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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 



CATALOG ISSUE 
DECEMBER 1965 






Correspondence Directory 



To facilitate prompt attention, inquiries 

should be addressed as indicated below: 

Matters of General College Interest President 

Academic Program Dean of the College 

Admissions Director of Admissions 

Alumni Interests Alumni Secretary 

Business Matters, Expenses Controller 

Campus Conferences Assistant Director of Public Relations 

Centennial Planning Executive Secretary, Centennial Committee 

Development and Bequests Director of Development 

Evening and Summer Schools Director of Auxiliary Schools 

Financial Aid to Students Student Financial Aid Officer 

Placement: 

Teacher Placement Director of Teacher Placement 

Business and Industrial Dean of Women 

Publications and Publicity Director of Public Relations 

Religious Activities Chaplain 

Student Interests Dean of Men or Dean of Women 

Transcripts, Academic Reports Registrar 

Address all mail to: 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

Direct all telephone calls to: 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Area Code 7 1 7 Local Number 867-356 1 

Regular office hours for transacting business: 

College office hours are from 8:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. Monday through 
Friday. Members of the staff are available for interviews at other times 
if appointments are made in advance. 



LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 

ig66-ig6j Catalog 



The provisions of this bulletin are not to be regarded as an irre- 
vocable contract between the student and the College. The College re- 
serves the right to change any provisions or requirements at any time 
within the student's term of residence. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Published Monthly by Lebanon Valley College 
Volume LIII, December, 1965, Number 4 

Entered as second-class matter at Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Bruce C. Souders '44, Editor 



CALENDAR 1965 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 


. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


.12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


12 3 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


.... 12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 








SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


12 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 . . 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



CALENDAR 1966 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 


FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


APRIL 
S M T W T F S 

12 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


30 31 .. .. 






MAY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 


JUNE 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . 


JULY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 


AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 


OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



College Calender, ig6s-ig66 

— Centennial Tear 

1965 First Semester 

Sept. 9 Thursday, 6:30 p.m Faculty Retreat Dinner 

10 Friday Faculty Retreat 

1 1 Saturday Board of Trustees Retreat 

13-15 Monday through 

Wednesday Freshmen Orientation 

14, 15 Tuesday, Wednesday ....Registration 
16 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

16 Thursday, 11:00 a.m Opening Convocation 

Oct. 12 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

30 Saturday Lebanon Valley College Day 

Nov. 6 Saturday Board of Trustees meeting 

9, 10 Tuesday, Wednesday ... .Balmer Showers Lectures 

9 Tuesday Mid-semester grades due 

24 Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. .. .Thanksgiving vacation begins 

29 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

Dec. 1-8 Wednesday through Pre-registration for second 

Wednesday semester 

17 Friday, 5:00 p.m Christmas vacation begins 

1966 

Jan. 3 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

17-26 Monday through 

following Wednesday . .First semester examinations 
26 Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. .. .Mid-year Commencement 
26 Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. .. .First semester ends 

Second Semester 

Jan. 31 Monday Registration 

Feb. 1 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

22 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Founders Day, Centennial 

observance 
Feb. 28- 
March 3 Monday through 

Thursday Opening Centennial Symposium 

11 Friday, 5:00 p.m Spring vacation begins 

21 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

22 Tuesday Phi Alpha Epsilon Day 

April 7 Thursday, 5:00 p.m Easter vacation begins 

12 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

19 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

22 Friday Music Festival 

April 27- 

May 4 Wednesday through 

Wednesday Pre-registration for 1966—67 

29 Friday Music Festival 

May 7 Saturday May Day (100th Anniversay, first 

classes held) 

17 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Awards and Recognition Day 

21 Saturday Spring orientation for incoming 

freshmen 
May 23- 
June 1 Monday through 

following Wednesday . .Second semester examinations 

May 30 Monday Memorial Day 

June 3 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

4 Saturday Alumni Day 

5 Sunday, 10:30 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

5 Sunday, 2:30 p.m 97th Annual Commencement 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



CALENDAR 1966 



FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 

.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 



MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 

.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 



S M 



APRIL 

T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



S M 



JUNE 
T W T F S 

... 12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 . . 



S M 



JULY 
T W T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

.. .. 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



CALENDAR 1967 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


MARCH 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


APRIL 
S M T W T F S 

1 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


MAY 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 


JUNE 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 . 


JULY 

S M T W T F S 

1 


AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

.... 12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 . . 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



College Calendar for ig66-ig6j 

1966 First Semester 

Sept. 8 Thursday, 6:30 p.m Faculty Retreat Dinner 

9 Friday Faculty Retreat 

10 Saturday Board of Trustees Retreat 

12-14 Monday through 

Wednesday Freshmen Orientation 

13, 14 Tuesday, Wednesday . . . .Registration 

15 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

15 Thursday, 11:00 a.m Opening Convocation 

Oct. 11 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

Nov. 1,2 Tuesday, Wednesday ... .Balmer Showers Lecture 

5 Saturday Lebanon Valley College Day 

8 Tuesday Mid-semester grades due 

12 Saturday Board of Trustees meeting 

23 Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. . . .Thanksgiving vacation begins 

28 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

Nov. 30- 

Dec. 7 Wednesday through 

Wednesday Pre-registration for second semester 

Dec. 16 Friday, 5:00 p.m Christmas vacation begins 

1967 

Jan. 3 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

16-25 Monday through follow- 
ing Wednesday First semester examinations 

25 Wednesday, 11:15 a.m. . .Mid year Commencement 
25 Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. .. .First semester ends 

Second Semester 

Jan. 30 Monday Registration 

31 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

Mar. 6-9 Monday through 

Thursday Religious Emphasis Week 

17 Friday, 5:00 p.m Easter vacation begins 

28 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

28 Tuesday Phi Alpha Epsilon Day 

April 5 Wednesday Charter Day 

6-7 Thursday, Friday Centennial Symposium 

8 Saturday Centennial Convocation 

18 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

21 Friday Spring Music Festival 

April 26- 

May 3 Wednesday through 

Wednesday Pre-registration for 1967—68 

April 28 Friday Spring Music Festival 

May 16 Tuesday, 11:00 a.m Awards and Recognition Day 

20 Saturday Spring Orientation for incoming 

freshmen 
22-31 Monday through follow- 
ing Wednesday Second semester examinations 

30 Tuesday Memorial Day 

31 Wednesday, 5:00 p.m. .. .Second semester ends 
June 2 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

3 Saturday Alumni Day 

4 Sunday, 10:30 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

4 Sunday, 2:30 p.m 98th Annual Commencement 




-^rr^SZ^r^^^^^ 



Contents 



College Profile 

History 10 

Principles and Objectives 17 

Location and Environment 19 

Support and Control 23 

Looking to the Future 28 




Academic Programs 

Requirements for Degrees 30 

Special Plans of Study 34 

The College Honors Program 50 

Courses of Study 53 



General Information 

Admission 114 

Student Finances 117 

Financial Aid 120 

Academic Procedures 122 

Administrative Regulations 125 

Auxiliary Schools 129 

Student Activities 131 



Directories 

Trustees 138 

Administrative Staff and Faculty 144 

Addresses and Phone Numbers 158 

Alumni Organization ... 161 

Degrees Conferred 166 

Student Awards 170 

Register of Students 175 

Index 195 

7 




College Profile 



Lebanon Valley College, a church-related college of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, enjoys the distinction and prestige resulting from 100 years of 
service to American youth and to Christian higher education. Classified 
as a small college, it enjoys a reputation for friendliness and courtesy. 
Placing strong emphasis on student-faculty contact, Lebanon Valley 
College is proud of the amount of individual attention devoted to each 
student. It strives to provide an opportunity for each student to de- 
velop his intellectual capacities and his whole personality. Its curriculum, 
designed to provide a basic foundation of liberal education, also offers 
professional specialization in areas in which staff and facilities are 
available. 

The college motto, taken from John 8:32, "And Ye Shall know the 
truth, and the truth shall make you free," has provided a continuous chal- 
lenge to each succeeding generation of students. 



College History 



An Act to Incorporate Lebanon Valley College 

Whereas, Rudolph Herr, John H. Kinports, George A. Marks, 
Jr., L. W. Craumer, George W. Hoverter and others, citizens of 
Annville and vicinity, bought the Annville Academy, located at 
Annville, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and presented the same to 
the East Pennsylvania Conference of the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ, on condition that they would establish, and main- 
tain forever, an institution of learning, of high grade, which is in 
accordance with the design of said conference: 

And Whereas, Said conference accepted said gift, and appointed 
a board of trustees to receive and control the same: 

And Whereas, Said board of trustees, agreeably to the instruc- 
tions of said conference, leased said property with all additional 
buildings to be erected, to George W. Miles Rigor and Thomas Rees 
Vickroy, until the fifteenth day of July, one thousand eight hundred 
and seventy-one, said parties having obligated themselves to provide 
instruction in the elements, the sciences, ancient and modern lan- 
guages and literature, the ornamental branches, and biblical literature 
and exegesis, with the privilege of teaching such other branches, as 
are usually taught in universities: 

And Whereas, Said parties have successfully organized said 
institution, having invested their own means, and gathered a number 
of students from different sections of the country, the said school 
being under the principalship of Professor Thomas Rees Vickroy: 

And Whereas, The Said conference have appropriated twenty- 
five thousand dollars for the purpose of purchasing additional grounds, 
and erecting thereon suitable buildings; therefore, 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represen- 
tatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in General Assembly 
met, and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the same, That 
there be and is hereby erected and established, at the village of 
Annville, in Lebanon county, in this commonwealth, a college for the 
education of persons of both sexes, the name, style and title of which 
shall be Lebanon Valley College. 

This is a portion of the Charter of Lebanon Valley College as it is 
recorded in the Laws of the General Assembly of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania Passed at the Session of the State of Pennsylvania. Through its 
adoption, the College, which had opened its doors May 7, 1866, under 
the presidency of Dr. Thomas Rees Vickroy, was officially incorporated. 

10 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

The College began operations in the building of the Annville 
Academy (the building still exists on the campus as South Hall). According 
to the late Dr. Hiram H. Shenk, the Academy was known to be in opera- 
tion in a blacksmith shop in 1834 but was not officially chartered until 
May 28, 1840. The property was made available to the East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ accord- 
ing to the terms stated in the Charter. This body had taken action at its 
Annual Session in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, in March, 1865, to establish 
an institution of higher learning in a town conveniently located within 
the bounds of the Conference. Prior to this time, the Conference had had 
quasi-official connections with colleges of the denomination in other 
areas of the country, according to Dr. Phares B. Gibble (History of the 
East Pennsylvania Conference, pp. 546-548). However, the distance of 
these colleges — one in Mt. Pleasant, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, 
and one in Westerville, Ohio — from the Conference Area created problems 
for those young people of the Conference who desired to attend them. 




The Lebanon Valley College Campus as it looked during its earlier years. 
South Hall, the building in the foreground, still stands. 



11 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

According to the action taken at Lebanon, five persons were appointed 
to meet with five persons of the Pennsylvania Conference to give further 
attention to establishing a local college. Within the next year, this 
committee recommended the following: "First, the establishing of a school 
of high grade under the supervision of the church; second, to accept 
for this purpose the grounds and buildings of what was known as the 
Annville Academy, tendered as a gift to the Conference; and, third, to 
lease the buildings and grounds to a responsible party competent to take 
charge of the school the coming year." (Gibble, p. 548) 

The new college, in order to provide itself with a secure financial 
foundation, availed itself of the goodwill of the old Annville Academy 
and accepted students for work in the lower grades. At first, as President 
Vickroy afterwards declared, there was not even a nucleus of college 
students. From the start, however, Lebanon Valley College offered an 
advanced curriculum. Before long, the College was attracting students 
who were fully prepared, and it slowly evolved into a full-fledged institu- 
tion of higher education. 

The Growth of the College 

With a student body of forty-nine, the college opened on May 7, 1866. 
Dr. Thomas Rees Vickroy served as its president during the first five 
years of its existence and issued diplomas to its first graduates. President 
Lucian Hammond, his successor, gathered the nucleus of a college library, 
secured some scientific apparatus, and founded the Alumni Association. 
During succeeding years the institution grew in numbers and facilities. 
In 1890, the college received the Mary A. Dodge Scholarship of $10,000, 
which enabled it to close its first quarter century with increased confidence 
for the future. 

In 1897, under the presidency of Dr. Hervin U. Roop, the college 
entered a period of expansion during which Engle Hall, the Carnegie 
Library, and North Hall, later Keister Hall, were built (the latter building 
was recently razed, and the site will be used for the College Chapel). 
During this period the destruction by fire of the old Administration Build- 
ing tested the loyalty of college supporters but did not interfere with 
the program of expansion. The friends of the college rallied to build a 
new and larger Administration Building, a men's residence hall, and a 
heating plant. Under Dr. Roop's presidency improved quarters and modern 
equipment were provided for the science departments. His vision and in- 
itiative laid the foundation for the continuing success of Lebanon Valley 
College. 

The inauguration of George Daniel Gossard as President in 1912 was 
the beginning of an era of prosperity for Lebanon Valley College. During 
his term of office the student body tripled in numbers, the faculty in- 
creased in size and attainments, and the elimination of all phases of 
secondary education raised the institution to true college status. During 
this period two successful endowment campaigns were completed. 

Dr. Gossard was succeeded by Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, who built soundly 
upon the foundations previously laid. Under his administration the bonds 

12 



COLLEGE HISTORY 




Keister Hall, one of the two new residence halls for men, offers students 
small-group living experiences. 



of affection between the college and the church were strengthened, the 
active support of the alumni was vastly stimulated, academic standards 
were raised, the services of the college were extended over a wider area, 
and as a visible symbol of his energetic administration, a physical educa- 
tion building was erected. 

Following Dr. Lynch's death in 1950, the Trustees elected to the 
presidency Dr. Frederic K. Miller, one of the members of the faculty. His 
election was greeted with warmest enthusiasm by both faculty and con- 
stituents. Under his leadership the curriculum has been expanded, the 
administrative staff reorganized, and relationships with the local com- 
munity and alumni strengthened. 

The story of Dr. Miller's first decade in this office can be told in 
many ways. In terms of facilities, it becomes the story of the erection 
of new buildings and the renovation of existing buildings. The spotlight 
falls specifically upon the Mary Capp Green Residence Hall (1957), the 
Gossard Memorial Library (1957), Science Hall (1957), The College Dining 
Hall (1958), Carnegie Lounge (1959), Vickroy Hall (1961), and Keister 
and Hammond Halls (1965). A chapel is currently under construction. 

In terms of organization, it becomes the story of expanding services 
through the establishing of the separate offices of Dean of the College, 
Dean of Men and Dean of Women (functioning jointly as the student 
Personnel Office), College Chaplain, Assistant to the President, and Direc- 
tor of Development, to name but a few of the administrative changes. 

In terms of academic growth, it becomes the story of curriculum 
changes, expanded recognition of the College's alumnae by the American 
Association of University Women, the recognition of the Chemistry De- 
partment by the American Chemical Society, the use of the services of the 

13 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

College Entrance Examination Board and the College Scholarship Service, 
the inauguration of an Honors Program and a Teacher Intern Program 
for the students, and the establishing of a recognized curriculum in 
Elementary Education. 

The Present Academic Status— (Accreditation) 

Lebanon Valley College, through its board of trustees, administrative 
staff, and faculty, has endeavored to adhere to its initial objective of being 
a coeducational institution of high learning fostering high standards of 
scholarship in a Christian atmosphere. 

Lebanon Valley College is accredited by the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Department of Public In- 
struction of Pennsylvania, the National Association of Schools of Music, 
and the American Chemical Society. It is a member of the American 
Council on Education, the Association of American Colleges, the Col- 
lege Entrance Examination Board, the College Scholarship Service, the 
Council of Protestant Colleges and Universities, and the Pennsylvania 
Foundation for Independent Colleges. It is on the approved list of the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York and the American 
Association of University Women. 




The College Chapel is now under construction 



14 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

The College currently operates on a two-semester system with a 
twelve-week summer school, an evening school on the campus throughout 
the regular semesters, and a cooperative relationship with the Pennsylvania 
State University, the University of Pennsylvania, Temple University, and 
Elizabethtown College in the Harrisburg Area Center for Higher Edu- 
cation. 

The Evangelical United Brethren Church 

Even as the College has changed through the years, so has the 
denomination which gave it birth and continues to offer its support. The 
Church of the United Brethren in Christ merged with the Evangelical 
Church at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, November 16, 1946. Both of these 
denominations originated as outgrowths of an evangelical religious awak- 
ening among the German-speaking people of southeastern Pennsylvania 
and northern Maryland in the late eighteenth century. The Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ, which founded Lebanon Valley College in 
1866, was officially organized in 1800 and was the first Christian church 
indigenous to the United States. The Evangelical Church was organized 
shortly thereafter. Both churches spread west rapidly; but growth was 
slow in the South, principally because of the limitation imposed by the 
exclusive use of the German language in the church in the beginning and 
because of the church's outspoken opposition to slavery. 

The Evangelical United Brethren Church by tradition emphasizes 
evangelism, rather than liturgical or doctrinal matters. That is, its em- 
phasis has been placed on personal religious experience and morality in 
practical living, rather than on ritual or creedal orthodoxy. In the main, 
its worship forms have been simple; and its theology has stressed the 
individual freedom and responsibility of man in his relationship to God 
rather than the overwhelming divine power which is characteristic of Cal- 
vinistic theology. 

In organization the church is similar to the Methodist Church. It 
possesses a modified episcopacy, although the highest governing power is 
vested in a General Conference which meets every four years and is 
composed of ministers and lay members from the whole denomination. 
Next to the General Conference, authority is vested in the annual con- 
ferences, composed of ministers and lay representatives of local congre- 
gations and circuits. The Church employs the itinerant system for its 
ministry, i.e., ministers are appointed to local churches by the bishop 
of the area and the superintendent or superintendents of the conferences. 

According to the 1964 Year Book, the Evangelical United Brethren 
Church is made up of 4,341 local churches, 3,762 ministers, and 760,818 
members. In size it is fourteenth among the Protestant denominations in 
the United States. The church operates nine educational institutions and 
ten homes for orphans and the aged. In 1961 its income from contribu- 
tions was over $54 million. Geographically the church extends across the 
United States, from New England to the Pacific Coast, although it is 
strongest numerically in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. Denominational 
headquarters are in Dayton, Ohio. 

The denomination to which Lebanon Valley College is related is a 

15 



COLLEGE HISTORY 

constituent member of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the 
U.S.A., and of the World Council of Churches, with official representatives 
in each body. 

There is no tendency on the part of Lebanon Valley College to 
illiberal religious views. Though there are required religion courses for all 
students and weekly chapel services with modified attendance require- 
ments, the students are encouraged to seek their own religious develop- 
ment under the guidance of the College Chaplain, by participating in the 
various religious activities open to them on the campus (See page 21) 
and by attending worship services in one of the several churches of the 
community. 

Presidents 

Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D 1866-1871 

Lucian H. Hammond, A.M 1871-1876 

Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M 1876-1887 

Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D 1887-1889 

Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M 1889-1890 

E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D 1890-1897 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D 1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S 1906-1907 

Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D 1907-1912 

Rev. George Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., LL.D 1912-1932 

Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D., Ph.D., LL.D 1932-1950 

Frederic K. Miller, A.M., Ph.D., Litt.D Acting President 1950-1951 

President 1951- 




The first LVC seal 



16 



Principles and Objectives 



The aim of Lebanon Valley College is to give its students the oppor- 
tunity to procure a liberal education of the highest quality. That is, it 
seeks, first of all, to acquaint them with the basic facts and principles of 
the cultural heritage of mankind, including its spiritual, scientific, liter- 
ary, artistic, and social elements. Second, it seeks to develop in its students 
the capacity to use their full intellectual resources in dealing with, formu- 
lating and communicating ideas, and making reasoned judgments. Third, 
it seeks to cultivate those qualities of personality and character, of moral 
and social responsibility and concern, that characterize personal maturity 
and constitute the basis of a free society. 

The liberal education aims of Lebanon Valley College are set within 
the context of commitment to the Christian faith and Christian values, 
and are ordered by the conviction that sincere faith and significant learn- 
ing are inseparable, that all truth has its origin and end in God, and that 
therefore learner and teacher alike not only can be, but must be free to 
subject all claims to truth and value, both religious and secular, to the 
tests of honest and humble inquiry, analysis, reflection, and redefinition. 
And implicit in this conviction is the correlate that keeping the doors open 
for exploration and application of Christian truth and value does not bar 
the way to the exploration of the truth and value to be found in other 
religious and philosophical traditions of mankind. Finally, in the Christian 
understanding of man as creature of God is found the basis of the Col- 
lege's concern for all its members as persons, as God-related as well as 
man-related and world-related beings. Thus through commitment to the 
ideal of Christian higher education does the College seek to serve the 
Church and the Christian community which nourishes and sustains it. 

In its policy of providing programs of a professional and pre-profes- 
sional nature, Lebanon Valley College does not seek simply to help edu- 
cate persons who will make their own useful contribution to the work 
of the world and to the service of mankind in certain professions and voca- 
tions. The College insists that for its students engaged in such prepara- 
tion the purposes of a Christian liberal education apply completely and 
must be neither ignored nor deprecated for the sake of technical or 
utilitarian ends or in the name of pragmatic or material values. Indeed, 
a liberally educated professional is a more complete person, while through 
his practice his knowledge and interests are applied and made relevant 
to the world. 

17 



PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES 

It is in relationship to these general principles that the following more 
specific educational objectives of Lebanon Valley College are to be under- 
stood: 

1. To provide an opportunity for qualified young people to 
procure a liberal education and to develop their total personalities 
under Christian influences. 

2. To help provide the Church with capable and enlightened 
leaders, both clerical and lay. 

3. To foster Christian ideals and to encourage faithfulness to 
the Church of the student's choice. 

4. To help train well-informed, intelligent, and responsible 
citizens, qualified for leadership in community, state, and nation. 

5. To provide pre-professional students with the broad prelim- 
inary training recommended by professional schools and professional 
associations. 

6. To provide, in an atmosphere of liberal culture, partial or 
complete training for certain professions and vocations. 

7. To provide opportunity for gifted students to pursue inde- 
pendent study for the purpose of developing their intellectual powers 
to the maximum. 






^r 



ROCHESTER 365 miles 



BUFFALO 305 miles 



BOSTON 365 miles 



CLEVELAND 345 



PITTSBURGH 210 miles 




ALLENTOWN 70 miles 



PHILADELPHIA 80 miles 

I \ N 

HAGERSTOWN 95 miles / / WILMINGTON 90 miles 

BALTIMORE 100 miles X 

/ ATLANTIC CITY 145 miles 

WASHINGTON 125 miles 



Location and Environment 



Lebanon Valley College is located in Annville, Lebanon County, 
Pennsylvania, twenty miles east of Harrisburg and five miles west of Leb- 
anon. The campus faces U. S. Highway 422 on the south and Pennsyl- 
vania Highway 934 on the west. Highway 422 is an east-west highway 
paralleling U. S. Highway 22 to the north and the Pennsylvania Turnpike 
to the south. Highway 934 is a north-south route providing direct access 
to Highway 22, U. S. Highway 322, and the Pennsylvania Turnpike 
(using the Lebanon-Lancaster Interchange, Pennsylvania Highway 72, 
and Highway 322). 

Bus service between Reading and Harrisburg over Highway 422 pro- 
vides rail and air connections at Harrisburg for Philadelphia, New York, 
Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburgh, and other major cities. 

Annville is a residential community of about 3,500 people situated 
in the agricultural country of the Pennsylvania Germans. Of historical 
significance in nearby areas are the Cornwall Charcoal Furnace, which 

19 



LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 

dates back to 1742 and which supplied cannonballs for Washington's 
army, and the adjacent Cornwall Ore Mines which are still operated by 
the Bethlehem Steel Corporation; the Union Canal Tunnel (the oldest 
tunnel in the United States) and remnants of the locks used from 1828 to 
1885 by the canal which provided access from the Susquehanna River to 
Philadelphia; and the first Municipal Water Works in America at Schaef- 
ferstown. 

Lebanon Valley College offers cultural programs in the form of a 
subscription Artist Series, concerts by students, faculty members, and 
musical organizations in the Department of Music, and lectures spon- 
sored by the various departments of the College. In addition, the neigh- 
boring communities of Harrisburg, Hershey, and Lebanon offer concerts, 
lectures, and other cultural activities throughout the year. 

There are nine churches of different denominations in Annville it- 
self. Other parishes of major religious groups not found in Annville are 
located within a five-mile radius of the College. 






Hatoa. 









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LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 

Campus, Buildings, and Equipment 

The campus of thirty-five acres is situated in the center of Annville. 
The college plant consists of twenty-six buildings including: 

The Administration Building — Administrative Offices (President, Dean 
of the College, Assistant to the President, and Controller) are located on 
the main floor. The remainder of the building is devoted to classrooms, 
laboratories, faculty offices, and administrative services. 

Gossard Memorial Library — Containing the most modern, approved 
facilities, The Gossard Memorial Library was opened in June, 1957. The 
more chan 83,000 volumes on its shelves contain an excellent collection of 
standard reference works. In addition to the books used by the various 
departments of the College, a diversified collection of periodicals is also 
available. 

The Hiram Herr Shenk Collection (which includes the Heilman 
Library) and the C. B. Montgomery Memorial Collection contain many 
valuable works dealing with the history and customs of the Pennsylvania 
Germans. These collections are housed in the Historical Collection Room 
and are open for reference use under staff supervision. 

A separate room houses the Archives of the Historical Society of the 
Eastern Conference of the Evangelical United Brethren Church. The 
materials in this collection are available for reference under the super- 
vision of the Conference Historian. 

Special equipment of the library includes a music and listening room 
outfitted with turntables and earphones, typing booths for students, con- 
ference rooms, microfilm readers, and carrels for individual study. In ad- 
dition to the library proper, the building contains an audio-visual room 
equipped with a loud speaker system and adaptable to the exhibiting of 
works of art. 

Carnegie Lounge — The former Carnegie Library building has been 
converted into a modified student services center. The basement contains 
a snack bar and the first floor is equipped with three attractive lounges 
for the use of faculty and students. The second floor houses a placement 
center for non-teachers and the offices of the Dean of Men, the Dean of 
Women, the College Chaplain, the student newspaper (La Vie Col- 
legienne), and the college yearbook (The Quittapahilla). 

South Hall — Formerly a women's residence, South Hall houses the 
Registrars' Office, the Teachers Placement Bureau, Admissions Office, and 
faculty offices. 

Residence Halls — There are five residence halls for women (Green, 
Laughlin, North College, Sheridan and Vickroy) and four for men (Ham- 
mond, Keister, Kreider, and West). Hammond and Keister Halls were put 
into use in September, 1965. 

Lynch Memorial Physical Education Building — This modern plant 
is well equipped for physical education, recreation, and campus meetings. 
It houses the Department of Economics and Business Administration. 

Infirmary — Staffed by a Head Nurse and resident nurses, the infirmary 
is available to all students. The College Physician is on call at all times. 
Adjacent to the Infirmary is a series of faculty offices. 

21 



LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 




Maintenance Building — The Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds and the Housekeeping Supervisor operate out of the Mainte- 
nance Building on West Church Street. 

Engle Hall — This building houses the Music Department and includes 
an auditorium, classrooms, studios, offices, and private practice rooms. It 
is augmented by facilities in the Music Department Annex adjacent to 
West Hall. 

Science Hall — The first floor of Science Hall contains the laboratories, 
library, class and conference rooms, and offices of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment. The second floor is equipped with similar facilities and a green- 
house for the Biology Department. 

The College Dining Hall — With facilities for serving approximately 
five hundred, the College Dining Hall was opened in September, 1958. 

The College Book Store — All textbooks, school supplies, stationery, as 
well as souvenirs, are available at the College Book Store, which was 
opened in 1963. 

Saylor Hall — The offices of the College Relations Area (Alumni, De- 
velopment, and Public Relations) are located in Saylor Hall. 

The Heating Plant — Most of the campus buildings are serviced by a 
central heating plant on the south end of the campus. 

Athletic Fields — The athletic fields provide space for football, basket- 
ball, hockey, track, baseball, tennis, lacrosse, and other sports. 

Women's Day Student Hall — Located on East Summit Street, this 
building provides commuting women students a place for relaxation and 
study. Men who commute have similar facilities in Kreider Hall. 

112 College Avenue — This building houses the offices of the Depart- 
ment of English and of the Department of Foreign Languages. 

22 



Support and Control 



Lebanon Valley College receives support from the Christian Service 
Fund Budget of the Evangelical United Brethren Church, individual con- 
gregations of the denomination in the Eastern and Susquehanna Confer- 
ences, endowments, and the Pennsylvania Foundation for Independent 
Colleges. Also, since at Lebanon Valley College as at most other institutions 
of higher learning the tuition and other annual charges paid by the student 
do not cover the total cost of his education, additional income is derived 
through the Lebanon Valley College Fund (currently incorporated in the 
Centennial Fund). The Fund is supported by industry, alumni, parents of 
students, and other friends of the College. 

Total assets of Lebanon Valley College exceed $8,000,000, including 
endowment funds in excess of $2,040,000. Aside from general endow- 
ment income available for unrestricted purposes, there are a number of 
special funds designated for specific uses such as professorships, scholar- 
ships, and the library. 

Control of the College is vested in a Board of Trustees composed of 
47 members, 32 of whom represent the Eastern, Susquehanna and Virginia 
Conferences; 3 of whom represent the alumni of the institution; and 12 of 
whom are elected at large. Members of the college faculty who are depart- 
mental chairmen are ex-officio members of the Board of Trustees. 

Endowment Funds 

(June 30, 1965) 
UNRESTRICTED 

For General Purposes $1,368,187.87 

RESTRICTED 

Professorship Funds 

Chair of English Bible and Greek Testament 15,230.00 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of Latin Language and Lit- 
erature 25,000.00 

John Evans Lehman Chair of Mathematics 36,430.04 

The Rev. J. B. Weidler Endowment Fund 200.00 

The Ford Foundation 181,000.00 

Restricted Other 

Bishop J. Balmer Showers Lectureship Fund 21,000.00 

Karl Milton Karnegie Fund 10,334.55 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 2,000.00 

Special Fund — Faculty Salaries 

The Batdorf Fund 500.00 

E. N. Funkhouser Fund 12,500.00 

23 



SUPPORT AND CONTROL 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Horn Fund 26,000.00 

Mary I. Shumberger Memorial Fund 10,000.00 

Woodrow W. Waltermeyer Professorship Fund 4,500.00 

Library Funds 

Library Fund of Class of 1916 1,524.79 

Class of 1956 Library Endowment Fund 700.00 

Dr. Lewis J. and Leah Miller Leiby Library Fund 1,000.00 

Maintenance Funds 

Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room Fund 200.00 

Equipment Funds 

Dr. Warren H. Fake and Mabel A. Fake Science Memorial Fund . . 20,000.00 

Williams Foundation Endowment Fund 10,357.12 

Scholarship Funds 

Allegheny Conference C. E. Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Alumni Scholarship Fund 11,985.88 

Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial Sunday School Scholar- 
ship Fund 3,000.00 

E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Andrew and Ruth Bender Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

Cloyd and Mary Bender Scholarship Fund 1,200.00 

Biological Scholarship Fund 2,517.00 

Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 12,001.15 

Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 500.00 

I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award Fund 2,590.00 

Collegiate Scholarship Fund of Evangelical United Brethren Church 4,000.00 
Isaiah H. Daugherty and Benjamin P. Raab Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 1,500.00 

Senator James J. Davis Scholarship Fund 100.00 

William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 600.00 

Derickson Scholarship Fund 6,847.22 

East Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

East Pennsylvania Branch W.S.W.S. Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Samuel F. and Agnes F. Engle Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 1,040.00 

Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 3,300.00 

Margaret Verda Graybill Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Jacob F. Greasly Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Church of The United Brethren In Christ 

Scholarship Fund 2,120.00 

Harrisburg Otterbein Sunday School Scholarship Fund 1,100.00 

J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 500.00 

Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 400.00 

Merle M. Hoover Scholarship Fund 6,000.00 

24 



SUPPORT AND CONTROL 




A convenient College Book Store 



Judge S. C. Huber Scholarship Fund 15,500.00 

Cora Appleton Huber Scholarship Fund 15,500.00 

H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Henry G. and Anna S. Kauffman and Family Scholarship Fund .... 1,000.00 

John A. H. Keith Fund '. 100.00 

Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 1,020.00 

Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. Kleffman Scholarship Fund . . . 1,000.00 

A. S. Kreider Ministerial Scholarship Fund 15,000.00 

W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Maude P. Laughlin Scholarship Fund 10,000.00 

William H. Worrilow Scholarship Fund 7,950.00 

The Lorenz Benevolent Fund 7,500.00 

Mrs. Edwin M. Loux Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Lykens Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 1,000.00 

Mechanicsburg U. B. Sunday School Scholarship Fund 2,000.00 

Medical Scholarship Fund 245.00 

Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 500.00 

Elizabeth May Meyer Musical Scholarship Fund 1,550.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial Scholarship Fund 5,000.00 

Harry E. Miller Scholarship Fund 2,500.00 

Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 5,500.00 

The Ministerial Student Aid Gift Fund of The Evangelical United 

Brethren Church 1,396.81 

Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 225.00 

Neidig Memorial Church Ministerial Scholarship Fund 1,036.80 

Grace U. B. Church of Penbrook, Penna. Scholarship Fund 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania Branch W.S.W.S. Scholarship Fund in Memory of 

Dr. Paul E. V. Shannon 6,500.00 

Pennsylvania Conference C. E. Scholarship Fund 4,465.17 

Pennsylvania Conference Youth Fellowship Scholarship Fund .... 2,000.00 

Philadelphia Lebanon Valley College Alumni Scholarship Fund . . . 866.35 

Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 1,300.00 

Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 6,380.00 

Quincy Evangelical United Brethren Orphanage and Home Scholar- 
ship Fund 5,000.00 

25 



SUPPORT AND CONTROL 

Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 

Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 

Emmett C. Roop Scholarship Fund 

Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 

Rev. and Mrs. Cawley H. Stine Scholarship Fund 

Dr. Alfred D. Strickler and Louise Kreider Strickler Pre-Medical 

Scholarship Fund 

Washington, D. C. Memorial E.U.B. Ministerial Scholarship Fund . . 
J. C. Winter Scholarship Fund 

Student Loan Funds 

Mary A. Dodge Loan Fund 

Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 

Prize Funds 

The L. G. Bailey Award 

Henry H. Baish Memorial Fund 

Andrew Bender Memorial Chemistry Fund 

The Class of 1964 Quittapahilla Award Fund 

Governor James H. Duff Award 

The French Club Prize Fund 

Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial Award in Music 

La Vie Collegienne Award Fund 

Max F. Lehman Fund 

The David E. Long Memorial Fund 

Pickwell Memorial Music Award 

The Rosenberry Award 

The Salome Wingate Sanders Award in Music Education 

Annuity Funds 

Rev. A. H. Kleffman and Erma L. Kleffman 

E. Roy Line Annuity 



1,000.00 
300.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 
1,300.00 

2,500.00 

1,573.65 

11,250.00 



9,500.00 
514.66 



150.00 

1,000.00 

1,519.35 

315.00 

1,200.00 

37.50 

479.56 

100.00 

400.00 

1,000.00 

853.25 

225.00 

900.00 



18,000.00 
200.00 




Work aid opportunities for students 



26 




Looking to the Future 

Lebanon Valley College will launch its Centennial observance on 
February 22, 1966, with a Founders' Day Convocation addressed by Dr. 
Frederic K. Miller. The next fifteen months will be given over to special 
programs, convocations, exhibits and other commemorative events. 

Even though the entire College family will be expected to participate 
in these events, every effort will be made to maintain the academic program 
at its usual high level. The best memorial we can give to our forefathers is 
to expend every effort to fulfill their dream of "an institution of learning 
of high grade." Consequently, we hope to make the Centennial Year a 
milestone along the way and not a year's retirement from academic re- 
sponsibility. 

The Centennial Year at Lebanon Valley College will also be marked 
by preparation for the future. A long-range development program based 
on the Lebanon Valley College Campus Planning Report, prepared by 
Howell Lewis Shay and Associates after almost a year of thorough study, 
is now in process. Toward this end, a $1.3 million Centennial Fund cam- 
paign is nearing successful completion. Evidences of the development pro- 
gram's progress can be seen on the main campus, where a new chapel is now 
under construction. The two new residence halls for men opened last Sep- 
tember also belong to this program. 

Students entering Lebanon Valley College now will be living through 
some exciting years as the institution begins its second century of service. 

28 




Academic Program 



j! 1 


i»i 


i 





Requirements for Degrees 

Lebanon Valley College confers five bachelor degrees. They are: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor of Science in Medical 
Technology. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon students who 
complete the requirements for graduation in the following areas, and who 
are recommended by the faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees: 
Biology, English, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, 
Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Sociol- 
ogy and Spanish. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who 
complete the requirements in the following areas, and who are recom- 
mended by the faculty and approved by the Board of Trustees: Biology, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Actuarial Science, Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration, Elementary Education, Music Education, Arts-En- 
gineering, and Arts-Forestry. 

The professional degrees of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Bache- 
lor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 
are conferred upon students who complete the requirements in the 
respective professional areas and who are recommended by the faculty 
and approved by the Board of Trustees. 

For detailed information see pages 34 ff. 

Semester Hours 

The requirements for degrees are stated in "semester hours of credit" 
which are based upon the satisfactory completion of courses of instruc- 
tion. Generally, one semester hour credit is given for each class hour a 
week throughout the semester. In courses requiring laboratory work, not 
less than two hours of laboratory work a week throughout a semester 
are required for a semester hour of credit. A semester is a term of ap- 
proximately seventeen weeks. 

Candidates for degrees must obtain a minimum of 120 semester hours 
credit in academic work in addition to the required courses in Freshman 
and Sophomore Physical Education. However, a student who has a physical 
disability may be excused (on recommendation from the college physi- 
cian) from the requirement in physical education. 

Major 

As a part of the total requirement of 120 hours every candidate for a 
degree must present at least twenty-four semester hours of course work 

30 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

in one department (this is his Major). A Major must be selected before 
the beginning of the junior year. A student accepted as a Major in any 
department has the right to remain in that department as long as he is in 
college. 

Examinations 

Candidates for degrees are required to take end of course examina- 
tions and the Graduate Record Examination in the major field. 

Graduate Record Examination 

Candidates for degrees must take the Advanced Test of the Graduate 
Record Examination in their major field. This examination is prepared 
and scored by the Educational Testing Service. The tests cover the entire 
field of concentration. The results are made available to the student and 
become a part of his permanent record. 

Residence Requirement 

Degrees will be conferred only upon those candidates earning in resi- 
dence a minimum of thirty semester hours out of the last thirty-six taken 
before the date of the conferring of the degree, or before the transfer to a 
cooperating program. Residence credit is given for course work com- 
pleted in regular day classes, and in evening and summer school courses 
taken on campus. 

Grade Point Average 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a cumulative grade point 
average of 1.75, computed in accordance with the grading system indi- 
cated below. 

In addition, candidates must earn a grade point average of 2.0 in the 
major field of study. 



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31 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

System of Grading and Quality Points 

The work of a student in each subject is graded A, B, C, D, or F, with 
the plus and minus available to faculty members who wish to use them. 
These grades have the following meanings: 

A — distinguished performance 

B — superior work 

C — general satisfactory achievement 

D — course requirements and standards satisfied at a minimum level 

F — course requirements and standards not satisfied at a minimum level 

When a grade of F has been received, the student may not proceed 
with any part of the course dependent upon the part in which the grade 
of F has been received. If a student fails in a subject twice, he may not 
register for it a third time. 

In addition to the above grades the symbols "I," "W," "WP," and 
"WF" are used on grade reports and in college records. "I" indicates that 
the work is incomplete (that the student has postponed with the consent 
of the instructor, certain required work), but otherwise satisfactory. This 
work must be completed within the semester following, or the "I" will be 
converted to an F. 

W indicates withdrawal from a course any time within the first six 
weeks of classes of a semester without prejudice to the student's standing. 
In case of withdrawal from a course after six weeks the symbol WP will 
be entered if the student's work is satisfactory, and WF if his work is un- 
satisfactory. The grade WP will be considered as without prejudice to the 
student's standing, but the grade WF will be counted as an F. If a stu- 
dent withdraws from a course after twelve weeks, without a reason satis- 
factory to the Registrar, a grade of WF will be recorded. 

For courses in which no academic credit is involved, student work 
is evaluated as either S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). 

For each semester hour credit in a course in which a student is 
graded A, he receives 4 quality points; A- 3.7; B+, 3.3; B, 3; B— 2.7; etc. 
F carries no credit and no quality points. 

Transfer Students 

Students transferring from two-year institutions are required to have 
sixty hours of work at a four-year institution as well as to meet the residence 
requirements at Lebanon Valley College. 

Students transferring from other institutions must secure a grade 
point average of 1.75 or better in work taken at Lebanon Valley College. 

Attendance at Baccalaureate and Commencement Programs 

All seniors are required to attend the Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment programs at which their degrees are to be conferred. 

Degrees will be conferred in absentia only for the most compelling 
reasons and only upon a written request approved by the Dean of the 

32 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

College. Such requests must be submitted two weeks prior to the date 
of Commencement. 

Faculty approval is required for the conferring of the degree and 
the issuance of the diploma in any -case of wilful failure to comply with 
these regulations. 

GENERAL AND DISTRIBUTION REQUrREMENTS— 
EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER, 1965 

7. General Requirements: 

Semester Hours 

English Composition* 6 

Foreign Language (Intermediate level)* 6 

Mathematics (First year level)* 3 

Religion 12 and 13 6 

Physical Education (two years) 

II. Distribution Requirements: 

Humanities: Three one-semester courses (not more than two 
from one field) to be chosen from among 
Art/Music; literature as offered by the Depart- 
ment of English or the Department of Foreign 
Languages; Philosophy. 9 

Social Sciences: Three one-semester courses (not more than two 
from one field) to be chosen from among Eco- 
nomics, History, Political Science, Sociology. 9 

Natural Sciences: Three one-semester courses (not more than two 
from one field) to be chosen from among Biol- 
ogy, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology. 9-12 

48-51 

Distribution requirements shall be met from among the following courses: 
Humanities: Art 11; English 20, 21, 24, 26, 37; Foreign Literature courses 

above 10 level; Music 19; Philosophy 10, 30. 
Social Sciences: Economics 20; History 13, 14, 17, 23; Pol. Sci. 10, 30, 33; 

Sociology 20, 21, 33. 
Natural Sciences: Biology 14, 18; Chemistry 13; Physics 10, 17; Psychology 20, 

25, 37, 44. 

Notes: 

1. No course in the major field shall be used to meet general or distribution 
requirements. 

2. No course taken as a general requirement may count toward a major. 

3. No credit is given for an elementary language course if two or more 
years of the same language have been taken in secondary school. Credit is 
given for any other elementary language course. 



* Requirement can be met by proficiency examinations selected by the chairman of the 
department involved in consultation with the Dean of the College, or through the Advanced 
Placement Program. 

33 



Special Plans of Study 



Actuarial Science 

Adviser: Dr. Bissinger 

Consultant: Actuaries Club of Philadelphia 



Course Number 

Mathematics 11 

English 10a— 10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Mathematics 12 

Music 19 

or Art 11 

Physics 17 

Physical Educ 10 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 

Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. Elementary Analysis I & II 3 3 

. English Composition 3 3 

. Intermediate French or German .... 3 3 

. Elementary Statistics — 3 

History and Appreciation of Muisc or 

History and Appreciation of Art. . . 3 — 

. Principles of Physics 4 4 

. Health, Hygiene and Phys. Ed 

16 16 



Mathematics 21 

Mathematics 37 

English 20 

Economics 20 

Economics 23 

Physical Educ 20 



Second Year 

. Intermediate Analysis I & II 3 3 

.Mathematical Statistics 3 3 

. Comparative Literature 3 3 

. Principles of Economics 3 3 

. Principles of Accounting 4 4 

. Physical Education 

16 16 



Mathematics 31 

Mathematics 25 

Mathematics 40.1 

History 23 

Psychology 20 

Sociology 20 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 

Economics 32 



Third Year 

.Advanced Analysis I & II 3 

. Modern Algebra — 

.Finite Differences & Comp. Interest . . 1 

.Political & Social Hist, of U.S. & Pa. 3 

. General Psychology — 

.Introductory Sociology 3 

. Introduction to Biblical Thought ... 3 

.Introduction to the Christian Faith . . — 

. Business Law 3 



16 16 



34 




Mathematics 41 

Mathematics 42 

Mathematics 40.1 

Economics 36 

Economics 44 

Economics 45 

Philosophy 10 

Electives 



Fourth Year 

. Probability 3 

.Design of Experiment — 

.Finite Differences & Comp. Interest . . 1 

. Money and Banking — 

. Corporation Finance 3 

. Investments — 

.Introduction of Philosophy 3 

. To be selected 6 



16 16 

Part 1 of the Examination of the Society of Actuaries may be taken in May 
of the freshman year or November or May of the sophomore year. Part 2 of the 
Examination may be taken in May of the sophomore year with the summer to be 
spent in the home office of one of the life insurance companies. Part 3 of the 
Examination may be taken in May of the junior year and should be taken by 
May of the senior year. 

The college is a testing center for the Society of Actuaries and the major 
can take each of the examinations on campus. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the above curriculum and tests, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Actuarial Science is granted. 



35 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Chemistry 

Students entering with advanced placement in chemistry are asked 
to consult the adviser. 

