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Full text of "Lebanon Valley College Catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/lebanonvalley197071leba 



1970 /1971 Catalog Issue 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



bulletin 



ebanon Valley College Bul- 
stin. Published four times 
early by Lebanon Valley Col- 
?ge, Annville, Pennsylvania 
7003 



Volume III, Number 4, 
Winter, 1969 



::■■■ 



■.'■■ ■:'-'-K:~.Si 
: 






.... 



The provisions of this bulle- 
tin are not to be regarded as 
an irrevocable contract be- 
tween the student and the 
College. The College reserves 
the right to change any pro- 
visions or requirements at 
any time within the student's 
term of residence. 










Second class postage paid 
at Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 



CALENDAR 1969 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 

MAY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

JUNE 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

JULY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



APRIL 

5 M T W T F 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 : 

27 28 29 30 

AUGUST 
S M T W T F 
1 
3 4 5 6 7 8 
10 11 12 13 14 15 ' 
17 18 19 20 21 22 
24 25 26 27 28 29 2 
31 

DECEMBER 
S M T W T F 
12 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

14 15 16 17 18 19 ; 

21 22 23 24 25 26 : 

28 29 30 31 



CALENDAR 1970 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


12 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 1 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 1 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 2 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 




29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 3 4 5 6 7 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 1 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 1 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 1 


31 






30 31 


SFPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 111 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 18 1 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 2 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1969/1970 

969 First Semester 

ept. 4, 5 Thursday, Friday Faculty Retreat 

6 Saturday Board of Trustees Retreat 

8-10 Monday through Wednesday Orientation for new students 

9, 10 Tuesday, Wednesday Registration 

11 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

11 Thursday, 11:00 a.m Opening College Convocation 

)ct. 7 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

25 Saturday Homecoming Day 

28, 29 Tuesday, Wednesday Balmer Showers Lectureship 

Jov. 5 Wednesday Mid-semester grades due 

8 Saturday Board of Trustees meeting 

26 Wednesday, 1 :00 p.m Thanksgiving vacation begins 

)ec. 1 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

3-10 Wednesday through Wednesday Pre-registration for 2nd semester 

19 Friday, 5:00 p.m Christmas vacation begins 

970 

an. 5 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

9 Friday, 5:00 p.m Classes end 

10-13 Saturday through Tuesday Reading period 

14-20 Wednesday through Tuesday First semester examinations 

20 Tuesday, 5:00 p,m First semester ends 

Second Semester 

an. 26 Monday Registration 

27, 28 Tuesday, Wednesday All-College Symposium 

29 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

eb. 24 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Founders' Day 

27-Mar. 8 Friday through Sunday Concert Choir Tour 

4ar. 9-12 Monday through Thursday Religious Emphasis Week 

20 Friday, 5:00 p.m Easter vacation begins 

31 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

Kpr. 7 Tuesday Phi Alpha Epsilon Day 

12 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, Symphonic Band 

21 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

22-29 Wednesday through Wednesday Pre-registration for 1st semester, 1970-1971, 

and Summer Session, 1970 

26 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, Chorus and Orchestra 

/lay 2 Saturday Alumni Day 

9 Saturday Spring orientation for incoming freshmen 

12 Tuesday, 11 :30 a.m Awards and Recognition Day 

15 Friday, 5:00 p.m Classes end 

16-19 Saturday through Tuesday Reading period 

20-26 Wednesday through Tuesday Second semester examinations 

26 Tuesday, 5:00 p.m Second semester ends 

29 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

31 Sunday, 9:00 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

31 Sunday, 11 :00 a.m 101st Annual Commencement 

i970 Summer Session: June 15-August 7 



CALENDAR 1970 



JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

MAY 

5 M T W T F S 

1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

SEPTEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 



OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



MARCH 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 

JULY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



APRIL 

S M T W T F 

12 3 

5 6 7 8 9 1( 

12 13 14 15 16 13 

19 20 21 22 23 2^ 

26 27 28 29 30 

AUGUST 
S M T W T 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 

DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 31 



CALENDAR 1971 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 30 


14 15 16 17 18 19 30 


11 12 13 14 15 16 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 


12 3 4 5 6 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


30 31 








SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


12 3 4 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1970/1971 
^0 First Semester 

it. 10, 11 Thursday, Friday Faculty Retreat 

12 Saturday Board of Trustees Retreat 

14-16 Monday through Wednesday Orientation for new students 

15, 16 Tuesday, Wednesday Registration 

17 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

17 Thursday, 11 :00 a.m Opening College Convocation 

ct. 6 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

27, 28 Tuesday, Wednesday Balmer Showers Lectureship 

31 Saturday Homecoming Day 

ov. 7 Saturday Board of Trustees meeting 

11 Wednesday Mid-semester grades due 

25 Wednesday, 1 :00 p.m Thanksgiving vacation begins 

30 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

ec. 2-9 Wednesday through Wednesday . . . Pre-registration for 2nd semester 

18 Friday, 5:00 p.m Christmas vacation begins 

m 

n. 4 Monday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

15 Friday, 5:00 p.m Classes end 

16-19 Saturday through Tuesday Reading period 

20-26 Wednesday through Tuesday First semester examinations 

26 Tuesday, 5:00 p.m First semester ends 

Second Semester 

?b. 1 Monday Registration 

2, 3 Tuesday, Wednesday . . All-College Symposium 

4 Thursday, 8:00 a.m Classes begin 

23 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Founders' Day 

lar. 8-11 Monday through Thursday Religious Emphasis Week 

19-28 Friday through Sunday Concert Choir Tour 

30 Tuesday Phi Alpha Epsilon Day 

pr. 2 Friday, 5:00 p.m Easter vacation begins 

13 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m Classes resume 

20 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Religion and Life Lecture 

21-28 Wednesday through Wednesday .... Pre-registration for 1st semester, 1971-1972, 

and Summer Session, 1971 

25 Sunday, 3:00 p.m. . Spring Music Festival, Symphonic Band 

ay 1 Saturday Alumni Day 

8 Saturday Spring orientation for incoming freshmen 

9 Sunday, 3:00 p.m Spring Music Festival, Chorus and Orchestra 

18 Tuesday, 11 :00 a.m Awards and Recognition Day 

21 Friday, 5:00 p.m Classes end 

22-25 Saturday through Tuesday Reading period 

26-June 1 Wednesday through Tuesday Second semester examinations 

1 Tuesday, 5:00 p.m Second semester ends 

4 Friday Board of Trustees meeting 

6 Sunday, 9:00 a.m Baccalaureate Service 

6 Sunday, 11 :00 a.m 102nd Annual Commencement 

>71 Summer Session: June 14-August 6 

5 


















|[ 




■■■ 











ontents 



College Profile . . . . 8 

College History . 9 

Accreditation 11 

Principles and Objectives 11 

Location and Environment 12 

Campus Map 13 

Campus, Buildings, and Equipment 14 

Support and Control . 16 

Enrollment Statistics 19 

Information For Prospective Students 20 

Admission 21 

Student Finances 23 

Financial Aid 25 

Academic Programs and Procedures 26 

Requirements For Degrees 27 

Special Plans of Study 30 

The College Honors Program 47 

Auxiliary Schools 48 

Junior Year Abroad 49 

Academic Procedures 50 

Administrative Regulations 52 

Student Activities 54 

The Religious Life 55 

Campus Organizations 57 

Cultural Opportunities 57 

Student Government 58 

Athletics and Recreation 59 

Courses of Study By Departments 60 

Directories 110 

Board of Trustees 111 

Administrative Staff and Faculty 115 

General Alumni Organization 126 

Degrees Conferred 129 

Student Awards 133 

Correspondence Directory 139 

Index 140 



College Profil 




IOLLEGE HISTORY 

Sfficials of the East Pennsylvania Conference 
f the Church of the United Brethren in 
,'hrist were acutely embarrassed in the spring 
f 1866. Five public-spirited citizens of the 
Dwn of Annville had come to Conference on 
ebruary 22 and offered as a gift the Annville 
xademy building on Main Street, which they 
ad bought for $4,500, providing that the 
inference would establish and maintain 
lere forever an institution of learning of high 
rade. The gift was accepted. The name 
ebanon Valley College was chosen. It was 
ecided to lease the property to some one 
ualified to operate a school. The opening 
ate was set — May 7. Planning then came to 

stop, for they could find no one to take 
ie lease. 

That was the situation seven weeks before 
ie opening date, according to George Washi- 
ngton Miles Rigor, whose short account is 
he earliest extant history of Lebanon Valley 
College. There was no college graduate in 
le whole Conference, and a poll of Otter- 
iein College graduates failed to turn up a 
»rospect. Rigor, a United Brethren minister 
vho had attended college for only three 
ears, stepped into the breach. He enlisted 
ie cooperation of a neighbor, Thomas R. 
ickroy, a Methodist minister and graduate 
)f Dickinson College. They took over the lease 
s partners for the next five years, Vickroy to 
un the school and Rigor to act as Agent, 
he building was readied and Lebanon Valley 
College opened on May 7, as scheduled, with 
9 students enrolled. From its first day it was 
:oeducational. 

President Vickroy's term was marked by 
ction. Eleven acres were added to the ''lot 
:nd a half of ground" conveyed by the origi- 
lal deed. A spacious four-story building was 
erected. A charter was granted by the Com- 



monwealth of Pennsylvania. A faculty was 
hired. A complete college curriculum was 
established, based on the classics but includ- 
ing music and art, and two classes were 
graduated before Vickroy gave up his lease 
in 1871. The College was not leased again 
but continued operations through a Board 
of Trustees. 

The five presidents during the next 25 
years had great difficulty in keeping the 
College afloat, due to lack of support rang- 
ing from open opposition to disinterested 
apathy. There was some progress. A library 
was established in 1874, and a college news- 
paper appeared in 1888. However, in the fall 
of 1896, the school was debt-ridden, living 
from hand to mouth, with an enrollment of 
only 80. 

The administration of President Hervin U. 
Roop, starting in 1897, marked the first real 
period of expansion. Under his leadership, 
five new buildings were erected, including a 
library donated by Andrew Carnegie, and the 
Administration Building was re-built after the 
disastrous fire of Christmas Eve, 1904. By 
1905, enrollment had soared to 470, with a 
faculty of 23. 

Loss of public confidence and financial sup- 
port prompted Roop's resignation in 1905 
and the College faced its darkest days. Bank- 
ruptcy was averted by the keen business 
sense and generosity of President Lawrence 
Keister, who served from 1907 to 1912. 

President George D. Gossard finally gave 
the College stability when he achieved for it 
accreditation and a million dollar endowment 
fund, the income from which was to form the 
financial cushion dreamed of by all the presi- 
dents before him. By the end of his 20-year 
term in 1932, there were 653 students and 
32 faculty members. Most important, the Con- 
servatory of Music was accredited by the Com- 
monwealth for its program in Public School 



Music, marking the start of an outstanding 
academic department. 

Following Dr. Gossard's death in 1932, 
Clyde A. Lynch faced a series of external crises 
which lasted throughout his 18 years as presi- 
dent. The stock market crash shrank the 
handsome endowment raised by his predeces- 
sor. The Depression of the 1930's reduced the 
enrollment and World War II shrank it still 
further; the post-war influx of G.l.'s then 
stretched it to more than capacity. In spite of 
these trials, Dr. Lynch's administration began 
buying property adjacent to the campus to 
allow for future expansion. It also raised over 
a half million dollars, part of which was to be 
used for a new physical education building. 
This building, still unfinished at the time of 
Lynch's death in 1950, was named in his honor 
upon completion. 

The twelfth president of the College, Fred- 
eric K. Miller, served for almost 17 years. 
During his term, inflation caused mushroom- 
ing costs, but the so-called 'Tidal Wave of 
Students" made possible selective admissions. 
The greatest physical expansion in the history 
of the College occurred, with seven new 
buildings erected and several renovated. Two 
major fund-raising drives were concluded suc- 
cessfully. Enrollment increased by 60%, with 
a corresponding increase in faculty and ad- 
ministrative staff. The Centennial of the found- 
ing of the College was observed by a year- 
long series of events. 

On April 1, 1967, Dr. Miller retired, and 
Allan W. Mund, President of the Board of 
Trustees, became Acting President. It was not 
until February 3, 1968, that Frederick P. 
Sample was selected by the Board to become 
thirteenth president of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. When Dr. Sample assumed office on 
September 1, 1968, Lebanon Valley College 
faced its second century as a fully-accredited, 
church-related, coeducational college of the 
liberal arts and sciences, occupying a 35-acre 
campus of 26 buildings, and supporting an 
enrollment of 900 and a full-time faculty of 58. 
Just as the College has changed through 
the years, so has the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ which gave it birth and of- 
fered its support. Organized in 1800 as the 



first Christian church indigenous to t 
United States, the denomination merged w 
the Evangelical Church to become the Eve 
gelical United Brethren Church in 1946. 
April, 1968, this body joined with the Meth 
dist Church to form the United Method 
Church. 

In looking to its second century, Lebam 
Valley College is very conscious of the drea 
of its forefathers that it be "an institution 
learning of high grade." It aims to be esse 
tially what it is now, a relatively small collej 
of the liberal arts and sciences that takes 
historic Christian origin and current relatio 
ship seriously. 

Presidents of Lebanon Valley College 

Rev. Thomas Rees Vickroy, Ph.D. 
1866-1871 

Lucian H. Hammond, A.M. 

1871-1876 
Rev. D. D. DeLong, A.M. 

1876-1887 
Rev. E. S. Lorenz, A.M., B.D. 

1887-1889 
Rev. Cyrus J. Kephart, A.M. 

1889-1890 

E. Benjamin Bierman, A.M., Ph.D. 
1890-1897 

Rev. Hervin U. Roop, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. 
1897-1906 

Rev. Abram Paul Funkhouser, B.S. 

1906-1907 
Rev. Lawrence Keister, S.T.B., D.D. 

1907-1912 
Rev. George Daniel Gossard, B.D., D.D., LL.D. 

1912-1932 

Rev. Clyde Alvin Lynch, A.M., B.D., D.D., 
Ph.D., LL.D. 
1932-1950 

Frederic K. Miller, M.A., Ph.D., Litt.D., D.H.L 
D.Pd., LL.D. 

Acting President 1950-1951 

President 1951-1967 
Allan W. Mund, LL.D. 

Acting President 1967-1968 

Frederick P. Sample, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed., Pd.D. 
1968- 



10 



Accreditation 

ebanon Valley College is accredited by the 
ollowing bodies: 

Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools 

Department of Education of Pennsylvania 

National Association of Schools of Music 

American Chemical Society 

Lebanon Valley College is a member of the 
ollowing bodies: 

American Council on Education 
1 Association of American Colleges 
College Entrance Examination Board 
College Scholarship Service 
Council of Protestant Colleges and 

Universities 
Pennsylvania Foundation for Independent 

Colleges 
American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education 

Lebanon Valley College is on the approved 
ists of the Regents of the University of the 
)tate of New York and the American Associa- 
ion of University Women. 



PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College is to give its 
students the opportunity to procure a libera! 
sducation of the highest quality. That is, it 
seeks, first of all, to acquaint them with the 
basic facts and principles of the cultural heri- 
tage of mankind, including its spiritual, scien- 
tific, literary, artistic, and social elements. 
Second, it seeks to develop in its students the 
capacity to use their full intellectual resources 
in dealing with, formulating and communicat- 
ing ideas, and making reasoned judgments. 
Third, it seeks to cultivate those qualities of 
personality and character, of moral and social 
responsibility and concern, that characterize 
personal maturity and constitute the basis of a 
free society. 

The liberal education aims of Lebanon 
Valley College are set within the context of 



commitment to the Christian faith and Chris- 
tian values, and are ordered by the conviction 
that sincere faith and significant learning are 
inseparable, that all truth has its origin and 
end in God, and that therefore learner and 
teacher alike not only can be, but must be 
free to subject all claims to truth and value, 
both religious and secular, to the tests of 
honest and humble inquiry, analysis, reflec- 
tion, and redefinition. And implicit in this 
conviction is the correlate that keeping the 
doors open for exploration and application of 
Christian truth and value does not bar the way 
to the exploration of the truth and value to 
be found in other religious and philosophical 
traditions of mankind. Finally, in the Christian 
understanding of man as creature of God is 
found the basis of the College's concern for 
all its members as persons, as God-related as 
well as man-related and world-related beings. 
Thus through commitment to the ideal of 
Christian higher education does the College 
seek to serve the Church and the Christian 
community which nourishes and sustains it. 

In its policy of providing programs of a 
professional and pre-professional nature, Leb- 
anon Valley College does not seek simply to 
help educate persons who will make their 
own useful contribution to the work of the 
world and to the service of mankind in certain 
professions and vocation. The College insists 
that for its students engaged in such prepara- 
tion the purposes of a Christian liberal educa- 
tion apply completely and must be neither ig- 
nored nor deprecated for the sake of techni- 
cal or utilitarian ends or in the name of prag- 
matic or material values. Indeed, a liberally 
educated professional is a more complete per- 
son, while through his practice his knowledge 
and interests are applied and made relevant 
to the world. 

It is in relation to these general principles 
that the following more specific educational 
objectives of Lebanon Valley College are to 
be understood: 

1. To provide an opportunity for qualified 
young people to procure a liberal educa- 
tion and to develop their total personali- 
ties under Christian influences. 



11 



2. To help provide the church with capa- 
ble and enlightened leaders, both clerical 
and lay. 

3. To foster Christian ideals and to encourage 
faithfulness to the Church of the student's 
choice. 

4. To help train well-informed, intelligent, 
and responsible citizens, qualified for 
leadership in community, state, and nation. 

5. To provide pre-professional students with 



the broad preliminary training recom 

mended by professional schools and pro 

fessional associations. 

To provide, in an atmosphere of libera 

culture, partial or complete training fo 

certain professions and vocations. 

To provide opportunity for gifted student 

to pursue independent study for the pur 

pose of developing their intellectua 

powers to the maximum. 



LOCATION AND ENVIRONMENT 

Lebanon Valley College is located in Ann- 
ville, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, twenty 
miles east of Harrisburg and five miles west 
of Lebanon. The campus faces U.S. Highway 
422 on the south and Pennsylvania Highway 
934 on the west. Lebanon Valley College is 
accessible from the Pennsylvania Turnpike 
using the Lebanon-Lancaster Interchange, 
Pennsylvania Highway 72, and Highway 322. 
Bus service between Reading and Harris- 
burg over Highway 422 provides rail and air 
connections at Harrisburg for Philadelphia, 
New York, Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburgh, 
and other major cities. 



Annville is a residential community of abou 
3,500 people situated in the agricultural coun 
try of the Pennsylvania Germans. Of historica 
significance in nearby areas are the Cornwal 
Charcoal Furnace, which dates back to 174^ 
and which supplied cannonballs for Washing- 
ton's army, and the adjacent Cornwall Ore 
Mines which are still operated by the Beth- 
lehem Steel Corporation; the Union Cana 
Tunnel (the oldest existing canal tunnel in 
the United States) and remnants of the locks 
used from 1828 to 1885 by the canal which 
provided access from the Susquehanna River 
to Philadelphia; and the first Municipal Water 
Works in America at Schaefferstown. 



ROCHESTER 365 miles 
BUFFALO 305 miles 



BOSTON 365 miles 



CLEVELAND 345 miles 



PITTSBURGH 210 miles 




ALLENTOWN 70 miles 



PHILADELPHIA 80 miles 

/ WILMINGTON 90 miles 

BALTIMORE 100 miles >y 

/ ATLANTIC CITY 145 miles 

WASHINGTON 125 miles 



12 




Tratfic Light 
WEST MAINSTREE 



US Highway 422 To Palmy'a Hershey 

To Route 322 Route 72 Turnpike 



EAST MAIN STREET To Lebanon Reading 



1 Administration Building 

2. Carnegie Lounge 

3. Gossard Memorial Library 

4. Kreider Hall 

5. Science Hall 

6. Maintenance Building 

7. College Book Store 

8. Central Heating Plant 

9. Laughlin Hall 

10. South Hall 

11. United Methodist Church 



12. Engle Hall 

13. Chapel 

14. Lynch Memorial Building 
(Gymnasium) 

15. Sheridan Hall 

16. West Hall Annex 

17. West Hall 

18. College Dining Hall 

19. Mary Capp Green Hall 

20. Vickroy Hall 



21. Infirmary 

22. North College 

23. Saylor Hall 

24. Keister Hall 

25. Hammond Hall 

26. 112 College Ave., Faculty 
Offices 

27. East College 

28. Centre Hall Annex 

29. Centre Hall 

30. Funkhouser Hall 



13 



CAMPUS, BUILDINGS, AND 
EQUIPMENT 

The campus of 35 acres is situated in the 
center of Annville. The college plant consists 
of 28 buildings including: 
The Administration Building — Administrative 
Offices (President, Vice President and Dean 
of the College, Vice President and Assistant 
to the President, and Vice President and Con- 
troller) are located on the main floor. The re- 
mainder of the building is devoted to class- 
rooms, laboratories, faculty offices, and admin- 
istrative services. 

Gossard Memorial Library — The Gossard Me- 
morial Library was opened in June, 1957. The 
more than 96,500 volumes include an excel- 
lent collection of standard reference works 
and bound periodicals. In addition to re- 
sources used by the various departments of 
the College, a diversified collection of peri- 
odicals is also available. 

The Hiram Herr Shenk Collection (which 
includes the Heilman Library) and the C. B. 
Montgomery Memorial Collection contain 
many valuable works dealing with the history 



and customs of the Pennsylvania Germans 
These collections are housed in the Historica 
Collection Room and are open for reference 
use under staff supervision. 

A separate room houses the Archives of the 
Historical Society of the Eastern Conference 
of the United Methodist Church. The material* 
in this collection are available for reference 
under the supervision of the Conference 
Historian. 

Special equipment of the library include; 
a music and listening room outfitted with 
turntables and earphones, typing booths foi 
students, conference rooms, microfilm reader- 
printers (there are some 6,000 periodicals on 
microfilm), an electrostatic copier, and carrels 
for individual study. In addition to the library 
proper, the building contains an audio-visual 
room equipped with a loudspeaker system 
and adaptable to the exhibiting of works of art. 
Chapel — This building houses the main sanc- 
tuary and meditation chapel, Office of the 
Chaplain, faculty offices of departments of 
Religion and Philosophy, classrooms, a fellow- 
ship room, and the Student Christian Associa- 
tion room. 




14 




Engle Hall — Engle Hall houses the Depart- 
ment of Music and includes an auditorium, 
classrooms, studios, offices, and private prac- 
tice rooms. 

Saylor Hall — The Art Department as well as 
Music Department practice rooms are located 
in Saylor Hall. 

Science Hall — The first floor of Science Hall 
contains laboratories, library, class and con- 
ference rooms, and offices of the Department 
of Chemistry. The second and third floors are 
equipped with similar facilities and a green- 
house for the Department of Biology. 
Carnegie Lounge — The former Carnegie Li- 
brary building has been converted into a 
modified student services center. The base- 
ment contains a snack bar and the first floor 
is equipped with three attractive lounges for 
the use of faculty and students. The second 
floor houses the offices of the Dean of Men, 
the Dean of Women, the student newspaper 
(La Vie Collegienne), the college yearbook 
(The Quittafiahilla), and conference rooms. 
Lynch Memorial Physical Education Building 
— This modern plant is well equipped for 
physical education, recreation, and campus 
meetings. It houses the Department of Eco- 
nomics and Business Administration. 



Residence Halls — There are six residence halls 
for women (Centre, Centre Annex, Green, 
Keister, North, and Vickroy) and seven for 
men (East, Funkhouser, Hammond, Kreider, 
Sheridan, West, and West Annex). 
The College Dining Hall — The College Dining 
Hall has facilities for serving all resident stu- 
dents. 

The College Book Store — All textbooks, 
school supplies, stationery, as well as sou- 
venirs, are available at the College Book 
Store. 

112 College Avenue — This building provides 
offices for the Department of English and for 
the Department of Foreign Languages. 

South Hall — South Hall houses the Office of 
the Registrar, the Teacher Placement Bureau, 
the Office of Admissions, and faculty offices. 
Laughlin Hall — The offices of the College Re- 
lations Area (Alumni, Development, and Pub- 
lic Relations) are located in Laughlin Hall. 
Infirmary — Staffed by a Head Nurse and resi- 
dent nurses, the Infirmary is available to all 
students. The College Physician is on call at 
all times. Adjacent to the Infirmary is the 
Women's Day Student Room. 




15 



SUPPORT AND CONTROL 

Lebanon Valley College receives support from 
the Christian Service Fund Budget of the 
United Methodist Church, individual congre- 
gations of the denomination in the Eastern and 
Susquehanna Conferences, endowments, and 
the Pennsylvania Foundation for Independent 
Colleges. Also, since at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege as at most other institutions of higher 
learning the tuition and other annual charges 
paid by the student do not cover the total cost 
of his education, additional income is derived 
through the Lebanon Valley College Fund. 
The Fund is supported by industry, alumni, 
parents of students, and other friends of the 
College. 

Total assets of Lebanon Valley College ex- 
ceed $11,000,000, including endowment funds 
in excess of $2,450,000. Aside from general 
endowment income available for unrestricted 
purposes, there are a number of special funds 
designated for specific uses such as professor- 
ships, scholarships, and the library. 

Control of the College is vested in a 
Board of Trustees composed of 54 members, 
32 of whom represent church conferences; 
5 of whom represent the alumni of the insti- 
tution; 5 of whom represent the faculty; and 
12 of whom are elected at large. 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS (June 30, 1969) 

UNRESTRICTED 

For General Purposes 
RESTRICTED 

Professorship Funds 

Chair of English Bible and Greek Testament 
Josephine Bittinger Eberly Professorship of 

Latin Language and Literature 
John Evans Lehman Chair of Mathematics 
The Rev. J. B. Weidler Endowment Fund 
The Ford Foundation 



Restricted Other 

Bishop J. Balmer Showers Lectureship Fund 
Karl Milton Karnegie Fund 

Special Fund— Faculty Salaries 

The Batdorf Fund 

E. N. Funkhouser Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Horn Fund 

Mary I. Shumberger Memorial Fund 

Woodrow W. Waltermeyer Professorship Func 

Library Funds 

Library Fund of Class of 1916 

Class of 1956 Library Endowment Fund 

Dr. Lewis J. and Leah Miller Leiby Library Fund 

Maintenance Funds 

Hiram E. Steinmetz Memorial Room Fund 

Equipment Funds 

Dr. Warren H. Fake and Mabel A. Fake Science 

Memorial Fund 
Williams Foundation Endowment Fund 

Publicity Funds 

Harnish-Houser Publicity Fund 




16 



Scholarship Funds 

Allegheny Conference C.E. Scholarship Fund 

A.F.S. Scholarship Fund 

Alumni Scholarship Fund 

Dorothy Jean Bachman Scholarship Fund 

Lillian Merle Bachman Scholarship Fund 

Baltimore Fifth Church, Otterbein Memorial 

Sunday School Scholarship Fund 
E. M. Baum Scholarship Fund 
Andrew and Ruth Bender Scholarship Fund 
Cloyd and Mary Bender Scholarship Fund 
Biological Scholarship Fund 
Eliza Bittinger Scholarship Fund 
Mary A. Bixler Scholarship Fund 
I. T. Buffington Scholarship Fund 
Alice Evers Burtner Memorial Award Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Clark Carmean Scholarship 

Fund 
Collegiate Scholarship Fund of Evangelical 

United Brethren Church 
Isaiah H. Daugherty and Benjamin P. Raab 

Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Senator James J. Davis Scholarship Fund 
William E. Duff Scholarship Fund 
Derickson Scholarship Fund 
East Pennsylvania Conference C.E. Scholarship 

Fund 
East Pennsylvania Branch W.S.W.S. Scholarship 

Fund 
Samuel F. and Agnes F. Engle Scholarship Fund 
M. C. Favinger and Wife Scholarship Fund 
Fred E. Foos Scholarship Fund 
C. C. Gingrich Scholarship Fund 
G. D. Gossard and Wife Scholarship Fund 
Margaret Verda Graybill Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 
Peter Graybill Scholarship Fund 
Jacob F. Greasly Scholarship Fund 
Harrisburg Otterbein Church of The United 

Brethren In Christ Scholarship Fund 
Harrisburg Otterbein Sunday School 

Scholarship Fund 
Alice M. Heagy Scholarship Fund 
J. M. Heagy and Wife Scholarship Fund 
Bertha Foos Heinz Scholarship Fund 
Harvey E. Herr Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Edwin M. Hershey Scholarship Fund 
Merle M. Hoover Scholarship Fund 
Judge S. C. Huber Scholarship Fund 



Cora Appleton Huber Scholarship Fund 

H. S. Immel Scholarship Fund 

Henry G. and Anna S. Kauffman and Family 

Scholarship Fund 
John A. H. Keith Fund 
Barbara June Kettering Scholarship Fund 
Rev. and Mrs. J. E. and Rev. A. H. Kleffman 

Scholarship Fund 
Dorothea Killinger Scholarship Fund 
A. S. Kreider Ministerial Scholarship Fund 
W. E. Kreider Scholarship Fund 
Maud P. Laughlin Scholarship Fund 
Lebanon Steel Foundry Foundation 

Scholarship Fund 
The Lorenz Benevolent Fund 
Mrs. Edwin M. Loux Scholarship Fund 
Lykens Otterbein Church Scholarship Fund 
Mechanicsburg U.B. Sunday School 

Scholarship Fund 
Medical Scholarship Fund 
Elizabeth Meyer Endowment Fund 
Elizabeth May Meyer Musical Scholarship Fund 
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Millard Memorial 

Scholarship Fund 
Harry E. Miller Scholarship Fund 
Bishop J. S. Mills Scholarship Fund 
The Ministerial Student Aid Gift Fund of 

The Evangelical United Brethren Church 
Germaine B. Monteux Memorial Scholarship 

Fund 
Elizabeth A. Mower Beneficiary Fund 
Neidig Memorial Church Ministerial 

Scholarship Fund 
Grace U.B. Church of Penbrook, 

Penna. Scholarship Fund 
Pennsylvania Branch W.S.W.S. Scholarship 

Fund in Memory of Dr. Paul E. V. Shannon 
Pennsylvania Conference C.E. Scholarship 

Fund 
Pennsylvania Conference Youth Fellowship 

Scholarship Fund 
People's National Bank Achievement Award 

in Economics 
Philadelphia Lebanon Valley College Alumni 

Scholarship Fund 
Rev. H. C. Phillips Scholarship Fund 
Sophia Plitt Scholarship Fund 
Quincy Evangelical United Brethren 

Orphanage and Home Scholarship Fund 



17 



Ezra G. Ranck and Wife Scholarship Fund 

Levi S. Reist Scholarship Fund 

G. A. Richie Scholarship Fund 

Emmett C. Roop Scholarship Fund 

Reynaldo Rovers Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Harvey L. Seltzer Scholarship Fund 

Rev. and Mrs. Cawley H. Stine Scholarship 

Fund 
Dr. Alfred D. Strickler and Louise Kreider 

Strickler Pre-Medical Scholarship Fund 
Washington, D. C. Memorial E.U.B. Ministerial 

Scholarship Fund 
Henry L. Wilder Scholarship Fund 
Jacob C. Winter Memorial Scholarship 

Student Loan Funds 

Mary A. Dodge Loan Fund 
Daniel Eberly Scholarship Fund 

Prize Funds 

Bradford C. Alban Memorial Award Fund 
The L. G. Bailey Award 



Henry H. Baish Memorial Fund 

Andrew Bender Memorial Chemistry Fund 

The Class of 1964 Quittapahilla Award Fund 

Governor James H. Duff Award 

The French Club Prize Fund 

Florence Wolf Knauss Memorial Award in 

Music 
La Vie Collegienne Award Fund 
Max F. Lehman Fund 
The David E. Long Memorial Fund 
Germaine Benedictus Monteux Music Award 
Pickwell Memorial Music Award 
The Rosenberry Award 
Wallace-Light-Wingate Award 
The Salome Wingate Sanders Award in 

Music Education 

Annuity Funds 

Rev. A. H. Kleffman and Erma L. Kleffman 

E. Roy Line Annuity 

Ruth Detwiler Rettew Annuity Fund 




18 



ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 

SUMMARY OF COLLEGE YEAR, 1968-1969 — CUMULATIVE 

DAY-TIME FULL-TIME PART-TIME 

Degree Students Men Women Total Men Women Total Men 

Seniors 130 70 200 7 11 18 137 

Juniors 114 73 187 2 2 4 116 

Sophomores 112 94 206 3 14 115 

Freshmen 161 121 282 1 1 2 162 

Non-degree _4 _J_ _5_ X\_ JI8_ _29^ _15_ 

Day-time Total 521 359 880 24 33 57 545 

Evening-Campus 33 50 83 33 

Extension 

Harrisburg 315_ 246_ 561_ 315_ 

Grand Total 521 359 880 372 329 701 893 

Names Repeated. -4 -2 -6 -4 

Net Total 52? 359" 880 368" 327 695" 889 

*Music Specials 27 44 71 27 

Summer School, 1969 

College 105 73 178 105 

*Music Specials 24 32 56 24 

Names Repeated . . -1-5 -6 -1 

* Not included in totals 

SUMMARY OF FIRST SEMESTER — 1969-1970 

DAY-TIME FULL-TIME PART-TIME 

Degree Students Men Women Total Men Women Total Men 

Seniors 113 63 176 6 9 15 119 

Juniors 99 95 194 2 3 5 101 

Sophomores 123 111 234 13 4 124 

Freshmen 197 123 320 1 1 198 

Non-degree _]_ _0 _J_ _12^ _12 _24 13 

Day-Time Total ... 533 392 925 22 27 49 555 

Evening-Campus 21 54 75 21 

Extension 

Harrisburg 185 209 394 185 

Grand Total 533 39? 92? 228" 290 518 761 

Names Repeated. _^0 _-1_ j^J_ j^0_ _^0_ ^0 _H3 

Net Total 533 39? 924 228 290 518 761 

*Music Specials 21 44 65 21 

* Not included in totals 



19 



TOTAL 




Women 


Total 


81 


218 


75 


191 


95 


210 


122 


284 


19 


34 


392 


937 


50 


83 


246 


561 


688 


1581 


-2 


-6 



686 1575 



44 



71 



73 


178 


32 


56 


-5 


-6 



Women 


Total 


72 


191 


98 


199 


114 


238 


123 


321 


12 


25 


419 


974 


54 


75 


209 


394 


682 


1443 


-1 


-1 


681 


1442 


44 


65 



Information For 
Prospective Students 




20 



ADMISSION 

Students are admitted to Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege on the basis of scholarly achievement, in- 
tellectual capacity, character, personality, and 
ability to profit by college experience. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

1. All communications concerning admission 
should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions, Lebanon Valley College, Ann- 
ville, Pennsylvania 17003. 

2. Applications should be submitted as early 
as possible in the latter part of the junior or 
the beginning of the senior year of high 
school or preparatory school. 

3. Applications must be filed on forms pro- 
vided by the Office of Admissions. 

4. Each application must be accompanied by 
an application fee of $10.00. This fee is not 
refundable. 

5. A transcript of the secondary school record, 

on a form provided by the College for 
that purpose, must be sent by the principal 
to the Director of Admission's. May 1 is the 
deadline for receiving applications. 

6. A student transferring from another collegi- 
ate institution must present an official tran- 
script of his scholastic record and evidence 
of honorable dismissal. 

7. All new students are required to present on 
or before August 20 the official Health 
Record showing a physician's report of 
medical examination; certification of vac- 
cination within a period of five years and 
immunization against flu, polio, and tetanus 
given just prior to the student's entrance to 
college. 

Admission is based on total information 
submitted by the applicant or in his behalf. 



Final decision, therefore, cannot be reached 
until all information has been supplied by the 
applicant. 



FACTORS DETERMINING ADMISSION 

Each candidate for admission will be con- 
sidered individually and the decision of the 
Admissions Committee with respect to ad- 
mission will be based on the following factors: 

1. The transcript of the applicant's secondary 
school record. 

2. Recommendation by the principal, teach- 
ers, and other responsible persons as to 
the applicant's special abilities, integrity, 
sense of responsibility, seriousness of pur- 
pose, initiative, self-reliance, and concern 
for others. 

