Department 
of Education. Mathematics 10, 11, and 43 are recommended for all 
prospective mathematics teachers. 

Major: Students majoring in Mathematics are required to take 
courses 11, 22, 23, 36, 40.1, and nine additional hours of mathe- 
matics, as well as Physics 20 and 21. A reading knowledge of French 
or German is required; students planning to go on to graduate 
school should have both. 

If a major in Mathematics desires a B.S. degree, he must take the 
general requirements (page 35) for the degree and must elect his 
minor in physics, chemistry, or biology. 

If a major desires the A.B. degree, the general requirements are 
taken (page 35) and the minor can be in any department other 
than physics, chemistry, or biology. 

In either case, the candidate will be required to take, during the 
senior year, the graduate record examination as well as a compre- 
hensive examination made up by the departmental chairman. If 
departmental honors are desired, eligibility must be satisfied at the 
end of the sophomore year by registration with the Dean of the 
College. During the senior year, the chairman will arrange for an 
additional oral examination by a committee of at least two members 
of the department and one member from outside the department 
who will decide if honors are to be recommended to the Dean. This 
examination will follow the written comprehensive. 

Jobs for students in mathematics and statistics are available in 
business, education and government. Especially in statistics can the 
student find opportunity in biological and psychological research 
projects, market research projects, public surveys, time and motion 
studies, and quality control in both industry and government. 

Minor: Students minoring in Mathematics are required to take 
one of the following sequences of courses: 

a) Math. 10, 11, and 4 additional hours; 

b) Math. 11, 22, 23, and 4 additional hours. 

• 87 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

10. Introduction to Mathematical Analysis. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A unified course involving training in concepts of arithmetic, algebra, 
trigonometry, and graphical analysis. The nature and significance of math- 
ematics is stressed. It may be taken as part of the general college require- 
ments by students who have had at least two years of high school 
Mathematics. 

11. Analytical Geometry and Calculus. Mr. Bissinger 

Four hours. Throughout the year. 
A thorough background in trigonometry is required. This course begins 
with plane analytical geometry and goes on to develop the concepts of 
differential and integral calculus including formal rules of both with 
applications. 

12. Elementary Statistics. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Data is analyzed by means of frequency distributions and the statistics 
which describe them. Averages, measures of variation, difference between 
distributions, curve fitting, correlation, use of normal distribution and some 
simple cases of probability judgment are studied with examples from 
business and the sciences. This course is not open to students who have 
credit for Math. 11. 

19. Mathematics of Finance. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. First semester. 
The course seeks to present the mathematical principles and operations 
used in financial work. A detailed study of compound interest, compound 
discount, and annuities is undertaken. Application of these principles is 
then made to practical problems of amortization, sinking funds, deprecia- 
ation, valuations of bonds, and building and loan associations. 

22. Advanced Calculus. Mr. Bissinger and Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. First semester. 
Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, infinite series, and the expansion 
of functions into power series are the main topics studied. 
Prerequisite: Math. 11. 

23. Ordinary Differential Equations. Mr. Bissinger and Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Second semester. 

The ordinary type of differential equations is studied and solved, espe- 
cially those of the first and second orders, with emphasis on applications 
to mechanical, electrical, and chemical problems, as well as biological 
growth. 

Prerequisite: Math. 11, 22 

36. Theory of Equations Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. First semester. 1956-1957. 
The basic theory of equations concerning roots and their properties, 
limits to the roots, solution by radicals of cubic and quartic equations, 




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CATALOGUE 

number of real roots, numerical solution of equations by Horner's and 
Newton's Methods, symmetric functions, and the elements of determinants. 
Prerequisite: Math. 10 

37. Mathematical Statistics. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Second semester. 1956-1957. 

The course considers classical and certain modern methods in statistics. 
Topics covered will include frequency distributions of one, two, and more 
than two variables, large-and small-sample theory, non-parametric methods 
and the Chi-square test. 

Prerequisite: Math. 11. 

38. Higher Calculus. Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. First semester. 1955-1956. 

A rigorous treatment of the limit notion as applied to sets and se- 
quences with the development of continuity, real functions, their deriva- 
tives and integrals are studied. 

Prerequisite: Math. 22 

39. Vector Analysis. Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. Second semester. 1955-1956. 

The emphasis is placed on the algebra and calculus of vectors with 
application thru the concepts of gradient, divergence, and curl in geom- 
etry and mathematical physics. 

Prerequisite: Math. 22 

41. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable. Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 1956-1957. 

The course develops the theory of analytic functions using the Cauchy- 
Riemann equations. The real and imaginary parts are interpreted for 
lines of flow and equal potential with applications to hydrodynamics, aero- 
dynamics, and other fields. 

Prerequisite: Math. 22, 38 or permission of instructor 

40. Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics. Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 1955-1956. 

The course introduces the student to the classical equations of heat 
flow, the vibrating string, sound waves, and others. Also are studied 
Volterra integral equations and their solutions by iteration and popular 
methods. Remarks are made on Bessel's equation and functions, Legendre 
polynomials, the gamma function, Fourier series and Wronskians. 

Prerequisite: Approval of head of department. 

43. Theory of Numbers. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. First semester. 1955-1956. 

The basis of the course is the properties of the natural numbers, 
diophantine solutions of linear equations, simple continued fractions, con- 
gruences, and some arithmetical functions. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

. 89 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
45. Periodic Functions and Fourier Analysis Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. Second semester. 1955-1956. 

The course introduces the useful concept of orthogonality of functions 
and convolution with series representation yielding the famous Bessel's 
inequality, Parseval's relation, and uniqueness theorems. Exercise in 
harmonic analysis of discrete data and application of Laplace Transforma- 
tion Theory are given. 

Prerequisite: Permission of head of department. 

48. Abstract Algebra Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. First semester. 1956-1957. 

Integral domains, fields, rings, and ideals are emphasized thru an 
axiomatic approach with an introduction to the theory of numbers and 
abstract mathematical logic. 

Prerequisite: Permission of head of department. 

49. Theory of Finite Groups Mr. Bissinger 

Three hours. Second semester. 1956-1957. 

The group concept is exemplified thru transformation with attention 
to cosets, isomorphism, homomorphism, and automorphism. Normal sub- 
groups and quotient groups are studied. 

Prerequisite: Math. 48 

40.1 Mathematics Seminar Staff 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

The senior major is required to work independently of class room sched- 
ule with his departmental advisor. The work may consist of writing an 
exposition on known material, research, further study in a new field, or 
a review of a book or paper, depending on the future plans of the student. 
Recent programs have included the subjects of: Operations Research, 
Numerical Analysis, Game Theory, and Linear Programming, Partial Dif- 
ferential Equations in Engineering. 

Other Courses Available on Sufficient Demand: 

Statistical Methods for Chemists 

Advanced Business Statistics 

Industrial Sampling Theory and Technique 

Matrix Algebra 

Symbolic Logic 

MUSIC 

Professors Gillespie, Bender; Associate Professors, Stachow, 
Fairlamb, Smith; Assistant Professors Thurmond, Lanese; 
Instructor, Knisley 

Music is recognized as having a proper place in a liberal educa- 
tion. The following courses, available to students in the liberal arts, 
are intended primarily to promote the appreciation of music. 

Major: See The Conservatory of Music, page 101. 

. 90 • 



CATALOGUE 

Minor: Twenty semester hours including continuous private les- 
sons on an instrument or in voice the entire four years. The selec- 
tion of courses must be supervised and approved by the Music 
Department adviser. 

Courses must be selected from the following: Sight Singing 10, 
11, 20; Ear Training 10, 11, 20; Theory of Music 10, 11, 20, 22, 30, 
40, 41 (Arranging and Scoring for the Modern Orchestra); History 
and Appreciation of Music, 30, 31; Music Literature 32; Conducting 
20, 30, 40; College Chorus. For description of courses see pages 
103 to 111. 

The above courses may be taken as electives for credit toward any 
degree conferred by the college. 

Courses in applied music will not be credited toward any degree 
except the Bachelor of Science with a major in Music Education 
unless they are taken as part of a full major or minor in music. 

N.B. No student may receive credit for chorus more than one 
year. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Ehrhart 

Philosophy is man's quest for universal knowledge both about the 
world in which he lives and about himself, understood in their 
broadest and deepest relationships. The method of philosophy is free 
and open inquiry. Its goal and purpose is the increase of wisdom 
among men. 

Major: Philosophy 10, 11, 20a-20b, 35a-35b and six additional 
semester hours. Two hours credit in Integrated Studies 20 is trans- 
ferable to a Philosophy major. 

Minor: Philosophy 10, 11, 20a-20b, 35a-35b. 

10. Introduction to Philosophy. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. First semester. 
This course is intended to introduce beginners to the basic method and 
some of the main problems of philosophy, while at the same time giving 
them at least an inkling of the work of the greatest thinkers and an op- 
portunity to do some philosophizing of their own. 

11. Introduction to Logic. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. Second semester. 
Introduction to the rules of clear and effective thinking, as well as 
those of exact communication and the logical use of language. Attention 
is given both to the classical syllogism of deductive logic, and inductive 
logic and scientific method. The aim of this course is primarily practical, 
with considerable use being made of exercises and problems. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
20a. Ancient Philosophy. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
The aim in this course is to trace the rise of Western philosophy from 
its non-philosophical origin in Greek religion, through the teachings of 
Plato and Aristotle, and the Hellenistic philosophies of Stoicism and 
Epicureanism. 

20b. Medieval Philosophy. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
This course continues the history of Western philosophical thought, 
tracing it through the thinking of the early Church Fathers, Neo- 
Platonism, and the Scholastic period of medieval philosophy. 

30. Ethics. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
An inquiry into the major theories on the nature of the good and 
the good life for man; examination of the problems of moral relativism 
and moral freedom; and discussion of the practical problems of morality 
as they are encountered in personal, political, and economic life. 

31. Philosophy of Religion. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The purpose of this course is to inquire into the validity of religious 
knowledge, as evidence is available from the realms of nature, moral ex- 
perience, aesthetic experience, religious experience, and history. The dif- 
ficulties involved in religious belief are examined, with the aim of arriving 
at an adequate religious viewpoint. 

35a. Modern Philosophy. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
In this course, which is the logical continuation of Philosophy 20a-20b, 
the changes brought about in philosophical thinking by the cultural and 
scientific renaissance are followed and a study made of philosophical de- 
velopments from Bacon and Descartes through Kant. 

35b. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy. Mr. Ehrhart 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
Here the history of Western philosophy is brought down to the present, 
starting with the philosophy of Fichte and concluding with a study of 
the living philosophers as well as the outstanding contemporary schools of 
philosophy. 

41. Aesthetics. Mr. Ehrhart 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A survey of the philosophy of the beautiful, the correlation of the 
same with the development of the fine arts, and a consideration of funda 
mental principles of criticism. 

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CATALOGUE 

PHYSICS 

Professor Grimm, Assistant Professor Gilmore 

The Physics Department aims not only to provide its majors an 
introduction to the techniques and applications of physical science, 
but aims also to give students of Liberal Arts an insight into the 
behavior of non-living matter and to indicate the possible extent, 
as well as the limitations, of our knowledge of the physical universe. 

Major: Physics 20, 21, 32, 33, 43, 44, 45, and any three additional 
semester hours. 

Minor: Physics 20, 21 and any ten additional semester hours. 

20. General College Physics. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
Three hours lectures and recitations per week. This course will be a 
thorough investigation of the fundamental principles of physical science, 
and is especially intended as a preparation for advanced courses in Physics, 
and for those interested in the practical applications of physical laws and 
principles. When accompanied by Physics 21, it meets the minimum re- 
quirements of those who are candidates for the bachelor's degree in 
science and for admission to the Medical Schools. 

21. General Physics Laboratory. Mr. Gilmore 

Three hours. Throughout the year. One hour credit per semester. 
Laboratory work associated with the subject matter of Physics 20. This 
course should accompany Physics 20. Laboratory fee: $10.00 per semester 

30. Mechanics. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. 
This course will be a thorough investigation of the mechanics of solids, 
liquids, gases, and sound. Prerequisite: Physics 20, 21. 

31. Mechanics Laboratory. Mr. Grimm 

Two hours. First semester. 
Experimental work in precise measurements. Conventional experiments 
with momentum, rotation, and physical moduli of materials. Laboratory 
fee: $10.00. 

32. Magnetism and Electricity. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. 
This course will be a thorough consideration of the laws of the electric 
and magnetic fields and the power applications of electricity as direct 
and low frequency alternating currents. 

33. Electrical Measurements. Mr. Grimm 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
One hour credit per semester. 

Measurements of potential, current, resistance, capacity, and inductance 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

in the field of direct currents and of alternating currents at low and high 
frequencies. This course should accompany Physics 32 and 46, and may 
be divided into two parts. Laboratory fee: $10.00 per semester. 

43. Light: Optics and Spectroscopy. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. First semester. 

This course will be concerned with the nature of light and its trans- 
mission through various media including reflection, refraction, and dis- 
persion. Prerequisite: Physics 20, 21. 

44. Optics Laboratory. Mr. Grimm 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 
Experimental work with reflection, refraction, and dispersion of light. 
This course should accompany Physics 43 and Physics 45. Laboratory fee: 
$10.00 per semester. 

45. Modern Physics. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 
An investigation of the application of physical principles to molecular, 
atomic, and electronic phenomena. Recent developments in nuclear physics. 

46. High Frequency Alternating Currents. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The generation of high frequency alternating currents and their appli- 
cation to radio transmission and its associated equipment. 

47. Heat and Thermodynamics. Mr. Grimm 

Three hours. Second semester. 
The theory of heat, kinetic theory of gases, and the laws of thermo- 
dynamics. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

See History and Political Science, page 84. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Assistant Professors Love, Dent, and Ebersole 

In keeping with the objective of the liberal arts, church-related 
college, the courses offered in the Department of Psychology are 
designed (1) to develop in the student an understanding and appre- 
ciation of the biological and environmental bases of human behavior 
and of the role of that behavior in adjustment; (2) to foster healthy 
adjustment through the objective application of psychological prin- 
ciples to problems related to personal, vocational, and moral growth; 
and (3) to furnish a theoretical, scientific, and practical acquaintance 
with principles, methods, and techniques not only basic to graduate 

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CATALOGUE 

study and employment in psychology but beneficial in the many occu- 
pations in which psychology is applied. 

Major: Twenty-four hours, to include Psychology 20 and 35. 

Minor: Eighteen hours, to include Psychology 20. 

20. General Psychology. Dr. Love 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 
A beginning course in general psychology, designed to acquaint the 
student with psychological principles and their application in daily life. 

21. Psychology of Childhood. Dr. Ebersole, Miss Dent 

Three hours. First semester. 

A study of the psychological development of the child from the begin- 
ning of life to adolescence. Throughout the course emphasis is placed 
upon practical problems of child care and training. Topics considered 
include the development of proper physical and health habits, children's 
questions, religious and sex instruction, emotional and personality prob- 
lems, problems of family life and relationships, behavior problems and 
discipline, and problems of school life and relationships. Laboratory fee 
of one dollar. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

22. Mental Hygiene. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

A study of wholesome and effective personality adjustments, including 
the causes and treatment of the more common social and emotional mal- 
adjustments. Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

23. Educational Psychology. Dr. Love 

Three hours. Throughout the year. 

A psychological study of the nature of the learner and the nature of 
the learning process. The course includes such topics as individual differ- 
ences, motivation, emotion, and transfer of training. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

30. Applied Psychology. 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A survey of the applications of psychology to the various fields of 
human relations. Among the areas covered are vocational guidance, per- 
sonnel problems in business and industry, public opinion and propaganda, 
advertising methods, work and efficiency, and fatigue. Laboratory fee of 
two dollars. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

31. Psychology of Adolescence. Dr. Love 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of the individual's development from childhood to maturity. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Characteristic features of physical, intellectual, social, emotional, and 
moral and religious growth are considered in detail, with practical appli- 
cation to problems of educational, vocational, and heterosexual adjust- 
ment. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

32. Abnormal Psychology. Dr. Love 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

An introduction, from the biosocial viewpoint, to the behavior disorders. 
Topics emphasized include behavior disorders as a twentieth century social 
problem; the development of current thinking concerning such disorders, 
as shown in religious and secular literature, as well as in the history of 
science; the dynamics of behavior as related to pathology; and the severe 
diagnostic categories of the psychoses and psychoneuroses. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

33. Social Psychology. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A study of psychological facts and principles and their application to 
problems arising from the interaction of individuals and groups in 
modern society. The biological and social foundations of human behavior, 
factors influencing social adjustment and interaction, the main types of 
social institutions, and major areas of social conflict are considered with 
a view to the formulation of concrete solutions to selected problems of 
major concern. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

35. Experimental Psychology. Miss Dent 

Three hours. Second semester. Required of all students with a major in 
psychology. 

This course introduces the student to the most important methods and 
techniques of research in psychology and to a number of the notable 
experiments in the field. Throughout the course the requirements of 
scientific method and the principle of "learning by doing" are emphasized. 
Laboratory fee of five dollars. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

41. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. Dr. Love 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the major types 
of educational and behavior problems, and with the most important 
techniques of individual diagnosis and treatment currently employed. 
The relationship of tests in the clinical situation is discussed as is the 
type of test used and its purpose in treating the individual. Various psycho- 
therapeutic methods are considered. Laboratory fee of three dollars. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20 and 32. 

42. Mental Tests and Measurements. Dr. Love 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
This course will acquaint students with the general theory underlying 

• 96 • 



CATALOGUE 

intelligence testing, and will afford practice in the giving of individual 
intelligence tests of both the verbal and the performance type. Emphasis 
will be placed, however, upon the administration of the Revised Stanford- 
Binet Tests of Intelligence and the Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale. 
Students will be held responsible for achieving some proficiency in the 
use of these tests. Laboratory fee of five dollars. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

Educational Measurements. See Education 30, page 68. 

Principles of Guidance Organization and Administration. See Edu- 
cation 41, page 71. 

RELIGION 

Professors Richie, Ehrhart, Assistant Professor Sparks 

The aim of this department is to provide opportunity for the study 
of our religious and moral heritage from ancient cultures and, in 
particular, from that which gave birth to the Judaeo-Christian tra- 
dition. 

Through courses, both elective and required, the department 
seeks to orient the student to a Christian world view. It strives toward 
an appreciation and understanding of the Holy Scriptures and the 
heritage of the Christian Church, the cultivation of skills for prac- 
tical service in a local church or community, and the undergirding 
of Christian living as a normal and dynamic experience. 

Professionally, basic foundations are offered to those students 
who are in preparation for the Christian ministry, the World Mis- 
sion field, the teaching of Religion, and other Church vocations. 

Major: Religion 10a- 10b, 11 a- lib, 32, Philosophy 31, and 11 
additional semester hours. 

Minor: Religion lOa-lOb, lla-llb, 20, 30, 32 and four additional 
semester hours. 

lOa-lOb. Introduction to English Bible. Mr. Sparks 

Two hours. Throughout the year. This course or Religion lla-llb required 
of all college freshmen. Offered 1957—1958. 

An appreciative and historical survey of the literature of the Old and 
New Testaments. 

lla-llb. Introduction to Religion. Mr. Sparks 

Two hours. Throughout the year. This course or Religion lOa-lOb is re- 
quired of all college freshmen. Offered 1956-1957. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the place 
and significance of religion — what it is and does. Included are studies in 
the nature of God, the worth of man, science and religion, personal 
religious living, the Judaeo-Christian tradition as found in the Old and 
New Testaments, the place of the Church in our modern life, and con- 
temporary problems in the field of religion. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

20. The Prophets. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of the lives of the major and minor prophets, and an analysis 
of their contributions to the ethical and religious thought of the Old 
Testament. 

21. The History and Religion of the Hebrews. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
The purpose of this course is to furnish the student with a true per- 
spective of the religious growth of the Hebrews during the period of the 
Old Testament. 

30. Life and Epistles of Paul. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
The life and epistles of Paul, and the practices, problems, and beliefs 
of the early church. 

31. The Christian Church. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of the growth of Christianity beyond the primitive church, 
with special emphasis on the origin and growth of denominations. 

32. The Teachings of Jesus. Mr. Ehrhart 

Two hours. First semester. Offered yearly. All students must take this course 
or Philosophy 31. 

This course attempts an intensive study of the religious concepts of 
Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. 

40. Principles of Religious Education. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A fundamental course investigating some of the theories, principles, 
and problems of Religious Education. 

41. The Church School. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
A study of the principles, problems, and methods in the organization 
and administration of the Sunday School, Church Vacation School, and 
Week Day School of Religion. 

42. The History of Religion. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1956—1957. 
This course is intended to provide the student with the facts concerning 
the rise and development of religion in general. The historical view is 
followed throughout. 

43. Biblical Archaeology. Mr. Richie 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
The course reviews the findings of the explorer, excavator, and scholar 
in the field of Archaeology, and attempts to evaluate their contribution to 
and illumination of Bible facts and teachings. 

Philosophy of Religion. See Philosophy 31. 

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CATALOGUE 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

See Integrated Studies, page 56. 

SPANISH 

See Foreign Languages, page 78. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Assistant Professor Brumbaugh 

The aim of the department is to prepare students for citizenship 
by acquainting them with the principles and problems of human 
associations within the several fields of specialized study. The courses 
are intended to be utilitarian as well as cultural. 

Major: Integrated Studies 30, Departmental Comprehensive Exam- 
ination, Sociology 20, 21, 22, 30, 31, 33, 40, 43. 

Minor: Sociology 20, 21, 22, six additional hours, Integrated Studies 
30. 

20. Introductory Sociology. Miss Brumbaugh 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956—1957. 
The nature of man's social heritage, the bearing of group life upon the 
individual's personality, the development of social institutions and com- 
munity life, and the forces involved in social change and reorganization 
are the principal topics studied in this course. 

21. Modern Social Problems. Miss Brumbaugh 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
This course deals with the preventive and remedial aspects of current 
social problems such as neglected children, widowhood, divorce, old age, 
poverty, unemployment, illegitimacy, poor health, housing, race, juvenile 
delinquency. 

22. Marriage and the Family. Miss Brumbaugh 

Two hours. Second semester. Offered 1956-1957. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the history 
and general social problems of the family, to aid in preparation for mar- 
riage, and to offer counseling services to those already married. 

30. Criminology. 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1956-1957. 

A study of the causes of crime and the treatment of criminals; criminal 
behavior; the police system and the criminal courts; treatment of juvenile 
offenders; punishment, probation, parole, and reform. Observation and 
criticism of social agencies dealing with the crime problem is required. 

Sociology 20 and 21 are prerequisites. 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

31. Introduction to Social Work. 

Three hours. Throughout the year. Offered 1956-1957. 

A pre-professional course dealing with the nature and requirements of 
the different fields of social work. Observation of the work of private and 
public agencies in the locality serving this field is required. 

Sociology 20 and 21 are prerequisites. Fee $2.00 per year. 

33. Social Institutions. Miss Brumbaugh 

Three hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

A study of the organization of contemporary American society with 
special emphasis on institutions such as the church, the family, economic 
and governmental organizations, and the school. An analysis is made of 
the interrelationship of these institutions and of their place in American 
culture. 

Sociology 20 and 21 are prerequisites. 