Adviser: Dr. Neidig 



Course Number 

Chemistry 24 

Chemistry 25 

English 10a— 10b 

German 11 

Mathematics 11 

Phys. Education 10 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 



Chemistry 36 

Distribution Requirements 

Mathematics 22 

Mathematics 23 

Phys. Education 20 

Physics 17 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 
Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. Chemistry of the Covalent Bond 4 — 

. Reaction Kinetics and Chemical 

Equilibria — 4 

. English Composition 3 3 

. Scientific German 3 3 

. Calculus and Analytical Geometry ... 3 3 

. Health, Hygiene and Phys. Ed 

. Introduction to Biblical Thought ... 3 — 

. Introduction to the Christian Faith . — 3 

16 16 
Second Year 

. Physical Chemistry 4 4 

. The Social Sciences 3 3 

. Calculus 3 — 

. Ordinary Differential Equations .... — 3 

. Physical Education 

. . Principles of Physics I 4 4 

14 14 




36 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 




Chemistry 38 

Chemistry 37 

Distribution Requirements 
Physics 27 



Third Year 

. . Instrumental Analysis 

. . Organic Chemistry 5 

. . The Humanities 6 

. . Principles of Physics II 4 

15 



— 5 



15 



Chemistry 47 

Chemistry 44 

Chemistry 41 

Chemistry 45 

Distribution Requirements 
Distribution Requirements 
Electives 



Fourth Year 

. . Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 3 

. . Special Problems 2 2 

. . Advanced Organic 3 — 

. .Advanced Analytical — 3 

. . Social Sciences 3 — 

. . Sciences — 3 

4 4 



15 15 



Curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
(American Chemical Society certified degree) 



37 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 




Department of Economics and Business Administration 

Adviser: Associate Professor Tom 

Suggested program for majors in Economics and Business Administration 



Course Number 

Economics 20 

Economics 23 

English 10a— 10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Mathematics ..1, 10, 11, or 12 



Distribution Requirements 
Phys. Education 10 

Economics 40.2 

Economics 36 

Economics 

Distribution Requirements 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 

Phys. Education 20 

Economics 38 

Economics 35 

Economics 

Distribution Requirements 

Electives 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 
Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. Principles of Economics 3 3 

.Principles of Accounting 4 4 

. English Composition 3 3 

.Intermediate French, German, Greek, 

Latin, Russian, or Spanish 3 3 

. Introductory Analysis, Basic Concepts 
of Mathematics, Elementary Calcu- 
lus, or Statistics 3 — 

. Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences — 3 

. Health, Hygiene, and Phys. Ed 

16 16 

Second Year 

. Microeconomic Analysis 3 — 

. Money and Banking — 3 

. Electives* 3 3 

. Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences 6-7 6-7 

.Intro, to Biblical Thought 3 — 

.Intro, to the Christian Faith — 3 

.Health, Hygiene, and Phys. Ed 

15-16 15-16 

Third Year 

. Labor Economics 3 — 

. Marketing — 3 

. Electives* 3 3 

. Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences 6-7 6-7 

3 3 

15-16 15-16 



38 



Economics 40.3 

Economics 

Electives 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Fourth Year 

. Economic Seminar — 3 

. Electives* 6-9 3-6 

6-9 6-9 



15 15 

* Students concentrating in areas designated should schedule courses as indi- 
cated: 

Economics: Econ. 37 — Public Finance 

Econ. 38 — International Economics 

Econ. 40.1 — History of Economic Thought 

Econ. 40.4 — Microeconomic Analysis 

Business Administration: 

Econ. 32— Business Law 
Econ. 44 — Corporation Finance 
Econ. 45 — Investments and Statement Analysis 
Econ. 49 — Personnel Administration and 
Industrial Management 

Accounting: Econ. 30 — Intermediate Accounting 
Econ. 31 — Advanced Accounting 
Econ. 42 — Income Tax Accounting 
Econ. 43 — Cost Accounting 
Econ. 45 — Investments and Statement Analysis 
Econ. 40.5 — Auditing 

For students who are interested in teaching economics and social sciences in the 
secondary schools, the following courses are recommended: 

Econ. 20 — Principles of Economics 

Econ. 32 — Business Law 

Econ. 36 — Money and Banking 

Econ. 37 — Public Finance 

Econ. 40.1 — History of Economic Thought 

Econ. 48 — Labor Economics 




39 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Elementary Education 

Advisers: Dr. Ebersole, Mrs. Herr 

Suggested Program for majors in Elementary Education 



Course Number 

Education 20 

English 10a— 10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Distribution Requirements 

Physical Education 10 

Psychology 20 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 



Elementary Education ... 25 
Elementary Education ... 23 

Math 10 

Elementary Education ... 22 

Geography lOa-lOb 

History 23 

English 20 

Physical Education 20 

Psychology 23 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 
Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. Social Foundations of Education 3 — 

. English Composition > . 3 3 

. Intermediate French, German, or 

Spanish 3 3 

. Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 3-4 3-4 

.Health, Hygiene and Phys. Ed 

. General Psychology — 3 

. Intro, to Biblical Thought 3 — 

. Intro, to Christian Faith — 3 

15-16 15-16 

Second Year 

. Mathematics for Elem. Grades 3 — 

. Physical Sciences in the Elem. 

School — 3 

. Basic Concepts — 3 

. Music in the Elementary School .... — 3 

.World Geography 3 3 

.Pol. and Social History of U.S. and 

Pennsylvania 3 — 

. Comparative Literature 3 — 

. Phys. Education for Sophomores .... 

. Educational Psychology 3 — 

15 15 



40 





Elementary Education ... 37 

Elementary Education ... 34 

Elementary Education ... 36 

Elementary Education ... 43 

Social Sciences 

Psychology 21 

Education 30 

Elective 



Third Year 

. Children's Literature 

. Teaching of Reading 3 

.Communication and Group Processes 

in the Elementary School 3 

. Health and Safety Education — 

.Pol. Sci., Sociology, or Economics .... 3 

. Child Psychology — 

. Educ. Measurement 3 

3 



— 3 



15 15 



Education 45 

Elementary Education ... 40 

Elementary Education ... 44 

Art 11 

Elementary Educ 32 

Elective 



Fourth Year 

.Visual and Sensory Techniques — 3 

. Student Teaching 12 — 

. Senior Seminar — 2 

. History and Appreciation of Art .... 3 — 

.Art in the Elementary School — 3 

— 7 



15 15 

41 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Cooperative Engineering Program 
Adviser: Dr. Bissinger 

Lebanon Valley College offers a cooperative program in Engineer- 
ing whereby a student may achieve a liberal arts degree from Lebanon 
Valley College and also an engineering degree from the University of 
Pennsylvania or any other institution with which co-operative arrange- 
ments are in effect. 

A student electing to pursue this curriculum spends the first three 
years in residence at Lebanon Valley College. At the end of these three 
years he may, if recommended, go to the University of Pennsylvania or 
another co-operating institution for two additional years of work in engi- 
neering. LIpon the successful completion of the five years of study, the 
student will receive two degrees: the Bachelor of Science degree from 
Lebanon Valley College and a Bachelor of Science degree in one of the 
fields of engineering from the University of Pennsylvania or other coop- 
erating institution. 

The adviser should be consulted concerning the various curriculums. 



Cooperative Forestry Program 

Adviser: Mr. Bollinger 

Lebanon Valley College offers a program in forestry in cooperation 
with the School of Forestry of Duke University. Upon successful comple- 
tion of a five-year coordinated course of study, a student will have earned 
the Bachelor of Science degree from Lebanon Valley College and the 
professional degree of Master of Forestry from the Duke School of 
Forestry. 

A student electing to pursue this curriculum spends the first three 
years in residence at Lebanon Valley College. Here he obtains a sound 
education in the humanities and other liberal arts in addition to the 
sciences basic to forestry. The student devotes the last two years of his 
program to the professional forestry curriculum of his choice at the Duke 
School of Forestry. 

The adviser should be consulted concerning the curriculum. 



Medical Technology Curriculum 
Adviser: Dr. Wilson 

Each applicant for admission to this program should secure approval 
by the School for Medical Technologists for the status of pre-registered 
students, to be admitted on the successful completion of the academic 
part of the curriculum at the college. The School for Medical Technolo- 
gists shall be the final judge of a student's qualifications to pursue its 
curriculum. 

The first three years will be spent at Lebanon Valley College in pur- 
suit of a program of study which includes all the general requirements 
for graduation and certain courses especially suitable as preparation for 

42 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 




the study of medical technology. The adviser should be consulted con- 
cerning the curriculum. 

Following the completion of this curriculum the student will spend 
twelve months at the Harrisburg Hospital School for Medical Technolo- 
gists or another approved school, in the pursuit of its regular curriculum 
as prescribed by The American Society of Clinical Pathologists. On the 
successful completion of both phases of the curriculum the student will 
be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology by 
Lebanon Valley College. 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, and Pre-Veterinary Curricula 
Adviser: Dr. Wilson 

Students contemplating admission to Medical, Dental, or Veterinary 
Colleges should pursue a science program with a major in either biology 
or chemistry. They should register their professional intentions with the 
adviser of these programs by the end of their freshman or sophomore 
years. At that time their work will be reviewed and provision made to 
meet the special requirements of the colleges of their choice. 

All students planning to enter the medical profession should confer 
with the pre-medical adviser as to the dates for medical aptitude tests 
and other special requirements. 

The adviser should be consulted concerning the curriculum. 

Nursing 
Adviser: Mr. Bollinger 

The five-year Nursing Plan offers to young women intending to enter 
the field of nursing an opportunity to obtain a liberal arts education in 
connection with their nurses' training. 

Lebanon Valley College has an affiliation with a number of hospital 
schools of nursing for a five-year curriculum in nursing, the first two years 
of which are spent at Lebanon Valley College. 

The next three years are spent at the School of Nursing in pursuit of 
the regular curriculum. At the end of these five years the student who 
has successfully completed both phases of the curriculum will be awarded 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing by Lebanon Valley College 
and the diploma in nursing by the School of Nursing. 

The adviser should be consulted concerning the curriculum. 

43 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 



Music 



Course Number 

English 10a— 10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Distribution Requirements 

Health & Phys. Ed 10 

Music 10, 11 

Music 12, 13 

Music 14, 15 

Music 



Distribution Requirements 

Mathematics 10 

Phys. Ed 20 

Psychology 20 

Art 11 

Music 20 

Music 22 

Music 24 

Music 40.1 

Music 

Electives 

History 23 

English 20 

Music 29 

Music 30a— 30b 

Music 31, 36 

Music 39 

Music 

Electives 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 

Music 32 

Music 35 

Music 

Electives 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 
Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. . English Composition 3 3 

..French, German, Spanish, Latin .... 3 3 

. . Sciences 3 3 

. . Health, Phys. Ed. & Hygiene 

. . Sight Singing I & II 1 1 

. . Ear Training I & II 1 1 

. . Harmony I & II 2 2 

. . Applied Music* 2 2 

15 15 
Second Year 

. . The Social Sciences 3 3 

..Basic Concepts of Mathematics — 3 

. . Physical Education 

. . General Psychology 3 — 

. . History and Appreciation of Art .... — 3 

. . Sight Singing III 1 — 

. . Ear Training III 1 — 

. . Harmony III 2 — 

. . Counterpoint — 2 

. . Applied Music* 2 2 

3 2 

15 15 
Third Year 

..Pol. & Soc. History of U.S. & Pa 3 — 

. . Comparative Literature 3 3 

. . Harmony IV 2 — 

. . History of Music 3 3 

. . Form and Analysis I & II 2 2 

. . Keyboard Harmony — 2 

. . Applied Music* 2 2 

— 3 

15 15 
Fourth Year 

..Introduction to Biblical Thought ... 3 — 

. .Introduction to the Christian Faith . . — 3 

. . Music Literature 2 — 

. . Conducting I — 2 

. . Applied Music* 2 2 



15 15 

* Study of voice, organ, piano, band and orchestral instruments, and music 
organizations. 

44 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 



Music Education 



Course Number 

English 10a— 10b 

Foreign Language .... 10 

Biology 14 

Health & Phys. Ed. ... 10 

Music 10, 11 

Music 12, 13 

Music 14, 15 

Music 



First Year 

Hours Credit 
1st 2nd 
Course Title Sem. Sem. 

. English Composition 3 3 

.French, German, Spanish, Latin 3 3 

. Human Biology 3 3 

. Health, Phys. Ed. 8c Hygiene 

. Sight Singing I & II 1 1 

. Ear Training I & II 1 1 

. Harmony I & II 2 2 

. Applied Music* 3 3 



16 16 



Distribution Requirements 

Physical Ed 20 

Psychology 20 

Psychology 23 

Education 20 

History 23 

Music 20 

Music 21 

Music 22 

Music Ed 23 

Music 24 

Music 



Second Year 

. Social Sciences 3 

. Physical Education 

. General Psychology 3 

. Educational Psychology 

. Social Foundations of Education 3 

.Pol. & Soc. History of U.S. & Pa. ... 

. Sight Singing III 

. Orchestration & Scoring for Band . . 

. Ear Training III 1 

.Methods: Vocal, grades 1-3 

. Harmony III 2 

. Applied Music* 3 



— 3 



— 3 



— 2 



— 2 



16 16 



English 20 

Music 30a— 30b 

Music 31 

Music 32 

Music Ed 33A 

Music Ed 33B 

Music Ed 34A 

Music Ed 34B 

Music 35 

Music 39 

Music 



Third Year 

Comparative Literature 3 3 

. History of Music 3 3 

. Form and Analysis 2 — 

. Music Literature 2 — 

. Methods, Vocal: Grades 4-6 2 — 

. Methods, Instrumental: Grades 4-6 .... 1 — 

. Methods, Vocal: Jr.-Sr. High — 2 

. Methods, Instrumental: Jr.-Sr. High . . — 1 

. Conducting I — 2 

. Keyboard Harmony — 2 

. Applied Music* 3 3 

16 16 

45 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 



Fourth Year 



Religion 12 . . Intro, to Biblical Thought 3 

Religion 13 . .Intro, to Christian Faith — 

Art 11 . . History and Appreciation of Art .... 3 

Music 36 . . Conducting II 2 

Music Ed 40a — 40b . . Student Teaching 4 

Music Ed 43 . .Seminar, Adv. Instrumental Problems . — 

Electives — 

Music . . Applied Music* 4 



16 16 

* Study of voice, organ, piano, band and orchestral instruments, and music 
organizations. 



Private instruction available to all students. 




40 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Teaching 

Advisers: Dr. McKlveen and Dr. Ebersole 

The requirements listed below are applicable to students certified to 
teach in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Basic Regulations — College Provisional Certificates 

A. General Education 

Certificates are based on the completion of a minimum of sixty (60) 
semester hours of acceptable courses in general education with not less than 
twelve (12) semester hours in the humanities and not less than six (6) semes- 
ter hours in each of the following areas: the social sciences and natural 
sciences. 

These requirements apply to both elementary and secondary fields. 

B. Professional Education 

Certificates are based on the completion of a minimum of eighteen 
(18) semester hours of professional education courses distributed in the 
following areas: social foundations of education, educational psychology 
and human growth and development, materials and methods of instruction 
and curriculum, and not less than six (6) of the eighteen (18) semester 
hours in actual practicum and student teaching experience under approved 
supervision and appropriate seminars including necessary observation, par- 
ticipation and conferences on teaching problems. The areas of methods 
and materials of instruction and curriculum, and student teaching shall 
relate to the subject matter specialization field or fields. 

These requirements apply to both elementary and secondary fields with 
one exception. Those applying for certification on the secondary level in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania will, after October 1, 1964, be re- 
quired to take a course in basic reading problems of the secondary school 
student. See Education 49. 

C. Elementary Education — Subject Matter Requirements 

The provisional college certificate may be issued to those who have 
been granted a baccalaureate degree upon the completion of thirty-six (36) 
semester hours in the elementary field distributed as follows: 

1. Eighteen (18) semester hours of basic professional education (same 
as B above). 

2. A course in the teaching of reading. 

3. The remainder of the thirty-six (36) semester hours selected from a 
minimum of four of the following areas: mathematics, arts and 
crafts, music, phyical education, language arts, sciences, social 
studies, geography, mental hygiene, or a course dealing with ex- 
ceptional children. 

D. Secondary Education — Subject Matter Requirements 

1. An applicant may have a "single subject" written on a certificate 
upon the completion of at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of approved 

47 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

college studies in the specialized subject field, unless otherwise specified in 
the certification requirements. 

2. Comprehensive and general certification: 

(a) Comprehensive English — 36 semester hours. 

(b) Comprehensive Foreign Language — 36 semester hours, with 
not less than 24 semester hours in the first language and 12 
semester hours in the second. 

(c) General Science — 24 semester hours in any two or all of the 
sciences. 

(d) Physics and Mathematics — 36 semester hours, with a minimum 
of 12 semester hours in each field. 

(e) Comprehensive Social Studies — 36 semester hours, distributed 

in the following areas: economics, geography, government, 
history, and sociology. 

(f) History and Government — 24 semester hours. 

E. Secondary Student Teaching Program 

(To begin with the 1967-1968 academic year) 

A student concentrating in a major area of interest may, upon the 
direction of his adviser and approval of the Dean of the College, enroll in 
one of four student teaching programs. 

I. SEMESTER OF PROFESSIONAL TRAINING 

A student desiring to receive, upon graduation, Pennsylvania State 
teacher certification devotes the first semester of the senior year to pro- 
fessional preparation. The fifteen weeks are organized as follows: 

Three Weeks: Ed. 20. Social Foundations of Education. 

3:15:0. See page 65 for course description. 
This course is also offered outside the semester of professional training. 

Three Weeks: Ed. 49. Practicum and Methods. 

3:75:0. See page 69 for course description. 
This course is given only in the semester of professional training. 
Some time is devoted to the presentation of data on Basic Reading instruc- 
tion to fulfill certification requirements for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Six Weeks: Ed. 40. Student Teaching. 

6:30:0. 

The student enters on a full-time student teaching experience for six con- 
secutive weeks. He is under the direction of a trained teacher in an accredited 
public high school and is counseled and directed by the college supervisor of sec- 
ondary education. The student teacher also is observed by his major adviser. 

Three Weeks: Ed. 31. Philosophy of Education. 

3:15:0. See page 68 for course description. 
This course is given only in the semester of professional training. 

48 



SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDY 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching: A student must have met the fol- 
lowing requirements to be accepted for student teaching in his senior year: 

1. Maintained satisfactory academic standing. 

2. Completed the basic courses Psychology 20, Psychology 23. 

3. Secured written approval of his major adviser and the director 
of student teaching. 

Major Requirements and Teacher Certification: All academic major re- 
quirements for the liberal arts degree and for Pennsylvania State certifica- 
tion must be met either prior to the student teaching experience, during 
the semester following student teaching, or in a prescribed summer school 
program approved by the major adviser. 

II. POST-GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING 

The post-graduate student teaching program is under the direction of 
Lebanon Valley College or, by arrangement, may be pursued with any other 
accredited institution which has provision for supervising student teaching 
in the public schools. 

Students enroll for student teaching after graduation and are em- 
ployed in the public school as a full-time faculty member. Supervision of 
the teaching experience is a joint responsibility of an assigned professional 
teacher and a college supervisor of student teaching either at Lebanon 
Valley College or a cooperating institution. 

Because of the necessity of meeting Pennsylvania State certification re- 
quirements of proper supervision, only a limited number of students are 
accepted in this program. Likewise, assignments are made only to those 
schools within the range of the institution responsible for supervising the 
enrollee. 

III. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP 

A student may, upon counsel of his adviser, enroll after graduation in 
one of many graduate internship programs. These programs offer, concur- 
rent with full-time employment as a professional teacher, the completion 
of an appropriate master's degree program. 

IV. SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENT TEACHING 
FOLLOWING GRADUATION 

A senior may, upon counsel of his adviser, enroll for a summer student 
teaching program after graduating from the college. 

The student may enroll in the Hershey Program sponsored by Leba- 
non Valley College or an acceptable summer student teaching program 
elsewhere. 

Addendum 

A student selecting one of the alternatives, other than the semester of 
professional training, is able to complete all formal course requirements 
for teacher certification except student teaching. 

The following courses, all carrying three semester hours credit, con- 
tinue to be offered outside the semester of professional training — Education 
20: Social Foundations, 30: Educational Measurements, 41: An Introduc- 
tion to Guidance, 42: The Education of the Exceptional Child, 45: Visual 
and Sensory Techniques; Psychology 20: General, 23: Educational. 

49 



The College Honors Program 

The College Honors Program exists for the following purposes: to 
provide an opportunity for intellectually able students to develop their 
abilities to the fullest extent, to recognize and encourage superior aca- 
demic achievement, and to stimulate all members of the college family 
to greater interest and activity in the intellectual concerns of college life. 

These objectives are pursued by means of a double-phased program 
consisting of (1) Honors Sections in a number of courses included in the 
general college requirements taken for the most part during the student's 
freshman and sophomore years, and (2) an Independent Study plan by 
which a student during his junior and senior years may do individual work 
within the department of his major concentration. An Honors student 
may participate in either of these phases of the program without partici- 
pating in the other. An over-all grade point average of 3.00 is a require- 
ment for the maintenance of Honors status. 

The two phases of the Honors Program are related to one another 
through a series of Honors Colloquia, special evening meetings of Honors 
students having both an academic and a social purpose. These are aimed 
at providing breadth and liberalization for students in the program. Dis- 
cussions and presentations by Honors students themselves, faculty mem- 
bers, and outside guests are prominent features of the colloquia. 

Appropriate recognition is given students who successfully complete 
either phase or both phases of the College Honors Program. 

Honors Sections 

Honors sections are offered in the following general requirements: 
English 10a — 10b, English Composition; Religion 12, Introduction to Bib- 
lical Thought; Religion 13, Introduction to Christian Faith; English 20, 
Comparative Literature; History 23, United States and Pennsylvania His- 
tory; and Psychology 20, General Psychology. The satisfactory completion of 
eighteen hours of Honors work is required for official recognition of partici- 
pation in this phase of the College Honors Program. 

Freshmen are admitted to Honors sections on the basis of their aca- 
demic standing in secondary school, performance in the College Entrance 
Examination Board tests, the recommendation of teachers and counsellors, 
and personal interviews with members of the Honors Council. Students 
not accepted initially can be admitted to the program at the beginning of 
subsequent semesters as they demonstrate ability to do superior work. 
Students having curricular or scheduling limitations are permitted three 
years to complete this phase of the program. 

The seminar and tutorial methods are used to the greatest possible 
extent, and sections are kept small in size. 

50 



COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM 

Independent Study 

Independent Study, formerly known as the departmental honors pro- 
gram, is offered for credit in the student's major field in the junior and 
senior years. Independent Study consists of a reading and/or research pro- 
gram producing a thesis or an essay. The latter is done on a problem or 
subject of the student's own choosing under the direct supervision of a 
faculty adviser. Opportunity is afforded to do creative work. A maximum 
of nine hours credit can be earned in Independent Study. 

Independent Study is offered in the following departments: Chemistry, 
Economics and Business Administration, English, Foreign Languages, 
History and Political Science, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Psychol- 
ogy, Religion, and Sociology. For further details regarding requirements 
and procedures in Independent Study, see the appropriate paragraph under 
each department in the catalog section "Courses of Study." 




Honors students and faculty in a 
regularly scheduled Colloquium. 



51 




52 



Courses of Study 



General Information 



Course Numbering System 

Courses are numbered as follows: 1-19 indicates courses offered at the 
freshman level; 20-29 indicates courses offered at the sophomore level; 
30-39 indicates courses offered at the junior level; 40-49 indicates courses 
offered at the senior level; 101-132 indicates courses in applied music. 

If the year is not indicated after a course, it is understood that the 
course is offered every year. Courses that continue throughout the year 
are listed in two ways. If either semester may be taken as a separate unit, 
without the other semester, the course will be listed as a and b. For ex- 
ample, a student may take English 21b even though he has not had Eng- 
lish 21a and does not expect to take it. But if no letter is indicated with 
the course number, a student may not enter the course at mid-year. 

Course Credit 

Semester hours of credit, class hours per week, and laboratory hours 
per week are indicated by three numbers immediately following the course 
title, i.e., "4:2:4 per semester" following "Biology 18a — 18b" means four 
semester hours of credit, two classroom hours per week, and four labora- 
tory hours per week each semester. 




53 



BIOLOGY 

Courses of Study by Departments 
Art 

Instructors Batchelor and Jeffries 

10. Beginning Painting. 

2:2:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in painting in water colors and oils with stress on com- 
position and the use of colors and their mixing. 
Offered in evening classes. 

11. History and Appreciation of Art 

5:3:0. Either semester. 

A study of the various forms of art — painting, sculpture, and architecture — 
of the western world. Attention is given to the major trends and periods of the 
western tradition as exemplified by significant artists and their work. The inter- 
relation of the arts — art, music, and literature — is emphasized. 

12. Introduction to Art 

3:3:0 First semester. 

The fundamental principles and techniques of art. The creative handling of 
materials and tools common to the various forms of art. 

Biology 

Professors Wilson and Light; 

Assistant Professors Bollinger and Hess; 

Instructor Malm 

The work outlined in the following courses in biology is intended to 
develop an appreciation of man's relation to his universe, to acquaint stu- 
dents with those fundamental concepts necessary for the proper interpre- 
tation of the phenomena manifested by the living things with which they 
are surrounded, and to lay a foundation for specialization in professional 
courses in biology. 

The courses are designed to prepare students for the work in medi- 
cal schools, schools for medical technologists, hospital schools for training 
of nurses, for graduate work in colleges and universities, for teaching the 
biological sciences in high schools, and for assistantships in university and 
experiment station laboratories in the departments of agriculture and other 
government agencies. 

Major: Biology 18, one semester of Biology 40.1, and twenty addi- 
tional hours. 

14a — 14b. Human Biology. 
3:2:2 per semester. 

The central theme is human life as expressed in activities related to anatomy 
and physiology. Modern concepts of chemistry and physics will be utilized to 
forward the understanding of these activities. 

Laboratory is oriented around the structure and function of the major 
human system. 

54 




18a— 18b. General Biology. 

4:2:4 per semester. 

Representative forms of plant life are studied the first semester and repre- 
sentative forms of animal life the second semester. Structure, and biological laws 
and principles are stressed. 

21. Microbiology. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

A study of bacteria, molds, yeasts, richettsia, and viruses, including labora- 
tory technique in sterilization and in methods of cultivating, isolating, and stain- 
ing bacteria. 

Required of those preparing for medical technology. 

22. Genetics. 

4:3:2. Second semester. 

This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and variation, 
and their practical applications. 

28. Botany. 

4:2:4. Second semester. 

The course is designed to deal with the broader aspects of plants, empha- 
sizing a study of the taxonomic, ecological, evolutionary and pathological prin- 
ciples. Consideration will be given to the local flora, with emphasis being placed 
on those features which indicate relationships of the various families. 

29. Biology of the Chordates. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

The anatomy of the chordates is studied from a comparative viewpoint with 
particular attention given to the correlation of structure to living conditions. 
Laboratory work involves dissection and demonstration of representative chor- 
dates. 

55 



BIOLOGY 

30. Vertebrate Histology and Microtechnique. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

This course deals with the cells, tissues, and organ systems of the vertebrate 
body, with special reference to the mammal. Modern micro-technical procedures 
are included in the course. 

31. Vertebrate Embryology. 

4:2:4. Second semester. 

A survey of the principles of development, with laboratory work on the 
frog, the chick, and the pig. 

32. Animal Physiology. 

4:2:4. Second semester. 

This course presents the basic concepts of physiology, with special reference 
to man. 

34, Plant Physiology. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

This course acquaints the student with the various functions of parts of 
plants. It includes lectures and experimental work on the processes of photo- 
synthesis, nutrition, respiration, growth, the role of hormones, digestion, absorp- 
tion, etc. 

35. Invertebrate Biology. 

4:2:4. Second semester. 

A comparative study of the free-living and parasitic invertebrates. Emphasis 
is on local forms. 

44. Special Problems. 

1 or 2 hours credit per semester. 

Limited to students majoring in biology who have had ample courses in 
the department and whose records indicate that they can be encouraged to take 
part in research or can work independently on research problems in which they 
have a special interest. 

It is also for those who have had most of the courses required for their 
major but who may have a special need for experience in fields not listed in the 
course offerings of the department. 

40.1. Biology Seminar. 

1:1:0 per semester. 

Readings, discussions, and reports on the modern trends in biology. 

41. Ecology. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

A study of the interrelation between living organisms and their environment, 
emphasizing both interspecific and intraspecific relations. Field investigations are 
made into local physical and biotic environments. 

45. Cellular Physiology. 

4:2:4. First semester. 

Cell function and structure: a basis for a deeper understanding of those 
processes common to living things. 

For Senior or Junior biology majors who have had organic chemistry and 
physics. 

56 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 

Professor Neidig; Associate Professor Lockwood; 
Assistant Professors Griswold and Haugh; Instructor Yingling 

The aims of the department are: (1) to provide students majoring in 
chemistry rigorous training in the principles and applications of modern 
chemistry; (2) to provide students interested in the teaching profession an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the teaching of science; and (3) 
to offer students interested in advanced study or in industrial employment 
professional training in chemistry. 

Major: Chemistry 24, 25, 36, 37, 38 and 4 hours of 44. 

B. S. in Chemistry (certified by the American Chemical Society): Chem- 
istry 24, 25, 36, 37, 38, 41, 45, 47 and 4 hours of 44. 

For outline of course leading to the degree of B.S. in Chemistry, see 
page 36. 

Independent Study 

Juniors and seniors may participate in the Independent Study pro- 
gram if they have demonstrated a high scholastic ability and proficiency 
in both experimental and theoretical chemistry. To be recommended for 
departmental honors, a student is required: (1) to submit a thesis based 
on extensive laboratory investigation of an original problem; (2) to de- 
fend the thesis before an appropriate examining committee. 

13, Principles of Chemistry. 

4:3:3 per semester. 
A systematic study of the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry. 

24. Chemistry of the Covalent Bond. 

4:3:4. First semester. 

The presentation of the structure and chemistry of covalent compounds 
including an introduction to the basic fundamentals of thermodynamics and 
kinetics. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 13 or demonstrated equivalent background. 

25. Reaction Kinetics and Chemistry Equilibria. 

4:3:4. Second semester. 

An investigation of chemical systems involving a study of reaction kinetics 
and equilibria, emphasizing the reaction of covalent compounds and using mod- 
ern analytical techniques. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 

36. Physical Chemistry. 

4:3:3 per semester. 

A course in the physical theories of matter and their applications to systems 
of variable composition. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25 and Mathematics 11. 
Corequisite: Physics 17. 

57 





58 



CHEMISTRY 

37. Organic Chemistry. 

5:5:5. First semester. 

A study of the preparation, properties, and uses of the aliphatic and aro- 
matic compounds with emphasis on the principles and reaction mechanisms de- 
scribing their behavior. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

38. Instrumental Analysis 

5:3:8. Second semester. 
A consideration of the use of instrumental analytical methods including 
spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, coulometry, and polarography. 
Prerequisite: One semester of Chemistry 36. 
Corequisite: A second semester of Chemistry 36. 

41. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A consideration of the structure of organic compounds and the mechanisms 
of homogeneous organic reactions. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36 and Chemistry 37. 

43. Biochemistry. 

4:3:4, First semester; 3:2:4, Second semester. 

A course in the physical and organic aspects of living systems. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

44. Special Problems. 

2:1:4 per semester. A maximum of eight semester hours credit may be 
earned in this course. 
Intensive library and laboratory study of topics of special interest to ad- 
vanced students in the major areas of chemistry. For students preparing for 
Secondary School Teaching, the emphasis is placed on methods of teaching 
Chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36, and the consent of the Chairman of the De- 
partment. 

45. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
A study of advanced topics in analytical chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 36 and Chemistry 38. 

46. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

2:0:8. First semester. 

A course in the principles and methods of organic analysis. The laboratory 
work includes the identification of organic compounds, the separation of mix- 
tures and the interpretation of laboratory data. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 37. 

47. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
An advanced course applying theoretical principles to the understanding of 
the descriptive chemistry of the elements. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36 and Physics 27. 

48. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A presentation of advanced topics in chemistry from such areas as quantum 
mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 36. 

59 



ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Economics and Business Administration 

Associate Professor Tom; Professors Riley and Stokes; 
Instructors Gates and Grace 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College is to give its students the oppor- 
tunity to procure a liberal education of the highest quality. Thus within 
this general objective of the College, the program of study in Economics 
and Business Administration at Lebanon Valley College is designed to 
provide for its own major: 

(1) A broad and liberal education so that graduates of this Depart- 
ment will play a more active role in our changing world of ideas 
and actions; and 

(2) A sound and integrated knowledge of the essential principles and 
problems of economics and business administration. 

Major: Economics 20, 23, and eighteen additional hours as approved 
by the adviser. These additional hours should include Economics 35, 36, 
40.2, 40.3 and 48. 

For an outline of the suggested program in Economics and Business 
Administration, see pages 38 ff. 

Economics 20 is a prerequisite for all courses in this department of 
a higher number except Economics 23 and 32. 

A concrete effort is afoot nationally to promote an understanding of 
the American economy. In an effort to raise the level of economic literacy, 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has prescribed the introduction of 
economics in the secondary schools. In this connection, the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration offers the following courses for 
those who are interested in teaching economics and social studies in the 
secondary schools: Economics 20, 32, 36, 37, 40.1 and 48. 

Independent Study 

The purpose of the departmental Independent Study program is to 
provide opportunity for capable students to undertake advanced academic 
work independently under supervision of one or more members of the 
department. 

In order to participate in the departmental Independent Study pro- 
gram, the applicant is required to: 

(1) demonstrate in his academic work the calibre of scholarship re- 
quired to undertake extensive research projects; 

(2) apply for and receive permission for such participation from the 
Departmental Chairman and from the Dean of the College no 
later than the end of the first semester of the junior year; 

(3) obtain departmental approval of a research project; 

(4) prepare a paper on the research project under the guidance of 
one or more staff members of the department; 

60 



ECONOMICS 

(5) submit the paper by April 1 of the senior year; and 

(6) present and defend the paper before a faculty committee selected 
by the Departmental Chairman and the Dean of the College. 

On the basis of the student's performance in the Independent Study 
program, the Departmental Chairman and the Dean of the College will 
determine whether or not the student will be graduated with departmental 
honors. 

Economics 

10. Economic Geography. 

3:3:0. Second Semester. 

Problems studied include: the geographical distribution, the signifi- 
cance and consequences of uneven production, and solutions to the surplus 
and deficit problems of economic resources in the world; the relationship 
between economic resources and economic development. Attention is given 
to the political, social, and cultural aspects of world geography, but with 
emphasis on the economic aspects. 

11. Introduction to American Business and Industry. 

5:5:0. First semester. 

A survey of the development of the American economic system as a whole, 
the nature of the various leading industries — agricultural and non-agricultural, 
consumer goods and producer goods, and the relationship between these indus- 
tries and the broader aspects of our national economic life. 

20. Principles of Economics. 

5:5:0 per semester. 

An introductory course in economic principles: consumption, production, 
banking and monetary theories and policies, governmental activities and fiscal 
policies, price system and allocation of resources, price levels and business fluctu- 
ation, theory of employment and income, and international economics. 

Prerequisite for courses of a higher number within the department, except 
23 and 32. 

36. Money and Banking. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

Nature and functions of money and credit, credit instruments and the money 
market, development and role of commercial banking and central banking, and 
structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System. Monetary and banking 
theory, policy, and practice. Influence on prices, level of income and employment, 
and economic stability and progress. 

37. Public Finance. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 965-1 966. 

Revenues and expenditures and economic functioning of the federal, state, 
and local governments; principles of taxation — shifting, incidence, and burden; 
influence on incentives, income distribution, and resource allocation; economic 
and social aspects of public spending; budgetary control and debt management; 
fiscal policy and economic stability. 

61 



ECONOMICS 

38. International Economics. 

3:5:0. First semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

A study of theories of trade; capital movement; mechanism for attaining 
equilibrium; economic policies such as tariff, quota, monetary standards and 
exchange, stale trading, cartel, and other economic agreements; the International 
Monetary Fund and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. 

40.1. History of Economic Thought. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 

The evolution of economic thought through the principal schools from 
Mercantilism to the present. Attention will be given to the analysis of the vari- 
ous theories of value, wages, interest, rent, profit, price level, business cycles, 
and employment, and to the influences of earlier economic ideas upon current 
thinking and policy-making. 

40.2. Microeconomic Analysis. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
Theories of demand, production, price, and resource allocation. 

40.3. Seminar and Special Problems. 

3:3:0. Hours to be arranged. 
Independent study and research in economics, business administration, or 
accounting under the direction and supervision of the departmental staff. 




Careful Personal Instruction 



62 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

40.4. Macroeconomic Analysis. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196 j. 

Theoretical and empirical study of national income, business cycle, and eco- 
nomic growth. 

48. Labor Economics 

3:3:0. First semester. 

Analysis of the American labor movement; theories, history, structure, and 
functions of unionism; individual and collective bargaining policies and prac- 
tices; labor legislation; grievances; arbitration. 



Business Administration 

23. Principles of Accounting. 

4:3:2 per semester. 

Accounting principles and their application in service, trading, and manu- 
facturing business operating as single proprietorships, partnerships, and corpo- 
rations. Topics studied include: the accounting cycle — journalizing, posting, work- 
sheet, financial statements, adjusting, closing; basic partnership problems — forma- 
tion, distribution of profits, dissolution; corporation and manufacturing account- 
ing; basic problems of depreciation, depletion, valuation; introduction to analysis, 
interpretation, and use of financial statements. 

Accounting, the language of business, provides a tool to implement work in 
other fields of business administration. 

30. Intermediate Accounting. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 966-1967. 

Intensively covers valuation accounting relating to working capital items — 
cash, temporary investments, receivables, inventories, current liabilities; non- 
current items — investments, plant and equipment, intangible assets and deferred 
charges, and long-term liabilities; and corporate capital. Includes nature of in- 
come, cost, and expense; statement of source and application of funds; and state- 
ment preparation and analysis. Attention is given to relevant official pronounce- 
ments in accounting. CPA examination accounting theory questions are utilized. 

Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

31. Advanced Accounting. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 

Accounting for joint ventures; special sales procedures — installment, consign- 
ment, agency and branch; parent and subsidiary accounting — consolidations and 
mergers; fiduciary and budgetary accounting— statement of affairs, receivership, 
estates and trusts, governmental accounting; foreign exchange; insurance; actu- 
arial science and applications. Attention is given to relevant official pronounce- 
ments in accounting. CPA examination accounting problems are utilized. 

Prerequisite: Economics 30. 

32. Business Law. 

3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1966-196']. 

Elementary principles of law generally related to the field of business includ- 
ing contracts, agency, sales, bailments, insurance, and negotiable instruments. 

63 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

35. Marketing. 

5:5:0. Second semester. 
As a branch of applied economics, this course deals with (1) the application 
of economic theory in the distribution of economic goods on the manufacturers' 
and wholesalers' level; (2) the methods of analysis on the product, the consumer, 
and the company, and (3) the administrative decisions on product planning, dis- 
tribution channels, promotional activities, sales management, and price policy. 
To bridge the gap between the understanding and the application of marketing 
principles, students are required to prepare and discuss a number of cases per- 
taining to some specific areas of marketing. 

40.5. Auditing. 

5:5:0. First semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
Study and appraisal of current auditing standards and related literature. 

42. Income Tax Accounting. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
Analysis of the Federal Income Tax Law and its applications to individuals, 
partnerships, fiduciaries, corporations; case problems; preparation of returns. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23, or consent of instructor. 

43. Cost Accounting. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 

Industrial accounting from the viewpoint of material, labor, and overhead 
costs; the analysis of actual costs for control purposes and for determination of 
unit product costs; assembling and presentation of cost data; selected problems. 

Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

44. Corporation Finance. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
A study of organizing a business, financing permanent and working capital 
needs, managing income and surplus, expanding through internal growth and 
combination, recapitalization and reorganization. Forms of business organiza- 
tion; charter and by-laws; directors, officers, and stockholders; stocks and bonds; 
dividend policy; concentration and anti-trust legislation. 

45. Investments and Statement Analysis. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
Development and role of investment and its relation to other economic, 
legal, and social institutions. Investment principles, media, machinery, policy, 
and management are discussed. Financial statement analysis is stressed and de- 
signed for preparation as Certified Public Accountants and/or Chartered Finan- 
cial Analysts. 

49. Personnel Administration and Industrial Management. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
Principles of scientific management: planning, organizing, staffing, directing 
and coordinating, and controlling. Personnel policies and practices — recruitment, 
selection, testing, placement, training, merit rating, job evaluation, wage and 
salary administration, health and safety; personal and group relations, employee 
benefits and services, time and motion study, work simplification, labor turnover 
and morale, efficiency records and incentives, standards, and personnel research. 

64 



EDUCATION 

Education 

Professors McKlveen and Ebersole; 

Assistant Professors Curfman, Herr and Wieder 

Instructors Batchelor and Garman 

The aim of the Department of Education is to acquaint students with 
the art of teaching and to develop in each prospective teacher a full reali- 
zation of his responsibilities in this profession. 

Courses are provided to comply with state certification in the elemen- 
tary and secondary fields of the public schools. 

For a statement of requirements for those planning to enter the teach- 
ing profession, see pages 40-41 and 45-49. 

Elementary Education 
Major: Elementary Education 22, 23, 32, 34, 36, 37, 40, 43; Geography 
10, Psychology 21. 



Education Courses 

For both Elementary and Secondary Education 

20. Social Foundations of Education. 

3:5:0. First semester. 

A study is made of the history of education correlated with a survey of the 
principles and theories of noted educational leaders. Emphasis is placed on the 
influence these leaders and their followers have made on school and society. 

Required for elementary and secondary certification. 

30. Educational Measurements. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
A study of the principles of validity and reliability, appraisal and con- 
struction of test items and consideration of the uses of test results. 
Recommended elective in elementary and secondary fields. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

41. An Introduction to Guidance. 

3:5:0. Second semester. 

An overview of guidance in the public schools including the history, 
philosophy and development of programs. Procedures and instruments to be 
employed by the classroom teacher; creation of conditions for mental health; 
relation of guidance to other phases for instruction. 

Prequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

42. The Education of the Exceptional Child. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A general view of the practices and programs for the education of excep- 
tional children and youth. The study includes children with physical, mental, 
and emotional handicaps; gifted children. Observation in special classes, child 
study, and the survey of curricular materials used in their education are part of 
the requirements. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

65 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

45. Visual and Sensory Techniques. 

5:3:0. Second semester. 

Psychological bases for sensory aids; study and appraisal of various aids; 
use of apparatus; sources of equipment and supplies. 

Recommended elective in elementary and secondary fields. Open only to 
seniors preparing to teach or enter the ministry. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

Elementary Education 

El. Ed. 22. Music in the Elementary School. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
Fundamentals of music, movement to music, study of child voice, materials 
and methods for the different grades, and a survey of the literature used in the 
public schools. 




I 



6G 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

El. Ed. 23. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School. 

3:2:2. Second semester. 

Recent developments in arithmetic and science and the applications in the 
classroom; curriculum planning; modern teaching methods; instructional ma- 
terials; demonstrations and experiments adapted to the elementary classroom. 

Prerequisites; El. Ed. 25, one year of a laboratory science. 

El. Ed. 25. Mathematics for the Elementary Grades. 

3:3:0. First semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematics and a survey 
of the new and old in mathematical disciplines as applied in the elementary 
school. 

El. Ed. 32. Art in the Elementary School. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A course in the understanding of the child's approach to art and his 
changing needs for artistic expression showing the parallel in creative and 
mental development. It includes methods used for different age levels and 
classroom situations, the development of work units integrating art with other 
subject matter areas, sources of art materials, their selection and evaluation. 
Lesson plans are arranged in accordance with the natural development of the 
child. 

El. Ed. 34. Teaching of Reading. 

3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the teaching materials and problems of instruction in the de- 
velopment of basic reading skills. Textbooks, effective reading programs, courses 
of study, tests, and scientific studies in this field are investigated and evaluated. 

El. Ed. 36. Communications and Group Processes in the Elementary School. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A course dealing with fundamentals for language growth in the areas of 
oral and written expression, correct usage, spelling, and handwriting. The de- 
velopment of basic concepts related to effective citizenship in a democracy. 
A variety of learning experiences and materials will be used and evaluated; 
especially, students will have experience in preparing an individual resource unit. 

El. Ed. 37. Children's Literature. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of appropriate children's books and poetry, including authors and 
illustrators. Attention is given to children's reading interests, criteria and aids 
in selecting materials, a brief survey of the development of children's litera- 
ture, and the art of storytelling and its place in the curriculum. 

El. Ed. 40. Student Teaching. 

Twelve semester hours credit. First semester. 

Each student spends an entire semester in a classroom of an area public 
school under the supervision of a carefully selected cooperating teacher. Open 
to seniors only. 

Student teaching begins with the opening of the public schools. College 
residence halls and dining hall are available to the student teachers. An ad- 
ditional charge is made for this period. 

Prerequisites: Ed. 20, Psychology 23, Elementary Education 23, 34, 36 and 37. 

67 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

El. Ed. 43. Health and Safety Education. 

5:5:0. Second semester. 

Instruction in basic health facts and safety procedures in everyday life; 
sources, evaluation and use of materials. 

EL Ed. 44. Senior Seminar. 

3:3:0. First semester. 

The seminar gives immediate help with pertinent problems in student 
teaching. Topics related to over-all success in teaching will be thoroughly dealt 
with; professional ethics, classroom management, home and school relationship, 
community responsibilities, professional standards, and other related areas. 




Secondary Education 

31. History and Philosophy of Education. 

3:3:0. First semester. 

The historical developments of the American educational system are 
studied. Also, philosophers past and present are analyzed as to their effect in 
establishing educational trends and practices. 

Open to juniors and seniors only. Recommended as an elective in Edu- 
cation. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

40. Student Teaching. 

Six semester hours credit. Either semester. 

This course fulfills the Pennsylvania certification requirement: 

The minimum in student teaching is based on not less than 180 clock 
hours spent in the schools under approved supervision including the 
necessary observation, participation and conferences. Ninety (90) clock 
hours of the 180 must be completed in actual teaching experiences. 
Conferences held with the college supervisor are also part of the 
program. 

The program consists of twelve weeks of teaching and observing in the public 
schools. Students must have four consecutive hours free each day. These hours 
may be from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon; 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.— 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 
p.m. or 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The morning hours are preferred. 

Open to seniors only except by permission of the Head of the Department. 
Students having a grade point average less than 2.0 during their first three 
years in college will not be admitted. Before registering for the course, students 
must consult the Chairman of the Department of Education. 

68 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 



Summer Student Teaching Program. 

Six hours credit. Six weeks of student teaching in the secondary field 
in the Derry Township Public Schools, Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

For information concerning the Summer Student Teaching Program con- 
tact the Chairman of the Department of Education. 

42. The Education of the Exceptional Child. 

3:5:0. Second semester. 

A general view of the practices and programs for the education of excep- 
tional children and youth. The study includes children with physical, mental, 
and emotional handicaps; gifted children. Observation in special classes, child 
study, and the survey of curricular materials used in their education are part of 
the requirements. 

Prerequisites: Education 20, Psychology 20, 23. 