3. A personal interview, whenever possible, 
with the Director of Admissions or his des- 
ignate. 

4. College Entrance Examination Board test 
results: (a) Scholastic Aptitude Test, (b) 
three achievement tests — English composi- 
tion and two optional tests. All candidates 
for admission are required to take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and three achieve- 
ment tests — English composition and any 
other two. Those seeking entrance in Sep- 
tember are advised to take these tests no 
later than in the preceding December and/ 
or January. Full information concerning 
dates and locations of these test adminis- 
trations may be obtained by writing to: 
College Entrance Examination Board, P.O. 
Box 592, Princeton, N. J. 08540. 

5. Additional test results which may be re- 
quired in special cases by the Committee 
on Admissions. 



21 



ADMISSION TO THE 
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

An applicant to the music or music educa- 
tion curriculums is expected to satisfy the 
general requirements for admission. In addi- 
tion, the candidate must appear for an audi- 
tion before members of the music faculty 
and show evidence of: 

1. An acceptable singing voice and a fairly 
quick sense of tone and rhythm; 

2. Ability to sing at sight hymn and folk tunes 
with a fair degree of accuracy and facility; 

3. Ability to sing or to play the piano, organ, 
or some orchestral instrument at a level 
representing three years of study. 

RECOMMENDED UNITS 
FOR ADMISSION 

It is recommended that all candidates offer 
16 units of entrance credit and graduation 
from an accredited secondary school or sub- 
mit an equivalency certificate acquired 
through examination. 

Ten of the 16 units offered for admission 
must be from the following subjects: English, 
foreign language, mathematics, science, and 
social studies. 

An applicant for admission whose prepara- 
tory courses do not coincide with the distri- 
bution of subject units (see below) may be 
considered by the Committee on Admissions 
if his academic record is of high quality and if, 
in the opinion of the Committee, he appears 
to be qualified to do college work satisfac- 
torily. All entrance deficiencies must be re- 
moved before sophomore academic status 
will be granted. 

DISTRIBUTION OF SUBJECT UNITS 

English 4 units 

Foreign Language (in one language)* 2 " 

Mathematics 2 " 

Science (laboratory) 1 " 

Social Studies 1 " 

Electives 6 " 

Total required 16 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

A student applying for advanced standing 
at Lebanon Valley College after having at- 



tended another accredited institution of higher 
education shall submit an official transcript 
of his record and evidence of good standing 
to the Director of Admissions. He must also 
submit College Board Aptitude and Achieve- 
ment Test scores. 

Credits are accepted for transfer provided 
that the grades received are C (2.0) or better 
and the work is equivalent or similar to work 
offered at Lebanon Valley College. Grades 
thus transferred count for hours only, not for 
quality points. 

Students transferring from two-year insti- 
tutions are required to earn at least 60 hours 
of credit from a four-year institution for 
graduation. A minimum of 30 hours of this 
must be taken at Lebanon Valley College to 
meet the residence requirement. 

Transfer students may be required to take 
placement examinations to demonstrate ade- 
quate preparation for advanced courses at 
Lebanon Valley College. 

Subject to the conditions listed in the sec- 
ond paragraph, Lebanon Valley College will 
recognize for transfer credit a maximum of 
15 hours of USAFI course work provided 
such credit is recommended by the Ameri- 
can Council on Education publication, A 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Ex- 
periences in the Armed Services. 

Credit will not be granted for corre- 
spondence courses. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Advanced placement and/or credit may 
be granted to entering students who make 
scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the College Board Ad- 
vanced Placement examination. 

Advanced placement without credit may 
be granted on the basis of the Achievement 
Tests of the College Board Examinations or 
such other proficiency tests as may be de- 
termined by the Assistant Dean of the Col- 
lege and by the chairman of the department 
in which advanced placement is sought. 

* If an applicant cannot present the two units of 
foreign language, he will be required to take a 
minimum of two years of one language in college. 
His credits for this work will be counted toward 
graduation requirements. 



22 




STUDENT FINANCES 

Lebanon Valley College is a private non-profit 
institution. It derives its financial support from 
endowment and gifts from the United Metho- 
dist Church, alumni, industry, friends and from 
the tuition, fees, and other charges paid by the 
students. The cost to the student is main- 
tained at a level consistent with adequate 
facilities and high quality instruction. 

FEES AND DEPOSITS 

An application fee of $10.00 which is not 
refundable is charged each applicant to apply 
against the cost of processing his application 
for admission. An admission deposit of 
$100.00, payable within ten days of notifica- 
tion of acceptance, is required of all new 
(including transfer) students. Until this de- 
posit is paid the student is not guaranteed 
a place in the entering class. The admission 
deposit is not refundable; it will be applied 
to the student's account upon registration. 

1969-1970 FEE STRUCTURE FOR 
FULL-TIME DEGREE CANDIDATES 



Resident 
Each 
Standard Charges Semester 

Tuition and Fees $ 950 

Room and Board 475 



$1,425 



Non- 
Resident 

Each 
Semester 

$950 



$950 



Students may be subject to the following 
additional fees and charges, depending upon 
their program: 
Laboratories, in excess of one per semester: 

Science, Mathematics, 

Languages $20.00 per semester 

All other laboratories . . 15.00 per semester 



Student Teaching Fee: 



$8.00 per credit 



Music Fees: 

Private music instruction 
(V2 hour per week, 
15 weeks) 60.00 per semester 



23 



Class music instruction 

(1 hour per week) .. 40.00 per semester 
Organ, practice rental 

(per hour per week). 8.00 per semester 
Band and orchestral 

instrument rental ... 15.00 per semester 
Transcript, in excess 

of one $ 1.00 

The insurance fee in the amount of $20.00 
is collected in the first semester of the stu- 
dent's enrollment and a pro-rata charge ap- 
plies to the student who first enrolls in the 
second semester. 

The contingency deposit in the amount of 
$25.00 must be made before registration and 
is required of all full-time students and will 
be refunded upon graduation or withdrawal 
from college provided no damage has been 
caused by the student. All student breakage 
that occurs in college-operated facilities will 
be charged against this deposit and the 
amount must be repaid to the College within 
30 days of notice to the student. 

A fee of $10.00 is charged each student who 
does not register for classes during any pre- 
scribed registration period. A fee of $2.00 is 
charged for every change of course made at 
the student's request after registration day. 

The fee for part-time students (less than 12 
credit hours per semester) is $75.00 per semes- 
ter credit hour plus a $2.00 registration fee; 
the fee for credit hours in excess of 16 credit 
hours per semester is $60.00; fractional hours 
of credit are charged proportionately. 

AUXILIARY SCHOOL FEE STRUCTURE 
(EVENING AND SUMMER) 

Tuition, $60.00 per semester credit hour 
Registration Fee, $2.00 
Late Registration Fee, $2.00 
Change of Registration Fee, $2.00 

PAYMENT OF FEES AND DEPOSITS 

Semester charges are due and payable in 
full on September 1 (first semester) and Jan- 
uary 1 (second semester) as a condition for 
registration. Those preferring to pay semester 
charges in monthly installments are invited to 
consult with the Office of the Controller re- 



garding deferred payment plans offered i 
various financial institutions. Arrangements f( 
deferred payment plans shall be complete 
prior to the above dates and as a conditio 
for registration. 

A satisfactory settlement of all college a 
counts is required before grades are release* 
transcripts are sent, honorable dismiss 
granted, or degree conferred. 

REFUND POLICY 

Refunds, as indicated below, are allowe 
only to students who officially withdraw fror 
the College by completing the clearance pre 
cedure: 

Period of student attendence in % of tuitio 

college from date classes begin refunded 

Less than three weeks 75% 

Over three weeks 0% 

A refund on board charge is allowed fc 
the period beginning after honorable officii 
withdrawal. 

No refund is allowed on student charge 
when a student retains his class standing dur 
ing his absence from college because of ill 
ness or for any other reason. 

No refund is allowed on room charges. N< 
refund is allowed on room deposit excep 
when withdrawal results from suspension o 
dismissal by College action or when with 
drawal results from entrance into active mili 
tary service. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Residence hall rooms are reserved only fo 
those returning students who make an ad 
vance room reservation deposit of $50. 0C 
(Receipt must be presented at the time o 
room sign-up which occurs immediately afte 
the Easter Vacation.) 

Occupants are held responsible for al 
breakage and loss of furniture, or any damagi 
for which they are responsible. 

Each room in the men's residence halls i 
furnished with chests of drawers, book case 
beds, mattresses, chairs, and study tables 
Drapes are provided in Hammond and Funk 
houser Halls. Students must provide bedding 
rugs, lamps, and all other furnishings. 



24 




Each room in the women's residence halls 
furnished with beds, mattresses, chairs, 

essers, book case, and study tables. Drapes 

e provided in Keister, Mary Green and Vick- 
>y Halls. Other desired furnishings must be 
ipplied by the student. 

Students rooming in residence halls may not 
iblet their rooms to commuting students or 
I others. 

Since Lebanon Valley College is primarily a 
Darding institution, all students are required 
• live in college-owned or controlled resi- 
?nce halls. Exceptions to the above are: mar- 
ed students, students living with immediate 
ilatives, or those living in their own homes 
ho commute daily to the campus. 

Should vacancies occur in any of the resi- 
?nce halls, the College reserves the right to 
;quire students rooming in the community 
) move into a residence hall. 

The College reserves the right to close all 

sidence halls during vacations and between 
?mesters. 

The College reserves the right to inspect any 
udent's room at any time. Periodic inspec- 
on of residence halls will be made by mem- 
ers of the administration. 

The College is not responsible for loss of 
ersonal possessions by the students. 

Lounges are provided by the College for 
Bsident and commuting students. 

4EALS 

All resident students are required to take 
leir meals in the College Dining Hall. Com- 
luting students may arrange for meals Mon- 
ay through Friday, if space is available. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Lebanon Valley College offers financial assist- 
ance to deserving students who have been ac- 
cepted for admission insofar as its aid funds 
permit. Students applying for financial aid 
must submit the Parents' Confidential State- 
ment through the College Scholarship Service, 
Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey, 08540. High 
school seniors may obtain these forms in 
high school guidance offices. It is not neces- 
sary to wait until notification of acceptance 
to Lebanon Valley College to apply for finan- 
cial aid. Application should be made as early 
as possible and no later than April 1. 

Applicants for financial aid and students re- 
ceiving financial aid are obligated to report 
the excess above $100 of all aid from non- 
college controlled sources (prizes, awards, 
grants, scholarships, and loans). The College 
reserves the right to review and revise the 
recipient's financial aid package in view of 
any outside aid that he receives. 

INTERNAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 

Lebanon Valley College offers financial as- 
sistance in the form of grants-in-aid, restricted 
scholarships, the Lebanon Valley College 
Loan Fund, and Presidential Scholarships. 

EMPLOYMENT 

Financial assistance is available in the form 
of waiterships, janitorships, laboratory aides, 
clerical aides, library aides and other forms 
of work assignments. Employment is granted 
to deserving students on the basis of the re- 
quirements of the College. 

EXTERNAL SOURCES OF FINANCIAL AID 

Financial aid also is available through pri- 
vate agencies, state government programs, and 
the three Federal government programs in 
which the College participates. The Federal 
programs are the National Defense Student 
Loans, Educational Opportunity Grants, and 
the College Work-Study Program. 

For further information, write to the Finan- 
cial Aid Officer, Lebanon Valley College, Ann- 
ville, Pennsylvania 17003. 



25 



Academic Program 

& Procedure 




26 



EQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

banon Valley College confers five bachelor 
grees. They are: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
Science, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, 
chelor of Science in Nursing, and Bachelor 
Science in Medical Technology. 
The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred 
>on students who complete the require- 
ents for graduation in the following areas, 
d who are recommended by the faculty 
d approved by the Board of Trustees: 
ology, English, French, German, Greek, His- 
ry, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, 
lysics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, 
>ciology and Spanish. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is con- 
rred upon students who complete the re- 
jirements in the following areas, and who 
e recommended by the faculty and ap- 
oved by the Board of Trustees: Biology, 
lemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Actuarial 
ience, Economics and Business Administra- 
>n, Elementary Education, Music Education, 
"ts-Engineering, and Arts-Forestry. 
The professional degrees of Bachelor of 
ience in Chemistry, Bachelor of Science in 
ursing, and Bachelor of Science in Medical 
?chnology are conferred upon students who 
>mplete the requirements in the respective 
ofessional areas and who are recommended 
' the faculty and approved by the Board of 
ustees. 

iMESTER HOURS 

The requirements for degrees are stated in 
emester hours of credit" which are based 
>on the satisfactory completion of courses 
instruction. Generally, one semester hour 
edit is given for each class hour a week 
roughout the semester. In courses requiring 
Moratory work, not less than two hours of 
Doratory work a week throughout a semester 



are required for a semester hour of credit. A 
semester is a term of approximately 17 weeks. 
Candidates for degrees must obtain a 
minimum of 120 semester hours credit in aca- 
demic work in addition to the required 
courses in Freshman and Sophomore Physical 
Education. However, a student who has a 
physical disability may be excused (on recom- 
mendation from the College Physician) from 
the requirement in physical education. 

MAJOR 

As a part of the total requirement of 120 
hours every candidate for a degree must pre- 
sent at least 24 semester hours of course work 
in one department (this is his major). The 
initial selection of a major may be indicated or 
recorded any time before the end of the stu- 
dent's sophomore year. Such a choice of 
department or curriculum in which to pursue 
work of special concentration must be made 
by the time of registration for the junior year. 
A student accepted as a major has the right 
to remain in that department as iong as he 
is in college. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Candidates for degrees are required to take 
end of course examinations. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

Degrees will be conferred only upon those 
candidates earning in residence a minimum 
of 30 semester hours out of the last 36 taken 
before the date of the conferring of the de- 
gree, or before the transfer to a cooperating 
program. Residence credit is given for course 
work completed in regular day classes and in 
evening and summer school courses taken on 
campus. 



27 



GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

Candidates for degrees must also obtain a 
cumulative grade point average of 1.75, com- 
puted in accordance with the grading system 
indicated below. 

In addition, candidates must earn a grade 
point average of 2.0 in the major field of 
study. 

Only grades received in courses taken on 
campus or in courses staffed by Lebanon Val- 
ley College at the University Center at Harris- 
burg are used to determine grade point 
averages. 

SYSTEM OF GRADING AND 
QUALITY POINTS 

The work of a student in each subject is 
graded A, B, C, D, or F, with the plus and 
minus available to faculty members who wish 
to use them. These grades have the following 
meanings: 

A— distinguished performance 
B— superior work 

C— general satisfactory achievement 
D-course requirements and standards satis- 
fied at a minimum level 
F-course requirements and standards not 
satisfied at a minimum level 
When a grade of F has been received, the 
student may not proceed with any part of the 
course dependent upon the part in which the 
grade of F has been received. If a student 
fails in a subject twice, he may not register 
for a third time. 

In addition to the above grades the symbols 
"I," "W," "WP," and "WF" are used on grade 
reports and in college records. "I" indicates 
that the work is incomplete (that the student 
has postponed with the consent of the in- 
structor, certain required work), but otherwise 
satisfactory. This work must be completed 
within the semester following, or the "\" will 
be converted to an F. 

W indicates withdrawal from a course any 
time within the first six weeks of classes of a 
semester without prejudice to the student's 
standing. In case of withdrawal from a course 
after six weeks the symbol WP will be en- 



tered if the student's work is satisfactory, 
WF if his work is unsatisfactory. The gr 
WP will be considered as without prejudio 
the student's standing, but the grade WF 
be counted as an F. If a student withdr 
from a course after twelve weeks, withoi 
reason satisfactory to the Registrar, a gr 
of WF will be recorded. 

For courses in which no academic cred 
involved, student work is evaluated as eii 
S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). 

For each semester hour credit in a coi 
in which a student is graded A, he recei 
4 quality points; A-, 3.7; B+, 3.3; B, 
B— , 2.7; etc. F carries no credit and no qua 
points. 

PASS FAIL GRADING 

After a student has gained sophom 
standing, he may elect to take up to t 
courses per semester and one course per si 
mer session on a P/F basis, but only six 
these courses can be counted toward grad 
tion requirements. 

Any courses not being counted toward 
fulfillment of the general requirements or 
specified major requirements may be optio 
on a pass/fail basis. Any pre-requisite cou 
taken on a P/F basis and successfully co 
pleted will satisfy the pre-requisite. 

Any course taken on a P/F basis will 
graded P/H (pass with distinction), P (pa.< 
or F (fail). P/H is defined as B+ and up, P 
defined as D- through B; and F is below D 

Any course completed on a P/F basis sh 
be counted toward graduation requiremei 
but only an F grade shall be included in co 
puting the grade point average. All passi 
grades shall be treated on the record as > 
presently treat transfer credit. 

The student will indicate at the time of pi 
registration or registration the courses that 
has elected to take on a P/F basis. He m 
change his option for P/F grading to tl 
regular grading basis or from regular gradii 
to P/F grading within two weeks after tl 
beginning of the semester. 

Instructors will not be informed of tl 
grading option selected by the student. I 
structors will submit an A through F grade f< 



28 



h student and the Registrar will convert 
grade to P/H, P or F for students selecting 
; grading system. 

ANSFER STUDENTS 

tudents transferring from two-year institu- 
is are required to have 60 hours of work 
a four-year institution for graduation. A 
limum of 30 hours of this must be taken 
Lebanon Valley College to meet the resi- 
ice requirement. (See page 27). 

tudents transferring from other institutions 
st secure a grade point average of 1.75 or 
ter in work taken at Lebanon Valley Col- 



TENDANCE AT BACCALAUREATE 
D COMMENCEMENT PROGRAMS 

vll seniors are required to attend the Bac- 
lureate and Commencement programs at 
ich their degrees are to be conferred. 
)egrees will be conferred in absentia only 
the most compelling reasons and only 
)n a written request approved by the As- 
ant Dean of the College. Such requests 
st be submitted at least two weeks prior 
the date of Commencement, 
acuity approval is required for the con- 
ing of the degree and the issuance of the 
loma in any case of wilful failure to comply 
h these regulations. 

NERAL AND DISTRIBUTION 
QUIREMENTS 

Semester 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: Hours 

;lish Composition* 6 

eign Language 

Intermediate level)* 6 

thematics (First year level)* 3 

igion 12 and 13 6 

/sical Education (two years) 

Requirement can be met by proficiency exami- 
ons selected by the chairman of the department 
)lved in consultation with the Dean of the Col- 
?, or through the Advanced Placement Programs. 



II. DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS: 

Humanities: Three one-semester courses 
(not more than two from one field) 
to be chosen from among Art or 
Music treated as one field; litera- 
ture as offered by the Department 
of English; literature as offered by 
the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages; Philosophy; Religion .... 9 

Social Sciences: Three one-semester 
courses (not more than two from 
one field) to be chosen from among 
Economics, History, Political 
Science, Sociology 9 

Natural Sciences: Three one-semester 
courses (not more than two from 
one field) to be chosen from Bi- 
ology, Chemistry, Physics, Psy- 
chology 9-12 

48-51 

Distribution requirements shall be met from 
among the following courses: 

Humanities: Art 12, 21; English 20, 21, 24, 
26, 37; Foreign Literature courses above 
first semester 15 level; Music 19; Philoso- 
phy 10, 30; Religion 22, 42. 

Social Sciences: Economics 20; History 10, 13, 
24; Pol. Sci. 10, 30.. 33; Sociology 20, 
21, 33. 

Natural Sciences: Biology 14, 18; Chemistry 
13; Physics 10, 17; Psychology 20, 25, 44. 

Notes: 

1. No course in the major field shall be used 
to meet general or distribution require- 
ments. 

2. No course taken as a general requirement 
may count toward a major. 

3. No credit is given for an elementary lan- 
guage course if two or more years of the 
same language have been taken in sec- 
ondary school or if credit for an elemen- 
tary language course has been given on 
transfer from another institution. Credit 
is given for any other elementary lan- 
guage course. 



29 



SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY 



ACTUARIAL SCIENCE 

Adviser: Dr. Bissinger 

Consultant: Actuaries Club of Philadelphia 



Course Number 
FIRST YEAR 

Mathematics 11 . 

English 10a-10b. 

Foreign Language 10. 

Mathematics 12. 

Music 19. 

or Art 12 

Physics 17. 

Physical Education 10. 



SECOND YEAR 

Mathematics 21 . 

Mathematics 37. 

English 20a-20b. 

Economics 20a-20b. 

Economics 23. 

Physical Education 20. 



Course Title 



Hours 

1st 
Sem. 



Elementary Analysis I & II 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate French or German 3 

Elementary Statistics — 

History and Appreciation of Music or In- 
troduction to Art 3 

Principles of Physics I 4 

Physical Education 



16 



Intermediate Analysis I & II 3 

Mathematical Statistics 3 

Comparative Literature 3 

Principles of Economics 3 

Principles of Accounting 4 

Physical Education 



16 





:tive 



thematics 24 

thematics 40.1 



chology 20. 

iology 20 

gion 12 

gion 13. 

nomics 32a-32b 

tive 



To be selected 

Linear Alegbra 

Mathematics Seminar— Finite Differences 

and Compound Interest 

General Psychology 

Introductory Sociology 

Introduction to Biblical Thought 

Introduction to the Christian Faith 

, Business Law 



16 



URTH YEAR 

:hematics 41 

thematics 40.1 

nomics 36 

nomics 44 

nomics 45 

osophy 10 

:tives 



Probability 

Mathematics Seminar— Life Contingencies 

Money and Banking 

Corporation Finance 

Investments and Statement Analysis 

Introduction to Philosophy 



16 



3 
3 
3 

16 



1 
3 

3 

9 
16 



he above program is one that is typical for 
actuarial student. Some variation is possi- 
with the consent of the advisor, 
art 1 of the Examination of the Society of 
uaries may be taken in May of the fresh- 
year or November or May of the sopho- 
re year. Part 2 of the Examination may be 
Bn in May of the sophomore year with 
summer to be spent in the home office 
lone of the life insurance companies. Part 



.n 



3 of the Examination may be taken in May 
of the junior year and should be taken by 
May of the senior year. 

The College is a testing center for the So- 
ciety of Actuaries and the major can take each 
of the examinations on campus. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the 
above curriculum and tests, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with a Major in Actuarial 
Science is granted. 



31 



CHEMISTRY 

Advisers: Dr. Neidig, Dr. Griswold, Dr. Lockwood 

Students entering with advanced placement in chemistry are asked to consult the adviser. 

Hours Cre 

1st 2n 

Course Number Course Title Sem. Ser 



FIRST YEAR 

Chemistry 13. . 

English 10a-10b. . 

German 11 . . 

Mathematics 11 . . 

Physical Education 10. . 

Religion 12. . 

Religion 13. . 



SECOND YEAR 

Chemistry 25, 

Chemistry 24, 

Distribution Requirements 

Mathematics 21 , 

Physical Education 20 

Physics 17. 



. . Principles of Chemistry 4 

. . English Composition 3 

. . Scientific German 3 

. . Elementary Analysis I & II 3 

. . Physical Education 

. . Introduction to Biblical Thought 3 

. . Introduction to the Christian Faith — 



16 



Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Equilibria 4 

Chemistry of the Covalent Bond — 

The Social Sciences 3 

Intermediate Analysis I & II 3 

Physical Education 

Principles of Physics I 4 

14 




32 




IIRD YEAR 

lemistry 36 

lemistry 37 

lemistry 38 

stribution Requirements 

lysics 27 

lemistry 39 

lemistry 30.1 



Physical Chemistry 3 

Organic Chemistry 5 

Instrumental Analysis — 

The Humanities 3 

Principles of Physics II 4 

Laboratory Investigations I 1 

Laboratory Investigations II — 



16 



)URTH YEAR 

lemistry 41 . 

lemistry 44. 

lemistry 45. 

lemistry 47. 

stribution Requirements 

stribution Requirements 

stribution Requirements 

actives 



Advanced Organic — 

Special Problems 2 

Advanced Analytical 3 

Advanced Inorganic 3 

The Social Sciences 3 

The Humanities — 

The Sciences 3 



14 



Curriculum leading to 
(American 



the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
Chemical Society certified degree) 



3 
3 

4 
1 
2 

16 



3 

2 

3 
3 

3 

14 



33 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Adviser: Dr. Tom 

Suggested program for majors in Economics and Business Administration. 



Course Number 



Course Title 



FIRST YEAR 

Economics 20a-20b 

Economics 23a 

English 10a-10b. 

Foreign Language 10. 



Hours 


Cre( 


1st 


2n< 


Sem. 


Sen 



. Principles of Economics 3 

. Principles of Accounting 4 

. English Composition 3 

. Intermediate French, German, Greek, 

Latin, Russian, or Spanish 3 

Mathematics 1 or 11 Introductory Analysis or Elementary 

Analysis I 3 

Distribution Requirements Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences — 

Physical Education 10 Physical Education 



16 



SECOND YEAR 

Economics 40.2 

Economics 36 

Economics 

History 13 

Distribution Requirements 



Religion 12 

Religion 13 

Physical Education 20 



Microeconomic Analysis 3 

Money and Banking — 

Electives* 3 

Introduction to Historiography 3 

Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences 3-4 

Intro, to Biblical Thought 3 

Intro, to the Christian Faith — 

Physical Education 



15-16 15-1 





THIRD YEAR 

conomics 48. . . . Labor Economics 3 

conomics 35. . . .Marketing — 

conomics Electives* 3 

Distribution Requirements Humanities, or Natural Sciences, or 

Social Sciences 6-7 

ectives 3 



OURTH YEAR 

conomics 40.3. . . .Seminar and Special Problems — 

conomics Electives* 6-9 

lectives 6-9 



* Students concentrating in areas desig- 
nated should schedule courses as indicated: 



15 



3 

3 

6-7 
3 



15-16 15-16 



3 
6-9 
6-9 

15 



conomics: 
Econ. 37— Public Finance 
Econ. 38— International Economics 
Econ. 40.1— History of Economic Thought 
Econ. 40.4— Macroeconomic Analysis 
Econ. 41— Economic Growth 
Econ. 46— Econometrics 

3usiness Administration: 
Econ. 32— Business Law 
Econ. 44— Corporation Finance 
Econ. 45— Investments and Statement 

Analysis 
Econ. 49— Industrial Management and 
Personnel Administration 

Accounting: 

Econ. 30— Intermediate Accounting 
Econ. 31— Advanced Accounting 
Econ. 42— Income Tax Accounting 
Econ. 43— Cost Accounting 
Econ. 45— Investments and Statement 

Analysis 
Econ. 40.5— Auditing 



For students who are interested in receiving 
Pennsylvania Teaching Certification in Com- 
prehensive Social Studies with a major in Eco- 
nomics, the following courses are required: 
Econ. 20— Principles of Economics 
Econ. 23— Principles of Accounting 
Econ. 35— Marketing 
Econ. 36— Money and Banking 
Econ. 40.2— Microeconomic Analysis 
Econ. 40.3— Seminar and Special Problems 
Econ. 48— Labor Economics 
Econ. 32— Business Law, or Econ. 37— 

Public Finance, or Econ. 40.1— 
History of Economic Thought, 
or Econ. 41— Economic 
Growth, or Econ. 46— 
Econometrics. 



35 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Advisers: Dr. Ebersole, Mrs. Herr 

Suggested program for majors in Elementary Education. 



Course Number 

FIRST YEAR 

Education 20 . 

English 10a-10b. 

Foreign Language 10. 

Distribution Requirements 

Physical Education 10. 

Psychology 20. 

Religion 12. 

Religion 13. 



SECOND YEAR 

Geography 10a— 10b. . 

Distribution Requirements 

Psychology 23 . . 

History 24a or 24b . . 

Elementary Education 22. . 

Elementary Education 25. . 

Elementary Education 37. . 

Physical Education 20. . 

Elective 



Course Title 



Hours 


Credi 


1st 


2nd 


Sem. 


Sem. 



.Social Foundations of Education 3 

. English Composition 3 

. Intermediate French, German, Russian, 

or Spanish 3 

.Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 3-4 

. Physical Education 

. General Psychology — 

. Intro, to Biblical Thought . . 3 

. Intro, to the Christian Faith — 



3 

3-4 



3 



15-16 15-16 



. World Geography 3 

. Humanities 3 or 

. Educational Psychology 3 

. Survey of U.S. History or 3 

.Music in the Elementary School — 

. Mathematics for Elem. Grades — 

. Children's Literature — 

. Physical Education 

3or6 



3 

0or- 

3 or C 

3 

3 

3 


0or3 



15 



15 




36 




HIRD YEAR 

ementary Education 34 

|ementary Education 23 

jementary Education 36 

istribution Requirements 

;ychology 21 

athematics 10 

ective 

ementary Education 43 



Teaching of Reading 

Physical Sciences in the Elementary School 
Communications and Group Processes in 

the Elem. School 

Social Sciences 

Psychology of Childhood 

Basic Concepts 



Health and Safety Education 



15 



3 
3 

15 



DURTH YEAR 

ementary Education 



40 
,32 



rt 

ementary Education 44 

istribution Requirements 

ectives or area of concentration . 



Student Teaching 12 

Art in the Elementary School 3 

Senior Seminar — 

Humanities — 



15 



3 
6 
6 

15 



37 



COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Adviser: Dr. Bissinger 

Lebanon Valley College offers a coopera- 
tive program in Engineering whereby a stu- 
dent may achieve a liberal arts degree from 
Lebanon Valley College and also an engi- 
neering degree from the University of Penn- 
sylvania or any other institution with which 
cooperative arrangements are in effect. 

A student electing to pursue this curricu- 
lum spends the first three years in residence 
at Lebanon Valley College. At the end of 
these three years he may, if recommended, go 
to the University of Pennsylvania or another 
co-operating institution for two additional 
years of work in engineering. Upon the suc- 
cessful completion of the five years of study, 
the student will receive two degrees: the 
Bachelor of Science degree from Lebanon 
Valley College and a Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in one of the fields of engineering from 
the University of Pennsylvania or other coop- 
erating institution. 

The adviser should be consulted concerning 
the various curriculums. 



•*-*. 




V 



r 




COOPERATIVE FORESTRY PROGRAM 

Adviser: Mr. Bollinger 

Lebanon Valley College offers a program 
forestry in cooperation with the School 
Forestry of Duke University. Upon successf 
completion of a five-year coordinated cour 
of study, a student will have earned the Bach 
lor of Science degree from Lebanon Vall< 
College and the professional degree of Mast 
of Forestry from the Duke School of Forestn 

A student electing to pursue this currici 
lum spends the first three years in residem 
at Lebanon Valley College. Here he obtaii 
a sound education in the humanities ar 
other liberal arts in addition to the sciena 
basic to forestry. The student devotes the la 
two years of his program to the profession 
forestry curriculum of his choice at the Dul< 
School of Forestry. 

The adviser should be consulted concerr 
ing the curriculum. 



38 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

Adviser: Dr. Argot 

Each applicant for admission to this pro- 
gram should secure approval by the School 
or Medical Technologists for the status of 
Dre-registered students, to be admitted on the 
successful completion of the academic part 
of the curriculum at the College. The School 
: or Medical Technologists shall be the final 
udge of a student's qualifications to pursue 
ts curriculum. 

The first three years will be spent at Leb- 
anon Valley College in pursuit of a program 
Df study which includes all the general re- 
quirements for graduation and certain courses 
specially suitable as preparation for the 
study of medical technology. The adviser 
should be consulted concerning the curricu- 
um. 

Following the completion of this curriculum 
he student will spend 12 months at the Har- 
isburg Hospital School for Medical Technolo- 
gists or another approved school, in the pur- 
suit of its regular curriculum as prescribed 
Spy The American Society of Clinical Patholo- 
gists. On the successful completion of both 
jphases of the curriculum the student will be 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
s/ledical Technology by Lebanon Valley 
ollege. 

PRE-MEDICAL, PRE-DENTAL, AND 
PRE-VETERINARY CURRICULA 

\dviser: Dr. Wolfe 

Students contemplating admission to Med- 
cal, Dental, or Veterinary Colleges should 
pursue a science program with a major in 
ither biology or chemistry. They should 
'egister their professional intentions with the 
adviser of these programs by the end of their 
reshman or sophomore years. At that time 
iheir work will be reviewed and provision 
made to meet the special requirements of the 
zolleges of their choice. 

All students planning to enter the medical 
Drofession should confer with the pre-medical 
dviser as to the dates for medical aptitude 
tests and other special requirements. 

The adviser should be consulted concern- 
ng the curriculum. 



NURSING 

Adviser: Mr. Bollinger 

The five-year Nursing Plan offers to young 
women intending to enter the field of nurs- 
ing an opportunity to obtain a liberal arts 
education in connection with their nurses' 
training. 

Lebanon Valley College has an affiliation 
with a number of hospital schools of nursing 
for a five-year curriculum in nursing, the first 
two years of which are spent at Lebanon Val- 
ley College. 

The next three years are spent at the School 
of Nursing in pursuit of the regular curricu- 
lum. At the end of these five years the student 
who has successfully completed both phases 
of the curriculum will be awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing by Lebanon 
Valley College and the diploma in nursing 
by the School of Nursing. 

The adviser should be consulted concern- 
ing the curriculum. 






39 



MUSIC 

Adviser: Mr. Fairlamb 

Course Number 
FIRST YEAR 

English 10a-10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Distribution Requirements 

Physical Education 10 

Music 10, 11 

Music 12, 13 

Music 14, 15 

Music 



Course Title 



Hours 

1st 

Sem. 



English Composition 3 

French, German, Spanish, or Russian .... 3 

Sciences 3 

Physical Education 

Sight Singing I & II 1 

Ear Training I & II 1 

Harmony I & II 2 

Applied Music* 2 



15 



SECOND YEAR 

Distribution Requirements 

Mathematics 10 

Physical Education 20 

Religion 12. 

Religion 13. 

Music 20 

Music 22 

Music 24 

Music 40.1 

Music 

Electives 



The Social Sciences 3 

Basic Concepts of Mathematics — 

Physical Education 

Introduction to Biblical Thought 3 

Introduction to the Christian Faith — 

Sight Singing III 1 

Ear Training III 1 

Harmony III 2 

Counterpoint — 

Applied Music* 2 

3 



3 

3 
3 

1 
1 
2 
2 

15 



15 



2 
2 
2 

15 




40 




THIRD YEAR 

Distribution Requirements The Social Sciences 3 

Distribution Requirements Humanities 3 

Music 29. . . .Harmony IV 2 

Music 30a— 30b .... History of Music 3 

Music 31, 36. . . . Form and Analysis I & II 2 

Music 39. . . .Keyboard Harmony — 

Music Applied Music* 2 

Electives — 



15 



FOURTH YEAR 

Distribution Requirements Sciences 3 

Distribution Requirements Humanities — 

Music 41 ... . Music Literature Seminar 3 

Music 35. . . .Conducting I — 

Music Applied Music* 2 

Electives 7 



15 



3 

2 
2 
2 
3 

15 



2 
2 
8 

15 



* Study of voice, organ, piano, band and orchestral instruments. 



41 



MUSIC EDUCATION 

Adviser: Mr. Smith 

Course Number 
FIRST YEAR 

English 10a-10b 

Foreign Language 10 

Biology 14 

Physical Education 10 

Music 10, 11 

Music 12, 13 

Music 14, 15 

Music 

SECOND YEAR 

Distribution Requirements 

Education 20 

Physical Education 20 

Psychology 20 

Religion 12 

Religion 13 

Music 20 

Music 21 

Music 22 

Music Ed 23 

Music 24 

Music 



Course Title 



Hours 

1st 

Sem. 