40. Population. Miss Brumbaugh 

Two hours. First semester. Offered 1957-1958. 

A study of the size, growth, composition, and distribution of the 
peoples of the earth. Emphasis is placed on the social significance of the 
nature and change of population. 

Sociology 20 and 21 are prerequisites. 

42. Rural Sociology. Miss Brumbaugh 

Two hours. Throughout the year. 

This course deals with the population composition, institutions, and 
problems of rural life; with the attitudes, structure, and organization of 
rural communities; with the processes of social change as found in rural 
areas. 

Field work will be required. 

Sociology 20 and 21 are prerequisites. 

43. Development of Sociological Theory. Miss Brumbaugh 

Three hours. Second semester. Offered 1957-1958. 
A study of the growth of social thought from the primitive to the 
present time from which have come our social institutions and democratic 
conceptions of human relations. 

Geography lOa-lOb. See page 78. 
Political Science 33. See page 86. 
Integrated Studies 30. See page 56. 



100 



The Conservatory of Music 



Professors Gillespie, Bender, Carmean; Associate Professors 

Stachow, Campbell, Malsh, Crawford, Fairlamb, Smith; 

Assistant Professors Rover, Thurmond, Lanese; 

Instructor Knisley 

THE aim of the Conservatory of Music is to teach music histori- 
cally and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture; to offer 
courses that will give a thorough and practical understanding of 
theoretical subjects; and to train artists and teachers. 

Major: See program outline below. 

Minor: Twenty semester hours including continuous private les- 
sons on an instrument or in voice the entire four years. The selec- 
tion of courses must be supervised and approved by the Music 
Department adviser. 

Courses must be selected from the following: Sight Singing 10, 11, 
20; Ear Training 10, 11, 20; Theory of Music 10, 11, 20, 22, 30, 40, 
41 (Arranging and Scoring for the Modern Orchestra); History and 
Appreciation of Music 30, 31; Music Literature 32; Conducting 20, 30, 
40; College Chorus. For description of courses see pages 103 to 111. 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

For Training Supervisors and Teachers of Public School Music 
(B.S. with a major in Music Education) 

This course has been approved by the Pa. State Council of Education for 
the preparation of supervisors and teachers of Music Education. 

The Music Education Teachers and Supervisors Course requires two 
private lessons per week, one of which is included in the tuition. Payment 
of the second private lesson will be an extra fee. Tuition also includes the 
use of a practice room two hours daily, and theoretical and college courses 
not exceeding a total of 17 semester hours each semester. For cost of pri- 
vate lessons, see page 19. 

The outline of the curriculum follows: 

_,. „ Clock Semester 

First Semester Hours Hours 

English, including Library Science 3 3 

Introduction to Education 20 3 3 

Harmony 10 3 3 

Sight Singing 10 3 2 

Ear Training 10 3 2 

Applied Music: Voice, Piano, Strings (Violin, Viola, 
'Cello, Bass) ; Woodwinds (Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, 

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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Clock 
Hours 
Bassoon) ; Brasses (Trumpet, French Horn, Trom- 
bone, Tuba) ; and Percussion Instruments. Chorus, 
Orchestra, and Band. Work arranged for greatest 

benefit of students 4 

Health Education — Physical Education 2 

Orientation (no credit) 1 

22 



Semester 
Hours 



16 



Second Semester 

English 3 3 

Sociology or Contemporary World Affairs 3 or 2 3 or 2 

Harmony 11 3 3 

Sight Singing 11 2 2 

Ear Training 11 2 2 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 6 3 

Health Education — Physical Education 2 1 

21 or 20 17 or 16 



Third Semester 

The Humanities, Literature of the Western World . . 4 

General Psychology 20 3 

Harmony 20 2 

Sight Singing 20 2 

Ear Training 20 2 

Eurhythmies 20 1 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 6 

20 



17 



Fourth Semester 

The Humanities, Literature of the Western World . . 4 4 

Ed. Psychology 23 3 3 

Scoring for the Band 22 2 2 

Elementary Conducting 20 2 2 

Methods and Materials 20 4 3 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 6 3 

21 17 



Fifth Semester 

Political and Social History of U. S. & Pa 3 

Intermediate Conducting 30 2 

Form and Analysis 41 2 

History and Appreciation of Music 30 3 

Methods and Materials 30 4 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 6 

20 



16 



102 



CATALOGUE 

c. , „ Clock Semester 

Sixth Semester H ours Hours 

Music Literature 30 2 2 

Harmony 30 (Keyboard) 2 2 

History and Appreciation of Music 31 3 3 

Methods and Materials 31 4 3 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 6 3 

Elective 2 2 

19 15 

Seventh Semester 

Advanced Conducting 2 2 

Eurhythmies 40 1 1 

Physical Science 40 3 3 

Student Teaching and Conferences 40 8 6 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 4 2 

Elective 2 2 

20 16 

Eighth Semester 

Educational Measurements 2 2 

Student Teaching and Conferences 41 8 6 

Applied Music (See First Semester) 4 2 

Elective 5 5 

19 15 



OUTLINE OF COURSES 
I. Theory of Music 
Sight Singing Courses 

10. Sight Singing. Miss Gillespie 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
Sight Singing 10 is a beginning course in music reading. It is integrated 
with studies being simultaneously introduced and used in Dictation 10 
and Harmony 10. 

11. Sight Singing. Miss Gillespie 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Sight Singing 11 covers the study equivalent to any advanced reading 
material necessary for use in music education. 

20. Sight Singing. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 

A continuation with exercises and instrumental and vocal literature of 
increasing difficulty, both tonal and rhythmic. Study and application of 
tempo, dynamic and interpretative markings. 

Speed and accuracy are expected. New literature is constantly used, re- 
sulting in an extensive survey of music materials. 

• 103 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Dictation (Ear Training) Courses 

10. Ear Training. Mrs. Bender 

Three hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
A study of tone and rhythm integrated with Sight Singing 10 and Har- 
mony 10, including the writing of intervals, melodies, and chord pro- 
gressions as dictated from the piano. 

11. Ear Training. Mrs. Bender 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
A continuation of the study of tone, rhythm, and intervals. A consider 
able portion of the time is devoted to the development of harmonic die 
tation. 

20. Ear Training. Mrs. Bender 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 

A study of the more difficult tonal problems and complicated rhythms. 
Chromatic dictation correlated with chromatic harmony. 

Designed to develop ability to recognize and write chord progressions, 
including modulation, and altered chords. 



Harmony Courses 

10. Harmony. Mr. Stachow 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. First semester. 
A study of the rudiments of music, including notation, scales, intervals, 
and triads; the connection of triads by harmonizing melodies and basses 
with fundamental triads; playing of simple cadences at the piano; analysis 
of phrases and periods. 

11. Harmony. Mr. Stachow 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Deals with inversions of triads, seventh and ninth chords, harmoniza- 
tions of melodies and figured basses; analysis and composition of the 
smaller forms; modulation. 

20. Harmony (Chromatic Harmony). Mr. Stachow 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
The use of dominant and diminished sevenths as embellishments of and 
substitutes for diatonic harmony; harmonization of melodies and figured 
basses; analysis of two and three part song forms; composition in two 
part song form. Playing of more advanced cadences and modulations at 
the piano. 

30. Harmony (Keyboard). Mrs. Bender 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Harmonization at the piano of melodies, both with four part harmony 
and accompaniment; transposition; modulation; improvisation. 

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CATALOGUE 

OTHER THEORY COURSES 

22. Scoring for the Band Mr. Stachow 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Study of instrumentation, devices, techniques and mechanics of scoring 
transcriptions, arrangements and solos for concert band, special work in 
scoring for marching band. Laboratory analysis and demonstration of 
various instrumental colors and combinations. Emphasis will be placed 
on creative scoring and original work for band. 

40. Counterpoint. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First or second semester. 
Elementary work in strict Counterpoint (five species in Two Part and 
Three Part Counterpoint) . 

41. Form and Analysis. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
This course offers an intensive study of the structure of music including 
hymns and simple folk songs, two and three part song forms, variations, 
contrapuntal forms, rondo and sonata forms. Compositions in these forms 
are studied and analyzed for harmonic content and structure. 

43. Arranging and Scoring for the Modern Orchestra. Mr. Stachow 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First or second semester. 

Study of modern harmony, modulation, style analvsis, special instru- 
mental effects as applied to modern arranging. Laboratory analysis and 
demonstration of sectional and ensemble voicings. 

Instruction offered privately and in classes. 

42. Schillinger System of Music Composition. Mr. Stachow 

Private teaching. 

A scientific system of music composition created by the late Joseph 
Schillinger, teacher of such accomplished professionals as George Gersh- 
win, Ted Royal Dewar. 

The major aims of the system are to (1) generalize underlying princi- 
ples regarding the behavior of tonal phenomena, (2) classify all the 
available resources of our tonal system, (3) teach a comprehensive appli- 
cation of scientific method to all components of the tonal art, to problems 
of melody, rhythm, harmony, counterpoint, orchestration and to composi- 
tion itself. 

The system is best studied in the light of a traditional background and 
admission to course or private instruction will be by special permission 
only. 

II. Methods and Materials 
20. Methods: Child Voice and Rote Songs with Materials 

and Methods for Kindergarten and Grades 1, 2, 3. 

Miss Gillespie 

Four hours per week, three semester hours credit. Second semester. 
A comprehensive study of the use of the child's singing voice in the 
primary grades, including the treatment of uncertain singers, acquaintance 

• 105 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

with the best collections of rote songs, and practice in choosing, memoriz- 
ing, singing, and presenting a large number of these songs; methods of pre- 
senting rhythm through singing games and simple interpretative move 
ments; beginnings of directed music appreciation; foundation studies for 
later technical developments. Comparative study of recognized Public 
School Music Series of books. 

30a. Methods: All Materials and Methods for Grades 4, 5, 6. 

Vocal: Miss Gillespie 

Four hours per week, three semester hours credit. First semester. 
A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades; special 
attention to the formal or technical work of these grades with an evalua- 
tion of appropriate texts and recent approaches. Preparation of lesson 
plans, and observation are required. Music appreciation is continued. 

30b. Methods, Instrumental: Grades 4, 5, and 6 Mr. Thurmond 

One hour per week, one semester hour credit. First semester. 
A study of methods and materials used in teaching band and orchestral 
instruments to children in these grades, with emphasis on a sound rhyth- 
mic approach. Both individual and class lesson techniques are studied. 

31a. Methods, Vocal. Miss Gillespie 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
A study of adolescent tendencies of high school students. Course pro- 
poses to acquaint the class with organization and class content of materials 
to be used. Recent trends in teaching are studied. 

31b. Methods, Instrumental: Junior and Senior High School 

Mr. Thurmond 

One hour per week, one semester hour credit. Second semester. 
A continuation of Methods 30b. Intermediate and advanced instru- 
mental teaching, methods of organizing and directing school orchestras 
and bands. 

40. Methods: Advanced Problems. Mr. Thurmond 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director 
of school orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general 
interest will include: organization and management; stimulating and main- 
taining interest; selection of beginners; scheduling rehearsals and class 
lessons; financing and purchasing instruments, uniforms, and other equip- 
ment; marching bands — formations and drills; evaluating music materials; 
organizing festivals, contests, and public performances. 

41. Methods: Piano Pedagogy. Mrs. Bender 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
A study of methods of teaching piano to children and adults. The course 
includes the song approach method, presentation of the fundamental 
principles of rhythm, sight reading, tone quality, form, technic, pedaling, 

• 106 • 



CATALOGUE 

transposition and the harmonization of simple melodies. Examination and 
discussion of materials will be included. 

42. Advanced Instrumental Teaching. Mr. Thurmond 

Three semester hours credit. One semester. 
Actual experience with practical problems involved in the following 
activities: teaching advanced instrumental classes, conducting sectional 
rehearsals and full band rehearsals, organizing and developing an ex- 
ploratory instrument class, training a young marching band, scheduling, 
preparing and presenting a public concert. 

43. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Problems. Mr. Thurmond 

Three semester hours credit. One semester. 
Use of the tape recorder, preparation of a list of 100 most used musical 
terms, most successful ways of raising money; study of the attitudes of 
teen-agers toward music study; how to set up an inventory for band uni- 
forms; specifications for music rooms in new buildings; question and an- 
swer periods with visiting music directors and school administrators; ob- 
servation of nearby summer instrumental programs. 

III. Student Teaching 
40, 41. Student Teaching. Mr. Thurmond, Instrumental 

Mr. Smith, Vocal 

Eight hours throughout the year, twelve semester hours credit. 

Student teaching in Music Education is done in the Annville-Cleona 
Joint and the Derry Township Consolidated Schools and includes vocal 
and instrumental work from elementary to senior high school. 

A fee of $20.00 per semester is charged for student teaching. 

IV. Instrumental Courses 
Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught 
the fundamental principles underlying the playing of all band and 
orchestra instruments, learn to play on instruments of each group, 
viz., string, woodwind, brass, and percussion. Problems of class pro- 
cedure in public schools are discussed; transposition of all instru- 
ments is taught and an extensive bibliography is prepared. Ensemble 
playing is an integral part of these courses. 

Brass Instruments (Cornet, French Horn, Trombone, Baritone, 
Tuba). 

10. Brass Class. Mr. Smith 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
A choice of two of the above instruments. 

11. Brass Class. Mr. Smith 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
The remainder of the brass instruments. 

• 107 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
Percussion Instruments (Snare Drums, Tympany, Bass Drum, etc.). 
10. Percussion. Mr. Smith 

One hour per week. One semester. 
Study of snare drum. 

30. Percussion. Mr. Smith 

One hour per week. One semester. 
Tympany, bass drum, etc. 

Woodwind Instruments (Clarinet, Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, 
Saxophone, Bassoon). 

20. Woodwind. Mr. Stachow 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
Study of the clarinet. 

21. Woodwind. Mr. Stachow 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
The remainder of the woodwind instruments. 

String Instruments (Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass) 

30. String. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
Study of violin, viola, cello, bass. 

31. String. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week. One semester. 
Study of violin, viola, cello, bass. 

Instrumental Seminar. 

One or two hours per week. First or second semester. 
Application of specific techniques to problems of class instruction. 

Woodwind ... 40. Prerequisite: Woodwind 21. Mr. Stachow 

Brass 40. Prerequisite: Brass 11. Mr. Smith 

String 40. Prerequisite: String 31. Mr. Lanese 

Percussion . . . 40. Prerequisite: Percussion 30. Mr. Smith 



V. Musical Organizations 
College Band. Mr. Thurmond 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
Lebanon Valley College maintains a uniformed band, the membership 
of which is made up of college and conservatory students. The band con- 
tributes to college life by playing at football games, by appearing on 
several programs during the year, and by providing the musical accom- 
paniment for the annual May Day Fete. During the spring several con- 
certs are given in various cities of this section of the state. Membership 

. 108 • 



CATALOGUE 

in the band is determined by an applicant's ability on his instrument and 
by the needs of the band with respect to maintaining a well-balanced in- 
strumentation. 

Girls' Band. Mr. Thurmond 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
This organization is open to girls of the Conservatory and College 
alike. Membership in this band is determined by the applicant's ability on 
her instrument, and by the needs of the band with respect to maintaining 
a well-balanced instrumentation. The group will participate in a spring 
concert. 

Symphony Orchestra. Mr. Lanese 

Three hours per zveek throughout the year. 
The Lebanon Valley College Symphony Orchestra is a musical organiza- 
tion of symphonic proportions. Open alike to advanced players from the 
college and the conservatory, the orchestra adheres to a high standard of 
performance. Throughout the school year a professional interpretation of 
a wide range of standard orchestral literature is insisted upon. 

Beginning Ensemble. Mr. Thurmond and Mr. Lanese 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
A training band and orchestra wherein students play secondary instru- 
ments and become acquainted with elementary band and orchestra litera- 
ture. Opportunity will be given for advanced conducting students to con- 
duct these organizations. 

Glee Club. Mr. Thurmond 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 
The Glee Club is a mixed chorus of selected voices. The personnel of 
the organization, while open to all L. V. C. students, is limited to forty 
members. During the spring the Club appears in concerts in several com- 
munities throughout this section of the state. Choral literature of the 
highest type is studied intensively. 

College Chorus. Mr. Rovers 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
The mixed chorus is open to all on the campus who are interested in 
this type of musical performance and who have had some experience in 
singing. 

Instrumental Ensembles. 

The advanced player, selected on an audition basis, may be granted the 
opportunity to perform in ensembles, such as: 



(1) 


String Trio 


Mr. Lanese 


(2) 


String Quartet 


Mr. Lanese 


(3) 


Violin Choir 


Mr. Malsh 


(4) 


Brass Ensemble 


Mr. Thurmond 


(5) 


Woodwind Ensemble 


Mr. Stachow 



109 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

VI. The History and Appreciation of Music 

30. History and Appreciation of Music. Mr. Smith 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. First semester. 

The first developments of music are treated briefly, and special empha- 
sis is placed on the work of the contrapuntal schools and the development 
of the harmonic idea in composition including the rise of opera, oratorio, 
and instrumental music in the sonata form. The first semester covers the 
development of music through the period of Beethoven. Much music of 
each period, style, and composer is studied. 

31. History and Appreciation of Music. Mr. Smith 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. Second semester. 
This is a continuation of History of Music 30 and includes the musical 
styles, forms, and composers of the Romantic, Impressionistic, and Con- 
temporary periods. 

32. A Study of Music Literature. Miss Gillespie 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
A study of music literature for elementary, secondary, and adult 
use. The purpose of the course is on an appreciation level; interpreta- 
tion of, response to, and listening to, music. The literature is primarily in- 
strumental and is graded to the use of the age level of the elementary, 
secondary, and adult. 

VII. Miscellaneous Courses 
20. Elementary Conducting. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Principles of conducting and a study of the technique of the baton are 
presented in this course. Each student will conduct vocal and instru- 
mental ensembles made up of the class personnel. 

30. Intermediate Conducting. Mr. Lanese 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. Second semester. 
Emphasis is given to a detailed and comprehensive study of the factors 
involved in the interpretation of choral and instrumental music. 

40. Advanced Conducting Mr. Thurmond 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
In addition to conducting from full score, each student will be ex- 
pected to conduct in rehearsal the various concert organizations of Leba- 
non Valley College. 

20. Eurhythmies (movement in music). Miss Gillespie 

One hour per week, one semester hour credit. First semester. 
The course offers a three-fold training: mental control through coordi- 
nation; physical poise through movements made in response to rhythm; 
and a musical sense through the analysis of the rhythmic element in music. 

. 110 • 



CATALOGUE 
40. Eurhythmies (movement in music). Miss Gillespie 

One hour per week, one semester hour credit. First semester. 
General survey of elementary and intermediate floor work, and inter- 
pretation together with a discussion of the principles underlying the 
presentation of this to children. Applied improvisation will be an integral 
part of the course. 

20. Care and Repair. Mr. Carmean 

One hour per week. Both semesters. 
An analytical laboratory technique applied to methods of construction 
of the band and orchestra instruments. With this information as a back- 
ground, preventive measures are established to avoid undue wear and 
deterioration of the instruments, and through actual experience the stu- 
dent acquires proficiency in the operations necessary in replacements and 
repair. 

40. Physical Science. Mr. Carmean 

Three hours per week, three semester hours credit. First semester. Open to 
music students only. 

Cultivation of the scientific approach to sound and tone, with emphasis 

on their application to music and musical instruments. Laboratory fee $2. 

30. Festivals and Pageants. Miss Bowman 

Two hours per week, two semester hours credit. First semester. 
Techniques involved in the organization, administration, and participa- 
tion of many people in both indoor and outdoor ceremonials. Directed 
toward a study of structure and staging, historical data, folk activities, 
folk-lore, and community life and spirit. Includes the writing of the theme, 
planning, arranging dances, and completing a pageant. 



VIII. Individual Instruction 
Voice, Piano, Organ, Chorus, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 

The work in the foregoing fields will be organized from the standpoint 
of the development of musicianship in the individual student. The work 
continues through eight semesters and assures a well-rounded and many- 
sided acquaintance with various musical techniques. 

Private instruction Is provided in Applied Music (Piano, Voice, Organ, 
Violin, and all instruments of orchestra and band) . 

Piano: Mrs. Bender, Mr. Fairlamb, Mrs. Kinsley. 

Voice: Mr. Crawford, Mr. Rovers. 

Organ: Mr. Campbell. 

Violin: Mr. Malsh. 

Brass: Mr. Thurmond. 

Viola, 'Cello, and String Bass: Mr. Lanese. 

Woodwind: Mr. Stachow. 

• Ill • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

IX. Preparatory Department 

The Conservatory of Music sponsors a Preparatory Department especially 
adapted to children of elementary or high school age. Adults are admitted 
at any stage of advancement. 

This Preparatory Department offers either private or class instruction in 
piano and all instruments of the band and orchestra. A desirable number 
for class instruction is from four to six members. 



THE STUDENT RECITALS 

The student evening recitals are of inestimable value to all students in 
acquainting them with a wide range of the best musical literature, in 
developing musical taste and discrimination, in affording young musicians 
experience in appearing before an audience, and in gaining self-reliance 
as well as nerve control and stage demeanor. 

Students in all grades appear on the programs of these recitals. 