49. Practicum and Methods. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A presentation and evaluation of teaching methods used in secondary 
schools. Experienced teachers will be invited to participate in class discussions 
and visitations will be made to the classrooms to observe good teaching. One 
third of class time will be devoted to acquainting students preparing to teach 
secondary subjects with understanding and techniques for teaching reading in 
their respective areas. This course will fulfill the certification requirements 
for a basic course in reading instruction on the secondary level, effective October 
1, 1964. 

Required of all seniors in secondary education. Prerequisites: Education 20, 
Psychology 20, 23. 



Consultation for Student Teachers 




M 






imt\*±\ t. 



r-^-i 





ENGLISH 



English 



Professor Struble; Associate Professor Faber; 

Assistant Professor Ford 

Instructors O'Donnell, Tucker, and Woods 

The purpose of the English Department is to afford students a vital 
contact with the literature of our language and to assist them to write and 
speak effectively. 

Major: In addition to the required course in English composition 
(English 10a — 10b) English majors will take English 20, English 21a, 22, 
26a— 26b, 30a— 30b, 31, 32, 35, and 49. 

Independent Study 

The English department provides three types of recognition of su- 
perior ability: 

1) Entering students of proved ability in English composition may 
under certain circumstances be exempted from one or both semes- 
ters of English 10, providing they register for Advanced Composi- 
tion and enough additional hours in literature to meet the general 
requirements in English for graduation. 

2) Students who are majoring in English may become candidates for 
departmental honors if they have a grade point average of 3.0 in 
courses in English, and if they receive permission from the head of 
the department and the Dean of the College, ordinarily no later than 
the end of the first semester of their junior year. 

The specific program for departmental honors for each student 
accepted for the Independent Study Program will be worked out by 
that student in consultation with the head of the department, in ac- 
cordance with the plan for departmental honors adopted by the 
faculty on May 8, 1961. 




70 



ENGLISH 

3) A senior who has been accepted for honors and who looks for- 
ward to a career in college teaching may, upon recommendation of 
the head of the department and appointment by the Dean of the 
College, become an intern in English, to render such assistance in 
the duties of the English department as will in some measure help 
to prepare him for a professional career in this field. Ordinarily only 
one intern will be appointed in any one academic year. 

10a — 10b. English Composition. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
A study, supplemented by practice in writing, of the principles of grammar, 
logic, rhetoric, and mechanics which enable men to communicate effectively. 

11a— lib. Word Study 

1:1:0 per semester. 
This course has a twofold purpose: (1) to give the student some insight 
into linguistic processes, particularly as pertains to the growth of the English 
vocabulary; and (2) to increase the range of the student*s vocabulary, in 
order that he may have greater mastery over his own native tongue. Problems 
of pronunciation and spelling go hand in hand with vocabulary building. 

English 20a — 20b. Comparative Literature 

5:5:0 per semester. 
This course has five principal aims: (1) to familiarize students with some of 
those masterpieces of Western World literature which are a part of the common 
heritage of every cultivated mind; (2) to acquaint students with the conventions, 
techniques, and presuppositions of various types of literature, so that they may 
be able to deal intelligentlv with these types when they meet them elsewhere; (3) 
to give students some training in the techniques of the comparative study of 
literature, and some appreciation of the possibilities of this approach to litera- 
ture; (4) to provide students with genuinely aesthetic experiences, in the hope 
that reading and the appreciation of literature will continue to enrich their 
spirits throughout their lives; and (5) to pass on to them some sense of the under- 
lying values of our cultural system. 

21a — 21b. American Literature. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

First semester: a survey of American literature from the beginnings to the 
Civil War. 

Second semester: a survey of American literature from the Civil War to 
the present day. 

22. Public Speaking. 

3:3:0. Either semester. 
Basic principles of public speaking with practical training in diction and 
platform delivery. 

23. Advanced Composition. 

2:2:0. First semester. 
Principles and techniques of the short story, drama, and novel for students 
interested in creative writing. Extensive practice in the field of student's special 
interest. 

24. Contemporary Literature. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A study of currents and cross-currents in the literature produced in Eng- 
land and America since World War I. 

71 



ENGLISH 

26a — 26b. Survey of English Literature. 

5:5:0 per semester. 

The whole course of English literature, from the beginnings to our own 
time, viewed in perspective against the background of English life and 
thought, foreign influences, and the developing national consciousness. 

Prerequisite: English 10. 

30a — 30b. Shakespeare. 

5:3:0 per semester. 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings to the time of Shakespeare; 
a study of Shakespeare's history plays and their place in the Elizabethan world, 
and an analysis of Shakespearean comedy. 

A study of Shakespeare's tragedies and comedies (problem and romantic). 

Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

3L History of the English Language. 

3:3:0. First semester. 

Historical study of English sounds, grammatical forms, and vocabulary; 
introduction to structural linguistics; standards of correctness and current usage. 
This course is primarily intended for those who plan to teach English and is in 
part a course in methods of teaching. 

Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

32. Chaucer. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

Intended to give the student a reasonable familiarity with Chaucer; to pro- 
vide a detailed picture of mediaeval life, culture, and thought; and to develop 
skill in the reading of earlier English. 

Prerequisite: English 31. 

33. Literature of the Victorian Period. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A survey of the major English poets and prose writers from 1830 to 1900. 
Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

35. Poetry of the Romantic Movement. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
A study of the principal poets of the early nineteenth century: Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

37. Contemporary Drama. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
A survey of Continental, British, and American drama since 1890. 
Prerequisite: English 10. 

38. The Novel. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
A study of the development of the novel in England (Richardson to Joyce). 

40. Eighteenth Century Literature. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
A survey of the principal English authors from Dryden to Blake. 

49. Seminar in English. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

Intensive review of the student's earlier work in English; systematic cover- 
age of the gaps in the student's knowledge; synthesis of the whole. 

The final examination in this course will constitute a comprehensive ex- 
amination for the department. 

Required of all English majors in their senior year. 

72 




Foreign Languages 

Professors Piel and Fields; Assistant Professors Damus, 

Mrs. Fields, and Titcomb; 

Instructors Cooper, Hansen, Saylor, and Troltman 

The immediate aim of this department is to assist the student to ac- 
quire a working knowledge of the language or languages which he chooses 
to study. 

The aim of the courses in modern foreign languages is to enable the 
student to use the foreign tongue as a means of communication: to hear, 
speak, and eventually to read and write the language. Through his study 
of the language and literature, the student gains a deeper understanding 
and appreciation of the life and thought of the people of the country. 

Laboratory practice is required of all students in modern foreign lan- 
guages except those in German 11. 

Major: A student may elect either a major in one language or a de- 
partmental major. The departmental major consists of at least twenty-four 
hours in one language and at least twelve hours in a second language. 

In French, German and Spanish, one literature course is offered each 
year, in a regular rotation of courses. 

Independent Study 

Students who are majoring in a foreign language may become candi- 
dates for departmental honors if they have a grade point average of 3.0 
in departmental courses, and if they receive permission from the depart- 
mental staff and the Dean of the College, ordinarily no later than the end 
of the first semester of their junior year. 

Honors work will involve the selection of a topic for investigation 
under the guidance of the departmental adviser, independent reading and 

73 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

study, frequent conferences with the adviser, preparation of a paper on 
the topic to be submitted by April 1 of the senior year, satisfactory defense 
of the paper before a committee composed of the departmental staff, the 
Dean of the College, and any other faculty members who may be invited 
to participate, and finally, an oral examination in the major language. If 
these requirements are satisfied, the student will be graduated with Honors 
in his major language. 

French 
Major: Twenty-four hours of work above the elementary level. 

1. Elementary French. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in French; audio-active technique. 

10. Intermediate French. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of French 1 with further practice in conversation, dictation, 
and in reading and writing. Attention is given to the cultural and historical 
background of the literature that is read. 

Prerequisite: French 1 or two years of secondary school French. 

20. French Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A survey of the literary history of the Renaissance and of the Classic 
periods in France. 

30. French Literature of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A study of the outstanding works of the Age of Enlightenment and of the 
Romantic, Realist, and Naturalist Schools of French literature. 

40. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A study of modern French literature with extensive reading of the works 
of the outstanding authors. 

45. Seminar. 

1-3 hours credit per semester. 

This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowl- 
edge, to stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for fu- 
ture work in his field. The course content varies according to the needs of the 
group involved. For those students who are planning to teach, the seminar will 
provide instruction in teaching methods. 



German 
Major: Twenty-fours hours above the elementary level. 

1. Elementary German. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in German; audio-active technique. 
74 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

10. Intermediate German. 

5:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of German 1 with practice in conversation, dictation, read- 
ing and writing. Emphasis is given to the cultural and historical background of 
the literature that is read. 

Prerequisite: German 1 or two years of secondary school German. 

11. Scientific German. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Practice in reading scientific and technical German with emphasis on 
vocabulary and the special difficulties inherent in this type of writing. General 
readings followed by readings in the student's major field. 

22. The Classical Period. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

Background of the Classical Period; detailed study of the period; readings 
from the works of Lessing, Goethe and Schiller. 

32. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Romanticism; Realism. 

42. German Literature of the Twentieth Century. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
A study of contemporary German literature with extensive reading of the 
works of the outstanding authors. 

45o Seminar. 

1-3 credits per semester. 
This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowl- 
edge, to stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for future 
work in his field. The course content varies according to the needs of the 
group involved. For those students who are planning to teach, the seminar will 
provide instruction in teaching method. 

Greek 

1. Elementary Greek. 

3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
An intensive course in the basic elements of ancient Greek. A study of 
forms and syntax, with easy prose composition. 

10a — 10b. Intermediate Greek. 

3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1966-196J. 
First semester: readings from the New Testament Gospels. 
Second semester: readings from Xenophon's Anabasis. A review of gram- 
mar throughout the year. Prerequisite: Greek 1. 

20. Readings from the Book of Acts. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 965-1 966. 
Prerequisite: Greek 10a — 10b. 

21. Readings in Hellenistic Greek. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 

Selections from the Septuagint, the Greek church fathers. 
Prerequisite: Greek 10a — 10b. 

75 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

30. Readings from the Epistles of Paul. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 966-1 967. 
Prerequisite: Greek 10a — 10b. 

31. Readings from the Greek Philosophers. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
Prerequisite: Greek 10a — 10b. 

Latin 
Major: Twenty-four hours above the elementary level. 

1. Elementary Latin. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
A beginning course in Latin. Study of forms and syntax, with easy prose 
composition. Selected readings. 

10. Intermediate Latin. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Review of forms and syntax. Reading of selections from Cicero's Essays. 
Prerequisite: Latin 1, or two years of secondary school Latin. 

20. Lyric Poetry and Drama. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Selected readings from Horace, Catullus, Plautus and Terence. 
Prerequisite: Latin 10. 

30. Letters and Satire. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Selected readings from Cicero, Pliny, Horace and Juvenal. 
Prerequisite: Latin 10. 

40. History and Philosophy. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Selected readings from Livy, Tacitus, and Lucretius. 
Prerequisite: Latin 10. 

Russian 

1. Elementary Russian. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
An elementary course with oral-aural approach. 

10. Intermediate Russian. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
An intermediate course in Russian with continued conversational practice 
reading and writing. 

Prerequisite: Russian 1 or two years of Russian in the secondary school. 

Spanish 
Major: Twenty-four hours of work above the elementary level. 

1. Elementary Spanish. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
A beginning course in Spanish; audio-active technique. 

76 




10. Intermediate Spanish. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of Spanish 1 with further practice in conversation, dictation, 
and in reading and writing. Attention is given to Spanish literature in its cul- 
tural and historical context. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or two years of secondary school Spanish. 

22. Spanish Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Reading of outstanding authors of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, 
with emphasis upon Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and Calderon. Composition and 
conversation. 



32. Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Extensive reading, composition and conversation. 

42. A Survey of Spanish and Latin American Literature. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

First semester: a survey of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the 
present. Intensive reading, composition, and conversation. 

Second semester: a survey of Latin American literature from the sixteenth 
century to the present. Intensive reading, composition, and conversation. 

45. Se minar . 

1-3 hours credits per semester. 
This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowl- 
edge, to stimulate individual study and research, and to prepare him for fu- 
ture work in his field. The course content varies according to the needs of the 
group involved. For those students who are planning to teach, the seminar will 
provide instruction in teaching methods. 

77 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Geography 
Assistant Professor Herr 

10a— 10b. World Geography. 

_j:_j:o per semester. 
A basic course in geography to develop a knowledge and an appreciation 
of the worldwide physical factors in man's environment and of his adjustment 
to them. The course includes a study of the motions of the earth, land forms, 
bodies of water, soil, climate, vegetation, with special emphasis on man's politi- 
cal, economic, and social responses to them. Knowledge of the location of both 
the physical and cultural aspects of man's habitat is related to contemporary 
events. 

Geology 
Professor Light 

20a — 20b. Structural and Historical Geology. 

2:2:0 per semester. 

The first semester, structural geology, acquaints the student with the forces 
and dynamic agencies by which the earth has been formed and has evolved into 
its present condition. 

The second semester, historical geology, deals with the probable location 
of land and sea areas of each of the various geologic periods, and the develop- 
ment of the plants and animals which lived during periods as identified by 
their fossil remains. 

German 

See Foreign Languages, pages 74-75. 

Greek 

See Foreign Languages, page 75-76. 

Health and Physical Education 

Assistant Professors Marquette and J. R. McHenry; 

Instructors Darlington, Garman, Petrofes 

The aims of this department are (1) to encourage attitudes and habits 
of good total health; (2) to develop the student's physical capacities; (3) to 
provide activities which will enrich his leisure throughout life. 

In addition to the family physician's report, it is strongly recom- 
mended that all entering students also undergo a thorough visual exam- 
ination. 

All students must pass skill and knowledge tests in team and indi- 
vidual sports before the physical education requirement is completed. 
The Physical Fitness Test is taken three times during the year by men 
students, twice by women. 

Students are required to wear the regulation gymnasium outfit, which 
may be purchased at the college bookstore. 

78 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. Health, Hygiene, and Physical Education (Men) (Women). 

0:2:0 per semester. 

Health and hygiene include instruction in biological needs, personal cleanli- 
ness and grooming, health conservation, effects of narcotics and alcohol. 

(Men) The physical education activities include: touch football, basketball, 
soccer, softball, volleyball, archery, badminton, golf, handball, squash, table 
tennis, trampoline, and weight-lifting. 

(Women) The physical education activities include: for the first semester, 
golf, archery, volleyball, and conditioning exercises; for the second semester, 
badminton, table tennis, bowling, tennis, and conditioning exercises. 

11. Health, Hygiene, and Corrective and Adaptive Physical Education (Men) 
(Women). 

0:2:0 per semester. 

Special activities, as prescribed by a physician, for students with physical 
handicaps or deficiencies. 

Not open to students qualified for Health, Hygiene, and Physical Educa- 
tion 10. 

20. Physical Education (Men) (Women). 

0:2:0 per semester. 

(Men) Advanced instruction, practice, and testing in any five activities in- 
cluded in Physical Education 10 as selected by the individual student. 

(Women) Each student selects one out-door and one in-door individual 
sport per semester. Advanced instruction, practice, and testing in golf, archery, 
tennis, badminton, table tennis, bowling, squash, swimming, riding, volleyball, 
and conditioning exercises. 

21. Corrective and Adaptive Physical Education (Men) (Women). 

0:2:0 per semester. 
Special activities, as prescribed by a physician, for students with physical 
handicaps or deficiencies. 

Not open to students qualified for Health and Physical Education 20. 




HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

History and Political Science 

Associate Professors Shay and Geffen; 

Assistant Professors Fehr and Richards; 

Instructor Jolly 

The aim in the teaching of history is to acquaint the student with 
human behavior in the dimension of past time, in the belief that by thus 
extending the range of his knowledge he may also enlarge the scope of 
his sympathies and become more richly human. 

The aim in the teaching of political science is to acquaint the student 
with the many-sided aspects of government, in the belief that by thus 
enlarging the extent of his knowledge he may expand the scope of his 
understanding and adopt a critical and objective attitude toward the 
problems of modern society. 

The department also prepares students for graduate and law schools 
and for careers in teaching, government, and business. 



History 

Major: History 13, 43; three one-semester courses from among His- 
tory 14, 21, 22, 31, 32; three one-semester courses from among History 
30a — 30b, 40a — 40b; two additional one-semester courses as approved by 
the departmental chairman. 

Independent Study 

Students majoring in history may participate in the Independent Study 
program when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) demonstrate 
in their academic work the caliber of scholarship required to undertake 
an extensive research project; (2) achieve a 3.3 grade point average in de- 
partmental courses and a 2.5 grade point average in all college courses; 
and (3) apply for and receive permission for such participation from the 
departmental staff and the Dean of the College no later than the end of 
the first semester of the junior year. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) submit 
to the departmental chairman periodic progress reports; (2) show progress 
at a rate and at a level indicating that he will complete the program on 
time and at the desired level of achievement; and (3) maintain a 3.3 grade 
point average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade point average in all 
college courses. 

The participant must (1) obtain departmental approval of a research 
topic; (2) prepare an essay on the subject selected for research under the 
guidance of a member of the departmental staff; (3) complete the writing 
of the essay by April 1 of the senior year; (4) defend the essay in a manner 
to be determined by the departmental staff and the Dean of the College; 
(5) pursue a program of independent reading approved by the depart- 
mental staff; (6) demonstrate, by means of a written and/or oral examina- 

80 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

tion, knowledge and understanding of the material studied in the inde- 
pendent reading program; and (7) present to the departmental chairman 
an assessment of his experience in the program. Upon fulfilling these re- 
quirements, the student will be recommended by the departmental staff to 
the Dean of the College for graduation with departmental honors. 

13. Introduction to Historiography. 

5:5:0. First semester. 
Theorv and practice in the writing of history. The work of selected his- 
torians is studied and each student is required to write a research paper. 

14. Backgrounds to Western Civilization. 

5:5:0. Second semester. 
The Greco-Roman civilization and its medieval transformation into the 
foundations of western society. 

17a — 17b. History' of Western Civilization. 

y.y.o per semester. 
A study of significant aspects of the political, economic, social, and intel- 
lectual development of man in western society, with special emphasis upon the 
processes of historiography. The first semester carries the story to 1715. The 
second semester brings it to the present day. 

21. The Renaissance and Reformation. 

y.y.o. First semester. 
A study of the political, economic, cultural, and religious changes which 
occurred from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries. 

22. Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Europe. 

y.y.o. Second semester. 
Europe from 1648 to 1815, with special emphasis on the impact of capital- 
ism, the Enlightenment, the rise of absolutism and the reaction to it. 

23. Political and Social History of the United States and Pennsylvania. 

yyo. Either semester. 
A survey of American history from the earliest settlements to the present 
time. Emphasis is placed upon the development of Pennsylvania as colony and 
Commonwealth. 

30a — 30b. American Colonial and National History to 1850. 

y.y.o per semester. Offered 1 966-1967. 

The first semester is devoted to American history from the European origins 
to 1800, with special attention to the development of Pennsylvania. 

The second semester deals with basic aspects of the development of popular 
democracy in the United States from the Jeffersonian period through the "Age 
of the Common Man," with stress on Pennsylvania's participation in this 
development. 

31. Europe from 1815 to 1914. 

y.y.o. First semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
Nineteenth century Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the outbreak 
of World War I. Emphasis is placed on diplomatic relations, revolutionary and 
liberal movements, the new colonialism, and the social changes of the latter 
part of the nineteenth century. 

81 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

32. Europe from 1914 to the Present. 

5:5:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 

World Wars I and II, emphasizing the causes of the world conflicts, the 
efforts to maintain peace, the rise of dictatorships, the tensions in international 
relations, and other aspects of the post-war periods. 

40a — 40b. The United States, 1850 to the Present. 

5:5:0 per semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

The first semester is concerned with the Civil War, its precedents and 
aftermath. Political, economic, social, and intellectual aspects to 1900 are con- 
sidered, with special reference to Pennsylvania. 

The second semester deals with political, economic, social, and intellectual 
development in modern America, with specific consideration to Pennsylvania. 

43» Senior Seminar in History. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A review of the student's college program in history, with reading, dis- 
cussion and writing assignments to serve the following ends: (1) synthesis of 
previous course work in history; (2) relation of the academic discipline of his- 
tory to other fields of knowledge; (3) formulation and expression of a personal 
philosophy of history by each student; and (4) preparation for the comprehen- 
sive examination. 

46. History of Russia. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

A survey of Russian history from ancient times to the present, with special 
attention to developments since the seventeenth century. 

47. History of the Far East. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

Social, political, economic, and cultural institutions of the Far East. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the trends since 1500. 



82 




HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

48. History of Latin America. 

)'-}:o. First semester. Offered 1967-1968. 
A survey of the Latin American republics from their colonial beginnings 
to the present time. Political, social, economic, and intellectual phases of their 
development are considered. 

49. Select Problems in History. 

5:5:0. First semester. 

5:5:0 per semester for independent study participants, with a maximum 
of nine hours credit. 
A course to provide the student with an opportunity to explore in depth 
a topic of special interest. Required of majors enrolled in the Independent Study 
program in history. Open to other history majors by permission of the instruc- 
tor and the departmental chairman. 

Political Science 

Major: Political Science 10a— 10b, 20, 21, 30, 31, 40, 41, 43, and three 
additional hours as approved by the departmental chairman. Majors are 
also required to take three one-semester courses from among History 30a — 
30b, 40a— 40b. 

Independent Study 

Students majoring in political science may participate in the Inde- 
pendent Study program when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) 
demonstrate in their academic work the caliber of scholarship required 
to undertake an extensive research project; (2) achieve a 3.0 grade point 
average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade point average in all col- 
lege courses; and (3) apply for and receive permission for such partici- 
pation from the departmental staff and the Dean of the College no later 
than the end of the sophomore year. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) submit 
to the departmental chairman periodic progress reports; (2) show progress 
at a rate and at a level indicating that he will complete the program on 
time and at the desired level of achievement, and (3) maintain a 3.0 
grade point average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade point aver- 
age in all college courses. 

The participant must (1) use the junior year for preliminary work in- 
volving selected readings and gathering of source material for a research 
topic; (2) obtain departmental approval of a research topic; (3) prepare 
an essay on the subject selected for research under the guidance of a 
member of the departmental staff; (4) complete the writing of the essay 
by April 1 of the senior year; (5) defend the essay in a manner to be de- 
termined by the departmental staff and the Dean of the College; (6) pur- 
sue a program of independent reading approved by the departmental 
staff; (7) demonstrate, by means of a written and/or oral examination, 
knowledge and understanding of the material studied in the independent 
reading program; and (8) present to the departmental chairman an 
assessment of his experience in the program. Upon fulfilling these re- 
quirements, the student will be recommended by the departmental staff 
to the Dean of the College for graduation with departmental honors. 

83 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

10a — 10b. American Government and Politics. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
A study of the structure, functions, and processes of American National 
government; the Constitution; federalism and its problems; civil rights; political 
parties and pressure groups; elections; and the increasing powers of the federal 
government. Attention is given to problems facing our government and to cur- 
rent world affairs. 

20. Comparative Government. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

A comparative study of important governmental systems of the world, 
both democratic and authoritarian. Comparison and contrasts are made between 
unitary and federal forms. Special study is made of the governmental system 
in force in the Soviet Union. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

21. Foreign Relations. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

A study of the development, structure, and functions of the United States 
diplomatic and consular service. Consideration is given to recruitment, training 
and promotions in the foreign service. Emphasis is given to the problems faced 
by the American diplomatic officials in contemporary international relations. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

22. State and County Government. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

This course deals with the structure and functions of state and county 
government. Emphasis is placed on federal-state-local relationships, on admin- 
istrative organization and services, on the courts, and on legislative representa- 
tion. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

23. City Government. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

This course deals with the rise of urbanization and the accompanying 
growth of municipal functions. Attention is paid to metropolitan areas to the 
legal process and status of cities, to municipal relations with state and national 
government, to urban politics, and to the various forms of city government. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

30. Political Parties in the United States. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1966- 1967. 

A study of the history and origins of political parties, their organization 
development, methods of operations, leaders, machines and bosses, campaigns 
and platforms. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

31. American Constitutional Government. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1 966-1 967. 

A study of the growth and development of the Constitution through the 
medium of judicial construction. Recent decisions illustrating its application to 
new conditions of the present age, and proposals for court modification are given 
particular attention. 

Political Science 10a — -10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

84 



MATHEMATICS 

33. Public Opinion. 

5:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

An analysis of the nature and sources of contemporary public opinion, with 
special attention to types of censorship and to modern propaganda devices. 

40. Political Theory. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

A survey of the different philosophies and theories of government, ancient 
and modern, with special reference to political philosophy since the sixteenth 
century. 

41. International Politics. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 967-1968. 

A course in the origin, forms, dynamics and prospects of the international 
political pattern, with emphasis on current developments and changing con- 
cepts in world politics. 

Political Science lOa-lOb is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

43. Senior Seminar in Political Science. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
An intensive review of the student's college program in political science, 
with reading, discussion, and written assignments to accomplish the following 
purposes: (1) integration of earlier course work in political science; (2) relation 
of the discipline to other fields of knowledge; and (3) development and expres- 
sion of an individual political philosophy by the student. 



Languages 

See Foreign Languages, pages 73-77. 

Latin 

See Foreign Languages, page 76. 

Mathematics 

Professor Bissinger; Assistant Professors Burras and Henning; 
Instructor Lewin 

The aims of the Department of Mathematics are: (1) to make avail- 
able mathematical theory and technique needed by students in applied 
sciences and industry; (2) to prepare students interested in mathematics for 
graduate schools as well as for secondary school teaching; (3) to provide 
the cultural advantages of a knowledge of mathematics. 

Major: Mathematics 11, 21, 25, 31 and ten additional semester hours 
beyond Mathematics 10. Prospective majors should elect a course in 
physics (Physics 10 or 17), and take sufficient French or German to read 
mathematical works in these languages. 

85 



MATHEMATICS 

Independent Study 

Students may participate in the departmental Independent Study 
Program if they have demonstrated high scholastic ability and have re- 
ceived permission for such participation from the Departmental Chairman 
and the Dean of the College no later than the end of the first semester of 
the junior year. 

A student may receive upon graduation departmental honors if he has 
maintained a 3.0 grade point average in mathematics and has satisfactorily 
completed the Independent Study Program. 

Plan of Study in Statistics 

Mathematics 37, 41, 42 form the basis for a concentration in statistics. 
A statistical and computing laboratory equipped with Brunsviga desk 
calculating machines is available to students doing computational work in 
connection with this program of study. Additional training with IBM 
electrical punched card equipment can be arranged with local industry 
and nearby military installations. 

Plan of Study in Mathematical Physics 

Students interested in mathematical physics may elect to major in 
either the Department of Physics or the Department of Mathematics and 
follow a plan of study in mathematical physics worked out by a suitable 
adviser to whom they will be referred. Ordinarily the program will include 
Mathematics 31, 37, 40, and 46. 

Plan of Study in Actuarial Science 

The program as outlined on page 34 is endorsed by the Philadelphia 
Section of the Society of Actuaries who sponsor it on this campus. The 
actuarial examinations, parts 1, 2, and 3, are also given on this campus 
which is a testing center. Interested students should consult with the 
Departmental Chairman. 

Plan of Study in Engineering 

The cooperative pre-engineering program is described on page 42. 
Ordinarily the program will include Mathematics 11, 12, 21, 40, and 46. 

Courses 
1. Introductory Analysis. 

3:5:0. First semester. 
This is a pre-calculus course which includes topics from college algebra, 
analytical trigonometry, and plane analytic geometry. Students who have not 
studied plane analytic geometry or whose background is not adequate for 
calculus may take this course and Mathematics 11 concurrently. 

10. Basic Concepts of Mathematics. 

3:3:0. Either semester. 
The foundational aspects of mathematics at work in the world today are 
stressed for cultural as well as for some technical competence. Topics in logic, 
sets, axiom systems, and geometry are included. This course, in general, is a 
terminal course and is recommended for elementary education majors. Witter, 
Mathematics: The Study of Axiom Systems. 

86 



MATHEMATICS 

11. Elementary Analysis I & II. 

5:5:0 per semester. 
The fundamental ideas of differential and integral calculus are introduced 
with applications. A thorough background in trigonometry, algebra, and plane 
analytic geometry is necessary. Protter and Morrey, College Calculus. 

12. Elementary Statistics. 

5:2:2. Either semester. 
Included in this course are descriptive statistics, an introduction to probabil- 
ity concepts, simple problems of statistical inference, and elementary treatment 
of analysis of pairs of measurements. Wilks, Elementary Statistical Analysis. 

21. Intermediate Analysis I & II. 

5:5:0 per semester. 
This is a continuation of Mathematics 11 with an introduction to partial 
differentiation, multiple integration, infinite series, differential equations, and 
linear algebra. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

25. Modern Algebra. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
Integral domains, groups, rings, and fields are emphasized through an axio- 
matic approach with applications. Birkhoff and Maclane, Survey of Modern 
Algebra and Lecture Notes. 

31. Advanced Analysis I & II. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Rigorous existence proofs of functional concepts of continuity, differentia- 
tion, integration, and series are given. Use is made of transformation theory by 
Jacobians. Buck, Advanced Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

37. Mathematical Statistics. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Calculus is used to develop basic statistical tools and notions. Generating 
functions, frequency distributions of one, two, or more variables, and various 
tests are considered. Wadsworth and Bryan, Introduction to Random Variables 
and Probability. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Mathematics 21. 

40. Methods of Applied Mathematics. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
Use is made of matrices and determinants, the concept of linear vector 
spaces and characteristic values. Formulation and solution of certain partial 
differential equations are accompanied by a treatment of integral equations, 
difference equations, and Green's function. Hildebrand, Methods of Applied 
Mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

41. Probability. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
This course constitutes a rigorous examination of the notions of sample 
space, random variables, distributions in time and space, and certain unifying 
limit theorems. Time permitting, it may include Markoff chain theory and 
related topics. Feller, Introduction to Probability Theory with Applications, Vol. 
1. Prerequisite: Mathematics 37. 

87 



MATHEMATICS 

42. Design of Experiment. 

5:5:0. Second semester. 
Fundamental principles of designing statistical experiments will be ac- 
companied by methods of analyzing the data therefrom. Finney, Introduction to 
Experimental Design and Lecture Notes. Prerequisite: Mathematics 37. 

46. Functions of a Complex Variable. 

3:5:0. Second semester. 
An introductory course that includes analytic functions, Cauchy's integral 
theorem, residue theory, contour integrals, and conformal mapping. Churchill, 
Complex Variables and Applications. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

48. Special Topics in Algebra. 

^:^:o. First semester. 
Topics such as group theory, rings, ideals, field extensions, and Galois 
theory will be studied. Lecture Notes and selected References. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 25. 

49. Topology. 

y.^:o. Second semester. 
The elements of point-set theory are introduced with topological considera- 
tions to appreciate generalization. Moore. Elementary General Topology. Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 25 and 31. 

40.1. Mathematics Seminar. 

1:1:0. Either semester. 
Logic, computer language, finite differences are among those topics which 
could be selected as a basis for a one-semester seminar. Special problems given 
on a recent competitive examination are presented and discussed in a seminar 
for upper classmen. 

Independent Study in Mathematics. 

}:^:o per semester. [Maximum of 5 semesters.) 

After receiving permission for participation, the student will prepare a 

paper on a selected subject for research which is approved by the department. 

This paper should be completed by the end of the first semester of the senior 

year, and must be defended in a manner determined by the departmental staff. 




MUSIC 




Music 



Associate Professor Smith, Chairman; Professors Bender, Carmean; 

Associate Professors Fairlamb, Lanese, Stachow, and Thurmond; 

Assistant Professors Curfman, Getz, Rovers, and vanSteenwyk; 

Instructors Reeve and Zimmerman 

The aims of the Department of Music are to train artists and teachers; 
to teach music historically and aesthetically as an element of liberal cul- 
ture; and to offer courses that give a thorough and practical understanding 
of theoretical subjects. 

A maximum credit of eight semester hours in applied music may be 
counted toward a degree in all areas other than Music or Music Education. 

Attendance at all faculty recitals and a portion of student recitals is 
compulsory. 

All majors in Music or Music Education are required to take private 
instruction on the campus if the Department offers instruction in the in- 
dividual's principal performance medium. 

Participation in music organizations may be required of all majors. 

For cost of private lessons see page 118. 

Music 

(A.B. with a major in Music) 

This program is designed for those students desiring a liberal arts con- 
text in their preparation for a career in applied music. 

Special Requirements 

All majors are required to take an hour lesson per week in the major 
performance area and to perform a half or full recital in the junior year 
and a full recital in the senior year. 

All majors outside of the keyboard area are required to take a V2 hour 
lesson per week in piano until the minimum requirements have been met. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see page 44. 

Music Education 
(B.S. with a major in Music Education) 

This program has been approved by the Pennsylvania State Council of 
Education and the National Association of Schools of Music for the prepa- 
ration of teachers of public school music. 

The Music Education curriculum requires two private lessons per 
week, one of which is included in the tuition charge. A charge is made for 
the second private lesson. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see page 45. 

89 



MUSIC 

I. Theory of Music 

Sight Singing 

Music 10. Sight Singing I. 

1:2:0. First semester. 
A beginning course in music reading with the use of syllables, incorporating 
the elements of melody and rhythm within the beat and its division. The fol- 
lowing are studied: basic beat patterns, simple and compound time, diatonic 
intervals, implied harmonic structure within the melodic line, the C clefs, 
modulation. 

Music 11. Sight Singing II. 

1:2:0. Second semester. 

A continuation of music reading, employing more difficult melodies and 
rhythms, the beat and its subdivision, and additional interval problems. Phrasing 
and the application of dynamics are stressed. 

Music 20. Sight Singing III. 

1:2:0. First semester. 

Exercises in four clefs, employing vocal literature of increasing difficulty, 
both tonal and rhythmic. Modal melodies, remote modulation, superimposed 
background and meter, changing and less common time signatures are stressed. 

Dictation (Ear Training) 

Music 12. Ear Training I. 

1:2:0. First semester. 

Includes the study of the basics of music notation essential for the writing 
of melodic and rhythmic dictation. Aural analysis and tonal memory are de- 
veloped. Essentials of tonality are covered, and harmonic dictation is begun in 
the latter half of the course. Correlated with Sight Singing and Harmony. 

Music 13. Ear Training II. 

1:2:0. Second semester. 

Increasing complexity and length of melodic and rhythmic dictation with 
emphasis upon the development of harmonic dictation. Inversions of triads, 
seventh and ninth chords are included. Modality is introduced together with 
strict species counterpoint in two and three voices. 

Music 22. Ear Training III. 

1:2:0. First semester. 

A study of more difficult tonal problems including modulation, chromati- 
cism, and altered chords. 

Harmony 

Music 14. Harmony I. 

2:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the rudiments of music including notation, scales, intervals, and 
triads; the connection of triads by harmonizing melodies and basses with funda- 
mental triads; playing of simple cadences at the piano; analysis of phrases and 
periods. 

90 



MUSIC 

Music 15. Harmony II. 

2:3:0. Second semester. 
A study of inversions of triads, seventh and ninth chords, harmonizations 
of melodies and figured basses; analysis and composition of the smaller forms; 
modulation. 

Music 24. Harmony HI. 

2:2:0. First semester. 
The use of dominant and diminished sevenths as embellishments of and 
substitutes for diatonic harmony; harmonization of melodies and figured basses; 
analysis of two and three-part song forms; composition in two-part song form. 
Playing of more advanced cadences and modulations at the piano. 

Music 29. Harmony IV (Elementary Composition) * on special announcement 
2:2:0. First semester. 
Melody analysis and writing; four part choral writing; continuation of two 
and three-part song-form analysis and composition. Composition in Theme and 
Variations, Fantasia, Rondo and Dance forms. Study of contemporary harmonic 
ideas. 

Music 39. Keyboard Harmony. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 
Work at the piano includes the harmonization of melodies both with four- 
part harmony and with various accompaniment forms; also transposition, im- 
provisation, modulation, reading from figured bass, and from score. 

Additional Theory Courses 

Music 21. Orchestration and Scoring for the Band. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 
Study of instrumentation, devices, techniques, and mechanics of scoring 
transcriptions, arrangements and solos for orchestra and concert band; special 
work in scoring for marching band. Laboratory analysis and demonstration of 
various instrumental colors and combinations. Emphasis is placed on creative 
scoring. 

Music 31. Form and Analysis. 

2:2:0. First semester. 
A study of the structure of music including hymns, folk songs, two, three 
and five-part song forms, variations, contrapuntal forms, rondo and sonata 
forms. Compositions in these forms are studied primarily for their structural 
content. Course includes extensive listening. 

Music 36. Form and Analysis II * on special announcement 
2:2:0. Second Semester. 
A study through analysis and listening of fugal forms, suite, overture, com- 
plete sonata forms (evolution of the symphony), string quartet, the tone poem. 
Analysis of classical and contemporary works in these forms. 

Music 40.1. Counterpoint. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

Introductory work in strict counterpoint through three and four-part work 
in all the species. 



B.A. Program in Music. 

91 



MUSIC 

Music 40.2. Arranging and Scoring for the Modern Orchestra. 

2:2:0. First or second semester. 

Study of modern harmony, modulation, style analysis, special instrumental 
effects as applied to modern arranging. Laboratory analysis and demonstration 
of sectional and ensemble voicings. 

Music 40.3. Composition, Schillinger System. 

Private teaching. 

A scientific system of music composition created by the late Joseph Schil- 
linger, teacher of such accomplished professionals as George Gershwin, Ted 
Royal Dewar. 

The major aims of the system are to: (1) generalize underlying principles 
regarding the behavior of tonal phenomena; (2) classify all the available re- 
sources of our tonal system; (3) teach a comprehensive application of scientific 
method to all components of the tonal art, to problems of melody, rhythm, 
harmony, counterpoint, orchestration and to composition itself. 

The system is best studied in the light of a traditional background and ad- 
mission to course or private instruction is by special permission only. 

II. Methods and Materials 

Music Ed. 23. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Kindergarten through Third Grade. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

A comprehensive study of the use of the child's singing voice in the pri- 
mary grades, including the treatment of uncertain singers, acquaintance with 
the best collections of rote songs, and practice in choosing, memorizing, singing, 
and presenting a large number of these songs; methods of presenting rhythm 
through singing games and simple interpretive movements; use of classroom 
instruments; beginnings of directed music appreciation; foundation studies for 
later technical developments. Comparative study of recognized Public School 
Music Series of books. 

Music Ed. 33A. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades; attention 
is given to the formal or technical work of these grades with an evaluation of 
appropriate texts and recent approaches. Preparation of lesson plans, and obser- 
vation are required. Music appreciation is continued. 

Music Ed. 33B. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: Fourth, Fifth and Sixth 
Grades. 

1:1:0. First semester. 

A study of methods and materials used in teaching band and orchestral 
instruments to children in these grades, with emphasis on a sound rhythmic 
approach. Both individual and class techniques are studied. Musical rudiments 
as applied to instrumental teaching are reviewed. 

Music Ed. 34A. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Junior and Senior High School. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of adolescent tendencies of high school students. Class content of 
materials is studied with attention to the organization and presentation of a 
varied program. Recent trends in teaching are studied. > 

92 



MUSIC 

Music Ed. 34B. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: Junior and Senior High 
School. 

1:1:0. Second semester. 

A study of intermediate and advanced instrumental teaching techniques; 
methods of organizing and directing school orchestras and bands; fundamentals 
of musicianship. 

Music Ed. 43. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Problems. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director 
of school orchestras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general inter- 
est include: organization and management, stimulating and maintaining inter- 
est; selecting beginners; scheduling rehearsals and class lessons; financing and 
purchasing instruments, uniforms, and other equipment; marching band forma- 
tions and drills; evaluating music materials; organizing festivals, contests, and 
public performances. 

Music Ed. 44. Methods in Piano Pedagogy. 

2:2:0. First or second semester. 

A study of methods of teaching piano to children and adults. The course 
includes the song approach method, presentation of the fundamental principles 
of rhythm, sight reading, tone quality, form, technique, pedaling, transposition 
and the harmonization of simple melodies. Materials are examined and dis- 
cussed. 

III. Student Teaching 

Music Ed. 40a — 40b. Student Teaching. 

./ hours credit per semester. 

Student teaching in Music Education, done in the Annville-Cleona Joint 
Schools, the Derry Township Consolidated Schools, and the Milton Hershey 
School, includes vocal and instrumental work from elementary to senior high 
school. 

IV. Instrumental Courses 

Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught the funda- 
mental principles underlying the playing of all band and orchestral instru- 
ments, learn to play on instruments of each group, viz., string, woodwind, brass, 
and percussion. Problems of class procedure in public schools are discussed; 
transposition of all instruments is taught. Ensemble playing is an integral 
part of these courses. 

Brass Instruments (Cornet, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Baritone, Tuba) 

Music 16. Brass I. 

1:2:0. First semester. 

A study of any two of the above instruments. 

Music 17. Brass n. 

7:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 

93 



MUSIC 

Percussion Instruments (Snare Drum, Tympany, Bass Drum, etc.) 

Music 18. Percussion I. 

y 2 :i:o. First semester. 

A study of snare drum only. 

Music 48. Percussion II. 

y 2 :i:o. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above listed instruments. 

Woodwind Instruments (Clarinet, Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon) 

Music 25. Woodwind I. 

1:2:0. First semester. 

The study of the clarinet. 

Music 26. Woodwind II. 

1:2:0. Second semester. 

A study of the remainder of the above listed instruments. 
String Instruments (Violin, Viola, 'Cello, String Bass) 

Music 37. String I. 

7:2:0. First semester. 

A study of all of the above listed instruments. 

Music 38. String II. 

1:2:0. Second semester. 

A continuation of the study of all of the above listed instruments. 

Instrumental Seminar. 

y 2 :i:o or 1:2:0. First or second semester. 

Application of specific techniques to problems of class instruction. 

Music 41.1-41.2 Brass Prerequisite: Music 17. 

Music 41.3-41.4 Percussion Prerequisite: Music 48. 

Music 41.5-41.6 String Prerequisite: Music 38. 

Music 41.7-41.8 Woodwind Prerequisite: Music 26. 

V. Music Organizations 

Opportunities for individual performance in a group experience are pro- 
vided by music organizations. Membership in the organizations is open on an 
audition basis to all students. 

Music lOla-lOlb. Symphonic Band.* 

1:2:0. First semester. iy 2 :^:o. Second semester. 

Lebanon Valley College maintains a uniformed band which contributes 
to college life by playing at football games, presenting concerts during the year, 
and providing the musical accompaniment for the annual May Day pageant. 
Off campus activities include appearances in neighboring communities. Mem- 
bership in the band is determined by an applicant's ability and by the needs of 
the band with respect to maintaining a well-balanced instrumentation. 



* Course may be repeated with credit. 
94 



MUSIC 

Music 102a— 102b. All-Girl Band.* 

y 2 :i:o per semester. 

Membership in this band is determined by the applicant's ability, and by 
the needs of the band with respect to maintaining a well-balanced instrumen- 
tation. The group presents a spring concert. 

Music 103a — 103b. Symphony Orchestra.* 

iy 2 :^:o. First Semester. 1:2:0. Second semester. 

The Symphony Orchestra is an organization of symphonic proportions 
maintaining a high standard of performance. A professional interpretation of a 
wide range of standard orchestral literature is insisted upon. 

Music 104a— 104b. Concert Choir * 

1:2:0 per semester. 

The Concert Choir is composed of approximately forty voices, selected by 
audition. All phases of choral literature are studied intensively. In addition to 
on-campus programs and appearances in neighboring communities, the Concert 
Choir makes an annual tour. 

Music 105a— 105b. College Chorus.* 

y 2 :i:o per semester. 

The Chorus provides an opportunity to study and participate in the pres- 
entation of choral literature of the masters. It is open to all students who are 
interested in this type of musical performance and who have had some experi- 
ence in singing. 

Music 106a — 106b. Beginning Ensemble.* 

y 2 :i:o per semester. 

A training band and orchestra in which students play secondary instru- 
ments and become acquainted with elementary band and orchestral literature. 
Opportunity is given for advanced conducting students to gain experience in 
conducting. 

Instrumental Small Ensembles.* 

y 2 :i:o per semester. 

Open to the advanced player on an audition basis. 

Music 107a-107b String Quartet. 

Music 108a-108b String Trio. 

Music 109a-109b Clarinet Choir. 

Music HOa-llOb Woodwind Quintet. 

Music 11 la-1 lib Brass Ensemble. 

Music 112a-112b Percussion Ensemble. 

VI. The History and Appreciation of Music 

Music 19. History and Appreciation of Music. 

3:3:0. Either semester. 
A course for the non-music major designed to increase the individual's musi- 
cal perceptiveness. Through selective, intensive listening, the student develops 
concepts of musical materials and techniques. The vocabulary thus gained is uti- 
lized in a survey of western music from the Middle Ages to the present. 



Course may be repeated with credit. 

95 



MUSIC 

Music 30a — 30b. History of Music 

3:5:0 per semester. 
A survey course of the entire history of western music. Emphasis is placed 
on the various stylistic developments which have occurred from one era to 
another, on the composers who have been responsible for these developments, 
and the music written during these various eras illustrating these stylistic trends. 
For this purpose, extensive use of recordings is made a part of the course. The 
first semester includes the development of music up to the Baroque era, the 
second semester from the Baroque to the present. 

Music 32. Music Literature. 

2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of music literature for elementary, secondary, and adult levels. 
Interpretation of, response to, and appreciation of music with attention directed 
to musical elements. Emphasis is placed on instrumental literature. 

VII. Conducting 
Music 35. Conducting I. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

Principles of conducting and a study of the technique of the baton are 
presented. Each student conducts vocal and instrumental ensembles made up 
of the class personnel. 

Music 45. Conducting II. 

2:2:0. First semester. 

A detailed and comprehensive study of the factors involved in the inter- 
pretation of choral and instrumental music. In addition to conducting from 
full score, each student conducts in rehearsal the various concert organizations. 

VIII. Miscellaneous Courses 

Music 27. Beginning Eurhythmies, Movement to Music. 

1:1:0. Second semester. 

This course offers a three-fold development: coordination through mental 
control; physical poise through movements in response to rhythm, and a musical 
sense through analysis of the rhythmic element in music. 

Music 42. Advanced Eurhythmies, Movement to Music. 

1:1:0. First semester. 

A general survey of elementary and intermediate floor work. The principles 
underlying the presentation of this to children are interpreted and discussed. 
Applied improvisation is an integral part of the course. 

Music 28. Care and Repair of Instruments. 

1:1:0. First or second semester. 