English Composition 3 

French, German, Spanish, or Russian .... 3 

Introduction to Biology 3 

Physical Education 

Sight Singing I & II 1 

Ear Training I & II 1 

Harmony I & II 2 

Applied Music* 3 

16 

Social Sciences 3 

Social Foundations of Education — 

Physical Education 

General Psychology 3 

Intro, to Biblical Thought 3 

Intro, to the Christian Faith — 

Sight Singing III 1 

Orchestration and Scoring for the Band.. — 

EarTraining III 1 

Methods: Vocal; Grades K-3 — 

Harmony III 2 

Applied Music* 3 

16 



3 
3 

3 

1 
1 

2 
3 

16 



3 

2 

2 

3 
16 




42 




rHIRD YEAR 

inglish 20a-20b. 

vtusic 30a— 30b . 

s/lusic 31 . 

s/lusic 32. 

vtusic Ed 33A. 

vlusicEd 33B. 

vtusic Ed 34A. 

vtusic Ed 34B. 

vtusic 35. 

vtusic 39. 

vtusic 



Comparative Literature 3 

History of Music 3 

Form and Analysis I 2 

Music Literature 2 

Methods: Vocal; Grades 4-6 2 

Methods: Instrumental; Grades 4-6 1 

Methods: Vocal; Jr.-Sr. High — 

Methods: Instrumental; Jr.-Sr. High — 

Conducting I . — 

Keyboard Harmony — 

Applied Music* 3 



16 



FOURTH YEAR 

Distribution Requirements 

Psychology 23 

\rt 12 

vtusic 45 

vtusic Ed 40a— 40b 

Vtusic Ed 43 



Social Sciences — 

Educational Psychology 3 

Introduction to Art 3 

Conducting II 2 

Student Teaching 6 

Seminar in Advanced Instrumental 

Problems — 



lective 

vtusic Applied Music* 

Study of voice, organ, piano, band and orchestral instruments. 

43 



16 



2 
1 

2 
2 
3 

16 



2 
3 
2 

16 



TEACHING 

Advisers: Dr. Ebersole, Mrs. Herr 

The requirements listed below are applica- 
ble to students certified to teach in the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. 



BASIC REGULATIONS-PENNSYLVANIA 
STATE PROVISIONAL COLLEGE 
CERTIFICATES 

A. General Education 

Certificates are based on the completion of 
a minimum of sixty (60) semester hours of 
acceptable courses in general education with 
not less than twelve (12) semester hours in the 
humanities and not less than six (6) semester 
hours in each of the following areas: the 
social sciences and natural sciences. 

These requirements apply to both elemen- 
tary and secondary fields. 



B. Elementary Education— Subject Matter 
Requirements 

The Pennsylvania Instructional I certifica 
may be issued to those who have complete 
the program specified on pp. 36-37. 

The prospective elementary educatic 
teacher is also required to have an academ 
major or an area of concentration of at lea 
18 to 24 semester hours. 

The area of concentration may be define 
as follows: 

Study in a single subject such as histor 
study in a broad field such as sociology, ps> 
chology, and anthropology elected from soci, 
science; study in an inter-disciplinary fiel 
such as courses elected from the humanitie 
social science, or the natural sciences. 




44 




C. Professional Education in 
Secondary Education 

Pennsylvania Instructional I certificates are 
>ased on the completion of the approved 
rogram in the subject field to be taught in 
he secondary school and a minimum of eigh- 
een (18) semester hours of professional ed- 
cation distributed in the following areas: 
ocial foundations of education, educational 
sychology, materials and methods of instruc- 
ion and curriculum, and not less than six (6) 
>f the eighteen (18) semester hours in actual 
iracticum and student teaching experience 
inder approved supervision and appropriate 
eminars including necessary observation, par- 
ticipation and conferences on teaching prob- 
sms. The areas of methods and materials of 
nstruction and curriculum, and student teachi- 
ng shall relate to the subject matter special- 
zation field or fields. 



D. Secondary Student Teaching Program 

A student concentrating in a major area of 
interest may, upon the direction of his adviser 
and approval of the Dean of the College, en- 
roll in one of four student teaching programs. 
1. Semester of Professional Training 

A student desiring to receive, upon gradu- 
ation, the Pennsylvania Instructional I cer- 
tificate devotes the first semester of the 
senior year to professional preparation. 
The fifteen weeks are organized as follows: 
Six Weeks: Psych. 23. Educational Psychol- 
ogy (effective September, 1970). 
3:772:0. See page 104 for course descrip- 
tion. 

This course is also offered outside the 
semester of professional training. 
Six Weeks: Ed. 49. Practicum and Methods. 
3:772:0. See page 74 for course descrip- 
tion. 



45 



Some time is devoted to the presentation 
of data on basic reading instruction to ful- 
fill certification requirements for the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Nine Weeks: Ed. 40. Student Teaching. 
Nine semester hours credit. (First semes- 
ter) 

The student enters on a full-time student 
teaching experience of not less than nine 
consecutive weeks. He is under the direc- 
tion of a trained teacher in an accredited 
public high school and is counseled and 
directed by the college supervisor of sec- 
ondary education. The student teacher also 
is observed by his major adviser. 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching: A 
student must have met the following re- 
quirements to be accepted for student 
teaching in the professional semester of 
his senior year: 

a. Maintained satisfactory academic stand- 
ing. 

b. Completed the basic courses Education 
20, Psychology 23, and Education 49. 

c. Secured written approval of his major 
adviser and the director of student teach- 
ing. 



2. Post-Graduate Student Teaching 

The post-graduate student teaching pr 
gram is under the direction of Lebam 
Valley College or, by arrangement, may [ 
pursued with any other accredited instit 
tion which has provision for supervisir 
student teaching in the public schools. 

Because of the necessity of meetir 
Pennsylvania state certification requin 
ments of proper supervision, only a limite 
number of students are accepted in tr 
in-service student teaching program. Like 
wise, assignments are made only to tho< 
schools within the range of the institutio 
responsible for supervising the enrollee. 

3. Graduate Internship 

A student may enroll in one of man 
graduate internship programs after gradu; 
tion from college. For further informatio 
contact the chairman of the Department c 
Education. 

4. Summer School Student Teaching Followin 

Graduation 

A senior may, upon counsel of his ac 

viser, enroll for a summer student teachin; 

program after graduating from the College 

This student may teach in the Derr 

Township School System in Hershey or ai 

acceptable summer student teaching pro 

gram elsewhere. 




46 




HE COLLEGE HONORS 
tOGRAM 

e college honors program exists for the fol- 
ding purposes: to provide an opportunity 
r intellectually able students to develop 
sir abilities to the fullest extent, to recog- 
^e and encourage superior academic 
hievement, and to stimulate all members of 
e College family to greater interest and 
tivity in the intellectual concerns of college 

9. 

These objectives are pursued by means of 
double-phased program consisting of (1) 
)nors Sections in a number of courses in- 



cluded in the general and distribution require- 
ments taken for the most part during the stu- 
dent's freshman and sophomore years, and (2) 
an Independent Study plan by which a student 
during his junior and senior years may do indi- 
vidual work within the department of his 
major concentration. An Honors student may 
participate in either of these phases of the 
program without participating in the other. 
An over-all grade point average of 3.00 is a 
requirement for the maintenance of Honors 
status. 

Appropriate recognition is given students 
who successfully complete either phase or 
both phases of the College Honors Program. 



47 



HONORS SECTIONS 

Honors Sections are offered in the following 
courses: English 10a-10b, English Composi- 
tion; Religion 12, Introduction to Biblical 
Thought; Religion 13, Introduction to the 
Christian Faith; Economics 20a-20b, Principles 
of Economics; English 20a-20b, Comparative 
Literature; History 24a-24b, Survey of United 
States History; and Psychology 20, General 
Psychology. The satisfactory completion of 
eighteen hours of Honors work is required 
for official recognition of participation in this 
phase of the College Honors Program. 

Freshmen are admitted to Honors Sections 
on the basis of their academic standing in 
secondary school, performance in the College 
Entrance Examination Board tests, the recom- 
mendation of teachers and counselors, and 
personal interviews with members of the Hon- 
ors Council. Students not accepted initially 
can be admitted to the program at the begin- 
ning of subsequent semesters as they demon- 
strate ability to do superior work. 

The seminar and tutorial methods are used 
to the greatest possible extent, and sections 
are kept small in size. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Independent Study is offered for credit in 
the student's major field in the junior and 
senior years. Independent Study consists of a 
reading and/or research program producing a 
thesis or an essay. The latter is done on a 
problem or subject of the student's own 
choosing under the direct supervision of a 
faculty adviser. Opportunity is afforded to do 
creative work. A maximum of nine hours 
credit can be earned in Independent Study. 

Independent Study is offered in the follow- 
ing departments: Chemistry, Economics and 
Business Administration, Elementary Educa- 
tion, English, Foreign Languages, History and 
Political Science, Mathematics, Music, Philoso- 
phy, Physics, Psychology, Religion, and Soci- 
ology. For further details regarding require- 
ments and procedures in Independent Study, 
see the appropriate paragraph under each de- 
partment in the catalog section "Courses of 
Study." 




AUXILIARY SCHOOLS 

SUMMER, EVENING, EXTENSION 

Summer sessions, evening classes on campi 
and extension classes in the University Cent 
at Harrisburg have enabled teachers, state er 
ployees, and others in active employment 
attend college courses and secure academ 
degrees. By a careful selection of course 
made in consultation with the appropriate a< 
viser, students can meet many of the requir 
ments for a baccalaureate degree. Son 
courses may be taken for interim, provision; 



48 



I permanent teaching certification; others 
/ be taken with the aim of transferring 
dit to another institution. Many courses 
d to professional advancement or are of 
Bet benefit to persons in business or indus- 
while others assist in broadening the stu- 
b's vocational, social, and cultural back- 
und. 

vtMER SESSION 

'egularly enrolled students may, by taking 
rimer session courses, meet the require- 
nts for the bachelor's degree in three years. 
v course in Student Teaching (Education 40) 
offered in the summer session at Hershey, 
insylvania. It is designed to meet the mini- 
m student teaching requirements in the 
ondary field toward teacher certification 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

MPUS EVENING CLASSES 

ivening classes are offered on the campus, 
mday through Thursday, and carry resi- 
ice credit. 

eparate brochures are published for the 
nmer Session and the Evening Classes. For 
)ies or for other information pertaining to 
Summer Session or Evening Classes write 
Director of Auxiliary Schools, Lebanon 
ley College, Annville, Pennsylvania, 17003. 

JIVERSITY CENTER AT HARRISBURG 

Extension classes are offered in the William 
in High School, Third and Division Streets 
d at the Center's Campus, 2991 North Front 
eet, Harrisburg, 17110, on Monday through 
ursday evenings and on Saturday mornings, 
banon Valley College's extension program in 
irrisburg is carried on in conjunction with 
zabethtown College, Temple University, The 
nnsylvania State University, and the Univer- 
y of Pennsylvania. 

All students admitted and enrolled for a 
l gree at the College are required to secure 
e permission of the Assistant Dean of the 
allege prior to enrolling for any courses at 
e University Center at Harrisburg. 
For details pertaining to the University Cen- 
r at Harrisburg write or call the director at 
•91 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
nia 17110, at 238-9694 or 238-9696. 




JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

A Lebanon Valley student may spend his junior 
year abroad in study under a program admin- 
istered by an accredited American college or 
university, or in a program approved by Leba- 
non Valley College. Such a student must have 
maintained a B average at Lebanon Valley 
College, must be proficient in the language 
spoken in the country in which he will study, 
and must be a person who in the judgment of 
the Assistant Dean of the College and the fac- 
ulty will be a worthy representative of his own 
country. His proposed course of study must be 
approved by the chairman of his department 
and the Assistant Dean of the College. 



49 



ACADEMIC PROCEDURES 

REGISTRATION 

Students are required to register for classes 
on official registration days of each semester 
and on designated pre-registration days. Infor- 
mation concerning the dates for official regis- 
tration is listed in the College Calendar, pages 
3 and 5. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Students registering later than the days and 
hours specified will be charged a late registra- 
tion fee of ten dollars. Students desiring to 
register later than one week after the opening 
of the semester will be admitted only by spe- 
cial permission of the Assistant Dean of the 
College. Students who do not pre-register dur- 
ing the designated time will be charged a late 
pre-registration fee of ten dollars. 

CHANGE OF REGISTRATION 

Change of registration, when necessary, 
must be made over the signature of the ad- 
viser. Registration for a course will not be 
permitted after the course has been in session 
for one full week. With the permission of. his 
adviser, a student may withdraw from a course 
at any time within the first six weeks of classes 
in a semester without prejudice. A fee of $2.00 
is charged for every change of course made at 
the student's request after registration day. 

ORIENTATION FOR NEW STUDENTS 

A spring orientation day is held annually for 
incoming freshmen. At this time the activities 
include a general orientation to the College, 
diagnostic testing, counseling with academic 
advisers and pre-registration for courses. Spe- 
cial sessions for parents are a vital part of the 
program. 

An orientation day for transfer students is 
held in early summer. At that time, academic 
counseling and pre-registration for courses are 
held. 

An orientation period of several days, Fresh- 
man Week, at the beginning of the college 
year is provided to help new students, both 
freshmen and transfers, to become familiar 
with their academic surroundings. This time is 



devoted to lectures, social activities, and 
formal meetings with members of the fact 

During the first semester all freshmen 
transfer students are required to participat 
an orientation course which includes a se 
of lectures and discussions on campus ac 
ties and methods of study. 

DISCONTINUANCE OF COURSE 

The College reserves the right to withd 
or discontinue any course for which an insi 
cient number of students have registered. 

REPETITION OF COURSES 

No student shall be permitted to rep 
for credit, grade, or quality points a course 
which he has already received a passing gra 

CONCURRENT COURSES 

A student enrolled for a degree at Lebar 
Valley College may not carry courses cone 
rently at any other institution without 
prior consent of his adviser and the Assist 
Dean of the College. Neither may a regi 
student carry work concurrently in evening 
extension courses without the prior permissi 
of his adviser and the Assistant Dean of 1 
College. 

A student registered at Lebanon Valley C 
lege may not obtain credit for courses tak 
in other colleges, including the Univers 
Center at Harrisburg, during the summer i 
less such courses have prior approval of I 
adviser and the Assistant Dean of the Collej 

AUDITING COURSES 

Full-time students are permitted to regisl 
to audit courses with the consent of the i 
structor and the academic adviser. The regul 
tuition fee is charged. Neither grade nor cre( 
is given either at the time the course is audit< 
or thereafter. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Each student is assigned a faculty advis 
who serves in the capacity of friendly coui 
selor. 

The initial selection of a major may be ind 
cated or recorded any time before the en 
of the student's sophomore year. Such 



50 



lice of department or curriculum in which 
bursue work of special concentration must 
<imade by the time of registration for the 
lior year. This department or curriculum 
II be known as his major. The chairman or 
either member of the department or the 
I iser of the curriculum in which the student 
elected to major becomes the adviser for 
ft student. The adviser's approval is neces- 
I before a student may register for or with- 
Ivv from any course. 

[Irangement of schedules 

lach student arranges his course of study 
ijj his class schedule in consultation with, 
\ approval of, his faculty adviser. Students 
>ady in attendance do this during pre- 
istration periods. Information concerning 
ulty advisers is given to new students at 
Spring Orientation Day. 

Lit of hours 

To be classified as full-time, a student must 

e at least twelve semester hours of work. 

teen semester hours of work is the maxi- 

im permitted without special permission of 

; Assistant Dean of the College; Physical 

[jcation carries no credit. 

The privilege of carrying extra hours will 

granted only for compelling reasons and 

|ly when a satisfactory grade level has been 

tintained for the previous semester. An ad- 

ional charge will be made for all hours 

ove sixteen. 

ZADEMIC CLASSIFICATION 

Students are classified academically at the 
ginning of each year. Membership in the 
phomore, junior, or senior classes is granted 
those students who have earned a mini- 
um of 28, 56, or 84 semester hours credit 
;pectively. 

All entrance deficiencies must be removed 
fore the academic status of sophomore is 
anted. 

3UNSELING AND PLACEMENT 

Lebanon Valley College recognizes as part 

its responsibility to its students the need 

r providing sound educational, vocational, 

d personal counseling. Measures of inter- 




est, ability, aptitude, and personality, in ad- 
dition to other counseling techniques, are 
utilized in an effort to help each student come 
to a fuller realization of his capabilities and 
personality. An important part of the coun- 
seling program consists of a series of lectures 
and discussions conducted as a non-credit 
orientation course for new students. 

Placement services are provided by the Col- 
lege for aiding students in procuring part-time 
employment while in college and in obtaining 
positions upon graduation. A current file is 
maintained which contains information about 
positions in various companies and institu- 
tions, Civil Service opportunities and exami- 
nations, entrance to professional schools, 
assistantships, and fellowships. Representatives 
of business, industry, and educational insti- 
tutions visit the campus annually to interview 
seniors for prospective employment. A file of 
credentials and activities of those students 
availing themselves of the services is available 
to prospective employers. Graduates may 
keep their individual files active by reporting 
additional information to the Director of In- 
dustrial Placement. 

A Teacher Placement Bureau which assists 
students in finding positions is maintained. 

Records of students' credentials in all areas 
of student activities are on file. 



51 



ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS 

The rules of the College are designed to pro- 
vide for proper regulation of the academic 
community. The rules and regulations as 
stated in this bulletin are announcements and 
in no way serve as a contract between the 
student and the College. Attendance at the 
College is a privilege and not a right. The stu- 
dent by his act of registration concedes to the 
College the right to require his withdrawal 
any time deemed necessary to safeguard the 
ideals of scholarship and character, and to 
secure compliance with regulations. It is ex- 
pected that the conduct of all campus citizens 
will conform to accepted standards. All stu- 
dents are required to respond to communica- 
tions sent by any duly constituted authority 
of the College. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Each student is held responsible for know- 
ing and meeting all requirements for each 
course, including regular class attendance. Be- 
cause of differences in various disciplines, 
specific regulations governing class attendance 
are set by each department, approved by the 
Dean of the College, and administered by the 
instructor. At the opening of each course the 
instructor will clearly inform the students of 
the regulations on class attendance. Viola- 
tions of class attendance regulations will make 
the student liable to being dropped from the 
course with a failing grade, upon the recom- 
mendation of the instructor and with the ap- 
proval of the Dean of the College. 

Excused absences are granted by the Assist- 
ant Dean of the College only for bona fide 
medical and compelling personal reasons, or 
for participation in official functions of the 
College. Students on academic probation are 
permitted only excused absences. 

Excused absences do not absolve the stu- 
dent from the necessity of fulfilling all course 
requirements. 

CHAPEL-CONVOCATION PROGRAM 

A chapel-convocation program is held reg- 
ularly each week. The weekly programs are 
augmented by not more than eight additional 




events at other times during the semesi 
From this total of twenty-four programs ei 
full-time student will select not less tr 
twelve to fulfill his attendance requirement 
the semester. For each unexcused absence, 
suiting in less than twelve attendances, o 
hour will be added to the hours required 
graduation. 

HAZING 

Hazing is strictly prohibited. Any infrin^ 
ment by members of other classes upon t 
personal rights of freshmen as individuals 
interpreted as hazing. 

CARS AND STUDENT PARKING 

Resident students of the three upper class 
may have cars on campus. Resident freshrm 
students are not permitted to have cars. 

All cars owned or operated by Leban( 
Valley College students must be registen 
with the Office of the Dean of Men. Viol 
tions of established parking regulations w 
result in fines and may result in suspension j 
revocation of parking privileges. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Each student, former student, or gradua 
is entitled to one transcript of his college re 
ord without charge. For each copy after tr 
first, a fee of one dollar is charged. 



52 



ULATIONS REGARDING ACADEMIC 
BATION, SUSPENSION, DISMISSAL, 
HDRAWAL 

ROBATION 

| student can be placed on academic pro- 

|>n by the Dean of the College or sus- 

ed or dismissed if his academic standing 

to come up to the grade-point average 

|j/n in the following table: 

Suspension or 
Probation dismissal 



semester 1.25 

semester 1.50 

semester 1.50 

semester 1.70 

semester 1.75 

semester. . . 1.75 



1.25 cumulative 
1.50 cumulative 
1.65 cumulative 



R 8th semesters. . .1.75 in all courses 

student placed on academic probation is 
ied of such status by the Dean of the 
ege and informed of the College regula- 
governing probationers. Students on 
>ation are required to regulate their work 
their times so as to make a most deter- 
*d effort to bring their work up to the 
lired standard. 




When a student is placed on academic 
probation, faculty and parents are notified by 
the Dean of the College. The Dean of the 
College may terminate the period of proba- 
tion of any student. Usually this occurs at the 
end of a final marking period. 

Infraction of the following regulations gov- 
erning probationers render a student liable 
to dismissal: 

1. No unexcused class absences will be 
permitted. 

2. Any office or activity in any College 
organization that involves such expendi- 
ture of time as to jeopardize the suc- 
cessful pursuit of academic work must 
be relinquished. 

B. SUSPENSION 

1. A student who obviously fails to achieve 
at a level commensurate with his measured 
ability may be suspended for at least one 
semester. 

2. A student suspended for academic rea- 
sons is not eligible for reinstatement for at 
least one semester, preferably two. 

3. A student seeking reinstatement to 
Lebanon Valley College must apply in writing 
to the Dean of the College. 

4. Students suspended for academic rea- 
sons are not permitted to register for work 
in the Auxiliary Schools except for the most 
compelling reasons and then only with the 
approval of the Assistant Dean of the College. 

5. A student may be suspended without a 
prior period on probation. 

C. DISMISSAL 

A student dismissed for academic reasons 
is not eligible for readmission. 

D. WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 
AND READMISSION 

Official withdrawal from College is accom- 
plished only by the completion of the with- 
drawal form obtained in the Office of the 
Registrar. This is the sole responsibility of the 
student. 

Application for readmission will be con- 
sidered only if the formal withdrawal pro- 
cedure has been followed at the time of 
withdrawal. 



53 



Student Activiti 




54 



*IE RELIGIOUS LIFE 



anon Valley College was founded as a 
istian College and continues to be dedi- 
;d to this objective. All students are in- 
d and urged to participate in some phase 
eligious activity. 



E CHAPEL-CONVOCATION 

DGRAM 

eries of twenty-four programs is held each 
lester from which each student selects a 
limum of twelve to fulfill attendance re- 
rements. These programs include chapel 
/ices and convocation programs that are 
d on Tuesday mornings, as well as cultural 
nts selected by the Chapel-Convocation 
mmittee. This committee, with equal rep- 
Ejntatives from administration, faculty and 
dents, will announce the total Chapel- 
vocation program at the beginning of 
:h semester. 



ionale of Chapel-Convocation Policy 

his rationale attempts to clarify the aims 
] objectives of Lebanon Valley College as 
y relate to the chapel-convocation policy 
\ program. These goals which have been 
y published constantly remind us that this 
titution was chartered to promote the 
;hest human possibilities. Two principal foci 
our chapel-convocation policy and pro- 
m are: (1) our conception of the distinc- 
le nature of the liberal arts and (2) the char- 
ier of the academic community we would 
Insciously shape. 

ilEvery aspect of educational activity reflects 

Jalitative concerns or a scale of values. The 

eral arts inevitably raise fundamental ques- 

ns which require honest regard for ultimate 



values and personal commitments. To insure 
responsible learning and human concern it 
is necessary to recognize the value-laden na- 
ture of all knowledge. Indeed, the liberal 
arts are not so much courses of study as they 
are human attributes or personal qualities 
which enhance the possibility for rational 
discrimination, uncoerced decision, and re- 
sponsible commitment. Chapel services and 
convocation programs are considered there- 
fore not only an opportunity to focus honest 
criticism upon our qualitative concerns and 
scale of values, but they are offered as an 
integrating experience for the development of 
the whole person. Thus, we believe an au- 
thentic liberal arts experience will engender 
a sense of mystery, reverence, adoration, and 
celebration of the Highest. Such an experience 
can be most profitably exercised and crea- 
tively structured in communal worship and 
convocation programs. 

Second, we believe a liberal arts college is 
a community of learning responsibly com- 
mitted to humanistic values. But human values 
are not meaningfully experienced in abstrac- 
tion or in isolation. Indeed, man is truly 
human only in community and therefore man 
can be correctly understood only when seen 
in relation to God and fellowman. As an in- 
stitution we consciously attempt to shape this 
community with reference to the values we 
see in Jesus Christ whom we confess to be 
our highest norm of truth and goodness; in 
Him we see authentic humanity as God's in- 
tention for all men. This orientation is not in 
any way an exclusion or demeaning of non- 
Christians; rather, such a confession positively 
requires a good will and sincere openness to 
all persons without exception. When a college 
seeks community at its highest and deepest 
levels through corporate learning and wor- 
ship it does so for the same reason it provides 



55 



a library, gymnasium, theatre, or laboratory, 
namely, opportunity for the highest human 
development. Of course it is fatuous to as- 
sume that every opportunity offered in col- 
lege will prove to be an occasion for an en- 
riching experience for every student; but that 
fact does not excuse the college from pro- 
viding opportunities for experiences con- 
sidered most essential to the realization of 
man's highest potential. 

In summary, a liberal arts institution may 
engage in a sort of quasi-education and will 
fail to serve the whole person if it defaults 
in its confrontation with qualitative concerns, 
deflects from commitment to ennobling 
values, or denies the need for corporate cele- 
bration of life's highest good. Granted our 
conception of the nature of the liberal arts 
and the particular kind of community we 
seek to be, provision for corporate worship 
and convocation programs is integral to our 
total reason for being a liberal arts community 
committed to a definitive value-orientation, 
i.e. Christian, to life. 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

The United Methodist Church and the 
other churches of the community extend a 
warm welcome to all college students who 
wish to attend Sunday worship. 

There are seven churches of different de- 
nominations in Annville itself. Other parishes 
of major religious groups not found in Ann- 
ville are located within a five-mile radius of 
the College. 

THE STUDENT CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

The Student Christian Association begins the 
year with a Big Sister-Little Sister, Big Brother- 
Little Brother program, and initiates a week of 
activities to welcome the incoming freshmen. 
Throughout the year the organization sponsors 
faculty firesides where students spend an eve- 
ning at home with the professors, and all- 
campus retreats for fun, fellowship and relaxa- 
tion. Student Christian Association provides 
special seasonal services, opportunities for 
weekend work camps, and presentations by 



guest speakers for intellectual and spi 
stimulation. All students are welcome to 
in the planning of and to participate in 
activities. 

RELIGIOUS EMPHASIS WEEK 

This is one of the outstanding reli 
events of the school year. Notable spe 
are invited to share their experiences 
the student body through classroom led 
seminars, convocations, and personal i 
views. 

THE BALMER SHOWERS LECTURESHII 

This annual lectureship was established 
endowed by the late Bishop Emeriti 
Balmer Showers, '07, of the Evangelical Ur 
Brethren Church. Under the stipulation 
the endowment, the lectures are delivere 
distinguished scholars of recognized lea 
ship in the areas of Christian faith and 
ology, biblical archaeology and interpreta 
and Christian ethics of the Christian mini 

RELIGION AND LIFE LECTURESHIPS 

The purpose of the Religion and Life 
tureships is to deepen the student's un 
standing of some of the problems of life 
the religious resources that are availabl( 
meet such problems. Each semester a CI 
tian leader of national or international r€ 
tation is invited to spend a day on cam 
in order to confer with students and faci 
to conduct seminars, and to address the 
tire college community. 

DELTA TAU CHI 

Delta Tau Chi is an organization compo 
primarily of students who have decided 
devote full-time service to church vocatic 
Membership is open, however, to all < 
dents who wish to participate in the activi 
of the organization. The group holds re 
larly scheduled meetings, daily morn 
prayers, sends deputations to churches, c< 
ducts programs at various hospitals a 
homes, and enters into other commur 
projects. 



56 



\MPUS ORGANIZATIONS 

>CIAL ORGANIZATIONS 

JFive organizations endeavor to enrich the 
:ial program of the College by sponsoring 
ial activities on the campus and in the 
Immunity, and by broadening the experi- 
tce of its members through group action, 
i Lambda Sigma 

tuppa Lambda Sigma 

ijppa Lambda Nu 
Ita Lambda Sigma 
ights of the Valley 

iCOGNITION GROUPS 

Students who have achieved scholastic dis- 
ction in their academic work or in certain 
^as are eligible for membership in hon- 
ary scholastic societies, 
i Alpha Epsilon 
ta Beta Beta 
Gamma Mu 
iChi 

ONORARY AND SERVICE 
RGANIZATIONS 

Six organizations exist to bring recognition 
deserving music students and participants 
dramatic activities or to function as service 

ganizations on the campus. 

pha Phi Omega 

pha Psi Omega 

hite Hats 

ii Mu Alpha 
ma Alpha lota 

amma Sigma Sigma 

UBLICATIONS 

Practical experience in management, writ- 
g, and editorial work is available to students 
rough membership on the staffs of the col- 
ge yearbook and the campus newspaper, 
be Quittapahilla 
i Vie Collegienne 

DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS 

Many departmental clubs provide oppor- 
inities for students to participate in supple- 

ental department activities. At regular 
leetings reports on appropriate topics are 



presented and discussed. Other activities 

sponsored by the departmental clubs include 

lectures by specialists in the club's particular 

field of interest, educational films, and field 

trips. 

Chemistry: American Chemical Society 

Affiliate 
Economics: Investment Club 
Education: Childhood Education Club, 

Student P.S.E.A. 
English: Green Blotter Club 
Mathematics: Industrial Mathematics Society 

Affiliate 
Modern Languages: French Club, German 

Club, Russian Club 
Physics: Physics Club, Student Section of the 

American Institute of Physics 
Psychology: Psi Chi 



DRAMATICS AND MUSIC 

An opportunity to develop dramatic, foren- 
sic, and musical talents under qualified 
leadership is offered to the students of Leba- 
non Valley College by the following organi- 
zations: 

Symphonic Band 
All-Girl Band 
College Chorus 
Concert Choir 
Chapel Choir 
Symphony Orchestra 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Guild Student Group (American Guild of 

Organists) 



CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Lebanon Valley College offers cultural pro- 
grams in the form of the Great Artists Series, 
concerts by students, faculty members, and 
musical organizations in the Department of 
Music, and lectures sponsored by the various 
departments of the College. In addition, the 
neighboring communities of Harrisburg, 
Hershey, and Lebanon offer concerts, lectures, 
and other cultural activities throughout the 
year. 



57 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Ultimate responsibility for activities on the 
college campus rests with the faculty and the 
administration. However, the faculty and the 
administration have delegated powers and 
responsibilities to the student governing 
bodies so that, to a large extent, students 
govern themselves. The College encourages 
initiative and self-government as a part of 
the democratic training offered. 

The representative organizations described 
below were established to function in areas 
of student government. They are privileged 
to conduct the affairs of the student body of 
Lebanon Valley College under their separate 
responsibilities so as to guide and promote 
the affairs of the students and in accordance 
with local, state and federal laws and general 
institutional rules. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council seeks to foster under- 
standing and cooperation among the students, 
faculty and administration of Lebanon Valley 
College. It is the elected group that acts as 
the central clearing house for all recommenda- 
tions and grievances, outside the area of re- 
sponsibility of the Student Senate, which 
emanate from the student body. The Student 
Council also coordinates student activities and 
provides for the financing of those activities. 
It is composed of fifteen members. 

STUDENT SENATE 

The Student Senate, composed of twelve 
elected members, is the student disciplinary 
body. In addition to rendering decisions con- 
cerning student justice and assigning punish- 
ments for rule violations, it has the responsi- 
bility of establishing social rules and regula- 
tions in accordance with the general rules of 
the College. One of the key concepts that 
underlies student government is that it is the 
responsibility and obligation of each student 
to enforce the rules that have been established 
by the Student Senate. A Senate Handbook is 
distributed to all new students at the start of 
the school year. 



9 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The highest authority in matters of stude 
government at Lebanon Valley College is t 
Executive Committee. This group, compos* 
of four students, two administrators, tv 
faculty members, and the President of tl 
College who serves as chairman, has authori 
to make major policy changes upon recor 
mendation by the Student Senate or Stude 
Council. It acts on matters or appeals refers 
to it by students, faculty members, administr 
tors, the Student Senate, or the Studei 
Council. 



58 



THLETiCS AND RECREATION 

banon Valley College maintains a full pro- 
\m of intramural and intercollegiate ath- 
ic activities. Intramural leagues and 
jrnaments are conducted in the various 
arts for men, while the women acquire 
ints toward individual awards by participa- 
n in the women's intramural program. 
The college participates in seven intercol- 
iate sports for men (basketball, cross- 
untry, football, golf, lacrosse, track, wrest- 
g) and two for women (basketball and 
ckey). There are two athletic organizations 
the campus, the LV Varsity Club for men 
d the Women's Athletic Association. 
Lebanon Valley College is a member of the 
(lowing national and regional athletic as- 
ciations: National Collegiate Athletic Asso- 
ition, Middle Atlantic States Collegiate 
hletic Conference, Eastern College Athletic 
>nference, and Central Pennsylvania Field 
Dckey Association. 





AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF 
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Lebanon Valley College supports its inter- 
collegiate athletics program because it offers 
its students an opportunity to participate in 
activities that afford an outlet for competitive 
spirit and vitality, while further providing each 
student with an opportunity to develop, 
understand and appreciate the values of team- 
work, pride, morale, dedication, physical fit- 
ness and school spirit. 



59 



Courses of Stud 




60 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



ZOURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Courses are numbered as follows: 1-19 indicates courses offered at the freshman level; 
>0-29 indicates courses offered at the sophomore level: 30-39 indicates courses offered 
it the junior level; 40-49 indicates courses offered at the senior level; 101-142 indicates 
:ourses in applied music. 

If the year is not indicated after a course, it is understood that the course is offered 
ivery year. Courses that continue throughout the year are listed in two ways. If either 
semester may be taken as a separate unit, without the other semester, the course will be 
isted as a and b. For example, a student may take English 21b even though he has not had 
English 21a and does not expect to take it. But if no letter is indicated with the course 
lumber, a student may not eruter the course at mid-year. 

lOURSE CREDIT 

Semester hours of credit, class hours per week, and laboratory hours per week are 
idicated by three numbers immediately following the course title, i.e., "4:2:4 per 
>emester" following "Biology 18" means four semester hours of credit, two classroom 
lours per week, and four laboratory hours per week each semester. 





ART 



Instructor Iskowitz 

12. Introduction to Art. 3: 3 :0 . Eit her semeste, 

Program seeks to develop an increase in an understanding of the nature of art as expressei 
through the visual art forms. Emphasis is made of the importance of the development of indi 
vidual perception for a qualitative increase of appreciation of the functional role of the artist 
the viewer, and the critic in their given culture. Lecture, problems using various elements o 
compositional structure with various media, visual aids, supplementary readings, field trips. 
Prerequisite to other art courses. 

14. Studio Drawing and Painting. 2:1 :2 per semester 

Problems offered which attempt to provide maximum opportunity for development of tht 
creative capacity of the individual in terms of active involvement with examination anc 
exploration of the limits of inherent qualities of various media, techniques, and tools as relatec 
to the various arts forms. Emphasis is placed on the strengthening of qualities of sound struc- 
ture, good drawing, fine craftsmanship, together with those of esthetic quality. 

21a. Art History, Pre-history through the Middle Ages. 330. First semester, 

Consideration of representative visual expressions of the major cultures of the successive 

historic periods included. Stress given to the interaction of factors influencing the various 

forms of visual expressions. Lecture, discussion, visual aids, and assignment of breadth to 

encourage individual research in area of developing interest. 
Prerequisite: Art 12. 

21b. Art History, Renaissance to Twentieth Century. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Study of the major forms of the visual arts representative of the Renaissance and succeeding 
centuries as expressed both by the individual and major schools. These viewed in terms of 
degree of reflection of the social, ideological, and economic foci of the period. Lecture, discus- 
sion, visual aids, supplementary assignments. 

Prerequisite: Art 12. 

32. Art in the Elementary School. 3: 2 :2 . First semester. 

Survey of theories of art education and of programs of creative process activities adaptive 
to the various levels of maturation at the elementary level. Studio experience employing a 
variety of media and techniques is offered to give experience and understanding to the problems 
involved. Practical knowledge of process, sources of supply, approaches to display, and trends 
in evaluation of process are presented through lecture, discussion, demonstration, visual aids, 
supplementary reading. 

Prerequisite: Art 12. 

62 







BIOLOGY 



Professor Light; Assistant Professors Argot, Bollinger, Malm, Wolf and Wolfe 

The work outlined in the following courses in biology is intended to develop an 
appreciation of man's relation to his universe, to acquaint students with those funda- 
mental concepts necessary for the proper interpretation of the phenomena manifested 
by the living things with which they are surrounded, and to lay a foundation for 
specialization in professional courses in biology. 