112 



CATALOGUE 



SPECIFICATIONS OF THE FOUR-MANUAL 
MOLLER ORGAN 



GREAT ORGAN (unenclosed) 

16' Violone 61 Pipes 

8' Principal 61 Pipes 

8' Diapason 61 Pipes 

8' Harmonic Flute ... 61 Pipes 

8' Gemshorn 61 Pipes 

4' Octave 61 Pipes 

4' Flute Overte 61 Pipes 

4' Gemshorn 61 Notes 

2-2/3' Twelfth 61 Pipes 

2' Fifteenth 61 Pipes 

III Rks. Mixture 163 Pipes 

Chimes (from Solo) 

SWELL ORGAN (enclosed) 

16' Flute Conique 73 Pipes 

8' Diapason 73 Pipes 

8' Rohr Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Spitz Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Salicional 73 Pipes 

8' Vox Celeste 61 Pipes 

4' Octave 73 Pipes 

4' Flute Triangulaire. . 73 Pipes 

4' Salicet 61 Notes 

2' Fifteenth 61 Pipes 

1-3/5' Tierce 61 Notes 

III Rks. Mixture 183 Pipes 

16' Waldhorn 73 Pipes 

8' Trumpet 73 Pipes 

8' Oboe 73 Pipes 

8' Vox Humana 61 Pipes 

4' Clarion 73 Pipes 

Tremulant 

CHOIR ORGAN (enclosed) 

16' Dulciana 97 Pipes 

8' English Diapason . . 73 Pipes 

8' Concert Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Dulciana 73 Notes 

8' Unda Maris 73 Pipes 

4' Flute d'Amour .... 73 Pipes 

4' Dulciana 73 Notes 

4' Unda Maris II 73 Notes 



2-2/3' Dulciana Twelfth .. 61 Notes 

2-2/3' Rohr Nazard 61 Pipes 

2' Piccolo 61 Pipes 

2' Dulciana 61 Notes 

8' Clarinet 73 Pipes 

Harp 49 Bars 

Celesta 37 Notes 

Tremulant 

SOLO ORGAN (enclosed) 
III Rks. Diapason Chorus ..219 Pipes 

8' Gamba 73 Pipes 

8' Gamba Celeste .... 61 Pipes 

8' Viole Sourdine .... 73 Pipes 

8' Viole Celeste 61 Pipes 

4' Gamba 61 Notes 

4' Orchestral Flute ... 73 Pipes 

8' Tromba 73 Pipes 

8' French Horn 73 Pipes 

4' Clarion 61 Notes 

Chimes 21 Tubes 

Tremulant 

PEDAL ORGAN 

16' Diapason 32 Pipes 

16' Bourdon 32 Pipes 

16' Violone 32 Notes 

16' Dulciana 32 Notes 

16' Flute Conique 32 Notes 

8' Octave 12 Pipes 

8' Flute Major 12 Pipes 

8' Concert Flute 32 Notes 

8' Gamba 32 Notes 

8' Dulciana 32 Notes 

4' Flute 32 Notes 

10-2/3' Quint 32 Notes 

II Rks. Mixture 64 Pipes 

16' Trombone 32 Pipes 

16' Waldhorn 32 Notes 

8' Trumpet 32 Notes 

8' Tromba 32 Notes 

4' Clarion 32 Notes 

Chimes (from Solo) 21 Notes 



Swell to Great 
Swell to Great 4' 
Swell to Great 16' 
Choir to Great 
Choir to Great 4' 
Choir to Great 16' 
Solo to Great 
Solo to Great 4' 
Solo to Great 16' 
Solo to Choir 
Solo to Choir 4' 
Solo to Choir 16' 
Swell to Choir 
Swell to Choir 4' 
Swell to Choir 16' 



COUPLERS 
Choir 4' 
Choir 16' 
Choir Unison Off 
Solo to Swell 
Solo to Swell 4' 
Solo to Swell 16' 
Choir to Swell 
Choir to Swell 4' 
Choir to Swell 16' 
Swell 4' 
Swell 16' 
Swell Unison Off 
Solo 4' 
Solo 16' 



Solo Unison Off 
Great 4' 

Great Unison Off 
Swell to Solo 
Swell to Solo 4' 
Swell to Solo 16' 
Solo to Pedal 
Solo to Pedal 4' 
Swell to Pedal 
Swell to Pedal 4' 
Great to Pedal 
Great to Pedal 4' 
Choir to Pedal 
Choir to Pedal 4' 
Pedal to Pedal Octave 



113 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



MECHANICALS 



8 Pistons affecting Swell Organ 
8 Pistons affecting Great Organ 
8 Pistons affecting Choir Organ 
8 Pistons affecting Solo Organ 
8 Pistons affecting Pedal Organ 

10 Pistons affecting Full Organ 

Crescendo Indicator — slide — four stages 

Sforzando Piston and toe stud 

All Swells to Swell Piston and toe stud 

Great to Pedal Reversible 

Swell to Pedal Reversible 

Choir to Pedal Reversible 

Solo to Pedal Reversible 

Balanced Expression Pedal — Choir Organ 

Balanced Expression Pedal — Swell Organ 



Balanced Expression Pedal — Solo Organ 
Balanced Crescendo Pedal 

S Full organ combination Pistons du- 
plicated by toe studs 

5 Pedal combination Pistons duplicated 
by toe studs 
Pedal to Swell — On and off 
Pedal to Great — On and off 
Pedal to Choir — On and off 
General Cancel Piston 
Coupler Cancel Piston 
Combination cut-out with lock 
Electric Clock 
Harp Dampers 
Chimes Dampers 



SPECIFICATIONS OF THREE-MANUAL ORGAN 
INSTALLED 1949 



GREAT ORGAN 

8' Diapason 73 Pipes 

8' Bourdon 73 Pipes 

8' Gemshorn 73 Pipes 

4' Octave 12 Pipes 

4' Bourdon 12 Pipes 

4' Gemshorn 12 Pipes 

2-2/3' Gemshorn Twelfth .. 61 Notes 
2' Gemshorn Fifteenth. 61 Notes 
Tremulant 



CHOIR ORGAN 

8' Viola 73 Pipes 

8' Concert Flute 73 Pipes 

8' Dulciana 73 Pipes 

4' Flute 12 Pipes 

4' Dulciana 12 Pipes 

2-2/3' Dulciana Twelfth . . 61 Notes 

2' Dulciana Fifteenth . 61 Notes 

8' Clarinet 73 Pipes 

Tremulant 



SWELL ORGAN 

16' Rohrbourdon 73 Pipes 

8' Rohrgedeckt 12 Pipes 

8' Viole de Gambe .... 73 Pipes 

8' Viole Celeste 61 Pipes 

4' Rohrflote 12 Pipes 

4' Gambette 12 Pipes 

2-2/3' Nazard 61 Notes 

2' Flautino 61 Notes 

8' Trompette 73 Pipes 

Tremulant 

PEDAL ORGAN 

16' Bourdon 32 Pipes 

16' Rohrbourdon 32 Notes 

8' Bourdon 12 Pipes 

8' Rohrgedeckt 32 Notes 

8' Gemshorn 32 Notes 

8' Dulciana 32 Notes 

4' Rohrflote 32 Notes 





COUPLERS 




Great to Pedal 


Swell to Great 4' 


Great 4' 


Great to Pedal 4' 


Choir to Great 16' 


Swell 16' 


Swell to Pedal 


Choir to Great 


Swell 4' 


Swell to Pedal 4' 


Choir to Great 4' 


Choir 16' 


Choir to Pedal 


Swell to Choir 16' 


Choir 4' 


Choir to Pedal 4' 


Swell to Choir 


Unison off Swell, Choir, 


Swell to Great 16' 


Swell to Choir 4' 


and Great 


Swell to Great 


Great 16' 





ADJUSTABLE COMBINATIONS 



Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 
Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 
General Cancel Piston 



Affecting Great Stops 
Affecting Swell Stops 
Affecting Choir Stops 
Affecting Pedal Stops 
Affecting Full Organ 



114 



CATALOGUE 

PEDAL MOVEMENTS 
Great to Pedal Reversible (duplicated by manual piston) 
Swell to Pedal Reversible (duplicated by manual piston) 
Balanced Expression Pedal — Great — Choir Organs 
Balanced Expression Pedal — Swell Organ 
Balanced Crescendo Pedal 
Sforzando Pedal (duplicated by manual piston) 



SPECIFICATIONS OF TWO-MANUAL ORGAN 
INSTALLED 1948 



GREAT ORGAN 

8' Diapason 73 Pipes 

8' Stopped Flute 73 Notes 

8' Salicional 73 Notes 

4' Flute D'Amour 73 Notes 

2' Piccolo 73 Notes 

8' Clarinet 73 Notes 



SWELL ORGAN 

8' Stopped Diapason . . 73 Pipes 

8' Salicional 73 Pipes 

8' Vox Celeste 73 Pipes 

4' Flute D'Amour 73 Notes 

2-2/3' Nazard 73 Notes 

2' Piccolo 12 Pipes 

8' Clarinet 73 Pipes 

Tremulant 



Great to Pedal 

Swell to Pedal 

Swell to Pedal 4' 

Swell to Great 16' 



PEDAL ORGAN 

16' Bourdon 32 Pipes 

16' Lieblich Gedeckt ... 32 Notes 
8' Flute 32 Notes 



COUPLERS 
Swell to Great 
Swell to Great 4' 
Great 16' 
Great 4' 



Swell 16' 
Swell 4' 

Great Unison off 
Swell Unison off 



Pistons No. 1-2-3 Affecting Great Stops 

Pistons No. 1-2-3 Affecting Swell Stops 

Great to Pedal Reversible 
Sforzando Reversible 

Also a two-manual unified practice organ of nine- 
teen stops and Swell to Great Coupler. 



115 



The Corporation 



TRUSTEES 

Representatives from the East Pennsylvania (U. B.) Conference 

Charles L. Bitzer 401-7 Telegraph Bldg., Hsbg., Pa... 1956 

E. W. Coble 344 N. West End Ave., Lane., Pa. . . 1956 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, a.m., d.d 3000 Herr St., Harrisburg, Pa 1956 

Rev. W. A. Wilt, d.d 50 College Ave., Annville, Pa 1956 

Rev. G. E. Hertzler, a.b., b.d., s.t.m., d.d. 3005 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa 1957 

Honorable Miles Horst, m.s., ll.d 103 E. Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa.... 1957 

J. B. McKelvey 5719 Walton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 1957 

A. C. Spangler Campbelltown, Pa 1957 

Paul L. Strickler, a.b 513 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa 1957 

Rev. Leroy Fegley, a.b., d.d 113 E. Clay St., Lancaster, Pa 1958 

Rev. P. B. Gibble, a.m., b.d., d.d 24 E. Main St., Myerstown, Pa 1958 

Rev. Mark T. Hostetter, a.b., b.d., s.t.m. 1 Carlisle Ave., Lincoln Park, 

West Lawn, Pa 1958 

Rev. D. E. Young, a.m., b.d., d.d 704 N. 16th St., Harrisburg, Pa 1958 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

E. N. Funkhouser, a.b., ll.d Wareham Bldg., Hagerstown, Md. .. 1956 

R. G. Mowrey, a.b., d.pd Chambersburg, Pa 1956 

Rev. F. Berry Plummer, a.b., d.d 106 E. Franklin St., Hagerstown, Md. 1956 

Rev. P. E. V. Shannon, a.b., b.d., d.d... 43 N. Keesey St., York, Pa 1956 

Rev. S. B. Daugherty, a.b., a.m., d.d.... 45 South West St., Carlisle, Pa 1957 

Rev. Lester M. Kauffman, a.b., b.d., d.d.413 Bridge St., New Cum., Pa 1957 

Harold T. Lutz, ll.d Apt. D, 108 Dumbarton Rd., 

Baltimore, Md 1957 

H. W. Shenk, a.b., a.m., ed.d Dallastown, Pa 1957 

Rev. Mervie H. Welty, a.b., b.d., d.d. ..123 Broadway, Red Lion, Pa 1957 

Rev. J. Stewart Glen, ll.b., d.d 1000 W. 38th St., Baltimore 11, Md. 1958 

Rev. Paul E. Horn, a.b., b.d 2 Adams St., N.W., Wash., D. C... 1958 

Huber D. Strine, a.b., m.a., pd.d 905 Hill St., York, Pa 1958 

Albert Watson 48 W. High St., Carlisle, Pa 1958 

Representatives from the Virginia Conference 

Rev. Carl W. Hiser, a.b., d.d 108 North Ave., Winchester, Va 1956 

Rev. E. E. Miller, a.b., d.d Mt. Clinton, Va 1956 

Rev. J. Paul Slonaker, b.s., b.d Berkeley Spring, W. Va 1957 

Rev. J. Paul Gruver, a.b., b.d., d.d 624 Ferdinand Ave., Roanoke 16, Va. 1957 

Rev. Donald N. Fridinger, a.b Franklin, W. Va 1958 

Rev. J. E. Oliver, a.b., b.d 325 National Ave., Winchester, Va. 1958 

Alumni Trustees 

Warren H. Fake, a.b., m.d Ephrata, Pa 1956 

Ernest D. Williams, a.b., ll.d Annville, Pa 1957 

Mrs. Louisa W. Yardley, a.b 11 Green Hill Lane, Overbrook, Pa. 1958 

Trustees at Large 

Bishop G. E. Epp, d.d., ll.d., l.h.d 1509 State St., Harrisburg, Pa 1956 

William J. Fisher, ll.d 106 N. Marshall St., York, Pa 1956 

Roy K. Garber 828 Walnut St., Columbia, Pa 1956 

Bishop D. T. Gregory, a.b., b.d., d.d., ll.d.900 E. End Ave., Pittsburgh 21, Pa. 1956 

Charles H. Horn 833 S. Main St., Red Lion, Pa 1956 

John F. Matsko 3616 Maple St., Harrisburg, Pa 1956 

Hon. J. Paul Rupp, a.b., ll.b., ll.d 603 Pine St., Steelton, Pa 1956 

Lawton Shroyer 935 N. Shamokin St., Shamokin, Pa. 1956 

W. H. Worrilow, ll.d 1st Ave. & E. High St., Lebanon, Pa. 1956 

Rev. DeWitt P. Zuse, a.b., m.th., d.d. ..Nelson Apts., Park & Edgar Sts., 

Chambersburg, Pa 1956 

Members of the College Faculty who are heads of departments are ex-officio mem- 
bers of the Board of Trustees. 

• 116 • 



CATALOGUE 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS 

President E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice-President Charles L. Bitzer 

Secretary-Treasurer Samuel O. Grimm 

COMMITTEES 

Executive: 

F. K. Miller, Chairman; P. E. V. Shannon, Vice-Chairman; S. O. 
Grimm, Secretary; E. N. Funkhouser, P. B. Gibble, J. Paul Gruver, 

G. Edgar Hertzler, R. G. Mowrey, M. H. Welty, D. E. Young 

Finance: 

William J. Fisher, Chairman; E. N. Funkhouser, Vice-Chairman; Sam- 
uel O. Grimm, Secretary; Albert Watson, Charles H. Horn, Miles 
Horst, F. B. Plummer, E. D. Williams, F. K. Miller 

Faculty Administrative; 

D. E. Young, Chairman; E. D. Williams, Secretary; J. Paul Gruver, 

F. K. Miller, H. E. Schaeffer, Paul E. Shannon, R. G. Mowrey 

Auditing: 

W. A. Wilt, Chairman; J. E. Oliver, Albert Watson 

Buildings and Grounds: 

W. Maynard Sparks, Chairman; C. L. Bitzer, S. B. Daugherty, Mrs. 
Louisa Yardley 

Library and Apparatus: 

G. Edgar Hertzler, Chairman; Carl Y. Ehrhart, J. Paul Slonaker, 
Lester M. Kauffman 

Publicity: 

Harold T. Lutz, Chairman; Charles Horn, F. B. Plummer, J. Paul 
Rupp, W. H. Worrilow 

Nominating: 

H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman; J. E. Oliver, M. H. Welty, E. D. Williams 



117 



Administrative Staff and Faculty 



ADMINISTRATION 

Frederic K. Miller, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D President 

Mrs. Anne E. Bohner Secretary to the President 

Thomas S. May, B.S. in Ed., B.D Assistant to the President 

Miss Lillian Goodman Secretary in the Development Office 

Miss Dorothy Lentz Clerk in the Development Office 

Howard M. Kreitzer, B.S., M.A., D.Ed Dean of the College 

Mrs. Mary B. Boger Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Alvin H. M. Stonecipher, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Advisory Dean 

Theodore D. Keller, A.B., A.M Dean of Men 

Constance P. Dent, B.A., A.M Dean of Women 

Mrs. Naomi Venzke. .Secretary to the Deans of Men and Women 

Ivin B. Moyer Business Manager 

Mrs. Lillie Struble, B.S Manager of the Book Store 

John Rittle Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Ida E. Gingrich Secretary to the Business Manager 

Mrs. Betty Heisey Clerk 

Mrs. Rita Baker Switchboard Operator and Clerk 

Samuel O. Grimm, B.Pd., A.B., A.M., ScD Secretary -Treasurer 

D. Clark Carmean, A.B., M.A Director of Admissions 

Mrs. Mary A. Heilman. . . .Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Gladys M. Fencil, A.B Registrar 

Miss Phyllis Schell Secretary to the Registrar 

Helen Ethel Myers, A.B Librarian 

Donald E. Fields, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., A.B. in L.S 

Associate Librarian 
Mrs. Francis T. Fields, A.B., A.B. in 'L.S.. .Cataloguing Librarian 

Miss Isabelle R. Smith, A.B Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Francis H. Wilson Assistant to the Librarian 

Mary E. Gillespie, B.S., M.A., Mus.D Director of the Conservatory 

Mrs. Ina Misal Secretary in the Conservatory of Music 

W. Maynard Sparks, A.B., B.D., Ed.M., D.D College Chaplain 

James W. Parsons, A.B Director of Public Relations 

Miss Christine Light, Secretary to the Director of Public Relations 

Carl Y. Ehrhart, A.B., B.D., Ph.D Director of Auxiliary Schools 

Mrs. P. Rodney Kreider, A.B Alumni Secretary 

Mrs. Isabel C. Millacci Secretary in the Alumni Office 

George G. Struble, Ph.D Secretary of the Faculty 

Ellis R. McCracken, A.B., M.Ed Director of Athletics 

Mrs. N. Margaret Swope Secretary to Director of Athletics 

Mrs. Margaret Millard Dietitian 

J. R. Monteith, M.D College Physician 

Phyllis A. Dasher, R.N College Nurse 

M. Elaine Goodyear, R.N College Nurse 

• 118 • 



CATALOGUE 

DORMITORY PROCTORS 

Men's Dormitory Theodore D. Keller 

41 East Sheridan Avenue (Annex) Alexander Crawford 

North Hall Gertrude L. Turner 

South Hall Mrs. O. R. Brooks 

West Hall Mary E. Gillespie 

Sheridan Hall Mrs. Margaret Sullivan 

Vickroy Hall Mrs. Elizabeth Miller 

Sheridan Hall Annex Mrs. J. E. Alexander 

FACULTY 

FREDERIC K. MILLER, 1939- 
President of the College 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; A.M., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1931; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1948; Litt.D., Muhl- 
enberg College, 1954 

HOWARD M. KREITZER, 1952- 
Dean of the College 

B.S., State Teachers College, Bloomsburg, 1934; M.A., New York 
University, 1940; D.Ed., Temple University, 1951 

PROFESSORS 

MRS. RUTH ENGLE BENDER, 1918-1922; 1924- 
Professor of Music Education 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College; Oberlin Conservatory; graduate, New 
England Conservatory; director, Lebanon Valley College Conserva- 
tory, 1924-30; student of Ernest Hutcheson, Lee Pattison, Sascha 
Gorodnitzki 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933- 

Professor of Music Education; Director of Admissions 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Columbia University, 
1932; supervisor, instrumental music, Erie County, 1927-29; teacher 
of music, Cleveland City Schools, 1929-31 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947- 

Professor of Philosophy , Chairman of the Department of Philosophy, 
Director of Auxiliary Schools 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; B.D., United Theological 
Seminary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 1954 

MARY E. GILLESPIE, 1930- 

Director, Conservatory of Music; Professor of Music Education 
Oberlin Conservatory; B.S., 1926, M.A., 1934 Columbia University; 
Dalcroze School of Music, NYC; Mus.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1954; Director, Music Department, Womens College, University of 
Delaware, 1925-30 

SAMUEL OLIVER GRIMM, 1912- 

Professor of Physics, Chairman of the Department of Physics; 

Secretary-Treasurer 

B.Pd., State Normal School, Millersville, 1907; A.B., Lebanon Valley 

College, 1912; A.M., Lebanon Valley College, 1917; Sc.D., Lebanon 

Valley College, 1942 

. 119 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

MRS. MAUD PEET LAUGHLIN, 1946- 

Professor of History, Director of Division of Social Studies, Chair- 
man of the Department of History and Political Science 
Bloomsburg State Normal School, 1915; B.S., Columbia University, 
1937; M.A., Columbia University, 1938 

V. EARL LIGHT, 1929- 

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Biology 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 

1926; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929 

GILBERT D. McKLVEEN, 1949- 

Professor of Education, Chairman of the Department of Education 
A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1941; 
D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1953 

HELEN ETHEL MYERS, 1921- 

Librarian with rank of professor 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Library Science, Drexel Institute 

of Technology 

G. A. RICHIE, 1925- 

Professor of Religion and New Testament Greek, Chairman of the 
Department of Religion and New Testament Greek 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1913; B.S., United Theological 
Seminary, 1917; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1923; D.D., Leba- 
non Valley College, 1927 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, 1932- 

Professor of German, Chairman of the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages, Advisory Dean 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1913; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1914; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1917 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931- 

Professor of English, Director of Division of Humanities, Chairman 
of Department of English, Secretary of the Faculty 
B.S. in Ed., University of Kansas, 1922; M.S. in Ed., University of 
Kansas, 1925; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1931 

FRANCIS W. WILSON, 1953- 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., Cornell University, 1923; M.S., Cornell University, 1925; Ph.D.. 

Cornell University, 1931 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

BARNARD H. BISSINGER, 1953- 

Associate Professor of Mathematics, Chairman of Department of 

Mathematics 

A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1938; M.A., Syracuse University, 

1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1943 

R. PORTER CAMPBELL, 1920- 

Associate Professor of Organ 

Mus.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; master courses in organ with 
Pietro Yon and Alexander McCurdy; pianoforte and pedagogy under 
Aloys Kramar and Arthur Freidheim 

• 120 • 




$ - ^fc 



Lebanon Valley maintains a full program of intercollegiate 
and intramural athletics for men and women 




College queens, elected by the student body, are honored 
at many of the annual campus social events 



The traditional May Pole Dance is one of the highlights 

OF THE ANNUAL MAY Day PAGEANT 




CATALOGUE 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD, 1927- 

Associate Professor of Voice 

Student of Evan Stephens and Wm. Shakespear, London, England; 
private studios, Denver, Colo., 1915-23, NYC, 1924-27; vocal pedagogy, 
Dr. Douglas Stanley, 1935-39 

WILLIAM FAIRLAMB, 1947- 

Associate Professor of Piano 

Mus.B., Cum laude, Philadelphia Conservatory, 1949; piano with 

Olga Samaroff, Charles deBodo; Juilliard Summer School; advanced 

teacher, guest pianist, Bay View Summer College of Music, Mich., 

1953- 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1947- 

Associate Librarian with rank of Associate Professor 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924; M.A., Princeton University, 
1928; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1935; A.B. in Lib. Sci., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947 

HAROLD MALSH, 1924- 

Associate Professor of Violin 

Graduate, Juilliard School of Music; private study with Louis Bos- 
telmann and Ottaker Cadek, NYC; assistant concert meister, Harris- 
burg Symphony; member, Altoona Symphony 

HOWARD A. NEIDIG, 1948- 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the Department of 

Chemistry 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.S., University of Delaware, 

1946; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1948 

ROBERT C. RILEY, 1951- 

Associate Professor of Economics and Business Administration, 
Chairman of Department of Economics and Business Administration 
B.S., State Teachers College, Shippensburg, 1941; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1947 

ROBERT W. SMITH, 1951- 

Associate Professor of Music Education 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1939; University of Pennsylvania, 1950; 

U.S. Army Music School; M.A., Columbia University; Band Director, 

83rd-99th Inf. Div.; public school teaching, Millersburg and Hershey, 

Pa. 