An analytical laboratory technique applied to methods of construction of 
band and orchestral instruments. With this information as a background, pre- 
ventive measures are established to avoid undue wear and deterioration of the 
instruments. Through actual experience the student acquires proficiency in the 
operations necessary in replacements and repair. 

96 




IX. Individual Instruction 

Music 131 — 132. Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 

Yz'-Yz'-o per semester. 

The work in the foregoing fields is organized from the standpoint of the 
development and musicianship in the individual student. The work continues 
through eight semesters and assures a well-rounded and many-sided acquaint- 
ance with various musical techniques. 

Organ: Mr. Getz 

Piano: Mrs. Bender, Mr. Fairlamb, Miss Reeve, Miss vanSteenwyk 

Voice: Mr. Rovers, Mrs. Zimmerman 

Brass: Dr. Thurmond 

String: Mr. Lanese 

Woodwind: Mr. Stachow 

Music 141-142. Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 

(Private study in major performance; for A.B. Music Majors only). 
2:1:0 per semester. 
A charge is made for the second half-hour of instruction. 

X. Preparatory Courses 

The Department of Music sponsors preparatory courses adapted to children 
of elementary or high school age. Both adults and children are admitted at any 
stage of advancement. 

Instruction, either private or in class, is offered in piano, voice, and all in- 
struments of the band and orchestra. A desirable number for class instruction 
is from four to six students. 



The Student Recitals 

The student recitals are of inestimable value to all students in acquainting 
them with a wide range of the best musical literature, in developing musical 
taste and discrimination, in affording experience in appearing before an 
audience, and in gaining self-reliance as well as nerve control and stage de- 
meanor. 

Students at all levels of performance appear in these student recitals. 

Pipe Organs 

The Department of Music contains four Moller organs for private in- 
struction and individual practice: one 4-manual, one 3-manual, and two 
2-manual instruments. 

97 



PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 

Assistant Professor Richards; Professor Ehrhart 

The objective of the Philosophy Department is to provide students 
with an opportunity to study the philosophical heritage of the Western 
World and to become acquainted with the major problems which leading 
philosophers have raised and attempted to resolve. 

Major: A total of twenty-four hours is required of the philosophy 
major. Besides the courses listed below, Greek 31 (Readings from Greek 
Philosophers) and Political Science 40 (Political Theory) may be taken to 
satisfy the requirement. 

Independent Study 

Students wishing to participate in the Independent Study program 
in the department may do so by fulfilling the following requirements: 
(1) achieve high academic standing in departmental courses; (2) submit 
a paper in connection with a course beyond the first year courses; (3) ap- 
ply and receive approval for participation in Independent Study from the 
departmental chairman and the Dean of the College by the end of the 
first semester of the junior year; (4) prepare an essay of 10,000 words 
or more under the direction of a member of the department to be sub- 
mitted by April 1 of the senior year; (5) defend the essay before a faculty 
committee selected by the departmental chairman and the Dean of the 
College. 

On the basis of his performance in the essay and oral examination, the 
departmental chairman and the Dean of the College will determine 
whether or not the candidate is to receive departmental honors. 




PHILOSOPHY 

10. Introduction to Philosophy. 

5:3:0. First semester. 

An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy and to the 
ways in which leading philosophers have dealt with them. 

11. Introduction to Logic. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

An introduction to the rules of clear and effective thinking. Attention is 
given to the logic of meaning, the logic of valid inference, and the logic of 
factual inquiry. Main emphasis is laid upon deductive logic, and students are 
introduced to the elements of symbolic logic as well as to traditional modes of 
analysis. 

23. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

This course traces the evolution of Western philosophical thought from 
its origins in the speculations of the Pre-Socratic nature-philosophers to the 
systematic elaborations of the schoolmen of the late Middle Ages. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 10. 

24. Modern Philosophy. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196"]. 

This course follows the development of philosophical thought in the lead- 
ing thinkers from the Renaissance to the beginning of the Nineteenth Century. 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 10 and 23. 

30. Ethics. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966- 196 j. 

An inquiry into the central problems of ethics, with an examination of the 
responses of major ethical theories to those problems. 

31. Philosophy of Religion. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the issues raised for philosophy by contemporary religious and 
theological thought. A critical examination of such problems as faith and 
reason; the meanings of revelation, symbolism, and language; the arguments 
for the existence of God; faith and history; religion and culture. 

35. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1967-1968. 

An examination of the philosophies of foremost thinkers from the German 
idealists to the present time. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, 11, 23, 24. 

41. Aesthetics. 

2:2:0. Second semester. Offered 1 967-1968. 

A study of the nature and basis of criticism of works of art. 
Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, Art 11 or Music 19. 

42. Seminar. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

Discussion of selected problems of philosophy. 

Open only to upperclassmen who are departmental majors. 

99 



PHYSICS 



Physics 



Professor Rhodes; Professor Grimm; 
Assistant Professors O'Donnell and Morris 

The Physics Department attempts to develop in the student an in- 
creased understanding of the basic laws of nature as they relate to our 
physical environment, and to indicate the possible extent, as well as the 
limitations, of our knowledge of the physical world. 

The introductory course, Physics 10, is intended for students who 
wish to take only one course in Physics. The sequence of courses beginning 
with Physics 17 provides suitable training for students who anticipate 
additional work in the physical sciences and who are preparing for gradu- 
ate school, for secondary school teaching, and for research and develop- 
ment work in governmental and industrial laboratories. Laboratory work 
is designed to acquaint the student with the experimental techniques and 
the measuring instruments appropriate to the various areas of investiga- 
tion, and to give experience in the interpretation and communication of 
the experimental results. 

Mathematics is an essential tool in the study of Physics. The introduc- 
tory course, Physics 10, requires a knowledge of high school algebra and 
trigonometry, but students who plan to take other courses in Physics 
should take the appropriate prerequisite mathematics courses as soon as 
possible. 

Major: Physics 17, 27, 32, 37 or 38, and 40. 
Independent Study 

Juniors and seniors who have demonstrated high academic ability may, 
with the permission of the departmental chairman and the Dean of the 




PHYSICS 

College, participate in the Independent Study program in Physics. Appli- 
cation for admission to the program should be made before the end of the 
junior year. Upon the satisfactory completion of an approved experimental 
or theoretical research project and the formal presentation of a research 
paper before an examining committee, the student will be recommended 
to the Dean of the College for graduation with departmental honors. 

10. General College Physics. 

4:3:3 per semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and laws of the various 
branches of physics, including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, 
optics, and atomic and nuclear structure. 

17. Principles of Physics I. 

4:3:3 per semester. 

A comprehensive introductory course designed for students who desire a 
more rigorous mathematical approach to college physics than is given in Physics 
10. Calculus is used throughout. The first semester is devoted to mechanics, 
and the second semester to heat, wave motion, and optics. This course should 
be followed by Physics 27. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11. 

27. Principles of Physics II. 

4:3:3 per semester. 

A continuation of Physics 17, devoted in the first semester to the study of 
electricity and magnetism and in the second semester to the study of modern 
physics, including the foundations of atomic physics, the quantum theory of 
radiation, the atomic nucleus, radioactivity, and nuclear reactions. 

Prerequisite: Physics 17. 

32. Electricity and Magnetism. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

The basic definition of electric and magnetic quantities, a study of the 
electric and magnetic properties of matter, the laws of electric and magnetic 
fields, the development of Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves. 

Prerequisites: Physics 27 and Mathematics 23. 

37. Experimental Physics I. 

1:0:3 P er semester. 

Experimental work in the areas of mechanics, electricity, and optics, with 
emphasis on experimental design, measuring techniques, and analysis of data. 
Prerequisite: Physics 27. 

38. Experimental Physics II. 

1:0:3 P er semester. 

Experimental work in the areas of high vacuum, electronics, atomic physics, 
and nuclear physics, with emphasis on experimental design, measuring tech- 
niques, and analysis of data. 

Prerequisite: Physics 27. 

101 



PSYCHOLOGY 

40. Analytical Mechanics. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A rigorous study of the principles of mechanics as applied to the motion 
of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies, under the action of conserva- 
tive and dissipative forces, using the methods of Newton, Lagrange, and Ham- 
ilton. 

Prerequisites: Physics 27 and Mathematics 23. 

41. Modern Physics. 

3:3:0 per semester. 

A rigorous study of modern physics, beginning with the development of 
quantum mechanics via the Schroedinger equation, including perturbation and 
collision theory. The latter portion of the course is directed toward the applica- 
tion of quantum mechanics to fundamental processes in atomic and nuclear 
physics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 32 and 40. 

48. Physics Seminar. 

2:2:0 per semester. 
A study at the senior level of special topics in physics, to be selected each 
year from the following: thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, physical optics, 
electronics, nuclear physics, and solid state physics. The seminar is open to 
students from any department with approval of the departmental chairman. 

Psychology 

Associate Professor Love; 

Assistant Professors Magee and Hollingsworth; 

Instructor John 

In keeping with the objectives of the liberal arts, church-related col- 
lege, the courses offered in the Department of Psychology are designed: 
(1) to develop in the student an understanding and appreciation of the 
biological and environmental bases of human behavior and of the role of 
that behavior in adjustment; (2) to foster healthy adjustment through the 
objective application of psychological principles to problems related to 
personal, vocational, and moral growth; and (3) to furnish a theoretical, 
scientific, and practical acquaintance with principles, methods, and tech- 
niques basic to graduate study and employment in psychology and bene- 
ficial in the many occupations in which psychology is applied. 

Major: Completion of either of the following programs will constitute 
a major in Psychology. 

(A) Psychology 20 (A or B), 25, 45a, 45b, and twenty-one hours of elec- 
tives in Psychology. With approval, a maximum of six hours of electives in 
Psychology may be credited from the following: Biology 22, 32; Education 
30, 41, 42; Philosophy 11; Sociology 21, 30, 31, 33; Mathematics 12. 

(B) Psychology 20 (A or B), 25, 35a, 35b, 37, 43, 45a, 45b, and nine 
hours of electives in Psychology; completion of independent research. 
With approval, six hours of electives may be credited from the follow- 
ing: Biology 22, 32; Mathematics 12; other graduate school recom- 
mendations. 

102 




Independent Study 

Independent Study in psychology is planned to permit the capable 
student to increase the depth of his understanding in areas of special 
interest and the general scope of his knowledge of psychology. 

In order to participate in Independent Study a psychology major is 
required to: (1) maintain an over-all grade-point average of 2.5, (2) main- 
tain a grade-point average of 3.0 in psychology courses, (3) show con- 
sistently high intellectual interest and initiative, (4) receive the approval 
of the departmental staff and the Dean of the College. 

The Student admitted to Independent Study will particiate in Psychol- 
ogy 45 — Seminar for a maximum of 9 hours. The hours will be distributed 
over the junior and senior years with a minimum of one and a maximum 
of three hours to be taken in one semester. 

The core of the program will consist in the investigation of a principal 
problem over the two year period, beginning with the study of the litera- 
ture and culminating in the design and execution of a direct study project. 
Results of this project will be reported and defended during the second 
semester of the senior year. The student may elect, for additional credit 
in Psychology 45, to study problems or to carry out projects and experi- 
ments relating to courses in which he is regularly enrolled. 

Graduation with Honors in Psychology will depend on the quality of 
performance in the specified activities, on the maintenance of the grade- 
point averages specified for admission to the program, on the results of 
the departmental comprehensive and the Graduate Record Examination, 
and on the final approval of the departmental staff and the Dean of the 
College. 



20. General Psychology. 

A. (Lecture). 3:3:0. Either semester. 

B. (Laboratory). 3 hours credit. First semester. 

A study of principles of psychology and of psychological method. Pre- 
requisite B: Permission of staff. 

103 



PSYCHOLOGY 

21. Psychology of Childhood. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A study of the psychological development of the child from the beginning 
of life to adolescence. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

23. Educational Psychology. 

3:3:0. Either semester. 

A study of the learner and of the learning process. 
Required for elementary and secondary certification. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

25. General Experimental Psychology. 

3 hours credit. Second semester. 
An introduction to experimentation and related methodology. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20; permission of staff for non majors. 

31. Psychology of Adolescence. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
A study of the psychological development in the adolescent period. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

32. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. 

3 hours credit. First semester. 
An introduction to the behavior disorders. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

33. Social Psychology. 

3 hours credit. Second semester. 
A study of the social and cultural determinants of behavior. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20; senior standing or permission of staff. 

35a — 35b. Research Design and Statistical Analysis. 

2 hours credit per semester. 

A study of principles of research design and statistical analysis; planning 
and execution of direct studies. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 20, 25. 

37. Learning and Motivation. 

3 hours credit. First semester. 

A study of the acquisition and of the psychological determinants of behavior. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

41. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 

3 hours credit. Second semester. 
An introduction to current methods of diagnosis and psychotherapy of 
behavior problems, and to the applications of psychology in clinical situations. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 20 and 32 or permission of the staff. 

104 



RELIGION 

43. Personality. 

5:5:0. First semester. 
A study of the major contemporary theories of personality. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

44. Physiological Psychology. 

5 hours credit. 
A study of the physiological determinants of behavior. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

45a — 45b. Seminar. 

Two hours credit per semester. 

A study of schools and systems in psychology; independent study and 
research. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 20; a major in psychology; or permission of the 
staff. 



Russian 

See Foreign Languages, page 76. 

Religion 

Associate Professor Wethington; Assistant Professors Bemesderfer 

and Troutman 

The aim of this department is to provide opportunity for the study of 
our religious heritage. 

The department seeks to orient the student to a Christian world view, 
providing an understanding of the Scriptures and the heritage of the 
Christian church as a means to this end, as well as the enhancing of Chris- 
tian living as a dynamic experience. 

Professionally, basic courses are offered to students preparing for the 
Christian ministry, the world mission field, the teaching of religion, and 
other church vocations. 

Major: A total of twenty-four semester hours is required, including 
Religion 44-45. A total of six hours of New Testament or Hellenistic 
Greek (Greek 21) as well as Philosophy of Religion (Philosophy 31) may 
be counted toward a Religion major. 

Independent Study 

Students wishing to participate in the Independent Study program in 
the department may do so by fulfilling the following requirements: (1) 
achieve high academic standing in departmental courses; (2) submit a 
paper in connection with a course beyond the first year courses; (3) apply 
and receive approval for participation in Independent Study from the de- 
partmental chairman and the Dean of the College by the end of the first 

105 



RELIGION 



semester of the junior year; (4) prepare an essay of 10,000 words or more 
under the direction of a member of the department to be submitted by 
April 1 of the senior year; (5) defend the essay before a faculty committee 
selected by the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College. 

On the basis of his performance in the essay, and oral examination, 
the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College will determine 
whether or not the candidate is to receive departmental honors. 

12. Introduction to Biblical Thought.* 

3:3:0. First semester. 
An examination of some of the basic themes of Biblical religion in relation 
to their historical context and their contemporary implications. 

13. Introduction to the Christian Faith.* 

3:3:0. Second semester. 
A systematic inquiry into the areas of religious language, religious knowl- 
edge, and the doctrines of God, man, Christ, and the Church. 

20. The Prophets. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
A study of the lives and writings of the Old Testament prophets, and an 
analysis of their contributions to Hebrew-Christian religious thought. 



* Religion 12 and 13 are prerequisites or corequisites for all courses in Religion, except 
Religion 22 and Religion 42. 

106 



RELIGION 

22. Religion in America. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

A study of contemporary Judaism, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism 
in the United States, including a brief historical background of each. Some 
attention is given to the various religious sects and cults. 

No prerequisites. 

30. Life and Epistles of Paul. 

5:3:0. Second semester. Offered 196 5-1 966. 
A study of the life, writings, and theological thought of Paul and their 
relationship to the practices, problems, and beliefs of the early church. 

32. Life and Teachings of Jesus. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1966- 1967. 
An intensive study of the life and message of Jesus as set forth in the 
Gospels. 

33. Christian Ethics. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1966-196']. 
A systematic analysis of the implications of the Christian faith both for 
personal moral decision, and for social policy in such areas as government and 
political life, work and the economic order. 

40. Introduction to Christian Nurture. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1965-1966. 
An investigation of some of the principles and problems of religious edu- 
cation as they are related to higher education, the public school, the church 
school, and the home. 

42. World Religions. 

3:3:0. First semester. 
An examination of the rise and development of religion along with a study 
of the ideas, and cultic and ethical practices of the great world faiths. 
No prerequisites. 

44. Seminar in Classical Religious Thinkers. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 966-1967. 
An intensive study of the thought of such classical religious thinkers as 
Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, and others. Required of majors and strongly rec- 
ommended for all pre-theological students; others by permission of the chairman 
of the department. 

45. Seminar in Contemporary Religious Problems. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1 966-1 967. 

A study of selected problems arising from the theological efforts of men 
like Barth, Tillich, and Niebuhr, and within contemporary religious movements 
like neo-orthodoxy, existentialism and humanism. Research methodology is 
stressed. 

Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological stu- 
dents; others by permission of the chairman of the department. 

107 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 
Associate Professor Shay; Instructors Bowker and Pavlidis 

The courses in the Department of Sociology have been designed: 
(1) to develop the student's understanding of the social structure and the 
social relationships in and through which man functions; (2) to provide 
preliminary training for those who are planning to enter the field of 
social, religious, and community work; and (3) to furnish basic back- 
ground knowledge for the pursuance of graduate work in Sociology. 

Major: Sociology 20, 21, 30, 31, 33, 40, 43, and 45. 

Independent Study 

The departmental Independent Study program is designed to pro- 
vide stimulation for capable students to undertake and carry through aca- 
demic work of high quality. Independent Study is planned as an integral 
part of the student's major program rather than viewed as work super- 
imposed upon it, and is set in the framework of a major area of con- 
centration. 

(1) The student should apply for admission to the Independent Study 
program at the beginning of the second semester of the sophomore year. 
This would enable him to undertake preliminary work for one year before 
being admitted to full status in the program at the beginning of the sec- 
ond semester of the junior year. 

(2) To enter the Independent Study program a student must have a 
high general standing in the College and the approval of the departmental 
chairman and the Dean of the College no later than the end of the first 
semester of the junior year. An average grade of 3.0 in all courses in the 
student's major area of concentration is required as is an average of 3.0 
while he is pursuing his work as a candidate for departmental honors. The 
student must, in addition, fulfill any other specific requirements of the 
department. 

(3) The student in Independent Study will prepare an essay of ten 
thousand words or more under the direction of the departmental chair- 
man to be submitted by the end of the first semester of his senior year. It 
shall be defended in a manner approved by the departmental chairman 
and the Dean of the College. 

(4) The Independent Study of each student shall be tested by a special 
oral examination. On the basis of his performance in the essay, Graduate 
Record Examination, and oral examination, the departmental chairman 
and the Dean of the College will determine whether or not the candidate 
is to receive departmental honors. 

20. Introductory Sociology. 

5:5:0. First semester. 

The study of social life and human values expressed in group activities and 
their interrelationships. This course acquaints the student with primary con- 
cepts in the field of Sociology. Particular attention is given to: contributions 

108 



SOCIOLOGY 

from cultural anthropology and social psychology; social stratification; racial and 
ethnic groups, the modern community; basic human institutions; major social 
forces. 

21. Modern Social Problems. 

3:3:0. Second semester. 

An application of sociological principles to problems such as: poverty, de- 
linquency, crime; family discord; industrial, race, and nationality conflicts; 
mental disorders. 

22. Marriage and the Family. 

2:2:0. Second semester. 

The American family studied in cross-cultural perspective. Special emphasis 
is placed upon functions of the family as institution and matrix of personality. 
The influence of the American value system is examined. 

30. Criminology. 

3:5:0. First semester. Offered 1966-1967. 

An analysis of the interplay of forces which result in criminal behavior. 
Case histories are used to illustrate the individual and social forces in criminal 
careers. Emphasis is given to organized crime as a social phenomenon in Ameri- 
can life, the administration of American criminal justice, developments in 
penology and treatment of offenders, and programs of crime prevention. Chang- 
ing aspects of juvenile delinquency are explored. 

31. Introduction to Social Work. 

3:3:0. per semester. Offered 1966-196']. 

A pre-professional course dealing with the nature and requirements of the 
fields of social work. Observation of the work of private and public agencies 
in this field is required. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 20 and 21. 

33. Social Institutions. 

3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1 967-1 968. 

Analysis of the structure and function of major social institutions, such as 
religion, education, mass culture and mass media. Attention is directed to the 
impact of institutional expectations upon the individual. 

40. Population. 

2:2:0. First semester. Offered 1967-1 968. 

A study of the size, growth, composition, and distribution of the peoples of 
the earth. Emphasis is placed on problems occasioned by urban development. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 20. 

43. Development of Sociological Theory. 

3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1 967-1 968. 

A critical appraisal of the works of some American and European sociolo- 
gists. Particular emphasis is given to the similarities and differences in basic 
assumptions and conclusions of leading writers since 1900. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 20 and 21. 

109 



SPANISH 

45. Senior Seminar. 

2:2:0 per semester. 

Emphasis upon coordination of previous course work and understanding 
of the basic contributions of Sociology in relation to other behavorial sciences. 
Significant reading, critical discussion, and written analysis, with these aims in 
view. Adapted to the individual needs of students. 

To supplement course work, direct experience in a social work practicum 
for students who have an expressed interest in the social work field. Cooperating 
social agencies include: the Lebanon County Board of Assistance; Family and 
Children's Service, Lebanon; and the Veterans Administration Hospital, R. D. 1, 
Lebanon. Participation by permission of the appropriate departmental chairman. 

Senior Sociology majors or with permission of the departmental chairman. 



Spanish 



See Foreign Languages, page 77. 




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112 




General Information 





Admissi 



isswn 

Students are admitted to Lebanon Yallev College on the basis of 
scholarlv achievement, intellectual capacity, character, personality, and 
ability to profit by college experience. 

General Information 

1. .All communications concerning admission should be addressed 
to the Director of Admissions. Lebanon Valley College.. Annville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

2. Applications should be submitted as earlv as possible in the latter 
part of the junior or the beginning of the senior year of high school or 
preparatory school. 

3. Applications must be filed on forms provided by the Office of 
Admissions. 

4. Each application must be accompanied by an application fee of 
SI 0.00. This fee is not refundable. 

5. A transcript of the secondary school record, on a form provided 
by the college for that purpose, must be sent by the principal to the 
Director of Admissions. Mav 1 is the deadline for receiving applications. 

6. A student transferring from another collegiate institution must 
present an official transcript of his scholastic record and evidence of 
honorable dismissal. 

7. All new students are required to present on or before August 20 
the official Health Record showing a physician's report of medical ex- 
amination; certification of vaccination within a period of five years and 
immunization against flu., polio., and tetanus given just prior to the stu- 
dent's entrance to college. 

Admission is based on total information submitted by the applicant 
or in his behalf. Final decision, therefore, cannot be reached until all in- 
formation has been supplied by the applicant. 

Factors Determining Admission 

Each candidate for admission will be considered individually and 
the decision of the Admissions Committee with respect to admission will 
be based on the following factors: 

1. The transcript of the applicant's secondary' school record. 

2. Recommendation bv the principal, teachers, and other responsible 
persons as to the applicant's special abilities, integrity, sense of responsi- 
bility, seriousness of purpose, initiative, self-reliance, and concern for 
others. 

114 



ADMISSION 

3. A personal interview, whenever possible, with the Director of 
Admissions or his designate. 

4. College Entrance Examination Board test results: (a) Scholastic 
Aptitude Test, (b) three achievement tests — English composition and two 
optional tests. All candidates for admission are required to take the Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test and three achievement tests — English composition 
and any other two. Those seeking entrance in September are advised to 
take these tests no later than in the preceding December and/or January. 
Full information concerning dates and locations of these test administra- 
tions may be obtained by writing to: College Entrance Examination Board, 
P.O. Box 592, Princeton, N. J. 

5. Additional test results which may be required in special cases by 
the Committee on Admissions. 

Department of Music 

An applicant to the Music or Music Education curriculum is expected 
to satisfy the general requirements for admission. In addition, the candidate 
must appear for an audition before members of the music faculty and show 
evidence of: 

a. An acceptable singing voice and a fairly quick sense of tone and 
rhythm; 

b. Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes with a fair degree of 
accuracy and facility; 

c. Ability to sing or to play the piano, organ, or some orchestral in- 
strument at a level representing three years of study. 

Recommended Units for Admission 

It is recommended that all candidates offer sixteen units of entrance 
credit and graduation from an accredited secondary school or submit an 
equivalency certificate acquired through examination. 

Ten of the sixteen units offered for admission must be from the fol- 
lowing subjects: English, foreign language, mathematics, science, and 
social studies. 

An applicant for admission whose preparatory courses do not coin- 
cide with the distribution of subject units (see below) may be considered 
by the Committee on Admissions if his academic record is of high quality 




ADMISSION 

and if, in the opinion of the Committee, he appears to be qualified to do 
college work satisfactorily. All entrance deficiencies must be removed be- 
fore sophomore academic status will be granted. 

DISTRIBUTION OF SUBJECT UNITS 

English 4 units 

*Foreign Language (in one language) 2 

Mathematics 2 

Science (laboratory) 1 

Social Studies 1 

Electives 6 

Total required 16 



Transfer Credit 



A student applying for advanced standing at Lebanon Valley College 
after having attended another accredited institution of higher education 
shall submit a official transcript of his record and evidence of good stand- 
ing to the Director of Admissions. He must also submit College Board 
Aptitude and Achievement Test scores. 

Credits are accepted for transfer provided the grades received are C 
(2.0) or better and the work is equivalent or similar to work offered at 
Lebanon Valley College. Grades thus transferred count for hours only, not 
for quality points. 

Students transferring from two-year institutions are required to have 
sixty hours of work at a four-year institution as well as to meet the residence 
requirements at Lebanon Valley College. 

Transfer students may be required to take placement examinations to 
demonstration adequate preparation for advanced courses at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Subject to the conditions listed in the second paragraph, Lebanon 
Valley College will recognize for transfer credit a maximum of fifteen 
hours of USAFI course work provided such credit is recommended by the 
American Council on Education publication, A Guide to the Evaluation 
of Experiences in the Armed Services. 

Credit will not be granted for correspondence courses. 

Advanced Placement 

Advanced placement and/or credit may be granted to entering stu- 
dents who make scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board Advanced 
Placement examination. 

Advanced placement without credit may be granted on the basis of 
the Achievement Tests of the College Board Examinations or such other 
proficiency tests as may be determined by the Dean of the College and 
by the chairman of the department in which advanced placement is 
sought. 



* If an applicant cannot present the two units of foreign language, he will be required 
to take a minimum of two years of one language in college. His credits for this work will be 
counted toward graduation requirements. 

116 



Student Finances 



Lebanon Valley College is a private non-profit institution. It de- 
rives its financial support from endowment and gifts from the Evangeli- 
cal United Brethren Church, alumni, industry, and friends and from the 
tuition, fees, and other charges paid by the students. The cost to the 
student is maintained at a level consistent with adequate facilities and 
high quality instruction. 

Fees and Deposits 

An application fee of SI 0.00 which is not refundable is charged each 
applicant to apply against the cost of processing his application for ad- 
mission. An admission deposit of S100.00, payable within ten days of noti- 
fication of acceptance, is required of all new (including transfer) students. 
Until this deposit is paid the student is not guaranteed a place in the 
entering class. The admission deposit is not refundable; it will be ap- 
plied to the student's account upon registration. 

1966-67 Fee Structure for full-time degree candidates: 

Standard Charges First Second 

Comprehensive Fee* $ 770.00 $ 680.00 

Student Insurance! 15.00 

Student Activity FeetJ 33.50 16.00 

Board 250.00 250.00 

Room 175.00/150.00 175.00/150.00 

Contingency Deposit 25.00 

(New Students Only) — — 

Total for women, and 

men in government dormitories ... $1,268.50 $1,121.00 

Total for men in other dormitories .. 1,243.50 1,096.00 

The insurance and activity fee and a student fee are collected in the 
first semester of the student's enrollment and a pro-rata charge applies to 
the student who first enrolls in the second semester. 

The contingency deposit in the amount of S25.00 must be made before 
registration and is required of all full-time students and will be refunded 
upon graduation or withdrawal from college provided no damage has 
been caused by the student. All student breakage that occurs in college- 



* The fee for part-time students (less than 12 credit hours per semester) is $50.00 per 

semester credit hours plus a $2.00 registration fee; the fee for credit hours in excess of 16 

credit hours per semester is $40.00; fractional hours of credit are charged proportionately. 

Also, the comprehensive fee for the student who first enrolls in the second semester is $725.00. 

t Pro-rated for students coming in second semester only. 

t Student Activity Fee includes : 

Annual Student Activity Fee $17.50 

College Center Fee 15.00 each semester 

Class Dues 1.00 each semester 

$33.50 

117 



STUDENT FINANCES 

operated facilities will be charged against this deposit and the amount 
must be repaid to the college within 30 days of notice to the student. 

Students may be subject to the following additional fees and charges, 
depending upon their program: 

Laboratories, in excess of one per semester: 

Science, Languages $15.00 per semester 

Psychology, Education 5.00 

Student Teaching: 

Elementary 80.00 " 

Secondary 40.00 " 

Music 20.00 " 

Music Fees: 

Private music instruction [}/ 2 hour per week, 

15 weeks) 50.00 " 

Class music instruction (1 hour per week) . . . 35.00 " 
Preparatory music instruction (1 class lesson 

per week) 25.00 " 

Practice rooms 5.00 " 

Organ, practice rental (per hour per week) .. 7.00 " 

Band and orchestral instrument rental 10.00 

Transcript, in excess of one per year 1.00 " 

A fee of $10.00 is charged each student who does not register for 
classes during the prescribed registration period. A late pre-registration fee 
in the amount of $10.00 is charged each student who does not pre-register 
during the established time. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for every change of course made at the 
student's request after registration day. 

Auxiliary School Fee Structure (Evening & Summer) 

Tuition, $40.00 per semester credit hour 

Registration Fee, $2.00. 

Payment of Fees and Deposits 

Semester charges are due and payable in full prior to registration 
and as a condition for registration. Those preferring to pay semester 
charges in monthly installments are invited to consult with the business 
office regarding deferred payment plans offered by various financial in- 
stitutions. Arrangements for deferred payment plans shall be completed 
prior to registration and as a condition for registration. 

A satisfactory settlement of all college accounts is required before 
grades are released, honorable dismissal granted, or degree conferred. 

Refund Policy 

Refunds are allowed only to students who officially withdraw from 
the college by completing the clearance procedure. 

When a student retains his class standing during his absence from 
college because of illness or for any other reason no refund will be al- 
lowed on the comprehensive fee. 

Refund will be allowed on the comprehensive fee, exclusive of room 

118 



STUDENT FINANCES 

and board charges, to a student who officially withdraws from the college 
as indicated below: 

Period of student's attendance in college 

from date classes begin % of tuition refunded 

Less than two weeks 75% 

Between two and three weeks 50% 

Over three weeks 0% 

A refund on board charge is allowed for the period beginning 7 days 
after honorable official withdrawal. 

No refund is allowed on residence hall deposit or room charge. 

Residence Halls 

Residence hall rooms are reserved only for those returning students 
who make an advance room reservation deposit of $50.00. (Receipts must 
be presented at the time of room sign-up which occurs immediately after 
the Easter Vacation.) This deposit is not refundable under any circum- 
stances. 

Occupants are held responsible for all breakage and loss of furni- 
ture, or any damage for which they are responsible. 

Each room in the men's residence halls is furnished with chests of 
drawers, book case, beds, mattresses, chairs, and study tables. Students 
must provide bedding, rugs, lamps, and all other furnishings. 

Each room in the women's residence halls is furnished with beds, 
mattresses, chairs, dressers, book case, and study tables. Drapes are pro- 
vided in Mary Green Hall and Vickroy Hall. Other desired furnishings 
must be supplied by the student. 

Students rooming in residence halls may not sublet their rooms to 
commuting students or to others. 

Since Lebanon Valley College is primarily a boarding institution, 
all students are required to live in college-owned or controlled residence 
halls. Exceptions to the above are: married students, students living with 
immediate relatives, or those living in their own homes who commute 
daily to the campus. 

Should vacancies occur in any of the residence halls, the college re- 
serves the right to require students rooming in the community to move 
into a residence hall. 

The college reserves the right to close all residence halls during vaca- 
tions and between semesters. 

The college reserves the right to inspect students' rooms for disci- 
plinary purposes. 

The college is not responsible for loss of personal possessions by the 
students. 

Lounges are provided by the college for resident and commuting 
students. 

Meals 

All resident students are required to take their meals in the College 
Dining Hall. Commuting students may arrange for meals Monday through 
Friday, if space is available. 



119 



Financial Aid 



Lebanon Valley College gives financial assistance to deserving stu- 
dents in so far as its scholarship and aid funds permit. In the assignment 
of scholarships and grants-in-aid, and in the granting of loans and other 
forms of assistance the scholarship record, personal character, general 
cooperation, and need of the individual are considered. 

Scholarships do not apply to accounts for tuition for extra semester 
hours taken. In general, scholarships are not applicable to summer school 
tuition. No scholarship or rebate is granted for less than a semester. 

Students in need of financial assistance may apply for such aid after 
they have been notified of their admission to the college. Application for 
aid should be made in writing to the Chairman of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. This is to be supplemented by information submitted through the 
College Scholarship Service, Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey, on forms 
available at the office of the high school principal. 

Scholarships may be granted for periods of from one to four aca- 
demic years. Grants-in-aid and loans are made for a maximum period of 
one academic year, but students may reapply. Financial aid for returning 
students is dependent upon satisfactory scholarship for the preceding 
semester. 

All scholarships and grants-in-aid awarded for a specific school year 
are payable in two equal installments, one in each semester. Work aids 
are paid by check upon certification that the work is completed. 

Competitive Scholarships 

Competitive scholarship examinations are conducted at the college 
each year. Any high shool senior, in the upper quarter of his class, who 
meets the admission requirements of the college, is eligible to participate. 
Information and applications may be procured by writing to the Student 
Financial Aid Officer. 

The total of the scholarship award is applied in equal amounts over 
a period of two years only. Recipients of competitive scholarships are re- 
quired to complete their undergraduate work at Lebanon Valley College 
or refund the used portion of the grant to the college. 

Scholarships won in the Competitive Examinations, or granted for 
high scholastic standing, can be retained only if the student maintains a 
grade point average of 2.5 or better. 

Remissions 

Resident students preparing for the ministry of the Evangelical 
United Brethren Church are entitled to an annual reduction of $700.00. 
Non-resident students preparing for the ministry of the Evangelical 
United Brethren Church are entitled to an annual reduction of $450.00. 

120 



FINANCIAL AID 

Children of ministers of the Evangelical United Brethren Church re- 
siding in the residence halls are entitled to an annual reduction of 
$375.00; non-resident students are entitled to a reduction of S275.00. 

Grants-In-Aid 

Grants-in-aid are defined as credit on tuition allowed students and 
come directly from College operating income instead of from special gifts 
or restricted endowment funds. 

Opportunities for Self -Support 

Financial assistance is available in the form of waiterships, janitor- 
ships, laboratory aids, clerical aids, work in the library, and other forms 
of work assignments. These are granted to deserving students on the basis 
of the needs of the College. 

Loans 

Income from endowment established as loan funds is available for 
loans to deserving students. A student may borrow a maximum of §600.00 
in any one year and a total of S2400.000 during his college career. Loans 
are interest free during the period that the student is in college. Interest 
at a nominal rate is charged following graduation or withdrawal from 
college. 

In addition to the student loan funds there are a number of other 
endowment aids established at the College. Only the income earned by 
the endowment funds can be used for student aid. 

All endowment funds are listed on pages 23 to 26. 

The National Defense Education Loan Program is also available to 
students at Lebanon Valley College. Application for a loan must be made 
before May 1 for the following year. 




Academic Procedures 



Registration 

Students are required to register for classes on official registration 
days of each semester and on designated pre-registration days. Informa- 
tion concerning the dates for official registration is listed in the college 
calendar, pages 2—6. 

Late Registration 

Students registering later than the days specified will be charged a 
late registration fee of ten dollars. Students desiring to register later than 
one week after the opening of the semester will be admitted only by 
special permission of the Dean of the College. Students who do not pre- 
register during the designated time will be charged a late pre-registration 
fee of ten dollars. 

Change of Registration 

Change of registration, when necessary, must be made over the sig- 
nature of the adviser. Registration for a course will not be permitted after 
the course has been in session for one full week. A student may withdraw 
from a course at any time within the first six weeks of classes in a semester 
without prejudice. 

Orientation for New Students 

A spring orientation day is held annually for incoming freshmen. At 
this time the activities include a general orientation to the College, diag- 
nostic testing, counselling with academic advisers and registration for 
courses. Special sessions for parents are a vital part of the program. 

An orientation day for transfer students is held in early summer. At 
that time, academic counseling and registration for courses are held. 

An orientation period of several days, Freshman Week, at the be- 
ginning of the college year is provided to help new students, both fresh- 
men and transfers, to become familiar with their academic surroundings. 
This time is devoted to discussion of summer reading books, lectures, 
social activities, and informal meetings with members of the faculty. 

During the first semester all freshmen and transfer students are re- 
quired to participate in an Orientation course which includes a series of 
lectures and discussions on campus activities and methods of study. 

Discontinuance of Course 

The college reserves the right to withdraw or discontinue any course 
for which an insufficient number of students have registered. 

122 



ACADEMIC PROCEDURES 

Repetition of Courses 

No student shall be permitted to repeat, either for credit or for 
quality points, a course for which he has already received a passing grade. 

Concurrent Courses 

A student enrolled for a degree at Lebanon Valley College may not 
carry courses concurrently at any other institution without the consent of 
his major adviser and the Dean of the College. Neither may a regular 
student carry work concurrently in evening or extension courses without 
the permission of the major adviser and the Dean of the College. 

A student registered at Lebanon Valley College may not obtain credit 
for courses taken in other colleges during the summer unless such courses 
have prior approval of the major adviser and the Dean of the College. 

Faculty Advisers 

Each student is assigned a faculty adviser who serves in the capacity 
of friendly counselor. 

The student, before registering for the second year, or the third year, 
at the latest, much choose a department or a curriculum in which to pursue 
work of special concentration. This department or curriculum shall be 
known as his major. The head of the department or the curriculum in 
which the student has elected to major becomes the adviser for that stu- 
dent. The adviser's approval is necessary before a student may register for 
or discontinue any course. 





123 



ACADEMIC PROCEDURES 

Arrangement of Schedules 

Each student arranges his course of study and his class schedule in 
consultation with, and approval of, his faculty adviser. Students already 
in attendance do this during pre-registration periods. Information con- 
cerning faculty advisers is given to new students at the Spring Orientation 
Day. 

Limit of Hours 

To be classified as full-time, a student must take at least twelve semes- 
ter hours of work. Sixteen semester hours of work is the maximum permit- 
ted without special permission of the Dean of the College; Physical Edu- 
cation carries no credit. 

The privilege of carrying extra hours will be granted only for com- 
pelling reasons and only when a satisfactory grade level has been main- 
tained for the previous semester. An additional charge will be made for 
all hours above sixteen. 

Academic Classification 

Students are classified academically at the beginning of each year. 
Membership in the sophomore, junior, or senior classes is granted to those 
students who have earned a minimum of 28, 56, or 84 semester hours 
credit respectively. 

All entrance deficiencies must be removed before the academic status 
of sophomore is granted. 

Counseling and Placement 

Lebanon Valley College recognizes as part of its responsibility to its 
students the need for providing sound educational, vocational, and per- 
sonal counseling. Measures of interest, ability, aptitude, and personality, 
in addition to other counseling techniques, are utilized in an effort to 
help each student come to a fuller realization of his capabilities and per- 
sonality. An important part of the counseling program consists of a series 
of lectures and discussions conducted as a non-credit orientation course for 
new students. 

Placement services are provided by the College for aiding students in 
procuring part-time employment while in college and in obtaining posi- 
tions upon graduation. A current file is maintained which contains infor- 
mation about positions in various companies and institutions, Civil Service 
opportunities and examinations, entrance to professional schools, assist- 
antships, and fellowships. Representatives of business, industry, and educa- 
tional institutions visit the campus annually to interview seniors for pros- 
pective employment. A file of credentials and activities of those students 
availing themselves of the services is available to prospective employers. 
Graduates may keep their individual files active by reporting additional in- 
formation to the Director of Placement Services. 

A Teacher Placement Bureau is maintained which assists students in 
finding positions. 

Records of students' credentials in all areas of the students' activities 
are on file. 

124 



Administrative Regulations 

The rules of the college are designed to provide for proper regula- 
tion of the academic community. The rules and regulations as stated in 
this bulletin are announcements and in no way serve as a contract be- 
tween the student and the college. Attendance at the college is a privilege 
and not a right. The student by his act of registration concedes to the 
College the right to require his withdrawal any time deemed necessary 
to safeguard the ideals of scholarship and character, and to secure com- 
pliance with regulations. It is expected that the conduct of all campus 
citizens will conform to accepted standards. All students are required to 
respond to communications sent by any duly constituted authority of the 
College. 

Class Attendance 

Each student is expected to attend every session of the courses for 
which he is registered unless he is excused for medical reasons. Excuses for 
any other absences, e.g., attendance at a college activity, must be secured 
from the Dean of the College. 

Class Absence 

Unexcused absences will be dealt with by the instructor concerned 
who will take appropriate action to insure the student's maintaining 
good academic standing. Repeated absences will be reported promptly to 
the academic adviser who will counsel with the student. Continued ab- 
sence thereafter will warrant the student's being dropped from the course 
with the approval of the Dean of the College. 

Excused absences do not absolve the student from the necessity of 
fulfilling all course requirements. 

Chapel Attendance 

Chapel service is conducted once a week. Attendance is required of 
all full-time students. Five absences are allowed during a semester. For 
each additional unexcused absence one hour will be added to the re- 
quired hours for graduation. 

Hazing 

Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infringement by members of other 
classes upon the personal rights of freshmen as individuals is interpreted 
as hazing. 

Cars and Student Parking 

Resident students of the three upper classes may have cars on 
campus. Resident freshmen students are not permitted to have cars. 
All cars owned or operated by Lebanon Valley College students 

125 




The Chaplain Interviewing Students 




Spring Commencement 



126 



ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

must be registered with the student Men's Senate Parking Committee. 
Violations of parking regulations established by the Senate Parking Com- 
mittee may result in fines. 

Transcripts 

Each student, former student, or graduate is entitled to one tran- 
script of his college record without charge. For each copy after the first, 
a fee of one dollar is charged. 

Regulations Regarding Academic Probation, 
Suspension, Dismissal, Withdrawal 

A. Probation 

1. A student can be placed on academic probation by the Dean of 
the College or suspended or dismissed if his academic standing fails to 
come up to the grade-point average shown in the following table: 

Probation Suspension or dismissal 

1st semester 1.25 

2nd semester 1.50 1.25 cumulative 

3rd semester 1.50 

4th semester 1.70 1.50 cumulative 

5th semester 1 .75 

6th semester 1.75 1.65 cumulative 

7th and 8th semesters 1.75 in all courses 

2. A student placed on academic probation is notified of such status 
by the Dean of the College and informed of the college regulations gov- 
erning probationers. Students on probation are required to regulate their 
work and their times so as to make a most determined effort to bring their 
work up to the required standard. 

3. When a student is placed on academic probation, faculty and 
parents are notified by the Dean of the College. The Dean of the College 
may terminate the period of probation of any student. Usually this occurs 
at the end of a final marking period. 

4. Infraction of the following regulations governing probationers 
render a student liable to dismissal: 

a. No unexcused class absences will be permitted. 

b. Any office or activity in any college organization that involves 
such expenditure of time as to jeopardize the successful pur- 
suit of academic work must be relinquished. 

B. Suspension 

1. A student who obviously fails to achieve at a level commensurate 
with his measured ability may be suspended for at least one semester. 

2. A student suspended for academic reasons is not eligible for re- 
instatement for at least one semester, preferably two. 

3. A student seeking reinstatement to Lebanon Valley College must 
apply in writing to the Dean of the College. 

127 




4. Students suspended for academic reasons are not permitted to reg- 
ister for work in the Auxiliary Schools except for the most compelling rea- 
sons and then only with the approval of the Dean of the College. 

C. Dismissal 

A student dismissed for academic reasons is not eligible for re- 
admission. 



D. Withdrawal from College and Readmission 

Official withdrawal from College is accomplished only by the com- 
pletion of the withdrawal form obtained in the Registrar's Office. This 
is the sole responsibility of the student. 

Application for readmission will be considered only if the formal 
withdrawal procedure has been followed at the time of withdrawal. 

128 



Auxiliary Schools 



Summer, Extension, Evening 

Summer sessions, evening classes on campus, and classes in the Har- 
risburg Area Center for Higher Education have enabled teachers, state em- 
ployees, and others in active employment to attend college courses and se- 
cure academic degrees. By a careful selection of courses, made in consulta- 
tion with the appropriate adviser, students can meet many of the require- 
ments for a baccalaureate degree. Some courses may be taken for perma- 
nent teaching certification; others may be taken with the aim of transfer- 
ring credit to another institution. Many courses lead to professional ad- 
vancement or are of direct benefit to persons in business or industry, while 
others assist in broadening the student's vocational, social, and cultural 
background. 

Summer School 

Regularly enrolled students may, by taking summer school courses, 
meet the requirements for the bachelor's degree in three years. 

A course in Student Teaching (Education 40) is offered in the summer 
session at Hershey, Pennsylvania. It is designed to meet the minimum stu- 
dent teaching requirements in the secondary field toward teacher certi- 
fication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Campus Evening Classes 

Evening classes are offered on the campus, Monday through Thurs- 
day, and carry residence credit. 

Separate brochures are published for the Summer School and the 
Evening Classes. For copies or for other information pertaining to Sum- 
mer School or Evening Classes write to Dr. Samuel Farmdrie, Director 
of Auxiliary Schools, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania. 



Harrishurg Area Center for Higher Education 

Extension classes are offered in the William Penn High School, Third 
and Division Streets and at the Center's Campus, 2992 North Second 
Street, Harrisburg, on Monday through Thursday evenings. Lebanon Valley 
College's extension program in Harrisburg is carried on in conjunction 
with Elizabethtown College, Temple University, the Pennsylvania State 
University, and the University of Pennsylvania. 

For details pertaining to the Harrisburg Area Center for Higher 
Education write or call Mr. Kenneth Baer, Dean, Hunter Hall, 2992 N. 
Second Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, at 238-9694. 

129 




130 



Student Activities 



Extra-curricular activities constitute a vital part of college life at Leb- 
anon Valley College. Activities outside the classroom range from various 
clubs and musical organizations to student government groups and numer- 
ous religious activities. The student has a wide variety from which to 
choose. 