The courses are designed to prepare students for the work in professional schools, 
schools for medical technologists, hospital schools for training of nurses, for graduate 
work in colleges and universities, for teaching the biological sciences in high schools, 
and for assistantships in university and experiment station laboratories in the depart- 
ments of agriculture and other government agencies. 

Major: Biology 18 and 22, Chemistry 13, 24, and 25, Physics 10 or 17, Math 1 or 
three hours of mathematics other than Math 10 or Math 12, one semester of Biology 
40.1, and sixteen additional hours in Biology. 

14. Introduction to Biology. 3:2:2 per semester. 

The central theme is human life, its relation to, and dependence upon, biological phe- 
nomena. The course is designed for the non-science major; however, modern concepts of 
chemistry and physics will be utilized to explain biological problems. 

The laboratory includes exercises in botany, genetics, ecology, anatomy, and physiology. 

18. General Biology. 4:2:4. per semester. 

Representative forms of plant life are studied the first semester and representative forms of 
animal life the second semester. Structure, and biological laws and principles are stressed. This 
course or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. 

21. Microbiology. 4:2:4. First semester. 
A basic study of the morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of representative miro- 

organisms. 

22. Genetics. 4:3:2. Second semester. 
This course deals with the mechanism and laws of heredity and variation, and their prac- 
tical applications. 



63 



28. Botany. 4:2:4. Second semest, 
I he course is designed to deal with the broader aspects of plants, emphasizing a study 

the taxonomic, ecological, evolutionary and pathological principles. Consideration will 
given to the local flora, with emphasis being placed on those features which indicate relatio 
ships of the various families. 

29. Biology of the Chordates. 4 :2: 4. First semest< 
The anatomy of the chordates is studied from a comparative viewpoint with particul 

attention given to the correlation of structure to living conditions. Laboratory work involv 
dissection and demonstration of representative chordates. 

30. Comparative Histology and Microtechnique. 4:2:4. First semeste 
Microscopic anatomy of invertebrate and vertebrate tissues illustrating basic tissue sirr 

larities and specializations in relation to function. The laboratory includes the preparation 
slides utilizing routine histological and histochemical techniques. 

31. Developmental Biology. 4:2:4. Second semeste 
The study of basic descriptive phenomena in the development of typical invertebrate ar 

vertebrate embryos will be extended into consideration of modern embryological problems. 

32. Animal Physiology. 4:2:4. Second semeste 
This course presents the basic concepts of physiology, with special reference to man. 

34. Plant Physiology. 4:2:4. First semeste 
This course acquaints the student with the various functions of parts of plants. It includ( 

lectures and experimental work on the processes of photosynthesis, nutrition, respiratioi 
growth, the role of hormones, digestion, absorption, etc. 

35. Invertebrate Zoology. 4:2: 4. Second semeste 
A study of the anatomy, physiology, and life histories of representatives of most of th 

invertebrate phyla. 

40.1 Biology Seminar. -| :1 :0 per semeste 

Readings, discussions, and reports on modern trends in biology. 

41. Ecology. 4:2:4. First semeste 

The fundamental concepts of ecology are examined with emphasis placed on the inte 
action between organisms and their biological and physical environment in selected ecosy: 
terns — freshwater, marine, and terrestial. Field trips will be taken to selected areas. Laboratoi 
will be conducted on problems associated with various types of ecosystems. 

Prerequisites: Two semesters of biology beyond Biology 18 or permission of the instructor; 

44. Special Problems. 1-3 hours credit per semeste 
Limited to students majoring in biology who have had ample courses in the departmer 

and whose records indicate that they can be encouraged to take part in research or can wor 
independently on research problems in which they have a special interest. 

It is also for those who have had most of the courses required for their major but whi 
may have a special need for experience in fields not listed in the course offerings of thi 
department. 

Prerequisite: Permission of staff. 

45. Cellular Physiology. 4:2:4. First semestei 
Cell function and structure: a basis for a deeper understanding of those processes commoi 

to living things. 

For Senior or Junior majors who have completed at least two years of chemistry. 



64 




CHEMISTRY 



Professor Neidig; Associate Professors Griswold and Lockwood; Assistant Professor 
Spencer; Instructor Bell 

The aims of the department are: (1) to provide students majoring in chemistry 
rigorous training in the principles and applications of modern chemistry; (2) to 
provide students interested in the teaching profession an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the teaching of science; and (3) to offer students interested in ad- 
vanced study or in industrial employment professional training in chemistry. 

Major: Chemistry 24, 25, 30.1, 36, 37, 38, 39 and 4 hours of 44. 

B.S. in Chemistry (certified by the American Chemical Society): Chemistry 24, 25. 
30.1, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 45, 47 and 4 hours of 44. 

For outline of course leading to the degree of B.S. in Chemistry, see pages 32-33. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Juniors and seniors may participate in the Independent Study program if they have 
demonstrated a high scholastic ability and proficiency in both experimental and 
theoretical chemistry. To be recommended for departmental honors, a student is 
required: (1) to submit a thesis based on extensive laboratory investigation of an 
original problem; (2) to defend the thesis before an appropriate examining committee. 



13. Principles of Chemistry. 



4:3:3 per semester. 



A systematic study of the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry. 

24. Chemistry of the Covalent Bond. 4:3:4. Second semester. 
The presentation of the structure and chemistry of covalent compounds including thermo- 
dynamic and kinetic considerations. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

25. Reaction Kinetics and Chemistry Equilibria. 4:3:4. First semester. 
An investigation of chemical systems involving a study of reaction kinetics and equilibria. 

emphasizing the reaction of ionic substances and using modern analytical methods. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 13 or demonstrated equivalent background. 



30.1. Laboratory Investigations II. 

Physical-chemical investigations of chemical systems. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 36 (first semester). 
Corequisite: Chemistry 36 (second semester). 



2:0:8. Second semester. 



65 






36. Physical Chemistry. 3:3:0 per semeste 
A course in the physical theories of matter and their applications to systems of variabl 

composition. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 25 and Mathematics 11. 
Corequisite: Physics 17. 

37. Organic Chemistry. 5:3:8. First semestei 
A study of the preparation, properties, and uses of the aliphatic and aromatic compound 

with emphasis on the principles and reaction mechanisms describing their behavior. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 

38. Instrumental Analysis. 3:3:0. Second semestei 
A consideration of the use of instrumental analytical methods including spectrophoto 

metric, electroanalytical, coulometry, and polarography. 
Prerequisite: One semester of Chemistry 36. 
Corequisite: A second semester of Chemistry 36. 



39. Laboratory Investigations I. 

Use of instrumental techniques for investigating chemical systems. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 
Corequisite: Chemistry 36. 



1 :0:4 per semester 



41. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3:3:0. Second semester 

A consideration Of the structure of organic compounds and the mechanisms of homogene- 
ous organic reactions. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36 and Chemistry 37. 

43. Biochemistry. 4:3:4. First semester; 3:2:4. Second semester. 
A course in the physical and organic aspects of living systems. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 25 and Chemistry 37. 

44. Special Problems. 2:1:4 per semester. A maximum of eight semes- 

ter hours credit may be earned in this course. 
Intensive library and laboratory study of topics of special interest to advanced students in the 
major areas of chemistry. For students preparing for Secondary School Teaching, the emphasis 
is placed on methods of teaching Chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36, and the consent of the Chairman of the Department. 



45. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 

A study of advanced topics in analytical chemistry. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 36 and Chemistry 38. 

46. Qualitative Organic Analysis. 

Presentation of the principles and methods of organic analysis. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 37. 



3:3:0. First semester. 



2:0:8. First semester. 



3:3:0 per semester. 



47. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

An advanced course applying theoretical principles to the understanding of the descriptive 
chemistry of the elements. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 36 and Physics 27. 

48. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
A presentation of advanced topics in chemistry from such areas as quantum mechanics, 

thermodynamics, and kinetics. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 36. 



66 




ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Tom; Assistant Professors Maniyar and Peterke; Instructors Gates and Grace 

The aim of Lebanon Valley College is to give its students the opportunity to pro- 
cure a liberal education of the highest quality. Thus within this general objective of 
the College, the program of study in Economics and Business Administration at 
Lebanon Valley College is designed to provide for its own major: 

1. A broad and liberal education so that graduates of this Department will play a 
more active role in our changing world of ideas and actions; and 

2. A sound and integrated knowledge of the essential principles and problems of 
economics and business administration. 

Major: Economics 20a-20b, first semester of Economics 23, Economics 35, 36, 40.2, 
40.3 and 48, and 6 additional hours as approved by the adviser. 

For an outline of the suggested program in Economics and Business Administration, 
see pages 34-35. 

Economics 20a-20b is a prerequisite for all courses in this department of a higher 
number except Economics 23 and 32a-32b. 

A concrete effort is afoot nationally to promote an understanding of the American 
economy. In an effort to raise the level of economic literacy, the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania and other states have prescribed the introduction of economics in the 
secondary schools. The Department of Economics and Business Administration offers 
an approved program for the granting of Teacher Certification in Comprehensive 
Social Studies with a major in Economics as approved by the Department of Education 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 

The purpose of the departmental Independent Study program is to provide oppor- 
tunity for capable students to undertake advanced academic work independently 
under supervision of one or more members of the department. 

In order to participate in the departmental Independent Study program, the appli- 
cant is required to: 

1. demonstrate in his academic work the caliber of scholarship required to under- 
take extensive research projects; 



67 






2. apply for and receive permission for such participation from the Departmenta 
Chairman and from the Dean of the College no later than the end of the firs 
semester of the junior year; 

3. obtain departmental approval of a research project; 

4. prepare a paper on the research project under the guidance of one or more stafi 
members of the department; 

5. submit the paper in April of the senior year; and 

6. present and defend the paper before a faculty committee selected by the Depart- 
mental Chairman and the Dean of the College. 

On the basis of the student's performance in the Independent Study program / 
the Departmental Chairman and the Dean of the College will determine whether o\ 
not the student will be graduated with departmental honors. 

ECONOMICS 

20a-20b. Principles of Economics. 3:3:0 per semester. 

An introductory course in economic principles: consumption, production, banking and 
monetary theories and policies, governmental activities and fiscal policies, price system and 
allocation of resources, price levels and business fluctuation, theory of employment and income, 
and international economics. 

Prerequisite for courses of a higher number within the department, except 23 and 32a-32b. 

36. Money and Banking. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
Nature and functions of money and credit, credit instruments and the money market, 

development and role of commercial banking and central banking, and structure and functions 
of the Federal Reserve System. Monetary and banking theory, policy, and practice. Influence on 
prices, level of income and employment, and economic stability and progress. 

37. Public Finance. 3:3:0. First semester. 
Revenues and expenditures and economic functioning of the federal, state, and local gov- 
ernments; principles of taxation — shifting, incidence, and burden; influence on incentives, 
income distribution, and resource allocation; economic and social aspects of public spending; 
budgetary control and debt management; fiscal policy and economic stability. 

38. International Economics. 3:3:0. First semester. 
A study of theories of trade; capital movement; mechanism for attaining equilibrium; 

economic policies such as tariff, quota, monetary standards and exchange, state trading, cartel, 
and other economic agreements; the International Monetary Fund and the International Bank 
for Reconstruction and Development. 

40.1. History of Economic Thought. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
The evolution of economic thought through the principal schools from Mercantilism to the 

present. Attention will be given to the analysis of the various theories of value, wages, interest, 
rent, profit, price level, business cycles, and employment, and to the influences of earlier 
economic ideas upon current thinking and policy-making. 

40.2. Microeconomic Analysis. 3:3:0. First semester. 
Theories of demand, production, price, and resource allocation. 

40.3. Seminar and Special Problems. 3:3:0. Hours to be arranged. 
Independent study and research in economics, business administration, or accounting under 

the direction and supervision of the departmental staff. 

68 



■ 



40.4. Macroeconomic Analysis. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Theoretical and empirical study of national income and business cycles. 

41. Economic Growth. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Theoretical and empirical study of economic development. 

46. Econometrics. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An introductory application of mathematical concepts and statistical methods to economic 
theories and policies. 

48. Labor Economics. 3:3:0. First semester. 

Analysis of the American labor movement; theories, history, structure, and functions of 
unionism; individual and collective bargaining policies and practices; labor legislation; 
grievances; arbitration. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

23. Principles of Accounting. 4:3:2 per semester. 

Accounting principles and their application in service, trading, and manufacturing business 
operating as single proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Topics studied include: the 
accounting cycle— journalizing, posting, worksheet, financial statements, adjusting, closing; 
basic partnership problems— formation, distribution of profits, dissolution; corporation and 
manufacturing accounting; basic problems of depreciation, depletion, valuation; introduction 
to analysis, interpretation, and use of financial statements. 

Accounting, a language of business, provides a tool to implement work in other fields of 
business administration. 

30. Intermediate Accounting. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
Intensively covers valuation accounting relating to working capital items— cash, temporary 

investments, receivables, inventories, current liabilities; non-current items— investments, plant 
and equipment, intangible assets and deferred charges, and long-term liabilities; and corporate 
capital. Includes nature of income, cost, and expense; statement of source and application of 
funds; and statement preparation and analysis. Attention is given to relevant official pronounce- 
ments in accounting. CPA examination accounting theory questions are utilized. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

31. Advanced Accounting. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
Accounting for joint ventures; special sales procedures— installment, consignment, agency 

and branch; parent and subsidiary accounting— consolidations and mergers; fiduciary and 
budgetary accounting— statement of affairs, receivership, estates and trusts, governmental ac- 
counting; foreign exchange; insurance; actuarial science and applications. Attention is given to 
relevant official pronouncements in accounting. CPA examination accounting problems are 

utilized. 

Prerequisite: Economics 30. 

32a-32b. Business Law. 3:3:0. per semester. Offered 1970-1971. 

Elementary principles of law generally related to the field of business including contracts, 
agency, sales, bailments, insurance, and negotiable instruments. 

35 Marketing. 3:3:0 - Second semester. 

As a branch of applied economics, this course deals with (1) the application of economic 
theory in the distribution of economic goods on the manufacturers' and wholesalers' level; 
(2) the methods of analysis on the product, the consumer, and the company, and (3) the admin- 
istrative decisions on product planning, distribution channels, promotional activities, sales 
management, and price policy. To bridge the gap between the understanding and the applica- 
tion of marketing principles, students are required to prepare and discuss a number of cases 
pertaining to some specific areas of marketing. 

69 



40.5. Auditing. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-197 

Study and appraisal of current auditing standards and related literature. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

42. Income Tax Accounting. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-197 
Analysis of the Federal Income Tax Law and its applications to individuals, partnership 

fiduciaries, corporations; case problems; preparation of returns. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23, or consent of instructor. 

43. Cost Accounting. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-197 
Industrial accounting from the viewpoint of material, labor, and overhead costs; the analys 

of actual costs for control purposes and for determination of unit product costs; assembling an 
presentation of cost data; selected problems. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

44. Corporation Finance. 3:3:0. First semeste 
A study of organizing a business, financing permanent and working capital needs, mana^ 

ing income and surplus, expanding through internal growth and combination, recapitalizatio 
and reorganization. Forms of business organization; charter and by-laws; directors, officers, an 
stockholders; stocks and bonds; dividend policy; concentration and anti-trust legislation. 
Prerequisite: Economics 23. 

45. Investments and Statement Analysis. 3:3:0. Second semeste 
Development and role of investment and its relation to other economic, legal, and soci; 

institutions. Investment principles, media, machinery, policy, and management are discussec 
Financial statement analysis is stressed and designed for preparation as Certified Publi 
Accountants and/or Chartered Financial Analysis. 

49. Industrial Management and Personnel Administration. 3:3:0. First semestei 

Principles of decision making in business management. Personnel policies and practices. 





EDUCATION 



Professor Ebersole; Associate Professor Weast; Assistant Professors Herr, Kerr and 
Petrofes 

The aim of the Department of Education is to acquaint students with the art of 
teaching and to develop in each prospective teacher a full realization of his responsi- 
bilities in this profession. 

Courses are provided to comply with state certification in the elementary and 
secondary fields of the public schools. 

For a statement of requirements for those planning to enter the teaching profession, 
see pages 36-37 and 44-46. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Major: Elementary Education 22, 23, 34, 36, 37, 40, 43, 44; Art 32; Geography 10; 
Psychology 21. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Independent Study in elementary education permits the capable student to increase 
the depth of his understanding in an area of special interest and the general scope 
of his knowledge of elementary education. It is planned as an integral part of the 
student's major program rather than work superimposed upon it. 

A student majoring in elementary education may participate in the Independent 
Study Program when he completes the freshman-sophomore College Honors Pro- 
gram or when he demonstrates in his academic work the caliber of scholarship re- 
quired to undertake an extensive research project; achieves a 3.3 grade-point average 
in departmental courses and a 3.0 grade-point average in all college courses; applies 
in writing to the chairman of the department not later than the end of the first 
semester of his junior year. Approval of the application must be given by the Dean 
of the College upon recommendation by the department staff. 

A maximum of nine credit hours may be earned in this program. These hours will 
be distributed over the junior and senior years with a minimum of one and a maxi- 
mum of three hours to be taken in one semester. This must include participation in 
the Senior Seminar, Elementary Education 44, required of all students majoring in 
elementary education. The student will investigate an area of special interest begin- 



71 



ning with the study of the literature and culminating in the design and execution i 
an approved experimental or theoretical research project; submit to the depar 
mental chairman periodic progress reports and any other indication of performan< 
that may be required by the department; complete the project by April of the senk 
year; report and defend the findings of the project in a manner to be determined t 
the departmental staff. 

Graduation with Honors in Elementary Education will depend on the quality < 
performance in the research project, the maintenance of the grade point average 
required for admission to the program, success in the comprehensive student-teachir 
program, and the final approval of the departmental staff and the Dean of the Colleg 

EDUCATION COURSES For Both Elementary and Secondary Education 

20. Social Foundations of Education. 3:3:0. Either semeste 

A study is made of the history of education correlated with a survey of the principles an 

theories of noted educational leaders. Emphasis is placed on the influence these leaders an 

their followers have made on school and society. 

Required for elementary and secondary certification. 

30. Educational Measurements. 3:3:0. First semeste 

A study of the principles of validity and reliability, appraisal and construction of test iterr 

and consideration of the uses of test results. 

Recommended elective in elementary and secondary fields. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

41. An Introduction to Guidance. 3:3:0. Second semeste 
An overview of guidance in the public schools including the history, philosophy an 

development of programs. Procedures and instruments to be employed by the classroor 
teacher; creation of conditions for mental health; relation of guidance to other phases c 
instruction. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

42. The Education of the Exceptional Child. 3:3:0. Second semeste 
A general view of the practices and programs for the education of exceptional children an 

youth. The study includes children with physical, mental, and emotional handicaps; gifte 
children. Observation in special classes, child study, and the survey of curricular materials use 
in their education are part of the requirements. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

45. Visual and Sensory Techniques. 3:3:0. Second semeste 

Psychological bases for sensory aids; study and appraisal of various aids; use of apparatus 

sources of equipment and supplies. 

Recommended elective in elementary and secondary fields. Open only to seniors preparin 

to teach or enter the ministry. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 20 and 23. 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

El. Ed. 22. Music in the Elementary School. 3:3:0. Second semeste 

Fundamentals' of music, movement to music, study of child voice, materials and method 
for the different grades, and a survey of the literature used in the public schools. 

El. Ed. 23. The Physical Sciences in the Elementary School. 3:2:2. Second semestei 

Recent developments in arithmetic and science and the applications in the classroom 

curriculum planning; modern teaching methods; instructional materials; demonstrations am 

72 



experiments adapted to the elementary classroom. 

Prerequisites: Elementary Education 25; one year of a laboratory science. 

El. Ed. 25. Mathematics for the Elementary Grades. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of mathematics and a survey of the new 
and old in mathematical disciplines as applied in the elementary school. 

El. Ed. 34. Teaching of Reading. 3:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the problems and procedures of instruction in the development of basic read- 
ing skills. Effective reading programs, courses of study, teaching and learning materials, and 
research studies in this field are investigated and evaluated. 

El. Ed. 36. Communications and Group Processes in the Elementary School. 3 :3 :0 per semester. 
A course dealing with fundamentals for language growth in the areas of oral and written 
expression, correct usage, spelling, and handwriting. The development of basic concepts related 
to effective citizenship in a democracy. A variety of learning experiences and materials will 
be used and evaluated; especially, students will have experience in preparing an individual 
resource unit. 

El. Ed. 37. Children's Literature. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the literature of childhood, including authors and illustrators. Attention is given 
to children's reading interests, criteria and aids in selecting materials, a brief survey of the de- 
velopment of children's literature, and the art of storytelling and its place in the curriculum. 

El. Ed. 40. Student Teaching. Twelve semester hours credit. First semester. 

Each student spends an entire semester in a classroom of an area public school under the 
supervision of a carefully selected cooperating teacher. Open to seniors only. A cumulative 
grade point average of 2.0 during the first six semesters in college is required. 

Student teaching begins with the opening of the public schools. College residence halls 
and dining hall are available to the student teachers. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 23; Elementary Education 23, 34, 36 and 37. 

El. Ed. 43. Health and Safety Education. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

The course includes a study of basic health and safety practices and procedures as applied 
to the elementary school, a program of physical education for elementary school children, an 
American Red Cross approved program of First Aid, and an evaluation of sources and use of 
materials. 

Prerequisites: Education 20; Psychology 23. 

El. Ed. 44. Senior Seminar. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

The semester gives immediate help with pertinent problems in student teaching. Topics 
related to over-all success in teaching will be thoroughly dealt with: professional ethics, class- 
room management, home and school relationships, community responsibilities, professional 
standards, and other related areas. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

40. Student Teaching. Nine semester hours credit. First semester. 

Given only to seniors as a part of the professional semester. Each student spends full time 
in the classroom for a minimum of 9 weeks. 

Six semester hours credit. Second semester. 

The program consists of twelve weeks of teaching and observing in secondary schools. 
Students must have four consecutive hours free each day. These hours may be from 8:00 a.m. 
to 12:00 noon; 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. or 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The 
morning hours are preferred. 

This course fulfills the Pennsylvania certification requirement: 

73 



The minimum in student teaching is based on not less than 180 clock hours spent in 
schools under approved supervision including the necessary observation, participation i 
conferences. At least ninety (90) clock hours of the 180 must be completed in actual teach 
experiences. Conferences held with the college supervisor are also part of the program. 

Prerequisites: Education 20 and 49; Psychology 23. 

Summer Student Teaching Program. 

Six hours credit. Six weeks of student teaching in the secondary field in the Derry Towns 
Public Schools, Hershey, Pennsylvania or other cooperating schools. 

For information concerning the Summer Student Teaching Program contact the Chairm 
of the Department of Education. 

49. Practicum and Methods. 3:7 1 /2 :0. First semester. (Professional semester on 

3:3:0. Second semest 

A presentation and evaluation of teaching methods used in secondary schools. Experienc 
teachers will be invited to participate in class discussions and visitations will be made to t 
classrooms to observe good teaching. One third of class time will be devoted to acquaintii 
students preparing to teach secondary subjects with understanding and techniques for teachii 
reading in their respective areas. This course will fulfill the certification requirements for 
basic course in reading instruction on the secondary level, effective October 1, 1964. 

Required of all seniors in secondary education. 

Prerequisite: Education 20; Psychology 23, or permission of the instructor. 





ENGLISH 



Professor Struble; Associate Professor Faher; Assistant Professors Ford and O'Donnell; 
Instructors Coleman, Ramsay and Woods 

The purpose of the Department of English is to afford students a vital contact with 
the literature of our language and to assist them to write and speak effectively. 

Major: In addition to the required course in English composition (English 10a-10b) 
English majors will take English 20, English 21a, 22, 26a-26b, 30a-30b, 31, 32, 35, 49, 
and twelve hours of electives. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

The Department of English provides three types of recognition of superior ability: 

1. Entering students of proved ability in English composition may under certain 

circumstances be exempted from one or both semesters of English 10, providing 

they register for Advanced Composition and enough additional hours in literature 

to meet the general requirements in English for graduation. 

2 Students who are majoring in English may become candidates for departmental 
honors if they have a grade point average of 3.0 in courses in English, and it they 
receive permission from the chairman of the department and the Dean ot the 
College ordinarily no later than the end of the first semester of their junior year. 

The specific program for departmental honors for each student accepted tor 
the Independent Study Program will be worked out by that student in consultation 
with the chairman of the department, in accordance with the plan tor depart- 
mental honors adopted by the faculty on May 8, 1961. 

3 A senior who has been accepted for honors and who looks forward to a career in 
college teaching may, upon recommendation of the chairman of the department 
and appointment by the Dean of the College, become an intern in English, to 
render such assistance in the duties of the Department of English as will in some 
measure help to prepare him for a professional career in this field. Ordinarily only 
one intern will be appointed in any one academic year. 

10a-10b. English Composition. , ( 3:3:0 . ^ ^Srir 

A study, supplemented by practice in writing, of the principles of grammar, log.c, rhetoric, 
and mechanics which enable men to communicate effectively. 

75 



11a— 11b. Word Study. 1 ^ 

This course has a twofold purpose: (1) to give the student some insight into' lin^ui 
processes, particularly as pertains to the growth of the English vocabulary; and (2) to incre 
the range of the student's vocabulary, in order that he may have greater mastery over his o 
building° n8Ue ' Pr ° blemS ° f P ro ™nciation and spelling go hand in hand with vocabul 

20a-20b. Comparative Literature. 3 :3 :0 per semesl 

I his course has five principal aims: (1) to familiarize students with some of those mast 
pieces of Western World literature which are a part of the common heritage of every cultival 
mind; (2) to acquaint students with the conventions, techniques, and presuppositions of varic 
types of literature, so that they may be able to deal intelligently with these types when tr 
meet them elsewhere; (3) to give students some training in the techniques of the comparat 
study of literature, and some appreciation of the possibilities of this approach to literatu 
4) to provide students with genuinely aesthetic experiences, in the hope that reading a 
the appreciation of l.terature will continue to enrich their spirits throughout their lives a 
(bj to pass on to them some sense of the underlying values of our cultural system. 

21a-21b. American Literature. 3:3:0 per semest 

hrst semester: a survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War 
Second semester: a survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present day. 

22. Public Speaking. i.-i.n c.*u 

D •..,,, ,. , 3:3:0. Either semesti 

Basic principles of public speaking with practical training in diction and platform deliver) 

23. Advanced Composition. 3:3:0. Second semest. 
Principles and techniques of the short story, drama, and novel for students interested 

creative writing. Extensive practice in the field of student's special interest. 

24. Contemporary Literature. 3:3:0 Rrst semest( 

• J, ■ j\? currents and cross-currents in the literature produced in England and Ameri* 
since World War I. 

26a-26b. Survey of English Literature. 3 :3 :0 semest€ 

The whole course of English literature, from the beginnings to our own time, viewed 

perspective against the background of English life and thought, foreign influences, and tr 

developing national consciousness. 
Prerequisite: English 10. 

30a-30b. Shakespeare 3:3:0 per semeste 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings to the time of Shakespeare; a study I 

Shakespeare's history plays and their place in the Elizabethan world, and an analysis I 

Shakespearean comedy. 

A study of Shakespeare's tragedies and comedies (problem and romantic). 
Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

31. History of the English Language. 330 First semeste 
Historical study of English sounds, grammatical forms, and vocabulary; introduction t 

structural linguistics; standards of correctness and current usage. This course is primaril 
intended for those who plan to teach English and is in part a course in methods of teaching 
Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

32. Chaucer. -, n c , 
.,.,,.., 3:3:0. Second semeste 
Intended to g.ve the student a reasonable familiarity with Chaucer; to provide a detaile. 

picture of mediaeval life, culture, and thought; and to develop skill in the reading of earlie 
English. b 

Prerequisite: English 31. 

76 



33. Literature of the Victorian Period. 



3:3:0. First semester. 



A survey of the major English poets and prose writers from 1830 to 1900. 
Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 

35. Poetry of the Romantic Movement. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of the principal poets of the early nineteenth century: Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Prerequisite: English 20 or 26 or consent of the instructor. 



37. Contemporary Drama. 

A survey of Continental, British, and American drama since 1890. 
Prerequisite: English 10. 



3:3:0. Second semester. 



38. The Novel. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

A study of the development of the novel in England (Richardson to Joyce). 

40. Eighteenth Century Literature. 3:3:0. Fi rst semester. Offered 1 970-1 971 . 

A survey of the principal English authors from Dryden to Blake. 

49. Seminar in English. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

Intensive review of the student's earlier work in English; systematic coverage of the gaps 
in the student's knowledge; synthesis of the whole. 

The final examination in this course will constitute a comprehensive examination for the 
department. 

Required of all English majors in their senior year. 




77 




FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Professor Piel; Associate Professors Damus, Titcomb and Troutman; Assistant 
Professors Cantrell and Cooper; Instructors Hansen and Saylor 

The immediate aim of this department is to assist the student to acquire a work 
knowledge of the language or languages which he chooses to study. 

The aim of the courses in modern foreign languages is to enable the student to i 
the foreign tongue as a means of communication: to hear, speak, and eventually 
read and write the language. Through his study of the language and literature, 1 
student gains a deeper understanding and appreciation of the life and thought of 1 
people of the country. 

Laboratory practice is required of all students in modern foreign languages exa 
those in German 11. 

Major: A student may elect either a major in one language or a departmental maf 
The departmental major consists of at least twenty-four hours in one language and 
least twelve hours in a second language. 

In French, German and Spanish, one advanced literature course is offered ea 
year, in a regular rotation of courses. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students who are majoring in a foreign language may become candidates for depai 
mental honors if they have a grade point average of 3.0 in departmental courses, ar 
if they receive permission from the departmental staff and the Dean of the Colleg 
ordinarily no later than the end of the first semester of their junior year. 

Honors work will involve the selection of a topic for investigation under the guii 
ance of the departmental adviser, independent reading and study, frequent confereno 
with the adviser, preparation of a paper on the topic to be submitted by April 1 
the senior year, satisfactory defense of the paper before a committee composed i 
the departmental staff, the Dean of the College, and any other faculty members wh 
may be invited to participate, and finally, an oral examination in the major language 
If these requirements are satisfied, the student will be graduated with Honors in h 
major language. 

FRENCH 

Major: Twenty-four hours above the elementary level. 



78 






1. Elementary French. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A beginning course in French; audio-active technique. 

10. Intermediate French. 3:3:0 per semester 

A continuation of French 1 with further practice in conversation, dictation, and in reading 

and writing. Attention is given to the cultural and historical background of the literature that 

Prerequisite: French 1 or two years of secondary school French. 

*15. Introduction to French Literature. , , 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills througn 
a study of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prerequisite: Four years of secondary school language or three years for specially qualified 

students. 

20 French Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A survey of the literary history of the Renaissance and of the Classic periods in France. 

30 French Literature of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A study of the outstanding works of the Age of Enlightenment and of the Romantic, 
Realist, and Naturalist Schools of French literature. 

40. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. 3:3 :0 p er semester. 

A study of modern French literature with extensive reading of the works of the outstanding 
authors. 

s . 1-3 hours credit per semester. 

' Thfe'seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowledge, to stimulate 

individual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in h, % fteld^he couree 

content varies according to the needs of the group involved. For those students who are 

planning to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching methods. 

GERMAN 

Major: Twenty-four hours above the elementary level. 

„ 3:3:0 per semester. 

1. Elementary German. 

A beginning course in German; audio-active technique. 

_ 3:3:0 per semester. 

10 ' TZ^ofTce^ 1 with practice in conversation dictation, reading and writing. 
Emphasis is given to the cultural and historical background of the hterature that ,s read. 
Prerequisite: German 1 or two years of secondary school German. 

3:3:0 per semester. 
11 " Pricto'n "TdTng scientific and technical German with emphasis on vocabulary and the 
special difficulties inherfm in this type of writing. General readings followed by readmgs ,„ 
the student's major field. 

*15. Introduction to German Literature. , .. h 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills through 
a studv of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prer^uiste Four years of secondary school language or three years for spec-ally qualified 

students. 



r^e"- Successful completion of the first semester will satisfy the language requirement for 
graduation and successful completion of the second semester will provide three credits toward 
distribution requirements in humanities. 

79 



; 



22. The Classical Period. 

o f uSfsa^sSBS? 1 period; detaiied s,udy ° f the period; ™^ *"™ 

32 - SzZciiTz**' Nine,een,h cen,ury - 

42. German Literature of the Twentieth Century. wn n 

ou,s t an S d i U n d g y authors ntemPOrary ^^^ 'i*^' 1 " 6 With e * tenSiVe ™ di "S of the EriST 

45. Seminar. 

lnrflJ5 ,S fT!? ar is , des| g ned to supplement and integrate the student's knowTedse^o stimul 
ndmdual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in hi field The cou To 

Ttel TthT^nVZt nee , dS ° f thG gr ° UP lnV ° ,Ved For those students who a " pa n n 
to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching methods. 

GREEK 

1 * An er ?T tary GreeL • 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1971-19 

An mtensive course in the basic elements of ancient Greek A study of forms and svnt 

with easy prose composition. y ana synt 

10a — 10b. Intermediate Greek. -*.?.n n ^, * ^^ 

c- rt „ _ , .. , , 3.3:0 per semester. Offered 1970-19' 

First semester: readings from the New Testament Gospels 

they Second semester: readings from Xenophon's Anabasis. A review of grammar throughc 
Prerequisite: Greek 1. 

20 - p^eSiircieer^or- 

21. Readings in Hellenistic Grppk r> o o r i 

c«i *• V ' l ; ureeK. 3;3 : o. Second semester. Offered 1972-197 

Selections from the Septuagint, the Greek church fathers 
Prerequisite: Greek 10a— 10b. 

30 - SS:K Paul 

31 ' "SSK MW 3:3: °- S — d s ~, Offered 19 72- 197 

RUSSIAN 

1. Elementary Russian. 

An elementary course with oral-aural approach. 3 ' 3 ] ° PGr SGmeSt6 

10. Intermediate Russian. 
writing" in ' ermedia,e C ° UrSe " RUS5ia " With CO " tin - d conversational practice; ^^7^ 

Prerequisite: Russian 1 or two years of secondary school Russian. 

SPANISH 

Major: Twenty-four hours above the elementary level. 
1. Elementary Spanish. 

A beginning course in Spanish; audio-active technique. ^ PCr SemeSt6r 

80 



10. Intermediate Spanish. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A continuation of Spanish 1 with further practice in conversation, dictation, and in reading 
and writing. Attention is given to Spanish literature in its cultural and historical context. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or two years of secondary school Spanish. 
*15. Introduction to Spanish Literature. 3 :3 :0 per semester 

A general language review with intensive practice in the four basic language skills through 
a study of selected literary works in their cultural and historic contexts. 

Prerequisite: Four years of secondary school language or three years for specially qualified 
students. 
22. Spanish Literature of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Reading of outstanding authors of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with emphasis 
upon Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and Calderon. Composition and conversation. 
32. Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Centuries. 3:3:0 per semester. 

Extensive reading, composition and conversation. 
42. A Survey of Spanish and Latin American Literature. 3:3:0 per semester. 

First semester: a survey of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Intensive 
reading, composition, and conversation. 

Second semester: a survey of Latin American literature from the sixteenth century to the 
present. Intensive reading, composition, and conversation. 
45 Seminar. 1 " 3 hours credits P er semester. 

This seminar is designed to supplement and integrate the student's knowledge, to stimulate 
individual study and research, and to prepare him for future work in his field. The course 
content varies according to the needs of the group involved. For those students who are 
planning to teach, the seminar will provide instruction in teaching methods. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Mr. Kerr 

10a-10b. World Geography. . . 3:3:0 per semester. 

A basic course in geography to develop a knowledge and an appreciation of the worldwide 
physical factors in man's environment and of his adjustment to them. The course includes a 
study of the motions of the earth, land forms, bodies of water, soil, climate, vegetation with 
special emphasis on man's political, economic, and social responses to them Knowledge of 
the location of both the physical and cultural aspects of man's habitat is related to contempo- 
rary events. 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Light 

20a-20b. Structural and Historical Geology. 2:2:0 per semester 

The first semester, structural geology, acquaints the student with the forces and dynamic 
agencies by which the earth has been formed and has evolved into its present condition 

The second semester, historical geology, deals with the probable bcation o land and sea 
areas of each of the various geologic periods, and the development of the plants and animals 
which lived during periods as identified by their fossil remains. 