FRANK E. STACHOW, 1946- 

Associate Professor of Theory and Woodwinds 

Diploma, clarinet, Juilliard School of Music; B.S., M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University; University of Michigan; Eastman 
School of Music 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

O. PASS BOLLINGER, 1950- 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 

1937 

. 121 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

BETTY JANE BOWMAN, 1952- 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Director of Athletics for 

Women 

B.S., State Teachers College, West Chester, 1950; MA., Columbia 

University, 1954 

♦MRS. MARY VIRGINIA BOWMAN, 1954- 
Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1940; M.A., University of Virginia, 
1951 

SAMUEL M. BRADLEY, 1955- 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., State Teachers College, Moorehead, Ky., 1936; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1941 

ALICE M. BRUMBAUGH, 1952- 

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Chairman of the Department of 

Sociology 

B.S. in Ed., State Teachers College, Shippensburg, 1947; M.A., 

University of Maryland, 1949 

RUTH E. BUTLER, 1955- 

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

A.B., George Washington University, 1929; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1932 

CONSTANCE P. DENT, 1951- 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Dean of Women 

B.A., Bucknell University, 1945; M.A., Temple University, 1951 

MRS. ANNA DUNKLE FABER, 1954- 
Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 
1950; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1954 

CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, 1953- 

Assistant Professor of Elementary Education 

A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State College, 1941; 

D.Ed., Pennsylvania State College, 1953 

WILLIAM H. EGLI, 1947- 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration 
B.A., Pennsylvania State College, 1936; LL.B., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1939 

ROBERT O. GILMORE, 1953- 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Brown University, 1926; A.M., Yale University, 1933 

THEODORE D. KELLER, 1949- 

Assistant Professor of English, Dean of Men 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 

1949 

JAMES L. KLINE, 1955- 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1944; M.S., Pennsylvania State 

College, 1945 



Leave of absence, 1955-1956 

• 122 



CATALOGUE 

THOMAS LANESE, 1954- 

Assistant Professor of Strings, Conducting and Theory 
B.Mus., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1938; fellowship, Juilliard Gradu- 
ate School; M.Mus., Manhattan School of Music, 1952; member, 
Monteux String Quartet and Conducting Class, 1950- 

JEAN O. LOVE, 1954- 

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Chairman of the Department of 

Psychology 

A.B., Erskine College, 1941; MA., Winthrop College, 1949; Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina, 1953 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, 1952- 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Director of Physical 
Education for Men, Head Coach of Basketball and Baseball 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University, 1951 

ellis r. Mccracken, 1954- 

Director of Athletics, Head Coach of Football, Assistant Professor 

of Education 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1937; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1947 

RICHARD M. NEITHAMER, 1955- 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Allegheny College, 1951 

REYNALDO ROVERS, 1945- 

Assistant Professor of Voice and Director of Chorus 

Graduate, Juilliard School of Music; head, Voice Department, Adel- 

phia College; conducting with Ifor Jones; opera with Pietro Cimara 

RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-1951; 1953- 

Assistant Professor of History 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1942; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 
1947 

W. MAYNARD SPARKS, 1950- 

Assistant Professor of Religion, College Chaplain 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1927; B.D., United Theological 
Seminary, 1930; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh, 1936; D.D., Leba- 
non Valley College, 1942 

JAMES M. THURMOND, 1954- 

Assistant Professor of Music Education, Brass Instruments, Band, 
Glee Club 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music, 1931; A.B., American University, 
1951; MA., Catholic University, 1952; Mus.D., Washington College 
of Music, 1944; member, Philadelphia Orchestra, 1931-32; director, 
Naval School of Music, 1935-49 

C. F. JOSEPH TOM, 1954- 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration 
B.A., Hastings College, 1944; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947 



123 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

INSTRUCTORS 

WILLIAM A. BATCHELOR, 1953- 
Instructor in Art 

B.S., Edinboro State Teachers College, 1934; MA., Pennsylvania 
State College, 1951 

ALEX J. FEHR, 1951- 

Instructor in Political Science 
A.B., Lebanon Vallege College, 1950 

MRS. FRANCES T. FIELDS, 1947- 

Instructor in Spanish, Cataloguing Librarian 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; A.B. in Library Science, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947 

MRS. NEVELYN J. KNISLEY, 1954- 

Instructor of Piano 

Mus.B., Oberlin Conservatory of Music, 1951; M.F.A., Ohio Univer- 
sity, 1953; piano with Frank Shaw and Emil Danenberg; instructor 
in piano, Oberlin Conservatory, 1953-54 



GERTRUDE L. TURNER, 1953 

Instructor in Remedial English 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1909; A.M., Bucknell University, 1921 



REVEREND WILLIAM A. WILT, 1934- 
College Pastor 
D.D., Lebanon Valley College, 1929 



COOPERATING TRAINING TEACHERS 

Mrs. Dorothy Balsbaugh, Derry Township High School . . Social Studies 

Norman Bucher, Lebanon Senior High School Mathematics 

David Chestnut, Derry Township High School Languages 

Barbara Christianson, Lebanon Senior High School English 

Harry Foreman, Derry Township High School Science 

John Fox, Henry Houck Junior High School Social Studies 

Kenneth Heberling, Lebanon Senior High School Mathematics 

Ruth Hoffman, Lebanon Senior High School Languages 

Henry Hollinger, Annville High School Mathematics 

Mike Intrieri, Lebanon Senior High School Social Studies 

Mrs. Grace Kase, Lebanon Senior High School Social Studies 

Mrs. Hilda Longenecker, Lebanon Senior High School English 

Sophie Rakosz, Derry Township High School English 

Martha Reinert, Derry Township High School English 

Anna G. Shankweiler, Annville High School Social Studies 

Albert Sincavage, Lebanon Senior High School Social Studies 

Raymond Swingholm, Annville High School Science 

. 124 • 



CATALOGUE 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Student teaching in Music Education is done in the Deny Township 

Consolidated School and the Annville-Cleona Joint Public Schools. The 

following cooperate in the program: 

L. Eugene Jacques, M.A., Ph.D., Superintendent of Derry Township Con- 
solidated Schools, Hershey, Pa. 

Paul Campbell, B.S., M.A., Supervisor of Music, Hershey, Pa. 

Paul G. Fisher, B.S., Supervisor of Music, Hershey, Pa. 

Merle L. Keim, B.S., M.A., Supervising Principal, Annville-Cleona Joint 
Schools. 

William K. Lemon, III, B.S., Supervisor of Music, Annville, Pa. 

FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 

1955-1956 

ELECTED 

Administrative Advisory — Dr. Stonecipher, Dr. Struble, Dr. Wilson 
Committee on Committees — Dr. Ehrhart, Mr. Riley, Dr. Struble 

APPOINTED 

Academic Progress — Dr. Kreitzer, Mr. Carmean, Miss Dent, Mr. Keller, 

Heads of the Department of the student concerned 
Admissions — Mr. Carmean, Miss Gillespie, Dr. Neidig 
Athletics — Mr. Shay, Dr. Bissinger, Dr. Ebersole, Mr. McCracken, Mr. 

Moyer, Mr. Richie, Dr. Thurmond (Miss Bowman, advisory member) 
Dramatics — Dr. Faber, Mr. Bradley, Mr. Keller, Mr. Kline, Dr. McKlveen, 

Dr. Struble, President of the Wig and Buckle Club 
Educational Policies — Dr. Kreitzer, Departmental Chairman, the Librarian 

Sub-Committee: Auxiliary Schools: Dr. Ehrhart, Dr. Kreitzer, Mr. 

Riley 
Educational Television — Mr. Fairlamb, Mr. Kline, Mr. Lanese, Dr. Mc- 
Klveen, Mr. Parsons 
Flower and Gift — Miss Myers, Mrs. Bender, Mrs. Fields 
Freshmen Week — Miss Dent and Mr. Keller, co-chairmen, Miss Fencil, 

Dr. Love, Mr. Marquette, Miss Myers, Mr. Smith, Dr. Sparks 
Honorary Degrees — Dr. Richie, Dr. Grimm, Dr. Sparks, Dr. Stonecipher 
Library — Miss Myers, Dr. Ehrhart, Mr. Fields, Mrs. Laughlin, Mr. Neit- 

hamer, Mr. Stachow 
May Day — Miss Bowman, Dr. Bissinger, Miss Butler, Dr. Faber, Mr. 

Marquette, Mr. Moyer, Dr. Thurmond, Mr. Tom, Mr. Smith, Student 
Parents' Day — Mrs. Kreider, Mr. Bollinger, Mr. Carmean, Miss Dent, Miss 

Gillespie, Mr. Keller, Dr. Light, Mr. Parsons, Dr. Sparks 
Phi Alpha Epsilon — Dr. Faber, Dr. Ehrhart, Mr. Fehr, Mr. Keller, Mr. 

Parsons, Mr. Shay 
Program — Mr. Fehr, Mrs. Fields, Mr. Smith, Dr. Wilson 
Publications — Dr. Struble, Mr. Bradley, Mr. Carmean, Miss Fencil, Mr. 

Lanese, Mr. Parsons (Executive Secretary), Student — Richard Shover 
Public Events — Mr. Shay, Miss Brumbaugh, Mr. Fehr, Mrs. Fields, Mr. 

Moyer, Mr. Riley, Dr. Thurmond, Dr. Struble, President of the Senioi 

Class, President of the Junior Class 
Religious Activities — Dr. Sparks, Dr. Ebesole, Dr. Ehrhart, Miss Fencil, 

• 125 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Dr. Light, Miss Myers, Dr. Neidig, Dr. Richie, Dr. Stonecipher, Dr. 

Wilt, President of the Student Christian Association 
Scholarship — Mr. Carmean, Miss Dent, Mr. McCracken, Mr. Moyer 
Social — Dr. Ehrhart, Miss Bowman, Miss Brumbaugh, Miss Butler, Dr. 

Ebersole, Mr. Lanese, Dr. McKlveen, Dr. Wilson 
Student Conduct — Dr. Stonecipher, Miss Brumbaugh, Miss Dent, Mr. 

Keller, Dr. Wilson 
Student Organizations — Constitutions: Mr. Fehr, Miss Dent, Mr. Gilmore, 

Mr. Keller, Mrs. Laughlin 
Student Personnel Services — Dr. Love, Miss Dent, Dr. Gillespie, Mr. Keller, 

Mr. Marquette, Mr. Moyer, Mr. McCracken, Mr. Riley, Mr. Stachow, 

Dr. Sparks; Sub-Committee: Student-Faculty Council — Dr. Sparks, 

Miss Dent, Mr. Keller; Student Finance — Mr. Moyer, Mr. Marquette, 

Mr. Riley 
Who's Who — Dr. Kreitzer, Miss Dent, Mr. Keller 
Health Committee — Miss Dent, Miss Bowman, Mr. Carmean, Mr. Keller, 

Mr. Marquette, Dr. Monteith 

The President and the Dean of the College are members ex officio of 
all committees. 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANTS 

1955-1956 

Athletics for Men George H. Wade, 1956 

Athletics for Women Georgianne B. Funk, 1957 

Chemistry Edward J. Billingham, Jr., 1956 

English Ruth Sheetz, 1957 

History and Political Science Charles L. Zetteemoyer, 1956 

Mathematics Thomas M. Cline, 1957 

Music John E. Goodman, 1956 

Philosophy Richard G. Stone, 1957 

Psychology Joan K. Heindel, 1958 

Sociology Kathryn L. Dotts, 1956 

ADDRESSES OF FACULTY, ADMINISTRATIVE 

OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS 

1955-1956 

Name Address Phone No. 

Alexander, Mrs. J.E Sheridan Hall Annex, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-9841 

Baker, Mrs. Rita 820 Mifflin St., Lebanon, Pa 2-4620 

Batchelor, William A Community Club, Hershey, Pa KE 3-9215 

Bender, Mrs. Ruth E 532 Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-4481 

Bissinger, Barnard H 635 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa 

Boger, Mrs. Mary B 121 Mill St., Cleona, Pa 3-3182 

Bollinger, O. Pass 726 Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-6472 

Bowman, Betty Jane 304 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-0191 

Bradley, Samuel M 631 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-5412 

Brooks, Mrs. O. R South Hall, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-9881 

Brumbaugh, Alice M 13 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-4414 

Butler, Ruth E 26 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Campbell, R. Porter 26 E. Chestnut St., Cleona, Pa 2-4865 

Carmean, D. Clark R. D. No. 1, Annville, Pa 7-9292 

Crawford, Alexander 41 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa 7-9781 

Dasher, Phyllis A 47 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa 7-3561 

Dent, Constance P 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-8872 

Ebersole, Cloyd H 1426 E. Walnut St., Annville, Pa 7-0894 

. 126 . 



CATALOGUE 

Name Address Phone No. 

Egli, William H 835 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa 3-3733 

Ehrhart, Carl Y 120 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-8902 

Faber, Mrs. Anna B 26 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-8924 

Fairlamb, William H 340 Cumberland St., Annville, Pa 7-8981 

Fehr, Alex J 404 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa 3-1821 

Fencil, Gladys M 128 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-3634 

Fields, Donald E 46 S. Lancaster Ave., Annville, Pa 7-0S21 

Fields, Mrs. Frances T 46 S. Lancaster Ave., Annville, Pa 7-0521 

Gillespie, Mary E West Hall, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-4951 

Gilmore, Robert 403 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-5402 

Gingrich, Mrs. Ida E 304 N. 21st St., Lebanon, Pa 2-5886 

Goodman, Lillian P 132 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-8072 

Goodyear, M. Elaine 47 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa 7-3561 

Grimm, Samuel 234 E. Main St., Annville, Pa , 7-7922 

Heisey, Mrs. Betty 401 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa 

Keller, Theodore D Men's Dormitory, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-989 1 

Home: 122 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa 2-6472 

Kline, James L Community Club, Hershey, Pa KE 3-921 5 

Knisley, Mrs. Nevelyn J 112 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-8073 

Kreider, Mrs. P. Rodney. .. 217 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-4131 

Kreitzer, Howard M 37 Long St., Annville, Pa 7-5744 

Lanese, Thomas A 330 Cumberland St., Annville, Pa 7-9072 

Laughlin, Mrs. Maud P 222 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-4591 

Lentz, Dorothy R R. D. No. 1, Annville, Pa 8-6969 

Light, Christine Cleona, Pa 

Light, V. Earl R. D. No. 1, Annville, Pa 7-6411 

Love, Jean 128 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-3673 

Malsh, Harold 634 S. 24th St., Harrisburg, Pa CE 8-3973 

Marquette, George R 11 E. Chestnut St., Cleona, Pa 2-0769 

May, Rev. Thomas S Green and Birch Sts., Palmyra, Pa 8-2163 

McCracken, Ellis R 1433 E. Queen St., Annville, Pa 7-2035 

McKlveen, Gilbert D 45 N. Ulrich St., Annville, Pa 7-2047 

Millacci, Mrs. Isabel C 314 S. 2nd Ave., Lebanon, Pa 2-7452 

Millard, Mrs. Margaret Benjamin Franklin Highway, Annville, Pa 7-5541 

Miller, Mrs. Elizabeth Vickroy Hall, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-9951 

Miller, Frederic K 763 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-065 1 

Misal, Mrs. Ina 304 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 

Monteith, Dr. James R 301 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-5381 

Moyer, Ivin B 512 S. Grant St., Palmyra, Pa 8-2409 

Myers, Helen Ethel 148 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-3802 

Neidig, Howard A Walnut & College Sts., Palmyra, Pa 8-4141 

Neithamer, Richard M 145 N. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa 8-4781 

Parsons, James W 569 S. 5th St., Lebanon, Pa 3-4220 

Richie, G. A 466 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-6131 

Riley, Robert C 131 E. Locust St., Annville, Pa 7-9552 

Rittle, John S 36 N. Railroad St., Annville, Pa 7-2055 

Rovers, Reynaldo 54 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa 7-7192 

Schell, Phyllis J 221 S. Lancaster St., Annville, Pa 7-7451 

Shay, Ralph S R. D. No. 3, Lebanon, Pa Jonestown 5-4481 

Smith, Isabelle R 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-8872 

Smith, Robert W 761 Linden Rd., Hershey, Pa 3-9456 

Sparks, W. Maynard 32 W. High St., Annville, Pa 7-5234 

Stachow, Frank E 438 E. Main St., Annville, Pa 7-8573 

Stonecipher, A. H. M 723 Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-7751 

Struble, George G 27 N. Ulrich St., Annville, Pa 7-5451 

Struble, Mrs. George G 27 N. Ulrich St., Annville, Pa 7-5451 

Sullivan, Mrs. Margaret. ... Sheridan Hall, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-9721 

Swope, Mrs. N. Margaret. .. 103 E. High St., Annville, Pa 7-2075 

Thurmond, James W 831 E. Maple St., Palmyra, Pa 8-3052 

Tom, C. F. Joseph 561 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa 7-2005 

Turner, Gertrude L North Hall, L.V.C., Annville, Pa 7-9871 

Wilson, Dr. Francis H 118 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-4524 

Wilson, Mrs. Francis H 118 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-4524 

Wilt, Rev. William A 50 College Ave., Annville, Pa 7-4291 

• 127 • 



Degrees and Awards 



DEGREES CONFERRED JANUARY 29, 1955 

Bachelor of Arts 

Boyd Carl Flickinger David Harold Jauss, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Economics and Business 

Fred William Arnold 

With a Major in Science 

Stanley Edwin Cohen 



DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 6, 1955 
Bachelor of Arts 



Carl Neibert Achbenbach 
Frederick Paul Brandauer 
Robert Rauch Burtner, Jr. 
Nancy Carolyn Daugherty 
Roger Leroy Dundore 
Stanley Franklin Imboden 
Howard Whitmoyer Rosier 
George Kenneth Ludwig 
Peter Michael McCoy 
Adora Jane Rabiger 
Dorothy Anne Roudabush 
Donald James Rowland 



Elmer Parker Shambaugh 
Aaron Milton Sheaffer 
Joan Rosenberry Sloca 
Robert LeVoy Smith, Jr. 
Melvin Guy Sponsler, Jr. 
Gerald Jacob Stutzman 
Clarence Daugherty Ulrich 
Dorothy Pfautz Wenger 
Patricia Sally Ann Whitmoyer 
Nancy Reed Williams 
Hilda Lucille Yost 
Mary Louise Young 



Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Economics and Business Administration 
John Joseph Giannelli George Radanovic 

Joseph Louis Gorshin J°hn Raymond Sautter 

Dorman John Grace, Jr. William Schmidt, Jr. 

John Stanley Mull, Jr. George Daniel Shaak 

Clair Wilson Noll Richard Lee Sparks 

With a Major in Elementary Education 
Rita Jean Castiglia Rosalind Mildred Orbach 

Joanne Marie Hostetter Barbara Joan Wingert 

With a Major in Music Education 



Richard Edward Besecker 
Kenneth Eugene Ellis 
Marian Louise Fortna 
Ardith Jeanette Gaumer 
Richard Dale Gingrich 
Nancy Catharine Gower 
Joyce Dissinger Herr 
Marian Lucille Hess 
Joyce Carol Hill 
Anton Franklin Kiehner 
Benjamin Vermont Lutz 
Lois Lorraine Reedy 



Ann Drew Rydberg 
George Morgan Seyfert 
Noel Zuver Stahle 
Elma Jean Swope 
Jane Louise Taylor 
Mary Eckenroth Treiber 
Lynette Esther Waller 
Mary Edith Werntz 
Joel John Wiest 
David Paul Willoughby 
Nancy Ann Wolf 
Thomas Gordon Wolfgang 



DeWitt Philo Zuse, Jr. 
. 128 



CATALOGUE 

With a Major in Science 
Robert Herman Ayers, Jr. Beverly Jean Ross 

Edward Ulmont Balsbaugh, Jr. Fay-Ann Weiler 

Claude Joseph Miller Lenwood Boyer Wert 

Florence Blanche Risser Harold Ray White 

Richard Edward Williams 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

Dean Richard Artz Henry Boughton Hollinger 

Frank Carl Bahsteter, Jr. Philip Elliott Krouse 

William Arthur Erby Frederick Lee Shaak 

Ross Wade Fasick Ralph Earl Yingst 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Alice Kathleen Bomberger Hazel Katherine Kindt 

Honorary Degrees 

William J. Fisher Doctor of Laws 

Chester C. Hollingsworth Doctor of Divinity 

Howard Pyle Doctor of Humane Letters 

Carl F. Schmidt Doctor of Science 

Graduates Cum Laude 

Dorman John Grace, Jr. George Kenneth Ludwig 

Joyce Carol Hill Patricia Sally Ann Whitmoyer 

ELECTED TO MEMBERSHIP 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Honorary Scholarship Society 

Nancy Carolyn Daugherty George Kenneth Ludwig 

Dorman John Grace, Jr. Adora Jane Rabiger 

Henry Boughton Hollinger Donald James Rowland 

Philip Elliott Krouse Aaron Milton Sheaffer 

Patricia Sally Ann Whitmoyer 

DEGREES CONFERRED SEPTEMBER 2, 1955 
Bachelor of Arts 

William Forrest Atkins Herbert Leonard Ely 

Bachelor of Science 

With a Major in Science 
Arthur James Duke Dorothy Crist Lutz 

William Anthony Zilka 

With a Major in Economics and Business Administration 
Franklin Marshall Hall 

With a Major in Music Education 
Charles Evans Hughes Robert Burnell McFarland 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

Norman John Wegemer 

• 129 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

AWARDS 

Baish Memorial History Award established in 1947 in memory of Henry 
Houston Baish by his wife and daughter Margaret. 

Awarded to a member of the Senior Class majoring in history; selected 
by the head of the History Department on the basis of merit. 

Awarded in 1955 to Donald James Rowland. 

Pi Gamma Mu Scholarship Award authorized by the National Social Sci- 
ence Honor Society Pi Gamma Mu, incorporated, and established at Leba- 
non Valley College in 1948 by the Pennsylvania Nu Chapter of the Society 
for the promotion of scholarship in the Social Sciences. 

As an additional incentive for effort toward this end, this Annual Award, 
in the form of a nationally uniform and attractive medal, is granted upon 
graduation to a senior member of Pennsylvania Nu Chapter, selected by 
the Chapter's Executive Committee, for outstanding scholarship in eco- 
nomics, government, history, or sociology, and high proficiency or other 
distinction attained in pursuit of same during his or her years at the 
College. 

Awarded in 1955 to Clair Wilson Noll. 

Award of the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants — The 
Accounts Handbook, awarded to a senior on the basis of accounting grades 
and qualities of leadership on campus. 

Awarded in 1955 to Dorman John Grace, Jr. 

Wall Street Journal Award 
Awarded in 1955 to Dorman John Grace, Jr. 

Music Scholarship Award given by the Conservatory of Music to the senior 
and junior who have attained the highest scholarship in music. 

Awarded in 1955 to Joyce Carol Hill, senior; Dorothy Jane Grabau, 
junior. 

Andrew Bender Memorial Chemistry Award established in 1952 by the 
Chemistry Club of the College and alumni. Awarded to an outstanding 
senior majoring in Chemistry. 

Awarded in 1955 to Henry Boughton Hollinger. 

The Chuck Maston Memorial Award established in 1952 by the Knights of 
the Valley. This award is made annually to a male member of a varsity 
team who has displayed the exceptional qualities of sportsmanship, lead- 
ership, cooperation, and spirit. 

Awarded in 1955 to Howard Victor Landa. 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award established in 1935 in memory of 
Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner, Class of 1883, by Daniel E. Burtner, Samuel J. 
Evers, and Evers Burtner. Awarded to an outstanding member of the 
Junior Class selected by the faculty on the basis of scholarship, character, 
social promise, and financial need. 

Awarded in 1955 to Donald Neil Griffith. 

The Biological Scholarship Award established in 1918 by alumni and 
friends. Awarded annually by the chairman of the Biology Department 
on the basis of merit. 
Awarded in 1955 to Joyce Elaine Buck. 