The Religious Life 



Lebanon Valley College was founded as a Christian College and con- 
tinues to be dedicated to this objective. All students are invited and urged 
to participate in some phase of religious activity. 

Chapel 

A college chapel service is held weekly in the College Church. (In the 
College Chapel, beginning September, 1966). Students are required to 
attend. Faculty, students, local clergymen from the various denominations, 
and nationally and internationally known speakers participate in these 
services, which constitute an integral part of a liberal education for every 
college student. The Chapel Choir shares in most of the services. 

Sunday Services 

The College Church and the other churches of the community extend 
a warm welcome to all college students who wish to attend Sunday wor- 
ship. A Sunday School class especially for college students is conducted in 
the College Church each Sunday during the academic year. 

The Student Christian Association 

The Student Christian Association conducts weekly services, campus- 
wide Bible studies, special seasonal services, and intercollegiate exchange 
religious programs. In addition, the Student Christian Association sponsors 
social events throughout the year and arranges for the Big Sister-Little 
Sister and the Big Brother-Little Brother program for incoming freshmen. 

All students are urged to participate actively in the student-centered 
religious programs. 

Religious Emphasis Week 

This is one of the outstanding religious events of the school year. 
Notable speakers are invited to share their experiences with the student 
body through classroom lectures, seminars, convocations, and personal 
interviews. 

131 



Students hold 

informal session 

with 

1964-65 Balmer 

Showers Lecturer, 

Dr. Theodore A. Gill. 




The Balmer Showers Lecture 

This annual lectureship was established and endowed by the late 
Bishop Emeritus J. Balmer Showers, '14, of the Evangelical United 
Brethren Church. Under the stipulations of the endowment, the lectures 
are delivered by distinguished scholars of recognized leadership in the 
areas of Christian faith and theology, biblical archaeology and interpreta- 
tion, Christian ethics of the Christian ministry. 

Religion and Life Lectureships 

The purpose of the Religion and Life Lectureships is to deepen the 
student's understanding of some of the problems of life and the religious 
resources that are available to meet such problems. Each semester a Chris- 
tian leader of national or international reputation is invited to spend a 
day on campus in order to confer with students and faculty, to conduct 
seminars, and to address the entire college community. 

Christian Vocations Week 

During this period special emphasis is given to the Christian way of 
life as the basis for all vocations and professions. Opportunity is provided 
for students interested in full-time church vocations to confer with vis- 
iting teams of advisors and counselors. 

Delta Tau Chi 

Delta Tau Chi is an organization composed primarily of students who 
have decided to devote full-time service to church vocations. Membership 
is open, however, to all students who wish to participate in the activities 

132 



FACULTY-STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

of the organization. The group holds regularly scheduled meetings, daily 
morning prayers, sends deputations to churches, conducts programs at 
various hospitals and homes, and enters into other community projects. 

Faculty-Student Government 

Ultimate responsibility for activities on the college campus rests with 
the faculty and the administration. However, the faculty and the adminis- 
tration have delegated powers and responsibilities to the student govern- 
ing bodies so that, to a large extent, students govern themselves. The Col- 
lege encourages initiative and self-government as a part of the democratic 
training offered. 

Faculty-Student Council 

The coordination of student affairs is the responsibility of the Faculty- 
Student Council. The Council is composed of three faculty members and 
a representative from each of the organizations on the campus. The pur- 
pose of this organization, in addition to coordinating student activities, is 
to consider matters pertaining to student welfare, to seek improvement 
of the social life of the campus, to serve as liaison between students and 
faculty, and to suggest and initiate programs for the over-all improvement 
of the College. 

Governing Bodies 

Four student governing bodies function on the campus. The Senate 
is the governing body for students living in the men's residence halls and 
for men students residing in the community with other than their immedi- 
ate families; the Men's Day Student Congress is the governing body for 
commuting men students; the Resident Women's Student Government As- 
sociation is the governing body for women living in the residence halls; 
and the Women's Commuter Council is the governing body for commuting 
women students. These four organizations, with the approval of the fac- 
ulty, make and administer the rules which govern certain aspects of stu- 
dent life. 




133 



Delta Tau Chi 

members 

bring cheer 

to patients 

at Crippled 

Children's Hospital. 




Campus Organizations 

Social Organizations 

Five organizations endeavor to enrich the social program of the Col- 
lege by sponsoring social activities on the campus and in the community, 
and by broadening the experience of its members through group action. 
Phi Lambda Sigma Kappa Lambda Nu 

Kappa Lambda Sigma Delta Lambda Sigma 

Knights of the Valley 

Recognition Groups 

Students who have achieved scholastic distinction in their academic 
work, or in certain areas, are eligible for membership in honorary scholas- 
tic societies. 

Phi Alpha Epsilon Pi Gamma Mu 

Beta Beta Beta Psi Chi 

Honorary and Service Organizations 

Five organizations exist to bring recognition to deserving music stu- 
dents and participants in dramatic activities or to function as service 
organizations on the campus. 

Alpha Phi Omega Phi Mu Alpha 

Alpha Psi Omega Sigma Alpha Iota 

White Hats 



134 



Chapel Choir 
Symphony Orchestra 
Wig and Buckle Club 



DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS 

Forensic, Dramatics, and Music 

An opportunity to develop dramatic, forensic, and musical talents 
under qualified leadership is offered to the students of Lebanon Valley 
College by the following organizations: 
Symphonic Band 
All-Girl Band 
College Chorus 
Concert Choir 

Guild Student Group (American Guild of Organists) 

Publications 

Practical experience in management, writing, and editorial work is 
available to students through membership on the staff of the college year- 
book and the campus newspaper. 

The Quittapahilla La Vie Collegienne 

The 13th Warthog 

Departmental Clubs 

Many departmental clubs provide opportunities for students to par- 
ticipate in supplemental department activities. At regular meetings reports 
on appropriate topics are presented and discussed. Other activities spon- 
sored by the departmental clubs include lectures by specialists in the club's 
particular field of interest, educational films, and field trips. 

Chemistry: American Chemical Society Affiliate 

Economics: Investment Club 

Education: Childhood Education Club 

Student Pennsylvania State Education Association 

English: Green Blotter Club 

Mathematics: Industrial Mathematics Society Affiliate 

Modern Languages: French Club, German Club, Russian Club 

Physics: Physics Club, Student Section of the American Institute of 
Physics 

Political Science: Political Science Club 

Psychology: Psi Chi 






Athletics and Recreation 

Lebanon Valley College maintains a full program of intramural and 
intercollegiate athletic activities. Intramural leagues and tournaments are 
conducted in the various sports for men, while the women acquire points 
toward individual awards by participation in the women's intramural 
program. 

The college participates in seven intercollegiate sports for men (base- 
ball, basketball, cross-country, football, golf, track, wrestling) and two 
for women (basketball and hockey). There are two athletic organizations 
on the campus, the LV Varsity Club for men and the Women's Athletic 
Association. 

Lebanon Valley College is a member of the following national and 
regional athletic associations: National Collegiate Athletic Association, 
Middle Atlantic States Collegiate Athletic Conference, and Eastern Col- 
lege Athletic Conference. 

Aims and Objectives of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Lebanon Valley College endeavors to maintain inter-collegiate ath- 
letic programs for the students rather than for spectators. The overall 
programs are not regarded as money-making ventures. On the contrary, 
intercollegiate athletics has consistently been a financial burden. How- 
ever, the College continues to support and encourage intercollegiate ath- 
letics because we are convinced that it is an important factor in the in- 
tangible known as "morale." Intercollegiate athletics is an integral part 
of the educational pattern of our young people — no more and no less. 

136 




Directories 




The Board of Trustees ig64-6§ 

OFFICERS: 

Honorary President E. N. Funkhouser 

President Allan W. Mund 

First Vice President Charles H. Horn 

Second Vice President Lawton W. Shroyer 

Secretary E. D. Williams, Jr. 

Treasurer Samuel K. Wengert 

MEMBERS:* 

From the Eastern Conference 

D. DWIGHT GROVE, B.S., M.D. (1968) 

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, 

Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital 

Home — 5025 North Marvine Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19141 

EZRA H. RANCK, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1968) 

Director of Christian Education — Eastern Conference 
Home — 604 Redwood Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 

DANIEL L. SHEARER, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. (1968) 
Pastor — First Evangelical United Brethren Church, 
Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 
Home — 210 West Main Street, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 17036 

HAROLD H. QUICKEL, A.B. (1968) 

Purchasing Agent — Hamilton Watch Company 
Home — 128 Atkins Avenue, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17603 

D. LEROY FEGLEY, A.B., TH.B., D.D. (1967) 

Pastor — Otterbein Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Home — 113 East Clay Street, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17602 

G. EDGAR HERTZLER, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. (1967) 

Pastor — St. Paul's Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 

Home — 400 N. Spruce St., Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 17022 

MARK J. HOSTETTER, A.B., B.D., S.T.M. (1967) 

Pastor — Evangelical United Brethren Church, Annville, Pennsylvania 
Home — 50 College Avenue, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 



Date in parenthesis indicates year in which term expires. 



138 



TRUSTEES 

WARREN F. MENTZER, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1967) 

Superintendent — Eastern Conference, Evangelical United Brethren Church 
Home — 3920 Woodvale Road, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 

JEFFERSON C. BARNHART, A.B., LL.B. (1966) 

Partner — McNees, Wallace, and Nurick, Harrisburg 
Home — 124 Java Avenue, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033 

PAUL C. EHRHART, A.B., M.A. (1966) 

Guidance Director — Penn Manor High School 
Home — 445 Herr Avenue, Millersville, Pennsylvania 17551 

WALTER C. ESHENAUR (1966) 

President — Eshenaur's, Incorporated 
Home — 3206 Elm Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 

THOMAS S. MAY, B.S., B.D., D.D. (1966) 

Pastor — State Street Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Home — 2403 Bellevue Park, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17104 

LAWTON W. SHROYER (1966) 

President — Shamokin Dress Company and Shroyers, Incorporated 
Home — 927 North Shamokin Street, Shamokin, Pennsylvania 17872 

From the Susquehanna Conference 

JOHN E. GEESEY, B.S. (1968) 

President — York County Gas Company 
Home — 29 South Rockburn Street, York, Pennsylvania 17402 

CALVIN B. HAVERSTOCK, JR., A.B.. B.D. (1968) 

Pastor — First Evangelical United Brethren Church, York, Pennsylvania 
Home — 114 North Newberry Street, York, Pennsylvania 17404 

FREDERICK W. MUND, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1968) 

Pastor — Dorguth Memorial Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Home — 525 Scott Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21230 

MELVIN S. RIFE (1968) 

Treasurer — Schmidt and Ault Paper Company, Division, 

St. Regis Paper Company 

Home — 907 North George Street, York, Pennsylvania 17404 

PAUL E. HORN, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1967) 

Superintendent — Pennsylvania Conference, 

Evangelical United Brethren Church 

Home — 2836 Eastwood Drive, York, Pennsylvania 17402 

GERALD D. KAUFFMAN, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1967) 

Pastor — Grace Evangelical United Brethren, Church 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

Home — 420 West South Street, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 17013 

139 



TRUSTEES 

ROBERT W. LUTZ, A.B. (1967) 
Assistant Treasurer — Blumenthal-Kohn Electric Company, Incorporated 
Home — 4808 Crowson Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21212 

ALBERT WATSON, LL.D. (1967) 

President — Bowman and Company 
Home — 448 West High Street, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 17013 

J. STEWART GLEN, JR., A.B., LL.B. (1966) 

Attorney at Law 
Home — 109 Farmington Road, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 17201 

LESTER M. KAUFFMAN, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. (1966) 

Pastor — St. Paul's Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Home — 1131 Oak Hill Avenue, Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 

H. W. SHENK, A.B., A.M., ED.D. (1966) 

Representative — C. C. Collings and Company, Incorporated, 

Investment Bankers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Home — 553 East Main Street, Dallastown, Pennsylvania 17313 

MERVIE H. WELTY, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1966) 

Pastor — Bethany Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 

Home — 123 West Broadway, Red Lion, Pennsylvania 17356 

CURVIN L. THOMPSON, A.B., B.D. (1966) 

Pastor — Community Evangelical United Brethren Church 

New Cumberland, Pennsylvania 

Home — 1506 Bridge Street, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania 17070 

From the Virginia Conference 

CARL W. HISER, A.B., B.B., D.D. (1968) 

Pastor — Calvary Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Cumberland, Maryland 

Home — 2 East Mary Street, Cumberland, Maryland 21503 

JOHN E. OLIVER, A.B., B.D. (1968) 

Retired Pastor — Evangelical United Brethren Church 
Home — 401 North Robinson Avenue, Pen Argyl, Pennsylvania 18072 

DONALD N. FRIDINGER, A.B., B.D. (1967) 

Pastor — Evangelical United Brethren Church, Elkton, Virginia 
Home — 505 East Spottswood Avenue, Elkton, Virginia 22827 

CHARLES B. WEBER, A.B., B.D. (1967) 

Pastor — First Evangelical United Brethren Church, 

Martinsburg, West Virginia 

Home — 547 North Queen Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 

140 



TRUSTEES 

J. PAUL GRUVER, A.B., B.D., D.D. (1966) 

Pastor — Evangelical United Brethren Church, Dayton, Virginia 
Address — Box 51, Shepardstown, West Virginia 25443 

PAUL J. SLONAKER, B.S., B.D. (1966) 
Pastor — First Evangelical United Brethren Church, Winchester, Virginia 
Home — 112 West North Avenue, Winchester, Virginia 22601 

Alumni Trustees 

JAMES H. LEATHEM, B.S., MA., Ph.D. (1968) 

Professor of Zoology and Director of the Bureau of Biological Research, 

Rutgers, The State University 

Home — 610 South First Avenue, Highland Park, New Jersey 08904 

MRS. RUTH EVANS GERBERICH, A.B., MA. (1967) 
Retired High School Teacher 
Home — 138 North Ninth Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

DE WITT M. ESSICK, A.B., M.S. (1966) 

Manager, Management Development and Personnel Services — 

Armstrong Cork Company, General Offices 

Home — 43 Wabank Road, Millersville, Pennsylvania 17551 

Trustees-at-Large 

WILLIAM D. BRYSON (1966) 

Partner — Walter W. Moyer Company 
Home — 40 West Sunset Avenue, Ephrata, Pennsylvania 17522 

CHARLES H. HORN (1966) 

Chairman of the Board — Tobacco Nuforms, Incorporated 
Home — 822 South Main Street, Red Lion, Pennsylvania 17356 

HERMANN W. KAEBNICK, A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. (1966) 

Bishop — Eastern Area, Evangelical United Brethren Church 
Home — 3018 Green Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110 

JOHN F. MATSKO (1966) 

President — Blough Wagner Manufacturing Company, Incorporated 
Home — 3616 Maple Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 

ALLAN W. MUND (1966) 

Chairman, Board of Directors — Ellicott Machine Corporation 

Chairman, Board of Directors — Ellicott-Brandt, Incorporated 

Home — 702 East Seminary Avenue, Towson, Maryland 21204 

WOODROW W. WALTEMYER (1966) 

Home — 286 Lambeth Drive, York, Pennsylvania 17403 

SAMUEL K. WENGERT, B.S. (1966) 

President — Wengert's Dairy 
Home — 717 South Twelfth Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

141 



•-"- : I 



TRUSTEE COMMITTEES 

E. D. WILLIAMS, JR. (1966) 

Vice President — H. E. Millard Lime and Stone Company 
Home — R.D. 1, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

JOHN L. WORRILOW, B.A. (1966) 

Secretary — Lebanon Steel Foundry 
Home — First Avenue and East High Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

RICHARD P. ZIMMERMAN (1966) 

Chairman of the Board — National Valley Bank of Chambersburg 
Home — 843 South Fifth Street, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 17201 
Members of the faculty who are heads of departments are ex officio 
members of the Board of Trustees. 



Honorary Trustees 

WILLIAM J. FISHER, LL.D. 

Retired President — A. B. Farquhar Company 

Retired Vice President — The Oliver Corporation 

Home — 106 North Marshall Street, York, Pennsylvania 17402 

E. N. FUNKHOUSER, A.B., LL.D. 

Retired President — Funkhouser Corporation 

Member, Board of Directors — Ruberoid Corporation 

Address — Box 569, Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 

E. D. WILLIAMS, SR., A.B., LL.D. 

President — H. E. Millard Lime and Stone Company 
Home — R.D. 1, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Committee: 

Frederic K. Miller, Chairman; Paul E. Horn, Vice Chairman; Paul C. Ehr- 
hart; DeWitt M. Essick; D. LeRoy Fegley; G. Edgar Hertzler; Mark J. 
Hostetter, Secretary; L. M. Kauffman; Robert W. Lutz; Warren F. Mentzer; 
Allan W. Mund; Lawton W. Shroyer; Mervie H. Welty; Samuel K. Wengert. 

Finance Committee: 

Richard P. Zimmerman (1968), Chairman; Samuel K. Wengert, Treasurer; 
Allan W. Mund, Vice Chairman; John F. Matsko (1966); Lawton W. 
Shroyer (1966); Woodrow W. Waltemyer (1966); William D. Bryson (1967); 
Frederic K. Miller; E. D. Williams, Jr. (1968), Secretary; Charles H. Horn 
(1967); Albert Watson (1967); John E. Geesey (1968). 

Faculty Administrative Committee: 

Charles H. Horn, Chairman; Jefferson C. Barnhart; DeWitt M. Essick; Paul 
E. Horn; John F. Matsko; Warren F. Mentzer; Frederic K. Miller; Ezra H. 
Ranck, Secretary; H. W. Shenk. 

Auditing Committee: 

Albert Watson, Chairman; Ruth Evans Gerberich; John L. Worrilow. 

142 



TRUSTEE COMMITTEES 
Building & Grounds Committee: 

Melvin S. Rife, Chairman; Walter C. Eshenaur; J. Stewart Glen, Jr.; Frederic 
K. Miller; Frederick W. Mund; Samuel K. Wengert; E. D. Williams, Jr. 

Public Relations Committee: 

Gerald D. Kauffman, Chairman; Ruth Evans Gerberich; Calvin B. Haverstock; 
Thomas S. May; Harold H. Quickel; Ezra H. Ranck; Curvin L. Thompson. 

Nominating Committee: 

Allan W. Mund, Chairman; D. Dwight Grove; J. Paul Gruver; Melvin S. Rife; 
Daniel L. Shearer; Mervie H. Welty. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 1965 1966 

Centennial Committee: 

Lawton W. Shroyer, Chairman; Jefferson C. Barnhart; James O. Bemesderfer; 
Paul C. Ehrhart; Samuel D. Evans; Samuel A. Farmerie; Miss Martha C. 
Faust; Miss Gladys M. Fencil; G. Wilbur Gibble; Samuel O. Grimm; June E. 
Herr; G. Edgar Hertzler; Paul E. Horn; Mrs. P. Rodney Kreider; James H. 
Leathern; George R. Marquette; Thomas S. May; Warren F. Mentzer; Jacob 
L. Rhodes; Ralph S. Shay; Daniel L. Shearer; Miss Esther Shenk; Robert W. 
Smith; Bruce C. Souders; George G. Struble; Mrs. Henry A. Weitz; John L. 
Worrilow; Mrs. Edna J. Carmean, Executive Secretary. 
Ex Officio — Allan W. Mund, Carl Y. Ehrhart, Frederic K. Miller. 

Committee on Church Support: 

William J. Fisher, Chairman; Walter C. Eshenaur; D. Leroy Fegley; Calvin B. 
Haverstock; G. Edgar Hertzler; Paul E. Horn; Gerald D. Kauffman; Warren 
F. Mentzer; Melvin S. Rife; Lawton W. Shroyer; Mervie H. Welty; Samuel 
K. Wengert. 

Board Appointees to Development Council: 

William D. Bryson; William J. Fisher; E. N. Funkhouser; John E. Geesey; 
Mrs. Ruth Evans Gerberich; Charles H. Horn; Paul E. Horn; Hermann W. 
Kaebnick; Thomas S. May; Warren F. Mentzer; Melvin S. Rife; Lawton W. 
Shroyer; Mervie H. Welty; E. D. Williams, Sr.; E. D. Williams, Jr.; John L. 
Worrilow; Richard P. Zimmerman. 
Ex Officio — Allan W. Mund, Frederic K. Miller. 

Building Committee: 

Melvin S. Rife, Chairman; DeWitt M. Essick, Co-Chairman; Bernard H. 
Bissinger; William D. Bryson; Miss Martha C. Faust; Charles H. Horn; James 
H. Leathern; Jean O. Love; George R. Marquette; Earl R. Mezoff; Howard A. 
Neidig; Jacob L. Rhodes; Robert C. Riley; Robert W. Smith; Samuel K. 
Wengert; E. D. Williams, Jr.; Francis H. Wilson; Glenn H. Woods. 

Committee for Self Evaluation: 

Richard P. Zimmerman, Chairman; Jefferson C. Barnhart; Carl Y. Ehrhart; 
Paul C. Ehrhart; Samuel A. Farmerie; G. Edgar Hertzler; James H. Leathern; 
Earl R. Mezoff; Melvin S. Rife. 

Committee for Chapel Policy and Program: 

Gerald D. Kauffman, Chairman; D. Leroy Fegley; Pierce A. Getz; Calvin B. 
Haverstock; George R. Marquette; L. Elbert Wethington. 

143 



Administrative Staff and Faculty 
1965-1966 

Offices of Administration 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT: 

FREDERIC K. MILLER, 1939-; President, 1951— 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1931; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1948; Litt.D., Muhlenberg 
College, 1954. 

EARL R. MEZOFF, 1963-; Assistant to the President. 

A.B., Thiel College, 1947; M.A., Michigan State University, 1948; 
D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1965. 

MRS. EDNA J. CARMEAN, 1961—; Staff Assistant; Executive Secretary 
of Centennial. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959. 

MISS GLADYS M. FENCIL, 1921-; Staff Assistant, 1965. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1921. 

MRS. ELSIE M. MOYER, Secretary. 

MRS. JEANNE M. MILLER, Secretary. 

ACADEMIC: 

Office of the Dean of the College 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-; Dean of the College, I960-. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 1954. 

MISS JEANETTE E. BENDER, Secretary. 

Admissions Office 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933-; Director of Admissions, 1949-. 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Columbia University, 
1932. 

DAVID W. TRAUGER, 1 964-; Assistant to the Director of Admissions; 
Student Financial Aid Officer, 1964-. 

B.S., West Chester State Teachers College, 1948; M.Ed., Temple Uni- 
versity, 1951. 

MRS. ALMA S. HEILMAN, Secretary. 

MRS. RUTH R. LEVITZ, Secretary. 

144 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Registrar's Office 

SAMUEL A. FARMERIE, 1963-; Registrar; Director of Auxiliary Schools, 
1964-. 

B.S. in Ed., Clarion State College, 1954; M.E. in Ed., Westminster 
College, 1960; D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University, 1964. 

iMRS. RHETA M. KREIDER, Secretary. 

MRS. MARION C. LOY, Secretary. 

Faculty 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931-; Secretary of the Faculty, 1933-. 

B.S. in Ed., University of Kansas, 1922; M.S. in Ed., University of Kan- 
sas, 1925; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1931. 

Library 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1947-; Librarian, 1956-. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924; M.A., Princeton University, 1928; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1935; A.B. in Library Science, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947. 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE, 1923-1949; Lebanon Valley College Fellow in 
the Humanities, 1965—. 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1915; M.A., University of Toronto, 1923; 
Ph.D., University of Toronto, 1925; Litt.D., Muhlenberg College, 1950. 

MRS. FRANCES T. FIELDS, 1947-; Cataloging Librarian. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; A.B. in Library Science, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947; M.A., Universidad de San Carlos de Guate- 
mala, 1960. 

JOHN B. LADLEY, JR., 1963-; Circulation-Reference Librarian. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1953; M. Lib. Sci., Carnegie Library 
School, 1959. 

MRS. ELOISE P. BROWN, 1961-; Cataloging Assistant. 
B.S. in Library Science, Simmons College, 1946. 

MRS. SETSUKO MENDENHALL, Secretary. 

Engle Hall 
MISS ELIZABETH A. READINGER, Secretary. 

Science Hall 

MRS. BERNICE LILES, Secretary. (Grants.) 

MRS. KAREN L. MILLER, Secretary. 

South Hall 
MRS. SARAH E. DETTRA, Secretary. 

112 College Avenue 
MRS. ELIZABETH C. MICHIELSEN, Secretary. 

145 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

STUDENT AFFAIRS: 

Student Personnel Office 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, 1952-; Dean of Men, 1956-. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1951. 

MRS. ESTHER A. KLINE, Secretary, Dean of Men. 

MISS MARTHA C. FAUST, 1957-; Dean of Women. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950. 

MRS. DORIS L. FAKE, Secretary, Dean of Women. 

MRS. ANNAMARIE PARKER, Head Resident, Mary Capp Green Hall. 

MRS. ETHEL M. HANIGAN, Head Resident, Vickroy Hall. 

MRS. MARY ALEXANDER, Hostess, Carnegie Lounge. 

Health Service 

JAMES R. MONTEITH, College Physician. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1932; M.D., Temple University, 1936. 

MRS. WILLIAM TREDICK, R.N., College Nurse, I960-. 
Jefferson Medical College Hospital School of Nursing. 

MISS BARBARA LENKER, R.N., Student Nurse. 

MISS SYLVIA GRIMM, R.N., Student Nurse. 

Office of the Chaplain 

JAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959-; College Chaplain. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1936; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1939; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological Seminary, Phila., 1945; 
S.T.D., Temple University, 1951. 

Office of Athletics 

WILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961—; Director of Athletics. 

B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1954; M.Ed., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1960. 

MRS. ELIZABETH SHAAK, Secretary. 

Coaching Staff 

GEORGE DARLINGTON, 1964-; Assistant Football Coach, Assistant 
Track Coach; Director of Intramurals. 

MRS. E. ELIZABETH GARMAN, 1964-; Women's Basketball Coach. 

WESLEY J. MACMILLAN, 1965-; A.B., Assistant Football Coach. 

GEORGE P. MAYHOFFER, 1955-; B.S., M.Ed., /. V. Basketball Coach; 
Track Coach. 

J. ROBERT McHENRY, 1964-; Basketball Coach; Cross Country Coach; 
Lacrosse Co-Coach. 

WILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961—; Football Coach; Lacrosse Co-Coach. 

146 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

GERALD PETROFES, 1963-; Athletic Trainer; Wrestling Coach; Golf 

Coach. 
MRS. JACQUELINE WALTERS, 1965-; Women's Hockey Coach. 

COLLEGE RELATIONS AREA: 

Development Office 

EDWARD P. HOFFER, 1964-; Director of Development. 
A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1958. 

WALTER L. SMITH, 1961—; Assistant Director of Development; Co- 
ordinator of Conferences. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1961. 

MRS. DORIS V. ACHENBACH, Secretary. 

MRS. LORETTA M. BAUM, Secretary. 

MISS CECELIA A. KORCHNAK, Secretary. 

Public Relations Office 

RICHARD V. SHOWERS, 1965—; Director of Public Relations. 
A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1942. 

REV. BRUCE C. SOUDERS, 1957—; Director of Publications and Infor- 
mation. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1944; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1947; M.A., Columbia University, 1954. 

MISS KATHLEEN M. LINE, Secretary. 

MRS. JOAN K. SCHMEHL, Secretary. 

Alumni Office 

MRS. P. RODNEY KREIDER, 1951-; Executive Secretary of Alumni 

Affairs. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1922. 
MRS. HELEN L. MILLER, Secretary. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: 

Office of the Controller 

ROBERT C. RILEY, 195 1-; Controller, 1962- 

B.S. in Ed., State College, Shippensburg, 1941; M.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., New York University, 1962. 

IRWIN R. SCHAAK, 1957-; Assistant Controller, 1964-. 

MRS. CLARA P. MILLER, Secretary, Bookkeeper-Cashier. 

LARRY H. MILLER, 1964-; Accountant. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1964. 

MRS. ISABEL FEGAN, Secretary, Accounts Payable. 

MRS. LUCILLE E. HANNIGAN, Switchboard Operator. 

MRS. JEAN W. KINDT, Duplicating Machines Operator. 

147 



FACULTY 

MRS. DORIS L. HOWER, IBM Data Processing. 

MISS DONNA L. DUPLER, Secretary. 

MRS. ETTA K. UNGER, Secretary. 

MRS. MARY J. THOMPSON, Assistant in Duplicating Room. 

MRS. LILLIE STRUBLE, Manager of the Book Store. 
A.B., University of Kansas, 1921. 

Buildings and Grounds 

RALPH B. SHANAMAN, 1955-; Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds. 

AUSTIN FLOOD, 1963-; Housekeeping Supervisor. 

MRS. LOIS M. HOFFMAN, Secretary. 

Food Service 
MRS. MARGARET MILLARD, 1951-; Dietitian. 
MRS. EMMA FLOOD, Manager of the Snack Bar. 



Faculty 1964-65 



FREDERIC K. MILLER, 1939-; President, 1951— 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; M.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1931; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1948; Litt.D., Muhlen- 
berg College, 1954. 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-; Dean of the College, I960-. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 1954. 

EMERITI: 

V. EARL LIGHT, 1929-1962; Professor Emeritus of Biology. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.S., Lebanon Valley College, 
1926; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1929. 

HELEN ETHEL MYERS, 1921-1956; Librarian Emeritus. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Library Science, Drexel Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

G. A. RICHIE, 1925-1958; Professor Emeritus of Religion and New Tes- 
tament Greek. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1913; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1917; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1923; D.D., Lebanon 
Valley College, 1927. 

148 



FACULTY 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, 1932-1958; Professor Emeritus of Latin 
Language and Literature; Dean Emeritus. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1913; A.M., Vanderbilt University, 1914; 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1917; Litt.D., Lebanon Valley College, 
1962. 

PROFESSORS: 

MRS. RUTH ENGLE BENDER, 1918-1922; 1924-; Adjunct Professor of 
Music Education. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberlin Conservatory; graduate 
New England Conservatory. 

BARNARD H. BISSINGER, 1953-; John Evans Lehman Professor of 
Mathematics; Chairman of the Department of Mathematics. 
A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1938; M.A., Syracuse University, 
1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1943. 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933-; Professor of Music Education; Director of 
Admissions, 1949-. 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., Columbia University, 
1932. 

CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, 1953-; Professor of Elementary Education. 
A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 
1941; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1954. 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-; Professor of Philosophy; Dean of the Col- 
lege. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1943; Ph.D., Yale University, 1954. 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1947-; Librarian; Josephine Bittinger Eberly Pro- 
fessor of Latin Language and Literature. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924; M.A., Princeton University, 
1928; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1935; A.B. in Lib. Sci., Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947. 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, 1912—; Professor of Physics. 

B.Pd., State Normal School, Millersville, 1910; A.B., Lebanon Valley 
College, 1912; A.M., Lebanon Valley College, 1918; Sc.D., Lebanon 
Valley College, 1942. 

GILBERT D. McKLVEEN, 1949-; Professor of Education; Chairman of 
the Department of Education. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1941; 
D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1953. 

HOWARD A. NEIDIG, 1948-; Professor of Chemistry, Chairman of the 
Department of Chemistry. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.S., University of Delaware, 
1946; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1948. 

149 



FACULTY 

SARA ELIZABETH PIEL, Jan., I960-; Professor of Languages; Chairman 
of the Department of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., Chatham College, 1928; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1929; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1938. 

JACOB L. RHODES, 1957-; Professor of Physics; Chairman of the De- 
partment of Physics. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1958. 

ROBERT C. RILEY, 1951—; Professor of Economics and Business Admin- 
istration; Controller. 

B.S. in Ed., State College, Shippensburg, 1941; M.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., New York University, 1962. 

MILTON L. STOKES, 1926-1946, 1965-: Professor of Economics. 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1920; M.A., University of Toronto, 1922; 
L.L.B., University of Toronto, 1926; Ph.D., Universtiy of Pennsylvania, 
1938. 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931—; Professor of English; Chairman of the 
Department of English; Secretary of the Faculty. 
B.S. in Ed., University of Kansas, 1922; M.S. in Ed., University of Kan- 
sas, 1925; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1931. 

FRANCIS H. WILSON, 1965-; Professor of Biology: Chairman of the De- 
partment of Biology. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1923; M.S., Cornell University, 1925; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1931. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 

MRS. ANNA DUNKLE FABER, 1954-; Associate Professor of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 
1950; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1954. 

WILLIAM H. FAIRLAMB, 1947-; Associate Professor of Piano and Music 
History. 
Mus. B., cum laude, Philadelphia Conservatory, 1949. 

ELIZABETH M. GEFFEN, 1958-; Associate Professor of History. 

B.S. in Ed., University of Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1936; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1958. 

THOMAS A. LANESE, 1954-; Associate Professor of Strings, Conducting, 
Theory. 

B.Mus., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1938; M.Mus., Manhattan School 
of Music, 1952. 

KARL LEE LOCKWOOD, 1959-; Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1951; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1955. 

JEAN O. LOVE, 1954-; Associate Professor of Psychology; Chairman of 
the Department of Psychology. 

A.B., Erskine College, 1941; M.A., Winthrop College, 1949; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1953. 

150 



FACULTY 

RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-51; 1953-; Associate Professor of History, Chair- 
man of the Department of History and Political Science; Acting Chair- 
man of the Department of Sociology, 1965-1966- 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1942; A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1947; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1962. 

ROBERT W. SMITH, 1951-; Associate Professor of Music Education, 
Chairman of the Department of Music. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1939; M.A., Columbia University, 1950. 

FRANK E. STACHOW, 1946-; Associate Professor of Theory and Wood- 
winds. 

Diploma, clarinet, Juilliard School of Music; B.S., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1943; M.A., Columbia University, 1946. 

JAMES M. THURMOND, 1954-; Associate Professor of Music Education 
and Brass Instruments. 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music, 1931; A.B., American University, 
1951; M.A., Catholic University, 1952; Mus.D., Washington College 
of Music, 1944. 

C. F. JOSEPH TOM, 1954-; Associate Professor of Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration; Chairman of the Department of Economics and 
Business Administration. 

B.A., Hastings College, 1944; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago, 1963. 

L. ELBERT WETHINGTON, 1963-; Associate Professor of Religion; 
Chairman of the Department of Religion. 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1944; B.D., Divinity School of Duke Uni- 
versity, 1947; Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 

JAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959-; Assistant Professor of Religion; Col- 
lege Chaplain. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1936; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1939; S.T.M., Lutheran Theological Seminary, Phila., 1945; 
S.T.D., Temple University, 1951. 

O. PASS BOLLINGER, 1950-; Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; M.S., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity, 1937. 

FAY B. BURRAS, 1964-; Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1960; M.A., Smith College, 1961. 

GEORGE D. CURFMAN, 1961-; Assistant Professor of Music Education. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1953; M.M., University of Michigan, 
1957. 

HILDA M. DAMUS, 1963-; Assistant Professor of German. 

M.A., University of Berlin and Jena, 1932; Ph.D., University of Ber- 
lin, 1945. 

151 



FACULTY 

MARTHA C. FAUST, 1957—; Assistant Professor of Education; Dean of 
Women. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.A., Syracuse University, 1950. 

ALEX J. FEHR, 195 1— ; Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1957. 

FRANCES T. FIELDS, 1947-; Assistant Professor of Spanish; Cataloging 
Librarian. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; A.B. in Library Science, Univer- 
sity of Michigan, 1947; M.A., Universidad de San Carlos de Guate- 
mala, 1960. 

ARTHUR L. FORD, 1965-; Assistant Professor of English. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; M.A., Bowling Green State Uni- 
versity, 1960; Ph.D., Bowling Green State University, 1964. 

PIERCE A. GETZ, 1959-; Assistant Professor of Organ. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; M.S.M., Union Theological 
Seminary School of Sacred Music, 1953. 

ROBERT E. GRISWOLD, I960-; Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., New Bedford Institute of Technology, 1954; M.S. in Chemistry, 
Northeastern University, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1960. 

JOHN F. HAUGH, 1961—; Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1953; Ph.D., University of Dela- 
ware, 1957. 

*PAUL FRANCIS HENNING, JR., 1959-; Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

A.B., Gettysburg College, 1954; M.A., Pennsylvania State University, 
1957. 

MRS. JUNE EBY HERR, 1959-; Assistant Professor of Elementary Ed- 
ucation. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

PAUL W. HESS, 1962-; Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., U. S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1944; M.S., University of Dela- 
ware, 1959; Ph.D., University of Delaware, 1963. 

HAROLD C. HOLLINGSWORTH, 1965-; Assistant Professor of Psy- 
chology. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; B.D., United Theological Semi- 
nary, 1940; S.T.D., Temple University, 1951. 

RICHARD D. MAGEE, 1961—; Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., Temple University, 1955; M.A., Temple University, 1957; Ph.D., 
Temple University, 1964. 



* Sabbatical leave, second semester, 1965-1966. 
152 



FACULTY 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, 1952-; Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation, Dean of Men, 1956—; Chairman of the Department of Physical 
Education. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., Columbia University, 1951. 

J. ROBERT McHENRY, 1964-; Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
A.B., Washington and Lee University, 1956. 

WILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961—; Assistant Professor of Education, Direc- 
tor of Athletics. 

B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1954; M.Ed., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1960. 

JOHN R. MORRIS II, 1963-; Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; M.S., University of New Hamp- 
shire, 1963. 

J. ROBERT O'DONNELL, 1959-; Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1950; M.S., University of Dela- 
ware, 1953. 

THEODORE PAVLIDIS, 1964-; Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College, 1943; B.D., Evangelical School of The- 
ology, 1947; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1945. 

BENJAMIN A. RICHARDS, I960-; Assistant Professor of Philosophy; 
Chairman of the Department of Philosophy. 

A.B., Wesleyan University, 1942; A.M., Yale University, 1948; Ph.D., 
Yale University, 1959. 

REYNALDO ROVERS, 1945-; Assistant Professor of Voice. 
Graduate Juilliard School of Music. 

LINDA VAN STEENWYK, 1961-; Assistant Professor of Piano. 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1956; M.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1959. 

ELEANOR TITCOMB, 1964-; Assistant Professor of French. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1938; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., 
Radcliffe College, 1959. 

PERRY J. TROUTMAN, I960-; Assistant Professor of Religion and 
Greek. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1949; B.D., United Theological Seminary, 
1952; Ph.D., Boston University, 1964. 

HOMER WEIDMAN WIEDER, 1964-; Assistant Professor of Education. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1926; M.A., New York University, 1936. 

INSTRUCTORS: 

WILLIAM A. BATCHELOR, 1953-; Instructor in Art. 

B.S., State Teachers College, Edinboro, 1933; M.A., Pennsylvania 
State University, 1951. 

153 



FACULTY 

LEE H. BOWKER, 1965-; Instructor in Sociology. 

A.B., Muhlenberg College, 1963; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 
1965. 

CHARLES T. COOPER, 1965-; Instructor in Spanish. 

B.S., U. S. Naval Academy, 1942; M.A., Middlebury College, 1965. 

GEORGE L. DARLINGTON, 1964-; Instructor in Physical Education. 
B.S., Rutgers University, 1961; M.A., Stanford University, 1962. 

MRS. E. ELIZABETH GARMAN, 1964-; Instructor in Physical Educations- 
Director of Athletics for Women. 
B.S., Beaver College, 1942. 

G. THOMAS GATES, 1963-; Instructor in Business Law. 

A.B., Brown University, 1945; LL.B., Boston University, 1949. 

D. JOHN GRACE, 1958-59; 1961-; Instructor in Accounting. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1955; C.P.C.U., 1955; C.P.A., 1957. 

MRS. GEILAN HANSEN, 1963-; Instructor in Russian. 

BARBARA S. JEFFRIES, 1965-; Instructor in Art. 
B.S., Kutztown State College, 1958. 

MARJORIE JOHN, 1965-; Instructor in Psychology. 

A.B., University of Virginia, 1958; M.A., University of Michigan, 1962. 

JAMES A. JOLLY, 1964-; Instructor in History. 

A.B., Central Michigan University, 1959; M.A., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1960. 

MRS. MARY B. LEWIN, 1963-; Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S. in Ed., Millersville State College, 1938; M.S. in Ed., Temple 
University, 1958. 

C. LINDLEY LIGHT, 1963-; Instructor in Mathematics. 
B.S., Millersville State College, 1962. 

MRS. SYLVIA R. MALM, 1962-; Instructor in Biology. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke, 1931; M.A., Brown University, 1934; Ph.D., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1937. 

MRS. AGNES B. O'DONNELL, 1961-; Instructor in English. 

A.B., Immaculata College, 1948; M.Ed., Temple University, 1953. 

GERALD J. PETROFES, 1963-; Instructor in Physical Education. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1958; M.Ed., Kent State University, 1962. 

E. JOAN REEVE, 1957-; Instructor in Piano. 

B.Mus., Beaver College, 1956; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964 

MRS. MALIN Ph. SAYLOR, 1961—; Instructor in French. 
Fil. kand., Universities of Uppsala and Stockholm, 1938. 

154 



FACULTY 

MRS. ROSALIND ANDREWS TUCKER, 1962-; Instructor in English. 
B.S., Bryn Mawr College, 1959; A.B., University of Miami, 1960; M.A., 
University of Miami, 1961. 

GLENN H. WOODS, 1965-; Instructor in English. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; M.Ed., Temple University, 1962. 

RICHARD T. YINGLING, January, 1964-; Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S. in Chem., Lebanon Valley College, 1962. 

MRS. LEAH M. ZIMMERMAN, 1964-; Instructor in Voice. 
Diploma, Juilliard School of Music, 1925. 

Auxiliary Schools 

MRS. ANNA HERR HOOVER, 1957-; Instructor in Elementary Edu- 
cation. 
A.B., Houghton College, 1946; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 1948. 

WILLIAM L. SCHMEHL, I960-; Instructor in History and Political 
Science. 
B.S., Shippensburg State College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

LUTHER W. STONE, 1965-; Instructor in Mathematics. 

B.S., Millersville State College, 1953; M.S. University of New Hamp- 
shire, 1964. 

PATRICIA A. ZIEGLER, 1965-; Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S. in Chemistry, Lebanon Valley College, 1964. 



MARK J. HOSTETTER, 1957-; College Pastor. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1936; B.D., United Theological Sem- 
inary, 1939; S.T.M., Yale University, 1940. 

HARRISBURG AREA CENTER FOR HIGHER EDUCATION: 

LAURENCE L. BARRELL, 1965-; Instructor in Sociology. 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1946; Ph.D., New York University, 1957. 

RICHARD C. BELL, 1964-; Instructor in Chemistry. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1941; M.Ed., Temple University, 1955. 

JEANNE E. BROOKER, 1965-; Instructor in Education. 

A.B., Mount Mercy College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh. 

EUGENE P. CLEMENTS, 1965-; Instructor in Philosophy. 

A.B. Goshen College, 1955; B.D., Goshen College Seminary, 1960; 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964. 

LEONARD M. COHEN, 1964-; Instructor in Psychology. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, 1950; D.Ed., Temple University, 1959. 

155 



FACULTY 

HARVEY D. HADDAD, 1961-; Instructor in Psychology. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1948; M.S. in Ed., Pennsylvania 
State University, 1949; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University, 1965. 

RICHARD C. JOHNSON, 1964-; Instructor in Sociology. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., University of Michigan, 
1951. 

MARCUS KONICK, 1961-; Instructor in Education. 

B.S. in Ed., Teachers College, Temple University, 1936; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, 1937; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1953. 

JOHN E. KOSOLOSKI, JR., 1965-; Instructor in Education. 

B.S., Bloomsburg State College; M.S., Bucknell University; M.Ed., 
Pennsylvania State University; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University. 

IRWIN RICHMAN, 1965-; Instructor in History. 

B.A., George Washington University, 1957; M.A., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1958; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1965. 

CHARLES A. NEWCOMER, 1965-; Instructor in Psychology. 

B.S., Susquehanna University, 1954; M.Ed., Temple University, 1959. 

ALBERT C. SOWERS, 1965-; Instructor in Psychology. 

B.S., West Chester State College, 1942; M.A., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1948. 

HELEN TODD, 1965—; Instructor in French. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1925; M.A., Middlebury College, 1928. 

LAURENCE WAITE, 1964-; Instructor in Spanish. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1949; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1951. 

JOSEPH P. ZACCANO, JR., I960-; Instructor in History. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1954; M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1956; 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1961. 

COOPERATING TRAINING TEACHERS: 

The student teaching program is organized to give the beginning 
teacher as wide and varied experiences as possible. 

Extreme care is used in the assignment of the cooperating teacher 
with the student teacher. The selection is made in a cooperative manner 
between the administration of the local school and the supervisor of 
practice teaching at the College. 

Student teaching in Music Education is done in the Derry Township 
Consolidated Schools, the Annville-Cleona Joint Public Schools and the 
Milton Hershey School. Student teaching in other areas of Elementary 
and Secondary Education is done in schools within reasonable traveling 
distance of the College. 

Names of cooperating teachers and subjects taught are available in 
the offices of the departments of Education and Music. 

156 



FACULTY 



DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANTS— 1965-1966 

Chemistry David H. Deck, 1966 

Economics and Business Administration Richard L. Shenk, 1966 

Elementary Education Ellen M. Jackson, 1967 

English Karen M. Caldwell, 1966 

Foreign Languages Charles R. Wright, 1966 

Health and Physical Education Charles W. Mowrer, 1966 

Barbara J. Macaw, 1967 

History and Political Science Rodney H. Shearer, 1966 

Mathematics Margaret J. Barto, 1967 

Music Robert W. Goodling, 1967 

Physics Richard N. Barshinger, 1966 

Psychology Valerie A. Yeager, 1968 

Religion Richard A. Wolfe, 1966 

Sociology Margaret A. Fehr, 1966 

TEACHING INTERNS— 1965-1966 

Biology Susan J. Schlesinger, 1966 

Ruth Ann Smith, 1966 

Economics Richard L. Shenk, 1966 

English Eric D. Brown, 1966 

Mathematics J onn W. Gregory, 1966 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY— 1965-1966 
Committee on Academic Affairs 

Departmental Chairmen; The Dean of the College, Dr. Ehrhart, Chairman 



Biology, Dr. Wilson 
Chemistry, Dr. Neidig 
Economics & Bus. Ad., Dr. Tom 
Education, Dr. McKlveen, 

Dr. Ebersole 
English, Dr. Struble 
Foreign Language, Dr. Piel 
Health & Phys. Ed., Mr. Marquette 

Term 
Expires 
Committee on Faculty Affairs 

Dr. Geffen, Chairman 1966 

Dr. Lockwood 1967 

Mr. O'Donnell 1967 

Dr. Rhodes 1968 

Dr. Richards 1968 

Committee on Student Affairs 
Mr. Henning, Chairman .... 1966 

Mr. Getz 1967 

Dr. Magee 1967 

Dr. Piel 1968 

Dr. Troutman 1968 



History & Pol. Science, Dr. Shay 
Mathematics, Dr. Bissinger 
Music, Mr. Smith 
Philosophy, Dr. Richards 
Physics, Dr. Rhodes 
Psychology, Dr. Love 
Religion, Dr. Wethington 

Term 
Expires 
Committee on Public Relations 

Dr. Thurmond 1966 

Mr. Curfman 1967 

Dr. Hess, Chairman 1967 

Dr. Griswold 1968 

Mrs. Tucker 1968 

Administrative Advisory Committee 

Dr. Rhodes 1966 

Dr. Wilson, Chairman 1967 

Dr. Love 1968 

and Chairmen of the other three 
committees. 