GERMAN 

See Foreign Languages, page 79. 

GREEK 

See Foreign Languages, page 80. 

~No^e~: Successful completion of the first semester will satisfy the language requirement for 
graduation and successful completion of the second semester will provide three credits toward 
distribution requirements in humanities. 

81 




HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Assistant Professors McHenry and Petrofes; Instructors Caeckler, Carman 
Rogerson ' 



ar 



hJbh a J^ s ° f . this , de P a u rtm ent are (1) to encourage attitudes and habits of good tot 
health; (2) to develop the student's physical capacities; (3) to provide activities whl 
will enrich his leisure throughout life. 

In addition to the family physician's report, it is strongly recommended that 
entering students also undergo a thorough visual examination 

Students are required to wear the regulation gymnasium outfit, which may t 
purchased at the college bookstore. Y 

Physical Education (Men) (Women) , „ 

h.11 <Me h n) ^ ^ ySiCal ^fr activiti « delude: touch football, basketball, sofrbalfvoTle 
brL« ^ u'H t0n ' g ° lf ' handba "' SqUash ' WreStlin S' tennis - s Peedball, swimming soc e 
Injuries ' gymnaSt ' CS ' drcu,t trainin S' wei § ht fining, and care and prevention" 

rTn n) J^ PhySiCa ' ^cation activities include: soccer, Softball, swimming golf archer 
bSl a^ooTm ^J^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ S 



0:2.0 per semeste 



Corrective and Adaptive Physical Education (Men)(Women) 

fidencief' ^"'^ "' preSCnbed by a P h V sici ^ for students with physical handicaps or de 
Not open to students qualified for Physical Education. 



82 




HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Geffen; Associate Professor Fehr; Assistant Professor Joyce; Instructor Kilgore 

The aim in the teaching of history is to acquaint the student with human behavior 
in the dimension of past time, in the belief that by thus extending the range of his 
knowledge he may also enlarge the scope of his sympathies and become more richly 
human. 

The aim in the teaching of political science is to acquaint the student with the 
many-sided aspects of government, in the belief that by thus enlarging the extent of his 
knowledge he may expand the scope of his understanding and adopt a critical and 
objective attitude toward the problems of modern society. 

The department also prepares students for graduate and law schools and for careers 
in teaching, government, and business. 



HISTORY 

Major: History 10a-10b, 13, 43; two courses from among History 11, 12, 21, 22, 31, 
32; History 24a and 40a-40b or History 24b and 30a-30b; one course from among 
History 41, 46, 47, 48. History 30a-30b and 40a-40b may be taken in place of the 
combinations of these courses with History 24. 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students majoring in history may participate in the Independent Study program 
when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) demonstrate in their academic work 
the caliber of scholarship required to undertake an extensive research project; (2) 
achieve a 3.3 grade point average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade point 
average in all college courses; and (3) apply for and receive permission for such 
participation from the departmental staff and the Dean of the College no later than 
the end of the first semester of the junior year. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) submit to the depart- 
mental chairman periodic progress reports; (2) show progress at a rate and at a level 
indicating that he will complete the program on time and at the desired level of 
achievement; and (3) maintain a 3.3 grade point average in departmental courses and 
a 2.5 grade point average in all college courses. 



83 



The participant must (1) obtain departmental approval of a research topic- 
prepare an essay on the subject selected for research under the guidance of 
member of the departmental staff; (3) complete the writing of the essay by April 
of the senior year; (4) defend the essay in a manner to be determined by the depa 
mental staff and the Dean of the College; (5) pursue a program of independent rea 
ing approved by the departmental staff; (6) demonstrate, by means of a written and/ 
oral examination, knowledge and understanding of the material studied in the ind 
pendent reading program; and (7) present to the departmental chairman an asse< 
ment of his experience in the program. Upon fulfilling these requirements, the stude 
will be recommended by the departmental staff to the Dean of the College f 
graduation with departmental honors. 

10a-10b. History of Western Civilization. 3 :3 :0 per semest. 

I he first semester covers the development of Western European culture in all of its aspec 
from its Near East origins to about 1715. The second semester covers its evolution during tl 
eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth centuries. 

11. Greek and Roman History. 3:3:0 . First semester. Offered 1971-197 
An examination of the origins, structure, and values of Greek and Roman societies fro 

about 1200 B.C. to about 500 A.D. The Mediterranean nature of these cultures and the hi 
torians' treatment of them are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: History 10a. 

12. The Middle Ages. 3:3: o. Second semester. Offered 1971-197 

A study of the emergence of a European society from 500 to 1300. Emphasis is on 1 

social and intellectual aspects of medieval life, and the historiographical record is anavzed 
Prerequisite: History 10a. 

13. Introduction to Historiography. 3:3:0 Fjrst semeste 
Theory and practice in the writing of history. The work of selected historians is studie 

and each student conducts and reports upon his own research. Training is given in researc 
methods and in the preparation of research reports. 

21. The Renaissance and Reformation: 1300 to 1600. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971 
A study of the beginnings of the modern era, paying particular attention to the inter 

relationships between its political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects 
Prerequisite: History 10a. 

22. The Old Regime: 17th and 18th Centuries. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971 
An mvest.gat.on of the impact of modern science and thought upon the development o 

Western European culture. Particular attention is paid to the nature of European society befon 
the era of revolutions. r 

Prerequisite: History 10b. 

24a-24b. Survey of United States History. 3 3 semester 

The first semester covers the development of the United States to 1865 the seconc 

semester from 1865 to the present. Special emphasis throughout the course is 'placed upor 

historiographical philosophy and method. 

30a-30b. American Colonial and National History to 1865. 

xu ,. . , . , 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1970-1971, 

I he first semester deals with American history from its European origins to 1800 the 

second semester from 1800 to 1865. Historiographical issues, methods, and problems are 

stressed. 

84 



31. The Era of Revolutions: 1789 to 1870. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A study of the political and economic changes in Europe from 1789 to 1870 and the total 

cultural impact of these changes. 
Prerequisite: History 10b. 

32. Contemporary Europe: 1870 to the Present. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
An analysis of the nineteenth century state system, its economic and social bases, its ideol- 
ogy, and its evolution through world wars and technological revolutions. 

Prerequisite: History 10b. 

40a-40b. The United States, 1865 to the Present. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

The first semester deals with the post-Civil War developments of American history from 
1865 to 1900, the second semester from 1900 to the present. Historiography is emphasized. 

41. Introduction to the History of African Culture. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A survey of African culture from the tenth-century Sudanic origins to the present day. 
Emphasis is on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

43. Senior Seminar in History. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A review of the student's college program in history, with reading, discussion, and writing 
to serve the following purposes: (1) synthesis of previous course work in history; (2) relation 
of the academic discipline of history to other fields of knowledge; and (3) formulation and 
expression of a personal philosophy of history by each student. 

Open only to senior departmental majors. 

46. History of Russia. 3:3:0. First Semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A survey of Russian history from ancient times to the present, with special attention to 

developments since the seventeenth century. 
Prerequsite: History 10b. 

47. History of the Far East. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A survey of the development of the cultural institutions of the Far East, with emphasis 

upon the trends since 1500. 

48. History of Latin America. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A survey of the Latin American republics from their colonial beginnings to the present 

time. 

49. Select Problems in History. 3:3:0. First semester. 3:3:0 per semester for Independent 

Study participants, with a maximum of nine hours credit. 
A course to provide the student with an opportunity to explore in depth a topic of special 
interest. Required of majors enrolled in the Independent Study program in history. Open to 
other history majors by permission of the instructor and the departmental chairman. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major: Political Science 10a-10b, 20, 21, 30, 31, 40, 41, 43, and three additional 
hours in Political Science as approved by the departmental chairman. Majors are also 
required to take History 24a and 40a-40b or History 24b and 30a-30b. History 30a-30b 
and 40a-40b may be taken in place of the combinations of these courses with History 

24. 

85 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students majoring in political science may participate in the Independent Stud 
program when they fulfill the following requirements: (1) demonstrate in their academi 
work the caliber of scholarship required to undertake an extensive research projeci 
(2) achieve a 3.0 grade point average in departmental courses and a 2.5 grade poir 
average in all college courses; and (3) apply for and receive permission for sue 
participation from the departmental staff and the Dean of the College no later tha 
the end of the sophomore year. 

During his participation in the program, the student must (1) submit to the deparl 
mental chairman periodic progress reports; (2) show progress at a rate and at a levt 
indicating that he will complete the program on time and at the desired level c 
achievement, and (3) maintain a 3.0 grade point average in departmental courses am 
a 2.5 grade point average in all college courses. 

The participant must (1) use the junior year for preliminary work involving selectei 
readings and gathering of source material for a research topic; (2) obtain departments 
approval of a research topic; (3) prepare an essay on the subject selected for researcl 
under the guidance of a member of the departmental staff; (4) complete the writin; 
of the essay by April 1 of the senior year; (5) defend the essay in a manner to b! 
determined by the departmental staff and the Dean of the College; (6) pursue , 
program of independent reading approved by the departmental staff; (7) demonstrate 
by means of a written and/or oral examination, knowledge and understanding of thi 
material studied in the independent reading program; and (8) present to the depart 
mental chairman an assessment of his experience in the program. Upon fulfilling thes< 
requirements, the student will be recommended by the departmental staff to th< 
Dean of the College for graduation with departmental honors. 

10a-10b. American National Government. 3:3:0 per semeste 

The first semester concentrates on backgrounds, theories, principles, processes, and prac 
tices of American national government. Subject areas include: the nature of democracy, Con 
stitutional backgrounds, federalism and its problems, civil rights, public opinion formation 
voting behavior, political parties, campaigns and elections. Special attention is given to con 
temporary racial and student unrest in the United States. 

The second semester stresses institutional surveys and the actual work of government. The 
structure, functions, and processes of the main organs of national government — the Presidency 
the Congress, the judiciary, and the bureaucracy — are examined. Subject areas covered include 
the role of government in regulating, promoting, managing, national defense, foreign policies 
and internal development. 

20. Comparative Government. 3 :3 :0. Fi rst semester. Offered 1 971 -1 972. 
A comparative study of important governmental systems of the world, both democratic 

and authoritarian. Comparison and contrasts are made between unitary and federal forms. 
Special study is made of the governmental system in force in the Soviet Union. 
Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

21. Foreign Relations. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A survey of the external relations of American government, with emphasis on twentieth 

century developments. Subject areas include diplomacy, military affairs, geographic and 
regional problems, trade and aid, technology and underdevelopment, alliances, nuclear prob- 
lems, and opposing ideologies. Consideration is given to recruitment, training, and problems 
of the United States foreign service and to the multiple influences shaping American foreign 
policies. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

86 



22. State and County Government. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
This course deals with the structure and functions of state and county government. Em- 
phasis is placed on federal-state-local relationships, on administrative organization and services, 
on the courts, and on legislative representation. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

23. City Government. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
This course deals with the rise of urbanization and the accompanying growth of municipal 

functions. Attention is paid to metropolitan areas, to the legal process and status of cities, to 
municipal relations with state and national government, to urban politics, and to the various 
forms of city government. 

Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

30. Political Parties in the United States. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A study of the origins and history of American political parties, their development, organi- 
zation, leaders, conventions, platforms, and campaigns. Emphasis is given to recent changes 
in American political patterns. 

31. American Constitutional Government. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A study of the growth and development of the Constitution through the medium of judicial 

construction. Recent decisions illustrating its application to new conditions of the present age, 
and proposals for court modification are given particular attention. 
Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

33. Public Opinion. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 

An analysis of the nature and sources of contemporary public opinion, with special atten- 
tion to types of censorship and to modern propaganda devices. 

40. Political Theory. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A survey of the different philosophies and theories of government, ancient and modern, 

with special reference to political philosophy since the sixteenth century. 

41. International Politics. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
A course in the origin, forms, dynamics and prospects of the international political pattern, 

with emphasis on current developments and changing concepts in world politics. 
Political Science 10a — 10b is a prerequisite, or a corequisite. 

43. Senior Seminar in Political Science. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

An intensive review of the student's college program in political science, with reading, 
discussion, and written assignments to accomplish the following purposes: (1) integration of 
earlier course work in political science; (2) relation of the discipline to other fields of knowl- 
edge; and (3) development and expression of an individual political philosophy by the student. 

Prerequisites: A major in political science and senior standing; or permission of the staff. 



LANGUAGES 

See Foreign Languages, page 78. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSE 

32. Seminar in Psychology and Literature. 3 hours credit. Second semester. 

A consideration of major psychological theories for use in literary interpretation. 

Prerequisites: A major in psychology or English, junior or senior standing and/or permission 
of the staff. 

87 




MATHEMATICS 



■M::;- 



■S:\ 



Professor Bissinger; Assistant Professors Burras, Lewin and Stare 

The aims of the Department of Mathematics are: (1) to make available mathematica 
theory and technique needed by students in applied sciences and industry (2) tc 
prepare students interested in mathematics for graduate schools as well as for sec 
ondary school teaching; (3) to provide the cultural advantages of a knowledge o 
mathematics. & 

Major: Math 11, 21, 25, 31 plus at least three semester hours from each of the 
following divisions: 

I Analysis-Math 40; Math 46. 
II Algebra and Topology-Math 48; Math 49. 
Ill Statistics-Math 12*; Math 37; Math 41. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students may participate in the departmental Independent Study Program if they 
have demonstrated high scholastic ability and have received permission for such par- 
ticipation from the Departmental Chairman and the Dean of the College no later than 
the end of the first semester of the junior year. 

A student may receive upon graduation departmental honors if he has maintained 
a 3.0 grade point average in mathematics and has satisfactorily completed the Inde- 
pendent Study Program. 



PLAN OF STUDY IN STATISTICS 

Mathematics 37, 41 form the basis for a concentration in statistics. A statistical and 
computing laboratory equipped with Brunsviga desk calculating machines is available 
to students doing computational work in connection with this program of study 
Additional training with IBM electrical punched card equipment can be arranged with 
local industry and nearby military installations. 



*The requirement in Statistics can be satisfied with Math 12 only if an additional three semester 
hours are taken from one of the other two divisions. 



88 






PLAN OF STUDY IN MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 

Students interested in mathematical physics may elect to major in either the Depart- 
ment of Physics or the Department of Mathematics and follow a plan of study in 
mathematical physics worked out by a suitable adviser to whom they will be referred. 
Ordinarily the program will include Mathematics 31, 37, 40, and 46. 

PLAN OF STUDY IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE 

The program as outlined on pages 30-31 is endorsed by the Philadelphia Section of 
the Society of Actuaries who sponsor it on this campus. The actuarial examinations, 
parts 1, 2 and 3, are also given on this campus which is a testing center. Interested 
students should consult with the Departmental Chairman. 

PLAN OF STUDY IN ENGINEERING 

The cooperative pre-engineering program is described on page 38. Ordinarily the 
program will include Mathematics 11, 12, 21, 40, and 46. 

COURSES 

I. Introductory Analysis. 3:3:0. First semester. 

This is a pre-calculus course which includes topics from college algebra and analytical 
trigonometry. This course is recommended for students who lack the necessary background 
for calculus. 

10. Basic Concepts of Mathematics. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

The foundational aspects of mathematics at work in the world today are stressed for 
cultural as well as some technical competence. This course is addressed to the non-science 
student and presents the scientific and humanistic importance of the subject in an historical 
approach. 

II. Elementary Analysis I & II. 3:3:0 per semester. 
The fundamental ideas of analytic geometry and calculus are introduced with applications. 

A thorough background in trigonometry and algebra is necessary. Thomas, Calculus and 
Analytic Geometry. 

12. Elementary Statistics. 3:2:2. Either semester. 

Included in this course are descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability concepts, 
simple problems of statistical inference, and elementary treatment of analysis of pairs of meas- 
urements. Mendenhall, Introduction to Probability and Statistics. 

21. Intermediate Analysis I & II. 3:3:0 per semester. 

This is a continuation of Mathematics 11 with an introduction to partial differentiation, 
multiple integration, infinite series, differential equations, and linear algebra. Thomas, Calculus 
and Analytic Geometry. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

24. Linear Algebra. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
Study is made of linear equations, linear dependence, vector spaces, operators, transforma- 
tions and matrices. Paige and Swift, Elements of Linear Algebra. 

25. Development of the Real Number System. 3:3:0. First semester. 
An introduction to logic, set theory, and a rigorous development of the number system. 

Webber, Number Systems of Analysis. 

89 



31. Advanced Analysis I & II. 3:3:0 per semest 

Rigorous existence proofs of functional concepts of continuity, differentiation, integratk 

and series are given. Use is made of transformation theory by Jacobians. Buck, Advanc 

Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 and 25. 

33. Geometry. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1971-19; 

Foundations of geometry, historical background, and an introduction to non-Euclide 
geometry. This course is designed primarily for teachers. 

37. Mathematical Statistics. 3:3:0 per semest 

Calculus is used to develop basic statistical tools and notions. Generating functions, fi 
quency distributions of one, two, or more variables, and various tests are considered. Wa< 
worth and Bryan, Introduction to Probability and Random Variables. 

40. Methods of Applied Mathematics. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1971-19! 
Use is made of matrices and determinants, the concept of linear vector spaces and ch; 

acteristic values. Formulation and solution of certain partial differential equations are accoi 
panied by a treatment of integral equations, difference equations, and Green's function. 

40.1 Mathematics Seminar. 1 :1 :0. Either semest 

Logic, computer language, finite differences are among those topics which could 
selected as a basis for a one-semester seminar. Special problems given on a recent competiti 
examination are presented and discussed in a seminar for upper classmen. 

40.1 (T). Mathematics Seminar. 1 :1 :0. Second semest 

A senior seminar designed for mathematics teachers is required of those students wl 
wish to become certified to teach mathematics. 

41. Probability. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-19/ 
This course constitutes a rigorous examination of the notions of sample space, randc 

variables, distributions in time and space, and certain unifying limit theorems. Time permittir 

it may include Markoff chain theory and related topics. Feller, Introduction to Probabil 

Theory with Applictaions, Vol. 1. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 37. 

46. Functions of a Complex Variable. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-19/ 

An introductory course that includes analytic functions, Cauchy's integral theorem, resid 

theory, contour integrals, and conformal mapping. Churchill, Complex Variables and App 

cations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

48. Algebra. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1970-197 
Topics such as group theory, rings, ideals, field extensions, and Galois theory will I 

studied. Herstein, Topics in Alegbra. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 25. 

49. Topology. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-197 
The elements of point-set theory are introduced with topological considerations to appr 

ciate generalization. Moore, Elementary General Topology. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 25 and 31. 

Independent Study in Mathematics. 3:3:0 per semester. (Maximum of 3 semester: 

After receiving permission for participation, the student will prepare a paper on a selecte 
subject for research which is approved by the department. This paper should be completed I 
the end of the first semester of the senior year, and must be defended in a manner determine 
by the departmental staff. 

90 




MUSIC 



Associate Professor Smith, Chairman; Professor Bender; Associate Professors Fair- 
lamb, Getz, Lanese, Stachow and Thurmond; Assistant Professors Curfman and jamanis; 
Instructors Aulenbach, Burrichter, Campbell, Catchings, Lau, Morgan and Veri 

The aims of the Department of Music are to train artists and teachers; to teach 
music historically and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture; and to offer 
courses that give a thorough and practical understanding of theoretical subjects. 

Attendance at all faculty recitals and a portion of student recitals is compulsory. 

All majors in Music or Music Education are required to take private instruction on 
the campus if the Department offers instruction in the individual's principal perform- 
ance medium. 

Participation in music organizations may be required of all majors. 

For cost of private lessons see page 23. 

MUSIC 

(B.A. with a major in Music) 

This program is designed for those students desiring a liberal arts context in their 
preparation for a career in applied music. 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

All majors are required to take an hour lesson per week in the major performance 
area and are expected to perform a half or full recital in the junior year and a full 
recital in the senior year. 

All majors outside of the keyboard area are required to take a V2 hour lesson per 
week in piano until the minimum requirements have been met. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see pages 40-41. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

(B.S. with a major in Music Education) 

This program has been approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education 
and the National Association of Schools of Music for the preparation of teachers of 
public school music. 

91 



The Music Education curriculum requires two private one-half hour lessons per wee 
(one each in the major and a minor performance area), one of which is included ii 
the tuition charge. A charge is made for the second private lesson. 

For the recommended plan of study in this program see pages 42-43. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

1. A candidate must have achieved a minimum grade point average of 3.00 at the en( 
of the sophomore year, and must maintain this minimum to remain eligible fo 
Honors status. 

2. The private instructor in the candidate's major performance area must recommenc 
the student for full recital privileges during the senior year, and will serve as advise 
to the individual's Independent Study program. 

3. The candidate through reading and research will produce a thesis or an essay 
based on a problem or subject of his own choosing under the direct supervision o 
his faculty adviser. Creative work will be encouraged with reference to, or emphasi: 
upon, his principal performance medium. 

4. Honors recognition shall be dependent upon the quality of the prepared thesis o 
essay and the level of the candidate's recital performance, both to be reviewed by i 
committee of three, including the private instructor (adviser), the chairman of th( 
department, and a third music faculty member to be designated by the chairmar 
with the approval of the adviser. 

5. In addition to any established pattern of announcing honors candidates and recipi- 
ents, the printed recital program shall also indicate "in partial fulfillment of require- 
ments for Honors in Music." 

6. A maximum of 8 hours credit can be earned in Independent Study. 

7. Upon the completion of the above requirements at a satisfactory level, the student 
will be recommended by the reviewing committee to the Dean of the College foi 
graduation with departmental honors. 

I: THEORY OF MUSIC 

Sight Singing 

Music 10. Sight Singing I. 1 :2:0. First semester. 

A beginning course in music reading with the use of syllables, incorporating the elements 
of melody and rhythm within the beat and its division. The following are studied: basic beal 
patterns, simple and compound time, diatonic intervals, implied harmonic structure within the 
melodic line, the C clefs, modulation. 

Music 11. Sight Singing II. 1 :2:0. Second semester. 

A continuation of music reading, employing more difficult melodies and rhythms, the beal 
and its subdivision, and additional interval problems. Phrasing and the application of dynamics 
are stressed. 

Music 20. Sight Singing III. 1 :2:0. First semester. 

Exercises in four clefs, employing vocal literature of increasing difficulty, both tonal and 
rhythmic. Modal melodies, remote modulation, superimposed background and meter, changing 
and less common time signatures are stressed. 

Dictation (Ear Training) 

Music 12. Ear Training I. 1 :2:0. First semester. 

Includes the study of the basics of music notation essential for the writing of melodic and 

rhythmic dictation. Aural analysis and tonal memory are developed. Essentials of tonality are 

92 



covered, and harmonic dictation is begun in the latter half of the course. Correlated with Sight 
Singing and Harmony. 

Music 13. Ear Training II. 1 :2:0. Second semester. 

Increasing complexity and length of melodic and rhythmic dictation with emphasis upon the 

development of harmonic dictation. Inversions of triads, seventh and ninth chords are included. 

Music 22. Ear Training III. 1 :2:0. First semester. 

A study of more difficult tonal problems including modulation, chromaticism, and altered 
chords. 

Harmony 

Music 14. Harmony I. 2:3:0. First semester. 

A study of the rudiments of music including notation, scales, intervals, and triads; the 
connection of triads by harmonizing melodies and basses with fundamental triads; playing of 
simple cadences at the piano; analysis of phrases and periods. 

Music 15. Harmony II. 2:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of inversions of triads, seventh and ninth chords, harmonizations of melodies and 
figured basses; analysis and composition of the smaller forms; modulation. 

Music 24. Harmony III. 2:2:0. First semester. 

The use of dominant and diminished sevenths as embellishments of and substitutes for dia- 
tonic harmony; harmonization of melodies and figured basses; analysis of two and three-part 
song forms; composition in two-part song form. Playing of more advanced cadences and modu- 
lations at the piano. 

Music 29. Harmony IV (Elementary Composition)* on special announcement. 2:2:0. First semester. 
Melody analysis and writing; four part choral writing; continuation of two and three-part 
song-form analysis and composition. Composition in Theme and Variations, Fantasia, Rondo and 
Dance forms. Study of contemporary harmonic ideas. 

Music 39. Keyboard Harmony. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Work at the piano includes the harmonization of melodies both with four-part harmony 
and with various accompaniment forms; also transposition, improvisation, modulation, reading 
from figured bass. 

Additional Theory Courses 

Music 21. Orchestration and Scoring for the Band. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Study of instrumentation, devices, techniques, and mechanics of scoring transcriptions, ar- 
rangements and solos for orchestra and concert band; special work in scoring for marching 
band. Laboratory analysis and demonstration of various instrumental colors and combinations 
Emphasis is placed on creative scoring. 

Music 31. Form and Analysis I. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of the structure of music including hymns, folk songs, two, three and five-part song 
forms, variations, contrapuntal forms, rondo and sonata forms. Compositions in these forms are 
studied primarily for their structural content. Course includes extensive listening. 

Music 36. Form and Analysis II* on special announcement. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

A study through analysis and listening of fugal forms, suite, overture, complete sonata forms 
(evolution of the symphony), string quartet, the tone poem. Analysis of classical and contempo- 
rary works in these forms. 



B.A. Program in Music. 

93 



Music 40.1. Counterpoint. 2:2:0. Second semest 

Introductory work in strict counterpoint through three and four-part work in all the speci 

Music 40.2. Arranging and Scoring for the Modern Orchestra. 2:2:0. Either semest 

Study of modern harmony, modulation, style analysis, special instrumental effects as appli 

to modern arranging. Laboratory analysis and demonstration of sectional and ensemble voicin 

Music 40.3. Composition, Schillinger System. Private teachii 

A scientific system of music composition created by the late Joseph Schillinger, teacher 

such accomplished professionals as George Gershwin, Ted Royal Dewar. 

The major aims of the system are to: (1) generalize underlying principles regarding t 

behavior of tonal phenomena; (2) classify all the available resources of our tonal system; 

teach a comprehensive application of scientific method to all components of the tonal art, 

problems of melody, rhythm, harmony, counterpoint, orchestration and to composition itself. 
The system is best studied in the light of a traditional background and admission to cour 

or private instruction is by special permission only. 



II. METHODS AND MATERIALS 

Music Ed. 23. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Early Childhood. 2:2:0. Second semest* 

A comprehensive study of music teaching at the lower elementary level, including rationa 
for building a music education curriculum; acquaintance with appropriate music educatic 
materials; suggestions for presenting music with the purpose of developing conceptual undt 
standing of the elements of music; use of classroom instruments; beginnings of directed appr 
ciation; foundation studies for later technical developments. 

Music Ed. 33A. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Later Childhood. 2:2:0. First semest* 

A study of the child's singing voice in the intermediate grades; attention is given to tl 
formal or technical work of these grades with an evaluation of appropriate texts and rece 
approaches. Preparation of lesson plans, and observation are required. Music appreciation 
continued. 

Music Ed. 33B. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

1 :1 :0. First semest( 
A study of methods and materials used in teaching band and orchestral instruments 
children in these grades, with emphasis on a sound rhythmic approach. Both individual ar 
class techniques are studied. Musical rudiments as applied to instrumental teaching are reviewe 

Music Ed. 34A. Methods and Materials, Vocal: Junior and Senior High School. 

2:2:0. Second semest( 
A study of adolescent tendencies of high school students. Class content of materials 
studied with attention to the organization and presentation of a varied program. Recent trem 
in teaching are studied. 

Music Ed. 34B. Methods and Materials, Instrumental: Junior and Senior High School. 

1 :1 :0. Second semest* 
A study of intermediate and advanced instrumental teaching techniques; methods of c 
ganizing and directing school orchestras and bands; fundamentals of musicianship. 

Music Ed. 43. Seminar in Advanced Instrumental Problems. 2:2:0. Second semestf 

A study of the general and specific problems which confront the director of school orche 
tras, bands, and instrumental classes. Problems of general interest include: organization ar 
management, stimulating and maintaining interest; selecting beginners; scheduling rehearse 
and class lessons; financing and purchasing instruments, uniforms, and other equipment; marc 

94 



ing band formations and drills; evaluating music materials; organizing festivals, contests, and 
public performances. 

Music Ed. 44. Methods in Piano Pedagogy. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of methods of teaching piano to children and adults. The course includes the song 
approach method, presentation of the fundamental principles of rhythm, sight reading, tone 
quality, form, technique, pedaling, transposition and the harmonization of simple melodies. 
Materials are examined and discussed. 

III. STUDENT TEACHING 

Music Ed. 40a. — 40b. Student Teaching. 6 hours credit per semester. 

Student teaching in Music Education, done in the Annville-Cleona Schools, the Derry Town- 
ship Public Schools, and the Milton Hershey School, includes vocal and instrumental work from 
elementary to senior high school. 






: 



IV. INSTRUMENTAL COURSES 

Class Instruction in Band and Orchestral Instruments. 

Practical courses in which students, in addition to being taught the fundamental principles 
underlying the playing of all band and orchestral instruments, learn to play on instruments of 
each group, viz., string, woodwind, brass, and percussion. Problems of class procedure in public 
schools are discussed; transposition of all instruments is taught. Ensemble playing is an integral 
part of these courses. 

Brass Instruments (Cornet, Trumpet, French Horn, Trombone, Baritone, Tuba) 



Music 16. Brass I. 

A study of any two of the above instruments. 

Music 17. Brass II. 

A study of the remainder of the above instruments. 

Percussion Instruments (Snare Drum, Tympany, Bass Drum, etc.) 

Music 18. Percussion I. 

A study of snare drum only. 

Music 48. Percussion II. 

A study of the remainder of the above listed instruments. 

Woodwind Instruments (Clarinet, Flute, Piccolo, Oboe, Saxophone, Bassoon) 



1 :2:0. First semester. 
1 :2:0. Second semester. 

Vi :1 :0. Second semester. 
Vi :1 :0. Second semester. 



Music 25. Woodwind I. 

A study of the clarinet. 

Music 26. Woodwind II. 

A study of the remainder of the above listed instruments. 

String Instruments (Violin, Viola, 'Cello, String Bass) 

Music 37. String I. 

A study of all of the above listed instruments. 

Music 38. String II. 

A continuation of the study of all of the above listed instruments. 



1 :2:0. First semester. 
1 :2:0. Second semester. 

1 :2:0. First semester. 
1:2:0. Second semester. 



95 



Instrumental Seminar. Vi :1 :0 or 1 2:0. First or second semes! 

Application of specific techniques to problems of class instruction. 
Music 41 .1—41 .2. Brass Prerequisite: Music 17. 

Music 41 .3 — 41.4. Percussion Prerequisite: Music 48. 

Music 41.5—41 .6. String Prerequisite: Music 38. 

Music 41. 7 — 41.8. Woodwind Prerequisite: Music 26. 

V. MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

Opportunities for individual performance in a group experience are provided by mu 
organizations. Membership in the organizations is open on an audition basis to all students 
the College. 

Music 101a — 101b. Symphonic Band. 0:2:0. First semester. 0:3:0. Second semest 

The Blue and White Marching Band of L.V.C. is noted for its half-time performances duri 
the football season. The Symphonic Band of ninety pieces plays several concerts during the ye 
both on and off campus. The finest original music for band is performed, as well as arranj 
ments of the standard repertoire. Membership in the band is dependent upon the ability 
the applicant and the instrumentation of the band. Students from all departments of the colle 
are invited to audition. 

Music 102a— 102b. All-Girl Band. 0:1:0 per semest 

L.V.C. is unique in having one of the few all-girl bands in the nation. All girls in t 
college with ability as instrumentalists are welcome to audition. Membership depends up> 
proficiency and the needs of the band regarding instrumentation. 

Music 103a — 103b. Symphony Orchestra. 0:3:0. First semester. 0:2:0. Second semest 

The Symphony Orchestra is an organization of symphonic proportions maintaining a hi 
standard of performance. A professional interpretation of a wide range of standard orchest 
literature is insisted upon. 

Music 104a — 104b. Concert Choir. 0:3:0 per semest 

The Concert Choir is composed of approximately forty voices, selected by audition, i 
phases of choral literature are studied intensively. In addition to on-campus programs and a 
pearances in neighboring communities, the Concert Choir makes an annual tour. 

Music 105a — 105b. College Chorus. 0:1 :0 per semest 

The Chorus provides an opportunity to study and participate in the presentation of cho 
literature of major composers from all periods of music history. It is open to all students wl 
are interested in this type of musical performance and who have had some experience 
singing. 

Music 106a — 106b. Beginning Ensemble. 0:1 :0 per semest 

A training band and orchestra in which students play secondary instruments and becor 
acquainted with elementary band and orchestral literature. Opportunity is given for advanc 
conducting students to gain experience in conducting. 

Music 113a — 113b. Chapel Choir. 0:1:0 per semest 

The Chapel Choir is composed of approximately forty voices, selected by audition. The m£ 
function of this choir is to provide musical leadership in the weekly chapel services. In additic 
seasonal services of choral music are prepared. 

Instrumental Small Ensembles. 0:1 :0 per semest 

Open to the advanced player on an audition basis. 
Music 107a— 107b. String Quartet. 
Music 108a— 108b. String Trio. 
Music 109a— 109b. Clarinet Choir. 
Music 110a — 110b. Woodwind Quintet. 

96 



Music 111a — 111b. Brass Ensemble. 
Music 112a — 112b. Percussion Ensemble. 

VI. THE HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF MUSIC 

Music 19. History and Appreciation of Music. 3:3:0. Either semester. 

A course for the non-music major designed to increase the individual's musical perceptive- 
ness. Through selective, intensive listening, the student develops concepts of musical materials 
and techniques. The vocabulary thus gained is utilized in a survey of western music from the 
Middle Ages to the present. 

Music 30a— 30b. History of Music. 3:3:0 per semester. 

A survey course of the history of western music. Emphasis is placed on the various 
stylistic developments which have occurred from one era to another, on the composers who 
have been responsible for these developments, and the music written during these various eras 
illustrating these stylistic trends. For this purpose, extensive use of recordings is made a part 
of the course. The first semester includes the development of music up to the Baroque era, the 
second semester from the Baroque to the present. 

Music 32. Music Literature. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A study of music literature for elementary, secondary, and adult levels. Interpretation of, 
response to, and appreciation of music with attention directed to musical elements. Emphasis 
is placed on instrumental literature. 

Music 41. Music Literature Seminar (on special announcement). 3 :3 :0. 

A study of music literature in depth, according to styles, form and techniques of the 
various musical periods. Designed especially for the B.A. candidate in Music with application 
of accumulated knowledge in theory, music history, and musical form. Emphasis is upon 
orchestral literature. 

VII. CONDUCTING 

Music 35. Conducting I. 2:2:0. Second semester. 

Principles of conducting and the technique of the baton are presented. Each student con- 
ducts vocal and instrumental ensembles made up of the class personnel. 

Music 45. Conducting II. 2:2:0. First semester. 

A continuation of Conducting I with emphasis on practical work with small vocal and instru- 
mental groups. Rehearsal techniques are discussed and applied through individual experience. 

VIII. INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

Music 131-132. Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 1 iVi :0 per semester. 

The work in the foregoing fields is organized from the standpoint of the development and 
musicianship in the individual student. The work continues through eight semesters and assures 
a well-rounded and many-sided acquaintance with various musical techniques. 

Music 141-142. Voice, Piano, Organ, Orchestral and Band Instruments. 2 :1 :0 per semester. 

(Private study in major performance; for B.A. Music Majors only) 
A charge is made for the second half-hour of instruction. 

IX. PREPARATORY COURSES 

The Department of Music sponsors preparatory courses adapted to children of 
elementary or high school age. Both adults and children are admitted at any stage of 
advancement. 

Instruction, either private or in class, is offered in piano, voice, and all instruments 
of the band and orchestra. A desirable number for class instruction is from four to 
six students. 