. 130 • 



CATALOGUE 

The Medical Scholarship Award established in 1918 by alumni and friends. 
Awarded annually by the chairman of the Biology Department on the 
basis of merit. 
Awarded in 1955 to Loretta Ruth Hostetter. 

Sophomore Prize in English Literature established by the Class of 1928. 
Awarded to the three best students in Sophomore English (Humanities 
20a-20b), taking into account scholarship, originality, and progress. 

The prize was awarded in 1955 to Marian Irene Marcus, Doris Yvonne 
Kane, and Richard Lee Shover. 

Max F. Lehman Memorial Mathematics Prize established by the Class of 
1907, in memory of a classmate. Awarded to that member of the freshman 
class who shall have attained the highest standing in mathematics. 
Awarded in 1955 to Edward Lee Hitz. 

Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial Award in Music awarded annually to that 
member of the freshman class who displays the following basic qualities: 
(1) musicianship with performing ability; (2) reasonably high academic 
standing; (3) cooperation, dependability, and loyalty to the college. 
Awarded in 1955 to Sally Ann Miller. 

Mathematics Achievement Award — Awarded by the Chemical Rubber 
Company to a member of the freshman class majoring in mathematics for 
the best work in mathematics throughout the freshman year. The award 
consists of a copy of the new edition of the Chemical Rubber Company's 
book on "Standard Mathematical Tables." 
Awarded in 1955 to Charles David Teates. 



131 



Register of Students 

First Semester, 1955-1956 



POST-GRADUATES 

Name Major Home Address 

Cullen, Mary Ann 226 Yale St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rosier, Howard Whitmoyer Grantville, Pa. 

Lutz, Mrs. Dorothy Crist 105 E. High St., Annville, Pa. 

Orsini, Anthony Joseph 608 W. 2nd St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Reed, Charles Allen 320 S. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Taylor, Earle Forney, Jr 2319 Herr St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



SENIORS 

Adams, Gene Roger Pre-Medical Hegins, Pa. 

Adams, Nancy Jane Chemistry 48 Legion Place, Closter, N. J. 

Albright, Anna Mae Nursing 1945 Briggs St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Allen, James Vincent Chemistry Box 180, Cornwall, Pa. 

Balsbaugh, James Haas Chemistry 243 Swatara St., Steelton, Pa. 

Becker, Dean Arlen Spanish 534 York St., Hanover, Pa. 

Billingham, Edward John, Jr. . Chemistry 1240 Colebrook Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Blantz, Norman Victor History 31 E. Queen St., Annville, Pa. 

Blatt, Miriam Annabelle Music Ed R.D. 1, Mohrsville, Pa. 

Blouch, Elin Louise Music. Ed R.D. 1, Millersville, Pa. 

Bollinger, James Norman. . . Pre-Vet R.D. 1, Richland, Pa. 

Boltz, James Timothy Pol. Science R.D. 1, Pine Grove, Pa. 

Bosacco, David Economics 208 S. Scott Ave., Glenolden, Pa. 

Boughter, Charles Edwin. ... Economics. . .C-43, Parkview Apts., 2400 Market St., 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Boush, Roy Elwood History 2118 Cleveland Ave., West Lawn, Pa. 

Bradley, Carol June Music Ed 46 Wilson St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Brandt, Doris Jean Music Ed 346 N. Fourth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brechbill, Joseph Albert History 104 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Buck, J. Elaine Biology 1330 N. 14th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chudzikiewicz, 

Henry Theodore Economics 747 Thomas St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Cody, Louise Joyce Music Ed 3214 N. 4th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Conlin, Joan Elizabeth French Veterans Adminis. Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Cook, Doris Aliene Nursing 417 Fifth St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Cottrell, John Charles Pre-Medical 3531 Rutherford St., Paxtang, Pa. 

Creamer, Anthony Bennett. .Economics 940 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

DaCosta, Audrey E. C English 408 Penwyn Rd., Wynnewood, Pa. 

Day, Ronald Richard Economics 34 E. South St., York, Pa. 

Deitrich, Richard Edgar Economics 149 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Dietrich, Cyrus Russel, Jr... Music Ed 221 E. Fulton St., Ephrata, Pa. 

Dotts, Kathryn Louise Sociology 444 Wise Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 

Eckenroad, Joan Louise Music Ed 46 Cacoosing Ave., Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Farling, David John Economics 201 N. Lincoln St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Fish, Theodore George Music Ed 947 Patton Ave., Reading, Pa. 

Fisher, Anna Lou Music Ed R.D. 3, Pine Grove, Pa. 

Forrest, Herbert Michael Chemistry 118 High St., Closter, N.J. 

Fox, Carole Elaine Sociology. .. 108 N. 31st St., Paxtang, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Geesey, Eugene Ronald Economics 461 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Germer, Nancy Jean Music Ed 2207 N. 4th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gittleman, David Herbert. .. Chemistry 238 Sunbury St., Minersville, Pa. 

Goodman, John Ellis Music Ed 156 S. Main St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

Grabau, Dorothy Jane Music Ed 539 Comly St., Philadelphia 20, Pa. 

Griffith, Donald Neil Music Ed 106 Maple St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Grochowski, Martin Jacob. . -Economics. .2737 E. Ontario St., Philadelphia 34, Pa. 

Hartman, Frederic Leonard . Chemistry 43 Lingle Ave., Palmyra, Pa. 

Heizmann, Shirley Ann Music Ed 219 Hill Ave., Langhorne, Pa. 

Hess, Thomas Lee Chemistry 1142 E. Derry Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Hill, Nicholas John Chemistry 925 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hofing, Sidney Lesser Pol. Science 423 Greenway Ave., Trenton, N.J. 

Jones, Lawrence Eugene .... Chemistry 331 Hummel St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kaltreider, Pius Henry Music Ed 16 Fair Ave., Hanover, Pa. 



132 



CATALOGUE 

Name Major Home Address 

Kelchner, Ruthanne Elem. Ed 944 Itaska St., Bethlehem, Pa. 

Kelly, Clair Leonard, II. ... Chemistry 231 Ramsey Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Kirby, Nancy Lee Elem. Ed 254 Seneca St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kohr, Diane Lucille Pre-Medical R.D. 1, York, Pa. 

Lehman, Ronald LeRoy Economics .... 7 W. Washington Ave., Myerstown, Pa. 

Leonard, Richard David Philosophy 1515 Chatham Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Loeper, Louise Helene Music Ed 636 N. 11th St., Reading, Pa. 

Markley, 

Mrs. June Elizabeth English 4106 Walnut St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Martin, Margaret Eugenia. . Music Ed 1948 Pennington Rd., Trenton, N. J. 

Napoliello, Joan Katherine. . Music Ed 20 Fairway Ave., Belleville, N.J. 

Neatock, Barbara Elsie Music Ed 201 Philadelphia Ave., Shillington, Pa. 

Nelson, Sandra Psychology 404 Tremont Ave., Westfield, N.J. 

Norris, Dean Franklin Economics 128 W. Gay St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Osinski, Mildred Johanna. .. Biology 301 Beidman Ave., Camden 5, N. J. 

Pachasa, Howard Joseph. ... Biology. . .64 Washington Ave., North Plainfield, N.J. 

Palmer, Robert Brewster. ... Economics 133 Pierce St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Patton, Cynthia Jane Music Ed State Hospital, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Quinn, Thomas Vincent Education 59 F St., Keyser, W. Va. 

Rhoads, Charles Walton Economics 256 King St., Pottstown, Pa. 

Rightmyer, Bernard Henry. . Music Ed R.D. 2, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Ritter, Gloria Dawn Music Ed 57 Cacoosing Ave., Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Romberger, Karl Arthur. ... Chemistry 516 N. Gannon St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rosenberry , Sylvia Ann Music Ed Fannettsburg, Pa. 

Salamandra, Benedict Carl. . Biology 465 Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Schreiber, William Henry. . . Pol. Science 809 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Shellenberger, Dale Lindberg. History 228 Wise Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 

Snyder, Mrs. Emily Clements. Elem. Ed 348 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Snyder, Joyce Elaine Music Ed Chewsville, Md. 

Sparks, Lynn Maynard Chemistry 32 W. High St., Annville, Pa. 

Sprenkle, Naomi Mae Music Ed North East, Md. 

Steele, Ronald Arthur Music Ed 57 Portland Place, Montclair, N.J. 

Steger, Gerald A Sociology 1243 Scotland Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Stoner, H. Rodney. Religion 348 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Strong, George William Economics 9 S. Franklin Ave., Bergenfield, N.J. 

Thomas, Jack Herr.. Pol. Science 16 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Thomas, Priscilla Diane .... Music Ed Quakertown, N.J. 

Thompson, Bruce Getz Music Ed 205 Springfield Ave., Folsom, Pa. 

Trautman, Mildred Ann. ... Music Ed 413 N. Tenth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Trostle, William Dale Music Ed 132 E. Hanover St., Hanover, Pa. 

Troutman, Curtis Calvin. .. .Music Ed Box 126, Womelsdorf, Pa. 

Urian, M. Irene English 330 Swarthmore Ave., Folsom, Pa. 

Wade, George Harry Economics 206 New St., Spring City, Pa. 

Walker, Robert M. S., Jr... English R.D. 2, Boonton, N.J. 

Warfel, Shirley Ann Music Ed R.D. 3, Quarryville, Pa. 

Webber, Harold Reed Music Ed Stouchsburg, Pa. 

Wenrich, William Charles. . Mathematics 102 N. Lincoln St., Palmyra, Pa. 

White, Mrs. Jocelyn Jones. . Music Ed 320 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolf, George Herbert Music Ed Trailer Court, Annville, Pa. 

Wolf, Mrs. Jean Marie Lowry For. Lang Box 125, Annville, Pa. 

Wuertz, John Henry Chemistry 17 Church Rd., Ardmore, Pa. 

Yoder, Richard Charles History 317 Second St., Shillington, Pa. 

Yorty, John Bashore Music Ed R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Zettlemoyer, Charles L Pol. Science Box 457, R.D. 2, Reading, Pa. 

Zimmerman, Eugene Walter. Sociology 1827 Herr St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



JUNIORS 

Abramson, Henry M Pre-Medical 4739 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Barr, Russell Winfield Philosophy 730 Washington St., Allentown, Pa. 

Bennetch, Larry Marvin. . . .Psychology Newmanstown, Pa. 

Bird, Harold Eugene Economics 257 Grove St., Somerville, N. J. 

Boehler, Ramon Barry Economics 824 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Book, Dorothy Marie English Box 529, R.D. 7, Lancaster, Pa. 

Boyer, James Donald English Quentin, Pa. 

Brown, Raloy Eugene Elem. Ed Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Brubaker, Martha Med. Tech 16 Wabank Rd., Millersville, Pa. 

Burkhart, Donald Samuel. . .English 102 Hillcrest Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Conway, Joan Clare Music Ed R.D. 1, Dallastown, Pa. 

Dasher, Phyllis Ann Nursing 3259 Wakefield Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Davis, Hazel Ann Music Ed 333 New Market St., Salem, N. J. 

• 133 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Major Home Address 

Davis, Nathalie Alice Music Ed R.D. 3, Bridgeton, N.J. 

DeBenedett, 

Mrs. Jacquelyn F Sociology 316 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dissinger, Ronald Kenneth .. Chemistry 1826 Center St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dove, Jacqueline Faye Pre-Medical 1300 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Drum, Cameron George Religion 120 N. 46th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Eberly, Bruce Weik Psychology R.D. 1, Sheridan, Pa. 

Ebright, Harvey Webster. . . . Religion Market Square, Jonestown, Pa. 

Eppler, Mervin Amos English 2229 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Feaser, John Kenneth History 514 Canal St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Funk, Georgianne Bowman. .English. . 38 Hess Blvd., Lancaster, Pa. 

Garda, Dominic John Mathematics P. O. Box 123, Leechburg, Pa. 

Gibson, Nancy Adella Music Ed 231 E. Main St., Everett, Pa. 

Goodyear, Mildred Elaine. .. Nursing 617 Seneca St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gorbey, Grace Jane English 219 Nassau Blvd., Prospect Park, Pa. 

Gordon, Patricia Ann Med. Tech 221 N. 21st St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Greybeck, Mildred Irene Elem. Ed 414 Fifth St., Windber, Pa. 

Grosky, Murray Bernard. . . . Pre-Medical 1401 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Grove, Jo Anne Chemistry R.D. 1, Red Lion, Pa. 

Grubb, Luke Kauffman Music Ed R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Handley, Robert William. .. .Economics 665 Rutherford Ave., Trenton, N.J. 

Henderson, Marion Elaine. .. Music Ed 7741 Parkview Rd., Upper Darby, Pa. 

Herr, Emma Elizabeth Music Ed 114 Lincoln St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Heynio, Michael Walter Biology 434 Elm St., Kearny, N. J. 

Hoffman, Jane Magnuson . . . Music Ed Ickesburg, Pa. 

Hollinger, Cyrus Lee Chemistry 351 W. Ninth St., Front Royal, Va. 

Hostetter, Loretta Ruth Biology R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Hottenstein, F. Peter Biology 315 S. Railroad St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Houston, James Edward Pre-Dental R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Kane, Doris Yvonne Music Ed 1835 Lehigh St., Easton, Pa. 

Kelly, Carol Ann Music Ed 502 W. Joppa Rd., Towson 4, Md. 

Kershner, T. Franklin, III.. Music Ed 4th & Grape Sts., Vineland, N.J. 

Kiick, William Herbert Economics 23 Center St., Glen Rock, Pa. 

Kunkel, Ray Lee Pol. Science. . 1956 Edgemont Dr., East Petersburg, Pa. 

Kupchnisky, George Edward. Chemistry 504 Pine Hill St., Minersville, Pa. 

Lantz, Mrs. June Lykens. ... Music Ed 546 South 14th St., Reading, Pa. 

Lantz, Wilbur Franklin History 205 N. Potomac St., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Lego, Jerry Ellsworth Music Ed 1828 North St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lentz, Dorothy Ruth Elem. Ed 1972 W. 73rd Ave., Philadelphia 38, Pa. 

Light, Willard Levi History R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Ludwig, Emelie Ann Music Ed 420 Weidman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Lutz, Patricia Ann Music Ed 128 Front St., Lititz, Pa. 

Lutz, William Bachman Philosophy 412 Park Ave., Laurel Springs, N.J. 

Maier, James Richard Economics 546 Jones St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Marcus, Marian Irene English Parkerford, Pa. 

Martin, Barry Lee Economics MacDonald Heights, R.D. 2, York, Pa. 

Martin, Jere Robert History. 755 Reservoir St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Martinsek, Henry Peter Economics 1006 Homeland Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 

McCormick, Gerald Allen. . . Greek. 18 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

McCulloch, Frank Robert ... Economics 1400 Sunnyhill Lane, Havertown, Pa. 

Mcllvaine, C. Linden, Jr... Music Ed 707 E. Market St., Georgetown, Del. 

Meyers, Eleanor June English 231 E. Areba Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Miller, Robert Gordon Chemistry 331 S. Lincoln St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Minnich, William Robert Elem. Ed R.D. 3, Lebanon, Pa. 

Mosemann, Ronald Joseph . . . Music Ed 5 W. Eby St., Manheim, Pa. 

Nelson, Robert James Economics 3600 Rutherford St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Oberholtzer, Kathleen Biology. .. .2815 Canby St., Penbrook, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Peraino, Carl Chemistry 11 New Bridge Rd., Bergenfield, N.J. 

Pieringer, Ronald Arthur. .. Chemistry. .. .63 Brookview Terrace, Bergenfield, N.J. 

Plasterer, Ross Stanley Economics Quentin, Pa. 

Priester, Wilbur Melvin. . . . Pol. Science 151 Green St., Athol, Mass. 

Reinhard, Donald Lewis. ... Chemistry 76 High St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

Repert, Jack Michael Sociology 31 West Main St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Reynolds, Arlene Maria Med. Tech 315 N. Monroe St., Media, Pa. 

Risser, Polly Ann Economics 117 W. End Ave., Lititz, Pa. 

Sauder, Helen Louise Music Ed 413 Second St., High Spire, Pa. 

Savastio, Leo John English 245 E. Second St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Saylor, Jack Fields Biology 331 Gilpin Rd., Willow Grove, Pa. 

Schadler, William Edward. . .Chemistry Richland, Pa. 

Schuler, Kenneth Walter. .. .Economics 429 Union St., Columbia, Pa. 

Schwab, John Jacob Economics 629 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schwaghart, Barbara Elaine. Elem. Ed 881 Crescent Dr., Rahway, N.J. 

Sheaffer,, Geraldine Yvonne. Music Ed 336 N. Broad St., Terre Hill, Pa. 

Sheetz, Ruth English 342 N. 2nd St., Reading, Pa. 

• 134 • 



CATALOGUE 

Name Major Home Address 

Sholley, Lanta A., Jr Elem. Ed 318 N. Fifth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Shover, Richard Lee English 561 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Shuey, Henry William History Ono, Pa. 

Silliman, Thomas Edward. .. Music Ed 116 N. 14th St., Allentown, Pa. 

Socha, Paul Biology 310 S. Springfield Rd., Clifton Height, Pa. 

Speck, Bonnie Lou Music Ed 1325 Scott St., Huntingdon, Pa. 

Spencer, Rita English 1117 Poplar St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Stearns, Jack Edwin Music Ed 268 W. South St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Stone, Richard Gilbert Philosophy R.D. 1, Grantville, Pa. 

Teates, Thomas Gilbert Chemistry 34 Fairview Ave., Front Royal, Va. 

Thomas, Glenn Allen Mathematics Craley, Pa. 

Veasey, William Ellsworth. . English 351 N. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Voorman, Howard Theodore. Biology 87 Hudson St., Garfield, N.J. 

Wacker, Calvin Jay Music Ed 227 Sherman Ave., Roselle Park, N. J". 

Weible, Thomas Wilson, Jr. . English 533 Chapel St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wentling, George Martin. . . . Chemistry 1433 King St., Annville, Pa. 

Winter, Jeanne Carol Music Ed 1329 Perry St., Reading, Pa. 

Workinger, William Calvin. . Music Ed 420 S. Main St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Yerkes, William Austin Mathematics Mt. Vernon St., Oxford, Pa. 

Yorty, Myles Robert Economics 234 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Young, Joanne Music Ed 68 Yale Rd., Havertown, Pa. 

Ziegler, Larry Lee Economics 26 Linden Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 



SOPHOMORES 

Achenbach, Donald Albert. .. Pre-Engineer 5 Folmer St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Alutius, Lois Mae Music Ed 1122 E. Grand Ave., Tower City, Pa. 

Ambler, Margaret Jane Biology R.D. 1, Drumore, Pa. 

Anderson, Carol Elaine Music Ed 3840 Brisban St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Anderson, Edward Aloysius. . Mathematics 524 Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bachman, Jerald Graybill. .. Philosophy R.D. 4, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Baker, Nancy Grace Elem. Ed 461 High St., Hanover, Pa. 

Barnhart, Barry Bernal Chemistry 267 W. High St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Barnhart, Thomas Charles. .. Economics 801 S. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bell, John James, Jr Pre-Theol 23 Shelburne Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Bell, Patricia Lou History Hop Bottom, Pa. 

Blank, Janet Lee Med. Tech 434 Cypress St., Lehighton, Pa. 

Blocher, Jean Elizabeth Music Ed 211 E. King St., Littlestown, Pa. 

Blumenthal, Theodore Lewis. Music Ed 410 Terrace Ave., Hanover, Pa. 

Bowman, Roy J., Jr Music Ed R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Brightbill, Charles Thomas. . Music Ed 130 N. Franklin St., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Brill, Marlene May Music Ed 705 N. Shippen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Brinser, Florence Anna Sociology 648 Briarcliff Rd., Middletown, Pa. 

Carmany, Thomas Bear. . . . Pre-Med 1113 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Carrender, Barbara Louise. . Music Ed 130 Park Ave., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Catanzaro, Frank Joseph. .. .Economics 367 E. Butler Ave., Ambler, Pa. 

Cline, Thomas Mark Mathematics 35 N. College St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Cook, Marshall Delmar Biology R.D. 4, Coatesville, Pa. 

Cooper, Thomas Evan Economics Delta, Pa. 

Cotton, David Webster Arts-Forestry Fawn Grove, Pa. 

Cunningham, 

George Garrison Music Ed 14 Fourth St., Quarryville, Pa. 

Cupina, Michael Joseph English 426 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Deiter, Barbara Louise Biology 432 N. 11th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Demko, Janice Held Music Ed 728 Park St., Fullerton, Pa. 

Dinerman, Robert Lee Economics. . 579 Woodside Heights, Cincinnati 17, Ohio 

DiPangrazio, Paul F History. ... 147 N. Sycamore St., Clifton Heights, Pa. 

Ditzler, Carroll Edward Chemistry 1023 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Doster, Robert Franklin History Rothsville, Pa. 

Dougherty, James William. . .English 312 S. High St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Douglass, Henry Gerber. ... Economics 528 Spring St., Middletown, Pa. 

Drum, Ronald Eugene English 302 Pershing Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dwight, Lois Ruth English 645 E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Eikner, Myrle Vesey Elem. Ed 214 Parham Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Epting, Helen Music Ed 1023 Hill Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. 

Eshleman, Dorothy Lorraine . Elem. Ed R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Fancovic, Edward Robert. . . Psychology 1307 Brandywine St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Fegan, Kenneth Ray Music Ed 46 N. King St., Annville, Pa. 

Felty, William Jack History R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Fetterolf, Drew Terry Economics 17 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Fisher, Kathleen Marie Music Ed 417 S. 15th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Fisher, Kenneth Larry Music Ed 602 Center Ave., Reading, Pa, 



135 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Major Home Address 

Foster, Ronald Charles Economics 80 Canoe Brook Pky., Summit, N. J. 

Fromm, L. Dean Biology R.D. 2, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Geltz, Barbara Ann Music Ed 132 S. Third St., Minersville, Pa. 

Gingrich, Lois Anne Elem. Ed 573 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Glick, Darwin Gene Economics 1100 Oak St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Gordon, Linda Lou Pre-Nursing 221 N. 21st St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Gravesande, James Ronald. . Pre-Engineer P.O. Box 152, San Nicholaas, 

Aruba, N.W.I. 

Harbold, Lynn Allen Music Ed R.D. 1, Dillsburg, Pa. 

Hauer, Thelma Louise Elem. Ed 23 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Heck, Grant Fries, II Pre-Engineer 1 N. 4th St., Steelton, Pa. 

Heidelbaugh, 

Warren Redding Economics 317 N. 26th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Heindel, Joan Kathryn Psychology 106 W. Lancaster St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Hemperly, Beverly Ann. .. .Elem. Ed 817 Rex Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Henninger, Jean Carol Elem. Ed 51 E. Pottsville St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

Hipp, Robert M Pre-Medical 228 S. Fifth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hitz, Edward Lee Pre-Vet 75 Market St., Campbelltown, Pa. 

Hoffman, Jack Ronald Philosophy 217 N. Locust St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hoffman, John Buch Pre-Dental 4 High St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoffman, John Henry Economics 2720 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hole, Donald Richard Music Ed 1645 Cotton St., Reading, Pa. 