157 



ADDRESSES AND TELEPHONE NUMBER 
OF FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 1965-1966 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

Phone: Area Code 717 

867-3561 

Name Address Telephone 

Alexander, Mrs. Mary Laughlin Hall, L.V.C., Annville (Night) 867-9901 

*Batchelor, William A Box 356, Hershey 533-2237 

*Bemesderfer, Dr. James O Ridge Rd., R.D. #1, Annville 867-2541 

*Bender, Mrs. Ruth E 532 Maple St., Annville 867-1249 

Bissinger, Dr. Barnard H 635 Maple St., Annville 867-2215 

*Bollinger, O. Pass 726 Maple St., Annville 867-2510 

*Bowker, Lee H 5 N. Manheim St., Annville 

Brown, Mrs. Max 48 N. Railroad St., Annville 867-2335 

*Burras, Miss Fay B 304 E. Main St., Annville 867-2519 

*Carmean, D. Clark R.D. #1, Annville 867-9292 

Carmean, Mrs. D. Clark R.D. #1, Annville 867-9292 

*Cooper, Charles T Birch Road, Gretna Heights 964-3659 

*Curfman, George D 315 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 867-2825 

*Damus, Dr. Hilda M 49 Rosemont Ave., Cleona 273-6457 

*Darlington, George L 110 West Elm St., Palmyra 838-4228 

*Ebersole, Dr. Cloyd H Box 251, Quittie Park Drive, Annville 867-2642 

•Ehrhart, Dr. Carl Y 643 E. Queen St., Annville 867-1592 

*Faber, Dr. Anna D 211 Locust St., Annville 867-7771 

*Fairlamb, William H 340 Cumberland St., Annville 867-2400 

Farmerie, Dr. Samuel A R.D. #1, Annville, Box 603 867-8142 

Faust, Miss Martha C 1409 E. Queen St., Annville 867-2184 

*Fehr, Alex J 404 Walnut St., Lebanon 273-1821 

Fencil, Miss Gladys M 128 E. Main St., Annville 867-8981 

*Fields, Dr. Donald E 46 South Lancaster St., Annville 867-2623 

*Fields, Mrs. Frances T 46 South Lancaster St., Annville 867-2623 

Flood, Austin C R.D. #1, Jonestown 867-4374 

*Ford, Dr. Arthur L 618 E. Queen St., Annville 867-3491 

*Garman, Mrs. Betty H 130 W. Caracas Ave., Hershey 533-7239 

*Gates, Judge G. Thomas Res. R.D. #5, Lebanon 272-7478 

*Geffen, Dr. Elizabeth M Sheridan Apts., 230 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville ..867-2689 

*Getz, Pierce A 227 S. Lancaster St., Annville 867-2438 

*Grace, D. John 230 E. Oak St., Palmyra 838-6903 

*Grimm, Dr. Samuel 234 E. Main St., Annville 867-7922 

♦Griswold, Dr. Robert E Box 139, Ridge Rd., Annville 867-8851 

Hanigan, Mrs. Ethel Vickroy Hall, L.V.C., Annville (Night) 867-3571 

*Hansen, Mrs. Geilan 101 E. Cumberland St., Lebanon 273-6447 

*Haugh, Dr. John F 101 N. Prince St., Palmyra 838-4445 

*Henning, Paul F., Jr 502 Matthew Rd., Harrisburg 545-3226 

*Herr, Mrs. June E 542 Cocoa Ave., Hershey 534-2680 

*Hess, Dr. Paul W 333 S. Green Street, Palmyra 838-7211 

Hofifer, Edward P 12 Sandelwood Drive, Palmyra 838-4663 

*Hollingsworth, Dr. Harold Birch and Green St., Palmyra 838-3621 

Hostetter, Rev. Mark J 50 College Ave., Annville 867-2934 




158 



FACULTY ADDRESSES 

Name Address Telephone 

•Jeffries, Barbara S 260 Elm Avenue, Hershey 533-7079 

♦John, Marjorie 14 Pearl, Wernersville (215)678-2348 

•Jolly, James A 224 Maple St., Annville 867-2923 

*Kreider, Mrs. P. Rodney 217 E. Main St., Annville 867-1333 

Ladley, John B., Jr 457^ Maple St., Annville 867-1550 

*Lanese, Thomas A 330 Cumberland St., Annville 867-2968 

*Lewin, Mrs. Mary B 285 W. High St., Hummelstown 566-2649 

♦Light, Dr. V. Earl (E) R.D #1, Annville 867-2456 

•Lockwood, Dr. Karl L 135 E. Locust St., Annville 867-2550 

*Love, Dr. Jean 128 E. Main St., Annville 867-1082 

MacMillan, Wesley J 234 N. Lancaster St., Annville 867-2108 

*Magee, Dr. Richard D Quittie Dr., Annville 867-1203 

•Malm, Mrs. Pierre R.D. #4 Lebanon 273-5956 

Marquette, George R R.D. #4, Lebanon 867-2548 

Mayhoffer, George P 611 S. 12th St., Lebanon 272-4471 

•McHenry, J. Robert 9 E. Main St., Annville 867-1245 

*McHenry, William D 450 S. Duke St., Palmyra 838-1930 

•McKlveen, Dr. Gilbert D 45 N. Ulrich St., Annville 867-2047 

Mezoff, Dr. Earl R 101 Lynnwood Drive, Palmyra 838-7071 

Millard, Mrs. Margaret Benjamin Franklin Highway, Annville 867-1583 

Miller, Dr. Frederick K 

(President of the College) 763 Maple St., Annville 867-1224 

Miller, Larry H 33 S. Weber St., Annville 867-2981 

Monteith, Dr. James R 301 E. Main St., Annville 867-1501 

•Morris, John R., II R.D. #2, Annville 867-2926 

Myers, Miss Helen Ethel (E)..Hill Farm Nursing Home, R.D., Annville 867-2451 

•Neidig, Dr. Howard A 96 W. Walnut St., Palmyra 838-1414 

•O'Donnell, J. Robert 235 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

•O'Donnell, Mrs. Agnes 235 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 

Parker, Mrs. Anna Marie Mary Green Hall, L.V.C., Annville (Night) 867-3501 

•Pavlidis, Rev. Theodore 1300 Robinson Ave., Havertown, Pa. ...(215) SU 9-0591 

•Petrofes, Gerald J 120 W. Elm St., Palmyra 838-1982 

•Piel, Dr. S. Elizabeth 19 Rosemont Ave., Cleona 272-2281 

•Reeve, Miss E. Joan 148 College Ave., Annville 867-2661 

•Rhodes, Dr. Jacob L 410 Maple St., Annville 867-2001 

•Richards, Dr. Benjamin A 531 Maple St., Annville 867-2564 

Richie, Dr. G. A. (E) 466 E. Main St., Annville 867-6131 

•Riley, Dr. Robert C R.D. #1, Ridge Rd., Annville 867-1046 

•Rovers, Mr. Reynaldo 1801 Warren St., New Cumberland 233-2738 

•Saylor, Mrs. Malin 803 Maple St., Annville 867-8731 

Schaak, Irwin R 1018 Martin St., Lebanon 273-2344 

Shanaman, Ralph B R.D. #2, Annville 867-2245 

•Shay, Dr. Ralph S R.D. #3, Lebanon 865-4481 

Showers, Richard V 23 Sandalwood Dr., Palmyra 838-1855 

•Smith, Robert W 761 Linden Road, Hershey 534-1274 

•Smith, Walter L Box 56, 26 E. Main St., Annville 867-1302 

Souders, Rev. Bruce C 150 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville 867-2346 

•Stachow, Frank E 438 E. Main St., Annville 867-8751 

•Stokes, Milton L R.D. #1, Quittie Drive, Annville 867-7801 

Stonecipher, Dr. A. H. M. (E) . .723 Maple St., Annville 867-7751 

•Struble, Dr. George G 27 N. Ulrich St., Annville 867-1259 

Struble, Mrs. Lillie 27 N. Ulrich St., Annville 867-1259 

•Thurmond, Dr. James M 46 Arlington Rd., Camp Hill 737-8344 

•Titcomb, Dr. Eleanor 1483 E. Queen St., Annville 867-7012 

•Tom, Dr. C. F. Joseph 626 Maple St., Annville 867-2005 

Trauger, David W 300 S. White Oak St., Annville 867-1023 

Tredick, Mrs. Alma 424 S. 14th St., Lebanon 273-1173 

•Troutman, Dr. Perry J R.D. #1, Annville 867-1770 

•Tucker, Mrs. Rosalind A 148 College Ave., Annville 867-1001 

•vanSteenwyk, Miss Linda 148 College Ave., Annville 867-2661 

Wallace, Dr. Paul A. W 1027 Drexel Hills Blvd., Camp Hill 236-2383 

•Wethington, Dr. L. Elbert R.D. #1, Ridge Rd., Annville 867-1111 

•Wieder, Homer W 1121 S. Green St., Palmyra 838-3517 

•Wilson, Dr. Francis H 219 Maple St., Annville 867-1318 

•Woods, Glenn H 405 E. Main St., Annville 867-1596 

•Yingling, Richard T Box 599, R.D. #1, Palmyra 838-4339 

•Zimmerman, Mrs. Leah M 2808 Laurel Lane, Camp Hill 737-1432 



Indicates teaching faculty; (E) indicates Emeritus status. 

159 




Tea for Women Students 



160 



General Alumni Organization 

Executive Council of the Lebanon Valley College 
Alumni Association— 1964-1966 

OFFICERS: 

President 

Curvin N. Dellinger '38 

622 South Thirteenth Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

Vice President 

Harry L. Bricker, Jr., Esq., '50 

407 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110 

Executive Secretary 

Mrs. P. Rodney Kreider '22 

217 East Main Street, Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

ELECTED MEMBERS: 

Mrs. Gladys Buffington Holman '27 

3340 North Third Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110 

Mrs. Miriam Miller Roush '33 

R.D. 3, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

Kenneth C. Sheaffer '35 

88 Mt. Zion Road, York, Pennsylvania 17400 

Charles W. Tome, Jr., '49 

215 Edge Hill Drive 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 17356 

ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

Mrs. Ruth Evans Gerberich '20 

138 North Ninth Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

Dewitt M. Essick '34 

43 Wabank Road, Millersville, Pennsylvania 17551 

James H. Leathern '32 

610 South First Avenue, Highland Park, New Jersey 08904 

PAST PRESIDENTS: 

Jefferson C. Barnhart, Esq., '38 

124 Java Avenue, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033 

E. Peter Strickler '47 

Eighth & Willow Streets, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 



All officers listed as of June 6, 1965. 

161 



ALUMNI ORGANIZATION 

Regional Alumni Clubs 

HARRISBURG AREA: 

(Dauphin and Cumberland Counties) 

President 

Floyd M. Baturin, Esq., '51 

Suite 204, Market Square Building, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
17104 

Vice President 

Donald C. Beitzel '50 

2426 Adrian Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17104 

Secretary 

Harry L. Bricker, Jr., Esq., '50 
407 North Front Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110 

Treasurer 

Nancy Wolf Jauss '55 
1947 Manada Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17101 

LANCASTER CITY AND COUNTY: 

President 

Edith Shanaman Rothenberger '51 

942 Chestnut Street, Columbia, Pennsylvania 17512 

Vice President 

Ralph E. Coleman '32 

215 East Willow Street, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 17022 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Jane Lutz McGary '52 

1538 Lambeth Road, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17600 

Alumni Clubs Meet Regularly 










ALUMNI ORGANIZATION 
LEBANON COUNTY AREA: 

President 

Norman Lazin '37 

403 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

Vice President 

Mrs. Alma Binner Wise '31 

Box 48, Rexmont, Pennsylvania 17085 

Secretary 

Mrs. Patricia Lutz Walter '57 

825 Church Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

Treasurer 

Leroy E. Copenhaver '59 

313 Weidman Street, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 17042 

PHILADELPHIA AREA: 

President 

Marlin A. Espenshade '41 

24 Hillside Drive, Downingtown, Pennsylvania 19335 

Vice President 

James A. Mitchell, Jr., '58 

107 Canterbury Drive, Sproul Estates, Chester, Pennsylvania 
19013 

Secretary 

Ruth Goyne Berger '37 

936 Carver Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19124 

Treasurer 

Otto L. Wolpert '57 

2538 Gypsy Lane, Glenside, Pennsylvania 19038 

READING AND BERKS COUNTY: 

Vice President 

Clair W. Noll '55 

2 West Pine Street, Fleetwood, Pennsylvania 19522 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Barry L. Keinard '61 

407 Douglass Street, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania 19096 

YORK COUNTY AREA: 

Vice President 

Joseph D. Rojahn '50 

248 South Walnut Street, Dallastown, Pennsylvania 17313 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Janease Howard Artz '57 

51 Hoke Street, Spring Grove, Pennsylvania 17362 

163 



ALUMNI ORGANIZATION 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS: 

Chairman 

Enos A. Detweiler '29 

2719 Elgin Road, Evanston, Illlinois 60201 

BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON 

President 

Robert P. Lutz '29 

4808 Crowson Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21212 

First Vice President 

George J. Hiltner, Jr. '35 

6221 Liberty Heights Terrace, Baltimore, Maryland 21207 

Second Vice President 

Raymond M. Oberholtzer '23 

5503 Christy Drive, Washington, D. C. 20016 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Viola Snell Maury '42 

6631 Dogwood Road, Baltimore, Maryland 21207 

NORTH NEW JERSEY AREA: 

President 

James M. Geiselhart '52 

Box 18, Ogdensburg, New Jersey 07439 

Vice Presidents 

Bruce Baver '54 

832 Valley Road, Upper Montclair, New Jersey 07087 

Ray C. Herb '24 

106 Linden Avenue, Metuchen, New Jersey 08840 

Joan Ringle Policastro '54 

14 Glen Gary Road, Middlesex, New Jersey 08846 

William Tomilen '52 

137 West 49th Street, Bayonne, New Jersey 07002 

Corresponding Secretary 

Elaine Barron Auerbach '52 

2 Old Farm Road, North Caldwell, New Jersey 07006 

Recording Secretary 

Margaret Garber Philp '60 

79 North Passaic Avenue, Chatham, New Jersey 07928 

Treasurer 

Nicholas Bova, Jr., '52 

545 Hanford Place, Westfield, New Jersey 07090 

164 



ALUMNI ORGANIZATION 
County Chairmen: 

Bergen 

Alicia Whiteman Hartgers '53 — 731 Birchwood Drive, Wykoff 

07481 
Richard Schiemer '51 — 468 Davidson Street, Maywood 08330 

Essex 

Ira Bechtel '61—180 Prospect Street, Apt. 9, East Orange 07017 
Mrs. Nancy Ulrich Wood '29 — 18 Duryea Road, Upper Mont- 
clair 07087 

Hudson 

William Tomilen '52 — 137 West Forty-ninth Street, Bayonne 
07002 

Middlesex 

Robert Hoffsommer, Jr., '52 — 258 Newman Street, Metuchen 08840 

Monmouth 

Robert Tarantolo '53 — 16 Myrtle Avenue, Rear, Long Branch 
07740 
Morris 

Margaret Garber Philp '60 — 79 North Passaic Avenue, Chatham 
07928 
Passaic 

Joan Orlando Geiselhart '52 — Box 18, Ogdensburg 07439 

Somerset 

Joseph D. Ragno '60 and Nancy Nickell Ragno '60 
Post Road, Bernardsville 07924 

Sussex 

Joan Orlando Geiselhart '52 — Box 18, Ogdensburg 07439 

Union 
Frances Shroyer Bova '54 — 545 Hanford Place, Westfield 07090 
Dorothy Long Sechrist '40 — 29 Hampton Road, Cranford 07016 



165 



Degrees Conferred 



Degrees Conferred January 27, 1965 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

*Frederick John Marsik Robert Harry Rittle 

John Elliott Thompson 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

With a major in Elementary Education 

Karen Mellinger Poorman *Judith Marie Shellhammer 

*Nancy Jean Shroyer 

With a Major in Economics and Business Administration 
Clair Eugene Shatto, Jr. 

With a major in Music Education 

*Sylvia Laubach Brill Robert Lewis Schmerker 

* Participated in formal ceremonies, June 6, 1965 



Degrees Conferred June 6, 1965 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Harold William Alsted 
William Garfield Altland 
Rhonwen Nancy Ashley 
Jill Barckley 
Judith Lee Bowman 
Richard Andrew Carlson 
Alyce Charlene Chubb 
William Cleveland DiGiacomo 
Julia Anne Dugan 
Carole Elaine Duncan 
William Brewster English 
Eston Earl Evans 
Mary Joan Farra 
William Charles Gingrich 
Grant Gilbert Greider 
Dale Bruce Hains 
John Wesley Hall 
Molly McCoy Hartman 
Terrance Richard Herr 
Daisy Mae Hoffman 
George Joseph Hollich, Jr. 



Alan Levy 

Sandra Hope Lindsay 

Jay William Lingerman 

Richard Lee London 

Robert Jay Ludwig 

Robert Wade Mariner 

♦Frederic John Marsik 

Dennis Jacob Martin 

Kathleen Rita McQuate 

Barry James Miller 

Marcia Louise Miller 

Catherine Jane Moore 

Frances Ann Niblo 

Dariel Nanette Orefice 

Ervin Wayne Reinbold 

Louise Seifert Royahn 

Joseph Dewey Rutter 

Dennis Clifford Schmid 

Patricia Ann Shreffler 

Mildred May Smith 

Carroll Gene Stroh 



166 



Suzanne Lenore Hollingsworth 
Barbara Alley Humphreys 
Larry Stephen Huntzberry 
Marlene Sims Jones 
Donald Ralph Kaufmann 
James Karl Klinedinst 
Philip Charles Kohlhaas 
Geraldine L. Hollinger Leet 
David William Leigh 
Susan Ellen Leonhard 



Robert Raymond Zweitzig 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1965 

Carl Alfred Synan 

Albert Joseph Taylor, Jr. 

David Grover Thompson 

John Allen Uhrich, III 

Mary Ellen vanHorn 

Harry Ellsworth Wackerman 

Virginia Beth Jenkins Walker 

Bruce Ramsey Wieder 

Harrison Diesel Woodruff, Jr. 

Albert Barry Yocom 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

With a Major in Economics and Busi?iess Administration 

Nettie Lucille Brannan Andrew William Kreider 

Vincent August Caprio Dennis Wayne Mills 

James Harold Cashion, Jr. Stephen Harding Roberts 



Robert Lee Deck 
Harry Martin Eberly 
Gary Leon Kline 



Victor Roeske 
Charles Theador Savidge, Jr. 
Robert Paul Shoap 
Glenn Robert Stech 



With a Major in Elementary Education 

Gail Diane Barger David Earley Sausser 
Margaret Carol Bottcher Jeanne Elaine Schneiderwind 

Jeannette Kathleen Brown *Judith Marie Shellhammer 

Judith Sylvia Horwitz *Nancy Jean Shroyer 

Harry Wilbur Jacobs Sallie Ann Slocum 

William Nicholas Koch Lois Louise Shroyer Smith 

Carolyn Sue Leitner Mark Raymond Treftz 

Caroline Marie Miller Audrey Anne Wahler 

Diana Lea Nelson Bonnie Carlene Weirick 

Mary Ellen Olmsted Ralph Henry White 

With a Major in Music Education 

Robert Earl Achenbach Arlene Jane Hartenstine 

James Allen Althouse Dorothy Carolyn Hudson 

Jeanne Frances Bogert Roberta Catherine Johns 

Sylvia Laubach Brill* Joy Anne Klingler 

James Grant Code Robert Clark Lau 

Arthur Louis Cohen Kenneth Lee Laudermilch 

Nancy Ellen Dice Betsy Ann Lorenz 

Paul Dwight Enterline William Edward Luce 

Audrey Mabus Frye Gail Myrlene Moritz 

Leslie Ellen Gardner Linda Stoudt Schaeffer 

Robert Bruce Gregory Marianne Thurmond 

Gary Paul Grimm Theodore Orris Weaver 

William Allen Grove Norma Christine Woolston 

With a Major in Science 



Dennis Gene Bechini 
Walter Eugene Blouch 
Michael William Bottomley 
William Edward Checket 



William Henry Hillmann, Jr. 

Howard Douglas Jones 

Richard Lester Krill 

Malcolm Lee Lazin 



167 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1965 



George Stuart Close 
Dorothy Jane Cole 
Thomas Bunnell Crisman 
Kay Frances Fontenoy 
Dale Bartlett Gouger 
Barry Melvin Grosky 
Martha Alice Harbaugh 

Edward Burton Ruth, Jr. 



Barry Lafean Lutz 

Karen Elizabeth Lutz 

David Barry Mahler 

Bruce LeRoy Moyer 

Edward Lee Nickoloff 

Larry Eugene Orwig 

Barry Lynn Reichard 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Virginia Alexandria Dilkes Glenn Allen Moser 

Wayne Lee Felty William Martin Scovell 

Joel Barry Lantz Lee Alan Thomas 

Lillian Elmira Loper Jamie Gordon Wescott 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Virginia Drumm Bergey Constance Anne Lemke 



Mildred Faye Hughes 



Virginia Helen Metz 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Sandra Kay Blouch 
Gayl Overgaard Hickox 
Linda Kay Keim 

Ruth S. Wood 



Sally May McCleary 

Doris Mae Walter 

Runette Elnora White 



GRADUATION HONORS 

Summa Cum Laude 
Larry Eugene Orwig 

Magna Cum Laude 

Eston Earl Evans Dorothy Carolyn Hudson 

John Wesley Hall Howard Douglas Jones 

Barry Lafean Lutz 

Cum Laude 

Margaret Carol Bottcher Suzanne Lenore Hollingsworth 

Judith Lee Bowman Barbara Alley Humphreys 

Mildred May Smith 

Elected to Membership 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 
Honorary Scholarship Society 
Margaret Carol Bottcher Suzanne Lenore Hollingsworth 

Judith Lee Bowman Dorothy Carolyn Hudson 

Linda Slonaker Conrad Barbara Alley Humphreys 

Eston Earl Evans Howard Douglas Jones 

John Wesley Hall Barry Lafean Lutz 

Larry Eugene Orwig 



168 



DEGREES CONFERRED, 1965 

Departmental Honors 

Wayne Lee Felty In Chemistry 

William Martin Scovell In Chemistry 

Barry Lafean Lutz In Physics 

Larry Eugene Orwig In Physics 

Suzanne Leonore Hollingsworth In Psychology 

James Karl Klinedinst In Psychology 

College Honors 
Barry Lafean Lutz 

Honorary Degrees 
Conferred June 6, 1965 

Robert Masters Browning Doctor of Laws 

Hermann Walter Kaebnick Doctor of Humane Letters 

Gerald Donald Kauff man Doctor of Divinity 

James Hain Leathern Doctor of Science 

Daniel LeRoy Shearer Doctor of Divinity 

Degrees Conferred September 3, 1965 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Dorcas Ruth Haines Richard Thomas Irwin 

Harry Wisler Smoker, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

With a Major in Economics and Business Administration 
Carvel Lee Mowery Peter A. Stanilla, Jr. 

With a Major in Elementary Education 
Alys Gamble Chambers Charles Russel Plantz 

Jean Cook Osevala Marena C. Stambach 

With a Major in Music Education 
Thomas Waldo Bowers 

With a Major in Science 
Robert Joseph Riether, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Wayne Frederick Eichel 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Sandra Kay Diener 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Cum Laude 

Harry Wisler Smoker, Jr. 

Columbia 



169 




Student Awards, ig6§ 



Senior Awards 



Baish Memorial History Award — 
John Allen Uhrich, III, Lebanon 

Established in 1947 in memory of Henry H. Baish by his wife and daughter, Mar- 
garet. Awarded to a member of the Senior Class majoring in history; selected by the 
Chairman of the History Department on the basis of merit. 

Andrew Bender Memorial Chemistry Award — 
William Martin Scovell, Kingston 

Established in 1952 by the Chemistry Club of the College and alumni. Awarded to an 
outstanding senior majoring in Chemistry. 

Wall Street Journal Award — 
Harry Martin Eberly, Palmyra 

Established in 1948 by the Wall Street Journal for distinguished work in the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Business. The award consists of a silver medal and a year's 
subscription to the Wall Street Journal. 

Music Scholarship Award — 

Dorothy Carolyn Hudson, McLean, Virginia 

Given by the Department of Music to the senior who has attained the highest 
scholarship in music. 

The Salome Wingate Sanders Award in Music Education — 
Roberta Catherine Johns, Manchester, Connecticut 

Established in 1957 by Robert Bray Wingate, Class of 1948, in honor of his grand- 
mother, Salome Wingate Sanders. Given annually to the senior who exemplifies excel- 
lent character, potential usefulness, high academic standing, and who evidences loyalty 
to his Alma Mater. 

The David E. Long Memorial Ministerial Award — 
Larry Stephen Huntsberry, Hagerstown, Maryland 

Established in 1956 by the Reverend Abraham M. Long, Class of 1917, in memory of 
his father, the Reverend David E. Long, Class of 1900. This award is given annually 
to a student preparing for the ministry, selected by the members of the Department 
of Religion on the basis of merit. 

Pi Gamma Mu Scholarship Award — 
Kathleen Rita McQuate, Lebanon 

Authorized by the National Social Science Honor Society Pi Gamma Mu, incorporated 
and established at Lebanon Valley College in 1948 by the Pennsylvania Nu Chapter 
of the Society for the promotion of scholarship in the Social Sciences. Granted upon 
graduation to a senior member of Pennsylvania Nu Chapter, selected by the Chapter's 
Executive Committee, for outstanding scholarship in economics, government, history, or 
sociology, and high proficiency or other distinction attained in pursuit of same during 
his or her years at the college. 

170 



STUDENT AWARDS, 1965 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Section, 

American Chemical Society Award — 

Wayne Lee Felty, Harrisburg 

Presented to the outstanding senior Chemistry major in each of the colleges in the 
area based on demonstrated proficiency in Chemistry. The award consists of a book 
entitled A German-English Dictionary for Chemists. 

The M. Claude Rosenberry Memorial Award — 
Robert Clark Lau, Lebanon 

Given to an outstanding senior in Music Education who is entering the teaching field 
in the State of Pennsylvania, and who has demonstrated unusual ability and promise 
as a potential teacher. 

B'nai B'rith Americanism Award — 

Howard Douglas Jones, Elizabethtown 

Given to the member of the graduating class who throughout the year by his actions 
best exemplified the philosophies of our American Democracy — those precepts of toler- 
ance — brotherhood, citizenship, respect for his fellow students regardless of race, color 
or creed; one who abhors prejudice and discrimination and who by his very actions has 
earned the respect and admiration of his fellow students by putting into practice the 
very tenets taught to all of us in our institutions of learning for the sole purpose of 
making this, our country, a better land in which to live. 

Governor James H. Duff Award — 
Albert Barry Yocom, Pottstown 

Established in 1960 by Governor James H. Duff (Pennsylvania) to promote interest 
in state government. Awarded annually to a senior who by participation in campus 
government or in debating demonstrates a facility and interest in government service. 

The Sigma Alpha Iota Honor Certificate Award — 
Dorothy Carolyn Hudson, McLean, Virginia 

Awarded to the senior music major with the highest scholastic average over her four 
years of study. The award consists of an honor certificate. 

Outstanding Senior of Delta Alpha Chapter, SAI — 
Dorothy Carolyn Hudson, McLean, Virginia 

Awarded by the Philadelphia Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota to the girl 
selected by her sister members as the outstanding senior of Delta Alpha Chapter. 
The award consists of a life subscription to Pan Pipes, the fraternity magazine. 

The Chuck Maston Award — * 

Howard Douglas Jones, Elizabethtown 

Established in 1952 by the Knights of the Valley. This award is made annually to a 
male member of a varsity team who has displayed the exceptional qualities of sports- 
manship, leadership, cooperation, and spirit. 

The American Association of University Women Award — 
Judith Lee Bowman, Lebanon 

Awarded annually by the Annville Chapter of the American Association of University 
Women to a senior woman on the basis of scholarship and campus service. 

The John Zola Memorial Award — * 
Terrance Richard Herr, Cornwall 

Established in 1962 by the LV Varsity Club. To be awarded to the football player 
showing qualities of desire, attitude, sportsmanship, and initiative, — the qualities that 
John displayed. This award is open to members of all classes and the winner is elected 
by the members of the football team. 



Not always awarded to seniors. 

171 



STUDENT AWARDS, 1965 

Childhood Education Club Award — 
Carolyn Sue Leitner, Harrisburg 

Awarded to an outstanding student in the Department of Elementary Education who 
has attained senior standing and has successfully completed one semester of student 
teaching. 

Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges — 

Margaret Carol Bottcher Howard Douglas Jones 

Virginia Alexandria Dilkes Malcolm Lee Lazin 

Carole Elaine Duncan Carolyn Sue Leitner 

Dale Bartlett Gouger Barry Lafean Lutz 

Robert Bruce Gregory Kathleen Rita McQuate 

Suzanne Lenore Hollingsworth Dennis Jacob Martin 

Dorothy Carolyn Hudson Edward Burton Ruth, Jr. 

Barbara Alley Humphreys Albert Barry Yocom 

Recognition in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is 
awarded annually on the basis of grades, personal character, and campus leadership. 
Final selection is made by the publishers. 

Sigma Alpha Iota — The Dean's Honor Award — 
Audrey Mabus Frye, Bloomsburg 

Awarded to a member of Delta Alpha Chapter on the basis of scholarship, musician- 
ship and fraternity service and in recognition of her outstanding achievement and 
contribution to the fraternity. 



General Awards 

Alumni Scholarships Awards — 

Janet Lee Bachant, Bergenfield, New Jersey 

Richard Norman Barshinger, York 

Carl Eugene Horning, Lebanon 

Richard Norman Simington, Valley Stream, New York 

These awards, authorized by the Alumni Association of Lebanon Valley College in 
June 1953, were established with the resources of the alumni Life Membership Fund. 
These scholarships are granted annually to deserving students on the basis of character, 
academic achievement, and need; the recipients of these scholarships to be designated 
Alumni Scholars. 

Maud P. Laughlin Social Science Scholarship Award — 
Rodney Hain Shearer, Wernersville 
Richard Lee Shenk, Myerstown 

Awarded in recognition of excellence in scholarship, academic progress, campus 
citizenship, service to the institution, participation in extra-curricular activities. 

John F. Zola Memorial Scholarship Award — 
Charles William Mowrer, Columbia 

Awarded by the Knights of the Valley to a full-time student, on the basis of character 
and financial need. 

The Biological Scholarship Award — 

Ruth Ann Smith, Princeton, New Jersey 

Established in 1918 by alumni and friends. Awarded annually by the chairman of the 
Biology Department on the basis of merit. 

172 



STUDENT AWARDS, 1965 

Medical Scholarship Award — 

LaDorna J. DePaul, Pittsburgh 

Established in 1918 by alumni and friends. Awarded annually on the basis of merit. 

The Harrisburg Chapter of the National Association of 
Accountants Award — 

Richard Lee Shenk, Myerstown 

Granted to the student demonstrating outstanding achievement in the introductory 
accounting course. The award consists of a student subscription to NAA Bulletin and 
Research Reports of the NAA. 

Phi Lambda Sigma Scholarship Award — 
Kiyofumi Sakaguchi, Sasebo, Japan 

Established in 1962 by Phi Lambda Sigma and awarded on the basis of need, academic 
achievement, and contribution to the goals of the College. 

Bradford Clifford Alban Memorial Scholarship — 
Jeanne Elizabeth Irwin, Dauphin 

Established in 1964 by Phi Lambda Sigma and awarded on the basis of need, academic 
achievement, and contribution to the goals of the College. 

The Woman's Club of Lebanon Scholarship Award — 
Lucretia Alexander Tate, Annville 

An award given annually by the Woman's Club of Lebanon to a person from Lebanon 
County enrolled as a full-time student; the choice to be based on financial need, 
scholarship, and character. 

Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award — 
Richard Norman Barshinger, York 

Established in 1935 in memory of Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner, Class of 1883, by 
Daniel E. Burtner, Samuel J. Evers, and Evers Burtner. Awarded to an outstanding 
member of the Junior Class selected by the faculty on the basis of scholarship, charc- 
ter, social promise, and need. 

The Andrew Bender Chemistry Scholarship Award — 
Ronald Scott Beckley, Lebanon 

Awarded to a member of the junior class majoring in Chemistry for outstanding 
achievement in Chemistry, for leadership, and for campus citizenship. 

Music Scholarship Award — 
Lois Elaine Moyer, Palmyra 

Awarded by the Department of Music to the member of the junior class who has 
attained the highest scholarship in music. 

Delta Alpha Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota Award — 
Bonnie Marie Hood, Allentown 

Established in 1963 in memory of Marcia M. Pickwell, instructor in piano. Given 
annually to a sophomore or junior woman student majoring in music; selected on the 
basis of need, musicianship, and future promise in her chosen profession. 

Sophomore Achievement Award in Chemistry — 
Roberta Jean Gable, Baltimore, Maryland 

Awarded to a member of the sophomore class majoring in chemistry who has 
demonstrated outstanding work in the field of Chemistry. This award was originated 
by the Student Affiliate Chapter of the American Chemical Society. 

173 




STUDENT AWARDS, 1965 

Sophomore Prize in English Literature — 
Ronald Dawson Newmaster, Lebanon 
Carol Lynn Toth, Coatesville 
Judith Ellen Donmoyer, Allentown 

Established by the Class of 1928. Awarded to the three best students in Sophomore 
English (Humanities 20), taking into account scholarship, originality, and progress. 

Physics Achievement Award — 

Bruce Leonard Bean, Bladensburg 

Awarded by the Chemical Rubber Company to the outstanding student of the freshman 
or sophomore class in the First Year Physics course. The award consists of a copy 
of the "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics." 

The Max F. Lehman Memorial Mathematics Prize — 
Carol Elaine Eshelman, Manheim 
Ellen Marie Latherow, Harrisburg 

Established by the Class of 1907, in memory of a classmate. Awarded to that member 
of the freshman class who shall have attained the highest standing in mathematics. 

Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial Award in Music — 
Marjorie Jean Miller, Titusville, New Jersey 

Awarded annually to that member of the freshman class who displays the following 
basic qualities: (1) musicianship with performing ability; (2) reasonably high aca- 
demic standing; (3) cooperation, dependability, and loyalty to the college. 

Mathematics Achievement Award — 
Bruce Leonard Bean, Bladensburg 
Carol Ann Edgecomb, Somerville, New Jersey 
Joan Roby Taylor, Wayne, New Jersey 

Awarded by the Chemical Rubber Company to a member of the freshman class for 
the best work in mathematics throughout the freshman year. The award consists of a 
copy of the new edition of the Chemical Rubber Company's book on "Standard Mathe- 
matical Tables." 

Freshman Achievement Award in Chemistry — 
Leroy Herr Arnold, Millersville 

Awarded by the Chemical Rubber Company to a member of the freshman class major- 
ing in chemistry who has demonstrated outstanding work in the field of chemistry. 
This award was originated by the Student Affiliate Chapter of the American Chemical 
Society. 

Freshman Girl of the Year Award — 
Janet Margaret Else, Wayne 

Given annually by the Resident Women's Student Government to the outstanding fresh- 
man girl on the basis of scholarship, leadership, campus citizenship, and personality. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Scholarship Award — 
Jean Louise Shaw, Stewartstown 

Awarded annually by the Philadelphia Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota to a junior 
member of Delta Alpha Chapter on the basis of talent and need. 

Pickwell Memorial Music Award — 
Carol Anne Frey, Lebanon 

Established in 1963 in memory of Marcia M. Pickwell, faculty member of the Depart- 
ment of Music. Awarded annually to a junior music major who has demonstrated 
outstanding pianistic ability and promise. 

174 



Register of Students, 1965-1966 

Seniors 

Name Major Address 

Alleman, Michael Terry Econ. & Bus. Ad 5 N. Manheim St., Annville, Pa. 

Anderson, Carl Leroy Elem. Educ 60 Canfield Ave., Dover, N. J. 

Arnold, Edward Leroy Pol. Science R.D. 2, Lebanon, Pa. 

Bachant, Janet Lee Psychology 51 C Liberty Rd., Bergenfield, N. J. 

Bachant, Karen Ann Elem. Ed 51 C Liberty Rd., Bergenfield, N. J. 

Bachant, Nancy Sue Sociology 51 C Liberty Rd., Bergenfield, N. J. 

Barshinger, Richard Norman . . .Physics 1850 Queen St., York, Pa. 

Bayer, Jay David Biology Box 144, Clayton, N. J. 

Beckley, Ronald Scott Chemistry 526 N. 3rd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Beltran, Lynne Carmen Spanish 64 Ethan Dr., Murray Hill, N. J. 

Bittinger, Lawrence Richard Econ. & Bus. Ad 20 E. Main St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Bobb, Alma Payne History 278 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Boffenmeyer, Janice Margaret . .Biology 318 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bott, James Harry Psychology 633 Fishburn Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Brandt, James Kenneth Biology 54 N. Lancaster St., Annville, Pa. 

Braun, Edward David Music Ed 1835 N. 16th St., Reading, Pa. 

Brehm, Zenas Linn Biology Box 349, R.D. 1, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Brill, Charles Pol. Science 225A N. College St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Brown, Eric Donald English R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Brubaker, Robert Larry Biology E. Derry Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Brunner, Linda Claire Nursing 1935 Holly St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Bullard, Albert Churchman ....History 173 Bridge St., Morton, Pa. 

Buys, Ralph Hedda English 1039 Hamilton Blvd., Hagerstown, Md. 

Caldwell, Karen Alberta English 31 S. Llanwellyn Ave., Glenolden, Pa. 

Campbell, Robert Bruce Psychology 305 S.W. Oak St., Annville, Pa. 

Checket, Thomas Richard Music Ed 454 N. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Chuchla, Joseph John Physics 880 68th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Codington, Jennifer Mathematics Smith St., Hampton, N. J. 

Cooper, Karen Zoe Nursing Walnut St., Wiconisco, Pa. 

Corsaro, Robert Dominic Chemistry 909 Lincoln Ave., Palmyra, N. J. 

Deck, David H Chemistry 220 S. 15th St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

DePaul, LaDorna Jo Biology 4817 Oak Ridge Dr., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Doonan, James III Biology 175 Second St., Highspire, Pa. 

Duke, James Edward Psychology 34 Richard Lane, W. Long Branch, N.J. 

Dyson, Theodore Frank Sociology Ill Waverly Rd., Wyncote, Pa. 

Earley, Mary Jane Spanish 4th Ave., Hastings, Pa. 

Egbert, Paul Ainslie Sociology 3525 Keswick Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Eppley, Sylvester Frank Pol. Science 237 Center St., Duncannon, Pa. 

Everett, Douglas Alan Biology 347 N. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Fehr, Margaret Adele Sociology 404 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Frey, Carol Anne Music Ed 124 E. Locust St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Gagnon, Dennis Peter Econ. & Bus. Ad 20 Florence Court, Babylon, N. Y. 

Gardner, George Karl, Jr Biology 3730 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gayman, Lois Moyer Music Ed Box 111, Campbelltown, Pa. 

Geesaman, Dorothy Evans Sociology R.D. 1, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Grabusky, John Michael Biology 103 No. 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Gregory, John William Mathematics Box 239, White Hall, Md. 

Gunnet, Kathleen Ann English R.D. 1, Dallastown, Pa. 

Hannah, Marcia Wayne Sociology 1009 Woodmont Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

Hartz, Inda Jean Spanish 352 N. 5th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Harvey, Sister Joseph A Sociology 900 N. 17th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hatch, Roger Wesley Psychology 8022 Glendale Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Heintzelman, Sarah Alice Sociology 116 N. 25th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Hennessy, Jacqueline Lee Biology 200 Poplar Ave., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Henzel, Richard Paul Chemistry 609 Banyon Rd., Edgewood, Pa. 

175 



SENIORS, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Hively, Ruth Ann English R.D. 2, Felton, Pa. 

Hoffman, Richard Charles Physics 304 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Hoffsommer, Barbara Louise ...Biology 728 S. 28th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hohenshelt, George W. II Biology 3201 Park Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hood, Bonnie Marie Music Ed 3058 Livingston St., Allentown, Pa. 

Hook, Kenneth Russell Econ. & Bus. Ad 143 Stanley St., Clifton, N. J. 

Horn, Robert Errol Econ. & Bus. Ad 1270 Brockie Dr., York, Pa. 

Howard, Barry Eugene Psychology 708 W. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hudgins, Barbara Elaine Sociology 101 Darrington St., Washington, D. C. 

Huffman, Robert Lee History R.D. 1, Box 147, Palmyra, Pa. 

Hughes, William George Pol. Science ..109 S. Queen Anne Dr., Fairless Hills, Pa. 

Irwin, Jeanne Elizabeth English R.D. 1, Dauphin, Pa. 

Kauffman, Ellen R Music Ed R.D. 1, Dallastown, Pa. 

Kauffman, Sara Ann Sociology Box 156, Codorus, Pa. 

Keim, David Edward Pol. Science 122 5th Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kline, Donald Eugene Chemistry R.D. 1, Hellam, Pa. 

Koch, Thomas Richard Chemistry 214 Miller St., Strasburg, Pa. 

Kreller, Elaine Dorothy Elem. Ed R.D. 1, Wescosville, Pa. 

Kriebel, John Duncan English 224 S. Middletown Rd., Media, Pa. 

Ladd, Judy Weisbeck Sociology R.D. 1, Lebanon, Pa. 

Lanese, John D Elem. Ed Box 231, Rothsville, Pa. 

Lehn, Philip Jeffery Biology 1478 E. Philadelphia St., York, Pa. 

Lenker, Barbara Faye Nursing 59 S. Market St., Elizabethville, Pa. 

Lesher, James Richard Econ. & Bus. Ad 509 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 

Liles, Charles Vernon German 16 Summit St., Annville, Pa. 

Lindquist, Elizabeth Ann Sociology 714 Prospect Ave., Richfield, N. J. 

Long, Elaine Faith Music Ed 222 Cannell Dr., Somerset, Pa. 

Long, Theodore Kohr Econ. & Bus. Ad 1660 Fieldcrest Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Loose, George Thomas Biology 118 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa 

Lynch, Eileen Dorothy English 223 Brakel Lane, Media, Pa. 

MacGowan, Donald Caughey . . . .Biology 71 Lafayette Ave., East Orange, N. J. 

Mamolen, Miriam Ruth Sociology 428 Vernon Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

McFadden, Gail Cathy Elem. Ed R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

McFaul, Ellen Mary Biology Hidden Point, Annapolis, Md. 

Mickey, Carol Ann English 9 Main St., E. Prospect, Pa. 

Miller, Carolyn Elem. Ed 580 Oak Ave., Maywood, N. J. 

Miller, George Wayne Psychology E.U.B. Home, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Miller, Sharon Ann English 353 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Moffitt, Sarah Walters Elem. Ed 64 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Moran, Daniel Bryan Chemistry 345 S. Main St., Wellsville, N. Y. 

Mowrer, Charles William Psychology 201 S. 9th St., Columbia, Pa. 

Moyer, Cameron Gene German R.D. 2, Birdsboro, Pa. 

Nagle, Claudia Mae Psychology 609 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Nagle, Ethel Helen English 210 Lewis St., Minersville, Pa. 

Padley, Albert Edward Econ. & Bus. Ad 607 Wayne Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Patrick, Katherine Ann English 11 Williams Lane, Yardley, Pa. 

Pell, Richard Ward Mathematics 125 4th Ave., Broomall, Pa. 

Perlaki, Thomas Nicholas Biology 224 E. Chestnut St., Cleona, Pa. 

Petosa, Michael Benard Econ. & Bus. Ad 4833 Pulaski Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pickett, Betty Kathryn English 1722 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Rapp, William Milton Chemistry 27 Terrace Court, Albertson, N. Y. 

Reed, Richard Carl Chemistry 608 N. Schanck Ave., Pen Argyl, Pa. 

Reidenbach, Robert David History 1141 W. Elm St., Scranton, Pa. 

Rice, Gail Marilyn English 301 Washington Ave., Pitman, N. J. 

Rice, Walter Vernon Econ. & Bus. Ad 106 Nashville Ave., Wildwood, N. J. 

Rohrbach, Margaret Jane Sociology 1255 Rolleston St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rojahn, John Robert, Jr English 70 E. Maple St., Dallastown, Pa. 

Ruddle, Larry Richard Chemistry 50 West Derry Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Saddington, Lois Leigh Mathematics 308 Carpenter St., Glassboro, N.J. 

Sargent, Mary Anne Biology 607 Phillips St., Seaford, Del. 

Sawyer, Barbara Ann English 406 College Circle, Staunton, Va. 

Schlesinger, Susan Jean Biology 308 Brookside Dr., Auburn, Ala. 

Schworer, Catherine Mary Elem. Ed 228 E. Main St., Myerstown, Pa. 

Seiler, William George Religion R.D. 1, Box 281, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shaw, Jean Louise Music Ed Stewartstown, Pa. 

Shearer, Rodney Hain History 426 W. Penn Ave., Wernersville, Pa. 

Shedd, Virginia Elem. Ed 3395 Manchester Rd., Wantagh, N. Y. 

Shenk, Richard Lee Econ. & Bus. Ad 200 W. Park Ave., Myerstown, Pa. 

176 



JUNIORS, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Sholley, Paul Bruce Music Ed 532 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Silberman, Andrew Leonard . . . .Mathematics 232 S. 3rd Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Smith, Harvey Jay Biology R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Smith, Ruth Ann Biology 56 Leabrook Lane, Princeton, N. J. 