97 



THE STUDENT RECITALS 

The student recitals are of inestimable value to all students in acquainting th 
with a wide range of the best musical literature, in developing musical taste and ( 
crimination, in affording experience in appearing before an audience, and in gain 
self-reliance as well as nerve control and stage demeanor. 

Students at all levels of performance appear in these student recitals. 

PIPE ORGANS 

The Department of Music contains four Moller organs for private instruction a 
individual practice: one 4-manual, one 3-manual, two 2-manual instruments, anc 
3-manual 62-rank Schantz organ in the College Chapel, installed in 1968. 




98 




PHILOSOPHY 



Professor Ehrhart; Assistant Professor Thompson 

The objective of the Department of Philosophy is to provide students with an oppor- 
tunity to study the philosophical heritage of the Western World and to become ac- 
quainted with the major problems which leading philosophers have raised and at- 
tempted to resolve. 

Major: A total of twenty-four hours is required of the philosophy major. Besides the 
courses listed below, Political Science 40 (Political Theory) may be taken to satisfy the 
requirements. 






INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students wishing to participate in the Independent Study program in the department 
may do so by fulfilling the following requirements: (1) achieve high academic stand- 
ing in departmental courses; (2) submit a paper in connection with a course beyond 
the first year courses; (3) apply and receive approval for participation in Independent 
Study from the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College by the end of 
the first semester of the junior year; (4) prepare an essay of 10,000 words or more 
under the direction of a member of the department to be submitted by April 1 of the 
senior year; (5) defend the essay before a faculty committee selected by the depart- 
mental chairman and the Dean of the College. 

On the basis of his performance in the essay and oral examination, the departmental 
chairman and the Dean of the College will determine whether or not the candidate is 
to receive departmental honors. 

10. Problems of Philosophy. 3:3:0. First semester. 
An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy and to the ways in which 

leading philosophers have dealt with them. 

11. General Logic. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
An introduction to the rules of clear and effective thinking. Attention is given to the logic 

of meaning, the logic of valid inference, and the logic of factual inquiry. Main emphasis is laid 
upon deductive logic, and students are introduced to the elements of symbolic logic as well as to 
traditional modes of analysis. 



99 



23. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-19] 
This course traces the evolution of Western philosophical thought from its origin in t 

speculations of the Pre-Socratic nature-philosophers to the systematic elaborations of t 
schoolmen of the late Middle Ages. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 10 or consent of the instructor. 

24. Modern Philosophy. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1 9) 
This course follows the development of philosophical thought in the leading thinkers frc 

the Renaissance to the beginning of the Nineteenth Century. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10 and 23 or consent of the instructor. 

30. Ethics. 3:3:0, First semester. Offered 1970-19} 
An inquiry into the central problems of ethics, with an examination of the responses 

major ethical theories to those problems. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 10 or consent of instructor. 

31. Philosophy of Religion. 3:3:0. Second semeste 
A study of the issues raised for philosophy by contemporary religious and theologic 

thought. A critical examination of such problems as faith and reason; the meaning of revel 
tion, symbolism, and language; the arguments for the existence of God; faith and histor 
religion and culture. 

Prerequisite: Philosophy 10 or consent of the instructor. 

35. Twentieth Century Philosophy. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-197 

An examination of the foremost American, British and Continental Philosophers, from 19C 

to the present. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, 11, 23, 24, or consent of instructor. 

40. Metaphysics. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-197 
A detailed consideration of the "theory of reality," as interpreted by representative philost 

phers from the Pre-Socratics to the British and American linguistic analysts, including tr 
twentieth-century phenomenologists. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, 11, 23, 24 and Senior standing; or consent of the instructo 

41. Aesthetics. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-197 
A study of the nature and basis of criticism of works of art. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, Art 12 or Music 19 or consent of the instructor. 

42. Seminar. 2-3 hours credit. Second semeste 
Discussion of selected problems of philosophy. 

Open to upperclassmen only, with consent of instructor. 

45. Epistemology. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-197 

A critical and analytical study of the chief questions involved in "knowing," as formulate 

by thinkers from the time of Plato to the present. 

Prerequisites: Philosophy 10, 11, 23, 24 and Senior standing; or consent of the instructo 



100 




! 



Professors Rhodes and Grimm; Assistant Professors O'Donneli and St. Pierre 

The Department of Physics attempts to develop in the student an increased understand- 
ing of the basic laws of nature as they relate to our physical environment, and to 
indicate the possible extent, as well as the limitations, of our knowledge of the physical 
world. 

The introductory course, Physics 10, is intended for students who wish to take only 
one course in Physics. The sequence of courses beginning with Physics 17 provides 
suitable training for students who anticipate additional work in the physical sciences 
and who are preparing for graduate school, for secondary school teaching, and for 
research and development work in governmental and industrial laboratories. Labora- 
tory work is designed to acquaint the student with the experimental techniques and 
the measuring instruments appropriate to the various areas of investigation, and to 
give experience in the interpretation and communication of the experimental results. 

Mathematics is an essential tool in the study of Physics. The introductory course, 
Physics 10, requires a knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry, but students 
who plan to take other courses in Physics should take the appropriate prerequisite 
mathematics courses as soon as possible. 

Major: Physics 17, 27, 32, 37 or 38, and 40. 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Juniors and seniors who have demonstrated high academic ability may, with the 
permission of the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College, participate in 
the Independent Study program in Physics. Application for admission to the program 
should be made before the end of the junior year. Upon the satisfactory completion 
of an approved experimental or theoretical research project and the formal presenta- 
tion of a research paper before an examining committee, the student will be recom- 
mended to the Dean of the College for graduation with departmental honors. 

10. General College Physics. 4:3:3 per semester. 

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and laws of the various branches of physics, 
including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear 
structure. 



101 



17. Principles of Physics F. 4:3:3 per seme 

A comprehensive introductory course designed for students who desire a more rigo 
mathematical approach to college physics than -is given in Physics 10. Calculus is used throi 
out The first semester is devoted to mechanics, and the second semester to heat, wave mot 
and optics. This course should be followed by Physics 27. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 11. 

27. Principles of Physics II. 4:3:3 per seme , 

A continuation of Physics 17, devoted in the first semester to the study of electricity 

magnetism and in the second semester to the study of modern physics, including the four 

tion of atomic physics, the quantum theory of radiation, the atomic nucleus, radioactivity 

nuclear reactions. 

Prerequisite: Physics 17. 

32. Electricity and Magnetism. 3 .3 :0 per semes 

I he basic definition of electric and magnetic quantities, a study of the electric and magn 

properties of matter, the laws of electric and magnetic fields, the development of Maxw< 

equations, and electromagnetic waves. 

Prerequisites: Physics 27 and Mathematics 21. 

37. Experimental Physics I. 1:0 . 3 semes 
Experimental work in the areas of mechanics, electricity, and optics, with emphasis 

experimental design, measuring techniques, and analysis of data. 
Prerequisite: Physics 27. 

38. Experimental Physics II 1 :0;3 semes 
Experimental work in the areas of high vacuum, electronics, atomic physics, and nucl 

physics, with emphasis on experimental design, measuring techniques, and analysis of data 
Prerequisite: Physics 27. 

40. Analytical Mechanics. 3:3 :0 per semesl 
A rigorous study of the principles of mechanics as applied to the motion of particl 

systems of particles, and rigid bodies, under the action of conservative and dissipative fore 
using the methods of Newton, Lagrange, and Hamilton. 
Prerequisites: Physics 27 and Mathematics 21. 

41. Modern Physics. Q ? n 

a • \ . r 3:3:0 per semest 

• r l g0 c°H S ■ Y modern Physics, beginning with the development of quantum mech; 

ics via the Schroedmger equation, including perturbation and collision theory. The latter port! 
of the course is directed toward the application of quantum mechanics to fundamental proces- 
in atomic and nuclear physics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 32 and 40. 

48. Physics Seminar. -, n 

a '«...j. . .1 •■ . 3:3.0 per semesti 

Ml A . Stuc, y at th e senior level of special topics in physics, to be selected each year from I 
!nH TnM h f rm ° d y. nam "^ statistical mechanics, physical optics, electronics, nuclear physi. 
and solid state physics. The seminar is open to students from any department with appro* 



102 




'SYCHOLOGY 



Professor Love; Associate Professor Felice; Assistant Professors Knarr and Mather 

The courses offered in the Department of Psychology are designed: (1) to develop 
in the student an understanding and appreciation of the biological and environmental 
bases of human behavior and of the role of that behavior in adjustment; (2) to foster 
healthy adjustment through the objective application of psychological principles to 
problems related to personal, vocational, and moral growth; and (3) to furnish a 
theoretical, scientific, and practical acquaintance with principles, methods, and tech- 
niques basic to graduate study and employment in psychology and beneficial in the 
many occupations in which psychology is applied. 

Major: Psychology 20, 43, 44, 45a, 45b, and 35a-b for pre-professional students. With 
approval, six hours of electives may be credited from the following: Biology 22, 32; 
Mathematics 12; other graduate school recommendations. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Independent Study in psychology is planned to permit the capable student to in- 
crease the depth of his understanding in areas of special interest and the general 
scope of his knowledge of psychology. 

In order to participate in Independent Study a psychology major is required to: 
(1) maintain an over-all grade-point average of 2.5, (2) maintain a grade-point average 
of 3.0 in psychology courses, (3) show consistently high intellectual interest and initia- 
tive, (4) receive the approval of the departmental staff and the Dean of the College. 



103 



The core of the program will consist in the investigation of a principal problem i 
ing the junior and senior years, beginning with the study of the literature and culmi 
ing in the design and execution of an empirical study. Results of this project will 
reported and defended during the second semester of the senior year. 

Graduation with Honors in Psychology will depend on the quality of performanc 
the specified activities, on the maintenance of the grade-point averages specified 
admission to the program, and on the final approval of the departmental staff and 
Dean of the College. 

20. General Psychology. 3:3:0. Either seme: 
A study of principles of psychology and of psychological method. 

21. Psychology of Childhood. 3:3:0. First seme! 
A study of the psychological development of the child from the beginning of life 

adolescence. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

23. Educational Psychology. 3:3:0. Either semes 

A study of the learner and of the learning process. 
Required for elementary and secondary certification. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

25. General Experimental Psychology. 3 hours credit per semes 

Introduction to experimental methods through the study of major areas of psychology. " 

first semester is concerned with learning and motivation. Second semester is concerned w 

sensation and perception. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

31. Psychology of Adolescence. 3:3:0. Second semes 
A study of the psychological development in the adolescent period. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

32. Psychology of Abnormal Behavior. 3 hours credit. First semes 
An introduction to the behavior disorders. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

33. Social Psychology. 3 hours credit. Second semes 
A study of the social and cultural determinants of behavior. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 20; junior or senior standing or permission of staff. 

35a — 35b. Research Design and Statistical Analysis. 3 hours credit per semes 

A study of principles of research design and statistical analysis; planning and execution 

direct studies. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 20 and 25. 

41. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 3 hours credit. Second semesl 

An introduction to current methods of diagnosis and psychotherapy of behavior problei 

and to the applications of psychology in clinical situations. 

Prerequisites: Psychology 20 and 32, senior standing or permission of the staff. 

104 



43. Personality. 

A study of the major contemporary theories of personality. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 

44. Physiological Psychology. 

A study of the physiological determinants of behavior. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 20. 



3:3:0. First semester. 



3 hours credit. First semester. 



1 to 3 hours credit per semester. 



45a— 45b. Seminar. 

Independent study and research. 

Prerequisites: A major in psychology and senior standing; or permission of the staff. 




105 




Us 



RELIGION 



Professor Wethington; Associate Professor Troutman; Assistant Professors Bemesderfi 
Cantrell and Stambach 

The aim of this department is to provide opportunity for the study of the meaniij 
of man's religious experience. 

The department seeks to orient the student to a Christian world view, providing \ 
understanding of the Scriptures and the heritage of the Christian church as a meai 
to this end, as well as the enhancing of Christian living as a dynamic experience. 

Professionally, basic courses are offered to students preparing for the Christian mil 
istry, the world mission field, the teaching of religion, and other church vocations. 

Major: A total of twenty-four semester hours is required, including Religion 44 an 
45. A total of six hours of New Testament or Hellenistic Greek (Greek 21) as well < 
Philosophy of Religion (Philosophy 31) may be counted toward a Religion major. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Students wishing to participate in the Independent Study program in the departmer 
may do so by fulfilling the following requirements: (1) achieve high academic standin 
in departmental courses; (2) submit a paper in connection with a course beyond th 
first year courses; (3) apply and receive approval for participation in Independer 
Study from the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College by the end of th 
first semester of the junior year; (4) prepare an essay of 10,000 words or more unde 
the direction of a member of the department to be submitted by April 1 of the senic) 
year: (5) defend the essay before a faculty committee selected by the departmenta 
chairman and the Dean of the College. 

On the basis of his performance in the essay, and oral examination, the departmenta 
chairman and the Dean of the College will determine whether or not the candidate i 
to receive departmental honors. 

12. Introduction to Biblical Thought. 3:3:0 First semester 

An examination of some of the basic themes of Biblical religion in relation to their his 
torical context and their contemporary implications. 

106 



13. Introduction to the Christian Faith. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A systematic inquiry into the areas of religious language, religious knowledge, and the 
doctrines of God, man, Christ, and the Church. 

20. The Prophets. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 

A study of the lives and writings of the Old Testament prophets, and an analysis of their 
contributions to Hebrew-Christian religious thought. 

Prerequisite: Religion 12. 

22. Religion in America. 3:3:0. Second semester. 

A study of contemporary Judaism, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism in the United 
States, including a brief historical background of each. Some attention is given to the various 
religious sects and cults. 

No prerequisites. 

30. Life and Epistles of Paul. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

A study of the life, writings, and theological thought of Paul and their relationship to the 
practices, problems, and beliefs of the early church. 

Prerequisite: Religion 12 or 13. 

32. Life and Teachings of Jesus. 3:3:0. First semester. 
An intensive study of the life and message of Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. 
Prerequisite: Religion 12 or 13. 

33. Christian Ethics. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
A systematic analysis of the implications of the Christian faith both for personal moral 

decision, and for social policy in such areas as government and political life, work and the 
economic order. 

Prerequisite: Religion 12 or 13. 

40. Introduction to Christian Nurture. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

An investigation of some of the principles and problems of religious education as they 
are related to higher education, the public school, the church school, and the home. 

Prerequisite: Religion 12 or 13. 

42. World Religions. 3:3:0. First semester. 

An examination of the rise and development of religion along with a study of the ideas, 
and cultic and ethical practices of the great world faiths. Special attention given to world 
religions. 

No prerequisites. 

44. Seminar in Classical Religious Thinkers. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
An intensive study of the thought of such classical religious thinkers as Augustine, Aquinas, 

Luther, and others. 

Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological students; others by 
permission of the chairman of the department. 

45. Seminar in Contemporary Religious Problems. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A study of selected problems arising from recent theological efforts. Research methodology 

is stressed. 

Required of majors and strongly recommended for all pre-theological students; others by 
permission of the chairman of the department. 

RUSSIAN 

See Foreign Languages, page 80. 



107 




CRfMINOf.Di 





SOCIOLOGY 



Acting Chairman Fehr; Assistant Professor White 

The courses in the Department of Sociology have been designed: (1) to develop thj 
student's understanding of the social structure and the social relationships in an! 
through which man functions; (2) to provide preliminary training for those who art 
planning to enter the field of social, religious, and community work; and (3) to furnisi 
basic background knowledge for the pursuance of graduate work in Sociology. 

Major: Sociology 20, 21, 30, 31, 33, 34, 43, and 45. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY 

The departmental Independent Study program is designed to provide stimulation tc 
capable students to undertake and carry through academic work of high quality. Inde 
pendent Study is planned as an integral part of the student's major program rather tha 
viewed as work superimposed upon it, and is set in the framework of a major area c 
concentration. 

1. The student should apply for admission to the Independent Study program at th 
beginning of the second semester of the sophomore year. This would enable hin 
to undertake preliminary work for one year before being admitted to full status ii 
the program at the beginning of the second semester of the junior year. 

2. To enter the Independent Study program a student must have a high genera 
standing in the College and the approval of the departmental chairman and thi 
Dean of the College no later than the end of the first semester of the junior year 
An average grade of 3.0 in all courses in the student's major area of concentratior 
is required as is an average of 3.0 while he is pursuing his work as a candidate fo 
departmental honors. The student must, in addition, fulfill any other specific require 
ments of the department. 

3. The student in Independent Study will prepare an essay of ten thousand words o 
more under the direction of the departmental chairman to be submitted by the enc 
of the first semester of his senior year. It shall be defended in a manner approvec 
by the departmental chairman and the Dean of the College. 

4. The Independent Study of each student shall be tested by a special oral examina 

tion. On the basis of his performance in the essay and oral examination, the depart- 
mental chairman and the Dean of the College will determine whether or not the 
candidate is to receive departmental honors. 



108 



20. Introductory Sociology. 3:3:0. First semester. 
The study of social life and human values expressed in group activities and their interre- 
lationships. This course acquaints the students with primary concepts in the field of Sociology. 
Particular attention is given to: contributions from cultural anthropology and social psychology; 
social stratification; racial and ethnic groups, the modern community; basic human institutions; 
major social forces. 

21. Modern Social Problems. 3:3:0. Second semester. 
An application of sociological principles to problems such as: poverty, delinquency, crime; 

family discord; industrial, race, and nationality conflicts; mental disorders. 

22. Marriage and the Family. 2:2:0. Second semester. 
The American family studied in cross-cultural perspective. Special emphasis is placed upon 

functions of the family as institution and matrix of personality. The influence of the American 
value system is examined. 

30. Criminology. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
An analysis of the interplay of forces which result in criminal behavior. Case histories are 

used to illustrate the individual and social forces in criminal careers. Emphasis is given to 
organized crime as a social phenomenon in American life, the administration of American 
criminal justice, developments in penology and treatment of offenders, and programs of crime 
prevention. Changing aspects of juvenile delinquency are explored. 

31. Introduction to Social Work. 3:3:0 per semester. Offered 1970-1971. 
A pre-professional course dealing with the nature and requirements of the fields of social 

work. Observation of the work of private and public agencies in this field is required. 
Prerequisites: Sociology 20 and 21. 

33. Social Institutions. 3:3:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 
Analysis of the structure and function of major social institution, such as religion, mass cul- 
ture and mass media. Attention is directed to the impact of institutional expecations upon the 
individual. 

34. Methods of Social Research. 3:3:0. Fi rst semester. Offered 1 971 -1 972. 
An introduction to the basic principles of research design and to the primary techniques 

utilized in the collection and analysis of data for testing sociological hypotheses. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 20 and 21; open only to junior and senior majors in Sociology and 
to others by permission of the staff. 
40. Population. 2:2:0. First semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

A study of the size, growth, composition, and distribution of the peoples of the earth. 
Emphasis is placed on problems occasioned by urban development. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 20. 
43. Development of Sociological Theory. 3:3:0. Second semester. Offered 1971-1972. 

A critical appraisal of the works of some American and European sociologists. Particular 
emphasis is given to the similarities and differences in basic assumptions and conclusions of 
leading writers since 1900. 

Prerequisites: Sociology 20 and 21. 
45. Senior Seminar. 2:2:0 per semester. 

Emphasis upon coordination of previous course work and understanding of the basic con- 
tributions of Sociology in relation to other behavioral sciences. Significant reading, critical 
discussion, written analysis, and research projects, with these aims in view. Adapted to the 
individual needs of students. 

To supplement course work, direct experience in a social work practicum for students who 
have an expressed interest in the social work field. Cooperating social agencies include: the 
Lebanon County Board of Assistance; Family and Children's Service, Lebanon; and the Veterans 
Administration, R.D. 1, Lebanon. Participation by permission of the appropriate departmental 
chairman. 

Senior Sociology majors or with permission of the departmental chairman. 

SPANISH 

See Foreign Languages, page 80. 

109 



Di recto rie 




HE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1969-1970 



OFFICERS: 



President Emeritus E. N. Funkhouser 

President Allan W. Mund 

First Vice-President Richard P. Zimmerman 

Second Vice-President Lawton W. Shroyer 

Secretary E. D. Williams, jr. 

Treasurer Samuel K. Wengert 



1EMBERS:* 



EFFERSON C. BARNHART (1972) 

A.B., LLB. 

Partner — McNees, Wallace, and Nurick 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
SAMUEL C BOYER (1971) 

Owner & Operator 

Boyer's Jewelry Store 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
"WILLIAM D. BRYSON (1972) 

LLD. 

Retired Executive — Walter W. Moyer Co. 

Ephrata, Pennsylvania 
WOODROW S. DELLINGER (1972) 

B.S., M.D. 

General Practitioner 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 
PAUL C. EHRHART (1972) 

A.B., M.A. 

Guidance Director— Penn Manor High Sch. 

Millersville, Pennsylvania 
DeWITT M. ESSICK (1972) 

A.B., M.S. 

Manager, Management Development & 
Personnel Services 

Armstrong Cork Co., General Offices 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
ALEX J. FEHR (1971) 

A.B., MA, Ph.D. 



* Elected by Church Conference 

* Trustee-at-Large 

t Alumni Trustee-at-Large 
t Faculty Trustee-at-Large 



Acting Chairman of Department of 
Sociology; Associate Professor of 
Political Science 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

*DONALD N. FRIDINGER (1970) 
A.B.. B.D. 

Pastor— United Methodist Church 
Elkton, Virginia 

*MRS. D. DWIGHT (KATHRYN MOWREY) 
GROVE (1971) 
A.B. 

Housewife 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

*J. PAUL GRUVER (1972) 
A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Pastor— United Methodist Church 
Dayton, Virginia 

THOMAS W. GUINIVAN (1970) 

A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Pastor— First United Methodist Church 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 
*CALVIN B. HAVERSTOCK, JR. (1971) 

A.B., B.D. 

Pastor— First United Methodist Church 

York, Pennsylvania 

*G. EDGAR HERTZLER (1970) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 
Pastor— Otterbein United Methodist 

Church 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



111 



*CARL W. HISER (1971) 

A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Retired Pastor— United Methodist 
Church 

Tampa, Florida 
tMRS. GLADYS B. HOLMAN (1970) 

B.A. 

Housewife 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
*PAUL E. HORN (1970) 

A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Program Director, Central Pennsylvania 
Conference 

United Methodist Church 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
*MARK J. HOSTETTER (1970) 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 

Pastor -St. Paul's United Methodist 
Church 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
**HERMAN W. KAEBNICK (1972) 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D., L.H.D. 

Resident Bishop — Harrisburg Area 

United Methodist Church 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
*GERALD D. KAUFFMAN (1970) 

A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Pastor— Grace United Methodist Church 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
*LESTER M. KAUFFMAN (1972) 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 

Pastor — St. Paul's United Methodist 
Church 

Hagerstown, Maryland 
*CLAIR C. KREIDLER (1972) 

A.B., D.D. 

Superintendent — York District 

Central Pennsylvania Conference 

United Methodist Church 

York, Pennsylvania 
*GORDON S. KUNKEL (1972) 

Office Manager — John E. Baker Co. 

York, Pennsylvania 
tJAMES H. LEATHEM (1971) 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Sc.D. 

Professor of Zoology & Director of the 

* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 
t Alumni Trustee-at-Large 
t Faculty Trustee-at-Large 



Bureau of Biological Research 

Rutgers, The State University 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 
tJEAN O. LOVE (1970) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Chairman of Department of Psychology; 
Professor of Psychology 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
*ROBERT W. LUTZ (1970) 

A.B. 

Retired Executive— Blumenthal-Kahn 
Electric Company 

Owings Mills, Maryland 
*THOMAS S. MAY (1972) 

B.S., B.D., D.D. 

Pastor — State Street United Methodist 
Church 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
*WARREN F. MENTZER (1970) 

A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Superintendent— Lebanon, Reading Distri 

Eastern Pennsylvania Conference 

United Methodist Church 

Mt. Gretna, Pennsylvania 
**MALCOLM MEYER (1970) 

B.S. 

President — Certain-Teed Products Corp. 

Ardmore, Pennsylvania 

**ALLAN W. MUND (1972) 

LL.D. 

Retired Chairman, Board of Directors 

Ellicott Machine Corporation 

Baltimore, Maryland 
^HOWARD A. NEIDIG (1970) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Chairman of Department of Chemistry; 
Professor of Chemistry 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
**RAYMOND M. OBERHOLTZER (1971) 

B.C.S. 

Retired — United States Government 

Washington, D.C. 

*HAROLD S. PEIFFER (1971) 
A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 
Pastor — Covenant United Methodist 

Church 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania 



112 



^HAROLD H. QUICKEL (1971) 

A.B. 

Purchasing Agent— Hamilton Watch Co. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
^WILLIAM B. RAMEY (1971) 

B.A., B.D. 

Pastor— Highland Park United Methodist 
Church 

Roanoke, Virginia 
**ROBERT H. REESE (1972) 

Retired President 

H.B. Reese Candy Co., Inc. 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 
tJACOB L. RHODES (1972) 

B.S., Ph.D. 

Chairman of Department of Physics; 
Professor of Physics 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
*MELVIN S. RIFE (1971) 

Treasurer — Schmidt & Ault Paper Co. 

Division, St. Regis Paper Co. 

York, Pennsylvania 
*RALPH M. RITTER (1970) 

Treasurer — Ritter Bros., Inc. 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
tF. ALLEN RUTHERFORD, JR. (1972) 

B.S., C.P.A. Arthur Young 

Richmond, Virginia 
*H. JACK SELTZER (1972) 

President — Seltzer's Lebanon Bologna Co., 
Inc. 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
*DANIEL L. SHEARER (1971) 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M., D.D. 

Superintendent— New Cumberland District 

Central Pennsylvania Conference 

United Methodist Church 

New Cumberland, Pennsylvania 
*LAWTON W. SHROYER (1972) 

President — Shamokin Dress Co. & 
Shroyer's Inc. 

Shamokin, Pennsylvania 
*PAUL J. SLONAKER (1972) 

B.S., B.D. 

Pastor— First United Methodist Church 

Winchester, Virginia 

* Elected by Church Conference 
** Trustee-at-Large 
f Alumni Trustee-at-Large 
t Faculty Trustee-at-Large 



**HORACE E. SMITH (1971) 

A.B., LLB. 

Attorney at Law 

York, Pennsylvania 
*ARTHUR W. STAMBACH (1972) 

B.A., B.D., D.D. 

Associate Program Director 

Central Pennsylvania Conference 

United Methodist Church 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 
*PAUL E. STAMBACH (1971) 

A.B., B.D., S.T.M. 

Pastor— Otterbein United Methodist 
Church 

Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania 
fE. PETER STRICKLER (1971) 

Strickler Insurance Agency 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
JC. F. JOSEPH TOM (1971) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Chairman of Department of Economics & 
Business Administration; Professor of 
Economics & Business Administration 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
**WOODROW W. WALTEMYER (1972) 
*CHARLES B.WEBER (1970) 

A.B., B.D. 

Pastor— First United Methodist Church 

Martinsburg, West Virginia 
**SAMUEL K. WENGERT (1972) 

B.S. 

President — Wengert's Dairy 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
**E. D. WILLIAMS, JR. (1972) 
**JOHN L. WORRILOW (1972) 

B.A. 

Secretary — Lebanon Steel Foundry 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
**RICHARD P. ZIMMERMAN (1972) 

Chairman of the Board 

National Valley Bank & Trust Co. 

Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 

Honorary Trustee 

PARKE H. LUTZ 

Retired Vice-president 
Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc. 
Member — State Board of Education 
Denver, Pennsylvania 



113 



rrustees Emeritus 

E. N. FUNKHOUSER 

A.B., LLD. 

Retired President 

Funkhouser Corporation 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Member, Board of Directors 

Ruberoid Corporation 

Baltimore, Maryland 
ALBERT WATSON 

LL.D. 

Retired President 

Bowman & Company 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
E. D. WILLIAMS, SR. 

A.B., LLD. 

Retired Executive 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

STANDING COMMITTEES 
Executive Committee: 

Frederick P. Sample, Chairman; Paul E. Horn, 
Vice Chairman; Mark J. Hostetter, Secretary; 
Paul C. Ehrhart; DeWitt M. Essick; Calvin B. 
Haverstock, Jr.; G. Edgar Hertzler; Lester M. 
Kauffman; Robert W. Lutz; Allan W. Mund; 
Warren F. Mentzer; Jacob L. Rhodes; Lawton 
W. Shroyer; Samuel K. Wengert. 
Finance Committee: 

Richard P. Zimmerman (1971), Chairman; 
Allan W. Mund, Vice Chairman; Samuel K. 
Wengert, Treasurer; Frederick P. Sample; E. 
D. Williams, Jr. (1971), Secretary; Raymond 
M. Oberholtzer (1971); Horace E. Smith 
(1971); William D. Bryson (1970); Malcolm 
Meyer (1970); Melvin S. Rife (1970); Ralph M. 
Ritter (1970); Hermann W. Kaebnick (1972); 
Robert H. Reese (1972); Lawton W. Shroyer 
(1972). 

Faculty Administrative Committee: 
Jefferson C. Barnhart, Chairman; DeWitt M. 
Essick; Paul E. Horn; James H. Leathern; War- 
ren F. Mentzer; Allan W. Mund; Howard A. 
Neidig; Melvin S. Rife; Frederick P. Sample. 
Auditing Committee: 

William D. Bryson, Chairman; Woodrow S. 
Dellinger; H. Jack Seltzer. 

Buildings & Grounds Committee: 

Melvin S. Rife, Chairman; Gladys B. Holman; 



Gordon S. Kunkel; Frederick P. Sample; San 
uel K. Wengert; E. D. Williams, Jr. 
Public Relations Committee: 

Gerald D. Kauffman, Chairman; Clair C. Kreic 
ler; Jean O. Love; Thomas S. May; Harold I 
Peiffer; Paul E. Stambach; Harold H. Quicke 
Nominating Committee: 
Allan W. Mund, Chairman; DeWitt M. EssicM 
Alex J. Fehr; Melvin S. Rife; Daniel L. Shearei 
John L. Worrilow. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 
Committee on Church Support: 

Paul C. Ehrhart, Chairman; Thomas V\ 
Guinivan; Calvin B. Haverstock, Jr.; G. Edga 
Hertzler; Paul E. Horn; Gerald D. Kauffman 
Warren F. Mentzer; Melvin S. Rife; Lawton W 
Shroyer; Arthur W. Stambach; Samuel K[ 
Wengert. 

Building Committee: 

Melvin S. Rife, Chairman; DeWitt M. Essick 
co-chairman; Barnard H. Bissinger; Williarr 
D. Bryson; Martha C. Faust; James H. Leathern 
Jean O. Love; George R. Marquette; Earl R 
Mezoff; Howard A. Neidig; Jacob L. Rhodes 
Robert C. Riley; Lawton W. Shroyer; Rober 
W. Smith; Samuel K. Wengert; E. D. Williams 
Jr.; Paul L. Wolf; Glenn H. Woods. 
Committee for Self Evaluation: 
Richard P. Zimmerman, Chairman; Jeffersor 
C. Barnhart; Carl Y. Ehrhart; G. Edgar Hertzler, 
James H. Leathern; Earl R. Mezoff; Melvin S 
Rife; Robert C. Riley; C. F. Joseph Tom. 
Committee for Chapel 
Policy and Program: 

Gerald D. Kauffman, Chairman; Pierce A. 
Getz; Thomas W. Guinivan; Calvin B. Haver- 
stock, Jr.; George R. Marquette; L. Elbert 
Wethington; James A. Grube (student); 
Robert G. Holbrook (student); Elizabeth A. 
Robinson (student). 

Ex-officio - President, Dean of the College, 
Chaplain, Chairman of the Board 

Committee on By-Laws: 

Jefferson C. Barnhart, Chairman; William D. 
Bryson; Paul E. Horn; James H. Leathern; 
Warren F. Mentzer; Howard A. Neidig; Rich- 
ard P. Zimmerman; Ex-officio — Allan W. 
Mund, Frederick P. Sample. 



114 




ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY 1969-1970 



3FFICES OF ADMINISTRATION 
3FFICE OF THE PRESIDENT: 

: REDER!CK P. SAMPLE, 1968-; 
President. 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1952; M.Ed., 
Western Maryland College, 1956; D.Ed., 
The Pennsylvania State University, 1968; 
Pd.D., Albright College, 1968. 

vtRS. ELSIE M. MOYER, Secretary. 

Office of the Assistant to the President 

EARL R. MEZOFF, 1963-; 
Assistant to the President, 7963-, Vice 
President, 1967— 

A.B. Thiel College, 1947; M.A., Michigan 
State University, 1948; D.Ed., The Penn- 
sylvania State University, 1965. 

MRS. ELOISE J. MILLER, Secretary. 

ACADEMIC: 

Office of the Dean of the College 

CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-; 
Dean of the College, 1960—; 
Vice President, 1967—. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1940; B.D., 
United Theological Seminary, 1943; Ph.D., 
Yale University, 1954. 



RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-51; Feb. 1953—; 
Assistant Dean of the College, 1967— 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1942; A.M., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ph.D., 
1962. 

MISS JEANETTE E. BENDER, Secretary. 

}{ Admissions 

D. CLARK CARMEAN, 1933-; 
Director of Admissions, 1949—. 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1926; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1932. 

GREGORY G. STANSON, 1966-; 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions, 

1968-. 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1963; M.Ed., 

University of Toledo, 1966. 

DIANE K. BOTT, 1968-. 
Counselor in Admissions. 
B.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1968. 

MRS. PATRICIA M. GILLO, Secretary 

MRS. S. ESTHER LINGLE, Secretary 



115 



Office of the Registrar 

RALPH S. SHAY, 1948-1951; Feb. 1953-; 

Registrar, 1967-. 
MRS. RHETA M. KREIDER, Secretary. 
MRS. MARION G. LOY, Secretary. 
MRS. SALLY A. SAPONSKY, Secretary 

Faculty 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931—; 
Secretary of the Faculty, 1933— 

Library 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1947-; 
Librarian, 1956—; 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1924; M.A., 
Princeton University, 1928; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1935; A.B. in Library Science, 
University of Michigan, 1947. 

MRS. FRANCES T. FIELDS, 1947-; 
Cataloging Librarian. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; A.B. 
in Library Science, University of Michigan, 
1947; M.A., Universidad de San Carlos de 
Guatemala, 1960. 

MRS. ALICE S. DIEHL, 1966-; 

Assistant in Cataloging and Reference. 
A.B., Smith College, 1956; B.S., Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, 1957; M.L.S., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1966. 

MRS. ELOISE P. BROWN, 1961-; 
Cataloging Assistant. 

B.S., in Library Science, Simmons College, 
1946. 

MRS. FERNE M. STECKMAN, Secretary. 
Chapel 

MISS SUSAN J. SMITH, Secretary. 

Engle Hall 

MRS. MARY ANN E. FISHER, Secretary. 
Lynch Memorial Building 

MISS EILEEN F. KRAUSE, Secretary. 

Science Hall 

MRS. BERNICE K. LILES, Secretary. (Grants) 
MRS. HEATHER P. ROSEN, Secretary. 



South Hall 

MRS. SARAH E. DETTRA, Secretary. 

112 College Avenue 

MRS. ELIZABETH C. MICHIELSEN, Secretary 

STUDENT AFFAIRS: 
Student Personnel Office 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE, 1952-; 
Dean of Men, 1956—. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A. 
Columbia University, 1951; Ed.D., Temple 
University, 1967. 

MRS. ESTHER A. KLINE, Secretary, Dean of 
Men 

MISS MARTHA C. FAUST, 1957-; 
Dean of Women. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.A.J 
Syracuse University, 1950. 

MRS. DORIS L. FAKE, Secretary, Dean of. 

Women. 
MRS. KATHRYN E. ROHLAND, Head Resident,] 

Mary Capp Green Hall. 

MRS. ELIZABETH C. OTT, Head Resident, 
Vickroy Hall. 

MRS. VIOLET KREIDER, Hostess, Carnegie 
Lounge. 

MRS. MARY E. RHINE, Hostess, Carnegie 
Lounge. 

MRS. NORA M. TEAHL, Hostess, Carnegie 
Lounge. 

Health Service 

P. LAURENCE KREIDER, 1966-; 
College Physician. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1953; M.D., Tem- 
ple University School of Medicine, 1957. 