Homer, Phyllis A Music Ed 32 Seward Ave., Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Hoshina, Tatsuo Music Ed c/o Biwaka Hotel, Otsu-shi, Shiga-Ken, 

Japan 

Hostetter, Eugene Roy Philosophy 2400 Mifflin St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hottenstein, Michael Philip. Economics 315 S. Railroad St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Johnson, Barbara Gunhild. .. Economics 43 Intervale Place, Rye, N. Y. 

Johnson, George Birkelbach. . English 925 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Jones, Dorothy Claire Music Ed 105 N. Queen St., Littlestown, Pa. 

Kauffman, Robert Witmer. .. Philosophy. .. .413 Bridge St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Keiter, Betty Ann English 613 S. Raleigh St., Martinsburg, W.Va. 

Kershner, Aubrey Hanford. . Elem. Ed 200 S. 4th St., Vineland, N.J. 

Kettle, Nancy Lee Elem. Ed 15 W. Broad St., Hopewell, N.J. 

Kindt, Robert Haines, Jr. .. Economics 1013 Willow Drive, Annville, Pa. 

Klinger, Barbara Jean Music Ed 540 Belmont Ave., Southampton, Pa. 

Krammes, Evelyn May Elem. Ed R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kreider, Fred Stuart, Jr Pol. Science 39 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Krick, William Paul Pre-Forestry Box 78, Rexmont, Pa. 

Landis, Clarence Robert Elem. Ed. .. 1642 Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster, Pa. 

Lapioli, Albert Martin Chemistry R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lauman, Robie Jane French. .. .315 Maple Rd., Oak Hills, Middletown, Pa. 

Laverty, James Darlington. . Pre-Medical 3109 Duke St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lebo, John Robert Greek 125 E. Ridge St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Leight, Richard Arthur Pre-Engineer R.D. 1, Dillsburg, Pa. 

Lightner, Charles Weicht History. .. .390 E. Washington St., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Liskey, Fern Romaine Music Ed 37 N. Chestnut St., Annville, Pa. 

Long, Charlotte Jean Music Ed 1622 Sycamore St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Longenecker, Robert Eugene. Biology 117 Oak St., Progress, Pa. 

Lutz, Ralph Harold Pre-Medical Muir, Pa. 

Mackrides, Robert Economics 6038 Sansom St., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 

Mark, Carol Ann Sociology 500 E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Martinicchio, Vincent L Economics.. 7 W. Wyncliffe Ave., Clifton Heights, Pa. 

McArdles, James M English 41 Sussex St., Port Jervis, N. Y. 

McBride, Robert Kay Music Ed Taylor Highlands, Huntingdon, Pa. 

McDonald, Jack Mars Economics 550 Radnor St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

McEvoy, Peter Paul, Jr Economics Tall Pines Inn, Sewell, N.J. 

McHenry, 

Richard Marshall, Jr Pre-Medical 326 N. Elm St., Orrville, Ohio 

McLinn, Samuel Edgar Pre-Medical 442 Hummel St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mentzer, Larry Martin Psychology 14 W. Park St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Meyer, Marie Ann Elem. Ed 743 Reservoir St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Meyers, Rachel Steele Pre-Nursing Laurel, Pa. 

Mickey, Harriet Ann Music Ed Stouffer Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Miller, Lester LeRoy, Jr. . . . Pre-Medical Valley View, Pa. 

Miller, Sally Ann Music Ed 415 Fifteenth St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Mitchell, James Ayars Economics Canterbury Drive, Chester, Pa. 

Molotsky, Stanley Harold. . .Economics 442 N. 8th St., Camden 2, N. J. 

Murray, William David Chemistry 2316 Chestnut St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Nassaur, Joseph Economics 426 3rd St., Brooklyn 15, N. Y. 

Nye, Harry Leroy Economics R.D. 3, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Obert, Ruth Ellen Music Ed Front St., Liverpool, Pa. 

Ollinger, John Porter Psychology 330 5th Ave., Ford City, Pa. 

Peepe, Jackson George Pre-Dental 46 High St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

. 136 . 



Pierson, Charlotte Ann Music Ed 4 Llandillo Rd., Havertown 

Pietreniak, Eugene Joseph. . . Biology 2S06 W. 3rd St., Chester 

Powell, Richard Eugene .... Music Ed Ickesburg 

Provard, Larry Lee Liberal Arts 416 W. 4th St., Waynesboro, 

Prugh, Sessaly Ann Music Ed Tioga 

Radcliffe, J. Carl Chemistry R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Rebok, Chester Theodore. . . .English 31 S. 2nd St., Steelton 

Reinhart, Thomas Charles. .. Biology 242 S. 8th St., Columbia 

Rhoads, Mrs. Jane Grubb. .. Music Ed.. .Benjamin Franklin Highway, Palmyra 

Rice, Marvin Lee Pre-Theol 104 Greenmount Ave., Hagerstown, 

Risser, Mary Ellen Elem. Ed 117 West End Ave., Lititz 

Ruhl, Rosemary Diane History 2158 Swatara St., Harrisburg 

Schell, David Henry Music Ed 16 E. Jefferson Ave., Myerstown 

Schmid, William Lee Economics 8 Latimer St., York 

Schott, Russell Howard Music Ed 737 Bullock Ave., Yeadon 

Schurman, Robert Cleveland. Economics 35 Smull Ave., Caldwell, 

Seibert, N. Linwood, Jr Music Ed 211Rosemont Ave., New Cumberland 

Sensenig, Robert Dale Biology 211 New St., Lititz 

Shaffer, Rodney Carroll. .. .Music Ed 131 Violet St., Johnstown 

Shatto, Elizabeth Powers. . . .Elem. Ed 21 Broadway, Hagerstown, 

Sheaffer, Dale Lee Pre-Dental 832 Highland St., Enhaut 

Shearer, Light Wilson Chemistry 939 Cornwall Rd., Lebanon 

Shirley, Marcia Ann English 310 W. John St., Martinsburg, W.Va 



Sipe, Gary Henry Pre-Medical 1224 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Smedley, Virginia Elsie Elem. Ed 416 W. Barnard St., West Chester, Pa. 

Snyder, Clark LaVerne Music Ed 202 Chestnut St., Reading, Pa. 

Snyder, Robert Eugene Economics 234 W. Gay St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Spearing, Jack Elmer Music Ed 213 Eighth St., Lewistown, Pa. 

Speicher, Elizabeth Rose. ... Elem. Ed 205 Intervilla Ave., West Lawn, Pa. 

Sproul, Elaine Barbara Elem. Ed 271 Ardmore Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Sproul, John Hardiman Economics 292 Green Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Stahley, Edgar Nathaniel, Jr. . Liberal Arts R.D. 1, Slatington, Pa. 

Starr, Richard Byron Religion Box 113, Lebanon, Pa. 

Stauffer, Joe Leroy Economics 157 Linden Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 

Steffy, James Richard Economics 1336 King St., Avon, Pa. 

Steiner, Darlene June Music Ed Paradise, Pa. 

Stineman, Mildred Ann Elem. Ed 1515 State St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Swavely, Judith Ann Music Ed 916 Oley St., Reading, Pa. 

Swicarz, Mary Ann Nursing 201 Lawrence St., Middletown, Pa. 

Swope, Mary Elizabeth Music Ed Bachman Road, Annville, Pa. 

Teates, Charles David Pre-Medical 34 Fairview Ave., Front Royal, Va. 

Tingley, Janet Marie Elem. Ed 5106 Whitby Ave., Philadephia 43, Pa. 

Tittle, Martha Eileen Elem. Ed 213 E. Oak St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Toy, Joseph Roger Liberal Arts R.D. 3, Kittanning, Pa. 

Tyson, James Daniel Music Ed 211 S. High St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Uhrich, Thomas Vincent. . . . History 250 S. Fifth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Walker, Robert Stanley Music Ed 7633 Oak Lane Rd., Cheltenham, Pa. 

Walp, Beverly Ann Elem. Ed 31 l / 2 S. St. Cloud St., Allentown, Pa. 

Weaver, Beverly Anne Music Ed 699 Broad St., Akron, Pa. 

Weaver, Herman Lester, Jr. .Arts-Engineer 1023 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Weinel, Ronald Blair Economics R.D. 1, Apollo, Pa. 

Weit, Sandra Jean Sociology 309 S. Cedar St., Lititz, Pa. 

Weitzel, Jay Harold Music Ed R.D. 1, Reinholds, Pa. 

Williamson, Donna Margaret. Music Ed 2050 Whitehall St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Wingenroth, Gerald Shober . . Music Ed Box 77, Reamstown, Pa. 

Wolfe, James Franklin Chemistry 422 W. Main St., Dallastown, Pa. 

Wolpert, Otto Lyle History 58 School St., Ambler, Pa. 

Wray, David William Economics P.O. Box 235, Avonmore, Pa. 

Wright, James Clifford Chemistry 722 Indian Ridge Rd., Louisville, Ky. 

Zimmerman, Susan Ruth. ... Music Ed Bloomingdale Rd., Akron, N. Y. 



FRESHMEN 

Acker, Grace Ann Sociology 3785 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Aharrah, Donald Neil Liberal Arts Templeton, Pa. 

Argenziano, Frank James. ... Economics 2064 Jersey Ave., Scotch Plains, N.J. 

Artz, Susan Elinor Music Ed 49 N. Hellertown Ave., Quakertown, Pa. 

Avoletta, John Louis Liberal Arts Mounted Route, Mechaicsburg, Pa. 

Barbour, Peggy Ann Pre-Nursing. . . . 154 S. Second St., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Barlow, Ernest Herbert. .. .Economics. 281 W. Baltimore Ave., Clifton Heights, Pa. 

Barr, James Franklin, Jr. ... Economics 1544 Lehigh Parkway, Allentown, Pa. 



137 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Major Home Address 

Bartlett, Richard Leroy Mus. Ed 265 Laurel Ave., Lakewood, N. J. 

Bartram, Mabel Louise Pre-Medical R.D. 1, Coatesville, Pa. 

Beaver, Mary Kathryn English R.D. 2, Millerstown, Pa. 

Berger, Estelle Anne Music Ed 936 Carver St., Philaedlphia 24, Pa. 

Bertoli, Gerald John Economics 417 N. 4th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bird, Richard Edward Chemistry 1808 Sunshine Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 

Bobb, William Albert History. 541 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Boeshore, Russell Jay Economics W. Main St., Jonestown, Pa. 

Bowman, Robert Bruce Economics 619 S. Harrison St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Bowman, Robert James Chemistry 119 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 

Brestovansky, 

Charles Leonard Economics 1013 Orchard Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brooks, Marion Edith Sociology 19 Isabel Ave., Glenolden, Pa. 

Buzgon, Bernerd Allen Economics 409 South 11th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Cetron, Theodore Milford. . .Liberal Arts 1633 Robin Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Checket, James William Music Ed 454 N. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Colangelo, John William. . . . Music Ed 2343 Rudy Road, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Copenhaver, LeRoy Edward . Economics 1117 Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Copenhaver, Merritt Allen .. Religion Box 186, Taneytown, Md. 

Crobaugh, Sara Priscilla. .. .Music Ed 1103 Main St., Honesdale, Pa. 

Cromwell, 

Oliver William, Jr Pol. Science 4505 Berkley St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Crudele, Vincent Lewis Economics. . 116 Oakland Ave., South Plainfield, N.J. 

Dale, Ronald Barry Economics 528 McKinley Ave., Pitman, N. J. 

DeLiberty, William Frank. . .Mathematics. .42 Huntington St., Rutherford Heights, 

Pa. 

Devitz, Anthony Benedict. . .History. .... . 444 N. 2nd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dick, David Richey Economics. Highland Rd., Cape May Court House, N.J. 

Dimon, Scott Frank Economics 52 E. Line St., Tremont, Pa. 

Dunn, Henrietta Lou Music Ed 14 S. Main St., Mifflintown, Pa. 

Eaby, Joan Marie Music Ed R.D. 1, Willow Street, Pa. 

Edris, Earl Victor Physics 825 Church St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Edwards, Albert George. ... Economics. . .923 Mt. Vernon Ave., Haddonfield, N.J. 

Eppley, Gary Lee Pre-Forestry Valley St., Marysville, Pa. 

Erickson, Albert William. .. Liberal Arts. .. .427 Lafayette Ave., Prospect Park, Pa. 

Evans, Patricia Ann Music Ed 215 Montrose St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Evans, Veronica Mary Music Ed 21 E. Winona Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

Farr, Nicholas Longworth. . . Economics Swatara Park, Middletown, Pa. 

Fillmore, George Edward. ... Pre-Medical. ... 305 Pennsylvania Ave., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Fitzgerald, Charles Ebert. . .Economics Maryland Rd., Ingomar, Pa. 

Ford, Arthur Lewis English 540 S. Ninth St., Columbia, Pa. 

Frye, Tilman Roger Philosophy R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Gay, Louise Jane Music Ed 145 Reel St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Giovinazzo, Frank Joseph. .. Economics 89 Knickerbocker Rd., Closter, N.J. 

Gold, Stuart Chemistry 438 E. 32nd St., Paterson, N. J". 

Graby, James Kenneth Pre-Theol 429 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Graham, Helen Virginia. ... Religion R.D., Box 267, Morrisdale, Pa. 

Gray, Norman Cunningham. . Pre-Medical 184 E. High St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Grimes, Richard George Economics 454 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Grubb, Joanne Jeffries Elem. Ed R.D. 3, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Haas, James Jay Economics 73 S. Charlotte St., Manheim, Pa. 

Hafer, Marilyn Kay Music Ed 136 W. Elm St., Shillington, Pa. 

Hart, Harlan Smith Economics R.D. 1, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hartenstine, Marion Alice. . Pre-Nursing E. Main St., Leola, Pa. 

Hartranft, Ronald Bair Economics 219 W. Franklin St., Ephrata, Pa. 

Hartz, Susan Mae Med. Tech 1133 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Heefner, Linda Clarella Pre-Nursing 1487 Lincoln Way East, 

Chambersburg, Pa. 

Heindel, Ned Duane Chemistry 120 W. Broadway, Red Lion, Pa. 

Hollinger, Richard Kent Liberal Arts 27 S. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoover, Sheldon Keith Liberal Arts 38 W. Granada Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Howard, Janease Elaine. .. .Music Ed 409 S. George St., York, Pa. 

Howell, Ruth Gail Music Ed Meeker St., Succasunna, N. J. 

Humbert, Richard Allen. ... Pol. Science. .34 Pennsylvania Ave., Westminster, Md. 

Ill, Anthony Stephen Pre-Engineer 306 S. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Jackson, George Wellington. . Chemistry 241 E. Main St., Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Johnson, Paul Edward Pre-Medical 145 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kelly, Leo Joseph Pre-Medical 6 N. Delaware Rd., Yardley, Pa. 

Kerstetter, Robert Danforth.Elem. Ed 135 S. Third St., Shamokin, Pa. 

Kierstead, Arlene Alice Music Ed 10 Hazelwood Road, Bloomfield, N. J. 

Kimmel, Sherwood Maurice. Economics 1016 Oak St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kirchner, Donna Janet Elem. Ed. .. 1819 E. Patton Drive, Ft. George Meade, 

Md. 
Kling, David Henry Economics 334 W. Queen St., Annville, Pa. 

• 138 • 



CATALOGUE 

Name Major Home Address 

Krant, Irving Economics 2412 Madison St., Chester, Pa. 

Kreider, Herbert Dale Pre-Medical R.D. 1, Palmyra, Pa. 

Kreider, Marilyn Liberal Arts 17 N. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Kristich, William Nicholas. . History 758 W. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Kunkle, Thomas Floyd Biology R.D. 2, Box 100, Apollo, Pa. 

Kurr, David Warren Music Ed 108 N. Linden St., Robesonia, Pa. 

Lambert, John Pierce Chemistry Box 4 1 , Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Lavorini, Nello Mario Economics 625 E. Ninth Ave., Tarentum, Pa. 

Layser, Gene Rolf History Box 118, Richland, Pa. 

Lebo, James Oliver Economics. .6651 Huntington St., Rutherford Heights, 

Pa. 

Lenker, John Franklin, Jr. . . Liberal Arts R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lennox, Grace Elizabeth .... Med. Tech Tafton, Pa. 

Lesher, Llewellyn Lowell . . . Pre-Engineer R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lewis, 

George Washington, III. . .Economics. . Shelter Island Heights, Long Island, N. Y. 

Lippincott, Alyce Elizabeth. . Nursing 12 E. Main St., Columbus, N.J. 

Luckens, Phyllis Joanne Elem. Ed 106 E. Sunbury St., Shamokin, Pa. 

Lyter, Anne Louise Economics 505 Walnut Street, Cleona, Pa. 

Maclnnes, Audrey Helen. .. Liberal Arts. 6711 Parsons Blvd., Fresh Meadows, N. Y. 

Martin, Robert Smith Pre-Dental 135-A E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

McClure, George Richard. . .Economics 203 Reno St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

McCullough, Alexander P... Music Ed 302 Maple Ave., Richmond, Va. 

McDonald, Nancy Joan Music Ed R.D. 1, Stewartstown, Pa. 

McKerns, Charles Vincent. . Economics 630 W. Centre St., Mahanoy City, Pa. 

Mearns, Frank Wister Biology 47 School Lane, Strafford, Pa. 

Michael, Joseph Everett. . . .Pre-Engineering Stewartstown, Pa. 

Miller, Mark Leon Economics 351 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Miller, Marlin Mervin Religion R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Miller, Myles Lamar Economics R.D. 1, Hegins, Pa. 

Miller, Ruth Anna Music Ed 1219 Harding Ave., Palmyra, Pa. 

Misal, Donald Arthur Pre-Theol 304 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Mitchell, Donald Arthur. .. .Economics 9 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Morris, John Roller, II. ... Science Box 226, R.D. 3, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Morrison, Richard Conwell. .Music Ed 339 Louella Ave., Wayne, Pa. 

Morroni, June Rose Music Ed Smithmill, Pa. 

Mowery, John Earl Religion W. Harrisburg St., Dillsburg, Pa. 

Moyer, Dale Arden Music. Ed 129 S. Landis St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Moyer, Karl Eby Music Ed R.D. 2, Hershey, Pa. 

Murphy, John Barry English 749 Church St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Nicholson, 

Mrs. Helen McCann Liberal Arts 308 Aspen St., Middletown, Pa. 

Niosi, Philip Nicholas Pre-Medical 170 Bell Ave., Lodi, N.J. 

Novinger, James Gray Economics 1349 W. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Oaks, Susan Marie Music Ed Cairnbrook, Pa. 

Orel, Sydney Alvin Pre-Dental 204 S. 11th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Ottinger, Frank Economics 115 Garden Rd., Oreland, Pa. 

Paul, Clair Lamar Pre-Enginer 411 W. Broad St., Williamstown, Pa. 

Pellegrino, Anthony Richard. Pre-Medical 518 W. 8th Ave., Creighton, Pa. 

Perez, Renato Eduardo Music Ed 74 Lakeshore Dr., Red Bank, N. J. 

Piatt, Kenneth Elmer Religion 231 W. Main St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Poet, Samuel George Music Ed 2623 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pounds, Joseph Theodore Liberal Arts 4019 Lasher Rd., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Radcliffe, J. Carl Chemistry R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Ragno, Joseph Diego Music Ed 122 Belvidere Ave., Washington, N. J. 

Ray, John Franklin Pre-Engineer N. Wayne St., Robesonia, Pa. 

Rhen, Flora Irene Music Ed R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Rhoads, Romaine Faye Liberal Arts 733 E. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Rich, L. Waldo Pre-Engineer.. . 1528 W. Kerbaugh St., Phila. 40, Pa. 

Rismiller, Bruce Robert. .. .Pre-Engineer. .212 E. Mahanoy Ave., Mahanoy City, Pa. 

Ritter, Elizabeth Jeanette. .. Music Ed 8362 Liberty Rd., Baltimore 7, Md. 

Robinson, Margaret Frances. Music Ed.. .111 W. Edgewater Ave., Pleasantville, N. J. 

Rock, Paul Frances, II Pre-Ministerial 343 Brook St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rodgers, Rosalyn Anona. ... Music Ed 31 E. Broadway St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Roeske, Viktor Adolf Pre-Engineer 1129 E. Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rohland, Ann Marie English R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Rothenberger, Richard W. . . Music Ed Leiz's Bridge Rd., Reading, Pa. 

Rubba, Jack Norman Music Ed 20 Orchard St., Hammonton, N. J. 

Ruppenthal, 

Henry Martin, III Religion 1204 S. Washington St., Berkely Springs, 

W. Va. 

Saile, Joseph Charles History 124 S. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Sass, Lawrence Robert Liberal Arts .... 6 Mileview Ave., White Plains, N. Y. 

Savidge, Richard Monroe. . . .Economics Hegins, Pa. 

• 139 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Major Home Address 

Scarini, Lloyd Charles Pre-Vet 72 Columbia Ave., Vineland, N. J. 

Schaeffer, Mark Jay Economics 1517 Cathell Rd., Pittsburgh 36, Pa. 

Schairer, Carolyn Marie Music Ed 1417 Clearview Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Schmidt, Karl Frederick . . . .Music Ed. Schwenksville, Pa. 

Schoener, Andrew Robert. . . Pre-Mortician Stouchsburg, Pa. 

Schuster, Erwin Ferdinand. .History Sand Brook Rd., Flemington, N. J. 

Seifarth, Wayne Alan Music Ed 1217 Amity St., Reading, Pa. 

Sellers, Howard Allen Engineering 105 Rosana St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Sharman, 

Charles Winfield, III Music Ed 738 Penn Ave., Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Shesser, William Vincent. .. Music Ed 610 S. 25th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shirey, Linda Brown Music Ed 325 N. Rolling Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Slezosky, Edmund John, Jr. . Chemistry 528 W. Coal St., Shenandoah, Pa. 

Smith, John Herbert Music Ed 311 S. Broad St., Lititz, Pa. 

Smith, Lloyd Ronald Economics 2217 Oak St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Smith, Richard Henry Biology. 105 F St., Carlisle, Pa 

Snare, Joseph Kenneth Economics Box 200, Camp Hill, Pa. 

Spancake, Mary Elizabeth. . .Med. Tech 2520-B Green St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Spencer, Denton LeRoy . . . . Pre-Ministerial 23 S. Lancaster St., Annville, Pa. 

Sponsler, Marie Grace Sociology R.D., Paxinos, Pa. 

Stevens, Glenn Richard Sociology 120 Prince St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Stonaker, John Alfred Liberal Arts 122 Stacey Ave., Trenton 8, N.J. 

Stover, Sandy Robert Pre-Medical Parkside Apts., Hershey, Pa. 

Stow, Richard Henry Liberal Arts.. Merlin Road, R.D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 

Swanger, Harold Pearson. . . Sociology R.D. 2, Myerstown, Pa. 

Swisher, Kenneth John Chemistry R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Tartaglin, John Allen Pol. Science 1839 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Tavaglione, Vincent Charles. Music Ed 128 Locust St., Columbia, Pa. 

Thomasco, 

Mrs. Ethel Strickler Pre-Medical 205 S. 3rd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Tobias, David Allan Music Ed 4343 10th Ave., Temple, Pa. 