Srna, Richard Frank Chemistry 6 Berkeley Terrace, Livingston, N. J. 

Stahl, Richard Randall History R.D. 2, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Stanton, Donald Ray Econ. & Bus. Ad 4 Harlech Dr., Wilmington, Del. 

Stanton, Jay Salisbury Biology 709 Layton Rd., Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Stauffer, Judith Ann Sociology 154 E. Main St., Leola, Pa. 

Steiner, Michael Robert Biology 129 S. 1 1th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Stetler, Sharon Kathleen Elem. Ed 250 N. 17th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Stohler, Thomas Clyde Pol. Science 2405 Kensington St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Stum, David Edward Psychology 519 Walnut St., Lemoyne, Pa. 

Tongu, Sahr James Econ. & Bus. Ad Box 169, Koidu Town, Sierra Leone, 

W. Africa 

Tshudy, Helen Marguerite Elem. Ed Box 802, R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Tulli, Frank Anthony History 821 Reese Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Ulrich, Paul Stanley English 1702 Silverpines Rd., Clear Lake City, 

Houston, Texas 

Vaszily, John Charles Mathematics 127 Pearl St., Norristown, Pa. 

Wagley, Karen Barbara Elem. Ed Qtrs. 35-B, Ft. McNair, Washington, D. C. 

Warnke, Helen Marguerite English 65 S. Main St., Manheim, Pa. 

Weigel, Charles Edwin Religion 1202 Central Ave., Columbia, Pa. 

Weis, James William Music R.D. 1, Boiling Springs, Pa. 

Wicks, Martha Sue Elem. Ed 40 Duncan Lane, Springfield, Pa. 

Williams, Daniel Lynn Econ. & Bus. Ad 610 Ardross Ave., Ambler, Pa. 

Wilson, Charles Howard Psychology 211 Myrtle Ave., Neptune, N. J. 

Witman, Karen Lee Music Ed 440 E. Pershing Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Witter, Jean Emma Elem. Ed 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown, Pa. 

Wolf, Stephen Noll Physics 84 Hillside Dr., E. Longmeadow, Mass. 

Wolfe, Richard John Philosophy 1027 Broadway, Hanover, Pa. 

Wolfersberger, Michael Gregg ..Chemistry 38 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Woolley, Carol Ann Elem. Ed 2030 Union St., Allentown, Pa. 

Wright, Charles Richard English 210 W. Main St., Mountville, Pa. 

Yeager, Frank Farrell Econ. & Bus. Ad 40 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 

Yeingst, John Lee Biology 350 Ebenezer Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 



Juniors 



Name Major Address 

Adams, Gary Edward Chemistry Hankins, New York 

Aldinger, Diane Carol Biology 424 N. Pershing Ave., York, Pa. 

Alexy, Paul, III Pol. Sci 12 Bartol Ave., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Arnold, Suzette Werni Pol. Sci 502 E. Klein Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bachtell, David Larry Music Box 276, Smithsburg, Md. 

Barlow, Margaret Edith Biology 32 Vicar Lane, Levittown, Pa. 

Barto, Margaret Joan Mathematics Harding Highway, Penns Grove, N.J. 

Beer, Elizabeth Stewart Biology DeBaugh Ave., Towson, Md. 

Behney, Rayanne Dee Biology Box 175, R.D. 3, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Behrens, Joel Peter Music Ed 229 W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Beltz, Barbara Ann Biology Valley Forge Rd., Lansdale, Pa. 

Bender, Nancy Susan English 9813 Richlyn Dr., Perry Hall, Md. 

Berry, Kenneth Scott Biology Winter St., Holliston, Mass. 

Bishop, Diana Elizabeth Psychology R.F.D. 1, Box 298, Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 

Brauner, Gary Nicholas Biology 454 North Evans St., Pottstown, Pa. 

Brenner, Elaine Anne Elem. Ed 42 Westcott Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

Bridge, Donna Doreen Biology R.D., Shermans Dale, Pa. 

Buek, Richard Whilldin, Jr History 935 Youngsford Rd., Gladwyne, Pa. 

Burkholder, Harold Lee History 4056 Linglestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Cadmus, William Albert Econ. & Bus. Ad. . . .274 Gramercy Place, Glen Rock, N. J. 

Cairns, Kathleen Marie Psychology 848 E. Madison St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Campbell, Richard Elwood Mathematics 96 Hillside Lane, Lancaster, Pa. 

Carissimi, Joan Margaret Sociology 7 Sommer Ave., Maplewood, N. J. 

Carlson, Richard Joseph Biology 425 North 5th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Chambers, Daniel Felix Econ. & Bus. Ad R.D. 2, Pine Bush, N. Y. 

Clark, Carol Joy English S. Prince St., Palmyra, Pa. 

177 



JUNIORS, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Clay, Carol Elizabeth Med. Tech 901 Soundview Dr., Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Cochran, Joanne Maxine Spanish 191 Jade Ave., Danville, Pa. 

Conrad, Kenneth Wolfe Econ. & Bus. Ad 1106 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Cormany, Philip Malcolm Econ. & Bus. Ad Overhill Dr., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Curley, Charles Joseph Philosophy 2253 Logan St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Curry, Donna Lee Elem. Ed Ill Poplar Ave., Hummelstown, Pa. 

D' Augostine, Louis Joseph Music E. Wheat Rd., Vineland, N. J. 

Denelsbeck, John Simpson, Jr. ..Chemistry 4545 Trevose Rd., Cornwells Hts., Pa. 

Diehl, Donna Kay Elem. Ed 1205 Apple Dr., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Dill, JoAnn Biology 171 Hunters Lane, Devon, Pa. 

Doll, Jane Elizabeth Psychology 301 Sycamore Rd., West Reading, Pa. 

Donaldson, Alan Smiley Elem. Ed 311 Barker St., Ridley Park, Pa. 

Donmoyer, Judith Ellen Biology 2509 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. 

Dougherty, John Edward Biology 826 Altivista Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dowling, M. Margaret Biology 1922 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dubbs, Lynn Victor Elem. Ed N. Race St., Richland, Pa. 

Dunn, Arthur Raymond, Jr. . . .Biology 812 Buffalo St., Franklin, Pa. 

Egge, Kenneth Lee Chemistry P.O. Box 42, Hershey, Pa. 

Embich, Thomas Russell Biology R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Enck, Robert Edwin Biology 209 S. Derr Drive, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Evans, Robert Burton Econ. & Bus. Ad 130 West St., Souderton, Pa. 

Foster, Joseph Nathaniel Psychology R.D. 1, Lehighton, Pa. 

Fulk, George Newton Pol. Sci Atlantic Ave., Broadway, Va. 

Furst, William Daniel Biology 1334 Markley St., Norristown, Pa. 

Gable, Roberta Jean Chemistry 16 Virginia Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Galat, John Milton Biology Pine Orchard Rd., Branford, Conn. 

Geier, Frank John Econ. & Bus. Ad R.D. 1, Box 175-a, Mendham, N. J. 

Gibble, Rachel Louise Music Ed 612 Geary St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Giles, Harold Frazee Chemistry 1853 Exton Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

Goodling, Robert Wayne Music P.O. Box 203, McAlisterville, Pa. 

Grace, Carol Jane Biology Route One, Annville, Pa. 

Green, Susan Jane Mathematics 19 Park Ave., Newton, N. J. 

Grimm, Sylvia Ann Biology 3502 Astoria Rd., Kensington, Md. 

Gulley, Marilyn Anne Mathematics Thompson, Pa. 

Guy, Frank Howard Undecided Box 100, Marcy, N. Y. 

Havens, John Wilson Biology 13 High St., Allentown, N. J. 

Hawk, Robert Bruce Econ. & Bus. Ad 3609 Darby Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hedd, Harold Samuel Pol. Sci. 3 Ambrose St., Freetown, Sierre Leone, West Africa 

Heizmann, Clifford LaRue Econ. & Bus. Ad 319 Hill St., Langhorne, Pa. 

Hoener, Clarence Ernst, Jr English 651 77th St., Pitcairn, Pa. 

Hoerrner, Robert Hambright ....Econ. & Bus. Ad 523 Fairmount Ave., Chatham, N.J. 

Hopkins, Helaine Ruth Psychology 257 New Vernon Rd., Gillette, N. J. 

Horst, Glen Irvin Econ. & Bus. Ad 2019 Hill St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Horton, Sue Ann French Harding Highway, Woodstown, N. J. 

Ingalls, David Paul Biology 8 Adams St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Jackson, Ellen Marie Elem. Ed 23 Olive St., E. Orange, N. J. 

Kamara, Mamie Marie Music Ed c/o M.A.S. Koker, Lungi Airport, 

Sierra Leone, West Africa 

Kamuyu, Michael Muturi Biology Box 234, Kiambu, Kenya, East Africa 

Kauffman, Jack Pol. Sci 1338 Kimberly Dr., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Keperling, David Larry Psychology 43 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Kimmich, Doris Joan Mathematics 90 Morse Ave., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Kitchell, Donald Bryant Music Ed 45 Whippany Rd., Whippany, N. J. 

Knarr, James Samuel Mathematics 333 West 3rd St., Roselle, N. J. 

Knier, Barry Lee Chemistry 353 N. 14th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kreiser, Ellen Pauline Biology Main St., Ono, Pa. 

Krikory, Kathleen Margaret . . . .Music Ed 5th & Elm Sts., Perkasie, Pa. 

Lafferty, John Milton Econ. & Bus. Ad. ..Ill North Chestnut St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Lamont, William James, Jr Econ. & Bus. Ad 734 Hillcrest Ave., Glenside, Pa. 

LeBaron, Duane Henry, Jr Pol. Sci 380 Main St., Apt. 47, Chatham, N.J. 

LeFevre, Lucy Amy Music Ed Shenge, Sierra Leone, West Africa 

Leiby, LeAnn Alice English 1108 Main St., Slatington, Pa. 

Leidich, Ann Marie Psychology Box 439, Richland, Pa. 

Lentz, Mervin Kreider German R. 2, Box 39-A, Jonestown, Pa. 

Lerner, Lewis Brian Biology 524 South 13th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Linton, John Cornelious Psychology 134 Rockwood Rd., Newtown Sq., Pa. 

Long, Gretchen Ann-Elizabeth ..Music Ed. . .249 E. Highland Ave., Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Looker, Julia Elizabeth Biology 2617 Penbrook Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Macaw, Barbara June Biology M.H.S. Weiser, Hershey, Pa. 

178 



JUNIORS, 1965-66 



Martalus, Robert John Physics 102 East Elm St., Lebanon 

Martin, Sue Ann Biology Box 975, Harrisburg 

Matsko, Robert Paul Biology 3616 Maple St., Harrisburg 

Maurer, Daniel Lee Music Ed 113 West Park Ave., Myerstown 

McCoy, Richard Carson Biology 1726 Riverview Rd., Gladwyne 

McKinney, James Mark Biology 2242 Penn St., Harrisburg 

Miller, William Kutz Music 481 E. Catherine St., Chambersburg 

Mills, Bonnie Caroline French & Spanish 238 Brooks St., Willow Grove 

Moyer, Bonnie Lynn Med. Tech 401 Moyer Rd., Pottstown 

Murphy Paul Cuthbert Pol. Sci 481 Limber Rd., Meadville 

Naugle, Carol Ann Music Ed 835 West King St., Shippensburg 

Newmaster, Ronald Dawson . . . .Mathematics R.D. 1, Lebanon 



Ochoa, Carol Sociology Ke 10 Sur #7-51 Cali, Colombia, S. A 

Otto, Walter Donald Econ. & Bus. Ad 800 Maple St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Padley, David Joseph Mathematics 607 Wynne St., Springfield, Pa. 

Painter, Larry Jacob Sociology 307 S. Lingle Ave., Palmyra, Pa. 

Parks, Nancy Emma English ....Rt. 1, Box 334, Abington Rd., Abington, Md. 

Pera, Albert Eugene Mathematics 142 W. Granada Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Pickard, Phyllis Adelaide Elem. Ed 1113 Edann Rd., Oreland, Pa. 

Posten, Robert Wayne Music Ed R.D. 2, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Quickel, Lois Elaine Elem. Ed 128 Atkins Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Renninger, Sandra Joan Elem. Ed 436 E. Third St., Boyertown, Pa. 

Renshaw, Craig Hulburt Psychology M.R., Middletown, Pa. 

Rentzel, Bradley Eugene Biology Center St. & Locust Ln., Mt. Wolf, Pa. 

Rice, Rita Irene Pol. Sci 1475 Cedar Hollow Rd., Paoli, Pa. 

Rogers, David Ray Econ. & Bus. Ad 264 S. 5th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rohrer, Linda Ellen French 1108 Fry Ave., Hagerstown, Md. 

Roth, Robert Allen Physics 227 Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Rovers, Reynaldo Tilton Biology 1801 Warren St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Rudy, Gail Marie Sociology 310 Maple St., Richland, Pa. 

Sakaguchi, Kiyofumi Mathematics 343 Takanashi-Cho Sasebo, Japan 

Schott, C. Richard Biology 6 Canal St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schwalm, Jack Seyler Music 3732 Brisban St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Selembo, Concetta Marie Biology R.D. 4, Box 139, Greensburg, Pa. 

Shaw, Patricia Elaine Psychology W. Penna. Ave., Stewartstown, Pa. 

Shimada, Tomoko S Spanish S-6, W-17, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan 

Shober, Judith Nadine Psychology 35 East Queen St., Ephrata, Pa. 

Shonk, Thomas Harry Music R.D. 4, Manheim, Pa. 

Shuey, John Eli Pol. Sci Box 41, Center St., Campbelltown, Pa. 

Silvers, Damon Lee III Psychology Box 56, R.D. 1, Pennington, N. J. 

Simmers, Donna Frances Chemistry Box 283, Rt. 1, Bowling Green, Ohio 

Smith, Mary Patricia Biology R.D. 1, Box 275, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Smith, Walter Lewis III Econ. & Bus. Ad 29 Red Oak Rd., Oreland, Pa. 

Smith, Ward Owen III Biology 1932 N. Main Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

Speer, Cheryl Jane Biology 738 Highland Ave., Lewistown, Pa. 

Spinelli, William Harry English 1810 Locust St., Norristown, Pa. 

Stearn, Francis Marion Econ. & Bus. Ad 100 W. Blackwell St., Dover, N.J. 

Stein, Janet Carol Biology 363 Harwicke Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Stowe, Carol Ann Music 514 Tenth Ave., Prospect Park, Pa. 

Swonger, Elaine Leilani Biology 6450 Blueridge Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Tate, Lucretia A Elem. Ed R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Thomas, Robert Everitt Biology 60 Glenside Rd., Murray Hill, N. J. 

Thompson, Gale Marion Biology 566 Delaware Ave., Roebling, N. J. 

Thornton, Patricia Ann Elem. Ed 14 Gobin St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Tietze, Paul George Chemistry 17 Carlson St., Lake Hiawatha, N. J. 

Tjhin, May (Martha) Kuen .... Sociology . .46 Djalan Suwarna, Medan, Sumatra, Indonesia 

Todd, Patrice Arlynn Elem. Ed 38 Chase Rd., Manhasset, N. Y. 

Toth, Carol Lynn Elem. Ed R.D. 3, Coatesville, Pa. 

Trayer, Ronald Terry Music Ed 65 South 7th St., Mt. Wolf, Pa. 

Trefsgar, Brooks Nelson Undecided 403 High St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Trupp, Caroline Elisabeth Med. Tech Swedesford Rd., Gwynedd, Pa. 

Updegrove, Edward Joseph, Jr. . .English 613 New St., Allentown, Pa. 

Ward, Paula Kathryn Music Ed 4 Dale Ave., Pompton Plains, N. J. 

Warfield, Carol Ann English 1716 E. Grand Ave., Tower City, Pa. 

Waring, James Morgan Elem. Ed 3313 Riverside Ave., Somerset, Mass. 

Weight, Terry Roy Biology 357 Blue Ridge Dr., Levittown, Pa. 

Wiest, John Alton, Jr Biology . . 10 Lawndale Rd., Wyomissing Hills, Reading, Pa. 

179 



■ . 

■! 



SOPHOMORES, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Willman, Samuel Alfred Econ. & Bus. Ad 8th St., Mt. Wolf, Pa. 

Wubbena, Laura Luise Music Ed 79 Highview Ave., Dover, Del. 

Young, Bonita Jean Sociology 2306 Logan St., Camp Hill, Pa. 



Sophomores 



Name Major Address 

Abernethy, Susan H Elem. Ed 511 N. High St., West Chester, Pa. 

Alwine, Alice Elaine Music Ed Carlisle St., New Oxford, Pa. 

Ankrum, Barbara Ann Elem. Ed R.D. 2, Peach Bottom, Pa. 

Arnold, Leroy Herr Chemistry 142 Elizabeth St., Millersville, Pa. 

Aungst, Scott Light Undecided 3009 Gordon St., Allentown, Pa. 

Baeckert, Cecelia Margaret Mathematics 404 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Banes, Christine Undecided 391 W. Dudley St., Westfield, N. J. 

Bashore, Dennis Terry Pol. Sci Main St., Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Bean, Bruce Leonard Physics 5421 Spring Rd., Bladensburg, Md. 

Bennetch, Suzanne Lee Biology Rt. 1, Box 63, Newmanstown, Pa. 

Bernhart, John Howard Music Ed 1214 Green St., Reading, Pa. 

Billmeyer, Bromley H., Jr Undecided 410 Brighton Ave., Spring Lake, N.J. 

Bloeser, Laurel Ann Med. Tech Box 7, R.D., Califon, N. J. 

Boffenmyer, John Raymond Biology 318 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bohlander, William Paul Biology 2220 Read St., Williamsport, Pa. 

Boland, Gerald Lee Undecided 507 Park Dr., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bollman, Donald P Undecided R.D. 1, Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Boston, James Edward, Jr Biology 17 Galbraith Rd., Norristown, Pa. 

Bott, Diane Kaye Mathematics 1711 North St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Bowman, Thomas Bear, Jr English 340 E. Chestnut St., Cleona, Pa. 

Brixius, Darryl Wayne Chemistry 107 Cumberland Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Brown, Dennis Allen Music 336 W. Douglass St., Reading, Pa. 

Buchanan, Philip Bruce Music Ed 113 S. Springfield Rd., Clifton Hgts., Pa. 

Burian, Carol- Ann Elem. Ed 56 Robbinwood Terrace, Linden, N. J. 

Capper, Harry Milton Physics 153 Kingswood Dr., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Christman, Lois Elaine Elem. Ed 865 Janet Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Clauser, George C Econ. & Bus. Ad 1426 Seneca St., Pottsville, Pa. 

Clay, Alan Bruce Pol. Sci 114 Sand Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Clemens, Priscilla Rebecca Med. Tech 107 South 4th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Cooke, Rebecca Ann Nursing 518 Market St., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Cressman, Barbara Ellen Elem. Ed 970 Sundale Dr., York, Pa. 

Cromwell, Marcia Jean Music Ed 3 Rivera St., Titusville, N. J. 

Cumming, Suzanne Barbara .... Biology 925 Minisink Way, Westfield, N. J. 

Curley, Michael Daniel Philosophy 400 Clive Place, Oceanside, N. Y. 

D'Anna, Mary Blanche Elem. Ed 59 Standish Rd., Little Silver, N. J. 

Dawson, Mildred Ann Biology R.D., Box 245, Pedricktown, N. J. 

DeHart, Charles James III Undecided 21 Care St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Deitrich, Cecelia Mary Elem. Ed 827 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Devitz, Julianne Physics 714 North 3rd Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dietze, Marilyn June Music Ed 1633 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd., Altoona, Pa. 

DiStefano, Deena Lynne Chemistry 1746 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Ditzler, Warren Dale Biology Route 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Doyle, Charles Lawrence Biology 216 S. Madison St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dreibelbis, Carolyn Betty Med. Tech R.D. 1, Shoemakersville, Pa. 

Dumbald, Jack Edward Biology 81 Trinidad Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Dunham, Marian Lee French Taneytown, Md. 

Edes, Joseph Kelsey Pol. Sci Oak St., Guilford, Me. 

Edgecomb, Carol Ann Biology 3 Arthur Rd., Somerville, N. J. 

Ehrlich, Heather Rae Biology 113 Gerald Ave., Rolling Hills, Reading, Pa. 

Else, Janet Margaret Biology 730 Laurel Lane, Wayne, Pa. 

Eshelman, Carol Elaine Mathematics R.D. 1 , Manheim, Pa. 

Fackler, Rebecca Louise Sociology R.D. 1, Windsor, Pa. 

Fasnacht, Lloyd John, Jr Econ. & Bus. Ad 228 West Walnut St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Foutz, Paul Beck Undecided R.D. 1, Thomasville, Pa. 

Foxall, Thomas Lee Biology 79 Fairview Dr., Wethersfield, Conn. 

Frey, LeRoy Galbreath Chemistry R.D. 3, Lititz, Pa. 

Fry, Alan Kenneth Pol. Sci 2900 Boas St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gangwer, Thomas Edgar Chemistry 1714 First Ave, Pottsville, Pa. 

Garman, Mary Marguerite Med. Tech 130 W. Caracas Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

180 



SOPHOMORES, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Garrett, Lynn Elem. Ed 2691 South Third St., Steelton, Pa. 

Gessner, Janet Louise Elem. Ed 200 Lafayette Ave., Oreland, Pa. 

Gettle, Judy Ann Biology 824 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Giraffa, Pietro Doraenic, Jr Econ. & Bus. Ad 146 Meade Ave., Hanover, Pa. 

Glick, Martha Sue Psychology 939 Skyline Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 

Govier, Mercedes Joyce English 47 Cobb Rd., Mountain Lakes, N. J. 

Groff, Stephen Anthony Biology Bethel, Pa. 

Grund, Jeffrey Wayne Pre-Forestry 32 Pine St., Norton, Mass. 

Hague, Alan Proctor Mathematics West Trenton Ave., Morrisville, Pa. 

Haight, Donald Alexander Undecided 314 Spier Ave., Allenhurst, N. J. 

Haight, Everett Arthur Med. Tech Box 1415, Clarendon, Pa. 

Hall, Dale Ernest Physics R.D. 1, Box 1061, Mitchellville, Md. 

Hall, Mary Jane English 42 Lakeside Ave., Devon, Pa. 

Halladay, John Anthony Biology 615 York St., Camden, N. J. 

Halladay, Mary Ann Biology 3 W. Cedar St., Merchantville, N. J. 

Hallar, Mary Ellen Biology 5 Irvine Place, Granville, N. Y. 

Hannon, Kathleen Margaret Undecided 106 Glen Mawr Dr., Trenton, N. J. 

Hawbaker, Sonja Lorraine Music Ed Fort Loudon, Pa. 

Heffner, John Howard Physics 30 S. Lancaster St., Annville, Pa. 

Helms, Paul Edward Econ. & Bus. Ad 500 Morgan Ave., Palmyra, N. J. 

Henninger, Dale Philip Music Ed 543 North 11th St., Allentown, Pa. 

Hicks, Terry Wayne Econ. & Bus. Ad P.O. Box 450, Newark, Del. 

Hill, Janet Louise Biology 180 Drexel Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 

Himmelberger, David Vel Mathematics 45 W. Main St., Mountville, Pa. 

Hofmann, Jon Eric Physics Port Henry, N. Y. 

Holtzman, Mark George Mathematics 50 South 24th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hoover, Gregory Paul Chemistry 140 N. Franklin St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hornberger, Charles Kerry Music Ed 519 Water St., Lititz, Pa. 

Horning, Carl Eugene Physics R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Hostetter, Mary Alice English R.D. 1, Box 60, Gap, Pa. 

Hummel, Patricia Jane Biology R.D. 1, Dauphin, Pa. 

Jacobs, Stephen Michael Chemistry 132 W. Keller St., Castanca, Pa. 

Jones, Barry Russell Biology 2812 Columbia Ave., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Joy, Elaine Waldron Elem. Ed 76 S. Main St., Allentown, N. J. 

Judson, John David Econ. & Bus. Ad.. .515 E. Union Ave., Bound Brook, N. J. 

Jungmann, Donna Kay Elem. Ed 535 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kane, Robert Leven Physics 204 Main St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Kauffman, Larry Lee Undecided Ill Hoover St., Mountville, Pa. 

Kauffman, Sue Ellen Nursing 137 Harris St., Cleona, Pa. 

Keefer, Paul Franklin, Jr Psychology R.D. 1, Box 401, Millersburg, Pa. 

Keehn, David Peter Music Ed 30 Market St., Lititz, Pa. 

Keperling, Linda Darleen Sociology 43 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 

King, George Joseph Econ. & Bus. Ad. ..15 Haddon Rd., Somers Point, N. J. 

Kisiel, Edwin Charles, Jr Music Ed 6902 Bright Ave., McLean, Va. 

Klick, Karen Sue Elem. Ed 708 North 3rd Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kline, Carol Phyllis Music Ed Route 1, Annville, Pa. 

Knopf, Andrea Frances Elem. Ed 1116 Greentree Lane, Penn Valley, Pa. 

Koehler, Janice Amelia English 715 Avondale Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kowach, Helen Barnhart Biology 733 W. Broadway, Red Lion, Pa. 

Kreamer, Keith Gleim Econ. & Bus. Ad 825 Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Lake, Howard Leo Econ. & Bus. Ad 503 South 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Latherow, Ellen Marie Mathematics 622 Geary St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Laughead, Robert Alexander ....Econ. & Bus. Ad 210 Plushmill Rd., Wallingford, Pa. 

Lauver, Earl Eugene Pol. Sci 610 South York St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Lehman, Dennis Meyer Physics 26 Campbelltown Rd., Palmyra, Pa. 

Leitner, Kermit Robert Undecided 2146 North 2nd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lingle, Robert Wayne Econ. & Bus. Ad.. .3110 Schoolhouse Lane, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lippert, Mary Jeanette Music Ed 821 Funston Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

Lokey, Dell Elizabeth Sociology Box 143, Perryville, Md. 

Lombardi, Marianne Med. Tech 4718 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Long, Ruth Elaine Music. Ed Route 2, Palmyra, Pa. 

MacGregor, Glenn Howard Econ. & Bus. Ad 424 N. Leh St., Allentown, Pa. 

Mackes, John David Elem. Ed 320 Wyoming Ave., Dover, Del. 

Manwiller, Judith Lynn Med. Tech 6 Morris Terrace, Glassboro, N. J. 

Matz, Kenneth Henry Undecided 42 New Holland Ave., Shillington, Pa. 

McComsey, Katharine Christine .Music Ed 354 E. Biddle St., West Chester, Pa. 

McCullough, Jeffrey Scott Undecided 436 N. 4th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

McFadden, John Rodney Psychology 112 Pennsylvania Ave., Camp Hill, Pa. 

McMinis, Joyce Elaine Elem. Ed 83 Mandalay Rd., Fairview, Mass. 

181 



SOPHOMORES, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Mead, Robert William Undecided 722 Clark St., Ridgefield, N. J. 

Mengel, Jay Alan Pre-Forestry 7318 Jonestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Merlo, Janet Arlene Biology 224 Herbert Ave., Fanwood, N. J. 

Meyer, Mirni Sociology 726 Black Rock Rd., Gladwyne, Pa. 

Miller, Dean Edwin Undecided Box 194, Stoystown, Pa. 

Miller, Gary Wayne Music Ed 104 W. Maple St., Dallastown, Pa. 

Miller, Gregory Jon Undecided 580 Highlawn Ave., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Miller, Marjorie Jean Music Ed Box 250, Lafayette Ave., Titusville, N. J. 

Miller, Stuart William Mathematics 10 Green Valley, Wallingford, Pa. 

Mooney, Patricia Carol Elem. Ed Midlane St., Syosset, N. Y. 

Moore, Henry Hopkins Undecided 408 S. Broad St., Kennett Sq., Pa. 

Moritz, Richard Theodore Mathematics 839 Maple Ave., Ardsley, Pa. 

Muhleisen, Kenneth Brian Pol. Sci 300 State Rd., Media, Pa. 

Murphy, Jeannette Arlyn Mathematics 2509 Scott Rd., Belmar, N. J. 

Nelson, Helen Jean Music Ed Box 104, Camden, Del. 

Nelson, Randall Econ. & Bus. Ad 1 Rose St., Cranford, N. J. 

Nestor, Lois Jean Undecided N. 7th St. Ext., Allentown, Pa. 

Newcomer, James Richard English 549 Maple St., Columbia, Pa. 

Nicholls, Grant Telfer Econ. & Bus. Ad. . .208 Sioux Trail, Medford Lakes, N. J. 

Paumer, Vivian Lorraine Med. Tech 2648 N. 7th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pickard, Paul Frederic Biology 75 Bank St., N. Y., N. Y. 

Pierce, Linda Lee Biology 1602 Oak St., Coatesville, Pa. 

Pinkerton, Barbara Lynn Music Ed Box 306, R.D. 1, Ronks, Pa. 

Paist, Carol Ann Music Ed 324 West Ave., Wayne, Pa. 

Reese, Edward Scott Chemistry Box 387, Hershey, Pa. 

Reidenbach, Raymond John Psychology 255 Noble St., Lititz, Pa. 

Reigle, Patricia Venice English R.D. 2, Palmyra, Pa. 

Richcreek, Ronald Lee Music Ed 158 "D" St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Roehm, Carolyn Jane Nursing 228 Main St., Landisville, Pa. 

Rohrbaugh, Patricia Ann Music 39 W. Hoke St., Spring Grove, Pa. 

Sabold, Carl Robert Econ. & Bus. Ad 802 Sledge Ave., Reading, Pa. 

Salmon, Katrinka Ann Mathematics Salmon Rd., Ledgewood, N. J. 

Sawyer, John Carson Undecided 406 College Circle, Staunton, Va. 

Schellenberg, Nancy Louise . . . .Biology Worchester Rd., Hollis, N. H. 

Schoenly, Stuart Gardner Mathematics Grange Ave., Collegeville, Pa. 

Schreiber, Richard Donald Pol. Sci 801 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schwartz, Anna Rachel Music Ed R.D. 2, Box 260, Lakewood, N. J. 

Seacat, Cheryl Alaine Undecided 163 Hostetter Lane, Lancaster, Pa. 

Seland, Paul Anthony, Jr Music Ed 45 N. 9th St., Easton, Pa. 

Semon, Arthur Daniel Pol. Sci 64-46 211 St., Bayside, N. Y. 

Senter, Lynda Sue Music Ed 45 Highway 33, Freehold, N. J. 

Shanaman, Susan Marie Psychology R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Sharnetzka, Charles Scott Music Ed 21 York Rd., Jacobus, Pa. 

Shatto, Milton Thomas English R.D. 1, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shearer, James Monroe Philosophy 210 West Main St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Shermeyer, Rae Ann LTndecided 847 W. Broadway, Red Lion, Pa. 

Simington, Richard Norman ....English 54 Fordham St., Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Simpson, Patrick Joseph Undecided 727 Federal St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Sitko, Susan Kay English 1121 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Slade, Dolores Jean Music Ed 12 Woodland Dr., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Snavely, Stanley Allen Mathematics 119 Cleveland Ave., Waynesboro, Pa. 

Spancake, William Ashley History 127 S. Harrison St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Spory, Linda Lee Biology Star Route, Mifflintown, Pa. 

Stecker, Patricia Languages 15541 Pratt Circle, Huntington, Calif. 

Swalm, Carol Leslie Elem. Ed. ..221 Washington Lane, Fort Washington, Pa. 

Swartz, Terrence Lee Undecided 502 N. High St., Hanover, Pa. 

Taylor, Joan Roby Med. Tech 78 Green Knolls Dr., Wayne, N. J. 

Thomas, James Kenneth Econ. & Bus. Ad 207 Oliver St., Jersey Shore, Pa. 

Thompson, Phillip Eugene Physics 50 S. Pine St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Van Camp, James Russell Chemistry 417 Cuyler Ave., Trenton, N. J. 

Vonada, Judy Ann Music Ed 337 E. Curtis St., Bellefonte, Pa. 

Wagner, Rebecca Ann Biology R.D. 1, Winfield, Pa. 

Walker, Peter David English Box 174, Gap, Pa. 

Wallace, Anthony Charles Undecided 614 Convent Rd., Chester, Pa. 

Ward, Sarah Agnes Music Ed Jarrettsville, Maryland 

Watkins, Norman Conrad Chemistry R.D. 3, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Watson, William Kenneth History 1332 Sand Hill Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wertsch, Harry William Undecided 453 S. Broad St., Lititz, Pa. 

West, Barbara Jean German 1610 Lampeter Rd., Lampeter, Pa. 

182 



FRESHMEN, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Williams, Richard Earl History 751 Walton St., Lemoyne, Pa. 

Witter, Constance Jean Elera. Ed 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown, Pa. 

Wlasova, Wanda Elem. Ed 1215 Brandywine St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Woodbury, Susan May Psychology 2301 Marlyn Dr., Wilmington, Del. 

Yeager, Valerie Anne Psychology 40 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 

Yerger, John Roy Music Ed 201 South Locust St., Lititz, Pa. 

Zart, Harry Conrad L T ndecided 525 Eutaw Ave., New Cumberland, Pa. 



Freshmen 



Name Major Address 

Achey, LesErik Brent History 140 S. 5th Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Albright, Cinda Ann Med. Tech Worcester, Pa. 

Althouse, Kerry William Undecided 49 Clarence Ave., Shoemakersville, Pa. 

Anspach, Jeanne Louise Pol. Science R.D. 1, Grantville, Pa. 

Arndt, Patrick Joseph Pol. Science R.D. 2, Box 569, Palmyra, Pa. 

Atkinson, Robert Douglas Undecided 37 Park St., Carbondale, Pa. 

Axman, Stephen Julius Econ. & Bus. Ad 19 Vermont St., 

Huntington Station, N. Y. 

Bair, Leslie Farrell Biology 1049 Swarthmore Rd., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Baker, Kenneth Melvin Biology 148 S. Landis St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Barbaccia, Stephen Louis Pol. Science Dahliadel Dr., Vineland, X. J. 

Bartholomew, David Elwood ...Biology 340 Cottage Place, Red Lion, Pa. 

Basta, Richard Edward Econ. & Bus. Ad. . .648 Monmouth Ave., Kenilworth, N. J. 

Bell, Linda Ann Chemistry 58 S. Landon Ave., Kingston, Pa. 

Bemesderfer, Loris Paul Undecided 435 N. "D" St., Hamilton, Ohio 

Bender, Barry Lee Biology 53 Alva Dr., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Berglund, Stephen William ....Mathematics 4144 Joshua Rd., Lafayette Hill, Pa. 

Biehler, Arthur Francis, Jr Mathematics 77 Lake Rd., Demarest, N. J. 

Biever, John Albert Undecided 1703 Center St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bishop, Ellen Jane History 1 728 Olive St., Reading, Pa. 

Blackstone, Douglas Brian ....Music Ed 423 Parkside Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Bland, William Keith Music Shepherdstown, W. Va. 

Blatt, Carol Ann Elem. Ed R.D. 1, Leesport, Pa. 

Bonnefond, James Louis Pol. Science 101 Warwick St., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Bower, Richard William Biology ....4705 Henry Hudson Pkwy, Riverdale, N. Y. 

Bowman, Karen Lynn Mathematics 1509 Sand Hill Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brandsberg, Steven Richard ....Chemistry . . . . Longwood Park Ave., S. Plainfield, N. J. 

Brandt, Miriam Eileen English R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Brennan, Peter Edward Biology 47 Nassau Rd., Great Neck, N. Y. 

Bright, Linda Eberly Undecided 880 S. Harrison St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Bross, Thomas Ray Physics R.D. 2, Lebanon, Pa. 

Brothman, Gayle Vern Biology 59 Village Line Rd., Babylon, N. Y. 

Brown, Edward Robert Biology 22 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brubaker, David Allan Mathematics 106 Pennsylvania Ave., Carlisle, Pa. 

Bryden, Doris Elaine Biology R.D. 1, Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Bryniarski, Kathleen Ann Biology 418 S. 15th St., Reading, Pa. 

Buchanan, Deborra Ellen Biology 2511 Gettysburg Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Buchanan, Patricia Ann Elem. Ed 401 Avenue E., Matamoras, Pa. 

Buchmoyer, Patricia Funk Elem. Ed R.D. 4, Lebanon, Pa. 

Bunting, Kenneth Paul Undecided 220 Dorn Ave., Middlesex, N. J. 

Burkholder, John Dean Mathematics R.D. 3, Lititz, Pa. 

Burklew, Kenneth Raymond ....Mathematics 130 N. Reservoir St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Bush, Ronald Leslie Psychology W. Erie St., Ext., Linesville, Pa. 

Cameron, Carole Collins Music Ed 1430 Hamilton Blvd., Hagerstown, Md. 

Campbell, Michael Jeffrey Music Ed 16 Academy Drive East, Whippany, N. J. 

Campbell, William Edward Undecided 500 W. Main St., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Carnathon, Polly Julia Music Ed R.D. 1, St. Thomas, Pa. 

Cerutti, Diane Florence Music Ed 455 Mountain Ave., Westwood, N. J. 

Cestone, Joanne Music Ed 451 River Rd., Hanover, N. J. 

Chase, Grace Suzanne Elem. Ed 106 Stratton Dr., 

Canterbury Hills, Hockessin, Del. 

Chell, Patricia Anne Sociology 225 Rollingfield Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Clemens, Thomas Michael Biology 1006 Colebrook Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Clipp, Albert Linden Philosophy 1065 Jefferson Blvd., Hagerstown, Md. 

Condon, Karen Lorraine Med. Tech 2003 Swatara St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

183 



FRESHMEN, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Conway, Jeffrey Lynn Music Ed R.D. 1 , Dallastown, Pa. 

Croesus, Lloyd John Chemistry 38 N. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Davis, James Francis History E 65 Hemlock Dr., Paramus, N. J. 

Deaven, Shirley Marie Elem. Ed R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Decker, Bruce Richard Biology 246 Crum Creek Dr., Woodlyn, Pa. 

Demmy, Thomas William Econ. & Bus. Ad 584 S. Lincoln Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Detwiler, Frederick Emery Religion 8 W. Dewart St., Shamokin, Pa. 

Ditzler, James Howard Undecided R.D. 2, Box 350, Jonestown, Pa. 

Dorcsis, Elaine Marie Med. Tech R.D. 2, Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Dunne, Lucille Patricia Chemistry 35 Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Dunne, Raymond George Econ. & Bus. Ad 212 Staley Ave., Collingdale, Pa. 

Eastman, Maryann Biology 493 Maplewood Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Ebert, William Chemistry 117 Arthur Place, Iselin, N. J. 

Eicher, Linda Lee Psychology 396 Terhune Rd., Princeton, N. J. 

Eisenhart, William Burk Econ. & Bus. Ad 40 Ridge Rd., Media, Pa. 

Eisenhower, Lin David Chemistry Bethel, Pa. 

English, Albert James Biology Windsor, N. J. 

Erdman, Gregory Lee Econ. & Bus. Ad 724 Market St., Lykens, Pa. 

Erff, Charles Gregory Econ. & Bus. Ad 923 Ainsworth St., Linden N. J. 

Esdale, Sally Joanne Undecided 247 Humiston Circle, Thomaston, Conn. 

Evans, James Thomas Undecided 524 N. 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Falato, Thomas John Spanish 76 Palisade Ave., Emerson, N. J. 

Fauber, Stephanie Jo Chemistry 405 Orchard Lane, Manheim, Pa. 

Fisher, Rosalee Flora Chemistry R.D. 1, Etters, Pa. 

Flinchbaugh, Judy Elaine Chemistry 110 S. Main St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Fogg, Norman Ware, Jr Chemistry 51 Ives Ave., Carneys Point, N. J. 

Fox, Robert Spencer Religion 803 Young Place, Frederick, Md. 

Frantz, Dennis Lee Biology Box 51, Kleinfeltersville, Pa. 

Frederick, Gary Donnell Chemistry R.D. 2, Lyons, N. Y. 

Friedmann, Ronald Jay History 539 N. 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Fultz, Gloria Suzanne Elem. Ed Star Route, Richfield, Pa. 

Garbrick, Quinetta Dianne Spanish 3319 Druck Valley Rd., York, Pa. 

Gault, Kay Suzanne Biology 3517 Schoolhouse Lane, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Gehman, Terry Lee Music Ed R.D. 1, Ephrata, Pa. 

Gehris, Marcia Jeanne Music Ed 808 N. 3rd St., Reading, Pa. 

Giovanis, Diane Biology 383 N. 28th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Goldberg, Arthur Undecided ..Apt. E-4, Wallingford Ave., Wallingford, Pa. 

Graham, Robert Emanuel, Jr. ..Pol. Science ..704 Philadelphia Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Graybill, Jean Evelyn Undecided P.O. Box 132, Richfield, Pa. 

Gunther, Gary Rodney Psychology 815 Woodsdale Rd., Wilmington, Del. 

Guyler, Karl Edward Chemistry 702 Second St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Hammacher, Everett X Music Ed 4607 Clarendon St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hardie, Bruce David Mathematics 200 W. Marshall Ave., Langhorne, Pa. 

Haslam, James Walter Chemistry 201 Lyster Rd., Oreland, Pa. 

Heck, Ronald Wilbur Music Ed R.D. 1, Shoemakersville, Pa. 

Hedenberg, Mary Elizabeth .... Undecided 68 Elm St., Milton, Pa. 

Heilman, Jean Louise Music Ed 1615 Russell Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hendrickson, Nancy Louise ....Undecided 18 Pelican Rd., Middletown, N. J. 

Hess, Paula Kay Biology 333 S. Green St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hetzer, Linda Christine Elem. Ed 189 Manor Parkway, Uniondale, N. Y. 

Hoch, Franklin Samuel Music Ed 19 E. Main St., Fleetwood, Pa. 

Hockley, Alfred John Biology 1119 Willow St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Hoffman, James Ronald Music Ed 37 S. Penn St., Manheim, Pa. 

Hoffner, David Aaron History 423 S. 14th St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Holladay, Lana Jean Psychology 4th & Main Sts., Elmer, N. J. 

Hollen, Michael Richard Mathematics P.O. Box 47, Sligo, Pa. 

Horn, Mary Ann Undecided 529 W. Market St., York, Pa. 

Hostetter, Fred William Chemistry 601 E. Walnut St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hughes, Sandra Diane French 418 W. Walnut St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Hunsicker, Virginia Lee Mathematics 310 Market St., Perkasie, Pa. 

Ide, Warren J Mathematics R.D. 1, Sweetvalley, Pa. 

Jacobs, Lloyd David Mathematics 100 E. Marble St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Jennings, Robert Gregory Chemistry 404 Ellerslie Ave., Ambler, Pa. 

Johnson, James Francis Music Ed Park St., Richland, Pa. 

Jones, Margaret Louise Elem. Ed 11 Linwood Terrace, Clifton, N. J. 

Jones, Michael Ray History 2427 Market St., York, Pa. 

Jones, Michael Scott Physics 247 Broadway, Hillsdale, N. J. 

Jones, Susan Kay Nursing 6 Morgan Terrace, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Kachur, Charles Gregory Biology S. Church St., Moorestown, N. J. 

184 



FRESHMEN, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Kain, James Edward, Jr Music Ed 155 Farm Lane, Landisville, Pa. 

Kaneda, Robert Rioji Biology 407 N. Orange St., Media, Pa. 

Kaplan, Paul Stephen Biology 39 S. 1st Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Karchner, Martin Craig Econ. & Bus. Ad R.D. 1, Sugarloaf, Pa. 

Kauffelt, Nancy Marie Music Ed 458 Wise Ave., Red Lion, Pa. 

Kaufmann, Richard Wayne ....Undecided 7801 Woodlawn Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kaufmann, Robert Allen Mathematics 7801 Woodlawn Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kehr, Philip Edward Biology 12 Martin St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Keller, Bonita Louise Music Ed 307 Wyatt Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kern, Luanne Evelyn Elem. Ed 7 Audobon Rd., Livingston, N. J. 

King, James William Psychology Box 345, Mont Alto, Pa. 

Klugh, Benjamin Franklin, Jr. ..Mathematics 36 S. 3rd St., Steelton, Pa. 

Koch, Lucille Anne Med. Tech 41 Furnace Rd., Wernersville, Pa. 

Kolle, Edward Allen Biology 362 N. 2nd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kortum, Sue Margaret Music Ed 19 Stonybrook Trail, Kinnelon, N. J. 

Kreiser, Janice Eileen Music Ed 7687 Dove Dr., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kulbaka, Frances Nesbitt Elem. Ed Box 186, Allentown, N. J. 

Kutay, Robert Stephen Chemistry West Market St., Jonestown, Pa. 

LaBella Mary Louise Biology 144 Concord Ave., Belmont, Mass. 

Lancaster, Susan Amelia French 7 Standish Rd., Lynnfield, Mass. 

Leibowitz, Blossom Iris Undecided 1100 Jackson Blvd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Lentz, Mary Jane Elem. Ed 350 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Levens, Elizabeth Jane Med. Tech 81 Meetinghouse Lane, Springfield, Pa. 

Light, Larry Lee Religion 2108 Hill St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Light, Mary Ann Undecided 126 Fairlawn Ave., State College, Pa. 

Long, Louise Bamberger Elem. Ed 1227 Cornwall Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Long, Ronald Lee Mathematics 217 N. 3rd St., Lehighton, Pa. 

Long, Steven Allen Chemistry 97 W. 7th Ave., Trappe, Pa. 

Lovegren, Lars Jackson Music Ed 6 Old Forge Heights, Spring Grove, Pa. 

Ludwig, Sandra Kay Nursing R.D. 1, Dauphin, Pa. 

Maclary, John Douglas Biology 101 Old Ford Dr., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Manning, Robert Kenneth Chemistry 133 Clay St., Mountville, Pa. 

Maresca, Joseph Francis Mathematics 645 Ayers Ave., N. Plainfield, N. J. 

Marshall, Carl Lyle Biology Box 214, Annville, Pa. 

Marshall, Georgia Lee Music 39 No. Main St., Shickshinny, Pa. 

Mbaluku, Hiddie Amisi Pol. Science P.O. Box 166, Ndola, Zambia, Africa 

McClain, Michael Edward Biology 1838 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

McClelland, Jean Kent Music Ed 49 Laurel St., Carbondale, Pa. 

McCrary, Cheryl Lynn Music Ed 719 Wisteria Rd., Newtown Square, Pa. 

McLean, Thomas Nathaniel, Jr. . . Music R.D. 2, Dillsburg, Pa. 

McNelly, John Leonard English R.D. 2, Avella, Pa. 