MRS. MARGIE M. YEISER, R.N., 1967-; 
Head Nurse. 

Harrisburg Polyclinic Hospital School of 
Nursing. 

MISS JUDY L. CREEGER, R.N., Resident Nurse. 

MISS ELAINE L GERHARD, R.N., Resident 
Nurse. 



116 



ffice of the Chaplain 

MES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959- ; 

College Chaplain. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1936; B.D., 

United Theological Seminary, 1939; S.T.M., 

Lutheran Theological Seminary, Phila., 1945; 

S.T.D., Temple University, 1951. 

ISS SUSAN J. SMITH, Secretary. 

ffice of Athletics 

'ILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961-; 
Director of Athletics. 

B.S., Washington and Lee University, 1954; 
M.Ed., University of Pennsylvania, 1960. 
iISS EILEEN F. KRAUSE, Secretary. 

oaching Staff 

HOMAS W. ALLMON, 1969-; 

Assistant Football Coach. 
I B.S., West Chester State College, 1959. 
j. ROGER GAECKLER, 1969-; 
! Basketball Coach; Assistant Lacrosse Coach. 
IRS. E. ELIZABETH GARMAN, 1964-; 

Women's Basketball Coach. 
IEORGE N. KOLARAC, 1968-; 

Assistant Football Coach. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1957. 

;eorge p. mayhoffer, 1955-; 

).V. Basketball Coach; Track Coach; Cross 

Country Coach. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; The 

Pennsylvania State University, 1955. 
VILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961—; 

Football Coach; Lacrosse Coach. 
IERALD J. PETROFES, 1963-; 

Athletic Trainer; Wrestling Coach; Golf 

Coach. 
lONALD A. ROGERSON, 1968-; 

Assistant Football Coach; Assistant Track 

Coach; Director of Intramurals. 
ARS. JACQUELINE WALTER, 1965-; 

Women's Hockey Coach. 

lOLLEGE RELATIONS AREA: 

)evelopment Office 

ROBERT M. WONDERLING, 1967-; 
Director of Development. 
B.S., Clarion State College, 1953; M.Ed., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1958. 



JOHN C. McFADDEN, 1969-; 

Assistant Director of Development; Co- 
ordinator of Conferences. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1968. 

MRS. PATRICIA A. BINKLEY, Secretary. 

MRS. CHERYL M. WUNDERLICH, Secretary. 

Public Relations Office 

RICHARD V. SHOWERS, 1965-; 

Director of Public Relations. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1942. 
MRS. ANN K. MONTEITH, 1966-; 

Director of Publications. 

A.B., Bucknell University, 1965. 
MRS. EDNA J. CARMEAN, 1961—; 

Staff Assistant. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959. 
MRS. CHRISTINE F. BROUGH, Secretary. 
MISS BARBARA C. RHINE, Secretary. 

Alumni Office 

DAVID M. LONG, 1966-; 

Director of Alumni Relations and Industrial 

Placement. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; M.Ed., 

Temple University, 1961. 
MRS. P. RODNEY KREIDER, 1951—; 

Assistant Director of Alumni Relations, 

1966-. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1922. 
MRS. HELEN L. MILLER, Secretary. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT: 

Office of the Controller 

ROBERT C. RILEY, 1951—; 

Controller, 1962-; 

Vice President, 1967-; 

B.S., in Ed., State College, Shippensburg, 

1941; M.S., Columbia University, 1947; 

Ph.D., New York University, 1962. 
IRWIN R. SCHAAK, 1957-; 

Assistant Controller, 1964—; 

Student Financial Aid Officer, 1967-. 
ROBERT C. HARTMAN, 1969-; 

Accountant. 

B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1962. 
MRS. CLARA P. MILLER, Staff Assistant. 
MRS. KATHLEEN M. HORNBERGER, Secretary. 



117 



MRS. LUCILLE E. HANNIGAN, Switchboard 
Operator. 

MRS. BARBARA A. STERNER, Secretary. 

MRS. ANNA M. GUIDON, Secretary. 

MRS. DORIS L. HOWER, Secretary. 

MRS. DOROTHY E. LAFFERTY, Secretary. 

MRS. ETTA K. UNGER, Secretary. 

ROBERT E. HARNISH, Manager of the Book 
Store and Snack Bar. 
B.A., Randolph Macon College, 1966. 

Buildings and Grounds 

SAMUEL J. ZEARFOSS, 1952-; 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 
1969-. 

AUSTIN C. FLOOD, 1963-; 

Assistant Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds, 1969— 

Food Service 

MRS. MARGARET S. MILLARD, 1951—; 
Dietitian. 

MRS. DERTHA A. HEILMAN, Assistant to the 
Dietitian. 

ROBERT E. HARNISH, Manager of the Snack 
Bar. 

FACULTY 1969-1970 

FREDERICK P. SAMPLE, 1968-; 

President. 
CARL Y. EHRHART, 1947-; 

Dean of the College. 

EMERITI: 

FREDERIC K. MILLER, 1939-1967; 
President Emeritus. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1929; M.A., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1931; Ph.D., 
1948; Litt.D., Muhlenberg College, 1954; 
D.H.L., Dickinson College, 1967; LL.D., 
Lebanon Valley College, 1968; D.Pd., Ge- 
neva College, 1968; LL.D., Waynesburg Col- 
lege, 1969. 

LENA L. LIETZAU, 1930-1952; 
Professor Emeritus of German. 
Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1928. 



V. EARL LIGHT, 1929-1962; 
Professor Emeritus of Biology. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1916; M.J 
1926; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 192 

HELEN ETHEL MYERS, 1921-1956; 
Librarian Emeritus. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1907; Librai 
Science, Drexel Institute of Technology. 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER, 1932-1958; 
Professor Emeritus of Latin Language an 
Literature; Dean Emeritus. 
A.B., Vanderbilt University, 1913; A.M 
1914; Ph.D., 1917; Litt.D., Lebanon Valle 
College, 1962. 

FRANCIS H. WILSON, 1953-1968; 
Professor Emeritus of Biology. 
B.S., Cornell University, 1923; M.S., 1925 
Ph.D., 1931. 

PROFESSORS: 

MRS. RUTH ENGLE BENDER, 1918-1922 
1924-; 

Adjunct Professor of Music Education. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1915; Oberli 
Conservatory; graduate New England Con 
servatory. 

BARNARD H. BISSINGER, 1953-; 
John Evans Lehman Professor of 
Mathematics; Chairman of the Departmen 
of Mathematics. 
A.B., Franklin & Marshall College, 1938 
M.A., Syracuse University, 1940; Ph.D. 
Cornell University, 1943. 

CLOYD H. EBERSOLE, 1953-; 

Professor of Education; Chairman of th< 

Department of Education. 

A.B., Juniata College, 1933; M.Ed., Th< 

Pennsylvania State University, 1941; D.Ed. 

1954. 



Department o 



CARLY. EHRHART, 1947-; 
Acting Chairman of the 
Philosophy. 

DONALD E. FIELDS, 1947-; 

Librarian; Josephine Bittinger Eberly 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature 1 , 



118 



IZABETH M. GEFFEN, 1958-; 

Professor of History; Chairman of the 
, Department of History and Political Science. 
I B.S., in Ed., University of Pennsylvania, 

1934; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1958. 

V\4UEL O. GRIMM, 1912-; 
Professor of Physics. 

B.Pd., State Normal School, Millersville, 
1910; A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1912; 
A.M., 1918; Sc.D., 1942. 

iAN O. LOVE, 1954—; 

Professor of Psychology, Chairman of the 
Department of Psychology. 
A.B., Erskine College, 1941; M.A., Winthrop 
College, 1949; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1953. 

IOWARD A. NEIDIG, 1948-; 
Professor of Chemistry; Chairman of the 
Department of Chemistry. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.S., 
University of Delaware, 1946; Ph.D., 1948. 

ARA ELIZABETH PIEL, Jan., 1960-; 
Professor of Languages; Chairman of the 
Department of Foreign Languages. 
A.B., Chatham College, 1928; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 1929; Ph.D., 1938. 

/\COB L. RHODES, 1957-; 
Professor of Physics; Chairman of the De- 
partment of Physics. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania, 1958. 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE, 1931—; 
Professor of English; Chairman of the De- 
partment of English; Secretary of the Fac- 
ulty. 

B.S., in Ed., University of Kansas, 1922; M.S., 
in Ed., 1925; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1931. 

C. F. JOSEPH TOM, 1954-; 
Professor of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration; Chairman of the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration. 
B.A., Hastings College, 1944; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Chicago, 1947; Ph.D., 1963. 

* Sabbatical leave, second semester, 1969-70. 



**L. ELBERT WETHINGTON, 1963-; 

Professor of Religion; Chairman of the De- 
partment of Religion. 

B.A., Wake Forest College, 1944; B.D., 
Divinity School of Duke University, 1947; 
Ph.D., Duke University, 1949. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 

HILDA M. DAMUS, 1963-; 
Associate Professor of German. 
M.A., University of Berlin and Jena, 1932; 
Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1945. 

MRS. ANNA DUNKLE FABER, 1954-; 
Associate Professor of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1948; M.A., 
University of Wisconsin, 1950; Ph.D., 1954. 

WILLIAM H. FAIRLAMB, 1947-; 

Associate Professor of Piano and Music 
History. 

Mus.B., cum laude, Philadelphia Conserva- 
tory, 1949. 

ALEX J. FEHR, 1951-; 

Associate Professor of Political Science; 

Acting Chairman of the Department of 

Sociology. 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; M.A., 

Columbia University, 1957; Ph.D., Syracuse 

University, 1968. 

ANTONIO FELICE, 1969-; 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 

A.B., Temple University, 1956; A.M., 1957; 

Ph.D., 1961. 

PIERCE A. GETZ, 1959-; 
Associate Professor of Organ. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; M.S.M., 
Union Theological Seminary School of 
Sacred Music, 1953; A.M.D., Eastman School 
of Music, 1967. 

ROBERT E. GRISWOLD, 1960-; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., New Bedford Institute of Technology, 
1954; M.S., in Chemistry, Northeastern 
University, 1956; Ph.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1960. 

** Sabbatical leave, first semester, 1969-70. 



119 



THOMAS A. LANESE, 1954-; 

Associate Professor of Strings, Conducting, 
Theory. 

B.Mus., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1938; fel- 
lowship, Juilliard Graduate School; M.Mus., 
Manhattan School of Music, 1952. 

KARL L. LOCKWOOD, 1959-; 
Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Muhlenberg College, 1951; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1955. 

ROBERT W. SMITH, 1951—; 
Associate Professor of Music Education; 
Chairman of the Department of Music. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1939; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1950. 

FRANK E. STACHOW, 1946-; 
Associate Professor of Theory and Wood- 
winds. 

Diploma, clarinet, Juilliard School of Music; 
B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1946. 

JAMES M. THURMOND, 1954-; 

Associate Professor of Music Education and 
Brass Instruments. 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music, 1931; 
A.B., American University, 1951; M.A., 
Catholic University, 1952; Mus.D., Washing- 
ton College of Music, 1944. 

ELEANOR TITCOMB, 1964-; 
Associate Professor of French. 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1938; M.A., 
Middlebury College, 1943; Ph.D., Radcliffe 
College, 1959. 

PERRY J. TROUTMAN, 1960-; 
Associate Professor of Religion and Greek; 
Acting Chairman of the Department of Reli- 
gion, first semester. 

B.A., Houghton College, 1949; B.D., United 
Theological Seminary, 1952; Ph.D., Boston 
University, 1964. 

HARRY P. WEAST, 1967-; 

Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1937; M.Ed., 

1944; D.Ed., 1953. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 

JEANNE E. ARGOT, 1969-; 
Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.S., Moravian College, 1965; M.S., Lehigh 
University, 1967; Ph.D., 1969. 



JAMES O. BEMESDERFER, 1959-; 

Assistant Professor of Religion; Collect 
Chaplain. 

O. PASS BOLLINGER, 1950-; 
Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; M.Sj 
The Pennsylvania State University, 1937. 

FAY B. BURRAS, 1964-; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1960; M.A 
Smith College, 1961. 

VOORHIS C. CANTRELL, 1968-; 
Assistant Professor of Religion. 
B.A., Oklahoma City University, 1952; B.D| 
Southern Methodist University, 1956; Ph.D ! 
Boston University, 1967. 

CHARLES T. COOPER, 1965-; 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1942; M.A., Mic! 
dlebury College, 1965. 

GEORGE D. CURFMAN, 1961-; 

Assistant Professor of Music Educatior 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1953; M.M 
University of Michigan, 1957. 

ARTHUR L. FORD, 1965-; 
Assistant Professor of English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1959; M.A 
Bowling Green State University, 1960; Ph.D 
1964. 

MRS. JUNE EBY HERR, 1959-; 

Assistant Professor of Elementary Educatior 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1943; M.Ed 
The Pennsylvania State University, 1954. 

MICHAEL G. JAMANIS, 1966-; 
Assistant Professor of Piano. 
B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1962; M.S 
1964. 

RICHARD A. JOYCE, 1966-; 
Assistant Professor of History. 
A.B., Yale University, 1952; M.A., Sari 
Francisco State College, 1963. 

WILLIAM KERR, 1969-; 

Assistant Professor of Education. 
B.A., Swarthmore College, 1950; M.A., Tern 
pie University, 1957; M.A., Montclair State 
College, 1962. 



120 



ARLOTTE F. KNARR, 1966-; 
\ssistant Professor of Psychology. 
J.A., Lebanon Valley College, 1964; M.A., 
<ent State University, 1966. 
:S. MARY B. LEWIN, 1963-; 
\ssistant Professor of Mathematics. 
5.S., in Ed., Millersville State College, 1938; 
vl.S., in Ed., Temple University, 1958; M.A., 
Jniversity of Illinois, 1969. 
IS. SYLVIA R. MALM, 1962-; 
\ssistant Professor of Biology. 
\.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1931; M.A., 
3rown University, 1934; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1937. 
slOD P. MANIYAR, 1969-; 
Assistant Professor of Economics. 
3.A., Gujarat University, 1956; M.A., 1959. 
VIES H. MATHER, 1968-; 
Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
A.B., Westminster College, 1962; M.A., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1965; Ph.D., 1969. 
ILLIAM D. McHENRY, 1961-; 
Assistant Professor of Education; Chairman 
of the Department of Physical Education. 
*S. AGNES B. O'DONNELL, 1961-; 
Assistant Professor of English. 
\.B., Immaculata College, 1948; M.Ed., Tem- 
ple University, 1953; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1968. 
ROBERT O'DONNELL, 1959-; 
Assistant Professor of Physics. 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 
1950; M.S., University of Delaware, 1953. 
ERNER H. PETERKE, 1967-; 
Assistant Professor of Economics. 
B.S., Cornell University, 1959; M.A., Kent 
State University, 1962. 
iRALD J. PETROFES, 1963-; 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
B.S., Kent State University, 1958; M.Ed., 
1962. 

MES N. SPENCER, 1967-; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
B.S., Marshall University, 1963; Ph.D., Iowa 
State University, 1967. 
nITHONY G. ST. PIERRE, 1969-; 
Assistant Professor of Physics. 
B.S., College of the Holy Cross, 1960; M.S., 
The Pennsylvania State University, 1964; 
Ph.D., 1968. 



PAUL E. STAMBACH, 1969-; 
Assistant Professor of Religion. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1952; B.D., 
United Theological Seminary, 1955; S.T.M., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, 1959; Ph.D., 
Temple University, 1969. 

DAYLE H. STARE, 1968-; 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1964; M.A., 
The Pennsylvania State University, 1966. 

WARREN K. A. THOMPSON, 1967-; 
Assistant Professor of Philospohy. 
A.B., Trinity University, 1957; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1963. 

EDWARD H. WHITE, 1969-; 
Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
A.B., Dickinson College, 1964; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, 1966. 

PAUL L. WOLF, 1966-; 
Assistant Professor of Biology; Chairman of 
the Department of Biology. 
B.S., Elizabethtown College, 1960; M.S., 
University of Delaware, 1963; Ph.D., 1968. 

ALLAN F. WOLFE, 1968-; 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 
B.A., Gettysburg College, 1963; M.A., Drake 
University, 1965; Ph.D., University of Ver- 
mont, 1968. 

INSTRUCTORS: 

ROBERT A. AULENBACH, 1968-; 
Instructor in Woodwinds. 
B.M., Boston Conservatory of Music, 1949. 

RICHARD C BELL, 1966-; 
Instructor in Chemistry. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1941; M.Ed., 
Temple University, 1955. 

RONALD G. BURRICHTER, 1968-; 
Instructor in Voice. 

B.M.E., Wartburg College, 1964; M.M., Pea- 
body Conservatory of Music, 1968. 

ROBERT B. CAMPBELL, 1968-; 
Instructor in Woodwinds. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1954; M.M., 
University of Michigan, 1960. 



121 



JOHN A. CATCHINGS, 1969-; 
Instructor in Strings. 
B.M., Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1969. 

MRS. KAREN W. COLEMAN, 1968-; 
Instructor in English. 

B.S., Kutztown State College, 1963; MA, 
Lehigh University, 1965. 

D. ROGER GAECKLER, 1969-; 
Instructor in Physical Education. 
B.S., Gettysburg College, 1964. 

MRS. E. ELIZABETH GARMAN, 1964-; 
Instructor in Physical Education; 
Director of Athletics for Women. 
B.S., Beaver College, 1942. 

D. JOHN GRACE, 1958-59; 1961-; 

Instructor in Accounting; Acting Chairman 
of the Department of Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration, second semester. 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1955; C.P. 
C.U., 1955; C.P.A., 1957. 

MRS. GEILAN A. HANSEN, 1963-; 
Instructor in Russian. 

RICHARD A. ISKOWITZ, 1969-; 
Instructor in Art. 

B.F.A., Kent State University, 1965; M.F.A., 
1967. 

MRS. FRANCES VERI JAMANIS, 1967-; 
Instructor in Piano. 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music, 1964; M.S., 
1965. 

KEITH L. KILGORE, 1969-; 
Instructor in Political Science. 
A.B., Muskingum College, 1966; J.D., Ohio 
Northern University, 1969. 

ROBERT C. LAU, 1968-; 

Instructor in Musical Theory. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1965. 

PHILIP G. MORGAN, 1969-; 
Instructor in Voice. 

B.M.E., Kansas State College, 1962; M.S., 
1965. 

JOHN P. RAMSAY, 1966-; 
Instructor in English. 

B.A., Albright College, 1958; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1960. 



M.E f 



a] 



RONALD A. ROGERSON, 1968-; 
Instructor in Physical Education. 
B.S., University of Maine, 1966; 
Colorado State University, 1968. 

MRS. MALIN Ph. SAYLOR, 1961-; 
Instructor in French. 
Fil. Kand., Universities of Upsala 
Stockholm, 1938. 

GLENN H. WOODS, 1965-; 
Instructor in English. 
A.B., Lebanon Valley College, 1951; M.Ej 
Temple University, 1962. 

TEACHING AIDES: 

BRIGITTE DENECK, 1969-; 

Foreign Language Teaching Aide. 
LICENCE, German, University of Lille, 196j 
LICENCE, English, University of Paris, 191 

CURT F. UNGER, 1969-; 

Foreign Language Teaching Aide. 

C.P.A., Instituteo Tecnologico y de Estudilj 

Superiores de Monterrey; M.B.A., 1969. 



122 




VERSITY CENTER AT HARRISBURG: 

.E W. BOMBERGER, 1969-; 

istructor in Sociology. 

.B., Elizabethtown College, 1965; M.S.W., 

/est Virginia University, 1967. 

NCIS E. BURTNETT, 1968-; 

)structor in Psychology. 

\S. f Shippensburg State College, 1962; 

I.A., The George Washington University, 

965'. 

\RLES O. CRAWFORD, 1967-; 

istructor in Sociology. 

.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 

956; M.S., 1958; Ph.D., Cornell University, 

963. 

BERT L. DAUB, 1969-; 

istructor in Accounting. 

I.S., Elizabethtown College, 1968; C.P.A., 

968. 

F. EBERSOLE, 1965-66; 1968-; 
Instructor in Philosophy. 
k.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1950; 
.D., Hartford Theological Seminary, 1953; 
T.M., Yale University, 1960. 

DRGE A. GETTY, 1969-; 

istructor in Education. 

.S., in Education, Indiana University of 

'ennsylvania, 1935. 

lHARD C. JOHNSON, 1964-; 

nstructor in Sociology. 

V.B., University of Michigan, 1949; M.A., 

951. 

4 RVIN H. JONES, 1968-; 

nstructor in Accounting. 

I.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1968; C.P.A., 

967. 

HN W. KENNEDY, 1962-63; 1964-65; 1966- 

>7; 1969-; 

.aboratory Assistant in Physics. 

5.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1950; M.S., in 

iducation, Temple University, 1969. 

CENNETH KREIDER, 1969-; 

nstructor in History. 

J.A., Elizabethtown College, 1961; M.A., The 

'ennsylvania State University, 1962; Ph.D.. 

1969. 



W. DEAN MANIFOLD, 1968-; 
Instructor in Psychology. 
B.S., Millersville State College, 1933; M.Ed., 
University of Maryland, 1948; D.Ed., 1954. 

MRS. PATRICIA L. MARSHALL, 1969-; 
Instructor in Art. 
B.S., in Art Education, 1964. 

SAMUEL R. McHENRY, JR., 1967-; 
Instructor in History. 

A.B., Grove City College, 1947; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1949; M.S., in Ed- 
ucation, 1955. 

DANIEL J. MENNITI, 1969-; 
Instructor in Psychology. 
B.A., St. Charles Seminary, 1950; S.T.B., 
Gregorian University, 1952; S.T.L., 1954; 
M.A., Catholic University of America, 1957; 
Ph.D., 1964. 

HARRIS W. REYNOLDS, 1967-; 
Instructor in Education. 
B.S., in Education, Lock Haven State Col- 
lege, 1934; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State 
University, 1940; Ed.D., 1959. 

MRS. ANNETTE L. RICH, 1969-; 
Instructor in Education. 
B.Ed., Duquesne University, 1951; M.Ed., 
University of Pittsburgh, 1953; Ph.D., 1960. 

VIVIAN Y. RICKABAUGH, 1969-; 
Instructor in Education. 
B.S., Juniata College, 1941; M.Ed., The 
Pennsylvania State University, 1954. 

EDWARD D. SMITH, 1968-; 
Instructor in Psychology. 
B.S., Shippensburg State College, 1959; 
M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University, 
1960. 

ROBERT A. SNYDER, 1969-; 
Instructor in Accounting. 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 
1964; C.P.A., 1966. 

ROBERT H. TILLISCH, 1964-; 
Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 
B.S., in Education, Shippensburg State Col- 
lege, 1960; M.S., Bucknell University, 1965. 

MRS. HELEN TODD, 1965-66; 1969-; 
Instructor in French. 

A.B., Geneva College, 1925; M.A., Middle- 
bury College, 1928. 



123 



JAMES H. WAGNER, 1969-; 
Instructor in Accounting. 
B.A., The George Washington University, 
1956; M.B.A., 1965. 

LAURENCE H. WAITE, 1964-; 
Instructor in Spanish. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1949; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1951. 

MRS. DIANA D. WOODWARD, 1968-; 
Instructor in Philosophy. 
B.A., University of Texas, 1965; M.A., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, 1968. 

JOSEPH P. ZACCANO, 1960-61; 1968-; 
Instructor in History. 

A.B., Dickinson College, 1954; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1956; Ph.D., 1961. 

COOPERATING TRAINING TEACHERS: 

The student teaching program is organized 
to give the beginning teacher as wide and 
varied experiences as possible. 

Extreme care is used in the assignment of 
the cooperating teacher with the student 
teacher. The selection is made in a cooperative 
manner between the administration of the 
local school and the supervisor of student 
teaching at the College. 

Student teaching in Music Education is done 
in the Derry Township Public Schools, the 
Annville-Cleona Schools and the Milton Her- 
shey School. Student teaching in other areas of 
Elementary and Secondary Education is done 



1 



in schools within reasonable traveling dista 
of the College. 

Names of cooperating teachers and sub] 
taught are available in the offices of the 
partments of Education and Music. 

DEPARTMENTAL ASSISTANTS - 1969-1970 

Biology, Laurence S. Morrison, 1970 

Chemistry, Henry D. Schreiber, 1970 

Economics and Business Administration, 
John W. Bitner, 1970 

Education, Martha B. Waring, 1971 

English, Paula C. Stock, 1970 

Foreign Languages, Morris S. Cupp, 

Health and Physical Education, 

Robin A. Kornmeyer, 1970 
History and Political Science, Glenn A. 

Phelps, 1970 

Mathematics, Margie L. Hardenstine, 
Music Education, David E. Myers, 1st semes 
1970; James E. Johnston, 2nd semester, T 
Philosophy, Anne L. Jameson, 1971 
Physics, David A. Diehl, 1970 
Psychology, Natalie A. Wagner, 1970 
Religion, Gregory C. Myers, 1970 
Sociology, George E. Zeiders, 1970 

TEACHING INTERNS -1969-1970 

English, Craig W. Linehaugh, 1970 
Mathematics, Donald W. Samples, 1970 



1 



124 



OMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY — 1969-1970 



Committee on Academic Affairs 



ology, Dr. Wolf 

lemistry, Dr. Neidig 

onomics & Bus. Ad., Dr. Tom 

lucation, Dr. Ebersole 

\glish, Dr. Struble 

neign Languages, Dr. Piei 

ealth & Phys. Ed., Mr. McHenry 



History & Pol. Science, Dr. Geffen 
Mathematics, Dr. Bissinger 
Music, Mr. Smith 
Philosophy, Dr. Ehrhart 
Physics, Dr. Rhodes 
Psychology, Dr. Love 
Religion, Dr. Wethington 



Sociology, Dr. Fehr 
Students — Rolanda M. Hofmann, Dennis G. Smith 



r. Rhodes 

ir. Fairlamb 

r. Love 

,rs. O'Donnell, Chairman 

r. Wethington 



liss Burras 

r. Getz 

rs. Herr 

ir. Cooper, Chairman 

Ir. Bell 



Irs. Garman 

Ir. Grace 

r. Ford, Chairman 

r. Faber 

lr. Jamanis 



Dr. Rhodes, Chairman 
Dr. Love 
Dr. Neidig 



Committee on Faculty Affairs 

Elected by the Faculty 

Elected by the Faculty 

Elected by the Faculty 

Appointed by the President 

Appointed by the President 

Committee on Student Affairs 

Appointed by the President 
Appointed by the President 
Appointed by the President 
Appointed by the President 
Appointed by the President 

Committee on Public Relations 



Appointed 
Appointed 
Appointed 
Appointed 
Appointed 



by the President 
by the President 
by the President 
by the President 
by the President 



Administrative Advisory Committee 



Elected 
Elected 
Elected 



by the Faculty 
by the Faculty 
by the Faculty 



hairmen of the other three committees. 



Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1972 
Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1971 



Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1972 



Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1972 



Term expires 1970 
Term expires 1971 
Term expires 1972 



Honors Council 

Mr. William H. Fairlamb, Chairman; Dr. Karl L. Lockwood; 
Dr. Sara E. Piel; Dr. C. F. Joseph Tom 



Special advisory group to the President and Dean of the College. 



125 




GENERAL ALUMNI ORGANIZATION 

Executive Council of the Lebanon Valley 
College Alumni Association — 1968-1970 

OFFICERS 

President 

Harry L. Bricker, Jr. '50 

407 North Front Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 17110 

Vice President 

Thomas C. Reinhart '58 
41 East Court Boulevard, 
West Lawn, Reading, Pa. 19609 

Director of Alumni Relations 
David M. Long '59 
Box 97, Mt. Gretna, Pa. 17064 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Miss Evalyn M. Strickler '39 

1679 Grace Avenue, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Peter P. McEvoy, Jr. '58 

Tall Pines Inn, Sewell, N.J. 08080 

David J. Farling '56 

420 Strafford Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 19087 

Lt. Col. John I. Grosnick '53 

335 W. Maple Ave., Hershey, Pa. 17033 

ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

DeWittM. Essick'34 

43 Wabank Road, Millersville, Pa. 17551 



Mrs. Gladys Buffington Holman '27 

(Mrs. Edward L.) 
3340 North Third Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 171' 
James H. Leathern '32 
610 South First Avenue, 
Highland Park, N. J. 08904 
F. Allen Rutherford, Jr. '37 
8958 Tarrytown Rd., Richmond, Va. 23229 
E. Peter Strickler '47 
201 Hathaway Pk., Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

PAST PRESIDENTS 

Curvin N. Dellinger'38 

Box 676, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Jefferson C. Barnhart '38 

306 Bahia Avenue, Hershey, Pa. 17033 

E. Peter Strickler '47 

201 High Street, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Carl Y. Ehrhart'40 

643 East Queen Street, Annville, Pa. 17003 

Robert A. Nichols, III '41 

810 Walnut Street, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Regional Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE AREA 

President 

Gustav T. Maury '40 

6631 Dogwood Drive, Baltimore, Md. 212 



126 



'ice President 
R. Frederick Crider, Jr. '63 
4844 Reisterstown Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21215 

ecretary-Treasurer 
Mrs. Viola Snell Maury '42 (Mrs. Gustav T.) 
6631 Dogwood Drive, Baltimore, Md. 21207 

IERKS COUNTY 

resident 

Barry L. Keinard '61 

1726 York Road, Wyomissing, 

Reading, Pa. 19610 
r ice President 

Robert A. Gustin '53 

1551 Dauphin Avenue, Wyomissing, 

Reading, Pa. 19610 
ecretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Janet Gessner Roberts '68 

160 Wilshire Blvd., Sinking Spring, Pa. 19608 

MRRISBURG AREA 

Resident 

Melvin E. Hostetter '53 

42 Center Drive, Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

//ce President 

Robert R. Shope '63 

1701 Walnut Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Secretary 

Mrs. Sharon Stetler Herr '66 (Mrs. Robert L.) 

4100-J Beechwood Lane, 

Harrisburg, Pa. 17112 

r reasurer 
John E. Battinger, Jr. '64 
White Birch Avenue, R.D. 4, 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055 

.ANCASTER COUNTY 

'resident 
Mrs. Jeanne Edwards Tesnar '51 

(Mrs. Edward F.) 
336 Ruth Ridge Drive, Lancaster, Pa. 17601 




Vice President 

Larry L. Ziegler '57 

123 North Clay Street, Manheim, Pa. 17545 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Jane Lutz McGary '52 (Mrs. Daniel W.) 
1538 Lambeth Road, Lancaster, Pa. 17600 

LEBANON COUNTY 

President 

Mrs. Alma Binner Wise '31 (Mrs. George H.) 
Box 48, Rexmont, Pa. 17085 

1st Vice President 
Ronald E. Drum '58 
416 Larkspur Lane, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

2nd Vice President 
Darwin G. Click '58 
P.O. Box 594, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

3rd Vice President 
Robert C. Rowe '60 
909 Kiner Avenue, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Secretary 

Mrs. Rae Anna Reber Barr (Mrs. Clyde M.) 
400 South Lincoln Avenue, 
Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Treasurer 

Carroll E. Ditzler '58 

217 South 9th Street, Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

NORTH NEW JERSEY AREA 

President 

Bruce A. Baver '54 

832 Valley Road, Upper Montclair, N.J. 07087 

Vice Presidents 

Richard J. Furda '53 

214 Appian Avenue, Middlesex, N.J. 08846 

Ray C. Herb '24 

106 Linden Avenue, Metuchen, N.J. 08840 

Robert Hoffsommer, Jr. '52 

68 Eggert Avenue, Metuchen, N.J. 08840 

James M. Geiselhart '52 

Box 18, Ogdensberg, N.J. 07439 

Recording Secretary 

Mrs. Margaret Garber Philp '60 

(Mrs. Lester P., Jr.) 
79 North Passaic Avenue, 
Chatham, N.J. 07928 



127 



Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. Jean Orlando Geiselhart '52 

(Mrs. James M.) 
Box 18, Ogdensberg, N.J. 07439 

Treasurer 

Joan Ringle Policastro '54 (Mrs. Steven G.) 
14 Glen Gary Road, Middlesex, N.J. 08846 

NATIONAL CAPITAL AREA 

President 

Raymond M. Oberholtzer '23 

5503 Christy Drive, Washington, D.C. 20016 

Vice President 

Samuel O. Grimm, Jr. '41 

3502 Astoria Road, Kensington, Md. 20795 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen Eddy Hart '33 (Mrs. Lawrence F.) 
2223 North Vermont Street, 
Arlington, Va. 22207 

DELAWARE VALLEY AREA 

President 
John W. Metka '60 
868 Beechwood Road, Havertown, Pa. 19083 

President Elect 

Donald R. Kaufman '65 

502 Warminster Road, Hatboro, Pa. 19040 

1st Vice President 
Robert J. Nelson '57 
23 Hannum Drive, Ardmore, Pa. 19003 

Secretary 

Janet C. Stein '67 

363 Harwicke Road, Springfield, Pa. 19064 

Treasurer 

Otto L. Wolpert '57 

2538 Gypsy Lane, Glenside, Pa. 19038 

YORK COUNTY 

President 

Mrs. Sandra Weit Shipman '58 (Mrs. James E.) 
R.D. 4, Red Lion, Pa. 17356 

Vice President 

Donald L. Harper '60 

105 East Main Street, Dallastown, Pa. 17313 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Janease Howard Artz '57 (Mrs. Dean R.) 
51 Hoke Street, Spring Grove, Pa. 17362 



HERSHEY-PALMYRA (DERRY AREA) 

Co-Chairman 

Kenneth A. Longenecker '60 

125 N. Grant St., Palmyra, Pa. 17078 

Co-Chairman 

Gregory G. Stanson '63 

805 E. Birch St., Palmyra, Pa. 17078 

YANKEE CLUB 

President 

Richard W.Moller '49 

19 Kimball Avenue, Wenham, Mass. 0198^ 

Vice President 

Jack W. Gregory '66 

48 Amsterdam Ave., Apt. A-8 

Bridgeport, Conn. 06606 




128 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



DEGREES CONFERRED JANUARY 22, 1969 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



)onald Potteiger Bollman, Psychology 
ames Thomas Heath III, Philosophy 



Kenneth Henry Matz, Jr., Political Science 
Carole Cameron Schauer, English 
Larry Lee Schauer, History 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



ohn Howard Bernhart, Music Education 
Jhirley Marie Deaven, Elementary Education 
*uth Ellen Heath, Elementary Education 



Charlotte Harnish Pearce, Biology 
Barbara Ruth Robertson, Elementary Education 
Nancy Lee Robinson, Economics and Business 
Administration 



oan Minnie Schmehl 



Vliriam Eileen Brandt 
David Allan Brubaker 
Carol Blatt Dunn 



Agneta Saylor Bjornberg 
Thomas Michael Clemens 
Albert Linden Clipp 
Quinetta Dianne Garbrick 



Agneta Saylor Bjornberg 
Vliriam Eileen Brandt 
David Allan Brubaker 
Thomas Michael Clemens 
Albert Linden Clipp 
Carol Blatt Dunn 
Quinetta Dianne Garbrick 
Marcia Jean Gehris 
Lucille Anne Koch 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 
Norman Conrad Watkins 

GRADUATION HONORS 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

Franklin Richard Shearer 
Jan Helmut Wubbena 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE 

Lucille Anne Koch 
Charles Maurice Schworer 
William Franklin Stine, III 
Barbara Ann Tezak 

CUM LAUDE 

Marcia Jeanne Gehris 
Gregory Keith Ossmann 
Linda Stroud Rothermel 
Leta Leigh Tompkins 
Ronald James Zygmunt 

Elected to Membership 

PHI ALPHA EPSILON 

Honorary Scholarship Society 

Gregory Keith Ossmann 
Linda Stroud Rothermel 
Joan Minnie Schmehl 
Charles Maurice Schworer 
Franklin Richard Shearer 
William Franklin Stine, III 
Barbara Ann Tezak 
Leta Leigh Tompkins 
Jan Helmut Wubbena 

Ronald James Zygmunt 



129 



DEGREES CONFERRED JUNE 1, 1969 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Susan Hall Abernethy, Psychology 