Trostle, Mary Susan Music Ed 132 E. Hanover St., Hanover, Pa. 

Troutman, Kenneth Charles. Pre-Dental W. Maple St., Valley View, Pa. 

Werner, Richard Charles Pre-Ministerial. .21 E. Pottsville St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

Wernert, Charles Edward. .. Music Ed 112 E. Bertsch St., Lansford, Pa. 

Wertz, Ann Etta Elem. Ed 3220 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

White, Doris Ella Liberal Arts 911 Locust St., Columbia, Pa. 

Winarski, Stanley Thaddeus . History R.D. 1, Glassboro, N.J. 

Wise, Ray Norman Pre-Dental Cornwall, Pa. 

Youse, Richard Allen Pre-Forestry 820 Forneydale Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Zakis, Michael Spiro Liberal Arts 4220 Locust Lane, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Zimmerman, Richard Ernest. Economics 315 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Zuse, Janet Odo Elem. Ed. .Nelson Hall Apartments, Chambersburg, Pa. 



SPECIALS 

Baldwin, Mrs. Ruth S Liberal Arts 24 N. Locust St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Carmean, Mrs. Edna Louise. Liberal Arts R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Caval, Albert L. Science 357 S. Duke St., York, Pa. 

Gatter, Audrie Lois Liberal Arts 433 Devon Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Igou, Ronald L Nursing 327 Boyles St., Bellwood, Pa. 

McGinn, Frank Philip Biology 903 Smith Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Murphy, Mary Ellen Elem. Ed 820 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Reda, 

Mrs. Margaret Grissinger. Nursing 2348 N. Green St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Reed, Charles 320R S. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Snyder, Mary Ellen Med. Tech R.D. 2, Box 83, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Whitenight, 

Mrs. Leah Reese Elem. Ed 3512 Schoolhouse Lane, Progress, Pa. 



SPECIALS IN DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Part-time 

Althouse, Josephine Piano, Organ 752 Mifflin St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Arnold, Jeffrey Violin 10 E. Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Baker, Janet Piano 43 N. Forge St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Baker, Judy Piano 43 N. Forge St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Barbour, Peggy Voice 154 S. Second St., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Barnhard, Ann Piano 625 Maple St., Lebanon, Pa. 

. 140 • 



Beard, Nancy Piano R.D. 1 , Palmyra. 

Behney, Wilson Oboe R.D. 1, Palmyra 

Bohner, Diane Organ 628 Cocoa Ave., Hershey 

Bollinger, Robert Trombone 726 Maple St., Annville 

Bott, Amelia Voice 16 W. Main St., Palmyra 

Bowman, James Violin 20 S. 10th St., Lebanon 

Bowman, John Organ 20 S. 10th St., Lebanon 

Brown, Dale Violin 420 S. 6th St., Lebanon 

Brown, Ray Trumpet 315 N. 8th St., Lebanon 

Bryce, Mrs. Mary Grace. . .Voice R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Dissinger, Sandra Piano Campbelltown 

Doster, Robert Baritone Horn Rothsville 

Eckenroth, Gabrielle A Organ R.D. 1, Annville 

Eshleman, Lorraine Violin R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Ficca, Judy Voice R.D. 2, Myerstown 

Frantz, Patricia Piano R.D. 1, Palmyra 

Frederick, Ann Violin E. Main St., Annville 

Furnam, Lessa Flute 2037 Oak St., Lebanon 

Gilbert, Barbara Flute 320 E. High St., Lebanon 

Gockley, David Piano 303 S. White Oak St., Annville 

Gockley, Joan Piano 303 S. White Oak St., Annville 

Grubb, Kathryn Voice R.D. 1, Annville 

Haak, Edna Flute 720 S. Railroad St., Myerstown 

Hackman, Jannette Organ R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Harkins, Alice Piano 153 W. Areba Ave., Hershey 

Heagy, Carol Flute R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Heilman, Alma Piano 115 W. Main St., Annville 

Hein, Doris French Horn R.D. 2, Hershey 

Hollingsworth, Suzanne Piano 36 N. College St., Palmyra 

Houston, James French Horn R.D. 2, Annville 

Houston, Janet Violin R.D. 2, Annville 

Kadel, Karen Violin Colebrook Rd., Lebanon 

Kaylor, Galen Voice R.D. 2, Lebanon 

Kegerize, Eve Piano 110 W. Caracas Ave., Hershey 

Kegerreis, Betty Piano R.D. 1, Campbelltown 

Kegerreis, Nancy Piano R.D. 1, Campbelltown 

Kelchner, Ruthanne Organ 944 Itaska St., Bethlehem 

Kern, Pamela Piano 333 S. Green St., Palmyra 

Kessler, Mrs. Harry Voice 524 S. 12th St., Lebanon 

Kettering, Joan Piano 4th Ave. & Birch Sts., Mt. Gretna 

Kilmoyer, Robert Clarinet 815 Guilford St., Lebanon 

King, Carole Violin 355 S. 2nd Ave., Lebanon 

Krammes, Evelyn Piano R.D. 20, Lebanon 

Kreider, Andy Trombone 410 E. Maple St., Annville 

Kreider, Linda Flute R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Kreider, Thomas Baritone Horn 106 Washington St., Cleona 

Lau, Robert Violin 1020 Lehman St., Lebanon 

Lebo, John Organ 125 E. Ridge St., Carlisle 

Levy, Betty Piano 401 S. 12th St., Lebanon 

Light, Sylvia Piano R.D. 2, Annville 

May, Anita Piano 201 N. Franklin St., Palmyra 

Mentzer, Jeannine Piano Campbelltown 

Meyers, Rachel Voice Laurel 

Miller, Janet Piano 763 E. Maple St., Annville 

Miller, Jay Clarinet 221 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Miller, Ruth Piano 144 College Ave., Annville 

Mills, Robert Saxophone 438 N. 5th St., Lebanon 

Morrison, Judy Flute 101 Wilson St., Cleona 

Nixon, Henry Trombone 260 E. Granada St., Hershey 

Pfortz, Glenn Piano 334 W. High St., Elizabethtown 

Riley, Jane Piano 12 E. Maple St., Annville 

Rovers, Ray Piano 53 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

Schell, Phyllis Percussion 10 221 S. Lancaster St., Annville 

Schober, Ann Violin, Piano 40 E. Cherry St., Palmyra 

Sepulveda, Judy Clarinet 433 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Shale, Sandra Piano Cornwall 

Shale, Stephanie Piano Cornwall 

Sherk, Albert Piano 42 E. Cherry St., Palmyra 

Sherk, Lynda Piano 30 N. Grant St., Palmyra 

Sherk, Suzanne Piano 42 E. Cherry St., Palmyra 

Shroyer, Lois Voice 83 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

Shuey, Janice Viola 126 North Ave., Palmyra 

Silvernail, Mrs. Viola Organ 439 Chestnut St., Palmyra, 

• 141 • 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Major Home Address 

Stahle, Edgar Cello R.D. 1, Slatington, Pa. 

Stein, Helen Voice 1525 Elm St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Stober, Richard Trombone 1070 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Strausser, Faith Violin P.O. Box 18, Klinefeltersville, Pa. 

Stroh, Janice Voice 110 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Suhr, Susan Flute 20 E. Main St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Swartz, Anne Organ E. Granada Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Thompson, Diann Violin 126 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Thurmond, Marianne Piano 831 E. Maple St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Tice, Patricia Piano 307 Wilson St., Cleona, Pa. 

Tittle, Martha Voice 213 E. Oak St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Weidman, Clyde Bassoon 365 Prune St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wilson, Robert Piano 118 College Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Witman, Karen Piano 440 E. Pershing Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Witters, Sarah Violin 1032 Colebrook Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Zuse, Janet Flute Nelson Hall Apts., Chambersburg, Pa. 



EVENING CLASSES 

Name Home Address 

Albert, Elizabeth R.D. 2, Lebanon, Pa. 



Alderice, Agnes C V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Anspach, David W 1822 Center St., Lebanon 

Atticks, Elizabeth G 1236 Derry St., Harrisburg 

Attwood, Esther H 1002 S. Lincoln Ave., Lebanon 

Baal, Mrs. Anthony R.D. 2, Jonestown 

Baker, Robert James ., 820 Mifflin St., Lebanon 

Bartol, Richard Mark 1128 Brandywine St., Lebanon 

Bass, Minerva Walters R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Behney, Mrs. Margaret D 23 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Bingaman, Paul C R.D. 1, Sheridan 

Blatt, Marvin R 337 Walnut St., Lebanon 

Brennan, Lauretta M 423 N. 8th St., Lebanon 

Briody, Julia 423^ Walnut St., Lebanon 

Brubaker, Marjorie H 109 E. Poplar St., Lebanon 

Carter, Gladys F 16 S. 24th St., Camp Hill 

Cooper, Norma Jonestown 

Covington, Mrs. Eunice V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Cullen, Mary Ann 226 Yale St., Harrisburg 

Cupina, Mrs. Lillian Ann 426 North 9th St., Lebanon 

Curry Rodney E 27 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

Deets, Daniel W 59 1 / 2 Trinidad Ave., Hershey 

DeFino, Dominic 733 Hill St., Lebanon 

Deibler, John H 17 E. Pottsville St., Pine Grove 

Dole, Robert L 81st MP Det. (CI), Indiantown Gap 

Eck, Milton A R.D. 1, Palmyra 

Eckenroth, Mrs. Ruth A R.D. 1, Annville 

Elliott, Douglas R Box 60, Schaefferstown 

Faber, Elmer W 2507 Thomas St., Harrisburg 

Ferrar, Barbara Buyer 27 North 32nd St., Harrisburg 

Fogarty, Mrs. Verna E 436 Locust St., Lebanon 

Francis, Jane V V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Fulk, Paul F 99 N. 49th St., Harrisburg 

Gingrich, Mrs. Martha Elizabeth R.D. 2, Annville 

Goodman, Mrs. Stuart 129 E. Locust St., Annville 

Grumbine, Charles A 612 E. Maple St., Palmyra 

Hatter, Ruth B 539 S. 5th Ave., Lebanon 

Heim, Stanley W 818 Church St., Lebanon 

King, Mrs. Alma Marie 355 S. Second Ave., Lebanon 

Klopp, Frederic K 204 Elm St., Annville 

Kreiser, Frederick S Box 34, Ono 

Kruger, David B R.D. 1, Annville 

Kutz, Theresa M V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Lawrence, Rena Mae 400 S. Fourth St., Lebanon 

Leonard, Margaret R 411 N. 8th St., Lebanon 

Light, Mrs. Ellen S 1266 Quentin Rd., Lebanon 

Lingle, Leland Stanford 213 N. 12th St., Lebanon 

Martinsek, Henry 1006 Homeland Dr., Lancaster 

Mattia, Joan Elizabeth 24 S. 19th St., Harrisburg ; 

McNelis, Rose R 1247 Kittatinny St., Harrisburg 

Mengel, Grayce Elnora 17 S. Third Ave., Lebanon : 

. 142 



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CATALOGUE 

Name Home Address 



Mesics, Ruth 31 Berwyn Pk., Lebanon 

Meyers, Rebecca J 231 E. Areba Ave., Hershey 

Millacci, Margaret G 314 S. Second Ave., Lebanon 

Miller, Charles B 67 Market St., Campbelltown 

Minnich, Elsie V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Mitchell, Mrs. Mabel 300 S. Locust St., Myerstown 

Moffatt, Alfred C 938 Broad St., Akron 

Moore, Richard 502 N. Railroad St., Palmyra 

Mosher, Thomas P 81st MP Det. (CI), Indiantown Gap 

Moyer, Keith 512 S. Grant St., Palmyra 

Mullikin, Mrs. Edna S R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Murphy, Mary E 820 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Nitrauer, Mrs. Catherine H 5 Maple St., Myerstown 

Noll, Kathryn Mae 314 Sand Hill Rd., Lebanon 

Overton, William M 617 Harris St., Harrisburg 

Partridge, Kenneth E Fairview Apts., R.D. 1, New Cumberland 

Plum, Pearl V 107 E. Poplar St., Lebanon 

Psota, Velma Jean State Hospital, Wernersville 

Quinn, Thomas Vincent 123 Locust St., Lebanon 

Reinbold, June Elizabeth R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Remlinger, Anthony John Michael 520 N. 7th St., Lebanon 

Reppert, Robert Charles 725 Hill St., Lebanon 

Rhen, George William, Jr Jonestown 

Schell, Irene June Mt. Aetna 

Sheaffer, Robert M 1631 Bridge St., New Cumberland 

Siegel, Herman R 1033 Lehman St., Lebanon 

Snyder, Mary P State Hospital, Wernersville 

Spier, Joseph W 200 Manchester Rd., Camp Hill 

Stone, Luther W 614 N. 9th St., Lebanon 

Trostle, Karl Gene 201 A No. Railroad St., Palmyra 

Urban, Robert J R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Vallely, Joseph R 114 S. Arlington Ave., Colonial Park 

Watson, Mary 60 Locust St., Bressler 

Whitman, Mrs. Dorothy R.D. 1, Lebanon 

Williams, Nancy Reed 418 S. Railroad St., Palmyra 

Whitmoyer, P. Sally Ann 2 E. Carpenter Ave., Myerstown 

Wise, Elizabeth Blanche Philhaven Hospital, R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Wolfe, Barbara Ann 319 S. 10th St., Lebanon 

Wolfe, Jane E 922 Mifflin St., Lebanon 

Zechman, Claudette E 139 Walton St., Lebanon 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

Anderson, Charles A 403 Wood St., Middletown 

Arna, Robert H 1633 Apricot St., Harrisburg 

Barnes, Bertha F 300 N. 70th St., Rutherford Heights 

Barr, Robert T 53 W. Louther St., Carlisle 

Barton, Velda LouElla 1718 Wayne St., Harrisburg 

Bast, Frank R 1314 Howard St., Harrisburg 

Beicher, Joseph R 550 Rosewood Lane, Paxtang, Harrisburg 

Biggs, Myron S., Jr 209 Cumberland Drive, Camp Hill 

Blasdel, Commander W.G. . .Quarters I-II, Naval Supply Depot, Mechanicsburg 

Blust, Paul L Front St., Marysville 

Blyler, Bertha Leba 760 State St., Millersburg 

Bogden, William A 1230 Christian St., Harrisburg 

Boswell, Carroll Page 115-1 2nd Ave., Oberlin 

Brehm, Frederic Carlton 516 Park Ave., New Cumberland 

Breinich, George 388 Highland St., Enhaut 

Brillinger, Henry B., II 3000 Derry St., Harrisburg 

Broadley, Janet L 1729 State St., Harrisburg 

Brubaker, Joseph D 1st Ave., Marysville 

Burket, John A Mounted Route, Mechanicsburg 

Burridge, Richard S 125 E. High St., Hummelstown 

Burroughs, William H 70 N. 12th St., Harrisburg 

Caldwell, Leo F 4430 Packard Lane, Camp Hill 

Cameron, Ralph W 1286 Letchworth Rd., Camp Hill 

Carter, Noah 932 Grand St., Harrisburg 

Cobb, Richard 2951 N. Front St., Harrisburg 

Crain, Lawrence W 2311 N. Front St., Harrisburg 

Deitrich, Mrs. Marjorie 103 Shell St., Harrisburg 

Dunbar, Lorraine 1929 Market St., Harrisburg 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Home Address 

Eichelberger, Mrs. Mary Lewisberry, Pa. 

Eppler, Mervin A 2229 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, 

Fabick, Leon P 1713 Chatham Rd., Camp Hill, 

Fake, Etha F R.D. 1, Etters, 

Farrell, Gerard A 2724 N. Sth St., Harrisburg, 

Feeser, Stuart R., Jr 3120 Elm St., Harrisburg, 

Fogarty, Vincent J 1622 North St., Harrisburg, 

Fortney, Clarence R 1249 Kittatinny St., Harrisburg, 

Fulk, Paul F 99 N. 49th St., Harrisburg, 

Gurley, Thomas Carlton 2951 N. Front St., Harrisburg, 

Hartlieb, Harold J 1703 Lincoln St., Camp Hill, 

Hetrick, Kathryn M 839 Center St., Millersburg, 

Hood, William E 304 E. Marble St., Mechanicsburg, 

Houpt, William R.. 218 N. 27th St., Camp Hill, 

Hughes, Evelyn Doris R.D. 1, Lewisberry, 

Hutchins, Mrs. Lydia H 205 Valley Rd., Harrisburg, 

Jackson, Frederick S 116 Boas St., Harrisburg, 

Jackson, Mary Louise Alpha Hall, College, Elizabethtown, 

Jones, Lieut. Commander C. P 3133 Chestnut St., Camp Hill, 

Keefer, Jack N 423 School Plaza, Hershey, 

Keller, Alfred John R.D. 1, Mechanicsburg, 

Kline, Ellis M P. O. Box 38, Camp Hill, 

Klinefelter, Milton H., Jr Mounted Route, Mechanicsburg, 

Koontz, Lieut. Commander Richard R 207 S. 32nd St., Camp Hill, 

Lawson, Walter E., Jr R.D. 1, Mechanicsburg, 

Lenker, Viola Faye 276 Pine St., Millersburg, 

Lowther, Joseph Gibson 2011 Harvard Ave., Camp Hill, 

Lutz, Edward Mounted Route, Hogestown, 

MacDonald, Roderick G 1516 Chatham Rd., Camp Hill, 

McCole, Catherine G 2113 Green St., Harrisburg, 

MacQuarrie, Harry Allard 3112 Yale Ave., Camp Hill, 

Martin, Earle Francis R.D. 6, Carlisle, 

Marchetti, Marie A 2309 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, 

Maurstad, Alfred S R.D. 4, Mechanicsburg, 

McKenzie, Harold R 2262 Kensington St., Harrisburg, 

Meyers, Doris Arlene 2436 Canby St., Penbrook, 

Miller, Josephine L 232 Maclay St., Harrisburg, 

Miller, Kenneth C Trindle Rd., Mechanicsburg, 

Miller, William R., Jr 140 Spruce St., Elizabethville, 

Mills, Hubert Preston Naval Supply Depot, Mechanicsburg, 

Nicholson, Helen M 308 Aspen St., Middletown, 

Novinger, Mrs. Talma K 554 Church St., Millersburg, 

O'Connor, Robert S 9 Ash Lane, Middletown, 

Overby, Archer R., Jr 108 E. Marble St., Mechanicsburg, 

Partridge, Kenneth E Fairview Apts., R.D. 1, New Cumberland, 

Patton, Gerald J 417 Apple Tree Rd., Camp Hill, 

Paul, Mary Angela 223 North 30th St., Paxtang, 

Perry, Ernest Valley St., Marysville, 

Pote, Elmer C 59 E. Main St., Mechanicsburg, 

Proctor, Ronald E 323 Lancaster Ave., Steelton, 

Rasnake, William C 313 Front St., Boiling Springs, 

Ratcliffe, Joan R 757 Pine St., Steelton, 

Raub, Charles E 205 N. 47th St., Harrisburg, 

Raysor, Naomi B 2923 Birch St., Harrisburg, 

Read, Herbert Brent, Jr 1534 Brandt Ave., New Cumberland, 

Reynolds, Frank E 304 Walnut St., Steelton, 

Ross, Mrs. Frances M 1415 Calder St., Harrisburg, 

Ross, Howard L 62 5th St., Enhaut, 

Ross, Margaret Janet 205 S. Front St., Harrisburg, 

Rumberger, Mrs. Frances H 2111 Yale St., Camp Hill, 

Sanford, Hugh S Mounted Route, Mechanicsburg, 

Schaffer, Geraldine N 2210 Logan St., Harrisburg, 

Shade, Adelaide E 2151 Derry St., Harrisburg, 

Sheaffer, Robert M 1631 Bridge St., New Cumberland, 

Sheesley, Mrs. Anna R.D. 1, Halifax, 

Shelley, Charles A R.D. 4, Mechanicsburg, 

Shoeman, Robert L Mounted Route, Camp Hill, 

Smith, Billy B R.D. 1, Abbottstown, 

Smith, Mrs. Mildred M 3316 Sunnyside Ave., Harrisburg, 

Snyder, Hazel 1608 N. 5th St., Harrisburg, 

Stetz, Mrs. Grace 640 State St., Millersburg, 

Stevens, Marshall C, Jr Box 27, Dillsburg, 

Strick, John H 24 N. 32nd St., Camp Hill, 

• 144 . 



CATALOGUE 

Name Home Address 

Summers, Mrs. Ruth E 629 Pine St., Steelton, Pa. 

Tillman, James Otto 1496 Simpson Ferry Rd., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Trevenen, Adeline C 1410 Market St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Urich, John E Halifax, Pa. 

Weaver, Mrs. Christine 2141 Swatara St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Weiss, Diane 2945 Green St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Wetzel, Evelyn Mae 1704 Susquehanna St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Yelito, Mary B 2 Village Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Zuba, Joseph S 208 S. Norway St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



SUMMER SESSION, 1955 

Abramson, Henry 4739 Walnut St., Philadelphia 39 

Adams, Gene Roger Hegins 

Albert, Ross J 530 Cumberland St., Lebanon 

Amig, Donald J 2425B Parkway Bldg., Harrisburg 

Appel, Bill Noel 203 Sell St., Johnstown 

Askew, Alfreda J 2080 Clayton Ave., Harrisburg 

Balsbaugh, James Haas 243 Swatara St., Steelton 

Baker, Milton M 2701 Walnut St., Harrisburg 

Barr, Russell W 730 Washington St., Allentown 



Bird, Harold Eugene, Jr 257 Grove St., Somerville, N. J 



Boehler, Ramon B 824 Guilford St., Lebanon 

Boush, Roy Elwood 2118 Cleveland Ave., West Lawn 

Bowman, Robert Bruce 619 S. Harrison St., Palmyra 

Boyer, Allen Chester 1268 Willow St., Lebanon 

Brandt, Rosanna Meyer R.D. 20, Lebanon 

Brechbill, Joseph Albert 104 N. Center St., Cleona 

Brightbill, Carlin Edwin 33 Lincoln St., Cleona 

Brightbill, Joseph M 115 Brunner St., Hummelstown 

Brinser, Florence Anna 648 Briarcliff Rd., Middletown 

Briody, Julia 423 J4 Walnut St., Lebanon 

Brown, Raloy E Fredericksburg 

Brubaker, Elizabeth DeBell 226 Walnut St., Lebanon 

Castiglia, Rita Jean 64 N. 17th St., Harrisburg 

Christianson, George E 29 N. 10th St., Lebanon 

Conlin, Joan Elizabeth V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Cooper, Norma Docilene Jonestown 

Cullen, Mary Ann 226 Yale St., Harrisburg 

DaCosta, Audrey 408 Penwyn Rd., Wynnewood 

Daylor, Helen Margaret 244 Pine St., Steelton 

Deimler, Evelyn Pauline R.D. 1, Harrisburg 

Deiter, Barbara Louise 432 N. 11th St., Lebanon 

Ditzler, Alice R.D. 1, Pine Grove 

Dove, Jacqueline Faye 1300 N. 8th St., Lebanon 

Drum, Cameron George 120 N. 16th St., Harrisburg 

Dukes, Arthur James 513 Laurel Ave., Cresson 

Eck, Milton A R.D. 1, Palmyra 

Eppler, Mervin A 2229 N. 6th St., Harrisburg 

Feeser, Virginia A 3201 Penbrook Ave., Harrisburg 

Fetterolf, Drew Terry 17 E. Main St., Annville 

Fitterer, Paul 211 Maple Ave., Hershey 



Forrest, Herbert Michael 118 High St., Closter, N. J 



Fortna, Marian Louise R.D. 1, Box 301, Lancaster 

Fulk, Paul Lawnton 

Gaskins, Mrs. Elizabeth 635 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Gatter, Audrie Lois 433 Devon Rd., Camp Hill 

Glick, Darwin Gene 1100 Oak St., Lebanon 

Gollam, Ruth Elaine 2143 Oak St., Lebanon 

Grochowski, Martin J 2737 E. Ontario St., Philadelphia 34 

Grubb, Ora Jane Benjamin Franklin Hwy., Palmyra 

Grumbine, Jane Light 612 E. Maple St., Palmyra 

Hajjar, Josephine 2312A N. 4th St., Harrisburg 

Hall, Frank M 130 E. Main St., Palmyra 

Hamaker, Mary A 230 Houcks Lane, Harrisburg 90 

Hauer, Thelma Louise 23 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

Henninger, Jean Carol 51 E. Pottsville St., Pine Grove 

Hill, Nicholas J 925 Cumberland St., Lebanon 

Hallenbech, Mrs. Jeanne M Box 407, R.D. 3, Beaver Creek Rd., Harrisburg 

Hostetter, Lorett Ruth R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Houston, Robert A., Jr R.D. 2, Annville 

• 145 • 



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LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Name Home Address 

Hughes, Charles E 245 Main St., Wilmore, Pa. 