McQuate, Robert Samuel Chemistry 904 E. Evergreen Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Mefferd, Stephen Craig Biology 118 S. Locust St., Shiremanstown, Pa. 

Metzgar, Donald Richard Biology 112 N. Providence Rd., Wellingford, Pa. 

Micka, Thomas Alan Chemistry 3106 Meadow Lane, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Miller, Diana Lucy Undecided R.D. 2, Box 50, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Miller, Marilyn Leigh Mathematics 1918 Pinehurst Rd., Bethlehem, Pa. 

Miller, William Hartman Biology 83 Greenwood Circle, Pennsboro Manor, 

Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Mills, Terry Alan English P.O. Box 102, Grantville, Pa. 

Mintmier, Carol Ann History E.U.B. Home, Quincy, Pa. 

Misal, Dennis Arthur Biology 118 N. Front St., Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Morgan, Charles Knight Chemistry Box 116, Hilltown, Pa. 

Morse, George Lyle Mathematics Box 175, North Beach, Md. 

Moyer, George Robert Chemistry 516 W. Main St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Moyer, William Zimmerman .... Pol. Science Box 6067, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mylly, Marion Louise English R.D. 2, Willow Street, Pa. 

Nixon, Jeanne Katharine Elem. Ed 7503 Brookfeld Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Northcutt, William Carl Undecided 117 Cranford Ave., Cranford, N. J. 

O'Brien, Sharon Ann Mathematics 314 Linda Dr., Mountainside, N. J. 

O'Hara, Paul David Mathematics 67 Winding Hill, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Ossmann, Gregory Keith English 219 Munn Ave., Irvington, N. J. 

Ott, Gregory Alan Religion Box 67, Main St., Stoystown, Pa. 

Patrick, Dennis Eugene Music Ed R.D. 2, Hummelstown, Pa. 

Pingel, Patricia Ann Biology 1320 Garfield Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. 

Poorman, Ronald Ernest German 159 Canterbury Rd., Fairless Hills, Pa. 

Prescott, Ann Louise Econ. & Bus. Ad R.D. 1, Pine Grove, Pa. 

Ptacek, Sherrie Elem. Ed 2125 Woodlawn Ave., Glenside, Pa. 

Radlof, Linda Ruth Mathematics 122 Bound Brook Rd., Middlesex, N. J. 

185 



FRESHMEN, 1965-66 

Name Major Address 

Ranc, David George Undecided 1014 East Blvd., Aurora, Ohio 

Reid, Jack Richard Chemistry 245 Dayleview Rd., Berwyn, Pa. 

Reisinger, Carol Jane Biology 410 N. 4th St., Newport, Pa. 

Rhawn, Deborah Ann Undecided 139 South St., Catawissa, Pa. 

Rice, Frank Lambert Biology 338 Sharps Lane, Trenton, N. J. 

Richard, Ann B Biology 368 Main St., Red Hill, Pa. 

Rife, James Melvin Undecided 907 N. George St., York, Pa. 

Robertson, Barbara Ruth Elem. Ed 312 Brock Rd., Springfield, Pa. 

Robinson, Nancy Lee Econ. & Bus. Ad 821 Hoffnagle St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rogers, Martin William, Jr. ...Undecided 515 King's Highway, Morristown, N. J. 

Rondeau, Patrick Edward Biology 40 Foucher Ave., North Adams, Mass. 

Rothermel, Linda Stroud Music Ed 57 S. Eagle Rd., Havertown, Pa. 

Schauer, Larry Lee Undecided 530 E. Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schieferstein, Ralph Charles ....Chemistry 220 S. Shipley St., Seaford, Del. 

Schimpf, Dale Charles Music Ed 53 Avenue "D", Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

Schmehl, Joan Minnie Chemistry 605 Linden Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Schmid, Barrie Edmund Econ. & Bus. Ad 528 W. Main St., Ephrata, Pa. 

Schmuck, Keith Jonathan Mathematics ....135 W. Simpson St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Schreiber, John Edward Undecided Route 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Sensenig, Margaret Lee Music 245 W. High St., Womelsdorf, Pa. 

Sentman, Linda Louise English 5313 Bangor Dr., Kensington, Md. 

Shaffer, Ronald Bernard Chemistry 949 E. Philadelphia St., York, Pa. 

Sharroe, William David Music Ed 922 Arch St., Williamsport, Pa. 

Shearer, Franklin Richard Econ. & Bus. Ad. ..426 W. Penn Ave., Wernersville, Pa. 

Shenenberger, William E Music Ed 4841 Erie Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shenk, Alan Eugene Econ. & Bus. Ad 140 N. Grant St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Shiner, Patricia Lee Biology 1 100 Jackson Blvd., Lebanon, Pa. 

Shuttlesworth, Duane Elwood ...Psychology 6207 Warren Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sipe, Kenneth Levere Undecided R.D. 1, Mt. Wolf, Pa. 

Smith, Charles Michael Undecided 400 Penn Ave., New Brighton, Pa. 

Smith, Earlene Marie Econ. & Bus. Ad 11 N. Colonial Dr., Hagerstown, Md. 

Smith, James Harvey Undecided 2005 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Snell, Richard Michael Biology Maple St., Valley View, Pa. 

Snyder, Irvin George History 35 N. Balliet St., Frackville, Pa. 

Spangler, Jeffrey, Lynn Music 285 S. Wilson Court, Yoe, Pa. 

Spangler, John Charles Music Ed Route 3, Myerstown, Pa. 

Spieker, William Frederik Biology 20 Pleasant Valley Rd., Woodbury, N. J. 

Stanilla, David Lee Mathematics 915 Smith Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Stauffer, George Anderson, Jr. ..Econ. & Bus. Ad 435 Drew Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 

Steffy, Allen Weidner Econ. & Bus. Ad 725 Highland Ave., Boyertown, Pa. 

Stevick, Glenn Ernest Undecided 4 Edgeweld Lane, Media, Pa. 

Stitt, Ida Lou Music Ed 1040 Roosevelt Ave., York, Pa. 

Stohler, Constance Marie German Box 76, Quentin, Pa. 

Stottlemyer, David Lee Physics Route 2, Thurmont, Md. 

Strong, Glenn Morrison Biology 317 Michael Rd., Yardley, Pa. 

Suter, Janet Baker Elem. Ed 43 N. Forge Rd., Palmyra, Pa. 

Taylor, Larry Robert Chemistry 101 E. Prospect St., Red Lion, Pa. 

Templin, Helen Elizabeth Med. Tech 10912 New Hampshire Ave., 

Silver Spring, Md. 

Tezak, Barbara Ann Music Ed 300 S. Progress Ave., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Thomas, Phyllis Ann Nursing 1 Elk St., Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Thompson, Carolyn Elizabeth . .Chemistry 48 W. Hoke St., Spring Grove, Pa. 

Thompson, Rae Louise Biology 114 E. 1 1th St., Berwick, Pa. 

Thompson, William Miller Religion 803 E. Canal St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Timlin, Frank Michael Undecided ....102 N. Abington Rd., Clarks Summit, Pa. 

Todd, Harold J Mathematics 35 Park Ave., Babylon, N. Y. 

Tompkins, Leta Leigh Elem. Ed 816 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Torre, Joseph Anthony Mathematics 80 George St., Carteret, N. J. 

Tulli, Dennis James Undecided 228 W. Granada Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Turkington, Barbara Jane Elem. Ed R.D. 2, Sunny Hall Rd., Cape May, N.J. 

Ulrich, Debra Ann Undecided 6730 Jonestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Umberger, Margaret Wright ....Med. Tech Main St., Holmdel, N. J. 

Unger, Robert Lewis Pol. Sci 849 E. Queen St., Annville, Pa. 

Weber, Joan Louise Music 133 Demarest Ave., Bloomfield, N. J. 

Wenger, Carlin Lee Chemistry 96 W. High St., Annville, Pa. 

Wenrich, James Thomas Philosophy 240 Vine St., Williamstown, Pa. 

Wert, Nelson Eugene Biology Route 1, New Holland, Pa. 

West, Janice Rae Biology 82 Forrest Hill Rd., Leola, Pa. 

West, Richard Allen Undecided 82 Forrest Hill Rd., Leola, Pa. 

186 



NON-DEGREE STUDENTS 

Name Major Address 

White, Barbara Cutler Chemistry 5520 Old Lawyers Hill Rd., Elkridge, Md. 

Wick, Susan Klitch English 1900 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Williams, Paul David Biology 1000 N. Orange St., Shamokin, Pa. 

Willman, Paul Charles Econ. Bus. Ad 614 E. Maple St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Winemiller, Douglas Robert ....Music Ed P.O. Box 134, Stewartstown, Pa. 

Winslow, JoAnn Biology Hand Lane, Amagansett, N. Y. 

Wolff, James Mason Undecided 44 Beech Ave., Berkeley Heights, N. J. 

Woodman, Steven Robert Psychology 92 E. Madison St., Clifton Heights, Pa. 

Wubbena, Jan Helmut Music 79 Highview Ave., Dover, Del. 

Yarger, Ronald Gilbert Chemistry 4531 Vista St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Yost, Joseph Titus Undecided R.D. 1, Etters, Pa. 

Zech, Janet Irene L T ndecided R.D. 2, Seven Valleys, Pa. 

Zelenak, Kathleen Mary Elem. Ed 129 Keystone Ave., Morrisville, Pa. 

Zimmerer, Karl Michael Chemistry 1311 Poplar Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Zimmerman, William Stephen ..Mathematics 90 Oneida Ave., Camp Hill, Pa. 

Zygmunt, Ronald James Chemistry 3518 Freemont St., Laureldale, Pa. 



Non-Degree Students 

Name Address 

Alleman, Bronwyn 1 5 N. Manheim St., Annville, Pa. 

Ballard, George L 201 Hetrick Ave., Palmyra, Pa. 

Chrisemer, Nancy L 6451 Jonestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Disbro, Sara A 334 Beech Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Faber, Elmer William 211 Locust St., Annville, Pa. 

Ferry, Lynda J Old Forge Acres, Palmyra, Pa. 

Gerberich, Margaret Cole R.D. 1, Jonestown, Pa. 

Leaser, Joseph P 208 E. Chestnut St., Cleona, Pa. 

Mahler, David Barry 551 Central Ave., River Vale, N. J. 

Pohronezny, David D R.D. 1 , Myerstown, Pa. 

Ross, R. David 4 Sandalwood Dr., Palmyra, Pa. 

Showers, Russell T., Jr 236 W. Sheridan Ave., Annville, Pa. 

Staver, Ann B R.D. 1, Box 303, Palmyra, Pa. 

Wise, Linda L Box 246B, R.D. 1, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Campus Evening Classes 



Name Adi 

Almond, Janet L 254 S. 22nd St., Lebanon 

Althouse, Donald D R.D. 2, Palmyra 

Andruzak, Barbara A Main St., Stouchsburg 

Anspach, John H R.D. 1, Grantville 

Berehulak, Zenon N 119 W. Carpenter St., Myerstown 

Berger, Henry M R.D. 1, Annville 

Bertram, Horst N Juliada Dr., R.D. 1, Lebanon 

Blethen, Floyd D R.D. 1, Fredericksburg 

Bomgardner, Ned E 50 S. White Oak St., Annville 

Boshart, Richard S 728 N. Hanover St., Lebanon 

Boyle, Anne 541 Old Orchard Lane, Camp Hill 

Bradney, Nancy D 119 Putnam St., W. Hazelton 

Brommer, John R R.D. 3, Pine Grove 

Brommer, Leanna M R.D. 3, Pine Grove 

Cassell, Charlene A 1020 N. Union St., Middletown 

Cousins, Glen R 697 Cherry St., Lebanon 

Cronin, Ethel R.D. 1, Lebanon 

Curtin, Richard Oak St., Lebanon 

Devitz, Marie E R.D. 3, Myerstown 

Dreher, Linda E 1013 Willow Dr., Annville 

Eckenroth, Paul L 127 E. Locust St., Lebanon 

Edwards, L. Jane Vet. Adm. Hospital, Lebanon 

Farmerie, Samuel A R.D. 1, Annville 

Fasnacht, Bruce H 38 W. Canal St., Union Deposit, Hershey 

Fisher, Vesta B 1504 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, 

Focht, John C 529 Cumberland St., Lebanon 



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187 



CAMPUS EVENING CLASSES 



Name 



Address 



Forney, Carolyn H 136 N. Railroad St., Palmyra 

Fox, Joseph A R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Fox, Virginia L 1021 S. Progress St., Harrisburg 

Freed, Richard K Box 104, Strausstown 

Graybill, Rhoda L Hershey Hospital, Hershey 

Grosky, Betty S 1645 Rita Lane, Lebanon 

Hardenstine, Bonnie D 865 Kimmerlings Rd., Lebanon 

Heisey, Richard H Quentin 

Herr, William C 525 N. 7th St., Lebanon 

Hess, Judith A 333 S. Green St., Palmyra 

Hissner, Harriet M 54 E. Pershing Ave., Lebanon 

Hoff, Nancy Sattazahn 122 S. 4th St., Lebanon 

Hostetter, Thelma M R.D. 1, Jonestown 

Jordan, Rudolph J 809 S. 1st Ave., Lebanon 

Keefer, Vivian J 201 W. Pine St., Palmyra 

Kindt, Jean W 18 W. Main St., Annville 

King, Suzanne M 302 E. Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Klopp, Frederic K 821 E. Mifflin St., Lebanon 

Kreeger, JoAnn P R.D. 6, York 

Kreis, James L 201 W. Walnut St., Palmyra, 

Kugler, Rosemarie 1024 North 7th St., Lebanon 

Kunkle, James R 11 N. Enola Dr., Enola 

Lanese, John D Box 195, Rothsville 

Leahy, Linda F 1029 Church St., Lebanon 

Lesher, Susan S 1275 Marion St., Lebanon 

Light, Ruth L 935 Hauck St., Lebanon 

Long, Nancy E Second St., Union Deposit, 

Luvisi, Helen 14 Clearview, Lebanon 

McKay, F. Clinton 717 N. 2nd St., Harrisburg 

Meek, June E 250 S. White Oak St., Annville 

Miller, Barbara A 33 S. Weber St., Annville 

Miller, Elizabeth R R.D. 4, Lebanon 

Miller, Jeanne M 49 S. White Oak St., Annville 

Minnich, Miriam M S. Lancaster St., Jonestown 

Nemec, Michael J 512 Oak St., Lebanon 

Pyles, Peter N 368 N. 5th St., Lebanon 

Readinger, Elizabeth A 112 N. Lingle Ave., Hershey 

Rhoads, G. Anne 100 W. Lincoln Ave., Robesonia 

Rich, Phyllis 105 E. Walnut St., Lebanon 

Royer, Marie J R.D. 2, Box 81, Lebanon 

Sager, Ann M R.D. 1, Box 235, Palmyra 

Schorpp, Earl L W. North St., Carlisle 

Schreffler, Sara K 8111 Park Dr., Harrisburg 

Schreiber, Nancy K R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Schwenk, Dennis P R.D. 1, Hummelstown 

Seaman, Donald R Annville 

Sharp, John E Colebrook Rd., Middletown 

Shott, Dolores S 1696 S. 5th Ave., Lebanon 

Smink, Lawrence O, Jr 915 S. Lincoln Ave., Lebanon 

Smith, Eleanor V. A. Hospital, Lebanon 

Snyder, James D 618 Greenleaf St., Allentown 

Strait, Linda K Derry Rd., Hershey 

Thomasco, Ethel S 205 S. 3rd St., Lebanon 

Trostle, Sandra L Ill W. Main St., Palmyra : 

Umberger, Evelyn M 121 S. Hanover St., Hummelstown 

Weidman, Clyde 625 Walnut St., Lebanon 

Wenner, Robert M 208 Hill's Mobile Homes, Mechanicsburg 

Wentzel, Richard W 42 N. 5th St., Lebanon 

Yeager, Frank, Sr 40 E. Penn Ave., Cleona. 

Yiengst, Janet M 2115 Grant Ave., Lebanon 

Yoder, Lura E R.D. 5, Lebanon 

Zartman, Louise U R.D. 1, Newmanstown 



188 



SUMMER SESSION, 1965 

Summer Session, 1965 

Name Address 

Alwine, Alice E 312 Carlisle St., New Oxford, Pa. 

Ashley, Rhonwen N Box 92, Chemung, N. Y. 

Anderson, Carl L 60 Canfield Ave., MineHill, Dover, N. J. 

Arnold, Edward L R.D. 2, Lebanon, Pa. 

Bachman, Alice A 318 Lowry Rd., Erie, Pa. 

Behrens, Joel 229 W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Blickstein, Richard H 1502 Elm St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bobb, James W 278 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

Boland, Gerald L 507 Park Dr., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bott, James H Fishburn Rd., Hershey, Pa. 

Bowers, Thomas W 9 Normal Ave., Millersville, Pa. 

Boyer, Jere M 116 So. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Brock, Elizabeth K V. A. Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Carnation, Polly R.D. 1, St. Thomas, Pa. 

Checket, Thomas R 454 N. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Chrisemer, Nancy L 6451 Jonestown Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Conrad, Kenneth W 1 106 Chestnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Cormany, Philip M 333 Overhill Dr., Chambersburg, Pa. 

Croesus, Lloyd J 38 N. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Curry, Alice L R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Damore, David H 436 Chestnut Ave., Hershey, Pa. 

D'Augostine, Louis Wheat Road, Vineland, N. J. 

Day, Rose M 809 Guilford St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Ditzler, Elvin T R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Ditzler, James H R.D. 2, Box 350, Jonestown, Pa. 

Ditzler, Gary T R.D. 1, Pine Grove, Pa. 

Doyle, Charles L 216 S. Madison St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dubbs, Lynn V N. Race St., Richland, Pa. 

Dunham, Marian L Taneytown, Maryland 

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Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

189 



Eiben, MaryEllen 1610 S. 5th Ave., Lebanon 

Eichel, Wayne F 27 Lakeshore Dr., Rockaway, 

Eppley, Sylvester F 237 Center St., Duncannon 

Ferguson, Jack W 4 Willow St., Cleona 

Fields, Henry R 889 E. Lehman St., Lebanon 

Forney, Carolyn H 136 N. R.R. St., Palmyra 

Frantz, James T., Jr R.D. 1, Fredericksburg 

Frederick, Harry P 502 E. Main St., Annville 

Gangwer, Thomas E 1714 1st Ave., Pottsville 

Garman, Betty Gene 130 W. Caracas Ave., Hershey 

Gonglowski, Joseph 297 Wall St., Hummelstown 

Greenawalt, Daniel W 915 Thru St., Lebanon 

Haak, William R 1637 Robin Rd., Lebanon 

Haines, Dorcas R Jefferson Lane, Red Lion 

Harris, Richard H., Jr 1934 Rudy Rd., Harrisburg 

Hartman, Molly M 4216 Ridge Dr., Harrisburg 

Harvey, Sister Joseph A 900 N. 17th St., Harrisburg 

Hawbaker, Sonja Fort Loudon 

Hawk, Robert B 3609 Darby Rd., Harrisburg 

Heisey, Richard H Quentin 

Hess, Judith A 333 S. Green St., Palmyra 

Hess, Paula K 333 S. Green St., Palmyra 

Hixson, Lois E 9 E. High St., Annville 

Hoener, Clarence E., Jr 651 7th St., Pitcairn 

Hohenshelt, George W 3201 Park Rd., Harrisburg 

Honafous, Richard F 814 N. 16th St., Harrisburg 

Horn, Robert E 1270 Brockie Dr., York 

Huey, James D 23 A N. Penn St., Palmyra 

Huffman, Robert L Box 147, R.D. 1, Palmyra 

Ide, Warren J R.D. 1, Sweetvalley 

Irwin, Richard T P.O. Box 716, Wharton, 

Isele, David C 3413 N. 4th St., Harrisburg 

Jones, Barry R 2812 Columbia Ave., Camp Hill 

Kauffman, Jack 1338 Kimberly Dr., Philadelphia 

Keehn, David 30 Market St., Lititz 

King, Barbara 128 Cocoa Ave., Hershey 

Kinsey, Stanley 14th St., Harrisburg 



SUMMER SESSION, 1965 



Name Address 

Klick, Karen S 708 N. 3rd Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Koehlert, George W 10 Greentree Dr., Phoenix, Md. 

Kohler, Shirlee A R.D. 4, Box 562, Ashland, Ohio 

Kreeger, JoAnn A R.D. 6, York, Pa. 

Kreider, Jay 509 Pleasure Rd., Lancaster, Pa. 

Kugler, Rosemarie 1024 N. 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Kuhn, Walter F 4302 Crestview Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lafferty, John M Ill N. Chestnut St,. Palmyra, Pa. 

Lake, Howard L 503 S. 7th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Lanese, John D 330 Cumberland St., Annville, Pa. 

Lapioli, Patrick E 717 Second St., Hershey, Pa. 

Laudermilch, Kenneth 304 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Lauver, Earl E 610 S. York St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Lee, Unda 413 N. Queen St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Leidich, Ann M Box 439, Richland, Pa. 

Lerner, Lewis B 524 S. 13th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Lesher, Susan S 1275 Marion Dr., Lebanon, Pa. 

Light, Larry L 2108 Hill St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Liles, Charles V 16 W. Summit St., Annville, Pa. 

Long, Alice 1227 Cornwall Rd., Lebanon, Pa. 

MacGregor, Glenn H 424 N. Leh St., Allentown, Pa. 

Mahler, David B 551 Central Ave., RiverVale, N. J. 

Mann, Thomas E Fredericksburg, Pa. 

Matsko, Robert P 3616 Maple St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Maurer, Daniel L 113 W. Park Ave., Myerstown, Pa. 

McFadden, Gail R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Mengel, John G 408 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Meyer, Elisabeth E S. Front St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Miller, Carol Ann Ridge Rd., Annville, Pa. 

Miller, Gregory J 580 Highlawn Ave., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Miller, Marcia L 580 Highlawn Ave., Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Minnich, Miriam M Box 554, Jonestown, Pa. 

Moffitt, Sarah W 64 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Moran, Daniel 345 S. Main St,, Wellsville, N. Y. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Va. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 

Pa. 



Mowery, Carvel L R.D. 1, Elysburg 

Moyer, George R 335 W. Main St., Annville 

Nagle, Claudia M 609 W. Main St., Annville 

Newswanger, Orpha A 506 Weir Rd., Chester 

Osevala, Jean L 271 W. High St., Hummelstown 

Patton, Gene N Box 815, Olmsted AFB 

Pickett, Betty 1722 E. Chocolate Ave., Hershey 

Plantz, Charles R Box 102, Cornwall 

Poorman, Ronald J 104 N. Union St., Middletown 

Rakow, William W., Jr 903 S. 12th St., Lebanon 

Reich, Frank J 400 Locust St., Cleona 

Rich, Norman W 105 E. Walnut St., Lebanon 

Rich, Phyllis 105 E. Walnut St., Lebanon 

Rodeffer, Barry Lee 104 Governor Rd., Hershey 

Rosen, Larry A 1030 Martin St., Lebanon 

Ross, Marjorie L 4 Sandalwood Dr., Palmyra 

Ruddle, Larry 52 W. Derry Rd., Hershey 

Rudy, Gail M Maple St., Richland 

Saddington, Lois L 231 Elm Ave., Hershey 

Schantz, Letty Jane 23 Chestnut St., Lebanon 

Schauer, Larry L 530 E. Lehman St., Lebanon 

Scheirer, Christine A 541 Park Dr., Lebanon 

Scheirer, Robert S 541 Park Dr., Lebanon 

Schwalm, June S 117 Center St., Cleona 

Schwartz, Glenn J Messiah College, Grantham 

Sharnetzka, C. Scott 21 York Rd., Jacobus 

Shonk, Thomas H R.D. 4, Box 87, Manheim 

Simpson, Patrick J 727 Federal St., Lebanon 

Sitko, Susan K 1121 Willow St., Lebanon 

Smart, Talmadge Box 361, Kimball, W. 

Smith, Robert K 761 Linden Rd., Hershey 

Smoker, Harry W., Jr 746 Locust St., Columbia 

Spang, Allen L 622 Poplar St., Lebanon 

Sparks, Robert H 643 E. Main St., Annville 

Stachow, Frank E 438 E. Main St., Annville 

190 



STUDENT REGISTER— SECOND SEMESTER, 1964-65 



Name 



Address 



Stefonich, Frances M Box 216, Cornwall 

Swanger, Harold P R.D. 2, Myerstown 

Tanner, Leonard M., Jr 1551 Rita Lane, Lebanon 

Tanner, Ronald J 1551 Rita Lane, Lebanon 

Tate, Lucretia R.D. 2, Annville 

Thomasco, D. Irene 353 N. 9th St., Lebanon 

Thomasco, Ethel S 205 S. 3rd St., Lebanon 

Tjhin, M. Martha 5714 Woodmont St., Pittsburgh 

Tom, Grace M 626 Maple St., Annville 

Tom, Jonathan C. W 626 Maple St., Annville 

Tom, Stephen CM 626 Maple St., Annville 

Weis, James R.D. 1, Boiling Springs 

Wenner, Robert M 208 Hill's Mobile Homes, Mechanicsburg 

Wiest, Terry L R.D. 1, Ephrata 

Witman, Karen Lee 440 E. Pershing Ave., Lebanon 

Witter, Jean E 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown 

Witter, Constance J 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown 

Wlasova, Wanda 1215 Brandywine St., Lebanon 

Yeingst, John L 350 Ebenezer Rd., Lebanon 

Yerger, John 201 S. Locust St., Lititz 

Zerbe, Richard S P.O. Box 292, Schaefferstown 



Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

Pa. 
Pa. 

Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

I 'a. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

Pa. 



Space Science Workshop 

Name Address 

Cook, Marshall 716 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Corbett, Frances R 343 A College Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 

Farmerie, Janice C R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Hoff, Nancy S 122 S. 4th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Martin, Elizabeth G 310 S.W. Oak St., Annville, Pa. 

Norman, Marilyn J R.D. 1, Liberty, Pa. 

Swanger, Harold P R.D. 2, Myerstown, Pa. 

Witter, Jean E 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown, Pa. 

Witter, John 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown, Pa. 

Wolf, Karl L., Jr 749 Monument St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Student Register— Second Semester 1964-1965 

(Not included in Catalog of 1964-1965) 

Name Major Address 

Seniors : 

Meek, June E El. Ed 250 S.W. Oak St., Annville, Pa. 

Riether, Robert J Biology 7 Weaver St., Singac, N. J. 

Smith, Judith N English 11 Easthill Dr., Doylestown, Pa. 

White, Ralph H El. Ed 726 S. 4th Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Juniors : 

Curry, Donna Lee El. Ed Ill Poplar Ave., Hummelstown, Pa. 

Donaldson, Alan S El. Ed 311 Barker St, Ridley Park, Pa. 

Geier, Frank J Undecided Box 5-A, R.D. 1, Mendham, N. J. 

Kauffman, Ellen R Music Ed R.D. 1, Dallastown, Pa. 

Schwab, Martha C Nursing 2934 N. George St., York, Pa. 

Sophomores : 

Felty, D. Kerry Biology Box 735, R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Hatch, Roger W Psychology 8022 Glendale Rd., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Horton, Sue Ann El. Ed Harding Highway, Woodstown, N. J. 

Lapioli, Patrick E Undecided 717 Second St., Hershey, Pa. 

Schreiber, Richard D Pol. Sci 147 S. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



191 



STUDENT REGISTER— SECOND SEMESTER, 1964-65 

Freshmen : 

Crass, Richard A Biology 7426 Tabor Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dietze, Marilyn J Music Ed 1633 E. Pleasant Valley Blvd., Altoona, Pa. 

Helmle, George F Undecided 309 McKinley Ave., Norwood, Pa. 

Hess, Linda D Sociology R.D. 1, Felton, Pa. 

Lippert, Mary J Music 821 Funston Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 

Schauer, Larry L Undecided 530 E. Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Witter, Constance J El. Ed 109 N. Ash Rd., Newmanstown, Pa. 

Specials and Post Graduates : 

Bordner, Karl W 42 W. Ridge Rd., Palmyra, Pa. 

Fields, Henry R 889 E. Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Groover, Robert D 120 E. Locust St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Horst, Elmer H R.D. 1, Hershey, Pa. 

Laserna, Priscilla M 102 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 

Lentz, Mervin R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

McKlveen, Helen Jo 45 N. Ulrich St., Annville. Pa. 

Schule, Helen L 150 W. Walnut St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Evening : 

Berra, Susan M 1133 Lehman St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Cassel, Charlene 7521 Allentown Blvd., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Davis, Dorothy Royer 804 E. Maple St., Annville, Pa. 

Ebersole, Richard L 928 New Akron St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Falk, Ann L 204 E. Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Featherstone, Donald P 1433 E. Queen St., Annville, Pa. 

Forney, Carolyn H 136 N. Railroad St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Freedman, Arthur M 12 Forest Notch, Cohasset, Mass. 

Gerberich, Margaret A R.D. 1, Jonestown, Pa. 

Groover, Robert D 120 E. Locust St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Haulman, Rickie 742 Hill St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Heisey, Richard H Quentin, Pa. 

Hess, Judith 333 S. Green St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Ide, Warren Veterans Hospital, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kalwac, Ann C R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kohlhaas, Philip C 561 S. 82nd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lemon, Miriam A R.D. 2, Annville, Pa. 

Lesher, Adam M R.D. 1, Annville, Pa. 

Lesher, Marie E Ridge Rd., Annville.Pa. 

Mordan, John W 307 S. 1 1th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Nye, Patricia L R.D. 2, Box 431, Palmyra, Pa. 

Roznowski, Edward P., Jr 436 E. Elm St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Schwalm, June S Center St., Cleona, Pa. 

Shroyer, Nancy J 50 Rosemont St., Cleona, Pa. 

Steckbeck, Samuel J 228 S. 6th St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Stober, Richard P 1060 E. Main St., Annville, Pa. 

Thomasco, Ethel S 205 S. 3rd St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Thompson, David G 1506 Bridge St., New Cumberland, Pa. 

Weber, J. Thomas 237 W. Cherry St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Wile, Elizabeth Mae 829 Church St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wood, Ruth S 1014 Marvin Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 

Wright, Susan K R.D. 1, Box 413, Annville, Pa. 

Yeager, Frank F., Sr 40 E. Penn Ave., Cleona, Pa. 



Specials in the Department of Music 

Name Instrument Address 

Bamberger, Judith Woodwinds; Piano 1402 Oak St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Bartley, Michael Brass 30 Harris St., Cleona, Pa. 

Boltz, Cheryl Piano 831 Walnut St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Evans, Diane Woodwinds R.D. 5, Lebanon, Pa. 

Eyler, Jane Woodwinds R.D. 2, Jonestown, Pa. 

Feeman, John Brass North King St., Jonestown, Pa. 

Huston, Debbie Woodwinds 627 E. Birch St., Palmyra, Pa. 

Niethamer, David Woodwinds 307 Edeson St., Wernersville, Pa. 

192 



CUMULATIVE STATISTICS 



Summary of College Year, 1964-1965 



Day-Time Full-time Part-Time Total 

Degree Students Men Women Total Men Women Total Men Women Total 

Seniors 99 64 163 4 8 12 103 72 175 

Juniors 103 68 171 5 3 8 108 71 179 

Sophomores 109 76 185 3 2 5 112 78 190 

Freshmen 128 100 228 1 1 128 101 229 

Non-degree students — 3 3 11 14 25 11 17 28 

Day-Time Total 439 311 750 23 28 51 462 339 801 

Evening-Campus — — — 54 80 134 54 80 134 

Harrisburg-Extension .213 247 289 536 249 290 539 

Grand Total 441 312 753 324 397 721 765 709 1474 

Names repeated ..— — — 8 311 8 311 

Net Total 441 312 753 316 394 710 757 706 1463 

♦Music Specials — — — 26 42 68 26 42 68 

•Summer School, 1965 

College — — — 190 146 336 190 146 336 

Music Specials and 

Clinics — — — 10 9 19 10 9 19 



f Not included in totals. 



Summary of College Year, 1965-1966 
First Semester 



Day-Time Full-time 

Degree Students Men Women Total 

Seniors 89 60 149 

Juniors 92 73 165 

Sophomores 110 94 204 

Freshmen 167 105 272 

Non-degree students — — — 

Day-time Total 458 332 790 

Evening-Campus — — — 

Harrisburg-Extension . — — — 

Grand Total 458 332 790 

Names repeated ... — — — ■ 

Net Total 458 332 790 

*Music Specials — — — 



Part-Time 




1 


otal 




Men Women 


Total 


Men 


W 


omen 


Total 


3 S 


8 


92 




65 


157 


— 1 


1 


92 




74 


166 


— — 


— 


110 




94 


204 


1 1 


2 


168 




106 


274 


7 7 


14 


7 




7 


14 



11 

37 
149 



14 
53 

212 



25 

90 

361 



469 346 815 

37 53 90 

149 212 361 



197 


279 


476 


655 


611 


1266 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


196 


277 


473 


654 


609 


1263 


24 


37 


61 


24 


37 


61 



Not included in totals. 



193 



Index 



Page 

Absence 118,125 

Academic Classification 124 

Academic Offices 144 

Academic Probation 127 

Academic Procedures 122 

Academic Program 29 

Academic Requirements 122 

Accreditation 14 

Activities Fee 117 

Activities, Student 131 

Actuarial Science, Outline of 

Course 34 

Actuarial Science, Plan of Study 

in 86 

Addresses (Faculty, Administra- 
tive Officers & Assistants) .... 158 

Administration Building 21 

Administrative Officers and As- 
sistants 144 

Administrative Regulations 125 

Admissions Deposit 117 

Admissions, Requirements and In- 
formation 114 

Advanced Standing 116 

Advisers, Faculty 123 

Aid, Student 120 

Aims of the College 18 

Alpha Phi Omega 134 

Alpha Psi Omega 134 

Alumni Office 147 

Alumni Organization 161 

American Chemical Society, Stu- 
dent Affiliate 135 

American Guild of Organists, Stu- 
dent Group 135 

American Institute of Physics, 

Student Section 135 

Application Fee . 117, 118 

Application for Admission 115 

Art, Courses in 54 

Assistant to the President 144 

Assistants, Student Depart- 
mental 157 

Athletic Fields 22 

Athletics 136 

Athletics, Aims and Objectives .. 136 

Attendance, Chapel 125 

Attendance, Class 125 

Auditions, Department of Music . 115 

Auxiliary Schools 129, 155 

Auxiliary School Fees 118 

Awards Conferred, 1965 170 

Baccalaureate, Attendance at ... . 32 

Balmer Showers Lectures 132 

Band, All-Girl 95,135 

Band, Symphonic 95, 135 

Baseball 136 

Basketball 136 

Beta Beta Beta . . 134 

Biology, Courses in 54 

Board Fees 117 

Board of Trustees 138 

Board of Trustees, Committees . . 142 

Board of Trustees, Officers .... 138 

Bookstore 22 

Breakage Deposits, Laboratories . 117 

Breakage Deposits, Rooms 117 

Buildings and Equipment 21 

Business Administration, Courses 

in 63 

Business Management 147 



Page 

Campus Evening Classes ". 129 

Campus, Buildings and Equipment 21 

Campus Organizations 134 

Carnegie Lounge 21 

Cars, Student Rules Concerning . . 127 

Centennial 28 

Centennial Fund 28 

Certification, Requirements, Public 

School Teachers 47 

Change of Registration 122 

Chapel Attendance 125 

Chapel Choir 135 

Charges 117 

Chemistry, Courses in 57 

Chemistry, Outline of Course .... 36 

Class Absence 125 

Class Attendance 125 

Christian Associations 132 

Christian Vocation Week 132 

Clubs, Departmental 135 

College Band 94, 135 

College Bookstore 22 

College Calendar, 1965-1966 3 

College Calendar, 1966-1967 5 

College Chorus 95,135 

College Dining Hall 22 

College Entrance Examination 

Board Tests 115 

College History 10 

College Honors Program 50 

College Profile 9 

College Relations Area 147 

Commencement, Attendance at . . 32 

Committees, Board of Trustees . . 142 

Committees, Faculty 157 

Competitive Scholarships 120 

Comprehensive Fees 117 

Concert Choir 95, 135 

Conducting 96 

Concurrent Courses 123 

Contingency Deposit 117 

Control and Support 23 

Cooperative Programs 42 

Cooperating Training Teachers .. 156 

Counseling and Placement 124 

Course Credit 31, 53 

Course Discontinuance 122 

Course Numbering System 53 

Courses of Study 53 

Credits Earned at Another 

Institution 116 

Cross Country 136 

Cum Laude Graduates, 1965 168 



Day Student Accommodations ... 22 

Deferred Payments 118 

Deficient Students 116 

Degrees Conferred, 1965 166 

Degrees, Requirements for 30, 33 

Delta Lambda Sigma 134 

Delta Tau Chi 132 

Dentistry 43 

Departmental Assistants 157 

Departmental Clubs 135 

Departmental Honors, 1965 169 

Departments, Courses of 

Study by 54 

Deposits 117 

Development Office 147 

Dining Hall 22 

Directories 137 

Discontinuance of Courses 122 



195 



Page 

Dismissal .•••.• ^8 

Dramatic Organizations 135 

Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration, Courses in 60 

Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration, Outline of Course .... 38 

Education, Courses in 65 

Elementary Education, Courses in 66 
Elementary Education, Outline of 

Course 40, 47 

Emeriti Professors 148 

Endowment Funds 23 

Engineering, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 42, 86 

English, Courses in 70 

Engle Hall 22 

Entrance Requirements 114 

Environment 19 

Equipment 21 

Evangelical United Brethren 

Church 15 

Evening Classes 129 

Examinations 31 

Examinations, College Entrance 

Board 115 

Examinations, Competitive Scholar- 
ship . 120 

Examinations, Graduate Record . 31 

Expenses 117 

Extension Courses 129 

Extra-Curricular Activities 131 

Facilities 21 

Faculty 148 

Faculty Committees 157 

Faculty-Student Government .... 133 

Fees 117 

Financial Aid 120 

Football 136 

Foreign Languages, Courses in . . 73 
Foreign Language Requirement .. 33, 114 

Forensic Organizations 135 

Forestry, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 42 

French, Courses in 74 

Freshman Roster, 1965-1966 183 

Freshman Orientation 122 

Furnishings, Residence Halls .... 119 

Future, Looking to the 28 

General Information 113 

General Requirements 33 

Geography, Course in 78 

Geology, Course in 78 

German, Courses in 74 

Golf 136 

Gossard Memorial Library 21 

Governing Bodies 133 

Grade Point Average 31 

Grading and Quality Points, 

System of 32 

Graduate Record examinations . . 31 

Graduation Requirements 30 

Grants-in-Aid 121 

Greek, Courses in 75 

Gymnasium 21 

Harrisburg College Center 129, 156 

Hazing 125 

Health and Physical Education, 

Courses in 78 

Health Reports 125 

Health Services 21 

Heating Plant 22 

History and Political Science, 

Department of 80 



Page 

History, College 12 

History, Courses in 80 

Honorary Degrees, 1964 169 

Honorary Organizations 134 

Honors Program 50 

Hours, Limit of Credit 124 

Independent Study 51 

Independent Study, Chemistry . . 57 

Independent Study, Economics . . 60 

Independent Study, English .... 70 
Independent Study, Foreign 

Languages 73 

Independent Study, History .... 80 
Independent Study, Political 

Science 83 

Independent Study, Mathematics . 86 

Independent Study, Philosophy . . 98 

Independent Study, Physics 100 

Independent Study, Psychology . . 102 

Independent Study, Religion .... 105 

Independent Study, Sociology . . . 107 

Individual Music Instruction .... 97 
Industrial Mathematics Society 

Affiliate 135 

Infirmary 21 

Installment Payments 118 

Instructors 153 

Insurance Plan and Fee 117 

Junior Roster, 1965-1966 177 

Kappa Lambda Nu 134 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 134 

Keister Hall 21 

Knights of the Valley 134 

Kreider Hall 21 

Laboratory Fees and Deposits .. 118 

Late Registration 118, 122 

Latin, Courses in 76 

Laughlin Hall 21 

La Vie Collegienne 135 

Library Facilities 21 

Limit of Hours 124 

Loans 121 

Location and Environment 19 

L.V. Varsity Club 136 

Lynch Memorial Building 21 

Maintenance_ Building 22 

Major Requirements 30 

Map, Campus Back Cover 

Map, Mileage 19 

Mary Capp Green Hall 21 

Mathematical Physics, Plan of 

Study in 86 

Mathematics, Courses in 85 

Meals 119 

Medical Examinations 78, 125 

Medical Technology, Cooperative 

Program, Outline of Course . . 42 

Medicine 43 

Music, Courses in 89 

Music Department Annex 22 

Music Education, Outline of 

Course 45 

Music Fees 118 

Music, Individual Instruction ... 97 
Music, History and Appreciation 

of 95 

Music, Methods and Materials ... 92 

Music, Outline of Course 44 

Music, Preparatory Courses .... 97 

Music, Theory of 90 

Musical Organizations 94 



196 



Page 

Night Classes 129 

North College 21 

Nursing, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 43 

Objectives of the College 18 

Office of the President 22, 144 

Officers, Administrative 144 

Officers, Board of Trustees 138 

Opportunities for self-support ... 121 

Organ Rental Fees 118 

Organs, Specifications of 97 

Organizations, Student 134 

Orientation 122 

Parking, Student Rules on 127 

Part-Time Student Fees 117 

Payment of Fees 118 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 134, 168 

Pennsylvania State Education 

Association, Student 135 

Phi Lambda Sigma 134 

Phi Mu Alpha 134 

Philosophy, Courses in 98 

Physical Education, Courses in . . 78 

Physical Education Requirement . 78 

Physical Examinations 78, 125 

Physics, Courses in 100 

Pi Gamma Mu 134 

Placement 124 

Political Science, Courses in ... . 83 

Practice Teaching 40, 48-49, 67, 68, 93 

Pre-Dental Curriculum 43 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 43 

Preparatory Courses, Music .... 97 

Presidents of the College 16 

Pre-Veterinary Curriculum 43 

Principles and Objectives 17 

Private Music Instruction 97 

Prizes Awarded, 1964 170 

Probation, Academic 127 

Procedures, Academic 122 

Professional Curricula, Special 

Plans for 34 

Professors 149 

Professors, Assistant 151 

Professors, Associate 150 

Professors, Emeriti 148 

Professorships 23 

Psi Chi 134 

Psychology, Courses in 102 

Public Relations 22, 147 

Public School Certification Re- 
quirements 47 

Public School Music, Outline of 

Course 45 

Publications, Student 135 

Quality Points, System of 32 

Quittapahilla, The 135 

Readmission 128 

Rebates 118 

Recitals, Student 97 

Recognition Groups 134 

Recreation 136 

Refunds 118 

Regional Alumni Clubs 162 

Register of Students 175-193 

Registration 122 

Regulations, Administrative .... 125 

Religion and Life Lectureships . . 132 

Religion, Courses in 105 

Religious Emphasis Week 131 

Religious Life 131 

Remissions 120 



Page 

Repetition of Courses 123 

Requirements, Admission 114 

Requirements, Degrees 30, 33 

Residence Halls 21 

Residence Halls, Regulations .... 119 

Residence Requirement 31 

Resident Heads 146 

Room Reservations 119 

Russian, Courses in 76 

Saylor Hall 22 

Schedules, Arrangement of 124 

Scholarships 120 

Science Hall 22 

Secondary Education, Courses in . 68 
Secondary Education, New Course 

Requirements 48 

Self-Support Opportunities 121 

Semester Hours 30 

Semester Hour Limitations 30 

Senior Roster, 1965-1966 175 

Service Organizations 134 

Sheridan Hall 21 

Showers Lectures, Balmer 132 

Sigma Alpha Iota 134 

Social Organizations 134 

Social Sciences, Courses in 53 

Societies 134 

Sociology, Courses in 108 

Sophomore Roster, 1965-1966 180 

South Hall 21 

Spanish, Courses in 76 

Special Fees 117 

Special Plans of Study 34 

Statistics, Plan of Study 86 

Student Activities and Fee 117 

Student Aid 120 

Student Awards, 1965 170 

Student Christian Association . . . 131 

Student Department Assistants . . 157 

Student Organizations 134 

Student Recitals 97 

Student Register 176-195 

Student Teaching ... 40, 48-49, 67, 68, 93 

Student Teaching Fees 118 

Summary of College Year, 

1964-1965 193 

Summary of College Year, 

1965-1966; First semester 193 

Summer School 129 

Sunday Church Services 131 

Support and Control 23 

Suspension 127 

Symphonic Band 94 

Symphony Orchestra 95, 135 

Teacher Placement 124 

Teaching, Certification Require- 
ments 47 

Teaching Interns 157 

Track 136 

Transcripts 127 

Transfer Students 32, 116 

Trustees, Board of 138 

Tuition Rebates 118 

Veterinary Medicine 43 

Vickroy Hall 21 

Warthog, The 13th 135 

West Hall 21 

Whitehats 134 

Wig and Buckle 135 

Withdrawal 128 

Withdrawal Refunds 118 

Women's Athletic Association .. 136 

Wrestling 136 



197 



Legend 

A. Administration Building 

B. Carnegie Lounge 

C. Gossard Memorial Library 

D. Kreider Hall 

E. Science Hal! 

F. Maintenance Building 

G. College Book Store 

H. Central Heating Plant 

I. Laughlin Hall 

J. South Hall 

K. Evangelical United Brethren Church 

L. Engle Hall (Department of Music) 

M. Site of New Chapel 

N. Lynch Memorial Building (Gymnasium) 

0. Sheridan Hall 

P. Music Department Annex 

Q. West Hall 

R. Dining Hall 

S. Mary Capp Green Hall 

T. Vickroy Hall 

U. Infirmary and offices 

V. North College 

W. Saylor Hall 

X. Keister Hall 

Y. Hammond Hall 

Z. Women's Day Student Hall 

AA. 112 College Avenue 




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LEBANON VAUEY COLLEGE 
ANNVIUE. r*. 



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The Lebanon Valley College Centennial Seal heralds the approach of the 
Centennial Year of the institution, which will be observed in 1966. The seal 
was one of 23 designs submitted by staff members, alumni, and students 
of the college. It is the creation of Mr. Peter Bugda, formerly an instructor 
at the Annville-Cleona High School and an instructor in art at L V C. 

The Centennial Theme — one of 28 ideas submitted for consideration — is 
"The Discriminating Mind and the Understanding Heart." It was suggested 
by Dr. George G. Struble, Chairman of the Department of English and 
Secretary of the Faculty.