LesErik Brent Achey, History 

Jeanne Louise Anspach, Political Science 

Patrick Joseph Arndt, II, Political Science 

Robert Douglas Atkinson, Psychology 

Cecelia Margaret Baeckert, Sociology 

Stephen Louis Barbaccia, Political Science 

David Elwood Bartholomew, English 

John Albert Biever, Psychology 

Agneta Saylor Bjornberg, Foreign Languages 

Karen Lynn Bowman, German 

Miriam Eileen Brandt, English 

Peter Edward Brennan, Psychology 

Edward Robert Brown, French 

David Allan Brubaker, Mathematics 

Kenneth Paul Bunting, Psychology 

John Dean Burkholder, Mathematics 

Ronald Leslie Bush, Psychology 

William Edward Campbell, Mathematics 

Albert Linden Clipp, Philosophy 

Jacque Richards DaCamara, Political Science 

James Francis Davis, History 

Frederick Emrey Detwiler, Jr., Religion 

Elaine Pearce Ebersole, Biology 

James Thomas Evans, Political Science 

Thomas John Falato, Spanish 

Lloyd John Fasnacht, Jr., Sociology 

Robert Spencer Fox, English 

Quinetta Dianne Garbrick, Foreign Languages 

Kay Suzanne Gault, Psychology 

Marcia Jeanne Gehris, Music 

Robert Emanuel Graham, Jr., Political Science 

James Walter Haslam, History 

Nancy Louise Hendrickson, Sociology 

Paula Kay Hess, Sociology 

Linda Christine Hetzer, English 

David Aaron Hoffner, History 

Michael Richard Hollen, Psychology 

William Stephen 



Mary Ann Horn, Psychology 
Sandra Diane Hughes, French 
Michael Ray Jones, History 
Paul Stephen Kaplan, Political Science 
Philip Edward Kehr, English 
Benjamin Franklin Klugh, Jr., Mathematics 
Ronald Lee Long, Mathematics 
Carl Lyle Marshall, Sociology 
Deborra Buchanan Matz, Sociology 
Hiddie Amisi Mbaluku, Political Science 
Cynthia Sue Melman, English 
Terry Allen Mills, Religion 
William Zimmerman Moyer, Political Science 
Marion Louise Mylly, English 
Gregory Keith Ossmann, English 
Gregory Alan Ott, Religion 
Ronald Ernest Poorman, German 
Linda Ruth Radlof, Psychology 
Patrick Edward Rondeau, Political Science 
Keith Jonathan Schmuck, Religion 
Margaret Karen Shemas, English 
Duane Elwood Shuttlesworth, Psychology 
Kenneth Levere Sipe, History 
Dennis Ray Snovel, Religion 
Frederick Carl Sorcsek, Psychology 
Allen Weidner Steffy, Jr., Sociology 
Constance Marie Stohler, German 
Carolyn Elizabeth Thompson, Political Science 
Rae Louise Thompson, Psychology 
William Miller Thompson, Religion 
Frank Michael Timlin, Sociology 
Joseph Anthony Torre, Mathematics 
Dennis James Tulli, Psychology 
Debra Ann Ulrich, Sociology 
Margaret Wright Umberger, French 
Robert Louis Unger, Political Science 
Jan Helmut Wubbena, Music 
Joseph Titus Yost, Political Science 
Zimmerman, Psychology 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Kerry William Althouse, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Virginia Hunsicker Bachtell, Music Education 
Leslie Farrell Bair, Biology 
Kenneth Melvin Baker, Biology 
Richard Edward Basta, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Barry Lee Bender, Biology 
Steven Richard Brandsberg, Biology 



Thomas Ray Bross, Physics 

Patricia Ann Buchanan, Elementary Education 

Michael Jeffrey Campbell, Music Education 

Polly Julia Carnathan, Elementary Education 

Leslie Ann Cassat, Biology 

Diane Florence Cerutti, Music Education 

Joanne Cestone, Music Education 

Thomas Michael Clemens, Biology 

Jeffrey Lynn Conway, Music Education 



130 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Bruce Richard Decker, Biology 

Carol Blatt Dunn, Elementary Education 

Maryann Eastman, Biology 

William Burke Eisenhart, Elementary Education 

Albert James English, Jr., Biology 

Gregory Lee Erdman, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Judy Elaine Flinchbaugh, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Norman Ware Fogg, Jr., Biology 
Dennis Lee Frantz, Biology 
Gloria Suzanne Fultz, Elementary Education 
Terry Lee Gehman, Music Education 
Everett Xephus Hammacher, Jr., Economics and 

Business Administration 
Jean Louise Heilman, Music Education 
Franklin Samuel Hoch, Music Education 
James Ronald Hoffman, Music Education 
Fred William Hostetter, Biology 
Lloyd David Jacobs, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Robert Gregory Jennings, Chemistry 
Margaret Louise Jones, Elementary Education 
Charles Gregory Kachur, Biology 
James Edward Kain, Jr., Music Education 
Robert Rioji Kaneda, Biology 
Nancy Marie Kauffelt, Music Education 
Richard Wayne Kaufmann, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Luanne Evelyn Kern, Elementary Education 
Lucille Anne Koch, Biology 
Janice Eileen Kreiser, Music Education 
Frances Nesbitt Kulp, Elementary Education 
Dennis Meyer Lehman, Biology 
Mary Jane Lentz, Elementary Education 
Lars Jackson Lovegren, Music Education 
John Douglas Maclary, Jr., Biology 
Robert Kenneth Manning, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Jean Kent McClelland, Music Education 
Cheryl Lynn McCrary, Music Education 
Stephen Craig Mefferd, Biology 

Douglas Robert Winemil 



Robert James Melfy, Music Education 

William Hartman Miller, Biology 

Dennis Arthur Misal, Biology 

Grant Telfer Nicholls, Elementary Education 

Paul David O'Hara, Physics 

Patricia Ann Pingel, Biology 

Anne Louise Prescott, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Sherrie Ptacek, Elementary Education 
Deborah Ann Rhawn, Elementary Education 
Frank Lambert Rice, Biology 
Linda Stroud Rothermel, Music Education 
Mitzi Jean Sans, Elementary Education 
Dale Charles Schimpf, Music Education 
Barrie Edmund Schmid, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Charles Maurice Schworer, Biology 
Franklin Richard Shearer, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Alan Eugene Shenk, Economics and Business 

Administration 
Shirley Ann Sherman, Elementary Education 
Noel Gerard Slonaker, Biology 
Eleanor Marie Smith, Biology 
Ronald Jay Smith, Biology 
Jeffrey Lynn Spangler, Music Education 
John Charles Spangler, Music Education 
David Lee Stanilla, Economics and Business 

Administration 
George Anderson Stauffer, Jr., Economics and 

Business Administration 
William Franklin Stine, III, Music Education 
Ida Louise Stitt, Music Education 
Nina Eleanor Tafel, Music Education 
Barbara Ann Tezak, Music Education 
Leta Leigh Tompkins, Elementary Education 
Barbara Jane Turkington, Elementary Education 
Diane Aldinger Vaszily, Biology 
Joan Louise Weber, Elementary Education 
Carlin Lee Wenger, Biology 
Richard Allen West, Biology 
Barbara Cutler White, Chemistry 
ler, Music Education 



Lucille Patricia Dunne 
Linn David Eisenhower 
Gary Donnell Frederick 
Karl Edward Guyler 
Nobuko Matsui 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Robert Samuel McQuate 
Thomas Allan Micka 
Jack Richard Reid 
Joan Minnie Schmehl 
Ronald Bernard Shaffer 



Daniel James Subach 
Larry Robert Taylor 
Janice Rae West 
Ronald Gilbert Yarger 
Ronald James Zygmunt 



131 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



Ann Richard Brennan 
Doris Elaine Bryden 



Rhoda Louise Graybill 
Joan Vonhauser Heagy 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 



Helen Elizabeth Templin 
Diane Esther Urick 



Anne Marie Boyle 
Barbara Ann Holmes 



Sue Ellen Kauffman 
Jonalyn Knauer 



COLLEGE HONORS 
Jan Helmut Wubbena Carol Blatt Dunn 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Robert Samuel McQuate ,„ r L nrv ,. f 

, , n . , _,ni m Chemistr 

Jack Richard Reid . r , . . 

■ n , L - . In Chemistr 

Larry Robert Taylor ,„ ru . . 

r ,,. D . , J c , In Chemistr 

Franklin Richard Shearer , n Economj( 

Carol Blatt Dunn In E , ement Educatio 

Sandra Diane Hughes , n Frenc| 

David Allan Brubaker ' V " ' u , tllo .., 

, l, , u ... . . In Mathematic 

Jan Helmut Wubbena , n Musj 

Thomas Ray Bross , n ph . 

Ray Louise Thompson |n Psycho 1 og 

HONORARY DEGREES 
Conferred June 7, 7969 

j. Cordon Howajjl Doctor of Divinit> 

John H. Mover. n^^f^. „( c~- 

' . .,,,,, Doctor of Science 

Vaclav Nelhybel Doctor of Musi< 

Juan.ta K.dd Stout Doctor of LaW! 

DEGREES CONFERRED AUGUST 29, 1969 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Alan James Balma, Mathematics 
Charles Gregory Erff, Psychology 
Diane Giovanis, Sociology 
Edwin Charles Kisiel, Jr., English 
Carl Richard Layne, English 



William David Sharrow, Music 

Susan Rutherford Sheckart Stanson, Sociology 

James Thomas Wenrich, Philosophy 

Susan May Woodbury, English 

Karl Michael Zimmerer, English 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Ronald Wilbur Heck, Music Education 
Lynn Alison Marlatt, Elementary Education 
Louise Long Rahalewich, Elementary Education 



William Eugene Shenenberger, Music Education 
Harold Joseph Todd, Economics and Business 
Administration 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 
George Robert Moyer 



132 




STUDENT AWARDS, 1969 

SENIOR AWARDS 

PHI BETA KAPPA PRIZE - 

Jan Helmut Wubbena, Dover, Del. 

Established in 1968 by the Phi Beta Kappa Faculty Group of Lebanon Valley College. Awarded to a senior 

who best measures up to the standards of scholarship and character set by the National Society. 

JAISH MEMORIAL HISTORY AWARD - 
LesErik Brent Achey, Lebanon 

Established in 1947 in memory of Henry H. Baish by his wife and daughter, Margaret. Awarded to a 
member of the Senior Class majoring in history; selected by the Chairman of the Department of History 
and Political Science on the basis of merit. 

ANDREW BENDER MEMORIAL CHEMISTRY AWARD - 
Jack Richard Reid, Berwyn 
Larry Robert Taylor, Red Lion 

Established in 1952 by the Chemistry Club of the College and alumni. Awarded to an outstanding senior 
majoring in Chemistry. 

r HE SALOME WINGATE SANDERS AWARD IN MUSIC EDUCATION - 
William Franklin Stine, III, York 

Established in 1957 by Robert Bray Wingate, Class of 1948, in honor of his grandmother, Salome Wingate 
Sanders. Given annually to the senior who exemplifies excellent character, potential usefulness, high 
academic standing, and who evidences loyalty to his Alma Mater. 

"HE DAVID E. LONG MEMORIAL MINISTERIAL AWARD - 
William Miller Thompson, Lebanon 

Established in 1956 by the Reverend Abraham M. Long, Class of 1917, in memory of his father, the 
Reverend David E. Long, Class of 1900. This award is given annually to a student preparing for the ministry, 
selected by the members of the Department of Religion on the basis of merit. 

I GAMMA MU SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Franklin Richard Shearer, Wernersville 

Authorized by the National Social Science Honor Society Pi Gamma Mu, incorporated and established at 
Lebanon Valley College in 1948 by the Pennsylvania Nu Chapter of the Society for the promotion of 
scholarship in the Social Sciences. Granted upon graduation to a senior member of Pennsylvania Nu 
Chapter, selected by the Chapter's Executive Committee, for outstanding scholarship in economics, 
government, history, or sociology, and high proficiency or other distinction attained in pursuit of same 
during his or her years at the college. 

133 



THE PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AWARD - 
Kerry William Althouse, Shoemakersville 
Awarded to a senior on the basis of accounting grades and qualities of leadership on campus. 

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP AWARD IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - 
Kerry William Althouse, Shoemakersville 
Everett Xephus Hammacher, Annville 
Mark George Holtzman, III, Harrisburg 
Franklin Richard Shearer, Wernersville 
George Anderson Stauffer, Jr., Swarthmore 

Awarded to a student majoring in Economics and Business Administration for outstanding scholarship 
Economics and Business Administration and for good campus citizenship. Established in 1965 by tl 
People's National Bank of Lebanon. 

THE WALLACE-LIGHT-WINGATE AWARD IN LIBERAL ARTS- 
Frank Lambert Rice, Whiting, N.J. 

Established in 1967 by Robert Bray Wingate, Class of 1948, in honor of Dr. P. A. W. Wallace and Dr. V. Ea 
Light. Given annually to the senior student who best exemplifies the aims of liberal arts education, namel 
a broad interest and training in both the arts and sciences. 

THE HARRISBURG CHAPTER OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ACCOUNTANTS AWARD - 
Franklin Richard Shearer, Wernersville 
Stuart Gardner Schoenly, Collegeville 

Granted to the student demonstrating outstanding achievement in the introductory accounting cours 
The award consists of a student subscription to NAA Bulletin and Research Reports of the NAA. 

SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA SECTION, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY AWARD - 
Jack Richard Reid, Berwyn 
Larry Robert Taylor, Red Lion 

Presented to the outstanding senior Chemistry major in each of the colleges in the area based on demo 
strated proficiency in Chemistry. The award consists of a book entitled A German-English Dictionary U 
Chemists. 

THE M. CLAUDE ROSENBERRY MEMORIAL AWARD - 
Janice Eileen Kreiser, Harrisburg 

Given to an outstanding senior in Music Education who is entering the teaching field in the State i 
Pennsylvania, and who has demonstrated unusual ability and promise as a potential teacher. 

B'NAI B'RITH AMERICANISM AWARD - 
John Dean Burkholder, Lititz 
Awarded to a member of the graduating class who throughout the year by his actions best exemplified tr 
philosophies of our American Democracy — those precepts of tolerance — brotherhood, citizenship, respe 
for his fellow students regardless of race, color or creed; one who abhors prejudice and discrimination ar 
who by his very actions has earned the respect and admiration of his fellow students by putting in 
practice the very tenets taught to all of us in our institutions of learning for the sole purpose of makir 
this, our country, a better land in which to live. 

GOVERNOR JAMES H. DUFF AWARD - 
John Dean Burkholder, Lititz 
Established in 1960 by Governor James H. Duff (Pennsylvania) to promote interest in state govemmeri 
Awarded annually to a senior who by participation in campus government or in debating demonstrates 
facility and interest in government service. 

THE SIGMA ALPHA IOTA HONOR CERTIFICATE AWARD - 
Marcia Jeanne Gehris, Reading 

Awarded to the senior music major with the highest scholastic average over her four years of study. Tr 
award consists of an honor certificate. 

134 



)UTSTANDING SENIOR OF DELTA ALPHA CHAPTER, SAI - 
Linda Stroud Rothermel, Havertown 

Awarded by the Philadelphia Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Alpha lota to the girl selected by her sister 
members as the outstanding senior of Delta Alpha Chapter. The award consists of a life subscription to 
Pan Pipes, the fraternity magazine. 

HE CHUCK MASTON AWARD-* 
George Anderson Stauffer, Jr., Swarthmore 

Established in 1952 by the Knights of the Valley. This award is made annually to a male member of a 
varsity team who has displayed the exceptional qualities of sportsmanship, leadership, cooperation, and 
spirit. 

HE JOHN F. ZOLA ATHLETIC AWARD-* 
Joseph Anthony Torre, Annville 

Established in 1962 by the L V Varisity Club. To be awarded to the football player showing qualities of 
desire, attitude, sportsmanship, and initiative — the qualities that John displayed. This award is open to 
members of all classes and the winner is elected by the members of the football team. 

;hildhood EDUCATION CLUB award - 

i Carol Blatt Dunn, Leesport 

An award to an outstanding student majoring in Elementary Education who has demonstrated qualities of 
character, scholarship, leadership, and service, and who has successfully completed one semester of 
student teaching. 

VHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES - 

Miriam Eileen Brandt, Lebanon Virginia Lee Hunsicker, Perkasie 

David Allan Brubaker, Carlisle Deborah Ann Rhawn, Catawissa 

John Dean Burkholder, Lititz Frank Lambert Rice, Whiting, N.J. 

Thomas Michael Clemens, Lebanon Barbara Ruth Robertson, Springfield 

Albert Linden Clipp, Hagerstown, Md. Linda Stroud Rothermel, Havertown 

Gary Donnell Frederick, Lyons, N.Y. William David Sharrow, Williamsport 

Marcia Jeanne Gehris, Reading Dennis Ray Snovel, Perkasie 

Nancy Louise Hendrickson, Middletown, N.J. Jan Helmut Wubbena, Dover, Del. 

Sandra Diane Hughes, Palmyra Ronald James Zygmunt, Laureldale 

Recognition in Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is awarded annually on 
the basis of grades, personal character, and campus leadership. Final selection is made by the publishers. 



GENERAL awards 

1UMNI SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDS - 
Phyllis Caroline Bacher, Drexel Hill 
Lucille Ada Bowen, Manchester 

B Theresa Ann Cook, Coatesville 

Georgia Mosely Thompson, West Hartford, Conn. 

These awards, authorized by the Lebanon Valley College Alumni Association in June, 1953, were estab- 
lished with the resources of the alumni Life Membership Fund. These scholarships are granted annually to 
deserving students on the basis of character, academic achievement, and need; the recipients of these 
scholarships to be designated Alumni Scholars. 



Not always awarded to seniors. 

135 



MAUD P. LAUGHLIN SOCIAL SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Glenn Alan Phelps, Ellicott City, Md. 
Daniel Jay Womer, Lebanon 

Awarded in recognition of excellence in scholarship, academic progress, campus citizenship, service to th 
institution, participation in extra-curricular activities. 

JOHN F. ZOLA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Thomas Eugene Whittle, Highspire 
Awarded by the Knights of the Valley to a full-time student, on the basis of character and financial neec 

THE BIOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Nancy Ann Swenson, Hohokus, N.J. 

Established in 1918 by alumni and friends. Awarded annually by the Chairman of the Department o 
Biology on the basis of merit. 

MEDICAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
William Thomas MacNew, Jr., Media 
Established in 1918 by alumni and friends. Awarded annually on the basis of merit. 

PHI LAMBDA SIGMA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Donald Ray Bechtel, Graterford 

Established in 1962 by Phi Lambda Sigma and awarded on the bases of need, academic achievement, an< 
outstanding service to the organization. 

BRADFORD CLIFFORD ALBAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP - 
Lloyd Raymond Helt, Jr., Sacramento 

Established in 1964 by Phi Lambda Sigma and awarded on the basis of need, academic achievement, am 
contribution to the goals of the College. 

THE WOMAN'S CLUB OF LEBANON SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Dorothy Ellen Fine, Annville 

An award given annually by the Woman's Club of Lebanon to a person from Lebanon County enrolled as 
full-time student; the choice to be based on financial need, scholarship, and character. 

ALICE EVERS BURTNER MEMORIAL AWARD - 
Rolanda Mae Hofmann, Waynesboro 

Established in 1935 in memory of Mrs. Alice Evers Burtner, Class of 1883, by Daniel E. Burtner, Samuel 
Evers, and Evers Burtner. Awarded to an outstanding member of the Junior Class selected by the faculty o 
the basis of scholarship, character, social promise, and need. 

DELTA ALPHA CHAPTER OF SIGMA ALPHA IOTA AWARD - 
Linda Beth Henderson, Maywood, N.J. 
Established in 1963 in memory of Marcia M. Pickwell, instructor in piano. Given annually to a sophomor 
or junior woman student majoring in music; selected on the basis of need, musicianship, and futur 
promise in her chosen profession. 

STUDENT PENNSYLVANIA STATE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION AWARD - 
Not awarded in 1969 

Established in 1967 by the local chapter of the Student Pennsylvania State Education Association. Given t 
a member on the bases of service to the organization and portrayal of qualities necessary for successfi 
teaching. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD - 
Franklin Richard Shearer, 

Established in 1948 by The Wall Street Journal for distinguished work in the Department of Economics an 
Business Administration. The award consists of a silver medal and a year's subscription to The Wall Stret 
Journal. 

136 



JOPHOMORE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN CHEMISTRY - 
Paul Theodore Lyter, Harrisburg 

Awarded to a member of the sophomore class majoring in chemistry who has demonstrated outstanding 
work in the field of Chemistry. This award was originated by the Student Affiliate Chapter of the American 
Chemical Society. 

JOPHOMORE PRIZE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE - 
Anita Jean Meiser, Hershey 
Priscilla Lenore Roth, Sinking Spring 
Jane Colette Snyder, Pottstown 
Daniel Jay Womer, Lebanon 

Established by the Class of 1928. Awarded to the three best students in Sophomore English, taking into 
account scholarship, originality, and progress. 

D HYSICS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - 
Ross Wesley Ellison, Hershey 

Awarded to the outstanding student of the freshman or sophomore class in the First Year Physics course. 
The award consists of a copy of the "Handbook of Chemistry and Physics." 

THE MAX F. LEHMAN MEMORIAL MATHEMATICS PRIZE - 
Masaji Yoshida, Tokyo, Japan 

Established by the Class of 1907, in memory of a classmate. Awarded to that member of the freshman class 
who shall have attained the highest standing in mathematics. 

LORENCE WOLF KNAUSS MEMORIAL AWARD IN MUSIC - 
Carol Ann Riccaboni, Bethlehem 

Awarded annually to the freshman girl who displays the following basic qualities: (1) musicianship with 
performing ability; (2) reasonably high academic standing; (3) cooperation, dependability, and loyalty to 
the college. 

MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - 
Beck Diane Huber, Trumbauersville 
Donald Wayne Samples, Lewisberry 
Awarded to a student in calculus on the bases of achievement, progress and industry. The award consists 
of a copy of the new edition of the Chemical Rubber Company's book on "Standard Mathematics Tables." 

FRESHMAN ACHIEVEMENT AWARD IN CHEMISTRY - 
Elizabeth Annette Robinson, Mechanicsburg 

Awarded to a member of the freshman class majoring in chemistry who has demonstrated outstanding 
work in the field of chemistry. This award was originated by the Student Affiliate Chapter of the American 
Chemical Society. 

FRESHMAN GIRL OF THE YEAR AWARD - 
Lucille Ida Bowen, Haledon, N.J. 

Given annually by the Resident Women's Student Government to the outstanding freshman girl on the basis 
of scholarship, leadership, campus citizenship, and personality. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA - THE DEAN'S HONOR AWARD - 
Mary Patricia Horn, York 

Awarded to a member of Delta Alpha Chapter on the basis of scholarship, musicianship and fraternity 
service and in recognition of her outstanding achievement and contribution to the fraternity. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD - 
Nancy Jean Hollinger, Lancaster 

Awarded annually by the Philadelphia Alumnae Chapter of Sigma Alpha lota to a junior member of Delta 
Alpha Chapter on the basis of talent and need. 

137 




PICKWELL MEMORIAL MUSIC AWARD - 
Eileen Jeannette Koch, Havertown 
Established in 1963 in memory of Marcia M. Pickwell, faculty member of the Department of Music 
Awarded annually to a junior music major who has demonstrated outstanding pianistic ability and promise 

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP AWARD IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - 
(see Senior Awards) 

Awarded to students majoring in Economics and Business Administration for outstanding scholarship ii 
economics and business administration and for good campus citizenship. Established in 1965 by th< 
People's National Bank of Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE AWARD - 
Lydia Mae Kauffman, Codorus 
Albert Ernest Schmick, III, Hummelstown 
The LA VIE COLLEGIENNE Award, established in 1964 by the Rev. Bruce C. Souders '44, a former editor o 
LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, seeks to acknowledge the contribution of students to good campus public relation: 
through leadership and responsibility in the publication of the campus newspaper. It is awarded annualh 
to an upperclassman and to a freshman on the staff of the newspaper. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE AWARD - 
Deborah Sherman Groff, Mt. Gretna 
Elizabeth Catherine Stachow — Annville 

Established in 1968, this medal is awarded (according to the American Association of Teachers of Spanisl 
and Portuguese) by the Department of Foreign Languages, to a Spanish student who in a minimum o 
2 year's regular work has achieved real excellence. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS - 
French: Deborah Sherman Groff, Mt. Gretna 

Elizabeth Annette Robinson, Mechanicsburg 
German: Connie Jean Brocious, Timblin 

Dorothy Resta Hartman, Harrisburg 

Joseph Peter Klutz, Mechanicsburg 

Constance Marie Stohler, Quentin 
Spanish: Elizabeth Catherine Stachow, Annville 

GERMAINE BENEDICTUS MONTEUX MUSIC AWARD 
Allison Christine Smith 

Established in 1968 by Denise Monteux Lanese in memory of her mother, Cermaine Benedictus Monteux 
This award is given annually to a sophomore or junior student majoring in music or music education a 
designated by the Department of Music on the bases of outstanding personal attitudes, effort, and progres 
in musical development, and need. 



138 



ZORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 

TO FACILITATE PROMPT ATTENTION, INQUIRIES 
IHOULD BE ADDRESSED AS INDICATED BELOW: 

Matters of General College Interest President 

\cademic Program Vice President and Dean of the College 

\dmissions Director of Admissions 

Klumni Interests Director of Alumni Relations 

business Matters, Expenses Vice President and Controller 

lampus Conferences Coordinator of Conferences 

Development and Bequests Director of Development 

vening and Summer Schools Director of Auxiliary Schools 

: inancial Aid to Students Student Financial Aid Officer 

Placement: 

Teacher Placement Director of Teacher Placement 

Business and Industrial Director of Industrial Placement 

'ublication and Publicity Director of Public Relations 

Religious Activities Chaplain 

Student Interests Dean of Men or Dean of Women 

Transcripts, Academic Reports Registrar 

\DDRESSALLMAILTO: 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 17003 

DIRECT ALL TELEPHONE CALLS TO: 

Lebanon Valley College 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Area Code 717 Local Number 867-3561 

REGULAR OFFICE HOURS FOR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 

College office hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1 :00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon- 
day through Friday. Members of the staff are available for interviews at other times if 
appointments are made in advance. 



139 



Index 

Absence 24, 52 

Academic Classification 51 

Academic Offices 115 

Academic Probation 53 

Academic Programs and Procedures 26 

Academic Procedures 50 

Academic Program 26 

Academic Requirements 27 

Accreditation 11 

Activities, Student 54 

Actuarial Science, Outline of Course 30 

Actuarial Science, Plan of Study in 89 

Administration Building 14 

Administrative Staff and Faculty 115 

Administrative Regulations 52 

Admissions Deposit 23 

Admissions, Requirements and Information 21 

Advanced Placement 22 

Advisers, Faculty 50 

Aid, Student 25 

Aims of the College 11 

Alpha Phi Omega 57 

Alpha Psi Omega 57 

Alumni Office 15 

Application Fee 23 

Application for Admission 21 

Art, Courses in 62 

Assistant to the President 115 

Assistants, Student Departmental 124 

Athletics 59 

Athletics, Aims and Objectives 59 

Attendance, Chapel 52 

Attendance, Class 52 

Auditing Courses 50 

Auditions, Department of Music 22 

Auxiliary Schools 48 

Auxiliary School Fees 24 

Awards Conferred, 1969 133 

Baccalaureate, Attendance at 29 

Balmer Showers Lectures 56 

Band, All-Girl 96 

Band, Symphonic 96 

Basketball ; 59 

Biology, Courses in 63 

Board Fees 23 

Board of Trustees 111 

Board of Trustees, Committees 111 

Board of Trustees, Officers 111 

Buildings and Equipment 14 

Business Administration, Courses in 69 



Business Administration, Outline of Course 34 

Business Management 117 

Campus Employment 25 

Campus, Buildings and Equipment 14 

Campus Organizations 57 

Carnegie Lounge 15 

Cars, Student Rules Concerning 52 

Certification, Requirements, 

Public School Teachers 36-37, 44-46 

Change of Registration 5C 

Chapel Building 14 

Chapel Choir 57, 96 

Chapel Program 55 

Chemistry, Courses in 65 

Chemistry, Outline of Course 32 

Class Attendance 52 

Christian Association 56 

Clubs, Departmental 57 

College Bookstore 15 

College Calendar, 1969-1970 3 

College Calendar, 1970-1971 5 

College Chorus 96 

College Dining Hall 15 

College Entrance Examination Board Tests 21 

College History 9 

College Honors Program 47 

College Profile 8 

College Relations Area 117 

Commencement, Attendance at 29 

Committees, Board of Trustees 114 

Committees, Faculty 125 

Concert Choir 96 

Concurrent Courses 50 

Contingency Deposit 24 

Cooperative Programs .38 

Cooperating Training Teachers 124 

Correspondence Directory .139 

Counseling and Placement 51 

Course Credit 61 

Course Numbering System 61 

Courses of Study by Departments 60 

Credits Earned at Another Institution 22 

Cross Country 59 

Cultural Opportunities 57 

Cum Laude Graduates, 1969 129, 131 

Day Student Accommodations 15 

Degrees Conferred, 1969 129 

Degrees, Requirements for 27 

Delta Tau Chi 56 

Departmental Assistants 124 

Departmental Clubs 57 

Departmental Honors, 1969 132 



140 



Departments, Courses of study by 60 

Development Office 15 

Directories 110 

Discontinuance of Courses 50 

Dismissal 53 

Distribution Requirements 29 

Dramatic Organizations 57 



Economics and Business Administration, 

Courses in 67 

Economics and Business Administration, 

Outline of Course 34 

Education, Courses in 71 

Elementary Education, Courses in 72 

Elementary Education, Outline of Course 36 

Elementary Education — 

Subject Matter Requirements . , 44 

Emeriti Professors 118 

Employment 25 

Endowment Funds 16 

Engineering, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 38 

Engineering, Plan of Study in 89 

English, Courses in 75 

EngleHall 15 

Enrollment Statistics 19 

Entrance Requirements 21 

Evening Classes 49 

Examinations 27 

Examination, College Entrance Board 21 

Examinations, Graduate Record 27 

Expenses 23 

Extension Courses 49 

Extra-Curricular Activities 54 



Facilities 14 

Faculty 118 

Faculty Advisers 50 

Faculty Committees 125 

Fees and Deposits 23 

Financial Aid 25 

Football 59 

Foreign Languages, Courses in 78 

Foreign Language Requirements 29 

Forestry, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 38 

French Club 57 

French, Courses in 79 

Freshman Orientation 50 

Furnishings, Residence Halls 24 



General Alumni Organization 126 



General Requirements 29 

Geography, Course in 81 

Geology, Course in 81 

German, Courses in 79 

Golf 59 

Gossard Memorial Library 14 

Governing Bodies 58 

Grade Point Average 28 

Grading and Quality Points, System of 28 

Grading, Pass-Fail 28 

Graduate Record Examinations 27 

Green Blotter Club 57 

Greek, Courses in 80 

Gymnasium 15 

Hazing 52 

Health and Physical Education, Courses in 82 

Health Reports 21 

Health Services 15, 116 

History and Political Science, Courses in 83 

History, College 9 

History, Courses in 83 

Honorary Degrees, 1969 132 

Honorary Organizations 57 

Honors Program 47 

Hours, Limit of Credit 51 

Independent Study 48 

Independent Study, Chemistry 65 

Independent Study, Economics 67 

Independent Study, Education 71 

Independent Study, English 75 

Independent Study, Foreign Languages 78 

Independent Study, History 83 

Independent Study, Political Science 85 

Independent Study, Mathematics 88 

Independent Study, Music and Music Education . .92 

Independent Study, Philosophy 99 

Independent Study, Physics 101 

Independent Study, Psychology 103 

Independent Study, Religion 106 

Independent Study, Sociology 108 

Information for Prospective Students 20 

Infirmary 15 

Instructors 121 

Insurance Plan and Fee 24 

Intercollegiate Athletic Programs 59 

Investment Club 57 

Junior Year Abroad 49 

Laboratory Fees and Deposits 23 

Lacrosse 59 



141 



Laughlin Hall ..15 

La Vie Collegienne 57 

Library Facilities 14 

Limit of Hours 51 

Loans 25 

Location and Environment 12 

L.V. Varsity Club 59 

Lynch Memorial Building 15 

Major Requirements 27 

Map, Campus 13 

Map, Mileage 12 

Mathematical Physics, Plan of Study in 89 

Mathematics, Courses in 88 

Meals 25 

Medical Examinations 21 

Medical Technology, Cooperative Programs, 

Outline of Course 39 

Music, Conducting 97 

Music, Courses in 91 

Music Education, Courses in 91 

Music Education, Outline of Course 42 

Music Fees 23 

Music, Instrumental Courses 95 

Music, History and Appreciation of 97 

Music, Methods and Materials 94 

Music, Outline of Course 40 

Music, Preparatory Courses 97 

Music, Special Requirements 91 

Music, Student teaching 95 

Music, Theory of 92 

Musical Instruction, Individual 97 

Musical Organizations 96 

Night Classes 49 

Nursing, Cooperative Program, 

Outline of Course 39 

Objectives of the College 11 

Office of President 115 

Officers, Board of Trustees 111 

Organ Rental Fees 24 

Organs, Specifications of ., 98 

Orientation 50 

Parking, Student Rules on 52 

Part-Time Student Fees 24 

Payment of Fees and Deposits 24 

Philosophy, Courses in 99 



Physical Education, Courses in 82 

Physical Education, Requirement 29 

Physical Examinations 21 

Physics, Courses in 101 

Placement 51 

Political Science, Courses in 85 

Practice Teaching 37, 43, 44-46, 73-74, 95 

Pre-Dental Curriculum 39 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 39 

Preparatory Courses, Music 97 

Presidents of the College 10 

Pre- Veterinary Curriculum 39 

Principles and Objectives 11 

Private Music Instruction 97 

Prizes Awarded, 1969 133 

Probation, Academic 53 

Procedures, Academic 50 

Professional Curricula, Special Plans for 30 

Professors 118 

Professors, Assistant 120 

Professors, Associate 119 

Professors, Emeriti 118 

Psychology, Courses in 103 

Public Relations 15 

Public School Certification 

Requirements 36-37, 44-46 

Public School Music, Outline of Course 42 

Publications, Student 57 



Quality Points, System of 28 

Quittapahilla, The 57 



Readmission 53 

Recitals, Student 98 

Recognition Groups 57 

Recreation 59 

Refund Policy 24 

Registration 50 

Regulations, Administrative 52 

Religion and Life Lectureships 56 

Religion, Courses in 106 

Religious Emphasis Week 56 

Religious Life 55 

Repetition of Courses 50 

Requirements, Admission 21 

Requirements, Degrees 27 

Residence Halls 15 

Residence Halls, Regulations 24 

Residence Requirement 27 

Russian, Courses in 80 



SaylorHall 15 



142 



Schedules, Arrangement of 51 

Scholarships 25 

Scholarship Funds 17 

Science Hall 15 

Secondary Education, Courses in 73 

Secondary Education — Subject Matter 

Requirements 45 

Semester Hours 27 

Semester Hour Limitations 51 

Social Organizations 57 

Sociology, Courses in 108 

South Hall 15 

Spanish, Courses in 80 

Special Plans of Study 30 

Statistics, Plan of Study 88 

Student Activities 54 

Student Affairs 116 

Student Finances 23 

Student Awards, 1969 133 

Student Christian Association 56 

Student Departmental Assistants 124 

Student Government 58 

Student Recitals 98 

Student Teaching 37, 43, 44-46, 73-74, 95 



Student Teaching Fees 23 

Summer School 49 

Sunday Church Services 56 

Support and Control 16 

Suspension 53 

Symphonic Band 96 

Symphony Orchestra 57, 96 

Teacher Placement Bureau 15 

Teaching, Certification Requirements . .36-37, 44-46 

Teaching Interns 124 

Track 59 

Transcripts 52 

Transfer Credit 22 

Transfer Students 29 

Trustees, Board of 111 

University Center at Harrisburg 49 

Withdrawal 53 

Withdrawal Refunds 24 

Wrestling 59 



143 



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