Johns, Joseph R 43 J Hall Manor, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Keefer, Jack N 123 School Plaza, Hershey, Pa. 

Kelly, Clair Leonard, II 231 Ramsey Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Kling, Jacqueline Lois 801 Cornwall Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kreider, Carl Dennis R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kurtz, Samuel Bruce 1501 Oak St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Ladd, James Warden, III Mt. Gretna, Pa. 

Lee, Mrs. Doris 2615 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lentz, Dorothy Ruth 1972 W. 73rd Ave., Philadelphia 38, Pa. 

Light, Mrs. Ellen S 1266 Quentin Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Lutz, Dorothy Crist 105 E. High St., Annville, Pa. 

Lutz, William B., Jr 105 E. High St., Annville, Pa. 

Mackrides, Robert 6032 Samson St. Philadelphia 39, Pa. 

Magrini, Jo Ann 103 Cocoa Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Mark, Carol Ann 300 E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Markley, June E 4106 Walnut St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

McClure, George Richard 203 Reno St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

McDonald, Franklin Delana 236 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

McFarland, Robert Burnell 237 S. Main St., Red Lion, Pa. 

McLinn, Samuel Edgar 442 Hummel St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mentzer, Larry M 14 W. Park St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Meyer, Morris R.D. 3, Lebanon, Pa. 

Miller, Arthur Grant R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Miller, Robert Gordon 331 S. Lincoln St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Mixell, Louise M 2736 Reel St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Murphy, Mary E 820 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

O'Connor, Robert S 9 Ash Lane, Middletown, Pa. 

Paschasa, Howard J 64 Washington Ave., North Plainsfield, N. J. 

Peiffer, Donald Irvin 2606 N. 5th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Penchard, Howard R. F Box 287, Schaefferstown, Pa. 

Peters, Susan Barbara R.D. 1, Gardners, Pa. 

Reingruber, Muriel Marie 4712 Ridgeview Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Reinhard. Donald 76 High St., Pine Grove, Pa. 

Repert, Jack M 31 W. Main St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Rhen, George William, Jr R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Rhoads, Charles W., Jr 256 King St., Pottstown, Pa. 

Richards, Joan Lee 212 Forney Ave., Hanover, Pa. 

Risser, Florence B R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Schreiber, Nancy E 410 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schwaghart, Barbara Elaine 881 Crescent Dr., Rahway, N. J. 

Seitzinger, Prowell M 126 Park Ave., Glen Rock, Pa. 

Sheaffer, Robert M 1631 Bridge St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Shchirow, Anastasia 801 Landie Ave., Vineland, N. J. 

Shover, Richard L 561 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Snyder, Mrs. Emily Clements 350 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Speicher, Kathryn L 405 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Strong, George W 9 S. Franklin Ave., Bergenfield, N. J. 

Thomasco, Ethel Strickler 205 S. 3rd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Tittle, Martha Eileen 213 E. Oak St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Tompkins, Mrs. Dorothy Gable Main St., Richland, Pa. 

Tyson, Mrs. Martha Elizabeth 3763 Rutherford St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Ulrich, Clarence Daugherty 5301 Jonestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Vinitsky, Shirley Raphael 220 E. Poplar St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Walborn, Robert Lewis Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Walker, Robert M. S., Jr R.D. 2, Boonton, N. J. 

Wallace, Joseph R 1 13 E. Oak St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Wandell, Miriam Kathleen 31 S. College St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Warren, William L 334 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wegemer, Norman John 304 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Wentling, George M 143 S. King St., Annville, Pa. 

White, Paul Henry R.D. 1, New Holland, Pa. 

Whitmoyer, Patricia Sally Ann 2 E. Carpenter Ave., Myerstown, Pa. 

Williams, Donald Ray R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Williams, Nancy Reed 5757 N. 5th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Witmyer, Joyce 1415 Hollywood Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 

Wolf, George H Trailer Park, Annville, Pa. 

Wolf, Jean M. Lowry 27 Hamilton St., East Orange, N. J. 

Wolfe, Barbara A 319 S. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolfe, Jane E 426 Spruce St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolpert, Otto Lyle 58 School St., Ambler, Pa. 

Wuertz, John H 17 Church Rd., Ardmore, Pa. 

Yerkes, William Austin Mt. Vernon St., Oxford, Pa. 

Zilka, William A R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

• 146 • 






CATALOGUE 
Specials in Music 

Name Major Home Address 

Addison, Joan Violin 209 Hathaway Park, Lebanon, Pa. 

Althouse, Josephine Organ 752 Mifflin St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Arnold, Jeffrey Violin 10 E. Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Behney, William Oboe R.D. 1, Palmyra, Pa. 

Bowman, James Violin 20 S. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bowman, Joan Trumpet 520 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Bowman, John Organ 20 S. Tenth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brandt, Doris Organ 346 N. Fourteenth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Caldwell, Janet Violin 338 S. 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Fredericks, Ann Violin 502 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Gerberich, Lavern Organ Jonestown, Pa. 

Grubb, Kathryn Voice R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Grubb, Luke Organ R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Grubb, Ora Jane Piano Benjamin Franklin Hwy., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hackman, Jeanette Organ R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Heilman, Claralou Raye Piano R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Hess, Marian Voice Dillsburg, Pa. 

Hoaster, Donna Violin 425 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoshina, Tatsuo Piano Mt. Gretna, Pa. 

Houston, Janet Violin R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Kadel, Karen Violin Colebrook Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kilmoyer, Robert Clarinet 815 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

King, Carole Violin 355 S. 2nd Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Knapp, Rosalyn Rochelle. ... Piano 137 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Krammes, Evelyn May Piano R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lau, Robert Violin 1020 Lehman St, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lebo, Warren Clarinet 7 S. Front St., Mifflintown, Pa. 

Lentz, Dorothy Piano 1972 W. 73rd Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lesher, Susan Violin 14 N. 10th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Mentzer, Janet Voice Campbelltown, Pa. 

Meyer, Judy Voice 270 S. White Oak St., Annville, Pa. 

Miller, Barbara Organ 109 S. Third St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Moyer, Karl Organ R.D. 2, Hershey, Pa. 

Myers, Joyce Voice 193 Roosevelt Ave., Middletown, Pa. 

Patton, Cynthia Voice State Hospital, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Reed, Cecilia Voice 310 St. Peter St., Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

Schell, David Organ 16 E. Jefferson St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Schober, Ann Violin 40 E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Sherwood, Thomas James .... Oboe R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Stoudt, Margaret Voice 425 N. 1 1th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Strauss, David R French Horn 416 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Strausser, Faith Violin Klinef eltersville, Pa. 

Stroh, Janice Voice 110 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Sweney, Kathrine Voice 606 Cocoa Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Thompson, Diann Violin 126 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa 

REGISTRATION 

Second Semester, 1954-1955 

(Not included in Catalogue of 1955-1956) 

COLLEGE: Major Field Home Address 

Post-Graduates 

Achenbach, Marian 128 S. Hanover St., Humelstown, Pa. 

Bowman, Betty Jane 112 E. Caracas Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Johns, Joseph Hall 43 J Hall Manor, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Senior 
Hall, Franklin M Economics 130 E. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Juniors 

Oberholtzer, Kathleen Science. . . .2815 Canby St., Penbrook, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Palmer, Robert Brewster. ... Economics 133 Pierce St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Shellenberger, Dale L History 228 Wise Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 

Sophomores 

Lutz, Ralph Harold Pre-Medical Muir, Pa. 

Thomas, Glenn Allen Physics Craley, Pa. 

Yorty, Myles Robert Economics 234 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

. 147 ♦ 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Major Field Home Address 

Freshmen 

Brinser, Florence Anna Sociology 648 Briarcliff Rd., Middletown, Pa. 

Cutler, Elmer S Economics 200 Buckley St., Minersville, Pa. 

Huntzinger, Harry C Pre-Medical Valley View, Pa. 

Knorr, Victor Christian. ... Economics. . 112 Bryn Mawr Ave., Newton Square, Pa. 

Lopes, Elaine Frances Elementary Ed.. 102-38 63rd Rd., Forrest Hills 25, N.Y. 

Mark, Carol Ann Sociology 500 E. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Stombaugh, S. David Music Ed R.D. 2, Box 111, Portage, Pa. 

Swicarz, Mary Ann Nursing 201 Lawrence St., Middletown, Pa. 

Swisher, Kenneth John Pre-Engineering Route 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Specials 

Baer, Kenneth Dale 1905 North St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Herr, James Robert 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Specials in Music (Part-time) 

Barr, Russell Voice 41 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Gockley, David Piano 303 S. White Oak St., Annville, Pa. 

Hackman, Jeannette Piano R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Hawk, Edna Flute 720 S. Railroad St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Heilman, Alma Jean Piano 115 W. Main St. , Annville, Pa. 

Kegerreis, Betty Lou Piano R.D. 1, Campbelltown, Pa. 

Krammes, Evelyn Piano R.D. 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Osinski, Mildred Voice 845 Olive St., Camden 4, N. J. 

Rovers, Reynaldo, Jr Piano 54 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Scott, James Oboe 319 Park Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Shankroff, Benjamin Oboe 35 E. Locust St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Shroyer, Lois Voice 83 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Stroh, Janice Voice 110 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Suter, Sandra Violin 205 High St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Tice, Patricia Piano 307 Wilson St., Cleona, Pa. 

Veasey, William E Piano 357 N. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Yorty, Judith Piano Fairview Heights, Lebanon, Pa. 

Evening Classes 

Beaty, Clarence Ward V. A. Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Brubaker, Marjorie 109 E. Poplar St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bruntel, Herbert E 474 Beechwood Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Colby, Russell S V. A. Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Deets, Daniel W 59y 2 Trinidad Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Deiter, Mrs. Helen R.D. 3, Lebanon, Pa. 

Guare, James P 908 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Held, Lillian H 229 S. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Herr, James Robert 43 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Herr, John H., Jr R.D. 2, Mt. Joy, Pa. 

Johns, Joseph Hall 43 J Hall Manor, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kraybill, Paul N Intercourse, Pa. 

Kuhlman, Paul E., Jr R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kutz, Mary V. A. Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Laughery, Jean R 32 E. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Light, Mrs. Ellen S 1266 Quentin Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Margut, Frances W 1117 Washington St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Pesyna, Sylvan S 226 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Psota, Vilma Jean Nurses' Home, State Hospital, Wernersville, Pa. 

Quinn, Thomas Vincent Box 121, Annville, Pa. 

Reed, Charles Allen 320 S. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Reinbold, June E Route 3, Lebanon, Pa. 

Schmanke, Mrs. Ethel P Ill E. Poplar St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schmidt, William 17 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Sohland, Doris M 231 E. Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Steiner, Stanley A 190 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Swanger, Mrs. Ethel M 827 Church St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Thomas, Jack Herr 16 E. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Tomasco, Mrs. Ethel S 1015 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Whitman, Ruth E R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolf, William H 463 Beechwood Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wolfe, Jane E 426 Spruce St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Zilka, William Anthony Route 20, Lebanon, Pa. 

Extension Courses 

Bucher, Marigrace Mount Joy , Pa. 

Dodd, Charles William 319 Lincoln St., Steelton, Pa. 

Eberts, Jessie M. E 616 Benton St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Eppler, Mervin A 2229 N. 6th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Geary, Mrs. Marion H 814 S. 17th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Grimm, Mrs. Pauline 529 Market St., Halifax, Pa. 

. 148 • 



Women 


Total 


4 


7 


21 


74 


18 


71 


24 


97 


32 


154 


2 


8 



CATALOGUE 

Major Field Home Address 

Hallenbech, Jeanne Marie Beaver Creek Rd., R.D. 3, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hughes, Evelyn D Lewisberry, Pa. 

Laughery, Jean R 32 E. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Orbach, Mrs. Rosalind M 2765A Green St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rider, Mrs. Helen K Mounted Route, Middletown, Pa. 

Rowe, Martha Louise 1827 Berryhill St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sheaffer, Robert M 1631 Bridge St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Valley, Joseph 114 S. Arlington Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 



SUMMARY OF COLLEGE YEAR, 1954-1955 

College Men 

Post-Graduates 3 

Senjors 53 

Juniors 53 

Sophomores 73 

Freshmen 122 

Specials 6 

310 

Conservatory of Music 

Post-Graduates — 

Seniors 13 

Juniors 13 

Sophomores 15 

Freshmen 23 

64 

Total 374 

Specials in Music — part-time 31 

Evening Classes 56 

Extension Courses 32 

Total in all Departments 493 

Names repeated 23 

Net Enrollment 470 343 813 

Summer Session, 1954 

College and Conservatory 63 38 101 

Specials in Music 13 28 41 

76 66 142 

Total including Summer Session 546 409 955 

Names repeated in Summer Session 42 29 71 

Net enrollment including Summer Session.. 504 380 884 



SUMMARY OF COLLEGE YEAR, 1955-1956— First Semester 

College Men Women Total 

Post-Graduates 4 2 6 

Seniors 51 18 69 

Juniors 60 21 81 

Sophomores 94 36 130 

Freshmen 116 26 142 

Specials 4 7 11 

329 110 439 

. 149 • 



1 


1 


14 


27 


23 


36 


24 


39 


32 


55 


94 


158 


195 


569 


80 


111 


48 


104 


39 


71 


362 


855 


19 


42 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Conservatory of Music 

Seniors 13 

Juniors 10 

Sophomores 20 

Freshmen 21 

64 

Total 393 

Specials in Music — part-time 27 

Evening Classes 38 

Extension Courses 73 

Total in all Departments 531 

Names repeated 11 

Net Enrollment S20 

Summer Session, 1955 

College and Conservatory 74 

Specials in Music 14 



22 
17 
27 
23 


35 
27 
47 
44 


89 


153 


199 


592 


69 

S3 
37 


96 
91 
110 


358 

7 


889 

18 


351 


871 


59 
31 


133 
45 



90 178 



150 



NDEX 



PAGE 

Absence 31,21 

Accreditations of the College . . 9 

Academic Classification 28 

Administration, Officers of . . . 118 
Administrative Regulations ... 31 
Admission, General Information 15 
Admission, Requirements for . . 15, 16 
Addresses, Faculty, Adminis- 
trative Officers and Assistants 126 

Advanced Standing 17 

Advisers 28 

Aid to Students 23 

Aims of the College 8 

Application Fee 19 

Application for Admission ... 15, 16 

Assistants, Student 126 

Athletics 14 

Awards 130 

Biology, Courses in 57 

Board of Trustees 116 

Board of Trustees, Committees 117 

Board of Trustees, Officers .. 117 

Boarding 18 

Breakage Deposit, Laboratories 20 

Breakage Deposit, Rooms .... 20 

Buildings and Equipment .... 10 

Calendar, 1956-57 2 

Calendar, College, 1955-56 ... 4 

Calendar, College, 1956-57 5 

Campus 10 

Chapel Attendance 11,31 

Charges, Schedule of Annual . . 18 

Chemistry, Courses in 61 

Chemistry, Outline of Course. . 36 

Christian Associations 11 

Christian Vocations Week .... 12 

Class Attendance 31 

Clubs, Departmental 13 

Committees of Board of Trus- 
tees 117 

Committees, Faculty and Ad- 
ministrative 125 

Competitive Scholarship Exam- 
ination 23 

Concurrent Courses 27 

Conservatory of Music 101 

Control 9 

Cooperating Training Teachers 124 

Corporation, The 116 

Corporation, Officers of 117 

Counseling and Placement .... 29 

Credits 34 

Day Student Rooms 22 

Deferred Payments 21 

Deficient Students 32 

Degrees Awarded — 1955 128 

Degrees Granted 33 



PAGE 

Degrees, Requirements for .... 35 

Delta Tau Chi 12 

Departmental Assistants 126 

Deposits 20 

Divisional Organization 55 

Dormitory Proctors 119 

Dramatics 13 

Drawing (Engineering) 72 

Economics and Business, 

Courses in 63 

Economics and Business, 

Outline of Courses 37 

Education, Courses in 

Elementary Education 68 

Secondary Education 71 

Elementary Education, 

Outline of Course 38 

Endowment Aids 24 

Engineering, Cooperative Pro- 
gram, Outline of Course ... 40 

English, Courses in 72 

Enrollment and Credits 27 

Enrollment, Student, 1954-55 . . 149 
Enrollment, Student, First Se- 
mester, 1955-56 149 

Entrance Requirements 15, 16 

Environment 9 

Equipment 10 

Evening Classes 30 

Expenses 18 

Extension Courses 30 

Faculty 119 

Faculty-Student Government . . 12 

Fee, Application 19 

Fee, Graduation 19 

Fee, Key 19 

Fees, Laboratory 19 

Fees, Music 19 

Fees, Student Teaching 20 

Financial Aid 23 

Foreign Languages, Courses in 75 
Forestry, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 42 

French, Courses in 75 

Freshman Orientation 27, 29 

Future Teachers of America . . 14, 52 

General Information 7-10 

Geography 78 

Geology 79 

German, Courses in 76 

Governing Bodies 12 

Grading System 34 

Graduation Fee 19 

Graduation Requirements 35 

Grants-in-Aid 24 

Greek, Courses in 77 

Gymnasium 10 



151 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



PAGE 

Hazing 31 

Health and Physical Educa- 
tion, Courses in 79 

Health Service 10, 19 

History, Courses in 81 

History of Music, Courses in 110 

History of the Collegf 7 

Hours, Limit of 28 

Humanities, Course in 56 

Hygiene, Courses in 80 

i, Infi .nary 10 

Individual Instruction, Music 111 

Insurance Plan 18, 19 

Integrated Studies 

Statement of Aims 54 

Courses of Study 56 

Introduction to LVC 6 

Kift-Mullen Scholarships 23 

Laboratory Fees 19 

Latin, Courses in 77 

Library 10 

Loan Funds 24 

Location 9 

Major and Minor 28, 34 

Mathematics, Courses in 86 

Medical Technology 48 

Music, Courses in 103 

Music Education, 

Outline of Course 101 

Musical Organizations 13,108 

Music, Preparatory Department 112 

Music and the A.B. Degree . . 90 

Music Minor 91,101 

Nursing, Outline of Course . . 49 

Nursing Education 49 

Objectives 8 

Officers of Administration .... 118 
Officers of the Board of Trus- 
tees 117 

Organ Specifications 113 

Organizations 13 

Orientation 27, 29 

Outline of Courses: 

Bachelor of Science with 

Major in Chemistry 36 

Major in Economics and 

Business 37 

Major in Music Education 101 

Cooperative Forestry 42 

Elementary Education 38 

Cooperative Engineering ... 40 

Medical Technology 48 

Nursing 49 

Pre-Dental 47 

Pre-Law 45 

Pre-Medical 46 

Pre-Theological 53 

Pre- Veterinary 47 

Teaching 50 



PAGE 

Parking . . . 31 

Payment of Fees 19,21 

Penalty Fees 18 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 13, 129 

Philosophy, Courses in 91 

Physical Education 79 

Physical Education Building . . 10 

Physician's Certificate 15 

Physics, Courses in 93 

Placement Bureau 29, 52 

Political Science, Courses in . . 84 

Pre-Dental Course 47 

Pre-Laboratory Technology 

Course 48 

Pre-Law Curriculum 45 

Pre-Medical, Outline of Course 46 

Preparatory Department, Music 112 

Presidents 8 

Pre-Theological, 

Outline of Course 53 

Pre- Veterinary Course 47 

Prizes Awarded, 1955 130 

Probation Regulations 32 

Psychology, Courses in 94 

Publications 13 

Public School Music, 

Outline of Course 101 

Quality Points 34 

Rebates 21,24 

Register of Students 132 

Registration 27 

Registration, Change of 27 

Registration, Late 18, 27 

Registration, Pre- 18, 27 

Religion and Life Lectureship 12 

Religion, Courses in 97 

Religious Emphasis Week .... 11 

Religious Life 11 

Requirements for Admission . . 15 

Requirements for Degree .... 33 
Residence Requirements for 

Degree 34 

Room Equipment 21 

Room Rent 18, 21 

Room Reservation 20, 21 

Schedules, Arrangement of . . . 28 

Scholarships 23 

Self-support 24 

Semester Hours 33 

Sickness 10, 21 

Social Activities 13 

Integrated Studies, Courses in 56 

Societies 13 

Sociology, Courses in 99 

Spanish, Courses in 78 

Student Activities 11 

Student Activities Fee 18, 19 

Student Assistants 126 

Student Christian Association.. 11 

Student Loan Funds 24 

Student Recitals 112 

Student Teaching 51,70,71,107 



152 



PAGE 

student Teaching Fee 20 

summary of the Enrollment . . 150 

summer Session 145 

sunday Services 11 

support 9 

Cachings, Requirements for 

Certificates 50 

["ranscripts 18, 31 

fransfer Students 17 



PAGE 

Trust Funds 25 

Trustees, Board of 116 

Tuition Fee 18, 19 

Tuition Plan 21 

Tuition Rebate, Ministers' 

Children 24 

Tuition Refund Schedule .... 21 

Withdrawal from Cou '»s . . . . 35 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CAMPUS 




Annville, 


Pa. 








KEY TO NUMBERS . 




1. 


Administration Building 




8. 


Conservatory Annex 


2 


Engle Hall 




9. 


Sheridan Hall 


3. 


North Hall 




10. 


Washington Hall 


4. 


Men s Dormitory 




11. 


Infirmary 


5. 


Carnegie Library 




12. 


College Church 


6. 


Lynch Memorial Physical 




13. 


South Hall 




Education Building 




14. 


Vickroy Hall 


7. 


West Hall 




15. 


Central Heading Plant 




MAIN STREET E AST—US HIGH WAY 422